Cabletron Systems | EMM-E6 Ethernet | User's Manual | Cabletron Systems EMM-E6 Ethernet User's Manual

Cabletron Systems EMM-E6 Ethernet User's Manual
CH1Book Page 1 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
EMM-E6
SN
BRIM-A100
RESET
CPU
D
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STBY
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ETHERNET
CABLETRON SYSTEMS, P.O. Box 5005, Rochester, NH 83866-5005
CH1Book Page i Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
NOTICE
Cabletron Systems reserves the right to make changes in specifications
and other information contained in this document without prior notice.
The reader should in all cases consult Cabletron Systems to determine
whether any such changes have been made.
The hardware, firmware, or software described in this manual is subject to
change without notice.
IN NO EVENT SHALL CABLETRON SYSTEMS BE LIABLE FOR
ANY INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
LOST PROFITS) ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO THIS
MANUAL OR THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN IT, EVEN IF
CABLETRON SYSTEMS HAS BEEN ADVISED OF, KNOWN, OR
SHOULD HAVE KNOWN, THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
 Copyright July 1995 by:
Cabletron Systems, Inc., P.O. Box 5005, Rochester, NH 03866-5005
All Rights Reserved
Printed in the United States of America
Part Number: 9031515 July 1995
LANVIEW and SPECTRUM are registered trademarks, and ESXMIM,
ESXMIM-F2, EMM-E6, EMME, IRM, MMAC, TPMIM, TPRMIM,
THN-MIM, CXRMIM, FOMIM, FORMIM, TPXMIM, TPT, FOT-F,
TMS-3, LANVIEWSECURE, BRIM, FPIM, APIM, and EPIM are
trademarks of Cabletron Systems, Inc.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corp.
VT220,VT320, VT100 and DECNet are trademarks of Digital
Equipment Corp.
i960 is a trademark of Intel Corp.
AppleTalk is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.
Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corp.
CompuServe is a registered trademark of CompuServe, Inc.
Printed on
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
recycled paper.
i
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NOTICE
FCC NOTICE
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject
to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful
interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment. This equipment uses, generates, and can radiate radio
frequency energy and if not installed in accordance with the operator’s
manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the
interference at his own expense.
WARNING: Changes or modifications made to this device which are not
expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void
the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
DOC NOTICE
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise
emissions from digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference
Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques
dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la class A
prescrites dans le Règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par le
ministère des Communications du Canada.
ii
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NOTICE
VCCI NOTICE
This equipment is in the Class I Category (information equipment to be
used in commercial and/or industrial areas) and conforms to the standards
set by the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by Information
Technology Equipment (VCCI) aimed at preventing radio interference in
commercial and/or industrial areas.
Consequently, when used in a residential area or in an adjacent area
thereto, radio interference may be caused to radios and TV receivers, etc.
Read the instructions for correct handling.
CABLETRON SYSTEMS, INC.
PROGRAM LICENSE AGREEMENT
IMPORTANT: Before utilizing this product, carefully read this
License Agreement.
This document is an agreement between you, the end user, and Cabletron
Systems, Inc. (“Cabletron”) that sets forth your rights and obligations
with respect to the Cabletron software program (the “Program”)
contained in this package. The Program may be contained in firmware,
chips or other media. BY UTILIZING THE ENCLOSED PRODUCT,
YOU ARE AGREEING TO BECOME BOUND BY THE TERMS OF
THIS AGREEMENT, WHICH INCLUDES THE LICENSE AND THE
LIMITATION OF WARRANTY AND DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY.
IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT,
PROMPTLY RETURN THE UNUSED PRODUCT TO THE PLACE OF
PURCHASE FOR A FULL REFUND.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
iii
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NOTICE
CABLETRON SOFTWARE PROGRAM LICENSE
1. LICENSE. You have the right to use only the one (1) copy of the
Program provided in this package subject to the terms and conditions
of this License Agreement.
You may not copy, reproduce or transmit any part of the Program
except as permitted by the Copyright Act of the United States or as
authorized in writing by Cabletron.
2. OTHER RESTRICTIONS. You may not reverse engineer,
decompile, or disassemble the Program.
3. APPLICABLE LAW. This License Agreement shall be interpreted
and governed under the laws and in the state and federal courts of
New Hampshire. You accept the personal jurisdiction and venue of
the New Hampshire courts.
BELLCORE TESTING INFORMATION
This product has been tested by Bellcore and found to comply with the
following Bellcore Standards:
1. TR-NWT-000063: Network Equipment Building System (NEBS)
Generic Equipment Requirements
2. GR-1089-CORE: EMC and Electrical Safety Generic Criteria for
Network Telecommunications Equipment.
iv
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NOTICE
EXCLUSION OF WARRANTY AND
DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY
1. EXCLUSION OF WARRANTY. Except as may be specifically
provided by Cabletron in writing, Cabletron makes no warranty,
expressed or implied, concerning the Program (including Its
documentation and media).
CABLETRON DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, OTHER THAN
THOSE SUPPLIED TO YOU BY CABLETRON IN WRITING,
EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, WITH
RESPECT TO THE PROGRAM, THE ACCOMPANYING
WRITTEN MATERIALS, AND ANY ACCOMPANYING
HARDWARE.
2. NO LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES. IN NO
EVENT SHALL CABLETRON OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE
FOR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING, WITHOUT
LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS, PROFITS,
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF BUSINESS
INFORMATION, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL,
OR RELIANCE DAMAGES, OR OTHER LOSS) ARISING OUT
OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS CABLETRON
PRODUCT, EVEN IF CABLETRON HAS BEEN ADVISED OF
THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. BECAUSE SOME
STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION
OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL
DAMAGES, OR ON THE DURATION OR LIMITATION OF
IMPLIED WARRANTEES, IN SOME INSTANCES THE ABOVE
LIMITATIONS AND EXCLUSIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
v
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NOTICE
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS
The enclosed product (a) was developed solely at private expense; (b)
contains “restricted computer software” submitted with restricted rights in
accordance with Section 52227-19 (a) through (d) of the Commercial
Computer Software - Restricted Rights Clause and its successors, and (c)
in all respects is proprietary data belonging to Cabletron and/or its
suppliers.
For Department of Defense units, the product is licensed with “Restricted
Rights” as defined in the DoD Supplement to the Federal Acquisition
Regulations, Section 52.227-7013 (c) (1) (ii) and its successors, and use,
duplication, disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as set
forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and
Computer Software clause at 252.227-7013. Cabletron Systems, Inc., 35
Industrial Way, Rochester, New Hampshire 03867.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12
1.13
1.14
INTRODUCTION
USING THIS MANUAL........................................................ 1-1
EMM-E6 FEATURES .......................................................... 1-4
THE MMAC WITH FLEXIBLE NETWORK BUS ................. 1-10
ETHERNET CHANNELS A, B, C, D, E, and F.................... 1-12
1.4.1 Ethernet Channel A ................................................ 1-12
1.4.2 Ethernet Channels B and C.................................... 1-13
1.4.3 Other FNB Modules................................................ 1-14
1.4.4 Ethernet Channel D................................................ 1-15
CHANNELS E AND F.......................................................... 1-16
BRIDGES ............................................................................ 1-17
1.6.1 Filtering and Forwarding......................................... 1-18
1.6.2 Spanning Tree Algorithm........................................ 1-19
LOCAL MANAGEMENT FEATURES.................................. 1-20
COMMUNITY NAMES ........................................................ 1-21
SNMP .................................................................................. 1-21
1.9.1 MIBs ....................................................................... 1-22
REVIEW OF ADDRESSING ............................................... 1-22
1.10.1 MAC Addresses ..................................................... 1-22
1.10.2 IP Addresses .......................................................... 1-23
1.10.3 Identifying IP Address Classes............................... 1-25
1.10.4 Subnet Addresses .................................................. 1-25
1.10.5 Subnet Masks......................................................... 1-26
1.10.6 Operation of the Subnet Mask................................ 1-30
1.10.7 Default Gateway..................................................... 1-30
1.10.8 Addressing Example .............................................. 1-31
LANVIEW LEDs AND RESET SWITCH.............................. 1-33
LANVIEWSECURE ............................................................. 1-33
GETTING HELP .................................................................. 1-35
RELATED MANUALS ......................................................... 1-35
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
NETWORK REQUIREMENTS ........................................... 2-1
2.1.1 10BASE-T Twisted Pair Network ........................... 2-2
2.1.2 Multimode Fiber Optic Network ............................. 2-4
2.1.3 Single Mode Fiber Optic Network .......................... 2-5
2.1.4 Thin-net Network ................................................... 2-6
TRANSCEIVER REQUIREMENTS .................................... 2-6
REPEATER MEDIA INTERFACE MODULES.................... 2-7
PORT ASSIGNMENT MODULES ...................................... 2-8
SAMPLE NETWORK CONFIGURATIONS ........................ 2-9
2.5.1 Three Networks With a Single MMAC-FNB ........... 2-10
2.5.2 The EMM-E6 as a Multiport Router ....................... 2-10
2.5.3 Adding Users to a Separate Segment ................... 2-11
2.5.4 A Fault Tolerant Wiring Hierarchy.......................... 2-12
2.5.5 The EMM-E6 and BRIMs ....................................... 2-14
CHAPTER 3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
viii
INSTALLATION
UNPACKING THE EMM-E6 ............................................... 3-2
SETTING MODE SWITCHES ............................................ 3-3
SIMM UPGRADES ............................................................. 3-6
3.3.1 Locating SIMMs ..................................................... 3-6
3.3.2 Installing SIMMs .................................................... 3-8
ADDING/REPLACING EPIMs ............................................ 3-9
LOCATING BRIMs.............................................................. 3-10
PRE-INSTALLATION TEST ............................................... 3-11
INSTALLING THE EMM-E6................................................ 3-13
INSTALLATION CHECK-OUT............................................ 3-16
CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK .................................. 3-18
3.9.1 Connecting a Twisted Pair Segment to an EPIM-T 3-19
3.9.2 Connecting an AUI Cable to an EPIM-X ................ 3-21
3.9.3 Connecting to an EPIM-F1/F2, or EPIM-F3 ........... 3-22
3.9.4 Connecting a Thin-Net Segment to an EPIM-C ..... 3-25
3.9.5 Connecting an AUI Cable to an EPIM-A ................ 3-27
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 4
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
ATTACHING A CONSOLE
CONFIGURING YOUR TERMINAL .................................... 4-1
CONFIGURING A CONSOLE CABLE ................................ 4-3
4.2.1 Connecting to a VT Series Terminal ...................... 4-4
4.2.2 Connecting to an IBM PC or Compatible ............... 4-5
PINOUT DESCRIPTIONS................................................... 4-6
CONFIGURING A UPS CABLE .......................................... 4-6
CHAPTER 5
ACCESSING LOCAL MANAGEMENT
CHAPTER 6
6.1
6.2
6.3
ACCESSING THE COMMUNITY NAME TABLE ................ 6-1
COMMUNITY NAME TABLE SCREEN FIELDS................. 6-2
ESTABLISHING COMMUNITY NAMES ............................. 6-3
CHAPTER 7
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
CONFIGURATION SCREEN
ACCESSING THE CONFIGURATION SCREEN................ 7-1
CONFIGURATION SCREEN FIELDS................................. 7-2
SETTING THE HOST IP ADDRESS................................... 7-4
MODIFYING A SUBNET MASK.......................................... 7-5
SETTING DEFAULT GATEWAY AND INTERFACE .......... 7-6
CONNECTING/DISCONNECTING A UPS ......................... 7-8
UNLOCKING PORTS.......................................................... 7-9
ENABLING PORTS............................................................. 7-9
CHAPTER 8
8.1
8.2
8.3
TRAP TABLE SCREEN
ACCESSING THE TRAP TABLE SCREEN ........................ 8-1
TRAP TABLE SCREEN FIELDS......................................... 8-2
CONFIGURING THE TRAP TABLE.................................... 8-2
CHAPTER 9
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
COMMUNITY NAMES
SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
ACCESSING THE SNMP TOOLS SCREEN ...................... 9-1
SNMP TOOLS SCREEN FIELDS ....................................... 9-2
THE SECURITY ACCESS LEVEL ...................................... 9-3
GETTING AND SETTING OIDS ......................................... 9-4
SCROLLING THROUGH MIB OIDS ................................... 9-6
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 11
11.1
11.2
11.3
ROUTER SETUP SCREEN
DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN
DEVICE STATISTICS......................................................... 11-2
DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN COMMANDS .................. 11-3
11.2.1 Selecting an Update Frequency ............................ 11-4
11.2.2 Selecting a Network/Slot/Port ................................ 11-5
11.2.3 Enabling Ports ....................................................... 11-5
11.2.4 Disabling Ports....................................................... 11-6
EXITING THE DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN ................. 11-6
CHAPTER 12
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE SCREEN
CHAPTER 13
13.1
13.2
13.3
MANAGING DEVICE MIBs................................................. 13-1
ACCESSING THE MIB NAVIGATOR................................. 13-2
MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW............... 13-3
13.3.1 Conventions For MIB Navigator Commands ......... 13-3
13.3.2 Navigation Commands .......................................... 13-4
13.3.3 Built-In Commands ................................................ 13-11
13.3.4 Special Commands................................................ 13-16
CHAPTER 14
14.1
14.2
14.3
x
TROUBLESHOOTING
USING LANVIEW ............................................................... 14-1
TROUBLESHOOTING CHECKLIST .................................. 14-4
USING THE RESET SWITCH ............................................ 14-7
CHAPTER 15
15.1
15.2
15.3
15.4
MIB NAVIGATOR
IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
GETTING STARTED .......................................................... 15-2
FORCED DOWNLOAD WITH UNIX................................... 15-3
STANDARD LOCAL DOWNLOAD ..................................... 15-7
REMOTE RUNTIME DOWNLOAD..................................... 15-8
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
APPENDIX A
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
A.9
A.10
A.11
A.12
EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
BRIDGING FUNCTIONALITY ............................................. A-1
REPEATER FUNCTIONALITY ........................................... A-2
COM 1 PORT ...................................................................... A-3
COM 2 PORT ...................................................................... A-3
ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS ............................... A-3
SAFETY .............................................................................. A-4
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES .................................................. A-4
EPIM-T (10BASE-T TWISTED PAIR PORT) ...................... A-5
EPIM-F1/F2 (MULTIMODE FIBER OPTIC PORT) ............. A-6
EPIM-F3 (SINGLE MODE FIBER OPTIC PORT) ............... A-7
EPIM-C (BNC PORT).......................................................... A-9
EPIM-A AND EPIM-X (AUI PORT)...................................... A-10
APPENDIX B
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
B.6
B.7
B.8
B.9
B.10
EMM-E6 OIDs
SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL.......................................... B-1
CONFIGURING ARP REQUEST PACKETS ...................... B-2
PORT GROUP SECURITY ................................................. B-3
ENABLING & DISABLING SNMP TRAPS .......................... B-6
B.4.1 Enabling Network Level SNMP Traps .................... B-6
B.4.2 Enabling Module Level SNMP Traps ..................... B-7
B.4.3 Enabling Port Level SNMP Traps........................... B-8
ACTIVATING RMON GROUPS .......................................... B-10
BRIDGING........................................................................... B-11
TRUNK PORT SECURITY.................................................. B-11
CHANNEL SELECTION...................................................... B-12
OID HASHING ON SOURCE ADDRESES ......................... B-13
REMOTE DOWNLOADING ................................................ B-13
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CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the Cabletron Systems EMM-E6 User’s Guide. This manual
explains how to set-up, configure, and locally manage the Cabletron
Systems 6-port Ethernet Bridge/Management Module (EMM-E6).
1.1
USING THIS MANUAL
Read through this manual completely to familiarize yourself with its
content and to gain an understanding of the features and capabilities of
the EMM-E6 and its Local Management, or LM, functions. A general
working knowledge of Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 type data
communications networks and their physical layer components is helpful
when installing the EMM-E6 module and when using LM.
Chapter 1, Introduction, outlines the contents of this manual, briefly
describes the EMM-E6’s features, provides a brief review of IP
addressing, and concludes with a list of related manuals.
Chapter 2, Requirements/Configurations, explains the network
requirements to consider before installing the EMM-E6. This chapter also
includes sample configurations to demonstrate various applications for
the EMM-E6.
Chapter 3, Installation, provides instructions/guidelines on how to install
the EMM-E6 into an MMAC-FNB, set the EMM-E6 mode switches, and
connect segments to your device using optional EPIMs. This chapter also
explains how to install optional Single In-line Memory Modules, EPIMs,
and locate Bridge Router Interface Module (BRIM) connectors.
Chapter 4, Attaching a Console, describes how to attach a Local
Management console to the EMM-E6. This chapter provides the setup
and configuration requirements for the console, the console cable, and any
cable connections.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Chapter 5, Accessing Local Management, describes how to access LM
after you attach the management console.
Chapter 6, Community Names, explains how to use the Community
Name Table screen to set both local and remote access levels.
Chapter 7, Configuration Screen, describes how to assign IP addresses,
subnet masks, and the default gateway to the EMM-E6. This chapter also
explains how to enable and disable all ports.
Chapter 8, Trap Table Screen, explains how to designate management
stations as recipients of SNMP alarm or event traps.
Chapter 9, SNMP Tools Screen, provides information on the resident
EMM-E6 Management Information Base (MIB) walking tool.
Chapter 10, Router Setup Screen, Shows the Routing Services Setup
Screen, where the EMM-E6’s optional Routing Services may be
accessed.
Chapter 11, Device Statistics Screen, illustrates the statistics provided by
EMM-E6/LM. This chapter also describes how to enable and disable
specific ports on the EMM-E6, and set the statistics update frequency
time.
Chapter 12, Command Line Interface Screen, shows the Command
Line Interface (CLI) screen. This screen will function in future releases of
EMM-E6 firmware.
Chapter 13, MIB Navigator, provides instructions and examples for
using the navigator command set.
Chapter 14, Troubleshooting, details the EMM-E6 LANVIEW LEDs
that enable you to quickly diagnose network/operational problems and
provides suggested courses of action for troubleshooting.
Chapter 15, Image File Download, provides instructions to download a
new image file to the EMM-E6 by setting specific MIB OID strings.
1-2
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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USING THIS MANUAL
Appendix A, EMM-E6 Specifications, details the properties of the
EMM-E6 and currently available EPIM modules.
Appendix B, OID Descriptions, supplies information detailing the
Object Identifiers that may be accessed for managing the EMM-E6.
Following the Appendices is a brief Glossary of Terms which provides
short definitions for terms related to items and concepts referred to in this
manual.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.2
EMM-E6 FEATURES
•
i960 Processor Design
•
IEEE 802.1d Compliant
•
Available Routing Services
EMM-E6
SN
•
BRIM-A100
RESET
Special Filtering Database
CPU
D
C
B
A
STBY
•
Six port Ethernet Bridge
•
Integrated BRIM technology
•
User Configurable EPIMs
•
Expandable Flash EEPROM
Memory and Runtime download
•
Expandable Local DRAM
•
Expandable Shared DRAM
•
SNMP and RMON Support
RCV
XMT
•
Local Communication Ports
•
UPS Proxy Agent Support
•
In-Band Telnet with MIB
Navigator
•
1-4
Port Locking and
LANVIEWSECURE Support
RCV
LNK
EPIM-A
XMT
STY
BRIM-F6
EPIM-A
PWR
BRIM-WT1
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TST RED SYN CTS TST
DLM Support
SYNC
•
LNK YEL STB DSR LNK
LANVIEW Diagnostic LEDs
E
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1
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T1/FT1
•
PWR
CLN
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2
ETHERNET
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EMM-E6 FEATURES
i960 Processor Design
The EMM-E6 is equipped with an advanced Intel i960 microprocessor
that provides a scalable RISC-based architecture.
IEEE 802.1d Compliant
The EMM-E6 is a fully IEEE 802.1d compliant Ethernet bridge. The
EMM-E6 supports both the IEEE and DEC Spanning Tree algorithms,
allowing it to operate in several fault-tolerant bridging environments.
Available Routing Services
Cabletron’s own routing services for the EMM-E6 are available as a
software upgrade. When properly configured with the software upgrade,
the EMM-E6 is capable of routing IP, IPX, DECnet, AppleTalk, and
OSPF.
Special Filtering Database
The EMM-E6 supports a special filtering database which allows packets
to be blocked from crossing the bridge based on manager-defined
parameters.
Six Port Ethernet Bridge
The EMM-E6 has six Ethernet ports. Three of these ports (Ethernet
Channels A, B, and C) operate within the hub. One other port (Ethernet
Channel D) provides an external connection through one of two Ethernet
Port Interface Modules (EPIMs) located on the EMM-E6 faceplate. The
remaining two ports (Ethernet Channels E and F) are externally accessible
through the use of Cabletron Bridge/Router Interface Modules (BRIMs),
which can be configured in the module.
Integrated BRIM Technology
In addition to Ethernet Channels A through D, the EMM-E6 provides
management for up to two optional Bridge/Router Interface Modules
(BRIMs). These modules allow for additional Ethernet connections or
Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) network backbones. The
following lists optional BRIMs:
NOTE
For current information on the available BRIM modules supported
by the EMM-E6, please refer to the Release Notes shipped with the
module or contact Cabletron Systems.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
•
•
•
•
BRIM-E6: Ethernet module with selectable EPIM connection
CRBRIM-W/E-IP: Cisco Router Ethernet/Wide Area module for
TCP/IP traffic.
CRBRIM-W/E-DESKTOP: Cisco Router Ethernet/Wide Area
module for IP, IPX, DECNet, and AppleTalk traffic.
CRBRIM-W/E-ENT: Cisco Router Ethernet/Wide Area module
for all standard Cisco protocols.
NOTE
•
•
•
All CRBRIM-W/E products provide two WAN interfaces and one
internally connected Ethernet interface. The Ethernet connection is
provided through the use of an EPIM-3PS, which is included with
the purchase of the CRBRIM-W/E product.
BRIM-F0: 100 Mbps FDDI Dual Attached Station (DAS) Media
Interface Connector (MIC) connection for multimode fiber optic
media.
BRIM-F5: 100 Mbps FDDI DAS MIC connection for single mode
fiber optic media
BRIM-F6: 100 Mbps FDDI Dual Attach Station connection with
configurable connectors
The BRIM-F6 uses FDDI Port Interface Modules (FPIMs). The FPIMs
allow a media flexibility for FDDI connections by providing connector
and media types meeting several ANSI standards. The following FPIM
types are currently available:
•
•
•
•
1-6
FPIM- 00: MultiMode Fiber - Physical Media Dependant
(MMF-PMD) compliant multimode fiber optic MIC connector
FPIM- 02: Twisted Pair - Physical Media Dependant (TP-PMD)
complaint Unshielded Twisted Pair RJ45 connector
FPIM- 04: TP-PMD compliant Shielded Twisted Pair RJ45
connector.
FPIM- 05: Single Mode Fiber - Physical Media Dependant
(SMF-PMD) compliant single mode fiber optic MIC connector.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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EMM-E6 FEATURES
•
BRIM-A6: 100/155 Mbps ATM Station connection with
configurable connector.
The BRIM-A6 uses ATM Port Interface Modules (APIMs). APIMs allow
a media flexibility for ATM connections like that provided by FPIMs
(described above). The following APIM types are currently available:
•
•
•
APIM-11: 100 Mbps multimode fiber optic SC connector
APIM-21: 155 Mbps multimode fiber optic SC connector
APIM-29: 155 Mbps single mode fiber optic SC connector
User Configurable EPIMs
The fourth channel (D) directs traffic to one of two external Ethernet Port
Interface Modules (EPIMs). The following list contains the currently
available EPIMs:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
EPIM-T: 10BASE-T RJ45 Port
EPIM-F1: Sub-Miniature Assembly (SMA) connectors for
multimode fiber optics
EPIM-F2: Straight-Tip (ST) connectors for multimode fiber
optics
EPIM-F3: Straight-Tip (ST) connectors for single mode fiber
optics
EPIM-C: RG-58 connector for thin coaxial cabling
EPIM-A: Female DB15 connector for AUI cabling
EPIM-X: Male DB15 connector for AUI cabling
Expandable Flash EEPROM Memory
The EMM-E6 incorporates 2 MB of Flash Electrically Erasable
Programmable Read Only Memory (Flash EEPROM). Flash memory
holds the operating instruction code of the EMM-E6. When the module is
activated, the instruction code (firmware) held in Flash memory is
forwarded to Main memory, decompressed, and used to startup the
EMM-E6. As the decompression of firmware slightly delays the
initialization of the EMM-E6, a Flash memory upgrade is available that
allows the firmware to be held in its expanded form.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Flash memory allows for the downloading of firmware to the module
without requiring that the module be shut down. The firmware download
may be performed at any time during the operation of the module, and the
new firmware image will be utilized at the next reset of the module.
Expandable LDRAM
The EMM-E6 comes with 8 MB of Local Dynamic Random Access
Memory (LDRAM). LDRAM is the “Main” memory from which the
routing or bridging functionality of the EMM-E6 operates. When the
EMM-E6 needs to support additional functionality, an LDRAM upgrade
may be required. If you are planning to add any functionality to your
EMM-E6 module, determine if an LDRAM expansion is required.
Expandable SDRAM
The EMM-E6 comes with 4 Megabytes (MB) of Shared Dynamic
Random Access Memory (SDRAM). SDRAM holds packets coming onto
the module temporarily while forwarding, filtering, and error checking
decisions are made. While SDRAM has been designed to facilitate future
expansion, at this time there are no EMM-E6 functions which require or
are assisted by the expansion of SDRAM memory.
SNMP and RMON support
Since the EMM-E6 is SNMP compliant, you can control and monitor the
device remotely and locally using different SNMP Network Management
packages. EMM-E6 firmware also supports several RMON groups,
including:
•
•
•
•
Alarms
Events
History
Host
• HostTopN
• Matrix
• Statistics
LANVIEW Diagnostic LEDs
Cabletron provides a visual diagnostic and monitoring system, called
LANVIEW, with the EMM-E6. LANVIEW LEDs can help you quickly
identify device, port, and physical layer problems.
1-8
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EMM-E6 FEATURES
DLM Support
The EMM-E6 allows the option of using Cabletron Distributed LAN
Monitor (DLM) software to locally poll and monitor any Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) or Internet Protocol (IP) device. The
EMM-E6 itself tallies the polling results and can be configured to contact
a management station when a predetermined threshold is exceeded. This
allows the EMM-E6 to request management attention when it is required,
reducing management polling over the network.
Local Communication Ports
The EMM-E6 provides two RJ45 serial ports on its front panel. The COM
1 port allows a serial management connection to an American Power
Conversion Smart Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS). The COM 2 port
allows you to access Local Management by locally connecting a DEC
VT220 or VT320 terminal, or a PC using VT emulation software.
In-Band Telnet with MIB Navigator
EMM-E6 firmware supports a management tool which allows for MIB
navigation from a remote Telnet station.
Port Locking and LANVIEWSECURE Support
The EMM-E6 supports Port Locking features and Cabletron’s
LANVIEWSECURE line of Media Interface Modules (MIMs). The
EMM-E6 is capable of configuring and controlling LANVIEWSECURE
MIMs through local or remote management. These security features can
help reduce the possibility of network eavesdropping.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.3
THE MMAC WITH FLEXIBLE NETWORK BUS
The Multi Media Access Center with Flexible Network Bus
(MMAC-FNB) provides the operational platform for the EMM-E6. The
MMAC-FNB (backplane) provides two physically separate buses Channel A (operating over the MMAC Power and Management bus), and
Channels B and C (on the FNB). Each of these channels/buses allows
different MIM types to access the EMM-E6 (Figure 1-1).
These channels/buses interconnect through the EMM-E6 to provide
bridging or routing and management for all MIMs in the MMAC chassis.
Power & Management Bus
Ethernet A Bus
Flexible Network Bus
Ethernet B Bus
Ethernet C Bus
Figure 1-1. MMAC Flexible Network Bus
Two types of MMACs currently support FNB architecture - shunting and
non-shunting. MMACs equipped with shunting backplanes allow
modules operating on Channels B and C to continue communicating with
the EMM-E6, regardless of whether there is an empty slot or an Ethernet
Channel A module between them in the chassis. The following table gives
the part numbers of the MMAC chassis that have shunting capabilities.
1-10
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THE MMAC WITH FLEXIBLE NETWORK BUS
Table 1-1. MMACs with Shunting Capabilities
NOTE
MMAC Chassis
Part #
MMAC-3FNB
FC000000000 or above
MMAC-5FNB
CC000000000 or above
MMAC-8FNB
CG000000000 or above
MMAC-M8FNB
DK000000000 or above
MMAC-M5FNB
all
MMAC-M3FNB
all
If your MMAC does not have a shunting backplane, upgrade
kits are available. For additional information on shunting
backplanes, or how to upgrade your hub, contact Cabletron
Systems Technical Support.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.4
ETHERNET CHANNELS A, B, C, D, E, and F
The EMM-E6 manages all Ethernet bridging traffic within its resident
hub. This means that the EMM-E6 controls up to six of the Ethernet
bridging channels - A, B, C, D, E, and, in the future, F. These channels
access the same EMM-E6 shared memory, so bridging between channels
is concurrent.
1.4.1
Ethernet Channel A
Channel A operates over the MMAC Power and Management Bus,
Cabletron’s original Ethernet channel. Only Cabletron Systems
non-repeater MIMs (i.e., TPMIMs, FOMIMs, and THN-MIMs) access
the EMM-E6 through Ethernet Channel A. Additionally, the TPXMIM
Ethernet Port Assignment modules are able to communicate through
Ethernet Channel A, as well as the additional backplane channels. When
the EMM-E6 receives a frame on Channel A, it goes through the same
bridging functions as any of the other channels. In addition, the EMM-E6
incorporates IEEE 802.3 repeater logic to repeat Channel A frames. In
other words:
•
the EMM-E6 bridges for all attached devices, and provides Ethernet
repeating functions for Channel A modules
•
even if the EMM-E6 does not bridge the Channel A traffic it
receives, it still repeats the information back out onto the Ethernet A
Channel.
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ETHERNET CHANNELS A, B, C, D, E, and F
1.4.2
Ethernet Channels B and C
The Cabletron Systems MultiChannel family of MIMs includes the
Repeater Interface Controller Media Interface Module (RIC MIM), an
IEEE 802.3 compliant multi-port repeater. You can configure these
modules to operate on either the Ethernet Channels B or C, or as a
standalone repeater, using hardware jumpers or management software.
RIC technology provides the option of connecting multiple RIC MIMs
over one common bus. This single bus connection allows multiple RIC
MIMs, communicating over an inter-RIC bus, to act as a single logical
repeater. For example:
•
An Ethernet frame follows a path from one RIC MIM, to the
inter-RIC bus, to another RIC MIM.
•
The RIC MIM retimes and regenerates the frame before transmitting
it to all ports.
Using this configuration yields a path cost equivalent to only one repeater
hop. Since the limit of serially linked repeaters in an Ethernet network is
only four, using the RIC repeater offers a significant advantage. By using
cascading RIC MIMs it is possible to construct a much larger network
than you could with stand-alone repeaters.
Channels B and C traffic travels through RIC MIMs (i.e., TPRMIMs,
FORMIMs, and CXRMIMs). These MIMs repeat packets on their own,
without the EMM-E6. Ethernet Channels B and C handle network traffic
over the RIC management bus on the FNB.
When frames have destination addresses for the same bus:
•
the sending RIC MIM transmits the frames over its designated
Ethernet bus;
•
the other RIC MIMs on this bus receive the frames, and repeat them;
•
the EMM-E6 receives the frames and, after determining the
destination, filters the frame.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
When frames have destination addresses for a different bus:
•
the sending RIC MIM transmits the frames over its designated
Ethernet bus;
•
the other RIC MIMs on this bus receive the frames, and repeat them;
•
the EMM-E6, after determining the source and destination, forwards
the traffic accordingly.
In addition to providing management for these modules, the EMM-E6
also gathers Network, Board, and Port Level performance and error
statistics for each individual RIC MIM on Channels B and/or C.
1.4.3
Other FNB Modules
Third Party MIMs - The EMM-E6 recognizes the third party MIMs
listed below and provides each module with support concerning the
statistics on the backplane and the control of channel selection for the
entire module:
•
•
•
•
•
1-14
CSMIM2 - With supported connectivity for Channels A, B, or C in
an FNB chassis.
MODMIM - With supported connectivity for Channels A, B, or C
in an FNB chassis.
CRM-3E - With supported connectivity for Channels A, B, or C in
an FNB chassis.
PCMIM - With supported connectivity for Channel A in any
MMAC chassis.
SNACMIM-E - With supported connectivity for Channel A in any
MMAC chassis.
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ETHERNET CHANNELS A, B, C, D, E, and F
FDDI and Token Ring Modules - The EMM-E6 recognizes the
following FDDI and Token Ring modules, but the EMM-E6 management
does not provide control or statistics.
•
•
•
•
•
•
CRM-3T
SNACMIM
TRMIM-32A
TRMIM-34A
TRRMIM-F2T
TRRMIM-F3T
With TRMMIM version 2.02 or greater, both Token Ring and Ethernet
modules can reside in the same chassis and support physical management
capabilities of the Token Ring MIMs using the TRMMIM as the Token
Ring management module. Without the TRMMIM, the EMM-E6 will
only recognize the Token Ring modules.
TPXMIM - The EMM-E6 also supports Cabletron’s family of Twisted
Pair Switching Media Interface Modules (TPXMIMs). These modules
provide board or individual port connectivity to any MMAC-FNB
Ethernet channel (A, B, or C) with full SNMP management including
RMON. All ports initially default to Channel B upon power up and
require a Management Information Base (MIB) change to access any
other channel.
1.4.4
Ethernet Channel D
Ethernet Channel D is provided by one of the two redundant EPIM ports
on the front panel of the EMM-E6. These EPIM ports provide the
capability for the use of a variety of Ethernet transmission media
connections, including twisted pair, fiber optic, and thick or thin Ethernet
coaxial cable.
Either one of the EPIM ports can act as the bridge port to the external
network. When the EMM-E6 is first powered up, the EPIM 1 port acts as
the bridge port and the EPIM 2 port is off. Using the network
management capabilities of the EMM-E6, you can reverse this
configuration to have the EPIM 2 port act as the primary bridge port.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Only one EPIM operates at any given time. However, using both EPIM
slots in a redundancy configuration ensures that if the primary bridging
port fails, or the connecting cable segment becomes inoperable, the backup
port automatically takes over the bridging operation. This is referred to as
Front Panel Redundancy.
As it does for Channels B and C, the EMM-E6 only bridges (i.e., it does
not repeat) Channel D traffic. When the EMM-E6 receives a frame
destined for Channel D, it goes through the normal bridging process for
that frame and filters/forwards the information accordingly.
1.5
CHANNELS E AND F
The EMM-E6 provides interfaces for two optional Bridge Router
Interface Modules (BRIMs). These modules provide the EMM-E6 with
additional connectivity for either bridging or routing functions. At the
same time, BRIMs provide access to various transmission methods.
As bridging modules, BRIMs perform the same functions as EPIMs; they
transfer packets between different channels. However, unlike EPIMs,
BRIMs bridge these packets from one transmission type to another (e.g.,
Ethernet to FDDI).
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BRIDGES
1.6
BRIDGES
An Ethernet bridge is a device that allows the expansion of a network
beyond the limitations of the IEEE 802.3 specified limits for repeated
Ethernet networks. If an Ethernet network has a repeater hop of four
repeaters or a round trip propagation delay near the 51.2 µs maximum, a
bridge can be used to build an extended network. Ethernet bridges read in
packets and decide to filter or forward based on the destination address of
the packet. The simple forward/filter decision process allows a bridge to
segment traffic between two networks, keeping local traffic local. This
process increases the availability of each network while still allowing
traffic destined for the opposite side of the bridge to pass.
Bridges can also connect similar networks together such as Ethernet,
Token Ring, and Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) together. Note
that similar networks means that the upper five layers of the OSI model,
see Figure 1-2, are the same but that different Data Link and Physical
layers may be used by the architecture. The Bridge operates at the Data
Link level of the OSI model. It stores packets and based on the packet
destination address, forwards or filters the packets. Because bridges work
at layer 2 of the OSI model, bridges are protocol independent. A bridge
must read the complete data frame, check for errors, and make forward or
filter decisions based on recognized addresses stored in its source address
table.
7. Application
7
7
6. Presentation
6
6
5. Session
5
5
4. Transport
4
4
3. Network
3
Bridge
2. Data Link
2
1. Physical
1
2
1
3
2
1
Figure 1-2. OSI Model
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
The bridge is considered a node on the network and performs store and
forward functions for packets on each network. This contrasts with a
repeater which repeats the signal bit by bit from one side of the network
to the other. The bridge actually reads each packet, checks the packet for
accuracy, then decides whether the packet should be sent to the other
network based on the destination address. If the other network is busy, it
is the responsibility of the bridge to store the packet, for a reasonable
time, until the transmission can be made.
The bridge is also responsible for handling collisions. If a collision
happens as the bridge is transmitting onto the second network, the bridge
is responsible for the back off and retransmission process. The original
sending node is not made aware of the collision. It assumes the packet has
been sent correctly. If the bridge is unable to send the packet to its final
destination, the original sending station, expecting some response from
the device it was attempting to contact, will “time out” and, depending on
the protocol attempt retransmission.
1.6.1
Filtering and Forwarding
The bridge decides whether to forward or filter a packet based on the
physical location of the destination device with respect to the source
device. A bridge dynamically learns the physical location of devices by
logging the source addresses of each packet and the bridge port the packet
was received on in a table called the Source Address Table (SAT).
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BRIDGES
1.6.2
Spanning Tree Algorithm
The Spanning Tree Algorithm (STA) is used by bridges to detect data
loops (duplicate data paths). The bridges will then automatically break the
loop and use the now open path as a backup in case the primary path fails.
When a bridge is powered up, it goes through a series of self tests to
check its internal operation. During this time the bridge is in a standby, or
blocking, condition and does not forward traffic. Also during this standby
period, the bridge sends out special bridge management packets called
configuration Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDU). Bridges use the
BPDUs as a way of communicating with each other. The purpose of the
configuration BDPU is to notify other bridges on all of the connected
networks of the current topology.
After the bridge has informed the network of its presence, the bridge
enters a second standby state, called listening. During listening, the
bridge monitors the network for the BPDUs of other bridges. Having
received packets from the networks, the bridge enters the learning state,
continuing to block traffic as it examines the information it receives.
Based on bridge priorities and MAC addresses, the interconnected bridges
will set bridge ports to either forwarding or standby conditions, allowing
a single access path to all parts of the network. The bridge or bridges
involved in this primary data path will then remain in the forwarding
state, and the bridges with lower priority involved in the backup path(s)
will remain in a standby condition. Any redundant paths (those placed in
standby) will be automatically used as need is detected by the operation
of the Spanning Tree Algorithm.
The other type of BPDU is the topology change BPDU. This BPDU is
made up of four bytes and notifies the other bridges that a change has
taken place. Upon receipt of the topology change BPDU, the bridges
re-arbitrate, or re-span, to form a legal topology.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.7
LOCAL MANAGEMENT FEATURES
Local Management for the EMM-E6 provides tools that allow you to
manage the device and its attached segments. Through Local
Management you can:
•
Assign an IP address and subnet mask to the EMM-E6 bridge via the
Configuration Screen menu.
•
Select a default gateway and default interface.
•
Control EMM-E6 local and remote access by establishing
Community Names.
•
Designate which Network Management Workstations receive
SNMP traps from the EMM-E6.
•
Navigate through Management Information Bases (MIBs). Since the
EMM-E6 is an SNMP compliant device, you can manage related
SNMP MIB objects, given the appropriate security level. You can
also manage the IETF Bridge MIB objects and many of the RMON
(Remote Monitoring) MIB objects.
Other management capabilities include enabling and unlocking all
managed ports in the Multi Media Access Center (MMAC) chassis.
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COMMUNITY NAMES
1.8
COMMUNITY NAMES
When using Local or Remote Management tools to access the EMM-E6 it
is important that the Network Manager has the ability to maintain network
security. Community Names provide some network security by acting as
passwords into the device and the software running it. The Network
Manager (Super-user) controls access by establishing four (4) passwords.
Each of these passwords is associated with a specific level of access to the
Local Management capabilities of the EMM-E6. The Community Names
are set through the Local Management Community Name Table. Once
these are set by the Network Manager, they can be maintained in
confidence or limited to users who have a need to manage the system. The
four levels of access are:
•
•
•
•
1.9
Super-User - Allows full management privileges
Read-Write - Allows editing of device configuration parameters not
including changing Community Names
Read-Only - Allows reading of device parameters not including
Community names
Basic-Read - Allows reading low level device data
SNMP
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) is a protocol within the
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol suite.
Network applications such as Local Management and MIB Navigator use
SNMP to manage device configurations and monitor operating
conditions. SNMP protocol defines methods for “GETs,” “SETs,” and
“TRAPs,” either remotely from any point along the TCP/IP network or
locally. This allows for control of the device from any point along the
network. SNMP tools use the MIBs located on the device to be managed
to; access information (GET), change device parameters (SET), and to
notify previously selected users that an event has occurred (TRAP).
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.9.1
MIBs
The Management Information Bases (MIBs) are a database resident on
the EMM-E6. Objects in the information base are uniquely identified by
administratively assigned identifiers (called object identifiers or OIDs),
and can be viewed, retrieved, or changed using an SNMP packet
exchange over the network.
1.10
REVIEW OF ADDRESSING
For network devices to recognize one another, unique identifiers, referred
to as addresses, are required. The following sections are intended for
review, and do not represent a comprehensive description of network
addressing.
This section begins by discussing the two types of addressing used in
TCP/IP networks, Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and Media Access
Control (MAC) addresses. These descriptions are followed by an
overview of the process of configuring addresses in a network, including
examples of network Classes and the creation of subnets within networks.
1.10.1
MAC Addresses
The MAC address is a unique, 48-bit binary number, associated with a
specific physical connection to a network which is capable of generating
packets. Examples of devices with MAC addresses include SNMP agents
and DNI cards. MAC addresses are divided into 6 octets, and represented
in hexadecimal form such as the following:
00-00-1D-00-26-FB
All MAC addresses are administered by the IEEE and are generally
assigned at the time of manufacture, and cannot be changed. The first
three octets uniquely identify the manufacturer. Cabletron devices’ MAC
addresses all start with: 00-00-1D.
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REVIEW OF ADDRESSING
As MAC addresses are often used to perform management and control
functions for networking hardware, it is important to be able to identify a
MAC address when it is requested or returned by network management.
Since most MAC addresses are set at manufacture and cannot be altered
by users, this manual does not examine MAC addressing in greater detail.
1.10.2
IP Addresses
Each network interface or TCP/IP host is identified by a 32-bit binary
number called the Internetwork Protocol (IP) address. An IP address
represents a connection to the network, but does not identify any specific
physical device location (physical locations are determined by MAC
Addresses, discussed earlier in this chapter). Every IP address is made up
of four 8-bit binary numbers (octets). Each octet is translated into its
decimal equivalent and represented using Dotted Decimal Notation
(DDN). The DDN format is XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX. Any of the four
DDN values, called fields, can range from 1 (octet 0000 0001) to 255
(octet 1111 1111). An IP address is made up of two portions, the Network
ID and a Host ID. Network IDs refer to a particular network and are
assigned by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). The IANA
assigns fixed numbers to one, two, or three of the fields in order to provide
a unique Network ID.
Once a Network ID has been assigned, the Network Manager assigns
individual Host IDs by configuring different values (within the allowable
ranges) for the octets not set by the IANA. This allows individual hosts on
the network to be identified by distinct numerical addresses.
There are three classes of IP addresses which define the Network and
Host ID numbering scheme. Tables 1-1 through 1-3 describe the classes.
The bold type in these tables indicates a field assigned by the IANA, the
Network ID. Any time the term “host” is found in the DDN format
example address, it indicates a Host ID field, which may be assigned by
the network manager.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Table 1-2. Class A
Range of Network IDs:
1 - 126. host. host. host
[1 octet for the Network ID
(127 reserved)]
Binary translation:
(of first octet)
0000001 - 01111111
[first bit is always 0]
Range for the Host ID:
net. 1 - 254. 1 - 254. 1 - 254
[3 octets for the Host ID - allows
16,777,214 hosts per network]
Table 1-3. Class B
Range of Network IDs:
128 - 191. 1 - 254. host. host
[2 octets for the Network ID]
Binary translation:
(of first octet)
1000000 - 10111111
[first bit is always 1 and second
is always 0]
Range for the Host ID:
net. net.1 - 254. 1 - 254
[2 octets for the Host ID - allows
65,534 hosts per network]
Table 1-4. Class C
1-24
Range of Network IDs:
192 - 223. 1 - 254. 1 - 254. host
[3 octets for the Network ID]
Binary translation:
(of first octet)
1100000 - 11011111
[first and second bits always 1
and third is always 0]
Range for the Host ID:
net. net. net. 1 - 254
[1 octet for the Host ID - allows
254 hosts per network]
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REVIEW OF ADDRESSING
1.10.3
Identifying IP Address Classes
In the event that you have an existing IP address and need to quickly
determine what fields are available for Host IP address configuration,
make that determination based on the binary value of the first DDN field.
Tables 1-1 to 1-3 show that different address classes have different initial
bits in the first octet. A Class A address, for example, will always have a
zero as the first bit of the first octet. To identify an IP address’ class,
convert the decimal value of the first DDN field to binary.
Example: 132.177.118.24
Convert first DDN field to binary: 13210 = 100001002
Since the first two bits of the octet are 102, the address is Class B. Refer to
the IP address Classes tables, each Class B address utilizes the first two
fields for a Network ID (132.177.118.24), while the remaining two fields
(132.177.118.24) are the Host ID.
1.10.4
Subnet Addresses
Subnet addresses are used to partition an IP network into multiple
subnetworks or subnets. The use of subnet addresses adds an additional
layer of hierarchy to the IP addressing scheme. This additional addressing
layer facilitates isolation, control, and administration of users within the
network, at a cost of reduction in total available Host IDs. This is done by
grouping hosts into separate subnets. To use the above Class B address,
132.177.118.24, as an example, the last two fields are available for the
assignment of Host IDs. If the Network Manager desired to use subnets,
the third field, 118, could become common to a series or group of hosts
with a common physical location or intended purpose.
Example (Class B):
Host ID
{
{
Net ID
Subnet Number
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
{
{
132.177.118.24
Host Number
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Subnet addresses, when used with routing, allow discrimination between
devices and groups of devices based on IP addresses. Networks of
different subnets, even those on the same physical network segment, may
be isolated, from a functional standpoint, from one another through the
implementation of routing. Repeaters, bridges, and switches, which
operate at the Data Link layer of the OSI model, make their decisions
based on MAC addresses. Network devices such as routers, servers, and
client stations can use IP addressing to recognize transmissions intended
for them. If a station on one routed subnet sees a transmission from
another subnet, it will ignore the packet without concern over who it is
intended for. To overcome this subnetwork blindness a router is used. Any
station or device which implements subnet masking needs to be
configured with an address for that subnet’s Default Gateway. When the
station or device transmits packets intended for a different subnetwork
than the one it identifies itself as belonging to, the transmission is also
sent to the Default Gateway, where the gateway or router will make the
determination of where the packet is sent.
The use of subnet addresses on the network means using a Subnet Mask
in conjunction with each IP address.
1.10.5
Subnet Masks
The purpose of the Subnet Mask is to indicate the part of the Host ID that
is being used as a subnet address. By default no part of the Host ID is
used, and therefore, the default or “Natural Mask” masks just the octets
that comprise the Network ID. Table 1-5 shows the default masks for the
four classes of IP networks.
Table 1-5. Class and Default Masks
Network Class
Length of Network ID
Default Mask
Class A
X.
255. 0. 0. 0
Class B
X. X.
255. 255. 0. 0
Class C
X. X. X.
255. 255. 255. 0
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REVIEW OF ADDRESSING
The binary 1’s in the mask “mask-out” the Network ID and the 0’s show
where the Host ID is located. When using part of the Host ID as a subnet
address, define a Subnet Mask that will mask-out the bits of the Host ID
that are being used as a subnet address. The calculations for the mask
must be done at the bit level since in some cases, and in all cases for Class
C addresses, the last octet must be split into part Host ID and part Subnet
ID. Figure 1-3 below, shows the means by which a Subnet Mask blocks
bits from an IP address to determine which bits are representing a Subnet
ID and which represent a Host ID.
Network Actual (195. 191. 21. XXX) - Class C Network ID, assigned by IANA.
This class of network allows for the creation of up to 254 Host IDs on one network.
1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1
1 0 1 1
1 1 1 1
0 0 0 1
0 1 0 1
X X X X
X X X X
1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 0
0 0 0 0
N N N N
S S S H
H H H H
Default Subnet Mask (255. 255. 255. 0) - Masks out Network ID octets,
allows all of final octet to be used for Host IDs.
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
Modified Subnet Mask (255. 255. 255. 224) - Masks first three bits of fourth octet,
allowing a portion of the Host ID to be used for Subnet identification. This particular
custom Subnet Mask allows the creation of six subnets, each having no more than
thirty hosts (see Table 1-6, below) for a maximum of 180 Host IDs.
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
Subnet Logical - Shows how final five bits of original remain for Host IDs.
N N N N
N N N N
N N N N
N N N N
N N N N
Subnet
64
Subnet Actual (195. 191. 21. 87) - Host number 23 on Subnet number 64.
1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1
1 0 1 1
1 1 1 1
0 0 0 1
0 1 0 1
0 1 0 1
Host
23
0 1 1 1
Figure 1-3. Subnet Masking
If you decide to modify the default Subnet Mask in order to accommodate
subnets within your network, you must determine the number of subnets
you desire and how many Host IDs will be available within each
configured Subnet.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
The example in Figure 1-3 masks out the three high order bits of the only
octet available for modification, the last octet. This provides for up to six
subnets and up to 30 Host IDs within each subnet. Modifying the default
mask for a Class B address (255.255.0.0) to mask out the third octet for
subnet purposes (255.255.255.0) would provide up to 254 subnets each
containing up to 254 Host IDs. Tables 1-7 and 1-6 show how using the
mask determines the subnet and host addresses that are available from an
individual octet. These tables examine the Host IDs and Subnet Addresses
available from the use of custom masks in both Class B and Class C IP
addresses. Bear in mind that Subnet Masks can only be modified for those
fields which are not assigned to a site by the IANA.
Table 1-6. Examples of Class C Subnet Masks
Decimal
Mask
Binary
Equivalent
Available Subnet
Addresses
Available
Host IDs
192
11000000
64 and 192
1 - 62
224
11100000
32, 64, 96, 128,
192, 224
1 - 30
240
11110000
16 - 240
increments of 16
1 -14
240
11110000
16 - 240
increments of 16
1 -14
248
11111000
8 - 248
increments of 8
1-6
252
11111100
4 - 252
increments of 4
1 and 2
254
11111110
2 - 254
increments of 2
None
255
11111111
1 - 254
None
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REVIEW OF ADDRESSING
Table 1-7. Examples of Class B Subnet Masks
Decimal
Mask
Binary
Equivalent
Available Subnet
Addresses
Host IDs
Per Subnet
192. 0
11000000 00000000
64 and 192
16,382
224. 0
11100000 00000000
32, 64, 96, 128, 192,
224
8,190
240. 0
11110000 00000000
16 - 240
increments of 16
4,094
248. 0
11111000 00000000
8 - 248
increments of 8
2,046
252. 0
11111100 00000000
4 - 252
increments of 4
1,022
254. 0
11111110 00000000
2 - 254
increments of 2
510
255. 0
11111111 00000000
1 - 254
254
255. 128
11111111 10000000
0 - 255.128
1 - 255. 0
126
11111111 11000000
0 - 254. 192
0 - 255. 128
0 - 255. 64
1 - 255. 0
62
11111111 11100000
0 - 255. 32, 64, 96,
128, 160, 192, 224
0 - 254. 224
1 - 254. 0
30
255. 240
11111111 11110000
0 - 254. 240
0 - 255. 16 - 240
increments of 16
1 - 255. 0
14
255. 248
11111111 11111000
0 - 255. 8 - 240
increments of 8
0 - 254. 248
6
255. 252
11111111 11111100
0 - 255. 4 - 248
increments of 4
0 - 254. 252
2
255. 192
255. 224
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.10.6
Operation of the Subnet Mask
The Subnet Mask defines how your EMM-E6 treats SNMP Trap IP
destination addresses in its Trap table (see Chapter 7, Trap Table Screen,
for additional information on traps).
When using the Subnet Mask, the EMM-E6 logically determines one of
two possible locations, either on or not on its own subnet, for each Trap
IP destination address in its trap table. If the address is on its own subnet,
the EMM-E6 transmits directly to the workstation with that address. If the
address is not on its subnet, the EMM-E6 transmits to the workstation
with that address combined with the Default Gateway IP address. Default
Gateways are discussed later in this chapter.
Modify the default Subnet Mask for the EMM-E6 when workstations in
the Trap table reside on a different subnet (i.e., across a gateway or
external router), and you want these workstations to receive SNMP Traps
generated by the EMM-E6. Caution should be exercised when
configuring subnets, as a poorly subnetted network can greatly increase
network traffic by duplicating transmissions.
1.10.7
Default Gateway
The Default Gateway is the IP address of the network or host to which all
packets addressed to unknown networks or hosts are sent. The Default
Gateway should be a perimeter or border device that connects the network
with the rest of the world. The Default Gateway attempts to route the
packet to the correct destination. This gateway is often used by managers
to handle all traffic between private networks and the Internet. If a Default
Gateway is not defined, the packets addressed to a network or host
address not found in the forwarding table will be dropped.
1-30
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REVIEW OF ADDRESSING
1.10.8
Addressing Example
A network manager, planning for the configuration of a network of 60
hosts, desires to implement subnets to create logical divisions between
different groups of workstations and devices. The Internet Assigned
Numbers Authority has supplied the company with a Class C Network
Address; 222. 131. 99. XXX.
Examining Table 1-6 for subnet masking forms, the Network Manager
decides that, due to the extent of subnetting to be implemented, the last
option in the subnet table is not realistic, as that configuration offers only
two subnets. Likewise, the first three options are unacceptable, as they
would create an excessively large number of subnets with relatively few
individual hosts per subnetwork. This leaves decimal masks of 248 (31
subnets, 6 hosts each), 240 (15 subnets, 14 hosts each), and 224 (6
subnets, 30 hosts each). Any of these decimal masks would support the
number of Host IDs to be configured. Looking ahead, the Network
Manager realizes that adding Host IDs to a full network can involve a
total reconfiguration of subnet strategies, and opts for the decimal mask
240, which provides room for the configuration of 210 Host IDs.
NOTE
On any subnet, one Host ID must be reserved for a connection to the
router(s) which will interconnect multiple subnets.
After taking time to fully plan and delineate the required subnets, assign
them to departments within the company, plan out the initial Host IDs for
existing devices within those subnets and configure the router(s) which
will interconnect the various subnets, the Network Manager determines
where on the network the network management station will reside. The IP
Host ID of this network management station will be essential when
configuring the network devices for sending SNMP Traps.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
For any SNMP Trap-generating network devices not residing on the same
subnet as the network management station, the default Subnet Mask
utilized on that device must be altered to match the subnet scheme. In the
above example, the default Subnet Mask is modified from
255. 255. 255. 0 to 255. 255. 255. 240. For each SNMP Trap-generating
device with a modified Subnet Mask, a Default Gateway is assigned. In
the event that any of the custom-masked devices generated an SNMP Trap
for the network management station, a comparison of the Subnet Mask
and the Network ID indicates that the SNMP Trap should be sent to that
subnet’s Default Gateway to be routed to the subnet where the network
management station resides. The procedures for modifying the Subnet
Mask and configuring the Default Gateway through Local Management
may be found in Chapter 7 of this User’s Guide, which deals with the
Configuration Screen.
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LANVIEW LEDs AND RESET SWITCH
1.11
LANVIEW LEDs AND RESET SWITCH
The EMM-E6 incorporates the Cabletron Systems LANVIEW Status
Monitoring and Diagnostics System. LANVIEW LEDs can help diagnose
any problems, such as a power failure or a cable fault. The module
includes the following LANVIEW LEDs:
•
•
•
A CPU (Central Processing Unit) LED, for board status
STBY (Standby), RCV (Receive), XMT (Transmit), and CLN
(Collision) LEDs for Ethernet Status
Power LEDs for the two EPIM slots.
The front panel also has a reset switch which allows you to re-initialize
the processor. Chapter 14, Troubleshooting, provides detailed
descriptions of each EMM-E6 LANVIEW LED.
1.12
LANVIEWSECURE
The EMM-E6 supports the LANVIEWSECURE suite of Ethernet MMAC
modules. The LANVIEWSECURE products support both inbound data
(Intruder Prevention) and outbound data (Eavesdrop Prevention). These
products are identified by the words “LANVIEWSECURE” printed on the
faceplate of the product.
Intruder prevention allows ports on the modules to be configured with
expected MAC addresses. If a port receives a packet from a station or
device whose MAC address does not correspond to the one previously
associated with that port, the port will automatically lock, sensing the
presence of an unauthorized station, then generate and send a trap to the
Network Management station to indicate the intruder violation.
Eavesdrop prevention delivers a modified data portion (filled with a
random pattern of binary ones and zeroes) to all ports on the module
except the port specified in the original packet’s destination MAC address
field. Effectively, all ports, except the destination port, recognize the
presence of a packet, but receive meaningless information.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
LANVIEWSECURE modules also provide a “Full security” configuration,
under which broadcast and multicast packets contain modified data fields
such as those used in eavesdrop prevention (described above). Ports set to
Full security mode will not see or respond to these types of packets. The
default setting for Full security is disabled. Enabling the Full security
function modifies the broadcast and multicast packets.
LANVIEWSECURE is enabled upon the locking of a channel, module, or
port. When enabled, the first two addresses that are learned become the
expected addresses associated with that port on any LANVIEWSECURE
module. If a port has never been enabled and a MAC address is added to
that port, then any MAC address learned on that port will be deleted
automatically. If a port is enabled and a new address is added to that port,
then any existing addresses remains in the expected address table.
1-34
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GETTING HELP
1.13
GETTING HELP
If you need additional support related to installation, configuration, or
management of the EMM-E6, or if you have any questions, comments, or
suggestions concerning this manual, contact Cabletron Systems Technical
Support:
By phone.......................... (603) 332-9400
Monday-Friday; 8am - 8pm ET
By CompuServe............... GO CTRON from any ! prompt
By Internet mail ............... support@ctron.com
1.14
RELATED MANUALS
Use the following manuals to supplement the procedures and other
technical data provided in this manual. This manual references procedures
in these manuals, where appropriate, but does not repeat them.
Cabletron Systems’ MMAC Overview and Setup Guide
Cabletron Systems’ Bridge Router Interface Module Guide(s)
Cabletron Systems’ Repeater Interface Controller Media Interface
Modules (TPRMIM/FORMIM/CXRMIM) Installation Guide
Cabletron Systems’ Remote LANVIEW/Windows Network Control
Management for the Cabletron Systems Station Software User’s
Manual
Cabletron Systems’ Router Services Manuals
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CHAPTER 2
REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
This chapter contains general networking guidelines. Before attempting
to install the EMM-E6 or any additional EPIMs or BRIMs, review the
requirements and specifications outlined in this chapter.
!
CAUTION
2.1
Your network installation must meet the conditions, guidelines,
specifications, and requirements included in this chapter to ensure
satisfactory performance of this equipment. Failure to follow these
guidelines may produce poor network performance.
NETWORK REQUIREMENTS
Take care in planning and preparing the cabling and connections for your
network. The quality of the connections, the length of cables, and other
conditions of the installation play critical roles in determining the
reliability of your network.
Refer to sections below that apply to your specific network configuration.
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.1.1
10BASE-T Twisted Pair Network
When connecting a 10BASE-T segment at any of the 10BASE-T hub
ports or a 10BASE-T Ethernet Port Interface Module (EPIM-T), ensure
that the network meets the following requirements:
•
Length - The IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T standard requires that
10BASE-T devices transmit over a 100 meter (328 foot) link using
22-24 AWG unshielded twisted pair wire. However, cable quality
largely determines maximum link length. If you use high quality,
low attenuation cable, it may be possible achieve link lengths of up
to 200 meters. Cable delay limits maximum link length to 200
meters, regardless of the cable type.
NOTE
Losses introduced by connections at punch-down blocks and other
equipment reduce total segment length. For each connector or
patch panel in the link, subtract 12 meters from the total length of
your cable.
•
Insertion Loss - Between frequencies of 5.0 and 10.0 MHz, the
maximum insertion loss must not exceed 11.5 dB. This includes the
attenuation of the cables, connectors, patch panels, and reflection
losses due to impedance mismatches in the link segment.
•
Impedance - Cabletron Systems 10BASE-T Twisted Pair products
work on twisted pair cable with 75Ω to 165Ω impedance.
Unshielded twisted pair cables typically have an impedance of
between 85Ω and 110Ω. You can also use shielded twisted pair
cables, such as IBM Type 1 cable, but keep in mind that this cable
has an impedance of 150Ω.
The high impedance of the IBM Type 1 cable increases signal
reflection. However, due to cable shielding, and its subsequent lack
of crosstalk between shielded pairs, this signal reflection has little
effect on the quality of the received signal.
2-2
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NETWORK REQUIREMENTS
•
Jitter - Intersymbol interference and reflections can cause jitter in
the bit cell timing, resulting in data errors. 10BASE-T links must not
generate more than 5.0 ns of jitter. Make sure your cable meets
10BASE-T link impedance requirements to rule out jitter as a
concern.
•
Delay - The maximum propagation delay of a 10BASE-T link
segment must not exceed 1000 ns. This 1000 ns maximum delay
limits the maximum link segment length to no greater than 200
meters.
•
Crosstalk - Signal coupling between different cable pairs within a
multi-pair cable bundle causes crosstalk. 10BASE-T transceiver
design alleviates concerns about crosstalk, providing the cable
meets all other requirements.
•
Noise - Crosstalk, or externally induced impulses, are causes of
noise. Impulse noise may cause data errors if the impulses occur at
very specific times during data transmission. Generally, noise is not
a concern. If you suspect noise-related data errors, you may need to
reroute the cable or eliminate the source of the impulse noise.
•
Temperature - Multi-pair PVC 24 AWG telephone cables typically
have an attenuation of approximately 8-10 dB/100 m at 20°C (78°F).
The attenuation of PVC insulated cable varies significantly with
temperature. At temperatures greater than 40°C (104°F), we
strongly recommend using plenum-rated cable to ensure attenuation
remains within specification.
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.1.2
Multimode Fiber Optic Network
When connecting a multimode fiber optic link segment to the hub (via
EPIM-F1/F2), ensure the network meets the following requirements:
•
Cable Type - Use the EPIM-F1 and EPIM-F2 for the following
multimode fiber optic media:
-
•
Attenuation - You must test the fiber optic cable with a fiber optic
attenuation test set adjusted for an 850 nm wavelength. This test
verifies that the signal loss in a cable falls within the following
acceptable levels:
-
•
50/125 µm fiber optic cabling
62.5/125 µm fiber optic cabling
100/140 µm fiber optic cabling
13.0 dB or less for a 50/125 µm fiber cable segment
16.0 dB or less for a 62.5/125 µm fiber cable segment
19.0 dB or less for a 100/140 µm fiber cable segment
Budget and Propagation Delay - When you determine the
maximum fiber optic cable length to incorporate fiber runs into your
network, you must calculate and consider the fiber optic budget (a
total loss of 10.0 dB or less is permissible between stations) and total
network propagation delay.
To determine the fiber optic budget, combine the optical loss due to
the fiber optic cable, in-line splices, and fiber optic connectors.
Typical loss for a splice and connector (together) equals 1 dB or less.
Total propagation delay allowed for the entire network must not
exceed 25.6 µs in one direction (51.2 µs round trip). If the total
propagation delay between any two nodes on the network exceeds
25.6 µs, you must either reduce the delay or use a bridge.
•
Length - The maximum possible multimode fiber optic cable length
is 2 km (2187.2 yards). However, IEEE 802.3 FOIRL specifications
specify a maximum of 1 km (1093.6 yards).
2-4
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NETWORK REQUIREMENTS
2.1.3
Single Mode Fiber Optic Network
When connecting a single mode fiber optic link segment to the hub (via
EPIM-F3), ensure the network meets the following requirements:
•
Cable Type - Fiber optic link segments should consist of 8/125 to
12/125 µm single mode fiber optic cabling. You can also use
62.5/125 µm multimode cable with the EPIM-F3; however,
multimode cable has greater optical loss, and limits the possible
distance to 2 km.
•
Attenuation - You must test the fiber optic cable with a fiber optic
attenuation test set adjusted for a 1300 nm wavelength. This test
verifies that the signal loss in a cable falls within the acceptable level
of 10.0 dB or less for any given single mode fiber optic link.
•
Budget and Propagation Delay - When you determine the
maximum fiber optic cable length to incorporate fiber runs into your
network, you must calculate and consider the fiber optic budget (a
total loss of 10.0 dB or less is permissible between stations) and total
network propagation delay.
To determine the fiber optic budget, combine the optical loss due to
the fiber optic cable, in-line splices, and fiber optic connectors.
Typical loss for a splice and connector (together) equals 1 dB or less.
Network propagation delay is the amount of time it takes a packet to
travel from the sending device to the receiving device. Total
propagation delay for the entire network must not exceed 25.6 µs in
one direction (51.2 µs round trip). If the total propagation delay
exceeds 25.6 µs, you must use bridges.
•
Length - If you meet all system budgets, the maximum single mode
fiber optic cable length can reach 5 km (3.1 miles) with bridges at
each segment end. However, IEEE 802.3 FOIRL specifications
specify a maximum of 1 km (1093.6 yards).
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.1.4
Thin-net Network
When connecting a thin-net (coaxial) segment to your hub (via an
EPIM-C), ensure your network meets the following requirements:
•
Cable Type - Use only 50 ohm RG-58A/U type coaxial cable for
thin-net cable segments.
•
Length - The thin-net segment must not exceed 185 meters.
•
Terminators - Terminate each end of a thin-net segment.
•
Connectors - You can use up to 29 T-connectors throughout the
length of the cable segment for host connections.
If you use an excessive number of barrel connectors within the cable
segment (e.g., finished wall plates with BNC feed-throughs), you
may need to reduce the number of host connections. For special
network design, contact Cabletron Systems Technical Support.
•
Grounding - For safety, ground only one end of a thin-net segment.
Do NOT connect EPIM BNC ports to earth ground.
Connecting a thin-net segment to earth ground at more than one
point could produce dangerous ground currents.
2.2
TRANSCEIVER REQUIREMENTS
When you connect an external network segment to an EPIM-A in your
hub through a transceiver, that transceiver must meet IEEE 802.3
standards or Ethernet version 1.0 or 2.0 requirements. The transceiver
must also have SQE disabled.
2-6
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REPEATER MEDIA INTERFACE MODULES
2.3
REPEATER MEDIA INTERFACE MODULES
The EMM-E6 communicates with the Repeater MIMs over Ethernet
Channels B and C of the MMAC-FNB. The following repeater MIMs are
currently available:
•
CXRMIM: coaxial repeater MIM; twelve 10BASE-2 coaxial
connectors; one EPIM.
•
FORMIM-22: fiber optic repeater MIM; twelve FOIRL/
10BASE-FL ports; ST type connectors.
•
TPRMIM-20/TPRMIM-22: twisted pair repeater MIM; RJ45
connectors (TPRMIM-20 has nine, TPRMIM-22 has twenty-one);
one EPIM.
•
TPRMIM-33/TPRMIM-36: twisted pair repeater MIM; 50-pin
RJ71 connectors (TPRMIM-33 has one, TPRMIM-36 has two);
each RJ71 connector provides twelve 10BASE-T twisted pair ports
(twelve total for TPRMIM-33, twenty-four total for TPRMIM-36);
each MIM has one EPIM; the TPRMIM-36 also has one AUI port.
For more information regarding Cabletron Systems Repeater MIMs, refer
to your Repeater Media Interface Modules (TPRMIM/FORMIM/
CXRMIM) Installation Guide.
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.4
PORT ASSIGNMENT MODULES
•
TPXMIM-20/TPXMIM-22: twisted pair port and bank assignment
repeater MIM; RJ45 connectors (TPXMIM-20 has nine, TPXMIM22 has twenty-one); one EPIM.
•
TPXMIM-32/TPXMIM-36: twisted pair port and bank assignment
repeater MIM; RJ71 connectors (TPXMIM-32 has one, TPXMIM36 has two); one EPIM.
Figure 2-1. Sample Repeater MIMs
2-8
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SAMPLE NETWORK CONFIGURATIONS
2.5
SAMPLE NETWORK CONFIGURATIONS
This section provides you with several examples for configuring networks
with the EMM-E6. These examples illustrate the flexibility and
advantages to using the EMM-E6 and RIC MIM technology:
2.5.1
2.5.2
2.5.3
2.5.4
2.5.5
Three networks with a single MMAC-FNB
The EMM-E6 as a multi-port router
Adding users to an existing network
A fault tolerant wiring scheme
The EMM-E6 and BRIMs
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.5.1
Three Networks With a Single MMAC-FNB
One of the basic applications of the EMM-E6 is for configuring three
separate networks within one MMAC. This provides you with the
advantages of having three separate networks in one wiring closet, with
full bridging and SNMP management for each network. Figure 2-2
illustrates an example of the three network configuration.
TPMIM-24
FORMIM-22
FORMIM-22
CXRMIM
Channel E
EMM-E6
TPRMIM-33
BRIM-FD2
TPMIM-24
XMT RCV
TWR WRP
EPIM-A
PWR
LNK
Channel F
Channel D
TST RED SYN CTS TST
T1/FT1
LNK YEL STB DSR LNK
SYNC
EPIM-A
PWR
BRIM-W2
E
F
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Figure 2-2. Single MMAC-FNB Configuration
2.5.2
The EMM-E6 as a Multiport Router
An EMM-E6 routing image allows you to set up the module as a multiport router. For information on how to upgrade the EMM-E6 to perform
routing functions, and how to configure the EMM-E6 as a multi-port
router, refer to Cabletron Systems’ Router Services Manual or contact
Cabletron Systems Technical Support.
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SAMPLE NETWORK CONFIGURATIONS
2.5.3
Adding Users to a Separate Segment
The example in Figure 2-3 compares two methods of connecting 48
additional users to a network.
Single - Channel
Multichannel
Single - Channel
Multi - Channel
Initial 48 Users
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
IRM3
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
EMM-E6
48 Users
- an MMAC
- an IRM2
- two 24-port MIMs
- an MMAC-FNB
- an EMM-E6
- two 24-port
RIC MIMs
Channel C
48 Users
An Additional 48 Users Require:
TPMIM-24
IRM3
TPMIM-24
48 Users
TPMIM-24
Bridge
TPMIM-24
IRM3
TPMIM-24
- an additional MMAC
- an additional IRM2
- two additional
24-port MIMs
- an external bridge
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
EMM-E6
- two additional
24-port RIC MIMs
Channel B
48 Users
Channel C
48 Users
48 Users
Another Additional 48 Users Require:
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
IRM3
48 Users
TPMIM-24
Bridge
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
IRM3
- an additional MMAC
- an additional IRM2
- two additional
24-port MIMs
- an external bridge
48 Users
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
EMM-E6
- two additional
24-port
non-RIC MIMs
Channel A Channel B Channel C
48 Users 48 Users 48 Users
Bridge
TPMIM-24
TPMIM-24
IRM3
48 Users
Figure 2-3. Adding New Users
To place additional users on a new network with an EMM-E6, you only
need to add a few additional MIMs to the MMAC-FNB.
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.5.4
A Fault Tolerant Wiring Hierarchy
The example in Figure 2-4 illustrates a fault tolerant wiring hierarchy.
D
D
C
B
A
MiniMMAC
D
D
Closet 1
D
BRIDGE
STAR HUB
D
BRIDGE
A
B
A
B
C
C
Closet 2
BRIDGE
A
Closet 3
B
C
BRIDGE
A
B
C
Figure 2-4. Configuring a Fault Tolerant Wiring Scheme
Closets 1, 2, and 3 each contain an MMAC-FNB with an EMM-E6,
MIMs, and RIC MIMs operating on Ethernet channels A, B, and C.
Within each closet, each Ethernet channel is separately repeated, and each
is dedicated to a specific set of network users (for example, Ethernet A
contains Novell users, Ethernet B contains TCP/IP and NFS users, and
Ethernet C contains DECnet users).
2-12
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SAMPLE NETWORK CONFIGURATIONS
The Star Hub, which is an MMAC-FNB that uses a configuration similar
to the closet hubs, is the central repeater interconnect for the closets, but
does not constitute a single point of failure.
The EMM-E6 in each MMAC-FNB utilizes the 802.1d Spanning Tree
Algorithm. By configuring the Root Path Cost and the Bridge Priority on
the EMM-E6, you can bridge primary paths from each segment to
Network D from each EMM-E6 (indicated by the solid line between
Ethernet channel A and the bridge in closet 1, Ethernet channel B and the
bridge in closet 2, and Ethernet channel C and the bridge in closet 3). The
dotted lines between the other Ethernet channels and the bridge show the
backup paths in a standby condition. If any repeater link fails, or if an
active bridge path fails, one or many backup bridge paths may become
active, replacing the failed repeater link or bridge path.
An additional level of redundancy is achieved by using the cable
redundancy algorithm built into Cabletron’s EMM-E6. This feature
enables you to configure redundant bridge paths, with one path remaining
in backup, standby mode until the primary path fails.
In the example, Segment D provides a manageable backbone, using a
MiniMMAC. Segment D provides intercommunication for channels A, B,
and C, as well as serving as the network management segment for the
hierarchy. The individual protocol segments are filtered by the EMM-E6
bridge component, so that the only traffic on segment D is minimal interchannel communication (i.e., mail). Otherwise, only network
management data is on segment D, out-of-band of the traffic on channels
A, B, and C.
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CHAPTER 2: REQUIREMENTS / CONFIGURATIONS
2.5.5
The EMM-E6 and BRIMs
The example in Figure 2-5 illustrates just one possible EMM-E6 and
BRIM configuration. The EMM-E6/BRIM combination provides various
connection possibilities, depending on the BRIM(s) you use. Refer to
individual BRIM manuals and/or Cabletron Systems’ Router Services
documentation to better understand the capabilities of each device.
FDDI Backbone
TPMIM-24
FORMIM-22
FORMIM-22
CXRMIM
EMM-E6
TPRMIM-33
XMT RCV
TWR WRP
EPIM-A
PWR
LNK
BRIM-FD2
TPMIM-24
EPIM-A
PWR
E
Redundant
Connectivity
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Ethernet
Backbone
Figure 2-5. The EMM-E6 and BRIMs
2-14
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CHAPTER 3
INSTALLATION
This chapter contains instructions for:
• unpacking and inventorying the contents of the EMM-E6 carton
• locating, identifying and setting the EMM-E6 mode switches
• adding/replacing optional modules (i.e., Single In-line Memory
Modules and Ethernet Port Interface Modules)
• identifying BRIM connector locations
• installing the EMM-E6 into a Multi Media Access Center (MMAC)
• connecting your device to a network.
NOTE
For information on how to install an optional BRIM, refer to
your specific BRIM documentation.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.1
UNPACKING THE EMM-E6
Unpack the EMM-E6 as follows:
!
Observe all anti-static precautions when handling
sensitive electronic equipment.
CAUTION
1. Remove the shipping material covering the EMM-E6.
2. Verify the contents of the packing carton. The carton is shipped with
the following items:
Item
Quantity
EMM-E6
1
Firmware Image
1
Grounding Strap
1
RJ45 Adapter Kit
1
Release Notes
1
3. Carefully remove the module from the shipping box. Leave the
module in its non-conductive bag until you are ready to install it.
4. Visually inspect the module. If there are any signs of damage, contact
Cabletron Systems Technical Support immediately.
5. Place the static grounding strap properly on your wrist before opening
the non-conductive bag.
6. Open the non-conductive bag by tearing the black and yellow tape
seal.
!
Do not cut the bag open, as damage to the module could
occur.
CAUTION
7. Perform a second visual inspection of the module.
3-2
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SETTING MODE SWITCHES
3.2
SETTING MODE SWITCHES
The bank of dip switches located at the top of the EMM-E6 (Figure 3-1)
are set to their default positions prior to shipping. Check these switches to
ensure that they are in the correct position for normal EMM-E6 operation.
Switches
EMM-E6
ON
On
Off
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Figure 3-1. EMM-E6 Mode Switches
The potential for electric shock is present inside the MMAC
chassis when power is applied. Do not adjust switch settings
when the EMM-E6 is within a powered MMAC enclosure.
Failure to comply could result in personal injury and/or
equipment damage.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
NOTE
Changes to switch positions only activate their associated
functions after the EMM-E6 is reset.
Switch definitions are as follows:
• Switch 1 - Cabletron Systems use only.
• Switch 2 - Cabletron Systems use only.
• Switch 3 - For manufacturing use only. Keep in OFF position.
• Switch 4 - MIMREV (Management Interface Module Revision).
This switch remains in the OFF position for normal operation. Only
if you are using THN-MIM part numbers 9000043-05 and below in
your MMAC-FNB should the switch be in the ON position.
• Switch 5 - Baud Rate Default. Allows you to set the Console port’s
baud rate. The OFF position sets the baud rate to 9600. The ON
position sets the baud rate to 2400.
•
Switch 6 - Forced Download. Changing the state of this switch
(i.e., moving the switch from one position to another) clears
download information from NVRAM and forces the EMM-E6 to
download an image file from the station acting as the EMM-E6’s
BOOTP server.
Do NOT change the state of Switch 6 unless you:
NOTE
3-4
-
have a station acting as a BOOTP server, and
that station contains the EMM-E6 image file.
-
intend to set up a station to act as a BOOTP
server for the EMM-E6.
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SETTING MODE SWITCHES
After changing the state of Switch 6 and repowering the device, the
EMM-E6 will request a new image until it either receives the image,
or you reset the EMM-E6 again by:
-
using the reset button on the front panel
-
removing the EMM-E6 from the chassis backplane and
plugging it back in
-
cycling the MMAC-FNB power.
After resetting the EMM-E6, the device attempts to locate a BOOTP
server again. However, the BOOTP request times out after about one
minute, and the EMM-E6 boots from FLASH memory.
•
Switch 7 - NVRAM (Non-Volatile Random Access Memory) Reset.
The EMM-E6 uses NVRAM to store user entered parameters such
the IP address, device name, etc. Changing the state of this switch
(i.e., moving the switch from one position to another) and executing
a reset of the module resets these parameters to the factory defaults.
Once the EMM-E6 resets, you can either use the defaults or re-enter
your own parameters. The EMM-E6 stores these parameters in
NVRAM when the device powers down. These parameters remain
in NVRAM until the switch changes state again.
NOTE
•
Do not change the state of Switch 7 unless you intend to reset
the EMM-E6 user parameters to the factory default settings.
Switch 8 - Password Defaults. Changing the state of this switch
clears user-entered passwords in NVRAM, and restores factory
default passwords. Once you reset the EMM-E6, you can use the
defaults or re-enter your own passwords.
NOTE
Do not change the state of Switch 8 unless you intend to reset
the EMM-E6 user-configured passwords to their factory
default settings.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.3
SIMM UPGRADES
The EMM-E6 allows memory upgrades for SDRAM, LDRAM, and
FLASH EEPROM. This section explains how to locate and add or replace
a Single In-line Memory Module (SIMM) for any of these memory types.
NOTE
3.3.1
For additional information on SIMMs, or how to upgrade the
memory in your Module, contact Cabletron Systems
Technical Support.
Locating SIMMs
Each memory type has a specific SIMM slot location on the EMM-E6
mother board. When installing SIMM boards, make sure that you place
them in their proper slots. Figure 3-2 illustrates the EMM-E6 SIMM slot
locations and the direction in which to install the SIMMs.
NOTE
3-6
The LDRAM SIMM slot is shipped with an expansion SIMM
located in it. If you are performing an upgrade to LDRAM,
ensure that the upgrade SIMM is placed in the proper SIMM
slot after removing the existing LDRAM SIMM. LDRAM
SIMM modules placed in the lower SDRAM slot will not
provide additional main memory. For further information on
the uses and types of memory in the EMM-E6, please refer to
Chapter 1.
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SIMM UPGRADES
Local Dynamic Random Access Memory (LDRAM) SIMM Slot
FLASH Memory SIMM Slot
Direction
of
Install
EMM-E6
Shared Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM) SIMM Slot
Figure 3-2. SIMM Slot Locations
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.3.2
Installing SIMMs
Installing a SIMM is a simple two step process. After finding the proper
SIMM slot location, refer to Figure 3-3 and the following instructions to
install your SIMM.
SIMM Slot
Connector
Teeth
Clips
1
SIMM Slot
Post
2
SIMM
SIMM Hole
Figure 3-3. Installing a SIMM
To install a SIMM:
!
Observe all anti-static precautions when handling
sensitive electronic equipment.
CAUTION
1. Insert the SIMM between the connector teeth in the SIMM slot.
2. Pivot the SIMM back until it locks into the clips in the SIMM slot,
and the SIMM holes fit over the SIMM slot posts.
3-8
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ADDING/REPLACING EPIMs
3.4
ADDING/REPLACING EPIMs
This section contains procedures on how to add/replace an Ethernet Port
Interface Module (EPIM) to upgrade or change the capabilities of your
hub. After installing your new EPIM, refer to appropriate EPIM sections
in this chapter to verify proper operation.
Observe all anti-static precautions when handling
sensitive electronic equipment.
!
CAUTION
To install an EPIM:
NOTE
When removing an EPIM, make sure to pull the module
straight out so as not to damage the connector.
1. Remove the coverplate or the EPIM (whichever applies).
2. Slide your new EPIM into place, making sure the connectors on the
rear of the module and inside the hub attach properly.
B
3. Install the mounting screw.
Mounting
Screw
STBY
RCV
XMT
E
P
I
M
XMT RCV
TWR WRP
LNK
CLN
1
E
PWR
EPIM-A
BRIM-W2
SYNC
EMM-E6
EPIM
E
P
I
M
TS TST
SR LNK
2
Figure 3-4. Installing an EPIM
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.5
LOCATING BRIMs
This section points out Bridge Router Interface Module (BRIM)
connector locations on your EMM-E6 board. Refer to your BRIM Guide
for installation procedures and additional information.
The following diagram (Figure 3-5) shows BRIM connector locations for
the EMM-E6:
BRIM-F Ribbon Cable Connector
Channel F BRIM Connector
Channel E BRIM Connector
Standoff
EMM-E6
Figure 3-5. BRIM Connector Locations
3-10
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PRE-INSTALLATION TEST
3.6
PRE-INSTALLATION TEST
Before installing the EMM-E6 in a live network, test the module in a
controlled situation to ensure that it is repeating and bridging packets. You
can perform this test with two workstations (see Figure 3-6), using an
MMAC-FNB, or MMAC-MFNB, installed with an EMM-E6 and a Media
Interface Module (MIM) as follows:
1. Install the EMM-E6 and any MIM (e.g., TPMIM, THN-MIM,
CXRMIM, FORMIM, etc.) into a non-networked MMAC.
2. Connect the first workstation to an EMM-E6 EPIM or BRIM.
3. Connect the second workstation to the MIM using the appropriate
cable or transceiver.
4. Assign the EMM-E6 a valid IP address through Local Management.
5. Designate the first workstation as a file server and the second one as
the client (refer to the workstation manuals for establishing one as a
file server and one as a client.).
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
6. Send packets between the two workstations to verify the proper
operation of the EMM-E6.
NOTE
Note: If using UNIX workstations, a “ping” test verifies the
EMM-E6 is operating properly.
If a failure occurs, refer to Chapter 14, Troubleshooting.
tTPRMIM-33
MMAC-M3FNB
EMM-E6
TPT
Figure 3-6. Pre-Installation Test
3-12
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INSTALLING THE EMM-E6
3.7
INSTALLING THE EMM-E6
Installing the EMM-E6 into any MMAC hub is an easy operation and
requires no special skills or tools. However, when you install your device,
keep the following in mind:
Any installation operations should be performed only by
qualified personnel
• You must install the EMM-E6 in slots 1 and 2 (furthest slots to the
right) of the MMAC chassis.
• Position RIC MIMs contiguously in any MMAC-FNB series hub,
from right to left. This ensures that the channels do not act in a standalone manner or desegment from the B or C channel. This does not
apply to shunting MMAC-FNBs, where the data path remains
unbroken, and allows non-interrupted communication.
Install the EMM-E6 into the MMAC-FNB (backplane) as follows:
NOTE
We recommend powering down your MMAC when inserting
or removing boards, even though Cabletron Systems modules
have “hot swap” capabilities.
1. Remove the safety bars which protect the chassis and remove any
module to be replaced or blank MMAC slot covers in accordance
with the installation and removal procedures for these items.
2. Holding the EMM-E6 by the edges of the board, align the bottom and
top edges of the board with the slot guides. Make sure that both the
bottom and top edges of the card rest in the guide slots.
3. Slide the EMM-E6 (Figure 3-7) into slots 1 and 2 (furthest right slots)
of the MMAC card cage. Make sure that the module aligns properly
in the top and bottom slot guides.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
4. Firmly press the module connections into the backplane. Do not try to
force the module into place or use the knurled knobs to draw the
module into the backplane. Forcing a misaligned module into place
can damage the EMM-E6 or the MMAC backplane.
MMAC M8FNB
EMM-E6
EMM-E6
Chassis Slots 1 and 2
Knurled Knobs
Figure 3-7. Installing the EMM-E6
5. Secure the module to the MMAC chassis by tightening the knurled
knobs. If you do not tighten the knurled knobs, vibration can cause
the module to lose contact with the backplane and disrupt your
network.
7. Re-install the MMAC chassis safety bars.
6. Power-up the MMAC (if it isn’t already ON).
NOTE
3-14
It takes several minutes for the EMM-E6 to boot up. While
booting, the EMM-E6 displays boot-up diagnostics on Local
Management. Refer to Chapters 4 and 5 for additional
information on how to connect and configure a Local
Management console.
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INSTALLING THE EMM-E6
7. Observe the status of the LANVIEW LEDs on the EMM-E6. When
the CPU LED is flashing, the STBY (standby) LEDs indicate the
module’s boot state. During this period (up to 5 minutes), the LEDs
cycle through a series of internal diagnostics. (See Figure 3-8)
EMM-E6
SN
BRIM-A100
RESET
CPU
D
C
B
A
STBY
RCV
XMT
CLN
Figure 3-8. EMM-E6 LANVIEW LEDs
8. After the system boot procedure, the LEDs should be in the following
conditions:
• CPU LED flashing, indicating proper EMM-E6 operation.
• STBY (A, B, C, D) LEDs ON or OFF, depending on the port’s
position in the Spanning Tree Algorithm.
• Appropriate EPIM/BRIM LEDs ON (see section 3.9, Connecting
to the Network, to obtain the appropriate LED status for individual
EPIMs; refer to individual BRIM Guides).
• ON LED lit for the active channel D EPIM.
If the LEDs are not operating in the fashion described above, refer
immediately to Chapter 14, Troubleshooting.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.8
INSTALLATION CHECK-OUT
After connecting to the network, verify that packets can pass over the
network segments via the EMM-E6. Again, you can use two workstations
set up as file server and client. Keep the server workstation stationary in
the wiring closet with the EMM-E6, and use the client workstation to
move to each node connected to the EMM-E6. See Figure 3-9.
1. After the EMM-E6 is installed in the MMAC, connect the server
workstation to either a MIM or to the EMM-E6 via an EPIM or BRIM.
2. Going to each node connected to the MMAC, connect the client
workstation and test the segment.
If a failure occurs, refer to Chapter 14, Troubleshooting.
3-16
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INSTALLATION CHECK-OUT
MMAC-M3FNB with EMM-E6 and TPRMIM
tTPRMIM-33
MMAC-M3FNB
EMM-E6
TPT
Office Locations
File Server Workstation
Client Workstation
Figure 3-9. Installation Checkout
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.9
CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK
This section gives procedures for connecting the EMM-E6 to the network
using the various EPIMs available. When the EMM-E6 is first powered up,
the EPIM 1 port acts as the bridge port and the EPIM 2 port is OFF.
Once you have successfully powered up your EMM-E6, you can add
network connections. The procedure for connecting Ethernet segments to
a hub varies depending on the media and ports you connect. Refer to the
following list and perform the procedure described in the subsection(s)
that apply to your hub:
•
•
•
•
•
3-18
EPIM-T
EPIM-X
EPIM-F1,F2,F3
EPIM-C
EPIM-A
3.9.1
3.9.2
3.9.3
3.9.4
3.9.5
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CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK
3.9.1
Connecting a Twisted Pair Segment to an EPIM-T
Before connecting a segment to the EPIM-T, check each end of the
segment to determine wire cross-over. If the wires do not cross over, use
the switch on the EPIM-T to internally cross over the RJ45 port. Refer to
Figure 3-10 to properly set the EPIM-T cross-over switch.
NOTE
To establish link, you must have an odd number of cross-overs
(preferably one) between 10BASE-T devices of the same type
(i.e., from repeater to repeater or transceiver to transceiver).
Position X
(crossed over)
1. RX+
2. RX3. TX+
4. NC
5. NC
6. TX7. NC
8. NC
Position =
(not crossed over)
1. TX+
2. TX3. RX+
4. NC
5. NC
6. RX7. NC
8. NC
Figure 3-10. EPIM-T Cross-over Switch
To connect an EPIM-T to a Twisted Pair Segment:
1. Connect the twisted pair segment to the module by inserting the RJ45
connector on the twisted pair segment into the RJ45 port on the
module. (See Figure 3-10.)
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
2. Check that the LNK LED for the port is on. If the LED is not on,
perform each of the following steps until it is:
a. Check that the 10BASE-T device at the other end of the twisted
pair segment is powered.
b. Verify that the RJ45 connectors on the twisted pair segment have
the proper pinouts (Figure 3-11).
c. Check the cable for continuity.
d. Check that the twisted pair connection meets dB loss and cable
specifications outlined in 10BASE-T Twisted Pair Network
Requirements (Chapter 2).
10BASE-T Device
Port
EPIM-T
Port
RX+
1
1
TX+
RX–
NOTE:
RX+/RX– and TX+/TX–
must share a common
TX+
color pair.
2
2
TX–
3
3
RX+
TX–
6
6
RX–
RJ-45 to RJ-45
Figure 3-11. Cable Pinouts - EPIM-T RJ45 Port
If you still cannot establish link, contact Cabletron Technical Support.
3-20
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CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK
3.9.2
NOTE
Connecting an AUI Cable to an EPIM-X
The Signal Quality Error (SQE) switch remains in the OFF
position for most network connections. However, some Data
Terminal Equipment (DTE) requires SQE. Refer to your DTE
manual for SQE requirement information.
To connect an EPIM-X to a device not requiring SQE:
1. Verify that the SQE LED on the EPIM-X is off. If the SQE LED is
on, set the position of the SQE switch to off.
NOTE
If the SQE light remains on, even though the SQE switch is in
the OFF position, contact Cabletron Technical Support.
2. Attach one end of an AUI cable, no longer than 50 meters in length, to
the port located on the EPIM-X (Figure 3-12) and the other end to the
intended node.
ON Position
(Toward Back
of EPIM)
ON
OFF
OFF Position
(Toward Front
of EPIM)
Figure 3-12. The EPIM-X
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
3.9.3
Connecting to an EPIM-F1/F2, or EPIM-F3
When connecting a fiber optic link segment to an EPIM-F1/F2, or
EPIM-F3 keep the following in mind:
• When connecting a fiber optic link segment with SMA 906
connectors to an EPIM-F1 with SMA ports, make sure each
connector uses half alignment, NOT full alignment, sleeves.
NOTE
A full alignment sleeve damages the receive port. SMA 905
connectors do not need alignment sleeves.
• When connecting a fiber optic link segment with ST connectors to
an EPIM-F2 with ST ports, keep in mind that ST connectors attach
to ST ports much like BNC connectors attach to BNC ports. Insert
the connector into the port with the alignment key on the connector
inserted into the alignment slot on the port. Turn the connector to
lock it down.
• The physical communication link consists of two strands of fiber
optic cabling: the Transmit (TX) and the Receive (RX). The
Transmit strand from a module port connects to the Receive port of
a fiber optic Ethernet device at the other end of the segment (i.e., TX
of the applicable port on the module goes to RX of the other fiber
optic device). The Receive strand of the applicable port on the
module connects to the Transmit port of the fiber optic Ethernet
device (i.e., RX of the applicable port on the module goes to TX of
the other fiber optic device).
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CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK
We recommend that you label the fiber optic cables to indicate
Receive and Transmit ends. Cabletron Systems prelabels its cable.
At one end of the cable, one fiber is labeled 1, and the other fiber is
labeled 2. This pattern repeats at the other end of the cable. If you
did not purchase your cable from Cabletron Systems, be sure to label
your cable in this manner.
!
CAUTION
Do not touch the ends of the fiber optic strands, and do not let
the ends come in contact with dust, dirt, or other
contaminants. Contamination of cable ends causes problems
in data transmissions. If necessary, clean contaminated cable
ends using alcohol and a soft, clean, lint-free cloth.
To connect a fiber optic link segment to an EPIM-F1/F2 or an EPIM-F3:
1. Remove the protective plastic covers from the fiber optic ports on the
applicable port on the module, and from the ends of the connectors on
each fiber strand.
2. On the EMM-E6, attach the fiber labeled 1 to the applicable receive
port, labeled RX (Figure 3-13).
3. On the EMM-E6, attach the fiber labeled 2 to the applicable transmit
port, labeled TX.
4. At the other end of the fiber optic cable, attach the fiber labeled 1 to
the transmit port of the device and the fiber labeled 2 to the receive
port.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
F1/F2
ST Connectors
F1/F2
SMA 906 Connectors w/
Half Alignment Sleeves
SMA 905 Connectors
F3
ST Connectors
Figure 3-13. The EPIM-F1/F2 and EPIM-F3
5. Check that the LNK LED on the applicable module port is on. If the
LED is not on, perform each of the following steps until it is:
a. Check that the device at the other end of the link is powered.
b. Verify proper “cross-over” of fiber strands between the applicable
port on the module and the fiber optic device at the other end of
the fiber optic link segment.
c. Verify that the fiber connection meets the dB loss specifications
outlined in Fiber Optic Network Requirements (Chapter 2).
If you still cannot establish link, contact Cabletron Technical Support.
3-24
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CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK
3.9.4
Connecting a Thin-Net Segment to an EPIM-C
To connect a thin-net segment to an EPIM-C:
1. Set the Internal Termination Switch (Figure 3-14), located above the
port (when the EPIM has been inserted into the EMM-E6) and
labeled TERM to:
• the ON position ( ) to internally terminate the thin-net segment at
the port.
• the OFF position ( ) if you do not want the thin-net segment to
internally terminate at the port.
2. If the Internal Termination Switch is in the On position, connect the
thin-net segment directly to the BNC port.
3. If the Internal Termination switch is in the Off position:
a. Attach a BNC T-connector to the BNC port on the module.
b. Attach the thin-net segment to one (1) of the female connectors on
the T-connector.
!
CAUTION
Failure to terminate each T-connector segment may result in
improper segment operation. Place a terminator on any open
female connection on the T-connector.
c. Attach another thin-coaxial segment or a terminator to the other
female connector on the T-connector.
Connecting a thin-net segment to earth ground at more than
one point could produce dangerous ground currents.
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
When internal termination switch
is set to off ( ):
Connect BNC T-connector to port.
Attach a terminator or terminated
thin-net segment to one female
connector of tee-connector.
Connect a terminated thin-net
segment to other female connector
of T-connector.
Attach thin-net segment directly to BNC
connector when internal termination
switch is set to on ( ).
Figure 3-14. The EPIM-C
3-26
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CONNECTING TO THE NETWORK
3.9.5
NOTE
Connecting an AUI Cable to an EPIM-A
Ensure that the external transceiver to which you connect the
EPIM-A does not have the Signal Quality Error (SQE or
“heartbeat”) test function enabled. The EPIM does not
operate if the transceiver has the SQE test function enabled.
Refer to the applicable transceiver manual for additional
information.
To connect an EPIM-A to an external network segment:
1. Check that the PWR LED on the EPIM-A is on. If the PWR LED is
not on, contact Cabletron Systems Technical Support.
2. Attach an external transceiver to the network segment intended for
AUI port connection. For additional information, refer to the
applicable transceiver manual.
3. Attach an AUI cable, no longer than 50 meters in length, to the
transceiver you connected to the network in step 2.
4. Connect the AUI cable to the AUI port located on the EPIM-A. (See
Figure 3-15.)
Figure 3-15. The EPIM-A
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CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION
5. Lock the AUI connector into place using the connector slide latch.
6. If the transceiver PWR LED is off with the AUI cable connected:
a. Check the AUI connections for proper pinouts. Appendix A lists
the pinouts for the transceiver connection.
b. Check the cable for continuity.
c. Reconnect the AUI cable to the EMM-E6 and the device.
If the transceiver PWR LED remains off, contact Cabletron Systems
Technical Support.
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CHAPTER 4
ATTACHING A CONSOLE
This chapter describes how to attach a Local Management console to the
EMM-E6, and lists the setup and configuration requirements for:
•
•
•
4.1
console/terminal
console cable
console cable connections.
CONFIGURING YOUR TERMINAL
The following instructions outline how to configure your console
(terminal) to communicate with Local Management. Refer to your
specific terminal manual for more instructions if necessary.
To access Local Management for the EMM-E6, you need either:
•
•
a VT200 or VT300 series terminal
a PC emulating a VT200 or VT300 series terminal.
To access the Setup Directory on a VT series terminal, press F3. The
following table lists the required terminal setup for a VT series terminal.
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CHAPTER 4: ATTACHING A CONSOLE
Table 4-1. VT Terminal Setup
Display Setup Menu
Columns .......................... ->
80 Columns
Controls ........................... ->
Interpret Controls
Auto Wrap ........................ ->
No Auto Wrap
Scroll................................ ->
Jump Scroll
Text Cursor....................... ->
Cursor
Cursor Style ..................... ->
Underline Cursor Style
General Setup Menu
Mode................................ ->
VT300, 7 Bit Controls
ID number ........................ ->
VT320ID or VT100ID
Cursor Keys ..................... ->
Normal Cursor Keys
Power Supply ................... ->
UPSS DEC Supplemental
Communications Setup Menu
Transmit=9600
Transmit ........................... ->
Receive=Transmit
Receive ............................ ->
XOFF at 64
XOFF ............................... ->
8 bits
Bits................................... ->
No Parity
Parity................................ ->
1 Stop Bit
Stop Bit ............................ ->
No Local Echo
Local Echo ....................... ->
DEC-423, Data Leads Only
Port .................................. ->
Limited Transmit
Transmit ........................... ->
No Auto Answerback
Auto Answerback ............. ->
Keyboard Set-up Menu
Keys ................................. ->
Typewriter Keys
Auto Repeat ..................... ->
any option
Keyclick ............................ ->
any option
Margin Bell....................... ->
Margin Bell
Warning Bell .................... ->
Warning Bell
4-2
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CONFIGURING A CONSOLE CABLE
4.2
CONFIGURING A CONSOLE CABLE
This section outlines the proper cable configurations for connecting the
EMM-E6 to a Local Management terminal. For information on the
appropriate pinouts, refer to Appendix A of this User’s Guide.
You need the following hardware (supplied with your EMM-E6) to
connect the EMM-E6 to a terminal:
•
•
•
an RS232 cable
an adapter
a device cable
The adapter you use depends on whether you connect to LM from a VT
series terminal, or a VT-emulating PC. Read the information included
with the cable kit to make sure you are using the right adapter.
To configure the cables:
1. Plug a straight-through twisted pair cable (e.g., an RS232 cable) into
the EMM-E6 RJ45 COM 2 Port.
NOTE
Do not attempt to utilize the COM 1 port for Local
Management, as the COM 1 port is intended to be used for
monitoring an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS). The
method for configuring the COM 1 port for this purpose is
described later in this chapter.
2. Plug the other end of the RS232 cable into the adapter.
3. Connect the adapter into the device cable and plug the other end of the
device cable into the terminal or terminal emulator. Detailed
descriptions of this process for VT terminals or terminal-emulating
PCs follow.
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CHAPTER 4: ATTACHING A CONSOLE
4.2.1
Connecting to a VT Series Terminal
To connect a VT Series terminal to a Cabletron module Console port
(Figure 4-1):
1. Connect the RJ45 connector at one end of the cable to the Console port
on the Cabletron module.
2. Plug the RJ45 connector at the other end of the cable into the RJ45 to
DB25 female adapter.
3. Connect the DB25 adapter to the port labeled COMM on the VT
terminal.
VT S i
T
i
l
Figure 4-1. Connecting a VT Series Terminal
4. Turn on the terminal and access the Setup Directory. Follow the
directions in the previous section and set up your VT terminal to match
the configuration given in Table 4-1.
5. When these parameters are set, the Local Management password
screen will appear. Refer to Chapter 5, Accessing Local Management.
4-4
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CONFIGURING A CONSOLE CABLE
4.2.2
Connecting to an IBM PC or Compatible
To connect an IBM PC or compatible running VT terminal emulation to a
Cabletron module Console port (Figure 4-2):
1. Connect the RJ45 connector at one end of the cable to the Console port
on the Cabletron module.
2. Plug the RJ45 connector at the other end of the cable into the RJ45 to
DB9 adapter.
3. Connect the DB9 adapter to the communications port on the PC.
PC
Figure 4-2. Connecting an IBM PC or Compatible
4. Turn on the PC and configure your VT emulation package to match the
configuration given in Table 4-1.
5. When these parameters are set, the Local Management password
screen will appear. Refer to Chapter 5, Accessing Local Management.
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CHAPTER 4: ATTACHING A CONSOLE
4.3
PINOUT DESCRIPTIONS
Table 4-2. RJ45 to DB9 Adapter (PC Adapter):
RJ45
Pin
DB9
Color
Pin
Description
1
Blue
2
Receive
4
Red
3
Transmit
5
Green
5
Ground
2
Orange
7
Send Request
6
Yellow
8
Clear to Send
Table 4-3. RJ45 to DB25 Adapter (VT Series Adapter):
RJ45
Pin
4.4
DB25
Color
Pin
Description
4
Red
2
Transmit
1
Blue
3
Receive
6
Yellow
5
Clear to Send
5
Green
7
Ground
2
Orange
20
Terminal Ready
CONFIGURING A UPS CABLE
To configure an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) cable:
1. Plug a straight-through twisted pair, RS232, cable into the EMM-E6
RJ45 COM 1 Port.
2. Plug the other end of the RS232 cable into the adapter (PN 9372066)
and connect the adapter to the UPS.
3. Set COM 1 in the LM Configuration screen to UPS. Refer to
Chapter 7, Configuration Screen, for additional information
regarding UPS connection.
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CHAPTER 5
ACCESSING LOCAL MANAGEMENT
With your terminal properly configured, and the correct physical cable
connections in place, you can access the Local Management interface.
To access Local Management:
1. Turn the terminal on, and press the Return key. The EMM-E6
Password Screen, Figure 5-1, appears.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
Cabletron Systems Incorporated
35 Industrial Way, P.O. Box 5005
Rochester, NH 03867-0505 U.S.A.
(603) 332-9400
(c) Copyright Cabletron Systems, Inc. 1994
EMM-E6-960 F/W Version:
0.00.00
Boot PROM Version: 00.00.00
EMM-E6-960 Board Rev#: 00.00.00
Enter USER PASSWORD:
Figure 5-1. EMM-E6 Password Screen
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CHAPTER 5: ACCESSING LOCAL MANAGEMENT
2. Enter your Password and press Return. The default Super-User
access password is the Return key (which defaults internally to
‘public’).
NOTE
Your password is one of the community names specified in the
Community Name Table. Access to certain LM capabilities
depends on the degree of access accorded that community
name. See Chapter 6, Community Names, for additional
information.
•
If you enter an invalid password, the EMM-E6 ignores the entry, and
the cursor returns to the beginning of the password entry field.
•
After entering a valid password, an associated access level flashes
across the bottom of the screen, and then the Feature Selection
Screen, Figure 5-2, appears.
NOTE
Entering 10 incorrect passwords in a row causes an access
violation. In such an event, the EMM-E6 disconnects from the
network and requires a reset to continue operation.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
FEATURE SELECTION
F6
COMMUNITY NAME TABLE
F7
IP ADDRESS ASSIGNMENT
F8
COMPONENT TRAP TABLE
F9
SNMP TOOL SUPPORT
F10 MIB NAVIGATOR
F14 ROUTER SETUP
DEVICE STATISTICS
EXIT LIM SERVICE
Figure 5-2. Feature Selection Screen
5-2
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3. Use the arrow keys to highlight an option, and press Return (or simply
use the corresponding Function key). The selected screen appears.
If you do nothing on LM for 15 minutes, the Password Screen reappears.
At this point, you must re-enter the password to continue using EMM-E6
Local Management.
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CHAPTER 6
COMMUNITY NAMES
The Community Name Table option lets you set Local Management
community names. These names act as passwords to LM and provide
security for your EMM-E6. You can control EMM-E6 access by
establishing up to four different levels of security authorization - basic
read-only, read-only, read-write, and super-user.
Super-user access gives you full management privileges and allows you to
change existing passwords and edit all modifiable MIB objects for the
EMM-E6 and additional Bridge/Router Interface Modules (BRIMs).
6.1
ACCESSING THE COMMUNITY NAME TABLE
To access the Community Name Table Screen:
1. From the Feature Selection Screen, use the arrow keys to highlight the
Community Name Table option, and press the Return key. The
Community Name Table Screen, Figure 6-1, appears.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
COMMUNITY NAME TABLE
<<
PASSWORD AUTHORIZATION = SUPER-USER
>>
NOTE: S/U names are LOCAL passwords
S AV E
F6
Community Name
Access
public
BASIC-READ
public
READ-ONLY
public
READ-WRITE
public
SUPER-USER
I P TA B L E
F7
T R A P TA B L E
F8
S N M P TO O L S
F9
CLI
F10
RETURN
Figure 6-1. Community Name Table Screen
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CHAPTER 6: COMMUNITY NAMES
6.2
COMMUNITY NAME TABLE SCREEN FIELDS
This section briefly explains each Community Name Table Screen field.
Community Name
Displays the community name through which a user can access LM. All
community names act as passwords to Local Management. Depending on
the assigned access, community names can vary in privileges.
Access
Indicates the privileges accorded each community name. Possible
selections are:
6-2
BASIC-READ
The community name corresponding to this status
has limited read-only access to the EMM-E6 and
does not include access to security protected fields
requiring a higher-level of authorization (read-only,
read-write, or super-user).
READ-ONLY
This allows for extended read-only access to
EMM-E6/LM fields, and excludes access to
security protected fields of read-write or super-user
authorization.
READ-WRITE
This allows you to read and write to EMM-E6/LM
fields, excluding fields security protected for superuser access only.
SUPER-USER
This access status gives the user read-write access
to the EMM-E6/LM and allows changes to be made
to all modifiable parameters including: community
names, IP addresses, traps, and SNMP objects.
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ESTABLISHING COMMUNITY NAMES
6.3
ESTABLISHING COMMUNITY NAMES
In order for any Community Name Table edits to take effect, you must
have super-user access. In other words, when you log into LM, you must
do so with a super-user password. A password from any of the other levels
of access (basic-read, read-only, or read-write) does not allow you to edit
the Community Name Table Screen.
NOTE
Any community name assigned in the Community Name Table
is a password to its corresponding level of LM access. These
names are case sensitive. The community name assigned
super-user access is the only one that gives you complete
access to LM. Remember this name.
Establishing community names:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Community Name field adjacent
to the access level of your choice.
2. Enter the name into the field (maximum 32 characters).
3. Press the Return key.
4. Repeat steps 1 - 3 to modify any other community names.
5. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Save command at the bottom of the
screen and press the Return key. The message “SAVED OK” appears.
The EMM-E6 saves the community names in memory, and
implements their access modes.
If you exit without saving, a “NOT SAVED?” message appears above
the SAVE command. If you proceed to exit without saving, you lose
all edits.
6. To exit the screen use the arrow keys to highlight Return and then
press the Return key. The Feature Selection Screen appears.
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CHAPTER 7
CONFIGURATION SCREEN
In the EMM-E6 Configuration Screen you can assign an IP address and
Subnet Mask to the EMM-E6. You can also:
•
•
•
•
7.1
set the Default Interface
set the Default Gateway
override locked ports
enable all ports.
ACCESSING THE CONFIGURATION SCREEN
To access the Configuration Screen:
1. From the Features Selection Screen, use the arrow keys to highlight the
IP Address Assignment option, and press the Return key. The
Configuration Screen, Figure 7-1, appears.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
CONFIGURATION
I/F
1
2
3
4
5
CHANNEL
A
B
C
D
E
IP ADDRESS
134.204.12.91
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
Default Interface: NONE
SubNET MASK
255.255.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
MAC ADDRESS
00-00-1D-07-50-0E
00-00-1D-07-50-0F
00-00-1D-07-50-10
0 0 - 0 0 - 1 D - 0 7 - 5 0 - 11
00-00-1D-07-50-12
Default Gateway: -NONE DEFINED-
COM 1 Application: UPS
COM 2 Application: CONSOLE
Baud Rate: 2400 --ACTIVE-Baud Rate: 9600 --ACTIVE--
Port Lock Override: OVERRIDE DISABLED
Port Enable Override: OVERRIDE DISABLED
SAVE IPs
F6
COMMUNITY NAMES
F7
TRAP TABLE
F8
SNMP TOOLS
F9
CLI
F10
RETURN
Figure 7-1. Configuration Screen
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CHAPTER 7: CONFIGURATION SCREEN
7.2
CONFIGURATION SCREEN FIELDS
The following briefly explains each Configuration Screen field.
I/F
Displays the interface number (1 to 6) corresponding to a particular
EMM-E6 channel. This number allows the EMM-E6 to accurately
identify MIB II channel information. The following table illustrates the
I/F number to channel association.
I/F
Channel
1
A
2
B
3
C
4
D
5
E
6
F
Channel A is the original Ethernet bus channel. Channels B & C are the
Flexible Network Bus (FNB) channels. Channel D is an external Ethernet
network accessed through an Ethernet Port Interface Module (EPIM).
Channels E and F are external connections through optional BRIMs.
Refer to Chapter 1 of this User’s Guide for a more complete description
of channels.
NOTE
Channel E and F configuration options are dynamic. This
means the EMM-E6 only provides options for Channels E or
F if you have a BRIM module installed in one of these slots.
IP Address
Displays the IP address for each interface of the EMM-E6. This IP
address will be used for the sending and receiving of SNMP data and
should be configured for the interface with a connection to the network
management station. If the network management station is located on a
different network or subnet, the Default Interface and Default Gateway
must be properly configured to allow the proper functioning of SNMP
management.
7-2
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CONFIGURATION SCREEN FIELDS
SubNET Mask
Displays the Subnet Mask for each of the six EMM-E6 channels in dotted
decimal notation.
MAC Address
Displays the physical address of each bridge interface.
Default Interface
Displays the default interface number for the EMM-E6 default gateway.
This field defaults to NONE.
Default Gateway
Displays the default gateway for the EMM-E6. You cannot use this field
until you enter an appropriate value for the Default Interface.
COM 1 Application
Displays a port application setting of OFFLINE, UPS, or SLIP.
COM 2 Application
Displays a port application setting of CONSOLE.
Baud Rate
Displays the Baud Rate setting of the device attached to the EMM-E6
through that COM port. The setting for COM 1 is 2400 or N/A; the setting
for COM 2 is 9600.
Port LOCK Override
This command overrides the port locking security feature, and unlocks all
ports in the MMAC containing the EMM-E6.
Port ENABLE Override
This command overrides the Port Disable feature, and enables all ports in
the MMAC containing the EMM-E6.
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CHAPTER 7: CONFIGURATION SCREEN
7.3
SETTING THE HOST IP ADDRESS
The table on the Configuration screen allows you to assign an IP address
and Subnet Mask to the EMM-E6.
The Host IP applies to each interface.
NOTE
To set the Host IP:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the IP Address field.
2. Enter the IP address into this field. The format for this entry is
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX, with values for XXX ranging from 0 to 254.
The EMM-E6 rejects non-numerics, adjacent dots (periods), or an
entry without dots separating the four XXX values.
3. Press the Return key. The screen displays the Host IP address and
changes any existing Subnet Mask to the default Subnet Mask for the
IP address entered.
4. Use the arrow keys to highlight the SAVE IPs command.
5. Press the Return Key. At the resulting prompt, typing “Y” will cause
the EMM-E6 to reset and load the Host IP changes into NVRAM.
NOTE
It takes approximately 35 seconds for the EMM-E6 to save
and reset. The board is inoperable during this time. After the
EMM-E6 resets, the password screen appears and you must
re-enter Local Management.
If you exit the Configuration Screen without saving, you lose all edits.
7-4
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MODIFYING A SUBNET MASK
7.4
MODIFYING A SUBNET MASK
NOTE
Consult your Network Administrator prior to modifying any
of the natural Subnet Masks.
The EMM-E6 automatically enters the natural Subnet Mask for any IP
address that you enter. A natural Subnet Mask is a logical separation
between network and host identifiers within the IP address. The EMM-E6
allows you to modify this mask to best suit your needs.
The Subnet Mask defines how your EMM-E6 treats SNMP trap IP
destination addresses in its Trap table (see Chapter 8, Trap Table Screen,
for additional information on traps).
Using the Subnet Mask, the EMM-E6 logically determines one of two
possible locations, either on or not on its own subnet, for each trap IP
destination address in its trap table. If the address is on its own subnet, the
EMM-E6 transmits directly to the workstation with that address. If the
address is not on its subnet, the EMM-E6 transmits to the workstation
with that IP address combined with the default gateway router MAC
address.
Use the natural Subnet Mask when:
•
workstations in the Trap table reside on a different subnet (i.e.,
across a gateway or external router), and you want these
workstations to receive SNMP traps
•
the EMM-E6 provides a natural subnet mask that fits your host/
network identifier scheme.
Modify the natural Subnet Mask when:
•
workstations in the Trap table reside on a different subnet (i.e.,
across a gateway or external router), and you want these
workstations to receive SNMP traps
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CHAPTER 7: CONFIGURATION SCREEN
•
the EMM-E6 does NOT provide a natural Subnet Mask that fits your
host/network identifier scheme.
NOTE
Make sure to modify the Subnet Mask option in conjunction
with the Default Gateway option.
To modify the Subnet Mask:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the appropriate Subnet Mask field.
2. Enter the Subnet Mask in this field in the format of
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX, with XXX ranging from 0 to 255.
3. Press the Return key.
4. Repeat steps 1 - 3 for each interface you want to modify.
The IP Address Table now contains Subnet Mask information specific to
your network.
7.5
SETTING DEFAULT GATEWAY AND INTERFACE
The Default Gateway is the IP address of the network connection (i.e.,
gateway or another external router) used in forwarding management
information from the EMM-E6 (e.g., SNMP traps) to a network
management station.
The Default Interface is the channel that the EMM-E6 uses to access the
Default Gateway. Make sure to set the Default interface to reflect the
correct interface channel for the Default Gateway.
NOTE
7-6
The Default Gateway field will not allow itself to be modified
until a Default Interface has been correctly configured on the
EMM-E6.
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SETTING DEFAULT GATEWAY AND INTERFACE
To set the Default Gateway and its associated Default Interface:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Default Interface field.
2. Enter the interface number of the EMM-E6 for the Default Gateway in
this field. The interface number will be a value between 1 and 6. A
table of the interface numbers may be found in section 7.2.
NOTE
The EMM-E6 will not allow Local Management to configure
the Default Interface to utilize an unsubscribed interface. For
example: To select Interface 5 as the Default Interface, a
BRIM module must first be configured to the E channel of the
EMM-E6.
3. Press the Return key. If the EMM-E6 accepts your entry as a valid
Default Interface, it displays “Previous Default Interface Marked
Invalid” at the top of the screen.
4. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Default Gateway field.
5. Enter the gateway’s IP address in this field. The format for this entry is
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX with values for XXX ranging from 0 to 254.
6. Press the Return key. If the EMM-E6 accepts your entry as a valid
Default Interface, it displays “Previous Default Interface Marked
Invalid” at the top of the screen.
You have now established a Default Gateway and Default Interface for
your EMM-E6.
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CHAPTER 7: CONFIGURATION SCREEN
7.6
CONNECTING/DISCONNECTING A UPS
The EMM-E6 provides the option of connecting to an Uninterruptible
Power Supply (UPS) using Local Management.
To enable the UPS connection using EMM-E6/LM:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the COM 1 Application: field.
2. Press the Return key until “UPS” appears in the field. This field
toggles between “OFFLINE”, which is the default value, “UPS”, and
“SLIP”.
3. Use the arrow keys to highlight the COM 1 Baud Rate field.
4. Press the Return key until “2400 Connect?” appears in the field.
5. Use the arrow keys to highlight Connect?.
6. Press the Return key. The request “Y/N:_” appears.
7. Enter Y if you want to connect a UPS, or N if you do not want a UPS
connection. Entering a Y response connects the EMM-E6 to the UPS
and “-- Active --” appears in the Connect? field.
8. Press the Return key.
To disable the UPS connection using EMM-E6/LM:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight -- Active -- in the COM 1 field.
2. Press the Return key. The option “Disconnect? Y/N:” appears.
3. Enter Y if you want to disconnect a UPS, or N if you want to remain
connected. Entering a Y response disconnects the EMM-E6 from the
UPS. “-N/A-” will appear in the Baud Rate field, and the COM1
Application field changes to “OFFLINE”.
4. Press the Return key.
7-8
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UNLOCKING PORTS
7.7
UNLOCKING PORTS
When you lock the chassis for security reasons (e.g., using remote inband
management), unauthorized devices cannot communicate through an
MMAC-FNB chassis station port. The Port LOCK Override function
provides fail-safe recovery if you cannot unlock ports using remote
inband SNMP.
To use the Port LOCK Override:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Port LOCK Override field.
2. Press the Return key. The adjacent field displays “UNLOCK ALL
PORTS Y/N”.
3. Enter Y to unlock all of the ports, or N to discontinue the port lock
override. Responding with a Y unlocks all ports.
4. Press the Return key.
7.8
ENABLING PORTS
The Port ENABLE Override function provides a fail-safe recovery when
you cannot enable the chassis with remote inband SNMP.
To use the Port ENABLE Override:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Port ENABLE Override field.
2. Press the Return key. The adjacent field displays “ENABLE ALL
PORTS Y/N”.
3. Enter Y to enable all of the ports, or N to discontinue the port enable
override. Responding with a Y enables all ports.
4. Press the Return key.
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CHAPTER 8
TRAP TABLE SCREEN
As an SNMP compliant device, the EMM-E6 can authenticate an SNMP
request. The Trap Table defines the management stations to receive
SNMP Traps for alarm/event notification.
8.1
ACCESSING THE TRAP TABLE SCREEN
To access the Trap Table Screen:
1. From the Features Selection Screen, use the arrow keys to highlight the
Component Trap Table option.
2. Press the Return key. The Trap Table Screen, Figure 8-1, appears.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
TRAP TABLE
SNMP Community Name
ctron
Mike
Joe
Randy
Jerry
Chris
Scott
<CR>
SAVE
F6
COMMUNITY NAMES
F7
IP TABLE
F8
Traps
Trap IP Address
N
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
132.177.118.24
132.177.118.25
132.177.118.26
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
SNMP TOOLS
F9
CLI
F10
RETURN
Figure 8-1. Trap Table Screen
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CHAPTER 8: TRAP TABLE SCREEN
8.2
TRAP TABLE SCREEN FIELDS
The Trap Table contains three modifiable fields. The fields, shown in
Figure 8-1, allow the user to direct trap information to users on the
network. The three fields are:
SNMP Community Name
Displays the community name associated with the network
management station IP address to which the EMM-E6 sends trap
messages.
Traps
Displays whether or not the EMM-E6 sends traps to the network
management station with the associated IP address.
Trap IP Address
Indicates the IP address of the workstation to receive trap alarms from
the EMM-E6.
8.3
CONFIGURING THE TRAP TABLE
1. Using the arrow keys, highlight the SNMP Community Name field.
2. Enter the community name that reflects the desired access level
(e.g., the community name associated with the SUPER-USER access
level) for SNMP trap information.
NOTE
While any of the community names can be used by the Trap
station, Network Management functions are best performed
by a station with Super-user access to the EMM-E6.
3. Press the Return key.
4. Using the arrow keys, highlight the Traps field and enter Y to send
alarms from the EMM-E6 to that workstation, or N to prevent the
EMM-E6 from sending alarms to that workstation.
5. Press the Return key.
8-2
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CONFIGURING THE TRAP TABLE
6. Using the arrow keys, highlight the desired Trap IP Address field.
7. Enter the IP address of the workstation to which you want the
EMM-E6 to send traps. Use the XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX format with
the value of XXX ranging from 0 to 254.
8. Using the arrow keys, highlight the SAVE command.
9. Press the Return key. The message “SAVED OK” appears.
If you exit without saving, you lose all edits.
NOTE
10. Exit the screen by either pressing the appropriate Function key to go
directly to the desired LM screen, or by using the arrow keys to
highlight the desired LM screen or the RETURN command, and then
pressing the Return key. Using the RETURN command takes you
back to the Feature Selection Screen.
The designated workstations, if properly configured and utilizing SNMP
compliant remote management software, will now receive SNMP traps
from the EMM-E6.
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CHAPTER 9
SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
This section describes specific commands and features within the SNMP
Tools screen. This screen allows you to access management information
bases (MIBs), and varies according to your level of security access.
The following descriptions outline the super-user management
capabilities. From SNMP Tools you can:
•
•
•
9.1
review specifics about object identifiers (OIDs)
edit configurable OIDs
view OIDs sequentially from the originally requested OID.
ACCESSING THE SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
To access the SNMP Tools Screen:
1. From the Features Selection Screen, use the arrow keys to highlight the
SNMP Tool Support option.
2. Press the Return key. The SNMP Tools Screen, Figure 9-1, appears.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
SNMP TOOLS
COMMUNITY NAME: public
OID PREPEND: 1.3.6.1
GET
F6
SET
F7
GETNEXT
F8
WALK
RECALL-OID
F9
STEP
CYCLES
REPEAT
RETURN
F10
Figure 9-1. SNMP Tools Screen
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CHAPTER 9: SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
9.2
SNMP TOOLS SCREEN FIELDS
The following describes the SNMP Tools Screen fields and commands.
COMMUNITY NAME
Identifies the community name MIB access level password.
OID PREPEND
Specifies the number prefix common to all object identifiers (OIDs)
found in a MIB. The prefix ‘1.3.6.1’ is the default. You can modify
this field to suit your needs.
GET
Allows you to retrieve MIB objects, one at a time, using SNMP
protocol.
SET
Lets you edit modifiable MIB objects, using SNMP protocol.
GETNEXT
Displays the next OID in the MIB tree by getting the next SNMP OID
from a remote agent.
WALK
Scrolls through the MIB, leaf by leaf, from a user-specified object
identifier. Leaves are objects, or instances of objects. After initializing
a walk you see the following categories for each entry:
•
•
•
•
Specified OID — identifies the number tag for that OID.
Size — gives the number of bytes required to store the object.
Data Type — gives the object’s variable type (e.g., int=integer).
Data Value — displays what the object identifier represents.
RECALL-OID
Recalls from memory the last OID used since powering up the board
or re-entering the SNMP Tools screen.
STEP
Displays the MIB, step by step, with specific OID details.
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THE SECURITY ACCESS LEVEL
CYCLES
Allows you to specify the number of GET NEXT requests to walk
through and how much time elapses between each request.
REPEAT
Repeats the Get command, allowing you to monitor any changes to a
specific OID.
9.3
THE SECURITY ACCESS LEVEL
Each MIB component that the EMM-E6 supports (e.g., RMON, DLM,
Repeater Rev. 4, etc.) has its own “password” for each possible level of
access (ranging from Basic Read-Only to Super-User).
Most MIB component community names default to “public.” However,
some components have specific community names (e.g., depending on
what devices reside in the EMM-E6 managed hub, Repeater Rev. 4 uses
separate community names for each channel in use – “channelA,”
“channelB,” and/or “channelC”).
NOTE
A complete list of Super-User community names (also called
community strings) resides in the Cabletron proprietary
chassis MIB. The MIB group chCompName provides the
names of the MIB components. The MIB group
chCompSUCommStr provides individual MIB component
community names/strings.
The component information corresponds numerically – by
last digit. In other words, each instance (i.e., OID element) in
the chCompName group indicates its match in the
chCompSUCommStr group.
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CHAPTER 9: SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
In order to access a specific MIB’s components, you must set the
appropriate MIB password in the COMMUNITY NAME field.
NOTE
The default super-user password (public) allows you to
access most MIB components. To change the SNMP Tools
screen COMMUNITY NAME field, you must have super-user
access to Local Management.
To set the SNMP Tools screen COMMUNITY NAME:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the field to the right of
COMMUNITY NAME.
2. Enter the community name necessary for super-user access for any
specific MIB (e.g., channelA for Repeater Rev. 4 MIB).
3. Press the Return key. The community name changes.
9.4
GETTING AND SETTING OIDS
To get an OID:
1. Highlight GET, using the arrow keys.
2. Press the Return key. “<GET> OID (=|F9)” appears.
3. Enter an OID either by:
•
using the keyboard to enter the OID.
TIP
Save yourself some keystrokes by typing the OID minus the
OID’s prepend (i.e., given an OID prepend of 1.3.6.1, you
enter 2.1.1.4.0, and the LM gets the MIB II sysContact OID
1.3.6.1.2.1.1.4.0).
•
pressing F9 to recall an OID already entered, and using the keyboard
to modify the recalled OID as necessary.
9-4
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GETTING AND SETTING OIDS
4. Press the Return key. If there is no instance of that OID, the EMM-E6
displays “MIB_NO_INSTANCE.” Otherwise, the EMM-E6 displays
that OID’s data type, length, and value.
To get the next OID:
1. Highlight GETNEXT, using the arrow keys.
2. Press the Return key. “<GETNEXT> OID (=|F9)” appears.
3. Enter the OID.
4. Press the Return key. If that OID does not exist, the EMM-E6 displays
“MIB_NO_INSTANCE”. Otherwise the EMM-E6 displays that
OID’s data type, length, and value.
If you have previously entered an OID, press F9 to recall that
entry. You can use the arrow keys to modify the recalled OID,
TIP
or if you have not previously entered the OID, type the OID
minus the OID’s prepend.
To set an OID:
1. Highlight SET, using the arrow keys.
2. Press the Return key. “<SET> OID (=|F9)” appears.
3. Enter an OID.
4. Press the Return key. If that OID does not exist, the EMM-E6 displays
“MIB_NO_INSTANCE”. Otherwise the EMM-E6 displays:
{INteger String Null OId IP address Counter Gauge Timeticks OPaque}
“DATA TYPE (name):”
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CHAPTER 9: SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
TIP
If you have previously entered an OID, press F9 to recall that
entry. You can use the arrow keys to modify the recalled OID,
or if you have not previously entered the OID, save yourself
some keystrokes by typing the OID minus the OID’s prepend.
5. Enter the OID’s Data Type.
NOTE
When setting a String, SNMP tools requests the kind of data
you plan to enter — HEX or ASCII.
6. Press the Return key. The EMM-E6 displays “SNMP OID DATA.”
7. Enter the Data, or value of the OID.
8. Press the Return key. If the EMM-E6 accepts the entry, it displays
“<SET> OPERATION CODE: XXXX <OK>”; otherwise, an error
message appears.
9.5
SCROLLING THROUGH MIB OIDS
Viewing several object identifiers at one time allows you to quickly scan a
MIB for the information that you need. The SNMP Tools screen provides
several scroll options:
•
•
•
9-6
Walk — scrolls through OIDs sequentially, from the initial OID.
Cycle — allows you to specify how many GetNext commands to
cycle through for one OID.
Step — pages through the MIB, one OID at a time.
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SCROLLING THROUGH MIB OIDS
To walk through the MIB:
1. Highlight WALK, using the arrow keys.
2. Press the Return key. “<INITIAL> OID (=|F9)” appears.
3. Enter the OID.
4. Press the Return key. LM begins walking through the sublayers of the
MIB available from the specified OID. Each OID in the list displays
the specified OID, its size, its data type, and the data value.
5. Press any key to stop the walk, or wait for “***MIB WALK
COMPLETED***” to appear on the screen.
To cycle through:
1. Highlight CYCLES, using the arrow keys.
2. Press the Return key. “ENTER CYCLE COUNT:” appears.
3. Enter the number of OID cycles that you want to scroll through.
4. Press the Return key. “ENTER CYCLE DELAY:” appears.
5. Enter the delay that you want (in seconds) between get next requests.
6. Press the Return key. “<INITIAL> OID (=|F9)” appears.
7. Enter the OID.
8. Press the Return key.
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CHAPTER 9: SNMP TOOLS SCREEN
To step through:
1. Highlight GETNEXT, using the arrow keys.
2. Press the Return key. “<GETNEXT> OID (=|F9)” appears.
3. Enter the OID (only the suffix is necessary).
4. Press the Return key. The initial OID details, including its size, data
type, and data value, appear.
5. Highlight STEP, using the arrow keys.
6. Press the Return key to page through the MIB to the next OID.
9-8
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CHAPTER 10
ROUTER SETUP SCREEN
This chapter shows the Router Setup Screen, Figure 10-1, below. Using
this screen the user can select the protocol to be used by any Routing
Services previously installed in the EMM-E6. The user should use the
Routing Services Manual to make the correct selections from the Router
Setup Screen. The EMM-E6 User’s Guide does not cover routing and all
data on this window will be found in the Routing Services Manuals.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
SNMP TOOLS
INTEGRATED ROUTER X.XX.XX
ROUTER SETUP
IP
IPX
DECnet
INITIALIZE
RETURN
Figure 10-1. Router Setup Screen
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CHAPTER 11
DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN
This chapter describes the features of the Device Statistics screen. Using
this screen, you can view error, collision, and traffic statistics for the
entire network, a selected slot, or a selected port. This screen also
provides the option of enabling and disabling ports.
To access the Statistics screen:
1. From the Features Selection screen, use the arrow keys to highlight the
Device Statistics option.
2. Press the Return key. The Device Statistics screen, Figure 11-1,
appears.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
DEVICE STATISTICS
BYTES RECEIVED:
FRAMES RECEIVED:
FRAMES FILTERED:
FRAMES TRANSMITTED:
ERRORS RECEIVED:
COLLISIONS:
OOW COLLISIONS:
CRC ERRORS:
ALIGNMENT ERRORS:
RUNT PACKETS:
GIANT PACKETS:
PORT ADMIN. STATUS:
PORT SEG. STATUS:
UPDATE -FREQ
NETWORK: A
SLOT: 1
PORT: 1
3792125
16547
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
67960
255
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
67960
255
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ENABLE
UNSEGMENTED
ENABLE PORT
DISABLE PORT
3 Sec
NETWORK A
SLOT 1
PORT 1
RETURN
Figure 11-1. Device Statistics Screen
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CHAPTER 11: DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN
11.1
DEVICE STATISTICS
This section describes Device Statistics screen data fields.
BYTES RECEIVED
Displays the number of bytes received.
FRAMES RECEIVED
Displays the number of frames received.
FRAMES FILTERED
Displays the total number of frames filtered.
FRAMES TRANSMITTED
Displays the total number of frames transmitted.
ERRORS RECEIVED
Displays the total number of errors received.
COLLISIONS
Displays the number of collisions received.
OOW COLLISIONS
Displays the number of Out Of Window collisions. OOW collisions
are usually caused by: The network being so long that the round trip
propagation delay is greater than 51.2 µs (the collision domain is too
large); a station somewhere on the network violating Carrier Sense
and transmitting at will; or a cable somewhere on the network failing
during the transmission of a packet.
CRC ERRORS
Displays the number of packets with bad Cyclic Redundancy Checks
(CRC) that have been received from the network. The CRC is a 4 byte
field in the data packet that ensures that the transmitted data that is
received is the same as the data that was originally sent.
ALIGNMENT ERRORS
Displays the number of errors due to misaligned packets. Misaligned
packets contain a non-integral number of bytes (i.e., some bytes
contain fewer than 8 bits).
11-2
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DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN COMMANDS
RUNT PACKETS
Displays the number of runt packets received from the network. A
runt packet is less than the minimum Ethernet frame size of 64 bytes,
not including preamble.
GIANT PACKETS
Displays the number of giant packets receivedfrom the network. A
giant packet is greater than the maximum Ethernet frame size of 1518
bytes, not including preamble.
PORT ADMIN. STATUS
Displays the administrative status of the port selected. The two
possible status messages are Enable or Disable.
PORT SEG. STATUS
Displays the segmentation status of the port selected. The two
possible status messages are Segmented or Unsegmented. The
EMM-E6 automatically partitions problem ports or interfaces (those
having 32 consecutive collisions, and re-connects non-problem
segments to the network.
11.2
DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN COMMANDS
The Device Statistics screen provides several commands that allow you to
access and manipulate various boards and ports. This section first gives a
brief description of each command, and then explains how to use them.
ENABLE PORT
This command lets you enable the selected port.
DISABLE PORT
This command lets you Disable the selected port.
UPDATE-FREQ
This command lets you select the time interval between Network/
Slot/Port counter updates. You can choose update intervals in
increments of 3 seconds, with the maximum interval being 99
seconds.
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CHAPTER 11: DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN
NETWORK
This command lets you select the network you want to monitor. The
choices range from A to F, depending on the configuration of your
network and the options available from this configuration. For
example, if you do not have a Media Interface Module running on the
A Channel, the EMM-E6 automatically disallows Channel A as a
network selection.
SLOT
This command lets you select the MMAC hub slot that you want to
monitor. The choices vary depending on the MMAC chassis you use.
The far right slot is always slot number one (1).
PORT
This command lets you select and view port statistics for ports 1
through 26 of the device residing in the selected Slot.
11.2.1
Selecting an Update Frequency
The EMM-E6 updates the Device Statistics screen every three seconds by
default. The EMM-E6 allows you to adjust this frequency in intervals of
three seconds (maximum frequency is 99 seconds).
To adjust the UPDATE-FREQ:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the UPDATE-FREQ command.
2. Press the Shift and + keys together, or just the - key until the desired
time/frequency appears (this number increments/decrements in 3
second intervals; minimum = 3 seconds; maximum = 99 seconds).
3. Press the Return key to set and save the changes to the
UPDATE-FREQ field.
11-4
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DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN COMMANDS
11.2.2
Selecting a Network/Slot/Port
When the Device Statistics screen first appears, statistics are displayed for
Network 1, Slot 1, and Port 1. To view statistics for another Network,
Slot, and Port, use the NETWORK X, SLOT X, or PORT X commands at
the bottom of the screen.
To select a Network, Slot, or Port:
1. Using the arrow keys, highlight the NETWORK X, SLOT X, or
PORT X command.
2. Press the Shift and + keys together, or just the - key until the desired
network, slot, or port number appears.
3. Press the Return key. Statistics associated with the selected network,
slot, or port appear.
11.2.3
Enabling Ports
The ENABLE PORT command lets you enable the port selected in the
PORT command. You must first use the PORT command to select the
desired port.
To set the PORT ENABLE command:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the ENABLE PORT command at the
bottom of the screen.
2. Press the Return key. The PORT ADMIN. STATUS field displays
“ENABLE”.
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CHAPTER 11: DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN
11.2.4
Disabling Ports
The DISABLE PORT command lets you disable the port selected in the
PORT command. You must first use the PORT command to select the
desired port.
To set the PORT DISABLE command:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the DISABLE PORT command at the
bottom of the screen.
2. Press the Return key. The PORT ADMIN. STATUS field displays
“DISABLED”.
11.3
EXITING THE DEVICE STATISTICS SCREEN
To exit the Device Statistics screen:
1. Use the arrow keys to highlight the RETURN command at the bottom
of the screen.
2. Press the Return key. The Feature Selection screen appears.
11-6
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CHAPTER 12
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE SCREEN
The Command Line Interface (CLI) Screen, Figure 12-1, will function in
future releases of the EMM-E6.
EMM-E6-960 LOCAL MANAGEMENT
Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision 0.00.00
CLI INFORMATION
THIS SCREEN RESERVED FOR THE
CABLETRON COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
COMMUNITY NAMES
F7
I P TA B L E
F8
T R A P TA B L E
F9
S N M P TO O L S
F10
RETURN
Figure 12-1. EMM-E6 CLI Information Screen
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CHAPTER 13
MIB NAVIGATOR
This chapter describes the procedures required to access the MIB
Navigator residing on the EMM-E6. The MIB Navigator Command Set is
described and examples of each command are provided.
13.1
MANAGING DEVICE MIBs
The MIB Navigator allows access to a command set from which you can
configure and manage your device. The MIB Navigator enables you to
manage objects in the device MIBs (Management Information Bases).
MIBs are databases of objects used for managing the device and
determining your EMME’s configuration. The commands within the MIB
Navigator allow you to view and modify a device’s objects.
The MIB Navigator views the MIB tree hierarchy as a directory (Figure
13-1). Each layer is numerically encoded, so that every branch group and
leaf object in the MIB is identified by a corresponding number, known as
an Object Identifier (OID). This allows the MIB Navigator to navigate
through the MIB and access the manageable leaf objects.
Group 1.1
Root 1
Group 1.2
Group 1.3
Object 1.1.1
Object 1.1.2
Object 1.2.1
Object 1.2.2
Object 1.3.1
Object 1.3.2
Figure 13-1. Hierarchical MIB Tree Structure
Often an ASCII name is assigned to a leaf object’s OID, making it more
readable. To identify the value for the object “ip Forwarding” you would
use the OID (/1/3/6/1/2/1/4/1), or its ASCII name (/iso/org/dod/internet/
mgmt/mib-2/ip/ipForwarding).
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
13.2
ACCESSING THE MIB NAVIGATOR
The MIB Navigator function resides on your Cabletron device (EMM-E6,
ETWMIM, ESXMIM, etc.). Access the MIB Navigator in-band, through a
device (i.e., workstation) connected to the same network or internetwork,
using a Telnet connection.
To access the MIB Navigator, perform the following actions from a PC or
workstation:
1. Telnet to a device by typing telnet followed by pressing the Return
key.
The telnet > prompt will appear.
2. At the telnet > prompt enter open and the IP address of the device
followed by pressing the Return key, i.e.,
telnet> open 123.231.213.132
3. The following messages will appear:
.Trying 123.231.213.132
Connected to 123.231.213.132
Password:
4. Enter your password at the Password: prompt and press the Return
key. For security reasons, the password does not display when typed.
NOTE
The password that you use is specific to the MIB that you are
accessing.
5. The MIB Navigator prompt, MIBNav ->, appears and you have access
to the MIB Navigator commands.
13-2
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
13.3
MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
There are three categories of commands in the command set.
•
Navigation Commands - Allows the user to access and manage the
MIB for the device running the MIB Navigator. Some of commands
also provide user community-string information. The commands are
as follows:
-
•
-
cd
ls
set
whoami
- ctron
- mib2
- show
- dir
- next
- su
Built-In Commands - Allows the user to access and manage
network devices connected to the device running the MIB
Navigator. The commands are as follows:
-
•
branch
get
pwd
tree
arp
- defroute
snmpbranch - snmpget
traceroute
- netstat
- snmpset
- ping
- snmptree
Special Commands - Allows the user to exit from the MIB
Navigator. The commands are as follows:
-
13.3.1
done
- quit
- exit
Conventions For MIB Navigator Commands
The following conventions are used for denoting commands:
•
Information keyed by the user is shown in this helvetica font.
•
Command arguments are indicated by two types of brackets:
-
required arguments are enclosed by [].
optional arguments are enclosed by <>.
MIB Navigator command conventions are as follows:
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
•
To abort the output or interrupt a process the escape character is ^C
(where ^ equals the Control key).
•
A slash (/) proceeding an OID issues that command from the root
directory regardless of where you are in the MIB. If no slash
precedes the OID the command issues from your current MIB
location.
•
Dot notation (1.1.1.1) is equivalent to slash notation (1/1/1/1). Use
slash notation with the navigational commands, and the dot notation
with the built-in commands that are using SNMP to access and
manage network devices.
13.3.2
Navigation Commands
The following provides a brief description, the proper format, and an
example of each Navigation command.
branch
The branch command displays all of the leaves in the MIB
tree below a specified path. The information displayed
includes the path name, the object ASCII name, the type of
object (i.e., integer, counter, time tick, etc.), and the current
value.
Format:branch [PATH]
Example
MIBNav> branch /1/3/6/1/2/17
#/1/3/6/1/2/1/7/1 udpInDatagrams COUNTER 38216
#/1/3/6/1/2/1/7/2 udpNoPorts
COUNTER 0
#/1/3/6/1/2/1/7/3 udplnErrors
COUNTER 0
13-4
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
Navigation Commands (cont’d)
cd
Use this command to change directories within a MIB
subtree. The path specified must be valid.
This command has two special subtree options:
..
- Moves you to one subtree above the current one.
/
- Moves you to the root.
Format: cd [PATH]
Example
ctron
MIBNav> cd iso/org/dod/internet/mgmt
The ctron command enables you to change directories
directly to the Cabletron MIB (1.3.6.1.4.1.52) without keying
in the entire path.
Format: ctron
Example
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
MIBNav> ctron
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
Navigation Commands (cont’d)
dir,
ls
Each of these commands displays the contents of a
specified sub-tree (the current directory displays if you do
not specify a sub-tree).
Options can be used separately or combined. When no
option is used the ASCII name of the leaf object displays.
The three options available with these commands are:
-l
Displays all instances of the object’s OID value (/1/3/
6/) and ASCII leaf object name (internet).
-p Displays all entries from the current directory including
the object’s path name.
-d Displays only directory entries in the tree.
Format:
Example
dir (ls)
dir -l
dir -lpd
MIBNav> dir
iso
Example
MIBNav> dir -l
/1
get
iso
The get command provides you with the value of a specific
managed object. The command is valid only for leaf entries
in the current MIB tree, or for managed objects in the MIB.
Format:
Example
get <OBJECTID>
MIBNav> get /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/1
# Cabletron EMM-E6 Revision X.XX.XX
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
Navigation Commands (cont’d)
help
The help command provides a list of available MIB Navigator
commands. The command also provides help for individual
MIB Navigator commands.
Format:
Example
help (general help)
help <COMMAND> (specific help)
MIBNav> help su
Command:
su
Format:
su <Community Name>
Allows user to change his/her community
name, in order to allow different access to
the MIB.
mib2
The mib2 command enables you to change directories
directly to MIB II (1.3.6.1.2.1) without keying in the entire
path.
Format:
Example
next
mib2
MIBNav> mib2
The next command enables you to determine the next leaf in
a specified path within the managed device’s MIB. This
command operates much like the SNMP GETNEXT
operator.
Format:
Example
next [PATH]
MIBNav> next /1/3/6/1/2/1
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/1 sysDescr String CtronRev.X.XX.XX
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
Navigation Commands (cont’d)
pwd
The pwd command displays the full path name for the
directory in which you are currently working.
Format:
Example
pwd
MIBNav> pwd
# /iso/org/dod/internet/mgmt/mib-2
set
The set command enables you to set the value of a
managed object. This command is valid only for leaf entries
in the current MIB tree, or for managed objects in the MIB.
If a leaf does not exist for the given path, you will be asked
what value to assign it. The following lists possible value
types:
(i)nteger - number
(c)ounter - number
(g)auge - number
(t)ime ticks - number
o(p)aque - “value” (with quotation marks)
(s)tring - “value” (with quotation marks)
(o)id - number/number.number
(a)ddress - IP address/dotted decimal
(m)ac - physical address/hex string
(n)ull - no type
Format:
Example
Example
set <OBJECTID> <VALUE>
MIBNav> set /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/5 “1st Floor”
MIBNav> set /1/3/6/14/1/52/1/6/4/7 122.1.1.1
Type: (i)nteger (a)ddress (c)ounter (g)auge (o)id:
13-8
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
Navigation Commands (cont’d)
su
The su command enables you to change your community
name to allow for different access to the MIB. The
community name that you enter allows you either Basic
Read, Read Only, Read/Write, or Super-User access to that
device’s MIBs, depending on the level of security access
assigned the password through the Local Management
Community Table. Refer to Chapter 6 on how to establish a
community name password.
Format:
Example
tree
su [COMMUNITYNAME]
MIBNav> su public
The tree command provides a display of the entire MIB for
the device. Leaves and associated values are displayed in
columns.
Format:
tree
Example
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/1
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/2
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/3
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/4
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/5
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/6
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/7
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
MIBNav> tree
sysDescr
STRING
EMRev X.X.X.X
sysObjectId OBJECT ID
1.3.6.1.4.1.52
sysUpTime TIME TICKS 8098654
sysContact STRING
AlZwieback/MIS
sysName
STRING
TrngEMME2
sysLocation STRING
1st Floor Closet
sysServices INTEGER
1
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
Navigation Commands (cont’d)
whoami
The whoami command displays your community string and
access privileges to the MIB. When using the whoami
command one of these four access levels will display: Basic
Read, Read Only, Read/Write, and Super User.
Format:
whoami
Example
# Community Name
# Access Level
13-10
MIBNav> whoami
:
:
super
SuperUser
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
13.3.3
Built-In Commands
The following provides a brief description, the proper format, and an
example of each Built-In command.
arp
The arp command provides access to the ARP (Address
Resolution Protocol) cache, enabling you to view cache
data, delete entries, or add a static route. Superuser access
is required to delete an entry or add a static route.
Each arp cache entry lists: the network interface that the
device is connected to, the device’s network address or IP
address, the device’s physical address or MAC address, and
the media type of connection to the device. The device’s
media connection occurs in one of the following ways:
1 - Other
2 - Invalid entry (cannot ping device, timed out, etc.)
3 - Dynamic route entry
4 - Static route entry (not subject to change).
Format
arp -a (to view cache data)
arp -d <INTERFACENUM>
<IPADDRESS> (deletes an IP address
entry)
arp -s <INTERFACENUM>
<IPADDRESS> <MACADDR> (adds a
static entry)
Example MIBNav> arp -a
# Interface Network Address
# (SonicInt) 122.144.40.111
# (SonicInt) 122.144.48.109
# (SonicInt) 122.144.52.68
# (SonicInt) 122.144.21.43
Physical Address Media Type
00.00.0e.12.3c.04 3(dynamic)
00.00.0e.f3.3d.14 3(dynamic)
00.00.0e.12.3c.04 3(dynamic)
00.00.0e.03.1d.3c 3(dynamic)
Example
MIBNav> arp -d 1 122.144.52.68
Example
MIBNav> arp -s 1 22.44.2.3 00:00:0e:03:1d:3c
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
Built-In Commands (cont’d)
netstat
The netstat provides a display of general network statistics
for the managed device. The netstat command must be
used with one of the following two display options:
-i
-r
Displays status and capability information for each
interface.
Displays routing information for each interface.
Format
netstat -i
netstat -r
Example
MIBNav> netstat -i
#Intrfc Description
#1
enet-csmacd
#2
enet-csmacd
#3
enet-csmacd
#4
enet-csmacd
Example
OperState MTU Speed
up
1514 10000000
up
1514 10000000
up
1514 10000000
up
1514 10000000
MIBNav> netstat -r
# Destination
# 122.144.40.0
ping
AdmnState
up
up
up
up
Next-Hop
DirectConnection
Interface
4
The ping command generates an outbound ping request to
check the status (alive/not alive) of a device at a specified IP
address.
Format:
ping <IPADDRESS>
Example MIBNav> ping 122.144.40.10
# 122.144.40.10 is alive
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
Built-In Commands (cont’d)
snmpbranch
The snmpbranch command enables you to query another
SNMP device. The command provides a display of objects
that match the specified OBJECT-ID. If no match is made,
no object will display.
Format:
snmpbranch <IPADDRESS>
<COMMUNITY STRING> <OBJECT-ID>
Example MIBNav> snmpbranch 2.4.8.1 public 1.3.6.2.1.1
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/1
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/2
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/3
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/4
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/5
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/6
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/7
snmpget
sysDescr
sysObjectID
sysUpTime
sysContact
sysName
sysLocation
sysServices
STRING
OBJECT ID
TIME TICKS
STRING
STRING
STRING
INTEGER
EMRev X.X.X.X
1.3.6.1.4.1.52
8098654
SueJason/MIS
Trng EMME2
1st floor closet
1
The snmpget command enables you to query another
SNMP device to obtain a value for a specified object. This
command requires the appropriate community string and
object id.
Format:
snmpget <IPADDRESS>
<COMMUNITY-NAME> <OBJECT-ID>
Example MIBNav>snmpget 22.44.61.22 public 1.3.6.1.2.1.1.1.0
# Cableton EMME Revision X.XX.XX
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
Built-In Commands (cont’d)
snmpset
The snmpset command enables you to set the value of an
object in other SNMP devices. This command requires the
appropriate community string and OID.
When defining a new leaf, the set command prompts you for
a value type. Possible value types are as follows:
(i)nteger - number
(c)ounter - number
(g)auge - number
(t)ime ticks - number
o(p)aque - “value” (value with quotation marks)
(s)tring - “value” (value with quotation marks)
(o)id - number/number.number
(a)ddress - IP address/dotted decimal
(m)ac - physical address/hex string
(n)ull - no type
Format:
Example
snmpset <IPADDRESS> <COMMUNITYNAME> <OBJECT-ID> <VALUE>
MIBNav> snmpset 122.44.1.2 public
1.3.6.1.2.1.1.4.0 “Cyrus/MIS”
snmptree
The snmptree command provides a display of all objects in
the device and their corresponding values.
Format:
Example
snmptree <IPADDRESS>
<COMMUNITY-NAME>
MIBNav> snmptree 122.144.89.10 public
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/1
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/2
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/3
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/4
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/5
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/6
# /1/3/6/1/2/1/1/7
13-14
sysDescr
STRING
EM Rev X.X.X.X
sysObjectID OBJECT ID 1.3.6.1.4.1.52
sysUpTime TIME TICKS 8098654
sysContact STRING
SlyStallone/MIS
sysName
STRING
Trng EMME2
sysLocation STRING
1st floor closet
sysServices INTEGER 1
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MIB NAVIGATOR COMMAND SET OVERVIEW
Built-In Commands (cont’d)
traceroute
The traceroute command generates a TRACEROUTE
request to a specified IP address and provides a display of
all next-hop routers in the path to the device. If the device is
not reached, the command displays all next-hop routers to
the point of failure.
Format:
Example
# next-hop[1]
# next-hop[2]
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
traceroute <IPADDRESS>
MIBNav> traceroute 122.144.11.52
122.144.61.45
122.144.8.113
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CHAPTER 13: MIB NAVIGATOR
13.3.4
Special Commands
The following provides a brief description, the proper format, and an
example applicable to each Special command.
done,
quit,
exit
These commands enable you to exit from the MIB Navigator
and return to the operating system.
Format:
Example
done
MIBNav> done
Connection closed.
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USING LANVIEW
CHAPTER 14
TROUBLESHOOTING
This chapter includes information for troubleshooting network and EMME6 operational problems. The following sections describe the EMM-E6’s
LANVIEW LEDs, provide a troubleshooting checklist, and explain how
and when to reset the EMM-E6.
14.1
USING LANVIEW
The EMM-E6 uses the Cabletron Systems built-in visual diagnostic and
status monitoring system called LANVIEW. With LANVIEW, you can
quickly scan the EMM-E6 LEDs to observe network status or diagnose
network problems.
EMM-E6
SN
BRIM-A100
RESET
CPU
D
C
B
A
STBY
RCV
XMT
CLN
Figure 14-1. LANVIEW LEDs
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CHAPTER 14: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 14-1. LANVIEW LEDs
LED
CPU
Description
Multicolor
Flashing Green
indicates that the
board is
operating
properly.
If OFF, or Red, the board has a
problem.
Indicates
packets will not
be forwarded as
the Spanning
Tree Algorithm
has put the
corresponding
Bridge Port into
a standby mode
due to detecting
a data loop
condition.
Network Management has
placed the EMM-E6 in a
Standby condition; a data loop
condition exists.
LED flashes to
indicate that a
segment is
receiving a
frame.
If none of the receive LEDs is
flashing, the EMM-E6 is not
receiving frames on any of the
segments.
Green
Red
STBY
A,B,C,D
(Standby)
RCV
A,B,C,D
(Receive)
Error Condition/
Recommended Action
Color
Yellow
Yellow
Press the reset switch on the
EMM-E6 front panel to reinitialize the board. If the board
does not re-initialize, it has
probably failed. Call Cabletron
Technical Support.
Check with your Network
Administrator to find out if the
EMM-E6 was placed in
Standby on purpose.
If a Data loop does exist,
reconfigure the network to
remove the data loop.
Check that each module is
firmly installed in the MMAC.
Ensure that all connected ports
are enabled.
14-2
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USING LANVIEW
Table 14-1. LANVIEW LEDs (Continued)
LED
XMT
A,B,C,D
(Transmit)
Color
Green
Description
LED flashes to
indicate that a
segment is
transmitting a
frame.
If not connected
to the LAN, the
LED flashes
every two
seconds to
indicate it is
transmitting
BPDU frames.
CLN
(Collision)
Red
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
Collision
detected on a
segment. When
the LAN is
operating
properly,
occasional
flashing is
normal.
Error Condition/
Recommended Action
If none of the transmit LEDs is
flashing, the EMM-E6 is not
transmitting frames on any of
the segments.
Contact Cabletron Technical
Support for assistance.
Excessive flashing, or a solid
light, indicates an inordinate
number of collisions.
Ensure that the SQE test is
disabled for any transceiver
connected to the EMM-E6’s
external channels (D, E, or F).
Check cabling for data loops or
defective cables.
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CHAPTER 14: TROUBLESHOOTING
14.2
TROUBLESHOOTING CHECKLIST
If your EMM-E6 is not operating properly, the following checklist
describes some of the problems that may occur with the EMM-E6
installed in an MMAC, possible causes for the problem, and suggestions
for resolving the problem.
14-4
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TROUBLESHOOTING CHECKLIST
Table 14-2. Troubleshooting Checklist
Problem
Possible Causes
No LEDs on.
Loss of Power to the
MMAC.
EMM-E6 not properly
installed.
Recommended
Action
Check the proper installation of the
MMAC power supply module and
its access to a live outlet.
Check that the MMAC has
adequate power. Some
configurations, especially those
including FDDI modules, require
that more than one power supply be
installed in the MMAC.
Check to see that the power supply
LEDs are green.
Reset EMM-E6 by removing it from
chassis and reinserting according
to directions in Chapter 3. Ensure
that all fasteners are tightened.
No Local
Management
Password
screen.
Terminal setup is not
correct.
Refer to Chapter 4 for proper setup
procedures.
Improper console
cable/UPS cable
pinouts.
Refer to Appendix A for proper
console/ UPS port pinouts.
Cannot
contact the
EMM-E6
from in-band
management.
Improper Community
Names Table.
Refer to Chapter 6 for Community
Names Table setup and Chapter 7
for IP address assignment
procedures.
EMM-E6 does not
have an IP address.
Check link to device.
No link to device.
Check Static Database.
Packets are being
bridged by a
permanent entry.
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CHAPTER 14: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 14-2. Troubleshooting Checklist (Continued)
Problem
Possible Causes
Recommended
Action
A port on a
MIM
managed by
the EMM-E6
cannot
access the
network,
while other
ports on the
same MIM
are able to
access.
The port is either off or
segmented.
Enable the port via local or remote
management.
Port cable is
defective.
Try connecting the port with a
different cable.
User
parameters
(IP address,
Device and
Module
name, etc.)
are lost
when device
is powered
down.
Switch 7 has been
toggled and userentered parameters
have been reset to
factory default.
See Chapter 3 for information on
the NVRAM switch setting.
No power to
an external
transceiver
connected to
an EPIM-A.
EPIM is defective.
Replace EPIM.
AUI cable is defective.
Replace AUI cable.
High number
of collisions
on EPIM port.
External transceiver
has SQE enabled.
Disable SQE.
Port(s) go
into standby
for no
apparent
reason.
Configurations where
devices connected
across EMM-E6
channels can cause
the EMM-E6 to detect
a looped condition.
Discuss these configurations with
Cabletron Technical Support
before implementing them into
your network.
14-6
If NVRAM is defective, call
Cabletron Technical Support.
NVRAM may be
defective.
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USING THE RESET SWITCH
14.3
USING THE RESET SWITCH
The EMM-E6 incorporates a recessed reset switch, located above the
LEDs (see Figure 14-1). This reset switch initializes the EMM-E6
processor. This switch does NOT initialize Non-Volatile Random Access
Memory (NVRAM), the non-volatile random access memory where the
EMM-E6 stores network management parameters.
To use the reset switch, use a pen or pencil to press the switch in. When
this is done, the EMM-E6 initializes itself.
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CHAPTER 15
IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
This chapter provides instructions for downloading an image file to the
EMM-E6 using three different methods; altering hardware switch settings
to force the module to accept new firmware, through UNIX operating
System commands, and by setting specific MIB OID strings. To set OID
strings, you can use the SNMP Tools screen described in Chapter 9 of this
User’s Guide or any MIB walking tool. Refer to specific MIB walking
tool documentation for instructions on how to set MIB OID strings.
NOTE
You can also download an image file using various remote
management packages such as Cabletron’s Remote
LANVIEW/Windows, SPECTRUM, SPECTRUM Element
Manager, or the appropriate SPECTRUM Portable
Management Application. Refer to specific package
documentation for image file download procedures.
The EMM-E6 supports the following Download applications:
•
Forced Download - Forcing a download of firmware images is
accomplished using Switch 6 of the EMM-E6 and a pre-configured
reverse address resolution protocol server holding the firmware
image.
•
Standard Local Download - the EMM-E6 automatically disables
management while you download the new firmware image. You can
not perform a Standard Download from a BRIM port.
•
Remote Runtime Download - the EMM-E6 continues to operate
without interruption while you download the new firmware image.
The EMM-E6 stores the new image in Flash memory. It continues to
operate with the old firmware image executing in processor memory
until you reset the EMM-E6. You can perform a Runtime Download
from any network port, including the BRIM.
EMM-E6 User's Guide
15-1
CH1Book Page 2 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
CHAPTER 15: IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
15.1
GETTING STARTED
Cabletron ships backup copies of image files for all of its intelligent
devices. The first file, suffixed with .hex (after it has been decompressed
from a .zip) is for Standard Local Downloading (any port, except the
BRIM). The second file, suffixed with .fls (after it has been decompressed
from a .zip) is for Remote Runtime Downloading through any network
port, including the BRIM.
Before you can download the image to a device, you must:
•
load the image file onto your network rarp server
NOTE
•
decompress the image file.
NOTE
15-2
For information on setting up a workstation as a rarp server,
refer to your specific workstation documentation. This
documentation includes limited information and guidelines
for setting up a UNIX workstation to act as a reverse address
resolution protocol (rarp) server.
For your convenience, Cabletron includes the PKUNZIP
utility for easy decompression of the “zipped” file. If you are
using a UNIX workstation as a rarp server, and you do not
have a decompression utility that recognizes the PKZIP
format, you can obtain a copy of a UNIX decompression
utility or the image file from the Cabletron Systems FTP
server. Contact Cabletron Technical Support for details.
EMM-E6 User's Guide
CH1Book Page 3 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
FORCED DOWNLOAD WITH UNIX
15.2
FORCED DOWNLOAD WITH UNIX
Downloading an EMM-E6 image file with a UNIX workstation requires
setting up a management station, and forcing the download. To force a
download, you can use mode switch 6 on the EMM-E6 or set specific
MIB OIDs.
NOTE
You can also download with other UNIX or DOS remote
management packages. Refer to specific package
documentation for image file download procedures.
Due to variations between UNIX systems and individual configurations,
this section provides only GUIDELINES for configuring a UNIX
workstation to perform an image file download. The instructions include
command examples, where appropriate. Bold lettering in examples
indicates operator entry.
NOTE
If unsure how to properly configure your UNIX workstation
using these guidelines, contact your Systems Administrator.
Before you start:
•
Editing ethers or hosts files requires Root/Superuser access.
•
Downloading an image file requires setting up your UNIX
workstation as a reverse address resolution protocol (rarp) server.
To set up a UNIX workstation:
1. Edit the /etc/ethers file by adding the EMM-E6 MAC address,
followed by a unique name (e.g., 00:00:1d:32:0c:1b EMME6).
EMM-E6 User's Guide
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CHAPTER 15: IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
2. Edit the /etc/hosts file by adding the EMM-E6 MAC address and
follow it with the same unique name you used in step one above.
(e.g., 00:00:1d:32:0c:1b EMME6).
3. If you already have a /tftpboot directory, confirm the rarp setup of your
workstation as follows:
Request a process status and grep for rarpd
(e.g., unix% ps -aux | grep rarpd).
The following information represents a typical output:
user
root
root
161
87
88
7.7 1.2
0.0 0.9
0.0 0.0
32 184
48 136
24 0
p3
?
?
S 12:00 grep rarpd
S 11:05 rarpd -a
IW 11:05 rarpd -a
The term rarpd -a, located at the end of the root string, indicates rarp is
active. If rarp is NOT running, only the grep process appears.
4. If you do NOT have a /tftpboot directory, then you must create one
(e.g., unix% mkdir tftpboot), and start the rarp daemon
(e.g., unix% rarpd -a).
5. Ensure that the /tftpboot directory is not owned
(e.g., unix% chown nobody tftpboot).
6. Store the hex image file in the /tftpboot directory as emme6.hex.
NOTE
15-4
This step requires decompression of the zipped image file. If
you do not have a UNIX unzip utility, access to a PC with
pkunzip, or a way to FTP the decompressed image to your
UNIX workstation, contact Cabletron Technical Support.
EMM-E6 User's Guide
CH1Book Page 5 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
FORCED DOWNLOAD WITH UNIX
7. Edit the /etc/inetd.conf file by removing anything prior to the tftpboot
daemon (e.g., the # sign) that comments-out the line.
8. Kill the inetd process (e.g., unix% kill -HUP ‘process ID number’),
and then restart the process (e.g., unix% inetd), to enable the revised
inetd.conf file.
NOTE
You must request a process status and grep for inetd to obtain
the process ID number (see step 3 above).
EMM-E6 User's Guide
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CHAPTER 15: IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
To force a download using the EMM-E6 download switch:
1. Remove the safety bars from the MMAC chassis.
2. Unscrew the knurled knobs at the top and bottom of the EMM-E6 front
panel.
3. Slide the MIM out of the chassis until you can easily access the
EMM-E6 switch panel located at the bottom of the board.
4. Change the state of EMM-E6 mode switch 6. For example, if the
switch is in the “OFF” position, move it to the “ON” position and leave
it there. This change in position activates the download process after
you reinstall the board.
NOTE
The EMM-E6 boot PROM must recognize the switch position
change to initiate a download sequence. This means you must
power-up the EMM-E6 at least one time for it to load initial
switch positions into memory.
5. Follow the installation procedures from Chapter 3 to re-install the
EMM-E6 properly.
Image file download takes several minutes. While downloading, the
EMM-E6 CPU LED flashes and the XMT/RCV pair receiving the image
flickers rapidly.
The EMM-E6 Boot-up Diagnostics indicate a file transfer from a server is
in progress. After the image file download is complete, verify that Local
Management displays the correct image file (FW) version number.
15-6
EMM-E6 User's Guide
CH1Book Page 7 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
STANDARD LOCAL DOWNLOAD
15.3
STANDARD LOCAL DOWNLOAD
Table 15-1 provides a step by step procedure for downloading the
firmware image file. This section provides specific MIB OIDs, their
names, and the required setting for proper image file download. Refer to
your specific MIB walking tool documentation for instructions on how to
set MIB OID strings.
The Download OIDs for Cabletron products reside in Cabletron
enterprise MIBs (group 52). The specific OIDs necessary to perform an
image file download reside in the common download group under
ctDL (Cabletron Download). The full OID string to reach this group is:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1
When performing the steps in Table 15-1, keep the following in mind:
•
•
•
You must follow the steps in order.
Enter the IP address of the tftp server in standard dotted decimal
notation (e.g., 132.177.118.24).
Enter the FULL path to the image file in the ctDLTFTPRequest OID,
including the name of the image file (e.g., c:\tftpboot\EMME6.hex).
Table 15-1. Standard Download Procedure
Step
OID Name
OID Number
Data
Type
SNMP
OID Data
(1).
ctDLForceOnBoot
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.1.0
integer
1
(2).
ctDLCommitRAMToFlash
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.2.0
integer
1
(3).
ctDLTFTPRequestHost
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.4.0
IP
address
Enter the IP
address of
the tftp
server.
(4).
ctDLTFTPRequest
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.5.0
string
(ASCII)
Enter the
path to the
image file.
(5).
ctDLInitiateColdBoot
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.3.0
integer
1
EMM-E6 User's Guide
15-7
CH1Book Page 8 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
CHAPTER 15: IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
15.4
REMOTE RUNTIME DOWNLOAD
NOTE
If the Runtime Download is interrupted, the Firmware Image
in Flash memory will be erased. The EMM-E6 will continue
to operate until it is either Reset or Powered OFF and ON.
After either of these events, the EMM-E6 can download a
Firmware Image from a BootP server ONLY! The process of
configuring a BootP Server is discussed at length in
Cabletron’s “Installing and Using Remote LANVIEW for
Windows”. Although Runtime Download is a powerful
network operations & firmware management feature, careful
consideration should be given to both the timing (best when
network usage is lowest) and network stability (especially
downloads over a WAN link) at the time of the planned
download.
Table 15-2 provides a step by step procedure for downloading the
firmware image file. This section provides specific MIB OIDs, their
names, and the required setting for proper image file download. Refer to
your specific MIB walking tool documentation for instructions on how to
set MIB OID strings.
The Download OIDs for Cabletron products reside in Cabletron
enterprise MIBs (group 52). The specific OIDs necessary to perform an
image file download reside in the common download group under
ctDL (Cabletron Download). The full OID string to reach this group is:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1
When performing the steps in Table 15-2 keep the following in mind:
•
•
•
15-8
You must follow the steps in order.
Enter the IP address of the tftp server in standard dotted decimal
notation (e.g., 132.177.118.24).
Enter the FULL path to the image file in the ctDLTFTPRequest OID,
including the name of the image file (e.g., c:\tftpboot\EMME6.fls).
EMM-E6 User's Guide
CH1Book Page 9 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
REMOTE RUNTIME DOWNLOAD
Table 15-2. Runtime Download Procedure
Step
OID Name
OID Number
Data
Type
SNMP OID Data
(1).
ctDLTFTPRequestHost
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.18.0
IP
address
Enter the IP address
of the tftp server.
(2).
ctDLTFTPRequest
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.19.0
string
(ASCII)
Enter the path to
the image file.
(3).
ctDLOnLineDownload
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.16.0
integer
1 = Default setting
(normal operation).
2=
forceDownLoad.
The new image
downloads to Flash
memory. The EMME6 does not use the
new image until you
press the Reset
button.
3=
forceDownLoadReset. The new
image downloads to
Flash memory. The
EMM-E6
automatically resets
upon completion of
the download.
(4)
ctDLOperStatus
(This OID monitors the
progress of the Runtime
Download.)
1.3.6.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.17.0
Integer
2 = Indicates that a
TFTP download
request has been
received but has
not yet been
activated.
3 = Indicates
normal operation.
The download
started and finished
normally and no
reset was specified
or a download has
not been started.
4 = Indicates that a
download is in
progress.
5 = Indicates that a
download was
started but has
terminated due to an
error.
EMM-E6 User's Guide
15-9
CH1Book Page 10 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
CHAPTER 15: IMAGE FILE DOWNLOAD
Table 15-2. Runtime Download Procedure (Continued)
Step
OID Name
OID Number
Data
Type
SNMP OID Data
NOTE: If you selected forceDownLoadReset at Step 3, then DO NOT
CONTINUE, you have completed all necessary settings.
NOTE: If you selected forceDownLoad at Step 3, then you can reset the
EMM-E6 at a later time. You can reset the EMM-E6 remotely using the
ctDLInitiateColdBoot OID described at Step 5 or manually using the Reset
Button or Cycle Power.
(5).
15-10
ctDLInitiateColdBoot
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8.1.3.0
integer
1
EMM-E6 User's Guide
CH1Book Page 1 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
APPENDIX A
EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
This appendix provides the operating specifications for the Cabletron
Systems EMM-E6. Cabletron Systems reserves the right to change these
specifications at any time without notice.
A.1
BRIDGING FUNCTIONALITY
FLASH Memory:
2 MB (expandable to 14 MB)
Shared Sonic Memory:
4 MB (expandable to 12 MB)
Internal Processor:
Intel 80960
Read Only Memory:
128K
Non-Volatile RAM:
128K
Ethernet Controller:
4 DP83932 Controllers
CPU Memory:
8 MB (expandable to 12MB)
Packet Filter Rate
(max. viewed per second):
30,000 packets
Packet Forward Rate
(max. forwarded per second):
22,000 packets
Forwarding Latency:
91 µs min.
Ageing Time:
5 minutes (default)
Filtering Database:
8,191 max.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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APPENDIX A: EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
A.2
REPEATER FUNCTIONALITY
Delay Times
(port x in to port x out)
Start of Packet:
1,450 ns max.
Collision to JAM:
1,550 ns max.
Preamble
Input:
Minimum of 40 bits to a max. of 64 bits
required.
Output:
64 bits min. (last 2 bits = 1, 1).
JAM Output:
If a collision occurs on one of the segments, a
pattern of 1,0 is sent to the other segments.
Minimum Packet Repeated: 96 bits including preamble. (Packet
fragments are extended using the JAM [1,0]
data pattern.)
FAULT Protection:
A-2
Each segment will disconnect itself from the
other segments if 32 consecutive collisions
occur, or the collision detector of a segment is
on for longer than approximately 2.4 ms. This
FAULT protection will reset automatically
after one packet is transmitted onto the
FAULT protected segment without causing a
collision.
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A.3
COM 1 PORT
Type: Standard RJ45 port
Pin 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
A.4
Transmit Data (XMT)
Data Set Ready (DSR)
Not used
Receive Data (RCV)
Signal Ground (GND)
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
Not used
Not used
From COM 1 port
To COM 1 port
To COM 1 port
From COM 1 port
COM 2 PORT
Type: Standard RJ45 port
Pin 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
A.5
Transmit Data (XMT)
Data Set Ready (DSR)
Not used
Receive Data (RCV)
Signal Ground (GND)
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
Not used
Not used
From COM 2 port
To COM 2 port
To COM 2 port
From COM 2 port
ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS
Operating Temperature:
+5° to +40°C (+41° to +104°F)
Non-operating Temperature:
-30° to +90°C (-22° to +194°F)
Operating Humidity:
5 to 95% (non-condensing)
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
A-3
CH1Book Page 4 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
APPENDIX A: EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
A.6
SAFETY
This unit meets the safety requirements of UL 1950 (without D3
deviations), CSA C22.2 No. 950, and EN 60950; the EMI requirements of
FCC Part 15 Class A, EN 55022 Class A, and VCCI Class I; and the EMC
requirements of EN 50082-1, including IEC 801-2 (ESD) levels 1 through
4, IEC 801-3 (Radiated Susceptibility) levels 1 through 4, and IEC 801-4
(EFT/B) levels 1 through 4.
WARNING
A.7
It is the responsibility of the person who sells the system of
which the EMM-E6 will be a part to ensure that the total
system meets allowed limits of conducted and radiated
emissions.
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Dimensions:
34.04D x 29.21H x 7.64W cm.
(13.4D x 11.5H x 3.0W in.)
Weight
Unit:
Shipping:
A-4
1.25 kg (2.75 lbs.)
1.74 kg (3.83 lbs.)
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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A.8
EPIM-T (10BASE-T TWISTED PAIR PORT)
Internal Transceiver:
Cabletron Systems TPT
10BASE-T
Twisted Pair Transceiver
Type:
8 Pin RJ45 Jack (Figure A-1).
Figure A-1. EPIM-T (with RJ45 Port)
A slide switch on the EPIM-T determines the cross-over status of the
cable pairs. The switch residing on the X side indicates the pairs
internally cross over. If the switch resides on the = side, the pairs do
not internally cross over. (See Figure A-2.)
Position X
(crossed over)
1. RX+
2. RX3. TX+
4. NC
5. NC
6. TX7. NC
8. NC
Position =
(not crossed over)
1. TX+
2. TX3. RX+
4. NC
5. NC
6. RX7. NC
8. NC
Figure A-2. Cross-over Switch on the EPIM-T
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
A-5
CH1Book Page 6 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
APPENDIX A: EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
A.9
EPIM-F1/F2 (MULTIMODE FIBER OPTIC PORT)
Internal Transceiver:
Type:
EPIM-F1:
EPIM-F2:
Cabletron Systems FOT-F
Fiber Optic Transceiver
SMA fiber optic ports (Figure A-3)
ST fiber optic ports (Figure A-3)
Figure A-3. EPIM-F1 and EPIM-F2
NOTE
The transmitter power and receive sensitivity levels, below,
represent Peak Power Levels after optical overshoot. You
must use a Peak Power Meter to correctly compare the above
values to those you measure on any particular port. If you
measure Power Levels with an Average Power Meter, you
must subtract 3 dBm from the measurement to correctly
compare measured values to the values below (e.g., -29.5
dBm peak = -32.5 dBm average).
Table A-1, EPIM-F1/-F2 Statistics
Receive Sensitivity:
-29.5 dBm
Max Receive Power:
-8.2 dBm
Transmitter Power Into 50/125 µm fiber:
-13.0 dBm
62.5/125 µm fiber:
-10.0 dBm
100/140 µm fiber:
-7.0 dBm
Bit Error Rate:
A-6
-10
Better than 10
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
CH1Book Page 7 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
A.10
EPIM-F3 (SINGLE MODE FIBER OPTIC PORT)
Internal Transceiver:
Cabletron Systems FOT-F3
Fiber Optic Transceiver
Type:
ST fiber optic ports (Figure A-4)
Figure A-4. EPIM-F3
NOTE
Transmitter power is inversely proportional to temperature
rise. Use the Output Power Coefficient to calculate increased
or decreased power output for your operating environment.
For example, typical power output at 25C equals -16.4 dBm.
For a 4C temperature increase, multiply the typical
coefficient (-0.15 dBm) by four, and add the result to the
typical output power (4 x -0.15 dBm + -16.4 dBm = -17.0
dBm).
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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CH1Book Page 8 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
APPENDIX A: EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
Table A-2. EPIM-F3 Statistics
Parameter
Typical
Minimum
Maximum
Transmitter Peak
Wave Length:
1300 nm
1270 nm
1330 nm
Spectral Width:
60 nm
—
100 nm
Rise Time:
3.0 ns
2.7 ns
5.0 ns
Fall Time:
2.5 ns
2.2 ns
5.0 ns
Duty Cycle:
50.1%
49.6%
50.7%
TX Power:
-15.1 dBm
TX Budget:
14.4 dBm
RX Sensitivity:
-29.5 dBm
MAX Receive
Power:
-6.99 dBm
Bit Error Rate:
Better than 10
NOTE
A-8
-10
The above transmitter power levels and receive sensitivity
levels represent Peak Power Levels after optical overshoot.
You must use a Peak Power Meter to correctly compare the
above values to those you measure on any particular port. If
you measure Power Levels with an Average Power Meter,
you must subtract 3 dBm from the measurement to correctly
compare those measured values to the values listed above
(e.g., -29.5 dBm peak = -32.5 dBm average).
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
CH1Book Page 9 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
A.11
EPIM-C (BNC PORT)
Internal Transceiver:
Cabletron Systems TMS-3
Transceiver
Type:
BNC receptacle, with gold
center contact, for use with BNC
type T-connectors and RG-58
thin-net cable (Figure A-5).
Internal Termination Switch
= On (internally terminated)
= Off (need external termination)
Figure A-5. EPIM-C (with BNC Port)
Termination:
Using the switch to the side of
the port, you can internally
terminate the port on the module
via a built-in 50Ω terminator.
This eliminates the need to
connect the port to a T-connector
and terminator.
Grounding:
For safety, connect only one end
of a thin-net segment to earth
ground. Do not connect the BNC
port of an EPIM-C to earth
ground.
Connecting a thin coaxial cable segment to earth ground at
more than one point can produce dangerous ground currents.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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APPENDIX A: EMM-E6 SPECIFICATIONS
A.12
EPIM-A AND EPIM-X (AUI PORT)
Interface Connector:
DB-15 Port (female connector
for EPIM-A, male connector for
EPIM-X) (Figure A-6).
Type:
15 position D type receptacle
Figure A-6. EPIM-A and EPIM-X (AUI Port)
Table A-3. DB-15 Pinouts
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Logic Ref.
Collision +
Transmit +
Logic Ref.
Receive +
Power Return
No Connection
Logic Ref.
Connector Shell:
A-10
Pin
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Collision Transmit Logic Ref.
Receive Power (+12 Vdc)
Logic Ref.
No Connection
Protective Ground
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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APPENDIX B
EMM-E6 OIDs
This Appendix contains a selected number of OID strings that are among
the most frequently needed. The OIDs are implemented by using either
the SNMP Tools procedures detailed in Chapter 9 or the MIB Navigator
procedures located in Chapter 13. Note that the OIDs can be accessed
using LANVIEW, SPECTRUM, SPMA, or the SNMP element
management packages of other vendors.
B.1
SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL
The following OID is used to select the desired Spanning Tree Protocol.
ctBridgeStpProtocolSpecification
Description: This object allows the network manager to select
which Spanning Tree Protocol will be operational on the bridge.
The value ‘decLb100’ (2) indicates the DEC LANBridge 100
Spanning Tree Protocol. The value ‘ieee8021d’ (3) indicates the
IEEE 802.1d Spanning Tree Protocol. The value ‘none’ (1)
indicates no Spanning Tree Protocol is operational.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
EMM-E6 User's Guide
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.2.3.2.1
Integer
1
None
2
decLb100
3
ieee8021
read-write
B-1
CH1Book Page 2 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
APPENDIX B: COMMONLY-USED OIDs
B.2
CONFIGURING ARP REQUEST PACKETS
The EMM-E6’s SNMP Tools Screen allows you to generate an Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) Request packet utilizing specific framing
through local management. An ARP Request is used to send an SNMP
Trap to a destination node that has not yet made or established contact
with the EMM-E6. This situation may occur when the destination node in
question has been moved from one port or channel interface of the
EMM-E6 to another location and has not yet transmitted information
which would notify the EMM-E6 of its network location. The generation
of ARP Request packets in such a situation would allow the EMM-E6 to
locate the reconfigured station without waiting for that station to transmit.
rptrScrAddrMgmtHashType
Description: Forces the EMM-E6 to utilize a specific framing
type for any ARP Request packet. The values entered determine
the framing type utilized for the ARP packet. Please note that any
changes to the framing type to be utilized for ARP requests will
take effect after the next soft reset of the EMM-E6.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B-2
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.2.2.2.3.1.2.2.2.1.1.1.8.1
Integer
2
Ethernet Framing
3
802.3=802.2 w/SNAP Header
read-write
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PORT GROUP SECURITY
B.3
PORT GROUP SECURITY
The next seven OIDs are used for port group security features.
rptrSrcAddrMgmtPortLock
Description: Setting this object to lock activates the network port
security lock. Setting a value of portMisMatch (3) is invalid. A
read of PortMisMatch means that the lock status between the port
group, port and repeater levels do not agree.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.1.5.3.2
Integer
1
unlock
2
lock
3
portMisMatch
read-write
rptrPortGrpSrcAddrLock
Description: Allows the setting of the lock status for this port
group. Unlock (1), unlocks the source address lock for this group.
Lock (2) locks the source address for this group. Setting a value
of portMisMatch (3) for this value is invalid. A read of
PortMisMatch (3) means that the lock status for the ports within
the port group does not match the lock status for the port group.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access policy:
EMM-E6 User's Guide
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.2.6.1.2
Integer
1
unlock
2
lock
3
portMisMatch
read-write
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APPENDIX B: COMMONLY-USED OIDs
rptrPortSecurityLockStatus
Description: Defines the lock status for this particular port entry.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.9.1.1.3
Integer
1
unlock
2
lock
read-write
rptrPortSecurityLockAddAddress
Description: Setting a value to this object adds a new entry to the
rptrPortSecurityListTable. When read, this object displays an
Octet String of size 6 with each octet containing a 0. This object
provides an easy method to add or delete conceptual rows in the
rptrPortSecurityListTable. The returned value has little or no
actual meaning.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.9.1.1.4
Octet String (size 6)
read-write
rptrPortSecurityLockDelAddress
Description: Setting a value to this object deletes a corresponding
entry in the rptrPortSecurityListTable. When read, this object
returns the last deleted source address. An Octet String of size 0 is
returned if no objects were deleted since last system reset.
Object Identifier: 1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.9.1.1.5
Data Type:
Octet String
Access Policy:
read-write
B-4
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PORT GROUP SECURITY
rptrPortSecurityDisableOnViolation
Description: Designates whether port is disabled if source address
is violated. A source address violation occurs when an address is
detected which is not in the source address list for this port. If this
port is disabled for this port address violation it can be enabled by
setting rptrPortMgmtAdminState. Default state is enabled (2).
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.9.1.1.6
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
rptrPortSecurityFullSecEnabled
Description: A port that is set to full security and is locked will
scramble all packets, which are not contained in the expected
source address list, including broadcasts and multicasts. A port
that is set to partial security will allow broadcast and multicasts to
repeat unscrambled. Default state disabled (1).
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
EMM-E6 User's Guide
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.9.1.1.7
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
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APPENDIX B: COMMONLY-USED OIDs
B.4
ENABLING & DISABLING SNMP TRAPS
The EMM-E6 supports the collection and reporting of SNMP Traps of
several types and at several levels. SNMP Trap sending may be enabled or
disabled for the following trap types: segmentation, link, and source
addressing. The traps may be enabled on the network level, module level,
or port level.
B.4.1
Enabling Network Level SNMP Traps
The next three OIDs control traps enable and disable at the network level
or channel level.
rptrHwTrapsSetLink
Description: Enables and disables link traps for this network (i.e.,
Channel A, B, or C).
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.1.6.1.1
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
rptrHwTrapsSetSeg
Description: Enables and disables segmentation traps for this
network (i.e., Channel A, B, or C).
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B-6
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.1.6.1.2
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
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ENABLING & DISABLING SNMP TRAPS
rptrSaTrapSetScraddr
Description: Enables and disables source address traps for this
network (i.e., Channel A, B, or C).
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B.4.2
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.1.6.2.1
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
Enabling Module Level SNMP Traps
The next three OIDs are for traps enable and disable at the board level.
The <b#> value is the number of the module in the MMAC chassis to be
examined. This number will be based on the location of the module in the
chassis. For detailed descriptions of the location numbering scheme in
your MMAC chassis, please refer to your MMAC User’s Guide.
rptrPortGrpHwTrapSetLink
Description: Enables and disables link traps for the specified port
group at the board level.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
EMM-E6 User's Guide
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.2.5.1.1.1.2.<b#>
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
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APPENDIX B: COMMONLY-USED OIDs
rptrPortGrpHwTrapSetSeg
Description: Enables and disables segmentation traps for the
specified port group at the board level.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.2.5.1.1.1.3.<b#>
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
rptrPortGrpSaTrapSetSrcaddr
Description: Enables and disables segmentation traps for the
specified port group at the board level.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B.4.3
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.2.5.1.1.2.<b#>
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
Enabling Port Level SNMP Traps
The next three OIDs are for traps enable and disable at the port level. The
<b#> value is the number of the module in the MMAC chassis to be
examined. This number will be based on the location of the module in the
chassis. For detailed descriptions of the location numbering scheme in
your MMAC chassis, please refer to your MMAC User’s Guide.
Likewise, the <p#> value is the assigned number of the individual port on
that module which SNMP Traps will be enabled or disabled for. Port
numbers may be determined by examining the faceplate of the module,
where they are clearly printed.
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ENABLING & DISABLING SNMP TRAPS
rptrPortHwTrapSetLink
Description: Enables and disables link traps for this port.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.8.1.1.1.3.<b#>.<p#>
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
rptrPortHwTrapSetSeg
Description: Enables and disables segmentation traps for this
port.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.8.1.1.1.4.<b#>.<p#>
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
rptrPortGrpSaTrapSetSrcaddr
Description: Enables and disables source address traps for the
specified port group.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
EMM-E6 User's Guide
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.8.2.1.1.3.<b#>.<p#>
Integer
1
disable
2
enable
read-write
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APPENDIX B: COMMONLY-USED OIDs
B.5
ACTIVATING RMON GROUPS
The initial configuration of the EMM-E6 at installation does not provide
the activation of the RMON Default and Host Groups. These management
groups may be activated or deactivated through local management using
OID Sets. As the specific OID used to control each RMON bundle is
dependent upon the presence or absence of BRIMs and their type, an
SNMP Get is necessary to determine the OID instances of the RMON
bundles before they may be enabled or disabled.
chCompName
Description: Returns OID values for the location of the RMON
bundle OIDs in the device being examined. These values may be
used in conjunction with the chCompAdminStatus OID (below)
to activate and deactivate the individual RMON bundles.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.2.4.1.5
Integer
read-write
chCompAdminStatus
Description: Enables and disables the RMON Default Group for
an EMM-E6.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B-10
[Result of above SNMP Get]
Integer
7
disable
3
enable
read-write
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BRIDGING
B.6
BRIDGING
The following OID is used to enable and disable the interface for the
bridging function.
dot1dstpPortEnable
Description: The enabled/disabled status of the port.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B.7
1.3.6.1.2.1.17.2.15.1.4
Integer
1
enable
2
disable
read-write
TRUNK PORT SECURITY
The following OID is required if security is not desired on a trunk port.
The user must force the port to be a trunk port before locking the port via
the module or channel. Failing to do this will cause the port to become
locked out when the third address is seen on the trunk port.
rptrPortSrcAddrForceTrunk
Description: When this object is set to Force, it places the port
into a Trunk topology state whether or not the network traffic
warrants such a state. When this object is set to NoForce, it allows
the port to assume the topological state it would naturally assume
based on the network activity across it. When read, this object
reports the current setting.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
EMM-E6 User's Guide
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.3.5.1.4
Integer
1
NoForce
2
Force
read-write
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APPENDIX B: COMMONLY-USED OIDs
B.8
CHANNEL SELECTION
The following two OIDs are needed to select channel assignments (A, B,
or C) for all boards or individual ports. These OIDs are needed for
products supporting multichannel connectivity.
fnbconnect
Description: Denotes the connection status of the CSMA/CD
board to the inter-RIC bus.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.1.6.1.2.2.1.1.2.slot
Integer
1
Channel B
2
Channel C
4
Channel A
read-write
fnbPortConnectPortAssignment
Description: Provides the capability to change or query the
specific interface that the port is assigned.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B-12
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.1.6.1.2.3.1.1.3.slot.port
Integer
1
Channel A
2
Channel B
3
Channel C
read-write
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OID HASHING ON SOURCE ADDRESES
B.9
OID HASHING ON SOURCE ADDRESES
The following OID allows the enabling and disabling of DEC hashing,
which may be necessary or desired in DECnet and mixed IEEE 802.3/
DECnet environments.
rptrSrcAddrMgmtHashType
Description: This enables and disables DECnet hashing on source
addresses which is useful in DECnet environments.
Object Identifier:
Data Type:
Values:
Access Policy:
B.10
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.1.4.1.5.3.4.0
Integer
1
NoDECnetHashing
2
DECnetHashing
read-write
REMOTE DOWNLOADING
For detailed step-by-step instructions on the use of OIDs for forcing a
remote download of firmware instruction code to the EMM-E6, please
refer to Image File Download, Chapter 15 of the main text.
EMM-E6 User's Guide
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GLOSSARY
This glossary provides brief descriptions of some of the recurrent terms in the
main text, as well as related terms used in discussions of the relevant networking
discussions. These descriptions are not intended to be comprehensive discussions
of the subject matter. For further clarification of these terms, you may wish to
refer to the treatments of these terms in the main text.
Words in the glossary description text listed in boldface type indicate other
entries in the glossary which may be referred to for further clarification.
10BASE-2
IEEE standard which governs the operation of devices
connecting to Ethernet thin coaxial cable.
10BASE-FL
IEEE standard which governs the operation of devices
connecting to Ethernet fiber optic cable. Supersedes
previous FOIRL standard.
10BASE-T
IEEE standard which governs the operation of devices
connecting to Ethernet Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP)
cable.
Alarm
A notification, generated by the operation of SNMP,
which is sent to a management station to indicate a
problem with the network or warn of an error condition.
Application
1: A software operation performed by a workstation or
other network node. 2: A layer of the OSI Model.
Architecture
A collective rule set for the operation of a network.
Architectures describe the means by which nodes transmit
and receive information in the network. See also:
Ethernet, Topology.
ATM
Asynchronous Transfer Mode. A networking architecture
that is based on the use of connections between
communicating devices that are set up, used, and then
eliminated.
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Attenuation to BRIM
Attenuation
Loss of signal power (measured in decibels) due to
transmission through a cable. Attenuation is dependent on
the type, manufacture and installation quality of cabling,
and is expressed in units of loss per length, most often
dB/m.
AUI
Attachment Unit Interface. A cabling type used in Ethernet
networks, designed to connect network stations and
devices to transceivers.
Backbone
A portion of a network which provides the interconnection
of a number of separate, smaller networks.
Backplane
The portion of a modular chassis to which all modules
are connected. Typically the backplane provide power and
management functions to each module, and is used to
provide networking connections, via buses, to all modules
in the modular chassis.
Bit
Binary Digit. A bit is the smallest unit of information,
consisting of a single binary number. A bit is represented
by a numerical value of 1 or 0.
BOOTP
Bootstrap Protocol. Checks MIB variables of a SNMP
manageable device to determine to determine wether it
should start up using its existing firmware or boot up from
a network server specifically configured for the purpose.
Branch Group
A collection of MIBs related by common function. These
MIBs are collected into families called branches. See also
Leaf Object, MIB Tree.
Bridge
Bridges are network devices which connect two or more
separate network segments while allowing traffic to be
passed between the separate networks when necessary.
Bridges read in packets and decide to either retransmit
them or block them based on the destination to which the
packets are addressed.
BRIM
Bridge/Router Interface Module. BRIMs are added to
B R I M - c a p a b l e C a b l e t r o n e q u i p m e n t t o p r ov i d e
connections to external networks through an integrated
bridge or router.
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Broadcast to Connectivity
Broadcast
A type of network transmission; a broadcast transmission
is one which is sent to every station on the network,
regardless of location, identification, or address.
Buses
Physical portions of the backplane of a modular chassis
which pass information between modules.
Card
See Module.
Channel
A portion of a backplane bus which is specifically
partitioned off for the transmission of one type of network
data.
Chassis
See Modular Chassis.
Client
A workstation or node which obtains services from a
server device located on the network.
Client-Server
A computing model which is based on the use of dedicated
devices (servers) for the performance of specific
computational or networking tasks. These servers are
accessed by several clients, workstations which cannot
perform those functions to the same extent or with the
same efficiency as the servers.
Coaxial
An Ethernet media type which consists of a core of
electrically conductive material surrounded by several
layers of insulation and shielding.
Community
Name
An identification which allows a specific level of access to
the network device. Similar to a password, a Community
Name acts to restrict access to control capabilities and
network statistics.
Concentrator
A network device which allows multiple network ports in
one location to share one physical interface to the network.
Congestion
An estimation or measure of the utilization of a network,
typically expressed as a percentage of theoretical
maximum utilization of the network.
Connectivity
The physical connection of cabling or other media to
network devices. The coupling of media to the network.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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Console to Decryption
Console
See Terminal.
Cross-Over
A length of multi-stranded cable in which the transmit
wire(s) of one end is/are crossed over within the cable to
connect to the receive wire(s) of the other end. CrossOvers are used to connect devices to like devices, ensuring
that transmit and receive connections are properly made.
Crosstalk
A corruption of the electrical signal transmitted through a
Shielded or Unshielded twisted pair cable. Crosstalk refers
to signals on one strand or set of strands affecting signals
on another strand or set of strands.
CSMA/CD
Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection.
CSMA/CD is the basis for the operation of Ethernet
networks. CSMA/CD is the method by which stations
monitor the network, determine when to transmit data, and
what to do if they sense a collision or other error during
that transmission.
Data
Information, typically in the form of a series of bits, which
is intended to be stored, altered, displayed, transmitted, or
processed.
Data Loop
A condition caused by the creation of duplicate paths
which network transmissions could follow. Data loops are
created by the use of redundant connections between
network segments or devices. Ethernet networks cannot
effectively function with data loops present. To allow the
creation of fault-tolerant networks, data loops are
automatically detected and eliminated by the Spanning
Tree algorithm.
DB15
A 15-pin connector used to terminate transceiver cables
in accordance with the AUI specification.
DB9
A 9-pin connector, typically used in Token Ring networks
and for serial communications between computers.
Decryption
The translation of data from an encrypted form into a
form both recognizable and utilizable by a workstation,
node, or network device.
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Dedicated to Fault-Tolerance
Dedicated
Assigned to one purpose or function.
Default
Gateway
the IP address of the network or host to which all packets
addressed to unknown network or host are sent
Device
(network)
Any discrete electronic item connected to a network which
either transmits and receives information through it,
facilitates that transmission and reception, or monitors the
operation of the network directly.
DLM
Distributed LAN Monitor. DLM is a feature of some
SNMP management devices which allows that device to
locally monitor other devices under its control and report
to a central network management station any noted errors.
This frees the network management station from directly
monitoring every SNMP device.
DNI
Desktop Network Interface. DNI cards are devices which
are added to workstations to provide them with a
connection to a network (NIC).
EEPROM
Electronic Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory.
Encryption
A security process which encodes raw data into a form that
cannot be utilized or read without decryption.
EPIM
Ethernet Port Interface Module. EPIMs are added to
specifically-designed slots in Cabletron Ethernet products
to provide connections to external media. EPIMs allow a
great flexibility in the media used to connect to networks.
Ethernet
A networking architecture which allows any station on
the network to transmit at any time, provided it has
checked the network for existing traffic, waited for the
network to be free, and checked to ensure the transmission
did not suffer a collision with another transmission.See
also CSMA/CD.
FaultTolerance
The ability of a design (device or network) to operate at
full or reduced capacity after suffering a failure of some
essential component or connection. See also redundant.
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FDDI to Host
FDDI
Fiber Distributed Data Interface. A high-speed networking
architecture. FDDI requires that stations only transmit
data when they have been given permission by the
operation of the network, and dictates that stations will
receive information at pre-determined intervals. See also
Token.
Fiber optics
Network media made of thin filaments of glass
surrounded by a plastic cladding. Fiber optics transmit and
receive information in the form of pulses of light. See
multimode and single mode.
File
A collection of related data.
Fileserver
A network server device which stores and maintains data
files for the use and modification of users on the network.
Firmware
The software instructions which allow a network device to
function. See also Image file.
Flash EEPROM
See EEPROM.
FNB
Flexible Network Bus. A Cabletron backplane design
which enables an FNB-configured chassis to support
multiple network architectures simultaneously.
Frame
A group of bits that form a discrete block of information.
Frames contain network control information. The size and
composition of a frame is determined by the network
protocol being used.
Gateway
A router.
Heartbeat
See SQE.
Hexadecimal
A base 16 numerical system. Digits in hexadecimal run
from 0 to 9 and continue from A to F, where F is
equivalent to the decimal number 16.
Host
A device which acts as the source or destination of data on
the network.
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Hot Swap to IP
Hot Swap
Hot Swap capability indicates that a product is capable of
being removed from an operating modular chassis and
reinserted or replaced without requiring that the chassis
and all associated modules be powered down.
Hub
See Modular Chassis.
IANA
Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. An agency which
assigns and distributes IP addresses.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. A
standards-making body.
IETF
Internet Engineering Task Force. A standards-making
body.
Image File
Software instruction code which is downloaded to an
intelligent network device. See also Firmware.
Impedance
A measure of the opposition of electrical current or signal
flow in a length of cable.
In-Band
Performed through the operating network architecture.
Refers most commonly to management functions. See also
Out-of-Band.
Interface
A connection to a network. Unlike a port, an interface is
not necessarily an available physical connector accessible
through the front panel of a device. Interfaces may be used
as backplane connections, or may be found only in the
internal operation of a module (All ports are interfaces, but
not all interfaces are ports).
Internet
A world-wide network which provides access through a
vast chain of private and public LANs.
Interoperability
The capacity to function in conjunction with other devices.
Used primarily to indicate the ability of different vendors’
networking products to work together cohesively.
IP
Internet Protocol.
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IP Address to Mbps
IP Address
Internet Protocol address. The IP address is associated, by
the network manager or network designer, to a specific
interface. The availability of IP addresses is controlled by
the IANA.
ISO
International Organization for Standardization. The ISO
has developed a standard model on which network
operation is based, called the OSI Model.
Jitter
Degradation of network signals due to a loss of
synchronization of the electrical signals. Jitter is often a
result of passing a signal through too many repeaters.
LAN
Local Area Network.
LANVIEW
A system which relates diagnostic, troubleshooting, and
operational information pertaining to network devices
through the use of prominently displayed LEDs.
LDRAM
Local Dynamic Random Access Memory
Leaf Object
An end unit in a MIB tree. Leaf objects are accessed
through a series of branch groups. Leaf objects are
always individual MIBs.
LED
Light Emitting Diode. A simple electronic light, used in
networking equipment to provide diagnostic indicators.
Also used as a light source for some fiber optic
communications equipment.
Load
An indication of network utilization.
MAC Address
Media Access Control address. The MAC address is
associated, usually at manufacture, with a specific
interface.
Mbps
Megabits Per Second. Mbps indicates the number of
groups of 1000 bits of data that are being transmitted
through an operating network. Mbps can be roughly
assessed as a measure of the operational “speed” of the
network.
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Media to Nanometer
Media
Physical cabling or other method of interconnection
through which network signals are transmitted and
received.
MIB
Management Information Base. A database of data related
to a specific management or manageable network device,
which may be viewed or modified through SNMP
commands.
MIB Tree
The MIB Tree is the collection of all MIBs that can be
used to monitor or control a network device. MIB Trees
are made up of several branch groups which lead to leaf
objects, or MIBs.
Micron (µ)
A micrometer, one millionth of a meter.
MIM
Media Interface Module. See also: Module.
MissionCritical
Vital to the operation of a network, company, or agency.
Modular
Chassis
A device which provides power, cooling, interconnection,
and monitoring functions to a series of flexible and
centralized modules for the purposes of creating a
network or networks.
Module
A discrete device which is placed in a modular chassis to
provide functionality which may include, but is not limited
to; bridging, routing, connectivity, and repeating. Modules
are easily installed and removed. Also, any device
designed to be placed in another device in order to operate.
See also: BRIM, EPIM.
Multichannel
A Cabletron Ethernet design which provides three separate
network channels (of Ethernet or Token Ring architecture)
through the backplane of a chassis, allowing for the
creation of multiple networks in a single chassis.
Multimode
A type of fiber optics in which light travels in multiple
modes, or wavelengths. Signals in Multimode fiber optics
are typically driven by LEDs.
Nanometer
One billionth of a meter.
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Node to Port Assignment
Node
Any single end station on a network capable of receiving,
processing, and transmitting packets.
NVRAM
Non-Volatile Random Access Memory. Memory which is
protected from elimination during shutdown and between
periods of activity, frequently through the use of batteries.
Octet
A numerical value made up of eight binary places (bits).
Octets can represent decimal numbers from zero (0000
0000) to 255 (1111 1111).
OID
Object Identifier.
OSI Model
Open Standards Interconnect. A model of the way in
which network communications should proceed from the
user process to the physical media and back.
Out-Of-Band
Performed without requiring the operation of the network
architecture. Most commonly used in reference to local
management operations.
Packet
A discrete collection of bits that form a block of
information. Packets are similar to frames, but may be
made up of control information (frames) or data to be
transmitted.
Plenum
A cabling term which indicates a cable with insulating
material that is considered safe to use in return-air plenum
spaces (in contrast to PVC insulation) due to its low
relative toxicity if ignited.
Port
A physical connector which is used as an interface to
cabling with modular or pinned connectors. Ports are
associated with Interfaces.
Port
Assignment
The association, through software management, of specific
ports on a network device to specific channels of a
backplane. This assignment is done on an individual port
basis.
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EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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Protocol to SDRAM
Protocol
A set of rules governing the flow of information within a
communications infrastructure. Protocols control
operations such as frame format, timing, and error
correction. See also Architecture.
PVC
Polyvinyl Chloride. A material commonly used in the
fabrication of cable insulation. This term is used to
describe a non-plenum rated insulating material. See also
Plenum.
Redundant
Extra or contingent. A redundant system is one that is held
in reserve until an occurrence such as a failure of the
primary system causes it to be required.
Repeater
A network device consisting of a receiver and transmitter
which is used to regenerate a network signal to increase
the distance it may traverse.
RJ45
A modular connector style used with twisted pair cabling.
The RJ45 connector resembles the modern home
telephone connector (RJ11).
RMIM
Repeating Media Interface Module. A term used to
indicate a family of Cabletron Ethernet Media Interface
Modules (See MIM) which are capable of performing
their own repeater functions.
RMON
Remote MONitoring. RMON is a network management
standard which provides more detailed network
information and status reporting than SNMP.
Router
A router is a device which connects two or more different
network segments, but allows information to flow between
then when necessary. The router, unlike a bridge,
examines the data contained in every packet it receives for
more detailed information. Based on this information, the
router decides wether to block the packet from the rest of
the network or transmit it, and will attempt to send the
packet by the most efficient path through the network.
SDRAM
Shared Dynamic Random Access Memory.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
GL-11
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Segment to SQE
Segment
A portion of a network which is separated from other
networks. A segment may be one portion of a bridged,
switched, or routed network. Segments must be capable of
operating as their own networks, without requiring the
services of other portions of the network.
Server
A workstation or host device that performs services for
other devices (clients) on the network.
SIMM
Single In-line Memory Module. A collection of Random
Access Memory microprocessors which are placed on a
single, replaceable printed circuit board. These SIMMs
may be added to some devices to expand the capacity of
certain types of memory.
Single Mode
A type of fiber optics in which light travels in one
predefined mode, or wavelength. Signals in single mode
fiber optics are typically driven by lasers. The use of lasers
and the transmission characteristics of single mode fiber
optics allow the media to cover greater distances than
multimode fiber optics.
SMA
Sub-Miniature Assembly. A modular connector and port
system used in multimode fiber optic cabling. The SMA
connector is threaded, and is screwed into an SMA port.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. SNMP is a
standardized set of network monitoring tools. See also
RMON.
Spanning Tree
A mathematical comparison and decision algorithm
performed by Ethernet bridges at power-up. Spanning tree
detects the presence of data loops and allows the bridges to
selectively activate some ports while others remain in a
standby condition, avoiding the data loops and providing
redundant paths in the event of bridge failures.
SQE
Signal Quality Error. A self-monitoring test performed by
some Ethernet equipment which examines the status of the
device’s connection to the network at arbitrary and
predefined intervals.
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ST to Throughput
ST
Straight-Tip. A modular connector and port system used
with both multimode and single mode fiber optic cabling.
The ST connector utilizes an insert and twist-lock
mechanism.
Station
See node.
STP
Shielded Twisted Pair. Refers to a type of cabling, most
commonly used in Token Ring networks, which consists
of several strands of cables surrounded by foil shielding,
which are twisted together. See also UTP.
StraightThrough
A length of multi-stranded cable in which the transmit
wire(s) of one end is/are passed directly through the cable
to the same location on the other end. Straight-through
cables are used for most facility cabling. See also crossover.
Subnet
A physical network within an IP network.
Subnet Mask
A 32-bit quantity which may be set up in SNMP
management devices to indicate which bits in an IP
address identify the physical network.
Switch
A network device which connects two or more separate
network segments and allows traffic to be passed between
them when necessary. A switch determines if a packet
should be blocked or transmitted based on the destination
address contained in that packet.
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol.
Terminal
A device for displaying information and relaying
communications. Terminals do not perform any processing
of data, but instead access processing-capable systems and
allow users to control that system.
Throughput
The rate at which discrete quantities of information
(typically measured in Mbps) are received by or
transmitted through a specific device.
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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Token to UTP
Token
A particular type of frame which informs a station in the
Token Ring and FDDI network architectures that it may
transmit data for a specified length of time. Once that time
has expired, the station must stop transmitting and pass the
token along to the next station in the network.
Token Ring
A network architecture which requires that stations only
transmit data when they have been given permission by the
reception of a Token, and dictates that stations will receive
information at pre-determined intervals and in a definite
series.
Topology
The physical organization of stations and devices into a
network.
Transceiver
A device which transmits and receives. A transceiver
provides the electrical or optical interface to the network
media, and may convert signals from one media for use by
another.
Trap
See Alarm.
User
Any person who utilizes a workstation or node on the
network. Anyone who will complain if the network is not
operating.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair. A type of network media which
consists of a number of individual insulated cable strands
which are twisted together in pairs.
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EMM-E6 User’s Guide
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INDEX
Numerics
C
10BaseT 3-19
C Channel 1-13
cd 13-5
Channel B 1-13
Channel C 1-13
Channel D 1-15
Channel E 1-16
Channel F 1-16
Channels A, B, C 1-12
Class A/B/C 1-24
Collision handling 1-18
Command Set 13-3
Community Names 1-21, 3-5
Setting 6-1
Connecting to the Network 3-18
Crosstalk 2-3
ctron 13-5
CXRMIM 2-7
A
A Channel 1-12
Address Classes
identifying 1-25
Addressing 1-22
ARP B-2
arp 13-11
Attenuation
Multimode 2-4
SingleMode 2-5
Twisted Pair 2-3
B
B Channel 1-13
Backplane 1-10
Basic read only 1-21
Basic-Read 6-2
Baud Rate Default 3-4
BOOTP 3-4
BPDU 1-19
branch 13-4
Bridge 1-17
BRIM 1-16
BRIMs 1-5, 3-10
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
D
D Channel 1-15
Data Link Level 1-17
Data loops (STA) 1-19
Default Gateway 1-30
Default Gateway, setting 7-6
Device Statistics screen 11-1
Diagnostic LEDs 14-1
Dimensions A-4
Dip Switches 3-3
dir 13-6
Distributed LAN Monitor (DLM)
1-9
done 13-16
Dot notation 13-4
Dotted Decimal Notation 1-23
Download OIDs 15-7
Index-i
CH1Book Page ii Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
E
I
E Channel 1-16
Eavesdrop Prevention 1-33
EMM-E6
Features 1-4
Enabling Ports 7-9
EPIMs 1-7
Errors, statistics 11-2
exit 13-16
IANA 1-23
Image File - Download 15-1
Impedance
10BaseT 2-2
Insertion Loss
10BaseT 2-2
Installing 3-13
Interface number 7-2
Introduction 1-1
Intruder Prevention 1-33
IP addresses 1-23
F
F Channel 1-16
Fault Tolerant Wiring 2-12
Filter 1-18
Filter Rate A-1
Firmware Upgrades 15-1
Flash Memory 1-7
Flexible Network Bus 1-10
Forced download 15-1
FORMIM-22 2-7
Forward Rate A-1
Forwarding 1-18
G
GET 1-21
get 13-6
Grounding 2-6
H
L
LANVIEW 14-1
CLN 14-3
CPU 14-2
RCV 14-2
STBY 14-2
XMT 14-3
LANVIEWSECURE 1-33
Latency A-1
LEDs 1-33, 14-1
Link Length
10BaseT 2-2
Multimode fiber 2-4
Single Mode 2-5
Thin coax 2-6
Local Download 15-1
ls 13-6
help 13-7
Host ID 1-23
Host IP Address 7-4
Index-ii
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
CH1Book Page iii Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
M
P
MAC address 1-22
Memory 3-6, A-1
EEPROM 1-7
Local Dynamic 1-8
Shared Dynamic 1-8
MIB 1-22
access 13-2
description 13-1
hierarchy 13-1
managing devices 13-1
mib2 13-7
Mode Switches 3-3
Multi Media Access Center 1-10
Partitioning Networks 1-25
Password 3-5
Screen 5-1
Setting 6-1
ping 13-12
Ports
enabling 7-9
Pinouts A-3
unlocking 7-9
Propagation Delay
10BaseT 2-3
multimode fiber 2-4
pwd 13-8
N
Q
Natural Mask 1-26
netstat 13-12
Network ID 1-23
next 13-7
Non-Volatile RAM 3-5
quit 13-16
O
OID 1-22, B-1
description 13-1
editing/viewing 9-1
getting 9-4
setting 9-5
OSI model 1-17
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
R
Read only 1-21
Read write 1-21
Read-Only 6-2
Read-Write 6-2
Remote runtime download 15-1
Requirements
10BaseT 2-2
Fiber Optic 2-4, 2-5
Thin Coax 2-6
Reset Switch 1-33, 14-7
RIC MIM 1-13, 2-7
RMON
Groups Supported 1-8
Index-iii
CH1Book Page iv Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
S
T
Safety A-4
Sample Configurations 2-9
Security 1-33
Community names 1-21
SET 1-21
set 13-8
SIMM Upgrade 3-6
Slash notation 13-4
SNMP 1-21
SNMP Tools screen 9-1
SNMP Traps 8-1
snmpbranch 13-13
snmpget 13-13
snmpset 13-14
snmptree 13-14
Spanning Tree Algorithm 1-19
Specifications A-1
Environmental A-3
Statistics, viewing 11-1
su 13-9
Subnet 1-26
Subnet address 1-25
Subnet Mask 1-26
Modifying 7-5
Operation 1-30
Super user 1-21, 6-2
Default password 5-2
Technical Support 1-35
Telnet 13-2
Terminals, configuration 4-1
THN-MIM 3-4
TPRMIM 2-7
TPXMIM 2-8
traceroute 13-15
Transceivers 2-6
Trap 1-21
Trap Table, configuring 8-2
tree 13-9
Troubleshooting 14-1
Index-iv
U
Unlocking Ports 7-9
Unpacking 3-2
Update Frequency 11-4
UPS support 7-8
W
whoami 13-10
EMM-E6 User’s Guide
CH1Book Page 5 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
EMM-E6 QUICK REFERENCE CARD
LANVIEW LEDs
LED
CPU
EMM-E6
STBY
A, B, C, D
BRIM-A100
RESET
CPU
STBY
RCV
Flashing Green: Board Operating
Properly.
Red: CPU error condition.
SN
D
DESCRIPTION
C
B
A
RCV
A, B, C, D
XMT
Amber indicates port or interface
placed in standby state.
Green indicates valid link from station
to EMM-E6 interface.
Amber indicates segment receiving
traffic.
CLN
XMT
A, B, C, D
CLN
A, B, C, D
Green indicates segment is
transmitting traffic.
Flashing red indicates port in standby
due to spanning tree operation.
Red indicates collision detected on
segment. Occasional activation of CLN
LED is normal.
SWITCH SETTINGS
Switch
Function
1
Cabletron Systems Use Only. Must be in OFF position.
2
Cabletron Systems Use Only. Must be in OFF position.
3
Cabletron Systems Use Only. Must be in OFF position.
4
MIMREV. Should be OFF unless THN-MIM s with part numbers below
9000043-05 are located in the MMAC.
5
Baud Rate Default. Sets local management console port baud rate. OFF
(default) = 9600 Baud, ON = 2400 baud.
6
Forced Download. When toggled, forces image files to be loaded from
BOOTP server by clearing information from NVRAM.
7
NVRAM Reset. When toggled, deletes user parameters stored in NVRAM
and returns these parameters to factory default settings.
8
Password Default. When toggled, deletes user defined passwords stored
in NVRAM and returns these passwords to factory default settings (public
or [Return]).
EMM-E6 QUICK REFERENCE CARD
CH1Book Page 6 Wednesday, March 20, 1996 7:48 AM
EMM-E6 QUICK REFERENCE CARD
INSTALLATION
•
Slide the EMM-E6 into the first and second slots of the MMAC chassis (as
shown below).
EMM-E6
•
•
•
•
Secure the module by tightening the knurled knobs at the top and bottom of
the module.
Power on the MMAC chassis. Monitor the state of the CPU LED.
The CPU LED will flash, indicating the EMM-E6 is in boot state. During this
period, which may last up to 5 minutes, the STBY LEDs will blink to indicate
the module’s boot state.
Fully operational EMM-E6 should display the following LED states:
CPU LED flashing, indicating normal operation.
STBY LEDs lit or unlit, depending on the results of
spanning tree operation.
Appropriate BRIM/EPIM LEDs lit.
ON LED lit for the active Channel D EPIM.
TERMINAL SETUP
Use the following setup parameters for a VT Terminal or Terminal Emulation
package to connect to Local Management functions.
Interpret
Controls
Columns:
80 Columns
Controls:
Scroll:
Jump Scroll
Text Cursor:
Cursor
Cursor Style:
Underline
Mode:
VT300, 7 Bit
ID Number:
VT320 or
VT100
Cursor Keys:
Normal
Transmit:
Bits:
Local Echo:
Keys:
9600
Receive:
8 Bits
No Local
Echo
Typewriter
Keys
9600
Autowrap:
XOFF:
No Autowrap
XOFF at 64
Parity:
No Parity
Stop Bit:
Port:
DEC-423
Auto
Answerback:
No Auto
Answerback
Warning
Bell:
Warning Bell
Margin Bell:
Margin Bell
EMM-E6 QUICK REFERENCE CARD
1 Stop Bit
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