teaming up to save you money!

teaming up to save you money!
TEAMING UP
TO SAVE
YOU MONEY!
ELECTRICITY USAGE
kWh use = 1000 watts x 1 hour / 1,000 watts = 1 kWh
Electricity use is on the rise in most homes. One reason we’re using more electricity
is because we’re using more equipment and gadgets. Along with our traditional
home appliances we have computer systems, entertainment centers, video games,
battery chargers for our cell phones and MP3 devices, and the list continues to grow!
Your cost = 1 kWh x $.10 = $.10 or 10 cents
Before you turn on your television, or plug in your new refrigerator, take a minute
to think about how much electricity it will use. How much does it impact your
utility bill? Does your bill seem high lately and you don’t know why? You can solve
the mystery by learning basic measurements of electricity and by using the handy
ENERGY USAGE CHART on the next few pages. Remember, the chart provides
average use – energy-efficiency appliances will use less, older models will use more.
HOW TO ESTIMATE ENERGY USE AND COST
Appliance and equipment wattage and operating time can vary greatly. The following
information will show you how to determine where your energy dollars are being spent.
Example:
A kitchen light with two 75 watt bulbs, on 2.5 hours per day:
– 2 bulbs x 75 watts = 150 watts
– 150 watts x 2.5 hours = 375 watt-hours per day
– 375 watt hours/1000 = .375 kWh per day
– .375 kWh x 30 days = 11.25 kWh per month
– 11.25 kWh x $.10 = $1.125/month
HOW TO REDUCE YOUR ENERGY USE
When you’re ready to replace your appliances or equipment, look for
products with the ENERGY STAR® label. They use less energy while
providing the same performance and features as conventional models.
You’ll also get great rebates on your purchase of ENERGY STAR®
products through Austin, Owatonna, and Rochester Public Utilities’ CONSERVE
& SAVE rebate program. See the back cover of this brochure for more information.
Step 1 – How is it measured?
The cost of electricity is determined by the number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) used
during a billing period. The first step is to determine your cost per kilowatt-hour.
ENERGY USAGE CHART
$ Amount of Electric Bill / kWh used = kWh Cost
Appliance or Equipment
Example: $100 / 1000 kWh = $.10 per kWh
Step 2 – How much does it use?
Since the wattage of an appliance determines the electrical usage per hour, the
second step is to determine the wattage. The wattage of an appliance is found on the
serial plate. But it is possible that the electrical use will be expressed in volts and
amperes, rather than watts. If so, multiply volts by amperes to determine the wattage.
Example: 120 volts x 12.1 amps = 1,452 watts
Microwave Serial Plate:
Amps 12.1
Hertz 60
Form no. 00000
Code 0
Volts 120
Watts 1452
Model no. 0000
Serial no. 00000
Step 3 – What is the cost?
If you have an appliance that is rated at 1000 watts (1 kilowatt) and you use it for
1 hour, you have used 1 kilowatt-hour of electricity (watts/1,000 = kilowatts (kW)
kW x 1 hour of use = 1 kilowatt hour (kWh). How much does this cost you?
Multiply the kWh by the rate to find your hourly cost.
–2–
Typical
Wattage
Rating
Avg Hours
used per
Month*
Avg kWh
Avg Cost
Used per
per Month
Month (10¢ per kWh)
4,000
3,000
2,300
180
180
180
720
540
414
$72.00
$54.00
$41.40
1,070
800
730
1,500
180
180
180
240
193
144
131
360
$19.30
$14.40
$13.10
$36.00
100
40
150
200
240
240
240
240
24
9.6
36
48
$2.40
$0.96
$3.60
$4.80
900
600
175
175
240
240
240
180
216
144
42
31.5
$21.60
$14.40
$4.20
$3.15
COMFORT CONDITIONING
Air Conditioning Central (30,000 BTU)
Conventional SEER 7.5
Conventional SEER 10
Energy Star SEER 13
Air Conditioning Room (8,000 BTU)
Conventional EER 7.5
Conventional EER 10
Energy Star EER 11
Electric Space Heater
Fans
Conventional Ceiling
Energy Star Ceiling
Portable
Window
Dehumidifier
Conventional (40 pint)
Energy Star (40 pint)
Electric Blanket
Humidifier (portable)
*based on 720 hours/month
–3–
Appliance or Equipment
Typical
Wattage
Rating
Avg Hours
used per
Month*
Avg kWh
Avg Cost
Used per
per Month
Month (10¢ per kWh)
CD Player (5 disk Changer)
Computer Components
20
CPU
Modem
Monitor (CRT)
Wireless Router
Laptop
60
20
80
7
50
120
120
120
720
120
7.2
2.4
9.6
5.04
4.5
$0.72
$0.24
$0.96
$0.50
$0.45
10
0.2
$0.02
180
650
20
8
100
30
40
40
5
5
10
730
120
10
720
10
0.9
3.25
0.2
6
12
0.3
28.8
0.4
$0.09
$0.33
$0.02
$0.60
$1.20
$0.03
$2.88
$0.04
17
197
187
30
30
30
0.51
5.91
5.61
$0.05
$0.59
$0.56
25
87
290
220
350
300
120
120
120
120
120
120
3
10.44
34.8
26.4
42
36
$0.30
$1.04
$3.48
$2.64
$4.20
$3.60
Printers
DVD Player
Radio
Satellite Dish
Stereo
TIVO
VCR
Video Games
Nintendo® Wii™
Sony Playstation®3
Xbox 360
Television (4 hours per day)
Digital Cable TV Box
Standard TV – 36”
LCD 50”
Energy Star LCD 50”
Plasma 50”
Energy Star Plasma 50”
Brew Cycle
Warm
Microwave (full power)
Toaster (two slices)
Toaster Oven
Slow Cooker
Oven
Standard
Range
200
600
10
15
2
9
$0.20
$0.90
1,100
70
1,500
1,100
1,250
200
8
57
7
3
1
50
9
4
10
3
1.25
10
$0.90
$0.40
$1.00
$0.30
$0.13
$1.00
3,200
1,000
12
15
38.4
15
$3.84
$1.50
2,000
1,800
25
25
58
46
$5.80
$4.60
Dishwasher (1 load/day) (not including hot water)
Conventional Unit
Energy Star Unit
*based on 720 hours/month
Avg Hours
used per
Month*
Avg kWh
Avg Cost
Used per
per Month
Month (10¢ per kWh)
200
180
375
375
75
67.5
$7.50
$6.75
-
-
60
48
48
38
80
$6.00
$4.80
$4.80
$3.80
$8.00
3,500
25
87.5
$8.75
256
166
1,200
75
25
25
4
13
6.4
4.15
5
1
$0.64
$0.42
$0.50
$0.10
7
100
27
75
23
60
13
730
150
150
150
150
150
150
5
15
4.05
11.25
3.45
9
1.95
$0.50
$1.5
$0.41
$1.13
$0.35
$0.90
$0.20
8
4
720
90
5.76
0.36
$0.58
$0.04
6
12
75
350
1,400
4
400
1,000
720
180
240
3
2
12
360
6
4.32
2.16
18
1
3
0.048
144
6
$0.43
$0.22
$1.80
$0.10
$0.30
$0.005
$14.40
$0.60
5,000
1,000
183
183
915
183
$91.50
$18.30
Freezer
Freezer (16 cf, upright)
Energy Star Freezer
Refrigerator
Standard Side-by-side, 25 cf
Energy Star Side-by-side, 25 cf
Standard Top Freezer 18 cf
Energy Star Top Freezer 18 cf
10-15 Year old, 17 cf
LAUNDRY
Clothes Dryer
Clothes Washer
Standard Washer (not including hot water)
Energy Star Washer (not including hot water)
Iron, Hand
Sewing Machine
LIGHTING
Nightlight
100 Watt Incandescent
27 Watt Compact Fluorescent (= 100 watt)
75 Watt Incandescent
23 Watt Compact Fluorescent (= 75 watt)
60 Watt Incandescent
13 Watt Compact Fluorescent (= 60 watt)
SMALL APPLIANCES/HOUSEWARES
KITCHEN
Blender
Bread Maker
Coffee Maker (drip)
Typical
Wattage
Rating
KITCHEN
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Ink Jet Printer
Laser Printer
Appliance or Equipment
–4–
Clock Radio
Cell Phone Charger (on, charging)
Cordless Phone &
Answering Machine (24 hrs/day always on)
Digital Picture Frames (6 hours a day)
Electric Blanket
Garage Door Opener
Hair Dryer (hand held)
i-Pod (charging)
Medical – Oxygen Concentrator
Vacuum Cleaner
MISCELLANEOUS
Hot Tub – Electric Heater (240v)
Hot Tub Pump (Circulation)
*based on 720 hours/month
–5–
VAMPIRE POWER – JOIN THE HUNT FOR VAMPIRES!
Although you may not realize it, your house is full of vampires! As you sleep, when
you’re awake, and while you’re out, these vampires have the run of your house.
used when devices are running, or deceivingly idle, you'll truly discover how much
energy and money can be saved by replacing, unplugging, or using a smart power
strip to cut off any power to that item.
4. Turn your computer off: Computers in sleep mode can cost an additional $70
Vampire Power is a phenomenon most of us passively permit. It is a plague that
consumes electricity while draining your wallet and polluting the atmosphere in
the process. A vampire load is the power that is sucked from a piece of electronic
equipment when it is seemingly turned off but still in standby mode, or not in use.
A growing number of household electrical devices are designed to draw power
24 hours a day, seven days a week. Even when they are turned “off” these devices
continue to use electricity to operate features such as clocks, timers, and touch
pads, or to receive signals from remote controls.
THE HUNT
The first challenge is to identify products that
draw Vampire Power. Here are clues to recognizing
products that draw power continuously:
Products with Vampire Power use:
• A remote control
• An external power supply
• A digital display, LED status light, or digital clock
• A battery charger
• A soft-touch keypad
5 TIPS TO STRIP THE FANGS OUT OF
VAMPIRE POWER:
1. Get unplugged: All of your chargers (cell phone, MP3, laptop, and even electric
toothbrushes) continue to draw electricity even when the device is not charging.
Only 5 percent of the power drawn by a cell phone charger is used to charge the
phone – the other 95 percent is wasted when it is left plugged into the wall.
2. Use a power strip: Choose a power strip with a switch to control clusters of
products. When you’re not using products, turn the power strip off. The most
likely targets for clusters are computer equipment (PC, monitor, printer, scanner,
speakers, etc.), entertainment centers (TV, DVD player, speakers, game consoles),
audio equipment (receiver, amplifier, CD player), and battery chargers.
3. Use a Kill A Watt™ Meter: Austin, Owatonna, and Rochester Public
Utilities all have Kill A Watt™ meters that you can use in your home for
free! This device will tell you how much electricity products are using
whether turned on or off. Once you know how much power is being
–6–
per year. If you are unable to do so, at least make sure the computer goes into a
low-power sleep, standby, or hibernate mode. And watch out for those screen
savers! Graphic intense screen savers can actually waste power.
5. Look for the STAR: Products that have earned the ENERGY STAR®
use less energy while providing the same performance and features as
conventional models. The ENERGY STAR® is awarded to products
that meet or exceed the established criteria for energy efficiency; they are as much
as 10 to 50 percent more efficient than conventional counterparts. They use less
energy and save you money.
You’ll also get great rebates on your purchase of ENERGY STAR® products
through Austin, Owatonna, and Rochester Public Utilities’ CONSERVE & SAVE
rebate program. See the back cover of this brochure for more information.
VAMPIRE POWER CHART
Cell Phone Charger (not charging, but plugged in)
Coffee Pot
Desktop PC (computer and LCD Monitor)
Computer Speakers
Computer Printer
Digital Cable Box
Dishwasher
Standard DVD
Energy Star DVD
Garage Door Opener
i-Pod Charger (not charging, but plugged in)
Microwave
Oven
Standard TV
Energy Star TV
Standard Stereo (rack system)
Energy Star Radio
Standard VCR
Energy Star VCR
Video Game Console
*based on 720 hours/month
Watts in
Standby
Energy
(Vampire
Load)
Estimated
Hours Off
per Month
(Vampire
Energy)*
1
1
5
2
6
35
1.8
4.5
0.9
2.5
1
3
3
5.9
2.5
3.2
0.9
5.1
3.5
1
630
655
600
600
715
600
695
710
710
717
630
713
670
600
600
710
710
710
710
690
–7–
Avg
Estimated
kWh/
Monthly
Used per
Cost
Month (10¢ per kWh)
0.63
.66
3.00
1.20
4.29
21.00
1.20
3.20
0.64
1.79
0.63
2.14
2.01
3.54
1.50
2.27
0.64
3.62
2.49
0.69
$0.06
$0.06
$0.30
$0.12
$0.43
$2.10
$0.12
$0.32
$0.06
$0.18
$0.06
$0.21
$0.20
$0.35
$0.15
$0.23
$0.06
$0.36
$0.25
$0.07
WHAT IS CONSERVE & SAVE?
Austin Utilities, Owatonna Public Utilities, and Rochester Public Utilities offer dozens
of rebates to customers who purchase energy efficient appliances and equipment.
Visit our web sites for a complete, up-to-date list of eligible products.
With CONSERVE & SAVE, our rebates will save you money on your purchase,
and the new appliances and equipment will save you energy and money on your
utility bills. Saving energy also helps our environment by using less of our valuable
natural resources.
HOW DOES CONSERVE & SAVE WORK?
1) Purchase appliances and equipment with the ENERGY STAR® label or that
meet our Minimum Efficiency Requirements. (see applications for Terms & Conditions)
2) Get a rebate application from your dealer, contractor, utility, or download them
from our web sites:
• www.austinutilities.com
• www.owatonnautilities.com
• www.rpu.org
3) Fill out the application completely, attach your sales receipt and any other
required documentation, and send it to your utility.
TEAMING UP TO SAVE YOU MONEY!
Austin Utilities
400 - 4th Street NE
Austin, MN 55912
507.433.8886
www.austinutilities.com
Please Print on Recycled Paper
Owatonna Public Utilities
P.O. Box 800
Owatonna, MN 55060
507.451.2480
www.owatonnautilities.com
Rochester Public Utilities
4000 East River Road NE
Rochester, MN 55906-2813
507.280.1500
www.rpu.org
0209
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