Installation Guide - Oracle Help Center

Installation Guide - Oracle Help Center
Database
Installation Guide
12c Release 2 (12.2) for Microsoft Windows
E50717-19
July 2017
Database Installation Guide, 12c Release 2 (12.2) for Microsoft Windows
E50717-19
Copyright © 1996, 2017, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Primary Author: Sunil Surabhi
Contributing Authors: Reema Khosla, Janet Stern, Prakash Jashnani
Contributors: Barb Glover, Eric Belden, Sudip Datta, David Friedman, Alex Keh, Peter LaQuerre, Rich
Long, Matt McKerley, Sham Rao Pavan, Hanlin Qian, Janelle Simmons, Helen Slattery, Sujatha Tolstoy,
Michael Verheij, Madhu Velukur, Sergiusz Wolicki, Sue Mavris, Mohammed Shahnawaz Quadri, Vishal
Saxena, Krishna Itikarlapall, Santanu Datta, Alex Keh
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Contents
Preface ............................................................................................................................................................... xv
Audience ...................................................................................................................................................... xv
Documentation Accessibility .................................................................................................................... xv
Accessing Documentation ........................................................................................................................ xvi
Platform-Specific Documentation................................................................................................... xvi
Product Documentation ................................................................................................................... xvi
Related Documentation ............................................................................................................................ xvi
Conventions...............................................................................................................................................
xvii
Changes in this Release for Oracle Database Installation Guide ........................................ xix
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) .................................................................................. xix
New Features ..................................................................................................................................... xix
Deprecated Features........................................................................................................................ xxiv
Desupported Features .................................................................................................................... xxiv
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1) ................................................................................ xxiv
New Features ................................................................................................................................... xxiv
Deprecated Features.......................................................................................................................
xxvii
Desupported Features ..................................................................................................................
xxviii
1 Oracle Database Installation Checklist
1.1 Server Hardware Checklist for Oracle Database Installation ....................................................
1-1
1.2 Operating System Checklist for Oracle Database Installation on Microsoft Windows .........
1-2
1.3 Server Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database Installation..............................................
1-2
1.4 Oracle User Environment Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database Installation ...........
1-3
1.5 Storage Checklist for Oracle Database Installation .....................................................................
1-4
1.6 Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database ........................................................................
1-4
1.7 Creating a Database After Installation ..........................................................................................
1-7
2 Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks
2.1 Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements.................................................................
2-2
2.1.1 Hardware Component Requirements for Windows x64.................................................
2-2
iii
2.1.2 Hard Disk Space Requirements ..........................................................................................
2-3
2.1.3 Verifying Hardware Requirements ....................................................................................
2-4
2.2 Oracle Database Software Requirements ......................................................................................
2-5
2.3 Windows Certification and Web Browser Support .....................................................................
2-6
2.3.1 Remote Desktop Services .....................................................................................................
2-6
2.3.2 Installation Requirements for Web Browsers....................................................................
2-7
2.3.3 Default Share Configuration Requirement........................................................................
2-7
2.4 Reviewing Operating System Security Common Practices........................................................
2-7
2.5 Confirming Host Name Resolution ...............................................................................................
2-8
2.6 Individual Component Requirements...........................................................................................
2-8
2.6.1 Configuring Disk Storage for Oracle Data Files and Recovery Files .............................
2-8
2.6.2 Creating Directories for Oracle Data Files or Recovery Files .........................................
2-9
2.6.3 Oracle Database Security Strong Authentication Requirements.................................. 2-12
2.6.4 Oracle Enterprise Manager Requirements ...................................................................... 2-12
2.6.5 Oracle-Managed Files Requirements ............................................................................... 2-12
2.6.6 Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) Writer ...................................................... 2-12
3 Overview of Oracle Database Installation
3.1 New Oracle Products and Features Installed with this Release ................................................
3-1
3.2 Planning Your Installation...............................................................................................................
3-1
3.3 Installation Considerations .............................................................................................................
3-3
3.3.1 Installation Differences Between Windows and UNIX Systems....................................
3-4
3.3.2 Recommended File System ..................................................................................................
3-5
3.3.3 Hardware and Software Certification ................................................................................
3-5
3.3.4 Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server .........................................................
3-6
3.3.5 Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services ...........................................................................
3-6
3.3.6 Oracle Universal Installer Overview ..................................................................................
3-6
3.3.7 Oracle Base Directory ...........................................................................................................
3-7
3.3.8 Oracle Home Directory.........................................................................................................
3-8
3.3.9 Oracle Inventory Directory .................................................................................................
3-9
3.3.10 Installing Oracle Database Vault in an Oracle Data Guard Environment ..................
3-9
3.3.11 Oracle Database Vault Default Audit Policy and Initialization Parameters ..............
3-9
3.3.12 Consider Memory Allocation and Automatic Memory Management ........................
3-9
3.4 Oracle Database Installation Methods......................................................................................... 3-10
3.4.1 Interactive Installation Types ............................................................................................ 3-10
3.4.2 Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files................................................ 3-11
3.5 Database Configuration Options.................................................................................................. 3-11
3.5.1 Creating a Database After Installation ............................................................................. 3-12
3.6 Database Backup and Recovery Options .................................................................................... 3-13
3.6.1 Configuring Recovery......................................................................................................... 3-13
3.7 Migration Considerations.............................................................................................................. 3-13
iv
4 Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database
4.1 Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users...........................................................
4-1
4.1.1 About the Oracle Installation User .....................................................................................
4-2
4.1.2 Creating Oracle Home User.................................................................................................
4-2
4.1.3 Understanding the Oracle Inventory Directory and the Oracle Inventory Group......
4-3
4.1.4 Operating System Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation ....................
4-4
4.1.5 Operating System Groups and Users for Job Role Separation .......................................
4-7
4.2 Stopping Existing Oracle Services................................................................................................ 4-11
4.3 Configuring User Accounts........................................................................................................... 4-12
4.3.1 Configuring Environment Variables for the Software Installation Owner ................ 4-12
4.3.2 Managing User Accounts with User Account Control .................................................. 4-12
5 Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
5.1 About Image-Based Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation......................................................
5-3
5.2 Requirements for an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
Installation............................................................................................................................................
5-4
5.2.1 System Requirements ...........................................................................................................
5-4
5.2.2 Memory Requirements .........................................................................................................
5-4
5.2.3 Disk Space Requirements.....................................................................................................
5-4
5.3 Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM ....................................................................................................
5-5
5.3.1 About Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM.............................................................................
5-5
5.3.2 Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM Support on Windows..................................................
5-5
5.3.3 Restrictions and Guidelines for Oracle ACFS ...................................................................
5-6
5.4 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration ...............................................
5-6
5.4.1 Managing Disk Groups for Older Database Versions .....................................................
5-7
5.4.2 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations ...........................
5-7
5.4.3 Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management................................. 5-8
5.5 Configuring Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Groups Manually Using Oracle
ASMCA............................................................................................................................................... 5-17
5.6 Testing the Oracle Automatic Storage Management Installation............................................ 5-17
5.7 About Upgrading Existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management Instances.................... 5-18
5.8 Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) Using a
Software-Only Installation............................................................................................................... 5-18
5.8.1 Installing the Software Binaries......................................................................................... 5-19
5.8.2 Configuring Software Binaries for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone
Server (Oracle Restart) ............................................................................................................. 5-19
5.9 Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle
Restart)................................................................................................................................................ 5-20
5.9.1 Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) with a
New Database Installation....................................................................................................... 5-21
5.10 Modifying Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) Binaries
After Installation ............................................................................................................................... 5-23
v
6
Installing Oracle Database
6.1 Preinstallation Considerations for Installing Oracle Database ..................................................
6-1
6.1.1 Installation Consideration on Windows ............................................................................
6-2
6.1.2 Performing Multiple Oracle Database Installations.........................................................
6-2
6.1.3 Installing on Systems That Already Have Oracle Components.....................................
6-2
6.1.4 Installing with Minimum Memory Requirements ...........................................................
6-3
6.2 Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines ............................................................
6-3
6.2.1 About Character Set Selection During Installation ..........................................................
6-4
6.2.2 Using an Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Group .....................................
6-5
6.3 Accessing the Installation Software ...............................................................................................
6-6
6.3.1 Installing from a Remote DVD Drive .................................................................................
6-7
6.3.2 Installing on Remote Computers Through Remote Access Software............................
6-8
6.3.3 Downloading Oracle Software ............................................................................................
6-9
6.3.4 Copying the Oracle Database Software to a Hard Disk ................................................ 6-11
6.4 Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages ......................................... 6-12
6.4.1 Configuring Oracle Components to Run in Different Languages ............................... 6-12
6.4.2 Installing Translation Resources ....................................................................................... 6-15
6.5 Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages.................................................... 6-16
6.6 Installing Oracle Database............................................................................................................. 6-17
6.7 Cloning an Oracle Home ............................................................................................................... 6-24
6.7.1 Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager in a Cloned Oracle Home..................... 6-27
7 Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks
7.5 Downloading and Installing the ORAchk Health Check Tool ..................................................
7-2
7.1 Using Oracle9i Language and Definition Files with Oracle Database 12c...............................
7-2
7.2 Downloading and Installing Patch Updates.................................................................................
7-3
7.3 Requirements for Database Password ...........................................................................................
7-4
7.4 Setting Language and Locale Preferences for Client Connections ............................................
7-4
7.6 About Using CVU Cluster Healthchecks After Installation.......................................................
7-5
7.7 Recompiling Invalid Objects on Windows Systems ....................................................................
7-8
7.8 Configuring the Secure Sockets Layer ...........................................................................................
7-8
7.9 Configuring Oracle Components ...................................................................................................
7-8
7.9.1 Configuring Direct NFS Client .......................................................................................... 7-10
7.9.2 Configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway ........................................................................ 7-17
7.9.3 Configuring Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows........................................ 7-17
7.9.4 Configuring Oracle Label Security ................................................................................... 7-17
7.9.5 Configuring the OraClrAgnt Service for Oracle Database Extensions for .NET ....... 7-17
7.9.6 Configuring Oracle Database Vault.................................................................................. 7-18
7.9.7 Configuring Oracle Net Services....................................................................................... 7-18
7.9.8 Installing Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases......................................................... 7-19
7.9.9 Installing the Oracle Text Filtering Component ............................................................. 7-19
7.9.10 Configuring or Reinstalling Oracle XML DB ................................................................ 7-19
vi
7.9.11 Configuring PL/SQL External Procedures ................................................................... 7-19
7.9.12 Configuring Shared Server Support ............................................................................... 7-20
7.9.13 Setting Credentials for the Job System to Work with Oracle Enterprise Manager.. 7-20
7.9.14 Configuring Oracle Database to Communicate with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management .............................................................................................................................. 7-21
7.9.15 Installing Oracle Database Examples ............................................................................. 7-21
7.9.16 Creating the OraMTS Service for Microsoft Transaction Server ................................ 7-21
7.10 Creating a Fast Recovery Area Disk Group.............................................................................. 7-22
7.10.1 About the Fast Recovery Area and the Fast Recovery Area Disk Group ................. 7-22
7.10.2 Creating the Fast Recovery Area Disk Group............................................................... 7-23
7.11 Enabling and Disabling Database Options After Installation ................................................ 7-23
7.12 Changing the Oracle Home User Password ............................................................................. 7-24
7.13 Postinstallation Tasks for SQL Developer................................................................................. 7-25
8 Getting Started with Oracle Database
8.1 Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory Location .............................
8-2
8.2 Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c..............................................
8-2
8.3 Managing Oracle Automatic Storage Management ....................................................................
8-3
8.3.1 Starting and Stopping Oracle Automatic Storage Management ....................................
8-3
8.3.2 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Utilities .............................................................
8-3
8.4 Starting and Stopping an Oracle Database ...................................................................................
8.4.1 Starting and Stopping the Database with Oracle Administration Assistant for
8-4
Windows ......................................................................................................................................
8-4
8.4.2 Starting and Stopping the Database from the Microsoft Windows Services Utility ...
8-5
8.5 Accessing Oracle Database with SQL*Plus...................................................................................
8-5
8.6 Accessing Oracle Database with Oracle SQL Developer ............................................................
8-6
8.7 Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords....................................................................................
8-6
8.7.1 Reviewing Administrative Accounts .................................................................................
8-7
8.7.2 Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords....................................................................... 8-10
8.8 Identifying Databases..................................................................................................................... 8-12
8.9 Locating the Server Parameter File .............................................................................................. 8-13
8.10 Identifying Tablespaces and Data Files ..................................................................................... 8-13
8.11 Locating Redo Log Files............................................................................................................... 8-14
8.12 Locating Control Files .................................................................................................................. 8-15
8.13 Understanding Oracle Database Services on Windows.......................................................... 8-15
9 Removing Oracle Database Software
9.1 About Oracle Deinstallation Options ............................................................................................
9-2
9.2 Example of Running the Deinstallation Tool ...............................................................................
9-6
9.3 Deinstallation Examples for Oracle Database ..............................................................................
9-6
9.4 Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Database.......................................................
9-7
9.5 Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Grid Infrastructure .....................................
9-7
9.6 Downgrading Oracle Restart ..........................................................................................................
9-9
vii
A Installing Java Access Bridge
A.1 Overview of Java Access Bridge 2.0.2........................................................................................... A-1
A.2 Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 .............................................................................................. A-1
B Optimal Flexible Architecture
B.1 About the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard .................................................................... B-1
B.1.1 About Multiple Oracle Homes Support ............................................................................ B-2
B.2 Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database......................................... B-2
B.3 Directory Tree Differences by Release .......................................................................................... B-3
B.3.1 Top-Level Oracle Directory ................................................................................................. B-3
B.3.2 Database File Names ............................................................................................................ B-3
B.3.3 Database File Name Extensions.......................................................................................... B-3
B.4 Optimal Flexible Architecture Directory Naming Conventions ............................................... B-3
B.4.1 ORACLE_BASE Directory Naming Convention ............................................................ B-4
B.4.2 ORACLE_HOME Directory Naming Convention........................................................... B-5
B.4.3 Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR) Directory ........................................................ B-5
B.4.4 ADMIN Directory ................................................................................................................. B-5
B.4.5 ORADATA Directory ........................................................................................................... B-5
B.4.6 RECOVERY_AREA Directory............................................................................................. B-6
B.5 Optimal Flexible Architecture and Multiple Oracle Home Configurations............................ B-6
B.5.1 Specifying an ORACLE_HOME Directory ....................................................................... B-7
B.5.2 Installing a Default Optimal Flexible Architecture Database: Example 1 .................... B-7
B.5.3 Installing a Nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture Database: Example 2............. B-7
B.6 Comparison Between Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and UNIX ...................... B-8
B.6.1 Directory Naming ................................................................................................................. B-9
B.6.2 ORACLE_BASE Directory .................................................................................................. B-9
B.6.3 Support for Symbolic Links on Windows ......................................................................... B-9
B.7 Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure File Mapping ............................................................ B-10
C Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
C.1 How Response Files Work.............................................................................................................. C-2
C.1.1 Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode ................................................. C-3
C.1.2 Using Response Files............................................................................................................ C-3
C.2 Preparing a Response File............................................................................................................... C-4
C.2.1 Editing a Response File Template ..................................................................................... C-4
C.2.2 Saving a Response File......................................................................................................... C-5
C.3 Running Oracle Universal Installer Using the Response File ................................................... C-6
C.4 Running Net Configuration Assistant Using a Response File .................................................. C-7
C.5 Running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File ............................ C-8
C.5.1 Silent Mode of Database Configuration Assistant........................................................... C-9
C.5.2 Running Database Configuration Assistant in Response File Mode ............................ C-9
C.6 Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File Created During Installation .............
viii
C-10
C.6.1 About the Postinstallation Configuration File ..............................................................
C-10
C.6.2 Running Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File ..................................
C-11
C.7 Postinstallation Configuration Using the ConfigToolAllCommands Script........................
C-12
C.8 Using the Installation Response File for Postinstallation Configuration..............................
C-12
D Configuring Networks for Oracle Database
D.1 Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple IP Addresses.................................. D-1
D.2 Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple Aliases ............................................ D-2
D.3 Installing Oracle Database on Nonnetworked Computers ....................................................... D-2
D.4 Installing a Loopback Adapter ...................................................................................................... D-3
D.4.1 Checking if a Loopback Adapter is Installed on Your Computer................................. D-3
D.4.2 Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 7 ................................................................ D-4
D.4.3 Installing Microsoft KM-TEST Loopback Adapter on Windows 8, Windows 8.1,
Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2........................................................... D-5
D.4.4 Removing a Loopback Adapter ......................................................................................... D-6
E Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers
E.1 About Managing Ports .................................................................................................................... E-1
E.2 About Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs........................................................................ E-2
E.3 Oracle Database Component Port Numbers and Protocols....................................................... E-2
E.4 Changing the Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Port ..................................... E-3
F Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Installation
F.1 Verifying Requirements................................................................................................................... F-2
F.2 Encountering Installation Errors .................................................................................................... F-2
F.3 Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session............................................................................... F-3
F.4 Silent Mode Response File Error Handling .................................................................................. F-3
F.5 Troubleshooting Host Name Changes and CSS .......................................................................... F-4
F.6 Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants................................................................................... F-4
F.6.1 Configuration Assistant Failures ........................................................................................ F-5
F.6.2 Irrecoverable Errors .............................................................................................................. F-5
F.7 Troubleshooting Inventory Issues.................................................................................................. F-6
F.8 Troubleshooting Screen Display Issues......................................................................................... F-6
F.9 Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation ........................................................................................ F-6
F.10 Continuing Installations or Upgrades After Server Restarts ................................................... F-6
G
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
G.1 Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client ..............................................................
G-1
G.2 Installing Oracle Database Tools ..................................................................................................
G-3
G.3 Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications ...............................................................
G-7
G.4 Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways) .........................
G-8
Index
ix
x
List of Examples
5-1
5-2
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-4
C-5
G-1
G-2
G-3
G-4
G-5
G-6
Using the asmtool Utility (Command Line).......................................................................... 5-16
Enabling Oracle ACFS on Oracle Restart Configurations................................................... 5-24
Running a Cluster Healthcheck After the Software Installation.......................................... 7-7
Running a Healthcheck for Oracle RAC Database................................................................. 7-8
Using Local and Path NFS Server Entries.............................................................................. 7-14
Using Names in Place of IP Addresses, with Multiple Exports, management and
community............................................................................................................................ 7-14
Using Kerberos Authentication with Direct NFS Export.................................................... 7-15
Running the Chopt Tool........................................................................................................... 7-24
Password response file for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server............. C-11
Password response file for Oracle Database......................................................................... C-11
Response File Passwords for Oracle Grid Infrastructure................................................... C-12
Response File Passwords for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(Oracle Restart).................................................................................................................... C-12
Response File Passwords for Oracle Database..................................................................... C-13
How do I upgrade Oracle Database?....................................................................................... G-3
The computers at my site have been configured to run as a cluster. How should I
install Oracle Database?....................................................................................................... G-3
How do I migrate my non-Oracle databases to Oracle Database?...................................... G-3
How do I perform backup and recovery operations for Oracle Database?....................... G-6
Is Oracle Workflow included with Oracle Database?........................................................... G-7
Is there a migration plan for customers that have built solutions using Oracle
Workflow?.............................................................................................................................. G-7
xi
xii
List of Tables
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
2-1
2-2
2-3
4-1
5-1
5-2
6-1
6-2
7-1
8-1
8-2
A-1
B-1
B-2
B-3
C-1
C-2
E-1
G-1
Server Hardware Checklist for Oracle Database Installation............................................... 1-1
Operating System General Checklist for Oracle Database on Microsoft Windows.......... 1-2
Server Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database............................................................. 1-2
User Environment Configuration for Oracle Database.......................................................... 1-3
Storage Checklist for Oracle Database...................................................................................... 1-4
Oracle Universal Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database Installation................ 1-5
Windows x64 Minimum Hardware Requirements................................................................ 2-2
Windows x64 Minimum Disk Space Requirements on NTFS.............................................. 2-4
Windows x64 Software Requirements..................................................................................... 2-5
User Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation.................................................. 4-4
Oracle ASM Disk Number and Space Requirements for an Oracle database (non-CDB)
................................................................................................................................................ 5-10
Oracle ASM Disk Number and Space Requirements for a multitenant container
database (CDB) with one pluggable database (PDB)..................................................... 5-11
Oracle Character Sets for Console Mode (OEM) Code Pages............................................. 6-15
Oracle Universal Installer Windows...................................................................................... 6-19
Database Options for Chopt Tool Command....................................................................... 7-24
Administrative Accounts ........................................................................................................... 8-7
Tablespaces and Data Files...................................................................................................... 8-14
Copy Files to JDK Directory on Windows 64-Bit................................................................... A-2
Default Optimal Flexible Architecture Database Settings.................................................... B-7
Nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture Database Settings: Example 2......................... B-8
Hierarchical File Mapping for Log Files in an Optimal Flexible Architecture
Installation............................................................................................................................ B-10
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode........................................................ C-3
Response Files ............................................................................................................................ C-4
Ports Used in Oracle Components............................................................................................ E-2
Oracle Gateway Products.......................................................................................................... G-9
xiii
xiv
Preface
Learn how to install and configure Oracle Database, perform postinstallation tasks,
and how to remove the database software.
The following topics are covered:
Audience (page xv)
Documentation Accessibility (page xv)
Accessing Documentation (page xvi)
Related Documentation (page xvi)
Conventions (page xvii)
Audience
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html
This guide is intended for anyone responsible for installing Oracle Database 12c
Release 2 (12.2).
To use this document, you need the following:
•
A supported Microsoft Windows operating system installed and tested on your
computer system
•
Administrative privileges on the computer where you are installing the Oracle
Database software
•
Familiarity with object-relational database management concepts
Documentation Accessibility
For information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit the Oracle
Accessibility Program website at http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?
ctx=acc&id=docacc.
Access to Oracle Support
Oracle customers that have purchased support have access to electronic support
through My Oracle Support. For information, visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/
topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=info or visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?
ctx=acc&id=trs if you are hearing impaired.
xv
Accessing Documentation
The documentation for this release includes platform-specific documentation and
generic product documentation.
Platform-Specific Documentation (page xvi)
Product Documentation (page xvi)
Platform-Specific Documentation
Platform-specific documentation includes information about installing and using
Oracle products on particular platforms.
The platform-specific documentation for this product is available in both Adobe
portable document format (PDF) and HTML format on Oracle Help Center at:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html
Product Documentation
Product documentation includes information about configuring, using, or
administering Oracle products on any platform. The product documentation for
Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) is available in both HTML and PDF formats at:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html
Related Documentation
For more information, see these Oracle resources:
•
Oracle Database Concepts
•
Oracle Database Examples Installation Guide
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Basic Installation Guide
•
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
Oracle error message documentation is available only in HTML. If you only have
access to the Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) Online Documentation Library, you
can browse the error messages by range. Once you find the specific range, use your
browser's "find in page" feature to locate the specific message. When connected to the
Internet, you can search for a specific error message using the error message search
feature of the Oracle online documentation.
Many books in the documentation set use the sample schemas of the seed database,
which is installed by default when you install Oracle.
To download free release notes, installation documentation, white papers, or other
collateral, please visit the following website:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html
xvi
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Sample Schemas
•
Oracle Database Error Messages for information about Oracle error
messages
Conventions
The following text conventions are used in this document:
Convention
Meaning
boldface
Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated
with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.
italic
Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for
which you supply particular values.
monospace
Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code
in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.
xvii
Changes in this Release for Oracle
Database Installation Guide
This guide explains how to install and configure single-instance Oracle Database.
This guide also provides information about Optimal Flexible Architecture, cloning an
Oracle home, and how to remove the database software.
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) (page xix)
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1) (page xxiv)
The following are changes in Oracle Database Installation Guide for Oracle
Database 12c Release 1 (12.1):
See Also:
Oracle Database New Features Guide
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2)
The following are changes in Oracle Database Installation Guide for Oracle Database 12c
Release 2 (12.2):
New Features (page xix)
Deprecated Features (page xxiv)
The following feature is deprecated in this release, and may be
desupported in a future release:
Desupported Features (page xxiv)
New Features
•
Simplified Image based Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation
Starting with Oracle Grid Infrastructure 12c Release 2 (12.2), the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure software is available as an image file for download and installation.
You must extract the image software into the directory where you want your Grid
home to be located, and then run the gridSetup.bat script to start the Oracle
Grid Infrastructure installation.
xix
See Also:
About Image-Based Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation (page 5-3)
•
Parallel NFS Support for Direct NFS Client
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), Oracle Direct NFS Client
supports parallel NFS. Parallel NFS is an NFSv4.1 option that enables direct client
access to file servers, enabling scalable distributed storage.
See Also:
Creating an oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)
•
Direct NFS dispatcher support
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), Oracle Direct NFS Client
supports adding a dispatcher or I/O slave infrastructure. For very large database
deployments running Direct NFS client, this feature facilitates scaling of sockets
and TCP connections to multi-path and clustered NFS storage.
See Also:
About Direct NFS Client Storage (page 7-11)
•
Support for Windows Group Managed Service Accounts and Virtual Accounts
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), support of Group Managed
Services Account (gMSA) and Virtual Accounts for installing an Oracle Database
provides additional options to create and manage database services without
passwords. The gMSA is a domain level account that can be used by multiple
servers in a domain to run the services using this account. Virtual Accounts are
auto-managed.
See Also:
Windows Group Managed Service Accounts and Virtual Accounts (page 4-11)
•
Kerberos Authentication for Direct NFS
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), Oracle Database supports
Kerberos implementation with Direct NFS communication. This feature solves the
problem of authentication, message integrity, and optional encryption over
unsecured networks for data exchange between Oracle Database and NFS servers
using Direct NFS protocols.
See Also:
Creating an oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)
•
Support for Microsoft Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machines
Hyper-V enables you to create and manage a virtualized computing environment
by running multiple operating systems simultaneously on a single computer.
xx
Hyper-V enables built-in integration services for supported guest operating
systems to improve integration between a computer and a virtual machine.
Microsoft Hyper-V generation 2 virtual machines are now supported.
See Also:
Microsoft Hyper-V (page 4-11)
•
AL32UTF8 as the Default Database Character Set
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the default database character
set of a database created from the General Purpose/Transaction Processing or the
Data Warehousing template is Unicode AL32UTF8. Oracle recommends that you
use Unicode AL32UTF8 as the database character set.
See Also:
About Character Set Selection During Installation (page 6-4)
•
Windows Direct NFS Client Supports All the Accepted NFS Path Formats
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the Windows Direct NFS Client
supports all widely accepted NFS path formats including both Windows style and
UNIX style NFS paths.
See Also:
About Direct NFS Client Storage (page 7-11)
•
Windows Resilient File System
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), Oracle Database is supported
on Resilient File System (ReFS). ReFS uses checksums for file metadata, and an
allocate-on-write method to update data which minimizes the risk of corruption.
•
Postinstallation Configuration of Oracle Software using the -executeConfigTools
option
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), you can perform
postinstallation configuration of Oracle products by running the Oracle Database
or Oracle Grid Infrastructure installer with the -executeConfigTools option.
You can use the same response file created during installation to complete
postinstallation configuration.
See Also:
Postinstallation Configuration Using the ConfigToolAllCommands Script
(page C-12)
•
Separation of Duty for Administering Oracle Real Application Clusters
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), Oracle Database provides
support for separation of duty for administering Oracle Real Application Clusters
(RAC) by introducing the SYSRAC administrative privilege that does not require
xxi
the SYSDBA administrative privilege. SYSRAC, like SYSDG, SYSBACKUP and
SYSKM, helps enforce separation of duties and reduce reliance on the use of
SYSDBA on production systems. This administrative privilege is the default mode
for connecting to the database by the clusterware agent on behalf of the Oracle
RAC utilities such as srvctl.
See Also:
About Job Role Separation Operating System Privileges Groups and Users
(page 4-8)
New Features for Oracle Automatic Storage Management 12c Release 2 (12.2)
•
Automatic Configuration of Oracle ASM Filter Driver
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), you can enable and automate
the configuration of Oracle ASM Filter Driver (Oracle ASMFD) with a check box
during the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation.
•
Oracle ACFS Snapshot-Based Replication
The Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS)
snapshot-based replication feature uses Oracle ACFS snapshot technology to
transfer the differences between successive snapshots to the standby file system
using standard ssh transport protocol. Oracle ACFS Snapshot-based replication is
more efficient with higher performance, lower overhead, and ease of
management.
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Compression
Oracle ACFS provides file system compression functionality, reducing storage
requirement, and resulting in lower costs. Oracle ACFS compression is managed
using the new acfsutil compress commands and updates to the acfsutil info
command.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Defragger
Databases that share storage with snapshots or with the base of the file system can
become fragmented under active online transaction processing (OLTP) workloads.
This fragmentation can cause the location of the data in the volume to be
discontiguous for sequential scans. Oracle ACFS automatically defragments these
files in the background.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
xxii
Oracle ACFS Support for 4K Sectors
Oracle ACFS supports I/O requests in multiples of 4K logical sector sizes as well
as continued support for 512-byte logical sector size I/O requests. The i4096
option is provided with the acfsformat command on Microsoft Windows and
the mkfs command in Linux and Oracle Solaris environments.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Automatic Resize
Oracle ACFS provides an automatic resize option with the acfsutil size
command. This command enables you to specify an increment by which an Oracle
ACFS file system grows automatically if the amount of available free space in the
file system falls below a specified amount. There is also an option to specify the
maxiOracle ACFS plugins support file content data collection. Both polling and
interval based capture are supported with the file content collection.mum size
allowed when using the automatic resize option. The output of the acfsutil
info fs command displays the automatic resize increment and maximum
amounts.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Metadata Acceleration
Oracle ACFS supports accelerator metadata storage. This support enables many
critical Oracle ACFS metadata structures, including extent metadata, storage
bitmaps, volume logs, and some snapshot metadata to be placed on accelerator
storage.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Plugins for File Content Data Collection
Oracle ACFS plugins support file content data collection. Both, polling and
interval based capture are supported with the file content collection.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Sparse Files
Oracle ACFS provides support for sparse files. Oracle ACFS sparse files greatly
benefit NFS client write operations, which are commonly received out of order by
the NFS server and the associated Oracle ACFS file system.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle ACFS Scrubbing Functionality
Oracle ACFS provides scrubbing functionality with the acfsutil scrub command to
check for and report any inconsistencies in the metadata or file data.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
High Availability Common Internet File System
xxiii
Release 12.2 enhances Oracle ACFS Common Internet File System (CIFS) features
to provide high availability for exported file systems with the Oracle ACFS NAS
Maximum Availability eXtensions (NAS MAX) technology. High Availability
Common Internet File System (HACIFS) and High Availability Network File
System (HANFS), both provide comprehensive Network Attach Storage solutions
for Oracle ACFS.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
Deprecated Features
The following feature is deprecated in this release, and may be desupported in a
future release:
•
Deprecation of the configToolAllCommands script
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the
configToolAllCommands script is deprecated and is subject to desupport in a
future release. The configToolAllCommands script runs in response file mode
to configure Oracle products after installation and uses a separate password
response file.To perform postinstallation configuration of Oracle products, you
can now run the Oracle Database or Oracle Grid Infrastructure installer with the executeConfigTools option. You can use the same response file created
during installation to complete postinstallation configuration.
For a complete list of deprecated features, see:
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
Desupported Features
The following features are no longer supported by Oracle:
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
•
CLEANUP_ORACLE_BASE Property Removed
For a complete list of desupported features, see:
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
Changes in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1)
The following are changes in Oracle Database Installation Guide for Oracle Database 12c
Release 1 (12.1):
New Features (page xxiv)
Deprecated Features (page xxvii)
Desupported Features (page xxviii)
New Features
•
Oracle Home User Support for Database
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1), Oracle Database supports the
use of Oracle Home User, which can be specified during installation. The Oracle
Home User can be a Windows Built-in Account or a standard Windows User
xxiv
Account (not an Administrator account). This account is used for running
Windows services for Oracle home. For enhanced security, Oracle recommends
that you use a standard Windows User Account (instead of Windows Built-in
Account).
Group Managed Services Account (gMSA) and Virtual Accounts are the new
options for Oracle Home User.
See Also:
•
–
Recommended File System (page 3-5)
–
Configuring Environment Variables for the Software Installation Owner
(page 4-12)
–
Managing User Accounts with User Account Control (page 4-12)
–
Operating System Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
(page 4-4)
–
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
Oracle ASM File Access Control on Windows
This feature provides access control to separate the roles on Windows. With
Oracle database services running as users rather than Local System, the Oracle
ASM access control feature must be enabled to support role separation on
Windows. In the previous releases, this feature was disabled on Windows because
all Oracle services ran as a Local System.
See Also:
•
–
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
–
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
–
"Operating System Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
(page 4-4)"
–
"Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
(page 5-8)"
Oracle Flex ASM
Oracle Flex ASM enables an Oracle ASM instance to run on a separate physical
server from the database servers. Any number of Oracle ASM servers can be
clustered to support much larger number of database clients.
Oracle Database instances can be set up as clients to Oracle Flex ASM where
metadata is provided to the database instance by an Oracle Flex ASM instance
that is on a different node than the database instance.
Note that Oracle Flex ASM can apply to a collection of databases, each one a
single instance but running in a Flex ASM Cluster.
xxv
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Deinstallation Tool Integrated with Installation Media
See Also:
•
–
"About Oracle Deinstallation Options (page 9-2)"
–
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
Simplified Oracle Label Security Installation
See Also:
–
"Configuring Oracle Label Security (page 7-17)"
–
Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide
•
Simplified Oracle Database Vault Installation
•
Unified Database Audit Configuration
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1), you can create named audit
policies. An audit policy contains a set of audit options and it is stored in the
database as an object. The advantage of creating a named audit policy is that it
reduces the number of commands that are required to create a database audit
policy, and it simplifies the implementation of an audit configuration for security
and compliance with conditional auditing.
This new audit policy framework is included with the database installation.
See Also:
Oracle Database Security Guide
xxvi
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c
•
Support for Separation of Database Administration Duties
See Also:
•
–
"About Job Role Separation Operating System Privileges Groups and
Users (page 4-8)"
–
"Extended Oracle Database Groups for Job Role Separation (page 4-9)"
–
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation and Upgrade Guide for Microsoft
Windows x64 (64-Bit)
–
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
–
Oracle Database Advanced Security Administrator's Guide
Oracle DBCA Support for CDBs and PDBs
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1), Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant (Oracle DBCA) enables you to create either a non-CDB or a multitenant
container database (CDB). You can create the CDB with zero, one, or more usercreated pluggable databases (PDBs).
You can also create a CDB with one PDB during database installation.
•
Support for NFS Version in Direct NFS Client
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1), you can specify the NFS
protocol version to be used by the Direct NFS Client.
See Also:
"Creating an oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)."
•
Configuring the OraClrAgnt Service for Oracle Database Extensions for .NET
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1), after installation you use the
OraClrCtl.exe utility to create, start, stop, and delete the OraClrAgnt service.
See Also:
"Configuring the OraClrAgnt Service for Oracle Database Extensions for .NET
(page 7-17)."
Deprecated Features
The following features are deprecated in this release, and may be desupported in a
future release:
•
Deinstallation Tool Integrated with Installation Media
•
Deprecation of -cleanupOBase
The -cleanupOBase flag of the deinstallation tool is deprecated in this release.
There is no replacement for this flag.
•
Windows NTS Authentication Using the NTLM Protocol
xxvii
The NTS authentication adapter no longer supports the use of the NT LAN
Manager (NTLM) protocol to authenticate Windows domain users. Thus, the NTS
adapter cannot be used to authenticate users in old Windows NT domains or
domains with old Windows NT domain controllers. However, local connections
and Oracle Database services running as a Windows Local User continues to be
authenticated using NTLM. A new client-side sqlnet.ora boolean parameter,
no_ntlm (default value is FALSE) enables you to control if NTLM can be used in
NTS authentication. When the parameter is set to TRUE, NTLM cannot be used in
NTS authentication.
For a complete list of deprecated features, see:
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
Desupported Features
The following features are no longer supported by Oracle:
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
•
CLEANUP_ORACLE_BASE Property Removed
•
Oracle COM Automation
•
Oracle Objects for OLE
•
Oracle Counters for Windows Performance Monitor
•
Raw Devices
For a complete list of desupported features, see:
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
xxviii
1
Oracle Database Installation Checklist
Use checklists to review system requirements, and to plan and carry out Oracle
Database installation.
Oracle recommends that you use checklists as part of your installation planning
process. Using a checklist ensures that your server hardware and configuration meets
minimum requirements for this release, and enables you to carry out a successful
installation.
Server Hardware Checklist for Oracle Database Installation (page 1-1)
Use this checklist to check hardware requirements for Oracle Database.
Operating System Checklist for Oracle Database Installation on Microsoft
Windows (page 1-2)
Use this checklist to check minimum operating system requirements for
Oracle Database.
Server Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database Installation (page 1-2)
Use this checklist to check minimum server configuration requirements
for Oracle Database installations.
Oracle User Environment Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database
Installation (page 1-3)
Storage Checklist for Oracle Database Installation (page 1-4)
Use this checklist to review storage minimum requirements and assist
with configuration planning.
Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database (page 1-4)
Use this checklist to assist you to be prepared before starting Oracle
Universal Installer.
Creating a Database After Installation (page 1-7)
You can create a database after installation by using Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant (Oracle DBCA).
1.1 Server Hardware Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Use this checklist to check hardware requirements for Oracle Database.
Table 1-1
Server Hardware Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Check
Task
Server Make and
Architecture
Confirm that server make, model, core architecture, and host
bus adaptors (HBA) or network interface controllers (NIC) are
supported to run with Oracle Database and Oracle Grid
Infrastructure. Ensure the server has a DVD drive, if you are
installing from a DVD.
Oracle Database Installation Checklist 1-1
Operating System Checklist for Oracle Database Installation on Microsoft Windows
Table 1-1
(Cont.) Server Hardware Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Check
Task
Minimum RAM
2 GB RAM recommended
Minimum network
connectivity
Server is connected to a network
Video Adapter
256 colors
Server Display Cards
At least 1024 x 768 display resolution, which Oracle Universal
Installer requires.
1.2 Operating System Checklist for Oracle Database Installation on
Microsoft Windows
Use this checklist to check minimum operating system requirements for Oracle
Database.
Table 1-2
Windows
Operating System General Checklist for Oracle Database on Microsoft
Item
Task
Operating system general
requirements
Oracle Database for Windows x64 is supported on the
following operating system versions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Windows 7 x64 - Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate
editions
Windows 8 x64 and Windows 8.1 x64 - Pro and Enterprise
editions
Windows 8.1 x64 - Pro and Enterprise editions
Windows 10 x64 - Pro, Enterprise, and Education editions
Windows Server 2012 x64 - Standard, Datacenter,
Essentials, and Foundation editions
Windows Server 2012 R2 x64 - Standard, Datacenter,
Essentials, and Foundation editions
1.3 Server Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Use this checklist to check minimum server configuration requirements for Oracle
Database installations.
Table 1-3
Server Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database
Check
Task
Disk space allocated to the
temporary file system
At least 1 GB of space in the temporary directory. Oracle
recommends 2 GB or more
At least 4 GB of space in the temporary directory for Oracle
Restart (Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server)
1-2 Database Installation Guide
Oracle User Environment Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Table 1-3
(Cont.) Server Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database
Check
Task
Swap space allocation
relative to RAM
•
•
If physical memory is between 2 GB and 16 GB, then set
virtual memory to 1 times the size of the RAM
If physical memory is more than 16 GB, then set virtual
memory to 16 GB
Oracle Inventory and
ORA_INSTALL Group
Requirements
The Oracle Inventory directory is the central inventory of
Oracle software installed on your system. You do not need to
create the Oracle central inventory or the ORA_INSTALL group
as Oracle Universal Installer creates it for you.
Groups and Users
Oracle recommends that you create groups and user accounts
required for your security plans before starting installation.
Installation owners have resource limits settings and other
requirements. Group and user names must use only ASCII
characters.
Mount point paths for the
software binaries
Oracle recommends that you create an Optimal Flexible
Architecture configuration as described in the appendix
"Optimal Flexible Architecture" in Oracle Database Installation
Guide for Microsoft Windows for your platform.
Ensure that the Oracle
home (the Oracle home
path that you select for
Oracle Database) uses only
ASCII characters.
The ASCII character restriction includes installation owner user
names, which are used as a default for some home paths, as
well as other directory names you must select for paths.
Set locale (if needed)
Specify the language and the territory, or locale, in which you
want to use Oracle components. A locale is a linguistic and
cultural environment in which a system or program is running.
National Language Support (NLS) parameters determine the
locale-specific behavior on both servers and clients. The locale
setting of a component determines the language of the user
interface of the component, and the globalization behavior,
such as date and number formatting.
1.4 Oracle User Environment Configuration Checklist for Oracle Database
Installation
Use this checklist to plan operating system users, groups, and environments for Oracle
Database management.
Table 1-4
User Environment Configuration for Oracle Database
Check
Task
Create operating system
groups and users
Create operating system groups and users depending on your
security requirements, as described in this install guide.
Oracle Database Installation Checklist 1-3
Storage Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Table 1-4
(Cont.) User Environment Configuration for Oracle Database
Check
Task
Unset Oracle Software
Environment Variables
If you have had an existing installation on your system, and
you are using the same user account to install this installation,
then unset the ORACLE_HOME, ORACLE_BASE,
ORACLE_SID, TNS_ADMIN environment variables and any
other environment variable set for the Oracle installation user
that is connected with Oracle software homes.
Manage User Account
Control
If you have enabled the User Account Control security feature,
then Oracle Universal Installer prompts you for either your
consent or your credentials when installing Oracle Database.
Provide either the consent or your Windows Administrator
credentials as appropriate.
1.5 Storage Checklist for Oracle Database Installation
Use this checklist to review storage minimum requirements and assist with
configuration planning.
Table 1-5
Storage Checklist for Oracle Database
Check
Task
Minimum local disk
storage space for Oracle
software
At least 6.0 GB for Oracle Database Enterprise Edition
Select Database File Storage
Option
Ensure that you have one of the following storage options
available:
At least 5.5 GB for Oracle Database Standard Edition 2
At least 7.0 GB for an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
standalone server installation
•
File System
Oracle recommends that the file system be separate from
the file systems used by the operating system or the Oracle
software. The file system can be any of the following:
- A file system on a disk that is physically attached to the
system
•
- A file system on a logical volume manager (LVM)
volume or a redundant array of independent disks (RAID)
device
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM)
Oracle ASM is installed as part of an Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installation. If you plan to use Oracle ASM,
then you must install Oracle Grid Infrastructure before
you install and create the database.
Determine your recovery
plan
Review the storage configuration sections of this document for
more information about configuring recovery.
1.6 Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database
Use this checklist to assist you to be prepared before starting Oracle Universal
Installer.
1-4 Database Installation Guide
Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database
Table 1-6 Oracle Universal Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database
Installation
Check
Task
Read the Release Notes
Review release notes for your platform, which are available for
your release at the following URL:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html
Review Oracle Support
Certification Matrix
New platforms and operating system software versions may be
certified after this guide is published, review the certification
matrix on the My Oracle Support website for the most up-to-date
list of certified hardware platforms and operating system versions:
https://support.oracle.com/
You must register online before using My Oracle Support. After
logging in, from the menu options, select the Certifications tab. On
the Certifications page, use the Certification Search options to
search by Product, Release, and Platform. You can also search using
the Certification Quick Link options such as Product Delivery,
and Lifetime Support.
Review the Licensing
Information
You are permitted to use only those components in the Oracle
Database media pack for which you have purchased licenses. For
more information about licenses, refer to the following URL:
Oracle Database Licensing Information
Run OUI with CVU
and use fixup scripts
Oracle Universal Installer is fully integrated with Cluster
Verification Utility (CVU), automating many CVU prerequisite
checks. Oracle Universal Installer runs all prerequisite checks and
creates fixup scripts when you run the installer. You can run OUI
up to the Summary screen without starting the installation.
You can also run CVU commands manually to check system
readiness. For more information, see:
Oracle Clusterware Administration and Deployment Guide
Download and run
ORAchk for runtime
and upgrade checks, or
runtime health checks
The ORAchk utility provides system checks that can help to
prevent issues before and after installation. These checks include
kernel requirements, operating system resource allocations, and
other system requirements.
Use the ORAchk Upgrade Readiness Assessment to obtain an
automated upgrade-specific system health check for upgrades to
11.2.0.3, 11.2.0.4, 12.1.0.1, 12.1.0.2, and 12.2. For example:
•
Before you perform a fresh database installation:
•
./orachk -profile preinstall
To upgrade your existing database to a higher version or
release:
./orachk -u -o pre
The ORAchk Upgrade Readiness Assessment automates many of
the manual pre- and post-upgrade checks described in Oracle
upgrade documentation. ORAchk is supported on Windows 2008
and Windows 2012 on a Cygwin environment only. Check My
Oracle Support Note 1268927.1 for more information about
ORAchk support.
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=1268927.1
Oracle Database Installation Checklist 1-5
Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database
Table 1-6 (Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database
Installation
Check
Task
Verify if Oracle Grid
Infrastructure is
installed
If you want to use Oracle ASM or Oracle Restart, then install Oracle
Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server before you install and
create the database. Otherwise, to use Oracle ASM, you must
complete an Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation, and then
manually register the database with Oracle Restart.
For Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) installations,
ensure that you have installed and configured Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a cluster.
Check running Oracle
processes, and shut
down if necessary
•
•
•
On a standalone database not using Oracle ASM: You do not
need to shut down the database while you install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure.
On a standalone database using Oracle ASM: The Oracle ASM
instances are restarted during installation.
On an Oracle RAC Database node: This installation requires an
upgrade of Oracle Clusterware, as Oracle Clusterware is
required to run Oracle RAC. As part of the upgrade, you must
shut down the database one node at a time as the rolling
upgrade proceeds from node to node.
Ensure cron jobs do
not run during
installation
If the installer is running when daily cron jobs start, then you may
encounter unexplained installation problems if your cron job is
performing cleanup, and temporary files are deleted before the
installation is finished. Oracle recommends that you complete
installation before daily cron jobs are run, or disable daily cron jobs
that perform cleanup until after the installation is completed.
Obtain your My Oracle
Support account
information.
During installation, you require a My Oracle Support user name
and password to configure security updates, download software
updates, and other installation tasks. You can register for My
Oracle Support at the following URL:
https://support.oracle.com/
Decide Oracle Database
management tool
By default, Oracle Database 12c is managed by Oracle Enterprise
Manager Database Express.
If you have an existing Oracle Management Agent, and decide to
use Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control to centrally manage
your database, then obtain the following information to enter
during the database installation:
1-6 Database Installation Guide
•
•
•
•
•
See:
OMS host
OMS port
EM admin username
EM admin password
Specify password of ASMSNMP user
•
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Administrator’s Guide
Creating a Database After Installation
Table 1-6 (Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Planning Checklist for Oracle Database
Installation
Check
Task
Review memory
allocation and
Automatic Memory
Management feature
You can enable automatic memory management either during, or
after Oracle Database installation. If you enable automatic memory
management after installation, then you must shut down and
restart the database.
With Automatic Memory Management, Oracle Database instances
automatically manage and tune memory. You choose a memory
target, and the instance automatically distributes memory between
the system global area (SGA) and the instance program global area
(instance PGA). As memory requirements change, the instance
dynamically redistributes memory between the SGA and instance
PGA.
For more information, see:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
Oracle Database Client
and Oracle Database
interoperability
For information about interoperability between Oracle Database
Client and Oracle Database releases, see My Oracle Support Note
207303.1:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=207303.11
1.7 Creating a Database After Installation
You can create a database after installation by using Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant (Oracle DBCA).
If you decide not to create a database during the installation, then you can use Oracle
Database Configuration Assistant (Oracle DBCA) to create one after you have installed
the software.
See Also:
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
Oracle Database Installation Checklist 1-7
Creating a Database After Installation
1-8 Installation Guide
2
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks
Review the preinstallation tasks before you start Oracle Universal Installer.
Learn about the information required to install Oracle Database 12c. Ensure that you
review information related to the platform on which you intend to install Oracle
Database 12c.
Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements (page 2-2)
Learn about the hardware component and hard disk space requirements.
Oracle Database Software Requirements (page 2-5)
The following table lists the software requirements for Oracle Database
on Windows x64:
Windows Certification and Web Browser Support (page 2-6)
Review the Windows Certification and Web Browser Support
information.
Reviewing Operating System Security Common Practices (page 2-7)
Secure operating systems are an important basis for general system
security.
Confirming Host Name Resolution (page 2-8)
Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is
connected to a network.
Individual Component Requirements (page 2-8)
Review the individual component requirements.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) for
an Existing Database (page 5-22)
Follow the high-level instructions in this section to install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) and configure it
for an existing Oracle database.
Requirements for an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle
Restart) Installation (page 5-4)
Before you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server
(Oracle Restart), ensures that your system meets the following
requirements:
Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements (page 2-2)
Learn about the hardware component and hard disk space requirements.
Oracle Database Software Requirements (page 2-5)
The following table lists the software requirements for Oracle Database
on Windows x64:
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-1
Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements
Windows Certification and Web Browser Support (page 2-6)
Review the Windows Certification and Web Browser Support
information.
Reviewing Operating System Security Common Practices (page 2-7)
Secure operating systems are an important basis for general system
security.
Confirming Host Name Resolution (page 2-8)
Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is
connected to a network.
Individual Component Requirements (page 2-8)
Review the individual component requirements.
See Also:
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation and Upgrade Guide for Microsoft Windows
x64 (64-Bit)
2.1 Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements
Learn about the hardware component and hard disk space requirements.
Hardware Component Requirements for Windows x64 (page 2-2)
The following table lists the hardware components that are required for
Oracle Database on Windows x64.
Hard Disk Space Requirements (page 2-3)
Learn about the system requirements for Windows platforms that use
the NT File System (NTFS).
Verifying Hardware Requirements (page 2-4)
Use this procedure to gather information about your server
configuration.
2.1.1 Hardware Component Requirements for Windows x64
The following table lists the hardware components that are required for Oracle
Database on Windows x64.
Table 2-1
Windows x64 Minimum Hardware Requirements
Requirement
Value
System Architecture
Processor: AMD64 and Intel EM64T
Physical memory (RAM)
2 GB minimum
Virtual memory (swap)
•
•
Disk space
2-2 Database Installation Guide
If physical memory is between 2 GB and 16 GB, then
set virtual memory to 1 times the size of the RAM
If physical memory is more than 16 GB, then set virtual
memory to 16 GB
•
Typical Install Type total: 10 GB
•
Advanced Install Types total: 10 GB
See Table 2-3 (page 2-5) for details.
Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements
Table 2-1
(Cont.) Windows x64 Minimum Hardware Requirements
Requirement
Value
Video adapter
256 colors
Screen Resolution
1024 X 768 minimum
Related Topics:
Configuring Disk Storage for Oracle Data Files and Recovery Files (page 2-8)
Learn about the storage options for storing Oracle data files and,
optionally, Oracle database recovery files.
Creating Directories for Oracle Data Files or Recovery Files (page 2-9)
If you decide to place the Oracle Database files on a file system, then use
the following guidelines when deciding where to place them:
Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 5-8)
Identify storage requirements and ASM disk group options.
Installing with Minimum Memory Requirements (page 6-3)
Installations of Oracle Database on computers with RAM and virtual
memory lesser than the minimum required have the following
limitations:
2.1.2 Hard Disk Space Requirements
Learn about the system requirements for Windows platforms that use the NT File
System (NTFS).
Oracle strongly recommends that you install the Oracle database home (Oracle
database binaries, trace files, and so on) on Oracle ACFS or NTFS.
The database files themselves must be placed on Oracle ASM if using Oracle ACFS;
otherwise they can be placed on NTFS. Usage of Oracle ACFS and Oracle ASM or
NTFS is recommended to ensure security of these files.
The NTFS system requirements are accurate than the hard disk values reported by the
Oracle Universal Installer Summary window. The Summary window does not include
accurate values for disk space, the space required to create a database, or the size of
compressed files that are expanded on the hard drive.
The hard disk requirements for Oracle Database components include 32 MB to install
Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and Oracle Universal Installer on the partition where
the operating system is installed. If sufficient space is not detected, then the
installation fails and an error message appears.
The following table lists the disk space requirements on NTFS for Windows x64. The
starter database requires 720 MB of disk space.
The values in this table include the starter database.
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-3
Oracle Database Minimum Hardware Requirements
Table 2-2
Windows x64 Minimum Disk Space Requirements on NTFS
Installation Type
TEMP Space
SYSTEM_DRIVE:\
Program Files\Oracle
\Inventory
Oracle Home
Data Files * Total
Enterprise Edition
595 MB
4.55 MB
6.00 GB
4.38 GB **
10.38 GB
**
Standard Edition 2
595 MB
4.55 MB
5.50 GB
4.24 GB **
9.74 GB **
* Refers to the contents of the admin, cfgtoollogs, flash_recovery_area,
and oradata directories in the ORACLE_BASE directory.
** This size can be higher depending on the installation options selected, such as
languages or additional components. If you choose to install Oracle Database with
customized backups enabled, then include at least 2 GB extra for data file disk space.
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
2.1.3 Verifying Hardware Requirements
Use this procedure to gather information about your server configuration.
To ensure that the system meets these requirements, follow these steps:
1. Determine the physical RAM size.
For example, on a computer running Windows Server 2012 R2, click System and
Security, then click System.
If the size of the physical RAM installed in the system is less than the required size,
then you must install more memory before continuing.
2. Determine the size of the configured virtual memory (also known as paging file
size).
For example, on a computer running Windows Server 2012 R2, click System and
Security, then click System, click Advanced System Settings, click the Advanced
tab on System Properties page, and then click Settings in the Performance section.
Then select the Advanced tab on Performance Options page.
The virtual memory is listed in the Virtual Memory section.
If necessary, see your operating system documentation for information about how
to configure additional virtual memory.
3. Determine the amount of free disk space on the system.
For example, on a computer running Windows Server 2012 R2, right-click My
Computer and click Open.
4. Determine the amount of disk space available in the temp directory. This is
equivalent to the total amount of free disk space, minus what is required for the
Oracle software to be installed.
2-4 Database Installation Guide
Oracle Database Software Requirements
On Windows x64, if there is less than 125 MB of disk space available in the temp
directory, then delete all unnecessary files. If the temp disk space is still less than
125 MB, then set the TEMP or TMP environment variable to point to a different hard
drive location.
For example, to change the environment variables on a computer running
Windows Server 2012 R2, click System and Security, then click System, click
Advanced System Settings, click the Advanced tab on System Properties page,
and then click Environment Variables.
2.2 Oracle Database Software Requirements
The following table lists the software requirements for Oracle Database on Windows
x64:
Table 2-3
Windows x64 Software Requirements
Requirement
Value
Operating System
Oracle Database for Windows x64 is supported on the
following operating systems:
•
Windows 7 x64 - Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate
editions
•
Windows 8 x64 and Windows 8.1 x64 - Core, Pro, and
Enterprise editions
•
Windows 8.1 x64 - Pro and Enterprise editions
•
Windows 10 x64 - Pro, Enterprise, and Education editions
•
Windows Server 2012 x64 - Standard, Datacenter,
Essentials, and Foundation editions
•
Windows Server 2012 R2 x64 - Standard, Datacenter,
Essentials, and Foundation editions
Note:
•
•
Compiler
Windows Multilingual User Interface Pack is supported.
The Server Core option is not supported.
The following components are supported with the Microsoft
Visual C++ 2013 Update 4, Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 Update
3, and Intel 14.0 C compilers:
•
Oracle Call Interface
•
External callouts
•
Pro*C/C++
•
Oracle XML Developer's Kit (XDK)
Oracle C++ Call Interface supports:
•
Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 Update 4
•
Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 Update 3 - OCCI libraries are
installed under ORACLE_HOME\oci\lib\msvc\vc14.
When developing OCCI applications with MSVC++ 2015,
ensure that the OCCI libraries are correctly selected from
this directory for linking and executing.
•
Intel 14.0 C compilers with Microsoft Visual Studio 2013
STLs
Pro*COBOL supports:
•
Micro Focus Visual COBOL 2.2 - Update 2
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-5
Windows Certification and Web Browser Support
Table 2-3
(Cont.) Windows x64 Software Requirements
Requirement
Value
Network Protocol
The Oracle Net foundation layer uses Oracle protocol support
to communicate with the following industry-standard network
protocols:
•
•
•
Oracle Database Client
TCP/IP
TCP/IP with SSL
Named Pipes
To connect to Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the
following are required:
•
•
Oracle Database Client is version 10.2.0.5 or higher.
If the earlier Oracle Database Client is running on the same
computer as Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), then you
cannot use a bequeath connection.
Oracle recommends upgrading Oracle Database Client to the
latest patchset (10.2.0.5, or 11.2.0.4 or later). You can download
the patchset from the Patches and Updates section of My Oracle
Support at
https://support.oracle.com
See Also:
•
https://support.oracle.com My Oracle Support Note 1563794.1 for more
information about Hyper-V support
•
Hardware and Software Certification (page 3-5) for information about
how to access the latest system requirements
2.3 Windows Certification and Web Browser Support
Review the Windows Certification and Web Browser Support information.
Remote Desktop Services (page 2-6)
Oracle supports installing, configuring, and running Oracle Database
through Remote Desktop Services, formerly known as Terminal
Services, on Windows.
Installation Requirements for Web Browsers (page 2-7)
You require Web browsers to use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Express and Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control.
Default Share Configuration Requirement (page 2-7)
The prerequisite checks during Oracle Database installation require that
the system drive on your computer has default share configured on it.
2.3.1 Remote Desktop Services
Oracle supports installing, configuring, and running Oracle Database through Remote
Desktop Services, formerly known as Terminal Services, on Windows.
2-6 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Operating System Security Common Practices
To install Oracle Database, Oracle recommends that you start all configuration tools
from the Terminal Server console session of the server (using mstsc/console).
Platform-specific support information is as follows:
•
Windows client operating systems: The Remote Desktop is only available in
Single User Mode.
•
Windows server operating systems: You can have multiple Remote Desktop
sessions.
See Also:
•
The Microsoft website for more information about Remote Desktop
Services
http://www.microsoft.com/
•
The My Oracle Support website for the latest Terminal Services and
Remote Desktop Services information
https://support.oracle.com/
2.3.2 Installation Requirements for Web Browsers
You require Web browsers to use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express and
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control.
Web browsers must support Java Script, and the HTML 4.0 and CSS 1.0 standards. For
a list of browsers that meet these requirements, see the Oracle Enterprise Manager
certification matrix on My Oracle Support:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article
See Also:
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Basic Installation Guide
2.3.3 Default Share Configuration Requirement
The prerequisite checks during Oracle Database installation require that the system
drive on your computer has default share configured on it.
Use the net use command to verify, for example:
C:\> net use \\hostname\c$
The command completed successfully
Ensure that the current user, the user in the Administrator group, has all the privileges
on the default share.
2.4 Reviewing Operating System Security Common Practices
Secure operating systems are an important basis for general system security.
Ensure that your operating system deployment is in compliance with common
security practices as described in your operating system vendor security guide.
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-7
Confirming Host Name Resolution
2.5 Confirming Host Name Resolution
Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is connected to
a network.
Ensure that the computer host name is resolvable through a Domain Name System
(DNS), a network information service (NIS), or a centrally-maintained TCP/IP host
file, such as /etc/hosts. Use the ping command to ensure that your computer host
name is resolvable. For example:
ping myhostname
pinging myhostname.example.com [192.0.2.2] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.0.2.2: bytes=32 time=138ms TTL=56
If your computer host name does not resolve, then contact your System Administrator.
2.6 Individual Component Requirements
Review the individual component requirements.
Individual Component Requirements contains the following topics:
Configuring Disk Storage for Oracle Data Files and Recovery Files (page 2-8)
Learn about the storage options for storing Oracle data files and,
optionally, Oracle database recovery files.
Creating Directories for Oracle Data Files or Recovery Files (page 2-9)
If you decide to place the Oracle Database files on a file system, then use
the following guidelines when deciding where to place them:
Oracle Database Security Strong Authentication Requirements (page 2-12)
Ensure that you meet the hardware and software requirements so that
you can use strong authentication (Kerberos, PKI) with Oracle Database.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Requirements (page 2-12)
All Oracle Enterprise Manager products must belong to the same
release.
Oracle-Managed Files Requirements (page 2-12)
If you choose the Advanced database creation option, then you can use
the Oracle-managed files feature with the new database.
Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) Writer (page 2-12)
Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service Writer is supported on Windows
Server operating systems.
See Also:
•
Oracle Application Express Installation Guide
2.6.1 Configuring Disk Storage for Oracle Data Files and Recovery Files
Learn about the storage options for storing Oracle data files and, optionally, Oracle
database recovery files.
2-8 Database Installation Guide
Individual Component Requirements
Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files (page 2-9)
Oracle Database files include data files, control files, redo log files, the
server parameter file, and the password file.
Configuring Disk Storage (page 2-9)
Learn how to configure disk storage before you start the installation.
2.6.1.1 Choosing a Storage Option for Oracle Database and Recovery Files
Oracle Database files include data files, control files, redo log files, the server
parameter file, and the password file.
For all installations, you must choose the storage option to use for Oracle Database
files. During the database installation, you must choose the storage option to use for
recovery files (the fast recovery area). You do not have to use the same storage option
for each file type.
Note:
Database files and recovery files are supported on file systems and Oracle
ASM.
The storage option that you choose for recovery files can be the same as or different to
the option you choose for the data files. The recovery files must be placed on Oracle
ASM if using Oracle ACFS; otherwise they can be placed on NTFS.
2.6.1.2 Configuring Disk Storage
Learn how to configure disk storage before you start the installation.
Related Topics:
Creating Directories for Oracle Data Files or Recovery Files (page 2-9)
If you decide to place the Oracle Database files on a file system, then use
the following guidelines when deciding where to place them:
Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 8-6)
You can use SQL Developer to issue SQL and PL/SQL statements. All
SQL and PL/SQL commands are supported as they are passed directly
from the SQL Worksheet to the Oracle Database.
2.6.2 Creating Directories for Oracle Data Files or Recovery Files
If you decide to place the Oracle Database files on a file system, then use the following
guidelines when deciding where to place them:
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Database Files on a File System or Logical Volume
(page 2-10)
Review the guidelines for placing Oracle Database files on a file system
or logical volume.
Guidelines for Placing Oracle Recovery Files on a File System (page 2-10)
Use the guidelines listed in this section to place Oracle recovery files on
a file system.
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-9
Individual Component Requirements
Creating Required Directories (page 2-11)
Use this procedure to create the required directories.
2.6.2.1 Guidelines for Placing Oracle Database Files on a File System or Logical
Volume
Review the guidelines for placing Oracle Database files on a file system or logical
volume.
•
Oracle Universal Installer indicates that the default path for the database file
directory is a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory.
•
You can choose either a single file system or more than one file system to store the
database files:
–
If you want to use a single file system, then choose a file system on a physical
device that is dedicated to the database.
For best performance and reliability, choose a RAID device or a logical
volume on multiple physical devices and implement a stripe-and-mirror
everything (SAME) storage policy.
–
If you want to use more than one file system, then choose file systems on
separate physical devices that are dedicated to the database.
This method enables you to distribute physical input-output operations and
create separate control files on different devices for increased reliability. It
also enables you to fully implement Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture
(OFA) guidelines. Choose the Advanced database creation option to
implement this method.
•
If you intend to create a preconfigured database during the installation, then the
file system (or file systems) that you choose must have at least 2 GB of free disk
space.
For production databases, you must estimate the disk space requirement
depending on the use of the database.
•
For optimum performance, the file systems that you choose must be on physical
devices that are used only by the database.
•
The Oracle user running the Oracle Database installation must have write
permissions to create the files in the path that you specify.
2.6.2.2 Guidelines for Placing Oracle Recovery Files on a File System
Use the guidelines listed in this section to place Oracle recovery files on a file system.
Note:
You must choose a location for recovery files only if you intend to enable
automated backups during the installation.
If you place the Oracle recovery files on a file system, use the following guidelines
when deciding where to place them:
2-10 Database Installation Guide
Individual Component Requirements
•
To prevent disk failure from making both the data files and the recovery files
unavailable, place the recovery files in a file system on a different physical disk
from the data files.
Note:
Alternatively, for both data files and recovery files, use an Oracle Automatic
Storage Management disk group.
•
The file system that you choose must have at least 2 GB of free disk space.
The disk space requirement is the default disk quota configured for the fast
recovery area (specified by the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE initialization
parameter).
If you choose the Advanced database configuration option, you can specify a
different disk quota value. After you create the database, you can also use Oracle
Enterprise Manager Cloud Control or Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Express to specify a different value.
See Also:
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
•
Oracle Universal Installer suggests that the default location for the database file
directory is a subdirectory of the Oracle base directory. However, this default
location is not recommended for production databases.
2.6.2.3 Creating Required Directories
Use this procedure to create the required directories.
Note:
You must complete this procedure only to place the Oracle database or
recovery files on a separate file system from the Oracle base directory.
To create directories for the Oracle database or recovery files on separate file systems
from the Oracle base directory, follow these steps:
1. Use Windows Explorer to determine the free disk space on the file system.
2. From the display, identify the file systems to use:
File Type
File System Requirements
Data files
Choose either:
•
•
Recovery files
A single file system with at least 950 MB of free disk space
Two or more file systems with at least 950 MB of free disk space
in total
Choose a file system with at least 2 GB of free disk space.
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-11
Individual Component Requirements
If you are using the same file system for multiple types of files, then add the disk
space requirements for each type to determine the total disk space requirement.
3. Note the names of the directories for the file systems that you identified.
Related Topics:
Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 5-8)
Identify storage requirements and ASM disk group options.
Stopping Existing Oracle Services (page 4-11)
Learn how to stop all processes, including the listener and database,
running in the Oracle home.
2.6.3 Oracle Database Security Strong Authentication Requirements
Ensure that you meet the hardware and software requirements so that you can use
strong authentication (Kerberos, PKI) with Oracle Database.
2.6.4 Oracle Enterprise Manager Requirements
All Oracle Enterprise Manager products must belong to the same release.
Older versions of Enterprise Manager are not supported with the new release.
Note:
Oracle Enterprise Manager products are released on the Enterprise Manager
Cloud Control installation media. Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Express is built into Oracle Database without any need for special installation
or management.
See Also:
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Basic Installation Guide and Oracle
Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Advanced Installation and Configuration Guide
2.6.5 Oracle-Managed Files Requirements
If you choose the Advanced database creation option, then you can use the Oraclemanaged files feature with the new database.
If you use this feature, then specify only the database object name instead of file names
when creating or deleting database files. You require configuration procedures to
enable Oracle Managed Files.
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
2.6.6 Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) Writer
Oracle Volume Shadow Copy Service Writer is supported on Windows Server
operating systems.
2-12 Database Installation Guide
Individual Component Requirements
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks 2-13
Individual Component Requirements
2-14 Installation Guide
3
Overview of Oracle Database Installation
Learn about the different installation types of Oracle Database and issues to consider
before you install Oracle Database.
New Oracle Products and Features Installed with this Release (page 3-1)
There are many new features and products installed with this release.
Planning Your Installation (page 3-1)
The Oracle Database installation process consists of the following steps:
Installation Considerations (page 3-3)
Learn about the information that you must consider before deciding
how to install this product.
Oracle Database Installation Methods (page 3-10)
You can choose the following installation methods to install Oracle
Database:
Database Configuration Options (page 3-11)
Review the different database configuration options.
Database Backup and Recovery Options (page 3-13)
To simplify the management of backup and recovery files, you can
create a fast recovery area for your database.
Migration Considerations (page 3-13)
Review the migration considerations in this topic.
3.1 New Oracle Products and Features Installed with this Release
There are many new features and products installed with this release.
There are many new New Oracle Products and Features Installed with this Release.
Related Topics:
Changes in this Release for Oracle Database Installation Guide (page xix)
This guide explains how to install and configure single-instance Oracle
Database.
3.2 Planning Your Installation
The Oracle Database installation process consists of the following steps:
1. Read the release notes: Read the Oracle Database release notes before you begin
the installation. The release notes are available with the platform-specific
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-1
Planning Your Installation
documentation. The latest version of the release notes is available on Oracle
Technology Network at
http://docs.oracle.com
2. Review the licensing information: Although the installation media in your media
pack contain many Oracle components, you are permitted to use only those
components for which you have purchased licenses.
Oracle Support Services does not provide support for components for which
licenses have not been purchased.
3. Plan the installation: This overview chapter describes the Oracle products that you
can install and issues that you must consider before starting the installation.
Oracle Database Client is installed separately. You cannot install Oracle Database
Client during an Oracle Database installation.
4. Complete preinstallation tasks: Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks (page 2-1)
describes tasks that you must complete before installing Oracle Database.
Additionally, see Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server (page 5-1) for Oracle Restart preinstallation tasks.
5. Install the software: Use the following sections to install Oracle Database:
•
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(page 5-1) describes how to use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle
Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server.
•
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-1) describes how to use Oracle Universal
Installer to install Oracle Database and how to clone an Oracle home.
•
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files (page C-1)
describes how to perform silent or response file installations, which you may
want to use to perform multiple installations of Oracle Database.
•
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages (page 6-16)
describes how to install and use Oracle components in different languages.
•
Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Installation (page F-1) provides
troubleshooting advice in case you encounter problems with the installation.
6. Complete postinstallation tasks: Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks
(page 7-1) describes postinstallation tasks.
7. Get started using Oracle Database: Use the following sections to get started using
Oracle Database:
•
Getting Started with Oracle Database (page 8-1) describes how to check the
contents of the installed Oracle Database, how to start the database and
various other Oracle tools, and how to locate various files.
•
"Cloning an Oracle Home (page 6-24)" describes how you can clone an
existing Oracle Database home.
•
Optimal Flexible Architecture (page B-1) on the Optimal Flexible
Architecture, which is a set of guidelines that ensure reliable Oracle
installations that require little maintenance.
3-2 Database Installation Guide
Installation Considerations
•
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages (page 6-12)
describes globalization support information.
•
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers (page E-1) explains how to
manage Oracle Database port numbers.
8. Remove Oracle Database software: Removing Oracle Database Software
(page 9-1) describes how to remove Oracle Database software.
See Also:
Oracle Database Licensing Information
Related Topics:
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation (page G-1)
Use the following guidelines to decide how to install Oracle Database
components:
Related Topics:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files (page C-1)
Learn how to install and configure Oracle products using response files.
3.3 Installation Considerations
Learn about the information that you must consider before deciding how to install this
product.
Installation Differences Between Windows and UNIX Systems (page 3-4)
If you are experienced with installing the Oracle components in UNIX
environments, note that many manual setup tasks required on UNIX are
not required on Windows.
Recommended File System (page 3-5)
Describes the recommended file system.
Hardware and Software Certification (page 3-5)
The platform-specific hardware and software requirements included in
this installation guide were current at the time this guide was published.
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (page 3-6)
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server provides the
infrastructure to include your single instance database in an enterprise
grid architecture.
Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services (page 3-6)
When you install the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(Oracle Restart), Oracle Universal Installer configures the single-node
version of Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS).
Oracle Universal Installer Overview (page 3-6)
Oracle Universal Installer is a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI)
tool that enables you to install Oracle software.
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-3
Installation Considerations
Oracle Base Directory (page 3-7)
If you install Oracle Database 12c on a computer with no other Oracle
software installed, Oracle Universal Installer creates an Oracle base
directory for you.
Oracle Home Directory (page 3-8)
Learn about the Oracle Home directory.
Oracle Inventory Directory (page 3-9)
The Oracle Inventory directory is the central inventory location for all
Oracle software installed on a server.
Installing Oracle Database Vault in an Oracle Data Guard Environment
(page 3-9)
Starting with Oracle Database 12c, Oracle Database Vault is installed by
default as part of the Oracle Database installation.
Oracle Database Vault Default Audit Policy and Initialization Parameters
(page 3-9)
Oracle Database Vault installs a baseline database auditing policy.
Consider Memory Allocation and Automatic Memory Management (page 3-9)
During a Typical installation, you create your database with Database
Configuration Assistant (DBCA), and automatic memory management is
enabled. If you choose advanced installation, then you can either specify
memory allocation manually, or enable automatic memory management.
3.3.1 Installation Differences Between Windows and UNIX Systems
If you are experienced with installing the Oracle components in UNIX environments,
note that many manual setup tasks required on UNIX are not required on Windows.
The key differences between UNIX and Windows installations are:
•
Startup and shutdown services
With Windows, you log in to a user account with Administrator privileges to
install the Oracle Database software. You can also specify an Oracle Home User
(standard Windows User Account, not an Administrator account) during
installation. On Linux and UNIX systems, you must create and use a software
owner user account, and this user must belong to the Oracle Inventory group.
•
Environment variables
With Windows, Oracle Universal Installer sets environment variables such as
PATH, ORACLE_BASE, ORACLE_HOME, and ORACLE_SID in the registry. In UNIX
systems, you must manually set these environment variables.
If you have multiple Oracle databases in an Oracle home, then only the SID of the
last Oracle database is set in the registry. See Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch
User's Guide for Windows and UNIX for more information about managing Oracle
homes.
•
Operating System Groups
On Windows systems, Oracle Universal Installer creates ORA_DBA, ORA_OPER,
ORA_SID_DBA, ORA_SID_OPER, ORA_HOMENAME_DBA, ORA_HOMENAME_OPER
and other groups, which are used for operating system authentication for Oracle
Database and Oracle ASM instances. On Linux and UNIX systems, you must
create these operating system groups manually, and they are used for granting
3-4 Database Installation Guide
Installation Considerations
permission to access various Oracle software resources and for operating system
authentication.
•
Account for running Oracle Universal Installer
With Windows, you log in to a user account with Administrator privileges to
install the Oracle Database software. You can also specify an Oracle Home User
(standard Windows User Account, not Administrator account) during installation.
On Linux and UNIX systems, you must create and use a software owner user
account, and this user must belong to the Oracle Inventory group.
3.3.2 Recommended File System
Describes the recommended file system.
Oracle strongly recommends that you install the Oracle database home (Oracle
database binaries, trace files, and so on) on Oracle ACFS, NTFS, or ReFS; the database
files themselves must be placed on Oracle ASM if using Oracle ACFS; otherwise they
can be placed on NTFS, or ReFS. Usage of Oracle ACFS, Oracle ASM, NTFS or ReFS is
recommended to ensure security of these files.
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
3.3.3 Hardware and Software Certification
The platform-specific hardware and software requirements included in this
installation guide were current at the time this guide was published.
However, because new platforms and operating system software versions may be
certified after this guide is published, review the certification matrix on the My Oracle
Support website for the most up-to-date list of certified hardware platforms and
operating system versions. This website also provides compatible client and database
versions, patches, and workaround information for bugs. The My Oracle Support
website is available at
https://support.oracle.com/
You must register online before using My Oracle Support. After logging in, from the
menu options, select the Certifications tab. On the Certifications page, use the
Certification Search options to search by Product, Release, and Platform. You can
also search using the Certification Quick Links options such as Software eDelivery
Cloud, and Lifetime Support.
Third-Party Database Certification for Oracle SQL Developer (page 3-6)
You can use Oracle SQL Developer to view metadata and data of several
non-Oracle databases.
Related Topics:
Windows Certification and Web Browser Support (page 2-6)
Review the Windows Certification and Web Browser Support
information.
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-5
Installation Considerations
3.3.3.1 Third-Party Database Certification for Oracle SQL Developer
You can use Oracle SQL Developer to view metadata and data of several non-Oracle
databases.
See Also: Oracle SQL Developer Installation Guide
3.3.4 Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server provides the infrastructure to
include your single instance database in an enterprise grid architecture.
Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) combines these infrastructure products into one
software installation called the Oracle Grid Infrastructure home. On a single instance
database, the Oracle Grid Infrastructure home includes Oracle Restart and Oracle
Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) software.
To use Oracle Automatic Storage Management or Oracle Restart, you must first install
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server before you install and create the
database. Otherwise, you must manually register the database with Oracle Restart.
See Also:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(page 5-1)
3.3.5 Oracle Cluster Synchronization Services
When you install the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle
Restart), Oracle Universal Installer configures the single-node version of Oracle
Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS).
The CSS service is required to enable synchronization between an Oracle ASM
instance and the database instances that rely on it for database file storage. Because the
service must be running before an Oracle ASM instance or database instance starts, it
is configured to start automatically by Oracle Restart before the Oracle ASM instance
is started. It must be running if an Oracle database is using Oracle ASM for database
file storage.
For single-instance installations, the CSS is installed-in and runs from the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure home which is the same home that runs Oracle ASM.
Note:
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide
3.3.6 Oracle Universal Installer Overview
Oracle Universal Installer is a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI) tool that
enables you to install Oracle software.
Oracle Universal Installer provides the following capabilities:
•
Component and suite installations
3-6 Database Installation Guide
Installation Considerations
•
Globalization support
•
Distributed installation support
•
Unattended silent installations using response files
•
Removal of installed components
•
Multiple Oracle homes support
Oracle Universal Installer can run a silent or a response file installation of Oracle
software using response files.
You must use the Oracle Universal Installer 12c to install components into an Oracle
Database 12c Oracle home directory.
Oracle Universal Installer automatically installs the Oracle version of the Java Runtime
Environment (JRE). This version is required to run Oracle Universal Installer and
several Oracle assistants. Do not modify the JRE, unless doing so with a patch
provided by My Oracle Support. Visit the following site to find Oracle patches to
download:
https://support.oracle.com/
When Oracle Universal Installer runs, it creates a dbhome_n directory, which keeps
track of the components you are installing. Do not modify the contents of this
directory. By default, this directory is located at the same directory level as
ORACLE_HOME.
Related Topics:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files (page C-1)
Learn how to install and configure Oracle products using response files.
3.3.7 Oracle Base Directory
If you install Oracle Database 12c on a computer with no other Oracle software
installed, Oracle Universal Installer creates an Oracle base directory for you.
If Oracle software is installed, then one or more Oracle base directories exist. In the
latter case, Oracle Universal Installer offers you a choice of Oracle base directories to
install Oracle Database.
The Oracle Home User has complete control over the Oracle Base for a particular
home. For security reasons, different Windows User Accounts used as Oracle Home
Users for different Oracle homes are not allowed to share the same Oracle Base.
However, to support Oracle Database upgrade, Oracle supports the sharing of an
Oracle Base between a Windows Built-in Account and a Windows User Account. This
means that if you choose to reuse an Oracle Base from an earlier release of Oracle
Database in Oracle Database 12c, then the Oracle Home User of Oracle Database 12c
Oracle home has complete control over the Oracle Base of the earlier release.
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
In a default Windows installation, the Oracle base directory appears as follows:
DRIVE_LETTER:\app\username
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-7
Installation Considerations
where username is the Oracle Installation User if you choose Windows Built-in
Account, else it is the Oracle Home User (standard Windows User Account).
Caution:
After installing Oracle Database 12c or later with a Windows User Account
used as the Oracle Home User, do not install older version of databases and
share the same Oracle base directory. During the installation of older releases
of Oracle Database, ACLs are reset corresponding to older releases. Thus
Oracle Database 12c or later services may not be able to access the Oracle base
directory and the files in it.
Note:
You can choose to create an Oracle base directory, even if the other Oracle
base directories exist on the system.
3.3.8 Oracle Home Directory
Learn about the Oracle Home directory.
Contents of the Oracle Home Environment (page 3-8)
The Oracle home directory is located under the Oracle base directory.
Multiple Oracle Home Components (page 3-9)
You can install all Oracle components in multiple Oracle homes on the
same computer.
3.3.8.1 Contents of the Oracle Home Environment
The Oracle home directory is located under the Oracle base directory.
For example, in a default Windows installation, if you name the Oracle home directory
dbhome_1, it appears in the Oracle base directory as follows:
DRIVE_LETTER:\app\username\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
where username is the installation user if you choose a Windows Built-in Account,
else it is the Oracle Home User specified.
An Oracle home corresponds to the environment in which the Oracle components run.
This environment includes the following:
•
Location of the installed component files
•
PATH variable pointing to the binary files of the installed components
•
Registry entries
•
Service names
•
Program groups
Oracle homes also have a name associated with them, which is automatically assigned
by the installer.
3-8 Database Installation Guide
Installation Considerations
3.3.8.2 Multiple Oracle Home Components
You can install all Oracle components in multiple Oracle homes on the same
computer.
However, some components can only support one active instance at a time. The
current (latest) installation renders the previous one inactive. These components are:
•
Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows
•
Oracle Provider for OLE DB
3.3.9 Oracle Inventory Directory
The Oracle Inventory directory is the central inventory location for all Oracle software
installed on a server.
By default, the location of the Oracle Inventory directory is C:\Program Files
\Oracle\Inventory. This directory is created by default the first time you install
Oracle software on a Windows server.
3.3.10 Installing Oracle Database Vault in an Oracle Data Guard Environment
Starting with Oracle Database 12c, Oracle Database Vault is installed by default as part
of the Oracle Database installation.
If you plan to use Oracle Data Guard with Oracle Database Vault, then see
"Integrating Oracle Database Vault with Oracle Data Guard" in Oracle Database Vault
Administrator's Guide.
3.3.11 Oracle Database Vault Default Audit Policy and Initialization Parameters
Oracle Database Vault installs a baseline database auditing policy.
This policy covers the access control configuration information stored in the following:
•
Database Vault database tables
•
Information stored in Oracle Catalog (rollback segments, tablespaces, and so on)
•
Use of system privileges
•
Oracle Label Security configuration
When you install Oracle Database Vault, the security specific database initialization
parameters are initialized with the default values.
See Also:
Oracle Database Vault Administrator's Guide
3.3.12 Consider Memory Allocation and Automatic Memory Management
During a Typical installation, you create your database with Database Configuration
Assistant (DBCA), and automatic memory management is enabled. If you choose
advanced installation, then you can either specify memory allocation manually, or
enable automatic memory management.
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-9
Oracle Database Installation Methods
With automatic memory management, the Oracle Database instances automatically
manage and tune memory for you. With automatic memory management, you choose
a memory target, and the instance automatically distributes memory between the
system global area (SGA) and the instance program global area (instance PGA). As
memory requirements change, the instance dynamically redistributes memory
between the SGA and instance PGA.
You can enable automatic memory management either during, or after the database
installation. Enabling automatic memory management after installation involves a
shutdown and restart of the database.
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
3.4 Oracle Database Installation Methods
You can choose the following installation methods to install Oracle Database:
Interactive Installation Types (page 3-10)
Review the different interactive installation methods in this section.
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files (page 3-11)
By creating a response file and specifying this file when you start Oracle
Universal Installer, you can automate some or all of the Oracle Database
installation.
3.4.1 Interactive Installation Types
Review the different interactive installation methods in this section.
When you use the interactive method to install Oracle Database by selecting the
Create and configure a database option, Oracle Universal Installer displays a series of
screens. The screens enable you to specify all the required information to install the
Oracle Database software and create a database.
Oracle Universal Installer provides you the following options:
•
Desktop Class: Select this option if you are installing on a laptop or desktop class
system. This option includes a starter database and allows minimal configuration.
This option is designed for those who want to quickly set up a database.
•
Server Class: Select this option if you are installing on a server class system, such
as when deploying Oracle in a production data center. This option allows for
more advanced configuration options. Advanced configuration options available
using this option include Oracle RAC, Oracle Automatic Storage Management,
backup and recovery configuration, integration with Enterprise Manager Cloud
Control, and more fine-grained memory tuning, among others.
Furthermore, the Server Class option provides you with the following installation
types:
–
Typical: Select this installation method to quickly install Oracle Database.
This installation type requires minimal user input. It installs the software and
optionally creates a general-purpose database using the information that you
specify on the screen. It is the default installation type.
–
Advanced: Select this installation type to complete any of the following tasks:
3-10 Database Installation Guide
Database Configuration Options
*
Select a database character set or different product languages
*
Create the EXAMPLE tablespace during the installation
*
Create a database on a different file system from the software
*
Specify different passwords for administrative schemas
*
Configure recovery options
*
Configure Oracle Configuration Manager
*
In the Select Database Edition screen, if you select Enterprise Edition,
then Oracle Universal Installer automatically selects the components
most customers need for their Oracle Database installation.
Related Topics:
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines (page 6-3)
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal
Installer:
3.4.2 Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files
By creating a response file and specifying this file when you start Oracle Universal
Installer, you can automate some or all of the Oracle Database installation.
These automated installation methods are useful if you must perform multiple
installations on similarly configured systems.
When you use a response file, you can run Oracle Universal Installer in the following
modes, depending on whether you specify all of the required information or not:
•
Silent Mode: Oracle Universal Installer runs in silent mode if you use a response
file that specifies all the required information, and specify the -silent option
when starting Oracle Universal Installer. None of the Oracle Universal Installer
screens are displayed.
•
Response File Mode: Oracle Universal Installer runs in response file mode if you
do not specify all the required information in the response file.
See Also: Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files
(page C-1).
3.5 Database Configuration Options
Review the different database configuration options.
You can create an Oracle database during the installation process. If you choose to
create an Oracle database, Oracle Universal Installer uses Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant to create it. You can create one of the preconfigured database
types, which are designed for a variety of different applications, modify one of the
preconfigured database types, or create a customized database to suit your own
requirements.
Creating a Database After Installation (page 3-12)
You can create a database after installation by using Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant (Oracle DBCA).
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-11
Database Configuration Options
3.5.1 Creating a Database After Installation
You can create a database after installation by using Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant (Oracle DBCA).
If you decide not to create a database during the installation, then you can use Oracle
Database Configuration Assistant (Oracle DBCA) to create one after you have installed
the software.
See Also:
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
Creating an Oracle Database on Direct NFS (page 3-12)
Learn how to install and create an Oracle Database that uses Direct NFS
(dNFS) for storage.
3.5.1.1 Creating an Oracle Database on Direct NFS
Learn how to install and create an Oracle Database that uses Direct NFS (dNFS) for
storage.
There are different configuration processes you must perform to use dNFS for your
database file system. Following are the steps:
1.
Perform a Software-Only Installation of Oracle Database
In a software-only installation, you install the Oracle Database software but do not
create a database as part of the installation process. You can install only the
database software by selecting the Install Database Software only option provided
on the Select Installation Option screen.
2.
Use Oracle Database Configuration Assistant to Create and Configure the
Database
After the Prerequisite checks are complete, on the Summary screen, minimize the
installation window. DO NOT click Finish at this point.
3.
Enable the Direct NFS option.
Return to the DBCA window and click Finish.
4.
Map a drive letter to a CIFS share on the NFS server that represents the location of
the database files.
NET USE * \\filer\vol0\orcl
After you complete this step, both Oracle and the Windows operating system can
access the location where the database files reside. Oracle is using DNFS, but the
Windows OS uses CIFS to access the same location on the NFS server.
5.
Verify that the Direct NFS is configured for the database.
a.
Start SQL*Plus.
b.
Connect to the newly created database as a DBA user.
c.
Run the following SQL command:
3-12 Database Installation Guide
Database Backup and Recovery Options
SELECT * FROM v$dnfs_servers;
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
3.6 Database Backup and Recovery Options
To simplify the management of backup and recovery files, you can create a fast
recovery area for your database.
During the database installation, Oracle Universal Installer provides you with options
to configure the fast recovery area location. However, to configure backups, and to
implement a backup and recovery strategy, you must use either Recovery Manager
(RMAN) or Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control.
Configuring Recovery (page 3-13)
You can provide the location of the fast recovery area during the
database installation.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
3.6.1 Configuring Recovery
You can provide the location of the fast recovery area during the database installation.
You can use either a file system directory or an Oracle Automatic Storage
Management disk group for the fast recovery area. The default disk quota configured
for the fast recovery area is 2 GB. For Oracle Automatic Storage Management disk
groups, the required disk space depends on the redundancy level of the disk group
that you choose.
See Also:
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks (page 2-1) describes how to choose the
location of the fast recovery area and identifies its disk space requirements.
3.7 Migration Considerations
Review the migration considerations in this topic.
You can migrate an existing Oracle Database 11g for 32-bit Windows to Oracle
Database 12c for 64-bit Windows.
Oracle Database Upgrade Assistant has an option, Move Database from a Different
Release 12.1 Oracle home, which lets you move your database from a Windows Builtin Account secured home to a Windows User Account secured home.
Overview of Oracle Database Installation 3-13
Migration Considerations
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
•
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
•
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows about "Migrating an
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) or Earlier Database"
3-14 Database Installation Guide
4
Configuring Users, Groups and
Environments for Oracle Database
Learn about the users, groups, and environment settings to complete before you install
Oracle Database and Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server.
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users (page 4-1)
If you are installing Oracle software for the first time and on the
products that you are installing, create several operating system groups
and users.
Stopping Existing Oracle Services (page 4-11)
Learn how to stop all processes, including the listener and database,
running in the Oracle home.
Configuring User Accounts (page 4-12)
During installation, you can specify an Oracle Home User.
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
4.1 Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
If you are installing Oracle software for the first time and on the products that you are
installing, create several operating system groups and users.
You can choose to create one administrative user and use one group for operating
system authentication for all system privileges on the storage and database tiers. For
example, you can designate the oracle user to be the Oracle Installation user for all
Oracle software and use only the ORA_DBA group for authentication. You can also
create custom configuration groups and users based on job role separation that divide
access privileges.
Log in as an Administrator user, and use the following instructions to create the
Oracle Installation user for Oracle Database.
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
About the Oracle Installation User (page 4-2)
To install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle
Restart) or Oracle Database software, you must use either a local or a
domain user that is also a member of the Administrators group.
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-1
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Creating Oracle Home User (page 4-2)
During Oracle Database installation, you can specify an optional Oracle
home user associated with the Oracle home.
Understanding the Oracle Inventory Directory and the Oracle Inventory Group
(page 4-3)
The Oracle Inventory directory is the central inventory location for all
Oracle software installed on a server.
Operating System Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
(page 4-4)
During installation, the user groups listed in the following table are
created, if they do not already exist.
Operating System Groups and Users for Job Role Separation (page 4-7)
A job role separation configuration of Oracle Database and Oracle ASM
is a configuration with groups and users to provide separate groups for
operating system authentication.
4.1.1 About the Oracle Installation User
To install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) or Oracle
Database software, you must use either a local or a domain user that is also a member
of the Administrators group.
This user is the Oracle Installation User. The Oracle Installation User can be either a
local user or a domain user.
4.1.2 Creating Oracle Home User
During Oracle Database installation, you can specify an optional Oracle home user
associated with the Oracle home.
For example, assume that you use an Administrator user named OraSys to install the
software (Oracle Installation user), then you can specify the ORADOMAIN\OraDb
domain user as the Oracle home user for this installation. The specified Oracle home
domain user must exist before you install the Oracle Database software.
Oracle home user can be a Windows Built-in Account (LocalSystem for Server and
LocalService for Client), Virtual Account, or a regular (not an administrator) Windows
account. If you specify an existing user as the Oracle home user, then the Windows
User Account you specify can either be a Windows Domain User or a Windows Local
User.
A Windows User Account need not be created by the Administrator if a Virtual
Account or a Windows Built-in Account is used during installation.
If you specify a non-existing user as the Oracle home user, then the Windows User
Account you specify must be a Windows Local User. The installer creates this account
automatically to run the Windows services for the Oracle home. Do not log in using
this account to perform administrative tasks.
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the Group Managed Services
Account (gMSA) and Virtual Accounts enables you to install Oracle Database, and
create and manage Database services without passwords. The gMSA is a domain level
account that can be used by multiple servers in a domain to run the services using this
account. Windows User Account can be a Windows Local User, Windows Domain
User, Managed Services Account (MSA), or Group Managed Services Account
(gMSA).
4-2 Database Installation Guide
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
If you want to create a new user during installation, then it can only be a Windows
Local User. It cannot be a Windows Domain User, an MSA, or a gMSA. The new user
that is created is denied interactive logon privileges to the Windows computer.
However, a Windows administrator can manage this account like any other Windows
account. Oracle recommends that you use Virtual Account or a standard Windows
User Account (instead of Windows Built-in Account) as the Oracle Home User for
enhanced security.
Note:
You cannot change the Oracle Home User after the installation is complete. If
you must change the Oracle Home User, then you must reinstall the Oracle
Database software.
When you specify an Oracle Home user, the installer configures that user as the Oracle
Service user for all software services that run from the Oracle home. The Oracle
Service user is the operating system user that the Oracle software services run as, or
the user from which the services inherit privileges.
Silent installation is enhanced to support password prompt for the Oracle home user.
So, customers and independent software vendors (ISV) can use response files without
hard coding the password into the source code.
Oracle recommends using Virtual Account or a standard Windows User Account (not
an Administrator account) as the Oracle Home User for typical installation, softwareonly installation, and cloning.
If an existing Windows User Account is used as the Oracle home user for softwareonly installation, then a password is not required. Thus, you can perform a silent,
software-only installation using Windows User Account.
If you use a Windows User Account as the Oracle home user for cloning individual
Oracle Database installations, then a password is not required.
Virtual Account is the Oracle home user for Oracle Database Single Instance database
installation. The account enables you to install Oracle Database, create, and manage
Database services without passwords. The gMSA is a domain level account that can be
used by multiple servers in a domain to run the services using this account. The gMSA
is a low privilege user account.
4.1.3 Understanding the Oracle Inventory Directory and the Oracle Inventory Group
The Oracle Inventory directory is the central inventory location for all Oracle software
installed on a server.
By default, the location of the Oracle Inventory directory is C:\Program Files
\Oracle\Inventory.
When you install Oracle software on the system for the first time, Oracle Universal
Installer creates the directories for the Oracle central inventory and the Oracle
Inventory group, ORA_INSTALL. The ORA_INSTALL group contains all the Oracle
Home Users for all Oracle homes on the server.
Whether you are performing the first installation of Oracle software on this server, or
are performing an installation of additional Oracle software on the server, you do not
need to create the Oracle central inventory or the ORA_INSTALL group; the Oracle
Universal Installer creates them automatically. You cannot change the name of the
Oracle Inventory group - it is always ORA_INSTALL.
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-3
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
4.1.4 Operating System Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
During installation, the user groups listed in the following table are created, if they do
not already exist.
The HOMENAME variable refers to the generated HOMENAME for a software installation,
which is of the form OraproductmajorVersionHomenumber. For example,
OraDB12cHome1.
Table 4-1
User Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
Operating System Group
Name
Related
System
Privilege
Description
ORA_DBA
SYSDBA
system
privileges for
all Oracle
Database
installations
on the server
A special OSDBA group for the Windows
operating system.
SYSOPER
system
privileges for
all Oracle
databases
installed on
the server
A special OSOPER group for the Windows
operating system.
SYSASM
system
privileges for
Oracle ASM
administratio
n
The OSASM group for the Oracle ASM
instance.
SYSDBA
system
privileges on
the Oracle
ASM instance
The OSDBA group for the Oracle ASM
instance.
ORA_OPER
ORA_ASMADMIN
ORA_ASMDBA
4-4 Database Installation Guide
Members of this group are granted SYSDBA
system privileges for all Oracle Databases
installed on the server.
Members of this group are granted SYSOPER
system privileges all Oracle Databases installed
on the server. This group does not have any
members after installation, but you can
manually add users to this group after the
installation completes.
Using this group and the SYSASM system
privileges enables the separation of SYSDBA
database administration privileges from Oracle
ASM storage administration privileges.
Members of the OSASM group are authorized
to connect using the SYSASM privilege and
have full access to Oracle ASM, including
administrative access to all disk groups that the
Oracle ASM instance manages.
This group grants access for the database to
connect to Oracle ASM. During installation, the
Oracle Installation Users are configured as
members of this group. After you create an
Oracle Database, this group contains the Oracle
Home Users of those database homes.
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Table 4-1
(Cont.) User Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
Operating System Group
Name
Related
System
Privilege
Description
ORA_ASMOPER
SYSOPER for
ASM system
privileges
The OSOPER group for the Oracle ASM
instance.
SYSDBA
system
privileges for
all instances
that run from
the Oracle
home with
the name
HOMENAME
An OSDBA group for a specific Oracle home
with a name of HOMENAME.
SYSOPER
system
privileges for
all instances
that run from
the Oracle
home with a
name
HOMENAME
An OSDBA group for the Oracle home with a
name of HOMENAME.
SYSBACKUP
system
privileges for
all instances
that run from
the Oracle
home with a
name of
HOMENAME
OSBACKUPDBA group for a specific Oracle
home with a name of HOMENAME.
SYSDG
system
privileges for
all instances
that run from
the Oracle
home with a
name of
HOMENAME
OSDGDBA group for a specific Oracle home
with a name of HOMENAME.
ORA_HOMENAME_DBA
ORA_HOMENAME_OPER
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSBACK
UP
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSDG
Members of this group are granted SYSOPER
system privileges on the Oracle ASM instance,
which permits a user to perform operations
such as startup, shutdown, mount, dismount,
and check disk group. This group has a subset
of the privileges of the OSASM group. Similar
to the ORA_HOMENAME_OPER group, this group
does not have any members after installation,
but you can manually add users to this group
after the installation completes.
Members of this group can use operating
system authentication to gain SYSDBA system
privileges for any database that runs from the
specific Oracle home. If you specified an Oracle
Home User during installation, the user is
added to this group during installation.
Members of this group can use operating
system authentication to gain SYSOPER system
privileges for any database that runs from the
specific Oracle home. This group does not have
any members after installation, but you can
manually add users to this group after the
installation completes.
Members of this group have privileges
necessary for performing database backup and
recovery tasks on all database instances that
run from the specified Oracle home directory.
Members of this group have privileges
necessary for performing Data Guard
administrative tasks on all database instances
that run from the specified Oracle home
directory.
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-5
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Table 4-1
(Cont.) User Groups Created During Oracle Database Installation
Operating System Group
Name
Related
System
Privilege
Description
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSKM
SYSKM
system
privileges for
all instances
that run from
the Oracle
home with a
name of
HOMENAME.
OSKMDBA group for a specific Oracle home
with a name of HOMENAME.
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSRAC
ORA_HOMENAME_SVCACCT
S
ORA_HOMENAME_DBSVCAC
CTS
Members of this group have privileges
necessary for performing encryption key
management tasks on all database instances
that run from the specified Oracle home
directory.
SYSRAC
system
privileges for
all instances
that run from
the Oracle
home with a
name of
HOMENAME.
OSRACDBA group for a specific Oracle home
with a name of HOMENAME.
Contains
Virtual
Accounts for
all Oracle
Database
Windows
Services that
run from,
Oracle Home
with a name
of
HOMENAM
E.
SVCACCTS group for a specific Oracle home
with a name of HOMENAME.
Contains
Virtual
Accounts for
all Oracle
Database
Windows
Services that
run from,
Oracle Home
with a name
of
HOMENAM
E.
DBSVCACCTS group for a specific Oracle
home with a name of HOMENAME.
Members of this group have privileges
necessary for performing a limited set of Oracle
Real Application Clusters administrative tasks
to create a separate group of operating system
users.
This group is used for internal use and proper
operation of Oracle Database using Virtual
Accounts. This group is automatically created,
and populated during Oracle installation and
use of Oracle administration tools.
This group is used for internal use and proper
operation of Oracle Database using Virtual
Accounts. This group is automatically created,
and populated during Oracle installation and
use of Oracle administration tools.
During the installation of Oracle Database, all groups mentioned in the table are
populated for proper operation of Oracle products. You must not remove any group
member populated by Oracle. However, if you want to assign specific database
privileges to new Windows operating system users, then you can manually add users
to these groups after the installation completes.
4-6 Database Installation Guide
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Oracle creates other groups, such as, ORA_INSTALL, ORA_CLIENT_LISTENERS,
ORA_GRID_LISTENERS, ORA_HOMENAME_SVCSIDS, ORA_HOMENAME_SVCACCTS,
and ORA_HOMENAME_DBSVCACCTS during installation and you must not change these
groups, memberships, and ACLs associated with various Oracle created groups.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
4.1.5 Operating System Groups and Users for Job Role Separation
A job role separation configuration of Oracle Database and Oracle ASM is a
configuration with groups and users to provide separate groups for operating system
authentication.
About Job Role Separation Operating System Privileges Groups and Users
(page 4-8)
During the Oracle Database installation, the ORA_DBA, ORA_OPER,
ORA_HOMENAME_DBA, ORA_HOMENAME_OPER,
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSBACKUP, ORA_HOMENAME_SYSDG,
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSKM, and ORA_HOMENAME_SYSRAC groups are
created and users assigned to these groups.
Oracle Software Owner For Each Oracle Software Product (page 4-8)
You can create a single user (for example, oracle) to own both Oracle
Database, and Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle
Restart) installations.
Standard Oracle Database Groups for Job Role Separation for Oracle Database
(page 4-8)
Review the standard Oracle Database groups.
Extended Oracle Database Groups for Job Role Separation (page 4-9)
In addition to the SYSOPER privilege to start up and shut down the
database, you can create new administrative privileges that are more
task-specific and less privileged than the ORA_DBA/SYSDBA system
privileges to support specific administrative privileges tasks required for
everyday database operation.
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Groups for Job Role Separation
(page 4-10)
Review the operating system groups.
Windows Group Managed Service Accounts and Virtual Accounts (page 4-11)
Group Managed Services Account (gMSA) and Virtual Accounts are
now supported and enable you to create and manage Database services
without passwords.
Microsoft Hyper-V (page 4-11)
Microsoft Hyper-V enables you to create and manage a virtualized
computing environment by running multiple operating systems
simultaneously on a single computer and isolate operating systems from
each other.
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-7
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
4.1.5.1 About Job Role Separation Operating System Privileges Groups and Users
During the Oracle Database installation, the ORA_DBA, ORA_OPER,
ORA_HOMENAME_DBA, ORA_HOMENAME_OPER, ORA_HOMENAME_SYSBACKUP,
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSDG, ORA_HOMENAME_SYSKM, and ORA_HOMENAME_SYSRAC
groups are created and users assigned to these groups.
Members of these groups are granted operating system authentication for the set of
database system privileges each group authorizes. Oracle recommends that you use
different operating system groups for each set of system privileges.
4.1.5.2 Oracle Software Owner For Each Oracle Software Product
You can create a single user (for example, oracle) to own both Oracle Database, and
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) installations.
However, Oracle recommends that you create one software owner to own each Oracle
software installation (typically, oracle, for the database software and grid for the
Oracle Restart owner user).
You must create at least one software owner the first time you install Oracle software
on the system.
Note:
In Oracle documentation, a user created to own only Oracle Grid
Infrastructure software installations is called the grid user. A user created to
own either all Oracle installations, or only Oracle database installations, is
called the oracle user.
4.1.5.3 Standard Oracle Database Groups for Job Role Separation for Oracle
Database
Review the standard Oracle Database groups.
The following is a list of standard Oracle Database groups. These groups provide
operating system authentication for database administration system privileges:
Note:
All these groups are automatically created as a part of Oracle Database
installation on Windows.
•
The OSDBA group (ORA_DBA)
Use this group the first time you install Oracle Database software on the system.
This group identifies operating system user accounts that have database
administrative privileges (the SYSDBA privilege) for all database instances
running on the server.
Members of the ORA_DBA group do not have SYSASM privileges on Oracle ASM
instances, which are needed for mounting and dismounting disk groups.
•
The OSOPER group for Oracle Database (ORA_OPER)
4-8 Database Installation Guide
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Use this group if you want a separate group of operating system users to have a
limited set of database administrative privileges for starting up and shutting
down the database (the SYSOPER privilege).
•
The OSDBA group for a particular Oracle home (ORA_HOMENAME_DBA)
This group is created the first time you install Oracle Database software into a
new Oracle home. This group identifies operating system user accounts that have
database administrative privileges (the SYSDBA privilege) for the database
instances that run from that Oracle home.
•
The OSOPER group for a particular Oracle home (ORA_HOMENAME_OPER)
Use this group if you want a separate group of operating system users to have a
limited set of database administrative privileges for starting up and shutting
down the database instances that run from a particular Oracle home (the
SYSOPER privilege).
4.1.5.4 Extended Oracle Database Groups for Job Role Separation
In addition to the SYSOPER privilege to start up and shut down the database, you can
create new administrative privileges that are more task-specific and less privileged
than the ORA_DBA/SYSDBA system privileges to support specific administrative
privileges tasks required for everyday database operation.
Users granted these system privileges are also authenticated through operating system
group membership.
During installation, you are prompted to provide operating system groups whose
members are granted access to these system privileges. You can assign the same group
to provide authentication for these privileges (for example, ORA_DBA), but Oracle
recommends that you provide a unique group to designate each privilege.
The OSDBA subset job role separation privileges and groups consist of the following:
•
The OSBACKUPDBA group for Oracle Database (ORA_HOMENAME_SYSBACKUP)
Use this group if you want a separate group of operating system users to have a
limited set of database backup and recovery related administrative privileges (the
SYSBACKUP privilege).
•
The OSDGDBA group for Oracle Data Guard (ORA_HOMENAME_SYSDG)
Use this group if you want a separate group of operating system users to have a
limited set of privileges to administer and monitor Oracle Data Guard (the SYSDG
privilege).
•
The OSKMDBA group for encryption key management (ORA_HOMENAME_SYSKM)
Use this group if you want a separate group of operating system users to have a
limited set of privileges for encryption key management such as Oracle Wallet
Manager management (the SYSKM privilege).
•
The OSRACDBA group for Oracle Real Application Clusters Administration
(ORA_HOMENAME_SYSRAC)
Use this group if you want a separate group of operating system users to have a
limited set of Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) administrative privileges
(the SYSRAC privilege). To use this privilege:
–
Add the Oracle Database installation owners as members of this group.
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-9
Creating Required Operating System Groups and Users
Note:
All these groups, ORA_HOMENAME_SYSBACKUP, ORA_HOMENAME_SYSDG,
ORA_HOMENAME_SYSKM, and ORA_HOMENAME_SYSRAC are applicable only to
the database instances running from that particular Oracle home.
4.1.5.5 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Groups for Job Role Separation
Review the operating system groups.
Create the following operating system groups if you are installing Oracle Grid
Infrastructure:
•
The OSDBA group for Oracle ASM (ORA_ASMDBA)
This group grants access for the database to connect to Oracle ASM. During
installation, the Oracle Installation Users are configured as members of this group.
After you create an Oracle Database, this group contains the Oracle Home Users
of those database homes. Any client of Oracle ASM that needs to access storage
managed by Oracle ASM needs to be in this group.
•
The OSASM group for Oracle ASM Administration (ORA_ASMADMIN)
Use this separate group to have separate administration privilege groups for
Oracle ASM and Oracle Database administrators. Members of this group are
granted the SYSASM system privilege to administer Oracle ASM. In Oracle
documentation, the operating system group whose members are granted
privileges is called the OSASM group. During installation, the Oracle Installation
User for Oracle Grid Infrastructure and Oracle Database Service IDs are
configured as members of this group. Membership in this group also grants
database access to the Oracle ASM disks.
Members of the OSASM group can use SQL to connect to an Oracle ASM instance
as SYSASM using operating system authentication. The SYSASM privilege
permits mounting and dismounting disk groups, and other storage administration
tasks. SYSASM system privileges do not grant access privileges on an Oracle
Database instance.
•
The OSOPER group for Oracle ASM (ORA_ASMOPER)
This is an optional group. Create this group if you want a separate group of
operating system users to have a limited set of Oracle ASM instance
administrative privileges (the SYSOPER for ASM privilege), including starting up
and stopping the Oracle ASM instance. By default, members of the OSASM group
also have all privileges granted by the SYSOPER for ASM privilege.
To use the Oracle ASM Operator group to create an Oracle ASM administrator
with fewer privileges than those granted by the SYSASM system privilege you
must assign the user to this group after installation.
See Also:
–
Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide
–
Oracle Database Security Guide
4-10 Database Installation Guide
Stopping Existing Oracle Services
4.1.5.6 Windows Group Managed Service Accounts and Virtual Accounts
Group Managed Services Account (gMSA) and Virtual Accounts are now supported
and enable you to create and manage Database services without passwords.
4.1.5.7 Microsoft Hyper-V
Microsoft Hyper-V enables you to create and manage a virtualized computing
environment by running multiple operating systems simultaneously on a single
computer and isolate operating systems from each other.
Microsoft Hyper-V enables built-in integration services for supported guest operating
systems to improve the integration between a computer and a virtual machine.
See Also:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/
virtualizationmatrix-172995.html for more information about
Microsoft Hyper-V support
4.2 Stopping Existing Oracle Services
Learn how to stop all processes, including the listener and database, running in the
Oracle home.
Caution:
If you are installing additional Oracle Database 12c products in an existing
Oracle home, then stop all processes, including the listener and database,
running in the Oracle home. You cannot install into an existing Oracle home
other than 12c. You must complete this task to enable Oracle Universal
Installer to relink certain executables and libraries.
Consider the following before you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for Independent
Servers (Oracle Restart) or Oracle Database:
•
If you intend to use Oracle Restart, then you must install the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for Independent Servers (Oracle Restart) before you install and
create the database. When you perform a database installation, the database must
use the same listener created during the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for
Independent Servers (Oracle Restart) installation, thereafter you do not have to
perform the steps listed in this section.
The default listener and any additional listeners must run from the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure home.
•
If you have an existing Oracle Database 12c running on Oracle ASM, then stop
any existing Oracle ASM instances. After you finish installing Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for Independent Servers (Oracle Restart), start the Oracle ASM
instance again.
If you choose to create a database during the installation, then most installation types
configure and start a default Oracle Net listener using TCP/IP port 1521 and the IPC
key value EXTPROC. However, if an existing Oracle Net listener process is using the
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-11
Configuring User Accounts
same port or key value, Oracle Universal Installer looks for the next available port (for
example, 1522) and configures and starts the new listener on this available port.
4.3 Configuring User Accounts
During installation, you can specify an Oracle Home User.
Before starting the installation, perform the following checks for the Oracle Installation
users to ensure the installation succeeds:
Configuring Environment Variables for the Software Installation Owner
(page 4-12)
Before starting the Oracle Database installation, ensure that the TEMP
environment variable is set correctly.
Managing User Accounts with User Account Control (page 4-12)
To ensure that only trusted applications run on your computer, the
Windows operating systems that support Oracle Database, provide User
Account Control.
4.3.1 Configuring Environment Variables for the Software Installation Owner
Before starting the Oracle Database installation, ensure that the TEMP environment
variable is set correctly.
4.3.2 Managing User Accounts with User Account Control
To ensure that only trusted applications run on your computer, the Windows
operating systems that support Oracle Database, provide User Account Control.
If you have enabled this security feature, then, depending on the configuration, Oracle
Universal Installer prompts you for either your consent or your credentials when
installing Oracle Database.
You must have Administrator privileges to run Oracle tools, such as Database
Configuration Assistant, Net Configuration Assistant, and OPatch, or to run any tool
or application that writes to any directory within the Oracle home. If User Account
Control is enabled, and you are logged in as the local Administrator, then you can
successfully run each of these commands. However, if you are logged in as "a member
of the Administrator group," then you must explicitly start these tasks with Windows
Administrator privileges. All the Oracle shortcuts that require Administrator
privileges start as "Administrator" by default when you click the shortcuts. However,
if you run the above tools from a Windows command prompt, you must run them
from an Administrator command prompt. OPatch does not have a shortcut and has to
be run from an Administrator command prompt.
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
To start a command prompt window with Windows Administrator privileges:
1. On your desktop, create a shortcut for the command prompt window. An icon for
that shortcut appears on the desktop.
2. Right-click the icon for the newly created shortcut, and specify Run as
administrator.
4-12 Database Installation Guide
Configuring User Accounts
When you open this window, the title bar reads Administrator: Command Prompt.
Run commands from within this window using Administrator privileges.
Configuring Users, Groups and Environments for Oracle Database 4-13
Configuring User Accounts
4-14 Installation Guide
5
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
If you intend to use Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM), then you
must install Oracle Restart before installing your database.
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server is a version of Oracle Grid
Infrastructure that supports single instance databases. This support includes volume
management, file system, and automatic restart capabilities. Oracle Grid Infrastructure
for a standalone server includes Oracle Restart and Oracle Automatic Storage
Management. Oracle combined the two infrastructure products into a single set of
binaries that is installed into an Oracle Restart home.
Oracle Restart is a feature provided as part of Oracle Grid Infrastructure. Oracle
Restart monitors and can restart Oracle Database instances, Oracle Net Listeners, and
Oracle ASM instances. Oracle Restart is currently restricted to manage single instance
Oracle Databases and Oracle ASM instances only, and is subject to desupport in future
releases. Oracle continues to provide Oracle ASM as part of the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installation for a standalone server and Cluster deployments.
Oracle Automatic Storage Management is a volume manager and a file system for
Oracle Database files that supports single-instance Oracle Database and Oracle Real
Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) configurations. Oracle Automatic Storage
Management also supports a general purpose file system for your application needs,
including Oracle Database binaries. Oracle Automatic Storage Management is Oracle's
recommended storage management solution that provides an alternative to
conventional volume managers and file systems.
Oracle Restart improves the availability of your Oracle database because of the
following:
•
When there is a hardware or a software failure, Oracle Restart automatically starts
all Oracle components, including the Oracle database instance, Oracle Net
Listener, database services, and Oracle ASM.
•
Oracle Restart starts components in the proper order when the database host is
restarted.
•
Oracle Restart runs periodic checks to monitor the status of Oracle components. If
a check operation fails for a component, then the component is shut down and
restarted.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-1
Note:
•
You can neither install Oracle Restart on an Oracle Grid Infrastructure
cluster member node, nor add an Oracle Restart server to an Oracle Grid
Infrastructure cluster member node. Oracle Restart supports singleinstance databases on one server, while Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Cluster supports single-instance or Oracle RAC databases on a cluster.
•
If you want to use Oracle ASM or Oracle Restart, then you must install
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server before you install and
create the database. Otherwise, you must install Oracle Restart, and then
manually register the database with Oracle Restart.
•
You can use the Oracle Restart implementation of Oracle Grid
Infrastructure only in single-instance (nonclustered) environments. Use
Oracle Grid Infrastructure with Oracle Clusterware for clustered
environments.
About Image-Based Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation (page 5-3)
Starting with Oracle Grid Infrastructure 12c Release 2 (12.2), installation
and configuration of Oracle Grid Infrastructure software is simplified
with image-based installation.
Requirements for an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle
Restart) Installation (page 5-4)
Before you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server
(Oracle Restart), ensures that your system meets the following
requirements:
Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM (page 5-5)
Learn about Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System
(Oracle ACFS) and Oracle Automatic Storage Management Dynamic
Volume Manager (Oracle ADVM).
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration (page 5-6)
Review the following sections for information on Oracle Automatic
Storage Management (Oracle ASM) storage configuration:
Configuring Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Groups Manually
Using Oracle ASMCA (page 5-17)
The Oracle Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant
utility creates a new Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance if
there is no Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance currently
configured on this computer.
Testing the Oracle Automatic Storage Management Installation (page 5-17)
After installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a single instance, use the
ASMCMD command-line utility to test the Oracle ASM installation.
About Upgrading Existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management Instances
(page 5-18)
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) upgrades are
carried out during an Oracle Grid Infrastructure upgrade.
5-2 Database Installation Guide
About Image-Based Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
Using a Software-Only Installation (page 5-18)
A software-only installation only installs the Oracle Grid Infrastructure
for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) binaries at the specified location.
You must complete a few manual configuration steps to enable Oracle
Restart after you install the software.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(Oracle Restart) (page 5-20)
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart)
includes Oracle Restart and Oracle Automatic Storage Management.
Modifying Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
Binaries After Installation (page 5-23)
After installation, you must first stop the Oracle Restart stack to modify
the software installed in your Grid home.
See Also: My Oracle Support Note 1584742.1
5.1 About Image-Based Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation
Starting with Oracle Grid Infrastructure 12c Release 2 (12.2), installation and
configuration of Oracle Grid Infrastructure software is simplified with image-based
installation.
To install Oracle Grid Infrastructure, create the new Grid home with the necessary
user group permissions, and then extract the image file into the newly-created Grid
home, and run the setup wizard to register the Oracle Grid Infrastructure product.
Using image-based installation, you can do the following:
•
Install and upgrade Oracle Grid Infrastructure for cluster configurations.
•
Install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart).
•
Install only Oracle Grid Infrastructure software, and register the software with
Oracle inventory.
•
Add nodes to your existing cluster, if the Oracle Grid Infrastructure software is
already installed or configured.
This installation feature streamlines the installation process and supports automation
of large-scale custom deployments. You can also use this installation method for
deployment of customized images, after you patch the base-release software with the
necessary Patch Set Updates (PSUs) and patches.
Note: You must extract the image software into the directory where you want
your Grid home to be located, and then run the gridSetup.sh script to start
the Grid Infrastructure setup wizard. Ensure that the Grid home directory
path you create is in compliance with the Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture
recommendations.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-3
Requirements for an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) Installation
5.2 Requirements for an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone
Server (Oracle Restart) Installation
Before you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart),
ensures that your system meets the following requirements:
System Requirements (page 5-4)
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) has
similar system requirements as Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a cluster,
such as requiring 64-bit Windows server operating system.
Memory Requirements (page 5-4)
At least 1 GB of RAM for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone
server (Oracle Restart) installations, including installations where you
plan to install Oracle Database.
Disk Space Requirements (page 5-4)
The disk space requirements for installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for
a standalone server (Oracle Restart) are:
5.2.1 System Requirements
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) has similar system
requirements as Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a cluster, such as requiring 64-bit
Windows server operating system.
Components included with Oracle Grid Infrastructure, such as Oracle ASM, have the
same system requirements as Oracle Grid Infrastructure.
See Also:
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation and Upgrade Guide for Microsoft Windows
x64 (64-Bit)
5.2.2 Memory Requirements
At least 1 GB of RAM for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle
Restart) installations, including installations where you plan to install Oracle
Database.
5.2.3 Disk Space Requirements
The disk space requirements for installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone
server (Oracle Restart) are:
•
At least 7 GB of disk space
•
The amount of disk space available in the %TEMP% directory is equivalent to the
total amount of free disk space, minus what is required to install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart)
If the free disk space is less than 1 GB in the %TEMP% directory, then:
•
Delete unnecessary files from the %TEMP% directory to meet the disk space
requirement.
5-4 Database Installation Guide
Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM
•
Set TEMP environment variable. Go to System Properties, then Environment
Variables, "TEMP=C:\Temp\."
Related Topics:
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks (page 2-1)
Review the preinstallation tasks before you start Oracle Universal
Installer.
5.3 Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM
Learn about Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle
ACFS) and Oracle Automatic Storage Management Dynamic Volume Manager (Oracle
ADVM).
About Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM (page 5-5)
Oracle ACFS extends Oracle ASM technology to support all of your
application data in both single instance and cluster configurations.
Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM Support on Windows (page 5-5)
Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM are supported on Windows Server 2008
R2 x64, Windows Server 2012 x64, and Windows Server 2012 R2 x64.
Restrictions and Guidelines for Oracle ACFS (page 5-6)
Review these topics as part of your storage plan for using Oracle ACFS
for single instance and cluster configurations.
5.3.1 About Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM
Oracle ACFS extends Oracle ASM technology to support all of your application data in
both single instance and cluster configurations.
Oracle ADVM provides volume management services and a standard disk device
driver interface to clients. Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System
communicates with Oracle ASM through the Oracle Automatic Storage Management
Dynamic Volume Manager interface.
5.3.2 Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM Support on Windows
Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM are supported on Windows Server 2008 R2 x64,
Windows Server 2012 x64, and Windows Server 2012 R2 x64.
See Also:
•
My Oracle Support Note 1369107.1 for more information about platforms
and releases that support Oracle ACFS and Oracle ADVM:
https://support.oracle.com
•
Patch Set Updates for Oracle Products (My Oracle Support Note 854428.1
for current release and support information:
https://support.oracle.com
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-5
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
5.3.3 Restrictions and Guidelines for Oracle ACFS
Review these topics as part of your storage plan for using Oracle ACFS for single
instance and cluster configurations.
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS)
provides a general purpose file system.
•
You can only use Oracle ACFS when Oracle ASM is configured.
•
Note the following general guidelines and restrictions for placing Oracle Database
and Oracle Grid Infrastructure files on Oracle ACFS:
•
–
You can place Oracle Database binaries, data files, and administrative files
(for example, trace files) on Oracle ACFS.
–
Oracle ACFS does not support replication or encryption with Oracle Database
data files, tablespace files, control files, and redo logs.
–
You can place Oracle Database homes on Oracle ACFS only if the database
release is Oracle Database 11g Release 2, or more recent releases. You cannot
install earlier releases of Oracle Database on Oracle ACFS.
–
For installations on Oracle Clusterware, you cannot place Oracle Clusterware
files on Oracle ACFS.
–
For policy-managed Oracle Flex Cluster databases, Oracle ACFS can run on
Hub Nodes, but cannot run on Leaf Nodes. For this reason, Oracle RAC
binaries cannot be placed on Oracle ACFS located on Leaf Nodes.
Oracle Restart does not support root-based Oracle Clusterware resources. For this
reason, the following restrictions apply if you run Oracle ACFS on an Oracle
Restart Configuration:
–
Oracle Restart does not support Oracle ACFS resources on all platforms.
–
Starting with Oracle Database 12c, Oracle Restart configurations do not
support the Oracle ACFS registry.
–
You must manually load Oracle ACFS drivers after a system restart.
–
You must manually mount an Oracle ACFS file system, and unmount it after
the Oracle ASM instance has finished running.
–
Creating Oracle data files on an Oracle ACFS file system is not supported in
Oracle Restart configurations. Creating Oracle data files on an Oracle ACFS
file system is supported on Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a cluster
configurations.
See Also: Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
5.4 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Review the following sections for information on Oracle Automatic Storage
Management (Oracle ASM) storage configuration:
5-6 Database Installation Guide
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Managing Disk Groups for Older Database Versions (page 5-7)
Use Oracle ASM Configuration Assistant (Oracle ASMCA) to create and
modify disk groups when you install earlier versions of Oracle databases
on Oracle Grid Infrastructure installations.
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations (page 5-7)
In previous releases, Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle
ASM) was installed as part of the Oracle Database installation. Starting
with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), Oracle Automatic Storage
Management is part of an Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation, either
for a cluster, or for a standalone server.
Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 5-8)
Identify storage requirements and ASM disk group options.
5.4.1 Managing Disk Groups for Older Database Versions
Use Oracle ASM Configuration Assistant (Oracle ASMCA) to create and modify disk
groups when you install earlier versions of Oracle databases on Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installations.
Releases before Oracle Database 11g Release 2 used Database Configuration Assistant
to perform administrative tasks on Oracle ASM. Starting with 11g Release 2 (11.2),
Oracle ASM is installed with Oracle Restart. You can no longer use Oracle DBCA to
perform administrative tasks on Oracle ASM.
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
5.4.2 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Installation Considerations
In previous releases, Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) was
installed as part of the Oracle Database installation. Starting with Oracle Database 11g
Release 2 (11.2), Oracle Automatic Storage Management is part of an Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installation, either for a cluster, or for a standalone server.
If you want to upgrade an existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management
installation, then you must upgrade Oracle Automatic Storage Management by
running an Oracle Grid Infrastructure upgrade (upgrades of existing Oracle
Automatic Storage Management installations). If you do not have Oracle Automatic
Storage Management installed and you want to use Oracle Automatic Storage
Management as your storage option, then you must complete an Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) installation before you start
your Oracle Database installation.
You must run Oracle Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant for
installing and configuring Oracle ASM instances, disk groups, volumes, and Oracle
Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS). In addition, you
can use the ASMCA command-line interface.
Apply the following guidelines when you install Oracle Automatic Storage
Management:
•
You must complete the steps listed under the Configuring Storage for Oracle
Automatic Storage Management section to prepare a disk partition to use for the
Oracle Automatic Storage Management disk groups.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-7
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
•
Ensure that at least one disk is configured appropriately in an Oracle ASM disk
group before beginning the installation.
•
When you install Oracle Automatic Storage Management, Oracle Automatic
Storage Management Configuration Assistant creates a separate server parameter
file (SPFILE) and password file for the Oracle Automatic Storage Management
instance. As soon as Oracle Automatic Storage Management is installed, ASMSNMP
schema and user are created.
•
The Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance that manages the existing
disk group runs in the Oracle Grid Infrastructure home directory.
Related Topics:
Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 5-8)
Identify storage requirements and ASM disk group options.
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide for more
information about:
•
Performance and Scalability Considerations for Disk Groups
•
Password File Authentication for Oracle ASM
5.4.3 Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
Identify storage requirements and ASM disk group options.
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
Identifying Storage Requirements for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
(page 5-9)
To identify the storage requirements for using Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, you must determine the number of devices and the
amount of free disk space that you require.
ASM Disk Group Options for Interactive and Noninteractive Installation
(page 5-12)
You can select new disk groups during interactive installations, but you
must use existing disk groups for noninteractive installations.
Configuring Disks Manually for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
(page 5-14)
To use Oracle Automatic Storage Management with direct attached
storage (DAS) or storage area network (SAN), the disks must be
stamped with a header.
5-8 Database Installation Guide
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Related Topics:
ASM Disk Group Options for Interactive and Noninteractive Installation
(page 5-12)
You can select new disk groups during interactive installations, but you
must use existing disk groups for noninteractive installations.
Configuring Disks Manually for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
(page 5-14)
To use Oracle Automatic Storage Management with direct attached
storage (DAS) or storage area network (SAN), the disks must be
stamped with a header.
5.4.3.1 Identifying Storage Requirements for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
To identify the storage requirements for using Oracle Automatic Storage Management,
you must determine the number of devices and the amount of free disk space that you
require.
To complete this task, follow these steps:
1. Determine whether you want to use Oracle ASM for Oracle Database files,
recovery files, or both. Oracle Database files include data files, control files, redo
log files, the server parameter file, and the password file.
During the database installation, you have the option to select either a file system
or Oracle ASM as the storage mechanism for Oracle Database files. Similarly, you
also have the option to select either a file system or Oracle ASM as the storage
mechanism for your recovery files.
Note:
You do not have to use the same storage mechanism for both Oracle Database
files and recovery files. You can use a file system for one file type and Oracle
ASM for the other.
If you select Oracle ASM as your storage option for Oracle Database files, then
depending on your choice in the Specify Recovery Options screen, you have
the following recovery options:
•
If you select the Oracle ASM option for your recovery files, then Oracle
Universal Installer provides you with only the option to use the same disk
group for both Oracle Database files and recovery files.
•
If you decide not to enable recovery during the database installation, then,
after the database installation, you can modify the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST
parameter to enable the fast recovery area.
2. Choose the Oracle ASM redundancy level to use for each Oracle Automatic Storage
Management disk group you create.
The redundancy level that you choose for the Oracle ASM disk group determines
how Oracle ASM mirrors files in the disk group and determines the number of
disks and amount of disk space that you require. The redundancy levels are as
follows:
•
Normal redundancy
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-9
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
To optimize performance and reliability in a normal redundancy disk group,
Oracle ASM uses two-way mirroring for data files and three-way mirroring for
control files, by default. In addition, you can choose the mirroring
characteristics for individual files in a disk group. You can use two-way
mirroring or no mirroring.
A normal redundancy disk group requires a minimum of two failure groups
(or two disk devices) if you are using two-way mirroring. The effective disk
space in a normal redundancy disk group is half the sum of the disk space in all
of its devices.
For most installations, Oracle recommends that you use normal redundancy
disk groups.
•
High redundancy
The contents of the disk group are three-way mirrored by default. To create a
disk group with high redundancy, you must specify at least three failure
groups (a minimum of three devices).Although high-redundancy disk groups
provide a high level of data protection, you must consider the higher cost of
additional storage devices before deciding to use this redundancy level.
•
Flex redundancy
A flex redundancy disk group is a new disk group type with features such as
flexible file redundancy, mirror splitting, and redundancy change. A flex disk
group can consolidate files with different redundancy requirements into a
single disk group. It also provides the capability for databases to change the
redundancy of its files.
For database data, you can choose no mirroring (unprotected), two-way
mirroring (mirrored), or three-way mirroring (high). A flex redundancy disk
group requires a minimum of three disk devices (or three failure groups).
3. Determine the total amount of disk space that you require for the data files and
recovery files.
If an Oracle ASM instance is running on the system, then you can use an existing
disk group to meet these storage requirements. If necessary, you can add disks to
an existing disk group during the database installation.
Use the following tables to determine the minimum number of disks and the
minimum disk space requirements for the installation:
Table 5-1 Oracle ASM Disk Number and Space Requirements for an Oracle
database (non-CDB)
Redundancy
Level
Minimum Number
of Disks
Data Files
Recovery
Files
Both File
Types
External
1
2.7 GB
8.1 GB
10.8 GB
Normal
2
5.2 GB
15.6 GB
20.8 GB
High
3
7.8 GB
23.4 GB
31.2 GB
Flex
3
7.8 GB
23.4 GB
31.2 GB
5-10 Database Installation Guide
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Table 5-2 Oracle ASM Disk Number and Space Requirements for a multitenant
container database (CDB) with one pluggable database (PDB)
Redundancy
Level
Minimum Number
of Disks
Data Files
Recovery
Files
Both File
Types
External
1
4.4 GB
13.2 GB
17.6 GB
Normal
2
8.6 GB
25.8 GB
34.4 GB
High
3
12.9 GB
38.7 GB
51.6 GB
Flex
3
12.9 GB
38.7 GB
51.6 GB
Note:
•
The disk devices must be owned by the user performing the grid
installation.
Check with your system administrator to determine if the disks used by
Oracle ASM are mirrored at the storage level. If so, select External for the
redundancy. If the disks are not mirrored at the storage level, then select
Normal for the redundancy.
•
Every Oracle ASM disk is divided into allocation units (AU). An
allocation unit is the fundamental unit of allocation within a disk group.
You can select the AU Size value from 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 or 64 MB,
depending on the specific disk group compatibility level. The default
value is set to 4 MB.
4. (Optional) Identify failure groups for the Oracle ASM disk group devices.
If you intend to use a normal or high redundancy disk group, then you can further
protect your database against hardware failure by associating a set of disk devices
in a custom failure group. By default, each device comprises its own failure group.
However, if two disk devices in a normal redundancy disk group are attached to
the same SCSI controller, then the disk group becomes unavailable if the controller
fails. The controller in this example is a single point of failure. To protect against
failures of this type, you could use two SCSI controllers, each with two disks, and
define a failure group for the disks attached to each controller. This configuration
enables the disk group to tolerate the failure of one SCSI controller.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-11
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Note:
Define custom failure groups after installation, using the GUI tool ASMCA,
the command line tool asmcmd, or SQL commands.
If you define custom failure groups, then you must specify a minimum of two
failure groups for normal redundancy disk groups and three failure groups
for high redundancy disk groups.
For failure groups containing database files and clusterware files, including
voting files, you must specify a minimum of three failure groups for normal
redundancy disk groups, and five failure groups for high redundancy disk
groups. Disk groups containing voting files must have at least three failure
groups for normal redundancy or at least five failure groups for high
redundancy. Otherwise, the minimum is two and three respectively. The
minimum number of failure groups applies whether or not they are custom
failure groups.
5. If you are sure that a suitable disk group does not exist on the system, then install
or identify appropriate disk devices to add to a new disk group. Use the following
guidelines when identifying appropriate disk devices:
•
The disk devices must be owned by the user performing the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installation.
•
All the devices in an Oracle ASM disk group must be the same size and have
the same performance characteristics.
•
Do not specify multiple partitions on a single physical disk as a disk group
device. Oracle Automatic Storage Management expects each disk group device
to be on a separate physical disk.
•
Although you can specify a logical volume as a device in an Oracle ASM disk
group, Oracle does not recommend their use because it adds a layer of
complexity that is unnecessary with Oracle ASM. Oracle recommends that if
you choose to use a logical volume manager, then use the logical volume
manager. The logical volume manager represents a single logical unit number
(LUN) without striping or mirroring. You can minimize the effect on storage
performance of the additional storage layer.
5.4.3.2 ASM Disk Group Options for Interactive and Noninteractive Installation
You can select new disk groups during interactive installations, but you must use
existing disk groups for noninteractive installations.
Select from the following choices to store either database or recovery files in an
existing Oracle ASM disk group, depending on installation method:
•
•
Installation method that runs Database Configuration Assistant in an interactive
mode (either during installation or after installation)
–
Select new Disk Group
–
Select existing Disk Group
Installation method that runs Database Configuration Assistant in a
noninteractive mode (either during installation or after installation)
5-12 Database Installation Guide
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Select an existing Disk Group only. You cannot create a disk group during
noninteractive installations. You can add disk devices to an existing disk group if
it has insufficient free space.
Note:
The Oracle ASM instance that manages the existing disk group can be running
in a different Oracle home directory.
•
Step 1: Enabling Disk Automounting (page 5-13)
•
Step 2: Creating the Disk Partitions (page 5-13)
Step 1: Enabling Disk Automounting
Before you can configure partitions or logical drives on Windows, you must enable
disk automounting. Enable disk automounting when using:
•
Disk partitions on both single-instance and Oracle RAC installations
•
Cluster file system for Oracle RAC
•
Oracle Clusterware
•
Raw partitions for a single-node database installation
•
Primary or logical partitions for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
To enable automounting:
1.
Enter the following commands at a command prompt:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> diskpart
DISKPART> automount enable
DISKPART> exit
2.
Restart your computer.
Step 2: Creating the Disk Partitions
To create disk partitions, use the disk administration tools provided by the operating
system or third party vendors. The following administration tools are provided by the
operating system:
•
The graphical user interface Disk Management snap-in to manage disks.
To access this tool, type diskmgmt.msc at the command prompt. (Optional)
From the Start menu, select All Programs, then Administrative Tools, then
Computer Management. Then select the Disk Management node in the Storage
tree.
Create primary partitions and logical drives in the extended partitions by
selecting the New Simple Volume option. To create a raw device, assign a drive
letter and remove the letter after the partition is created. You must select Do not
format this partition to specify a raw partition. Do not use spanned volumes or
striped volumes. These options convert the volume to a dynamic disk. Oracle
Automatic Storage Management does not support dynamic disks.
For other Windows, create primary partitions by selecting the New Partition
option. Create the logical drives by selecting the New Logical Drive option.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-13
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
•
The command-line tool diskpart.exe, which lets you create primary partitions,
extended partitions, and logical drives.
To access this tool, enter diskpart.exe at the command prompt. The syntax for
using diskpart.exe for the procedures in this section is as follows:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> diskpart
DISKPART> select disk diskn
DISKPART> create partition primary | extended | logical size=sizen
DISKPART>
where:
–
diskpart.exe is the command-line tool for managing disks.
–
diskn is the disk number where the partitions are created.
–
sizen is the size of the partition, for example 500 represents 500 MB.
See Also:
The online help or documentation for the administration tool that you are
using
You can enter the diskpart.exe commands directly at the command line.
Alternatively, you can enter the commands in a text file, and then run diskpart /s
using this file as a script.
You cannot create more than four primary disk partitions per disk. If you need more,
you can get around this limitation by creating three primary partitions and then the
fourth as an extended partition with as many logical partitions.
For example, to create the disk partitions on Disk 5 and assign them each a size:
DISKPART>
DISKPART>
DISKPART>
DISKPART>
DISKPART>
DISKPART>
DISKPART>
select
create
...
create
create
...
create
disk 5
partition primary size=500
partition extended
partition logical size=800
partition logical size=500
5.4.3.3 Configuring Disks Manually for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
To use Oracle Automatic Storage Management with direct attached storage (DAS) or
storage area network (SAN), the disks must be stamped with a header.
If you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) in an
interactive mode, Oracle Universal Installer configures the headers of the disk during
the installation process. However, if you intend to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure
for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) in a response file mode, then you must
manually configure the disks before installation by using either asmtoolg (GUI
version) or asmtool (command-line version). You can also use these tools to
reconfigure the disks after installation. The asmtoolg and asmtool utilities work
only on partitioned disks: you cannot use Oracle Automatic Storage Management on
unpartitioned disks.
The asmtoolg and asmtool tools associate meaningful, persistent names with disks
to facilitate using those disks with Oracle Automatic Storage Management. Oracle
5-14 Database Installation Guide
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
Automatic Storage Management uses disk strings to more easily operate on groups of
disks at once, so the names that asmtoolg or asmtool creates make this easier than
using Windows drive letters.
All disk names created by asmtoolg or asmtool begin with the prefix ORCLDISK
followed by a user-defined prefix (the default is DATA) and a disk number for
identification purposes.
Using the asmtoolg Tool (Graphical User Interface)
The asmtoolg tool is a graphical interface for creating device names. Use asmtoolg
to add, change, delete, and examine the devices available for use in Oracle Automatic
Storage Management.
To add or change disk stamps:
1.
In the installation media labeled Oracle Grid Infrastructure 12c Release 2 (12.2),
from the media root, go to asmtool directory and double-click asmtoolg.exe.
If Oracle Database is installed, go to ORACLE_HOME\bin and double-click
asmtoolg.exe.
If User Account Control is enabled, then create a shortcut for the command
prompt window on your desktop. An icon for that shortcut appears on the
desktop. Right click the icon for the newly created shortcut, and specify "Run as
administrator." When the command window opens, go to ORACLE_HOME\bin,
and then type asmtoolg.
2.
Select the Add or change label option, then click Next.
The asmtoolg tool shows the devices available on the system. Unrecognized
disks are labeled as "Candidate device", stamped Oracle Automatic Storage
Management disks as "Stamped ASM disk", and unstamped Oracle Automatic
Storage Management disks as "Unstamped ASM disks." The tool also shows disks
that are recognized by Windows as a file system (such as NTFS). These are not
available for use as disks and cannot be selected. In addition, Microsoft Dynamic
disks are not available for use as Oracle Automatic Storage Management disks.
3.
In the Stamp Disks window, select the disks to stamp.
Oracle Automatic Storage Management can generate unique stamps for all of the
devices selected for a given prefix. The stamps are generated by concatenating a
number with the prefix specified. For example, if the prefix is DATA, then the first
Oracle Automatic Storage Management link name is ORCLDISKDATA0.
You can also specify the stamps of individual devices.
4.
(Optional) Select a disk to edit the individual stamp (Oracle Automatic Storage
Management link name).
5.
Click Next.
6.
Click Finish.
To delete disk stamps:
1. Select the Delete labels option, then click Next.
The delete option is only available if disks exist with stamps. The delete window
shows all stamped Oracle Automatic Storage Management disks.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-15
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Storage Configuration
2. In the Delete Stamps window, select the disks to unstamp.
3. Click Next.
4. Click Finish.
Example 5-1
Using the asmtool Utility (Command Line)
The asmtool utility is a command-line interface for stamping disks. If User Account
Control is enabled, then you can create a shortcut for the command prompt window
on your desktop. An icon for that shortcut appears on the desktop. Right-click the icon
for the newly created shortcut, and select "Run as administrator." Then start asmtool.
It has the following options:
Option
Description
-add
Adds or changes stamps. You must specify the hard disk, partition,
and new stamp name. If the disk is a raw device or has an existing
Oracle Automatic Storage Management stamp, then you must specify
the -force option. Also sets Oracle Automatic Storage Management
instances to rescan the available disks.
If you must partition a disk, then follow the procedures under "ASM
Disk Group Options for Interactive and Noninteractive Installation
(page 5-12)".
Example:
asmtool -add [-force]
\Device\Harddisk1\Partition1 ORCLDISKASM0
\Device\Harddisk2\Partition1 ORCLDISKASM2...
-addprefix
Adds or changes stamps using a common prefix to generate stamps
automatically. The stamps are generated by adding a number with the
prefix specified. If the disk is a raw device or has an existing Oracle
Automatic Storage Management stamp, then you must specify the force option. Also sets Oracle Automatic Storage Management
instances to rescan the available disks.
Example:
asmtool -addprefix ORCLDISKASM [-force]
\Device\Harddisk1\Partition1
\Device\Harddisk2\Partition1...
-list
Lists available disks. The stamp, windows device name, and disk size
in megabytes are shown. Some disks may be file systems, and cannot
be stamped. If the disk is a raw device or has an existing Oracle
Automatic Storage Management stamp, then you must specify the force option.
Example:
asmtool -list [-force]
5-16 Database Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Groups Manually Using Oracle ASMCA
Option
Description
-delete
Removes existing stamps from disks. Also sets Oracle Automatic
Storage Management instances to rescan the available disks.
Example:
asmtool -delete ORCLDISKASM0 ORCLDISKASM1...
Related Topics:
ASM Disk Group Options for Interactive and Noninteractive Installation
(page 5-12)
You can select new disk groups during interactive installations, but you
must use existing disk groups for noninteractive installations.
5.5 Configuring Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Groups
Manually Using Oracle ASMCA
The Oracle Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant utility creates a
new Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance if there is no Oracle Automatic
Storage Management instance currently configured on this computer.
After installing the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart),
you can also use Oracle Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant to
create and configure disk groups, Oracle Automatic Storage Management Dynamic
Volume Manager (Oracle ADVM), and Oracle Automatic Storage Management
Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS).
If you want to create additional disk groups or manually configure Oracle Automatic
Storage Management disks, then you can run the Oracle Automatic Storage
Management Configuration Assistant as follows:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd ORACLE_HOME\bin
DRIVE_LETTER:\> asmca.bat
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
5.6 Testing the Oracle Automatic Storage Management Installation
After installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a single instance, use the ASMCMD
command-line utility to test the Oracle ASM installation.
To test the Oracle Automatic Storage Management installation:
1. Use SQL*Plus to connect to the Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance as
the SYS user with SYSASM privilege and start the instance if necessary:
DRIVE_LETTER:\>sqlplus /nolog
SQL> CONNECT SYS as SYSASM
Enter password: SYS_password
SQL> STARTUP
2. Enter the following command to view the existing disk groups, their redundancy
level, and the amount of free disk space in each one:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-17
About Upgrading Existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management Instances
SQL> SELECT NAME,TYPE,TOTAL_MB,FREE_MB FROM V$ASM_DISKGROUP;
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
5.7 About Upgrading Existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management
Instances
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) upgrades are carried out during
an Oracle Grid Infrastructure upgrade.
If you are upgrading from Oracle ASM 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.1) or later, then Oracle
ASM is always upgraded with Oracle Grid Infrastructure. Oracle Automatic Storage
Management Configuration Assistant (Oracle ASMCA) is started by the root scripts
during upgrade. Subsequently, you can use Oracle ASMCA (located in Grid_home/
bin) to configure failure groups, Oracle ASM volumes, and Oracle Automatic Storage
Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS).
Oracle ASMCA cannot perform a separate upgrade of Oracle ASM from a prior release
to the current release.
Upgrades of Oracle ASM from releases prior to 11g Release 2 (11.2) are not supported.
See Also:
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
5.8 Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle
Restart) Using a Software-Only Installation
A software-only installation only installs the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
standalone server (Oracle Restart) binaries at the specified location. You must
complete a few manual configuration steps to enable Oracle Restart after you install
the software.
Note:
Oracle recommends that only advanced users perform the software-only
installation, because this installation method provides no validation of the
installation and this installation option requires manual postinstallation steps
to enable the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle
Restart) software.
Installing the Software Binaries (page 5-19)
Use this procedure to do a software-only installation of Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for Independent Servers (Oracle Restart).
5-18 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) Using a Software-Only Installation
Configuring Software Binaries for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone
Server (Oracle Restart) (page 5-19)
Use this procedure to configure and activate a software-only Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) installation for
Oracle Restart without Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle
ASM).
5.8.1 Installing the Software Binaries
Use this procedure to do a software-only installation of Oracle Grid Infrastructure for
Independent Servers (Oracle Restart).
1. Log in to Windows as an Administrator user.
2. Download the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation image files, create the Grid
home directory, and extract the image files in this Grid home directory.
For example:
C:\> mkdir \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
C:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
C:\> unzip -q download_location\grid.zip
3. Verify that the server meets the installation requirements using the command
runcluvfy.bat stage -pre hacfg. Ensure that you have completed all
storage and server preinstallation requirements.
For Example:
C:\> app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\runcluvfy.bat
4. Log in as the Oracle Restart software owner user and run gridSetup.bat to start
the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation wizard.
C:\> app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\gridSetup.bat
5. In the Select Configuration Option screen, select the Set Up Software Only option
to perform a software-only installation of Oracle Grid Infrastructure for
Independent Servers (Oracle Restart). Click Next.
6. Respond to the prompts as needed to set up Oracle Grid Infrastructure. Click Help
for information.
5.8.2 Configuring Software Binaries for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone
Server (Oracle Restart)
Use this procedure to configure and activate a software-only Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) installation for Oracle Restart
without Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM).
1. Log in as a member of the Administrators group and run the roothas.pl script
from the Grid_home, using the following syntax:
Grid_home\perl\bin\perl -IGrid_home\perl\lib -IGrid_home\crs\install
Grid_home\crs\install\roothas.pl
For example, if your Grid home is C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid,
then run the following script:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-19
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\perl\bin\perl -I C:\app\oracle\product
\12.2.0\grid\perl\lib -I
C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\crs\install
C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\crs\install\roothas.pl
2. Change the home directory to the path of the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for
Independent Servers (Oracle Restart) home as follows:
Grid_home\oui\bin, (where Grid_home is the path of the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) home).
3. Enter the following command:
setup.exe -updateNodeList ORACLE_HOME=Grid_home
CLUSTER_NODES= CRS=TRUE
For example:
C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid> setup.exe -updateNodeList ORACLE_HOME=C:\app
\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
CLUSTER_NODES= CRS=TRUE
4. Use the SRVCTL utility along with Network Configuration Assistant and Oracle
Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant to add the listener, the
Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance, and all Oracle Automatic Storage
Management disk groups to the Oracle Restart configuration.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Net Services Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
with a New Database Installation (page 5-21)
Complete these steps to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) and then create a database that is
managed by Oracle Restart.
5.9 Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone
Server (Oracle Restart)
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) includes Oracle
Restart and Oracle Automatic Storage Management.
If you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) and
then create your database, the database is automatically added to the Oracle Restart
configuration, and is then automatically restarted when required. Oracle Restart
automatically restarts the database when required.
If you install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) on a
host computer on which a database already exists, then you must manually add the
database, the listener, the Oracle ASM instance, and other components to the Oracle
Restart configuration before you are able to configure automatic database restarts.
5-20 Database Installation Guide
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
Note:
Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server (Oracle Restart) can support
multiple single-instance databases on a single host computer.
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
with a New Database Installation (page 5-21)
Complete these steps to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) and then create a database that is
managed by Oracle Restart.
5.9.1 Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) with
a New Database Installation
Complete these steps to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(Oracle Restart) and then create a database that is managed by Oracle Restart.
Install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart), which
installs Oracle Restart and Oracle ASM, and creates one disk group.
1. Log in as the Oracle Restart software owner user (grid).
2. Download the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation image files, create the Grid
home directory, and extract the image files in this Grid home directory.
For example:
C:\> mkdir \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
C:\> icacls grid:oinstall \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
C:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
C:\> unzip -q download_location\grid_home.zip
Note:
Ensure that the Grid home directory path you create is in compliance with the
Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture recommendations. Also, unzip the
installation image files only in this Grid home directory that you created.
3. Run gridSetup.bat to start the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation wizard.
C:> Grid_home\gridSetup.bat
Note: You must install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(Oracle Restart) from the Oracle Grid Infrastructure media.
4. In the Select Configuration Option screen, select the Configure Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) option to install and
configure Oracle Restart and Oracle ASM. Click Next.
5. During installation, disk paths mounted on Oracle ASM and registered on Oracle
ASMFD with the string ORCL:* are listed as default database storage candidate
disks.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-21
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
6. Configure Oracle ASM as needed with additional disk groups.
•
The default Disk Group Name is DATA. You can enter a new name for the
disk group, or use the default name.
•
Any additional disk devices that you create must be owned by the user
performing the grid installation.
7. Respond to the configuration prompts as needed to configure Oracle Grid
Infrastructure. Click Help for information.
8. Provide information to automate root scripts, or run scripts as root when prompted
by Oracle Universal Installer.
If you configure automation for running root scripts, and a root script fails, then
you can fix the problem manually, and click Retry to run the root script again
9. Start the Oracle Database installation, and select Oracle ASM disk groups for
Oracle Database files storage. For assistance during installation, click Help on the
Oracle Universal Installer page where you need more information.
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) for
an Existing Database (page 5-22)
Follow the high-level instructions in this section to install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) and configure it
for an existing Oracle database.
5.9.1.1 Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
for an Existing Database
Follow the high-level instructions in this section to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure
for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) and configure it for an existing Oracle
database.
Oracle Restart 12c Release 2 (12.2) can only manage resources from the same release.
For this reason, you can install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server
(Oracle Restart) to provide services only for Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2).
However, previous release Oracle Databases can coexist on the same server without
being managed by Oracle Restart.
To install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) for a
database that is already installed:
1.
On the same host computer as the database, install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for
a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart), and select Configure Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) as the installation option.
See, “Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
with a New Database Installation” in Oracle Database Installation Guide.
The Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
components are installed in an Oracle Grid Infrastructure Oracle home (Grid
home), which is in a different location from existing Oracle Database homes.
2.
If you have an existing Oracle Database, then register it for High Availability with
Oracle Restart using the srvctl command:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd ORACLE_HOME\bin
DRIVE_LETTER:\> srvctl add database -db dbname -o oracle_home_path -dbtype SINGLE
5-22 Database Installation Guide
Modifying Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) Binaries After Installation
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
with a New Database Installation (page 5-21)
Complete these steps to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) and then create a database that is
managed by Oracle Restart.
5.10 Modifying Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle
Restart) Binaries After Installation
After installation, you must first stop the Oracle Restart stack to modify the software
installed in your Grid home.
For example, to apply a one-off patch or modify any of the DLLs used by Oracle
Restart or Oracle ASM, you must follow these steps to stop and restart the Oracle
Restart stack.
Caution:
Before relinking executables, you must shut down all executables that run in
the Oracle home directory that you are relinking. In addition, shut down
applications linked with Oracle shared libraries.
Prepare the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) home
for modification using the following procedure:
1. Log in using a member of the Administrators group and go to the directory
Grid_home\bin, where Grid_home is the path to the Oracle Grid Infrastructure
for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) home.
2. Shut down the Oracle Restart stack using the following command:
DRIVE_LETTER:\Grid_home\bin> crsctl stop has -f
Alternatively, you can use the roothas.bat script to stop Oracle Restart, as
shown in the following example:
DRIVE_LETTER:\Grid_home\crs\install> roothas.bat -unlock
Note:
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2), the roothas.bat
script replaces the roothas.pl script in the Oracle Grid Infrastructure home.
The roothas.bat script stops Oracle Restart and then verifies that it is stopped.
3. After the Oracle Restart stack is completely shut down, perform the changes to the
software installed in the Grid home.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server 5-23
Modifying Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) Binaries After Installation
Apply the patches using opatch apply.
4. Lock the Grid home:
DRIVE_LETTER:\Grid_home\crs\install>roothas.bat -lock
5. Use the following command to restart the Oracle Restart stack:
DRIVE_LETTER:\Grid_home\bin> crsctl start has
Example 5-2
Enabling Oracle ACFS on Oracle Restart Configurations
To use Oracle ACFS on Oracle Restart configurations, you must first enable
Administrator access for Oracle ACFS using the following command:
DRIVE_LETTER:\cd Grid_home\crs\install
DRIVE_LETTER:\Grid_home\crs\install>roothas.bat -lockacfs
See Also:
Oracle OPatch User's Guide for Windows and UNIX
5-24 Database Installation Guide
6
Installing Oracle Database
Learn how to install Oracle Database using the installer.
Preinstallation Considerations for Installing Oracle Database (page 6-1)
The Oracle Database software is available on the installation media or
you can download it from the Oracle Technology Network (OTN)
website.
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines (page 6-3)
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal
Installer:
Accessing the Installation Software (page 6-6)
The Oracle software is available on the installation media or you can
download it from the Oracle Technology Network website, or Oracle
Software Delivery Cloud website.
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages (page 6-12)
Learn about installing and using Oracle components in different
languages.
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages (page 6-16)
Describes how to run Oracle Universal Installer in other languages.
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
Cloning an Oracle Home (page 6-24)
Follow these steps to clone an Oracle home.
6.1 Preinstallation Considerations for Installing Oracle Database
The Oracle Database software is available on the installation media or you can
download it from the Oracle Technology Network (OTN) website.
In most cases, Oracle Universal Installer provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to
install the software. However, you can also use Oracle Universal Installer without the
GUI by supplying a response file with silent or response file mode.
Note:
Windows requires Administrator privileges at the command prompt.
Installing Oracle Database 6-1
Preinstallation Considerations for Installing Oracle Database
Installation Consideration on Windows (page 6-2)
On Windows, open command prompts with the Administrator
privileges.
Performing Multiple Oracle Database Installations (page 6-2)
To perform multiple installations of Oracle Database, use either of the
following methods to install Oracle Database:
Installing on Systems That Already Have Oracle Components (page 6-2)
Perform the following steps when other components exist on your
computer:
Installing with Minimum Memory Requirements (page 6-3)
Installations of Oracle Database on computers with RAM and virtual
memory lesser than the minimum required have the following
limitations:
Related Topics:
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines (page 6-3)
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal
Installer:
6.1.1 Installation Consideration on Windows
On Windows, open command prompts with the Administrator privileges.
6.1.2 Performing Multiple Oracle Database Installations
To perform multiple installations of Oracle Database, use either of the following
methods to install Oracle Database:
•
Response files: At each node, you run Oracle Universal Installer from the
command line using silent or response file mode and you supply a response file to
provide information Oracle Universal Installer needs. The response file is a text
file containing the settings you normally enter in the Oracle Universal Installer
GUI dialog boxes.
•
Cloning the Oracle home of an existing Oracle Database installation: With this
method, install one instance of Oracle Database, and then clone its Oracle home
for each additional installation.
Related Topics:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files (page C-1)
Learn how to install and configure Oracle products using response files.
Cloning an Oracle Home (page 6-24)
Follow these steps to clone an Oracle home.
6.1.3 Installing on Systems That Already Have Oracle Components
Perform the following steps when other components exist on your computer:
1.
Log on as a member of the Administrators group for the computer on which you
want to install Oracle components.
If you are installing on a Primary Domain Controller (PDC) or a Backup Domain
Controller (BDC), log on as a member of the Domain Administrators group.
6-2 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines
2.
Delete the ORACLE_HOME environment variable if it exists. See the Microsoft
online help for more information about deleting environment variables.
Note:
The ORACLE_HOME environment variable is automatically set in the registry.
Manually setting this variable prevents installation.
3.
Back up any databases you must upgrade.
See Also:
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide
6.1.4 Installing with Minimum Memory Requirements
Installations of Oracle Database on computers with RAM and virtual memory lesser
than the minimum required have the following limitations:
•
Computers cannot run Oracle Database Upgrade Assistant, Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant, or Oracle Net Services Configuration Assistant during an
Oracle Universal Installer installation session.
•
Depending on how many applications run on the computer, you must further
increase the paging file size or reduce the size of the System Global Area (SGA) if
you run out of virtual memory. If temporary files and the paging file are both
stored on the same physical drive, the space requirements for one can limit the
size of the other. If your system has limited free space, first install the Oracle
Database software. After the installation is finished, create a database with Oracle
Database Configuration Assistant.
Note:
Do not install the database on computer systems that barely meet the
minimum memory and virtual memory requirements of 1 GB.
You can install only the database software by selecting the Install Database Software
only option provided on the Select Installation Option screen.
After installation, run the appropriate configuration assistant for your needs:
•
To create a new database, run Oracle Database Configuration Assistant. From the
Start menu, select All Programs, then Oracle - HOMENAME, then Configuration
and Migration Tools, then Database Configuration Assistant.
•
To upgrade an existing database, run Oracle Database Upgrade Assistant. From
the Start menu, select All Programs, then Oracle - HOMENAME, then
Configuration and Migration Tools, then Database Upgrade Assistant.
6.2 Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal Installer:
Installing Oracle Database 6-3
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines
•
Oracle Universal Installer
Do not use Oracle Universal Installer from an earlier Oracle release to install
components from this release.
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management
In previous releases, Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) was
installed as part of the Oracle Database installation. With Oracle Database 11g
Release 2 (11.2), Oracle Automatic Storage Management is part of an Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installation, either for a cluster, or for a standalone server.
If you want to upgrade an existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management
installation, then you must upgrade Oracle Automatic Storage Management by
running an Oracle Grid Infrastructure upgrade. If you do not have Oracle
Automatic Storage Management installed and you want to use Oracle Automatic
Storage Management as your storage option, then you must complete an Oracle
Grid Infrastructure for a standalone server installation before you start your
Oracle Database installation.
•
Installations on a cluster
If Oracle Clusterware or Oracle RAC is installed on the system, then Oracle
Universal Installer displays the Grid Installation Options page. You must select
Single instance database installation, unless you want to install Oracle RAC. The
other options on the page are Oracle Real Application Clusters database
installation and Oracle RAC One Node database installation.
See Also:
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide
About Character Set Selection During Installation (page 6-4)
Review character set options before you start the installation.
Using an Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Group (page 6-5)
Learn how to identify disk groups and determine the available free disk
space.
6.2.1 About Character Set Selection During Installation
Review character set options before you start the installation.
After a database is created, changing its character set is usually very expensive in
terms of time and resources. Such operations may require converting all character data
by exporting the whole database and importing it back. Therefore, it is important that
you carefully select the database character set during installation.
Oracle Database uses character sets for the following:
•
Data stored in SQL character datatypes (CHAR, VARCHAR2, CLOB, and LONG).
•
Identifiers such as table names, column names, and PL/SQL variables.
•
Stored SQL and PL/SQL source code, including text literals embedded in this
code.
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the default database character set of
a database created from the General Purpose/Transaction Processing or the Data
6-4 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing Component-Specific Installation Guidelines
Warehousing template is Unicode AL32UTF8. Oracle recommends that you use
Unicode AL32UTF8 as the database character set.
Unicode is the universal character set that supports most of the currently spoken
languages of the world. It also supports many historical scripts (alphabets). Unicode is
the native encoding of many technologies, including Java, XML, XHTML,
ECMAScript, and LDAP. Unicode is ideally suited for databases supporting the
Internet and the global economy.
Because AL32UTF8 is a multibyte character set, database operations on character data
may be slightly slower when compared to single-byte database character sets, such as
WE8MSWIN1252. Storage space requirements for text in most languages that use
characters outside of the ASCII repertoire are higher in AL32UTF8 compared to legacy
character sets supporting the language. Storage for non-character data types, such as
NUMBER or DATE, does not depend on a character set. The universality and
flexibility of Unicode usually outweighs these additional costs.
Note: English data may require more space only if stored in CLOB columns
The database character set of a multitenant container database (CDB) determines
which databases can be plugged in later. Ensure that the character set you choose for
the CDB is compatible with the database character sets of the databases to be plugged
into this CDB.
See Also:
Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide
6.2.2 Using an Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Group
Learn how to identify disk groups and determine the available free disk space.
You can store either database or recovery files in an existing Oracle Automatic Storage
Management disk group that you created during the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
standalone server installation.
Note:
The Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance that manages the
existing disk group runs in a different Oracle home directory.
1.
In the Services Control Panel, ensure that the OracleASMService+ASM service
has started.
2.
Open command prompt and temporarily set the ORACLE_SID environment
variable to specify the appropriate value for the Oracle Automatic Storage
Management instance.
For example, if the Oracle Automatic Storage Management SID, which is named
+ASM, is located in the asm directory, then enter the following setting:
DRIVE_LETTER:\>set ORACLE_SID=+ASM
Installing Oracle Database 6-5
Accessing the Installation Software
3.
Connect to the Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance as the SYS user
with the SYSASM privilege and start the instance if necessary:
DRIVE_LETTER:\>sqlplus /nolog
SQL> CONNECT SYS as SYSASM
Enter password: SYS_password
SQL> STARTUP
4.
Enter the following command to view the existing disk groups, their redundancy
level, and the amount of free disk space in each one:
SQL> SELECT NAME,TYPE,TOTAL_MB,FREE_MB FROM V$ASM_DISKGROUP;
5.
From the output, identify a disk group with the appropriate redundancy level and
note the free space that it contains.
6.
If necessary, install, or identify the additional disk devices required to meet the
storage requirements.
Note:
If you are adding devices to an existing disk group, then Oracle recommends
that you use devices that have the same size and performance characteristics
as the existing devices in that disk group.
Related Topics:
About Upgrading Existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management Instances
(page 5-18)
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) upgrades are
carried out during an Oracle Grid Infrastructure upgrade.
6.3 Accessing the Installation Software
The Oracle software is available on the installation media or you can download it from
the Oracle Technology Network website, or Oracle Software Delivery Cloud website.
To install the software from the hard disk, you must either download it and unpack it,
or copy it from the installation media, if you have it.
You can access and install Oracle Database by using one of the following methods:
Installing from a Remote DVD Drive (page 6-7)
If the computer where you want to install Oracle Database does not have
a DVD drive, you can perform the installation from a remote DVD drive.
Installing on Remote Computers Through Remote Access Software (page 6-8)
If you want to install and run Oracle Database on a remote computer
(that is, the remote computer has the hard drive and runs Oracle
Database components), but you do not have physical access to the
computer, you still can perform the installation on the remote computer
if it is running remote access software such as VNC or Symantec
pcAnywhere.
Downloading Oracle Software (page 6-9)
You can download the trial version of the installation files from the
Oracle Technology Network (OTN) or the Oracle Software Delivery
Cloud portal and extract them on your hard disk.
6-6 Database Installation Guide
Accessing the Installation Software
Copying the Oracle Database Software to a Hard Disk (page 6-11)
To copy the contents of the installation media to a hard disk:
6.3.1 Installing from a Remote DVD Drive
If the computer where you want to install Oracle Database does not have a DVD drive,
you can perform the installation from a remote DVD drive.
Step 1: On the Remote Computer, Share the DVD Drive (page 6-7)
The remote DVD drive must allow shared access.
Step 2: On the Local Computer, Map the DVD Drive (page 6-7)
Perform these steps on the local computer to map a remote DVD drive
and to run Oracle Universal Installer from the mapped drive:
6.3.1.1 Step 1: On the Remote Computer, Share the DVD Drive
The remote DVD drive must allow shared access.
To set this up, perform these steps on the remote computer that has the DVD drive:
1.
Log in to the remote computer as an Administrator user.
2.
Start Windows Explorer.
3.
Right-click the DVD drive letter and select Sharing (or Sharing and Security).
4.
Click the Sharing tab and do the following:
5.
a.
Select Share this folder.
b.
In Share name, give it a share name such as dvd. You use this name when
you map the DVD drive on the local computer in step 1.d (page 6-7) of
"Step 2: On the Local Computer, Map the DVD Drive (page 6-7)".
c.
Click Permissions. You need at least read permission for the user who
accesses the drive to install Oracle Database.
d.
Click OK when you are finished.
Insert the Oracle Database installation media into the DVD drive.
6.3.1.2 Step 2: On the Local Computer, Map the DVD Drive
Perform these steps on the local computer to map a remote DVD drive and to run
Oracle Universal Installer from the mapped drive:
1.
Map the remote DVD drive.
a.
Start Windows Explorer on the local computer.
b.
From the Tools menu, select Map Network Drive to display the Map
Network Drive dialog box.
c.
Select a drive letter to use for the remote DVD drive.
d.
In Folder, enter the location of the remote DVD drive using the following
format:
\\remote_hostname\share_name
Installing Oracle Database 6-7
Accessing the Installation Software
where:
•
remote_hostname is the name of the remote computer with the DVD
drive.
•
share_name is the share name that you entered in step 4 (page 6-7) of
the previous procedure. For example:
\\computer2\dvd
2.
e.
If you must connect to the remote computer as a different user, click different
user name, and enter the user name.
f.
Click Finish.
Run Oracle Universal Installer from the mapped DVD drive.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.3.2 Installing on Remote Computers Through Remote Access Software
If you want to install and run Oracle Database on a remote computer (that is, the
remote computer has the hard drive and runs Oracle Database components), but you
do not have physical access to the computer, you still can perform the installation on
the remote computer if it is running remote access software such as VNC or Symantec
pcAnywhere.
You also need the remote access software running on your local computer.
You can install Oracle Database on the remote computer in one of two ways:
•
If you have copied the contents of the Oracle Database DVD to a hard drive, you
can install the software from the hard drive.
•
You can insert the DVD into a drive on your local computer, and install the
software from the DVD.
Installing on Remote Computers from a Hard Drive (page 6-8)
If you have copied the contents of the Oracle Database DVD to a hard
drive, you can install the software from the hard drive.
Installing on Remote Computers from a Remote DVD Drive (page 6-9)
You can insert the DVD into a drive on your local computer, and install
from the DVD.
6.3.2.1 Installing on Remote Computers from a Hard Drive
If you have copied the contents of the Oracle Database DVD to a hard drive, you can
install the software from the hard drive.
To install the software on a remote computer from a hard drive:
1. Ensure that the remote access software is installed and running on the remote and
local computers.
2. Share the hard drive that contains the Oracle Database DVD.
6-8 Database Installation Guide
Accessing the Installation Software
3. On the remote computer, map a drive letter to the shared hard drive. You use the
remote access software to do this on the remote computer.
4. Through the remote access software, run Oracle Universal Installer on the remote
computer. You access Oracle Universal Installer from the shared hard drive.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.3.2.2 Installing on Remote Computers from a Remote DVD Drive
You can insert the DVD into a drive on your local computer, and install from the DVD.
To install the software on a remote computer from a remote DVD drive:
1. Ensure that the remote access software is installed and running on the remote and
local computers.
2. On the local computer, share the DVD drive.
On the remote computer, map a drive letter to the shared DVD drive. You use the
remote access software to do this on the remote computer.
3. Through the remote access software, run Oracle Universal Installer on the remote
computer. You access Oracle Universal Installer from the shared DVD drive.
Related Topics:
Installing from a Remote DVD Drive (page 6-7)
If the computer where you want to install Oracle Database does not have
a DVD drive, you can perform the installation from a remote DVD drive.
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.3.3 Downloading Oracle Software
You can download the trial version of the installation files from the Oracle Technology
Network (OTN) or the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud portal and extract them on
your hard disk.
Select the method that you want to use to download the software. Ensure that you
review and understand the terms of the license. Most downloads include the
development license.
Downloading the Installation Archive Files from Oracle Technology Network
(page 6-10)
To download the installation archive files from Oracle Technology
Network:
Downloading the Software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud (page 6-10)
Extracting the Installation Files (page 6-11)
Use this procedure to extract the installation archive files.
Installing Oracle Database 6-9
Accessing the Installation Software
6.3.3.1 Downloading the Installation Archive Files from Oracle Technology Network
To download the installation archive files from Oracle Technology Network:
1. Use any browser to access the software download page from OTN at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/downloads/index.html
2. Navigate to the download page for the product to install.
3. On the download page, identify the required disk space by adding the file sizes for
each required file.
The file sizes are listed next to the file names.
4. Select a file system with enough free space to store and expand the archive files.
In most cases, the available disk space must be at least twice the size of all of the
archive files.
5. On the file system that you selected in step 4 (page 6-10), create a parent directory
for each product, for example OraDB12c, to hold the installation directories.
6. Download all of the installation archive files to the directory that you created in
step 5 (page 6-10).
7. Verify that the files you downloaded are the same size as the corresponding files on
Oracle Technology Network. Also verify the checksums are the same as noted on
Oracle Technology Network.
8. Extract the files in each directory that you just created.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.3.3.2 Downloading the Software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud
You can download the software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud as Media Packs.
A Media Pack is an electronic version of the software that is also available to Oracle
customers on CD-ROM or DVD. To download the Media Pack:
1. Use any browser to access the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud website:
http://edelivery.oracle.com/
2. Complete the Export Validation process by entering information (name, company,
e-mail address, and country) in the online form.
3. In the Media Pack Search page, specify the Product Pack and Platform to identify
the Media Pack you want to download. If you do not know the name of the
Product Pack, you can search for it using the License List.
4. Optionally, select the relevant product to download from the Results list.
5. In the search results page, click Readme to download and review the Readme file
for download instructions and product information.
6-10 Database Installation Guide
Accessing the Installation Software
6. After you review the Readme, choose the appropriate Media Pack from the search
results to download the individual zip files. Follow the Download Notes
instructions in this page. Once you download and extract the contents of the
required zip files, proceed with the installation of the software.
Note:
Print the page with the list of downloadable files. It contains a list of part
numbers and their corresponding descriptions to refer during the installation
process.
7. After you download the files, click View Digest to verify that the MD5 or SHA-1
checksum matches with what is listed in the media download page.
See Also:
•
My Oracle Support note 549617.1 for information on how to verify the
integrity of a software download at:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=549617.1
•
Frequently Asked Questions section on the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud
website for more information about Media Packs
6.3.3.3 Extracting the Installation Files
Use this procedure to extract the installation archive files.
To extract the installation archive files, perform the following steps:
1. If necessary, change to the directory that contains the downloaded installation
archive files.
2. Oracle Database software is available as two zip files. Ensure that you extract both
the zip files to the same directory.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.3.4 Copying the Oracle Database Software to a Hard Disk
To copy the contents of the installation media to a hard disk:
1. Create a directory on your hard drive. For example:
C:\> mkdir \install
C:\> mkdir \install\database
2. Copy the contents of the installation media to the directory that you just created.
Installing Oracle Database 6-11
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.4 Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
Learn about installing and using Oracle components in different languages.
Configuring Oracle Components to Run in Different Languages (page 6-12)
You can specify the language and the territory, or locale, in which you
want to use the Oracle components.
Installing Translation Resources (page 6-15)
To view the user interface of Oracle components in different languages,
you must install the appropriate language translations along with the
component.
6.4.1 Configuring Oracle Components to Run in Different Languages
You can specify the language and the territory, or locale, in which you want to use the
Oracle components.
The locale setting of a component determines the language of the user interface of the
component and the globalization behavior, such as date and number formatting.
Depending on the Oracle component, the locale of the component is either inherited
from the operating system session that started the component, or is defined by the
NLS_LANG environment variable.
The operating system locale usually influences Oracle components that are based on
Java technology. The NLS_LANG environment variable usually influences Oracle
components that use Oracle Client libraries such as OCI.
Note:
The user interface of an Oracle component is displayed in a selected language
only if the appropriate translation is available and has been installed.
Otherwise, the user interface is displayed in English.
Determining the Operating System Locale (page 6-13)
The locale setting of your operating system session determines the
language of the user interface and the globalization behavior for
components such as Oracle Universal Installer, Oracle Net Configuration
Assistant, and Oracle Database Configuration Assistant.
Configuring Locale and Character Sets Using the NLS_LANG Environment
Variable (page 6-13)
The NLS_LANG environment variable determines the language of the
user interface and the globalization behavior for components such as
SQL*Plus, exp, and imp.
NLS_LANG Settings in Console Mode and Batch Mode (page 6-14)
Before you can use Oracle utilities such as SQL*Plus, SQL Loader,
Import, and Export from the command prompt, you may have to set the
character set in the parameter NLS_LANG to a different value from the
one used in the registry.
6-12 Database Installation Guide
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
6.4.1.1 Determining the Operating System Locale
The locale setting of your operating system session determines the language of the
user interface and the globalization behavior for components such as Oracle Universal
Installer, Oracle Net Configuration Assistant, and Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant.
It also determines the globalization behavior of Oracle Database sessions created by a
user application through Oracle JDBC driver, unless overridden by the application.
Open the Control Panel from the Start menu to modify the operating system locale
settings. In the classic view of the Control Panel on Windows, click Regional and
Language Options. In the default view of the Control Panel on Windows, click
Change keyboards or other input methods.
To set locale for the current operating system user on Windows, select the desired
locale from the Current format pop-up list on the Formats tab.
Some of the locales may be unavailable until you install required operating system
support files.
Some Oracle components, such as SQL*Plus, require that the Windows System Locale
is also set to the language in which the components are to be run. System Locale is
called Language for non-Unicode programs on Windows. On Windows, click the
Change system locale... button on the Administrative tab, accept the use of
administrative privileges, if User Account Control is active, and select the locale from
the pop-up list in the opened dialog box.
Note:
The operating system must be restarted after the System Locale is changed.
See the operating system documentation for further information about
Windows locale settings.
6.4.1.2 Configuring Locale and Character Sets Using the NLS_LANG Environment
Variable
The NLS_LANG environment variable determines the language of the user interface
and the globalization behavior for components such as SQL*Plus, exp, and imp.
It sets the language and territory used by the client application and the database user
session. It also declares the character set for entering and displaying data by the client
application.
The NLS_LANG environment variable uses the following format:
NLS_LANG=language_territory.characterset
In this format:
•
language specifies the language used for displaying Oracle messages, sorting,
day names, and month names
•
territory specifies the conventions for default date, monetary and numeric
formats
•
characterset specifies the encoding used by the client application
Installing Oracle Database 6-13
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
In most cases, this is the Oracle character set that corresponds to the Windows
ANSI Code Page as determined by the System Locale.
The NLS_LANG parameter on Windows can be set
•
in Registry under the subkey corresponding to a given Oracle home,
•
as an environment variable.
When you install Oracle Database components and the NLS_LANG parameter is not yet
set in the Registry subkey of the target Oracle home, Oracle Universal Installer sets the
NLS_LANG parameter to a default value derived from the operating system locale for
the current user. See the following table.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for information about the
NLS_LANG parameter and Globalization Support initialization parameters
For example:
•
Arabic (U.A.E.) - ARABIC_UNITED ARAB EMIRATES.AR8MSWIN1256
•
Chinese (PRC) - SIMPLIFIED CHINESE_CHINA.ZHS16GBK
•
Chinese (Taiwan) - TRADITIONAL CHINESE_TAIWAN.ZHT16MSWIN950
•
English (United Kingdom) - ENGLISH_UNITED KINGDOM.WE8MSWIN1252
•
English (United States) - AMERICAN_AMERICA.WE8MSWIN1252
•
French (Canada) - CANADIAN FRENCH_CANADA.WE8MSWIN1252
•
French (France) - FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8MSWIN1252
•
German (Germany) - GERMAN_GERMANY.WE8MSWIN1252
•
Hebrew - HEBREW_ISRAEL.IW8MSWIN1255
•
Japanese - JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16SJISTILDE
•
Russian - RUSSIAN_RUSSIA.CL8MSWIN1251
•
Spanish (Spain) - SPANISH_SPAIN.WE8MSWIN1252
•
Spanish (Mexico) - MEXICAN SPANISH_MEXICO.WE8MSWIN1252
•
Spanish (Venezuela) - LATIN AMERICAN
SPANISH_VENEZUELA.WE8MSWIN1252
6.4.1.3 NLS_LANG Settings in Console Mode and Batch Mode
Before you can use Oracle utilities such as SQL*Plus, SQL Loader, Import, and Export
from the command prompt, you may have to set the character set in the parameter
NLS_LANG to a different value from the one used in the registry.
You may need to set a different character set for console mode utilities, because
programs running in console mode use, with a few exceptions, a different code page
(character set) from programs running in GUI mode. The default Oracle home
6-14 Database Installation Guide
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
NLS_LANG parameter in the Registry is always set to the appropriate GUI code page. If
you do not set the NLS_LANG parameter for the console mode session correctly,
incorrect character conversion can corrupt error messages and data.
For Japanese, Korean, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Thai, and Vietnamese,
the console (OEM) code page is identical to the GUI (ANSI) code page. In this case,
you are not required to set the NLS_LANG parameter. For other languages, set the
correct character set value of NLS_LANG by issuing a SET NLS_LANG command in
the same Command Prompt window in which you want to start the affected utility.
Similarly, in batch mode, set the correct character set value of NLS_LANG by inserting
a SET NLS_LANG command at the start of the batch procedure, according to the
character set of the files to be processed in the procedure.
To find the current console code page, issue the CHCP command in the Command
Prompt window. Use the reported code page number to look up the corresponding
Oracle character set name in the following table:
Table 6-1
Oracle Character Sets for Console Mode (OEM) Code Pages
OEM Code Page
Oracle Character Set for Console Mode
437 (US)
US8PC437
737 (Greek)
EL8PC737
775 (Baltic)
BLT8PC775
850 (Multilingual Latin I)
WE8PC850
852 (Latin II)
EE8PC852
855 (Cyrillic)
RU8PC855
857 (Turkish)
TR8PC857
858 (Multilingual Latin I +
Euro)
WE8PC858
866 (Russian)
RU8PC866
874 (Thai)
TH8TISASCII
932 (Japanese Shift-JIS)
JA16SJISTILDE
936 (Simplified Chinese
GBK)
ZHS16GBK
949 (Korean)
KO16MSWIN949
950 (Traditional Chinese
Big5)
ZHT16MSWIN950
1258 (Vietnam)
VN8MSWIN1258
6.4.2 Installing Translation Resources
To view the user interface of Oracle components in different languages, you must
install the appropriate language translations along with the component.
Installing Oracle Database 6-15
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
Note:
Part of Oracle Database Vault user interface text is stored in database tables in
the DVSYS schema. By default, only the English language is loaded into these
tables. You can use Oracle Database Vault Configuration Assistant to add
more languages to Oracle Database Vault.
To install translation resources:
1.
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
2.
In the Configure Security Updates screen enter the relevant information and click
Next.
3.
In the Select Installation Option screen, select the installation option and click
Next.
4.
In the System Class screen, select the type of system class for installing the
database, and click Next.
5.
In the Grid Installation Options screen, select the type of database installation you
want to perform, and click Next.
See Also: Oracle Database Vault Administrator's Guide
6.5 Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
Describes how to run Oracle Universal Installer in other languages.
Your operating system locale determines the language in which Oracle Universal
Installer runs. You can run Oracle Universal Installer in one of these languages:
•
Brazilian Portuguese (pt_BR)
•
French (fr)
•
German (de)
•
Italian (it)
•
Japanese (ja)
•
Korean (ko)
•
Simplified Chinese (zh_CN)
•
Spanish (es)
•
Traditional Chinese (zh_TW)
To run Oracle Universal Installer in a supported language, change the locale in which
your operating system session is running before you start Oracle Universal Installer. If
the selected language is not one of the supported languages, then Oracle Universal
Installer runs in English.
1. Change the locale for the operating system user and the System Locale.
2. Run Oracle Universal Installer.
6-16 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database
Related Topics:
Determining the Operating System Locale (page 6-13)
The locale setting of your operating system session determines the
language of the user interface and the globalization behavior for
components such as Oracle Universal Installer, Oracle Net Configuration
Assistant, and Oracle Database Configuration Assistant.
Installing Oracle Database (page 6-17)
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is
available on multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
6.6 Installing Oracle Database
Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation software is available on
multiple media, and can be installed using several options.
The Oracle Database software is available on installation media, or you can download
it from the Oracle Technology Network website, or the Oracle Software Delivery
Cloud portal. In most cases, Oracle Universal Installer provides a graphical user
interface (GUI) to install the software. However, you can also use Oracle Universal
Installer to complete silent mode installations, without using the GUI.
Note:
•
If you plan to use Oracle Restart or Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, then you must install Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
standalone server before you install and create the database. Otherwise,
you must manually register the database with Oracle Restart. For
information about installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure, see
•
You may have to shut down existing Oracle processes before you start the
database installation.
•
To install Oracle Database using the silent or response file installation
method, without the GUI. It also explains how to clone an existing Oracle
home. These methods are useful to perform multiple installations of
Oracle Database.
To install the Oracle Database software:
1. Log in to Windows as an Administrator user.
If you are installing on a Primary Domain Controller (PDC) or a Backup Domain
Controller (BDC), log on as a member of the Domain Administrators group.
2. If you are installing Oracle Database on a computer with multiple Network
Interface Cards or multiple aliases, use System in the Control Panel to create the
ORACLE_HOSTNAME system environment variable. Set this variable to point to the
host name of the computer on which you are installing Oracle Database.
3. Navigate to the location of the installation media for Oracle Database 12c Release 2
(12.2), open a command prompt with administrator privileges, and run the
setup.exe command.
Installing Oracle Database 6-17
Installing Oracle Database
Use the same installation media to install Oracle Database on all supported
Windows operating systems.
4. Follow these guidelines to complete the installation:
•
Do not install Oracle Database 12c software into an existing Oracle home.
•
Follow the instructions displayed in the Oracle Universal Installer screens. If
you need additional information, click Help.
Tip:
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords (page 8-10)
•
Do not modify the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) except by using a patch
provided by Oracle Support Services. Oracle Universal Installer automatically
installs the Oracle-supplied version of the JRE. This version is required to run
Oracle Universal Installer and several Oracle assistants.
•
If you encounter errors while installing the software, see for information about
troubleshooting.
•
If you chose an installation type that runs Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant in interactive mode, then you must provide detailed information
about configuring your database and network.
If you need help when using the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in
interactive mode, click Help on any screen.
Note:
If you chose a default installation, Oracle Database Configuration Assistant
does not run interactively.
5. When the Configuration Assistant tasks are complete, click Finish, click Exit, then
click Yes to exit from Oracle Universal Installer.
6. Optionally, delete the OraInstalldate_time directory to remove the temporary
files that were created during the installation process. The
OraInstalldate_time directory holds about 45 MB of files. This directory is
created in the location set by the TEMP environment variable setting.
Restarting your computer also removes the OraInstalldate_time directory.
7. See for information about tasks that you must complete after you have installed
Oracle Database.
The following table lists the various screens displayed during an Enterprise Edition
installation for Oracle Database 12c:
6-18 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database
Table 6-2
Oracle Universal Installer Windows
Screen
Action
Configure Security
Updates
Enter your e-mail address, preferably your My Oracle Support e-mail address or
user name in the Email field.
You can select the I wish to receive security updates via My Oracle Support check
box to receive security updates.
Enter your My Oracle Support password in the My Oracle Support Password field.
Click Next.
Select Installation Option
Select one of the following installation options, click Next.
•
•
•
System Class
Select the type of system for installing the database, click Next.
•
•
Grid Installation Options
Desktop Class: Choose this option if you are installing on a laptop or desktop
class system. This option includes a starter database and enables minimal
configuration. This option is designed for those who want to quickly set up a
database.
Server Class: Choose this option if you are installing on a server class system,
such as when deploying Oracle in a production data center. This option enables
more advanced configuration options. Advanced configuration options
available using this option include Oracle RAC, Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, backup and recovery configuration, integration with Enterprise
Manager Cloud Control, and more fine-grained memory tuning, among many
others.
Select the type of database installation you want to perform, click Next.
•
•
•
Select Install Type
Create and configure a database: This option creates a new database along with
sample schemas.
Install database software only: This option installs only the database binaries.
To configure database, you must run Oracle Database Configuration Assistant
after the software installation.
Upgrade an existing database: This option installs the software binaries in a
new Oracle home. At the end of the installation, you can upgrade the existing
database.
Single instance database installation: This option installs the database and the
listener.
Oracle Real Application Clusters database installation: This option installs
Oracle Real Application Clusters.
Oracle RAC One Node database installation: This option installs Oracle RAC
One Node database.
Select one of the following, then click Next:
•
•
Typical Install: This installation method is selected by default. It lets you quickly
install Oracle Database using minimal input. It installs the software and
optionally creates a general-purpose database using the information that you
specify on this screen.
Advanced Install: This installation method enables you to perform more
complex installations, such as creating individual passwords for different
accounts, creating specific types of starter databases (for example, for
transaction processing or data warehouse systems), using different language
groups, specifying e-mail notifications, and so on.
Installing Oracle Database 6-19
Installing Oracle Database
Table 6-2
(Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Windows
Screen
Action
Select Database Edition
Select Enterprise Edition or Standard Edition 2. Click Next
Specify Oracle Home
User
Starting with Oracle Database 12c, Oracle recommends that you use Virtual Account
or specify a standard Windows User Account (not an Administrator account) to
install and configure the Oracle home. This account is used for running the Windows
services for the Oracle home. Do not log in using this account to perform
administrative tasks. Select one of the following, then click Next.
•
Use Virtual Account User
•
The account is the Oracle Home User for Oracle Database Single Instance and
Client installations. The account enables you to install Oracle Database, create,
and manage database services without passwords.
Use Existing Windows User
•
The account can be a Windows Local User, Windows Domain User, Windows
Managed Services Account (MSA), or a Windows Group Managed Services
Account (gMSA). You must provide both the user name and password for a
Windows Local or Domain User. For a Windows MSA, which is a managed
domain account, only the user name is required. For a Windows gMSA, which
is also a managed domain account, only the user name is required.
Create New Windows User
Provide the user name and password for the Windows Local User that you
want Oracle Universal Installer to create. Confirm the password. The new user
that is created is denied interactive logon privileges to the Windows computer.
However, a Windows administrator can manage this account like any other
Windows account.
Select Use Windows Built-in Account if you do not want to specify an Oracle Home
User during installation. No user name or password is required and the Windows
services for the Oracle home run as the LocalSystem or LocalService.
For Database Server installation, Oracle recommends that you use a standard
Windows User Account (instead of Windows Built-in Account) or Virtual Account as
the Oracle Home User for enhanced security.
Specify Installation
Location
The Oracle base path appears by default. You can change the path based on your
requirement. Specify Oracle base, Software location, and click Next.
The Oracle base directory is a top-level directory for Oracle software installations
owned by an Oracle installation owner account. The default Oracle base path is
DRIVE_LETTER:\app\user, where user is the user account running the
installation. You can change the path based on your requirements.
In the Software Location field, accept the default value or enter the Oracle home
directory path in which you want to install Oracle components. The directory path
must not contain spaces.
Click Next.
Note: This screen is available only with Advanced Installation.
6-20 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database
Table 6-2
(Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Windows
Screen
Action
Select Configuration Type
Select one of the following, click Next:
•
General Purpose / Transaction Processing: This is a starter database designed
for general usage or transaction-heavy applications.
•
Data Warehousing: A starter database optimized to run Data Warehousing
applications.
See the online Help provided by either Oracle Universal Installer or Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant for a description of these preconfigured database types.
Specify Database
Identifiers
Specify the following information, then click Next:
Database Naming
Specify the Global Database Name using the following syntax:
database_unique_name.db_domain
where:
•
•
database_unique_name is the name of the database. It can contain a
maximum of 30 characters as long as the first eight characters are unique and
begin with an alphabetic character. The characters can include ASCII
alphanumeric (A-Za-Zz0-9), underscore (_), dollar ($), and pound (#), no other
special characters are permitted in a database name.
db_domain is the computer environment used for the database. It must contain
no more than 128 characters (ASCII alphanumeric (A-Za-Zz0-9), underscore (_),
and pound (#)), inclusive of all periods.
Note: Ensure that the combination of database name (first eight unique characters of
database unique name), delimiter, and the database domain name does not exceed
128 characters.
For example:
sales.us.example.com
where:
•
database_unique_name is sales
•
db_domain is us.example.com
When you enter the Global Database Name, Oracle Universal Installer automatically
populates the SID prefix with the database name. You can change this name in
Advanced installation.
Oracle Universal Installer limits the SID to 12 alphanumeric characters and the SID
cannot contain underscore (_), dollar ($), and pound (#).
Select the Create as Container database option to create the database as a
multitenant container database (CDB) that can support one pluggable database
(PDB). If you want Oracle Universal Installer to create a PDB when it creates the
CDB, specify the PDB name in the Pluggable Database Name field.
The PDB name must be unique and must follow the database naming conventions.
To create additional PDBs and to manage PDBs, use Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant.
See Also: Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
Installing Oracle Database 6-21
Installing Oracle Database
Table 6-2
(Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Windows
Screen
Action
Specify Configuration
Options
Specify the following configuration details, then click Next.
Memory:
Select the Enable Automatic Memory Management option to allow the database to
automatically distribute memory between SGA and PGA. If you do not select this
option, then the SGA and PGA must be sized manually.
Character Sets:
This option enables you to select the character set used to store and process character
data in the database. The choices are:
•
Use Unicode (AL32UTF8): The database character set is AL32UTF8 and the
database can process most languages of the world.
•
Use OS character set (WE8MSWN1252): The database character set
(WE8MSWN1252) is based on the language of the operating system.
•
Choose from the following list of character sets: This option enables the Select
database character set drop down list.
See Also: Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide
Sample Schemas:
The Create database with sample schemas option is not selected by default.
However, you can select the option, to create the starter database with sample
schema. If you create the database as a CDB with one PDB, then the sample schema
is created as a PDB.
Note: By default, Oracle database is configured to include enhanced security
settings.
Specify Database Storage
Options
Select one of the following, then click Next.
Specify Management
Options
This screen gives you the option to manage your database using Oracle Enterprise
Manager Cloud Control. Select Register with Enterprise Manager (EM) Cloud
Control and specify the following for Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control
configuration, and click Next:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
File System: Specify the database file location.
Oracle Automatic Storage Management.
OMS Host: This is the system name where the Management repository is
running.
OMS Port: This is the Oracle Enterprise Manager port number to receive
requests from the Management service.
EM Admin User Name: This is the user name to log in to Oracle Enterprise
Manager.
EM Admin Password: This is the password to log in to Oracle Enterprise
Manager.
Specify password of ASMSNMP user: This is the password for the ASMSNMP
user configured in Oracle ASM, required only if you choose Oracle ASM as
your database storage option.
Note: Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express is always installed and
configured by default irrespective of whether you register Oracle Enterprise
Manager Cloud Control.
6-22 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database
Table 6-2
(Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Windows
Screen
Action
Specify Recovery Options
Select Enable Recovery to enable recovery using one of the following options:
•
Select File System to use a file system directory for the fast recovery area, and
then specify the fast recovery area path in the Recovery Area location field.
•
Select Oracle Automatic Storage Management to use an Automatic Storage
Management disk group for the fast recovery area.
Click Next.
Select ASM Disk Group
This screen is displayed only if you select Oracle Automatic Storage Management as
your storage option.
Disk groups are created during the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation. Disk
groups are configured with the SYSASM privilege using asmcmd or SQL create
diskgroup commands. An ASM disk group consists of multiple disk partitions.
The table in this screen displays existing disk groups created during the Oracle Grid
Infrastructure installation. Select a disk group to use for database file storage.
Specify Schema
Passwords
Enter and confirm passwords for the privileged database accounts: SYS, SYSTEM,
and DBSNMP.
If you chose to create the database as a CDB, then Oracle Universal Installer also asks
for the PDBADMIN password.
Click Next.
Note: Optionally, you can use the same password for all accounts. However, Oracle
recommends that you specify a different password for each account. You must
remember the passwords that you specify.
Perform Prerequisite
Checks
This option checks if the minimum system requirements to perform the database
installation are met.
Click Fix & Check Again, if you want the installer to fix the problem and check the
system requirements once more.
If you click Check Again, then you can run the prerequisite check again to see if the
minimum requirements are met to carry on with the database installation.
To get a list of failed requirements, select Show Failed from the list. To get a list of
all the prerequirement checks run by the OUI, select Show All. To get a list of the
prerequirement checks that are successful, select Show Succeeded.
Note: Oracle recommends that you use caution in checking the Ignore All option. If
you check this option, then Oracle Universal Installer may not confirm that your
system can install Oracle Database successfully.
See Also: for information about the system requirements.
Summary
Review the information displayed on this screen, and click Install.
Note: You can save all the installation steps into a response file by clicking Save
Response File. Later, this file can be used for a silent installation.
Install Product
This screen displays the progress of a database installation. It also shows the status
information while the product is being installed. Click Next.
This screen then displays the status information for the configuration assistants that
configure the software and create a database. When the message is displayed after
Database Configuration Assistant process, click OK to continue.
Installing Oracle Database 6-23
Cloning an Oracle Home
Table 6-2
(Cont.) Oracle Universal Installer Windows
Screen
Action
Finish
This screen is shown automatically when all the configuration tools are successful.
See Also:
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation and Upgrade Guide for Microsoft
Windows x64 (64-Bit)
Related Topics:
Identifying Databases (page 8-12)
The Oracle Database software identifies a database by its global database
name.
Consider Memory Allocation and Automatic Memory Management (page 3-9)
During a Typical installation, you create your database with Database
Configuration Assistant (DBCA), and automatic memory management is
enabled. If you choose advanced installation, then you can either specify
memory allocation manually, or enable automatic memory management.
About Character Set Selection During Installation (page 6-4)
Review character set options before you start the installation.
Using an Oracle Automatic Storage Management Disk Group (page 6-5)
Learn how to identify disk groups and determine the available free disk
space.
Configuring Storage for Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 5-8)
Identify storage requirements and ASM disk group options.
Optimal Flexible Architecture Directory Naming Conventions (page B-3)
Optimal Flexible Architecture uses directory naming conventions that
make it easy to identify the precise Oracle home and database name that
is associated with a set of files.
Related Topics:
Stopping Existing Oracle Services (page 4-11)
Learn how to stop all processes, including the listener and database,
running in the Oracle home.
6.7 Cloning an Oracle Home
Follow these steps to clone an Oracle home.
Note:
During cloning, Oracle Universal Installer (OUI) prompts you to run scripts
that require root privileges.
6-24 Database Installation Guide
Cloning an Oracle Home
1.
Verify that the installation of Oracle Database to clone is successful.
You can do this by reviewing the installActionsdate_time.log file for the
installation session, which is typically located in the following directory:
C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs
If you have installed patches, you can check their status by running the following
commands at a command prompt:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\OPatch> set ORACLE_HOME=ORACLE_HOME_using_patch
C:\ORACLE_HOME\OPatch> opatch lsinventory
2.
Stop all processes related to the Oracle home.
You can stop Oracle services by using one of the following methods:
•
Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows: From the Start menu, select
All Programs, then Oracle - HOMENAME, then Configuration and
Migration Tools, then Administrative Assistant for Windows, then Oracle
Managed Objects, then Computers, and then machine-name. Select
Databases, then right-click global database name, select Stop Service.
Note:
Choose Startup/Shutdown Options to control whether a database instance
must be stopped along with the service.
•
3.
Microsoft Windows Services utility: From the Start menu, select Control
Panel, then Administrative Tools, then Services. Right-click any service that
begins with Oracle, and then from the menu, select Stop.
Create a ZIP file with the Oracle home (but not Oracle base) directory.
For example, if the source Oracle installation is in C:\app\username\product
\12.2.0\dbhome_1 you zip the dbhome_1 directory, leaving out the admin,
flash_recovery_area, and oradata directories that are under 12.2.0. These
directories are created in the target installation later on when you create a new
database there.
4.
Copy the ZIP file to the root directory of the target computer. If you use File
Transfer Protocol (FTP), then transfer the ZIP file in binary mode only.
5.
Extract the ZIP file contents, selecting the Use folder names option.
6.
Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each computer where you want to clone the Oracle home,
unless the Oracle home is on a shared storage device.
7.
In the source Oracle home, restart the services that you stopped in step 2.
8.
On the target computer, cd to the unzipped Oracle home directory, and perform
the following steps:
a.
Remove the *.ora files that are present in unzipped ORACLE_HOME
\network\admin directory, such as listener.ora, sqlnet.ora, and
tnsnames.ora.
b.
Delete unnecessary files from the unzipped Oracle home directory.
Installing Oracle Database 6-25
Cloning an Oracle Home
The unzipped Oracle home directory contains files that are relevant only to
the source Oracle home. Remove the unnecessary files from the unzipped
Oracle home in the log, crs/init, crf, and cdata directories. The
following example shows how to remove these unnecessary files from the
unzipped Oracle home directory:
[grid_home]# cd copy_path
[grid_home]# rm -rf host_name
[grid_home]# rm -rf log/host_name
[grid_home]# rm -rf gpnp/host_name
[grid_home]# rm -rf find gpnp -type f -exec rm -f {} \;
c:\<Gridhome> c:\mksnt\find gpnp -type f and delete these files.
gpnp/init/host_name
gpnp/init/host_name.pid
gpnp/profiles/peer/profile.xml
gpnp/profiles/peer/profile_orig.xml
gpnp/host_name/profiles/peer/profile.old
gpnp/host_name/profiles/peer/profile.xml
gpnp/host_name/profiles/peer/profile_orig.xml
gpnp/host_name/wallets/pa/cwallet.sso
gpnp/host_name/wallets/peer/cwallet.sso
gpnp/host_name/wallets/prdr/cwallet.sso
gpnp/host_name/wallets/root/ewallet.p12
gpnp/wallets/pa/cwallet.sso
gpnp/wallets/peer/cwallet.sso
gpnp/wallets/prdr/cwallet.sso
gpnp/wallets/roor/ewallet.p12
[grid_home]# find cfgtoollogs -type f -exec rm -f {} \;
[grid_home]# rm -rf crs/init/*
[grid_home]# rm -rf cdata/*
[grid_home]# rm -rf crf/*
[grid_home]# rm -rf network/admin/*.ora
9.
From the ORACLE_HOME\clone\bin directory, run clone.pl for the unzipped
Oracle home.
Use the following syntax:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\clone\bin>target_home\perl\bin\perl.exe clone.pl
ORACLE_HOME="target location" ORACLE_BASE="target Base location"
ORACLE_HOME_USER="Windows User Account" OSDBA_GROUP=OSDBA_privileged_group
OSOPER_GROUP=OSOPER_privileged_group
OSBACKUPDBA_GROUP=OSBACKUPDBA_privileged_group
OSRACDBA_GROUP=OSRACDBA_privileged_group -defaultHomeName
where ORACLE_HOME_USER="Windows User Account" is the Oracle Home
User for the cloned home.
Windows Built-in Account is used as the Oracle Home User if the parameter for
ORACLE_HOME_USER is not specified.
For example:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\clone\bin>target_home\perl\bin\perl.exe clone.pl
ORACLE_HOME="C:\app\username\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1"
ORACLE_BASE="C:\app\username"
ORACLE_HOME_USER="mydomain\username" -defaultHomeName
OSDBA_GROUP=dba OSOPER_GROUP=oper OSBACKUPDBA_GROUP=backupdba
OSRACDBAGROUP=racdba -defaultHomeName
6-26 Database Installation Guide
Cloning an Oracle Home
Oracle Universal Installer starts, and then records the cloning actions in the
cloneActionstimestamp.log file. This log file is normally located in C:
\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs.
Note:
Run \ORACLE_HOME\clone\bin>target_home\perl\bin\perl.exe
clone.pl -help command for more information about the command
option flags.
10. To configure connection information for the new database, run Net Configuration
Assistant.
To start Net Configuration Assistant, select Start, then All Programs, then Oracle
- HOMENAME, then Configuration and Migration Tools, and then Net
Configuration Assistant.
11. To create a new database for the newly cloned Oracle home, run Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant.
To start Oracle Database Configuration Assistant, select Start, then All Programs,
then Oracle - HOMENAME, then Configuration and Migration Tools, and then
Database Configuration Assistant.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and UNIX
Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager in a Cloned Oracle Home
(page 6-27)
Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager for a cloned Oracle home
depends on its configuration in the original Oracle home.
6.7.1 Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager in a Cloned Oracle Home
Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager for a cloned Oracle home depends on its
configuration in the original Oracle home.
If you have already installed but not configured Oracle Configuration Manager in the
original Oracle home, then follow these steps:
1.
Run the following commands from the cloned Oracle home:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd %ORACLE_HOME%\ccr\bin
DRIVE_LETTER:\> setupCCR
2.
Provide your My Oracle Support credentials to proceed.
If you have already configured Oracle Configuration Manager in the original Oracle
home, then follow these steps:
1. Run the following commands from the cloned Oracle home:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd %ORACLE_HOME%\ccr\bin
DRIVE_LETTER:\> deriveCCR
Installing Oracle Database 6-27
Cloning an Oracle Home
2. deriveCCR prompts for your My Oracle Support (MOS) credentials to proceed
only if it cannot find the original configuration; otherwise it does not prompt.
6-28 Database Installation Guide
7
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks
Complete configuration tasks after you install Oracle Database.
Oracle recommends that you complete additional tasks immediately after installation.
You must also complete product-specific configuration tasks before you use those
products.
Using Oracle9i Language and Definition Files with Oracle Database 12c
(page 7-2)
Changes are made to the content of some of the language and territory
definition files in Oracle Database 10g and later releases.
Downloading and Installing Patch Updates (page 7-3)
Download and install patch dates for your Oracle software after you
complete the installation.
Requirements for Database Password (page 7-4)
To secure your database, every password must satisfy the Oracle
recommended password requirements, even the passwords for
predefined user accounts.
Setting Language and Locale Preferences for Client Connections (page 7-4)
Configure client applications connecting to an Oracle Database
according to your locale preferences and your I/O device character set.
Downloading and Installing the ORAchk Health Check Tool (page 7-2)
Download and install the ORAchk utility to perform proactive heath
checks for the Oracle software stack.
About Using CVU Cluster Healthchecks After Installation (page 7-5)
You can use the CVU healthcheck command to check your Oracle
Clusterware and Oracle Database installations for their compliance with
mandatory requirements and best practices guidelines, and to ensure
that they are functioning properly.
Recompiling Invalid Objects on Windows Systems (page 7-8)
Run the utlrp.sql script after you install, patch, or upgrade a
database, to identify, and recompile invalid objects.
Configuring the Secure Sockets Layer (page 7-8)
Oracle highly recommends that you configure and use a Secure Sockets
Layer (SSL) to ensure that passwords and other sensitive data are not
transmitted in clear text in HTTP requests.
Configuring Oracle Components (page 7-8)
Many Oracle products and options must be configured before you use
them for the first time.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-1
Downloading and Installing the ORAchk Health Check Tool
Creating a Fast Recovery Area Disk Group (page 7-22)
During installation, by default you can create multiple disk groups.
Enabling and Disabling Database Options After Installation (page 7-23)
When you install Oracle Database, some options are enabled and the
others disabled. You can view the enabled Oracle Database options by
querying the V$OPTION view using SQL*Plus.
Changing the Oracle Home User Password (page 7-24)
Oracle Home User Control is a command-line utility that allows an
administrator to update the password for an Oracle Home User.
Postinstallation Tasks for SQL Developer (page 7-25)
Learn about the recommended postinstallation tasks for SQL Developer.
7.5 Downloading and Installing the ORAchk Health Check Tool
Download and install the ORAchk utility to perform proactive heath checks for the
Oracle software stack.
ORAchk replaces the RACCheck utility. ORAchk extends health check coverage to the
entire Oracle software stack, and identifies and addresses top issues reported by
Oracle users. ORAchk proactively scans for known problems with Oracle products
and deployments, including the following:
•
Standalone Oracle Database
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters
•
Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) Validation
•
Upgrade Readiness Validations
•
Oracle Golden Gate
Oracle is continuing to expand checks, based on customer requests.
ORAchk is supported on Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2016 on a
Cygwin environment only.
Oracle recommends that you download and run the latest version of ORAchk from
My Oracle Support. For information about downloading, configuring and running
ORAchk utility, refer to My Oracle Support note 1268927.2:
https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocContentDisplay?
id=1268927.2&parent=DOCUMENTATION&sourceId=USERGUIDE
Related Topics:
Oracle ORAchk and EXAchk User’s Guide
7.1 Using Oracle9i Language and Definition Files with Oracle Database
12c
Changes are made to the content of some of the language and territory definition files
in Oracle Database 10g and later releases.
7-2 Database Installation Guide
Downloading and Installing Patch Updates
Changes are made to the content of some of the language and territory definition files
in Oracle Database 10g and later releases. These updates are necessary to correct the
legacy definitions that no longer meet the local conventions in some of the languages
and territories that Oracle Database supports.
Oracle Database 12c customers must review their existing application code to ensure
that the correct cultural conventions, which were introduced and defined in Oracle
Database 10g, are being used.
For customers who are not able to make the necessary code changes to support their
applications, Oracle Database offers Oracle9i locale definition files with this release of
Oracle Database. If the Oracle Database server installation has been configured to use
the Oracle9i files, then you must enable this functionality in each client installation as
well.
To enable this functionality, perform the following steps:
1. Run the cr9idata.pl script, which by default is in the following location:
ORACLE_HOME\nls\data\old
If the installation type you chose does not include this directory, you can find the
cr9idata.pl script in the same directory path in a default Oracle Database Client
installation.
2. Set the ORA_NLS10 environment variable to point to the directory ORACLE_HOME
\nls\data\9idata, into which cr9idata.pl copies the new language and
territory definition files. ORA_NLS10 must have this value each time the affected
client programs are started. Therefore, set the variable permanently in a startup
script or, on the Microsoft Windows platform, set it in the Windows Registry.
7.2 Downloading and Installing Patch Updates
Download and install patch dates for your Oracle software after you complete the
installation.
Check the My Oracle Support website for required patch updates for your installation.
To download the required patches, perform the following steps:
1. Use a web browser to view the My Oracle Support website:
https://support.oracle.com/
2. Log in to My Oracle Support.
Note:
If you are not a My Oracle Support registered user, then click Register here
and follow the registration instructions.
3. On the main My Oracle Support page, click Patches and Updates tab.
4. In the Patch Search group, select Product or Family (Advanced).
5. In the Product field, select Oracle Database.
6. In the Release field select the release number. For example, Oracle 12.2.0.1.0.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-3
Requirements for Database Password
7. Click Search.
8. Any available patch updates are displayed in the Patch Search page.
9. Select the patch number and click ReadMe. The README page is displayed and
contains information about the patch set and how to apply the patches to your
installation.
10. Return to the Patch Search page, click Download, and save the file on your system.
11. Use the unzip utility provided with Oracle Database 12c to uncompress the Oracle
patch updates that you downloaded from My Oracle Support. The unzip utility is
located in the ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\bin directory.
7.3 Requirements for Database Password
To secure your database, every password must satisfy the Oracle recommended
password requirements, even the passwords for predefined user accounts.
Oracle Database provides a set of predefined user accounts. You must create
passwords in a secure fashion. If you have default passwords, you must change these.
You can manage the security for Oracle Database users by enforcing restrictions on the
passwords that are created, creating user profiles, and using user resource limits to
further secure user accounts.
See Also:
Oracle Database Security Guide
7.4 Setting Language and Locale Preferences for Client Connections
Configure client applications connecting to an Oracle Database according to your
locale preferences and your I/O device character set.
You must configure client applications connecting to an Oracle Database according to
your locale preferences and your I/O device character set. If your applications do not
have their own specific methods to configure locale preferences, then the method you
use to configure an Oracle database client connection depends on the access API you
use to connect to the database. Check your application documentation, before you
configure locale preferences for your applications.
For applications that connect to Oracle Databases using Oracle Call Interface (OCI) use
NLS_LANG and other client settings with names that start with NLS_ to set the locale
conventions and client character set for Oracle Database sessions. It is important that
you set the character set part of the NLS_LANG value properly. The character set you
set must correspond to the character set used by your I/O devices, which in case of
Microsoft Windows is either the ANSI Code Page (for GUI applications), such as
WE8MSWIN1252, or the OEM Code Page (for Console mode applications), such as
US8PC437. By doing this, the OCI API is notified about the character set of data that it
receives from the application. OCI can then convert this data correctly to and from the
database character set.
NLS_LANG and the other NLS settings can be specified either as environment
variables or as Windows Registry settings. Environment variable values take
precedence over Registry values.
7-4 Database Installation Guide
About Using CVU Cluster Healthchecks After Installation
Oracle Universal Installer sets a default value for the NLS_LANG setting in Registry
when it creates a new Oracle home. The NLS_LANG value is based on the language of
the Windows user interface, which is the language of Windows menu items and
dialog box labels.
Caution: Failure to set the client character set correctly can cause data loss.
Java applications that connect to Oracle Databases by using Oracle JDBC do not use
NLS_LANG. Instead, Oracle JDBC maps the default locale of the Java VM in which the
application runs to the Oracle Database language and territory settings. Oracle JDBC
then configures the connected database session using these settings. Because Java
works internally in Unicode, the client character set is always set to Unicode. Unless
an application explicitly changes it, the default locale of the Java VM is set based on
the locale of the user operating system on which the Java VM runs. Check your Java
VM documentation for information about configuring the Java VM default locale.
Note: In 3-tier architecture deployments, application servers that are database
clients can have settings in their configuration files that specify the
NLS_LANG value or the Java VM locale. Check the documentation
accompanying these servers.
See Also:
Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for more information about
configuring user locale preferences
Related Topics:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
7.6 About Using CVU Cluster Healthchecks After Installation
You can use the CVU healthcheck command to check your Oracle Clusterware and
Oracle Database installations for their compliance with mandatory requirements and
best practices guidelines, and to ensure that they are functioning properly.
Syntax
cluvfy comp healthcheck [-collect {cluster|database}] [-db db_unique_name]
[-bestpractice|-mandatory] [-deviations] [-html] [-save [-savedir directory_path]
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-5
About Using CVU Cluster Healthchecks After Installation
Options
Option
Description
-collect [cluster | database]
Use this option to specify that you want to
perform checks for Oracle Clusterware
(cluster) or Oracle Database (database). If you
do not use the collect flag with the
healthcheck command, then cluvfy
comp healthcheck performs checks for
both Oracle Clusterware and Oracle
Database.
-db db_unique_name
Use this flag to specify checks on the database
unique name that you enter after the —db
option.
CVU uses JDBC to connect to the database as
the user CVUSYS to verify various database
parameters. For this reason, if you want
checks to be performed for the database you
specify with the -db option, then you must
first create the CVUSYS user on that
database, and grant that user the CVUspecific role, CVUSAPP. You must also grant
members of the CVUSAPP role SELECT
permissions on system tables. The SQL script
cvusys.sql is included in the CVU_home
\cv\admin directory to facilitate the
creation of this user. Use this SQL script to
create the CVUSYS user on all the databases
that you want to verify using CVU.
If you use the -db option but do not provide
a database unique name, then CVU discovers
all the Oracle databases on the cluster. To
perform best practices checks on these
databases, you must create the CVUSYS user
on each database, and grant that user the
CVUSAPP role with the SELECT privileges
needed to perform the best practice checks.
7-6 Database Installation Guide
About Using CVU Cluster Healthchecks After Installation
Option
Description
[-bestpractice | -mandatory] [deviations]
•
-html
Use the -html option to generate a detailed
report in HTML format.
Use the -bestpractice option to
specify best practice checks
•
Use the -mandatory option to specify
mandatory checks
•
Add the -deviations option to specify
that you want to see only the deviations
from either the best practice
recommendations or the mandatory
requirements
•
If you specify neither -bestpractice
or -mandatory, then both best practices
and mandatory requirements are
displayed.
You can specify either the -bestpractice
or -mandatory option, but not both options.
If you specify the -html option, and a
browser that is recognized by CVU is
available on the system, then the browser is
started and the report is displayed on the
browser when the checks are complete.
If you do not specify the -html option, then
the detailed report is generated in a text file.
-save [-savedir dir_path]
Use the -save or -save -savedir options
to save validation reports
(cvuchecdkreport_timestamp.txt and
cvucheckreport_timestamp.htm),
where timestamp is the time and date of the
validation report.
If you use the -save option by itself, then the
reports are saved in the path CVU_home\cv
\report, where CVU_home is the location
of the CVU executable files.
If you use the options -save -savedir,
and enter a path where you want the CVU
reports saved, then the CVU reports are
saved in the path you specify.
Example 7-1
Running a Cluster Healthcheck After the Software Installation
To run a healthcheck for your Oracle Grid Infrastructure cluster, to check for any
deviations from best practices, and display the results in HTML format, use the
following command:
C:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.1.0\dbhome_1\bin
C:\..bin> cluvfy comp healthcheck -html
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-7
Recompiling Invalid Objects on Windows Systems
Example 7-2
Running a Healthcheck for Oracle RAC Database
To run a healthcheck for your Oracle RAC cluster, to check best practices
recommendations and mandatory requirements, and display the results in HTML
format, use the following command:
C:\> cd app\12.1.0\grid\bin
C:\..bin> cluvfy comp healthcheck -html
7.7 Recompiling Invalid Objects on Windows Systems
Run the utlrp.sql script after you install, patch, or upgrade a database, to identify,
and recompile invalid objects.
The utlrp.sql script recompiles all invalid objects, including packages, procedures,
and types. Run the script immediately after installation, to ensure that users do not
encounter invalid objects.
1. Log in as an Administrator user, or as the Oracle Home user.
2. Start SQL*Plus and log in as a SYSDBA user:
a. Click Start.
b. Select Programs (or All Programs).
c. Select Oracle - HOME_NAME.
d. Select Application Development.
e. Select SQL*Plus.
3. Run the utlrp.sql script, where Oracle_home is the Oracle home path:
SQL> @Oracle_home\rdbms\admin\utlrp.sql
The utlrp.sql script automatically recompiles invalid objects in either serial or
parallel recompilation, based on the number of invalid objects, and on the number of
CPUs available. CPUs are calculated using the number of CPUs (cpu_count)
multiplied by the number of threads for each CPU (parallel_threads_per_cpu).
On Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC), this number is added across all
Oracle RAC nodes.
7.8 Configuring the Secure Sockets Layer
Oracle highly recommends that you configure and use a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to
ensure that passwords and other sensitive data are not transmitted in clear text in
HTTP requests.
See Also:
Oracle Database Security Guide
7.9 Configuring Oracle Components
Many Oracle products and options must be configured before you use them for the
first time.
7-8 Database Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Components
Before using individual Oracle products or options, refer to the appropriate manual in
the product documentation library.
See Also:
•
Oracle Application Express Installation Guide
•
Oracle Configuration Manager Installation and Administration Guide
Note:
Perform postinstallation tasks only for the components that you intend to use.
Configuring Direct NFS Client (page 7-10)
Direct NFS Client is an alternative to using kernel-managed NFS.
Configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway (page 7-17)
Oracle Messaging Gateway, an Oracle Database Advanced Queuing
feature, requires additional configuration after you install Oracle
Database if you plan to use Oracle Database Advanced Queuing.
Configuring Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows (page 7-17)
Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows requires the Microsoft
Management Console and HTML Help 1.2 or later to run.
Configuring Oracle Label Security (page 7-17)
You must configure Oracle Label Security in a database to use it.
Configuring the OraClrAgnt Service for Oracle Database Extensions for .NET
(page 7-17)
Oracle Database Extensions for .NET depends on a Windows service to
operate properly. This service is called the OraClrAgnt service, which
can be accessed through the Service Control Panel, as
OracleORACLE_HOMEClrAgent, where ORACLE_HOME represents an
Oracle home name.
Configuring Oracle Database Vault (page 7-18)
Oracle Database includes Database Vault by default, but you must
register it before you can use it.
Configuring Oracle Net Services (page 7-18)
Describes how to configure Oracle Net Services.
Installing Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases (page 7-19)
An Oracle Text knowledge base is a hierarchical tree of concepts used for
theme indexing, ABOUT queries, and deriving themes for document
services.
Installing the Oracle Text Filtering Component (page 7-19)
Oracle Text Filtering Technology requires the Visual C++ libraries
included in the Visual C++ Redistributable Package provided by
Microsoft.
Configuring or Reinstalling Oracle XML DB (page 7-19)
Oracle XML DB is a component of the Oracle Database installation.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-9
Configuring Oracle Components
Configuring PL/SQL External Procedures (page 7-19)
Configuring PL/SQL depends on the network configuration files used.
Configuring Shared Server Support (page 7-20)
The default setup for using the Shared Server mode depends on how the
software has been installed.
Setting Credentials for the Job System to Work with Oracle Enterprise Manager
(page 7-20)
Windows systems require that you set the correct credentials for the Jobs
system to work properly in Oracle Enterprise Manager.
Configuring Oracle Database to Communicate with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management (page 7-21)
On Windows, Oracle Database installations that use Oracle Automatic
Storage Management must use Windows native authentication.
Installing Oracle Database Examples (page 7-21)
If you plan to use the following products or features, then download and
install the products from the Oracle Database Examples media:
Creating the OraMTS Service for Microsoft Transaction Server (page 7-21)
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server (OraMTS) permit
Oracle databases to be used as resource managers in Microsoft
application coordinated transactions.
7.9.1 Configuring Direct NFS Client
Direct NFS Client is an alternative to using kernel-managed NFS.
About Direct NFS Client Storage (page 7-11)
With Oracle Database, you can store data files on a supported NFS
system. You can configure Oracle Database to access NFS servers
directly using an Oracle internal Direct NFS Client.
About the Oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)
To enable the Direct NFS Client, you must add an oranfstab file to
ORACLE_HOME\dbs.
Mounting NFS Storage Devices with Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)
Direct NFS Client determines the mount point settings for the NFS
storage devices based on the configuration information in oranfstab.
Specifying Network Paths for a NFS Server (page 7-12)
Direct NFS Client can use up to four network paths defined in the
oranfstab file for an NFS server.
Creating an oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)
Direct NFS uses a configuration file, oranfstab, to determine the
available mount points.
Performing Basic File Operations Using the ORADNFS Utility (page 7-15)
ORADNFS is a utility which enables the database administrators to
perform basic file operations over Direct NFS Client on Microsoft
Windows platforms.
Monitoring Direct NFS Client Usage (page 7-15)
Use the following views for Direct NFS Client management:
7-10 Database Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Components
Enabling Direct NFS Client (page 7-16)
To enable Direct NFS Client, you must add an oranfstab file to the
Oracle_home\dbs directory and modify the related DLL files used by
the Oracle Database software.
Disabling Direct NFS Client (page 7-16)
Complete the following steps to disable the Direct NFS Client:
Enabling HCC on Direct NFS Client (page 7-16)
To enable Hybrid Columnar Compression (HCC) on Direct NFS Client,
perform the following steps:
7.9.1.1 About Direct NFS Client Storage
With Oracle Database, you can store data files on a supported NFS system. You can
configure Oracle Database to access NFS servers directly using an Oracle internal
Direct NFS Client.
Direct NFS Client supports NFSv3, NFSv4, NFSv4.1, and pNFS protocols to access the
NFS server. If Oracle Database cannot open an NFS server using Direct NFS Client,
then an informational message is logged into the Oracle alert and trace files indicating
that Direct NFS Client could not be established.
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2, when you enable Direct NFS, you can
access Direct NFS dispatcher. The Direct NFS dispatcher consolidates the number of
TCP connections that are created from a database instance to the NFS server. In large
database deployments, using Direct NFS dispatcher improves scalability and network
performance. Parallel NFS deployments also require a large number of connections.
Hence, the Direct NFS dispatcher is recommended with Parallel NFS deployments too.
Direct NFS Client supports Dispatcher or the Input/Output (I/O) infrastructure.
Dispatcher enables database processes to use I/O slave processes to perform I/O
operations. This limits the number of sockets and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
connections that the Direct NFS Client requires to connect to the NFS server.
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), Windows Direct NFS Client
supports all widely accepted NFS path formats including UNIX-style NFS paths, NFS
version 4, and NFS version 4.1 protocols.
The Oracle database files resident on the NFS server that are served by the Direct NFS
Client can also be accessed through a third party NFS client. The volume must be
mounted through CIFS or kernel NFS to enable regular windows utilities and
commands, such as copy, and so on, access the database files in the remote location.
Volumes mounted through CIFS cannot be used for database file storage without
configuring Direct NFS Client. The atomic write requirements required for database
access are not guaranteed by CIFS protocol. Consequently, CIFS can only be used for
the operating system level commands, such as copy, move, and so on.
Some NFS file servers require NFS clients to connect using reserved ports. If your filer
is running with reserved port checking, then you must disable it for Direct NFS Client
to operate. To disable reserved port checking, consult your NFS file server
documentation.
Related Topics:
Creating an oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client (page 7-12)
Direct NFS uses a configuration file, oranfstab, to determine the
available mount points.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-11
Configuring Oracle Components
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Reference
•
Oracle Database Performance Tuning Guide
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
7.9.1.2 About the Oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client
To enable the Direct NFS Client, you must add an oranfstab file to ORACLE_HOME
\dbs.
When oranfstab is placed in this directory, the entries in this file are specific to a
single database.
7.9.1.3 Mounting NFS Storage Devices with Direct NFS Client
Direct NFS Client determines the mount point settings for the NFS storage devices
based on the configuration information in oranfstab.
Direct NFS Client looks for the mount point entries in ORACLE_HOME\dbs
\oranfstab. It uses the first matched entry as the mount point.
7.9.1.4 Specifying Network Paths for a NFS Server
Direct NFS Client can use up to four network paths defined in the oranfstab file for an
NFS server.
The Direct NFS Client performs load balancing across all specified paths. If a specified
path fails, then Direct NFS Client reissues I/O commands over any remaining paths.
Direct NFS Client requires an NFS server supporting NFS read/write buffers of at
least 16384 bytes.
Direct NFS Client issues writes at wtmax granularity to the NFS server. Direct NFS
Client does not serve an NFS server with a wtmax less than 16384. Oracle recommends
that you use the value 32768.
For NFS servers that restrict port range, you can use the insecure option to enable
clients other than root to connect to the NFS server. Alternatively, you can disable
Direct NFS Client.
Note:
Use NFS servers supported for Oracle Database. See the My Oracle Support
website for support information:
https://support.oracle.com
Related Topics:
Disabling Direct NFS Client (page 7-16)
Complete the following steps to disable the Direct NFS Client:
7.9.1.5 Creating an oranfstab File for Direct NFS Client
Direct NFS uses a configuration file, oranfstab, to determine the available mount
points.
7-12 Database Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Components
Create an oranfstab file with the following attributes for each NFS server that you
want to access using Direct NFS Client:
•
server
The NFS server name.
•
local
Up to four paths on the database host, specified by IP address or by name, as
displayed using the ifconfig command run on the database host.
•
path
Up to four network paths to the NFS server, specified either by IP address, or by
name, as displayed using the ifconfig command on the NFS server.
•
export
The exported path from the NFS server. Use UNIX-style path.
•
mount
The corresponding local mount point for the exported volume. Use WINDOWSstyle path.
•
Dontroute
Specifies that the outgoing messages must not be routed by the operating system,
but sent using the IP address to which they are bound.
•
mnt_timeout
Specifies (in seconds) the time Direct NFS Client should wait for a successful
mount before timing out. This parameter is optional. The default timeout is 10
minutes (600).
•
uid (Optional)
The UNIX user ID to be used by Direct NFS Client to access all NFS servers listed
in oranfstab. The default value is uid:65534, which corresponds to
user:nobody on the NFS server.
•
gid (Optional)
The UNIX group ID to be used by Direct NFS Client to access all the NFS servers
listed in oranfstab. The default value is gid:65534, which corresponds to
group:nogroup on the NFS server.
•
nfs_version
Specifies the NFS protocol version used by Direct NFS Client. Possible values are
NFSv3, NFSv4, NFSv4.1, and pNFS. The default version is NFSv3. If you select
NFSv4.x, then you must configure the value in oranfstab for nfs_version.
Specify nfs_version as pNFS, if you want to use Direct NFS with Parallel NFS.
•
security_default (Optional)
Specifies the default security mode applicable for all the exported NFS server
paths for a server entry. The default value is sys . See the description of the
security parameter for the supported security levels for the
security_default parameter.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-13
Configuring Oracle Components
•
security (Optional)
Specifies the security level, to enable security using Kerberos authentication
protocol with Direct NFS Client. Specify security per export-mount pair. The
supported security levels for the security_default and security parameters
are:
sys: UNIX level security AUTH_UNIX authentication based on user identifier
(UID) and group identifier (GID) values. This is the default value for security
parameters.
krb5: Direct NFS runs with plain Kerberos authentication. Server is
authenticated as the real server which it claims to be.
krb5i: Direct NFS runs with Kerberos authentication and NFS integrity.
Server is authenticated and each of the message transfers is checked for
integrity.
krb5p: Direct NFS runs with Kerberos authentication and NFS privacy. Server
is authenticated, and all data is completely encrypted.
The security parameter, if specified, takes precedence over the
security_default parameter. If neither of these parameters are specified, then
sys is the default authentication.
For NFS server Kerberos security setup, review the relevant NFS server
documentation. For Kerberos client setup, review the relevant operating system
documentation.
•
management
Enables Direct NFS Client to use the management interface for SNMP queries.
You can use this parameter if SNMP is running on separate management
interfaces on the NFS server. The default value is the server parameter value.
•
community
Specifies the community string for use in SNMP queries. Default value is public.
The following examples show three possible NFS server entries in oranfstab. A
single oranfstab can have multiple NFS server entries.
Example 7-3
Using Local and Path NFS Server Entries
The following example uses both local and path. Because they are in different subnets,
you do not have to specify dontroute.
server: MyDataServer1
local: 192.0.2.0
path: 192.0.2.1
local: 192.0.100.0
path: 192.0.100.1
export: /vol/oradata1 mount: C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL
Example 7-4 Using Names in Place of IP Addresses, with Multiple Exports,
management and community
server: MyDataServer2
local: LocalPath1
path: NfsPath1
local: LocalPath2
path: NfsPath2
local: LocalPath3
path: NfsPath3
local: LocalPath4
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Configuring Oracle Components
path: NfsPath4
nfs_version: nfsv3
dontroute
export: /vol/oradata2
export: /vol/oradata3
export: /vol/oradata4
export: /vol/oradata5
management: MgmtPath1
community: private
Example 7-5
mount:
mount:
mount:
mount:
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL2
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL3
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL4
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL5
Using Kerberos Authentication with Direct NFS Export
The security parameter overrides security_default:
server: nfsserver
local: 192.0.2.0
path: 192.0.2.2
local: 192.0.2.3
path: 192.0.2.4
export: /vol/oradata2 mount:
export: /vol/oradata3 mount:
export: /vol/oradata3 mount:
export: /vol/oradata3 mount:
security_default: krb5i
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL2 security: krb5
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL3 security: krb5p
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL4 security: sys
C:\APP\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL5
7.9.1.6 Performing Basic File Operations Using the ORADNFS Utility
ORADNFS is a utility which enables the database administrators to perform basic file
operations over Direct NFS Client on Microsoft Windows platforms.
ORADNFS is a multi-call binary, a single binary that acts like several utilities. This
allows ORADNFS to be smaller since all the built-in commands can leverage DNFS
code for many common operations. ORADNFS is run by issuing a command as an
argument on the command line.
For example, C:\> ORADNFS help causes ORADNFS to print a list of built-in
commands, and C:\> ORADNFS ls C:\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL causes
ORADNFS to behave as an ls command of C:\ORACLE\ORADATA\ORCL remote
directory, where C:\ORACLE\ORADATA is a DNFS virtual mount point specified in the
oranfstab configuration file.
Note:
•
A valid copy of the oranfstab configuration file must be present in
ORACLE_HOME\dbs directory for ORADNFS to operate.
•
The user must be a member of the local ORA_DBA group to execute
ORADNFS.
7.9.1.7 Monitoring Direct NFS Client Usage
Use the following views for Direct NFS Client management:
•
v$dnfs_servers: Shows a table of servers accessed using Direct NFS Client.
•
v$dnfs_files: Shows a table of files currently open using Direct NFS Client.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-15
Configuring Oracle Components
•
v$dnfs_channels: Shows a table of open network paths (or channels) to servers
for which Direct NFS Client is providing files.
•
v$dnfs_stats: Shows a table of performance statistics for Direct NFS Client.
7.9.1.8 Enabling Direct NFS Client
To enable Direct NFS Client, you must add an oranfstab file to the Oracle_home
\dbs directory and modify the related DLL files used by the Oracle Database
software.
1. Create an oranfstab file.
2. Replace the standard ODM library, oraodm12.dll, with the ODM NFS library
Oracle Database uses the ODM library, oranfsodm12.dll, to enable Direct NFS
Client. To replace the ODM library, complete the following steps:
a. Change directory to Oracle_home\bin.
b. Shut down the Oracle Database instance on a node using the Server Control
Utility (SRVCTL).
c. Enter the following commands:
copy oraodm12.dll oraodm12.dll.orig
copy /Y oranfsodm12.dll oraodm12.dll
d. Restart the Oracle Database instance using SRVCTL.
e. Repeat Step 2.a to Step 2.d for each node in the cluster.
7.9.1.9 Disabling Direct NFS Client
Complete the following steps to disable the Direct NFS Client:
1. Log in as the Oracle Grid Infrastructure software owner.
2. Set ORACLE_HOME to Oracle home for which the Direct NFS Client must be
disabled.
3. Change directory to ORACLE_HOME\bin.
4. Shut down the Oracle database.
5. Run the batch file, disable_dnfs.bat to delete ORACLE_HOME\rdbms\lib
\odm\oranfsodm12.dll.
6. Remove the oranfstab file.
Note:
If you remove an NFS path that an Oracle Database is using, then you must
restart the database for the change to take effect.
7.9.1.10 Enabling HCC on Direct NFS Client
To enable Hybrid Columnar Compression (HCC) on Direct NFS Client, perform the
following steps:
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Configuring Oracle Components
1.
Ensure that SNMP is enabled on the ZFS storage server. For example:
C:\>snmpget -v1 -c public server_name .1.3.6.1.4.1.42.2.225.1.4.2.0
SNMPv2-SMI::enterprises.42.2.225.1.4.2.0 = STRING: "Sun Storage 7410"
2.
If SNMP is enabled on an interface other than the NFS server, then configure
oranfstab using the management parameter.
3.
If SNMP is configured using a community string other than public, then
configure the oranfstab file using the community parameter.
4.
Ensure that Wsnmp32.dll and snmpapi.dll are installed by checking if
snmpget is available.
7.9.2 Configuring Oracle Messaging Gateway
Oracle Messaging Gateway, an Oracle Database Advanced Queuing feature, requires
additional configuration after you install Oracle Database if you plan to use Oracle
Database Advanced Queuing.
See Also:
Oracle Database Advanced Queuing User's Guide
7.9.3 Configuring Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows
Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows requires the Microsoft Management
Console and HTML Help 1.2 or later to run.
Microsoft Management Console (MMC) version 3.0 is available with Windows Server
2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2. Oracle recommends the latest MMC version
available.
See Also:
Microsoft documentation at
http://www.microsoft.com/
7.9.4 Configuring Oracle Label Security
You must configure Oracle Label Security in a database to use it.
See Also:
Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide
7.9.5 Configuring the OraClrAgnt Service for Oracle Database Extensions for .NET
Oracle Database Extensions for .NET depends on a Windows service to operate
properly. This service is called the OraClrAgnt service, which can be accessed through
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-17
Configuring Oracle Components
the Service Control Panel, as OracleORACLE_HOMEClrAgent, where ORACLE_HOME
represents an Oracle home name.
In earlier versions of Oracle Database, the OraClrAgnt service was automatically
created by the installer. Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), after
installation you use the OraClrCtl.exe utility to create, start, stop, and delete the
OraClrAgnt service. The OraClrAgnt service is configured by this tool using the
Oracle Home User account specified during the Oracle Database installation.
See Also:
Oracle Database Extensions for .NET Developer's Guide for Microsoft Windows
7.9.6 Configuring Oracle Database Vault
Oracle Database includes Database Vault by default, but you must register it before
you can use it.
You must create the Database Vault Owner user and, optionally, the Database Vault
Account Manager administrative user accounts.
See Also:
Oracle Database Vault Administrator's Guide
7.9.7 Configuring Oracle Net Services
Describes how to configure Oracle Net Services.
If you have a previous release of Oracle software installed on this system, you can
copy information from the Oracle Net tnsnames.ora and listener.ora
configuration files from the previous release to the corresponding files for the new
release.
Note:
The default location for the tnsnames.ora and listener.ora files is the
ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\network\admin\ directory.
Modifying the listener.ora File
If you are upgrading from a previous release of Oracle Database, Oracle recommends
that you use the current release of Oracle Net listener instead of the listener from the
previous release.
If you have referenced the previous Oracle home directory names in the static listener
information, then these directory names must be modified before the listener.ora
file can be used in the 12.2 environment.
To use the listener from the current release, you must copy static service information
from the listener.ora file from the previous release to the version of that file used
by the new release.
7-18 Database Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Components
For any database instances earlier than release 8.0.3, add static service information to
the listener.ora file. Oracle Database releases later than release 8.0.3 do not
require static service information.
Modifying the tnsnames.ora File
Unless you are using a central tnsnames.ora file, copy Oracle Net service names
and connect descriptors from the previous release tnsnames.ora file to the version
of that file used by the new release.
If necessary, you can also add the connection information for additional database
instances to the new file.
7.9.8 Installing Oracle Text Supplied Knowledge Bases
An Oracle Text knowledge base is a hierarchical tree of concepts used for theme
indexing, ABOUT queries, and deriving themes for document services.
If you plan to use any of these Oracle Text features, you can install two supplied
knowledge bases (English and French) from the Oracle Database Examples media.
See Also:
Oracle Text Reference
7.9.9 Installing the Oracle Text Filtering Component
Oracle Text Filtering Technology requires the Visual C++ libraries included in the
Visual C++ Redistributable Package provided by Microsoft.
You can download the 2005 SP1 Redistributable Package version at:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads
Run the vcredist_x64.exe file.
See Also:
Oracle Text Reference
7.9.10 Configuring or Reinstalling Oracle XML DB
Oracle XML DB is a component of the Oracle Database installation.
However, you must manually configure the FTP and HTTP ports for Oracle XML DB.
See Also:
Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
7.9.11 Configuring PL/SQL External Procedures
Configuring PL/SQL depends on the network configuration files used.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-19
Configuring Oracle Components
In nearly all cases, configuration is automatic. However, if you are using pre-8.0.3
tnsnames.ora and listener.ora files with your 12c database, then you must
manually configure them.
7.9.12 Configuring Shared Server Support
The default setup for using the Shared Server mode depends on how the software has
been installed.
If you install Oracle Database using Oracle Universal Installer, then shared support is
not configured. If you created your database through Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant, then you were offered a choice of shared or dedicated server support.
7.9.13 Setting Credentials for the Job System to Work with Oracle Enterprise Manager
Windows systems require that you set the correct credentials for the Jobs system to
work properly in Oracle Enterprise Manager.
By default, the Management Agent service is installed as a LocalSystem user. When
submitting jobs, such as stopping or starting the database, the operating system user
submitting the job must have the Log on as a batch job privilege enabled.
Perform the following steps to establish that privilege for any operating system user
who must submit an Oracle Enterprise Manager job.
1.
Under the Security Settings list, expand the list to Local Policies.
2.
Under Local Policies, double-click User Rights Assignment.
3.
Under Policy, search for the Log on as a batch job policy.
If the Management Agent service is installed as any other user (that is, not
LocalSystem), then, in addition to granting the Log on as a batch job privilege,
you must grant the "Windows service" user the following three privileges:
•
Act as part of the operating system
•
Adjust memory quotas for a process
•
Replace a process level token
The service under the "Windows service" user runs at the operating system
level.
4.
With each policy, perform the following steps:
a.
Double-click the policy name.
b.
In the Properties dialog box, click Add User or Group.
c.
In the Select Users or Groups dialog box, enter the name of the user (for
example, jsmith, administrator, and so on.)
Note:
On Windows Server 2008, the name of the dialog box is Select Users,
Computers, or Groups.
d.
Click Check Names to check that you have entered the name correctly.
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Configuring Oracle Components
e.
Click OK.
5.
Click OK to exit the Properties dialog box, then exit Local Security Settings and
Administrative Tools.
6.
Restart your computer.
If a user exists locally and at the domain level, Windows gives the local user
precedence. To use the domain user, qualify the user name with the domain name. For
example, to use the user joe in the ACCOUNTS domain specify the user name as
ACCOUNTS\joe.
7.9.14 Configuring Oracle Database to Communicate with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management
On Windows, Oracle Database installations that use Oracle Automatic Storage
Management must use Windows native authentication.
By default, Windows native authentication is enabled. To ensure that Windows native
authentication is enabled, check the sqlnet.ora file, which by default is located in
ORACLE_HOME\network\admin, and ensure that it has NTS enabled. For example:
sqlnet.authentication_services=(NTS)
See Also:
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
7.9.15 Installing Oracle Database Examples
If you plan to use the following products or features, then download and install the
products from the Oracle Database Examples media:
•
Oracle Database Examples
•
Oracle JDBC Development Drivers
•
Oracle Text Knowledge Base
See Also:
Oracle Database Examples Installation Guide
7.9.16 Creating the OraMTS Service for Microsoft Transaction Server
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server (OraMTS) permit Oracle databases to
be used as resource managers in Microsoft application coordinated transactions.
OraMTS acts as a proxy for the Oracle database to the Microsoft Distributed
Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC). As a result, OraMTS provides client-side
connection pooling and allows client components that leverage Oracle to participate in
promotable and distributed transactions. In addition, OraMTS can operate with Oracle
databases running on any operating system, given that the services themselves are run
on Windows.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-21
Creating a Fast Recovery Area Disk Group
On releases before Oracle Database 12c, the OraMTS service was created as part of a
software-only installation. Starting with Oracle Database 12c, you must use a
configuration tool to create this service.
To create the OraMTS service after performing a software-only installation for Oracle
Database, perform the following steps:
1. Open a command window.
2. Change directories to ORACLE_HOME\bin.
3. Run the OraMTSCtl utility to create the OraMTS Service:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\bin> oramtsctl.exe -new
See Also:
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Developer's Guide for Microsoft
Windows
7.10 Creating a Fast Recovery Area Disk Group
During installation, by default you can create multiple disk groups.
If you plan to add an Oracle Database for a standalone server, then you must create
the fast recovery area for database files.
About the Fast Recovery Area and the Fast Recovery Area Disk Group
(page 7-22)
The fast recovery area is a unified storage location for all Oracle
Database files related to recovery. Enabling rapid backups for recent
data can reduce requests to system administrators to retrieve backup
tapes for recovery operations.
Creating the Fast Recovery Area Disk Group (page 7-23)
Use this procedure to create the fast recovery area disk group.
7.10.1 About the Fast Recovery Area and the Fast Recovery Area Disk Group
The fast recovery area is a unified storage location for all Oracle Database files related
to recovery. Enabling rapid backups for recent data can reduce requests to system
administrators to retrieve backup tapes for recovery operations.
Database administrators can define the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE parameter
to the path for the fast recovery area to enable on-disk backups, and rapid recovery of
data.
When you enable fast recovery in the init.ora file, it writes all RMAN backups,
archive logs, control file automatic backups, and database copies to the fast recovery
area. RMAN automatically manages files in the fast recovery area by deleting obsolete
backups and archive files no longer required for recovery.
Oracle recommends that you create a fast recovery area disk group. Oracle
Clusterware files and Oracle Database files can be placed on the same disk group, and
you can also place fast recovery files in the same disk group. However, Oracle
recommends that you create a separate fast recovery disk group to reduce storage
device contention.
7-22 Database Installation Guide
Enabling and Disabling Database Options After Installation
The fast recovery area is enabled by setting DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE. The
size of the fast recovery area is set with DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE. As a
general rule, the larger the fast recovery area, the more useful it becomes. For ease of
use, Oracle recommends that you create a fast recovery area disk group on storage
devices that can contain at least three days of recovery information. Ideally, the fast
recovery area must be large enough to hold a copy of all of your data files and control
files, the online redo logs, and the archived redo log files needed to recover your
database using the data file backups kept under your retention policy.
Multiple databases can use the same fast recovery area. For example, assume you have
created one fast recovery area disk group on disks with 150 GB of storage, shared by
three different databases. You can set the size of the fast recovery for each database
depending on the importance of each database. For example, if database1 is your
least important database, database2 is of greater importance and database3 is of
greatest importance, then you can set different DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE
settings for each database to meet your retention target for each database: 30 GB for
database1, 50 GB for database2, and 70 GB for database3.
7.10.2 Creating the Fast Recovery Area Disk Group
Use this procedure to create the fast recovery area disk group.
1. Navigate to the Grid home bin directory, and start ASM Configuration Assistant
(ASMCA). For example:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\bin
DRIVE_LETTER:\> asmca
2. ASMCA opens at the Disk Groups tab. Click Create to create a disk group.
3. The Create Disk Groups window opens.
In the Disk Group Name field, enter a descriptive name for the fast recovery area
group. For example: FRA.
In the Redundancy section, select the level of redundancy you want to use.
In the Select Member Disks field, select the eligible disks to be added to the fast
recovery area, and click OK.
4. The Diskgroup Creation window opens to inform you when the disk group
creation is complete. Click OK.
5. Click Exit.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
7.11 Enabling and Disabling Database Options After Installation
When you install Oracle Database, some options are enabled and the others disabled.
You can view the enabled Oracle Database options by querying the V$OPTION view
using SQL*Plus.
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-23
Changing the Oracle Home User Password
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
If you need to enable or disable a particular database feature for an Oracle home, then
use the chopt tool. The chopt tool is a command-line utility that is located in the
ORACLE_HOME\bin directory. The syntax for chopt is as follows:
chopt [ enable | disable] db_option
The possible values for db_option described in the following table.
Table 7-1
Database Options for Chopt Tool Command
Value
Description
oaa
Oracle Advanced Analytics
olap
Oracle OLAP
partitioning
Oracle Partitioning
rat
Oracle Real Application Testing
ode_net
Oracle Database Extensions for .NET
Example 7-6
Running the Chopt Tool
To enable the Oracle Data Mining RDBMS Files option in your Oracle binary files:
1.
Shut down the database with srvctl or SQL*Plus:
srvctl stop database -d myDb
2.
Stop the database service, OracleServiceSID, using the Services program in
Control Panel.
3.
Run the following commands:
cd ORACLE_HOME/bin
chopt enable dm
4.
Start the database service, OracleServiceSID, using the Services program in
Control Panel.
5.
Start up the database:
srvctl start database -d myDb
7.12 Changing the Oracle Home User Password
Oracle Home User Control is a command-line utility that allows an administrator to
update the password for an Oracle Home User.
This tool updates the password for Windows services in the Oracle home. The input
password must match the password for the Windows User Account used as the Oracle
Home User. So, first use the Windows operating system tools to change the Windows
password and then use this tool to update the Windows services in the Oracle home to
use the same password.
7-24 Database Installation Guide
Postinstallation Tasks for SQL Developer
Note:
You must have the Administrator privileges to run this Oracle Home User
Control utility.
Syntax Overview:
The following is the command syntax:
orahomeuserctl list | updpwd [-user username] [-host hostname1, hostname2, . . .] [log logfilename]
where:
•
orahomeuserctl is used to display the Oracle Home User name associated with
the current Oracle home or to update the Oracle Home User password.
•
list displays the Oracle Home User name associated with the current Oracle
home.
•
updpwd prompts for the new password and updates the password for the named
Oracle Service User. The following are the options for updpwd:
–
-user username
This option determines the Oracle Home User name. If this option is not
present, then the user name associated with the current Oracle home is used.
If the named user, be it the username or user of the current Oracle home, is
an MSA or Windows Built-in account, then an error message is displayed and
the command is terminated.
–
-host hostname1, hostname2,. . .
When this option is present, the utility updates the passwords for all the
services belonging to the named Oracle Home User on the specified hosts.
Otherwise, the Oracle Home User Control utility updates the passwords for
all the services belonging to the named Oracle Home User on a specified host
with single instance installation, or updates the passwords for all services
belonging to the named Oracle Home User on all the specified hosts.
When the update completes, the utility displays the number of successful
updates and any services that failed to update with the new password.
–
-log logfilename
This option adds the password update operation results to a log file for every
service name receiving the new password. By default, the log files are located
in the ORACLE_HOME\log directory. If logfilename specifies only a file
name, then the log is stored in the named file in the default directory.
However, if the logfilename contains a path, then that path is used without
modification.
7.13 Postinstallation Tasks for SQL Developer
Learn about the recommended postinstallation tasks for SQL Developer.
See Also: Oracle SQL Developer Installation Guide
Oracle Database Postinstallation Tasks 7-25
Postinstallation Tasks for SQL Developer
•
Migrating User Settings from a Previous Release
•
Migrating Information from Previous Releases
•
Location of User-Related Information
7-26 Database Installation Guide
8
Getting Started with Oracle Database
Learn how to check the installed contents, start various tools, identify, and locate
various files after completing Oracle Database installation.
Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory Location
(page 8-2)
Use Oracle Universal Installer to check the contents and directory
location of your Oracle Database installation.
Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c (page 8-2)
To start Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express, use the EM
Express URL provided by Oracle Database Configuration Assistant
(Oracle DBCA) during the database installation and creation.
Managing Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 8-3)
Describes about starting and stopping Oracle Automatic Storage
Management.
Starting and Stopping an Oracle Database (page 8-4)
Describes about starting and stopping an Oracle database by using any
of the following methods:
Accessing Oracle Database with SQL*Plus (page 8-5)
You can use SQL*Plus to issue SQL and PL/SQL statements to the
Oracle Database.
Accessing Oracle Database with Oracle SQL Developer (page 8-6)
You can use SQL Developer to issue SQL and PL/SQL statements. All
SQL and PL/SQL commands are supported as they are passed directly
from the SQL Worksheet to the Oracle Database.
Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords (page 8-6)
All databases created by the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant
include the SYS, SYSTEM, and DBSNMP database accounts.
Identifying Databases (page 8-12)
The Oracle Database software identifies a database by its global database
name.
Locating the Server Parameter File (page 8-13)
The starter database contains one database initialization response file.
The initialization response file, init.ora.xxxxx, must exist for an
instance to start.
Identifying Tablespaces and Data Files (page 8-13)
An Oracle Database is divided into smaller logical areas of space known
as tablespaces.
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-1
Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory Location
Locating Redo Log Files (page 8-14)
The preconfigured database uses three redo log files. Redo log files
record all changes made to data in the database buffer cache.
Locating Control Files (page 8-15)
The preconfigured database contains two control files located in the
ORACLE_BASE\oradata\DB_NAME directory.
Understanding Oracle Database Services on Windows (page 8-15)
The following Oracle services are automatically started after installation
when you create a database:
8.1 Checking the Installed Oracle Database Contents and Directory
Location
Use Oracle Universal Installer to check the contents and directory location of your
Oracle Database installation.
Follow these steps:
1. From the Start menu, select All Programs, then Oracle - HOMENAME, then Oracle
Installation Products, then Universal Installer.
2. In the Welcome window, click Installed Products to display the Inventory dialog
box.
3. To check the installed contents, find the Oracle Database product in the list.
To find additional information about an installed product, click Details.
4. To check the directory location of the installed contents, click the Environment tab.
5. Click Close to exit the Inventory dialog box.
6. Click Cancel to exit Oracle Universal Installer, then click Yes to confirm.
8.2 Logging In to Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c
To start Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express, use the EM Express URL
provided by Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (Oracle DBCA) during the
database installation and creation.
If Oracle DBCA did not provide the EM Express URL during the database installation
and creation, or if you need to change the EM Express port later on, then see the
following:
See Also:
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA for information about “Starting EM Express”
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA for information about “Accessing the Database
Home Page”
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA for information about “Configuring the HTTP
Port for EM Express"
8-2 Database Installation Guide
Managing Oracle Automatic Storage Management
8.3 Managing Oracle Automatic Storage Management
Describes about starting and stopping Oracle Automatic Storage Management.
Starting and Stopping Oracle Automatic Storage Management (page 8-3)
To start and stop Oracle Automatic Storage Management, in addition to
using SQL*Plus, you can use the srvctl utility.
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Utilities (page 8-3)
To manage Oracle Automatic Storage Management, you can use the
following tools:
8.3.1 Starting and Stopping Oracle Automatic Storage Management
To start and stop Oracle Automatic Storage Management, in addition to using
SQL*Plus, you can use the srvctl utility.
To start Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance using the srvctl utility, run
the following command:
srvctl start asm
To stop Oracle Automatic Storage Management instance using the srvctl utility, run
the following command:
srvctl stop asm
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
8.3.2 Oracle Automatic Storage Management Utilities
To manage Oracle Automatic Storage Management, you can use the following tools:
•
asmcmd: This command-line tool lets you manage Oracle Automatic Storage
Management disk group files and directories.
•
asmtool: This command-line tool is required to stamp the disks to create or
modify disk groups later on after the database installation.
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant: Oracle
Automatic Storage Management Configuration Assistant (ASMCA) is an
interactive utility that enables you to create an Oracle Automatic Storage
Management instance or upgrade existing Oracle Automatic Storage Management
instances. It also enables you to create and configure disk groups, Oracle
Automatic Storage Management volumes and Oracle Automatic Storage
Management File Systems (ASMFS).
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control: If you have Oracle Enterprise Manager
installed, you can use Cloud Control to manage Oracle ASM functions, such as
migrating an existing database to Oracle ASM, checking the status of the Oracle
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-3
Starting and Stopping an Oracle Database
ASM instance, checking the performance of the Oracle ASM disk groups, and
creating or dropping Oracle ASM disk groups.
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c: This utility enables you to
perform basic administrative tasks such as user, performance, memory, and space
management.
•
SQL*Plus: You can use Oracle Automatic Storage Management-specific
commands from this tool. To connect to the Oracle Automatic Storage
Management instance, you use the same methods that you use to connect to an
Oracle Database instance.
See Also:
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
8.4 Starting and Stopping an Oracle Database
Describes about starting and stopping an Oracle database by using any of the
following methods:
Starting and Stopping the Database with Oracle Administration Assistant for
Windows (page 8-4)
Use this procedure to start or stop the database:
Starting and Stopping the Database from the Microsoft Windows Services Utility
(page 8-5)
You can use SQL or srvctl utility to start or stop the database instance.
SRVCTL starts the service automatically.
8.4.1 Starting and Stopping the Database with Oracle Administration Assistant for
Windows
Use this procedure to start or stop the database:
To start or stop the database:
1. From the Start menu, select All Programs, then Oracle - HOMENAME, then
Configuration and Migration Tools, and then Administrative Assistant for
Windows.
2. In the console window, expand the Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows
tree structure.
3. Under Databases, right-click the name of the database, and from the menu, select
from the following options:
•
Connect Database
•
Start Service
•
Disconnect Database
•
Stop Service
•
Startup/Shutdown Options
8-4 Database Installation Guide
Accessing Oracle Database with SQL*Plus
•
Process Information
8.4.2 Starting and Stopping the Database from the Microsoft Windows Services Utility
You can use SQL or srvctl utility to start or stop the database instance. SRVCTL
starts the service automatically.
To use SQL to start the database instance, start the Windows services:
1. From the Start menu, select All Programs, then Administrative Tools, and then
Services.
2. In the Services dialog box, locate the name of the database you want to start or
stop.
3. Right-click the name of the database, and from the menu, select either Start, Stop,
or Pause.
To set its startup properties, right-click Properties, and in the dialog box, select
either Automatic, Manual, or Disabled from the Startup type list.
8.5 Accessing Oracle Database with SQL*Plus
You can use SQL*Plus to issue SQL and PL/SQL statements to the Oracle Database.
This tool enables you to perform the same database management operations, and
query, insert, update, or delete data directly in the database.
To start SQL*Plus, from the Start menu, select All Programs, then Oracle HOMENAME, then Application Development, and then SQL Plus.
Alternatively, at the command line, you can enter the following command at a
Windows command prompt:
C:\> sqlplus /nolog
SQL> CONNECT user_name
Enter password: password
For example, to log on as SYSTEM using the password password, you enter:
C:\> sqlplus /nolog
SQL> CONNECT SYSTEM
Enter password: password
If you are logging on as SYS, you must connect as SYSDBA:
C:\> sqlplus /nolog
SQL> CONNECT SYS AS SYSDBA
Enter password: password
See Also:
•
SQL*Plus User's Guide and Reference
•
SQL*Plus Quick Reference
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-5
Accessing Oracle Database with Oracle SQL Developer
8.6 Accessing Oracle Database with Oracle SQL Developer
You can use SQL Developer to issue SQL and PL/SQL statements. All SQL and
PL/SQL commands are supported as they are passed directly from the SQL
Worksheet to the Oracle Database.
All SQL and PL/SQL commands are supported as they are passed directly from the
SQL Worksheet to the Oracle Database.
To start SQL Developer:
1. From the Start menu, select All Programs, then Oracle - HOMENAME, then
Application Development, and then SQL Developer.
2. If you are prompted to enter the full path name for java.exe, click Browse and find
java.exe. For example, C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_25\bin
\java.exe.
3. Once SQL Developer starts, perform the following steps:
•
Right-click Connections.
•
Select New Connection.
•
In the New/Select Database Connection dialog box, enter a Connection name,
username, password, and for the host string, the name of the database to
which you want to connect.
•
Click Connect.
Once connected, you can view, create, modify, and delete the database objects using
the Connection Navigator or issue any SQL or PL/SQL command using a SQL
Worksheet (From the Tools menu, select SQL Worksheet).
SQL*Plus commands have to be interpreted by the SQL Worksheet before being
passed to the database. The SQL Worksheet currently supports many SQL*Plus
commands. SQL*Plus commands which are not supported by the SQL Worksheet are
ignored and are not sent to the Oracle Database.
See Also:
Oracle SQL Developer User's Guide
8.7 Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords
All databases created by the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant include the SYS,
SYSTEM, and DBSNMP database accounts.
In addition, Oracle provides several other administrative accounts. Before using these
other accounts, you must unlock them and reset their passwords.
Note:
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c to view the complete list
of database accounts.
8-6 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
Reviewing Administrative Accounts (page 8-7)
Describes the administrative user names.
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords (page 8-10)
Passwords for all Oracle system administration accounts except SYS,
SYSTEM, and DBSNMP are revoked after installation.
Related Topics:
Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords (page 8-10)
Passwords for all Oracle system administration accounts except SYS,
SYSTEM, and DBSNMP are revoked after installation.
8.7.1 Reviewing Administrative Accounts
Describes the administrative user names.
Table 8-1
Administrative Accounts
User Name
Description
See Also
ANONYMOUS
Allows HTTP access to Oracle XML DB.
Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
APEX_050000
The account owns the Oracle Application Express
schema and metadata.
Oracle Application Express App Builder
User’s Guide
APEX_PUBLIC_USE
R
The minimally privileged account used for Oracle
Application Express configuration with Oracle
HTTP Server and mod_plsql.
Oracle Application Express Application
Builder User's Guide
APPQOSSYS
Used for storing or managing all data and
metadata required by Oracle Quality of Service
Management.
None
AUDSYS
The account where the unified audit data trail
resides.
Oracle Database Security Guide
CTXSYS
The Oracle Text account.
Oracle Text Reference
DBSNMP
Used by Management Agent of Oracle Enterprise
Manager to monitor and manage the database.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud
Control Administrator's Guide
DIP
Used by Directory Integration Platform (DIP) to
synchronize the changes in Oracle Internet
Directory with the applications in the database.
None
DVF
The account owned by Database Vault that
contains public functions to retrieve the Database
Vault Factor values.
Oracle Database Vault Administrator's
Guide
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-7
Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords
Table 8-1
(Cont.) Administrative Accounts
User Name
Description
See Also
DVSYS
There are two roles associated with this account.
Database Vault owner role manages the Database
Vault roles and configurations. The Database
Vault Account Manager is used to manage
database user accounts.
Oracle Database Vault Administrator's
Guide
Note: Part of Oracle Database Vault user interface
text is stored in database tables in the DVSYS
schema. By default, only the English language is
loaded into these tables. You can use the
DVSYS.DBMS_MACADM.ADD_NLS_DATA
procedure to add other languages to Oracle
Database Vault. See the "Adding Languages to
Oracle Database Vault" section in the Oracle
Database Vault Administrator's Guide
EXFSYS
Owns the Expression Filter schema.
None
FLOWS_FILES
The account owns the Oracle Application Express
uploaded files.
Oracle Application Express App Builder
User’s Guide
GSMADMIN_INTERN
AL
The internal account that owns the Global Data
Services schema. It must not be unlocked or used
for a database login.
Oracle Database Global Data Services
Concepts and Administration Guide
GSMCATUSER
The account used by Global Service Manager to
connect to the Global Data Services catalog.
Oracle Database Global Data Services
Concepts and Administration Guide
GSMUSER
The account used by Global Service Manager to
connect to the database.
Oracle Database Global Data Services
Concepts and Administration Guide
HR
Owns the Human Resources schema included in
the Oracle Sample Schemas. It is available only if
you loaded the Sample Schemas.
Oracle Database Sample Schemas
LBACSYS
The Oracle Label Security administrator account.
Oracle Label Security Administrator’s
Guide
MDDATA
The schema used by Oracle Spatial and Graph for
storing geocoder and router data.
Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's
Guide
MDSYS
The Oracle Spatial and Graph, and Oracle
Multimedia Locator administrator account.
Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's
Guide
ORACLE_OCM
This account contains the instrumentation for
configuration collection used by the Oracle
Configuration Manager.
Oracle Configuration Manager
Installation and Administration Guide
ORDDATA
This account contains the Oracle Multimedia
DICOM data model.
Oracle Multimedia DICOM Developer's
Guide
8-8 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords
Table 8-1
(Cont.) Administrative Accounts
User Name
Description
See Also
ORDPLUGINS
The Oracle Multimedia user. Plug-ins supplied
by Oracle and third party plug-ins are installed in
this schema.
Oracle Multimedia User's Guide
ORDSYS
The Oracle Multimedia administrator account.
Oracle Multimedia User's Guide
OUTLN
Centrally manages metadata associated with
stored outlines. Supports plan stability, which
enables maintenance of the same execution plans
for the same SQL statements.
None
REMOTE_SCHEDULE
R_AGENT
The account to disable remote jobs on a database.
Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide
SI_INFORMTN_SCH
EMA
Stores the information views for the SQL/MM
Still Image Standard.
Oracle Multimedia User's Guide
SPATIAL_CSW_ADM
IN_USR
The Catalog Services for the Web (CSW) account.
It is used by the Oracle Spatial and Graph CSW
cache manager to load all record type metadata,
and record instances from the database into the
main memory for the record types that are
cached.
Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's
Guide
SPATIAL_WFS_ADM
IN_USR
The Web Feature Service (WFS) account. It is
used by the Oracle Spatial and Graph WFS cache
manager to load all feature-type metadata, and
feature instances from the database into main
memory for the feature types that are cached.
Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's
Guide
SYS
Used for performing database administration
tasks.
Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide
SYSBACKUP
The account used to perform backup and
recovery tasks.
Oracle Database Installation Guide
The account used to administer and monitor
Oracle Data Guard.
Oracle Database Installation Guide
The account used to perform encryption key
management.
Oracle Database Installation Guide
The account used to perform a limited set of
administrative tasks to create a separate group of
operating system users.
Oracle Database Installation Guide
The account used to administer Remote
Management Framework, including the remote
Automatic Workload Repository (AWR).
Oracle Database Performance Tuning
Guide
SYSDG
SYSKM
SYSRAC
SYS$UMF
(this guide)
(this guide)
(this guide)
(this guide)
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-9
Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords
Table 8-1
(Cont.) Administrative Accounts
User Name
Description
See Also
SYSTEM
Used for performing database administration
tasks.
Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide
WMSYS
The account used to store the metadata
information for Oracle Workspace Manager.
Oracle Database Workspace Manager
Developer's Guide
XDB
Used for storing Oracle XML DB data and
metadata.
Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Database Platform Guide for Microsoft Windows
8.7.2 Unlocking and Resetting User Passwords
Passwords for all Oracle system administration accounts except SYS, SYSTEM, and
DBSNMP are revoked after installation.
Before you use a locked account, you must unlock it and reset its password. If you
created a preconfigured database during the installation, but you did not unlock
accounts required to use the database, then you must unlock and reset those accounts
using these procedures.
Apply the following guidelines when specifying passwords:
•
Passwords must be between 8 and 30 characters long.
•
Passwords must not start with a numeral.
•
Password cannot contain invalid characters: ! @ % ^ & * ( ) + = \ | ` ~ [ { ] } ; : ' " , <
>?
•
Passwords must not be the same as the user name.
•
Passwords must not be Oracle reserved words.
•
The SYS account password cannot be change_on_install. (case-insensitive)
•
The SYSTEM account password cannot be manager. (case-insensitive)
•
The SYSMAN account password cannot be sysman. (case-insensitive)
•
The DBSNMP account password cannot be dbsnmp. (case-insensitive)
•
If you choose to use the same password for all the accounts, then that password
cannot be change_on_install, manager, sysman, or dbsnmp. (caseinsensitive)
•
Passwords must have at least one alphabetic, one numeric, and one special
character.
8-10 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing User Accounts and Passwords
•
Passwords must not be simple or obvious words, such as welcome, account,
database, and user.
Note:
If you select the option to create the database as a multitenant container
database, then you must provide the pluggable database administrator
password.
If you created a starter database during the installation, but you did not unlock the
required account, unlock the account using one of the following methods:
•
Using Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c to Unlock Accounts and Reset
Passwords (page 8-11)
•
Using SQL*Plus to Unlock and Change Passwords (page 8-11)
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
Using Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c to Unlock Accounts and Reset
Passwords (page 8-11)
Use this procedure to unlock and reset user account passwords using
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c.
Using SQL*Plus to Unlock and Change Passwords (page 8-11)
Use this SQL*Plus procedure to unlock and reset user account
passwords.
8.7.2.1 Using Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c to Unlock Accounts and
Reset Passwords
Use this procedure to unlock and reset user account passwords using Oracle
Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c.
To unlock and reset user account passwords:
See Also:
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
Tip:
Click Help in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c window
for more information
8.7.2.2 Using SQL*Plus to Unlock and Change Passwords
Use this SQL*Plus procedure to unlock and reset user account passwords.
To change a password after installation:
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-11
Identifying Databases
1. Start SQL*Plus:
C:\> sqlplus /nolog
2. Connect as SYSDBA:
SQL> CONNECT SYS AS SYSDBA
Enter password: SYS_password
3. Enter a command similar to the following, where account is the user account to
unlock and password is the new password:
SQL> ALTER USER account IDENTIFIED BY password ACCOUNT UNLOCK;
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Security Guide
•
Oracle Database SQL Language Reference
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
8.8 Identifying Databases
The Oracle Database software identifies a database by its global database name.
A global database name consists of the database name and database domain. Usually,
the database domain is the same as the network domain, but it need not be. The global
database name uniquely distinguishes a database from any other database in the same
network. You specify the global database name when you create a database during the
installation, or when using Oracle Database Configuration Assistant.
The database name input field is used to set the DB_NAME, DB_UNIQUE_NAME, and
DB_DOMAIN Oracle initialization parameter values.
For example:
sales_world.example.com
In this example:
•
sales_world is the name of the database. The database name
(DB_UNIQUE_NAME) portion is a string of no more than 30 characters that can
contain ASCII alphanumeric, underscore (_), dollar ($), and pound (#) characters
but must begin with an alphabetic character. No other special characters are
permitted in a database name.
•
sales_wo is the DB_NAME. The DB_NAME initialization parameter specifies a
database identifier of up to eight characters.
•
example.com is the network domain in which the database is located. Together,
the database name and the network domain make the global database name
unique. The domain portion is a string of no more than 128 characters that can
contain alphanumeric, underscore (_), and pound (#) characters. The DB_DOMAIN
initialization parameter specifies the domain name.
However, the DB_NAME parameter need not necessarily be the first eight characters of
DB_UNIQUE_NAME.
8-12 Database Installation Guide
Locating the Server Parameter File
The DB_UNIQUE_NAME parameter and the DB_DOMAIN name parameter combine to
create the global database name value assigned to the SERVICE_NAMES parameter in
the initialization parameter file.
The System Identifier (SID) identifies a specific database instance. The SID uniquely
distinguishes the instance from any other instance on the same computer. Each
database instance requires a unique SID and database name.
For example, if the SID and database name for an Oracle database are ORCL, then each
database file is located in the ORACLE_BASE\oradata\orcl directory, and the
initialization response file is located in the ORACLE_BASE\admin\orcl\pfile
directory.
See Also:
Oracle Database Reference
8.9 Locating the Server Parameter File
The starter database contains one database initialization response file. The
initialization response file, init.ora.xxxxx, must exist for an instance to start.
A response file is a text file that contains a list of instance configuration parameters.
The starter database init.ora file has preconfigured parameters. You must not edit
this file to use the starter database.
The server parameter file (SPFILE) is created from the initialization response file, then
the initialization response file is renamed. The SPFILE file name is spfileSID.ora
and is located in the ORACLE_HOME\database directory.
To use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c to view the location of the
server parameter file and list the initialization parameters, see the "Viewing and
Modifying Initialization Parameters" section in Oracle Database 2 Day DBA.
See Also:
Click Help in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c window
for more information
See Also: Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
8.10 Identifying Tablespaces and Data Files
An Oracle Database is divided into smaller logical areas of space known as
tablespaces.
Each tablespace corresponds to one or more physical data files. Data files contain the
contents of logical database structures such as tables and indexes. A data file can be
associated with only one tablespace and database.
Note:
The SYSAUX and SYSTEM tablespaces must be present in all Oracle Database
12c databases.
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-13
Locating Redo Log Files
The following table lists the tablespaces and data files in the Oracle Database. By
default, the data files are located in the ORACLE_BASE\oradata\DB_NAME directory:
Table 8-2
Tablespaces and Data Files
Tablespace
Data File
Description
EXAMPLE
EXAMPLE01.DBF
Stores the Sample Schemas, if you included them.
SYSAUX
SYSAUX01.DBF
Serves as an auxiliary tablespace to the SYSTEM
tablespace. Some products and options that previously
used the SYSTEM tablespace now use the SYSAUX
tablespace to reduce the load on the SYSTEM tablespace.
SYSTEM
SYSTEM01.DBF
Stores the data dictionary, including definitions of
tables, views, and stored procedures needed by the
Oracle Database. Information in this area is maintained
automatically.
TEMP
TEMP01.DBF
Stores temporary tables and indexes created during the
processing of your SQL statement. If you run a SQL
statement that involves a lot of sorting, such as the
constructs GROUP BY, ORDER BY, or DISTINCT, then you
must expand this tablespace.
UNDOTBS
UNDOTBS01.DBF
Stores undo information. This contains one or more
undo segments that maintain transaction history that is
used to roll back, or undo, changes to the database.
All starter databases are configured to run in automatic
undo management mode.
USERS
USERS01.DBF
Stores database objects created by database users.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Concepts
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
8.11 Locating Redo Log Files
The preconfigured database uses three redo log files. Redo log files record all changes
made to data in the database buffer cache.
If an instance fails, then Oracle Database uses the redo log files to recover the modified
data in memory.
Oracle Database uses redo log files in a cyclical fashion. For example, if three files
constitute the online redo log, Oracle Database fills the first file, then the second file,
and then the third file. In the next cycle, it reuses and fills the first file, the second file,
and so on.
8-14 Database Installation Guide
Locating Control Files
See Also:
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA about Viewing Online Redo Log File
Information
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA about Viewing Archived Redo Log File
Information
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA
•
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
8.12 Locating Control Files
The preconfigured database contains two control files located in the ORACLE_BASE
\oradata\DB_NAME directory.
The preconfigured database contains two control files located in the ORACLE_BASE
\oradata\DB_NAME directory. Oracle recommends that you keep at least two control
files (on separate physical drives) for each database, and set the CONTROL_FILES
initialization parameter to list each control file.
A control file is an administrative file. Oracle Database 12c requires a control file to
start and run the database. The control file defines the physical structure of the
database. For example, it defines the database name and the names and locations of
the database data files and redo log files.
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
For more information about using Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c to
perform various tasks related to tablespaces and data files, redo log files, and control
files, click Help in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express window.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Database 2 Day DBA for information about “Viewing Control File”
8.13 Understanding Oracle Database Services on Windows
The following Oracle services are automatically started after installation when you
create a database:
•
OracleServiceSID (Oracle Database service)
•
OracleHOMENAMETNSListener (Oracle Database listener service)
If you configured Oracle Automatic Storage Management, then the
OracleOHService and OracleASMService+ASM services are listed as well.
Getting Started with Oracle Database 8-15
Understanding Oracle Database Services on Windows
However, other services for networking or other individual components may not
automatically start.
8-16 Database Installation Guide
9
Removing Oracle Database Software
Learn how to remove Oracle software and configuration files.
You can remove Oracle software either by using Oracle Universal Installer with the
deinstall option, or by using the deinstallation tool (deinstall) that is included
in Oracle homes. Oracle does not support the removal of individual products or
components related to the specified Oracle home. It includes information about
removing Oracle software using the deinstallation tool.
The deinstallation tool removes standalone Oracle Database installations, Oracle
Clusterware and Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) from your
server, as well as Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC), and Oracle Database
client installations.
Oracle recommends that you use the deinstallation tool to remove the entire Oracle
home associated with the Oracle Database, Oracle Clusterware, Oracle ASM, Oracle
RAC, or Oracle Database client installation. Oracle does not support the removal of
individual products or components.
Caution:
If you have a standalone database on a node in a cluster and you have
multiple databases with the same global database name (GDN), then you
cannot use the deinstallation tool to remove one database only.
Caution:
You must use the deinstallation tool from the same release to remove Oracle
software. Do not run the deinstallation tool from a later release to remove
Oracle software from an earlier release. For example, do not run the
deinstallation tool from the 12.2.0.1 installation media to remove Oracle
software from an existing 11.2.0.4 Oracle home.
About Oracle Deinstallation Options (page 9-2)
Using Oracle Universal Installer with the deinstall option, or running the
deinstallation tool from the Oracle home, stops and removes Oracle
software and it's components, such as database and configuration files
for a specific Oracle home.
Example of Running the Deinstallation Tool (page 9-6)
If you perform a deinstallation by running the setup.exe command
with the -deinstall option from the installation media, then the help
displays.
Removing Oracle Database Software 9-1
About Oracle Deinstallation Options
Deinstallation Examples for Oracle Database (page 9-6)
Examples of running deinstallation using OUI (runinstaller) or as a
standalone tool (deinstall).
Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Database (page 9-7)
You can run the deinstallation tool with the -paramfile option to use
the values you specify in the response file.
Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Grid Infrastructure (page 9-7)
You can run the deinstallation tool with the -paramfile option to use
the values you specify in the response file.
Downgrading Oracle Restart (page 9-9)
Use this procedure to deconfigure and downgrade Oracle Restart, or to
troubleshoot Oracle Restart if you receive an error during installation.
See Also:
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation and Upgrade Guide for Microsoft
Windows x64 (64-Bit)
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows x64
(64-Bit)
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
9.1 About Oracle Deinstallation Options
Using Oracle Universal Installer with the deinstall option, or running the
deinstallation tool from the Oracle home, stops and removes Oracle software and it's
components, such as database and configuration files for a specific Oracle home.
You can remove the following software using Oracle Universal Installer or the Oracle
deinstallation tool:
•
Oracle Database
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure, which includes Oracle Clusterware and Oracle
Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM)
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC)
•
Oracle Database Client
Starting with Oracle Database 12c, the deinstallation tool is integrated with the
database installation media. You can run the deinstallation tool using the
runInstaller command with the -deinstall and -home options from the base
directory of the Oracle Database, Oracle Database Client, or Oracle Grid Infrastructure
installation media.
The deinstallation tool is also available as a separate command (deinstall) in Oracle
home directories after installation, and is located in the following directory:
ORACLE_HOME\deinstall
The deinstallation tool uses the information you provide, plus information gathered
from the software home to create a response file. You can alternatively supply a
9-2 Database Installation Guide
About Oracle Deinstallation Options
response file generated previously by the deinstall command using the –
checkonly option, or by editing the response file template.
Using Oracle Universal Installer with the deinstall option, or running the
deinstallation tool from the Oracle home, stops and removes Oracle software and its
components, such as database and configuration files for a specific Oracle home.
If the software in the Oracle home is not running (for example, after an unsuccessful
installation), then the deinstallation tool cannot determine the configuration, and you
must provide all the configuration details either interactively or in a response file.
In addition, before you run the deinstallation tool for Oracle Grid Infrastructure
installations, ensure that you meet the following guidelines:
•
Dismount Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle
ACFS) and disable Oracle Automatic Storage Management Dynamic Volume
Manager (Oracle ADVM).
•
If Grid Naming Service (GNS) is in use, then notify your DNS administrator to
delete the subdomain entry from the DNS.
Caution:
When you install Oracle Database, if the central inventory contains no other
registered homes besides the home that you are deconfiguring and removing,
then the Deinstallation tool removes the following files and directory contents
in the Oracle base directory of the Oracle Database installation owner:
•
admin
•
cfgtoollogs
•
checkpoints
•
diag
•
oradata
•
flash_recovery_area
Oracle strongly recommends that you configure your installations using an
Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) configuration, and that you reserve
Oracle base and Oracle home paths for exclusive use of Oracle software. If you
have any user data in these locations in the Oracle base that is owned by the
user account that owns the Oracle software, then the deinstallation tool deletes
this data.
The deinstallation tool deletes Oracle Database configuration files, user data,
and fast recovery area (FRA) files even if they are located outside of the Oracle
base directory path.
Oracle recommends that you run the deinstallation tool as the Oracle software
installation owner. The default method for running the deinstallation tool is from the
deinstall directory in the Oracle home as the installation owner:
ORACLE_HOME\deinstall
DRIVE_LETTER:\> deinstall\deinstall.bat
The command uses the following syntax, where variable content is indicated by italics:
Removing Oracle Database Software 9-3
About Oracle Deinstallation Options
deinstall.bat [-silent] [-checkonly]
[-paramfile complete path of input parameter property file] [-params name1=value
name2=value . . .]
[-o complete path of directory for saving files] [-help]
[-tmpdir complete path of temporary directory to use]
[-logdir complete path of log directory to use] [-help]
To run the deinstallation tool from the database installation media, use the
setup.exe command with the -deinstall option, followed by the -home option to
specify the path of the Oracle home you want to remove using the following syntax,
where variable content is indicated in italics:
setup.exe -deinstall -home complete path of Oracle home [-silent] [-checkonly] [local]
[-paramfile complete path of input parameter property file] [-params name1=value
name2=value . . .] [-o complete path of directory for saving files] [-help]
[-tmpdir complete path of temporary directory to use]
[-logdir complete path of log directory to use] [-help]
Provide information about your servers as prompted or accept the defaults.
Note:
If User Account Control is enabled, then you must create a desktop shortcut to
a DOS command window. Open the command window through the Run as
administrator, right-click context menu, and start the deinstallation tool.
In addition, you can run the deinstallation tool from other locations, or with a
response file, or select other options to run the tool.
•
-home
Use this flag to indicate the home path of the Oracle home to check or deinstall. To
deinstall Oracle software using the deinstall command, located in the Oracle
home you plan to deinstall, provide a response file in a location outside the Oracle
home, and do not use the -home flag.
If you run the deinstallation tool from the ORACLE_HOME\deinstall path, then
the -home flag is not required because the tool identifies the location of the home
where it is run. If you run the tool using setup.exe -deinstall from the
installation media, then -home is mandatory.
•
-silent
Use this flag to run the deinstallation tool in a noninteractive mode. This option
requires one of the following:
–
A working system that it can access to determine the installation and
configuration information. The -silent flag does not work with failed
installations.
–
A response file that contains the configuration values for the Oracle home
that is being deinstalled or deconfigured.
You can generate a response file to use or modify by running the tool with the checkonly flag. The tool then discovers information from the Oracle home to
9-4 Database Installation Guide
About Oracle Deinstallation Options
deinstall and deconfigure. It generates the response file that you can then use with
the -silent option.
You can also modify the template file deinstall.rsp.tmpl, located in the
ORACLE_HOME\deinstall\response directory.
•
-checkonly
Use this flag to check the status of the Oracle software home configuration.
Running the deinstallation tool with the -checkonly flag does not remove the
Oracle configuration. The -checkonly flag generates a response file that you can
then use with the deinstallation tool and -silent option.
•
-paramfile complete path of input parameter property file
Use this flag to run the deinstallation tool with a response file in a location other
than the default. When you use this flag, provide the complete path where the
response file is located.
The default location of the response file depends on the location of the
deinstallation tool:
•
–
From the installation media or stage location: \response
–
After installation from the installed Oracle home: \deinstall\response.
-params ["name1=value" "name2=value" "name3=value" . . .]
Use this flag with a response file to override one or more values to change it in a
response file you have created.
•
-o complete path of directory for saving response file
Use this flag to provide a path other than the default location where the response
file is saved. The default location is \response\deinstall.rsp.tmpl.
The default location of the response file depends on the location of deinstallation
tool:
•
–
From the installation media or stage location before installation: \response
–
After installation from the installed Oracle home: ORACLE_HOME/
deinstall/response.
-tmpdir complete path of temporary directory
Specifies a non-default location where Oracle Deinstallation Tool writes the
temporary files for the deinstallation.
•
-logdir complete path of log directory
Specifies a non-default location where Oracle Deinstallation Tool writes the log
files for the deinstallation.
•
-help
Use the help option (-help ) to obtain additional information about the command
optional flags.
Removing Oracle Database Software 9-5
Example of Running the Deinstallation Tool
Related Topics:
Managing User Accounts with User Account Control (page 4-12)
To ensure that only trusted applications run on your computer, the
Windows operating systems that support Oracle Database, provide User
Account Control.
See Also:
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows x64 (64Bit) for information about the -local option
9.2 Example of Running the Deinstallation Tool
If you perform a deinstallation by running the setup.exe command with the deinstall option from the installation media, then the help displays.
Enter the-home flag and provide the path to the home directory of the Oracle software
to remove from your system.
Use the optional flag -paramfile to provide a path to a response file.
In the following example, the setup.exe command is in the path
\directory_path, where directory_path is the path to the database directory
on the installation media, and C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1 is the
path to the Oracle home which is removed:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd \directory_path
DRIVE_LETTER:\> setup.exe -deinstall -home C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
The following example uses a response file in the software owner location C:
\Documents and Settings\oracle\:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd \directory_path
DRIVE_LETTER:\> setup.exe -deinstall -paramfile C:\Documents and Settings\oracle
\my_db_paramfile.tmpl
9.3 Deinstallation Examples for Oracle Database
Examples of running deinstallation using OUI (runinstaller) or as a standalone
tool (deinstall).
If you run the deinstallation tool using runinstaller -deinstall from the
installation media, then the help displays unless you enter a -home flag and provide a
path to the home directory of the Oracle software to remove from your system.
Use the optional flag -paramfile to provide a path to a response file.
You can generate a deinstallation response file by running the deinstallation tool with
the -checkonly flag. Alternatively, you can use the response file template located at
DRIVE_LETTER:\> ORACLE_HOME/deinstall/response/
deinstall.rsp.tmpl.
In the following example, the deinstall command is in the path C:\app\oracle
\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1\deinstall, and it uses a response file in the
software owner location C:\Documents and Settings\oracle\:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1\deinstall\
DRIVE_LETTER:\> deinstall.bat -paramfile %HOMEPATH%\my_db_paramfile.tmpl
9-6 Database Installation Guide
Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Database
For the grid infrastructure home, use the deinstallation script (deinstall.bat) in
the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) home, which in
this example is C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid:
DRIVE_LETTER:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\deinstall\
DRIVE_LETTER:\> deinstall.bat -paramfile %HOMEPATH%\my_grid_paramfile.tmpl
9.4 Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Database
You can run the deinstallation tool with the -paramfile option to use the values you
specify in the response file.
The following is an example of a response file, in which the Oracle Database binary
owner is oracle, the Oracle Database home (Oracle home) is in the path C:\app
\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1, the Oracle base (where other Oracle
software is installed) is C:\app\oracle, the Oracle Inventory home is C:\Program
Files\Oracle\Inventory, and the local node (the node where you run the
deinstallation session from) is myserver:
#Copyright (c) 1998, 2015 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
ORACLE_HOME=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
ORACLE_BASE.orcl=C:\app\oracle
FLASH_RECOVERY_LOC.orcl=C:\app\oracle\flash_recovery_area\ORCL
STORAGE_TYPE.orcl=FS
DB_TYPE.orcl=SI_DB
NETCA_LOCAL_LISTENERS=LISTENER
LOGDIR=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1\deinstall\logs\
NODE_LIST.orcl=myserver
ObaseCleanupPtrLoc=\tmp\deinstall2012-06-12_09-14-11AM\orabase_cleanup.lst
ARCHIVE_LOG_DESTINATION_LOC.orcl=
ORACLE_BASE=C:\app\oracle
DUMP_DESTINATION_LOC.orcl=C:\app\oracle\admin\orcl
LOCAL_SID.orcl=orcl
INVENTORY_LOCATION=C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory
RAW_MAPPING_FILE.orcl=
SID_LIST.orcl=orcl
DB_UNIQUE_NAME_LIST=orcl
DATAFILE_LOC.orcl=C:\app\oracle\oradata\orcl, C:\app\oracle\fast_recovery_area\orcl
HOME_TYPE=SIDB
CRS_HOME=false
CREATION_MODE.orcl=y
CONFIGFILE_LOC.orcl=
ORACLE_BINARY_OK=true
DIAG_DEST.orcl=C:\app\oracle\diag\rdbms\orcl
LOCAL_NODE=myserver
local=false
SPFILE_LOC.orcl=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1\dbs\spfileorcl.ora
inventory_loc=C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory
MinimumSupportedVersion=11.2.0.1.0
silent=false
DBCA_LOG.orcl=C:\app\oracle\cfgtoollogs\dbca\orcl
ORACLE_HOME=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
CCR_CONFIG_STATUS=CCR_DEL_HOME
EMCA_LOG.orcl=C:\app\oracle\cfgtoollogs\emca\orcl
ORACLE_HOME_VERSION_VALID=true
9.5 Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Grid Infrastructure
You can run the deinstallation tool with the -paramfile option to use the values you
specify in the response file.
Removing Oracle Database Software 9-7
Deinstallation Response File Example for Oracle Grid Infrastructure
The following is an example of a response file, in which the Oracle grid infrastructure
binary owner is oracle, the Oracle grid infrastructure home is in the path D:\app
\oracle, the Oracle base (where other Oracle software is installed) is D:\app
\12.2.0\, the central Oracle inventory home (oraInventory) is , the local node
(the node where C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory you are run the
deinstallation session from) is myserver:
# Copyright (c) 1998, 2015 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
ORACLE_HOME=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
LOCAL_NODE=myserver
HOME_TYPE=SIHA
ASM_REDUNDANCY=EXTERNAL
ORACLE_BASE=C:\app\oracle\
ObaseCleanupPtrLoc=C:\Users\oracle\AppData\Local\Temp\deinstall2013-01-28_05-03-31AM
\utl\orabase_cleanup.lst
SCAN_PORT=0
silent=false
ASM_UPGRADE=false
ORA_CRS_HOME=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
MinimumSupportedVersion=11.2.0.1.0
GPNPCONFIGDIR=$ORACLE_HOME
LOGDIR=C:\Users\username\logs\
ORACLE_HOME_VERSION_VALID=true
GPNPGCONFIGDIR=$ORACLE_HOME
ORACLE_OWNER=username
ISROLLING=true
CRS_STORAGE_OPTION=0
ORACLE_BINARY_OK=true
MGMT_DB=false
NETCA_LISTENERS_REGISTERED_WITH_HAS=LISTENER
ASM_AU_SIZE=1
HUB_SIZE=0
ASM_ORACLE_BASE=C:\app\oracle
ORA_DBA_GROUP=
JREDIR=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\jdk\jre\
USER_IGNORED_PREREQ=false
ASM_DISK_GROUPS="+DATA"
ORA_ASM_GROUP=
LANGUAGE_ID=AMERICAN_AMERICA.WE8MSWIN1252
CSS_LEASEDURATION=400
ASM_HOME=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
ASM_DIAGNOSTIC_DEST=C:\app\oracle\product\OB
TZ=America/Denver
WindowsRegistryCleanupList=C:\Users\oracle\AppData\Local\Temp
\deinstall2013-01-28_05-03-31AM\utl\registry_cleanup.lst
REUSEDG=false
SILENT=false
local=false
INVENTORY_LOCATION=C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory
GNS_CONF=false
BIG_CLUSTER=false
LISTENER_USERNAME=domainname\oracle
ASM_DISKS=\\.\ORCLDISKDATA0
ORACLE_HOME=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid
CRS_HOME=true
ASM_IN_HOME=true
CRFHOME="C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid"
ASM_DROP_DISKGROUPS=true
OLD_ACTIVE_ORACLE_HOME=
ASM_LOCAL_SID=+ASM
JLIBDIR=C:\app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\jlib
9-8 Database Installation Guide
Downgrading Oracle Restart
VNDR_CLUSTER=false
ASM_DISK_GROUP=DATA
9.6 Downgrading Oracle Restart
Use this procedure to deconfigure and downgrade Oracle Restart, or to troubleshoot
Oracle Restart if you receive an error during installation.
To downgrade Oracle Restart, you must first downgrade Oracle Database, deconfigure
Oracle Restart, and then reconfigure Oracle Restart.
Also, running the perl.exe roothas.pl-deconfig -force with the command
flags -deconfig -force enables you to deconfigure Oracle Restart without removing the
installed binaries. By running perl.exe roothas.pl-deconfig -force, you can
deconfigure Oracle Restart.
Note:
Stop any databases, services, and listeners that may be installed and running
before deconfiguring and downgrading Oracle Restart.
1. Log in as a member of the Administrators group and go to the directory
Grid_home\bin, where Grid_home is the path to the Oracle Grid Infrastructure
for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) home.
2. Downgrade the Oracle Restart resources:
srvct1 downgrade database -d db_unique_name -o oracle_home -t
to_version
3. Go to the Grid_home\crs\install directory:
C: \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\crs\install
4. Run perl.exe roothas.pl -deconfig -force with the -deconfig -force
flags to deconfigure Oracle Restart.
roothas.pl -deconfig -force
5. Deinstall Oracle Restart using the deinstallation tool (deinstall).
6. Run perl.exe root.pl manually in the earlier release Oracle Restart home to
configure Oracle Restart.
If you do not have an earlier release Oracle Restart on your system, then perform
an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) installation
for the respective release to install Oracle Restart.
Removing Oracle Database Software 9-9
Downgrading Oracle Restart
9-10 Installation Guide
A
Installing Java Access Bridge
Learn how to install Java Access Bridge 2.0.2. Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 enables use of a
screen reader with Oracle components:
Overview of Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 (page A-1)
Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 enables assistive technologies to read Java
applications running on the Windows platform.
Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 (page A-1)
Learn how to install and configure Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 for Windows
after installing Oracle components.
A.1 Overview of Java Access Bridge 2.0.2
Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 enables assistive technologies to read Java applications
running on the Windows platform.
Assistive technologies can read Java-based interfaces, such as Oracle Universal
Installer and Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express.
For a list of supported system configurations, including supported versions of
Microsoft Windows and Java SE, see section "Supported System Configuration"
available at the following link location:
http://docs.oracle.com
During installation, Oracle Universal Installer uses the Java Runtime Environment
(JRE) 1.8 contained in an Oracle Database installation media. The JRE enables the use
of Java Access Bridge during installation.
Related Topics:
Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 (page A-1)
Learn how to install and configure Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 for Windows
after installing Oracle components.
A.2 Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2
Learn how to install and configure Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 for Windows after
installing Oracle components.
To set up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2 on a Windows 64-bit operating system, follow these
steps:
1. Go to Java Standard Edition 2 (Java SE) Downloads page to download the latest
build of JDK 8:
http://docs.oracle.com
Installing Java Access Bridge A-1
Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2
2. Install JDK 8 after accepting the Oracle license agreement.
Note:
You must have administrator privileges to install JDK on Windows.
3. Download and install screen reader, JAWS:
http://www.freedomscientific.com/downloads/jaws/JAWSdownloads.asp
4. Press Windows key+U to open the Ease of Access Center, and select Use the
computer without a display.
5. Select Enable Accessbridge check box. Click Save to save the changes.
6. Download Java Access Bridge 2.0.2:
http://docs.oracle.com
Download the accessbridge-2_0_2-fcs-bin-b06.zip file, after accepting
the Oracle license agreement.
7. Extract accessbridge-2.0.2 to a directory on your system where you plan to
install Java Access Bridge. For example, name the directory as follows:
AB_HOME
8. Copy AB_HOME\WindowsAccessBridge-64.dll to c:\windows\system32
and start the screen reader.
9. Open the command prompt and navigate to setup.exe file.
10. Run the following command once you are in the Disk1 directory:
setup.exe
Oracle Universal Installer starts and JAWS is able to read all prompts and controls
on the screen.
11. Once you click the Install button, you must open Windows Explorer to see the
directory where the database is installed (DRIVE_LETTER:\app\username
\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1), until the JDK folder is created. Once the JDK
folder is created, you must copy the files from the Java Access Bridge source
location to the JDK destination folder. Copying these files enables accessibility for
both the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant and Oracle Net Configuration
Assistant.
Table A-1
Copy Files to JDK Directory on Windows 64-Bit
Copy
To
AB_HOME\JavaAccessBridge-64.dll
dbhome_1\jdk\jre\bin
AB_HOME\JAWTAccessBridge-64.dll
dbhome_1\jdk\jre\bin
AB_HOME\Accessibility.properties
dbhome_1\jdk\jre\lib
AB_HOME\Access-bridge-64.jar
dbhome_1\jdk\jre\lib\ext
A-2 Database Installation Guide
Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2
Table A-1
(Cont.) Copy Files to JDK Directory on Windows 64-Bit
Copy
To
AB_HOME\jaccess.jar
dbhome_1\jdk\jre\lib\ext
Installing Java Access Bridge A-3
Setting Up Java Access Bridge 2.0.2
A-4 Installation Guide
B
Optimal Flexible Architecture
Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) rules are a set of configuration guidelines
created to ensure well-organized Oracle installations, which simplifies administration,
support and maintenance.
About the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard (page B-1)
Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) rules help you to organize
database software and configure databases to allow multiple databases,
of different versions, owned by different users to coexist.
Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database (page B-2)
The Optimal Flexible Architecture recommended Oracle home path is
similar to the following:
Directory Tree Differences by Release (page B-3)
Optimal Flexible Architecture has necessitated changes to the Oracle
Database directory tree.
Optimal Flexible Architecture Directory Naming Conventions (page B-3)
Optimal Flexible Architecture uses directory naming conventions that
make it easy to identify the precise Oracle home and database name that
is associated with a set of files.
Optimal Flexible Architecture and Multiple Oracle Home Configurations
(page B-6)
Learn about the various Optimal Flexible Architecture and multiple
Oracle homes configurations.
Comparison Between Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and UNIX
(page B-8)
You can implement Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and
UNIX in a similar manner.
Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure File Mapping (page B-10)
The following table shows a hierarchical file mapping for the log files of
a sample Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant installation in the
orcl database:
B.1 About the Optimal Flexible Architecture Standard
Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) rules help you to organize database
software and configure databases to allow multiple databases, of different versions,
owned by different users to coexist.
In earlier Oracle Database releases, the OFA rules provided optimal system
performance by isolating fragmentation and minimizing contention. In current
releases, OFA rules provide consistency in database management and support, and
Optimal Flexible Architecture B-1
Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database
simplifies expanding or adding databases, or adding additional hardware. By default,
Oracle Universal Installer places Oracle Database components in directory locations
and with permissions in compliance with the OFA rules. Oracle recommends that you
configure all Oracle components on the installation media in accordance with the OFA
guidelines. Oracle recommends that you accept the OFA default.
About Multiple Oracle Homes Support (page B-2)
Oracle Database supports multiple Oracle homes.
B.1.1 About Multiple Oracle Homes Support
Oracle Database supports multiple Oracle homes.
You can install this release or earlier releases of the software more than once on the
same system, in different Oracle home directories.
Careful selection of mount point names can make Oracle software easier to administer.
Configuring multiple Oracle homes in compliance with the Optimal Flexible
Architecture (OFA) rules provides the following advantages:
•
You can install this release, or earlier releases of the software, more than once on
the same system, in different Oracle home directories. However, you cannot
install products from one release of Oracle Database into an Oracle home
directory of a different release. For example, you cannot install Oracle Database
12c software into an existing Oracle 11g Oracle home directory
•
Oracle Database Client can be installed in the same Oracle Database home if both
products are at the same release level. For example, you can install Oracle
Database Client 12.1.0.1 into an existing Oracle Database 12.1.0.1 home, but you
cannot install Oracle Database Client 12.1.0.1 into an existing Oracle Database
12.1.0.2 home. If you apply a patch set before installing the client, then you must
apply the patch set again.
•
Structured organization of directories and files, and consistent naming of the
database files simplify database administration.
•
Distribution of I/O across multiple disks prevents performance bottlenecks
caused by multiple read or write commands issued simultaneously to a single
drive.
•
Distribution of applications across multiple disks safeguards against database
failures.
•
Login home directories are not at risk when database administrators add, move,
or delete Oracle home directories.
•
Multiple databases, of different versions, owned by different users can coexist
concurrently.
•
Software upgrades can be tested in an Oracle home in a separate directory from
the Oracle home where your production database is located.
B.2 Changes to the Optimal Flexible Architecture for Oracle Database
The Optimal Flexible Architecture recommended Oracle home path is similar to the
following:
c:\app\usernameusername\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
B-2 Database Installation Guide
Directory Tree Differences by Release
The ORACLE_BASE default does not contain version information but the default
ORACLE_HOME does.
B.3 Directory Tree Differences by Release
Optimal Flexible Architecture has necessitated changes to the Oracle Database
directory tree.
The differences are listed as follows:
Top-Level Oracle Directory (page B-3)
When you install an Oracle Database Optimal Flexible Architecturecompliant database, there is a top-level Oracle base directory,
DRIVE_LETTER: \app\username, where DRIVE_LETTER is the hard
drive letter.
Database File Names (page B-3)
Database files do not have the SID in the database file name.
Database File Name Extensions (page B-3)
In an Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant release, database file
names have the following extensions:
B.3.1 Top-Level Oracle Directory
When you install an Oracle Database Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant
database, there is a top-level Oracle base directory, DRIVE_LETTER: \app\username,
where DRIVE_LETTER is the hard drive letter.
The Oracle base directory contains \ORACLE_HOME directories, \oradata directories
(for database files), \diag (for diagnostic data), \flash_recovery_area (for
recovery operations), and \admin directories (for database administration files).
B.3.2 Database File Names
Database files do not have the SID in the database file name.
For example, the first control file is named control01.ctl. The SID in the file name
is not necessary because all the database files for a particular database are placed in
\oradata under a directory called DB_UNIQUE_NAME that is named for that
database.
B.3.3 Database File Name Extensions
In an Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant release, database file names have the
following extensions:
•
.ctl for control files
•
.log for log files
•
.dbf for data files
B.4 Optimal Flexible Architecture Directory Naming Conventions
Optimal Flexible Architecture uses directory naming conventions that make it easy to
identify the precise Oracle home and database name that is associated with a set of
files.
Optimal Flexible Architecture B-3
Optimal Flexible Architecture Directory Naming Conventions
The naming conventions used for top-level directories of an Optimal Flexible
Architecture-compliant database directory tree are as follows:
ORACLE_BASE Directory Naming Convention (page B-4)
The Oracle Base directory is the database home directory for Oracle
Database installation owners. Learn about the Oracle Base directory and
its naming conventions.
ORACLE_HOME Directory Naming Convention (page B-5)
By default, Oracle Universal Installer configures Oracle home directories
using these Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture conventions.
Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR) Directory (page B-5)
Oracle Database 11g onwards, Automatic Diagnostic Repository
directories replace the bdump, cdump, and udump directories for the
database.
ADMIN Directory (page B-5)
Database administration files are stored in the subdirectories of
ORACLE_BASE\admin\DB_UNIQUE_NAME.
ORADATA Directory (page B-5)
Database files are stored in ORACLE_BASE\oradata
\DB_UNIQUE_NAME.
RECOVERY_AREA Directory (page B-6)
The recovery_area directory stores and manages files related to
backup and recovery.
B.4.1 ORACLE_BASE Directory Naming Convention
The Oracle Base directory is the database home directory for Oracle Database
installation owners. Learn about the Oracle Base directory and its naming conventions.
ORACLE_BASE is the root of the Oracle directory tree. If you install an Optimal
Flexible Architecture-compliant database using Oracle Universal Installer default
settings, then ORACLE_BASE is DRIVE_LETTER:\app\username.
If you are installing Oracle Database for Microsoft Windows on a computer with no
other Oracle software installed, then you can change the ORACLE_BASE directory
before running Oracle Universal Installer. Most users do not need or want to do this.
Do not change the value of ORACLE_BASE after you run Oracle Universal Installer for
the first time. If there is an existing ORACLE_BASE and you change it, then there is a
conflict of Oracle base directories. If you create another ORACLE_BASE when the
original ORACLE_BASE exists, then certain tools and the database are not able to find
previously created files. They look for them in the new ORACLE_BASE instead of the
original ORACLE_BASE.
See Also:
Your operating system documentation for instructions about editing the
environment variables
B-4 Database Installation Guide
Optimal Flexible Architecture Directory Naming Conventions
B.4.2 ORACLE_HOME Directory Naming Convention
By default, Oracle Universal Installer configures Oracle home directories using these
Oracle Optimal Flexible Architecture conventions.
The ORACLE_HOME directory is located under DRIVE_LETTER:\ORACLE_BASE,
where DRIVE_LETTER:\is any hard drive, and contains subdirectories for the Oracle
software executables and network files.
If you install Oracle Database for Windows on a computer with no other Oracle
software installed and you use the default settings, then the first directory that you
create is called \dbhome_1.
B.4.3 Automatic Diagnostic Repository (ADR) Directory
Oracle Database 11g onwards, Automatic Diagnostic Repository directories replace the
bdump, cdump, and udump directories for the database.
The diagnostic data goes into ORACLE_BASE\diag\rdbms\DB_UNIQUE_NAME
\instance_name
Some of these subdirectories are:
\alert
\hm
\incident
\incpkg
\ir
\lck
\metadata
\stage
\sweep
\trace
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
B.4.4 ADMIN Directory
Database administration files are stored in the subdirectories of ORACLE_BASE
\admin\DB_UNIQUE_NAME.
B.4.5 ORADATA Directory
Database files are stored in ORACLE_BASE\oradata\DB_UNIQUE_NAME.
Names and brief descriptions of these files are:
CONTROL01.CTL
CONTROL02.CTL
CONTROL03.CTL
EXAMPLE01.DBF
SYSAUX01.DBF
SYSTEM01.DBF
TEMP01.DBF
USERS01.DBF
*.dbf
--control file 1
--control file 2
--control file 3
--EXAMPLE tablespace data files
--SYSAUX tablespace data files
--SYSTEM tablespace data file
--TEMP tablespace data file
--USERS tablespace data file
--data files corresponding to each tablespace in your database
Optimal Flexible Architecture B-5
Optimal Flexible Architecture and Multiple Oracle Home Configurations
REDO01.LOG
REDO02.LOG
REDO03.LOG
--redo log file group one, member one
--redo log file group two, member one
--redo log file group three, member one
Note:
This directory structure allows for disk striping on UNIX and Windows
platforms.
Related Topics:
Support for Symbolic Links on Windows (page B-9)
The goal of Optimal Flexible Architecture is to place all Oracle software
under one ORACLE_BASE directory and to spread files across different
physical drives as your databases increase in size.
B.4.6 RECOVERY_AREA Directory
The recovery_area directory stores and manages files related to backup and
recovery.
It contains a subdirectory for each database on the system. A fast recovery area is an
optional disk location that you can use to store recovery-related files such as control
files and online redo log copies, archived logs, flashback logs, and Oracle Database
Recovery Manager (RMAN) backups. Oracle and RMAN manage files in the fast
recovery area automatically.
See Also:
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
B.5 Optimal Flexible Architecture and Multiple Oracle Home
Configurations
Learn about the various Optimal Flexible Architecture and multiple Oracle homes
configurations.
Specifying an ORACLE_HOME Directory (page B-7)
To install an Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant database, you
must specify an Oracle home directory in the form of:
Installing a Default Optimal Flexible Architecture Database: Example 1
(page B-7)
This example shows how to create all Oracle homes within one Oracle
base directory.
Installing a Nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture Database: Example 2
(page B-7)
In this example, you install each Oracle home into its own directory, but
they all share the same Oracle base.
B-6 Database Installation Guide
Optimal Flexible Architecture and Multiple Oracle Home Configurations
B.5.1 Specifying an ORACLE_HOME Directory
To install an Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant database, you must specify an
Oracle home directory in the form of:
DRIVE_LETTER:\app\username\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
where:
•
DRIVE_LETTER:\ is any hard drive. For example, c:\
•
\app\ is the ORACLE_BASE before performing the installation.
•
dbhome_1 is the default directory name.
The following are the examples of Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant Oracle
home directories:
•
c:\app\test1\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
•
d:\app\test2\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
B.5.2 Installing a Default Optimal Flexible Architecture Database: Example 1
This example shows how to create all Oracle homes within one Oracle base directory.
1. Install any Oracle Database that supports Optimal Flexible Architecture (Oracle
Database Release 8.1.6 or later) on a computer with no other Oracle software
installed and ensure that you accept the default settings for the Oracle home (for
example, c: \app\username\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1).
2. Install any Oracle Database in a second Oracle home accepting the default settings.
The following table shows the default Optimal Flexible Architecture database settings:
Table B-1
Default Optimal Flexible Architecture Database Settings
Setting
Value
ORACLE_BASE
c:\app\username (same for all Oracle homes)
Oracle home 1
c:\app\username\product\12.2.0\dbhome_1
Oracle home 2
c:\app\username\product\12.2.0\dbhome_2
B.5.3 Installing a Nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture Database: Example 2
In this example, you install each Oracle home into its own directory, but they all share
the same Oracle base.
1. Install any Oracle Database that supports Optimal Flexible Architecture (Oracle
Database 8.1.6 or later) on a computer with no other Oracle software installed and
change the default Oracle Universal Installer settings for the first Oracle home (for
example, from c:\oracle\ora81 to X:\xyz\oracle\abc).
Optimal Flexible Architecture B-7
Comparison Between Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and UNIX
2. Install any Oracle Database and change the default Oracle Universal Installer
settings for the second Oracle home (for example, from c:\oracle\ora10 to X:
\pqr).
The table shows the nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture database settings for
this example:
Table B-2
Nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture Database Settings: Example 2
Setting
Value
ORACLE_BASE
X:\xyz\oracle
(same for both Oracle homes)
Oracle home 1
X:\xyz\oracle\abc
Oracle home 2
X:\pqr
The resulting directory tree looks similar to this:
X:\pqr
\bin
\network
X:\xyz
\oracle
\abc
\bin
\network
\admin
\DB_UNIQUE_NAME1
\dpdump
\
\DB_UNIQUE_NAME2
\...
\oradata
\DB_UNIQUE_NAME1
CONTROL01.CTL
CONTROL02.CTL
CONTROL03.CTL
EXAMPLE01.DBF
SYSAUX01.DBF
SYSTEM01.DBF
TEMP01.DBF
USERS01.DBF
REDO01.LOG
REDO02.LOG
REDO03.LOG
\DB_UNIQUE_NAME2
--Oracle home 2
--ORACLE_BASE for both Oracle homes
--Oracle home 1
B.6 Comparison Between Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and
UNIX
You can implement Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and UNIX in a similar
manner.
Directory Naming (page B-9)
Top-level names of the Optimal Flexible Architecture directory tree
differ between Windows and UNIX.
B-8 Database Installation Guide
Comparison Between Optimal Flexible Architecture on Windows and UNIX
ORACLE_BASE Directory (page B-9)
On Windows, Oracle base is associated with an Oracle home directory.
ORACLE_BASE is defined in the registry (for example, in
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ORACLE\KEY_HOMENAME).
Support for Symbolic Links on Windows (page B-9)
The goal of Optimal Flexible Architecture is to place all Oracle software
under one ORACLE_BASE directory and to spread files across different
physical drives as your databases increase in size.
See Also: Your UNIX operating system-specific administrator's reference for
information about Optimal Flexible Architecture on UNIX
B.6.1 Directory Naming
Top-level names of the Optimal Flexible Architecture directory tree differ between
Windows and UNIX.
However, main subdirectory names and file names are the same on both operating
systems.
B.6.2 ORACLE_BASE Directory
On Windows, Oracle base is associated with an Oracle home directory. ORACLE_BASE
is defined in the registry (for example, in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE
\ORACLE\KEY_HOMENAME).
On UNIX, ORACLE_BASE is associated with a UNIX user's environment.
B.6.3 Support for Symbolic Links on Windows
The goal of Optimal Flexible Architecture is to place all Oracle software under one
ORACLE_BASE directory and to spread files across different physical drives as your
databases increase in size.
On UNIX, although everything seems to be in one directory on the same hard drive,
files can be on different hard drives if they are symbolically linked or have that
directory as a mount point.
On Windows, you can use volume mount points to mount files on different hard
drives to a single directory. You can have oradata directories on multiple drives,
with data files in each one, on Windows version which does not support volume
mount points.
Oracle recommends that you use one logical drive to store your database
administration files and that you place other files, as needed, on other logical drives in
an oradata\DB_UNIQUE_NAME directory.
In the following example, there are four logical drives for a database named prod:
•
c:\ contains an Oracle home and database administration files.
•
f:\ contains redo log files. The F:\ drive could also represent two physical
drives that have been striped to increase performance.
•
g:\ contains one of the control files and all tablespace files. The G:\ drive can
also use a RAID Level-5 configuration to increase reliability.
Optimal Flexible Architecture B-9
Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure File Mapping
•
h:\ contains the second control file.
The directory structure looks similar to this:
c:\app\username\product\11.2.0 --First logical drive
\dbhome_1
--Oracle home
\bin
--Subtree for Oracle binaries
\network
--Subtree for Oracle Net
\...
\admin
--Subtree for database administration files
\prod
--Subtree for prod database administration files
\adump
--Audit files
\dpdump
--Default directory for data pump operations.
\pfile
--Initialization response file
f:\app\username\product\11.2.0 --Second logical drive (two physical drives,
striped)
\oradata
--Subtree for Oracle Database files
\prod
--Subtree for prod database files
redo01.log
--Redo log file group one, member one
redo02.log
--Redo log file group two, member one
redo03.log
--Redo log file group three, member one
g:\app\username\product\11.2.0 --Third logical drive (RAID level 5 configuration)
\oradata
--Subtree for Oracle Database files
\prod
--Subtree for prod database files
CONTROL01.CTL
--Control file 1
EXAMPLE01.DBF
--EXAMPLE tablespace data files
SYSAUX01.DBF
--SYSAUX tablespace data files
SYSTEM01.DBF
--System tablespace data file
TEMP01.DBF
--Temporary tablespace data file
USERS01.DBF
--Users tablespace data file
h:\app\username\product\11.2.0 --Fourth logical drive
\oradata
--Subtree for Oracle Database files
\prod
--Subtree for prod database files
CONTROL02.CTL
--Control file 2
B.7 Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure File Mapping
The following table shows a hierarchical file mapping for the log files of a sample
Optimal Flexible Architecture-compliant installation in the orcl database:
Table B-3
Hierarchical File Mapping for Log Files in an Optimal Flexible Architecture Installation
Directory
Description
C:\app\username\admin\orcl\TAR
Subtree for support log files
C:\app\username\admin\orcl\arch
Archived log files
C:\app\username\admin\orcl\create\
Contains the database creation log files
C:\app\username\oradata\orcl\*.log
Redo log files
C:\app\username\admin\orcl\dpdump\
Contains the data pump file dp.log
C:\app\username\diag
Contains all database, listener, sqlnet and other
diagnostic logs
C:\app\username\audit
Contains all audit logs
B-10 Database Installation Guide
Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure File Mapping
Table B-3 (Cont.) Hierarchical File Mapping for Log Files in an Optimal Flexible Architecture
Installation
Directory
Description
C:\app\username\cfgtoollogs
Contains logs for configuration assistants such as
Oracle Database Configuration Assistant,
Database Upgrade Assistant, and Oracle Net
Configuration Assistant
Optimal Flexible Architecture B-11
Optimal Flexible Architecture Structure File Mapping
B-12 Installation Guide
C
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database
Using Response Files
Learn how to install and configure Oracle products using response files.
How Response Files Work (page C-2)
Response files can assist you with installing an Oracle product multiple
times on multiple computers.
Preparing a Response File (page C-4)
Learn about the methods that you can use to prepare a response file for
use during silent-mode or response file-mode installations.
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using the Response File (page C-6)
At this stage, you are ready to run Oracle Universal Installer at the
command line, specifying the response file you created, to perform the
installation.
Running Net Configuration Assistant Using a Response File (page C-7)
When you run Net Configuration Assistant with a response file, you run
it in a silent mode.
Running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
(page C-8)
You can run Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in a silent or a
response file mode to configure and start an Oracle database on your
system.
Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File Created During Installation
(page C-10)
To run a response file configuration after installing Oracle software:
Postinstallation Configuration Using the ConfigToolAllCommands Script
(page C-12)
You can create and run a response file configuration after installing
Oracle software. The configToolAllCommands script requires users
to create a second response file, of a different format than the one used
for installing the product.
Using the Installation Response File for Postinstallation Configuration
(page C-12)
Starting with Oracle Database 12c release 2 (12.2), you can use the
response file created during installation to also complete postinstallation
configuration.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-1
How Response Files Work
C.1 How Response Files Work
Response files can assist you with installing an Oracle product multiple times on
multiple computers.
When you start Oracle Universal Installer (OUI), you can use a response file to
automate the installation and configuration of Oracle software, either fully or partially.
OUI uses the values contained in the response file to provide answers to some or all
installation prompts.
Typically, the installer runs in an interactive mode, which means that it prompts you
to provide information on the graphical user interface (GUI). When you use response
files to provide this information, you run Oracle Universal Installer at a command
prompt using either of the following modes:
•
Silent mode: If you include responses for all of the prompts in the response file
and specify the -silent option when starting the installer, then it runs in the
silent mode. During a silent mode installation, the installer does not display any
screens. Instead, it displays progress information in the terminal that you used to
start it.
•
Response file mode: If you include responses for some or all of the prompts in the
response file and omit the -silent option, then the installer runs in the response
file mode. During a response file mode installation, the installer displays all the
screens. The screens for which you specify information in the response file, and
for those which you did not specify the required information in the response file.
To use the response file mode, run setup.exe without the -silent parameter,
but include the response file or any other parameters that apply.
You define the settings for a silent or a response file installation by entering values for
the variables listed in the response file. For instance, to specify the Oracle home,
provide the appropriate value for the ORACLE_HOME variable, as in the following
example:
ORACLE_HOME="C:\app\product"
Another way of specifying the response file variable settings is to pass them as
command-line arguments when you run Oracle Universal Installer. For example:
DRIVE_LETTER:\setup.exe_location> setup -silent "ORACLE_HOME=C:\app\product" ...
This method supports only the Oracle Home User passwords.
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode (page C-3)
Review this section for use cases for running the installer in silent mode
or response file mode.
Using Response Files (page C-3)
Review this information to use response files.
See Also:
•
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and UNIX
•
My Oracle Support website for more information about response files:
https://support.oracle.com/
C-2 Database Installation Guide
How Response Files Work
C.1.1 Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode
Review this section for use cases for running the installer in silent mode or response
file mode.
Table C-1
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode
Mode
Uses
Silent
Use silent mode to:
•
Complete an unattended installation, which you schedule using
operating system utilities such as at.
•
Complete several similar installations on multiple systems without
user interaction.
•
Install the software on a system that does not have X Window System
software installed on it.
The installer displays progress information on the terminal that you used
to start it, but it does not display any of the installer screens.
Response file
Use response file mode to complete similar Oracle software installations
on more than one system, providing default answers to some, but not all
of the installer prompts.
If you do not specify information required for a particular installer screen
in the response file, then the installer displays that screen. It suppresses
screens for which you have provided all of the required information.
C.1.2 Using Response Files
Review this information to use response files.
Use the following general steps to install and configure Oracle products using the
installer in silent or response file mode:
1.
2.
If you plan to use Oracle Automatic Storage Management and configure new
disks, then you must perform the following steps:
a.
Create partitions for DAS or SAN disks.
b.
Manually configure the disks using the asmtoolg or asmtool utility.
Customize or create a response file for the installation settings that you need.
You can create the response file by using one of the following methods:
3.
•
Modify one of the sample response files that is provided with the installation.
•
Run Oracle Universal Installer at a command prompt and save the inputs by
selecting the Save Response File option.
Run Oracle Universal Installer from a command prompt, specifying the response
file, using either silent or response file mode.
Note:
Windows requires Administrator privileges at the command prompt.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-3
Preparing a Response File
Related Topics:
ASM Disk Group Options for Interactive and Noninteractive Installation
(page 5-12)
You can select new disk groups during interactive installations, but you
must use existing disk groups for noninteractive installations.
Configuring Disks Manually for Oracle Automatic Storage Management
(page 5-14)
To use Oracle Automatic Storage Management with direct attached
storage (DAS) or storage area network (SAN), the disks must be
stamped with a header.
Preparing a Response File (page C-4)
Learn about the methods that you can use to prepare a response file for
use during silent-mode or response file-mode installations.
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using the Response File (page C-6)
At this stage, you are ready to run Oracle Universal Installer at the
command line, specifying the response file you created, to perform the
installation.
C.2 Preparing a Response File
Learn about the methods that you can use to prepare a response file for use during
silent-mode or response file-mode installations.
Editing a Response File Template (page C-4)
Saving a Response File (page C-5)
C.2.1 Editing a Response File Template
Oracle provides response file templates for each product and the installation type, and
for each configuration tool. These files are located in the ORACLE_BASE
\ORACLE_HOME\assistants directory, and the database\response directory on
the Oracle Database installation media.
Note:
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response files are located in the
stage_area\database\response directory.
The following table lists the available sample response files:
All response file templates contain comment entries, sample formats, examples, and
other useful instructions. Read the response file instructions to understand how to
specify values for the response file variables, so that you can customize your
installation.
Table C-2
Response Files
Response File Name
Description
db_install.rsp
Silent installation of Oracle Database 12c
C-4 Database Installation Guide
Preparing a Response File
Table C-2
(Cont.) Response Files
Response File Name
Description
grid_install.rsp
Silent installation of Oracle Grid Infrastructure
dbca.rsp
Silent installation of Database Configuration Assistant
netca.rsp
Silent installation of Oracle Net Configuration
Assistant
Caution:
When you modify a response file template and save a file for use, the response
file may contain plain text passwords. Ownership of the response file must be
given to the Oracle software installation owner only. Oracle strongly
recommends that database administrators or other administrators delete or
secure response files when they are not in use.
To copy and modify a response file:
1. Copy the appropriate response files from the database\response directory on
the Oracle Database media to your hard drive.
2. Modify the response files with a text file editor.
3. Run the response file.
Related Topics:
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using the Response File (page C-6)
At this stage, you are ready to run Oracle Universal Installer at the
command line, specifying the response file you created, to perform the
installation.
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and UNIX
C.2.2 Saving a Response File
You can use the Oracle Universal Installer in an interactive mode to save a response
file, which you can edit and then use to complete a silent mode or a response file mode
installation.
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), you can save all the installation
steps into a response file during installation by clicking Save Response File on the
Summary page. You can use the generated response file for a silent installation later.
When you save the response file, you can either complete the installation, or you can
exit from Oracle Universal Installer on the Summary page, before it starts to copy the
software to the system.
Note:
Oracle Universal Installer does not save passwords in the response file.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-5
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using the Response File
To save a response file:
1.
Ensure that the computer on which you are creating the response file has met the
requirements described in Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks.
When you run Oracle Universal Installer to save a response file, it checks the
system to verify that it meets the requirements to install the software. For this
reason, Oracle recommends that you complete all of the required preinstallation
tasks and save the response file while completing an installation.
2.
At the command prompt, use the cd command to change to the directory that
contains the Oracle Universal Installer setup.exe executable.
Note:
Windows requires the Administrator privileges at the command prompt.
On the installation DVD, setup.exe is located in the database directory.
Alternatively, navigate to the directory where you downloaded or copied the
installation files.
3.
Run setup.exe.
4.
After Oracle Universal Installer starts, enter the installation settings, to save the
response file.
5.
When the installer displays the Summary screen, perform the following:
a.
Click Save Response File and specify a file name and location for the
response file. Then, click Save to save the values to the file.
b.
Click Finish to continue with the installation.
Click Cancel if you do not want to continue with the installation. The
installation stops, but the saved response file is retained.
6.
Before you use the saved response file on another system, edit the file and make
any required changes.
Use the instructions in the file as a guide when editing it.
Related Topics:
Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks (page 2-1)
Review the preinstallation tasks before you start Oracle Universal
Installer.
C.3 Running Oracle Universal Installer Using the Response File
At this stage, you are ready to run Oracle Universal Installer at the command line,
specifying the response file you created, to perform the installation.
On Windows, open the command prompt with Administrator privileges. The Oracle
Universal Installer executable, setup.exe, provides several options. For help
information about the full set of these options, run setup.exe with the -help
option, for example:
DRIVE_LETTER:\setup.exe_location setup -help
C-6 Database Installation Guide
Running Net Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
A new command window with the "Preparing to launch..." message appears.
To run Oracle Universal Installer, and specify a response file:
1. Place the response file on the computer where you want to install Oracle Database.
2. At a command prompt, run Oracle Universal Installer with the appropriate
response file. On Windows, you must open command prompt with the
Administrator privileges. For example:
DRIVE_LETTER:\setup.exe_location setup [-silent] "variable=setting" [nowelcome] [-noconfig] [-nowait] -responseFile
filename
where:
•
filename: Identifies the full path of the response file.
•
setup.exe_location: Indicates the location of setup.exe.
•
-silent: Runs Oracle Universal Installer in silent mode and suppresses the
Welcome window.
•
"variable=setting" refers to a variable within the response file that you
may prefer to run at the command line rather than set in the response file.
Enclose the variable and its setting in quotes.
•
-noconfig: Suppresses running the configuration assistants during
installation, performing a software-only installation instead.
•
-nowait: Closes the console window when the silent installation completes.
If you save a response file during a silent installation, then Oracle Universal
Installer saves the variable values that were specified in the original source
response file into the new response file.
See Also:
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and UNIX
C.4 Running Net Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
When you run Net Configuration Assistant with a response file, you run it in a silent
mode.
This lets you configure and start an Oracle Net listener on the system, configure
naming methods, and configure Oracle Net service names. To run NetCA in a silent
mode, use the netca.rsp response file in the ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME
\assistants\netca directory, and the response directory in the database
\response directory on the DVD.
Note:
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response files are located in the
stage_area\database\response directory.
On Windows, you must open command prompt with the Administrator privileges.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-7
Running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
To create a Net Configuration Assistant response file:
1.
Copy the netca.rsp response file template from the response file directory to a
directory on your system.
The netca.rsp is located in the database\response directory on the Oracle
Database installation media.
2.
Open the response file in a text editor.
3.
Edit the file, following the instructions in the file.
Net Configuration Assistant fails if you do not correctly configure the netca.rsp
response file.
To run Net Configuration Assistant using the response file you just created, run Net
Configuration Assistant in silent mode as follows, replacing local_dir with the
directory where you placed your version of the netca.rsp response file:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\bin> netca /silent /responsefile local_dir\netca.rsp
For example:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\bin> netca /silent /responsefile
C:\oracle_response_files\mynetca.rsp
C.5 Running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response
File
You can run Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in a silent or a response file
mode to configure and start an Oracle database on your system.
To run Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in silent or response file mode, use
the dbca.rsp response file in the ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\assistants
\netca directory, and the response directory in the database\response
directory on the DVD.
Note:
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response files are located in the
stage_area\database\response directory.
To run Database Configuration Assistant in a response file mode, you must use the responseFile flag in combination with either the -silent or -progressOnly
flag. To run Database Configuration Assistant in response file mode, you must use a
graphical display and set the DISPLAY environment variable.
On Windows, you must open the command prompt with Administrator privileges.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide
C-8 Database Installation Guide
Running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant Using a Response File
Silent Mode of Database Configuration Assistant (page C-9)
Use the -silent flag in combination with the -responseFile flag to
set the mode to silent.
Running Database Configuration Assistant in Response File Mode (page C-9)
Use this procedure to run Database Configuration Assistant in response
file mode.
C.5.1 Silent Mode of Database Configuration Assistant
Use the -silent flag in combination with the -responseFile flag to set the mode
to silent.
In the silent mode, Database Configuration Assistant uses values that you specify, in
the response file or as command-line options, to create a database. No window or user
interface is displayed in the silent mode.
C.5.2 Running Database Configuration Assistant in Response File Mode
Use this procedure to run Database Configuration Assistant in response file mode.
To create an Oracle Database Configuration Assistant response file:
1. Copy the dbca.rsp response file template from the response file directory to a
directory on your system.
The dbca.rsp response file is located in the database\response directory on
the Oracle Database installation media.
2. Open the dbca.rsp response file in a text editor.
3. Edit the dbca.rsp file, following the instructions in the file.
Oracle Database Configuration Assistant fails if you do not correctly configure the
dbca.rsp response file.
To run the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant using the response file you just
created, run Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in a silent or a response file
mode using the following syntax:
C:\ORACLE_HOME\bin> dbca {-progressOnly | -silent} -responseFile local_dir/dbca.rsp
where:
•
-silent runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in the silent mode
•
-progressOnly runs Oracle Database Configuration Assistant in the response
file mode
•
local_dir is the full path of the directory where you copied the dbca.rsp
response file template.
For example:
C:\> ORACLE_HOME\bin> dbca -progressOnly -responseFile
C:\oracle_response_files\mydbca.rsp
As an alternative to creating a database using a response file, you can run dbca at the
command line by specifying all the required information as command line options.
Database Configuration Assistant writes progress messages to stdout. For
information about the list of options supported, enter the following command:
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-9
Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File Created During Installation
C:\ORACLE_HOME\bin\dbca -help
C.6 Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File Created During
Installation
To run a response file configuration after installing Oracle software:
About the Postinstallation Configuration File (page C-10)
When you run a silent or a response file installation, you provide
information about your servers in a response file that you otherwise
provide manually during a graphical user interface installation.
Running Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File (page C-11)
Use this procedure to run postinstallation configuration using response
file.
C.6.1 About the Postinstallation Configuration File
When you run a silent or a response file installation, you provide information about
your servers in a response file that you otherwise provide manually during a graphical
user interface installation.
However, the response file does not contain passwords for user accounts that
configuration assistants require after software installation is complete. The
configuration assistants are started with a script called configToolAllCommands.
You can run this script in the response file mode by using a password response file.
The script uses the passwords to run the configuration tools in succession to complete
the configuration.
If you keep the password file to use for clone installations, then Oracle strongly
recommends that you store it in a secure location. In addition, if you must stop an
installation to fix an error, you can run the configuration assistants using
configToolAllCommands and a password response file.
The configToolAllCommands password response file consists of the following
syntax options:
•
internal_component_name is the name of the component that the configuration
assistant configures
•
variable_name is the name of the configuration file variable
•
value is the desired value of the configuration.
The command syntax is as follows:
internal_component_name|variable_name=value
For example:
oracle.crs|S_ASMPASSWORD=myPassWord
Oracle strongly recommends that you maintain security with a password response
file:
•
Permissions on the response file must be set to 600.
•
The owner of the response file must be the installation owner user, with the group
set to the central inventory (oraInventory) group.
C-10 Database Installation Guide
Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File Created During Installation
C.6.2 Running Postinstallation Configuration Using Response File
Use this procedure to run postinstallation configuration using response file.
To run configuration assistants with the executeConfigTools script:
1.
Create a response file using the syntax filename.properties. For example:
C:\> copy nul cfgrsp.properties
2.
Open the file with a text editor, and cut and paste the password template,
modifying as needed.
3.
Secure the cfgrsp.properties file by changing permissions in Properties page.
Right-click the file to open the Properties page. Select the Security tab, click the
Edit button, select a group or user, then select Deny check box against Read
permissions to remove read access for unwanted users.
4.
Change directory to ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs
5.
Before running configToolAllCommands, rename it using the following
command:
copy configToolAllCommands configToolAllCommands.bat
6.
Run the configuration script using the following syntax:
configToolAllCommands.bat RESPONSE_FILE=\path
\name.properties
for example:
C:\> configToolAllCommands.bat RESPONSE_FILE=C:\oracle\cfgrsp.properties
Example C-1 Password response file for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server
Oracle Grid Infrastructure requires passwords for Oracle Automatic Storage
Management Configuration Assistant (ASMCA), and for Intelligent Platform
Management Interface Configuration Assistant (IPMICA) if you have a BMC card and
you want to enable this feature. Provide the following response file:
oracle.crs|S_ASMPASSWORD=password
oracle.crs|S_ASMMONITORPASSWORD=password
oracle.crs|S_OMSPASSWORD=password
oracle.crs|S_BMCPASSWORD=password
oracle.crs|S_WINSERVICEUSERPASSWORD=password
Example C-2
Password response file for Oracle Database
Oracle Database configuration requires the SYS, SYSTEM, and DBSNMP passwords for
use with Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA). The S_ASMSNMPPASSWORD
password is necessary only if the database is using Oracle ASM for storage. Similarly,
the S_PDBADMINPASSWORD password is necessary only if you create a multitenant
container database (CDB) with one or more pluggable databases (PDBs). Also, if you
select configure Oracle Enterprise Manager, then provide the password for the Oracle
software installation owner for the S_EMADMINPASSWORD password.
oracle.server|S_SYSPASSWORD=password
oracle.server|S_SYSTEMPASSWORD=password
oracle.server|S_DBSNMPPASSWORD=password
oracle.server|S_PDBADMINPASSWORD=password
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-11
Postinstallation Configuration Using the ConfigToolAllCommands Script
oracle.server|S_EMADMINPASSWORD=password
oracle.server|S_ASMSNMPPASSWORD=password
If you do not want to enable Oracle Enterprise Manager or Oracle ASM, then leave
those password fields blank.
C.7 Postinstallation Configuration Using the ConfigToolAllCommands
Script
You can create and run a response file configuration after installing Oracle software.
The configToolAllCommands script requires users to create a second response file,
of a different format than the one used for installing the product.
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2), the configToolAllCommands
script is deprecated and may be desupported in a future release.
C.8 Using the Installation Response File for Postinstallation Configuration
Starting with Oracle Database 12c release 2 (12.2), you can use the response file created
during installation to also complete postinstallation configuration.
Run the installer with the -executeConfigTools option to configure configuration
assistants after installing Oracle Grid Infrastructure or Oracle Database. You can use
the response file located at Oracle_home\install\response
\product_timestamp.rsp to obtain the passwords required to run the
configuration tools. You must update the response file with the required passwords
before running the -executeConfigTools command.
Oracle strongly recommends that you maintain security with a password response
file. The owner of the response file must be the installation owner user.
Example C-3
Response File Passwords for Oracle Grid Infrastructure
oracle.install.crs.config.ipmi.bmcPassword=password
oracle.install.asm.SYSASMPassword=password
oracle.install.asm.monitorPassword=password
oracle.install.config.emAdminPassword=password
oracle.install.OracleHomeUserPassword=password
If you do not have a BMC card, or you do not want to enable IPMI, then leave the
ipmi.bmcPassword input field blank.
If you do not want to enable Oracle Enterprise Manager for management, then leave
the emAdminPassword password field blank.
If you did not specify an Oracle Home user for the Oracle Grid Infrastructure
installation, then leave the OracleHomeUserPassword field blank.
Example C-4 Response File Passwords for Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
oracle.install.asm.SYSASMPassword=password
oracle.install.asm.monitorPassword=password
oracle.install.config.emAdminPassword=password
oracle.install.OracleHomeUserPassword=password
If you do not want to enable Oracle Enterprise Manager for management, then leave
the emAdminPassword password field blank.
C-12 Database Installation Guide
Using the Installation Response File for Postinstallation Configuration
If you did not specify an Oracle Home user for the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a
Standalone Server (Oracle Restart) installation, then leave the
OracleHomeUserPassword field blank.
Example C-5
Response File Passwords for Oracle Database
This example illustrates the passwords to specify for use with the database
configuration assistants.
oracle.install.db.config.starterdb.password.SYS=password
oracle.install.db.config.starterdb.password.SYSTEM=password
oracle.install.db.config.starterdb.password.DBSNMP=password
oracle.install.db.config.starterdb.password.PDBADMIN=password
oracle.install.db.config.starterdb.emAdminPassword=password
oracle.install.db.config.asm.ASMSNMPPassword=password
oracle.install.OracleHomeUserPassword=password
You can also specify
oracle.install.db.config.starterdb.password.ALL=password to use the
same password for all database users.
Oracle Database configuration assistants require the SYS, SYSTEM, and DBSNMP
passwords for use with Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA). Specify the
following passwords, depending on your system configuration:
•
If the database uses Oracle ASM for storage, then you must specify a password for
the ASMSNMPPassword variable. If you are not using Oracle ASM, then leave the
value for this password variable blank.
•
If you create a multitenant container database (CDB) with one or more pluggable
databases (PDBs), then you must specify a password for the PDBADMIN variable.
If you are not using Oracle ASM, then leave the value for this password variable
blank.
•
If you did not specify an Oracle Home user for the Oracle Database installation,
then leave the OracleHomeUserPassword field blank.
Installing and Configuring Oracle Database Using Response Files C-13
Using the Installation Response File for Postinstallation Configuration
C-14 Installation Guide
D
Configuring Networks for Oracle Database
Typically, the computer on which you want to install Oracle Database is connected to
the network, has a local storage to contain the Oracle Database installation, has a
display monitor, and has a media drive.
Configuring networks for Oracle Database describes how to install Oracle Database on
computers that do not meet the typical scenario.
Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple IP Addresses
(page D-1)
Use this procedure to set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME Environment
Variable.
Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple Aliases (page D-2)
A computer with multiple aliases is registered with the naming service
under a single IP address but with multiple aliases.
Installing Oracle Database on Nonnetworked Computers (page D-2)
You can install Oracle Database on non-networked computers.
Installing a Loopback Adapter (page D-3)
When you install a loopback adapter, the loopback adapter assigns a
local IP address for your computer.
D.1 Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple IP Addresses
Use this procedure to set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME Environment Variable.
Clients must be able to access the computer using its host name, or using aliases for its
host name. To check access, ping the host name from the client computers using the
short name (host name only) and the fully qualified domain name (FQDN, host name
and domain name). Both must work.
1. Display System in the Windows Control Panel.
2. In the System Properties dialog box, click Advanced.
3. In the Advanced tab, click Environment Variables.
4. In the Environment Variables dialog box, under System Variables, click New.
5. In the New System Variable dialog box, enter the following information:
•
Variable name: ORACLE_HOSTNAME
•
Variable value: The host name of the computer to use.
Configuring Networks for Oracle Database D-1
Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple Aliases
6. Click OK, then in the Environment Variables dialog box, click OK.
7. Click OK in the Environment Variables dialog box, then in the System Properties
dialog box, click OK.
D.2 Installing Oracle Database on Computers with Multiple Aliases
A computer with multiple aliases is registered with the naming service under a single
IP address but with multiple aliases.
The naming service resolves any of those aliases to the same computer. Before
installing Oracle Database on such a computer, set the ORACLE_HOSTNAME
environment variable to the computer whose host name you want to use.
D.3 Installing Oracle Database on Nonnetworked Computers
You can install Oracle Database on non-networked computers.
If the computer, such as a laptop, is configured for DHCP and you plan to connect the
computer to the network after the Oracle Database installation.
Perform these steps before you install Oracle Database on the non-networked
computer:
1.
Install a loopback adapter on the computer.
The loopback adapter and the local IP address simulate a networked computer. If
you connect the computer to the network, Oracle Database still uses the local IP
address and host name.
2.
Ping the computer from itself, using only the host name and using the fully
qualified name, which is in the DRIVE_LETTER:\system32\drivers\etc
\hosts file.
For example, if you installed a loopback adapter on a computer called
mycomputer on the mydomain.com domain, check the following:
DRIVE_LETTER:\>ping mycomputer
hostname.
Ping itself using just the
Reply from 10.10.10.10
Returns local IP.
DRIVE_LETTER:\>ping mycomputer.mydomain.com
Ping using a fully qualified name.
Reply from 10.10.10.10
Returns local IP.
Note:
When you ping a computer from itself, the ping command must return the
local IP address (the IP address of the loopback adapter).
If the ping command fails, contact your network administrator.
If you connect the computer to a network after installation, the Oracle Database
instance on your computer can work with other instances on the network. Remember
that you must have installed a loopback adapter on your computer. Your computer
can use a static IP or DHCP, depending on the network to which you are connected.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database on Nonnetworked Computers (page D-2)
You can install Oracle Database on non-networked computers.
D-2 Database Installation Guide
Installing a Loopback Adapter
D.4 Installing a Loopback Adapter
When you install a loopback adapter, the loopback adapter assigns a local IP address
for your computer.
After the loopback adapter is installed, there are at least two network adapters on your
computer: your own network adapter and the loopback adapter. To run Oracle
Database on Windows, set the loopback adapter as the primary adapter.
You can change the bind order for the adapters without reinstalling the loopback
adapter. The bind order of the adapters to the protocol indicates the order in which the
adapters are used. When the loopback adapter is used first for the TCP/IP protocol, all
programs that access TCP/IP first probe the loopback adapter. The local address is
used for tools, such as Oracle Enterprise Manager. Any other applications that use a
different Ethernet segment are routed to the network card.
A loopback adapter is required if:
•
You are installing on a non-networked computer and plan to connect the
computer to a network after installation.
Checking if a Loopback Adapter is Installed on Your Computer (page D-3)
To check if a loopback adapter is installed on your computer, run the
ipconfig /all command:
Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 7 (page D-4)
Use this procedure to install a loopback adapter on Windows 7.
Installing Microsoft KM-TEST Loopback Adapter on Windows 8, Windows 8.1,
Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2 (page D-5)
Use this procedure to install Micrsoft KM-TEST loopback adapter on
different Windows versions.
Removing a Loopback Adapter (page D-6)
Use this procedure to remove a loopback adapter.
Related Topics:
Installing Oracle Database on Nonnetworked Computers (page D-2)
You can install Oracle Database on non-networked computers.
D.4.1 Checking if a Loopback Adapter is Installed on Your Computer
To check if a loopback adapter is installed on your computer, run the
ipconfig /all command:
DRIVE_LETTER:\>ipconfig /all
Note:
Loopback Adapter installed on the computer must be made the Primary
Network Adapter.
If there is a loopback adapter installed, then see a section that lists the values for the
loopback adapter. For example:
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Configuring Networks for Oracle Database D-3
Installing a Loopback Adapter
Description . . .
Physical Address.
DHCP Enabled. . .
IP Address. . . .
Subnet Mask . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
:
:
:
:
:
Microsoft Loopback Adapter
02-00-4C-4F-4F-50
No
10.10.10.10
255.255.0.0
D.4.2 Installing a Loopback Adapter on Windows 7
Use this procedure to install a loopback adapter on Windows 7.
To install a loopback adapter on Windows 7:
1.
Click Start and enter hdwwiz in the Search box.
2.
Click hdwwiz to start the Add Hardware wizard.
3.
In the Welcome window, click Next.
4.
In the The wizard can help you install other hardware window, select Install the
hardware that I manually select from a list, and click Next.
5.
From the list of hardware types, select the type of hardware you are installing,
select Network adapters, and click Next.
6.
In the Select Network Adapter window, make the following selections:
•
Manufacturer: Select Microsoft.
•
Network Adapter: Select Microsoft Loopback Adapter.
7.
Click Next.
8.
In the The wizard is ready to install your hardware window, click Next.
9.
In the Completing the Add Hardware Wizard window, click Finish.
10. Click Manage Network Connections. This displays the Network Connections
Control Panel item.
11. Right-click the connection that was just created. This is usually named "Local Area
Connection 2". Choose Properties.
12. On the General tab, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and click Properties.
13. In the Properties dialog box, click Use the following IP address and do the
following:
a.
IP Address: Enter a non-routable IP for the loopback adapter. Oracle
recommends the following non-routable addresses:
•
192.168.x.x (x is any value between 0 and 255)
•
10.10.10.10
b.
Subnet mask: Enter 255.255.255.0.
c.
Record the values you entered, which you need later in this procedure.
d.
Leave all other fields empty.
e.
Click OK.
D-4 Database Installation Guide
Installing a Loopback Adapter
14. Click Close.
15. Close Network Connections.
16. Restart the computer.
17. Add a line to the DRIVE_LETTER:\ WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc
\hosts file with the following format, after the localhost line:
IP_address
hostname.domainname
hostname
where:
•
IP_address is the non-routable IP address you entered in step 13
(page D-4).
•
hostname is the name of the computer.
•
domainname is the name of the domain.
For example:
10.10.10.10
mycomputer.mydomain.com
mycomputer
18. Check the network configuration:
a.
Open System in the Control Panel, and verify that Full computer name
displays the host name and the domain name, for example,
sales.us.example.com.
b.
Click Change. In Computer name, you must see the host name, and in Full
computer name, you must see the host name and domain name. Using the
previous example, the host name is now sales and the domain name
us.example.com.
c.
Click More. In Primary DNS suffix of this computer, you must see the
domain name, for example, us.example.com.
D.4.3 Installing Microsoft KM-TEST Loopback Adapter on Windows 8, Windows 8.1,
Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2
Use this procedure to install Micrsoft KM-TEST loopback adapter on different
Windows versions.
To install a loopback adapter on Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, or
Windows Server 2012 R2, perform the following steps:
1. Open the Windows Control Panel.
2. Double-click Add Hardware to start the Add Hardware wizard.
3. In the Welcome window, click Next.
4. In the The wizard can help you install other hardware window, select Install the
hardware that I manually select from a list, and click Next.
5. From the list of hardware types, select the type of hardware you are installing,
select Network adapters, and click Next.
6. In the Select Network Adapter window, make the following selections:
Configuring Networks for Oracle Database D-5
Installing a Loopback Adapter
•
Manufacturer: Select Microsoft.
•
Network Adapter: Select Microsoft KM-TEST Loopback Adapter.
Then continue with the same steps as given for Windows Server 2008.
D.4.4 Removing a Loopback Adapter
Use this procedure to remove a loopback adapter.
To remove a loopback adapter, perform the following steps:
1. Display System in the Windows Control Panel.
2. In the Hardware tab, click Device Manager. This tab is not available with Windows
Server 2008. Click Device Manager instead.
3. In the Device Manager window, expand Network adapters. You must see
Microsoft Loopback Adapter.
4. Right-click Microsoft Loopback Adapter and select Uninstall.
In Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, or Windows Server 2012 R2,
right-click Microsoft KM-TEST Loopback Adapter and select Uninstall.
5. Click OK.
6. Restart the computer.
7. Remove the line from the DRIVE_LETTER:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc
\hosts file, added after the localhost line while installing the loopback adapter on
other Windows operating systems.
D-6 Database Installation Guide
E
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers
Review default port numbers.
If needed, use these steps to change assigned ports after installation.
About Managing Ports (page E-1)
During installation, Oracle Universal Installer assigns port numbers to
the components from a set of default port numbers.
About Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs (page E-2)
In most cases, the port number of an Oracle Database component is
displayed in the tool used to configure the port. In addition, ports for
some Oracle Database applications are listed in the portlist.ini file.
Oracle Database Component Port Numbers and Protocols (page E-2)
This table lists the port numbers and protocols configured for Oracle
Database components during a single-instance installation.
Changing the Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Port (page E-3)
In most cases, you need not reconfigure the port number.
E.1 About Managing Ports
During installation, Oracle Universal Installer assigns port numbers to the components
from a set of default port numbers.
Many Oracle Database components and services use ports. As an administrator, it is
important to know the port numbers used by these services, and to ensure that the
same port number is not used by two services on your host.
Most port numbers are assigned during installation. Every component and service has
an allotted port range, which is the set of port numbers Oracle Database attempts to
use when assigning a port. Oracle Database starts with the lowest number in the range
and performs the following checks:
•
Is the port used by another Oracle Database installation on the host?
The installation may be up or down at the time; Oracle Database can still detect if
the port is used.
•
Is the port used by a process that is currently running?
This could be any process on the host, even a non-Oracle Database process.
•
Is the port listed in the /etc/services file?
If the answer to any of the preceding questions is yes, then Oracle Database moves to
the next highest port in the allotted port range, and continues checking until it finds a
free port.
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers E-1
About Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs
E.2 About Viewing Port Numbers and Access URLs
In most cases, the port number of an Oracle Database component is displayed in the
tool used to configure the port. In addition, ports for some Oracle Database
applications are listed in the portlist.ini file.
This file is located in the ORACLE_HOME\install directory.
If you change a port number, that port number is not updated in the portlist.ini
file. For this reason, the portlist.ini file is an accurate record of ports configured at the
time of installation.
E.3 Oracle Database Component Port Numbers and Protocols
This table lists the port numbers and protocols configured for Oracle Database
components during a single-instance installation.
By default, the first port in the range is assigned to the component, if it is available.
Table E-1
Ports Used in Oracle Components
Component and Description
Default Port Number
Port Range
Protocol
Oracle Net Listener
1521
Port number
changes to
the next
available
port.
TCP
Enables Oracle client connections to the database by
using Oracle Net services. You can configure this port
number during installation. To reconfigure this port, use
Net Configuration Assistant.
Oracle Connection Manager
Modifiable
manually to
any available
port.
1630
1630
TCP
0
Configured
Manually
HTTP
0
Configured
Manually
FTP
42424
Dynamic
TCP
Listening port for Oracle client connections. It is not
configured during installation, but can be configured
manually by editing the cman.ora parameter file. You
can find the file under /network/admin directory.
Oracle XML DB
The Oracle XML DB HTTP port is used if web-based
applications need to access an Oracle database from an
HTTP listener. It is configured during installation, but
you cannot view it afterward.
See Also: Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
The Oracle XML DB FTP is used when applications need
to access an Oracle database from an FTP listener. It is
configured during installation, but you cannot view it
afterward.
See Also: Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
Cluster Synchronization Service (CSS)
CSS service internode connection for Group Manager.
The port number is assigned automatically. You cannot
view or modify it afterward.
E-2 Database Installation Guide
Changing the Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Port
Table E-1
(Cont.) Ports Used in Oracle Components
Component and Description
Default Port Number
Port Range
Protocol
Oracle Cluster Registry
Dynamic
Dynamic
TCP
Dynamic
49152-65535
TCP
The port number is assigned automatically during
installation. You cannot view or modify it afterward.
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server
The port number for Microsoft Transaction Server is
configured when you enter its value in the Oracle
Universal Installer the first time you install the software
on a particular server. If you install the software in
multiple Oracle homes on the same server, then Oracle
Universal Installer uses the same port number that you
specified during the first installation.
In most cases, you do not have to reconfigure the port
number.
Related Topics:
Changing the Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Port (page E-3)
In most cases, you need not reconfigure the port number.
See Also:
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Advanced Installation and
Configuration Guide for information on Oracle Management Agent ports
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows x64
(64-Bit) for a list of clusterware ports used in Oracle components
E.4 Changing the Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Port
In most cases, you need not reconfigure the port number.
If you must, then you can use the Registry Editor to edit its value in the
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ORACLE\OracleMTSRecoveryService
\Protid_0 Registry Editor key to any available port within the range 1024 to
65535.
During installation, Oracle Universal Installer takes the value for the port from the
key, if it exists. Otherwise, a free port ranging from 49152 to 65535 is chosen.
Managing Oracle Database Port Numbers E-3
Changing the Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server Port
E-4 Installation Guide
F
Troubleshooting the Oracle Database
Installation
Learn how to troubleshoot the Oracle Database installation.
See Also:
•
Oracle Configuration Manager Installation and Administration Guide
Verifying Requirements (page F-2)
Before you try any of the troubleshooting steps, do the following:
Encountering Installation Errors (page F-2)
If you encounter an error during installation:
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session (page F-3)
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all the actions
that it performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the
installation, review the log file for information about possible causes of
the problem.
Silent Mode Response File Error Handling (page F-3)
To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, check
the silentInstallActionsdate_time.log file, located in
DRIVE_LETTER:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs.
Troubleshooting Host Name Changes and CSS (page F-4)
If you change the host name for Oracle Automatic Storage Management,
then the Oracle CSS service does not start.
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants (page F-4)
To troubleshoot an installation error that occurs when a configuration
assistant is running:
Troubleshooting Inventory Issues (page F-6)
If you face any of the following situations for Oracle home, then run the
opatch lsinventory -detail command to list the contents of the
inventory.
Troubleshooting Screen Display Issues (page F-6)
If you connect to Oracle database with the screen resolution 640 X 480 or
800 X 600, then the Next button in the GUI is not visible as it hides
behind the Taskbar.
Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Installation F-1
Verifying Requirements
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation (page F-6)
If an installation fails, then you must remove files that Oracle Universal
Installer created during the attempted installation and remove the
Oracle home directory.
Continuing Installations or Upgrades After Server Restarts (page F-6)
Use this procedure to install or upgrade after server restarts.
F.1 Verifying Requirements
Before you try any of the troubleshooting steps, do the following:
•
Check to ensure that the system meets the requirements and that you have
completed all of the preinstallation tasks.
•
Read the release notes for the product on your platform before installing it. You
can find the latest version of the release notes on the Oracle Technology Network
website:
http://docs.oracle.com
F.2 Encountering Installation Errors
If you encounter an error during installation:
•
Do not exit Oracle Universal Installer.
•
If you clicked Next after you entered incorrect information about one of the
installation windows, click Back to return to the window and correct the
information.
•
If you encounter an error while Oracle Universal Installer is copying. or linking
files.
•
If you encounter an error while a configuration assistant is running.
•
If you cannot resolve the problem, remove the failed installation.
Related Topics:
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session (page F-3)
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all the actions
that it performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the
installation, review the log file for information about possible causes of
the problem.
Silent Mode Response File Error Handling (page F-3)
To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, check
the silentInstallActionsdate_time.log file, located in
DRIVE_LETTER:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs.
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants (page F-4)
To troubleshoot an installation error that occurs when a configuration
assistant is running:
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation (page F-6)
If an installation fails, then you must remove files that Oracle Universal
Installer created during the attempted installation and remove the
Oracle home directory.
F-2 Database Installation Guide
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session
F.3 Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all the actions that it
performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the installation, review the log
file for information about possible causes of the problem.
By default, the log files are located in the following directory:
SYSTEM_DRIVE:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs
Log filenames from interactive installations take the form:
installActionsdate_time.log
oraInstalldate_time.err
oraInstalldate_time.out
For example, if an interactive installation occurred at 9:00:56 a.m. on October 14, 2005,
then the log file is named:
installActions2005-10-14_09-00-56AM.log
Note:
Do not delete or manually alter the Inventory directory or its contents.
Doing so can prevent Oracle Universal Installer from locating products that
you install on your system.
Related Topics:
Silent Mode Response File Error Handling (page F-3)
To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, check
the silentInstallActionsdate_time.log file, located in
DRIVE_LETTER:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs.
F.4 Silent Mode Response File Error Handling
To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, check the
silentInstallActionsdate_time.log file, located in DRIVE_LETTER:
\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\logs.
A silent installation fails for the following reasons:
•
You do not specify a response file.
•
You specify an incorrect or an incomplete response file.
•
Oracle Universal Installer encounters an error, such as insufficient disk space.
Oracle Universal Installer or a configuration assistant validates the response file at run
time. If the validation fails, the silent-mode installation or configuration process ends.
Related Topics:
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session (page F-3)
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all the actions
that it performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the
installation, review the log file for information about possible causes of
the problem.
Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Installation F-3
Troubleshooting Host Name Changes and CSS
F.5 Troubleshooting Host Name Changes and CSS
If you change the host name for Oracle Automatic Storage Management, then the
Oracle CSS service does not start.
In order to solve this problem, perform the following steps:
1. Log in as a user with Administrator privileges.
2. Run roothas.bat to deconfigure CSS.
C:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\crs\install
perl roothas.bat -deconfig -force
Note:
Starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2), the roothas.bat
script replaces the roothas.pl script in the Oracle Grid Infrastructure home.
This removes any configuration related files on the system that referenced the old
host name.
3. Run gridconfig.bat script to reconfigure CSS using the new host name:
C:\> cd \app\oracle\product\12.2.0\grid\crs\config
gridconfig.bat
4. Go to the grid home's bin directory. Use the srvctl add database command
with the -c SINGLE flag to add the database in an Oracle Restart configuration.
Also use the srvctl add command to add the listener, the Oracle ASM instance,
all Oracle ASM disk groups, and any database services to the Oracle Restart
configuration.
See Also:
Oracle Database Administrator's Guide
F.6 Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
To troubleshoot an installation error that occurs when a configuration assistant is
running:
•
Review the installation log files.
•
Review the specific configuration assistant log file located in the ORACLE_BASE
\cfgtoollogs directory. Try to fix the issue that caused the error.
Note:
Ensure that there is no space in the path.
•
If you see the "Fatal Error. Reinstall message", look for the cause of the problem by
reviewing the log files.
F-4 Database Installation Guide
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
Configuration Assistant Failures (page F-5)
Oracle Configuration Assistant failures are noted at the bottom of the
installation window.
Irrecoverable Errors (page F-5)
Use this procedure if you receive an irrecoverable error while a
configuration assistant is running.
Related Topics:
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session (page F-3)
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all the actions
that it performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the
installation, review the log file for information about possible causes of
the problem.
Irrecoverable Errors (page F-5)
Use this procedure if you receive an irrecoverable error while a
configuration assistant is running.
F.6.1 Configuration Assistant Failures
Oracle Configuration Assistant failures are noted at the bottom of the installation
window.
The configuration assistant interface displays additional information, if available. The
configuration assistant execution status is stored in the
installActionsdate_time.log file.
The execution status codes are listed in the following table:
Status
Result Code
Configuration assistant succeeded
0
Configuration assistant failed
1
Configuration assistant canceled
-1
F.6.2 Irrecoverable Errors
Use this procedure if you receive an irrecoverable error while a configuration assistant
is running.
If you receive an irrecoverable error:
1.
Remove the failed installation.
2.
Correct the cause of the irrecoverable error.
3.
Reinstall the Oracle software.
Related Topics:
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation (page F-6)
If an installation fails, then you must remove files that Oracle Universal
Installer created during the attempted installation and remove the
Oracle home directory.
Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Installation F-5
Troubleshooting Inventory Issues
F.7 Troubleshooting Inventory Issues
If you face any of the following situations for Oracle home, then run the opatch
lsinventory -detail command to list the contents of the inventory.
•
Oracle home is cloned without completing the inventory steps.
•
There is bad inventory.
•
Inventory is not available but it is created when the Oracle Enterprise Manager
Agent is installed in a separate Oracle home.
See Also: Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and
UNIX
F.8 Troubleshooting Screen Display Issues
If you connect to Oracle database with the screen resolution 640 X 480 or 800 X 600,
then the Next button in the GUI is not visible as it hides behind the Taskbar.
In order to counter this problem, do one of the following:
•
Hide the Taskbar.
•
Move the Oracle Universal Installer screen up.
•
Set the screen resolution to 1024 X 768 or higher.
F.9 Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
If an installation fails, then you must remove files that Oracle Universal Installer
created during the attempted installation and remove the Oracle home directory.
F.10 Continuing Installations or Upgrades After Server Restarts
Use this procedure to install or upgrade after server restarts.
During an Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a Standalone Server (Oracle Restart)
installation or upgrade, the server may require a restart and you may see an error
similar to the following:
ACFS-9427 Failed to unload ADVM/ACFS drivers. A system reboot is recommended
ACFS-9428 Failed to load ADVM/ACFS drivers. A system reboot is recommended
The workaround is to perform the following steps:
1. Restart the computer.
2. Log in as the Oracle Installation User for the Oracle home, and run the
gridconfig.bat script located in the path Grid_home\crs\config.
3. To complete the installation or upgrade, run the configToolAllCommands
script, located in the path ORACLE_HOME\cfgtoollogs
\configToolAllCommands.
F-6 Database Installation Guide
Continuing Installations or Upgrades After Server Restarts
Related Topics:
Postinstallation Configuration Using a Response File Created During Installation
(page C-10)
To run a response file configuration after installing Oracle software:
Troubleshooting the Oracle Database Installation F-7
Continuing Installations or Upgrades After Server Restarts
F-8 Installation Guide
G
Frequently Asked Questions About
Installation
Use the following guidelines to decide how to install Oracle Database components:
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client (page G-1)
The following are the frequently asked questions about installing Oracle
Database:
Installing Oracle Database Tools (page G-3)
The following are frequently asked questions about installing Oracle
Database tools:
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications (page G-7)
The following are the frequently asked questions about installing Oracle
Database with Oracle applications:
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
(page G-8)
Learn how to access and install Gateway products.
G.1 Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
The following are the frequently asked questions about installing Oracle Database:
I only need one instance of Oracle Database or I just want to install a test
database to get familiar with the product. How do I install Oracle Database for
these situations?
If you want a quick installation using the default installation settings, then see this
guide.
See Also:
Oracle Database Installation Checklist (page 1-1) if your site has special
requirements
How can I create an Oracle database that can handle transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications?
If you want to create a starter database designed for transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications, then see this guide for more details. Select the Advanced
Installation method, and then select the database type you want on the Select
Database Configuration screen.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation G-1
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
Alternatively, you can use Oracle OLAP. The OLAP option is provided with Oracle
Database Enterprise Edition. Oracle OLAP provides optimal support for database
environments that must meet OLAP requirements.
See Also:
•
Oracle OLAP User's Guide
•
Oracle OLAP DML Reference
•
Oracle OLAP Java API Reference
•
Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide after installation
What's the best way to install multiple Oracle databases?
Use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle Database using either of the following
methods:
•
Installing with response files: This method lets you run Oracle Universal
Installer at a command line using a response file that contains settings specific to
each computer.
•
Cloning a database: Install Oracle Database on one computer using interactive
mode. You can also clone databases.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator's Guide about instructions for cloning
databases
How do I configure client connections to an Oracle database?
1.
Install Oracle Database on a server by using Oracle Universal Installer.
2.
Use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle Database Client on each client
node, and select the Instant Client installation type.
If you have many client nodes, consider staging the software centrally, mapping
the drive, and running Oracle Universal Installer in the silent or response file
mode.
If the client nodes only require a default installation into a new Oracle home
directory, consider using Oracle Universal Installer.
What is the best way to install Oracle Database Client if my client nodes have
limited disk space?
1. Install Oracle Database onto a server by using this guide for more details.
2. Use platform-specific Client Installation guide to install Oracle Database Client on
each client node, and select the Instant Client installation type.
If you have many client nodes, then consider running Oracle Universal Installer in
silent or response file mode.
See Also: Oracle Database Client Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows
G-2 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Tools
Example G-1
How do I upgrade Oracle Database?
See Also: Oracle Database Upgrade Guide
Example G-2 The computers at my site have been configured to run as a cluster.
How should I install Oracle Database?
Use any of the following installation scenarios:
•
If you want to run a single-instance Oracle Database in a clustered environment,
then install Oracle Grid Infrastructure either before or after you install Oracle
Database.
•
If you want a consolidated pool of storage for all databases in a cluster, then
install Oracle Grid Infrastructure, and use Oracle Automatic Storage Management
(Oracle ASM) to manage this storage. Then, install Oracle Database or Oracle Real
Application Clusters.
•
If you plan to use Oracle Real Application Clusters, first install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure, and then install Oracle Real Application Clusters.
Oracle Clusterware is a key component required by Oracle Real Application Clusters
installations. Oracle Clusterware is an integrated cluster management solution that can
bind multiple servers to act as a single system. This is referred to as a cluster. It
performs workload management and component restart. For example, when an
instance supporting a particular service fails, Oracle Clusterware restarts the service
on the next available instance that you have configured for that service. Oracle
Clusterware can monitor non-Oracle programs, if they are defined within the Oracle
Clusterware environment using the High Availability API.
See platform-specific instructions for your platform to install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure and Oracle Real Application Clusters. Oracle Clusterware is installed in
an Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation.
See Also:
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide
Example G-3
How do I migrate my non-Oracle databases to Oracle Database?
Use Oracle SQL Developer to migrate your non-Oracle databases and applications to
Oracle. Oracle SQL Developer software and documentation is available on Oracle
Help Center at:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html?tab=2#sqldev
G.2 Installing Oracle Database Tools
The following are frequently asked questions about installing Oracle Database tools:
How do I install Oracle WebLogic Server?
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation G-3
Installing Oracle Database Tools
See Also: Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle WebLogic Server
.
How can I administer and monitor my Oracle Database products?
To perform regular administrative functions such as creating, configuring, or deleting
databases, or managing database templates, use one of the following methods:
To manage only the single database and listener that you are installing:
1.
Use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle Database.
2.
From Oracle Database, use Database Configuration Assistant to manage your
databases.
You can also administer and monitor the database with Oracle Enterprise
Manager Cloud Control, which is installed by default with Oracle Database.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control requires an agent which is not installed
by default.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control includes the Oracle Management
Agent, Oracle Management Service, and Oracle Management Repository, as well
as Cloud Control, a browser-based central console through which administrators
can perform all monitoring, administration, and configuration tasks for the
enterprise.
To perform advanced administration tasks, such as monitoring Oracle Database and
managing multiple hosts, application servers, and databases including the one that
you are installing, install Oracle Enterprise Manager as follows:
1.
Use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle Database.
If you plan to use Oracle Real Application Clusters, then install Oracle Database
by using the platform-specific guides.
2.
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Advanced Installation and Configuration
Guide to install and configure Oracle Enterprise Manager. For postconfiguration
tasks, use Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Administrator's Guide.
See Also:
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Advanced Installation and
Configuration Guide
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Basic Installation Guide
•
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows x64
(64-Bit)
How do I manage security for my Oracle Database products?
Oracle provides a wide range of security solutions for your enterprise environment,
including centralized administration and security features integrated with Oracle
Internet Directory. The set of Oracle security services called Oracle Platform Security
G-4 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Tools
integrates the security features built into Oracle Database, Oracle WebLogic Server,
and the Oracle Identity Management infrastructure. Combined, these features enable
the development and deployment of secure e-business applications.
Oracle Identity Management includes Oracle Internet Directory, a centralized
repository that simplifies administration of users and applications in the Oracle
environment with the following components:
•
Oracle Internet Directory client tools, including LDAP command-line tools, the
Oracle Internet Directory SDK, and Oracle Directory Manager.
•
Oracle Internet Directory server components, including the directory server, the
directory replication server, the directory integration server, and various tools for
starting and stopping them.
Oracle Database includes the Oracle Internet Directory client tools, but not the Oracle
Internet Directory server components. To install the Oracle Internet Directory server
components, see Oracle Identity Management documentation on Oracle Help Center
at:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Security Guide
•
Oracle Database Enterprise User Security Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide
•
Oracle Help Center topics on database security:
http://docs.oracle.com/database/121/nav/portal_25.htm
How do I use Oracle Database to manage my XML data?
Use Oracle XML DB, which is installed as part of Oracle Database. Oracle XML DB
enables you to efficiently store, generate, retrieve, query, and manage XML data on
your site. Oracle XML DB provides all the advantages of a relational database, for
example, allowing you to control the referential integrity of XML data with constraints
and triggers. It works well with large amounts of XML data by storing it in a parsed,
relational form, which improves access performance.
Oracle XML DB supports XML Type, which is a native data type for XML data, for
which you can choose various storage options depending on your needs. In addition,
Oracle XML DB supports XML Schema processing, structured and unstructured
storage, a content repository that you can access by using common protocols (FTP,
HTTP(S), and WebDAV), and SQL/XML, which is a standard for SQL with XML. For
Oracle Database 11g Release 1 (11.1), Oracle XML DB introduced support for the
XQuery language for querying, transforming, and constructing XML; the ability for
users to define their own metadata for schema-based XML; a set of new SQL functions
for DML operations on XML data; and more.
You can use Oracle XML DB with Oracle XML Developer's Kit (XDK) to build
applications that run on either Oracle Database or Oracle WebLogic Server.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation G-5
Installing Oracle Database Tools
See Also:
•
Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
•
Oracle XML Developer's Kit Programmer's Guide
Does Oracle Database provide OLAP tools so that I can analyze data such as
trends and time series in my database?
Yes, Oracle OLAP is available as part of an Oracle Database Enterprise Edition
installation. Oracle OLAP provides optimal support for database environments that
must meet OLAP requirements.
See Also:
•
Oracle OLAP User's Guide
•
Oracle OLAP DML Reference
•
Oracle OLAP Java API Reference
Does Oracle Database provide data mining tools that I can use to discover
hidden meaning in my data and predict likely outcomes based on my data?
Yes, you must have an Oracle Enterprise Edition license to use Oracle Data Mining
tools. Oracle Data Mining is an option of the Enterprise Edition, as described in Table
6–2, in the Select Database Edition row.
With the Oracle Data Mining option, you can create and execute predictive and
descriptive data mining models that use a variety of algorithms.
Use the following method to install Oracle Data Mining:
1. When you run Oracle Universal Installer, select the Enterprise Edition installation
type.
2. In the Select Database Configuration screen, select the General Purpose/
Transaction Processing configuration.
See Also:
The following manuals for information about Oracle Data Mining:
•
Oracle Data Mining Concepts
•
Oracle Data Mining User's Guide
•
Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference (search for Data
Mining)
Example G-4
Database?
How do I perform backup and recovery operations for Oracle
Use Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN), which is a backup and recovery tool
integrated into Oracle Database. This tool satisfies the pressing demands of high-
G-6 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
performance, manageable backup, and recovery. Recovery Manager is native to the
database server, automatically tracks database structure changes, and optimizes
operations accordingly. In addition, Recovery Manager is integrated with leading tape
media management products, so that Oracle database backups can be integrated with
your existing networked data protection infrastructure.
See Also:
•
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
•
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference
Example G-5
Is Oracle Workflow included with Oracle Database?
Starting with Oracle Database 11g, Oracle Workflow is no longer released with the
database. Oracle Workflow is available with the Oracle E-Business Suite releases.
See Also:
Oracle Workflow statement of direction: http://www.oracle.com/
technetwork/middleware/ias/workflow-sod-089843.html
Example G-6 Is there a migration plan for customers that have built solutions using
Oracle Workflow?
Starting January 2006, customers are encouraged to re-create and implement
workflows using Oracle SOA Suite. Refer to the following technical migration guide
for detailed recommendations about migrating Oracle Workflow processes to Oracle
SOA Suite (formerly known as Oracle BPEL Process Manager) at http://
www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/owf2bpel-132189.pdf
See Also:
Oracle Workflow statement of direction: http://www.oracle.com/
technetwork/middleware/ias/workflow-sod-089843.html
G.3 Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
The following are the frequently asked questions about installing Oracle Database
with Oracle applications:
•
How do I install my Oracle applications with Oracle Database? (page G-8)
•
How can I create web applications that communicate with Oracle Database?
(page G-8)
•
Which web server can my Oracle applications use? (page G-8)
•
How can I migrate my non-Oracle applications to Oracle? (page G-8)
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation G-7
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
How do I install my Oracle applications with Oracle Database?
In most cases, install Oracle Database itself, then install the Oracle application. The
Oracle Universal Installer for that application prompts you for the connection
information. Check the application documentation requirements.
If you must implement your applications with Oracle Real Applications Clusters
databases, see Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide and Oracle Grid
Infrastructure Installation Guide for your platform.
How can I create web applications that communicate with Oracle Database?
Install Oracle Application Express and a web server. Use Oracle Universal Installer to
install Oracle Database. Oracle Application Express is automatically installed, when
you install Oracle database.
See Also:
Oracle Application Express Installation Guide
Which web server can my Oracle applications use?
Install Oracle HTTP Server, which ships on a separate media, or use the XML DB
HTTP Protocol Server and the embedded PL/SQL Gateway that installs with Oracle
Database 12c.
How can I migrate my non-Oracle applications to Oracle?
Use Oracle SQL Developer to migrate your non-Oracle applications to Oracle. Oracle
SQL Developer software and documentation is available on Oracle Help Center at:
http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html?tab=2#sqldev
G.4 Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools
(Gateways)
Learn how to access and install Gateway products.
How can I access my Oracle applications access data in a non-Oracle database system?
(page G-8)
How can I access my Oracle applications access data in a non-Oracle database
system?
You can use Oracle Database Gateway as the connectivity tool to enable Oracle
applications to access data in non-Oracle databases. The following are the functions of
Oracle Database Gateway:
•
Integrates a non-Oracle database into your Oracle Database environment.
•
Enables Oracle PL/SQL applications to integrate with APPC-enabled transactions,
or access messages in IBM Websphere MQ.
You can install the Gateway product on a computer independent of the Oracle
application, Oracle database, and non-Oracle database.
For example, suppose you have the following scenario:
G-8 Database Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
•
Oracle Database is installed on a Linux computer.
•
The Oracle application is installed on a Microsoft Windows computer and
accesses data from the Oracle database on the Linux computer.
•
The Oracle application needs to join data in a DB2 database on Solaris Operating
System and an Oracle Database on Linux.
You have the option of installing Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA on the Solaris
computer where DB2 is running, on Linux where Oracle is running, or on a third
computer.
Table G-1 (page G-9) lists the non-Oracle database systems that you can access from
Oracle applications, and the Gateways products that are available for those systems.
Table G-1
Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
IBM DB2 Universal
Database (UDB)
Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA.
IBM DB2 z/OS
Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA User's Guide
Use Oracle Database Gateway for APPC Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft
Windows and Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA User's Guide
IBM DB2/400
Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA User's Guide
WebSphere MQ
Oracle Database Gateway for WebSphere MQ.
Oracle Database Gateway for WebSphere MQ Installation and User's Guide
CICS/TS
Oracle Database Gateway for APPC.
IMS/TM
Use Oracle Database Gateway for APPC Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft
Windows and Oracle Database Gateway for APPC User's Guide
SQL Server
Oracle Database Gateway for SQL Server.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and Oracle Database Gateway for SQL Server User's Guide
Sybase Adaptive Server
Oracle Database Gateway for Sybase.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and Oracle Database Gateway for Sybase User's Guide
Teradata
Oracle Database Gateway for Teradata.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and Oracle Database Gateway for Teradata User's Guide
Informix Server
Oracle Database Gateway for Informix.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and Oracle Database Gateway for Informix User's Guide
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation G-9
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
G-10 Installation Guide
Index
A
accessibility software, Java Access Bridge, A-1
account control, 4-12
accounts
ANONYMOUS, 8-7
APEX_030200, 8-7
APEX_PUBLIC_USER, 8-7
CTXSYS, 8-7
DBSNMP, 8-7
DIP, 8-7
EXFSYS, 8-8
FLOWS_FILES, 8-8
HR, 8-8
LBACSYS, 8-8
MDDATA, 8-8
MDSYS, 8-8
ORACLE_OCM, 8-8
ORDPLUGINS, 8-9
ORDSYS, 8-9
OUTLN, 8-9
SI_INFORMTN_SCHEMA, 8-9
SYS, 8-9
SYSTEM, 8-10
WMSYS, 8-10
XDB, 8-10
admin directory, B-5
administrative user names, listed, 8-7
Administrators group, requirements for Oracle
installations, 6-2
aliases, multiple on computers, D-2
ANONYMOUS administrative user name, 8-7
APEX_030200 administrative user name, 8-7
APEX_PUBLIC_USER administrative user name, 8-7
applications, migrating non-Oracle applications to
Oracle, G-8
ASMCA, 8-3
asmcmd utility, 5-17
asmtool utility, 5-16
asmtoolg utility, 5-15
authentication support
preinstallation requirements, 2-12
Automatic Memory Management
Automatic Memory Management (continued)
about, 1-4
Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM)
configuring Oracle Database to communicate
with, 7-21
B
backups of database
flash_area_recovery directory, B-6
Oracle Database Recovery Manager, G-6
perform before upgrading, 6-3
Basic installation method, 3-10
See also Advanced installation method
best practices, 7-5
bind order of the adapters
about, D-3
C
CDBs, 6-5, 6-21–6-23, 8-11, C-11
certification, hardware and software, 3-5
character sets, 6-14
cloning
Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager in a
Cloned Oracle Home, 6-27
Cloud Control
See Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control
Cluster Synchronization Services (CSS)
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
clusters
installation guidelines, 6-3
See also Oracle Clusterware, Oracle Real
Application Clusters
cluvfy comp healthcheck, 7-5
commands
runcluvfy.bat, 5-19
setup.exe, 5-19
components
for single Oracle homes, 3-9
installation of single Oracle home components,
3-9
computers with multiple aliases, D-2
computers, non-networked, D-2
Index-1
configuration assistants
suppressing during silent or response file
installation, C-7
troubleshooting, F-4
See also Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant (DBCA), Net Configuration Assistant
(NetCA)
configuring disks for Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 6-5
Configuring Oracle Configuration Manager in a
Cloned Oracle Home, 6-27
Connection Manager
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
console mode, 6-14
control files
about, 8-15
using Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control with, 8-15
cron jobs, 1-4
CTXSYS administrative user name, 8-7
custom database
requirements when using Automatic Storage
Management, 5-10
D
data files
about, 8-13
creating separate directories for, 2-11
minimum disk space for, 2-10
options for placing on file systems, 2-9
recommendations for file system, 2-10
data loss
minimizing with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 5-11
data mining tools
Oracle Data Mining, G-6
data warehousing tool
Oracle OLAP, G-3
Database Security
preinstallation requirements, 2-12
Database Upgrade Assistant, computers with
minimum memory, 6-3
databases
accounts, listed, 8-7
control files, 8-15
data files, 8-13
initialization parameter file, 8-13
naming, 6-21
OLAP support (Oracle OLAP), G-3
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle
ASM)
requirements, 5-9
recovery with Oracle Backup and Recovery, G-6
redo log files, 8-14
security management, G-4
starting, 8-4
stopping, 8-4
Index-2
databases (continued)
tablespaces, 8-13
DB_DOMAIN parameter, 8-12
DB_NAME
parameter, 8-12
DBCA
See Oracle Database Configuration Assistant
dbca.rsp file
about, C-5
using, C-9
DBSNMP administrative user name
about, 8-7
default control files, 8-15
default data files, 8-13
default initialization parameter file, init.ora, 8-13
default tablespaces, 8-13
Deinstallation Tool
about, 9-2
description
database restart, 5-1
Oracle Restart, 5-1
Desktop Class
about, 3-10
device names
creating with asmtool, 5-16
creating with asmtoolg, 5-15
differences between installing Oracle on Windows and
UNIX, 3-4
DIP administrative user name, 8-7
Direct NFS
oranfstab file, 7-12
Direct NFS Client
enabling, 7-16
Enabling HCC, 7-16
SNMP support, 7-16
directory
creating separate data file directories, 2-11
database file directory, 2-10
disk space
checking, 2-4
requirements for preconfigured database in
Oracle ASM, 5-10
diskpart.exe tool
about, 5-14
syntax, 5-14
disks
configuring for Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 6-5
documentation
additional Oracle documentation, xvi
DVD drive, installing from, 6-7
E
environment variables
NLS_LANG, 6-13
ORACLE_HOME
preventing installation, 6-3
environment variables (continued)
PATH
set in Registry, 3-4
TEMP and TMP
hardware requirements, 2-5
TMP and TMPDIR, 5-4
errors
configuration assistants, F-4
installation, F-3, F-5
silent mode, F-3
example01.DBF data file, 8-14
executeConfigTools, C-12
EXFSYS administrative user name, 8-8
external redundancy
Oracle Automatic Storage Management
redundancy level, 5-9
F
failure groups
characteristics in Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 5-11
FAQ for installation, G-1
Fast Recovery Area, 7-22
fatal errors, F-5
file systems
data file and recovery file placement options, 2-9
system requirements, 2-3
using for data files, 2-10
files
Oracle Universal Installer log files, F-3
tnsnames.ora, 7-19
Flash Recovery Area
See Fast Recovery Area
flash_area_recovery directory, B-6
FLOWS_FILES administrative user name, 8-8
frequently asked installation questions, G-1
G
Gateways products FAQ, G-8
generic documentation references
Windows-specific parameter file name and
location, 8-13
Windows-specific redo log file location, 8-14
Windows-specific redo log file size, 8-14
global database name
about, 8-12
identifying, 8-12
Global Database Name
about, 6-21
global database name, defined, 8-12
globalization
localization for client connections, 7-4
NLS_LANG
and client connections, 7-4
H
hardware certification, 3-5
healthchecks, 7-5
high redundancy
Oracle Automatic Storage Management
redundancy level, 5-9
host name, setting before installation, D-1
HR administrative user name, 8-8
I
IBM WebSphere MQ databases, G-9
image
install, 5-3
initialization parameter file
about, 8-13
in database, 8-13
init.ora, 8-13
installActions.log file, F-3
installation
completing, 6-18
component-specific guidelines, 6-3
computer aliases, multiple, D-2
configuration options, about, 3-11
differences between installing Oracle on UNIX
and Windows, 3-4
downloading software from Oracle Technology
Network, 6-9
DVD drive, 6-7
errors
log session, F-3
while configuration assistant runs, F-5
FAQ for Oracle Database products, G-1
guidelines, 6-18
Java Access Bridge, A-2
laptops, D-2
log files, F-3
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle
ASM)
requirements, 5-9
Oracle Universal Installer, about, 3-6
overview, 3-1
planning, 3-1
postinstallation tasks, 7-1
preinstallation considerations, 6-1
procedure, 6-17
remote installation with remote access software,
6-8
remote installation, DVD drive, 6-7
response file mode error handling, F-3
response files
errors, F-3
restrictions on installing in pre-8.1.5 homes, 3-7
restrictions on using old Oracle Installer, 3-7
reviewing a log of an installation session, F-3
silent mode error handling, F-3
Index-3
installation (continued)
single Oracle home components, 3-9
troubleshooting, F-1
upgrading, G-1
with other components, G-1
installation methods
See Desktop Class, Server Class
Installing
Oracle restart, 5-21
invalid objects
recompiling, 7-8
J
Java Access Bridge
about, A-1
installing, A-2
Java Runtime Environment
See JRE
Jobs system, 7-20
JRE (Java Runtime Environment)
requirements, 2-3
restrictions on modifying, 3-7
version used by Oracle, 3-7
K
Kerberos Based Authentication for Direct NFS, 7-16
L
languages
installing Oracle components in different
languages, 6-16
using Oracle components in different languages,
6-15
laptops, installing Oracle Database on, D-2
LBACSYS administrative user name, 8-8
licensing, 1-4
listeners
stopping existing listener process, 4-11
local device, using for data files, 2-10
log files
reviewing an installation session, F-3
troubleshooting, F-3
log files locations in OFA, B-10
Logical Volume Manager (LVM)
recommendations for Automatic Storage
Management, 5-9
loopback adapters
about, D-3
checking if installed, D-3
computers with multiple aliases, D-2
installing, 2-8, D-3
installing on Windows Server 2008, D-4
non-networked computers, D-2
removing, D-6
Index-4
loopback adapters (continued)
See also network adapters, primary network
adapters
M
MDDATA administrative user name, 8-8
MDSYS administrative user name, 8-8
migrating applications to Oracle, G-8
migrating non-Oracle databases to Oracle, G-3
mirroring Oracle ASM disk groups, 5-9
multihomed computers, installing on, D-1
multiple aliases, computers with, D-2
multiple Oracle homes
setting, D-1
System Identifier (SID), 8-13
multitenant container databases
See CDBs
My Oracle Support site
about, 3-5
accessing, 3-5
N
Net Configuration Assistant (NetCA)
response files, C-7
running at command prompt, C-7
suppressing during silent or response file
installation, C-7
troubleshooting, F-4
Net Services Configuration Assistant, computers with
minimum memory, 6-3
netca.rsp file
about, C-5
using, C-7
network adapters
computers with multiple aliases, D-2
how primary adapter is determined, D-3
non-networked computers, D-2
primary, on computers with multiple aliases, D-2
See also loopback adapters, primary network
adapters
network cards, multiple, D-1
network protocols, supported, 2-6
network topics
computers with multiple aliases, D-2
laptops, D-2
listed, 2-8, D-1
loopback adapters, 2-8, D-3
multiple network cards, D-1
non-networked computers, D-2
NLS_LANG environment variable, 6-13
non-networked computers, D-2
normal redundancy, Oracle Automatic Storage
Management redundancy level, 5-9
NTFS system requirements, 2-3
NTLM (NT Lan Manager)
NTLM (NT Lan Manager) (continued)
authenticating Windows domain users, xxviii
authenticating Windows local users, xxviii
deprecation, xxviii
O
OEM
See Oracle Enterprise Manager
OLAP tools
about, G-6
Oracle OLAP, G-3
operating system
reviewing common practices, 2-7
operating systems, supported, 2-5
Optimal Flexible Architecture
advantages, B-2
overview, B-1
standard, B-1
Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA)
changes for this release, B-2
default Optimal Flexible Architecture database,
B-7
differences since previous releases, B-3
directory naming conventions, B-4
nondefault Optimal Flexible Architecture
database 2, B-7
Oracle base directory, B-9
Oracle Database directory tree, affect on, B-3
Oracle home directory, B-7
symbolic links, B-9
Windows and UNIX differences, B-8
ORAchk
and Upgrade Readiness Assessment, 1-4
Oracle ACFS
enabling, 5-23
Installing Oracle RAC binaries not supported on
Oracle Flex Cluster, 5-6
restrictions for Oracle Restart, 5-6
Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows
behavior with multiple Oracle homes, 3-9
configuration, 7-17
Oracle applications
installing with Oracle Database, G-8
Oracle Automatic Storage Management
asmcmd utility, 5-17
configuring disks, 6-5
considerations before installing, 5-7
installation, testing, 5-17
password file, 5-8
SPFILE server parameter file, 5-8
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM)
asmtool utility, 5-16
asmtoolg utility, 5-15
DAS disks, 5-12
failure groups
characteristics, 5-11
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) (continued)
getting started using, 8-3
managing, 8-3
mirroring, 5-9
Oracle ASM asmcmd utility, 8-3
Oracle ASM disk groups
managing, 8-3
recommendations for, 5-9
partition creation, 5-12
redundancy levels, 5-9
SAN disks, 5-12
silent or response file mode installations, C-3
space required for preconfigured database, 5-10
starting and stopping, 8-3
Oracle Automatic Storage Management Configuration
Assistant, 8-3
Oracle base directory
about, 3-7, B-4
example, B-7
installation, 3-7
location on UNIX, B-9
location on Windows, B-9
Oracle Cluster Registry port, E-3
Oracle Clusterware
about, G-3
installed before Oracle Database, 6-3
used with Oracle Real Application Clusters, G-3
Oracle components
using in different languages, 6-15
Oracle Data Mining
about, G-6
installing, G-6
Oracle Database
administering and monitoring, G-4
Automatic Storage Management, configuring
communication with, 7-21
checking installed contents, 8-2
creating data file directories, 2-11
getting started using
accessing, 8-5, 8-6
starting and stopping database, 8-5, 8-6
installing with Oracle applications, G-8
installing with other Oracle components, G-1
minimum disk space requirements, 2-10
naming, 6-21
requirements with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 5-10
security management, G-4
starting and stopping, 8-4
upgrading, G-1
Windows Terminal Services support, 2-7
See also installation, postinstallation, removing,
requirements
Oracle Database Advanced Queuing, 7-17
Oracle Database Client
configuring connections, G-2
requirements, 2-6
Index-5
Oracle Database components
administering and monitoring, G-4
connectivity FAQ, G-8
FAQ on installing, G-1
installing with Oracle applications, G-7
installing with Oracle Database tools, G-3
Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA)
about, 3-11
computers with minimum memory, 6-3
response files, C-8
suppressing during silent or response file
installation, C-7
troubleshooting, F-4
Oracle Database directory tree, B-3
Oracle Database Gateway
listed products, G-9
Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN)
about, G-6
Oracle Database SID
about, 6-21
naming rules, 6-21
ORACLE_SID environment variable, 3-4
Oracle Database Upgrade Assistant, computers with
minimum memory, 6-3
Oracle Database Vault
audit policy, 3-9
postinstallation task, 7-18
Oracle Disk Manager (ODM)
library file, 7-16
Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control
using to modify control files, 8-15
using to modify redo log files, 8-14
using to view control files, 8-15
using to view redo log files, 8-14
Oracle Enterprise Manager (OEM)
jobs system, setting correct credentials, 7-20
preinstallation requirements, 2-12
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express
logging into, 8-2
password management, 8-11
port number, 8-2
Oracle Flex Clusters
Oracle Restart
restrictions for, 5-6
restrictions for Oracle ACFS, 5-6
Oracle Grid Infrastructure
restrictions for Oracle ACFS, 5-6
Oracle home directory
about, 3-8
examples, B-7
location, B-5
multiple homes, network considerations, D-1
multiple homes, precedence of components, 3-9
Optimal Flexible Architecture, B-7
single Oracle home components, 3-9
specifying, B-7
Index-6
Oracle host name, setting before installation, D-1
Oracle Internet Directory, G-5
Oracle Messaging Gateway feature, 7-17
Oracle Net Listener
ports
ranges and protocol, E-2
Oracle Net Services
configuring, 7-18
postinstallation task, 7-18
stopping existing listener, 4-11
Oracle Net Services Configuration Assistant,
computers with minimum memory, 6-3
Oracle OLAP
about, G-3
Oracle Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction
Server
ports
changing, E-3
Oracle Provider for OLE DB
behavior with multiple Oracle homes, 3-9
Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC)
installed before Oracle Database, 6-3
installing with Oracle Enterprise Manager, G-4
Oracle Clusterware
about, G-3
Oracle Restart
description, 5-1
Installing, 5-21
password file, C-12
Oracle Schemas, xvi
oracle service user, 4-3
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server
ports
ranges and protocol, E-3
Oracle SQL Developer
accessing, 8-6
migrating non-Oracle applications to Oracle, G-8
migrating non-Oracle databases to Oracle, G-3
Oracle Technology Network (OTN)
downloading software from, 6-9
Oracle Text knowledge base, 7-19
Oracle Universal Installer
location of executable, C-7
running in different languages, 6-16
Oracle Universal Installer (OUI)
about, 3-6
guidelines in using, 6-3
installation guidelines, 6-3
log files, F-3
response files, C-1
restrictions on installing in pre-8.1.5 homes, 3-7
running at command line, C-7
Oracle WebLogic Server, G-3
Oracle XML DB
about, G-5
ports, ranges and protocol, E-2
XDB administrative user name, 8-10
ORACLE_BASE directory
See Oracle base directory
ORACLE_HOME directory
See Oracle home directory, ORACLE_HOME
environment variable
ORACLE_HOME environment variable
preventing installation, 6-3
ORACLE_HOSTNAME environment variable
computers with multiple aliases, D-2
setting before installation, D-1
ORACLE_OCM administrative user name, 8-8
Oracle-managed files feature, 2-12
ORADATA directory, explained, B-5
oranfstab configuration file, 7-12
ORDPLUGINS administrative user name, 8-9
ORDSYS administrative user name, 8-9
OUI
See Oracle Universal Installer
OUTLN administrative user name, 8-9
P
partitions
using with Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 5-9
See also diskpart.exe tool
password file for Oracle Automatic Storage
Management, 5-8
passwords
for administrative accounts, 8-6
guidelines, 8-10
managing in SQL*Plus, 8-11
patch set information, downloading, 7-3
PATH environment variable
set in Registry, 3-4
PDBs, 6-5, 6-22, C-11
PGA
and memory management, 1-4
PL/SQL
external procedures postinstallation task, 7-20
pluggable databases
See PDBs
portlist.ini file, E-2
ports
access URLs, E-2
Cluster Synchronization Services, ranges and
protocol, E-2
configured for applications, E-2
Connection Manager, ranges and protocol, E-2
default ranges, E-1
Oracle Cluster Registry, E-3
Oracle Net Listener
ranges and protocol, E-2
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server
changing, E-3
Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server,
ranges and protocol, E-3
Oracle XML DB, ranges and protocol, E-2
postinstallation
configuration of Oracle software, C-12
postinstallation tasks
changing passwords, 8-10
configuring secure sockets layer, 7-8
database-to-Automatic Storage Management
communication, 7-21
getting started using Oracle Database, 8-1
Jobs system, 7-20
Oracle Administration Assistant for Windows,
7-17
Oracle Messaging Gateway feature, 7-17
Oracle Net Services, 7-18
Oracle Text knowledge base, 7-19
PL/SQL external procedures, 7-20
setting job system credentials for Enterprise
Manager, 7-20
shared server support, 7-20
preconfigured database
Oracle Automatic Storage Management disk space
requirements, 5-10
requirements when using Oracle Automatic
Storage Management, 5-10
preinstallation
perform database backup, 6-3
requirements for Oracle Database Security, 2-12
requirements for Oracle Enterprise Manager, 2-12
preinstallation considerations, 6-1
primary network adapters
how determined, D-3
See also loopback adapters, network adapters
process, stopping existing listener process, 4-11
proxy realm, 1-4
R
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)
using for Oracle data files, 2-10
readme.txt file, E-2
recommendations
on performing software-only installations, 5-18
recovery files, options for placing on file system, 2-9
recovery of databases
Oracle Backup and Recovery, G-6
redo log files
in starter database, 8-14
using Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control with, 8-14
redundancy level
and space requirements for preconfigured
database, 5-10
for Oracle Automatic Storage Management, 5-9
Redundant Array of Independent Disks
See RAID
release notes, 3-1
remote access software, 6-8
remote installations
Index-7
remote installations (continued)
DVD drive, 6-7
remote access software, 6-8
requirements
for JRE, 2-3
for Oracle Enterprise Manager, 2-12
hard disk space, 2-3
hardware, 2-2
hardware, verifying, 2-4
Oracle Database Client, 2-6
software, 2-5
Web browser support, 2-7
Windows Terminal Services, 2-6
response file mode
about, C-2
error handling, F-3
reasons for using, C-3
See also response file mode
See also response files, silent mode
response files
about, C-2
creating
with record mode, C-5
with template, C-4
dbca.rsp, C-5
error handling, F-3
general procedure, C-3
Net Configuration Assistant, C-7
netca.rsp, C-5
Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA),
C-8
passing values at command line, C-2
specifying with Oracle Universal Installer, C-6
using, C-1
response files installation
about, C-1
roadmap for installing Oracle Database components,
G-1
server parameter file (SPFILE), 5-8
SERVICE_NAMES parameter, 8-12
services, stopping, 4-11
setup.exe
See Oracle Universal Installer (OUI)
SGA
and memory management, 1-4
shared server support, 7-20
SI_INFORMTN_SCHEMA administrative user name,
SID
8-9
See Oracle Database SID
silent mode
about, C-2
error handling, F-3
errors, F-3
reasons for using, C-3
See also response file mode, response files
single Oracle home components, 3-9
software certification, 3-5
SPFILE server parameter file, 5-8
SQL Developer
accessing, 8-6
SQL*Plus
accessing, 8-5
password management, 8-11
sqlnet.ora file, enabling Windows native
authentication, 7-21
SSL, 7-8
stopping existing services, 4-11
symbolic links, B-9
SYS administrative user name, 8-9
SYSTEM
tablespace, description, 8-14
SYSTEM administrative user name, 8-10
system requirements
on NTFS file systems, 2-3
system01.dbf data file, 8-14
root user, 6-18
T
S
Sample Schemas
administrative user names, 8-7
tablespaces and data files, 8-14
schemas
database schema passwords, 6-23
Oracle Schemas, about, xvi
Sample Schemas administrative user names, 8-7
Sample Schemas tablespaces and data files, 8-14
security
management tools, G-4
Oracle Database Security Strong Authentication
requirements, 2-12
Server Class
about, 3-10
See also Desktop Class
Index-8
tablespaces
expanding for large sorts, 8-14
in database, 8-13
SYSTEM, 8-14
TEMP, 8-14
UNDOTBS, 8-14
USERS, 8-14
TEMP
tablespace (temp01.dbf), 8-14
TEMP environment variable, hardware requirements,
2-5
temp01.dbf data file, 8-14
temporary directory, 2-4
temporary disk space
checking, 2-4
freeing, 2-4
tmp directory
checking space in, 2-4
freeing space in, 2-4
TMP environment variable
hardware requirements, 2-5
TMPDIR environment variable, 5-4
tnsnames.ora file, 7-19
troubleshooting
cron jobs and installation, 1-4
fatal errors, F-5
Inventory log files, F-3
user names (continued)
ORDSYS, 8-9
OUTLN, 8-9
SI_INFORMTN_SCHEMA, 8-9
SYS, 8-9
SYSTEM, 8-10
WMSYS, 8-10
XDB, 8-10
USERS
tablespace (users01.dbf), 8-14
utlrp.sql, 7-8
U
W
UNDOTBS
tablespace (undotbs01.dbf), 8-14
UNIX
differences between installing Oracle on
Windows, 3-4
unsupported components
on Windows Terminal Services, 2-6
upgrading
and ORAchk Upgrade Readiness Assessment, 1-4
backing up before upgrading, 6-3
user account control, 4-12
user accounts, managing, 4-12
user names
ANONYMOUS, 8-7
APEX_030200, 8-7
APEX_PUBLIC_USER, 8-7
changing passwords, 8-10
CTXSYS, 8-7
DBSNMP, 8-7
DIP, 8-7
EXFSYS, 8-8
FLOWS_FILES, 8-8
HR, 8-8
LBACSYS, 8-8
MDDATA, 8-8
MDSYS, 8-8
ORACLE_OCM, 8-8
ORDPLUGINS, 8-9
Web browser support, 2-7
WebSphere MQ database, G-9
Windows
compilers, supported, 2-5
credentials for job system, 7-20
network protocol, supported, 2-6
operating systems, supported, 2-5
Oracle Database installation differences with
UNIX, 3-4
Windows 7
user account control, 4-12
Windows 8
user account control, 4-12
Windows Server 2008
user account control, 4-12
Windows Server 2008 R2
user account control, 4-12
Windows Services utility, starting and stopping
databases, 8-5
Windows Terminal Services
support, 2-7
unsupported components, 2-6
WMSYS administrative user name, 8-10
X
XDB administrative user name, 8-10
XML data, G-5
Index-9
Index-10
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