Annual report - Ahold Delhaize
2012
Annual
report
W W W . D E L H A I Z E G R O U P . C O M
TOGETHER THE BEST FOR LIFE
DELHAIZE GROUP, A
LEADING FOOD RETAILER
Delhaize Group has leading positions in food retailing in key markets. Our
operating companies have acquired these leading positions through distinct
go-to-market strategies. The Group is committed to offer its customers a
locally differentiated shopping experience, to deliver superior value and to
maintain high social, environmental and ethical standards. Our Group’s
strength is supported by the close cooperation of its operating companies at
both the regional and global levels.
840 stores
16 304 associates
Belgium
SEE&A
USA
1 058 stores
36 859 associates
158 000
associates
1 553
stores
104 613
associates
11
3
countries
continents
NYSE Euronext Brussels
(ticker symbol: DELB)
New York Stock Exchange
(ticker symbol: DEG)
3 451
stores (+ 43 vs 2011)
22.7
bil €
of revenues
CONTENT
GROUP
02 Key Performance Indicators
04 Interview with the Chairman
and the CEO
08 Segment Overview
10 Visions, Values and Principles
STRATEGY
12
14
18
23
Our strategy at work
Growth
Efficiency
Sustainability
REVIEW (1)
These chapters contain the
information required by the
Belgian Companies Code to be
included in the Management
Report on the consolidated
financial statements and
constitute in the aggregate
such Management Report.
(1)
26
29
32
35
Financial Review
United States
Belgium
Southeastern Europe & Asia
GOVERNANCE (1)
38 Our Board of Directors
39 Our Executive Committee
RISK FACTORS (1)
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (1)
INVESTORS
168 Shareholder Information
GLOSSARY
GROUP
KEy PERFORMANCE
indicaTors
7m72
io € free cas
h flow
reVenues
operaTing profiT
14.0%
158 000
22.7
billion €
343
associates
64.4%
3 451
stores
+ 224 new
688
mio €
capital
expenditures
2 //
-113
United States
Belgium
SEE & Asia
United States
Belgium
SEE & Asia
202
21.6%
number of associaTes
10.4%
23.3%
dividend
157 910
66.3%
gross
United States
Belgium
SEE & Asia
5 144
mio
€ enterprise value
1.40 €
($ in millions
except per share amounts)(4)
(€ in millions except per
share amounts)
Change vs
Prior Year
2012
2012
2011(5)
2010
29 213
22 737
21 110
20 850
+7.7%
+1.2%
502
390
813
1 024
-52.0%
-20.6%
Net profit from continuing operations
161
125
477
576
-73.7%
-17.2%
Net profit (Group share)
135
105
475
574
-77.8%
-17.4%
Free cash flow
992
772
-231
665
N/A
N/A
+12.8%
RESULTS
Revenues
Operating profit
(1)
FINANCIAL POSITION
Total assets
2012
2011(5)
15 335
11 936
12 292
10 902
-2.9%
Total equity
6 672
5 193
5 419
5 069
-4.2%
+6.9%
Net debt(1)
2 647
2 060
2 647
1 787
-22.1%
+48.1%
Enterprise value(1)(3)
6 609
5 144
7 069
7 400
-27.2%
-4.5%
PER SHARE INFORMATION (in €/$)
Group share in net profit (basic)(2)
1.35
1.05
4.71
5.73
-77.8%
-17.7%
Group share in net profit (diluted)(2)
1.34
1.04
4.68
5.68
-77.7%
-17.6%
Free cash flow(1)(2)
9.84
7.66
-2.29
6.64
N/A
N/A
+2.3%
1.35
1.05
1.32
1.29
-20.4%
Shareholders’ equity(3)
65.46
50.95
53.18
49.91
-4.2%
+6.6%
Share price (year-end)
38.87
30.25
43.41
55.27
-30.3%
-21.5%
RATIOS (%)
Operating margin
1.7%
3.9%
4.9%
-213bps
-106bps
Net margin
0.5%
2.2%
2.8%
-178bps
-51bps
39.7%
48.8%
35.3%
-9.1ppt
+13.6ppt
Net dividend
Net debt to equity(1)
CURRENCY INFORMATION
Average € per $ rate
0.7783
0.7184
0.7543
+8.3%
-4.8%
€ per $ rate at year-end
0.7579
0.7729
0.7484
-1.9%
+3.3%
3 451
3 408
2 800
+1.3%
+21.7%
Capital expenditures
688
762
660
-9.7%
+15.5%
Number of associates (thousands)
158
160
139
-1.2%
+15.3%
OTHER INFORMATION
Number of sales outlets
Full-time equivalents (thousands)
Weighted average number of shares (thousands)
120
122
103
-1.5%
+18.0%
100 777
100 684
100 271
+0.1%
+0.4%
(1) These are non-GAAP financial measures. (2) Calculated using the weighted average number of shares over the year. (3) Calculated using the total number of
shares at the end of the year. (4) Calculated using an exchange rate of €1 = $1.2848. (5) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations in
discontinued operations and of the finalization of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 3
GROUP
Interview
“The best chef makes the
tastiest dishes with the simplest
ingredients and resources”
On May 26, 2012 Mats Jansson succeeded Count Jacobs de Hagen as Chairman
of the Board. Mats Jansson brings significant experience, notably in food retail, to
Delhaize Group. Together with Chief Executive Officer Pierre-Olivier Beckers he shared
his reflections on his first year and looks forward to the next.
How do you look back on 2012?
Mats Jansson: 2012 was both a
challenging and an exciting year for
Delhaize Group and for me as Chairman. Challenging because the performance of the Group was under
pressure as a result of the difficult
market circumstances in most of
the countries where we operate and
exciting because as Chairman of the
Board I found myself accompanied
by a diverse and professional team
with one single mission: to guide Delhaize Group through this challenging
period. And although I am aware that
there are still many challenges ahead
of us, I was nevertheless happy that
we were able to announce at the end
of 2012 that we firmly achieved two
important targets: underlying operating profit and free cash flow. As my
father had a grocery store, I learned
from my childhood that retail is about
giving your customers what they
deserve: excellent service, a high
quality assortment and affordable
prices. After becoming a member of
the Board in 2011, the Group’s spirit
really reminded me of my father’s
store and the way he treated his customers as his most important asset.
How would you describe 2012
from an operational point of
view?
See the video on
www.delhaizegroup.com
4 //
MJ: In the past, when there was a
downturn or a recession, food retail
companies showed much more resilience than they do today. Food retail,
as one of the few defensive sectors,
over de
livered o
was considered an exception with
continued attractive growth prospects. This is less the case in the current and more complex environment.
Food retailers, including Delhaize
Group, are challenged to find the right
answers to satisfy a customer focused
on price but not wanting to compromise on the expectations on quality
and sustainability. Delhaize Group
has continued to work hard to take on
that challenge with already some visible results in 2012.
pierre-olivier beckers: Already at
the end of 2011 we recognized that
2012 would be a difficult year. And
although we ended the year with
2.9% revenue growth at identical
exchange rates, we realize we can
do better and aim higher to claim
our position among the best-in-class
food retailers.
I have stated it before; we are in the
middle of the river. We have left the
shore of steady healthy margins and
low revenue growth and decided to
go to the other side where we will
be able to achieve sustainable and
higher growth. It is true that the water
is rougher than we had expected, but
we have already made some significant moves in the right direction by
investing in prices at all our banners,
strengthening our presence in higher
growth markets and developing new
store formats.
mJ: Crossing a wild river requires fast
and decisive action and that is what
we are doing. We have made and will
continue to make the necessary decisions in the coming months to make
sure that we reach the other side of
the river as a stronger company.
€ 500
n
million a
nnual g
ross
savings
target
what decisions do you have
in mind?
pob: Through the years, our company grew considerably in size and
complexity. In the current environment
it is critical to increase our agility. We
are therefore determined to reduce
the complexity of the organization
and increase the speed of decision
making. Our mindset is really changing in this respect. Simplification and
cost awareness is really becoming
everyone’s focus. Because retail is
detail, we need to turn every penny
twice before we spend it and when
we spend it, it has to benefit both the
customer and the company.
mJ: We are operating in an industry that is going through important
changes and that is facing important challenges, so it is of the utmost
importance that we keep our structure and our procedures simple. In
2013, we will continue to strengthen
our focus on cost control and capital allocation discipline. In times like
these, you must focus your resources
even more than usual and you need
to come up with the best of what
you have. For everything you do. The
best chef makes the tastiest dishes
with the simplest ingredients and
resources.
what are the ingredients to
make a winning recipe?
mJ: If you are at the end of the value
chain, you have to be extremely customer oriented. you have to understand what the customer needs,
monitor the trends and challenge
yourself to verify that you are positioned correctly to fulfill the long term
demands of the customer. And in
order to have enough room to invest
in the customer offer, you have to
search continuously for productivity improvements. you have to be
extremely efficient in all parts of the
value chain, from the supply chain, to
the wholesale operations and finally
on the store level. I am convinced that
we are making the right moves and
are on our way to reach this level.
A third element is that as a company,
you need to be able to attract talent.
At Delhaize Group we have developed strong programs to achieve this
goal. In addition to those, our very real
and lively values are a strong point of
attraction for young talent.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 5
GROUP
is the delhaize group strategy
still founded on the new game
plan?
pob: Food retail is indeed about
large quantities and efficient processes. This makes people highly
important. An example of what we
did in this respect is the launch of a
high level international trainee program in 2009. Today these trainees
have found their way in our company
and have become valuable ambassadors of the Delhaize Group brand
and the banners it represents. The
number of candidate trainees is now
close to one thousand for each class
of 10 selected recruits, underlining on
the one hand our determination to
look for the best human capital and
on the other hand the attractiveness
of Delhaize Group as an employer.
mJ: Absolutely. The three pillars,
accelerated growth, higher efficiency
and sustainability that were set forward when Delhaize Group launched
the strategic plan at the beginning of
2010, are more than ever crucial in
our efforts to become a best-in-class
retailer. The whole organization is
focused on delivering on this strategy for all of our stakeholders. And
in order to retain talented associates
it is crucial to offer them a common
set of visions and values. They are the
overarching element of our strategic
framework.
pob: However, we realized that, in
order to make fast and coherent decisions to execute our strategic choices
across three continents, we needed
to improve our tools. So we developed eight principles (see overview on
page 11). They are designed to help all
of our associates, from the store floor
to the members of the Executive Committee, to make daily decisions that
are consistent with and in support of
our Group strategy.
generating free cash flow
became one of the critical action
points in 2012. why is this so
important?
maTs Jansson
chairman delhaiZe group
i learned from my childhood that retail is
about giving your customers what they
deserve: excellent service, a high quality
assortment and affordable prices.
6 //
pob: In 2012, we set a target of €500
million free cash flow. As technical as
this may sound, the importance of
this key performance indicator cannot be underestimated. It is crucial
in these difficult times to safeguard
the liquidity and the financing of the
company. It is the blood we need to
ensure that we can keep the virtuous
circle turning and continue to focus on
our customers. When we announced
the €500 million target it was considered very ambitious, but at the end
of 2012 we are pleased to have over
delivered on our promise. This was
made possible by rigorously monitoring our working capital, by a ruthless
discipline on capital allocation and by
driving the operations in the stores.
It provides us with confidence in our
future. The focus on cash flow was
also an important signal to the investor community. In December we suc-
cessfully refinanced a Euro and Dollar
bond with a new €400 million bond,
resulting in lower financing costs and
improving our debt profile.
in the u.s. food lion got a lot
of attention in 2012.
pob: The preparation work for the
Food Lion Brand strategy and the first
steps of its implementation took place
in 2011 and we continued the roll-out
in 2012. Given its importance, it was
paramount to do the job right from
the start. With 62% or more than 700
of the Food Lion stores repositioned
today, we can say that we have made
significant progress. More importantly, the results of the repositioned
stores continue to be pleasing. We
see meaningful uplifts in transactions,
volumes and ultimately comparable
store sales growth. Also, the stores
that have cycled the first 12 months
show year-on-year growth in transactions, items and sales. Customer feedback points to improved perception
in terms of service levels in the store,
in terms of variety in fresh produce
and private label and finally in terms
of price as the accompanying price
investments have not gone unnoticed.
mJ: Food Lion had to step up its efforts
to be more in line with what customers need on service levels and prices. I
was in the U.S. several times last year
and I was impressed by our operations. The repositioning work we are
doing is a reflection of the new reality
in food retail, so what we are doing,
i.e reducing the price gap, closing
underperforming stores and polishing the image of the brand, is the right
approach. It is too early to say that
we have solved all problems, but we
are clearly doing the right things to
increase and further deploy the real
potential of Food Lion.
what are the next steps you
will take to fire up the u.s.
operations?
pob: It is obvious that we want to
stay on top of our game to safeguard
the Group´s interests in the U.S. In
2012, we were faced with increased
competitive pressure for our Hannaford banner. In order to stay relevant
to our customers in this market, we
pierre-oliVier beckers
ceo delhaiZe group
have adapted and we will continue
to invest in price, in assortment and
in our stores. We are serious about
stepping up our efforts in the U.S. This
is also demonstrated by the appointment of Roland Smith as the new CEO
for Delhaize America. He took over
from Ron Hodge who retired at the
end of the year after successfully creating the Delhaize America structure
and initiating the Food Lion repositioning. Roland came on board with
energy and determination to further
build and accelerate our efforts in
order to solidify and secure the future
of the operations in the U.S.
looking at the evolution of the
market share in belgium, it looks
like your historic base could also
use some attention.
pob: When we look at the market
share trend in Belgium, it is obvious
that we can do better and, of course,
have that ambition. There are a number of elements to explain this evolution. The current economic crisis and
waning consumer confidence are in
the advantage of the so-called price
players in the market. On top of that,
some of our competitors found traction again and new competitors
entered the market. So yes, the battleground has changed and we lost
some ground. But we know we have
the tools and the people, to regain
what we have lost. Over the last years,
we have invested heavily in the back
office, now we will focus more on our
network and on our product offering.
Delhaize in Belgium has always been
recognized as a food innovator offering unique products and service. It will
be our goal in the months and years
to come to make these points of differentiation stronger than ever before.
while delhaize group seems
to have difficulties in its mature
markets, with the portfolio in
southeastern europe it clearly
has a winning hand.
pob: The performance of our newer
operations and formats, like South-
simplification and cost awareness is really becoming everyone’s
focus. because retail is detail, we
need to turn every penny twice
before we spend it and when we
spend it, it has to benefit both the
customer and the company.
62%
of all f
o
lion sto od
reposit res
ioned
eastern Europe, Indonesia, Red
Market in Belgium and Bottom Dollar Food in the U.S., was without any
doubt one of the bright spots in 2012.
In Romania, we opened at an incredible speed 89 new stores in 2012 and
in Indonesia Super Indo celebrated
the opening of its 100th store. As was
the case last year, our operations in
Greece weathered the tough economic conditions in the country well.
Alfa Beta succeeded again in market
share growth thanks to the consistent
implementation of its strategy, based
on low prices and affordable private
brand alternatives. Of course we are
satisfied with this performance, but
we nevertheless stay vigilant with
regards to the future of the country
within the Euro zone. Not being prepared would be irresponsible.
pob: In 2013, more than ever before,
our focus will be on accelerating
revenue growth and on value creation. Further price investments, selective store openings and comparable
store sales growth should result in
an increased top line while a ruthless
discipline in our capital allocation in
combination with a new strategic cost
plan and focus on free cash flow generation should result in value creation.
By delivering on these two key priorities we will not only reach the other
side of the river, will be well positioned
far beyond 2013.
looking forward, what are
the key priorities for 2013?
mJ: I have had significant experience
navigating through rough waters. The
most important lesson I have learned
from those experiences is that an
organization has to be focused on a
limited number of high impact priorities. Speed and impeccable execution
will be required to win the hearts and
the wallets of the customers and to
keep you in the game. And as I said
before, the overall priority is to continue to deliver on this strategy and
increase the value for both our customers and our shareholders.
+ 224 new stores
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 7
GROUP
usa
The american markeT
1 627
1 650
1 553
998
742
441
operaTing profiT
(in millions of $)
10
11
12
10
11
12
103 839
107 237
104 613
number of associaTes
18 800
reVenues
(in millions of $)
19 230
At the end of 2012, Delhaize Group operated
companies in eleven countries on three
continents: America, Europe and Asia. For
reporting purposes, these companies have
been grouped into three segments: the
United States, Belgium and Southeastern
Europe & Asia. Delhaize Group operates a
total network of 3 451 stores
number of sTores
18 807
delhaiZe
group, an
inTernaTional
local food
reTailer
With $18 800 million (€14 632 million) in revenues and
a network of 1 553 stores at the end of 2012, the U.S. is
the largest market for Delhaize Group. Of total Group
revenues, 64.4% came from the five U.S. banners
operating along the East coast, from Maine down to
Florida and covering 18 states.
10
11
12
10
11
12
Ò read more on page 29
8 //
SEE
ASIA
BE
236
243
202
368
937
1 058
10
11
12
10
11
12
10
11
12
11
12
NUMBER OF ASSOCIATES
4 922
17 207
16 857
16 304
1 863
2 450
3 183
17 469
35 651
36 859
REVENUES(1)
(in millions of €)
4 845
NUMBER OF ASSOCIATES
10
4 800
REVENUES
(in millions of €)
OPERATING PROFIT(1)
(in millions of €)
-113
840
NUMBER OF STORES
821
OPERATING PROFIT
(in millions of €)
805
NUMBER OF STORES
Delhaize Group’s Southeastern Europe & Asia segment
(SEE & Asia) includes the operations in Greece, Romania,
Indonesia and the Maxi-operations in four Balkan countries
(Serbia, Bulgaria, Bosnia & Herzegovina and Montenegro).
The Albanian activities were sold at the start of 2013. The
SEE & Asia segment generated revenues of €3 183 million
in 2012 (14% of the Group total).
81
Belgium is Delhaize Group’s historical home market.
At the end of 2012, Delhaize Group operated a multiformat network of 840 stores in Belgium and the Grand
Duchy of Luxembourg. In 2012, Delhaize Belgium’s
revenues of €4 922 million accounted for 21.6% of the
Group total.
THE SEE & ASIA MARKET
68
THE BELGIAN MARKET
10
11
12
10
11
12
10
11
12
10
11
12
Ò READ MORE ON PAGE 32
(1) 2011 figures have been restated as
Albanian operations are now included
in discontinued operations.
Ò READ MORE ON PAGE 35
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 9
GROUP
OUR VISION
Nutritious, healthy, safe, affordable
and sustainable.
Together, we deliver the best of
Delhaize for life.
Together, we aspire to enrich the lives of our customers,
associates, and the communities we serve
in a sustainable way.
Together, we offer assortments, products and services that are
nutritious, healthy and safe, everyday, at prices all customers
can afford.
We are connected with our colleagues across the Group.
We learn, we grow talent and we innovate. We support, we respect
and we inspire each other.
Together, we deliver the best of Delhaize for life.
OUR VALUES
Determination, integrity,
courage, humility,
and humor
10 //
OUR principles
To reinforce the New Game Plan, Delhaize Group
established Principles. They inform how
we conduct our business.
8
f
ples o
princi rategy
our st
1
We connect with our customers
and act on their feedback
2
We share and live one common
vision and values across the Group
3
Each banner will achieve and
maintain its unique differentiation
4
We commit to growing and
defending strong market densities
5
Continuous productivity
improvement drives our value
proposition
6
We are a leader in sustainability
7
Our team is built with excellent
people to deliver excellent results
8
Simpler is better
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 11
STRATEGY
OUR STRATEGY
THE NEW GAME PLAN AT WORK IN 2012
The New Game Plan is the backbone of the Delhaize Group Strategy and is built on
three equally important pillars: growth, efficiency and sustainability. By executing on this
consistently, Delhaize Group will be able to claim its place among the best-in-class food
retailers worldwide and will create value for all its stakeholders: customers, suppliers,
employees and shareholders.
JANUARY
MARCH
FEBRUARY
 Appointment of Pierre
Bouchut as Chief Financial
Officer of Delhaize Group
 Portfolio Optimization
+14
new stores
Bottom Dollar Food
in Pittsburgh
JULY
 Delhaize Belgium launches
test of
enlarged local assortment
 Food Lion Launches New
Brand Strategy in 269
North Carolina and South
Carolina Stores
 Food Lion launches phase 2
of brand strategy work
 Publication of
the first Digital
Annual Report
MAY
 Hannaford implements
sweeping sustainable
seafood policy
 Mats Jansson elected new
Chairman
 Shari Ballard elected Board
Member
$
€
APRIL
 AB brings prices back to 2008 level
 Delhaize Belgium launches
Delhaize Direct Cube
 Maxi launches “Prices speak for
themselves”-campaign
 Fred Marlin receives first Delhaize
Group Store Manager of the Year
Award
JUNE
 Delhaize Serbia and Montenegro
change offices
 Delhaize Bulgaria receives
Mystery Shopper award

5th Report
Sustainability
AUGUST
 Launch of Strategic Cost Plan
SEPTEMBER
Piccadilly
paves
way to
 Alfa Beta rewarded by Greek customers
BER m
OCTaO
ize Belgiu
tores
 Delh
es City s
announc Proxy
e
to becom
nd
nt of Rola
e
m
it
ru
 Rec
f
CEO o
Smith as
America
e
iz
a
lh
De
12 //
 Recruitment of Marcus Spurrell as
Delhaize Group’s first Senior Vice
President Digital
 Delhaize Group becomes member of
the Dow Jones Sustainability Index
zero
waste
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER
 Alfa Beta implements
first phase of SAP
Retail successfully
 Creation of a new Delhaize
America Leadership Team
structure
 Delhaize Serbia closes
TP Srbija stores and
distribution center

 Food Lion Launches
New Produce Initiative
 Delhaize Belgium pioneer in
the use of stevia
100 store
th
opened by Super Indo
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 13
STRATEGy
h
T
w
o
gr
e growth
ble revenu
ta
fi
ro
p
g
n
f the
Accelerati
ey pillars o
k
e
re
th
e
this
is one of th
omprising
C
.
y
g
te
a
tr
roup s
tiation,
Delhaize G
all differen
w
ru
fo
re
lar a
rowth and
growth pil
network g
o
li
fo
rt
o
p
braced
organic
re fully em
a
ts
n
e
m
le
the
se e
ies within
n
M&A. The
a
p
m
o
c
ting
mpany
by all opera
erating co
p
o
h
c
a
e
ves,
Group and
wth initiati
ro
g
c
ifi
c
e
p
ped s
ortment,
has develo
alized ass
c
lo
g
n
ri
e
v
li
ds,
such as de
rivate bran
p
d
e
iz
m
sto
tiveness,
offering cu
e competi
c
ri
p
g
in
v
ro
fit the
further imp
gy to bene
lo
o
n
h
c
te
ucing
ence.
and introd
ing experi
p
p
o
h
s
s
r’
custome
14 //
4-wall DIFFERENTIATION
assortment
Although Delhaize Group operates as an international food
retailer, the company believes
that the importance of a strong
local identity cannot be overestimated. This belief comes to life
within each operating company
as it tailors its local assortment
as well as price and promotion
strategy to the needs and tastes
of the local customers. The success of this local approach of
Delhaize Group can easily be
measured when looking at its
performance in Greece.
Although fully owned by Delhaize Group, Alfa Beta remains
first and foremost a Greek
retailer. Alfa Beta perfectly
understands what its customers desire, especially during
difficult economic times, like
the ones currently experienced
in Greece, when shoppers are
looking for ways to control their
budgets. In addition to a wide
range of affordable products,
the assortment in our Alfa Beta
stores offers a great number of
local products as well, giving
not only to customers the best of
what they need but also offering opportunities to local suppliers. In the United States, DG’s
Hannaford banner uses the
same approach with its “Close
to Home” campaign. The campaign is well received by cus-
tomers and continues to gain
traction.
In addition to using local management to understand the
local customer and offer the
right assortment, several operating companies within the
Group also devote significant
attention to data analysis.
These data come, where available, from loyalty programs and
give banners the possibility to
identify the shopping behaviors of their customers. With
this information DG operating
companies, like both Food Lion
and Delhaize Belgium, can personalize promotional offerings
and optimize the individual customer’s shopping experience.
private brand
Within
the
assortments, one of the strongest differentiators are the
Delhaize Group Private Brands.
They give the Group the opportunity to offer tailor-made solutions to different customer segments, balancing both quality
and price. In Belgium top chefs
recognize the quality of many
of the private brand items,
including 365. This feedback
should come as no surprise
since Delhaize Group does not
compromise on product quality, even in the value range 365
product line. And being able to
offer these quality products at
affordable prices demonstrates
a deep knowledge of the entire
production cycle reflecting the
expertise within the Delhaize
Group that makes a difference.
In addition to the 365 value line
in Europe and MyEssentials in
the U.S., the DG private brand
assortment includes a house
brand at most of our banners,
the Taste of Inspirations gourmet brand, and some category-specific brands that target specific assortments, such
as Care (health & beauty), Bio
(organic), Kids (children), and
Baby (infants).
Every year DG operating companies develop new products
to better meet the needs and
satisfy the demands of our customers. For example, at Delhaize Belgium, 11 new vegetarian products were launched in
the Bio assortment in 2012. In
the U.S., Hannaford became the
first grocery chain in the country to document that all 2,500
private brand seafood products – no matter where they are
located in the store – have been
sustainably harvested. The
company can trace every seafood product back to its source
fishery and provide that information to customers when they
request it.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 15
STRATEGy
price
Having an attractive assortment
and innovative private brand products is necessary. But it is not sufficient – the Group also needs to offer
both at attractive prices. This is why
Delhaize Group continues to invest
in price competitiveness and looks
for value leadership, which is translated into offering quality products
at affordable prices.
Delhaize Group’s commitment to
value leadership was tested again
in 2012 and the Group took many
actions to defend its relative price
position with the price leaders in the
markets where it operates. Delhaize
Group’s operating companies maintained their targeted price gaps and
further reduced them where possible. The Group has also undertaken
efforts to further strengthen its pricing systems, allowing its respective
operating companies to make price
investments where those investments have the highest impact for
our customers.
118
16 //
delhaize direct pick-up
points in belgium
And for customers to understand
the impact of the price investments,
Delhaize Group’s operating companies have to clearly communicate
these investments to the customers.
As done in previous years, several
marketing campaigns in different
countries underscored the fact that
Delhaize Group’s many operating
companies really care about the
purchasing power of the customers. One of the local campaigns that
Delhaize Serbia ran, “Falling Prices
at Maxi” even received international
attention for its clarity and humor.
Technology
It has been discussed before and
remains the case today – Technology
is increasingly present in supermarkets and this is expected to be the
case for the foreseeable future. Our
customers demand more technological convenience and the company
benefits from the increased transparency and efficiency resulting from
technological investments. To coordinate the Group’s customer-facing
technological efforts, implement a
global digital strategy and ensure
that remain competitive in the industry, Delhaize Group created and filled
in 2012 the new role of Senior Vice
President – Digital.
In 1989, with Caddy Home, Delhaize
Belgium was one of the first supermarkets to offer home delivery to its
customers. Today Delhaize Belgium
is building on this experience and on
this service with its buy-and-collect
service – Delhaize Direct.
With Delhaize Direct a customer can
order at home via a dedicated website and then pick up the ready-togo, filled, grocery bags at store of
the customer’s choice. At the end
of 2012 118 stores were equipped
with a Delhaize Direct pick-up point.
Building on this success in Belgium,
the Group is running trials for this
technology at other operating companies with the intention to deploy
the concept as soon as it proves feasible. In addition, Delhaize Belgium
also created the Delhaize DirectCube, a virtual supermarket that
allowed customers to do their shopping using their mobile device by
scanning products on a billboard. In
the U.S., Delhaize America’s Hannaford banner uses the Hannaford.com
website to support customers who
want to plan both their shopping
and cooking experiences, offering
detailed information on products
(from pricing to ingredients) and a
comprehensive list-making app.
In addition to driving comparable store sales, the Group is
active in organically growing its store network. In spite of
the portfolio optimization program at the beginning of 2012,
by which Delhaize Group announced that it was closing
a total of 146 stores and converting another 64, mostly in
the U.S. as part of the Food Lion repositioning work, the
Group nonetheless added 224 stores. This resulted in a net
increase of 43 stores for the Group as a whole. Two-thirds
of this growth occurred as part of the strong expansion
within Southeastern Europe and Indonesia where
153 stores were opened.
Affiliated stores
Finally, the affiliated stores, also in
Belgium, are an important lever for
10
11
224
182
158
99
EVOLUTION OF
NEW STORES
105
In addition to expanding in the
Group’s newer markets, Delhaize
Group also pushed the further
expansion of new formats like
Bottom Dollar Food, its innovative discount concept in
the U.S. At the beginning
of 2012 Bottom Dollar
Food entered the Pittsburgh market, opening 14
stores in 2 weeks and finished the year with a total
of 56 stores. Red Market in
Belgium, comparable to Bottom Dollar Food from a format
perspective, opened 2 new stores
in 2012 and was operating 9 stores
by year-end.
growth and in 2012 the Group had
24 new affiliates enter the Delhaize
Belgium network, of which 16 in
the Proxy format. These additions
increased the contribution of affiliates in Belgium to more than 50%
of total sales. Entrepreneurs are
attracted by the historical strengths
of Delhaize Belgium, the solid reputation of the Delhaize brand, and
the prospects that both offer them
for the future.
59
Leading the way for the Group with
89 new stores, Mega Image was
the most active operating company
within Delhaize Group and the most
dynamic retailer in Romania in 2012.
After having celebrated the opening
of its 100th store in 2011, Mega Image
came close to celebrating the 200th
store mark in 2012. In Indonesia,
Super Indo celebrated the opening
of its 100th store.
12
Newer Operations
Total New Stores
Focus on
NETWORK GROWTH
In 2012, the Delhaize Gro
up activities in the
U.S. were first and foremo
st focused on the
brand repositioning wo
rk at Food Lion. After
completing the preparatio
n work and testing the
repositioning initiatives
in the
2011, the company continu first two markets in
ed the repositioning
implementation in more
than 500 stores in 2012.
By the end of 2012 more
than 60% of the Food
Lion network had been
revitalized and made
ready for the future. “We
’ve clearly reached a
tipping point. Looking at
the performance of the
repositioned stores it is
clear that we stabilized
our business, reconnect
ed with our customers
and created a platform
for future growth”,
explains Cathy Cheely,
Director Strategy and
Innovation for Food Lion
.
Previous to the reposition
ing work, Food Lion had
lost some of its luster and
as a result some of its
attractiveness to custom
ers. Well aware of this
evolution, Delhaize Group
wanted to address this
challenge promptly but
methodically and began
with a thorough analysi
s of the strengths, weaknesses and opportunitie
s at its largest operationa
l
banner. The results of this
exercise were both
revealing and inspiring.
Customers wanted to
take the Food Lion stores
back to their roots; they
wanted a simple and con
venient supermarket
with an attractive assortm
ent at affordable prices.
Delhaize Group manag
ement listened, learned,
and established new fram
ework to tackle the
issues. Simple – Quality
– Price: these are the
keywords for the reposit
ioning work and the
strategy behind it. “It is
inspiring to see that, wh
en
you ask customers what
they want and then
you give them what the
y want, they reward you
for it with their business,”
com
Director of Intelligence and ments Matt Yates,
Planning for Food
Lion. This reward can be
read in the performanc
e
of the repositioned stores
in comparison with the
ones that have not yet und
ergone repositioning. “For the first time sinc
e 2007, Food Lion has
succeeded in realizing
two successive quarters
of
real growth,” says Cathy
Cheely, “but we are not
there yet. The reposition
ing work is only enablin
g
us to seek a new peak.”
Through the brand strateg
y implementation,
Food Lion improved its ove
rall price position by
achieving a better balanc
e between base price
and promotion. The adv
ertising campaign of the
repositioned stores include
d low price messaging that ran across the sto
re with emphasis on
center store, produce and
private brand. This last
element is a very importa
nt differentiator. Almost
simultaneously with the
start of the repositioning
work, the new private bra
nd, MyEssentials, was
launched in the U.S. Tod
ay the repositioned stores
are offering a full range
of MyEssentials products
that are well received by
customers looking for
affordable choices within
their budgets, without
having to compromise on
quality.
STRATEGy
Y
c
n
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i
c
i
eff
e growth
fitable revenu
ro
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as been
Acce
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With this con
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P
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the New G
gs target of €
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vi
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of 2012.
an annual gro
d by the end
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b
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million to
ieved this targ
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o
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cross the
Delhaize Gro
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penny matte
and shareho
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ecking out the
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shopping exp
18 //
CUSTOMIZE FOR THE
cusTomer AND
STANDARDIZE FOR saVings
The efficiency of the retail cycle
starts with buying products.
Across its different banners,
Delhaize Group has a team of
experienced buyers ensuring
the right products for the right
assortment at the right price.
This is the result of both their
knowledge of products within
their own category enhanced
with the knowledge and experience of buyers in other countries
and in other categories across
the Group.
In order to capitalize even better on this collective experience
from across the Group, and to
benefit from the synergies of
scale, Delhaize Group started
already a few years ago centralizing its buying activities in
the U.S. Combining the procurement teams from across the
different operating companies
within Delhaize America into
one organization ensures that
Delhaize America fully benefits
from the available knowhow
and best-practices with respect
to sourcing, assortment, promotional planning , and private
brand management. Migrating
these back-office systems and
processes from the individual
operational companies gives
those more resources to do what
they do best: listen and respond
to the needs of their customers
and serve them the way they
deserve to be served. Finally,
the Delhaize America structure
also centralized and standardized other non-customer-facing
functions like accounting, financial analysis, legal and business
development. On top of that, the
Delhaize America structure
comes with the systems to support it like a common finance
platform and centralized human
resources and payroll systems.
The success of this standardized structure at Delhaize
America proved to be a good
example for the creation of the
Delhaize Europe structure in
2012. Important efforts were
made to harmonize and standardize local activities on a European level such as finance, IT,
legal and human resources.
From a systems perspective
this new structure will be supported by SAP. Efforts are also
being made in Europe to create better procurement efficiencies in order to leverage knowhow and economies of scale.
Already, since early 2009 all
European operations have been
benefiting from the membership
to the buying alliance, AMS, giving them access to the best possible quality products at the best
possible prices.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 19
STRATEGy
VALUE CHAIN
VirTuous circle
efficiency gains in
33
distribution centers.
After purchasing the products,
Delhaize creates more savings with
efficient logistics. Whether from helping a supplier find the best lanes or
via back-hauling by Delhaize-owned
transportation, there is always room
for incremental improvement. At
Delhaize Group’s distribution centers, further efficiency gains are
made. Storage is expensive and so
is installing warehouse management systems. In order to achieve
the highest return possible it is crucial that products find their way into,
through, and out of the warehouse
as fast and efficiently as possible.
One example of a state-of-theart warehouse complex within the
Delhaize Group network can be
found in the semi-automated distri-
20 //
bution centers of Delhaize Belgium in
Zellik, near Brussels. In these warehouses, fresh products can both be
processed at a very high speed and
with a high level of customization.
This standardized customization not
only makes it possible to increase
the freshness of the products delivered to the store, it also enables the
distribution center to supply a store
with only the number of products that
store expects to be able to sell. This
increased speed as well as heightened selectivity both significantly
diminishes food waste store level
and increases inventory rotation at
the distribution center, which results
in fresher products for the customer
and higher returns for the Group. In
the U.S., Delhaize America installed
an overarching Supply Chain Master Network to increase the performance of its distribution centers and
logistic network. This master network
not only results in better conditions
from suppliers, because of the scale
advantages, it also increases the
quality of the products and reduces
the transportation costs.
While warehouse management systems work well at distribution centers, small inventories at store level
require a very different ordering system. At all operational companies
across Delhaize Group, systems have
been installed to optimize the store
inventory levels. For example, In 2012
Food Lion implemented Computer
Assisted Ordering (CAO) for center
store items at all 1,138 Food Lion
stores. Three Food Lion districts are
piloting CAO in fresh departments. In
Delhaize Europe, an important support tool being implemented is SAP
Retail. This implementation represents a new common way of working across the region that unites
the foundational operating systems
and supply chain standard practices
across Delhaize Europe. It includes
the purchase, sale and handling
of products throughout both warehouses and stores. The first phase
of the system implementation was
successfully launched in Greece in
2012 and will be further rolled out in
the rest of the European operations
in 2013.
The efficiency work continues when
products reach the store. Intelligent planograms, planned truckunloading, and purposeful inventory
placement increase speed to shelf.
Shelf-ready packaging, being developed in conjunction with suppliers,
will further improve labor efficiency.
These advances mean store associates spend less time stocking the
product and more time improving
the customer experience.
This is especially the case at the discount format, Bottom Dollar Food.
There, most of the store inventory of
many products can be found on “sky
shelves” located above the top selling shelf. Fresh fruit and vegetables
are presented in their original case
inside a walk-in cooler. Presenting
produce this way means less handling from associates, improving not
only efficiency of the associate but
also improving quality of the product. The less an orange is touched
before it is sold, the better its quality. This is another example of the
way Delhaize Group increases its
efficiency without compromising its
offer to the customers.
Focus on
saVing
AT THE STORE
2012 was another wrench
ing year for the
Greek economy. GDP wa
s down 6% in the
fourth quarter and the une
mployment rate
remained at historical leve
ls. However,
even in this difficult env
ironment, Alfa Beta
showed resistance and
even succeeded in
capturing a market sha
re from its competitors.
“In these uncertain times
for customers, Alfa
Beta has benefited from
its strong identity. We have been known
for decades for
our high quality assortm
ent and excellent
service. And long before
the effects of the
crisis started to hurt the
Greek population,
we started investing hea
vily in lower prices,”
explains Kostas Mache
ras, Executive Vice
President of Delhaize Gro
up and Chief Executive Officer Southeastern
Europe. “While in
1998 we were significan
tly more expensive
than our competitors, tod
ay that situation
has changed dramatica
lly and we are even
price leaders for many
categories. The perception of low prices has
maybe not been
fully established yet, but
what is important is
that through this proces
s we have managed
to safeguard our identit
y.”
Alfa Beta is able to offe
r its customers lower
prices than its competitor
s because of its
disciplined cost control.
“We keep costs low
by being alert and by wa
tching every line.
We also benefit strongly
from being part of
an important internation
al group. As such,
we are in an excellent pos
itio
suppliers. We can guaran n to talk to
tee them that they
will get paid on time, wh
ile we are guaranteed to receive the best
conditions for our
products. It is a clear win
-win,” underlines
Mr. Macheras.
greek + locality = gre
ekality
Another important feature
through which
Alfa Beta won the hearts
and the wallets
of customers is its inhere
nt Greek character. “I like to call this our
Greekality,” says
Mr. Macheras. “Although
we are part of an
international group, we
have been able to
keep our strong local ide
ntity. Greeks like
food and like to eat and
while they like to
discover new tastes, the
y are also very loyal
to what their country has
to offer. So we
went to look for those loca
l products and
gave Greek food to the
Greeks, amongst
others, with our highly app
reciated ‘Close to
Greek Nature products.”
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 21
STRATEGy
Finally, for many customers the real
frustration in grocery shopping is
checking out and paying. Customers do not like to wait too long and
prefer to minimize their time spent
on this tedious part of their shopping trip. Improving this aspect of
the customer’s experience is why
Delhaize Group offers a wide variety of check out systems at most of
its stores. One of the most innovative and award-winning check-out
systems is at the discount format,
Red Market, in Belgium. There the
checkout already starts when entering the stores. Customers “check as
they shop” using a handheld device
to scan the products they buy. Then
when they are finished shopping
they cue in an airport-like single
line to then pay at the first available
checkout desk. No extra manipulation, like moving products from one
basket to another, is needed.
500 mio €
free cash flow generaTion
strong cash flow generation is the life blood of any business and delhaize
group is no exception. facing the difficulties in 2012 and preparing for the
coming challenges ahead, delhaize group has emphasized the creation of
strong free cash flow. “The importance of this key financial indicator cannot
be overestimated. it is crucial in assessing both the current health of the company and securing the performance going forward. The initial target at the
beginning of the year was set at generating €500 million of free cash flow by
the end of 2012. at the end of the year, delhaize group largely overachieved
this target and even set aside €772 million in free cash flow”, comments delhaize group chief financial officer pierre bouchut. going forward delhaize
group aims at creating an average annual free cash flow of around €500
million for the next three years. “This should give the company sufficient
financial breathing space to further implement its strategy of achieving profitable top line growth and creating added value for all its stakeholders in both
the short and long term”.
€ 772 million
free cash flow generated in 2012
22 //
Y
T
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Th
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12 Delhaiz
products
strategy
its own. In 20
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DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 23
strategy
Given the importance of food in
everybody’s life, food retail has
emerged as a central industry in the
conversation on sustainable development. Delhaize Group has been
participating in this conversation
and working on sustainability, formerly known as Corporate Responsibility, for many years. In 2008 the
Group formalized its commitment
in business strategy and two years
later, in 2010, made it one of the
three pillars in the New Game Plan
comprising the key areas of People, Products and Planet. In 2012,
in an exceptionally tough business
climate, Delhaize Group launched
new initiatives and already moved
towards the 2020 ambition, which
places a much stronger focus on
building sustainability into private
brands and puts more emphasis on
reducing waste across the Group.
Product
Some 2012 steps on the path to sustainability leadership.
In 2012 Delhaize Belgium stepped
up its efforts to offer more local
Store manager
of the year
From 2012 on Delhaize America
ensures that all seafood products
sold in its stores are harvested in a
sustainable manner. This means that
seafood is fished or farmed in a way
that will enable it to be around for
generations to come. Delhaize America will only sell seafood from fisheries and farms that are managed by
competent authorities that use a science-based approach to their management plans. Similar efforts were
made in Belgium where Delhaize
reached a significant milestone in its
partnership with the World Wide Fund
for Nature (WWF). Now, all fresh fish
sold at Delhaize supermarkets is harvested in a sustainable way. All frozen fish will be sustainably sourced
by the end of 2013.
People
In 2012 Delhaize Group organized
for the first time the Store Manager
of the Year (SMYA) Award across the
entire Group. DG launched the SMYA
program as a way to recognize the key
role Store Managers play every day
at the heart of the multi-national food
retailing business. While the program
selects one overall winner, its intent is
to recognize and celebrate the important role that all Store Managers play
in growing a stronger business, associates and communities every day.
24 //
products. These products are not
only excellent choices for the customers; they offer also a unique
opportunity to support local communities. “I think customers like products that they can link to the people
who make them. And for a small
company like ours it is important to
be supported so we can be present
at different places in our region”,
explains a local producer of pancakes. Just like the other operating
companies within Delhaize Group,
Delhaize Belgium has always given
priority to local products and local
producers. 100% of the eggs, 95% of
milk, 85% of meat and 90% of the
fruit and vegetables sold in Belgian
Delhaize stores are Belgian. So with
broadening its assortment of local
products, Delhaize Belgium also
provides local farmers and producers opportunities for growth.
Planet
Beginning in 2012, most of the
Delhaize Group banners launched
new programs to reduce store
waste. Delhaize Belgium, a longtime
partner of food banks, launched a
test program in three cities to provide a daily selection of items to
local food organizations. Volunteers
from Saint-Vincent de Paul Society
arrived at the stores every afternoon
to pick up pre-assembled packages
of select dry foods, fresh foods that
reached their sell-by dates, and fro-
100%
of seafo
harveste od products
d
at Delha sustainably
ize Ame
rica
zen bread to distribute to the needy
that same day. In the U.S., Hannaford launched a “moving to zero
waste” project in its entire store network that combined (1) a reinvigorated focus on waste and recycling
standard procedures, (2) strengthening relationships with local food
pantries to ensure that edible food
that can’t be sold is donated to feed
people in local communities, and
(3) adding food waste recycling
programs where they didn’t exist
already. The pilot was successful,
leading to much lower waste and
higher recycling, bringing waste
cost at Hannaford down by 15%
from 2011 to 2012.
2020
While the above steps are good,
there remains much to be done;
being recognized as a leader in sustainability by 2020 is a long journey
and a work in progress. Moving forward, Delhaize Group has crafted its
sustainability ambition as a “journey to Supergood”. Supergood is
about embedding the sustainability
approach into everything Delhaize
Group and all of its operating banners do. Supergood means supermarkets filled with good products,
where what’s good for the bottom
line goes hand-in-hand with what’s
good for the community, the company, and the planet.
To achieve Supergood by 2020, the
Delhaize Group sustainability strategy focuses on three categories:
Areas we intend to WIN (exceed
our competitors’ efforts in local
markets); areas we intend to LEAD
(be among the leaders in our local
markets); and areas we will address
EVERYDAY (ensuring we meet core
environmental and social standards
across our business).
Delhaize Group entered for the first time the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI), both
at the world and European levels, for food and drug retailers. “This is a great acknowledgement that we are building a solid foundation of sustainable business practices. As
we move toward our ambitious 2020 sustainability strategy, this recognition from the
world’s leading business indexes reinforces that we are on our way to embedding sustainability across our business and using it to drive clear business value.” commented
Megan Hellstedt, Director of Sustainability at Delhaize Group.
The Dow Jones Sustainability World Index was launched in 1999 as the first global sustainability benchmark. The indexes track the stock performance of the world’s leading
companies in terms of economic, environmental and social criteria, such as corporate
governance, risk management, supply chain management, health and nutrition, environmental efficiency, and labor practices.
Read more on our progress towards sustainability
leadership in the Sustainability Report, published on
the Delhaize Group website in June
 www.delhaizegroup.com/SustainabilityReport/2012
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 25
REVIEW
financial REVIEW
income statement
20.8
21.1
22.7
reVenues
(in billions of €)
10
11
12
4.9
3.9
1.7
operaTing margin
(in %)
10
11
12
1 024
813
390
operaTing profiT
(in millions of €)
10
11
12
26 //
477
10
11
125
576
neT profiT from
conTinuing operaTions
(in millions of €)
12
In 2012, Delhaize Group achieved
revenues of €22.7 billion. This
represents an increase of 7.7% at
actual exchange rates, mainly due
to the strengthening of the U.S. dollar by 8.3% against the euro compared to 2011, or 2.9% at identical
exchange rates. Organic revenue
growth was 2.1%.
The revenue growth was the result
of the performance of all segments.
In the U.S. revenue growth was
0.9% in local currency, excluding
the impact of the 126 stores closed
in the first quarter of 2012. Revenue
growth in Belgium was 1.6% as a
result of network growth and comparable store sales growth of 0.6%.
Finally, Southeastern Europe & Asia
delivered a solid revenue growth of
34.1% at identical exchange rates
following the acquisition of the
Maxi operations in 2011 (+10.0% at
identical exchange rates excluding
Maxi) and the strong performance
in Greece and Romania.
The U.S. operating companies generated 64% of Group revenues,
Belgium 22% and Southeastern
Europe and Asia 14%. gross margin was 24.5% of revenues, a
102 basis points decrease at identical exchange rates due to price
investments across the Group. The
lower margin of our Maxi business
also contributed to the decreased
gross margin.
other operating income was
€122 million, an increase of €4 million compared to last year.
selling, general and administrative expenses were 21.4% of
revenues and were flat at identical exchange rates as expenses
related to our strategic initiatives
in the U.S. and salary indexations
in Belgium were offset by cost savings across the Group, a payroll
tax refund in Belgium related to the
prior year and the reduction of our
U.S. bonus accrual.
other operating expenses were
€428 million compared to €169 million last year primarily due to a
€125 million charge linked to the
portfolio optimization announced
in January 2012 and a €270 million impairment charge recorded in
the fourth quarter of 2012, mostly
related to Maxi, and to a lesser
extent to planned Sweetbay store
closures.
operating profit decreased by
52% at actual exchange rates
to €390 million mainly due to
price investments, store closing
expenses of �€125 million in the first
quarter of 2012 and the impairment
charges of €270 million recorded in
the fourth quarter of 2012.
underlying
operating
profit
decreased by 13.4% at actual
exchange rates to €810 millions.
net financial expenses were
€241 million, an increase of
€50 million at identical exchange
rates mainly due to the premiums
paid as part of the debt refinancing at the end of 2012 and to the
additional debt to partially finance
the Maxi acquisition. At the end of
2012, the average interest rate on
our long-term debt was 4.4% compared to 5.0% at the end of 2011.
net profit from continuing operations decreased by 73.7% (-78.9%
at identical exchange rates) as a
result of the portfolio optimization charge in the first quarter, the
impairment charge in the fourth
quarter and a decline in operating
profit which was partially offset by
the resolution of tax matters and
51.5% of total capital expenditures
were invested in the U.S. activities
of the Group, 22.3% in the Belgian
operations, 22.8% in the Southeastern Europe & Asia segment
and 3.4% in Corporate activities.
Investments in new store openings
amounted to €160 million (23.3%
of total capital expenditures), a
At the end of 2012, Delhaize
Group’s net debt decreased by
€587 million to €2.1 billion mainly
as a result of strong free cash flow
generation partially offset by the
payment of dividends.
475
105
574
11
1.05
10
12
capiTal eXpendiTures
(in millions of €)
688
At the end of 2012, total equity
decreased by 4.2% to €5.2 billion.
In 2012, Delhaize Group did not
purchase any treasury shares and
issued 29 308 shares of common
stock for €1 million in the fourth
quarter as a consequence of the
exercise of warrants, and used
139 813 treasury shares to satisfy
the vesting of restricted stock units
that were granted as part of the
share-based incentive plans. The
Group owned 1 044 135 treasury
shares as of December 31, 2012.
12
basic neT profiT
(group share) (in €)
4.71
At the end of 2012, Delhaize
Group’s sales network consisted
of 3451 stores, a net increase of
43 stores compared to 2011. Of
these stores, 700 were owned by
the Company. Delhaize Group also
owned 29 warehousing facilities in
the U.S., Belgium and Southeastern Europe.
11
10
11
12
neT debT
(in billions of €)
2.1
During 2012, Delhaize Group made
capital expenditures of €688 million, consisting of €590 million in
property, plant and equipment,
€92 million in intangible assets
and €6 million in investment property. In 2011 capital expenditures
amounted to €762 million.
At the end of 2012, Delhaize
Group’s total assets amounted to
€11.9 billion, 2.9% less than at the
end of 2011.
10
762
net cash used in investing activities decreased by €628 million,
mainly due to the acquisition of
Delta Maxi in 2011 as well as more
capex discipline in 2012.
balance sheet
group share in neT profiT
(in millions of €)
2.6
In 2012, net cash provided by
operating activities was €1 408
million, an increase of €302 million compared to 2011, primarily
as a result of inventory reduction
initiatives across the Group and
especially in the U.S., an improved
payment process in Belgium and
improvement in the working capital
position at Maxi over the course of
2012.
Net cash used in financing activities amounted to €262 million, an
increase of €116 million compared
to the prior year mainly due to
the higher repayment of longterm loans partly offset by higher
proceeds from the issuance new
bonds.
revenues in 2012
5.73
cash flow statement
Capital spending in information
technologies, logistics and distribution, and miscellaneous categories
amounted to €293 million (42.6%
of total capital expenditures), compared to €346 million in 2011.
22.7
billion €
660
group share in net profit amounted
to €105 million, a decrease of 77.8%
at actual exchange rates (-82.9% at
identical exchange rates) compared
to 2011, mainly due to portfolio optimization and impairment charges,
partly offset by the favorable impact
of lower effective tax charges. Per
share, basic net profit was €1.05
(€4.71 in 2011) and diluted net profit
was €1.04 (€4.68 in 2011).
decrease of €71 million compared
to 2011 due to capex discipline.
Delhaize Group invested €235 million (34.1% of capital expenditures)
in store remodeling and expansions (€185 million in 2011).
1.8
was €125 million or €1.27 basic
earnings per share (€4.74 in 2011).
Delhaize Group recorded a loss of
€22 million in discontinued operations related to the Albanian operations (including an impairment
charge of €16 million) following an
agreement to sell these operations
in February 2013.
10
11
12
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 27
REVIEW
non-gaap measures
At the end of 2012, Delhaize Group
had total annual minimum operating lease commitments for 2013
of €312 million, including €21 million related to closed stores. These
leases generally have terms that
range between 1 and 45 years with
renewal options ranging from 3 to
30 years.
in its financial communication, delhaize
group uses certain measures that have
no definition under ifrs or other generally
accepted accounting standards (nongaap measures). delhaize group does not
represent these measures as alternative
measures to net profit or other financial
measures determined in accordance
with ifrs. These measures as reported by
delhaize group might differ from similarly
titled measures by other companies. we
believe that these measures are important
indicators for our business and are widely
used by investors, analysts and other
parties. a reconciliation of these measures
to ifrs measures can be found in the
chapter “supplementary information” of
the financial statements (www.annualreports.delhaizegroup.com). a definition of
non-gaap measures and ratio composed
of non-gaap measures can be found in
the glossary. The non-gaap measures provided in this report have not been audited
by the statutory auditor.
events after
balance sheet date
On January 3, 2013, Delhaize Group
redeemed the remaining $99 million of the $300 million 5.875% senior notes due 2014 and the underlying cross-currency swap.
On January 17, 2013, Delhaize
Group announced the decision to
close 52 stores, 45 stores in the
U.S. (34 Sweetbay, 8 Food Lion and
3 Bottom Dollar Food), 6 stores in
Southeastern Europe and 1 store
in Belgium. As a result, the group
recorded an impairment charge of
€49 million in the fourth quarter of
2012. During the first part of 2013,
the Group expects earnings to be
impacted by approximately €80
211
54
400
225
400
341
8
232
164
627
debT maTuriTY profile(1) (afTer swaps) (in millions of €)
2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2027 2031 2040
28 //
(1) Excluding finance
leases; principal
payments (related
premiums and
discounts not taken into
account) after effect of
cross-currency interest
rate swaps.
million to reflect store closing liabilities including a reserve for ongoing
lease and severance obligations.
In addition, the Group will record
charges of approximately $20 million (€15 million) in the first quarter
of 2013 related to the severance of
senior management and of support services associates in the U.S.
In January 2013, the Greek parliament prospectively enacted an
increase in the Greek corporate tax
rate from 20 to 26%. The impact on
Alfa Beta will be immaterial.
In February 2013, Delhaize Group
launched a tender offer to acquire
16% non-controlling interest in
C-Market (Serbian subsidiary), held
by the Serbian Privatization Agency,
at a price of €300 per share. At
December 31, 2012 Delhaize Group
owned 75.4% of C-Market, or
150 254 shares.
In February 2013, Delhaize Group
completed the sale of its Albanian
activities and recorded a gain of
approximately €1 million.
United States
With 64% of total group revenue, the U.S. is the biggest market for Delhaize Group.
With a network of 1 553 stores and 104 613 associates, Delhaize America generated
€14.6 billion ($18.8 billion) in revenues in 2012 and €850 million in EBITDA. Through
multiple formats and banners, Delhaize America operates stores on the
East Coast of the United States; from Maine to Florida.
64%
of total group
revenue
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 29
REVIEW
REVENUES
(total: $ 18 800 million)
NUMBER OF STORES BY STATE
(as of December 31, 2012)
Delaware
23
Florida
113
Georgia
91
Kentucky
3
Maine
56
Maryland
79
Massachusetts
26
New Hampshire
33
New Jersey
11
New York
49
North Carolina
507
Ohio
3
Pennsylvania
50
South Carolina
130
Tennessee
32
Vermont
17
Virginia
312
West Virginia
18
Total
1 553
Number of states
18
Hannaford
Bottom Dollar Food
Food Lion
Harvey’s
Sweetbay
36% /
Other
segments
US / 64%
1 553
stores
104 613
associates
KEY FIGURES (as of December 31, 2012)
v
sq.ft.
30 //
1 138
73
56
181
105
Southeast and
Mid-Atlantic
Georgia, Northern
Florida, South Carolina
New Jersey, Ohio,
Pennsylvania
Northeast
Westcoast
of Florida
25 000 - 45 000
25 000 - 45 000
18 000 - 20 000
25 000 - 55 000
25 000 - 50 000
15 000 - 20 000
15 000 - 20 000
6 000 - 8 000
25 000 - 46 000
28 000 - 42 000
In 2012, revenues in the U.S.
decreased by 2.2% in local currency. This was mainly the result of
closing 126 stores in the beginning
of 2012. Excluding this impact, revenue growth stood at 0.9%. Comparable store sales decreased by
0.8%. While this performance is
unsatisfactory, it does not yet demonstrate the full impact of the Food
Lion repositioning. In 2012 the number of repositioned stores reached
more than 700, representing more
than 60% of the Food Lion network.
Since their launch, the repositioned
stores showed increases in transaction counts and real sales volume
growth. In these repositioned markets, comparable store sales growth
outperformed stores that have not
yet repositioned by more then 5% at
the end of the 4th quarter 2012.
In addition to the Food Lion repositioning, the Group took other important measures in the U.S to solidify
the health and the future growth of
the company. At the beginning of the
year management made the decision to retire the Bloom banner. This
decision was not taken lightly, but it
was deemed necessary in light of the
strategic choice to focus resources
on a limited number of projects.
Similarly, expansion of Bottom Dollar Food was focused on increasing density in its first two markets:
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. Finally,
at the beginning of 2013, Delhaize
America trimmed its Sweetbay store
network to provide more oxygen for
the remainder of the portfolio.
As a result of price investments,
especially at Food Lion, and the
negative impact from the closure
of 126 stores, the U.S. gross margin decreased in 2012 by 107 basis
points to 26.2%. At the same
time, lower sales and the impact
of the Food Lion brand repositioning resulted in an increase of selling, general and administrative
expenses as a percentage of revenues by 21 basis points to 23.0%
mainly. This increase was partly
offset by the reduction of the U.S.
bonus accrual.
The operating margin of the U.S.
business decreased from 3.9% in
2011 to 2.3% in 2012 mainly because
of the $249 million impairment and
store closing charges.
Total capital expenditures were
$455 million, an decrease of 21.4%
compared to prior year.
Food Lion
Founded in 1957, Food Lion prides
itself on offering customers convenient stores providing a good assortment of quality products at low
prices. At the end of 2012, Food Lion
operated 1 138 stores located in 10
states in the Southeastern United
States. In 2011 the company launched
the brand repositioning project
which focused on the elements Simple, Quality and Price. Using a combination of limited capital and associate training these elements aimed,
amongst others, at enhancing the
customer satisfaction through price,
fresh produce and an easy and convenient shopping experience. The
brand repositioning project created
a positive dynamic around Delhaize
Group’s largest banner. In 2012
more than 500 stores were repositioned in Virginia, West Virginia,
North Carolina and South Carolina.
By lowering prices, training associates and investing its capital smartly,
Food Lion stabilized the business in
launched markets and set the foundation for future growth.
Bottom Dollar Food
Bottom Dollar Food is Delhaize
Group’s discount format in the U.S.
offering a limited assortment of
about 7 000 products, including
meat and produce, with a laser-like
focus on keeping prices low for customers. At the end of 2012, the Bottom Dollar Food network numbered
56 stores, 29 in Philadelphia and
13 in Pittsburgh, its two core markets. At the start of 2012 the banner
opened 14 stores in two weeks in
Pittsburgh and ended the year with
a total of 27 new stores.
and fresh products. The banner
possesses strong brand recognition
and customer loyalty. At the end of
2012, Harveys operated 73 stores.
Hannaford
Hannaford is a chain of 181 large
stores, with an average selling area
of 40 000 square feet. The stores
offer a wide range of high quality
and fresh products, typically carrying on average 35 000 SKUs.
Additionally, more than 81% of the
stores has pharmacies. Hannaford
augments its quality positioning
and increases its value proposition
by being priced right every day. This
everyday pricing is a foundational
element in the Hannaford strategy
and substantial work to support this
was done in 2012. Hannaford also
takes pride in offering sustainable
seafood as well as locally-grown
and locally-made products.
Sweetbay
62%
Located in Southwest
Florida, Sweetbay has
a reputation for quality,
price and fresh food.
of all Food Lion stores were
The banner is also wellrepositioned, meaning
more than 700 stores.
known for its strong
Hispanic food offering.
At the end of 2012 Sweetbay operated 105 stores. However, in the first
quarter of 2013, Sweetbay closed
34, primarily loss making, stores
throughout its network.
Harveys
Harveys is a supermarket format
focused on serving rural markets in
Georgia, South Carolina and North
Florida and offering a highly localized assortment of regional favorites
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 31
REVIEW
belgium
Belgium is Delhaize Group’s historical domestic
market. Delhaize Belgium operates a wide
variety of company-operated and affiliated
store formats including supermarkets,
convenience and proximity stores, specialty
stores and the recently added discount
supermarkets Red Market. At the end of 2012,
Delhaize Belgium operated 840 stores in
Belgium and Luxemburg, a net increase of
19 stores compared to the prior year.
32 //
Delhaize Belgium generated €4.9 billion in revenues in
2012, an increase of 1.6% compared to 2011. The 2012
growth numbers were a combination of both a positive
comparable store sales evolution of 0.6% and network
growth. In total 35 new stores were opened in 2012 and
9 stores were remodelled in line with the New Generation Store Concept that was launched at the end of 2011.
The affiliated store model for supermarkets and convenience stores was once again a strong pillar in the
network growth model in 2012.
During 2012, Delhaize Belgium’s gross margin
decreased by 71 basis points to 20.3% of revenues as a
result of price investments. Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased by 6 basis points to 16.7%
of revenues mainly as a result of a payroll tax refund
related to prior year partly offset by the impact of automatic salary indexation.
Total capital expenditures at Delhaize Belgium
amounted to €153 million, compared to €142 million in
2011.
Supermarkets - Delhaize
With 146 company-operated stores, Delhaize “Le Lion”
is the leading supermarket banner of Delhaize Group
in Belgium and Luxemburg. The strengths of Delhaize
“Le Lion” are its assortment of high quality and affordable products, its broad private brand assortment with
both innovative and low price items, and its emphasis
on customer service.
Go stores are small convenience-oriented and located
mainly at gas stations. They are responding to customers’ expectations on proximity, convenience, speed and
longer operating hours.
Low-cost / low-price supermarkets Red Market
Red Market supermarkets are newer concept stores
that combine high quality products, private as well as
national brands, new technologies and ease of shopping with helpful associates and very low prices. The
first two Red Markets were opened in 2009. With the
addition of two more new stores in 2012, the Red Market network reached a total of 9. Striking and humorous add campaigns, like hiding piggy banks with Red
Market vouchers in big cities to raise brand awareness,
underlined the dynamics around the youngest Delhaize
Belgium banner.
Everything for your pet stores - Tom & Co
Tom & Co is the leading pet food chain in Belgium. The
136 stores sell pet food, care products, care services and
accessories for pets. In 2012, Tom & Co launched Tom &
Care, “health insurance” for animals. It is sold exclusively
at Tom & Co and is unique in its kind.
Affiliated supermarkets - AD Delhaize
Just like the company-operated Delhaize “Le Lion” banner, AD Delhaize is a supermarket banner but operated
by independent owners. These stores are similar but on
average smaller than the company operated supermarkets. Our affiliated stores continue to be the most important contributor to Delhaize Belgium’s growth. In 2012
another 24 supermarket affiliates joined the network
throughout Belgium and Luxemburg.
Company operated urban convenience
stores - City
In 2012 Delhaize Group decided to convert its 15 company-operated City neighborhood stores in Belgium into
independent Proxy stores. As such they will benefit from
the greater flexibility needed to run urban stores and will
be able to better adapt to their specific environment. In
Luxemburg Delhaize continues to operate 3 City stores.
Affiliated convenience stores Proxy and Shop ‘n Go
Proxy is a convenience store format with a focus on
fresh products and private label products. In 2012 the
Proxy network expanded with 18 new stores, The Shop’n
cooking
event
Delhaize Belgium wants to be recognized as an
expert in nutrition, in excellent food and in culinary
trends. The company considers it as part of its mission to guide and inspire customers for both their
everyday as well as their festive cooking. So for the
year-end holiday season in 2012, Delhaize Belgium
gave its customers the unique opportunity to take a
cooking class with five of the most important Chefs
in Belgium: Peter Goosens, Lionel Rigolet, Yves
Mattagne, Wout Bru and Bart Desmidt. This was the
second largest cooking event ever organized worldwide. No fewer than 18 000 candidates signed up
for the experience and 1 600 were eventually chosen to be guided by the five chefs who collectively
have earned nine Michelin Stars.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 33
REVIEW
35
new an
9 remod d
elled
stores
25%
market share
in belgium
16 304
associates
keY figures (as of December 31, 2012)
m2
146
223
18
208
100
9
136
1 900
1 125
500
500
140
1 200
450
17 000
12 000
6 500
6 500
2 000
5 700
3 600
mulTi channel iniTiaTiVes
delhaize belgium also operates e-commerce initiatives like delhaize direct,
delhaize wineworld, and a home delivery service, caddy home.
• Delhaize Direct: customers do their shopping on-line on a dedicated store
website and collect their groceries at one of the 118 stores that have a
dedicated collection point. The ambition is to further increase this number in
2013 and continue the roll out to affiliated stores. in 2012, with the launch of
delhaize direct cube, a new virtual supermarket in train stations was created
to promote the delhaize direct service.
• Delhaize Wineworld: with more than 1 300 different wines, delhaize belgium
offers its customers one of the broadest selections of wines in belgium.
Through a new and easy-to-navigate website, customers can explore a
unique wine cellar, offering both everyday and exclusive wines from all over
the world. after completing the ordering process, the wines are delivered to
the customer at home.
• Caddy Home: for customers who are pressed for time or mobility-challenged
and therefore cannot visit one of the delhaize stores, groceries can be
ordered online, by telephone or fax and will be delivered at a time of the
customers convenience at home.
34 //
souTheasTern europe & asia
Southeastern Europe & Asia comprise Delhaize Group’s fastest growing segment. Combining
the acquired Maxi-operations in five Balkan countries with the existing operations of Alfa Beta in
Greece, and Mega Image in Romania and then adding the Super Indo operations in Indonesia
resulted in total 2012 revenues of €3.2 billion. These combined revenues comprise 14% of total
Group revenues, up from 12% in 2011.
revenues of the Southeastern Europe & Asia segment
increased by 34.1% in 2012, at identical exchange
rates. The Maxi-operations, for the first time fully consolidated for the entire year in 2012, account for a
significant portion of this growth. However, excluding
the impact of Maxi, revenue increased 10% at identical
exchange rates thanks to impressive network expansion at Mega Image in Romania and solid growth in
Indonesia.
In a declining Greek market Alfa Beta managed to gain
market share in 2012. This is an excellent example of
how consistently implementing a customer-focused
strategy wins customer loyalty. During the past decade
Alfa Beta has worked vigorously to improve its price
perception while at the same time safeguarding its
valuable image as a quality food retailer. In 2012, Alfa
Beta continued its strategy of offering attractive assortments containing both national and private brands,
emphasizing on local products, and investing in price
competitiveness, and thus continued to win both the
heart and wallet of the challenged Greek customer.
The Maxi-operations benefited in 2012 from further
integration efforts with Delhaize Group. Under the
umbrella of Delhaize Europe the company succeeded
in maintaining cost discipline, making more resources
available to invest in sales building initiatives. Additionally, the company recently took the decision to sell the
small Albanian operations.
gross margin in the SEE & Asia segment decreased by
43 basis points due to the lower gross margin of Maxi.
Excluding Maxi, gross margin for the segment increased
by 32 basis points as a result of better supplier terms,
partly offset by price investments. selling, general and
administrative expenses as a percentage of revenues
decreased by 15 basis points to 20.3% as a result of
higher taxes in Greece due to austerity measures and
higher staff costs and rents due to new store openings.
Total capital expenditures amounted to €157 million,
compared to €185 million in 2011.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 35
review
Alfa Beta - Greece
Mega Image - Romania
Alfa Beta operates a multi-format
store network in Greece combining
both company-operated and affiliated stores. Alfa Beta is known for
its large assortment, including fresh
and organic products and local
specialties. In a challenging Greek
economic environment, Alfa Beta
succeeded in securing this position
and strengthened its market share
to 21.4%, up from 19.3% in 2011
(Source: AC Nielsen). This was due
both to increasing the network by net
17 stores, reaching a total of 268, as
well as better-than-competition comparable store sales performance. In
addition Alfa Beta continues to look
for ways to better connect with its
customers: in 2012 it developed a
new store concept Alfa Beta Shop &
Go. This small (100-120 sqm), convenience-oriented format mainly focuses
on immediate-need and daily shopping and will operate in high density
neigh­borhoods in large cities.
Mega Image operates neighborhood supermarkets concentrated
in Bucharest with a focus on variety,
fresh offering, proximity, and competitive prices. After accelerating its
expansion program in 2011, Mega
Image shifted into an even higher
gear in 2012 by opening 89 new
stores, nearly doubling its store network and ending the year with 193
stores. An important lever for this
growth was the development and
deployment of the Shop & Go format in 2010, enabling Mega Image
to respond to the proximity and convenience needs of Romanian customers.
Maxi
In 2012 Delhaize Group operated
stores under the Mini Maxi, Maxi,
Tempo, Piccadilly, Euromax banners
across the five countries of Serbia,
Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Montenegro, and Albania.
Serbia
“Price Restore” campaign
On April 2 2012, Maxi launched a price
reduction campaign under the theme “In
Maxi prices speak for themselves.” The
campaign was announced in an innovative
manner, where climbers wearing “price”
costumes rappelled down a building in
downtown Belgrade to symbolize prices
falling. “Everybody kept telling me that I
was flying too high and I had to fall. When
I fall, everybody is happy and each of my
falls is in customers’ interest. When I live low
life, everybody else’s living standard rises.
Excuse me, but
I have to go on
and keep on
falling,” a Price
was quoted. The
objective of this
campaign is to
bring significant
savings for customers in Maxi
stores. Price
reductions have
been made on
several hundreds
of products in
all categories
reaching in some
cases a reduction of up to
30 percent.
36 //
Today, Delhaize Group operates its
stores primarilly under the aegis
of the Maxi brand and with more
than 360 stores, Delhaize Group is
the leading food retailer in Serbia.
The Maxi and Tempo stores thrive
on unique brand awareness, built
by offering a broad assortment,
including fresh and bakery products, in stores with great locations.
In 2012, Maxi continued its integration efforts and further aligned and
simplified its formats. Tailoring the
offer for customers, management
developed the concepts Exclusive
Maxi, Urban Maxi and Local Maxi.
For MiniMaxi the same exercise was
done and resulted in launching of
the pilot concept Shop‘n Go, focusing on convenience.
Bulgaria
In Bulgaria, Delhaize operates
under the Piccadilly brand. Piccadilly is known for its large assortment, strong focus on fresh products and extended opening hours.
Last year, important and successful
efforts were made to sharpen this
quality and convenience image
and improve customer satisfaction.
Most Piccadilly stores are located in
urban areas, concentrated in Sofia,
Varna and Plovdiv. At the end of
2012 Delhaize Group operated 43
stores in Bulgaria, a gross increase
of 8 stores compared to the prior
year.
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Delhaize Group operates a network
of 41 stores, making it one of the
largest food retailers in Bosnia and
Herzegovina. The multi-format network comprises Mini Maxi convenience stores, Maxi supermarkets,
Tempo hypermarkets, and Tempo
Express discount stores.
Montenegro
Delhaize Group offers 3 different
store formats to our customers in
Montenegro. The Maxi supermarket
and the Tempo hypermarket have
both a strong focus on fresh products as well as a large assortment.
The Mini Maxi convenience stores
offer a narrower assortment but
include fresh products.
Albania
The Albanian network consists of
23 Euromax stores, offering a mix of
convenience stores and supermarkets. At the end of 2012, in an effort
to further focus resources, Delhaize
Group decided to sell the Albanian
activities and completed this transaction in February 2013.
Super Indo - Indonesia
Most Super Indo stores (51% owned
by Delhaize Group) are located in
Jakarta, Bandung, Surabaya and
Yogyakarta, all densely populated
cities on the island of Java, in Indonesia. Super Indo supermarkets
offer a wide variety of fresh products with a focus on fresh meat and
fish at low prices, both of which
are important differentiators in the
Indonesian market. In 2012, Super
Indo opened 15 new stores primarily in the Central and East Java
Regions. The market share of Super
Indo came out at 4.2% in the supermarket and hypermarket category
(Source: AC Nielsen).
36 859
associates
%p
4f 5
ro
g u
o
rowth
revenue g om
coming fr ent
gm
see&a se
keY figures (as of December 31, 2012)
albania
m2
bosnia and herzegovina
bulgaria
23
19
20
2
25
18
170 - 6 000
400
400 - 2 500
4 000 - 10 000
2 200
250
16 000
12 000
19 000
25 000
15 000 - 18 000
3 000 - 6 000
montenegro
m2
Serbia
8
15
1
220
121
10
12
up to 400
400 - 2 500
3 000
up to 400
400 - 2 500
4 000 - 10 000
500 - 2 000
4 000
12 000 - 18 000
24 000
6 600
14 500
31 500
5 000
Greece
m2
indonesia
romania
162
42
27
25
12
132
61
103
1 250
440
500
220
2 370
600
260
1 000
13 300
4 150
6 750
4 250
8 200
5 900
2 000
8 700
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 37
governance
BoarD oF DiRECToRs
as of December 31, 2012
5. shARi l. BAllARD (1966)
1. MATs JANssoN (1951)
chairman since 2012
Board Member of Danske Bank
Former President of Ica Detaljhandel and
Deputy ceo and chairman of the group
Former ceo of catena/Bilia, Karl Fazor oy,
axfood
Former President and ceo of axel Johnson aB
Former President and ceo of SaS
Former Board member of axfood,
Mekonomen, Swedish Match and
Hufvudstaden
Member of JP Morgan european advisory
council
Degree in economics and Sociology
elected 2011
2. huGh G. fARRiNGToN (1945)
Former President and ceo of Hannaford
Former vice chairman of Delhaize america
Former executive vice President of Delhaize
group
Ba in History, Ma in education
elected 2005
1
6
38 //
2
7
President, International - enterprise
executive vice President of Best Buy co., Inc.
Bachelors Degree in Social Work
elected 2012
3. WilliAM G. McEWAN (1956)
6. piERRE-oliViER BECkERs (1960)
Former President and ceo of Sobeys
Former Board Member of empire company
Former President and ceo of the U.S.
atlantic region of The great atlantic and
Pacific Tea company
Board Member of The consumer goods Forum
elected 2011
President and ceo since 1999
President of the Belgian olympic and
Interfederal committee
Member of the International olympic
committee
Former co-chairman of The consumer
goods Forum
Board member and former vice-chairman
of Food Marketing Institute
Board member and former chairman of
cIeS
Board member of the consumer goods
Forum
Board member of guberna
vice-chairman executive committee
Federation of Belgian companies
Master in Business administration
elected 1995
4. JACQuEs DE VAuClERoy (1961)
Member of Management committee and
ceo of the northern, central and eastern
europe region (norcee) of axa
Former Member executive Board Ing group
and ceo of Ing Insurance europe
Degree in Law,
Master of Business Law
elected 2005
3
8
4
9
5
10
11
7. JEAN-piERRE hANsEN (1948)
8. ClAiRE h. BABRoWski (1957)
10. DiDiER sMiTs (1962)
executive committee member of gDF Suez
chairman of the energy Policy committee
of gDF Suez
Member of the Management committee
of ForeM
Former ceo and chairman of electrabel
Former coo and vice chairman of the
executive committee of Suez group
chairman of the Board of SncB Logistics
Board member of electrabel, electrabel
customers Solutions and cMB
Former vice chairman of Federation of
enterprises in Belgium
civil engineer, Philosophy Degree in
engineering,
Master in economics
elected 2011
Board member of Pier 1 Imports and Quiznos
Former evP and coo of Toys’r’Us
Former coo and ceo of radioShack
Former Senior evP and chief restaurant
operations officer of McDonald’s corp.
MBa
elected 2006
Managing Director of Papeteries aubry
Former Manager of advanced Technics
company
Master in economics and Financial Sciences
elected 1996
9. JACk l. sTAhl (1953)
President of Sioen
vice chairman and former ceo of recticel
Former chairman of the Board of Spector Photo
group and Telindus group
Board member at Spector Photo group,
Former chairman of Federation of Belgian
companies
Member of the corporate governance
commission
civil engineer
elected 2005
Former President and ceo of revlon
Former President and coo of
The coca-cola company
Former group President and cFo of
coca-cola north america
Former Board member at Schering-Plough
Board member of Dr. Pepper Snapple
group, Sacks and coty and cvc capital
Partners advisory Inc.
Board member of nonprofit organization
MBa
appointed by the Board in 2008,
elected 2009
11. BARoN VANsTEENkisTE (1947)
eXecUTIve CoMMiTTEE
as of December 31, 2012
12. piERRE-oliViER BECkERs (1960)
15. MiChEl EECkhouT (1949)
President and ceo Delhaize group
Belgium’s Bel 20 ceo of the Year 2009
Manager of the Year 2000 (Trends/
Tendances)
Master in Business administration
Joined Delhaize group in 1983
evP Delhaize group (until December 31,
2012)
Master in economics, executive Master in
general Management
Joined Delhaize group in 1978
16. RoNAlD C. hoDGE (1948)
13. piERRE BouChuT (1955)
evP Delhaize group and ceo of Delhaize
america (until october15, 2012)
BS in Business administration
Joined Hannaford in 1980
evP and cFo Delhaize group
graduate in Financial Banking
Master in applied economics
Joined Delhaize group in 2012
17. NiColAs hollANDERs (1962)
14. sTÉfAN DEsChEEMAEkER
(1960)
evP of Human resources, IT and
Sustainability Delhaize group
Master in Law and notary Law,
Post graduate in economics
Joined Delhaize group in 2007
evP and ceo Delhaize europe
Master in commercial engineering
Joined Delhaize group in 2009
12
13
17
14
18
15
19
16
20
18. kosTAs MAChERAs (1953)
19. RolAND sMiTh (1954)
evP Delhaize group and ceo of
Southeastern europe
Hellenic Management association
Manager of the Year 2008
Joined alfa Beta in 1997
retail Manager of the Decade 2011
(2011 retail awards in greece)
graduate in economics
Ba, MBa
Joined Delhaize group in 2007
evP Delhaize group and ceo of Delhaize
america
graduate U.S. Military academy
Joined Delhaize group In 2012
20. MiChAEl R. WAllER (1953)
evP, general counsel and general
Secretary Delhaize group
Ba in Psychology, Juris Doctorate
Joined Delhaize america in 2000
The following former Directors and Executives have
been granted an honorary
title in gratitude for their
contribution to Delhaize
Group:
• Honorary chairman and
chief executive officer:
chevalier Beckers, Baron
de vaucleroy
• Honorary chairman and
Director: Mr. Frans vreys,
count georges Jacobs de
Hagen
• Honorary Director: Mr.
Jacques Boël, Mr. roger
Boin, Baron de cooman
d’Herlinckhove, Mr. William
g. Ferguson, Mr. robert J.
Murray
• Honorary general Secretary and Member of the
executive committee: Mr.
Jean-claude coppieters ‘t
Wallant
• Honorary Members of the
executive committee: Mr.
Pierre Malevez, Mr. arthur
goethals, Mr. renaud
cogels
• Honorary Secretary of the
executive committee: Mr.
Pierre Dumont
honorary Director Mr.
Roger Boin passed away at
the end of 2012. The Board
of Directors of Delhaize
Group and its management
wish to show their respect
and pay tribute for his
part in helping to build the
company.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL rePorT ‘12 // 39
governance
The Delhaize Group Board of Directors and its management ensure
that the Company serves the interests of its shareholders and other
key stakeholders with the highest
standards of responsibility, integrity and compliance with all applicable laws and regulations. Delhaize Group strives to continually
earn investor confidence by being
a leader in good corporate governance, complying with the law
wherever it operates and providing
clear, consistent and transparent
communication about its strategy
and performance. Upholding this
commitment is in line with our high
ethical standards and is important
for our continued success.
Corporate Governance
Charter of Delhaize Group
Delhaize Group follows the corporate
governance principles described in
the 2009 Belgian Code on Corporate
Governance and adopted this 2009
Code as its reference Code. The
Belgian Code on Corporate Governance is available at: www.corporate
gover­nancecommittee.be.
In accordance with the recommendations and guidelines described
in the Belgian Code on Corporate
Governance, the corporate governance framework in which Delhaize
Group operates is specified in Delhaize Group’s Corporate Governance Charter.
The Corporate Governance Charter
is reviewed and updated from time to
time. The latest update of the Charter is available on the Company’s
website (www.delhaizegroup.com).
The Corporate Governance Charter
of Delhaize Group includes the rules
and policies of the Company, which
together with applicable law, the
securities exchange rules and the
Company’s Articles of Association,
govern the manner in which the
Company operates.
While the Company refers to its Corporate Governance Charter for its
corporate governance framework,
this Corporate Governance Statement in the annual report focuses,
as recommended by the Belgian
40 //
Code on Corporate Governance, on
factual information relating to the
Company’s corporate governance,
including changes in the Company’s
corporate governance structure
together with relevant events that
took place during 2012.
one member of the Audit Committee must be competent in accounting and audit and that a majority of
the members of the Remuneration
& Nomination Committee must be
independant pursuant to the Belgian Companies Code.
The Board of Directors
Gender Diversity within
the Board of Directors
Mission of the Board of Directors
The Board of Directors of Delhaize
Group is responsible for the strategy
and the management of the Company in its best corporate interests.
This responsibility includes the maximization of shareholder value, including the optimization of long-term
financial returns, while also taking
into account the Company’s associates, suppliers and the communities
where it operates. To achieve this, the
Board of Directors, as the Company’s
ultimate decision-making body, is
entrusted with all powers that are not
reserved by law to the General Meeting of shareholders.
The Terms of Reference of the Board
are attached as Exhibit A to the
Company’s Corporate Governance
Charter.
Composition of the Board
of Directors
On December 31, 2012, the Board
of Directors of Delhaize Group consisted of 11 members, including 10
non-executive directors and one
executive director. As indicated in
the Terms of Reference of the Board
of Directors, the Board periodically
reviews the Board membership criteria in the context of the current
make-up of the Board and its committees against current and future
conditions and circumstances. This
assessment is made on the basis
of knowledge, experience, integrity, diversity, complementary skills
such as understanding of retail,
finance and marketing, and willingness to devote adequate time to
Board duties. At all times, at least
one member of the Board and the
Audit Committee must be an “audit
committee financial expert” as
defined by U.S. federal securities
laws. In addition, the Belgian Companies Code requires that at least
A recent Belgian law requires that at
least one third of the members of the
Board of Directors has another gender than the other members of the
Board of Directors as of the financial year starting on 1 January 2017.
The Board of Directors is focused on
the recruitment of female directors
because it is convinced that diversity
strengthens the Board’s decisions.
In addition, it will support meeting
the one-third requirement by 2017.
Ms. Claire H. Babrowski has been
a member of our Board of Directors
since May 2006. Ms. Shari L. Ballard
joined our Board of Directors in May
2012. We will propose the appointment of Ms. Elizabeth Doherty as
director for a term of three years
to the shareholders at the Ordinary
General Meeting to be held on May
23, 2013. Ms. Doherty’s biographical
information is provided below.
Evaluation of the Board
of Directors
Periodically, and at least every two
years, the Board evaluates its overall performance. In the Board’s view,
this is best accomplished by the
entire Board under the leadership
of the Chairman, with the assistance
of the Remuneration and Nomination Committee and of an external
specialist when deemed appropriate. Generally, the assessments
are done at the same time as the
review of Board membership criteria. The purpose of this assessment
is to enhance the effectiveness of
the Board as a whole and should
specifically review areas in which
the Board and/or the management
believe the Board may be more
effective. The review of the Board as
a whole necessarily includes consideration of each director’s overall
contribution to the work of the Board.
The results of each Board evaluation
are discussed with the full Board.
Additionally, each Committee of
the Board conducts an evaluation
periodically, and at least every two
years, of such Committee’s performance and reports the results of the
evaluation to the Board.
The performance of individual directors is reviewed by the Remuneration and Nomination Committee
when a director is being considered
for re-nomination. The Remuneration and Nomination Committee
chooses the method and criteria for
these reviews. If, at any time, the
Board determines that an individual
director is not meeting the established performance standards and
qualification guidelines, or his or
her actions reflect poorly upon the
Board and the Company, the Board
may request the resignation of the
non-performing director.
Activity Report of the Board in 2012
In 2012, the Board of Directors met ten
times. All directors were present at all
of those meetings with the following
exceptions: Ms. Claire H. Babrowski
and Mr. William G. McEwan, who
each were excused at one meeting,
and Mr. Jean-Pierre Hansen, who
was excused at three meetings.
In 2012, the Board’s
included, among others:
activities
• Regular closed sessions with the
Chief Executive Officer of Delhaize
Group
• Two-day annual strategic session
on key strategic issues and related
follow-up discussions
• Approval of the annual budget
and the three-year financial plan
• Regular business reviews
• Review of forecasts
• Review and approval of quarterly,
half yearly and annual financial
statements
• Adoption of the annual accounts
including proposed allocation of
profits and dividend proposal, the
consolidated financial statements,
Management’s Report on the
annual accounts and the consolidated financial statements, and
the annual report
Delhaize Group Board of Directors and Committee Membership in 2012
Name
(year of birth)
Count Jacobs de Hagen (1940)
Mats Jansson (1951)
Membership
Audit
Committee
Membership
Remuneration
and Nomination
Committee
Position
Director
Since
Term Expires
Chairman(1)
May 2003
May 24,
2012(3)
Chair(3)
X
Chairman(1),(2)
May 2011
2014
Director(1)
May 2012
2015
President,
Chief
Executive,
Officer, and
Director
May 1995
2015
Claire H. Babrowski (1957)
Director(1)
May 2006
2016
Jacques de Vaucleroy (1961)
Director(1)
May 2005
2015
X
Hugh G. Farrington (1945)
Director
May 2005
2014
Chair(2)
Jean-Pierre Hansen (1948)
Director(1)
May 2011
2014
William G. McEwan (1956)
Director(1)
May 2011
2014
Director
May 2001
May 24,
2012(3)
Director
Shari L. Ballard (1966)
Pierre-Olivier Beckers (1960)
Robert J. Murray (1941)
Didier Smits (1962)
X
X
X
May 1996
2015
Jack L. Stahl (1953)
Director(1) August 2008
2014
Chair
Baron Vansteenkiste (1947)
Director(1)
May 2005
2015
x
(1)Independent director under the Belgian Companies Code, the Belgian Code on Corporate Governance and the NYSE rules.
(2)As of May 24, 2012.
(3)Count Jacobs de Hagen and Mr. Murray have reached the retirement age set by the Board and have therefore determined not
to stand for renewal when their respective mandates expired at the Ordinary General Meeting held on May 24, 2012.
• Approval of revenues and earnings press releases
• Approval of the publication of the
Corporate Responsibility Report
2011
• Review and decision on possible
acquisitions and divestitures
• Regular review and update on
treasury matters
• Reports of Committee Chairmen
and decisions on Committee recommendations
• Call and adoption of the agenda
of the Ordinary and Extraordinary
General Meetings
•N
omination of directors, nomination of directors for renewal
of their directors’ mandate and
assessment of their independence
• Approval of the changes to the
Executive Committee
• Approval of €400 million fixed
rated bond offering and $300 million senior notes offering
• Approval of repurchase of
€285 million in senior notes pursuant to debt tender offers
• Approval of repurchase of
$201 million in senior notes pursuant to debt tender offers
• Approval of early redemption of
$99 million in senior notes
• Review of the Terms of Reference
of the Board of Directors and of its
committees
Nomination and Tenure
of Directors
As a general rule, under Belgian law,
directors are elected by majority vote
at the ordinary general meeting for
a term of up to six years. From 1999
to 2009, the Company set the length
of director terms for persons elected
during such period at a maximum
of three years. Pursuant to a recent
Belgian law, a director is not independent if such person is elected to
more than three successive terms or
more than twelve years.
In March 2010, the Board of Directors
decided to set the term of the mandate of directors starting with elections in 2010 to three years for the
first term, then four years for subsequent terms, which would permit a
non-executive director who is otherwise independent to serve a total
of eleven years before such director would no longer be considered
independent under Belgian law. The
term of directors who are not considDELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 41
governance
ered independent by the Board of
Directors at the time of their election
has been set by the Board at three
years. Unless otherwise decided by
the Board, a person who is up for
election to the Board and who would
turn age 70 during the Company’s
standard director term length may
instead be elected to a term that
would expire at the ordinary general meeting occurring in the year
in which such director would turn
70. Directors may be removed from
office at any time by a majority vote
at any meeting of shareholders.
The Ordinary General Meeting held
on May 24, 2012 decided to appoint
Ms. Shari L. Ballard as director for
a term of three years, and to renew
the director’s mandate of (i) Mr.
Pierre-Olivier Beckers and Mr. Didier
Smits each for a term of three years,
and (ii) Ms. Claire H. Babrowski for a
term of four years.
Count Georges Jacobs and Mr. Robert J. Murray have reached the
retirement age set by the Board and
therefore determined not to stand
for renewal when their current mandate expired at the Ordinary General Meeting held on May 24, 2012.
Proposed Appointment
of New Director
Upon recommendation of the
Remuneration and Nomination
Committee, the Board will propose
the appointment of Ms. Elizabeth
Doherty as director for a term of
three years to the shareholders at
the Ordinary General Meeting to be
held on May 23, 2013.
Ms. Doherty began her career with
Unilever in 1979 as an assistant
auditor and then spent the following
22 years serving the organization,
assuming positions of increasing
responsibility in audit, accounting,
supply chain, commercial operations, and finance in multiple countries across Europe and Asia. She
left Unilever as Senior Vice President
Finance, Central & Eastern Europe in
2001 to enlist with Tesco as its Group
International Finance Director where
she led that function for six years.
In 2007 she joined Brambles Indus42 //
tries as its Chief Financial Officer and
most recently served as CFO of Reckitt
Benckiser, from 2011 to 2013. In additional to her executive experience
she has also served on the Boards of
both Brambles Industries and Reckitt
Benckiser as well as that of SABMiller.
Ms. Doherty graduated from the University of Manchester, in the United
Kingdom with a Bachelor of Science
(Honors) in Liberal Studies in Science
(Physics). She also is a Fellow of the
Chartered Institute of Management
Accountants in the United Kingdom
Independence of Directors
In March 2013, the Board of Directors considered all criteria applicable
to the assessment of independence
of directors under the Belgian Companies Code, the Belgian Code on
Corporate Governance and the New
York Stock Exchange (NYSE) rules.
Based on the information provided
by all directors regarding their relationships with Delhaize Group, the
Board of Directors determined that all
directors, with the exception of Chief
Executive Officer Pierre-Olivier Beckers, Mr. Hugh G. Farrington and Mr.
Didier Smits, are independent under
the criteria of the Belgian Companies
Code, the Belgian Code on Corporate
Governance and the NYSE rules.
Based on determinations made up to
and including the Ordinary General
Meeting of 2012, the shareholders
have determined that all current directors are independent under the criteria
of the Belgian Companies Code, with
the exception of the directors mentioned above. Such determinations
have been made upon a director’s
election or re-election to the Board by
an Ordinary General Meeting.
Didier Smits (effective May 2009) is
no longer independent under the criteria of the Belgian Companies Code
because he has served on the Board
of Directors as a non-executive director for more than three consecutive
terms. Hugh G. Farrington (effective
May 2011) is not independent under
the criteria of the Belgian Companies
Code because he was compensated
until 2003 as an executive of the Company’s subsidiary Hannaford Brothers.
The Board of Directors considered
all criteria applicable to the assessment of independence of directors under the Belgian Companies
Code, the Belgian Code on Corporate Governance and the New
York Stock Exchange (NYSE) rules
and determined that, based on the
information provided by Ms. Elizabeth Doherty, she qualifies as independent under all these criteria. At
the Ordinary General Meeting of
May 23, 2013, the Board will propose
that the shareholders acknowledge
that Ms. Elizabeth Doherty is independent within the meaning of the
Belgian Companies Code.
Committees of the Board
of Directors
The Board of Directors has two
standing committees: the Audit Committee and the Remuneration and
Nomination Committee. The table on
page 39 provides an overview of the
membership of the standing committees of the Board of Directors. The
committees annually review their
Terms of Reference and recommend
any proposed changes to the Board
of Directors for approval.
Audit Committee
The Audit Committee was set up
by the Board to assist the Board in
monitoring the integrity of the financial statements of the Company, the
Company’s compliance with legal
and regulatory requirements, the
Statutory Auditor’s qualification and
independence, the performance of
the Company’s internal audit function and Statutory Auditor, and the
Company’s internal controls and
risk management. The Audit Committee’s specific responsibilities are
set forth in the Terms of Reference
of the Audit Committee, which are
attached as Exhibit B to the Company’s Corporate Governance Charter.
The Audit Committee is composed
solely of non-executive directors,
and all of them are independent
pursuant to the Belgian Companies
Code, the Belgian Code on Corporate Governance, the SEC rules and
the NYSE rules. The members of the
Audit Committee are appointed by
the Board on the recommendation
of the Remuneration and Nomination Committee. The composition of
the Audit Committee can be found
in the table on page 39. The Board
of Directors has determined that
Ms. Claire H. Babrowski, Mr. JeanPierre Hansen, Mr. Jack L. Stahl
and Baron Vansteenkiste are “audit
committee financial experts” as
defined under applicable U.S. law.
The Remuneration and Nomination
Committee and the Board of Directors have adequately considered
the competence and the skills of
the members of the Audit Committee on an individual as well as on a
collective basis and considered that
such members meet all the required
competencies and skills to exercise the functions pertaining to the
Audit Committee. Most members
of the Audit Committee are holders
of a master’s degree in Business
Administration and most members
of the Audit Committee have held or
continue to hold a position as Chief
Executive Officer, Chief Financial
Officer or Chief Operating Officer in
multinational groups. All members
of the Audit Committee are considered to be experts in accounting and
auditing for Belgian law purposes.
In 2012, the Audit Committee met
five times. All members of the Audit
Committee attended all of those
meetings with the exception of
Mr. Jean-Pierre Hansen, who was
excused at one meeting.
The activities of the Audit Committee
in 2012 included, among others:
• Review of financial statements and
related revenues and earnings
press releases
• Review of the effect of regulatory
and accounting initiatives and any
off-balance sheet structures on
the financial statements
• Review of changes, as applicable,
in accounting principles and valuation rules
• Review of the Internal Audit Plan
• Review of major financial risk
exposures and the steps taken by
management to monitor, control
and disclose such exposures
• Review of Management’s Representation Letter
• Review of the Audit Committee
Charter Required Actions Checklist
• Review of reports concerning the
policy on complaints (SOX 301
Reports Policy/I-Share line)
• Review of SOX 404 compliance
plan for 2012
• Review of report provided by the
General Counsel
• Review and evaluation of the lead
partner of the independent auditor
• Holding separate closed sessions
with the independent auditor and
with the Company’s Chief Audit
Officer
• Review and approval of the Policy
for Audit Committee Pre-Approval
of Independent Auditor Services
• Review of required communications from the independent auditor
• Review and approval of the Statutory Auditor’s global audit plan for
2012
• Supervision of the performance of
external auditor and supervision
of internal audit function
• Review of the Audit Committee
Terms of Reference
Remuneration and
Nomination Committee
The Remuneration & Nomination
Committee’s specific responsibilities are set forth in the Terms of Reference of the Remuneration and
Nomination Committee (the “RNC”),
which are attached as Exhibit C to
the Company’s Corporate Governance Charter.
The RNC is composed solely of nonexecutive directors, and a majority of the members of the RNC are
independent pursuant to the Belgian Companies Code, the Belgian
Code on Corporate Governance and
the NYSE rules. The composition of
the RNC can be found in the table
on page 39.
In 2012, the RNC met six times. All
RNC members attended all of those
meetings with the exception of Mr.
Jacques de Vaucleroy, who was
excused at one meeting.
The RNC reviewed and approved all
components of Company executive
pay and made recommendations to
the Board of Directors.
The activities of the RNC in 2012
included among others:
• Evaluation of the CEO
• Review and approval of the Remuneration Report
• Review of and recommendation
for senior management compensation individually and review of
variable remuneration for other
levels of management in the
aggregate
• Review of the application of the
share
ownership
guidelines
(applicable as of 2008)
• Recommendation
for
Board
approval of director nominations
and directors’ compensation
• Review of succession planning for
Executive Management
• Recommendation of approval of
2011 annual incentive bonus funding (payout in 2012)
• Review of and recommendation
on long-term incentive programs
• Recommendation on 2012 Board
remuneration
• Recommendation on renewal of
director mandates and review of
independence qualifications
• Review of and recommendation
on independence of Board members
• Review of new Short-Term Incentive Program for the Senior Management
• Review of the RNC Terms of Reference
Executive Management
Chief Executive Officer and
Executive Committee
Delhaize Group’s Chief Executive
Officer, Mr. Pierre-Olivier Beckers, is
in charge of the day-to-day management of the Company with the
assistance of the Executive Committee (together referred to as “Executive
Management”). Under Belgian law,
the Board of Directors has the power
to delegate under certain conditions
its management authority to a manDELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 43
governance
agement committee (“comité de
direction” / ”directiecomité”). However, the Board of Directors of Delhaize Group has not done so. The
Executive Committee, chaired by the
Chief Executive Officer, prepares the
strategy proposals for the Board of
Directors, oversees the operational
activities and analyzes the business performance of the Company.
The Terms of Reference of Executive Management are attached as
Exhibit D to the Company’s Corporate Governance Charter.
The composition of the Executive
Committee can be found on page
37 of this report.
The members of the Executive Committee are appointed by the Board
of Directors. The Chief Executive
Officer is the sole member of the
Executive Committee who is also a
member of the Board of Directors of
Delhaize Group.
Shareholders
Each holder of Delhaize Group
ordinary shares is entitled to attend
any general meeting of shareholders and to vote on all matters on
the agenda, provided that such
holder complies with the formalities specified in the notice for the
meeting.
The rights of a shareholder to attend
the general meeting of shareholders and to vote are subject to the
registration of these shares in the
name of this shareholder at 11:59
pm (European Central Time) on the
record date, which is the fourteenth
day before the meeting, either by
registration of registered shares
in the register of registered shares
of the Company, or by registration
of dematerialized shares in the
accounts of an authorized securities
account keeper or clearing institution, or by delivery of bearer shares
to a financial intermediary. Shareholders must notify the Company
(or the person designated by the
Company for this purpose) of their
intent to participate in the general
meeting of shareholders, no later
than six days before the date of the
meeting.
44 //
Similarly, a holder of Delhaize Group
American Depositary Shares (“ADSs”)
who gives voting instructions to the
depositary must arrange for having
those ADSs registered on the record
date set by the Company, which is the
fourteenth day before the meeting.
Each share or ADS is entitled to
one vote. The Company’s Articles
of Association do not contain any
restriction on the exercise of voting
rights by the shareholders, provided
that the shareholders concerned are
admitted to the General Meeting of
shareholders and their rights are not
suspended. The relevant provisions
governing the admission of shareholders to the General Meeting of
shareholders are set out in Article
545 of the Belgian Companies Code
and Article 31 of the Articles of Association. According to Article 6 of the
Articles of Association, the Company
is entitled to suspend the exercise of
the rights vested in a share in case
there are joint owners of this share
until one person has been appointed
in writing by all the co-owners to
exercise those rights. Article 10 of the
Articles of Association provides that
the voting rights pertaining to unpaid
shares are automatically suspended
as long as called payments, duly
made and claimable, have not been
made. Finally, voting rights attached
to treasury shares held by the Company itself are suspended (please
see page 83 of this Annual Report as
to treasury shares).
The Articles of Association of the
Company do not contain any restriction on the transfer of the shares
or ADSs, other than the prohibition
set out in Article 10 of the Articles
of Association that provides that
shares that have not been fully paid
up may not be transferred unless
the Board of Directors has previously
approved the transferee.
Belgian law does not require a quorum for the ordinary general meetings of shareholders. Decisions are
taken by a simple majority of votes
cast at the meeting, irrespective of
the number of Delhaize Group ordinary shares present or represented
at the meeting.
Resolutions to amend any provision of the Articles of Association,
including any decision to increase
the capital or an amendment which
would create an additional class of
shares, require a quorum of 50% of
the issued capital at an extraordinary
general meeting (provided that if this
quorum is not reached, the Board
may convene a second extraordinary
general meeting for which no quorum
is required), as well as the affirmative
vote of at least 75% of the shares present or represented and voting at the
meeting, or 80% of such shares if the
amendment would change Delhaize
Group’s corporate purpose or authorize the Board to repurchase Delhaize
Group ordinary shares.
The Board of Directors has been
authorized to increase the share
capital in one or several times up
to the amount of €5.1 million on the
dates and pursuant to the terms
decided by the Board of Directors
for a period of five years as from
June 21, 2012.
The Board of Directors has been
authorized to acquire up to 10% of
the outstanding shares of the Company at a minimum unit price of
€1 and at a maximum unit price not
higher than 20% above the highest closing stock market price of
the Company’s shares on Euronext
Brussels during the twenty trading days preceding such acquisition. Such authorization has been
granted for a period of five years as
from the date of the Extraordinary
General Meeting of May 26, 2011
and extends to the acquisition of
shares of the Company by its direct
subsidiaries; as such subsidiaries
are defined by legal provisions on
the acquisition of shares of the parent company by its subsidiaries.
Ordinary and Extraordinary
General Meeting of May 24, 2012
The Ordinary General Meeting is
held annually. The Ordinary General
Meeting of 2012 was held on May
24, 2012, together with an Extraordinary General Meeting.
During the Ordinary General Meeting, the Company’s management
presented the Management Report,
the report of the Statutory Auditor and
the consolidated annual accounts.
The Ordinary General Meeting then
approved the non-consolidated statutory annual accounts of fiscal year
2011 and discharged the Company’s
directors and the Statutory Auditor
of liability for their mandate during
2011. The Ordinary General Meeting
decided to appoint Ms. Shari L. Ballard as director for a term of three
years, and to renew the director’s
mandate of Mr. Pierre-Olivier Beckers
and Mr. Didier Smits for a term of three
years, and Ms. Claire H. Babrowski
for a term of four years. The Ordinary
General Meeting acknowledged Ms.
Claire H. Babrowski and Ms. Shari
L. Ballard as independent directors
under the Belgian Companies Code.
Additionally, the Ordinary General
Meeting approved (i) the company’s
remuneration report, (ii) the Delhaize
Group 2012 U.S. Stock Incentive Plan
and the Delhaize America, LLC 2012
Restricted Stock Unit Plan and their
related vesting periods, (iii) a change
of control provision set out in those
incentive plans, and (iv) a provision
allowing for early redemption upon
a change of control of the Company
to be provided to bondholders and/
or noteholders in certain transactions
the Company might enter into prior to
the next Ordinary General Meeting.
During the Extraordinary General
Meeting, the shareholders renewed
the power of the Board of Directors
for five years to increase the Company’s share capital.
The minutes of the Ordinary and
Extraordinary General Meeting of
May 24, 2012, including the voting
results, are available on the Company’s website together with all other
relevant documents relating to such
meeting.
Shareholder Structure and
Ownership Reporting
Pursuant to the legal provisions in
force and the Articles of Association of the Company, any person or
legal entity (hereinafter a “person”)
which owns or acquires (directly or
indirectly, by ownership of American
Depositary Shares (“ADSs”) or other-
wise) shares or other securities of
the Company granting voting rights
(representing the share capital or
not) must disclose to the Company
and to the Belgian Financial Services
and Markets Authority (“FSMA”) the
number of securities that such person owns, alone or jointly, when
its voting rights amount to three
percent or more of the total existing voting rights of the Company.
Such person must make the same
type of disclosure in case of transfer or acquisition of additional voting right securities when its voting
rights reach five percent, 10 percent,
and so on by blocks of five percent,
or when the voting rights fall below
one of these thresholds.
The same disclosure requirement
applies if a person transfers the
direct or indirect control of a corporation or other legal entity which
owns itself at least three percent of
the voting rights of the Company.
Furthermore, if as a result of events
changing the breakdown of voting
rights, the percentage of the voting rights reaches, exceeds or falls
below any of the above thresholds,
a disclosure is required even when
no acquisition or disposal of securities has occurred (e.g., as a result
of a capital increase or a capital
decrease). Finally, a disclosure is
also required when persons acting in concert enter into, modify or
terminate their agreement which
results in their voting rights reaching, exceeding or falling below any
of the above thresholds.
The disclosure statements must be
addressed to the FSMA and to the
Company at the latest the fourth
trading day following the day on
which the circumstance giving rise
to the disclosure occurred. Unless
otherwise provided by law, a shareholder shall be allowed to vote at
a general meeting of shareholders
of the Company only with the number of securities it validly disclosed
20 days, at the latest, before such
meeting.
Delhaize Group is not aware of
the existence of any shareholders’
agreement with respect to the vot-
ing rights pertaining to the securities
of the Company.
With the exception of the shareholders identified in the table below, no
shareholder or group of shareholders had declared as of December
31, 2012 holdings of at least 3% of
the outstanding voting rights of
Delhaize Group.
Rebelco SA (subsidiary of Sofina SA)
Citibank, N.A.(1)
4.04%
10.62%
BlackRock Group
Silchester International Investors LLP
4.00%
10.05%
(1) Citibank, N.A. has succeeded The Bank of New York
Mellon as Depositary for the American Depositary
Receipts program of Delhaize Group as of February
18, 2009. Citibank, N.A. exercises the voting rights
attached to such shares in compliance with the
Deposit Agreement that provides among others
that Citibank, N.A. may vote such shares only in
accordance with the voting instructions it receives
from the holders of American Depositary Shares.
On December 31, 2012, the directors
and the Company’s Executive Management owned as a group 725,700
ordinary shares and ADSs of Delhaize Group SA combined, which
represented approximately 0.71%
of the total number of outstanding
shares of the Company as of that
date. On December 31, 2012, the
Company’s Executive Management
owned as a group 1,187,576 stock
options, warrants and restricted
stock units representing an equal
number of existing or new ordinary
shares or ADSs of the Company.
External Audit
The external audit of Delhaize
Group SA is conducted by Deloitte
Reviseurs d’Entreprises/Bedrijfsrevisoren, Registered Auditors, represented by Mr. Michel Denayer, until
the Ordinary General Meeting in
2014.
Certification of Accounts 2012
In 2013, the Statutory Auditor has
certified that the statutory annual
accounts and the consolidated
annual accounts of the Company,
prepared in accordance with legal
and regulatory requirements applicable in Belgium, for the year ended
December 31, 2012, give a true and
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 45
governance
fair view of its assets, financial situation and results of operations. The
Audit Committee reviewed and discussed the results of the Statutory
Auditor’s audits of these accounts
with the Statutory Auditor.
Statutory Auditor’s Fees for
Services Related to 2012
The following table sets forth the
fees of the Statutory Auditor and
its associated companies relating
to the services with respect to fiscal
year 2012 of Delhaize Group SA and
its subsidiaries.
(in €)
2012
a. Statutory audit of
Delhaize Group SA(1)
460 000
b. Legal audit of the consolidated
financial statements(1)
259 200
Subtotal a,b: Fees as approved
by the shareholders at the
Ordinary General Meeting of
May 26, 2011
719 200
c. Statutory audit of subsidiaries
of Delhaize Group
1 934 299
Subtotal a,b,c: Statutory audit
of the Group and subsidiaries
2 653 499
d. Audit of the 20-F (Annual Report
filed with U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission)
e. Other legally required services
Subtotal d, e
f. Consultation and other
non-routine audit services
g. Tax services
h. Other services
Subtotal f, g, h
Total
42 000
185 237
227 237
94 689
145 024
16 311
256 024
3 136 760
(1) Includes fees for limited reviews of quarterly and
half-yearly financial information.
As a company that has securities
registered with the U.S. Securities
and Exchange Commission (SEC),
the Company is required to provide a management report to the
SEC regarding the effectiveness of
its internal controls, as described in
Section 404 of the U.S. SarbanesOxley Act of 2002 and the rules
implementing such act (see “Risk
Management and Internal Controls
– Financial Reporting” below). In
addition, the Statutory Auditor must
provide its assessment of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal
controls. The fees related to this
work represent a part of the Statutory Auditor’s fees for the “Statutory
audit of Delhaize Group SA”, the
46 //
“Statutory audit of subsidiaries of
Delhaize Group” and the “Legal audit
of the consolidated financial statements” in 2012. The Audit Committee
has monitored the independence of
the Statutory Auditor under the Audit
Committee’s pre-approval policy,
setting forth strict procedures for the
approval of non-audit services performed by the Statutory Auditor.
Risk Management and
Internal Controls
Overview
The Company’s management is
responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal controls.
Internal control is broadly defined as
a process effected by the Board and
management, designed to provide
reasonable assurance regarding
achievement of objectives related to
(i) effectiveness and efficiency of operations, (ii) reliability of financial reporting, and (iii) compliance with applicable laws and regulations.
The Audit Committee ultimately
oversees major business and financial risk management and discusses
the process by which management
of the Company assesses and manages the Company’s exposure to
those risks and the steps taken to
monitor and control such exposures.
The Company has established and
operates its internal control and risk
management systems based on
guidelines issued by the Committee
of Sponsoring Organizations of the
Treadway Commission (“COSO”). The
internal control system is based upon
COSOs Internal Control – Integrated
Framework, and its risk management
system is based on COSOs Enterprise
Risk Management Framework.
Financial reporting
The Company’s internal controls over
financial reporting are a subset of
internal control and include those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to
the maintenance of records that, in
reasonable detail, accurately and fairly
reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company, (ii)
provide reasonable assurance that
transactions are recorded as neces-
sary to permit preparation of financial
statements in accordance with IFRS as
adopted by the EU, and that receipts
and expenditures of the Company are
being made only in accordance with
authorizations of management and
directors of the Company, and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding
prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition
of the Company’s assets that could
have a material effect on the financial
statements.
As a company that has securities
registered with the SEC, the Company
must provide (i) a management report
on the effectiveness of the Company’s
internal control over financial reporting and (ii) the Statutory Auditor’s
assessment of the effectiveness of
internal control over financial reporting, as described in Section 404 of
the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
and the rules implementing such act.
The Statutory Auditor’s related opinions regarding the Company’s year
ended December 31, 2012 will be
included in the Company’s Annual
Report on Form 20-F for such year,
which is required to be filed with the
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission by April 30, 2013. The Group’s
2011 annual report filed on Form 20-F
includes management’s conclusion
that the Group’s internal control over
financial reporting was effective as
of December 31, 2011. The Statutory
Auditor concluded that the Group
maintained, in all material respects,
effective internal control over financial
reporting as of December 31, 2011.
Control Environment
The Company operates in 10 countries
across three continents, and as such
operates in a decentralized way. The
management of the group is organized
around strong banner and regional
management teams with assignment
of responsibility to Executive Committee members as appropriate.
The Company provides support
and coordination functions to all
members of the group and monitors selected activities group-wide.
Our operating companies have
acquired leading positions in food
retailing through a distinct go-to-
market strategy, benefiting from
support functions at the global and/
or regional level, whichever makes
the most sense in terms of efficiency.
Delhaize Group also has implemented policies and procedures
that determine the governance of
the Group to ensure that group
strategies and overall business
objectives are pursued under a controlled and well-defined decisionmaking authority.
The Company’s Guide for Ethical
Business Conduct provides a statement of our position on various
ethical and compliance issues that
could impact our business and summarizes a number of Company policies that must guide our actions.
We also expect our franchisees and
independent store operators, vendors and outside consultants such
as business, financial, technical or
legal advisors to be guided by these
standards. Ultimately, the guide
serves to make good decisions and
conduct business ethically.
A full copy is available on the Company website.
Risk Management
The Company defines risk management as a process of identifying,
assessing, and managing the risks
associated with the operations of
the business for the purpose of minimizing the effects of such risks on
the organization’s ability to achieve
its objectives and create value for its
stakeholders.
Leaders throughout the Company
and at all levels of the organization
are responsible for managing risk.
These leaders are expected to be
aware of and understand risk when
developing strategies, setting objectives and making decisions. Many
departments within the Company
support risk management activities
including: Legal, Compliance, Internal Audit, Quality Assurance and
Food Safety, Insurance, Claims Management, Loss Prevention/Security,
Health/Safety, Information Security,
Accounting and Finance and Risk
Management. These activities sup-
port our leaders in fulfilment of their
risk management responsibilities.
The Audit Committee and Executive Committee have approved the
Delhaize Group Risk Management
Program, which is a Company-wide
process to provide high quality, actionable risk information to its leaders.
The Program’s standardized framework enables the Company to create an aggregated view of risk,
strengthen its risk capability, and provides a tool to secure our future success. It creates visibility into risk information for Company leaders as well
as the Executive Committee, Audit
Committee and Board of Directors.
The Program and its supporting
framework have been designed to
manage risk broadly throughout the
Group. It can be used to manage
risk at an enterprise, region, operating company, function, department,
process, activity or project level.
The risk framework supports enterprise risk management. The traditional risk management process
starts by identifying business activities or business processes as well
as the risks associated with these
activities or processes. Enterprise
risk management starts with the
Company’s strategic priorities, goals
and objectives and an evaluation
of those risks that may prevent the
Company from achieving its strategic priorities, goals and objectives.
Information and Communication
Pertinent information is identified,
captured and communicated to associates in a form and timeframe that
enables them to effectively carry out
their responsibilities. The Company’s
information systems produce reports,
containing operational, financial and
compliance-related information, that
make it possible to run and control
every aspect of the business. Communication within the Company occurs
in a broader sense, flowing down,
across and up the organization.
The Chief Executive Officer and his
Executive Committee have set a clear
tone at the top that consistent and
effective performance of internal con-
trol activities are crucial to achieving
executional excellence; a founding
principle of the New Game Plan.
Uniform reporting of financial information is performed both upstream
and downstream and ensures the
consistency of data which allows the
Company to detect potential anomalies in its internal control framework. A detailed financial calendar
for this reporting is established
every year in consultation with the
Board and is designed to allow
for performance information to be
prepared accurately, yet reported
timely to stakeholders in order to
make sound business decisions.
Control Activities
Control activities include policies
and procedures to help monitor
and manage risk. Control activities
occur throughout the organization,
at all levels and in all functions.
They include a range of activities as
diverse as approvals, authorizations,
verifications, reconciliations, reviews
of operating performance, security
of assets and segregation of duties.
The Company has designed control
activities for all relevant business processes across each operating company as well as its corporate support
offices. Significant policies and procedures are published on the Company’s public websites, intranet sites
and other communication portals as
well as being periodically circulated
throughout the Company.
Monitoring
Monitoring, as defined in the COSO
Framework, is implemented to help
ensure “that internal control continues to operate effectively.” The Company had designed its monitoring
procedures to ensure that:
• Internal control deficiencies are
identified and corrected on a
timely basis;
• Information used in decision making is reliable and accurate;
• F inancial statements are prepared
accurately and timely; and
•P
eriodic certifications or assertions
on the effectiveness of internal
control can be made.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 47
governance
The Company’s monitoring procedures consist of a combination of
management oversight activities
and independent objective assessments of those activities by internal
audit or other third-parties.
Management’s monitoring of internal control is performed on a continuous basis. Operating company
performance is measured and
compared to budgets and longterm plans and key performance
indicators that may identify anomalies indicative of a control failure. In
addition, the Company has implemented a group-wide performance
management system to monitor
and measure performance consistently across the organization.
The Company has a professional
and independent internal audit
team led by the Chief Audit Officer
who reports functionally to the Audit
Committee. The Audit Committee
reviews Internal Audit’s risk assessment and audit plan, and regularly
receives internal audit reports for
review and discussion.
Internal control deficiencies identified by internal audit are communicated timely to management and
periodic follow up is performed to
ensure the corrective action has
been taken.
The Company’s Board of Directors
has the ultimate responsibility for
monitoring the performance of the
company and its internal control.
As such, the separate committees, described herein, have been
formed to monitor various aspects
of the Company’s performance;
and the Terms of Reference for each
Committee are available on the
Company website.
The Company determined that,
as of December 31, 2012, effective
internal controls were maintained.
Additional Governance
Matters
Related Party Transactions Policy
In line with the recommendations
of the Belgian Code on Corporate
Governance, the Company adopted
a Related Party Transactions Policy
48 //
containing requirements applicable to the members of the Board
and the Executive Management
in addition to the requirements of
the conflicts of interest policy in
the Company’s Guide for Ethical
Business Conduct, which is available at www.delhaizegroup.com.
The Company’s Related Party Transactions Policy is attached as Exhibit
F to the Company’s Corporate Governance Charter. The members of
senior management and the directors of the Company and of its subsidiaries completed a Related Party
Transaction Questionnaire in 2012
for internal control purposes. Further
Information on Related Party Transactions, as defined under International Financial Reporting Standards, can be found in Note 32 to the
Financial Statements.
Insider Trading and Market
Manipulation Policy
The Company has a Policy Governing Securities Trading and Prohibiting Market Manipulation (“Trading
Policy”) which reflects the Belgian
and U.S. rules of market abuse (consisting of insider trading and market
manipulation). The Company’s Trading Policy contains, among other
things, strict trading restrictions
that apply to persons who regularly
have access to material non-public
information. More details concerning the Company’s Trading Policy
can be found in the Company’s
Corporate Governance Charter. The
Company maintains a list of persons
having regular access to material
non-public information and periodically informed these persons in
2012 about the rules of the Trading
Policy and about upcoming restriction periods for trading in Company
securities.
Disclosure Policy
As recommended by the Belgian
Code on Corporate Governance, the
Company has adopted a Disclosure
Policy that sets out the framework
and the guiding principles that the
Company applies when disclosing
information. This policy is available
at www.delhaizegroup.com.
Compliance with the Belgian
Code on Corporate Governance
In 2012, the Company was fully
compliant with the provisions of the
Belgian Code on Corporate Governance.
Undertakings upon Change
of Control over the Company as
of December 31, 2012
Management associates of nonU.S. operating companies received
stock options issued by the Board
of Directors under the Stock Option
Plan 2006 and under the umbrella
stock option plan 2007, granting to the beneficiaries the right
to acquire ordinary shares of the
Company. Management associates of U.S. operating companies
received options, which qualify as
warrants under Belgian law, issued
by the Board of Directors under the
Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan, as amended, and under
the Delhaize Group U.S. 2012 Stock
Incentive Plan, granting to the beneficiaries the right to subscribe to new
American Depositary Receipts of
the Company. The General Meeting
of Shareholders approved a provision of these plans that provide that
in the event of a change of control
over the Company the beneficiaries
will have the right to exercise their
options and warrants, regardless of
their vesting period. The number of
options and warrants outstanding
under those plans as of December
31, 2012 can be found under Note
21.3 to the Financial Statements.
Management associates of U.S. operating companies received restricted
stock units under the Delhaize
America, LLC 2002 and 2012 Restriced Stock Unit Plans, granting
to beneficiaries the right to receive
existing shares of the Company
upon vesting. The Shareholders’
Meeting approved a provision of
these plans that provide that in the
event of a change in control over the
Company the beneficiary will receive
existing shares regardless of the
vesting period.
In 2003, the Company adopted a
global long-term incentive program
which incorporates a Performance
Cash Plan. The grants under the
Performance Cash Plan provide for
cash payments to the beneficiaries
at the end of a three-year period that
are dependent on Company performance against Board-approved
financial targets that are closely correlated to building long-term shareholder value. The General Meeting of
Shareholders approved a provision
of the Performance Cash Plan that
provides that the beneficiaries are
entitled to receive the full cash payment with respect to any outstanding grant in the event of a change of
control over the Company.
The Ordinary General Meeting of
Shareholders held on May 24, 2007,
May 22, 2008, May 28, 2009, May
27, 2010, May 26, 2011 and May
24, 2012, respectively, approved the
inclusion of a provision granting to
the holders of the bonds, convertible bonds or medium-term notes
that the Company may issue within
the 12 months following the respective ordinary shareholders meeting, in one or several offerings and
tranches, denominated either in U.S.
Dollars or in Euros, with a maturity or
maturities not exceeding 30 years,
for a maximum aggregate amount
of €1.5 billion, the right to obtain the
redemption, or the right to require
the repurchase, of such bonds or
notes for an amount not in excess
of 101% of the outstanding principal
amount plus accrued and unpaid
interest of such bonds or notes, in
the event of a change of control over
the Company, as would be provided
in the terms and conditions relating
to such bonds and/or notes.
On June 27, 2007 the Company
issued €500 million 5.625% senior
notes due 2014 and $450 million
6.50% notes due 2017 in a private
placement to qualified investors.
Pursuant to an exchange offer registered under the U.S Securities Act,
the 6.50% Dollar Notes were subsequently exchanged for 6.50% Dollar
Notes that are freely transferable in
the U.S. Each of these series of notes
contain a change of control provision granting its holders the right to
early repayment for an amount not
in excess of 101% of the outstanding principal amount thereof in the
event of a change of control over
the Company and downgrading by
Moody’s and S&P.
On February 2, 2009 the Company
issued $300 million 5.875% senior
notes due 2014 to qualified investors
pursuant to a registration statement
filed by the Company with the U.S.
Securities and Exchange Commission. The notes contain a change
of control provision granting their
holders the right to early repayment
for an amount not in excess of 101%
of the outstanding principal amount
thereof in the event of a change
of control over the Company and
downgrading by Moody’s and S&P.
On October 6, 2010, the Company announced the issuance of
new $827 million 5.70% Notes due
2040 (the “New Notes”) pursuant to a private offer to exchange
9.00% Debentures due 2031 and
8.05% Notes due 2027 issued
by its wholly-owned subsidiary
Delhaize America, LLC held by eligible holders. The New Notes contain a change of control provision
granting their holders the right to
early repayment for an amount not
in excess of 101% of the outstanding principal amount thereof in the
event of a change of control over
the Company and downgrading by
Moody’s and S&P.
On October 5, 2011 the Company
announced the successful completion on October 4, 2011 of its public offering of €400 million 7 year
4.25% retail bonds in Belgium and
in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
listed on NYSE Euronext Brussels
pursuant to a prospectus filed by
the Company with the Financial Services and Markets Authority of Belgium (FSMA). The bonds contain a
change of control provision granting
their holders the right to early repayment for an amount not in excess of
101% of the outstanding principal
amount thereof in the event of a
change of control over the Company
and downgrading by Moody’s and
S&P.
On April 10, 2012 the Company
issued $300 million 4.125% senior
notes due 2019 to qualified investors
pursuant to a registration statement
filed by the Company with the U.S.
Securities and Exchange Commission. The notes contain a change
of control provision granting their
holders the right to early repayment
for an amount not in excess of 101%
of the outstanding principal amount
thereof in the event of a change
of control over the Company and
downgrading by Moody’s and S&P.
On November 27, 2012 the Company issued €400 million 3.125%
senior notes due 2020 listed on
NYSE Euronext Brussels to qualified
investors pursuant to a prospectus
filed by the Company with the FSMA.
The notes contain a change of control provision granting their holders
the right to early repayment for an
amount not in excess of 101% of
the outstanding principal amount
thereof in the event of a change
of control over the Company and
downgrading by Moody’s and S&P.
The Ordinary General Meeting of
Shareholders held on May 26, 2011
approved a change in control clause
set out in the €600 million five-year
revolving credit facility dated April 15,
2011 entered into among inter alios
the Company, Delhaize America,
LLC, Delhaize Griffin SA, Delhaize
The Lion Coordination Center SA,
as Borrowers and Guarantors, the
subsidiary guarantors party thereto,
the lenders party thereto, and Fortis
Bank SA/NV, Bank of America Securities Limited, JP Morgan PLC and
Deutsche Bank AG, London Branch,
as Bookrunning Mandated Lead
Arrangers. The “Change in Control”
clause provides that, in case any
person (or persons acting in concert)
gains control over the Company or
becomes the owner of more than 50
per cent of the issued share capital
of the Company, this will lead to a
mandatory prepayment and cancellation under the credit facility.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 49
governance
Remuneration report
Delhaize Group wants to provide its
shareholders and all other stakeholders with consistent and transparent information on executive
compensation.
tive compensation plan in 2013 to
ensure that the design of the different programs and components of the
Remuneration Policy are supporting
the Company strategy and remain
aligned with market practices.
In this remuneration report we
include information on the following
topics:
Role and Involvement of Various
Parties in Executive Compensation
Analysis and Decisions
• The remuneration policy applied
during 2012;
• The role and involvement of various parties in executive compensation analysis and the related
decision-making processes;
• Director remuneration;
• Executive Management compensation; and
• Share ownership guidelines.
Role of the Remuneration &
Nomination Committee (RNC)
Remuneration Policy applied
during 2012
During the reported year, the Company applied the remuneration policy for directors and Executive Management as it is displayed in Exhibit E
of the Corporate Governance Charter
posted on the Company’s website at
www.delhaizegroup.com.
Delhaize Group strongly believes in
rewarding talent, experience and
performance. Accordingly, Delhaize
Group’s remuneration policy is
designed to provide incentives so
that the Company can attract and
retain talented directors and executives in order to deliver strong growth
and high returns for shareholders.
The policy’s goal is to reward individual and Company performance
in a manner that aligns the interests
of the Company’s executives, directors and shareholders while also
taking into account market practices and the differences between
the Group’s operating companies.
Delhaize Group has consistently
applied this policy in the past years.
As of March 6, 2013 Delhaize Group
does not intend to substantially alter
the Remuneration Policy in the coming two years with the exception of
what is mentioned hereunder under
the Short and Long Term Incentive
chapter. Delhaize Group also plans a
thorough analysis of its senior execu50 //
The composition and activities of the
RNC are discussed on page 41.
Role of Executive Officers in
Executive Compensation Decisions
The Company’s Chief Executive
Officer makes recommendations
concerning compensation for all
senior executives, and presents
those recommendations to the RNC.
These compensation recommendations take the results of the annual
performance review for each executive into account. The Company’s
Executive Vice President for Human
Resources assists the Chief Executive Officer in this process.
Role of Outside Compensation
Consultant
During 2012, and as in previous
years, the Company hired an independent compensation consultant
to assist the RNC in its understanding
and review of market practices. This
consultant worked with Company
management to obtain background
information and related support in
formulating recommendations.
Director Remuneration
The Company’s directors are remunerated for their services with a
fixed annual amount, decided by the
Board of Directors, which is not to
exceed the maximum amounts set
by the Company’s shareholders. The
maximum amount approved by the
shareholders at the Ordinary General
Meeting of May 26 2011 is (i) to the
directors as compensation for their
positions as directors, an amount of
up to €80 000 per year per director,
and (ii) to the Chairman of the Board,
an amount up to €160 000 per year.
The above-mentioned amounts are
increased by an amount of up to
€10 000 per year for each member of
any standing committee of the Board
(other than the chair of the committee), and increased by an amount of
up to €15 000 per year for the Chairman of any standing committee of
the Board. Non-Executive Directors
do not receive any remuneration,
benefits, equity-linked consideration
or other incentives from the Company
other than their remuneration for their
service as Director of the Company.
For some non-Belgian Board members, the Company pays a portion of
the cost of preparing the Belgian and
U.S. tax returns for such directors.
Delhaize Group has not extended
credit, arranged for the extension of
credit or renewed an extension of
credit in the form of a personal loan
to or for any member of the Board.
Individual director remuneration for
the fiscal years 2012, 2011 and 2010
is presented in the table on page 49
All amounts presented are gross
amounts before deduction of withholding tax.
Executive Management
Compensation
The term “Executive Management”
refers to the individuals who are
members of the Delhaize Group
Executive Committee.
Delhaize Group’s Remuneration Policy is tailored to emphasize the delivery of strong annual earnings growth
as well as sustained increases in
shareholder value over the long term.
Short-term performance is rewarded
in cash while long-term performance
is rewarded through a combination of
cash and equity-based instruments.
In the following paragraphs, we outline in detail the different components
of Executive Management compensation and illustrate its evolution over
time.
The executive compensation package includes the following components:
•B
ase salary;
•A
nnual bonus;
• L ong-term incentives (“LTI”); and
•O
ther benefits, retirement and
post-employment benefits.
(in €)
2010
2011
2012
€ 85 000
€ 90 000
€ 90 000
€0
€0
€ 48 352
François Cornélis(2)
€ 80 000
€ 32 088
€0
Count de Pret Roose de Calesberg(3)
€ 85 000
€ 36 099
€0
Jacques de Vaucleroy(4)
€ 80 000
€ 85 989
€ 90 000
€ 93 022
Non-Executive Directors
Hugh Farrington(5)
€ 85 000
€ 90 000
Count Goblet d'Alviella(6)
€ 85 000
€ 45 000
€0
€0
€ 47 912
€ 86 044
€ 160 000
€ 175 000
€ 69 231
Mats Jansson(9)
€0
€ 53 901
€ 138 352
William McEwan(10)
€0
€ 47 912
€ 86 044
Robert J. Murray(11)
€ 89 038
€ 80 000
€ 31 648
Didier Smits
€ 80 000
€ 80 000
€ 80 000
Jack Stahl(12)
€ 87 981
€ 95 000
€ 95 000
Baron Vansteenkiste(13)
€ 82 981
€ 90 000
€ 90 000
€ 1 000 000
€ 1 048 901
€ 997 693
Executive Director
€ 80 000
€ 80 000
€ 80 000
€ 1 080 000
€ 1 128 901
€ 1 077 693
(1) Prorated: Mrs Ballard joined the Board of Directors effective May 24, 2012.
(2) Prorated: Mr Cornélis resigned from the Board of Directors effective May 26, 2011.
(3) Prorated: Mr de Pret Roose de Calesberg resigned from the Board of Directors effective May 26, 2011.
(4) Prorated: Mr de Vaucleroy joined the RNC effective May 26, 2011.
(5) Prorated: Mr Farrington became chairman of the RNC effective May 24, 2012.
(6) Prorated: Mr Goblet d’Alviella resigned from the Board of Directors effective June 30, 2011.
(7)Prorated: Mr Hansen joined the Board of Directors effective May 26, 2011 and became member of the Audit
Committee effective May 24, 2012.
(8) Prorated: Count Jacobs de Hagen resigned from the Board of Directors effective May 24, 2012.
(9)Prorated: Mr Jansson joined the Board of Directors effective May 26, 2011 and became Chairman effective
May 24, 2012.
(10)Prorated: Mr McEwan joined the Board effective May 26, 2011 and became member of the RNC effective
May 26, 2012.
(11)Prorated: Mr Murray resigned from the Audit Committee effective May 27, 2010, from the RNC effective
May 25, 2011 and from the Board of Directors effective May 24, 2012.
(12)Prorated: Mr Stahl became chairman of the Audit Committee effective May 27, 2010.
(13)Prorated: Baron Vansteenkiste became member of the Audit Committee effectieve May 27, 2010.
(14)The amounts solely relate to the remuneration of the executive director and exclude his compensation as CEO
that is separately disclosed below.
Base salaries are established and
adjusted as a result of an annual
review process. This review process
considers market practices. The following table summarizes base salary paid to the CEO and the other
members of Executive Management
for the period 2010-2012.
Base salary (in millions of €)
Fixed vs Variable
Compensation for the CEO
fixed: 36.3%
variable: 63.7%
10
CEO
11
12
3.10
Delhaize Group believes that the current proportion of fixed versus variable pay offers its executives the right
incentives to optimize both the shortterm and long-term objectives of the
Company and its shareholders.
Base salary is a key component of
the compensation package, both on
its own and because annual target
awards and long-term incentive
awards are denominated as percentages of base salary.
2.73
In general, these components
can be categorized as either fixed
or variable. The base salary and
other benefits, retirement and postemployment benefits are considered
fixed. The annual bonus and the different components of the long-term
incentives are considered variable.
The following graphs illustrate the
proportion of fixed versus variable
compensation for both the CEO and
other members of Executive Management. These charts reflect base
salary, annual bonus and performance cash components granted in
2012.
Base Salary
0.95
When determining a compensation
package, the RNC considers all of
these elements.
The tables used in the following sections of this report are based on the
actual payments received during
the year and not on the amounts
granted for the year, i.e., 2012
payments include cash received
based on annual bonus earned for
2011 and performance cash grants
received over the performance
period 2009-2011.
0.97
Pierre-Olivier Beckers(14)
Total
variable: 63.2%
3.28
Total Non-Executive Directors
fixed: 36.9%
0.97
Count Jacobs de Hagen(8)
Fixed vs Variable Compensation for
the Other Members of Executive
Management
2.54
Jean-Pierre Hansen(7)
0.97
Claire H. Babrowski
Shari L. Ballard(1)
13
Other Members of Executive Management
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 51
governance
0.39
0.58
0.76
13
Variable Compensation Other
Members of Executive Management
by Component (in millions of €)
10
11
12
13
L TI - Performance
Cash grants
Annual Bonus
Annual Bonus
The annual bonus rewards shortterm performance of the Executive
Management. The annual bonus is
a cash award for achieving performance goals related to the individual and the Company. The annual
bonus is a variable part of executive
compensation.
Annual bonus (in millions of €)
Delhaize Group uses a scale to
correlate actual performance with
target performance to determine
the bonus payment. For the 2011
payment, 80% of the target performance level needed to be reached
in order to receive a bonus payment
equal to 50% of the target bonus
payment. The bonus payment levels
increase as performance exceeds
80% of the target performance level.
If performance reaches or exceeds
110% of the target performance
level, the bonus payment will equal
125% of the target bonus payment,
which represents the maximum
payment level. If the actual performance does not reach 80% of the
target performance level, the payment of a bonus is entirely at the
discretion of the Board of Directors
upon recommendation of the RNC.
The following graph illustrates how
this scale works.
CEO
11
12
13
Other Members of Executive Management
Performance during 2011
The target bonus for the current year
is expressed as a percentage of the
annual base salary of the individual
for that year. The annual bonus paid
in 2012 was based on the performance against Board approved
targets for Profit from Operations
Funding Percent
10
1.04
140
The annual bonus paid in a certain
year is a reflection of performance
during the previous year against
Board approved targets.
52 //
(“PFO”) for 2011. However, taking into
account the economic environment,
Executive Management has voluntary recommended to the Board
of Directors, who agreed, to adjust
the annual bonus related to their
performance 2011 at 50% of target,
substantially below the amounts to
which they would have been entitled
had the regular scale been applied.
Bonus Payout (in%)
0.39
The following graphs illustrate the
split of the variable remuneration
paid per component for the CEO
and other members of Executive
Management.
12
1.01
For 2013 the CEO and the members of the Executive Management
(with the exception of one person
whose geographical responsibilities have been substantially
altered)
have recommended
to the Board of Directors, who
agreed, to maintain their base
salary unchanged, thereby also
excluding automatic indexation
(Belgium) or, where applicable,
cost of life adjustment.
11
0.73
In 2012, the CEO and the members
of the Executive Management have
recommended to the Board of Directors, who agreed, to maintain their
base salary unchanged, thereby
also excluding automatic indexation (Belgium) or, where applicable,
cost of life adjustment.
10
1.04
(1) Amounts are gross amounts before deduction of
withholding taxes and social security levy. They
do not include the compensation of the CEO as
director of the Company.
(2) For 2010 these numbers include the pro-rata share
of compensation of Rick Anicetti who left
the Company on May 21, 2010. 2012 includes the
pro-rata share of compensation for Pierre Bouchut
and Roland Smith who joined the company in
2012.
L TI - Performance
Cash grants
Annual Bonus
0.39
3.10
0.39
3.28
1.34
8
6
1.01
0.97
0.97
1.29
2012
2013
0.66
2.54
0.66
2.73
6
0.56
7
0.97
1.29
0.95
1.63
2010
2011
0.38
Payout
0.74
Number of
persons
0.68
Payout
Variable Compensation CEO by
Component (in millions of €)
1.12
(in millions of €)
Other Members
of Executive
Management(2)
1.63
CEO
0.68
Base
Salary(1)
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
Percent to Budget
The annual bonus for the CEO
depends on the results at the consolidated Group level. For the other
members of Executive Management
the annual bonus payment is correlated to their respective responsibilities. These can be at the consolidated
Group level or at a level that is a mix
of operating companies, regions and
the consolidated Group level.
The table below shows an overview of
the Annual Bonus amounts paid during 2012, 2011 and 2010 (based on the
performance of the previous year).
Annual
Bonus(1)
(in millions of €)
CEO
Payout
Other Members
of Executive
Management
Number of
persons
Payout
2010
0.68
7
1.63
2011
0.66
6
1.29
2012
0.39
8
1.01
2013
0.39
6
1.04
(1) A
mounts are gross before deduction of withholding
taxes and social security levy.
Performance during 2012
With respect to annual bonuses
paid in 2013 based on performance
in 2012, the annual bonus for the
members of management having
the level of Director, Vice President,
Senior Vice President, Executive Vice
President and CEO is funded based
on the following elements:
• Company Performance – 50% of
the funding is based on Company
performance as measured by Profit
from Operations and other relevant
metrics. For the 2012 payment, 90%
of the target performance level
needed to be achieved in order to
receive a bonus payment equal to
75% of the target bonus payment.
The bonus payment levels increase
as performance exceeds 90% of
the target performance level. If performance reaches or exceeds 110%
of the target performance level, the
bonus payment will equal 125% of
the target bonus payment, which
represents the maximum payment
level. If the Company’s actual performance does not achieve 90% of the
target performance level, the payment of the Company Performance
component of the annual bonus is
entirely at the discretion of the Board
of Directors upon recommendation
of the RNC. The following graph illustrates how this scale works.
Bonus Payout (in %)
140
Funding Percent
In 2012, the CEO and the members of the Executive Management
received payment of their annual
bonus related to their performance
during 2011.
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
Percent to Budget
• Individual Performance – 50% of
the funding is based on individual
performance: this performance is
directly linked to the achievement
of 4-5 individual targets that are
identified through an individual
target setting process. The payout
for this part of the bonus target
(50%) can be funded from 0% to
150% depending on the individual
performance.
• Circuit breaker – The funding for the
Individual Performance component
of the annual bonus is dependent
on the condition that the Company
achieves at least 80% of the Company’s target performance level. If
the Company’s actual performance
does not achieve 80% of its target
performance level then the Individual Performance component of
the annual bonus is not funded and
any payment of a bonus is entirely
at the discretion of the Board of
Directors upon recommendation of
the RNC.
This system enhances a performance-based management culture
that aims to support the Company’s
strategy through a focus on growth
and efficiency.
Taking into account the current
economic environment Executive
Management has voluntary recommended to the Board of Directors, who agreed, to reduce the
Annual bonus related to their performance in 2012 and to be paid
in 2013: the bonus is set at 50%
of target for the CEO, and for the
other members of the Executive
Management the bonus has been
reduced with 20% of what they
would have been entitled to if the
regular scale was applied.
As a consequence, in 2013, the
CEO will be paid €€0.39 million and
the other members of the Executive Management in the aggregate
will be paid €€1.04 million (these
amounts are gross before deduction of withholding taxes and
social security levy).
Performance during 2013
and following years
With respect to annual bonuses that
will be paid based on performance
in 2013 the annual bonus for the
members of management having
the level of Director, Vice President,
Senior Vice President, Executive Vice
President and CEO will be funded
based on the following elements:
• Company Performance – 50% of
the funding will be based on Company performance as measured
by achievement of both Underlying
Operating Profit and Revenue. The
2013 payment scales will be defined
for every operational company and
for the Group as a whole. The funding can range from 0% to 150%.
•
Individual Performance – 50%
of the funding will be based on
individual performance: this performance is directly linked to the
achievement of 4-5 individual targets that are identified through an
individual target setting process.
The payout for this part of the
bonus target (50%) can be funded
from 0% to 150% depending on
the individual performance.
• Circuit breaker – The funding of the
part of the bonus that is based on,
respectively, the Company performance (50%) and the individual
performance (50%) is, compared
to previous years, dependent on
the stricter condition that the Company achieves 90% of its Underlying Operating Profit target. If
the Company does not meet this
target then there is no funding
of the Company or the Individual
Performance components of the
annual bonus and any payment of
a bonus is entirely at the discretion
of the Board of Directors upon recommendation of the RNC.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 53
governance
Long-Term Incentives
Stock Options / Warrants
The long-term incentive plan is
designed to retain the Executive
Management team and reward
long-term success of the Group. Delhaize Group’s long-term incentive
plan consists of three components:
Pursuant to Article 520 ter of the Belgian Companies Code on reinforcement of corporate governance, the
Ordinary Shareholders’ Meeting of
May 2012 approved the adoption of
the new Delhaize Group 2012 U.S.
Stock Incentive Plan and authorized
the Board of Directors to continue
grants of options with a vesting in
equal installments of one third over
a three-year period following the
grant date in order to maintain a
competitive recruitment and retention framework in the U.S.
• Stock options and warrants;
• Restricted stock unit awards
(mostly applicable in the U.S.); and
• Performance cash grants.
These components typically constituted approximately 25%, 25% and
50% of the total value of long-term
incentives, respectively.
To support the Company strategy and
to recognize at the same time the
need for a continuous effort to maximize the alignment with the shareholders’ interest the following changes
will be made to the grants under the
U.S. Long-term Incentive plans:
•A
s from the year 2013 the grant
of Restricted Stock Units will be
turned into a grant of Peformance
Shares by submitting the vesting
of the shares to the achievement
of a financial performance condition (ROIC targets over a cumulative 3-years period).
•A
s from the same time the vesting
scheme of the Performance Shares
will be changed into a cliff vesting
after 3 years (instead of the current vesting scheme that foresees a
vesting in equal instalments of one
fourth starting at the end of the second year following the grant date)
• F inally, for the Vice President Level
and above in the US, the 2013
grant will consist solely of Performance Shares and Stock Options
(evenly split in expected value).
In 2012, 527,737 stock options were
granted to the Executive Management of Delhaize Group. The exercise price per share for the stock
options granted in 2012 amounted
to €30.99 for options on ordinary
shares traded on Euronext Brussels and $38.86/39.62 for options
related to the Company’s American
Depositary Shares traded on the
New York Stock Exchange.
Following U.S. market practice, the
options granted in June 2012 under
the Delhaize Group 2012 U.S. Stock
Incentive Plan for executives of the
Group’s U.S. operating companies
vest in equal annual installments of
one third over a three-year period
following the grant date. Following
European market practice, options
granted in June 2012 under the nonU.S. 2007 Stock Option Plan for other
executives vest at the end of a threeand-a-half-year period following the
grant date (“cliff vesting”).
For more details on the share-based
incentive plans see Note 21.3 in the
financial statements.
The value of the stock option grant
determines the number of options
awarded. The value is determined
each year at the time of the grant using
the Black-Scholes-Merton formula.
The value of the stock option may vary
from year to year. As a result, the total
number of options granted can also
be different from year to year.
The following table shows the number of stock options granted to the
CEO and the different members of
the Executive Management team
during the period 2010-2012.
54 //
Number of Stock Options awarded
Pierre-Olivier
Beckers
Pierre Bouchut
2010
2011
2012
31 850
32 000
32 000
0
0
38 072
17 591
20 487
35 576
Michel Eeckhout
14 827
23 176
23 176
Ron Hodge
20 567 45 381(1)
25 381
Stéfan
Descheemaeker
Nicolas
Hollanders
8 765
14 238
14 238
Kostas
Macheras
12 741
20 306
41 299
Roland Smith
0
Michael Waller
0
Total
0 300 000(2)
17 995
17 995
106 341 173 583 527 737
(1) Special grant upon appointment as CEO of Delhaize
America
(2) Including the following components; (1) special
grant upon appointment as CEO of Delhaize
America (2) long-term Incentive grant 2013
During 2012, no stock options were
exercised by the members of Executive Management 20 875 stock options
lapsed.
Stock Options
Exercised Lapsed Year(s)
in 2012 in 2012 granted
Pierre-Olivier
Beckers
0
10 089
2002,
2005
Stéfan
Descheemaeker
0
Michel Eeckhout
0
5 824
2002,
2005
Ron Hodge
0
2 008
2002
Nicolas
Hollanders
0
Kostas
Macheras
0
2 954
2005
Roland Smith
0
Michael Waller
0
Total
0 20 875
-
Restricted Stock Unit Awards
Pursuant to Article 520 ter of the Belgian Companies Code on reinforcement of corporate governance, the
Ordinary Shareholders’ Meeting of
May 24 2012 approved the adoption of the new Delhaize America
2012 Restricted Stock Unit Plan and
authorized Delhaize America to
continue grants of restricted stock
units with a vesting in equal installments of one fourth over a five-year
period starting at the end of the second year following the grant date
in order to maintain a competitive
recruitment and retention framework within the U.S. market.
12 000
12 000
1 630
2 355
Pierre Bouchut
Stéfan
Descheemaeker
Michel Eeckhout
0
0
0
0
0
Ron Hodge
5 102
5 198
5 198
Nicolas
Hollanders
1 288
1 637
1 466
Kostas
Macheras
0
0
0
40 000(1)
Roland Smith
Michael Waller
Total
4 593
3 685
3 685
22 677
24 875
62 349
(1) Including the following components; (1) special
grant upon appointment as CEO of Delhaize
America (2) long-term Incentive grant 2013
Participants may receive up to 150%
of the target cash award if actual
performance reaches or exceeds
120% of the performance targets for
both ROIC and revenue growth. At
the end of each three-year period,
actual ROIC and revenue growth
Resulting Payout
(in millions of €)
CEO
Other Members
of Executive
Management
Payout Number of Payout
persons
2010
0.74
7
1.12
2011
0.38
6
0.56
2012
0.76
8
1.34
2013
0.58
6
0.73
(1) Amounts are gross before deduction of withholding
taxes and social security levy.
Performance Cash Grant
(in millions of €)
10
CEO
11
12
0.73
10 064
Performance
Cash Grant(1)
0.58
2012
The following table shows the
amounts paid in the years 20102012 for the performance over the
respective periods 2007-2009,
2008-2010 and 2009-2011.
1.34
2011
80 85 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135 140
Performance (as a% of Target)
0.76
Pierre-Olivier
Beckers
2010
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
0.56
Number of Restricted
Stock Units awarded
The Company sets these targets
each year based upon its growth
expectations for the ensuing threeyear performance period. Participants receive the “target award”
in cash if the performance targets
are achieved. Cash payments are
reduced for performance below
the targets and are increased if
performance exceeds the targets.
The Board of Directors determines
the performance target goals every
year. These performance target
goals include minimum threshold
performance goals below which no
cash payment will occur, and the
maximum award levels if the performance targets are exceeded.
Payout Range (in%)
0.38
The following table shows the number of restricted stock units granted
to the CEO and the different members of the Executive Management
team during the period 2010-2012.
The long-term incentive plan
includes a component which can
result in a cash payment in the
period following a three-year performance period. The value of the
performance cash award granted
each year, referred to as the “target award,” is based on the face
value of the award at the time of the
grant, i.e., at the beginning of each
three-year period. For example, the
payment done in 2012 is based on
achievements against targets set
in 2009. The amount of the cash
payment at the end of the threeyear performance period depends
on performance by the Company
against Board-approved financial targets for return on invested
capital (“ROIC”) and compounded
annual revenue growth. These metrics are key performance indicators
which the Company considers to be
closely correlated to building longterm shareholder value. The relative
weight for these metrics is 50% for
ROIC and 50% for revenue growth.
are measured against the performance targets for both metrics and
the actual payout is calculated. The
cash payment occurs in the year
following the end of the three-year
period. For example, the amounts
paid in 2012 relate to the achievement of the goals determined for
the period 2009-2011. This principle
is illustrated in the following graph.
1.12
The value of the restricted stock unit
grant determines the number of
units awarded. The value is determined each year on the date of
the award based on the stock price
on the grant date. The value of the
restricted stock unit award may vary
from year to year. As a result, the
total number of restricted stock units
granted can also be different from
period to period.
Performance Cash Grant
0.74
The restricted stock unit awards
granted in 2012 under the Delhaize
America 2012 Restricted Stock Unit
Plan represent a commitment of
Delhaize America to deliver Company’s American Depositary Receipts
(“ADRs”) to the award recipient, at no
cost to the recipient (one restricted
stock unit equals one ADR). The ADRs
are delivered over a five-year period
starting at the end of the second
year after the award. These ADRs
can be sold by the award recipient
at any time following the delivery of
the ADRs consistent with the guidelines and restrictions contained in
the Company’s trading policies.
13
Other Members of Executive Management
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 55
governance
Other Benefits, Retirement and
Post-employment Benefits
pension plans, which vary regionally. U.S. members of the Executive
Management participate in defined
benefit and defined contribution
plans in their respective operating
companies. The European plan is
contributory and based on the individual’s career length with the Company. In 2010, the members of the
Executive Management in Belgium
were offered the option to switch
to a defined contribution plan or to
continue in the existing defined benefit plan. The amounts paid by the
Company are included in the summary table on this page.
Other benefits include the use of
company-provided
transportation, employee and dependent life
insurance, welfare benefits and an
allowance for financial planning for
U.S. members of Executive Management. Delhaize Group believes
these benefits are appropriate for
Executive Management’s responsibilities and believes these are consistent with the Group’s philosophy
and culture and market practices.
The members of Executive Management benefit from corporate
Summary of Total Compensation Paid
The following table summarizes the components described in the paragraphs above and
that represent a cash payment during the year.
CEO
Other Members of Executive
Management(2)
(in millions of €)(1)
2010
2011
2012
2013
2010
2011
2012
2013
Base Salary
0.95
0.97
0.97
0.97
2.73
2.54
3.28
3.10
Annual Bonus(3)
0.68
0.66
0.39
0.39
1.63
1.29
1.01
1.04
LTI - Performance Cash Grants(4)
0.74
0.38
0.76
0.58
1.12
0.56
1.34
0.73
Other Short-Term Benefits
0.06
0.06
0.05
0.05(5)
0.32
0.16
0.25
0.25(5)
Retirement and
Post-Employment Benefits
0.56
0.74
0.76
0.76(5)
1.05
1.11
1.13
1.13(5)
Total
2.99
2.81
2.93
2.75
6.85
5.66
7.01
5.99
(1) Amounts are gross before deduction of withholding taxes and social security levy. (2) Included 8 members in 2012, 6 members in 2011
and 7 members in 2010. (3) Based on the performance of Year-1. (4) Based on the performance of the preceeding 3 years. (5) Projected
Total CEO Compensation Components
(in millions of €)
0.56
0.06
0.74
0.74
0.06
0.38
0.76
0.05
0.76
0.76*
0.05*
0.58
0.68
0.66
0.39
0.39
1.63
1.11
0.16
0.56
1.29
0.95
0.97
0.97
0.97
2.73
2.54
10
11
12
Retirement and Post-Employment Benefits
Other Short-Term Benefits
LTI - Performance Cash grants
Annual Bonus
Base Salary *Projected
56 //
Total Compensation Components for Other
Members of the Executive Management
(in millions of €)
1.05
0.32
1.12
13
10
11
1.13
0.25
1.34
1.01
1.13*
0.25*
0.73
1.04
3.28
3.10
12
Retirement and Post-Employment Benefits
Other Short-Term Benefits
LTI - Performance Cash grants
Annual Bonus
Base Salary *Projected
13
Share Ownership Guidelines
Delhaize Group believes that Executive Management should be encouraged to maintain a minimum level
of share ownership in order to align
the interests of the shareholders and
Executive Management. In 2008, the
Board of Directors adopted share
ownership guidelines based on the
recommendation of the RNC.
Under these guidelines and during
their active employment, the CEO
and the other members of Executive Management are expected to
acquire and maintain ownership
of Delhaize Group stock equal to a
multiple of the annual base salary.
These multiples are set as follows:
Multiple of Annual Base Salary
Chief Executive Officer
300%
Executive Management $ payroll
200%
Executive Management € payroll
100%
The difference between U.S.-based
and European-based management
is due to the different market practices in these regions and the differences between the instruments
available for Executive Management
remuneration. In the U.S., equitybased compensation is more widely
encouraged than in Europe.
Executive Management is expected
to achieve the share ownership levels by the end of 2013. New members of Executive Management will
be allowed a period of five years to
achieve the recommended share
ownership levels.
The RNC will monitor the compliance
with these Guidelines at least once
a year. The Board of Directors is currently satisfied with the progress
that has been made so far.
Main Contractual Terms of Hiring
and Termination of Executive
Management
The Company’s Executive Management, in accordance with employment-related agreements and applicable law, is compensated in line
with the Company’s Remuneration
Policy and is assigned duties and
responsibilities in line with current
market practice for its position and
with the Company’s Terms of Reference of Executive Management.
Executive Management is required
to abide by the Company’s policies
and procedures, including the Company’s Guide for Ethical Business
Conduct, and is subject to confidentiality and non-compete obligations
to the extent authorized by applicable law. Executive Management is
also subject to other clauses which
are typically included in employment agreements for executives.
The employment agreements of the
CEO, Pierre Bouchut, Nicolas Hollanders and Stéfan Descheemaeker,
who all have a Belgian employment
contract, do not provide for a severance payment in case of termination. Should the employment be terminated, the parties will negotiate
in good faith to determine the terms
and conditions applicable to such
termination. In case of disagreement, the case will be settled by the
Courts applying Belgian law.
The employment agreement of
Kostas Macheras, who has a Greek
employment contract, provides for
a severance payment of twice the
annual base salary and annual
incentive bonus in certain cases of
termination of the agreement, for
example in the event of retirement.
Such payment is not due in case
of dismissal of Kostas Macheras
for serious misconduct or serious
fault. The above-mentioned Greek
employment contract relates to the
activities of Kostas Macheras as
CEO of the relevant Greek subsidiary and has been referred to in this
report for the sake of completeness.
The U.S. employment agreement of
Roland Smith provides for a severance payment of eighteen months
base salary and annual incentive
bonus and the continuation of the
Company health and welfare benefits for a comparable period in
the event of the termination of his
employment by the Company without cause or by Roland Smith for
good reason. The termination would
also result in accelerated vesting of
all or substantially all of the longterm incentive awards.
Ron Hodge retired in December
2012 and received in this context
a lump sum representing the Total
Cash Compensation of one year.
Michel Eeckhout retired in December 2012 and did not receive any
payment in the framework hereof
with the exception of a special contribution to the retirement benefits
in order to guarantee normal retirement benefits at the age of 65.
The contracts with the members
of Executive Management do not
provide for a claw-back right for
the Company in cases where the
variable remuneration paid was
calculated on the basis of erroneous
financial data.
The U.S. employment agreement
of Michael Waller provides the payment of two times his annual base
salary and annual incentive bonus
and the continuation of the Company health and welfare benefits for
a comparable period in the event of
the termination of his employment
by the Company without cause or
by Michael Waller for good reason.
The termination would also result
in accelerated vesting of all or substantially all of the long-term incentive awards.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 57
risk factors
Risk Factors
The following discussion reflects business risks that are evaluated by our management
and our Board of Directors. This section should be read carefully in relation to our prospects
and the forward-looking statements contained in this annual report. Any of the following
risks could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations
or liquidity and lead to impairment losses on goodwill, intangible assets and other assets.
There may be additional risks of which the Group is unaware. There may also be risks
Delhaize Group now believes to be immaterial, but which could evolve to have a material
adverse effect.
Strategic Risks
Macro-economic Risk
Major macro-economic risks of
Delhaize Group are reduced consumer spending, cost inflation
or deflation and possible consequences of the sovereign debt crisis
in Europe. Economic conditions such
as employment level, business conditions, interest rates, energy and
fuel costs and tax rates could reduce
consumer spending or change consumer purchasing habits. Weaker
consumer spending can negatively
impact profitability due to pressure
on sales and margins. If labor cost
and the cost of merchandise sold,
which are the Group’s primary
operating costs, increase above
retail inflation rates, this could have
an adverse effect on the Group’s
profitability. In addition, rising fuel
and energy prices can increase the
Group’s cost for heating, lighting,
cooling and transportation. Where
possible, cost increases are recovered through retail price adjustments and increased operating
efficiencies.
Delhaize Group is particularly susceptible to macroeconomic risks in
the U.S. In 2012, 64% of the Group’s
revenues were generated in the
U.S. (2011: 65%), where its stores
are located on the East Coast. Consequently, the Group’s operations
depend significantly upon the economic conditions in this area.
58 //
In Europe and in particular in
Greece, Delhaize Group is exposed
to the possible aftermath of the sovereign debt crisis and the breakup
of the eurozone. This is likely to have
an adverse impact on consumer
spending and may cause the company to impair assets and record
lower contribution in operating
results.
Expansion Risk
Delhaize Group’s ability to open new
stores is dependent on purchasing
or entering into leases on commercially reasonable terms for properties that are suitable for its needs.
If the Group fails to secure property
on a timely basis, its growth may be
impaired. Similarly, its business may
be harmed if it is unable to renew
the leases on its existing stores on
commercially acceptable terms.
Acquisition and Integration Risk
As part of its strategy, Delhaize
Group continues to reinforce its
operations by pursuing acquisition opportunities in the food retail
industry. Delhaize Group looks for
the acquisition of businesses operating the same or similar store
formats in geographical areas
where it currently operates or in
adjacent areas. By acquiring other
businesses, the Group faces risks
related to the integration of these
businesses. These risks include,
but are not limited to, as applica-
ble, incurring significantly higher
than anticipated financing related
risks and operating expenses, failing to assimilate the operations and
personnel of acquired businesses,
failing to install and integrate all
necessary systems and controls, the
loss of customers, entering markets
where we have no or limited experience, the disruption of our ongoing
business and the stretching of our
management resources. Realization of the anticipated benefits of an
acquisition, store renovation, market renewal or store opening may
take several years or may not occur
at all. The above may also have a
negative impact on goodwill recognized in the financial statements
in connection with acquisitions (see
also Note 6 “Goodwill” in the Financial Statements). Our growth strategy may place a significant strain
on our management, operational,
financial and other resources. The
lack of suitable acquisition targets
at acceptable prices may limit the
Group’s growth.
Risk Related to Competitive
Activity
The food retail industry is competitive and characterized by narrow
profit margins. Delhaize Group
faces heavy competition from many
store chains. The Group’s profitability could be impacted by the pricing,
purchasing, financing, advertising
or promotional decisions made by
these competitors. To the extent
Delhaize Group reduces prices
or increases expenses to support
sales in the face of competition, net
income and cash generated from
operations could be affected.
Operational Risks
Risk Related to Events
of Exceptional Nature
Delhaize Group’s operations, assets
and staff can be exposed to risks
related to events of an exceptional
nature such as, but not limited to,
severe weather, natural disasters,
terrorist attacks, hostage taking,
political unrest, fire, power outages,
information technology failures,
food poisoning, health epidemics
and accidents. Such events could
have a significant effect on the
Group’s relationships with its customers and on its financial condition, results of operations and cash
flows. The Group is continuously
evaluating and addressing possible threats linked to external events
and has business continuity plans
and crisis procedures in place. The
effectiveness of these plans in limiting financial losses will vary according to the nature and severity of any
exceptional event.
Risk Related to Social Actions
At the end of 2012, Delhaize Group
had union representation in its operations in Belgium, the Grand-Duchy
of Luxembourg, Romania, Greece
and Serbia. In its U.S. operations,
the Group had union representation
in one of its eleven distribution centers, for which a collective bargaining
agreement with the union is in effect
until February 2015.
Delhaize Group’s operations and
results could be negatively affected
by social actions initiated by trade
unions or other parts of its workforce, in which event the Group cannot ensure that it would be able to
adequately meet the needs of its
customers.
Risk Related to Information
Technology Systems
Delhaize Group’s operations are
dependent on IT systems for many
functions and processes. These systems have been developed and are
maintained by internal experts or
external suppliers. Failure of these
systems could possibly cause disruptions in Delhaize Group’s operations, affecting sales and profitability. Delhaize Group has business
continuity plans in place to take the
necessary measures to reduce the
negative impact from IT failures on
its operations.
If third parties or our associates are
able to penetrate our network security or otherwise misappropriate our
customers’ personal information
or credit or debit card information,
or if we give third parties or our
associates’ improper access to our
customers’ personal information or
credit card information, we would
be subject to liability. This liability
could, for instance, include claims
related to unauthorized purchases
with credit card information; identity
theft or other similar fraud-related
claims and administrative fines. Any
such liability for misappropriation
of this information could decrease
our profitability. Our security measures are designed to protect against
security breaches, but our failure
to prevent such security breaches
could subject us to liability, damage our reputation and diminish the
value of our brand names.
Risk related to the Achievement
of Cost Savings, which may
Reduce, Delay or otherwise
Hinder our Ability to Implement
our New Game Plan
Effective February 1, 2010, the support functions for Food Lion, Bloom,
Harveys, Bottom Dollar Food, Hannaford and Sweetbay began to be
integrated within the U.S. segment
of Delhaize Group, while maintaining the unique go-to-market strategies of each of these banners.
In this new structure, the banner
organizations can benefit from common U.S. support services for supply
chain, IT, finance, human resources,
organizational change management, legal and government relations, communications, strategy
and research, and corporate development. The goal of these common support services is to create
greater efficiencies and scale, and
the elimination of redundancies, as
well as to become more flexible in
the integration of acquisitions, and
ultimately better serve our banners
and customers. This restructuring is
also expected to simplify our legal,
accounting and tax compliance
requirements. We anticipate that
cost savings achieved through our
U.S. support services restructuring
will help fund our New Game Plan
that was announced in December 2009. A significant component
of our New Game Plan involves,
among other things, our operating
companies’ fine-tuning their pricing strategies to achieve local value
leadership. Our New Game Plan is
intended to accelerate our growth.
However, we cannot provide assurance that we will achieve all cost
savings anticipated through our
U.S. support services restructuring,
or through other related initiatives,
which may reduce, delay or otherwise hinder our ability to implement
our New Game Plan.
Risk Related to Our Franchised
and Affiliated Stores
Approximately 20% of the stores in
our sales network are franchised or
affiliated. The operators of our affiliated and franchised stores operate
their stores as independent third
parties. Although we attempt to
properly select, train and support the
operators of our affiliated and franchised stores, the ultimate success
and quality of any affiliated or franchised store rests with its operator.
If the operators of our affiliated and
franchised stores do not successDELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 59
risk factors
fully operate in a manner consistent
with our standards, our image and
reputation could be harmed, which
could adversely affect our business
and operating results.
Risk Related to our Prices
and Our Suppliers
Significant disruptions in operations
of, or our relationships with, our
vendors and suppliers could materially impact our operations by disrupting store-level product selection
or costs, resulting in reduced sales.
The products we sell are sourced
from a wide variety of domestic and
international suppliers. This sourcing may be impacted by elements
outside of Delhaize Group’s control
and may include political and economic instability in the countries in
which suppliers are located, their
financial instability and any other
condition that may result in them
not being able to continue to supply Delhaize Group. These factors
affecting our suppliers and access
to products may result in decreased
product selection and increased
out-of-stock conditions, as well as
higher product costs, which could
adversely affect our operations and
financial performance.
Financial Risks
Delhaize Group has identified the
exposure associated with the ability
to continuously fund its operations,
adverse interest rate and currency
movements, the credit quality of its
financial counterparties, fluctuations
in its share price within the framework of its share-based compensation plans, and the funding of its
pension plans as its principal financial risks.
In order to manage its identified and quantified market risks
Delhaize Group uses derivative
financial instruments - such as foreign exchange forward contracts,
interest rate swaps, currency swaps
and other derivative instruments and does not hold such positions for
speculative purposes.
Funding and Liquidity Risk
Funding and liquidity risk is the
risk that the Group will encounter difficulty in meeting payment
obligations when they come due.
Delhaize Group manages this
exposure by closely monitoring
its cash resources, consisting of a
combination of retained cash flows,
bank facilities, long-term debt capital markets and leases, essential
to fulfil its working capital, capital
expenditures and debt requirements.
Delhaize Group operates an international cash-pooling structure in
order to centralize cash on a daily
basis whenever possible. At yearend 2012 the Group’s Cash and
Cash Equivalents amounted to
€932 million.
Delhaize Group also monitors the
amount of short-term funding, the
mix of short-term funding to total
debt and the availability of committed credit facilities in relation to the
level of outstanding short-term debt
(see Note 18.2 “Short-term Borrowings” in the Financial Statements).
At year-end 2012, the Group had
committed and undrawn credit
60 //
lines totalling €725 million. These
credit lines consisted of a syndicated multicurrency credit facility of
€600 million for the Company and
certain of its subsidiaries including
Delhaize America, LLC and €125
million of bilateral credit facilities
for European entities. In addition,
the Group had €30 million of committed credit facilities for Letters of
Credit and guarantees of which €11
million was used. At December 31,
2012, the maturities of the committed credit facilities were as follows: €77 million maturing in 2013,
€28 million maturing in 2014, €50
million maturing in 2015 and €600
million maturing in 2016.
Delhaize Group pro-actively monitors the maturities of its outstanding
debt in order to reduce refinancing risk. As described in Note 18.1
”Long-term Debt,” the debt maturing in 2014 has been largely refinanced and no significant principal
payment of financial debt is due
until 2017. At December 31, 2012,
the maturities of the long-term debt
through 2017 were €156 million in
2013, €232 million in 2014, €1 million in 2015, €7 million in 2016 and
€341 million in 2017 after the effect
of interest rate swaps and crosscurrency interest rate swaps. Delhaize Group relies on a strong credit
rating to optimally refinance maturing debt. Delhaize Group’s longterm issuer ratings from Standard
& Poor’s and Moody’s are BBB(stable) and Baa3 (stable) investment grade ratings, respectively.
These credit ratings are supported
by cross-guarantee arrangements
among Delhaize Group and substantially all of Delhaize Group’s
U.S. subsidiaries, whereby the entities are guaranteeing each other’s
financial debt obligations.
As also described in Notes 18.1
”Long-term Debt” and 18.2 “Shortterm Borrowings”, the Group is
subject to certain financial and
non-financial covenants related to
its long- and short-term debt instruments, which contain certain accelerated repayment terms that are
detailed in these Notes.
Interest Rate Risk
Interest rate risk arises on interestbearing financial instruments and
represents the risk that the fair value
or the associated interest cash flows
of the underlying financial instrument will fluctuate because of future
changes in market interest rates.
Delhaize Group’s interest rate risk
management objectives are to
reduce earnings volatility, to minimize interest expense over the long
term, and to protect future cash
flows from the impact of material adverse movements in interest
rates.
Delhaize Group reviews its interest
rate risk exposure on a quarterly
basis and at the inception of any
new financing operation. As part of
its interest rate risk management
activities, the Group enters into interest rate swap agreements when
appropriate (see Note 19 ”Derivative
Financial Instruments and Hedging”
in the Financial Statements). At the
end of 2012, 75.8% of the financial
debt after swaps of the Group were
fixed-rate debts (2011: 75.1%; 2010:
72.3%).
tracts, including derivative financial
instruments such as currency swaps
and forward instruments (see Note
19 ”Derivative Financial Instruments
and Hedging” in the Financial Statements).
Translation exposure
The results of operations and
the financial position of each of
Delhaize Group’s entities outside
the euro zone are accounted for in
the relevant local currency and then
translated into euro at the applicable
foreign currency exchange rate for
inclusion in the Group’s consolidated
financial statements, which are presented in euros (see also Note 2.3
”Summary of Significant Accounting
Policies” in the Financial Statements
with respect to translation of foreign
currencies). If the average U.S. dollar exchange rate had been 1 cent
higher/lower and all other variables
were held constant, the Group’s
net profit would have increased/
decreased by €2 million in 2012 and
2011 (2010: €3 million), solely due to
the translation of the financial state-
The sensitivity analysis presented in
the table on the right estimates the
impact on the income statement and
equity of a parallel shift in the interest rate curve. The shift in that curve
is based on the standard deviation
of daily volatilities of the “Reference
Interest Rates” (Euribor 3 months
and Libor 3 months) during this year,
within a 95% confidence interval.
December 31, 2012 (in millions of €)
Currency Risk
Total
Delhaize Group’s foreign currency
risk management objectives are to
minimize the impact of currency fluctuations on the Group’s profit & loss
account, cash flows and balance
sheet, using foreign exchange con-
Currency
ments denominated in U.S. dollars.
The effect from the translation of the
functional currency to the reporting
currency of the Group does not affect
the cash flows in local currencies.
To reduce the overall foreign
exchange exposure from foreign
currency earnings the Group strives
to achieve a natural currency offset
between assets and liabilities and
between revenues and expenditures denominated in local currencies using foreign exchange forward contracts and currency swaps.
Because a substantial portion of
its assets, liabilities and operating
results are denominated in U.S. dollars, Delhaize Group is particularly
exposed to currency risk arising
from fluctuations in the value of the
U.S. dollar against the euro. After
cross-currency swaps, 65% of the
Group’s financial debt is denominated in U.S. dollars (71% and 85%
in 2011 and 2010, respectively). In
2012, 62% of net cash provided by
operating activities were generated
in U.S. dollars (77% and 61% in 2011
and 2010, respectively).
Reference Interest Rate
Shift
Impact on Net Profit
€
0.19%
+/- 7 basis points
+/- 0.09
-
$
0.31%
+/- 4 basis points
-/+ 0.17
+/- 0.2
Increase/Decrease
-/+ 0.08
+/- 0.2
Impact on Equity
Total
Impact on Equity
December 31, 2011 (in millions of €)
Currency
Reference Interest Rate
Shift
Impact on Net Profit
€
1.36%
+/- 29 basis points
+/- 0.1
-
$
0.58%
+/- 11 basis points
-/+ 0.5
+/- 0.6
Increase/Decrease
-/+ 0.4
+/- 0.6
Impact on Equity
December 31, 2010 (in millions of €)
Currency
Reference Interest Rate
Shift
Impact on Net Profit
€
1.01%
+/- 16 basis points
-/+ 0.2
-
$
0.3%
+/- 13 basis points
-/+ 0.7
+/- 0.9
Increase/Decrease
-/+ 0.9
+/- 0.9
Total
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 61
risk factors
Foreign currency risk on financial instruments is the risk that the
fair value or future cash flows of
a financial instrument will fluctuate because of future changes in
foreign currency exchange rates.
From an accounting perspective,
the Group is exposed to foreign currency risks only on monetary items
not denominated in the functional
currency of the respective reporting
entities, such as trade receivables
and payables denominated in a foreign currency, financial assets classified as available for sale, derivatives, financial instruments not
designated as for hedge relationships and borrowings denominated
in a foreign currency. If at December 31, 2012, the U.S. Dollar had
weakened/strengthened by 17%
(estimate based on the standard
deviation of daily volatilities of the
€/$ rate during 2011 using a 95%
confidence interval), the Group’s
net profit (all other variables held
constant) would have been €3.7
million lower/higher (2011: €3.8 million higher/lower with a rate shift of
22%, 2010: €1.4 million higher/lower
with a rate shift of 20%). Due to the
financing structure of the Group,
such a change in €/$ exchange rate
would have no impact on the equity
of Delhaize Group.
Transaction exposure
The Group’s exposure to fluctuations in foreign currency movements in its business operations is
limited as Operating Companies’
purchases and sales are primarily
denominated in local currency.
Credit Risk/Counterparty Risk
Share-Based Incentive Plans Risk
Credit risk is the risk that one party
to an agreement will cause a financial loss to another party by failing to
discharge its obligation. Credit risk
covers trade receivables, cash and
cash equivalents, short term deposits and derivative instruments.
The Group offers various equity-settled incentive plans (Stock Options,
U.S. warrants, and Restricted Stock
Units). Delhaize Group hedges the
risk arising from those plans by
occasionally buying treasury shares
and/or derivatives.
The credit risk on trade receivables
relates mainly to the wholesale activity in Belgium. The Group covers this
risk by entering into credit insurance
policies with external insurers. The
contracts contain stop-loss clauses
and maximum liability amounts that
provide sufficient cover against possible annual credit losses. In connection
with the cash and cash equivalents,
short term deposits and derivative
instruments Delhaize Group requires
a minimum credit quality for its financial investments (see Notes 11 ”Investments in Securities” and 14 ”Receivables” in the Financial Statements for
further details).
The Group’s exposure to sharebased incentive plans is reviewed
at least on a quarterly basis and at
inception of any new plan. For further information about share-based
incentive plans, refer to Note 21.3
Share-Based Compensation in the
Financial Statements.
The Group’s policy is to require
short-term investments to have a
short-term credit rating of at least A1
(Standard & Poor’s) / P1 (Moody’s).
Delhaize Group’s long-term investment policy requires a minimum
long-term credit rating of A-/A3 for
its financial investments. See Note
11 ”Investments in Securities” in connection with the credit quality of
the Group’s investments. Deposits
should be maintained with banks
having a minimum long-term credit
rating of A-/A3, although the Group
might deviate from this policy from
time to time for operational reasons.
The Group’s exposure to changes
in credit ratings of its counterparties is continuously monitored and
the aggregate value of transactions concluded is spread amongst
approved counterparties. Counterparty risk is always assessed with
reference to the aggregate exposure to a single counterparty or
group of related parties to avoid or
minimize concentration risk.
62 //
Pension Plan Risk
Most operating companies of
Delhaize Group have pension
plans, the structures and benefits
of which vary with conditions and
practices in the countries concerned.
Pension benefits may be provided
through defined contribution plans
or defined benefit plans.
A defined contribution plan is a
post-employment
benefit
plan
under which Delhaize Group and/
or the associate pays fixed contributions usually to a separate entity.
Under such a plan, there are no
legal or constructive obligations to
pay further contributions, regardless
of the performance of the funds held
to satisfy future benefit payments.
The actual retirement benefits are
determined by the value of the contributions paid and the subsequent
performance of investments made
with these funds.
A defined benefit plan is a postemployment benefit plan which normally defines an amount of benefit
that an employee will receive upon
retirement, usually dependent on
one or more factors such as age,
years of service, compensation and/
or guaranteed returns on contributions made.
Delhaize Group operates defined
benefit plans at several of its entities
and approximately 30% of Delhaize
Group’s associates were covered by
defined benefit plans at the end of
2012.
If, at balance sheet date, the fair
value of the plan assets of a defined
benefit plan, is lower than the
defined benefit obligations (determined based on actuarial assumptions), the Group would bear a
theoretical ”underfunding risk” at
that moment in time. At the end of
2012, Delhaize Group recognized a
net liability of €129 million (2011: €90
million; 2010: €79 million).
Details on pension plans at Delhaize
Group and its subsidiaries can be
found in Note 21.1 ”Employee Benefit
Plans” to the Financial Statements.
Insurance Risk
The Group manages its insurable risk through a combination of
external insurance coverage and
self-insured retention programs. In
deciding whether to purchase external insurance or use self-insured
retention programs, the Group considers the frequency and severity of
losses, its experience in managing
risk through safety and other internal programs, the cost and terms
of external insurance, and whether
external insurance coverage is mandatory.
External insurance is used when
available at reasonable cost and
terms. The amount and terms of
insurance purchased are determined by an assessment of the
Group’s risk exposure, by comparison to industry standards and by
assessment of financial capacity in
the insurance markets.
The main risks covered by Delhaize
Group’s insurance programs are
property, liability and health-care.
The U.S. operations of Delhaize
Group use self-insured retention
programs for workers’ compensation, general liability, automotive
accident, pharmacy claims, and
healthcare (including medical,
pharmacy, dental and short-term
disability). Delhaize Group also uses
captive insurance programs to provide flexibility and optimize costs. In
the event of a substantial loss there
is a risk that external insurance coverage may not be sufficient to cover
the loss. It is possible that the financial condition of an external insurer
may deteriorate over time in which
case the insurer may be unable to
meet the obligation to pay a loss. It
is possible that due to changes in
financial or insurance markets that
Delhaize Group will be unable to
continue to purchase certain insurance coverage on commercially
reasonable terms.
Reserves for self-insured retentions are based upon actuarial
estimates of claims reported and
claims incurred but not reported.
Delhaize Group believes these
estimates are reasonable, however these estimates are subject
to a high degree of variability and
uncertainty caused by such factors
as future interest and inflation rates,
future economic conditions, litigation and claims settlement trends,
legislative and regulatory changes,
changes in benefit levels and the
frequency and severity of incurred
but not reported claims. It is possible that the final resolution of some
claims may require Delhaize Group
to make significant expenditures in
excess of existing reserves.
Self-insurance provisions of €142 million are included as liability on the
balance sheet as of December 31,
2012. More information on self-insurance can be found in Note 20.2 “Self
Insurance Provisions” and related
investments held to cover the selfinsurance exposure are included in
Note 11 ”Investments in Securities” to
the Financial Statements.
If external insurance is not sufficient
to cover losses or is not collectable, or if self-insurance expenditures exceed existing reserves,
the Group’s financial condition
and results of operation may be
adversely affected.
Compliance
and Regulatory Risks
Litigation Risk
From time to time, Delhaize Group
is involved in legal actions, including matters involving personnel and
employment issues, personal injury,
antitrust claims and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course
of business. The Group regularly
reviews its exposure to the claims
and litigation arising in the normal
course of operations. It recognizes a
provision when it has a present obligation as a result of a past event, it
is probable that an outflow of economic resources will be required
to settle the obligation, and the
amount of obligation can be reliably estimated. As of December 31,
2012 the Group believes that it has
made adequate provisions for such
exposures. Any litigation, however,
involves risk and unexpected outcomes could result in an adverse
effect on the Group’s financial statements. More information on pending litigation can be found in Note
34 to the Financial Statements,
”Contingencies.”
Regulatory Risk
Delhaize Group is subject to federal, regional, state and local laws
and regulations in each country in
which it operates relating to, among
others, zoning, land use, antitrust
restrictions, work place safety, public health, environmental protection,
community right-to-know, information security and data protection, alcoholic beverage sales and
pharmaceutical sales. A number of
jurisdictions regulate the licensing
of supermarkets, including retail
alcoholic beverage license grants.
Under certain regulations, Delhaize
Group is prohibited from selling
alcoholic beverages in some of its
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 63
risk factors
stores. Employers are also subject
to laws governing their relationship
with associates, including minimum wage requirements, overtime,
working conditions, disabled access
and work permit requirements.
Compliance with, or changes in,
these laws could reduce the revenues and profitability of the Group’s
stores and could affect its business,
financial condition or results of
operations.
The Group is subject to a variety of
antitrust and similar legislation in
the jurisdictions in which it operates. In a number of markets, the
Group has market positions which
may make future significant acquisitions more difficult and may limit
its ability to expand by acquisition
or merger, if it wished to do so. In
addition, Delhaize Group is subject
to legislation in many of the jurisdictions in which it operates relating
to unfair competitive practices and
similar behavior. Delhaize Group
has been subject to and may in the
future be subject to allegations of,
or further regulatory investigations
or proceedings into, such practices.
Such allegations or investigations or
proceedings (irrespective of merit),
may require the Group to devote
significant management resources
to defending itself against such
allegations. In the event that such
allegations are proven, Delhaize
Group may be subject to significant
fines, damages awards and other
expenses, and its reputation may
be harmed. For information on a
pending antitrust matter in Belgium,
see Note 34 ”Contingencies” to the
Financial Statements.
Delhaize Group actively strives to
ensure compliance with all laws
and regulations to which it is subject. A Guide for Ethical Business
Conduct that replaced the former
Code was implemented in 2010,
anti-fraud and other appropriate
training has been implemented
within the Group, and the internal
64 //
audit function has been reinforced
during the recent years.
Product Liability Risk
The packaging, marketing, distribution and sale of food products entail
an inherent risk of product liability,
product recall and resulting adverse
publicity. Such products may contain
contaminants that may be inadvertently redistributed by Delhaize
Group. These contaminants may,
in certain cases, result in illness,
injury or death. As a consequence,
Delhaize Group has an exposure to
product liability claims. The Group
purchases insurance to cover such
risk. However, if a product liability claim is successful, the Group’s
insurance may not be adequate to
cover all liabilities it may incur, and
it may not be able to continue to
maintain such insurance or obtain
comparable insurance at a reasonable cost, if at all.
In addition, even if a product liability claim is not successful or is not
fully pursued, the negative publicity
surrounding any assertion that the
Group’s products caused illness or
injury could affect the Group’s reputation and its business and financial
condition and results of operations.
Delhaize Group takes an active
stance towards food safety in order
to offer customers safe food products. The Group has worldwide food
safety guidelines in place, and their
application is vigorously followed.
Risk of Environmental Liability
Delhaize Group is subject to laws
and regulations that govern activities that may have adverse environmental effects. Delhaize Group
may be responsible for the remediation of such environmental
conditions and may be subject to
associated liabilities relating to its
stores and the land on which its
stores, warehouses and offices are
located, regardless of whether the
Group leases, subleases or owns
the stores, warehouses or land in
question and regardless of whether
such environmental conditions were
created by the Group or by a prior
owner or tenant. The Group has
put in place control procedures at
the operating companies in order
to identify, prioritize and resolve
adverse environmental conditions.
Risk Related to Internal Controls
Undetected control weaknesses or
controls that function ineffectively
represent a risk of loss and/or financial misstatement. Delhaize Group
routinely assesses the quality and
effectiveness of its internal controls.
Internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements because of its inherent
limitations, including the possibility
of human error, the circumvention
or overriding of controls, or fraud.
Therefore, even effective internal
controls can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to the
preparation and fair presentation
of financial statements. If the Group
fails to maintain the adequacy of
its internal controls, including any
failure to implement required new
or improved controls, or if it experiences difficulties in the implementation of internal controls, the Group’s
business and operating results
could be harmed, and it could fail to
meet its reporting obligations.
As a company filing financial reports
under U.S. law, Delhaize Group is
required to meet the requirements
of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley
Act of 2002, which requires management and the Statutory Auditor
to report on their assessment of the
effectiveness of the Group’s internal
control over financial reporting.
The Group’s 2011 annual report filed
on Form 20-F includes management’s conclusion that the Group’s
internal control over financial reporting is effective as of December 31,
2011. In the same Form 20-F, the
Statutory Auditor concluded that
the Group maintained, in all material respects, effective control over
financial reporting as of December
31, 2011.
Tax Audit Risk
Delhaize Group is regularly audited
in the various jurisdictions in which it
does business, which it considers to
be part of its ongoing business activity. While the ultimate outcome of
these audits is not certain, Delhaize
Group has considered the merits of
its filing positions in its overall evaluation of potential tax liabilities and
believes it has adequate liabilities
recorded in its consolidated financial
statements for potential exposures.
Unexpected outcomes as a result of
these audits could adversely affect
Delhaize Group’s financial statements. For more information on tax
audits in jurisdictions where we conduct business, see Note 34 ”Contingencies” to the Financial Statements.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 65
financial
statements
66 //
68
70
71
72
74
75
Consolidated Balance sheet
Consolidated income statement
Consolidated statement of Comprehensive income
Consolidated statement of Changes in Equity
Consolidated statement of Cash flows
Notes to the financial statements
75 1. general Information
75 2. Significant accounting Policies
89 3. Segment Information
91 4. Business combinations and acquisition of non-controlling Interests
94 5. Divestitures, Disposal group / assets Held for Sale and Discontinued operations
96 6. goodwill
99 7. Intangible assets
101 8. Property, Plant and equipment
104 9. Investment Property
105 10. Financial Instruments by category
109 11. Investments in Securities
110 12. other Financial assets
110 13. Inventories
111 14. receivables
112 15. cash and cash equivalents
112 16. equity
116 17. Dividends
117 18. Financial Liabilities
124 19. Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedging
127 20. Provisions
129 21. employee Benefits
142 22. Income Taxes
145 23. accrued expenses
145 24. expenses from continuing operations by nature
145 25. cost of Sales
146 26. employee Benefit expenses
146 27. other operating Income
146 28. other operating expenses
147 29. Financial result
148 30. net Foreign exchange Losses (gains)
148 31. earnings Per Share (“ePS”)
149 32. related Party Transactions
150 33. commitments
151 34. contingencies
151 35. Subsequent events
152 36. List of consolidated and associated companies and Joint ventures
155 supplementary information
159 historical financial overview
160 Certification of Responsible persons
160 Report of the statutory Auditor
162 summary statutory Accounts of Delhaize Group sA/NV
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL rePorT ‘12 // 67
Consolidated Balance Sheet
Consolidated Assets
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
Goodwill
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investment property
Investment in securities
Other financial assets
Deferred tax assets
Derivative instruments
Other non-current assets
Total non-current assets
6
7
8
9
11
12
22
19
3 189
848
4 331
116
11
19
89
61
53
3 414
878
4 550
83
13
18
97
57
48
2 828
634
4 075
60
125
17
95
61
19
8 717
9 158
7 914
Inventories
Receivables
Income tax receivables
Investment in securities
Other financial assets
Derivative instruments
Prepaid expenses
Other current assets
13
14
1 401
634
21
93
—
—
79
41
1 717
697
10
93
22
1
56
50
1 460
637
1
43
3
5
44
37
Cash and cash equivalents
15
(in millions of €)
Assets classified as held for sale
Total current assets
Total assets
11
12
19
5.2
932
432
758
3 201
3 078
2 988
18
56
—
3 219
3 134
2 988
11 936
12 292
10 902
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition (see Note
4.1).
68 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Consolidated Liabilities and Equity
(in millions of €)
Share capital
Share premium
Treasury shares
Retained earnings
Other reserves
Cumulative translation adjustments
Shareholders’ equity
Non-controlling interests
Total equity
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
16
16
16
16
16
16
51
2 791
(59)
3 646
(60)
(1 178)
51
2 785
(65)
3 728
(47)
(1 038)
51
2 778
(59)
3 426
(34)
(1 094)
16
5 191
2
5 414
5
5 068
1
5 193
5 419
5 069
2 313
612
570
10
369
70
2 325
689
624
20
289
98
1 966
684
543
16
233
68
3 944
4 045
3 510
—
156
62
4
88
19
1 884
437
145
60
88
61
—
76
57
1 845
442
199
16
40
57
—
52
17
1 574
393
174
2 795
2 828
2 323
4
2 799
—
2 828
—
2 323
6 743
6 873
5 833
11 936
12 292
10 902
Long-term debt
Obligations under finance leases
Deferred tax liabilities
Derivative instruments
Provisions
Other non-current liabilities
Total non-current liabilities
18.1
18.3
22
19
20, 21
Short-term borrowings
Long-term debt - current portion
Obligations under finance leases
Derivative instruments
Provisions
Income taxes payable
Accounts payable
Accrued expenses
Other current liabilities
18.2
18.1
18.3
19
20, 21
Liabilities associated with assets held for sale
Total current liabilities
Total liabilities
Total liabilities and equity
23
5.2
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition (see Note
4.1).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 69
Consolidated Income Statement
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
22 737
24, 25
(17 170)
21 110
(15 749)
20 850
(15 497)
5 567
5 361
5 353
27
24
28
24.5%
122
(4 871)
(428)
25.4%
118
(4 497)
(169)
25.7%
85
(4 394)
(20)
390
813
1 024
29.1
29.2
1.7%
(258)
17
3.9%
(203)
23
4.9%
(215)
12
Income tax expense
Net profit from continuing operations
22
149
(24)
633
(156)
821
(245)
Result from discontinued operations (net of tax)
Net profit
Net profit (loss) attributable to non-controlling interests
Net profit attributable to equity holders of the Group (Group share in net profit)
5.3
125
(22)
477
(2)
576
(1)
103
(2)
105
475
—
475
575
1
574
1.27
1.05
4.74
4.71
5.74
5.73
1.26
1.04
4.70
4.68
5.69
5.68
100 777
101 134
100 684
101 426
100 271
101 160
(in millions of €)
Revenues
Cost of sales
Gross profit
Gross margin
Other operating income
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating expenses
Operating profit
Operating margin
Finance costs
Income from investments
Profit before taxes and discontinued operations
(in €)
Earnings per share
Basic
Net profit from continuing operations
Group share in net profit
Diluted
Net profit from continuing operations
Group share in net profit
31
(in thousands)
Weighted average number of shares outstanding
Basic
Diluted
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
70 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
(in millions of €)
Note
Net profit
Deferred gain (loss) on discontinued cash flow hedge
Reclassification adjustment to net profit
Tax (expense) benefit
Deferred gain (loss) on discontinued cash flow hedge, net of tax
Gain (loss) on cash flow hedge
Reclassification adjustment to net profit
Tax (expense) benefit
Gain (loss) on cash flow hedge, net of tax
Unrealized gain (loss) on financial assets available for sale
Reclassification adjustment to net profit
Tax (expense) benefit
Unrealized gain (loss) on financial assets available for sale, net of tax
16, 19
16, 19
16
Actuarial gain (loss) on defined benefit plans
Tax (expense) benefit
Actuarial gain (loss) on defined benefit plans, net of tax
Exchange gain (loss) on translation of foreign operations
Reclassification adjustment to net profit
Exchange gain (loss) on translation of foreign operations
16, 21
16
Other comprehensive income
Attributable to non-controlling interests
Attributable to equity holders of the Group
Total comprehensive income for the period
Attributable to non-controlling interests
Attributable to equity holders of the Group
16
2012
2011(1)
2010
103
475
575
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1
—
—
—
2
4
(2)
—
(5)
2
1
23
(15)
(3)
4
(1)
(6)
1
(3)
6
(4)
—
5
3
(1)
—
2
(6)
2
(16)
(17)
1
4
7
(1)
(12)
(140)
—
(10)
53
—
263
—
(140)
53
263
(154)
(1)
42
(1)
271
—
(153)
43
271
(51)
517
846
(3)
(48)
(1)
518
1
845
—
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition (see Note
4.1).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 71
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
(in millions of €, except number of shares)
Attributable to Equity Holders of the Group
Issued Capital
Other comprehensive
income
Net profit
Total comprehensive
income for the period
Capital increases
Call option on own equity
instruments
Treasury shares purchased
Other Reserves
Discontinued
Cash Flow
Hedge
Reserve
Cash
Flow
Hedge
Reserve
Availablefor-sale
Reserve
Actuarial
Gains
and
Losses
Reserve
Cumulative
Translation
Adjustment
Shareholders’
Equity
Noncontrolling
Interests
Total
Equity
Amount
Share
Premium
Number of
Shares
Amount
Retained
Earnings
100 870 626
50
2 752
955 586
(54)
3 044
(9)
(6)
2
(27)
(1 360)
4 392
17
4 409
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
—
—
574
—
—
5
—
2
—
(1)
—
266
—
271
574
—
1
271
575
—
684 655
—
—
1
—
—
25
—
—
—
441 996
(1)
—
(26)
574
—
—
—
—
—
5
—
—
2
—
—
(1)
—
—
266
—
—
845
26
(26)
1
—
—
846
26
(26)
—
—
(11)
(408 722)
22
—
—
—
—
—
—
11
—
11
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1
—
1
—
—
(5)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(5)
—
(5)
—
—
—
—
16
—
—
—
—
—
—
(161)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
16
(161)
—
(1)
16
(162)
—
—
—
—
—
(31)
—
—
—
—
—
(31)
(16)
(47)
101 555 281
51
2 778
988 860
(59)
3 426
(9)
(1)
4
(28)
(1 094)
5 068
1
5 069
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
475
—
—
(3)
—
2
—
(12)
—
56
—
43
475
(1)
—
42
475
—
336 909
—
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
475
—
—
—
(3)
—
2
—
(12)
—
56
—
518
13
(1)
—
517
13
—
—
—
—
(6)
—
—
408 138
—
(20)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(6)
(20)
—
—
(6)
(20)
Number of
Shares
Balances at January 1,
2010
Other comprehensive
income
Net profit
Total comprehensive
income for the period
Capital increases
Treasury shares purchased
Treasury shares sold upon
exercise of employee
stock options
Excess tax benefit
(deficiency) on employee
stock options and
restricted shares
Tax payment for restricted
shares vested
Share-based compensation
expense
Dividend declared
Purchase of non-controlling
interests
Balances at December 31,
2010
Treasury Shares
72 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Treasury shares sold upon
exercise of employee
stock options
Excess tax benefit
(deficiency) on employee
stock options and
restricted shares
Tax payment for restricted
shares vested
Share-based compensation
expense
Dividend declared
Non-controlling interests
resulting from business
combinations
Purchase of non-controlling
interests
Balances at December 31,
2011(1)
Other comprehensive
income
Net profit
Total comprehensive
income for the period
Capital increases
Treasury shares sold upon
exercise of employee
stock options
Tax payment for restricted
shares vested
Share-based compensation
expense
Dividend declared
Purchase of non-controlling
interests
Balances at December 31,
2012
—
—
(10)
(213 050)
14
—
—
—
—
—
—
4
—
4
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1
—
1
—
—
(4)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(4)
—
(4)
—
—
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
—
—
(174)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
13
(174)
—
—
13
(174)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
15
15
—
—
—
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
—
1
(10)
(9)
101 892 190
51
2 785
1 183 948
(65)
3 728
(9)
(4)
6
(40)
(1 038)
5 414
5
5 419
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
105
—
—
4
—
(6)
—
(11)
—
(140)
—
(153)
105
(1)
(2)
(154)
103
—
29 308
—
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
105
—
—
—
4
—
(6)
—
(11)
—
(140)
—
(48)
1
(3)
—
(51)
1
—
—
(6)
(139 813)
6
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(2)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(2)
—
(2)
—
—
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
—
—
(177)
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
13
(177)
—
—
13
(177)
—
—
—
—
—
(10)
—
—
—
—
—
(10)
—
(10)
101 921 498
51
2 791
1 044 135
(59)
3 646
(9)
—
—
(51)
(1 178)
5 191
2
5 193
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition (see Note 4.1).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 73
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
(in millions of €)
Note
2012
2011
2010
105
(2)
475
—
574
1
650
288
3
13
22
259
(17)
(16)
586
135
11
13
156
204
(23)
7
575
14
6
16
245
216
(12)
(2)
291
74
(31)
54
2
38
(147)
(10)
(15)
(24)
(4)
4
(108)
(39)
(10)
98
16
(24)
(229)
10
(106)
1 408
(196)
11
(77)
1 106
(202)
11
(58)
1 317
(12)
3
(596)
(92)
39
(1)
—
22
—
(591)
—
(675)
(87)
11
72
(21)
28
(2)
(19)
—
(568)
(92)
14
(13)
(2)
15
—
Net cash used in investing activities
(637)
(1 265)
(665)
Cash flow before financing activities
771
(159)
652
(1)
—
—
(23)
(180)
—
—
621
(564)
(54)
(60)
(1)
(262)
(8)
13
(6)
(20)
(10)
(173)
—
2
408
(224)
(53)
(85)
2
(146)
(21)
32
—
(26)
(47)
(161)
(1)
2
(1)
(42)
(49)
(49)
(1)
(343)
10
(326)
758
432
319
439
758
Operating activities
Net profit attributable to equity holders of the Group (Group share in net profit)
Net profit attributable to non-controlling interests
Adjustments for:
Depreciation and amortization
Impairment
Allowance for losses on accounts receivable
Share-based compensation
Income taxes
Finance costs
Income from investments
Other non-cash items
28
21.3
22
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Inventories
Receivables
Prepaid expenses and other assets
Accounts payable
Accrued expenses and other liabilities
Provisions
Interest paid
Interest received
Income taxes paid
Net cash provided by operating activities
Investing activities
Business acquisitions, net of cash and cash equivalents acquired
Business disposals, net of cash and cash equivalents disposed
Purchase of tangible assets (capital expenditures)
Purchase of intangible assets (capital expenditures)
Sale of tangible and intangible assets
Sale and maturity of (investment in) debt securities, net
Purchase of other financial assets
Sale and maturity of other financial assets
Settlement of derivatives instruments
Financing activities
Proceeds from the exercise of share warrants and stock options
Purchase of call option on own equity instruments
Treasury shares purchased
Purchase of non-controlling interests
Dividends paid
Dividends paid by subsidiaries to non-controlling interests
Escrow maturities
Borrowing under long-term loans, net of financing costs
Repayment of long-term loans
Repayment of lease obligations
Borrowings (repayments) of short-term loans, net
Settlement of derivative instruments
Net cash used in financing activities
Effect of foreign currency translation
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
_______________
(1) Includes €1 million in assets classified as held for sale.
74 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
4.1
5.1
8, 9
7
16
16
16
4.2
17
15
15
501
432
933(1)
Notes to the Financial Statements
1.
General Information
The principal activity of Delhaize Group (also referred to, with its consolidated and associated companies, except where the
context otherwise requires, as “we,” “us,” “our,” “the Group” and “the Company”) is the operation of food supermarkets. The
Company is present in ten countries on three continents. The Group’s sales network also includes other store formats such as
convenience stores. In addition to food retailing, Delhaize Group engages in food wholesaling to affiliated stores in its sales
network and independent wholesale customers and in retailing of non-food products such as pet products.
The Company is a limited liability company incorporated and domiciled in Belgium, with its shares listed on NYSE Euronext
Brussels and on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), under the symbols “DELB” and “DEG,” respectively.
The consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2012 as presented in this annual report were prepared
under the responsibility of the Board of Directors and authorized for issue by the Board of Directors on March 6, 2013 subject to
approval of the statutory non-consolidated financial statements by the shareholders at the Ordinary General Meeting to be held
on May 23, 2013. In compliance with Belgian law, the consolidated accounts will be presented for information purposes to the
shareholders of Delhaize Group at the same meeting. The consolidated financial statements are not subject to amendment
except conforming changes to reflect decisions, if any, of the shareholders with respect to the statutory non-consolidated
financial statements affecting the consolidated financial statements.
2.
Significant Accounting Policies
2.1 Basis of Preparation
The consolidated financial statements comprise the financial statements of Delhaize Group and its subsidiaries as of December
31, 2012 except for the Delhaize Group’s U.S. subsidiaries for which the fiscal year ends the Saturday closest to December 31.
Consequently, the consolidated results of Delhaize Group for 2012, 2011, and 2010 include the results of operations of its U.S.
subsidiaries for the 52 weeks ended December 29, 2012, December 31, 2011 and January 1, 2011, respectively.
Delhaize Group’s consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), and as adopted by the European Union (EU).
Currently, the only difference between the effective IFRS as issued by the IASB and as adopted by the EU relates to certain
paragraphs of IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement, which are not mandatory applicable in the EU (socalled “carve-out”). Delhaize Group is not affected by the carve-out and therefore for the Group there is no difference between
the effective IFRS as issued by the IASB and adopted by the EU. We further refer to the comments made in connection with the
“Initial Application of New, Revised or Amended IASB Pronouncements” in Note 2.2 and “Standards and Interpretations Issued
but not yet Effective” in Note 2.5.
These financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention except for derivative financial instruments,
available-for-sale financial assets and financial liabilities being part of a designated fair value hedge relationship that have been
measured at their relevant fair values, as disclosed in the corresponding notes. Assets and disposal groups classified as held for
sale have been measured at the lower of carrying value and fair value less costs to sell.
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also
requires management to exercise its judgment in the process of applying the Group’s accounting policies. The areas involving a
higher degree of judgment or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the consolidated financial
statements are disclosed in Note 2.4.
2.2 Initial Application of New, Revised or Amended IASB Pronouncements
The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous financial year except for the following new, amended
or revised IASB pronouncements that have been adopted as of January 1, 2012:


Amendments to IAS 12 Income Taxes; and
Amendments to IFRS 7 Disclosures – Transfers of Financial Assets.
The adoption of these new, amended or revised pronouncements did not have any material impact on the consolidated financial
statements of the Group.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 75
2.3 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
The principle accounting policies applied in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are described below.
These policies have been consistently applied for all financial years presented except as explained in Note 2.2.
In the event of the presentation of discontinued operations, the comparative income statement is re-presented as if the operation
presented as discontinued operations during the period had been discontinued from the start of the comparative period (see Note
5.3).
Principles of Consolidation
Subsidiaries are all entities - including special purpose entities - over which the Group has - directly or indirectly - the power to
govern the financial and operating policies, which is generally accompanying a shareholding of more than half of the voting
rights. The existence and effect of potential voting rights that would be exercisable or convertible at year-end, if any, are
considered when assessing whether the Group controls another entity. All subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date of
acquisition, being the date on which the Group obtains control, and continue to be consolidated until the date such control
ceases. For a list of all subsidiaries, see Note 36.
Joint ventures are entities over whose activities the Group has joint control, established by contractual agreement and requiring
unanimous consent for strategic, financial and operating decisions. Joint ventures are proportionally consolidated from the date
joint control is established until such joint control ceases (see Note 36).
The Group currently holds no investments in entities over which Delhaize Group has significant influence, but no control
("associates").
The consolidated financial statements are prepared using uniform accounting policies for like transactions and other events in
similar circumstances. Accounting policies of subsidiaries or joint ventures have been adjusted, where necessary, to ensure
consistency with the policies adopted by the Group.
All intragroup balances and transactions are eliminated in full when preparing the consolidated financial statements.
Non-controlling interests (also referred to as “minority interests”) represent the portion of profit or loss and net assets that is not
held by the Group and are presented separately in the consolidated income statement and within equity in the consolidated
balance sheet, separately from the parent shareholders’ equity. Transactions with non-controlling interests that do not result in
loss of control are accounted for as transactions between shareholders and therefore have no impact on profit or loss (this
applies also to related acquisition costs) nor on goodwill. The difference between fair value of any consideration received or paid
and the relevant share acquired or disposed of the carrying value of net assets of the subsidiary is recorded directly in retained
earnings.
Business Combinations and Goodwill
In accordance with IFRS 3, business combinations are accounted for using the acquisition method. Under this method, the cost
of an acquisition is measured as the aggregate of the consideration transferred, measured at acquisition date fair value and the
amount of any non-controlling interest in the acquiree. For each business combination, the acquirer measures the non-controlling
interest in the acquiree, that present ownership interests and that entitle their holders to a proportionate share of the entity's net
assets in the event of liquidation, either at fair value or at the proportionate share of the acquiree’s identifiable net assets.
Acquisition costs incurred are expensed and included in “Selling, general and administrative expenses.” When Delhaize Group
acquires a business, it assesses the financial assets and liabilities assumed for appropriate classification and designation based
on the facts and circumstances at the acquisition date (except for lease and insurance agreements, which are classified on the
basis of the contractual terms and other factors at the inception of the respective contract). This includes the separation of
embedded derivatives in host contracts by the acquiree. If the business combination is achieved in stages, the acquisition date
fair value of the acquirer’s previously held equity interest in the acquiree is remeasured to fair value at the acquisition date
through profit or loss. Any contingent consideration to be transferred by the acquirer will be initially recognized and subsequently
measured at fair value. Goodwill is initially measured at cost being the excess of the aggregate of the consideration transferred
and the amount recognized for non-controlling interests over the net identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed. If this
consideration is lower than the fair value of the net assets of the subsidiary acquired, the difference is recognized in profit or loss.
After initial recognition, goodwill is not amortized, but annually reviewed for impairment and whenever there is an indication that
goodwill may be impaired. For the purpose of testing goodwill for impairment, goodwill is allocated to each of the Group’s cash
generating units that are expected to benefit from the synergies of the combination, irrespective of whether other assets or
liabilities of the acquiree are assigned to those units.
Non-current Assets / Disposal Groups Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations
Non-current assets and disposal groups are classified and presented in the balance sheet as held for sale if their carrying
amount will be recovered through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use.
76 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
This condition is regarded as met only when the sale is highly probable and the asset (or disposal group) is available for
immediate sale in its present condition. When a subsidiary is held for sale, all of its assets and liabilities are classified as held for
sale, when the conditions are met, even when the Group retains a non-controlling interest. Non-current assets that will be
abandoned are excluded from the scope of IFRS 5.
Immediately before classification as held for sale, the assets (or components of a disposal group) are re-measured in accordance
with the Group’s accounting policies. Thereafter, non-current assets (or disposal group) held for sale are measured at the lower
of their carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell. If the impairment exceeds the carrying value of the non-current assets
within the scope of IFRS 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations measurement guidance, Delhaize
Group recognizes a separate provision to reflect the difference in its financial statements. Non-current assets are not depreciated
or amortized once classified as held for sale. See further details in Note 5.2.
A discontinued operation is a component of a business that either has been disposed of, or is classified as held for sale, and:



represents a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations;
is part of a single coordinated plan to dispose of a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations; or
is a subsidiary acquired exclusively with a view to resale.
When an operation is classified as a discontinued operation, the comparative income statements are re-presented as if the
operation had been discontinued from the start of the comparative periods. The resulting profit or loss after taxes is reported
separately in the income statements (see Note 5.3).
Translation of Foreign Currencies
 Functional and presentation currency: Items included in the financial statements of each of the Group’s entities are

measured using the currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates (“functional currency”).
Delhaize Group’s financial statements are presented in (millions of) euros, the parent entity’s functional and the Group’s
“presentation currency,” except where stated otherwise.
Foreign currency transactions and balances: Foreign currency transactions of an entity are initially translated into its
functional currency and recognized in its financial records at the exchange rate prevailing at the date of the transaction.
Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are subsequently re-translated at the balance sheet date
exchange rate into the functional currency of the entity. All gains and losses resulting from the settlement of foreign currency
transactions and from the translation of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are included in the
income statement, except for exchange differences arising on monetary items that form part of a net investment in a foreign
operation (i.e., items that are receivable from or payable to a foreign operation, for which settlement is neither planned, nor
likely to occur in the foreseeable future), which are recognized in the “Cumulative translation adjustment” component of
equity. Foreign exchange gains and losses that relate to financial liabilities are presented in the income statement within
“Finance costs” (see Note 29.1), while gains and losses on financial assets are shown as “Income from investments” (see
Note 29.2).
Non-monetary items that are measured at historical cost in a foreign currency are translated using the exchange rates as of
the dates of the initial transaction. Non-monetary items measured at fair value in a foreign currency are translated using the
exchange rate at the date when the fair value is determined and gains or losses are included in the income statement except
for differences arising on the retranslation of non-monetary items in respect of which gains and losses are recognized
directly in equity. For such non-monetary items, any exchange component of that gain or loss is also recognized directly in
equity.

Foreign group entities: The results and balance sheets of all Group entities that have a functional currency different from the
Group’s presentation currency are translated into the presentation currency as follows:
(a) the balance sheets of foreign subsidiaries are converted to euros at the year-end exchange rate (closing exchange
rate);
(b) goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on the acquisition of a foreign entity are treated as assets and liabilities of
the foreign entity and translated at the closing exchange rate; and
(c) the income statements are translated at the average daily exchange rate (i.e., the yearly average of exchange rates on
each working day).
The differences arising from the use of the average daily exchange rate for the income statement and the closing exchange
rate for the balance sheet are recorded in the “Cumulative translation adjustment” being part of “Other Comprehensive
Income” (OCI). On disposal of a foreign operation, the component of OCI relating to that particular foreign operation is
recognized in the income statement (as a “reclassification adjustment”).
None of the Group entities has the currency of a hyper-inflationary economy nor does Delhaize Group currently hedge net
investments in foreign operations.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 77
Closing Rate
(in €)
Country
1 USD
100 RON
1 BGN
100 RSD
100 ALL
1 BAM
100 IDR
U.S.
Romania
Bulgaria
Serbia
Albania
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Indonesia
2012
Average Daily Rate
2011
2010
2012
2011
2010
0.757920
0.772857
0.748391
0.778331
0.718391
0.754318
22.499719
23.130479
23.463163
22.42504
23.589913
23.740563
0.511292
0.511292
0.511292
—
0.955657
0.883939
0.980873
—
0.716384
0.719787
0.719373
0.713878
—
0.511292
0.511292
—
—
—
—
0.511292
0.879353
0.511292
0.511292
—
0.007865
0.008524
0.008332
0.008302
0.008192
0.008304
Intangible Assets
Intangible assets include trade names, customer relationships and favorable lease rights that have been acquired in business
combinations (unfavorable lease rights are recognized as “Other liabilities” and released in analogy with SIC 15 Operating
Leases - Incentives), computer software, various licenses and prescription files separately acquired. Separately acquired
intangible assets are initially recognized at cost, while intangible assets acquired as part of a business combination are
measured initially at fair value (see “Business Combinations and Goodwill”). Intangible assets acquired as part of a business
combination that are held to prevent others from using them (“defensive assets”) - often being brands with no intended future
usage - are recognized separately from goodwill, as required by IFRS 3. Such assets are not used by the Group, but prevent
others from using them and are therefore amortized over the expected useful life, which will depend on the facts and
circumstances surrounding the specific defensive asset.
Expenditures on advertising or promotional activities, training activities and start-up activities, and on relocating or reorganizing
part or all of an entity are recognized as an expense as incurred, i.e., when Delhaize Group has access to the goods or has
received the services in accordance with the underlying contract.
Intangible assets are subsequently carried at cost less accumulated amortization and accumulated impairment losses.
Amortization begins when the asset is available for use as intended by management. Residual values of intangible assets are
assumed to be zero and are reviewed at each financial year-end.
Costs associated with maintaining computer software programs are recognized as an expense as incurred. Development costs
that are directly attributable to the design and testing of identifiable and unique “for-own-use software” controlled by the Group
are recognized as intangible assets when the following criteria are met:






it is technically feasible to complete the software product so that it will be available for use;
management intends to complete the software product and use it;
there is an ability to use the software product;
it can be demonstrated how the software product will generate probable future economic benefits;
adequate technical, financial and other resources to complete the development and to use the software product are
available; and
the expenditure attributable to the software product during its development can be reliably measured.
Directly attributable costs capitalized as part of the software product include software development employee costs and directly
attributable overhead costs. Other development expenditures that do not meet these criteria are recognized as an expense as
incurred. Development costs recognized in a previous reporting period as an expense are not recognized as an asset in a
subsequent period.
Intangible assets with finite lives are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. The useful lives of
(internally and externally developed) intangible assets with finite lives are reviewed annually and are as follows:





Prescription files
Favorable lease rights
Customer relationships
Computer software
Other intangible assets
15 years
Remaining lease term
5 to 20 years
3 to 8 years
3 to 15 years
Intangible assets with indefinite useful lives are not amortized, but are tested for impairment annually and when there is an
indication that the asset may be impaired. The Group believes that acquired and used trade names have indefinite lives because
they contribute directly to the Group’s cash flows as a result of recognition by the customer of each banner’s characteristics in
the marketplace.
78 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
There are no legal, regulatory, contractual, competitive, economic or other factors that limit the useful life of the trade names. The
assessment of indefinite life is reviewed annually to determine whether the indefinite life assumption continues to be supportable.
Changes, if any, would result in prospective amortization.
Property, Plant and Equipment
Property, plant and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment, if any. Acquisition costs include
expenditures that are directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. Such costs include the cost of replacing part of the asset
and dismantling and restoring the site of an asset if there is a legal or constructive obligation and borrowing costs for long -term
construction projects if the recognition criteria are met. Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or
recognized as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item
will flow to the Group and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. Costs of day-to-day servicing of property, plant and
equipment are recognized in the income statement as incurred.
Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method based on the estimated useful lives of the related assets and starts
when the asset is available for use as intended by management. When significant parts of an item of property, plant and
equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate components of property, plant and equipment. Land is
not depreciated. The useful lives of tangible fixed assets are as follows:




Buildings
Permanent installations
Machinery and equipment
Furniture, fixtures, equipment and vehicles
33 to 50 years
3 to 25 years
3 to 14 years
5 to 10 years
Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing the proceeds with the carrying amount and are recognized within
“Other operating income” (see Note 27) or “Other operating expenses” (see Note 28) in the income statement.
Residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation are reviewed at each financial year-end and adjusted prospectively, if
appropriate.
Investment Property
Investment property is defined as property (land or building - or part of a building - or both) held by Delhaize Group to earn rental
income or for capital appreciation or both, rather than for sale in the ordinary course of business or for use in supply of goods or
services or for administrative purposes and includes investment property under construction. Delhaize Group recognizes any part
of an owned (or leased under a finance lease) property that is leased to third-parties as investment property, unless it represents
an insignificant portion of the property.
Investment property is measured initially at cost including transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, Delhaize Group
elected to measure investment property at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any (i.e.,
applying the same accounting policies (including useful lives) as for property, plant and equipment). The fair values, which reflect
the market conditions at the balance sheet date, are disclosed in Note 9.
Leases
The determination of whether an agreement is, or contains, a lease is based on the substance of the agreement at inception
date. Leases are classified as finance leases when the terms of the lease agreement transfer substantially all the risks and
rewards incidental to ownership to the Group. All other leases are classified as operating leases.
Assets held under finance leases are recognized as assets at the lower of fair value or present value of the minimum lease
payments at the inception of the lease. The corresponding liability to the lessor is included in the balance sheet as a finance
lease obligation. Lease payments are allocated between finance costs and a reduction of the lease obligation to achieve a
constant rate of interest over the lease term. Finance lease assets and leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter
of the expected useful life of similar owned assets or the relevant lease term.
Rents paid on operating leases are recognized as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Benefits received and
receivable as an incentive to enter into an operating lease are spread over the relevant lease term on a straight-line basis as a
reduction of rent expense.
In connection with investment property, where the Group is the lessor, leases where the Group does not transfer substantially all
the risk and rewards incident to the ownership of the investment property are classified as operating leases and are generating
rental income. Contingent rents are recognized as “Other operating income” (see Note 27) in the period in which they are earned.
Borrowing Costs
Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of an asset that necessarily takes a substantial
period of time to get ready for its intended use (“qualifying assets”) are capitalized as part of the respective asset. All other
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 79
borrowing costs are expensed as incurred. Borrowing costs consist of interest and other costs that Delhaize Group incurs in
connection with the borrowing of funds.
Government Grants
Government grants are recognized when there is reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and the Group will comply
with all attached conditions. When a grant relates to an expense item, it is recognized as income over the period necessary to
match the grant on a systematic basis to the costs that it is intended to compensate. When a grant relates to an asset, it is
recognized as deferred income and recognized in the income statement as “Other operating income” (see Note 27) on a
systematic basis over the expected useful life of the related asset.
Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost on a weighted average cost basis and net realizable value. Costs of inventory include all
costs incurred to bring each product to its present location and condition. Inventories are regularly reviewed and written down on a
case-by-case basis if the anticipated net realizable value (anticipated selling price in the course of ordinary business less the
estimated costs necessary to make the sale) declines below the carrying amount of the inventories. When the reason for a writedown of the inventories has ceased to exist, the write-down is reversed.
Delhaize Group receives allowances and credits from suppliers primarily for in-store promotions, cooperative advertising, new
product introduction and volume incentives. These “vendor allowances” are included in the cost of inventory and recognized in
the income statement when the product is sold, unless they represent reimbursement of a specific, incremental and identifiable
cost incurred by the Group to sell the vendor’s product in which case they are recorded immediately as a reduction of the
corresponding selling, general and administrative expenses. Estimating rebates from suppliers requires in certain cases the use
of assumptions and judgment regarding the achievement of specified purchase or sales level and related inventory turnover.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash on call with banks and on hand, short-term deposits and other highly liquid investments
with an original maturity of three months or less which
. Negative cash balances (bank overdrafts) are reclassified on the balance sheet to “Other
current liabilities.”
Impairment of Non-Financial Assets
At each reporting date, the Group assesses whether there is an indication that a non-financial asset (hereafter “asset”) may be
impaired. If such indications are identified, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated. Further, goodwill and intangible assets
with indefinite lives or that are not yet available for use are tested annually for impairment, which at Delhaize Group is in the
fourth quarter of the year and whenever there is an indication that goodwill may be impaired.
The recoverable amount of an asset or cash-generating unit is the greater of its value in use and its fair value less costs to sell.
In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a discount rate that reflects
current market assessments of the time value of money and the risk specific to the asset. As independent cash flows are often
not available for individual assets for the purpose of impairment testing, assets need to be grouped together into the smallest
group of assets that generates cash inflows from continuing use that are largely independent of the cash inflows of other assets
or groups of assets (“cash generating unit” or CGU).
In determining fair value less costs to sell for individual assets or CGUs, appropriate valuation models are used, which are
supported by valuation multiples or other available fair value indicators.
Goodwill acquired in a business combination is, for the purpose of impairment testing, allocated to the CGUs that are expected to
benefit from the synergies of the combination and that represents the lowest level within the Group at which the goodwill is
monitored for internal management purposes and that is not larger than an operating segment before aggregation (see Note 6).
An impairment loss of a continuing operation is recognized in the income statement in "Other operating expenses" (see Note 28)
if the carrying amount of an asset or CGU exceeds its recoverable amount. Impairment losses recognized for CGUs are allocated
first to reduce the carrying amount of any goodwill allocated to the units and then to reduce the carrying amounts of the other
assets in the CGU on a pro rata basis.
If the impairment of assets, other than goodwill, is no longer justified in future periods due to a recovery in fair value or value in
use of the asset, the impairment is reversed. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount
does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortization, if no impairment loss
had been recognized. Goodwill impairment is never reversed.
80 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Non-derivative Financial Assets
Delhaize Group classifies its non-derivative financial assets (hereafter “financial assets”) within the scope of IAS 39 Financial
Instruments: Recognition and Measurement into the following categories: held-to-maturity, loans and receivables and availablefor-sale. Delhaize Group currently holds no financial assets that would be classified as measured at fair value through profit or
loss. The Group determines the classification of its financial assets at initial recognition.
These financial assets are initially recorded at fair value plus transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or
issuance of the financial assets.


Loans and receivables: Financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are
classified as loans and receivables. Such financial assets are subsequent to initial recognition carried at amortized cost
using the effective interest rate method. Gains and losses are recognized in the income statement when the loans and
receivables are derecognized or impaired and through the amortization process. The Group’s loans and receivables
comprise “Other financial assets” (see Note 12), “Receivables” (see Note 14) and “Cash and cash equivalents” (see Note
15).
Trade receivables are subsequently measured at amortized cost less a separate impairment allowance. The allowance for
impairment of trade receivables is established (on a separate allowance account) when there is objective evidence that the
Group will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of the receivables and the amount of the loss
is recognized in the income statement within “Selling, general and administrative expenses.” Impaired trade receivables are
derecognized when they are determined to be uncollectible.
Available-for-sale investments: Available-for-sale investments are financial assets that are either designated in this category
or not classified in any of the other categories. After initial measurement, available-for-sale investments are measured at fair
value with unrealized gains or losses recognized directly in OCI, until the investment is derecognized or impaired, at which
time the cumulative gain or loss recorded in the available-for-sale reserve is recognized in the income statement as a
reclassification adjustment.
Delhaize Group mainly holds quoted investments and the fair value of these are predominately based on current bid prices
(see further Note 10.1). The Group monitors the liquidity of the quoted investments to identify inactive markets, if any. In a
very limited number of cases, e.g., if the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the Group
establishes fair value by using valuation techniques making maximum use of market inputs, including broker prices from
independent parties, and relying as little as possible on entity-specific inputs, in which case the Group ensures that they are
consistent with the fair value measurement objective and is consistent with any other market information that is available.
For available-for-sale financial assets, the Group assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence
that an investment or a group of investments is impaired. For investments in debt instruments, the impairment is assessed
based on the same criteria as financial assets carried at amortized cost (see above “Loans and receivables”). Interest
continues to be accrued at the original effective interest rate on the reduced carrying amount of the asset. If, in a subsequent
year, the fair value of a debt instrument increases and the increase can be objectively related to an event occurring after the
impairment loss was recognized in the income statement, the impairment loss is reversed through the income statement. For
investments in equity instruments the objective evidence for impairment includes a significant or prolonged decline in the fair
value of the investment below its costs. Where there is evidence of impairment, the cumulative loss – measured as the
difference between the acquisition cost and the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that investment previously
recognized in the income statement – is removed from equity and recognized in the income statement. Impairment losses on
equity investments are not reversed through the income statement. Increases in their fair value after impairment are
recognized directly in OCI.
Available-for-sale financial assets are included in “Investments in securities” (see Note 11). They are classified as noncurrent assets except for investments with a maturity date less than 12 months from the balance sheet date.
Financial assets are derecognized when the rights to receive cash flows from the financial assets have expired, or if the Group
transferred the financial asset to another party and does not retain control or substantially all risks and rewards of the financial
asset.
Non-derivative Financial Liabilities
IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement contains two categories for non-derivative financial liabilities
(hereafter “financial liabilities”): financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss and financial liabilities measured at amortized
cost. Delhaize Group mainly holds financial liabilities measured at amortized cost that are included in “Debts,” “Borrowings,”
“Accounts payable” and “Other liabilities.” In addition, the Group issued financial liabilities, which are part of a designated fair
value hedge relationship (see Note 19).
All financial liabilities are recognized initially at fair value, plus, for instruments not at fair value through profit or loss, any directly
attributable transaction costs.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 81
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
Financial liabilities measured at amortized cost are measured at amortized cost after initial recognition. Amortized cost is
computed using the effective interest method less principal repayment. Associated finance charges, including premiums and
discounts are amortized or accreted to finance costs using the effective interest method and are added to or subtracted from
the carrying amount of the instrument.
An exchange between existing borrower and lenders or a modification in terms of a debt instrument is accounted for as a
debt extinguishment of the original financial liability and the recognition of a new financial liability, if the terms are
substantially different. For the purpose of IAS 39, the terms are substantially different if the discounted presented value of
the cash flows under the new terms, including any fees paid net of any fees received and discounted using the original
effective interest rate, is at least 10 percent different from the discounted present value of the remaining cash flows of the
original financial liability. If the exchange or modification is not accounted for as an extinguishment, any costs or fees
incurred adjust the carrying amount of the liability and are amortized, together with the difference in present values, over the
remaining term of the modified financial liability.
Financial liabilities are derecognized when the Group’s obligations specified in the contract expire or are discharged or cancelled.
Derivative Financial Instruments
While at recognition the initial measurement of derivative contracts is at fair value, the subsequent accounting for derivative
financial instruments depends on whether the derivative is designated as an effective hedging instrument and, if so, the nature of
the item being hedged (see “Hedge Accounting” below).


Economic hedges: Delhaize Group does not hold or issue derivatives for speculation/trading purposes. The Group uses
derivative financial instruments - such as foreign exchange forward contracts, interest rate swaps, currency swaps and other
derivative instruments - solely to manage its exposure to interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates. Derivatives not
being part of an effective designated hedge relationship are therefore only entered into in order to achieve “economic
hedging.” This means that, e.g., foreign exchange forward contracts and currency swaps are not designated as hedges and
hedge accounting is not applied as the gain or loss from re-measuring the derivative is recognized in profit or loss and
naturally offsets the gain or loss arising on re-measuring the underlying instrument at the balance sheet exchange rate (see
Note 19).
These derivatives are mandatory classified as held-for-trading and initially recognized at fair value, with attributable
transaction costs recognized in profit or loss when incurred. Subsequently, they are re-measured at fair value. Derivatives
are accounted for as assets when the fair value is positive and as liabilities when the fair value is negative (see Note 19).
The fair value of derivatives is the value that Delhaize Group would receive or have to pay if the financial instruments were
discontinued at the reporting date. This is calculated on the basis of the contracting parties’ relevant exchange rates, interest
rates and credit ratings at the reporting date. In the case of interest-bearing derivatives, the fair value corresponds to the
“dirty price” or “full fair value” (i.e., including any interest accrued).
Any gains or losses arising from changes in fair value on these derivatives are taken directly to the income statement. As
Delhaize Group enters into derivative financial instruments contracts only for economic hedging purposes, the classification
of the changes in fair value of the derivative follow the underlying (i.e., if the economically hedged item is a financial asset,
the changes in fair value of the derivative are classified as “Income from investment,” Note 29.2; if the underlying is a
financial liability, the changes in fair value of the derivative are classified as “Finance costs,” Note 29.1).
Derivatives are classified as current or non-current or separated into a current or non-current portion based on an
assessment of the facts and circumstances.
Embedded derivatives are components of hybrid instruments that include non-derivative host contracts. Such embedded
derivatives are separated from the host contract and accounted for separately, if the economic characteristics and risks of
the host contract and the embedded derivative are not closely related, a separate instrument with the same terms as the
embedded derivative would meet the definition of a derivative, and the combined instruments are not measured at fair value
through profit or loss. The accounting for any separated derivative follows the general guidance described above.
Hedge Accounting
At the inception of a hedge relationship, the Group formally designates and documents the hedge relationship to which the Group
intends to apply hedge accounting and the risk management objective and strategy for undertaking the hedge. The
documentation includes identification of the hedging instrument, the hedged item or (forecast) transaction, the nature of the risk
being hedged and how the entity will assess the hedging instrument’s effectiveness in offsetting the exposure to changes in the
hedged item’s fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk. Such hedges are expected to be highly effective in
achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows and are assessed on an ongoing basis to determine that they actually
have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which they were designated.
Hedges which meet the criteria for hedge accounting are accounted for as follows:

Cash flow hedges are used to protect the Group against fluctuations in future cash flows of assets and liabilities recognized
in the balance sheet, from firm commitments (in the case of currency risk) or from highly probable forecast transactions. In
such a cash flow hedge relationship, the changes in the fair value of the derivative hedging instrument are recognized
directly in OCI to the extent that the hedge is effective.
82 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
To the extent that the hedge is ineffective, changes in fair value are recognized in profit or loss. Amounts accumulated in
OCI are recycled in the income statement in the periods when the hedged item affects profit or loss (e.g., when the forecast
sale that is hedged takes place).
If the hedging instrument no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting, expires or is sold, terminated, exercised, or the
designation is revoked, then hedge accounting is discontinued prospectively. The cumulative gain or loss previously
recognized in OCI and presented in the discontinued cash flow hedge reserve in equity remains in there until the hedged
item affects profit or loss.


Fair value hedges are used to hedge the fair values of assets or liabilities recognized in the balance sheet or firm
commitments not yet recognized in the financial statements. When designated as such a fair value hedge, the gain or loss
from re-measuring the hedging instrument at fair value is recognized in profit or loss. Additionally, the gain or loss on the
hedged item, attributable to the hedged risk, is recognized in profit or loss by adjusting the carrying amount of the hedged
item. Delhaize Group usually hedges financial liabilities. As for economic hedges, the changes in the hedging instrument
follow the hedged item and, therefore, they are usually presented in the income statement as “Finance costs” (see Note
29.1).
Hedges of a net investment: Delhaize Group currently does not hedge any of its net investments in any of its foreign
operations.
Share Capital and Treasury Shares
 Ordinary shares: Delhaize Group’s ordinary shares are classified as equity. Incremental costs directly attributable to the

issuance of ordinary shares and share options are recognized as a deduction from equity, net of any tax effects.
Treasury shares: Shares of the Group purchased by the Group or companies within the Group are included in equity at cost
(including any costs directly attributable to the purchase of the shares) until the shares are cancelled, sold or otherwise
disposed. Where such shares are subsequently reissued, any consideration received, net of any directly attributable
incremental transaction costs and the related income tax effects, is included in equity attributable to the company’s equity
holders.
Income Taxes
The tax expense for the period comprises current and deferred tax. Tax is recognized in the income statement except to the
extent that it relates to items recognized directly in OCI or equity.
The current income tax charge is calculated on the basis of the tax laws enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet
date in the countries where the Group’s subsidiaries and associates operate and generate taxable income. Provisions and
receivables are established on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to or recovered from the tax authorities.
Deferred tax liabilities and assets are recognized, using the liability method, on temporary differences arising between the
carrying amount in the consolidated financial statements and the tax basis of assets and liabilities. However, the deferred income
tax is not accounted for if it arises from initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction other than a business combination
that at the time of the transaction affects neither accounting nor taxable profit or loss. Deferred income tax is determined,
considering (i) tax rates and laws that have been enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date that are expected to
apply when the temporary differences reverse and (ii) the expected manner of realization or settlement of the carrying amount of
assets and liabilities.
Deferred tax liabilities are recognized for temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries, associates and interests in
joint ventures, if any, except where the Group is able to control the timing of the reversal of the temporary difference and it is
probable that the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future.
A deferred tax asset is recognized only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profit will be available against which the
temporary difference can be utilized. Deferred tax assets are reviewed at each reporting date and are reduced to the extent that
it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realized.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are only offset if there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax liabilities and assets
and the deferred income taxes relate to the same taxable entity and the same taxation authority.
The Group elected to present interests and penalties relating to income taxes in “Income tax expense” in the income statement.
Provisions
Provisions are recognized when the Group has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of past events, it is more
likely than not that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation, and the amount can be reliably estimated.
Provisions are measured at balance sheet date at management’s best estimate of the expenditures expected to be required to
settle the obligation, discounted using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects the current market assessments of the time value of
money and the risk specific to the liability, if material. Where discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage
of time (“unwinding of the discount”) is recognized in “Finance costs” (see Note 29.1).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 83

Closed store provisions: Delhaize Group regularly reviews its stores operating performance and assesses the Group’s plans
for certain store closures. Closing stores results in a number of activities required by IFRS in order to appropriately reflect
the value of assets and liabilities and related store closing costs, such as a review of net realizable value of inventory or
review for impairment of assets or cash generating units (for both activities see accounting policies described above). In
addition, Delhaize Group recognizes “Closed store provisions,” which consist primarily of provisions for onerous contracts
and severance (“termination”) costs (for both see further below). Costs recognized as part of store closings are included in
“Other operating expenses” (see Note 28), except for inventory write-downs, which are classified as “Cost of sales” (see
Note 25). If appropriate (see accounting policy for “Non-Current Assets / Disposal Groups and Discontinued Operations”
above), stores are accounted for in accordance with IFRS 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations.
Onerous contracts: IAS 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets requires the recognition of a provision for
a present obligation arising under an onerous contract, which is defined as a contract in which the unavoidable costs of
meeting the obligations under the contract exceed the economic benefits expected to be received under it. Judgment is
required in determining if a present obligation exists, taking into account all available evidence. Once the existence has been
established, at the latest upon actual closing, Delhaize Group recognizes provisions for the present value of the amount by
which the unavoidable costs to fulfill the agreements exceed the expected benefits from such agreements, which comprises
the estimated non-cancellable lease payments, including contractually required real estate taxes, common area
maintenance and insurance costs, net of anticipated subtenant income. The adequacy of the closed store provision is
dependent upon the economic conditions in which stores are located which will impact the Group’s ability to realize
estimated sublease income. Owned and finance leased stores that are closed and rented to third-parties are reclassified as
investment property (see Note 9).
When termination costs are incurred in connection with a store closing, a liability for the termination benefits is recognized in
accordance with IAS 19 Employee Benefits, when the Group is demonstrably committed to the termination for the estimated
settlement amount, which is when the implementation of a formal plan has started or the main features have been
announced to those affected (see also “Employee Benefits” below).
Closed store provisions are reviewed regularly to ensure that accrued amounts appropriately reflect management’s best
estimate of the outstanding commitments and that additional expenses are provided for or amounts that are no longer
needed for their originally intended purpose are released.

Self-insurance: Delhaize Group is self-insured for workers’ compensation, general liability, vehicle accidents, pharmacy
claims, health care and property insurance in the U.S. The self-insurance liability is determined actuarially, based on claims
filed and an estimate of claims incurred but not reported. Excess loss protection above certain maximum retained exposures
is provided by external insurance companies.
Restructuring provisions are recognized when the Group has approved a detailed formal restructuring plan, and the
restructuring either has commenced or has been announced to those affected by it. Any restructuring provision contains only
those expenditures that are directly arising from the restructuring and are both necessarily entailed by the restructuring and
not associated with the ongoing activity of the Group. Future operating losses are therefore not provided for.

Employee Benefits
 A defined contribution plan is a post-employment benefit plan under which the Group pays fixed contributions - usually to a

separate entity - and has no legal or constructive obligation to pay further contributions regardless of the performance of the
funds held to satisfy future benefit payments. The Group makes contributions to defined contribution plans on a contractual
and voluntary basis. The contributions are recognized as “Employee benefit expense” when they are due (see Note 21.1).
A defined benefit plan is a post-employment benefit plan other than a defined contribution plan (see above), which normally
defines an amount of benefit that an employee will receive upon retirement, usually dependent on one or more factors such
as age, years of service and compensation. The Group’s net obligation recognized in the balance sheet for defined benefit
plans is the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the balance sheet date less the fair value of plan assets - which
in the case of funded plans are usually held by a long-term employee benefit fund or qualifying insurance company and are
not available to the creditors of the Group nor can they be paid directly to the Group - and adjustments for past service costs.
The defined benefit obligation is calculated regularly by independent actuaries using the projected unit credit method. The
present value of the defined benefit obligation is determined by discounting the estimated future cash outflows using interes t
rates of high-quality corporate bonds that are denominated in the currency in which the benefits will be paid and that have
maturity terms approximating the duration of the related pension liability. In countries where there is no deep market in such
bonds, the market rates on government bonds are used.
When the calculation results in a benefit to the Group, the recognized asset is limited to the total of any unrecognized past
service costs and the present value of economic benefits available in the form of any future refunds from the plan or
reductions in future contributions to the plan. An economic benefit is available to the Group if it is realizable during the life of
the plan or on settlement of the plan liabilities.
Delhaize Group recognizes actuarial gains and losses, which represent adjustments due to experience and changes in
actuarial assumptions, fully in the period in which they occur in OCI.
Past service costs are recognized immediately in the income statement unless the changes to the plan are conditional on the
employee remaining in service for a specified period of time (the vesting period). In this case, the past service costs are
amortized on a straight-line basis over the vesting period.
Pension expense is included in “Cost of sales” and in “Selling, general and administrative expenses.” See for details of
Delhaize Group’s defined benefit plans Note 21.1.
84 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
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


Other post-employment benefits: some Group entities provide post-retirement health care benefits to their retirees. The
Group’s net obligation in respect of long-term employee benefit plans other than pension plans is the amount of future
benefit that employees have earned in return for their services in the current or prior periods. Such benefits are discounted
to determine their present value and the fair value of any related asset is deducted. The calculation is performed using the
projected unit credit method and any actuarial gain or loss is recognized in OCI in the period in which it arises. These
obligations are valued annually by independent qualified actuaries. For details, see Delhaize Group’s other post-employment
benefit plans in Note 21.2.
Termination benefits: are recognized when the Group is demonstrably committed, without realistic possibility of withdrawal,
to a detailed formal plan to terminate employment before the normal retirement date. In addition, Delhaize Group recognizes
expenses in connection with termination benefits for voluntary terminations if the Group has made an offer of voluntary
termination, if it is probable that the offer will be accepted and the number of acceptances can be measured reliably.
Profit-sharing and bonus plans: the Group recognizes a liability and an expense for bonuses and profit-sharing based on a
formula that takes into consideration the profit attributable to the company’s shareholders after certain adjustments. The
Group recognizes a provision if contractually obliged or if there is a past practice that has created a constructive obligation
(see Note 21.3).
Share-based payments: the Group operates various equity-settled share-based compensation plans, under which the entity
receives services from employees as consideration for equity instruments (options, warrants or restricted stock units) of the
Group. The fair value of the employee services received in exchange for the grant of the share-based awards is recognized
as an expense. The total amount to be expensed is determined by reference to the grant date fair value of the share-based
awards and is calculated using the Black-Scholes-Merton valuation model (for details see Note 21.3). The share-based
compensation plans operated by Delhaize Group currently do not contain any (non-)market vesting conditions, but only
service vesting conditions.
The total amount expensed is recognized in the income statement - together with a corresponding increase in equity - over
the vesting period of the share-based award, which is the period over which all of the specified vesting conditions are to be
satisfied. The cumulative expense recognized for equity-settled transactions at each reporting date until the vesting date
reflects the extent to which the vesting period has expired and the Group’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments
that will ultimately vest. No expense is recognized for awards that do not ultimately vest.
In the event of a modification of the terms of an equity-settled award, the minimum expense recognized is the expense as if
the terms had not been modified. An additional expense would be recognized for any modification which increases the total
fair value of the share-based payment arrangement or is otherwise beneficial to the employee as measured at the date of
modification.
Where an equity-settled award is cancelled, it is treated as if it had vested on the date of cancellation, and any expense not
yet recognized for the award is recognized immediately. However if a new award is substituted for the cancelled award and
designated as a replacement award on the date that it is granted, the cancelled and new awards are treated as if they were
a modification of the original award.
Any proceeds received, net of any directly attributable transaction costs, are credited to share capital (nominal value) and
share premium when options are exercised. The dilutive effect of outstanding (vested and unvested) options is reflected as
additional share dilution in the computation of diluted earnings per share (see Note 31).
Revenue Recognition
Revenue is recognized to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Group and the revenue can be
reliably measured. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received net of discounts, rebates, and sales taxes
or duty. The Group assesses its revenue arrangements against the criteria included in the appendix to IAS 18 Revenue to
determine if it is acting as principal or agent.




Sales of products to the Group’s retail customers are recognized at the point of sale and upon delivery of groceries to
internet or telephone order customers. In addition, Delhaize Group generates revenue from sales to its wholesale
customers, which are recognized upon delivery to or pick-up by the wholesale customer.
As stated above, sales are recorded net of sales taxes, value-added taxes and discounts and incentives. These include
discounts from regular retail prices for specific items and “buy-one, get-one-free”-type incentives that are offered to retail
customers through the Group’s customer loyalty programs. Discounts provided by vendors are recorded as a receivable.
Revenue from the sale of gift cards and gift certificates is recognized when the gift card or gift certificate is redeemed by the
retail customer.
The Group maintains various loyalty points programs whereby customers earn points for future purchases. These customer
loyalty credits are accounted for as a separate component of the sales transaction in which they are granted. A portion of the
fair value of the consideration received is allocated to the award credits and deferred. This is recognized as revenue when
the award credits are redeemed.
The Group generates limited revenues from franchise fees, which are recognized in net sales when the services are
provided or franchise rights used.
For certain products or services, such as the sale of lottery tickets, third-party prepaid phone cards, etc., Delhaize Group
acts as an agent and consequently records the amount of commission income in its net sales.
Rental income from investment property is recognized in profit or loss on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease and
included in “Other operating income” (see Note 27).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 85
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
Interest Income is recognized as interest accrues (using the effective interest method) and is included in “Income from
investments” (see Note 29.2).
Dividend income is recognized when the Group’s right to receive the payment is established. The income is included in
“Income from investments” (see Note 29.2).
Cost of Sales
Cost of sales includes the purchase cost of products sold and all costs associated with getting the products into the retail stores
including buying, warehousing and transportation costs. Finally, cost of sales includes appropriate vendor allowances (see also
accounting policy for “Inventories” above).
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
Selling, general and administrative expenses include store operating expenses, costs incurred for activities which serve securing
sales, administrative and advertising expenses.
Segment Reporting
Operating segments are reported in a manner consistent with the internal reporting provided to the chief operating decision
maker (CODM), who is responsible for allocating resources and assessing performance of the operating segments (see Note 3).
2.4 Significant Use of Estimates, Assumptions and Judgment
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires Delhaize Group to make judgments, estimates and
assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities and income and
expenses, which inherently contain some degree of uncertainty. These estimates are based on experience and assumptions
Delhaize Group believes to be reasonable under the circumstances. By definition, actual results could and will often differ from
these estimates. In the past, the Group’s estimates generally have not deviated materially from actual results. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimates are revised and in any future periods affected.
Information about significant areas of estimation uncertainty and critical judgments in applying accounting policies that have the
most significant effect on the amounts in the consolidated financial statements is included in, but not limited to, the following
notes:






Note 4.1 - Business combinations;
Notes 6, 7, 8, 11, 14, 19 - Assessing assets for impairment and fair values of financial instruments;
Notes 13, 25 - Accounting for vendor allowances;
Note 20 - Provisions;
Note 21 - Employee Benefits; and
Note 22 - Income Taxes.
2.5 Standards and Interpretations Issued but not yet Effective
The following standards, amendments to or revisions of existing standards or interpretations have been published and are
mandatory for the Group’s accounting periods beginning on January 1, 2013 or later periods. Unless otherwise indicated below,
Delhaize Group is still in the process of assessing the impact of these new standards, interpretations, or amendments to its
consolidated financial statements and does not plan to early adopt them:




Amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Items of Other Comprehensive Income (applicable for annual periods beginning on or
after July 1, 2012): Following the adoption of the amendment the Group will have to modify its presentation by grouping
items presented in OCI on the basis of whether they are potentially reclassifiable to profit or loss subsequently. The initial
application will have little impact on the Group's consolidated financial statements.
Amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits (applicable for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013): The
amendment will require, besides others, replacing interest cost and expected return on plan assets with a net interest
amount that is calculated by applying the discount rate to the net defined benefit liability (asset), including the impact of
taxes in the measurement of the defined benefit obligation and immediate recognition of all past service costs. The
amendments to IAS 19 require retrospective application. Based on the Group’s assessment, the revised IAS 19 standard
would have increased the 2012 defined benefit cost by €2 million, and will increase the 2013 defined benefit cost by
€1 million.
Amendments to IAS 32 Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (applicable for annual periods beginning on or
after January 1, 2014). The amendment adds application guidance to the existing financial asset and financial liabilities
offsetting requirements in IAS 32. The Group believes that the initial application of the amendment should have minimal
impact on its consolidated financial statements.
Amendments to IFRS 7 Disclosures - Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (applicable for annual periods
beginning on or after January 1, 2013). The change will require specific disclosures to all recognized financial instruments
86 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12








that are offset or that are subject to enforceable master netting arrangements and will have limited impact on the Group’s
consolidated financial statements, mainly in connection with financial derivative contracts.
Improvements to IFRS (applicable for annual periods beginning after January 1, 2013): On May 17, 2012, the IASB issued
the final omnibus annual improvements standard containing six changes to five IASB pronouncements. The Group believes
that these amendments will have no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
IFRS 9 Financial Instruments (applicable for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2015): On November 12, 2009,
the IASB published the first part of IFRS 9, the accounting standard that will eventually replace IAS 39 Financial Instruments:
Recognition and Measurement. The revised guidance included in IFRS 9 relates to classification and measurement of
financial assets alone and applies a “business model” and “characteristics of the financial asset” test to assess if, after initial
recognition at fair value, a financial asset is subsequently measured at amortized cost or at fair value. All financial assets
that are equity investments are measured at fair value either through OCI or profit or loss. This is an irrevocable choice the
entity makes by instrument unless the equity investments are held for trading, in which case they must be measured at fair
value through profit or loss.
On October 28, 2010, the IASB issued the second part of IFRS 9 dealing with the Recognition and Measurement of
Financial Liabilities, which is also applicable for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2015. The IASB has
retained the existing guidance in IAS 39 regarding classifying and measuring financial liabilities, except for those liabilities
where the fair value option has been elected, which is currently not the case for any of Delhaize Group's financial liabilities.
Therefore, the Group does not expect that the IFRS 9 guidance will have an impact on its consolidated financial statements
with respect to financial liabilities.
On December 16, 2011, the IASB modified the mandatory effective date of IFRS 9 for annual periods beginning on or after
January 1, 2015. The change modified the guidance about the disclosure requirements an entity needs to make when it first
applies IFRS 9. In parallel with the amendment of IFRS 9, the IASB also modified IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures
and added specific requirements that an entity should disclose upon the initial application of IFRS 9.
Delhaize Group continues reviewing the revised guidance and the ongoing progress and subsequent changes made by the
IASB with respect to the new standard in order to assess the full impact IFRS 9 might have on its consolidated financial
statements, but will only be able to conclude once the IASB has finalized the development of IFRS 9, including the remaining
phases on hedge accounting and impairment.
IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements and Amendments to IAS 27 Separate Financial Statements (applicable for
annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013). IFRS 10 builds on existing principles by identifying the concept of
control as the determining factor in whether an entity should be included within the consolidated financial statements of the
parent company. The standard provides additional guidance to assist in the determination of control where it is difficult to
assess. The remaining guidance of IAS 27 deals now solely with separate financial statements. The Group concluded that
the implementation of IFRS 10 will have no material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements and Amendments to IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures (applicable for
annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013): Although IFRS 11 modifies the currently existing definition of joint
control of IAS 31, the determination will still be based on the concept of unanimous consent. IFRS 11 classifies joint
arrangements into two types - joint operations and joint ventures - and will require that investments in joint ventures are
accounted for using the equity method in accordance with IAS 28, which has been amended to include additional guidance
on the application of the equity method. The requirement to account for joint ventures using the equity method will impact the
accounting of the Group's investment in P.T. Lion Super Indo, LLC (“Super Indo”) which is currently proportionately
consolidated and will be equity accounting as from January 1, 2013. Further, Super Indo will no longer represent an
operating segment. Besides the investment in Super Indo, the Group does not have any other interest in jointly controlled
entities.
IFRS 12 Disclosures of Interests in Other Entities (applicable for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013): The
standard includes the disclosure requirements for all forms of interests in other entities, including joint arrangements,
associates, special purpose vehicles and other off balance sheet vehicles. The disclosures are generally more extensive
than under current IFRS guidance.
IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurements (applicable for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013): The standard aims
to improve consistency and reduce complexity by providing a precise definition of fair value and a single source of fair value
measurement and disclosure requirements for use across IFRS. The requirements will not extend the use of fair value
accounting but provide guidance on how it should be applied where its use is already required or permitted by other
standards within IFRS.
Investment Entities: Amendments to IFRS 10, IFRS 12 and IAS 27 (applicable for annual periods beginning on or after
January 1, 2014): On October 31, 2012, the IASB issued an amendment to IFRS 10, IFRS 12 and IAS 27 that introduced an
exception to the principle that all subsidiaries shall be consolidated. This amendment defines the term investment entity and
requires a parent that is an investment entity to measure its investments in particular subsidiaries at fair value through profit
or loss in accordance with IAS 39. The Group expects that the new guidance will have no impact on its consolidated
financial statements.
Transition Guidance (Amendments to IFRS 10, IFRS 11 and IFRS 12): On June 28, 2012, the IASB issued an amendment
to IFRS 10, IFRS 11 and IFRS 12 which clarifies that the ”date of initial application” means ”the beginning of the annual
reporting period” in which these standards have to be applied for the first time. The requirement means that for Delhaize
Group the date of initial application of these standards will be January 1, 2013.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 87
2.6 Financial Risk Management, Objectives and Policies
The Group’s activities expose it to a variety of financial risks: market risk (including currency risk, fair value interest rate risk, cash
flow interest rate risk and price risk), credit risk and liquidity risk. Delhaize Group’s principal financial liabilities, other than
derivatives, comprise mainly debts and borrowings and trade and other payables. These financial liabilities are mainly held in
order to raise funds for the Group’s operations. On the other hand, the Group holds notes receivables, other receivables and
cash and cash equivalents that result directly from the Group’s activities. The Group also holds several available-for-sale
investments. Delhaize Group exclusively uses derivative financial instruments to hedge certain risk exposures.
The risks to which the Group is exposed are evaluated by Delhaize Group’s management and Board of Directors and discussed
in the section “Risk Factors” in this annual report.
88 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
3.
Segment Information
IFRS 8 applies the so-called “management approach” to segment reporting and requires the Group to report financial and
descriptive information about its reportable segments. Such reportable segments are operating segments or aggregations of
operating segments that meet specified criteria.
Operating segments are components of an entity which engage in business activities from which they may earn revenues and
incur expenses, including revenues and expenses that relate to transactions with any of the Group’s other components, about
which discrete financial information is available that is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker (CODM) in
deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. The Group is required to report separate information about
each operating segment that:


has been identified as described above or results from aggregating two or more of those segments if they exhibit similar
long-term financial performance and have similar economic characteristics; and
exceeds certain quantitative thresholds.
Delhaize Group identified the Executive Committee as its CODM and defined operating segments based on the information
provided to the Executive Committee. Subsequently, the Group reviewed these operating segments in order to establish if any of
these individual operating segments can be considered to have similar economic characteristics and exhibit similar long-term
financial performance as described by IFRS 8, which are then aggregated into one single aggregated operating segment. In a
final step, reportable segments have been identified, which represent (aggregated) operating segments that exceed the
quantitative thresholds defined by IFRS 8 and require individual disclosure. Operating segments that do not pass these
thresholds are by default combined into the “All Other Segments” category of IFRS 8, which the Group has labeled as
“Southeastern Europe and Asia.”
Management concluded that the reader of the Group’s financial statements would benefit from distinguishing operating from nonoperating - other business activities - and, therefore, decided to disclose separately the corporate activities of the Group in the
segment “Corporate.”
During 2012, the CODM started, in addition to the financial information of Delhaize America as a whole, to review discrete
financial information of the different U.S. banners, in order to better assess the performance and allocate resources to the main
banners of the U.S. operations. Consequently, the Group’s U.S. banners represent individual operating segments. Delhaize
Group reviewed these operating segments for similar economic characteristics and long-term financial performance, using, for
example, operating profit margin, gross margin and comparable store sales development as quantitative benchmarks and
concluded that aggregating them into the segment “United States” meets the requirements of IFRS 8 and is consistent with the
core principle of the standard. While this has no immediate impact on the segment reporting, as the composition of the reportable
segments did not change, goodwill is tested at operating segment level, before aggregation, in accordance with IAS 36 (see Note
6), i.e., separately for Food Lion and Hannaford.
Overall, this results in a geographical segmentation of the Group’s business, based on the location of customers and stores,
which matches the way Delhaize Group manages its operations.
The Executive Committee internally reviews the performance of Delhaize Group’s segments against a number of measures, of
which operating profit represents the most important measure of profit or loss. The amount of each segment item reported is
measured using the amounts reported to the CODM, which equals consolidated IFRS financial information. Therefore, as the
information provided to the CODM and disclosed as segment information represents consolidated IFRS financial information, no
reconciling items need to be disclosed.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 89
The operating segments information for 2012, 2011 and 2010 is as follows:
Year ended December 31, 2012 (in millions of €)
(1)
Revenues
Cost of sales
Gross profit
Gross margin
Other operating income
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating expenses
Operating profit (loss)
Operating margin
Operating result of discontinued operations
Other information
Assets
Liabilities
Capital expenditures
Non-cash operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization
United States
Belgium(2)
Southeastern
Europe and
Asia(3)
14 632
(10 800)
3 832
26.2%
63
(3 360)
(192)
343
2.3%
(2)
4 922
(3 921)
1 001
20.3%
39
(823)
(15)
202
4.1%
—
3 183
(2 449)
734
23.1%
20
(647)
(220)
(113)
(3.5%)
(5)
—
—
—
—
—
(41)
(1)
(42)
—
—
22 737
(17 170)
5 567
24.5%
122
(4 871)
(428)
390
1.7%
(7)
7 191
2 511
354
1 838
1 342
153
2 318
887
157
589
2 003
24
11 936
6 743
688
Corporate
Total
444
116
81
9
650
Impairment loss(6)
63
5
220
—
288
Share-based compensation
11
1
—
1
13
United States
(2)
Southeastern
Europe and
Asia(3),(4)
Corporate
Total(4)
Year ended December 31, 2011 (in millions of €)
Revenues(1)
Cost of sales
Gross profit
Gross margin
Other operating income
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating expenses
Operating profit (loss)
Operating margin
Operating result of discontinued operations
Other information
Assets(5)
Liabilities(5)
Capital expenditures
Non-cash operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization
Impairment loss(6)
Share-based compensation
90 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Belgium
13 815
(10 049)
3 766
27.3%
67
(3 142)
(157)
534
3.9%
—
4 845
(3 825)
1 020
21.0%
41
(814)
(4)
243
5.0%
—
2 450
(1 875)
575
23.5%
10
(501)
(3)
81
3.3%
(1)
—
—
—
—
—
(40)
(5)
(45)
—
—
21 110
(15 749)
5 361
25.4%
118
(4 497)
(169)
813
3.9%
(1)
7 752
2 765
416
1 886
1 211
142
2 477
844
185
177
2 053
19
12 292
6 873
762
410
130
11
107
1
1
60
1
—
9
3
1
586
135
13
Year ended December 31, 2010 (in millions of €)
(1)
Revenues
Cost of sales
Gross profit
Gross margin
Other operating income
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating expenses
Operating profit (loss)
Operating margin
Operating result of discontinued operations
Other information
Assets
Liabilities
Capital expenditures
Non-cash operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization
Impairment loss(6)
Share-based compensation
United States
Belgium(2)
Southeastern
Europe and
Asia(3)
Corporate
Total
14 187
(10 272)
3 915
27.6%
43
(3 189)
(16)
753
5.3%
—
4 800
(3 803)
997
20.8%
36
(795)
(2)
236
4.9%
—
1 863
(1 422)
441
23.7%
6
(377)
(2)
68
3.7%
—
—
—
—
—
—
(33)
—
(33)
—
—
20 850
(15 497)
5 353
25.7%
85
(4 394)
(20)
1 024
4.9%
—
7 850
2 592
410
1 806
1 141
128
1 014
508
113
232
1 592
9
10 902
5 833
660
423
13
14
104
—
1
39
1
—
9
—
1
575
14
16
_______________
(1) All revenues are from external parties.
(2) Belgium includes Delhaize Group’s operations in Belgium and the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
(3) Southeastern Europe and Asia includes the Group’s operations in Greece, Romania, Indonesia and since August 1, 2011 Serbia, Bulgaria, Bosnia and
Herzegovina and Montenegro.
(4) The 2011 consolidated income statement was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
(5) The December 31, 2011 consolidated balance sheet was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter 2012 of the purchase price
allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
(6) No impairment loss was recorded or reversed in equity. The 2012 impairment loss includes €16 million on the re-measurement of assets of the disposal group
(see Note 5.3.)
Delhaize Group’s operation of retail supermarkets represents approximately 90% of the Group’s consolidated revenues. The
remaining revenue represents wholesale retail revenues. Total revenues can be further analyzed as follows:
(as a percentage of revenues)
Retail revenues
- Food - perishable
- Food - non-perishable
- Non-food
Total retail revenues
Wholesale revenues
Total revenues
2012
2011
2010
40.0%
35.6%
13.4%
37.9%
36.1%
15.0%
40.0%
35.5%
13.8%
89.0%
11.0%
89.0%
11.0%
89.3%
10.7%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
Delhaize Group is not reliant on any individual major customer and, consequently, there are no individual customers where the
total amount of revenue derived from that customer would be more than 10% of Delhaize Group’s revenue.
4.
Business Combinations and Acquisition of Non-controlling Interests
4.1 Business Combinations
Acquisitions during 2012
During 2012, Delhaize Group entered into several agreements in Belgium and Romania that have resulted in the acquisition of
businesses and were accounted for in accordance with IFRS 3. The total consideration transferred during the year for these
transactions was €5 million and resulted in an increase of goodwill of €3 million.
Acquisitions during 2011
Acquisition of Delta Maxi
On July 27, 2011, Delhaize Group acquired 100% of the shares and voting rights of Delta Maxi for a purchase price of €615
million, subject to customary purchase price adjustments, but not any earn-out or similar clauses.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 91
At December 31, 2011, the total consideration transferred amounted to (i) €574 million in cash, net of €21 million cash acquired,
of which €100 million was held in escrow by the seller and (ii) €20 million held in escrow by the Group (see Note 12). The
acquired business, in combination with the Group’s existing operations in Greece and Romania, makes Delhaize Group a leading
retailer in Southeastern Europe. At acquisition date, Delta Maxi operated 485 stores and 7 distribution centers in five countries in
Southeastern Europe. Delta Maxi was included into Delhaize Group’s consolidated financial statements as of August 1, 2011 and
is part of the Southeastern Europe & Asia segment (see Note 3). Delhaize Group incurred approximately €11 million acquisitionrelated costs in 2011 that were included in selling, general and administrative expenses in the “Corporate” segment.
During the first half of 2012, the Group completed the purchase price allocation of the transaction and revised the provisional
amounts previously recognized to reflect additional information obtained on the acquisition date fair values for assets acquired
and liabilities assumed. As part of this process, the Group completed its assessment and quantification of legal contingencies
that were assumed as part of the acquisition and recognized corresponding provisions in accordance with IFRS 3. The
contingent liabilities mainly related to pending legal disputes for a number of property ownership related cases. The agreement
with the former owner of Delta Maxi contains specific indemnification clauses for all known significant contingencies and,
consequently, the Group recognized indemnification assets of €33 million for such contingencies as it expects to be
compensated by the former owner for any potential losses. As a result, acquisition date goodwill increased from €467 million to
€507 million. The €20 million held in escrow by the Group was entirely released through the year.
(in millions of €)
August 1, 2011
Cash paid
595
20
Cash held in escrow
Total consideration transferred
615
Indemnification assets
(33)
Total consideration
582
The above noted adjustments have been, in accordance with the guidance provided in IFRS 3, recognized in the consolidated
financial statements of Delhaize Group as if the accounting had been completed at the acquisition date, and comparative
information has been revised correspondingly. The revision of acquisition date fair values did not have a significant impact on the
profit and loss of the year ended December 31, 2011.
The table below summarizes the total consideration paid for Delta Maxi and the amounts of the assets acquired and liabilities
assumed recognized at the acquisition date, comparing the provisional fair values (as disclosed in our 2011 annual report) and
revised final acquisition date fair values.
August 1, 2011 Acquisition
date Fair Values
Provisional
Fair Values(1)
Final Fair Values
194
426
44
24
69
59
9
21
218
394
34
24
68
54
9
21
15
16
861
(211)
(8)
(132)
(14)
(259)
(37)
838
(211)
(8)
(132)
(45)
(261)
(69)
Deferred tax liabilities
(24)
(22)
Total identified net assets
Non-controlling interests (measured at the proportionate shares of the net assets)
Goodwill arising on acquisition
Total
176
(28)
467
90
(15)
507
615
582
(in millions of €)
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investment property
Financial assets
Inventory
Receivables
Other assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Assets classified as held for sale
Long-term debt, including current portion
Obligations under finance lease
Short-term borrowings
Provisions
Accounts payable
Other liabilities
_______________
(1)
As disclosed in the 2011 annual report.
92 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Receivables mainly consist of trade receivables and other receivables. The gross contractual amount of the receivables due is
€65 million, of which €11 million is expected to be uncollectible, resulting in a final acquisition date fair value of €54 million.
The acquisition date goodwill was €507 million (Note 6) and has been allocated to the specific cash-generating units that were
expected to benefit from the synergies of the combination, resulting in the following split between the various countries where
Maxi operates, which represent the lowest level at which management monitors goodwill:
(in millions of €)
Serbia
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Montenegro
Albania
Total
Final Acquisition
Date value
448
26
15
10
8
507
The goodwill reflected the anticipated synergies that could be realized from integrating Delta Maxi into Delhaize Group’s
international network, especially in the areas of improved procurement, better inventory management and optimized IT and
supply chain systems and processes and is deductible for income tax purposes.
From the date of acquisition, Maxi (including Albania which was reclassified to discontinued operations) has contributed €460
million to the Group’s revenues and €(0.2) million to the net profit of the year in 2011. If the business combination had occurred
at the beginning of the year, the 2011 revenues of Delhaize Group would have been approximately €584 million higher. This pro
forma information is provided for informational purposes only and is not necessarily indicative of the revenues that actually would
have been achieved had the acquisition been consummated as of that time, nor is it intended to be a projection of future
revenues. Due to significant differences in accounting policies applied before acquisition date by Delta Maxi and existing policies
applied within Delhaize Group, it was concluded that it would be impracticable to estimate the pro forma impact on the Group’s
consolidated net profit for the full year.
Other 2011 acquisitions
In addition, Delhaize Group entered into several small agreements acquiring 17 individual stores in various parts of the world.
The total consideration transferred during 2011 for these transactions was €16 million and resulted in an increase of goodwill of
€10 million, mainly representing expected benefits from the integration of the stores into the existing sales network, the locations
and customer base of the various stores acquired, all resulting in synergy effects for the Group.
Acquisitions during 2010
During 2010, Delhaize Group entered into several small agreements acquiring a total of 15 individual stores in various parts of
the world, which meet the business definition under IFRS 3 and were accounted for accordingly. Total consideration transferred
during 2010 was €16 million in cash, and additional final payments of €1 million were paid in 2011. These transactions resulted in
an increase of goodwill of €12 million, mainly representing expected benefits from the integration of the stores into the existing
sales network and the locations and customer base of the various stores acquired, all resulting in synergy effects for the Group.
In addition, the Group made a final payment of €3 million during 2010, relating to the acquisition of Koryfi SA, which occurred in
2009 and for which acquisition accounting was completed during 2010.
4.2 Acquisitions of Non-controlling Interests
Acquisitions during 2012
In June 2012, the minority shareholder of Ela d.o.o. Kotor irrevocably and unconditionally exercised its put option selling to
Delhaize Group its share of 49% in the subsidiary. In accordance with IAS 32, the Group recognized, as part of the purchase
price allocation, (i) a liability of approximately €13 million in connection with the put option, representing its best estimate of the
expected cash outflow, and (ii) an indemnification asset of approximately €6 million towards the former owner of Delta Maxi. The
Group reclassified the remaining non-controlling interest into retained earnings and recognized the subsequent immaterial
changes in value of the liability and the indemnification asset in profit or loss.
During 2012, Delhaize Group acquired additional non-controlling interests for a total amount of €10 million, including transaction
costs, recognized in equity, mainly relating to other Maxi subsidiaries.
Acquisitions during 2011
Subsequent to the acquisition of Delta Maxi, Delhaize Group started the process of acquiring non-controlling interests held by
third parties in several Delta Maxi subsidiaries. Until December 31, 2011, the Group acquired non-controlling interests of a
carrying amount of €10 million for a total cash consideration of approximately the same amount.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 93
Acquisitions during 2010
On May 18, 2009, Delhaize Group announced the launch of a voluntary tender offer for all of the shares of its Greek subsidiary
Alfa Beta Vassilopoulos S.A. (“Alfa Beta”) which were not yet held by any of the consolidated companies of Delhaize Group at a
price of €30.50 per Alfa Beta share. On June 29, 2009, the offer price was increased to €34.00 per share, based on an
agreement with two major shareholders (approximately 12%) of Alfa Beta. At the end of the acceptance period on July 9, 2009,
Delhaize Group held 89.56% of Alfa Beta shares. During the second half of 2009, Delhaize Group acquired additional shares on
the market and at December 31, 2009 Delhaize Group owned 11 451 109 shares (representing 89.93%).
On March 12, 2010, Delhaize Group launched through its wholly owned Dutch subsidiary Delhaize “The Lion” Nederland BV
(“Delned”) a new tender offer to acquire the remaining shares of Alfa Beta at €35.73 per share.
On June 4, 2010, Delned requested from the Hellenic Capital Market Commission the approval to squeeze-out the remaining
minority shares in Alfa Beta, which was granted on July 8, 2010. The last date of trading Alfa Beta shares at the Athens
Exchange was July 29, 2010 and settlement occurred on August 9, 2010.
Since August 9, 2010, Delhaize Group owns 100% of the voting rights in Alfa Beta, which was delisted from the Athens
Exchange as of October 1, 2010.
The difference between the carrying amount of non-controlling interest (€16 million) and the fair value of the consideration paid
(€47 million), including transactions costs (€1 million), was recognized directly in equity and attributed to the shareholders of the
Group and, therefore, had no impact on goodwill or profit or loss.
5.
Divestitures, Disposal Group / Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued
Operations
5.1 Divestitures
On February 14, 2012, Delhaize Group reached a binding agreement to sell Wambacq & Peeters SA, a Belgian transport
company, to Van Moer Group. This transaction did not meet the criteria of a “Discontinued Operation” and was completed on
April 30, 2012.
Delhaize Group received €3 million in cash and recorded a gain on disposal of €1 million in 2012.
No divestitures took place in 2011 and 2010.
5.2 Disposal Group / Assets Classified as Held for Sale
Disposal of Delhaize Albania SHPK
The assets and liabilities related to the Group’s operations in Albania (part of the Southeastern Europe & Asia segment) have
been presented as held for sale following the approval of Delhaize Group’s Board of Directors on December 19, 2012 to sell
Delhaize Albania SHPK. In January 2013, Delhaize Group reached a binding agreement with Balfin SHPK and agreed on a sales
price of €2 million, subject to contractual adjustments. The transaction was completed in February 2013.
At December 31, 2012, the carrying value of assets classified as assets held for sale and associated liabilities were as follows:
(in millions of EUR)
Property, plant and equipment
Inventories
Receivables and other current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Assets classified as held for sale
Less:
Non-current liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Assets classified as held for sale, net of associated liabilities
2012
1
3
1
1
6
(1)
(3)
2
The Group recognized an impairment loss of €16 million (see also Note 5.3) to write down the carrying value of Delhaize Albania
to its fair value less costs to sell, which includes goodwill impairment charges of approximately €8 million.
94 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Disposal of individual properties
As part of the acquisition of Delta Maxi (see Note 4.1), the Group identified a number of properties, mainly small shops, office
buildings, pharmacies or bank branches, which it considered not being incremental to its retail operations. At year-end 2011, the
revised carrying value of the assets held for sale amounted to €56 million. During 2012, the Group sold properties for a total
amount of €17 million. As a result of the weakening real estate market and the deteriorating state of the property for sale, the fair
value less cost to sell of a number of properties decreased during 2012 resulting in impairment losses of €18 million. As due to
these conditions, a sale within the anticipated timeframe was considered to be no longer feasible, properties for a total net book
value of €7 million have been reclassified to investment property (see Note 9). Consequently, at December 31, 2012, the
remaining properties held for sale amount to €10 million and are part of the Southeastern Europe & Asia Segment.
In addition, Delhaize America intends to dispose a parcel of land within the next 12 months for €2 million.
5.3 Discontinued Operations
As mentioned in Note 5.2, Delhaize Albania was classified as a disposal group held for sale and qualified simultaneously as
discontinued operations. The Group recognized an impairment loss of €16 million in order to write down the carrying value of
Delhaize Albania to its estimated fair value less cost to sell and classified the operations of Delhaize Albania in 2012 and 2011 as
“Result from discontinued operations (net of tax).” No pre-tax loss or gain was recognized on the re-measurement of assets held
for sale in 2011 and 2010.
The overall “Result from discontinued operations” and corresponding net cash flows of the entities classified as discontinued
operations are summarized as follows:
(in millions of €, except per share information)
Revenues
Cost of sales
Other operating income
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Other operating expenses
Finance costs
Result before tax
Income taxes
Result of discontinued operations (net of tax)
Pre-tax loss recognized on re-measurement of assets of disposal groups
Income taxes
Result from discontinued operations (net of tax), fully attributable to equity holders of the Group
Basic earnings per share from discontinued operations
Diluted earnings per share from discontinued operations
Operating cash flows
Investing cash flows
Financing cash flows
Total cash flows
2012
2011(1)
2010
21
(18)
1
(8)
(3)
(1)
9
(7)
—
(3)
—
(1)
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
(8)
2
(2)
—
(1)
—
(6)
(16)
—
(2)
—
—
(1)
—
—
(22)
(0.22)
(0.22)
(2)
(0.03)
(0.02)
(1)
(0.01)
(0.01)
(6)
9
(3)
(5)
(3)
9
—
—
—
—
1
—
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 95
6.
Goodwill
(in millions of €)
2012
2011(1)
2010
Gross carrying amount at January 1
3 487
2 900
2 707
(73)
(72)
(67)
3 414
2 828
2 640
3
517
12
(8)
(136)
(84)
—
—
69
—
—
176
3 396
(207)
3 487
(73)
2 900
(72)
3 189
3 414
2 828
Accumulated impairment at January 1
Net carrying amount at January 1
Acquisitions through business combinations and adjustments to initial purchase accounting
Classified as held for sale
Impairment loss
Currency transaction effect
Gross carrying amount at December 31
Accumulated impairment at December 31
Net carrying amount at December 31
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
Goodwill is allocated and tested for impairment at the cash-generating unit (CGU) level that is expected to benefit from synergies
of the combination the goodwill resulted from, which at Delhaize Group represents an operating entity or country level, being also
the lowest level at which goodwill is monitored for internal management purpose.
During 2012, the Group revisited its reporting to the CODM for its U.S. operations (see Note 3). As a consequence, Delhaize
Group’s U.S. operations represent separate operating segments at which goodwill needs to be reviewed for impairment testing
purposes.
In 2011, Delhaize Group acquired 100% of the retail company Delta Maxi Group, operating in five countries in the Balkan area.
During the first half of 2012, Delhaize Group completed the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition and
recognized goodwill of €507 million at acquisition date (see Note 4.1).
The Group’s CGUs with significant goodwill allocations are detailed below:
(in millions)
2012
2011
2010
USD
USD
1 259
1 984
1 259
1 984
1 259
1 984
United States
Serbia
Bulgaria
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Montenegro
Albania
EUR
RSD
BGN
BAM
EUR
ALL
2 458
36 228
—
—
—
—
2 507
45 844
30
50
10
1 161
2 427
—
—
—
—
—
Maxi(1)
EUR
318
497
—
Belgium
EUR
186
184
182
Greece
EUR
207
207
202
Romania
EUR
20
19
17
Total
EUR
3 189
3 414
2 828
Food Lion
Hannaford
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
In accordance with the accounting policies stated in Note 2.3, Delhaize Group conducts an annual impairment assessment for
goodwill and, in addition, whenever events or circumstances indicate that an impairment may have occurred. The impairment test
of goodwill involves comparing the recoverable amount of each CGU with its carrying value, including goodwill, and recognition
of an impairment loss if the carrying value exceeds the recoverable amount.
The recoverable amount of each operating entity is determined based on the higher of value in use calculations and the fair value
less cost to sell:

The value in use (“VIU”) calculations use local currency cash flow projections based on the latest available financial plans
approved by management for all CGUs, adjusted to ensure that the CGUs are tested in its current condition, covering a
three-year period, based on actual results of the past and using observable market data, where possible. Cash flows beyond
the three-year period are extrapolated to five years.
96 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Growth rates and operating margins used to estimate future performance are equally based on past performance and
experience of growth rates and operating margins achievable in the relevant market and in line with market data, where
possible. Beyond five years, perpetual growth rates are used which do not exceed the long-term average growth rate for the
supermarket retail business in the particular market in question and the long-term economic growth of the respective
country. These pre-tax cash flows are discounted applying a pre-tax rate, which is derived from the CGU’s WACC (Weighted
Average Cost of Capital) in an iterative process as described by IAS 36.

The fair value less cost to sell (“FVLCTS”) is based on discounted cash flow calculations, in local currencies, using cash flow
projections based on the latest available financial plans approved by management for all CGUs, as explained above. Cash
flows beyond the three-year period are extrapolated to ten years in line with market participant assumptions. Beyond ten
years, perpetual growth rates do not exceed the long-term average growth rate for the supermarket retail business in the
particular market in question and the long-term economic growth of the respective country. Operating margins are kept in
line with longer term market assumptions. Delhaize Group uses pre-tax cash flows which are discounted applying a pre-tax
rate, being derived from the CGU’s WACC as described above. Earnings multiples paid for similar companies in the market
are used to ensure appropriateness of the FVLCTS estimates and overall consistency.
United States
The recoverable amount of the U.S. operating segments Food Lion and Hannaford has been determined based on VIU
calculations. The key assumptions used for the VIU calculations were as follows:
Perpetual
Growth Rate
Pre-tax
discount rate
Food Lion
Hannaford
2011:
2.3%
2.3%
10.1%
9.6%
Food Lion
Hannaford
2010:
2.3%
2.3%
10.4%
10.4%
Food Lion
Hannaford
2.3%
2.3%
11.7%
10.8%
2012:
Management believes that the assumptions used in the VIU calculations represent the best estimates of future development and
is of the opinion that no reasonable possible change in any of the key assumptions mentioned above would cause the carrying
value of the cash generating units to exceed their recoverable amounts. The Group estimated that a decrease in growth rate by
50 basis points, keeping all other assumptions constant, would decrease the 2012 VIU for both Food Lion and Hannaford by
$396 million. An increase of the discount rate by 100 basis points, keeping all other constant, would decrease the 2012 VIU fo r
Food Lion and Hannaford by $891 million and $893 million, respectively. A simultaneous increase in discount rate and decrease
in growth rates by the before mentioned amounts would not result in the carrying amount of Food Lion or Hannaford exceeding
the VIU. Alternatively, a reduction in the total projected future cash flows by 10%, keeping all other constant, would decrease the
2012 VIU for Food Lion and Hannaford by $485 million and $493 million, respectively and would not result in the carrying amount
of Food Lion or Hannaford exceeding the VIU.
Europe
The recoverable amount of the operating segments Belgium, Greece and Romania has been determined based on VIU
calculations. The key assumptions used for the VIU calculations were as follows:
Perpetual
Growth Rate
Pre-tax
discount rate
Belgium
Greece
Romania
2011:
2.4%
1.6%
2.3%
9.9%
14.4%
11.7%
Belgium
Greece
Romania
2010:
3.3%
2.5%
2.7%
10.3%
14.3%
11.9%
Belgium
Greece
Romania
2.9%
2.5%
3.7%
7.8%
7.0%
14.7%
2012:
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 97
Management believes that the assumptions used in the VIU calculations represent the best estimates of future development and
is of the opinion that no reasonable possible change in any of the key assumptions mentioned above would cause the carrying
value of the cash generating units to exceed their recoverable amounts. The Group estimated that a decrease in growth rate by
50 basis points, keeping all other constant, would decrease the 2012 VIU for Belgium, Greece and Romania by €201 million, €60
million and €15 million respectively. An increase of the discount rate by 100 basis points, keeping all other constant, would
decrease the 2012 VIU for Belgium, Greece and Romania by €444 million, €104 million and €40 million, respectively. A
simultaneous increase in discount rate and decrease in growth rates by the before mentioned amounts would not result in the
carrying amount of Belgium, Greece or Romania exceeding the VIU. Alternatively, a reduction in the total projected future cash
flows by 10%, keeping all other constant, would decrease the 2012 VIU for Belgium, Greece and Romania by €258 million, €96
million and €37 million, respectively and would not result in the carrying amount of Belgium, Greece or Romania exceeding the
VIU.
Considering the expected growth of the relatively young operations in the Maxi countries, the recoverable amount of these
countries has been determined based on FVLCTS calculations. Delhaize Group impaired 100% of the goodwill related to
Bulgaria, Bosnia & Herzegovina and Montenegro and recognized a €85 million impairment loss with respect to the Serbian
goodwill. The Group believes that this brings the value of the operations in line with its revised current expectations and reflects
market conditions in the various countries, resulting from less optimistic expectations on growth rates, due to lower sales square
meters assumptions, and higher competitive environment compared to the initial assumptions applied, having a negative impact
on revenue growth, despite maintaining profitability. The key assumptions used and the recognized impairment losses were as
follows:
Serbia
Bulgaria
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Montenegro
Total
Perpetual
Growth Rate
Pre-tax
discount rate
3.7%
2.7%
2.3%
3.4%
14.6%
10.7%
16.1%
14.1%
Impairment
Loss
(in millions)
RSD
BGN
BAM
EUR
EUR
9 616
30
50
10
136
The Group estimated that a decrease in growth rate by 50 basis points, keeping all other constant, would further decrease the
FVLCTS for Serbia by €16 million. An increase of the discount rate by 100 basis points, keeping all other constant, would
decrease the FVLCTS by €72 million. A simultaneous increase in discount rate and decrease in growth rates by the before
mentioned amounts would result in the carrying amount of Serbia exceeding the FVLCTS by an additional €84 million.
Alternatively, a reduction in the total projected future cash flows by 10%, keeping all other constant, would result in the carrying
amount of Serbia exceeding the FVLCTS by an additional €68 million.
Impairment losses are recognized in profit or loss in “Other operating expenses” (Note 28).
As a result of the decision to dispose the Group’s Albanian operations (see Note 5.2), relating goodwill has been fully impaired to
reflect the measurement of Albania at FVLCTS, as required by IFRS 5. The remeasurement loss has been included in “Result
from discontinued operations (net of tax)” (Note 5.3).
98 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
7.
Intangible Assets
Intangible assets consist primarily of trade names, customer relationships, purchased and developed software, favorable lease
rights, prescription files and other licenses.
Delhaize Group has determined that its trade names have an indefinite useful life and are not amortized, but are tested annually
for impairment and whenever events or circumstances indicate that impairment may have occurred. Trade names are tested for
impairment by comparing their recoverable amount, being their value in use, with their carrying amount. The recoverable amount
is estimated using revenue projections of each operating entity (see Note 6) and applying an estimated royalty rate of 0.45% and
0.70% for Food Lion and Hannaford, respectively.
During 2012, the Group fully impaired the Albanian trade name (€3 million), reflecting the measurement of the disposal group in
accordance with IFRS 5, and included this impairment in “Result from discontinued operations (net of tax)” (Note 5.3). Further,
the Group recognized impairment charges in connection with the Piccadilly brands in Bulgaria (part of the “Southeastern Europe
& Asia” segment) for €15 million, reflecting the Group’s revised expectations on market conditions. The recoverable amount has
been estimated using the royalty-relief-method and royalty rates for the various Maxi brands range from 0.68% (Piccadilly) to
1.34% (Maxi), depending on the individual local strengths of the different brands. No impairment loss of trade names was
recorded or reversed in 2011 or 2010.
See Note 8 for a description of the impairment test for assets with finite lives.
Trade
Names
Developed
Software
Purchased
Software
Favorable
Lease
Rights
Other
Total
Cost at January 1, 2012
599
222
281
170
65
1 337
Additions
Sales and disposals
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Classified as held for sale
Currency translation effect
Cost at December 31, 2012
Accumulated amortization at January 1, 2012
Accumulated impairment at January 1, 2012
Amortization expense
Impairment loss
Sales and disposals
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Accumulated amortization at December 31, 2012
Accumulated impairment at December 31, 2012
Net carrying amount at December 31, 2012
—
—
—
(3)
(21)
575
—
(36)
—
(15)
—
—
—
—
(51)
71
—
(20)
—
(2)
271
(116)
—
(27)
—
—
—
1
(142)
—
17
(2)
30
—
(5)
321
(171)
—
(36)
—
1
(8)
3
(211)
—
—
(12)
—
—
(4)
154
(105)
—
(11)
—
12
—
2
(102)
—
4
(4)
—
—
(2)
63
(30)
(1)
(3)
(2)
4
—
2
(28)
(2)
92
(18)
10
(3)
(34)
1 384
(422)
(37)
(77)
(17)
17
(8)
8
(483)
(53)
524
129
110
52
33
848
Cost at January 1, 2011
390
192
230
195
56
1 063
Additions
Sales and disposals
Acquisitions through business combinations
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Cost at December 31, 2011
Accumulated amortization at January 1, 2011
Accumulated impairment at January 1, 2011
Amortization expense
Impairment loss
Sales and disposals
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Accumulated amortization at December 31, 2011
—
—
200
—
9
599
—
(35)
—
—
—
—
(1)
—
58
(12)
—
(19)
3
222
(94)
(2)
(23)
(1)
12
(5)
(3)
(116)
27
(6)
1
21
8
281
(138)
(3)
(32)
(1)
5
3
(5)
(171)
—
(36)
8
—
3
170
(129)
—
(11)
—
37
—
(2)
(105)
2
—
9
(3)
1
65
(28)
—
(4)
(1)
—
3
(1)
(30)
87
(54)
218
(1)
24
1 337
(389)
(40)
(70)
(3)
54
1
(12)
(422)
Accumulated impairment at December 31, 2011
(36)
—
—
—
(1)
(37)
563
106
110
65
34
878
(in millions of €)
(1)
(1)
Net carrying amount at December 31, 2011
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 99
(in millions of €)
Cost at January 1, 2010
Additions
Sales and disposals
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Cost at December 31, 2010
Accumulated amortization at January 1, 2010
Accumulated impairment at January 1, 2010
Amortization expense
Sales and disposals
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Accumulated amortization at December 31, 2010
Accumulated impairment at December 31, 2010
Net carrying amount at December 31, 2010
Trade
Names
Developed
Software
Purchased
Software
Favorable
Lease
Rights
Other
Total
362
—
—
—
28
390
—
(33)
—
—
—
(2)
—
(35)
151
43
(4)
(4)
6
192
(71)
(3)
(21)
4
(1)
(4)
(94)
(2)
175
43
(2)
5
9
230
(103)
(2)
(32)
1
1
(6)
(138)
(3)
201
—
(22)
—
16
195
(123)
(5)
(12)
22
(1)
(10)
(129)
—
49
6
—
(2)
3
56
(24)
—
(4)
—
2
(2)
(28)
—
938
92
(28)
(1)
62
1 063
(321)
(43)
(69)
27
1
(24)
(389)
(40)
355
96
89
66
28
634
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
Trade name assets are allocated to the following cash generating units:
December 31,
2012
2011(1)
2010
Food Lion
Hannaford
Delhaize America
Serbia
Bulgaria
Albania
196
163
359
200
167
367
151
14
164
29
193
162
355
—
—
—
3
—
Maxi
165
196
—
Total
524
563
355
(in millions of €)
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
Amortization expenses are mainly charged to selling, general and administrative expenses.
100 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
8.
Property, Plant and Equipment
Land and
Buildings
Leasehold
Improvements
Furniture,
Fixtures,
Equipment
and
Vehicles
Cost at January 1, 2012
2 539
1 902
3 624
87
969
9 121
Additions
Sales and disposals
Acquisitions through business combinations
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Divestitures / Classified as held for sale
Balance at December 31, 2012
Accumulated depreciation at January 1, 2012
Accumulated impairment at January 1, 2012
Depreciation expense
Impairment loss
Sales and disposals
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Divestitures / Classified as held for sale
Accumulated depreciation at December 31, 2012
Accumulated impairment at December 31, 2012
Net carrying amount at December 31, 2012
96
(21)
3
29
(49)
(1)
2 596
(735)
(19)
(93)
(15)
14
10
11
—
(801)
(26)
101
(110)
—
56
(28)
(1)
1 920
(1 126)
(35)
(132)
(23)
109
1
17
—
(1 160)
(29)
246
(228)
1
41
(56)
(12)
3 616
(2 117)
(62)
(294)
(36)
210
4
34
5
(2 203)
(53)
147
(4)
—
(187)
—
—
43
—
—
—
(1)
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
14
(26)
—
(86)
(15)
—
856
(422)
(55)
(49)
(12)
25
78
8
—
(407)
(20)
604
(389)
4
(147)
(148)
(14)
9 031
(4 400)
(171)
(568)
(87)
358
93
70
5
(4 571)
(129)
1 769
731
1 360
42
429
4 331
Cost at January 1, 2011
Additions
Sales and disposals
Acquisitions through business combinations
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Balance at December 31, 2011(1)
Accumulated depreciation at January 1, 2011
Accumulated impairment at January 1, 2011
Depreciation expense
Impairment loss
Sales and disposals
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Accumulated depreciation at December 31, 2011
1 930
112
(8)
297
167
41
2 539
(587)
—
(74)
(17)
4
(60)
(20)
(735)
1 861
92
(22)
21
(90)
40
1 902
(1 055)
(12)
(126)
(24)
20
65
(29)
(1 126)
3 217
265
(96)
77
76
85
3 624
(1 881)
(23)
(264)
(39)
89
(3)
(58)
(2 117)
94
204
(5)
5
(213)
2
87
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
930
35
(18)
—
(6)
28
969
(380)
(19)
(49)
(35)
19
3
(16)
(422)
8 032
708
(149)
400
(66)
196
9 121
(3 903)
(54)
(513)
(115)
132
5
(123)
(4 400)
(19)
(35)
(62)
—
(55)
(171)
1 785
741
1 445
87
492
4 550
(in millions of €)
Accumulated impairment at December 31, 2011
Net carrying amount at December 31, 2011(1)
Construction
in Progress
and Advance
Payments
Property
under
Finance
Leases
Total
Property,
Plant and
Equipment
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 101
Land and
Buildings
Leasehold
Improvements
Furniture,
Fixtures,
Equipment
and
Vehicles
1 764
59
(11)
1
45
72
1 930
(503)
—
(71)
—
8
(1)
(20)
(587)
—
1 652
82
(29)
1
58
97
1 861
(899)
(14)
(127)
(2)
29
(2)
(52)
(1 055)
(12)
2 891
228
(124)
2
55
165
3 217
(1 633)
(34)
(254)
(5)
115
1
(94)
(1 881)
(23)
62
184
—
—
(154)
2
94
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
845
54
(27)
—
—
58
930
(330)
(16)
(51)
(5)
27
—
(24)
(380)
(19)
7 214
607
(191)
4
4
394
8 032
(3 365)
(64)
(503)
(12)
179
(2)
(190)
(3 903)
(54)
1 343
794
1 313
94
531
4 075
2012
2011
2010
61
56
56
Selling, general and administrative expenses
507
457
447
Total depreciation
568
513
503
(in millions of €)
Cost at January 1, 2010
Additions
Sales and disposals
Acquisitions through business combinations
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Balance at December 31, 2010
Accumulated depreciation at January 1, 2010
Accumulated impairment at January 1, 2010
Depreciation expense
Impairment loss
Sales and disposals
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Accumulated depreciation at December 31, 2010
Accumulated impairment at December 31, 2010
Net carrying amount at December 31, 2010
Construction
in Progress
and Advance
Payments
Property
under
Finance
Leases
Total
Property,
Plant and
Equipment
Depreciation expense is included in the following line items of the income statement:
(in millions of €)
Cost of sales
Property, plant and equipment can be summarized by reportable segment as follows:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
United States
Belgium
Southeastern Europe and Asia
Corporate
Total property, plant and equipment
2012
2011(1)
2010
2 510
828
983
2 750
808
983
2 794
784
488
10
9
9
4 331
4 550
4 075
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
In accordance with the accounting policy in Note 2.3, Delhaize Group tests assets with finite lives for impairment whenever
events or circumstances indicate that an impairment may exist. The Group monitors the carrying value of its operating retail
stores, the lowest level asset group for which identifiable cash inflows of store assets are independent of other (groups of) assets
(“cash-generating unit” or CGU), for potential impairment based on historical and projected cash flows. The value in use,
applying the main assumptions detailed in Note 6, is estimated using projected discounted cash flows based on past experience
and knowledge of the markets in which the stores are located, adjusted for various factors such as inflation and general
economic conditions. The fair value less cost to sell is estimated based on a multiples approach or independent third-party
appraisals, based on the location and condition of the stores. Closed stores are reviewed for impairment on a fair value less cost
to sell basis, based on actual results of the past and using observable market data, where possible.
Management believes that the assumptions applied when testing for impairment are reasonable estimates of the economic
conditions and operating performance of the different CGUs. Changes in these conditions or performance will have an impact on
the projected cash flows used to determine the recoverable amount of the CGUs and might result in additional stores identified
as being possibly impaired and/or on the impairment amount calculated.
102 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Impairment losses of property, plant and equipment are recorded in other operating expenses (Note 28).
During the fourth quarter of 2012, the Group recognized impairment charges of €87 million related to (i) 45 stores (34 Sweetbay,
8 Food Lion and 3 Bottom Dollar Food) that were closed early 2013 and 9 underperforming stores, both in the United States, for
a total amount of €54 million, (ii) the closing of 6 stores and underperformance of 57 stores in Southeastern Europe (€28 million),
and (iii) 1 store closing and the impairment of 6 stores in Belgium (€5 million).
A store portfolio review resulted in the decision to close 146 underperforming stores in the first quarter of 2012. Consequently,
the Group recorded in 2011 €115 million impairment charges relating to 126 stores in the U.S. (113 Food Lion, 7 Bloom and 6
Bottom Dollar stores) and one distribution center, while the underperformance of 20 Maxi stores (in Serbia, Bulgaria and Bosnia
and Herzegovina) was already reflected in the fair values of the related assets in the opening balance sheet (see Note 4). In
addition, Delhaize Group recognized impairment reversals of €3 million in the United States, which was offset by impairment
charges in various other parts of the Group.
The 2010 impairment losses of €12 million relate to underperforming stores, mainly in the United States, with only insignificant
amounts incurred in connection with store closings.
The impairment charges can be summarized by property, plant and equipment categories as follows:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
Land and buildings
Leasehold improvements
Furniture, fixtures, equipment and vehicles
Construction in progress
15
23
36
1
17
24
39
—
—
2
5
—
Property under finance leases
12
35
5
Total
87
115
12
In 2012 and 2011, the Group reclassified property, plant and equipment to investment property (see Note 9) for €44 million and
€31 million, respectively. In accordance with the Group’s policy, closed stores held under finance lease agreements are
reclassified to investment property. In 2011 the Group also transferred €16 million of assets acquired from Delta Maxi to “Assets
classified as held for sale.”
Property under finance leases consists mainly of buildings. The number of owned versus leased stores by segment at December
31, 2012 is as follows:
Owned
Finance
Leases
Operating
Leases
Affiliated and Franchised
Stores Owned by their
Operators or Directly Leased
by their Operators from a
Third Party
United States
Belgium
229
153
593
32
731
208
—
447
1 553
840
Southeastern Europe & Asia
318
—
694
46
1 058
Total
700
625
1 633
493
3 451
Total
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 103
9.
Investment Property
Investment property, principally comprised of owned rental space attached to supermarket buildings and excess real estate, is
held for long-term rental yields or appreciation and is not occupied by the Group.
In accordance with the Group’s accounting policy in Note 2.3, investment property is accounted for at cost less accumulated
depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any. When stores held under finance lease agreements are closed (see
Note 20.1) or if land will no longer be developed for construction purposes, they are reclassified from property, plant and
equipment to investment property.
In 2012, €44 million of property, plant and equipment was transferred to investment property (see Note 8), of which €34 million
related to the store portfolio review, which took place at the beginning of 2012. In 2011, Delhaize Group acquired investment
property of €34 million as part of the Delta Maxi acquisition (see Note 4.1), of which €21 million was subsequently classified as
“held for sale.” In 2012, as a result of the weakening real estate market and the deteriorating state of the property for sale,
making a sale within the foreseeable future unlikely, part of these properties (net book value of €7 million) has been reclassified
into investment property (see Note 5.2).
During 2012, the Group recorded €14 million of impairment charges, primarily on 15 properties in the United States and a
warehouse in Albania. In 2011, an impairment loss of €17 million was recorded, primarily due to the portfolio review (€12 million).
(in millions of €)
Cost at January 1
Additions
Sales and disposals
Acquisition through business combinations
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Cost at December 31
Accumulated depreciation and impairment at January 1
Depreciation expense
Sales and disposals
Impairment
Transfers to (from) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Accumulated depreciation and impairment at December 31
Net carrying amount at December 31
2012
2011(1)
2010
137
6
(29)
—
142
91
2
(7)
34
12
79
15
(6)
—
(3)
(6)
5
6
250
(54)
(4)
26
(14)
(91)
137
(31)
(3)
3
(17)
(3)
91
(29)
(3)
5
(2)
—
3
(3)
(2)
(134)
(54)
(31)
116
83
60
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, the Group only had insignificant investment property under construction.
The fair value of investment property amounted to €146 million, €115 million and €92 million at December 31, 2012, 2011 and
2010, respectively. The fair values for disclosure purposes have been determined using either the support of qualified
independent external valuers or by internal valuers with the necessary recognized and relevant professional qualification,
applying a combination of the present value of future cash flows and observable market values of comparable properties.
Rental income from investment property recorded in other operating income was €7 million for 2012, €5 million for 2011 and
€3 million for 2010. Operating expenses arising from investment property generating rental income, included in selling, general
and administrative expenses, were €6 million in 2012, €5 million in 2011 and €4 million in 2010. Operating expenses arising from
investment property not generating rental income, included in selling, general and administrative expenses were €4 million in
2012, €2 million in 2011 and €4 million in 2010.
104 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
10. Financial Instruments by Category
10.1 Financial Assets
Financial Assets by Class and Measurement Category
December 31, 2012
Financial assets measured
at amortized cost
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Investments in securities
Other financial assets
Derivative instruments
Current
Receivables
Financial assets measured at fair value
Derivatives through
equity
Available for
sale through
equity
Total
11
—
—
11
19
61
Note
Loans and
Receivables
Derivatives through
profit or loss
11
12
19
—
19
—
—
—
61
—
—
—
14
634
—
—
—
634
Investments in securities
Other financial assets
11
12
—
—
—
—
—
—
93
—
93
—
Derivative instruments
19
—
—
—
—
—
Cash and cash equivalents
15
932
—
—
—
932
1 585
61
—
104
1 750
Total financial assets
December 31, 2011
Financial assets measured
at amortized cost
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Investments in securities
Other financial assets
Derivative instruments
Current
Receivables(1)
Investments in securities
Other financial assets
Derivative instruments
Cash and cash equivalents
Total financial assets
Financial assets measured at fair value
Derivatives through
equity
Available for
sale through
equity
Total
Note
Loans and
Receivables
Derivatives through
profit or loss
11
12
19
—
18
—
—
—
57
—
—
—
13
—
—
13
18
57
14
11
12
19
697
—
22
—
—
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
—
93
—
—
697
93
22
1
432
—
—
—
432
1 169
58
—
106
1 333
15
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition in the second quarter of 2012.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 105
December 31, 2010
Financial assets measured
at amortized cost
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Investments in securities
Other financial assets
Derivative instruments
Current
Receivables
Investments in securities
Other financial assets
Derivative instruments
Cash and cash equivalents
Total financial assets
Financial assets measured at fair value
Derivatives through
equity
Available for
sale through
equity
Total
Note
Loans and
Receivables
Derivatives through
profit or loss
11
12
19
—
17
—
—
—
61
—
—
—
125
—
—
125
17
61
14
11
12
19
637
—
3
—
—
—
—
5
—
—
—
—
—
43
—
—
637
43
3
5
15
758
—
—
—
758
1 415
66
—
168
1 649
Financial Assets measured at fair value by Fair Value Hierarchy
Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged or a liability settled in an arm’s length transaction. IFRS 7
requires, for financial instruments that are measured in the balance sheet at fair value, the disclosure of fair value measurements
by level of the following fair value measurement hierarchy:



Level 1: The fair value of a financial instrument that is traded in an active market is measured based on quoted (unadjusted)
prices for identical assets or liabilities. A market is considered as active if quoted prices are readily and regularly available
from an exchange, dealer, broker, industry group, pricing service, or regulatory agency, and those prices represent actual
and regularly occurring market transactions on an arm’s length basis.
Level 2: The fair value of financial instruments that are not traded in an active market is determined by using valuation
techniques. These valuation techniques maximize the use of observable market data where it is available and rely as little as
possible on entity specific estimates. If all significant inputs required to fair value an instrument are observable, either directly
(i.e., as prices) or indirectly (i.e., derived from prices), the instrument is included in level 2.
Level 3: If one or more of the significant inputs used in applying the valuation technique is not based on observable market
data, the financial instrument is included in level 3.
December 31, 2012
(in millions of €)
Note
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
11
19
19
8
—
—
3
61
—
—
—
—
11
61
—
11
19
19
93
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
93
—
—
101
64
—
165
Non-Current
Available for sale - through equity
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Current
Available for sale - through equity
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Total financial assets measured at fair value
106 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
December 31, 2011
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Available for sale - through equity
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Current
Available for sale - through equity
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Total financial assets measured at fair value
Note
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
11
19
19
12
—
—
1
57
—
—
—
—
13
57
—
11
19
19
93
—
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
93
1
—
105
59
—
164
Note
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
11
19
19
122
—
—
3
61
—
—
—
—
125
61
—
11
19
19
43
—
—
—
5
—
—
—
—
43
5
—
165
69
—
234
December 31, 2010
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Available for sale - through equity
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Current
Available for sale - through equity
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Total financial assets measured at fair value
During 2010, €1 million of securities were transferred from Level 2 to Level 1. No transfers between the different fair value
hierarchy levels took place in 2012 and 2011.
10.2 Financial Liabilities
Financial Liabilities by Class and Measurement Category
December 31, 2012
Note
Derivatives through profit
or loss
Derivatives through
equity
Financial
liabilities
being part
of a fair
value
hedge
relationship
18.1
18.3
19
—
—
10
—
—
—
561
—
—
1 752
612
—
2 313
612
10
18.2
18.1
18.3
19
—
—
—
4
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
156
62
—
—
156
62
4
—
—
—
1 884
1 884
14
—
561
4 466
5 041
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Long-term debt
Obligations under finance lease
Derivative instruments
Current
Short-term borrowings
Long-term debt - current portion
Obligations under finance leases
Derivative instruments
Accounts payable
Total financial liabilities
Financial
liabilities at
amortized
cost
Total
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 107
December 31, 2011
Note
Derivatives through profit
or loss
Derivatives through
equity
Financial
liabilities
being part
of a fair
value
hedge
relationship
18.1
18.3
19
—
—
9
—
—
11
541
—
—
1 784
689
—
2 325
689
20
18.2
18.1
18.3
19
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
60
88
61
—
60
88
61
—
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
(in millions of €)
Financial
liabilities at
amortized
cost
Total
Non-Current
Long-term debt
Obligations under finance lease
Derivative instruments
Current
Short-term borrowings
Long-term debt - current portion
Obligations under finance leases
Derivative instruments
Accounts payable(1)
Total financial liabilities
—
—
—
1 845
1 845
9
11
541
4 527
5 088
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
December 31, 2010
Note
Derivatives through profit
or loss
Derivatives through
equity
Financial
liabilities
being part
of a fair
value
hedge
relationship
18.1
18.3
19
—
—
3
—
—
13
544
—
—
1 422
684
—
1 966
684
16
18.2
18.1
18.3
19
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
16
40
57
—
1 574
16
40
57
—
1 574
3
13
544
3 793
4 353
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Long-term debt
Obligations under finance lease
Derivative instruments
Current
Short-term borrowings
Long-term debt - current portion
Obligations under finance leases
Derivative instruments
Accounts payable
Total financial liabilities
108 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Financial
liabilities at
amortized
cost
Total
Financial Liabilities measured at fair value by Fair Value Hierarchy
December 31, 2012
(in millions of €)
Note
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
19
19
—
—
10
—
—
—
10
—
19
19
—
—
4
—
—
—
4
—
—
14
—
14
Note
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
19
19
—
—
9
11
—
—
9
11
19
19
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
20
—
20
Note
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Current
Derivatives - through profit or loss
19
19
—
—
3
13
—
—
3
13
19
—
—
—
—
Derivatives - through equity
19
—
—
—
—
—
16
—
16
Non-Current
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Current
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Total financial liabilities measured at fair value
December 31, 2011
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Current
Derivatives - through profit or loss
Derivatives - through equity
Total financial liabilities measured at fair value
December 31, 2010
(in millions of €)
Non-Current
Total financial liabilities measured at fair value
During 2012, 2011 and 2010, no transfers between the different fair value hierarchy levels took place. See Note 10.1 with respect
to the definition of the fair value hierarchy levels.
11. Investments in Securities
Investments in securities contain investments in debt securities and equity investments, which are held as available for sale.
Securities are included in current assets, except for debt securities with maturities of more than 12 months from the balance
sheet date, which are classified as non-current assets. The carrying amounts of the available-for-sale financial assets are as
follows:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Non-current
Current
Total
2012
2011
2010
11
93
13
93
125
43
104
106
168
At December 31, 2012, the Group’s non-current investments in debt securities were €11 million, of which €8 million (2011: €9
million, 2010: €10 million) were held in escrow related to defeasance provisions of outstanding Hannaford debt and were
therefore not available for general company purposes (see Note 18.1). The escrow funds have the following maturities:
2
(in millions)
Cash flows in USD
Cash flows translated into EUR
2013
20142
2015
2016
2
Total
1
—
1
1
9
7
11
8
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 109
T
Delhaize Group further holds smaller non-current investments in money market and investment funds (€3 million at December
31, 2012) in order to satisfy future pension benefit payments for a limited number of employees, which however do not meet the
definition of plan assets as per IAS 19. The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date is the carrying value of the
investments.
At December 31, 2012, the Group’s current investments in securities were €93 million and consisted primarily of investment
funds that are entirely invested in U.S. Treasuries. These investments are predominately held by the Group’s captive reinsurance
company, covering the Group’s self-insurance exposure (see Note 20.2).
The fair values of Delhaize Group’s available-for-sale securities (both debt and equity investments) were predominantly
determined by reference to current bid prices in an active market (see Notes 2.3 and 10.1). As mentioned in Note 2.3, the Group
assesses at each reporting date whether there is objective evidence that an investment or a group of investments is impaired. In
2012, 2011 and 2010, none of the investments in securities were either past due or impaired.
12. Other Financial Assets
Other financial assets, non-current and current, include notes receivable, guarantee deposits, restricted cash in escrow, collateral
for derivatives and term deposits and are carried at amortized cost, less any impairment. The fair value of other financial assets
approximates the carrying amount and represents the maximum credit risk.
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Non-current
Current
Total
2012
2011
2010
19
—
18
22
17
3
19
40
20
The 2011 current financial assets included an amount of €20 million held in escrow relating to the acquisition of Delta Maxi (see
Note 4.1), which has been released during 2012. The 2010 current financial assets contained collateral for derivatives of
€2 million in connection with derivatives under existing International Swap Dealer Association Agreements (“ISDAs”).
13. Inventories
Inventory predominately represents goods for resale. In 2012, 2011 and 2010, Delhaize Group did not recognize any (or reverse
any previously recognized) material write-downs of inventory in order to reflect decreases in anticipated selling prices below the
carrying value and ensure that inventory at hand is not carried at an amount in excess of amounts expected to be realized from
its future sale or use.
Inventory recognized as an expense during the period is disclosed in Note 25 as “Product cost.”
110 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
14. Receivables
(in millions of €)
Trade receivables
Trade receivables - bad debt allowance
Other receivables
Total current receivables
2012
2011(1)
2010
630
(31)
35
674
(36)
59
640
(29)
26
634
697
637
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
The aging of the current receivables is as follows:
December 31, 2012
(in millions of €)
Trade receivables
Trade receivables - bad debt allowance
Other receivables
Total
Net Carrying
Amount
Neither
Impaired nor
Past Due on
the Reporting
Date
Past Due - Less
than 30 Days
Past Due Between 30
and 180 Days
Past
Due - More
than 180 Days
630
(31)
35
433
(3)
25
123
(7)
7
43
(4)
2
31
(17)
1
634
455
123
41
15
December 31, 2011(1)
(in millions of €)
Trade receivables
Trade receivables - bad debt allowance
Other receivables
Total
Net Carrying
Amount
Neither
Impaired nor
Past Due on
the Reporting
Date
Past Due - Less
than 30 Days
Past Due Between 30
and 180 Days
Past
Due - More
than 180 Days
674
(36)
59
504
(6)
45
100
(3)
5
49
(11)
5
21
(16)
4
697
543
102
43
9
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
December 31, 2010
(in millions of €)
Trade receivables
Trade receivables - bad debt allowance
Other receivables
Total
Net Carrying
Amount
Neither
Impaired nor
Past Due on
the Reporting
Date
Past Due - Less
than 30 Days
Past Due Between 30
and 180 Days
Past
Due - More
than 180 Days
640
(29)
26
521
(2)
17
71
(3)
2
29
(9)
4
19
(15)
3
637
536
70
24
7
Trade receivables are predominantly to be paid, in full, between 30 days and 60 days.
Trade receivables credit risk is managed by the individual operating entities and credit rating is continuously monitored either
based on internal rating criteria or with the support of third party service providers and the requirement for an impairment is
analyzed at each reporting date on an individual basis for major positions. Additionally, minor receivables are grouped into
homogenous groups and assessed for impairment collectively based on past experience. The maximum exposure to risk for the
receivables is the carrying value minus any insurance coverage. The Group is not exposed to any concentrated credit risk as
there are no outstanding receivables that are individually material for the Group or the operating entity because of the Group’s
large and unrelated customer and vendor base. Management believes there is no further credit risk provision required in excess
of the normal individual and collective impairment analysis performed at each reporting date. The fair values of the trade and
other receivables approximate their (net) carrying values.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 111
The movement of the bad debt allowance account was as follows:
(in millions of €)
Bad debt allowance as of January 1
Addition (recognized in profit or loss)
Usage
Note
2012
2011
2010
24
36
2
(7)
29
11
(4)
30
6
(8)
Currency translation effect
—
—
1
Bad debt allowance at December 31
31
36
29
The 2011 increase of other receivables was predominantly due to the amounts receivable from insurance companies in
connection with tornado and hurricane damages in the United States (€29 million).
15. Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents were as follows:
(in millions of €)
Deposits with original maturity of three months or less
Cash at banks
Cash on hand
Cash and cash equivalents at December 31
2012
2011
2010
500
349
100
244
491
203
83
88
64
932
432
758
2012
2011
2010
14
24
35
2
54
1
Supplemental Cash Flow information:
(in millions of €)
Non-cash investing and financing activities:
Finance lease obligations incurred for store properties and equipment
Finance lease obligations terminated for store properties and equipment
As a result of the store closings (announced in the beginning of 2012 as a consequence of the portfolio review), Delhaize
America terminated several finance lease agreements.
16. Equity
Issued capital
There were 101 921 498, 101 892 190 and 101 555 281 Delhaize Group ordinary shares issued and fully paid at December 31,
2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively (par value of €0.50), of which 1 044 135, 1 183 948 and 988 860 ordinary shares were held in
treasury at December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Delhaize Group’s ordinary shares may be in either dematerialized,
bearer or registered form, within the limits provided for by applicable law. Each shareholder is entitled to one vote for each
ordinary share held on each matter submitted to a vote of shareholders.
In the event of a liquidation, dissolution or winding up of Delhaize Group, holders of Delhaize Group ordinary shares are entitled
to receive, on a pro-rata basis, any proceeds from the sale of Delhaize Group’s remaining assets available for distribution. Under
Belgian law, the approval of holders of Delhaize Group ordinary shares is required for any future capital increases. Existing
shareholders are entitled to preferential subscription rights to subscribe to a pro-rata portion of any such future capital increases
of Delhaize Group, subject to certain limitations.
Authorized Capital
As authorized by the Extraordinary General Meeting held on May 24, 2012, the Board of Directors of Delhaize Group may, for a
period of five years expiring in June 2017, within certain legal limits, increase the capital of Delhaize Group or issue convertible
bonds or subscription rights which might result in an increase of capital by a maximum of €5.1 million, corresponding to
approximately 10.2 million shares. The authorized increase in capital through emission of new shares, convertible debt or
warrants, may be achieved by contributions in cash or, to the extent permitted by law, by contributions in kind or by incorporation
of available or unavailable reserves or of the share premium account. The Board of Directors of Delhaize Group may, for this
increase in capital, limit or remove the preferential subscription rights of Delhaize Group’s shareholders, within certain legal limits.
In 2012, Delhaize Group issued 29 308 shares of common stock (2011: 336 909; 2010: 684 655) for €1 million (2011: €13
million; 2010: €26 million), net of €0 million (2011: €6 million; 2010: €13 million) representing the portion of the subscription price
funded by Delhaize America, LLC in the name and for the account of the optionees and net of issue costs.
112 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Capital
Share Premium
(Belgian GAAP)(1)
Number of
Shares
50 435 313
2 739 020 552
100 870 626
342 328
50 777 641
38 587 734
2 777 608 286
684 655
101 555 281
168 454
50 946 095
18 875 623
2 796 483 909
336 909
101 892 190
14 654
50 960 749
1 171 837
2 797 655 746
29 308
101 921 498
Recent Capital Increases (in €, except number of shares)
Capital on January 1, 2010
Capital increase as a consequence of the exercise of warrants under the
2002 Stock Incentive Plan
Capital on December 31, 2010
Capital increase as a consequence of the exercise of warrants under the
2002 Stock Incentive Plan
Capital on December 31, 2011
Capital increase as a consequence of the exercise of warrants under the
2002 Stock Incentive Plan
Capital on December 31, 2012
____________________
(1) Share premium as recorded in the non-consolidated statutory accounts of Delhaize Group SA, prepared under Belgian GAAP.
Authorized Capital - Status (in €, except number of shares)
Authorized capital as approved at the May 24, 2007 General Meeting with effect as of
June 18, 2007
May 30, 2008 - Issuance of warrants under the Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan
June 9, 2009 - Issuance of warrants under the Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan
June 8, 2010 - Issuance of warrants under the Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan
Balance of remaining authorized capital as of December 31, 2010
June 15, 2011 - Issuance of warrants under the Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan
Balance of remaining authorized capital as of December 31, 2011
May 24, 2012 - Issuance of warrants under the Delhaize Group U.S. 2012 Stock Incentive
Plan
Unused authorized capital as approved at the May 24, 2007 General Meeting, expired in
June 2012
Authorized capital as approved at the May 24, 2012 General Meeting with effect as of
June 21, 2012
August 31, 2012 - Issuance of warrants under the Delhaize Group U.S. 2012 Stock
Incentive Plan
Balance of remaining authorized capital as of December 31, 2012
Maximum Number
of Shares
Maximum Amount
(excluding Share
Premium)
19 357 794
(528 542)
(301 882)
(232 992)
18 294 378
(318 524)
17 975 854
9 678 897
(264 271)
(150 941)
(116 496)
9 147 189
(159 262)
8 987 927
(291 727)
(145 864)
17 684 127
8 842 063
10 189 218
5 094 609
(300 000)
9 889 218
(150 000)
4 944 609
Share Premium
During 2011, Delhaize Group acquired euro denominated call options on its own shares in order to hedge its potential exposure
arising from the possible future exercise of stock options granted to the associates of its non-U.S. operating companies. These
call options met the requirements of IFRS to qualify as equity instruments and are recognized in share premium at their initial
transaction cost of €6 million. The first tranche of the options will expire in June 2013, and the second and third tranches in May
2015 and May 2016, respectively.
Treasury Shares
On May 26, 2011, at an Ordinary and Extraordinary General Meeting, the Delhaize Group’s shareholders authorized the Board of
Directors, in the ordinary course of business, to acquire up to 10% of the outstanding shares of the Group at a minimum share
price of €1.00 and a maximum share price not higher than 20% above the highest closing price of the Delhaize Group share on
NYSE Euronext Brussels during the 20 trading days preceding the acquisition. The authorization is granted for five years. Such
authorization also relates to the acquisition of shares of Delhaize Group by one or several direct subsidiaries of the Group, as
defined by legal provisions on acquisition of shares of the Group by subsidiaries.
In May 2004, the Board of Directors approved the repurchase of up to €200 million of the Group’s shares or ADRs from time to
time in the open market, in compliance with applicable law and subject to and within the limits of an outstanding authorizati on
granted to the Board by the shareholders, to satisfy exercises under the stock option plans that Delhaize Group offers to its
associates. No time limit has been set for these repurchases. On August 3, 2011, the Board of Directors approved the increase
of the amount remaining for repurchases under the May 2004 repurchases approval to €100 million to satisfy exercises under the
stock option plans that Delhaize Group and/or its subsidiaries offer to associates and to hedge certain stock option plan
exposures.
During 2012, Delhaize Group SA did not acquire Delhaize Group shares and did not transfer shares to satisfy the exercise of
stock options granted to associates of non-U.S. operating companies (see Note 21.3).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 113
Delhaize America, LLC did not repurchase any Delhaize Group ADRs from third parties in 2012 and transferred 139 813 ADRs to
satisfy the exercise of stock options granted to U.S. management pursuant to the Delhaize America 2000 Stock Incentive Plan
and the Delhaize America 2002 Restricted Stock Unit Plan.
Since the authorization of the Board of August 3, 2011, Delhaize Group SA acquired 285 000 Delhaize Group shares for an
aggregate amount of €13 million. As a consequence, at the end of 2012, the management of Delhaize Group SA had a
remaining authorization for the purchase of its own shares or ADRs for an amount up to €87 million subject to and within the
limits of an outstanding authorization granted to the Board of Directors by the shareholders.
At the end of 2012, Delhaize Group owned 1 044 135 treasury shares (including ADRs), all of which were acquired prior to 2012,
representing approximately 1.02% of the Delhaize Group share capital.
Delhaize Group SA provided a Belgian financial institution with a discretionary mandate to purchase up to 1 100 000 Delhaize
Group ordinary shares on NYSE Euronext Brussels until December 31, 2013 to satisfy exercises of stock options held by
management of its non-U.S. operating companies. This credit institution makes its decisions to purchase Delhaize Group
ordinary shares pursuant to the guidelines set forth in the discretionary mandate, independent of further instructions from
Delhaize Group SA, and without its influence with regard to the timing of the purchases. The financial institution is able to
purchase shares only when the number of Delhaize Group ordinary shares held by a custodian bank falls below a certain
minimum threshold contained in the discretionary mandate.
Retained Earnings
Retained earnings decreased in 2012 by €82 million, representing (i) the profit attributable to owners of the parent (€105 million),
(ii) the purchase of non-controlling interests in Maxi for €10 million (see Note 4.2) and (iii) the dividend declared and paid in 2012
(€177 million).
According to Belgian law, 5% of the statutory net income of the parent company must be transferred each year to a legal reserve
until the legal reserve reaches 10% of the capital. At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, Delhaize Group’s legal reserve
amounted to €5 million and was recorded in retained earnings. Generally, this reserve cannot be distributed to the shareholders
other than upon liquidation.
The Board of Directors may propose a dividend distribution to shareholders up to the amount of the distributable reserves of
Delhaize Group SA, including the profit of the last fiscal year, subject to the debt covenants (see Note 18.2). The shareholders at
Delhaize Group’s Ordinary General Meeting must approve such dividends.
Other Reserves
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Deferred gain (loss) on discontinued cash flow hedges:
Gross
Tax effect
Cash flow hedge:
Gross
Tax effect
Unrealized gain (loss) on securities available-for-sale:
Gross
Tax effect
Actuarial gain (loss) on defined benefit plans:
Gross
Tax effect
Total other reserves


2012
2011
2010
(15)
6
(15)
6
(15)
6
—
—
(6)
2
(1)
—
—
—
7
(1)
5
(1)
(79)
(64)
(44)
28
24
16
(60)
(47)
(34)
Deferred gain (loss) on discontinued cash flow hedge: This represents a deferred loss on the settlement of a hedge
agreement in 2001 related to securing financing for the Hannaford acquisition by Delhaize America, and a deferred gain
related to the 2007 debt refinancing (see Note 19). Both the deferred loss and gain are amortized over the life of the
underlying debt instruments.
Cash flow hedge: This reserve contains the effective portion of the cumulative net change in the fair value of cash flow
hedge instruments related to hedged transactions that have not yet occurred (see Note 19). During 2012, Delhaize Group
refinanced the $300 million bond issued in 2009 (see Note 18.1) that was included in a cash flow hedge relationship. As a
result, the cumulative loss on the hedging instrument recognized in other comprehensive income was reclassified to profit or
loss as a reclassification adjustment and was not included in the initial cost or other carrying amount of a non-financial asset
or liability.
114 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12


Unrealized gain (loss) on securities available for sale: The Group recognizes in this reserve fair value changes on financial
assets classified as available-for-sale.
Actuarial gain (loss) on defined benefit plans: Delhaize Group elected to recognize actuarial gains and losses, which
represent adjustments to the defined benefit net liabilities due to experience and changes in actuarial assumptions, fully in
the period in which they occur in OCI (see Note 21.1). Actuarial gains and losses are never reclassified into profit or loss.
Cumulative Translation Adjustment
The cumulative translation adjustment relates to changes in the balance of assets and liabilities due to changes in the functional
currency of the Group’s subsidiaries relative to the Group’s reporting currency. The balance in cumulative translation adjustment
is mainly impacted by the appreciation or depreciation of the U.S. dollar and the Serbian dinar to the euro.
Non-controlling Interests
Non-controlling interests represent third-party interests in the equity of fully consolidated companies that are not wholly owned by
Delhaize Group.
December 31,
Non-controlling interests (in millions of €)
Note
Belgium
Southeastern Europe and Asia
4.2
Total
2012
2011(1)
—
—
1
2
5
—
2
5
1
2010
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
With the acquisition of Delta Maxi in July 2011, Delhaize Group recognized €15 million of non-controlling interests (see Note 4.1).
Subsequently, the Group acquired additional non-controlling interests in several Maxi subsidiaries (see Note 4.2), reducing the
amount to €5 million. The decrease in 2012 is the result of (i) the purchase of additional non-controlling interests and (ii) the loss
of the period attributable to non-controlling interests.
During 2010, Delhaize Group acquired the remaining non-controlling interests in Alfa Beta.
Capital Management
Delhaize Group’s objectives for managing capital are to safeguard the Group’s ability to continue as a going concern and to
maximize shareholder value, while maintaining investment grade credit rating, keeping sufficient flexibility to execute strategic
projects and reduce the cost of capital.
In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure and optimize the cost of capital, the Group may, besides others, return capital
to shareholders, issue new shares and / or debt or refinance / exchange existing debt. Further, Delhaize Group’s dividend policy
aims at paying out a regularly increasing dividend while retaining free cash flow at an amount consistent with the opportunities to
finance the future growth of the Group and maintaining the finance structure in accordance with the objectives stated above.
Consistent with the objectives noted, the Group monitors its capital structure, by using (i) the equity vs. liability classifications as
applied in its consolidated financial statements, (ii) debt capacity, (iii) its net debt and (iv) “Net debt to equity” ratio (see
Note 18.4).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 115
17. Dividends
On May 24, 2012, the shareholders approved the payment of a gross dividend of €1.76 per share (€1.32 per share after
deduction of the 25% Belgian withholding tax) or a total gross dividend of €179 million (including the dividend on treasury
shares). On May 26, 2011, the shareholders approved the payment of a gross dividend of €1.72 per share (€1.29 per share after
deduction of the 25% Belgian withholding tax) or a total gross dividend of €175 million.
With respect to the financial year 2012, the Board of Directors proposes a gross dividend of €1.40 per share to be paid to owners
of ordinary shares against coupon no. 51 on May 31, 2013. This dividend is subject to approval by shareholders at the Ordinary
General Meeting of May 23, 2013 and, therefore, has not been included as a liability in Delhaize Group’s consolidated financial
statements prepared under IFRS. The financial year 2012 dividend, based on the number of shares issued at March 6, 2013, is
€143 million. The payment of this dividend will not have income tax consequences for the Group.
As a result of the potential exercise of warrants issued under the Delhaize Group 2002 and 2012 Stock Incentive Plans, the
Group may have to issue new ordinary shares, to which payment in 2013 of the 2012 dividend is entitled, between the date of
adoption of the annual accounts by the Board of Directors and the date of their approval by the Ordinary General Meeting of May
23, 2013. The Board of Directors will communicate at this Ordinary General Meeting the aggregate number of shares entitled to
the 2012 dividend and will submit at this meeting the aggregate final amount of the dividend for approval. The annual statutory
accounts of Delhaize Group SA for 2012 will be modified accordingly. The maximum number of shares which could be issued
between March 6, 2013, and May 23, 2013, assuming that all vested warrants were to be exercised, is 2 786 792. This would
result in an increase in the total amount to be distributed as dividends to a total of €4 million. Total outstanding non-vested
warrants at March 6, 2013 amounted to 666 974, representing a maximum additional dividend to be distributed of €1 million.
116 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
18. Financial Liabilities
18.1 Long-term Debt
Delhaize Group manages its debt and overall financing strategies using a combination of short, medium and long-term debt and
interest rate and currency swaps. The Group finances its daily working capital requirements, when necessary, through the use of
its various committed and uncommitted lines of credit. The short and medium-term borrowing arrangements generally bear
interest at the inter-bank offering rate at the borrowing date plus a pre-set margin. Delhaize Group also has a treasury notes
program available.
The carrying values of long-term debt (excluding finance leases, see Note 18.3), net of discounts and premiums, deferred
transaction costs and hedge accounting fair value adjustments were as follows:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Senior notes, unsecured
Debentures, unsecured
Notes, unsecured
Senior fixed rate bonds(1)
Senior notes(1)
Retail bond, unsecured
Bonds, unsecured
Notes, unsecured(1)
Senior notes, unsecured(1)
Bonds, unsecured(2)
Notes, unsecured
Other debt
Mortgages payable
Senior notes
Other notes, unsecured
Floating term loan, unsecured
Bank borrowings
Total non-subordinated borrowings
Less current portion
Total non-subordinated borrowings, non-current
Nominal Interest
Rate
Maturity
Currency
2012
2011
2010
5.70%
9.00%
8.05%
3.125%
4.125%
4.25%
6.50%
5.625%
5.875%
5.10%
8.125%
4.58% to 7%
8.25%
7.06%
13.21%
LIBOR 6m+45bps
2040
2031
2027
2020
2019
2018
2017
2014
2014(3)
2013
2011
2013 to 2031
2010 to 2016
2010 to 2016
2010 to 2013
2012
USD
USD
USD
EUR
USD
EUR
USD
EUR
USD
EUR
USD
USD
USD
USD
USD
USD
EUR
438
204
52
397
232
400
339
229
75
80
—
15
1
6
—
—
1
445
208
53
—
—
400
345
541
231
80
—
14
2
6
—
87
1
430
201
51
—
—
—
334
544
223
80
38
10
2
7
1
84
1
2 469
(156)
2 413
(88)
2 006
(40)
2 313
2 325
1 966
____________________
(1) Notes are part of hedging relationship (see Note 19) and refinancing transactions that took place in 2012 (see below).
(2) Bonds issued by Delhaize Group’s Greek subsidiary Alfa Beta.
(3) Redeemed in January 2013 (see below).
The interest rate on long-term debt (excluding finance leases, see Note 18.3) was on average 4.4%, 5.0% and 5.1% at
December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. These interest rates were calculated considering the interest rate swaps
discussed in Note 19.
Delhaize Group has a multi-currency treasury note program in Belgium. Under this program, Delhaize Group may issue both
short-term notes (commercial paper) and medium-term notes in amounts up to €500 million, or the equivalent thereof in other
eligible currencies. No notes were outstanding at December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010.
Refinancing of Long-term Debts
In April 2012, Delhaize Group issued $300 million aggregate principal amount of senior notes with an annual interest rate of
4.125% due 2019. The senior notes were issued at a discount of 0.193% on their principal amount. The offering of the notes was
made to qualified investors pursuant to an effective registration statement filed by Delhaize Group with the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission (SEC), and are not listed on any stock exchange. At the same time, the Group completed a tender offer
for cash prior to maturity of up to €300 million aggregate principal amount of its outstanding €500 million 5.625% senior notes
due 2014. The net proceeds of the debt issuance were used in part to fund the partial repurchase of these senior notes for a
nominal amount of €191 million, at a price of 108.079%.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 117
Simultaneously, Delhaize Group entered into (i) matching interest rate swaps to hedge the Group’s exposure to changes in the
fair value of the 4.125% notes due, and (ii) cross-currency swaps, exchanging the principal amount ($300 million for €225 million)
and interest payments (both variable), to cover the foreign currency exposure (economic hedge). See Note 19 for additional
information on the hedge accounting applied.
During November 2012, Delhaize Group issued €400 million senior fixed rate bonds due 2020, at an annual coupon of 3.125%,
issued at 99.709% of their principal amount. Delhaize Group entered into matching interest rate swaps to hedge €100 million of
the Group’s exposure to changes in the fair value of the 3.125% bonds due to variability in market interest rates (see Note 19).
The net proceeds of the issuance were primarily used to fund the following tender offers:


During December 2012, Delhaize Group completed a second tender offer for cash and purchased an aggregate nominal
amount of €94 million of the above mentioned €500 million notes at a price of 107.740%. Following the completion of both
offers, an aggregate nominal amount of €215 million of the notes remained outstanding.
Simultaneously, the Group also completed an offer for cash for any and all of its outstanding $300 million 5.875% senior
notes due 2014 and purchased $201 million of the tendered notes at a purchase price of 105.945%. Following the
completion of the tender, an aggregate nominal amount of $99 million of the notes remained outstanding. Delhaize Group
exercised its right to redeem these remaining outstanding notes, which was completed on January 3, 2013.
These refinancing transactions did not qualify as a debt modification and resulted in the derecognition of existing notes and
recognition of new notes (see also Note 29.1).
Both the €400 and $300 million notes issued in 2012 contain a change of control provision allowing their holders to require
Delhaize Group to repurchase the notes in cash for an amount equal to 101% of their aggregated principal amount plus accrued
and unpaid interest thereon, if any, upon the occurrence of both (i) a change in control and (ii) a downgrade of the rating of the
notes by the rating agencies Moody’s and Standard & Poors within 60 days of Delhaize Group´s public announcement of the
occurrence of the change of control.
In October 2010, Delhaize Group exchanged $533 million of the 9.00% debentures due 2031 and $55 million of the 8.05% notes
due 2027 (together the “Existing Securities”) issued in a private offering by the wholly-owned subsidiary Delhaize America, LLC,
for $827 million, 5.70% senior notes due 2040 issued by Delhaize Group.
The transaction qualified as a “debt modification” under IFRS (see Note 2.3) and any costs or fees incurred adjusted the carrying
amount of the Existing Securities, being the carrying amount of the new senior notes, and are amortized over the remaining term
of the senior notes due 2040. In line with IFRS, the non-cash premium granted, being the difference between the principal
amounts of the Existing Securities tendered and the principal amount of the new senior notes issued, had no immediate impact
on the carrying amount of the new notes and is also amortized over the remaining term of the senior notes, i.e., until 2040.
Issuance of new Long-term Debts
During October 2011, Delhaize Group completed the public offering of a 7-year 4.25% retail bond in Belgium and in the Grand
Duchy of Luxembourg for a total amount of €400 million. The majority of the proceeds of the retail bond were used for the
voluntarily early repayment of long-term and short-term debt assumed as part of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
The bonds contain a change of control provision allowing their holders to require Delhaize Group to repurchase their bonds in
cash for an amount equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount of the bonds plus accrued and unpaid interest thereon (if
any), upon the occurrence of (i) the acquisition by an offeror of more than 50% of the ordinary shares or other voting rights of
Delhaize Group or if a majority of the members of the Board of Directors of Delhaize Group no longer are so-called continuing
directors and (ii) 60 days after the change in control described under (i), there is a downgrade of the rating of Delhaize Group by
two rating agencies.
Repayment of Long-term Debts
On June 27, 2012, the $113 million floating term loan issued by the Group matured and was repaid.
On April 15, 2011, the $50 million notes issued in 2001 by Delhaize Group’s U.S. subsidiary Delhaize America matured and were
repaid.
Defeasance of Hannaford Senior Notes
In 2003, Hannaford invoked the defeasance provisions of several of its outstanding senior notes and placed sufficient funds in an
escrow account to satisfy the remaining principal and interest payments due on these notes (see Note 11). As a result of this
defeasance, Hannaford is no longer subject to the negative covenants contained in the agreements governing the notes.
As of December 31, 2012 and 2011, $8 million (€6 million) and in 2010 $11 million (€8 million) in aggregate principal amounts of
the notes were outstanding. At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, restricted securities of $11 million (€8 million), $12 million
118 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
(€9 million) and $13 million (€10 million), respectively, were recorded in investment in securities on the balance sheet (see Note
11).
Long-term Debt by Currency, Contractually Agreed Payments and Fair values
The main currencies in which Delhaize Group’s long-term (excluding finance leases, see Note 18.3) debt are denominated are as
follows:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
U.S. dollar
1 362
1 391
1 381
Euro
1 107
1 022
625
Total
2 469
2 413
2 006
The following table summarizes the contractually agreed (undiscounted) interest payments and repayments of principals of
Delhaize Group’s non-derivative financial liabilities, excluding any hedging effects and not taking premiums and discounts into
account:
(in millions of $)
Fixed rates
Notes due 2014, redeemed in
2013
Average interest rate
Interest due
Bonds due 2017
Average interest rate
Interest due
Notes due 2019
Average interest rate
Interest due
Notes due 2027
Average interest rate
Interest due
Debentures due 2031
Average interest rate
Interest due
Notes due 2040
Average interest rate
Interest due
Senior and other notes
Average interest rate
Interest due
Mortgage payable
Average interest rate
Interest due
Other debt
Average interest rate
Interest due
Total $ cash flows
Total cash flows translated
in millions of €
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Thereafter
Fair Value
99
5.88%
2
—
—
29
—
—
12
—
—
6
—
—
24
—
—
47
—
—
1
—
—
—
1
2.88%
1
—
—
—
—
—
29
—
—
12
—
—
6
—
—
24
—
—
47
—
—
1
—
—
—
12
5.36%
1
—
—
—
—
—
29
—
—
12
—
—
6
—
—
24
—
—
47
—
—
1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
29
—
—
12
—
—
6
—
—
24
—
—
47
9
7.06%
—
2
8.25%
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
450
6.50%
15
—
—
12
—
—
6
—
—
24
—
—
47
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
300
4.13%
19
71
8.05%
54
270
9.00%
330
827
5.70%
1 084
—
—
—
—
—
—
7
4.50%
4
105
222
132
119
129
554
2 966
2 171
168
100
90
98
420
2 248
1 645
513
310
82
323
806
10
2
20
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 119
(in millions of €)
Fixed rates
Bonds due 2013
Average interest rate
Interest due
Notes due 2014
Average interest rate
Interest due
Retail Bond due 2018
Average interest rate
Interest due
Senior Notes due 2020
Average interest rate
Interest due
Floating rates
Bank borrowings
Average interest rate
Interest due
Total € cash flows
Total cash flows in €
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Thereafter
Fair Value
80
5.10%
4
—
—
12
—
—
17
—
—
13
—
1
0.70%
—
—
—
—
215
5.63%
12
—
—
17
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
17
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
17
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
17
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
400
4.25%
17
400
3.13%
38
—
—
—
—
80
127
295
257
357
30
120
30
128
30
450
855
3 103
227
423
413
1
1 144
2 789
The variable interest payments arising from financial liabilities with variable coupons were calculated using the last interest rates
fixed before year-end. In the event where a counterparty has a choice of when an amount is paid (e.g., on demand deposits), the
liability is allocated to the earliest period in which Delhaize Group can be required to pay. Delhaize Group is managing its liquidity
risk based on contractual maturities.
The fair value of the Group’s long-term debt (excluding finance leases, see Note 18.3) is based on the current market quotes for
publicly traded debt in an active market (multiplying the quoted price with the nominal amount). Fair values of non-public debt or
debt for which there is no active market are estimated using rates publicly available for debt of similar terms and remaining
maturities offered to the Group and its subsidiaries.
Collateralization
The portion of Delhaize Group’s long-term debt that was collateralized by mortgages and security charges granted or irrevocably
promised on Delhaize Group’s assets was €23 million at December 31, 2012, €37 million at December 31, 2011 and €17 million
at December 31, 2010.
At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, €39 million, €56 million and €38 million, respectively, of assets were pledged as
collateral for mortgages.
Debt Covenants for Long-term Debt
Delhaize Group is subject to certain financial and non-financial covenants related to the long-term debt instruments indicated
above. While these long-term debt instruments contain certain accelerated repayment terms, as further described below, none
contain accelerated repayment clauses that are subject solely to changes in the Group’s credit rating (“rating event”). Further,
none of the debt covenants restrict the abilities of subsidiaries of Delhaize Group to transfer funds to the parent.
Indentures covering the notes due in 2014 ($ and €), 2017 ($), 2019 ($), 2020 (€), 2027 ($) and 2040 ($), the debentures due in
2031 ($) and the retail bond due in 2018 (€) contain customary provisions related to events of default as well as restrictions in
terms of negative pledge, liens, sale and leaseback, merger, transfer of assets and divestiture. The 2014 ($ and €), 2017 ($),
2019 ($), 2020 (€) and 2040 ($) notes and the 2018 (€) bonds also contain a provision granting their holders the right to early
repayment for an amount not in excess of 101% of the outstanding principal amount thereof in the event of a change of control in
combination with a rating event.
The bonds due in 2013 contain customary defined non-GAAP measure based minimum fixed charge coverage and maximum
leverage ratios.
At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, Delhaize Group was in compliance with all covenants for long-term debt.
120 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
18.2 Short-term Borrowings
Short-term Borrowings by Currency
December 31,
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
U.S. Dollar
Euro
—
—
—
45
2
14
Other currencies
—
15
—
Total
—
60
16
The carrying amounts of short-term borrowings approximate their fair values.
Short-term credit facilities
At April 15, 2011, Delhaize Group and certain of its subsidiaries, including Delhaize America, LLC, entered into a €600 million,
five-year multi-currency, unsecured revolving credit facility agreement (the “New Facility Agreement”).
U.S. Entities
At April 15, 2011, Delhaize America, LLC terminated all of its commitments under the 2009 Credit Agreement and joined the New
Facility Agreement.
Delhaize America, LLC had no outstanding borrowings under this agreement as of December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011,
and no outstanding borrowings under the 2009 Credit Agreement as of December 31, 2010.
Under the credit facilities that were in place at the various reporting dates, Delhaize America, LLC had $1 million (€1 million)
average daily borrowings during 2012 at an average rate of 1.69%, no average daily borrowings during 2011 and $2 million (€2
million) during 2010. In addition to the New Facility Agreement, Delhaize America, LLC had a committed credit facility exclusively
to fund letters of credit of $35 million (€27 million) of which approximately $12 million (€9 million) was drawn for issued letters of
credit as of December 31, 2012, compared to an outstanding of $16 million (€13 million) and $20 million (€15 million) as of
December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Further, Delhaize America, LLC has periodic short-term borrowings under uncommitted credit facilities that are available at the
lenders’ discretion and these facilities were $100 million (€76 million) at December 31, 2012, of which $35 million (€27 million)
may also be used to fund letters of credit. As of December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, Delhaize America, LLC had no borrowings
outstanding under such arrangements but used in 2012 and 2011 $5 million (€4 million) to fund letters of credit.
European and Asian Entities
At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, the Group’s European and Asian entities together had credit facilities (committed and
uncommitted) of €846 million (of which €725 million of committed credit facilities and including the €600 million New Facility
Agreement: see above), €864 million and €490 million, respectively.
Borrowings under these facilities generally bear interest at the inter-bank offering rate at the borrowing date plus a pre-set
margin, or based on market quotes from banks. In Europe and Asia, Delhaize Group had no outstanding short-term bank
borrowings at December 31, 2012, compared to €60 million at December 31, 2011 and €14 million at December 31, 2010,
respectively, with an average interest rate of 2.95% in 2011 and 4.83% in 2010. During 2012, the Group’s European and Asian
entities had €5 million average daily borrowings at an average interest rate of 2.06%.
In addition, European and Asian entities have credit facilities (committed and uncommitted) of €17 million (of which €3 million of
committed credit facilities), exclusively to issue bank guarantees. Of these credit facilities approximately €11 million was
outstanding to fund letters of guarantee as of December 31, 2012 (€10 million at December 31, 2011 and €4 million at December
31, 2010).
Debt Covenants for Short-term Borrowings
The New Facility Agreement of €600 million and the €125 million committed European bilateral credit facilities require
maintenance of various financial and non-financial covenants. The agreements contain customary provisions related to events of
default and affirmative and negative covenants applicable to Delhaize Group. The negative covenants contain restrictions in
terms of negative pledge, liens, indebtedness of subsidiaries, sale of assets and mergers, as well as minimum fixed charge
coverage ratios and maximum leverage ratios based on non-GAAP measures. None of the debt covenants restrict the abilities of
subsidiaries of Delhaize Group to transfer funds to the parent.
At December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, Delhaize Group was in compliance with all covenants conditions for short-term bank
borrowings.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 121
18.3 Leases
As described in Note 2.3, the classification of a lease agreement depends on the allocation of risk and rewards incidental to the
ownership of the leased item. When assessing the classification of a lease agreement, certain estimates and assumptions need
to be made and applied, which include, but are not limited to, the determination of the expected lease term and minimum lease
payments, the assessment of the likelihood of exercising options and estimation of the fair value of the lease property.
Delhaize Group as Lessee - Finance and operating lease commitments
As detailed in Note 8, Delhaize Group operates a significant number of its stores under finance and operating lease
arrangements. Various properties leased are (partially or fully) subleased to third parties, where the Group is therefore acting as
a lessor (see further below). Lease terms (including reasonably certain renewal options) generally range from 1 to 45 years with
renewal options ranging from 3 to 30 years.
The schedule below provides the future minimum lease payments, which were not reduced by expected minimum sublease
income of €35 million, due over the term of non-cancellable subleases, as of December 31, 2012:
(in millions of €)
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Thereafter
Total
Finance Leases
Future minimum lease payments
129
115
111
101
90
772
1 318
Less amount representing interest
(67)
(64)
(59)
(54)
(48)
(352)
(644)
62
6
51
5
52
5
47
5
42
4
420
33
674
58
312
21
260
18
231
15
195
14
164
12
754
49
1 916
129
Present value of minimum lease payments
Of which related to closed store lease obligations
Operating Leases
Future minimum lease payments (for non-cancellable leases)
Of which related to closed store lease obligations
The average effective interest rate for finance leases was 11.6%, 11.8% and 12.0% at December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010,
respectively. The fair value of the Group’s finance lease obligations using an average market rate of 5.1% at December 31, 2012
was €842 million (2011: 4.5%, €1 016 million, 2010: 5.1%, €994 million).
The Group’s obligation under finance leases is secured by the lessors’ title to the leased assets.
Rent payments, including scheduled rent increases, are recognized on a straight-line basis over the minimum lease term. Total
rent expense under operating leases was €330 million (of which €2 million related to discontinued operations), €311 million (of
which €1 million related to discontinued operations) and €295 million in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively, being included
predominately in “Selling, general and administrative expenses.”
Certain lease agreements also include contingent rent requirements which are generally based on store sales and were
insignificant in 2012, 2011 and 2010.
Sublease payments received and recognized into income for 2012 were €21 million and €16 million in 2011 and 2010.
Delhaize Group signed lease agreements for additional store facilities under construction at December 31, 2012. The
corresponding lease terms as well as the renewal options generally range from 10 to 30 years. Total future minimum lease
payments for these agreements relating to stores under construction were approximately €52 million.
Provisions for €107 million, €46 million and €44 million at December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively, representing the
discounted value of remaining lease payments, net of expected sublease income, for closed stores, were included in “Closed
Store Provisions” (see Note 20.1). The discount rate is based on the incremental borrowing rate for debt with similar terms to the
lease at the time of the store closing.
Delhaize Group as Lessor – Expected Finance and Operating Lease Income
As noted above, occasionally, Delhaize Group acts as a lessor for certain owned or leased property, mainly in connection with
closed stores that have been sub-leased to other parties, retail units in Delhaize Group shopping centers or within a Delhaize
Group store. At December 31, 2012, the Group did not enter into any lease arrangements with independent third party lessees
that would qualify as finance leases. Rental income is included in “Other operating income” in the income statement.
122 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
The undiscounted expected future minimum lease payments to be received under non-cancellable operating leases as at
December 31, 2012 can be summarized as follows:
(in millions of €)
Future minimum lease payments to be received
Of which related to sub-lease agreements
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Thereafter
Total
43
14
27
10
11
5
6
2
4
1
16
3
107
35
The total amount of €107 million represents expected future lease income to be recognized as such in the income statement and
excludes expected future sub-lease payments to receive in relation to stores being part of the “Closed store provision” (see
Note 20.1).
Contracts including contingent rent clauses are insignificant to the Group.
18.4 Net Debt
Net debt is defined as the non-current financial liabilities, plus current financial liabilities and derivative financial liabilities, minus
derivative financial assets, investments in securities, and cash and cash equivalents.
December 31,
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
18.1, 18.3
18.1, 18.2, 18.3
19
19
11
11
2 925
218
14
(61)
(11)
(93)
3 014
209
20
(58)
(13)
(93)
2 650
113
16
(66)
(125)
(43)
(in millions of €)
Non-current financial debt
Current financial liabilities
Derivative liabilities
Derivative assets
Investments in securities - non current
Investments in securities - current
Cash and cash equivalents
Net debt
Net debt to equity ratio
15
(932)
(432)
(758)
2 060
2 647
1 787
39.7%
48.8%
35.3%
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
The following table summarizes the movement of net debt during 2012:
(in millions of €)
Net debt at January 1, 2012
2 647
Free cash flow
Adjustment for net cash received from derivative instruments (included in free cash flow)
(772)
17
Exercise of stock options and warrants
Premium paid on tendered debt
Purchase of non-controlling interests
Dividends paid
Net debt after cash movements
Non-cash movements
Currency translation effect on assets and liabilities
Net debt at December 31, 2012
1
32
23
180
2 128
(61)
(7)
2 060
Free cash flow is defined as cash flow before financing activities, investments in debt securities and sale and maturity of debt
securities and can be summarized as follows:
(in millions of €)
Net cash provided by operating activities
Net cash used in investing activities
Net investment in debt securities
Free cash flow
2012
1 408
(637)
1
772
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 123
19. Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedging
The Group enters into derivative financial instruments with various counterparties, principally financial institutions with investment
grade credit ratings. The calculation of fair values for derivative financial instruments depends on the type of instruments:



Derivative interest rate contracts: the fair value of derivative interest rate contracts (e.g., interest rate swap agreements) is
estimated by discounting expected future cash flows using current market interest rates and yield curve over the remaining
term of the instrument.
Derivative currency contracts: the fair value of forward foreign currency exchange contracts is based on forward exchange
rates.
Derivative cross-currency contracts: the fair value of derivative cross-currency contracts is estimated by discounting
expected future cash flows using current market interest rates and yield curve over the remaining term of the instrument,
translated at the rate prevailing at measurement date.
The fair values of derivative assets and liabilities are summarized below:
December 31,
2012
(in millions of €)
2011
2010
Assets
Liabilities
Assets
Liabilities
Assets
Liabilities
Cross-currency swaps
60
1
4
10
57
1
—
20
61
5
—
16
Total
61
14
58
20
66
16
Interest rate swaps
As described in Note 2.3, Delhaize Group does not enter into derivative financial instrument arrangements for speculation /
trading, but for hedging (both economic and accounting) purposes only. As the Group currently holds no derivatives where net
settlement has been agreed, the following table indicates the contractually agreed (undiscounted) gross interest and principal
payments associated with derivative financial instruments (assets and liabilities) at December 31, 2012:
1 - 3 months
(in millions of €)
Interest rate swaps being part of a
fair value hedge relationship
Inflows
Outflows
Interest rate swaps without a
designated hedging relationship
Inflows
Outflows
Cross-currency interest rate swaps
without a designated hedging
relationship
Inflows
Outflows
Total Cash Flows
4 - 12 months
2014
2015 and beyond
Principal
Interest
Principal
Interest
Principal
Interest
Principal
Interest
—
—
1
(3)
—
—
22
(8)
—
—
25
(9)
—
—
61
(38)
—
—
1
(1)
—
—
18
(6)
—
—
18
(5)
—
—
—
—
107
6
—
9
500
9
227
27
(108)
(9)
—
(9)
(508)
(8)
(225)
(23)
(1)
(5)
—
26
(8)
30
2
27
Interest Rate Swaps
Fair value hedges:
In 2007, Delhaize Group issued €500 million senior notes with a 5.625% fixed interest rate and a 7-year term, exposing the
Group to changes in the fair value due to changes in market interest rates (see Note 18.1). In order to hedge that risk, Delhaize
America, LLC swapped 100% of the proceeds to a EURIBOR 3-month floating rate for the 7-year term. The maturity dates of
these interest rate swap arrangements (“hedging instrument”) match those of the underlying debt (“hedged item”). The
transactions were designated and qualify for hedge accounting in accordance with IAS 39, and were documented as a fair value
hedge. The aim of the hedge is to transform the fixed rate notes into variable interest debt (“hedged risk”). In April 2012 and
December 2012, Delhaize Group refinanced in total €285 million of these €500 million senior notes (see Note 18.1). The Group
prospectively and proportionally discontinued the hedge accounting for the tendered amounts.
In April 2012, Delhaize Group issued $300 million senior notes (see Note 18.1) with a 4.125% fixed interest rate due 2019
(“hedged item”), exposing the Group to changes in the fair value due to changes in market interest rates (“hedged risk”). In order
to hedge that risk, Delhaize Group entered into matching interest rate swaps and swapped 100% of the proceeds of the bond to
124 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
a LIBOR 3-month floating rate for the 7-year term (“hedging instrument”). The Group designated and documented this
transaction as a fair value hedge.
Finally, in November 2012, Delhaize Group issued €400 million senior notes (see Note 18.1) with a 3.125% fixed interest rate
due 2020 (“hedged item”), exposing the Group to changes in the fair value due to changes in market interest rates (”hedged
risk”). Delhaize Group partially hedged this exposure through an interest rate swap (3 months EURIBOR floating rate) with a
nominal of €100 million and a maturity equal to the maturity of the bond. The Group designated and documented this transaction
as a fair value hedge.
Hedge effectiveness for fair value hedges is tested using regression analysis. Credit risks are not part of the hedging
relationships. The testing did not result in any material ineffectiveness. Changes in fair values on the hedging instruments and
hedged items were recognized in the income statement as finance costs as follows (see Note 29.1):
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Losses (gains) on
Interest rate swaps (“hedging instruments”)
Related debt instruments (“hedged risks”)
Total
Note
2012
2011
2010
29.1
(6)
5
3
29.1
3
(5)
(3)
(3)
—
—
Following the refinancing transaction in April 2012, the Group entered into an interest rate swap maturing in 2014 in order to
offset the changes in future interest cash flows on a notional amount of €191 million on which the Group pays a fixed interest rate
of 1.80% and receives a floating interest rate EURIBOR 3-month plus 0.94%, resulting from the hedging instrument entered into
in 2007 (see above).
Discontinued cash flow hedges:
In 2001, the Group recorded a deferred loss ($16 million) on the settlement of a hedge agreement related to securing financing
for the Hannaford acquisition by Delhaize America. In 2007, as a result of the debt refinancing and the consequent
discontinuance of the hedge accounting, Delhaize Group recorded a deferred gain (€2 million). Both the deferred gain/loss were
recorded in OCI (“discontinued cash flow hedge reserve”) and amortized to finance costs over the term of the underlying debt,
which matures in 2031 and 2017, respectively.
Currency Swaps
The Group uses currency swaps to manage some of its currency exposures.
Cash flow hedge:
Delhaize Group issued in 2009 a $300 million bond with a 5.875% fixed interest rate and a 5-year term (“hedged item”), exposing
Delhaize Group to currency risk on dollar cash flows (“hedged risk”). In order to hedge that risk, Delhaize Group swapped 100%
of the proceeds to a euro fixed rate liability with a 5-year term (“hedging instrument”). The maturity dates, the dollar interest rate,
the interest payment dates, and the dollar flows (interest and principal) of the hedging instrument, match those of the underlying
debt. The transactions were designated and qualified for hedge accounting in accordance with IAS 39, and were documented
and historically reflected in the financial statements of Delhaize Group as a cash flow hedge. Delhaize Group tested
effectiveness by comparing the movements in cash flows of the hedging instrument with those of a “hypothetical derivative”
representing the “perfect hedge.” The terms of the hedging instrument and the hypothetical derivative were the same, with the
exception of counterparty credit risk, which was closely monitored by the Group.
During 2012, a total credit of €4 million, net of taxes (2011: debit of €3 million; 2010: credit of €5 million), was recognized in the
“Cash flow hedge reserve” (see Note 16) of which €2 million was reclassified into profit or loss during the year. In 2012, following
the refinancing and exercise of early redemption option on the $300 million senior notes due 2014 (see Note 18.1), the Group
prospectively discontinued hedge accounting. The outstanding amount from the cash flow hedge reserve related to those
transactions of €2 million was recycled to profit and loss (see Note 29.1).
Economic hedges:
Delhaize Group entered into other currency swap contracts, which are not designated as cash flow, fair value or net investment
hedges. Those contracts are generally entered into for periods consistent with currency transaction exposures where hedge
accounting is not necessary, as the transactions naturally offset the exposure hedged in profit or loss. Consequently, the Group
does not designate and document such transactions as hedge accounting relationships.
In April 2012, and simultaneously to entering into interest rate swaps for the 4.125% senior notes due 2019 (see above), the
Group also entered into cross-currency swaps, exchanging the principal amount ($300 million for €225 million) and interest
payments (both variable), to cover the foreign currency exposure of these senior notes. In 2007, Delhaize Group’s U.S.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 125
operations also entered into cross-currency interest rate swaps, exchanging the principal amounts (€500 million for $670 million)
and interest payments (both variable), in order to cover the foreign currency exposure of the entity in connection with the
transaction described above. Delhaize Group did not apply hedge accounting to this transaction because this swap constitutes
an economic hedge with Delhaize America, LLC’s underlying €500 million term loan.
Also, Delhaize Group enters into foreign currency swaps with various commercial banks to hedge foreign currency risk on
intercompany loans denominated in currencies other than its reporting currency.
The table below indicates the principal terms of the currency swaps outstanding at December 31, 2012. Changes in fair value of
these swaps are recorded in “Finance costs” or “Income from investments” in the income statement:
Foreign Currency Swaps
(in millions)
Year Trade
Date
Year
Expiration
Date
Amount
Received
from Bank at
Trade Date,
and to be
Delivered to
Bank at
Expiration
Date
2012
2019
€225
2012
2013
€ 30
2012
2013
€1
2011
2012
€12
2010
2011
€53
2010
2011
€26
2009
2014
€76
2007
2014
$670
Interest Rate
3m EURIBOR
+2.06%
12m EURIBOR
+3.77%
12m EURIBOR
+4.30%
12m
EURIBOR
+4.83%
6m EURIBOR
+3.33%
12m
EURIBOR
+5.02%
6.60%
3m LIBOR
+0.98%
Amount
Delivered to
Bank at
Trade Date,
and to
Receive from
Bank at
Expiration
Date
Interest Rate
Fair Value
Dec. 31,
2012 (€)
Fair Value
Dec. 31,
2011 (€)
Fair Value
Dec. 31,
2010 (€)
3m LIBOR
+2.31%
12m LIBOR
+3.85%
12m LIBOR
+4.94%
1
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
$17
12m LIBOR
+4.94%
—
1
—
$75
6m LIBOR
+3.40%
—
—
3
$35
12m LIBOR
+4.94%
—
—
1
5.88%
3m EURIBOR
+0.94%
(4)(1)
(11)
(13)
(6)
(9)
(2)
$300
$ 40
$1
$100
€500
_______________
(1) As of December 31, 2012, $100 million €76 million remained outstanding from the $300 million/€228 million currency swap. Following the redemption on the $300
million senior notes due 2014, the remaining outstanding amount of this swap was unwound and settled on January 3, 2013.
Debt Covenants for Derivatives
The Group has several ISDAs in place containing customary provisions related to events of default and restrictions in terms of
sale of assets, merger and rating.
The maximum exposure of derivative financial instruments to credit risk at the reporting date equals their carrying values at
balance sheet date (i.e., €61 million at December 31, 2012). See Note 12 in connection with collateral posted on derivative
financial liabilities.
126 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
20. Provisions
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Closed stores:
Non-current
Current
Self-insurance:
Non-current
Current
Pension benefit and other post-employment benefits:
Non-current
Current
Other:
Non-current
Current
Total provisions
Non-current
Current
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
89
18
37
9
36
8
90
52
89
54
82
39
126
10
90
3
80
2
64
73
35
8
10
3
457
369
88
365
289
76
285
233
52
20.1
20.2
21
20.3
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
20.1 Closed Store Provisions
As explained in Note 2.3, Delhaize Group records closed store provisions for present obligations in connection with store closing
activities, which consist primarily of provisions for onerous contracts and severance (“termination”) costs. The amounts
recognized reflect management’s best estimate of the expected expenditures required to settle the present obligation at balance
sheet date and requires the application of judgment and estimates that could be impacted by factors such as the discount rate
applied, the ability to sub-lease, the creditworthiness of the sub-lessee or the success when negotiating any early termination of
lease agreements. Most of the factors are significantly dependent on general economic conditions and the interrelated demand
for commercial property. Consequently, the cash flows projected, and the risk reflected in those, might change, if applied
assumptions change.
Most obligations recognized relate to onerous lease contracts, predominately for stores located in the U.S., with remaining lease
terms ranging from 1 to 23 years. The average remaining lease term for closed stores was 5 years at December 31, 2012. The
following table reflects the activity related to closed store provisions:
(in millions of €)
Closed store provision at January 1
Additions:
Store closings - lease obligations
Store closings - other exit costs
Update of estimates
Interest expense (unwinding of discount)
Acquisition through business combination
Utilization:
Lease payments made
Lease terminations
Payments made for other exit costs
Transfer from (to) other accounts
Currency translation effect
Closed store provision at December 31
2012
2011
2010
46
44
54
131(1)
12
(15)
7
—
3
—
5
4
2
1
—
1
4
—
(27)
(42)
(13)
11
(3)
(12)
—
(1)
—
1
(14)
(5)
(2)
—
5
107
46
44
_______________
(1) Of which €3 million included in discontinued operations (see Note 5.3).
During 2012, Delhaize Group recorded €143 million of additions to the closed store provision, which were primarily related to the
store portfolio review announced at the beginning of 2012, resulting in the decision to close 146 stores (126 stores in the United
States and 20 underperforming Maxi stores) (see Note 28). During the year, additional stores were closed as part of the ordinary
course of business, resulting in 180 stores being closed during 2012.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 127
The “Other exit costs” primarily relate to termination benefits (€10 million) and were negligible in 2011 and 2010. During 2012,
Delhaize Group paid €42 million of lease termination fees, primarily at Delhaize America (€20 million) and Bulgaria (€17 million).
In 2011 and 2010, Delhaize Group recorded additions to the closed store provision of €3 million and €1 million, respectively,
primarily related to 18 and 7 store closings, respectively, made in the ordinary course of business.
The following table presents a reconciliation of the number of closed stores included in the closed store provision:
Number of Closed Stores
Balance at January 1, 2010
146
Store closings added
Stores sold/lease terminated
Balance at December 31, 2010
7
(49)
Store closings added
Stores sold/lease terminated
Balance at December 31, 2011
Store closings added
Stores sold/lease terminated
Balance at December 31, 2012
18
(20)
104
102
163
(86)
179
Expenses relating to closed store provisions were recorded in the income statement as follows:
(in millions of €)
Other operating expenses
Interest expense included in “Finance costs”
Results from discontinued operations
Total
Note
2012
2011
2010
28
29.1
125
7
8
4
2
4
5.3
3
—
—
135
12
6
20.2 Self-insurance Provision
Delhaize Group’s U.S. operations are self-insured for their workers’ compensation, general liability, vehicle accident and
pharmacy claims up to certain retentions and holds excess-insurance contracts with external insurers for any costs in excess of
these retentions. The self-insurance liability is determined actuarially, based on claims filed and an estimate of claims incurred
but not reported. The assumptions used in the development of the actuarial estimates are based upon historical claims
experience, including the average monthly claims and the average lag time between incurrence and payment.
The maximum retentions, including defense costs per occurrence, are:




$1.0 million per accident for workers’ compensation;
$3.0 million per occurrence for general liability;
$3.0 million per accident for vehicle accident; and
$5.0 million per occurrence for pharmacy claims.
Our property insurance in the U.S. includes self-insured retentions per occurrence of $15 million for named windstorms,
$5 million for Zone A flood losses and $2.5 million for all other losses.
Delhaize Group is also self-insured in the U.S. for health care, which includes medical, pharmacy, dental and short-term
disability. The self-insurance liability for claims incurred but not reported is based on available information and considers annual
actuarial evaluations of historical claims experience, claims processing procedures and medical cost trends.
128 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
The movements of the self-insurance provision were as follows:
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
Self-insurance provision at January 1
Expense charged to earnings
Claims paid
Currency translation effect
Self-insurance provision at December 31
143
190
(188)
(3)
121
168
(151)
5
108
179
(174)
8
142
143
121
Actuarial estimates are judgmental and subject to uncertainty, due to, among many other things, changes in claim reporting
patterns, claim settlement patterns or legislation. Management believes that the assumptions used to estimate the self-insurance
provision are reasonable and represent management’s best estimate of the expenditures required to settle the present obligation
at the balance sheet date. Nonetheless, it is in the nature of such estimates that the final resolution of some of the claims may
require making significant expenditures in excess of the existing provisions over an extended period and in a range of amounts
that cannot be reasonably estimated. Future cash flows are discounted with period specific discount rates.
20.3 Other Provisions
The other provisions mainly consist of long-term incentive and early retirement plans, but also include amounts for asset removal
obligations and provisions for litigation. The movements of the other provisions were as follows:
(in millions of €)
Other provisions at January 1
Acquisitions through business combinations
Expense charged to profit and loss
Payments made
Transfer (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Other provisions at December 31
2012
2011(1)
2010
83
38
35
—
6
(17)
4
(4)
43
6
(4)
—
—
—
9
(4)
(3)
1
72
83
38
_______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
In 2012, Delhaize Group finalized the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition (see Note 4.1) and as a result
recognized €43 million of legal contingencies (compared to €12 million disclosed in our 2011 annual report). These contingent
liabilities mainly related to pending legal disputes for a number of property ownership related cases and €4 million of these
provisions was settled and paid in 2012. Simultaneously, the Group recognized indemnification assets of €33 million relating to
these legal disputes, in line with the ownership percentage the Group holds in the Maxi entities being subject to these legal
disputes.
21. Employee Benefits
21.1 Pension Plans
Delhaize Group’s employees are covered by defined contribution and defined benefit pension plans, mainly in the U.S., Belgium,
Greece, Serbia and Indonesia. In addition, the Group has also other post-retirement defined benefit arrangements, being
principally health care arrangements in the U.S.
The actuarial valuations performed on the defined benefit plans involve making a number of assumptions about, e.g., discount
rate, expected rate of return on plan assets, future salary increase or mortality rates. For example, in determining the appropriate
discount rate, management considers the interest rate of high-quality corporate bonds (at least AA rating) in the respective
country, in the currency in which the benefits will be paid and with the appropriate maturity date; mortality rates are based on
publicly available mortality tables for the specific country; the expected return on plan assets is determined by considering the
expected returns on the assets underlying the long-term investment strategy. Any changes in the assumptions applied will impact
the carrying amount of the pension obligations, but will not necessarily have an immediate impact on future contributions. All
significant assumptions are reviewed periodically. Plan assets are measured at fair value, using readily available market prices,
or using the minimum return guaranteed by an independent insurance company. Actuarial gains and losses (i.e., experience
adjustments and effects of changes in actuarial assumptions) are directly recognized in OCI. The assumptions are summarized
below.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 129
Defined Contribution Plans
 In Belgium, Delhaize Group sponsors for substantially all of its employees a defined contribution plan, under which the

Group and the employees (starting in 2005) also, contribute a fixed monthly amount. The contributions are adjusted annually
according to the Belgian consumer price index. Employees that were employed before implementation of the plan were able
to choose not to participate in the employee contribution part of the plan. The plan assures the employee a lump-sum
payment at retirement based on the contributions made. Based on Belgian law, the plan includes a minimum guaranteed
return, which is guaranteed by an external insurance company that receives and manages the contributions. Since July
2010, the Group also sponsors an additional defined contribution plan, without employee contribution, for a limited number of
employees who decided to change pension plans (see below “Defined Benefit Plans”). The expenses related to these plans
were €10 million in 2012, €9 million in 2011 and €6 million in 2010, respectively.
In the U.S., Delhaize Group sponsors profit-sharing retirement plans covering all employees at Food Lion, Sweetbay,
Hannaford and Harveys with one or more years of service. Profit-sharing contributions substantially vest after three years of
service. Forfeitures of profit-sharing contributions are used to reduce future employer contributions or offset plan expenses.
The profit-sharing contributions to the retirement plan are discretionary and determined by Delhaize America, LLC’s Board of
Directors. The profit-sharing plans also include a 401(k) feature that permits participating employees to make elective
deferrals of their compensation and requires that the employer makes matching contributions.
The defined contribution plans generally provide benefits to participants upon death, retirement or termination of
employment.
The expenses related to these U.S. defined contribution retirement plans were €46 million in 2012 and €37 million in 2011
and 2010.

In addition, Delhaize Group operates defined contribution plans in Greece to which only a limited number of employees are
entitled and where the total expense is insignificant to the Group as a whole.
Defined Benefit Plans
Approximately 30% of Delhaize Group employees are covered by defined benefit plans.


In Belgium, Delhaize Group has a defined benefit pension plan covering approximately 7% of its employees. The plan is
subject to legal funding requirements and is funded by contributions from plan participants and the Group. The plan provides
lump-sum benefits to participants upon death or retirement based on a formula applied to the last annual salary of the
associate before his/her retirement or death. An independent insurance company guarantees a minimum return on plan
assets and mainly invests in debt securities in order to achieve that goal. Delhaize Group bears any risk above this minimum
guarantee.
During 2010, Delhaize Group offered its employees who participate in the defined benefit plan on a going forward basis the
opportunity to participate in a new defined contribution plan (new plan), instead of continuing earning benefits under the
defined benefit pension plan (old plan). Approximately 40% of the eligible employees accepted the offer, reducing the
number of people covered by the old plan to the above mentioned 7%. Under Belgian legislation, employees that decided to
participate in the new plan for future service, remain entitled to retirement benefits under the old defined benefit plan for past
service. Due to the plan amendment, a negative past service cost related to death-in-service benefits of €3 million was
recognized in 2010.
In the U.S., Delhaize Group operates several defined benefit pension plans that can be grouped into three different types:
(a) Cash balance plans set up a hypothetical individual account for each employee, and credits each participant
annually with a plan contribution that is a percentage of the participant’s monthly compensation. The contributions
are transferred to a separate plan asset that generates return based on the investment portfolio. The largest plan is
funded and covers approximately 65% of the Hannaford employees.
As of December 31, 2012 the actuarial calculation resulted in a benefit to the Group that is not subject to asset
ceiling restrictions and an asset of $5 million (€4 million) has been recognized in “Other non-current assets.”
In 2011, when aligning the benefits and compensation across its operating entities, Delhaize America modified the
terms of the plan and froze it for new employees and for further accruals of current employees. The plan
amendment led to the recognition of net actuarial losses of $8 million (€6 million), recognized in OCI and of net
curtailment gain of $13 million (€10 million), included in “Selling, general and administrative expenses.”
Following the plan amendment, the investment policy for the funded plan was also changed and as from 2012 it
mainly invests in debt securities.
(b) Delhaize America sponsors further unfunded non-qualified deferred compensation plans offered to a very limited
number of Hannaford, Food Lion, Sweetbay and Harveys officers. These plans provide benefit to the participant at
some time in the future by deferring a part of their annual cash compensation that is adjusted based on returns of a
hypothetical investment account. The balance is payable upon termination or retirement of the participant.
130 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Further, during 2012, Delhaize America amended a defined contribution retirement and savings plan offered to
Hannaford executives by closing it for new employees and future services and at the same time offering existing
participants a guaranteed return achieved by an hypothetical investment account. Consequently, the plan
classification changed to a defined benefit plan and the net liability of $28 million (€22 million) was transferred from
other non-current liabilities to pension benefit provisions.
(c) Further, Delhaize America operates unfunded supplemental executive retirement plans (“SERP”), covering a limited
number of executives of Food Lion and Hannaford. Benefits generally are based on average earnings, years of
service and age at retirement. In 2011, Delhaize America decided to discontinue the SERP for Hannaford
executives.



Alfa Beta has an unfunded defined benefit post-employment plan. This plan relates to termination indemnities prescribed by
Greek law, consisting of lump-sum compensation granted only in cases of normal retirement or termination of employment.
All employees of Alfa Beta are covered by this plan.
In Serbia, Delhaize Group has an unfunded defined benefit that provides a lump-sum retirement indemnity upon retirement
of the employee. The plan and the benefit to be provided is subject to the requirements of local law. The benefit is based on
a certain multiple of the average salary upon retirement of the employee.
Super Indo operates an unfunded defined benefit post-employment plan, which provides benefits upon retirement, death and
disability, as required by local law and regulation. All employees of Super Indo that were employed for at least two years are
covered by this plan.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 131
Defined Benefit Plans
2012
2011
2010
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
175
2
8
1
—
(5)
(19)
22
—
—
(4)
121
4
5
1
—
28
(12)
1
—
1
—
296
6
13
2
—
23
(31)
23
—
1
(4)
161
9
8
1
—
11
(11)
—
(10)
—
6
115
4
5
1
1
3
(9)
—
—
1
—
276
13
13
2
1
14
(20)
—
(10)
1
6
136
9
8
2
(1)
4
(12)
4
—
—
11
121
5
6
2
(3)
—
(17)
—
—
1
—
257
14
14
4
(4)
4
(29)
4
—
1
11
180
149
329
175
121
296
161
115
276
131
7
74
3
205
10
123
8
74
3
197
11
99
8
78
3
177
11
Actuarial gain/(loss) on plan assets
2
5
7
(6)
3
(3)
5
1
6
Employer contributions
6
3
9
12
2
14
13
7
20
1
(19)
1
(12)
2
(31)
1
(11)
1
(9)
2
(20)
2
(12)
2
(17)
4
(29)
(3)
—
(3)
4
—
4
8
—
8
125
9
74
8
199
17
131
2
74
6
205
8
123
13
74
4
197
17
122
(125)
115
(74)
237
(199)
140
(131)
97
(74)
237
(205)
131
(123)
92
(74)
223
(197)
Net deficit/(surplus) for funded plans
Deficit for funded plans
(3)
41
38
9
23
32
8
18
26
1
41
42
9
23
32
8
18
26
Surplus for funded plans
Present value of unfunded obligations
(4)
—
(4)
—
—
—
—
—
—
58
—
34
(1)
92
(1)
35
—
24
(1)
59
(1)
30
—
23
—
53
—
55
74
129
44
46
90
38
41
79
3.49%
4.25%
3.05%
2.27%
2.66%
2.00%
4.17%
4.25%
3.05%
3.99%
3.02%
2.00%
5.00%
4.25%
3.03%
4.54%
3.20%
2.00%
(in millions of €)
Change in benefit obligation:
Benefit obligation at January 1
Current service cost
Interest cost
Plan participants’ contributions
Amendments
Actuarial (gain)/loss
Benefits paid
Business combinations/divestures/ transfers
Plan curtailments
Plan settlements
Currency translation effect
Benefit obligation at December 31
Change in plan assets:
Fair value of plan assets at January 1
Expected return on plan assets
Plan participants’ contributions
Benefits paid
Currency translation effect
Fair value of plan assets at December 31
Actual return on plan assets
Amounts recognized in the balance sheet:
Present value of funded obligation
Fair value of plan assets
Unrecognized past service cost
Net liability
Weighted average assumptions used to
determine benefit obligations:
Discount rate
Rate of compensation increase
Rate of price inflation
132 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
(in millions of €)
Component of pension cost:
Amounts recognized in the income
statement:
Current service cost
Interest cost
Expected return on plan assets
Amortization of past service cost
Curtailment gain recognized
Settlement loss recognized
Total pension cost recognized in the
income statement
Amounts recognized in OCI:
Actuarial (gains)/losses immediately
recognized
Effect of changes in exchange rates
Cumulative amount of actuarial
gains and losses recognized
Weighted average assumptions used
to determine pension cost:
Discount rate
Expected long-term rate of return on
plan assets during year
Rate of compensation increase
Rate of price inflation
(in millions of €)
Historical Information
Defined benefit obligation
Plan assets
Deficit
Experience (gains) and losses:
Related to plan assets
Percentage of plan assets
Related to plan liabilities
Percentage of plan liabilities
2012
2011
2010
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
2
8
(7)
—
—
—
4
5
(3)
—
—
1
6
13
(10)
—
—
1
9
8
(8)
—
(10)
—
4
5
(3)
—
—
1
13
13
(11)
—
(10)
1
9
8
(8)
(1)
—
—
5
6
(3)
(3)
—
1
14
14
(11)
(4)
—
1
3
7
10
(1)
7
6
8
6
14
(7)
(1)
23
—
16
(1)
17
3
—
—
17
3
(1)
3
(1)
—
(2)
3
45
34
79
53
11
64
33
11
44
4.17%
3.99%
5.00%
4.54%
5.54%
4.66%
5.00%
4.25%
3.05%
4.00%
3.02%
2.00%
6.99%
4.25%
3.03%
4.00%
3.20%
2.00%
7.75%
4.74%
3.50%
4.00%
3.29%
2.00%
2012
2011
2010
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
180
125
149
74
329
199
175
131
121
74
296
205
161
123
115
74
276
197
55
75
130
44
47
91
38
41
79
(2)
-1.89%
(2)
-0.89%
(5)
-6.54%
5
3.21%
(7)
-3.59%
3
0.95%
6
4.65%
(2)
-1.02%
(3)
-3.54%
—
0.21%
3
1.71%
(2)
-0.53%
(5)
-3.89%
2
1.14%
(1)
-1.02%
(2)
-1.96%
(6)
-3.05%
—
0.00%
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 133
2009
(in millions of €)
Historical Information
Defined benefit obligation
Plan assets
Deficit
Experience (gains) and losses:
Related to plan assets
Percentage of plan assets
Related to plan liabilities
Percentage of plan liabilities
(in millions of €)
Balance sheet reconciliation:
Balance sheet liability at January 1
Pension expense recognized in the income
statement in the year
Amounts recognized in OCI
Employer contributions made in the year
Benefits paid directly by company in the year
Business combinations/divestures/transfers
Currency translation effect
Balance sheet liability at December 31
2008
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside of
the United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside of
the United
States
Total
136
99
121
78
257
177
111
79
106
69
217
148
37
43
80
32
37
69
(9)
-9.15%
—
-0.04%
1
-0.93%
1
0.49%
(8)
-4.52%
1
0.39%
28
35.61%
2
1.83%
1
0.87%
1
1.13%
29
19.38%
3
1.51%
2012
2011
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
44
46
90
38
3
(7)
(3)
(3)
22
(1)
55
7
23
—
(3)
1
—
74
10
16
(3)
(6)
23
(1)
129
(1)
17
(11)
(1)
—
2
44
2010
Total
United
States
Plans
Plans
Outside
of the
United
States
Total
41
79
37
43
80
7
—
—
(2)
—
—
46
6
17
(11)
(3)
—
2
90
8
(1)
(12)
(1)
4
3
38
6
(1)
(5)
(2)
—
—
41
14
(2)
(17)
(3)
4
3
79
The asset portfolio of the Group‘s defined benefit pension plan in Belgium is funded through a group insurance program. The
plan assets, which benefit from a guaranteed minimum return, are part of the insurance company’s overall investments. The
insurance company’s asset allocation was as follows:
December 31,
Equities
Debt
Real estate
Other assets (e.g., cash equivalents)
2012
2011
5%
5%
2010
5%
91%
0%
4%
94%
0%
1%
91%
0%
4%
In 2013, the Group expects to contribute an insignificant amount to the defined benefit pension plan in Belgium.
The expected long-term rate of return for the Belgian defined benefit pension plan is based on the guaranteed return by the
insurance company and the expected insurance dividend.
134 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
The Hannaford plan asset allocation was as follows:
December 31,
Equities
Debt
Other assets (e.g., cash equivalents)
2012
2011
2010
0%
95%
5%
49%
49%
2%
66%
32%
2%
In 2012, Delhaize America performed a review of the plan’s funding position and the investment policy applied by the plan.
Following the closure of the plan, the Group’s exposure to continuously growing defined benefit obligations has decreased and
Delhaize America changed the investment strategy of the plan and intends to invest going forward mainly in debt securities.
The 2012 year-end actuarial calculation resulted in a benefit to the Group and due to the improved funding position Delhaize
Group expects that only insignificant contribution will be made to the plan during 2013.
Total defined benefit expenses in profit or loss equal €10 million, €6 million and €14 million for 2012, 2011 and 2010,
respectively, and can be summarized as follows:
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
Cost of sales
1
Selling, general and administrative expenses
9
2
4
2
12
10
6
14
Total defined benefit expense recognized in profit or loss
21.2 Other Post-Employment Benefits
Hannaford and Sweetbay provide certain health care and life insurance benefits for retired employees, which qualify as defined
benefit plans. Substantially all Hannaford employees and certain Sweetbay employees may become eligible for these benefits,
however, currently a very limited number is covered. The post-employment health care plan is contributory for most participants
with retiree contributions adjusted annually.
The total benefit obligation as of December 31, 2012 was €3 million (2011 and 2010: €3 million). The medical plans are unfunded
and the total net liability, impacted by unrecognized past service benefits, was €3 million in 2012, 2011 and 2010 respectively.
During 2012, the changes in actuarial assumptions did not result in significant actuarial gains or losses.
The assumptions applied in determining benefit obligation and costs are summarized in the table below:
December 31,
2012
2011
2010
Discount rate
Current health care cost trend
Ultimate health care cost trend
Year of ultimate trend rate
Weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine benefit cost:
3.30%
7.80%
5.00%
2018
3.80%
9.09%
5.00%
2017
4.77%
9.00%
5.00%
2017
Discount rate
Current health care cost trend
Ultimate health care cost trend
Year of ultimate trend rate
3.80%
9.09%
5.00%
2017
4.77%
9.00%
5.00%
2017
5.38%
9.25%
5.00%
2016
Weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine benefit obligations:
A change by 100 basis points in the assumed health care trend rates would have an insignificant effect on the post-retirement
benefit obligation or expense.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 135
21.3 Share-Based Compensation
Delhaize Group offers share-based incentives to certain members of its senior management: stock option plans for associates of
its non-U.S. operating companies; stock option, warrant and restricted stock unit plans for associates of its U.S. based
companies.


Under a warrant plan the exercise by the associate of a warrant results in the creation of a new share, while stock option or
restricted stock unit plans are based on existing shares. Due to the sizeable administrative requirements that Belgian law
imposes on capital increases, a certain amount of time passes between the moment warrants have been exercised and the
capital increase is formally performed. In cases when the capital increase occurs after year-end for warrants exercised
before year-end, which usually concern a limited number of warrants, Delhaize Group accounts for the actual exercise of the
warrants at the date of the following capital increase. Consequently, no movement occurs in equity due to warrants
exercised pending a subsequent capital increase, until such a capital increase takes place. If considered dilutive, such
exercised warrants pending a subsequent capital increase are included in the diluted earnings per share calculation.
Restricted stock unit awards represent the right to receive the number of ADRs set forth in the award at the vesting date at
no cost to plan participants.
The remuneration policy of Delhaize Group can be found as Exhibit E to the Delhaize Group’s Corporate Governance Charter
available on the Company’s website (www.delhaizegroup.com).
As explained in Note 2.3, the share-based compensation plans operated by Delhaize Group are accounted for as equity-settled
share-based payment transactions, do not contain cash settlement alternatives and the Group has no past practice of cash
settlement. The cost of such transactions with employees is measured by reference to the fair value of the equity instruments at
grant date and is expensed over the applicable vesting period. The Group’s share-based compensation plans are subject to
service vesting conditions and do not contain any performance conditions.
Delhaize Group uses the Black-Scholes-Merton valuation model to estimate the fair value of the warrants and options underlying
the share-based compensation. This requires the selection of certain assumptions, including the expected life of the option, the
expected volatility, the risk-free rate and the expected dividend yield:




The expected life of the option is based on management’s best estimate and based on historical option activity.
The expected volatility is determined by calculating the historical volatility of the Group’s share price over the expected
option term.
The risk-free rate is determined using a generic price of government bonds with corresponding maturity terms.
The expected dividend yield is determined by calculating a historical average of dividend payments made by the Group.
The exercise price associated with stock options is dependent on the rules applicable to the relevant stock option plan. The
exercise price is either the Delhaize Group share price on the date of the grant (U.S. plans) or the Delhaize Group share price on
the working day preceding the offering of the option (non-U.S. plans).
The usage of historical data over a period similar to the life of the options assumes that the past is indicative of future trends, and
- as with all assumptions - may not necessarily be the actual outcome. The assumptions used for estimating fair values for
various share-based payment plans are given further below.
Total share-based compensation expenses recorded - primarily in selling, general and administrative expenses - were €13
million in 2012 and 2011 and €16 million in 2010.
Non-U.S. Operating Entities Stock Options Plans
During 2009, Delhaize Group significantly reduced in its European entities the number of associates that are entitled to future
stock options and replaced this part of the long-term incentive plan with a “performance cash” plan. As a consequence, since
2009, only vice presidents and above are granted stock options.
25% of the options granted to associates of non-U.S. operating companies vest immediately and the remaining options vest after
a service period of approximately 3½ years, the date at which all options become exercisable. Options expire seven years from
the grant date.
136 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Delhaize Group stock options granted to associates of non-U.S. operating companies were as follows:
Plan
2012 grant under the 2007
Stock option plan
2011 grant under the 2007
Stock option plan
2010 grant under the 2007
Stock option plan
2009 grant under the 2007
Stock option plan
2008 grant under the 2007
Stock option plan
2007 grant under the 2007
Stock option plan
Effective
Date of
Grants
Number of
shares
Underlying
Award
Issued
Number of shares
Underlying Awards
Outstanding at
December 31, 2012
Exercise
Price
Number of
Beneficiaries (at the
moment of
issuance)
November
2012
35 000
35 000
€26.39
1
May 2012
362 047
362 047
€30.99
95
June 2011
290 078
278 302
€54.11
83
June 2010
198 977
188 294
€66.29
80
June 2009
230 876
215 357
€50.03
73
May 2008
237 291
224 256
€49.25
318
June 2007
185 474
166 920
€71.84
619
June 2006
216 266
136 079
€49.55
601
2006 Stock option plan
Exercise
Period
Jan. 1, 2016 –
May 24, 2019
Jan. 1, 2016 –
May 24, 2019
Jan. 1, 2015 June 14, 2018
Jan. 1, 2014 June 7, 2017
Jan. 1, 2013 June 8, 2016
Jan. 1,
2012 - May 29,
2015
Jan. 1,
2011 - June 7,
2017(1)
Jan. 1,
2010 - June 8,
2013
_______________
(1) In 2009, Delhaize Group offered to the beneficiaries of the 2007 grant (under the 2007 stock option plan) the exceptional choice to extend the exercise period
from 7 to 10 years. This was accounted as a modification of the plan and the non-significant incremental fair value granted by this extension, measured in
accordance with IFRS 2, was accounted over the remaining vesting period. In accordance with Belgian law, most of the beneficiaries of the 2007 Stock option
plan agreed to extend the exercise period of their stock options for a term of three years. The very few beneficiaries who did not agree to extend the exercise
period of their stock options continue to be bound by the initial expiration dates of the exercise period of the plan, i.e., June 7, 2014.
Activity associated with non-U.S. stock option plans was as follows:
2012
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Exercised
Forfeited
Expired
Outstanding at end of year
Shares
1 606 255
55.71
30.58
—
55.73
50.97
49.95
Options exercisable at end of year
742 612
54.61
2011
Shares
Weighted Average Exercise
Price (in €)
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Exercised
Forfeited
Expired
Outstanding at end of year
Options exercisable at end of year
1 379 150
397 047
—
(16 463)
(153 479)
Weighted Average Exercise
Price (in €)
1 328 980
290 078
(80 506)
(58 767)
(100 635)
1 379 150
55.92
54.11
41.75
58.00
63.65
55.71
687 629
55.23
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 137
2010
Shares
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Exercised
Forfeited
Expired
Outstanding at end of year
Weighted Average Exercise
Price (in €)
1 381 791
198 977
(244 176)
(7 362)
(250)
Options exercisable at end of year
1 328 980
52.37
66.29
44.47
51.82
25.81
55.92
663 909
57.22
The weighted average remaining contractual term for the share options outstanding as at December 31, 2012 was 4.34 years
(2011: 4.20; 2010: 4.09 years). No options were exercised during 2012. The weighted average share price for options exercised
during 2011 and 2010 amounted to respectively €57.00 and €60.50.
The following table summarizes options outstanding and options exercisable as of December 31, 2012, and the related weighted
average remaining contractual life (years) and weighted average exercise price under the Delhaize Group stock option plans of
non-U.S. operating companies:
Number
Outstanding
Weighted Average
Remaining Contractual Life
(in years)
Weighted Average
Exercise Price (in €)
€26.39 - €30.99
€49.25 - €54.11
€66.29 - €71.84
397 047
853 994
355 214
6.40
3.35
4.44
30.58
51.08
68.90
€26.39 - €71.84
1 606 255
4.34
49.95
Range of Exercise Prices
Options exercisable at the end of 2012 had a weighted average remaining contractual term of 2.80 years (2011: 2.85; 2010:
2.80).
The weighted average fair values of options granted was €3.86 per option for the May 2012 grant and €4.27 for the November
2012 grant (2011: €8.62; 2010: €9.73) and were estimated on the date of grant using the following assumptions:
Share price (in €)
Expected dividend yield (%)
Expected volatility (%)
Risk-free interest rate (%)
Expected term (years)
Nov. 2012
May 2012
2011
2010
26.39
3.4
26.7
0.6
5.8
28.41
3.3
26.0
0.7
5.8
49.99
2.6
25.9
2.3
5.3
60.55
2.5
26.6
1.5
5.0
U.S. Operating Entities Stock Options and Warrants Plans
Since 2009, Delhaize Group also limited in its U.S. operating entities the number of associates that are entitled to future grants to
vice presidents and above.
Warrants granted under the “Delhaize Group 2012 Stock Incentive Plan” and the “Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan”
vest ratably over a three-year service period, are exercisable when they vest and expire ten years from the grant date.
138 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Options and warrants granted to associates of U.S. operating companies under the various plans were as follows:
Plan
Delhaize Group 2012 Stock Incentive plan
- Warrants
Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive plan
- Warrants
Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive plan
- Options not backed by warrants
Effective
Date of
Grants
Number of
shares
Underlying
Award
Issued
Number of
Shares
Underlying
Awards
Outstanding at
December 31,
2012
Exercise
Price
August 2012
300 000
300 000
May 2012
291 727
280 160
June 2011
June 2010
318 524
232 992
June 2009
May 2008
June 2007
June 2006
May 2005
May 2004
May 2003
Various
Number of
Beneficiaries
(at the
moment of
issuance)
Exercise
Period
(exercisable
until)
$39.62
1
2022
$38.86
75
2022
303 771
213 946
$78.42
$78.33
75
74
2021
2020
301 882
242 121
$70.27
88
2019
528 542
1 165 108
1 324 347
1 100 639
1 517 988
335 867
876 470
442 906
248 396
167 112
$74.76
$96.30
$63.04
$60.76
$46.40
237
3 238
2 983
2 862
5 449
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2 132 043
108 973
$28.91
5 301
2013
2 154
$74.76
-$78.33
11
Various
3 221
Activity related to the “Delhaize Group 2012 Stock Incentive Plan” and the “Delhaize America 2002 Stock Incentive Plan” was as
follows:
2012
Shares
Weighted Average
Exercise Price (in $)
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Exercised(1)
Forfeited/expired
Outstanding at end of year
3 195 599
591 727
(28 561)
(236 889)
3 521 876
74.22
39.25
42.14
64.27
69.27
Options exercisable at end of year
2 322 027
74.56
Shares
Weighted Average
Exercise Price (in $)
2011
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Exercised
Forfeited/expired
Outstanding at end of year
3 313 126
318 524
(318 545)
(117 506)
3 195 599
72.31
78.42
56.54
79.82
74.22
Options exercisable at end of year
2 206 490
73.87
Shares
Weighted Average
Exercise Price (in $)
2010
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Exercised
69.90
78.33
56.87
Forfeited/expired
3 703 267
234 316
(530 525)
(93 932)
Outstanding at end of year
3 313 126
72.31
Options exercisable at end of year
2 314 195
71.77
79.35
_______________
(1) Includes warrants exercised by employees, for which a capital increase had not occurred before the end of the year. The number of shares for which a capital
increase had not yet occurred was 964 at December 31, 2012.
The weighted average remaining contractual term for the share options outstanding as at December 31, 2012 is 4.76 (2011:
5.10; 2010: 5.52). The weighted average share price for options exercised during 2012 amounts to $52.87 (2011: $79.73; 2010:
$79.22).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 139
The following table summarizes options and warrants outstanding as of December 31, 2012, and the related weighted average
remaining contractual life (years) and weighted average exercise price under the stock option plans for associates of U.S.
operating companies:
Number
Outstanding
Weighted Average
Remaining Contractual Life
(in years)
Weighted Average
Exercise Price
(in $)
$28.91 - $46.40
$60.76 - $74.76
$78.33 - $96.30
856 245
1 270 623
1 395 008
6.40
3.52
4.89
39.33
67.08
89.64
$28.91 - $96.30
3 521 876
4.76
69.27
Range of Exercise Prices
Options exercisable at the end of 2012 had a weighted average remaining contractual term of 3.60 years (2011: 4.40; 2010:
4.90).
The fair values of options granted were $5.89 (August 2012), $6.10 (May 2012), $12.61 and $13.03 per option for the years
2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and were estimated using the following weighted average assumptions:
August 2012
May 2012
2011
2010
39.62
3.6
27.1
0.5
4.2
38.86
3.5
27.9
0.6
4.2
78.42
2.9
26.0
1.2
4.0
78.33
2.5
25.2
1.6
4.0
Share price (in $)
Expected dividend yield (%)
Expected volatility (%)
Risk-free interest rate (%)
Expected term (years)
U.S. Operating Entities Restricted Stock Unit Awards Plan
Restricted stock unit awards follow a graded vesting plan over a five-year period, with a first 25% tranche of restricted stock units
to be transferred to associates starting at the end of the second year after the award has been granted. As the award vests, the
associate receives - at no cost for the associate - ADRs equal to the number of restricted stock units that have vested, free of
any restriction.
Restricted stock unit awards granted to associates of U.S. operating companies under the “Delhaize America 2012 Restricted
Stock Unit Plan” and the “Delhaize America 2002 Restricted Stock Unit Plan” (grants prior to 2012) were as follows:
Effective Date of Grants
Number of Shares
Underlying Award
Issued
Number of Shares
Underlying
Awards Outstanding at
December 31, 2012
Number of Beneficiaries
(at the moment of issuance)
40 000
126 123
128 717
123 917
150 073
466 503
40 000
116 671
104 331
69 351
48 402
79 978
1
253
249
243
245
3 421
August 2012
May 2012
June 2011
June 2010
June 2009
May 2008
Activity related to the restricted stock plans was as follows:
2012
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Released from restriction
Forfeited/expired
Outstanding at end of year
140 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Shares
520 584
166 123
(210 611)
(17 363)
458 733
2011
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Released from restriction
Forfeited/expired
Outstanding at end of year
2010
Outstanding at beginning of year
Granted
Released from restriction
Forfeited/expired
Outstanding at end of year
Shares
597 111
128 717
(185 549)
(19 695)
520 584
Shares
716 350
123 917
(221 141)
(22 015)
597 111
The fair value at date of grant for restricted stock unit awards granted during August 2012, May 2012, 2011 and 2010 was
$39.62, $38.86, $78.42 and $78.33 based on the share price at the grant date, respectively.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 141
22. Income Taxes
The major components of income tax expense for 2012, 2011 and 2010 were:
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
110
(57)(2)
—
2
(62)
6
(6)
18
13
103
5
(1)
—
52
(5)
(2)
3
1
17(1)
(2)
—
—
226(1)
3
—
2
(1)
24
(2)
156
—
245
—
22
156
245
Continuing operations
Current tax
Taxes related to prior years recorded in the current year
Utilization of previously unrecognized tax losses and tax credits
Other (current tax related)
Deferred tax
Deferred taxes related to prior years recorded in the current year
Recognition of deferred tax on previously unrecognized tax losses and tax credits
Derecognition of previously recorded deferred tax assets
Deferred tax expense relating to changes in tax rates or the imposition of new taxes
Total income tax expense from continuing operations
Total income tax expense from discontinued operations
Total income tax expense from continuing and discontinued operations
(3)
_______________
(1)
(2)
(3)
In 2010, current tax decreased and deferred tax increased primarily due to a change in tax treatment of capital expenditures in the U.S., which are considered
deductible for tax purposes and therefore increase the deferred tax liabilities.
Primarily related to the resolution of several tax matters in the U.S. which resulted in the recognition of an income tax benefit.
In December 2012, the Serbian government enacted an increase in tax rate from 10 to 15%, effective as from January 1, 2013.
Profit before taxes can be reconciled with net profit as follows:
(in millions of €)
Continuing operations
Discontinued operations
Total profit before taxes
Continuing and discontinued operations
Current tax
Taxes related to prior years recorded in the current year
Utilization of previously unrecognized tax losses and tax credits
Other (current tax related)
Deferred tax
Deferred taxes related to prior years recorded in the current year
Recognition of deferred tax on previously unrecognized tax losses and tax credits
Derecognition of previously recorded deferred tax assets
Deferred tax expense relating to changes in tax rates or the imposition of new taxes
Total income tax expense from continuing and discontinued operations
Net profit
(4)
2012
2011(1)
2010
149
(24)
633
(2)
821
(1)
125
631
820
109
(57)(3)
—
2
(63)
6
(6)
18
13
22
103
5
(1)
—
52
(5)
(2)
3
1
156
17(2)
(2)
—
—
226(2)
3
—
2
(1)
245
103
475
575
______________
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
In 2010, current tax decreased and deferred tax increased primarily due to a change in tax treatment of capital expenditures in the U.S., which are considered
deductible for tax purposes and therefore increase the deferred tax liabilities.
Primarily related to the resolution of several tax matters in the U.S. which resulted in the recognition of an income tax benefit.
In December 2012, the Serbian government enacted an increase in tax rate from 10 to 15%, effective as from January 1, 2013.
142 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
The following reconciles Delhaize Group’s Belgian statutory income tax rate to the Group’s effective income tax rate:
Belgian statutory income tax rate
Items affecting the Belgian statutory income tax rate:
Different statutory tax rates in jurisdictions outside Belgium
Non taxable income
Non deductible expenses
Tax charges on dividend income
Deductions from taxable income(3)
(Recognition) non recognition of tax assets
Taxes related to prior years recorded in current year
Changes in tax rate or imposition of new taxes
Other
Effective tax rate
2012(1)
2011
2010
34.0%
34.0%
34.0%
25.7(2)
(25.9)
21.6
6.5
(35.6)
18.7
(40.5)(4)
10.7
2.4
(1.2)
(0.6)
1.2
0.7
(10.0)
0.4
0.1
0.1
1.0
(0.8)
1.0
(5.9)
0.3
(0.5)
0.5
0.2
17.6%
24.7%
29.8%
2012
2011
2010
2
(5)
(1)
(9)
(2)
5
(3)
(10)
3
______________
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
The weight of each item affecting the Belgian statutory income tax rate is higher in 2012 due to the lower profit before tax.
The increase is mainly due to tax losses incurred in the Balkan countries at a lower tax rate.
Deductions from taxable income relate to notional interest deduction in Belgium and tax credits in other countries.
Primarily related to the resolution of several tax matters in the U.S. which resulted in the recognition of an income tax benefit.
The aggregated amount of current and deferred tax charged or (credited) directly to equity was as follows:
(in millions of €)
Current tax
Deferred tax
Total tax charged (credited) directly to equity
Delhaize Group has not recognized income taxes on undistributed earnings of its subsidiaries and proportionally consolidated
joint venture as the undistributed earnings will not be distributed in the foreseeable future. The cumulative amount of
undistributed earnings on which the Group has not recognized income taxes was approximately €4.1 billion at December 31,
2012, €4.2 billion at December 31, 2011 and €3.6 billion at December 31, 2010.
Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are offset when there is a legally enforceable right to offset and when the deferred
income taxes relate to the same fiscal authority. Deferred income taxes recognized on the balance sheet were as follows:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Deferred tax liabilities
Deferred tax assets
Net deferred tax liabilities
2012
2011(1)
2010
570
89
481
624
97
527
543
95
448
______________
(1) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 143
The changes in the overall net deferred tax liabilities were as follows:
(in millions of €)
Net deferred tax liabilities at January 1, 2010
Charge (credit) to equity for the year
Charge (credit) to profit or loss for the year
Effect of change in tax rates
Acquisition
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Net deferred tax liabilities at December 31, 2010
Charge (credit) to equity for the year
Charge (credit) to profit or loss for the year
Effect of change in tax rates
Acquisition
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Net deferred tax liabilities at December 31, 2011(3)
Charge (credit) to equity for the year
Charge (credit) to profit or loss for the year
Effect of change in tax rates
Divestiture
Transfers (to) from other accounts
Currency translation effect
Net deferred tax liabilities at December 31, 2012
Accelerated
Tax
Depreciation
Closed
Store
Provision
Leases
Pension
Other
Total
344
—
201(2)
1
—
14
20
(15)
—
3
—
—
(4)
(1)
(69)
—
(3)
—
—
—
(5)
(25)
1
(2)
—
—
(6)
(1)
(31)
4(1)
32
(2)
(1)
(4)
(3)
204
5
231
(1)
(1)
—
10
580
—
(41)
—
36
(1)
12
(17)
—
1
—
(3)
1
—
(77)
—
2
—
—
1
(2)
(33)
(7)
1
—
—
—
(1)
(5)
(2) (1)
85
1
(9)
(1)
6
448
(9)
48
1
24
—
15
586
(45)
14
(1)
(1)
(11)
(18)
(26)
—
—
—
1
(76)
1
—
—
—
1
(40)
(4)
(2)
—
—
—
—
75
(1)(1)
28
(1)
1
1
(1)
527
(5)
(44)
13
—
—
(10)
542
(43)
(74)
(46)
102
481
______________
(1) In 2012, 2011 and 2010, includes €2 million, €(2) million and €3 million, respectively, in relation to the cash flow hedge reserve.
(2) Primarily due to a change in tax treatment of capital expenditures in the U.S., which are considered deductible for tax purposes and therefore increase the
deferred tax liabilities.
(3) 2011 was revised to reflect the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition.
At December 31, 2012, Delhaize Group did not recognize deferred tax assets of €112 million, of which:




€42 million related to U.S. tax loss carry-forwards of €901 million (mainly at a 4.0% U.S. State effective tax rate) and U.S. tax
credits, which if unused would expire at various dates between 2013 and 2032;
€8 million related to tax loss carry-forwards of €84 million in Europe, which if unused would expire at various dates between
2013 and 2017;
€8 million related to tax credits in Europe, which if unused would expire at various dates between 2014 and 2022; and
€54 million related to tax loss carry-forwards of €170 million in Europe which can be utilized without any time limitation.
The unused tax losses and unused tax credits may not be used to offset taxable income or income taxes in other jurisdictions.
Delhaize Group recognized deferred tax assets only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profit will be available
against which the unused tax losses, the unused tax credits and deductible temporary differences can be utilized. At December
31, 2012, the recognized deferred tax assets relating to unused tax losses and unused tax credits was €29 million.
144 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
23. Accrued Expenses
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Accrued payroll and short-term benefits
Accrued interest
Other
Total accrued expenses
2012
2011
2010
327
33
77
437
329
42
71
442
299
37
57
393
24. Expenses from Continuing Operations by Nature
The aggregate of cost of sales and selling, general and administrative expenses from continuing operations can be specified by
nature as follows:
(in millions of €)
Product cost, net of vendor allowances and cash discounts
Employee benefit expenses
Supplies, services and utilities purchased
Depreciation and amortization
Operating lease expenses
Bad debt allowance
Other expenses(1)
Total expenses by nature
Cost of Sales
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Total expenses by function
Note
2012
2011(2)
2010
25
26
16 504
3 069
889
649
328
2
600
15 138
2 849
827
585
310
11
526
14 905
2 839
761
575
295
6
510
22 041
20 246
19 891
17 170
4 871
15 749
4 497
15 497
4 394
22 041
20 246
19 891
7, 8, 9
18.3
14
25
_______________
(1) Allowances and credits received from suppliers that represent a reimbursement of specific and identifiable non-product costs incurred by the Group (see Note 25)
have been included for the purposes of this overview in “Other expenses.”
(2) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
25. Cost of Sales
(in millions of €)
Product cost, net of vendor allowances and cash discounts
Purchasing, distribution and transportation costs
Total
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
24
16 504
666
15 138
611
14 905
592
17 170
15 749
15 497
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
Delhaize Group receives allowances and credits from suppliers mainly for in-store promotions, co-operative advertising, new
product introduction and volume incentives. In accordance with the Group’s accounting policies, described in Note 2.3, these
allowances are included in the cost of inventory and recognized as a reduction to cost of sales when the product is sold, unless
they represent the reimbursement of a specific and identifiable cost incurred by the Group to sell the vendor’s product in which
case they are recorded as a reduction in “Selling, general and administrative expenses” (€14 million, €18 million and €9 million in
2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively).
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 145
26. Employee Benefit Expenses
Employee benefit expenses for continuing operations can be summarized and compared to prior years as follows:
(in millions of €)
Wages, salaries and short-term benefits including social security
Stock option expenses
Retirement benefits (including defined contribution, defined benefit and other postemployment benefits)
Total
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
21.3
2 987
13
2 784
13
2 766
16
21.1, 21.2
69
52
57
24
3 069
2 849
2 839
2012
2011(1)
2010
375
2 694
354
2 495
354
2 485
3 069
2
2 849
1
2 839
—
3 071
2 850
2 839
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
Employee benefit expenses were recognized in the income statement as follows:
(in millions of €)
Cost of sales
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Employee benefits for continuing operations
Results from discontinued operations
Total
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
27. Other Operating Income
Other operating income includes income generated from activities other than sales and point of sale services to retail and
wholesale customers.
(in millions of €)
2012
2011
2010
Rental income
Income from waste recycling activities
Services rendered to wholesale customers
Gains on sale of property, plant and equipment
52
20
7
10
46
26
11
3
33
23
12
4
Other
33
32
13
Total
122
118
85
“Other” primarily includes, amongst others, litigation settlement income and income from government grants. During 2012,
Delhaize Group recognized €3 million of government grant income and €5 million of lease termination/settlement income in
“Other.” In 2011, the caption “Other,” contained an insurance reimbursement related to tornado damages in the U.S. (€13
million).
28. Other Operating Expenses
Other operating expenses include expenses incurred outside the normal course of operating supermarkets.
(in millions of €)
Store closing expenses
Impairment
Losses on sale of property, plant and equipment
2012
2011
2010
125
272
22
(2)
14
3
5
20
Other
9
8
135
13
13
Total
428
169
During 2012, Delhaize Group closed a total of 180 stores, of which 146 stores (126 in the United States and 20 Maxi stores)
were closed early 2012 following a store portfolio review both in the United States and Europe, resulting in total store closing
charges of €140 million. These charges were partly offset by €15 million resulting from the periodic update of estimates used for
the store closing provision (see Note 20.1). In 2011, Delhaize Group incurred store closing expenses of €8 million of which €5
million related to the update of estimates for closed store provisions.
146 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
In 2010, the update and revision of the provision for store closing and U.S. organizational restructuring was €3 million income,
which, together with incurred store closing expenses of €1 million, resulted in a net gain of €2 million.
At year-end 2012, the impairment losses recognized amounted to €272 million and can be summarized as follows:
(in millions of €)
Goodwill
Intangible assets
Property, plant & equipment
Investment property
Assets held for sale
Total
Note
2012
2011
2010
6
7
8
9
5.2
136
17
87
14
18
—
3
115
17
—
—
—
12
2
—
272
135
14
As part of the 2012 annual goodwill impairment review, the Group impaired 100% of the goodwill recognized in Bulgaria, Bosnia
& Herzegovina and Montenegro (totaling €51 million) and €85 million with respect to the Serbian goodwill. The Group further
recognized impairment charges in connection with the Piccadilly brand in Bulgaria for €15 million, and other intangible assets at
Delhaize America for €2 million. In addition, the Group recognized impairment charges of €87 million in property, plant and
equipment relating to (i) 45 stores (34 Sweetbay, 8 Food Lion and 3 Bottom Dollar Food) that were approved for closure early
2013 and 9 underperforming stores, all in the United States, for a total amount of €54 million, (ii) the closing of 6 stores and
underperformance of 57 stores in the Southeastern Europe (€28 million), and (iii) 1 store closing and the underperformance of 6
stores in Belgium (€5 million). Further, impairment charges of €14 million were recognized on investment properties, primarily on
15 properties in the United States and a warehouse in Albania. Finally, assets held for sale at Maxi Group were impaired by €18
million as a result of the weakening real estate market and the deteriorating state of the property for sale.
During the fourth quarter of 2011, the Group performed a review of its store portfolio and concluded to impair 126 stores and one
distribution center in the U.S. (€115 million) and several of its investment properties (€12 million). The 2010 impairment charges
resulted from the periodic impairment review of underperforming stores for €12 million and investment property for €2 million,
mainly located in the U.S.
“Other” primarily consists of hurricane and other natural disasters related expenses, as well as legal settlement expenses.
29. Financial Result
29.1 Finance Costs
(in millions of €)
Note
2012
2011(1)
2010
20.1
134
5
78
7
120
7
78
4
117
4
81
4
206
Interest on short and long-term borrowings
Amortization of debt discounts (premiums) and financing costs
Interest on obligations under finance leases
Interest charged to closed store provisions (unwinding of discount)
Total interest expenses
224
209
Foreign currency losses (gains) on debt covered by cash flow hedge
30
(1)
7
16
Reclassification of fair value losses (gains) from OCI on cash flow hedge
19
4
(5)
(15)
19
19
3
3
(6)
(3)
13
(4)
—
27
(2)
2
(5)
5
—
1
(3)
3
—
(17)
2
—
9
(2)
(33)
34
1
9
(3)
258
203
215
Total cash flow hedging impact
Fair value losses (gains) on debt instruments — fair value hedges
Fair value losses (gains) on derivative instruments — fair value hedges
Total fair value hedging impact
Foreign currency losses (gains) on debt instruments
Fair value losses (gains) on cross currency interest rate swaps
Amortization of deferred loss on hedge
Other finance costs
Less: capitalized interest
Total
30
16
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 147
In February 2009, $300 million senior notes due 2014 were issued, which generated a foreign currency gain of €1 million in 2012
compared to a loss of €7 million and €16 million in respectively 2011 and 2010. As the debt was part of a designated cash flow
hedge relationship (see Note 19), this amount, and corresponding effects on interest, is offset by reclassification adjustments
from OCI to profit or loss relating to the hedging instrument (€2 million loss in 2012, €5 million gain in 2011 and €15 million gain
in 2010). Additionally, a loss of €2 million has been recycled from OCI to profit or loss following the tender of the senior notes in
December 2012 (see Note 18.1) and the termination of hedge accounting.
At December 31, 2012, Delhaize Group had three outstanding debts which are part of a fair value hedge relationship (see Note
19), which had a combined positive impact of €3 million.
Other finance costs mainly contain €17 million net debt refinancing transactions costs (see Note 18.1) and consist of (i) €36
million of agreed early repayment premiums, (ii) settlement of the underlying cross- currency interest swaps (€3 million), partially
offset by (iii) fair value gains of €22 million on the related notes.
Borrowing costs attributable to the construction or production of qualifying assets were capitalized using an average interest rate
of 5.6%, 6.2% and 7.5% in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
29.2 Income from Investments
(in millions of €)
Interest and dividend income from bank deposits and securities
Gains on disposal of securities
Foreign currency gains on financial assets
Fair value gains (losses) on currency swaps and foreign exchange forward contracts
Note
30
Other investing income
Total
2012
2011
2010
6
6
3
—
9
8
7
(2)
9
2
—
—
2
1
1
17
23
12
No impairment losses on financial assets were incurred during 2012, 2011 and 2010.
30. Net Foreign Exchange Losses (Gains)
The exchange differences charged (credited) to the income statement, excluding the impact of hedge accounting and economic
hedges, were as follows:
(in millions of €)
Note
2012
2011
2010
Cost of sales
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Finance costs
29.1
1
(2)
12
—
1
(10)
—
—
(17)
Income from investments
29.2
(3)
(7)
—
8
(16)
(17)
Total
31. Earnings Per Share (“EPS”)
Basic earnings per share is calculated by dividing the profit attributable to equity holders of the Group by the weighted average
number of ordinary shares outstanding during the year, excluding ordinary shares bought by the Group and held as treasury
shares (see Note 16).
Diluted earnings per share is calculated by adjusting the weighted average number of ordinary shares outstanding to assume
conversion of all dilutive potential ordinary shares. The Group only has dilutive potential share-based awards (see Note 21.3).
Dilutive share-based awards are assumed to have been exercised, and the assumed proceeds from these instruments are
regarded as having been received from the issue of ordinary shares at the average market price of ordinary shares during the
period. The difference between the number of ordinary shares issued and the number of ordinary shares that would have been
issued at the average market price of ordinary shares during the period is treated as an issue of ordinary shares for no
consideration.
Approximately 4 581 153, 2 651 448 and 1 917 112 shares attributable to the exercise of outstanding stock options and warrants
were excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per share for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively, as their effect was antidilutive because their average exercise price was higher than the average market price during the year.
148 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Basic and diluted earnings per share for 2012, 2011 and 2010 were as follows:
2
(in millions of €, except numbers of shares and earnings per share)
Net profit from continuing operations
2012
2011(1)
2010
125
477
—
576
1
(2)
Net profit (loss) from continuing operations attributable to non-controlling interests
Group share in net profit from continuing operations
127
Result from discontinued operations, net of tax
(22)
477
(2)
575
(1)
Group share in net profit for diluted earnings
105
475
574
100 777 257
100 683 828
100 270 861
356 326
742 075
888 825
101 133 583
101 425 903
101 159 686
1.27
(0.22)
4.74
(0.03)
5.74
(0.01)
1.05
4.71
5.73
1.26
(0.22)
4.70
(0.02)
5.69
(0.01)
1.04
4.68
5.68
Weighted average number of ordinary shares outstanding
Adjusted for dilutive effect of share-based awards
Weighted average number of diluted ordinary shares outstanding
Basic earnings per ordinary share (in €):
From continuing operations
From discontinued operations
Basic EPS attributable to the equity holders of the Group
Diluted earnings per ordinary share (in €):
From continuing operations
From discontinued operations
Diluted EPS attributable to the equity holders of the Group
_______________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations..
32. Related Party Transactions
Several of the Group’s subsidiaries provide post-employment benefit plans for the benefit of employees of the Group. Payments
made to these plans and receivables from and payables to these plans are disclosed in Note 21.
The Company’s Remuneration Policy for Directors and the Executive Management can be found as Exhibit E to the Corporate
Governance Charter posted on the Company’s website at www.delhaizegroup.com.
Compensation of Directors
The individual Directors’ remuneration granted for the fiscal years 2012, 2011 and 2010 is set forth in the “Corporate
Governance” section of this annual report. The total remuneration of Directors is as follows, gross before deduction of
withholding taxes:
(in thousands of €)
Total remuneration non-executive Directors
Executive Director
Pierre-Olivier Beckers(1)
Total
(1)
2012
2011
2010
998
1 049
1 000
80
80
80
1 078
1 129
1 080
The amounts solely relate to the remuneration of the Executive Director and exclude his compensation as CEO.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12 // 149
Compensation of Executive Management
The table below sets forth the number of restricted stock unit awards, stock options and warrants granted by the Group during
2012, 2011 and 2010 to its Executive Management. For more details on the share-based incentive plans, see Note 21.3.
Restricted stock unit awards
Stock options and warrants
2012
2011
2010
62 349
527 737
24 875
173 583
22 677
106 341
For information regarding the number of restricted stock unit awards, stock options and warrants granted as well as the
compensation effectively paid (for services provided in all capacities to the Group) during the respective years to the Chief
Executive Officer and the members of the Executive Committee, we refer to the Remuneration Report included in the “Corporate
Governance Statement” of this annual report.
The aggregate compensation for the members of Executive Management recognized in the income statement is summarized
below.
Amounts are gross amounts before deduction of withholding taxes and social security levy. They do not include the
compensation of the CEO as director of the Company that is separately disclosed above. In 2012, the aggregate compensation
includes the pro-rata share of compensation of two members of the Executive Management who joined the company in 2012
(one member in March and one in August), and the pro-rata share of compensation of one member of the Executive
Management who left the company on October 15 as well as his termination benefits. In 2010, the aggregate compensation
includes the pro-rata share of compensation of one member of the Executive Management who left the Company in May 2010,
as well as his termination benefits.
(in millions of €)
(1)
2012
2011
2010
6
5
7
Retirement and post-employment benefits(2)
1
1
1
Other long-term benefits(3)
1
2
2
Termination benefits
1
—
5
Share-based compensation
3
2
3
1
2
1
14
12
18
Short-term benefits
Employer social security contributions
Total compensation expense recognized in the income statement
_____________
(1) Short-term benefits include the annual bonus payable during the subsequent year for performance achieved during the respective years.
(2) The members of Executive Management benefit from corporate pension plans, which vary regionally (see Note 21.1). Amounts represent the employer
contributions for defined contribution plans and the employer service cost for defined benefit plans.
(3) Other long-term benefits include the performance cash component of the Long-Term Incentive Plan that was established in 2003. The grants of the performance
cash component provide for cash payments to the grant recipients at the end of a three-year performance period based upon achievement of clearly defined
targets. Amounts represent the expense recognized by the Group during the respective years, as estimated based on realized and projected performance.
Estimates are adjusted every year and when payment occurs.
33. Commitments
Purchase obligations include agreements to purchase goods or services that are enforceable and legally binding on the Group
and that specify all significant terms including: fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price
provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction. Agreements that can be cancelled within 30 days of the reporting date
without penalty are excluded.
As of December 31, 2012, purchase obligations amounted to €164 million (2011: €238 million and 2010: €177 million), of which
€44 million related to the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets.
Commitments related to lease obligations are disclosed in Note 18.3.
150 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
34. Contingencies
Delhaize Group is from time to time involved in legal actions in the ordinary course of its business. Delhaize Group is not aware
of any pending or threatened litigation, arbitration or administrative proceedings, the likely outcome of which (individually or in the
aggregate) it believes is likely to have a material adverse effect on its business or consolidated financial statements. Any
litigation, however, involves risk and potentially significant litigation costs and therefore Delhaize Group cannot give any
assurance that any litigation currently existing or which may arise in the future will not have a material adverse effect on our
business or consolidated financial statements.
The Group continues to be subject to tax audits in jurisdictions where we conduct business. Although some audits have been
completed during 2010, 2011 and 2012, Delhaize Group expects continued audit activity in 2013. While the ultimate outcome of
tax audits is not certain, we have considered the merits of our filing positions in our overall evaluation of potential tax liabilities
and believe we have adequate liabilities recorded in our consolidated financial statements for exposures on these matters.
Based on our evaluation of the potential tax liabilities and the merits of our filing positions, we also believe it is unlike ly that
potential tax exposures over and above the amounts currently recorded as liabilities in our consolidated financial statements will
be material to our financial condition or future results of operations.
Delhaize Group is from time to time subject to investigations or inquiries by the competition authorities related to potential
violations of competition laws in jurisdictions where we conduct business. None of these investigations are currently in a stage
where Delhaize Group could reliably assess their merits, if any. In this context, in April 2007, representatives of the Belgian
Competition Council visited Delhaize Group’s Procurement Department in Zellik, Belgium, and requested the provision of certain
documents. This visit was part of a local investigation affecting several companies active in Belgium in the supply and retail of
health and beauty products and other household goods. On October 1, 2012, the Auditor to the Belgian Competition Council
issued its investigation report. The investigation involves 11 suppliers and 7 retailers, including Delhaize Belgium, on an alleged
coordination of price increases on the concerned market from 2002 to 2007. As a next step, the Belgian Competition Council will
hear the parties and establish a calendar for the exchange of arguments where Delhaize Group intends to vigorously defend
itself. The investigation report does not contain sufficient information, and there is no similar case precedent, that would allow
estimating a possible financial impact that could result from any future decision of the Belgian Competition Council. According to
Belgian legislation, compensation payments are calculated on the turnover of the last year of the alleged infringement and
capped to 10% of the Belgian annual revenues of the year preceding the decision of the Competition Council. Such
compensation payments, if any, will therefore be capped to 10% of the Belgian annual revenues of 2012 or 2013, depending on
the timing of the decision. A decision by the Council is not expected before the end of 2013 and, under the current legislation, the
parties involved have the right to appeal in court. Consequently, the Group does currently not have sufficient information
available to make a reliable estimate of any financial impact or the timing thereof.
The Group’s Hannaford and Sweetbay banners experienced an unauthorized intrusion (“Computer Intrusion”) into portions of
their computer system that process information related to customer credit and debit card transactions, which resulted in the
potential theft of customer credit and debit card data. Also affected was credit card data from cards used at certain
independently-owned retail locations in the Northeast of the U.S. that carry products delivered by Hannaford. The Computer
Intrusion was discovered during February 2008, and Delhaize Group believes the exposure window for the Hannaford and
Sweetbay credit and debit card data was approximately from December 7, 2007 through early March 2008. There is no evidence
that any customer personal information, such as names or addresses, was obtained by any unauthorized person. Various legal
actions have been taken, and various claims have been otherwise asserted, against Hannaford and affiliates relating to the
Computer Intrusion. While the Group intends to defend the legal actions and claims vigorously, it cannot predict the outcome of
such legal actions and claims, and thus, does not have sufficient information to reasonably estimate possible expenses and
losses, if any, which may result from such litigation and claims.
In February 2011, Delhaize Group was notified that some former Greek shareholders of Alfa Beta Vassilopoulos S.A., who
together held 7% of Alfa Beta shares, have filed a claim in front of the Court of First Instance of Athens challenging the price paid
by the Group during the squeeze-out process that was approved by the Hellenic Capital Markets Commission. Delhaize Group is
convinced that the squeeze-out transaction has been executed and completed in compliance with all legal and regulatory
requirements. Delhaize Group continues to assess the merits and any potential exposure of this claim and will vigorously defend
itself. The first hearing has been scheduled in October 2013.
35. Subsequent Events
On January 3, 2013, Delhaize Group redeemed the remaining $99 million of the $300 million 5.875% senior notes due 2014 (see
Note 18.1), as well as the underlying cross-currency swap (Note 19).
On January 17, 2013, Delhaize Group announced the decision to close 52 stores, of which 45 stores in the U.S. (34 Sweetbay, 8
Food Lion and 3 Bottom Dollar Food), 6 stores in Southeastern Europe and 1 store in Belgium. As a result, the group recorded
an impairment charge of €49 million in the fourth quarter of 2012. During the first part of 2013, the Group expects earnings to be
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 151
impacted by approximately €80 million to reflect store closing liabilities including a reserve for ongoing lease and severance
obligations. In addition, the Group will record charges of approximately $20 million (€15 million) in the first quarter of 2013 related
to the severance of support services senior management and associates in the U.S.
In January 2013, the Greek parliament enacted the increase in the Greek corporate tax rate from 20 to 26%. The impact on Alfa
Beta will be immaterial.
In February 2013, Delhaize Group launched a tender offer to acquire 16% non-controlling interest in C-Market (Serbian
subsidiary), held by the Serbian Privatization Agency, at a price of €300 per share. At December 31, 2012 Delhaize Group
owned 75.4% of C-Market, or 150 254 shares.
In February 2013, Delhaize Group finalized the sale of its Albanian activities and recorded a gain of €1 million.
36. List of Consolidated and Associated Companies and Joint Ventures
A.
Fully Consolidated
Alfa Beta Vassilopoulos S.A.
Alliance Wholesale Solutions, LLC(1)
Anadrasis S.A.
Aniserco SA
Athenian Real Estate Development, Inc.
ATTM Consulting and Commercial, Ltd.(2)
Boney Wilson & Sons, Inc.
Bottom Dollar Food Holding, LLC
Bottom Dollar Food Northeast, LLC
Bottom Dollar Food Southeast, LLC
Centar za obuchenie i prekvalifikacija EOOD
C Market a.d. Beograd
(3)
Delhaize Albania SHPK
Delhaize America, LLC
Delhaize America Shared Services Group, LLC
Delhaize BH d.o.o. Banja Luka
Delhaize Distribution Luxembourg S.A.
Delhaize Finance B.V.
Delhaize Griffin SA
Delhaize Insurance Company, Inc
Delhaize Luxembourg S.A.
Delhaize Montenegro d.o.o. Podgorica
Delhaize Serbia d.o.o. Beograd
Delhaize The Lion America, LLC
Delhaize The Lion Coordination Center SA
Delhaize “The Lion” Nederland B.V.
Delhaize US Holding, Inc.
Delhome SA
Delimmo SA
DZA Brands, LLC
Ela d.o.o. Kotor
ENA SA.(4)
FL Food Lion, Inc.
Food Lion, LLC
Guiding Stars Licensing Company
Hannaford Bros. Co.
Hannaford Energy, LLC
Hannaford Licensing Corp.
152 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
2012
2011
2010
81, Spaton Avenue, Gerakas, Athens, Greece
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
—
81, Spaton Avenue, Gerakas, Athens, Greece
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
Kyriakou Matsi, 16 Eagle House, 10th floor, Agioi
Omologites, P.C. 1082, Nicosia, Cyprus
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
Bitolya 1A str, Varna, Bulgaria
Jurija Gagarina Street, 14, 11 070 Novi Beograd, Serbia
Autostrada Tiranë – Durrës, Km. 7, Kashar, Albania
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
Branka Popovića 115, 78000 Banja Luka, Bosnia and
Herzegovina
Rue d’Olm 51, 8281 Kehlen, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Martinus Nijhofflaan 2, 2624 ES Delft, The Netherlands
Square Marie Curie 40, 1070 Brussels, Belgium
76 St. Paul Street, Suite 500, Burlington, VT 05401, U.S.A.
Rue d’Olm 51, 8281 Kehlen, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Josipa Broza Tita 23a, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro
Jurija Gagarina Street, 14, 11 070 Novi Beograd, Serbia
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
Martinus Nijhofflaan 2, 2624 ES Delft, The Netherlands
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
Bld de l’Humanité 219/221, 1620 Drogenbos, Belgium
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A.
Trg od oruzja bb, Kotor, Montenegro
81, Spaton Avenue, Gerakas, Athens, Greece
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147, U.S.A
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.4
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.4
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
51.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Hannaford Trucking Company
Hannbro Company
Harveys Stamping Company, LLC
Holding and Food Trading Company Single Partner
LLC
Holding and Food Trading Company Single Partner
LLC & Co Ltd Partnership
Huro NV(4)
I-Del Retail Holdings, Ltd.
J.H. Harvey Co., LLC
Kash n’ Karry Food Stores, Inc.
Kingo C.V.A.(1)
Knauf Center Pommerlach S.A.(4)
Knauf Center Schmëtt S.A.(4)
Leoburg NV
Liberval SA(1)
Lion Lux Finance S.à r.l.
Lion Real Estate Albania SHPK(1)
Lion Retail Holding S.à r.l.
Lithia Springs, LLC
Marietta Retail Holdings, LLC
Marion Real Estate Investments, LLC
Martin’s Food of South Burlington, Inc.
MC Portland, LLC
Mega Doi S.R.L.(2)
Mega Image S.R.L.
Molmart NV
Morrills Corner, LLC
Oxon Run Inc.
Pekabeta a.d. Beograd(4)
Piccadilly AD
Points Plus Punten SA
Progressive Distributors, Inc.
Redelcover S.A.
Risk Management Services, Inc.
( )
Rousseau NV 4
Serdelco S.A.S.
Sinking Spring Retail Holdings, LLC
Smart Food Shopping SA
SS Morrills, LLC
Summit Commons Retail Holdings, LLC
Superb Beverage Inc.
The Pride Reinsurance Company, Ltd.
TP Srbija a.d. Kragujevac
TP Stadel d.o.o. Kragujevac
Victory Distributors, Inc.
Wambacq & Peeters NV(5)
Wintrucks NV(6)
Zvezdara a.d. Beograd
_______________
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
81, Spaton Avenue, Gerakas, Athens, Greece
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
—
100.0
—
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
—
100.0
60.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
60.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
60.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.0
95.6
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.0
—
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
100.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
100.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
68.2
100.0
95.4
95.4
100.0
85.0
88.0
68.2
100.0
—
—
100.0
85.0
88.0
—
81, Spaton Avenue, Gerakas, Athens, Greece
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
70 Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin 2, Ireland
727 South Davis Street, Nashville, GA 31639, U.S.A
3801 Sugar Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619, U.S.A.
Melchelseweg 50, 1880 Kappelle-op-den-Bos, Belgium
Rue d’Olm 51, 8281 Kehlen, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Rue d’Olm 51, 8281 Kehlen, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Lommelsesteenweg 8, 3970 Leopoldsburg, Belgium
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
Rue d’Olm 51, 8281 Kehlen, Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg
Autostrada Tiranë – Durrës, Km. 7, Kashar, Albania
Rue d’Olm 51, 8281 Kehlen, Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
3735 Beam Rd, Unit B, Charlotte, NC 28217, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
39-49 Nicolae Titulescu Avenue, 1st district, Bucharest,
Romania
95 Siret Street, 1st district, Bucharest, Romania
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
Jurija Gagarina Street, 14, 11 070 Novi Beograd, Serbia
Istoria Slavianabulgarska 21, 1220 Sofia, Bulgaria
Rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
Rue de Merl 74, 2146 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
Kouter 158, 9000 Gent, Belgium
Parc des Moulins, Avenue de la Créativité 4, 59650
Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
3735 Beam Rd, Unit B, Charlotte, NC 28217, U.S.A.
Chaussée de Wavre 42A, 5030 Gembloux, Belgium
145 Pleasant Hill Road, Scarborough, ME 04074, U.S.A.
3735 Beam Rd, Unit B, Charlotte, NC 28217, U.S.A.
2110 Executive Drive, Salisbury, NC 28187, U.S.A.
The Metropolitan Building, 3rd Floor, James Joyce Street,
Dublin 1, Ireland
Crvenog barjaka bb, 34000 Kragujevac, Serbia
Crvenog barjaka bb, 34000 Kragujevac, Serbia
P.O. Box 1000, Portland, ME 04104, U.S.A.
Isidoor Crockaertstraat 25, 1731 Zellik, Belgium
Rue Osseghem 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium
Zivka Davidovica 64, Belgrade, Serbia
Newly created or acquired company during 2012.
In liquidation.
Sold in February 2013 (classified as held for sale in 2012).
Merged into a group company during 2012.
Sold in February 2012.
Liquidated in 2012.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 153
B.
Joint Ventures - Proportionally Consolidated
Ownership Interest in %
P.T. Lion Super Indo, LLC
Menara Bidakara 2, 19th Floor
Jl. Jend. Gatot Soebroto Kav. 71 -73
Pancoran, Jakarta Selatan 12870, Indonesia
2012
2011
2010
51.0
51.0
51.0
P.T. Lion Super Indo, LLC (“Super Indo”) is accounted for as a joint venture because Delhaize Group shares control with another
party. Delhaize Group’s interest in assets and liabilities of Super Indo was:
December 31,
(in millions of €)
Non-current assets
Current assets
Non-current liabilities
Current liabilities
2012
2011
2010
19
27
1
18
17
26
1
15
10
25
1
13
2012
2011
2010
6
(7)
—
6
(8)
—
6
(3)
—
Cash flows of Super Indo included in Delhaize Group’s cash flow statements were:
(in millions of €)
Net cash provided by operating activities
Net cash used in investing activities
Net cash used in financing activities
Revenue of Super Indo included in the Group’s result was €141 million, €119 million and €110 million for 2012, 2011 and 2010,
respectively. Net income of Super Indo included in the Group’s results was approximately €4 million in 2012, 2011 and 2010.
154 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Supplementary Information
Quarterly Data (Unaudited)
(in millions of €, except earnings per share)
2012(1)
Full Year
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
4th Quarter
22 737
5 473
5 691
5 810
5 763
5 567
1 356
1 384
1 424
1 403
24.5%
24.8%
24.3%
24.5%
24.3%
(4 871)
(1 211)
(1 232)
(1 222)
(1 206)
21.4%
22.1%
21.6%
21.0%
20.9%
390
32
177
231
(50)
1.7%
0.6%
3.1%
4.0%
(0.9%)
Net profit (loss) from continuing operations
125
(2)
86
192
(151)
Group share in net profit (loss)
105
(3)
87
189
(168)
Basic
1.05
(0.02)
0.86
1.88
(1.67)
Diluted
1.04
(0.02)
0.86
1.87
(1.66)
Full Year
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
4th Quarter
21 110
5 044
5 107
5 325
5 634
5 361
1 290
1 280
1 350
1 441
25.4%
25.6%
25.1%
25.3%
25.6%
(4 497)
(1 090)
(1 089)
(1 126)
(1 192)
21.3%
21.6%
21.3%
21.1%
21.2%
813
218
209
239
147
3.9%
4.3%
4.1%
4.5%
2.6%
Net profit from continuing operations
477
126
117
134
100
Group share in net profit
475
126
117
133
99
Basic
4.71
1.25
1.16
1.32
0.98
Diluted
4.68
1.24
1.15
1.31
0.98
Full Year
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter
4th Quarter
20 850
4 971
5 329
5 307
5 243
5 353
1 275
1 357
1 364
1 357
25.7%
25.7%
25.5%
25.7%
25.9%
(4 394)
(1 056)
(1 148)
(1 127)
(1 063)
21.1%
21.2%
21.5%
21.2%
20.3%
1 024
241
227
249
307
4.9%
4.8%
4.3%
4.7%
5.9%
Net profit from continuing operations
576
130
115
141
190
Group share in net profit
574
130
114
140
190
Basic
5.73
1.29
1.15
1.40
1.88
Diluted
5.68
1.28
1.13
1.39
1.87
Revenues
Gross profit
Gross margin
Selling, general and administrative expenses
as a percentage of revenues
Operating profit (loss)
Operating margin
Group share in net profit (loss) per share:
2011(1)
Revenues
Gross profit
Gross margin
Selling, general and administrative expenses
as a percentage of revenues
Operating profit
Operating margin
Group share in net profit per share:
2010
Revenues
Gross profit
Gross margin
Selling, general and administrative expenses
as a percentage of revenues
Operating profit
Operating margin
Group share in net profit per share:
_____________
(1) 2012 and 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 155
Number of Stores (at year-end)
United States
Belgium and G.D. Luxembourg
Greece
Romania
Indonesia
Serbia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Montenegro
Subtotal
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
1 553
840
268
193
103
363
41
43
24
1 650
821
251
105
89
366
44
42
22
1 627
805
223
72
73
1 607
792
216
51
66
1 594
771
201
40
63
1 570
734
159
22
56
1 549
840(1)
148
18
50
1 537
806
135
16
46
1 523
745
129
16
42
1 515
726
119
15
38
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
3 428
3 390
2 800
2 732
2 669
2 541
2 605
2 540
2 455
2 413
—
—
—
—
—
—
97
94
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
97
11
Divested and Discontinued Operations
Czech Republic
Slovakia
Thailand
Germany
Albania
Total
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
23
—
18
—
—
—
—
4
—
4
—
3
—
2
—
2
—
94
14
36
2
—
3 451
3 408
2 800
2 732
2 673
2 545
2 705
2 636
2 565
2 559
_____________
(1) Includes 132 Di stores sold in 2007.
Number of Associates (at year-end)
Full-time
Part-time
FTE(1)
Male
Female
Total
2012
2011
2010
77 457
80 453
119 804
75 102
78 945
80 911
121 648
77 175
61 617
77 005
103 051
68 294
82 808
82 681
70 328
157 910
159 856
138 622
Geographical Split
2012
Total
United States
Belgium (including G.D. Luxembourg)
Greece
Romania
Indonesia
Serbia
Bulgaria
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Montenegro
Albania
Total
_____________
(1) Full-time equivalent.
156 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
104 613
16 438
10 599
5 693
5 489
10 860
1 971
1 053
706
488
157 910
2011
2010
(1)
Total
FTE
Total
FTE
72 003
13 708
8 306
5 557
5 489
10 646
1 907
1 048
655
485
119 804
107 237
16 968
10 438
4 277
5 165
10 890
2 442
1 245
713
481
159 856
74 492
14 139
8 234
4 167
5 165
10 621
2 425
1 232
692
481
121 648
103 839
17 314
9 857
2 998
4 614
73 451
14 289
7 791
2 906
4 614
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FTE
—
—
138 622
103 051
Organic Revenue Growth Reconciliation
(in millions of €)
Revenues
Effect of exchange rates
Revenues at identical exchange rates
Acquisitions
Effect of the U.S. store portfolio optimization
Organic revenue growth
2012
2011(1)
% Change
22 737
21 110
7.7%
21 712
21 110
2.9%
(601)
—
(50)
(476)
21 061
20 634
(1 025)
2.1%
_____________
(1)
(2)
2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations..
The organic revenue growth excludes the revenues generated from the 126 U.S. stores, which were closed in the first quarter as part of the portfolio
optimization.
Free Cash Flow
Free Cash Flow Reconciliation
(in millions of €)
Net cash provided by operating activities
Net cash used in investing activities
Investment in (sale and maturity of) debt securities, net
Free cash flow
2012
2011
2010
1 408
(637)
1
1 106
(1 265)
(72)
1 317
(665)
13
772
(231)
665
Use of Free Cash Flow
(in millions of €)
Inflow:
Free cash flow
Borrowings under long-term loans, net
Outflow:
Dividends paid
Repayment of short-term loans, net
Purchase of non-controlling interests
Investment in debt securities, net
Stock options exercised
Settlement of derivative instruments
Cash movement before translation
Foreign exchange translation difference (on cash portion)
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
2012
772
3
(180)
(60)
(23)
(1)
(1)
(1)
509
(8)
501
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 157
Results at Identical Exchange Rates
(in millions of €, except per share amounts)
Revenues
2011(1)
2012
2012/2011
At Actual
Rates
Effect of
Exchange
Rates
At
Identical
Rates
At Actual
Rates
At Actual
Rates
At
Identical
Rates
22 737
(1 025)
21 712
21 110
7.7%
2.9%
Operating profit
390
(33)
357
813
(52.0%)
(56.1%)
Net profit from continuing operations
125
(24)
101
477
(73.7%)
(78.9%)
Group share in net profit
Basic earnings from Group share in net
profit
Diluted earnings from Group share in net
profit
Free cash flow
105
(24)
81
475
(77.8%)
(82.9%)
1.05
(0.24)
0.81
4.71
(77.8%)
(82.9%)
1.04
(0.24)
0.80
4.68
(77.7%)
(82.8%)
772
(34)
738
(231)
N/A
N/A
(in millions of €)
Net debt
December 31, 2012
2 060
—
December 31, 2011
2 060
2 647
Change
(22.1%)
(22.2%)
Corporate
Total
_____________
(1) 2011 was adjusted for the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations..
Underlying operating profit reconciliation
December 31, 2012
(in millions of €)
Operating profit (as reported)
Add (substract):
Fixed asset impairment charges (reversals)
Restructuring expenses (reversals)
Store closing expenses
(Gains) losses on disposal of assets
Other
Underling operating profit
United States
Belgium
Southeastern
Europe and
Asia
343
202
(113)
(42)
390
63
5
204
—
272
—
—
—
—
—
109
5
29
1
7
(18)
15
(1)
—
—
—
125
12
11
549
197
105
(41)
810
1
2012 was significantly impacted by €272 million impairment charges and the store portfolio optimization expenses: €125 million
store closing expenses and €22 million of related expenses, included in the caption “Other” and mainly consisting of sales price
mark-downs and accelerated depreciation. In addition, the caption “Other” contains storm damage expenses of €5 million, a
retirement expense of €3 million and severance expenses of €6 million, partially compensated by a net gain of €7 million on the
settlement of legal cases in the U.S. and a payroll tax refund (€18 million) in Belgium.
EBITDA reconciliation
(in millions of €)
Operating profit (as reported)
Add (substract):
Depreciation and amortization
Impairment
EBITDA
158 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
2012
390
649
272
1 311
Historical Financial Overview
RESULTS (in millions of €)
Revenues
Operating profit
Net financial expenses
Income tax expense
Net profit from continuing operations
Net profit (Group share)
Free cash flow(1)
2012
2011(4)
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005(5)
22 737
390
(241)
(24)
125
105
772
21 110
813
(180)
(156)
477
475
(231)
20 850
1 024
(203)
(245)
576
574
665
19 938
942
(202)
(228)
512
514
626
19 024
904
(202)
(217)
485
467
162
18 943
937
(332)
(204)
401
410
326
19 215
947
(276)
(245)
426
352
216
18 345
900
(297)
(224)
380
365
164
11 936
5 193
2 060
5 144
12 292
5 419
2 647
7 069
10 902
5 069
1 787
7 400
9 748
4 409
2 063
7 472
9 700
4 195
2 402
6 849
8 822
3 676
2 244
8 281
9 295
3 561
2 635
8 726
10 254
3 596
2 943
8 171
1.05
1.04
7.66
1.40
1.05
135.4%
50.95
30.25
4.71
4.68
(2.29)
1.76
1.32
37.8%
53.18
43.41
5.73
5.68
6.64
1.72
1.29
30.4%
49.91
55.27
5.16
5.08
6.26
1.60
1.20
31.4%
43.54
53.62
4.70
4.59
1.63
1.48
1.11
31.9%
41.19
44.20
4.20
4.04
3.35
1.44
1.08
35.2%
36.17
60.20
3.71
3.55
2.28
1.32
0.99
36.4%
36.55
63.15
3.89
3.71
1.75
1.20
0.90
31.4%
37.65
55.20
1.7%
3.9%
4.9%
4.7%
4.8%
4.9%
4.9%
4.9%
15.8%
0.5%
39.7%
24.6%
2.2%
48.8%
29.8%
2.8%
35.3%
30.8%
2.6%
46.8%
30.9%
2.5%
57.3%
33.7%
2.2%
61.0%
36.5%
1.8%
74.0%
37.1%
2.0%
81.8%
0.7783
0.7579
0.7184
0.7729
0.7543
0.7484
0.7169
0.6942
0.6799
0.7185
0.7297
0.6793
0.7964
0.7593
0.8038
0.8477
3 451
688
158
120
3 408
762
160
122
2 800
660
139
103
2 732
520
138
104
2 673
714
141
106
2 545
729
138
104
2 705
700
143
107
2 636
636
137
102
100 777
100 684
100 271
99 803
99 385
97 666
94 939
93 934
FINANCIAL POSITION (in millions of €)
Total assets
Total equity
Net debt(1)
Enterprise value(1),(2)
PER SHARE INFORMATION (in €)
Group net earnings (basic)(3)
Group net earnings (diluted)(3)
Free cash flow(1),(4)
Gross dividend
Net dividend
Pay-out ratio (net profit)
Shareholders’ equity(2)
Share price (year-end)
RATIOS (%)
Operating margin
Effective tax rate of continuing
operations
Net margin
Net debt to equity(1)
CURRENCY INFORMATION
Average € per $ rate
€ per $ rate at year-end
OTHER INFORMATION
Number of sales outlets
Capital expenditures (in millions of €)
Number of associates (thousands)
Full-time equivalents (thousands)
Weighted average number of shares
outstanding (thousands)
_____________
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
See “Financial Review” section for explanation of the non-GAAP financial measures.
Calculated using the total number of shares issued at year-end.
Calculated using the weighted average number of shares outstanding over the year.
2011 was revised to reflect (i) the effects of the completion in the second quarter of 2012 of the purchase price allocation of the Delta Maxi acquisition and (ii)
the reclassification of the Albanian operations to discontinued operations.
Not adjusted for reclassification of German operations to discontinued operations.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 159
Certification of Responsible Persons
The undersigned, Pierre-Olivier Beckers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Delhaize Group, and Pierre Bouchut, Chief
Financial Officer of Delhaize Group, confirm that to the best of their knowledge:
a) the consolidated financial statements for the year ending December 31, 2012 have been prepared in accordance with IFRS
(International Financial Reporting Standards) and give, in all material respects, a true and fair view of the consolidated
financial position and results of Delhaize Group and of its subsidiaries included in the consolidation;
b) the management report for the year ending December 31, 2012 gives, in all material respects, a true and fair view of the
evolution of the business, the results and the situation of Delhaize Group and of its subsidiaries included in the consolidation,
as well as an overview of the most significant risks and uncertainties with which Delhaize Group is confronted.
Brussels, March 6, 2013
Pierre-Olivier Beckers
Pierre Bouchut
President and CEO
Executive Vice President and CFO
160 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Report of the Statutory Auditor
Delhaize Brothers and co “The Lion” (Delhaize Group) SA/NV
Statutory auditor’s report to the shareholders meeting on the consolidated financial
statements for the year ended December 31, 2012
To the shareholders
As required by law, we report to you on the statutory audit mandate which you have entrusted to us. This report includes our
report on the consolidated financial statements as defined below together with our report on other legal and regulatory
requirements.
Report on the consolidated financial statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Delhaize Brothers and Co “The Lion” (Delhaize Group)
SA (“the company”) and its subsidiaries (jointly “the group”), prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards as adopted by the European Union and with the legal and regulatory requirements applicable in Belgium. These
consolidated financial statements comprise the consolidated balance sheet as at December 31, 2012, the consolidated income
statement, the consolidated statement of comprehensive income, the consolidated statement of changes in equity and the
consolidated statement of cash flows for the year then ended, as well as the summary of significant accounting policies and other
explanatory notes. The consolidated statement of financial position shows total assets of €11 936 million and the consolidated
income statement shows a consolidated profit (group share) for the year then ended of €105 million.
Responsibility of the board of directors for the preparation of the consolidated financial statements
The board of directors is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these consolidated financial statements in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as adopted by the European Union and with the legal and
regulatory requirements applicable in Belgium, and for such internal control as the board of directors determines is necessary to
enable the preparation of consolidated financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or
error.
Statutory auditor’s responsibility
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our
audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements
and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free
from material misstatement.
An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial
statements. The procedures selected depend on the statutory auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of
material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments,
the auditor considers internal control relevant to the group’s preparation and fair presentation of the consolidated financial
statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing
an opinion on the effectiveness of the group’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of
accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the board of directors, as well as evaluating
the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We have obtained from the company’s officials and the board of
directors the explanations and information necessary for performing our audit.
We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.
Unqualified opinion
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements of Delhaize Brothers and Co “The Lion” (Delhaize Group) SA give a true and
fair view of the group’s net equity and financial position as of December 31, 2012, and of its results and its cash flows for the year
then ended, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as adopted by the European Union and with the
legal and regulatory requirements applicable in Belgium.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 161
Report on other legal and regulatory requirements
The board of directors is responsible for the preparation and the content of the directors’ report on the consolidated financial
statements.
In the framework of our mandate, our responsibility is to verify, for all significant aspects, the compliance with some legal and
regulatory requirements. On this basis, we provide the following additional comment which does not modify the scope of our
audit opinion on the consolidated financial statements:
The directors’ report on the consolidated financial statements includes the information required by law, is, for all significant
aspects, in agreement with the consolidated financial statements and is not in obvious contradiction with any information
obtained in the context of our mandate.
Diegem, March 6, 2013
The statutory auditor
DELOITTE Bedrijfsrevisoren / Reviseurs d’Entreprises
BV o.v.v.e. CVBA / SC s.f.d. SCRL
Represented by Michel Denayer
162 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’12
Summary Statutory Accounts of Delhaize Group SA/NV
The summarized annual statutory accounts of Delhaize Group SA/NV are presented below. In accordance with the Belgian
Company Code, the full annual accounts, the statutory Directors’ report and the Statutory Auditor’s report will be filed with the
National Bank of Belgium. These documents will also be available on the Company’s website, www.delhaizegroup.com, and can
be obtained upon request from Delhaize Group SA/NV, rue Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium. The Statutory Auditor
has expressed an unqualified opinion on these annual accounts.
Summary of Accounting Principles
The annual statutory accounts of Delhaize Group SA are prepared in accordance with Belgian Generally Accepted Accounting
Principles (Belgian GAAP).
1. Formation expenses
Formation expenses are capitalized and amortized over a period of five years or, if they are related to debt issuance costs,
over the maturity of the loans.
2. Intangible Fixed Assets
Intangible assets are recognized as asset in the balance sheet and amortized over their expected useful live. The intangible
assets are amortized as follows:


Goodwill
Software
5 years
5 to 8 years
Internally developed software
Internally developed software is recognized as intangible asset and is measured at cost to the extent that such cost does not
exceed its value in use for the Company. The Company recognizes internally developed software as intangible asset when it
is expected that such asset will generate future economic benefits and when the Company has demonstrated its ability to
complete and use the intangible asset. The cost of internally developed software comprises the directly or indirectly
attributable costs of preparing the asset for its intended use to the extent that such costs have been incurred until the asset is
ready for use. Internally developed software is amortized over a period of 5 years to 8 years.
3. Tangible Fixed Assets
Tangible fixed assets are recorded at purchase price or at agreed contribution value.
Assets held as finance leases are stated at an amount equal to the fraction of deferred payments provided for in the contract
representing the capital value.
Depreciation rates are applied on a straight-line basis at the rates admissible for tax purposes:






Land
Buildings
Distribution centers
Equipment for intensive use
Furniture
Motor vehicles
0.00% /year
5.00% /year
3.00% /year
33.33% /year
20.00% /year
25.00% /year
Plant, machinery and equipment are depreciated over periods of 5, 12 and 25 years based on the expected useful live of
each type of component.
4. Financial Fixed Assets
Financial fixed assets are valued at cost, less accumulated impairment losses. Impairment loss is recorded to reflect longterm impairment of value. Impairment loss is reversed when it is no longer justified due to a recovery in the asset value. A fair
valuation method is applied, taking into account the nature and the features of the financial asset. One single traditional
valuation method or an appropriate weighted average of various traditional valuation methods can be used. Generally, the net
equity method is applied and is adjusted with potential unrecognized capital gain if any. The measurement of foreign
investments is calculated by using the year-end exchange rate. Once selected, the valuation method is consistently applied
on a year-to-year basis, except when the circumstances prevent to do so. When the valuation method shows a fair value
lower than the book value of a financial asset, an impairment loss is recognized but only to reflect the long-term impairment of
value.
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 163
5. Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost (on a weighted average cost basis) or net realizable value. Inventories are written
down on a case-by-case basis if the anticipated net realizable value declines below the carrying amount of the inventories.
Such net realizable value corresponds to the anticipated estimated selling price less the estimated costs necessary to make
the sale. When the reason for a write-down of the inventories has ceased to exist, the write-down is reversed.
6. Receivables and Payables
Amounts receivable and payable are recorded at their nominal value, less allowance for any amount receivable whose value
is considered to be impaired on a long-term basis. Amounts receivable and payable in a currency, other than the currency of
the Company, that are not hedged by a derivative instrument, are valued at the exchange rate prevailing on the closing date.
The resulting translation difference is written off if it is a loss and deferred if it is a gain.
Amounts receivable and payable in a currency other than the currency of the Company, and hedged by a derivative
instrument, are valued at the exchange rate fixed within the financial instrument with a consequence that there is no resulting
translation difference in the exchange rate.
7. Treasury shares
The purchase of treasury shares is recorded on the balance sheet at acquisition cost. When at balance sheet date, the
market value is below the acquisition cost, the unrealized loss is recorded in the income statement. Upon sale, the
treasury shares are derecognized at their historical acquisition cost, less any recognized losses.
8. Provision for Liabilities and Charges
Provision for liabilities and charges are recorded to cover probable or certain losses of a precisely determined nature but
whose amount, as of the balance sheet date, is not precisely known. They include, principally:




Pension obligations, early retirement benefits and similar benefits due to present or past employees
Taxation due on review of taxable income or tax calculations not already included in the estimated payable included in
the amounts due within one year
Significant reorganization and store closing costs
Charges for which the Company may be liable as a result of current litigation.
9. Debt Under Finance Leases and Similar Debts
At the end of each year, these commitments are valued at the fraction of outstanding deferred payments, corresponding to
the capital value of the assets, which mature within more than one year. The fraction of these payments contractually
maturing within less than one year is recorded under “Current portion of long-term debts.”
10. Derivative financial instruments
The Company uses derivative financial instruments such as foreign exchange forward contracts, interest rate swaps and
currency swaps to manage its exposure on interest rate risks and foreign currency exchange risks relating to borrowings. Call
options are used to manage the exposure in relation to the exercise of the stock options granted to the entitled employees of
Delhaize Group SA/NV. The purchased call options are recognized on the balance sheet at acquisition cost which is in
general the paid premium. In case the option is exercised the recognized premium forms part of the acquisition cost of the
purchased treasury shares. However, in case the option expires and it is not exercised, then the recognized premium is
recorded as expense in the income statement.
For the measurement of the derivative financial instruments, Delhaize Group SA/NV does not apply the Mark-To-Market
method. Instead the foreign exchange forward contracts, the interest rate swaps and the currency swaps are measured in the
same way as the underlying exposures in accordance with the principle of accrual accounting. The accrued interest income
and expenses, the realized foreign exchange differences and the unrealized foreign exchanges losses are recognized in the
income statement in the same caption as the underlying exposure. On the other hand the unrealized foreign exchange gains
are deferred on the balance sheet in accordance with the principle of prudency.
In accordance with its internal policy, Delhaize Group SA/NV does not hold or issue derivative instruments for speculative or
trading purposes.
Summary of the net earnings per share of Delhaize Group SA/NV:
Net earnings per share
164 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12
2012
2011
2010
4.03
2.94
0.65
Summary Company Accounts of Delhaize Group SA/NV
Assets
(in millions of €)
Fixed assets
Formation expenses
Intangible fixed assets
Tangible fixed assets
Financial fixed assets
Current assets
Amounts receivable after more than one year
Inventories
Short-term receivables
Short-term investments
Cash and bank
Prepayments and accrued income
Total assets
December, 31
2012
2011
8 779
13
131
433
8 202
815
5
210
441
31
112
16
9 594
8 332
11
121
401
7 799
863
—
235
477
48
86
17
9 195
2012
2011
4 116
51
2 798
45
88
1 134
17
4 399
3 747
652
670
392
1
346
45
9 594
3 847
51
2 796
27
107
866
20
4 273
3 947
326
646
409
1
352
56
9 195
Liabilities and Equity
(in millions of €)
Shareholders’ equity
Capital
Share premium
Distributable reserves
Other reserves
Profit carried forward
Provisions and deferred taxation
Financial liabilities
After one year
Within one year
Trade creditors
Other liabilities
After one year
Within one year
Accruals and deferred income
Total liabilities and equity
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 165
Income Statement
(in millions of €)
Operating income
Sales
Other operating income
Operating expenses
Merchandise and consumables
Salaries, social security and pensions
Other operating expenses
Operating profit
Financial income
Financial charges
Current profit before taxation
Exceptional income
Exceptional expenses
Current year profit before taxation
Transfer (-) to/ release (+) from deferred taxes
Current taxation
Financial year results
Transfer (-) to/ release (+) from tax-exempt reserves
Financial year results to be appropriated
2012
2011
4 897
4 717
180
(4 741)
(3 559)
(654)
(528)
156
485
(232)
409
9
(7)
411
—
(1)
410
—
410
4 863
4 709
154
(4 677)
(3 537)
(651)
(489)
186
250
(220)
216
92
(9)
299
—
—
299
—
299
2012
2011
410
299
866
—
746
—
1 277
1 045
1 134
143
866
179
Appropriation of Profit
(in millions of €)
Profit of the year to be appropriated
Profit brought forward from previous year
Transfer from reserves
Appropriation:
Profit to carry forward
Dividends to shareholders(1)
_____________
(1) As a result of the exercise of warrants issued under the Delhaize Group 2002 Stock Incentive Plan, the Company might have to issue new ordinary shares, to
which coupon no. 51 entitling to the payment of the 2012 dividend is attached, between the date of adoption of the annual accounts by the Board of Directors and
the date of their approval by the Ordinary General Meeting of May 23, 2013. The Board of Directors will communicate at the Ordinary General Meeting of May 23,
2013 the aggregate number of shares entitled to the 2012 dividend and will submit to this meeting the final amount of the total dividend for approval. The annual
accounts of 2012 will be modified accordingly.
166 // DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12
Share Capital
(December 31, 2012)
Share capital
Shares in issue
At the end of the previous year
Issue of new shares
At the end of the financial year
Analysis of share capital
Class of shares
Ordinary shares of no nominal value
Registered shares or bearer shares
Registered
Bearer
Treasury shares held by
The company itself
Its subsidiaries
Commitments to issue new shares
On the exercise of subscription rights
Number of subscription rights in issue
Amount of capital to be subscribed
Corresponding maximum number of shares to be issued
Unissued authorized capital
(in thousands of €)
Number of Shares
50 946
15
50 961
101 921 498
4 308 989
97 612 509
1 016 452
27 683
3 519 438
1 760
3 519 438
4 945
DELHAIZE GROUP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ’12 // 167
InveSTorS
shAREholDER InForMaTIon
Delhaize group shares trade on nYSe euronext Brussels under the symbol DeLB. american Depositary
Shares (aDS), each representing one ordinary share of Delhaize group, are traded on the new York
Stock exchange under the symbol Deg. aDSs are evidenced by american Depositary receipts (aDrs).
Information on Delhaize group’s share price can be found on the websites of Delhaize group
(www.delhaizegroup.com), nYSe euronext Brussels (www.euronext.com) and the new York Stock
exchange (www.nyse.com). Detailed information on trading activity and share prices can also be found
in the financial section of many newspapers.
share performance in 2012
(2012 - iN €)
60
EuRoNExT 100
50
40
Delhaize Group share
(DElB)
30
20
J
f
M
A
M
J
J
A
s
o
N
D
on December 31, 2012, the closing
price of Delhaize group’s aDr on
the new York Stock exchange was
$40.55, 28.0% lower than the closing price on December 30, 2011
($56.35). In the same period, the
S&P 500 index increased by 13.4%,
and the S&P 500 Food and Staples
retailing Index increased by 15.8%.
In 2012, the average daily trading
volume of Delhaize group aDrs was
46,789.
(2012 - iN $)
70
s&p 500
60
50
Delhaize Group ADR
(DEG)
Equity indices
40
30
168 //
J
f
M
A
on December 31, 2012, the closing
price of Delhaize group’s ordinary
share on nYSe euronext Brussels
was €30.25, a 30.3% decrease compared to €43.41 a year earlier. During the same period, the euro Stoxx
50 index increased by 13.8% and the
Bel20 index increased by 18.8%. The
FTSe eurofirst 300 Food and Drug
retailers Index decreased by 6.5%
in 2012. In 2012, Delhaize group
shares traded on nYSe euronext
Brussels at an average closing price
of €33.33 and an average daily
trading volume of 500,935 shares.
M
J
J
A
s
o
N
D
on December 31, 2012, Delhaize
group’s shares were included in the
following major stock indices: BeL20,
euronext 100, Dow Jones Stoxx 600
and the Dow Jones Sustainability
Index.
FINANCIAL CALENDAR Press release - 2013 first quarter results and Capital Markets Day
May 8, 2013(1)
Shareholders' record date
On December 31, 2012, the weight of
Delhaize Group shares in the BEL20
index was 5.7%. Delhaize Group
shares represented the 9th largest
constituent in the index.
On December 31, 2012, the weight of
Delhaize Group in the Euronext 100
index was 0.21%. Delhaize Group
represented the 96th largest constituent in the index.
Dividend
At the Ordinary Shareholders’ Meeting to be held on May 23, 2013,
the Board of Directors will propose
the payment of a gross dividend of
€1.40 per share, compared to €1.76
the previous year. After deduction
of 25% Belgian withholding tax, this
will result in a net dividend of €1.05
per share (€1.32 the prior year).
The net dividend of €1.05 per share
will be payable to owners of ordinary shares against coupon no. 51.
The Delhaize Group shares will start
trading ex-coupon on May 28, 2013
(opening of the market). The record
date (i.e. the date at which shareholders are entitled to the dividend)
is May 30, 2013 (closing of the market) and the payment date is May
31, 2013. The payment will be made
at the registered office of the Company (rue Osseghem / Osseghemstraat 53, 1080 Brussels, Belgium) as
well as all Belgian financial institutions.
For shares held through a share
account, the bank or broker will
automatically handle the dividend
payment.
The payment of the dividend to the
ADR holders will be made through
Citibank.
May 1, 2013
Final date for notifying intent to participate in the Ordinary Shareholders’ Meeting
May 17, 2013(1)
Ordinary Shareholders’ Meeting
May 23, 2013
ADR and ordinary share dividend record date
May 30, 2013
Dividend for the financial year 2012 becomes payable to owners of ordinary shares
May 31, 2013
Dividend for the financial year 2012 becomes payable to ADR holders
June 5, 2013
August 8, 2013(1)
Press release - 2013 second quarter results
Press release - 2013 third quarter results
November 7, 2013(1)
(1) You are kindly invited to listen to the related conference call. See www.delhaizegroup.com for further details on the
conference call and the webcast.
Type of Delhaize Group
Shares
Delhaize shares can be held in three
different forms: dematerialized form,
bearer shares or registered shares.
Bearer shares are held in printed
form. Dematerialized shares are
shares that can only be represented
by entries into an account in the
book of a depositary institution. Registered shares are shares that can
only be represented by entries into
a shareholder register held by the
Company. On request, shareholders may convert their shares into
another form at their own expense.
The ownership of registered shares
can be transferred by informing the
Company and returning the certificate of record in the shareholder
register to the Company. As from
January 1, 2008, bearer shares
booked into a securities account
have been automatically converted
into dematerialized shares. Bearer
shares not yet booked in a securities account shall be automatically converted into dematerialized
shares as from the time they are
booked into a securities account. All
remaining bearer shares that shall
not have been deposited in a securities account shall be converted at
the choice of their holder into dematerialized or registered shares by
December 31, 2013.
Information for ADR Holders
ADSs (American Depositary Shares),
each representing one ordinary
share of Delhaize Group, are traded
on the New York Stock Exchange
under the symbol DEG. ADSs are
evidenced by American Depositary
Receipts (ADRs). The Delhaize Group
ADR program is administrated by:
Citibank Shareholder Services
P.O. Box 43077
Providence, RI 02940-3077
U.S.A.
Toll free telephone number for U.S.
callers: 1-877-853-2191
International Call Number:
1-781-575-4555
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.citi.com/dr
Citibank has put in place an International Direct Investment Plan for
Delhaize Group, which is a dividend
reinvestment and direct purchase
plan sponsored and administered
by Citibank. The program enables
existing holders and first time purchasers the opportunity to make
purchases,
reinvest
dividends,
deposit certificates for safekeeping
and sell shares. For further information on Citibank’s International
Direct Investment Program for Delhaize Group, please visit www.citi.
com/dr or contact Citibank Shareholder Services at 1-877-248-4237
(1-877-CITIADR.)
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 169
investors
€ 1f g.r4oss0
Taxation of Dividends of
Delhaize Group Shares
It is assumed that, for the application of domestic Belgian tax legislation and the U.S.-Belgian tax treaty,
owners of Delhaize Group ADRs
are treated the same as owners of
Delhaize Group shares and that the
ADRs are treated as Delhaize Group
shares. However, it must be noted
that this assumption has not been
confirmed or verified with the Belgian Tax Authorities.
For Belgian income tax purposes,
the gross amount of all distributions made by Delhaize Group to its
shareholders (other than repayment
of paid-up capital in accordance
with the Belgian Companies Code)
is generally taxed as dividends. Dividends that are attributed or paid on
the shares are in principle subject to
a 25% Belgian withholding tax.
For non-Belgian residents - individuals and corporations - Belgian
withholding tax is retained also
at the rate of 25% subject to the
reductions or exemptions provided
by Belgian tax law or by the tax
treaty concluded between Belgium
and the country of which the nonBelgian beneficiary of the dividend
is a resident. Such withholding tax
is normally the final tax in Belgium.
For dividends paid by Delhaize
Group to a U.S. holder of ADRs, beneficial owner of the dividends, who
is not holding the shares through
a permanent establishment in Belgium and is entitled to claim benefits
under the U.S.- Belgian tax treaty,
the withholding tax is reduced from
25% to 15%. If the beneficial owner
is a company that owns directly
at least 10% of the voting stock of
Delhaize Group, a reduced with170 //
o
are
per sh
d
n
e
id
div
in 2012
holding tax rate of
5% is applicable. No
withholding tax is however applicable if the beneficial owner of the dividends is i) a
company, resident of the U.S. that
has owned directly shares representing at least 10% of the capital
of Delhaize Group for a 12-month
period ending on the date the dividend is declared, or ii) a pension
fund, resident of the U.S., provided
that the dividends are not derived
from carrying on a business by the
pension fund or through an associated enterprise.
Although there are exceptions, in
general the full 25% Belgian withholding tax must be withheld by
Delhaize Group or the paying agent,
and the non-Belgian holder of
Delhaize Group shares or ADRs
may file a claim for reimbursement
for amounts withheld in excess of
the treaty rate. The reimbursement
claim form (Form 276 Div.- Aut.) can
be obtained from the AFER – Bureau
Central de Taxation, BruxellesEtranger, Tour North Galaxy B7,
Boulevard Albert II 33, PO Box 32,
B-1030 Brussels, Belgium. (phone:
+32 2 576 90 09, fax: +32 2 579
68 42, email: [email protected]
minfin.fed.be). The form should be
completed in duplicate and sent to
the relevant Tax Office in the residence country of the non-Belgian
holder with the request that one
copy be appropriately stamped and
returned to the sender.
The non-Belgian holder can then
obtain reimbursement from the
Bureau Central de Taxation, at the
same address, upon presentation
of the stamped form and a document proving that the dividend has
been cashed. The request for reim-
bursement must be
filed with the Bureau
Central de Taxation within
five years from January 1 of
the year following the year in which
the dividend was declared payable.
Prospective holders should consult
their tax advisors as to whether they
qualify for the reduced withholding
tax upon attribution or payment of
dividends, and as to the procedural requirements for obtaining
the reduced withholding tax immediately upon the attribution or payment of the dividends or through the
filing of a claim for reimbursement.
Annual Report
This annual report is available in
English, French and Dutch. It can be
downloaded from Delhaize Group’s
website: www.delhaizegroup.com.
Delhaize Group is subject to the
reporting requirements of the U.S.
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) governing foreign companies listed in the U.S. An annual
report will be filed with the SEC on
Form 20-F. The Form 20-F will be
available from the SEC’s EDGAR
database at www.sec.gov/edgarhp.
htm and on the Company’s website.
Consultation of Documents
The public documents concerning
Delhaize Group can be consulted at
the registered office (rue Osseghem/
Osseghemtraat 53, 1080 Brussels Belgium).
In the United States, Delhaize Group
is subject to the informational
requirements of the U.S. Securities
Exchange Act of 1934, as amended
(the “Exchange Act”), and in accordance with the Exchange Act Delhaize
Group files reports and other infor-
mation with the SEC. The reports and
other information Delhaize Group
files with the SEC can be inspected
at the SEC’s public reference room
located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C., U.S. 20549. You may
obtain information on the operation of the SEC’s public reference
room by calling the SEC at +1 (800)
SEC-0330. Also, the SEC maintains
a website at www.sec.gov that contains reports and other information
that registrants have filed electronically with the SEC.
Delhaize Group makes available
free of charge, through the shareholder information section of Delhaize
Group’s website (www.delhaizegroup.
com), the Company’s reports filed
electronically with the SEC pursuant to
the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company
electronically files such material with
the SEC.
Delhaize Group’s reports and other
information can also be inspected
and copied at the offices of the New
York Stock Exchange, Inc., 20 Broad
Street, New York, NY 10005, U.S.A.
Ordinary Shareholders’
Meeting
The next Ordinary Shareholders’
Meeting will take place on Thursday,
May 23, 2013. Detailed information
about the Ordinary Shareholders’
Meeting will be published in the
Belgian newspapers L’Echo and De
Tijd, as well as in the Belgian Official
Gazette and on the Company website.
INFORMATION DELHAIZE GROUP SHARE
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
40.78
Share price (in €)
Price: year-end
30.25
43.41
55.27
53.62
44.20
60.20
63.15
55.20
55.95
average (close)
33.33
51.29
57.24
49.26
46.37
67.38
58.14
51.68
44.98
28.15
highest (intraday)
46.91
60.80
67.29
55.00
59.67
75.79
67.00
59.70
59.75
43.99
25.59
40.82
47.69
42.81
32.80
54.5
49.12
45.95
36.61
11.90
Annual return Delhaize Group share(1)
lowest (intraday)
-27.3%
-19.1%
5.3%
23.8%
-26.6%
-4.7%
16.1%
0.7%
39.9%
136.3%
Evolution Belgian All Shares Return index
18.80%
-20.8%
2.7%
31.6%
-47.6%
-1.9%
+26.2%
+28.1%
+38.2%
+16.0%
Dividend (in €)
Gross dividend
1.40
1.76
1.72
1.60
1.48
1.44
1.32
1.20
1.12
1.00
Net dividend
1.05
1.32
1.29
1.20
1.11
1.08
0.99
0.90
0.84
0.75
Dividend return(2)
3.5%
3.0%
2.3%
2.2%
2.5%
1.8%
1.6%
1.6%
1.5%
1.8%
Share price/shareholders' equity(3)
0,58
0.81
1.09
1.22
1.07
1.66
1.73
1.47
1.84
1.36
Share price/basic earnings per share(3)
28,8
9.2
9.6
10.4
9.4
14.3
17.0
14.2
17.5
13.5
Share price/diluted earnings per share(3)
29,1
9.3
9.7
10.6
9.6
14.9
17.8
14.9
18.1
13.5
Annual volume of Delhaize Group shares traded (in
millions of €; NYSE Euronext Brussels)(4)
4 188
3 895
5 216
5 633
6 754
8 141
6 548
3 686
3 581
2 021
Annual volume of Delhaize Group shares traded (in
millions of shares;
NYSE Euronext Brussel)(4)
128.2
74.7
89.3
115.1
146.7
121.9
113.1
71.9
81.1
72.7
101 921
101 892
101 555
100 871
100 583
100 281
96 457
94 705
93 669
92 625
3 083.1
4 423
5 613
5 409
4 446
6 037
6 091
5 228
5 241
3 777
5 144
7 069
7 400
7 472
6 849
8 281
8 726
8 171
7 849
6 805
Ratios
Number of Shares
Number of shares (in thousands;
year-end)
Market Capitalization
Market capitalization (in millions of €; year-end)
Enterprise value(3) (5)
(1) Capital gains recorded during the year, including net dividend and reinvestment.
(2) Net dividend divided by share price at year-end.
(3) Cannot be calculated for years before 2003, since no IFRS financials are available before 2003.
(4) Excluding shares traded on the New York Stock Exchange.
(5) Enterprise value = market capitalization + net debt.
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 171
glossary
glossary
Affiliated store
Company-operated store
A store operated by an independent retailer to whom Delhaize Group
sells its products at wholesale
prices and who benefits from the
trade name and knowhow of Delhaize Group.
A store operated directly by Delhaize Group.
American Depositary Receipt
(ADR)
An American Depositary Receipt
evidences an American Depositary
Share (ADS).
American Depositary Share
(ADS)
An American Depositary Share represents ownership in the common
shares of a non-U.S. corporation.
The underlying common shares are
held by a U.S. bank as depositary
agent. The holder of an ADS benefits
from dividend and voting rights pertaining to the underlying common
share through the bank that issued
the ADS. Each Delhaize Group ADS
represents one share of Delhaize
Group common stock and is traded
on the New York Stock Exchange.
Average shareholders’ equity
Shareholders’ equity at the beginning of the year plus shareholders’
equity at the end of the year, divided
by two.
Basic earnings per share
Profit or loss attributable to ordinary
equity holders of the parent entity
divided by the weighted average
number of ordinary shares outstanding during the period. Basic
earnings per share are calculated
on profit from continuing operations
less minority interests attributable to
continuing operations, and on the
Group share in net profit.
172 //
Comparable store sales
Sales from the same stores, including relocations and expansions, and
adjusted for calendar effects.
Cost of sales
Cost of sales includes purchases of
products sold and all costs associated with getting the products into
the retail stores, including buying,
warehousing and transportation
costs. Finally, Cost of Sales includes
appropriate vendor allowances.
Delhaize Belgium
Delhaize Belgium is not a separate
legal entity. In the consolidated
financial statements, any reference
to “Delhaize Belgium” is a reference
to the consolidation of the statutory
accounts of the Belgian companies,
of which the major ones are Delhaize Group SA, Delimmo SA, Delhome SA, Aniserco SA, Points Plus
Punten SA, Wambacq & Peeters
SA, Wintrucks SA and the companies acquired as part of the Cash
Fresh acquisition (see Note 36 to the
Financial Statements), excluding corporate expenses. In the remainder
of the document, “Delhaize Belgium”
refers to the operations of Delhaize
Group in Belgium, the Grand-Duchy
of Luxembourg and France.
Diluted earnings per share
Calculated by adjusting the profit or
loss attributable to ordinary equity
shareholders and the weighted
average number of shares outstanding for the effects of all dilutive
potential ordinary shares, including those related to convertible
instruments, options or warrants
or shares issued upon the satisfaction of specified conditions. Diluted
earnings per share are calculated
on profit from continuing operations
less minority interests attributable to
continuing operations, and on the
Group share in net profit.
Direct goods
Goods sold to customers.
EBITDA
Operating profit plus depreciation,
amortization and impairment.
Enterprise value
Market capitalization plus net debt.
Free cash flow
Cash flow before financing activities,
investment in debt securities and
sale and maturity of debt securities.
Gross margin
Gross profit divided by revenues.
Gross profit
Revenues minus cost of sales.
Indirect goods
Goods necessary to operate the
business, but which are not sold to
customers, such as office and store
equipment.
Net debt
Non-current financial liabilities,
plus current financial liabilities and
derivatives liabilities, minus derivative assets, investments in securities,
and cash and cash equivalents.
Net debt to equity ratio
Net debt divided by total equity.
Net financial expenses
Finance costs less income from
investments.
Net margin
Net profit attributed to equity holders
of the Group divided by revenues.
Operating leases
A lease that does not qualify as a
finance lease and therefore is not
recorded on the balance sheet.
Operating lease costs are classified
in rent expense in cost of sales and
in selling, general and administrative expenses.
Operating margin
Operating profit divided by revenues.
Organic revenue growth
Sales growth excluding sales from
acquisitions and divestitures at
identical currency exchange rates,
and adjusted for calendar effects.
sale of groceries and pet products),
net of discounts, allowances and
rebates granted to those customers.
Selling, general and
administrative expenses
Selling, general and administrative
expenses include store operating
expenses, costs incurred for activities which serve securing sales,
administrative and advertising
expenses.
Total debt
Other operating income
Treasury shares
Primarily rental income on investment property, gains on sale of
fixed assets, recycling income and
services rendered to wholesale customers.
The number of shares issued by the
Company, excluding treasury shares.
Shares repurchased by one of the
Group’s legal entities and that are
not cancelled as of year-end date.
Treasury shares are excluded from
the number of shares outstanding
and excluded from the calculation
of the weighted average number of
shares for the purpose of calculating earnings per share.
Pay-out ratio (net earnings)
Underlying operating profit
Proposed dividends on current year
earnings divided by current year
Group share in net profit.
Operating profit (as reported)
excluding fixed assets impairment
charges, restructuring charges,
store closing expenses, gains/
losses on disposal of fixed assets
and other items that management
considers as not being representative of the Group’s operating performance of the period.
Return on equity
Group share in net profit (loss) divided
by average shareholders’ equity.
Revenues
Revenues include the sale of goods
and point of sale services to customers, including wholesale and
affiliated customers, relating to the
normal activity of the Company (the
Withholding by a corporation or
financial institution of a certain percentage of dividend payments due
to tax legislation.
Stock Keeping Unit.
Primarily store closing expenses,
impairment losses, losses on the
sale of fixed assets and hurricanerelated expenses.
Outstanding shares
Withholding tax
SKU
Long-term
financial
liabilities,
including current portion and obligations under finance leases, plus
short-term financial liabilities net
of derivative instruments related to
financial liabilities.
Other operating expenses
shares, adjusted by the number of
shares cancelled, repurchased or
issued during the period multiplied
by a time-weighting factor.
Weighted average number
of shares outstanding
Number of shares outstanding at the
beginning of the period less treasury
DELHAIZE GROUP ANNUAL REPORT ‘12 // 173
Company Information
Operations
Registered Office:
United States
Company Support Office:
P.O. Box 1330, 2110 Executive Drive
Salisbury - NC 28145-1330
U.S.A.
Tel : +1 704 633 8250
www.foodlion.com
www.bottomdollarfood.com
Delhaize Group SA
rue Osseghemstraat 53
1080 Brussels
Belgium
Tel: +32 2 412 21 11 - Fax: +32 2 412 21 94
Delhaize Group
Square Marie Curie 40
1070 Brussels
Belgium
Tel: +32 2 412 22 11 - Fax: +32 2 412 22 22
http://www.delhaizegroup.com
Company number: 0402 206 045
Delhaize Brothers and Co. “The Lion”
(Delhaize Group) SA is a Belgian company
formed in 1867 and converted into a limited
company on February 22, 1962.
Investors and Media
For all questions regarding Delhaize Group
and its stock, please contact:
Delhaize Group
Investor Relations Department
Square Marie Curie 40
1070 Brussels
Belgium
Tel.: +32 2 412 21 51 - Fax.: +32 2 412 29 76
Questions can be sent to
[email protected]
Information regarding Delhaize Group,
including press releases, annual reports
and share price can be found in three
languages (English, French and Dutch) on
Delhaize Group’s website
www.delhaizegroup.com.
FOOD LION - BOTTOM DOLLAR FOOD
HANNAFORD
145 Pleasant Hill Road
Scarborough – ME 04074
U.S.A.
Tel : +1 207 883 2911 - Fax : +1 207 883 7555
www.hannaford.com
SWEETBAY SUPERMARKET
3801 Sugar Palm Drive
Tampa – FL 33619
U.S.A.
Tel : +1 813 620 1139 - Fax : +1 813 627 9766
www.sweetbaysupermarket.com
Belgium, G.D. of Luxembourg
DELHAIZE BELGIUM
Rue Osseghemstraat 53 - 1080 Brussels
Belgium
Tel: +32 2 412 21 11 - Fax: +32 2 412 21 94
www.delhaize.be
Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina
and Montenegro
MAXI
Jurija Gagarina 14 - 11070 Belgrade - Serbia
Tel: +381 11 715 34 00 - Fax: +381 11 715 39 10
www.maxi.rs
Romania
MEGA IMAGE
95 Siret Str. - Sektor 1 - Bucuresti - Romania
Tel: +40 21 224 66 77 - Fax: +40 21 224 60 11
www.mega-image.ro
Bulgaria
PICCADILLY
Varna 9002, 1A, Bitolia Str. - Bulgaria
Tel.: +359 52 66 34 34 - Fax: +359 52 66 34 56
www.piccadilly.bg
Indonesia
PT LION SUPER INDO
Menara Bidakara 2, 19th floor
Jl Jend. Gatot Soebroto kav 71-73
Jakarta Selatan 12870 - Indonesia
Tel.: +62 21 2929 3333
Fax: +62 21 29069441-45
www.superindo.co.id
Greece
ALFA BETA VASSILOPOULOS
81, Spaton Ave. - Gerakas Attica
Greece 153 44
Tel: +30 210 66 08 000
Fax: +30 210 66 12 675
www.ab.gr
About the people included in the pictures in this report
Most of the people portrayed in the pictures in this annual report included in the sections “Strategy,” “Review” are our
associates or our associates’ family members.
Legal Version of the Annual Report
Only the French version of the annual report has legal force. The Dutch and English versions represent translations of the
French original. The consistency between the different language versions has been verified by Delhaize Group under
its own responsibility.
Credits
You can also subscribe through the email
alert service to receive other information:
agendas of the general meetings, press
releases, projects of modifications of
Articles of Association, special reports
from the Board of Directors, publication of
annual report, statutory accounts, dividend
payment, number of outstanding shares
and warrants, and shareholder notifications.
@
For more info, see also
www.delhaizegroup.com
Design & production: www.chriscom.be - Photos: Patrick Schneider Photography (U.S.), Pascal Broze - Reporters
(Belgium), Jean-Michel Byl (Belgium), Arnaud Ghys (Belgium)
Caution Concerning Forward-looking Statements
All statements that are included or incorporated by reference in this annual report or that are otherwise attributable to
Delhaize Group or persons acting on behalf of Delhaize Group, other than statements of historical fact, which address
activities, events or developments that Delhaize Group expects or anticipates will or may occur in the future, including,
without limitation, statements regarding expected financial performance; expansion and growth of Delhaize Group’s
business; anticipated store openings and renovations; future capital expenditures; projected revenue growth or synergies resulting from acquisitions and other transactions; efforts to control or reduce costs, improve buying practices
and control shrink; contingent liabilities; future consumer spending; forecasted currency exchange rates or inflation;
expected competition; and business strategy, are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the U.S. federal
securities laws that are subject to risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified as statements that include phrases such as “believe,” “project,” “target,” “predict,” “estimate,” “forecast,” “strategy,”
“may,” “goal,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “foresee,” “likely,” “will,” “should” or other similar words or phrases.
Although Delhaize Group believes such statements are based on reasonable assumptions, actual outcomes and results
may differ materially from those projected. Accordingly, all forward-looking statements should be evaluated with the
understanding of their inherent uncertainty. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from
expectations of Delhaize Group include, but are not limited to, those factors described in the annual report in the chapter
entitled ”Risk Factors” on p. 58 and under Item 3 under Part 1 of Delhaize Group’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for the
fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on April 3, 2012. Delhaize
Group undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future
developments or otherwise, and disclaims any obligation to do so.
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