Matrox RT.X2 User Guide

Matrox RT.X2 User Guide
Matrox RT.X2
User Guide
May 11, 2006
Y10979-301-0100
Trademarks
Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd. ....................................... Matrox®, Axio™, DigiSuite™, Flex CPU™, Flex GPU™, RT.X2™
Adobe Systems Inc.......................................................... Adobe®, After Effects®, Audition®, Encore DVD®, Photoshop®,
Premiere®, Adobe Media Encoder™, Clip Notes™, Flash™
Apple Computer, Inc. ....................................................... Apple®, FireWire™
Autodesk, Inc. ................................................................. Autodesk®, 3ds Max®, Combustion®
eyeon Software Inc. ........................................................ Fusion™
International Business Machines Corporation .................. IBM®, VGA®
Microsoft Corporation...................................................... Microsoft®, ActiveMovie®, DirectShow®, DirectX®, Windows®,
Windows Media®, Video for Windows™
NewTek, Inc .................................................................... LightWave 3D®
Panasonic (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.).................. Panasonic®, DVCPRO™, DVCPRO50™, DVCPRO HD™
RealNetworks, Inc. .......................................................... RealNetworks®, RealMedia™
Sony Corporation ............................................................ Sony®, DVCAM™, HDV™
Victor Company of Japan, Limited (JVC) .......................... JVC™, D-9™, HDV™
All other nationally and internationally recognized trademarks and tradenames are hereby acknowledged.
Copyright © 2006 Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd. • All rights reserved.
Disclaimer Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd. reserves the right to make changes in specifications at any time and without notice. The information provided by this document is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by Matrox Electronic
Systems Ltd. for its use; nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties resulting from its use. No license is granted
under any patents or patent rights of Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd.
Unauthorized recording or use of broadcast television programming, video tape, or other copyrighted material may violate copyright laws.
Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd. assumes no responsibility for the illegal duplication, use, or other acts that infringe on the rights of copyright
owners.
Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd.
1055 St. Regis Blvd., Dorval, Quebec, Canada H9P 2T4
Tel: (514) 685-2630 Fax: (514) 685-2853 World Wide Web: www.matrox.com
Contents
Chapter 1
Introducing Matrox RT.X2
Welcome to Matrox RT.X2 ...............................................................2
Matrox RT.X2 key features ....................................................................2
About this manual ............................................................................3
Style conventions...................................................................................3
How video formats are expressed ........................................................3
Other documentation .......................................................................4
Chapter 2
Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
A note about running other programs with Adobe Premiere Pro ....6
Setting your system’s volume levels ...............................................6
Running the Audio Drift Detection test............................................. 7
Loading project presets...................................................................8
Setting up your scratch disks ..........................................................9
Displaying warnings in Adobe Premiere Pro’s Events panel ...........9
Mixing SD and HD clips in a project .................................................9
Defining your General settings....................................................... 10
Specifying your video output settings .................................................. 13
Selecting your DV-1394 output settings ............................................... 15
Defining your Video Rendering settings......................................... 15
Defining your Capture settings ...................................................... 16
Specifying your video capture settings ................................................ 16
Specifying your audio capture settings ................................................ 18
Performing a Premiere Pro export to disk .....................................22
Selecting your MPEG-2 I-frame settings .......................................24
Exporting material using Matrox Media Encoder ..........................26
Setting up Matrox DV/HDV device control..................................... 27
Exporting your sequence to tape .................................................. 27
Preparing your tapes for recording...................................................... 27
Avoiding missing frames when exporting to DV tape........................... 27
Exporting to DV tape using DV-1394 device control ............................28
ii
Creating an SD project in 16:9 format ........................................... 29
Chapter 3
Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
Available effects ............................................................................ 32
How to apply a Matrox video effect in Adobe Premiere Pro......... 33
How to apply a Matrox video transition in Adobe Premiere Pro ... 33
Transforming your clip ................................................................... 34
Using the transform controls ...............................................................34
Transforming a clip in the Program Monitor.........................................36
Cropping your clip ......................................................................... 37
Using Select Crop................................................................................38
Applying a mask to your effect ...................................................... 39
Using Select Mask ...............................................................................40
Creating a color correction ............................................................41
Using the color balance graph.............................................................43
Performing an auto balance ................................................................45
Matching colors between two clips .....................................................46
Using the luma mapping graph............................................................48
Creating a secondary color correction ......................................... 50
Using the selective key graph..............................................................55
Creating a color pass effect ................................................................59
Creating a 3D DVE effect .............................................................. 60
Creating a 4-corner pin effect....................................................... 62
Creating a blur/soft focus effect ................................................... 64
Overview of the chroma key effects ............................................. 65
Creating a chroma key or chroma key shadow effect.................. 66
Using the chroma key graph to modify key colors and
perform an auto key ...........................................................................69
Creating a crystallize effect........................................................... 72
Creating a lens flare effect ............................................................ 74
Overview of the luma key effect.................................................... 76
Creating a luma key effect .............................................................77
Using the luma key graph .................................................................... 78
Contents
iii
Creating a mask effect ..................................................................80
Creating a mask blur effect ...........................................................82
Creating a mask mosaic effect......................................................84
Creating a move & scale effect .....................................................86
Creating an old movie effect..........................................................88
Creating a page curl effect ............................................................92
Creating a pan & scan effect .........................................................94
Creating a shadow effect ..............................................................96
Creating a shine effect ..................................................................98
Creating a surface finish effect.................................................... 102
Creating a track matte effect ...................................................... 105
Creating a wipe transition ............................................................ 107
Using the Matrox chroma clamper effect.................................... 109
Selecting your speed control method.......................................... 109
About Adobe Premiere Pro’s fixed effects .................................. 109
Matrox RT.X2 realtime guidelines ................................................. 110
Supported graphics formats ................................................................111
Limitations ...........................................................................................111
Chapter 4
Using Matrox RT.X2 with Video for Windows Programs
Overview ....................................................................................... 114
Using VFW programs without the RT.X2 hardware ...................... 114
Before you start rendering ........................................................... 115
Selecting color space conversion options .......................................... 116
Rendering material to a Matrox VFW .avi file ............................... 118
Configuring the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame codec ................................. 119
Configuring the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec .......................... 120
Contents
iv
Chapter 5
Using the Matrox WYSIWYG Plug-ins
Overview.......................................................................................122
Using the Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel ..................................122
Required steps to use the WYSIWYG plug-ins .............................123
Adobe After Effects ........................................................................... 123
Adobe Photoshop ............................................................................. 123
Autodesk 3ds Max ............................................................................ 123
Autodesk Combustion ....................................................................... 123
eyeon Fusion ..................................................................................... 123
NewTek LightWave 3D ...................................................................... 124
Chapter 6
Monitoring Your Matrox RT.X2 System
Using X.info to display RT.X2 information .....................................126
Monitoring your Adobe Premiere Pro memory usage ....................... 126
Displaying system information ........................................................... 126
Displaying hardware information ....................................................... 128
Monitoring your RT.X2 card’s operating temperatures...................... 129
Enabling and disabling the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects
in Adobe Premiere Pro ..................................................................... 129
Error notification ................................................................................ 130
Appendix A
Understanding Standard and Advanced Pulldown
Overview.......................................................................................132
Standard 2:3 pulldown..................................................................132
Matrox RT.X2 implementation of standard reverse pulldown ............ 133
Advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown ..........................................................133
Matrox RT.X2 implementation of advanced reverse pulldown........... 134
Appendix B
Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
Overview.......................................................................................136
Working with SD “24P” material ...................................................136
486p @ 23.98 fps workflow example ..................................................137
Contents
v
Working with HD material ............................................................ 138
HDV workflow example ..................................................................... 139
Capturing HDV and SD material to edit in SD .............................. 140
Using the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec .............................. 141
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec workflow example for offline editing........ 141
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec workflow example for online editing ....... 143
Using Matrox RT.X2 to edit Matrox Axio offline HD projects ....... 144
Supported video compression formats ....................................... 145
Supported master output formats ............................................... 146
Appendix C
Matrox RT.X2 Customer Support
Getting the most support............................................................. 148
Registration ....................................................................................... 148
Keep up to date with our web site..................................................... 148
Contacting us .................................................................................... 148
Appendix D
Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
Glossary of terms ........................................................................ 150
Index ...................................................................................... 161
Contents
vi
Your notes
Contents
Chapter
1
Introducing Matrox RT.X2
This chapter outlines some of
the features of Matrox RT.X2
and describes the available
Matrox RT.X2 documentation.
2
Welcome to Matrox RT.X2
Matrox RT.X2 lets you get the most from Adobe Premiere Pro and is ideal for
corporate communications, event videographers, project studios, educational
facilities, and digital filmmakers. Designed primarily for realtime native HDV
and DV editing, Matrox RT.X2 also provides a high-quality MPEG-2 I-frame
codec so you can capture other HD and SD formats using your Matrox RT.X2
system’s analog inputs and mix all types of footage on the timeline in real time.
Matrox RT.X2 key features
The following are key features of Matrox RT.X2:
• Realtime multi-layer workflows that combine HD and SD material from
analog and digital sources.
• Realtime Matrox Flex CPU effects, including color correction, speed
changes, chroma/luma keying, and many more.
• Realtime and accelerated Matrox Flex GPU effects, including 3D DVEs,
blur/glow/soft focus, shine, and many more.
• Native HDV and MPEG-2 4:2:2 I-frame HD editing.
• Native DV/DVCAM, DVCPRO, and MPEG-2 4:2:2 I-frame SD editing.
• Realtime mixing of HD and SD clips in a project.
• Realtime mixed-format multi-camera editing.
• Realtime high-quality hardware downconverting for SD output of an HD
project.
• Accelerated export to DVD, multimedia formats including Flash Video, and
Adobe Clip Notes.
• WYSIWYG plug-ins for many popular compositing and animation
programs, including Adobe After Effects, Adobe Photoshop, and Autodesk
Combustion.
• DV-1394, composite, S-Video, and SD/HD analog component video input
and output.
• Full-resolution DVI output for previewing the video output on a DVI
monitor that accepts digital input, such as an inexpensive digital flat-panel
display.
Chapter 1, Introducing Matrox RT.X2
3
About this manual
This manual explains how to use Matrox RT.X2 with the provided Matrox
software, including how to use your RT.X2 system with Adobe Premiere Pro.
Style conventions
The following style conventions are used in this manual:
• The names of files, directory paths, and manuals appear in italics. For
example:
$
The data is stored in the sample.wav file.
$
The file is located in your C:\Windows\System directory.
$
Please refer to your Matrox RT.X2 Installation Manual.
• Menus and commands that you need to choose are displayed in the form
Menu > Command. For example, File > Save means click File in the
menu bar, then click Save in the menu that appears.
• The names of keys are displayed in small capital bold letters, such as the
CTRL key.
• A plus (+) sign is used to indicate combinations of keys and/or mouse
operations. For example:
$
CTRL+C means to hold down the CTRL key while pressing the C key.
$
SHIFT+click means to hold down the SHIFT key while you click an item
with the mouse.
How video formats are expressed
With the exception of NTSC and PAL, all SD and HD video formats are
expressed in the Matrox RT.X2 documentation and dialog boxes as follows:
VRp or i @ n fps
Where:
• VR is the vertical resolution.
• p or i represents either progressive or interlaced video.
• @ n fps is the frame rate in frames per second.
Here are some examples:
• 486p @ 23.98 fps
per second.
Represents 720×486 progressive video at 23.98 frames
• HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps Represents 1440×1080 interlaced video at 29.97
frames per second. This format is used for HDV material. All HDV and HD
analog component video on Matrox RT.X2 is captured to HDV 1080i format.
About this manual
4
• 1080i @ 29.97 fps Represents 1920×1080 interlaced video at 29.97
frames per second. This format is supported on Matrox RT.X2 for HD analog
component video input and output only.
Other documentation
In addition to this user guide, the following Matrox RT.X2 documents are
available:
• Matrox RT.X2 Quick Installation Guide Provides brief installation
instructions to help you quickly set up your Matrox RT.X2 system.
• Matrox RT.X2 Installation Manual Provides detailed instructions for
installing your Matrox RT.X2 hardware and software, including how to
connect your external devices to the RT.X2 breakout box.
• Matrox RT.X2 Release Notes Provides any important last-minute
information and operational limitations.
Chapter 1, Introducing Matrox RT.X2
Chapter
2
Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro
Settings
This chapter explains how to
define various settings for
using Matrox RT.X2 with Adobe
Premiere Pro. This includes
specifying your project and
export settings.
6
A note about running other programs with
Adobe Premiere Pro
For the best performance, you shouldn’t run any other programs at the same time
as Adobe Premiere Pro. If you choose to do so, however, make sure that you start
Adobe Premiere Pro and open your Matrox RT.X2 project before starting the
other programs. Otherwise, Adobe Premiere Pro may fail to start. If this happens,
quit all programs and then restart Adobe Premiere Pro.
¥ Tip When Adobe Premiere Pro is running, you can monitor your Adobe
Premiere Pro memory usage. To do this, hold your mouse pointer over the
Matrox X.info ( ) icon. For details on using Matrox X.info, see Chapter 6,
“Monitoring Your Matrox RT.X2 System.”
Setting your system’s volume levels
To properly capture and play back audio in Adobe Premiere Pro, make sure
you’ve set appropriate recording and playback volume levels for your system as
follows:
1 Double-click the speaker icon on the Windows taskbar.
¥ Tip If you don’t see the speaker icon on your Windows taskbar, run
Sounds and Audio Devices from the Windows Control Panel, select Place
volume icon in the taskbar, then click OK.
2 Choose Options > Properties.
3 From the Mixer device list, make sure that the audio device you want to use
with your Matrox RT.X2 system is selected.
4 Select the Recording option, then select all check boxes in the list. Click
OK.
5 For each of the controls (Line-in, Microphone, etc.), make sure the
Volume sliders are at an appropriate level, such as at half-level. As well,
clear all the Mute check boxes.
¦ Note Some items in Volume Control may contain a Select check box
instead of a Mute check box. Enable Select to turn on sound for those items.
6 Choose Options > Properties.
7 Select the Playback option, then select all check boxes in the list. Click OK.
8 For each of the controls (Line-in, Wave, etc.), make sure the Volume sliders
are at an appropriate level, such as at half-level. As well, clear all the Mute
check boxes.
9 Close the dialog box.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
7
Running the Audio Drift Detection test
The first time you start Adobe Premiere Pro, you’ll be prompted to run the Audio
Drift Detection test. This test ensures proper audio and video synchronization
between your sound card and your Matrox RT.X2 hardware during analog
captures and playback. Click Start to run the test (it will take about five minutes
to complete).
Once you’ve completed the test, you won’t be prompted to run the test again
unless:
• You’ve changed your sound card.
• You have more than one sound card installed in your computer and have
selected a different sound card as your preferred device for sound recording
(capture). For details on how to change your preferred device for sound
recording, see your Windows documentation.
There are, however, several instances in which you’ll want to manually start the
test again:
• You’ve replaced your sound card with a similar model. (If you replace your
sound card with a different model, the Matrox realtime plug-in will
automatically prompt you to run the test again.)
• You’ve updated or re-installed the drivers for your sound card.
• You’ve moved your sound card to another slot in your computer.
° To run the Audio Drift Detection test manually:
1 Choose Start > Programs > Matrox Mx.tools > Audio Drift Detection.
2 From the Test Duration list, select a duration for the test. In most cases, five
minutes will give you good results.
¦ Note If you often perform long analog captures (longer than one hour), it’s
recommended that you select one of the longer test durations, such as
10 minutes.
3 Click Start to run the test.
Running the Audio Drift Detection test
8
Loading project presets
The Matrox realtime plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro includes project presets that
you can load to immediately apply appropriate Matrox RT.X2 settings. For more
information about using the Matrox project presets for working with different
types of projects, see Appendix B, “Matrox RT.X2 Workflows.”
° To load a Matrox project preset:
1 Start Adobe Premiere Pro. The New Project dialog box appears.
2 From the appropriate Matrox folder (Matrox - SD to create an SD project,
or Matrox - HD to create an HD project), select the preset that matches the
type of project you want to create. For example, if you want to create an
NTSC project in which you’ll capture clips to DV/DVCAM format and work
in a standard 4:3 editing environment, expand the NTSC and Standard
folders under Matrox - SD, then select the DV preset.
¦ Note If you’ll be capturing HDV material, select the appropriate Matrox
HDV preset for your HDV footage. For example, if your footage was shot in
Sony 1080/60i format, select the Matrox HDV 1080i 29.97 fps preset. If your
footage was shot in the Sony 1080/50i format, select the Matrox HDV 1080i
25 fps HDV preset.
3 Under Location, specify where you want to save the project on your A/V
drive.
4 Under Name, specify a name for your project.
5 Click OK to apply the settings.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
9
Setting up your scratch disks
When specifying the location of your scratch disks in Adobe Premiere Pro, make
sure you follow the recommendations in your Adobe Premiere Pro User Guide.
For example, always store your video and audio files on an A/V drive.
° To specify your scratch disks:
1 Choose Edit > Preferences > Scratch Disks.
2 Under Scratch Disks, select an appropriate A/V drive letter for each scratch
disk type.
¥ Tip To enhance performance, store your media cache files on a drive
separate from your video files.
3 Click OK to save your preferences.
¡ Important Make sure that you specify the same scratch disk settings for all
your projects. This will help shorten the amount of time it takes to open new or
existing projects.
Displaying warnings in Adobe Premiere Pro’s
Events panel
Matrox RT.X2 uses Adobe Premiere Pro’s Events panel to issue certain error
messages and warnings. To display these, either double-click the alert icon (
),
(
), or (
) on Adobe Premiere Pro’s status bar, or choose Window >
Events. For more information about using the Events panel, see your Adobe
Premiere Pro documentation.
Mixing SD and HD clips in a project
Matrox RT.X2 supports realtime playback of SD clips in an HD project, and HD
clips in an SD project. To do this, however, the clips must be scaled to your
project’s frame size. If you want the scaling to be performed when you import the
clips into your project, choose Edit > Preferences > General and select
Default scale to frame size. This option does not affect clips that have already
been imported into your project. To scale individual clips in a sequence,
right-click the clip in the Timeline panel and choose Scale to Frame Size.
Depending on your project’s video format, realtime scaling of clips is supported
as shown in the following table:
Project video format
Supported realtime scaling
HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps
HDV 1080i @ 25 fps
NTSC
PAL
Upscale NTSC clips
Upscale PAL clips
Downscale HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps clips
Downscale HDV 1080i @ 25 fps clips
Setting up your scratch disks
10
Defining your General settings
The Matrox Playback Settings dialog box has several pages that you can use to
specify various settings for editing in Adobe Premiere Pro on Matrox RT.X2.
When you select a Matrox project preset, such as DV Standard, a Matrox
editing mode is automatically set for your project, and several settings are
optimized for editing on Matrox RT.X2.
° To specify your General settings on Matrox RT.X2:
1 Choose Project > Project Settings > General and click the Playback
Settings button.
2 Click the General tab.
3 Under Scrubbing Mode, select Frame, 1st Field, or 2nd Field to indicate
whether you want to display frames or only one field when you scrub a
sequence in the Timeline panel. For example, you may want to scrub the
first or second field to eliminate the flickering that can be seen in your
picture when you pause while scrubbing frames of interlaced video.
Scrubbing fields can also be used to check for any dropped fields that may
have occurred in your video during a telecine process.
¦ Note If you choose to scrub fields when working with progressive scan
video, you won’t normally see a difference between scrubbing the first or
second field.
4 Under Video Luma Level, select the type of processing that you want to be
applied to luminance levels in your video when rendering and previewing
video in a sequence:
$
Broadcast Processes video using the standard legal range of luminance
levels for broadcast video. Any super black or super white luminance levels
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
11
(that is, levels that fall below the standard black level or exceed the standard
white level) are clipped.
$
Post Production Processes video for post production. Any super black
or super white luminance levels in your video are retained.
5 Under Error Reporting, select Report dropped frames on playback if
you want to be warned each time frames are dropped when you play back
video from the Timeline panel. Otherwise, clear this option.
¦ Note Once playback of the sequence has stopped, a red bar will appear over
segments of the sequence that have dropped frames (even if you don’t choose
to report dropped frames).
6 Under Frame Hold, select Enable Frame Hold if you want to use Adobe
Premiere Pro’s Frame Hold to freeze on a particular frame of a clip in a
sequence. When you do this, any Frame Hold effects applied to your clips
will require rendering. If you’ve selected Enable Frame Hold and
encounter repeated frames when playing back nested sequences or clips with
negative speed changes, or you find that segments are identified with a red
bar that don’t actually require rendering, you can clear this option. When
you do this, however, any Frame Hold effects you’ve applied will be ignored.
7 Under Accelerated Premiere Pro Effects, you can select various options
for your realtime/accelerated Premiere Pro effects:
$
Disable accelerated scaling to frame size Select this if you want to
disable the realtime playback of clips that are scaled to your project’s frame
size as explained in “Mixing SD and HD clips in a project” on page 9. When
you apply a DVE or other effect that resizes a realtime scaled clip, the
full-screen image is resized, including any letterbox or pillarbox black bars.
By disabling the accelerated scaling to frame size, any black bars in your
scaled clips will become transparent, but your scaled clips will require
rendering.
$
Disable accelerated transitions Select this if you’d like to disable the
realtime/accelerated playback of Premiere Pro transitions that support this
feature. Because Matrox RT.X2 emulates Premiere Pro’s non-realtime
version of these transitions, if you don’t like the emulation you can disable
the accelerated transitions to revert to Premiere Pro’s non-realtime version
that requires rendering.
$
Accelerate Motion using Select this if you’d like realtime/accelerated
playback of Premiere Pro Motion effects. You can then select one of the
following to determine how you want the Motion effects to be processed:
Maps the Motion effects to the Matrox
CPU-based move & scale effect, which gives the best results if you only
want to create picture-in-picture effects without rotation. If you apply
rotation when you set up a Motion effect, it will require rendering.
• Matrox move & scale
Defining your General settings
12
Maps the Motion effects to the Matrox
hardware-accelerated 3D DVE effect, which supports rotation. The
picture, however, won’t be as sharp as when you map the Motion effects
to the Matrox move & scale effect. You can map to the Matrox 3D DVE
effect only if you have a display card that supports the Matrox
hardware-accelerated effects. For more information, see “Enabling and
disabling the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe Premiere
Pro” on page 129.
• Matrox 3D DVE
8 Under Realtime Indicator Threshold, drag the slider to set the threshold at
which Matrox RT.X2 determines that a segment in the Timeline panel is
realtime. Drag to the left to set a lower (safer) threshold, or to the right to set
a higher (more aggressive) threshold. For example, if you find that Matrox
RT.X2 does not identify any segments as being non-realtime (that is, with a
red bar) and you have dropped frames when you export your project to tape,
you can set a safer threshold to force more segments to require rendering and
avoid having dropped frames. Alternately, if you find that some segments are
identified with a red bar but they don’t have dropped frames, you can set a
more aggressive threshold.
9 Click OK to save your settings and return to the Project Settings dialog
box.
The following sections explain how to specify the other settings available in the
Matrox Playback Settings dialog box for editing on Matrox RT.X2.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
13
Specifying your video output settings
You can specify various settings to configure your video output signals from the
RT.X2 breakout box.
° To specify your video output settings:
1 Choose Project > Project Settings > General and click the Playback
Settings button.
2 Click the Video Output tab.
3 Under Master Output Format, select the video format you want for all
video outputs from the RT.X2 breakout box. Depending on your project’s
video format, you may not be able to change the master output format.
4 If the Aspect Ratio Conversion list is available, such as when the video
output for an HD project is downconverted to NTSC or PAL, select one of
the following settings for the video output:
$
16x9 Letterbox Outputs the widescreen 16:9 picture in letterbox mode
by adding black bars at the top and bottom of the picture for display on a
standard 4:3 television screen.
$
Anamorphic
Outputs the widescreen 16:9 picture as horizontally
compressed 4:3 video, which retains the picture’s full vertical resolution
for display on a widescreen television. To display the video with the correct
proportions on an NTSC or PAL monitor, select the 16:9 display setting on
the monitor.
5 If your master output format is NTSC and your project’s video format is
486p @ 23.98 fps, under Pulldown Method, select the pulldown method
you want to be applied to your output video (Standard 2:3 or Advanced
2:3:3:2). You should select Advanced 2:3:3:2 only if you’ll be recording
to a DV-1394 device that supports this pulldown method. For more
information, see “Working with SD “24P” material” on page 136.
Defining your General settings
14
6 Under Analog Setup (NTSC), select the setup level you want for your
NTSC analog video:
$
0 IRE Applies a setup level of 0 IRE. You should select this option only
when working with a commercial DV-1394 device that uses the Japanese
analog NTSC setup of 0 IRE. For example, if the video appears too bright
when you play back DV clips on your NTSC monitor, you can change the
setup to 0 IRE to output your DV clips at the correct brightness.
$
7.5 IRE
Applies the standard NTSC setup level of 7.5 IRE.
7 Under Analog Output Type, select the type of analog video output you
want. If you’re outputting SD analog video, you can select Component or
Composite & S-Video. If you’re outputting HD analog video, the analog
output type will be set to Component.
8 Select Allow Super White to allow the highest luminance level of your
video output to exceed the standard maximum white level. Select Allow
Super Black to allow the lowest luminance level of your video output to fall
below the standard black level.
¦ Note Super white and super black should not be allowed when producing
your final video production for broadcast.
9 Click OK to save your settings and return to the Project Settings dialog
box.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
15
Selecting your DV-1394 output settings
You can choose to output a sequence from the Timeline panel over the 1394
interface to perform an export to DV tape, and select the format you want for
your DV-1394 output.
¦ Note These settings are not needed to export to an HDV device, and the
DV-1394 Output page won’t be available if you’re working with an HDV 1080i
project.
° To select your DV-1394 output settings:
1 Choose Project > Project Settings > General and click the Playback
Settings button.
2 Click the DV-1394 Output tab.
3 Select Enable 1394 output for export to tape if you want your sequence
to be output over the 1394 interface when you perform an export to tape (that
is, when you choose File > Export > Export to Tape). This lets you record
your sequence to the DV-1394 device connected to your RT.X2 system.
¡ Important Because this option requires additional system resources, you
may find that when this option is selected some effects that were previously
realtime will drop frames and require rendering (you’ll see a red bar over
these segments in your sequence). Therefore, you should select this option
only when you want to export your sequence to DV tape. When you perform
the export to tape, Adobe Premiere Pro will render the segments identified
by the red bar.
4 From the Output Format list, select the format you want for the DV-1394
output. For example, to record to a standard DV device, select Matrox
DV/DVCAM.
5 Click OK to save your settings and return to the Project Settings dialog
box.
Defining your Video Rendering settings
When you select a Matrox project preset, your Video Rendering settings for
editing on Matrox RT.X2 are automatically set for you. You can specify
additional Video Rendering settings as explained in your Adobe Premiere Pro
documentation.
Defining your Video Rendering settings
16
Defining your Capture settings
The Matrox Capture Settings dialog box has pages that you can use to specify
your settings for capturing video and audio in Adobe Premiere Pro on Matrox
RT.X2.
¦ Note When you specify your capture settings on Matrox RT.X2, VU meters
will be displayed to let you monitor your audio input levels. For more
information, see “Monitoring audio levels for capture” on page 21.
Specifying your video capture settings
Matrox RT.X2 lets you capture your video to various formats depending on your
project’s video format. For example, if you’re working with an SD project (such
as NTSC), you can capture to a DV format, such as DVCPRO, to create .avi files
for use in your SD Premiere Pro projects.
° To specify your settings for capturing video in Adobe Premiere Pro on
Matrox RT.X2:
1 Choose Project > Project Settings > Capture.
2 From the Capture Format list, select Matrox AVI.
3 Click the Configure button, then click the Video Capture Settings tab.
4 Under Input Device, select one of the following devices:
$
RT.X2 to capture material from an analog source connected to your RT.X2
breakout box.
$
DV-1394 to capture material from a DV-1394 device connected to your
RT.X2 breakout box. If you’re working with a 486p @ 23.98 fps project,
you can capture from a DV-1394 device only.
5 If you selected the RT.X2 breakout box as your input device, from the Input
Source list, select the type of input you want to capture (Component,
Composite, or S-Video). This will be set to Component when capturing
analog video for an HD project.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
17
Remarks
$
If you selected DV-1394 as your input device, the name of the DV-1394
device connected to your breakout box will appear in the Input Source box.
$
If Matrox RT.X2 can’t detect your source device when you start a capture,
you’ll receive an error message. Either black video will be captured or the
capture won’t be able to start until a valid input signal is present. In either
case, you must make sure that your source device is switched on and
properly connected to the breakout box to properly capture the video.
$
Matrox RT.X2 sets the Input Format to NTSC or PAL for an SD project.
If you’re working with an HDV 1080i (1440×1080) project, your analog
source video must be full-size 1080i (1920×1080), but it will be captured
to HDV 1080i (1440×1080) format.
6 From the Input Aspect Ratio list, select the aspect ratio of your source
video (4:3 or 16:9). For example, to capture video that was recorded using
the standard TV screen format, select 4:3. To capture video that was
recorded using the widescreen 16:9 format, select 16:9. If you’re defining
capture settings for an HD project, the Input Aspect Ratio will be set to
16:9.
7 Under Capture Format, select your desired capture format from the list. If
you’re capturing from a DV-1394 device, however, video will be captured to
native DV or HDV format (the Capture Format will be set to Native
DV/HDV). To capture to HDV format, you must be working with an HDV
1080i project.
¦ Note The capture formats that are available in the Capture Format list
depend on your project’s video format. For example, if you’re defining capture
settings for an SD project, only SD capture formats will be available.
Captures video to DV or DVCAM format.
$
Matrox DV/DVCAM
$
Matrox DVCPRO
$
Captures video to MPEG-2 intra-frame format
using the 4:2:2 Profile @ Main Level at a selected data rate (SD resolution
only). For the best results when capturing video clips on which you’ll be
applying chroma key effects, you should use this codec instead of a DV
codec.
$
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD Captures video to MPEG-2 intra-frame
format using the 4:2:2 Profile @ High Level at a selected data rate (HD
resolution only). This is the only capture format available to capture analog
video for an HDV 1080i project.
Captures video to DVCPRO format.
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame
8 If you selected Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame or Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD,
click the Configure button to configure your MPEG-2 I-frame settings. For
details on the available settings, see “Selecting your MPEG-2 I-frame
Defining your Capture settings
18
settings” on page 24. Once you’ve configured your settings, click OK to
return to the Matrox Capture Settings dialog box.
9 Select Use Automatic Gain Control (AGC) if you want the gain of your
composite or S-Video input signal to be adjusted automatically to
compensate for very bright or dark images. This improves the brightness or
contrast of your picture.
10 Click OK to save your settings and return to the Project Settings dialog
box.
Specifying your audio capture settings
You can specify various audio capture settings, such as to specify your input
source and the type of audio files (either stereo .wav or mono .wav) that you want
to create when capturing audio on Matrox RT.X2. When you capture a clip on
Matrox RT.X2, the clip’s video and audio are saved to an .avi file, and the clip’s
audio is also saved to one or more separate .wav files. You could choose to edit
the separate .wav files using audio post-processing software, such as Adobe
Audition.
° To specify your settings for capturing audio in Adobe Premiere Pro on
Matrox RT.X2:
1 Choose Project > Project Settings > Capture.
2 From the Capture Format list, select Matrox AVI.
3 Click the Configure button, then click the Audio Capture Settings tab:
4 If you selected the RT.X2 breakout box as your video input device (see
“Specifying your video capture settings” on page 16), you must also select
the source from which you want to capture audio. Your audio source must
match the audio input where you connected the cable labeled TO AUDIO
CARD IN from your RT.X2 breakout box as explained in your Matrox RT.X2
Installation Manual. For example, if you plugged the TO AUDIO CARD IN
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
19
connector into the Line-In jack (or corresponding jack) on your sound card,
select Line-In from the Input Source list.
Remarks
$
If all available audio inputs don’t appear in the Input Source list, select
List all audio inputs. If your audio input connection does not appear in
the list, you must unplug the TO AUDIO CARD IN connector and connect
it to an audio input on your sound card that appears in the list.
$
If your analog audio source appears with an * beside it in the list, your sound
card does not have matching audio inputs and outputs. In this case, choose
the audio source with an * that matches your audio input, make sure that
your source is playing back audio, and click Advanced Settings. In the
provided dialog box, select an analog audio passthrough. If you can hear
audio, then you’ve selected the correct analog audio source and
passthrough. If you can’t hear audio, try selecting a different analog audio
source and/or passthrough.
$
The Capture Format (bit depth) for your captured audio files is set to
16-bit.
5 If you don’t want the VU meters to be displayed each time you configure
your Matrox RT.X2 capture settings or open the Capture panel to start a
capture, clear Show VU meters. This option is selected by default. For
details on using the VU meters, see “Monitoring audio levels for capture” on
page 21.
6 Under Capture Files, indicate whether you want to capture to stereo or
mono audio files, and select which channels you want to save to separate
.wav files.
$
From the File Type list, select Stereo to save your captured audio to stereo
.wav files, or Mono to save your captured audio to mono .wav files.
$
From the Filename lists, select which stereo pairs or mono channels you
want to save to your .wav files. When capturing from a DV-1394 device,
you can capture up to two stereo files or up to four mono files. Select None
if you don’t want a particular .wav file to be created. When Matrox RT.X2
saves each .wav file, it assigns a .Stereo.wav or .Mono.wav suffix to the base
name you gave for the associated video (.avi) file. For example, if you’ve
named your video file MyFile.avi, the associated stereo audio files would
be named MyFile.Stereo1.wav, MyFile.Stereo2.wav, etc.
Remarks
$
The channels that you choose to save to the first stereo.wav file or first two
mono.wav files will be embedded in the associated .avi file. When you
import your .avi file to the Project window, the clip’s separate .wav files
will also be imported, and the embedded audio in the .avi file will be
ignored. The clip’s .avi file and first associated .wav file, however, will
Defining your Capture settings
20
appear as a single Movie clip in your project. The embedded audio in the
.avi file will be used only if the .avi file does not have any associated .wav
files. Therefore, if you perform audio post processing on your .avi files,
make sure you delete the associated .wav files so that only the embedded
audio in the .avi files will be used in your project.
$
When performing an audio-only capture, Matrox RT.X2 supports capture
of only one stereo pair. Your first stereo or first two mono channels will be
saved to a single stereo .wav file (any other channels will be ignored). When
RT.X2 saves the .wav file of an audio-only capture, it does not assign the
.Stereo.wav suffix to the filename.
7 Click OK to save your settings and return to the Project Settings dialog
box.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
21
Monitoring audio levels for capture
If you select Show VU meters on the Audio Capture Settings page, each
time you configure your Matrox RT.X2 capture settings or open the Capture
panel to start a capture in Adobe Premiere Pro, VU meters will be displayed to let
you monitor the levels of your currently selected audio input source.
Clipping detectors
Peak level indicators
As you play your audio source, the color of the input level is green at or below
–12 dBSF, yellow between –12 and –6 dBFS, and red above –6 dBFS. The
clipping detectors will “light up” (become red) whenever audio clipping occurs.
The peak level indicators are thin lines that show the highest level recently
reached. These indicators will show the peak level for about two seconds or until
a higher peak level is reached.
If needed, adjust the audio level on your source device to keep the average input
level between –30 and –10 dBSF. You can also use Windows Volume Control to
adjust your audio input levels as explained in “Setting your system’s volume
levels” on page 6.
Defining your Capture settings
22
Performing a Premiere Pro export to disk
Several software codecs are included with Adobe Premiere Pro so that you can
export your video to different formats. Your Matrox RT.X system adds several
Matrox codecs to the ones included with Premiere Pro. Because the Matrox
codecs use your RT.X2 hardware to accelerate rendering, they can export video
much faster than when you use a software codec.
The Matrox codecs are available in SD and HD formats. The supported formats
for exporting to a Matrox .avi file depend on your project’s video format as
shown in the following table:
Project video format
Supported export format(s)
NTSC
PAL
486p @ 23.98 fps
HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps
HDV 1080i @ 25 fps
NTSC
PAL
486p @ 23.98 fps or NTSC
HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps or NTSC
HDV 1080i @ 25 fps or PAL
For example, if you have an NTSC project, you must select an NTSC codec. If
you have an HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps project, you can select an HDV 1080i @
29.97 fps codec to export to HD format, or you can select an NTSC codec to
downconvert the HD video to NTSC (this includes appropriate color space
conversion from HD to SD).
° To export your sequence to a Matrox .avi file:
1 Choose File > Export > Movie. Click the Settings button, and from the
File Type list, select Matrox AVI.
2 From the Range list, select an export range, then select any additional export
options.
3 From the menu on the left side of the dialog box, choose Video.
4 From the Compressor list, select the compression format you want for your
exported file.
¡ Important The Matrox codecs are listed in all supported SD and HD
formats. The format is shown in brackets beside the codec name, such as
(NTSC). Make sure you select a Matrox codec in one of the supported video
formats for your project as listed in the above table.
Renders video to DV or DVCAM format.
$
Matrox DV/DVCAM
$
Matrox DVCPRO
$
Renders video to MPEG-2 intra-frame format
using the 4:2:2 Profile @ Main Level at a selected data rate (SD resolution
only).
Renders video to DVCPRO format.
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
23
$
Renders video to MPEG-2 intra-frame
format using the 4:2:2 Profile @ High Level at a selected data rate (HD
resolution only).
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD
5 If you selected Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame or Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD,
click the Configure button to select your MPEG-2 I-frame settings. For
details on the available settings, see “Selecting your MPEG-2 I-frame
settings” on page 24.
6 From the Pixel Aspect Ratio list, select the setting that matches the aspect
ratio of your material:
For NTSC or 486p @ 23.98 fps material that uses
the standard TV screen format. If you’re downconverting HD video to
NTSC format, the video will be exported in letterbox mode.
$
D1/DV NTSC (0.9)
$
D1/DV Widescreen 16:9 (1.2)
$
D1/DV PAL (1.067) For PAL material that uses the standard TV screen
format. If you’re downconverting HD video to PAL format, the video will
be exported in letterbox mode.
$
D1/DV PAL Widescreen 16:9 (1.422) For PAL material that uses the
widescreen 16:9 format. If you’re downconverting HD video to PAL format,
the video will be exported as anamorphic (horizontally compressed 4:3)
video.
$
HD Anamorphic 1080 (1.333)
For NTSC or 486p @ 23.98 fps material
that uses the widescreen 16:9 format. If you’re downconverting HD video
to NTSC format, the video will be exported as anamorphic (horizontally
compressed 4:3) video.
For all HDV 1080i material that is not
downconverted.
7 It’s recommended that you do not select Recompress. This retains the
quality of your video. It also optimizes the speed of the export because
realtime video segments that have no effects will be copied directly to disk
without recompression, assuming that the compression and video format of
your video clips matches the format to which you’re exporting.
8 Choose OK to save your export settings.
¦ Note Exported audio will be embedded in your .avi file and also saved as
one or more separate .wav files in the same folder as your .avi file. Matrox
RT.X2 does not support audio-only exports.
Performing a Premiere Pro export to disk
24
Selecting your MPEG-2 I-frame settings
When you select the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame or Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD
format to capture or export your video using Adobe Premiere Pro, you can
specify various options for the MPEG-2 I-frame compression.
° To select your MPEG-2 I-frame options:
1 Click the Configure button. This displays a dialog box similar to the
following:
2 Drag the Data Rate slider until your desired data rate is displayed. The
higher the data rate you select, the better the video quality will be. The range
of available data rates depends on whether you’re using the Matrox MPEG-2
I-frame HD or SD format.
¡ Important Depending on the capabilities of your system, you may drop
frames if you select a data rate higher than about 90 Mb/sec.
3 To apply advanced settings to your MPEG-2 I-frame file, click the
Advanced button.
¦ Note The default advanced settings should provide good results for most
applications. We recommend that you change these settings only when needed
for special purposes.
4 Under Rounding Type, select one of the following:
Rounds the AC coefficients up to the nearest whole number
when calculating the quantization coefficient.
$
MPEG-2
$
Matrox Custom Truncates the AC coefficients to the lowest whole
number when calculating the quantization coefficient. In some cases, this
setting may yield less artifacts in graphics.
5 Under DC Precision, select the bit-depth precision of the DC intra block.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
25
¦ Note The higher the DC precision value that’s used to capture or render
your video, the more likely that the DC content will be increased at the expense
of the AC content in the encoded stream. This may result in lowering the
overall quality of the compressed stream at a specified data rate.
6 Under Zig Zag Type, select one of the following:
Sets the regular (default) zig zag scanning pattern of the AC
coefficient of the DCT block as defined in the ISO/IEC 13818-2 (figure
7-2) specification documentation.
$
Regular
$
Alternate
Sets an alternate zig zag scanning pattern of the AC coefficient
of the DCT block as defined in the ISO/IEC 13818-2 (figure 7-3)
specification documentation. Use this setting when capturing or rendering
video at a high data rate (that is, at a data rate of about 25 Mb/sec for SD
video, or 90 Mb/sec or higher for HD video).
7 Select the Force Frame-based DCT setting to render macroblocks as
frames rather than as fields. In some cases, graphics will yield less artifacts if
this option is selected.
8 Click OK to save your settings.
Selecting your MPEG-2 I-frame settings
26
Exporting material using Matrox Media
Encoder
You can use Matrox Media Encoder to export clips from a sequence in the
Timeline panel to various formats for specific media delivery, such as Windows
Media or RealMedia streaming media format, or MPEG-2 format for DVD
authoring. For example, you can use Matrox Media Encoder to export video from
your sequence to an MPEG-2 Elementary (.m2v) file that’s suitable for use with
Adobe Encore DVD. Matrox Media Encoder provides the same export formats as
Adobe Media Encoder, and benefits from hardware acceleration on Matrox
RT.X2.
To avoid having inverted fields in your exported files when exporting material for
DVD authoring, you must select the appropriate field order for the export
according to your projects’s video format as shown in the following table:
Project video format
Field order
NTSC
PAL
486p @ 23.98 fps
HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps
HDV 1080i @ 25 fps
Lower
Upper
None (Progressive)
Upper
Upper
° To export material using Matrox Media Encoder:
1 Start Adobe Premiere Pro.
2 Open the project from which you want to export material.
3 If you want to export only part of your sequence, drag the ends of the work
area bar so that it extends over the length of the area you want to export.
4 Choose File > Export > Matrox Media Encoder.
5 Select the export format you want from the Format list. To export material
for DVD authoring, select MPEG2-DVD.
6 Select a preset from the Preset list that matches the type of export you want
to perform (a summary of the settings will be displayed in the Export
Settings dialog box). If you selected MPEG2-DVD as your export format,
click the Video tab and make sure that the appropriate field order is selected
as shown in the above table.
7 Click OK.
8 Specify a name, location, and export range for the export, then click Save.
All the settings in the Export Settings dialog box are the same as provided for
Adobe Media Encoder. For details on using these settings, see your Adobe
Premiere Pro documentation.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
27
Setting up Matrox DV/HDV device control
Matrox DV/HDV device control lets you control DV-1394 devices when
capturing or exporting material to tape in Adobe Premiere Pro.
° To set up Matrox DV/HDV device control:
1 Choose Edit > Preferences > Device Control.
2 From the Devices list, select Matrox DV/HDV Device Control.
3 Click Options and make sure that your device control options are correctly
set as explained in your Adobe Premiere Pro documentation (the options are
the same as those provided for Adobe Premiere Pro’s DV/HDV device
control).
4 Click OK to save your settings.
You can now use device control when capturing or exporting material over the
1394 interface (make sure that your device is set to Remote or VTR mode). For
details on how to capture material in Adobe Premiere Pro, see your Adobe
Premiere Pro documentation. For information about exporting material to tape
using device control, see the next section.
Exporting your sequence to tape
Your Matrox RT.X2 system lets you export your Adobe Premiere Pro sequence to
tape using DV-1394 or RS-422 device control. You can use Matrox DV/HDV
device control to control DV-1394 devices. For RS-422 devices, you can use
Adobe Premiere Pro’s serial device control as explained in your Adobe Premiere
Pro documentation.
Preparing your tapes for recording
To use device control, the tape on which you’ll be recording your material must
contain continuous and consecutive time code. You can stripe your entire tape
with time code by recording black video for the duration of the tape.
¦ Note The format of your DV tape must match the format you’re recording. For
example, if you set your DV-1394 device to record in DV/DVCAM format, your
tape must be striped entirely in DV/DVCAM format. Mixed format tapes are not
supported.
Avoiding missing frames when exporting to DV
tape
When performing an export to tape on some DV-1394 devices, a delay may occur
between the time the device starts recording and the time that Adobe Premiere
Pro starts to play back your project. This may result in the first video frames of
your project not being recorded to tape. To ensure that your export to DV tape
Setting up Matrox DV/HDV device control
28
does not miss any frames, you can delay the playback of the project that you are
exporting.
To do this, you will need to do a test export with your DV-1394 device to
determine the number of frames that are missing from the start of your project on
the DV tape. In the Adobe Premiere Pro Export To Tape dialog box, select
Delay Movie Start and enter the number of frames you’ve determined are
missing from your project multiplied by 4 (to convert the value to quarter
frames). If needed, adjust this amount until you obtain a frame-accurate or near
frame-accurate export to tape.
¦ Note If your exported video is frame-accurate, but you’re missing audio at the
start of your project on the DV tape, simply add a few frames of black and silence
at the start of the sequence. If you do this, you may not need to use the Delay
Movie Start.
Exporting to DV tape using DV-1394 device
control
You can use Matrox DV/HDV device control when exporting your Adobe
Premiere Pro sequence to a DV-1394 device.
° To export your sequence to tape over the 1394 interface:
1 Open the project and activate the sequence you want to export to tape.
2 Make sure your DV-1394 device is properly connected and turned on.
3 Unless you’re exporting to an HDV device, make sure that you’ve enabled
the DV-1394 output for export to tape and selected a DV-1394 output format
as explained in “Selecting your DV-1394 output settings” on page 15.
¦ Note If you’re exporting to an HDV device, Premiere Pro will detect that
you’re using an HDV device when you perform the export to tape and the
video will be exported in native HDV format.
4 If you’re using a camcorder, switch it to VTR mode.
5 Load a striped recordable tape into your DV-1394 device.
6 Make sure that you’ve set up Matrox DV/HDV device control as explained in
“Setting up Matrox DV/HDV device control” on page 27.
7 Choose File > Export > Export to Tape.
For information about exporting your sequence to tape using Adobe Premiere
Pro, see your Adobe Premiere Pro documentation.
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
29
Creating an SD project in 16:9 format
When editing on Matrox RT.X2, you can choose to work with SD source video
that’s been recorded in either the 4:3 standard TV screen format, or the
widescreen 16:9 format.
° To create an SD project in 16:9 format on Matrox RT.X2, do the following:
1 Record your video onto tape with your camera set to the widescreen 16:9
format. The video will be recorded as horizontally compressed 4:3
(anamorphic) video.
2 Start Adobe Premiere Pro and select the appropriate Matrox widescreen
preset (such as DVCPRO Widescreen). This ensures that the effects you
create on Matrox RT.X2 will be displayed with the correct proportions when
viewed in 16:9 format.
3 Capture your video clips as you normally would. Select the 16:9 display
option on your NTSC or PAL video monitor to “unsquish” the video and
play it back in widescreen format without distortion.
4 If you create animations, titles, or graphics for your project using a program
that lets you set the pixel aspect ratio, use the appropriate setting for 16:9
display:
$
For NTSC or 486p @ 23.98 fps video, set the pixel aspect ratio to 1.185.
$
For PAL video, set the pixel aspect ratio to 1.422.
If you can’t set the pixel aspect ratio, create your image at 864×486 for
NTSC or 486p @ 23.98 fps video, or at 1024×576 for PAL video. After
you’ve created your image, resize only its width to 720. When you resize the
image, your text or graphic will appear elongated on your computer screen.
5 Edit your project as you would a standard 4:3 project.
¦ Note Be aware that if your video monitor is displaying in 4:3 format, certain
effects may appear elongated because of the horizontal scaling. Setting your
monitor to 16:9 will display the effects with the correct proportions.
6 Record your finished project onto tape. Remember that you’ll need a
monitor capable of displaying material in 16:9 format to properly view your
master tape.
Creating an SD project in 16:9 format
30
Your notes
Chapter 2, Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings
Chapter
3
Setting Up Realtime Effects
with Adobe Premiere Pro
This chapter explains how to
set up realtime effects using
the Matrox realtime plug-in for
Adobe Premiere Pro.
32
Available effects
The Matrox realtime plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro lets you:
• Set up spectacular realtime Matrox effects and transitions. The plug-in
includes color corrections, chroma keys, luma keys, 3D DVEs, page curls,
shadows, and many more effects.
¦ Note Certain effects will be available only if you have a display card that
supports the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects. For more information, see
“Enabling and disabling the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe
Premiere Pro” on page 129.
• Change various effect settings, and add or modify keyframes to customize
your effects.
• Transform and crop your realtime effects.
• Create realtime graphics overlays using single-frame graphics files with an
alpha-key channel.
• Set up certain Adobe Premiere Pro effects in real time, including fades
(Video Opacity), DVEs (Motion), and Black & White effects.
• Apply realtime speed changes to video clips.
• Set up many Adobe Premiere Pro transitions in real time when using SD
video, or accelerate many Adobe Premiere Pro transitions when using HD
video.
Realtime means that you can play back and record your effects onto tape without
having to render them. This gives you creative freedom to experiment with
different effects and change your mind as often as you want. You’ll instantly see
the changes you make on your video monitor. Effects in Adobe Premiere Pro
other than those listed above are not realtime, and therefore require rendering.
For guidelines on setting up your realtime effects, see “Matrox RT.X2 realtime
guidelines” on page 110.
When you install Matrox Mx.tools, the Matrox effects are added to Adobe
Premiere Pro so that you can include them in your video productions. You set up
Matrox effects in your productions the same way as other effects included with
Adobe Premiere Pro. For example, you apply a Matrox transition to your clips
just as you would any other type of transition, except that the controls provided
let you create a Matrox transition, as is explained in this chapter.
For instructions on how to apply Adobe Premiere Pro effects to your productions,
refer to your Adobe Premiere Pro User Guide.
¡ Important To use the Matrox realtime plug-in, you must have defined your
Adobe Premiere Pro settings for use with your Matrox RT.X2 system, as
explained in Chapter 2, “Defining Your Adobe Premiere Pro Settings.”
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
33
How to apply a Matrox video effect in Adobe
Premiere Pro
The Matrox realtime plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro allows you to apply many
realtime video effects to your clips. To apply a Matrox video effect to a clip, drag
the desired effect from the Effects panel onto the clip in the Timeline panel.
By default, the Matrox video effects are found in the Matrox bin under Video
Effects.
¥ Tips
• You can also apply preconfigured Matrox video effects found in the Matrox
Effect Presets bin under Presets.
• If you can’t see the Effects panel, choose Window > Effects. If you can’t
see the Effect Controls panel, choose Window > Effect Controls.
How to apply a Matrox video transition in
Adobe Premiere Pro
In Adobe Premiere Pro, the Matrox wipe transitions are found in the Matrox bin
under Video Transitions in the Effects panel.
There are numerous methods to create transitions in Premiere Pro. Use the
method that works best for you to apply your Matrox wipes. For information on
applying transitions, see your Adobe Premiere Pro documentation.
How to apply a Matrox video effect in Adobe Premiere Pro
34
Transforming your clip
Many of the Matrox effects allow you to adjust the scale, position, and rotation of
a clip by applying various transform settings. You can adjust the transform
settings in two ways:
• Use the transform controls in the Effect Controls panel to adjust the settings
you want.
• Work directly in Adobe Premiere Pro’s Program Monitor using your mouse.
For example, click the desired transform button (Position, Scale, Rotation,
or Rotation Center Offset), then click and drag within the Program
Monitor to make your adjustments. To do this, you’ll need to activate the
transform controls for use in the Program Monitor. For more information,
see “Transforming a clip in the Program Monitor” on page 36.
¦ Note If you are working with the Matrox crystallize, shadow, mask, mask
blur, mask mosaic, or shine effect, the transform settings will apply only to
your mask or shadow and not the entire clip.
Using the transform controls
To apply various transform settings to your clip using the transform controls in
the Effect Controls panel, click the triangle next to the Transform property to
expand it:
You can enter the values you want in the text boxes or drag the appropriate
sliders.
• Position (X, Y, Z) Use these controls to position your clip on the x
(horizontal), y (vertical), and z (depth) axes. Values of (0,0,0) pixels align
the center of your clip with the center of the screen, and positions are
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
35
measured from this point. You can enter positive or negative pixel values to
move your clip right or left (x), up or down (y), and forward or backward (z).
• Scale (X, Y) Use these controls to make your clip smaller or larger.
Full-screen size is represented as 100%. You can shrink your clip to 0% or
enlarge it to 1000%. Note, however, that by enlarging your clip, the
resolution may become blurry. You can adjust the size controls individually,
or if you select Fixed Aspect Ratio, you only need to adjust the x axis.
Adjusting the percentage on the x and y axes changes your clip’s width and
height, respectively.
¦ Note The Matrox surface finish effect includes a Scale Z property that
allows you to adjust the thickness of your slab. For more information, see
“Creating a surface finish effect” on page 102.
• Rotation (X, Y, Z) Use these controls to set the number of times the clip
spins. Each rotation of 360° produces one spin on the selected axis. You can
have positive or negative rotation from -360° to 360°.
• Rotation Center Offset (X, Y, Z) Use the Rotation Center Offset
controls to set the pivot point, or center of rotation, of your clip on the x
(horizontal), y (vertical), and z (depth) axes. When Rotation settings are
applied, your clip spins around this point. You can use positive or negative
pixel values to offset your clip on each axis.
In the illustrations below, notice how different Offset values can affect the
rotation of the cube.
Z
Z
X
X
Y
Figure 1: Offset at 0,0,0
Y
Figure 2: Offset at 100,0,0
In Figure 1, the Offset values are (0,0,0), so the center of rotation for the cube is
where the x, y, and z axes meet. In Figure 2, the Offset value for the x axis is set
to 100, thus moving the cube and the pivot point to the right, so when the cube is
rotated, it has a wider arc when spinning around the axes.
Transforming your clip
36
Transforming a clip in the Program Monitor
You can use your left mouse button to resize, position, and rotate your clip
directly in the Program Monitor. Effects that support transforming a clip in the
Program Monitor have the Transform icon to left of the effect name in the
Effects Controls panel.
Transform icon
¦ Note When working with some effects, the Transform icon lets you
manipulate your clip directly in the Program Monitor to set up your effect instead
of adjusting transform settings as explained in this section.
To activate the transform controls in the Program Monitor, click the Transform
icon or the name of the Matrox effect in the Effect Controls panel. The direct
manipulation mode buttons will appear in the upper left corner of the Program
Monitor:
Precision Mode
Position
Scale
Rotation
Rotation
Center Offset
Select the transform setting you want to adjust by clicking the appropriate button
(Position, Scale, Rotation, or Rotation Center Offset). Precision Mode is
available only in the Program Monitor and allows you to make precise
adjustments with the currently selected transform setting.
The following table shows the available mouse controls for working in the
Program Monitor.
Action
Result
Left mouse button
Adjusts x and y axes
SHIFT+left mouse button, drag left or right
Adjusts x axis only
SHIFT+left mouse button, drag up or down
Adjusts y axis only
CTRL+left mouse button, drag up or down
Adjusts z axis only
For example, if you want to alter the position of your clip on the y axis only, first
click the Position button, then press and hold SHIFT while dragging the mouse
up or down in the Program Monitor.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
37
Cropping your clip
Many of the Matrox effects allow you to apply crop settings to your clip. To
apply crop settings, click the triangle next to Crop to expand the property list.
The controls under Crop let you crop any edge of your clip. You can enter the
values you want in the text boxes or drag the appropriate sliders (Left, Right,
Top, Bottom).
• Crop Left
Crops the left edge of your clip.
• Crop Right Crops the right edge of your clip.
• Crop Top
Crops the top edge of your clip.
• Crop Bottom Crops the bottom edge of your clip.
• Select Crop Displays a dialog box in which you can apply your crop
settings. For details, see “Using Select Crop” on page 38.
• Stretch to original size
original size of your clip.
Select this to stretch the cropped area to the
¦ Note If you’re applying a Matrox effect that doesn’t provide the Crop
property, you can apply realtime cropping to your clip using Adobe Premiere
Pro’s crop effect (available in the Video Effects bin under Transform). The
Premiere Pro crop effect will remain realtime unless you enable the Zoom
option. For more information about using Premiere Pro’s crop effect, see your
Adobe Premiere Pro documentation.
Cropping your clip
38
Using Select Crop
To apply crop settings to your clip using the Select Crop dialog box, click the
triangle next to the Select property to expand it, then click the Select Crop
button:
The Select Crop dialog box allows you to crop your clip in two ways:
• Click and drag directly in the Select Crop window to create the rectangular
cropping area.
To resize your cropping area, drag any side of the rectangle. For example,
drag the right side of the rectangle to crop the right edge of your clip. To
resize the entire cropping area at once, drag one of the corners (the corner
that’s diagonally opposite the corner you are moving will remain stationary).
• Use the Left, Right, Top, and Bottom controls to crop any edge by a given
number of pixels. You can enter values in the text boxes or drag the sliders to
resize your crop area. For example, drag the Left slider to crop the left edge
of your clip.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
39
Applying a mask to your effect
Many of the Matrox effects allow you to add a mask to define the area where you
want to apply your effect. For example, you may want to apply a color correction
to only one area of your clip and leave the rest of the clip untouched.
Adding a mask to the chroma or luma key effect and selecting Transparent
Outside Mask lets you disable keying in the area outside the mask so that only
the underlying image appears outside the mask. For example, you can define a
mask area where you want the keying to be performed, and show only your
underlying image outside the mask. This is useful if you’re having problems
keying on an area at the edges of your foreground image.
° To adjust the mask properties:
Click the triangle next to Mask to expand the property list.
The properties under Mask let you control the area on the clip where you want to
apply the mask. You can enter the values you want in the text boxes or drag the
appropriate sliders (Left, Right, Top, and Bottom).
• Left
Adjusts the left edge of your mask.
• Right Adjusts the right edge of your mask.
• Top Adjusts the top edge of your mask.
• Bottom
Adjusts the bottom edge of your mask.
• Select Mask Displays a dialog box in which you can apply your mask
settings (see “Using Select Mask” on page 40).
• Invert Inverts the mask so that your effect is applied outside the mask,
instead of within the mask.
Applying a mask to your effect
40
Using Select Mask
To apply a mask to your Matrox effect using the Select Mask dialog box, click
the triangle next to the Select property to expand it, then click the Select Mask
button:
The Select Mask dialog box allows you to apply a mask in two ways:
• Click and drag directly in the Select Mask window to create the rectangular
area where you wish to apply the mask.
You can resize the mask area by dragging any side of the rectangle. For
example, dragging the right side of the rectangle adjusts the right edge of the
mask area. To resize the entire mask area at once, drag one of the corners
(the corner that’s diagonally opposite the corner you are moving will remain
stationary).
• Use the Left, Right, Top, and Bottom controls to adjust any edge of your
mask by a given number of pixels. You can enter values in the text boxes or
drag the sliders to resize your mask area. For example, drag the Left slider to
adjust the left edge of your mask area.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
41
Creating a color correction
Color correction is important for all productions, whether you want to achieve
continuity when cutting between shots, ensure broadcast safe levels, or establish
and emphasize a “look.” Matrox color correction provides basic proc amp
control, three-way color correction complete with master, shadows, midtones,
and highlights control, and input and output level control. You can also easily
match colors with a reference shot. For more information about color matching,
see “Matching colors between two clips” on page 46.
¥ Tip Adobe Premiere Pro includes a workspace setup that is optimized for
working with clips and effects to facilitate color correction. To prepare your
workspace for color correction, choose Window > Workspace > Color
Correction.
° To set up a Matrox color correction:
Click the triangle next to Matrox Color Correction to expand the property list.
• Proc Amps The processing amplifier (proc amp) controls allow you to
adjust different aspects of your clip:
Adjusts the tint of the colors in the image.
$
Hue
$
Saturation
$
Contrast
$
Brightness
Adjusts the saturation (vividness) of the image’s colors.
Adjusts the difference in luminance between the lightest and
darkest areas of the image.
Adjusts the level of black in the image.
• Color Balance These controls let you adjust the mixture of colors in your
clip.
$
Allows you to see a graphical representation of your changes
when you adjust the color balance settings. You can also modify most of
Graphical
Creating a color correction
42
the color balance settings directly within the graph. For more information,
see “Using the color balance graph” on page 43.
$
Lets you adjust your color balance settings numerically by
entering values in the text boxes, or by dragging the corresponding sliders.
You can adjust the Hue, Saturation, and Luminance for each tonal range.
Numerical
• Master (Hue, Saturation, and Luminance)
Affects all areas of your
clip from the lightest white to the darkest black.
• Shadows (Hue, Saturation,
and Luminance) Affects the darkest
areas of your clip.
• Midtones (Hue, Saturation, and Luminance)
Affects the areas with
tones between the darkest and lightest areas of your clip.
• Highlights (Hue, Saturation,
and Luminance) Affects the lightest
areas of your clip.
• Luma Mapping
$ Graphical
Allows you to see a graphical representation of your changes
when you adjust the luma mapping settings. You can also modify the
luminance of your clip directly within the graph. For more information, see
“Using the luma mapping graph” on page 48.
$
Lets you adjust the luma mapping settings numerically by
entering values in the text boxes, or by dragging the corresponding sliders.
Numerical
• Input Levels (Black and White)
These controls let you fine-tune your
clip’s brightness and contrast by changing the luminance value that
represents black, white, or gray. Doing so expands or compresses the
range of luminance levels in your clip, which increases or decreases your
clip’s tonal range.
For example, by increasing the black value, you set black in your clip to
a higher luminance value, which compresses the luminance range and
darkens your clip proportionally.
and White) These controls let you map the
values under Input Levels to any level of black and white. You can
reduce contrast in your clip, or reverse the luminosity of your clip by
setting black to a higher value than white.
• Output Levels (Black
Use this to adjust the midtones in your clip without adjusting
black or white.
• Gamma
• Mask Allows you to apply a mask to your effect. For more information,
see “Applying a mask to your effect” on page 39.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
43
Using the color balance graph
The color balance graph allows you to modify the Color Balance settings for
each tonal range directly within the color maps. You can also perform an auto
balance or a color match using the buttons beneath the color maps. For more
information, see “Performing an auto balance” on page 45 and “Matching colors
between two clips” on page 46. Depending on which color map you use, you can
adjust your clip globally, or only the shadows, midtones, or highlights.
You can drag the handle in the center of any color map to adjust the color balance
(Hue and Saturation) for a specific tonal range, such as to adjust the color
balance globally throughout your clip using the Master color map, or adjust the
color balance of only the shadows using the Shadows color map. Drag the
crosshair toward a color you want to increase in your clip, or away from a color
Creating a color correction
44
you want to decrease. For example, if you move the crosshair towards red, you
also decrease cyan by the same amount, as shown in the following diagram:
RED
YELLOW
GREEN
MAGENTA
BLUE
CYAN
If you want to reset the color balance (Hue and Saturation) setting, click the
Reset Color Balance button under the color map you are using.
Reset Color
Balance button
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
45
Performing an auto balance
Before matching colors, you can perform an auto balance on your target clip to
automatically apply a color shift to your clip to compensate for different lighting
conditions. To do this, click the Auto Balance button under the corresponding
color map and use the eyedropper to select the area you want to correct in your
clip. For example, to balance your clip’s highlights, click the Auto Balance
button under the Highlights color map, and click (or click and drag) on the
lightest area of your clip. The auto balance is performed immediately.
Auto Balance
button
¦ Note To perform an auto white balance, click the Auto White Balance button
under the Master color map, and click (or click and drag) on a white or light gray
area of your clip.
Creating a color correction
46
Matching colors between two clips
You can perform a color match to match colors between two clips (such as skin
tone, sky, etc.). The color match lets you select colors from a reference clip to
match to your target clip. You can affect the colors globally (Master), or just the
Shadows, Midtones, or Highlights.
You can select the colors for your reference color and match color by either
clicking the Color Picker button or the eyedropper.
Color Picker button
Eyedropper
The eyedropper can be used in two ways:
$
Click the eyedropper button and click on the desired color in your clip.
Click the eyedropper button and click and drag anywhere on your clip to
create a rectangular area containing the color you want to select. The
selected color will be an average of the pixel information contained within
the rectangle.
° To perform a color match:
1 Prepare your workspace for color correction by choosing Window >
Workspace > Color Correction.
$
2 Open your target clip (clip that contains the colors you want to correct) in the
Source Monitor.
¦ Note For best results when using a target clip that has multiple effects
applied to it, create a nested sequence and open it in your Source Monitor
before performing the color match. For more information about creating
nested sequences, see your Adobe Premiere Pro documentation.
3 Apply the Matrox Color Correction effect to your target clip on the
timeline.
4 Use the controls under the Reference Monitor to move to a frame in your
reference clip that contains the colors you want to match.
5 Use the controls under the Source Monitor to go to the frame in your target
clip that contains the colors you want to match to your reference clip.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
47
6 Select a reference color from your reference clip by using the Reference
Color eyedropper under the color map you want to affect (Master,
Shadows, Midtones, or Highlights).
Reference Color eyedropper
For example, to match a very dark color in your reference clip to your target
clip, click the Reference Color eyedropper under the Shadows color map,
and click (or click and drag) on the desired color in your reference clip.
7 Select a match color from your target clip in the Source Monitor window by
using the Match Color eyedropper under the corresponding color map
(Master, Shadows, Midtones, or Highlights).
Match Color eyedropper
Creating a color correction
48
Using the luma mapping graph
To modify your luma mapping values directly in the graph, click the triangle next
to the Luma Mapping Graphical property to expand it:
• Map This is the default view when you first expand the Graphical
property. You can drag the handles in the graph to adjust the Input and
Output levels for black and white, as well as the Gamma.
i
i Input
Black
Level
Input
White
Level
Output
Black
Level
Output
White
Level
Gamma
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
49
• Plot Click this button to plot the luminance values in the current frame of
your clip to the histogram (the plot will reflect any color correction changes
you’ve made). Each luminance value present in your image appears as a
vertical line in the histogram. A longer line indicates a higher amount of
pixels in your image of that line’s luminance value. You can drag the handles
in the graph to adjust the Input and Output levels for black and white, as
well as the Gamma.
i
i Input
Black
Level
Input
White
Level
Output
Black
Level
Output
White
Level
Gamma
• Auto Black Click this to define the darkest pixels in your clip as black.
The intermediate luminance values are proportionally redistributed.
• Auto White Click this to define the lightest pixels in your clip as white.
The intermediate luminance values are proportionally redistributed.
¦ Note If you want to restore the default luminance values at any time, click
the Restore Default Values button.
Restore
Default Values
button
Creating a color correction
50
Creating a secondary color correction
Matrox secondary color correction offers all the properties found in Matrox color
correction, with the added capability of limiting the color correction to a specific
range of pixels using the selective key properties. For example, secondary color
correction can be used to change the color of a dress, deepen the background sky
color, or to achieve an effect where only one object or person remains in color
while the rest of the image becomes black and white. For details on how to isolate
a color and make the rest of the clip black and white, see “Creating a color pass
effect” on page 59.
¥ Tip Adobe Premiere Pro includes a workspace setup that is optimized for
working with clips and effects to facilitate color correction. To prepare your
workspace for color correction, choose Window > Workspace > Color
Correction.
° To set up a Matrox secondary color correction:
Click the triangle next to Matrox Secondary Color Correction to expand the
property list.
• Proc Amps The processing amplifier (proc amp) controls allow you to
adjust different aspects of your clip:
Adjusts the tint of the colors in the image.
$
Hue
$
Saturation
$
Contrast
Adjusts the saturation (vividness) of the image’s colors.
Adjusts the difference in luminance between the lightest and
darkest areas of the image.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
51
$
Brightness
Adjusts the level of black in the image.
• Color Balance These controls let you adjust the mixture of colors in your
clip.
Allows you to see a graphical representation of your changes
when you adjust the color balance settings. You can also adjust and modify
most of the color balance settings directly within the graph. For more
information, see “Using the color balance graph” on page 43.
$
Graphical
$
Numerical
Lets you adjust your color balance settings numerically by
entering values in the text boxes, or by dragging the corresponding sliders.
You can adjust the Hue, Saturation, and Luminance for each tonal range.
• Master (Hue, Saturation, and Luminance)
Affects all areas of your
clip from the lightest white to the darkest black.
• Shadows (Hue, Saturation,
and Luminance) Affects the darkest
areas of your clip.
• Midtones (Hue, Saturation, and Luminance)
Affects the areas with
tones between the darkest and lightest areas of your clip.
• Highlights (Hue, Saturation,
and Luminance) Affects the lightest
areas of your clip.
• Luma Mapping
$ Graphical
Allows you to see a graphical representation of your changes
when you adjust the luma mapping settings. You can also modify the
luminance of your clip directly within the graph. For more information, see
“Using the luma mapping graph” on page 48.
$
Lets you adjust your luma mapping settings numerically by
entering values in the text boxes, or by dragging the corresponding sliders.
Numerical
• Input Levels (Black and White)
These controls let you fine-tune your
clip’s brightness and contrast by changing the luminance value that
represents black, white, or gray. Doing so expands or compresses the
range of luminance levels in your clip, which increases or decreases your
clip’s tonal range.
For example, by increasing the black value, you set black in your clip to
a higher luminance value, which compresses the luminance range and
darkens your clip proportionally.
and White) These controls let you map the
values under Input Levels to any level of black and white. You can
reduce contrast in your clip, or reverse the luminosity of your clip by
setting black to a higher value than white.
• Output Levels (Black
Use this to adjust the midtones in your clip without adjusting
black or white.
• Gamma
Creating a secondary color correction
52
• Mask Allows you to apply a mask to your effect. For more information,
see “Applying a mask to your effect” on page 39.
• Selective Key The selective key settings allow you to apply the color
correction effect to a specific range of pixels in your clip. Performing a
selective key is similar to performing a chroma or luma key, however, with a
selective key you are applying color correction to the keyed area instead of
transparency. For example, if you use the selective key properties to select
red as your Hue color, the color correction will be applied to the red regions
in your clip. You can enable each keyer (Hue, Saturation, and Luma)
individually, or enable all three at the same time to get the desired results.
Allows you to see a graphical representation of your changes
when you adjust the selective key Numerical settings. You can also modify
the settings directly within the graph and perform an auto key. For more
information, see “Using the selective key graph” on page 55.
$
Graphical
$
Numerical
Lets you adjust your key settings numerically by entering
values in the text boxes, or by dragging the corresponding sliders.
This type of key lets you select areas to be keyed (affected by
the color correction) based on their hue.
• Hue Key
$
Enable Select this to enable the Hue Key properties and hue key
indicator in the selective key graph.
$
Hue Use this to rotate the indicator around the perimeter of the color
spectrum so that you can select different hues (colors) on which to key.
Aperture Use this to widen or narrow the aperture of the indicator
to increase or decrease the range of colors on which you want to key.
$ Softness
Sets the amount of softness applied to the range of colors
specified in the aperture region.
• Saturation Key This lets you select colors to be keyed (affected by the
color correction) based on their saturation value. Pale colors have a low
saturation value, while vivid colors have a high saturation value.
$
Select this to enable the Saturation Key properties and
saturation key indicator in the selective key graph.
$
Enable
$
Low Clip Use this to select the lower saturation values to be keyed.
$
Use this to set the range of saturation values you want to
be partially affected based on the value set by the Low Clip control.
As you increase the Low Gain setting, more pixels are partially
affected by the color correction. If you decrease the Low Gain control,
less pixels are partially affected.
Low Gain
A Low Gain setting of 100 provides the widest range for maximum
color correction. Alternately, a gain setting of 0 creates a key where
saturation values are either completely affected or left untouched. You
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
53
can think of the Low Gain control as defining an “Affected to
Untouched” range for keying the pale colors in your image.
$
This control is similar the Low Gain setting, except you
use it to set the range of higher saturation values you want to be
partially affected based on the value set by the High Clip control. As
you increase the High Gain setting, less pixels are partially affected
by the color correction. If you decrease the High Gain setting, more
pixels are partially affected. You can think of the High Gain control
as defining an “Untouched to Affected” range for keying the vivid
colors of your image.
$
High Clip This control is similar to Low Gain, except you use it to
select the higher saturation values to be keyed.
High Gain
¦Note The values you can select using the Low Clip and Low Gain
controls are dependent on the High Clip and High Gain controls, and
vice versa. This prevents the low and high controls from keying on the
same values.
This type of key lets you select areas to be keyed (affected
by the color correction) based on their luminance value.
• Luma Key
$
Enable Select this to enable the Luma Key properties and luma key
indicator in the selective key graph.
$
Low Clip
$
Low Gain Use this to set the range of luminance values you want
to be partially affected based on the value set by the Low Clip control.
As you increase the Low Gain setting, more luminance values become
Use this to select the lower (darker) luminance values to
be keyed. A Low Clip setting of 0 represents black, and a setting of
255 represents white. Intermediate settings represent different shades
of gray, from very dark to very light gray.
partially affected by the color correction.
A Low Gain setting of 100 provides the widest range for maximum
color correction. Alternately, a gain setting of 0 creates a key where
the luminance values are either completely affected or left untouched.
You can think of the Low Gain control as defining an “Affected to
Untouched” range for keying the dark areas of your image.
$
High Gain This control is similar to Low Gain, except you use it
to set the range of luminance values you want to be partially affected
based on the value set by the High Clip control. You can think of the
High Gain control as defining an “Untouched to Affected” range for
keying the lighter areas of your image.
$
High Clip This control is similar to Low Clip, except you use it to
select the higher (brighter) luminance values to be keyed.
Creating a secondary color correction
54
¦Note The values you can select using the Low Clip and Low Gain
controls are dependent on the High Clip and High Gain controls, and
vice versa. This prevents the low and high controls from keying on the
same luminance values.
Select this to invert the key selection, giving you the
opposite result of what you originally selected.
• Invert Key
Select this to display the matte used to define
your selective key region. This enables you to further refine your key.
Areas that are completely affected by the color correction are white,
untouched areas are black, and gray areas are partially affected.
• Show Key as Output
Applies the color correction settings outside
the mask area. This setting is especially useful when setting up a color
pass effect where you have several objects of the same color but want to
retain the color for only one object. For more information, see “Creating
a color pass effect” on page 59.
• Expand Outside Mask
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
55
Using the selective key graph
The selective key graph allows you to modify your selective key settings (Hue
Key, Saturation Key, and Luma Key) directly in the graph. You can also
perform an auto key.
• Map This is the default view when you first expand the graphical property.
You can drag the handles to move the indicator to different regions in the
graph to adjust the Hue Key, Saturation Key, and Luma Key settings.
In order to see the indicator and handles, you have to enable the key setting
you want to use. For example, if you want to adjust the Hue Key properties,
you need to click the Hue button in the selective key graph or select the
Enable option in the Hue Key numerical properties. In the following graph,
the Hue properties have been enabled.
• Plot Click this button to plot the colors and luminance values that are
present in the current frame of your clip. You can drag the handles to move
the indicator to different regions in the graph to adjust the Hue Key,
Saturation Key, and Luma Key properties. The luma plot histogram shows
Creating a secondary color correction
56
each luminance value present in your image as a vertical line. A longer line
indicates a higher amount of pixels in your image of that line’s luminance
value.
• Hue Click this button to enable or disable the Hue Key properties (Hue,
Aperture and Softness). When enabled you will be able to see the Hue
Key indicator and handles to modify the Hue Key properties in the selective
key graph.
i Hue
i
Aperture
Softness
• Sat Click this button to enable or disable the Saturation Key properties
(Low Clip, Low Gain, High Gain, and High Clip). When enabled you will
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
57
be able to see the Sat Key indicator and handles to modify the Saturation
Key properties in the selective key graph.
i
i Low Clip
Low Gain
High Gain
High Clip
• Lum Click this button to enable or disable the Luma Key properties (Low
Clip, Low Gain, High Gain, and High Clip). When enabled you will be
able to see the Lum Key indicator and handles to modify the Luma Key
properties in the selective key graph.
i
i Low Clip
Low Gain
High Gain
High Clip
¥ Tip For both the Saturation Key and Luma Key properties, you can lock
and move all the handles at the same time in the selective key graph by
pressing SHIFT and then dragging any handle. If you press CTRL you can
lock and move either the Low Clip and Low Gain handles or High Gain
and High Clip handles.
Creating a secondary color correction
58
¦ Note If you want to reset the hue, saturation, and luma key properties to the
default settings at any time, click the appropriate Reset button.
Saturation Key
Reset button
• Show Key Click this button to display the matte used to define your
selective key region. This enables you to further refine your key. Areas that
are completely affected by the color correction are white, untouched areas
are black, and gray areas are partially affected.
• Auto Key Click this button to automatically key on the most common
color at the current frame (except gray). Selecting Auto Key affects values
for the Hue Key, Saturation Key, and the Luma key properties.
Alternately, you can use the eyedropper to select a color on which you want
to key. The eyedropper can be used in two ways:
$
Click the eyedropper button and click on a color on which you want to key.
$
Click the eyedropper button and click and drag anywhere on your clip to
create a rectangular area containing the color on which you want to key.
The selected color will be an average of the pixel information contained
within the rectangle.
• Indicator Click this button to turn the indicator lines on or off.
• Handles Click this button to turn the handles for the indicator lines on or
off.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
59
Creating a color pass effect
You can use the Matrox secondary color correction to create a color pass effect to
convert your clip to black and white, with the exception of one specified color.
This can be useful if you want to isolate a single color to make it prominent.
In the following example, the pink color of the girl’s shirt has been retained,
while the rest of the clip has been converted to black and white:
Pink shirt is isolated,
while the rest of clip is
grayscale.
° To perform a color pass effect:
1 Click the Auto Key eyedropper in the selective key graph and click and drag
anywhere on your clip to create a rectangular area containing the color you
want to isolate.
2 Under Proc Amps, set the Saturation to 0.
3 Select Invert Key.
If you have more than one object of the same color but you want to isolate only
one of those objects, you can apply a mask and use the Expand Outside Mask
option to isolate the area that contains the color you want to remain intact. For
example, if you have a clip that has two roses that are the same red and you
would like only one of them to remain red, you can do the following.
° To perform a color pass effect using the Expand Outside Mask option:
1 Click the auto key eyedropper in the selective key graph and click and drag
anywhere on your clip to create a rectangular area containing the color you
want to isolate.
2 Under Proc Amps set the Saturation to 0.
3 Select Invert Key.
4 Apply a mask surrounding the colored object you want to remain intact (see
“Applying a mask to your effect” on page 39).
5 Select Expand Outside Mask.
Creating a secondary color correction
60
Creating a 3D DVE effect
The Matrox 3D DVE effect lets you position your clips anywhere in 3D space
while adding soft edges and rounded borders with color gradients in real time.
¦ Note If you want to create a picture-in-picture effect, the move & scale effect
will provide a sharper picture (see “Creating a move & scale effect” on page 86).
However, if you want to apply rotation to your effect, you must use the 3D DVE
effect.
° To set up a Matrox 3D DVE effect:
Click the triangle next to Matrox 3D DVE to expand the property list.
• Transform Use these properties to apply or change various transform
settings, such as the position, scale, and rotation settings of your clip. For
more information, see “Transforming your clip” on page 34.
• Border Settings Allow you to create a border or soft edge on your clip.
$
Border Outside Softness Lets you adjust the softness of the edge of
your clip or outside edge of your border. The higher the softness value, the
less sharp the edge becomes.
$
Border Type Allows you to select the type of border you want (None,
Flat, Gradient, or Alpha Edge). Click the triangle on the right to expand
the list of border types.
Click here to
select your
border type
¦ Note The Alpha Edge border type is for use with alpha-keyed graphics
only.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
61
$
Border Width Use this control to adjust the border along the X and Y
axes simultaneously. The higher the value, the wider your border becomes.
If you clear Fixed Aspect Ratio, you can adjust each axis individually.
$
Border Width X Use this control to adjust the border along the X axis.
The higher the value, the wider your border becomes.
$
Border Width Y Use this control to adjust the border along the Y axis.
The higher the value, the wider your border becomes.
$
Border Inside Softness Sets the border softness on the inside edge of
your border. The higher the softness value, the less sharp the edge or border
becomes.
$
Border Outside Color
$
Border Outside Transparency Sets the transparency of your border, or
outside edge of your border if you selected Gradient as your border type.
Levels range from opaque (0) to fully transparent (100).
Use the color picker or eyedropper to select the
color you want for your border, or the outside edge of your border if you
selected Gradient as your border type.
¦ Note The next two properties (Border Inside Color and Border Inside
Transparency) are available only if you selected Gradient as your border
type.
Use the color picker or eyedropper to set the inside
color of your border, which will create a gradient between this color and
the outside color of your border.
$
Border Inside Color
$
Border Inside Transparency
of your border.
$
Round Corner Size
your border.
$
Corner Point Offset
Sets the transparency of the inside color
Allows you to round the corners on the edges of
Allows you to move the position of the corner
points of your border so that you can create various shapes for your 3D
DVE. Negative values bring the corner points towards the center of the clip,
while positive values move the corner points outward.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a 3D DVE effect
62
Creating a 4-corner pin effect
The Matrox 4-corner pin effect lets you anchor each corner of a video or graphics
clip onto points in an underlying clip, even if the underlying clip is angled or
skewed. You could use this effect, for example, to overlay a video clip onto an
underlying clip of a television screen.
° To set up a Matrox 4-corner pin effect:
Click the triangle next to Matrox 4-corner Pin to expand the property list.
• Top Left and Top Right Corner Use these controls to horizontally and
vertically position the top left and right corners of your clip.
• Bottom Left and Bottom Right Corner Use these controls to
horizontally and vertically position the bottom left and right corners of your
clip.
¥ Tip You can easily position each corner of your clip directly in the
Program Monitor. To do this, click the Transform icon (
) beside
Matrox 4-corner Pin in the Effect Controls panel. A cursor will appear at
each corner of your clip in the Program Monitor. Drag these cursors to
position the corners of your clip.
• Edge Softness Lets you apply softness to the edges of your clip.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
• Preview Settings
your effect:
$
You can select the following options for previewing
Show Cursors Displays a diamond-shaped cursor at each corner of your
clip on your video monitor only. These cursors can help you precisely
determine where each corner is located. Each corner has a different colored
cursor as follows:
•
Top Left: Red
•
Top Right: Green
•
Bottom Left: Blue
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
63
•
Bottom Right: Orange
Displays a semi-transparent shape that
represents the clip to which you are applying the 4-corner pin effect. This
is useful if you’re positioning an alpha-keyed title, for example, and you
need to see the edges of the clip.
$
Show Color Frame Only
$
Color
To select a different color for the color frame, use the color picker
button or the eyedropper.
¥ Tip The Show Color Frame Only option is provided as a viewing aid
while setting up your 4-corner pin effect. However, you can choose to leave
it selected to create a unique lighting effect, such as to create a flashlight
beam.
Creating a 4-corner pin effect
64
Creating a blur/soft focus effect
The Matrox blur/soft focus effect lets you create unique effects and simulate
camera defocus.
° To set up a Matrox blur/soft focus effect:
Click the triangle next to Matrox Blur/Soft Focus to expand the property list.
• Blur Amount Use this to change the amount of blurring in your clip.
• Source Blend Factor Use this to superimpose the original image on top
of your clip after you’ve applied blurring. A value of zero will show only the
blur result, and a value of 100 will show only the original image. Anything in
between will result in a blending of the blurring with the original image,
therefore creating a soft focus effect.
• Lock Colors Select this option to proportionally increase or decrease the
red, green, and blue color gain. For example, any adjustments you make to
the Red Color Gain will be used for the green and blue color gain as well.
• Red Color Gain Lets you increase or decrease the red present in your
image.
• Green Color Gain Lets you increase or decrease the green present in your
image.
• Blue Color Gain Lets you increase or decrease the blue present in your
image.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
¦ Note If you are working in HD, the blur/soft focus effect may require
rendering based on certain setting combinations.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
65
Overview of the chroma key effects
You can use the Matrox realtime plug-in to apply a chroma key or chroma key
shadow effect to make certain areas of a foreground image transparent based on a
color in that image, so that an underlying image can show through.
In the following example of a chroma key effect, our foreground image is a video
clip of a woman sitting in front of a green backdrop, and our underlying image is
a video clip of a sand dune:
+
Foreground image
Underlying image
By chroma keying on the particular shade of green in the backdrop of the
foreground image, the backdrop area becomes transparent and the corresponding
area of the underlying image shows through in the composite image as follows:
=
Result of chroma key
¡ Important The chroma key shadow effect includes controls for fine-tuning
shadows in your effect. It is best to use the chroma key shadow effect when you
are performing a chroma key without any additional effects. If you want to apply
additional effects to your chroma key, you will get more desirable results by
using the chroma key effect without shadow controls. For example, if you want to
apply a DVE to your chroma key, you should use the chroma key effect and not
the chroma key shadow effect.
Overview of the chroma key effects
66
Creating a chroma key or chroma key shadow
effect
To set up a Matrox chroma key or chroma key shadow effect, click the triangle
next to Matrox Chroma Key/Matrox Chroma Key Shadow to expand the
property list:
• Graphical Provides a graphical representation of the chroma key controls
that you can use to select your key colors, and also lets you perform an auto
key.
$
Map Lets you select your key colors within a cube that contains a color
spectrum.
$
Plot Displays a plot of the colors present in your clip so that you can
select the particular colors on which you want to key.
$
Show Key
Click this button to display the matte used to create your key
effect. This enables you to further refine your key. For example, when you
display the matte, your key color (such as green) appears as black, and
opaque areas appear as white. If you notice some white spots that you want
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
67
to key, you can adjust the key controls until the undesired white spots
disappear.
$
Auto Key Click this button to automatically key on the most common
color at the current frame in your clip (except gray).
For details on selecting key colors within the graph or performing an auto
key, see “Using the chroma key graph to modify key colors and perform an
auto key” on page 69.
¦ Note You must expand the Graphical property in order to see the indicator
when adjusting the chroma key controls.
• Hue Use this to rotate the indicator around the perimeter of the color
spectrum so that you can select different hues (colors) on which to key.
• Aperture Use this to widen or narrow the aperture of the indicator to
increase or decrease the range of colors on which you want to key.
• Saturation Use this to select colors that have a particular saturation value.
Pale colors have a low saturation value and are located at or near the center
of the spectrum. Vivid colors have a high saturation value and are located at
or near the perimeter of the spectrum. Because pale colors have low
saturation, you’ll find them more difficult to key on than the vivid colors.
• Saturation Threshold Use this to proportionally increase or decrease the
region outside of your saturation range. This controls how closely the
Saturation value must match the key color before a region becomes
transparent.
For example, after applying a chroma key effect to a foreground image that
includes dark areas or shadows that you want to preserve in your effect, you
may find that these areas have become semi-transparent. By adjusting the
Saturation Threshold, you can eliminate the key color from these dark areas,
so that they’ll become completely opaque.
• Softness Use this to soften the edges of your key by blending parts of
your foreground image with your underlying image. This makes certain
areas of your foreground image partially transparent instead of completely
transparent or opaque.
• Spill Removal Use this to remove the contamination (spill) that your key
color may leave on or around the edges of your foreground image. Spill is
usually caused by light reflecting from your solid color backdrop (key color)
onto your foreground image. Spill Removal replaces your key color from
the “spill areas” with the opposite color in the spectrum, which returns a
more natural look to these areas.
• Chroma Suppression Use this to remove any tint that your key color
imposes on your foreground image. For example, if your solid color
backdrop (key color) is green and you are using a person in your foreground
Creating a chroma key or chroma key shadow effect
68
image, the person’s skin may have a green tint. You can adjust the Chroma
Suppression to replace the green tint with the opposite color in the
spectrum to return the person’s skin to a more natural-looking color.
¦ Note The following properties (Luminance and Shadow Suppression)
are only available in the chroma key shadow effect.
• Luminance Use this to adjust the luminance of your shadow. Negative
values increase the brightness of the shadow, while positive values decrease
the brightness.
• Shadow Suppression Use this to make shadows in your clips less
apparent. A higher value indicates less shadow.
• Mask Allows you to apply a mask to your effect. For more information,
see “Applying a mask to your effect” on page 39.
• Transparent Outside Mask Select this option to apply transparency
outside the mask area. This allows you to define a mask area where you want
the keying to be performed, and show only your underlying image outside
the mask. For more information, see “Applying a mask to your effect” on
page 39.
• Invert Key Select this to invert the key selection, giving you the opposite
result of what you originally selected.
• Show Key as Output Select this to display the matte used to create your
key effect. This enables you to further refine your key. For example, when
you display the matte, your key color (such as green) appears as black, and
opaque areas appear as white. If you notice some white spots that you want
to key, you can adjust the key controls until the undesired white spots
disappear.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
69
Using the chroma key graph to modify key
colors and perform an auto key
To modify your key colors directly within the chroma key graph or perform an
auto key, click the triangle next to the Graphical property to expand it:
• Map This is the default view when you first expand the Graphical
property. You can drag the handles in the color spectrum to move the
indicator to different regions in the cube to adjust the Hue, Aperture,
Saturation, and Saturation Threshold.
i
i Hue
Saturation Saturation Aperture
Threshold
Luminance
¦ Note This graph will contain a luminance spectrum only if you are creating a
chroma key shadow effect. You can drag the handle in the luminance spectrum to
adjust the Luminance.
• Plot Click this button to plot the colors and luminance values that are
present in the current frame of your clip. You can drag the handles in the
chroma plot graph to move the indicator to different regions in the graph to
adjust the Hue, Aperture, Saturation, and Saturation Threshold. The
luma plot histogram shows each luminance value present in your image as a
Creating a chroma key or chroma key shadow effect
70
vertical line. A longer line indicates a higher amount of pixels in your image
of that line’s luminance value.
i
¦ Note The Plot graph will contain a luma plot histogram only if you are
creating a chroma key shadow effect. You can drag the handle in the luma plot
histogram to adjust the Luminance.
i Hue
Saturation Saturation Aperture
Threshold
Luminance
Click this button to display the matte used to create your key
effect. This enables you to further refine your key. For example, when you
display the matte, your key color (such as green) appears as black, and
opaque areas appear as white. If you notice some white spots that you want
to key, you can adjust the key controls until the undesired white spots
disappear.
• Auto Key Click this button to automatically key on the most common
color at the current frame (except gray). Selecting Auto Key affects values
for Hue, Aperture, Saturation, and Saturation Threshold. If your clip
consists of a uniform key color that is evenly lighted, Auto Key will usually
give you a good-quality chroma key. Alternately, you can use the eyedropper
to select a color on which you want to key.
• Show Key
eyedropper
You can use the eyedropper in two ways:
$
Click the eyedropper button and click on a color on which you want to key.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
71
$
Click the eyedropper button and click and drag anywhere on your clip to
select a rectangular area containing colors on which you want to key.
• Indicator
• Handles
Click this button to turn the indicator on or off.
Click this button to turn the handles for the indicator on or off.
Creating a chroma key or chroma key shadow effect
72
Creating a crystallize effect
The Matrox crystallize effect lets you choose from many different patterns that
you can use to make your image or text appear as if it is made of crystals.
° To set up a Matrox crystallize effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Crystallize to expand the property list.
• Select Shape Click the button to the right of the current pattern to see the
list of available crystal patterns.
Click here to
select a new
pattern
• Smoothness Sets the smoothness applied to the colors in the crystal
pattern. The higher the value, the less sharp the colors become.
• Crystal Opacity Sets the opacity of the crystals. Levels range from
completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
• Crystallize Alpha Channel Enables alpha for the crystallize effect, so the
crystals will remain visible even on the anti-aliased edges of a title or DVE.
This option is enabled by default, but can be cleared if you find that the
crystals make your title difficult to read.
¦ Note Crystallize Alpha Channel is applicable only when your source clip
or an effect applied to your source clip contains alpha key information. For
example, if you apply the crystallize effect to a clip with no alpha key
information and scale it down using Adobe’s Motion effect, the crystals will
not be visible on the edges of your clip because the Motion effect is the last
effect applied, and there is no alpha key information to crystallize. Whereas,
if you apply a Matrox 3D DVE to the same clip and then you apply the
crystallize effect, you will be able to apply and see the crystallized edges,
because the Matrox 3D DVE effect contains alpha information.
• Mask Settings Let you select a mask pattern and adjust the transparency
settings to define the area where you want to apply your crystallize effect.
$
Enable Mask
Select this option to enable the mask.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
73
$
Select Shape Click the button to the right of the current pattern to see
the list of available mask patterns.
Click here to
select a new
pattern
Sets the transparency of the shape and the area
around the shape. At the default setting (0), the shape is completely opaque
and the area around the shape is transparent. Dragging the slider to the left
increases the transparency of the shape, which makes the crystallize effect
less apparent. Dragging the slider to the right decreases the transparency of
the area around the shape, which increases the amount of crystals outside
the mask area.
$
Shape Transparency
$
Outside Transparency
Sets the transparency level of the area outside
your mask.
¦ Note The Outside Transparency setting is applicable only if you’ve
scaled down, moved, or rotated your mask using the transform controls so that
the mask doesn’t cover the entire screen.
Lets you apply the crystallize effect to the edges of your mask.
$
Softness
$
Select this option if you want to invert the opaque and
transparent areas of your mask.
$
Apply Crop to Video Only Select this if you want the mask to be
squeezed to fit your cropped clip. If you don’t select this option, the mask
will be cropped by the same amount that you crop your clip.
$
Transform Use these properties to apply or change various transform
settings, such as the position, scale, and rotation settings of your mask. For
more information, see “Transforming your clip” on page 34.
Invert Mask
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a crystallize effect
74
Creating a lens flare effect
The Matrox lens flare effect lets you simulate the light refractions caused by
shining a bright light into the lens of a camera when taking a photo. You can
choose from many different lens flare patterns.
° To set up a Matrox lens flare effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Lens Flare to expand the property list.
• Light Source Position
$
Position X & Y Sets the position of the light source along the horizontal
and vertical axes. The refractions caused by the light source will move in
accordance with its position.
$
Position Z
Sets the depth of the light source.
¥ Tip You can easily adjust the light source position directly in the Program
Monitor. To do this, click the Transform icon (
) beside Matrox Lens
Flare in the Effect Controls panel. A crosshair will appear in the Program
Monitor. Drag the crosshair to position the light source along the horizontal
and vertical axes.
• Center Position
$ Position X
Sets the position of the lens flare along the horizontal axis.
Sets the position of the lens flare along the vertical axis.
Click the button to the right of the current pattern to see the
list of available lens flare patterns.
$
Position Y
• Select Shape
Click here to
select a new
pattern
• Global Settings
$ Scale (X, Y)
Use these controls to make your lens flare smaller or larger.
Full-screen size is represented as 100%. You can shrink your lens flare to
0% or enlarge it to 1000%. Note, however, that by enlarging your clip, the
resolution may become blurry. You can adjust the size controls individually,
or if you select Fixed Aspect Ratio, you only need to adjust the x axis.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
75
$
$
Adjusting the percentage on the x and y axes changes the lens flare’s width
and height, respectively.
Intensity Sets the opacity of the light refractions. Levels range from
completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
Enable Alpha Select this option to enable alpha for the lens flare, so it
will remain visible even on transparent (keyed) areas of your clip.
• Flare Settings Adjusting these settings will change the appearance of the
flare (usually the brightest spot) in the lens.
¦ Note While most of the lens flare patterns contain a flare, some of them do
not. If you choose a pattern without a flare, these settings aren’t applicable.
Sets the size of the flare.
$
Size
$
Intensity
$
Color
Sets the opacity of the flare. Levels range from completely
transparent (0) to opaque (100).
Sets the color of the flare.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a lens flare effect
76
Overview of the luma key effect
You can use the Matrox realtime plug-in to apply a luma key to make certain
areas of a foreground image transparent based on the luminance in that image, so
that an underlying image can show through.
In the following example of a luma key effect, two video clips are combined to
produce the effect of two cowboys riding through fire. Our foreground image is a
video clip of a ring of fire against a black background, and our underlying image
is a video clip of two men riding horses:
+
Foreground image
Underlying image
By luma keying on the particular luminance (brightness) of the black areas in the
foreground clip, these areas become transparent and the corresponding areas of
the underlying image show through in the composite image as follows:
=
Result of luma key
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
77
Creating a luma key effect
To set up a Matrox luma key effect, click the triangle next to Matrox Luma Key
to expand the property list:
• Graphical Allows you to see a graphical representation of your changes
when you adjust the property settings. You can adjust the luma key
properties directly in the graph to select the luminance values on which you
want to key. For more information, see “Using the luma key graph” on
page 78.
• Transparency Use this control to set the transparency level of your key
effect. Higher values indicate higher transparency. For example, a
Transparency value of 100 makes the keyed area in your foreground image
completely transparent, leaving the underlying image visible.
• Low Clip Use this to select the lower (darker) luminance values to be
keyed. A Low Clip setting of 0 represents black, and a setting of 255
represents white. Intermediate settings represent different shades of gray,
from very dark to very light gray.
• Low Gain Use this to set the range of luminance values you want to be
partially transparent based on the value set by the Low Clip control. As you
increase the Low Gain setting, more luminance values become partially
transparent to give you a softer-edged key.
A Low Gain setting of 100 provides the widest range for maximum softness.
Alternately, a gain setting of 0 creates a hard key where the luminance values
are either completely transparent or opaque. You can think of the Low Gain
Creating a luma key effect
78
control as defining a “Transparent to Opaque” range for keying the dark areas
of your foreground image.
• High Clip This control is similar to Low Clip, except you use it to select
the higher (brighter) luminance values to be keyed.
• High Gain This control is similar to Low Gain, except you use it to set the
range of luminance values you want to be partially transparent based on the
value set by the High Clip control. You can think of the High Gain control
as defining an “Opaque to Transparent” range for keying the lighter areas of
your foreground image.
¦ Note The values you can select using the Low Clip and Low Gain controls
are dependent on the High Clip and High Gain controls, and vice versa. This
prevents the low and high controls from keying on the same luminance values.
• Mask Allows you to apply a mask to your effect. For more information,
see “Applying a mask to your effect” on page 39.
• Transparent Outside Mask Select this option to apply transparency
outside the mask area. This allows you to define a mask area where you want
the keying to be performed, and show only your underlying image outside
the mask. For more information, see “Applying a mask to your effect” on
page 39.
• Invert Key Select this to invert the key selection, giving you the opposite
result of what you originally selected
• Show Key as Output Select this to display the matte used to create your
key effect. This enables you to further refine your key settings. For example,
when you display the matte, areas of your clip that are completely
transparent appear as black, and opaque areas appear as white. If you notice
some white spots that you want to key, you can adjust the key controls until
the undesired white spots disappear.
Using the luma key graph
The luma key graph contains a luminance spectrum and a luminance eyedropper.
You can drag the handles in the luminance spectrum to adjust the Transparency,
Low Clip, High Clip, Low Gain, and High Gain properties.
Eyedropper
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
79
You can select luminance values on which to key by adjusting the Low Clip and
High Clip handles, or you can use the luminance eyedropper to automatically
pick the luminance value you want to key on. The eyedropper can be used in two
ways:
$
Click the eyedropper button and click on the color with the desired
luminance value in your clip.
$
Click the eyedropper button and click and drag anywhere on your clip to
create a rectangular area containing the luminance values you want to select.
The selected luminance will be an average of the luminance values
contained within the rectangle.
You can also adjust the softness of your key with the Low Gain, High Gain, and
Transparency handles. All these adjustments affect the shape and size of the
luminance selector as follows:
LOW CLIP
HIGH CLIP
TRANS
LOW GAIN
HIGH GAIN
• Plot Click this button to see the luminance spectrum with a plot that shows
each luminance value present in your image as a vertical line in the
histogram. A longer line indicates a higher amount of pixels in your image of
that line’s luminance value. You can drag the handles in the luma plot
spectrum to adjust the Transparency, Low Clip, High Clip, Low Gain, and
High Gain properties. Any adjustments made affect the shape and size of the
luminance selector in the Luma Plot.
Creating a luma key effect
80
Creating a mask effect
The Matrox mask effect lets you choose from dozens of soft-edged cutout shapes
that you can apply to a clip to superimpose it onto another clip.
° To set up a Matrox mask effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Mask to expand the property list.
• Select Shape Click the button to the right of the current pattern to see the
list of available mask patterns.
Click here to
select a new
pattern
• Shape Transparency Sets the transparency of the shape and the area
around the shape. At the default setting (0), the shape is completely opaque
and the area around the shape is transparent. Dragging the slider to the left
increases the transparency of the shape. Dragging the slider to the right
decreases the transparency of the area around the shape.
• Outside Transparency
your mask.
Sets the transparency level of the area outside
¦ Note The Outside Transparency setting is applicable only if you’ve
scaled down, moved, or rotated your mask using the transform controls so that
the mask doesn’t cover the entire screen. When Outside Transparency is
applied, the Shape Transparency sets the overall transparency of the entire
clip.
• Softness
Applies softness to the edges of your mask.
• Invert Mask Select this option if you want to invert the opaque and
transparent areas of your mask.
• Apply Crop to Video Only Select this if you want the mask to be
squeezed to fit your cropped clip. If you don’t select this option, the mask
will be cropped by the same amount that you crop your clip.
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• Transform Use these controls to apply or change various transform
settings for your mask effect, such as the position, scale, and rotation of the
mask. For more information, see “Transforming your clip” on page 34.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a mask effect
82
Creating a mask blur effect
The Matrox mask blur effect lets you create a “region of interest” by adding a
mask to your clip and applying blurring to it. You can choose from many
different mask patterns.
° To set up a Matrox mask blur effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Mask Blur to expand the property list.
• Blur Settings
Let you adjust the amount of blurring in your clip.
$
Red, Green, Blue, and Alpha Blur Amount
Use these controls to adjust
the amount of blurring to be applied to each of the color and alpha channels
in your clip. For example, you can choose to apply blurring to only the red
color component of your clip. The Alpha Blur Amount is applicable only
to graphics clips that have an alpha channel.
$
Lock Channels
Select this to apply the same blur settings to all channels.
When you adjust the setting for the Red Blur Amount, the same settings
will be applied to the other channels.
• Color Gain Settings Let you adjust the amount of color in your clip
within the blurred area.
$
Red, Green, and Blue Color Gain Use these controls to individually
fine-tune the intensity of a particular color present in your clip. For example,
you can increase the Red value to increase only the red color component
of your clip within the blurred area.
$
Lock Channels
Select this to apply the same color gain settings to all
channels. When you adjust the setting for the Red Color Gain, the same
settings will be applied to the other channels.
• Mask Settings Let you select the mask pattern and adjust the
transparency settings for your effect.
$
Click the button to the right of the current pattern to see
the list of available mask patterns.
Select Shape
Click here to
select a new
pattern
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Sets the transparency of the shape and the area
around the shape. At the default setting (0), the shape is completely opaque
and the area around the shape is transparent. Dragging the slider to the left
increases the transparency of the shape, which makes the blur less apparent.
Dragging the slider to the right decreases the transparency of the area
around the shape, which increases the amount of blurring outside the mask
area.
$
Shape Transparency
$
Outside Transparency
Sets the transparency level of the area outside
your mask.
¦ Note The Outside Transparency setting is applicable only if you’ve
scaled down, moved, or rotated your mask using the transform controls so that
the mask doesn’t cover the entire screen.
Lets you apply blurring to the edges of your mask.
$
Softness
$
Invert Mask Select this option if you want to invert the opaque and
transparent areas of your mask.
$
Apply Crop to Video Only Select this if you want the mask to be
squeezed to fit your cropped clip. If you don’t select this option, the mask
will be cropped by the same amount that you crop your clip.
$
Transform
Use these controls to apply or change various transform
settings for your mask blur effect, such as the position, scale, and rotation
of the mask. For more information, see “Transforming your clip” on
page 34.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
¦ Note If you are working in HD, the mask blur effect may require rendering
depending on your project’s video format.
Creating a mask blur effect
84
Creating a mask mosaic effect
The Matrox mask mosaic effect lets you create a “region of interest” by adding a
mask to your clip and applying a mosaic effect to it. You can choose from many
different mask patterns.
° To set up a Matrox mask mosaic effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Mask Mosaic to expand the property list.
• Mosaic Settings Let you adjust the size of the mosaic blocks and the
sharpness of the color in the mosaic effect.
$
Block Width and Block Height
Use these controls to set the width and
height of the mosaic blocks in your effect. If you select Fixed Aspect
Ratio, you only need to adjust the block width and the height will be set to
the same value.
$
Color Sharpness Select this to sharpen the color of each mosaic block
in your effect. This causes each block to take on the predominant color of
that section of the underlying image (instead of the average color).
• Mask Settings Let you select the mask pattern and adjust the
transparency settings for your effect.
$
Click the button to the right of the current pattern to see
the list of available mask patterns.
Select Shape
Click here to
select a new
pattern
Sets the transparency of the shape and the area
around the shape. At the default setting (0), the shape is completely opaque
and the area around the shape is transparent. Dragging the slider to the left
increases the transparency of the shape, which makes the mosaic effect less
apparent. Dragging the slider to the right decreases the transparency of the
area around the shape, which increases the amount of mosaic outside the
mask area.
$
Shape Transparency
$
Outside Transparency
Sets the transparency level of the area outside
your mask.
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¦ Note The Outside Transparency setting is applicable only if you’ve
scaled down, moved, or rotated your mask using the transform controls so that
the mask doesn’t cover the entire screen.
Lets you apply the mosaic effect to the edges of your mask.
$
Softness
$
Invert Mask Select this option if you want to invert the opaque and
transparent areas of your mask.
$
Apply Crop to Video Only Select this if you want the mask to be
squeezed to fit your cropped clip. If you don’t select this option, the mask
will be cropped by the same amount that you crop your clip.
$
Transform
Use these controls to apply or change various transform
settings for your mask mosaic effect, such as the position, scale, and rotation
of the mask. For more information, see “Transforming your clip” on
page 34.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a mask mosaic effect
86
Creating a move & scale effect
The Matrox move & scale effect lets you position and scale your clips anywhere
in 2D space while adding soft edges in real time.
¦ Note The move & scale effect provides the sharpest picture when creating a
picture-in-picture effect. However, if you want to apply rotation to your effect,
you must use the 3D DVE effect as explained in “Creating a 3D DVE effect” on
page 60.
° To set up a Matrox move & scale effect:
Click the triangle next to Matrox Move & Scale to expand the property list.
• 2D Transform
$ Position (X, Y)
Use these controls to position your clip on the x
(horizontal) and y (vertical) axes. X and y values of 0.0 pixels align the
center of your clip with the center of the screen, and positions are measured
from this point. You can enter positive or negative pixel values to move your
clip right or left (x), and up or down (y).
$
Scale (X, Y) Use these controls to make your clip smaller or larger.
Full-screen size is represented as 100%. You can shrink your clip to 0% or
enlarge it to 1000%. Note, however, that by enlarging your clip, the
resolution may become blurry. You can adjust the size controls individually,
or if you select Fixed Aspect Ratio, you only need to adjust the x axis.
Adjusting the percentage on the x and y axes changes your clip’s width and
height, respectively.
Anchor Point X & Y Sets the point of origin from which to scale your
clip along the x (horizontal) and y (vertical) axes.
• Edge Softness (X, Y) Lets you apply softness to the edges of your clip
along the x (horizontal) and y (vertical) axes. You can adjust the softness
controls individually or if you select Fixed Aspect Ratio, you only need to
adjust the x axis. The higher the softness value, the less sharp the edges
become.
$
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$
Nonlinear Softness Select this option to make the boundaries of the
softness region less obvious. Enabling this option makes your edge softness
controls produce results similar to the border softness controls in the Matrox
3D DVE effect.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a move & scale effect
88
Creating an old movie effect
The Matrox old movie effect lets you create an old film look on your clips by
adding noise, dust, streaks, jitter, and flickers.
° To set up a Matrox old movie effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Old Movie to expand the property list.
• Random Artifact Generator Adjust this setting to change the placement
of artifacts in your clip. The artifacts are randomly distributed based on the
value you select. For example, if you notice the streaks in your clip are
always in the same place, you can use this setting to move them.
• Border Settings
$ Round Corner Size
Allows you to round the corners on the edges of
your clip.
$
Softness Lets you adjust the amount of softness on the edge of your clip
by dragging the slider or entering a percentage in the text box. The higher
the value, the less sharp the edge will become.
• Preprocessing These controls allow you to isolate a channel to process
black and white values for your effect. For example, to adjust black and
white values on the red channel only, select Red Only as your mode.
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89
$
Enable Preprocessing Select this option to enable preprocessing.
Enabling this option will turn your clip black and white.
¦ Note Adjusting the Color Gain and Color Addition controls will change
the color of your clip. If you would like your clip to remain black and white,
select Lock Colors for both the Color Gain and Color Addition.
$
Mode Lets you select the channel you want to use for the processing.
Click the triangle on the right to expand the list.
• Red Only
Uses the red channel.
• Green Only
• Blue Only
• Alpha Only
• Luma
Uses the green channel.
Uses the blue channel.
Uses the alpha channel.
Uses the luminance values.
• Oversaturated Luma
Uses the oversaturated luminance values only.
• Noise
$ Noise Pattern
Allows you to select a noise pattern. Click the button on
the right to see the list of available patterns.
Click here to
select a noise
pattern
$
Lifetime Sets the maximum number of frames that the noise pattern will
remain immobile before moving to another random position.
$
Opacity
$
Color Use this to set the noise color.
Sets the opacity of the noise pattern. Levels range from
completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
• Dust
$ Dust Pattern
Allows you to select a dust pattern. Click the button on the
right to see the list of available patterns.
Click here to
select a dust
pattern
$
Amount Sets the maximum number of dust particles that can be visible
at any given time.
$
Lifetime Sets the maximum number of frames that the dust pattern will
remain immobile before moving to another random position.
$
Opacity
Sets the opacity of the dust pattern. Levels range from
completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
Creating an old movie effect
90
$
$
Use this to set the dust color.
Fixed Particle
• Display Fixed Particle Select this option if you would like one of the
dust particles to remain fixed on your image.
Color
Use this to select the particle you want to remain
fixed on your image. Each dust particle is represented by a value.
• Particle Number
Sets the position of the fixed particle along the horizontal
• Position X
axis.
• Position Y
Sets the position of the fixed particle along the vertical axis.
• Streak
$ Streak Pattern
Allows you to select a streak pattern. Click the button on
the right to see the list of available patterns.
Click here to
select a streak
pattern
$
Amount Sets the maximum number of streaks that can be visible at any
given time.
$
Opacity
$
Color Use this to set the streak color.
Sets the opacity of the streak pattern. Levels range from
completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
• Jitter
$ Manual Control
Select this option to disable Probability and manually
control the amount of jittering by using only the Offset control.
$
Probability Specifies how often the jitter will occur. The higher the value
the more probable the jitter.
$
Offset
$
Distance Between Frames Sets the space in between the current frame
Specifies how far the image jitters vertically upward.
and the next frame jittering upwards. The higher the value, the more space
between the two frames.
• Flicker
$ Manual Control
Select this option to manually control when the
flickering occurs by using only the Highest Intensity control. Enabling
this option will disable all other flicker controls.
Specifies the amount of flickering that occurs. The higher the
value, the more flickering you will see.
$
Frequency
$
Sets the lowest level of brightness, which creates a
progression from dark to bright between this level and the Highest
Intensity level during the flicker. Lower values will start the flicker at a
Lowest Intensity
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darker level. For example, if you want your flickering to progress from
complete darkness to normal brightness, you would select 0% for the
Lowest Intensity and 100% for the Highest Intensity.
$
Highest Intensity Sets the highest level of brightness the flicker will
attain.
¦ Note If you enable Manual Control, you can use Highest Intensity to
control the flickering by creating keyframes at various levels of brightness.
$
Randomize Specifies the amount of random flickering that will occur.
For example, at 0% there will be no randomization and the flickering
follows a rhythmic beat. The higher the value the more random the
flickering becomes.
• Color Gain and Color Addition (Red, Green, Blue) You can use the
controls under Color Gain and Color Addition to individually fine-tune the
colors of your image. To proportionally increase or decrease the red, green,
and blue values, select Lock Colors.
$
The Color Gain controls for Red, Green, and Blue let you increase or
decrease the intensity of a particular color present in your image. For
example, increasing the Red value increases only the red color component
of your image, without affecting the other colors.
$
Color Addition lets you adjust all colors in your image by a given amount
of Red, Green, or Blue. For example, increasing the Red value increases
the amount of red throughout your entire image.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating an old movie effect
92
Creating a page curl effect
The Matrox page curl effect lets you create page curls that are truly 3D with
full-motion video on the reverse side, and realistic highlights. You can control the
position, rotation, scaling, and zooming of the page curls in 3D space, and apply
softness to the edges. You can also apply page curls on graphics to create great
looking text effects.
° To set up a Matrox page curl effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Page Curl to expand the property list.
• Page Curl
You can select Page Peel or Page Roll as your page curl type
(this setting is active for the duration of your effect).
$
Fold Type
$
Fold Angle Sets the angle of your page curl, in degrees. Alternately, you
can set the number of spins for your page curl.
$
Curl Radius
$
Progression
$
Edge Softness
Determines the tightness of your page curl. For example, a
radius of 0 produces the tightest page curl, and the higher the radius, the
looser the page curl.
Sets the progression of your page curl pattern at any
keyframe. In order to see your page curl progress you need to apply at least
two keyframes to your clip. To create a standard page curl, create a keyframe
at the first frame of your clip with Progression set to 0%, and another
keyframe at the last frame of your clip with Progression set to 100%. For
more information about creating keyframes, see your Adobe Premiere Pro
documentation.
Creates a soft edge on your page curl.
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93
$
Curl Softness
curling.
Creates a soft edge on the section of the page that is
¦ Note You will not be able to see the Curl Softness on your page curl if you
adjust the scale or rotation settings in the transform controls.
• Highlight There is a white illuminated line that highlights each page curl.
The following settings allow you to manipulate this highlight.
$
Position
$
Intensity
Sets the location in the page curl where the highlight appears.
Sets the brightness of the highlight, as a percentage.
• Shadow Intensity
percentage.
Sets the darkness of the page curl shadow, as a
• Transform Allows you to apply or change various transform settings, such
as to change your clip’s size, position, and rotation. For more information,
see “Transforming your clip” on page 34.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a page curl effect
94
Creating a pan & scan effect
The Matrox pan & scan effect lets you easily convert footage from one aspect
ratio to another. Tracking on-screen action to make accurate judgements is easy
because you see the entire source clip and the section of it that will become the
final result.
You can use the Matrox pan & scan effect to convert your entire production to
another aspect ratio. To do this you should apply the pan & scan effect to a nested
sequence:
1 Choose File > New > Sequence.
2 Give your new sequence a name and click OK.
3 Drag your original sequence from the Project panel into the new sequence.
4 Apply the Matrox pan & scan effect to the new sequence.
5 Adjust the pan & scan settings as desired for your entire production.
For more information about creating nested sequences, see your Adobe Premiere
Pro documentation.
° To set up a Matrox pan & scan effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Pan & Scan to expand the property list.
• Source Aspect Ratio Use this to select the aspect ratio of your source
clip. You can click the triangle on the right to expand the list and choose a
predefined aspect ratio or use the Source Aspect Ratio slider to select a
custom aspect ratio.
• Destination Aspect Ratio Use this to select the new aspect ratio that you
want for your clip. You can click the triangle on the right to expand the list
and choose a predefined aspect ratio or use the Destination Aspect Ratio
slider to select a custom aspect ratio.
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¦ Note If you are working in HD, your output will always be 16:9. Therefore, if
you choose 4:3 as your Destination Aspect Ratio, your clip will be distorted.
• Scale Use this to proportionally resize (enlarge or reduce) your clip.
• Pan Position Lets you move the area of interest at a specific frame in your
clip. When used with Global View (see below), you’ll see a visual
representation of the selected area.
• Enable Global View Select this to display a rectangle around the area of
interest that you’re selecting using Pan Position.
Creating a pan & scan effect
96
Creating a shadow effect
The Matrox shadow effect lets you project a realistic shadow from any source
containing key information, such as DVEs and titles with an alpha channel. You
can tint the shadow, and position, scale, and rotate it to match the angle of the
surface on which it is cast. Applying blur to the shadow can simulate the realistic
look of diffused light being projected on the source.
¦ Note If you are working in HD, the Matrox shadow effect may require
rendering when combined with other effects.
° To set up a Matrox shadow effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Shadow to expand the property list.
¡ Important Either your source clip or an effect applied to your source clip must
contain alpha key information in order to create a shadow effect. For example, if
you apply a shadow effect to a clip with no alpha key information and scale it
down using Adobe’s Motion effect, you won’t see any shadow because the
Motion effect is the last effect applied, and there is no alpha key information to
create the shadow effect. Whereas, if you apply a Matrox 3D DVE to the same
clip and then apply the shadow effect, you will be able to see the shadow because
the Matrox 3D DVE effects contains alpha information.
• Lock Colors Select this option to lock the colors and opacity values for the
top and bottom corners of your shadow. For example, the color and opacity
value you select for the top right corner will be used for all four corners of
the shadow.
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• Top Right Corner Color
Use this to set the top right corner color.
• Top Right Corner Opacity Sets the opacity of the top right corner. Levels
range from completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
• Top Left Corner Color Use this to set the top left corner color.
• Top Left Corner Opacity Sets the opacity of the top left corner. Levels
range from completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
• Bottom Left Corner Color Use this to set the bottom left corner color.
• Bottom Left Corner Opacity Sets the opacity of the bottom left corner.
Levels range from completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
• Bottom Right Corner Color Use this to set the bottom right corner color.
• Bottom Right Corner Opacity Sets the opacity of the bottom right
corner. Levels range from completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
¦ Note The shadow corner colors are applied based on the size of the full
screen. Therefore, corner colors of your shadow may vary depending on the
size and position of your DVE. For example, if you choose red for your
shadow’s top right corner color and scale down and position your DVE to take
up only the top right quarter of the screen, the shadow will reflect red for each
corner of the shadow even though you may have selected different colors for
all four corners.
• Shadow Softness Use this to set the softness of your shadow. The higher
the value, the softer your shadow becomes.
¦ Note Shadow Softness is applied starting from the borders of the full
screen, therefore the Shadow Softness may be less apparent based on the
size and position of your DVE.
• Blur Use this to apply blurring to your shadow.
• Camera Field of Vision Specifies the field of vision of the camera in
reference to the shadow.
• Camera Position X Moves the camera around the x axis.
• Camera Position Y Moves the camera around the y axis.
• Camera Position Z Moves the camera inward or outward from the
shadow.
• Transform Allows you to apply or change various transform settings for
your shadow, such as the size, position, and rotation of the shadow. For more
information, see “Transforming your clip” on page 34.
Creating a shadow effect
98
Creating a shine effect
The Matrox shine effect allows you to create rays that shine through text, or add
shimmer to an object in your clip. You can also use the shine effect to make
two-dimensional text appear as three-dimensional text.
° To set up a Matrox shine effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Shine to expand the property list:
• Light Source
$ Position X
Sets the position of the light source along the horizontal axis.
$
Position Y Sets the position of the light source along the vertical axis.
$
Position Z
Sets the depth of the light source.
Rotation Rotates the light source. Positive values rotate the light source
counterclockwise, and negative values rotate the light source clockwise.
• Volume
$ Length
Specifies how far the light rays shine outward from the light
source. Positive values make the rays shine outward, while negative values
make the rays shine inward.
$
$
Mode Allows you to select the mode you want (Additive or Blend).
Click the triangle on the right to expand the list.
Adds the shine layers on top of one another repeatedly so the
effect becomes brighter.
• Additive
Blends the shine layers together. This mode is useful if you want
to make two-dimensional text appear to be three-dimensional.
• Blend
$
Sets the amount of shine layers applied in the effect. Higher
values result in a cleaner, more precise effect.
Precision
¦ Note The higher the precision value, the longer the shine effect will take to
render.
$
Sets the opacity of the rays closest to the light source.
Levels range from completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
Start Opacity
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$
Sets the opacity of the rays furthest from the light source.
Levels range from completely transparent (0) to opaque (100).
End Opacity
• Preprocessing These controls allow you to isolate a channel as the input
for the shine. For example, if you wanted to apply the shine to the alpha
channel only, you would select Alpha Only as your mode.
Select this option to enable preprocessing.
$
Enable Preprocessing
$
Mode Lets you select the channel you want to use for your effect. Click
the triangle on the right to expand the list.
• Red Only
Uses the red channel.
• Green Only
• Blue Only
• Alpha Only
• Luma
Uses the green channel.
Uses the blue channel.
Uses the alpha channel.
Uses the luminance values.
• Oversaturated Luma
$
Uses the oversaturated luminance values only.
Use this to proportionally increase or decrease the region
outside your Mode range. For example, if you chose Red Only as your
mode, raising the Threshold will cause only the really bright red areas of
your image to be affected by the shine.
Threshold
• Color Remapping These controls allow you to apply a color gradient to
your effect. For example, you may want to simulate the look of a crackling
fire by using a gradient that contains orange, red, and white.
$
Enable Color Remapping Select this option to enable color remapping.
$
Gradient
$
Use Gradient Built-in Alpha Select this option when using a gradient
that contains an alpha channel.
$
Gradient Lower Boundary Sets the starting color from the gradient you
chose, which will create a gradual progression between this color and the
Gradient Upper Boundary color. Drag the slider to progress through the
various colors in the gradient. For example if you selected a gradient that
progresses from black to white and you want your gradient to start at
medium gray, drag the slider to 50%.
$
Gradient Upper Boundary Sets the end color from the gradient you
chose, which will create a gradual progression between this color and the
Gradient Lower Boundary color. Drag the slider to progress through the
various colors in the gradient. For example, if you selected a gradient that
Allows you to select a gradient. Click the button on the right
to see the list of available gradients. You can use the Gradient Lower
Boundary and Gradient Upper Boundary controls to specify a range of
colors from the gradient you choose.
Creating a shine effect
100
progresses from black to white and you want your gradient to end at dark
gray, drag the slider to 10%.
• Noise Use these controls to apply noise patterns to your shine effect.
$
Noise Pattern Allows you to select a noise pattern. Click the button on
the right to see the list of available patterns.
Click here to
select a noise
pattern
$
Amount Sets the amount of noise that will be applied to your effect. The
higher the value, the more apparent the noise pattern becomes.
$
Size Sets the size of the artifacts in the noise pattern. Drag the slider to
the right to increase the size of the artifacts, or to the left to shrink them.
$
Progression (X)
Sets the progression of the noise pattern along the
horizontal axis.
$
Progression (Y)
Sets the progression of the noise pattern along the
vertical axis.
• Postprocessing Use these controls to define how your shine colors blend
with your source image’s colors. Each mode involves a calculation that uses
the pixel values from your shine effect and the source image.
$
Mode Use this to select the mode you want to use for blending. Click the
triangle on the right to expand the list.
• None
There is no blending, only the shine pixels are displayed.
Adds the source image pixel values to the shine pixel values. This
lightens the effect.
• Add
Multiplies the shine pixel values with the source image pixel
values. This darkens the effect.
• Modulate
Subtracts the source image pixel values from the shine pixel
values to create a new color.
• Subtract
Blending of the shine pixel values is performed only on
the low saturated (pale) colors from the source image. This will result in
a more subtle effect.
• Add Smooth
Adds the shine pixel values to the brightest pixel values
of the source image.
• Add Signed
Blends the shine pixel values with the alpha pixel values of the
source image.
• Blend
Blends the shine pixel values with the brightest pixel
values of the source image.
• Blend Signed
$
Original Opacity Sets the opacity of the source image.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
101
• Mask Settings Let you select a mask pattern and adjust the transparency
settings to define the area where you want to apply your shine effect.
Select this option to enable the mask.
$
Enable Mask
$
Mask Pattern Allows you to select a mask pattern. Click the button on
the right to see the list of masks.
Click here to
select a mask
pattern
Select this option if you want to invert the opaque and
transparent areas of your mask.
$
Invert Mask
$
Outside Transparency
Sets the transparency level of the region outside
your mask.
¦ Note The Outside Transparency setting is applicable only if you’ve
scaled down, moved, or rotated your mask using the transform controls so that
the mask doesn’t cover the entire screen.
Sets the transparency of the shape and the area
around the shape. At the default setting (0), the shape is completely opaque
and the area around the shape is transparent. Dragging the slider to the left
increases the transparency of the shape, which makes the shine effect less
apparent. Dragging the slider to the right decreases the transparency of the
area around the shape, which increases the amount of shine outside the mask
area.
$
Shape Transparency
$
Transform Use these properties to apply or change various transform
settings, such as the position, scale, and rotation settings of your mask. For
more information, see “Transforming your clip” on page 34.
• Crop Allows you to crop the edges of your clip. For more information, see
“Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Creating a shine effect
102
Creating a surface finish effect
The Matrox surface finish effect allows you to apply various textures to your
clips, such as metal, brick, wood, or granite with color spot lighting. You can also
adjust the transform controls to create a rotating slab with a different look on the
front and back face.
° To set up a Matrox surface finish effect:
Click the triangle beside Matrox Surface Finish to expand the property list.
• Surface Control
$ Apply to Opaque Areas Only
Select this option to apply the surface
texture to only the opaque areas of a clip that contains an alpha channel.
¦ Note When this option is enabled you cannot adjust the Scale Z transform
property, and therefore your clip will be two dimensional.
$
$
Allows you to select your surface texture. Click the
button on the right to see the list of available textures.
Front Face Control
• Blending Factor Blends the front face of the slab with the surface
texture. The higher the value, the more your clip blends in. A value of
zero will display only the surface texture.
Surface Texture
• Invert Video Orientation
Select this to invert your clip on the front
face of your slab.
Sets the crop region used on the front face of the slab. For more
information, see “Cropping your clip” on page 37.
Back Face Control
• Blending Factor Blends the back face of the slab with the surface
texture. The higher the value, the more your clip blends in. A value of
zero will display only the surface texture.
• Crop
$
• Invert Video Orientation
Select this to invert your clip on the back
face of your slab.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
103
Sets the crop region used on the back face of the slab. For more
information, see “Cropping your clip” on page 37.
• Light Control
$ Ambient Light Color
Use the color picker button or eyedropper to select
the ambient color of light for your entire clip.
• Crop
$
$
Show Light Cursors Select this option to see the reference point of the
two light sources to help you set up your lights. Remember to clear this
option when you’re finished setting up your effect.
First Light
• Enable Select this to enable the first light.
Use the color picker button or the eyedropper to select the color
of your first light.
• Color
Allows you to select the first light pattern. Click
the button on the right to see the list of available patterns.
• First Light Pattern
• Position X
Sets the position of the first light along the horizontal axis.
• Position Y
Sets the position of the first light along the vertical axis.
• Position Z
Sets the depth of the first light.
Selecting this option makes the first light source
position relative to the center of your clip. For example, if you move your
clip, the first light will move with it. By default, the position of the first
light is relative to the center of the screen.
Second Light
• Enable Select this to enable the second light.
• Relative Position
$
Use the color picker button or the eyedropper to select the color
of your second light.
• Color
Allows you to select the second light pattern.
Click the button on the right to see the list of available patterns.
• Second Light Pattern
• Position X
Sets the position of the second light along the horizontal
axis.
• Position Y
Sets the position of the second light along the vertical axis.
• Position Z
Sets the depth of the second light.
Selecting this option will make the second light
source relative to the center of your clip. For example, if you move your
clip, the second light source will move with it. By default, the second
light source is relative to the center of the screen.
• Relative Position
• Transform Allows you to apply or change various transform settings, such
as to change your clip’s size, position, and rotation to create a rotating slab.
Creating a surface finish effect
104
¦ Note The transform properties for the surface finish effect include a Scale
Z property that allows you to adjust the thickness of your slab. For more
information about using the other transform properties, see “Transforming
your clip” on page 34.
¡ Important If you are working in HD, the surface finish effect may require
rendering based on certain setting combinations.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
105
Creating a track matte effect
The Matrox track matte effect lets you superimpose one clip onto another using
an animated matte, sometimes called a traveling matte, to determine how the two
clips are composited (keyed). You can use any of the following types of clips as
your matte:
• A grayscale video or graphics clip.
• A graphics clip or graphics sequence with an alpha channel.
• Any clip to which you’ve applied an effect that provides an alpha channel,
such as a Matrox chroma key or 3D DVE.
When using a grayscale clip as your matte, areas of black in the matte create
transparent areas in your foreground clip, areas of white create opaque areas that
prevent the underlying clip from showing through, and gray areas create
semi-transparent areas in your foreground clip.
° To set up a Matrox track matte effect:
1 Place your background clip (underlying image) on the Video 1 track.
2 Place your matte clip directly above your background clip on the Video 2
track, and apply the Matrox Track Matte - Matte Identifier effect to this
clip. There are no settings for this effect as it is used only to identify which
clip you’re using as the matte for your track matte effect.
¡ Important Any effect applied to your matte after applying the Matrox
Track Matte - Matte Identifier effect will be ignored. Therefore, if you
want to apply an effect such as a Matrox chroma key or apply motion to your
matte using a Matrox 3D DVE or Adobe Premiere Pro Motion effect, you
must apply this effect before applying the Matrox Track Matte - Matte
Identifier effect.
3 Place your foreground clip (the clip you want to superimpose onto your
background clip) directly above your matte on Video 3, and apply the
Matrox Track Matte - Video Source effect to this clip. Your sequence
should be similar to the following example:
Matrox Track Matte - Video
Source effect applied to
foreground clip
Matrox Track Matte - Matte
Identifier effect applied to
matte clip
Creating a track matte effect
106
4 In the Effect Controls panel, click the triangle beside Matrox Track Matte
- Video Source to expand the property list:
5 Click the triangle beside Composite Type to select a composite type.
Click here to select a
composite type
You can select any of the following:
Uses the alpha channel of your matte to key your foreground
image. This is applicable only if your matte is a graphics clip that has an
alpha channel, or a clip to which you’ve applied an effect that provides an
alpha channel, such as a Matrox chroma key.
$
Alpha
$
Luma 0-255
$
Luma 16-235
Uses the full range of luminance levels in your matte to key
your foreground image. This is applicable only if your matte contains super
black and super white luminance levels.
Uses the standard range of luminance levels in your matte
to key your foreground image.
6 To reverse the result of your track matte effect, select Reverse. This inverts
the key to give you the opposite result (transparent areas of your foreground
image become opaque and opaque areas become transparent).
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
107
Creating a wipe transition
The Matrox wipe transitions support standard dissolves, SMPTE wipes, and
organic wipes with soft edges and color borders.
° To set up a Matrox wipe transition:
Click the transition’s icon in your sequence, then click the Custom button in the
Effect Controls panel. This opens the Customize Matrox Wipes dialog box:
1 Under Wipe Pattern, click the Select Pattern button and choose a pattern
for your wipe.
2 If you would like to add a border to your wipe, select Enable under Border.
$
Width Lets you adjust the width of your border by dragging the slider or
entering a percentage in the text box.
$
Color
Click this button to select a color for your border.
Creating a wipe transition
108
$
Balance Lets you adjust the prominence of the border between image A
and image B. For example, positive values make the border more prominent
in image B, while negative values make the border more prominent in image
A.
$
Reset
Click this button to restore the default Border values.
3 Use the controls under Softness to create a soft edge on the border of your
wipe.
This option is selected by default. You may find it
useful to clear this option when using certain wipe patterns. For example,
nonlinear softness often provides better results when creating SMPTE
wipes, while linear softness is usually preferable when creating organic
wipes.
$
Nonlinear softness
$
Amount Lets you adjust the amount of softness by dragging the slider or
entering a percentage in the text box. The higher the value, the less sharp
the edge of your border or wipe will become.
$
Reset
Click this button at any time to restore the default Softness values.
4 Use the controls under Preview to preview your wipe transition:
$
Drag the slider beside the Play button to scrub through your transition.
$
Click the Play button or press the SPACEBAR to play back your transition.
Select Loop if you’d like the wipe to play back continuously until you click
Stop.
You can adjust the wipe settings as your transition is playing to immediately
see the result of your changes.
For more information about setting up transitions, see your Adobe Premiere Pro
documentation.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
109
Using the Matrox chroma clamper effect
You can use the Matrox chroma clamper effect to ensure that when you’ve
applied effects that perform color space conversion on part of a clip, the clip’s
colors remain constant throughout. Some effects, such as Matrox
hardware-accelerated effects and Adobe Premiere Pro native effects, perform
color space conversions (YUV to RGB) that will clip RGB values to the
acceptable range of 0-255 per color component. The clipping, however, is usually
only required on clips that have very bright or highly saturated colors.
For example, if you split a clip that contains very bright or highly saturated colors
and apply a Matrox 3D DVE to one portion of the clip, you may notice minor
color differences between the two halves on your video monitor. Applying the
Matrox chroma clamper effect to the portion of the clip that does not have the 3D
DVE effect ensures that colors remain constant throughout the clip.
Selecting your speed control method
You can choose the type of speed control that’s best suited for individual clips in
your Premiere Pro projects. By default, the speed control method of each clip in
the Timeline panel is set to Frame Blend, which interpolates between the video
fields or frames, and typically works well on standard or slow-paced video and
camera pans. For fast action video you may get better results by clearing this
option.
To change the speed control method for a clip in the Timeline panel, right-click
the clip and select Frame Blend to use the speed control method that’s
recommended for standard or slow-paced video and camera pans, or clear this
option for fast-action video.
Remarks
• The Frame Blend option is not supported for speed changes over 200%.
• If you are working in HD, you will need to render if you clear the Frame
Blend option.
About Adobe Premiere Pro’s fixed effects
In Adobe Premiere Pro, every clip in the Timeline panel has pre-applied fixed
effects. When you select a clip in a sequence, the fixed effects appear in the
Effect Controls panel. All fixed effects can be adjusted in the Effect Controls
panel. Adobe Premiere Pro’s fixed effects include the Motion, Opacity, and
Volume effects. Matrox RT.X2 provides realtime support for all of Premiere Pro’s
fixed effects.
Using the Matrox chroma clamper effect
110
Matrox RT.X2 realtime guidelines
In your Adobe Premiere Pro projects, you can use various combinations of
realtime Matrox CPU-based effects (Flex CPU effects), hardware-accelerated
effects (Flex GPU effects), and Adobe Premiere Pro fixed effects, all with
transparency.
Realtime means that the clips don’t require rendering and will play back in real
time without dropping frames (that is, there is no red indicator bar above the
segment).
The Matrox CPU-based effects are wipes, color corrections, chroma keys, luma
keys, move and scale, the chroma clamper, and Adobe Premiere Pro’s crop and
speed change. The Matrox hardware-accelerated effects are all the other Matrox
effects (such as page curls, 3D DVEs, surface finish effects, Premiere Pro fixed
effects and fades, etc.).
¦ Note The hardware-accelerated effects will be available only if you have a
display card that supports the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe
Premiere Pro. For more information, see “Enabling and disabling the Matrox
hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe Premiere Pro” on page 129.
Matrox RT.X2 constantly analyzes your sequence as you work, and will identify
which segments require rendering (with a red indicator bar above the segment).
For example, once playback of the sequence has stopped, a red bar will appear
over segments of the sequence that have dropped frames. Even when your system
is idle, Matrox RT.X2 will analyze segments to determine if they require
rendering. Certain complex effects or combinations of effects can cause dropped
frames when previewing. Matrox RT.X2 will always provide a preview of your
output at the best frame rate possible by analyzing the segments and dropping
frames systematically.
If you find that you have dropped frames when you export your project to tape
and those segments were not identified with a red bar, you can lower the
Realtime Indicator Threshold. For more information, see “Defining your
General settings” on page 10.
The maximum number of layers that can be played back in real time depends on
the capabilities of your system, your project’s video format, the compression
format of your clips, and the number and complexity of the effects you’ve applied
to your clips.
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
111
Supported graphics formats
All full-screen single-frame graphics supported by Adobe Premiere Pro are
supported in real time on Matrox RT.X2. This includes all titling formats that
Premiere Pro supports, such as Adobe Title Designer .prtl files. For details on the
supported formats, see your Adobe Premiere Pro documentation.
¦ Note Graphics rolls, crawls, and animations are not supported in real time.
Limitations
You will need to render your effects if you do any of the following:
• Apply any Field Options to a clip, such as Always Deinterlace or Flicker
Removal.
• Apply a freeze-frame effect to a clip using the Frame Hold command.
Matrox RT.X2 realtime guidelines
112
Your notes
Chapter 3, Setting Up Realtime Effects with Adobe Premiere Pro
Chapter
4
Using Matrox RT.X2 with Video for
Windows Programs
This chapter provides
information you need to know
when using Video for Windows
programs to render material on
your Matrox RT.X2 system.
114
Overview
When using Video for Windows programs to render material to an .avi file, such
as in the case of a completed video production or an animation, you can use a
Matrox codec to create a Matrox .avi file. For example, you may want to render
an animation to Matrox DV/DVCAM format so that you can record it onto DV
tape. You could also use your Video for Windows program to render video to a
Matrox .avi file so that you can import the file as a realtime clip into your Adobe
Premiere Pro projects on Matrox RT.X2.
The following sections explain the various settings you need to make to render
material using a Video for Windows program with your Matrox RT.X2 system.
For details on exporting video from Adobe Premiere Pro to a Matrox .avi file, see
“Performing a Premiere Pro export to disk” on page 22. Using Adobe Premiere
Pro to export video on your Matrox RT.X2 system lets you overcome the 2-GB
.avi file limit of Video for Windows programs.
¦ Note Although Matrox has tested many Video for Windows programs, there
may be certain operational limitations when using Matrox RT.X2 with some of
these programs (as well as with untested programs).
Using VFW programs without the RT.X2
hardware
If you installed the Matrox Video for Windows (VFW) software codecs (see
“Installing the Matrox VFW software codecs on a system without the RT.X2
hardware” in your Matrox RT.X2 Installation Manual), you can render and play
back RT.X2-compatible .avi files using your Video for Windows program
without having the RT.X2 hardware in your computer.
Chapter 4, Using Matrox RT.X2 with Video for Windows Programs
115
Before you start rendering
Before you start rendering material to a Matrox .avi file, make the following
settings in your Video for Windows program:
• Set the appropriate frame rate for the video format to which you are
rendering. For example, if you are rendering to PAL format, set the frame
rate to 25 fps.
• Set the frame size of your rendered material to full-screen:
$
720×480 if you are rendering to NTSC or 486p @ 23.98 fps format using
the DV/DVCAM, DVCPRO, or MPEG-2 I-frame codec.
$
720×576 if you are rendering to PAL format using the DV/DVCAM,
DVCPRO, or MPEG-2 I-frame codec.
$
1440×1080 if you are rendering to MPEG-2 I-frame HD format.
• To render video using the same compression format, frame size, and frame
rate as your source video but using a different video quality (data rate) or
scanning mode (interlaced or progressive), you must select the Recompress
Always option so that your video will be recompressed during the export.
• If you’ll be rendering audio, set the audio sample rate to 48 kHz and the
sample size to 16-bit (mono or stereo).
• For best results, make sure you clear your program’s Data rate limit option
for rendered material. This ensures that your .avi files will be rendered at the
particular video quality you select.
• If you’re using Adobe Premiere Pro, set the Fields for rendering to Lower
Field First for NTSC video, Upper Field First for PAL and interlaced HD
video, or No Fields (Progressive Scan) for progressive video.
¦ Note Before rendering a lot of material, check that your rendered animations
and transitions such as wipes and slides play back smoothly. If they appear
jumpy, try adjusting the field dominance or field order for your rendered material.
For example, if your transitions appear jumpy with the field dominance set to
Odd field or Field 1, try switching the setting to Even field or Field 2.
Before you start rendering
116
Selecting color space conversion options
When you render material to an .avi file using a Matrox VFW codec, you can
determine how you want the luminance levels and chroma information to be
processed during the color space conversion that’s performed during the render.
¦ Note The default settings for color space conversion provide good results for
most applications. We recommend that you change these settings only when
needed for special purposes.
° To select the color space conversion options you want:
1 Right-click My Computer, then choose Manage, and double-click Device
Manager.
2 Under Sound, video and game controllers, double-click Video Codecs.
3 Click Properties, then select one of the Matrox VFW codecs.
¦ Note All the available Matrox VFW codecs will be listed. You can select
Matrox VFW Software Codecs to configure all the Matrox DV, MPEG-2
I-frame SD, and legacy M-JPEG codecs.
4 Click Properties, and then Settings.
5 In the provided dialog box under Color Space Conversion, select the
options you want:
¦ Note If an option isn’t supported by the particular codec(s) you are
configuring, that option will not be available. Most options, however, are
common to all the Matrox VFW codecs. When these options are set for a
Chapter 4, Using Matrox RT.X2 with Video for Windows Programs
117
particular codec, they are also set for the other codecs that support those
options.
$
Standard Renders video using standard broadcast luminance levels.
Super black and super white luminance levels are clipped.
$
DV-compliant
$
Expanded
Renders video using luminance levels appropriate for DV
material. This ensures that the super white luminance levels of your video
are retained.
Renders video using the full range of luminance levels. Super
black and super white luminance levels are retained. You may want to use
this setting, for example, to render material on which you’ll be applying
luminance key effects.
¡ Important When rendering RGB graphics, selecting Expanded or
DV-compliant will create super black and/or white in your rendered images.
For example, if you select Expanded, all black in your RGB graphics will
become super black, and white will become super white. To render your
RGB graphics with standard black and white levels, set your luminance
range to Standard.
$
Chroma filtering and Chroma interpolation Select these options to
adjust the chroma bandwidth of RGB graphics. This improves images that
have abrupt changes between different colors, such as a blue box on a black
or white background. You should select these options for most animation
and compositing work (computer-generated material). For most video
editing programs, however, it’s best that you not select these options. If you
find that your rendered images appear to be blurred, try clearing one or both
of these options.
$
Chroma sampling for fast-motion video
Select this option to help
eliminate artifacts such as jagged edges and unwanted lines at the edges of
fast-motion video (for PAL video only).
¡ Important When rendering graphics and titles, make sure that Chroma
sampling for fast-motion video is not selected, as this option can cause
jagged edges to appear in your rendered images.
6 Click OK to save your settings. Any change you make to your selected
luminance range setting (such as switching from Standard to Expanded)
will only take effect the next time you start your VFW program.
Before you start rendering
118
Rendering material to a Matrox VFW .avi file
When you render material to an .avi file, such as when you render a finished
video production or an animation, you must select the compressor (codec) you
want to create the file. The compressor determines the quality of your rendered
video. Refer to your program’s documentation for instructions on how to select a
compressor for your .avi file.
To create a Matrox Video for Windows .avi file, select the Matrox codec you
want to use from your program’s list of available compressors.
° To create a Matrox Video for Windows .avi file:
1 Select one of the following codecs from your program’s list of available
compressors:
$ Matrox DV/DVCAM
Renders video to DV or DVCAM format.
Renders video to DVCPRO format.
$
Matrox DVCPRO
$
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame
$
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD Renders video to MPEG-2 intra-frame
format using the 4:2:2 Profile @ High Level at a selected data rate.
Renders video to MPEG-2 intra-frame format
using the 4:2:2 Profile @ Main Level at a selected data rate (SD resolution
only).
¦ Note Additional Matrox codecs will be available, such as the Matrox
M-JPEG, DVCPRO HD, and uncompressed HD codecs. You can use these
codecs to create clips for use on other Matrox systems, such as Matrox
DigiSuite or Matrox Axio. For information about creating VFW clips for other
Matrox systems, see the documentation for those systems.
2 If you selected Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame or Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD,
click the Configure button to configure your MPEG-2 I-frame settings. For
details, see “Configuring the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame codec” on page 119,
or “Configuring the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec” on page 120.
Chapter 4, Using Matrox RT.X2 with Video for Windows Programs
119
Configuring the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame codec
When you click your program’s Configure button to configure the Matrox
MPEG-2 I-frame codec (SD resolution), the following dialog box appears:
1 Drag the slider until your desired data rate (video quality) is displayed. The
higher the data rate you select, the better the video quality will be.
Depending on the capabilities of your system, however, you may not be able
to smoothly play back video at a high quality using your Video for Windows
program.
2 Click OK to save your selection. The quality you selected will be used each
time you render material with your program, until you change the quality
again.
Rendering material to a Matrox VFW .avi file
120
Configuring the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD
codec
When you click your program’s Configure button to configure the Matrox
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec, the following dialog box appears:
1 Drag the Data Rate slider until your desired data rate is displayed. The
higher the data rate you select, the better the video quality will be.
Depending on the capabilities of your system, however, you may not be able
to smoothly play back video at a high quality using your Video for Windows
program.
2 Beside Frame Rate, select a frame rate from the list. Make sure the frame
rate you select is appropriate for the HD format to which you are rendering.
3 Click OK to save your settings. The settings you selected will be used each
time you render material with your program, until you change the settings
again.
Chapter 4, Using Matrox RT.X2 with Video for Windows Programs
Chapter
5
Using the Matrox WYSIWYG Plug-ins
This chapter explains how to
use the WYSIWYG plug-ins
available with Matrox RT.X2 so
that you can display the
contents of your composition
or animation on your video
monitor.
122
Overview
The Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins, together with your Matrox RT.X2 hardware,
let you display the contents of your composition or animation on your video
monitor. This lets you see the exact color temperature, safe-title area, and any
interlaced artifacts as you work. The following programs are supported:
• Adobe After Effects (version 5.0 or later).
• Adobe Photoshop (version 7.0 or later).
• Autodesk 3ds Max (version 7.0 or later).
• Autodesk Combustion (version 4 or later).
• eyeon Fusion (version 4 or later).
• NewTek LightWave 3D (version 7.5 or later).
Using the Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel
The Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel lets you specify the settings you want for
previewing your composition or animation on your video monitor. To use the
Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel, right-click the
icon on your Windows
taskbar. If you don’t see the
icon, choose Start > All Programs > Matrox
Mx.tools > Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel.
¦ Note By default, the Matrox WYSIWYG plug-in output to your video monitor
is enabled. To disable it, clear the Enable WYSIWYG Output option in the
Control Panel.
1 From the Project Format menu, select the format that matches your
composition or animation, such as NTSC 4:3.
2 From the Output Format menu, select the format you want for your
preview output. The available output formats depend on your project format.
For example, if you chose an NTSC project format, you can select an NTSC
output format only. If you chose an HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps project format,
you can select an HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps output format, or you can select
an NTSC output format to downconvert the HD video to NTSC.
¦ Note If Adobe Premiere Pro is running, the Project Format and Output
Format will be determined by your Premiere Pro project’s video output
settings.
3 From the Preview Type menu, select one of the following options for the
preview:
Select this to view your composition or animation.
$
Video
$
Alpha Channel
Select this to view only your composition’s or
animation’s grayscale alpha-key (matte) information.
Chapter 5, Using the Matrox WYSIWYG Plug-ins
123
Required steps to use the WYSIWYG plug-ins
The following sections list the steps required to use the Matrox WYSIWYG
plug-in for each application in order to preview your composition or animation
on your video monitor.
¦ Note The following procedures are applicable to the most recent version of
each program that’s presently supported. These procedures may change with a
subsequent release of the program.
Adobe After Effects
1 Start Adobe After Effects and import the footage you want to preview.
2 Drag the footage from the Project window to the Composition window.
Adobe Photoshop
1 Start Adobe Photoshop and open the file you want to preview.
2 Choose File > Export > Matrox WYSIWYG Preview.
Autodesk 3ds Max
1 Start Autodesk 3ds Max and open the file you want to preview.
2 Open the Render Scene dialog box by choosing Rendering > Render.
3 Under Render Output, click Devices.
4 In the Select Image Output Device dialog box, select Matrox WYSIWYG
Preview, and click OK.
5 Click Render.
Autodesk Combustion
1 Start Autodesk Combustion and open the file you want to preview.
2 Choose File > Preferences > Framebuffer.
3 In the menu beside Framebuffer Type, select Matrox WYSIWYG
Preview, and click OK.
eyeon Fusion
1 Start eyeon Fusion and open the file you want to preview.
2 Right-click on the file, and choose View On > Matrox WYSIWYG
Preview.
Required steps to use the WYSIWYG plug-ins
124
NewTek LightWave 3D
1 Start NewTek LightWave 3D and load the file you want to preview by
choosing File > Load > Load Scene.
2 Select Rendering > Render Options.
3 From the Render Display menu, select Matrox WYSIWYG Preview.
4 Choose Rendering > Render Current Frame.
Chapter 5, Using the Matrox WYSIWYG Plug-ins
Chapter
6
Monitoring Your Matrox RT.X2 System
This chapter explains how to
use the Matrox X.info program
to display important details
about your Matrox RT.X2
system and installed hardware.
126
Using X.info to display RT.X2 information
The Matrox X.info program lets you display information about your Matrox
RT.X2 system and installed hardware, and provides warnings when certain
problems arise, such as when the temperature of your RT.X2 card exceeds the
maximum operating temperature. You can also use the X.info program to enable
and disable the Matrox hardware-accelerated (Flex GPU) effects in Adobe
Premiere Pro if you have a display card that supports these effects (see “Enabling
and disabling the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe Premiere Pro”
on page 129).
Matrox X.info runs continuously to monitor your system, whenever your
computer is turned on. You can open Matrox X.info to display system and
hardware details by double-clicking the
icon on your Windows taskbar.
¦ Note If you do not see the icon, right-click the taskbar and choose Properties,
then clear the Hide inactive icons option, and click OK.
Monitoring your Adobe Premiere Pro memory
usage
When Adobe Premiere Pro is running, you can monitor your Adobe Premiere Pro
memory usage. To do this, hold your mouse pointer over the Matrox X.info
( ) icon. A pop-up message will display the current Adobe Premiere Pro
memory usage. If your Adobe Premiere Pro memory usage is very high, X.info
will issue a warning message with additional information.
Displaying system information
To display information about your Matrox RT.X2 system, select System from
the Display Information About list. On this page, you can see Install
Information, such as the install path and version of Matrox Mx.tools.
You can also create an HTML log file of your system information, which can be
useful for troubleshooting. To create this log, use the Browse button under
System Information Log to select the path and name of the log, then click
Chapter 6, Monitoring Your Matrox RT.X2 System
127
Create. If Open file after scan is selected, the HTML system log opens after it
is created.
Using X.info to display RT.X2 information
128
Displaying hardware information
To display information about your Matrox RT.X2 hardware, select Hardware
from the Display Information About list. Your RT.X card and display card are
each represented by a tab.
Click a card’s tab to display a page with hardware information (for example,
serial number and production date). You can also monitor the current and
maximum operating temperatures for your RT.X2 card.
¡ Important Whether or not you have opened Matrox X.info, if your RT.X2
card exceeds the maximum operating temperature, you’ll receive a warning
message with further instructions as explained in the section “Error notification”
on page 130.
Chapter 6, Monitoring Your Matrox RT.X2 System
129
Monitoring your RT.X2 card’s operating
temperatures
As shown in the X.info Hardware section, the RT.X2 Card page displays the
current and maximum operating temperatures for your Matrox RT.X2 card. To
avoid damage to your Matrox RT.X2 system, make sure that you don’t operate
your RT.X2 card at or near the maximum temperature for a prolonged period of
time. You should target your RT.X2 card to operate at least 10°C below the
maximum operating temperature.
You should monitor the temperature of your RT.X2 card periodically and take
measures as needed to lower the room temperature and/or improve the ventilation
in your Matrox RT.X2 system. For details on how to ensure your system is
properly ventilated, see your Matrox RT.X2 Installation Manual.
Enabling and disabling the Matrox hardwareaccelerated effects in Adobe Premiere Pro
The X.info program provides a page to display hardware information about your
display card. On this page, you can also choose to enable or disable the Matrox
hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe Premiere Pro. If your display card
supports the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects, Enable Matrox hardwareaccelerated effects in Adobe Premiere Pro will be selected by default. If
you’re having problems with these effects, however, you may want to clear this
option to disable the effects.
To enable the Matrox hardware-accelerated effects in Adobe Premiere Pro you
must be using Matrox RT.X2 with a display card that has at least 256 MB of
onboard memory and supports Microsoft DirectX 9. You can’t enable the
Matrox-hardware accelerated effects if Matrox has tested your display card and
determined that it doesn’t support these effects. You can check the Matrox Video
Support site for up-to-date information about the display cards tested by Matrox
at www.matrox.com/video/support.
If you select Automatically check for Matrox-validated display card, each
time you start your system X.info will connect to the Matrox Video web site to
determine whether or not the currently installed display card supports the Matrox
hardware-accelerated effects, and will warn you if the effects cannot be enabled.
¦ Note If you don’t want X.info to automatically check your system for a
Matrox-validated display card, you can manually perform the update by choosing
Start > All Programs > Matrox Mx.tools > Check for Matrox-validated
Display Card. You must, however, have a working internet connection to do this.
Using X.info to display RT.X2 information
130
Error notification
X.info provides temperature warnings and warnings for other possible RT.X 2
hardware problems. Once X.info has detected a hardware problem, the Matrox
X.info Notification dialog box will be displayed to give you details of the
problem and further instructions. You will not be able to close this dialog box
until the problem has been resolved.
Chapter 6, Monitoring Your Matrox RT.X2 System
Appendix
A
Understanding Standard and Advanced
Pulldown
This appendix describes the
most common pulldown
methods, and explains how
and when these pulldown
methods are employed by
Matrox RT.X2.
132
Overview
Part of your project’s workflow may involve the application of a pulldown
technique to convert your input video to your project’s video format. Pulldown
can also be applied to your output video to meet certain requirements. When a
pulldown is required in your project, Matrox RT.X2 performs either a standard
2:3 pulldown or an advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown.
Standard 2:3 pulldown
Standard 2:3 pulldown is often used as part of the telecine process to transfer 24
fps film footage to 29.97 fps interlaced video. This pulldown method is also used
to convert any 23.98 fps progressive video to 29.97 fps interlaced video, such as
for converting 486p @ 23.98 fps video to NTSC.
In order to convert 24 fps film or 23.98 progressive video to 29.97 fps interlaced
video, additional video frames, and more specifically video fields, must be
created and added to the video sequence. For example, to convert a sequence of
four film or progressive frames, five frames of video are needed for a total of 10
video fields. Therefore, one additional video frame or two video fields must be
created. To accomplish this, the first and third frames of a four-frame film or
progressive video sequence are each converted to two video fields. The second
and fourth frames of the sequence are converted to three video fields to make up
a total of five interlaced video frames.
The following diagram demonstrates the process:
Film frames @ 24 fps or progressive frames @ 23.98 fps
A
B
C
D
Video fields @ 29.97 fps
a1
a2
Video frame A
b1
b2
Video frame B
b3
c1
c2
d1
d2
d3
Video frame C Video frame D Video frame E
Standard 2:3 pulldown is accomplished by representing the first frame of film or
progressive video (frame A) as two fields of video (fields a1 and a2), the second
frame (frame B) as three fields of video (fields b1, b2, and b3), the third frame
(frame C) as two fields (fields c1 and c2), and the fourth frame (frame D) as three
fields (fields d1, d2, and d3). This sequence repeats six times each second.
Appendix A, Understanding Standard and Advanced Pulldown
133
Performing a standard reverse pulldown (2:3 cadence) reverses the process by
converting 29.97 fps interlaced video to 23.98 fps progressive video. This is
achieved by discarding a video frame (two video fields) from the sequence. From
the diagram above, a typical standard reverse pulldown would discard fields b3
and d1. This means that video frames C and D must be read by the application to
remove the additional fields. For standard reverse pulldown that is performed on
compressed video, the application must decompress frames in order to remove
the additional fields, and then it must recompress frames to complete the
conversion.
Matrox RT.X2 implementation of standard
reverse pulldown
In order for Matrox RT.X2 to properly perform a standard reverse pulldown, the
material that is to be converted from 29.97 fps interlaced video to 23.98 fps
progressive video must have been originally acquired at 23.98 fps. When Matrox
RT.X2 performs a standard reverse 2:3 pulldown, the process identifies the A
frames of a sequence as those frames that have time code ending in 0 or 5. For
example, a frame with the time code 00:00:20:20 or 00:00:20:25 would be
considered an A frame, and therefore would be used as the first frame in a
pulldown sequence.
In the case of batch captures, when the first frame of a clip that is to be captured
might not always be an A frame, Matrox RT.X2 advances to the next instance of
an A frame in the clip to start the pulldown sequence (if it’s required). In order
for Matrox RT.X2 to perform standard reverse 2:3 pulldown accurately, the clips
must have A frames appearing at time codes 0 and 5. The clips must also be
recorded to a tape that has continuous, non-drop frame time code.
Advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown
Advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown was developed as an alternative to the standard
pulldown method for making frame rate conversions in DV video only. It is used
to convert 486p @ 23.98 fps video to NTSC (486i @ 29.97 fps) video. This
conversion is used when video footage is acquired by a DV camera at 23.98 fps
and recorded to DV tape with the recorder set for advanced pulldown (called
24PA or 24P Advanced mode on some devices). Advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown
differs from standard 2:3 pulldown in that the two middle frames of the video
sequence are each converted to three video fields.
Advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown
134
The following diagram demonstrates the process:
Progressive frames @ 23.98 fps
A
B
C
D
Video fields @ 29.97 fps
a1
a2
Video frame A
b1
b2
Video frame B
b3
c1
c2
c3
d1
d2
Video frame C Video frame D Video frame E
Advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown is accomplished by representing the first frame of
progressive video (frame A) as two fields of video (fields a1 and a2), the second
frame (frame B) as three fields of video (fields b1, b2, and b3), the third frame
(frame C) as three fields (fields c1, c2, and c3), and the fourth frame (frame D) as
two fields (fields d1 and d2).
Performing an advanced reverse pulldown (2:3:3:2 cadence) reverses the process
by converting 29.97 fps interlaced video to 23.98 fps progressive video. This is
achieved by discarding a video frame (two video fields) from the sequence. From
the diagram above, a typical advanced reverse pulldown would discard video
fields b3 and c1. This means that the application can remove video frame C from
the sequence without reading the other frames.
When compared to standard reverse pulldown, advanced reverse pulldown results
in less degradation in the converted video because removing an entire frame from
the sequence leaves the remaining frames in the sequence intact, and therefore
preserves the native generation of the video.
Matrox RT.X2 implementation of advanced
reverse pulldown
The advanced reverse pulldown process is simpler than a standard reverse 2:3
pulldown because the additional frame, video frame C in the diagram above, is
tagged when the 23.98 fps progressive footage is recorded to tape. This
information is present in the DV stream and when Matrox RT.X2 performs an
advanced reverse pulldown, it reads this information to identify the additional
frame that is then removed from the sequence. Matrox RT.X2 can perform
advanced reverse pulldown on clips that have been recorded to a DV tape that has
continuous drop-frame or non-drop frame time code.
Appendix A, Understanding Standard and Advanced Pulldown
Appendix
B
Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
This appendix provides
information about working with
different types of projects in
Adobe Premiere Pro on Matrox
RT.X2.
136
Overview
This appendix provides general information about using various Matrox RT.X2
project presets and codecs for working with different types of projects in Adobe
Premiere Pro. Workflow diagrams and descriptions are used to help explain the
specific workflow details.
Working with SD “24P” material
Matrox RT.X2 allows you to choose a Premiere Pro preset to work with SD
material originally acquired at 23.98 fps or 24 fps. When you select the Matrox
486p @ 23.98 fps project preset, you can edit SD material as 23.98 fps
progressive video as long as the source video was originally acquired at 23.98 fps
or 24 fps. This includes video that was captured to tape by a DV camera capable
of shooting 486p @ 23.98 fps video or film footage that was shot at 24 fps, then
transferred to DV tape by telecine processing. You cannot use the 486p @ 23.98
fps project preset to capture or edit video that was originally acquired as NTSC or
PAL.
Regardless of it’s origin, SD material that is acquired at 23.98 fps (or 24 fps then
transferred to DV tape) must undergo a format conversion to NTSC
(486i @ 29.97 fps) when it is recorded to the tape. This means that the output
from your source device and input to Matrox RT.X2 is always NTSC. Your
source device outputs the 23.98 fps material as NTSC by applying a pulldown
method when it records the material to tape. The frames that are acquired at
23.98 fps are tagged when they are recorded to tape and are in turn detected by
Matrox RT.X2 during capture.
Some DV cameras that are capable of shooting 23.98 fps progressive video have
the option of performing either a standard or advanced pulldown for recording
material to tape. To use the video with Matrox RT.X2, we recommend that you
set your DV-1394 device to use advanced pulldown (called 24PA or 24P
Advanced mode on some devices) to convert the footage to 29.97 fps interlaced
video. Matrox RT.X2 will then apply an advanced reverse pulldown method to
convert the incoming video to 486p @ 23.98 fps for editing clips in Adobe
Premiere Pro.
The output from your 486p @ 23.98 fps project on Matrox RT.X2 is always
NTSC. Matrox RT.X2 provides the option to apply either an advanced pulldown
or standard pulldown. In most cases, you would want to perform an advanced
2:3:3:2 pulldown only if your DV video requires further processing or if it is to
be archived. Otherwise, a standard 2:3 pulldown should be used when you export
your 486p @ 23.98 fps project to tape. For more information about standard 2:3
pulldown and advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown, see Appendix A, “Understanding
Standard and Advanced Pulldown.”
Appendix B, Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
137
486p @ 23.98 fps workflow example
The following diagram illustrates a typical 486p @ 23.98 fps workflow using
Matrox RT.X2:
¦ Note For all Matrox RT.X2 projects, you can choose to export to an MPEG-2
file for DVD authoring or export to a web format using Matrox Media Encoder as
explained in “Exporting material using Matrox Media Encoder” on page 26.
Working with SD “24P” material
138
Working with HD material
Matrox RT.X2 lets you capture native HDV material over the 1394 interface and
capture HD analog component input to MPEG-2 I-frame HD format. Native
HDV and MPEG-2 I-frame HD clips can be mixed in real time in the same HD
project. You can also import SD clips to your HD project and Matrox RT.X2 will
upscale the clips in real time as explained in “Mixing SD and HD clips in a
project” on page 9.
Matrox HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps and HDV 1080i @ 25 fps project presets are
provided for capturing to native HDV or MPEG-2 I-frame HD format, but
regardless of which preset you choose to create your project, you can change
your capture settings at any time to switch between capturing native HDV using
DV-1394 input and capturing HD analog component video to MPEG-2 I-frame
HD format. For more information about capturing to MPEG-2 I-frame HD
format, see “Using the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec” on page 141.
When your edits are complete you can export your project to an HDV device over
the 1394 interface, or export to tape using your Matrox RT.X2’s HD analog
component output. You can also choose to downconvert the video to NTSC or
PAL (depending on your project’s frame rate) to record to SD tape.
Appendix B, Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
139
HDV workflow example
The following diagram illustrates a typical workflow for working with an HDV
1080i @ 29.97 fps or 25 fps project on Matrox RT.X2:
¦ Note You can also choose to export to disk as HD or SD video. For example,
you can export an HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps project to an .avi file in the same
format as the project or as NTSC video. For more information, see “Performing a
Premiere Pro export to disk” on page 22.
Working with HD material
140
Capturing HDV and SD material to edit in SD
If you want to deliver in SD but take advantage of the superior image quality
offered by your HDV camera, you can capture HDV material over the 1394
interface and edit the clips in NTSC or PAL on Matrox RT.X2. To do this, you
create an HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps or 25 fps project and capture the HDV clips
natively over the 1394 interface. You then create an NTSC or PAL project and
import your HDV clips.
When working in your SD project you can capture native DV clips over the 1394
interface, and capture SD clips using Matrox RT.X2’s analog component,
S-Video, or composite inputs. The SD and HDV clips can be mixed in real time
in the same SD project. The HDV clips will be downscaled to NTSC or PAL
when you scale the clips to your project’s frame size for realtime playback as
explained in “Mixing SD and HD clips in a project” on page 9.
When the edits are complete you can export your project to tape as NTSC or PAL
video for broadcast. If you want to deliver in HD format, you import your SD
project to an HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps or 25 fps project. You can then export to
HD format without having to recapture your clips (the SD clips can be upscaled
to HDV 1080i for realtime playback).
This workflow scenario is represented in the following diagram:
HDV clips captured
natively over the
1394 interface
Matrox project using
an HDV 1080i @
29.97 fps or 25 fps
project preset
HDV clips
imported to SD
project
Matrox project using
an NTSC or PAL
project preset (HDV
clips are downscaled)
Exported to tape as
NTSC or PAL video
for broadcast
Appendix B, Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
DV clips captured
natively over the
1394 interface, and
SD clips captured
using analog inputs
Project imported to an
HDV 1080i project for
delivery in HD
(SD clips are upscaled)
141
Using the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
The Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec allows you to control the data rate of the
video that you are capturing or exporting. At low data rates (about 50 Mb/sec) the
codec can be used to capture and export video for an offline editing project. At
high data rates (about 90 Mb/sec), the codec can be used to capture and export
high-quality video for an online editing project. The VFW MPEG-2 I-frame HD
codec allows you to render and play back MPEG-2 I-frame HD clips in VFW
applications, such as Adobe After Effects.
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec workflow example
for offline editing
In this workflow example, the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec is used to
capture video clips for use in an offline editing project. The clips are captured
with Matrox RT.X at a data rate of 50 Mb/sec and then used to complete an
offline editing project. When the offline edit is complete, the project is trimmed,
and the offline clips are unlinked and then recaptured using the Matrox MPEG-2
I-frame HD codec at a data rate of 90 Mb/sec or higher. The online editing
project is then exported to tape for broadcast.
Using the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
142
This workflow scenario is represented in the following diagram:
Analog component video
footage shot as 1080i @ 29.97
fps or 25 fps
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD
codec set at 50 Mb/sec used
to capture clips
Matrox offline editing project
using an HDV 1080i MPEG-2
I-frame project preset
Offline project is trimmed,
offline clips are unlinked and
recaptured using the Matrox
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec at
90 Mb/sec or higher
Exported to tape as finishingquality HD video for broadcast
Appendix B, Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
143
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec workflow example
for online editing
In this workflow example, the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec is used to
capture video clips for use in an online editing project. The clips are captured
with Matrox RT.X2 at a data rate of 90 Mb/sec or higher and then used to
complete an online editing project. A VFW application, such as Adobe After
Effects, is used to create a composition that is rendered using the VFW MPEG-2
I-frame HD codec and imported into the online editing project. When the edit is
complete, it is exported to tape for broadcast.
This workflow scenario is represented in the following diagram:
Analog component video
footage shot as 1080i @ 29.97
fps or 25 fps
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
set at 90 Mb/sec or higher used to
capture clips
Matrox online editing project using
an HDV 1080i MPEG-2 I-frame
project preset
Exported to tape as finishing-quality
HD video for broadcast
MPEG-2 I-frame HD clips used
in a VFW application on the
RT.X2 system or an offline
editing station.
VFW application, such as
Adobe After Effects, uses
the MPEG-2 I-frame HD
clips. The compositing
project is rendered using
the Matrox VFW MPEG-2
I-frame HD codec.
Clips rendered using
the Matrox VFW
MPEG-2 I-frame HD
codec are imported into
the online editing
project.
Using the Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
144
Using Matrox RT.X2 to edit Matrox Axio offline
HD projects
Matrox RT.X2 supports realtime playback of Matrox Axio offline HD clips so
that you can use your Matrox RT.X2 system as an offline editing station for
Matrox Axio offline HD projects. A Matrox Axio HDV 1080i (1440×1080) @
29.97 fps or 25 fps project can be opened directly on Matrox RT.X2 and the
offline HD clips will be supported in real time.
A Matrox Axio full-size 1080i (1920×1080) @ 29.97 fps or 25 fps project is not
supported on Matrox RT.X2. Therefore, to edit this offline project you’ll need to
import it to an HDV 1080i project on Matrox RT.X2 as follows:
1 Open a new Adobe Premiere Pro project on Matrox RT.X2 by choosing
File > New > Project, and from the Available Presets list, select the
appropriate Matrox HDV preset. For example, if you want to import an Axio
1080i @ 29.97 fps project, select a Matrox HDV 1080i 29.97 fps preset.
2 Import your Axio 1080i project by choosing File > Import and browse to
your offline project’s Premiere Pro project (.prproj) file.
¥ Tip To see a list of your .prproj files in the Import dialog box, you’ll need
to select Adobe Premiere Pro Projects (.prproj) from the Files of type
list.
3 You can now edit the offline project on your Matrox RT.X2 system. When
you’ve completed the edits, you can open the project directly on Matrox
Axio, or import it to a new Matrox Axio 1080i project.
Appendix B, Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
145
Supported video compression formats
The following table lists the supported video compression formats for performing
various operations on Matrox RT.X2 depending on your project’s video format.
SD project
HD project
DV/DVCAM
DVCPRO
MPEG-2 I-frame
DV-1394 input only:
HDV
Analog component input
only:
MPEG-2 I-frame HD
1
DV/DVCAM
DVCPRO
MPEG-2 I-frame
HDV
MPEG-2 I-frame HD
Offline HD (for playback of
Matrox Axio offline HD
projects)
Export to
disk
DV/DVCAM
DVCPRO
MPEG-2 I-frame
MPEG-2 I-frame HD
(Can also downconvert to any
supported SD format)2
Render
previews
DV/DVCAM
DVCPRO
MPEG-2 I-frame
MPEG-2 I-frame HD
DV-1394
export to
tape
DV/DVCAM
DVCPRO
HDV
Capture
Playback
1
Realtime playback is also supported when mixing SD and HD clips in the same project
as explained in “Mixing SD and HD clips in a project” on page 9.
2
When exporting an HD project to a Matrox .avi file, you can choose to downconvert the
HD video to any of the supported SD video formats. For details, see “Performing a
Premiere Pro export to disk” on page 22.
Supported video compression formats
146
Supported master output formats
The following table lists the supported master output formats for Matrox RT.X2
depending on your project’s video format.
Project video format
Supported master output
formats
NTSC
NTSC
PAL
PAL
486p @ 23.98 fps
NTSC
HDV 1080i @ 25 fps
1080i @ 25 fps or PAL
HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps
1080i @ 29.97 fps or NTSC
¦ Note HD analog component output for an HDV 1080i (1440×1080) project is
always full-size 1080i (1920×1080).
Appendix B, Matrox RT.X2 Workflows
Appendix
C
Matrox RT.X2 Customer Support
This appendix explains how
you can register your Matrox
RT.X2 and obtain customer
support.
148
Getting the most support
If you have a problem that you’re unable to solve by referring to your Matrox
RT.X2 documentation, please contact your Matrox RT.X2 representative. He or
she should be able to help you quickly correct any installation or system
configuration problem.
If your representative is unable to solve your problem, contact Matrox for further
information and assistance.
Registration
You can register your Matrox RT.X2 in the Matrox RT.X2 Support section of our
web site at www.matrox.com/video/support. To go directly to the registration
page, choose Start > All Programs > Matrox Mx.tools > Register Your
Matrox RT.X Product.
¡ Important Only registered users are entitled to customer support, software
updates, access to our user forums, and special promotional offers.
Keep up to date with our web site
In addition to registering your Matrox RT.X2, our web site offers you up-to-theminute information about Matrox products and software updates. Be sure to
place our site in your favorites or bookmarks: www.matrox.com/video/support.
Contacting us
Matrox is proud to offer worldwide customer support. Please use the Matrox
RT.X2 contact information for your area as provided on our web site at
www.matrox.com/video/support.
Appendix C, Matrox RT.X2 Customer Support
Appendix
D
Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
This glossary defines many of the
terms used in this manual and
related documentation.
150
Glossary of terms
Use this glossary as a reference for many of
the basic terms used in this manual and
related documentation.
Numerics
1394
See IEEE-1394.
2:3 pulldown A method used to create
additional video frames when 24 fps film
footage or 23.98 fps progressive video is
converted to 29.97 fps interlaced video, such
as NTSC. To convert a four-frame sequence
of film or progressive video, five frames of
video are required. The 2:3 pulldown
sequence accomplishes this by representing
the first frame of film or progressive video as
two fields (1 frame), the second frame as
three fields (1.5 frames), the third frame as
two fields (1 frame), and the fourth frame as
three fields (1.5 frames). See also advanced
2:3:3:2 pulldown.
2D Short for two-dimensional. An image
that has height and width only.
3D Short for three-dimensional. An object
in three dimensions has height, width, and
depth. Various techniques are used to show
3D images on 2D surfaces like your computer
screen.
4:2:[email protected] 4:2:2 [email protected] Level.
An international standard video compression
profile introduced by MPEG-2. It supports
4:2:2 luminance/chrominance sampling at up
to 720 × 608 pixel resolution, and data
transfer rates up to 50 Mb/sec (5.96 MB/sec).
This profile is used for high-quality
distribution and for archiving. See also
[email protected]
4-corner pin A Matrox effect that lets you
anchor each corner of a video or graphics clip
onto points in an underlying clip, even if the
underlying clip is angled or skewed.
Appendix D, Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
A
A/B roll Typically, A/B roll is an editing
technique where scenes or sounds on two
source reels (called roll A and roll B) are
played simultaneously to create dissolves,
wipes, and other effects. On nonlinear editing
systems, A/B roll refers to using two source
streams (.avi, .wav, .tga, and so on) to create
an effect.
advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown A method
that is often used to convert 23.98 fps
progressive video to NTSC when the video is
acquired by a camera shooting at 23.98 fps
and recorded to DV tape. Advanced 2:3:3:2
pulldown differs from standard 2:3 pulldown
in that the two middle frames of a four-frame
sequence are each converted to three video
fields. This results in less image degradation
when a reverse pulldown is performed to
convert the video back to 23.98 fps
progressive video.
AGP slot Connection slot to a type of
expansion bus found in many computers. The
AGP slot is used to house the AGP display
card.
alpha key An effect that makes parts of a
foreground image fully or partially
transparent based on alpha (transparency)
values stored within the image’s file, so that
an underlying image can show through. See
also chroma key and luma key.
analog component video See
component video.
analog signal A video or audio signal that
varies continuously, as opposed to a digital
signal which varies only by fixed steps.
anti-aliasing A technique that smooths
jagged edges in computer-generated text or
graphics.
151
aspect ratio A width-to-height ratio. For
example, a 12-by-9-inch image has an aspect
ratio of 4:3 (four-to-three). Most TV screens
have a 4:3 aspect ratio. HDTV screens have a
16:9 aspect ratio.
Blue Book standard
See DV.
blur/soft focus effect A Matrox effect
that uses various levels of intensity to blur an
image or simulate camera defocus.
assemble editing Recording new video
and audio material sequentially onto tape.
Because all the signals are recorded (video,
audio, and control track), the new material
completely replaces any previously recorded
material on the tape. See also insert editing.
bus A shared set of hardware lines that lets
different parts of your computer transfer
information between one another. A card
inserted into an expansion slot of your
computer makes an electrical connection to
the bus and effectively becomes part of your
computer system.
AVI Audio Video Interleaved. A video file
format designed for the Microsoft Windows
environment. See also codec.
C
A/V drive A hard drive capable of storing
high-bandwidth audio/video data.
B
B-frame (Bi-directional frame) A frame
created during the MPEG or MPEG-2 IBP
compression process. A B-frame is generated
by forwards and backwards referencing of the
P-frames and I-frames respectively, which
allows it to have the highest compression ratio
of the three frame types. B-frames contain
only predictive data (that is, not enough data
to make up an entire picture), and therefore
cannot be edited independently.
BIOS Basic Input/Output System settings
for system components, peripherals, etc. This
information is stored in a special batterypowered memory and is usually accessible for
changes at computer start-up.
bitmap A graphics image in which a set of
values defines each pixel’s relative brightness
and color.
black level The level of brightness at
which no light is emitted from the screen
(reference black). The standard black level is
7.5 IRE for NTSC video, or 0 IRE for NTSCEIAJ (Japan) and PAL video. Also called
setup (NTSC video only). See also white
level, super black, and super white.
capture The process of digitizing video or
audio material, usually from a VTR or
camera, and storing it in a file on a hard disk.
chroma key An effect that makes portions
of a foreground image fully or partially
transparent based on the color of that image,
so that an underlying image can show
through. See also alpha key and luma key.
chrominance The color portion of a video
signal that carries the hue and saturation
information. See also luminance.
codec Compressor/decompressor. A
processor that compresses video to reduce its
file size by eliminating redundancies in
information. It also decompresses files to play
them back.
color bars A standard test signal that
appears as a series of vertical rows of color by
which the chrominance and video levels of a
camera’s output or a recorded signal can be
checked.
color correction effect A Matrox effect
that allows various color properties of an
image to be adjusted. There are controls for
adjusting the intensity level for hue,
saturation, contrast, and brightness. The color
correction effect can correct improper color
levels of an image that are due to varying
Glossary of terms
152
lighting conditions or incorrect camera
settings. See also white balancing.
compile
See render.
component video A video signal having
separate channels for the video information,
as opposed to a combined (composite) signal.
Y, R-Y, B-Y video is a component video
signal.
composite video A video signal
containing luminance and chrominance
information that has been combined using a
video standard such as NTSC or PAL.
Composite video often uses a single RCA or
BNC cable connection. See also component
video.
contrast The difference in brightness
between the lightest and darkest areas of an
image on the screen.
CPU Central processing unit. The central
processor of a computer that performs
calculations and interprets and executes
commands.
CPU-based effect An effect that takes
advantage of your computer’s CPU to play
back in real time. Matrox Flex CPU effects,
such as the Matrox color correction effects,
are CPU-based effects. Compare with
hardware-accelerated effect.
crawl Sideways movement of text across a
screen. See also roll (1).
crossfade
See dissolve.
crystallize effect A Matrox effect that lets
you choose from many different patterns to
make your image or text appear as if it is
made of crystals.
cut A direct switch from one video and/or
audio source to another.
D
D-9 Originally known as Digital-S. A
variant of the DV format developed by JVC
Appendix D, Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
that uses a data rate of 50 Mb/sec (5.96 MB/
sec), which is double the data rate of most
other DV formats. Video is sampled at 4:2:2
for both NTSC and PAL sources to give
enhanced chroma resolution. It uses a 1/2”
metal particle tape.
Digital8 A camcorder video format
developed by Sony. Digital8 camcorders use
the DV format to record digital video and
audio onto 8mm and Hi-8 tapes via any
device that has an IEEE-1394 interface.
Digital-S See D-9.
digital signal A signal representing video
or audio information as binary digits that can
be easily regenerated with no noise or
distortion. See also analog signal.
Digital Video
See DV.
digitize To convert analog information,
such as a video signal from a VTR or camera,
into digital information that can be processed
and stored by a computer.
Direct memory access (DMA) A
technique used to rapidly transfer data
between an attached device, such as a disk
drive, and the computer’s main memory
without needing to pass the data through the
CPU.
DirectX A Microsoft-developed program
that enables interfaces to support advanced
hardware features without being written
specifically for each hardware model.
DirectShow (formerly called ActiveMovie) is
part of DirectX.
display card A card that has its own
memory and processor to handle graphics and
enhance display capabilities. Also called
graphics card. See also GPU.
dissolve A transition in which one image
smoothly fades to another image. It is
characterized by the gradual ending of one
image occurring simultaneously with the
153
gradual beginning of another. Also called
crossfade.
driver Software that controls a device, such
as a display card, and enables it to work with
other software.
drop-frame time code For NTSC video,
time code is normally produced by a
generator that counts at 30 frames per second.
NTSC color signals, however, actually have a
display frequency rate close to 29.97 frames
per second. Drop-frame time code
compensates for this time difference by
dropping two frames from the count every
minute except for every tenth minute so that
the time code matches clock time.
DV Digital Video. A standard digital bit
stream and compression format (known as the
Blue Book standard) used to record video and
audio onto a digital tape. DV is intra-frame
based, saving each frame separately, and uses
a fixed 5:1 compression ratio to reduce the
size of video files. DV’s data rate is fixed at
25 Mb/sec (2.98 MB/sec). Video is sampled
at 4:1:1 for NTSC sources or 4:2:0 for PAL
sources. See also DVCAM, DVCPRO,
DVCPRO50, and D-9.
DVCAM A variant of the DV format
developed by Sony that records a 15 micron
track on a metal evaporated (ME) tape at a
data rate of 25 Mb/sec (2.98 MB/sec). Video
is sampled at 4:1:1 for NTSC sources or 4:2:0
for PAL sources.
DVCPRO A variant of the DV format
developed by Panasonic that records an 18
micron track on metal particle tape at a data
rate of 25 Mb/sec (2.98 MB/sec). Video is
sampled at 4:1:1 for both NTSC and PAL
sources. See also DVCPRO HD.
DVCPRO HD A high-definition variant of
the DVCPRO format developed by Panasonic
that uses a data rate of 100 Mb/sec.
DVCPRO50 A variant of the DV format
developed by Panasonic that uses a data rate
of 50 Mb/sec (5.96 MB/sec), which is double
the data rate of most other DV formats. Video
is sampled at 4:2:2 for both NTSC and PAL
sources to give enhanced chroma resolution.
It uses the same type of tape as DVCPRO.
DVD Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video
Disc. A type of compact disc that can hold
from 4.7 gigabytes (GB) to 17 GB of
information. The greatest advantage that
DVD has over CD is that it can store video as
well as audio and computer data. For video
storage, DVD uses MPEG-2 compression, to
provide better quality than standard VHS.
DVE Digital Video Effect. Generally, an
effect that resizes and repositions a picture on
the screen. See also move & scale effect.
DVI Digital Video Interface. A video
interface technology that maximizes the
quality of flat-panel LCD monitors and
modern display cards.
E
Edit Decision List (EDL) A file
containing a list of edit decision statements
used to create a video production.
edit master The first generation (original)
of a final edited tape.
expansion slot Electrical connection slot
mounted on a computer's motherboard (main
circuit board). It allows several peripheral
devices to be connected inside a computer.
See also AGP slot, PCI slot, PCI Express slot,
and PCI-X slot.
F
fade to black A transition commonly used
to signify the end of a scene, in which an
image or sound smoothly fades to a black
screen or silence (also called a fade-out
transition). Similarly, you could start a new
scene with a fade up from black (or fade-in)
transition.
Glossary of terms
154
field One-half of the horizontal lines
needed to make a complete scan of an
interlaced video frame. In the NTSC system,
two consecutive fields of 262.5 lines each
create a frame of 525 scan lines. In the PAL
system, two consecutive fields of 312.5 lines
each create a frame of 625 scan lines.
FireWire Apple Computer’s original
implementation of the technology that would
be standardized as IEEE-1394 in 1995.
Flex CPU effect
See CPU-based effect.
Flex GPU effect See hardware-accelerated
effect.
frame A single video image. An interlaced
video frame is comprised of two consecutive
fields (the odd and even fields).
G
GOP Group of Pictures. The sequence of I,
B and/or P-frames produced during MPEG or
MPEG-2 compression. This sequence of
frames contains all of the information
required to reproduce a complete video
segment. The longer the GOP, the less
editable it is.
GPU Graphics processing unit. A processor
that is used primarily for computing 3D
functions, such as processing 3D DVEs and
lighting effects. Because the calculations
required to process these effects are CPUintensive, the GPU lifts this burden from the
CPU to allow it to perform more efficiently. A
high-performance display card is sometimes
referred to as a GPU.
graphics card
See display card.
graphics overlay Text or a graphics
image that’s superimposed on video. Also
called super.
H
hardware-accelerated effect An effect
that requires the assistance of dedicated
hardware to play back in real time. Matrox
Appendix D, Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
Flex GPU effects, such as 3D DVEs and page
curls, are hardware-accelerated effects.
Compare with CPU-based effect.
HD
Short for HDTV.
HDTV High Definition Television. A
digital television format with image
resolutions up to 1080 vertical scan lines.
HDTV has a 16:9 aspect ratio. Also called
HD. See also SDTV.
HDV A high-definition video format that
uses MPEG-2 video compression at a data
rate of about 19 Mb/sec for HDV-1 or
25 Mb/sec for HDV-2, and records to standard
DV format digital video cassettes. Matrox
RT.X2 supports HDV-2 for HDV 1080i
projects only
hue The tint or tone of a color. For
example, the difference between the color
green and red is its hue.
I
IBP compression
See MPEG-2 IBP.
IEEE-1394 An international standard data
transfer protocol created by Apple Computer
under the FireWire trademark and
standardized by the Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers (IEEE). It enables
simple, low-cost, realtime data transfer
between computers and consumer and
prosumer electronics products, such as DV
camcorders and DV decks. Commonly
referred to as 1394.
I-frame compression
frame.
See MPEG-2 I-
I-frame (Intra-frame) A frame created
during the MPEG or MPEG-2 compression
process that contains all the information
required to reproduce a complete image. It
allows random access points within a video
stream, and acts as a reference point for Bframes and P-frames to be built. I-frames are
editable because they contain enough data to
155
construct an entire video frame, unlike Bframes or P-frames.
amplitude of a video signal. 1 IRE is equal to
approximately 7 mV.
insert editing Recording new video and/
or audio material onto a prerecorded (or
striped) tape. Insert edits can be made in any
order, unlike assemble edits, which must be
made sequentially.
J
inter-frame compression A video
compression method that compares a series of
frames in a video sequence and removes the
redundant data. Inter-frame compression
treats all the frames in the sequence as an
interdependent group. As a result, most of the
frames can’t be edited independently. Also
called temporal redundancy reduction.
Contrast with intra-frame compression. See
also GOP.
K
interlaced scanning A method of
creating a video image by drawing only the
odd numbered lines on the screen in one pass,
then the even numbered lines in the next pass.
Two passes are therefore required to create a
complete frame of video. NTSC and PAL
displays are interlaced. See also progressive
scanning.
lens flare effect A Matrox effect that lets
you choose from many different patterns to
simulate the light refractions caused by
shining a bright light into the lens of a camera
when taking a photo.
interleave A technique used to incorporate
the video and audio portions of a video clip
into one file. See also AVI.
intra-frame compression A video
compression method that removes redundant
information from within a frame. Intra-frame
compression treats each frame of a video
segment independently. Several video
compression formats use the intra-frame
method. These include Motion-JPEG, DV,
and MPEG-2 I-frame. Also called spatial
redundancy reduction. Contrast with interframe compression. See also I-frame (Intraframe).
IRE unit An arbitrary unit designated by
the Institute of Radio Engineers to define the
JPEG (pronounced “jay-peg”) Joint
Photographic Experts Group. A compression
and storage standard used for still, digital
images. See also Motion-JPEG.
key effect
luma key.
See alpha key, chroma key, and
keyframe A particular frame at which one
or more effect settings have been defined.
Settings applied at a keyframe remain active
on the clip until a later keyframe is defined to
turn off or change the settings.
L
LTC Longitudinal Time Code. Time code
that is generally encoded as an audio signal
onto a linear audio track of a tape. This type
of time code can be read only while the tape is
moving. See also VITC.
luma key An effect that makes portions of
a foreground image fully or partially
transparent based on the luminance of that
image, so that an underlying image can show
through. See also alpha key and chroma
key.
luminance The brightness portion of a
video signal. The luminance of a pixel
determines its brightness on a scale from
black to white. See also chrominance.
luminance key
See luma key.
M
mark in
mark out
To select the first frame of a clip.
To select the last frame of a clip.
Glossary of terms
156
mask effect A Matrox effect that lets you
apply a mask (cutout shape) to a clip to
superimpose it onto another clip.
mask blur effect A Matrox effect that lets
you create a “region of interest” by adding a
mask to your clip and applying blurring to it.
mask mosaic effect A Matrox effect that
lets you create a “region of interest” by
adding a mask to your clip and applying a
mosaic effect to it.
MIP mapping In 3D graphics, a rendering
technique where a texture is stored at multiple
resolutions. See also texture mapping.
M-JPEG
See Motion-JPEG.
frame and intra-frame redundancy reduction.
The MPEG standard supports data transfer
rates of up to 1.5 Mb/sec (0.2 MB/sec). Also
called MPEG-1. See also MPEG-2, interframe (IBP) compression, and intra-frame (Iframe) compression.
MPEG-1
See MPEG.
MPEG-2 A video compression standard
that improves upon the MPEG standard by
supporting data rates of up to 100 Mb/sec (12
MB/sec), scalable modes, field or frame
searching, and much larger screen sizes. See
also intra-frame (I-frame) compression, interframe (IBP) compression, 4:2:[email protected], and
[email protected]
mosaic effect An effect that “blurs” an
image by copying pixels into adjacent pixels
both horizontally and vertically. This gives
the image a blocky appearance, often used to
hide people’s identities on television.
MPEG-2 IBP An MPEG-2 compression
type that uses inter-frame compression to
create a group of I, B, and P-frames. Used for
broadcast transmissions and distribution on
DVD. See also GOP.
move & scale effect A Matrox effect that
lets you position and scale your clips
MPEG-2 I-frame An MPEG-2
compression type that uses only intra-frame
compression (that is, only I-frames are
created). Used for high-quality distribution
and for archiving.
anywhere in 2D space while adding soft
edges. See also DVE.
Motion-JPEG A compression and storage
standard used for motion video. The JPEG
compression process is applied to each video
field, in succession. Also called M-JPEG.
[email protected] Main [email protected] Level. An
MPEG-2 video compression profile that
supports 4:2:0 luminance/chrominance
sampling at up to 720×576 pixel resolution,
and data transfer rates up to 15 Mb/sec (1.79
MB/sec). This profile is used for broadcast
transmission and distribution on DVD. See
also 4:2:[email protected]
MPEG A video compression standard that
specifies a series of compression profiles and
image resolution levels, introduced in 1990 by
the Motion Picture Experts Group. MPEG
takes advantage of the redundancy inherent in
video data through a combination of interAppendix D, Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
mV Abbreviation for millivolt (onethousandth of a volt). Unit of measurement
sometimes used to define the amplitude of a
video signal. See also IRE unit.
N
nonlinear editing Random access editing
that generally uses video and audio clips
stored on disks. Nonlinear editing programs
let you rearrange and edit clips without
having to redo the entire production, and
provide instant cueing to any frame in a clip
without waiting for tapes to rewind.
NTSC National Television Systems
Committee. The NTSC RS-170A standard
defines a method of broadcasting a color
signal that can be received by both
monochrome and color TVs. It uses a
157
composite interlaced display comprised of
525 scan lines per frame, refreshed at a rate of
approximately 30 frames per second.
Broadcast systems in North America and
Japan use the NTSC standard.
O
old movie effect A Matrox effect that lets
you simulate the look of old film by adding
noise, dust, streaks, jitter, and flickers to your
clip.
organic wipe A wipe effect that uses a
grayscale gradient pattern to switch from one
image to another by gradually revealing the
second image according to the pattern
P
page curl A Matrox effect that lets you
peel or roll an image off the screen to reveal
another image.
PAL Phase Alternate Line. A video
standard that uses a composite interlaced
display comprised of 625 scan lines per
frame, refreshed at a rate of 25 frames per
second. This is the broadcast video standard
for most of Europe.
pan & scan effect A Matrox effect that
lets you convert clips from one aspect ratio to
another, such as from 16:9 to 4:3.
PCI slot Connection slot to a type of
expansion bus found in many computers. It is
smaller in size than older ISA slots and
provides connections to the PCI host bus at
speeds up to 66 MHz.
PCIe slot See PCI Express slot.
PCI Express slot A type of PCI slot that
uses a different and much faster
communications protocol than a 32-bit PCI
slot. PCI Express can accommodate the
higher speeds required for high-performance
peripherals such as display cards and network
controllers. PCI Express slots are available in
different sizes (x1, x4, x8, and x16). The
Matrox RT.X2 card is installed in a PCI
Express slot. Also called PCIe slot.
PCI-X slot A type of PCI slot that
increases the speed at which data can move
within the computer from 66 MHz to up to
133 MHz.
P-frame (Predicted frame) A frame
created during the MPEG or MPEG-2 IBP
compression process. A P-frame is created by
using motion vectors to predict the
differences between it and the closest
previous I-frame or P-frame. This forward
prediction allows for higher compression than
with I-frames, but not as high as with Bframes. P-frames, like B-frames, contain only
predictive data and therefore cannot be edited
independently.
pixel Picture element. The smallest portion
of an image that can be written to a display.
Each pixel in an image represents a single dot
on the computer screen. A picture’s resolution
depends on the number of pixels on the
screen.
Plug and Play A hardware standard for
auto-configuration. It refers to the ability of
computer hardware to detect and configure
expansion devices such as your Matrox
hardware. Windows XP and Windows 2000
support Plug and Play.
plug-in Software that adds functionality
and/or features to an application. For
example, the Matrox realtime plug-in for
Adobe Premiere Pro adds realtime Matrox
effects and transitions to Adobe Premiere Pro.
proc amp An electronic device that adjusts
the different aspects of a video signal, such as
its hue, saturation, and contrast.
progressive scanning A method of
creating a video image by drawing all the
lines of a screen sequentially so that the
complete image is displayed in one pass.
VGA displays and some HDTV formats use
Glossary of terms
158
progressive scanning. Progressive scanning
produces smoother pictures than interlaced
scanning, but uses more bandwidth.
pulldown detection A method of
identifying the extra video frames that are
added when 24 fps film footage or 23.98 fps
progressive video is converted to 29.97 fps
interlaced video. See also 2:3 pulldown and
advanced 2:3:3:2 pulldown.
R
realtime effect An effect that is played
back instantly, without having to be rendered
by an editing program.
render To compute an image or effect
using a nonlinear editing, compositing, or
animation program. The result is generally
saved in a file on the computer. Also called
compile.
RGB parade A specialized scope that
displays the red, green, and blue components
of a video signal.
RGB video A component video signal that
uses three signals to carry the separate Red,
Green, and Blue channels of colored images.
roll 1. Vertical movement of text across the
screen. Also called scroll. See also crawl.
2. Unwanted vertical roll of a video image,
indicating unstable sync.
RS-232 A non-differential serial data
transmission standard used for computer
connections. See also serial control.
RS-422 A differential serial data
transmission standard that is often used for
linking video production equipment (VTRs,
mixers, etc.). Because this standard is
differential, RS-422 connections are less
subject to interference and noise than RS-232
connections. See also serial control.
S
saturation A measure of the depth of a
color. Fully saturated colors are vivid, while
Appendix D, Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
colors that lack saturation look washed out or
faded.
scroll
SD
See roll (1).
Short for SDTV.
SDTV Standard Definition Television. A
television format with image resolutions up to
525 vertical scan lines for NTSC video and
625 vertical scan lines for PAL video. SDTV
can have a 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratio. See also
HDTV.
SECAM Séquentiel Couleur Avec Mémoire
(sequential color with memory). A color
television system developed in France and the
former USSR. It uses a composite interlaced
display comprised of 625 scan lines per
frame, refreshed at a rate of 25 frames per
second. The color difference signals are
transmitted sequentially on alternate lines.
serial control A method of remotely
controlling a device via a data line. The
control data is transmitted in serial form (that
is, one bit after another), such as for RS-232
and RS-422 connections.
setup
See black level.
shadow effect A Matrox effect that lets
you project a realistic shadow from any
source that provides alpha key information,
such as Matrox DVEs and titles with an alpha
channel.
shine effect A Matrox effect that lets you
create rays that shine through text, or add
shimmer to an object in your clip. You can
also use the shine effect to make 2D text
appear as 3D text.
spatial redundancy reduction
intra-frame compression.
See
striping a tape Preparing a tape for
editing by recording continuous control track,
time code, and a video signal (such as black
or color bars).
159
super
See graphics overlay.
super black Video that is darker than the
standard black level. See also super white.
super white Video that is brighter than the
standard white level. See also super black.
surface finish A Matrox effect that lets
you apply various surface textures to your
clips, such as metal, brick, wood, or granite
with color spot lighting.
SVCD Super Video CD. A standard for
storing video and audio on a CD that provides
better video quality than VCD and standard
VHS. Video is compressed using MPEG-2 at
2500 Kbps, and audio is compressed as
MPEG-1, layer II, at 224 Kbps. An SVCD
can hold about 30 minutes of material. Super
Video CDs will play back on some DVD settop players.
S-Video A component video signal in
which the luminance (Y) and chrominance
(C) information are separate. S-VHS
videocassette recorders use the S-Video
format. Also called Y/C video.
sync A circuit or signal that directs the
electron gun in a camera or TV picture tube to
hold a picture steady on the screen. It also
synchronizes the electronics of other video
equipment.
sync generator An electrical device that
generates sync (timing) signals used to
synchronize video equipment and keep
pictures stable on the screen.
T
TBC See time base corrector.
telecine process A process that transfers
film (negative or positive) to SD or HD video
tape. The telecine process shines a light
source through each frame, converting the
optical images to an electronic signal that is
then recorded to video tape.
temporal redundancy reduction
inter-frame compression.
See
texture mapping A display technique
where bitmaps (textures) are placed (mapped)
onto 3D surfaces to make objects look more
realistic.
time base corrector (TBC) An
electronic device that, when connected to the
output of a VTR, corrects the stability and
timing of the VTR’s playback video. This is
achieved by stripping the unstable horizontal
and vertical sync pulses from the video signal,
and replacing them with new, clean sync
pulses.
time code A sequential code number
assigned to successive video frames on tape.
Each frame has its own time code, which is
electronically encoded on the tape in the form
hours:minutes:seconds:frames. See also dropframe time code, LTC, and VITC.
timeline The graphical representation
(normally a horizontal line) of a video
sequence. It is usually divided into
hours:minutes:seconds:frames, and is used to
position video, audio, graphics, and video
effects that make up the sequence.
tonal range The range of light and dark
areas in an image. Tonal range can be divided
into three different areas: shadows, midtones,
and highlights. Shadows are the darkest areas
of an image, highlights are the lightest areas,
and midtones are the areas with tones
between the lightest and darkest areas.
track matte effect A Matrox effect that
lets you superimpose one clip onto another
using an animated matte, sometimes called a
traveling matte, to determine how the two
clips are composited (keyed).
transform settings Settings that let you
change the position, size, and rotation of a
clip in the Matrox realtime plug-in. Transform
Glossary of terms
160
settings can be applied on the x, y, and z axes
of a clip.
using the Matrox color correction effect, and
is also available as a setting on most cameras.
traveling matte effect See track matte
effect.
white level The brightest “legal” level of a
video signal (reference white), which is at 100
IRE. See also black level, super black, and
super white.
V
VCD Video CD. A standard for storing
video and audio on a CD that provides
slightly better video quality than standard
VHS. Video is compressed using MPEG-1 at
1100 Kbps, and audio is compressed as
MPEG-1, layer II, at 224 Kbps. A VCD can
hold about 60 minutes of material. Video CDs
can play back on most DVD set-top players.
See also SVCD.
vectorscope A device that measures the
phase and amplitude of the color components
of a video signal.
VITC Vertical Interval Time Code. Time
code that is encoded onto the vertical
blanking interval of a video signal. VITC can
be read by a VTR whenever an image is
displayed, but not usually during high-speed
operation. See also LTC.
voice-over Narration added to a video
segment and mixed in louder than the original
background sounds.
W
WAV An audio data file format developed
by Microsoft and IBM. This format is the
standard for Windows and can be played by
most applications that can support sound.
white balancing A color correction
technique that adjusts the color levels of an
image using white or gray as a color reference
point. White balancing assumes that when a
white object can be made to look white, the
other color levels will also be accurate. White
balancing is used to correct improper color
levels of an image that are due to varying
lighting conditions or incorrect camera
settings. White balancing can be performed
Appendix D, Matrox RT.X2 Glossary
wipe A transition in which one image is
gradually replaced by another image that is
revealed in a given pattern. For example, the
second image could be revealed from the top
of the screen downwards until it fills the
entire screen. See also organic wipe.
X
x-y-z coordinate system A 3D
positioning system that includes a third (z)
axis running perpendicular to the horizontal
(x) and vertical (y) axes. The x-y-z coordinate
system is used in computer graphics for
creating models with height, width, and
depth, and for moving models in 3D space.
Y
Y waveform A specialized scope that
displays the luminance (Y) values of a video
signal.
Y/C video See S-Video.
YC waveform A specialized scope that
displays the combined luminance (Y) and
chrominance (C) of a video signal.
Y, Pb, Pr video
See Y, R-Y, B-Y video.
Y, R-Y, B-Y video An analog component
video signal comprised of three channels: Y
(luminance), R-Y (red minus luminance), and
B-Y (blue minus luminance). Also called Y,
Pb, Pr video.
Index
Numerics
3D DVE
creating 60
mapping Motion effect to 12
3ds Max WYSIWYG plug-in
See Autodesk 3ds Max WYSIWYG plug-in
486p @ 23.98 fps project
working with 136
4-corner pin
creating 62
A
Adobe After Effects WYSIWYG plug-in
about 122
required steps 123
See also Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
Adobe Encore DVD
exporting material for 26
Adobe Photoshop WYSIWYG plug-in
about 122
required steps 123
See also Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
Adobe Premiere Pro
Capture settings 16
displaying warnings in Events panel 9
Export Movie settings 22
exporting material using Matrox Media
Encoder 26
exporting sequence to tape 27
fixed effects 109
General settings 10
hardware-accelerated effects 129
loading Matrox project presets 8
monitoring memory usage 126
setting up DV-1394 device control 27
setting up scratch disks 9
Video Rendering settings 15
See also Realtime plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro
Advanced pulldown
description of 133
See also Standard pulldown
After Effects WYSIWYG plug-in
See Adobe After Effects WYSIWYG plug-in
Allow super black 14
Allow super white 14
Analog output type
selecting 14
Anamorphic
selecting for exported video 23
selecting for video output 13
Aspect ratio
creating SD project in 16:9 format 29
selecting conversion setting for output video 13
selecting for source video 17
Audio capture settings 18
monitoring audio levels 21
selecting channels 19
Audio Drift Detection test
running 7
Audio levels
monitoring for capture 21
recording and playback volume controls 6
Auto balance
performing using color correction 45
Auto key
performing using the chroma key graph 69
performing using the selective key graph 58
Autodesk 3ds Max WYSIWYG plug-in
about 122
required steps 123
See also Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
Autodesk Combustion WYSIWYG plug-in
about 122
required steps 123
See also Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
Automatic Gain Control
selecting 18
AVI files
capturing using Adobe Premiere Pro 16
exporting using Adobe Premiere Pro 22
rendering using VFW programs 114, 118
162
Axio offline HD projects
editing on RT.X2 144
B
Blur/soft focus effect
creating 64
C
Capture format
selecting for video capture 17
Capturing using Adobe Premiere Pro
HDV material to edit in SD 140
monitoring audio levels for 21
specifying settings for 16
Chroma clamper effect
using 109
Chroma filtering and chroma interpolation
for rendering to VFW files 117
Chroma key effect
creating 66
overview 65
using the chroma key graph 69
Chroma key graph
using 69
Chroma key shadow effect
creating 66
overview 65
Chroma sampling for fast-motion video
for rendering to VFW files 117
Codec
Matrox DV/DVCAM 17, 22
Matrox DVCPRO 17, 22
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame 17, 22, 24
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD 17, 23, 24
Matrox VFW codecs 118
Color balance graph
using 43
Color correction
color matching clips 46
creating 41
performing an auto balance 45
using the color balance graph 43
using the luma mapping graph 48
Index
Color matching clips
using color balance graph 46
Color pass effect
creating with secondary color correction 59
Color space conversion options
for rendering to VFW files 116
Combustion WYSIWYG plug-in
See Autodesk Combustion WYSIWYG plugin
Compression formats
supported 145
Compressor
selecting for VFW render 118
CPU-based effects 110
Cropping your clip 37
using Select Crop 38
Crystallize effect
creating 72
Customer support 148
D
Device control in Adobe Premiere Pro
setting for DV-1394 devices 27
Display card
checking for Matrox-validated 129
Dropped frames in realtime effects
reporting 11
DV material
capturing native 17
DV/DVCAM codec
See Matrox DV/DVCAM codec
DV/HDV device control
setting 27
DV-1394 device
as source in Adobe Premiere Pro 16
settings in Adobe Premiere Pro 15
DV-1394 device control
exporting to tape with 28
setting 27
DV-1394 output settings 15
DVCPRO codec
See Matrox DVCPRO codec
163
E
Effect presets 33
Error notification
in Events panel 9
with X.info 130
Events panel
displaying warnings in 9
Exporting
enabling DV-1394 output for 15
Matrox clips in Adobe Premiere Pro 22
to tape using Adobe Premiere Pro 27
using Matrox Media Encoder 26
eyeon Fusion WYSIWYG plug-in
about 122
required steps 123
See also Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
F
Fixed effects
applying in Adobe Premiere Pro 109
Flex CPU effects
See Matrox CPU-based effects
Flex GPU effects
See Matrox hardware-accelerated effects
Fusion WYSIWYG plug-in
See eyeon Fusion WYSIWYG plug-in
G
General settings
in Adobe Premiere Pro 10
Glossary 150
Graphics clips
supported formats 111
H
Hardware information
displaying with X.info 128
Hardware-accelerated effects 110
enabling/disabling 129
HD clips
using in an SD project 9
HD projects
supported compression formats 145
using SD clips in 9
HDV 1080i @ 25 fps project
working with 138, 140
HDV 1080i @ 29.97 fps project
working with 138, 140
HDV material
capturing native 17
editing in SD 140
exporting native 28
I
Input aspect ratio
selecting 17
Input device
selecting 16
Input source
selecting for audio capture 18
selecting for video capture 16
Internet
Matrox WWW site 148
Isolating colors in a clip
using secondary color correction 59
K
Key colors
modifying using the chroma key graph 69
L
Lens flare effect
creating 74
Letterbox
selecting for exported video 23
selecting for video output 13
LightWave 3D WYSIWYG plug-in
See NewTek LightWave 3D WYSIWYG
plug-in
Luma key effect
creating 77
overview 76
using the luma key graph 78
Index
164
Luma key graph
using 78
Luma mapping graph
using 48
Luminance range settings
for rendering to VFW files 117
M
M2V files
exporting using Matrox Media Encoder 26
Mask
applying to effect 39
applying using Select Mask 40
Mask blur effect
creating 82
Mask effect
creating 80
Mask mosaic effect
creating 84
Master output format
selecting 13
supported formats based on project
format 146
Matrox
contacting us 148
WWW site 148
Matrox Axio offline HD projects
editing on RT.X2 144
Matrox CPU-based effects 110
Matrox DV/DVCAM codec
selecting for capture 17
selecting for export to disk 22
selecting for VFW render 118
Matrox DV/HDV device control
exporting to tape with 28
setting 27
Matrox DVCPRO codec
selecting for capture 17
selecting for export to disk 22
selecting for VFW render 118
Matrox hardware-accelerated effects 110
enabling/disabling 129
Index
Matrox Media Encoder 26
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame codec
configuring for VFW render 119
configuring in Adobe Premiere Pro 24
selecting for capture 17
selecting for export to disk 22
selecting for VFW render 118
Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
configuring for VFW render 120
configuring in Adobe Premiere Pro 24
selecting for capture 17
selecting for export to disk 23
selecting for VFW render 118
using 141
workflow example for offline editing 141
workflow example for online editing 143
Matrox RT.X2
checking for Matrox-validated display
card 129
customer support
documentation 4
enabling/disabling hardware-accelerated
effects 129
glossary 150
key features 2
monitoring using X.info 126
realtime guidelines 110
registration 148
supported compression formats 145
supported master output formats 146
using to edit Axio offline HD projects 144
workflows 136
Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel
using 122
Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
about 122
required steps 123
Matrox X.info
using 126
Memory usage
monitoring in Adobe Premiere Pro 126
165
Monitoring your system
with X.info 126
Motion effects
selecting options for 11
Move & scale effect
creating 86
mapping Motion effect to 11
MPEG-2 Elementary files
exporting for DVD project 26
MPEG-2 I-frame codec
See Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame codec
MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
See Matrox MPEG-2 I-frame HD codec
MPEG-2 I-frame HD settings
selecting in Adobe Premiere Pro 24
selecting in VFW programs 120
MPEG-2 I-frame settings
selecting in Adobe Premiere Pro 24
MPEG-2 I-frame video quality
selecting in VFW programs 119
N
NewTek LightWave 3D WYSIWYG plug-in
about 122
required steps 124
See also Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
NTSC setup level
selecting for analog video 14
O
Old movie effect
creating 88
P
Page curl
creating 92
Pan & scan effect
creating 94
Photoshop WYSIWYG plug-in
See Adobe Photoshop WYSIWYG plug-in
Pixel aspect ratio
selecting for render in Adobe Premiere
Pro 23
Preconfigured Matrox effects
applying 33
Proc amps
adjusting using Matrox color correction 41,
50
Project presets
for HD material 138
for SD "24P" material 136
loading for Matrox RT.X2 8
See also Matrox RT.X2 workflows
Pulldown
description of advanced 133
description of standard 132
used in 486p @ 23.98 fps project 136
Pulldown method
selecting for video output 13
R
Realtime plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro
3D DVE
creating 60
4-corner pin
creating 62
applying a Matrox transition 33
applying a Matrox video effect 33
available effects 32
blur/soft focus effect
creating 64
chroma key effect
creating 66
overview 65
chroma key shadow effect
creating 66
overview 65
color correction
creating 41
cropping your clip 37
crystallize effect
creating 72
lens flare effect
creating 74
luma key effect
creating 77
Index
166
overview 76
mask blur effect
creating 82
mask effect
creating 80
mask mosaic effect
creating 84
move & scale effect
creating 86
old movie effect
creating 88
page curl
creating 92
pan & scan effect
creating 94
realtime guidelines 110
secondary color correction
creating 50
selecting speed control method 109
shadow effect
creating 96
shine effect
creating 98
surface finish effect
creating 102
track matte effect
creating 105
transforming a clip
using the Program Monitor 36
using the transform controls 34
wipe transitions
creating 107
Realtime threshold
adjusting 12
Registering your Matrox RT.X2 148
Rendering using Adobe Premiere Pro
limitations to realtime effects 111
Rendering using VFW programs
before you start 115
selecting color space conversion options 116
selecting compressor 118
selecting video quality 118, 119, 120
Index
Reporting dropped frames
during video playback 11
S
Scale to Frame Size
applying in real time 9
disabling realtime 11
Scratch disks
specifying 9
Scrubbing mode
selecting 10
SD clips
using in an HD project 9
SD projects
supported compression formats 145
using HD clips in 9, 140
Secondary color correction
creating 50
creating a color pass effect 59
using the selective key graph 55
Select Crop
using 38
Select Mask
using 40
Selective key graph
using 55
Setup level
selecting for NTSC analog video 14
Shadow effect
creating 96
Shine effect
creating 98
Sound card
recording and playback volume controls 6
Speed changes
selecting speed control method 109
Speed control method
selecting 109
Standard pulldown
description of 132
See also Advanced pulldown
167
Style conventions
of this manual 3
Super black
allowing for output video 14
Super white
allowing for output video 14
Surface finish effect
creating 102
System information
displaying with X.info 126
T
Tapes
preparing for export to tape 27
Technical support
See Customer support
Temperatures
monitoring 129
Titles
supported formats 111
Track matte effect
creating 105
Transforming a clip 34
using the Program Monitor 36
using the transform controls 34
Transitions
applying realtime 33
disabling accelerated/realtime 11
V
Video capture settings 16
Video effects
applying realtime 33
Video for Windows programs 114
rendering Matrox AVI file 118
Video formats
expressed in RT.X2 documentation 3
Video luma level 10
Video output settings 13
Video quality
selecting in Adobe Premiere Pro 24
selecting in VFW programs 118, 119, 120
Video Rendering settings
in Adobe Premiere Pro 15
Volume controls
recording and playback settings 6
VU meters 21
W
Warnings
displaying in Adobe Premiere Pro’s Events
panel 9
displaying with X.info 130
WAV files
capturing using Adobe Premiere Pro 18
exporting using Adobe Premiere Pro 23
Widescreen format
editing SD material on Matrox RT.X2 29
Wipe transitions
creating 107
Workflows
for Matrox RT.X2 136
WWW site 148
WYSIWYG Control Panel
See Matrox WYSIWYG Control Panel
WYSIWYG plug-ins
See Matrox WYSIWYG plug-ins
X
X.info
error notification 130
hardware information 128
hardware-accelerated effects on RT.X2 129
monitoring Adobe Premiere Pro memory
usage 126
monitoring temperatures 129
system information 126
using 126
Index
168
Your notes
Index
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