CD-II MAX - masterholod
CD-II MAX
TK 51120-1-MM (Rev. 0, 01/01)
Copyright© 1997 Thermo King Corp., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.
Printed in U.S.A.
The maintenance information in this manual covers unit models:
CD-II MAX 30 NAD (919060)
CD-II MAX 30 EEC (919064)
CD-II MAX 50 NAD 230/1/60 (919061)
CD-II MAX 50 230/1/60 EEC (919065)
CD-II MAX 50 NAD 230/3/60 (919062)
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/50 EEC (919066)
CD-II MAX 50 NAD 380-460/3/50-6 (919063)
CD-II MAX 50 380/3/50 EEC (919067)
For further information, refer to…
CD-II MAX Parts Manual
TK 51153
Operator’s Manual
TK 51111
Diagnosing Thermo King Refrigeration Systems
TK 5984
Tool Catalog
TK 5955
The information in this manual is provided to assist owners, operators and service people in the proper upkeep
and maintenance of Thermo King units.
This manual is published for informational purposes only and the information so provided should not be considered
as all-inclusive or covering all contingencies. If further information is required, Thermo King Corporation should be
consulted.
Sale of product shown in this manual is subject to Thermo King’s terms and conditions including, but not limited to,
the Thermo King Limited Express Warranty. Such terms and conditions are available upon request.
Thermo King’s warranty will not apply to any equipment which has been “so repaired or altered outside the manufacturer’s plants as, in the manufacturer’s judgment, to effect its stability.”
No warranties, express or implied, including warranties of fitness for a particular purpose or merchantability, or warranties arising from course of dealing or usage of trade, are made regarding the information, recommendations, and descriptions contained herein. Manufacturer is not responsible and will not be held
liable in contract or in tort (including negligence) for any special, indirect or consequential damages,
including injury or damage caused to vehicles, contents or persons, by reason of the installation of any
Thermo King product or its mechanical failure.
Recover Refrigerant
At Thermo King, we recognize the need to preserve the
environment and limit the potential harm to the ozone layer that
can result from allowing refrigerant to escape into the
atmosphere.
We strictly adhere to a policy that promotes the recovery and
limits the loss of refrigerant into the atmosphere.
In addition, service personnel must be aware of Federal
regulations concerning the use of refrigerants and the
certification of technicians. For additional information on
regulations and technician certification programs, contact your
local THERMO KING dealer.
NOTE: Because of the many variables in oils, particularly in HVAC systems, Zexel, ICE, Bock and Alma
A6 compressors may be delivered with an oil that is not specified for the particular unit it is to be fitted
to. Unless it is 100% clear it is the correct oil, Thermo King recommends the oil is changed to the correct
type.
CAUTION: With HVAC systems and the use of PAG, it is very important that oil mixing does not
take place. PAG and POE oil CANNOT be mixed. Mixing these oils will cause serious system
contamination, especially with chlorine based refrigerants.
NOTE: The proper compressor oil is determined by the refrigerant used and specific air conditioning
application requirements. Verify both serial nameplates on the unit and compressor for correct oil to use
in a particular system. DO NOT mix PAG and POE oils.
CAUTION: All Thermo King systems must be properly labeled with the refrigerant and oil that is
used in that system. If this is not done, and the wrong oils/refrigerants are mixed, damage to the
system will result.
CAUTION: Units containing R-134a require dedicated refrigeration equipment and special
maintenance practices. Read the section “Refrigerant R-134a for Bus Applications” in the Safety
Precautions Chapter before performing any maintenance procedures.
Table of Contents
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Maintenance Inspection Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Unit Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Engine Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Serial Number Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Unit Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Operating Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Unit Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
In-Cab TG-V Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Unit Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Unit Protection Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Unit Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Electronic Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
TG-V Thermostat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Single Temp In-Cab TG-V Controller (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Display Symbols and Control Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
General Display Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Additional Operating Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Guarded Access Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Testing the TG-V Thermostat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Electrical Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Alternator With Integral Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Charging System Diagnostic Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
12V Alternators With Internal Regulator Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Charging System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Unit Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Glow Plugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Engine Reset Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
High Water Temperature Switch (HWT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Engine Low Oil Pressure Switch (LOP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Circuit Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Fuse Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Unloading Timers (UT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Clutch Timer (CLT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Defrost System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Charging System (12 vDC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Conversion System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
CYCLE-SENTRY Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
CYCLE-SENTRY Truck Unit Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Table of Contents (Rev. 01/01)
Electrical Maintenance (continued)
Option Circuit Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switch Panel Circuit Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CYCLE-SENTRY Electronic Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preheat Buzzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Reset Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cab Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshoot the Auto-Start System Using CYCLE-SENTRY Diagnosis Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rpm Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature Compensating Thermistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Temperature Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
In-Cab TG-V Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
108
109
112
112
112
113
113
114
115
116
117
Engine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Lubrication System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crankcase Breather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Air Cleaner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Cooling System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Fuel System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TK 2.49 Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Solenoid Timers on PC Boards (TK 2.49 Engine) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Limit Screw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Speed Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Injection Pump Removal, Installation And Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjust Engine Valve Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121
121
121
122
123
126
131
131
137
138
139
142
143
145
Refrigeration Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Evacuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refrigerant Leaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refrigerant Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High Pressure Cutout Switch (HPCO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Liquid Line Solenoid (LLS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot Gas Solenoid (HGS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
147
147
155
155
155
156
156
Refrigeration Service Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Low Side Pump Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accumulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Condenser/Radiator Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Evaporator Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expansion Valve Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Heat Exchanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High Pressure Cutout Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High Pressure Relief Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
157
157
157
157
158
158
159
159
160
160
161
Table of Contents (Rev. 01/01)
Refrigeration Service Operations (continued)
Suction Pressure Regulator Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Receiver Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Liquid Line Check Valve Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Liquid Line Check Valve Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Liquid Line Solenoid (LLS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Hot Gas Solenoid (HGS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Compressors Shipped with R-404A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Equipment Recommendations For Use With R-404A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Structural Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Unit and Engine Mounting Bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Fan Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Unit Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Evaporator Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Condenser Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Jackshaft Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Compressor Clutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Shaft Seal Cover and Shaft Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Special Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
System Compressor and Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
Hot Water Heat Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
Mechanical Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
CYCLE-SENTRY Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
Electric Standby (Optional) Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
Refrigeration Diagnosis Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Refrigeration Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
Wiring Diagrams and Schematic Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
Safety Precautions
GENERAL PRACTICES
1.
ALWAYS WEAR GOGGLES OR SAFETY
GLASSES. Refrigerant liquid, refrigeration oil, and
battery acid can permanently damage the eyes (see First
Aid).
2.
Never operate the unit with the compressor discharge
service valve closed.
3.
Keep your hands, clothing and tools clear of the fans
and belts when the unit is running. This should also be
considered when opening and closing the compressor
service valves.
4.
Make sure gauge manifold hoses are in good condition.
Never let them come in contact with a belt, fan motor
pulley, or any hot surface.
5.
AUTO START/STOP
CAUTION: The unit may start automatically and at
any time when the unit ON/OFF switch is in the ON
position. Units with the CYCLE-SENTRY option
start automatically in both CYCLE-SENTRY mode
and Continuous mode. Be sure to turn the ON/OFF
switch off before opening doors or inspecting or
working on any part of the unit.
REFRIGERANT
When removing refrigerant from a unit, a recovery process
that prevents or minimizes refrigerant loss to the atmosphere is required by law.
Never apply heat to a sealed refrigeration system or
container.
6.
Fluorocarbon refrigerants in the presence of an open
flame produce toxic gases that are severe respiratory
irritants capable of causing death.
7.
Make sure all mounting bolts are tight and are of correct length for their particular application.
8.
Use extreme caution when drilling holes in the unit.
The holes may weaken structural components, and
holes drilled into electrical wiring can cause fire or
explosion. Holes drilled into the refrigeration system
will release refrigerant.
9.
11. When using ladder or scaffolding, use caution and
follow manufacturer recommendations.
When a refrigerant is exposed to the atmosphere in the liquid state, it evaporates rapidly, freezing anything it contacts.
If refrigerant contacts the skin, severe frost bite can result.
First Aid
In the event of frost bite, the objectives of First Aid are to
protect the frozen area from further injury, to warm the
affected area rapidly and to maintain respiration.
Use caution when working around exposed coil fins.
The fins can cause painful lacerations.
10. Use caution when working with a refrigerant or refrigeration system in any closed or confined area with a
limited air supply (for example, a truck body or
garage). Refrigerant tends to displace air and can cause
oxygen depletion resulting in suffocation and possible
death.
i
•
EYES: For contact with liquid, immediately flush eyes
with large amounts of water and get prompt medical
attention.
•
SKIN: Flush area with large amounts of lukewarm
water. Do not apply heat. Remove contaminated clothing and shoes. Wrap burns with dry, sterile, bulky
dressing to protect from infection/injury. Get medical
attention. Wash contaminated clothing before reuse.
•
INHALATION: Move victim to fresh air and use cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or mouth-to-mouth
ventilation if necessary. Stay with victim until arrival of
emergency medical personnel.
Safety Precautions (Rev. 01/01)
REFRIGERATION OIL
The following procedures must be rigidly adhered to when
servicing units to avoid microprocessor damage or
destruction.
Observe the following precautions when working with or
around synthetic or polyol ester refrigerant oil:
•
Do not allow refrigerant oil to contact your eyes.
•
Do not allow prolonged or repeated contact with skin or
clothing.
•
To prevent irritation, you should wash thoroughly
immediately after handling refrigerant oil. Rubber
gloves are recommended when handling polyol ester
oil.
1.
Disconnect all power to the unit.
2.
Avoid wearing clothing that generates static electricity
(wool, nylon, polyester, etc.).
3.
Do wear a static discharge wrist strap (P/N 204-622)
with the lead end connected to the microprocessor’s
ground terminal. These straps are available at most
electronic equipment distributors. DO NOT wear these
straps with power applied to the unit.
First Aid
•
EYES: Immediately flush eyes with large amounts of
water for at least 15 minutes while holding the eyelids
open. Get prompt medical attention.
•
SKIN: Remove contaminated clothing. Wash
thoroughly with soap and water. Get medical attention
if irritation persists.
•
•
Refer to the THERMOGUARD µP-T Microprocessor
Controller Operations and Diagnosis Manual
(TK 41087) (T.I.P. Procedure #P41AA12B) and the
Electrostatic Discharge Training Guide (TK 40282) for
additional information.
INHALATION: Move victim to fresh air and restore
breathing if necessary. Stay with victim until arrival of
emergency personnel.
4.
Avoid contacting the electronic components on the circuit boards of the unit being serviced.
5.
Leave the circuit boards in their static proof packing
materials until ready for installation.
6.
If a defective controller is to be returned for repair, it
should be returned in the same static protective packing
materials from which the replacement component was
removed.
7.
After servicing the controller or any other circuits, the
wiring should be checked for possible errors before
restoring power.
8.
Never use testers consisting of a battery and a light bulb
to test circuits on any microprocessor based equipment.
9.
Before connecting or disconnecting the battery, the
microprocessor switch must be turned off.
INGESTION: Do not induce vomiting. Contact a local
poison control center or physician immediately.
ELECTRICAL HAZARDS
Microprocessor Service
Precautions must be taken to prevent electrostatic discharge
when servicing the microprocessor controller and related
components. Potential differences considerably lower than
those which produce a small spark from a finger to a door
knob can severely damage or destroy solid-state integrated
circuit components.
ii
Safety Precautions (Rev. 01/01)
High Voltage
NOTE: The following T.I.P. Procedures may be found in
Operation and Diagnosis Manual TK 41087.
•
Replacing and calibrating the return air and discharge
sensor.
•
Replacing the µP-T microprocessor.
•
Welding on the unit or truck.
When servicing or repairing a temperature control unit, the
possibility of serious or even fatal injury from electrical
shock exists. Extreme care must be used when working with
a refrigeration unit that is connected to a source of operating
power, even if the unit is not operating. Lethal voltage
potentials can exist at the unit power cord, inside the control
box, at the motors and within the wiring harnesses.
Welding of Units or Truck Bodies
Precautions
When electric welding is to be performed on any portion of
the temperature control unit, truck or truck chassis when the
temperature control unit is attached, it is necessary to ensure
that welding currents are NOT allowed to flow through the
electronic circuits of the unit.
1.
Be certain the unit ON/OFF switch is turned off before
connecting or disconnecting the standby power plug.
Never attempt to stop the unit by disconnecting the
power plug.
These procedures must be rigidly adhered to when servicing
units to avoid damage or destruction of the controller.
2.
Be certain the unit power plug is clean and dry before
connecting it to a power source.
1.
Disconnect all power to the unit.
3.
2.
Disconnect all wire harnesses from the controller.
3.
Switch all of the electrical circuit breakers in the control box to the OFF position.
When working on high voltage circuits on the temperature control unit, do not make any rapid moves. If a tool
drops, do not grab for it. People do not contact high
voltage wires on purpose. It occurs from an unplanned
movement.
4.
Weld unit and/or container per normal welding procedures. Keep ground return electrode as close to the area
to be welded as practical. This will reduce the likelihood of stray welding currents passing through any
electrical or electronic circuits.
4.
Use tools with insulated handles that are in good condition. Never hold metal tools in your hand if exposed,
energized conductors are within reach.
5.
Treat all wires and connections as high voltage until a
meter and wiring diagram show otherwise.
6.
Never work alone on high voltage circuits on the temperature control unit. Another person should always be
present to shut off the temperature control unit and to
provide aid in the event of an accident.
7.
Have electrically insulated gloves, cable cutters and
safety glasses available in the immediate vicinity in the
event of an accident.
5.
When the welding operation is completed, the unit
power cables, wiring and circuit breakers must be
restored to their normal condition.
iii
Safety Precautions (Rev. 01/01)
First Aid
UNIT DECALS
IMMEDIATE action must be initiated after a person has
received an electrical shock. Obtain immediate medical
assistance if available.
Serial number decals, refrigerant type decals and warning
decals appear on all Thermo King equipment. These decals
provide information that may be needed to service or repair
the unit. Service technicians should especially read and follow the instructions on all warning decals.
AEA1635
The source of shock must be immediately removed by either
shutting down the power or removing the victim from the
source. If it is not possible to shut off the power, the wire
should be cut with either an insulated instrument (e.g., a
wooden handled axe or cable cutters with heavy insulated
handles) or by a rescuer wearing electrically insulated
gloves and safety glasses. Whichever method is used do not
look at the wire while it is being cut. The ensuing flash can
cause burns and blindness.
Refrigerant Decal
If the victim must be removed from a live circuit, pull the
victim off with a non-conductive material. Use the victim’s
coat, a rope, wood, or loop your belt around the victim’s leg
or arm and pull the victim off. DO NOT TOUCH the victim.
You can receive a shock from current flowing through the
victim’s body.
After separating the victim from the power source, check
immediately for the presence of a pulse and respiration. If a
pulse is not present, start CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) and call for emergency medical assistance. If a pulse is
present, respiration may be restored by using mouth-tomouth resuscitation, but call for emergency medical assistance.
Low Voltage
Control circuits used in the temperature control unit are low
voltage (24 volts ac and 12 volts dc). This voltage potential
is not considered dangerous, but the large amount of current
available (over 30 amps) can cause severe burns if shorted
or ground.
Do not wear jewelry, watch or rings when working on the
unit. If these items contact an electrical circuit, severe burns
may result.
iv
Specifications
ENGINE
Model
Fuel Type
Thermo King TK 2.49
Use Diesel Fuel Only
No. 2 Diesel fuel under normal conditions
No. 1 Diesel fuel is acceptable cold weather fuel
Oil Capacity: Crankcase & Oil Filter
3.0 quarts (2.8 liters)
Fill to full mark on dipstick
Oil Type*
Mineral Oil API Classification CF-4 or CG-4
Synthetic Oil (After First 500 Hours) API Classification CF-4 or CG-4
Oil Viscosity**
Multi-grade
Oil Ambient Temperature F (C)
SAE 15W-40 5 to 104 F (-15 to 40 C)
SAE 10W-40 -4 to 104 F (-20 to 40 C)
SAE 10W-30 -4 to 86 F (-20 to 30 C)
SAE 5W-30 -22 to 86 F (-30 to 30 C)
Engine rpm:
Low Speed Operation 1550 to 1650 rpm
High Speed Operation 2350 to 2450 rpm
Engine Oil Pressure
44 psig (303 kPa) or higher (high speed)
25 psig (172 kPa) or lower (low speed)
Intake Valve Clearance
0.0079 in. (0.20 mm)
Exhaust Valve Clearance
0.0079 in. (0.20 mm)
Valve Setting Temperature
70 F (21 C)
Fuel Injection Timing
14° BTDC
Low Oil Pressure Switch
Closes 7 to 13 psi (48 to 90 kPa) or lower (shutdown)
High Coolant Temperature Switch:
Closes 215 to 225 F (102 to 107 C) or higher (shutdown)
Opens 190 F (88 C) or lower (OK)
Engine Thermostat
180 F (82 C)
Cooling System Capacity
3 quarts, 2 ounces (3.8 liters) with overflow tank
Engine Coolant Type***
GM 6038M or equivalent low silicone antifreeze
mixture, 50/50 antifreeze/water mixture, not to
exceed 60/40.
Radiator Cap Pressure
10 psig (69 kPa)
*Thermo King synthetic oil is compatible with petroleum lubricants so there is no danger if accidental
mixing occurs or if an emergency requires addition of petroleum oil. Mixing is not recommended,
however, since it will dilute the superior performance properties of the synthetic oil.
**Multi-viscosity weight oil with the recommended API classification may be used based on the ambient
temperature and straight weight viscosity recommendations above. The above recommendations are
written for mineral oil based lubricants.
***Do not use high silicone automobile antifreeze.
1
Specifications (Rev. 01/01)
EVAPORATOR - ELECTRICAL
Voltage
Fan Motors
14 volts DC (nominal)
Horsepower: 1/16 HP
RPM: 1850
Full Load Current: 14.5 amps
BELT TENSION*
Tension No. on TK Gauge 204-427
Engine (Clutch)/Alternator/Motor/Jackshaft
53
Water Pump
40
Compressor/Jackshaft (Electric Motor)/Condenser Fan
50
*NOTE: These are original factory settings. Because it is difficult to use the TK Gauge 204-427 in the
field, adjust each belt to allow 1/2 inch (13 mm) deflection at the center of the longest span of A and 3V
belts only.
MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLER TG-V FACTORY SETTINGS
Temperature Display
Save Elapsed Time
Fahrenheit
Yes. The defrost interval timer will save the time
which has elapsed since the last defrost cycle, even
if the unit is shut off.
45 minutes
4 hours
No
Yes, at setpoint below 15 F (-9.5 C)
Defrost Terminate Time
Defrost Time Interval
High Speed Delay
High Speed Heat Lockout
ELECTRICAL CONTROL SYSTEM
Voltage
Circuit Breaker, Control Circuit
Circuit Breaker, Glow Plugs and Starter
Circuit Breaker, Evaporator Fan
Control Circuit Fuse
Battery Charging Alternator
Voltage Regulator Setting
12.5 volts DC (nominal)
20 amp remote reset
50 amp remote reset
30 amp remote reset
60 amps
12 volt, 37 amp, brush type
14.0 to 14.2 volts @ 77 F (25 C)
ELECTRIC STANDBY
Electric Motor
RPM
Full Load Amps
Locked Rotor Amps
5 hp, 230/460 V, 60 Hz
1750 rpm
14.4/7.2
58
2
Specifications (Rev. 01/01)
STANDBY POWER REQUIREMENTS
Voltage/Phase
Frequency
Horsepower
Power Supply
Circuit Breaker
Power Cord
Size (AWG) Up to
25’
50’
75’
230/1/60
5
40
12
10
8
230/3/60
5
30
12
12
10
460/3/60
5
15
14
14
14
3
Specifications (Rev. 01/01)
R-404A REFRIGERATION SYSTEM
Compressor Model
Refrigerant Charge
Compressor Oil Charge*
Compressor Oil Type
Suction Pressure Regulator Setting
Heat/Defrost Method:
ICE TK 208R
5.8 pounds (2.6 kg) R-404A
12 ounces (354 ml)
Ester Base oil (TK 203-413)
25 psig (172 kPa)
Engine Operation Hot gas
Electric Operation Hot gas and optional electric heater strips
Defrost Termination Switch:
Opens 52 F (11 C)
Closes 42 F (6 C)
High Pressure Cutout Switch:
Opens 440 to 475 psig (3034 to 3275 kPa) or higher
(shutdown)
Automatic reset at 337 to 413 psi (2324 to 2848 kPa)
Low Pressure Cutout Switch:
Opens 5 to 11 in. vacuum (-17 to -37.2 kPa)
Closes 4 to 7 psig (28 to 48 kPa)
Defrost Time Interval
Programmable 2 to 16 hours in 2 hour increments
*When the compressor is removed from the unit, oil level should be noted or the oil removed from the
compressor should be measured so that the same amount of oil can be added before placing the
replacement compressor on the unit.
AIR SWITCH
Air Switch Setting
0.50 ± 0.05 in. (12.7 ± 1.3 mm) H2O
THERMOSTAT
Type
Range
Heat Lockout: Continuous Operation
CYCLE-SENTRY Operation (Operational Equipment
Electric Standby Operation (Optional Equipment)
4
Solid state Thermoguard V thermostat
-20 to 80 F (-27 to 27 C)
High speed heat locked out below 15 ± 3 F
(-9.4 ± 1.7 C)
All heat locked out below 15 ± 3 F(-9.4 ± 1.7 C)
All heat locked out below 15 ± 3 F(-9.4 ± 1.7 C)
Specifications (Rev. 01/01)
ELECTRICAL CONTROL SYSTEM
Voltage
Fuse Link Rating
Main Circuit Breaker
Control Circuit Breaker
Fan Motor Circuit Breaker
Battery Charging
Voltage Regulator Setting
Unloading Timer
12.5 volts dc
50 to 55 amps
50 amp auto reset
20 amp auto reset
30 amp
12 volt 37 amp alternator
14.0 to 14.2 volts @ 77 F (25 C)
40 ± 5 seconds
ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
NOTE: Disconnect components from unit circuit to check resistance.
Current Draw (Amps)Resistance—
at 12.5 Vdc(Ohms)
8.31.5
30 to 40.41 to.31
0.9712.8
3.33.8
0.917.0
0.917.0
90 to 105 (cranking)
7-12
Glow Plug
Fuel Solenoid: Pull In
Hold In
Throttle Solenoid
Liquid Line Solenoid
Hot Gas Solenoid
Starter Motor
Evaporator Fan Motor (Each)
Electrical Standby (Model 50 Unit Only)
Full Load
(amps)
Overload
Relay
Setting
(amps)
Voltage/Phase/Frequency
Horsepower
Kilowatts
rpm
230/1/60*
5
3.7
1750
14.5
18
230/3/60
6
4.5
1760
16.4
10
380/3/60
5
3.7
1630
8.0
10
460/3/60
5
3.7
1630
8.2
10
220/3/50 EEC
6
4.5
1760
16.4
18
230/3/60 EEC
5
3.7
1630
13.8
18
380/3/50 EEC
5
3.7
1630
8.0
10
*Uses the three-phase motor and a phase converter.
5
Specifications (Rev. 01/01)
6
Maintenance Inspection Schedule
Pre
trip
750
1,000 3,000 Maintenance interval may be extended to 2000 hours when equipped with bypass
Hours Hours Hours oil filter.
Yearly Inspect/Service These Items
Engine
•
Check fuel supply.
•
•
Check engine oil level.
•
•
Inspect belts for condition and proper tension.
•
•
Check engine oil pressure hot, on high speed. Minimum 40 psig
(276 kPa or 2.8 bar).
•
•
•
Listen for unusual noises, vibrations, etc.
•
Change oil in oil bath air cleaner cup, clean and service crankcase breather and check air
cleaner hose for damage.
•
Change fuel filter/water separator.
•
Drain water from fuel tank and check vent.
•
Inspect/clean fuel prefilter and electric fuel pump filter.
•
Change engine coolant every two years. Maintain year around
antifreeze protection at -30 F (-34 C).
•
Check and adjust engine speeds (high and low speed).
•
Check condition of engine mounts.
ENGINE OIL CHANGE INTERVALS: ENGINE
NOTE: Change engine oil and filters (hot).
•
EMI Oil change interval with CG-4 oils.
•
EMI Oil change interval with CG-4 oils, with new TK 11-9321
by-pass filter.
•
Synthetic Oil change interval, without by-pass filter.
•
Synthetic Oil change interval with CG-4 oils, with new TK 11-9321
by-pass filter.
*NOTE: With belt removed, spin bearings by hand. Listen for noise (bearings roll freely).
7
Maintenance Inspection Schedule (Rev. 01/01)
Pre
trip
•
•
•
•
•
750
1,000 3,000 Maintenance interval may be extended to 2000 hours when equipped with bypass
Hours Hours Hours oil filter.
Yearly Inspect/Service These Items
Electrical
•
Check alternator voltage screen.
•
Check defrost initiation and termination.*
•
Check thermostat cycle sequence.*
•
Inspect battery terminals and electrolyte level.
•
Check operation of protection shutdown circuits.*
•
Inspect electrical contacts for pitting or corrosion.
•
Inspect wire harness for damaged wires or connections.
•
Check calibration of return and discharge air sensor, and optional air
sensors, in 32 F (0 C) ice water.
•
Check air switch setting.
•
Inspect electric motor bearings.*
•
Inspect DC (battery charging) alternator bearings* and brushes.
•
Check discharge and suction pressures.
•
Check compressor efficiency.
—
Replace dehydrator and compressor oil filter every two years.
Refrigeration
•
Check refrigerant level.
•
Check compressor oil level.
•
•
Check suction pressure regulator/throttling valve operation on defrost or heat.
Structural
•
Visually inspect unit for fluid leaks (coolant, oil, refrigerant).
•
Visually inspect unit for damaged, loose or broken parts (includes air ducts and bulkheads, if so equipped).
•
•
Inspect clutch for shoe and anchor bushing wear with a mirror.*
•
Inspect idler bearings for leakage and bearing wear.*
•
Clean entire unit including condenser and evaporator coils and defrost drains.
•
Check all unit, fuel tank, engine and electric motor mounting bolts, brackets, lines,
hoses, etc.
*NOTE: With belt removed, spin bearings by hand. Listen for noise (bearings roll freely).
8
Unit Description
NOTE: A buzzer sounds when the unit is automatically
preheating.
The CD-II MAX is a one-piece, diesel powered, temperature control unit designed especially for straight trucks. The
unit mounts on the front of a truck. The evaporator extends
into the box. There are two basic models:
•
Model 30: Cool, hot gas heat, and defrost on engine
operation; hot water heat (optional)
•
Model 50: Cool, hot gas heat, and defrost on engine
operation and electric standby operation (optional electric evaporator heaters are available for extra heating
capacity on electric standby); hot water heat (optional).
The CYCLE-SENTRY system automatically starts the unit
on thermostat demand and shuts down the unit when the
box temperature reaches the thermostat setpoint. The
CYCLE-SENTRY system automatically maintains engine
temperature in cold ambients by restarting the unit if the
engine block temperature drops to 32 F (0 C). When the unit
starts because of low engine blow temperature, it will run in
the operating mode called for by the unit thermostat until
the battery is fully charged and the engine block temperature reaches 90 F (32.2 C).
During engine operation, power is provided by the TK 2.49
two-cylinder, water-cooled, diesel engine rated at 7.4 continuous horsepower (6.1 KW) at 2600 rpm. A centrifugal
clutch (mounted on the engine) and a belt drive system
transfer energy to the compressor, the condenser fan, and
the alternator. The centrifugal clutch engages when the
engine reaches 900 ± 100 rpm. The clutch isolates the
engine from the belt drive system during electric operation.
Electric standby power (Model 50) is provided by an electric motor.
Features of the CYCLE-SENTRY system are:
•
Offers either CYCLE-SENTRY (CYCLE) or Continuous Run (CONTINUOUS) operation.
•
Thermostat controlled all season temperature control.
•
Maintains minimum engine temperature in low ambient
conditions.
•
Variable glow plug preheat time.
THERMOGUARD V Thermostat (TG-V)
•
Preheat indicator buzzer.
Accurate temperature control of the cargo area is provided
by a TG-V, which is a programmable microprocessor controller. Normally Heat Lockout is enabled on the TG-V.
Heat Lockout does not allow the TG-V to demand High
Speed Heat at setpoints below 15 F (-9.4 C). Special units
may not have Heat Lockout enabled.
Cab Control Box (Optional)
An optional cab control box is available. It allows the driver
to control and monitor some of the unit functions from
inside the cab. The auto start system is included with this
option. The auto start system controls the preheat, run, and
start relays to automatically start the unit when the unit is
turned on. Refer to the Operating Instructions for a detailed
description.
CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop Controls
(Optional)
A CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop fuel saving system is available to provide optimum operating economy.
Remote Control Box (Optional)
An optional remote control box is available. It is normally
mounted on the truck below the unit and allows the driver to
control some unit functions without having to reach the unit.
WARNING: With the CYCLE-SENTRY switch in
the AUTO START-STOP position and the ON/OFF
switch in the ON position, the unit may start at any
time without prior warning.
9
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
OPERATING MODES
Model 50 units may be equipped with optional electric
evaporator heaters. During electric operation, the evaporator
heaters are energized when the heater contactor is energized
by the 26 circuit.
High Speed Heat is locked out at setpoints below 15 F
(-9.4 C).
The CD-II MAX does not have a three-way valve. It has a
liquid line solenoid (LLS) and a hot gas solenoid (HGS)
instead. The LLS is normally open. The HGS is normally
closed. The LLS and the HGS are both energized by the 26
circuit, which is controlled by the heat relay (1K).
Defrost
Defrost can be initiated with the manual defrost switch, by
the air switch, or by the defrost timer any time the evaporator coil temperature is below 42 F (5.6 C). If the unit is in
null (CYCLE-SENTRY or electric operation), manually initiating defrost will cause the unit to start and operate in
defrost. When defrost is initiated, the defrost relay is energized. This energizes the 26 circuit, the Defrost light, and
the low speed defrost relay, and de-energizes the fan relay.
Energizing the low speed defrost relay de-energizes the
throttle solenoid. De-energizing the fan relay de-energizes
the evaporator fan motors.
Cool
When the thermostat is calling for cool, the heat relay is not
energized. Therefore, the 26 circuit is not energized, the
LLS is open and the HGS is closed. The discharge gas from
the compressor must flow through the cool circuit (condenser, receiver, drier, heat exchanger, expansion valve, distributor, evaporator, heat exchanger, accumulator, and
suction pressure regulator) to return to the compressor.
The unit remains on defrost until the evaporator coil temperature rises to 52 F (11.1 C) causing the defrost termination switch to open. When the defrost termination switch
opens, the defrost relay is de-energized and the thermostat
determines the unit’s mode of operation.
Heat
When the thermostat is calling for heat, the heat relay is
energized. Therefore, the 26 circuit is energized, the LLS is
closed and the HGS is open. The discharge gas from the
compressor must flow through the heat circuit (pan heater,
distributor, evaporator, heat exchanger, accumulator, and
suction pressure regulator) to return to the compressor.
ENGINE OPERATION
Continuous Run Operation
Units may be equipped with the hot water heat option. The
evaporator water solenoid is energized by the 26 circuit.
This routes hot engine coolant through a special evaporator
circuit.
At setpoints above 15 F (-9.4 C), the unit operates in the following modes:
10
•
High Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Heat
•
High Speed Heat
•
Defrost
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
At setpoints below 15 F (-9.4 C), the unit operates in the following modes:
•
High Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Heat
•
Defrost
•
Low Speed Heat—Null if block temperature switch is
satisfied.
•
High Speed Heat
•
Defrost
At setpoints below 15 F (-9.4 C), the unit operates in the following modes:
•
High Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Heat—Null if block temperature switch is
satisfied.
•
Defrost
(1) If High Speed Heat Lockout is enabled, High
Speed Heat is replaced by Low Speed Heat at setpoints below 15 F (-9.4 C)
TG-V Control Algorithm
Continuous Run
(1) Low Speed Heat if CYCLE-SENTRY system
determines unit should be running.
(2) If High Speed Heat Lockout is enabled, High
Speed Heat is replaced by Null at setpoints below
15 F (-9.4 C).
CYCLE-SENTRY Operation (Optional)
At setpoints above 15 F (-9.4 C), the unit operates in the following modes:
•
High Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Cool
TG-V Control Algorithm
CYCLE-SENTRY
11
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
Electric Operation (Model 50)
SERIAL NUMBER LOCATIONS
At setpoints above 15 F (-9.4 C), the unit operates in the following modes:
Unit: Nameplate on the curbside of the unit frame.
•
Cool
•
Null
•
Heat
•
Defrost
Engine: Nameplate on the rocker arm cover.
Compressor: Nameplate on the compressor body.
Standby Motor: Nameplate on the motor.
At setpoints below 15 F (-9.4 C), the unit operates in the following modes:
•
Cool
•
Null
•
Defrost
(1) If High Speed Heat Lockout is enabled, Heat is
replaced by Null at setpoints below 15 F (-9.4 C)
TG-V Control Algorithm
Electric Operation
12
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
UNIT MODEL
CD-II MAX 30
(919060)
DESIGN FEATURES
•
•
•
•
TK 2.49 Diesel Engine
TK 208R (ICE) Compressor
Tapered Roller Bearing Jackshaft
Oil Bath Air Cleaner
Dry Air Cleaner
Opt
•
•
•
•
Inlet and Outlet Fuel Lines
Electric Fuel Pump
Fuel Prefilter
Spin-On Full Flow Oil Filter
Spin-On Bypass Oil Filter
Opt
•
•
Spin-On Fuel Filter
EPDM Coolant Hoses
Top Screen
Opt
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Coolant Expansion Tank
Hourmeter (Measures Engine Run Time)
Thermoguard V Thermostat (TG-V)
Defrost Timer (Built into TG-V)
37 Amp Alternator
Stainless Steel Exterior Condenser Hardware
Stainless Steel Evaporator Hardware
CYCLE-SENTRY
Cab Control Box
Remote Control Box
Opt
Opt
Opt
•
R-404A
Hot Water Heat, Engine Coolant
Silicone Coolant Hoses
Opt
Opt
13
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
UNIT MODEL
CD-II MAX 30
(919060)
PROTECTION DEVICES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ENGINE LOW OIL PRESSURE Switch
ENGINE HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE Switch
REFRIGERANT HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT Switch
Fuse Link
Circuit Breaker in Main Power Circuit
Circuit Breaker in Control Circuit
Control Breaker in Fan Motor Circuit
14
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
DESIGN FEATURES
UNIT MODEL UNIT MODEL UNIT MODEL
CD-II MAX 50 CD-II MAX 50 CD-II MAX 50
230/1/60
230/3/60
380-460/3/50-60
(919065)
(919066)
(919067)
Electric Standby Motor 230/1/60
•
•
—
—
•
Opt
•
•
—
•
—
Electric Evaporator Heaters
Opt
Opt
Opt
•
•
•
Opt
Opt
Opt
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Opt
Opt
•
•
•
•
Opt
Opt
Opt
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hourmeter, Electric Standby Hours
Opt
Opt
Opt
Thermoguard V Thermostat (TG-V)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CYCLE-SENTRY
Opt
Opt
Opt
Cab Control Box
Opt
Opt
Opt
Remote Control Box
Opt
Opt
Opt
•
•
TK 2.49 Diesel Engine
TK 208R (ICE) Compressor
Electric Standby Motor 230/3/60
Electric Standby Motor 380-460/3/50-60
Oil Bath Air Cleaner
Dry Air Cleaner
Electric Fuel Pump
Fuel Prefilter
Spin-On Full Flow Oil Filter
Spin-On Bypass Oil Filter
Spin-On Fuel Filter
EPDM Coolant Hoses
Top Screen
Coolant Expansion Tank
Hourmeter, Engine Hours
Defrost Timer (Built into TG-V)
37 Amp Alternator
Stainless Steel Exterior Condenser Hardware
Stainless Steel Evaporator Hardware
Inlet and Outlet Fuel Lines
R-404A
•
•
•
—
Hot Water Heat, Engine Coolant
Opt
Opt
Opt
Silicone Coolant Hoses
Opt
Opt
Opt
15
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
PROTECTION DEVICES
UNIT MODEL UNIT MODEL UNIT MODEL
CD-II MAX 50 CD-II MAX 50 CD-II MAX 50
230/1/60
230/3/60
380-460/3/50-60
(919065)
(919066)
(919067)
ENGINE LOW OIL PRESSURE Switch
ENGINE HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE Switch
REFRIGERANT HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT Switch
Fuse Link
Circuit Breaker in Main Power Circuit
Circuit Breaker in Control Circuit
Control Breaker in Fan Motor Circuit
Electric Motor Overload Relay
High Temperature Switch (with Electric Heater
Option)
16
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Opt
Opt
Opt
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
UNIT PHOTOGRAPHS
1.
2.
Standard CD-II MAX
CD-II MAX with Low Noise Option
Front View
17
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
Roadside View
18
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
1
2
3
4
5
aea181
8
9
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
7
Motor Reset Button
Engine Reset Button
START/STOP Light
Engine Light
DC Alternator Light
ON/OFF Switch
PREHEAT/START Switch
Manual Defrost Switch
TG-V Thermostat
Control Panel
19
6
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
In-Cab TG-V Controller
20
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
1
2
1.
2.
ON/OFF Switch
DIESEL/ELECTRIC Switch
Electric Standby Power Receptacle—Model 50 Domestic Only
2
3
1
1.
2.
3.
DIESEL/ELECTRIC Switch
Optional Electronic High Temperature Switch LED (EEC Units with Electric Evaporator Heaters Only)
ON/OFF Switch
Electric Standby Power Receptacle—Model 50 EEC Only
21
Unit Description (Rev. 01/01)
1.
2.
3.
Manual Defrost Switch
ON/OFF Switch
PREHEAT/START Switch
Optional Remote Control Box—Model 30
1.
2.
3.
4.
DIESEL/ELECTRIC Switch
Manual Defrost Switch
ON/OFF Switch
PREHEAT/START Switch
Optional Remote Control Box—Model 50 Domestic
22
Operating Instructions
UNIT CONTROLS
1.
5.
ON/OFF SWITCH. This switch energizes the electrical
system of the unit.
a.
b.
ON position. The unit will operate in response to
the thermostat setting and the trailer air temperature.
Set the thermostat at the required temperature. Programming the thermostat to a lower temperature will
not make the unit cool faster.
OFF position. The fuel solenoid that controls the
supply of fuel is de-energized to stop the engine.
The unit will not operate.
Features of the TG-V include: thermometer, thermostat,
defrost timer, fuel saver and alarm.
NOTE: Model 50 units are also equipped with an
ON/OFF switch in the Electric Standby Power
Receptacle. The optional Cab Control Boxes and
Remote Control Boxes also contain ON/OFF
switches. All of the ON/OFF switches must be in
the ON position to allow the unit to operate.
2.
NOTE: TG-V thermostats have low voltage and open
circuit protection. If there is no power from the battery to the thermostat or if the battery leads to the
thermostat are reversed, the thermostat switches the
unit to Low Speed Cool. If the sensor circuit is open,
the unit switches to Low Speed Cool. If the battery
voltage drops below 6 Vdc, the unit will shift to Low
Speed Cool.
PREHEAT/START SWITCH. When positioned in
PREHEAT, the PREHEAT/START switch energizes the
glow plugs to aid in starting the diesel engine. When
positioned in START, the PREHEAT/START switch
energizes both the glow plugs and the starting motor.
Hold the switch on START until the engine starts to fire
and pick up speed. DO NOT release the switch from
the START position prematurely when the engine is
extremely cold.
3.
DIESEL/ELECTRIC SWITCH (Model 50 only). The
DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch disconnects the engine
controls and engine protection devices from the electrical system when placed in the ELECTRIC position.
The switch is mounted in the remote control and power
connector box.
4.
MANUAL DEFROST SWITCH. The unit can be
placed in defrost by pressing the MANUAL DEFROST
switch. The evaporator coil temperature must be below
42 F (5.6 C) before the unit will defrost.
THERMOSTAT—TG-V MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLER. The TG-V is a solid-state, programmable
microprocessor that uses external relays to control unit
operation and maintains the cargo area temperature at
thermostat setpoint.
23
6.
ELECTRONIC HIGH TEMPERATURE SWITCH
LED (EEC units with Optional Electric Evaporator
Heaters only—Model 50 only). This LED lights up to
indicate that the electronic high temperature switch is
open.
7.
DEFROST AIR SWITCH. The DEFROST AIR
SWITCH senses the air pressure difference between the
evaporator coil inlet and outlet. The switch automatically places the unit on defrost when the evaporator
temperature is below 42 F (5.6 C) and frost builds up
on the coil to a point where the air flow across the coil
is restricted.
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
8.
9.
Unit operation is controlled automatically by unit
thermostats, engine block temperature thermostat,
Battery Sentry and defrost controls.
DEFROST TERMINATION Switch. The electronic
defrost termination switch uses solid-state components
to control the defrost circuit. The switch has short circuit protection and solid state reliability. The switch is
mounted in the evaporator and controls the defrost
cycle in response to the evaporator coil temperature.
The switch is closed when the evaporator coil temperature is below 42 F (5.6 C) completing the defrost circuit
to ground and preparing the electrical system for the
defrost cycle.
The engine starts automatically whenever the thermostat calls for cooling or heating, or when the
engine block temperature drops to 30 F (0 C). The
engine is automatically stopped by the CYCLESENTRY control module when the thermostat
demand is satisfied, the battery is fully charged,
and the block temperature reaches 90 F (32.2 C).
Timers.
a.
UNLOADING TIMER (UT)—The UNLOADING
timer (UT) energizes the unloading relay (UL) for
approximately 40 seconds when the engine is first
started to reduce the load on the engine.
b.
CLUTCH TIMER (CLT)— The CLUTCH timer
(CLT) keeps the clutch relay (CLR) from energizing for 20 seconds when the engine is first started
to reduce the load on the engine. The clutch is
timed to be staged in 20 seconds earlier than the
evaporator fans.
CAUTION: With the selector switch in AUTO
START-STOP position and the unit ON/OFF switch
in the ON position, the unit may start at any time
without prior warning.
11. REMOTE CONTROL BOX (Outside) (Optional).
The switches in the remote control box energize relays
on the option board to control the operation of the unit.
The remote ON/OFF switch and the unit ON/OFF
switch must both be in the ON position for the unit to
operate. Either switch will turn the unit off.
The remote control box mounts on the truck body
beneath the unit to offer easier accessibility to unit controls. This box offers the following functions:
10. AUTO START-STOP/CONTINUOUS RUN SWITCH
(Optional). This switch selects continuous run operation or automatic start-stop operation.
a.
b.
CONTINUOUS RUN position. The unit must be
started manually with the unit ON/OFF switch and
Preheat-Start switch. After start-up, the unit operates continuously until the unit ON/OFF switch is
turned off or a unit reset switch protection circuit
shutdown occurs due to a malfunction in the fuel,
engine oil, engine coolant or unit refrigeration system.
AUTO START-STOP position. All unit starting
operations are performed automatically on thermostat demand. Starting functions such as throttle
solenoid control, preheat, and cranking are performed automatically.
24
a.
PREHEAT/START SWITCH. When pressed to
PREHEAT, the switch energizes the glow plugs to
aid in starting. When pressed to START, it energizes both the glow plugs and the starter motor.
b.
ON/OFF SWITCH. The ON/OFF switch energizes
the ON relay, activating the unit electrical system.
The control panel ON/OFF switch and the remote
ON/OFF switch must both be on in order for the
unit to operate. Either switch can stop the unit.
c.
MANUAL DEFROST. Pressing the MANUAL
DEFROST switch will initiate a defrost cycle if the
evaporator coil temperature is below 42 F (5.6 C).
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
d.
DIESEL/ELECTRIC SWITCH (Model 50 only).
Switches the unit to electric motor standby power
when placed in ELECTRIC position and power
cord is connected to the box.
Alarm. Can detect and display up to 6 alarm conditions
including sensor, microprocessor and defrost termination
failures plus engine or standby electric stoppage.
There is nothing complicated about learning to operate the
controller, but you will find that a few minutes studying the
contents of this manual and the In-Cab Controller Operating
Manual TK 40940 will be time well spent.
IN-CAB TG-V CONTROLLER
This manual is published for informational purposes only
and the information furnished herein should not be considered as all-inclusive or meant to cover all contingencies.
Display Symbols and Control Keys
In-Cab TG-V Controller
The following is a list of the display symbols and control
keys used in the In-Cab Controller. It is recommended that
you become completely familiar with the meaning of each
symbol and the function of each control key before operating the unit.
The In-Cab TG-V functions similarly to the standard unit
mounted TG-V. However, the In-Cab TG-V Controller also
has the following features:
Features include:
ON Key
Thermometer. Displays return air temperature and
(optional) discharge air temperature with 0.5 degree
accuracy.
(One) is used to turn on the controller.
NOTE: The main unit ON/OFF switch must be set to ON
before the In-Cab Controller can be turned on. The unit
engine will automatically start. Also, the In-Cab Controller must be ON before the main unit can be started.
Thermostat. Provides temperature control from -20 to 80
degrees Fahrenheit or -30 to 30 degrees Celsius, in
0.5 degree increments.
Defrost Control. When the evaporator coil is cold enough
for frost to form, defrost is automatically initiated every 4
hours during pulldown until the return air temperature is inrange. At in-range temperatures (between approximately 7
degrees above and 7 degrees below setpoint) the controller
is programmable for 1 hour or 2 to 16 hours in 2 hour increments. Defrost interval is set at the factory but can be reprogrammed by your Thermo King Dealer.
OFF Key
(Zero) is used to turn off the controller and
stop the engine or standby motor.
SELECT Key
(Cycling arrows) is used to select the various
displays which can appear on the screen.
Fuel Saver. Can be programmed to delay high speed operation for optimum fuel economy.
25
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
Display Symbols and Control Keys
(continued)
2.
HOURMETER—ENGINE. The engine hourmeter
records the total number of hours that the engine is in
operation so proper maintenance can be scheduled.
3.
HOURMETER—ELECTRIC STANDBY (Optional).
The electric standby hourmeter records the total hours
of unit operation on electric standby power.
4.
HOURMETER—TOTAL (Optional). This hourmeter
records the total number of hours the unit switch is
turned on.
5.
SIGNAL LIGHTS. The control panel lights indicate the
following:
UP Key
(Arrow pointing upward) When the setpoint
symbol is on the screen, this key is used to
increase the setpoint temperature.
DOWN Key
(Arrow pointing downward) When the setpoint symbol is on the screen, this key is used
to decrease the setpoint temperature.
ENTER Key
RED—Engine—indicates that the reset switch is open.
(Equal sign) is used to enter new information
into the controller.
YELLOW—Alternator—indicates no alternator output.
GREEN—Start-Stop—indicates the unit is operating in
the CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop mode of operation.
NOTE: The ENTER key must be pressed within 6 seconds
after releasing the UP or DOWN key to complete the setpoint change.
ORANGE—Defrost—indicates the unit is operating in
the defrost mode.
DEFROST Key
(Coil and water drops within circle) is used to
start the defrost cycle of the unit.
LOW NOISE Key
(Turtle) is used to lock out high speed operation to maintain low speed (low noise) operation.
UNIT INSTRUMENTS
1.
AMMETER (Optional). The ammeter indicates the battery charging and discharge amperage during engine
operation. The charging amperage varies according to
the needs of the battery. The ammeter also indicates the
amount of current drawn by the glow plugs during preheat.
6.
COMPOUND PRESSURE GAUGE (Optional). The
compound gauge indicates the pressure in the compressor crankcase.
7.
RECEIVER TANK SIGHT GLASS.
The receiver
tank sight glass indicates the level of refrigerant in the
receiver tank for checking the refrigerant charge.
8.
REMOTE LIGHT INDICATORS (Optional). Remote
indicator lights in a box that can be mounted on the
truck beneath the unit feature these signals:
WHITE—system is in cooling cycle.
BLUE—system is in defrost cycle.
AMBER—system is in heat cycle.
GREEN—system is in high speed heat or cool.
26
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
UNIT PROTECTION DEVICES
1.
RESET SWITCH. A thermal type manual RESET
switch protects the engine. The reset switch contains a
heater coil that is attached to a sensor switch in the
engine oil system, engine coolant system and the
CYCLE-SENTRY system (optional).
When the engine oil pressure is too low, when the
starter exceeds the cranking limit on Auto Start-Stop
operation, or when the engine coolant temperature is
too high, the coil in the reset switch starts to heat up. In
10 to 30 seconds, the switch will trip and shut down the
unit. The switch must be manually reset.
2.
CONTROL SYSTEM CIRCUIT BREAKER. Circuit
breakers located behind the control panel face trip if the
12 V dc control circuits or starting circuit overloads.
A 50 amp remote reset circuit breaker protects the unit
preheat-starting circuit.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
A 20 amp remote reset circuit breaker protects the unit
control circuit. Both breakers are reset by shutting off
the ON/OFF switch for a minute.
Cool Light
Defrost Light
Heat Light
High Speed Light
CYCLE-SENTRY Light
Not Used
A 30 amp auto reset circuit breaker protects the evaporator fan circuit.
Remote Indicator Light Box (Optional)
27
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
3.
CONTROL CIRCUIT FUSE. Located between battery
and unit control circuits. At about 60 amps, the fuse
will blow and cut battery power to the unit.
4.
HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT. The high pressure cutout
(HPCO) is a pressure sensitive switch located in the
compressor head. If the discharge pressure rises above
470 psig (3241 kPa) on R-404A units, the HPCO
switch opens the circuit to the throttle solenoid stopping the engine. Within 20 to 40 seconds, the reset
switch will trip because of low oil pressure in the
engine.
5.
HIGH PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE. The high pressure relief valve is designed to relieve excess pressure
within the refrigeration system. The valve is a springloaded piston that lifts off its seat when refrigerant
pressure exceeds 525 ± 50 psig (3620 ± 345 kPa). The
valve will reset when the pressure drops to 400 psig
(2758 kPa). The valve could possibly leak refrigerant
after it has relieved excess pressure. Tapping the valve
lightly may help the valve reseat and SEAL PROPERLY. The valve is non-repairable and requires no
adjustment. If the valve fails to reseat properly, remove
the refrigerant charge and replace the valve.
The high pressure relief valve is located on a high pressure line near the condenser. Its location is such that
when the pressure is expelled from the valve, it would
be directed away from anyone servicing the unit.
aea186
1
1.
2.
6.
2
50 Amp Circuit Breaker
20 Amp Circuit Breaker
Printed Circuit Board
28
OVERLOAD RELAY—Manual Reset (Model 50). An
overload relay protects the standby electric motor. The
overload relay opens the circuit from the line starter to
the electric motor if the motor overloads (e.g., low line
voltage or improper power supply) while the unit is on
electric standby operation.
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
7.
8.
9.
3.
EVAPORATOR HIGH TEMPERATURE PROTECTION SWITCH (Model 50 with optional Electric
Evaporator Heaters only). A HIGH TEMPERATURE
PROTECTIVE switch is located above the evaporator
coil to interrupt the heat cycle if the temperature above
the coil exceeds 150 F (66 C) during electric standby
operation.
CAUTION: Do not remove radiator cap while coolant is hot.
PREHEAT INDICATOR BUZZER. The preheat indicator buzzer is energized whenever the GLOW PLUGS
are energized.
ELECTRONIC HIGH TEMPERATURE SWITCH
(EEC Model 50 with Optional Electric Evaporator
Heaters only). The ELECTRONIC HIGH TEMPERATURE switch is located in the electric standby power
receptacle. It is connected to a temperature sensor
located in the evaporator. If the evaporator temperature
rises above 130 F (54 C), the switch opens to de-energize the heater contactor and the electric evaporator
heaters. The switch closes when the temperature falls
below 130 F (54 C) and the unit is turned off for one
second or more.
UNIT OPERATION
The following Pre-trip Inspection should be completed
before loading the truck. While the Pre-trip Inspection is not
a substitute for regularly scheduled maintenance inspections, it is an important part of the preventive maintenance
program designed to head off operating problems and
breakdowns before they happen.
FUEL. The diesel fuel supply must be sufficient to
guarantee engine operation to the next check point.
2.
ENGINE OIL. The engine oil level should be at the
FULL mark with the dipstick. Never overfill.
4.
BATTERY. The terminals must be clean. Electrolyte
should be at FULL mark.
5.
BELTS. The belts must be in good condition and
adjusted to proper tension.
6.
ELECTRICAL. The electrical connections should be
securely fastened. The wires and terminals should be
free of corrosion, cracks or moisture.
7.
STRUCTURAL. Visually inspect the unit for leaks,
loose or broken parts and other damage. The condenser
and evaporator coils should be clean and free of debris.
Check the defrost drain hoses and fittings to be sure
they are open. The damper in the evaporator outlet
must move freely with no sticking or binding. Make
sure all the doors are latched securely.
Starting Unit on Diesel Operation
Pre-trip Inspection
1.
COOLANT. The engine coolant must be above the
ADD mark and have antifreeze protection to -30 F
(-34 C). Check and add coolant in the expansion
tank.
1.
Switch the DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch to the DIESEL
position (Model 50 unit).
2.
Switch the unit ON/OFF switch to ON.
NOTE: If the unit has a remote control box, the control panel and remote box switches must both be ON.
3.
Hold the Preheat-Start switch in the PREHEAT position for the required time. The ammeter should show
glow plug discharge (optional).
Ambient Temperature
Above 60 F (16 C)
32 to 60 F (0 to 16 C)
0 to 32 F (-18 to 0 C)
Below 0 F (-18 C)
29
Preheat Time
0 minutes
1/2 minute
1 minute
2 minutes
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
Starting Unit on Diesel Operation
(continued)
•
Candy
•
Chemicals
1.
•
Film
•
All non-edible products
2.
Press PREHEAT-START switch to START position to
crank engine. Release when the engine starts. DO NOT
release the switch prematurely when the engine is
extremely cold. In cold weather, it is best to repeat preheat if the engine does not start within 15 seconds of
cranking time.
Examples of Products Normally Requiring
Continuous Run Operation of Air Flow
•
Fresh fruits and vegetables, especially asparagus,
bananas, broccoli, carrots, citrus, green peas, lettuce,
peaches, spinach, strawberries, sweet corn, etc.
•
Non-processed meat products (unless pre-cooled to recommended temperature)
•
Fresh flowers and foliage
Repeat steps 3 and 4 if the engine fails to start.
CAUTION: Never use starting fluid.
Starting CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop
Equipped Units on Diesel Operation
The above listings are not all inclusive. Consult your
grower, shipper or USDA if you have any questions about
the operating mode selection on your type of load.
Selection of Operating Modes on CYCLE-SENTRY
Equipped Units
The Thermo King CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop system
(optional) is designed to save refrigeration fuel costs. The
savings vary with the commodity, ambient temperatures and
box insulation. However, not all temperature controlled
products can be properly transported without continuous air
circulation.
Continuous Run Operation
With the selector switch in the CONTINUOUS-RUN position, the unit will operate in its regular cooling and heating
modes. Refer to Starting Instructions for Standard Units.
Auto Start-Stop Operation
Since highly sensitive products will normally require continuous air circulation, CYCLE-SENTRY units come
equipped with a selector switch for AUTO START-STOP or
CONTINUOUS RUN operation. Your selection of operation mode for the proper protection of a particular commodity should use the following guidelines.
With the selector switch in the AUTO START-STOP position, the CYCLE-SENTRY system starts the unit on thermostat demand and shuts down the unit when the box
temperature reaches the thermostat setpoint.
On CYCLE-SENTRY equipped units, the unit start-ups
may also be initiated by defrost cycle initiation or engine
block temperature switch demand.
Examples of Products Normally Acceptable for
CYCLE-SENTRY Operation
•
Frozen foods (in adequately insulated trucks)
•
Boxed or processed meats
•
Poultry
•
Fish
•
Dairy products
If defrost is initiated manually, the unit will start and run on
high speed. When the defrost cycle is complete, the unit will
run in whichever operating mode the thermostat is calling
for until the box temperature reaches setpoint.
30
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
In cold ambients, the CYCLE-SENTRY system automatically maintains engine temperature by restarting the unit if
the engine block temperature drops to 30 F (0 C). When the
unit starts up because of low engine block temperature, the
unit will run in whichever operating mode the unit thermostat is calling for until the engine block temperature rises to
90 F (32.2 C).
4.
CAUTION: With the selector switch in AUTO
START-STOP position and the unit ON/OFF
switch in the ON position, the unit may start at any
time without proper warning.
If the thermostat calls for cooling or heating, the cool or
heat light (optional) will be on and the engine will preheat if necessary, then begin cranking. The glow plugs
and the preheat buzzer are energized during the cranking period. If the engine rpm does not exceed 50 rpm
during the first 4 seconds of cranking, or if the engine
does not start after 25 seconds of cranking, the cranking
cycle terminates.
NOTE: If the engine fails to start, the unit reset
switch will open, interrupting current to the control
system approximately 30 seconds after the cranking
cycle terminates.
NOTE: Initial start-up of cold soaked units in cold
weather. Truck units equipped with CYCLE-SENTRY
should be manually started if the units have been nonoperative (turned OFF), resulting in cold soaked engine
temperatures below 30 F (0 C). Place the selector switch in
the CONTINUOUS RUN position and refer to Starting
Instructions for CONTINUOUS RUN Operation for manual starting instructions. After this initial cold start, the
selector switch can be switched to AUTO START-STOP
operation. CYCLE-SENTRY sensors will then automatically maintain temperature and provide reliable unit
restarts on demand.
5.
If the engine fails to start, place the unit switch in the
OFF position, determine and correct the cause for not
starting, then push in the reset button and repeat the
starting procedure.
Starting Units on Electric Standby Power
(Model 50 Unit)
1.
With the ON/OFF switch in the OFF position and the
high voltage power supply off, connect the power cable
to the power supply. Make sure the power supply is the
proper voltage, amperage and phase.
Fully charged batteries in good condition are essential for
reliable unit operation. This is especially true on CYCLESENTRY equipped units in cold weather.
2.
Set the thermostat at the desired temperature. Do not
set the thermostat lower than required (lowering the
thermostat setting does not make the unit cool faster).
Starting Procedure
3.
Snap the DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch to the ELECTRIC position.
1.
2.
3.
Set the thermostat at the desired temperature. DO NOT
set the thermostat lower than required (lowering the
thermostat setting does not make the unit cool faster).
CAUTION: Do not start the electric motor until the
diesel engine has come to a complete stop, disengaging the clutch.
Place the AUTO START-STOP/CONTINUOUS RUN
selector switch in the AUTO START-STOP position.
4.
Place the unit On-Off switch in the ON position. The
green indicator light will come on. (This green light
must be on at all times while the unit is on Auto StartStop operation).
31
Turn the high voltage power supply ON and momentarily snap the ON/OFF switch to the ON position.
Check for correct fan rotation by placing a small piece
of cloth or paper in front of the condenser grille. Proper
rotation will hold the cloth or paper to the grille, incorrect rotation will blow it away from the unit.
Operating Instructions (Rev. 01/01)
5.
4.
If the fan rotation is correct, leave the unit ON. If the
fan rotation is incorrect, turn off the power to the cable
and reverse the position of any two power leads on the
power cable plug. DO NOT disturb the green ground
wire. (Refer this procedure to a qualified electrical
repairman.)
DEFROST. When the unit has finished pre-cooling the
truck interior (box temperature dropped below 42 F
[5.6 C]), initiate a defrost cycle with the manual defrost
switch. Defrost cycle should terminate automatically.
Loading Procedure
NOTE: If the unit fails to run, the thermostat setting may
not demand operation. Check the unit thermometer and
compare the box temperature with the thermostat setting.
The thermostat setting must be more than 5.1 F (2.8 C)
above or 3.5 F (2 C) below the box temperature to demand
unit operation. If the thermostat setting is well above or
below the box temperature, check the overload relay reset
button on the unit to be sure the overload relay has not
tripped from overload.
1.
To minimize frost accumulation on the evaporator coil
and heat gain in the truck, make sure the unit is OFF
before opening the doors. (Unit may be running when
loading the box from a warehouse with door seals.)
2.
Spot check and record load temperature while loading.
Especially note any off-temperature product.
3.
Load product so that there is adequate space for air circulation completely around the load. DO NOT block
the evaporator inlet or outlet.
After Start Inspection
1.
2.
3.
Post Load Procedure
AMMETER (Optional). Needle should indicate
CHARGE for a short period of time after start-up.
1.
Make sure all the doors are closed and locked.
THERMOSTAT. Change the thermostat setting above
and below the box temperature to check cycle sequence
and switch differential (see “Operating Modes” under
Unit Operation).
2.
Adjust the thermostat to the desired temperature setpoint.
3.
Start the unit.
NOTE: On units equipped with CYCLE-SENTRY
Start-Stop controls, if the engine has not run long
enough to thoroughly warm up, the unit may not shut
off in the Null mode.
4.
One-half hour after loading, defrost the unit by momentarily pressing the MANUAL DEFROST switch. If the
box temperature has dropped below 42 F (5.6 C), the
unit will defrost. The defrost cycle should terminate
automatically.
PRE-COOLING. With the thermostat set at the desired
temperature, allow the unit to run for one-half to one
hour (longer if possible) before loading the truck. Precooling removes residual body heat and moisture from
the box interior and provides a good test of the refrigeration system.
Post Trip Inspection
32
1.
Wash the unit.
2.
Check for leaks.
3.
Check for loose or missing hardware.
4.
Check for physical damage to the unit.
Electronic Controls
TG-V THERMOSTAT
1
The TG-V is a programmable microprocessor controller
that uses external relays. The TG-V module is replaced as
an assembly, no internal repair is available.
For complete details, see the Microprocessor Controller
TG-V Operating and Setup Manual TK 40284-6.
Features of the TG-V Thermostat include:
Thermometer. It displays the return air temperature, and
can be programmed to display the optional discharge air
temperature with 0.1 degree accuracy.
Thermostat. It provides temperature control from -20 to
80 F (-28 to 28 C), in 0.5 degree increments.
Defrost Control. When the evaporator coil is cold enough
for frost to form, defrost is automatically initiated every 4
hours during pull-down until the return air temperature is in
range. At in-range temperatures (between approximately 7
degrees above and 7 degrees between point), the controller
is programmable for 2 to 16 hours in 2 hour increments.
Defrost interval is set at the factory but can be reprogrammed by your Thermo King Dealer. It can also be programmed to terminate defrost at 30 or 45 minutes.
9072a
2
1.
2.
Fuel Saver. It can be programmed to delay high speed operation for optimum fuel economy.
LCD
Keypad
TG-V Thermostat
Alarm. It can detect and display up to four alarm conditions
including sensor, microprocessor, and defrost termination
failures.
The keypad and the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) allow the
operator to operate the TG-V. The input and output terminals on the back of the TG-V monitor unit conditions and
control unit functions.
33
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
SINGLE TEMP IN-CAB TG-V
CONTROLLER (OPTIONAL)
Features of the Single Temp In-Cab TG-V Controller
include:
The In-Cab TG-V Controller is a microprocessor based controller that is designed to be used in Thermo King Units.
Thermometer. Displays return air temperature and
(optional) discharge air temperature with 0.5 degree accuracy.
For complete details, see the In-Cab TG-V Controller Operating and Setup Manual TK 40804-8-MS.
Thermostat. Provides temperature control from -20 to 80 F
or -30 to 30 degrees C, in 0.5 degree increments.
Defrost Control. When the evaporator coil is cold enough
for frost to form, defrost is automatically initiated every 4
hours during pull-down until the return air temperature is
in-range. At in-range temperatures (between approximately
7 degrees F [4 degrees C] above and 7 degrees F
[4 degrees C] below setpoint), the controller is programmable for 1 hour or 2 to 16 hours in 2 hour increments. The
defrost interval is set at the factory but can be reprogrammed by your Thermo King Dealer.
ARA055
Single Temp In-Cab TG-V Controller
The early versions of the Single Temp In-Cab TG-V have
the following part numbers:
•
P/N 41-1544 - 12V No Modulation
•
P/N 41-1545 - 12V Modulation
•
P/N 41-1546 - 24V No Modulation
•
P/N 41-1547 - 24V Modulation
Fuel Saver. Can be programmed to delay high speed operation for optimum fuel economy.
Alarm. Can detect and display up to six alarm conditions
including sensor, microprocessor, and defrost termination
failures plus engine or electric standby stoppage.
The software and alarm codes were updated in the first
quarter of 2000. The updated versions of the Single Temp
In-Cab TG-V have the following part numbers:
•
P/N 41-3305 - 12V No Modulation
•
P/N 41-3306 - 12V Modulation
•
P/N 41-3307 - 24V No Modulation
•
P/N 41-3308 - 24V Modulation
•
P/N 41-3309 - Isuzu
The face plate is P/N 91-8117 for all versions, except for
Isuzu.
Interconnecting harness P/N 41-346 is used for all versions.
34
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
DISPLAY SYMBOLS AND CONTROL
KEYS
The following is a list of the display symbols and control
keys on the TG-V. It is recommended that you become completely familiar with the meaning of each symbol and the
function of each control key before operating the unit.
Display Symbols
Return Air Symbol
(Arrow returning from thermometer to unit.) Indicates that
the return air temperature is being displayed.
Discharge Air Symbol
(Arrow from unit pointing at thermometer.) Indicates that
the discharge air temperature is being displayed (optional).
Setpoint Symbol
(Hand pointing to thermometer.) Indicates that the setpoint
temperature is being displayed.
Fahrenheit Symbol
(Degree symbol and letter F.) Indicates that the temperature
being displayed is in Degrees Fahrenheit.
Minus Sign
Indicates that the temperature being displayed is below
zero.
35
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Display Symbols
(continued)
Celsius Symbol
(Degree symbol and letter C.) Indicates that the temperature
being displayed is in Degrees Celsius.
Temperature
When a temperature symbol is displayed:
•
Large numbers indicate the temperature in whole
degrees.
•
A decimal point and 1/2 size number indicates temperature in tenths of a degree.
Alarm Symbol
(Exclamation point within a triangle.) When this flashing
symbol is displayed, an alarm (fault) condition has been
detected by the controller.
Alarm Code
When an alarm has been sensed and an alarm screen has
been selected by pressing the SELECT key, this two-digit
code indicates the type of alarm.
36
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Control Keys
SELECT Key
(Cycling arrows) is used to select the various displays
which can appear on the screen.
ENTER Key
(Equals sign) is used to enter new information into the controller.
UP Key
(Arrow pointing upward) When the setpoint symbol is on
the screen, this key is used to increase the setpoint temperature.
DOWN Key
(Arrow pointing downward) When the setpoint symbol is
on the screen, this key is used to decrease the setpoint temperature.
37
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
GENERAL DISPLAY INFORMATION
When the Thermo King unit is switched OFF, the controller
screen will be dark; nothing will be on the display.
When the Thermo King unit is switched ON, all symbols
and readouts will be displayed for about 5 seconds. Make
sure that all display segments are operational.
After 5 seconds the standard display will appear. This display remains on the screen during normal operation. The
standard display is set to Return Air Temperature at the
factory, however, the controller can be programmed to show
Discharge Air, Return Air, or Setpoint as the standard display.
38
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
When the Thermo King unit is switched OFF, it is normal
for the display to remain on for about 30 seconds as it
slowly fades.
NOTE: With the power off or battery disconnected, all settings are saved in the controller memory and become
active when the unit is switched ON.
39
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Displaying Operating Data
During normal operation, the standard display is on the
screen. Return Air Temperature is the factory standard
display setting (this may be changed). Other operating data
can also be displayed.
To view other operating data, repeatedly press and release
the SELECT key.
In addition to Return Air Temperature, the following data
may be displayed:
•
Discharge Air Temperature (optional)
Press for next display
•
Setpoint Temperature
Press for next display
40
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
•
Alarms
(Can be displayed only when an alarm condition has
been sensed by the controller)
When viewing a display...If no keys are pressed, the standard display will automatically reappear on the screen in
about 10 seconds.
41
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Entering the Setpoint
The setpoint temperature of the Thermo King unit can be
easily and quickly changed. To change the setpoint:
1.
Press and release the SELECT key repeatedly until the
setpoint symbol is on the screen.
2.
Press the UP or DOWN key until the setpoint is at the
correct temperature setting.
3.
•
Pressing and releasing either key repeatedly will
cause the temperature to change by .5 degree each
key press.
•
Holding either key down will cause the
temperature to scroll automatically, one degree at a
time.
To enter the new setpoint into memory: Press and
release the ENTER key within 5 seconds.
•
The display will blink once as the new setpoint is
entered into memory.
•
The new setpoint will remain on the screen for
about 5 seconds, then,
•
The standard screen will automatically appear.
CAUTION: If the ENTER key is not pressed within
5 seconds: the original setpoint will appear on the
screen for 5 seconds, the standard screen will automatically appear, and the Thermo King unit will be
controlled at the original setpoint.
1.
2.
3.
Setpoint Symbol
Setpoint Temperature
New Setpoint Temperature
42
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Displaying and Clearing Alarm Codes
When the TG-V controller senses an alarm condition, a
flashing alarm symbol appears on the display. A two digit
alarm code is used to identify the type of alarm.
1.
To display the alarm code, repeatedly press and release
the SELECT key until the alarm screen is displayed.
•
If more than one alarm has been sensed, all alarm
codes present will automatically alternate on the
screen.
•
The following alarm codes are used:
03 Return Air Sensor Failure
The Return Air Sensor has failed or is disconnected.
03A Return Air Sensor Failure
The Return Air Sensor has failed or is disconnected (Zone 2).
04 Discharge Air Sensor Failure (Optional)
The Discharge Air Sensor has failed or is disconnected.
14 Defrost Circuit Failure
The unit is still in defrost after the end of the
defrost time limit, indicating a defrost circuit
failure.
25 Battery Charging Alternator Failure
Current output from the unit alternator is NOT
being sensed.
29 Defrost Initiation Failure
This code indicates that the unit attempted to
enter defrost three times in rapid succession
indicating a shorted air switch, shorted manual
defrost switch or other defrost circuit failure.
43
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Displaying and Clearing Alarm Codes
(continued)
47 Zone 2 Evaporator Defrost Circuit Failure
Zone 2 evaporator is still in defrost after end
of the defrost time limit, indicating a defrost
circuit failure (No. Rh circuit).
74 Cold Start or Checksum Error
Test In-Cab TG-V with tester P/N 204-83.
75 Microprocessor RAM Faulty
Test In-Cab TG-V with tester P/N 204-83.
76 Microprocessor EEPROM Faulty
Test In-Cab TG-V with tester P/N 204-83.
77 EPROM Faulty
Test In-Cab TG-V with tester P/N 204-83.
87 Field Test Error
88 Microprocessor Failure
The TG-V has failed and must be replaced.
2.
To clear the alarms, press the ENTER key while the
alarm screen is showing. The alarms will clear and the
standard display will appear on the screen.
•
44
Alarms may continue to appear as the unit operates
if the alarm condition is not corrected.
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
ADDITIONAL OPERATING INFORMATION
Sensor Failure
In addition to generating an alarm, the failure of a sensor
will cause the display screen for that sensor to show a minus
sign and dashes in place of temperature. The alarm symbol,
the minus sign and the dashes will blink continuously.
Temperatures Outside of Display Range
The Microprocessor Controller TG-V is capable of displaying temperatures ranging from -40 to 99.9 F (-40 to
37.8 C). A blinking temperature display of -40 or 99.9 F
(-40 or 37.8 C) without an alarm symbol, indicates the unit
is functioning normally but the temperature being sensed is
outside of the display range of the controller.
Example: If the temperature in the cargo compartment were
110 F, the display would read 99.9 F (-37.8 C) and would
blink continuously. The display would stop blinking once
the temperature dropped below 99.9 F (-37.8 C).
45
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
GUARDED ACCESS MODE
If the controller is being replaced, the programming set-up
codes must be set to match the configuration of the unit.
The TG-V controller is pre programmed at the factory to
match the standard configuration and operating requirements of the unit.
The factory programming set-up codes can be found on the
schematic and wiring diagrams for the unit. Special changes
in the programming can be made for specific special applications.
Programming
Programming is done through the Guarded Access Mode.
The Guarded Access Mode consists of 5 screens numbered
1 through 5. Screen numbers are indicated by a 1/2 size
digit.
The Microprocessor Controller is programmed by entering
a two digit set-up code into each screen.
Set-up code 68 is the standard set-up code for Screen 1 on
CD-II MAX (NAD) units.
Programming the controller requires the following:
Thermostat Set-Up Codes
Left Digit
Right Digit
Screen
USA
EEC
6
8
9
1
1
1
1
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
4
0
1
1
5
•
Choosing the desired set-up code for each screen.
•
Entering the Guarded Access Mode.
•
Changing the set-up codes as required.
Choosing Set-up Codes
The standard set-up codes for the CD-II MAX are shown at
the left.
NOTE: The set-up code for Screen 3 can be determined by
checking the sensors themselves.
Each two digit set-up code can represent several operational
settings of the Thermo King unit.
The factory programming set-up codes can be found on the
schematic and wiring diagrams for the unit.
If the set-up codes are not available, they can be determined
using information shown later in this chapter.
46
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Before entering the Guarded Access Mode or changing setup codes:
47
1.
Choose the set-up codes for each screen.
2.
Write the set-up codes in the space provided or on a
separate piece of paper.
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Entering the Guarded Access Mode
To get to the Guarded Access Mode:
1.
Press and release the SELECT key repeatedly until the
setpoint symbol is on the screen.
NOTE: Record the setpoint so that the unit may be
returned to the original setting when programing is
finished.
1.
Setpoint Symbol
48
2.
Press the UP or DOWN key until the setpoint is at
exactly 32.0 F or 0.0 C.
3.
Press and release the ENTER key within 5 seconds to
enter the setpoint into the controller.
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
4.
Press the SELECT key until the setpoint symbol is
again on the screen. However, this time, when the setpoint symbol comes on the screen, DO NOT release the
SELECT key, hold it down.
5.
While holding down the SELECT key, press the UP
key and the DOWN key at the same time.
•
Screen 1 in the Guarded Access Mode will appear.
To select other Guarded Access screens, press and release
the SELECT key until the desired screen is on the display.
If no keys are pressed, the standard display will automatically reappear on the screen in about 10 seconds.
1.
2.
Current Setup Code
Screen Number
49
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Changing Set-Up Codes
To change the set-up code:
1.
With a Guarded Access screen on the display, press the
UP key or the DOWN key repeatedly until the desired
code is on the screen.
NOTE: Display digits cannot be set individually. The
UP or DOWN key is used to “scroll” the display until
the correct two digit code is on the screen.
2.
To enter the new set-up code into memory:
Press and release the ENTER key within 5 seconds.
1.
New Set-up Code
•
The display will blink once as the new code is
entered into memory.
•
The new code will remain on the screen for about 5
seconds and then,
•
The standard screen will automatically appear.
•
You may go to another Guarded Access screen by
pressing and releasing the SELECT key within 5
seconds of entering the new code. To change the
set-up code on other screens, repeat steps 1 and 2.
or
CAUTION: If the ENTER key is not pressed within
5 seconds: the original set-up code will appear on
the screen for 5 seconds, the standard screen will
automatically appear, and the controller will operate with the original set-up code for that screen.
NOTE: Remember to return the controller to the original
setpoint when programming is finished.
50
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Screen 1
The Microprocessor Controller should be set to save
elapsed time:
The set-up code for Screen 1 represents a combination of
the following seven settings:
1.
•
In delivery applications where the unit will be
turned ON and OFF before a normal defrost time
has elapsed.
•
In units without an air switch.
Save Elapsed Time
Elapsed time is the duration between the end of one
defrost cycle and the beginning of the next.
Elapsed time should NOT be saved in normal, overthe-road applications where the unit is run continuously
and is not frequently turned OFF and ON.
The TG-V Microprocessor Controller has a built in
defrost interval timer which can automatically initiate a
defrost cycle after a preset period of time has elapsed.
Settings:
When the Thermo King unit is switched OFF, the
defrost interval timer can be set to do one of two things:
•
•
YES = Save elapsed time.
NO = Do not save elapsed time.
It can save the time which has elapsed since the
last defrost and continue on when the unit is
restarted.
2.
If a defrost cycle is not terminated automatically, the
TG-V Microprocessor Controller terminates the defrost
cycle after the programmed period of time.
Or, it can reset and start timing again from the
beginning.
Example: Defrost interval time is set to 2 hours. The
unit is switched OFF after 1 hour (that is, a defrost
interval of 1 hour has elapsed):
•
•
Defrost Terminate Time
Settings:
30 minutes or 45 minutes.
If the elapsed time HAS been saved; when the unit
is turned back ON, the timer could initiate defrost
1 hour later. The total interval is 1 hour of elapsed
time plus 1 hour of time since the unit was turned
ON.
3.
High Speed Delay
To save fuel when the cargo compartment temperature
is in range, the TG-V Microprocessor Controller can
delay high speed heat or high speed cool for 8 minutes.
Settings:
If the elapsed time HAS NOT been saved; when
the unit is turned back ON, the timer will reset and
start timing again from the beginning. The timer
could initiate defrost 2 hours from the time the unit
was turned back ON.
YES = Delay high speed operation for 8 minutes.
NO = Do not delay high speed operation for 8 minutes.
NOTE: In order for the High Speed Delay to operate,
the 7K terminal must be used.
NOTE: Low Speed heat is only available in Continuous Run operation. In CYCLE-SENTRY, the unit
restarts and runs in High Speed Heat.
51
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Screen 1 (continued)
4.
7.
The TG-V can control Thermo King units which are
equipped with a modulation valve.
High Speed Heat Lockout
To protect frozen foods, the TG-V can lockout high
speed heat when the setpoint is below 15 F (-9.4 C).
5.
Settings:
Settings:
YES = Unit has a modulation valve.
YES = Lockout high speed heat below 15 F (-9.4 C).
NO = Unit does not have a modulation valve.
NO = Do not lockout high speed heat below 15 F
(-9.4 C).
NOTE: Units with a modulation valve must have a
discharge air sensor connected to the controller.
Fahrenheit/Celsius
If the sensor is not connected, the controller will display an alarm symbol and the alarm display will show
alarm 04 (Discharge Air Sensor Faulty).
The TG-V can display temperatures in either Fahrenheit or Celsius.
Settings:
F = Fahrenheit
C = Celsius
Directions for choosing the set-up codes for Screen 1
are on the next page.
6.
Modulation Valve
Discharge Sensor
When an optional discharge air sensor is connected to
the TG-V, the discharge air temperature can be displayed.
Settings:
YES= Discharge sensor connected, display discharge
air temperature.
NO = Discharge sensor not connected, do not display
discharge air temperature.
NOTE: If the unit does not have a discharge air sensor, but the discharge sensor setting is set to “YES”,
the controller will display an alarm symbol and the
alarm screen will show alarm 04 (Discharge Air Sensor Faulty). Instead of showing a temperature, the
discharge air screen will display dashes.
52
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Set-up Code—Screen #1
Save
Elapsed
Time
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Defrost
Terminate
Time
30 min
30 min
45 min
45 min
30 min
30 min
45 min
45 min
High
Speed
Delay
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Directions: To determine the two digit set-up code for
Screen #1:
1.
Select the code number that matches the correct combination of settings from the top table. This becomes the
left digit.
2.
Select the code number that matches the correct combination of settings from the bottom table. This becomes
the right digit.
NOTE: Factory standard settings are in bold type.
High Speed
Heat
Lockout
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Discharge
Sensor
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Modulation
Valve
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Fahrenheit/
Celsius
F
C
F
C
F
C
F
C
F
C
F
C
F
C
F
C
53
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Screen #2
Defrost intervals are set with Screen #2. A defrost interval is
the period of time between the end of one defrost cycle and
the beginning of the next.
During pull-down the defrost interval is 4 hours. Once the
unit is in-range, the defrost interval becomes the interval set
with this screen.
Defrost Time Interval Above Lockout
Sets the defrost interval for setpoint temperatures above 15 F
(-9.4 C).
Settings:
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 hours
Defrost Time Interval Below Lockout
Sets the defrost interval for setpoint temperatures below
15 F (-9.4 C).
Settings:
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 hours
Directions for choosing the set-up codes for Screen #2 are
on the next page.
NOTE: The 1 hour defrost interval is provided for checking the system and is not intended as a practical defrost
interval.
54
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Set-Up Code—Screen #2
Defrost
Time Above
Lockout
2 Hours
4 Hours
6 Hours
8 Hours
10 Hours
12 Hours
14 Hours
16 Hours
1 Hour
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Left Digit
Directions: To determine the two digit set-up code for
Screen #2.
1.
Select the code number that matches the correct setting
from the top table. This becomes the left digit.
2.
Select the code number that matches the correct setting
from the bottom table. This becomes the right digit.
NOTE: Factory standard settings are listed in the wiring
and schematic diagrams for each unit.
Defrost
Time Below
Lockout
2 Hours
4 Hours
6 Hours
8 Hours
10 Hours
12 Hours
14 Hours
16 Hours
1 Hour
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Right Digit
55
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Screen #3
NOTE: An ungraded sensor can be partially graded by
immersing the sensor in a good ice bath and then selecting
various sensor grades until the return air (or discharge
air) temperature reads 32.0 F (or 0.0 C). The sensor may
then be accurate for freezing temperature but may not be
accurate towards either extreme of the controller range.
For accuracy, the Microprocessor Controller must be
adjusted to match the unit sensors. That adjustment is done
with Screen #3.
There are two types of sensors, graded and ungraded.
NOTE: When return air and discharge air sensors are
used with a modulation control valve, graded sensors must
be used. Without modulation, the use of graded sensors is
optional.
Graded sensors are measured and presorted at the factory
into categories (grades) based on their electrical resistance.
They are marked with grades 1 through 5. Graded sensors,
regardless of grade number, are accurate to within ±.125
degrees.
NOTE: The return air sensor is the primary control sensor
and must be connected at all times.
Ungraded sensors are not sorted and therefore have a wider
possible range of resistance. They do not have grading
marks and are accurate to ±.6 degrees.
The TG-V Microprocessor Controller can be calibrated to
work with either type of sensor.
For graded sensors, set the controller to match the grade of
the sensor. Example: for a grade 4 sensor, the controller setting would be 4.
For ungraded sensors, set the controller to grade 0.
Directions for choosing the set-up codes for Screen #3 are
on the next page.
Discharge Sensor Grade (Optional)
Matches controller operation to the grade of the discharge
air sensor.
Settings:
Grades 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5
Return Sensor Grade
Matches controller operation to the grade of the return air
sensor.
Settings:
Grades 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5
56
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Set-Up Code—Screen #3
Discharge
Sensor
Grade
0
1
2
3
4
5
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
Left Digit
Directions: To determine the two digit set-up code for
Screen #3.
1.
Select the code number that matches the discharge air
sensor grade from the top table. This becomes the left
digit.
2.
Select the code number that matches the return air sensor grade from the bottom table. This becomes the right
digit.
NOTE: Factory standard settings are listed in the wiring
and schematic diagrams for each unit.
Return
Sensor
Grade
0
1
2
3
4
5
Right Digit
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
57
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Screen #4
The “standard display” is set with Screen #4.
Standard Display
The standard display normally appears on the screen. The
screen automatically returns to the standard display when
viewing of other screens is complete and no keys are
pressed for about 10 seconds.
Settings:
•
Return Air Temperature
•
Setpoint Temperature
•
Discharge Air Temperature (optional).
NOTE: This screen is available only when the Discharge
Sensor setting (Screen #1) is set to YES.
•
Alternate between Return Air Temperature and Setpoint Temperature (Return Air 30 seconds, Setpoint 5
seconds).
•
Alternate between Discharge Air Temperature and Setpoint Temperature (Discharge Air 30 seconds, Setpoint
5 seconds). This screen is available only when the Discharge Sensor setting (Screen #1) is set to YES, and
the discharge sensor is installed.
NOTE: The Left Digit is always zero.
NOTE: This screen is available only when the Discharge
Sensor setting (Screen #1) is set to YES.
58
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Directions: To determine the two digit set-up code for
Screen #4.
•
Select the code number that matches the correct standard display. The LEFT digit of the code number
becomes the LEFT digit on the screen. The RIGHT
digit of the code number becomes the RIGHT digit on
the screen.
NOTE: Factory standard settings are listed in the wiring
and schematic diagrams for each unit.
DEFROST Model Display
The purpose of this modification is to allow the default display to include a periodic indication that the system is in the
DEFROST mode.
The new selections possible on Guarded Access Screen 4
are as follows:
Screen 4 Selection
Left Digit Right Digit
Default Display
Code
Code
Return Air Temperature
0
0
Setpoint Temperature
00
1
Discharge Air Temperature
00
2
Alternate Return Air
00
3
Temperature and Setpoint
Temperature
Alternate Discharge Air
00
4
Temperature and Setpoint
Temperature
59
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Screen #5
As operation continues:
The set-up code for Screen #5 represents a combination of
the following settings:
•
In Continuous Run or CYCLE-SENTRY, if setpoint has
not been reached in eight minutes while running low
speed cool, the unit will switch to high speed cool, driving the return air temperature back down to setpoint.
•
If the unit has been running in low speed cool for less
than eight minutes and the return air temperature
reaches setpoint:
High Speed (Cool) Pull-Down
This feature provides faster temperature Pull-Down for critical cargos.
At start-up:
•
•
— Units operating in Continuous Run will switch to
low speed heat changing to low speed cool as
necessary.
In Continuous Run or CYCLE-SENTRY, to reduce the
time needed to bring cargo box temperature down to
setpoint (Pull-Down), the unit will operate in High
Speed Cool until the return air temperature reaches setpoint.
— Units operating in CYCLE-SENTRY will shut
down, restarting as necessary.
Once the return air temperature reaches setpoint:
•
— Units operating in Continuous Run will switch to
low speed cool for five seconds then to low speed
heat. The unit will then cycle between low speed
heat and low speed cool as necessary.
In Continuous Run or CYCLE-SENTRY, if the return
air temperature reaches 5.1 F (2.8 C) degrees above setpoint, the unit will immediately switch to high speed
cool, unless the Fuel Saver 8 minute Delay to High
Speed is active.
NOTE: High Speed Pull-Down will be inactive in units
with modulation that are operating in Continuous Run
above 15 F (-9C).
— Units operating in CYCLE-SENTRY will switch
to low speed cool for five seconds to allow Battery
Sentry to check the charging current. If the battery
is charged, the unit is not in defrost and the engine
block is sufficiently warm, the unit will shut-down,
restarting as necessary. If not, the unit will
continue to run switching from low speed heat to
low speed cool as necessary.
High Speed Pull-Down Fresh
The controller can initiate a High Speed Pull-Down to setpoint of fresh loads above 15 F (-9.4 C).
Settings:
YES = Enable High Speed Pull-Down to setpoint.
NO = Normal operation. Do not enable high speed pulldown to setpoint.
60
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
High Speed Pull-Down Frozen
The controller can initiate a High Speed Pull-Down to setpoint of frozen loads at or below 15 F (-9.4 C).
Settings:
YES = Enable High Speed Pull-Down to setpoint.
NO = Normal operation. Do not enable High Speed PullDown to setpoint.
2 Minute Low Speed Start (Continuous Run only)
This setting allows the engine to warm-up by running it in
low speed for 2 minutes when the unit is first started. After
2 minutes, the unit will resume normal operation.
This setting functions only while the unit is operating in
Continuous Run.
Settings:
YES = Enable 2 minute low speed start.
NO = Normal operation. Do not enable 2 minute low
speed start.
Reduced Setpoint Range
Smaller truck units are not designed to operate with a setpoint range of -20 to 80 F (-28 to 28 C). For these units the
setpoint range must be reduced to 0 to 80 F (-18 to 28 C).
This setting is programmed at the factory. Change it only
when replacing the controller, and then only to the original
factory setting for your unit.
Settings:
YES = Reduce setpoint range to 0 to 80 F (-18 to 28 C).
NO = Do not reduce setpoint range.
61
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Set-Up Code—Screen #5*
Code
Left Digit
0
Directions: To determine the two digit set-up code for
Screen #5:
1.
Left digit code number is always 0 for this screen.
2.
Select the code number that matches the correct combination of settings from the bottom table. This becomes
the right digit.
NOTE: Factory standard settings are listed in the appropriate wiring and schematic diagrams for each unit.
2 Minute
High Speed
High Speed
Low Speed
Pull-Down
Pull-Down
Start*
Frozen
Fresh
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
* Functions in Continuous Run only
Reduced
Setpoint
Range
F
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
62
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
b
C
d
E
F
Right Digit
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
In-Range Temperature Differential Setting
Directions:
The In-Range Temperature Differential Setting is set with
Screen 5. This setting determines the range used in monitering in-range and out of range conditions.
To determine the setting for Screen 5, choose the temperature differential desired for the in-range temperature interval.
The following settings are available for Fahrenheit or Celcius readouts:
Example:
•
Fahrenheit: 0.0 F (OFF), 6, 10, 14, and 18 degrees
•
Celsius: 0.0 F (OFF), 3, 6, and 10 degrees
To set an in-range temperature differential of 6 degrees
above and below the setpoint, select the number 6.
NOTE: The settings available automatically correspond to
the scale (F or C) chosen in Display 1.
In-Range Temperature Differential Setting
63
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TESTING THE TG-V THERMOSTAT
Sensor Test
Tools and Materials Required for Testing
1.
Visually check the bulb end, lead, and terminal end of
the sensor. Make sure that it is not damaged.
2.
Using an ohmmeter capable of reading at least 4000
ohms, check resistance between the sensor leads.
3.
1.
Volt/ohm meter capable of accurately reading 1/100
volt increments.
2.
Jumper Wires
3.
Three Relays, Part No. 44-5847
4.
One 12 Vdc Power Supply
Sensor resistance should be approximately 3000 to
3500 ohms. Use the following method to give the sensor a more accurate test:
5.
Mercury Thermometer
a.
Cool the sensor down to 32 F (0 C) and check the
resistance—reading should be 3266 ± 3.4 ohms.
b.
Warm the sensor up to 70 F (21.1 C) and check the
resistance—reading should be 3450 ± 6.9 ohms.
TG-V Calibration
The TG-V thermostat is permanently calibrated, and no
attempt should be made to recalibrate it. The thermostat
module is a non-serviceable item and repairs should not be
attempted. If the thermostat is found to be defective, replace
it.
Ice-Water Bath Preparation
1.
Fill an insulated container full of ice. Add enough
water to cover the top of the ice during the test procedure.
2.
Remove the sensor bulb from the unit or use a known
good sensor for testing the thermostat module.
3.
Stir the ice-water bath for one minute or until stabilized
at 32 F (0 C).
4.
Monitor the ice-water bath temperature with a mercury
thermometer during testing to ensure test accuracy.
NOTE: Before testing a questionable thermostat module,
it is a good idea to check the thermostat sensor first.
64
4.
If the sensor does not meet specifications, replace it.
5.
If the sensor does meet specifications, proceed to TG-V
thermostat bench test.
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Preparing TG-V Module for Bench Test
1.
Place the unit ON/OFF switch in the ON position. (If
the thermostat module is out of the unit, this can be
accomplished by connecting a 12 Vdc power source to
the 8 and CH terminals, 8 is connected to positive (+)
and CH is connected to negative (-).
2.
Press and release the SELECT key repeatedly until the
setpoint symbol is on the screen.
3.
Press the UP and DOWN key until the setpoint is at
exactly 32 F or 0 C.
4.
Press the ENTER key (within 5 seconds) to enter this
setpoint.
5.
With the setpoint temperature at 32 F or 0 C, press the
UP key, the DOWN key and the SELECT key at the
same time.
•
Screen #1 in the Guarded Access Programming
Mode will appear.
NOTE: Pressing the three keys at the same time can
be difficult. If it does not work the first time, return to
the setpoint screen with the setting at 32 F or 0 C and
try again. It may take several attempts.
65
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Preparing TG-V Module for Bench Test
(continued)
6.
Press the UP or DOWN key until the set-up code on
Screen #1 reads 68.
7.
Press the ENTER key.
If no keys are pressed, the standard display will automatically reappear on the screen in about 10 seconds.
66
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TG-V Module Bench Test
1.
Place the main ON/OFF switch in the OFF position.
2.
Disconnect all of the wires from the thermostat module.
3.
Connect a known good sensor (yellow jacketed) to the
terminals labelled SN on the rear of the thermostat
module.
4.
9.
To obtain accurate voltage readings during the thermostat module checkout, circuits 10T and 14T must be
tested under normal load. This is provided by connecting two Bosch relays (Part No. 44-5847) as follows:
Place the sensor bulb in a 32 F (0 C) ice bath.
6.
Connect the positive (+) 12 Vdc power source on the 8
terminal. Connect the negative (-) power source to the
CH terminal.
7.
Check for voltage between terminal 10T and CH.
Zero volts should be present. The speed relay
should be de-energized.
b.
Check for voltage between terminals 14T and CH.
Zero volts should be present. The heat relay should
be de-energized.
a.
Check for voltage between terminals 10T and CH.
Zero volts should be present. The speed relay
should be de-energized.
b.
Check for voltage between terminals 14T and CH.
12 volts should be present. The heat relay should
be energized.
11. Set the thermostat module setpoint to 36 F (2.2 C). The
thermostat is now in high speed heat.
a.
Check for voltage between terminals 10T and CH.
12 volts should be present. The speed relay should
be energized.
b.
Check for voltage between terminals 14T and CH.
12 volts should be present. The heat relay should
be energized.
Check for voltage between 8 and CH. Make sure
approximately 12 volts is present.
NOTE: Due to the accuracy of the TG-V module, the
digital readout may read a few tenths of a degree
higher than 32 F (0 C).
8.
a.
10. Set thermostat module setpoint to 33 F (0.6 C). The
thermostat is now in low speed heat.
Connect pin 86 of two relays to the negative (-) terminal of a 12 Vdc power source. Connect pin 85 of one
relay to the 10T terminal to simulate the speed relay.
Connect pin 85 of the second relay to the 14T terminal
to simulate the heat relay.
5.
Set the thermostat module setpoint to 29 F (-1.7 C). The
thermostat is now in low speed cool.
12. Turn off the power to the thermostat module.
Set the thermostat module setpoint to 24 F (4.4 C). The
thermostat is now in high speed cool.
a.
b.
13. Place a jumper wire from the 8 terminal on thermostat
module to the 7K terminal on the thermostat module.
Check for voltage between terminals 10T and CH.
12 volts should be present. The speed relay should
be energized.
14. Turn on the power to the thermostat module.
Check for voltage between terminals 14T and CH.
Zero volts should be present. The heat relay should
be de-energized.
67
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TG-V Module Bench Test
(continued)
15. Set thermostat module setpoint to 33 F (0.6 C). The
thermostat module should now be in low speed heat.
(12 volts present on terminal 14T, zero volts present on
terminal 10T). Leaving the jumper from the 8 terminal
to the 7K terminal in place, set the thermostat module
setpoint to 36 F (2.2 C).
16. Check voltage on 14T and 10T terminals.
a.
Check for voltage on terminal 14T. 12 volts should
be present. The heat relay should be energized.
b.
Check for voltage on terminal 10T. Zero volts
should be present. The speed relay should be deenergized. The thermostat module is in the eight
minute high speed lockout mode of operation.
17. At the end of eight minutes, the thermostat module
should automatically switch to high speed heat. Check
the voltage at terminal 10T after the eight minute
interval. 12 volts should be present.
18. Connect pin 86 of the third relay to the 11 terminal in
order to simulate the defrost relay. Connect pin 85 of
this relay to the positive (+) terminal of the power
source.
19. Place a jumper between the 12 terminal and the negative (-) terminal of the power supply. Place another
jumper between the 12 terminal and the 11 terminal.
The relay should energize.
20. Remove the jumper between the 12 terminal and the 11
terminal. The relay should remain energized.
21. Remove the jumper between the 12 terminal and the
negative (-) terminal of the power supply. The relay
should de-energize.
68
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TG-V Terminal Voltage Chart
Voltages must be checked with the yellow jacketed sensor
hooked across the SN terminals and the bulb placed in a
32 F (0 C) ice-water bath.
Return Air
Sensor
MOD
Disc
8
CH
29
10T
14T
SN
SN
HFL
HLO
38
7T
SP
12
11
HGV
7K
(-)
(+)
8B
Sensor
Sensor
HSC
Setpoint
24°
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
—
—
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
1.95 Vdc
12 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc
—
—
LSC
Setpoint
29°
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
—
—
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
2.00 Vdc
12 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc
—
—
LSH
Setpoint
33°
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
12 Vdc
—
—
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
2.04 Vdc
12 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc
—
—
HSC - High Speed Cool
LSC - Low Speed Cool
LSH - Low Speed Heat
HSH - High Speed Heat
69
HSH
Setpoint
36°
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
12 Vdc
12 Vdc
—
—
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
2.07 Vdc
12 Vdc
12 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc*
0 Vdc
—
—
See note below.
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TG-V Terminal Identification
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
aea957
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Basic Terminal Functions
(8) Supply Voltage From Unit To Thermostat Module
(CH) Thermostat Module Ground Circuit
(29) Force To High Speed (INPUT) During Defrost
(10T) Applies Voltage To Speed Relay Coil When Calling For High Speed
(14T) Applies Voltage To Heat Relay Coil When Calling For Heat
(SN) Connects One Lead of the Return Air Sensor to Thermostat
(SN) Connects Other Lead of the Return Air Sensor to Thermostat
70
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TG-V Terminal Identification
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
aea958
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Specialized Terminal Functions
(HFL) Force Heat Lockout
(HLO) Heat Lockout Output
(38) In-range Output
(7T) Force High Speed Cool
(SP) Setpoint Output
(12) Defrost Circuit
(11) Defrost Circuit
71
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
TG-V Terminal Identification
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
aea959
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Specialized Terminal Functions
(HGV) Hot Gas Bypass Valve
(7K) Accumulative Defrost Time and High Speed Delay Input
(-) Output to Modulation Valve Not Connected to CH Ground
(+) Output to Modulation Valve
(8B) CYCLE-SENTRY is in Operation (INPUT)
(DISC SENSOR) Connects One Lead of Discharge Air Sensor to Thermostat
(DISC SENSOR) Connects Other Lead of Discharge Air Sensor to Thermostat
72
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Field Test Procedure for Single
Temperature In-Cab TG-V Controllers
6.
Use tester P/N 204-831.
1.
Connect the end of the tester marked “SINGLE” to the
single temperature controller.
2.
Power up the controller by connecting the tester leads
to a 12 volt DC power supply.
3.
Press the controller's ON key to display all segments.
a.
b.
4.
The TURTLE icon must be displayed. If not, press
the TURTLE key. Alarm Code 19 will be recorded
if the TURTLE icon is not displayed.
a.
All other icons will be off.
b.
The red, Power Cord LED will begin to flash on
and off.
c.
All icons will then turn on for a few seconds.
d.
Then the display will count from 1 to 15.
e.
The display will then read PS for pass, or FC for
fail.
f.
Press the OFF key to exit the test.
2
1
If the ALARM icon is displayed, press the
SELECT key to display the alarm and press the
ENTER key to clear the alarm.
Press the SELECT key to display the setpoint and
adjust the setpoint to 80 F.
NOTE: The controller must be set to display temperatures in the Fahrenheit scale. The test will not work if
the controller is displaying temperatures in the Celsius scale.
5.
The display will read “FT”.
1.
2.
With the setpoint of 80 F displayed on the screen, press
the following keys simultaneously:
a.
SELECT key.
b.
UP ARROW key.
c.
TURTLE key.
Tester P/N 204-831 (Connect “Single” Side)
In-cab TG-V Controller
Connect Tester to Controller
73
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Connector Pins for Single Temperature In-Cab TG-V
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Circuit Code
HGV
8YY
MVCH
8YY
WS
14T
ACC
PC
8B
10T
38
INDL
8HB
SN
SN
CH
11
12
7T
DSN
PS
7K
29
DSN
Harness Wire Color Code
WHT/BLK/RED
WHT/VOIL
WHT/ORG
BLUE
YELLOW
WHT/BLK/ORG
WHT/BLK/YEL
WHT/RED
WHT/BRN
Circuit Description
Hot Gas Valve (Modulation Only)
On Relay (Power On)
Modulation Valve Negative (Modulation Only)
Battery Negative
On Relay (Power On)
Whisper Relay
Heat Relay
Accessory Wire to Truck Ignition
Power Cord (Electric Standby)
CLCLE-SENTRY Input
High Speed Relay
In-Range Output
WHT/BLK/VOIL
WHT/BLK/BLU
VIOLET
WHT/BLK/BRN
WHT/GRN
WHT/GREY
WHT/BRN/RED
WHITE
GREEN
WHT/BLK
BRN
WHT/YEL
WHT/BLK/GRN
BLK
WHT/BLU
GREY
ORANGE
RED
Alternator Output
High Pressure Cutout
Return Air Sensor
Return Air Sensor
Battery Negative
Defrost Relay Circuit
Defrost Termination Switch
Not Used
Discharge Air Sensor
On Relay Coil
Latching Circuit after 8D
Defrost Damper Circuit
Discharge Air Sensor
Connector on Back of Single Temperature In-Cab TG-V
74
Electronic Controls (Rev. 01/01)
Sensor Test
1.
Visually check the bulb end, lead, and terminal end of
the sensor. Make sure that it is not damaged.
2.
Using an ohmmeter capable of reading at least 4000
ohms, check the resistance between the sensor lead terminals.
3.
Sensor resistance should be approximately 3000 to
3500 ohms. Use the following method to give the sensor a more accurate test:
4.
a.
Cool the sensor down to 32.0 F (0.0 C) and check
the resistance. The reading should be 3266 ± 3.4
ohms.
b.
Warm the sensor up to 70.0 F (21.1 C) and check
the resistance. The reading should be 3450 ± 6.9
ohms.
If the sensor does not meet specifications, replace it.
AEA617
1.
2.
Band Wraps—if used, the return air sensor has yellow band wraps
and the discharge air sensor has red band wraps.
Sensor Lead Terminals
Sensor
75
76
Electrical Maintenance
ALTERNATOR WITH INTEGRAL
REGULATOR
CHARGING SYSTEM DIAGNOSTIC
PROCEDURES
Complete the following checkout procedure before replacing the voltage regulator or the alternator:
1.
2.
3.
1.
With the unit switch OFF, attach a voltmeter to terminal
SENSE and the alternator chassis. Voltmeter should
indicate battery voltage.
2.
With the unit switch ON, attach a voltmeter to terminal
EXC and the alternator chassis. Voltmeter should indicate battery voltage.
3.
To determine whether the alternator or regulator is
faulty, attach a test lead between terminal F2 and
chassis ground. Run the engine on high speed.
8D, 7K, 7KK, F1 or EXC Wire
New Style Alternator (NO F1 Terminal)
Filter Capacitor
CAUTION: Never apply battery voltage to terminal
F2.
NOTE: Alternators with integral regulators and alternators with remote regulators are not interchangeable on
units equipped with CYCLE-SENTRY operation.
NOTE: Units manufactured with CYCLE-SENTRY and
alternators with integral regulators MUST use replacement alternators with integral regulators.
CAUTION: “Full Fielding” alternators with the
integral regulator is accomplished by installing a
jumper from terminal F2 to ground. Attempting to
full-field the alternator by applying battery voltage
to terminal F2 will cause regulator failure.
a.
Full alternator output indicates the alternator is
good but the voltage regulator needs replacement.
b.
If there is LOW or NO output, the alternator is
probably faulty. However, the following items are
potential causes for not charging:
•
Check the alternator brushes.
•
Check the 2A circuit from the alternator to the
battery.
•
Properly tension the alternator belt.
•
Check the battery cable connections and the
alternator ground. They must be clean and
tight.
•
The battery must be in good condition and
must accept a charge.
•
Check for excessive or unusual amperage
draw by the unit control circuits.
NOTE: A loss of battery voltage to either terminal
EXC or terminal SENSE will cause the alternator to
stop charging.
77
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
12V ALTERNATORS WITH INTERNAL
REGULATOR SETTING
CHARGING SYSTEM
When a Thermo King unit is installed on a truck, it is often
connected to a truck battery. When both the Thermo King
unit and the truck engine are running on the truck battery,
the charging system with the higher voltage may automatically turn off the charging system with the lower voltage
output.
Immediately after start-up, the DC ALT LED may light to
indicate a discharge condition on systems with brush type
alternators. This is due to light film build-up on the alternator slip rings. The film build-up occurs primarily on units
that have been sitting unused for long periods of time. The
film should disappear after a minute or two, and the DC
ALT LED should go out.
Alternator Removal
UNIT WIRING
1.
Disconnect the battery power from the unit.
2.
Remove the wires from the alternator terminals.
3.
Remove the mounting bolts and remove the alternator.
Inspect the unit wiring and the wire harnesses during scheduled maintenance inspections for loose, chaffed or broken
wires to protect against unit malfunctions due to open or
short circuits.
Alternator Installation
GLOW PLUGS
1.
Mount the alternator to the bracket, but do not tighten
the bolts.
2.
Install the alternator drive belt, tension properly and
tighten the mounting bolts.
3.
Install the wires and nuts on the alternator terminals
and then tighten the nuts.
Glow plugs heat the combustion chamber to aid in quick
starting. The glow plugs are energized when the PREHEAT/
START switch is held on the PREHEAT or the START position or when the CYCLE-SENTRY module initiates a unit
start-up (CYCLE-SENTRY switch in the AUTO START/
STOP position).
4.
A defective glow plug (burned out) can be detected with the
unit ammeter (optional). The unit ammeter should show 21
to 25 amps discharge while the PREHEAT/START switch is
held in the PREHEAT position and the ON/OFF switch is in
the OFF position. A discharge of 21 to 25 amps means all
three glow plugs are working. If the discharge rate drops
below 21 amps on PREHEAT, at least one glow plug is bad.
Connect the battery power to the unit.
BATTERY
Inspect/clean the battery terminals and check the electrolyte
level during scheduled maintenance inspections. A dead or
low battery can be the cause of the DC ALT LED indicating
discharge due to lack of initial excitation of the alternator,
even after the unit has been boosted for starting. The minimum specific gravity should be 12.35. Add distilled water
as necessary to maintain the proper water level.
To isolate an open circuit glow plug, remove the bus bar and
test each glow plug individually with an ohmmeter or a
jumper wire and ammeter. Each glow plug should have a
resistance of approximately 1.5 ohms or a current draw of
about 8.3 amps.
78
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
NOTE: A ground or shorter circuit in the electrical
system does not cause the RESET switch to pop out.
A shorted glow plug will be indicated by the ammeter
showing a very high current draw when the PREHEAT
switch is pressed, the 50 amp circuit breaker tripping, or the
fuse link burning out. Check each glow plug, a shorted glow
plug will have very low resistance.
HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE SWITCH
(HWT)
The HWT will close and trip the RESET switch if the coolant temperature is greater than 220 F (104 C). Use a continuity tester to check the switch, and use a coolant
temperature gauge to check the temperature.
ENGINE RESET SWITCH
The engine is protected by a MANUAL RESET switch. The
RESET switch is attached to a two sensors. One sensor
switch is in the engine oil system, the other is in the engine
cooling system.
If either sensor switch is grounded due to an abnormal condition (low oil pressure, or high water temperature), the RESET
switch will trip and stop the engine in about 40 seconds.
The RESET switch must be replaced if it is defective.
1.
Remove the 20A wire from the HWT.
2.
Run the unit until it reaches normal operating temperature, approximately 180 F (82 C). There should be no
continuity from the HWT to ground.
3.
If the engine runs hot and the RESET switch does not
trip, run the unit until it reaches 220 F (104 C). The
HWT should have continuity to ground.
Conditions that cause the RESET switch to trip:
1.
Engine coolant (water) temperature over 220 F (104 C).
2.
Engine oil pressure below 10 psig (69 kPa).
3.
Lack of fuel to the engine. The LOW OIL PRESSURE
switch will cause the RESET switch to trip after the
engine stops.
Replace the switch as necessary.
ENGINE LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
(LOP)
Engine oil pressure should rise immediately on starting,
causing the OIL PRESSURE switch to open. If the oil pressure drops below 10 ± 3 psig (69 ± 21 kPa), the switch will
close and trip the RESET switch and stop the engine. A continuity tester is needed to check the OIL PRESSURE
switch.
NOTE: If the ON/OFF switch(es) are in the ON position, if the CYCLE-SENTRY switch is in the CONT
RUN position, and if the engine is not running; the
LOW OIL PRESSURE switch will cause the RESET
switch to trip.
4.
High pressure in the refrigeration system. The LOW
OIL PRESSURE switch will cause the RESET switch
to trip after the high pressure cutout stops the engine.
5.
RESET switch becomes defective. The switch may get
to a point where it will open due to vibration.
6.
A ground fault in the 20 or 20A wires to the sensor
switches is also a possible cause.
79
1.
Remove wire 20A from the switch.
2.
Continuity tester should indicate a complete circuit
between the terminal and ground.
3.
Start the engine. Tester should show an open circuit
between the terminal and ground.
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
ENGINE LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
(continued)
FUSE LINK
The fuse link protects the electrical system if a circuit
breaker fails to open. If the fuse link burns out, check for a
grounded 2 wire or for any of the conditions that would
cause one of the circuit breakers to open. Replace the defective circuit breaker and replace the fuse link.
Repair consists of replacing the switch.
UNLOADING TIMERS (UT)
The unloading timer (UT) energizes the unloading relay
(UR) for approximately 40 seconds when the engine is first
started to reduce the load on the engine. The unloading relay
opens the 7K-7KC circuit, which supplies power to the
EXC terminal on the alternator.
Engine Low Oil Pressure Switch
CIRCUIT BREAKERS
This de-energizes the field coil, which keeps the alternator
from charging and allows the alternator to turn freely. The
unloading relay also opens the INDL-FR circuit, which deenergizes the fan relay (FR). This de-energizes the fan
motors to reduce the current draw on the battery while the
alternator is not charging. If the UT is defective, it may be
difficult to start the engine.
Main Circuit Breaker
This 50 amp auto reset circuit breaker protects 2A, the main
power circuit.
If the circuit breaker opens:
1.
Check for a short in one of the glow plugs.
2.
Check for a ground in the 2A or H circuits.
Testing the Unloading Timer
1.
Place an ON/OFF switch in the OFF position, place the
CYCLE-SENTRY switch in the CONT RUN position,
and place the DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch in the DIESEL position.
2.
Disconnect the unloading timer wires (BLU and ORG)
from the main wire harness (BLU and 7K) at the two
pin connector.
3.
Check the resistance between the BLU wire in the main
wire harness and ground. If the resistance is more than
100 ohms, check the BLU wire to the unloading relay,
the unloading relay coil, the H circuit, and the glow
plugs for bad connections or opens.
Control Circuit Breaker
This 20 amp auto reset circuit breaker protects the unit control circuits.
If the circuit breaker opens, check the unit for a grounded
wire or a grounded condition in a relay or solenoid.
Evaporator Fan Circuit Breaker
This 25 amp auto reset circuit breaker protects the evaporator fan circuits.
If the circuit breaker opens, check the evaporator fans, and
the 2C and EF circuits.
80
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Partial Schematic
4.
5.
The clutch timer (CLT) keeps the clutch relay (CLR) from
energizing for 20 sec when the engine is first started to
reduce the load on the engine. The clutch is timed to be
staged in 20 seconds earlier than the evaporator fans. The
clutch relay is energized by 7K-7MC through the clutch
timer. The clutch relay pulls in and supplies power to the
compressor clutch through the (CLR) from 2C to CLU.
Place the ON/OFF switch(es) in the ON position and
check for battery voltage at the 7K wire in the main
wire harness. If battery voltage is not present or if it is
low, check the 7K circuit and the other circuits and
components back to the battery for bad connections or
opens.
6.
Place the ON/OFF switch in the OFF position.
7.
Connect the unloading timer wires to the main wire
harness at the two pin connector. Attach one lead of a
voltmeter to the ORG wire and attach the other lead to
the BLU wire.
8.
CLUTCH TIMER (CLT)
Hold the PREHEAT/START switch in the PREHEAT
position and check for battery voltage at the BLU wire
in the main wire harness. If battery voltage is not
present or if it is low, check the H circuit, the PREHEAT/START switch, and the 2A circuit for bad connections or opens.
Testing the Clutch Timer (CLT)
Place the ON/OFF switch in the ON position and check
the voltage between the ORG and BLU wires. No voltage or very low voltage should be present when the
ON/OFF switch is first turned on. Approximately 40
seconds after the ON/OFF switch is turned ON, battery
voltage should appear between the ORG and BLU
wires. If battery voltage is present when the ON/OFF
switch is first turned ON, or if battery voltage does not
appear approximately 40 seconds after the ON/OFF
switch is turned ON, the unloading timer is defective
and must be replaced.
81
1.
Place the ON/OFF switch in the OFF position, place
the CYCLE-SENTRY switch in the CONT RUN
position, and place the DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch in
DIESEL position.
2.
Disconnect the clutch timer wires (BLU and ORG)
from the main wire harness (7MC and 7K) at the two
pin connector.
3.
Check the resistance between the BLU wire in the main
wire harness and ground. If the resistance is more than
100 ohms, check the 7MC wire to the clutch relay, the
clutch relay coil, the H circuit and the glow plugs for
bad connections for opens.
4.
Hold the PREHEAT/START switch in the PREHEAT
position and check for battery voltage at the 7MC wire
in the main wire harness. If battery voltage is not
present or if it is low, check the H circuit, PREHEAT/
START switch and the 2A circuit for bad connections
or opens.
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Testing the Clutch Timer
(continued)
5.
Place the ON/OFF switch(es) in the ON position and
check for battery voltage at the 7K wire in the main
harness. If battery voltage is not present or if it is low,
check the 7K circuit and the other circuits and components back to the battery for bad connections or opens.
6.
Place an ON/OFF switch in the OFF position.
7.
Connect the clutch timer wires to the main wire harness
at the two pin connector. Attach one lead of a voltmeter
to the ORG wire and attach the other lead to the 7MC
wire.
8.
drop the evaporator coil temperature below 42 F (5.6 C).
Press the MANUAL DEFROST switch. The unit should
shift from the cool cycle to the defrost cycle.
If the unit continues to cool, double check the evaporator
coil temperature and refer to the Defrost Cycle Checkout
Procedure.
The AIR switch setting should be checked annually. Refer
to the Air Switch Testing and Adjustment.
Defrost Cycle Diesel Operation
The Defrost cycle can be initiated with the MANUAL
DEFROST switch, by the AIR switch, or by the defrost
timer in the TG-V when the DEFROST TERMINATION
switch is closed.
Place the ON/OFF switch in the ON position and check
the voltage between the ORG and BLU wires. No voltage or very low voltage should be present when the
ON/OFF switch is first turned ON. Approximately 20
seconds after the ON/OFF switch is turned ON, battery
voltage should appear between the ORG and BLU
wires. If battery voltage is present when the ON/OFF
switch is first turned ON, or if battery voltage does not
appear approximately 20 seconds after the ON/OFF
switch is turned ON, the clutch timer is defective and
must be replaced.
The initiation of the Defrost cycle energizes the defrost
relay, which energizes the 26 circuit, the DEFROST light,
and the low speed defrost relay, and de-energizes the fan
relay.
The 26 circuit energizes the LLS and the HGS. This diverts
heated refrigerant vapor to the evaporator coil, melting any
accumulated frost. The evaporator fans are de-energized to
hold the heat within the evaporator and prevent warm air
from passing over the load. The throttle solenoid is de-energized so the unit runs in low speed.
DEFROST SYSTEM
NOTE: The unit will not defrost during normal unit operation unless the Defrost cycle is initiated while the evaporator temperature is below 42 F (5.6 C).
CAUTION: CYCLE-SENTRY Equipped Units—
Place the CYCLE-SENTRY switch in the CONT
RUN position before performing any diagnosis and
service operations on the unit. The unit may start at
any time without prior warning if the ON/OFF
switch is in the ON position and the CYCLE-SENTRY switch is in the AUTO START/STOP position.
The DEFROST TERMINATION switch will open and deenergize the defrost relay when the frost has melted and the
evaporator temperature rises above 52 F (11.1 C). The thermostat then determines the unit’s mode of operation.
The unit should be run through a defrost cycle during After
Start Inspections and during scheduled maintenance inspections to test defrost system components. To check the
defrost cycle, run the unit on cool and set the thermostat to
82
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Defrost Cycle Electric Operation
(Model 50 Units)
Unit Does Not Defrost
1.
The Defrost cycle on electric standby operation is similar to
defrost on diesel operation. An optional heat contactor,
HIGH TEMPERATURE CUTOUT switch, and electric
heater strips can be added for increased defrosting capability. The Model 50 EEC uses an ELECTRONIC HIGH
TEMPERATURE switch instead of the HIGH TEMPERATURE CUTOUT switch.
Check the evaporator temperature:
Make sure the evaporator temperature is actually below
42 F (5.6 C) if the unit will not defrost. Use a test thermometer to check the evaporator temperature.
2.
Check the operation of the DEFROST TERMINATION switch:
If the unit fails to defrost, place a jumper wire between
the 12 terminal and the CH terminal on the switch panel
board. Press the MANUAL DEFROST switch. If the
unit shifts to defrost, check the 12 wire to the DEFROST
TERMINATION switch for an open and check for a
defective DEFROST TERMINATION switch.
The electric heater strips are energized by the heater contactor and the 26 circuit. The HIGH TEMPERATURE CUTOUT switch or ELECTRONIC HIGH TEMPERATURE
switch must be closed to energize the heater contactor. The
heater strips are also energized when the unit is in heat.
If the unit still fails to defrost, move to step 3.
Defrost Cycle Checkout Procedure
3.
CAUTION: CYCLE-SENTRY Equipped Units—
Place the CYCLE-SENTRY switch in the CONT
RUN position before performing any diagnosis and
service operations on the unit. The unit may start at
any time without prior warning if the ON/OFF
switch is in the ON position and the CYCLE-SENTRY switch is in the AUTO START/STOP position.
Check the MANUAL DEFROST switch:
If the unit failed to defrost, place a jumper wire
between the 11 terminal and the CH terminal on the
switch panel board. If the unit shifts to defrost immediately, replace the MANUAL DEFROST switch.
If the unit does not shift to defrost, move to step 4.
4.
To check the Defrost cycle, run the unit on cool until the
evaporator coil temperature is below 42 F (5.6 C). Push the
MANUAL DEFROST switch.
Check the 11 circuit:
If the unit failed to defrost, check for an open in 11 circuit between the switch panel board and the relay
board. If the 11 circuit is intact, move to step 5.
If the unit shifts to defrost momentarily but shifts out of
defrost when the switch is released, check the TG-V thermostat, and the 11 and 12 wires to the TG-V.
5.
Check the defrost relay:
If the unit fails to defrost, check the 8 circuit at the
defrost relay socket for 12 volts. If the 8 circuit has 12
volts, the defrost relay is defective and should be
replaced. A lack of voltage indicates an open in the 8
circuit.
If the unit will not shift to defrost, or if the Defrost cycle
will not terminate, see the following defrost checkout procedures.
CAUTION: Do not forget to remove the jumper
wires from the unit after checking or testing unit
components.
6.
83
If the defrost relay works, the DEFROST INDICATOR
light comes on and the fans stop, but the unit continues
to cool; check the 26 circuit, the LLS, and the HGS.
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Defrost Cycle Checkout Procedure
(continued)
Unit Continually Fails to Terminate Defrost In Less
than 45 Minutes
If the unit continually fails to complete the Defrost cycle in
less than 45 minutes and cycles between cool and defrost,
check the evaporator coil temperature, LLS, HGS, refrigerant charge, fan relay, DEFROST TERMINATION switch,
and the 12 circuit.
Unit Will Not Terminate Defrost
If the DEFROST TERMINATION switch does not open
and terminate defrost less than 45 minutes after defrost was
initiated, the TG-V should terminate defrost in 45 minutes.
If the unit stays in defrost longer than 45 minutes, code 14
will generate.
1.
Be sure the evaporator temperature is actually above 52
F (11.1 C) if the unit will not terminate defrost. Use a
test thermometer to check the temperature. If the evaporator temperature does not rise enough to bring the
unit out of defrost, the LLS or the HGS may be faulty,
or the unit may be low on refrigerant.
Unit Sticks In Defrost Indefinitely
If the unit remains stuck in defrost indefinitely, check the
defrost relay, the 11 and 11A circuits and the TG-V thermostat.
1.
Unplug the defrost relay and check the 11 and 11A circuits:
To check the refrigerant charge, refer to Refrigerant
Charge in the Refrigeration Maintenance Section.
Unplug the defrost relay and check the A slot in the
defrost relay socket for continuity to CH (ground). If
there is no continuity from the A slot to CH (ground),
replace the defrost relay. If there is continuity from the
A slot to CH (ground), check the 11 and 11A circuits
for a short to ground. If no short is found, move to
step 2.
2.
Check the evaporator temperature:
2.
Check the operation of the DEFROST TERMINATION switch.
If the unit will not come out of Defrost, disconnect the
12 wire from the DEFROST TERMINATION switch.
If the unit shifts back to cool, the DEFROST TERMINATION switch is not opening and should be replaced.
If the unit remains in defrost, move to step 3.
Check the TG-V thermostat:
3.
The integral defrost timer in the TG-V thermostat
should terminate the defrost cycle after 45 minutes
regardless of the evaporator temperature or amount of
frost or ice on the evaporator coil. If not, test the TG-V
and replace it if necessary.
Check the and 12 circuit for a ground:
If the unit remains in defrost, use an ohmmeter to check
the 12 wire for a ground. If a 12 wire is grounded, find
the grounded portion and repair it.
84
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Defrost System Components
MANUAL DEFROST Switch
The MANUAL DEFROST switch is located on the unit
switch panel board. Pressing the MANUAL DEFROST
switch initiates the Defrost cycle if the DEFROST TERMINATION switch is closed.
DEFROST TERMINATION Switch
The electronic DEFROST TERMINATION switch uses
solid state components to control the Defrost cycle. The
switch is mounted in the evaporator and controls the Defrost
cycle in response to the evaporator coil temperature. The
switch is closed when the evaporator coil temperature is
below 42 F (5.6 C), completing the defrost circuit to ground
and preparing the electrical system for the Defrost cycle.
DEFROST TERMINATION Switch
DEFROST TERMINATION Switch Bench Test
1.
Connect a test light between the screw terminal on the
switch and the positive battery terminal.
NOTE: Attempting to test the electronic DEFROST
TERMINATION switch with an ohmmeter is generally not satisfactory because of the low voltage available at the meter leads.
When the unit does shift into a Defrost cycle, the fans stop,
and heat from the hot refrigerant gas melts the frost from the
evaporator coil. The switch opens and terminates the
Defrost cycle when the evaporator coil temperature rises to
52 F (11.1 C).
2.
Connect the negative lead of the switch to the negative
battery terminal.
Installation
3.
Raise the temperature of the DEFROST TERMINATION switch above 52 F (11.1 C). The light should be
off indicating an open switch.
4.
Cool the DEFROST TERMINATION switch below 42
F (5.6 C). The light should come on indicating the
switch has closed.
The proper polarity must be observed when installing the
DEFROST TERMINATION switch. The wire from the
defrost thermostat is negative and must be attached to the
chassis ground of the unit. This chassis ground wire must be
grounded on a screw separate from the switch mounting
screws or an improper ground may result. The 12 wire from
the unit attaches to the terminal mounted solid on the
switch. If the polarity is reversed on the device, it will conduct continuously and act like a switch that is stuck closed.
NOTE: Allow adequate time for the temperature
change to saturate the switch before performing the
test.
85
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Defrost Relay
The defrost relay controls the operation of the unit on the
defrost cycle. When the AIR switch, the TG-V defrost
timer, or the MANUAL DEFROST switch complete the circuit through the DEFROST TERMINATION switch to
ground, the defrost relay pulls in to initiate defrost and energize the DEFROST light. A holding circuit in the TG-V
keeps the unit on defrost until the DEFROST TERMINATION switch opens.
3.
Connect the test equipment (P/N 204-442 and P/N 204494) to the hose fitting on the side of the AIR switch
stamped BLACK.
4.
Pressurize the hose until the continuity tester indicates
a completed circuit. Now read the dial of the test gauge.
This is the setpoint of the AIR switch (correct reading
is 0.50 ± 0.05 in. [12.7 ± 1.3 mm] H2O). Release the
pressure.
5.
AIR Switch
If the switch is out of calibration, pressurize the hose
again until the tester indicates 0.50 in. (12.7 mm) H2O.
The AIR switch automatically places the unit on defrost
when ice accumulation on the evaporator coil builds up to a
point where the air flow across the coil is restricted.
Turn the adjustment screw until the switch closes and
the continuity tester indicates a completed circuit with
the gauge reading of 0.50 in. (12.7 mm) H2O. Release
the pressure.
Restricted air flow results in a pressure difference between
the evaporator coil inlet and outlet. The AIR switch senses
the pressure differential across the coil and initiates the
Defrost cycle.
The AIR switch is preset at the factory. Normally readjustment is not necessary unless the switch has been tampered
with or does not function properly due to factors affecting
air circulation, such as bulkhead construction and duct work
AIR Switch Testing and Adjustment
Before testing or adjusting the AIR switch, check the clear
plastic tubing and black plastic tubing to the evaporator coil.
Make sure they are not obstructed or crushed. Check the
probes in the evaporator housing to be sure they are not
obstructed.
1.
2.
6.
Repeat the test procedure several times to be sure the
setting is correct.
7.
Remove the test equipment. Connect the wire and air
sensing tubes to the switch. The BLACK hose from the
high pressure or air inlet side of the evaporator coil
goes on the hose fitting on the side of the AIR switch
stamped BLACK. The CLEAR hose from the low pressure or air outlet side of the evaporator coil goes on the
hose fitting on the side of the AIR switch stamped
CLEAR.
NOTE: Route hoses for continuous slope to avoid condensate traps.
If too much frost continues to accumulate before defrost is
initiated, decrease the pressure setting. Turn the adjustment
screw counterclockwise.
Remove plastic sensing tubing from both sides of the
AIR switch.
If defrost occurs with too little frost accumulation, increase
the pressure setting. Turn the adjustment screw clockwise.
Disconnect one wire at the switch terminal. Connect a
test light or continuity tester to the two terminals used
on the switch.
86
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Measuring Evaporator Coil Pressure Differential
If the AIR switch is initiating defrost too often even though
the AIR switch is adjusted properly, the tubing is routed correctly, and the probes are positioned correctly, the air flow
through the evaporator may be restricted.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
Run the unit through a Defrost cycle to clear the evaporator coil of frost.
2.
Remove the plastic sensing tubes from the AIR switch.
3.
Connect a Magnehelic pressure gauge (P/N 204-442) to
the plastic sensing tubes.
Continuity Tester
Adjustment Screw
Squeeze Bulb (P/N 204-494)
Pressure in Inches of Water (P/N 204-442)
Air Switch Testing and Adjustment
87
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
4.
Run the unit in high speed cool and measure the evaporator coil pressure differential. If the pressure differential of the clear coil is more than one half of the AIR
switch setpoint, the evaporator coil is restricted and
must be cleaned.
5.
Remove the test equipment. Connect the air sensing
tubes to the switch. The BLACK hose from the high
pressure or air inlet side of the evaporator coil goes on
the hose fitting on the side of the AIR switch stamped
BLACK. The CLEAR hose from the low pressure or
air outlet side of the evaporator coil goes on the hose
fitting on the side of the AIR switch stamped CLEAR.
with a three-phase electric motor and a phase conversion
system. This electric motor is the same 5/4.2 hp (3.7/3.1
kW) motor used in units with a three-phase electric standby
option. The phase conversion system enables the threephase electric motor to operate using power from a singlephase power source.
NOTE: The suction pressure regulator must be set at a
maximum of 25 psig (172 kPa) on these single-phase
units. A higher setting will overload the electric motor. To
check the suction pressure regulator setting, run the unit
on defrost and observe the suction pressure.
The overload relay is set at 18 amps. A higher setting may
not provide adequate protection.
CHARGING SYSTEM (12 VDC)
Voltage taps (230 volt or 208 volt) for the transformer are
located on the test strip in the control panel. To make sure
the unit operates properly, wire L1A should be connected to
the voltage tap that matches the voltage of the power source.
Wire L1A is normally connected to the 208 volt tap.
Immediately after start-up, the LED or ammeter (optional)
may show a discharge condition on systems with brush type
alternators. This is due to a light film build-up on the alternator slip rings. The film build-up occurs primarily on units
that have been sitting unused for long periods of time. The
film should disappear after a minute or two, and the LED or
ammeter (optional) should show a high charge rate that will
continue until the battery voltage is brought back up to normal. Under normal running conditions, the ammeter will
show a slight charge condition. If the ammeter shows a discharge after start-up, check the alternator belt tension and
all charging circuit connections including the battery.
CONVERSION SYSTEM
The phase conversion system itself consists of a start system
and a run system. The start system is energized by the high
current draw that is present while the motor is starting under
a load. Once the motor is running at normal speed and the
current draw has dropped, the start system is de-energized
and the run system is solely responsible for the phase shift.
The run system is always connected to the motor circuit, but
it does not affect the circuit while the start system is energized because the start capacitors have much larger capacitance and dominate the run capacitors.
NOTE: On installations where the CD-II MAX unit is
connected to the truck battery and both units are running—it is normal for the unit charge LED or optional
ammeter to indicate a discharge condition while the truck
engine is running because of the truck’s higher voltage
charge rate.
Start System
CD-II MAX Units Equipped with a Three-Phase
Electric Motor and a Phase Converter That
Operates on Single-Phase Power
The components of the start system are:
•
a current relay
The CD-II MAX Model 50 units that are ordered with the
single-phase 220 volt electric standby option are equipped
•
a motor start relay
88
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
•
a motor start contactor
•
a filter capacitor
•
two start capacitors (400 to 480 µF each)
•
two start bleed down resistors (180 k ohms each)
Single-phase power is available at L1 and L2. L1 and L2
pass through the motor contactor and become L1A and
L2A. L1A passes through the overload relay to become T1.
L2A passes through the overload relay to become L2B. L2B
passes through the overload relay to become T2.
The three-phase motor has two separate sets of windings
with three windings in each set. Branches of T1 are connected directly to the first winding in each set. A branch of
T2 is connected directly to the second winding in one set.
Another branch of T2 passes through the control coil of the
current relay and becomes T2A, which is connected to the
second winding in the other set.
89
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
First and Second-Phase Connections
L1 and L2 supply power directly to the first and
second windings in both sets of windings in the motor
When the motor is starting under a load, the current in T1
and T2 climbs to a fairly high rate. When the current in T2T2A passes through the control coil of the current relay
exceeds 27 amps, the current relay is energized and its contacts close.
A branch of T2 passes through the motor contactor to
become T3. A branch of T3 passes through the motor start
contactor and a start capacitor to become T3E, which is connected to the third winding in one set. Another branch of T3
passes through the motor start contactor and a start capacitor to become T3F, which is connected to the third winding
in the other set.
90
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Motor Start Contactor Control Coil Circuit
7EA energizes the motor start contactor through the start
relay when the current in T2-T2A exceeds 27 amps
A branch of wire 7EA also supplies control voltage to one
side of the motor start relay contacts. When the motor start
relay is energized, control voltage passes through the closed
contacts and wire 7EB to energize the motor start contactor.
Wire 7EA supplies control voltage from the unit to the current relay at terminal 4. When the current relay is energized,
control voltage passes through the contacts to terminal 2
and wire 7EB to energize the motor start relay. The C3
capacitor, which is connected in parallel with the control
coil of the motor start relay, works with the motor start relay
to act as a smoothing device to reduce chatter in the motor
start contactor.
The contacts in the motor start contactor close when it is
energized through the motor start relay. T3E and T3F are
energized and the start capacitors provide the phase shift
and boost in power necessary to start the motor under a
load.
91
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Third Phase Connection During a Start
L2 supplies power to the third windings in
both sets of motor windings through the start
second windings in both sets of windings in the motor
Run System
As the motor approaches normal running speed, the current
through T2-T2A drops. When this current drops below 22
amps, the current relay is de-energized. This de-energizes
the motor start relay, the motor start contactor and the start
capacitors. The start system is now disconnected from the
motor circuit and the run system provides the phase shift
necessary to operate the motor at normal running speed.
The components of the run system are:
92
•
a run transformer
•
two run capacitors (60 µF each)
•
two run bleed down resistors (560 k ohms each)
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Third Phase Connection While Running Normally
L1 and L2 supplies power to the third windings in
both sets of motor windings through the run
transformer and the run capacitors
The run transformer, run capacitors, and start capacitors are
located in a control box under the motor pedestal. These
components can be accessed by removing the motor and
pedestal assembly from the unit’s condenser frame. The
wiring harness connected to the motor is long enough to
allow the motor and pedestal assembly to be set beside the
unit and test run if necessary.
The primary winding of the run transformer is connected to
L1A on one side and to L2A on the other side. A branch of
T3 passes through one of the secondary windings on the run
transformer and one of the run capacitors to become T3E,
which is connected to the third winding in one set of the
motor windings. Another branch of T3 passes through the
other secondary winding of the run transformer and the run
capacitor to become T3F, which is connected to the third
winding in the other set of motor windings. The run transformer and the run capacitors combine to provide a phase
shift and power needed to operate the motor at its normal
running speed.
The current relay, motor start relay, motor start contactor,
and a test point strip are located in the unit’s main control
box. The test point strip is used to diagnose problems associated with the run transformer, the run capacitors, and the
start capacitors.
93
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Troubleshooting the Phase Conversion
System
Test 2. Run the motor with single-phase power and the
phase conversion system connected to the motor.
If the electric motor does not run properly, first check the
line voltage, the motor contactor, and the motor overload
relay. If these are all acceptable, test the electric motor to
narrow down the possible causes for the problem. See the
Troubleshooting Chart for the individual component tests.
Remove the electrical connection box cover on the motor,
and check and record the current readings in a copy of the
following chart.
Wire
T1
T1
T2
T2A
T3E
T3F
Electric Motor Tests
Test 1. Run the motor with three-phase power.
Disconnect the T1, T2, T2A, T3E, and T3F wires from the
motor and connect three-phase power directly to the motor.
Connect L1 to leads 1 and 7, connect L2 to leads 2 and 8,
and connect L3 to leads 3 and 9. Start and run the unit.
Check and record the voltage and current readings in a copy
of the following chart.
Wires
L1-L2
L2-L3
L3-L1
Voltage
Wire
Start
Current
(Motor
Lead)
(1)
(7)
(3)
(9)
(2)
(8)
Start
Current
Run
Current
The electric motor has two sets of windings. This test separates the sets.
The start current should begin at 40 to 45 amps, and then
drop off to approximately 20 amps in 1 to 3 seconds (in
wires T2 and T2A). After 3 seconds, the run current should
stabilize at 4 to 8 amps (in each of the six wires).
Run
Current
L1
L2
L3
Circuit T2A contains the current relay, which controls the
motor start contactor. If the start current is in the proper
range but the motor does not shift to run after 3 seconds, go
to Test 3. If the start or run currents are very uneven, go to
the start or run capacitor checks in the Troubleshooting
Chart.
The ideal voltage is 208 to 235 volts AC and the voltage
should not vary more than 10% between the sets of wires. If
the voltages are out of these ranges, check the power source.
The start current should be approximately 75 amps.
NOTE: Wire L1A should be connected to the transformer
voltage tap that matches the line voltage of the power
source. High voltage on the 208 volt tap will cause high
run currents.
The run current should not exceed 14.5 amps.
The current should not vary more than 10% between wires.
If the run current is higher than 14.5 amps in all three wires,
check the suction pressure regulator setting before replacing
the motor. Check the setting of the suction pressure regulator by observing the suction pressure while the unit is running in defrost. If the suction pressure is higher than 25 psig
(172 kPa), the suction pressure regulator must be adjusted
or replaced.
Test 3. The unit starts but does not shift to the run system.
If the motor starts correctly but the current remains at
approximately 20 amps after 3 seconds, the start system is
not being de-energized. Use the following procedure.
Replace the motor if currents are out of these ranges.
94
1.
Locate the current relay in the main control panel.
2.
Disconnect the 7EA and 7EB wires.
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
3.
Install a switch between the 7EA and 7EB wires.
4.
Close the switch between the 7EA and 7EB wires and
start the motor.
5.
Wait 3 seconds and then open the switch between the
7EA and 7EB wires.
a.
If the motor does not shift to run, check for a faulty
motor start relay or a faulty motor start contactor.
b.
If the motor shifts to run, check for a faulty current
relay or an overload on the motor.
c.
If the motor shifts to run but then slows down or
stops, check for a faulty transformer or faulty run
capacitors.
See the Troubleshooting Chart for the individual component
tests.
95
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
NOTE: All amperage and voltage measurements should be taken with the unit turned ON and the motor running or
attempting to start. Most of the voltage measurements can be taken inside the unit control box, from the components in the
high voltage tray and from the test point strip. The voltage measurements associated with the components under the motor
pedestal should be taken at the test point strip before checking the components and connections under the pedestal. The
overload relay will trip if the motor does not start shortly after the motor contactor is energized.
PROBLEM/PROBABLE CAUSE
TEST/SOLUTION
Motor Does Not Start/Low Line Voltage
Check the power supply voltage at L1 and L2. The voltage
should be between 195 and 230 volts. If not, check the power
cord, the plug, and the main building power supply. / Repair as
necessary.
— / Motor Contactor
Check to see that the motor contactor closes when energized. If
not, check the control circuit and control coil. If the contactor
closes, check the voltage between L1A and L2A and between
L1A and T3. If either voltage is low, inspect the connector for
burned or pitted points. / Replace the contactor or points as
necessary.
— / Motor Overload Relay
Check the overload relay to see if it is tripped. / Reset the relay.
(The correct setting for the overload relay is 18 amps.) Check
the current if the relay continues to trip. / Repair the cause of the
overload. Check the voltage between T1 and L2B and between
T1 and T2. If either voltage is low, check the overload relay for
burned or pitted points. / Replace the overload relay or points as
necessary.
— / Motor Faulty
Test the motor by disconnecting the T1, T2, T2A, T3E, and T3F
wires from the motor and connecting three-phase power directly
to the motor. Connect L1 to leads 1 and 7, connect L2 to leads 2
and 8, and connect L3 to leads 3 and 9. If the motor starts and
runs under a load, the current should not exceed 14.5 amps per
leg. / Replace the motor if it does not run or if the current is too
high.
NOTE: With the phase converter connected to the motor,
the current per leg will vary with the line voltage and, in
general, will not be the same in all legs.
96
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
PROBLEM/PROBABLE CAUSE
TEST/SOLUTION
— / Current Relay
Check the voltage between T1 and T2 at terminal 1 of the
current relay and between T1 and T2A at terminal 3 of the
current relay. If there is voltage between T1 and T2, but not T1
and T2A, the control coil is open. / Replace the current relay.
Check the voltage on 7EB at terminal 2 of the current relay with
unit control voltage (12 to 14 volts dc) present at 7EA on
terminal 4 of the current relay and the current relay energized
(current in T2A above 30 amps). If there is no control voltage or
low control voltage on 7EB when the current relay is energized,
the current relay is defective. / Replace the current relay.
— / Motor Start Relay
Check the voltage on 7EC at the motor start relay with unit
control voltage (12 to 14 volts dc) present on 7EA and 7EB at
the motor start relay. If there is no control voltage or low control
voltage on 7EC, the motor start relay is defective. / Replace the
motor start relay.
— / Motor Start Contactor
Line voltage must be present between T1 and T3 and T1 and
T31 at the motor start contactor. If not, check T3 from the motor
contactor to the start contactor. / Repair T3 as necessary. Check
the voltage between T1 and T3C and T1 and T3D with control
voltage present on 7EC at the motor start contactor. Line
voltage should be present. If no voltage is present, the control
coil of the start contactor is defective. If low voltage is present,
the points are defective. / Repair or replace the contactor or
points as necessary.
97
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
PROBLEM/PROBABLE CAUSE
TEST/SOLUTION
— / Start Capacitors
Voltage Test
With line voltage present between T1 and T3C and T1 and T3D
at the start capacitors, check the voltage between T1 and T3E
and T1 and T3F. Both voltages should be within 10% of line
voltage. If one of the voltages is low, the start capacitor in that
circuit is defective. / Replace as necessary.
Current Test (NOTE: Only one of the two T3E and one of the
two T3F wires connected to the motor will carry a current
while starting.) Check the current through T3E and T3F at the
motor with an inductive ammeter during a start attempt. The
current in each wire should be 30 to 45 amps. If one of the
currents is low, the start capacitor in that circuit is faulty. If both
the currents are low, the motor start contactor did not close. /
Replace as necessary.
Motor Starts But Runs Poorly Or Slows
Down and Restarts
— / Run Transformer
With line voltage present between L1A and L2A at the primary
winding of the run transformer, check the voltage between T3
and T3A and between T3 and T3B at the secondary windings of
the run transformer. The voltages should be 122 (+ 13/-8) volts.
If either voltage is less than 110 volts, the line voltage is low or
the run transformer is defective. / Replace as necessary.
NOTE: The transformer has a 208 volt tap and a 230 volt
tap. These taps are accessible on the test strip as L1B (208
volts) and L1C (230 volts). Wire L1A should be connected
to the tap that matches the line voltage of the power
source.
98
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
PROBLEM/PROBABLE CAUSE
TEST/SOLUTION
— / Run Capacitors
Voltage Test (This test is valid only if the motor is running at
normal speed and the motor start contactor is de-energized.)
Check the voltage between T3A and T3E and between T3B and
T3F at the test point strip. The voltages should be within 10% of
the sum of the line voltage and the secondary transformer
voltage. If the voltage is low, the run capacitor in that circuit is
defective. / Replace as necessary.
Current Test (This test is valid only if the motor is running at
normal speed and the motor start contactor is de-energized.)
NOTE: Only one of the two T3E and one of the two T3F
wires connected to the motor will carry a current while
running.
Check the current in T3E and T3F at the motor with an inductive
ammeter. Both currents should be 4 to 8 amps. If a current is
below 4 amps, the run capacitor in that circuit is defective. /
Replace as necessary.
99
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
PROBLEM/PROBABLE CAUSE
TEST/SOLUTION
— / Electric Motor Runs Hot or Loads the
Diesel Engine During Diesel Operation
— / Electric Motor Acting As An Induction
Alternator
Check the voltage at the overload relay, T1 to T2, T2 to T3, and
T3 to T1.
Check the voltage between T3E and T3F.
The voltage on any of the above pairs of wires should not
exceed 15 volts AC while the unit is running on diesel operation.
If the voltage on any of the above pairs of wires is between 500
and 700 volts AC, the electric motor is acting as an induction
alternator. To repair the unit, check the following
1. Check the T2 and T3 circuits through the motor contactor to
make sure they are open during diesel operation. / Replace
or repair the motor contactor as necessary.
2. Check the connections between the electric motor leads and
the Thermo King wiring in the connection box on the electric
motor. Compare these connections to those indicated in the
wiring diagrams and schematics. / Repair the wiring
connections as necessary.
3. Disconnect the electric motor leads from the Thermo King
wiring at the connection box on the electric motor. Check the
wiring in the electric motor with an ohmmeter to make sure
the wires have continuity and are labeled correctly according
to the wiring diagrams and schematics. / Repair as
necessary.
100
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
CAUTION: If the electric motor is being rewound,
it must be rewound to the factory specifications
because this special application requires the phases to be
split.
Full Load Current Test—Used to check the overall performance of the phase conversion system.
Use an inductive ammeter to check the current in motor
leads 1 and 7, 3 and 9, and 2 and 8. The wires should have
the following currents:
Leads 1 and 7 together—8 to 18 amps
Leads 3 and 9 together—10 to 14 amps
Leads 2 and 8 together—9 to 14 amps
Quantity
Description
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
Electric Motor
Motor Contactor
Overload Relay
Current Relay
Motor Start Relay
Motor Start Contactor
Transformer
Start Capacitors
Run Capacitors
Filter Capacitor
Run Capacitor Resistors
Start Capacitor Resistors
Part Number
104-466
44-2853
44-9712
44-8755
41-0895
44-2853
44-9947
44-8758
44-8757
44-8759
44-8760
44-8761
Parts List for the CD-II MAX Single-Phase Electric
Motor System
The three motor windings will exhibit a slight imbalance of
currents. A difference of as much as 6 amps is possible.
The currents through L1 and L2 can be as high as 85 amps
while starting, and as high as 23 amps when running at normal speed in high ambient temperatures. High suction pressure settings can cause high current values.
101
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
CYCLE-SENTRY OPERATION
preheat relay and the starter relay, leaving the engine running.
The description of operation is to be used with the flow
chart on the adjacent page. When the unit requires start-up,
power comes from either the box temperature thermostat,
block temperature thermostat, or defrost relay. the box
temperature thermostat supplies power if the box
temperature requires a start up. The block temperature
thermostat supplies power if the engine temperature is too
cold and requires a start up to maintain its temperature, or
the defrost relay supplies power if defrost has been initiated
and requires start up. Power is supplied to the CYCLESENTRY module, the preheat relay, run relay and the start
relay. The CYCLE-SENTRY module will provide a ground
circuit to each relay in the sequence of operation. The
CYCLE-SENTRY module energizes the preheat relay
which supplies power to the glow plugs and the fuel pump
relay. Preheating occurs until the engine starts. The block
temperature thermistor also feeds a signal to the CYCLESENTRY module which establishes the proper preheat time
depending upon engine block temperature. After the proper
preheat time, the CYCLE-SENTRY module energizes the
run relay. The run relay supplies power to the fuel solenoid,
the fuel pump and energizes the preheat buzzer. The preheat
buzzer will continue to sound until the glow plugs no longer
have power supplied to them. The fuel solenoid circuit also
supplies power to the engine reset switch. The CYCLESENTRY module will continue to energize the run relay as
long as engine operation is required.
The engine remains running until all of the following have
occurred:
1.
The box temperature has been satisfied (box temperature at setpoint).
2.
Engine temperature is above 90 F (32.2 C). (Engine is
warm enough).
3.
Unit is not in defrost.
When the above three items are satisfied, the unit will shut
down.
The CYCLE-SENTRY module supplies power to the start
relay at the appropriate time to engage the starter motor. The
start relay control circuit is wired to a 12 volt positive
circuit and to pin 1 of the CYCLE-SENTRY module. When
the proper preheat time has occurred, the ground will be
completed on the start relay through the pin 1 of the
CYCLE-SENTRY module. At that time, the start relay will
feed power to the starter motor causing the engine to crank.
Five seconds after the CYCLE-SENTRY module has energized the run relay, the starter relay is energized. The starter
relay energizes the starter, causing the engine to crank. The
CYCLE-SENTRY module also energizes a 30 second maximum cranking signal internally while the starter is cranking.
When the starter cranks the engine, the RPM sensor produces a signal indicating that cranking or running has
occurred. The cranking signal must be above 50 rpm within
4 seconds and the running signal must be above 600 rpm or
shut down will occur. When this signal indicates the engine
is running, the CYCLE-SENTRY module de-energizes the
102
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
CYCLE-SENTRY TRUCK UNIT
OPERATION
Understanding this sequence is important to understanding
the operation of the unit.
The Automatic Start-Stop operation requires that all devices
perform properly and in the proper sequence.
BOX TEMPERATURE
THERMOSTAT CIRCUITRY
BLOCK TEMPERATURE
THERMOSTAT
DEFROST RELAY
(load temperature
requires start-up)
(engine temperature
is too cold and
requires start-up)
(defrost has been
initiated and
requires start-up)
CAUTION: 3 to 5 seconds
before cranking, a preheat
buzzer will sound during preheat in CYCLE-SENTRY
power comes from one of
the above three and goes
to the run relay,
preheat relay,
fuel pump, start relay and
CYCLE-SENTRY Module
(CSM)
ENERGIZES
PREHEAT RELAY
(energizes)
GLOW PLUGS
PREHEAT
Block
Temperature
Thermistor
(controls
preheat time)
(until engine starts)
FUEL PUMP
RELAY
Primary
30 second
cranking limit
Safety
Circuit
Energizes
RUN RELAY
(energizes 3 to 5 seconds
before cranking)
RESET SWITCH
FUEL SOLENOID
STARTER RELAY
(energizes 3 to 5
seconds after
RUN RELAY)
STARTER
(20 circuit energizes—
connected while running)
(engine cranks)
FUEL PUMP
(fuel pump energizes)
ENGINE STARTS
RPM Sensor
(produces Cranking and
Running Signal) Minimum of 50
rpm in 4 to 5 seconds to
remain cranking. 600 to 800 rpm to
disconnect starter.
103
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Functional Chart
Components
Preheating
Cranking
Running
Null
Protection
(Reset Tripped)
CYCLE-SENTRY
Module
Timing preheat
Timing cranking,
Monitoring
engine speed of
more than 50
rpm and less
than 800 rpm.
Max time cranking 30 sec
Monitors engine De-energized
speed of more
than 800 rpm and
then locks out
preheat and
cranking
De-energized
Run Relay
De-energized
Energized
Energized
De-energized
De-energized
Start Relay
De-energized
Energized
De-energized
De-energized
De-energized
Preheat Relay
Energized
Energized
De-energized
De-energized
De-energized
Green Start-Stop
Light
On
On
On
On
Off
Fuel Solenoid
De-energized
Energized
Energized
De-energized
De-energized
Glow Plugs
Energized
Energized
De-energized
De-energized
De-energized
Reset Switch
Disconnected
Disconnected
(trips approximately 30
seconds) after
engine stops
cranking on a no
start condition
(no oil pressure)
Connected to
protection
switches
Disconnected
Tripped
104
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
CYCLE-SENTRY Checkout and Diagnosis
Use this checkout procedure to determine if the CYCLESENTRY is operating properly. This procedure should be
used to check out new units, check out units after field
installations have been made and check out units when an
operating problem is reported.
Prior to effective diagnosis of the CYCLE-SENTRY, it is
necessary to determine the exact nature of the problem. To
do this, it is first necessary to run the unit in the Continuous
Run mode to determine if the problem also exists in that
mode. If the problem does exist in the Continuous Run
mode of operation, then it is necessary and easier to troubleshoot and repair the problem in that mode. To determine if
the unit is operating properly, start the unit in ContinuousRun and perform a THERMOSTAT switch sequence test
(see Thermostat Checkout). Test the defrost operation by
grounding the 12 circuit and pressing the MANUAL
DEFROST switch. The unit should go into defrost. Disconnect the 12 circuit from ground, and the unit should terminate defrost if the defrost termination switch is open.
4.
At the completion of the Preheat cycle, the unit should
crank, start and run on high speed cool.
5.
Set the thermostat from -20 F (-29 C) to +80 F (27 C).
The unit should go from high speed cool to low speed
cool and go into null (engine off) at setpoint. The green
START/STOP light should be the only light energized
after the unit shuts off
NOTE: The unit will not go to null until the engine is
warmed up (block temperature switch open). When
this occurs, the unit will run in low speed heat until it
shuts down in null.
6.
With the unit in null, slowly set the thermostat up to
+80 F (27 C). The unit should preheat, crank and run in
high speed heat.
7.
Set the thermostat at null.
Start-Stop Operation Checkout
CAUTION: With the selector switch in AUTO
START-STOP position and the unit ON/OFF
switch in the ON position, the unit may start at any
time without prior warning.
1.
Place the START-STOP/CONTINUOUS RUN selector
switch in AUTO START-STOP position.
2.
Set the thermostat to -20 F (-29 C).
3.
Turn the ON/OFF switch to the ON position. The green
start-stop light on the control panel should be on.
NOTE: Preheat duration will vary depending on
engine temperature. Preheat time is approximately
5 seconds at 150 F (66 C) to 120 seconds at -20 F
(-29 C).
AUTO START-STOP Operation
105
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Start-Stop Operation Checkout
(continued)
8.
9.
15. Disconnect the fuel solenoid wire (8D) and set the thermostat to -20 F (-29 C). Snap the ON/OFF switch into
the ON position. The unit should preheat and crank for
30 seconds. The cranking limit time should not exceed
30 seconds. At the end of 30 seconds, the unit should
discontinue cranking, and the RESET switch should
trip.
With the unit in null, connect a jumper wire from #12
circuit to a chassis ground (CH). Depress the MANUAL DEFROST switch. The DEFROST light should
come on. The unit should preheat, crank and run in
defrost until the jumper is removed if the DEFROST
TERMINATION switch is open.
16. With the fuel solenoid wire disconnected, disconnect
the FS1 or FS2 wire from the flywheel sensor. Turn the
ON/OFF switch to ON. The unit should preheat and
crank for approximately 5 seconds only since no minimum cranking rpm signal is being received from the
flywheel sensor. At the end of 5 seconds, the unit
should discontinue cranking and the RESET switch
should trip. Turn the switch OFF and reset the RESET
switch.
Turn the unit ON/OFF switch to the OFF position. Disconnect the BLOCK TEMPERATURE switch at the
harness plug connection located behind the engine and
pull this section of the harness to an accessible position.
CAUTION: Do not route the wires through the
belts.
10. Set the ON/OFF switch to the ON position. Rotate the
thermostat to the HIGH SPEED COOL position and
allow unit to start and run. Set the thermostat to Null
mode.
17. Reconnect the fuel solenoid and flywheel sensor wires
and allow the unit to start and run in High Speed Cool.
With the unit running, disconnect either the FS1 or FS2
wire from the flywheel sensor and observe that the unit
does not attempt to preheat or crank with the unit running.
11. Allow the unit to cycle off in the Null mode.
12. Connect a jumper across plug pins (wires 8B and 7A)
disconnected in step 9. The unit should preheat, crank
and run.
18. Reconnect the flywheel sensor and turn the switch OFF.
After completing the checkout of the Start-Stop mode of
operation, determine the condition causing the problem and
relate that condition to conditions found in the diagnosis
chart in the back of this manual. By using the diagnosis
chart, the probable cause can be checked and the problem
determined in a minimal amount of time.
13. Disconnect the jumper wire between the plug pins
(wires 8B and 7A) connected in step 12. The unit
should return to null. Snap the ON/OFF switch into the
OFF position, and reconnect the plug to the BLOCK
TEMPERATURE switch located behind the engine.
14. Connect a voltmeter across the positive and negative
post of the battery. Monitor the battery voltage during
the cranking limit test outlined in step 15. An acceptable battery with a full charge should not drop below 9
volts at 80 F (27 C) during the cranking period of 30
seconds. If the battery was fully charged and the voltage drops below 9 volts during cranking, the battery
condition is marginal and the battery must be replaced
for dependable Start-Stop operation.
106
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Component Tests
NOTE: All voltage and resistance readings are measured
with a Simpson 260 meter. Use of other meters may give
different readings because of variations in internal meter
circuitry. Before relying on other meters, compare meter
readings with those obtained on the same component
using a Simpson 260.
OPTION CIRCUIT BOARD
The printed circuit board assembly contains the CYCLESENTRY module socket, the preheat relay socket, the run
relay socket, the Whisper relay socket, the on relay socket
and a preheat indication buzzer.
CAUTION: A preheat buzzer will sound five seconds before cranking to indicate the unit is in the
Preheat mode.
Refer to the CYCLE-SENTRY Operation and Diagnosis
Manual for all operation and diagnosis procedures. The CDII MAX is not presently included in that manual but the system is similar.
107
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Option Board Jumpers
SWITCH PANEL CIRCUIT BOARD
The option board has three 7.5 amp fuses that are used as
jumpers to configure the board for different applications. If
these jumpers are not in the correct positions, the unit may
not function properly. The correct jumper positions for the
CD-II MAX are: J1—Position A, J2—Position A, J3—
Position A.
This circuit board contains two circuit breakers that protect
the unit. One breaker, the 50 amp remote reset is located
between the 2A and 2B circuits on the circuit board. This
breaker is designed to trip in the event of an overload on
either the 2B circuit, starter solenoid or glow plugs. The
second breaker is a remote reset 20 amp breaker that protects the 8 series operation circuits.
When requesting board TK No. 44-9865, six (6) additional
nylon washers MUST BE ordered (TK No. 55-7585).
1.
NOTE: The 50 amp circuit breaker and the 20 amp circuit
breaker can be reset by turning the unit ON/OFF switch
OFF for 60 seconds. This will allow the bi-metal strip in
the breaker to cool and reset. The printed circuit board
contains several diodes and resistors. These can be
checked by turning the unit OFF and checking them with
an ohmmeter. The diodes should show no continuity in
Correct Jumper Positions
Option Board
108
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
temperature thermistor located on the back side of the
engine block. This temperature thermistor is connected to
pins 2 and 5 of the CYCLE-SENTRY module. The
CYCLE-SENTRY module interprets the resistance of the
thermistor, and in turn delays the engagement of the start
relay long enough to give the proper preheat time. The
preheat time will vary from 5 seconds on a hot engine to
120 seconds on a cold engine.
one direction and continuity (10 to 20 ohms) in the other.
The resistors can be checked with an ohmmeter by placing
the test leads across the resistor. The resistor should show
continuity within 10% of the value listed in the wiring diagram. Diodes can be replaced with P/N 44-3400 and resistors of 1/2 watt size.
NOTE: Flat washers are used between the board and circuit breakers. These must be used when replacing circuit
breakers.
Use a de-soldering tool, 60-40 resin core solder and a low
wattage soldering iron.
Some things to note are:
•
The current paths on the circuit board can be
damaged (scratched, etc.) and cause an open circuit.
•
A feed through hole may burn out between the top
and bottom surfaces.
•
If either circuit board is damaged, they must be
replaced. They cannot be repaired.
CYCLE-SENTRY ELECTRONIC MODULE
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The CYCLE-SENTRY Module (CSM) is the heart of the
CYCLE-SENTRY system. All CYCLE-SENTRY modules
are orange colored to distinguish them from the time delay
modules which are light blue colored and were used in the
CYCLE-SENTRY system and the starter disconnect timer
used in the truck units.
CYCLE-SENTRY Module #44-7192
CD-II MAX units must use Module #44-7192, designed
specifically for CYCLE-SENTRY requirements. This module has all of the operating features of the CYCLE-SENTRY module (#44-6874), but also has an additional run
relay timed input control on pin “A”. This relay is used on
CYCLE-SENTRY systems to give proper run relay and fuel
solenoid operation.
The CYCLE-SENTRY module plugs into the CYCLESENTRY printed circuit board and controls the preheat
relay. The control coil of the preheat relay is wired to a 12
volt positive circuit and to pin 4 of the CYCLE-SENTRY
module. When preheat is required, the CYCLE-SENTRY
module completes the ground on pin 4 causing the preheat
relay to energize. When the preheat relay energizes, the
glow plugs will be fed power causing preheating to occur.
The proper preheat time is determined by the engine block
NOTE: If a #44-6874 CYCLE-SENTRY module is erroneously installed in the CD-II MAX CYCLE-SENTRY circuit board, the unit will preheat and crank automatically,
but the fuel solenoid will not energize and the unit will not
start.
109
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Initial Crank Protection
ure occurs on an rpm sensor or in the circuit connecting the
rpm sensor to the CYCLE-SENTRY module.
The CYCLE-SENTRY module has a protection feature
which assures positive engagement of the starter and proper
cranking of the engine. Approximately 4 to 5 seconds after
the start relay is energized and the starter motor begins
cranking, the engine must be rotating a minimum of 50 rpm
or the cranking attempt is ceased. This is designed so that if
the starter fails to engage in the ring gear of the flywheel or
if the engine fails to turn over for any reason, power would
not be applied to the starter continually for 30 seconds. This
feature will give maximum protection against extreme
starter or ring gear damage in the event the starter fails to
engage. After the cranking attempt is terminated, the
RESET switch will trip approximately 40 seconds after
cranking started, allowing a complete shutdown of all electrical circuits.
Testing The CYCLE-SENTRY Module
The CYCLE-SENTRY module can be tested in three ways
1.
It can be exchanged with a known good module. This
type of testing is usually a very fast and effective
method to determine defective modules
2.
It can be tested in a CYCLE-SENTRY module tester
available under P/N 204-571 and adapter P/N 204-637.
This method of testing is also very fast and effective;
however, it does require the tester and adapter to be
available. The specific instructions regarding use of this
tester and adapter are covered later in this section.
Testing the CYCLE-SENTRY module using the
special module tester P/N 204-571 and special
module adapter P/N 204-637
Failure to Start Protection
The CYCLE-SENTRY module also has a 30 second
maximum cranking limit feature built into it. Whenever the
start relay is engaged by the CYCLE-SENTRY module, an
electronic timer inside the module begins timing out the
cranking limit protection. If the engine continuously cranks
for approximately 30 seconds without starting, the CYCLESENTRY module de-energizes both the start relay and the
preheat relay. This terminates all cranking.
After this
occurs, the RESET switch trips causing a total shutdown of
all electrical circuits.
Equipment required:
•
CYCLE-SENTRY module tester P/N 204-571
•
Special CYCLE-SENTRY module adapter P/N 204637
•
12 volt battery or DC power supply
Procedure
1.
Attach the red (+) and black (-) leads from the CYCLESENTRY module tester to a 12 volt power source such
as a 12 volt battery or 12 volt DC regulated power supply available under P/N 204-572.
2.
Turn the POWER switch to the OFF position.
3.
Insert the CYCLE-SENTRY module adapter P/N 204637 in the right hand socket identified STD-CSM. The
(CSM) refers to the CYCLE-SENTRY module.
Starter Re-engagement Protection
The CYCLE-SENTRY module is also designed so the start
relay and the preheat relay are locked out 30 seconds after
the starter is engaged. The start relay and the preheat relay
are locked out until the 7A power is removed from the
CYCLE-SENTRY module, indicating the thermostat has
been satisfied. This feature prevents the preheat and starter
engagement from reoccurring on a running engine if a fail-
110
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
4.
5.
Insert the CYCLE-SENTRY module into the special
adapter. CYCLE-SENTRY modules are uniquely identified with an orange case and the P/N 1189A98G07.
Other modules with an orange case are CYCLE-SENTRY modules (CSM); modules that have a light blue
case are TIME DELAYS (TD) or STARTER DISCONNECT TIMERS (SDT). Make sure the module being
tested is the appropriate one and the appropriate socket
is being used.
8.
If the red light labeled “C” on the tester is lit, then this
indicates a failed module.
NOTE: This completes the first part of the test. The
second part of the test must also be completed to verify
a totally good module.
9.
Turn the POWER switch OFF.
10. Turn the POWER switch on and hold down the button
labeled “CSM SHORT CYCLE TEST.” At this time,
the yellow light (A) should come on. Continue holding
the SHORT CYCLE TEST button down. After
approximately 10 seconds, the tester should light the
red light (C). This red or reject light indicates that the
CYCLE-SENTRY module is performing satisfactorily
on the short cycle test.
Turn the POWER switch ON. The yellow light (A) on
the tester should come on indicating the unit is in the
testing mode. The G06 LED on the special adapter
should also be on.
11. Turn the POWER switch OFF, disconnect the CYCLESENTRY module, and remove the tester from the
power supply.
Preheat, Starter and Run Relays
These are SPDT 12 Volt DC relays. The preheat relay supplies power to the glow plugs. The starter relay is energized
through the CYCLE-SENTRY module after proper preheat
time has occurred. When this relay energizes, the starter
solenoid receives power and the engine cranks. When the
run relay energizes, the contact supplies power to the fuel
solenoid, the fuel pump and the RESET switch. These
relays are identical and interchangeable.
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To Test the Relays
Module Tester P/N 204-571 and Special Test Module
Adapter P/N 204-637
6.
After 10 to 12 seconds of power ON, the G06 LED
should go out and the G07 LED should come on.
7.
After 18 to 20 seconds of power on time the:
a.
Amber light (A) on the tester turns off.
b.
Green light (B) on the tester turns on.
c.
G07 LED on the module adapter stays on.
When the relay is de-energized, there is continuity between
pins 30 and 87a. There should be no continuity between
pins 87 and 30. When the relay is energized with 12 Vdc
positive power supplied to pin 85 and CH to pin 86, the
relay contacts will close, and there should be continuity
between pins 87 and 30.
111
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
To Test the Relays
(continued)
Start Relay
If the start relay fails in the open position, the engine would
not crank. If the relay failed in the closed position, the
starter would continue to crank after the unit started.
There should be no continuity between pins 30 and 87a.
Disconnect the 12 V dc to pins 85 and 86. The relay contacts should open.
PREHEAT BUZZER
.
The preheat buzzer module on the circuit board is designed
to indicate preheat is in operation.
ENGINE RESET RELAY
CD-II MAX units with CYCLE-SENTRY have an engine
reset relay added to the engine reset circuit. This relay is
located in the control box.
The engine reset relay supplies battery voltage to the resistor in the ENGINE RESET switch if the HIGH PRESSURE
CUTOUT switch opens. Battery voltage on the resistor will
cause the engine reset to trip if the engine stopped running
because the HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT switch opened.
Relays with Wiring and Schematic
Diagram Symbols
The 8H circuit energizes the relay during normal operation.
If the 8H circuit is de-energized, a set of contacts in the
relay close and connect the 8 circuit to the 7KB circuit. This
switching supplies battery voltage to the resistor in the
ENGINE RESET switch.
Preheat Relay
If the preheat relay fails in the open position, the glow plugs
would not preheat and the engine may not start, resulting in
the cranking time limit being exceeded. If the preheat relay
failed in the closed position, the glow plugs would remain
on.
CAB CONTROLS
CD-II MAX units ordered with the standard cab control
option have an ON/OFF switch, a DEFROST switch, a
WHISPER (idle) switch, and a thermometer mounted in a
DIN box. The standard cab control option has a feature
called Auto-Start. The Auto-Start system uses a CYCLESENTRY module to automatically start the unit whenever
the unit is turned on. A CYCLE-SENTRY cab control
option that automatically starts and stops the unit can also
be ordered.
Run Relay
If the run relay fails in the closed position, the unit would
run continuously as in the Continuous Run mode of the
operation. If the relay fails in the open position, the fuel
solenoid would not stay in on low speed.
112
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Testing the RPM Sensor
The ON/OFF switch in the cab control box energizes the
CYCLE-SENTRY module. The CYCLE-SENTRY module
controls relays located on the option board that preheat,
start, and run the engine. Since the CYCLE-SENTRY module is energized by the ON/OFF switch (not a Battery Sentry
or the thermostat), once the engine is started it will run until
the unit is turned OFF.
Equipment required:
CAUTION: The unit will always automatically start
when both the unit ON/OFF switch and the cab
control box ON/OFF switch are turned ON.
•
AC voltmeter capable of reading up to 10 volts
•
Ohmmeter
•
CYCLE-SENTRY Stop-Start unit with bracketry for
installing the rpm sensor.
The rpm sensor may be checked as follows:
1.
TROUBLESHOOT THE AUTO-START
SYSTEM USING CYCLE-SENTRY
DIAGNOSIS PROCEDURES
Install the rpm sensor into the flywheel bracket of the
start-stop unit until it contacts the ring gear. Back out
the sensor 1/2 turn and tighten the lock nut.
A WHISPER (idle) switch is located in the cab control box.
When this switch is in the WHISPER position, the engine
will always run in low speed. The engine will start in high
speed but it will return to low speed after it is first started.
The whisper relay on the option board energizes the high
speed solenoid whenever the H circuit is energized.
The PREHEAT/START switch on the unit switch panel
allows an operator to manually preheat and start the unit.
RPM SENSOR
The rpm sensor is in the engine bell housing adjacent to, but
not touching, the flywheel (backed off 1/2 turn).
The rpm sensor is a device containing an inductance coil
and magnet. When the magnetic field is distorted by the
passing ring gear teeth, the inductance coil generates an ac
electrical signal that has a voltage and frequency variation
proportional to the engine rpm.
RPM Sensor
2.
By monitoring the frequency of this signal with the starter
disconnect module, the timing of the starter disengagement
can be precisely controlled.
If the rpm sensor fails, the starter may not disengage or
engage properly.
113
Disconnect wires (FS1 and FS2) from the sensor.
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Testing the RPM Sensor
(continued)
TEMPERATURE COMPENSATING
THERMISTOR
3.
The block temperature compensating thermistor is a bolt
type thermistor located in a bolt hole in the rear of the
engine block. This location is one of the bolts that holds the
BLOCK TEMPERATURE switch in position on the engine.
It is readily identified by two wires seemingly coming from
the center of the bolt.
Switch CYCLE-SENTRY to Continuous Run. Run the
unit on low speed and high speed. Check the AC voltage output across the sensor terminals. Use a meter
with a high ohms per volt internal resistance. A Simpson 260, Fluke digital or any good VOM will work.
However, an automotive type meter may not give an
accurate reading because the meter may load the circuit
heavily and cause the voltage level to appear lower than
it actually is.
a.
The output voltage should be 1.0 to 2.0 Vac on low
speed.
b.
The output voltage should be 2.0 to 2.5 Vac on
high speed.
The temperature compensating thermistor is a variable
resistance device that reacts to temperature. As the temperature increases, the resistance value decreases. The thermistor controls the amount of preheat time. This allows an
optimum preheat time of 5 to 120 seconds, depending upon
the engine temperature.
If the thermistor fails in the OPEN position, the preheat time
would always be extremely long. This preheat time would
be approximately 120 seconds before cranking would begin.
If the thermostat fails in the SHORTED position, the preheat time would not be sufficient to properly preheat the
engine, and the cranking time would probably exceed the
cranking time limit of 30 seconds on extremely cold
engines.
NOTE: If the voltage is slightly off, the voltage may be
increased by turning the sensor in more, and the voltage may be lowered by turning the sensor out more.
4.
Reconnect FS1 and FS2 wires on rpm sensor.
If the rpm sensor passes the above test, the sensor may be
considered good.
If the unit is not available, an alternate less reliable test may
be performed as follows:
•
Disconnect the sensor from all wires, and measure the
resistance across the terminals and from each terminal
to the aluminum case. The resistance should be 250 to
300 ohms across the terminals, and there should be no
continuity from each terminal to the case.
Temperature Compensating Thermistor
114
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Testing the Temperature Compensating
Thermistor
If the block temperature switch fails in the CLOSED position, the unit starts up and runs continuously and would not
shut off when the setpoint has been reached on the thermostat. Basically, the unit would operate as it normally would
in the CONTINUOUS RUN position. If the block temperature switch fails in the OPEN position, the engine would
not automatically be started if the temperature dropped
below 30 F (0 C), and the problem of a no-start situation
could occur in extremely cold ambients. Also, the engine
would not always come up to operating temperature if the
load temperature thermostat was satisfied in a short period
of time. This would result in short cycling a cold engine
and could result in excessive engine wear and extremely
short cycling of the thermostat in cold ambients.
Equipment required:
•
Ohmmeter
•
Method of cooling and warming the sensor
1.
Check the resistance of the thermistor with an ohmmeter set on the Rx10,000 scale.
2.
The resistance of the bolt-type sensor will be 35,000 to
65,000 ohms at 70 F (21 C). At 180 F (82 C), the resistance will be 1,000 to 10,000 ohms.
The resistance decreases as the temperature increases
and increases as the temperature decreases. A faulty
sensor shows no change in resistance as the temperature changes
3.
Check the resistance from either lead to the surface of
the bolt or chassis ground. There must be infinite resistance or no continuity to the surface of the bolt or chassis ground.
If the thermistor passes the above tests, it may be considered
good.
BLOCK TEMPERATURE SWITCH
The BLOCK TEMPERATURE switch is located on the
rear of the engine block. This switch is very similar to a
DEFROST TERMINATION switch. When the temperature
is below 30 F (0 C), the switch closes, and there will be
continuity through its connections. If the temperature rises
above 90 F (32.2 C), the switch opens, and there will be no
continuity between its connections. This switch is used to
make sure the engine temperature is never allowed to drop
to an extremely cold state preventing automatic start-up and
is also to ensure that once start-up has occurred, the engine
will be brought up to a satisfactory temperature prior to
shut down.
Block Temperature Switch
115
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Testing the BLOCK TEMPERATURE
THERMOSTAT Switch
It takes approximately 10 to 30 seconds for the coil to heat
up and trip the RESET switch.
The RESET switch must be replaced if it is defective.
Equipment required:
•
Ohmmeter
•
Method of cooling the switch below 30 F (0 C) (deep
freeze, R-404A, etc.)
•
Method of heating the switch above 90 F (32.2 C)
(trouble light bulb, controlled torch, etc.).
1.
Connect an ohmmeter set on the Rx1 scale across the
leads of the BLOCK TEMPERATURE switch.
2.
Cool the switch below 30 F (0 C) and allow the temperature of the switch to stabilize (may require several
minutes). When the saturated temperature of the switch
is below 30 F (0 C), there should be continuity across
the terminals.
Summary of reasons for the RESET switch tripping:
1.
Coolant temperature excessively high.
2.
Lack of engine oil pressure.
3.
Lack of fuel to the engine (switch trips because of a
lack of engine oil pressure).
NOTE: If the unit switch is ON with AUTO STOPSTART/CONTINUOUS RUN selector switch in the
CONTINUOUS RUN position and the engine is not
running, the low oil pressure sensor will cause the
RESET switch to open.
4.
High pressure in the refrigeration system (high pressure
cutout shuts down the engine, then RESET switch trips
because of engine low oil pressure).
5.
Unit exceeds cranking limit on CYCLE-SENTRY
operation. If the engine cranks continuously for approximately 30 seconds and fails to start, the CYCLE-SENTRY module stops further cranking attempts. After this
occurs, the RESET switch trips in 10 to 30 seconds or
less because of engine low oil pressure.
6.
RESET SWITCHES
A ground fault in the No. 20 or 20A wires to the
switches is also a possible cause.
ENGINE RESET Switch
NOTE: A ground or short circuit in the electrical system does not cause the RESET switch to pop out
3.
4.
Warm the switch above 90 F (32.2 C), and allow the
temperature of the switch to stabilize (may take several
minutes). When the saturated temperature of the switch
is above 90 F (32.2 C), there should be no continuity
across the terminals.
If the block temperature switch passes the above tests,
it may be considered good.
The engine is protected by a manually reset THERMOBREAKER switch. The RESET switch contains a heating
coil that is attached to sensor switches in the engine oil system and engine cooling system.
STARTING CIRCUIT RESET Switch
This 50 amp manually reset circuit breaker protects the
electrical circuit to the engine glow plugs and the starter
solenoid.
If one of the sensors is grounded due to an abnormal condition (low oil pressure, high coolant temperature or extended
cranking time), the heated coil heats up causing the RESET
switch to trip and stop the engine.
116
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
If the circuit breaker opens:
1.
Check for a short in one of the glow plugs.
2.
Check for a ground in the 2B or H circuits.
The In-Cab TG-V functions similarly to the standard unit
mounted TG-V. However, the In-Cab TG-V Controller also
has the following additional features:
•
Alarm Codes for Single Temperature In-Cab TG-V
Alarm
Code
03
04
14
10
or 19
25
74
75
76
77
87
88
Control Circuit Reset Switch
This 20 amp remote reset circuit breaker protects the unit
control circuits. This circuit breaker is reset by turning the
ON/OFF switch OFF for a minute.
IN-CAB TG-V CONTROLLER
Fault Condition
Return Air Sensor Faulty
Discharge Air Sensor Faulty
Defrost Circuit Failure
Refrigeration High Pressure Cutout
Battery Charging Alternator Failure
Cold Start or Checksum Error
Microprocessor RAM Faulty
Microprocessor EEPROM Faulty
EPROM Faulty
Field Test Error
Microprocessor Faulty
•
Power Cord LED on Model 50 Units
•
WHISPER (LOW SPEED) PUSH Button
The operating manuals and the setup and operating manuals
contain information about the control functions and how to
customize the display screens. Manuals for the Single
Temperature In-Cab TG-V Controller: Operating Manual
(TK 40940) and Operating and Setup Manual (TK 40804).
Single Temperature In-Cab TG-V Controller
(P/N 41-1544—12V No Modulation)
A stand alone tester is available as P/N 204-831. It will test
all In-Cab TG-V Controllers.
117
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Field Test Procedure for Single
Temperature In-Cab TG-V Controllers
NOTE: The controller must be set to display temperatures in the Fahrenheit scale. The test WILL NOT
work if the controller is displaying temperatures in the
Celsius scale. Refer to the Controller Operating and
Setup Manual for information about changing the
displayed temperature scale.
Use tester P/N 204-831.
1.
Connect the end of the tester marked “SINGLE” to the
single temperature controller.
5.
6.
1.
2.
Tester Side “SINGLE” Connection
Single Temperature Controller
With the setpoint of 80° F displayed on the screen,
press the following keys simultaneously:
a.
SELECT key.
b.
UP ARROW key.
c.
TURTLE key.
The display will read “FT”.
a.
All other icons will be off.
b.
The red, Power Cord LED will begin to flash on
and off.
c.
All icons will then turn ON for a few seconds.
d.
Then the display will count from 1 to 15.
e.
The display will then read PS for pass, or FC for
fail.
f.
Press the OFF key to exit the test.
Connecting Tester to Controller
2.
3.
4.
Power up the controller by connecting the tester leads
to a 12 volt DC power supply.
Press the controller’s ON key to display all segments.
a.
The TURTLE icon must be displayed. If not, press
the TURTLE key. Alarm Code 19 will be recorded
if the TURTLE icon is not displayed.
b.
If the ALARM icon is displayed, press the
SELECT key to display the alarm and press the
ENTER key to clear the alarm.
Press the SELECT key to display the setpoint(s) and
adjust the setpoint(s) to 80° F.
118
Electrical Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Connector Pins for Single Temperature In-Cab TG-V
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Circuit Code
HGV
BATT+
MVBATTBATT+
WS
14T
ACC
PC
8B
10T
38
INDL
8
SN
SN
BATT11
12
7T
DSN
PS
7K
29
DSN
Harness Wire Color Code
WHT/BLK/RED
WHT/VOIL
WHT/ORG
BLUE
YELLOW
WHT/BLK/ORG
WHT/BLK/YEL
WHT/RED
WHT/BRN
Circuit Description
Hot Gas Valve (Modulation Only)
Battery Positive
Modulation Valve Negative (Modulation Only)
Battery Negative
Battery Positive
Whisper Relay
Heat Relay
Accessory Wire to Truck Ignition
Power Cord (Electric Standby)
Cycle-Sentry Input
High Speed Relay
In-Range Output
WHT/BLK/VOIL
WHT/BLK/BLU
VIOLET
WHT/BLK/BRN
WHT/GRN
WHT/GREY
WHT/BRN/RED
WHITE
GREEN
WHT/BLK
BRN
WHT/YEL
WHT/BLK/GRN
BLK
WHT/BLU
GREY
ORANGE
RED
Alternator Charging
Power from On-Off Switch
Return Air Sensor
Return Air Sensor
Battery Negative
Defrost Relay Circuit
Defrost Termination Switch
Not Used
Discharge Air Sensor
On Relay Coil
Latching Circuit after 8D
Defrost Damper Circuit
Discharge Air Sensor
Connector on Back of Single Temperature In-Cab TG-V
119
120
Engine Maintenance
ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM
of oil to drain out. Refill the pan with 3 quarts (2.8 liters) and check
the dipstick level. Run the unit, and then recheck the oil level.
The TK 2.49 diesel engine has a pressure lubrication system. Oil is circulated by a trochoid type oil pump driven by
the crankshaft timing gear and has several times the capacity required by the engine. Oil is picked up through a suction tube with a screened inlet. Oil to the rocker arm shaft
flows through a tube on the outside of the engine and into
the head through a restrictor fitting.
NOTE: Fill the crankcase slowly so oil will not run into
the breather hose, thus filling up an open cylinder. Leaving the dipstick out while adding engine oil will vent the
crankcase.
Add oil as necessary to reach the full mark. See Specifications page for correct type of oil.
Oil pressure is affected by oil temperature, viscosity and
engine speed. Subnormal oil pressures usually may be
traced to lack of oil, faulty relief valve or worn bearings.
The use of improper viscosity oil will also produce low oil
pressure shutdowns.
Oil Filter Change
The oil filters should be changed along with the engine oil.
Spin-on filters:
ENGINE LOW OIL PRESSURE Switch
Engine oil pressure should rise immediately on starting. A
LOW OIL PRESSURE switch will trip the RESET switch
and stop the engine if the oil pressure drops below 10 ± 3
psig (69 ± 21 kPa). A continuity tester is needed to check
the OIL PRESSURE switch.
1.
Remove the wire 20A from the switch.
2.
Continuity tester should indicate a complete circuit
between the 20A wire terminal and ground.
3.
Start the engine. Tester should show an open circuit
between the 20A wire terminal and ground.
1.
Remove the filter.
2.
Apply oil to rubber ring of new filter and install filter.
3.
Tighten the filter until the rubber ring makes contact,
then tighten 1/2 turn more.
1.
2.
3.
Maintenance consists of replacing the switch.
Engine Oil Change
Filter
Pressure Valve Nut
Oil Pressure Valve
Oil Filter Parts
The engine oil should be changed every 750 hours with CG-4 oils
or synthetic oil (1,200 hours with CG-4 oils or synthetic oil, with
new TK 11-9321 bypass filter) or 6 months, whichever occurs first.
Drain the oil only when the engine is hot to ensure that all the oil
drains out. When changing oil, try to make sure that the trailer is not
tipped away from the direction that the oil is supposed to flow from
the oil pan. It is important to get as much of the residual oil out as
possible because most of the dirt particles are in the last few quarts
CRANKCASE BREATHER
The crankcase breather system ducts crankcase gases
formed in the crankcase directly to the intake elbow. Harmful vapors that would otherwise collect in the crankcase and
contaminate the oil or escape to the outside, are now drawn
back into the engine and burned. The breather hose should
be inspected yearly to make sure it is not plugged.
121
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
ENGINE AIR CLEANER
Dry Type (Optional)
A dry element air cleaner filters all of the air entering the
engine. Excessive restriction of the air intake system affects
horsepower, fuel consumption and engine life. Inspect the
element at regular unit service intervals.
Oil Bath Type
A heavy duty, oil bath air cleaner filters all of the air entering the engine. Excessive restriction of the air intake system
reduces the flow of air to the engine affecting horsepower
output, fuel consumption and engine life.
The air cleaner removes abrasive material from the air entering
the engine. The air cleaner must be kept clean and open so that
the air can pass freely. If the oil has absorbed the maximum
amount of dirt, it allows the dirt to enter the engine. Remove
the oil cup, wash thoroughly and dry every 1000 operating
hours (500 hours under dusty conditions). Refill using the same
weight oil used in the engine crankcase. Inspect the cleaner
body and wash in solvent when it becomes dirty.
1.
2.
3.
Air Filter Box
Air Filter
Air Filter Cover
Dry Air Cleaner (Optional)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Air Intake Hose
Air Cleaner Filter
Clamp Assembly
Mounting Clamps
Cup
Oil Bath Air Cleaner
122
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM
All water-cooled engines are shipped from the factory with
a 50% permanent type antifreeze concentrate and 50%
water mixture in the engine cooling system.
The engine employs a closed, circulating type, pressurized
cooling system. Correct engine temperatures are controlled
and maintained by a radiator, fan and thermostat. The
coolant is circulated through the system by a belt-driven
centrifugal pump. The pump draws the coolant from the
side of the radiator (large header), circulates it through the
cylinder block and head, then back to the radiator. A
thermostat mounted in the water outlet from the cylinder
head to the radiator automatically maintains coolant
temperature within the specified temperature range.
1.
2.
3.
This provides the following:
1.
Prevents freezing down to -30 F (-34 C).
2.
Retards rust and mineral scale that can cause engine
overheating.
3.
Retards corrosion (acid) that can attack accumulator
tanks, water tubes, radiators and core plugs.
4.
Provides lubrication for the water pump seal.
Radiator Cap
Expansion Tank
Radiator
Engine Cooling System Components
123
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Extended Life Coolant
Antifreeze Maintenance Procedure
Extended Life Coolant (ELC) has been phased in all truck
and trailer units that are equipped with TK 486, TK 482, TK
3.95, TK 3.74, TK 2.40, and se 2.2 engines. A decal tag on
the coolant expansion tank can identify units with ELC.
As with all equipment containing antifreeze, periodic
inspection on a regular basis is required to verify the condition of the antifreeze. After one year of service, inhibitors
become worn out and must be replace by changing the antifreeze.
NOTE: The new engine coolant, Texaco Extended Life
Coolant (ELC), is RED in color instead of the current
GREEN colored coolants.
Every year drain, flush, and replace the total antifreeze mixture to maintain total cooling system protection. When the
antifreeze is replaced, use ethylene glycol type engine coolant concentrate meeting the GM 6038-M specification. The
factory recommends the use of a 50/50 antifreeze mixture in
all units even if they are not exposed to freezing temperatures. This antifreeze mixture will provide the required corrosion protection and lubrication for the water pump.
These are the Extended Life Coolants currently approved by
Thermo-King for use in ELC units for five years or 12,000
hours.
•
Texaco ELC #16445 (nitrite free) 100 % concentrate.
•
Texaco ELC #16447 premixed 50/50 % concentrate.
•
Havoline Dex-Cool #7994 (nitrite free) 100 % concentrate, or #7997 (with nitrites) 100 % concentrate.
•
Havoline Dex-Cool #7995 (nitrite free) premixed 50/50
% concentrate.
•
Shell Dexcool #94040.
•
Shell Rotella #94041.
•
Havoline XLC #30379 (Europe) 100 % concentrate.
•
Havoline XLC #33013 (Europe) premixed 50/50 %
concentrate.
•
Saturn/General Motors Dex-Cool.
•
Caterpillar ELC.
•
Detroit Diesel POWERCOOL Plus.
Checking the Antifreeze
Check the solution concentration by using a temperature
compensated antifreeze hydrometer or a refactometer
designed for testing antifreeze. Maintain a minimum of 50%
permanent type antifreeze concentrate and 50% water solution to provide protection to -30 F (-34 C). Do not mix antifreeze stronger than 68% permanent type coolant
concentrate and 32% water for use in extreme temperatures.
NOTE: The temperature range of antifreeze protection for
units with the hot water heat (engine coolant) option is -34
to 50 F (-37 to -46 C).
Changing the Antifreeze
CAUTION: The "Most Important Rules to Remember" are:
NEVER add "RED" Extended Life Coolants" to cooling
systems using "GREEN" coolants.
1.
Run the engine until it is up to its normal operating
temperature. Stop the unit.
2.
Open the engine block drain and completely drain the
coolant. Observe the coolant color. If the coolant is
dirty, proceed with a, b and c. Otherwise go to 3.
CAUTION: Avoid direct contact with hot coolant.
NEVER add "GREEN" coolants to cooling systems using
"RED" extended life coolants.
a. Run clear water into radiator and allow it to drain
out of the block until it is clear.
124
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
b.
c.
Engine Thermostat
Close the block drain and install a commercially
available radiator and block flushing agent. Operate the unit in accordance with instructions of the
flushing agent manufacturer.
For the best engine operation, use a 180 F (82 C) thermostat
year around.
Open the engine block drain to drain the water and
flushing solution.
CAUTION: Avoid direct contact with hot coolant.
3.
Run clear water into the radiator, and allow it to drain
out of the block until it is clear.
4.
Inspect all hoses for deterioration and hose clamp tightness. Replace if necessary.
5.
Loosen the water pump belt. Check the water pump
bearing for looseness.
6.
Inspect the radiator cap. Replace the cap if the gasket
shows any signs of deterioration.
7.
Mix one gallon of permanent type antifreeze concentrate meeting GM 6038-M specification and one gallon
clean water in a container to make a 50/50 mixture. (Do
not add antifreeze and then water to the unit. This procedure may not give a true 50/50 mixture because the
exact cooling system capacity may not always be
known.)
8.
Refill the radiator with the 50/50 antifreeze mixture and
make sure to bleed the air from the cooling system.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Bleeding Cooling System
Thermostat Housing
Gasket
Thermostat
Water Pump
Water Pump Assembly and Thermostat
After filling the radiator, run the unit up to operating temperature to check for overheating and to allow any air to be
purged from the system. Check the coolant level and add
coolant as necessary.
CAUTION: Do not remove radiator cap while
engine is hot.
125
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM
The most common cause of fuel system problems is contamination. It cannot be stressed enough that the fuel must
be clean, fuel tanks must be free from contaminants, and the
fuel filter must be changed regularly. Any time that the fuel
system is opened up, all possible precautions must be taken
to keep dirt from entering the system. This means all fuel
lines should be capped when open. The work should be
done in a relatively clean area, if possible, and the work
should be completed in the shortest time possible.
The fuel system used on the TK 2.49 diesel engine is a high
pressure system used in conjunction with a prechamber.
The components of the fuel system are:
•
fuel tank (may be the truck fuel tank)
•
prefilter
•
electric fuel pump
•
fuel filter
•
injection pump
•
injection nozzles
Thermo King recommends that any major injection pump or
nozzle repairs be done by a quality diesel injection service
specialty shop. The investment in equipment and facilities
to service these components is quite high. Therefore, this
equipment is not found in most repair shops.
A 10 psig (69 kPa) electric fuel pump pulls fuel from the
fuel tank through a prefilter, then pushes it through the fuel
filter to the injection pump. The prefilter is designed for diesel fuel and is the only type that should be used.
The following procedures can be done under field conditions.
The injection pump plungers are activated by an extension
on the engine camshaft. The governor sleeve and weight
assembly is mounted on the end of the crankshaft with governor’s speed requirements being relayed to the injection
pump through a linkage arrangement located in the front
timing cover. The injection pump raises the pressure of the
fuel and meters the correct amount of fuel to the nozzle at
the correct time. The increased fuel pressure will lift the
spring loaded nozzle to admit fuel into the combustion
chamber.
The fuel system is relatively trouble free and if properly
maintained will usually not require major service repairs
between engine overhauls.
126
1.
Bleeding air from the fuel system.
2.
Maintenance involving the fuel tank and filter system.
3.
Speed and governor adjustments.
4.
Electric transfer pump replacement or repair (10 psig
[69 kPa] pump with diesel filter).
5.
Injection line replacement.
6.
Pump timing.
7.
Nozzle spray pattern testing and adjustment.
8.
Minor rebuilding of nozzles.
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Bleeding the Fuel System
If the engine runs out of fuel, if repairs are made to the fuel
system, or if air gets into the system for any other reason,
the air must be bled out of the fuel system.
NOTE: Make sure to keep the fuel tank vent open. If the
vent becomes clogged, a partial vacuum develops in the
tank, this may cause air to enter the system.
Proceed as follows:
1.
Loosen the air bleed screw in the inlet fuel fitting on the
injection pump.
2.
Turn on the electric fuel pump. The electric fuel pump
is energized when the ON/OFF switch is turned ON.
Tighten the air bleed screw when a clear flow of fuel
appears.
NOTE: For the initial start-up, crack the air bleed
screw at the injection pump and bleed fuel until a
clear flow of fuel is noted.
3.
Loosen the injector lines at the injection nozzles.
4.
Crank the engine until fuel appears at the nozzles.
Tighten the injector lines, and start the engine.
NOTE: Fuel will not appear at the nozzles by merely
running the electric pump. The engine must be
cranked.
Water in the Fuel System
Water in the fuel system can damage the injection pump and
nozzles. This damage will subsequently cause more expensive damage to the engine. A large accumulation of water in
the bottom of the fuel tank will stop a diesel engine. Water
should be drained off periodically to avoid breakdowns.
This should be done after the tank has set idle for an hour.
DO NOT steam clean fuel tank caps.
127
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Filter Mounting Base
Injection Pump
Pick Up Tubes
Prefilter
Fuel Filter
Fuel System
128
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Electric Fuel Pump
Operation
The electric fuel pump must be mounted next to the fuel
tank. This pump is designed to push fuel rather than pull
fuel.
Make sure the pump case has a good ground with the battery. The pump will not operate at less than 9 volts DC. The
pump is self primping as long as it is not more than 30 in.
(762 mm) above the fuel in the fuel tank.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Maintenance
The fuel pump filter should be cleaned whenever the oil is
changed. The filter and gasket are replaceable but the pump
cannot be repaired, it must be replaced if it is defective.
Filter
Gasket
Cover
Screw (3)
Magnet
Electric Fuel Pump
Disassembly
1.
Remove the three screws from the cover.
2.
Remove the cover, gasket, and filter. Wash the filter in
cleaning solvent and blow out the dirt and cleaning solvent with compressed air. Check the cover gasket and
replace it if necessary. Clean the cover.
If the pump does not operate, check for:
Assembly
1.
A good ground to the pump body.
2.
Clean and tighten the electrical connections.
3.
The pump voltage and polarity must be the same as the
unit system.
If the pump operates but does not deliver fuel,
check for:
Place the cover gasket on the cover, place the filter in the
pump, install the cover and replace the three screws.
129
1.
Air leaks in the fuel lines or connections.
2.
Kinks or other restrictions in the fuel lines.
3.
A leaking or distorted cover gasket.
4.
A clogged or dirty filter.
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Integral Fuel Solenoid
The fuel stop solenoid is located on the end of the fuel injection pump.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Bolt (P/N 91-3095)
Fuel Stop Solenoid (P/N 41-1386)
Low Speed Adjustment Screw
Throttle Lever (P/N 11-6129)
Ball Joint (11-8663)
Eye Bolt (P/N 55-2762)
Throttle Solenoid (P/N 44-9181)
Integral Fuel Solenoid Components
130
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
TK 2.49 ENGINE
Operation of the TK 2.49 engine is controlled by the operation of the fuel solenoid and the throttle (high speed) solenoid. The fuel solenoid consists of a spring loaded plunger
and electro-magnetic coil. When the engine is OFF, spring
tension on the plunger maintains the plunger’s “OUT” position. When pushed out, this causes the governor linkage to
move the injection pump rack to the “FUEL OFF” position.
When the fuel solenoid is energized, current is applied to
the coil creating an electro-magnetic field, which pulls the
When in the “PULLED-IN” position, the plunger releases
tension on the governor linkage. The governor linkage then
moves the fuel injector rack, thus controlling the fuel flow
and placing it in the “FUEL ON” position.
Adjustments made to the throttle (high) speed solenoid
change governor spring tension which in turn adjust speed
settings.
FUEL SOLENOID TIMERS ON PC
BOARDS (TK 2.49 ENGINE)
1.
2.
3.
4.
The fuel solenoid timer is being used on CD-II MAX units,
consists of a small PC board (P/N 41-1234) that contains a
capacitor, three diodes, an eight pin wire connector, and two
removable relays. It is used to provide a manual start relay.
The manual start relay has been added to improve the starter
reliability. This timer is mounted on the control box door to
the right of the relay board.
Fuel Solenoid Relay (FSR)
Capacitor
Manual Start Relay (MSR)
Eight Pin Connector
New Fuel Solenoid Timer on PC Board
Electrical Changes
The fuel solenoid timer and fuel solenoid relay are located
on a PC board. This improves reliability and simplifies the
wiring.
The size of the capacitor has been changed to increase the
pull-in time from 1 second to 2 seconds. This minimizes the
chance that the pull-in coil would fail to open the fuel valve.
The integral fuel solenoid contains two coils: the pull-in
coil, and the hold-in coil. The pull-in coil draws approxi-
131
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
The timer now turns OFF instantly because the capacitor
discharges through the hold-in coil in the fuel solenoid (8D
circuit). This minimizes the chance that the timer would fail
to energize the fuel solenoid relay after the unit had been
turned off momentarily. The earlier timer required the unit
to be turned off for at least 3 seconds to discharge the capacitor.
mately 30 to 40 amps at 12 volts. The hold-in coil draws
approximately 1 amp at 12 volts.
The pull-in coil must be energized to move the injection
pump governor linkage to the fuel ON position. Once the
injection pump governor linkage has been moved to the fuel
on position, the hold-in coil will keep it in fuel on position
until the 8D circuit is de-energized. The pull-in coil must be
de-energized after the 2 second pull-time.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Fuel Solenoid Relay Contacts
Fuel Solenoid Pull-in Coil
Fuel Solenoid Hold-in Coil
Capacitor
Fuel Solenoid Relay Coil
Simplified Schematic Diagram of Updated Integral Fuel Solenoid System
132
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Wiring Diagram of P/N 41-1234 Fuel Solenoid Timer and Manual Start Relay PC Board
NOTE: The manual start relay has been added to improver the starter reliability.
4.
Troubleshooting the Integral Fuel
Solenoid System
Turn the unit ON and check the voltage on the 8D pin
in the fuel solenoid wire connector from the main wire
harness. Refer to the following illustration to identify
the pins in the wire connector and in the fuel solenoid.
NOTE: The fuel solenoid pull-in coil will require 35 to 45
amps to turn on the fuel. The unit’s battery must be in
good condition. If the battery has enough power to crank
the engine over, it has enough power to energize the fuel
solenoid pull-in coil.
If you suspect that the engine does not run because the fuel
solenoid is not operating correctly, use the following procedure:
1.
Disconnect the 20 wire from the RESET switch so the
RESET switch will not trip.
2.
Disconnect the 8S wire from the starter solenoid.
3.
Disconnect the fuel solenoid wire connector from the
fuel solenoid.
1.
2.
3.
133
Hold Coil 8DP Color: White
Pull Coil 8D Color: Red
Common—Ground Color: Black CH
Fuel Solenoid Pin Identification
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
5.
a.
If battery voltage is not present on the 8D circuit,
check the 8D circuit for an open or a short.
b.
If battery voltage is present on the 8D circuit, go to
step 5.
7.
b.
8.
Check the CH pin in the fuel solenoid wire connector
for continuity to a good chassis ground.
a.
6.
NOTE: If the pull-in coil fails, make sure to
replace the fuel solenoid relay with a PotterBrumfield relay P/N 44-9111.
If there is no continuity between the CH pin in the
fuel solenoid wire connector and a good chassis
ground, check the black (CH) wire that goes from
the fuel solenoid connector to the CH terminal on
the throttle solenoid for an open circuit.
b.
If this black (CH) wire is not open, check the other
CH wire connected to the CH terminal on the throttle solenoid for an open circuit.
c.
If there is continuity between the CH pin in the
fuel solenoid connector and a good chassis ground,
go to step 6.
Place a jumper wire between the CH pin in the fuel
solenoid and a good chassis ground.
Test the hold-in coil.
a.
Energize the hold-in coil by placing a jumper
between the 8D pin in the fuel solenoid and the 2
terminal at the fuse link.
b.
Momentarily energize the pull-in coil by placing a
jumper between the 8DP pin in the fuel solenoid
and the 2 terminal at the fuse link. The fuel solenoid should make a definite click when the pull-in
coil is energized, but should not click when the
pull-in coil is de-energized.
c.
De-energize the hold-in coil by removing the
jumper from the 8D terminal. The fuel solenoid
should make a definite click when the hold-in coil
is de-energized.
d.
If the hold-in coil does not function properly,
check the resistance of the hold-in coil by placing
an ohmmeter between the 8D pin and the CH pin
in the fuel solenoid. The resistance of the hold-in
coil should be approximately 12.8 ohms. If the
resistance of the hold-in coil is not in this range,
replace the fuel solenoid.
e.
If the hold-in coil does function properly, go to
step 9.
Test the pull-in coil by momentarily placing a jumper
between the 8DP pin in the fuel solenoid and the 2 terminal at the fuse link. The fuel solenoid should make a
definite click when the pull-in coil is energized and
should click again when the pull-in coil is de-energized.
NOTE: The pull-in coil will draw 30 to 40 amps so do
not leave the jumper connected to the 8DP pin for
more than a few seconds.
a.
9.
If the pull-in coil does not energize, check the
resistance of the pull-in coil by placing an ohmmeter between the 8DP pin and the CH pin in the fuel
solenoid. The resistance of the pull-in coil should
be 0.4 to 0.3 ohms. If the resistance of the pull-in
coil is not in this range, replace the fuel solenoid.
If the pull-in coil does energize, go to step 8.
Reconnect the fuel solenoid wire connector to the fuel
solenoid.
10. Remove the fuel solenoid relay from its socket and
make sure the unit is turned ON.
134
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
11. Check the voltage on the 8D circuit at the 85 terminal
in the fuel solenoid relay socket. Refer to the following
illustration to identify the terminals in the relay socket.
a.
If battery voltage is not present on the 8D circuit,
check the 8D circuit for an open or a short (minimum voltage is 10 volts).
b.
If battery voltage is present on the 8D circuit, go to
step 12.
13. Test the relay.
12. Check the voltage on the 2B circuit at the 30 terminal in
the fuel solenoid relay socket.
a.
If battery voltage is not present on the 2B circuit,
check the 2B circuit for an open or a short.
b.
If battery voltage is present on the 2B circuit, go to
step 13.
1.
2.
3.
4.
a.
Use a jumper to connect the 85 terminal on the
relay to the 2 terminal at the fuse link.
b.
Use another jumper to connect the 85 terminal on
the relay to the 2 terminal at the fuse link.
c.
If the relay does not energize, it is defective.
Replace the relay.
d.
If the relay does energize, the timer is defective.
Replace the fuel solenoid timer PC board.
14. Remember to reconnect the 20 wire to the RESET
switch.
30 Terminal—2B Circuit
86 Terminal to Capacitor and Diode
85 Terminal—8D Circuit
87 Terminal—8DP Circuit
Relay Socket Terminal Identification
135
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Fuel Solenoid Replacement
1.
Disconnect the 20 wire from the reset switch to prevent
the reset switch from tripping.
2.
Disconnect the fuel solenoid wire connector and
remove the old fuel solenoid.
3.
Connect the fuel solenoid wire connector to the new
fuel solenoid.
4.
NOTE: The fuel solenoid must be energized when it is
being installed. If it is not, the plunger and the linkage
may not line up correctly and the fuel solenoid will
not function properly.
Turn the unit ON to energize the fuel solenoid.
1.
2.
3.
5.
Place the O-ring in the groove in the end of the fuel
injection pump. Make sure that the O-ring is positioned
correctly during installation to avoid damage and leaks.
6.
Install the new fuel solenoid.
7.
Turn the unit OFF and make sure to connect the 20 wire
to the RESET switch.
O-Ring
Fuel Stop Solenoid
Fuel Injection Pump Groove
Fuel Solenoid Components
136
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
FUEL LIMIT SCREW
The fuel limit screw is not adjustable. It is equipped with an
anti-tamper cap to fulfill requirements for CARB (California Air Resources Board) emission regulations. Service
technicians must be CARB certified to perform service on
fuel limit screw for equipment operating in California. All
other equipment can be serviced per recent service bulletins
with special tools and procedures. California service technicians should see your local Thermo King dealer for recent
bulletins.
CARB Certification Decal
137
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
ENGINE SPEED ADJUSTMENTS
3.
Bleed air out of the nozzles. Recheck the speed.
When the diesel engine fails to maintain the correct engine
speeds, check the following before adjusting the speed:
4.
Check the operation of the electric fuel pump.
1.
Clean the fuel prefilter screen. Recheck the speed.
2.
Bleed air out of the fuel system. Recheck the speed.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Throttle Solenoid
Adjuster
Jam Nut
Regulator Handle
5.
6.
7.
Make engine speed adjustments with the engine fully
warmed up.
Low Speed Adjustment Screw
Throttle Lever
Eye Bolt
Engine Speed Adjustments
138
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Low Speed Adjustment
1.
Start the unit and let it run until the engine is warmed up.
2.
Set the thermostat to make the engine run in low speed
and check the engine speed. The engine speed should
be 1550 to 1650 rpm. If the engine speed is not correct,
loosen the jam nut on the low speed adjustment screw.
3.
4.
INJECTION PUMP REMOVAL,
INSTALLATION AND TIMING
Injection Pump Removal
Turn the low speed adjustment screw to change the
engine speed. Turn the screw in to increase the engine
speed. Turn the screw out to decrease the engine speed.
Set the engine speed at 1550 to 1650 rpm and tighten
the jam nut.
1.
Remove the fuel injection lines and the fuel lines.
Remove the four nuts holding the pump to the timing
cover, and the fuel supply line.
2.
Remove the inspection plate on the side of the timing
cover.
3.
Remove the clip that connects the rack pin to the governor arm.
4.
Center the rack in the pump body, then remove the
injection pump from the timing cover. The timing
shims will usually stay attached to the pump.
High Speed Adjustment
1.
2.
Start the unit and let it run until the engine is warmed
up.
Set the thermostat to make the engine run in high speed
and check the engine speed. The engine speed should
be 2350 to 2450 rpm.
3.
If the engine speed is not correct, loosen the jam nuts at
the ends of the adjuster.
4.
Turn the adjuster to change the engine speed. Turn the
adjuster clockwise to increase the engine speed. Turn
the adjuster counterclockwise to decrease the engine
speed.
5.
CAUTION: If the rack is not positioned correctly,
the pump will not come out of the timing cover.
Injection Pump Installation
1.
NOTE: Do not put gasket sealer on the shim set or the
pump until the injection pump timing has been
checked. The shim set may have to be replaced with
one of a different thickness.
Set the engine speed at 2350 to 2450 rpm and tighten
the jam nuts.
Part Description
Fuel Stop Solenoid
O-ring
Throttle Solenoid
Relay
Part Number
41-1386
33-2770
44-9181
44-9111
Replace the shim set if it has been damaged during the
pump removal. New shims are supplied in sets. Select a set
with the same thickness as that removed from the pump.
Quantity
1
1
1
1
139
2.
Center the rack in the pump body and insert the pump
into the timing gear cover. The rack pin must be aligned
with the governor arm as the pump is being inserted.
3.
Install the clip that fastens the rack pin to the governor
arm.
4.
Install the washers and nuts. Torque the nuts to 18 to
20 ft-in (24 to 27 N•m).
5.
Install the injection lines and the fuel lines.
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Timing the Injection Pump to the Engine
There are two different types of timing procedures used on
the TK 2.49 engine. One procedure involves checking to
make sure the cylinders are timed correctly to each other.
The second procedure times the injection pump correctly to
the engine. If the cylinders are not timed correctly to each
other, it is of no value to time the injection pump to the
engine because one of the two cylinders would be out of
time. The individual plungers in the injection pump are
timed to each other by the use of spacers in the pump
plunger base. It is unlikely that an injection pump would
change individual cylinder timing unless it had been
through some type of repair process, but if all other possible
problems with a rough running engine have been checked,
and especially if the engine’s injection pump has been
replaced or repaired recently, it may be worthwhile to check
the individual cylinder timing. Because the possibility of
incorrect individual cylinder timing is so minimal, the procedure for timing the pump to the engine will be covered
first. The procedure for individual cylinder timing is very
similar to timing the injection pump so it will be covered
last.
1.
2.
3.
Injection Mark
Starter Plate Mark
TDC Mark
Flywheel Timing Marks
CAUTION: The cylinders on the engine are numbered from the flywheel end to the water pump end.
The number 1 cylinder is next to the flywheel. The
number 2 cylinder is next to the water pump. The
timing marks on the flywheel match this numbering
system.
NOTE: The top dead center timing marks are stamped on
the flywheel and are identified by the cylinder number.
The injection timing marks are also stamped on the flywheel but have no identifying numbers. The timing marks
are 180° apart.
140
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
NOTE: The design of the CD-II MAX units makes it difficult to see the flywheel timing marks when the engine is
mounted in the unit. Therefore, use the timing marks on
the front engine pulley if necessary.
1.
2.
3.
4.
CAUTION: Loosen the injection line at the injection nozzle for the number 2 cylinder to prevent any
possibility of the engine firing.
5.
The engine should be close to the top dead center position with the plunger port in the pump closed. No fuel
should flow from the drip tube.
6.
Turn the engine backwards past the injection timing
mark until fuel flows from the drip tube.
7.
Slowly rotate the engine in the direction of rotation
while watching the drip tube. When the fuel flow slows
to approximately one drip every 10 to 15 seconds,
check the timing marks. They should be lined up.
8.
If the timing marks did not line up, a shim or shims will
have to be added or subtracted from the injection pump.
Adding shims will retard the injection timing, subtracting shims will advance the timing. Increasing or
decreasing shim thickness by 0.004 in. (0.1 mm) will
change the timing by 1°.
9.
After shims have been added or subtracted, recheck the
timing.
Injection Mark
Starter Plate Mark
TDC Mark
Front Engine Pulley Timing Marks
1.
2.
3.
Activate the run solenoid and the fuel pump by turning
the unit ON. Make sure the DIESEL/ELECTRIC
switch is in the DIESEL position.
Rotate the engine in the direction of rotation (clockwise
as viewed from the water pump end) until the number 1
cylinder (closest to flywheel) is at approximately top
dead center of the compression stroke. The valve cover
should be removed to identify the compression stroke.
Both rocker arms of the number 1 cylinder will be
loose.
10. When the injection pump has been correctly timed to
the engine, remove the pump and put a light coat of silicone gasket sealer on the shim pack and the pump, or
dip the new shims in lacquer thinner to activate the
sealer.
Remove the injection line from the number 1 injector
and the injection pump. Remove the delivery valve
holder, delivery valve and spring. Care must be taken to
prevent dirt from entering the fuel injection system.
Replace the delivery valve holder and the delivery
valve.
11. Reinstall the pump, and torque the nuts to 18 to 20 ft-lb
(24 to 27 N•m).
12. Reinstall the delivery valve spring. Torque the delivery
valve holder to 30 ft-lb (41 N•m).
13. Reinstall the injection lines, bleed the air from the nozzles, and test run the engine.
Install a drip tube on the delivery valve holder.
141
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Timing Individual Cylinder Injection
2.
This procedure should be used when a poor running engine
has had all possible problems checked but continues to run
badly. If the injection pump has been repaired or replaced,
the chance of individual cylinder timing problems has a
greater possibility of occurring.
Both the intake and the exhaust valve are adjusted
to.008 in. (0.20 mm) with the temperature at 70 F
(21 C).
Rotate the engine in the direction of rotation, clockwise
as viewed from the water pump end.
CAUTION: Make sure fuel rack is OFF to prevent
engine from starting.
To check individual cylinder timing, follow the pump timing procedure but instead of changing shims to adjust the
pump timing, check the timing of number 2 injector after
checking number 1. Each cylinder should be timed to its
respective flywheel timing marks.
If the injection pump plungers are not correctly timed to
each other, the pump must be removed and sent to a diesel
injection equipment repair shop for calibration.
a.
Turn the engine so the number 1 cylinder is on
compression with the number 1 TDC mark
aligned. Both number 1 push rods should turn
freely. Adjust both valves on the number 1
cylinder.
b.
Turn the crankshaft 180° to align the TDC mark of
the number 2 cylinder. Both number 2 push rods
should turn freely. Adjust both valves on the number 2 cylinder.
ADJUST ENGINE VALVE CLEARANCE
1.
Remove the valve cover. Torque the 18 mm diameter
head bolts before adjusting valves: 26.8 ft-lb (36.3
N•m). The valve clearance should be checked after the
first 500 hours of engine operation and then after every
2000 operating hours, maximum. It is very important
that valves be adjusted to the correct specifications for
satisfactory engine operation. Insufficient valve clearance will result in compression loss and misfiring of
cylinders resulting in burned valves and seats. Excessive valve clearance will result in noisy valve operation
and abnormal wear of the valves and rocker arms. The
intake and exhaust valves are adjusted with the valves
in the closed position.
NOTE: In steps a and b if both push rods do not
turn freely, rotate the engine 360° and check
again.
c.
3.
142
MAKE SURE to tighten the lock nut while holding
the adjustment screw in position.
Install the valve cover and make sure that the gasket is
in position.
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
BELTS
CAUTION: Do not attempt to adjust belts with the
unit running.
Belts should be regularly inspected during unit pre-trip for
wear, scuffing or cracking and belt tension.
CAUTION: CYCLE-SENTRY equipped units—
with the CYCLE-SENTRY switch in the AUTO
START/STOP position and the ON/OFF switch in
ON position, the unit may start at any time without
prior warning. Switch the ON/OFF switch to the
OFF position before performing maintenance or
repair procedures.
Belts that are too loose will whip, and belts that are too tight
put too much strain on the belt fibers and bearings.
NOTE: Do not attempt to remove or install belts without
loosening them. Belts that are installed by prying will fail
prematurely due to internal cord damage.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Engine/clutch
Idler
Alternator
Motor/Jackshaft
Compressor
Rotation
Belt Arrangement
143
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Motor/Jackshaft—Compressor Belt
NOTE: Adjust this belt before adjusting the Engine-IdlerAlternator-Motor/Jackshaft Belt.
1.
Loosen the motor/jackshaft mounting bolts.
2.
Position the motor/jackshaft to obtain a tension of 50 or
0.5 in. (13 mm) deflection at the center of the belt
between the motor/ jackshaft and the compressor.
3.
Tighten the mounting bolts.
Engine/Clutch-Idler-Alternator- Motor/
Jackshaft Belt
NOTE: Adjust the Engine/Clutch-Idler-Alternator-Motor/
Jackshaft Belt before adjusting this belt.
1.
Loosen the alternator adjustment bolt and the pivot
bolt.
2.
Position the alternator to obtain a tension of 53.
3.
Tighten the alternator adjustment bolt and the pivot
bolt.
Water Pump Belt
Add or remove shims between the water pump pulley
sheaves to obtain a tension of 40 or 0.5 in. (13 mm) deflection at the center of the belt between the crankshaft and the
water pump.
144
Engine Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
CLUTCH
Clutch Maintenance
Inspect the clutch every 1,000 hours of operation or yearly,
whichever occurs first. Remove the clutch, clean the shoes
and drum, regrease the bearings or replace them if they are
worn. Inspect the bushings, shoe shafts, shoe linings, and
springs for wear and replace if necessary.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Bearing
Shoe Shaft
Shoe
Spring
Clutch
145
146
Refrigeration Maintenance
NOTE: The following procedures involve servicing the refrigeration system. Some of these service procedures are regulated by Federal, and in some cases, by state and local laws.
All regulated refrigeration service procedures must be performed by an EPA certified technician, using approved equipment and complying with all Federal, state and local laws.
SYSTEM EVACUATION
2
1
3
4
9
5
8
7
8587A
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Evacuation Quality Hoses
V-4
Thermistor Sensor
V-3
V-2
6.
7.
8.
9.
V-1
Two Stage Vacuum Pump
Calibration Standard
Micron Gauge
Evacuation Station—TK No. 204-725
147
6
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Evacuation is Important and is Critical to
System Performance!
NOTE: The attached evacuation procedures have been
written to be used with the Thermo King Evacuation
System (Tool No. 204-725). However, the principles of 3point evacuation and the use of a micron gauge during
evacuation should always be practiced.
NOTE: A low leak fitting must be used on hoses when
Schrader port fittings are encountered on units (unit
OFF).
Refer to the diagram of the Thermo King evacuation station
(Tool No. 204-725) and note the location of the valves.
It has been determined through testing and system analysis
that refrigeration systems which contain non-condensable
such as nitrogen and/or air can be overcharged with refrigerant when charged using the sight glass method. An overcharge of refrigerant will cause compressor damage.
Valve #1 (V-1): Is in the open position when the pump is
running to evacuate the hoses and/or the unit. When V-1 is
closed, the pump has been isolated from the hoses and/or
the unit.
Therefore, Thermo King recommends that all repairs to the
refrigeration system include the removal and reclamation
(cleaning) of the refrigerant, followed by a thorough evacuation using the proper tools and procedures. (See attached
tool list and evacuation procedures.)
Valve #2 (V-2): Is in the open position during unit evacuation. In the closed position, V-2 isolates the micron gauge
and thermistor assembly from the hoses and/or the unit.
Valve #3 (V-3): Is in the open position during unit evacuation. When closed, V-3 isolates the micron gauge and the
vacuum pump from the other evacuation hoses.
The primary objective of evacuation is to bring the system’s
pressure to a low micron level to ensure the removal of
moisture and non-condensables. There are however, certain
other principles which must be observed. These are:
•
Evacuate from 3-points to access both sides of check
valves and solenoids. Energize solenoids during evacuation
to prevent trapping of refrigerant or non-condensables.
•
Always leave service valve caps on during evacuation
and do not exercise the valve stems while the unit is in
a deep vacuum. Packing glands on older valves are
prone to leak.
•
Never attempt evacuation without a micron or vacuum
gauge. The micron gauge will help determine:
—
Valve #4 (V-4): Is in the open position during unit evacuation. When closed, V-4 isolates the evacuation hoses and
the unit from the evacuation system.
If the pump is capable of pulling a deep vacuum.
— When the vacuum pump oil is contaminated.
— If the vacuum hoses and valves are leak free.
— If the unit is leak free.
— How long you should evacuate the unit.
— That the unit is still in a deep vacuum before any
lines are disconnected or refrigerant is added.
148
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Calibration Standard
Vacuum or Micron Gauge
V-4
V-3
Thermistor
6.
7.
8.
9.
V-2
V-1
Two Stage Vacuum
P/N 204-725 (120 VAC); P/N 204-744 (220 VAC)
149
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
100 Microns
500 Microns
1000 Microns
2500 Microns
5000 Microns
6.
7.
8.
9.
20000 Microns
Atmospheric Pressure
Calibration Adjustment Screw
Example: Meter needle shown at calibration position
when Calibration Standard specifices 0.15 mm Hg.
150
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Set Up and Test of Evacuation Equipment
NOTE: If the vacuum pump is okay, and there are no
leaks between V-1 and V-3, the micron gauge should
show less than 500 microns. If not, locate and correct
the problem.
NOTE: Refer to the previous two pages for the following
discussion.
1.
Connect the evacuation system to a 110 Vac power supply. Connect a gauge manifold and refrigerant supply to
the fitting above valve V-4. Turn the micron gauge ON.
2.
Close valves V-1, V-3 and V-4. Valve V-2 is open.
3.
Turn the vacuum pump ON.
4.
Open valve V-1 at the pump. The micron gauge needle
will move to the left. (Refer to micron gauge scale diagram—previous page.)
LEAK
5.
With the pump still operating, open valve V-3. If the
micron reading does not return to a level of less than
500 microns, locate and correct the problem before
continuing.
6.
With the vacuum pump still operating, open valve V-4.
The micron level will rise momentarily. If the micron
reading does not return to a level of less than 500 microns,
locate and correct the problem before continuing.
MOISTURE
Isolate the pump from the system by closing the
proper valve. Watch the movement of the vacuum
gauge needle. If the needle continues to rise, this is an
indication that a leak exists in the unit or the connecting line. The leak must then be located and eliminated.
Should the needle show a pressure rise but finally
level off to practically a constant mark, this is an indication that the system is vacuum tight but is still too
wet, requiring additional dehydration and pumping
time.
151
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
7.
Evacuate hoses to 100 microns or lowest achievable
level below 500 microns.
4.
Start the vacuum pump and open valves V-1, V-2, V-3
and V-4.
8.
Once 100 microns is reached, close valve V-1 at the
pump. Turn the vacuum pump OFF.
5.
Evacuate the system to 500 microns or the lowest
achievable level between 500 and 1000 microns.
9.
Observe the micron gauge reading. The vacuum rise
should not exceed 1500 microns in 5 minutes.
NOTE: The presence of refrigerant in the compressor
oil may prevent a low micron reading from being
achieved. The oil can continue to “outgas” for long
periods of time. If the micron level appears to stall
after 1/2 hour or 45 minutes between 1000 and 1500
microns, back seat the suction service valve and
observe the micron gauge. A sharp drop in the micron
reading (300 to 500 microns) would indicate that
refrigerant is present in the oil or a leak exists in the
compressor area.
10. If the rise is above 1500 microns in 5 minutes, check all
hoses and connections for leaks. Hoses with moisture
present will require additional evacuation time to
achieve satisfactory results.
NOTE: Dirty vacuum pump oil or a defective vacuum
pump will prevent a low micron reading. Hoses and
fittings can be isolated individually to identify leaks.
Unit Evacuation
NOTE: Refer to the diagram on page 154 for the following
discussion.
6.
When the desired micron level has been achieved (500
to 1000 microns), close valve V-1 at the pump. Turn the
pump to OFF.
7.
Observe the reading on the micron gauge after 5 minutes have elapsed. The vacuum rise should not exceed
2000 microns. If the vacuum level exceeds 2000
microns after 5 minutes, a leak is present or additional
evacuation time is required.
8.
If the vacuum level is acceptable, start the pump and
open valve V-1 to evacuate the pressure rise (5 minutes).
9.
Close valve V-1 and stop the pump. Observe the
micron gauge to confirm that the system remains in a
deep vacuum. Close valve V-4. The unit is ready to
charge.
NOTE: Do not attempt to evacuate the unit until the evacuation equipment has been tested and its performance has
been verified.
1.
Prepare the unit for evacuation. Recover refrigerant to 0
psig (0 kPa). (New Federal Regulations may require
your recovery machine to pull the system’s pressures
lower than 0 psig [0 kPa]).
CAUTION: Do not attempt to evacuate a unit until
you are certain that the unit is leak free. A unit with
less than a full refrigerant charge should be thoroughly leak checked and all leaks must be repaired.
2.
Install hoses on the receiver tank, suction and discharge
ports of the compressor.
3.
Install a charging line from the spare access port on
valve V-4 to a refrigerant supply bottle. Bottle valve
closed.
152
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Unit Charging
4.
NOTE: Refer to the diagram on the next page for the following discussion.
Back seat (close) the receiver outlet valve. Remove the
evacuation station hoses.
5.
NOTE: Before charging, make sure that the refrigerant
lines from the gauge manifold to the refrigerant supply
bottle have been evacuated or purged.
If the unit is not fully charged, install a gauge manifold
set on the suction and discharge ports of the
compressor.
6.
Open the refrigerant supply valve for liquid. Open the
gauge manifold hand valve (suction side).
7.
Start and operate the unit with the thermostat set for
cool. Add liquid through the suction service port until
the correct charge is attained. Make sure that the liquid
level does not rise above the sight glass. Refer to the
unit serial plate for the correct amount of charge.
8.
When the correct amount of charge has been added,
close the gauge manifold hand valve.
1.
Valve V-4 is closed.
2.
Set the refrigerant supply bottle for liquid. Open the
gauge manifold hand valve, and charge liquid refrigerant until the system has the proper charge or until the
system will take no more liquid.
3.
After the liquid refrigerant is added, close the gauge
manifold hand valve. Close the valve on the refrigerant
supply bottle.
153
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Calibration Standard
Vacuum or Micron Gauge
V-4
V-2
Thermistor
6.
7.
8.
9.
V-3
V-1
Two Stage Vacuum Pump
P/N 204-725 (120 VAC); P/N 204-744 (220 VAC)
154
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Remove Evacuation Hoses
1.
Gauge lines need to have low leak fittings.
2.
Remove gauge lines.
3.
Replace and tighten the valve stem caps.
4.
The unit is ready for a functional check out.
If the pressure is below this, it can be raised by covering a portion of the condenser coil with a piece of cardboard.
6.
R-404A Systems—The compound gauge should be
indicating 13 to 18 psig (90 to 124 kPa) gauge pressure.
If there is any doubt about the unit gauge, check the
calibration.
REFRIGERANT LEAKS
7.
Use a reliable leak detector (e.g., electronic detector) to leak
test the refrigeration system. Inspect for signs of oil leakage
which is the first sign of a leak in the refrigeration system.
Under these conditions, the ball in the receiver tank
sight glass should be floating.
Testing the Refrigerant Charge with a
Loaded Box
NOTE: It is normal for compressor shaft seals to have a
slightly oily film.
1.
Install a gauge manifold (optional).
2.
Run the unit on the Cool cycle.
3.
Cover at least three quarters of the condenser to drive
any excess refrigerant from the condenser into the
receiver tank.
If the unit has an insufficient charge of refrigerant, the evaporator will be “starved” and the box temperature will rise
even though the unit is operating. The suction pressure will
drop as the refrigerant charge decreases. The charge may be
determined by inspection of the refrigeration through the
receiver tank sight glass with the following conditions
established:
4.
As the head pressure is rising, check the receiver tank
sight glass. The ball should be floating. If there is no
indication of refrigerant in the receiver tank sight glass,
the unit is low on refrigerant.
1.
Place a test box over the evaporator.
2.
Place a thermometer (TK No. 204-135) test lead in the
box near the evaporator return air opening.
3.
Install the gauge manifold.
4.
Run the unit on Cool until the air in the box indicates 0 F
(-18 C). By allowing the box to leak a small amount,
you will be able to maintain 0 F (-18 C).
The HPCO is located in the compressor discharge line. If
the discharge pressure rises above 470 psig (3241 kPa) for
R-404A units, the HPCO opens the 8 circuit, de-energizing
the fuel solenoid or the motor contactor. To test the HPCO,
rework a gauge manifold per the High Pressure Cutout
Manifold illustration.
REFRIGERANT CHARGE
Testing the Refrigerant Charge with an
Empty Box
5.
HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT SWITCH
(HPCO)
1.
R-404A Systems—The discharge or head pressure
gauge should read 275 psig (1896 kPa).
155
Connect the gauge manifold to the compressor discharge service valve with a heavy duty, black jacketed,
thick wall #HCA 144 hose with a 900 psig (6204 kPa)
working pressure rating.
Refrigeration Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
2.
Set the thermostat well below the box temperature and
run the unit in high speed cool.
3.
Raise the discharge pressure of the compressor first by
blocking the condenser coil air flow by covering the
condenser grille with a piece of cardboard. If this does
not raise the discharge pressure to the cutout level of
the HPCO, increase the engine speed by overriding the
throttle solenoid. This should increase the discharge
pressure enough to cause the HPCO to cut out.
LIQUID LINE SOLENOID (LLS)
The LLS is a normally open solenoid that closes when the
unit shifts to heat. If the LLS fails and sticks in the closed
position, the HPCO will shut down the unit whenever it
shifts to cool. If the LLS fails and sticks in the open position
or if it leaks, the unit will appear to operate normally.
HOT GAS SOLENOID (HGS)
The HGS is a normally closed solenoid that opens when the
unit shifts to heat. If the HGS fails and sticks in the closed
position, the HPCO will shut down the unit whenever it
shifts to heat. If the HGS fails and sticks in the open position or if it leaks, the unit will not cool well and the suction
pressure will be high.
NOTE: The discharge pressure should never be
allowed to exceed a pressure of 470 psig (3241 kPa)
on R-404A units.
4.
1.
2.
3.
Failure of the HPCO system to stop compressor operation should be investigated first by checking the control
circuit operation and secondly by HPCO replacement.
Relief Valve (66-6543)
O-Ring (33-1015)
Adapter Tee Weather Head (NO. 552X3)
High Pressure Cutout Manifold
156
Refrigeration Service Operations
NOTE: It is generally good practice to replace the filter drier whenever the high side is opened or when the low side is
opened for an extended period of time.
LOW SIDE PUMP DOWN
ACCUMULATOR
NOTE: Operate all units in cool for 2 to 5 minutes with
the service valves in their normal operating positions
before performing the low side pump down. Install a
gauge manifold at the compressor.
1.
Removal
Run the unit in cool, front seat the receiver tank outlet
valve, and pump down the low side to a 20 to 25 in. Hg
vacuum (-68 to -85 kPa). Turn the ON/OFF switch
OFF.
1.
Remove the refrigerant from the unit.
2.
Unsolder the inlet and outlet suction lines from the
accumulator tank.
3.
Unbolt and remove the accumulator from the unit.
Installation
If the unit pumps down acceptably and then holds at
least a 15 in. Hg vacuum (-51 kPa) for 2 minutes or
more, it can be assumed that the receiver tank outlet
valve, the compressor discharge valve plates, and the
HGS solenoid are sealing acceptably.
2.
Prepare to perform service on the low side by equalizing the high side and low side pressures. Turn the ON/
OFF switch ON and set the thermostat to shift the unit
into heat. The gauge manifold’s HIGH PRESSURE
gauge will indicate a pressure decrease and the LOW
PRESSURE gauge will indicate a pressure increase
when the HGS opens.
1.
Place the accumulator in the unit and tighten the
mounting bolts.
2.
Solder the inlet and outlet suction lines to the accumulator tank.
3.
Pressurize the low side and test for refrigerant leaks. If
no leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
4.
Evacuate the unit. Recharge with refrigerant.
COMPRESSOR
Removal
NOTE: Repeat the pump down procedure if the pressures equalize above 20 psig (138 kPa). If acceptably
low pressures cannot be achieved after the third pump
down, the refrigerant must be recovered to perform
service on the low side.
If the reading on the gauge manifold’s HIGH PRESSURE gauge increases after the high and low side pressures have been equalized, the condenser inlet check
valve is leaking.
157
1.
Remove refrigerant from the unit.
2.
Loosen and remove the belts from the compressor pulley.
3.
Disconnect the discharge and suction lines from the
compressor.
4.
Remove the compressor mounting bolts.
5.
Lift the compressor out of the unit. Keep the compressor ports covered to prevent dust, dirt, etc., from falling
into the compressor.
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
NOTE: When the compressor is removed from the
unit, the oil level should be noted, or the oil removed
from the compressor should be measured so that the
same amount of oil can be added before placing the
replacement compressor in the unit.
5.
Connect the coolant hoses to radiator and refill the
cooling system tank with 50/50 ethylene glycol/water
solution.
6.
Recharge the unit with refrigerant.
7.
Reinstall the front grille.
Installation
1.
Lift the compressor into the unit and install the mounting bolts.
2.
Install the discharge and suction lines.
3.
Pressurize the system and test for refrigerant leaks. If
no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
4.
Replace the belts and adjust the tension.
5.
Evacuate and recharge the unit.
DRIER
Removal
1.
Pump down the low side and equalize the pressure to
slightly positive.
2.
Disconnect the ORS nuts at the ends of the drier.
3.
Loosen the mounting hardware and remove the drier.
Installation
CONDENSER/RADIATOR COIL
1.
Place new O-rings in the ORS fittings on the ends of
the drier.
2.
Install the new drier and tighten the mounting screws
and nuts.
3.
Install and tighten the inlet ORS nut. Hold the drier
with a back-up wrench on the hex behind the ORS fitting.
4.
Release a small amount of refrigerant to purge the air
through the drier. Then tighten the outlet ORS nut.
5.
Pressurize the system and inspect for leaks. If no leaks
are found, open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
Removal
1.
Remove the refrigerant charge.
2.
Remove the grille assembly.
3.
Drain engine coolant and disconnect the coolant hoses
from the condenser/radiator coil.
4.
Unsolder the inlet line and liquid line connections.
5.
Unbolt and remove the condenser/radiator coil.
Installation
1.
Clean the tubes for soldering.
2.
Place the condenser/radiator coil in the unit and install
the mounting hardware.
3.
Solder the inlet line and liquid line connections.
4.
Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for leaks. If
no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
EVAPORATOR COIL
Removal
1.
158
Pump down the low side and equalize the pressure to
slightly positive.
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
2.
Remove the evaporator panels.
3.
Unsolder the expansion valve from the distributor.
4.
Unsolder the suction line and hot gas line from the
evaporator coil.
5.
Remove the DEFROST TERMINATION switch.
6.
Disconnect the electric heaters and the HIGH TEMPERATURE switch or remote temperature sensor (if so
equipped).
7.
EXPANSION VALVE ASSEMBLY
Removal
Remove the mounting bolts and slide the coil from the
evaporator housing.
1.
Pump down the low side and equalize the pressure to
slightly positive.
2.
Remove feeler bulb from suction line clamp. Note the
position of the feeler bulb on the suction line.
3.
Unsolder the equalizer line from the expansion valve.
4.
Unsolder the inlet liquid line and the distributor from
the expansion valve.
5.
Remove the expansion valve mounting bolt and remove
the expansion valve from the unit.
Installation
1.
Place the evaporator coil in the housing.
2.
Install and tighten the mounting bolts.
3.
Clean the tubes for soldering.
4.
Installation
1.
Install and bolt the expansion valve assembly in the
unit.
Solder the suction line and drain pan hot gas line connections to the evaporator coil.
2.
Solder the inlet liquid line and distributor to the expansion valve.
5.
Install the DEFROST TERMINATION switch.
3.
Solder the equalizer line to the expansion valve.
6.
Solder the distributor to the expansion valve assembly.
4.
7.
Connect the HIGH TEMPERATURE SWITCH or
remote temperature sensor and electric heaters (if so
equipped).
8.
Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If not leaks
are found, evacuate the low side.
Clean the suction line to a bright polished condition.
Install the feeler bulb clamps and the feeler bulb on the
side of the suction line in its former position. The feeler
bulb must make good contact with the suction line or
the operation will be faulty. Wrap the feeler bulb with
insulating tape.
5.
9.
Open the refrigeration valves and place the unit in operation. Check the refrigerant charge and add as required.
Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If no leaks are
found, evacuate the low side.
6.
Open the refrigeration valves and place the unit in operation.
159
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
EXPANSION VALVE ASSEMBLY
(continued)
7.
Installation
Test the unit to see that the expansion valve is properly
installed.
1.
Clean the tubes for soldering.
2.
Place the heat exchanger assembly in the evaporator
housing and install the mounting hardware loosely.
3.
Solder the refrigeration lines and tighten the mounting
hardware.
4.
Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If no leaks are
found, evacuate the low side.
5.
Open the refrigeration valves and place the unit in operation. Check the refrigerant charge and add refrigerant
as required.
HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT SWITCH
Removal
Location of Expansion Valve Bulb
1.
Pump down the low side and equalize the pressure in
the high side to slightly positive.
2.
Disconnect the wires and remove the HIGH PRESSURE CUTOUT switch from the discharge line.
HEAT EXCHANGER
Removal
1.
Pump down the low side and equalize the pressure to
slightly positive.
2.
Remove the evaporator panels.
3.
Installation
1.
Apply a refrigerant locktite to the threads of the high
pressure cutout switch.
Remove the mounting bolts that hold the heat
exchanger on the bulkhead.
2.
Install and tighten the high pressure cutout switch and
reconnect the wires.
4.
Unsolder the refrigeration lines.
3.
Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for leaks.
5.
Lift the heat exchanger assembly out of the evaporator
housing.
4.
If no leaks are found, open the refrigeration valves and
place the unit in operation.
160
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
HIGH PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE
RECEIVER TANK
Removal
Removal
1.
Remove the refrigerant charge.
1.
Remove the refrigerant charge.
2.
Remove the high pressure relief valve.
2.
Unsolder the inlet tube from the receiver tank.
3.
Unsolder the drier line from the receiver tank outlet
tube.
4.
Unbolt the mounting hardware and remove the receiver
tank from the unit.
Installation
1.
Apply a refrigerant oil to the O-ring on the high pressure relief valve.
2.
Install and tighten the high pressure relief valve.
3.
Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for leaks. If
no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
4.
Installation
1.
Place the receiver tank in the unit and install the mounting hardware loosely. Position the receiver tank so the
sight glass is clearly visible and the outlet tube lines up
with the drier line.
2.
Solder the inlet tube to the receive tank.
3.
Solder the drier line to the receiver tank outlet tube.
4.
Tighten the receiver tank mounting hardware securely.
5.
Pressurize the refrigeration system and check for leaks.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
6.
Recharge the unit with refrigerant.
Recharge the unit with refrigerant.
SUCTION PRESSURE REGULATOR
VALVE
Removal
1.
Pump down the low side and equalize the pressure to
slightly positive.
2.
Remove the remaining pressure and unsolder the suction pressure regulator valve from the accumulator tank
and suction tube.
Installation
1.
Clean the tubes for soldering.
2.
Place the valve in position and solder the connections.
3.
Pressurize the low side and check for leaks.
4.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
5.
Open the refrigeration valves, and place the unit in
operation. Check the refrigerant charge and add refrigerant as required.
161
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
LIQUID LINE CHECK VALVE REPAIR
Removal
1.
Remove the refrigerant charge.
2.
Remove the cap nut from the check valve, and remove
the spring and seat.
4.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
5.
Recharge the unit with the proper refrigerant.
LIQUID LINE CHECK VALVE
REPLACEMENT
Removal
1.
Remove the refrigerant charge.
2.
Unsolder the lines and remove the check valve.
NOTE: Disassemble the valve before unsoldering.
Installation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Cap
Gasket
Spring
Seat
Liquid Line Check Valve
Install the new seat and spring. Place a new gasket on
the cap and torque it to 45 ft-lb (61 N•m).
3.
Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for leaks.
2.
Place the disassembled check valve in position. The
arrow on the valve body indicates the direction of
refrigerant flow through the valve.
3.
Solder the inlet and outlet connections. After the valve
cools, reassemble the valve.
4.
Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for leaks.
5.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
6.
Recharge the unit with the proper refrigerant.
Removal
Inspect the inside of the check valve body for damage
or foreign particles that might adhere to the seat and
damage the new seat. If the valve body is damaged,
replace the check valve.
2.
Clean the tubes for soldering.
LIQUID LINE SOLENOID (LLS)
Installation
1.
1.
1.
Remove refrigerant from the unit.
2.
Remove the coil and disassemble the valve.
3.
Unsolder the refrigeration lines and remove the valve
from the unit.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink to prevent damage.
162
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
Installation
1.
Clean the tubes for soldering.
2.
Remove the coil and disassemble the valve.
3.
Place the valve in position and solder the refrigeration
lines.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink to prevent damage.
4.
After the valve cools, assemble the valve and install the
coil.
5.
Pressurize the system and test for leaks.
6.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
7.
Evacuate and recharge the unit.
2.
Remove the coil and disassemble the valve.
3.
Unsolder the refrigeration lines and remove the valve
from the unit.
2.
Remove the coil and disassemble the valve.
3.
Place the valve in position and solder the refrigeration
lines.
6.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
7.
Evacuate and recharge the unit.
Because Polyol Ester has an affinity for moisture, it must be
kept in capped containers. In addition, it should be added as
the last step in system repair. Rubber gloves are recommended when handling Polyol Ester because it may cause
skin irritation.
Installation
Clean the tubes for soldering.
Pressurize the system and test for leaks.
CAUTION: Polyol Ester (POE) is the only oil for
use with Thermo King units using R-404A. It
should not be added to standard Thermo King units,
Nor should the standard or synthetic oil be added to
systems containing R-404A. Combining the two oils
could result in damage to the system.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink to prevent damage.
1.
5.
The CD-II MAX compressors are ICE TK 208R compressors and are charged with Polyol Ester oil (POE) (TK No.
203-413). All gauge fittings are 1/4 inch fittings.
Removal
Remove the refrigerant charge.
After the valve cools, assemble the valve and install the
coil.
COMPRESSORS SHIPPED WITH R-404A
HOT GAS SOLENOID (HGS)
1.
4.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink to prevent damage.
163
Refrigeration Service Operations (Rev. 01/01)
EQUIPMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR
USE WITH R-404A
Gauge Manifold Sets
Gauge manifold sets that show the correct pressure-temperature relationship should be used. Gauge manifolds and
manifold hoses used with other Thermo King refrigerants
may be used but extreme care should be taken to prevent
contamination of the R-404A system with other refrigerants. Purge manifold and hoses with dry nitrogen before
using. NEVER USE EQUIPMENT THAT MAY BE CONTAMINATED WITH AUTOMOTIVE TYPE POLYALKYLENE GLYCOL (PAG) OILS.
Dedicated Equipment
CAUTION: Equipment that has been used with
other refrigerants MUST NOT be used with R-404A
refrigerants. Mixing R-404A with other refrigerants
will cause contamination of the refrigerant. Using
contaminated refrigerant will cause system failure.
Vacuum Pumps
System Clean-up
When evacuating a two stage, three or five CFM pump is
recommended. It is also recommended that dry nitrogen be
used first. Ideally, a new vacuum pump should be used and
dedicated for use with R-404A systems because residual
refrigerants may remain in used vacuum pumps.
Existing clean up devices such as suction line filters and
compressor oil filters may be used if they are thoroughly
cleaned and new filter elements are installed. All standard
compressor oils must be removed from clean-up devices to
prevent contamination of the R-404A system. Dangerous
contamination will result if other refrigerants or standard
oils are introduced to R-404A systems.
Pumps used with other Thermo King refrigerants may be
used but extreme care should be taken to prevent contamination of R-404A systems with other refrigerants.
NOTE: For additional information on parts and supplies,
consult your local Thermo King dealer and Thermo King
Tool Catalog TK No. 5955.
An oil filter, P/N 66-7462 is added.
The Thermo King Evacuation Station is recommended. This
station is available from service parts under part number
204-725. See Truck and Trailer Service Bulletin T&T 061
for additional details.
Refrigerant Recovery
Present systems can be adapted to the recovery of R-404A
but should be dedicated to the recovery of these refrigerants.
Consult the manufacturer of your recovery equipment for
details.
Use only recommended vacuum pump oils and change oil
after every major evacuation. Vacuum pump oils are highly
refined and the use of contaminated oils will prevent the
desired vacuum from being obtained. Failure to follow these
recommendations may result in conditions that will destroy
the vacuum pump.
164
Structural Maintenance
UNIT AND ENGINE MOUNTING BOLTS
FAN LOCATION
Periodically check and tighten all unit and engine mounting
bolts. Torque the unit mounting bolts to 60 ft-lb
(81 N•m). Torque the engine mounting bolts to 50 ft-lb
(68 N•m).
When mounting the fan and hub assembly on the motor or
jackshaft, position the assembly in the orifice with 30 to 35
percent of the blade width to the air discharge side for
proper fan performance.
Fan Blade Position in Orifice
1.
Check Mounting Bolts For Tightness
165
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
UNIT INSPECTION
Inspect the unit during pretrip inspections and scheduled
maintenance inspections for loose or broken wires or hardware, compressor oil leaks, or other physical damage which
might affect unit performance and require repair or replacement of parts.
EVAPORATOR COIL
Clean the evaporator coil during scheduled maintenance
inspections by blowing compressed air through the coil in
the direction opposite the normal air flow. Inspect the coil
and fins for damage and repair if necessary.
CAUTION: Air pressure should not be high enough
to damage coil fins.
CONDENSER COIL
Clean the condenser coil during scheduled maintenance
inspections by blowing compressed air from the back side
of the coil out toward the front of the unit (direction opposite normal air flow). Inspect the coil and fins for damage
and repair if necessary.
166
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
1.
2.
3.
Shim
O-Ring
Seal
4.
5.
6.
Bearing
Shaft
Oil Sling Retainer
Jackshaft Assembly
JACKSHAFT ASSEMBLY
The CD-II MAX 30 does not have electric standby capability, therefore, the electric motor is replaced by a jackshaft.
The jackshaft assembly oil level plug should be removed,
and the oil level checked every 1000 operating hours. Check
the jackshaft during the pre-trip inspection for oil leakage. If
there is any sign of leakage, remove the jackshaft assembly.
Remove the level and fill plugs and drain oil reservoir.
3.
Remove bearing retainer cap from fill plug end of the
jackshaft assembly.
NOTE: There are shims between the bearing retainer
cap and the housing. These should be saved for possible reuse during reassembly.
4.
Model 30 truck units are equipped with jackshafts that have
improved venting. This improvement was made by using a
new air vent (P/N 55-6417), adding an oil sling retainer
(P/N 77-2434), and using fanshaft oil (P/N 203-278). The
new air vent, oil sling retainer, and fanshaft oil reduce the
build-up of pressure inside the jackshaft.
Remove the shaft and bearings.
NOTE: The oil sling retainer is pulled out by the bearing assembly on shaft.
Disassembly
1.
2.
Remove jackshaft assembly from the unit and remove
the pulleys.
167
5.
Remove the retainer cap from level plug end of assembly.
6.
Use a punch and hammer to remove the seals and bearing cups from bearing retainer caps.
7.
Use a bearing splitter or similar tool to remove the
bearing cones from the shaft.
8.
Clean all parts in clean solvent and then examine the
bearing cups and cones for damage.
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Reassembly
1.
Coat the edges of the oil seals with a gasket sealant.
2.
Using a suitable tool, install the seals in the end caps.
Fill the space between the seal lips with grease. Install
the assembled end cap (seal and bearing race installed)
on the oil level plug end of jackshaft housing.
3.
Place the oil sling retainer on the shaft. If the bearings
were removed from the shaft, place the oil sling
retainer on the shaft while installing the bearings. If the
bearings were not removed from the shaft, press the oil
sling retainer onto the shaft through the opening in the
top of the oil sling retainer.
1.
2.
3.
End Cap
Oil Sling Retainer
Tie Band
4.
5.
4.
Use a tie band or a hose clamp as tool to compress the
oil sling retainer enough to fit inside the jackshaft
housing.
5.
Install the shaft into the jackshaft housing with oil sling
retainer on the shaft with bearing. Align the opening in
the oil sling retainer with the air vent opening in the top
of the jackshaft housing.
6.
Use a punch and hammer to tap the oil sling retainer
into the jackshaft housing until it is centered beneath
the air vent opening and past the housing lip that holds
the outer race.
7.
Remove the tie band or hose clamp.
Air Vent (P/N 55-6417)
Shaft
Installing Oil Sling Retainer
168
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
8.
Install the remaining end cap.
9.
Torque the bolts to 10 ft-lb (13.6 N•m).
10. Check end play of the shaft with a dial indicator. End
play should be between 0.001 to 0.005 in. (0.025 to
0.127 mm). Change shims if necessary.
Pour 3.5 ozs (104 ml) of fanshaft oil P/N 203-278 into the
jackshaft housing.
1.
2.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Fill Plug And Vent
Oil Level Plug
Jackshaft Assembly
Hub
Stationary Field Coil
Pulley
Disk
Flat Springs
Compressor Clutch Assembly
COMPRESSOR CLUTCH
Clutch Test
Operation
A stationary field coil is mounted on the compressor body
concentric with the shaft. A pulley assembly, consisting of a
pulley, a disc and a hub, is mounted on the shaft of the compressor. The hub and disc are flexibly connected by flat
springs that, in the disengaged position, hold the disc
slightly away from the pulley web (friction surface).
169
1.
If the field coil lead wire is broken, replace the field
coil.
2.
Check the amperage and voltage. The amperage range
should be 3.6 to 4.2 at 12 volts or 1.8 to 2.1 at 24 volts.
Note the following symptoms and conditions:
a.
A very high amperage reading—a short within the
field coil.
b.
No amperage reading—an open circuit in the
winding.
c.
An intermittent or poor system ground results in
lower voltage at the clutch. Check for tight fit on
the coil retaining snap ring or for good ground at
the coil retaining screws.
d.
Replace field coil if it has an open or short circuit.
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
3.
Air Gap—An incorrect air gap could cause erratic
engagement or disengagement and/or clutch rattle.
Check the air gap with a feeler gauge (0.016 to
0.031 in. [0.4 to 0.8 mm]). Adjust based on Clutch
Installation chapter.
2.
Remove the drive plate using the shaft seal kit (TK
204-805). Then remove the shims from either the drive
shaft or the drive plate.
Clutch Removal
NOTE: Make sure the proper tools are available before
performing maintenance procedures. Refer to the tool listing at the end of this chapter for tools required. Contact
your local Thermo King dealer for further information.
Removal
1.
Remove the center bolt using the puller arbor (TK
204-804) to prevent drive plate rotation.
1.
Remove Drive Plate
3.
Remove the snap ring using external snap ring pliers
(TK 204-808).
4.
Remove the cover.
Holder
Remove Center Bolt
1.
2.
Snap Ring
Cover
Remove Snap Ring and Cover
170
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
5.
Remove the pulley assembly using the clutch remover
(TK No. 204-806) and the spacer positioned on the
cylinder head hub.
NOTE: DO NOT hold the coil by the lead wire.
NOTE: To avoid damaging the pulley groove, the
pulley claws should be hooked into (NOT UNDER)
the pulley groove.
Remove Coil
Inspection
1.
Drive Plate
If the contact surface is scorched, the drive plate and
pulley should be replaced.
2.
Remove Pulley
6.
Remove the coil’s lead wire from the holder on the top
of the compressor.
7.
Remove the three screws that attach the coil to the compressor and remove the coil.
Pulley Assembly
Inspect the appearance of the pulley assembly. If the
pulley’s contact surface is excessively grooved due to
slippage, both the pulley and drive plate must be
replaced. There should also be no foreign matter, such
as oil or grit, lodged between the clutch plate and
pulley. Thoroughly clean these contact surfaces and the
drive plate.
171
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
3.
Coil
Inspect the coil for a loose connector or cracked insulation. If the insulation is cracked, replace the coil.
Repair or replace the wire or the connector if either is
loose or damaged.
1.
2.
3.
Drive Plate
Pulley Assembly
Coil
Install Coil
1.
Inspect Components
4.
Clutch Installation
Felt
Install the pulley assembly using the compressor holder
(TK No. 204-807) and a hand press.
NOTE: Before installation refer to the “Inspection” procedures previously described.
1.
Confirm that the felt is installed on the front of the cylinder head.
2.
Install the coil on the compressor (with the lead wire on
top). At this time, confirm that the coil’s concave portion is aligned with the felt and then tighten the mounting screws to the specified torque.
NOTE: Specified torque: 2.9 to 4.3 ft-lbs (0.4 to
0.6 kgm).
3.
Install the lead wire in the wire holder on the
compressor.
Install Pulley
5.
Install the cover and the snap ring using external ring
pliers.
NOTE: When installing the snap ring, the chamfered
inner edge of the snap ring should face upward.
172
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
After tightening the bolt, ensure that the pulley rotates
smoothly.
1.
2.
Snap Ring
Cover
1.
Install Cover and Snap Ring
6.
Install the driver plate on the drive shaft, together with
the original shim(s). Press the drive plate down by
hand.
7.
Tighten the bolt to the specified torque using the puller
arbor (TK No. 204-804) to prevent drive-plate rotation.
Shims
Install Shims and Drive Plate
8.
Ensure that the clutch clearance is as specified. If necessary, adjust the clearance using shims.
Adjusting shims are available in the following thicknesses:
Shim TK P/N
NOTE: Specified torque: 8.7 to 10.1 ft-lbs (1.2 to
1.4 kgm).
TK 11-8031
TK 11-8032
TK 11-8033
173
Thickness in. (mm)
0.0039 in. (0.1 mm)
0.0118 in. (0.3 mm)
0.0197 in. (0.5 mm)
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
NOTE: Specified clearance: 0.01 to 0.02 in. (0.3 to
0.6 mm).
3.
Use the seal remover (from the shaft seal kit P/N 204805) to remove the shaft seal cover. Turn the seal
remover to engage the hook on the seal remover with
the hook on the shaft seal cover, then slowly pull the
shaft seal cover out of the cylinder head.
NOTE: The shaft seal cover SHOULD NOT be
reused. Always use a new shaft seal cover when reassembling a compressor.
Check Clearance
Electrical Connection
1.
Connect the lead wire to the electrical circuit.
NOTE: The stationary field is grounded at the factory; therefore, it is necessary only to connect the hot
(lead) wire.
2.
1.
2.
Engage and disengage the clutch several times to check
the clutch engagement. The disc should snap firmly
against the pulley.
Remove Shaft Seal Cover
4.
SHAFT SEAL COVER AND SHAFT SEAL
Removal
1.
Remove the magnetic clutch assembly, as outlined in
“Magnetic Clutch Removal” section of this manual.
2.
Remove the felt pad.
Shaft Seal Cover
Felt Pad
174
Use the seal remover (from the shaft seal kit P/N 204805) to remove the shaft seal. Turn the seal remover to
engage the hook on the seal remover with the hook on
the shaft seal, then slowly pull the shaft seal out of the
cylinder head.
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Installation
Before installing a shaft seal inspect it carefully (see
Inspection).
1.
1.
Clean the section of the front cylinder head that holds
shaft seal.
2.
Apply clean compressor oil to the new shaft seal and to
the front cylinder head. If the slip surfaces are dirty,
clean them with thinners, dry the clean surfaces and
apply clean compressor oil.
3.
Place the seal guide (from the shaft seal kit P/N
204-805) on the end of the shaft.
Shaft Seal
Remove Shaft Seal
Inspection
The shaft seal should not be reused. Always use a new shaft
seal when reassembling a compressor. Be extremely careful
to make sure the lip of the shaft seal that is being installed is
not scratched or damaged in any way. Make sure the shaft
seal is free from lint and dirt that could damage the shaft
seal surface.
1.
Seal Guide
Place Guide on Shaft
Inspect Shaft Seal
175
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
4.
Place the shaft seal on the seal guide and slide the
seal into the cylinder head.
8.
Place the shaft seal cover on the seal guide and slide
the shaft seal cover into the cylinder head.
Install Shaft Seal Cover
1.
2.
Seal Guide
Shaft Seal
9.
Place Shaft Seal on Guide
5.
Use the seal installer (from the shaft seal kit P/N
204-805) to press the shaft seal into the cylinder
head as far as possible.
6.
Remove the seal guide from the shaft.
Use the seal installer (from the shaft seal kit P/N 204805) to press the shaft seal cover into the cylinder.
10. Remove the seal guide from the shaft.
NOTE: Position the shaft seal cover as shown in the illustration. The felt pad should also be replaced with a new
one when the shaft seal is replaced.
Press Seal Into Cylinder Head
7.
Place the seal guide (from the shaft seal kit P/N
204-805) on the end of the shaft.
Proper Shaft Seal Cover Position
176
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
SPECIAL TOOLS
8932a
Clutch Remover P/N 204-806
8932b
Compressor Holder P/N 204-807
8932c
Clutch Installation Kit P/N 204-890
8932d
Snap Ring Pliers P/N 204-808
177
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
8932f
8932e
Shaft Seal Kit P/N 204-805
Pulley Arbor P/N 204-804
SYSTEM COMPRESSOR AND OIL
Installation of the Compressor
The compressor is mounted in the condenser section. The
side to side mounting angle of the compressor must remain
± 45° from the horizontal. The forward to backward angle
must be within ± 10° of horizontal. Access to the air conditioning system service ports is from the top of the unit.
178
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Checking the Oil Level
Each compressor comes with a standard charge of Polyol
Ester (POE) oil inside. This quantity of oil is enough to supply the compressor lubrication when it is installed into an
already “oil wet” system. New systems require an extra
quantity of oil be added to “wet” all the interior surfaces of
the system.
Drain the Oil
During normal operation there is always a quantity of oil
that travels around inside the system. This oil lubricates all
the components, returns to the compressor for a while, and
again travels around the system.
Adding Extra Oil to the System
The initial oil charge into a new system is based on the size
of the system and the amount of oil, which remains in the
compressor during operation.
Draining the Oil
The correct oil to use in the CD-II MAX using R-404A is
Polyol Ester (POE) oil (P/N 203-413). Any extra or
replacement oil should be placed into the system at the
receiver tank port.
Remove the compressor from the unit and drain the oil from
the compressor drain plug and all other ports. Turn the
clutch (rotating the internal compressor parts) by hand and
drain oil again. Repeat until all oil is removed from the
compressor. Measure the oil in liquid ounces. Also, inspect
the oil for signs of contamination.
CAUTION: Keep all oil containers tightly sealed
from the air. Oil tends to absorbed moisture from
the air and can become contaminated if left open. If
contaminated oil is put into a system, it may damage
the components of the system.
Major Loss of Refrigerant
In case of a major loss of refrigerant, it must be assumed
that some system oil is lost also. The oil level should be
verified by the “Checking the Oil Level” method in this
manual.
179
Structural Maintenance (Rev. 01/01)
Oil contamination:
1.
Dirt in the oil.
2.
Color changed to a varnish color.
3.
Presence of foreign substances, metal shavings, etc. in
the oil.
NOTE: Always replace oil with new fresh oil taken from a
sealed container only.
NOTE: Always replace the system filter-drier anytime the
system has been opened for service.
When a System Becomes Contaminated
A severely contaminated system may be indicated by black
oil in the compressor. If severe contamination occurs, it will
be necessary to flush the complete system. If flushing is
required, use industry approved materials.
In all cases when this occurs you must determine the extent
of contamination. Do this by removing the filter-drier and
determine if the darker colored oil is present at that point of
the system too. If it is, flushing the system is recommended.
If the oil appears clean at the filter-drier, install a new filterdrier and replace the compressor with clean new oil. Refer
to checking and draining the compressor oil section for
details.
CAUTION: Any extra or replacement oil should be
placed into the system at the receiver tank port.
180
Hot Water Heat Diagnosis
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Unit not cooling
Stuck coolant valve; solenoid bad
Repair or replace
Unit not heating
Coolant valve stuck open
Replace thermostat
No electrical signal
Check for power on 26 wire
Heater coil heavily scaled
Replace heater coil
Evaporator water temperature
thermostat inoperative
Replace thermostat
Leaking hoses, tubing or
connections
Repair or replace as required
Loss of coolant
181
Hot Water Heat Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
Hot Water Heat Option
NOTE: Sensor to
Control Water
Solenoid #3
NOTE: To engine thermostat housing
below thermostat.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Special Evaporator Coil with Water Tubes
Tube - Valve to Coil
Water Valve - (Evaporator)
Elbow - 90°
Adapter
Water Bracket - Valve
Tube - Water (Evaporator to Radiator)
Tube - Water (Inlet, Engine to Valve)
Tube - Water (Engine to Evaporator)
Tube - Water (Return to Radiator)
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
182
Clamp - Tubes
Bracket - Guard (Belt/Tube)
Switch - Water Temperature
Adapter
Hose - Water
Clamp - Hose (EPDM)
Water Nipple
Water Adapter
Air Bleed Screw
Radiator
Mechanical Diagnosis
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
UNIT switch ON—nothing happens Dead battery
UNIT switch ON—indicator lights
come on but engine does not
crank
Engine cranks but FAILS to start
REMEDY
Recharge or replace battery
REMOTE switch OFF (optional)
Turn ON
Circuit breaker open
Replace or reset
Corroded battery connections
Clean and tighten
RESET switch open
Correct cause—push in button
Control circuit fuse blown
Check for shorted main harness and
replace 60 amp control circuit fuse
Battery low
Replace or recharge battery
DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch in
ELECTRIC position
Flip switch to DIESEL
Circuit breaker open
Push in RESET button
Starter solenoid defective
Repair or replace
Starter relay defective
Replace relay
Corroded battery connections
Clean and tighten
Starter clutch defective
Replace
Starter defective
Repair or replace
STARTER switch defective
Replace
Misadjusted fuel solenoid linkage
Adjust
Fuel solenoid not energized
Check 8D circuit, fuel solenoid timer
and relay
Fuel solenoid defective
Replace solenoid
No fuel or wrong fuel in tank
Fill fuel tank. After filling a
completely empty tank, first bleed
fuel system.
Engine too cold
Use winter preheat procedure
Glow plugs defective
Replace glow plugs
183
Mechanical Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Engine cranks but FAILS to start
(continued)
Air in fuel system
Bleed fuel system. During this
operation, it can also be determined
if the fuel lines are tight and filters
clean.
Speed/run relay malfunction
Check relay or unit thermostat
Insufficient compression
Measure compression pressure. If
necessary, grind valves or replace
piston
Electric fuel pump not operating
Check pump for running and 8 to 10
psig (55 to 69 kPa). Repair or
replace fuel pump
Injection pump incorrectly timed
Adjust timing
Faulty injection nozzle(s)
Repair injection nozzle or replace it
Faulty injection pump
Have pump repaired
Air in injection pump
Bleed fuel system
Fuel filter obstructed
Replace filter element
High water temperature coolant
Add coolant. Check for leaks
Low oil pressure
Add oil. Check for leaks
Vent of fuel tank obstructed
Remove obstruction
Electric fuel pump not operating
Check pump for running and 8 to 10
psig (55 to 69 kPa). Repair or
replace fuel pump
Dry air cleaner (optional) plugged
Change filter element
Fuel solenoid not energized
Change filter element
Button pops out on reset switch
Check 8D circuit
High refrigerant pressure
Locate and correct cause
Air or dirt in fuel system
Adjust
Fuel line leaks
Tighten connections of fuel lines. if
necessary, replace damaged lines
Speed adjustment wrong
Adjust speed
Electric fuel pump does not run
Check voltage. Repair or replace
pump
Engine stops after starting
Engine does not reach full power
184
Mechanical Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Engine does not reach full power
(continued)
Fuel filter blocked
Install new filter
Electric fuel pump filter dirty
Clean and replace diesel filter
Delivery of fuel pump insufficient
Repair or replace pump
Cylinder head gasket leaking
Replace gasket
Piston rings worn, stuck or broken
Replace rings
Cylinder worn
Replace or bore
Leaking injection nozzle or irregular
injection caused by fouling
Clean and repair nozzle
Insufficient compression pressure
due to faulty piston or valves
Check cylinder with compression
tester. if necessary, grind valves or
replace piston
Air filter clogged
Clean air filter
Fuel tank vent clogged
Unclog vent
Injection rate too low
Adjust pump discharge rate
Insufficient injection pressure
Readjust or replace nozzle
Pump injects too early or too late
Adjust injection pump timing
Air in fuel system
Bleed fuel system
Air is drawn into fuel pump
Check all fuel lines and fittings
Loose governor assembly
Check and repair governor
assembly
Restricted exhaust system
Clean or replace restricted parts
Wrong fuel
Drain and refill with correct fuel
Clogged air intake system
Clean air cleaner
Restricted exhaust system
Clean or replace
Opening pressure of nozzle is
too low or needle sticks
Repair nozzle. Replace if necessary
Injection amount too great
Have pump repaired
Oil being drawn in
Check oil level in oil bath air filter
Injection pump too timed
Check timing of injection pump
Excessive load
Check drive system and engine oil
pressure
Engine is sooting heavily, emits
thick black clouds of smoke
(excessive fuel to air ratio)
185
Mechanical Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Engine knocks
Insufficient air
Clean air filter
Air in fuel system
Bleed fuel system
Engine is cold
Warm up
Fuel return line plugged
Remove restriction
Injection pump not timed
Retime injection pump
Injection nozzle fouled or opening
pressure too low
Clean, repair or replace injection
nozzle
Dirty radiator
Clean radiator
Worn engine parts
Overhaul engine
Engine coolant is low
Add coolant slowly while engine is in
operation
Dirty or plugged radiator
Clean radiator
Cooling system heavily scaled
Clean cooling system
Water pump leaks
Repair or replace water pump
Worn or loose belt
Replace belt or adjust
Engine runs hot
Cylinder head gasket leaks (bubbles Replace cylinder head gasket.
appear in radiator if cylinder gasket Correct gasket
is leaking)
Oil pressure too low or drops
suddenly. Minimum oil pressure
for a hot engine is 10 psig (69
kPa), setting on the LOW OIL
PRESSURE switch.
Faulty thermostat
Check or replace the thermostat
Faulty temperature gauge
Replace gauge
Insufficient oil in pan
Refill oil base after correcting cause
of loss
Leak in oil line
Tighten oil line fittings
Oil relief valve sticking
Disassemble and clean oil pressure
regulator valve
Faulty oil pressure gauge
Check oil line to oil pressure gauge
to see if it is blocked. Check oil
pressure gauge. Replace if
necessary
186
Mechanical Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Oil pressure too low or drops
suddenly (continued)
Worn oil pump, camshaft, main or
connecting rod bearings, loose oil
gallery plug, oil in water through
crack
Repair engine
High oil consumption
Oil leakage
Check and eliminate possible
causes
Clogged air cleaner
Clean air cleaner
Damaged valve seals
Replace seals on valve stem
Worn valve stem or valve guides
Replace valves and valve guides
Broken piston rings or cylinder bore Have engine repaired. Replace
worn or scored
broken piston rings
Blue Smoke (oil consumption)
Crankcase breather clogged
Clean crankcase breather
Excessive oil consumption
Refer to High Oil Consumption.
Repair as necessary
White Smoke (fuel is not burning) Cold engine
Battery is not recharging
Allow engine to warm up
Low compression
Check and eliminate possible
causes. Repair as necessary
Timing
Readjust timing
Air or water in fuel
Bleed system. Replace filters, clean
fuel system, drain and clean tank
and check supply tank for water. Use
known good fuel
Insufficient preheat
Check glow plugs
Loose alternator belt
Tighten belt
Loose connections in electrical
system
Check all electrical connections and
charging system
Worn brushes in alternator
Repair
Voltage regulator faulty
Replace
Battery defective
Replace
Alternator defective
Repair or replace
187
188
CYCLE-SENTRY Diagnosis
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
TEST PROCEDURE
Unit will not energize the run relay Defective run relay
Test run relay
when required
Open 7A circuit from selector switch Test 7A circuit
to run relay
Preheat relay will not energize
when required
Defective selector switch
Test circuit from 7M to 7A on switch
in the start-stop function
Defective load temperature
thermostat
Check load temperature thermostat
in Continuous Run mode
Open D7 or D8 diodes
Test D7 and D8 diodes
Defective CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test CYCLE-SENTRY module
Open 53 circuit from run relay to
CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test 53 circuit
Defective preheat relay
Test preheat relay
Open 52A circuit from preheat relay
to CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test 52A circuit
Open D7 or D8 diodes
Test D7 or D8 diodes
Defective CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test CYCLE-SENTRY module
Open CH circuit to CYCLE-SENTRY Test CH circuit
module
Open 7A circuit from selector switch Test 7A circuit
to the preheat relay
Unit will not automatically crank,
but will preheat automatically
Open 2A circuit to preheat relay
(after 9-89)
Test 2A circuit
Defective CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test CYCLE-SENTRY module
Open 52 circuit from start relay to
starter
Test 52 circuit
Open 8S circuit from start relay to
starter
Test 8S circuit
Defective start relay
Test start relay
Defective starter
Test starter
189
CYCLE-SENTRY Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
TEST PROCEDURE
Unit will not automatically crank,
but will preheat automatically
(continued)
Open 8 circuit to starter relay (after
9-89)
Test 8 circuit
Open 7A circuit to starter relay
Test 7A circuit
Unit disengaged starter before
engine is running
Defective CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test CYCLE-SENTRY module
Low battery condition
Test battery under load
Defective starter
Test starter in Continuous Run mode
Defective starter
Test starter in Continuous Run mode
Defective RPM sensor
Test 52A circuit
Open or grounded FS-1 or FS-2
circuit from RPM sensor to CYCLESENTRY module
Test FS-1 or FS-2 circuit
Defective CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test CYCLE-SENTRY module
Unit fails to start (normal indication)
Test for normal starting in
Continuous mode
Open 52 circuit from start relay to
CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test 52 circuit
Open 8S circuit from start relay to
starter
Test 8S circuit
Defective CYCLE-SENTRY module
Test CYCLE-SENTRY module
Unit does not disengage starter
when engine is started
Unit turns ON and RESET switch
trips
Standard 4-mode unit has no low Defective thermostat
speed cool in automatic start-stop
Open diode D6
mode (unit shuts off after high
speed cool
Test thermostat
Standard 4-mode unit will not
initiate start from defrost
Open 29 circuit
Test 29 circuit to PC board
Open D11 diode or R9 resistor, or
29T circuit on PC board
Test D11 diode or R9 resistor and
29T circuit on PC board to
thermostat
Defective thermostat
Test unit thermostat
190
Test D6 diode
CYCLE-SENTRY Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
TEST PROCEDURE
Unit will not initiate start if engine Defective block temperature
Test block temperature thermostat
temperatures drop below 60 F
thermostat
(15.5 C)
Open 8B circuit to block temperature Test 8B circuit
thermostat
Unit will not stop when load
temperature thermostat is
satisfied
Open 7A circuit from block
temperature thermostat to run relay
Test 7A circuit
Defective block temperature
thermostat switch
Test block temperature thermostat
switch
Defective load temperature
thermostat
Test load temperature thermostat in
Continuous Run mode
Engine temperature below 120 F
(49.0 C)
Check engine temperature after
warm up
Battery not charged
Charge battery
Defective battery sentry
Replace battery sentry
Charging system faulty
Correct charging system
191
192
Electric Standby (Optional) Diagnosis
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
UNIT switch ON—indicator lights
do not come on
Battery discharged
Charge or replace battery
Remote switch off
Turn ON switch (optional)
Circuit breaker or SAFETY switch
open
Push in button. Replace switch if
defective
Electric MOTOR RESET switch
tripping
Check for short circuit in unit wiring
(high voltage)
Control circuit fuse blown
Replace 60 amp control circuit fuse
Dirty battery terminals
Clean and retighten terminals
DIESEL/ELECTRIC switch on
DIESEL
Move switch to ELECTRIC position
No standby power
Provide power to unit; check power
at:
1. Power source
2. Power plug
3. Motor contactor hot side
4. Motor contactor load side
(contactor closed)
5. Overload relay
6. Motor terminals
Defective motor contactor
Repair or replace motor contactor
Defective LOW OIL PRESSURE
switch
Replace LOW OIL PRESSURE
switch
Overload relay tripping
Check for shorted motor windings or
wires
Defective motor
Replace motor
Batteries discharged
Charge ore replace batteries
UNIT switch ON—indicator lights
come on but electric motor does
not run
Electric motor hums but does not Locked rotor (overload relay will
run
open after a period of time)
Remove interference
Locked compressor
Repair compressor
Defective clutch on engine (locked
up)
Repair or replace clutch
Low line voltage or no voltage on
one leg
Bring voltage up to within 10% of
motor rating
193
Electric Standby (Optional) Diagnosis (Rev. 01/01)
CONDITION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Contact chatter
Low battery voltage
Check voltage condition. Check
momentary voltage dip during
starting—low voltage prevents
magnet sealing
Defective or incorrect coil
Replace coil
Poor contact in control circuit
Check auxiliary switch contacts and
overload relay contacts. Check for
loose connections in control circuits
Poor ground on PC board
Test ground circuit on PC board
Defective thermostat relay
Check operation of thermostat relay
Abnormal in-rush of current
Check or grounds, shorts or
excessive motor load current
Low voltage
Correct voltage condition. Check
momentary voltage dip during
starting
Foreign matter prevents contacts
from closing
Clean contacts
Rapid cycling
Check for cause of short cycling
(such as thermostat)
Short circuit
Correct fault
Defective heater contactor
Replace contactor
26 wire open
Locate open and repair
Defective HIGH TEMPERATURE
switch or sensor
Replace switch or sensor
Loose connections in electrical
system
Check all electrical connections and
charging system
Worn brushes in alternator
Replace brushes
Voltage regulator faulty
Repair or replace regulator
Battery defective
Replace battery
Alternator defective
Repair or replace alternator
Loose belt
Tighten belt
Dirty battery terminals
Clean and retighten
Contact welding or freezing
Electric heaters do not heat—
(optional) indicator lights come
on
Battery is not recharging
194
•
•
•
•
•
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
•
•
SYMPTOM
Rapid cycling between cool and heat
Unit cools in Heat and Defrost cycle
Unit heats in Refrigeration cycle
High head pressure
Low head pressure
No head pressure
High suction pressure
Low suction pressure
No suction pressure
Unit operating in a vacuum
Receiver sight glass empty
Suction line frosting back
Unable to pump down system
Unable to pull vacuum in low side
Unable to hold vacuum in low side
Noisy compressor
Unit not refrigerating
Unit not heating or defrosting
Refrigeration Diagnosis Chart
POSSIBLE CAUSES
Overcharge of refrigerant
Shortage of refrigerant
No refrigerant
Air through condenser too hot (ambient)
Air flow through condenser restricted
•
•
•
Air through condenser too cold (ambient)
•
•
• •
Air in refrigerant system
Condenser fan blades bent or broken
•
Air short cycling around evaporator coil
•
•
Air through evaporator restricted
•
•
•
•
Evaporator needs defrosting
•
•
Compressor discharge valves leaking
•
Compressor suction valves leaking
•
Too much compressor oil in system
•
•
•
• • • •
•
•
•
Faulty oil pump in compressor
Loose compressor pulley
Compressor bearing loose or burned out
Broken valve plate in compressor
•
Expansion valve power element lost its charge
•
Expansion valve feeler bulb improperly mounted
195
•
•
•
•
•
•
Expansion valve needle eroded or leaking
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Expansion valve closed too much
•
•
Expansion valve partially closed by ice, dirt or wax
•
•
•
•
Liquid refrigerant entering compressor
Restricted line on the low side
•
•
Restricted line on the high side
Restricted drier
•
•
•
•
Discharge service valve back seated
•
•
•
Evaporator shutter open
Evaporator shutter stuck closed
•
• •
• •
•
POSSIBLE CAUSES
Expansion valve feeler bulb making poor contact
Expansion valve open too much
•
•
SYMPTOM
Rapid cycling between cool and heat
Unit cools in Heat and Defrost cycle
Unit heats in Refrigeration cycle
High head pressure
Low head pressure
No head pressure
High suction pressure
Low suction pressure
No suction pressure
Unit operating in a vacuum
Receiver sight glass empty
Suction line frosting back
Unable to pump down system
Unable to pull vacuum in low side
Unable to hold vacuum in low side
Noisy compressor
Unit not refrigerating
Unit not heating or defrosting
Refrigeration Diagnosis Chart (Rev. 01/01)
•
Suction service valve back seated
•
•
• •
•
• • • •
• •
•
•
• •
•
•
Faulty three-way valve
Faulty pilot solenoid
Loose or broken electrical connections
Thermostat or thermometer out of calibration
Suction pressure gauge out of calibration
•
•
•
Leaky receiver tank outlet valve
Leaky bypass check valve
• •
196
Leaky condenser check valve
Refrigeration Diagrams
Cool Mode
1.
Compressor
10.
Receiver Outlet Valve
2.
Oil Separator
11.
Drier
3.
Hot Gas Solenoid
12.
Heat Exchanger
4.
Liquid Line Solenoid
13.
Expansion Valve
5.
Condenser Inlet Check Valve
14.
Pan Heater
6.
Condenser Coil
15.
Evaporator Coil
7.
High Pressure Relief Valve
16.
Accumulator Tank
8.
Receiver Tank
17.
Suction Pressure Regulator
9.
Sight Glass
197
Refrigeration Diagrams (Rev. 01/01)
Heat and Defrost Modes
1.
Compressor
10.
Receiver Outlet Valve
2.
Oil Separator
11.
Drier
3.
Hot Gas Solenoid
12.
Heat Exchanger
4.
Liquid Line Solenoid
13.
Expansion Valve
5.
Condenser Inlet Check Valve
14.
Pan Heater
6.
Condenser Coil
15.
Evaporator Coil
7.
High Pressure Relief Valve
16.
Accumulator Tank
8.
Receiver Tank
17.
Suction Pressure Regulator
9.
Sight Glass
198
Wiring Diagrams and Schematic Index
Dwg No.
Drawing Title
Rev.
Page
5D39622
Cab Box Wiring Diagram
G
201
5D40793
Cab Control Schematic Diagram
C
202
5D82975
CD-II MAX 30 Wiring Diagram
D
203
CD-II MAX 30 EEC Wiring Diagram
5D82976
CD-II MAX 30 Schematic Diagram
204
D
CD-II MAX 30 EEC Schematic Diagram
5D48584
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE-SENTRY Schematic Diagram
206
C
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE-SENTRY EEC Schematic Diagram
5D48585
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE-SENTRY TG-V Wiring Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE-SENTRY Schematic Diagram
A
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE-SENTRY TG-V Wiring Diagram
A
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE-SENTRY TG-V Wiring Diagram
B
CD-II MAX 50 230/1/60 Wiring Diagram
213
214
A
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE-SENTRY TG-V EEC Wiring Diagram
5D83000
211
212
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE-SENTRY TG-V EEC Wiring Diagram
5D48588
209
210
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE-SENTRY EEC Schematic Diagram
5D48587
207
208
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE-SENTRY TG-V EEC Wiring Diagram
5D48586
205
215
216
E
217
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 Wiring Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/60 EEC Wiring Diagram
218
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 EEC Wiring Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 380/3/60 EEC Wiring Diagram
5D48365
CD-II MAX 50 230/1/60 Schematic Diagram
D
219
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 Schematic Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram
220
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 380/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram
5D48366
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 Schematic Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram
CD-II MAX 50 380/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram
199
C
221
222
200
Cab Box Wiring Diagram
201
Cab Control Schematic Diagram
202
CD-II MAX 30 Wiring Diagram—Page 1 of 2
203
CD-II MAX 30 EEC Wiring Diagram—Page 2 of 2
204
CD-II MAX 30 Schematic Diagram—Page 1 of 2
205
CD-II MAX 30 EEC Schematic Diagram—Page 2 of 2
206
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE-SENTRY Schematic Diagram—Page 1 of 2
207
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE SENTRY EEC Schematic Diagram—Page 2 of 2
208
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE SENTRY TG-V Wiring Diagram—Page 1 of 2
209
CD-II MAX 30 w/CYCLE SENTRY TG-V EEC Wiring Diagram—Page 2 of 2
210
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE SENTRY Schematic Diagram—Page 1 of 2
211
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE SENTRY EEC Schematic Diagram—Page 2 of 2
212
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE SENTRY TG-V Wiring Diagram—Page 1 of 2
213
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE SENTRY TG-V EEC Wiring Diagram—Page 2 of 2
214
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE SENTRY TG-V Wiring Diagram—Page 1 of 2
215
CD-II MAX 50 w/CYCLE SENTRY TG-V EEC Wiring Diagram—Page 2 of 2
216
CD-II MAX 50 230/1/60, 230/3/60 Wiring Diagram—Page 1 of 2
217
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/60 EEC, 230/3/60 EEC, 380/3/60 EEC Wiring Diagram—Page 2 of 2
218
CD-II MAX 50 230/1/60, 230/3/60 Schematic Diagram—Page 1 of 2
219
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/60 EEC, 230/3/60 EEC, 380/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram—Page 2 of 2
220
CD-II MAX 50 230/3/60 Schematic Diagram—Page 1 of 2
221
CD-II MAX 50 220/3/60 EEC, 230/3/60 EEC, 380/3/60 EEC Schematic Diagram—Page 2 of 2
222
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