minding their manors minding their manors
Meet Suze Orman, page 6; Make Your Oms Matter More, 29;
If the Beatles Met ‘Rocky Horror,’ 37; RWJ Sheds Jobs, 49.
Transforming the Blues:
Three time Grammy Award-winning
singer-songwriter Keb’ Mo’ comes
to McCarter on November 2.
, 2009
R 28
TOBE
Business Meetings
7
Preview
20
Opportunities
33
PRST STD
Singles
36
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
Jobs
54
Permit No. 199
Contents 52 Princeton, NJ 08540
© OC
RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE
PAGE 12
M INDING THEIR M ANORS
Erin Dougherty, left, and Barbara Webb begin
their preview at 20 Greenhouse Drive.
The Superintendent’s House
6 Greenhouse Drive
The Historical Society’s November 7
House Tour includes five unusual homes
that once belonged to Drumthwacket.
The Greenhouse
19 Greenhouse Drive
Princeton's Business and Entertainment Weekly
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87 Lovers Lane
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2
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Here at U.S. 1 we don’t normally fuss about anniversaries, but
Richard K. Rein
Editor and Publisher
Kathleen McGinn Spring
Business Editor
Jamie Saxon
Preview Editor
Scott Morgan
Survival Guide Editor
Lynn Miller
Events Editor
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Contributors
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Copyright 2009 by Richard K. Rein
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ture, whether it be in print, online,
or some other medium we haven’t
yet encountered. Though we can’t
announce the date yet, we assure
you it will be a publishing event
that will also be entertaining. We
look forward to seeing many of
you in person in this, our 25th year.
this year might be a little different.
Twenty-five years ago we were
preparing the first edition of U.S. 1
for the printer. Even then it was an
audacious idea: First, because
everyone thought the greater
Princeton area was already saturated with newspapers; and second
because it was designed to serve a
segment of the community that up
until then had been viewed as a
problem, not an opportunity.
We are going to mark this milestone in several ways that we hope
are informative, as well as enterwas diagnosed with Non
taining. In our Wednesday, No- Hodgkins Lymphoma in 2001.
vember 11 issue, we will kick off Fortunately, I received excellent
our 25th anniversary with our care from talented medical profesfounder, Richard K. Rein, chroni- sionals.
cling the 25 top ideas — mostly
But, at age 40, I was going
good but some bad — that have through chemotherapy, I was bald,
shaped our enterprise.
bloated, and scared when I
For entertainment, we
a sign for the Breast
Between saw
will reprise the netCancer Resource Center’s
The
working opportunity
support group for women
that we introduced 25
under 45. I received some
Lines
years ago: a “rush hour
of the same chemotherapy
reception” to which all
as many breast cancer pareaders are invited. Our tentative tients at that time. We shared many
date: Tuesday, November 24, from of the same side effects, concerns
5 to 8. Place to be announced.
and fears. The BCRC told me that I
That does it for our ideas, but could not join the group because I
the celebration continues. In our did not have breast cancer. I felt refirst issue of the new year, jected, but with more treatments to
Wednesday, January 6, we will face, I moved on. Next, I had radipresent the best of your ideas — ation to the chest, similar to breast
that eureka moment that led to the cancer patients. I met many wonbirth of your business, or the light derful women during this time and
bulb that helped turn your venture we did our best to support one aninto an ongoing successful enter- other. A fellow patient never exprise. See our house ad on page 10 cluded me because we suffered
for information on how you can from different cancers.
join in this issue.
Last year I was having back
Finally, in the late spring, U.S. 1 problems and restorative yoga was
will sponsor an event that cele- recommended to me. I saw a sign
brates the art and craft of writing, in my oncologist’s office for a yothe discipline that has kept us in ga class given by the BCRC for
business all these years and what
Continued on page 4
we hope will sustain us into the fu-
To the Editor:
Should The BCRC
Expand Its Scope?
I
We bring over 30 years of experience,
and provide you with advice you can trust.
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INSIDE
Survival Guide
5
Using Word-of-Mouth To Spread the Word
Building Your Personal Wealth
Franchising As a Small Business Opportunity
Corporate Angels
Business Meetings
5
6
6
7
7
Princeton Chamber Newsletter
8
Preview
20-37
Day by Day, October 28 to November 4
Roger Rees Untangles the Bard
Review: ‘Wishful Drinking’
Make Your Oms Matter More
Opportunities
At the Movies
U.S. 1 Singles Exchange
Think the Beatles Meet ‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’
Fast Lane 49
Jobs 52
Classifieds
Richard K. Rein
20
24
27
29
33
35
36
37
51
53
For advertising or editorial inquiries, call 609-452-7000. Fax: 609-452-0033.
Mail: 12 Roszel Road, Princeton 08540. E-Mail: [email protected]
Home page: www.princetoninfo.com
© 2009 by Richard K. Rein.
For articles previously published in U.S. 1, for listings of scheduled events far
into the future, consult our website: www.princetoninfo.com.
The U.S. 1 Sneak Preview edition is E-mailed weekly.
It contains highlights of the next issue, and links to key websites.
For a free subscription fill out the form at www.princetoninfo.com.
Copyright 2009 Richard K. Rein and the U.S. 1 Publishing Company.
Company Index
Boston Properties, 49; Brains
On Fire, 5; Connolly Architecture,
50; Cushman & Wakefield, 49;
ETS, 49; Franchise Network of
NJ, 6; Historical Society of Princeton, 12.
Joseph L. Mazotas, 40; Lasley
Brahaney, 12; Lawrence Zirinski
Associates, 50; McCarter Theater,
51; MISource, 50.
National Business Parks, 50;
NeoStrata, 50; NRG Energy, 50.
Onsen for All, 51; Opinion Research, 51; PharmaNet, 49;
Princeton Ballet Society, 51; RWJ
Hamilton Hospital, 49; S&B Property Management, 49; Seven21
Group, 6; Syska Hennessy, 50.
TD Bank, 6; TD Bank, 7; Universial Display, 50; VoicePulse,
51; Your Career Doctor, 6.
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U.S. 1
3
4
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Letter to the Editor
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cancer survivors. I hoped that in
the years since my initial phone
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I understand some funding
makes these classes free for only
breast cancer patients. I offered to
pay, but was still denied access.
From my perspective, there is no
difference between my cancer
journey and that of breast cancer
patients who have not had major
surgery. The YWCA prides itself in
including all people, regardless of
race, age, religion, etc. Why then is
an entity of the YWCA discriminating based on in which particular
body part cancer is diagnosed? I
can understand a breast cancer
group wanting to provide funding
for research and information for
that specific cancer. What I cannot
understand is denying support
services for a person with a different type of cancer.
The BCRC, under the auspices
of the YWCA, has a more complete
program of classes and support
than any other cancer group that I
have found in the Princeton area.
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Excluding survivors of other cancers seems cruel to me. To have
that done under the umbrella of the
YWCA seems contradictory to the
goals and mission of the YWCA. If
the BCRC were a separate, freestanding entity, I would be disappointed by their exclusions, but I
could understand it. However, as
part of the YWCA, I think it is not
fair to exclude people with other
cancer histories. While the Princeton Y has said it is trying to fund
wellness programs for all women,
none have started. Regardless of
which side people take, I feel that it
is important for people to realize
the policies of the BCRC and the
YWCA before they decide to financially support their programs.
Lisa Schmid
West Windsor
The BCRC Responds
W
e at the YWCA Princeton
appreciate Lisa Schmid’s situation,
her quest to find support, and her
desire to move beyond her cancer
diagnosis. We understand her concerns and dilemmas, and know that
facing cancer of any kind can leave
one scared, confused, angry, and
looking for answers.
We have spoken with Ms.
Schmid several times over the past
year, and have invited her to share
not only her concerns but also her
ideas for future programs that
might meet her needs. Our Breast
Cancer Resource Center (BCRC)
has provided her with referrals to
organizations from whose programs she might benefit, as is done
with any patient or survivor of another cancer who contacts BCRC.
We feel it is important for the
community at large to be reminded
that the YWCA and its Breast Cancer Resource Center are both longstanding and well-respected members of the Princeton community.
The Breast Cancer Resource Center was founded under the name
ENCORE right here at the YWCA
Princeton more than 35 years ago.
It was developed by breast cancer
survivors as an exercise program
for breast cancer survivors. The
program was so successful that it
later was adopted by the YWCA of
the USA as one of their national
programs, and ENCORE is offered
today by a great percentage of
YWs across the nation.
In Princeton, the focus gradually broadened beyond a single exercise program to a more inclusive
breast health wellness model, and
progressed to the Breast Cancer
Resource Center we know today.
BCRC’s wide range of programs
and services is free and includes
support groups, private counseling, a peer support network, a
mind/body wellness program, a
prosthesis and wig bank, guest
speaker and teleconference series,
a lending library, and education activities. Each year BCRC positively impacts the lives of more than
5,000 women and their families.
We well know that cancer
comes in all forms, and believe that
all cancer patients should have access to not only top quality medical
care but also information and support throughout their journey. Fortunately, there are many medical
centers and community organizations including the American Cancer Society, CancerCare, The Wellness Community, and CancerHope
Network that offer wonderful services and programs for women diagnosed with all types of cancer.
There are also many other organizations that, like BCRC, focus
specifically on breast cancer, including Susan G. Komen for the
Cure, Sisters Network, and the
South Jersey Breast Cancer Coalition. We believe strongly in providing breast cancer patients and survivors a place they can gather,
bond, and share experiences in order to better live with, through, and
beyond breast cancer. BCRC’s
supporters also believe in this mission, and most of the funding received by BCRC is restricted by
the donors themselves to serve
breast cancer patients and survivors only.
We are proud that YWCA programming has evolved to meet the
changing needs of the community.
Ms. Schmid’s concerns underline
the importance of plans already underway to explore the feasibility of
designing and funding a general
wellness program for women
struggling with a range of diseases
including cancer, heart disease,
obesity, and more. This is on the
agenda of our new director of mission advancement, Marialanna
Lee.
For now, the YWCA Princeton
and its Breast Cancer Resource
Center remain dedicated to serving
our mission by helping women and
families affected by the most common cancer in women, breast cancer, through their journey.
Judith Hutton,
CEO, YWCA Princeton
Kara Stephenson
Director,
Breast Cancer Resource Center
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
SURVIVAL
GUIDE
EDITOR:
SCOTT MORGAN
[email protected]
Wednesday, October 28
Spreading the Word
The Old-School Way
Church began his career doing
more traditional marketing. “Our
firm won awards,” he says. “We
hen we hear the phrase won Addy’s (American Advertis“word-of-mouth marketing” these ing Federation awards) for our dedays we automatically think of the signs. But in the mid-’90s I started
Internet and social networking to understand that doing the right
sites such as Facebook, Twitter, thing for the client meant doing the
right thing, not winning an award.”
YouTube, and LinkedIn.
The campaign that was the turnBut while these can all be useful
ing
point for Church was called,
tools for a company that wants to
increase its brand presence, word- “Rage Against the Haze,” an antiof-mouth marketing is really about smoking campaign aimed at South
much more than just a great pres- Carolina high school students.
“We could have developed a
ence on the web, says Geno
great,
creative ad campaign, but inChurch, “word-of-mouth inspiration officer” for Brains on Fire, a stead we realized that the way to
marketing company based in serve the clients, and the students
Greenville, South Carolina. The we needed something different,”
firm, says Church, “helps organi- he says.
The campaign, which is still in
zations build movements through a
bond between word-of-mouth effect in South Carolina, works to
marketing and identity develop- develop teens into non-smoking
advocates for other teens.
ment.”
Develop a plan. One of the first
Church will speak on “People
are the Killer App: Lessons mistakes many people make when
Learned in Building Word-of- starting to use social networking as
Mouth Movements” at the next a business strategy is to forget to
meeting of the New Jersey Com- develop the strategy. “Don’t just
munications, Advertising and Mar- start a Facebook or MySpace page
because everyketing Associaone tells you
tion
on
that you need
We d n e s d a y,
Most companies still
to,”
Church
October 28, at 6
says. Zappo’s
p.m. at the Paul
use social networkShoes, for exRobeson Cening to push their inample, has been
ter for the Arts,
formation instead of
very successful
102
Witherusing Twitter
spoon Street.
pulling in customers.
because
it
Cost:
$25.
works with the
Reservations
can be made at www.njcama.org. company’s overall strategy of sellFor more information contact njca- ing shoes online. “It is a great way
[email protected] or call 609-275- for the company to listen to people.
They are saying, ‘What can we do
4123.
Church has helped build word- to help you right now?’ and if
of-mouth campaigns for brands someone sends them a Twitter they
such as Fiskars, the American can respond immediately.”
Booksellers Association, Rawlings
Pull vs. push. Unfortunately,
Sporting Goods, and Ronald Mc- most companies do not have such a
Donald Children’s Charities. A well-thought out strategy for their
1982 graduate of the University of social networking marketing.
South Carolina, where he majored “Most companies are still treating
in graphic design, he credits his social networking sites as public
professors as some of his earliest relations sites — a way to push the
influences in understanding the information out to their customers.
concepts of word-of-mouth mar- Instead, they should try to pull in
keting.
their customers,” he explains.
“I was very lucky,” Church says.
Church uses a bagel shop as an
“I was really influenced by Madi- example. “The shop can put out a
son Avenue, but my professors al- Twitter saying ‘right now we’ve
ways held me to the fire to make got a two for one special going on
sure that I developed good strategy. bagels,’” and pull people into the
They stressed it’s not just about the store. They can talk about how
look, about creating great design. their bagels are made and get reIt’s not about being the most cre- sponses from their customers.”
ative, but about what works.”
W
DENTAL INSURANCE??
Talking Point: Geno
Church says word-ofmouth is still the most
effective way to promote your business.
Give a little. One of the best features of social networking sites is
the ability to personalize your business. “Give a little bit of you,” he
says. “It’s not just about saying
‘you need to come in and buy our
product.’ You want to share your
passion, share why you are there.
That’s the great thing about social
networking.”
There is a delicate balance,
however, between sharing enough
and sharing too much information.
When Church was asked to create a
word-of-mouth campaign for
Fiskars, the scissors manufacturer,
he first studied several blogs devoted to scrapbooking and crafts.
He spoke with Donna Downey, a
well-known crafter, with a sucContinued on following page
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Continued from preceding page
cessful blog. Her formula, he says,
was that 90 percent of the blog
should be about life and 10 percent
about the business. Her theory, he
says, is “if they don’t like me they
aren’t going to respect me.”
That does not mean, however,
that a business-related Twitter
should include tweets on every aspect of the person’s life. “If you
tweet every time you go to the
bathroom people are just going to
hope you shut up. Tweet about your
personal life, but make it meaningful,” he advises.
Just be polite. “There is no formula” yet for successfully using
social networking for a business,”
Church says. “We’re all still new at
this. We’re all just taking the master’s class together.” The basic
thing to remember is to be just as
polite on your social networking
site as you would be in person.
Don’t be a nuisance.
More than social networking.
Word-of-mouth is about a lot more
than just learning to effectively use
social networking sites. “Sell the
passion, not the product,” is
Church’s basic rule for word-ofmouth marketing. “Find out why
your customers love your product
or service, then tell others.”
He mentions a South African
mattress company that gets love
letters every day from its customers. They asked Church’s advice on how these testimonials
could work for them.
He suggested inviting the letter
writers to the factory for a special
tour to see just how their mattresses were made. This type of individual marketing helps to develop a
personal relationship between the
customer and the company. Any
customers who take the tour are
certain to tell all of their friends
about the experience.
Personal recommendations.
Successful word-of-mouth marketing creates personal recommendations about your business. “If
someone becomes a fan on Facebook and I read that, will it really
have any meaning for me? I don’t
know you,” asks Church. In fact,
he says, 90 percent of word-ofmouth marketing occurs offline,
rather than online.
“If someone I know talks to me
about a product and tells me how
great it is, that’s a recommendation
I remember.”
— Karen Hodges Miller
Saturday, October 31
A Wealthier You
T
he road to personal wealth is
not paved with investments alone,
and alongside sound advice on
planning, some of the country’s top
financial and business personalities will offer guidance on getting
your professional life in working
order on Halloween.
On Saturday, October 31, at
8:30 a.m., the Star Ledger and TD
Bank will present the eighth annual “Road to Personal Wealth Conference” at Rutgers university’s
New Brunswick campus. The daylong event costs $25 and features
keynote speakers Suze Orman
and cookie baron Wally “Famous” Amos, among others. Visit
www.roadtopersonalwealth.com.
Orman will kick off the first of
two sessions with her 9 a.m.
keynote address on personal
wealth. The morning session will
feature a talk on loan strategies by
Nick Miceli, market president for
TD Bank, on positioning your
business for the funding it needs.
Amos will lead the afternoon
session, which also features workshops on improving your marketability by career coach Lee
Miller of Your Career Doctor, and
on franchising, by Robert Cox,
president of Seven21 Group of
New York.
Monday, November 2
Starting a Business?
Consider a Franchise
J
ack Armstrong is deeply
committed to franchising. He is
president of the Franchise Network
of New Jersey and is CFO of FranNet, which works with individuals
to help them buy a franchise that
will play to their strengths. Armstrong also owns Sunbelt, a business brokerage franchise that sells
small, privately-held businesses,
whether franchises or not, for people who are ready to retire.
Armstrong suggests that franchises have many advantages over
individually owned, independent
businesses. First of all, even before
making a purchase, it is easy for a
potential buyer to talk to existing
franchise owners. Because so
many other franchises will exist in
some proximity, he says, the poten-
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tial buyer can talk to 20 or 30 other
franchisees in the area and see how
they are doing before going ahead.
Getting financing is also easier
for a franchise. “It’s a proven track
record,” says Armstrong. “The
banks have made loans to other
franchisees, and they know the industry and know the business.”
Franchises also have a marketing and sales plan that has usually
been tested over 15 to 20 years.
“Most new businesses waste half
of their money in advertising, and
they don’t know it doesn’t work
until they’ve spent it,” says Armstrong. “Franchises know it will
work because they’ve done it.” He
adds that, according to the Department of Commerce, individual
businesses have the highest failure
rate, whereas franchises have the
highest success rate.
Franchises also offer economies
of scale. Whether advertising on
the Internet or ordering supplies or
inventory, says Armstrong, doing it
as part of 300 or 500 stores instead
of individually creates a lot of buying power.
Finally, franchisers have staff
experts who support fledgling
franchises — usually an operations
director, a marketing director, and
training staff. “They help at the
opening and get people off to a
good start,” says Armstrong.
Armstrong will speak on “Franchising as a Small Business Option,” on Monday, November 2, at
6:45 p.m. for the Greater Princeton
Area chapter of SCORE at the
Princeton Public Library. To register for this free workshop, E-mail
[email protected] or call
609-393-0505.
Although an array of skills are
necessary for success in a franchise, people’s particular strengths
and weaknesses often suggest the
types of businesses that will be a
good match. “Most who come in
don’t know what they want,” said
Armstrong, “so we have them take
Franchises are a
known commodity,
but they require a lot
of work and wellhoned people skills.
an online assessment and interview
them to find out what their
strengths and weaknesses are.”
From his experience with FranNet
and Sunbelt, Armstrong understands what skills are important for
potential franchisees.
Communication. Successful
franchise owners should be able to
converse comfortably with customers and employees as well as
speak intelligently with the franchise company, says Armstrong.
Sales. Franchises vary in how
significant sales skills are, says
Armstrong. “Some are heavy duty
and some are not.”
A person who is not comfortable
reaching out to potential customers
might be more suited to a retail environment where the customers
come to them. For example, one of
the franchises he represents, Huntington Learning Center, does not
require heavy duty sales because
the parents come in on their own.
On the other hand, for a franchise
that supplies temporary workers,
the owner must be on the phone
seven hours a day calling on clients
to see if they need temporary help.
“If person has never done a sales
call, they wouldn’t be comfortable
with this,” says Armstrong.
Management. “You’re going to
have employees and you have to
train and motivate them and find
the right team to build,” Armstrong
says. Yet not every franchise requires the owner to manage a significant number of employees.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
For people who do have strong
management skills, a franchise in
the homecare industry might make
sense. For a person who does not
want to manage employees but is
comfortable in sales and enjoys
networking, chamber events, and
community activities, a training or
business coaching franchise might
work well.
Customer service. All business
owners, says Armstrong, must
have some empathy for customers
and understood what they are looking for, yet he has seen people coming out of corporations who don’t
understand this. “They are used to
a hierarchy and that’s it,” he says.
Armstrong grew up in Summit.
His father worked in a Western
Electric factory and his mother
stayed home with him and his three
brothers. Armstrong has an accounting degree from Bemidji
State University in Minnesota and
an MBA focusing on finance from
Pace.
For three years after college
Armstrong worked as the first
comptroller and treasurer of New
Jersey Monthly magazine. Then he
raised some capital and bought a
Manhattan-based culture and history magazine, Americana, that he
owned for 14 years.
Armstrong went to Pace at night
and did his thesis on franchising. In
1994 he sold Americana and flew
to California to buy the rights for a
FranNet franchise covering the territory from Trenton to Bergen
County. He bought the Sunbelt
franchise in 1997.
Armstrong’s office is in
Metuchen, where he has two support staff and five other associates;
his son, John Armstrong III, who
was previously an investment
banker at Morgan Stanley, now
runs a New York office. Armstrong
has lived in Lawrence for 30 years.
For entrepreneurs interested in
buying a franchise, Armstrong
compared several industries where
franchises are available: food, retail, automotive, business services,
and consumer services. “Food and
retail are having a tough time; they
are very competitive, and people
are not shopping or eating out as
much,” he said. “What’s growing
is the service economy — business
and consumer services.”
Within consumer services,
some of the more recession-resistant areas are home care and healthcare as well as insurance restoration for damage from floods, mold,
or kitchen fire damage. One franchise that is doing well is Great
Clips, because people are moving
from higher-end salons down to
more basic ones.
The automative industry is a
mature one where buyers are purchasing existing franchises as their
owners retire rather than starting
up new ones. “The industry is reasonably good,” said Armstrong,
“because people aren’t buying new
cars — are fixing up older ones and
trying to keep them going longer.”
For people on the lookout for a
good business opportunity, many
franchisers are looking to help out.
But before opening your pocketbook, investigate the potential in
the particular industry and, equally
as important, make sure your skills
match the requirements for the
business.
— Michele Alperin
Corporate Angels
The TD Charitable Foundation,
the charitable giving arm of TD
Bank, recently donated $5,000 to
HomeFront of Mercer County, to
help the organization fund supportive services for recently-homeless
families.
Business Meetings
Wednesday, October 28
6 p.m.: NJ CAMA, “Lessons
Learned in Building Word-ofMouth Movements,” $35. Robeson Center for the Arts, [email protected] 609-275-4123.
Thursday, October 29
7:30 a.m.: NJ SBDC, “Employee
vs. Independent Contractor,” $10.
TCNJ. 609-771-2947.
12:30 p.m.: Hyatt Regency New
Brunswick, MEET-USA 2009 East
Coast Conference for Meeting
Professionals: “Contracting for
the Next Decade: Are your Contracts Measuring Up?” Two-day
conference, free to attend. Register online. 2 Albany Street. 866318-4357.
6 p.m.: FDU-Rothman Institute,
“Brand You: Building a Business
Resume,” Willa Edgerton-Chisler,
Symphony Coaching, free.
Florham Park campus. 973-5079700.
Friday, October 30
7 a.m.: Hyatt Regency New
Brunswick, MEET-USA 2009 East
Coast Conference for meeting
professionals: “Innovative Meetings of Tomorrow by Hyatt Hotels
& Resorts,” free to attend. Register online. 2 Albany Street, . 866318-4357.
7:30 a.m.: Princeton Chamber and
East Windsor EDC, Public Policy
Forum on Turnpike expansion,
Stephen Dilts, commissioner of
transportation, free. Americana
Diner. 609-924-1776.
8:30 a.m.: Speaking4Biz, “Presentation Mirrors & Masks,” Eileen
Sinett, $10. CCS, 610 Plainsboro
Road, [email protected] 609-799-1400.
9:30 a.m.: U.S. Department of
Commerce, “Distributor, Rep, &
Agent Contracts,” Margaret Gatti,
$45. Monmouth University,
[email protected] 732571-3641.
Saturday, October 31
8:30 a.m.: Rutgers University,
Road to Personal Wealth Financial Conference, Suze Orman
and Wally “Famous” Amos,
keynoters, $15. New Brunswick
campus. 908-735-8400.
U.S. 1
9 a.m.: NJICLE, “NJ Guardianship
Practice,” Shirley Whitenack,
$169. NJ Law Center, New
Brunswick. 732-214-8500.
Monday, November 2
9 a.m.: CareerTrack Seminars,
“Dealing with Difficult People,”
$149. Holiday Inn. 800-780-8476.
9 a.m.: Dale Carnegie Institute,
“High Impact Presentations,”
$1,800. 243 Route 130, Bordentown, [email protected] 609-324-7700.
10:30 a.m.: Get Hired Today!,
Weekly meeting for unemployed
professionals, $5. Center for Relaxation, 635 Plainsboro Road.
609-750-7432.
7 p.m.: SCORE Princeton, “Franchising,” Jack Armstrong, Franchise Network, free. Princeton Library, Witherspoon Street. 609393-0505.
Tuesday, November 3
Noon: CUH2A Toastmasters,
Open house, free. 1000 Lenox
Drive, Lawrenceville. 609-2529667.
7 a.m.: LeTip Networking Group,
Tuesday Morning Networking,
free breakfast. Clarion Hotel at
Palmer Inn. 609-243-7860.
8 a.m.: NJ Bankers, “Bank Secrecy Act and Anti-Money Laundering Training,” Jay Friedland, National Association for Bank Security, two-day seminar, $725.
Crowne Plaza Monroe. 908-2728500.
6 p.m.: ACG Princeton chapter,
“Church & Dwight: Growth Story,”
Brian Buchert, $60. Westin Hotel
at Forrestal Village, [email protected] .
6 p.m.: Strategy Dynamix, “Business Plan Design,” Sylvester Di
Diego, $225. Courtyard Princeton, [email protected] 866-407-9326.
7 p.m.: SCORE Princeton, Tuesday Tech Talk: “Connecting with
140 Characters or Fewer On Twitter,” Amy Kearns and Julie
Strange, free. Princeton Library.
609-393-0505.
7:30 p.m.: JobSeekers, Networking, free.Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. 609-924-2277.
Wednesday, November 4
8 a.m.: Mercer Chamber, “Breakfast Club” meeting,” $35 Hampton
Inn. 609-689-9960.
8 a.m.: NJ Bankers, “Bank Secrecy Act and Anti-Money Laundering Training,” Jay Friedland, National Association for Bank Security, two-days, $725. Crowne
Plaza Monroe. 908-272-8500.
8:15 a.m.: NJ Society of CPAs,
“International Financial Reporting
Standards,” $35. Holiday Inn
Somerset. 973-226-4494.
9:30 a.m.: Robbinsville Business
Networking Group, networking,
free. Robbinsville Firehouse,
Route 130 North. 609-945-7330.
3 p.m.: NJ SBDC, “Talk, Taste,
Twitter Networking Reception,”
$20. TCNJ. 609-771-2947.
5 p.m.: Mercer Chamber, Trenton
Chapter, “Why Not Wednesdays?” networking, free. 354
South Broad Street, Trenton. 609689-9960.
Princeton Computer Repairs
“My computer always works”
Explore your options
and develop your plan in an
Engaged Retirement Workshop
At the Princeton Senior Resource Center
45 Stockton Street, Princeton
Four Saturday sessions: Oct. 31-Nov. 21., 9:30-11:30
$85 per person • $150 per couple
Information: 609-924-7108 • [email protected]
www.princetonsenior.org
Our job is to ask
the right questions.
Your job is to come up
with the best answers.
Don’t worry, we’ll help.
Kath
609
1223
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Experienced Professionals at Your Service
PC & MAC
Installation / Upgrade / Repair
Data Recovery
ine Kish, Pre
NJBiz Toer
sident
p 50 Women
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Helping organizations make better
decisions on strategic and marketing
issues for over twenty years.
Market Entry, Inc.
609-799-8898 • 800-593-7946
WBE/SBE certified [email protected]
7
8
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
T
The Business Edge
A Letter from the Chairman
Congratulations
To Annual
Award Winners!
On behalf of the Board of
Directors of the Princeton Re-
gional Chamber of Commerce,
please join us on Wednesday,
December 2, at the Chamber’s
Annual Business Leadership
Awards Gala when we gather
together at the beautiful Tournament Players Club Jasna Polana
to congratulate our outstanding
Business Leadership Award recipients. Additionally, this year
we are pleased to announce the
inaugural Princeton Regional
Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Community Leader of
the Year Award.
On this special evening we
will recognize the Chamber’s
Entrepreneur of the Year, Jim
D’Ovidio,
President
and
Founder of Brown Dog Marketing; Innovator of the Year
William Rue, President and
CEO of Rue Insurance; Business Leader of the Year Phillip
Griffin, Co-Chair of Fox Rothschild LLP; and Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
Foundation’s Community Leaders of the Year Judith and
William Scheide.
Without the support of our
sponsors, presentation of these
distinguished awards would not
be possible so I am taking this
opportunity to extend a sincere
thank you to:
Bank of America for continued Sponsorship of the Entrepreneur of the Year Award;
T
Lawrence H. Krampf
Chairman, Princeton Regional
Chamber of Commerce
Board of Directors,
CEO,
Marke Communications.
NRG Energy for the continued
Sponsorship of the Innovator of
the Year Award; WithumSmith+Brown for Sponsorship
of the Business Leader of the
Year Award, and Glenmede for
Sponsorship of the Community
Leader of the Year Award.
Throughout the course of a
year your Chamber continues to
provide the highest levels of
value and service to its Members. Within the next few
months our Chamber Members
and the business community
will have access to a next-generation website that will feature
Continued on page 10
he Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce announced this
year’s Business Leader, Entrepreneur, and Innovator of the Year
award winners at a press conference at the offices of Fox Rothschild LLP, 997 Lenox Drive,
Building Three, Third Floor,
Lawrenceville.
Additionally, the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
Foundation announced the recipients of the inaugural Community
Leader of the Year Award.
The award winners will be honored at the Chamber’s Annual Business Leadership Awards Gala being held on
Wednesday, December 2, at the Tournament Players Club Jasna Polana.
Larry Krampf, Chair of the Board of Directors of
the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce and
CEO of Marke Communications said, “The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce is proud to
honor three leaders whose accomplishments are a
source of motivation and inspiration to the business
community and the entire Princeton region.
We look forward to celebrating with them as well
as the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
Foundation’s Community Leader of the Year Award
recipients at the Chamber’s Annual Business Leadership Awards Gala on December 2.”
Karen Jezierny, Chair of the Princeton Regional
Continued on page 10
Left to right, upper row, Princeton Regional
Chamber of Commerce Chair-Elect - J. Robert
Hillier, Founder and Principal of J. Robert Hillier;
Chairman of the Board, Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce - Larry Krampf, Marke Communications; Leader of the Year - Phillip Griffin, Fox
Rothschild, LLP; ; Innovator of the Year - William
Rue, Rue Insurance; Entrepreneur of the Year - Jim
D’Ovidio, Brown Dog Marketing; Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Vice-Chairman of
the Board- Jerry Fennelly, NAI Fennelly; Community Leader Award Sponsor - Fred Young, Glenmede; (l-r lower row) Community Leaders of the
Year - William and Judith Scheide, The Scheide
Fund; Anne O’ Neill, The Scheide Fund; Chair of
the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
Foundation - Karen Jezierny of Princeton Universi-
OCTOBER 28, 2009
From the Princeton Chamber
How Polling
Affects Business
P
olls provide the best
source of information about public opinion. Join the Princeton
Regional Chamber of Commerce
at our Monthly Membership
Luncheon on Thursday, November 5, to hear a timely and informative presentation from
Frank Newport of the Gallup
Poll, who has managed and analyzed the U.S.’s most respected
and public opinion.
Learn how results of the polls
can be used to manage important
business decisions.
The meeting will take place at
the Princeton Marriott Hotel and
Conference Center, 100 College
Road East, Plainsboro, beginning at 11:30 a.m. with a networking reception, followed by a
buffet luncheon and the program
at noon, and will adjourn at 1:35
p.m. Cost to attend is $40 for
Chamber members and $50 for
non-members and walk-ins.
Reservations can be made at
www.princetonchamber.org or
by calling 609-924-1776.
Frank Newport is Editor in
Chief of the Gallup Poll and president-elect of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. He is co-author of “Winning the White House 2008: The
Gallup Poll, Public Opinion and
the Presidency” (Facts on File,
2009), author of “Polling Matters
— Why Leaders Must Listen to
the Wisdom of the People”
(Warner Books, 2004), co-author
with Stuart Rothenberg of “The
Evangelical Voter,” and co-editor of The Gallup Poll: Public
Opinion 2004-2008. His articles
and op-ed pieces have appeared
in the American Sociological Review, Public Opinion Quarterly,
The New York Times, the Los
Angeles Times, and many other
publications.
In addition to his role with
AAPOR, Frank is vice-president
of the National Council on Public Polls, on the Board of Directors for the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, and served
on the University of Michigan
Program in Survey Methodology
External Advisory Committee.
Frank holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of
Michigan.
Before
joining
Gallup, he taught sociology at
the University of Missouri-St.
Louis, was news director and talk
show host at KTRH Radio in
Houston, and a partner at a market research and public opinion
research firm in Houston.
Frank is a frequent guest on
radio and television programs,
discussing public opinion and
the collective views of the American people. His weekly radio
show “What Are We Thinking?”
is produced and syndicated by
Philadelphia NPR affiliate
WHYY-FM.
Five Deadly Sins
CEOs Make in Sales
im Lewis, President & CEO of Princeton Sales
Partners Inc. will talk at the Princeton Regional Chamber’s Business Before Business Breakfast Meeting on
Wednesday, November 18, about the ways business
owners can develop effective and profitable business
methods and best practice selling techniques.
The meeting will take place at the Nassau Club, 6
Mercer Street, from 7:30 to 9:15 a.m. Cost to attend is
$20 for Chamber members and $30 for non-members.
Seating is limited, reservations in advance are required
and can be made at www.princetonchamber.org, or call
609-924-1776.
Jim will base his presentation on his recent book,
“Five Deadly Sins CEOs Make in Sales.” He will discuss the most common buyer habits and how buyers
make selections in addition to other valuable targeted
material. He has exhaustively observed and studied numerous businesses to develop systems for how “best
practice” selling techniques can and should be applied
to increase the rate of conversion.
Fall Networking Reception
Save the Date
J
Business After Business Networking
Hosted by Music Together
Thursday, October 29
5 p.m. - 7 p.m.
225 Pennington-Hopewell Road
Hopewell
Networking! Food! Drinks!
Register at www.princetonchamber.org
Fifth Annual
Mercer County Economic Summit
Wednesday, March 24, 2010
The Conference Center
at Mercer County Community College
For info, contact Cheri Durst, [email protected] or 609-924-1776 ext. 105
T
he Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring
another of its popular “Business After Business” networking events at
Mrs. G. TV and Appliances on Tuesday, November 10, from 5 to 7
p.m. Mrs. G is located at 2960 US Highway Route 1 in Lawrenceville.
The event is in partnership with Miele, McCaffrey’s, Sub-Zero, and
Wolf. Cost to attend is $25 for Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce members and $30 for non-members. Visit www.princetonchamber.org.
The business community is invited to join the Chamber and the
friendly hosts from Mrs. G TV and Appliances for a relaxed evening
filled with great networking, delicious food, beverages, and signature
food demonstrations. Guests are encouraged to bring plenty of business cards as the convenient and central location of Mrs. G is sure to
attract an abundance of brand new business contacts.
Mrs. G TV & Appliances is a third generation family owned retail
appliances and TV super store that has out performed its competition
for over 70 years. A newly renovated 20,000-square-foot showroom
beautifully displays more than 70 brands of appliances, TVs, and
plumbing fixtures, including Sub-Zero, Wolf, Miele, Monogram,
Viking, Frigidaire, Whirlpool, GE, Sony, Mitsubishi, Sony, and Toto.
For directions, visit http://www.mrsgs.com
ABC’s of the Family Leave Act
and the “New” Paid Family Leave Act
Seminar will be presented by the
Princeton Regional Chamber of
Commerce, Mercer Regional
Chamber of Commerce and Metropolitan Trenton African American Chamber of Commerce on
Monday, November 9, 8:00 a.m.
– 11:30 a.m. at the Conference
Center at Mercer County Community College, West Windsor
Campus.
This informative seminar,
presented by Ian D. Meklinsky,
Esq. and Anne Ciesla Bancroft,
Partner, Fox Rothschild LLP will
provide a working platform for
employers to understand and
navigate through the complex
maze of leave entitlement and
leave compensation statutes in
an easy to understand and practical way. The presenters will illustrate the analytical steps needed to be taken as well as tips for
administering and monitoring
these types of leaves. Cost to attend is $25 per person. For additional information, call (609)
924-1776 ext. 104.
9
Jim has more than 25 years experience managing
high profile companies, and has served in numerous executive positions with responsibility for global sales,
marketing, and operations and has worked in more than
40 countries.
Jim founded Princeton Sales Partners after implementing revenue improving sales processes in his last
three companies. He has since helped clients in North
America, Europe, and Asia achieve similar results.
Before founding Princeton Sales Partners, Jim
served as President, CEO, and a member of the board of
directors for NYSE-listed Berlitz International(GlobalNet). Prior to that Jim was President of GlobalLink, an
AMEX listed company, and Vice President of Marketing for MAXM Systems, a network technology company. He has also worked as International Vice President
at Landmark Systems, a mainframe software developer,
and as Director of International Operations for Peter
Norton Computing.
He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and government from St. Lawrence University and attended the
EA executive management program at Stanford.
Jim is a certified instrument-rated pilot, and a member of Angel Flight, for which he flies financially needy
medical patients to healthcare facilities across America.
Jim is also a certified Homeland Security Pilot First.
Princeton Regional Chamber
Sponsors After Business Hours
Reception Hosted by Mrs. G
A Joint Legislative Committee “Paid Family Leave”
U.S. 1
Community Leader of the Year
Judith & William Scheide
10
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
T
The Business Edge
New Jersey Turnpike Widening Project
And Central New Jersey Transportation Updates
M
ayor Janice S. Mironov announced that the
East Windsor Township Economic Development
Committee and the Princeton Regional Chamber of
Commerce are co-hosting a Public Policy Forum
Breakfast on Friday, October 30. The guest speaker for
the breakfast will be New Jersey Commissioner of
Transportation Stephen Dilts. The program topic will
be “New Jersey Turnpike Widening Project and Central New Jersey Transportation Updates.”
The event will be held at the Americana Diner on
Route 130 North in East Windsor. Registration and networking begin at 7:30 a.m. The breakfast and program
convene at 8 a.m. All area businesses and officials are
encouraged to attend.
According to Mayor Mironov, “East Windsor is
pleased to co-host another annual event with the
Princeton Regional Chamber, providing a forum for
Commissioner Dilts to present his perspective on this
Chairman’s Letter
Continued from page 8
a brand new design offering increased visibility for our Members.
The website is being built to better
serve our Members and to provide
added value to their membership.
The Chamber continues to partner
with neighboring organizations to
provide to our Members increased
exposure to new business contacts. I
am pleased to report on the October
21 Business Before Business Breakfast, held in partnership with the
Metropolitan Trenton African American Chamber of Commerce
(MTAACC) in conjunction with
Trenton Small Business Week.
Guests were fascinated to hear the
timely and important topic.”
Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Peter Crowley added, “Our continued
partnership with the East Windsor Township Economic Development Committee and the Mayor has provided the opportunity to hear from speakers discussing
topics that are important to businesses in East Windsor.
We are delighted to be co-hosting this event once again
with Mayor Mironov and Commissioner Dilts to hear
about the transportation changes that will be impacting
East Windsor”.
The networking breakfast will be held in the Lounge
area of the Americana Diner. A full breakfast will be
provided. The admission charge is $20. Advance registration is required. Register online at www.princetonchamber.org. For more information call the Princeton
Regional Chamber of Commerce at 609-924-1776.
success story of a local business, TerraCycle, and had the opportunity to
network with new business contacts
from the partnering organization.
Be sure to join us at the Business
After Business Networking event on
Thursday, October 29, as we congratulate our hosts at Music Together
on the grand opening of their new International Headquarters in Hopewell.
Additionally, a “Paid Family
Leave” Seminar will be presented by
the Princeton Regional Chamber of
Commerce, Mercer Regional Chamber of Commerce and Metropolitan
Trenton African American Chamber
of Commerce Joint Legislative
Committee on Wednesday, November 9 at the Conference Center at
Mercer County Community College.
This seminar will address “The
ABC’s of the FMLA, NJ Family
Leave Act and the “New” NJ Paid
Family Leave Act. Business leaders
who wish to be informed about the
Family Leave Act laws and how they
affect business should attend this
seminar.
Your Chamber continues to be
your platform to do business in this
volatile business environment. I invite you to take your business to the
next level by joining us at a Chamber
event where you will learn something new, meet new contacts, and
have a great time while you are promoting your business.
Sincerely,
Lawrence H. Krampf
Leadership Awards
Continued from page 8
Chamber of Commerce Foundation and Director of Public
Affairs at Princeton University,
said, “On behalf of the Chamber
Foundation I am thrilled to announce the creation of a new
award that will recognize commitment and innovation in community services. Like the
Chamber’s business awards, the
Foundation’s recognition of
community leadership will inspire individuals, companies,
and organizations to aim ever
higher in areas of philanthropy,
community service, and civic
engagement.”
Jim D’Ovidio, President of
Brown Dog Marketing, located
in Cranbury, has been named as
the recipient of the Princeton
Regional Chamber of Commerce Entrepreneur of the Year
Award. The Annual Entrepreneur of the Year Award is sponsored by Bank of America.
William Rue, President and
CEO of Rue Insurance, located
in Hamilton, has been named
the recipient of the Princeton
Regional Chamber of Commerce Innovator of the Year
Award. The Annual Innovator of
the Year Award is sponsored by
NRG Energy.
Phillip Griffin, Co-Chair,
Fox Rothschild, LLP, located in
Lawrenceville, has been named
as the recipient of the Princeton
Regional Chamber of Commerce Business Leader of the
Year Award. The Annual Business Leader of the Year Award is
sponsored by WithumSmith
+Brown.
William and Judith Scheide,
of the Scheide Fund, located in
Princeton, have been named as
recipients of the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
Foundation’s inaugural Community Leader of the Year
Award sponsored by Glenmede.
Each year the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
hosts the Annual Business
Leadership Awards Gala in order to devote an evening to reflect on the accomplishments
and achievements of its Members throughout New Jersey.
This annual event, which has
been occurring since the Chamber’s inception in 1960, is an opportunity to honor Members,
friends, and colleagues. In addition, the Business Leadership
Awards Gala helps support the
programs, activities, and events
which make the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce
one of the strongest business organizations in New Jersey.
The gala is being held on
Wednesday, December 2, at the
Tournament Players Club Jasna
Polana. Cocktail reception begins at 5:30 p.m., with dinner
and awards at 7 p.m. For further
information on the Business
Leadership Awards Gala, contact Cheri Durst, Director of
Special Events, at cheri @prin
cetonchamber.org, or 609-9241776, ext. 105.
25 YEARS AGO THIS PAPER STARTED
WITH ONE SIMPLE THOUGHT:
The new development on Route 1 wasn’t just creating traffic jams;
it was also a community that deserved a newspaper of its own.
WHAT BRIGHT IDEA DRIVES
YOUR BUSINESS?
Share the Eureka moment or defining thought that has helped
your business thrive. As a sponsor of our 25th annniversary Survival
Guide issue to be published Wednesday, January 6, you can take your
place among the leading thinkers of the U.S. 1 business community.
For more information contact Sara Hastings:
609-452-7000 or [email protected]
Our writers are available to help you focus your thoughts — reserve space early.*
25 Years Later We Still Have Stories to Tell
— Make Yours One of Them
*
For as little as $250, or even less for U.S. 1 contract advertisers.
25 Y EARS Y OUNG
OCTOBER 28, 2009
The Princeton Chamber
Welcomes Its Newest Members . .
Amerprise Financial Services Inc., Michael Siciliano, Financial Services
Biltmore Capital Advisors, D. Tyler Vernon, Investment Management
Business Writing That Works, James Salter, Marketing Communications
Catherine M. Verna, Esq., Attorneys
CheckPointHR, David Potter, Business Services
Irimi Group, Amy Castoro, Consultants
Isles Inc., Richard Ober, Organizations
Klatzkin & CO LLP, Frank G. Sweeney, Accountants
Mark Kamin & Associates, Annette Nathan, Consultants
McCaffrey’s with locations in Princeton, West Windsor, and Yardley,
Mark Eckhouse, Food
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Karl Falkenstein, Financial Services
Nolan Wealth Management LLC, Brian Nolan, Financial Services
Papier Photographic Studios, Paul Papier, Photography
Sansima Consulting Group LLC, Gustavo Sanchez, Employee Benefits
The Grape Escape, Nancy Nye, Food/Retail
. . . and Its Renewing Members
Alphagraphics Inc.
Altman Investment Management LLC
American Boychoir School
American Repertory Ballet Company
The Arts Council of Princeton
Atlantic City International Airport
Blue Star Jets LLC
Brown Dog Marketing
Corporation
CASA of Mercer County
Catholic Charities Trenton
CertaPro Painters
Certified Video Productions Inc.
Chambers Walk Catering
Charlie Browns Steakhouse
Conference Center
at RWJ Hamilton
DeLuxe Travel Bureau Inc.
Edible Arrangements — Princeton
Educational Testing Service - scholarship
Helen Evatt
Fastsigns
Flyte Tyme Limousine
Gloria Nilson GMAC Real Estate —
Madolyn Greve
Goddard School (Princeton)
Grand Bank
Grayson Bridge LLC
Greater Trenton Area YMCA
Greenacres Country Club
Greenleaf Painters LLC
Hampton Inn-Princeton
Hazen Plastic Surgery
Henderson Sotheby’s — Peggy
Hughes Fulmer
High Point Insurance Corporation
Homewood Suites by Hilton
Hopewell Valley Vineyards LLC
The House of Cupcakes
IH Engineers P.C.
International Schools Services Inc.
J. McLaughlin
JRS Architect P.C.
Leigh Photo and Imaging
Life Ties
Meadow Lakes Senior Living
Mercer County Community
College
Mercer County Sports
Mercer Oak Realty LLC
Morford & Dodds
Nassau Inn
Nassau Place
Newark Trade Digital Graphics
NJAWBO — Mercer Chapter
Old Barracks Association
Olympic Limousine Service
(Airporter)
Opera New Jersey
The Original Soup Man
PAYCHEX Inc.
Personal Paperwork Solutions ... and
More
Present Company
Princeton Computer Support
Princeton Music Connection
Princeton Theological Seminary
Quaker Bridge Mall
R Square
Randall Furniture
Reid Sound Inc.
Residence Inn by Marriott Carnegie
Center
RomAsia Bank
The Savino Group
Showhomes of Princeton
Signator Advisory Group
Small World Coffee
Sound Choice Disc Jockeys
Source One Personnel
Stark & Stark
Steinberg Enterprises LLC
Strand Management Solutions
Superior Office Systems
TechGuides Inc.
Terhune Orchards
TK Home Remodeling
Trinity Counseling Service
Tyco International
V.J. Scozzari & Sons
VioCare Technologies Inc.
The Vitello Group
VolunteerConnect
YWCA Princeton
Zweena LLC
October 21 Joint Chamber Business Before Business Breakfast Meeting in conjunction with Trenton Small Business Week: Left to right, Peter Crowley, President and CEO, Princeton Regional Chamber
of Commerce with Guest Speaker, Michael Waas
Smith, Vice President, Brigades, TerraCycle; Herb
Ames, President & CEO, The Devin Group and Chairman of the Board, Metropolitan Trenton African American Chamber of Commerce; Peter Dawson, President, Leigh Photo & Imaging and Chairman of the
Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Program
Committee.
U.S. 1
Sustaining Sponsors 2009
With great appreciation, the Chamber thanks the following companies
and organizations who have shown their support and loyalty to the Princeton Regional
Chamber of Commerce by becoming Sustaining Sponsors.
Our Sustaining Sponsors enable us to take the Chamber to an advanced level
which allows the resources for greater benefits and enhanced programs and events
to our members and the business community.
PLATINUM
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Tyco International, Fox Rothschild LLP
GOLD
Verizon, NRG Energy, Leigh Photo & Imaging, Glenmede
SILVER
Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney P.C., Nassau Inn, Marke Communications
Nelligan Sports Marketing, Inc., Heartland Payment Systems
Accenture
Bank of America
Bank of Princeton
Bartolomei Pucciarelli
Bovis Lend Lease
Brown Dog Marketing
Capital Health
CareersUSA
Community Options
Eden Autism Services
BRONZE
ETS
Munich ReAmerica
NAI Fennelly
Ortho-McNeil Janssen
Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
PNC Bank
Princeton Air Conditioning
Princeton Fuel Oil Inc.
Princeton HealthCare System
Princeton Internet Group
Princeton Marriott Hotel &
Conference Center at Forrestal
Princeton University
PSE&G
Sarnoff Corp.
Stevens & Lee
Town Topics
WthumSmith+Brown
11
12
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
History Comes Home
M
ost homes built 100 or
more years ago are small, due in
equal measure to the materials
builders had available, the efficiency of fireplace heating, and the financial state of the builders and
buyers.
But all is not so tiny in the realm
of historic homes, especially on the
grounds
of
the
former
Drumthwacket estate. On Saturday, November 7, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. the Historical Society of
Princeton will present its 2009
House Tour, including five on
Drumthwacket, near the governor’s mansion, that are both historic and grand. For $40, history
buffs can take a self-directed look
into homes that span American history from the early colonies to the
early
20th
century.
Visit
www.princetonhistory.org/housetour.cfm
This year’s tour is more ambitious than previous endeavors, says
Erin Dougherty, executive director
by Scott Morgan
of the Historical Society. In years
past such tours typically featured
five properties within walking distance of each other. This year’s
eight require a small drive, and is
self-guided, Dougherty says.
Dougherty took the reins of the
Historical Society two-and-a-half
years ago, succeeding Gail Stern,
the society’s longtime executive
director who died in 2006.
Dougherty had been vice president
for programs at the Morris Museum in Morristown, near where she
grew up.
A graduate of the University of
Michigan, Dougherty has a master’s in education from the College
of William and Mary. She says
“museums are my love,” and parlayed her education and history
backgrounds into a 20-year career
in the field.
She has worked at the Staten Island Children’s Museum, the New
Jersey Historical Society, and the
Jersey City Museum.
In her tenure at the Historical
Society, she has learned the value
of working with others and the value of not taking the community’s
love for granted, she says. The
progress the society has made since
2007 has been due to a joint effort
of society members, corporate
donors, and homeowners willing to
open their homes to the public.
Her tenure has also overseen the
society’s efforts to relocate its administrative offices to Updike
Farm on Quaker Road. The society
purchased the farm for $1.25 million — paid for through a combination of state and county grants — in
2004 and plans to use the site for
classes, exhibits, and receptions.
Renovations on the historic,
mid-19th century barnhouse began
earlier this month.
One of Dougherty’s most hopeful plans is to expand the society’s
public profile and its fundraising
capacity. The house tour is this
year’s second fundraiser for the so-
Outbuildings: This year’s tour features, for the
first time, homes on the former Drumthwacket estate. Left to right, the Garden House, 20 Greenhouse; the Coach House, 87 Lovers Lane; and
the Dairy Barn, 176 Parkside Drive.
ciety, the first being the Fall Antiques and Fine Arts, which just had
its fifth go-around in September
and generated more than a quarter
million dollars, according to Barbara Webb, the society’s director of
development and coordinator for
the Historic House Tour.
Last year’s house tour, Webb
says, drew about 1,100 people,
meaning the society would raise
$44,000 if that crowd was to return.
2009 House Tour: Saturday,
November 7, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Selfguided tour of eight historic
homes, including five on former
Drumthwacket estate. Tickets:
$44. 609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org/housetour.cfm.
Also lunch at Drumthwacket,
the official governor’s residence,
354 Stockton Street, for $20. Separate, advance reservations required. Call 609-683-0057, ext. 4,
or visit www.drumthwacket. org.
Drumthwacket’s
Five Outbuildings
Princeton Township
derson Sotheby’s/Peggy Henderson,
609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
7 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Trinity style, designed by owner/architect Alfred
Hopkins. Known by most Princetonians for its Cloister, which connects
the main house to the music wing,
where Einstein played the violin on
many occasions. Major price reduction. $2,650,000.
151 Highland Terrace. Lot size:
1.19 acres. Taxes: $46,608. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Jane Kenyon,
609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 5 full, 3 half baths;
full finished basement; 3-car garage.
Colonial. Bluestone terrace. Four
fireplaces. Library, game room, media room, solarium. $2,600,000.
W
hen Claire Percarpio and
her husband, Edward, went shopping for a house 15 years ago
Princeton beckoned because it was
a mid-point between Philadelphia
and New York. She was working as
a stock market analyst in Philadelphia, and he was expected to be frequently traveling to Manhattan for
his technology management consulting firm.
Neither were looking for a place
on the former Drumthwacket estate, but they ended up in its greenhouse anyway. The home of the
Percarpios since 1994, the “Greenhouse” is on the state Historic Register and is one of five “outbuildings” on the Drumthwacket estate
to be featured on November 7.
According to Barbara Webb, the
Houses for Sale
Listings below are based on information provided by real estate
brokers — prices and availability
are subject to change.
For listings of houses for rent
please turn to page 47.
$2,000,000 & Up
Hopewell Township
255 Concord Place. Taxes:
$6,961. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Maggie Peters, 609-737-9550.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 2-car
garage. Two-story end-unit townhome. Recessed lighting, upgraded
kitchen, gas fireplace with marble
surrounding. $3,499,900.
72 Bayberry Road. Taxes:
$57,452. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Peggy Henderson, 609-9271000. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 5 full, 2 half baths;
14 zones heat and air; 3-car garage.
Colonial by William Thompson. 16
rooms, paneled archways, crown
moldings, marble tile and Brazilian
cherry floors, three fireplaces. Two
master suites (one on main floor), inlaw apartment. $2,950,000.
4850 Province Line Road. Lot
size: 20 acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Norman and Christina Callaway, 609-921-1050. 4850provinceline.ntcallaway.com.
5 bedrooms; 4 full, 2 half baths;
full finished basement. Colonial in
meadow. Blend of gables, Palladian
style windows and dormers.
$2,450,000.
Lawrence Township
1 Benedek Road. Lot size: 2.98
acres. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Roberta Parker, 609-9241600.
6 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; full walkout basement; 4-car garage. All-brick
mansion with Brazillian cherry hardwood floors. Au pair suite main level,
all bedrooms ensuites, cherry library,
For sale: Clockwise from top left: 44 Fackler, fivebedroom house in Lawrence, listed for
$2,750,000; 4850 Province Line Road, five-bedroom house in Hopewell, $2,450,000; 199 Highland Terrace, five-bedroom house in Princeton,
$2,450,000. All listed by N.T. Callaway.
elevator to all four levels, two laundry
rooms, three fireplaces. $3,299,999.
44 Fackler Road. Lot size: 9.82
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Norman
and Christina Callaway, 609-9211050. 44fackler.ntcallaway.com.
5 bedrooms; 5 baths. Boxwood
Farm. Swimming pool, tennis court,
one-stall barn. $2,750,000.
233 Carter Road. Lot size: 10.5
acres. Taxes: $22,124. Listed, Stockton Real Estate/Martha Stockton,
609-924-1416.
5 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; basement; 3-car garage. 90-year-old
colonial on a private lane; includes
approved subdivided 5.77-acre lot.
Flagstone patio and park-like setting.
$2,100,000.
Montgomery
741 Cherry Valley Road. Lot
size: 18.82 acres. Taxes: $26,889.
Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson
Henderson, 609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; 4-car
garage. Colonial farmhouse with detached cottage. In-ground pool, five
pastures. $2,250,000.
Princeton Borough
17 Hibben Road. Lot size: .66
acres. Taxes: $49,919. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 7.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial, tudor.
Circular conservatory, in-ground
pool, newer gourmet kitchen, guest
house. $3,595,000.
59 Westcott Road. Lot size: .57
acres. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Christina Phillips, 609-9241000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; full walkout basement; garage. Stone colonial, new construction. 5,800 SF plus
2,000 SF in basement. $3,295,000.
170 Library Place. Lot size: .46
acres. Taxes: $43,576. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Christina Phillips,
609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 5 full, 2 half baths;
basement; garage. Contemporary
colonial in western section of Borough. Close to town. $2,149,000.
40 Cradle Rock. Lot size: 2.75
acres. Taxes: $63,903. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; full basement; 4-car garage. Colonial with
Blue Stone patio, finished lower level, third-floor bonus room.
$3,475,000.
63 Greenhouse Drive. Lot size: 1
acre. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Kim Rizk, 609-924-1482.
www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 6 full, 2 half baths;
basement; 2-car garage. Three fireplaces, mahogany floors, sweeping
staircases with custom iron work,
kitchen with granite counters.
$2,890,000.
124 Edgerstoune Road. Lot size:
1 acre. Taxes: $39,365. Listed, Hen-
Continued on page 14
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Drumthwacket of a century ago was
surrounded by a 138-acre estate complete with model farm buildings, greenhouses, a serpentine road, garden buildings, a butler’s lodge, small lakes, employees housing and cottages, a deer
park, and a coach house with stables.
The owner of all this was Moses Taylor Pyne, an 1877 Princeton University
graduate who, with a fortune he inherited from his grandfather, Moses Taylor,
the first president of the First National
City Bank of New York, bought the 40acre estate of New Jersey’s Civil War
governor, Charles Smith Olden in
1893.
Olden had named the estate
Drumthwacket after a novel by Sir Walter Scot, which was published in the
1830s, a few years before the main
block of the house was built. Olden’s
land was part of the Princeton Battlefield and included the burial site of the
dead of both armies.
When Pyne developed the properties
on Drumthwacket, he did it in an unusual way. Most who know Drumthwacket
know its centerpiece mansion, now the
official home of the governor.
But the estate’s other buildings —
the servants’and superintendents’quarters, greenhouses, and stables known as
Drumthwacket’s outbuildings — are
manors in their own right. Pyne did not
simply construct servicable wood
frame houses as pale satellites to his
home. He built them of expensive stone
as a testament to his enormous wealth.
Pyne reportedly inherited more than
$70 million when his grandfather died
in 1882. Adjusted for inflation, it would
equal more than $150 billion today.
Pyne, also a Princeton trustee, was a
generous benefactor and an ardent sup-
Drumthwacket was built
with the fortune of Moses
Taylor Pyne, who would
be worth more than $150
billion today.
porter of collegiate Gothic architecture,
which he felt linked Princeton intellectually to the rich heritage of the English
universities, according to the society.
The architect of almost all this was
Raleigh Gildersleve, who designed several buildings on the Princeton campus,
including McCosh Hall and the Cap and
Gown Club. The estate was subdivided
in 1941 and the following buildings the
survivors.
The Greenhouse, 19 Greenhouse
Drive, was built around 1906 and became a residence when the estate was
subdivided. It is the only survivor of the
original greenhouses that surrounded
the main building. The rest were demol-
U.S. 1
ished in the 1940s, but parts of the masonry foundation walls remained and
were incorporated into the landscaping.
The Percarpios immediately fell in
love with the outside of the Tudor cottage and moved in with their new child.
Percarpio says she and her husband
were perfectly content to live in the
house as is, having fallen in love with
the interior too.
They just wanted to do a little remodeling in the kitchen.
Their architecture firm, Lasley Brahaney of State Road, had better plans.
“We ended up flipping the living room
and the kitchen,” Percarpio says. Then
the couple enlarged other rooms,
which cost them two bedrooms —
which they then added back in.
By the time the renovations were
done, the house had a larger second
floor and saw half its footprint reconfigured, Percarpio says.
Continued on page 39
Destinations: Clockwise from top left: The Greenhouse, 19 Greenhouse Drive, and the Superintendent’s House, 6 Greenhouse Drive,
are the tour’s two other Drumthwacket outbuildings; the other destinations are the Ezekiel Smith House, 974 Mercer Street, At Last Farm,
984 Cherry Valley Road – which was once moved – and 132 Birch Avenue. The Historical Society’s annual tour is Saturday, November 7.
Bhatla-Usab Real Estate Group
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$335,000
WEST WINDSOR - 2 Norfolk Dr. STUNNING 5 BR/3 BA HOME
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bath w/Jacuzzi tub, clear-glass shower. Full fin basement.
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two-car detached garage.
HAMILTON TWP - 3 Panick Dr. ORIGINALLY THE BUILDER
MODEL HOME FOR HAMILTON WOODS! Beautiful 4BR/2.5
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flooring, EIK w/sliding doors to large deck, expanded FR w/new crpt,
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EAST WINDSOR - 94 Shelley Cir. PRISTINE CONDITION –
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HAMILTON - 22 Whitman Rd. REMODELED & UPDATED 3
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ROBBINSVILLE - 41 Tynemouth Ct. COMPLETELY REMODELED – Beautiful 2BR townhome in Foxmoor. Gourmet Kitchen w/
granite counters, maple cabinets. LR w/fireplace, DR, fully remodeled
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WEST WINDSOR - 24 Glengarry Way. West Windsor Estates, 4 BR
2.5Ba colonial. 2 story foyer, circular staircase, Hardwood floors in
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100 Canal Pointe Blvd. • Princeton, NJ • 609-987-8889
13
14
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
A U.S. 1 ADVERTISING FEATURE
‘Three Rs’ Keep Cranbury Design Center Busy
A
fter 44 years in the business, Cranbury Design
Center partners Charlie
Rini and Frank O’Leary have
seen it all and know what it
takes to serve clients in uncertain times: The Three Rs.
Refresh, Remodel, and
Renovate are hallmarks of
Cranbury Design Center’s
business. This philosophy enables clients at every budget
level to spruce up their
homes.
“Whether you’re refreshing
the kitchen, remodeling your
bathroom to make it more current or doing a full-scale renovation, it’s an investment,” Rini explained. “We evaluate
what the client wants, what
needs to be done now, what
can be done in the future, and
what’s going to bring not only
the most pleasure but also the
most value.” This big-picture
approach combined with
years of knowledge and attention to detail is why clients like
doing business with Cranbury
Design Center.
Rini refers to the Cranbury
Design Center experience as
an “oasis” for people who are
tired of failed projects and
who desire great results and
caring service. “Our clients
don’t go to the ‘big box’ stores
because they want someone
who is friendly and who isn’t
concentrating on simply making a sale,” Rini added. “We
listen, learn about the space
they’re working on, and understand their budget. That’s
important.”
Cranbury Design Center’s
clients are generally targeting
a high-traffic area, such as the
kitchen or the bath. Refreshing is one of the most economical, efficient and attractive ways to update or change
the look of a space without introducing any major design
changes such as a full-scale
renovation that are more involved.
Remodeling takes it a step
further, incorporating some
design changes into the mix.
Still short of a full renovation,
remodeling can bring new life
to an outdated kitchen or less
than functional bath space.
“Renovating is comprehensive; a complete change in
concept and design to upgrade a space,” Rini said. “We
have design experts on staff
who work with the client from
the start. We pride ourselves
on our ‘design-to-build’ approach for custom work, from
ordering all project materials
to successful project execution, plus 24-hour availability
to address any client concerns.”
Rini found that people who
tried to take advantage of a
huge discount at another
store sometimes had the situation reversed when the “discount” took advantage of
them, resulting in a poorly designed project.
That’s why the Cranbury
Design Center team takes the
time to explain what can be
done at every price point and
level: sometimes the lowest
price is not the best solution.
As a testimony to Cranbury
Design Center’s philosophy:
this past summer, the company was selected by Home &
Garden Television to design a
kitchen for its “Dear
Genevieve” program. It aired
July 11, 2009, on HGTV.
Cranbury Design Center also partnered with manufacturer Plain & Fancy to design a
kitchen project for “Remodeler,” a magazine published by
“Better Homes & Gardens.”
Part of that project also aired
on “Better Living” and online
at www.better.tv.
Learn more about Cranbury
Design Center at www.cranburydesigncenter.com
Cranbury Design Center,
145 West Ward Street, Hightstown. 609-448-5600. Fax:
609-448-6838. [email protected]
Refresh, Remodel & Renovate are hallmarks of Cranbury Design Center’s
business. This enables clients at all budget levels to spruce up their homes.
Continued from page 12
358 Wendover Drive. Lot size: 2.5
acres. Taxes: $41,145. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Suzy Trowbridge, 609924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; partial finished basement; 3-car garage. Updated
colonial. Six fireplaces (one gas),
garage apartment, artist studio.
$2,495,000.
199 Highland Terrace. Lot size: 2.02
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Norman
and Christina Callaway, 609-921-1050.
199highland.ntcallaway.com.
5 bedrooms; 5 full, 2 half baths; full
finished basement; garage. Contemporary in Princeton Preserve. $2,450,000.
72 Knoll Drive. Lot size: .53 acres.
Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Helen
Sherman, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. Mission style
colonial close to Lake Carnegie, major
routes, public transportation, town,
Riverside School. $2,175,000.
West Windsor
4 Dey Farm Road. Lot size: 6 acres.
Taxes: $42,654. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-9241000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; full basement; 4-car garage. Contemporary,
8,000+ SF with indoor pool. $2,795,000.
72 Knoll Drive: Fivebedroom house in
Princeton listed by Henderson Sotheby’s for
$2,175,000.
$950,000-$2,000,000
Cranbury
20 Evans Drive. Lot size: .49 acres.
Taxes: $14,085. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609-5752253. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 4 baths; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. Colonial with
view of Brainerd Lake. Extensively renovated in 1995 featuring modern kitchen
and second floor. Master suite. Formal
gardens with gazebo. 3,666 SF.
$1,250,000.
168 Plainsboro Road. Lot size: 9.32
acres. Taxes: $13,214. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609575-2253. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; partial unfinished basement. Colonial farmhouse
from 1840. Updated and renovated.
Less than two miles from downtown.
$1,010,000.
Continued on page 17
32 Chambers Street
3 2 CHAMBERS
Princeton, NJ STREET * P
-763-1416 * 6
1-8001-800
-763-1416
609-924-1416
www.stockton-realtor.com
Timeless Beauty ...
...ON OVER 10 ACRES,
INCLUDING A 5-ACRE
BUILDABLE LOT, this gracious
residence has classic good looks
and lovely architectural details
throughout. With 5 bedrooms and 4½
baths and surrounded by picturesque
grounds, it provides country living
not far from town. In Lawrence with
a Princeton address a marvelous
blend of the past and the present.
VIEW THE VIRTUAL TOUR:
www.realestateshows.com/143401
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
Meet Our Agents
at www.MercerTPA.com
Whether you need help finding your dream home or getting the highest price for your
present home, members of Mercer County Top Producers Association are the best agents
to have working with you.
Wen Bash
Weichert
609-799-3500
Deborah Benedetti
Keller Williams
609-987-8889
Barbara Blackwell
NT Callaway
609-921-1050
Beatrice Bloom
Weichert
609-921-1900
Sandy Brown
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-737-9100
Eugenia Brunone
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-750-2020
Ellen Calman
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-750-2020
Radha Cheerath
Coldwell Banker
609-799-8181
Susan DeHaven
Weidel
609-737-1500
Joseph DeLorenzo
Re/Max in Town
609-895-0500
Diane Detuelo
Coldwell Banker
609-799-8181
Suzanne Drabek
Coldwell Banker
609-921-1411
Marilyn Durkee
NT Callaway
609-921-1050
Joan Eisenberg
Re/Max Greater Princeton
609-951-8600
Karma Estaphanous
Re/Max of Princeton
609-452-1887
Barbara Facompre
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-737-9100
Alrene Feinstein
Re/Max Greater Princeton
609-951-8600
Lisa Folmer
Weidel
609-896-1000
Robin Froehlich
NT Callaway
609-921-1050
Joan George
Re/Max Tri County
609-587-9300
George Scott Glenfield
Pinnacle Realtors
609-924-6550
Phyllis Grodnicki
Prudential Fox & Roach
609-924-1600
Margaret Hill
NT Callaway
609-921-1050
Harriet Hudson
Weichert
609-921-1900
Ingela Kostenbader
Weichert
609-921-1900
Linda Kriebel
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-921-2600
Saundra Lafferty
Coldwell Banker
609-799-8181
Debbie Lang
Prudential Fox and Roach
609-924-1600
Ellen Lefkowitz
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-921-2600
Beth Miller
Prudential Fox & Roach
609-924-1600
Maura Mills
NT Callaway
609-921-1050
Donna Moskowitz
Century 21
Abrams Hutchinson
609-683-5000
Kathleen Murphy
Weichert
609-921-1900
Donna Murray
Prudential Fox and Roach
609-924-1600
Linda S. November
Re/Max Greater Princeton
609-951-8600
Blanche Paul
Prudential Fox and Roach
609-924-1600
Dawn Petrozzini
Re/Max Greater Princeton
609-951-8600
Brenda Probasco
Re/Max Premiere Properties
609-737-7474
Maureen Provenzano
Prudential Fox & Roach
609-924-1600
Mary Reiling
Coldwell Banker
609-799-8181
Donna Reilly
Weichert
609-921-1900
Rebecca Rogers
Re/Max of Princeton
609-452-1887
Emily Schwab
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-737-9100
Smita Shah
Re/Max Greater Princeton
609-951-8600
Denise Shaughnessy
Henderson
609-924-1000
Betsy Silverman
Coldwell Banker
609-799-8181
Bernard Smolowitz
Keller Williams
609-987-8889
Susan Steber
Re/Max Tri County
609-587-9300
Kimberly Steinnagel
Coldwell Banker
609-921-1411
Carole Tosches
Prudential Fox & Roach
609-924-1600
Diane Urbanek
Gloria Nilson GMAC
609-921-2600
Kenneth Verbeyst
Prudential Fox and Roach
609-924-1600
Robin L. Wallack
Prudential Fox & Roach
609-924-1600
Proud Sponsor of the Mercer County
Top Producers Association
Jane Weber
Henderson
609-924-1000
Ivy Wen
Prudential Fox & Roach
609-924-1600
Amy G. Worthington
NT Callaway
609-921-1050
Barbara Yacullo
Weidel
609-586-1400
Frank J. Mancino • 609-586-0020
15
16
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
17
Top Producers Association of Mercer County
T
he 58-member Mercer County “Top Producers Association” represents 21 real estate companies and consists of full-time, full service, experienced agents. The group was founded in 1987 to promote professionalism, exchange marketing/listing information, and
keep abreast of the latest real estate trends. Frank Mancino of Gateway
Funding keeps the members up-to-date on the economic and mortgage
market. Meet the agents at MercerTPA.com.
Houses for Sale
Continued from page 14
8 Perrine Lane. Lot size: .41
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Barbara
Blackwell, 609-921-1050.
8perrine.ntcallaway.com.
4 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; nearly full
finished basement. Expanded brick
from Kingston model in Cranbury
Greene. Professionally landscaped
with pergola, cedar deck, and bubbling fountain. $985,000.
Hopewell Township
23 Michael Way. Lot size: 7.39
acres. Listed, Gloria Nilson GMAC/Barbara Facompre, 609-737-9100.
5 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; full basement; 3-car garage. 6,500 SF colonial with custom moldings, built-ins,
Wolfe appliances, mahogany library.
$1,879,000.
12 Benson Lane. Lot size: 6.3
acres. Taxes: $38,369. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Mary Finnell, 609577-5528. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; full finished basement; 3-car garage. 5,964
SF colonial with open floorplan.
Basement includes high ceilings with
rec. area, excercise room, and a full
bath. $1,799,000.
291 Hopewell Amwell Road. Lot
size: 7.26 acres. Taxes: $26,541.
Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Jane
Kenyon, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 5 baths; partial basement; 3-car garage. 5,811 SF colonial farmhouse with stone fireplace,
stalls, barn, fenced paddock, inground pool. $1,795,000.
1258 Bear Tavern Road. Lot
size: 8.41 acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Norman Callaway, 609-7377765. 1258beartavern.ntcallaway.com.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; basement. The Andrew Mershon House is
an 18th-century tavern that hosted
Washington’s army. Large studio/office on-site. $1,390,000.
153 Harbourton-Woodsville
Road. Lot size: 10.96 acres. Taxes:
$17,872. Listed, Gloria Nilson
GMAC/Rosaria Lawlor, 609-6835773.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 2-car
garage. 4,394 SF colonial. Deck, inground pool. Stone front. Two stone
fireplaces. Intercom with music.
Home warranty. $1,185,000.
138 Province Line Road. Lot
size: 10.76 acres. Taxes: $19,693.
Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret Henderson, 609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3 baths; full finished
basement; 1-car garage. 2,942 SF
Cape with updated eat-in kitchen,
central air, loft. $1,095,000.
26 Hallet Drive. Lot size: 2.23
acres. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Jean Habig, Maggie Peters,
609-737-9550. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 3-car
garage. 4,660 SF Colonial. Extended
kitchen with cherry cabinets, stainless steel appliances, six-burner
stove. $978,500.
Lawrence Township
106 Carson. Lot size: 4 acres.
Taxes: $16,208. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Jody Erdman, 609-9241000. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; basement; garage. Princeton address.
Country estate; 19th-century barn
with four stalls. Entry hall, mahogany
curved staircase, four fireplaces,
perennial gardens, renovated
kitchen, rentable apartment with separate entrance. $1,950,000.
Millstone Township
357 Millstone Road. Lot size:
3.51 acres. Taxes: $28,671. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Janice Wilson
and Gilda Aronovic, 609-635-5608.
www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 5 full, 2 half baths;
full basement; 5-car garage. Showcase property featuring two master
bedrooms en suite and a private office measuring 48’ x 10’. In-ground
pool and out-buildings. $1,999,000.
11 Alpine Drive. Lot size: 2.47
acres. Taxes: $16,968. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Robert Corriveau
and Anne Setzer, 609-516-9203.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full unfinished basement; 3-car garage. Nestled in rolling hills and backed by
wildlife corridor. A bank of French
doors leads out from living room onto
a covered veranda. $995,000.
Montgomery
500 Province Line Road. Lot
size: 3.83 acres. Taxes: $26,403.
Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret Henderson, 609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 6.5 baths; full finished basement; 3-car garage. Colonial with in-ground hot tub, sprinkler
system, three fireplaces, game
room. $1,950,000.
138 Van Zandt Road. Lot size:
2.67 acres. Taxes: $26,662. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret
Coghlin, 908-874-0000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full unfinished basement; 3-car garage. Twostory foyer with sweeping staircase,
conservatory, office with bar area,
gourmet kitchen with all amenities.
Colonial. $1,225,000.
76 Meadow Lark. Lot size: 3.07
acres. Taxes: $24,972. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
4 bedrooms; 4 baths; full basement; 3-car garage. Chesapeake
Federal model colonial with conservatory situated on three acres of
park-like setting. Grand foyer and circular staircase, gourmet kitchen,
many upgrades. $1,200,000.
9 Congressional Court. Lot size:
.47 acres. Taxes: $19,433. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret
Coghlin, 908-874-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full unfinished basement; 2-car garage. Colonial near Cherry Valley Country Club.
Hardwoods throughout main rooms,
gourmet kitchen with all the amenities. $1,175,000.
Continued on following page
18
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Continued from preceding page
Pennington Borough
3 Roosevelt Avenue. Lot size:
2.18 acres. Taxes: $22,443. Listed,
Prudential Fox & Roach/Roberta
Parker, 609-924-1600.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full unfinished walk-out basement; 3-car
garage. Custom-crafted moldings,
Venetian plaster. Two-story family
room with stone fireplace. Master
bedroom has two walk-in closets and
tray ceiling with dome. $1,350,000.
Princeton Borough
57 Cleveland Lane. Lot size: .53
acres. Taxes: $23,959. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Dutch colonial.
Renovated apartment over garage.
Kitchen and baths renovated.
$1,995,000.
2 Greenholm Street. Lot size: .51
acres. Taxes: $17,231. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Susan Gordon, 609921-1411.
4 bedrooms; 3 baths. Contemporary traditional. $1,200,000.
Princeton Township
8 Winfield Drive. Lot size: 3.94
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Amy
Worthington, 609-921-1050. 8winfield.ntcallaway.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full unfinished basement; garage. Colonial on
private, park-like four acres. Good
for casual living and formal entertaining. $1,950,000.
917 Stuart Road. Lot size: 2
acres. Taxes: $29,198. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Linda Feldstein, 609921-2700.
5 bedrooms; 4 full, 3 half baths; 3car garage. Ranch with large living
room, dining room, and family room
with wet bar. 20x40 heated concrete
pool and cabana. Central vac./sprinkler system. $1,950,000.
19 Locust Lane. Lot size: .52
acres. Taxes: $12,003. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Kim Rizk, 609924-1482. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 4 baths; partial basement; 2-car garage. Master suite
with fireplace and walk-in closet, redoak hardwood flooring, bluestone
terraces, custom tile work.
$1,695,000.
69 Pretty Brook Road. Lot size:
.96 acres. Taxes: $29,430. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Kim Rizk, 609924-1482. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; 3-car
garage. French colonial. Two fireplaces, hardwood flooring. Granite
countertops, security system.
$1,695,000.
21 Vernon Circle. Lot size: .58
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Norman
Callaway, Jr., 609-921-1050. 21vernon.ntcallaway.com.
4 bedrooms; 3 baths; finished
basement; garage. Colonial on cul
de sac. Lake views and towering
trees. $1,549,000.
55 Battle Road. Lot size: .52
acres. Taxes: $22,145. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Kim Rizk, 609924-1482. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 3 full, 2 half baths;
basement; 1-car garage. Colonial.
Four fireplaces, hardwood floors,
butler’s pantry, screened summer sitting porch, built-in bookcases, heated workshed with running water.
$1,495,000.
207 Snowden Lane. Lot size: .46
acres. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Susan Gordon, 609-921-1411.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial, new
construction. $1,486,000.
1000 Kingston Road. Lot size:
1.15 acres. Taxes: $25,188. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Kim Rizk, 609924-1482. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; unfinished
basement; 3-car garage. Brick colonial. Year-round spa suite, in-ground
pool, view of Lake Carnegie, in-law
suite. $1,475,000.
472 Stockton Street. Lot size:
4.62 acres. Taxes: $26,963. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret
“Peggy” Baldwin, 609-737-9550.
www.hendersonsir.com.
A U.S. 1 ADVERTISING FEATURE
Real Home Improvements With Mainstreet
T
he weather is turning, and
winter winds soon will be
testing siding and roofing.
Mainstreet Siding Home Improvements is ready.
Murray Gilbert has been in the
business for nearly 50 years and
has seen not only the times
change, but also materials and
building techniques. Today’s siding and roofing is much hardier
to get the job done.
“The siding industry has been
changing,” said Murray, who coowns the business with Thomas
Maslowski. “Cement siding is becoming increasingly popular, replacing the vinyl that eclipsed
aluminum siding in the last 20
years.”
Gilbert says cement siding is a
real improvement. It’s attached
in long panels and is termite- and
fire-proof. The panels are five
times thicker than vinyl and are
painted to look like wood, right
down to the grain. It doesn’t rust,
mildew, or mold, and there’s no
maintenance. Best of all, cement
siding carries a 15- and 25-year
paint guarantee.
Roofing has also taken a
quantum leap in the last few
years, and Mainstreet Siding
Home Improvements offers the
latest and greatest.
“We’re using longer-lasting,
heavier shingles,” he added.
“They’re simply more durable, as
evidenced by an up to 50-year
guarantee. Heavier shingles offer attractive options, such as finishes that look like slate, for example.”
Gilbert knows his business.
He started out in home improvements in the 1960s, and then
worked for a wholesaler. In 1980,
he launched his own company,
which he sold in 2000. However,
after three months, retirement
was over, and he was back in
business with Maslowski, an engineer, who was one of his customers.
Both Gilbert and Maslowski
are hands-on. They are on job
sites every day, supervising and
assuring quality. Gilbert believes
the company’s highly trained
workers, attention to detail and
customer service sets it apart
from the rest.
“I keep people informed, so
they know the status of their projects,” he noted. “Every detail is
important, from the permits to
where the dumpster will go.”
Mainstreet Siding Home Improvement is headquartered in
Mercerville and has clients all
over New Jersey and in Bucks
County, Pa. The majority of his
clients come from Princeton,
Lawrenceville, Pennington, and
West Windsor.
“We are competitively priced,
with an emphasis on quality,”
Gilbert said.
For more information or an appointment, call 609-584-9572, or
visit them on the Web at
www.mainstreet-siding.com.
Mainstreet Siding Home Improvements, PO Box 3278,
Trenton. 609-584-9572.
www.mainstreet-siding.com
Murray Gilbert, co-owner of Mainstreet Siding Home Improvements with
Thomas Maslowski, has been in the business for nearly 50 years.
3 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage.
Ranch sitting on a plateau overlooking greenery and plantines.
$1,395,000.
South Brunswick
55 Davidsons Mill Road. Lot
size: 9.81 acres. Taxes: $16,264.
Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Roberta Parker, 609-9241600.
5 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; 3-car
garage. Three-story contemporary,
open floor plan, 20 years old. Window walls of floor-to-ceiling glass.
Stainless steel appliances and granite counters. Formal dining room and
living room separated by a seethrough fireplace. Master bedroom
includes a renovated master bath
with whirlpool tub. Attached handicap-accessible apartment. Includes
five-stall horse stable. Subdividable.
$1,590,000.
West Windsor
4 Cardinal Drive. Taxes:
$22,168. Listed, Weidel Realtors/John Zanvardine, 609-799-6200.
5 bedrooms; 5.5 baths; full finished basement; 3-car garage. Heated pool, au pair suite, two fireplaces,
sunroom, library, wine cellar, media
room. $1,140,000.
Continued on page 38
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
19
20
U.S. 1
ART
OCTOBER 28, 2009
FILM
LITERATURE
DANCE
DRAMA
MUSIC
PREVIEW
DAY-BY-DAY EVENTS, OCT. 28 TO NOV. 4
For up-to-date event listings visit www.princetoninfo.com.
PREVIEW EDITOR:
JAMIE SAXON
Wednesday
October 28
[email protected]
William Dunham, author of “The Calculus
Gallery: Masterpieces from Newton to
Lebesque;” Michael Huber, author of
“Mythematics: Solving the Twelve Labors of
Hercules;” and Paul Pasles, author of “Benjamin Franklin’s Numbers.” 6 p.m.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT: Hey, It’s That
Harvard Professor from TV
Good Causes
Communities of Light, Womanspace,
Drumthwacket, Princeton, 609-394-0136.
www.womanspace.org. Launch event for
the annual lighting of luminary candles to
raise awareness of domestic violence and
sexual assault with a reception, program,
and ceremonial lighting. Join honorary
chair Governor Jon S. Corzine and event
chairs Kristin Marvin Keller and Christine
Clayton. Rain or shine. Luminary kits are
available for $10. Lighting is Sunday, December 13, at dusk. Register. Free. 5:30
p.m.
Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers
University, 126 College Avenue, New
Brunswick. Interactive discussion by
Michael Sandel, host of the PBS series
“Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?”
The series airs from Sandel’s lecture hall at
Harvard, where his “Justice” course is one
of the university’s most popular courses.
7:30 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, New Hope Sidetracks Art
Gallery, 2A Stockton Avenue, New Hope,
215-862-4586. www.nhsidetracks.com.
“Naked in New Hope ‘09,” a group show
celebrating the human body featuring oil
paintings by Ralf Feyl of Friendship, Maine;
and oil paintings and watercolors by the
late Inge Klimpt. More than 60 other artists
are participating in the show. Extended to
November 15. 11 a.m.
Art Exhibit, College of New Jersey, Art
Gallery, Holman Hall, Ewing, 609-7712198. www.tcnj.edu/~tcag. Opening reception for “Distortions: Contemporary Media
Art from Mexico,” an exhibit featuring six
Latin American artists. Experimental music
performance and a panel discussion with
artists Ivan Abreu, Marcela Armas, Ale de
La Puente, Gilberto Esparza, Gerardo Gardia de la Garza, and Ivan Puig. On view to
December 2. 5 p.m.
Faith
Drama
Health & Wellness
She Stoops to Conquer, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Comedy
about mistaken identities by Oliver Goldsmith. Directed by Nicholas Martin.
Through November 1. $20 to $55. 7:30
p.m.
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater,
Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama based on
John Steinbeck’s novel. Directed by Joe
Discher. $34 to $54. 7:30 p.m.
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of
Fleet Street, Bucks County Playhouse,
70 South Main Street, New Hope, 215-8622041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com.
Musical. $25. 8 p.m.
Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15 walkin. Discounted class cards available. 9:30
to 10:50 a.m.
Let’s Walk, Princeton Senior Resource
Center, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108. Weekly
stroll to enjoy fall foliages. Rain or shine.
Free. 10:30 a.m.
Prostate Cancer Support Group, Princeton HealthCare System, 731 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 888-897-8979. www.princetonhcs.org. Open discussion facilitated by Lois Glasser, oncology social worker
with Cancer Care; and Karen Rust, University Medical Center at Princeton Cancer
outreach coordinator. Free. Noon to 1:30
p.m.
Caregiver Support Group, Alzheimer’s
Association, Buckingham Place, 155 Raymond Road, Princeton, 800-883-1180.
www.alz.org. Light dinner provided. 5:30
p.m.
Rediscover the Heart of Healing, Center
for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609581-3539. www.relaxationandhealing.com.
“Deepen Your Relationship to Spirit.” Register with Susan Pie. 7 p.m.
Attention Deficit Disorder Lecture and
Discussion, Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,
Riverside School, 58 Riverside Drive,
Princeton, 609-683-8787. “What is the first
step in the treatment of AD/HD: Pill or
Skills?” presented by Dr. William Pelham
(DVD presentation). Facilitated group discussions follow. 7 to 9 p.m.
Introduction to Raja Yoga, Onsen For All,
4451 Route 27, Princeton, 609-924-4800.
www.onsenforall.com. Presented by
Wendy Young. Register. $15. 7 p.m.
To List An Event
Send listings for upcoming events
to U.S. 1 Preview ASAP (it is never too
early). Deadline for events to appear
in any Wednesday edition is 5 p.m. the
previous Thursday.
You can submit press releases to us
by E-mail at [email protected]; by fax at 609-452-0033; or
by mail to U.S. 1, 12 Roszel Road,
Princeton 08540. E-photos (300 ppi or
above) should be addressed to
[email protected]
We suggest calling before leaving
home. Check our website, princetoninfo.com, for up-to-date listings, cancellations, and late listings.
A Taste of Judaism: Are You Curious?,
Har Sinai Temple, 2441 Pennington Road,
Pennington, 609-730-8100. www.harsinai.org. Rabbi Stuart Pollack presents a modern, Jewish perspective on living in today’s
complicated world. Register. 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Living the Questions, Prince of Peace
Lutheran Church, 177 Princeton-Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-799-1753.
www.popnj.org. Discussion of issues in
modern theology. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Food & Dining
Autumn in Rhone, One 53, 153 Washington Street, Rocky Hill, 609-921-0153. Wine
tasting and hors d’oeuvres. Register. $65.
6:30 p.m.
Isn’t Motherhood a Laugh Riot?
Dena Blizzard, a former Miss NJ, now the mother of three
young children (we don’t know who all those kids are in the
photo), pokes fun at parenthood in her stand-up comedy
act, Friday and Saturday, October 30 and 31, Catch a
Rising Star, Hyatt Regency Princeton. 609-987-8018.
Come Back, Come Back, Wherever You
Are, George Street Playhouse, 9 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, 732-2467717. www.gsponline.org. Premiere of drama about love written and directed by
Arthur Laurents. $28 to $78. 8 p.m.
Happy Days, Princeton University, Lewis
Center, 185 Nassau Street, 609-258-1500.
www.princeton.edu/arts. Samuel Beckett’s
drama. $10. 8 p.m.
MacHomer, State Theater, at Crossroads
Theater, 7 Livingston Avenue, New
Brunswick, 732-246-7469. www.statetheatrenj.org. Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”
performed by Rick Miller features more
than 50 voices of characters from “The
Simpsons.” $32. 8 p.m.
Film
Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “Who Does She
Think She Is?” about women artists, selfexpression, and motherhood. 7 p.m.
Dancing
Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569
Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com. For newcomers. $10. 7 to 9 p.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country
Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609-924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction
and dance. $7. 7:40 to 10:30 p.m.
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5
Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m.
Salsa Class, Pennington Ewing Athletic
Club, 1440 Lower Ferry Road, Ewing, 609883-2000. www.peachealthfitness.com.
For beginners. $15. 8 to 9:30 p.m.
Literati
Science and Math Night, Labyrinth
Books, 122 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609497-1600. www.labyrinthbooks.com.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Perfect for Halloween: The Princeton Theater
Experiment presents ‘Shade and Shadow:
Readings and Reflections on the Works of Edgar
Allan Poe,’ Thursday, October 29, 7 p.m., Princeton Public Library. 609-924-9529.
For Families
Family Boo Bounce, Bounce U,
410 Princeton Hightstown Road,
West Windsor, 609-443-5867.
www.bounceu.com. Two hours of
bouncing to Halloween-themed
music, costume contest, treats.
$9.95. 6 p.m.
Lectures
People Are the Killer App, NJ
Communications Advertising
and Marketing Association, Arts
Council of Princeton, Witherspoon Street, 609-275-4123.
www.njcama.com. “Lessons
Learned in Building Word of
Mouth Movement” presented by
Geno Church, Brains on Fire. Reception, cash bar, and presentation. Register. $25. 6 to 9 p.m.
Center for the Study of Religion,
Princeton University, McCormick 101, 609-258-3000. www.princeton.edu. “A Conversation
with Margaret Benefiel: A Quaker
Perspective on Ethics in the Executive Suite” moderated by
David W. Miller, director of the
Princeton University Faith & Work
Initiative. Benefiel, CEO of ExecutiveSoul.com, addresses issues
of leadership, spirituality, and decision making. Free. 7 p.m.
Prejudice Reduction, Rider University, Bart Luedeke Center,
Lawrenceville, 609-896-5521.
www.rider.edu. “Prejudice Among
the Well-Intentioned” presented
by Samuel Gaertner, director of
social psychology, University of
Delaware. 7 p.m.
Camera Club, South Brunswick
Arts Commission, South Brunswick Community Center, 124 New
Road, Monmouth Junction, 732329-4000. “You Can Take Better
Pictures” presented by John Se-
Bob Shetzline, Limelight, 812
North Easton Road, Doylestown,
PA, 215-345-6330. Piano and vocals. 6 to 11 p.m.
William Hart Strecker, Salt Creek
Grille, One Rockingham Row,
Forrestal Village, Plainsboro,
609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 6 to 9 p.m.
Politics
Woodrow Wilson School,
Princeton University, Robertson
Hall, Bowl 016, 609-258-2943.
www.princeton.edu. “Intended
Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape,” Jonathan
Torgovnik leads a panel discussion. 4:30 p.m.
Candidate Night, Mercer County
Republican Committee, Mercer
Oaks Club, 725 Village Road,
West Windsor, 609-936-1880.
www.abettermercer.com. Refreshments. Cash bar. Register.
Donations invited. 7 to 9 p.m.
Eagleton Institute of Politics,
Rutgers University, 126 College
Avenue, New Brunswick. Interactive discussion by Michael
Sandel, host of the PBS series
“Justice: What’s the Right Thing
to Do?” The series airs from
Sandel’s lecture hall at Harvard,
where his “Justice” course is one
of the university’s most popular
courses. 7:30 p.m.
All Day Every Day
All Year Long!
Served with Your Choice of House Salad, Caesar Salad, Cup of Soup,
Fresh Baked Bread & 2 Side Items (unless specified).
Full Lb! while it lasts!
$9.99
Slow Roasted to Perfection & Served with Au Jus.
ginal
Our Ori
$9.99
Twin Pork Tenderloin Shish Kabob Marinated with Herbs,
Onions, Mushrooms & Peppers over Rice Pilaf & Veg.
Barbecued Baby Back Ribs $15.99
$9.99
A Whole Rack of Delicious, Tender Ribs, Double Glazed
with Our Signature BBQ Sauce.
Tilapia Francaise $16.99
$9.99
Dipped in Egg Batter. Served in Lemon Butter
& White Wine. Served over Rice Pilaf & with 1 Veg.
Stuffed Broiled Flounder $17.99
$9.99
Stuffed with Seafood. Served with Butter Sauce & Lemon.
Fried Flounder $16.99
$9.99
Lightly Fried, Served with Cocktail & Tartar Sauce.
*Broiled + $6.99.
Hawaiian Ham Steak $12.99
Breast of Chicken Parm $13.99
$9.99
Breaded, Fried & Topped with Tomato Sauce
& Melted Mozarella Cheese. Served with Side of Linguini.
Broiled Sea Scallops $18.99
$9.99
Wild Caught, Tender Mixed Sizes. Served En Casserole with
Lemon & Butter Sauce.
Twin Chicken Shishkebobs $15.99
$9.99
(On the skewer.) Marinated with Herbs & Served with Onions,
Mushrooms & Peppers. Served over Rice & with 1 Veg.
Fresh Fillet of $13.99
Jersey Blue Fish
$9.99
Sauteed in Oil, Fresh Garlic, Jersey Tomatoes, Peppers,
Onions, Herbs. Served over Rice Pilaf & with 1 Vegetable.
Tilapia Bruschetta $15.99
$9.99
With Our Bruschetta Topping. Served over Rice Pilaf.
Sauteed with Mushrooms, Garlic & Spices.
Served over Rice Pilaf & with 1 Veg.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT: A Ghoulish Night at the Museum
Mercer by Moonlight, Mercer
Museum, Pine and Ashland
streets, Doylestown, 215-3450210. www.mercermuseum.org.
Tour through the museum includes grisly objects including a
hearse, gallows, witch doctor’s
canes, and vampire killing kits.
Not recommended for children
under eight. Register. $12. 7 p.m.
Pop Music
Willie Nile and Big Note Trio, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Memorial Drive, Trenton,
609-984-8400. All seating onstage. 7 p.m.
Dudu Fisher, State Theater, 15
Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, 732-246-7469. www.statetheatrenj.org. Concert features
his talent as a Broadway performer, a cantor, and a contemporary artist. $45 to $75. 7:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
HOUR
HAPPYY DAY
EVERm-5pm
11a r only)
(in ba
Great Italian Food
and American cuisine
in our CASUAL ATMOSPHERE
enjoy!
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in our Unique Atmosphere.
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Us: Weddings, Showers,
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of Up to 125 Guests!
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Broiled, Served with Drawn Butter & Lemon.
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Thursday
October 29
$9.99
Grilled Virginia Ham Steak in Our Special Ham Marinade.
Served with Grilled Pineapple Rings.
Grilled Pork tenderloin $16.99
Like eating at “Nonna’s” house!
Live Music
Introducing Our New Menu Additions
Available 11am - 1pm
Greek Souvlaki Platter $16.99
21
instadt, New Jersey Federation of
Camera Clubs. Free. 7 to 9 p.m.
West Windsor Library, 333 North
Post Road, 609-799-0462. “How
to Protect and Keep Your Computer and Children Safe on the Internet” presented by Robin Kessler,
Internet Associates. 7 to 9 p.m.
Town
&
Country
Diner Bakery Bar
Prime Rib $16.99
U.S. 1
$9.99
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R Musicians
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Contemporary American Cuisine
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22
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
October 29
Continued from preceding page
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Afternoon Concert, Princeton
University Chapel, Washington
Road, 609-258-3654. Free. 12:30
to 1 p.m.
Joe R. Engle Organ Concert,
Princeton Theological Seminary, Miller Chapel, 609-4977890. www.ptsem.edu. “Words of
Albert Schweitzer and the Music
of Bach,” a dramatic reading and
multimedia presentation, features
Eric Plutz on organ and Michael
Brothers as the voice of Schweitzer. In conjunction with “Visiting
Hours at Lambarene: Photographic Reminisces of Albert
Schweitzer, 1961-1963,” an exhibit commemorating the 60th anniversary of Schweitzer’s only visit to the United States, at Erdman
Library. Schweitzer was a physician, theologian, musician, and
winner of the 1952 Nobel Peace
prize. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Glenn Miller Orchestra, Princeton High School Studio Band,
at West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School South, 346 Clarksville
Road, West Windsor, 609-7165050, ext. 7339. www.prspac.org.
Benefit evening opens with the
609-258-0652
Fresh Made To Order Sushi
Freshness is what matters in Sushi.
Comparable in quality & freshness to the
finest restaurants in the area.
Teriyaki Boy can’ t be beat for its combination of
well-prepared food and inexpensive prices.
—Princeton Living
$
20
Sushi
selections from 2.29
Choose from Teriyaki, Tempura, Udon or Combos & Platters.
Over
Take-out & Catering
Service Available.
All food is cooked
to order in 100% vegetable oil.
MARKETFAIR
609-897-7979 Fax: 609-897-1204
Mon-Thurs. 10am-9pm, Fri-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun 11am-7:30pm
Grand Opening
Authentic Japanese Sushi & Cooking
The Only Truly Japanese Sushi Restaurant in the Area
Authentic & Healthy Cuisine – We use only wild-ccaught fish
Also serving Korean Barbecue
BYOB – No Set-u
up Charge
Out & Lunch Special Available (Monday through Saturday)
Take-O
3349 BRUNSWICK PIKE • LAWRENCEVILLE. NJ
269- 5800 • FAX: 609- 269- 5795 • WWW.HONSUSHI.COM
609-2
Philadelphia Jazz
Orchestra. Please
note that the event
is NOT located at
Princeton High
School. $25. E-mail
[email protected] to reserve
tickets. 7:30 p.m.
Art
Gallery Talk,
Princeton University Art Museum,
Princeton campus,
609-258-3788.
www.princetonartmuseum.org. Highlights of the collections, new acquisitions, and special
exhibitions. Free.
12:30 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Princeton Theological Seminary, Erdman Center, 20 Library Place,
609-497-7990. www.ptsem.edu.
Reception for “Visiting Hours at
Lambarene: Photographic Reminiscences of Albert Schweitzer,
1961-1963,” an exhibit commemorating the 60th anniversary of
Schweitzer’s only visit to the United States. Schweitzer was a
physician, theologian, musician,
and winner of the 1952 Nobel
Peace prize. On view to November 8. 6:15 to 7 p.m.
Late Thursdays, Princeton University Art Museum, Campus,
609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Extended
hours to explore the special exhibitions and collections. Many
evenings feature film screenings,
musical performances, and activities. Free. 7 to 10 p.m.
Drama
Come Back, Come Back, Wherever You Are, George Street
Playhouse, 9 Livingston Avenue,
New Brunswick, 732-246-7717.
www.gsponline.org. Premiere of
drama about love written and directed by Arthur Laurents. $28 to
$78. 2 and 8 p.m.
Meeting of the Macabre, Hickory
Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor, 609448-1330. The writings of Edgar
Allen Poe and Bram Stoker
brought to life by three actors in
period costume. 7 p.m.
She Stoops to Conquer, McCarter Theater, 91 University
Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787.
www.mccarter.org. Comedy
about mistaken identities by Oliver Goldsmith. Directed by
Nicholas Martin. Through November 1. $20 to $55. 7:30 p.m.
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Bucks
County Playhouse, 70 South
Main Street, New Hope, 215-8622041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com. Musical. $25. 8 p.m.
Happy Days, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau
Live at Salt Creek:
William Hart Strecker
appears on Wednesday, October 28, at
Salt Creek Grille,
Forrestal Village.
609-419-4200.
Street, 609-258-1500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Samuel Beckett’s drama. $10. 8 p.m.
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama
based on John Steinbeck’s novel.
Directed by Joe Discher. $34 to
$54. 8 p.m.
MacHomer, State Theater,
Crossroads Theater, 7 Livingston
Avenue, New Brunswick, 732246-7469. www.statetheatrenj.org. Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”
performed by Rick Miller features
more than 50 voices of characters
from “The Simpsons.” $32. 8 p.m.
Film
Give Me the Night, New Jersey
Film Festival, Ruth Adams Building, 131 George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-8482. www.njfilmfest.com. “Creature From
the Black Lagoon” in 3D, 1954.
$10. 6 p.m.
Dancing
Salsa Dancing, HotSalsaHot,
Princeton YWCA, 69 Paul Robeson Place, Princeton, 609-6517070. www.hotsalsahot.com.
Three levels of class instruction
plus social practice, $20. Only social practice, $7. 6:30 p.m.
Argentine Tango, Black Cat Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center,
Monument Drive, 609-273-1378.
www.theblackcattango.com. Beginner and intermediate classes
followed by guided practice. $10.
8 p.m.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Literati
Help With Your Novel, East
Brunswick Library, Jean Walling
Civic Center, 732-390-6767.
www.ebpl.org. Rachelle Burk,
Highlight Magazine’s author of
the month, talks about the nuts
and bolts of getting your book
published and how to avoid mistakes made by many novice writers. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Princeton Theater Experiment,
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
“Shade and Shadow: Readings
and Reflections on the Works of
Edgar Allan Poe” examines the
works of Poe through poetry,
short stories, and film. Free. 7
p.m.
Good Causes
Awards Dinner, PlanSmart NJ,
New Brunswick Hyatt, 609-3939434. www.plansmartnj.org. Benefit for the state’s oldest land use
research and advocacy organization. $125 to $150. 5:30 p.m.
Crafters’ Marketplace Patrons’
Gala Cocktail Party, YWCA
Princeton, Princeton BMW
showroom, Quakerbridge Road,
609-497-2100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. Hors d’oeuvres,
desserts, cocktails, jazz trio, and
silent auction. $75. 6 to 9 p.m.
Fairs
Hometown Halloween Parade,
Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Public Library Plaza,
609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Meet at the plaza
next to the library and then, led by
the Princeton University Band,
parade to Palmer Square, where
the festivities will continue with
treats, a performance by Alex and
the Kaleidoscope Band, and
pumpkin decorating on the green
in front of the historic Nassau Inn.
Costumes are welcome. Free. 5
to 6:30 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Open House, Pennington Ewing
Athletic Club, 1440 Lower Ferry
Road, Ewing, 609-883-2000.
www.peachealthfitness.com.
Costumes are welcome. Register.
9 a.m. to noon.
Lunch and Learn, Onsen For All,
4451 Route 27, Princeton, 609924-4800. www.onsenforall.com.
“Natural Allergy Relief” presented
by Allison Scharf. Register. $15.
Noon.
Mindful Lunch, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman,
609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Medication, guided
mindful eating, and mindful eating
skills. Bring your own lunch. Register. $15. Noon. to 1 p.m.
Home, Safe Home, Capital
Health System, 1445 Whitehorse
Mercerville Road, Hamilton, 609584-5140. www.capitalhealth.org.
“Independent Living in Your Golden Years,” presentations about
planning and adjusting to aging in
place including “The Aging Brain:
What’s Normal,” “Watch Your
Step: Being Safe and Sensible at
Home,: “Prevention is Worth More
Than the Pound of Cure,” and
“Simple Improvements for Comfort and Safety.” Register. Free.
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Boost Your Immune System,
Onsen For All, 4451 Route 27,
Princeton, 609-924-4800. www.onsenforall.com. “Natural Alternatives” presented by Andrew Appello. Register. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Windsor Healthcare, and
the new University Medical
Center of Princeton at
Plainsboro presented by
Barry S. Rabner, Princeton
HealthCare System, and
Hyman and Michael Jacobs, Windsor HealthCare.
Register. Free. 10 a.m. to
noon.
Singles
Meet and Greet, Singles Get Togethers, Olive Garden, 777
Route 18, East Brunswick, 732605-0958. Dinner. Register. $25.
6 p.m.
Divorce Support Group, Hopewell Presbyterian Church,
Hopewell, 609-213-9509. Register. 7:30 p.m.
Friday
October 30
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
Just a Jump to the Left
The Time Warp Masquerade,
New Hope Chamber of Commerce, Stephen House, 28 West
Bridge Street, New Hope, PA,
908-752-1174. www.newhopechamber.com. Party followed by
performance of “Rocky Horror
Show” at Bucks County Playhouse. Party, $40; party and performance, $50. 8 p.m.
Classical Music
Behind the Music, Arts Council
of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Princeton
Symphony Orchestra presents a
public forum to learn about the
creation of new music. Panelists
include John Harbison, composer; David Alan Miller, conductor;
and Jayn Rosenfeld, flutist. Register. Free. 5:30 p.m.
Concert, Concordia Chamber
Players, Trinity Church, Upper
York and Sugan road, New Hope,
215-297-5972. www.concordiaplayers.org. “Tangos and Tapas”
featuring violinist Jeremy Cohen.
$25. 6 p.m.
Graveyard Music, Artek, All
Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’
Road, Princeton, 212-967-9157.
Lectures
Windrows, 2000 Windrows Drive,
Plainsboro, 800-708-7007. www.princetonwindrows.net. Presentation about the relationship between Princeton Windrows,
Princeton HealthCare System,
Highest Price Paid
GOLD • DIAMONDS • SILVER
A Life in Song: Dudu
Fisher — a Broadway
performer, a cantor,
and a contemporary
artist — appears on
Thursday, October
29, at the State Theater, New Brunswick.
732-246-7469.
www.artekearlymusic.org. Original poetry and music celebrating
witches, spirits, ghosts, and death
from 17th century England and
Italy. $10 to $40. 8 p.m.
Le Pescatrici (The Fisherwoman), Mason Gross School
of the Arts, Nicholas Music Center, 85 George Street, New Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Haydn’s
1770 comic opera presented by
Rutgers Musica Raritana period
instrument ensemble. $10. 8 p.m.
Folk Music
Bread & Bones and Hub Hollow,
Folk Project, Morristown Unitarian Fellowship, 21 Normandy
Heights Road, Morristown, 973335-9489. www.folkproject.org.
$7. 8 p.m.
Art
Gallery Talk, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. princetonartmuseum.org. “How the West Was
Done: The Portrayal of the American Frontier in a 19th Century
Japanese Woodblock Print” presented by Nicole Fabricand-Person. Free. 12:30 p.m.
Dance
Momix, State Theater, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick,
732-246-7469. www.StateTheatreNJ.org. “Passion” features dances and illusionists.
Contains nudity. $32 to $57. 8
p.m.
Drama
The Addams Family Murder
Mystery, Peddler’s Village,
Routes and 202 and 263, Lahaska, PA, 215-794-4000. Interactive
show by Without a Cue Productions. $47.95. 7:15 p.m.
Bell, Book and Candle, Actors’
NET, 635 North Delmorr Avenue,
Morrisville, PA, 215-295-3694.
www.actorsnetbucks.org. Classic
comedy about a modern-day
witch in Manhattan. $20. 8 p.m.
Continued on following page
RALPH LAUREN • ELLEN TRACY • ESCADA
COLUMBUS DAY/HALLOWEEN
Ongoing through
October 31st
SALE
(Selected jewelry
items included.)
FABULOUS Clothing! AMAZING Discounts!
1378 Route 206, Village Shopper Skillman, NJ 08558 • 609-924-2288
M-F 10-6; Thurs. 10-7; Sat. 10:30-5 • Consignments by appointment
DONNA KARAN • LOUIS FERAUD • MONDI
LAGERFELD • CHLOE • JAEGER
Kingston Wellness Associates,
4446 Route 27, Kingston, 215598-7225. www.thenewtemperament.com. “Money Consciousness and Your Temperament”
presented by Jay Sanders, CPA;
and Michael Edelstein, founder of
the New Temperament. Register.
$25. 7 to 9:30 p.m.
ARMANI • CHANEL • HERMES
Financial Workshop
23
CASH
Live Music
Vinnie Rome, Limelight,
812 North Easton Road,
Doylestown, PA, 215-3456330. Piano and vocals. 6
to 11 p.m.
Myra Murphy, Salt Creek
Grille, One Rockingham
Row, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-419-4200.
www.saltcreekgrille.com. 6
to 9 p.m.
Captured by Robots, The
Record Collector Store, 358
Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown,
609-324-0880. www.the-recordcollector.com. $12. 7:30 p.m.
John Bianculli Quartet, Novita’s
Bistro, 25 New Street, Metuchen,
732-549-5306. www.novitanj.com. 8 to 11 p.m.
Singer Songwriter Showcase,
Triumph Brewing Company,
138 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. Shaun Ruymen of
West Windsor performs. Hosted
by Frank Thewes, also of West
Windsor. 9 p.m.
U.S. 1
Gold Jewelry (can be damaged)
Sterling Silver Jewelry • Sterling Silver Flatware
Tea Sets • Silver Coins • Gold Coins
Dental Gold • Diamonds ¼ Carat & Up
Rolex Watches
With the Precious Metal Market
at an All-Time High, Now Is the Time to Turn
Broken Jewelry and Unwanted Items to CASH!
Trent Jewelers
16 Edinburg Rd. at 5 Points • Mercerville, N.J.
609-5
584-8
8800
Dr. Sheryl Haber-Kuo, M.D.
Board Certified in Internal Medicine
• Medical Preventative
Maintenance
• Treating Men & Women
from 15 yrs to 100 +
• New Patients Welcome
Most Insurances Accepted
Monday evening hours available
Tt
Cranbrook II Professional Building
2312-2314 Whitehorse-Mercerville Rd.,
Suite 201 • Mercerville
609-586-9566
Helping our Patients Return
to a Full & Active Life
St. Lawrence Rehabilitation
Center is a comprehensive
physical rehabilitation hospital
that offers all the therapies and
specialty medical programs
you need to help you to return
to a full and active life.
• 166-bed facility dedicated
solely to physical
rehabilitation
• Acute, Subacute and Brain
Injury rehabilitation located
within one facility
• Board certified physiatrists,
physicians specializing
in physical medicine
and rehabilitation, direct
all rehabilitation programs
• State-of-the-art 23,000 sq. ft.
Outpatient Health Center
St. Lawrence
Rehabilitation Center
2381 Lawrenceville Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648-2024
fax 609-844-0648
www.slrc.org
609-896-9500
24
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Lisa D. Arthur, DMD, PA
V
V
Implant, Cosmetic and General Dentistry
For Children and Adults.
Treatment for Snoring & Obstructive Sleep Apnea
• All Phases of General Dentistry
• Composite (White) Fillings
• Root Canal Treatment
• Extractions
• Non-Surgical Gum Disease
Treatment
• Crown & Bridge
• Whitening
• Veneers
• Implant Dentistry
• Digital Radiography
Lisa D. Arthur, DMD
Committed to your dental health and appearance.
Building enduring relationships in a compassionate environment.
609-586-6688
www.lisaarthurdmd.com
University Office Plaza II
3705 Quakerbridge Road, Suite 203, Hamilton, NJ
Roger Rees Untangles the Bard
T
by David McDonough
here’s an old magazine
cartoon that shows an actor onstage in Hamlet’s traditional black
velvet. In the shell at the front of a
stage is a helpful prompter, whispering to him, “...or not to be!”
Something similar once happened
to actor/director/writer Roger
Rees, but you’ll have to go to his
one-man slant on the Bard, “What
You Will,” on Tuesday, November
3, at McCarter, to hear the story.
In addition to Shakespeare,
Rees has tackled the works of some
of the world’s greatest writers —
Charles Dickens, Anton Chekov,
George Bernard Shaw, and Harold
Pinter. He has worked with everyone in show business from Laurence Olivier to Judi Dench to
Steve Martin to Sylvester Stallone
to the Rock, and for directors as
varied as Mel Brooks and Bob Fosse. But for the Welsh-born actor,
Shakespeare has always been
where it’s at.
Rees’ name has appeared at the
McCarter before; last year, he directed another single actor show,
B.D. Wong in “Herringbone.”
While he was in town, in September, 2008, he played one of the two
leads in a dramatic reading of
“Class,” by Princeton resident
Charles Evered, then artist-in-residence at the Arts Council in Princeton. Best known to theater audiences for his Tony Award-winning
performance in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s landmark eighthour production of Dickens’s “The
Life and Adventures of Nicholas
Nickleby,” Rees also has plenty of
fans from his TV appearances as
Robin Colchord on “Cheers,” Lord
John Melbury on “The West
Wing,” and Dr. Colin Marlow on
“Grey’s Anatomy.” He was just
seen in the last three episodes of the
current season on ScyFy’s spooky
series “Warehouse 13.” And his
biggest claim to fame may be that
he is the only celebrated British actor of his generation not to appear
in a Harry Potter film.
But it’s his own classical credits
that drive his 90-minute journey
through everything Shakespeare.
In his 22 years with the Royal
Shakespeare Company, Rees appeared in just about every major
Shakespeare work: “Much Ado
About Nothing,” “Twelfth Night,”
“Romeo and Juliet,” and “Macbeth,” among others. He wasn’t always center stage, either, starting
his career with the obligatory
“spear-carrier” roles, and moving
on to those parts that even the most
dedicated theatergoers have to look
up in their Who’s Who in Avon
(Quick: who’s Volumnius in “Julius
Caesar?”). And finally, working his
way up to the title role in “Hamlet,”
the longest running Danish prince
in the company’s history.
In his one-man show “What You
Will” (the name comes from the
subtitle of “Twelfth Night”), Rees
performs snippets of Shakespeare,
peppered with anecdotes about his
own and others’ experiences and
opinions of the Bard. “I’ve been
doing it for about three years now,”
says Rees in a telephone interview
from New York City, where he is
working on an independent film
October 30
by Rutgers Theater Company.
Through Sunday, November 8.
$25. 8 p.m.
She Stoops to Conquer, McCarter Theater, 91 University
Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787.
www.mccarter.org. Comedy
about mistaken identities by Oliver Goldsmith. $20 to $55. 8 p.m.
Happy Days, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau
Street, 609-258-1500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Samuel Beckett’s drama. $10. 8 p.m.
Capitol Steps, Raritan Valley
Community College, Route 28,
North Branch, 908-725-3420.
www.rvccarts.edu. Political satire.
$31 and $36. 8 p.m.
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama
based on John Steinbeck’s novel.
Directed by Joe Discher. $34 to
$54. 8 p.m.
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s
Nest, Somerset Valley Players,
Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908369-7469. www.svptheatre.org.
Drama. $15. 8 p.m.
Continued from preceding page
Rocky Horror Show, Bucks
County Playhouse, 70 South
Main Street, New Hope, 215-8622041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com. Through October 31.
$25. 8 and midnight.
Come Back, Come Back, Wherever You Are, George Street
Playhouse, 9 Livingston Avenue,
New Brunswick, 732-246-7717.
www.gsponline.org. Premiere of
drama about love written and directed by Arthur Laurents. $28 to
$78. 8 p.m.
Equus, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-5703333. www.kelseytheatre.net.
Drama with PinnWorth Productions. $14. Reception with cast
and crew follows performance. 8
p.m.
The Crucible, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, New Theater,
85 George Street, New Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Drama
‘When the human being is revealed, then it
does become truly
poetic,’ says Rees.
called “Almost Perfect” (“I’m
playing the Caucasian father of a
Chinese family,” Rees says).
‘I
tested it at the Folger Theater [run by the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington,
DC]. I was going to do an evening
which I used to call ‘Roger Rees
Acts Up,’ just a lot of poetry and
pieces that I’ve done before. Beth
Emelson, the clever assistant artistic director, said that since it was
the Folger, maybe it should just be
Shakespeare. And I started to put it
together and it actually works quite
well. It does keep on changing. I
get interested in different aspects
of things and start researching. I
think it should be a moveable
feast.”
A feast it is, according to the
critics. The Washington Post says
that “Rees’skills as a raconteur and
his gift for mimicry make the
evening a breeze,” and when he
performed the show at the American Conservatory Theater in San
Francisco, the Examiner called it
“the funniest, smartest, most delightful show you’ll see this summer.”
Rees’ family moved to London
when he was nine, and he actually
was attending art school when the
theater bug hit. He didn’t find it to
be a huge leap. “No, it’s the same
artistic thing,” he says. “Lots of
wonderful actors were artists. It’s
just that you daren’t tell people you
want to be an actor. Or you don’t
know yourself. You just have to release your artistic bounds, and
luckily for some people it ends up
in the theater.”
He didn’t pass his first audition
for the RSC, but came back after a
sojourn as a working actor in Scotland. This time, in 1968, the RSC
said yes. The then 24-year-old actor had a found a home that lasted
over two decades. “That was really
my education; I never went to drama school,” he says. “You got a little brainwashed — indoctrinated,
if you like. There’s something in
me that feels I’d like to be there
now. I’d like to be just studying
plays, continually performing
them. It’s a great life.”
In his book about the RSC production of Nicholas Nickleby,
Leon Rubin, the assistant director
of the show, writes, “Roger was the
perfect company lead...the bestliked acting member of the RSC.”
“Well, I’m the best-liked cast
member of ‘What You Will,’ anyway,” Rees says diplomatically. He
also downplays the idea that he was
the obvious choice for Nicholas.
“There were lots of young men in
the company who looked liked the
original drawings of Nicholas. I
was just a juvenile character actor.
I had a lot of stamina, [director]
Trevor Nunn thought. You needed
someone in the middle who could
be onstage for eight hours, carry
things, and lift people.”
The production was so well-received, and Rees’s performance so
hailed, that some predicted international stardom. That didn’t happen.
Whether it was his age — he was
36 playing 19, or that his angular
face and mellifluous voice are better suited for character work, or
perhaps his desire to continue to
strive within the RSC, Rees is now,
at 65, a sought after character actor
on screen and television. He frequently plays villains, and is often
cast in off-beat science fiction. The
film and TV work is fine, but in
conversation with Rees, you get
the distinct impression that all
artistic roads lead back to Shakespeare, whether it’s in his guise as
actor or director. He spent 2005
through 2007 as artistic director of
the Williamstown (Massachusetts)
Theatre Festival (“A great time.
Three fantastic years”), and he’s
anxious to articulate his feelings
about modern attitudes towards
Shakespeare, as well as his impression of what he’s seen on American
campuses.
MacHomer, State Theater,
Crossroads Theater, 7 Livingston
Avenue, New Brunswick, 732246-7469. www.statetheatrenj.org. Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”
performed by Rick Miller features
more than 50 voices of characters
from “The Simpsons.” $32. 8 p.m.
Assassins, Westminster Conservatory, The Playhouse, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu.
Stephen Sondheim’s dark musical. $20. 8 p.m.
Dinner Theater
Murdery Mystery Dinner, Bistro
Soleil, 173 Mercer Street, Hightstown, 609-443-9700. www.bistrosoleil.com. Register. $55. 6:30
p.m.
Film
Out of Synch, New Jersey Film
Festival, Scott Hall 123, College
Avenue, New Brunswick, 732932-8482. www.njfilmfest.com.
“Deja Vu,” 2009; “Mildred
Richards,” 2008; and “Unremembered,” 2009. $10. 7 p.m.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Turbo Shakespeare:
Actor Roger Rees
presents all things
Shakespeare in his
one-man show ‘What
You Will.’
“I’ve been onstage with many of
the great Shakespearean actors of
the last 30 years, and I do think
some of the best Shakespeare I’ve
ever seen is done by young students
in colleges and universities around
America. Something about them
nowadays, they have less of a sense
of apprenticeship and more of a
sense of ownership, of new tasks
and interesting areas of scrutiny.
And it’s really great to see people
just readily identify with these
characters in a way that I think was
probably not easy to do in a more
conceited age, when I was growing
up, when everyone sort of had to
wait in line; you never had a dream
that you could play Hamlet.
“There’s a school of education
in Shakespeare that suggests that
you should wait in line, and spend
20 years over one speech before
you say it because it’s a really
beautiful piece of poetry. It’s not a
beautiful piece of poetry till the human being speaks it. That’s what
I’m interested in, and I think that’s
what these kids are able to do. I
think we might have been a bit
more cowed when I was younger, a
bit frightened perhaps. These kids
are actually getting on and doing it
for themselves and their schools.
And they speak in a young, modern
way that I rather think Shakespeare
spoke in.”
It is worth noting that Rees isn’t
proprietary about Shakespeare;
rather, he is anxious to spread the
wealth. He is delighted when he
sees the material done well regardless of the source. Jude Law is currently playing Hamlet on Broadway, and part of the audience for
his show is the young fans, some of
them seeing Shakespeare for the
first time. Rees says, “I’ve seen it,
and I think he’s tremendous. Having played the part, you realize actually what it takes. Thing is, if you
do Romeo and Juliet, Juliet could
be fat and Romeo could be spotty,
not prepossessing, but you wouldn’t actually sell any tickets. So I
think Jude Law’s Hamlet was pretty marvelous, and of course it belongs to every generation, as does
Shakespeare, and that’s something
that I’m very interested in.
“I’d seen Hamlet many, many
times before I played it. They say
that your Hamlet always contains
something that no one else ever
did. It’s very often the case in
Shakespeare: people think ‘Oh,
Shakespeare’s characters, what
Dancing
Salsa Class, Pennington Ewing
Athletic Club, 1440 Lower Ferry
Road, Ewing, 609-883-2000.
www.peachealthfitness.com. For
advanced beginners. $15. 7 to
8:30 p.m.
Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road,
Hamilton, 609-931-0149. www.americanballroomco.com. $15. 8
to 11 p.m.
Halloween Dance Party, Fred
Astaire Dance Studio, Princeton
Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street, 609-921-8881.
www.fredastaireprinceton.com.
Prizes for best costumes. Light
refreshments. $20. 8:30 p.m.
Good Causes
Witches and Warlocks Wingding, Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions, 33 Livingston
Avenue, New Brunswick, 732932-2222. www.brodskycenter.org. Costumes invited, music,
dancing, and prizes. Benefit for
the artists residency program.
$30. 7 p.m.
they say is true.’ That’s not the fact
— they could be lying. And in
Dickens, too, when somebody says
something you don’t have to believe it. The great writers, they demand a real human being in the
middle of it.
“‘What You Will’ is dedicated to
the idea that you can take the religious aspects of Shakespeare away
and reveal the human being in the
center,” Rees continues. “When
the human being is revealed, then it
does become truly poetic. Because
the thing about Shakespeare is that
he’s better than we are. That’s why
it’s irresistible. It’s like you can’t
just say, ‘Oh, he sucks.’Although I
quote many people in my show
who do say that. He writes better
than I do, so I like to be near him.”
E
ven great Shakespearean actors can have one role that has eluded them, and Rees is no exception.
“I’m such a weird person. People
say, ‘You’ve had a wonderful career,’ and I thank them for that but I
just do whatever comes next. I really am somebody who had no favorites. The one thing I wish I was
physically, and in this day politically correctly attuned to do, is play
Othello, because Othello actually
moves me more than any other part.
I was going to direct it once with an
actor who didn’t quite see it the way
I saw it, so I didn’t do it, but I would
love to direct it one day, because I
have a lock on it that is pretty interesting. I think it’s very often turned
out to be a play called Iago. Othello
is a deeply, deeply moving role. So
fabulously sad, and I’m very attracted to those sorts of things. The
only thing I would claim to have
any favoritism about — I’ve
worked with such wonderful people and been in such marvelous
things, I’m really grateful, and I
love to tell the next generation
about it in a way that this show does
— is getting people excited to listen
Halloween Party Fundraiser,
Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436. www.artworkstrenton.org. Benefit for arts
programming. Food, beer, wine,
art, dance performance, art project, ghost stories, scary movies,
costume contest, and a poster
contest. $10 to $75. 8 p.m.
Comedy Clubs
Dena Blizzard, Chris Johnson,
and Steve Trevelise, Catch a
Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, 609-987-8018.
www.catcharisingstar.com.
Reservation. $20. 7:30 p.m.
Craft Fair
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, Garden State Exhibit Center, Somerset, 800-210-9900. www.sugarloafcrafts.com. Fine artists, craft
designers, and craft demonstrations. $8. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Continued on following page
to Shakespeare again. I just want to
spread the word.”
Roger Rees, McCarter Theater,
91 University Place, Princeton.
Tuesday, November 3, 8 p.m.
“What You Will,” a one-man show,
includes Shakespeare soliloquies,
anecdotes, and snippets of his life
in the theater. Rees is known to TV
audiences as Robin Colcord on
“Cheers,” Lord Marbury on “The
West Wing,” and Dr. Colin Marlow
on “Grey’s Anatomy.” $39 to $50.
609-258-2787 or mccarter.org.
Experience the Service
Tuxedo Rentals & Sales, Wedding Specials
1 Hour service for those last minute black tie invites
Single rentals starting at $69.99.
Wedding Specials: FREE Groom’s Tuxedo, plus
$30 off each member of the wedding party.
Group Discounts for all Corporate Events
MarketFair Mall, 3535 US Route 1, Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 452-0921 www.chazmatazz.com
“Proud Sponsor of Post Prom Activities for Local High Schools”
U.S. 1
25
26
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
October 30
Continued from preceding page
Faith
Shabbat Seder Service, Adath
Israel Congregation, 1958 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville,
609-806-4977. www.adathisraelnj.org. Dinner, prayer, and song.
Register. $10; $30 per family. 6
p.m.
Food & Dining
Unibroue Beer Dinner, Catherine Lombardi, 3 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, 732-8284444. www.stageleft.com. Fourcourse dinner with beer and
chocolate. Register. $79. 7 p.m.
Masquerade Ball, Rats Restaurant, Grounds for Sculpture, 16
Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609584-7800. www.ratsrestaurant.org. The restaurant is transformed
into a haunted country mansion for
an evening of food, wine, and
dancing. Two-hour open bar and
buffet dinner. Costume contest.
Register. $99. 8 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan
Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard
Road, lower level, 609-306-6682.
www.yogasusan.com. $15 walkin. Discounted class cards available. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m.
Color and Crystal Therapy, Planet Apothecary, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 732-406-6865. Lunch
and learn. Register. $10. Noon.
Restorative Yoga, Four Winds
Yoga, 114 West Franklin Avenue,
Pennington, 609-818-9888.
www.fourwindsyoga.com. $17.
5:45 to 6:45 p.m.
History
Need a Lift?
Try an Introductory Flying Lesson!
Become a Pilot in 2009!
Princeton Airport only $
41 Airpark Road
Princeton, NJ 08540
69+
Princeton Pub Crawl, Princeton
Tour Company, Starbucks, 98
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609902-3637. www.princetontourcompany.com. Architectural, literary, and historical sites and
events through the town. Register. $10. 6 p.m.
Mercer by Moonlight, Mercer
Museum, Pine and Ashland
streets, Doylestown, 215-3450210. www.mercermuseum.org.
Tour through the museum includes grisly objects including a
hearse, gallows, witch doctor’s
canes, and vampire killing kits.
Not recommended for children
under eight. Register. $12. 7 p.m.
For Families
609-921-3100
Instrument C lass S tarting S oon!
www.princetonairport.com
Halloween Walk, Waldorf
School, 1062 Cherry Hill Road,
Princeton, 609-466-1970. www.princetonwaldorf.org. Fright-free
outdoor walk to visit vignettes of
fairy tales. For ages 9 and under.
$5 per child. 5:45 to 7:15 p.m.
Educating the mind. Nurturing the spirit.
Princeton Friends School is part of a 300-year-old tradition of Quaker education.
Learn more at www.princetonfriendsschool.org or call 609.683.1194.
Open House–Saturday, November 7 and Saturday, January 9 from 1-3 pm
470 Quaker Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540
When Schweitzer Came to the U.S.:
‘Albert Schweitzer’ by Joel Mattison, from ‘Visiting
Hours at Lambarene: Photographic Reminiscences of Albert Schweitzer, 1961-1963,’ an
exhibit commemorating the 60th anniverary of
Schweitzer’s only visit to the United States,
opening with a reception on Thursday, October
29, 6 p.m., Erdman Center, 20 Library Place
Princeton Theological Seminary. 609-497-7990.
Photo: Special Collections/Princeton Theological Seminary
Not So Scary Halloween, Fernbrook Farms, 142 Bordentown
Georgetown Road, Chesterfield,
609-298-4028. www.fernbrookfarms.com. Hayrides, campfire,
games, hikes, and stories for kids
under eight. Register. $10. 6:30
to 9 p.m.
Lectures
Institute for Advanced Study,
Wolfensohn Hall, Einstein Drive,
Princeton, 609-734-8175. www.ias.edu. “The Evolution of Bodies
Bound by Gravity” presented by
Peter Goldreich, professor emeritus in the School of Natural Sciences. Free. 6 p.m.
Live Music
Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley
Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com.
Princeton Swing presents jazz favorites. Brick oven pizza and wine
available. Free admission. 5 to 8
p.m.
Vinnie Rome, Limelight, 812
North Easton Road, Doylestown,
PA, 215-345-6330. Piano and vocals. 6 to 11 p.m.
Meg Hanson Group, Salt Creek
Grille, One Rockingham Row,
Forrestal Village, Plainsboro,
609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7 to 10 p.m.
Martian Masquerade, Grover’s
Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. “War of the
Worlds” anniversary celebration,
alien costume contest, martian
madness. Performers include August, Chris Jankoski, and Dan
Zimmerman. CD release of “The
Very Best of Grover’s Mill Coffee
House,” a benefit CD. 7:30 p.m.
Bob Egan, Bowman’s Tavern,
1600 River Road, New Hope, PA,
215-862-2972. www.bowmanstavernrestaurant.com. Open mic
and piano. 8 p.m.
Jazz Is, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com. 8 p.m.
Caleb Hawley, Lizanne Knott,
and John Schmitt, The Record
Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth
Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. $12. 8 p.m.
John Bianculli Trio with Jackie
Jones, Christopher’s, Heldrich
Hotel, 10 Livingston Avenue, New
Brunswick, 732-214-2200. www.theheldrich.com. 8:30 p.m.
Garden State Radio, BT Bistro,
3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. 9 p.m.
Night of Mischief, Joe’s Mill Hill
Saloon, 300 South Broad Street,
Trenton, 609-394-7222. Music.
$5 9 p.m.
Rick and Kenny, Runway
Restaurant and Bar, Trenton
Mercer County Airport, 1100 Terminal Drive, West Trenton, 609883-1002. www.therunwayonline.com. Costumes invited.
Free appetizer buffet at 11 p.m.
No cover. 9 p.m.
Ernie White and Tom Reock,
Sotto 128 Restaurant and
Lounge, 128 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-921-7555. www.sotto128.com. Rock covers and
originals. 9 p.m.
Karaoke Night, Hillbilly Hall Tavern and Restaurant, 203
Hopewell-Wertsville Road,
Hopewell, 609-466-9856. www.hillbillyhall.com. DJ Mike. 9:30
p.m.
Successful Fridays, The
Phoenix, 120 South Warren
Street, Trenton, 609-394-0091.
$10 to $20. 10 p.m.
Choice Society, Tre Piani, 120
Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-452-1515.
www.choicesociety.ning.com. Hip
hop, reggae, and pop music.
Drink specials, hors d’oeuvres. $5
admission. 10 to 2 a.m.
Outdoor Action
Twilight Bike Tour, Duke Farms,
80 Route 206 South, Hillsborough, 908-722-3700. www.dukefarms.org. Bring mountain pike
and helmet. Register. $10. 4:30
to 6 p.m.
Moonlight Walk on the Wild
Side, Duke Farms, 80 Route 206
South, Hillsborough, 908-7223700. www.dukefarms.org. Stroll
alone a self-guided nature trail.
Costumes invited. Cider and
donuts in the visitors center. Free.
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Family Fun Maze, Corner Copia
Farm Market, 299 PrincetonHightstown Road, East Windsor,
609-426-8884. Challenging 10acre corn maze includes more
than two miles of potential pathways depicting a barn and farm
animals. $9.99. Bring a flashlight.
7 to 11 p.m.
Schools
Halloween Performance Party,
Spotlight School of Drama,
1300 Windsor Road, West Windsor, 609-228-3069. www.spotlightdrama.com. Learn the
“Thriller” dance, create and act
out scary scenes, scream like a
professional, evil laugh contest,
snacks, and pizza. For ages 8 to
13. Register. $65. 6 to 9 p.m.
Retail Therapy
Cooking Demonstrations, Liberty Village Outlets, 1 Church
Street, Flemington, 908-7828550. www.premiumoutlets.com.
Cookware, menu, guest chefs at
Le Creuset. Samples at Harry &
David. 5 to 7 p.m.
Continued on page 28
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
27
Review: ‘Wishful Drinking’
J
ust as you might expect,
Carrie Fisher steps out of a twinkling galaxy with a flourish onto
the stage of Studio 54 where she is
performing her solo stand-upwalk-around-crawl-about-sitdown performance piece “Wishful
Drinking.” Fisher, who has been
performing her assiduously detailed memoirs (subsequently issued in book form) around the
country since 2006, is entitled to
make a starry entrance. She no
longer looks like the Princess Leia
whom we fondly recall from “Star
Wars” but she does have the look of
a mature woman of 52 who would
like us to believe that she has been
hurtling through time and space for
the past 33 years.
Fisher is generously doused
with glitter that clings to her short
red hair and relatively familiar
face. Wearing a loose colorful print
peignoir over black silk pajamas,
she gives the impression that she is
ready for bed, or at least she will be
as soon as she finishes sharing her
own personal bedtime stories with
us. In order to get her pajama party
off to a nice start, she sings a robust
chorus of “Happy Days Are Here
Again” followed by the confession, “I’m Carrie Fisher and I’m an
alcoholic. And this is a true story.”
A large screen dominates the
center of an attractively abstracted
living room setting designed by
Alexander V. Nichols (who also
gets credit for the lighting and projection design). Projections and
film are used advantageously as
Fisher’s tell-it-all and tell-it-funny
monologue runs its course, under
the direction of Tony Taccone. She
also makes frequent use of a comfy
lounging chair after kicking off her
bedroom slippers, often transporting herself across the stage barefoot. She is especially keen on
making personal contact with
members of the audience, even enticing a gentleman, undoubtedly a
good sport, to come up on the stage
and put on the famous Princess
Leia wig in all its braided glory.
Alliteratively speaking, there’s
a lot of muck beneath the mirth in
Fisher’s delivery. That she brings it
to the surface without apparently
harboring any resentment or bitterness is good. As the daughter of
Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher
and step-daughter to Elizabeth
Taylor, Fisher draws on her Hollywood celebrity family roots, her
ascent to fame in “Star Wars,” and
Appropriately, there’s
a lot of muck beneath
the mirth.
her descent that takes into account
her addiction to drugs and alcohol.
D
iagnosed as bi-polar, she
cheerily confides, “I was invited to
go to a mental hospital.” The truth,
as Fisher reveals it, is almost too absurd for words, but she finds the
words. There is no lack of material,
as old and familiar as it is, as she
takes us back to the point in her
childhood when her father (Eddie)
leaves her mother (Debbie) to go and
comfort (Elizabeth), whose husband
(Mike Todd) had just died in a plane
crash. “He first dried her eyes with
his handkerchief, then he consoled
her with flowers, and he ultimately
consoled her with his penis.”
Discovering discomforting similarities between her failed marriage to composer Paul Simon (“a
short Jewish man”) and her mother’s marriage to short and Jewish
Eddie Fisher, she also explores the
twisted trail that led her to another
failed marriage. This time it was to
agent Bryan Lourd who was gay
and left her for a man named Scott,
but not before he fathered their
daughter, Billie. As she says about
Scott, he was “the man who got the
man who got away.”
Fisher gets plenty of mileage out
of these weirdly turbulent relationships but she pulls them together
entertainingly and without resorting to blame or resentment. Easily
exploitable considering her pedigree, Fisher also appears to be allowing her “manic depressive” history to serve her therapeutically.
She has proven herself a gifted
writer (“Postcards from the Edge,”
et al.) and now stands up with commendable resolve to let the facts
speak for themselves — none more
comically than how she uses a
blackboard for a session she calls
“Hollywood Inbreeding 101.” Attempting to answer her daughter
Billy’s question about whether she
is related to her boyfriend Rhys
Tivey, Elizabeth Taylor’s grandson, Fisher uses a pointer to take us
through a maze of well-known
celebrity faces, affairs, marriages,
and divorces to show the eventual
connection. The answer: “You are
related by scandal.”
Although Fisher’s life has
proven to be eminently readable in
book form, her amiable stage performance makes it clear how important personal connections are
and have always been to her. The
audience at the performance I attended certainly seemed amused
by her wittily conceived anecdotes,
but they also seemed obliged to
play the role of a support group. Is
Fisher sport enough to recreate a
scene from “Star Wars?” You bet,
and to the audiences delight.
There is an irony in that Fisher is
performing at the one-time infamous disco Studio 54, which she
Six Degrees: Carrie
Fisher explains Hollywood inbreeding.
admits to having frequented (in her
wayward past), now the home of
the Roundabout Theater Company,
known for its classic revivals. It’s
true that Fisher’s life has been
gainfully revived. But is she really
ready to be considered a classic? **
— Simon Saltzman
“Wishful Drinking,” through
Sunday, January 3, Roundabout
Theater Company at Studio 54, 254
West 54th Street. $31.50 to
$111.50. 212-719-1300 or www.roundabouttheatre.org.
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U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
October 30
Continued from page 26
Singles
Singles Night, One South Rustic
Grill, 4095 Route 1 South, South
Brunswick, 732-355-1030. Happy
hours for singles 35 and up. DJ by
Music Express begins at 10 p.m.
Free food. Cash bar. No cover. 4
p.m.
Halloween Dance Party, Professional and Business Singles
Network, Yardley Country Club,
1010 Reading Avenue, Yardley,
888-348-5544. www.PBSNinfo.com. Cash bar. Jacket and tie.
Ages 40 to 65. $15; $12 with costume. 8 p.m.
Sexy Black Halloween Soiree,
Princeton Elite Club, Marsha
Brown’s, 15 South Main Street,
New Hope, PA, 609-454-8183.
www.princetoneliteclub.com.
Open bar and food. Prizes for
sexiest black attire. Costumes not
required. For singles and couples.
Register. $65; $120 couple. 8:30
p.m.
Drop-In, Yardley Singles, The
Runway, Trenton Mercer Airport,
Ewing, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Music, dancing, and cash bar. Register. 9
p.m.
Scrabble
Classics Used and Rare Books,
117 South Warren Street, Trenton, 609-394-8400. All skill levels
welcome. 6:30 p.m.
Saturday
October 31
Halloween.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT: Into the
Woods (for Adults Only)
The Ecology of the Princeton Institute Woods, Stony Brook
Millstone Watershed, Princeton
Institute Woods, Olden Lane,
Princeton, 609-737-7592. www.thewatershed.org. Discover life
and death in the forest, a program
for adults only, led by Henry Horn,
professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton University. Register. $5. 9 a.m. to
noon.
Classical Music
Le Pescatrici (The Fisherwoman), Mason Gross School of
the Arts, Nicholas Music Center,
85 George Street, New Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Haydn’s 1770
comic opera presented by Rutgers Musica Raritana period instrument ensemble. $10. 8 p.m.
Art
Halloween Party, Design Within
Reach, 30 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-0899. www.dwr.-
com. Pumpkin design contest
submissions on display as well as
new works by Robert Cannon,
sculptor and inventor of Terraforms. Noon to 6 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street,
Doylestown, 215-340-9800.
www.michenerartmuseum.org.
“Charles W. Ward: Paintings for
People,” an exhibit of paintings,
opens. On view to February 14. 1
p.m.
Annual Juried Exhibition,
Phillips Mill, 2619 River Road,
New Hope, 215-862-0582. www.phillipsmill.org. Annual fall juried
exhibition featuring artists of the
Delaware Valley. Last day. $3. 1
to 5 p.m.
Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free.
2 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Coryell Gallery, 8
Coryell Street, Lambertville, 609397-0804. First day for exhibition
of paintings of Charles W. Ward.
On view to February 14. 3 to 7
p.m.
Drama
Come Back, Come Back, Wherever You Are, George Street
Playhouse, 9 Livingston Avenue,
New Brunswick, 732-246-7717.
www.gsponline.org. Premiere of
drama about love written and directed by Arthur Laurents. $28 to
$78. 2 and 8 p.m.
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama
based on John Steinbeck’s novel.
Directed by Joe Discher. $34 to
$54. 2 and 8 p.m.
She Stoops to Conquer, McCarter Theater, 91 University
Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787.
www.mccarter.org. Comedy
about mistaken identities by Oliver Goldsmith. $20 to $55. ASL interpretation. 3 and 8 p.m.
Rocky Horror Show, Bucks
County Playhouse, 70 South
Main Street, New Hope, 215-8622041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com. Through October 31.
$25. 4 and 8 p.m.
The Addams Family Murder
Mystery, Peddler’s Village,
Routes and 202 and 263, Lahaska, PA, 215-794-4000. Interactive
show by Without a Cue Productions. $47.95. 7:15 p.m.
Bell, Book and Candle, Actors’
NET, 635 North Delmorr Avenue,
Morrisville, PA, 215-295-3694.
www.actorsnetbucks.org. Classic
comedy about a modern-day
witch in Manhattan. $20. 8 p.m.
Equus, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-5703333. www.kelseytheatre.net.
Drama with PinnWorth Productions. $14. 8 p.m.
The Crucible, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, New Theater,
85 George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Drama
by Rutgers Theater Company.
$25. 8 p.m.
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s
Nest, Somerset Valley Players,
Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908369-7469. www.svptheatre.org.
Drama. $15. 8 p.m.
Assassins, Westminster Conservatory, The Playhouse, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu.
Stephen Sondheim’s dark musical. $20. 8 p.m.
Dancing
Dance Classes and Workshops,
Web of Compassion, Suzanne
Patterson Center, 45 Stockton
Street, Princeton, 609-497-4598.
www.webofcompassion.org.
Dance and yoga classes. Call for
schedule. 2:30 to 6:20 p.m.
Halloween Party, G & J Studios,
5 Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908-892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Quick step workshop, general dance. Refreshments. Register. 6:30 to 11 p.m.
Comedy Clubs
Dena Blizzard, Chris Johnson,
and Steve Trevelise, Catch a
Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, 609-987-8018.
www.catcharisingstar.com.
Reservation. $20. 7:30 p.m.
Fairs
Halloween Fair and Haunted
House, French American
School of Princeton, 16 All
Saints Road, Princeton, 609-4303001. www.ecoleprinceton.org.
Costume contest, face painting,
photos, crafts, games, and a
haunted house. Bake sale benefits purchase of new science
equipment. Rain or shine. 11:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Halloween Street Fair and Trick
or Treating, New Hope Chamber of Commerce, Mechanic
Street, New Hope, PA, 215-8629990. www.newhopechamber.com. Costume contest. Bring your
own heels to the High Heeled
Drag Race at 6:30 p.m. Pumpkin
pie eating contest, pumpkin bowling, pumpkin toss, pumpkin carving contest, candy corn catch,
face painting, and trick or treating.
Free. 6 to 8 p.m.
Craft Fairs
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, Garden State Exhibit Center, Somerset, 800-210-9900. www.sugarloafcrafts.com. Fine artists, craft
designers, and craft demonstrations. $8. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The Shape of Dance:
Momix appears on
Friday, October 30, at
the State Theater in
New Brunswick.
732-246-7469.
Food & Dining
Wine Tasting, CoolVines, 344
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609924-0039. www.coolvines.com. 2
to 5 p.m.
Halloween Costume Party,
Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46
Yard Road, Pennington, 609-7374465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Appetizers. Music
by Maggie Wordsale and Felix
Truex. Guest appearance by
Edgar Allan Poe and Bram Stoker. Register. $25. 7 to 10 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Blood Drive, American Red
Cross, Hightstown Emergency
Medical Services, 168 Bank
Street, Hightstown, 800-4483543. www.pleasegiveblood.org.
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Mixed Level Yoga, Holsome
Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592.
www.holsome.com. $15. 9:15 to
10:15 a.m.
Yoga for Teen Athletes, Simply
Yoga, 4437 Route 27, Kingston,
609-895-1481. www.simplyyogakingston.com. Register. $15. 1 to
2:30 p.m.
History
Historic Exhibition, Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-924-8144. www.morven.org. First day for “Rocks
& Dino” showcasing an historic
series of paintings by Benjamin
Waterhouse Hawkins, depicting
different geological eras that were
installed in Princeton University’s
Nassau Hall in the late 1870s. On
view through the spring. The exhibit also includes fossils, engravings, dinosaur models, and interactive educational components
for children. 11 a.m.
Halloween Fun, Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge
House, 158 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Crafts and a
scavenger hunt for all ages. Free.
Noon to 3 p.m.
Baking, Old Barracks Museum,
Barrack Street, Trenton, 609-3961776. www.barracks.org. Bake
spice cake cookies in 18th century outdoor bake oven. $8. Noon
to 3 p.m.
Halloween, Pennsbury Manor,
400 Pennsbury Memorial Road,
Morrisville, PA, 215-946-0400.
www.pennsbudymanor.org. Costumes invited. Trick-or-treating,
games, and fall activities. Free. 1
to 4 p.m.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour
Company, Starbucks, 98 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-902-3637.
www.princetontourcompany.com.
Listen to chilling ghost stories and
walk through creepy walkways
while holding a lantern. Register.
$10. 8 p.m.
Kids Stuff
India’s Festival of Lights, South
Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction,
732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. Indian food, henna tatooing,
themed games and crafts. All
ages. Free. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
For Families
Halloween Boo Bounce, Bounce
U, 410 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-4435867. www.bounceu.com. 75minute bouncing session and Halloween-themed snack. $7.95. 10
a.m. noon, and 2 p.m.
Continued on page 30
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Make Your Oms Matter More
GRAND OPENING
M
ahatma Gandi’s famous declaration, “Be the change
you wish to see in the world,” is the
inspiration for the first annual Yoga
for Unity Conference for Change,
taking place on Sunday, November
1, at Can Do Fitness Club in
Princeton Forrestal Village. The
day-long conference features lectures and yoga sessions taught by
instructors who also are generously involved in doing service for
their communities on the local and
global scale.
The idea for the Yoga for Unity
Conference came to yoga instructor
Kristen Boccumini, who has
backed off on her instruction to
dedicate this year to fundraising for
Off the Mat, Into the World’s humanitarian work in Uganda (offthematintotheworld.org) and on the
local level, for Kula for Karma (kulaforkarma.org), a nonprofit that
offers yoga and nutritional and
therapeutic support services, at no
charge, to those who have been
challenged by difficult circumstances such as illness, addiction,
and abuse.
“My intention was to create
fundraising events where people
can come together as a community
to help a global cause while also
empowering them to create positive change in their own lives,” says
Boccumini. “If everyone just gives
a little bit it makes a big difference.
My goal is to raise over $20,000 by
December 15th and encourage people to be more proactive in charitable giving, whether in the form of
monetary donations or service. Together we have the power as a collective to make significant changes
in the state of the world that we will
be able to see in our lifetime.”
Conference presenters include:
— The internationally recognized Alison Ingenito, who will
speak on “Creating the Change”
and lead a workshop “Advancing
the Practice,” with a focus on
learning to move past plateaus, and
find new strength to engage any
physical endeavor with less apprehension. Her Yoga & U Foundation
provides supplies for schools, babies, and families locally and internationally.
— Carol Buckley, also known
worldwide, creator and president
of the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, a home for elephants after
laborious work in the entertainment industry.
— New Jersey native Debby
Kaminsky, who brings yoga into
all Newark Public Schools, gives a
prana flow class, “Honoring the
Heart Flow,” featuring heart opening asanas.
— Joanne Carter, a Lawrenceville resident and owner of Simply
Yoga in Kingston, gives a class on
the subtle details and alignment
principles from the Iyengar tradition.
— Area instructor Andrea Sacchetti, who brings yoga into New
Jersey correctional facilities, leads
“Gentle Yoga: A Rejuvenation
Practice.”
— Laurie Greene, who will educate participants about Uganda and
humanitarianism while recollecting her work as an anthropologist,
also leads a vinyasa class, “Kama
Yoga: Moving to Your Breath’s
Desire.”
— Ellen Mosko, a highly experienced teacher, leads “Stillness
and Flow: Yin Yoga and Gentle
Vinyasa.”
— Area instructors April Eichhorn and Tiffiny Twardowsky lead
a multi-level class, “Life, Compassion, and Freedom for All Beings.”
U.S. 1
29
in Princeton
Specials
11/11/09.
5-13-09.
Woodlands Professional Building
256 Bunn Drive, Suite 3A Princeton, NJ 08540
609-477-0700
Offer expires 11/11/09.
Offer expires 11/11/09.
Offer expires 11/11/09.
www.mylasercenters.com
00
9
1-2
43
45
Namaste: Yoga instructor Kristen Boccumini, top,
hatched the idea for the first annual Yoga for Unity
Conference for Change. Above: Seane Corn
(blond) and Nikki Myers (next to Corn) of Off the
Mat, Into the World in Uganda.Photos: Top: Neil Van
Niekerk. Above: Courtesy of Off the Mat, Into the World.
According to Boccumini, the
event is open to everyone, no matter
how much or how little yoga experience someone has. Everyone can
An opportunity for
yoga enthusiasts to
refine their practice
and help a global
cause.
participate, even brand new beginners to yoga.
‘T
his is a great way for people
to learn from a great selection of
highly experienced teachers for a
great price, a price that all goes to
creating a better world,” she says.
“We want this event to fit everyone’s schedule, so participants can
enjoy the whole day or even just one
session.” Thus, the minimum suggested donation is $18 per class, or
$36 for the whole day. “We want
people to come and enjoy their yoga, enjoy being a part of the community, without worrying about the
cost while still making a positive
difference in the world and supporting a great cause.”
— Jamie Saxon
Yoga for Unity Conference for
Change, CAN DO Fitness Club,
Princeton Forrestal Village, Sunday, November 1, 10 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. Lectures and yoga sessions
led by a variety of leading instructors, to benefit Off the Mat into the
World’s fundraiser for humanitarian work in Uganda and efforts to
help at-risk youth in the United
States. Minimum suggested donation of $18 for one session or $36
for whole day. Light fare for breakfast and lunch provided. Pre-register online and view conference
schedule at www.YogaforUnity.com/conference.html.
Complete
Musicianship
at
the Piano
for All Ages & Stages
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Now for Fall Classes!
CLASSES!
Complete musicianship
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Now Offering
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through Age 6.
Attend One FREE Musikgarten Class!
A Division of the Frances Clark Center for Keyboard Pedagogy
The New School for Music Study maintains
a totally non-discriminatory admissions policy.
30
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
October 31
Continued from page 28
Hayrides, Howell Living History
Farm, Valley Road, off Route 29,
Titusville, 609-737-3299. www.howellfarm.org. Horsedrawn
hayrides every 20 minutes. Free.
10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Planetarium Shows, New Jersey
State Museum, 205 West State
Street, Trenton, 609-292-6464.
www.newjerseystatemuseum.org. “One World, One Sky” at 1
and 3 p.m. “Extreme Planets” at 2
and 4 p.m. $5. 1 p.m.
Halloween, Quaker Bridge Mall,
Center Court, 609-799-8177.
www.quakerbridgemall.com. Costume parade and games. Trick or
treating for ages 12 and under at
select stores while supplies last
from noon to 5 p.m. Free. 1 p.m.
Trunk or Treat, Princeton Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow
Road, West Windsor, 609-9871166. www.princetonpresbyterian.org. Children may trick-ortreat by going car trunk to car
trunk to get their bags filled with
goodies. Free. 2 to 4 p.m.
Spooky Saturday, Princeton
University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788.
www.princetonartmuseum.org.
Gargoyle and ghost tour followed
by a clay workshop. Register. $7.
2 to 4 p.m.
Alex & the Kaleidoscope Band,
Rojo’s Roastery, 243 North
Union Street, Lambertville, 609397-0040. Full band show. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Annie Jr., Bucks County Playhouse, 70 South Main Street,
New Hope, 215-862-2041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com. $8.
11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Lectures
Fall Football Lecture Series,
Princeton University, Lewis Library, 609-258-3000. www.-
princeton.edu. “Trick of Treat?
Behavioral and Neurochemical
Evidence for Sugar Addiction”
presented by Bart Hoebel. Free.
10 a.m.
Live Music
Vinnie Rome, Limelight, 812
North Easton Road, Doylestown,
PA, 215-345-6330. Piano and vocals. 6 to 11 p.m.
Country and Bluegrass Music
Show, WDVR-FM, Women’s
Club, 43 Park Avenue, Flemington, 609-397-1620. www.wdvrfm.org. Heartlands Hayride Band.
$10. Food available. 6 to 8 p.m.
The Ferrymen, Salt Creek Grille,
One Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4194200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7
to 10 p.m.
John Bianculli Trio, Steakhouse
85, 85 Church Street, Metuchen,
732-247-8585. www.novitanj.com. 7 to 11 p.m.
Martian Masquerade, Grover’s
Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Alien Invasion variety show, alien costume contest,
martian madness, comedian He-
len Angley, and the band, 3-26.
7:30 p.m.
The Zombeatles and the
Gomers, The Record Collector
Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue,
Bordentown, 609-324-0880.
www.the-record-collector.com.
$17. 7:30 p.m. See story page
37.
CJ Barna, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com. 8 p.m.
DJ Davey Gold, BT Bistro, 3499
Route 1 South, West Windsor,
609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com.
Halloween Bash. 9 p.m.
Halloween Costume Party, Hillbilly Hall Tavern and Restaurant, 203 Hopewell-Wertsville
Road, Hopewell, 609-466-9856.
www.hillbillyhall.com. Karaoke
and drink specials. 9 p.m.
Sexy Lounge Lizards, Runway
Restaurant and Bar, Trenton
Mercer County Airport, 1100 Terminal Drive, West Trenton, 609883-1002. www.therunwayonline.com. Costumes invited.
Free appetizer buffet at 11 p.m.
No cover. 9 p.m.
Teeny Tiny Pollack: An exhibit of Jay McPhillips’
‘Modern Mini’s’ above left, opens Wednesday,
November 4, at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau
Street. 609-921-8011. Above: ‘m (r.p.m.) mass in
terms of revolutions per minute,’ 2007, by Ivan
Abreu, from 'Distortions,' a group show featuring
six Latin American artists, opening Wednesday,
October 28, 5 p.m., the College of New Jersey Art
Gallery. 609-771-2198.
Outdoor Action
Breakfast, Friends of the
Delaware Canal, Black Rock Picnic Area, Yardley, PA, 215-8622021. www.fodc.org. 9 a.m.
Canal Walk 2009, Friends of the
Delaware Canal, Black Rock
Road picnic area, Bristol, 215862-2021. www.fodc.org. Bring a
light lunch and beverage. Transportation back to the starting point
will be arranged through carpooling. Register. Free. 12 mile walk.
9 a.m.
The Ecology of the Princeton Institute Woods, Stony Brook
Millstone Watershed, Princeton
Institute Woods, Olden Lane,
Princeton, 609-737-7592. www.-
thewatershed.org. Discover life
and death in the forest, a program
for adults only, led by Henry Horn,
professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton University. Register. $5. 9 a.m. to
noon.
Family Fun Maze, Corner Copia
Farm Market, 299 PrincetonHightstown Road, East Windsor,
609-426-8884. Challenging 10acre corn maze includes more
than two miles of potential pathways depicting a barn and farm
animals. $9.99. Bring a flashlight.
10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Corn Maze, Howell Living History Farm, Valley Road, off Route
29, Titusville, 609-737-3299.
www.howellfarm.org. $8. Noon to
4 p.m.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Book Sale
Plainsboro Public Library, 641
Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Hardbacks, $1; paperbacks, 50 cents;
miscellaneous media and art at
bargain prices. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Singles
Wine and Dinner, Dinnermates,
Princeton Area, 732-759-2174.
www.dinnermates.com. Ages 30s
to early 50s. Call for reservation
and location. $20 plus dinner and
drinks. 7:30 p.m.
Halloween Oldies Dance, Singles
Sociable, Knights of Columbus
Hall, 61 Pine Street, Old Bridge,
732-251-0970. Music of the 1950s
and ‘60s. Refreshments, trivia
games, and door prizes. Costumes
optional. Cash bar. Register. $20 to
$25. 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.
Halloween Party, Professional
and Business Singles Network,
Hyatt Morristown, 3 Speedwell Avenue, Morristown, 888-348-5544.
www.PBSNinfo.com. Cash bar.
Jacket and tie, costumes optional.
Ages 40 to 65. $12 to $15. 8 p.m.
Halloween Dance Party, Steppin’ Out Singles, Sheraton, 6 Industrial Way East, Eatontown,
732-656-1801. www.steppinoutsingles.com. Ages 40 plus. $15.
8:30 p.m.
Sports
Princeton Football, Princeton
Stadium, 609-258-3538. Cornell.
1 p.m.
Sunday
November 1
Daylight Saving Time ends. 2
a.m.
INTO THE SPOTLIGHT: For Fans
of ‘The Colbert Report’
Stephen Colbert, Count Basie
Theater, 99 Monmouth Street,
Red Bank, 732-842-9000. www.countbasietheatre.org. “I Am
Stephen Colbert (and So Can
You),” a candid conversation with
Stephen Colbert, the host and executive producer of “The Colbert
Report,” interviewed by Aaron
Posner, Two River Theater Company’s artistic director (and
friends with Colbert since their
Northwestern University days).
$35 to $99.50. 7:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Concert, Concordia Chamber
Players, Trinity Church, Upper
York and Sugan road, New Hope,
215-297-5972. www.concordiaplayers.org. “Argentianian Masters” featuring William Wolfram
on piano, Todd Palmer on clarinet, and Jesse Mills and Cyrus
Beroukhim on violin. $25. 3 p.m.
Two Pianos: Two Sisters, New
Jersey Symphony Orchestra,
State Theater, New Brunswick,
800-ALLEGRO. www.njsymphony.org. Twin sisters, Christina and
Michelle Naughton, present
works of Schumann, Poulenc,
and Brahms. Michael Stern
conducts. $20 to $82. 3 p.m.
The Sealed Angel, Bucks County Choral Society, Trinity Lutheran Church, 1000 W. Main Street,
Lansdale, PA., 215-598-6142.
www.buckschoral.org. By Rodion
Shchedrin, with choreographer
and dancer Tim Early, co-director
of the Philadelphia-based Opus 1
Contemporary Dance Company,
and dancer Carrie Ellmore-Tallitsch of the Martha Graham
Dance Company. Also with flutist
Mimi Stillman and treble soloist
Alex Bessen. $20. 4 p.m.
Sunday Evensong Series, Christ
Church, 5 Paterson Street, New
Brunswick, 732-545-6262. www.christchurchnewbrunswick.org.
Mack Brandon, Benny Barksdale,
and others present jazz. Vespers
and concert. Free. 4 p.m.
Edward T. Cone Series, Princeton Symphony Orchestra,
Richardson Auditorium, Princeton
University, 609-497-0020. www.princetonsymphony.org. David
Alan Miller conducts a program
featuring music of Brahms and
Harbison. Jayn Rosenfeld on
flute. Pre-concert lecture at 3 p.m.
$20 to $64. 4 p.m.
Dedication and Evening Prayer,
St. Charles Borromeo Catholic
Church, 47 Skillman Road, Skillman, 609-466-0300. www.borromeo.org. In honor of the recently installed 27 rank pipe organ. 4 p.m.
Rutgers Symphony Orchestra,
Mason Gross School of the
Arts, Nicholas Music Center, 85
George Street, New Brunswick,
732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. “Janacek’s
Sinfonietta.” Kynan Johns conducts. $25. 8 p.m.
Kirtan
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. Sharon
Silverstein and the Peace Project
featuring a call and response repeating of simple mantras to experience freedom from the daily
chatter of the mind and create a
vibration meditation. $10. 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Gourgaud Gallery, 23
North Main Street, Cranbury, 609395-0900. www.gourgaudhist.htm.
Opening reception for exhibit by
the Suburban Artist Guild featuring
a variety of media. On view to November 29. 1 to 3 p.m.
Panel Presentation, Michener
Art Museum, 138 South Pine
Street, Doylestown, 215-3409800. www.michenerartmuseum.org. “The Art of Collecting” in conjunction with “An Evolving Legacy: Twenty Years of Collecting at the Michener Art Museum.” Register. $20. 2 to 4 p.m.
Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free.
2 p.m.
Also, Gallery Talk. Highlights of
the collections, new acquisitions,
and special exhibitions. Free. 3
p.m.
Also, Gallery Talk. “How the
West Was Done: The Portrayal of
the American Frontier in a 19th
Century Japanese Woodblock
Print” presented by Nicole Fabricand-Person. Free. 3 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Riverrun Gallery,
287 South Main Street, Lambertville, 609-397-3349. Coffee and
guided tour in conjunction with
“Breakthrough Paintings,” an exhibit of paintings by Charles
David Viera. 2 to 3 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Artists’ Gallery, 32
Coryell Street, Lambertville, 609397-4588. www.lambertvillearts.com. Closing reception for “Innovations,” a shared exhibit featuring new paintings and drawings
by Florence Moonan and Carol
Sanzalone. 4 to 5 p.m.
Dance
Alarmel Valli, Navatman Dance,
Montgomery High School, 1016
Route 601, Skillman, 732-5802093. www.navatman.org.
Bharatanatyam ballet, “The Forgotten Seed.” $15 to $50. 3 p.m.
Drama
Bell, Book and Candle, Actors’
NET, 635 North Delmorr Avenue,
Morrisville, PA, 215-295-3694.
www.actorsnetbucks.org. Classic
comedy about a modern-day
witch in Manhattan. $20. 2 p.m.
Come Back, Come Back, Wherever You Are, George Street
Playhouse, 9 Livingston Avenue,
New Brunswick, 732-246-7717.
www.gsponline.org. Premiere of
drama about love written and directed by Arthur Laurents. $28 to
$78. Final performance. 2 p.m.
Equus, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-5703333. www.kelseytheatre.net.
Drama with PinnWorth Productions. $14. 2 p.m.
The Crucible, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, New Theater,
85 George Street, New Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.-
masongross.rutgers.edu. Drama
by Rutgers Theater Company.
$25. 2 and 8 p.m.
She Stoops to Conquer, McCarter Theater, 91 University
Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787.
www.mccarter.org. Comedy
about mistaken identities by Oliver Goldsmith. $20 to $55. 2 p.m.
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama
based on John Steinbeck’s novel.
Directed by Joe Discher. $34 to
$54. 2 and 7:30 p.m.
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s
Nest, Somerset Valley Players,
Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908369-7469. www.svptheatre.org.
Drama. $15. 2 p.m.
Assassins, Westminster Conservatory, The Playhouse, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu.
Stephen Sondheim’s dark musical. $20. 3 p.m.
Film
Central New Jersey Jewish Film
Festival, Regal Cinemas, 2399
Route 1 South, North Brunswick,
732-932-4166. www.jewishstudies.rutgers.edu. Screenings
of “Gevald Rabbi’s Daughter,”
“The Goldbergs, “The Little Traitor,” and “A Secret.” $6 to $11.
Check website for full schedule
and tickets. 12:30 p.m.
Honor Roll, New Jersey Film
Festival, Scott Hall 123, College
Avenue, New Brunswick, 732932-8482. www.njfilmfest.com.
“Pause Replay,” 2009; “The Snow
Princess,” 2008; “Mr. Brooklyn,”
2008; “Scarecrow,” 2009; and
“The Street Stops Here,” 2009.
$10. 7 p.m.
Good Causes
Yoga for Unity Conference for
Change, Yoga for Unity, Can Do
Fitness Club, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-947-4645. www.yogaforunity.com. Guest teachers
present talks and yoga sessions.
To benefit Off the Mat, Into the
World’s humanitarian efforts in
Uganda. For all levels, even beginners. Register. $18 for one
session; $36 for whole day. 9:30
a.m. to 6:30 p.m. See story page
29.
Travel the World in Song, Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61
Nassau Street, 609-924-0103.
Mezzo-soprano Joan Waite performs a concert of 18 songs in 11
languages representing 14 countries across five continents. Peter
de Mets, piano, and Bill Trigg,
percussion. To benefit the Crisis
Ministry of Princeton and Trenton.
Free will offering. 3 p.m.
Champagne Reception, NAACP
Legal Defense and Education
Fund, Conant Hall, ETS,
Rosedale and Carter road, 609468-0484. Margaret S. Goheen,
Princeton resident and former cochair of the committee, receives
the annual service award. The
Bob Smith Trio presents music.
Register. $75. 4 to 7 p.m.
Fairs
Day of the Dead Celebration,
Arts Council of Princeton, 102
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Festival with music, bilingual story telling, and
hands-on art workshops. El Dia
de Los Muertos is a Mexican holiday to honor the brief return of
spirits. Free. 3 to 5 p.m.
Craft Fairs
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, Garden State Exhibit Center, Somerset, 800-210-9900. www.sugarloafcrafts.com. Fine artists, craft
designers, and craft demonstrations. $8. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Faith
Theology on Tap, Princeton Theological Seminary, Fridays,
MarketFair, West Windsor. Discussion of the crossroads between life and theology led by
Josh Scott. Geared to young
adults. E-mail [email protected] for information. 7 p.m.
Continued on following page
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OCTOBER 28, 2009
November 1
Continued from preceding page
Wind Songs Hymn Festival Concert, Doylestown Presbyterian
Church, 127 East Court Street,
Doylestown, PA, 215-348-3531.
www.dtownpc.org. Mixed-media
event based on the book, “Wind
Songs,” by calligrapher Timothy
R. Botts. Reception follows the
concert. Free-will offering. 7:30
p.m.
Health & Wellness
Blood Drive, American Red
Cross, Beth El Synagogue, 50
Maple Stream Road, East Windsor, 800-448-3543. www.pleasegiveblood.org. 8 a.m. to 1:30
p.m.
Satsang and Gathering, Integral
Yoga Institute Princeton, 122
Carter Road, Princeton, 732-2742410. www.iyiprinceton.com. “Insights into the Nature of Suffering:
The Book of Job” presented by
Reverend Jaganath Carrera, author of “Inside the Yoga Sutras”
and founder of Yoga Life Society.
Register. $15. 10 a.m. to noon.
History
Rafael C. Castro, M.D., P.A.
Board-Certified in Internal Medicine
• Primary Care Physician
for Patients 15 Yrs. & Up
• Thorough and
Personalized Care
• New Patients Welcome
We Listen!
Most Insurances Accepted
Saturday and Evening Hours Available
Spanish & Tagalog spoken.
Rafael C. Castro, M.D., P.A.
Princeton Professional Park
601 Ewing Street
Suite C-18 • Princeton
609-924-1331
From Revolution to Relativity,
Historical Society of Princeton,
Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-921-6748.
www.princetonhistory.org. Classic walking tour of downtown
Princeton and Princeton University includes stops at Nassau Hall,
University Chapel, Woodrow Wilson’s homes, and Einstein’s residence. Register by phone or Email [email protected] $7. 2 p.m.
For Families
Planetarium Shows, New Jersey
State Museum, 205 West State
Street, Trenton, 609-292-6464.
www.newjerseystatemuseum.org. “One World, One Sky” at 1
and 3 p.m. “Extreme Planets” at 2
and 4 p.m. $5. 1 p.m.
Congressman Rush Holt,
Barnes & Noble, 869 Route 1
South, North Brunswick, 732545-7860. www.bn.com. Story
time event features Rush Holt
reading stories with environmental themes. Feared to ages 3 to
10, the event is a kick-off event
for the holiday book drive benefiting Head Start of Middlesex and
Somerset counties. 2 p.m.
The Skies over Hogwarts, Raritan Valley College, Planetarium,
College Center, North Branch,
908-526-1200. www.raritanval.edu. Witches and wizards guide
visitors through a Harry Potter
themed tour of the night sky to
see how J.K. Rowling uses astronomy as the inspiration for
some of her character’s names.
$6. 2 and 4 p.m.
Lectures
Astrological Society of Princeton, Plainsboro Public Library,
Plainsboro, 609-924-4311. www.aspnj.org. “Financial Astrology
and the Economy” presented by
Jeri London. Social hour follows
the talk. Donations accepted at
the door. 2 p.m.
Dorothea’s House, 120 John
Street, Princeton, 609-924-8275.
dorotheashouse.org. “A Puccini
Retrospect” presented by Joseph
Pucciatti. Bring a refreshment to
share at the reception. 5 p.m.
Difficult Questions Roundtable,
Westerly Road Church, 25
Westerly Road, Princeton, 609924-3816. www.westerlyroad.org.
Roundtable discussions concerning life, faith, suffering, evil, and
Christianity, discussed by Pastor
Matthew Ristuccia, Westerly
Road Church; Rajan Matthews,
Chuck Hetzler, and David Ward.
Lecture, buffet dinner, and discussion. Register. 6:30 p.m.
Live Music
Jerry Topinka, Salt Creek Grille,
One Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4194200. www.saltcreekgrille.com.
Jazz brunch. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
David Schlossberg, South
Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction,
732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. Piano concert in memory of Daphne
Powell, a former music professor
at Rutgers University. Schlossberg, a West Windsor resident,
has been playing piano since age
five. Free. 1 p.m.
Tom Glover, Triumph Brewing
Company, 400 Union Square,
New Hope, 215-862-8300. www.triumphbrew.com. Irish and cover
tunes. 1 to 4 p.m.
Songwriters Showcase, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822.
www.princetonlibrary.org. Kim
Yarson, Jo Wymer, and Sarah
Donner bring their individual
sounds and styles. 2 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Greenway Walks, D&R
Greenway, Sourlands Ecosystem
Preserve, 609-924-4646. drgreenway.org. Walk led by Jared Rosenbaum. Register. Free. 9:30 a.m.
Family Fun Maze, Corner Copia
Farm Market, 299 PrincetonHightstown Road, East Windsor,
609-426-8884. Challenging 10acre corn maze includes more
than two miles of potential pathways depicting a barn and farm
animals. $9.99. Bring a flashlight.
10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Schools
Middle Eastern Percussion
Class, Drum & Dance Learning
Center, 4110 Quakerbridge
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-3247383. www.drumdancecenter.com. First of three sessions. Register. $45. 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
West African Percussion Class,
Drum & Dance Learning
Center, 4110 Quakerbridge
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-3247383. www.drumdancecenter.com. First of three sessions. Register. $45. 1:45 to 1:30 p.m.
Book Sale
Plainsboro Public Library, 641
Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Stuff
a bag for $3. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Singles
Yardley Singles, Havana’s, New
Hope, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Big band music. Dining and dancing. Cash
bar. 2 to 6 p.m.
Monday
November 2
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
I Got the Obama Blues
Frederick Neumann Memorial
Lecture, Princeton Theological
Seminary, Mackay Campus Center, 609-497-7990. www.ptsem.edu. “Blues, Gospel, and Jazz Impulses in the Age of Obama” presented by Timothy B. Tyson,
Duke Divinity School. Free. 7
p.m.
Classical Music
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Drew University
Concert Hall, 36 Madison Avenue, Madison, 973-408-3917.
Anne-Marie McDermott, piano;
Ani Kavafian, violin; Nicolas Altstaedt, cello; and David Shifrin,
clarinet. Program includes Debussy, Ravel, and Messiaen. 8
p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony
Chorus, 5000 Windrows Drive,
Plainsboro, 732-469-3983. www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony.
New members are welcome. 7:15
p.m.
Keb’ Mo’ and Band, McCarter
Theater, 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Singer songwriter
Kevin Moore on guitar with Delta
blues and storytelling. He is releasing his first indie album, “Live
& Mo’” featuring six live performances. $40 to $48. 8 p.m.
Dancing
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J
Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14,
Hillsborough, 908-892-0344.
www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm.
Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to
11 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan
Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard
Road, lower level, 609-306-6682.
www.yogasusan.com. $15 walkin. Discounted class cards available. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m.
Yoga, Center for Relaxation and
Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road,
Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609-7507432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Beginners at 4:15
p.m.; mixed level at 5:30 p.m.
$15. 4:15 p.m.
Cancer Transitions: Moving Beyond Treatment, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, 732235-8522. www.cinjfoundation.org. Exercise component, educational topic, and support group.
Register. Free. 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Compassionate Friends, Raymond Dwier Center, 392 Church
Street, Groveville, 609-516-8047.
Support group for families following the death of a child of any age
and to provide information to help
others be more supportive. 7:30
p.m.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Opportunities
Donate Please
PEAC Health & Fitness is collecting blankets in support of
HomeFront. New blankets of all
shapes, colors, and sizes will be
collected at 1440 Lower Ferry
Road, Ewing, from Sunday, November 1 to Monday, November
30. www.peachealthfitness.com or
609-883-2000.
Mercer County is accepting
monetary donations that go toward
the purchase of food vouchers for
veterans to use to purchase holiday
meals. Checks should be payable
to Mercer County Trust Fund and
sent to Mercer County Division of
Veteran Services, 2280 Hamilton
Avenue, Hamilton 08619. Call
609-989-6120 for information.
The county’s goal is $6,000 to allow hundreds of veterans and their
families purchase items for a holiday meal.
Call for Entries
Small World Coffee invites
artist to submit a piece of original
artwork for “Love,” exhibitions at
both cafes in February. All artwork
must be suitable for a family environment, must be easily hung on a
wall, prepared for hanging, and not
Workout 101, Optimal Exercise
Studio, 27B Maplewood Avenue,
Cranbury, 609-490-7710. Workshop featuring the equipment
found in most commercial health
clubs. Register. $20. 7:30 to 8:30
p.m.
History
Tour and Talk, Historical Society
of West Windsor, Schenck
House, 50 Southfield Road, West
Windsor, 609-799-1230. Clifford
Reed and Victor Mount, both
longtime residents of the farming
community, present a tour and
talk. Free. 8 p.m.
Lectures
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
“Music Learning Supports All
Learning,” an interactive session
that explores the role of music in
early childhood learning, presented by Lili Levinowitz, professor of
music at Rowan University. 9:30
a.m.
Kids Stuff
Boy Scout Open House, Princeton United Methodist Church,
corner of Nassau and Vandeventer streets. Open house for Boy
Scout Troop 88. All boys in
grades 5 through 12 are welcome. Find out about the adventures of scouting. Learn about
camping, how to make a real fire,
and so much more. For more information E-mail David Wertz at
[email protected]
7:30 to 9 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Safe Boating Course, West
Windsor-Plainsboro Community Education, High School
South, Clarksville Road, West
Windsor, 609-716-5000 ext.
5034. $65. 7 to 10 p.m.
Tuesday
November 3
to exceed 30 inches. Submit up to
three images per artist with a $5 fee
payable to Small World Coffee
sent to 14 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton 08540. Images may be
digitally submitted at www.smallworldcoffee.com. Deadline
Monday, December 21. 609-9244377.
South Brunswick Public Library seeks entries for a poster
contest for the teen summer reading program. The winning design
will appear on posters. Visit www.sbpl.info/teens for information.
Hunterdon Chamber of Commerce is holding its inaugural gingerbread competition featuring
Hunterdon County sites and buildings. Five categories include authentic reproduction of a significant building, unusual three-dimensional, ages 12 and under, ages
13 to 18, and a traditional category.
www.hunterdon-chamber.org.
Deadline is Monday, November
16. 908-782-7115.
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association seeks creative artists with a love of the environment for its Stream Clean-Up
Logo contest. The winning logo
will be printed on the front the
shirts and used in clean-up promotional material prior to the spring
Fischer narrates and presents piano tunes from Disney beginnings
through the 1990s. $7. 7:30 p.m.
World Music
Waked Lunch, Looking Glass
Pond, 800 Alexander Road, West
Windsor, 609-720-0098. An experimental project that utilizes atmospheric sounds, samplers,
strings, drums, guitar, and synths.
The dark music is inspired by
William Burroughs and Angelo
Badalamenti. $15. 8 p.m.
Art
Art History Lecture Series,
Michener Art Museum, 138
South Pine Street, Doylestown,
215-340-9800. www.michenerartmuseum.org. “Twenty Years Ago:
The Art Scene in Bucks County”
in conjunction with “An Evolving
Legacy: Twenty Years of Collecting at the Michener Art Museum.”
Register. $20. 1 to 2 p.m.
Drama for Kids
George Street Playhouse offers holiday drama workshops for
8 to 10 year-olds. Monday, December 28, comedy workshop; Tuesday, December 29, create a play;
and Wednesday, December 30, theater mania. Each class is $50. Call
732-846-2895, ext. 115 for information.
Endangered Sites
Preservation New Jersey seeks
nominations of endangered historic sites in the State. www.pnj10most.org or call 609-3926409. Deadline is Monday, November 30.
Dancing
Tuesday Night Folk Dance
Group, Riverside School, Princeton, 609-655-0758. Instruction
and dancing. No partner needed.
$3. 7 to 9 p.m.
Literati
Critique Group, Barnes & Noble,
MarketFair, West Windsor, 609716-1570. www.bn.com. Panel
discussion and signing with
Courtney Sheinmel, author of
“Positively,” and Bob Krech, author of “Rebound.” Aspiring children’s book authors are invited to
bring first pages of their work for
critique. 7 p.m.
Craft Fairs
Lydia’s Guild Craft Show, Historic Aldie Mansion, 85 Old
Dublin Pike, Doylestown, PA,
215-362-5406. www.lydiasguild.com. Fine arts and crafts from 90
artisans. $4. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Drama
Faith
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama
based on John Steinbeck’s novel.
Directed by Joe Discher. $34 to
$54. 7:30 p.m.
I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now
Change, Bristol Riverside Theater, 120 Radcliffe Street, Bristol,
215-785-0100. www.brtstage.org.
Musical focuses on being single,
dating, married, and heartbroken.
Opening night on Thursday, November 5. Through Sunday, November 22. $34 to $42. 8 p.m.
Roger Rees, McCarter Theater,
91 University Place, Princeton,
609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. “What You Will,” a one-man
show, includes Shakespeare soliloquies, anecdotes, and snippets of his life in the theater. Rees
is known to TV audiences as
Robin Colcord on “Cheers,” Lord
Marbury on “The West Wing,” and
Dr. Colin Marlow on “Grey’s
Anatomy.” $39 to $50. 8 p.m. See
story page 24.
Talmud Class, Chabad of the
Windsors, East Windsor Library,
138 Hickory Corner Road, 609448-9369. www.chabadwindsor.com. Register. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Election Day.
Film
IN THE SPOTLIGHT: It’s a
Small World After All
Central New Jersey Jewish Film
Festival, Regal Cinemas, 2399
Route 1 South, North Brunswick,
732-932-4166. www.jewishstudies.rutgers.edu. Screenings of
“Valentina’s Mother, “Lemon
Tree,” and “And Along Come
Tourists.” $6 to $11. Check website for full schedule and tickets.
12:30 p.m.
Music of Walt Disney, Monroe
Township Cultural Arts Commission, Monroe Township High
School, 1629 Perrineville Road,
732-521-2111. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com. Marvin
event. Send submissions to [email protected]
with the subject line “2010 Stream
Clean-Up Logo Contest Entry.”
Deadline is Monday, November
16. Submission should also include a short description of why
clean water is important to you, a
pdf version of your logo, and your
names, address, and contact information. Visit www.thewatershed.org or call 609-737-3735, ext. 30
for more information.
Food & Dining
Election Day Lasagna Dinner,
First Presbyterian Church of
Hamilton Square, 3550 Nottingham Way, Hamilton, NJ, 609-9150136. Includes salad, homemade
lasagna, beverages, and homemade desserts. $12. 4 p.m.
Business Networking, One
South Rustic Grill, 4095 Route 1
South, South Brunswick, 732355-1030. Meet other professionals in a social gathering. Free
food. Cash bar. 4 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Gentle Therapeutic Yoga, Susan
Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard
Road, lower level, 609-306-6682.
www.yogasusan.com. $15 walkin. Discounted class cards available. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m.
Food Workshop, Kristin
Harvest, 206 Sandpiper Court,
Pennington, 609-462-4717.
“Seeking Comfort Through Right
Eating,” a workshop for men and
women who compulsively
overeat, think they have food allergies, or just want to get over
the fall-winter blues. Register.
$15. 7 p.m.
Continued on following page
U.S. 1
33
34
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
November 3
Continued from preceding page
Feldenkrais, Onsen For All,
4451 Route 27, Princeton, 609924-4800. www.onsenforall.com.
“Whole Body Exercises for Successful Sitting” presented by Edward Feldman. $55. 7 to 9 p.m.
Financial Workshop
Kingston Wellness Associates,
4446 Route 27, Kingston, 215598-7225. www.thenewtemperament.com. “Money Consciousness and Your Temperament”
presented by Jay Sanders, CPA;
and Michael Edelstein, founder of
the New Temperament. Register.
$25. 7 to 9:30 p.m.
For Families
Tiger Hall Play Zone, 53 State
Road, Princeton, 609-356-0018.
www.tigerhallkids.com. For ages
to 8. Register. $10. 9:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m.
Lectures
Open House, Toastmasters
Club, CUH2A, 1000 Lenox Drive, Lawrenceville, 609-252-9667. www.tmdistrict38.org. Bring lunch. Beverages
provided. Noon.
Computer Tips and Tricks, Ewing SeniorNet Computer Literacy Center, 999 Lower Ferry Road, 609-882-5086. www.ewingsnet.com. Free. 1 p.m.
Thunderbird Alumni Association, Nassau
Inn, Tap Room, 10 Palmer Square, Princeton, 609-933-1621. www.thunderbird.edu.
Networking and social. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.
Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Tech Talk, free. 7 p.m.
Workshop, Rider University, Memorial
310, Lawrenceville. http://osgw.wordpress.com. “Graphic Design Techniques” workshop presented by John Lemasney, an
artist, sculptor, designer, technologist,
writer, poet, and manager of Instructional
Technology at Rider University. Register.
Free. 7 p.m.
Sit with Willie Nile Onstage:
Willie Nile and Big Note Trio
perform on Thursday, October 29, at Patriots Theater
in Trenton, with all seating
onstage. 609-984-8400.
Live Music
George Sinkler, Limelight, 812 North Easton Road, Doylestown, PA, 215-345-6330.
Piano bar. 6 to 11 p.m.
Glenn Tilbrook, The Record Collector
Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-324-0880. www.the-record-collector.com. $38. 8 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Princeton Ski Club, Romeo’s Restaurant,
Plainsboro, 732-329-2067. www.princetonski.org. Get acquainted social. Register. 6
p.m.
Exhibit Your Art in Princeton’s
largest corporate gallery.
U.S. 1 is preparing its annual wall calender highlighting
events and venues throughout central New Jersey.
We are inviting artists who live or work
in the greater Princeton area to submit original
artworks for publication in U.S. 1’s annual calendar,
to be distributed Tuesday, December 22,
to 4,000 + offices in the U.S. 1 distribution area.
Paintings or drawings in any medium that capture
the changing seasons of the region
are especially encouraged.
Works will be reproduced in full color.
Artists’ biographies and contact information
will be included in the calendar
and a modest honorarium will be awarded.
Submit E-files to [email protected]
or mail photos or prints to U.S. 1 Calendar,
12 Roszel Road, Princeton 08540.
Deadline: Friday, November 20.
ATTENTION: PRINCETON AREA EVENT PLANNERS
The 2010 U.S. 1 Wall Calendar will be distributed along with our last issue of 2009.
Now is the time to inform us of your events for the coming year. They will be posted online in
the Events directory at www.princetoninfo.com. Send to [email protected]
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
35
Movies
NJ Filmfest
Children & Adults Welcome
SCHOOL BAND
“Deja Vu,” 2009; “Mildred
Richards,” 2008; and “Unremembered,” 2009. New Jersey
Film Festival, Scott Hall 123, College Avenue, New Brunswick, 732932-8482. www.njfilmfest.com.
$10. Friday, October 30, 7 p.m.
MUSIC
LESSONS
RENT
ALS
RENTALS
•• piano
•
guitar
piano
• guitar •• drums
drums
•• violin
voice
•• flute
TES
W R•• A
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O
violin
voice
flute
• cello
clarinet
sax
•• trumpet
••• flute
• trombone
clarinet •••sax
sax
trumpet
PRINCETON:
609-924-8282
• clarinet • trumpet • violin
★ NEW LOCATION ★
Mainstream Movies
Confirm titles with theaters.
All the Best: Fun Begins. Hindi
comedy. Multiplex, Regal.
Amelia. Drama about the life of
Amelia Earhart. AMC, Garden,
MarketFair, Montgomery, Multiplex.
Astro Boy. Animated family
film. AMC, Destinta, MarketFair,
Multiplex, Regal.
Blue. Drama with John Bryant
Davila.
Multiplex,
Regal.
@lt:Bright Star. Romantic drama
about poet John Keats. Montgomery.
Capitalism: A Love Story.
Documentary by Michael Moore.
AMC, Montgomery, Multiplex.
Cirque du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant. Suspense with
John C. Reilly. AMC, Destinta,
MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Cloudy with a Chance of
Meatballs. Animated film based
on children’s book by Ron and Judi
Barrett. AMC, Destinta, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Coco Before Chanel. Biopic
about Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel
stars Audrey Tautou. Montgomery.
Couples Retreat. Comedy
about four couples. AMC, Destinta, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
The Damned United. Sports
bio about Brian Clough in 1974.
Montgomery.
Fame. Remake of 1980 film
about performing arts high school.
AMC.
Politics
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
“Connecting in 140 Characters or
Fewer on Twitter” presented by
Amy Kearns and Julie Strange.
“Election Night at the Library” follows using live Twitter stream. 7
p.m.
Singles
Pizza Night, Yardley Singles,
Vince’s, 25 South Main Street,
Yardley, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Register. 6
p.m.
Wednesday
November 4
IN THE SPOTLIGHT: The Best
Pre-Holiday Sample Sale
Sample Sale, Philip David/Party
City, 3625 Quakerbridge Road,
Mercerville, 609-588-0141. Jewelry, books, watches, fashion purses, stationery, Christmas items,
pet-themed gifts, glassware,
mugs, plush toys, pottery, candles,
baby accessories, kids’ clothes,
magnets, home decor items, and
keychains. Also, Thursday, November 5, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. 8
a.m. to 6 p.m.
Art
Art Show, Small World Coffee,
254 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-924-4377. www.smallworldcoffee.com. Art exhibit features the
206, O
Suite N
204 S
L E947
SRT.S
609-897-0032
(next to Audi dealer)
Good Hair. Chris Rock documentary about hair. AMC, Destinta.
Halloween II. Sci-fi horror directed by Rob Zombie. Destinta.
The Informant. Comedy with
Matt Damon and Scott Bakula.
Multiplex.
Law Abiding Citizen. Thriller
with Jamie Foxx and Gerard Butler. AMC, Destinta, MarketFair,
Multiplex, Regal.
Main Aurr Mrs. Khanna.
Comedy. Regal.
Michael Jackson’s This is It.
Documentary of Jackson’s last
days. AMC, Destinta, MarketFair,
Multiplex, Regal.
More Than a Game. Sports
documentary about young basketball players. Destinta.
New York, I Love You. Romantic comedy. AMC, Montgomery.
Paranormal Activity. Sci-fi
thriller. AMC, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Saw VI. Thriller with Tobin
Bell. AMC, Destinta, MarketFair,
Multiplex, Regal.
A Serious Man. Drama with
Richard Kind portraying a man in
1967. Garen, Montgomery.
The Stepfather. Thriller with
Sela Ward and Dylan Walsh. AMC,
Destinta, MarketFair, Multiplex,
Regal.
Toy Story in 3D Sci-fi animation. AMC.
works of Jay McPhillips, a painter,
writer, and graphic designer. Work
includes oil paintings, screen
prints, stickers, t-shirts, newsprint,
magazines, and billboards. On
view to December 1. 7 a.m.
Drama
The Grapes of Wrath, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Drama
based on John Steinbeck’s novel.
Directed by Joe Discher. $34 to
$54. 7:30 p.m.
I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now
Change, Bristol Riverside Theater, 120 Radcliffe Street, Bristol,
215-785-0100. www.brtstage.org.
Musical focuses on being single,
dating, married, and heartbroken.
Opening night on Thursday, November 5. Through Sunday, November 22. $34 to $42. 8 p.m.
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Bucks
County Playhouse, 70 South
Main Street, New Hope, 215-8622041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com. Musical. $25. 8 p.m..
Dancing
Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road,
Hamilton, 609-931-0149. For
newcomers. $10. 7 to 9 p.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. $7. 7:40 to 10:30 p.m.
Salsa Class, Pennington Ewing
Athletic Club, 1440 Lower Ferry
Road, Ewing, 609-883-2000.
www.peachealthfitness.com. For
beginners. $15. 8 to 9:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
A La David Lynch:
‘Unremembered,’
about a man with no
past, screens Friday,
October 30, at the New
Jersey Film Festival.
www.njfilmfest.com
Wake Up Sid. Comedy. Regal.
Where the Wild Things Are.
Family film based on Maurice
Sendak’s book. AMC, Destinta,
MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Zombieland. Comedy thriller
with Woody Harrelson. AMC, Destinta, Multiplex, Regal.
Venues
AMC Hamilton 24 Theaters, 325
Sloan Avenue , I-295 Exit 65-A, 609890-8307.
Destinta, Independence Plaza,
264 South Broad Street, Hamilton,
609-888-4500.
Garden Theater, 160 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-683-7595.
MarketFair-UA, Route 1 South,
West Windsor, 609-520-8700.
Montgomery Center Theater,
Routes 206 and 518, Rocky Hill,
609-924-7444.
Multiplex Cinemas Town Center
Plaza, 319 Route 130 North, East
Windsor, 609-371-8472.
Regal Theaters, Route 1 South,
New Brunswick, 732-940-8343.
609-387-9631
609-448-7170
PRINCETON JCT 609-924-8282
5 Minutes from
Downtown
BURLINGTON
HIGHTSTOWN
PRINCETON
Lessons Only
FREE PARKING
www.farringtonsmusic.com
Our Capital City’s
Premier Historic Site
Guided Tours: Daily 12:30 to 4:00pm
October 31st at 2pm
Haunted Stories
from Our
Colonial Past!
(FREE, please bring
non-perishable food items
for donation to the
Trenton Area Soup Kitchen)
15 Market Street ★ Trenton, New Jersey ★ (609) 989-3027
www.williamtrenthouse.org
The 1719 William Trent House Museum is owned, maintained and operated by the City of Trenton,
Department of Recreation, Natural Resources and Culture, Division of Culture, with assistance from the
New Jersey Historical Commission, Department of State
...because two is always
better than one
New Jersey & Pennsylvania's Largest Personalized Introduction Service
Don’t Leave Your
up to
20+ years of Matchmaking
Experience
All members met, screened
and criminal background
checked: very safe
BBB accredited business
13 offices nationally
Call (609) 912-1700 to make an appointment
and also visit our website: www.twoofus.com
36
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
SINGLES
“Dedicated to Quality and Service”
Dr. Mary E. Boname
Optometric Physician
TPA Cert #27OMO0032100
LIC # 0A 5298
Family
Eye Care
Benedict A. Fazio
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Montgomery Center near Shoprite • 1325 Route 206 Suite 24
Skillman, New Jersey 08558 • www.mecnj.com
MAC
609-279-0005
609-279-0005
Hours: M: 10-8 • T: 10-5
Wed, Th: 10-7 • F: 10-6 • Sat: 9-3
MEN SEEKING WOMEN
MEN SEEKING WOMEN
WOMEN SEEKING MEN
Are you a smart, active, attractive
woman in her 50’s? I’m a SWM with
many interests including good conversation, reading, politics, tennis, theater
(as an actor as well as a member of the
audience), film, the great outdoors, and
traveling. I’m 5’9”, good build, not a badlooking fellow. I especially value someone who’s eternally curious about the
world, has a playful sense of humor, and
a supportive personality. If you think we
just might match up — then contact me
(photo would be appreciated) and with
the right chemistry... Box 236197
back. Box 236193
Single, black, professional female,
32 years of age, with no children. I am
5’9”, medium build, short black hair, big
bright eyes, and beautiful smile. I love to
laugh. I am very laid back but I like to mix
it up a little and have fun. Looking for
someone to share one-on-one time
with. In search of a good-looking, 5’9” or
taller, single, white professional male
between the ages of 35 and 45, with a
good personality and a sense of humor.
I hope to find someone who is fun, adventurous, and enjoys life. Box 236216
Athletic, SJD NR. 5’10”, 170 lbs.
Seeks a younger, cute, fit, woman for
a meaningful relationship. I have a
beautiful daughter with whom I am very
close. I love slow dancing, romance,
candlelit dinners, long walks hand in
hand, cooking, oldies, weekends away,
travel, Poconos, flea markets, biking,
jogging, new adventures, and spending
quiet evenings with that special lady.
Let’s exchange pictures. I am a very
young 56. Ciao. Box 236220
I am a 54-year-old SWM who has
never married and doesn’t have kids.
I’m in good physical shape despite my
disability. I keep busy during the day by
going to the gym, running, and bowling
Wednesday nights. I also enjoy gardening. I don’t drink or smoke. Looking for a
SWF 45-mid-50s, also non-smoker, for
relationship. I live in East Windsor and
hope that one of you lives here too; I’m
lonely. Box 236189
SWM 45 self-employed, intelligent,
neat, very romantic, kind, and thoughtful. Into cycling, hiking, art, music, reading, the outdoors. Seeking Asian or
White lady, 30-47, for friendship to longterm relationship. You must be serious
yet fun, considerate, outgoing, physically fit, and believe in romance and a future. Regardless or life, job title, or status, if you are admirable I’d like to know
you. Ball’s in your court, go ahead, hit it
November 4
Continued from preceding page
Craft Fairs
Lydia’s Guild Craft Show, Historic Aldie Mansion, 85 Old
SWM 57- I am a well-educated professional who is financially and emotionally balanced. I know how to show a
girl a good time whether it’s a movie, dinner, hike, or museum trip. I have a good
sense of humor and am easy to be with.
I am average size with nice eyes. I am in
good shape. I am running a halfmarathon in May. I enjoy many sports including softball, running, skiing, tennis
and golf. I also enjoy indoor activities
like museum, movies, etc. I am looking
for a SWF, 40-55, slim or medium build,
kids OK, non-smoker, educated, who
likes different activities and has a good
sense of humor to share some autumn
fever. [email protected]
WOMEN SEEKING MEN
“Life is best shared.” D.W.F. late
50s, slim, 5’4”, caring, easygoing, would
like to meet retired, widowed or divorced, N/S, N/D white male late 50s to
??? for friendship, maybe more. Box
236178
Fabulous female looking for fun
with a man whose lifestyle includes the
love of travel. Passion in your work
mixed with the desire to share free time
with someone special...that could very
well be ME. I am 50 (look 40), 5’1”, petite, long blonde hair, hazel eyes with diverse interests. You are adventurous
and comfortable in your own skin. Let’s
talk soon! Box 236192
I am a youthful, female, senior, college grad, attractive, particularly enjoy
bridge, theater, tennis, movies, dining
out, and simply laughing. I am looking
for a tall, thin, easy-going gentleman. I
believe I am personable, friendly, and
pleasant to talk to. Male counterpart a
plus. I am Jewish but not religious. Box
236190
Dublin Pike, Doylestown, PA,
215-362-5406. Fine arts and
crafts from 90 artisans. Benefit for
Meals on Wheels, Wellness Community at the Anne McCouch
Center, Heifer International, and
Remote Area Medical. $4. 9:30
a.m. to 8 p.m.
Gardens
Central Jersey Orchid Society,
D&R Greenway Land Trust, Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton, 609-9241380. Novice Night. 7:30 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan
Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard
Road, lower level, 609-306-6682.
www.yogasusan.com. $15 walkin. Discounted class cards available. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m.
Mixed Level Yoga, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. $15.
5:25 to 6:35 p.m.
Lectures
Fall Football Lecture Series,
Princeton University, Guyot
Hall, 609-258-3000. www.princeton.edu. “Dilemmas in Ath-
SEEKING FRIENDS
Professional, bright, Jewish, single, straight, attractive female with a
zest for life wishes to meet intelligent,
kind, earthy, peaceful people of both
genders, age 40-70, for friendship, going to social events, possible travel here
and abroad. Be honest, sincere and
genuine. People of substance. Nonsmokers. Positive outlook. Enjoy dancing, the arts, travel, laughing, good
restaurants, going to Philadelphia and
NYC. Prefer Princeton-area friends. Be
healthy mentally and physically - wholesome, cerebral, cultured, refined, decent human beings. Box 236139
HOW TO RESPOND
How to Respond: Place your note in
an envelope, write the box number on
the envelope, and mail it with $1 cash to
U.S. 1 at the address above.
HOW TO ORDER
Singles By Mail: To place your free
ad in this section mail it to U.S. 1, 12
Roszel Road, Princeton 08540, fax it to
609-452-0033, or E-mail it to [email protected] Be sure to include
a physical address to which we can
send responses.
letics” presented by Harold Feiveson. Free. 10 a.m.
Distinguished Lecture Series,
Mercer College, West Windsor,
Communications 109, 609-5703324. www.mccc.edu. “On Life
Support: The New Jersey Labor
Movement in the 21st Century”
presented by Joseph Gowaskie,
a professor of history at Rider
University. Free. Noon.
Adoption Awareness Program,
Families from China, St. Paul’s
Church, 214 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-897-0529. www.fccny.org. Mei-Ling Hopgood, author of “Lucky Girl,” reads and discusses being an adult Chinese
adoptee. Booksigning follows.
Register. $5. 6:30 p.m.
Difficult Questions Roundtable,
Westerly Road Church, Wilson
House, 240 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-924-3816. Roundtable discussions concerning life,
faith, suffering, evil, and Christianity, discussed by Pastor Matthew
Ristuccia, Westerly Road Church;
Rajan Matthews, Chuck Hetzler,
and David Ward. Lecture, buffet
dinner, and discussion. 7 p.m.
Live Music
Opus Soul, BT Bistro, 3499
Route 1 South, West Windsor,
609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. 8 to 11 p.m.
Wills & Estate Planning
Mary Ann Pidgeon
Pidgeon & Pidgeon, PC
Attorney, LLM in Taxation
600 Alexander Road
Princeton
609-520-1010
www.pidgeonlaw.com
OCTOBER 28, 2009
ART
FILM
LITERATURE
DANCE
DRAMA
U.S. 1
37
MUSIC
PREVIEW
Think the Beatles Meet ‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’
H
ide the women and
children — in fact, hide everyone
— because the Zombeatles, a
group of “undead” British pop musicians who are hungry for human
flesh, are about to invade Bordentown. “The Fab Gore” are coming
to the Record Collector on Halloween night, Saturday, October
31, to perform an all-ages show.
Look for Jaw Nlennon, Pall Ickartney, Gorge Harryson, and Dingo
Scarr to roll out gory classics like
“I Want to Eat Your Hand,” “Dead
Prudence,” and “Hey Food.”
The unsuspecting alternative
rock group the Gomers will open
— and then will be eaten, according to Biff Blumfumgagnge, who
“channels” drummer Dingo Scarr.
“Even though undead, the
Zombeatles are able to rock and
roll and had old and young alike
holding up lighters at the first
Record Collector appearance last
Halloween,” Scarr says in a phone
interview from his home in Madison, Wisconsin. “It’s kind of like an
old Monkees episode, where the
Monkees are running around town.
But this is the Gomers being
chased through town by the
Zombeatles. We’ll start out as the
mild-mannered Gomers and the
Zombeatles will end up taking
over.”
For readers who might be confused, the Gomers are the flip side
to the Zombeatles, kind of the yin
to The Zombeatles’ yang. In fact,
they’re the same guys. In addition
to Blumfumgagnge, the Gomers
are rounded out by Stephen Burke,
Andy Buckner, and Jonathan
Dichter. It was through their
warped minds that the Zombeatles
were birthed in 2004. “The Gomers
have a fertile creative mind and this
was one of the goofy mash-ups that
seemed obvious,” says Blumfumgagnge. “The idea kept coming
back to us. We looked around and
saw no one had done it yet. It’s a
big enough concept that everyone
can sink their teeth into, so to
speak.”
They have created an entire
Zombeatles parallel universe,
complete with a “mockumentary,”
mapping a history of the group,
with references by and interviews
with other zombie bands, like the
Rolling Kidney Stones, the Dead
Clark Five, Dead Zeppelin, and the
ZomZombies. In 2006 their creative minds put together a music
video, “Hard Day’s Night of the
Living Dead,” filmed mostly near
Blumfumgagnge’s house. Viewers
will see the Zombeatles — in glorious black and white — playing music, scowling at the camera, mowing the lawn, scowling some more,
doing housework, frightening families in a nearby park, and screaming “brains!” over and over. In
homage to the Beatles’ classic film
“A Hard Day’s Night,” the
Zombeatles get as zany as possible
for the undead, running in and out
of the camera’s frame toting a surfboard at one point (in Wisconsin?).
“Hard Day’s Night of the Living
Dead” gained international status
by Susan Van Dongen
when horror film director and musician Rob Zombie chose it as one
of his top YouTube Halloween
video picks of 2007, resulting in
more than a million views worldwide.
Earlier this year, the band released an album called “Meat the
Zombeatles” (on Capitol Punishment records) and another mockumentary called “The Zombeatles:
All You Need Is Brains.” The
group was a hit last year at the
Record Collector, despite a small
mishap with a fog machine. This
year, the Zombeatles will also appear at the Tritone in Philadelphia,
on Thursday, October 29, and at the
Asbury Park Lanes in Asbury Park,
on Friday, October 30.
Born January 17, 1964 (just
weeks before the real Beatles performed on “The Ed Sullivan
Show”), Blumfumgagnge is a musician, guitar technician, sound engineer, and producer in and around
Madison, Wisconsin. He is also an
instructor of music and recording
technology at the Madison Media
Institute.
“I’ve been playing since childhood, mostly violin in school and
youth orchestras,” he says. “I also
played viola, cello, bass, then took
up guitar. I was involved in a lot of
singing groups and bands, since
there are a lot of crazy bands here in
Madison.
“There was always music in the
house, since my mom was a piano
teacher,” Blumfumgagnge continues. “I can remember being on my
hobby horse and hearing ‘The
William Tell Overture.’ Even
though that memory came from a
child’s brain, it’s very strong. To
this day I associate that piece with
my hobby horse!”
H
is dad was a budget analyst,
not particularly musical, but could
whip up some wild fusion meals,
usually with a hint of Asian spices.
“My dad had been a cook in the
Army during the Korean War, and
he brought that kind of creativity to
the home table. I wish I could do
my dad’s cooking,” Blumfumgagnge says. “Parents play a larger role
than we think.”
The Beatles’ music that underscores the Zombeatles is executed
with real musical chops, and the
musicians obviously have listened
to the Fab Four closely. “‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’
came out when I was about four or
five, and I must have found a
scratched copy of it in a Goodwill
store,” Blumfumgagnge says. “I
was attracted to the cover, but then
played it over and over, and it
formed my musical tastes. It was
one of those records that started it
all. I still love ‘Within You, Without You.’As a little kid, hearing the
‘The Fab Gore’: The Zombeatles
channel the Beatles — with a
Halloween twist — with songs like
‘I Want to Eat Your Hand,’ ‘Dead
Prudence,’ and ‘Hey Food.’
sitar on that song really stayed with
me, and I still love Indian music.”
After earning an associate’s degree in vocal performance in 1986
from the University of Wisconsin
at Milwaukee, Blumfumgagnge
opted to lean more toward his instrumental skills, recording and
touring with bands ranging from
Jimmy Black’s Mothers of Invention to someone he refers to as a
“crazed banjo genius” from South
Carolina.
Since September, 2004, he has
toured and recorded with the legendary British guitarist and producer Robert Fripp, as well as King
Crimson and Fripp’s League of
Crafty Guitarists. In addition, he has
worked with the Wisconsin Youth
Symphony Orchestra; Sigtryggur
Baldursson, former drummer for
the Sugarcubes (the Icelandic group
formerly fronted by Bjork); songwriter-guitarist Pat MacDonald;
and American guitarist Adrian
Belew. Fripp and Belew make an
appearance on the Gomers’ latest
self-release, “Mike Zirkel.”
“I’m Fripp’s stateside guitar
tech,” Blumfumgagnge says. “I set
up his gear and help him move it,
and I also run the sound for the
shows when he tours. I’m lucky to
be able to work with him. I had
been Adrian Belew’s guitar tech in
the late ‘80s and early ‘90s and met
and befriended the guy who was
Robert’s guitar tech. He got invited
to tour with Dweezil Zappa [son of
the late Frank Zappa], which had
always been a dream for him.
When he left to
tour with them,
there was an
opening
for
me.”
Blumfumgagnge has also
performed with
Clyde Stubblefield
(James
Brown’s “funky drummer”), reggae singer Lee “Scratch” Perry,
and New York-based Zappa tribute
band Project/Object with Napoleon Murphy Brock.
A
side from imagining parallel worlds of undead British rock
groups, most of his creativity is
spent in the studio with the
Gomers, which he describes as
“twisted-weasel-in-heat-style alternative rock.” You can hear this
electronics and instrumental genius — and humorist — at his best
on songs like “Fripping the Rude
Oud,” which features an oud, a
Middle-Eastern cousin to the lute.
You’ll also hear snippets of sound,
conversation, and spoken word,
someone starting a car engine, and
even the family cat.
“If you hear the cat, then you’ve
got good ears,” he says. “But yes,
we did sample the cat. I’ve always
had an aptitude for electronics, so
playing in the studio, using modified instruments, was a natural fit.”
Around Madison, The Gomers
are known as a comedy rock/experimental/progressive rock band, fa-
Horror film director and musician Rob Zombie chose the
Zombeatles’ ‘Hard Days Night of the Living Dead’ as one of his
top YouTube Halloween video picks of 2007.
mous for their “Gomeroke,” basically, karaoke, but where the participants perform their songs
backed up by a live band, not a
recording.
For Blumfumgagnge, the highlight of his musical career so far
came in the fall of 2004, when the
late inventor and guitarist Les Paul
was honored with a Lifetime
Achievement Award at the Wisconsin Foundation for School Music in Waunakee. The Gomers were
chosen to play for the event. “Les
was sitting right up in front, listening and he really enjoyed us,”
Blumfumgagnge says. “He got up
and performed with Steve Miller,
who had been a student and good
friend, and then he came up and
jammed with us, which was a huge,
shining moment. He wrote us
notes, thanking us. What a cool,
awesome cat he was, so humble.
And like a little kid, he just wanted
to have fun.”
The Zombeatles and the
Gomers, The Record Collector
Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue,
Bordentown. Saturday, October
31, 7:30 p.m. All ages show $15 in
advance: $17 at the door. The
Gomers on the Web: www.beeftone.com/gomers-home.htm.
The Zombeatles on the Web:
www.beeftone.com/zombeatles.ht
ml 609-324-0880 or www.therecord-collector.com.
38
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Houses for Sale
Continued from page 18
West Windsor
6 Robin Circle. Lot size: .8 acres.
Taxes: $20,770. Listed, Prudential
Fox & Roach/Carole Tosches, 609921-1600.
5 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; full finished basement; 3-car garage. Colonial with first-floor library and guest
suite, gourmet granite kitchen, cedar
fenced yard with climbing roses, potting shed, paver patios and koi pond.
$999,900.
$850,000-$950,000
Hopewell Township
9 Glenwood Drive. Lot size: 1.87
acres. Taxes: $18,248. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Beth Miller,
609-683-8574.
5 bedrooms; 4.5 baths; full finished basement; 3-car garage. 4,144
SF colonial. Gourmet kitchen with
cherry cabinets, paved patios, butler’s pantry with additional staircase
to second floor, finished game room.
$929,000.
317 Pennington-Titusville
Road. Lot size: 9+ acres. Taxes:
$13,267. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Ken Verbeyst, 609-924-1600.
6 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full unfinished basement; 3-car garage. Historic colonial. More than 100 years
old with pumpkin pine flooring, twostory newer block barn. Carriage
house — farm assessed. Main
house set up as in-law suite with
separate family room, bathroom,
three bedrooms. $925,000.
2 Hart Court. Lot size: 3.16
acres. Taxes: $17,549. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Karen Friedland, 609-439-6343.
5 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished basement; 4-car garage. Traditional colonial. Hardwood floors
throughout, new kitchen, new appliances, new bathrooms, many upgrades. $875,000.
71 Elm Ridge Road. Lot size: 3
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Maura
Mills, 609-921-1050. 71elmridge.ntcallaway.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full partial
finished basement; garage. Contemporary with towering elms, maples,
and dogwoods. Five miles from
downtown Princeton. $869,000.
Montgomery
80 John Blaw Drive. Lot size: .64
acres. Taxes: $18,737. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Peggy Henderson,
609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished with bar basement; 2-car
garage. Colonial. Expanded Avignon
model with enlarged living room (fireplace) and extra bath upstairs. Open,
contemporary with rich hardwood
floors throughout and indirect lighting
in all rooms. Kitchen/breakfast
room/family room is open with fireplace and access to deck. $945,000.
12 Badger Drive. Lot size: 1.35
acres. Taxes: $18,706. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret Coghlin,
908-874-0000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full basement; 3-car garage. Modern colonial
featuring two-story foyer, custom
built-ins, gourmet kitchen, two-story
family room with wood-burning fireplace, hardwood throughout main areas. $869,900.
Princeton Borough
98 Bayard Lane. Lot size: .23
acres. Taxes: $15,166. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Merrill Biancosino, 609-924-1600.
4 bedrooms; 5 baths; partial finished basement; 1-car garage. Tudor
cape. Authentically restored and upgraded to preserve original details.
Private yard with koi pond. Set back
from and oriented away from the
road. $948,000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. Contemporary with Blue Stone patio and eat-in
kitchen. $949,000.
113 Herrontown Lane. Lot size:
.98 acres. Taxes: $15,805. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Sarah Strong
Drake, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2 full, 2 half baths;
finished basement; 2-car garage.
Colonial in wooded setting. Renovated in 2000 to include a custom
kitchen. In-ground pool with perennial planting. $945,000.
1016 Mercer Road. Lot size: 1.5
acres. Taxes: $13,989. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Susan Gordon, 609921-1411.
6 bedrooms; 4 baths; none basement; 2-car garage. Colonial.
$899,000.
222 Moore Street. Lot size: .17
acres. Taxes: $10,498. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Susan Gordon, 609921-1411.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; basement. Contemporary $850,000.
West Windsor
2 Norfolk Drive. Lot size: .91
acres. Listed, Keller Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and William Usab,
609-987-8889. www.NJdreamhomes.us.
5 bedrooms; 3 baths; full finished
basement; 3-car garage. Colonial
with two-story foyer with split staircase, eat-in kitchen with granite
counters and custom cherry cabinets, Dacor six-burner range, family
room with brick fireplace, sun room
with skylights and tile floor, first-floor
fifth bedroom, master bath with
Jacuzzi. Basement has additional
rooms. $925,000.
$750,000-$850,000
Princeton Township
Cranbury
86 Castle Howard Court. Lot
size: .5 acres. Taxes: $16,190. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson
Henderson, 609-924-1000.
26 North Main Street. Lot size:
.26 acres. Taxes: $11,786. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609-575-2253. www.hendersonsir.com.
6 Benedek: Four-bedroom house in Lawrence
listed by N.T. Callaway for $749,000.
6 bedrooms; 3 baths; partial in
main house and carriage basement;
2-car garage. Historic colonial and
carriage house. Restored with original wide-plank pumpkin pine floors
and federal wood mantle. Newer
kitchen, new carpeting upstairs, and
fresh paint throughout. Carriage
house is additional 3,000 SF with
central air and pine floors. $779,995.
50 North Main Street. Lot size:
.21 acres. Taxes: $7,803. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609-575-2253. www.hendersonsir.com.
Historic victorian currently used
as an interior decorating business.
Property renovated with original
hardwood floors, exposed brick, fireplaces, and other architectural details. Can be converted back to a residence. $750,000.
Franklin
423 Canal Road. Lot size: 6.3
acres. Taxes: $9,749. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Sarah Strong
Drake, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial. Renovated, sitting high above the
Delaware & Raritan Canal. Built in
1700s. Pond, in-ground pool, twostory bar. $789,000.
Hillsborough
20 Pschorn Lane. Lot size: 33
acres. Taxes: $8,144. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Carol Castaldo
and Janice Anastasia, 609-9241600.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement. Ranch. Updated kitchen and
bath, entrance galley, wood floors
throughout, kitchen island with soapstone sinks, custom cabinetry, twosided fireplace, woodburning stove,
skylights, volume ceiling, exposed
beams, wooded lot. $849,900.
Hopewell Township
150 Marshall’s Corner Woodsville Road. Lot size: 7.09 acres. Taxes: $8,257. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Margaret “Peggy” Baldwin, 609-737-9550. www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Cape. Hilltop
farm with Harbourton Hills views.
$775,000.
Montgomery
2 Princeville Court. Lot size: .65
acres. Taxes: $17,013. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Roberta Parker,
609-924-1600.
■ Heavy Power (2,000 amp service) with
buss duct throughout.
■ Heavy Floor Load.
■ Precast concrete structure with precast
concrete roof deck.
■ 2 tailgate loading docks with load levelers.
■ Abundant parking.
■ Gas heat.
■ Landscaped site.
PROPERTY FEATURES:
■ 42,000 +/- SF Immediately Available!
■ Class A facility in excellent condition.
■ Immediately at Princeton Pike interchange
■ Divisible to 10,000SF and up.
■ 3,000 + SF office space; additional office area can be
constructed.
■ FULLY AIR-CONDITIONED FACILITY!!
of I95/295... minutes from Route One,
Hamilton Transit Train Station, banking,
shopping, restaurants, etc.
For Further Information, Please Contact:
OCTOBER 28, 2009
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. Custom-designed Churchill model
home. Hardwood floors. Marble surrounds two-way gas fireplace with
custom mantles in living and dining
rooms. $848,999.
New Egypt
74 Hawkin Road. Lot size: 7.26
acres. Taxes: $9,696. Listed, Weidel
Realtors/Cecelia Friedrich, 609-7996200.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished walk-out basement; 2-car
garage. Ranch. Heated pool, large
detached garage with car lift, workshop, two offices, all-year sunroom.
$750,000.
Princeton Township
109 Littlebrook Road. Lot size:
3.42 acres. Taxes: $10,448. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Cheryl Stites,
908-874-0000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement; 2-car garage. Ranch in Carnassa Park neighborhood. Over
three acres within walking distance
of Littlebrook Elementary School.
$795,000.
158 Poe Road. Lot size: .82
acres. Taxes: $12,228. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Susan Gordon, 609921-1411.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 2-car
garage. Colonial. $750,000.
West Windsor
4 Diamond Court. Lot size: .8
acres. Taxes: $16,038. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Kathryn Baxter,
609-521-7771.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. Colonial with custom details throughout.
Gourmet kitchen with state-of-the-art
appliances, great room with wet bar,
finished basement with full bath.
Showcase backyard, in-ground pool,
mature gardens, large deck,
screened-in porch. $785,000.
$650,000-750,000
Bordentown
Cranbury
188 Friendship Road. Lot size: 2
acres. Taxes: $13,019. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
5 bedrooms; 3 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial country
estate. Gourmet kitchen with granite,
stainless steel appliances, custom
cabinets, two decks, in-ground pool
and more. $699,900.
6 North Main. Lot size: .21 acres.
Taxes: $9,762. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609575-2253. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 1 full, 2 half baths;
partial unfinished basement; 2-car
garage. Colonial, circa 1800. Historic federal brick colonial on Main
Street with view of Brainerd Lake.
Lots of architectural details.
$699,000.
95 N. Main. Lot size: .77 acres.
Taxes: $9,741. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609575-2253. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement. Historical colonial, modern
kitchen with quartz countertop, hardwood floors, some wide-plank pumpkin pine, and original architectural
details. Large lot with mature trees.
Convenient to major transportation
and historic downtown. $675,000.
15 N. Main. Lot size: .22 acres.
Taxes: $7,286. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Roberta Marlowe, 609575-2253. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 1 full, 2 half baths.
Updated colonial currently used as
an office building. $650,000.
Continued on page 43
The remodeling was allowed
despite the house’s historic designation, in large measure because
from the road it is not so obvious,
she says. These days, the house affords a lush view of the garden and
elicits such sentiments from
friends as one Percarpio says she
heard a few years ago: “It looks
like Goldilocks and the Three
Bears live here.”
“The Dairy Barn,” 176 Parkside Drive. Built in 1899 and gutted by fire in 1911, the Tudor revival building housed prize cattle
and sheep until the late 1930s.
Charles Weigel and his wife,
president and treasurer of Rockwood Dairy, purchased the dairyman’s house, dairy, and barns in
1941, along with 40 acres and used
the site for their operations. In
1947 much of their leased grazing
land became part of Battlefield
Park and operations were transferred elsewhere,
But the Weigels remained and
subdivided the property in 1960.
As a result, the connections between the house, dairy, and barns
were demolished. Princeton architect Charles K. Agle converted the
north barn into a residence and the
courtyard into a garden with trees
for the new owners, Patrick Kelleher, director of the Princeton University Art Museum, and his wife.
In 1995 architects Ralph Lerner
and Lisa Fischetti bought the property and began to restore it along
Gildersleeve’s design.
“The
Superintendent’s
House,” 6 Greenhouse Drive.
Originally planned as a home for
the head gardener, the house was
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2009 Historic House Tour
Continued from page 13
1001 Potts Mill Road. Taxes:
$8,687. Listed, Weidel Realtors/John Zanvardine, 609-799-6200.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths. House on
five acres and three-bay garage.
Many commercial possibilities.
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$739,000.
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built sometime after 1908 and enlarged in the 1950s. Renovations in
1990 won a preservation award
from the Historical Society of
Princeton. Regan and Jeffrey Tuder bought the property in 2005.
“The Garden House,” 20
Greenhouse Drive. This complex
began in 1905 when the original
buildings formed a long L-shape
facing a series of kitchen gardens.
By 1908 parts of the plan still were
not complete, although the round
brick water tower was in place
along with housing for farm equipment, stables, and wagon sheds.
Chris Mario — a reporter for
U.S. 1 in the early 1990s who susequently has invested in real estate
and has helped manage his fami-
Renovations to some
of the houses earned
preservation awards
from the Historical
Society of Princeton.
ly’s investments — purchased this
property in 2003 and began a
restoration program aimed at creating a fresh interpretation of an English country house. The project
earned another of the estate’s historic preservation awards from the
Historical Society of Princeton.
“The Coach House,” 87
Lovers Lane. Dating to around
1893, this building is thought to be
one of the earliest of the
Drumthwacket outbuildings. Designed around a courtyard with one
open side, the building is a mix of
shingle style with Tudor revival
touches. It transitioned from coach
house to garage during Moses Taylor Pyne’s lifetime and his coachman became his chauffeur.
The street, once called Lubberly’s Lane, made a similar transition
to Lovers Lane long before subdivision provided the coach house
with suburban neighbors.
Dilip and Nomita Abreu purchased the property in 1991.
Outlying Homes
“At Last Farm,” 984 Cherry
Valley Road. The house was built
circa 1850 by Reuben Savidge, an
entrepreneur who ran the Mt. Rose
general store and post office.
According to the Historical Society, the house is a good example
of New Jersey vernacular architecture, often called “I-houses” because they are tall and narrow, two
stories high, and one room deep
with two rooms on the first floor.
Owned by architect Max Hayden, who bought the house in 1984,
the house has been enlarged several times and moved once. Two
years ago the house stood just a
few feet from the intersection of
Cherry Valley and Carter roads.
Hayden and his wife, Jennifer,
worried about their children’s safety, as well as the threat to the house
itself, moved the entire building a
quarter mile back.
132 Birch Avenue. This colonial revival house has been the
home of the same family — one of
the area’s most prominent black
families of the early and mid-20th
century — for five generations.
Alvin Clarence Anderson and his
wife, Mabel, bought the property
in 1924 and, according to family
Continued on following page
40
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Old Homes Are Great — But
Know What You’re Getting Into
People in the market for historic homes rarely talk in pragmatic terms. There is way too much romance in owning something that
saw the birth of the nation, the Civil War, or the Industrial Revolution.
But before you drift away on a
current of Americana, understand
this — historic homes are old.
They require upkeep not needed in
newer models. They are not engineered with green design, and often cannot be updated to meet such
standards. The wiring might be
brittle and the paint might be toxic.
And historic properties come with
regulations that require a measure
of stewardship to carry the history
to the next owner.
Older homes, historic or not,
mean more maintenance, says
Joseph Mazotas, right, who owns
an eponymous commercial real estate brokerage and management
firm at 344 Nassau Street — itself a
building of historical significance.
And the cost of maintenance to
such homes has increased.
Old buildings often feature materials and aspects that cannot be
attended to by going to Home Depot and grabbing a piece of molding from the bin. Thus, specialists
are often needed for what could be
exacting re-creations of significant
Continued from preceding page
tradition, built the house the following year with much help from
students from the Tuskegee Institute.
The Andersons had lived in
Washington, D.C., before moving
to Princeton but Mrs. Anderson’s
family roots were in Maryland.
The social columns of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper
described celebrations at the
Princeton house when the Andersons sent news to family and
friends, Webb says.
The family names have included Walter B. Harris, the first
African American member of the
Princeton police force; Stanley
Twyman; and Eric and Beverly
Broadway, the current owners,
who bought the house with their
son, Cameron, to become the
fourth and fifth generations to live
at 132 Birch Avenue.
For More Information Contact
Eric Baron @ 609-883-7900 OR Sandy Sorce 201-488-4000
[email protected][email protected]
414 Essex Street Hackensack, NJ 07601
609-883-7900 • F: 609-530-0678
www.sorce.com
examples of early American architecture and crafstmanship.
Because of their construction,
older homes sometimes cannot accommodate certain upgrades, such
as central HVAC. If the house or
office building is historic, you
probably won’t be allowed to install solar panels, and the very density of the structure — which often
means stone — could forbid any
duct or wiring from being installed
in or behind the walls.
Because advanced materials
and techniques did not exist when a
house went up in, say, the 1870s,
buildings were what Mazotas
refers to lovingly as “overbuilt.”
E
zekiel Smith House, 974
Mercer Road. Built in the 1730s,
the Smith house is one of the few
remnants of the early Quaker settlement at Stony Brook.
A succession of owners named
Ezekiel Smith farmed here until
1826, and access to the property increased in 1808 when Mercer
Road, then called the branch turnpike, was laid out through the
Smiths’ land.
In the 1870s the property was
the Stony Brook Stud Farm of
Colonel David McDaniel, who lost
his land when Paul Tulane foreclosed on a mortgage. For the next
73 years the farm belonged to John
H. Updike and his heirs.
The current owners, Bruce and
Marcia Willsie, bought the house
in 1999. The Willsies found the
house when Bruce was on a business trip to Princeton. He had graduated from Princeton University in
1986 with a bachelor’s in international relations.
Born and raised on Vashon, a
storybook island near Seattle, he is
the president of the Bellevue,
Washington-based Labels and
Lists, a privately held non-partisan
national voter profile data processing company. Clients include the
polling industry, individual candidates, political parties, organizations running campaigns, independent expenditure campaigns,
and political consultants.
The Willsies got Ezekiel’s
house for the modest price of
$500,000, then shelled out another
$500,000 during an 18-month
restoration and renovation Bruce
orchestrated along distance from
his office in Bellevue with T. Jeffery Clarke of 116 Commons Way.
Clarke, vice president of the
Historical Society of Princeton, also was the architect behind the
restoration of Avril and John
Moore’s Tusculum mansion in
Princeton Township, built by John
Witherspoon three years before he
signed the Declaration of Independence.
Marcia Willsie ran a cooking
school, Ezekiel’s Table, at the 300year-old farmstead last year (U.S.
1, March 26, 2008).
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Walls, particularly exterior ones,
are heavy and thick because they
had to be — they needed to be able
to stand their ground whenever
Mother Nature got bitchy.
The interiors of old homes also
tend to be overbuilt, Mazotas says.
His office building, which dates
back, in part, to about 1700, has
four fireplaces in it, plus a bevy of
ornate woodwork, which was the
order of the day in centuries past.
Mazotas’ building is considered
historic mainly because of its west
wall, believed to be a remnant of a
structure built at the end of the 17th
century. According to “Princeton
Architecture,” a book published in
1980, the early buildings constructed here circa 1700 were never meant to be permanent structures — “although they were overbuilt like everything in the early
days,” Mazotas says. As a result,
few examples of Quaker architecture here remain, fewer still as a
complete set of walls.
Around 1740 a two story section
was added to 344 Nassau, and in
the early 1900s a second story was
added to the original 1700 section
of the building, Mazotas says. In
1987 a large addition was added to
the east side and rear of the two
original buildings.
Also lending the site some historical cachet is the belief, reported
in the Home News of New
Brunswick at the beginning of this
century, that 344 Nassau Street was
connected to 342 Nassau via a tunnel believed to be part of the underground railroad.
Most of the building is now used
as professional office space for
four professional service businesses and it is the site of Coolvines, a
specialty wine store.
Along with ornate interior
craftsmanship and multiple fireplaces — the pre-20th century answer to central heating — the in-
sides of old homes are small due to
the truth behind the old adage that
“people were a lot smaller back
then.” Smaller people coupled with
systems of heating that were not
terribly efficient led to low ceilings, little rooms, and narrow stairwells.
But despite the combination of
small spaces that require more
work that costs more money, Mazotas says there is a healthy appetite for historic homes. “There is
Old and historic
homes require as
much TLC as they do
money, patience, and
the ability to follow
some strict rules.
a substantial enough market to pay
premiums on these properties,”
Mazotas says. “Many old properties were on popular stagecoach
lines that became our big roads.
People will pay big for them.”
Mazotas, who grew up in the
Trenton area, served in the Army in
Vietnam before earning a bachelor’s in business from Trenton
State College in the 1970s. He
opened his firm in 1987. Real estate was in his blood, however, as
that was his mother’s job. His father worked for the railroad.
M
azotas says the allure and
drawback of properties from specific historic periods is that no one
is making any more of them. Revolution-era homes and furniture are
the pinnacle of historic properties
in this country, and they are increasingly rare finds on the open
market.
Right now, says Mazotas, there
is a growing interest in houses built
in the 1920s. These houses, solidly
made and functional in design, are
heavy on hardwoods and often are
roomy enough for a small to medium-sized family. And they are
more available than Victorian-era
manors on winding country roads.
Most homes in the ‘20s were built
in clusters and neighborhoods and
are often near urban amenities.
What makes a building historic
isn’t necessarily its age, and a common misperception is that something significant had to happen, or
a person of historical significance
would have to have lived or been
born in a building in order for it to
be considered historic.
While it doesn’t hurt to know
that Washington slept on your
floor, historical significance is assigned mostly to places because
they are, or contain, examples of
original period work, Mazotas
says. And, officially, the state Register of Historic Places will decide
if a property is actually historic.
Sometimes an old property has
already been renovated and much
of its interior or facade has been replaced or altered before it was considered for historic preservation.
But maybe the floors have never
been changed. Or the porch. These
surviving areas of the original
house, says Mazotas, can be designated as historic, independent from
the rest of the building. Owners can
renovate around the historic aspects, though Mazotas says most
people will try to keep the spirit of
the structure as consistent as they
can.
An example of an interior piece
of historical importance is the Historical Society of Princeton’s second location — and anticipated
new administrative headquarters
— on Updike Farm. This farmhouse, recognized itself by the
state Office of Historic Preserva-
tion, had an easement placed on the
interior stairway, as it is an original
to this mid-19th century building.
The facilitator of the deal on the
Historical Society’s behalf —
Joseph Mazotas.
Buying or owning a property
that has historical significance
takes dedication and money, but
there is help available. If you operate a business in a historic structure, as Mazotas does, the state offers tax incentives to owners who
plan to maintain the integrity of the
property in perpetuity.
Beware, however, that with gov-
U.S. 1
41
ernment help comes government
rules. You might be limited to the
brand and color of the paint you
can use, the contractors you can
hire, and the grades and types of
wood or stone. And if you get a federal historical preservation grant
for a home — hard to come by and
very restrictive — you might even
have to open your house to the public a few times a year as a national
historical site.
Typically, such grants are available only to historic preservation
Continued on page 43
WEST WINDSOR - 950-3200 SF
Office / R&D / Warehouse
• Immediate Occupancy
• Flexible Lease Terms
• Ample parking
• Walk to restaurants
• Expansion potential
William Barish
[email protected]
609-921-8844
www.cpnrealestate.com
★
Commercial Property Network, Inc.
We Have a Place For Your Company
42
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
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OCTOBER 28, 2009
Joe Mazotas
Houses for Sale
Continued from page 41
Continued from page 39
groups and nonprofits. At the state
level, the Historic Preservation
Trust offers grants for historic upkeep to home or property owners
for locations listed in the New Jersey or National Register of Historic Places, or are certified to be
eligible for the designation. Details are available from the state
Department of Community Affairs
at www.state.nj.us/dca.
Mazotas also notes that, while
older homes are rife with charm,
they are not necessarily friendly to
older people. Old houses have a lot
of steps (and not all at the same
height), sockets in baseboards and
floors, heavy doors, and little room
to fit ramps or stair lifts. And if the
house, or part of it, is historic, the
maintenance of its integrity will
win over your ailments.
Though a lot of people love an
old home, “a lot” does not mean
everybody, and resale could be an
issue. Potential buyers might not
be willing to commit to the necessary upkeep, or they might find the
bedrooms and kitchen too small.
Or they don’t like the neighborhood. Remember, houses built in
the early to middle of the 20th century are abundant in urban areas,
and a lot of cities, particularly in
the history-rich Northeast, have
suffered the exodus of jobs. Many
historic places in Trenton, for example, are not in neighborhoods
that people with the necessary
money to maintain an old house
would want to inhabit.
When it comes down to it, Mazotas says, you own an old house
because you love it, not because it
will make you a fat profit in the
open market. But if you have it in
you to make a house a home, the
results can be spectacular.
— Scott Morgan
East Windsor
36 Bradford Road. Lot size: 2.63
acres. Taxes: $17,738. Listed, Weidel Realtors/John Zanvardine, 609799-6200.
5 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; basement; 3-car garage. Colonial. Corner
lot, in-ground pool. $664,000.
Hopewell Township
167 Pleasant Valley Road. Lot
size: 7.21 acres. Listed, Keller
Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and
William Usab, 609-987-8889.
www.NJdreamhomes.us.
5 bedrooms; 2 baths; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. Colonial.
Living room with fireplace, dining
room with architectural paneling, eatin kitchen, remodeled baths, newly
refinished hardwood floors, slate
raised patio, rec-room in basement
with brick fireplace. Detached
garage. $675,000.
2 Coventry Lane. Lot size: 1.86
acres. Taxes: $14,375. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Sandy Brown, 609737-9100. www.sandybrown.myglorianilsonagent.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial. Twostory foyer, open floor plan, wood
floors, large corner lot, enclosed garden. $674,000.
Lawrence Township
6 Benedek Road. Lot size: 1.84
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Diane
and Gary Kilpatrick, 609-921-1050.
6benedek.ntcallaway.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; partial finished basement; garage. Victorian in
Rosedale Acres with Princeton mailing address. Wrap-around front
porch, rear deck, new wood floors in
living and family rooms. $749,000.
6 Highland Road. Lot size: .69
acres. Taxes: $15,199. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Marianne Greer,
609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 4 baths; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. Contemporary on wooded lot. Upgraded
kitchen, hardwood floors. $719,888.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; 2-car
garage. Ranch with lots of closets in
Province Hill gated community.
Cathedral ceiling, circular driveway,
large bonus room for office or exercise. Princeton mailing address.
$699,000.
701 Rosedale Road. Lot size: 3
acres. Listed, N.T. Callaway/Margaret “Maggie” Hill, 609-921-1050.
701rosedale.ntcallaway.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; full walk-out
basement; garage. Cape Cod with
oak-lined driveway. House, guest
cottage and cabana surround an inground pool. Princeton address.
$679,000.
4 Herman Court. Lot size: .68
acres. Taxes: $13,208. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Carole
Tosches, 609-924-1600.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement; 3-car garage. Colonial on cul-de-sac backing to preserved woods. Upgraded gourmet
kitchen. Three-level trex deck.
$657,500.
Montgomery
West Windsor
512 Hollow Road. Lot size: 1.7
acres. Taxes: $14,553. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret Coghlin,
908-874-0000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3 baths; full unfinished basement. Five-year-old cape
featuring a modern floor plan and upto-date amenities. Two-story family
room, first-floor master bedroom.
$699,999.
16 Haskel Drive. Lot size: .69
acres. Taxes: $15,475. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Roberta Parker,
609-924-1600.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. 2,679
SF Buckingham model. Brick front.
Set against preserved wooded area.
Updated eat-in kitchen with center island and black granite counters.
Brazilian cherry floors throughout
main level. Wood deck overlooking
pool. Professionally landscaped rear
and front yard. $693,999.
9 Tindall Trail. Lot size: 1.24
acres. Taxes: $12,616. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Christina Phillips,
609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; finished
basement; garage. Brick-front colonial. Landscaped backyard. On culde-sac. Blue-ribbon school district.
$689,000.
Pennington Borough
441 Sked Street. Lot size: .28
acres. Taxes: $15,608. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Emily Schwab, 609737-9100.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. 2,500 SF Yankee barn. Recently constructed intown with post and beam construction using both rustic and refined material. $749,000.
Princeton Township
111 Red Hill Road. Lot size: .94
acres. Taxes: $9,821. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Jody Erdman,
609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; finished
basement; yes-car garage. Colonial
on private lane in walking distance of
Nassau Street. Au pair suite is adjacent to fieldstone patio. $719,900.
23 Heather Lane. Lot size: 1.4
acres. Taxes: $15,262. Listed, ERA
Properties Unlimited/John Terebey,
609-750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
Robbinsville
$550,000-$650,000
East Windsor
17 Loveland Court. Lot size:
145x139. Taxes: $12,475. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. Colonial with new granite kitchen and
stainless steel appliances. Vaulted
ceilings, cul-de-sac location.
$595,000.
U.S. 1
43
Franklin
1009 Canal Road. Lot size:
190x300. Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Dawn Petrozzini, 609-9518600.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Three fireplaces, wide-plank HWF, beamed
10’ ceilings, wooded lot, in-ground
pool, deck. Williamsburg colonial.
$649,999.
28 Wyckoff Place. Lot size:
3.271 acres. Taxes: $12,353. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
6 bedrooms; 4 baths; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. Colonial situated at the top of a cul-de-sac and
adjacent to a dedicated conservation
area. Three levels of living. Walk-out
basement. Warranty. $579,900.
Hopewell Township
24 Woodsville Road. Lot size: 2+
acres. Taxes: $12,665. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Edward Stawicki, 609799-6200.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial. Family
room with brick fireplace, cathedral
ceiling with skylights. Hardwood and
marble floors. 9’ ceilings. $588,888.
155 Hopewell-Princeton Road.
Lot size: 4.62 acres. Taxes: $10,357.
Listed, RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement; 3-car garage. Cape on wooded lot. Custom stone work, pond
landscaping, three-plus garage
workshop, newer septic, well, furnace. $574,900.
167 Pennington Rocky-Hill
Road. Lot size: 3.55 acres. Taxes:
$11,453. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Maggie Peters, 609-737-9550.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Renovated
Cape. New kitchen, baths, great
room, loft. 2,468 SF. $559,000.
Continued on following page
44
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Continued from preceding page
Lawrence Township
3 Coach Drive. Lot size: .77
acres. Taxes: $11,100. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Daniel and Rina
Shack, 609-737-9550. www.henderonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial. New
kitchen with granite countertops.
Oversized formal rooms with crown
moldings. Professionally landscaped
with deck. In-ground heated pool.
$649,900.
45 Laurel Wood Drive. Taxes:
$9,872. Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Dawn DeFeir Burger, 609951-8600. picketfencehomesnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Contemporary.
Cul-de-sac location. Skylights,
kitchen updated with “granite transformations” countertop. Covered
porch and deck. $574,900.
1 Klockner Court. Lot size: .62
acres. Taxes: $10,878. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Lisa LeRay, 609-7379100.
4 bedrooms; 3 baths; basement;
2-car garage. 3,346 SF colonial.
Nine-foot ceilings, hardwood flooring, gas fireplace, crown molding,
skylights, large windows, brick front,
side entry. $559,900.
Montgomery
8 Pineview Court. Lot size: 1.061
acres. Taxes: $12,795. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Rashmi Bhanot, 609921-1411.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; basement; 2-car garage. 3,015 SF colonial. Two bedrooms on main floor.
Three bedrooms and den on second
floor. Mature landscaping, looks out
over open farm land. $639,000.
50 Skillman Road. Lot size: 1.6
acres. Taxes: $9,998. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Maynett Breithaupt, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. One-floor ranch
with decorative painted finishes,
artistic stone and tile work, spacious
basement. $565,000.
19 Robin Drive. Lot size: 1.01
acres. Taxes: $11,661. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Emily Schwab, 609737-9100.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. 2,500
SF colonial with finished basement,
updated kitchen and baths, updated
septic, pool. $550,000.
Princeton Borough
18 Pine Street. Lot size: .16
acres. Taxes: $8,986. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; partial
basement. Colonial condo with parking for two. Eat-in kitchen, fireplace,
walk to town. $649,000.
90-92 Birch Avenue. Lot size: .07
acres. Taxes: $6,251. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Martha Jane Weber, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial twofamily dwelling. First-floor has 2 bedrooms, bath, kitchen, living room,
and second has 3 bedrooms, bath,
kitchen, living room. $589,000.
Princeton Township
18 Maidenhead Road. Lot size:
.13 acres. Taxes: $11,511. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret
Coghlin, 908-874-0000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage.
Builder’s Deerfield model in Fieldwood Manors — the largest floorplan
available. Backs to open space and
woods, finished basement with tall
ceilings and gas fireplace. $649,900.
West Windsor
4 Fairfax Court. Listed, Re/Max
Greater Princeton/Arlene Feinstein.
5 bedrooms.Grover Mill Estates,
in-ground pool, screened-in porch,
finished basement. $629,900.
$450,000-$550,000
East Amwell
239 Mountain Road. Lot size:
2.03 acres. Taxes: $7,998. Listed,
Gloria Nilson GMAC/Emily Schwab,
609-737-9100.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. 3,000 SF colonial. Five bedrooms all on second
floor. Updated kitchen and baths.
Flexible floor plan. $474,500.
Hamilton
3 Pannick Drive. Lot size: .24
acres. Taxes: $7.576. Listed, Keller
Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and
William Usab, 609-987-8889.
www.NJdreamhomes.us.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial with
two-story foyer, living room and dining room with new laminate flooring,
family room with new carpet, vaulted
ceiling, floor-to-ceiling fireplace and
two skylights. Master bath with
Jacuzzi tub. Large deck and firstfloor laundry. $459,000.
Hopewell Township
21 Continental Lane. Lot size:
.56 acres. Taxes: $8,096. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Maggie Peters, 609-737-9550. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial in walking distance of Washington Crossing
Park. Upgraded kitchen with stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, many custom details. 2,136
SF. $485,000.
405 Oak Street. Lot size: .50
acres. Taxes: $9,683. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Cathy Nemeth,
609-737-9500.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement. Expanded Cape with flexible
floorplan; three bedrooms that could
be changed to five. Lot has specimen trees and shrubbery; privacy.
$485,000.
18 Creek Rim. Lot size: .69
acres. Taxes: $9,064. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Maggie Peters,
609-737-9550.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. 2,071 SF ranch.
$465,000.
Lawrence Township
28 Dix Lane. Lot size: 225x171.
Taxes: $10,169. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/John Terebey, 609750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial in
Lawrence Woods. Spacious, neutraltoned rooms. Upgraded kitchen.
Brick front. $547,888.
86 Lewisville Road. Lot size:
87x119. Taxes: $5,255. Listed, Weidel Realtor/Diane Ozarowski, 609799-6200.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; partial
basement. Colonial farmhouse. Original parts of home date from 1800s.
All new fixtures, appliances, wiring,
etc. Hardwood and tile floors and two
new fireplaces. $525,000.
33 Springwood Drive. Lot size:
100x150. Taxes: $9,111. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Diane Ozarowksi, 609799-6200.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; basement; garage. Colonial. New brick
patio, new furnace, kitchen — new
floor, new granite countertops, new
cabinets, new dishwasher.
$517,900.
5 Titus Avenue. Lot size: .34
acres. Taxes: $6,945. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; partial
basement. Colonial with new appliances, new carpeting, Brazilian cherry and bamboo flooring, crown moldings, new fixtures. $459,000.
Montgomery
41 Sycamore Lane. Lot size: 1
acre. Taxes: $11,060. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Eleanor (Peggy)
Hughes-Fulmer, 609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3 baths; basement;
2-car garage. Colonial with many
renovations/updates. Owner has replaced windows, roof, garage door,
washer, dryer, refrigerator. Renovated kitchen. New master bath.
$545,000.
North Brunswick
1123 North Boyd Parkway. Lot
size: 150x100. Taxes: $11,243. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/John
Terebey, 609-750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished walk-out basement; 2-car
garage. Custom built Cape colonial.
Overlooks Boyd pond. $469,888.
Pennington Borough
227 South Main Street. Lot size:
.34 acres. Taxes: $11,426. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret
“Peggy” Baldwin, 609-737-9550.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement. 10-year-old colonial, wraparound porch, gourmet kitchen, updated baths. Extra high ceilings in
basement. Close to all town amenities. $499,900.
440 Sked Street. Lot size: .45
acres. Taxes: $10,909. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Emily Schwab, 609737-9100.
4 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; 2-car
garage. 2,200 SF Cape Cod. Updated kitchen, family room with loft and
cathedral ceiling, fenced lot, walk to
schools and park. $489,900.
Princeton Borough
5 Gordon Way. Taxes: $8,174.
Listed, Stockton Real Estate/Martha
Stockton, 609-924-1416. www.stockton-realtor.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; basement;
1-car garage. Townhouse in Queenston Common. Unit in back with private back yard and patio. $498,000.
71 Maple Street. Lot size: .12
acres. Taxes: $6,135. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Janice Wilson,
609-635-5608.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; partial
basement; 1-car garage. Duplex with
updated bathrooms and kitchen with
newer stainless steel appliances, refinished hardwood floors and large
deck for outdoor entertaining. Walk
to downtown Princeton. $495,000.
59 South Harrison Street. Lot
size: .12 acres. Taxes: $10,705. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Susan Gordon,
609-921-1411.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; basement;
2-car garage. Colonial. $469,000.
Princeton Township
37 Trewbridge Court. Lot size:
.07 acres. Taxes: $8,715. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Joan
Eisenberg, 609-951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; basement; 2-car garage. Upgraded townhouse with full-finished basement
with full bath. Gourment kitchen with
42” cabinets, corian counters, island,
and sink. Living room with corner
fireplace. Dining room with hardwood floors, extensive decorative
molding. Fenced backyard and
paved patio. $539,900.
8 Benjamin Rush Lane. Lot size:
.05 acres. Taxes: $7,207. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Kim Rizk, 609924-1482. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; finished
basement; 1-car garage. Townhouse. Brazilian teak hardwood
flooring, vaulted ceilings, master
suite, with walk-in closet featuring
California closet system. $499,000.
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTIES
& BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE OR LEASE
Hamilton Twp. Office & 2 apartments. “Your office is waiting.” Nice corner location with 1,200 SF of office w/2 BA.
Corner parking w/2 one-bedroom apts. Only $295,000.
Hamilton Twp. 4 Stores + 2 Two-Bedroom Apartments. Corner location 1 block from 295 interchange. Move your
business in and collect the rents to pay your mortgage. $595,000.
For more information call
Bonanni Realtors 609-586-4300
OCTOBER 28, 2009
South Brunswick
West Windsor
26 Edgemere Drive. Lot size: .18
acres. Taxes: $9,880. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Joan
Eisenberg, 609-951-8600.
4 bedrooms; 3 baths; 2-car
garage. Colonial located on lot backing woods. Upgraded gourmet
kitchen with granite counters. Expanded breakfast area. First-floor
master bedroom with tray ceiling.
Master bathroom with heated floor.
First-floor study. Huge loft area. Dramatic moldings, recessed lights,
hardwood floors. In active adult community. $500,000.
230 South Lane. Lot size: .56
acres. Taxes: $9,354. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Ranch. Sun
porch with flagstone floor and floorto-ceiling sliders. Garden. $449,900.
West Windsor
3 Galston Drive. Lot size: .61
acres. Taxes: $8,553. Listed, Long
and Foster Real Estate/Josephine
“Josie” Rost.
5 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; unfinished
basement; 1-car garage. Updated
colonial with park-like backyard.
Master suite with dressing room and
fireplace. $529,900.
$410,000-$450,000
Burlington
11 Augusta Drive. Taxes:
$10,118. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Edward Stawicki, 609-799-6200.
5 bedrooms; 3 full, 2 half baths;
full finished basement; 2-car garage.
Two master suites, island kitchen,
fireplace, central vaccuum, two skylights. $399,900.
72 Jennifer Lane. Lot size:
75x113. Taxes: $8,397. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Lisa Case,
609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; finished
basement; 2-car garage. 2,020 SF
Colonial with gas fireplace, inground pool. $390,000.
Ewing
12 Trimmer Avenue. Lot size: .18
acres. Taxes: $8,815. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Maggie Peters,
609-737-9550.
www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths. 10-yearold, 2,000 SF victorian. New septic
and well. 30-year timberline roof. Andersen windows, custom pavers,
maintenance-free exerior, minutes to
tow path. $445,000.
38 Hart Avenue. Lot size: .30
acres. Taxes: $9,011. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Sandy Brown, 609737-9100. www.sandybrown.myglorianilsonagent.com.
4 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Wood floors,
wood trim, bay windows, original
light fixtures, walk-up usable attic.
$429,000.
31 Brophy Drive. Lot size: .52
acres. Taxes: $7,113. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Kathie Yates, 609306-7703.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full partial
finished basement; 2-car garage.
Colonial. Updated kitchens with additional cabinetry for buffet area.
New roof, windows, heat, and A/C.
New baths. $399,000.
Lawrence Township
Pennington Borough
109 Hoover Avenue. Lot size: .17
acres. Taxes: $2,603. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Alison Dalley, 609924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. New
construction colonial. $439,000.
415 Hale Street. Lot size: .26
acres. Taxes: $11,500. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Kimberly Storcella, 609737-1500. www.weidel.com/kimberly.storcella.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths. Expanded
Cape. Recently remodeled kitchen
and upstairs master suite. Complete
with fireplace and spacious, refurnished bathroom. $392,670.
1389 Main Street. Lot size: .16
acres. Taxes: $6,511. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Sarah Strong
Drake, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Historic colonial.
Updated with wide-plank floors, exposed brick walls, stained-glass windows and new custom kitchen.
$414,900.
Monroe Township
15 Breckenridge Lane. Taxes:
$6,174. Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Mary Jeffries, 609-9518600.
2 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 2-car
garage. Two-story townhome with
stainless steel appliances, granite
kitchen, living room, dining room,
bedroom hardwood flooring, new
Berber carpet, freshly painted
throughout, 42” cherry cabinets.
$437,500.
Princeton Borough
45B Wiggins Street. Lot size: .14
acres. Taxes: $7,904. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Janet Stefandl,
609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Colonial condo within walking distance of shops,
dining, university, Dinky. Large
rooms, freshly cleaned, updated appliances, driveway parking.
$445,000.
Robbinsville
26 Tindall Road. Lot size: 2.29
acres. Taxes: $10,722. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Vincent DiDonato, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Ranch with brick
fireplace, hardwood floors.
$419,000.
Industrial
$390,000-$410,000
Hopewell Township
Millstone Township
Office
U.S. 1
1 Crossroads Drive, Hamilton, NJ
658 Etra Road, Hightstown, NJ
Available: 2,000 SF of Office/Flex space
Great Rental Rate ■ Call for Details
Immediate Occupancy
3 Offices and a Private Kitchen
Convenient to I-95, NJ Turnpike & Route 130
For Sale or Lease ■ 15,000 SF Building for Sale
11,000 SF for Lease ■ Building Remodeled Over Last
Four Years ■ New Parking Lot, 15 Parking Spaces
Loading: 2 Tailgates ■ 3 Drive-ins ■ Ceiling Height:
20’ Clear ■ Close Proximity to Rt. 130 & NJ Turnpike
259 Prospect Plains, Cranbury, NJ
45 Everett Dr., West Windsor, NJ
2,000 SF of Office
6-7 private window offices
Good rental rate
Close proximity to NJ Turnpike Exit 8A
For Lease - Office/Warehouse
2 units at 4,846 SF Contiguous ■ Incl. 1,500 SF of Office
& 1 Drive-In ■ 2 Units at 5,643 SF Contiguous Incl.
2 Loading Docks & 2 Drive-Ins, 20’ Clear
1 Unit at 9,586 SF Incl. 2,500 SF of Office ■ 1 Drive-In
& 1 Loading Dock ■ Convenient to Route 1, I-95,
I-295 & the Princeton Jct. Train Station
Hopewell Township
307 Deer Run Court. Taxes:
$7,294. Listed, Gloria Nilson
GMAC/Lisa LeRay, 609-737-9100.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 2-car
garage. 2,052 SF, two-story contemporary colonial. Granite countertops,
upgraded cabinets, trek patio, ceramic floors, new carpet. $395,000.
Office/Medical
NAME
YOUR
HERE
West Windsor
743 Village Road West. Lot size:
.46 acres. Taxes: $7,708. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Robert Corriveau, 609-658-7344. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full unfinished basement; 2-car garage. Updated Cape. Modern kitchen opens
into large dining area. Bathrooms
updated with entire septic system replaced in 2003. Blue-ribbon schools
and convenient to train. $409,900.
$340,000-$390,000
200 Whitehead Road, Hamilton, NJ
Sports and Entertainment Factory
2997 Princeton Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ
Office Condominiums for Sale or Lease
7,500-15,000 SF Divisible to 1,500 SF
Located in Lawrenceville’s Medical District ■ Covered
Parking ■ Medical Build-Out Available ■ Close Proximity
to Route 1, I-95 & I-295 ■ Put Your Name
on the Building ■ Create Your Own Identity!
42,000 SF Available ■ For Lease
Range from 410 SF and Up 14’ to 32’ Clear
Zoned for Industrial, Office, Warehouse
or Sports/Entertainment Use
Convenient to US Hwy. 1 and Interstate 295
Newly Renovated ■ Clear Span Space
Burlington
426 West Country Club Drive.
Taxes: $9,902. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/John Tereby, 609-7500372. www.sellingnj.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial in golf
course community. Gas fireplace,
two-story family room, home office
on first floor. $389,888.
18 Augusta Drive. Lot size:
80x108. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/Cherie Davis, 609-750-0372.
www.sellingnj.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; finished
basement; 2-car garage. Colonial
with chair railing and crown molding,
stainless steel appliances, and vaulted ceilings. Golf course. $385,000.
52 Greenbrook Drive. Lot size:
75x110. Taxes: $7,188. Listed, ERA
Properties Unlimited/Simone
Abiona, 609-750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial with
two-story foyer. Backs to wooded
area. Jacuzzi-style tub in master
bath, eat-in kitchen. $369,000.
Continued on following page
VanNest Office Park
Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, NJ
Built-out Suites Available: 1,700 to 2,200 SF ■ Building II
Completed: 33,000 SF Available, Divisible to 2,000 SF
Attractive Corporate Setting Overlooking the
VanNest Forest Reserve ■ Close Proximity to Hospitals,
Route 1, I-295 & the Hamilton Train Station
www.fennelly.com
25 Princess Diana Lane , Ewing, NJ
Industrial Warehouse For Sale or Lease
Total SF: 84,600 ■ Single Story Building
Maximum Height: 22’
Outside Storage Space Available
6.64 Acres ■ Zoning: IP2
Available Units for Lease: 13,000 SF and 10,000 SF
Call for Sale Price & More Details!!
88% Leased ■ Great Investment!
Ibis Plaza
3525 Quakerbridge Road
Hamilton, NJ 08619
609 520 0061
45
46
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTIES
& BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE
OR LEASE
AUTOMOTIVE / REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Continued from preceding page
43 Chamber Lane. Lot size: .17
acres. Taxes: $6,501. Listed, Weidel
Realtors/John Zanvardine, 609-7996200.
3 bedrooms; 3 baths; 2-car
garage. Ranch with see-through fireplace, plenty of storage, separate office. $365,000.
East Amwell
8 Burd Lane. Lot size: .75 acres.
Taxes: $5,942. Listed, Gloria Nilson
GMAC/Bonnie Fell, 609-737-9100.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths. Split-level
with large eat-in kitchen, deck, and
screened porch. Two-family in Sourland Mountains. Main house is 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath. Attached 1-bedroom apartment. $379,900.
East Windsor
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
8 Hawthorne Lane. Lot size:
100x200. Taxes: $9,797. Listed,
ERA Properties Unlimited/John Terebey, 609-750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths. Hickory
Acres colonial. Upgraded split with
new windows, full-wall brick fireplace, Berber carpet. $379,888.
11 Evan Avenue. Lot size:
59x103. Taxes: $10,835. Listed,
Weidel Realtors/Barbara Harris,
609-799-6200.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement; 1-car garage. Colonial. Hardwood floors, center-island
kitchen, two walk-in closets in master bedroom. Six years old.
$349,872.
PRIME
MERCER COUNTY
AUTO DEALERSHIP
Hamilton Township • Route 33
30 Year Location
Prime corner location with 10 acres. New car and
used car location w/separate body shop.
Totally renovated. (3) road frontage with all utilities.
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
Route 130, Burlington. Prime Auto Dealership. 6.62 Acres. 15,480 Sq. Ft. Almost
700 feet of road frontage. Parking for 200+ cars.
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
For more information call
Bonanni Realtors 609-586-4300
3 Mansfield Road. Lot size: .53
acres. Taxes: $8,231. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Rosalie Laframboise,
609-737-9100.
4 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; partial
basement; 2-car garage. Ranch with
cast-iron baseboard heat and central
air. Double-faced fireplace. New appliances and oak floor in kitchen.
Hardwood floors. Walk-up attic via
pull-down stairs. $350,000.
Franklin
Hamilton
96 Kingston Boulevard. Lot
size: 30x115. Taxes: $6,701. Listed,
DiDonato Realty Company/Marian
Conte, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 1-car
garage. End-unit townhouse in Villages at Hamilton adult community.
Totally upgraded — fireplace.
$349,000.
Hopewell Township
404 Bollen Court. Taxes: $7,038.
Listed, Coldwell Banker/Kimberly
Steinnagel, 609-252-2330.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; finished
walk-out basement; 1-car garage.
Townhouse on cul-de-sac. Private
fenced rear yard backs to woods.
$370,000.
WOODSIDE AT THE OFFICE CENTER
Plainsboro, New Jersey
Suites of Approx. 800, 909, 1,818 (fully furnished) & 2,121 Sq. Ft.
Available for Immediate Occupancy
•
609-799-0220
1423 Lawrence Road. Lot size:
.41 acres. Taxes: $6,200. Listed,
Burgdorff ERA/Kathleen Printon,
609-933-5488.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Dutch Colonial.
Completely renovated, hardwood
floors, turn around driveway, French
doors, detailed molding. $365,000.
36 Greenfield Avenue. Lot size:
60x90. Listed, DiDonato Realty
Company/Laurie Giangrasso, 609586-2344.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Cape; new construction. $349,000.
36 Greenfield Avenue. Lot size:
60x90. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Donna Murray, 908-3918396.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. New construction Cape. Energy star efficient.
Open floor plan, pick your own upgrades. 1,800 SF. $325,000.
185 Eldridge Avenue. Lot size:
60x140. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Donna Murray, 908-3918396.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Colonial, new
construction. Energy star efficient.
Open floor plan. Time to customize.
$325,000.
Pennington Borough
110 Woolsey Court. Taxes:
$6,516. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Karen Friedland, 609-4396343.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 2-car
garage. Open traditional. Neutral
decor. $320,000.
59 Beekman Road. Lot size: 1.24
acres. Taxes: $5,957. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
4 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement; 2-car garage. Cape with plenty
of privacy. Being sold “as is.”
$339,900.
424 New Road. Lot size: 1.175
acres. Taxes: $6,264. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
6 bedrooms; 2 baths; 4-car
garage. Opportunity to own two
homes on 1.75 acres. Each has
three bedrooms and one full bath.
Possible subdivision. $339,900.
SALE/LEASE BACK.
Plainsboro
HAVE
A NEED TO RAISE
59 Tennyson
Lot size: .03
CASH
FOR Drive.
INVENTORY,
acres. Taxes: $6,192. Listed, Weidel
Realtors/Jennifer Slinn, 609-799EXPANSION,
ETC.?
6200.
15 Reins Court. Taxes: $6,657.
Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Bohdan Twerdowsky, 609951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. 1,834 SF townhouse. Fireplace, cathedral ceiling in
master bedroom, master bath with
soaking tub, close to NYC bus and
train. $354,900.
Modern, One-Story Office Buildings
Lawrence Township
Lawrence Township
WE ARE BUYING
COMMERCIAL
South Brunswick
PROPERTY AND LAND.
Ewing
Route 130, East Windsor Dealership/Retail Bldg. - Sale/lease. 12,450 SF auto sales & service. 8,450 SF
service, 2,700 SF showroom, 1,300 SF office. Possible redevelopment opportunity. Other uses incl. auto parts
store, restaurant, bank, day care, pet shop, paint or liquor store, appliances, strip ctr. Equipment included.
2617 Pennington Road. Lot size:
.46 acres. Taxes: $5,700. Listed,
Stockton Real Estate/Elizabeth
Hicks, 609-924-1416.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; basement;
1-car garage. Cape with fenced
yard. Hardwood floors, granite countertops in kitchen and bathrooms.
Renovated. Move-in condition.
Hopewell Valley Regional school district. $369,000.
44 Model Avenue. Lot size: .27
acres. Taxes: $7,476. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Sandy Brown, 609737-9100. www.sandybrown.myglorianilsonagent.com.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Wood floors,
light-filled rooms. $358,000.
Park-Like Setting
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; crawl
space basement. Townhouse. Country model in Brittany. Remodeled
bathrooms, Karastan carpets,
Casablanca ceiling fans. Private
courtyard for kitchen garden.
$340,000.
South Brunswick
16 Pelham Road. Lot size:
90x150. Taxes: $5,902. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
4 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; 1-car
garage. Updated ranch with inground pool, fenced yard, shed, updated bath, windows, siding, driveway, flooring, and paint. $354,900.
5 Lakeview Avenue. Lot size:
60x165. Taxes: $4,410. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement; 1-car garage. Ranch in
Kingston. Refinished HWF, newer
windows, updated bath, heat, and
appliances. Warranty included.
$349,900.
$315,000-$340,000
East Windsor
94 Shelley Circle. Lot size:
24x106. Listed, Keller Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and William Usab,
609-987-8889. www.NJdreamhomes.us.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; full finished basement; 1-car garage. Contemporary. Living room with fireplace
with oak mantle. Eat-in kitchen with
42-inch raised maple cabinets, sliding doors in dining room backyard,
basement with full bath, rec-room,
office. $335,000.
Hamilton
Trenton
10 Morningside Drive. Lot size:
50x156. Taxes: $5,942. Listed, Weidel Realtors/J. Jay Smith, 609-7371500.
4 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial. Living
room with fireplace, sun porch, newer kitchen with exposed beam ceilings, hardwood floors. $319,900.
$285,000-$315,000
Burlington
37 Spyglass Court. Taxes:
$6,463. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/John Tereby, 609-750-0372.
www.sellingnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage.
Townhome in Deerwood Country
Club Estates. Golf club community.
Everything upgraded. Floors, kitchen
has stainless steel package. 2,090
SF. $299,888.
East Windsor
13 Haymarket Court. Lot size:
.08 acres. Taxes: $7,297. Listed,
Long and Foster Real Estate/Helene
Ashukian, 609-275-5101.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 1-car
garage. Townhouse with central air,
security system, central VAC, low
maintenance fee, tennis court.
$313,000.
Ewing
2076 Yardville-Hamilton Square
Road. Lot size: 70x110. Taxes:
$5,767. Listed, DiDonato Realty
Company/Kevin Kerins, 609-5862344.
5 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Colonial with
fireplace, central air. $325,000.
35 Crown Road. Lot size: .45
acres. Taxes: $7,630. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Emily Schwab, 609737-9100.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. 2,000 SF Hampton Hills Ranch offering an open
flow, rear deck, large rooms.
$314,900.
Hopewell Township
Hamilton
15 Woosamonsa Road. Lot size:
.55 acres. Listed, Keller Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and William Usab, 609-987-8889. www.NJdreamhomes.us.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full finished
basement; 2-car garage. 1,200 SF
ranch with hardwood floors, dining
room with designer chandelier, basement with rec-room and office. Detached garage with wrap-around
porch overlooking private backyard.
$325,000.
19 Goldenrod Court. Lot size:
26x100. Taxes: $5,361. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Ramona
Bruno, 609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 1-car
garage. Townhouse with all appliances, all custom window treatments. Next to park. $299,000.
22 Whitman Road. Lot size: .47
acres. Listed, Keller Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and William Usab,
609-987-8889. www.NJdreamhomes.us.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Ranch with completely remod-
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Ewing
86 Kyle Way. Listed, DiDonato
Realty Company/Barbara Landolfi,
609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First-floor
condo in Scotch Run. Fireplace.
Rents for $1,400.
Hamilton
96 Kingston Road. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Marian Conte,
609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 1-car
garage. Adult community. Largest
model. Fireplace, computer room, on
bus route. Rents for $1,900.
Hillsborough
418 Bradford Court. Listed,
Coldwell Banker/Kimberly Steinnagel, 609-252-2330.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths. Townhouse available December 15. Sixmonth to 12-month lease possible.
Rents for $2,300.
920 Cherry Valley Road. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Judson Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; 3-car
garage. Colonial farmhouse with inground pool. Rents for $8,000.
Hopewell Township
138 Province Line Road. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret Henderson, 609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. 2,942 SF Cape
with updated eat-in kitchen, central
air, loft. Rents for $4,500.
9 Elm Ridge Road. Listed, Weidel Realtors/J. Jay Smith, 609-7371500.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. 1,000 SF cape with gourmet
galley kitchen, living room with fireplace, recently renovated with new
systems. Rents for $1,900.
Monroe Township
22A Edinburgh Drive. Listed,
Levinson Associates/Iris Levine,
732-816-1485.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. Ranch with den. 1,640SF.
Rents for $1,600.
172C Rossmoor Drive. Listed,
Levinson Associates/Charlotte
Casey, 609-655-5535.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Ranch with
sunroom and one carport. 958SF.
Rents for $1,050.
277 Crosse Drive, Apt. 1E. Listed, Levinson Associates/Frank Bianco, 732-245-4440.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Ground-floor
on golf course in gated 55+ adult
community. Rents for $850.
Montgomery
102 Kingsway Commons. Listed, RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Joan
eled kitchen with maple/ceramic tile
floor/gas range, refinished oak hardwood floors, new bath, six panel
doors, cedar-lined closets, vinyl replacement windows. Walk-out basement. $289,900.
34 Sparrow Drive. Lot size:
30x114. Taxes: $6,558. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Marian Conte,
609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 2-car
garage. Ranch in Traditions at
Hamilton adult community. Gas fireplace, master suite. $289,000.
Hightstown
218 Morrison Avenue. Lot size:
.28 acres. Taxes: $8,615. Listed,
Prudential Fox & Roach/Roberta
Parker, 609-924-1600.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full unfinished basement; 3-car garage. Victorian farmhome with large front
wrap-araound porch, updated farm
kitchen, laundry room off kitchen,
hardwood floors throughout, in-law
apartment attached. $289,000.
Hopewell Township
11 Nedsland Avenue. Lot size:
.33 acres. Taxes: $6,064. Listed,
Gloria Nilson GMAC/Andrea D’Angelo, 609-737-9100.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; full unfinished basement. Two-story cape,
new roof, air conditioning; basement
has been waterproofed. $310,000.
18 Crusher Road. Lot size: .68
acres. Taxes: $7,541. Listed, Gloria
Nilson GMAC/Andrea D’Angelo,
609-737-9100.
4 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full partial
finished basement; 2-car garage.
Ranch with two-car attached garage
and one detached garage for two
cars. Air conditioning. $299,000.
Mansfield Township
2 Chamber Lane. Taxes: $5,645.
Listed, Coldwell Banker/Kimberly
Steinnagel, 609-252-2330.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; 2-car
garage. Ranch located in Four Seasons adult community. Private Paver
patio with retractable awning and
professional landscaping. $299,000.
Monroe Township
28 Chandler Court. Taxes:
$6,477. Listed, Levinson Associates/Marilyn Krawet, 908-415-4576.
3 bedrooms; 3 baths; 1-car
garage. Westport model on cul-desac. Walk-out bay window in breakfast area, marble floor in entry foyer,
family room, and kitchen. Patio. Walk
to clubhouse and temple. $310,000.
Trenton
115 Kensington Avenue. Lot
size: 72x172. Taxes: $6,636. Listed,
Weidel Realtors/J. Jay Smith, 609737-1500.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; finished
basement. Ranch. Hiltonia — renovated kitchen, master bedroom suite
with dressing room, closets, and full
bath, sunporch with hot tub.
$299,500.
800 West State Street. Lot size:
105x200. Taxes: $6,789. Listed,
Weidel Realtors/J. Jay Smith, 609737-1500.
7 bedrooms; 6 baths; full basement; 3-car garage. Tudor with plaster-molded ceilings, hand-cut wood
paneling, lincusta wallpaper, stone
fireplace. $289,900.
West Windsor
112 Tunic Flower Lane. Lot size:
.12 acres. Taxes: $6,619. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Joan
Eisenberg, 609-951-8600.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 2-car
garage. Colonial ranch with vaulted
living room and dining room. Family
room with fireplace. Upgraded appliances and decorative tile backsplash. Breakfast bar. Patio. Active
adult community. $299,900.
$265,000-$285,000
Ewing
539 Lafayette Avenue. Lot size:
.17 acres. Taxes: $5,745. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Beverly
Willever, 609-737-9550. www.hendersonsir.com.
Eisenberg, 609-951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths. Freshly
painted townhouse with refaced cabinetry. LR/DR combo and family
room with fireplace. Deck. $1,900.
North Brunswick
159 Darwin Lane. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First-floor
condo. Eat-in kitchen with granite
and 42” upgraded cabinets, porcelain tile floor, upgraded lighting, and
more. Rents for $1,495.
Pennington Borough
32 North Main Street. Listed,
Gloria Nilson GMAC/Barbara Facompre, 609-737-9100.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Carriage
house. Second-floor deck, fully furnished, no pets, no smoking. Shortterm will be considered. $1,650.
Plainsboro
2412 Ravens Crest. Listed, ERA
Properties Unlimited/Yang Li, 609750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Secondfloor condo. Rents for $1,250.
60 Fox Run Drive. Listed, Fox
Run Apartments/Susan Brown, 800960-6043.
1 bedroom; 1 bath. Garden-style
apartments. Fitness center, walking
distance to shopping, washer/dryer
in most, laundry facilities, lakeside.
Higher rates for larger units. $829.
Princeton Borough
45B Wiggins Street. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Janet Stefandl,
609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Colonial condo within walking distance of shops,
dining, university, Dinky. Freshly
cleaned, updated appliances, driveway parking. Rents for $2,400.
West Windsor
24 Glengarry Way. Listed, Keller
Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and
William Usab, 609-987-8889.
www.NJdreamhomes.us.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; 3-car
garage. Rents for $3,400.
22 Halstead Place. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Deborah Hornstra,
609-933-0073. www.hendersonsir.com.
3 bedrooms; 3.5 baths; 1-car
garage. Townhouse in Windsor
Haven. Bed and bath on lower level
suitable for convenient in-law or au
pair suite. Rents for $2,600.
110 Lowell Court. Listed, Stockton Real Estate/Martha Stockton,
609-924-1416. www.stockton-realtor.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First-floor
cloister model condo. $1,650.
207 Salem Court, #3. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Joan
Eisenberg, 609-951-8600.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. No pets allowed. Rents for $1,550.
PLEASE CALL TIM REEF, MANAGER
MON. - FRI., 9 AM - 10AM 609-924-7027
44 Aristotle Way. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Joan
Eisenberg, 609-951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 3 baths; 2-car
garage. Upgraded colonial in active
adult community. Hardwood floors,
recessed lighting. Kitchen with 42”
cabinets and granite counters. Master bedroom on first floor. Upgraded
master bath. Family room with fireplace. Loft area with third bedroom
and full bath. Close to shopping,
trains. Rents for $2,550.
Hopewell Township
111 Red Hill Road. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Jody Erdman,
609-924-1000. www.hendersonsir.com.
4 bedrooms; 3.5 baths. Colonial
on private lane in walking distance of
Nassau Street. Au pair suite. $4,200.
84 Dempsey Avenue. Listed,
Keller Williams Realty/Harveen
Bhatla and William Usab, 609-9878889. www.NJdreamhomes.us.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. Ranch
with large eat-in kitchen, family room
with cathedral ceiling, fireplace, and
sliding doors to deck. 1.3 miles to
university. Rents for $2,000.
194 Jonathon Dayton Court.
Listed, Stockton Real Estate/Martha
Stockton, 609-924-1416.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. 15 minutes from downtown. $1,700.
607 Rosedale. Listed, Henderson
Sotheby’s/Janet Stefandl, 609-9241000. www.hendersonsir.com.
Furnished or unfurnished studio.
Serene setting, minutes from downtown. Utilities included. $1,200.
• 678 SQ. FT. - 2 LARGE ADJOINING OFFICES!
• 742 SQ. FT. - FABULOUS SPACE! ONE HUGE
OFFICE WITH 12 FOOT CEILINGS, DRAMATIC
ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS, NEWLY RENOVATED!
East Windsor
Housing for Rent
Parking Available in Multi-Story
Garage Across the Street - Hourly
to Monthly Basis
118 Threadleaf Terrace. Listed,
ERA Properties Unlimited/Cherie
Davis, 609-750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Townhome with
two-story foyer, hardwood floors, EP
Henry paver patio in rear yard. Great
room has gas fireplace, upstairs
laundry. Rents for $1,900.
Princeton Township
Heart of Downtown Princeton
Burlington
U.S. 1
Center of Princeton
Office Space
Easy Parking!
S PACES
•SMALL
from $295/mo
200 SF & Up
Perfect for 1 & 2
Person Offices.
Brokers Protected
SF - Dramatic!
•900
High Ceilings,
Stunning Pillars,
Fully Renovated;
One Large Space
Plus Small
Bonus Room!
$1490/Month
Management Office
609-924-9201 or
609-924-7027
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTIES
& BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE OR LEASE
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; partial basement. 2,000 SF Cape in quiet West
Trenton neighborhood. Expanded
home with refinished hardwood
floors throughout. $274,000.
Hamilton
662 Edinburg Road. Lot size:
50x230. Taxes: $4,408. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Juan Fatardo, 609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement; 1-car garage. Colonial with
hardwood floors, close to Mercer
County Park. $280,000.
20 Allen Street. Lot size: 56x765.
Taxes: $5,135. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Antoinette Shelton,
609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement; 2-car garage. Colonial over
two acres of wooded property. Backs
to Crosswicks Creek. $279,900.
9 Baltusrol Street. Lot size:
55x141. Taxes: $5,725. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Tina Neely,
609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. Split-level.
Steinert school district. $272,900.
43 Baltusrol Street. Lot size:
55x117. Taxes: $5,440. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Stephanie Katona, 609-586-2344.
4 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Cape in Steinert
school district. $264,000.
Just Listed - Hamilton Twp. - 4,100 Sq. ft. store/showroom & warehouse. Located on active corner near
295/195. Now being used for home improvement business/construction. Single-family home also available
w/extra commercial lot. Priced right: $539,900.
Lawrence Township
Just Listed - Center of Robbinsville - Route 526/Main St. - 2½-story colonial in prime location w/use
approval for professional offices. Excellent for small office use or in-home office. Priced right: $495,000.
2167 Brunswick Avenue. Lot
size: 90x158. Taxes: $5,546. Listed,
Prudential Fox & Roach/Jacqeulyn
Stockman, 609-924-1600.
3 bedrooms; 1 bats; basement.
Colonial with four decorative fireplaces, including one in master bedroom. $269,999.
817 Roundtree Place. Taxes:
$4,173. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Marianne Greer, 609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. Colonial condo, newer air
conditioning. End unit, lots of windows, second floor with cathedral
ceiling, fireplace. $265,000.
Continued on following page
JUST
LISTED!
JUST
LISTED!
JUST
LISTED!
JUST LISTED - HAMILTON TWP. BEAUTY SALON - Prime location. Right off 295 w/large corner parking lot & large
3-BR apt. on 2nd flr. Priced right: $395,000 w/all equipment included. Modern/perfect condition.
For more information call
Bonanni Realtors 609-586-4300
47
48
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Continued from preceding page
Quality Office Space at Affordable Prices
Robbinsville
5 South Main Street. Lot size: .1
acres. Taxes: $5,602. Listed, Long
and Foster Real Estate/Helene
Ashukian, 609-275-5101.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; basement. Colonial with brick wood-burning fireplace, first floor laundry, deck
with hot tub, central air. $270,000.
West Windsor
OUTSTANDING INVESTMENT PROPERTY
Plainsboro
13,500 SF Fully-Leased
Child Care Center
Triple Net 15-Year Lease
Office Condo For Sale
Montgomery Knoll
100 Tamarack Circle
1500 SF — $298,000
110 Lowell Court. Taxes: $5,413.
Listed, Stockton Real Estate/Martha
Stockton, 609-924-1416.
www.stockton-realtor.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First-floor
cloister model condo in move-in condition. $265,000.
$235,000-$265,000
Bordentown
37 Mary Street. Taxes: $4,996.
Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Deborah Hornstra, 609-933-0073.
www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full unfinished basement. Three-story detached. Spacious third-floor loft.
Walk to downtown. $244,900.
East Windsor
NEW CONSTRUCTION
Lawrenceville
168 Franklin Corner Road
3200 SF, 1350 SF, 1150 SF
Rocky Hill
1026 Rt 518
Office/Medical Space
1250 SF-9000 SF
Downtown Princeton
195 Nassau Street
220 SF Plus On-site Parking
Hamilton
127 Route 206
350 SF, 2260 SF, 3900 SF
367 Bolton Road. Lot size:
26x80. Taxes: $5,199. Listed, Weidel
Realtors/Linda Feldstein, 609-9212700.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full finished basement. End-unit Twin
Rivers townhome with updated
kitchen, full finished basement, newer siding, roof, heating and AC, hot
water heater. 1,796 SF. $249,900.
Ewing
117 Honeysuckle Drive. Lot
size: 75x100. Taxes: $6,099. Listed,
ERA Properties Unlimited/John Terebey, 609-750-0372. www.sellingnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full finished basement; 2-car garage. Colonial. Fenced rear yard, deck. Eight
years old. $264,888.
3 Constance Drive. Lot size:
95x100. Taxes: $5,751. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Marian
Conte, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 3 baths; full basement; 1-car garage. Split-level with
fireplace, hardwood floors, new gas
furnace and central air. $259,000.
6 Dunmoor Court. Lot size:
20x70. Taxes: $5,283. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Laurie Giangrasso, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; basement. Townhouse. New windows,
bath, granite counters. $245,000.
Lawrence Township
86 Dewes Court. Taxes: $3,524.
Listed, ERA Properties
Unlimited/John Mozloom, 609-7500372. www.sellingnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 2.5 baths. Townhouse in Lawrenceville Square Village. Updated flooring and kitchen.
Pool, tennis, playground. $247,000.
Monroe Township
30 Daniel Webster Avenue. Listed, Levinson Associates/Gary Blei,
609-655-5535.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 2-car
garage. 55+ community. Borders on
18-hole golf course. $236,975.
Exit 8A NJ Tpke
1 Rossmoor Drive, Monroe Twp.
6900 SF (Bank, Rest., Various Uses)
Bordentown
101 Farnsworth Avenue
from 340 SF to 1054 SF
Contact:
Cosmo Iacavazzi
Bryce Thompson Jr.
[email protected]
[email protected]
Thompson Realty of Princeton
195 Nassau St. • Princeton, NJ 08542
Tel 609-921-7655 • Fax 609-921-9463
Princeton Township
194 Jonathon Dayton Court.
Taxes: $3,381. Listed, Stockton Real
Estate/Martha Stockton, 609-9241416.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. Griggs
Farm, 15 minutes from downtown.
$259,900.
Robbinsville
41 Tynemouth Court. Lot size:
22x82. Listed, Keller Williams Realty/Harveen Bhatla and William Usab,
609-987-8889. www.NJdreamhomes.us.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. Contemporary with gourmet kitchen with
granite counters, fireplace, remodeled bath with jacuzzi tub/slate tile,
new water heater. $250,000.
South Brunswick
3 Prospect Street. Lot size:
84x125. Taxes: $3,871. Listed,
RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn
Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths. 130-yearold colonial moved to site. Is being
restored to “like new” condition.
Plans available. “As is” price for
$250,000 or remodeled for
$479,900. $250,000.
Trenton
201 Woodside Avenue. Lot size:
.14 acres. Taxes: $5,663. Listed,
Henderson Sotheby’s/Cathy
Nemeth, 609-737-9550. www.hendersonsir.com.
5 bedrooms; 1 full, 2 half baths;
full finished basement; 2-car garage.
Well-built, decorated and maintained
Dutch colonial. Hardwood on first
floor, pine floors upstairs, finished
third floor and basement. $239,000.
West Windsor
117 Federal Court #6. Taxes:
$4,421. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Janet Stefandl, 609-924-1000.
www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Princeton
mailing address, West Windsor
school system. Near Route 1, MarketFair mall, Princeton Junction train
station. Condo. $250,000.
117 Federal Court, #2. Taxes:
$4,921. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Lisa Candella-Hulbert, 609924-1600.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First-floor
Belvedere model condo in Canal
Pointe. Newly installed carpeting
and recessed lighting. $239,900.
$210,000-$235,000
Burlington
306 Hendrickson Avenue. Lot
size: .20 acres. Taxes: $4,422. Listed, Gloria Nilson GMAC/Ann Marie
Latty, 609-737-9100.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; basement. 1,800 SF split-level within
walking distance of light rail. Updated and maintained — all newer systems. $229,500.
Ewing
1965 North Olden Avenue. Lot
size: 50x80. Taxes: $3,622. Listed,
Weidel Realtors/J. Jay Smith, 609737-1500.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement; 2-car garage. Ranch. Living
room with fireplace, large family
room with cathedral ceiling and skylights, updated kitchen, newer systems. $229,900.
12 Gilmore Road. Lot size:
83x125. Taxes: $4,739. Listed, Prudential Fox & Roach/Jacquelyn
Stockman, 609-924-1600.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. Ranch. Master bedroom
with full bath, Andersen windows,
vinyl-sided. $224,900.
86 Kyle Way. Taxes: $4,641. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Barbara Landolfi, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First-floor
condo in Scotch Run. Fireplace.
$219,000.
209 Clamer Road. Lot size:
50x125. Taxes: $3,909. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Kevin
Kerins, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Ranch with new siding, new
electric, Pergo floors. $217,000.
Monroe Township
221 Waxwing Drive. Taxes:
$4,973. Listed, Levinson Associates/Frank Bianco, 732-245-4440.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 2-car
garage. Adult community, 55+, gated
security. Indoor and outdoor pools.
$220,000.
Robbinsville
77 Andover Place. Taxes:
$4,550. Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Dawn Petrozzini, 609951-8600.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Condo in
Foxmoor. Updated kitchen. Custom
chair rail and moldings, fireplace.
$214,900.
Continued on page 54
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Life in the Fast Lane
T
he need for more efficient use of space and a rough
economy will cost 19 workers at
RWJ-Hamilton hospital their jobs.
The cuts, announced on October
22, are part of a hospital-wide consolidation plan aimed at improving
the hospital’s bottom line. The first
phase of the plan calls for merging
medical surgical space spread
throughout the hospital, including
the newer Lakefront Tower, which
opened in 2007 to offer private patient rooms. By consolidating the
medical surgical units, RWJ
Hamilton will be in a better position to adjust to changes in patient
volume and hospital demand, according to hospital spokesman
Michael Ashworth.
The second part of the plan is the
job cuts, though Ashworth would
not say whether the cuts would
come from support, administrative, or medical ranks.
In a written statement, CEO Anthony “Skip” Cimino said the hospital “is in sound financial condition but is being buffeted by the
same economic forces affecting
the entire hospital industry in New
Jersey, where eight hospitals have
closed in the past two years.”
Healthcare, one of the few job
sectors not affected by the economy of the past year, is booming despite ominous signs that healthcare
facilities like RWJ now must trim
costs. Cimino said that despite the
rosy job outlook in the healthcare
industry, “hospitals are not im-
Cimino said RWJ is financially sound, but
is being hit by the
same economy that
closed eight hospitals in two years.
mune from the recession. Like other businesses facing difficult economic conditions, we have to operate as efficiently as possible.”
Cimino blamed much of the
problem on insurance and the state.
Private and government insurance
plans, including Medicare, are
seeking to reimburse hospitals at
discounted rates for the care their
members receive, he said. He
added that the state’s formula for
charity care payments leaves suburban hospitals like RWJ Hamilton
with a wide gap between the cost of
care provided and the level of reimbursement.
“These forces put pressure on
the revenue we are able to gather to
fund our operations,” Cimino said.
Cimino said the hospital does
not plan to cut patient services and
that the hospital is seeking to build
upon its affiliation with Robert
Wood Johnson University Hospital
in New Brunswick. The hospital
also is pursuing initiatives in palliative care, which addresses patients and families making difficult
decisions about end-of-life treatments. Often, this involves shorter
hospital stays.
According to the hospital, the 19
facing job loss at RWJ will receive
severance packages and help with
resume-writing and job-search
strategies.
— Scott Morgan
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Hamilton,
1 Hamilton Health Place,
Hamilton 08619; 609-5867900; fax, 609-584-6525. Anthony J. Cimino, president
and CEO. Home page:
www.rwjhamilton.org.
Edited by Scott Morgan
U.S. 1
Laboratories
& Research
Center
Princeton Corporate Plaza
with over 80 scientific companies
U.S. 1 Route 1 Frontage
New Laboratory Incubator #4
• Affordable & Immediate
• Occupancy Available
• Innovation/Flexibility
• Promoting the Scientific Community
PARK-LIKE CAMPUS WITH OVER 80 SCIENTIFIC COMPANIES
WALK TO HOTEL & GYM FACILITIES • CAFE ON PREMISES
Feeling the Pinch: RWJ Hamilton Hospital CEO
Anthony ‘Skip’ Cimino, who just took the position
this year, is facing a tight budget that is forcing
him to cut 19 jobs and consolidate services.
Sellers Beware
P
olice are seeking a fugitive
Trenton couple that recently was
indicted by a state Superior Court
in connection with a real estate
scam that allegedly bilked three
mortgage companies out of more
than $641,000 in house sale deals
in and around Mercer County.
Joann Smith, 44, and Wayne
Batha, 39, who operate S&B Property Management LLC in Trenton,
remain at large, despite being
charged with laundering, conspiracy, theft, and failure to file corporate tax returns.
According to state Attorney
General Anne Milgram, the couple
allegedly stole the money from 11
homeowners in Trenton, Ewing,
Hamilton, Orange, Willingboro,
and Camden by diverting funds on
the sales of the houses and convincing the owners that they were
not entitled to the full share of the
sales due to service fees.
Smith and Batha also allegedly
misrepresented the sellers’ financial state to agencies such as the
federal Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
Milgram said in a statement that
the victims were not financially
savvy, but were in financial distress and were desperate to unload
properties they could no longer afford the mortgages for.
New ETS Program
To Aid Latinos
Educational Testing Service,
Rosedale Road, Princeton
08541; 609-921-9000; fax,
609-734-5410. Kurt F. Landgraf, president. Home page:
www.ets.org.
O
n October 21 ETS launched
“Si! The New American Workforce Scholarship and Internship”
program, an initiative that addresses the private sector need to find
and develop Latino and other students for programs carrying them
from college to good jobs.
The announcement comes less
than a month after a presentation to
ETS by Loui Olivas, president of
the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education in
Phoenix, who presented statistics
showing that the Latino population
is the fastest-growing segment of
the U.S. population and workforce.
Si! will be a national program
looking to increase corporate sponsorship of scholarships and internships in order to increase the number of Latino and other minority
students who enter and finish college, then make their way into the
corporate world.
“For the private sector this is a
cost-effective operation that helps
companies develop and later employ high-quality employees,”
says Bill McCambley, director of
scholarship and recognition proContinued on following page
GREAT LOCATION
IN RESEARCH
CORRIDOR
www.princetoncorporateplaza.com • 732-329-3655
OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE
MONTGOMERY KNOLL CONDO
Tamarack Circle - off Route 206
1900 sf - Will Subdivide
5 Large Offices + Reception + Baths
Available Furnished/Unfurnished
Ample Parking - Quiet Setting
Call 908.281.5374
Meadow Run Properties, LLC
49
50
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Continued from preceding page
...Freedom of Choice
West Windsor/571, Sale/lease
4,000 SF. 1 acre. Income-development potential.
grams at ETS. “It establishes a
learning platform that promotes
strong employee relationships, increases loyalty, and allows employers to observe performance.”
Si! services cover program design and planning, applicant pool
development, candidate review,
academic progress and internship
monitoring, program evaluation,
and mentor training.
For information about the Si!
program contact Linda Bailey at
[email protected] or call 609-2436545.
Leases Renewed
William Barish [email protected]
Princeton Commerce Center
750-7000 SF, Immediate Occupancy
Just Off Route One at Meadow Road Overpass
William Barish [email protected]
www.29emmons.com
Available - Near Train - 9300 SF
777 Alexander Park. Will Divide, Great Signage
Immediate Occupancy, Cafe On Site
William Barish [email protected]
New Construction - Medical/Retail
Pennington - Rte. 31
5,100 SF. Will Divide.
Al Toto [email protected]
Commercial Property Network
609-921-8844 • www.cpnrealestate.com
For more information and other opportunities, please
call Commercial Property Network, 609-921-8844
PharmaNet
(PDGI),
504
Carnegie Center, Princeton
08540-6242; 609-951-6800;
fax, 609-514-0390. Jeffrey
McMullen, president and
CEO.
Home
page:
www.pharmanet.com.
P
harmaNet, a provider of
clinical development services to
pharmaceutical, biotechnology,
generic drug, and medical device
companies, has signed an early renewal for its 122,000-square-foot
headquarters lease at 504 Carnegie
Center. Cushman & Wakefield Inc.
of East Rutherford represented
PharmaNet in the long-term transaction. The space is owned by
Boston Properties, which has its
offices at 302 Carnegie.
According to Walter Schoenberg of Cushman & Wakefield,
timing and flexibility were critical
in its successful outcome.
“We were retained to explore
the market for cost-saving opportunities well in advance of PharmaNet’s
lease
expiration,”
Schoenberg said. “Ultimately, the
firm chose to stay at 504 Carnegie
by renewing a full 24 months early.”
PharmaNet started at 504
Carnegie as a subtenant and has expanded several times there over the
years to become its sole, full-building tenant.
The signing comes barely two
weeks after the Securities and Exchange Commission closed a twoyear investigation into PharmaNet’s handling of SEC filings.
The commission found no evidence to pursue further legal action
against the company.
National Business Parks Inc.,
2 Research Way, Princeton
08540; 609-452-1300; fax,
609-452-8364. Vince Marano, vice president and COO.
www.collegepk.com.
T
he managing arm of
Lawrence Zirinsky Associates,
owner of College Park at Princeton
Forrestal Center, has renewed a
lease and signed in a new tenant to
the 11-building office complex.
NeoStrata, which develops and
markets advanced dermatological
and skin care products at its facility
at 307 College Road East, has renewed a long-term lease for 21,000
square feet.
Meanwhile, consulting, engineering, and construction firm
Syska Hennessy SH Group Inc. has
leased 9,000 square feet at 105
College Road East. The firm will
be moving its regional offices from
502 Carnegie Center in the coming
months. The long-term lease was
brokered by Todd Elfand of Jones
Lang La Salle.
The signings maintain a 97-percent occupancy rate in the complex, which has 815,000 square
feet of office space.
NBP also has recently reached
full occupancy at Bridgewater
Corporate Center with the lease of
a 900-square-foot space to MIS-
From Strange House to Dream Job
H
ugh Connolly’s interest
in architecture stretches back to
eighth grade when, during a
classroom drawing exercise, he
sketched a concept house that
was inspired by the spray foam
used for in-ground pools.
“It was a very strange house,”
Connolly says. His final design
was a weird-looking, bulbous
structure that not even the most
eccentric person would want to
live in, “but ever since then, I
knew I wanted to be an architect.”
In early May, after working at
several area firms, Connolly
opened his own in Hopewell to
accommodate residential, commercial, and institutional clients
with an emphasis on sustainability.
“There is more that I can offer
clients when I’m on my own,” he
says. “I like to put an emphasis
on sustainability in my projects,
and having my own company
makes it easier to give clients the
full service they deserve.”
Connolly was raised in New
Vernon, where his father was in
public relations and his mother
was a model. He earned a bachelor’s in architecture from Cornell in 1980. Since then he has
worked at several Princetonarea architectural firms, including the former Hillier Group. He
has designed almost all types of
buildings, from luxury custom
residences, affordable housing,
and elementary schools to
restaurants, corporate headquarters, and courthouses. Four of
his projects have won Downtown New Jersey awards.
Some of his notable projects
include Pinnacle at Morris
Township, a multifamily residential housing complex; Presbyterian Homes Crossroads at
Howell, a senior-living facility;
the Lambertville House, Tiger
Inn in Princeton, and KatManDu
Night Club in Trenton.
Connolly became interested
in sustainability issues after
joining a firm in 2002 that emphasized the importance of being environmentally friendly. “I
became familiar with it, and it
became my primary focus at that
point,” he says. “At that firm, I
worked on three to four school
projects that were designed for
LEED Silver certification.”
ource Inc., a nationwide staffing
solution provider headquartered in
Tampa, Florida. The space is in a
48,500-square-foot building at 757
Route 202/206, which also counts
Ameriprise, Legato Law Firm, and
Stellar Academy among its tenants.
Contracts Awarded
Universal Display Corporation Inc. (PANL), 375 Phillips
Boulevard, Ewing 08618;
609-671-0980; fax, 609-6710995. Steven Abramson,
president. www.universaldisplay.com.
U
DC, developer of phosphorescent OLED technology, has
been given a $333,593 extension to
a U.S. Army contract to continue
development on its flexible OLED
display technology. The company
plans to deliver a prototype of the
technology, which consists of flexible displays built on metal foil.
The technology is being evaluated by the Department of Defense
for military applications including
a wrist-mounted, light-weight display for use by soldiers in the field.
According to the company, work
Connolly presents his clients
with information about the financial, health and environmental advantages that sustainable
design can have on a project. He
also discusses options for reducing energy and water use, installing passive heating and
cooling, using renewable energy, using recycled and renewable materials, and using low or
no-VOC paints and adhesives
that can improve indoor air quality.
“When you’re doing sustainable design, you’re considering
the entire building, as opposed to
just concentrating on just piece
by piece,” he says. “The obvious
thing is the environment. It also
has health benefits for clients,
and in the long run, it can save
money for clients.”
In his spare time, when he’s
not constructing buildings, he’s
collecting them. Connolly has
amassed hundreds of souvenir
buildings, some made from
whiskey or perfume bottles, and
others made from cigarette
lighters. He even has a salt-andpepper shaker set of the Empire
State Building with a replica of
King Kong. Connolly finds the
buildings at flea markets, antique stores and during an annual collector’s convention.
“I have a wide variety, but
compared to some people, my
collection is small. Some people
have 7,000,” he says.
— Kristin Boyd
Connolly Architecture LLC,
106 West Broad Street,
Hopewell 08525; 609-3755355.www.connollyarchitecturellc.com.
under the extension includes the
design and fabrication of new prototypes using amorphous-silicon
backplanes and a phosphorescent
OLED frontplane.
The OLED display will be encased in a new and thinner housing,
designed and fabricated by L-3
Display Systems. The new housing
is expected to be less bulky and
more rugged than earlier prototypes.
Management Moves
NRG Energy Inc. (NRG), 211
Carnegie Center, Princeton
08540-6213; 609-524-4500;
fax, 609-524-4501. David
Crane, president and CEO.
www.nrgenergy.com.
T
he energy company’s CFO,
Robert Flexon, is leaving NRG, effective November 2, to take over as
CEO of Clinton-based construction giant Foster Wheeler.
Gerald Luterman will serve as
interim CFO for NRG while the
company conducts a search for a
permanent officer. Luterman sits
on the NRG board and its audit
committee. Before joining NRG he
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1 Classifieds
HOW TO ORDER
Phone, Fax, E-Mail: That’s all it takes
to order a U.S. 1 Classified. Call 609452-7000, or fax your ad to 609-4520033, or use our E-Mail address:
[email protected] We will
confirm your insertion and the price. It
won’t be much: Our classifieds are just
50 cents a word, with a $7 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are just 40
cents per word, and if your ad runs for 16
consecutive issues, it’s only 30 cents
per word. (There is a $3 service charge if
we send out a bill.) Box service is available. Questions? Call us.
OFFICE RENTALS
1st Month FREE on select offices:
Princeton Route 1. Single Offices, Office
Suites, Virtual Offices, 50MB High
Speed Internet, Great Reception Team,
Instant Activation, Flexible Terms. Call
609-514-5100 or visit www.princeton-office.com
2300 sq. ft. Princeton address in
South Brunswick: Ideal for doctors,
dentists, chiros, accountants, lawyers
and other businesses/professionals.
(Near Princeton Medical Center and
RWJ Hospital): $3200/month. Re/Max
of Princeton 609-452-1887/609-9020709 (Ali).
2nd Floor Office Condo in Montgomery Knoll: 500 sq. ft. 2 offices with
reception area. Call 609-924-9214.
194 Nassau Street, 953 sq. ft. office
for lease. Reception area, three offices,
kitchen, storage, private restroom, single parking space included. Please call
609-921-6060 for details.
Downsizing? Expanding? Montgomery Knoll: Route 206, Skillman.
1500 sq. ft., newly painted, new carpet,
move-in condition. 7 offices plus ample
secretarial space, kitchen, copy room,
(2) half baths, great parking, principals
only. Call 212-223-0404.
Hamilton: Single Offices & Suites
available, near hospital, 12.90SF. Call
Pat Conte, 732-567-5600.
Pennington - Hopewell: Straube
Center offices from virtual office, 25 to
300 square feet and office suites, 500 to
2,400 square feet. From $100 per
month, short and long term. Storage
space, individual signage, conference
rooms, copier, Verizon FIOS available,
call
609-737-3322
or
e-mail
[email protected] www.straubecenter.com
Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in
well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate
AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected]
Princeton - Psychotherapy Office:
Available Mondays. Large office (20 x
15), elegantly furnished, in prof office
building at 1000 Herrontown Road.
$250/month. Contact: Dr. Washton,
[email protected], 917-699-7882.
Princeton Junction: Prof. Office
space in highly visible spot near trains.
All utilities/maintenance included in rent,
OFFICE RENTALS
U.S. 1
51
Office Opportunities
OFFICE RENTALS
AREA OFFICE RENTALS
Pennington, Route 31, Corner
2300 SF-Immediate Occupancy
Princeton, Trenton, Hamilton, Hopewell, Montgomery,
Ewing, Hightstown, Lawrenceville and other Mercer,
Somerset & Middlesex Communities. Class A, B and
C Space Available.
For details on space
and rates, contact
www.WeidelCommercial.com
except electric. Units from $450 to
$2330 per month. Call Ali at Re/max of
Princeton 609-452-1887 or cell 609902-0709.
Princeton Prof. Office Park, off
Route One. 600 sq. ft. Fully furnished
and equipped. Perfect for professional
organizations, shared use considered,
$995. Call 732-329-1601 for details.
Single-room ground floor office in
Princeton, Nassau Street, for sublease
by primary lessee. 13x8 feet overall,
partially furnished if desired by renter.
Available October 3, 2009. $425/month.
Ralph at 609-529-9027.
SUB LEASE: Class A office space
(1,650) square feet) available immediately entirely or willing to share in
Alexander Park, Princeton. Contact Audi @ 732-619-7631.
BUSINESSES FOR SALE
PRINCETON
PREMIER
Art/Photo/Frame Shop, turn-key, highvolume, ideal location. Financing. Dixie
Curtice, Broker/Sale Associates, Weidel
Realtors, 609-737-1500 ext. 259. Cell:
215-499-4629.
INDUSTRIAL SPACE
Unique Rental Space zoning (I3), ordinance passed for retail and recreation
activities, ample parking all utilities, one
1200’, one 2000’, one 2500’ one 3600’,
and one 10,000. Located at 325 and 335
New Road, Monmouth Junction. Call
Harold 732-329-2311.
COMMERCIAL SPACE
Hamilton Flex/WH: Need great
space at CHEAP pricing? Ready-to-occupy space with high ceilings and
docks/drive-ins. 1,800 to 15,000 sf Flex
units at UNDER MARKET rents. Must
see! Brian @ 609-731-0378 or [email protected]
Hamilton Office Space - 1,0002,200 SF units in both new and rehabbed NY-style loft mill building. Move
in now, must see, great locations, low
rents! Brian @ 609-731-0378 or [email protected]
Lambertville Office & Retail: Canal
studios. Attractive, creative exec offices
with tons of style in NY Style Mill Bldg @
low prices. Several bright spaces available from 300-6,600 sf. Perfect for atty,
studio, prof, couns, web, massage, spa,
bakery, wellness. MUST SEE! Brian @
609-731-0378 or [email protected]
STORAGE
General or Auto Storage - Four-car
Garage: Non-Heated for rent or lease.
Private residence. Perfect for automobiles and/or long-term storage. Call 732207-8373 or E-mail [email protected]
William Barish - [email protected]
Pennington - Office For Lease
Howe Commons, Downtown Pennington. 995-1,330 SF.
Flexible lease terms, ample parking, walk to restaurants.
STUDIO SPACE
Studio space for classes, workshops, etc. 19 ft x 19 ft., high ceiling, lots
of natural light. $30 per hour. Kingston.
Call 609-468-1286.
HOUSING FOR SALE
Must, Must Sell! Roosevelt: Very
special home on 1/2-acre. 4 bedrooms,
3 baths, eat-in kitchen, dining room, living room, den, huge family room,
garage, in-ground pool. Spotless
palace! Many amenities and extras.
$439,900. All reasonable offers will be
considered. Levinson Associates Realtors. 609-655-5535. Marketed by Mel
Adlerman. 609-655-7788.
Al Toto [email protected]
Office - Pennington Pointe
450 - 4,400 SF Office
FREE RENT and FLEXIBLE LEASE TERMS.
Immediate occupancy.
Plainsboro: 3-bedroom, 1.5-bathroom house with full basement and
walk-up attic. Excellent location near
top-ranked WWP-North High School,
Princeton Junction train station, and
Princeton University. 1.5 miles from new
Princeton Medical Center under construction. House in good condition. For
appointments call 609-683-1515 or 908229-9056. $330,000. Pictures at
Craigslist.org.
Country Setting: 1 possibly 2-bedroom apartment for rent. Duplex. Newly
renovated. Internet cable ready. $1,100
per month. Call for appointment: 732207-8373.
HOUSING FOR RENT
Princeton’s Exclusive Western Section - For family or house share by
Princeton-area
professionals!
7,000SF, stunning, contemporary home.
4 bedrooms, 4.5 bathrooms, library/office, exercise room, guest apartment.
Large, private lot, just five minutes to
Princeton center. Unfurnished/partially
furnished, pets considered. Professionally managed. Credit check, detailed application required. $4,900/month. 609924-9201 or 609-937-8833.
Al Toto [email protected]
Visit www.penningtonpointoffice.com
Hopewell Boro, Office/Professional/Records
500-30,000/SF Office & low priced storage, warehouse
Continued on following page
William Barish [email protected]
served for eight years as CFO of
KeySpan Corp.
Flexon, who has served on the
Foster Wheeler board of directors
since 2006, has been NRG’s CFO
since 2004. Prior to joining NRG
he was vice president of corporate
development, work process, and
business analysis and controller at
Hercules Inc. He also held various
financial management positions at
Atlantic Richfield and the Coopers
& Lybrand public accounting firm.
VoicePulse, 1095 CranburySouth River Road, Suite 11,
Monroe Township 08831;
609-409-1800; fax, 609-4098511. Christopher Silk, CEO.
www.voicepulse.com.
founder Ravi Sakaria in the seat.
Sakaria will continue to serve as
chairman of the board.
Sakaria said that the transition
allows him to focus on the company’s overall direction and strategy.
According to the company, Silk
was brought on to accelerate the
growth of the company. He is a 15year veteran of the telecommunications industry and the former
CEO of a private cable company,
where he worked on several acquisitions as the “Mom & Pop” Private Cable industry evolved into
consolidation, he said.
The broadband Internet service provider has named Christo-
Joan Lucas, 79, on September
1. She served as a faculty member
at Princeton University, the Princeton Ballet Society, and Trenton
pher Silk as CEO, replacing
Deaths
State College. She choreographed
20 musicals for the PJ&B Company at McCarter Theater and the
university’s Triangle Club. Her
students included actors Bebe
Neuwirth and Christopher Reeve.
Mary Stachowicz, 87, on October 13. She worked 35 years for
Opinion Research before founding
206 Hardware with her husband,
which she ran for 38 years.
Dale Krieger, 59, on October
24. A financial manager and entrepreneur, Krieger founded Onsen
for All, a massage therapy spa in
Kingston. He also restored historic
buildings, such as Princeton Nurseries Village and the Higgins
house, the home of Onsen for All.
A private service is set for
Wednesday, October 28. Friends
may call between 2 and 7 p.m. at
the Krieger home, 600 Pretty
Brook Road, Princeton.
Tree Farm Village - 23,000 SF
1,500-4,500 SF Retail Available Immediately, Liquor License
Available, New Building, Great Location, Flexible Terms
Al Toto [email protected]
www.cpnrealestate.com
For more information and other opportunities, please
call Commercial Property Network, 609-921-8844
52
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Employment Exchange
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
Bookkeepers: Detail oriented. Organized. Comfortable with
emails and internet. Please send
resume
to
[email protected]
Sales, Account Executives:
Ambitious and results driven. Excellent phone manners. Comfortable with emails and internet.
Organized. Huge potential.
Please
send
resume
to
[email protected]
Help wanted, excellent pay,
work from the comfort of
home. For details & application
send a long stamped self-addressed envelope to NDN DEPT
NJ PO Box 26 Bushkill, PA
18324.
Loan Originators Needed:
$3,000-$5,000/Month potential
income. No experience needed full training provided. No license
required - earn while you learn.
Work toward ownership - part
time/full time. Call today 1-800789-7943.
Personal assistant wanted
for president of small book
publishing firm. Excellent
proofreading and copyediting
skills required. Responsibilities
include organizing paper and
electronic files, and other clerical
tasks as well as online research.
8-12 hrs/wk divided over 2-3
days a week. Pay negotiable.
Send email to [email protected]
Princeton PR Agency seeks
a Business Development Intern. Applicant must have a communications or business college
degree and willing to learn the
PR business. This 3-month internship has the opportunity to
transition into an Account Executive position. Please send resume and cover letter to [email protected]
Property Inspectors: Parttime $30k, full-time $80k. No experience, will train. Call Tom,
609-731-3333.
Real Estate Sales: No Experience Needed, Free Training, License Info Available. Weidel Realtors.
[email protected],
800-288-7653 x260, www.weidel.com.
Web Designers, e-commerce
architect, and programmers: All
levels, all areas. Please send resume and samples of finished
web sites to [email protected]
CAREER SERVICES
Job Worries? Let Dr. Sandra
Grundfest, licensed psychologist
and certified career counselor,
help you with your career goals
and job search skills. Call 609921-8401 or 732-873-1212 (License #2855)
JOBS WANTED
Job Hunters: If you are looking for a full-time position, we
will run a reasonably worded
classified ad for you at no
charge. The U.S. 1 Jobs Wanted
section has helped people like
you find challenging opportunities for years now. We know this
because we often hear from the
people we have helped. We reserve the right to edit the ads and
to limit the number of times they
run. If you require confidentiality,
send a check for $4 with your ad
and request a U.S. 1 Response
Box. Replies will be forwarded to
you at no extra charge. Mail or
Fax your ad to U.S. 1 Jobs Wanted, 12 Roszel Road, Princeton,
NJ 08540. You must include your
name, address, and phone number (for our records only).
Accomplished
Proposal
Writer. During these tough times
— there is no room for error or
missteps. You need to WIN! Let
me help you formulate a “WIN”
strategy and write a local, state,
federal or private sector proposal
that will get the needed results.
REAL ESTATE SERVICES
Continued from preceding page
BANK FORECLOSURES: Free list
of Homes for Sale FREE daily list by
email with photos. www.theforeclosuredeals.com. RE/MAX Tri County.
INVESTMENT PROPERTY
Investment/Vacation Property for
Sale: Vermont condo with spectacular
views of Stratton and surrounding
mountains in the year-round resort area
of Manchester. 3 bedrooms+ loft. Low
taxes, fully furnished, a great get-away!
$290,000. [email protected]
CONTRACTING
Handyman/Yardwork: Painting/Carpentry/Masonry/Hauling/All Yard Work
from top to bottom. Done by pros. Call
609-737-9259 or 609-273-5135.
CLEANING SERVICES
Barbara’s Cleaners: Commercial
and residential houses, Princeton, W.
Windsor, Plainsboro, Hopewell, and
Flemington area. Quality work, reasonable prices, references. Free estimates.
Leave message for Barbara, 609-3945934 or cell 609-933-6701.
Patty’s Cleaning Service: Serving
Plainsboro,
the
Windsors,
the
Brunswicks, and Brandon Farms since
1978. Thorough, honest, and reliable.
Free estimate. 609-397-2533.
Quality Commercial Cleaning: We
offer great office cleaning, good rates
and most of all, good quality of work. We
are insured and bonded. For a free estimate, please call Lidia, 609-989-7799.
CLASSIFIED BY EMAIL
[email protected]
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
I can take care of your
house this winter!
Do you have plans to travel
for a long time? Maybe you
own a house in a warm
destination and you would
feel more comfortable to
leave knowing that someone is taking care of your
house and your pets?
My name is Lidia, I am 35,
I don't smoke. I don't have
kids nor pets. I have a good
driving record and no criminal history. I run my own
business and I am myself
a house owner in New
Jersey. I can provide you
with business and personal
references. I can take care
of your house and pets in
exchange for living in your
house during your absence.
If you have any questions
feel free to call me.
VICE PRESIDENT
OF HUMAN RESOURCES
NEEDED:
Lidia Pilarska
823 Pine Street
Trenton, NJ 08638
609-610-0333
JOBS WANTED
Professionally and formally
trained with templates/samples
for
review.
[email protected]
or
call Ron at 908-256-2165.
B.S. Mechanical Engineer
with 20 years experience. Very
strong in manufacturing environments and facilities management, seeking full-time employment. Capital projects, machinery design, and management
are strong suits. Call David at
609-448-4271.
Companion/Home
health
aide/housekeeper with over 20
years experience and excellent
references seeking employment. Please call 609-610-6048.
HELP WANTED
Planned Parenthood based
in Trenton, NJ is seeking a
part-time Vice President of
Human Resources. We are
a staff of 40 with an annual
operating budget of $3.5
million. Candidates should
have experience in benefits
management, coaching to
performance, HR
systems/policy development
and be well versed in New
Jersey state employment
regulations. They should
also have a strategic, detailoriented approach to their
work. Ideal candidates will
possess a Master’s degree
and have a minimum of 5
years of HR management
experience. A commitment
to women’s health and to a
positive and diverse workplace required. Competitive
salary. Send resume and
cover letter by Nov 23 to:
Vice President of Human
Resources Search, Planned
Parenthood Association
of the Mercer Area
437 East State Street,
Trenton, NJ 08608 or
[email protected] EOE
HELP WANTED
WeTheHOpportunities
ave
are You
What
Endless...
Need
J&J Staffing Resources, has been a leader in
the employment industry since 1972.
We specialize in: Direct Hire, Temp to Hire
and Temporary Placements.
Administrative
Assistants
ADMINISTRATIVE
• LEGAL
SECRETARIES
Executive
Assistants
CUSTOMER SERVICE • ACCOUNTING
Receptionists/Customer
Service
CLERICAL • WAREHOUSE
Warehouse/Light Industrial
J&J STAFFING RESOURCES
103 Carnegie
Center,
Suite 107
103 Carnegie
Center
Princeton,
N.J.NJ
08540
Princeton,
609-452-2030
609-452-2030
WWW.JJSTAFF.COM
EOE “Staffing Success Begins Here” NO FEE
JOBS WANTED
JOBS WANTED
JOBS WANTED
Executive/office assistant,
customer service is available
for a permanent position with
part-time schedule. Topnotch,
college grad., 10+ years experience. Heavy legal, commercial,
and light medical background.
Computer literate, dictating machine, liaison, corporate appearance.
Please
contact:
[email protected]
electrical or plumbing experience). Local deliveries or errands (Mercer County area). I’ve
been our of work for more than a
year after being laid off as a janitor for a great company. I’m a
nice man and a non-smoker.
Please contact me if you’re interested at 609-448-8420.
penter and can house-sit. Call
609-937-9456
or
e-mail
[email protected]
Retired police officer seeks
full or part-time position: Available for security, driver, all types
of home maintenance - painting,
siding, power washing, lawn
care, carpentry. Also am a car-
Top Biotech Recruiter seeking new position. Expertise
within R&D and Clinical Research. BA Biology. Contact Diane at [email protected]
In search or either part or
full-time
work:
Various
jobs/computer entry/filing/light
custodial or janitorial work (no
Retiree, 57 years old, Plainsboro blue collar laborer looking for work. Background:
warehousing, forklift (certified).
Call Tony, 609-799-7617.
HOME MAINTENANCE
FINANCIAL SERVICES
MENTAL HEALTH
INSTRUCTION
Handyman: Electrical, plumbing, any
projects around the house. 609-2756631.
Bookkeeping Services for Your
Bottom Line: QuickBooks ProAdvisor.
Call Joan today at Kaspin Associates,
609-490-0888.
Having problems with life issues?
Stress, anxiety, depression, relationships... Children and adults. Free consultation. Working in person or by
phone. Rafael Sharon, Psychoanalyst
609-683-7808.
Time, Experienced Teacher (20 yrs.).
Call Matt 609-919-1280.
Man With A Van Service: Pick-up and
delivery service, small local moves, and
light hauling. Serving Mercer County and
nearby areas 7 days a week. Reliable,
courteous and professional service at
reasonable rates. Call: 609-512-7248.
Need a business loan: As little as
seven day approval. 90% approval rate.
Flexible pay back terms. For information
call 866-768-6689. www.bankcardempire.com/jhs355219.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TAX SERVICES
Unique Virtual Assistance: We offer
services to streamline your business
chaos, virtually. www.uniquevirtualassistance.com. 1-877-472-8817.
Tax Preparation and Accounting
Services: For individuals and small
businesses. Notary, computerized tax
preparation, paralegal services. Your
place or mine. Fast response, free consultation, reasonable costs. Gerald
Hecker, 609-448-4284.
Virtual Assistant assisting clients
worldwide. Reports typed, transcription,
E-mails, calendar mgmt, concierge
services & more. www.executivesonthego.com
[email protected] 800-745-1166
Web-based PBX phone systems:
Be sure that your phones are always
professionally answered. Be sure that
you got all of your messages. Direct
calls to your office, home or cell. Get a
free 15 day account. For information call
8 6 6 - 7 6 8 - 6 6 8 9 .
www.simmonsservice.com.
Your Perfect Corporate Image:
Princeton Route 1. Virtual Offices, Offices, Receptionist, Business Address
Service, Telephone Answering Service,
Conference Rooms, Instant Activation,
Flexible Terms. Call 609-514-5100 or
visit www.princeton-office.com
COMPUTER SERVICES
Any problems with computer, network, Internet? Repair, install, on-site
services. Call 732-710-7416 any time.
Computer Service: Computer repair,
computer training (offer senior discount), data recovery, free estimate.
Cell: 609-213-8271.
TRAVEL
Glory Days Travel: Travel packages,
cruises, hotels, airline tickets, car
rentals. Visit my website at www.ytbtravel.com/camclark or call me at 609-7214157.
HEALTH
Introductory Massage Special $60: at the Ariel Center for Wellbeing. Integrative, Swedish, Spiritual Mind Treatment. 609-454-0102.
Massage and Reflexology: The
benefits are beyond what we even fathom. Experience deep relaxation, heightened well-being, improved health. Holistic practitioner offering reflexology,
Swedish and shiatsu massage. Available for on-site massage at the work
place, etc. Gift certificates, flexible
hours. Call Marilyn 609-403-8403.
Massage Therapy: Upscale, classy
est. staff. Enjoy our hot pack service, an
oasis for your soul and spirit. Enjoy the
deep tissue and healing touch of our
friendly, certified massage therapists.
Call: 609-520-0050. (Princeton off
Route 1 Behind “Pep Boys Auto.”)
Psychotherapy, Using a Counseling Approach: that can rapidly promote
self-acceptance and a sense of well-being; effective with depression, anxiety,
trauma, school issues, among others.
Work with children, adults, families. Dr.
Kristine Schwartz, Psy.D., MA, LPC;
609-937-0987.
INSTRUCTION
ESL Tutor - All Ages / Levels: Improve your English! Speak and write better — learn grammar, pronunciation,
and American expressions. Experienced ESL Professor. Excellent references. 609-658-6914.
Flute and Piano Lessons. Professional instructor, M.A. All ages and levels welcome. Plainsboro studio 609936-9811.
Guitar and Bass Lessons in your
home or my Princeton location. 5 years
teaching experience, all levels welcome. Contact Mike: 609-943-8634,
[email protected]
Handwriting with nature Experienced Occupational Therapist reveals
simple, effective way to teach handwriting to kids at home or school. 24-hr.
msg. Free info. Call Now: 609-7211456.”
Lessons in Your Home: Music lessons in your home. Piano, clarinet, saxophone, flute and guitar. Call Jim 609737-9259 or 609-273-5135.
Mac and/or Photoshop Tutor:
Grand mom needs help. 609-865-1111.
Math & Chemistry Tutoring: All
Course Levels plus SAT, ACT. Full-
Math, Science, English & SAT Tutoring: Available in your home. Brown
University educated college professor.
Experienced with gifted, under-achieving and learning disabled students. Free
initial consultation. Call Bruce 609-3710950.
Music Lessons - Farrington’s Music: Piano, guitar, drum, sax, clarinet,
voice, flute, trumpet, violin. $28 half
hour. School of Rock. Join the band!
Princeton 609-924-8282. Princeton
Junction 609-897-0032. Hightstown
609-448-7170. www.farringtonsmusic.com.
SAT and ACT Tutoring — Reading,
Writing, Math: Boost your scores with
outstanding private instruction by experienced college English professor and
high school math teacher. Let us help
you succeed! Reasonable fee. Many excellent local references. 609-658-6914.
Science and Math Tutoring: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra, Geometry.
Taught by college professor. 17 years
experience. Recipient of two national
teaching awards. Discoverygenics 609581-5686.
ADHD Coaching- Students, adults &
parents of children challenged with attentional issues, time management, procrastination, disorganization. Our experienced, certified coaches can help you
find effective strategies and tools. At
609-216-0441,
[email protected] o a c h e s . c o m ,
www.odysseycoaches.com
ENTERTAINMENT
Disc Jockey. Ambient DJ Service
provides customized music and entertainment services for corporate, formal
and family events. Please contact us at
609-672-1270 or [email protected]
www.ambientdj.com.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
I
away from the students.
With all those headlines in the air, why
wouldn’t I pull my
camera from its obvious blue bag
and stick it out of sight in my parka
while I walked from my car to the
field? But like a lot of bad publicity, it can lead to exaggerated fears.
In fact, on the streets surrounding
the school and on the athletic fields
behind it, the Trenton people were
cordial and friendly. The football
team, which has lost 17 straight
games, nevertheless put up a spirited fight and showed good sportsmanship throughout.
All is not lost at Trenton High.
While the school may not have the
94 percent post-secondary school
acceptance rate that Princeton
High basks in, it does take a practical approach to its curriculum. The
school includes six “small learning
communities,” including Applied
Engineering, Media Technology,
Business, Computer, Technology
& Design; Performing Arts; Hotel
Restaurant and Tourism; and Junior ROTC.
But, while the state has attempted to even out the public school
funding disparities between rich
communities such as Princeton and
poor cities such as Trenton, there’s
still a tale of two cities here. While
the Trenton High School “Invincible Marching Band” has entertained at plenty of Princeton University alumni P-rades, I doubt that
it has undertaken the kinds of excursions enjoyed by my kids in
Princeton, financed mostly by the
parents.
Last year my older boy traveled
to Italy (twice), Disney World, and
Boston, as well as that trip to Washington, D.C. As this school year began the music schedule included a
possible trip to Monterey, California, and a 16-day summer trip to
Greece. That was considered to be
a modest schedule for this year’s
Princeton High jazz band (though
still a challenge to the parents’wallets). A few weeks into the current
school year, however, my kid heard
that the orchestra needed a trumpet
player. He signed up. The orchestra, we discover, has a trip of its
own: An eight-day tour of China in
February.
Here in Princeton, the parents
may get a little poorer, or at least
dig deeper into their savings, but
the rich get richer.
U.S. 1
Richard K. Rein
Premium Retail & Office Space
[email protected]
Carduner’s Center
went over to
Trenton Central High
School a few Saturdays ago to see
the Princeton-Trenton high school
football game. More specifically, I
went to see the Princeton High
School Pep Band, which includes
my two kids on trumpet and trombone, perform at the football game.
That’s one of the nice things
about having kids in the music program — you get to witness a lot of
good shows. In the last year or so I
have heard my kids perform at the
Kennedy Center in Washington,
D.C., as well as Chris’s Jazz Cafe
in Philadelphia. A short walk from
my house, at the high school’s new
771-seat performing arts center
(part of a recent renovation and expansion), I heard the high school
kids open for Zydeco star and
Grammy winner Terrance Simien,
the Count Basie Orchestra, jazz vocalist Tierney Sutton, and the
Glenn Miller Orchestra. (This
Thursday, October 29, at 7:30 p.m.
I get to hear the Miller band again
at West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School South. The Philadelphia
Jazz Orchestra, a band of college
and high school musicians, including my two kids, will open.)
I won’t say that high school musicians work any harder than high
school athletes, but I would argue
that high school musical performances reach a higher level of proficiency and box office appeal than
do high school sports contests. Last
year at Princeton High I was treated to a compelling performance by
trombonist Wycliffe Gordon, who
at the end of the program was
joined onstage by the trumpet
soloist of the high school’s jazz
band, Senyo Agawu. It was as if the
high school quarterback was
scrimmaging with Peyton Manning and the New York Giants.
So on a rainy Saturday afternoon I tucked my video camera into an inside pocket of my parka and
drove 15 minutes down Route 1 to
Perry Street, and turned onto
Chambers Street to Trenton High.
It’s an imposing school, with a
bell tower overhead and two wings
on either side taking up a very long
city block. But at 77 years old,
Trenton High is down on its luck.
The state’s Schools Development
Authority (SDA) wants to tear it
down and replace it with a modern
structure. But some Trenton High
alumni and residents argue that the
school is a landmark of a community that has already lost too much
of its identity. Replacement buildings are usually done on the cheap.
They have devised a plan to renovate the old school, instead of tearing it down.
As Jennifer B. Leynes, president
of the Trenton Historical Society,
argued in the Trenton Times, the
school’s urban location is a strike
against it: “In New Jersey the SDA
has favored renovating schools in
Trenton High is down
on its luck, but neither the football team
nor the folks who
want to save the
school from demolition have quit.
suburban districts, including high
schools in Princeton and Teaneck.
In urban districts, however, the
SDAis predisposed to demolishing
historic schools, with Camden
High School being the most recent
and blatant example. Yet schools
like Trenton High are integral to
the fabric of our urban neighborhoods, and they are as important to
our cities as the historic suburban
schools are to theirs. Why, then,
has it become state policy to respect history in some municipalities and destroy it in others?”
Building maintenance issues
may be minor compared to the violence that has been reported both in
the school and in its environs after
the final bell sounds. The Trenton
Times has been filled with headlines concerning the violence. The
other day an “after school program” was announced. It wasn’t
the college prep assistance or music mentoring that you would expect at a school like Princeton
High; it was a law enforcement
program aimed at getting kids safely from the school to their homes.
The strategy: Barricade the street
in front of the high school and keep
gang-influenced
troublemakers
ENTERTAINMENT
BILLBOARD
WANTED TO BUY
Graphic artist-caricaturist. Live
caricatures - funny profiles. The best attraction for parties, meetings, seminars,
etc. Princeton, Lawrenceville, W. Windsor area. For details call Richard, 609532-3676.
will feature original material primarily influenced by classic and progressive
rock. Hall of Mirrors has opened for Spiraling (featuring Tom Brislin of Yes, Debbie Harry’s solo band, Camel and Meatloaf). Admission is free. Please call the
club at 215-862-5981 for more information.
tries. Top prices paid. “Armies of the
Past LTD”. 2038 Greenwood Ave.,
Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4:00,
or by appointment.
New Jersey Band Hall of Mirrors
will Be Performing: Sunday, November 1 at John and Peter’s, 96 South
Main Street, New Hope, Pa. The group
will play from 3 pm to 6 pm. The show
will feature original material primarily influenced by classic and progressive
rock. Hall of Mirrors has opened for Spiraling (featuring Tom Brislin of Yes, Debbie Harry’s solo band, Camel and Meatloaf). Admission is free. Please call the
club at 215-862-5981 for more information.
One Man Band: Keyboardist for your
wedding or party. Perfect entertainment.
You’ll love the variety. Duos available.
Call Ed at 609-424-0660.
SPORTS
Mayco Golf Supplies(an Amazon affiliate store): For the finest golf supplies
and accessories visit our website at
www.maycogolfsupplies.com.
Fax:
609-860-5260.
BILLBOARD
New Jersey Band Hall of Mirrors
will Be Performing: Sunday, November 1 at John and Peter’s, 96 South
Main Street, New Hope, Pa. The group
will play from 3 pm to 6 pm. The show
MERCHANDISE MART
Assorted samples of tote bags,
computer bags, leather wallets.
Please call 1-609-936-0300 for details.
Beauty/Barber Stations (2): 3 sets
of cabinets, 5 mirrors, etc. Top offer;
must be seen. 609-883-7172.
Dell Laptop with Windows XP:
$120, cell phone 609-213-8271.
Wedding dress: Perfect condition,
worn once, size 0-6. Hand-made in
Barcelona. Price: $500 (list was
$1,410). Pictures available. Call 609716-8142.
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
I Buy Guitars and All Musical Instruments in Any Condition: Call Rob at 609457-5501.
WANTED TO BUY
Antique Military Items: And war
relics wanted from all wars and coun-
Wanted - Baseball Cards/Memorabilia: Football, basketball, hockey.
Cards, bats, balls, photographs, programs, autographs. Highest prices paid.
908-596-0976.
OPPORTUNITIES
Beauty salon: Take over running
business in Princeton area. Prime location. Huge parking space. For further
details please call 732-735-9865.
Why not have a DEBT free holiday?
Work at Home United is an honest
home-based biz. No MLM, no RISK. We
do not sell, stock, or deliver any product.
Free training and website. Must love
talking to people and able to work at
least
15-20
hours
a
week.
www.WAHU4ME.com.
HOW TO ORDER
Call 609-452-7000, or fax your ad to
609-452-0033, or use our E-Mail address: [email protected] We
will confirm your insertion and the price.
Our classifieds are just 50 cents a word,
with a $7 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are just 40 cents per word, and
if your ad runs for 16 consecutive issues,
it’s only 30 cents per word. (There is a $3
service charge if we send out a bill.)
Prime Location: Corner U.S. Highway 130
and Princeton-Hightstown Road
East Windsor, NJ
Office Space
Immediately Available
1150 +/- SF & 2 at 500 +/- SF • 2nd floor
Retail Space:
Immediately Available
1600 SF & 1640 SF
Call: Brian Carduner
908-670-7613 • Website: cardunercenter.com
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTIES
& BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE OR LEASE
Just Listed! Long Beach Island. New restaurant + 4-BR/3-BR apartment. Main blvd. location/ocean block.This is
your chance to own a brand new facility on LBI into which the owner has put $1.3 mil. The bank has approved a sale
price of $750,000.
Lambertville. Office/retail/medical store front space for lease. Mt. Airy Shopping Village. 650 SF to 3,533 SF divisible. Attractive Lease Rate!
For more information call
Bonanni Realtors 609-586-4300
Time for a Change?
Commercial Space
for Lease
Lawrence
• 5,000 sq. ft. Will renovate
to your specs.
Ewing
• 800-2000 sq. ft. in professional
park. Near Rt. 31 & TCNJ.
• Near Lawrence Border.
1,000 sq. ft. 1st month FREE.
Buildings for Sale
Ewing
• 6,300 sq. ft. multi-tenant
office bldg.
Great upside potential.
Reduced $495,000.
Trenton/Lawrence Border
• 12-unit apartment
money-maker. $690,000.
Hamilton
• 630 sq. ft. across
from Applebee’s. Great location.
• 2,025 sq. ft. Newly renovated.
Ideal for many uses.
• 1,000 sq. ft. retail on Rt. 33.
Florence
• 2,000 to 12,000 sq. ft.
on Route 130 at NJ Turnpike.
Will renovate to your specs.
Bensalem, PA.
• 500-1,950 sq. ft. Near
Neshaminy Mall & PA. Turnpike.
Real Estate
Management Services
Hopewell Boro
• 1,400 sq. ft. office/retail.
Pennington
• 400 sq. ft. 2-room suite
at Pennington Circle.
7 Gordon Ave.
Lawrenceville
609-896-0505
53
54
U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
Houses for Sale
Continued from page 48
Trenton
116 Huff Avenue. Lot size: 6.05
acres. Listed, Prudential Fox &
Roach/Lynn Collins, 609-924-1600.
4 bedrooms; 2.5 baths; full basement. Completed in 2008. Stone
baths, granite countertop in kitchen.
$229,000.
West Windsor
102 Sequoia Court, #11. Taxes:
$4,799. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Arlene Hauser, 609-688-4808.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. 1,009 SF
penthouse condo. New carpet, new
furnace. Central air. Recent spa-like
bath. Good views. $228,000.
$185,000-$210,000
East Windsor
19 Huber Court, Building 12. Lot
size: .03 acres. Taxes: $5,100. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Kimberly Storcella, 609-737-1500.
www.weidel.com/kimberly.storcella.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Condo with
cathedral ceiling in family room.
$203,900.
Hamilton
JOIN
THE
Phyllis
(Cohen)
Grodnicki
CLUB
Bus: 609-924-1600
Direct: 609-683-8537
ER
UND CT!
TRA
CON
Over 15 years
experience
D!
SOL
President of Mercer Co.
Top Producers ‘07
President of Women
for Greenwood House
www.princetonmercerhomes.com
253 Nassau Street • Princeton
An independently owned and operated member
of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.
It’s Time!
Power Wash & Repaint
Exterior Before Winter
Interior & Exterior Painting
Owner-operated, highest quality work
for over 40 years in the Princeton area.
Julius H. Gross, Inc.
609-924-1474
www.juliushgrosspainting.com • [email protected]
3BR, 2.5 baths. Cool, creative & very
unique home in mature Nelson Ridge
Community, off Cherry Valley & Carter.
Wrapped in trees, stone drive, new 4BR
septic, new 20 year hardy-plank siding,
windows, recent roof. Both sides w/brick
& beam exterior. Home conveys barn-like
impression, 2-car garage. Interior w/brick
& beam/2 sides, wide plank HW floors
throughout. 2-story LR w/floor to ceiling
glass wall, open plan main floor, 2 story
brick FP, 2nd FP in great room. Bluestone
patio, yard filled w/ varied plantings,
2nd natural stone & boulder patio area.
Clearly not a typical home, ideal for
couple, creative singles/pairs or more.
Wonderful neighborhood w/children, quiet
street, great access to P-ton & surrounds.
Flexible terms: Sale, Lease, Lease-purchase,
Home-sale contingency OK, flexible occupancy, Brokers protected, owner is licensed
realtor. Asking $575,000 or $2500/month.
97 Chambord Court. Taxes:
$3,575. Listed, DiDonato Realty
Company/Bart DiNola, 609-5862344.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Secondfloor condo in Society Hill. New appliances, neutral colors. $199,500.
49 Lehaure Court. Taxes:
$3,575. Listed, Coldwell Banker/Kimberly Steinnagel, 609-921-1411.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Secondfloor condo with new washer, dryer.
Balcony. $195,000.
41 Ewingville Road. Lot size:
60x136. Taxes: $4,923. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Lee
Vereen, 609-586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Ranch with hardwood floors.
$189,900.
Lawrence Township
98 Quince Court. Lot size: .15
acres. Taxes: $2,791. Listed, Henderson Sotheby’s/Margaret “Peggy”
Baldwin, 609-737-9550. www.hendersonsir.com.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Condo with
newer carpeting, refrigerator, furnace, A/C, hot water heater.
$199,999.
Plainsboro
1405 Aspen Drive. Taxes:
$3,735. Listed, Weidel Realtors/Linda Feldstein, 609-921-2700.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. First floor
Grenoble model with new kitchen
countertops, and newer hot water
heater. Pergo floor. $186,000.
Trenton
106 Jackson Street. Listed, Long
and Foster Real Estate/Patrick
Weaver, 609-936-2525.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. Mill Hill townhouse, tax-exempt until 2012. Walk to state house
complex, Mercer County Courthouse
and Trenton train station. $185,000.
Home for Sale - Princeton address
$165,000-$185,000
Hamilton
527 Johnston Avenue. Lot size:
25x100. Taxes: $3,586. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Tina Neeley, 609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement. Newly renovated colonial. Finished loft. $175,000.
161 Reed Avenue. Lot size:
50x100. Taxes: $3,960. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Audrey
Perry, 609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Cape with hardwood floors,
driveway. $170,000.
Robbinsville
49 Wyndham Place. Listed,
Coldwell Banker/Carole Gross, 609688-4805.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. First-floor
condo; new carpeting, freshly painted. $169,900.
$135,000-$165,000
Ewing
15 Stratford Avenue. Lot size:
.14 acres. Taxes: $4,838. Listed,
Gloria Nilson GMAC/Sandy Brown,
609-737-9100.
www.sandybrown.myglorianilsonagent.com.
4 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Cape Cod. $149,500.
Hamilton
1812 Silver Court. Taxes:
$2,904. Listed, DiDonato Realty
Company/Stephanie Katona, 609586-2344.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Second-floor
condo. $159,000.
521 Lafayette Avenue. Lot size:
45x105. Taxes: $4,138. Listed,
Stockton Real Estate/Martha Stockton, 609-924-1416.
2 bedrooms; 1 bath. Cape Cod on
a one-way street. $139,000.
Monroe Township
562A Sheldon Way. Taxes:
$4,965. Listed, Levinson Associates/Barbara Carr, 609-655-5535.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. Corner ranch property, just
painted and carpeted. Attached
garage. Age-restricted 55+ community. 1,275 SF. $159,000.
22A Edinburgh Drive. Taxes:
$4,900. Listed, Levinson Associates/Iris Levine, 732-816-1485.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. 1,640 SF. $159,000.
795A Sparta Road. Listed, Levinson Associates/Gary Blei, 609-6555535.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths 2-car
garage. 55+ adult community. Oversize garages. Ranch on corner lot.
Four-season room. $148,000.
426 Redding Lane. Listed, Levinson Associates/Gary Blei, 609-6555535.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. 55+ Rossmoor adult community. Very private location. Ranch
with patio. $135,000.
Trenton
14 Morris Avenue. Lot size:
22x106. Taxes: $3,875. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Ramona
Bruno, 609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement. Semi-detached. Many amenities. Three-zone heat, two fireplaces,
updated kitchen. $159,900.
48 Market Street. Lot size:
25x100. Taxes: $2,520. Listed, Weidel Realtors/J. Jay Smith, 609-7371500.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; basement.
Mill Hill townhouse with off-street
parking, stained-glass windows,
large updated kitchen. $139,900.
$110,000-$135,000
Monroe Township
Contact [email protected] or 609-731-6076
5B George Washington Drive.
Listed, Levinson Associates/Gary
Blei, 609-655-5535.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths; 1-car
garage. In 55+ adult community on
golf course. Ranch with sunroom
and eat-in kitchen. $119,000.
South Brunswick
404 Samuel Court. Taxes:
$2,558. Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Dawn Petrozzini, 609951-8600.
1 bedroom; 1 bath. Heritage Glen
adult community condo. New hot water heater, air conditioner, refrigerator, and stove. Loft, deck. $119,900.
Trenton
1136 Franklin Street. Taxes:
$3,581. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/David Kaschak, 609-7500372. www.sellingnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 1.5 baths; full basement. Villa Park Section twin. Newer
windows, ceramic-tile kitchen and
bathrooms, walk-up attic, new carpets. $128,000.
513 Deklyn Avenue. Lot size:
20x100. Listed, DiDonato Realty
Company/Bart DiNola, 609-5862344.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath; full finished
basement. Colonial semi. New
kitchen and driveway. $114,500.
722 Roebling Avenue. Lot size:
12x112. Taxes: $2,165. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Susan
Grinkcvich, 609-586-2344.
4 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Chambersburg $110,000.
$96,000-$110,000
Ewing
860 Lower Ferry Road. Taxes:
$3,550. Listed, Weidel Realtors/J.
Jay Smith, 609-737-1500.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. Condo in
Cambridge Hall. Living room with
crown molding. Galley kitchen with
white cabinets, Berber-type carpeting throughout. $109,900.
Monroe Township
280B Milford Lane. Taxes:
$2,315. Listed, RE/MAX Greater
Princeton/Dawn Petrozzini, 609951-8600.
2 bedrooms; 2 baths. Rebuilt in
2009. Brand new. Vacant. Quick
closing available. Across from golf
course. Upgraded floors and cabinets. $99,500.
South Brunswick
602 Jacob Court. Taxes: $2,339.
Listed, RE/MAX Greater Princeton/Dawn Petrozzini, 609-951-8600.
1 bedroom; 1 bath. One-bedroom
condo in Heritage Glen adult community. All appliances included.
Close to senior center and library.
$104,900.
Trenton
525 Lamberton Street. Lot size:
25x70. Taxes: $2,281. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Don Black,
609-586-2344.
5 bedrooms; 1 bath; full basement. Three-story colonial near
Trenton Waterfront Park. $99,000.
Under $96,000
Hamilton
1929 South Broad Street. Lot
size: 25x125. Taxes: $3,841. Listed,
DiDonato Realty Company/Bart DiNola, 609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement. Dutch
Monroe Township
105A Hanover. Taxes: $1,244.
Listed, Levinson Associates/Charlotte Casey, 609-655-5535.
2 bedrooms; 1.5 baths. Ranch
with sunroom; co-op. $92,000.
Trenton
240 Woodland Street. Lot size:
18x60. Taxes: $2,923. Listed, DiDonato Realty Company/Audrey Perry,
609-586-2344.
3 bedrooms; 2 baths; full basement. Semi-detached. Newer
kitchen. Off-street parking. $92,900.
115 Dye Street. Lot size: 12x75.
Taxes: $1,946. Listed, ERA Properties Unlimited/Yolanda Phillips-Hadden, 609-750-0372.
www.sellingnj.com.
3 bedrooms; 1 bath. Eat-in
kitchen with stainless steel/black appliances. $79,500.
OCTOBER 28, 2009
U.S. 1
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Hopewell Twp. A gracious interior compliments the elegant
Lawrence Twp. 6 bedroom, 6.5 bath stone & frame French
Lawrence Twp. Well-lit, nearly new house with lofty views
exterior ofTwp.
this- Newly
customconstructed.
brick Georgian
on 4.5
Princeton
Sun., Oct.
14th,acres
1-4 in
a premiere enclave of estate homes.
pm. Dir.: Great Rd. to Pretty Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
$1,975,000
609-921-1050
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
Eclectic on 2-acre lot with tennis and indoor racquetball/
Princeton
Twp. - Newly constructed. Sun., Oct. 14th, 1-4
basketball court. Close to Princeton, shopping & trains.
pm.
Dir.: Great Rd. to Pretty Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
$1,575,000
609-921-1050
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
of the 3.82-acre
Three
supremelySun.,
appointed
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Princeton
Twp. - lot.
Newly
constructed.
Oct. 14th,
1-4with
elevator access hold 5 full baths and 5 beds.
pm. Dir.: Great Rd. to Pretty Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
$1,250,000
609-921-1050
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
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South Brunswick. 5 bedroom, 3 ½ bath solidly constructed
Princeton
- Newly
constructed.
14th, 1-4
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the eyeSun.,
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$3,250,000
609-921-1050
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609-921-1050
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Ewing Twp. A wide mahogany deck overlooks private wood-
Princeton
Twp.this
- Newly
constructed. four-bedroom
Sun., Oct. 14th,
1-4with
ed views from
well-proportioned,
Cape
pm.
Dir.:walk-out
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to Pretty
finished
lower
level.Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
$350,000
609-921-1050
Princeton Twp. Remarkable 5 bedroom renovated Colonial
Princeton
Twp.finishes,
- Newly fixtures
constructed.
Oct. 14th,
1-4
with custom
and Sun.,
woodwork
throughout.
pm.
Dir.: Great
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$3,250,000
609-921-1050
oasis.
$2,195,000
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Ewing Twp. Comfortable cape with darling nooks, built-ins,
Princeton
Newly constructed.
14th, 1-4
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and -screened
porch. WithSun.,
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to
Pretty
Brook
Rd.
to
Pheasant
Hill, #16
finished basement, it's bigger than expected.
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
$315,000
609-921-1050
Hopewell Twp. In the cul-de-sac of Chase Hollow, this custom
Princeton
Twp. - Newly
constructed.
Sun., Oct.
14th,walk-out
1-4
Colonial features
5 bedrooms,
3.5 baths,
finished
pm.
Dir.:
Great
Rd.
to
Pretty
Brook
Rd.
to
Pheasant
Hill,
#16
basement & custom pool on 3+ acres.
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
$1,175,000
Princeton Twp. - Newly constructed. Sun., Oct. 14th, 1-4
Lawrence Twp. Sunny Slope Farm, with pre-revolutionary
pm.
Dir.: Great Rd. to Pretty Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
origins, includes an historic stone manor house, guest cottage,
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
big barn and pool on 13+ wondrous acres.
$1,895,000
609-737-7765
Hopewell Twp. Elegantly detailed Colonial on two pictur-
Princeton
Twp.
Newly constructed.
Sun., Oct.
1-4
esque acres
with- flowering
trees, in-ground
pool,14th,
and pergola.
pm.
Dir.:
Great
Rd.
to
Pretty
Brook
Rd.
to
Pheasant
Hill,
#16
Exquisite new kitchen and built-ins throughout.
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
$850,000
609-921-1050
609-921-1050
Princeton Twp. - Newly constructed. Sun., Oct. 14th, 1-4
Hopewell Twp. In a beautifully landscaped meadow sits an
pm. Dir.: Great Rd. to Pretty Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
inviting house designed by Michael Giardino. On 20 acres with
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
5 bedrooms, this Colonial is a harmonious blend of gables,
Palladian style windows and dormers.
$2,450,000
609-921-1050
Princeton Twp. - Newly constructed. Sun., Oct. 14th, 1-4
Princeton Twp. In the Pretty Brook area, this enchanting
pm.
Dir.: Great Rd. to Pretty Brook Rd. to Pheasant Hill, #16
5,950 sq. ft. Shingle-style house will enjoy one of the last
$3,250,000
609-921-1050
remaining lots bordering picturesque Stony Brook.
$2,985,000
609-921-1050
www.ntcallaway.com
PRINCETON
PENN INGTON HUNTERDON COUNT Y BUCKS COUNT Y
Princeton NJ
609.921.1050
Pennington NJ
609.737.7765
Sergeantsville NJ
908.788.2821
New Hope PA
215.862.6565
© N.T. Callaway Real Estate Broker, LLC
55
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U.S. 1
OCTOBER 28, 2009
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Pennington Boro
$749,000
441 Sked Street. You can't just look at this one
- you must experience it. This Yankee Barn
interior is a must see. DIR: From Pennington
Town Center South On Main Street To West On
Welling To Left Sked Street - #441 On L.
Pennington Office 609-737-9100
Allentown
$1,399,000
A piece of paradise. 7 ac. of rolling pasture
surround this custom built colonial.Over 7000
sq. ft of living! Many trees & plantings,& pool
w/hot tub. Princeton Office 609-921-2600
E. Amwell Twp
$379,900
Charm abounds! Rare opportunity to own TWO
FAMILY home nestled in the historic Sourland
Mountains. Private wooded lot. Impeccably
maintained. Pennington Office 609-737-9100
East Brunswick
$290,000
Beautifully situated modified cape cod
home on mature tree lined street. 4 brs, 2 full
baths, large master br and EIK. Partially
finished basement. South Brunswick Office
732-398-2600
Ewing
$145,000
Being sold as-is. 108 Pennsylvania Ave. (lot) is
included. Close to College of NJ. Ideal for
investor. Princeton Office 609-921-2600
Ewing Twp
$159,900
Cozy ranch has updated kitchen w/recessed
lighting, ceramic tile & stainless steel appliances. Central air, fenced yard, 3 car off street
parking. Pennington Office 609-737-9100
Hopewell
$599,900
Picture perfect 4 bdr Yorkshire Model sits on
a beautiful professionally landscaped lot in
Mershon Chase. Princeton Junction Office
609-750-2020
Montgomery
$675,000
Beautifully appointed, first floor master suite,
Portofino model in Clubside at Cherry
Valley. Enjoy the lifestyle! Princeton Office
609-921-2600
Montgomery
$329,900
Lovely Birch model with spacious loft, bright &
airy kitchen, living room with sliding door to
balcony & electric fireplace. Available immediately. Princeton Office 609-921-2600
Princeton
$389,900
Well maintained home with gleaming wood
floors, spacious kitchen, 3 bedrooms. Family
room with half bath. Large professionally
finished basement. South Brunswick Office
732-398-2600
Robbinsville
$600,000
Idyllic 4 BR, 2.5 Bath, 2 car side entry garage,
beautifully positioned on almost an acre of land
w/fenced in meadow-like back yard. Princeton
Junction Office 609-750-2020
Titusville
$985,000
This home offers the charm of the old world
with all the conveniences of modern living. The
layout offers possibilities for in-law or au pair
suite. Princeton Office 609-921-2600
West Windsor
$519,900
Great location-walk to the train! Nice 3 bedroom
colonial with a beautiful yard in a coveted
neighborhood. Airy & bright with HW floors
on 1st & 2nd flr. Princeton Junction Office
609-750-2020
West Windsor
$499,900
Grand 5 bedroom, 2.5 bath colonial with hardwood floors throughout, upgraded kitchen with
granite countertops. Princeton Junction Office
609-750-2020
West Windsor
$324,900
2BR, 2BA Coventry model in active 55+ community. Numerous upgrades, custom window
treatments, sunroom & oversized garage.
Princeton Office 609-921-2600
West Windsor Twp
$1,050,000
Sept. occupancy! LIve in this fully custom built
home, sited on a wonderful lot w/great views
of nature. Fully upgraded interior with HW
flrs, 6 BR's 4.5B. Princeton Junction Office
609-750-2020
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