Citrix Systems Presentation Client for Macintosh 10 User's Manual

Citrix Systems Presentation Client for Macintosh 10 User's Manual
Citrix Presentation Server™ Client for Macintosh
Administrator’s Guide
Citrix Presentation Server™ Client for Macintosh, Version 10.x
Copyright and Trademark Notice
Use of the product documented in this guide is subject to your prior acceptance of the End User License Agreement. Copies of
the End User License Agreement are included in the root directory of the Citrix Presentation Server CD-ROM and in the root
directory of the Components CD-ROM.
Information in this document is subject to change without notice. Companies, names, and data used in examples herein are
fictitious unless otherwise noted. Other than printing one copy for personal use, no part of this document may be reproduced or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without the express written permission of
Citrix Systems, Inc.
© 1994-2007 Citrix Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Citrix, ICA (Independent Computing Architecture), and Program Neighborhood are registered trademarks, and Citrix Solutions
Network, SpeedScreen, and Citrix Presentation Server are trademarks of Citrix Systems, Inc. in the United States and other
countries.
RSA Encryption © 1996-1997 RSA Security Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Trademark Acknowledgements
Microsoft, MS, Windows, Windows NT, ActiveX, Active Directory, Windows 2003, Internet Explorer, and Windows XP are
either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Apple, Mac, Macintosh, MacBook, Keychain, Safari, and Mac OS are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. registered
in the United States and other countries.
Netscape, Netscape Navigator, and Netscape Communicator are trademarks of Netscape Communications Corporation in the
United States and other countries.
Novell Directory Services, NDS, and NetWare are registered trademarks of Novell, Inc. in the United States and other
countries. Novell Client is a trademark of Novell, Inc.
Java, JavaSoft, and Solaris are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and other
countries.
Iomega, Zip, REV, Active Disk, Micro Mini, iStorage, HotBurn and QuikTouch are either registered trademarks or trademarks
of Iomega Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
All other trade names referred to are the Servicemark, Trademark, or Registered Trademark of the respective manufacturers.
Document Code: December 6, 2007 (AO)
C ONTENTS
Contents
Chapter 1
Before You Begin
Who Should Use this Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
How to Use this Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Accessing Product Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Chapter 2
Introducing the Citrix Presentation Server Client for Macintosh
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Using the Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Client for Macintosh Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
New Features at This Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Connection Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
User Interface Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Security Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Mapping Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Performance Improvement Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Chapter 3
Deploying the Client for Macintosh
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Installing the Client for Macintosh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
To install the client from the Citrix Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Uninstalling the Client for Macintosh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Chapter 4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
About Connection Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Starting the ICA Client Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
To start the ICA Client Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Creating a Basic Connection File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
To create a connection file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Identifying a Desktop or Application to Connect to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
To configure a default master browser server for all connections. . . . . . . . . . . 24
To configure a master browser for an individual connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
To find the application or desktop to connect to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Configuring Business Recovery and Server Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
To configure a business recovery server group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Mapping Client Devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Mapping Client Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
To map a folder on the Macintosh hard disk for an ICA session. . . . . . . . . 28
To turn drive mapping off for a specific connection file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Mapping Client COM Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
To map a client COM port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Mapping Client Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
To turn client audio on or off on a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
To turn audio mapping on for a specific connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Opening a File in a Specific Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Configuring the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Extended Parameter Passing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Server Drive Mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Configuring the Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Client Drive Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Associating the file type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Chapter 5
Running Applications, Accessing Desktops, and Working in Sessions
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Starting an ICA Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
To start an ICA session. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Opening a Specific Application Using a Connection File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
To specify application properties for a connection file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
To print using the Macintosh Print dialog box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
To turn printing off for a specific connection file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Reconnecting to Servers after a Disconnection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Session Reliability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
To turn session reliability on for a specific connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Making Keystrokes with Macintosh Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
About Client Keyboard Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Using a Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Contents
Chapter 6
5
Configuring the User Interface
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Window Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
To configure the default window properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
To specify the window properties for a particular connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Showing and Hiding the Menu Bar and Dock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
To display the menu bar and Dock only when the mouse is at the edge of the
screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Configuring Sound Support (Audio Mapping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Playing Windows Alert Beeps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
To configure the default alert beep setting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Configuring Hotkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
To change the default hotkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Using Japanese Hotkeys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
To map Kotoeri hotkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Using Japanese Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
To configure default keyboard layout and type settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Solving Japanese Keyboard Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Chapter 7
Improving Performance
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Compressing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Caching Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Reducing Display Latency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Improving Performance Over a Low-Bandwidth Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Changing Your Client Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Changing the Way You Use the Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Chapter 8
Integrating the Client with Security Solutions
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Configuring the Client to Work with a Proxy Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Specifying the Proxy Server Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Detecting Proxy Details Automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Integrating the Client with the Secure Gateway or SSL Relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
The Secure Gateway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
SSL Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Configuring SSL/TLS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Installing Root Certificates on Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Configuring the Client to Use SSL/TLS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Connecting to a Server through a Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Using Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
1
Before You Begin
Who Should Use this Guide
This guide is for system administrators responsible for installing, configuring,
deploying, and maintaining the Client for Macintosh. The guide assumes
knowledge of:
•
Citrix Presentation Server
•
The machine running Presentation Server to which the client connects
•
The operating system on the client device (Mac OS X)
•
Installation, operation, and maintenance of network and asynchronous
communication hardware, including serial ports, modems, and device
adapters
To make it easier to read, all the procedures in this guide refer to “you.” In some
circumstances “you” refers to the administrator of the client, in others to the user
of the client, and sometimes to both. The context indicates whether a procedure is
primarily an administrator or user activity.
How to Use this Guide
To get the most out of this guide, review the table of contents to familiarize
yourself with the topics discussed.
This guide contains the following sections:
Topic
Contents
This section
Introduces the Client for Macintosh
Administrator’s Guide
Introducing the Citrix Presentation Server
Client for Macintosh
Gives a detailed list of features and an
overview of how the client works
Deploying the Client for Macintosh
Describes how to install and deploy the
client
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Topic
Contents
Configuring Connections to Servers and
Applications
Describes how to configure connection
properties and device mappings for the client
Running Applications, Accessing Desktops, Describes how to use connection files to
and Working in Sessions
open files in published applications and
access remote server desktops
Configuring the User Interface
Describes how to customize the appearance
and behavior of client sessions
Improving Performance
Gives recommendations for methods to
speed client processing and improve
efficiency
Integrating the Client with Security
Solutions
Describes how to integrate the client with
security technologies such as proxy servers,
firewalls, and systems based on Secure
Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security
(SSL/TLS)
Accessing Product Documentation
This guide is part of the Presentation Server documentation set and contains
conceptual information and installation and configuration steps for the client.
Apple Help is provided for some tasks within the client and Citrix ICA Client
Editor. This is shipped with the client software and accessed from the client and
ICA Client Editor menu bars, and by using COMMAND+SHIFT+? in the ICA
Client Editor.
The documentation for Presentation Server includes online documentation,
known issues information, and application Help, as follows:
•
Use Welcome to Citrix Presentation Server (Read_Me_First.html) to access
the complete set of online guides on the Web. Alternatively, to access the
documentation at any time, go to http://support.citrix.com. Online
documentation is provided as Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF)
files.
•
Known issues information is included in the product readme, also available
on the Web. Use Welcome to Citrix Presentation Server
(Read_Me_First.html) to access the product readme.
•
For information about terminology related to Presentation Server, see the
Citrix Presentation Server Glossary, available from the Knowledge Center
at http://support.citrix.com.
•
More information about Citrix documentation, and details about how to
obtain further information and support, is included in Getting Started with
1
Before You Begin
9
Citrix Presentation Server, available from the Knowledge Center at http://
support.citrix.com.
Note: To provide feedback about the documentation, go to http://
www.citrix.com and click Support > Knowledge Center > Product
Documentation. To access the feedback form, click the Submit Documentation
Feedback link.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
2
Introducing the Citrix Presentation
Server Client for Macintosh
Overview
When connected to a server, the Client for Macintosh provides features that make
remote computing just like running applications on a local desktop.
Topics covered in this section include:
•
The client architecture
•
Features of the Client for Macintosh
You use the client to access remote servers and applications available on those
servers, even those running on operating systems other than Macintosh OS X.
You can run the applications on the server and see them display locally in a
window on your own desktop. The window displays either the remote server
desktop, from where you can open any available application, or displays a
specific application (called a published application) that runs on the remote
server.
Architecture
The diagram below shows how the different elements of the client interact with
each other and the server in order to display remote applications on the Macintosh
screen.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Figure showing the Client for Macintosh’s place in a Citrix Presentation Server system
Using the Client
There are two ways of using the client to gain access to Presentation Server
applications and content
•
You can use the Web Interface to connect through a standard Web browser,
or, in the case of Citrix Web Interface for Microsoft Sharepoint, a standard
SharePoint environment. Once the client is installed, all the user needs to
2
Introducing the Citrix Presentation Server Client for Macintosh
13
do is navigate to a certain page, enter their credentials if required, and click
an icon in the list of available resources to start a session.
•
You can use the ICA Client Editor to configure a connection to a particular
application, server, or group of servers. The ICA Client Editor saves this
information as a connection file. You can use the ICA Client Editor to set
default values for each connection or build a tailored suite of server desktop
and published application connections. If you want to amend any of the
settings, use the ICA Client Editor to reconfigure connections.
When you open the connection file the client connects to the server. This
information might go through various security systems such as firewalls
and proxy servers before it reaches the server. The server then runs the
desktop or published application, but displays it on your client device as
though it were an application on your hard disk.
This document focuses on creating and configuring connection files.
Client for Macintosh Features
Note: SpeedScreen Latency Reduction, audio mapping, time zone support,
encryption, automatic reconnection, and support for smart card features are
available only when connecting to computers running Presentation Server for
Windows and not computers running Presentation Server for UNIX.
New Features at This Release
•
Improved printing. The user can now use the local Macintosh Print
dialog box to control output, and use any printer to which they can connect.
•
Kerberos support. Users can now connect to servers and applications
using the Kerberos authentication protocol, and therefore avoid entering
their credentials whenever they try to connect.
•
Improved graphics performance. Using Citrix’s SpeedScreen Image
Acceleration technology, the connection now uses less bandwidth when
displaying graphics.
•
Session reliability. If the connection to a server is lost, the user can
continue to see the session while the client tries to reconnect.
•
Encryption. This release offers Citrix’s SecureICA technology as an
alternative means of encryption.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Connection Features
•
Automatic reconnection. If the client disconnects from a server
unexpectedly, it attempts to reconnect automatically. See “Reconnecting to
Servers after a Disconnection” on page 40 for more information.
•
Multiple session support. Users can run multiple connections
concurrently.
•
Alternate addresses when connecting to servers across firewalls. Users
can use an alternate address when connecting to a server across a firewall
for individual connections. See “Connecting to a Server through a Firewall”
on page 62.
•
Per-connection browsing. Users can specify a server for a particular
connection in order to define specific network protocols and servers, or
change security settings, for each connection. See “Identifying a Desktop or
Application to Connect to” on page 24.
•
File type association. You can map file extensions to published
applications so that ICA sessions are launched automatically using the
correct application when a file is opened. See “Opening a File in a Specific
Application” on page 33.
•
Local clipboard integration. Users can cut and paste objects between
applications running locally on the client device and applications running
remotely in an ICA session.
Pasted RTF text may not look identical to the text that was copied. If a font
is not available on the platform users paste the RTF text to, the application
uses a compromise font on that platform.
User Interface Features
•
Dock and menu bar auto-hide. When a session is running in full screen
mode, you can keep the menu bar and Dock out of the way and only show
them when you move your mouse to the top of the screen or whichever
edge the Dock is located. See “Showing and Hiding the Menu Bar and
Dock” on page 46 for more information.
•
Recent items option. To enable users to find connection files more easily, a
list of recently used items is available in both the client and ICA Client
Editor File menus.
•
Multi-button mouse support. The client recognizes three buttons (left,
right, and center) on a multi-button mouse. It also recognizes when a wheel
is used as a center button and supports all wheel scrolling functions.
2
Introducing the Citrix Presentation Server Client for Macintosh
15
Note: The client does not support cursor feedback. This means, for
example, that if an administrator is controlling what is happening in the
session window, the user might see a menu open, but the cursor on that
user’s computer would not move to track the administrator’s mouse
movement.
•
Printing. Printing uses the Citrix Universal Printer Driver technology so
that applications running remotely on the server can print to local printers.
For more information, see “Printing” on page 39.
•
PC key mapping. Users can use special key combinations to mimic PC
keys not available on standard Macintosh keyboards and to replicate mouse
actions. See “Configuring Hotkeys” on page 47.
•
Time zone support. Sessions on servers in a different time zone reflect the
time zone of the client device, as set in the computer’s System Preferences
dialog box.
For example, a user in London logs on to a server in the USA and launches
Microsoft Outlook as a published application. Microsoft Outlook stamps
emails sent during this session with the user’s London time zone
information.
The time zone displayed may be different from the user’s actual location
because the server uses the first country in the alphabetically ordered list
for that time zone. Users in Helsinki will see their time zone reported as
Athens because both are GMT +2:00.
•
Seamless windows. As well as configuring sessions to run in windows of a
fixed size, you can choose the seamless mode to display applications and
desktops in a fully resizeable window.
Security Features
•
Support for smart cards. You can use smart cards to provide
authenticating credentials when logging on to a server. See “Creating a
Basic Connection File” on page 23 for more information about using smart
cards with the client.
You may also need to install proprietary software to use smart card readers.
•
Secure proxy server support. As an alternative to using a SOCKS proxy,
the client also supports using a Secure Proxy Server. For more information,
see “Configuring the Client to Work with a Proxy Server” on page 57.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
•
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) support. SSL provides server authentication,
encryption of the data stream, and message integrity checks. See
“Integrating the Client with the Secure Gateway or SSL Relay” on page 59.
•
Transport Layer Security encryption. As an alternative to Secure
Sockets Layer (SSL) 3.0, the client also supports Transport Layer Security
(TLS) 1.0. See “Configuring SSL/TLS” on page 60.
•
NDS support. When users launch the client, they can log on and be
authenticated using their Novell Directory Services (NDS) credentials.
Supported NDS credentials are user name (or distinguished name),
password, directory tree, and context.
•
Encryption. The client supports different levels of encryption, including
RSA RC5 encryption.
Mapping Features
•
Client device mapping. The client supports client device and COM port
mapping to allow you to access devices attached to the client computer
during an ICA session. See “Mapping Client Devices” on page 28 and
“Mapping Client COM Ports” on page 30.
•
Client drive mapping. Client drive mapping allows you to access the local
disk drives of the client computer during an ICA session. See “Mapping
Client Drives” on page 28.
•
Client audio mapping. Client audio mapping allows the client computer to
play sounds generated by applications running on the server. See “Mapping
Client Audio” on page 31.
Performance Improvement Features
•
SpeedScreen Browser Acceleration. SpeedScreen Browser Acceleration,
available to users running Internet Explorer 5.5 or later within a session,
increases the rate at which images are downloaded and displayed.
SpeedScreen Browser Acceleration must be enabled on the server to be
available to the client—it does not work when running Internet Explorer
locally. When enabled, SpeedScreen Browser Acceleration operates
automatically; you do not need to configure the client.
•
Disk caching. Disk caching stores locally those graphics that are used
regularly, such as icons, fonts, and bitmaps. This avoids retransmitting data.
See “Caching Images” on page 51.
•
Data compression. Data compression reduces the amount of data sent over
the communications link to the server. See “Compressing Data” on page 51.
2
Introducing the Citrix Presentation Server Client for Macintosh
17
•
SpeedScreen Latency Reduction. SpeedScreen Latency Reduction
accelerates the display of text input on the client computer and provides
visual feedback to show that input is being processed. See “Reducing
Display Latency” on page 53.
•
Business recovery support. The client supports multiple server sites with
different addresses for the same published application name. See
“Configuring Business Recovery and Server Groups” on page 27.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
3
Deploying the Client for Macintosh
Overview
This section describes how to install and deploy the Client for Macintosh. Topics
covered in this section include:
•
System requirements
•
Installing the client
•
Uninstalling the client
System Requirements
Users need equipment that meets these minimum requirements to run this release
of the client:
•
Either an Intel-based Macintosh running Mac OS X Version 10.4 or later, or
a PowerPC-based Macintosh running Mac OS X 10.3 or later
•
At least 128 MB of RAM
•
12 MB of free disk space
•
A working network connection or a working Internet connection to connect
to servers
Installing the Client for Macintosh
The client is available as a compressed disk image (MacICA_OSX.dmg.zip) on
the Citrix Web site.
To install the client from the Citrix Web site
1.
Download the file MacICA_OSX.dmg.zip and open it. This runs the Disk
Utility program, which mounts the file as a disk image accessible from your
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Macintosh desktop. This can happen automatically after downloading the
.zip file, if your browser is set up to do so.
2.
Double-click the Citrix icon and follow the instructions. (After installation,
you might also want to put the client and ICA Client Editor in your Dock so
they are easily available.)
Uninstalling the Client for Macintosh
To uninstall the client, delete the folder containing the client and ICA Client
Editor.
If you want to remove cache files and any initial settings used by the client, delete
the folder at /Users/home/Library/Preferences/Citrix ICA Client, where home
is the name of the current user’s personal Home folder.
4
Configuring Connections to Servers
and Applications
Overview
This section describes how to create and edit connections between the client and
server. Topics include:
•
Starting the ICA Client Editor
•
Creating a basic connection file
•
Configuring network protocol and server location
•
Changing connection file settings and default settings
•
Mapping client drives, COM ports, and printers
About Connection Files
You can create two types of connections to clients: connections to server desktops
and connections to published applications.
•
A connection to a server desktop lets you access the desktop of a specified
server. You can run any applications available on the desktop, in any order.
•
A published application is a predefined application and its associated
environment. The published application may be available on more than one
server.
By using the default settings, you can quickly create a basic connection file (see
“Creating a Basic Connection File” on page 23) and customize it in several ways,
either when you are creating it or afterwards. The settings you edit can be used
either as defaults for all connection files that you create subsequently or you can
apply them just to a single file.
If a number of users all need to connect to the same server with the same settings,
you can create one standard connection file and install this on each user’s
computer.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
You can change the following aspects of the client connection:
•
The network protocol used to search for servers. See “Identifying a Desktop
or Application to Connect to” on page 24.
•
The servers the client can connect to. See “Configuring Business Recovery
and Server Groups” on page 27.
•
Client device mapping, which enables applications running on a server to
access devices connected to the client. See “Mapping Client Devices” on
page 28 and “Mapping Client COM Ports” on page 30.
•
The application to run when the client connects to a server desktop. For
details, see “Opening a Specific Application Using a Connection File” on
page 38.
•
The application used to open a particular file type. See “Opening a Specific
Application Using a Connection File” on page 38.
•
User interface settings such as the appearance of session windows and
quality of sound. See “Configuring the User Interface” on page 45.
•
Performance improvement features such as compressing data and reducing
display latency. See “Improving Performance” on page 51.
•
Security solutions such as connecting through proxy servers. See
“Integrating the Client with Security Solutions” on page 57.
Starting the ICA Client Editor
You use the ICA Client Editor to create connection files. You can also place
connection files, the client, and the ICA Client Editor in the Dock so they are
easily available.
To start the ICA Client Editor
Do one of the following:
•
Navigate to the folder where you installed the client and open Citrix ICA
Client Editor.
•
If you have added the ICA Client Editor to the Dock, click on the client
icon in the Dock.
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
23
Creating a Basic Connection File
To create a connection file
1.
In your client installation folder, open Citrix ICA Client Editor.
The ICA Client Editor opens at the Network Connection pane.
2.
To connect to a desktop, choose Server, or to connect to a published
application, choose Published Application.
3.
In the Connect To box, type the name or IP address of the server, or the
name of the published application or content, or click Browse and choose
the name from a list.
Note: If your list of available servers changes, it is because you have
access to more than one network and adverse loading conditions mean you
are seeing a different set of servers.
4.
•
In order to use Kerberos authentication, choose the Kerberos Passthrough Authentication option to connect automatically with the
credentials configured in the Macintosh Kerberos application.
•
If you are using a smart card to log on to the server, choose the Smart
Card option. For information about configuring security policy
settings for smart card authentication, see the Presentation Server
documentation.
•
Type the user name, the domain (if required), and the password in the
appropriate boxes. If you leave these boxes blank, the client prompts
for this information each time you make a connection using this file.
Click Save. Choose a location in which to save the connection file. By
default, the Save box displays the server or published application name, but
you can give the file a different name.
If you do not save the connection settings, they are lost when you exit the
ICA Client Editor or open another connection file. However, you can still
make a connection to a server without saving the settings.
5.
To start the ICA session immediately, click Connect.
6.
To exit the ICA Client Editor, click Quit. If you did not save the connection
details, a dialog box appears prompting you to save them now.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Identifying a Desktop or Application to Connect to
You need to take the following two steps to find the desktop or application you
want to use.
1.
Identify a server that acts as the master browser. This server contains the list
of available desktops and applications and their locations.
2.
View the list and choose the desktop or application you want. The master
browser then directs the client to the requested desktop or application.
See the Presentation Server documentation for instructions about how to
configure a server to act as a master browser.
The way server location works depends on which network protocol is configured:
•
For TCP/IP+HTTP and SSL/TLS+HTTPS, you must set specific server
addresses for the servers. The client uses the HTTP or HTTPS protocol to
contact these servers. If you choose to use HTTP, the server must be
running Presentation Server in interoperability mode.
•
For TCP/IP, the default setting for server location is Auto Locate. The
client attempts to contact all of the servers on the network by broadcasting
on the User DataGram Protocol (UDP). Alternatively, you can set specific
addresses for servers.
To configure a default master browser server for
all connections
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
The Default Settings dialog box opens at the Making a Connection >
Server Location pane.
2.
Choose the network protocol you want to use.
The network protocol setting lets you control the way the client searches for
servers and how it communicates with them.
The protocols are:
•
TCP/IP. The client uses UDP to search for servers. The client
communicates with the server using the ICA protocol over TCP/IP.
•
TCP/IP+HTTP. The client uses the HTTP protocol to search for
servers. The client communicates with the server using the ICA
protocol over TCP/IP. This is the default protocol but it can be used
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
25
only with servers running Presentation Server in interoperability
mode.
•
3.
SSL/TLS+HTTPS. The client communicates with the server using
the SSL/TLS protocol. This protocol is described in more detail in
“Integrating the Client with the Secure Gateway or SSL Relay” on
page 59.
Click Add.
You can specify groups of servers for each protocol. See “Configuring
Business Recovery and Server Groups” on page 27.
4.
In the Server Address box:
•
If you choose TCP/IP to be the network protocol, choose or type the
name of the server.
•
If you choose TCP/IP+HTTP or SLL/TLS+HTTPS to be the network
protocol, type the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the server
and type a port number if different from the default 80.
For more information about fully qualified domain names, see “The Secure
Gateway” on page 59.
5.
Click OK and then click Save. Any changes you make affect all connection
files configured to use the default server.
To configure a master browser for an individual
connection
1.
2.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor File menu, choose Open and choose the
connection file you want to edit.
•
Drag and drop the connection file onto the ICA Client Editor icon.
If you want to connect using a protocol other than the default one, make
sure the Network Protocol > Use Default check box is cleared.
The network protocol shown depends on the current connection settings. If
you did not change these settings for this connection file, they show the
default settings.
•
If the default is set up for secure communications (SSL/TLS), the
Network Protocol > Use Default check box is selected and the list of
protocols displays SSL/TLS+HTTPS
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
•
If the default is set up for normal connections (that is, not using SSL/
TLS), the Network Protocol > Use Default check box is selected
and the list of protocols displays TCP/IP or TCP/IP+HTTP
Choose the protocol you want to use to communicate with the server from
the drop-down list. The options are:
•
TCP/IP. The client uses UDP (User DataGram Protocol)
•
TCP/IP+HTTP. The client uses the HTTP protocol
•
SSL/TLS+HTTPS. The client uses the SSL/TLS protocol
3.
Make sure the Server Location > Use Default check box is cleared.
4.
Type the full name of the server. If you chose SSL/TLS+HTTPS as the
network protocol, type the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the
server; for example, winston.secure.company.com.
For more information about fully qualified domain names, see “The Secure
Gateway” on page 59.
5.
Click Save. Any changes you make affect only this specific connection file.
To find the application or desktop to connect to
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor File menu, choose Open and choose the
connection file you want to edit.
•
Drag and drop the connection file onto the ICA Client Editor icon.
The file opens at the Network Connection pane.
2.
Choose either Server or Published Application.
3.
Click Browse to see a list of servers or applications. If you know the name
of the server or application you want, you can enter its name in the Connect
To box without having to browse the list.
4.
Choose the server or application from the list and click Select.
The name of the selected server or application appears in the Connect To
box. When you save the connection file (or click Connect), this server or
application opens when you start an ICA session.
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
27
Configuring Business Recovery and Server Groups
Business recovery provides consistent connections to published applications in
the event of a master browser server disruption. You can define up to three groups
of servers: a primary and two backups. Each group can contain up to five servers.
When you configure business recovery, the client attempts to contact all the
servers within the Primary group simultaneously; the first server to respond acts
as the master browser. If none of the servers responds, the client attempts to
contact all the servers within the Backup 1 group. If there is still no response, the
client attempts to contact all of the servers in the Backup 2 group. When a server
responds, the client queries the server for the address of the server on which to
run the published application. This process is repeated each time the user attempts
to make a connection.
By default, the client uses the TCP/IP+HTTP protocol. You can change the
protocol and specify business recovery server addresses. Whichever protocol you
choose applies to all connections and cannot be configured for individual servers
or groups.
To configure a business recovery server group
1.
2.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, look at the Server
Group > Address List and choose the server group you want to configure.
You can specify separate server groups for each protocol.
3.
Click Add to add a server to the selected group.
4.
In the Server Address box:
•
For TCP/IP: choose or type the name of the server.
•
For TCP/IP+HTTP and SSL/TLS+HTTPS: type the name of the
server and type a port number if different from the default 80.
5.
Add more servers as necessary. You can have a maximum of five servers in
a group.
6.
Click Save.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Mapping Client Devices
The client supports client device mapping for connections to servers. Client
device mapping allows a remote application running on the server to access
devices attached to the local client.
This section includes more information about:
•
Mapping client drives
•
Mapping client COM ports
•
Mapping client audio
For information regarding mapping client printers, see “Printing” on page 39.
Note: Presentation Server for UNIX does not support client audio mapping.
Mapping Client Drives
Because Windows operating systems recognize file paths with drive letters but
not Macintosh paths, the client needs to map local Macintosh folders to drive
letters for published applications and remote desktop sessions to locate local files.
Client drive mapping allows you to access the local disk drives of the client,
including CD-ROM drives, during ICA sessions. When a server is configured to
allow client drive mapping, users can access their locally stored files, work with
them during their ICA sessions, and then save them either on a local drive or on a
drive on the server.
For example, to use the files in the Macintosh HD/MacClientDocs/Docs/MacPDF
folder, you can map Macintosh HD/MacClientDocs/Docs to drive M and within a
session access the files using the path M:\MacPDF.
In addition, you can configure servers to map their server drives. When server
drives are mapped and the drive letters clash with those selected for the user’s
local drives, the server automatically changes the client drive letters.
To map a folder on the Macintosh hard disk for an ICA session
1.
2.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
Choose Drives and Devices > Drive Mapping > Enable Drive Mapping.
For each server drive letter, the Drive Mapping list shows the disk or path
name of the Macintosh folder mapped to the drive. In the Enabled/Read/
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
29
Write column, icons display each mapped drive that is enabled for use and
what type of access users have to the drive. Items that are no longer
available do not display a folder icon.
Icons that include a question mark indicate that a drive mapping has
“query” permissions. This is a security feature that means when any
application tries to read from or write to the folder, a dialog box appears
asking whether you want to allow or deny access. If you choose Deny,
access will be denied for the duration of the connection. In order to remove
the deny permission, close or disconnect the session and restart.
Drives A, B, and C are mapped automatically as follows:
Drive:
Mapped to:
A
A Macintosh removable media drive (floppy disk, USB flash drive, or
any other item that is removable and can be written to). Where there is
more than one removable drive, users can change the one to which drive
A is mapped from within an ICA session:
From the Drives menu, choose Client A Diskette to display the options
and choose the required drive.
B
The Macintosh internal CD or DVD drive, or any other item that is
removable and non-writable, such as a disk image .dmg file. Where there
is more than one such item, users can change the one to which drive B is
mapped from within an ICA session:
From the Drives menu, choose Client B CDROM to display the options
and choose the required item.
C
Permanently mapped to the user’s Home folder on the Macintosh hard
disk.
3.
Choose an available drive letter.
4.
Click Browse. Choose the folder on the Macintosh hard disk to map and
click Choose. The Drive Mapping pane now displays the mapped folder. If
the drive letter selected is not available on the server, the specified folder is
mapped to another free drive letter.
5.
Click Save.
6.
Log off from any open ICA connections and reconnect.
Note: There is no way of ejecting removable media from within the client. To
eject a CD or other item, use the standard Macintosh methods.
To turn drive mapping off for a specific connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
30
Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, choose Turn Drive Mapping Off
for this Server.
3.
Click Save.
To ensure that client drive mapping works with filenames containing accented
characters (for example, é), set the client DOS code page to 1252. You can do this
by changing a setting in the server registry.
Caution: Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that
require you to reinstall the operating system. Citrix cannot guarantee that
problems resulting from incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use
Registry Editor at your own risk. Make sure you back up the registry before you
edit it.
Set the registry entry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\
Nls\CodePage\OEMCP
to 1252.
However, within a console window, you may then need to set the code page back
to the original value of the server registry entry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\
Nls\CodePage\OEMCP
You can do this using the CHCP command. This ensures that DOS applications
can display characters correctly and accept ALT+numeric entries from the
keypad.
Mapping Client COM Ports
Client COM port mapping lets you access serial devices connected to the client
device. Applications running remotely on the server can use local devices such as
modems and serial port printers.
Note: Client COM port mapping is not TAPI compatible. Applications that
communicate with devices using TAPI are not supported
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
31
Macintosh serial ports do not provide all the control signal lines that are used by
Windows applications. The DSR (Data Set Ready), DCD (Device Carrier Detect),
RI (Ring Indicator), and RTS (Request To Send) lines are not provided. Windows
applications that rely on these signals for hardware handshaking and flow control
may not work. The Macintosh implementation of serial communications relies on
CTS (Clear To Send) and DTR (Data Terminal Ready) lines for input and output
hardware handshaking only.
To map a client COM port
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Drives and Devices > COM Port Mapping.
3.
Choose the COM port you want to configure.
This is a virtual client COM port that is displayed in the ICA session. It
does not refer to a physical port on the local machine.
4.
Click Modify to display the Select Serial Port dialog box.
5.
Choose the physical port to associate with the selected COM port and click
Select.
6.
Repeat steps 3 through 5 to map other ports as necessary and then click
Save to save the new settings.
7.
Start the client and log on to a server.
8.
To start a command prompt, click Start > Programs > Accessories >
Command Prompt.
9.
At the prompt, type
net use comx: \\client\comz:
where x is the number of the COM port on the server (ports 1 through 9 are
available for mapping) and z is the number of the client COM port (ports 1
through 4 are available).
10.
To confirm the mapping, type net use at the prompt. A list displays mapped
drives, LPT ports, and mapped COM ports.
You can now use this mapped COM port as you would a COM port on the client.
Mapping Client Audio
Client audio mapping lets applications running on the server play sounds through
the client device.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Note: Client audio mapping is not available when you connect to computers
running Presentation Server for UNIX.
Three different audio quality settings are available. The higher the audio quality,
the more bandwidth is required to transfer the audio data. Higher quality audio
also uses more server CPU to process.
You can set the audio quality or turn client audio mapping on or off on the server.
You can set the audio quality or turn client audio mapping on or off for each
connection file. If the client and server audio quality settings are different, the
lower of the two qualities is used.
The audio quality options are:
•
High. This setting is recommended only for connections where bandwidth
is plentiful and sound quality is important. It allows clients to play a sound
file at its native data rate. Sounds at the highest quality level require about
1.3 Mbps of bandwidth to play clearly. Transmitting this amount of data can
result in increased CPU utilization and network congestion.
•
Medium. This setting is recommended for most LAN-based connections.
This setting causes any sounds sent to the client to be compressed to a
maximum of 64 Kbps. This compression results in a moderate decrease in
the quality of the sound played on the client. The host CPU utilization
decreases compared with the uncompressed version because of the
reduction in the amount of data being sent.
•
Low. This setting is recommended for low-bandwidth connections,
including most modem connections. This setting causes any sounds sent to
the client to be compressed to a maximum of 16 Kbps. This compression
results in a significant decrease in the quality of the sound. The CPU
requirements and benefits of this setting are similar to those of the Medium
setting; however, the lower data rate allows reasonable performance for a
low-bandwidth connection.
To turn client audio on or off on a server
From the ICA Settings dialog box on the server, administrators can turn client
audio on or off by choosing the appropriate option. See the Presentation Server
documentation for details.
To turn audio mapping on for a specific connection
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, choose Enable Sound.
3.
Set Quality to High, Medium, or Low, depending on available bandwidth.
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
33
Opening a File in a Specific Application
You can assign certain files and file types to specific applications so that the
appropriate published application starts automatically when you open a file on
your computer. For example, while working on files using a published Windows
application on a client, you can work on PC files that you can save to the
Macintosh hard disk.
Using file type association, you can open files either by
•
Dragging the file icon to the client icon configured to connect to the
appropriate published application
•
Choosing File > Open or double-clicking the file icon to open the
published application with your file in it
You need to configure a number of settings on both the server and the client.
Configuring the Server
You need to complete these preliminary tasks for file type association to work:
•
Set extended parameter passing, if necessary.
•
Identify the server drive letter that is mapped to the client hard disk and tell
users so they can map their hard disk or document folder to the correct
server drive letter.
Extended Parameter Passing
The server administrator may need to set up the published application to receive
and use the file name by appending the parameter "%*" to the command line; for
example, powerpoint "%*". Using speech marks ensures that spaces in file
names and paths are catered for.
Full details about how to publish applications and set up commands, and
information regarding whether or not this parameter is needed for the server you
are using, are in the Presentation Server documentation.
Server Drive Mapping
Servers map client drives to drive letters automatically when a client logs on. The
server tries to match the client drives to client drive letters, typically A for the
first floppy drive, B for the CD or DVD drive, C for the current user’s Home
folder, and so on. If these letters are already used for drives on the server, the
server uses other letters. Machines running Presentation Server start at V and
search in ascending order for free drive letters.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Configuring the Client
Client Drive Mapping
For file type association to work, a file must be within a folder that can be
accessed through client drive mapping. For example, if client drive mapping is
enabled for the C Drive, which is always mapped to the current user's Home
directory, file type association will work for all files within the Home directory.
For more information about drive mapping, see “Mapping Client Devices” on
page 28.
To view mapped client drives when connected to a server desktop
From within the ICA session, open the My Computer window from the desktop
to display a list of mapped drives.
Associating the file type
To associate the file type (as identified by its extension) with a published
application, you must use the ICA Client Editor to associate the file type with a
connection file. This enables you to open a file in a specific application by
dragging the file on the client icon. In order to open a file in a specific application
by double-clicking on it, or by using the keyboard, you must also use Macintosh
functions to associate the file or file type with the client.
To associate a file type with a published application
1.
Create a connection file that connects to the published application you want
to use. (See “Creating a Basic Connection File” on page 23.)
2.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
3.
Choose Making a Connection > File Type Association to see a list of
current associations.
4.
Click Add to open the File Type Association dialog box.
5.
In the Extension box, type the file type (extension); for example, PPTX for
Microsoft PowerPoint files.
6.
Click Browse to see a list of files, folders, and connection files on your
Macintosh.
7.
Choose the folder containing the connection file you created in Step 1
above. Choose the connection file and click Open. The connection file
name appears in the Map to Connection File box.
4
Configuring Connections to Servers and Applications
35
8.
Click OK to confirm. To remove or change the association, choose the
association to make the Remove and Change buttons active and then click
the relevant button.
9.
Click Save to exit and confirm the association you have just set up.
You can now open files in an associated application by dragging and
dropping them onto the client. If you want to open files in an associated
application by double-clicking or using the keyboard, you must perform the
following additional steps.
10.
Choose a file of the relevant type.
11.
From the Finder menu bar, choose File > Get Info > Open with > Other
and choose Citrix ICA Client.
By default, only the selected file opens the associated application. If you
want all files of this type to open in the application, choose Change All.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
5
Running Applications, Accessing
Desktops, and Working in Sessions
Overview
This section describes how to use the client. Topics in this section include:
•
Starting an ICA session
•
Configuring file type association to access published applications
•
Opening a specific application using a connection file
•
Printing from a published application
•
Using the Macintosh keyboard to make PC keystrokes
•
What happens when you get disconnected from the server
Starting an ICA Session
After you create one or more connection files (or complete connection details in
the ICA Client Editor), you can start an ICA session.
When you start an ICA session, you may see additional messages or warnings
displayed on your screen, depending on the requirements of the application you
are opening. For example, some applications require read/write access to a
directory on your local hard disk (for example, the Home directory) and you may
get a dialog box asking you to deny or allow access. If you deny access, you may
have trouble using the application if it needs to access local files.
To start an ICA session
Do one of the following:
•
Double-click the connection file, or single-click the connection file if it is in
the Dock.
•
Drag and drop the connection file onto the client icon.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
•
Open the client. From the File menu, choose Open Connection and choose
the connection file you want to open.
•
Open the ICA Client Editor. From the File menu, choose Open and choose
the connection file you want to open. On the Network Connection pane,
click Connect.
•
If you configure file type association, you can start an ICA session by
dragging the file onto the ICA Client Editor icon. (See “Opening a Specific
Application Using a Connection File” on page 38.)
•
If you opened connection files in the past, open the ICA Client Editor. From
the File menu, choose Open Recent and choose the connection file you
want to open from the list. On the Network Connection pane, click
Connect.
Note: If you cannot connect to a server, you may need to change the Server
Location (see “Configuring Business Recovery and Server Groups” on page 27)
or proxy server details (see “Configuring the Client to Work with a Proxy Server”
on page 57).
Opening a Specific Application Using a Connection File
You can specify an application to run after you connect to a server. If you specify
an application, you do not see the server desktop when you connect and the
connection closes when you exit from the application.
If you specify an application, you cannot run any other application in the ICA
session nor access the server desktop.
To specify application properties for a connection
file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Application tab, specify the path and file name of the application
to be executed after connecting to the server.
For example, to launch Microsoft Word automatically after connecting to
the server, type c:\winword\winword.exe.
3.
If necessary, type the working directory to be used for the application in the
Working Directory box.
5
Running Applications, Accessing Desktops, and Working in Sessions
39
Printing
You can access printers connected to client devices during an ICA session. When
a server is configured to allow client printer mapping, applications running
remotely on the server can print to any printer that can be used from locally
running applications. For information about configuring printer mapping, see the
Citrix Presentation Server Administrator’s Guide.
No special configuration is needed to set up local printers to print during an ICA
session. You can choose to print using the dialog box within the session, or use
the remote printing dialog box followed by the standard Macintosh printing
dialog box and its additional printing options.
Important: A4 pages might not print correctly if the user chooses the A4 paper
size option in the Page Setup dialog box (or the Page Layout tab in the case of
Microsoft Office 2007 applications). In order to print on A4 paper, the user must
either specify it as a default size and use the A4 paper size option, or choose the
A4 210×297 option if available. To set A4 as the default, from the client menu,
choose File > Default Paper Size > A4.
All other paper sizes will print correctly if the printer supports that paper size.
You can also turn printing off for a specific connection file.
To print using the Macintosh Print dialog box
From the client menu, choose File > Enable Print Dialog.
To turn printing off for a specific connection file
1.
Before you make the connection, open the connection file you want to edit
in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, choose Turn Printer Mapping Off
for this Server.
3.
Click Save.
Note: In some circumstances, when you connect to the server, the Macintosh
Printer icon is still present even though you turned printer mapping off. However,
if you try to print, you see a Windows error message saying there is a problem
when trying to print and printing is not possible.
For information about mapping peripherals other than printers, see “Mapping
Client Devices” on page 28.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Reconnecting to Servers after a Disconnection
You can be disconnected from ICA sessions because of unreliable networks,
highly variable network latency, or range limitations of wireless devices. With the
automatic client reconnection feature, the client can detect unintended
disconnections and automatically reconnect users to the affected sessions.
When this feature is enabled on a machine running Presentation Server, you do
not have to reconnect manually. Instead, a message box appears indicating that
automatic reconnection is under way, and the client tries to reconnect until it is
successful or the user cancels the reconnection attempts. If you require users to be
authenticated again, a dialog box requesting credentials appears during automatic
reconnection. Automatic reconnection does not occur if you exit applications
without logging off.
Please refer to the Presentation Server documentation for information on how to
implement automatic client reconnection.
Session Reliability
With the session reliability feature, users continue to see a published application’s
window if the connection to the application experiences an interruption, and no
message box explaining that the client is trying to reconnect appears for three
minutes (at which stage the user can cancel the reconnection attempt). For
example, wireless users entering a tunnel may lose their connection when they
enter the tunnel and regain it when they come out on the other side. During such
interruptions, the session reliability feature enables the session window to remain
displayed while the connection is being restored.
To reduce the likelihood that users continue to click links or type text while the
connection is being restored, mouse pointers become hourglass icons while the
application is unresponsive.
To turn session reliability on for a specific connection
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file.
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, under Session Reliability, choose
Enable and enter the port number to which you want to connect. If the
session reliability feature is enabled, the default port used for session
communication with the server changes from 1494 to 2598. Please refer to
the Presentation Server documentation for information on how to change
the port used for session reliability.
3.
Click Save.
5
Running Applications, Accessing Desktops, and Working in Sessions
41
Making Keystrokes with Macintosh Keyboards
Remote sessions recognize most Macintosh keyboard combinations for text input,
such as Option-G to input the copyright symbol ©. However some keystrokes the
user makes during a session do not appear on the remote application or desktop,
and instead are interpreted by the Macintosh operating system. This can result in
keys triggering Macintosh responses instead (for example, F9 can be configured
to run the All Windows feature of Exposé).
The user might also face the problem of wanting to use certain PC keys, such as
INSERT, that many Macintosh keyboards do not have.
Keyboards and the ways keys are configured can differ widely between
machines. The client therefore offers several choices to ensure that keystrokes
can be correctly sent to desktops and applications running within a session. These
are listed in the table below.
Conventions used in the table:
•
Letter keys are capitalized and do not imply that the Shift key should be
pressed simultaneously.
•
Hyphens between keystrokes indicate that keys should be pressed together
(for example, Control-C); spaces between keystrokes indicate that keys
should be pressed and released before pressing the next key (for example,
Option-Escape T means the user should press Option and Escape together,
and then release the keys and press T).
•
Character keys are those that create text input and include all letters,
numbers, and punctuation marks; special keys are those that do not create
input by themselves but act as modifiers or controllers. Special keys include
Control, Alt, Shift, arrow keys, and function keys.
•
Menu instructions relate to the menus in the client session.
•
Depending on the the configuration of the machine, some key combinations
might not work as expected, and alternative combinations are listed.
•
Fn refers to the Fn (Function) key on a Macintosh keyboard; function key
refers to F1 to F12 on either a PC or Macintosh keyboard.
PC key
Macintosh options
ALT+character key
Command–Option–character key (e.g. to send ALT-C, use
Command-Option-C)
ALT+special key
Option–special key (e.g. Option-Tab)
Command–Option–special key (e.g. Command-Option-Tab)
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
PC key
Macintosh options
CTRL+character key
Command–character key (e.g. Command-C)
Control–character key (e.g. Control-C)
CTRL+special key
Control–special key (e.g. Control-F4)
Command–Control–special key (e.g. Command-Control-F4
CTRL/ALT/SHIFT
Option-Escape Control/Option/Shift–function key
combination + function key
Choose Keyboard > Send Function Key > Control/Alt/
Shift-function key
CTRL+ALT
Control-Command
CTRL+ALT+DEL
Control–Option–Forward Delete
Control-Option-Fn-Delete (on MacBook keyboards)
DELETE
Delete
Option-Escape D
Choose Keyboard > Send Special Key > Delete
Fn-Backspace (Fn-Delete on some US keyboards)
END
End
Fn-Right Arrow
ESC
Escape
Option-Escape E
Choose Keyboard > Send Special Key > Escape
F1 to F9
F1 to F9
Option-Escape 1 to 9
Choose Keyboard > Send Function Key > F1 to F9
F10
F10
Option-Escape 0 (zero)
Choose Keyboard > Send Function Key > F10
F11
F11
Option-Escape hyphen
Choose Keyboard > Send Function Key > F11
F12
F12
Option–Escape equal sign
Choose Keyboard > Send Function Key > F12
HOME
Home
Fn–Left Arrow
5
Running Applications, Accessing Desktops, and Working in Sessions
PC key
Macintosh options
INSERT
Option-Escape I
43
Command-Help
Choose Keyboard > Send Special Key > Insert
NUM LOCK
Clear
Fn-6
PAGE DOWN
Page Down
Fn–Down Arrow
PAGE UP
Page Up
Fn–Up Arrow
SPACEBAR
Option-Escape S
Choose Keyboard > Send Special Key > Space
TAB
Option-Escape T
Choose Keyboard > Send Special Key > Tab
About Client Keyboard Support
The client has two keyboard modes: Enhanced keyboard support, for extra
options and easier ways to use special keys such as function keys in Windows
applications, and Standard keyboard support, as used by older client versions.
The user selects the preferred keyboard mode using the Keyboard menu during a
client session.
Enhanced keyboard support comprises a set of three features that can be turned
on and off using the client’s Keyboard menu.
•
Send Special Keys Unchanged enables the user to send keys to remote
sessions without additional keystrokes.
•
Use Command Key for Control Characters enables the user to send
Command-character key combinations as CTRL+character key
combinations.
•
Use Command-Option for Alt Characters enables the user to send
Command-Option-key combinations as ALT+key combinations.
Standard keyboard mode enables the following keystrokes to be used.
PC Key or action
Macintosh options
ALT
Command
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
PC Key or action
Macintosh options
INSERT
0 (zero) on the numeric keypad; Num Lock must be off
Option-Help
DELETE
Decimal point on the numeric keypad; Num Lock must be off
Clear
F1 to F9
Option 1 to 9 on numeric keypad
Option-Escape 1 to 9
F10
Option 0 (zero) on numeric keypad
Option-Escape 0
F11
Option minus sign on numeric keypad
Option-Escape hyphen
F12
Option plus sign on numeric keypad
Option-Escape equal sign
ALT+TAB
Option-Tab (This can be reconfigured by the user—see
“Configuring Hotkeys” on page 47)
ALT+SHIFT+TAB
Option-Shift-Tab (This can be reconfigured by the user—see
“Configuring Hotkeys” on page 47)
Standard keyboard mode also enables the user to use the Keyboard menu to send
function keys, send special keys, and enable all the keystrokes that can be used
when they select Use Option-Escape for more Keys.
Using a Mouse
Citrix recommends using a two button mouse and configuring the right mouse
button to be the secondary button. You can also emulate a PC mouse right-click
using Option and click.
6
Configuring the User Interface
Overview
This section discusses the user interface settings you can configure to make
connections work according to personal taste and to make them more efficient. It
includes the following topics:
•
Window properties
•
Showing and hiding the Macintosh menu bar and Dock
•
Mapping audio and windows alert beeps
•
Hotkeys
•
Japanese hotkeys and other keyboard settings
Window Properties
You can change the maximum size and color depth of the session window. You
can change the default settings or set different dimensions for different
connections.
To configure the default window properties
1.
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings, or
click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Windows and Sounds.
3.
Make your changes:
•
Use the Size pop-up menu to choose a preconfigured window size,
choose Full Screen, or choose Custom and type dimensions at
Width and Height.
You can also choose Seamless, where applications appear in a fully
resizable window.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
The maximum window size is determined by the server.
•
4.
Choose the window color depth to display.
Click Save.
To specify the window properties for a particular
connection
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Window tab, clear Use Default and enter your own settings:
3.
•
For window size, use the size list to choose a preconfigured window
size, choose Full Screen mode, or choose Custom and type your
own window size. Choose Seamless to display applications in a fully
resizable window
•
Choose the window color depth to display.
Click Save.
Showing and Hiding the Menu Bar and Dock
If your ICA session is running in Full Screen mode, the Macintosh menu bar and
Dock might be hidden.
To display the Macintosh menu bar, press Control-Option. The same key
combination also hides it again.
Note: If you are not in Full Screen mode, and your window size enables you to
see the entire remote desktop, you can use Control-Option to show a standard
Macintosh resize control in the bottom right corner of the ICA session window.
The same key combination hides the resize box again.
If the window size is too small to show the entire remote desktop, you must use
the scroll bars to see the hidden content of the desktop.
To display both the complete window and the Macintosh menu bar, in the client
File menu, click Best Window Position.
You can also configure the client so that it will show the menu bar and Dock only
when you move your mouse to the top of the screen or to the edge where the
Dock is located.
6
Configuring the User Interface
47
To display the menu bar and Dock only when the
mouse is at the edge of the screen.
Do one of the following:
•
In the ICA Client Editor, choose Default Settings > Connection
Properties > Windows and Sounds and choose the Display the
Macintosh Dock and menu bar automatically.
•
Use the standard Macintosh method from the Apple menu by choosing
Dock > Dock Preferences > Automatically hide and show the Dock.
Configuring Sound Support (Audio Mapping)
You can configure sound support for a connection file using settings on the
Connection Properties pane of the ICA Client Editor. For details, see “Mapping
Client Audio” on page 31.
Playing Windows Alert Beeps
You can set the client to play the default Macintosh beep when an application in
the ICA session triggers the default Windows beep.
To configure the default alert beep setting
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Windows and Sounds.
3.
Choose or clear Enable Windows Alert Sounds.
4.
Click Save.
Configuring Hotkeys
The client offers several means of using a Macintosh keyboard to make the
equivalent of PC keystrokes and change the way Macintosh keys are interpreted
in Windows desktops and applications running within a session. See “Making
Keystrokes with Macintosh Keyboards” on page 41 for information on these
features.
The following default key combinations can be changed.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
•
Option-Tab (to cycle through open applications—equivalent to ALT+TAB
on PC)
•
Option-Shift-Tab (to cycle through open applications in reverse order—
equivalent to ALT+SHIFT+TAB on PC)
•
Latency reduction hotkey (to override the selected SpeedScreen mode—see
“Reducing Display Latency” on page 53 for more information)
To change the default hotkeys
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Keyboard to see the current settings for
the hotkeys.
3.
Choose the main key for the function, then use the check boxes to choose
the additional keystrokes.
4.
Click Save.
Using Japanese Hotkeys
Choose your input locale in the Input Menu from the Macintosh system
preferences. Depending on how your hotkeys have been set up, you may be able
to use Command-Space Bar to change the input locale; this can be changed using
the International options in the Mac OS X System Preferences.
The following Kotoeri hotkeys are supported:
This key combination
Has this effect
Control-Shift-H
Show help
Control-Shift-N
Add word to dictionary
Control-Shift-R
Reconvert
Control-J
Convert to Hiragana
Control-V
Convert to Katakana
Control-L
Convert to full-width alphanumeric
Control–Semi-colon key
Convert to half-width alphanumeric
Control-Shift-J
Hiragana input mode
Control-Shift-K
Katakana input mode
6
Configuring the User Interface
This key combination
Has this effect
Control-Shift-L
Katakana input mode
Control-Shift–Semi-colon
Half-width alphanumeric input mode
49
There may be a conflict if the remote application uses the same hotkeys as one of
the hotkeys listed above.
Note: When you connect to a Japanese server, you may experience difficulty
generating Japanese keystrokes using the keyboard. You can use the on-screen
buttons of the Input Method Editor (IME) using the mouse. Alternatively, you can
set up hotkey mappings that simulate the effect of the IME keys. For example, if
you cannot generate the Kanji key normally from the keyboard, you can define
Control-Command-5 as the Kanji key.
To map Kotoeri hotkeys
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Japanese Hotkeys.
3.
Choose Map Kotoeri Shortcuts.
4.
Click Save.
Using Japanese Keyboards
If you use a Japanese keyboard you need to specify the layout and type.
To configure default keyboard layout and type
settings
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Keyboard.
3.
Choose the keyboard layout and keyboard type.
4.
Click Save.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Solving Japanese Keyboard Problems
If you are using IME version 2000 or later, the Kanji Bango hotkey and the Caps
Lock key may not work with the default settings.
If you are using SpeedScreen (Local Text Echo) and your server has two or more
input locales, you may experience a problem with 106 key Japanese keyboards
with US keyboard layout. See “Reducing Display Latency” on page 53.
Note: Kana input is not supported when using the Apple Extended Keyboard II
Japanese with the client. You can still use this keyboard for Roman input.
To enable the Kanji Bango hotkey and Caps Lock key
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Keyboard.
3.
From the Keyboard Layout list, choose Japanese MS-IME2000.
4.
Click Save.
To overcome problems using 106 key Japanese keyboards with US keyboard
layout
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Keyboard.
3.
From the Keyboard Type list, choose 101 Keyboard (Japanese).
4.
Click Save.
7
Improving Performance
Overview
This section describes ways you can improve the performance of the client
including:
•
Compressing data
•
Caching images
•
Reducing display latency
It also gives tips for improving performance over low-bandwidth connections.
Compressing Data
Data compression reduces the amount of data that needs to be transferred over the
connection but requires additional processor resources to compress and
decompress the data. In high-bandwidth LAN environments where bandwidth
consumption is not a concern, turning data compression off may give better
performance because it reduces the demand on the processor.
To turn data compression on or off for a specific connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, choose or clear the Use Data
Compression check box.
3.
Click Save.
Caching Images
Disk caching stores commonly used graphical files, such as bitmaps and fonts, in
a local cache on the client device. If the connection has limited bandwidth, using
disk caching improves performance. If the connection is a high-speed LAN, you
do not need disk caching.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Important: Although you can configure default disk cache settings, disk
caching does not happen unless you turn it on for a particular connection file.
Note: In addition, the client uses SpeedScreen Browser Acceleration, a feature
that also improves performance when you display Web pages containing .jpeg
and .gif images in Microsoft Internet Explorer. SpeedScreen Browser
Acceleration operates automatically and requires no configuration.
To configure the default settings for disk caching
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
Choose Connection Properties > Performance.
3.
Change the disk cache settings as required. You can do the following:
4.
•
Use a different disk cache folder (the default directory where the
cached data is stored). To do this, click Folder Location and choose
the folder you want.
•
Change the cache folder size using the Amount of disk space to use
selector. Choose an amount from 1 MB to 100 MB.
•
For Minimum size bitmap that will be cached, specify the size of
the smallest bitmap to be cached to disk. This must be a value
between 2 and 64 kilobytes.
•
Remove all cached data from the client by clicking Clear Disk
Cache.
Click Save.
To turn disk caching on or off for a specific connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, choose or clear the Use Disk Cache
for Bitmaps check box.
3.
Click Save.
7
Improving Performance
53
Reducing Display Latency
Over high latency connections, you might experience significant delays between
the time when you type text at the keyboard and when it is displayed on the
screen. Similarly, there may be a delay between clicking a mouse button and the
screen displaying any visible feedback. This can result in you retyping text or
making several unnecessary mouse clicks. The client’s SpeedScreen Latency
Reduction feature lessens the impact on display of high latency.
Note: SpeedScreen Latency Reduction only works if you enable it on the
server. For full details, see the Presentation Server documentation. Note that
SpeedScreen Latency Reduction is not available when you connect to computers
running Presentation Server for UNIX.
To turn SpeedScreen Latency Reduction on or off for a specific connection
file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Connection Properties tab, choose the SpeedScreen Latency
Reduction settings:
•
Mouse Click Feedback: display an hourglass to show the mouse
input is being processed.
•
Local Text Echo: display text in a generic font (as you type) that gets
overwritten with the correct font after the input has been processed by
the server. For some applications, such as Microsoft Word, your text
might appear in a floating bubble before being displayed in the
application you are using.
For each setting, choose an option:
3.
•
Auto: automatically turn the feature on or off depending on the speed
of the connection. Choose this option if you are not certain of the
connection speed.
•
On: choose for slower connections (for example, over a WAN or a
dial-up connection).
•
Off: choose for faster connections (for example, over a LAN).
Click Save.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
Note: You can override the selected SpeedScreen mode for the current
session by using the Latency Reduction hotkey. See “Configuring Hotkeys”
on page 47 for details.
Improving Performance Over a Low-Bandwidth
Connection
If you have a low-bandwidth connection, such as a modem, there are a number of
changes that you can make to improve performance:
•
Change your client configuration. Changing your client configuration can
reduce the bandwidth that the ICA protocol requires. See “Changing Your
Client Configuration” on page 54.
•
Change the way you use the client. See “Changing the Way You Use the
Client” on page 55 for ways of reducing the bandwidth required for a
high-performance connection by changing working practices.
•
Use the latest client. Citrix is continually enhancing and improving
performance with each release, and many performance features require the
latest client and server software.
Changing Your Client Configuration
On devices with limited processing power, or where limited bandwidth is
available, there is a trade-off between performance and functionality. The client
provides both user and administrator with the ability to choose an acceptable
mixture of rich functionality and interactive performance. Making one or more of
the following changes can reduce the bandwidth that your connection requires,
and improve performance:
•
Allow maximum data compression. Compression reduces the size of the
data that is transferred over the connection. See “Compressing Data” on
page 51.
•
Turn the disk cache on. Disk caching stores commonly used images and
fonts locally on the client computer so that they do not have to be
transferred over the connection every time they are needed. See “Caching
Images” on page 51.
•
Turn SpeedScreen Latency Reduction on. SpeedScreen Latency
Reduction improves performance over high latency connections by
providing instant feedback in response to typed data or mouse clicks. See
“Reducing Display Latency” on page 53.
7
Improving Performance
55
•
Reduce the window size. Change the window size to the minimum size
you can comfortably use. See “Window Properties” on page 45.
•
Turn client audio mapping off. If you do not need sound, turn client audio
mapping off. See “Mapping Client Audio” on page 31.
Changing the Way You Use the Client
ICA technology is highly optimized and typically does not have high CPU and
bandwidth requirements. However, if you are using a very low-bandwidth
connection, consider the following to preserve performance:
•
Avoid accessing large files using client drive mapping. When you access
a large file with client drive mapping, the file is transferred over the
connection. On slow connections, this may take a long time. Consider
opening large file directly from its remote location instead.
•
Avoid printing large documents on local client printers. When you print
a document on a local client printer, the print file is transferred over the
connection. On slow connections, this may take a long time. Consider
printing large files on a network printer instead.
•
Avoid playing multimedia content. Playing multimedia content uses a lot
of bandwidth and can reduce performance.
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8
Integrating the Client with Security
Solutions
Overview
This section describes how you can integrate the client with a range of security
technologies, including proxy servers, firewalls, and Secure Sockets Layer/
Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS) based systems. This section assumes you
have a working knowledge of these technologies. It describes:
•
Connecting through a proxy server
•
Integrating the client with the Secure Gateway or SSL Relay solutions with
SSL/TLS protocols
•
Connecting to a server using alternate addressing across a firewall
Configuring the Client to Work with a Proxy Server
You can use either a SOCKS proxy or a Secure Proxy Server (also known as
Security Proxy Server, HTTPS Proxy Server, or SSL Tunneling Proxy Server).
Proxy authentication is also supported. When used with the Secure Gateway,
applications can be delivered securely to anywhere in the world by the Web. The
client can automatically detect proxy server settings from the network settings in
the client computer’s Network System Preferences.
To configure the client to work with a proxy server you can specify the default
details of your proxy server manually or detect proxy servers automatically.
Instructions on how to do this are provided in the following two sections.
Specifying the Proxy Server Manually
If you are specifying the proxy server manually, you need to know its address.
You also need to know its port number if it is not set to 1080 for a SOCKS Proxy
Server or 8080 for a Secure Proxy Server.
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Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
To configure a default SOCKS or Secure Proxy Server
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, click Firewalls to
open the Firewall Settings dialog box.
3.
Choose the proxy type (or No Proxy for a direct connection.)
4.
Type the address of the proxy server, and the port number if it is not 1080
(for a SOCKS Proxy Server) or 8080 (for a Secure Proxy Server).
5.
Click OK, then Save.
To specify a SOCKS or Secure Proxy Server for a connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Security tab, clear the Proxy > Use Default check box.
3.
Click Firewall Settings.
4.
Choose the proxy type (or No Proxy for a direct connection.)
5.
Type the address of the proxy server, and the port number if it is not 1080
(for a SOCKS Proxy Server) or 8080 (for a Secure Proxy Server).
6.
Click OK.
Note: You can enter only one proxy server address.
Detecting Proxy Details Automatically
If you are deploying the client in an organization with many proxy servers,
consider using auto proxy server detection (also called auto client proxy
detection.) It is also useful if you cannot determine which proxy server will be
used when you configure the client. Auto proxy server detection obtains proxy
details from the network settings in the client device’s Network System
Preferences.
To turn auto proxy server detection on by default
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
8
Integrating the Client with Security Solutions
2.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, click Firewalls.
3.
Choose Use Web browser proxy settings.
4.
Click OK, then Save.
59
Integrating the Client with the Secure Gateway or SSL
Relay
You can integrate the client with the Citrix Secure Gateway or an SSL Relay
service. The client supports both SSL and TLS protocols:
•
SSL provides strong encryption to increase the privacy of your connections
and certificate-based server authentication to ensure that the server you are
connecting to is a genuine server.
•
TLS is the latest, standardized, version of the SSL protocol. Because there
are only minor technical differences between SSL Version 3.0 and TLS
Version 1.0, they are functionally equivalent.
The Secure Gateway
If you are using the server in SSL Relay mode, the Secure Gateway functions as a
proxy server. You must configure the client to use both the fully qualified domain
name (FQDN) and port number of the Secure Gateway server. (For further
details, see the Secure Gateway for Windows Administrator’s Guide.)
The FQDN of the Secure Gateway server must list the following components in
sequence:
•
Host name
•
Intermediate domain
•
Top-level domain
For example, my_computer.my_company.com is an FQDN because it lists, in
sequence, a host name (my_computer), an intermediate domain (my_company),
and a top-level domain (com). The combination of intermediate and top-level
domains (my_company.com) is generally referred to as the domain name.
You can configure the Secure Gateway settings only if you already chose SSL/
TLS+HTTPS. See “Identifying a Desktop or Application to Connect to” on page
24.
To configure a default Secure Gateway server (Relay mode)
1.
Do one of the following:
60
Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, click Firewalls to
open the Firewalls Settings dialog box.
3.
Type the fully qualified domain name of the Secure Gateway server and the
port number, if not 443.
4.
Click OK, then Save.
To specify a Secure Gateway server (Relay mode) for a connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Security tab, clear the Proxy > Use Default check box.
3.
Click Firewall Settings.
4.
Type the fully qualified domain name of the Secure Gateway server and the
port number, if not 443.
5.
Click OK.
SSL Relay
You can use SSL Relay to secure communications between the following:
•
An SSL/TLS-enabled client and a server
•
Devices running Presentation Server and the Web Interface
For information about configuring and using SSL Relay, see the Presentation
Server documentation. For information about configuring Web Interface to use
SSL/TLS encryption, see the Web Interface Administrator’s Guide.
Configuring SSL/TLS
TLS is the standardized form of SSL. Both are cryptographic security protocols
designed to ensure the integrity and privacy of data transfers across public
networks.
SSL and TLS are configured in the same way and use the same certificates. When
you enable SSL and TLS, each time you initiate a connection the client tries to
use TLS first, then tries SSL. If it cannot connect with SSL, the connection fails
and an error message appears.
There are three main steps involved in setting up SSL/TLS:
1.
Set up SSL Relay on the devices running Presentation Server or the Web
Interface and obtain and install the necessary server certificate. See the
8
Integrating the Client with Security Solutions
61
Presentation Server documentation and SSL Relay documentation for
details.
2.
Install the equivalent root certificate on the client. See “Configuring SSL/
TLS” on page 60.
3.
Configure a connection, or all connections, to connect to the server using
SSL/TLS. See “Configuring SSL/TLS” on page 60.
Installing Root Certificates on Clients
To use SSL/TLS to secure communications between SSL/TLS-enabled clients
and the server, you need a root certificate on the client that can verify the
signature of the Certificate Authority on the server certificate. Mac OS X comes
with about 100 commercial root certificates already installed, but if you need to
install another certificate, follow the guidelines below.
Obtain a root certificate from the Certificate Authority and place it on each client
(the certificate will usually have the extension .crt or .cer). This root certificate is
then used and trusted by the client.
Depending on your organization’s policies and procedures, you may want to
install the root certificate on each client instead of directing users to install it. The
easiest and safest way is to add root certificates to the Mac OS X keychain;
alternatively place root certificates in a certificates folder in the folder containing
your client.
Important: The following steps assume your organization has a procedure in
place for users to check the root certificate before they install it.
To add a root certificate to a keychain
1.
Double-click on the file containing the certificate. This will automatically
start the Keychain Access application.
2.
In the Add Certificates dialog box, choose X509Anchors (if using Mac
OS 10.4 Tiger) or System (if using Mac OS 10.5 Leopard) from the
Keychain pop-up menu. Click OK.
3.
Type your password in the Authenticate dialog box and click OK. The root
certificate is installed and can be used by SSL-enabled clients and by any
other application using SSL.
Configuring the Client to Use SSL/TLS
The following section explains how to configure the client to use SSL/TLS.
62
Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
To configure the default SSL/TLS settings
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, at Network
Protocol, choose SSL/TLS+HTTPS. The Address List changes to show
available SSL/TLS-enabled servers.
3.
If the address list does not include the server you want, click Add. The
Server Address dialog box appears.
4.
Type the fully qualified domain name of the required server, for example
my_computer.my_company.com.
For more information about fully qualified domain names, see
“Configuring SSL/TLS” on page 60.
5.
Type the port number if it is different from the default.
6.
Click OK to save this server information to the address list.
7.
Click Save.
Connecting to a Server through a Firewall
If there is a firewall between the client and the server, you must configure the
default setting to use the alternate server address returned by the master browser.
You need to do this even if you are not using a SOCKS Proxy Server.
If you use the client inside and outside a firewall (at work and at home, for
example), you can create two connection files, one with the alternate address
setting off (for work) and one with the alternate address setting on (for home.)
To configure the default firewall alternate address setting
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, click Firewalls.
3.
Choose the Use alternate address for firewall connection check box and
click OK.
4.
Click Save.
8
Integrating the Client with Security Solutions
63
To specify the alternate server address setting for a connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Security tab, clear the Proxy > Use Default check box.
3.
Click Firewall Settings.
4.
Choose the Use alternate address for firewall connection check box and
click OK.
5.
Click Save.
Using Encryption
Encryption increases the security of your connection. By default, basic encryption
is turned on for all connections. This type of security is primarily suited to local
networks. If the server you are connecting to supports encryption, you can use it
to improve security.
Note: Encryption is not available for connections to servers running
Presentation Server for UNIX.
To configure a default encryption level
1.
Do one of the following:
•
From the ICA Client Editor Options menu, choose Default Settings.
•
Click Default Settings in the ICA Client Editor.
2.
On the Making a Connection > Server Location pane, change the
encryption level.
3.
Click Save.
To change the encryption settings for a specific connection file
1.
In the ICA Client Editor, open the connection file you want to edit.
2.
From the Security tab, clear Encryption > Use Default and choose an
encryption level supported by the client.
Note: You must configure the server to allow the selected encryption level or
greater. See the Presentation Server documentation for more information.
64
Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
I NDEX
Index
A
A4 paper 39
alert beep 47
alternate firewall address 62–63
application
configuring connection to 24
running remote 37–39
specifying properties 38
application properties 38
Application tab 38
associating file extensions, see file type association
audio, see client audio
authentication 23
auto hide menu bar and Dock 46
auto proxy server detection
configuring default setting 58
described 58
turning on/off 58
auto reconnect 40
auto-client proxy detection, see auto proxy server
detection
B
bandwidth 32, 51, 54–55
Best Window Position command, Client File Menu 46
bitmap caching, see disk caching
business recovery 27
C
certificate 59–61
Citrix documentation set 8
client audio
mapping 31–32
options 32
with low-bandwidth connection 55
client COM port 30–31
client devices, mapping 28
client drive mapping 28, 34, 55
client printer
mapping 39
printing with low-bandwidth connection 55
turning on/off 39
COM port 30–31
compression 51
configuring the client 21
connection
configuring 21
direct 58
low-bandwidth 54
connection file
creating 23
deploying for multiple users 21
disk caching 40, 52
encryption settings 63
firewall alternate address 63
specifying application properties 38
specifying proxy server 58
specifying Secure Gateway 60
SpeedScreen Latency Reduction 53
turning audio mapping on/off 32
turning drive mapping on/off 29
turning on/off client printing 39
window properties 46
creating a connection file 23
cursor feedback 15
D
data compression
disabling 51
with low-bandwidth connection 54
66
Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
default settings
auto proxy server detection 58
business recovery server group 27
disk caching 52
encryption 63
firewall alternate address 62–63
hotkeys 48
keyboard layout 49
keyboard type 49
mapping drives 28
Secure Gateway 60
Secure Proxy Server 58
SOCKS Proxy Server 58
SSL/TLS+HTTPS 62
window properties 45
windows alert beep 47
deploying the client 19
desktop, viewing remote server 37
devices, mapping 28
direct connection 58
disabling
auto proxy server detection 58
data compression 51
disk caching 40, 52
printing 39
SpeedScreen Latency Reduction 53
disconnections
automatic reconnection 40
business recovery 27
disk caching
configuring default setting 52
described 51
disabling 40, 52
with low-bandwidth connection 54
displaying menu bar and Dock 46
Dock 22
showing and hiding 46
starting an ICA session with 37
Dock auto-hide 46
domain name, see fully qualified domain name
Drives menu, Client 29
E
editing registry 30
ejecting CDs or other removable media 29
encryption 63
enhanced keyboard 43
extension, file, see file type association 33
F
file names
spaces in 33
file type association 33
associating file extensions 34
client configuration 34
described 33
drive mapping 33–34
extended parameter passing 33
server configuration 33
firewall 62
folders mapping 28
FQDN, see fully qualified domain name
full screen mode 45–46
fully qualified domain name
and Secure Gateway 60
described 59
SSL/TLS settings 62
G
graphics 13
H
hiding menu bar and Dock 46
Hiragana 48
hotkeys 41–49
HTTPS, see SSL/TLS+HTTPS
I
ICA Client Editor
help for 8
in client architecture 13
starting 22
ICA session
mapped client COM port 31
mapping folders 28
printing from 39
starting 37
IME (Input Method Editor) 50
improving performance 54–55
installing
from downloaded file 19
root certificate 61
J
Japanese hotkeys 49
Japanese keyboards 49
Index
K
O
Kana 50
Kanji Bango 50
Kanji key 49
Katakana 48
Kerberos 23
keyboard 41
Japanese 48–49
layout 49
type 49
keychain 61
keys 41
Kotoeri 49
opening files 37
L
LAN 32, 51, 53
latency, see SpeedScreen Latency Reduction
local clipboard integration 14
local text echo, see SpeedScreen Latency Reduction
low-bandwidth connection 54
M
mapping
audio 31
client devices 28
client drive 28
client printer 39
COM port 31
folders 28
master browser 24–25, 27
menu bar 46
mouse 44
mouse click
feedback, see SpeedScreen Latency Reduction
multi-button mouse 14
multimedia 13
multiple sessions 14
N
NDS support 16
Network Connection pane 23
network protocol 24
described 24
SSL/TLS+HTTPS 24–26
TCP/IP 24, 26
TCP/IP+HTTP 24, 26
Novell Directory Services 16
P
PC keys 41
performance, improving 13, 51–55
ports 30–31
printing 39
proxy server 57–59
R
reconnecting 40
registry 30
remote applications 37
remote server 21
resize box, hiding and displaying 46
root certificate
described 61
installing 61
running remote applications 37
S
Secure Gateway
and fully qualified domain name 60
configuring default setting 60
relay mode 59
specifying 60
Secure Proxy Server 57–59
configuring default 58
described 15
specifying 58
Secure Sockets Layer, see SSL
security 57–63
Security tab 58, 60, 63
serial ports 31
server desktop 21
server groups 27
server location
SSL/TLS+HTTPS 24
TCP/IP 24
TCP/IP+HTTP 24
Server Location pane 27, 58–60, 62–63
session reliability 40
sessions 37
shortcuts 41
showing menu bar and Dock 46
smart card 13, 23
67
68
Client for Macintosh Administrator’s Guide
SOCKS Proxy Server
configuring default setting 58
specifying 58
sound, see client audio
SpeedBrowse 16
SpeedScreen Latency Reduction
described 53
disabling 53
local text echo 53
mouse click feedback 53
with low-bandwidth connection 54
SSL/TLS 16, 59
SSL/TLS+HTTPS 25–26
default settings 62
described 25–26
server location 24
starting
ICA Client Editor 22
ICA session 37
system requirements 19
T
TAPI 30
TCP/IP 24, 26
described 24, 26
server location 24
TCP/IP+HTTP 24, 26
default setting 27
described 24, 26
server location 24
time zone 15
TLS, see SSL/TLS
Transport Layer Security, see SSL/TLS
U
UDP 24, 26
uninstalling the client 20
user interface configuration 45–50
V
viewing
remote server desktop 37–38
W
Web Interface, the 60
window properties
configuring default setting 45
described 45
specifying 46
with low-bandwidth connection 55
Window tab 46
Windows alert beep 47
working directory 38
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