Specification - Wadebridge School

Specification - Wadebridge School
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Cambridge
NATIONALS
Specification
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award in ICT (60 glh)
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT (120 glh)
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Diploma in ICT (240 glh)
September 2012
The OCR Cambridge Nationals are vocationally
related qualifications that take an engaging,
practical and inspiring approach to learning
and assessment.
They’re industry relevant, geared to key sector
requirements and very popular with schools
and colleges because they suit such a broad
range of learning styles and abilities.
The new generation of Cambridge Nationals
has been developed to ensure that they
build upon the legacy and reputation of the
existing qualifications, which are taught in
over 3,000 centres.
Created to bring together the Wolf Report recommendations
and industry needs
The Cambridge Nationals in ICT have been founded upon the recommendations of the Wolf
Report and created in partnership with teachers, students, education specialists and industryleading employers. This collaborative approach has resulted in a qualification that offers
students a solid foundation for their future studies and careers.
Cambridge Nationals and Cambridge Technicals – how they differ
Cambridge Nationals in ICT are targeted at 14-16 year olds in a school environment. They’re available
as an Award, Certificate and Diploma, with the Certificate being the same size as a GCSE. They use both
internal and external assessment and are recognised by the recently published DfE Performance Tables for
2014.
Cambridge Technicals are targeted at students aged 16+ in either a school or FE environment. They allow
for greater flexibility with the choice of units that make up the qualification and are wholly internally assessed. In addition, the Level 3 qualifications have UCAS points, supporting progression to HE.
A few good reasons to work with OCR
•
You can enjoy the freedomandexcitement of teaching ICT qualifications that have been developed to help you inspire
students of all abilities
•
We’ve built specifications withyouinmind, using a clear and easy-to-understand format, making them straightforward to
deliver
•
Our clearandsensibleassessment approach means that assessment material and requirements are clearly presented and
sensibly structured for you and your students
•
Pathwaysforchoice – we have the broadest range of vocational qualifications, and Cambridge Nationals provide an ideal
foundation for students to progress to more advanced studies and ICT-related careers
•
Workinginpartnershiptosupportyou – together with teachers, we’ve developed a range of practical help and support
to save you time. We provide everything you need to teach our specifications with confidence and to ensure that your
students get as much as possible from the programme of learning
•
Cambridge Nationals are supportedwithnewinnovativesupportproducts and training – to help you get started,
prepare to teach and share best practice
Sign up to teach – let us know you will be teaching this specification to ensure you receive the
support you need. Simply complete the online form at cambridgenationals.org.uk/signup
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OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
ICT skills are essential for success in employment and higher education, and are among the
fundamental transferable skills required by employers. Cambridge Nationals deliver these skills
across the whole range of learning styles and abilities, effectively engaging and inspiring all
students to achieve great things.
Units
AssessmentMethod
GLH
Award60 Certificate Diploma
GLH
120GLH
240GLH
Mandatory
R001: Understanding computer systems
Written paper –
1 hour – 60 marks
30
M
M
M
R002: Using ICT to create business solutions
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
M
M
M
R003: Handling data using spreadsheets
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
S
R004: Handling data using databases
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
S
R005: Creating an interactive product using multimedia components
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
R006: Creating digital images
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
R007: Creating dynamic products using sound and vision
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
R008: Introduction to computer programming
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
R009: Exploring computer hardware and networks
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
R010: Developing control systems
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
Centre assessed task,
OCR moderated
30
N/A
O
O
Business strand
Creative Strand
Technical strand
Student-initiated project
R011: Understanding technology - a project approach
Key: M = mandatory unit O = optional unit S = software – must choose one of the S units
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Next steps for your students –
Future progression to other qualifications
Cambridge Nationals in ICT lead to a wide range of general and vocational qualifications for
your students.
ALevel
Diplomas/Principal
Learning
Apprenticeship
Framework
Electronics • ICT •
Applied ICT •
Computing
Engineering
Levels 2 & 3
Creative Media •
IT Practitioner
Levels 2 & 3
Levels 2 & 3
Level 3
QCF
CambridgeTechnicals
inIT
GCSE
Cambridge
Nationals
inICT
Levels 2 & 3
Engineering • ICT •
Computing • Manufacturing •
Art & Design • Media
Studies • Design & Technology
Level 1 / Level 2
EntryLevel
ICT
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Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
and learning resources
Our support is carefully designed to help you at every stage,
from preparation through to the delivery of our specifications.
ContinuingProfessionalDevelopment(CPD)
As with all our qualifications, there will be a range of events and activities to
support you. The reputation of our Professional Development is second to none
and we will continue to build up our reputation in providing exemplary support.
Tokeepuptodatevisitwww.ocreventbooker.org.uk
Learning resources are an important part of any qualification
and the Cambridge Nationals are no exception. We have
developed a suite of support and learning resources that
provide what teachers tell us they want.
We’ve worked in partnership with teachers and
education specialists to develop ideas and ensure
that there is a range of tasks that suit differing levels
and abilities of students.
By working in this collaborative way, we have ensured that
our range of resources support classroom activities, from lesson
planning and teaching to monitoring student progression and success.
This includes our ‘teaching links’, offering additional resource information,
and teaching tools such as games and activities directly linked to
some units.
Otherresourcesinclude:
Administration guides and tools that include a ‘rules of
combination’ online tool and a progress tracker
Sample assessment materials for the
mandatory units
Teaching packs, including introductory unit
presentations
Text book (working in partnership with Hodder)
Theseresourcesarefreeandavailablefromwww.ocr.org.uk
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Preparing for first teaching
Adopting a new specification can appear daunting. There’s quite a lot of information to weigh
up: the demands of the course, the quality of support, and the needs and expectations of
teachers and candidates. Here’s some advice to help you make the best decision.
7 Steps
to First Teaching
1
MAKE THE MOST OF THE OCR WEBSITE
2
TAKE A TOUR OF THE SAMPLE ASSESSMENTS
3
MAKE GOOD MARKING DECISIONS
4
The unit specifications will be available online. While the overall programme of study may be familiar,
it’s important to check each unit specification to make sure that you’re happy with the learning
outcomes, knowledge, understanding and skills.
They give a clear idea about the type of tasks to be undertaken. OCR will provide model assignments for
centre assessed units (R002 – R010). They can be used directly or adapted to suit your needs.
The specification contains information on performance indicators, which indicate the level of
attainment associated with grades, marking criteria glossary of terms and guidance on assessment for
you to use in addition to the marking criteria to support your marking decisions.
GET SOCIAL
Visit our social media site (www.social.ocr.org.uk). By registering you will have FREE access to a
dedicated platform where teachers can engage with each other – and OCR – to share best practice, offer
guidance and access a range of support materials produced by other teachers such as lesson plans,
presentations, videos and links to other helpful sites.
5
ENJOY SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE
6
GET GREAT TRAINING
7
EXPLORE EXTERNAL WEBSITES
It’s wise to review our Report to Centres for generic guidance and explore the summary of key issues
from previous assessment series. These will be available on the OCR website once the qualifications
have been through their first cycle of assessment.
Check OCR’s website to see if there is a convenient course available. OCR’s Professional Development
courses are an excellent way to get practical advice on the best ways to deliver Cambridge Nationals.
It’s often worthwhile carrying out an internet search to see if there is any free or paid-for resource
material available. But please always check that whatever material you incorporate into your teaching
meets the qualification’s assessment requirements.
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viii
OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award in ICT (60 GLH) J800
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT (120 GLH) J810
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Diploma in ICT (240 GLH) J820
QN J800 - 600/4774/4, J810 - 600/4776/8, J820 - 600/4778/1
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
1
Contents
2
1
Introduction to Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Contents
1.1
Qualification aims
4
1.2
Qualification summary
4
1.3
Guided learning hours (GLH)
4
1.4
Prior learning/attainment
4
1.5
Overview of the qualifications
5
2
Units
6
2.1
Guidance on unit content
6
2.2
Unit R001: Understanding computer systems
7
2.3
Unit R002: Using ICT to create business solutions 11
2.4
Unit R003: Handling data using spreadsheets
15
2.5
Unit R004: Handling data using databases
17
2.6
Unit R005: Creating an interactive product using multimedia components
19
2.7
Unit R006: Creating digital images
21
2.8
Unit R007: Creating dynamic products using sound and vision
23
2.9
Unit R008: Introduction to computer programming
25
2.10
Unit R009: Exploring computer hardware and networks
26
2.11
Unit R010: Developing control systems
28
2.12
Unit R011: Understanding technology – a project approach
30
3
Assessment of Cambridge Nationals in ICT
3.1
Overview of the assessment in the Cambridge Nationals in ICT
32
3.2
Links between units and synoptic assessment
34
3.3
Grading and awarding grades
35
3.4
Performance descriptors 36
3.5
Quality of written communication
38
4
The centre assessed units (R002-R011)
4.1
The centre assessed units 39
4.2
Tasks for the centre assessed units
39
4.3
Completing the tasks (for units R002–R011)
41
4.4
Marking and moderating centre assessment
42
4.5
Authentication
44
4.6
Moderation
45
5
Support for Cambridge Nationals in ICT
47
5.1
Free resources available from the OCR website
47
5.2
Other resources
47
5.3
Training
47
5.4
OCR support services
48
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
4
32
39
6
Access to Cambridge Nationals in ICT
49
6.1
Equality Act information relating to Cambridge Nationals in ICT
49
6.2
Arrangements for learners with particular requirements
49
7
Administration of Cambridge Nationals in ICT
7.1
Availability of assessment
50
7.2
Making entries
50
7.3
Certification rules
52
7.4
Unit and qualification re-sits
52
7.5
Enquiries about results
52
7.6
Shelf-life of units
52
8
Other information about Cambridge Nationals in ICT
8.1
Overlap with other qualifications
53
8.2
Progression from/to these qualifications
53
8.3
Avoidance of bias
54
8.4
Criteria requirements
54
8.5
Language
54
8.6
Spiritual, moral, ethical, social, legislative, economic and cultural issues
55
8.7
Sustainable development, health and safety considerations and European
developments, consistent with international agreements
56
8.8
Key Skills
56
8.9
Functional Skills
57
50
53
Appendix A: Guidance on witness statements
58
Appendix B: Marking criteria for centre assessment
59
Unit R002: Using ICT to create business solutions
59
Unit R003: Handling data using spreadsheets
63
Unit R004: Handling data using databases
68
Unit R005: Creating an interactive product using multimedia components
73
Unit R006: Creating digital images
78
Unit R007: Creating dynamic products using sound and vision
83
Unit R008: Introduction to computer programming
88
Unit R009: Exploring computer hardware and network
92
Unit R010: Developing control systems
96
Unit R011: Understanding technology – a project approach
100
Appendix C: Guidance for the production of electronic internal
assessment
105
Appendix D: Marking criteria glossary of terms
107
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
3
1
Introduction to Cambridge Nationals in ICT
1.1
Qualification aims
These qualifications will assess the application of ICT skills through their practical use. They will
provide learners with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in
other subjects with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing
to their personal development and future economic well-being.
The Cambridge Nationals in ICT will equip learners with sound ICT skills for everyday use and provide
opportunities to develop in context those desirable, transferable skills such as planning, research and
analysis, working with others or communicating technical concepts effectively. They will also challenge
all learners, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to demanding material and skills;
encouraging independence and creativity; providing tasks that engage with the most taxing aspects of
the National Curriculum (including data handling, modelling and programming).
The hands on approach that will be required for both teaching and learning will chime appropriately
with the way young people use new technology and will underpin a highly valid approach to the
assessment of their skills as is borne out by what teachers tell us. The qualification design, including
the range of units available, will allow learners the freedom to explore more deeply the things that
interest them as well as providing good opportunity to enhance their learning in a range of curriculum
areas.
This specification contains OCR’s Cambridge National Award/Certificate/Diploma in ICT for first
teaching from September 2012.
1.2
Qualification summary
The Cambridge Nationals in ICT consist of three qualifications:
The OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award in ICT consists of two mandatory units.
The OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT consists of two mandatory units and two
optional units.
The OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Diploma in ICT consists of two mandatory units and six
optional units.
1.3
Guided learning hours (GLH)
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award in ICT requires 60 GLH in total.
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT requires 120 GLH in total.
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Diploma in ICT requires 240 GLH in total.
1.4
Prior learning/attainment
Learners who are taking courses leading to any of these qualifications should normally have a
corresponding Key Stage 3 Programme of Study within the National Curriculum.
4
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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1.5
Overview of the qualifications
Units
Assessment method
GLH
J800
Award
60 GLH
J810
Certificate
120 GLH
J820
Diploma
240 GLH
Mandatory
R001: Understanding
computer systems
Written paper
OCR set and marked
1 hour – 60 marks (60 UMS)
Learners answer all questions
30
M
M
M
R002: Using ICT
to create business
solutions
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
M
M
M
Business information systems strand
R003: Handling data
using spreadsheets
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
S
R004: Handling data
using databases
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
S
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
O
R006: Creating digital Centre assessed tasks
images
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
O
R007: Creating
dynamic products
using sound and
vision
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
O
R008: Introduction
to computer
programming
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
O
R009: Exploring
computer hardware
and networks
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
O
R010: Developing
control systems
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 10 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
n/a
O
O
n/a
O
O
Creative strand
R005: Creating an
interactive product
using multimedia
components
Technical strand
Learner-initiated project
R011: Understanding
technology – a
project approach
Centre assessed tasks
OCR moderated
Approx 15 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS)
30
Key: M = mandatory unit
O = optional unit
S = software – must choose one of the S units
A bank of model assignments is available free of charge from the OCR website for the centre assessed
units R002 – R010.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
5
Units
2
2.1
Guidance on unit content
Use of i.e./e.g. in unit content
The unit content describes what has to be taught to ensure that learners are able to access the
highest marks.
Teachers will need to ensure that any modifications to tasks, from the bank of model assignments for
the centre assessed units, do not expect the learner to do more than they have been taught, but they
must enable them to access the full range of marks as described in the marking criteria.
For externally assessed units, where the content contains i.e. and e.g. under specific areas of content,
the following rules will be adhered to when setting questions:
6
••
a direct question may be asked where the unit content is shown with an i.e.
••
where unit content is shown as an e.g. a direct question will not be asked about that example.
Any questions relating to the area of content will offer learners the opportunity to provide their
own examples as the unit has not specified which examples they should be familiar with.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
2
2.2
Unit R001: Understanding computer systems
Aims
This unit will provide learners with the underpinning knowledge and understanding required to use
computer systems effectively. Learners will develop their knowledge and understanding of the systems
they use both at home and at school and will explore how these same technologies are used by
business organisations.
This unit complements unit R002. In unit R001 learners will study the computer system on which
applications software sits and consider the implications of working with data to create content, while
in unit R002 they will work with ‘office’ applications software to edit and format/create content to meet
specified business purposes.
From personal computers to smartphones, computing devices are an essential feature of the modern
world. Technology may be changing every day, but the knowledge and understanding of how to use
computers effectively is the same regardless of the technology being used. Computers are powerful
devices for the storage and manipulation of data, but how can they be used effectively and the
important data they use be stored securely?
On completion of this unit, learners will have gained the knowledge and understanding to use
computers more effectively in a variety of different contexts including home, school and the workplace.
Their regard for their own personal data security and for the security of the data of others will be
increased and, overall, learners will be more informed users of computers making them more effective
participators in business and social life.
Learners studying optional units will be able to apply the knowledge and understanding they have
gained in this unit to develop their skills.
Learning Outcome 1: Understand how ICT can be used to meet business needs
Learners must be taught:
•
features and purposes of computing devices, i.e.:
○ desktop and portable devices, i.e. laptops, netbooks, tablets, smartphones
○ input devices, i.e. mice, keyboard, microphone, sensors, pads, specialist keyboards, touch pad,
microphones, remote controls, scanners, digital cameras, webcams, touch screens, readers for
barcodes, magnetic stripes and chip and pin, MIDI instruments
○ output devices, i.e. monitor/screens, printers, speakers, head/earphones, digital projectors, data
projectors, plotters, actuators
○ software, i.e.:
– operating systems (e.g. Windows, OS X, Android, iOS)
– utility software (e.g. computer security)
– applications software, i.e. word processors, desktop publishing software, spreadsheets, database
management software, multimedia software, slideshow software, video-editing software, graphics
manipulation software, communications software (e.g. social networking software, chat, instant
messaging, file transfer and email clients), presentation software, gaming software, web browsers,
apps for portable devices
○ storage and connectivity devices, i.e.:
– optical disks (e.g. CD and DVD for data storage)
– magnetic media (e.g. internal and external hard disk drives (HDD), tape)
– Solid State Drives (SSD)
– Memory cards, i.e. flash memory devices
– network devices (e.g. routers, modems)
– cloud storage
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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2
○ configurations, i.e.:
– typical office configurations
– customised systems for specified needs, i.e.:
• physical impairment, i.e. sight, hearing, movement
• remote working (e.g. travelling, hotel or home)
•
how the following factors can affect the choice of system: cost, availability, user needs, data security
•
how peripherals can be connected to a computer device, i.e.:
○ wired methods (e.g. USB, firewire)
○ wireless methods (e.g. wifi, Bluetooth, infra-red)
•
how to connect a computing device to an existing wireless network, i.e.:
○ network name, i.e. Service Set Identifier (SSID)
○ the use of security keys
○ appropriate firewall settings for public and private networks
•
how organisations can monitor employees, i.e. GPS location tracking, monitoring internet use, monitoring
communications.
Learning Outcome 2: K
now how to work with information and data to meet specified business
needs
Learners must be taught:
8
•
data capture methods, i.e.:
○ online and paper-based forms
○ automated data capture systems, i.e. control system sensors, barcode readers, Radio Frequency
Identification Device (RFID), Near Field Communication (NFC)
•
how the following factors can affect the choice of method:
○ nature of information to be collected (e.g. environmental conditions, location of information)
○ cost
○ availability
○ ease of use
○ data security
•
how to design data capture forms to obtain specified information
•
how to code information for use in a spreadsheet or database
•
data validation methods
•
file formats for storing data, i.e.:
○ proprietary formats, i.e. .doc, .xls, .ppt, .fla, .wma, .aac
○ open formats, i.e. .rtf, .pdf, .csv, .exe, .txt, .mp3, .wav
•
data storage technologies, i.e.:
○ local and removable media
○ remote storage (e.g. offsite location, cloud storage)
•
security measures to be used when storing data, i.e.
○ network/computer security, i.e.:
– usernames/passwords
– access rights/permissions
○ document security, i.e.:
– passwords
– other ways to restrict access to or editing of content
– how and why data is encrypted
○ physical security to prevent loss of data/devices (e.g. locked doors)
•
data transferring technologies, i.e.:
○ wired and wireless methods
○ mobile data transmission (e.g. 3g, 4g)
○ remote methods (e.g. email, internet/cloud, peer to peer file sharing)
○ security methods, i.e. data encryption
○ how the following factors can affect the choice of method: file size, transfer speed, future-proofing,
data security, user needs
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
2
•
factors affecting data transfer speed (e.g. bandwidth, router technology)
•
the factors affecting the appropriate optimisation of electronic files (e.g. download speeds, quality of
product)
•
how to use back-up and recovery systems, i.e.:
○ data storage media (e.g. removable devices, remote storage)
○ back-up frequency
○ archiving
○ automated versus manual systems
•
how the following factors can affect the choice of method: cost, availability, ease of use, data security.
Learning Outcome 3: K
now how ICT can be used to support business working practices
Learners must be taught:
•
how businesses can communicate with employees and others working remotely, i.e. voice telephones,
SMS, instant messaging, e-mail, chat rooms, forums, bulletin boards, Voice-over-IP (VoIP), video
conferencing, webcams, blogs, social networking
○ appropriate use of remote communication tools, i.e. for email appropriate use of subject, cc/bcc,
attachments and email etiquette
○ the benefits and drawbacks of these methods
•
how diary management software can be used to organise work schedules, i.e.:
○ creating appointments/meetings
○ inviting participants
○ creating tasks
○ creating to-do lists
○ setting reminders
•
how documents can be created and edited collaboratively, i.e.:
○ documents in shared access locations, i.e.:
– network shared areas (e.g. read/write access)
– cloud-based services (e.g. providing open or restricted access to services enabling the creating/
editing of documents online)
○ inserting comments into an existing draft
○ editing drafts, tracking changes made
○ reviewing facilities: accepting or rejecting changes made.
Learning Outcome 4: U
nderstand how legal, ethical, safety and security issues affect how
computers should be used
Learners must be taught:
•
how legislation affects business computer users, i.e.:
○ health and safety
○ data protection
○ copyright
○ computer misuse
•
how moral and ethical issues affect business computer users, i.e.:
○ the use and abuse of personal and private data
○ cyberbullying
○ monitoring of individuals by organisations through the use of:
– worker monitoring/logging,
– cookies,
– key logging,
– worker call monitoring/recording,
– electronic consumer surveillance,
– mobile phone triangulation
•
the implications and consequences for organisations of data loss, corruption and theft, i.e.:
○ legal implications (e.g. action from the Information Commissioner)
○ impact on customers (e.g. reduced confidence in business, increased risk of personal identity theft)
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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2
○ impact on employees (e.g. disciplinary action for not following company procedures)
○ impact on organisation (e.g. increased costs in resolving problems caused, loss of income if customers
lose confidence)
•
the main threats to data security and how to deal with them, i.e.:
○ threats to data security, i.e.:
– computer viruses
– trojans
– worms
– phishing
– spyware
– adware
– hacking
– Denial of Service (DoS) attacks
– physical threats (e.g. loss/theft of devices)
○ actions to minimise risks, i.e.:
– act online in ways which reduce the risk of identity theft and protect personal security
– use of protection software, i.e. firewall, anti-virus, anti-spam, data encryption to store and transfer
data
•
using automatic and manual updating facilities for operating systems and security software.
Assessment guidance
During the external assessment, learners will be expected to demonstrate their understanding through
questions that require the skills of analysis and evaluation in particular contexts.
10
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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2.3
Unit R002: Using ICT to create business solutions
Aims
This unit will enable learners to develop ICT skills that would equip them to operate effectively in a
business environment. This unit complements unit R001. In unit R001 learners will study the computer
system on which applications software sits and consider the implications of working with data to create
content, while in this unit they will work with ‘office’ applications software to edit and format/create
content to meet specified business purposes.
Learners will use a wide range of applications that are commonly used in the workplace, schools,
and in further and higher education. They will learn how to select the most appropriate software to
complete tasks to meet specified business requirements in a variety of contexts.
They will learn how to use software tools to handle data and communicate information for a range of
business purposes, and how to apply formatting to enhance those documents to suit their purpose
and intended audience. This type of skill is very valuable as it can be transferred from one software
application to another. So if the learner is able to secure these skills through this unit they will be
prepared to use a range of software applications effectively. They will learn to work with a variety of file
types and to integrate/import files of different types into other documents. They will develop techniques
to search for, select and store information in a variety of contexts. They will learn how to select the
tools and techniques to communicate information and solve problems.
On completion of this unit learners will have extended their capability in the use of applications
software.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to use techniques to search for, store and share information
Learners must be taught how to:
•
use search engine techniques to find specific information on the internet, i.e. using
○ phrase
○ key words
○ advanced search pages
○ quotes
○ wildcards
•
use and organise bookmarks/favourites
•
select, capture and store graphics and text in compliance with copyright
○ download
○ ‘copy and paste’
•
use non-internet based sources to find information, i.e. local area network, wireless area network, CDROMs
•
evaluate validity of information, i.e.:
○ reliability of source
○ age
○ bias of information
•
reference all information copied/sourced, i.e.:
○ author/source
○ year created (if available)
○ title of webpage/web document
○ date last updated (if available)
○ URL
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•
store electronic information1, i.e.:
○ meaningful file and folder names
○ folder structure
○ backups
○ password protection
○ compressing/zipping files
•
use email to communicate with others in business contexts, i.e.:
○ subject line when composing messages
○ body message text when sending, forwarding and replying to messages, appropriateness of body text
○ including multiple recipients, i.e.:
– Carbon Copy (cc)
– Blind Carbon Copy (bcc)
– Groups
○ attachments
○ email signatures
○ auto response messages
○ folders to store messages.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to select and use software to handle data
Learners must be taught how to use software to handle data, i.e.:
Creating business spreadsheets:
•
Import/open csv files and save in an appropriate file type
•
enter title, column headings and row labels
enter2/import data, i.e.:
○ text
○ numeric
○ title
○ column/field headings
○ row labels
○ formulae involving arithmetic operators2, i.e. +, –, *, /
○ simple functions2, i.e.:
– SUM
– AVERAGE
– MIN
– MAX
– IF
○ cell references, i.e. relative, absolute
Editing and manipulating data in spreadsheets:
•
12
•
insert and delete rows/columns
•
change/amend data in cells
•
amend formulae
•
change data to model outcomes
•
search data
•
sort data2
•
create graphs2, i.e.:
○ pie chart
○ column/bar graph
○ line graph
○ scatter graph
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Printing data from spreadsheets:
•
spreadsheet view
•
formulae view
•
selected data
Creating flat file (single table) databases:
•
import csv files and save in an appropriate file type
Editing databases:
•
enter new records
•
edit records
•
delete records
•
sort table
•
query data in a single table using3:
○ simple criteria, i.e. =
○ complex criteria, i.e. <, >, <>, >=.<=, NOT, AND, OR, BETWEEN
○ sort data
Printing databases:
•
selected data (queries)
•
reports
○ tabular
○ columnar
○ stepped
○ list
○ label
○ grouped
○ grouped with summaries.
Learners must be taught how the purpose and audience for the business activity influences the choice of
software.
Teaching should be delivered in the context of data handling software, i.e. spreadsheets and databases.
Learning Outcome 3: B
e able to select and use software to communicate information for a
business purpose
Learners must be taught how to:
•
import txt and rtf files and save in an appropriate file type to retain formatting
•
use tools and facilities appropriate to the software, i.e.
○ enter text, tables, images using the keyboard, mouse or other input device
○ modify existing documents
○ design and create new documents
○ create screen layouts by using existing templates and by creating and positioning text and graphic
frames
○ graphics, i.e. copy, paste, resize
○ select appropriate text and graphics
○ edit using insert, delete, cut, copy and paste functions
○ import tables, graphic images, and graphs/charts created in other software
○ integrate files of different types
○ mail merge, i.e.
– enter merge fields/codes
– merge selected data
○ use spelling, grammar and design checkers
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•
proof read documents to detect errors not corrected by automated checkers available within the software
used, i.e. spelling, grammar, design checkers.
Learners must be taught how the purpose and audience influences the choice of document type, and how the
document type influences the choice of software.
Teaching should be delivered in the context of a range of software, i.e. Word Processing, Desktop Publishing,
Presentation, Web page, Graphics, for a range of documents that are typically used in business.
Learning Outcome 4: B
e able to use software tools to format information
Learners must be taught how to:
•
use headings, subheading and body text
•
use widows and orphans
•
use white space
•
use case, i.e. capitals and lower case and how to use it consistently
•
use spacing before and after punctuation, bullets and numbered lists
•
use line, paragraph and page breaks and how to use it consistently
•
auto date format, i.e. English UK
•
use formatting techniques to create impact and enhance the appearance of documents, i.e.:
○ orientation, i.e. landscape and portrait
○ margins
○ inserting page and line breaks
○ columns
○ graphics, i.e. positioning, scaling maintaining aspect ratio, cropping
○ text, i.e. font2, style, size, direction, colour2, emphasis
○ paragraph, i.e. alignment, indents, line spacing, tabs
○ bulleted and numbered lists
○ text wrapping around objects
○ cells, i.e.:
– text, i.e. font, style, size, alignment,
– number, i.e. decimal places, percentage, currency, date/time
○ borders and shading2
○ backgrounds, i.e. images, colours2
○ transition and animation effects
○ scaling/fit to page
○ set print options appropriate to the software2
○ inserting headers and footers2
•
inserting automatic fields, i.e. date and document information.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1
If learners have already completed unit R006 they will have covered the content marked with 1.
2
If learners have already completed unit R003 they will have covered the content marked with 2.
3
If learners have already completed unit R004 they will have covered the content marked with 3.
There is no requirement to teach the units in a particular order but teachers should take note of this
coverage and schedule the programme of learning accordingly.
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2.4
Unit R003: Handling data using spreadsheets
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and
understanding developed in those units and vice versa. This unit will help the learner to process and
present data into meaningful information that can be used to support the decision-making process in
real life scenarios.
The learning is important because spreadsheets are used extensively in businesses for a variety of
purposes such as budgeting, cost modelling, reporting, trend analysis and forecasting. Spreadsheets
are very effective at performing automatic calculations e.g. for displaying information to highlight
relationships, for predicting outcomes by changing data, for numerical analyses and to create
informative graphs and charts. In a school environment teachers use spreadsheets to monitor and
analyse learners’ performance. Learners will create a spreadsheet to provide a solution to a given
scenario which will provide the facility for the user to create and manipulate data and to produce
graphs and/or charts to support decision making.
On completion of this unit learners will be able to interpret requirements for a spreadsheet, take
unstructured data, plan how to use it in a spreadsheet, create and populate a spreadsheet, use
relevant functions and tools to manipulate the data and produce outputs to present the data
graphically to support decision making.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to create and populate spreadsheets to meet user requirements
Learners must be taught how to:
•
provide structure1, i.e. worksheet name(s), column/row headings/sub-headings
•
set size of rows, columns, print area
•
use presentation features, i.e. borders, shading, fonts, colours, wrap text, merge cells, hide/show columns
•
use validation rules1, i.e. list, time, text length
•
use input messages and error messages to advise and/or redirect the user in the event of invalid data
entry
•
enter given data
•
set data types1, i.e. alphanumeric, text, numeric (integer, currency, percentages, number of decimal places
and fractions), date/time, limited choice (drop-down list, radio buttons, tick lists), object, logical/Boolean
(Yes/No, Male/Female) types
•
use conditional formatting
•
use page layout features, i.e. headers, footers, gridlines, scaling, paper size, orientation
•
provide help for user of spreadsheet (e.g. notes, comments)
•
interpret user requirements from the user brief.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to select and use spreadsheet functions to meet user requirements
Learners must be taught how to:
•
select and enter formulae using correct and appropriate arithmetic operators2, i.e. +, –, /, *
•
select and enter functions2, i.e. SUM, AVERAGE, LOOK UPS, IF, AND, OR, TODAY, DATE, MIN, MAX,
COUNT
•
use absolute and relative cell references
•
use brackets to force order of operation
•
reference data on other worksheets with formulae, i.e. cell linking
•
create, assign, print and annotate macros
•
test spreadsheet functionality.
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Learning Outcome 3: B
e able to use spreadsheet models to present information to support
decision making
Learners must be taught how to:
•
arrange data by sorting
•
reduce data by filtering
•
use ‘what if analysis’ (e.g. trial and error, change variable data, goal seek) to predict results and create
different scenarios and outcomes
•
recognise that data type influences the graphical method used3
•
use graphical methods to present information, i.e. bar chart, pie chart, line graph, scattergram and the use
of scales, a title, axis title and key legend.3
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1
Unit R001 LO2 supports the development of these skills by developing an understanding of them in
business contexts.
2
Unit R002 LO2 supports the development of this Learning Outcome.
3
Unit R002 LO2 supports this by developing an understanding of appropriate chart types.
If learners have already completed core units R001 and R002 they will already understand why and
how spreadsheets are used to store and retrieve data in a business context and they will have covered
the Data Protection Act (DPA). It is therefore recommended that they do these units first. However,
if this is not possible teachers should cover the content from the mandatory units which specifically
relates to spreadsheets and the DPA as well as the taught content for unit R003 listed above.
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2.5
Unit R004: Handling data using databases
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge
and understanding developed in those units and vice versa. This unit will enable learners to gain
the necessary additional skills and knowledge to be able to modify an existing database by adding
fields and then to further enhance a database by creating new table structures to produce a relational
database structure. They will also learn how to test and interrogate a database. They will understand
that a database has to be developed to meet the needs of an individual user or organisation.
Database software is one of the most important IT applications programs used by organisations in the
21st Century. Databases are used to store and organise data so that it is easy to find the data again
when an organisation or individual wants to do something with the data. For example, a website that
sells goods is likely to have a database behind it to store details of all the products the business sells
and the account details of its customers. A computer game has a database to store all the options
selected and to store the results of each game played, so users can compare their progress. A school
keeps a database of contact details and exam results of its current pupils.
On completion of this unit learners will be able to modify an existing database and produce a relational
database. They will also be able to create queries to interrogate a database and find specific records
and produce reports based on the results of these queries and create a user interface for the
database.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to modify databases to meet user requirements
Learners must be taught how to:
•
modify existing databases to add field(s), table(s) to meet user needs
•
modify single-table databases into multi-table databases and understand the need/rationale for doing this
•
create table structures with key fields (primary keys); field names1
•
use data types, i.e. number, text, date/time, currency, auto-incremented , yes/no; field length1
•
use validation rule, i.e. input masks, presence check, range check, list check; customised error
messages1.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to produce outputs from databases to meet user requirements
Learners must be taught how to:
•
create queries and understand the need/rationale for them2, i.e.:
○ simple queries on a single table using single criteria
○ complex queries on linked tables using single and multiple criteria
○ reusable queries, i.e. parameter queries using parameter text
•
save queries using appropriate query names2
•
output results of queries in reports on screen and formatted to print (e.g. address labels, letters, invoices3)
•
customise standard reports (e.g. add labels, adjust field widths, re-position fields, add header/footer3).
•
customise reports to reflect house styles (e.g. consistent layouts and formatting3).
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Learning Outcome 3: Be able to create user interfaces for databases to meet user requirements
Learners must be taught how to:
•
enable security such as password protection of databases4
•
create data input forms and add objects, i.e. fields, text labels, pictures, list boxes, combo boxes, option
buttons, command buttons5
•
create menus using forms, use of wizards, i.e. switchboard manager, use of command buttons for
navigation, main menu form to load at start up5
•
customise interfaces to reflect house styles (e.g. consistent layout and formatting5).
Learning Outcome 4: B
e able to analyse a databases suitability for a business purpose
Learners must be taught how to:
•
test validation rules, data entry forms, queries and reports
•
solve problems such as responding to error messages, resolving incorrect results from queries
•
create a test plan with headings, i.e. test number, test purpose, test data, expected outcome, actual
outcome, modification
•
use different test methods i.e. use of test data, i.e. normal, extreme, erroneous test plans, end user
testing, i.e. end user/peer testing of user interface to provide feedback.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1
Unit R001 LO2 supports the development of these skills by developing understanding through their
use in business contexts.
2
Unit R002 LO2 supports this by developing these skills in the context of existing spreadsheets and
databases.
3
Unit R002 LO3 and LO4 support this by developing understanding of how to communicate using
business documents, of which these are examples.
4
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing understanding of the need for security measures and the
consequences of data loss.
5
Unit R001 LO2 supports this by developing understanding of how data can be captured using forms.
If learners have already completed core units R001 and R002 they will already understand why and
how databases are used to store and retrieve data in a business context and they will have covered
the Data Protection Act (DPA). It is therefore recommended that they do these units first. However,
if this is not possible teachers should cover the content from the mandatory units which specifically
relate to databases and the DPA as well as the taught content for unit R004 listed above.
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2.6
Unit R005: Creating an interactive product using multimedia components
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and
understanding developed in those units and vice versa.
This unit will enable learners to demonstrate their creative flair by combining multimedia components
to create a vibrant, energetic or stimulating www, webpage, or interactive product.
Interactive products are used widely in everyday life; from visiting a website, ordering online products,
using mobile phone applications, viewing a presentation, e-learning products or playing computer
games.
On completion of this unit learners will be able to show how the interactive product meets both the
user needs and extends their capability within the use of applications software such as website
development.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to design interactive products
Learners must be taught how to:
•
select and use the software features appropriate to the interactive products to aid in the design process,
i.e. website, tablet/mobile phone apps, gaming platforms, presentation software
•
identify success criteria, i.e. meeting the client brief, component quality, composition and the extent to
which the product is interactive
•
select and use different forms of navigation site planning techniques, i.e. mood boards, spider diagrams,
mind mapping, site plans, house-style, hand-drawn templates
•
source and store multimedia components for inclusion in products and how to make ready where
applicable, i.e. source components images, video, sound, animation, scripting, sprites. Storage will
necessitate the use of different file types1, i.e. swf, html, sis, app, exe, xaml, xml, ppt
•
understand the implications of legislation on their sources, i.e. Copyright Law; Intellectual Property; photo
permissions and releases; acknowledgement and referencing of sources2
•
select the applications software dependent on purpose and audience, i.e. web authoring software, game
making software, ‘App’ development software or presentation authoring software.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to create interactive products containing multimedia components
Learners must be taught how to:
•
combine components using techniques (e.g. alternative pathway, user interaction and effects)
•
use templates, i.e. master slides, environments, cascading style sheets
•
create a navigation system, i.e. navigation bar, buttons, hyperlinks, mouse /keyboard controls, menus and
drop down lists, graphical user interface
•
set up interaction, i.e. roll over, drag and drop, input form, behaviours (e.g. pop up messages, shake,
fades, and sounds) triggers, collision, scripting, hot spots
•
use effects, i.e. transitions, html clock, fade in, fade out, custom animation.
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Learning Outcome 3: Be able to carry out usability testing
Learners must be taught how to:
•
test the product during production and where appropriate review tools and techniques used in line with the
success criteria
•
test the product post completion against the success criteria using a variety of feedback methods including
client feedback.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1 Unit
R001 LO2 supports this by developing an understanding of appropriate file types.
2 Unit
R001 LO4 supports this by developing an understanding of the implications of copyright
legislation and the consequences of non-compliance with its provisions.
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2.7
Unit R006: Creating digital images
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and
understanding developed in those units and vice versa. This unit will enable learners to acquire the
underpinning knowledge and skills to enable them to create, edit, enhance and save different types of
digital images.
We live, learn, work and play in a very visual world. Whether we like it or not digital images influence
our actions and thoughts – persuading us to buy one product instead of another, instructing us to go
this way rather than that, explaining a complicated scientific concept and portraying an emotion or
expressing a feeling using powerful digital art. With or without words successful digital images will
convey their message effectively so that the viewer receives and understands it – and can then act
upon it.
The most famous type of digital image is a logo or brand concept. Large companies will spend
hundreds of thousands of pounds on their brand image (such as the London 2012 logo; BBC One
re-branding) and may re-brand products many times over their life. Pepsi has had 11 re-brandings:
The graphic design industry is big business.
On completion of this unit learners will be able to create a digital image that communicates the
intended message effectively, meeting the client’s needs, and they will have extended their capability
within the use of digital editing software packages.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to specify a digital image solution for a client’s needs
Learners must be taught how to:
•
analyse a client brief to determine success criteria: suitability; relevance; measurability
•
select and use research methods, i.e. image/thought showers/spider diagrams; interviews/focus groups;
questionnaires/surveys; competitor/market research/stakeholder perceptions
•
select and use creative design plans, i.e. storyboards; roughs/sketches; design concepts/layouts
•
select and use component sources, i.e. image capture (e.g. camera, scanner); hand-drawn design; clientprovided images; stock images; internet; effect of sourced components on final image quality, i.e. file size,
resolution, scalability, noise
•
identify the implications of legislation on sources,
i.e. Copyright Law; Intellectual Property Rights; photo permissions and releases; acknowledgement and
referencing of sources1.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to create digital images
Learners must be taught how to:
•
select and use software for different purposes2, i.e. software for vector-based images; software for bitmap/
raster-based images
•
set image/canvas size and image resolution for different outputs/output sizes for print and for screen3 (as
appropriate to the software)
•
use standard software tools to create and edit digital images, i.e. cut, copy, crop, paste; select parts of
images; move, align and order components; group/ungroup components; rotate and flip; create lines,
curves and shapes, i.e. basic and freehand; change stroke and fill, i.e. colour, thickness, style; draw/paint,
i.e. pencil, brush, bucket; insert and edit text, i.e. colour, font, size
•
select and use specialised software tools to enhance digital images, i.e.:
○ filters, i.e. sharpen, blur, noise; colour balance, levels and curves; masks and layers
○ retouching tools, i.e. clone, red eye; trace; edit and combine paths
○ opacity/transparency; transform, scale, rotate and distort
○ text effects, i.e. attach to path; guides/guidelines
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•
combine components to create complex composite digital images, i.e. multiple-step processes; multilayering; combine output from different software applications
•
feedback/evaluate, i.e. recognising merits and faults of technical features; constructive feedback.
Learning Outcome 3: B
e able to store, retrieve and present digital images
Learners must be taught how to:
•
use storage systems, i.e. standard naming conventions; version control; archiving
•
use file formats for working files4, i.e. native file formats (e.g. AI, CDR, PSD, PSP); standard bitmap-based
formats (e.g. TIFF, JPEG, GIF, PNG); vector-based formats (e.g. SVG, EPS, WMF, AI, DPP)
•
use file formats for final output, i.e. save and/or export; resolution; colour mode; size (e.g. physical and
digital); orientation; optimisation5/compression; dependent upon method of display or printing
•
recognise the effect of different file formats on image quality and size
•
use presentation methods6, i.e. exhibition; printed portfolio; digital portfolio; mock-up/visual representation;
print/web sizes; print media; colour options.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
If learners have already completed units R001 and R002 they will already understand why and how
storage systems are used. Teachers should take note that coverage of storage systems is in units
R001, R002 and R006 and manage the teaching of this area of learning accordingly.
1
Unit R002 LO1 develops research skills in using the internet.
2
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing an understanding of the implications of legislation
including copyright laws and the consequence of non-compliance with their provisions.
3
Unit R002 LO3 supports this by considering how the purpose and audience influences the choice of
product and content.
4
Unit R001 LO2 supports this by developing an understanding of optimisation and the factors to be
taken into account whilst optimising objects.
5
Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of optimisation and filetypes that addresses these three
bullets.
6
Unit R002 LO3 supports this by considering how the purpose and audience influences the choice of
document type, and how the document type influences the choice of software.
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2.8
Unit R007: Creating dynamic products using sound and vision
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and
understanding developed in those units and vice versa.
21st century technology such as gaming technologies, mobile phone apps, media marketing
technologies and web-based technologies make great use of dynamic specialist technologies to
differentiate their products for the end user. This unit will enable learners to develop the knowledge,
understanding and skills that would be expected in creative media industries such as advertising,
music and online marketing. Learners will have the opportunity to learn about dynamic products such
as music recordings and/or mixes; video/media news clips and animation for webpages before going
on to create their own dynamic product.
Movies, animations and sounds bring messages and communications to life. The ability to create, edit
and enhance these types of media is an essential business and personal skill that can be used for
many purposes. On completion of this unit learners will be able to prepare, create, export and evaluate
a timeline-based dynamic product.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to prepare for the production of dynamic products
Learners must be taught how to:
•
analyse a client brief to determine success criteria, i.e. length, file type, main features, theme, message
•
produce a time-line storyboard and script for a product suitable to audience and purpose provided by a
client
•
select appropriate software1
•
source and select appropriate assets and store efficiently
•
identify the implications of legislation on sources, i.e. Copyright Law; Intellectual Property Rights; photo
permissions and releases (e.g. model, property/location); acknowledgement and referencing of sources2,3.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to create dynamic products
Learners must be taught how to:
•
import sourced assets
•
use features of the software to edit the assets, i.e.:
○ sound, i.e. cut, copy and paste, envelope tool, generate silence
○ animation, i.e. frame-by-frame, layers, tweening, resizing, rotate, drawing tools
○ movie, i.e. splitting, layers, mute, sound, titles, audio
•
use the features of the software to enhance the assets, i.e.:
○ sound, i.e. level, fade, amplify, bass, filter, noise removal, reverse, fade, pitch, invert
○ animation, i.e. motion path, rotation, flip, magnifying, gradient, mask, 3D, transparency, interactions,
tints
○ movie, i.e. transitions, pan, zoom, dissolve, brightness, colour, fade, filter, spin, blur, mirror, edge
detection
•
combine assets within the selected software to produce an audio, animation or movie suitable to audience
and purpose4
•
save file in original format
•
export the product file type suitable for purpose5, i.e.:
○ sound, i.e. WAV, WMA and MP3
○ animation, i.e. Animated GIF, SWF and Silverlight
○ movie, i.e. AVI, MP4 and WMV
•
recognise the advantages and disadvantages of exporting as different file types, file sizes, compression
techniques, optimisation6 techniques, codecs, resolution and compatibility.
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Learning Outcome 3: Be able to test functionality of dynamic products
Learners must be taught how to:
•
create test plans, i.e.:
○ tests required and how to carry them out
○ retests
•
test the product during production and where appropriate review tools and techniques used in line with the
success criteria
•
test the product post completion against the success criteria.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1
Unit R002 LO3 supports this by considering how the purpose and audience influences the choice of
product and content.
2
Unit R002 LO1 supports this by developing an understanding of how to select, capture and store
graphics and text in compliance with copyright.
3
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing an understanding of the implications of legislation
including copyright laws and the consequence of non-compliance with their provisions.
4
Unit R002 LO3 develops an understanding of the importance of purpose and audience when editing
content.
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5
Unit R001 LO1 develops an understanding of appropriate filetypes.
6
Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of optimisation.
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2.9
Unit R008: Introduction to computer programming
Aims
This unit builds on Unit R002 by developing knowledge and understanding of how operators are used
within computer applications.
Computer programs are an essential element of modern living. Without suitable programs most
modern devices or systems would not function. For example, they are used in games, phone
applications, domestic appliances, life-support systems, CAD/CAM, transport, security systems.
This unit will enable learners to gain additional skills and to develop their knowledge and
understanding of the use of programming and scripting to enable computer systems to solve
problems.
On completion of this unit learners will be able to appreciate the range of programming and scripting
languages that are used and their applications and will be able to develop, test and evaluate working
programs in one language of their choice. Learners will have acquired the skills necessary to help
develop their programming further into interactive websites, mobile phone and tablet apps and a range
of computer applications and they will communicate technical concepts effectively using terminology
appropriately.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to devise algorithms to solve problems
Learners must be taught about1:
• the nature and uses of various high-level language types, i.e.:
○ Object-oriented (e.g. VB, VBA, Scratch, App inventor, iPhone Apps)
○ Procedural (e.g. Basic)
○ Scripting languages (e.g. VB Script, Action Script, JavaScript, Game Maker)
Learners must be taught how to:
• analyse problems in terms of language choice, input, processes, and outputs required
• break down solutions into simple steps
• present solutions using algorithms, i.e. flow diagrams and structured English
• identify measurable success criteria.
Learning Outcome 2: B
e able to develop computer programs
Learners must be taught how to:
• write code for a program, i.e.:
○ declaring and using different types of variables and constants
○ using assignment operators to store data in variables and constants
○ using relational operators to compare the values in variables
○ using mathematical operators to perform calculations using variables
○ using the programming constructs of sequence, selection and iteration to produce working routines.
• annotating code to explain how it works.
Learning Outcome 3: Be able to test and evaluate computer programs
Learners must be taught how to:
•
recognise different types of errors, i.e. syntax, logic and run-time
•
develop a test plan for a program
•
use this plan to test a program
•
evaluate test results against the expected outcomes and success criteria.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1 This
LO is linked to Unit R002 LO2 where an understanding of variables and formulas is developed
in the context of a spreadsheet.
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2.10 Unit R009: Exploring computer hardware and networks
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will need to apply the skills, knowledge and
understanding developed in those units. Learners will gain an appreciation of computer hardware and
the range of platforms currently available, including gaming and mobile devices. They will understand
the characteristics and features of computer networks and how to design a network. They will be able
to identify and provide solutions to a range of common hardware and network issues.
On completion of this unit learners will have acquired skills and knowledge that would be beneficial to
working with IT systems within different employment sectors or within the home environment and they
will communicate technical concepts effectively using terminology appropriately.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to select computer system devices and platforms
Learners must be taught how to:
• select core computer components to meet the requirements of computer systems, i.e. the features of:
○ CPU
○ RAM
○ ROM
○ input devices1
○ output devices1
○ storage1
• select and use specialist input devices in flexible ways
(e.g. voice activated systems, multi-touch gestures, fingerprint recognition utility1)
• make use of assistive technology (e.g. eye-tracking and ‘sip and puff’ input devices) to provide access for
disabled users1
• select and use different computer platforms (e.g. games consoles, mobile phones, Kindle, tablet and
embedded systems) according to their properties1.
Learning Outcome 2: Be able to devise network solutions
Learners must be taught:
• network topologies in a modern context (e.g. extended star in a typical wired LAN), hierarchical (e.g.
complex LAN), cell topology in a wireless LAN or mobile telephony network, cloud topology, grid topology2
• the advantages and disadvantages of different topologies (e.g. redundant links as in a cloud or grid, or
central points of failure such as in a hierarchical topology)
• the components and features of LANs and WANs
• the role of computers in network communication, i.e.:
○ server
○ client
○ peer-to-peer host
• the need for a network ID and host ID3
• the role of an IP address and its purpose in network communication
• the need for a physical address and to be able to recognise a MAC address
• the role of the network ID in determining how the router forwards packets
• commonly encountered standards and types of cables (e.g. cat 5, 6 and 7 UTP, fibre optic, 802.11g and n,
3G, 4G)
• network bandwidth and throughput
• security considerations associated with networks4
Learners must be taught how to:
• plan a network to meet requirements by selecting hardware components, network devices, network type,
considering bandwidth, security and cost implications.
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Learning Outcome 3: Be able to identify and solve hardware and network problems
Learners must be taught how to:
•
recognise hardware and network problems (e.g. an unsuccessful PING between two hosts, fault indicator
LED on a printer etc.)
•
check network configuration information using IPCONFIG.
•
capture packets in real time to analyse network communication events and protocols, verify network
communication using TRACERT
•
identify and solve simple hardware and network problems (e.g. faulty network cables, a printer has run out
of paper, IP address conflict, incorrect WEP key5).
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1
This section is supported by Unit R001 LO1 where an understanding of the elements of computer
systems is developed.
2
Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of how networks are used in business organisations.
3
Unit R001 LO1 supports this by developing an understanding of how to connect a device to an
existing network.
4
Unit R001 LO4 develops an understanding of the threats to data security, including those affecting
computer networks.
5
Unit R001 LO1 supports this by developing an understanding of how to connect a device to an
existing network.
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2.11 Unit R010: Developing control systems
Aims
This unit builds on Unit R001 and learners will need to apply the knowledge and understanding
developed in that unit. This unit will enable learners to increase their knowledge and understanding of
control systems and to develop valuable transferable logical skills.
Control systems form part of everyday life. For example, they are used in games consoles, street
lamps, domestic appliances, transport systems, alarm systems, manufacturing systems and theme
park rides. Exposure to real life examples of control systems will really aid learners’ understanding of
control systems, and educational trips are encouraged.
On completion of this unit learners will be able to explore the different components which can be used
to build control systems and the rules which are written to ensure they work properly, and be able
to communicate technical concepts effectively using terminology appropriately. Learners will build
working control systems using either real components or simulation software to show they understand
the concepts.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to design control systems
Learners must be taught:
•
what a computer control system is
•
the range of sensors, i.e. light, temperature, sound, position, pressure and actuators, i.e. motors, buzzers,
LEDs, used within control systems1
•
the role of feedback within control systems
•
the use of variables within control systems
•
the use of open and closed loop control systems
•
the uses of control systems within society, i.e. security systems, environmental control, safety systems,
CAM, robotics, the properties of each, input / output and benefits and impacts of their use1.
Learners must be taught how to:
•
use block diagrams to represent control systems, i.e.:
○ components of block system diagrams
○ input, process (including feedback and variables) and output
•
use block diagrams to define control systems
•
design sets of instructions for control systems, i.e.:
○ repeat loops and subroutines
•
identify success criteria for control system designs, i.e. the functions that will be needed to meet the
requirements.
Learning Outcome 2: Be able to implement control systems
Learners must be taught how to:
•
implement control systems from designs which use a range of sensors and actuators
•
be precise in framing instructions.
Learning Outcome 3: Be able to test control systems
Learners must be taught how to:
28
•
devise test plans to ensure functionality of control systems
•
test control systems using a test plan to evaluate the performance of the system
•
use the results of testing to refine control systems.
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Links between units and synoptic assessment
1 Unit
R001 LO1 develops an understanding of input devices and Unit R001 LO2 develops an
understanding of data capture methods and the factors affecting the choice of appropriate method.
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2.12 Unit R011: Understanding technology – a project approach
Aims
This unit builds on Units R001 and R002 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and
understanding developed in those units and vice versa.
This unit will allow learners to develop their planning, research, presentation and analytical skills by
undertaking a learner initiated-individual project with an ICT-related theme.
Developments in the ICT sector move at a fast pace giving a fascinating array of emerging
technologies which could be studied as well as technologies which are already in daily use. Therefore
the project is an opportunity to:
••
study a completely new area of ICT which is learner motivated and which supports their personal
aspirations
••
explore the 21st century emerging technologies, from tablet computing, smartphone or webbased communications to the home entertainment centres such as gaming consoles, TVs and
3D technologies
••
extend the learning already achieved as a result of studying one of the optional units from the
creativity or technical strands.
The output of the project could be a design, a report or a presentation, but, whatever form the project
output takes, the learner also has to produce a project record for assessment.
On completion of this unit learners will have acquired the transferable skills to work through the cycle
of planning, research, presentation and analysis to answer a question, test a hypothesis or to design a
product or new concept.
Learning Outcome 1: Be able to initiate projects
Learners must be taught:
•
the different forms the project output could take (e.g. an ICT solution, the answer to a question or a
response to a hypothesis)
•
how to choose a project topic
•
how to set objectives, identify success criteria
•
how to use planning tools and techniques to create plans, i.e.:
○ use timelines for planning a project and the need to amend and review plans
○ divide a project into manageable stages.
Learning Outcome 2: K
now how to conduct research for projects
Learners must be taught how to1:
30
•
find information in different ways and from a variety of sources both primary and secondary (e.g. research,
questionnaires, interviews, books, websites, magazines)
•
select sources that are relevant to their project
•
check for bias and accuracy of information
•
select information that is relevant
•
check the reliability of information selected
•
acknowledge other people’s ideas and written work
(e.g. using quote marks in written work)
•
record sources of information using formal referencing systems within ICT.
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Learning Outcome 3: Be able to carry out projects
Learners must be taught how to:
•
produce a project output based on the agreed topic
•
record and monitor project progress, i.e. project plan, record of investigation, design stages (if applicable),
diary of progress2
•
obtain and act on feedback whilst completing a project
•
keep records in order to look back and check progress, learn from work already completed and
incorporate learning into the next stage of the project.
Learners must be taught:
•
the importance of producing the project record whilst carrying out various stages of the project.
Learning Outcome 4: K
now how to review projects
Learners must be taught how to:
•
differentiate between the actual project outcome and the anticipated outcome
•
differentiate between the actual process of completing the project and the planned process
•
describe clearly what went well and what could be improved
•
review the actual project timescale compared to the planned timescale
•
measure the project against its objectives
•
describe the learning achieved as a result of completing the project.
Links between units and synoptic assessment
1
This section is supported by Unit R002 LO1 where learners develop the ability to use ICT based
sources to carry out research.
2
This builds on Unit R001 LO3 which develops an understanding of how ICT can be used to support
working practices.
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3
Assessment of Cambridge Nationals in ICT
3.1
Overview of the assessment in the Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Entry code
J800
Qualification title
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award in ICT
GLH
Reference
60
600/4774/4
120
600/4776/8
240
600/4778/1
Made up of:
•
Units R001 and R002.
J810
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT
Made up of:
•
Units R001 and R002
•
Any other two units.
J820
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Diploma in ICT
Made up of:
•
Units R001 and R002
•
Any other six units.
Individual unit details below:
Unit R001: Understanding computer systems
30 GLH
This question paper:
1 hour written paper
• is based on a pre-release case study
60 marks (60 UMS)
• consists of two sections, each comprising
short answer and extended response
questions.
OCR set and marked
Unit R002: Using ICT to create business solutions
30 GLH
The assessment for this unit:
Centre assessed tasks (OCR set)
• is an OCR set task
60 marks (60 UMS)
• assesses the quality of written
communication.
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
Unit R003: Handling data using spreadsheets
30 GLH
The centre assessed tasks:
Centre assessed tasks
• assess the quality of written communication.
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
Unit R004: Handling data using databases
30 GLH
The centre assessed tasks:
Centre assessed tasks
• assess the quality of written communication.
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
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Unit R005: Creating an interactive product using multimedia components
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R006: Creating digital images
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R007: Creating dynamic products using sound and vision
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R008: Introduction to computer programming
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R009: Exploring computer hardware and networks
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R010: Developing control systems
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R011: Understanding technology – a project approach
30 GLH
Centre assessed tasks
60 marks (60 UMS)
Centre assessed and OCR moderated
The centre assessed tasks:
• assess the quality of written communication.
Unit R001 is a timetabled exam. The question paper is based on a pre-release case study. It consists
of two sections, each comprising short answer and extended response questions.
Units R002–R011 are centre-assessed and OCR-moderated tasks. These units assess the quality
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of written communication (QWC).To claim the Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award (60 GLH)
qualification learners must complete both Unit R001 and Unit R002.
The written assessment for Unit R001 is available in English and Welsh. For centre assessed unit(s) R002–R011, centres may request a bilingual moderator. Further
information regarding this is available in the Admin Guide.
3.2
Links between units and synoptic assessment
The DfE has recently announced that only those qualifications that provide evidence of synoptic
assessment that demonstrates pupils’ broad understanding of what they have studied in their courses
will be counted in the school attainment tables.
This qualification is designed with that requirement in mind. It has been written in a way that allows
learners to sequentially build up their knowledge, understanding and skills between the mandatory
units (R001 and R002) and their chosen optional units over the course of their programme of learning,
which will support them in the assessment of their mandatory and optional units.
While we will not prescribe in which order the units are assessed, it is important to be aware of the
links between units and the requirement for synoptic assessment so that the teaching, learning and
assessment can be planned accordingly then when being assessed learners can apply their learning
in ways which show they are able to make connections across the qualification.
Synoptic assessment is included in units R003–R011.
This specification will support synoptic assessment by:
••
showing teaching and learning links between the units across the specification
••
giving guidance, with the marking criteria for the optional units, about where learners could apply
the knowledge and understanding from the core units to improve their performance.
This qualification supports synoptic learning and assessment by employing the following principles:
34
••
to enable learners to follow specialist pathways within their optional units allowing for holistic
delivery and the application of prior or concurrent learning
••
to develop learners’ appreciation of how different situations or user needs may contribute to
different uses and applications of technology
••
to enable learners to demonstrate an ability to use and apply a range of different methods and/or
techniques
••
to provide assessment that encourages learners to put forward different ideas and/or
explanations to support decisions they have made
••
to develop learners’ ability to suggest or apply different approaches to contexts, situations
••
to develop and assess learners’ use of transferable skills
••
to enable learners to demonstrate analytical and interpretation skills (of situations and/or results)
and the ability to formulate valid well-argued responses
••
to enable learners to evaluate and justify their decisions, choices and recommendations.
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3.3
Grading and awarding grades
All results are awarded on the following scale:
••
Distinction* at Level 2 (*2)
••
Distinction at Level 2 (D2)
••
Merit at Level 2 (M2)
••
Pass at Level 2 (P2)
••
Distinction at Level 1 (D1)
••
Merit at Level 1 (M1)
••
Pass at Level 1 (P1).
The shortened format of the grade will be displayed on Interchange and some administrative
documents provided by OCR. However, the full format of the grade will appear on certificates issued to
learners.
The boundaries for Distinction at Level 2, Pass at Level 2 and Pass at Level 1 are set judgementally.
Other grade boundaries are set arithmetically.
The Merit (Level 2) is set at half the distance between the Pass (Level 2) grade and the Distinction
(Level 2) grade. Where the gap does not divide equally, the Merit (Level 2) boundary is set at the lower
mark (e.g. 45.5 would be rounded down to 45).
The Distinction* (Level 2) grade is normally located as far above Distinction (Level 2) as Merit (Level
2) is below Distinction (Level 2).
To set the Distinction (Level 1) and Merit (Level 1) boundaries, the gap between the Pass (Level
1) grade and the Pass (Level 2) grade is divided by 3, and the boundaries set equidistantly. Where
this division leaves a remainder of 1, this extra mark will be added to the Distinction (Level 1)-Pass
(Level 2) interval (i.e. the Distinction (Level 1) boundary will be lowered by 1 mark). Where this division
leaves a remainder of 2, the extra marks will be added to the Distinction (Level 1)-Pass (Level 2)
interval, and the Merit (Level 1)-Distinction (Level 1) interval, i.e. the Distinction (Level 1) boundary will
be lowered by 1 mark, and the Merit (Level 1) boundary will be lowered by 1 mark.
For example, if Pass (Level 2) is set judgementally at 59, and Pass (Level 1) is set judgementally at
30, then Distinction (Level 1) is set at 49, and Merit (Level 1) is set at 39.
Grades are indicated on qualification certificates. However, results for learners who fail to achieve the
minimum grade (Pass at Level 1) will be recorded as unclassified (U or u) and this is not certificated.
These qualifications are unitised schemes. Learners can take units across several different series.
They can also re-sit units or choose from optional units available. Please refer to section 7.3 Unit and
qualification re-sits. When working out learners’ overall grades OCR needs to be able to compare
performance on the same unit in different series when different grade boundaries have been set, and
between different units. OCR uses a Uniform Mark Scale to enable this to be done.
A learner’s uniform mark for each unit is calculated from the learner’s raw mark on that unit. The raw
mark boundary marks are converted to the equivalent uniform mark boundary. Marks between grade
boundaries are converted on a pro rata basis.
When unit results are issued, the learner’s unit grade and uniform mark are given. The uniform mark is
shown out of the maximum uniform mark for the unit, e.g. 40/60.
The uniform mark boundaries for each of the assessments are shown below:
Unit
GLH
Max
Unit
Uniform
Mark
Unit Grade
distinction*
at L2
distinction
at L2
merit
at L2
30
60
54
48
42
pass distinction at
at L2
L1
36
30
merit
at L1
pass
at L1
u
24
18
0
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The learner’s uniform mark for Unit R001 will be combined with the uniform mark for the centre
assessed units to give a total uniform mark for the qualification. The learner’s overall grade will be
determined by the total uniform mark. The following table shows the minimum total mark for each
overall grade:
Max
Qualification Uniform
Mark
Qualification Grade
distinction*
at L2
distinction
at L2
merit
at L2
pass distinction at
at L2
L1
merit
at L1
pass
at L1
u
Award
120
108
96
84
75
60
48
36
0
Certificate
240
216
192
168
144
120
96
72
0
Diploma
480
432
384
336
288
240
192
144
0
3.4
Performance descriptors
The performance descriptors indicate the level of attainment associated with Distinction at Level 2,
Pass at Level 2 and Pass at Level 1. They are for use at awarding meetings. They give a general
indication of the levels of attainment likely to be shown by a representative learner performing at these
boundaries.
Performance descriptor – Distinction at Level 2
Learners will be able to work with confident independence to create material which reflects thoughtful
planning, skilled development and perceptive evaluation.
They will be able to apply knowledge, understanding and skills in a variety of contexts – exploring,
identifying, selecting and using a range of ICT tools, hardware and file types efficiently to produce
effective ICT-based solutions. They will be able to use confidently a range of features from a broad
range of applications that add value in the workplace and in higher education.
They will be able to produce work that is complete and coherent, demonstrating originality and depth
of understanding.
They will be able to:
36
••
recall a wide range of information regarding the effective use of ICT
••
perceptively analyse ICT problems
••
create solutions which demonstrate detailed consideration of audience and fitness for purpose
••
understand and use a wide range of ICT terminology correctly
••
use techniques efficiently to search for, select and store appropriate information effectively, in a
wide variety of contexts
••
model situations, interpret and present information with sensitivity to needs and with a flair for
effective communication
••
perceptively evaluate the impact of ICT
••
demonstrate, in depth, research, analytical and evaluative skills
••
work independently and manage time efficiently.
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Performance descriptor – Pass at Level 2
Learners will be able to work with independence to create material which reflects effective planning,
development and evaluation.
They will be able to apply knowledge, understanding and skills – identifying, selecting and using a
range of ICT tools, hardware and file types to produce ICT-based solutions. They will be able to use
appropriate features from a range of applications commonly used in the workplace and in higher
education.
They will be able to produce work that is complete and coherent, demonstrating independence and
understanding.
They will be able to:
••
recall information regarding the effective use of ICT
••
analyse ICT problems
••
create solutions which demonstrate consideration of audience and fitness for purpose
••
understand and use ICT terminology correctly
••
use techniques to search for select and store appropriate information in a variety of contexts
••
model situations, interpret and present information with an understanding of needs and effective
communication
••
evaluate the impact of ICT
••
demonstrate research, analytical and evaluative skills
••
work independently and manage time.
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Performance descriptor – Pass at Level 1
Learners will be able to show evidence of independent work to create material which has been
planned, developed and evaluated.
They will be able to apply knowledge, understanding and skills in a limited range of contexts. They will
have understanding of how to identify, select and use ICT tools, hardware and file types to produce
ICT-based solutions. They will be able to use a limited range of features from a range of applications
commonly used in the workplace and in higher education.
They will be able to produce work which demonstrates some evidence of independence and
understanding.
They will be able to:
••
recall some information regarding the effective use of ICT
••
demonstrate an understanding of ICT problems
••
create solutions which demonstrate awareness of audience and fitness for purpose
••
understand and use ICT terminology correctly
••
use techniques to search for, select and store information
••
model situations and present information with an understanding of needs
••
understand the impact of ICT
••
demonstrate some research and evaluative skills
••
state some advantages or disadvantages.
3.5
Quality of written communication
Quality of written communication is assessed in all centre assessed units and is integrated in the
marking criteria.
Learners are expected to:
38
••
ensure that text is legible and that spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate so that
meaning is clear
••
present information in a form that suits its purpose
••
use a suitable structure and style of writing
••
use specialist terminology, where applicable.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
The centre assessed units (R002–R011)
4
This section provides guidance on the completion of the centre assessed units.
4.1
The centre assessed units
Each of the centre assessed units (R002–R011) is designed to provide learners with the opportunity to
build a portfolio of evidence to meet the learning outcomes for that unit.
We recommend that teaching and development of subject content and associated skills be referenced
to real vocational situations, through the utilisation of appropriate industrial contact, vocationally
experienced delivery personnel, and real life case studies.
Units R002–R011 are centre assessed and externally moderated by OCR. Centres can choose
whether they would like moderation via the OCR Repository, postal or visiting moderation.
Appendix B of this specification contains assessment guidance for the centre assessed units, which
should be referred to in conjunction with the unit content and marking criteria grids to inform delivery
of the units. The assessment guidance aims to provide clarification regarding the scope of the learning
required in specific areas of the units where this is felt to be beneficial.
4.2
Tasks for the centre assessed units
4.2.1
Units R002–R011
A bank of model assignments is provided by OCR for units R002–R010. Centres must select from the
model assignments provided to use when assessing their learners. The assignments will be available
free of charge from the OCR website. Learners are able to work on the tasks anytime until the date
the centre collects the work for internal assessment. OCR will review the model assignments annually
which may result in an assignment being withdrawn and replaced. It is up to the centre to check the
OCR website to see which model assignments are available to be used. We will give approximately
12 months notice if a model assignment is to be withdrawn and replaced so that we do not
disadvantage any learners who have already started working on an assignment that is to be replaced.
Centres can make modifications to the model assignments that OCR provides so that the assignment
can be put within a local context that learners might relate to more easily, or to allow for differences in
the materials, equipment and facilities at different centres. Guidance on what can be modified is given
in each assignment in the section Teacher Information under Scope of permitted model assignment
modification. If modifications are made to the model assignment, whether to just the scenario or to
both the scenario and tasks, it is up to the centre to ensure that all learning outcomes can be met and
that learners can assess the full range of marks.
For R002:
The assessment will be structured so that learners are required to provide evidence of using
appropriate ICT techniques to meet specified purposes. It is unlikely that evidence of the techniques
used will, on their own, provide sufficient evidence to judge the extent to which they have been used
appropriately. Annotations may help to provide this additional context and guidance on producing
evidence is given in the OCR assignment for the unit.
Learners must be provided with access to an appropriate range of software that fully meets the
requirements of this unit when they are taking their assessment. Learners must have access to
a range of software as they must make their own decisions as to the choice of software and the
techniques to be used when carrying out activities to generate assessment evidence. For example
learners should have access to both word processing and desk top publishing software and must
be free to choose for themselves the most appropriate software to use in order to format/create
documents which meet a specified purpose. Learners must also make their own decisions when
formatting/creating content. For example learners must start with blank documents and then choose
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4
an appropriate layout as well as the techniques they will use to import, create and edit content – using
wizards will not be appropriate. Similarly, this will apply to their use of spreadsheets and databases.
For R011:
Centres must take note that the nature of unit R011 means that the learner agrees a project title with
the teacher in order to produce evidence that meets the marking criteria. Responsibility lies with the
centre to verify the choice of project topic and title. A verification of topic and title form is available on
the OCR website.
The duration of the assessment is included in the guided learning hours for the unit. Tasks should
indicate how long learners should expect to spend on each task.
The OCR model assignments are provided for summative assessment and not as practice materials.
Teachers must ensure learners are clear about the tasks they are to undertake and the criteria which
they are expected to meet.
4.2.2
Methods of assessment
It is the assessor’s responsibility to choose the best method of assessing a learner in relation to their
individual circumstances. The methods chosen must be:
••
valid
••
reliable
••
safe and manageable and
••
suitable to the needs of the learner.
Valid
Validity can also be compromised if a learner does not understand what is required of them. For
example, one valid method of assessing a learner’s knowledge and understanding is to question them.
If the questions posed are difficult for the learner to understand (not in terms of the content but the way
they are phrased, for example) the validity of the assessment method is questionable.
As well as assessment methods being valid, the evidence presented must also be valid. For example,
it would not be appropriate to present an organisation’s equal opportunities policy as evidence towards
a learner’s understanding of how the equal opportunities policy operates within the organisation. It
would be more appropriate for the learner to incorporate the policy within a report describing different
approaches to equal opportunities.
Reliable
A reliable method of assessment will produce consistent results for different assessors on each
assessment occasion. Internal moderators must make sure that all assessors’ decisions are
consistent.
Safe and manageable
Assessors and internal moderators must make sure that the assessment methods are safe and
manageable and do not put unnecessary demands on the learner.
Suitable to the needs of the learner
OCR is committed to ensuring that achievement of these awards is free from unnecessary barriers.
Centres must follow this commitment through when designing tasks and/or considering assessment.
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4.3
Completing the tasks (for units R002–R011)
Teachers/assessors are expected to supervise and guide learners when undertaking work that is
centre assessed. It should be remembered, however, that the final pieces of work must be produced
solely by the individual learner.
When supervising tasks, teachers/assessors are expected to:
••
exercise continuing supervision of work in order to monitor progress and to prevent plagiarism
••
exercise continuing supervision of practical work to ensure essential compliance with Health and
Safety requirements
••
ensure that the work is completed in accordance with the specification requirements and can be
assessed in accordance with the specified marking criteria and procedures.
Centre assessed work should be completed in the course of normal curriculum time, and supervised
and marked by the teacher/assessor. Some of the work, by its very nature, may be undertaken outside
the centre, for example, research work, testing etc. As with all centre assessed work, the teacher must
be satisfied that the work submitted for assessment is the learner’s own.
Learners are free to revise and redraft work without teacher/assessor involvement before submitting
the work for assessment. The advice provided prior to final submission should only enable the learner
to take the initiative in making amendments, rather than detailing what amendments should be made.
This means that teachers/assessors must not provide templates, model answers or detail specifically
what amendments should be made.
Adding, amending or removing any work after it has been submitted for final assessment will constitute
malpractice.
4.3.1 Presentation of the final piece of work
Learners must observe the following procedures when producing their final piece of work for the centre
assessed tasks:
••
work can be word processed or hand written
••
tables, graphs and spreadsheets may be produced using appropriate ICT. These should be
inserted into the report at the appropriate place
••
any copied material must be suitably acknowledged
••
quotations must be clearly marked and a reference provided wherever possible
••
a completed cover sheet must be attached to work submitted for moderation. The cover sheet
must include the following information as well as the marks given for each of the assessment
criteria:
–
–
–
–
–
–
centre number
centre name
candidate number
candidate name
unit code and title
assignment title.
Work submitted in digital format (CD or online) for moderation or marking must be in a suitable file
structure as detailed in Appendix C at the end of this specification. Work submitted on paper must be
secured by treasury tags or other suitable method.
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4.4
Marking and moderating centre assessed units
All centre assessed units are internally marked by centre staff using OCR marking criteria and
guidance and externally moderated by the OCR-appointed moderator.
The centre is responsible for appointing someone to act as the assessor. This could be the teacher
who has delivered the programme or another person from the centre.
The marking criteria must be used to mark the learners’ work. These specify the levels of skills,
knowledge and understanding that the learner is required to demonstrate.
The following assessment methods are considered suitable for teachers/assessors to adopt for these
qualifications alongside the assessment of the evidence submitted by the learner:
••
observation of a learner doing something
••
questioning of the learner or witness.
Observation
The teacher/assessor and learner should plan observations together but it is the teacher/assessor’s
responsibility to record the observation properly.
Questioning
Questioning the learner is normally an ongoing part of the assessment process, and may in some
circumstances provide evidence to support achievement of learning outcomes.
Questioning is often used to:
••
test a learner’s understanding of work which has been completed outside of the classroom
••
check if a learner understands the work they have undertaken
••
collect information on the type and purpose of the processes a learner has gone through.
If questioning is to be used as evidence towards achievement of specific learning outcomes, it is
important that teachers/assessors record enough information about what they asked and how the
learner replied, to allow the assessment decision to be moderated.
Questioning witnesses is normally an ongoing part of validating written witness statements. However,
questioning witnesses can be used for other purposes. Teachers/assessors should be able to speak to
witnesses and record, in whatever way is suitable, the verbal statements of these witnesses. A record
of a verbal statement is a form of witness statement and could provide valuable evidence. Further
guidance on the use of witness statements can be found in Appendix A.
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4.4.1
Use of a ‘best fit’ approach to marking criteria
The assessment tasks should be marked by teachers/assessors according to the OCR marking
criteria using a ‘best fit’ approach. For each of the marking criteria, teachers/assessors select the
band descriptor provided in the marking grid that most closely describes the quality of the work being
marked.
Marking should be positive, rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions.
The award of marks must be directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the learning outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all of the requirements of a band descriptor before being
placed in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements
of that band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
the extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
an answer that convincingly meets nearly all of the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded
••
an answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded
••
if an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
Teachers/assessors should use the full range of marks available to them and award full marks in any
band for work that fully meets that descriptor. This is work that is ‘the best one could expect from
learners working at that level’.
4.4.2
Annotation of learners’ work
Each piece of internally assessed work should show how the marks have been awarded in relation to
the marking criteria.
The writing of comments on learners’ work, and cover sheet, provides a means of communication
between teachers during the internal standardisation and with the moderator if the work forms part of
the moderation sample.
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4.5
Authentication
Teachers/assessors must be confident that the work they mark is the learner’s own. This does not
mean that a learner must be supervised throughout the completion of all work, but the teacher
must exercise sufficient supervision, or introduce sufficient checks, to be in a position to judge the
authenticity of the learner’s work.
Wherever possible, the teacher should discuss work-in-progress with learners. This will not only
ensure that work is underway in a planned and timely manner, but will also provide opportunities for
teachers/assessors to check authenticity of the work.
Learners must not plagiarise. Plagiarism is the submission of another’s work as one’s own and/or
failure to acknowledge the source correctly. Plagiarism is considered to be malpractice and could lead
to the learner being disqualified. Plagiarism sometimes occurs innocently when learners are unaware
of the need to reference or acknowledge their sources. It is therefore important that centres ensure
that learners understand that the work they submit must be their own and that they understand the
meaning of plagiarism and what penalties may be applied. Learners may refer to research, quotations
or evidence but they must list their sources. The rewards from acknowledging sources, and the
credibility they will gain from doing so, should be emphasised to learners as well as the potential risks
of failing to acknowledge such material.
Both learners and teachers must declare that the work is the learner’s own.
••
Each learner must sign a declaration before submitting their work to their teacher. A learner
authentication statement that can be used is available to download from the OCR website.
These statements should be retained within the centre until all enquiries about results,
malpractice and appeals issues have been resolved. A mark of zero must be recorded if a
learner cannot confirm the authenticity of their work.
••
Centres must confirm to OCR that the evidence produced by learners is authentic. Teachers
are required to declare that the work submitted for centre assessment is the learner’s own work
by completing a Centre Authentication Form for each unit. If a centre fails to provide evidence of
authentication, we will set the mark for the learner(s) concerned to Pending (Q) for that unit
until authentication can be provided. The Centre Authentication Form is available to download
from the OCR website and includes a declaration which teachers must sign.
4.5.1
Internal standardisation
It is important that all teachers/assessors work to common standards. Centres must ensure that, within
each unit, the internal standardisation of marks across teachers/assessors and teaching groups takes
place using an appropriate procedure.
This can be done in a number of ways. In the first year, reference material and OCR training meetings
will provide a basis for centres’ own standardisation. In subsequent years, this, or centres’ own archive
material, may be used. Centres are advised to hold preliminary meetings of staff involved to compare
standards through cross-marking a small sample of work. After most marking has been completed, a
further meeting at which work is exchanged and discussed will enable final adjustments to be made.
4.5.2
Submitting marks
All work for centre assessment is marked by the teacher and internally standardised by the centre.
Marks are then submitted to OCR; see Section 4.6 for submission dates of the marks to OCR.
There should be clear evidence that work has been attempted and some work produced. If a learner
submits no work for a centre assessed unit, then the learner should be indicated as being absent from
that unit. If a learner completes any work at all for a centre assessed unit, then the work should be
assessed according to the marking criteria and the appropriate mark awarded, which may be zero.
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4.6
Moderation
The purpose of external moderation is to ensure that the standard of marking is the same for each
centre and to ensure that internal standardisation has taken place.
Centres can select from:
••
Moderated via OCR Repository (see section 4.6.1)
••
Moderated via postal moderation (see section 4.6.2)
••
Moderated via visiting moderation (see section 4.6.3)
The deadline dates for entries and submission of marks for each moderation method are detailed
below. Centres must ensure when selecting a moderation method that the appropriate entry and
marks submission deadlines can be adhered to.
Moderation method
January series
June series
Entries
Marks
Entries
Marks
Moderated via OCR Repository
21st Oct
10th Jan
Moderated via postal moderation
21st Oct
10th Jan
Moderated via visiting moderation
21st Oct
10th Dec 21st Feb 31st Mar
November series
(2013 onwards)
Entries
Marks
21st Feb 15th May
tbc
tbc
21st Feb 15th May
tbc
tbc
Not available
When making your entries, the entry option specifies how the work is going to be moderated.
For each unit, you must choose the same moderation method for all learners (i.e. all learners for that
unit in that series must be entered using the same entry option). However, you can choose different
moderation methods for different units and in different series.
Sample requests
Once you have submitted your marks, your exams officer will receive an email telling you which
work will be sampled as part of the moderation. Samples will include work from across the range of
attainment of the learners’ work.
Each learner’s work must have a cover sheet attached to it with a summary of the marks awarded for
the task. If the work is to be submitted via OCR Repository this cover sheet must also be submitted
electronically within each learner’s files.
OCR will require centres to release work for awarding and archive purposes and the co-operation
of the centre is most appreciated in these instances, as it is imperative to have work available at
awarding meetings. If this is required then centres will be notified as early as possible.
Centres will receive the final outcome of moderation when the provisional results are issued. The
following reports will be issued via Interchange:
••
Moderation adjustments report – This lists any scaling that has been applied to internally
assessed units ••
Moderator report to centres – This is a brief report by the moderator on the internal assessment
of learners’ work.
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4.6.1
Moderated via OCR Repository
The OCR Repository is a secure website for centres to upload candidate work and for assessors to
access this work digitally. Centres can use the OCR Repository for uploading marked candidate work
for moderation.
Centres can access the OCR Repository via OCR Interchange, find their candidate entries in their
area of the Repository, and use the Repository to upload files (singly or in bulk) for access by their
moderator.
The OCR Repository allows candidates to produce evidence and files that would normally be difficult
for postal submissions, for example multimedia and other interactive unit submissions.
The OCR Repository is seen as a faster, greener and more convenient means of providing work for
assessment. It is part of a wider programme bringing digital technology to the assessment process,
the aim of which is to provide simpler and easier administration for centres.
All moderated units can be submitted electronically to the OCR Repository via Interchange: please
check section 7.2.2 for unit entry codes for the OCR Repository.
There are three ways to load files to the OCR Repository:
1. Centres can load multiple files against multiple candidates by clicking on ‘Upload candidate files’
in the Candidates tab of the Candidate Overview screen.
2. Centres can load multiple files against a specific candidate by clicking on ‘Upload files’ in the
Candidate Details screen.
3. Centres can load multiple administration files by clicking on ‘Upload admin files’ in the
Administration tab of the Candidate Overview screen.
Instructions for how to upload files to OCR using the OCR Repository can be found on OCR
Interchange.
4.6.2
Moderated via postal moderation
Your sample of work must be posted to the moderator within three days of receiving the request. You
should use one of the labels provided by OCR to send the learner’s work.
We would advise you to keep evidence of work submitted to the moderator, e.g. copies of written work
or photographs of practical work. You should also obtain a certificate of posting for all work that is
posted to the moderator.
Work may be submitted in digital format (on CD) for moderation but must be in a suitable file structure
as detailed in Appendix C at the end of this specification.
4.6.3
Moderated via visiting moderation
Your sample of work must be retained in the centre ready for the moderation visit.
The work that is presented to the visiting moderator as their initial sample must be available in rank
order, by unit, to allow moderation to take place. All work not selected for initial sampling must be
available to the visiting moderator during their visit should they need to extend their sample.
At the end of the visit, the moderator may need to take samples of work away or request for work to be
posted to them for further consideration.
All learners’ work must be retained securely within the centre until results are issued and it is certain
that no Enquiries about results or appeal procedure is required.
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Support for Cambridge Nationals in ICT
5.1
5
Free resources available from the OCR website
The following materials will be available on the OCR website:
••
specification
••
specimen assessment materials for units R001
••
a bank of model assignments for the centre assessed units R002 – R010.
5.2
Other resources
OCR works in close collaboration with partners to ensure you have access to a wide range of high
quality resources tailored to OCR specifications.
Endorsed publications
OCR endorses a range of publisher materials to provide quality resources for centres delivering its
qualifications. You can be confident that materials branded with OCR’s ‘Official Publisher Partnership’
or ‘Approved publication’ logos have undergone a thorough quality assurance process to achieve
endorsement. All responsibility for the content of the publisher’s materials rests with the publisher.
These endorsements do not mean that the materials are the only suitable resources available or
necessary to achieve an OCR qualification.
5.3
Training
OCR will offer a range of support activities for all practitioners throughout the lifetime of the
qualification to ensure they have the relevant knowledge and skills to deliver the qualification.
Please see Event Booker for further information.
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5
5.4
OCR support services
5.4.1
Active Results
Active Results is available to all centres offering the Cambridge Nationals qualifications.
Active Results is a free results analysis service to help teachers review the performance of individual
learners or whole schools.
Devised specifically for the UK market, data can be analysed using filters on several categories such
as gender and other demographic information, as well as providing breakdowns of results by question
and topic.
Active Results allows you to look in greater detail at your results:
••
richer and more granular data will be made available to centres including question-level data
available from e-marking for unit R001
••
you can identify the strengths and weaknesses of individual learners and your centre’s cohort as
a whole
••
our systems have been developed in close consultation with teachers so that the technology
delivers what you need.
Further information on Active Results can be found on the OCR website.
5.4.2
OCR Interchange
OCR Interchange has been developed to help you to carry out day-to-day administration functions
online, quickly and easily. The site allows you to register and enter learners online. In addition,
you can gain immediate and free access to learner information at your convenience.
Sign up at https://interchange.ocr.org.uk.
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Access to Cambridge Nationals in ICT
6.1
6
Equality Act information relating to Cambridge Nationals in ICT
The Cambridge Nationals in ICT require assessment of a broad range of competencies and, as such,
prepare learners for a wide range of occupations and higher level courses.
The Cambridge Nationals in ICT qualifications were reviewed to identify whether any of the
competencies required by the subject presented a potential barrier to any disabled learners. If this
was the case, the situation was reviewed again to ensure that such competencies were included only
where essential to the subject.
Reasonable adjustments are made for disabled learners in order to enable them to access the
assessments and to demonstrate what they know and can do. For this reason, very few learners will
have a complete barrier to the assessment. Information on reasonable adjustments is found in Access
Arrangements, Reasonable Adjustments and Special Consideration produced by the Joint Council for
Qualifications www.jcq.org.uk.
The access arrangements permissible for use in this specification are as follows:
Access arrangement
Yes/No
Type of assessment
Readers
Yes
All assessments
Scribers
Yes
All assessments
Practical assistants
Yes
All assessments
Word processors
Yes
All assessments
Transcripts
Yes
All assessments
BSL interpreters
Yes
All assessments
Oral language modifiers
Yes
All assessments
MQ papers
Yes
All assessments
Extra time
Yes
All assessments
6.2
Arrangements for learners with particular requirements
All learners with a demonstrable need may be eligible for access arrangements to enable them to
show what they know and can do. The criteria for eligibility for access arrangements can be found
in the JCQ document Access Arrangements, Reasonable Adjustments and Special Consideration.
Learners who have been fully prepared for the assessment but who have been affected by adverse
circumstances beyond their control at the time of the examination, may be eligible for special
consideration. Centres should consult the JCQ document Access Arrangements, Reasonable
Adjustments and Special Consideration.
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7
Administration of Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Full details of the administrative arrangements can be found in the Cambridge Nationals Admin Guide.
The Admin Guide is available from the OCR website.
7.1
Availability of assessment
There are three assessment series each year in January, June and November. All units will be
assessed from January 2013. Assessment availability can be summarised as follows:
Unit R001
Unit R002 – R011
January 2013
3
3
June 2013
3
3
November 2013
–
3*
January 2014
3
3
June 2014
3
3
November 2014
–
3*
Certification is available for the first time in January 2013 and each January, June and November
thereafter.
* Visiting moderation is not available in the November series. Please see section 4.6 for details on the
moderation methods available in each series.
7.2
Making entries
Centres must be registered with OCR in order to make any entries, including estimated entries. It is
recommended that centres apply to OCR to become a registered centre well in advance of making
their first entries. Details on how to register with OCR can be found on the OCR website.
Centres must have made an entry for a unit in order for OCR to supply the appropriate forms and
allocate a visiting moderator for centre assessment.
It is essential that unit entry codes are quoted in all correspondence with OCR.
7.2.1
Making estimated unit entries
Estimated entries must be made prior to each assessment series. Estimated entries are used by OCR
to allocate examiners and moderators to centres.
7.2.2
Making final unit entries
When making an entry centres must quote unit entry code and component codes. For the centre
assessed units, centres must decide whether they want to submit learners’ work for moderation via the
OCR Repository or for postal or visiting. Learners submitting work must be entered for the appropriate
unit entry code from the table opposite.
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For Unit R001, centres must ensure that the correct unit entry code is selected for the required
language of the assessment materials.
Unit entry Component
code
code
Assessment method
R001
01
Written paper
R001 W
02
Written paper: Welsh language
R002 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R002 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R002 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R003 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R003 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R003 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R004 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R004 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R004 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R005 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R005 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R005 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R006 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R006 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R006 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R007 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R007 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R007 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R008 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R008 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R008 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R009 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R009 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R009 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R010 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R010 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R010 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
R011 A
01
Moderated via OCR Repository
R011 B
02
Moderated via postal moderation
R011 C
03
Moderated via visiting moderation
Unit titles
Understanding computer systems
Using ICT to create business solutions
Handling data using spreadsheets
Handling data using databases
Creating an interactive product using
multimedia components
Creating digital images
Creating dynamic products using
sound and vision
Introduction to computer programming
Exploring computer hardware and
networks
Developing control systems
Understanding technology – a project
approach
The short title for these Cambridge National qualifications is CAMNAT and will display as such on
Interchange and some administrative documents provided by OCR.
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7.3
Certification rules
Learners must be entered for qualification certification separately from unit assessment(s). If a
certification entry is not made, no overall grade can be awarded.
Learners may be entered for:
••
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Award – certification code J800
••
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate – certification code J810
••
OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Diploma – certification code J820.
Learners may be entered for certification of any combinations of the Award, Certificate and Diploma
qualifications concurrently.
Unit results used to calculate the result for one qualification can be re-used toward certification of other
qualifications of a different size. This means that, as learners progress through the course, they may
certificate for a qualification of one size and then later certificate for a qualification of a different size,
re-using the units used towards the first certification.
There are no terminal requirements for these qualifications therefore learners can complete units in
any order.
7.4
Unit and qualification re-sits
Learners may re-sit each unit an unlimited number of times. The best unit result will be used to
calculate the certification result.
Learners may enter for the qualification an unlimited number of times. Learners must retake at least
one unit, or take a different optional unit, for a new result to be issued.
7.5
Enquiries about results
Under certain circumstances, a centre may wish to query the result issued to one or more learners.
Enquiries about results for all units must be made immediately following the series in which the
relevant unit was taken (by the Enquiries about results deadline).
Please refer to the JCQ Post-Results Services booklet and the Cambridge National Admin Guide
for further guidance about action on the release of results. Copies of the latest versions of these
documents can be obtained from the OCR website.
For internally assessed units the enquiries about results process cannot be carried out for one
individual learner; the outcome of a review of moderation must apply to a centre’s entire cohort.
7.6
Shelf-life of units
Individual unit results, prior to certification of the qualification, have a shelf-life limited only by that of
the qualification.
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Other information about Cambridge Nationals
in ICT
8.1
8
Overlap with other qualifications
There is some overlap between the content of these qualifications and that of GCSE in ICT.
There is also some potential overlap between units R008 – R010 with GCSE in Computing.
There is overlap of skills and content between the units of this specification and the Functional Skills
Qualification in ICT at Level 1 and Level 2.
8.2
Progression from/to these qualifications
Apprenticeship
Framework
(Level 2 & 3)
Principal Learning
Engineering
(Level 1, 2 & 3)
Vocational
Qualifications
(QCF)
Creative iMedia
IT Practitioner
(Level 1 & 2)
Cambridge Technical
in ICT
(Level 2 & 3)
Cambridge
Nationals
in ICT
(Level 1/Level 2)
GCE
Electronics
ICT
Applied ICT
Computing
(Level 3)
GCSE
Engineering
ICT
Computing
Manufacturing
(Level 1/Level 2)
Entry Level
ICT
OCR offers a flexible and responsive range of general and vocational ICT qualifications that allow
suitable progression routes for all types of learners.
Centres are able to use these qualifications to create pathways that provide learners with the
underpinning skills and knowledge that will enable them to choose the most appropriate progression
routes for their particular needs (further study, Further Education (FE) or employment).
Progression from OCR Level 1/Level 2 Cambridge National Award/Certificate/Diploma in ICT to GCSE
qualifications:
••
ICT
••
Computing
••
Business and Communication Systems
••
Manufacturing
••
Art and Design
••
Media Studies
••
Design and Technology.
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8
For learners who want to progress to Level 3 qualifications they have the choice of various GCE
qualifications which will further develop areas of their learning from Level 1/Level 2.
••
ICT
••
Computing
••
Design and Technology.
Learners can progress from OCR Level 1/Level 2 Cambridge National Award/Certificate/Diploma in
ICT to other vocational qualifications:
••
IT User Skills, IT Professional and IT Practitioner suite of qualifications (Levels 1-4)
••
Creative iMedia suite of qualifications (Levels 1-3).
8.3
Avoidance of bias
OCR has taken great care in preparing this specification and assessment materials to avoid bias of
any kind. Special focus is given to the 9 strands of the Equality Act with the aim of ensuring both direct
and indirect discrimination is avoided.
8.4
Criteria requirements
This specification complies in all respects with the Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition.
8.5
Language
This specification is available in English only. The assessment materials are available in English and
Welsh.
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© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
8
8.6
Spiritual, moral, ethical, social, legislative, economic and cultural issues
These qualifications provide potential for centres to develop learners’ understanding of spiritual, moral,
ethical, social, legislative, economic and cultural issues. This specification offers opportunities to
contribute to an understanding of these issues in the following topics.
Issue
Examples of opportunities for developing an understanding of the issue
during the course
Spiritual issues
○ developing knowledge and understanding of: how ICT systems have
changed the way people go about their daily lives (including communication,
shopping, gaming, entertainment, education and training, banking and
financial services, social networking, and online/remote working etc)
Moral issues
○ learning about appropriate uses of software, malicious use of software and
the damage it can cause, and the safe and responsible use of ICT.
Ethical issues
○ learning about the ethical implications of the electronic storage and
transmission of personal information:
○ how ICT systems can affect the quality of life experienced by persons with
disabilities and the responsibility to meet individuals access requirements
Social issues
○ social issues that can affect users of ICT, including the use and abuse of
personal and private data, cyber bullying, etc
Legislative issues
○ the main aspects of legislation relating to the use of ICT: the computer
misuse, data protection, copyright design and patents acts and other
legislation as it applies to the use of ICT
○ The legal implications and consequences for business organisations of data
loss
Economic issues
○ learning about making informed decisions about the choice, implementation,
and use of ICT depending upon cost and the efficient management of
money and resources
Cultural issues
○ helping learners appreciate that ICT contributes to the development of our
culture and is becoming increasingly central to our highly technological
future
○ how learners need to show cultural awareness of the audience when
communicating with ICT
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
55
8
8.7
Sustainable development, health and safety considerations and European
developments, consistent with international agreements
These qualifications provide potential to heighten learners’ awareness of sustainable development,
health and safety considerations and European developments consistent with international
agreements.
The specification incorporates learning about relevant health and safety, European and environmental
legislation, and could include learning about how each of these factors has affected the use of ICT for
businesses and individuals.
Environmental issues
Learners could have the opportunity to learn about how the changes in working practices due to the
use of ICT have impacted upon the environment e.g. fewer carbon emissions due to more online/
remote working and therefore less travel and environmental issues connected to the production, use
and disposal of ICT systems.
Learners could also explore the effect on natural resources of the creation and use of ICT systems
including the environmental impact of digital devices and their use, deployment and eventual recycling
and disposal.
The understanding of environmental issues will only form part of the assessment requirements where
they are relevant to the specific content of the specification and have been identified within the taught
content. Learners may choose to produce work that has an environmental theme or to enhance their
learning by carrying out further personal study.
8.8
Key Skills
These qualifications provide opportunities for the development of the Key Skills of Communication,
Application of Number, Information and Communication Technology, Working with Others, Improving
Own Learning and Performance and Problem Solving at Levels 1 and/or 2. However, the extent to
which this evidence fulfils the Key Skills criteria at these levels will be totally dependent on the style
of teaching and learning adopted for each unit. The following table indicates where opportunities may
exist for at least some coverage of the various Key Skills criteria at Levels 1 and/or 2 for each unit.
Unit
56
C
AoN
1
2
Unit R001
3
3
Unit R002
3
3
3
Unit R003
3
3
3
Unit R004
3
Unit R005
IoLP
PS
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R006
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R007
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R008
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R009
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R010
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R011
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
WwO
1
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
1
ICT
3
3
8
8.9
Functional Skills
These qualifications provide opportunities for the development of the Functional Skills of:
••
English: Speaking and Listening, Reading and Writing
••
Mathematics: Representing, Analysing and Interpreting
••
ICT: Use ICT systems, Find and select information and Develop, present and communicate
information
at Levels 1 and 2. However, the extent to which this evidence fulfils the criteria at these levels will
be totally dependent on the style of teaching and learning adopted for each unit. The following table
indicates where opportunities may exist for at least some coverage of the criteria at Levels 1 and/or 2
for each unit.
English
Unit
S&L
Maths
R
W
R
1
ICT
A
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
Unit R001
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R002
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R003
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R004
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R005
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R006
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R007
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R008
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R009
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R010
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Unit R011
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
2
D,P&C
1
3
2
F&SI
2
3
1
U
1
3
2
I
3
3
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
57
Appendix A: Guidance on witness statements
A
It is anticipated that the majority of evidence will be produced directly by the learner. Indirect evidence,
such as witness statements, should only be used where it would be impractical for the learner to
produce the evidence themselves.
Witness statements will, ideally, support the direct evidence produced by the learner.
••
Care should be taken that a witness statement is impartial and free from bias. The use of
relatives and close friends as witnesses should be avoided, if possible.
••
In all cases the witness will be required to declare their relationship to the learner.
••
A witness statement should record what the learner has done and in doing so should not seek to
repeat or paraphrase the marking criteria.
••
The evidence presented by the witness should record the learner’s individual contribution and
should focus on the contribution made by the individual learner, as distinct from that of the group
or team as a whole.
••
Witnesses should describe what the learner did and not assess the learner. It is the responsibility
of the teacher/assessor to judge the learner’s skill, knowledge and understanding against the
marking criteria. In doing so the teacher/assessor will use the witness statement to determine
the value of the evidence against the marking criteria and award marks accordingly.
••
The teacher/assessor is responsible for briefing anyone who is to provide a witness statement. It
is expected that the teacher/assessor will ensure that the witness is appropriately prepared and
that any issues related to child protection have been fully considered.
••
The role of the witnesses should be that of impartial observers and they should not become
involved in carrying out the activity on behalf of the learner.
••
In circumstances where a witness does assist the learner in accomplishing a task or activity
their input must be recorded within the statement so that the teacher/assessor can reflect this
appropriately in the award of marks.
Where the above guidance has not been followed, the reliability of the witness statement may be
called into question. In circumstances where doubt exists about the validity of a witness statement
it cannot be used as assessment evidence and no marks may be awarded on the basis of it. If
the unreliability of a witness statement becomes apparent during the visiting moderation process
moderators will be instructed to adjust centre marks in accordance with this directive.
An exemplar template for recording a witness statement is available from the OCR website and
centres are encouraged to use this to assist in recording witness evidence. However, witness evidence
may take different forms including digitally recorded spoken commentary or video. In these cases
additional accompanying documentation may be required to corroborate that the guidelines on witness
statements detailed above have been followed.
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Appendix B:Marking criteria for centre
assessment
B
These qualifications are combined Level 1/2, therefore, the marking criteria for the centre assessed
units span both levels.
Unit R002: Using ICT to create business solutions
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the learning outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all of the requirements of a band descriptor before being
placed in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements
of that band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
the extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
an answer that convincingly meets nearly all of the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded
••
an answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded
••
if an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria, please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
59
Demonstrates a thorough understanding of the
common and advanced tools and features of email
software. Demonstrates a thorough understanding of
email etiquette.
Enters effective search criteria into a search engine
to find appropriate information, which fully meets the
specified requirements, and records the Copyright
holder(s) of the information found accurately and
thoroughly.
Demonstrates a sound understanding of the most
common tools and features of email and some
understanding of the more advanced features of email
software. Demonstrates some awareness of email
etiquette.
Enters sound search criteria into a search engine to
find appropriate information which largely meets the
specified requirements, and records the Copyright
holder(s) of the information found with some accuracy
but not all the required details.
Demonstrates a limited understanding of the most
common tools and features of email software.
Creates a spreadsheet or database importing data
mostly accurately which meets most of the specified
requirements.
Edits and manipulates data mostly accurately and
provides mostly relevant information to meet particular
purposes.
The choice of data-handling software used is of sound
appropriateness to the audience and purpose.
Edits and manipulates data with some accuracy and
provides some relevant information to meet particular
purposes.
The choice of data-handling software used is of limited
appropriateness to the audience and purpose.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
Creates a spreadsheet or database importing data with
some accuracy which meets some of the specified
requirements.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
The choice of data-handling software used is of wholly
appropriate to the audience and purpose.
60
Edits and manipulates data with complete accuracy and
provides wholly relevant information to meet particular
purposes.
Creates a spreadsheet or database importing data
with complete accuracy which fully meets the specified
requirements.
LO2: Be able to select and use software to handle data
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Produces a well structured, logical system to store
electronic information, in which
○ all folders have meaningful names
○ all files are saved in an appropriate file type
with meaningful names and, where appropriate,
versions of file(s) are clearly identified
○ all files are stored logically within the folder
structure.
Produces a sound system to store electronic
information, in which
○ most folders have meaningful names
○ most files are saved in an appropriate file type
with meaningful names
○ most files are stored logically within the folder
structure.
Produces a basic system to store electronic files, in
which
○ some folders have meaningful names
○ some files are saved in an appropriate file type
with meaningful names
○ some files are stored logically within the folder
structure.
Enters basic search criteria into a search engine to
find appropriate information which partly meets the
specified requirements, and records limited information
on the Copyright holder(s) of the information found.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
LO1: Be able to use techniques to search for, store and share information
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
Marking criteria grid
B
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Works independently to enhance the appearance of
the output.
Works with only occasional support to enhance the
appearance of the output.
Requires support to enhance the appearance of the
output.
The application of formatting tools thoroughly
enhances the overall appearance of the document and
means the information is consistently clear and easy to
read.
The sound application of formatting tools results
in some enhancement of the overall appearance
of the document and improves the ease with which
information can be read.
The basic application of formatting tools has limited
impact on the overall appearance of the document and
ease with which information can be read.
Makes effective use of formatting tools and applies
them consistently.
Makes sound use of formatting tools and in most
cases applies them consistently.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Includes content that fully meets the specified
requirements and is wholly suitable for the target
audience. Few, if any, errors in spelling, punctuation
and grammar.
LO4: Be able to use software tools to format information
Includes content, most of which meets the specified
requirements and is mostly suitable for the target
audience. Occasional errors will not affect the overall
meaning.
MB3: 5 – 6 marks
Uses the tools and facilities in each type of software
effectively to meet all of the specified requirements.
Uses the tools and facilities in each type of software
with sound effectiveness to meet most of the specified
requirements.
MB2: 3 – 4 marks
Creates a range of file types, in each case selecting
the appropriate medium for the type of communication.
MB3: 7 – 9 marks
Creates a range of file types, mostly selecting the
appropriate medium for the type of communication.
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
Makes basic use of formatting tools, there may be
limited consistency in their use.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
Includes content, some of which meets the specified
requirements and has limited suitability for the target
audience. Errors may be intrusive and likely to impact
significantly on the meaning of the content.
MB1: 1 – 2 marks
Uses some tools and facilities in each type of software
with limited effectiveness to meet some of the
specified requirements.
Creates a limited range of file types, sometimes
selecting the appropriate medium for the type of
communication.
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
LO3: Be able to select and use software to communicate information for a business purpose
61
B
B
Assessment guidance
Learners must be provided with access to an appropriate range of software that fully meets the
requirements of this unit when they are taking their assessment. Learners must have access to
a range of software as they must make their own decisions as to the choice of software and the
techniques to be used when carrying out activities to generate assessment evidence. For example
learners should have access to both word processing and desk top publishing software and must
be free to choose for themselves the most appropriate software to use in order to format/create
documents which meet a specified purpose. Learners must also make their own decisions when
formatting/creating content. For example learners must start with blank documents and then choose
an appropriate layout as well as the techniques they will use to import, create and edit content – using
wizards will not be appropriate. Similarly, this will apply to their use of spreadsheets and databases.
62
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B
Unit R003: Handling data using spreadsheets
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
○
When creating a spreadsheet structure, learners could apply their learning from unit R002
LO2 regarding the creation of business spreadsheets.
○
When learners are selecting data, and carrying out data validations, they could apply their
learning from unit R002 LO2 regarding the entering/importing and manipulation of data.
Learners could also apply learning from R001 LO2 regarding data capture forms, coding
information for use in spreadsheets and data validation methods.
○
When learners are selecting formulae and functions to produce a solution that is effective
and efficient, they could apply their learning from unit R002 LO2 regarding the use of
formulae and functions within spreadsheets.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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B
○
When learners create graphs they could apply their learning from unit R002 regarding the
manipulation of data (LO2) and the presentation of information in graphs or charts (LO2
and LO3).
○
When learners carry out spreadsheet modelling to provide alternative outcomes for
different scenarios, they could apply their knowledge from unit R002 regarding the
changing of data to model outcomes (LO2) and how information/data can be presented or
manipulated to support decision making (LO3).
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D. 64
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Selects the data which is relevant to user requirements
and enters it accurately. Few if any errors intrude, so
the functionality of the spreadsheet is not affected.
Selects data that is mostly relevant to user
requirements and enters most of it accurately.
Occasional errors will not impact on the functionality of
the spreadsheet.
Gives a sound explanation of why the formulae and
functions were selected giving mostly valid reasons.
Demonstrating a sound understanding of which
formulae and functions will meet user requirements.
Demonstrates a limited understanding of which
formulae and functions will meet user requirements.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Demonstrating a detailed understanding of
which formulae and functions will best meet user
requirements.
Gives a thorough justification of why the formulae and
functions were selected giving full and valid reasons.
65
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Gives a limited explanation of why the formulae and
functions were selected.
Selects formulae and functions to produce a solution
that is effective and efficient and in the main accurately
meets user requirements.
Selects formulae and functions to produce a solution
that includes elements of efficiency and satisfies some
of the user requirements.
Selects formulae and functions to produce a solution
which has limited capacity to meet user requirements.
LO2: Be able to select and use spreadsheet functions to meet user requirements 2
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
MB3: 8 – 10 marks
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Selects some data that is relevant to user requirements
and enters some of it accurately. Errors may be
intrusive and likely to impact significantly on the
functionality of the spreadsheet.
MB3: 7 – 9 marks
Uses relevant data validation and data types
effectively to minimise data entry errors including
appropriate input messages to redirect the user.
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Creates an organised structure which meets most of
the user requirements of a brief and uses appropriate
presentation to make the purpose of the spreadsheet
model clear and very user-friendly, enabling the user
to readily identify where the inputs and outputs are
located.
MB3: 9 – 11 marks
Uses relevant data types and some relevant data
validation types to minimise data entry errors including
input messages to redirect the user.
Creates a structure which meets many of the user
requirements of a brief, makes the purpose of the
spreadsheet model clear to the user and incorporates
some features to make it user-friendly.
Creates a basic structure which meets few of the user
requirements from a brief and provides some indication
to the user of the purpose of the spreadsheet model.
Uses some data types, some of which are relevant,
and limited data validation.
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
LO1: Be able to create and populate spreadsheets to meet user requirements 1
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Marking criteria grid
B
Describes the results and gives some justification for
the choice of tools used providing some support to
decision-making
The results give limited information to support to
decision-making.
Detailed explanation of the results and thorough
justification of the choice of tools used and fully
supporting decision-making.
Uses complex spreadsheet modelling to provide
alternative outcomes for a range of different scenarios
utilising complex data tools.
MB3: 8 – 10 marks
Creates a graph taking into account the relevant data
and the graph is suitable for the data type. The graph
is labelled appropriately meaning that it fully supports
decision-making.
Efficiently arranges and/or reduces data through the
selection of criteria using multiple data choices, to
enable the user to assess information effectively to
inform decisions. User requirements are met.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Unit R001 LO2 supports the development of these skills by developing an understanding of them in business contexts.
Unit R002 LO2 supports the development of this Learning Outcome.
Unit R002 LO2 supports this by developing an understanding of appropriate chart types.
1
2
3
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
66
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding
that have been studied across the specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for this unit in order to meet
the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/
knowledge/understanding from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously studied units or content unless it is
appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links
identified below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able to apply synoptically either in addition to or in
place of this guidance.
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Uses spreadsheet modelling to provide a variety of
alternative outcomes for a scenario.
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
Creates a graph taking into account most of the
relevant data. Graph is labelled but needs some other
supporting information for the data to be interpreted. It
gives some support to decision-making.
Clearly arranges and/or reduces data through the
selection of criteria giving some support to decisionmaking. Most of the user requirements are met.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Uses a spreadsheet to change a simple variable to
show an alternative outcome.
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Creates a graph with data, some of which relevant.
There may be some labelling. It gives limited
information to support to decision-making.
Arranges and/or reduces data through selection of
criteria to meet some of the user requirements.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
LO3: Be able to use spreadsheet models to present information to support decision making 3
B
B
Assessment guidance
To be able to access the full range of marks learners will need to have access to spreadsheet software
with graphical representation.
LO1 Learners must be given the opportunity to design and populate a spreadsheet structure and not
be provided with a spreadsheet to amend.
LO1, 2 and 3 – Learners should test their spreadsheet as they are developing to ensure that their
design, incorporated function/formulae and models are meeting user requirements.
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Spreadsheet showing data
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
• Electronic files/evidence
• Test plans
• Written explanations
• Annotated screen prints
Spreadsheet showing
formulas – formula view
• Electronic files/evidence
• Written/typed or recorded explanation
• Test plans – user feedback
• Witness statements
• Annotated screen shots/printouts
Amended spreadsheet
– changes
• Electronic files/evidence
• Annotated screen shots/printouts
– selection of criteria
Graph
• Electronic files/evidence
• Written/typed or recorded explanation
• Annotated screen shots/printouts
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
67
B
Unit R004: Handling data using databases
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
○
When learners are adding data to a database they could apply their learning from unit
R002 LO2 regarding editing database. Learners could also apply their learning from unit
R001 regarding data validation methods.
○
When learners are producing a report they could apply their learning from unit R002 LO2
regarding database queries and printing of reports from databases.
○
Learners are required to produce a data entry form and user interface for data entry and
they could apply their learning from unit R002 LO2 regarding entering information into
databases. Learners could also apply learning from unit R001 LO2 regarding how to
design data capture forms to obtain specified information.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
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Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Produces reports from simple queries which display
some of the relevant data and show some attempt at
formatting and customisation. Reports may have some
minor errors such as field names truncated or a field
omitted.
Creates simple queries, using single table/single
criteria, which meet some of the user requirements.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
Produces reports from complex queries which
clearly display all of the relevant data and have been
formatted and customised to create a consistent house
style. Reports require little or no amendment to the
layout.
Produces reports from simple and complex queries
which clearly display most of the relevant data and
have been formatted and customised in an attempt to
create a consistent house style. Reports may require
some amendment to the layout in more than one area.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Creates complex queries, using single table/single
criteria and multiple tables/multiple criteria, which meet
most of the user requirements.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Creates simple and complex queries, using single
table/single criteria and multiple tables/multiple criteria,
which meet some of the user requirements.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
LO2: Be able to produce outputs from databases to meet user requirements 2 3
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Data added to the database is free from errors.
Data added to the database is largely free from errors;
these have no impact the functionality of the database.
Data added to the database may contain some minor
errors. Errors may be intrusive, which are likely to
impact significantly on the functionality of the database.
Detailed justification is given for the validation rules
used.
Sound explanation is given for the validation rules
used.
Limited explanation is given for the validation rules
used.
Makes effective modifications to a database by adding
fields, properties and tables; adding validation rules,
including original error messages; and linking tables
using key fields.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Makes sound modifications to a database by adding
fields, properties and validation rules, and adding
tables.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
LO1: Be able to modify databases to meet user requirements 1
Makes basic modifications to a database by adding
fields and properties to an existing table and attempting
to include validation rules.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
Marking criteria grid
69
B
Provides a sound explanation of methods of testing
that have been used and gives sound justification for
the choice of methods used.
Carries out peer testing of a user interface and provides
feedback, most of which is relevant.
Carries out a sound analysis of the test results,
identifies some modifications that could be made as a
result of testing and, where possible, implements them.
Carries out peer testing of a user interface and provides
limited feedback, some of which is relevant.
Carries out a limited analysis of the test results,
identifies limited modifications that could be made as a
result of testing and, where possible, implements them.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
Provides a basic explanation of testing that has been
used in the database and gives limited justification for
the choice of method used.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Carries out a detailed analysis of the test results,
identifies a range of appropriate modifications that
could be made as a result of testing and, where
possible, implements them.
70
Carries out peer testing of a user interface and provides
detailed and relevant feedback.
Provides a detailed explanation for each of the
methods of testing that have been used and gives a
detailed justification for the choice of methods used.
LO4: Be able to analyse a database’s suitability for a business purpose
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Produces an effective menu-driven interface which
allows the user to select all of the database objects
they have created i.e. forms, queries and reports from
the menu.
Produces a sound menu-driven interface which allows
the user to select some of the database objects from
the menu.
Produces a basic menu-driven interface which allows
the user to select either a table or a form from the
menu.
Creates effective data entry forms for most of the
tables in the database. The forms contain a range of
features to simplify data entry.
Creates clear data entry forms for most of the tables in
the database. The forms contain at least one feature to
simplify data entry.
Creates a simple data entry form to enable data to be
entered into a single table.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
LO3: Be able to create user interfaces for databases to meet requirements 4 5
B
B
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is
achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding that have been studied across the
specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for
this unit in order to meet the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work
for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously
studied units or content unless it is appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers
should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links identified
below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able
to apply synoptically either in addition to or in place of this guidance.
1
Unit R001 LO2 supports the development of these skills by developing understanding through their
use in business contexts.
2
Unit R002 LO2 supports this by developing these skills in the context of existing spreadsheets and
databases.
3
Unit R002 LO3 and LO4 support this by developing understanding of how to communicate using
business documents, of which these are examples.
4
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing understanding of the need for security measures and the
consequences of data loss.
5
Unit R001 LO2 supports this by developing understanding of how data can be captured using forms.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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B
Assessment guidance
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Database showing data
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
• Electronic files/evidence
• Annotated screen prints
• PDF printouts
• Witness statements
Database queries
• Electronic files/ evidence
• Annotated screen prints
• Printout
Database reports
• Electronic files/evidence
• Annotated screen prints
• Printout
Data entry form
• Electronic files/evidence
• Annotated screen prints
• PDF printouts
Database with a
menu-driven interface
• Electronic files/evidence
• Annotated screen prints
• PDF printouts
Testing
• Electronic files/evidence
• Test plans
• User feedback form
• Witness statements
• Written/typed or recorded analysis
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© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
B
Unit R005: Creating an interactive product using multimedia components
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
○
When learners have to select appropriate software to create the final product they could
apply their learning from R002 where they developed the ability to select and use software
to meet a specific purpose and audience
○
Learners have to create an interactive product and they have the opportunity to apply their
learning from R001 regarding applications software (LO1), different file types (LO2) and
their understanding of the implications of copyright legislation and the consequences of
non-compliance with its provisions (LO4).
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
73
Design specification has some structure. Occasional
errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar will not
affect the overall meaning. Uses technical terminology
with reasonable accuracy and demonstrates a clear
understanding.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Design specification has limited structure. There may
be errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar which
are intrusive and likely to impact on the meaning.
Makes limited use of technical terminology and
demonstrates a basic understanding of the subject
matter.
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Stores the components to be used in the interactive
product in file types that are mostly appropriate.
Lists components sourced for the interactive product,
gives sound reasons for selection in relation to their
success criteria and explains what the legislative
constraints that apply to their use.
Lists components sourced for the interactive product
and gives basic reasons for selection in relation to their
success criteria.
Stores the components to be used in the interactive
product in file types that are not always appropriate.
Applies sound planning techniques, including some
reference to a house style that takes into consideration
of some of the success criteria.
Applies basic planning techniques, enough to
show what the product will look like but with limited
consideration to the success criteria.
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Selects appropriate software to create the final
product, including the presentation method of the
design, and gives sound justification for its use.
Produces a sound specification for an interactive
product, identifying success criteria, most of which are
suitable, and demonstrates a clear understanding of
the client brief.
Produces a basic specification for an interactive
product, identifying success criteria, some of which are
suitable, and demonstrates a limited understanding of
the client brief.
Reasons for selecting the software to create the final
product, including the presentation method of the
design, are basic and limited.
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
LO1: Be able to design interactive products 1 2
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Marking criteria grid
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Design specification is logical and coherent. Contains
few, if any, errors in spelling, punctuation and
grammar. Uses technical terminology accurately
and appropriately and demonstrates a thorough
understanding.
Stores the components to be used in the interactive
product in file types that are consistently appropriate.
Lists components sourced for the interactive product,
clearly explaining and justifying choices in relation to
their success criteria. Explains legislative constraints
that apply to their use, stating how they would comply
with them.
Applies comprehensive planning techniques in a well
organised way, including some reference to a clear
house style that refers back to the success criteria.
Selects appropriate software to create the final
product, including the presentation method, and
provides a thorough and detailed justification for its
use.
MB3: 9 – 11 marks
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Produces a comprehensive specification for an
interactive product, identifying suitable success criteria,
and demonstrate a thorough understanding of the
client brief.
MB3: 7 – 9 marks
B
Uses a sound template and/or creates and uses a
clear house-style and the product generally reflects the
designs.
Uses a basic template and the product in the most part
reflects the designs.
Gathers limited feedback and carries out some
analysis of it, making a limited reference to success
criteria.
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Carries out some testing of the product.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Uses effects appropriately to meet some of the user
requirements.
Makes an attempt to use effects to meet user
requirements, with limited success.
Gathers appropriate feedback and analyses the
feedback in relation to the final product and to most of
the success criteria.
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
Carries out sound testing of the product while creating
and post completion.
LO3: Be able to carry out usability testing
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Applies some advanced techniques of the software
enhancing the user interaction of the product.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Combines components with a working sound
navigation system when creating the interactive
product.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Applies basic techniques with some effects created in
the software to allow user interactivity.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Combines components with a working basic navigation
system when creating the interactive product.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Gathers appropriate feedback and justifies the
feedback methods used. Effectively analyses the
feedback in relation to the final product and all of the
success criteria.
MB3: 7 – 8 marks
Carries out thorough testing of the product while
creating and post completion.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
The interactive product is well organised, effectively
making use of templates and/or creating and using
house-styles, and the product fully and accurately
reflects the designs.
Uses effects appropriately to consistently meet the
user requirements.
75
Applies a range of advanced techniques of the
software appropriately and effectively, enhancing the
user interaction of the product and are based upon user
requirements.
MB3: 9 – 12 marks
Combines components effectively showing a clear
and coherent working navigation system when creating
the interactive product.
LO2: Be able to create interactive products containing multimedia components
B
B
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is
achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding that have been studied across the
specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for
this unit in order to meet the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work
for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously
studied units or content unless it is appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers
should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links identified
below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able
to apply synoptically either in addition to or in place of this guidance.
1
Unit R001 LO2 supports this by developing an understanding of appropriate file types.
2
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing an understanding of the implications of copyright
legislation and the consequences of non-compliance with its provisions.
76
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
B
Assessment guidance
To complete the assessment of Unit R005 the learners will need the use of either web authoring
software, game making software or presentation authoring software.
Learners will also need access to sourced components e.g. images, video, sound, animation,
scripting, sprites.
LO2 – learners are not being assessed on the creation of the components but on combining them to
create the interactive product. Learners can not be awarded any marks if the product created has no
user interactivity.
It would be inappropriate for learners to produce a simple presentation or a webpage/2 page site
LO3 – Learners must test the usability of their product during the design and production to ensure the
client brief is being met.
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Specification
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
• Electronic files/evidence
• Written/typed report or recorded analysis
• Planning documents e.g. storyboards, mind maps, site plans,
hand-drawn templates.
• Witness statement
• Source table
• Component log
• Print screen
An interactive product
using multimedia
components
• An interactive: game, presentation, animation, website or tablet/
mobile phone apps.
• Final electronic files/evidence of the interactive product
• Print screen evidence
• Annotated screen shots
Testing
• Test plans
• Self Evaluation
Feedback collected and
analysed
• Electronic files/evidence
• Peer feedback – questionnaires
• Feedback judging form or feedback review
• Written/verbal or recorded analysis
• Witness statement
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
77
B
Unit R006: Creating digital images
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
78
○
Learners who have completed unit R002 could apply their learning regarding carrying out
internet research (LO1). Learners could also apply their learning from R001 regarding
the implications of copyright legislation and the consequences of non-compliance with its
provisions (LO4).
○
When learners create a storage system for digital files they could apply learning from unit
R001 LO1 regarding the optimisation of electronic files here when setting the size and/or
resolution of digital images. Learners can also use apply their knowledge from units R001
and R002 regarding why and how storage systems are used.
○
When preparing to present the final digital image(s) to the client learners could also apply
their learning from R001 (LO1) regarding software to be used with photo editing and R002
where they developed the ability to select and use software to meet a specific purpose and
audience.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Specification has a basic structure. There may be
errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar which
are intrusive and likely to impact on the meaning.
Makes limited use of technical terminology which
demonstrates a basic understanding of the subject
matter.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Specification has a sound structure. Occasional errors
in spelling, punctuation and grammar will not affect
the overall meaning. Uses technical terminology with
reasonable accuracy which demonstrates a clear
understanding of the subject matter.
Makes a sound list of components sourced for the
digital image solution and gives sound reasons for
selection in relation to the identified success criteria
and explains what legislation constraints apply to their
use.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Specification has a logical and coherent structure.
Contains few, if any, errors in spelling, punctuation
and grammar. Uses technical terminology accurately
and appropriately which demonstrates a thorough
understanding of the subject matter.
Makes a comprehensive list of components sourced
for the digital image solution, clearly explaining and
justifying selection in relation to the identified success
criteria. Explains legislation constraints that apply to
their use, stating how they would comply with them.
79
Uses a wide range of relevant research methods
effectively to inform ideas and produces clear and
detailed designs for a digital image solution which show
complexity, originality and creativity.
Uses a range of research methods to inform ideas and
produces clear designs for a digital image solution
which show some originality and creativity.
Uses a limited range of research methods to inform
ideas and produces basic designs for a simple digital
image solution which are based on the familiar or
commonly used.
Makes a basic list of components sourced for the
digital image solution and gives basic reasons for
selection in relation to the identified success criteria
with limited explanation of what legislation constraints
apply to their use.
MB3: 7 – 9 marks
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Produces a comprehensive specification for a
digital image solution, identifying success criteria all
of which are suitable and demonstrate a thorough
understanding of the client brief.
Produces a sound specification for a digital image
solution, identifying success criteria most of which are
suitable and demonstrate a sound understanding of
the client brief.
Produces a basic specification for a digital image
solution, identifying success criteria some of which are
suitable and demonstrate a basic understanding of the
client brief.
MB3: 9 – 11 marks
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
LO1: Be able to specify a digital image solution for a client’s needs 1
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Marking criteria grid
B
Sets the image size and/or resolution of the digital
images and gives a sound explanation of the settings
chosen.
Sets the image size and/or resolution of the digital
images and gives a basic explanation of the settings
chosen.
Presents the final digital image(s) to the client. The
methods chosen provide a basic idea of what the
image(s) will look like in the intended final location.
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Carries out sound evaluation and provides mostly
relevant feedback on digital images.
Uses a range of appropriate standard and specialised
software tools and techniques with a reasonable
degree of accuracy.
Creates suitable digital image(s) which show some
complexity and communicate the intended message
appropriately.
Presents the final digital image(s) to the client
effectively. Size, resolution, output medium and colour
are the most appropriate and provide an accurate
representation of the image(s) in the intended final
location.
Presents the final digital image(s) to the client clearly.
Size, resolution, output medium and colour are
generally suitable and provide a clear representation of
the image(s) in the intended final location.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
MB3: 7 – 8 marks
Stores digital files effectively, naming files and folders
appropriately and consistently, selecting the most
appropriate file formats for working files and final
output.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
80
Carries out thorough evaluation and provides detailed
and relevant feedback on digital images.
Uses a range of appropriate standard and specialised
software tools and techniques with a high degree of
accuracy.
Creates complex digital image(s) which communicate
the intended message effectively and creatively. Uses
multiple process steps, multi-layering and/or combines
output from different software packages.
MB3: 9 – 12 marks
Sets the appropriate image size and/or resolution
of the digital images and justifies fully and clearly the
settings chosen.
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
Stores digital files, naming files and folders
appropriately, using suitable file formats for working
files and final output.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Makes appropriate software choices and gives a
thorough explanation of their use in relation to the
client brief.
LO3: Be able to store, retrieve and present digital images 4 5 6
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Stores digital files using names that enable the files to
be located again.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Carries out basic evaluation and provides basic
feedback on digital images.
Uses a basic range of appropriate standard software
tools and techniques with some accuracy.
Creates simple digital image(s) which communicate
the intended message.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Makes appropriate software choices in relation to the
client brief and gives sound explanation of their use in
relation to the client brief.
Makes limited software choices in relation to the client
brief and gives limited explanation of their use in
relation to the client brief.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
LO2: Be able to create digital images 2 3
B
B
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is
achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding that have been studied across the
specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for
this unit in order to meet the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work
for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously
studied units or content unless it is appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers
should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links identified
below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able
to apply synoptically either in addition to or in place of this guidance.
1
Unit R002 LO1 develops research skills in using the internet.
2
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing an understanding of the implications of legislation
including copyright laws and the consequence of non-compliance with their provisions.
3
Unit R002 LO3 supports this by considering how the purpose and audience influences the choice of
product and content.
4
Unit R001 LO2 supports this by developing an understanding of optimisation and the factors to be
taken into account whilst optimising objects.
5
Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of optimisation and filetypes that addresses these three
bullets.
6
Unit R002 LO3 supports this by considering how the purpose and audience influences the choice of
document type, and how the document type influences the choice of software.
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81
B
Assessment guidance
To complete the assessment of Unit R006 the learners will need the use of editing and manipulating
bitmaps software as well as software for creating and editing vectors.
Learners will also need access to sourced components e.g. image capture (camera, scanner), hand
drawn design, client-provided images, stock images, internet.
LO2 – Learners are not being assessed on the creation of the components but on creating a digital
image(s) which communicates the intended message.
LO3 – Learners must present their final digital image to the client and this must provide an idea of
what the image will look like in the intended final location.
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Specification
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
• Electronic file/evidence
• Written/typed report
• Planning documents e.g. mood boards, storyboard, mind maps,
market research surveys, sketches
• Witness statement
• Source table
• Component log
• Print screen
A digital image
• Electronic file/evidence
• Annotated print screens
• Witness statements
Feedback response/actions
• Electronic file/evidence
• Feedback review
• Feedback judging form
• Written/verbal or recorded analysis
• Witness statement
Stored digital file(s)
showing naming method
• Electronic evidence/final files of the digital image(s) which use a
logical naming method to aid retrieval
• Witness statement
• Screen shots
Presentation of the final
digital image(s)
• Electronic file/evidence
• Annotated print screens
• Presentation e.g. Framed prints, a DVD case with printed inserts
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© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
B
Unit R007: Creating dynamic products using sound and vision
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. An example of this is:
○
Learners are required to produce a specification for a dynamic product and have the
opportunity to apply their learning from unit R002 LO3 regarding how the purpose and
audience can influence the choice of product and content.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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Specification is produced independently.
May need occasional guidance and support to
produce a specification.
Selects appropriate software to create the final product,
including the presentation method of the design, and
gives sound justification for its use.
Selects software to create the final product, giving
basic reasons for the selection.
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Information produced is relevant and presented in a
clear format with technical terminology used for the
most part appropriately. Occasional errors in grammar,
punctuation and spelling will not affect the overall
meaning.
Stores the components to be used the product in an
appropriate file type.
Stores the components to be used in the product in a
file type that may be appropriate.
Information produced is basic and presented in a
simple format with limited use of technical terminology.
Errors of grammar, punctuation and spelling are
intrusive and likely to impact on the meaning.
Makes a comprehensive list of components sourced
for the dynamic product solution, thoroughly
explaining and justifying selection in relation to the
identified success criteria. Detailed explanation of what
legislation constraints apply to their use, stating how
they would comply with them.
Makes a clear list of components sourced for the
dynamic product solution and gives sound reasons for
selection in relation to the identified success criteria.
Sound explanation of what legislation constraints apply
to their use.
Makes a basic list of components sourced for the
dynamic product solution and gives basic reasons for
selection in relation to the identified success criteria.
Limited explanation of what legislation constraints
apply to their use is given.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
84
All information produced is relevant, clear, organised
and presented in a structured and coherent format with
technical terminology used appropriately. There are
few, if any, errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.
Selection the most appropriate software to create the
final product, including the presentation method of the
design, and provides a detailed justification for the
selection in relation to the client brief.
Stores the components to be used in the product in an
appropriate file type.
MB3: 7 – 9 marks
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
May need guidance and support to produce a
specification.
Produces a comprehensive specification for a
dynamic product, providing a complex solution, which
shows originality and creativity, identifying suitable
success criteria which demonstrate a thorough
understanding of the client brief.
Produces a sound specification for a dynamic product,
providing a solution which shows some originality and
creativity, identifying success criteria most of which are
suitable and demonstrate a sound understanding of
the client brief.
Produces a basic specification for a dynamic product,
providing a simple solution and identifying success
criteria some of which are suitable and demonstrate a
basic understanding of the client brief.
MB3: 9 – 11 marks
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
LO1: Be able to prepare for the production of dynamic products 1 2 3
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Marking criteria grid
B
Carries out basic testing of the product during
production and post completion.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Creates a basic test plan.
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Shows sound understanding of the advantages and
disadvantages of exporting as different file types.
Shows basic understanding of the advantages and
disadvantages of exporting as different file types.
Carries out sound testing of the product during
production and post completion.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Creates a clear test plan, identifying some tests and
expected outcomes.
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Carries out a thorough testing of the product during
production and post completion.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Creates and completes a detailed test plan, listing
tests, expected and actual outcomes and identifying
re-tests.
MB3: 8-10 marks
Shows a thorough understanding of the advantages
and disadvantages of exporting as different file types.
Saves timeline-based product in a raw editable file
format and exports final product as a suitable file type
and thoroughly justifies the choice of file type.
LO3: Be able to test functionality of dynamic products
Saves timeline-based product in a raw editable file
format and exports final product as a suitable file type
with a sound explanation for choice of file type.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Produces a final product which clearly resembles
planning and meets user requirements in full.
Uses a range of sophisticated editing and enhancing
techniques.
Uses a range of editing and enhancing techniques.
Produces a final product which clearly resembles
planning and generally meets user requirements.
Imports appropriate, including some original,
components into the chosen software.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Imports appropriate components into the chosen
software.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Saves timeline-based product in a raw editable file
format and exports final product, although may need
guidance as to which file type to use.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Produces a final product which shows some
resemblance to planning and partly meets user
requirements.
Uses limited editing and enhancing techniques.
Imports basic components into the chosen software.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
LO2: Be able to create dynamic products 4 5 6
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B
B
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is
achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding that have been studied across the
specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for
this unit in order to meet the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work
for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously
studied units or content unless it is appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers
should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links identified
below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able
to apply synoptically either in addition to or in place of this guidance.
1
Unit R002 LO3 supports this by considering how the purpose and audience influences the choice of
product and content.
2
Unit R002 LO1 supports this by developing an understanding of how to select, capture and store
graphics and text in compliance with copyright.
3
Unit R001 LO4 supports this by developing an understanding of the implications of legislation
including copyright laws and the consequence of non-compliance with their provisions.
4
Unit R002 LO3 develops an understanding of the importance of purpose and audience when editing
content.
86
5
Unit R001 LO1 develops an understanding of appropriate filetypes.
6
Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of optimisation.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
B
Assessment guidance
To complete the assessment of Unit R007 the learners will need the use of either, sound, movie or
animation software.
Learners will also need access to sourced assets e.g. music, sounds, graphics, video and text.
LO1 – Learners can be provided with the target audience and purpose from the centre.
LO2 – Learners are not being assessed on the creation of the components but on sourcing, editing,
combining and exporting to create a timeline-based product.
LO3 – Learners must test the product against the success criteria (the original brief provided to the
learner).
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Specification
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
• Electronic file/evidence
• Time-line storyboard
• Script
• Stored components list/log
• Source/asset table
• Witness statement
• Written/typed or recorded analysis
• Annotated screen shots
A time-line based product
• Electronic file/evidence: Either a movie (e.g. video news clip),
animation (e.g. for a web page) or sound product (e.g. music
recording/mix)
• Annotated screen shots
Exported final product
• Electronic file/evidence
• PDF printouts
• Witness statement
• Annotated screen shots
Test final product
• Electronic file/evidence
• Test plans
• Amended product
• Witness statement
• Written/typed or recorded analysis
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
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B
Unit R008: Introduction to computer programming
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
••
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
○
When learners are producing an algorithm that defines a solution to a problem they could
apply learning from unit R002 LO2 where they develop an understanding of variables and
formulas in the context of a spreadsheet.
○
When producing algorithms to solve problems they can also apply their learning from unit
R001 LO2 regarding how ICT can be used to met business needs.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
88
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Provides annotation of the code, using some
terminology appropriately, to demonstrate a sound
understanding of how the constructs, variables and
operators have been used.
There are occasional errors in spelling, punctuation and
grammar that will not affect the overall meaning.
Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar may
detract from the clarity of the evaluation.
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
Uses a range of constructs, variables and operators to
produce a partially working solution to the problem.
Provides some annotation of the code using limited
terminology to demonstrate a limited understanding of
how the constructs, variables and operators have been
used.
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Uses some constructs, variables and operators to
produce a partial solution to the problem with limited
functionality.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Few, if any, errors in spelling, punctuation and
grammar.
Provides clear and detailed annotation of the code,
using terminology appropriately, to demonstrate
an thorough understanding of how the constructs,
variables and operators have been used.
MB3: 8 – 10 marks
Uses a wide range of constructs, variables and
operators effectively to produce a working solution to
the problem.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
LO2: Be able to develop computer programs
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Identifies suitable success criteria which demonstrate a
thorough understanding of the problem.
Identifies success criteria, most of which are suitable,
and demonstrate a clear understanding of the problem.
Identifies success criteria which are partially suitable,
and demonstrate a basic understanding of the
problem.
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Produces an algorithm that defines a complete and
effective solution to the problem.
Produces an algorithm that defines a workable solution
to most elements of the problem.
MB3: 9 – 11 marks
Uses the analysis effectively to select an appropriate
programming language and fully justifies the choice.
Produces an algorithm that partially defines a solution
to some elements of the problem.
Uses analysis to select an appropriate programming
language and gives some justification for the choice.
Uses limited analysis to select a programming
language and partly justifies choice.
Carries out a thorough analysis of the problem,
accurately identifying the outputs, inputs, and
processing requirements.
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
Carries out a sound analysis of the problem, identifying
most outputs, inputs, and processing requirements.
Carries out a basic analysis of the problem, identifying
some outputs, inputs, and processing requirements.
MB3: 7- 9 marks
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
LO1: Be able to devise algorithms to solve problems 1
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Marking criteria grid
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B
For the most part the evaluation is relevant and
presented in a structured and coherent format. Uses
technical terminology that is sometimes accurate and
appropriate.
There may be limited use of technical terminology.
The evaluation is relevant, organised and presented in
a structured and coherent format with appropriate and
accurate use made of technical terminology.
Uses the results of testing to provide a thorough
evaluation of the solution against all of the
requirements and the success criteria.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Systematically, carries out the full test plan.
Creates a comprehensive test plan which fully tests
the functionality of the program.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
1
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
This LO is linked to Unit R002 LO2 where an understanding of variables and formulas is developed in the context of a spreadsheet
90
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding
that have been studied across the specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for this unit in order to meet
the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/
knowledge/understanding from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously studied units or content unless it is
appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links
identified below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able to apply synoptically either in addition to or in
place of this guidance.
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Uses the results of testing to produce a sound
evaluation of the solution against most of the
requirements and the success criteria.
Uses the results of testing to produce a basic
evaluation of the solution against some of the
requirements and the success criteria.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Carries out most of the test plan.
Carries out some testing.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Creates a sound test plan which tests most of the
functionality of the program.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Creates a basic test plan which partially tests the
functionality of the program.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
LO3: Be able to test and evaluate computer programs
B
B
Assessment guidance
LO1 – Learners should analyse a problem identifying the required outputs and the necessary inputs
and processing required in order to generate these outputs. They should explain how their choice of
programming language is suited to developing a solution to the problem. Learners should break down
the problem into discrete stages/elements and present their solution using suitable algorithms. They
should identify measurable success criteria to be used when evaluating the success of the solution.
LO2 – Learners should develop their solution following their design using the chosen programming
environment and an appropriate range of programming constructs and features. The development
should be illustrated with testing throughout the development and the resulting code should be fully
annotated to explain how it works.
LO3 – A test plan should be produced and implemented by the learner to verify that the code performs
as expected. Any errors in the program should be identified and possible causes and solutions
discussed. Where there are no errors learners should discuss possible improvements and how these
might be carried out. There should be an evaluation of the solution against the success criteria.
Evidence requirements:
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Design
A computer program
Testing and evaluation
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
• An analysis of the problem, an algorithm, for example as flow
charts / structured English /story boards and a written/typed set of
success criteria
• A working solution with annotated code, (annotated electronically
in the file and/or printed with added annotations) and the
electronic evidence of the finished program
• Test plan with evidence of testing for example screen capture
evidence (video and/or still). A written/typed/recorded evaluation
of the solution against the success criteria.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
91
B
Unit R009: Exploring computer hardware and network
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
○
Learners need to select computer devices to meet the general and specialist user
requirements and they could apply their learning from unit R001 LO1 regarding the
features, functions and purposes of computing devices.
○
When learners are providing a plan for the network they could apply their learning from unit
R001 LO1 regarding the connection of computing devices and office configurations, and
LO2 regarding how networks are used in business functions. Unit R001 LO4 also provides
transferable learning regarding threats to data security and network security that could be
used here.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
92
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Gives a basic description of relevant LAN and WAN
services for the proposed network.
Proposes network topologies with some relevance to
the user requirements.
Distinguishes accurately between LAN and WAN
services appropriate for the proposed network.
Defines appropriate LAN and WAN services for the
proposed network.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Proposes and justifies appropriate topologies to meet
user requirements, with a detailed explanation of how
IP addresses could be assigned.
MB3: 8 – 10 marks
93
Defines and justifies the appropriate choice of network
components clearly and accurately.
Produces an accurate and detailed plan for the
network which fully meets the user requirements.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Fully justifies the choices made demonstrating a
detailed understanding of the use and function of a
wide range of computer components and devices.
MB3: 9 – 11 marks
Selects appropriate computer devices to fully meet the
general and specialist user requirements.
MB3: 8 – 9 marks
Proposes appropriate topologies which in the most
part meet user requirements, describing the format of
device addresses to be used on the network.
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
Suggests some appropriate network components
describing their purpose.
Suggests some network components.
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Produces a sound plan for the network which meets
most of the user requirements.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
Produces a basic plan for the network which partly
meets the user requirements.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
LO2: Be able to devise network solutions 2 3 4
Largely justifies the choices made demonstrating a
sound understanding of the use and function of a
range of computer components and devices.
Selects appropriate computer devices to meet some
of the general and specialist user requirements.
Selects some computer devices with limited reference
to user requirements.
Describes the choices made, demonstrating a basic
understanding of the use and function of some
computer components and/or devices.
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
LO1: Be able to select computer system devices and platforms 1
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Marking criteria grid
B
Uses any technical terminology accurately and
appropriately. There are few, if any, errors in spelling,
punctuation and grammar.
Uses technical terminology that is sometimes accurate
and appropriate. Occasional errors in grammar,
punctuation and spelling will not affect the overall
meaning.
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Organises all of the information clearly to enable the
user to easily locate solutions to specific problems.
Organises most of the information clearly to enable
the user to locate solutions to specific problems.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Presents a wide range of troubleshooting activities that
are relevant to requirements, by selecting problems
that are likely to be encountered and producing a wide
range of possible solutions.
MB3: 11 – 15 marks
Presents a range of troubleshooting activities which
have some relevance to requirements, by selecting
some problems that are likely to be encountered and
producing a range of possible solutions.
MB2: 6 – 10 marks
This section is supported by Unit R001 LO1 where an understanding of the elements of computer systems is developed.
Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of how networks are used in business organisations.
Unit R001 LO1 supports this by developing an understanding of how to connect a device to an existing network.
Unit R001 LO4 develops an understanding of the threats to data security, including those affecting computer networks.
Unit R001 LO1 supports this by developing an understanding of how to connect a device to an existing network.
1
2
3
4
5
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
94
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding
that have been studied across the specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for this unit in order to meet
the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/
knowledge/understanding from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously studied units or content unless it is
appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links
identified below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able to apply synoptically either in addition to or in
place of this guidance.
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Errors of grammar, punctuation and spelling are
intrusive and likely to impact on the meaning.
The information has limited structure.
Presents a limited range of troubleshooting activities
which have some relevance to requirements,
by selecting some problems that are likely to be
encountered and producing a limited range of possible
solutions.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
LO3: Be able to identify and solve hardware and network problems 5
B
B
Assessment guidance
LO1 – Learners produce a specification for a system required to carry out specific tasks. Their chosen
components show understanding of the range of currently available technologies. Teachers should
provide learners with a realistic scenario for system specification. This could be based on the needs of
a real user who, for example, has a disability and would require assistive devices or who has a hobby
of editing high-quality digital photographs.
LO2 – Learners produce a network plan that specifies the resources and services required for a
network. A scenario should be given for example, a small business network to be installed in a client’s
home or a shop unit and office within a shopping centre complex. If the centre is in a rural location,
this would provide an interesting scenario and permit learners to consider how mobile broadband and
satellite technologies could provide Internet access.
LO3 – Learners will undertake troubleshooting of computer hardware and network systems. They
will demonstrate systematic recording of system information and testing activities. They will eliminate
possible causes using standard techniques to identify the most likely source of the problem. Learners
should devise their own recording system which must compare the actual result against the expected
outcome.
Evidence requirements:
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
System Specification
• This could take the form of a written report or an oral presentation
Network plan and proposal
• To meet this learning outcome, a diagram of the network
accompanied by a written report or an oral presentation
Testing and troubleshooting
record
• This could be screen capture videos with commentary or video of
the learner carrying out activities which they will describe. A diary
of troubleshooting activities could also be presented. A written test
plan and completed log should accompany the evidence.
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B
Unit R010: Developing control systems
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002. Examples of this include:
○
When designing a control system learners could apply their learning from unit R001 LO1
regarding how the different variable factors can affect the choice of system
○
Learners can also apply their learning from unit R001 LO2 regarding the use of control
system sensors.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
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© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Uses block diagrams to create a design that fully meets
all of the requirements and demonstrates a thorough
understanding of input, process (including variables
and feedback) and output.
Creates sequences of instructions to fully define the
control structures within the system using variables and
feedback.
Uses block diagrams to create a design that mostly
meets requirements and demonstrates a sound
understanding of input, process (including variables
and/or feedback) and output.
Creates sequences of instructions to define some of
the control structures within the system.
Information is for the most part relevant and presented
in a well structured format. There are occasional errors
in grammar, punctuation and spelling that do not affect
the overall meaning.
Information is partly relevant and presented in a basic
format. Errors of grammar, punctuation and spelling
prevent clear communication of these choices.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Describes and gives a clear explanation for choices
made in most aspects of the design, with some use of
appropriate terminology and demonstrating a sound
understanding of control systems.
Describes and gives a basic explanation for choices
made in some aspects of the design with limited use
of appropriate terminology and demonstrating a basic
understanding of control systems.
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
MB2: 4 – 6 marks
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Creates sequences of instructions with limited
suitability.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
Information is consistently relevant and presented in
a clear and coherent format with few, if any errors in
grammar, punctuation and spelling.
97
Gives a clear and detailed explanation for choices
made in the design, using appropriate terminology
consistently demonstrating a detailed understanding of
control systems.
MB3: 7 – 9 marks
Selects appropriate components that fully
meet requirements, demonstrating a thorough
understanding of the properties and applications of a
comprehensive range of components.
Selects appropriate components that meet most of the
requirements, demonstrating a sound understanding
of the properties and applications of a good range of
components.
Selects components that partly meet the requirements,
demonstrating a basic understanding of the properties
and applications of some components.
Uses block diagrams to create a design that partly
meets requirements and demonstrates a basic
understanding of input, process and output.
Identifies success criteria that are all suitable and
demonstrates a thorough understanding of the
requirements.
MB3: 9-11 marks
Identifies success criteria that are mostly suitable
and demonstrates a sound understanding of the
requirements.
MB2: 5 – 8 marks
LO1: Be able to design control systems 1
Identifies success criteria that are partly suitable
and demonstrates a basic understanding of the
requirements.
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
Marking criteria grid
B
Where necessary, devises some appropriate
refinements to the system, in response to the results of
the testing, with clear justification.
Where necessary, devises appropriate refinements to
the system, in response to the results of the testing with
thorough justification.
MB3: 6 – 7 marks
Carries out thorough and effective testing of the test
plan.
Create a comprehensive test plan which fully tests the
functionality of the control system.
MB3: 11 – 13 marks
The system thoroughly meets the success criteria
identified in the design.
MB3: 9 – 10 marks
Implements a design incorporating a wide range of
sensors, actuators and feedback, consistently carrying
out appropriate modifications to the design where
necessary.
MB3: 8 – 10 marks
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Unit R001 LO1 develops an understanding of input devices and Unit R001 LO2 develops an understanding of data capture methods and the factors affecting
the choice of appropriate method.
1
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding
that have been studied across the specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for this unit in order to meet
the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/
knowledge/understanding from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously studied units or content unless it is
appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links
identified below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able to apply synoptically either in addition to or in
place of this guidance.
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Where necessary, devises basic refinements to the
system in response to the results of the testing, with
basic justification.
MB2: 4 – 5 marks
Carries out sound testing of the test plan.
Carries out basic testing of the test plan.
MB1: 1 – 3 marks
Creates a sound test plan which tests some of the
functionality of the control system.
LO3: Be able to test control systems
MB2: 7 – 10 marks
The system meets some of the success criteria
identified in the design.
MB2: 6 – 8 marks
Implements a design incorporating a range of
sensors, actuators and some feedback, carrying out
some appropriate modifications to the design where
necessary.
MB2: 5 – 7 marks
Creates a basic test plan which tests a limited amount
of the functionality of the control system.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
The system meets limited aspects of the design.
MB1: 1 – 5 marks
Partly implements a design incorporating a limited
range of sensors and actuators with limited evidence
of feedback and modification to the design.
MB1: 1 – 4 marks
LO2: Be able to implement control systems
B
B
Assessment guidance
LO1 – Learners should interpret a brief to design a control system that makes correct use of sensors,
actuators and feedback. This should be presented using standard techniques. They will demonstrate
understanding of the purpose of the system and how this relates to real-world systems. Learners
should be provided with a straightforward scenario for example, a system to regulate ventilation and
watering inside a greenhouse or a simple burglar alarm system.
LO2 – Learners will be able to demonstrate the correct construction of a control system using either
simulator software or hardware components. It is acceptable to use the same scenario for LO1 and 2
but the teacher must ensure that the learner’s block diagram is correct before they proceed to develop
the system. It is also acceptable to use a different scenario for LO2 where a design is provided for the
learner to implement as a system.
LO3 –A test plan should be produced and implemented by the learner to verify control system
operation. Deviations from expected outcomes will be identified. The learner can test the system that
they have implemented for LO2. It is not essential that the system produced functions correctly as this
learning outcome assesses the ability to carry out structured testing and record results accurately.
Evidence requirements:
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
Control system design.
Block diagram of the
proposed system
• Written report or oral presentation describing the system
accompanied by a block diagram. A flow chart may also be
produced.
Modelled control system
• Working control system
Test plan and log for a
control system
• Test plan and log
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99
B
Unit R011: Understanding technology – a project approach
Marking criteria guidance
0 marks must be given where there is no evidence or no evidence worthy of credit.
A range of marks is allocated to each learning outcome. Where marks are allocated to a number
of statements within a learning outcome, marks should be awarded using a ‘best fit’ approach. For
each of the learning outcomes, one of the descriptors provided in the mark scheme that most closely
describes the quality of the work being marked should be selected. Marking should be positive,
rewarding achievement rather than penalising failure or omissions. The award of marks must be
directly related to the marking criteria.
••
Each band descriptor covers all the relevant content for the Learning Outcomes.
••
The descriptors should be read and applied as a whole.
••
Make a best-fit match between the answer and the band descriptors.
••
An answer does not have to meet all the requirements of a band descriptor before being placed
in that band. It will be placed in a particular band when it meets more of the requirements of that
band than it meets the requirements of other bands.
When deciding the mark within a band, the following criteria should be applied:
••
The extent to which the statements within the band have been achieved.
For example:
••
An answer that convincingly meets nearly all the requirements of a band descriptor should
be placed at or near the top of that band. Where the learner’s work convincingly meets the
statement, the highest mark should be awarded.
••
An answer that meets many of the requirements of the band descriptor should be placed in
the middle of the band. Where the learner’s work adequately meets the statement, the most
appropriate mark in the middle range should be awarded.
••
If an answer is on the border-line between two bands but it is decided that it fits better the
descriptors for the lower of these two bands, then it should be placed near the top of that band.
Where the learner’s work just meets the statement, the lowest mark should be awarded.
When learners are taking an assessment task, or series of tasks, for this unit they will be able to use
relevant, appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that they will have developed through the
mandatory units R001 and R002.
For a description of the key words in the marking criteria please see the Marking criteria glossary of
terms in Appendix D.
100
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Produces a sound project plan which is detailed and
assigns timescales to the tasks.
Produces a basic project plan with a limited
description of what is to be done and a very brief
outline of timescales.
Gives a detailed justification for the choice of
resources and thoroughly checks the reliability of the
resources.
Gives clear justification for the choice of resources and
makes an attempt to check on their reliability.
Gives a basic justification for the choice of resources
and makes a limited check on the reliability of the
resources.
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
Produces a bibliography which shows evidence of
the use of a wide range of resources which are
consistently relevant.
Produces a bibliography which shows evidence of the
use of a range of resources which is mostly relevant
to the project.
Produces a bibliography which shows evidence of the
use of a limited range of resources which is partly
relevant to the project.
There is evidence of extensive, relevant research.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
There is evidence of relevant research.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
Worked independently in identifying and scoping a
project topic.
Produces a thorough project plan showing clearly the
realistic expected timescales for all of the tasks.
Produces a detailed description of the project
objectives.
Gives a detailed rationale for doing the project,
consistently making clear links to the project.
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
There is some evidence of research.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
LO2: Know how to conduct research projects 1
May have required some support and guidance in
identifying a project topic.
Produces a sound description of the project objectives.
Produces a basic description of the project objectives.
May have required significant support and guidance in
identifying and scoping a project topic.
Gives a clear rationale for doing the project, making
some links to the purpose of the project.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
LO1: Be able to initiate projects
Gives a basic rationale for doing the project, making
few links to the purpose of the project.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
Marking criteria grid
101
B
The information in the project record is mostly relevant
and presented in a clear format.
Draws upon some relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
The information in the project record is partly relevant
and presented in a basic format.
Draws upon limited skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units in the specification.
Produces a review of the project which:
○ makes clear reference back to the project objectives
○ shows sound understanding of what went well and
what could have been improved
○ demonstrates sound understanding of the learning
achieved as a result of completing the project
○ demonstrates sound understanding of the process
• makes basic reference back to the project objectives
• shows basic understanding of what went well and
what could have been improved
○ demonstrates basic understanding of the learning
achieved as a result of completing the project
○ demonstrates basic understanding of the process
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
Produces a review of the project which:
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
LO4: Know how to review projects
○ thorough and clear description and explanation of
the development of the project
○ detailed evidence of review of the original plan and
any consequent amendments made as a result of
problems encountered or feedback
○ detailed articulation of the project objectives
○ effective and thorough use of technical terminology
○ few, if any, errors in spelling, punctuation and
grammar so that the report is clear and coherent.
○ a sound description and explanation of the
development of the project
○ some evidence of review of the original plan and
any consequent amendments made as a result of
problems encountered or feedback
○ sound articulation of the project objectives
○ sound use of technical language.
○ occasional errors in spelling, punctuation and
grammar but insufficient to detract from the clarity of
the report.
○ a basic description and explanation of the progress
of the tasks
○ limited evidence of review of the original plan and
any consequent amendments made as a result of
problems encountered or feedback
○ basic articulation of the project objectives
○ limited use of technical language
○ some errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar
which may detract from the clarity of the report
© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
○ consistently refers back to the project objectives
○ shows thorough understanding of what went well
and what could have been improved
○ demonstrates thorough understanding of the
learning achieved as a result of completing the
project
○ demonstrates a detailed understanding of the
process
Produces a review of the project which:
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Clearly draws upon relevant skills/knowledge/
understanding from other units in the specification.
102
The information in the project record is consistently
relevant, and is organised and presented in a coherent
format.
The project record contains:
The project record contains:
An attempt has been made to meet the project
objectives.
The project record contains:
MB3: 12 – 15 marks
Most of the project objectives have been met.
MB2: 7 – 11 marks
Some of the project objectives have been met.
MB1: 1 – 6 marks
LO3: Be able to carry out projects 2
B
B
Guidance on synoptic assessment
Synoptic assessment is based upon demonstrating a broad understanding of the subject. This is
achieved by drawing upon the skills/knowledge/understanding that have been studied across the
specification and utilising them in an appropriate and relevant way to complete the assessment for
this unit in order to meet the marking criteria for a specific Learning Outcome. When completing work
for assessment, learners should be encouraged to apply the relevant skills/knowledge/understanding
from other units within the specification and not seek to incorporate input from all the previously
studied units or content unless it is appropriate to do so. When assessing the learner’s work teachers
should focus on whether the skills/knowledge/understanding applied are relevant. The links identified
below are guidance only and learners may find other skills/knowledge/understanding that they are able
to apply synoptically either in addition to or in place of this guidance.
1
This section is supported by Unit R002 LO1 where learners develop the ability to use ICT based
sources to carry out research.
2
This builds on Unit R001 LO3 which develops an understanding of how ICT can be used to support
working practices.
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103
B
Assessment guidance
To complete the assessment of Unit R011 the learners need to produce a project record which must
consist of; a project proposal form, project plan, record of research, project log, the actual project
outcome and a project review. The suggested formats for these are given below. It is envisaged
that learners will use word processing software to produce some or possibly all of this record. Other
software may be used depending on the way they chose to present some evidence for assessment.
For example they could choose to use a spreadsheet to present their project plan and timeline or a
video diary to record the progress of their project. Learners should be encouraged to use software to
produce their project record but this does not mean that hand written notes, designs etc cannot be
included.
Software used to complete the project and to present the project outcome will depend on the topic
the learner chooses to investigate. Learners have complete freedom to use whatever software is
appropriate and to present the project outcome in a variety of formats.
What do learners need to
produce (evidence)
Examples of format of evidence (this list is not exhaustive)
Project proposal form
• Written/typed form
Project plan
• Electronic file/evidence
• Spreadsheet/PDF printout
• Written/typed table
Record of research
• Written/typed bibliography
Project log
• Written/typed diary
• Documented changes to project plans
• Blog
• Video diary
• Feedback review notes
• Presentation notes
Project outcome
• Blog
• Video
• Photographs
• Witness statement/s
• Annotated print screens
• Drawn designs/sketches
• Written/typed report
• Presentation – visual or verbal
• End user feedback questionnaires
• PDF printouts
Project review
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© OCR 2012 OCR Cambridge Nationals in ICT
• Written/typed or recorded analysis
Appendix C: Guidance for the production of
electronic internal assessment
C
Structure for evidence
The centre assessed units are comprised of R002, the OCR-set task and Units R003-R011. For each
learner, all the tasks together will form a portfolio of evidence, stored electronically. Evidence for each
unit must be stored separately.
An internal assessment portfolio is a collection of folders and files containing the learner’s evidence.
Folders should be organised in a structured way so that the evidence can be accessed easily by a
teacher or moderator. This structure is commonly known as a folder tree. It would be helpful if the
location of particular evidence is made clear by naming each file and folder appropriately and by use
of an index called ‘Home Page’.
There should be a top level folder detailing the learner’s centre number, OCR candidate number,
surname and forename, together with the unit code (R002, R005 etc), so that the portfolio is clearly
identified as the work of one learner.
Each learner’s internal assessment portfolio should be stored in a secure area on the centre’s
network. Prior to submitting the portfolio to OCR, the centre should add a folder to the folder tree
containing the internal assessment and summary forms.
Data formats for evidence
In order to minimise software and hardware compatibility issues it will be necessary to save learners’
work using an appropriate file format.
Learners must use formats appropriate to the evidence that they are providing and appropriate
to viewing for assessment and moderation. Open file formats or proprietary formats for which a
downloadable reader or player is available are acceptable. Where this is not available, the file format
is not acceptable.
Centre assessed tasks are designed to give learners an opportunity to demonstrate what they
know, understand and can do using current technology. Learners do not gain marks for using more
sophisticated formats or for using a range of formats. A learner who chooses to use only digital
photographs (as required by the specification) and word documents will not be disadvantaged by that
choice.
Evidence submitted is likely to be in the form of word processed documents, PowerPoint
presentations, digital photos and digital video.
To ensure compatibility, all files submitted must be in the formats listed below. Where new formats
become available that might be acceptable, OCR will provide further guidance. OCR advises against
changing the file format that the document was originally created in. It is the centre’s responsibility to
ensure that the electronic portfolios submitted for moderation are accessible to the moderator and fully
represent the evidence available for each learner.
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105
C
Movie formats for digital video evidence
MPEG (*.mpg)
QuickTime movie (*.mov)
Macromedia Shockwave (*.aam)
Macromedia Shockwave (*.dcr)
Flash (*.swf)
Windows Media File (*.wmf)
MPEG Video Layer 4 (*.mp4)
Audio or sound formats
MPEG Audio Layer 3 (*.mp3)
Graphics formats including photographic evidence
JPEG (*.jpg)
Graphics file (*.pcx)
MS bitmap (*.bmp)
GIF images (*.gif)
Animation formats
Macromedia Flash (*.fla)
Structured markup formats
XML (*xml)
Text formats
Comma Separated Values (.csv)
PDF (.pdf)
Rich text format (.rtf)
Text document (.txt)
Microsoft Office suite
PowerPoint (.ppt)
Word (.doc)
Excel (.xls)
Visio (.vsd)
Project (.mpp)
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Appendix D:Marking criteria glossary of terms
Accurately
Acting or performing within care and precision; within acceptable limits from a standard
Advanced
Being at a high level; progressive
All
All relevant as described in the unit content for a specific area
Appropriate
Relevant to the purpose/task
Basic
The work comprises the minimum required and provides the base or starting point from
which to develop. Responses are simple and not complicated; the simplest and most
important facts are included
Basic
Gives the minimum required
Brief
Accurate and to the point but lacking detail/contextualisation/examples
Clear
Focussed and accurately expressed, without ambiguity
Comment
Present an informed opinion
Communicate
Make known, transfer information
Complex
Consists of several interwoven parts, all of which relate together
Comprehensive
The work is complete and includes everything that is necessary to evidence
understanding in terms of both breadth and depth
Confident
Exhibiting certainty; having command over one’s information/argument etc
Consider
Review and respond to given information
Considered
Reached after or carried out with careful thought
Create
To originate (e.g. to produce a solution to a problem)
Critical
Incisive – exposing/recognising flaws
Describe
Set out characteristics
Design
Work out creatively/systematically
Detail
To describe something item by item, giving all the facts
Detailed
Point-by-point consideration of (e.g. analysis, argument)
Discuss
Present, explain and evaluate salient points (e.g. for/against an argument)
Effective
Applies skills appropriately to a task and achieves the desired outcome; Successful in
producing a desired or intended result
Efficient
Performing or functioning in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and
effort; having and using requisite knowledge, skill and effort
D
Note on effective versus efficient: both express approval of the way in which someone or something works but
their meanings are different. Effective describes something which successfully produces an intended result,
without reference to morality, economy or effort, or efficient use of resources. Efficient applies to someone
or something able to produce results with the minimum expense or effort, as a result of good organisation or
good design and making the best use of available resources
Evaluate
Make a qualitative judgement taking into account different factors and using available
knowledge/experience
Explain
Set out the purposes or reasons
Extensive
Large in range or scope
Few
A small number or amount, not many but more than one
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107
C
High
Advanced in complexity or development
Independent
Without reliance on others
Limited
The work produced is small in range or scope and includes only a part of the information
required; it evidences partial, rather than full, understanding
List
Document a series of outcomes or events or information
Little
A very small amount of evidence, or low number of examples, compared to what was
expected, is included in the work
Many
A large number of (less than ‘most’ see below)
Most
Greatest in amount; the majority of; nearly all of; at least 75% of the content which is
expected has been included
Occasionally
Occurring, appearing or done infrequently and irregularly
Outline
Set out main characteristics
Plan
Consider, set out and communicate what is to be done
Present
1. Produce an exposition/resumé for an audience (e.g. at the conclusion of the project to
demonstrate what has been done and the outcome)
2. Set out (project) aims, content, outcomes and conclusions clearly/logically for the use/
benefit of others
108
Range
The evidence presented is sufficiently varied to give confidence that the knowledge and
principles are understood in application as well as in fact
Reasoned
Justified, to understand and to make judgments based on practical facts
Relevant
Correctly focused on the activity
Simple
The work is composed of one part only, either in terms of its demands or in relation to
how a more complex task has been interpreted by the learner
Some
About 50% of the content which would have been expected is included
Sound
Valid, logical, shows the learner has secured relevant knowledge/understanding
Support
Teacher gives training, instruction, guidance and advice as appropriate and monitors
activities to assist learners in tackling/completing their projects, ensuring authenticity and
a fair and accurate assessment
Thorough
Extremely attentive to accuracy and detail
Wide
The learner has included many relevant details, examples or contexts thus avoiding a
narrow or superficial approach, broad approach taken to scope/scale; comprehensive list
of examples given
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Your checklist
Our aim is to provide you with all the information and support you need to deliver our
specifications.
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Post: Customer Contact Centre, OCR, Progress House, Westwood Business Park,
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What to do next
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Registered office 1 Hills Road, Cambridge CB1 2EU. Registered company number 3484466. OCR is an exempt charity.
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