2013 - 2014 catalog - College of Staten Island

2013 - 2014 catalog - College of Staten Island

Welcome to

Undergraduate Catalog

2013-2014

2800 Victory Blvd

Staten Island, NY 10314

718.982.2000 www.csi.cuny.edu

Office of the Registrar

E-mail comments or questions to [email protected]

Statement of Nondiscrimination

The College of Staten Island is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action institution. The College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, transgender, disability, genetic predisposition or carrier status, alienage or citizenship, veteran or marital status in its student admissions, employment, access to programs, and administration of educational policies.

Danielle E. Dimitrov, Esq., Director of the Office of Compliance and Diversity, serves as the College's Compliance

Office, Title IX Coordinator, and 504 Coordinator. Her office is located in Building 1A, Room 1032 and her telephone number is 718.982.2250.

Important Notice of Possible Changes

The City University of New York reserves the right, because of changing conditions, to make modifications of any nature in the academic programs and requirements of The University and its constituent colleges without advance notice. Tuition and fees set forth in this publication are similarly subject to change by the Board of Trustees of The

City University of New York. The University regrets any inconvenience this may cause. The responsibility for compliance with the regulations in each catalog rests entirely with the student.

Published by the College of Staten Island/The City University of New York

2800 Victory Blvd, Staten Island, NY 10314

CONTENTS

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT ........................................................................................................................ 4

ABOUT THE COLLEGE ............................................................................................................................................. 7

ADMISSIONS ........................................................................................................................................................... 13

REGISTRAR ............................................................................................................................................................. 17

TUITION AND FEES ................................................................................................................................................ 19

FINANCIAL AID ........................................................................................................................................................ 22

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS ............................................................................................................................ 23

DIVISIONS, SCHOOLS, AND DEPARTMENTS ...................................................................................................... 24

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS .......................................................................................................................... 31

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS .......................................................................................................................... 35

ACADEMIC POLICIES ............................................................................................................................................. 41

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS .............................................................................. 50

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................................... 52

MAJORS, DISCIPLINES AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ..................................................................................... 83

FACULTY AND STAFF .......................................................................................................................................... 304

APPENDIX .............................................................................................................................................................. 322

TRAVEL INFORMATION ....................................................................................................................................... 333

INDEX ..................................................................................................................................................................... 335

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Greetings! It is my pleasure to welcome you to the College of Staten Island, a senior college of The City University of New York, the nation's leading urban university.

CSI is committed to providing you a richly integrated learning experience, with a variety of learning opportunities, both in and outside of the classroom, at home, and around the world.

The 204-acre landscaped campus of CSI, the largest in NYC, is fully accessible and contains an advanced, networked infrastructure to support technology-based teaching, learning, and research. We offer associate's degrees in selective areas, a comprehensive range of bachelor's and master's degrees, and doctoral degrees in cooperation with the CUNY Graduate Center.

We offer a broad spectrum of disciplines on campus, with courses taught by highly credentialed faculty from leading institutions around the world. A hallmark of a CSI education is the opportunity for undergraduate students to experience real-world, hands-on research using sophisticated equipment, side by side with leading scientists and authorities in their fields.

CSI also offers a comprehensive array of international programs to further enhance your education. Whether you choose to take advantage of dynamic study abroad and exchange programs in over 35 countries, enroll in our Virtual Classroom that connects you with fellow classmates at leading institutions around the world via a high-speed video link, or enrich your education through internships with leading companies in New York City, your CSI experience will help you attain your educational, philosophical, and professional goals.

CSI's administration, faculty, and staff are singularly dedicated to your success, and as we affirm in the College's mission statement,

“practice their commitment to educational excellence as they instill in students preparing to enter their chosen careers an enduring love of learning, a sensitivity to pluralism and diversity, a recognition of their responsibility to work for the common good, and an informed respect for the interdependence of all people.

This focus on mutual interdependence and civic responsibility is illustrated by the many international partnerships that the College maintains worldwide through our Center for International Service, as well as by the relationship that

CSI enjoys with the larger Staten Island community; our Office of Continuing Education and Professional Development administers programs focused on developing career-related skills; and our Small Business Development

Center assists local businesses.

CUNY has recognized the College's flagship research status by designating certain programs as Research Centers.

CSI's Center for Developmental Neuroscience and Developmental Disabilities works closely with the New York

State Institute for Basic Research (IBR) to conduct, promote, and sponsor research, education, and training in the developmental neurosciences with special emphasis on research and educational programs in the specific field of developmental disabilities; our Center for Environmental Science, established in 1987, provides support for research and policy recommendations concerning environmental problems and the quality of life; and our Center for

Engineered Polymeric Materials actively fosters the development of complex polymeric materials based on multiple phases with significant structures at the nanometer scale.

Further, we offer programs to help our students succeed at every level: from our summer immersion program, which provides tuition-free instruction aimed toward helping students pass the CUNY skills assessment tests, to our FIRST program's specialized academic and personal support services for freshmen who have passed all three of these tests, CSI strives to ease our first-year students' transition into college. Other programs, such as the Macaulay

Honors College at CSI and The Verrazano School at CSI are designed for gifted and highly motivated students, while the Teacher Education Honors Academy educates a new generation of exceptional teachers of science and mathematics.

These are only a few examples of what you will find at CSI. I encourage you to explore our Web site to learn more about the programs and the people of our College community. Congratulations on taking this first step into what I know will be a bright future, and welcome!

Sincerely,

William J. Fritz

Interim President

CSI Administration

Interim President

William J. Fritz, BS, MS, PhD

Interim Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

Fred Naider, BS, MS, PhD

Vice President for Finance and Administration

Ira Persky, BA, MA

Vice President for Student Affairs

A. Ramona Brown, MSEd, EdD

Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs

Kenneth Boyden, AS, BS, JD, EdD

Vice President for Technology Systems

Michael Kress, AAS, BS, MA, MS, PhD

Vice President of Enrollment Management

Mary Beth Reilly, AA, BS, MS

Assistant Vice President for Finance and Business Services

Ed Rios, AAS, BA

Assistant Vice President for Campus Planning and Facilities Management

Stephen J. Brennan, AAS, BS

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs

Salvador B. Mena, BA, MA

Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs (Interim)

Janine Scaff, BS, MS

Interim Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences

Nan Sussman, BA, MA, PhD

Dean of Science and Technology

Alex Chigogidze, MS, PhD

Associate Provost for Institutional Effectiveness

Susan Holak, BS, MPhil, PhD

Associate Provost for Undergraduate and Academic Programs

Deborah Vess, BA, BMUS, MA, PhD

Deputy to the President, Chief of Staff

Kenichi Iwama, Esq., BA, JD

Chief Librarian

Wilma Jones, AA, BA, MA, MA, PhD

Special Counsel and Labor Designee

Kathleen Galvez, BS, MA, JD

Director of Diversity and Compliance

Danielle E. Dimitrov, Esq., BA, JD

Department Chairpersons

Accounting and Finance

Jonathan Peters, BS, MA, PhD

Biology

El Idrissi, Abdeslem, BS, MA, MP, PhD

Business

Thomas Tellefsen, AAS, BBA, MBA, PhD

Chemistry

Qiao-Sheng Hu, BS, MS, PhD

Computer Science

Louis Petingi, BS, MS, PhD

Economics

Vasilios Petratos, BA, PhD

Education

Eleni (Nelly) Tournaki, BA, MA, PhD

Engineering Science and Physics

Alfred Levine, BSEE, MA, PhD

English

Ashley Dawson, BA, MA, PhD

History

Eric Ivison, BA, MA, PhD

Library

Wilma L. Jones, Chief Librarian, AA, BA, MA, MA, PhD

Management

Gordon DiPaolo, BA, MBA, PhD

Marketing

Thomas Tellefsen, AAS, BBA, MBA, PhD

Mathematics

John Verzani, BA, MS, PhD

Media Culture

Ying Zhu, BA, MA, PhD

Nursing

Mary O’Donnell, BS, MS, RN, PhD

Performing and Creative Arts

George Emilio Sanchez, MFA

Philosophy

Mark D. White, BSBA, PhD

Physical Therapy

Jeffrey Rothman, PT, EdD

Political Science and Global Affairs

Richard Flangan, BA, PhD

Psychology

John Lawrence, BA, BS, PhD

Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

Leigh Binford, BA, MA, PhD

World Languages and Literature

Gerry Milligan, BA, MA, PhD

About the College 7

ABOUT THE COLLEGE

The College of Staten Island is a four-year, senior college of The City University of New York that offers exceptional opportunities to all of its students. Programs in the liberal arts and sciences and professional studies lead to bachelor’s and associate’s degrees. The master’s degree is awarded in 18 professional and liberal arts and sciences fields of study. The College will now assume degree-granting authority of the doctorate in Physical Therapy and this will become effective for students enrolled in the Class of 2017 (beginning Fall

2014). The College participates in doctoral programs of

The City University Graduate School and University

Center in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Nursing, Physical Therapy, and Physics.

A broad general education is assured through requirements that allow students to explore a range of fields of knowledge and acquire educational breadth in mathematics, the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Requirements for the bachelor’s degree provide a disciplined and cumulative program of study in a major field of inquiry. Enrollment in baccalaureate programs requires freshman admission standards consonant with those of CUNY senior colleges. Enrollment in associate’s degree programs is open to all students with a high school diploma or the equivalent.

The College of Staten Island is one of seven campuses that participate in the Macaulay Honors College of

CUNY. Students accepted into this highly competitive program complete their degree requirements, including honors in their chosen major, at the College of Staten

Island. Special seminars, research opportunities, and co-curricular activities are challenging and enriching elements of the program. The Macaulay Honors College at CSI is designed for a limited number of students who have demonstrated a well-developed commitment to learning and who intend to continue their undergraduate education in graduate and/or professional schools.

Students who have earned, or expect to earn, a high school academic diploma with an average of at least 90 with competitive SAT or ACT scores are eligible to apply for admission.

The academic year follows a two-semester pattern, with a separate summer and winter session. Classes are scheduled days, evenings, and weekends. The College has an extensive Continuing Education program and offers off-campus courses with and without credit.

CSI was founded in 1976 through the union of two existing colleges

—Staten Island Community College and

Richmond College. Staten Island Community College, the first community college in the University, opened in

1955. Richmond College, an upper-division college that offered undergraduate and graduate degrees to students who had successfully completed the first two years of college study elsewhere, was founded in 1965.

The merger of these two colleges resulted in the only public four-year institution of higher learning on Staten

Island.

The Campus

Completed in 1994, the 204-acre campus of CSI/CUNY is the largest site for a college in New York City. Set in a park-like landscape, the campus is centrally located on

Staten Island. Mature trees and woodlands, flowering trees and ornamental plantings, fields and outdoor athletic facilities, the great lawn, sculpture, and seating areas create a rural oasis in an urban setting.

Fourteen renovated neo-Georgian buildings serve as classrooms, laboratories, and offices. The academic buildings house 300 classrooms, laboratories and instructional spaces, study lounges, department and program offices, and faculty offices.

North and South Academic Quadrangles are connected by the Alumni Walk, with the Library and Campus Center as focal points. The Center for the Arts is located midway between the Quadrangles at the fountain plaza.

The Sports and Recreation Center and the athletic fields are located near the main entrance to the campus.

Sixteen works of art, a permanent collection of works either commissioned or purchased through the Art Acquisitions Program of the Dormitory Authority of the

State of New York, are installed throughout the campus.

The artists and their free-standing sculptures and reliefs are: Vincenzo Amato, Body of Hector/Glaucus; Miriam

Bloom, Shooliloo; Fritz Bultman, Garden at Nightfall

(extended loan); Chryssa, Untitled; Lucille Friedland, Big

Stride (gift of the artist); Red Grooms, Marathon; Sarah

Haviland, Staten Island Arch; Jon Isherwood, Borromi-

ni’s Task; Zero Higashida, Maquette for a Small Uni-

verse; Valerie Jaudon, Untitled; Niki Ketchman, Red

Inside; Win Knowlton, Ellipse; Mark Mennin, Torak; Don

Porcaro, Moon Marker; and Hans Van de Bovenkamp,

Stele in the Wind.

Astrophysical Observatory: The 16-foot dome astrophysical observatory was completed in 1996. In addition to serving students in astronomy courses, the facility is used for faculty and student research projects, environment monitoring projects, and community programs.

Biological Sciences/Chemical Sciences Building: An ultramodern facility, the building contains classrooms, laboratories, faculty offices, research facilities for faculty and students, the Center for Environmental Science, and the Center for Developmental Neuroscience and

Developmental Disabilities.

Campus Center: The Campus Center provides facilities for a complete student life including offices for student organizations, food services, health services, a study lounge, bookstore, and the studios of WSIA-FM, the student-operated radio station.

Center for the Arts: Entered from the Great Lawn and from the Alumni Walk, the Center houses two academic wings for programs in the arts as well as superb public spaces: the Clara and Arleigh B. Williamson Theatre, a

8 About the College

900-seat concert hall, a recital hall, an experimental theater, lecture halls, an art gallery, and a small conference center.

Library: Designed with inviting reading rooms, open shelves, and study carrels, the Library research and study facilities are enhanced by computer data-based operations available to all students. The Library Media

Services make accessible pedagogical multimedia materials to distant classrooms and laboratories by means of the campus fiber-optic network.

Sports and Recreation Center: This 77,000 square-foot multipurpose facility and surrounding athletic fields serve the intercollegiate and intramural sports and recreation programs for students. On a membership basis, faculty, staff, alumni, and the general public also have access to the facilities.

Research Institutes and Centers

Center for Developmental Neuroscience and

Developmental Disabilities

Dr. Alejandra del Carmen Alonso, Director

Office: Biological Sciences/Chemical Sciences Building

(6S), Room 229

The Center for Developmental Neuroscience and Developmental Disabilities (CDNDD) is a CUNY Center that conducts, promotes, and sponsors research, education, and training in the developmental neurosciences with special emphasis on research and educational programs in the specific field of developmental disabilities.

The Center serves as a hub for collaborative efforts between the College and other research institutions in offering a Master of Science degree in Neuroscience and Developmental Disabilities, and also partnering with the CUNY Doctoral programs in multiple disciplines in mentoring Ph.D. students. On the CSI campus, the

Center has established research laboratories for investigations in cellular, molecular, behavioral, and clinical neuroscience and provides advanced research training for graduate and undergraduate students.

Center for Environmental Science

Dr. Alfred M. Levine, Director

Office: Biological Sciences/Chemical Sciences Building

(6S), Room 310

The Center for Environmental Science, established in

1987, provides support for research and policy recommendations concerning environmental problems. One of the major purposes of the Center is to define and solve environmental problems on Staten Island and its environs through research that includes studies of respiratory diseases, toxic and carcinogenic chemicals in the air, and the population at risk for lung cancer.

Center for the Study of Staten Island: Staten Island

Project (SIP)

Dr. Richard Flanagan and Dr. Jonathan Peters,

Co-Directors

The Center for the Study of Staten Island is designed to integrate the work of the College with the public affairs concerns of the people of Staten Island. To that end, it mediates and facilitates the collaboration of the College's faculty, students, and staff with government, civic organizations, and businesses in order to identify and assist in finding solutions to the borough's pressing public issues. More specifically, the Center serves as an information and consultation resource to prepare citizens and leaders to make better informed decisions about public life; it fosters the development of faculty research and undergraduate and graduate education through engagement with the Staten Island community; and it builds bridges to other public affairs institutes and local communities as a spur to innovations in public life on Staten Island. Whenever possible, the Center seeks to partner with community groups and agencies in advancing initiatives of mutual interest and in fulfilling consonant missions.

While encouraging and facilitating debate that accommodates differing and sometimes conflicting positions on controversial issues crucial to the community, the

About the College 9

Center is committed to maintaining a nonpartisan stance.

Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences

The Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences brings together a wide range of research faculty and students with interests in interdisciplinary applications of mathematics and computational science.

The Center’s activities include the use of the campus super-computer, faculty collaboration, grant writing, student mentoring, undergraduate research, and sponsored lectures. More information can be found at

www.math.csi.cuny.edu/ciamcs.

The City University of New York

The City University of New York (CUNY), of which the

College of Staten Island is a part, traces its beginning to

1847 and a public referendum that provided tuition-free higher education for residents of New York City. The municipal college system grew rapidly and its various colleges were consolidated as The City University of

New York by an act of the New York State Legislature in

1961. CUNY comprises 11 senior colleges, six community colleges, a graduate school, a law school, and a medical school. It is the largest municipal college system and the third largest university in the nation.

The Board of Trustees

CUNY is governed by the Board of Trustees composed of 17 members, ten of whom are appointed by the Governor of New York State, and five by the Mayor of New

York City. The chairperson of the University Faculty

Senate serves ex officio, without vote; the chairperson of the University Student Senate serves ex officio, with vote. The individual colleges of CUNY have considerable latitude in governing their own affairs through various bodies representing faculty, students, and administrators. The Board of Trustees decides overall University policy and approves major new collegiate plans and programs.

Board of Trustees

Benno Schmidt, B.A., J.D., Chairperson

Philip Alfonso Berry, M.B.A., M.S.W., B.A., A.A., Vice

Chairperson

Valerie Lancaster Beal, B.A., M.B.A.

Wellington Z. Chen, B.S.

Rita DiMartino, A.A., B.A., M.P.A.

Freida D. Foster, B.A. M.S

Judah Gribetz, A.B., LL.B, LL.M

Joseph J. Lhota, B.S., B.A., M.B.A.

James P. Molinaro

Hugo M. Morales, MD, DPN-P, F.A.P.A.

Brian D. Obdergfell, B.S., J.D.

Peter S. Pantaleo, J.D., B.A.

10 About the College

Carol A. Robles-Roman, B.A., J.D.

Barry F. Schwartz, A.B, J.D.

Charles A. Shorter, B.A., M.A.

Muhammad W. Arshad, B.S.

Terrence F. Martell, B.A., Ph.D

Secretary of the Board

Jay Hershenson

General Counsel

Frederick P. SchafferB

Council of Presidents

GRADUATE SCHOOLS, HONORS COLLEGE and

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

The Graduate Center

Chase Robinson, Interim President

The Graduate School of Journalism

Sarah Bartlett, Dean

City University School of Law at Queens College

Michelle Anderson, Dean

School of Professional Studies

John Mogulescu, Dean

Macaulay Honors College

Ann Kirschner, Dean

CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College

Ayman El Mohandes, Interim Dean

THE SENIOR COLLEGES

Baruch College

Mitchel B. Wallerstein, President

Brooklyn College

Karen L. Gould, President

City College

Lisa Staiano-Coico, President

College of Staten Island

William J. Fritz, Interim President

Hunter College

Jennifer J. Raab, President

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Jeremy Travis, President

Lehman College

Ricardo R. Fernández, President

Medgar Evers College

Rudolph F. Crew, President

New York City College of Technology

Russell K. Hotzler, President

Queens College

James L. Muyskens, President

York College

Marcia Keizs, President

THE COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Antonio Pérez, President

Bronx Community College

Carole B. Joseph, President

Hostos Community College

Felix V. Matos Rodriguez, President

Kingsborough Community College

Stuart Suss, Acting President

LaGuardia Community College

Gail O. Mellow,President

The New Community College Initiative

Scott E. Evenbeck, President

Queensborough Community College

Diane Call, President

University Administration

Chancellor

James B. Milliken

Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer

Allan H. Dobrin

Interim Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost

Julia Wrigley

Senior Vice Chancellor for University Relations and

Secretary of the Board of Trustees

Jay Hershenson

Senior Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs and General

Counsel

Frederick P. Schaffer

Senior Vice Chancellor for Budget, Finance and Financial Policy

Marc Shaw

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

Frank D. Sanchez

Vice Chancellor for Labor Relations

Pamela S. Silverblatt

Vice Chancellor for Research

Gillian Small

Vice Chancellor for Human Resources Management

Gloriana B. Waters

Vice Chancellor for Facilities Planning, Construction and

Management

Iris Weinshall

Associate Vice Chancellor & University CIO

Brian Cohen

Associate Vice Chancellor for Budget and Finance

Matthew Sapienza

Associate Vice Chancellor for Corporate, Foundation and Major Gifts Development

Andrea Shapiro Davis

Senior University Dean/Special Counsel to the Chancellor

Dave Fields

Sponsorship and Accreditation

The College of Staten Island is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street,

Philadelphia, PA 19104; 215.662.5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary

Accreditation.

The Chemistry Program is accredited by the American

Chemical Society (ACS), 1155 Sixteenth Street, NW,

Washington, DC 20036; 800.227.5558.

The Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of

ABET accredits the BS degree in Computer Science. The Engineering Accreditation Commission

(EAC) of ABET accredits the BS degree in Engineering

Science. The Technology Accreditation Commission

(TAC) of ABET accredits the AAS degree in Electrical

Engineering Technology. ABET is based at 111 Market

Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202; 410.347.7700.

The Nursing Programs are accredited by the National

League for Nursing Accreditation Commission (NLNAC),

3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA

30326, 404.975.5000.

The Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy

Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1488; 703.706.3245 accredits the Physical Therapy program.

The Education Programs are accredited by the National

Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

(NCATE), 2010 Massachusetts Ave NW, Suite 500,

Washington, DC 20036, 202.466.7496.

The MA in Liberal Studies program is accredited by the

Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs

(AGLSP), c/o Duke University, Box 90095, Durham, NC,

27708; 919.684.1987.

The Medical Technology program is accredited by the

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory

Sciences (NAACLS) and utilizes hospital affiliations accredited by NAACLS, 5600 N. River Road, Suite

720, Rosemont, IL 60018-5119; 847.939.3597.

Copies of these accreditation documents, as well as the respective accreditation documents for the various academic disciplines, are available for review through the

Office of Academic Affairs.

About the College 11 nurture responsible citizens for our city, country, and the world.

Vision

The College of Staten Island will enhance the quality of its student-centered programs, research, scholarship, and creative works. The College will provide models for initiatives on technology, community, and our environment, as well as effective integration of programs, projects, and methodologies. CSI will develop a richer array of rigorous undergraduate and graduate degree offerings to better meet students’ educational and professional aspirations. The College of Staten Island will expand its role in The Graduate Center and other cross-campus activities of The City University of New

York. We will become an even more vibrant center of intellectual and cultural exchange. The College will be strengthened by increasing its ability to serve a diverse campus community. Through these accomplishments, the College of Staten Island will achieve greater regional, national and international recognition.

Values and Fundamental Principles

Our campus Community values:

Each Student

We nurture each student’s intellectual growth, curiosity, and excitement in order to prepare students to function in a complex and dynamic world.

Excellence in Research and Teaching

We set and meet high expectations in our academic programs through innovative and effective teaching, scholarship, and research. We strive to promote engagement among students and faculty.

Experiential Learning

We believe it is essential to provide transformational curricular and co-curricular opportunities, such as service learning, study abroad, leadership development, undergraduate research and scholarship, and internships.

Resourcefulness

We take pride in our work ethic, our ability to solve problems, and our stewardship of resources.

Community Engagement

We actively work to instill the value of civic participation and are proud of our leadership role for Staten Island and beyo nd. We foster partnerships to address public issues and encourage involvement in community affairs.

Mission, Vision, & Values

Mission

Grounded in the Liberal Arts tradition, the College of

Staten Island is committed to the highest standards in teaching, research, and scholarship. Drawing on the rich heritage of The City University of New York that has provided access to excellence in higher education since

1847, the College of Staten Island offers that same opportunity in New York City’s Borough of Staten Island.

The College is dedicated to helping its students fulfill their creative, aesthetic, and educational aspirations through competitive and rigorous undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. We embrace the strength of our diversity, foster civic mindedness, and

Our fundamental principles:

Diversity:

Drawing from the richness of our diverse community, we incorporate multiple approaches to developing and encouraging the inclusion of various world views, cultures, and experiences into the fabric of our institution.

Respect

In our relationships with each other, we insist on mutual respect and thoughtful dialogue. We provide forums for the exchange of ideas informed by the techniques of critical analysis and the traditions of scholarly discourse.

Integrity

We uphold the highest standards of honesty and fairness in our interactions with each other.

12 About the College

Institutional Strategic Directions

Strategic Direction 1

Develop a richer array of rigorous undergraduate and graduate degree programs that meet students’ educational and professional aspirations

Strategic Direction 2

Enhance the quality and recognition of research, scholarship, and creative works for faculty and students.

Strategic Direction 3

Become a more vibrant center of intellectual and cultural exchange through community partnerships.

Strategic Direction 4

Strengthen and increase our ability to serve a diverse campus community.

Strategic Direction 5

Position the College to achieve greater regional, national and international recognition through advancement and fund raising activities.

Strategic Direction 6

Examine the College’s current and possible future uses of technology for a wide range of purposes.

Admissions 13

ADMISSIONS

Office of Recruitment and Admissions

Director, Emmanuel Esperance, Jr.

Building 2A, Room 103

718.982.2010

Visit our Website: www.csi.cuny.edu/admissions

Procedures for admission as a first-year or transfer student from another college are outlined below. Campus tours are available Thursdays at 3:30pm, by appointment only, for prospective students and their guests. In addition, special on-campus programs and open houses are scheduled each semester. Students are also invited to visit particular departments by request. lege’s minimum index number will be admitted to a bachelo r’s degree program. A faculty admissions committee may consider the baccalaureate admission of applicants whose scores approach the College’s minimum index number.

Applicants who are not admitted to a bachelor's degree program may be eligible for admission to an associate's degree program at the College.

Matriculated and Non-Degree

(Non-Matriculated) Students

Students are classified into two groups according to their enrollment status: matriculated and non-degree.

Matriculated students are those who have met the College admission requirements and are enrolled in a program of study leading to a degree. Non-degree

(non-matriculated) students are those who are enrolled for credit courses but who are not officially registered in a degree program. Credits earned as a non-matriculated student may later be transferred to a degree program.

Students may enroll as candida tes for the bachelor’s degree or the associate’s degree. Bachelor’s degree programs are designed to be completed in four years and associate’s degree programs in two years. The programs for the junior and senior years of study, upper-division programs, are structured for smooth articulation for students graduating with associate’s degrees and students transferring from community colleges. The

College has also developed auxiliary and pre-entry programs with support systems for those students returning to the classroom after an interruption in their education and for the not-so-recent high school graduate.

Academic Requirements for

Admission to Bachelor’s Degree

Programs (Four-Year)

Freshman Admission to Bachelor’s

Degree Programs

1.

An applicant for admission to a bachelor’s degree program must pass the three CUNY Assessment

Tests, unless he/she qualifies for exemption based on a satisfactory performance on the SAT or ACT standardized tests or Regents Examinations.

2.

Admission to a bachelor’s degree program is determined by an applicant’s score on the College’s admissions index. The index is based on the applicant’s high school courses and academic average and the combined verbal and mathematics SAT scores. An applicant whose score reaches or exceeds the Col-

Transfer Students Admission to

Bachelor’s Degree Programs

Students are encouraged to continue in bachelor’s degree programs from associate’s degree programs at

CSI, and they may also transfer from other colleges and universities into bachelor’s degree programs. Students must have passed the CUNY Assessment Tests in mathematics, writing, and reading prior to enrolling in a bachelor’s degree program. Final degree credit for transfer work depends on grades earned and College and departmental requirements. With some exceptions, a course with a grade of C or higher may be transferred.

In the case of transfers from CUNY colleges, D grades are usually acceptable. Transfer credits carry a grade of

Pass (P) on the CSI transcript. Transfer students from other CUNY col leges are encouraged to visit CUNY’s online Transfer Information and Program Planning System (CUNY TIPPS) at www.tipps.cuny.edu for information about transfer credits.

Based on University policy, all liberal arts and sciences courses taken in one City University college are considered transferable, with full credit, to each college of The

City University, and full credit will be granted for these courses in all departments and programs and recognized for the fulfillment of degree requirements. See section on Pathways General Education Requirements for details on transfer of courses in this category.

Students must earn a minimum of 30 credits at the College and, to qualify for a bachelor’s degree, at least half of the credits required for the major. Students who transfer with 30 or fewer credits must complete 12 College Option credits. Students who transfer with more than 30 credits but without an Associates Degree must complete a maximum of 9 College Option credits.

Students who transfer with a completed Associates Degree must complete a maximum of 6 College Option credits.

Work completed at other colleges may be used to fulfill

Pathways General Education and other requirements.

The Office of the Registrar will evaluate each student’s transcript. Every effort will be made to apply the course work previously completed by transfer students to the general education requirements at CSI.

In many programs, particularly in professional and scientific disciplines, students are required to complete specific courses before being considered for admission to these programs. Generally, these courses are taken

14 Admissions during the first two years of study as necessary preparation for the advanced work required. Students seeking admission to these programs may have to spend additional time completing pre-major courses.

Academic Requirements for

Admission to the Macaulay Honors

College

Students who are entering college for the first time may apply for admission to the Macaulay Honors College of

CUNY at the College of Staten Island. Applicants are expected to have an academic diploma with an average of at least 90. The admissions committee for the Macaulay Honors College considers the following documents submitted by applicants: high school transcript; scores on Regents Examinations; scores on the SAT,

ACT, and achievement tests; Advanced Placement courses; extracurricular activities; evidence of talents and interests; letters of recommendation; and personal essay. Personal interviews are also required. Admission is limited and competitive. Details on the Macaulay

Honors College University Scholars Program admission process are available online at:

www.csi.cuny.edu/honorscollege/.

Passing of, or exemption from, all three CUNY

Assessment Tests;

Acceptance to a baccalaureate program at CSI;

Demonstration of leadership, community service, creativity, talent, and enthusiasm. Personal characteristics that will contribute to The Verrazano School community are also considered.

The Verrazano School also accepts applications from transfer and current students who have accumulated more than 11 credits and fewer than 36 undergraduate credits at the conclusion of the term of their application.

Admission to The Verrazano School for current CSI students and transfer students is based upon the following criteria:

Verrazano Supplemental Application, including two letters of recommendation;

Full time enrollment in a baccalaureate program at

CSI;

A minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA at CSI or another accredited institution.

Passing of, or exemption from, all three CUNY

Assessment Tests;

Demonstration of leadership, community service, creativity, talent, and enthusiasm. Personal characteristics that will contribute to The Verrazano School community are also considered.

For information or an application, please visit

www.csi.cuny.edu/verrazanoschool or call

718.982.4171.

Academic Requirements for

Admission to the Teacher Education

Honors Academy

Entering freshmen or students with less that 30 undergraduate credits may apply for admission to the Teacher

Education Honors Academy. Entering freshmen are expected to have a high overall high school average (a minimum of an 85 College Admissions Average); a college preparatory program in science and mathematics; high grades in mathematics and science courses; high

Regents scores in mathematics and science subjects; and high SAT or ACT scores. Students with college credits must have a college GPA of 3.0. All candidates must submit two recommendations that include at least one from a math or science teacher and must have a strong desire to be a teacher in a New York City high school or middle school.

For information or an application, please call

718.982.3609.

Academic Requirements for

Admission to The Verrazano School

Entering freshmen or students with fewer than 11 undergraduate credits may apply for admission to The

Verrazano School at the College of Staten Island. Admission for these students to The Verrazano School is based upon the following criteria:

Verrazano Supplemental Application, including two letters of recommendation;

Strong academic high school record;

High SAT or ACT standardized test scores;

Academic Requirements for

Admission to Associate’s Degree

Programs (Two-Year)

Freshman Admission to Associate’s

Degree Programs

Applications for matriculation as a first-time student will be accepted from persons who have never attended any institution of higher education (with the exception of those students who have taken college courses while in high school) and who have either:

1. graduated from an accredited high school, or

2. earned an equivalency diploma (GED), or

3. are currently attending high school and will receive a diploma prior to enrollment.

A diploma from an accredited high school is required for admission to the College. Scores on either the New

York State Equivalency Diploma Examination or the

General Education Development Examination are accepted as substitutes for the high school diploma provided that the student attains a score of 35 or higher on each of the five tests, with a total score of 225 or higher.

Starting in the Fall 2009 semester, in order to advance into nursing clinicals, students must provide documentation for one of the following categories:

1. United States citizenship

2. Permanent residency

3. International student with F1 status

4. Granted asylum, refugee status, temporary protected status, withholding of removal, deferred enforced departure; or deferred action status by the United

States government

Transfer Student Admission to

Associate’s Degree Programs

Applicants who have attended another college must file a transfer application. Applications for matriculation will be accepted from transfer students who have an official transcript verifying attendance at another college. As a general rule, the College requires a grade point average equivalent to a C for transfer as a matriculated student.

The Office of the Registrar will evaluate credits of transfer students for advanced standing. Final degree credit for transfer work depends on grades earned and

College and departmental requirements. With some exceptions, a course with a grade of C or higher may be transferred. In the case of transfers from CUNY colleges, D grades are usually acceptable. Transfer credits carry a grade of Pass (P) on the CSI transcript. However, all students must complete a minimum of 30 credits at the College, including at least one-half of the credits required for the core, in order to earn an associate’s degree.

Starting in the Fall 2009 semester, in order to advance into nursing clinicals, students must provide documentation for one of the following categories:

1. United States citizenship

2. Permanent residency

3. International student with F1 Status

4. Granted asylum, refugee status, temporary protected status, withholding of removal, deferred enforced departure; or deferred action status by the United States government

Admissions 15

Applicants are required to submit the following to be considered for admission to the College of Staten Island:

Completed freshman application

$65 application fee

Official high school transcript

Copy of high school diploma or GED diploma and scores

SAT or ACT scores (required for entrance to baccalaureate programs)

Transfer Applications

Transfer applicants are students who have attended any college, university, and/or proprietary school since graduating from high school or secondary school. This applies whether or not the applicant is seeking transfer credit and/or changing program of study.

Applicants are required to submit the following to be considered for admission to the College of Staten Island:

Completed transfer application

$70 application fee

Official college transcript(s)

Official high school transcript

Copy of high school diploma or GED diploma and scores

Students must meet the standards of proficiency in the basic skills areas of reading, writing, and mathematics established by the University to transfer to a bachelor's degree program.

Non-Degree (Non-Matriculated) Applications

Non-matriculated (non-degree) students may obtain an

Undergraduate Non-Degree application from The Hub in

Building 2A, Room 106; online at www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/importantforms; or at the time of registration.

Admissions Committee

An Admissions Committee of six members of the faculty and administrative staff considers all matters affecting the admission of students to the College of Staten Island, including academic requirements.

Filing an Application

Filing an Application

Applicants must apply online at www.cuny.edu. CSI has continuous admissions; however, applications should be filed early. Priority deadline for the Fall semester is February 1. Priority deadline for the Spring semester is September 15th.

Freshman Applicants

Freshman (first time) applicants are students who have not previously attended any college, university, and/or proprietary school within or outside the United States since graduating from high school or secondary school.

College Preparatory Initiative (CPI)

The College Preparatory Initiative (CPI), a collaborative effort between The City University of New York and the

New York City Board of Education, was designed to strengthen the academic preparation of high school students. This requirement for all students entering

CUNY colleges is 16 units. See section on Degree Requirements for complete details.

High school students should consult with guidance counselors to ascertain which courses meet the CPI requirements. GED students will receive units in English and mathematics based on their test scores. Students who have not completed the CPI requirements prior to enrolling in the University will be required to demonstrate skills and knowledge in the discipline areas in which they lack preparation. In most cases, this will be accomplished by taking college courses in designated academic areas. No student will be eligible for graduation from CSI until all CPI requirements are satisfied.

16 Admissions

Advanced Placement

The College will grant course credit for advanced placement courses offered in secondary school when students score 4 or 5 on the advanced placement test.

A maximum of 30 credits will be awarded on the basis of special examinations taken prior to admission. These include approved high school advanced placement examinations, Regents Examinations, Educational Testing

Service examinations, Departmental Challenge examinations, New York State College Proficiency examinations, and the College Level Examination Program

(CLEP). Further information is available from the Office of the Registrar http://www.csi.cuny.edu/transferguide/. and at

Applying for financial aid (All students are strongly encouraged to file)

Test preparation for the CUNY Assessment Tests

Enrollment in free immersion programs (workshops) for students who need to retake any assessment tests

Please note the following enrollment requirements/policies:

Incoming freshmen who have not passed at least one of the CUNY Assessment Tests (reading, writing and mathematics) will not be allowed to enroll.

All incoming freshmen who have failed parts I & II of the CUNY Assessment Test in Mathematics must complete CSI's free math immersion program prior to their first semester of matriculation at the College.

International Students

The Center for International Service at CSI facilitates admission and registration for international students.

The Center is located in the Building 2A, Room 206; telephone 718.982.2100 or visit our Website:

www.csi.cuny.edu/international.

SEEK Program

SEEK Director Gloria Garcia, South Administrative

Building (1A), Room 112

The SEEK Program (Search for Education, Elevation, and Knowledge) is a New York State program for residents who are in need of both academic and financial assistance in order to obtain a college education. Information about the program and the application process may be obtained from the SEEK Office, 1A, Room

112; telephone 718.982.2410 or visit our Website:

www.csi.cuny.edu/seek.

Admission of Sex Offenders

The College reserves the right to deny admission to any student if in its judgment, the presence of that student on campus poses an undue risk to the safety and security of the College or the College community. That judgment will be based on an individualized determination taking into account any information that the College has about a student's criminal record and the particular circumstances of the College, including the presence of a childcare center, a public school, or public school students on the campus.

After Acceptance to the College of

Staten Island

After Acceptance to the College of Staten Island

Please visit the New Student Information Guide Guide for detailed information. The Guide will lead you through the enrollment process, saving you time and enhancing your registration experience.

Generally, the enrollment process will include:

Completion of CUNY Assessment Tests and/or

Placement Examination

Payment of a commitment deposit

Submission of immunization and medical records

Orientation, academic advisement, and registration

Attend a mandatory two-day New Student Orientation which includes academic advisement and registration (freshmen only)

Meet with a Transfer Registration and Advisement Communication (TRAC) team member in the Center for Advising and Academic Success for advisement and registration (transfers only)

Paying your bill

Other related services and possible enrollment steps include:

Registrar 17

REGISTRAR

Office of the Registrar

Registrar, Neila Green

Building 2A, Room 110

718.982.2120

Visit our Website: www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar

The Office of the Registrar assists students in navi-

gating the necessities of the school. The Office performs a variety of services both online and in person for students including: registration, transcript ordering, grade reporting, enrollment certification, final examination scheduling, the schedule of classes, college catalog, academic calendars, VA benefits administration, transfer credit evaluation, degree audit, and graduation evaluation.

A senior citizen may enroll in courses for credit but cannot be enrolled in the same semester for courses on both an audit basis (no tuition) and a credit or degree basis (tuition charged).

Readmission

Undergraduate students who do not register for a semester and then decide to return in a subsequent semester must file an application for readmission with the

Registrar. Readmission is routine unless the student is applying for a different curriculum, which may entail a review of qualifications. To qualify for priority registration, applications for readmission must be filed by the deadline specified in the academic calendar.

Registration

Students must register each semester. Registration and appointment materials are sent by the Office of the

Registrar prior to registration to all current, readmitted, and newly admitted students. An open registration period is scheduled at the beginning of each semester for students who miss their registration appointments or who are returning to CSI too late for an appointment to be scheduled.

Students scheduled for registration using their

CUNYfirst self-service account may register and perform program changes following the procedures accompanying the registration e-mail notification. Instructions for using CUNYfirst are also available online.

A detailed registration schedule and class listings are available online each semester on the Registrar's website. Registration is not complete until all financial obligations have been satisfied. The Registrar’s Office is in

Building 2A, Room 110.

Special Categories of Registration

Permit/Visiting Students

Permit students from within The City University must submit a valid CUNY permit through the ePERMIT system from their home college to the CSI Registrar’s Office prior to registration. Visiting students from outside

The City University must submit the Visiting Student

Application available online on the Registrar's website along with documentation from their home schools that they have permission to enroll at CSI.

Senior Citizens

Senior citizens, 60 years and older, may be permitted to enroll in undergraduate courses as non-matriculated students, on a space-available basis, without tuition and fees, provided they do so on an audit basis. Senior citizens enrolling as auditors are charged an administrative fee and a Consolidated Service Fee for the semester as indicated in the Fee Schedule.

Immunization Requirement

New York State Public Health Law requires immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella for some students. All students born on or after January 1, 1957, who are enrolling for six or more equated credits, must have proof of immunization on file at the College Health

Center, Campus Center (1C), Room 112, one week prior to registration. Transfer students must request that their health records be transferred to CSI. Information and the immunization forms are available at the Health

Center, the Registrar’s Office, and online at

www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/forms.php4

New York State Public Health Law 2167 requires that all college and university students be informed of the meningococcal disease, a potentially fatal bacterial infection commonly referred to as meningitis. The College of

Staten Island is required to maintain a record of the following for each student:

A response to receipt of meningococcal disease and vaccine information signed by the student or if a student is under the age of 18, by the student’s parent or guardian. The information provided to you must include information on the availability and cost of meningococcal meningitis vaccine (Menomune™);

AND EITHER

A record of meningococcal meningitis immunization within the past ten years;

OR

An acknowledgment of meningococcal disease risks and refusal of meningococcal meningitis immunization signed by the student or if a student is under the age of 18, by the student’s parent or guardian.

Meningitis is rare. However, when it strikes, its flu-like symptoms make diagnosis difficult. If not treated early, meningitis can lead to an increase in fluid surrounding the brain and spinal column as well as severe and permanent disabilities, such as hearing loss, brain damage, seizures, limb amputation, and even death. Cases of meningitis among teens and young adults 15 to 24 years of age (the age of most college students) have

18 Registrar more than doubled since 1991. The disease strikes about 3,000 Americans each year and claims about 300 lives. Between 100 and 125 meningitis cases occur on college campuses and as many as 15 students will die from the disease. A vaccine is available that protects against four types of the bacteria that cause meningitis in the United States: types A, C, Y, and W-135. These types account for nearly two-thirds of meningitis cases among college students. The College of Staten Island does not offer meningococcal immunization. The meningitis vaccine is provided at the New York City Department of Health Travelers’ clinics,

wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentFindClinic.aspx. The meningitis vaccine may or may not be covered by insurance. The vaccine cost is approximately $75. The

Ryan Chelsea Clinton Community Center, 645 Tenth

Avenue (between 45th and 46th) New York, NY 10036,

212.265.4500, offers the meningitis vaccine at a low and affordable cost. Note: Per public health law, the

College may not permit any student to attend the institution in excess of 30 days without complying with this law.

To learn more about meningitis and the vaccine, please consult your physician. You can also find information about the disease at:

The College Health Center’s Website:

www.csi.cuny.edu/studentaffairs/healthservices

New York State Department of Health Website:

www.health.state.ny.us/prevention/immunization/ind

ex.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Websites:

wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentFindClinic.aspx

and

www.cdc.gov/DiseasesConditions

American College Health Association (ACHA) Website:

www.acha.org/projects_programs/meningitis/diseas

e_info.cfm#overview and the National Meningitis Association (NMA), Website: www.nmaus.org

I.D. Cards

Each student will be provided with a photo identification card. Each semester the I.D. cards are validated upon completion of registration. Validated I.D. cards must be carried by a student on campus at all times. Duplicate

I.D. cards are available at a cost of $5.

Veterans Educational Transition

Services (V.E.T.S.)

The Veterans Educational Transition Services (V.E.T.S.) provides academic support from admissions to graduation as well as certification of benefits. The V.E.T.S. office is located in the Office of the Registrar, Building

2A, Room 110 or visit www.cuny.edu/veterans.

Tuition and Fees 19

TUITION AND FEES

Bursar, Michael D. Baybusky

Building (2A), Room 105

718.982.2060

Visit our Website: www.csi.cuny.edu/bursar

All tuition and fees listed in this Catalog and in any registration materials issued by the College are subject to change without prior notice by action of the CUNY

Board of Trustees. have intentionally and voluntarily renounced all the legal duties and surrendered all the legal rights of their position as parents). Students currently classified as non-residents, who wish to apply for resident status, must present proof that the above conditions have been met to the Office of Admissions or the Office of the

Registrar.

All tuition and fee schedules are necessarily subject to change without notice, at any time, upon action by the

Board of Trustees of The City University of New York regardless of tuition and fee schedules in effect at the time of this printing.

If you do not make full payment on your tuition and fees and other college bills and your account is sent to a collection agency, you will be responsible for all collection costs, including agency fees, attorney fees, and court costs, in addition to whatever amounts you owe the

College.

In addition, non-payment or a default judgment against your account may be reported to a credit bureau and reflected in your credit report.

Payment

A student is not registered until all financial obligations to the College have been satisfied. Before registration can be completed, students must have paid in full unless the student: (a) has been awarded financial aid sufficient to cover tuition and fees, (b) is enrolled in the

University Payment Plan, (c) is eligible for a tuition waiver, (d) is in a special registration status (e.g., veteran). The registration dates are located online in the

Semester Information. During the registration process, a student’s bill is prepared with a payment/validation due date indicated. Students registering late will be given a bill at the time of registration and are expected to pay their bill within three or fewer days. If a student’s bill is not paid and a student is not covered by one of the above categories, the registration will be canceled.

A student who has not fulfilled all financial obligations to the College will be barred from obtaining any transcripts or from registering for the next semester.

Place of Residence

Students are eligible for the tuition rate for residents of

New York State if they meet the following requirements for resident status: are 18 years of age or older, are

United States citizens or aliens with permanent resident status, have maintained their principal place of abode in

New York State for a period of 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes for the semester under consideration, and state their intention to live permanently and maintain their principal place of abode in New York State. The residence of a person under the age of 18 is that of his/her parents unless the person is an emancipated minor (one whose parents

Student Status

Full-Time and Part-Time

Undergraduate students are considered part-time if they are registered for 11 equated credits or less. A student is considered full-time if registered for 12 or more equated credits in a semester. Students applying for

TAP should see the requirements for TAP eligibility in the section on Financial Aid and online in the Semester

Information.

Part-time undergraduate matriculated students are charged the tuition rate on a per equated credit basis

(1-11 equated credits).

Undergraduate full-time students are charged tuition on a per semester basis; undergraduate non-resident full-time students are charged tuition on a per equated credit basis.

Summer session and non-degree students are billed on a per equated credit basis regardless of the number of equated credits for which they register. There are no maximum tuition limits for summer session or non-degree students. Non-degree students (as of June

1, 1992) pay a higher rate than matriculated students.

Senior Citizens

Individuals satisfying the New York City/State residency requirements and who are 60 years of age or older (as of the first day of the semester or session) are permitted to enroll in undergraduate courses on a space-available basis. Proof of age is required by the College; the following forms of proof of age are acceptable: Medicare card, driver’s license, or birth certificate.

Administrative fee: A non-refundable administrative fee of $65 per semester or session is charged senior citizens who are enrolling on an audit basis. The application fee and Student Activity Fee are not charged. Senior citizens as students are responsible for the Consolidated Service Fee and any other fees they might incur.

Undergraduate courses: For senior citizens enrolled in undergraduate courses, tuition will not be charged provided credit is not given for the course(s). Senior citizens are enrolled on an audit basis and will receive an

AUD grade. Senior citizens who wish to enroll for credit must pay the applicable tuition and fees, including the application fee and the Student Activity Fee. Senior citizens cannot be registered on both an audit basis (no tuition) and a credits basis (tuition charged) during the same semester.

20 Tuition and Fees

Graduate courses: Senior citizens are not permitted to register free of tuition or fee for graduate-level courses.

Senior citizens may register for graduate courses on a space-available basis and are charged the graduate tuition rate regardless. No exception is made for matriculated or non-matriculated status. The Student Activity

Fee and application fee must also be paid.

Tuition

Tuition is subject to change without prior notice by the CUNY Board of Trustees.

UN-

Resident non-degree

Non-Resident

DER-GRADUATE* full-time matriculated $2,865/semester $510/equated part-time matriculated $245/equated credit

$510/equated credit

$360/equated credit

Resident credit

$760/equated credit

Non-Resident GRADUATE* full-time part-time excess hours

$4,485/semester $710/credit

$385/credit

$65/hour

$710/credit

$85/hour

The last date for submitting documentation for a residency status change for tuition billing purposes is the last day of final examinations (see the academic calendar located on the Registr ar’s home page).

Matriculated Status

If a student’s matriculation status changes on or after the first day of classes, the lower matriculation tuition charge will not be effective until the next semester’s registration. No refunds will be issued for the semester in which the reclassification occurs. Students who have satisfied their baccalaureate degree requirements

(graduated) and wish to take additional credits beyond the degree will automatically be coded non-degree and charged the higher non-degree rate per credit, unless they have filed for a second undergraduate degree in the Registrar’s

Office by the last business day before the first day of classes.

Non-Instructional Fees

Fees are subject to change without prior notice by the CUNY Board of Trustees.

Student Activity

Senate

$98.15

*

$62.15

*

1.45

1.45 for all full-time students for all part-time students for all full-time students for all part-time students

Technology $125 for full-time students

$62.50 for part-time students

Consolidated

Service Fee

$15 all students pay this fee

Application:

Freshman $65

Undergraduate

Transfer

Graduate

$70

$125 payable upon filing application for admission or at the time of initial registration at the College

Readmission $20 payable on registration after an absence from the College of one or more semesters for any addition to the stuProgram

Late Registra-

$18

Change

Senior Citizen $80

Cooperating

Teacher Waiver

$25 dent's initial registration

$25 charged after the specified tion registration period

Late Payment $25 charged after bill due date

Reinstatement $15

Transcript $7 each (except for copies going to other CUNY colleges for which there is no charge). Check or money order only.

Reprocessing $15 for bad checks

Duplicate Bill

Maintenance of

Matriculation

$5

$190 per semester for matriculated graduate students who

NYS Resident

Maintenance of

Matriculation

NYS

Non-Resident

$15 do not wish to register for courses during the current semester

$310 per semester for matriculated graduate students who do not wish to register for courses during the current semester

Duplicate Diploma

Duplicate ID

Card

Duplicate Record

Special Examination

$5

$5

$25 for the first; $5 each additional examination

*Included in the Student Activity Fee is the NYPIRG

($4) fee.

Students attending both the Winter Session and preceding fall semester will be charged fees based on total credits for winter and fall semester combined. All non-matriculated and visiting students attending the

Winter Session only will be charged fees based on credits enrolled. All matriculated students attending the

Winter Session only will not be charged fees for the

Winter Session.

Effective Summer 2013, students attending both Summer Session I and Summer Session II will be charged a separate Student Activity Fee, Senate Fee, and Consolidated Service Fee for each session.

Materials Charges

Special materials charges of $10 or more are required in some courses and subject to change at any time by the Board of Trustees of The City University of New

York. Details may be found in the Semester Information. (Materials charges are not refundable).

Library Fines

Overdue books:

Reserve items:

General circulation: 10 cents per day, including days on which the Library is closed, to a maximum of the current price of the item.

$1.20 per overdue hour to a maximum of the current price of the item.

Damaged book:

Lost item:

Borrower must pay any overdue fines up to and including the date the item is reported as being damaged, plus an amount to be determined by the nature and extent of the damage, not to exceed the current price of the item, plus a processing charge of $10.

Borrower must pay a $10 processing charge in addition to the current price of the item.

Tuition and Fee Refunds

When courses are canceled by the College, a full refund of appropriate tuition and fees will be made. In cases of student-initiated withdrawals, the date on which the withdrawal application is received by the Registrar, not the last date of attendance, is considered the official date of withdrawal for the purpose of computing refunds.

Withdrawal from a course before the beginning of classes allows a 100 percent refund of tuition and the CUNY accelerated study fee; and withdrawal from the College in order to register at another unit of The City University during the same semester allows a 100 percent refund of tuition and the CUNY accelerated study fee. Information about refunds for withdrawal under other circumstances is shown in the Academic Calendar located on the Registrar’s home page. Class non-attendance, informing the instructor of withdrawal, or altering the bill to indicate intention to drop a course DOES NOT constitute an official withdrawal. If a portion of the tuition has been paid with federal financial aid funds, that portion of any tuition refund is returned to the appropriate financial aid program.

Students should be aware that withdrawal or failure to complete a course affects their financial aid obligations.

Questions about financial aid obligations should be referred to the Office of Financial Aid.

Except for the NYPIRG portion of the Student Activity

Fee, there are no fee refunds. The NYPIRG amount

($4) is refundable through the NYPIRG Office only.

Return of Title IV Funds

Title IV (Pell, SEOG, Direct, and Perkins Loans) recipients who withdraw from all courses, officially or unofficially, are subject to a calculation to determine earned

Federal Financial Aid. This calculation may require a payment toward tuition and fees that previously were determined to have been satisfied.

Medical Withdrawals

Medical withdrawals, which must include documentation from a physician, should be addressed to the College

Health Center. Medical withdrawals are subject to the regular College refund policy. Refer to the Semester

Information for more details.

Tuition and Fees 21

22 Financial Aid

FINANCIAL AID

Student Financial Aid Office

Building 2A, Room 401

Director, Philippe Marius

Telephone: 718.982.2030

Fax: 718.982.2037

E-mail: [email protected]

Website: www.csi.cuny.edu/finaid

The mission of the Office of Student Financial Aid of the

College of Staten Island is to facilitate students’ access to public and private financial assistance programs for post-secondary education. The Office assists students and their families in applying for aid and aims to generate delivery of aid funds to students most expeditiously within all applicable rules, regulations and procedures of funding entities, CUNY, and the College.

For the more information about the Financil Aid Application Process and eligibility please visit our website at

www.csi.cuny.edu/finaid or contact us by email [email protected]

Office Hours:

Monday through Friday, 9:00am

– 4:45pm*

*A representative from the Office of Student Financial

Aid is available in the Hub

Wednesday and Thursday evenings from 5:00

7:00pm.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS

Scholarships and Awards 23

Scholarship Committee

Director, Caryl Watkins

Career and Scholarship Center

Building 1A, Room 105

718.982.2300

Website: www.csi.cuny.edu/career

The scholarship program at the College of Staten Island recognizes academic excellence and college or community service. In addition to scholarships offered directly by the College, the CSI Foundation, and departments and associations of the College, memorial scholarships have been endowed through the generosity of many individuals and organizations who value higher education. Scholarships support, in varying ways, the education of the men and women of our community.

Eligibility: General Standards

Scholarship awards generally require a minimum grade point average of 3.5. College and/or community service is also generally required. Financial need is required only when indicated. Scholarships are awarded to students enrolled for 12 or more credits at all levels of study

—first-year students, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Some scholarships may be available for part-time undergraduate and graduate students.

Requirements

Registered for at least 12 credits (matriculated), with the exception of a few specialized scholarships for part-time and graduate students.

Academic excellence (GPA 3.5 or above).

School and/or community service.

Incoming students: high school average of 95% or above.

Relationship to Financial Aid

In most instances, scholarship awards do not affect TAP awards. New York State TAP regulations require that tuition-based scholarships be used as a resource in determining eligibility for a TAP award. Because most of the awards offered by CSI are not designated as tuition scholarships, they will have no effect on TAP awards.

Only awards specifically designated as tuition awards, such as the Williamson Scholarship, affect eligibility for

TAP. Students who wish additional information on the relationship between these awards and financial aid should contact the Office of Student Financial Aid.

How to Apply

Scholarship applicants must be current students at the

College of Staten Island or must have applied for admission. Application forms and information about scholarships are available online or from the Career and

Scholarship Center and academic departments and student services offices. In the high schools, application forms are available from the College Adviser. The scholarship application can also be found online by visiting www.csi.cuny.edu/career and clicking on the

Scholarships and Awards option in the left tool bar.

Notification to Recipients

Applicants are notified by the Scholarship Committee.

An awards ceremony and reception is held every year for scholars and their family and friends.

Other Awards

Study Abroad: Scholarships and awards for study abroad are available through the Center for International

Service. CSI students are also eligible for Study/Travel

Opportunities for CUNY Students grants, a CUNY program promoting short-term (summer or January inter-session) study abroad, and for scholarships offered by the College Consortium for International Studies.

Information is available from the Center for International

Service.

Graduate Students: Assistance is available in the form of financial aid and assistantships to selected students in Master’s degree programs in Adult Health Nursing,

Gerontological Nursing, Biology, Cinema and Media

Studies, Computer Science, Education, English, Environmental Science, History, Liberal Studies, and Physical Therapy. Graduate fellowships and assistantships are available to qualified students enrolled in doctoral programs offered in conjunction with the Graduate

School. See the department chairperson or the graduate program coordinator for further information.

Commencement Awards: Awards and prizes have been established by the faculty to recognize the exceptional achievements of graduating students. Information on Commencement awards is available from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and from department chairpersons.

24 Divisions, Schools, and Departments

DIVISIONS, SCHOOLS, AND DEPART-

MENTS

Interrelationships between fields of knowledge are emphasized by grouping academic departments together within the larger categories of humanities and social sciences or science and technology. The Division of

Humanities and Social Sciences includes the following departments: Education, English, History, Media Culture, World Languages and Literatures, Performing and

Creative Arts, Political Science and Global Affairs, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology, and

Social Work. The Division of Science and Technology includes the following departments: Biology, Chemistry,

Computer Science, Engineering Science and Physics,

Library, Mathematics, Nursing, and Physical Therapy.

The School of Business includes the following departments: Accounitng and Finance, Econoimcs, Management and Marketing.

The offices for Interim Dean Nan Sussman, Division of

Humanities and Social Sciences, and for Dean Alex

Chigogidze, Division of Science and Technology, is located in Building 1A. The office for Interim Dean Susan

Holak, School of Business is located in Building 3N .

Divisions, Schools, and Departments 25

Division of Humanities and Social

Sciences

The Division of Humanities and Social Sciences includes the following departments: Education, English,

History, Media Culture, World Languages and Literatures, Performing and Creative Arts, Political Science and Global Affairs, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology, and Social Work.

Hoeller, Frederick Kaufman, Catherine Marvin, Ira Shor,

Christina Tortora. Associate Professors: Charlotte Alexander, Alyson Bardsley, William Bernhardt, L. Ava

Chin, Ellen Goldner, Katharine Goodland, Dalia Kandiyoti, John Miller, Steven Monte, Mary Jeanette Moran,

Lee Papa, Mary Reda, Terry Rowden, Patricia Smith.

Assistant Professors: Maria Bellamy Rice, Kelly Bradbury, Amber Buck, Matthew Brim, Kathleen Currie Hall,

Tyehimba Jess, Peter Keil, Suha Kudsieh, Christopher

Miller, James Riddle. Lecturer: Harry Thorne. Higher Education Assistant: Robert Brandt.

Department of Education

Building 3S

Eleni (Nelly) Tournaki, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Professors: Igor Arievitch, Irina Lyublinskaya, Susan

Sullivan. Associate Professors: Margaret Berci, Deborah DeSimone, Eileen Donoghue, Kenneth Gold,

Jinyoung Kim, David Kritt, Ruth Powers Silverberg,

Helen Mele Robinson, Bethany Rogers, Gregory Seals,

Vivian Shulman, Liqing Tao, Nelly Tournaki. Assistant:

David Allen, Erica Blatt, Christopher Hale, Elisabeth

Johnson, Judit Molnar Kerekes, Edward Lehner. Higher Education Associate: Deirdre Armitage, El Samuels,

Kristin Wilson. Higher Education Assistant: Diane

Brescia.

The department offers the Bachelor's degree in English, with options in Literature, Writing, and Linguistics; and the Master's degree. The department also offers non-credit courses in reading and writing for both native and non-native speakers of English.

A general course of study provides students in career programs and in baccalaureate programs with essentials in the important areas of writing and literature. A more advanced series of courses is available for students interested in obtaining a deeper and broader understanding of the discipline, including those students who will pursue English as a major. Students with majors in other disciplines may minor in English with a literature, linguistics, or writing option. The department offers a program in Communications jointly with the faculty of the Department of Media Culture and programs in

Dramatic Arts and Dramatic Literature jointly with faculty of the Department of Performing and Creative Arts.

The Master's degree program is coordinated by Professor Maryann Feola.

The department provides initial preparation and undergraduate programs for teaching at the Early Childhood level and in elementary and secondary schools; graduate programs in Childhood Education, Adolescence

Education, Special Education; and a Post-

Master’s Advanced Certificate for Leadership in Education.

The undergraduate program coordinators are: Associate

Professor Helen Mele Robinson for the Undergraduate

Early Childhood Program, Associate Professor Margaret

Berci for the Undergraduate Childhood Education Program, and Associate Professor Bethany Rogers for the

Undergraduate Adolescence Education Program.

The graduate program coordinators are: Associate Professor Vivian Shulman for the Master’s degree Sequence 1 program in Childhood Education, Associate

Professor Vivian Shulman for the Master’s degree Sequence 2 program in Childhood Education, Associate

Professor Bethany Rogers for the Master’s degree Sequence 1 program in Secondary Education, Associate

Professor Bethany Rogers for the

Master’s degree Sequence 2 program in Secondary Education, Associate

Professor Nelly Tournaki for the Master’s degree Sequence 1 and 2 programs in Special Education Childhood (1-6) and the Master's degree in Special Education Adolescence Generalist (7-12), Associate Professor

Ruth Powers Silverberg for the Post-

Master’s Advanced

Certificate for Leadership in Education. Professor Susan Sullivan is the director of collaborative projects.

Department of English

Building 2S

Ashley Dawson, Chairperson and Professor

Distinguished Professor: Sarah Shulman

Professors: Frank Battaglia, Sarah Benesch, Janet Ng

Dudley, Maryann Feola, Timothy Gray, Hildegrad,

Department of History

Marchi Hall 2N

Eric Ivison, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Professors: Sandi Cooper, Samira Haj, Calvin B. Holder, Richard G. Powers, David Traboulay. Associate

Professors: Sandra Gambetti, Eric Ivison, Catherine

Lavender, Richard Lufrano, Jonathan Sassi, Susan

Smith-Peter, Howard Weiner. Assistant Professors:

Zara Anishanslin, John Dixon, Marcela Echeverri, Mark

Lewis, Emmanuel M. Mbah, Ben Mercer, John Wing.

The department offers a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in History. Its courses combine the traditional function of the scholarly examination of the past for its value in general education with the utilitarian concern for preparing students with the basic skills to enable them to live more meaningfully. It seeks to train future historians, to update the teaching of history by secondary school teachers, and to provide opportunities for lifelong education. History may also be taken as a minor. Associate Professor Sandra Gambetti coordinates the Master’s degree program in History and Professor David Traboulay coordinates the interdisciplinary

Master’s degree program in Liberal Studies.

The directors of two interdisciplinary Bachelor's degree programs reside in the History Department. They are

Assistant.Professor Emmanuel.Mbah

– African American Studies; and Associate Professor Catherine Lavender

– American Studies.

26 Divisions, Schools, and Departments

Department of Media Culture

Center for the Arts 1P

Ying Zhu, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: David Gerstner, Sherry Millner, Ying Zhu.

Associate Professors: Cynthia Chris, Michael Mandiberg, Edward Miller, Jason Simon, Valerie Tevere.

Cindy Wong. Assistant Professors: Christopher Anderson, Jillian Baez, Racquel Gates, Tara Matiek, Bilge

Yesil.

The department offers Ba chelor’s degrees in Cinema

Studies and in Communications, and a Master’s degree in Cinema and Media Studies. Programs in this department focus on the principles of media, interactions with the media, and the cultures dependent upon communications technologies. The department serves students interested in the history and theory of film and various electronic and computer-related media, and in producing works with these media. The program in

Communications is offered in collaboration with the Department of English. A minor is also awarded in the

Baccalaureate programs. The Master’s degree program in Cinema and Media Studies is coordinated by

Associate Professor Edward Miller.

The department offers a Bachelor's degree and a Minor

Philosophy; and it offers a dual major jointly with the

Department of Political Science and Global Affairs in

Philosophy and Political Science. Courses meet the needs of students in a variety of programs in the liberal arts and sciences, and the department’s programs provide a solid background for a number of careers as well as for graduate or professional school.

Department of Political Science and

Global Affairs

Marchi Hall 2N

Richard Flanagan, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Professors: Deborah Popper, Ming Xia. Associate

Professors: Richard Flanagan, Jane Marcus Delgado,

Peter Kabachnik, Michael Paris, Assistant Professors:

Aaron Gilbreath, Cary Karacas, Roshen Hendrickson,

Anat Niv-Solomon. Lecturer: James Falkin.

The departmen t offers a Bachelor’s degree in Political

Science. A dual major is offered jointly with the Department of Philosophy in Philosophy and Political Science. Minors are offered in Political Science, Public

Administration and Geography. Courses meet the needs of students in a variety of programs in the liberal arts and sciences, and the department’s programs provide a solid background for a number of careers as well as for graduate or professional school. Associate Professor Michael Paris is the adviser to students planning to apply to law school.

Department of Performing and Creative

Arts

Center for the Arts 1P

George Emilio Sanchez, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Sylvia Kahan, Nanette Salomon, George

Emilio Sanchez, Maurya Wickstrom. Associate Professors: Frank Galati, Tracey Jones, Beatrix Reinhardt,

Charles Thomas. Assistant Professors: William Bauer,

Kevin Judge, David Keberle, Marianne Weil, Siona Wilson. Lecturer: Michael Morreale. Higher Education Assistants: Craig Manister, Jennifer Straniere.

The department offers Bachelor’s degrees in Art, with a concentration in Photography; Dramatic Arts; and Music; with concentrations in Classical Performance, Theory and Literature, Music Technology, and Jazz Studies and Performance with the BS in Music; and a Dramatic

Literature concentration jointly with the Department of

English. Students may minor in Art, Dance, Dramatic

Arts, Music and Photography; a program for Psychology majors interested in dance therapy provides for a minor in Dance.

The department serves the needs of students who wish to pursue both the practice and the theory of the arts. In addition to preparing students majoring in the arts and those planning to continue in graduate school, the department’s courses meet the needs and interests of students in the liberal arts and sciences and in career programs, and foster the role of the arts within the framework of a liberal education.

Department of Psychology

Building 4S

John Lawrence, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Patricia Brooks, Benjamin Kest, John Lawrence, Edward Meehan, Nan Sussman, Bertram Ploog .

Associate Professors: Sarah Berger, Florette Cohen,

Kathleen (Katie) Cumiskey, Joel Erblich, Darryl Hill, Judith Kuppersmith, Irina Sekerina. Assistant Professors:

Comfort Asanbe, Rima Blair, Kristen Gillespie-Lynch,

Sandra Hunt, Lana Karasik, Dan McCloskey, Lauren

Rogers-Sirin, Jennifer Wagner. Lecturer: Peter Costa and Frances Melendez. Senior College Laboratory

Technician: Joanne Camhi. Higher Education Assistant: Victoria Baker.

The department offers both Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. Students can also earn a minor in psychology which can be combined with many other majors. In addtion, the department offers the Master of

Arts degree in Mental Health Counseling. The department participates in the Master’s program in Neuroscience, Mental Retardation, and Developmental Disabilities.

Department of Philosophy

Marchi Hall 2N

Mark D. White, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Peter Simpson, Mark White. Associate

Professors: Robert Lovering, Barbara Montero. Assistant Professors: Stephen Morris.

Department of Sociology,

Anthropology, and Social Work

Building 4S

Arthur (Leigh) Binford, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Roslyn Bologh, Kate Crehan, Christine,

Flynn Saulnier, David Goode. Associate Professors:

Sondra Brandler, Jeffrey Bussolini, Rafael De La

Dehesa, Ismael Garcia-Colon, Jean Halley Grace

Mitchell-Cho, Anaya Mukherjea, Phil Sigler, Lacey

Sloan, Saadia Toor. Assistant Professors: John Arena,

Vandana Chaudhry, Francesca Degiuli, Ozlem Goner,

Hosu Kim, Don Selby,Thomas Volscho. Lecturer:

Patti Gross, Kari Meyer

The department offers a combined Bachelor’s degree in

Sociolog y/Anthropology, and the Bachelor’s degree in

Social Work. A minor is offered in Sociology. The department also participates in interdisciplinary major/minors in Disability Studies; Liberal Studies (MA);

Science, Letters, and Society; and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies. The Co-Coordinator of Latin

American, Caribbean, and Latina/o Studies is Associate

Ismael Garcia-Colon.

Department of World Languages and

Literatures

Building 2S

Gerry Milligan, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Professors: Giancarlo Lombardi, Francisco Soto,

Kathryn Talarico. Associate Professors: Gerry Milligan, Jane Marcus-Delgado, Nuria Morgado. Assistant

Professors: Jill Jegerski, Chao Li, Lucas

Marchante-Aragon, Felipe Martinez-Pinzon, Sarah Pollack, Noelle Rouxel-Cubberly, Paola Ureni, Oswaldo

Zavala. Lecturers: Dorey Houle, Alberto Zambenedetti.

Director, Modern Languages Media Center: Valeria

Belmonti.

The department offers programs of study leading to

Bachelor of Arts degrees in Italian Studies and Spanish; minior in Chinese, French, and Spanish. Courses are also offered in American Sign Language and Arabic.

The programs are designed to give students knowledge about the literature and culture of the language studied, in addition to linguistic competence.

The director of the International Studies program is Associate Professor Jane Marcus-Delgado. This interdisciplinary program offers the option of a major or minor course of study. The director of the Science Letters and Society program is Professor Francisco Soto. The

Co-Coordinator of the Certificate Latin American, Caribbean, and Latina/o Studies Program is Assistant Professor Sarah Pollack.

Divisions, Schools, and Departments 27

28 Divisions, Schools, and Departments

Division of Science and Technology

The Division of Science and Technology includes the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Computer

Science, Engineering Science and Physics, Library,

Mathematics, Nursing, and Physical Therapy.

Department of Biology

Building 6S

Abdeslem El Idrissi, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Alejandra del Carmen Alonso, Frank Burbrink, Gregory Cheplick, Leonard Ciaccio, Abdeslem El

Idrissi, Charles Karmer, William L’Amoreaux, Jacqueline

LeBlanc, William Wallace, Andrzej Wieraszko. Associate Professors: Cesar Arenas-Mena, Robert Corin,

Margaret Dooley, Elena McCoy, John Oppenheimer,

Chang-Hui Shen. Assistant Professors: Jimmie Fata,

Jianying Gu, Lisa Manne, Shibal Mitra, Eugenia

Naro-Maciel. Lecturers: Rebecca Chamberlain, Carol

Hartman. Chief College Lab Technician: Emmel (Tom)

Brown. Senior College Lab Technicians: Cassandra

Camillio, Kinnea Keating. College Lab Technicians:

Ileana D’Aversa, Lisa Ghigliotti, Natalie Thompson.

The department offers the

Bachelor’s degree in Biology,

Biology with options in Bioinformatics and Adolescent

Education and a Master of Science degree in Biology.

The department participates in the joint program for the

Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry and a minor in Biochemistry, and in the interdisciplinary program leading to the Bachelor’s degree in Medical Technology. The department is active in the University's Doctoral program in Biology, with many students in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior and Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; and Neuroscience. The Medical

Technology program utilizes hospital affiliations accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS).

The MS program in Biology is coordinated by Professor

Frank Burbrink. Assistant Professor Jimmie Fata serves as Chair of the advisory committee for pre-medicine students.

Bachelor’s degree in Medical Technology. The University’s Doctoral program in Polymer Chemistry is coordinated by Professor Nan-Loh Yang.

Department of Computer Science

Building 1N

Louis Petingi, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Bernard Domanski, Natacha Gueorguieva,Michael Kress, Mohamed Yousef. Associate Professors: Emile Chi, Yumei Huo, John Owens, Herbert

Schanker, Deborah Sturm, Sarah Zelikovitz, Shuqun

Zhang, Zhanyang Zhang. Assistant Professors: Marianne Carlin, Anatoliy Gordonov, Susan Imberman,

Xiaowen Zhang. Lecturer: Roberta Klibaner. Senior

College Lab Technicians: Orit Gruber, Chang Guo.

The department offers programs leading to the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Computer Science. The

Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science/Mathematics is offered jointly with the Department of Mathematics; the

Bachelor’s degree in Information Systems is offered jointly with the Department of Business; and the department participates in the University Doctoral program. Baccalaureate students majoring in other disciplines may also minor in Computer Science. The department offers an Associate’s degree program in

Computer Technology that provides sound career preparation as well as a solid foundation for continued study in the field. Faculty in the department participate with the Interdisciplinary Coordinating Committee for the

Associate in Applied Science degree program in Electrical Engineering Technology. The Bachelors program in Computer Science is accredited by the Computer

Science Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET.

Assistant Professor Anatoliy Gordonov is coordinator of the Master's degree program.

Department of Chemistry

Building 6S

Chairperson and Professor Qiao-Sheng Hu

Distinguished Professor: Fred Naider

Professors: Probal Banerjee, Qiao-Sheng Hu, Michal

Kruk, Alan Lyons, John Olsen, Chwen-Yang Shew,

Nan-Loh Yang, Shuiqin Zhou. Associate Professors:

Ralf Peetz. Assistant Professors: Myra Hauben, Shi

Jin, Areben Jusufi, Sharon Loverde, Krishnaswami Raja, Sebastien Poget. Chief College Lab Technician: Tai

Park. Senior College Lab Technician: Soa Thu Dang,

Abraham Malz. College Lab Technicians: Carol (Huiyu)

Liu.

The department offers the Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry and participates in the joint program leading to the

Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry. Minors are offered in

Chemistry and Biochemistry. The department also participates in the interdisciplinary program leading to the

Department of Engineering Science and

Physics

Building 1N

Alfred Levine, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Erlan Feria, William Fritz, Anshel

Gorokhovsky, Anatoly Kuklov, Alfred Levine, William

Monaghan, Elliot Rothkopf, Syed Rizvi, William

Schreiber, José Torres, Alexandre Zaitsev. Associate

Professors: Neophytos Antoniades, Satyaprakash Das,

James Hladek, Xin (Jessica) Jiang, Athanasios Koutavas, Lihong Li, Charles Liu, Chang-Min Kim, Vadim

Oganesyan, Dwight Richards, Irving Robbins, Leonard

Winkler. Adjunct Associate Professor: Anatoly

Fonarev. Assistant Professors: Anderson Ohan, Emily

Rice, Yasha Yi. Lecturers: Jane Alexander, Alan

Benimoff. Senior College Lab Technicians: Tracy

Campbell, Jackeline Figueroa, Stephen Gundry. College

Lab Technician: Valerie DeAngelo

The department offers programs leading to the Bachelor’s degree in Engineering Science and in Physics and participates in the University Doctoral program in Physics, Engineering, Astrophysics, and Environmental Science. The Associate’s degree is offered in Engineering

Science in Applied Science degree program in Electrical

Engineering Technology. Courses in astronomy, geolo-

Divisions, Schools, and Departments 29 gy, and integrated science are offered by the department, and faculty in the department direct the programs and research at the Astrophysical Observatory. The BS in Engineering Science is accredited by the Engineering

Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for

Engineering and Technology (ABET), and the Electrical

Engineering Technology program is accredited by the

Technology Accrediting Commission of ABET. The interdisciplinary Master’s degree program in Environmental Science is coordinated by Professor Alfred Levine.

Department of the Library

Library 1L

Wilma Jones, Chief Librarian and Professor

Professors: James Kaser, Linda Roccos. Associate

Professors: Rebecca Adler Schiff, Judy Xiao. Assistant

Professors: Jonathan Cope, Ewa Dzurak, Naomi Gold,

Timothy Hasin, Elizabeth Hicks, Andrew Leykam, Mark

Aaron Polger, Amy Stempler. Lecturer: Rachel Jirka.

Higher Education Officer: Mark Lewental. Higher Education Assistant: Antonio Gallego. College Lab Technicians: Brian Farr, Stanley Zimmerman. The Library supports the entire range of academic programs at the

College through its collections, periodical subscriptions, and microforms. Computer facilities for database searching provide access to City University and national catalogs. The Library’s own resources are supplemented by an array of modern networking arrangements at regional, state, and national levels. The Library is the center for the implementation of multimedia programs in pedagogy.

Department of Mathematics

Building 1S

John Verzani Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Jane Coffee, Antonia Foldes, Joel Hamkins, Carlo Lancellotti, Prabudh Misra, Joseph Newmark, Andrew Poje, Arundhati Raychaudhuri, Jay

Rosen, John Verzani. Associate Professors:

Jean-Claude Derderian, Deborah Franzblau, Gunter

Fuchs, Sherman Heller, Ilya Kofman, Joseph Maher,

Wladimir Pribitkin, Tobias Schaefer, Stephen Wollman.

Assistant Professors: Abhibit Champanerskar, Zheng

Huang, , Marcello Lucia, Kevin O’Bryant, Sidney Richard, Calandra R. Tate Moore, Alan Tesdall, Jesenko

Vukadinovic. Lecturer: Louis Blois, Mohammad

Talafha. Higher Education Assistants: Dorothy Manganel, Lewis Carbonaro.

Natalie Fischetti, Barbara Griffiths, Eleanor Kehoe, Susan Mee, Angela Sammarco. Instructors: June Como,

Dawn Fairlie, Marie Giordano. Distinguished Lecturer:

Janice Pattison. Lecturers: Karen Arca Contreras,

Danna L. Curcio, Regina Gonzalez Lama, Nora Maloney, Estelle Press, Barbara Schiano, Danna Sims.

Senior College Lab Technician: Eileen Quagliano.

The department offers an upper-division program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing, a

Master of Science degree program in Adult Health

Nursing, and the Post-

Master’s Advanced Certificate in

Adult Health Nursing, Cultural Competence, Gerontological Nursing, and Nursing Education. The department also offers an Associate’s degree program that prepares students for the New York State Board of Nursing Examination for license as a Registered Nurse. The Associate’s degree, Bachelor’s degree, and Master’s degree programs are accredited by the National League for

Nursing Accrediting Commission and all programs hold

New York State Certification. Health education courses and courses fulfilling the Physical Education requirement are offered by this department. Professor Margaret

Lunney is coordinator of the Master’s degree program in

Adult Health Nursing.

Department of Physical Therapy

Building 5N, Room 207

Jeffrey Rothman, Chairperson and Professor

Professor: Maria Knikou. Associate Professors:

Maureen Becker. Assistant Professors: Zaghloul Ahmed, Michael Chiacchiero, Wei Zhang.

The College of Staten Island offers a clinical Doctoral program in Physical Therapy leading to the Doctorate in

Physical Therapy (DPT). The DPT Program is accredited by the Commission of Accreditation in Physical

Therapy Education (CAPTE).

The department offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and the Bachelor of Science degree in

Computer Science-Mathematics jointly with the Department of Computer Science. A minor in Mathematics is available for students with majors in other disciplines.

Department of Nursing

Marcus Hall 5S

Mary O’Donnell, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Professors: Eileen Gigliotti, Marianne Jeffreys, Margaret

Lunney, Mary Ellen McMorrow. Associate Professors:

Arlene Farren, Howard Peirano. Assistant Professors:

30 Divisions, Schools, and Departments

School of Business

The School of Business includes the following departments: Accounitng and Finance, Econoimcs, Management and Marketing.

Department of Accounting and Finance

Building 3N

Jonathan Peters, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Max Gottlieb, Laura Nowak. Associate

Professors: Baruch Englard, Jihazhuo Wang. Assistant Professors: Deborah Brickman, Patricia Galleta, Barry Martin, Mary Recor, John Sandler, Cynthia

Scarinci

The department offers Associate, Bachelor, and Master-level degree programs. The Associate's degree is offered with options in Accouting, Finance. Graduates with an AAS degree may enter the job market directly or continue to study toward the bachelor's degree, and should consult and adviser and plan their programs accordingly. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in

Accounting, and in Business with concentrations in Finance. The Bachelor's degree program in Accounting prepares students for careers in accounting and advanced study toward the CPA examination. The Master's degree program in Accounting is coordinated by

Assistant Professor John Sandler.

Department of Marketing

Building 3N

Thomas Tellefsen, Chairperson and Professor

Professors: Susan Holak, Alan Zimmerman. Associate

Professors: Soon Chun, Paul Herskovitz. Assistant

Professors: Dan Zhang. Lecturers: Daniel Gagliardi.

The department offers Associate, Bachelor-level degree programs. The Associate's degree is offered with an option in Marketing

Department of Economics

Building 3N

Vasilios Petratos, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Associate Professors: Alexandru Voicu, Simone

Wegge, Chu-Ping C. Vijverberg. Assistant Professors:

Kristen Mammen, John Osakue, George Vachadze.

Lecturer: Linda Coull.

The department offers Bachelor of Science degrees in

Economics. In cooperation with the School of Business, a Business and Finance Concentrations are offered within the Bachelor’s degree program in Economics.

Department of Management

Building 3N

Gordon DiPaolo, Chairperson and Associate Professor

Professors: Eugene Garaventa. Associate Professors:

Dorothy Lang. Assistant Professors: Deepa Aravind,

Heidi Bertels, Alexei Matveev. Lecturers: George

Stern, Jr.

The department offers Associate, Bachelor, and Master-level degree programs. The Associate's degree is offered with an option in Management. Graduates with an AAS degree may enter the job market directly or continue to study toward the bachelor's degree, and should consult and adviser and plan their programs accordingly. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in

Business with a concentration in Management. The

Master's degree program in Business Management is coordinated by Professor Eugene Garaventa.

Division of Student Affairs 31

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

Division of Student Affairs

Building 1A, Room 301

Vice President, A. Ramona Brown

718.982.2335

The Division of Student Affairs is concerned with all aspects of student life at the College and provides a comprehensive program of support services that includes orientation, counseling, career development, job placement, and the SEEK program. The Division coordinates student recruitment and admissions, student activities, services for disabled students, the CLUE program, pluralism and diversity programming, the scholarship and internship programs, health services, intercollegiate and intramural sports, and the Commencement exercises.

Management of the Sports and Recreation Center,

Campus Center, and the Center for the Arts are under the auspices of the Division. The Division of Student

Affairs offers courses in Issues in College Life, Career

Development, and Personal Growth and Development, and internships.

Assistance with the fellowship, scholarship, and special opportunity application process is provided as well as review of mission statements and personal essays that may be required for select fellowship and graduate school applications.

Career coaching is available to students who are unsure about their career choice. Career assessment testing for first year students is available through the Pathfinder

Program, which is now administered by the Center for

Advising and Academic Success.

Career-related workshops are given throughout the year and computers are available to students who want to access the database of full- and part-time jobs, internships, and fellowships.

Campus Center

Building 1C

The Campus Center draws together all members of the

College of the Staten Island community. It is a shared possession of the students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. While each of these groups is important, it is the students who are at the heart of what the Campus

Center is about. The Campus Center is the focal point of extra- and co-curricular student life. It houses the Office of Student Life, the CSI Student Government, student clubs, student publications, the CSI Association

Inc., and the Auxiliary Services Corporation. Such services as the Bookstore, Cafeteria, Park Café, the College Health Center, the Wellness Program, and the

Peer Drop-in Center are located in the Campus Center.

Lounges for entertainment and studying, a computer lab, a video game room, conference and meeting rooms, and locker rentals are available for student use.

WSIA-FM (88.9) broadcasts from the Campus Center.

Questions regarding use of facilities and locker rentals may be directed to the Campus Center, Room 201. The telephone number is 718.982.3071.

The Career and Scholarship Center

Building 1A, Room 105

The Center assists current students and graduates with their career, internship, and placement needs. Résumé critique and referral, mock interviews, on-campus employer recruitment, collegiate job fairs and the Senior

Employment Referral Program help students to meet their employment goals.

Students seeking an internship can review a database of over 400 internship opportunities and can learn about the Summer Internship Stipend Program and internship referral program.

Children's Center

Building 2R

The Children's Center is sponsored by the CSI Association and provides early education and childcare services for students who may be attending classes, working, participating in other school-related activities, or who need personal time. The programs for infants/toddlers and preschool children are licensed by the Bureau of

Day Care of the NYC Department of Health and Mental

Hygiene. The program for school-age children is registered with the School Age Division of the NYS Office of

Children and Family Services. The Center is funded through the Student Activity Fee; city, state, and federal grant money; and parent fees. For further information please call 718.982.3190

www.csi.cuny.edu/childcare. or visit

Clubs and Organizations

The CSI Student Government and the Office of Student

Life charter and recognize student clubs and organizations. Any group of students with a common interest may request a charter for a student club or organization from the Student Government Office, and students may join any of the existing groups that receive a charter each year. Members of clubs associate around a broad range of interests and identifications. Approximately 40 clubs are organized by students with common interests rising out of academic studies, social commitments, or personal values. Sports-related clubs file for a charter initially with Student Government before applying for funding from the Intramural and Recreation Program.

The telephone number is 718.982.3088.

College of Staten Island Association,

Inc.

The College of Staten Island Association, Inc. is a non-profit corporation that administers the Student Activity Fee. The Association is governed by a board of directors comprised of six students, three administrators, three faculty, and the President or designee. The

32 Division of Student Affairs

Association allocates designated portions of the Fee, traditionally applied to graduation exercises, intercollegiate athletics and intramural programs, the Children's

Center, Health and Wellness, WSIA, and the Campus

Activities Board.

www.csi.cuny.edu/cix/index.php and click on the appropriate links, or visit

www.csi.cuny.edu/currentstudents and select the link

“Look up CSI's email & Login ID to access CSI's computers.

Counseling Services

Building 1A, Room 109

The Counseling Center provides personal and academic counseling services for students at the College of Staten

Island. Students are given the opportunity to explore issues that can help them to achieve success. Professionally trained counselors provide individual and group counseling to address various issues that affect academic performance and experiences in college and one's personal life. With a few legal exceptions, counseling is a confidential process. Personal counseling is designed to help students address concerns, come to a greater understanding of themselves, and develop effective strategies for dealing with life's challenges. Academic counseling assists students with maximizing their academic performance. Counselors help students with a variety of issues that affect academic success such as test anxiety, time management, study strategies, and concentration.

Center for Student Accessibility

Center for the Arts (1P)

The Center for Student Accessibility has responsibility for providing reasonable accommodations and services to students with a documented disability. The Center also serves as a resource for faculty and staff in their work with CSI students with disabilities. To qualify for services, students must submit documentation to the

Center and request services. All documentation is kept confidential and should be submitted directly to the

Center. Services include pre-admissions counseling and accessibility information, advisement, priority registration, and testing accommodations. Assistive technology software, scientific calculators, audio recorders, and assistance in facilitating the use of alternate formats are also available. The Resource Center for the Deaf serves the specific needs of deaf and hard of hearing students providing interpreters and CART services to students who are hard-of-hearing. Interpreters are available for academic advisement, conferences with professors, and other College business. The College's policy for students with disabilities conforms to federal guidelines and the Center offers services mandated by federal and state law. All students with disabilities are encouraged to use the services of the Center. Services are also available to students who are temporarily disabled.

Intercollegiate and Intramural

Athletics

CSI fields women's and men's teams in competition throughout the East Coast, primarily in the New

York/New Jersey metropolitan area. Team and individual sports include men's and women's cross-country, basketball, swimming, tennis, and soccer; men's baseball; and women's softball and volleyball. The College is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association

(NCAA Division III), the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC), and The City University of New York

Athletic Conference (CUNYAC). The intercollegiate athletic program is supported by funding from the CSI Association.

To be eligible for intercollegiate competition, a student must be matriculated as a full-time student. The following criteria must also be met.

1. Proof of good health; physician's examination and review by CSI medical staff;

2. Good Academic Standing - Incoming students must meet the CSI Index for baccalaureate eligibility. For continuing student-athletes having acquired over 12 credits, good academic standing is defined as a minimum 2.0 cumulative Grade Point Average.

3. Maintenance of satisfactory progress toward completion of a bachelor's degree. For continuing student-athletes, this requires successful completion of a minimum of eight credits in the semester previous to the semester of competition in order to meet satisfactory progress requirements. For two-semester sports (Basketball, Swimming and Diving), this requires successful completion of a minimum of eight credits during each semester. Students completing less than eight credits in a required semester who can show good cause may appeal to the committee on student athlete appeals one time during their collegiate playing career.

The recreational and intramural sports program provides opportunities for all students, staff, and faculty to participate in individual and team sports, including competitive, non-competitive, and recreational.

Email Accounts

The Office of Technology Systems will generate a College email/computer login account for all currently registered students. If you have any questions or forget your password after changing it, come to the Library

(1L), Room 204. A validated student ID card is required.

For more information, please call 718.982.4080, visit

Liberty Partnerships Program

The program is a collaborative effort of the College and the Staten Island Branch of the New York Urban

League, the local school district, and community-based organizations and individuals that provides a broad range of educational, enrichment, and support services for high school students who are at risk of dropping out of school.

Division of Student Affairs 33

Ombudsperson

Building 1A, Room 301

Reporting to the Vice President for Student Affairs, the

Ombudsperson is authorized to investigate student concerns and to make recommendations regarding the outcome of those investigations. The Ombudsperson, available to all students enrolled at the College, is a source of information about College policies and procedures and, in certain situations, will provide mediation and advocacy services. Students may be advised to visit other College offices to file official student concerns as well. grams that culturally enlighten, intellectually stimulate, and entertain. The planning and decision making process is one in which students learn many skills, especially those related to working with other students on campus-wide projects. Proposals for programs, events, and activities may be made by students and members of the College community. The telephone number is

718.982.3268.

The Ombudsperson helps students to develop positive strategies to resolve problems and conflicts and acts as a neutral party to hear any type of student concern or dispute related to the College.

The Office deals with academic matters such as grade appeals, accusations of cheating and plagiarism, faculty/student disputes, and non-academic matters such as billing disagreements, conduct issues, campus issues, and interpersonal conflict. This is not a comprehensive list, as it is understood that each individual may have concerns and needs that are unique.

Students can file an official complaint or put information

“on the record” at the Office of the Ombudsperson.

New Student Orientation/College Life

Unit Experience (CLUE) Program

Building 2A, Room 208

The New Student Orientation/CLUE Office maintains up-to-date records on students' progress toward meeting the New Student Orientation Requirement as described in the Catalog section on Degree Requirements.

Students may obtain information about current and planned CLUE-certified events, programs, and activities, and may also check on their status in meeting the requirement. Two enrichment programs called CLUE

Challenge and CLUE Pathways encourage students to commit themselves to a broad involvement in the out-of-the-classroom life of the College and its surrounding community. Information about orientation and the CLUE program is available at the CLUE Office.

The telephone number is 718.982.2529.

Publications

Students at CSI publish a biweekly newspaper, The

Banner; a political journal, The College Voice; a politics and literary arts magazine, Third Rail; an art and literature magazine, Serpentine/Artifacts; a literary journal,

Caesura; and the Dolphin yearbook. Publications are funded by Student Activity Fees allocated through the

Publication Board. Students interested in participating in the production of these publications as writers, photographers, editors, or layout artists, or in starting new publications are invited to visit the publications' offices or the Office of Student Life in the Campus Center.

The Percy Ellis Sutton SEEK

Program

Building 1A, Room 112

The Percy Ellis Sutton SEEK Program Director Gloria

Garcia

The SEEK Program (Search for Education, Elevation, and Knowledge) is a New York State program for residents who are in need of both academic and financial assistance in order to obtain a college education. Information about the program and the application process may be obtained from the SEEK Office. The telephone number is 718.982.2410 or visit our Website:

www.csi.cuny.edu/seek.

Sports and Recreation Center

Building 1R

The Sports and Recreation Center houses a full range of facilities and equipment for individual and team sports and games: a gymnasium with seating capacity for

1,200 spectators, an auxiliary gymnasium, two fitness rooms, racquetball courts, and a 25-meter pool. Outdoor facilities include a track, tennis courts, and ball fields.

Pluralism and Diversity

Building 2A, Room 208

The Office of Pluralism and Diversity seeks to develop in all aspects of the College's activities a climate that fosters respect for the pluralism and diversity of U.S. society. The Office offers programming, workshops, and training sessions on sensitivity and diversity. The telephone number is 718.982.2897.

Campus Activities Board (CAB)

The Campus Activities Board, a joint committee of the

CSI Association and the CSI Student Government, is a student programming board that allocates a designated portion of the Student Activity Fee for social, cultural, and educational programs. The board develops pro-

Student Life

Campus Center (1C), Room 201

The Office of Student Life assists and advises students involved in student organizations, governance committees, and campus activities to develop a rich and diverse co-curricular campus life. The Student Life team also involves staff from the CSI Association, the Student

Government, and the Campus Activities Board. The Office sponsors leadership programs for chartered clubs and the general student population and is responsible for the operations of the Campus Center. The telephone number is 718.982.3088.

34 Division of Student Affairs

Student Government

The College of Staten Island Student Government is composed of 20 representatives (senators) elected by the student body each spring semester. Organized into commissions with a specific mandate (e.g., Academic and Curricular Affairs; Clubs; Elections; Finance;

Part-time, Evening, and Weekend Students; Student

Center; and Student Services), the Student Government represents student interests to the administration and faculty of the College and serves as an advocate for student services. Through its commissions, the Student

Government charters and funds all student clubs and associations, administers student elections, allocates a designated portion of the Student Activity Fee, advocates for the special needs of students, and advises the

College on the utilization of Campus Center space to serve students in their co-curricular activities. Student

Government senators serve on planning and decision making committees with faculty and members of the CSI administration. The telephone number is 718.982.3082.

Health Center and Wellness Program

Campus Center (1C), Room 111

Health and Wellness Services provides prevention and treatment services to enhance health and encourage healthy lifestyle decisions. In collaboration with Staten

Island University Hospital, nurse practitioners provide episodic treatment for acute health problems, first aid, college related physicals, immunizations, and tuberculosis skin test (PPD). Rapid confidential HIV testing services, pregnancy testing, and blood pressure checks are also available. This office provides confidential health education appointments with professional staff, student-centered health information, educational outreach programs and a peer education program. Health promotion events include wellness fairs, blood drives, as well as special health-screening events. Services are partially funded by the Student Activity Fee. The telephone number is 718.982.3045.

WSIA - 88.9 FM

Campus Center (1C), Room 106

WSIA, the only radio station on Staten Island, is licensed to the College. The station is staffed by student volunteers working under the guidance of professional staff and broadcasts at 88.9 FM. The state-of-the-art studios, include a digital recording facility, music studio, computerized news operation, and a 40,000-volume record and CD collection. Station programming emphasizes diverse and creative music, local news and public affairs, and Staten Island sports. Students interested in working as DJs, newscasters, sportscasters, and engineers should visit the studio and fill out an application.

The telephone number is 718.982.3050.

Office of Academic Affairs 35

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Office of Academic Affairs

Building 1A, Room 305

Interim Senior Vice President and Provost, Fred Naider

718.982.2440

www.csi.cuny.ed/administration/academicaffairs/

As the College’s chief academic officer, the Provost provides vision, leadership, and oversight to the maintenance and development of quality academic programs including support for the development of a distinguished faculty in both the liberal arts and sciences and professional studies and support of faculty research and graduate education at the master’s and doctoral levels.

March and October) is designed to provide students with ample opportunity to discuss their educational plans and to complete their upcoming semester’s course selection process. Prior to the Priority Registration Period (each April and November), students receive notification of the priority registration access date.

Students should meet with their advisor to complete their educational plans, have their Advisement Stop removed, and prepare to complete their registration process at least 3 weeks before their priority registration access date.

The Provost reports directly to the President and is the ranking member of the executive management team, with responsibility for all academic units and departments. The Provost is responsible for promoting academic excellence and for assuring that students have access to intellectual and practical experiences that will enrich their lives and prepare them for their post-collegiate careers.

Adults Returning to College Program

(ARC)

Office of Recruitment and Admissions, Building 2A,

Room 103

The College offers a gateway program for first time and returning degree track adult students. The ARC (Adults

Returning to the Classroom) program provides personalized, comprehensive support services from pre-admission counseling to registration. The goals of the ARC program is to facilitate a seamless transition for non-traditional students into the College.

Center for Advising and Academic

Success (CAAS)

“Empowering Proactice Learning and Providing the

Foundation for Lifelong Success

Paulette Brower-Garrett, Director, Building (1A), Room

101

The Center for Advising and Academic Success (CAAS) is responsible for teaching the principles and philosophy of general education and its relevance in curricula.

CAAS provides advisement support to new students, matriculated continuing students who have earned less than 45 credits and to students who are declared as

Associate Degree Liberal Art majors. Committed to utilizing the most effective advisement practices in support of student academic success, it empowers students to proactively become involved in their own educational experience.

Here, while students find academic assistance with educational goal planning, major, minor, and career identification, general education requirements, DegreeWorks

(the degree audit self-advisement tool), TAP eligibility and academic policies and regulations; faculty can find assistance with advisor training and development and evening & weekend services. Additionally, CAAS is responsible for administration of the Pathfinder Program, a career exploration workshop series designed to help students determine potential career pathways and related academic majors. Further information about advisement, Pathfinder, and other services can be found at www.csi.cuny.ed/academicadvisement.

All students assigned faculty or professional advisors are required to meet with an advisor minimally once each semester. The Early Advisement Period (each

Alumni Relations

Associate Director, Jennifer Lynch, Building 1A, Room

111

The Office of Alumni Relations maintains contact with alumni through ongoing social, educational, athletic, and cultural events.

The Office also assists the CSI Alumni Association and its elected Board of Directors, who serve as the representative voice for over 50,000 alumni worldwide. The

Alumni Association was established in 1980 and its mission is dedicated to promoting a lifelong spirit of pride, fellowship, loyalty, and learning among alumni, students, and the community.

All persons who have a degree or six-year certificate from CSI or its predecessor institutions, Richmond College and Staten Island Community College, are members of the Alumni Association. Alumni seeking further information or wishing to obtain a permanent alumni photo ID are invited to call 718.982.2290, email alum-

[email protected] or visit the Office.

Center for the Arts

Center for the Arts 1P, Room 116

Director, John Jankowski

The Center for the Arts contains, in the instructional wing, the Department of Performing and Creative Arts, the Department of Media Culture, studios, performance and rehearsal spaces, a screening room, a studio theater, film and video production facilities, and laboratories for communications and graphics. The workshops in-

36 Office of Academic Affairs clude facilities for print making, painting, sculpture, photography, electronic music, and recording.

The Center for the Arts is home to the Clara and Arleigh

B. Williamson Theatre, a 430-seat proscenium-stage theater; the 893-seat Concert Hall; the 150-seat Recital

Hall; the 150-seat Lecture Hall; the 150-seat Lab Theatre for student productions; the CFA Atrium; the Conference Room; the Art Gallery, for major exhibitions; and the Student Art Gallery. Each academic year, the CFA presents a full schedule of innovative performing and visual arts public programming that features guest artists, CSI arts faculty, and CSI art students. The CFA also administers a theater rental program open to the

Staten Island community.

Menéndez Pelayo in Santanden, Spain; IPAG in Nice and Paris, France; Seinan Gakuin University in Fukuoka, Japan; and Dublin Institute of Technology in Ireland.

Overseas study programs in more than 25 countries are open to CSI students through membership in the College Consortium for International Studies.

There is no foreign language prerequisite; however, students are required to study the language of the country and are placed in courses suitable to their ability. A minimum grade point average of 2.5 is required for participation in most of the CSI-sponsored study abroad programs. The staff provides assistance and information about admissions, financial aid, orientation, and re-entry. To prepare effectively for participation in the program, students are encouraged to investigate the overseas study opportunities early in their academic careers. Most student financial aid plans are applicable to study abroad programs and special scholarship funds are available for eligible students.

Center for International Service

Building 2A, Room 206

Director, Stephen M. Ferst

The Center for International Service encourages and supports the international component of the academic life of the College. The Center provides direction and assistance in matters affecting the College’s international student population, sponsors study abroad programs, directs scholar and student exchange programs, and facilitates international development programs.

Guidance for the Center’s activities is provided by a faculty advisory committee.

International Faculty Activities

The Center coordinates a faculty exchange program with Shanghai University in China on behalf of The City

University. The Center also has responsibility for CSI exchange programs and faculty development activities and international projects in various countries.

On-campus programs for faculty and students include the World on Wednesday lecture series, International

Education Week Events, and special programs.

English Language Institute (ELI)

Building 2A, Room 206

Academic Coordinator, Joanne Riggio

The Institute, a member of the American Association of

Intensive English Programs, offers intensive English language study and programs in American language and culture to international students and professionals.

The Institute is supported by course fees. Admission to the English Language Institute does not constitute admission to the College.

College Advancement

Building 1A, Room 401

Vice President for Institutional College Advancement,

Barbara Eshoo

The Office of College Advancement is responsible for advancing the mission of the College and developing financial support for the College from alumni, faculty and staff, the community, and private industry. The CSI

Foundation, Inc. was established to provide leadership and volunteer assistance to the College in its fundraising programs.

Foreign Student and Scholar Services

The staff, serving foreign students and scholars, processes immigration documentation; facilitates admission procedures; provides academic advisement, counseling, adjustment, and orientation to college life in the U.S.; and assists in off-campus housing.

Study Abroad Programs

The Center offers a variety of study abroad programs for undergraduate credit only with partner institutions around the world including the following: Nanjing University, Shanghai University, and the City University of

Hong Kong in China; the Danish Institute for Study

Abroad (DIS) in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Catholic

University of Guayaquil and the University of San Francisco de Quito in Ecuador; Middlesex University in London, England; The American College of Thessaloniki in

Greece; Scuola Lorenzo deMedici in Florence and

Tuscania, The American University of Rome, and the

Istituto Venezia in Italy; the Universidad Internacional

Collegiate Science and Technology

Entry Program (CSTEP)

The CSTEP program seeks to increase enrollment and graduation, among historically underrepresented students, in undergraduate and graduate programs leading to professional licensure or to careers in the fields of science, technology, and education at the College of

Staten Island (CSI). Through exposure to research opportunities in technology, scientific research, and teaching, CSTEP students will begin to view themselves as professionals and will help to reshape the culture of these professional fields as they reach their desired career goals.

The CSTEP Program is designed for New York State residents, including permanent residents, who must be full-time students and have good academic standing, which includes a 2.75 grade point average and enroll-

Office of Academic Affairs 37 ment in an approved scientific, technical, heath-related, pre-professional, or professional undergraduate or graduate program of study. Students must be of African,

Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native descent or be economically disadvantaged (based on criteria established by New York State.) Students enrolled in State-funded opportunity programs (AMP,

HEOP, EOP, SEEK, or College Discovery) are also eligible to participate in the CSTEP program. my program. Students in the Teacher Education Honors

Academy are eligible for financial and academic assistance and for internships in middle and high schools.

Please see the section on academic requirements for

Admissions to Teacher Education Honors Academy.

Discovery Institute

Building 1A, Room 211

Acting Director Charles Gomes

CUNY Language Immersion Program

Building 4N, Room 210

Coordinator: Elizabeth Schade

The CUNY Language Immersion Program (CLIP) is an intensive English language program for students who are non-native speakers of English and have been admitted to a CUNY college but have not passed the

CUNY reading and/or writing assessment tests. CLIP offers students the opportunity to spend more time learning English in an academic environment before formally enrolling in or returning to college courses.

CLIP provides a full-time immersion approach to English language study that does not draw upon a student's financial aid allocation; students pay only a nominal fee for the program.

The Discovery Institute offers several pre-college programs that strengthen the academic preparation of students while they are still in high school and others that encourage college students to consider teaching careers. The Institute also provides opportunities for teachers to develop new teaching strategies. The programs are supported by the resources of the College and by grants from a variety of state, federal, and private institutions.

Evening, Weekend, and Summer

Services

“Empowering Proactice Learning and Providing the

Foundation for Lifelong Success

Building 1A, Room 101

Coordinator, Thomas Brennan

College Success Initiative

Building 1A, Room 310

Coordinator: Debra Evans-Greene

The College Success Initiative is the Black Male Initiative Program (BMI) at the College of Staten Island.

This program was designed by The City University of

New York (CUNY) to engage successful minority students in the recruitment and retention of other minority students, especially males, at the college and high school levels.

The College Success Initiative is open to all academically eligible students, faculty, and staff without regard to race, gender, national origin, or other characteristic.

The program is a collaborative effort of parents, college faculty and staff, and high school principals and teachers, as well as members of the Staten Island community, to attain the same goals with our minority students.

Evening & Weekend Services is a unit within the operation of the Center for Advising and Academic Successs.

It is the central administrative office of the College during evening and weekend hours and serves students, faculty, and staff by providing administrative and academic assistance; information about College programs, policies, and procedures; and other special services.

Additionally, the Office advocates for those various evening and weekend student provisions and support services which are needed and during times which are convenient for this specialized population.

Teacher Education Honors Academy

Director, Dr. Jane Coffee, Building 1S, Room 212

The goal of the Teacher Education Honors Academy is to educate undergraduate students who have a demonstrated talent in science and mathematics and who have a sincere desire to teach in the high schools or middle schools. Teacher Academy students have a choice of four majors: biology, chemistry, mathematics, or physics. They must complete all the requirements for their chosen major as well as the undergraduate sequence of education courses required for initial teacher certification. The Teacher Education Honors Academy students acquire hands-on experience in New York City public middle or high schools and this experience begins in the first semester in the Teacher Education Honors Acade-

Center for Advising and Academic Success is an integral part of this operation. The College regularly schedules a wide choice of courses in the evening and on the weekend to accommodate those students in all of its degree programs who prefer to take classes at these times. Evening class sessions start at 6:30pm or later; and both Saturday and Sunday morning and afternoon classes are available to help students with their course selection process. Over a period of time, evening and weekend students can fulfill general education requirements and complete degree requirements for a number of specific majors. Please check www.csi.cuny.ed/academicadvisement for our current schedule of operating hours.

Consistent with the college’s mission, it proudly supports the Adults Returning to the Classroom (ARC) Program. This program supports those adults who may be coming to college for the first time, or returning after a prolonged absence and offers personalized services from pre-admissions counseling through registration, and provides guidance and support as adult students

38 Office of Academic Affairs make choices about their careers and education. Interested adults (those who are at least 25 years old) not yet admitted to the College should have an initial consultation with an admissions counselor: please call

718.982.2259 or send an e-mail to [email protected] Currently matriculated continuing students interested in this program should contact

Thomas Brennan at 718.982.2155 or [email protected]

The FIRST Program

Building 5N, Room 117

The College offers a special program called Freshman

Integrated Resources, Support, and Teaching (FIRST) for new students who, upon entry, have passed the three CUNY Assessment Tests. Students enroll in a learning community of three or more courses, the majority of which satisfy the College's general education requirements. FIRST is designed to provide a student experience that assists in the transition from high school to college and that promotes a sense of belonging to the

CSI community. Students develop peer friendships and build relationships with faculty and other key personnel who assist them in their academic pursuits. For more information, please call the FIRST Program Office at

718.982.4171. laptops or PDAs equipped for wireless networking.

With Hotspots, wireless computers have high-speed access to the Internet and College Web Services.

The OIT home page

www.csi.cuny.edu/technologysystems. is:

Office of Academic Support

Library (1L), Room 117

Director, Linda Sharib

The Office of Academic Support (OAS) offers a variety of programs to enhance the academic preparation of all

CSI students. The Immersion Program provides intensive reading, writing, and mathematics workshops for students who have not passed one or more of the assessment tests. The Preparation for Academic Success

Program (PASS), an initiative presented in collaboration with the Brooklyn Educational Opportunity Center, offers intensive reading, writing, and mathematics instruction to students needing to pass the three CUNY Assessment Tests. The Pre-Test Preparation workshops provide important CUNY Assessment Test preparation for students, enabling them to become familiar with the testing formats and to experience practice tests, thereby increasing their chances for success on the tests. Furthermore, OAS houses CSI’s multi-disciplinary tutoring lab and also coordinates the ten campus tutoring centers.

Information Technology

Building 2A, Room 303

Vice President for Technology Systems, Michael Kress

The Office of Information Technology (OIT) advances and supports the use of information technology at the

College. OIT administers 20 general purpose computer laboratories and over 30 specialized computing laboratories in conjunction with academic departments. Over

2,500 desktop computers are connected through a high-speed local area network running Windows XP or

Windows 2000. This hardware configuration allows students, faculty, and staff full access to specialized software, the Internet, online library resources, and email.

Four open computer labs running Windows XP or Windows 2000 are equipped with the software that students need to do their assignments. Computer labs for students with disabilities include software like JAWS,

Dragon, etc. as well as ADA-compliant furniture. In addition to the open labs, there are computers available in the lobbies of Building 1S, 2S, 3S, 4S, 5S, 1N, 2N,

3N, 4N, and 5N, and systems are also located in the

Cybercafe and the Campus Center. These stations allow students to use the Internet.

“CSI unplugged,” wireless access is via 802.1 b/g technology. The network can be accessed from any of the academic or administrative buildings. The College of

Staten Island's Data network spans 19 buildings and provides access for all campus staff, faculty, and students, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Wireless

Hotspots are designed to expand service to users with

Laboratories

Building 6S, home of the Department of Biology, the

Department of Chemistry, the Center for Environmental

Science, and the Center for Developmental Neuroscience and Developmental Disabilities, contains 74 state-of-the-art laboratories for study and research. The ten departmental buildings in the academic quadrangles house instructional, tutorial, and research laboratories, and personal computer classrooms.

Library/Media Services

Library 1L, Room 109

Chief Librarian, Professor Wilma L. Jones

The Library is the focal point of the South Academic

Quadrangle. The building, with its distinctive rotunda, is the home to five central services: a study center for the campus community; a broad collection of books and journals in the liberal arts and sciences; computer facilities, online services, and databases that serve as points-of-access to informational resources beyond the walls of the Library; an instructional facility for the teaching of information retrieval and information literacy; an Archives and Special Collections unit; and media distribution services in support of instruction.

One hundred and seventy-five computer workstations for student use are available throughout the building.

The general reference area is located on the first floor, as is the faculty Center for Excellence in Learning

Technology. The second floor leads to the elegant archives facility, the distance-learning center, the document center, the Library instruction facility, and the Me-

dia Services unit. The circulating book collection and the print journal holdings are housed on the third floor.

Hours of Service:

Monday

–Friday

8:00am

–midnigh

Saturday

Sunday t

8:30am

–9:00pm noon

–9:00pm

Hours of service during summer session, intersession, and holidays are posted at the Library entrance and on the Library homepage, www.library.csi.cuny.edu.

Borrowing Privileges: Students and faculty from CSI and other CUNY colleges must present current ID cards in order to borrow books. Students and faculty may obtain

ID cards from the College Office of Public Safety.

Overdue books, lost books, or unpaid fines may result in the suspension of borrowing privileges.

The Collection: The holdings include 245,000 bound volumes of books, 143 online databases (of which more than 50,000 are full text), 155,000 e-books, 215 print journal subscriptions, 53,000 e-journals 3,500 films and videos, 5,000 sound recordings, and 1,300 linear feet of archival materials.

The Online Catalog: The CSI Library is a member of the

CUNY-wide integrated library system. Access to

CUNY+, the online union catalog portion of the system, is available throughout the campus as well as from offsite.

Reference librarians provide service at the General

Reference Desk on the first floor at all times when the

Library is open. The Library instruction service includes orientation tours, open workshops, presentations to classes by reference specialists in connection with specific course assignments, and the compilation of bibliographic aids.

Media Services

Library (1L), Room 201

Director: Mark Lewental

Media Services provides viewing and listening facilities and classroom services for its collections of videotapes,

DVDs, slides, audiotapes, and recordings. The Media

Distribution System provides access to the media collections via fiber-optic technology, connecting over 40 classrooms, laboratories, and conference rooms. Media

Services operates the Videoconferencing Lab, a network of wireless laptops for use in the Library, and oversees the Center for Excellence in Learning Technology, which assists faculty in using technology to promote better learning.

Macaulay Honors College

Building 1A, Room 206

Director: Associate Professor Charles Liu

The William E. Macaulay Honors College of CUNY is designed for highly motivated and capable students who meet rigorous admissions criteria. During their first and second years at the College of Staten Island, Macaulay

Honors College students enroll in a variety of innovative and challenging courses and develop with their faculty a cohesive intellectual community. In their third and fourth

Office of Academic Affairs 39 years, Macaulay Honors College students pursue their fields of study in a wide range of majors and specializations, and must meet the program’s criteria for graduation with honors. In addition to their academic work,

Macaulay Honors College students must complete co-curricular requirements.

Please see the sections on Admissions and on Programs and Course Descriptions for details about the requirements and further information about the program.

Ombudsperson

Building 1A, Room 301

Reporting to the Vice President for Student Affairs, the

Ombudsperson is authorized to investigate student concerns and to make recommendations regarding the outcome of those investigations. The Ombudsperson, available to all students enrolled at the College, is a source of information about College policies and procedures and, in certain situations, will provide mediation and advocacy services. Students may be advised to visit other College offices to file official student concerns as well.

The Ombudsperson helps students to develop positive strategies to resolve problems and conflicts and acts as a neutral party to hear any type of student concern or dispute related to the College.

The Office deals with academic matters such as grade appeals, accusations of cheating and plagiarism, faculty/student disputes, and non-academic matters such as billing disagreements, conduct issues, campus issues, and interpersonal conflict. This is not a comprehensive list, as it is understood that each individual may have concerns and needs that are unique.

Students can file an official complaint or put information

“on the record” at the Office of the Ombudsperson.

The Pathfinder Program

Sponsored by the Center for Advising and Academic

Success, The Pathfinder Program has been created to meet the unique needs of College of Staten Island students as they begin exploring majors and careers. This unique, three-part Career Exploration Workshop series allows students to discover those interests that will lead them towards a successful career. Our workshops will teach students about the career decision-making process, how to choose a major, and how to conduct relevant career research.

The final part of the Pathfinder Program provides students with the opportunity to make an appointment to meet with Career Coaches, who are specially trained advisors and counselors who can guide students toward making good career decisions. The Career Coaching program is the result of collaboration between the Career & Scholarship Center and the Center for Advising and Academic Success. Additional information about the program can be found at

www.csi.cuny.edu/pathfinder.

40 Office of Academic Affairs

Science and Technology Entry

Program (STEP)

The STEP program at the College of Staten Island (CSI) focuses on helping students to build self-esteem and develop positive behaviors toward learning. A Saturday enrichment and academic program, STEP services students from Staten Island and Brooklyn in grades 7 through 12 who demonstrate a career interest in the fields of science, engineering, technology or education.

Through the program, students come to CSI and engage in science, computer math, communication arts, and PSAT and SAT prep with an interdisciplinary learning approach. The STEP program also encourages students to strive for good grades throughout their secondary school years so that they eventually have the experience to choose from a broader range of choices when pursuing a career.

Participation in the STEP program is free. The only cost is student commitment and parental involvement.

Testing Services

Building 1A, Room 104

Director, Alan Hoffner

The Testing Office tests in the following areas: the

CUNY Assessment Tests in writing, reading, and mathematics; the departmental placement examination in Biology; the National League for Nursing (NLN) pre-admissions exam; and the test that enables students to earn college credits, the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). other resources available to women both on campus and in the broader communities of Staten Island and

New York City. The Bertha Harris Women’s Center raises awareness about issues important to women and encourages community service by CSI students at organizations that serve women on campus, on Staten

Island, and in New York City. In response to needs and interests voiced by students each semester, The Women’s Center organizes student activities, panels, and speakers on a variety of topics and other events. Visit us in Building 2N, room 106 or on the Web at

www.csi.cuny.edu/womenscenter.

The Writing Center

Building 2S, Room 216

Director, Robert Brandt

The Writing Center is under the supervision of the Department of English. The Center provides assistance to students who need to enhance their reading and writing skills. Instructors from any discipline may refer students to The Writing Center, or students themselves may choose to visit it and make appointments to work with tutors. Tutors do not edit papers or do homework assignments for students, but help them to work on the skills they need to develop. The Writing Center serves students for whom English is a first or second language.

The Verrazano School

Building 5N, Room 113

Director, Dr. Charles Liu

Coordinator, Katie Geschwendt

The Verrazano School at CSI is a competitive, highly selective program for undergraduates at the College of

Staten Island. Established in 2007, The Verrazano

School offers students the opportunity to be part of a dynamic, academically motivated learning community while enjoying the benefits of a comprehensive public institution within The City University of New York. Outstanding faculty, a wide range of academic disciplines, and extensive student services are some of the resources available through The Verrazano School.

Information about the program and admission requirements can be found online at

www.csi.cuny.edu/verrazanoschool

or contact

718.982.4171.

The Bertha Harris Women’s Center

Building 2N, Room 106

Coordinator, Associate Professor Ellen J. Goldner

The Bertha Harris Women’s Center promotes the education and personal growth of women students and the men who support their concerns. It encourages a confidential support network among students and faculty and serves as a conduit of information about counseling and

Academic Policies 41

ACADEMIC POLICIES

This chapter covers the College’s general academic policies and policies that govern the academic standards and requirements to maintain matricu-

lated status and to qualify for a degree.

Grades

Grading Symbols

The following grading symbols are used:

Grade Identification

Quality Points per Credit

A

A-

B+

B

B-

C+

C

D

F

Excellent

Good

Satisfactory

Passing

P

W

Failing/unsuccessful completion of course

Pass

Withdrew with no penalty

WA Administrative Withdrawal

WN Never Attended

*WN Never Attended

WU Withdrew Unofficially (counts as failure)

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

2.7

2.3

2.0

1.0

0.0

-

-

-

0.0

-

0.0

INC Incomplete (temporary grade)

AUD Auditor

Z No grade submitted by instructor

PEN Grade Pending

FIN Failure (changed from Incomplete)

-

-

-

-

0.0

A brief explanation of the grades receiving no quality points follows:

F

P

No credit is received for a course in which the student is assigned a grade of F. If a student wishes to receive credit for the course, it must be repeated with a passing grade; however, the F remains on the transcript (see section on

Repeating Courses).

Course requirements have been satisfied. This grade is used only for specially designated courses and for courses taken at another college for which a student receives advanced standing.

W Students may withdraw without academic penalty from any course up to the end of the ninth week of the semester (see College calendar for date); a grade of W will be assigned. After that date, students may petition the instructor and the chairperson for permission to withdraw until the last day of classes. Consult the Office of the Registrar for the procedures to be followed when withdrawing from a course. If these procedures are not followed, students may receive a penalty grade of WU. In cases of illness, students may apply to the Medical

Office for a medical withdrawal. Under no circumstances will a W be assigned after the last day of classes without positive action by the

Committee on Course and Standing or its designee.

WA Students not in compliance with the New York

State immunization requirement receive the grade of WA. This grade carries no academic penalty.

WN Never Attended. No credit is received for a course in which this grade is assigned, it is equivalent to a grade of F.

*WN Never Attended. This grade carries no academic penalty.

WU An unofficial withdrawal results in a grade of

WU. No credit is received for a course in which this grade is assigned; it is equivalent to a grade of F.

INC The grade INC is a temporary grade assigned when, in the instructor’s judgment, course requirements are not completed for valid reasons. Recipients of INC are required to complete all assignments before the end of classes during the succeeding semester. Students should not register a second time for a course in which an INC is given. Rather, arrangements should be made with the instructor to complete the remaining work. If a student registers again for a course in which an INC was awarded, the INC will become a FIN and the course will appear a second time on the student’s transcript with the grade earned.

FIN If a grade of INC is not changed before the last day of classes of the succeeding semester, it will automatically be changed to a grade of

FIN. If the required work is not completed for continuing valid reasons, the course instructor may grant an extension. Such extensions shall not exceed a period of more than two years beyond the original due date of the uncompleted work.

42 Academic Policies

AUD Students may audit courses for which they are registered by presenting a written statement to the Registrar declaring their status as auditors within the first three weeks of the semester.

This statement must be countersigned by the instructor of the course. No credit is received for an audited course.

Z An administrative symbol assigned when no grade has been submitted by the instructor.

PEN The pending grade is used in the first semester of a two-semester course.

Deadlines: Students must elect the pass/fail option each semester by the

“last day to withdraw from course(s) without a grade of

“W” as listed in the academic calendar for that semester. Students may not elect the pass/fail option retroactively. Once the election of pass/fail has been made, the student may no longer choose to receive a letter grade other than P/F for the course.

Pass/Fail Grading Option

Undergraduate matriculated students of the College of

Staten Island have the option to elect a Pass/Fail grade with the following restrictions:

1. Students may not elect the pass/fail option for any courses satisfying general education, pre-major, major, minor, or certification requirements.

2. Academic departments may exclude additional courses and may prohibit pass/fail courses from being used as prerequisites for degree requirements.

3. Courses taken on permit at other institutions and independent study courses may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Credit Maximum: The student may not elect more than eight credits (8) total as Pass/Fail. The total number of P grades on a transcript may not exceed 90 credits. This includes all credits transferred from other institutions.

Grading and Grade Point Average: For courses taken as Pass/Fail, letter grades

“A through C” are converted to P; letter grades of D and F are converted to F. A pass

“P” grade is not counted in the student’s grade point average. A fail

“F” grade is counted in the student’s grade point average.

Prerequisite Academic Standing: A student must be matriculated, with sophomore, junior, or senior standing.

Transfer students must have completed a minimum of

12 credits at the College of Staten Island. To elect this option, the student must have a GPA greater than or equal to 2.25.

Grade Appeals

Students wishing to appeal a grade other than WU or

FIN must do so within 60 school days following the end of the semester*. Appeals must be submitted in writing to the chairperson of the department in which the course was offered. Upon receipt of the appeal, the chairperson shall direct the student to discuss the issue with the instructor who assigned the grade. If the issue remains unresolved, the student may request a review by the

Department Committee on Grade Appeals.

This Committee on Grade Appeals shall review all information presented by the student and shall meet with the instructor. The committee shall render a decision within 30 days after the student requested the grade review by the committee because the student and instructor had not resolved the matter. If the committee upholds the appeal by a vote of 3-0, the chairperson shall change the grade to reflect the decision of the committee. If the committee does not uphold the student, there is no further appeal within the College.

In all deliberations on grade appeals, the burden shall be on the student to prove that a violation of the College’s regulations occurred or that the instructor’s own stated criteria for grading, which shall have been enunciated at the beginning of the semester, have not been followed. Students needing advice on the procedure may consult an academic and personal counselor.

Students wishing to have a WU or a FIN grade changed to a grade of W must file a written petition supported by documentation to the Committee on Course and Standing.

*Summer and winter session months are not included in the 60 day appeal deadline.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The grade point average (GPA) is determined by dividing the total quality points earned by the total number of credits attempted. All credits for which the student is officially registered after the change of program period of each semester shall be considered

“attempted credits,” except where the grades carry no penalty (i.e., grades of W, WA,

INC, AUD, and PEN). For example:

Course Grade Credits Quality

Points per credit

Total

Quality

Points

ENG 111 A 3 x 4 = 12

COR 100

ART 100

ANT 100

PED 190

B

C

D

F

4

3

3

1 x x x x

3

2

1

0

=

=

=

=

12

6

3

0

Academic Policies 43

Total

Credits

=

14 Total Quality

Points

33

33

GPA Quality

Points

Total Credits

Attempted

= =

14

2.36

Students may calculate current and prospective grade point averages using the GPA Calculator.

Transcripts and Grade Reports

www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/forms.php4. There is no fee.

At the end of each semester, students earn grades that reflect academic work undertaken. Students may access their transcript records and review semester grades in CUNYfirst via the CUNY Portal

(www.cuny.edu).

Students may request copies of their transcripts online at www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/transcript.html (see

Fee Schedule). To be official, transcripts must be signed and sealed by the Registrar.

The Major

Declaration of Major

Each matriculated student in the College is recorded in the Registrar’s Office as enrolled in a specific curriculum or major leading to a degree. Students are responsible for informing the Registrar of their specific curriculum or major. Assignment of an academic adviser is based upon this official listing. All students who have completed 60 credits and have passed all three CUNY Assessment Tests who expect to receive a bachelor’s degree from the College should declare a bachelor’s degree major. Students who have completed fewer than

60 credits may also declare a bachelor’s degree major provided they meet the following criteria: have passed or are exempt from the three CUNY Assessment Tests and have successfully completed 12 credits at or above the 100 level and have a GPA of 2.00 or above.

Credits toward the Major

All courses listed as major requirements, including courses that apply toward concentrations, specializations, or options, are counted toward completion of the minimum credits meeting requirements for the major.

Credits for pre-major courses are not included.

GPA in the Major

The GPA in the major is calculated in the same manner as the overall GPA using only the courses that fulfill major requirements: all courses listed in the major requirements, including courses in concentrations, specializations, options, and all courses taken in the discipline other than those in the pre-major. Students are required to achieve at least a 2.0 GPA in their core or major requirements in order to earn an undergraduate degree. Some programs require a GPA higher than 2.0.

Second Major

Students who wish to declare a second major should file a Declaration/Change of Major form with the Registrar’s

Office. This can be done online at www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/forms.php4. There is no fee.

Academic Standing

In addition, individual departments may modify this policy for entry into their curricula as follows:

1.

The department may require a chairperson’s approval before a student with fewer than 40 credits may choose a major in that department.

2. The department may require a GPA greater than 2.0 for entrance into its major.

3. The department may require minimum grades in specific courses before a student may choose a major in that department.

Credit Load

Students may attend full-time or part-time as either matriculated or non-degree students. They may attend day, evening, or weekend sessions in any combination.

A full-time student is one registered for 12 or more equated credits in a semester; six must be degree credits (three in the case of first-time freshmen). Equated credits are generally the same as degree credits except for courses below the 100 level. In courses below the

100 level, equated credits are equivalent to the contact hours of the course.

Change of Major

Students who wish to change their major or whose academic advisement plan or transcript shows that they are recorded incorrectly in a major should file a Declaration/Change of Major formm with the Registrar’s Office.

This can be done online at

Students with less than a 3.0 (B) average and/or fewer than 30 credits who wish to take more than 18 credits must request permission. The Registrar’s Office, 2A,

Room 110, will direct such students to the appropriate office. Students on academic warning or probation may not register for more than 14 credits per semester. In the summer sessions, they may not register for more than a total of nine credits (two courses plus PED 190).

44 Academic Policies

Class or Standing

Class, or standing, as freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior is determined by the number of credits completed:

Lower Freshman 0-14.9 credits completed

Upper Freshman 15-29.9 credits completed

Lower Sophomore 30-44.9 credits completed

Upper Sophomore 45-59.9 credits completed

Lower Junior

Upper Junior

Lower Senior

Upper Senior

60-74.9 credits completed

75-89.9 credits completed

90-104.9 credits completed

105-120+ credits completed

Standing is sometimes listed as a course prerequisite.

Dean’s List

A matriculated undergraduate student, full-time or parttime, merits inclusion on the annual dean’s list by:

(a) for full-time, attaining a GPA of 3.5 or above during the preceding academic year, provided at least 12 credits were earned in the fall semester and 12 credits were earned in the spring semester; (b) for part-time, attaining a GPA of 3.5 or above over the last two academic years, provided at least 24 credits were earned during that period. Only credits earned at the College of

Staten Island will enter the computation. Students who have received a grade of F, WN, WU, or INC during the period under consideration are not eligible.

Committee on Course and Standing

The Committee on Course and Standing is chaired by the Vice President for Academic Affairs or a designee; and its membership consists of the Registrar and one member of the faculty from each instructional department. In addition to reviewing student records, the

Committee considers student appeals related to readmission, and graduation.

Academic Warning

Students with 0 to 24 credits attempted will be placed on academic warning if they meet the academic standards

(above) but fail to achieve a 2.00 grade point average.

Academic Probation

Students will be placed on academic probation if their grade point average falls below the minimum grade point average for the number of credits attempted : 0-12 attempted credits, 1.50 grade point average; 13-24 attempted credits, 1.75 grade point average; 25 credits-above, 2.0 grade point average.

Students on academic probation who meet the College’s academic standards at the end of the probation semester will be removed from academic probation.

Students on academic probation will not be dismissed but automatically continued on probation as long as they achieve a grade point average of 2.5 or better in both the fall and spring semesters immediately prior to dismissal or a grade point average of 2.75 in either of those semesters until they have reached the required minimum grade point average. Students who fail to achieve the minimum 2.5 grade point average for any semester while on probation will be dismissed.

Students on academic warning or academic probation may not register for more than 14 credits a semester.

Summer session students may not register for more than a total of nine credits in the summer session (two courses plus PED 190).

Academic Dismissal

Students who do not meet the academic standards outlined above at the end of the probation semester will be dismissed from the College.

Students can petition the Committee through an appeals counselor in the Division of Student Affairs. The appeals counselors, whose names are available through the Registrar’s Office, will advise the students in the preparation of their petition, which will then be referred to the Committee.

Minimum GPA

Students are expected to maintain a minimum GPA of

2.0 (C) throughout their academic careers at the College. Whenever a student’s GPA falls below 2.0, the student’s record will be reviewed by the Committee on

Course and Standing. Students must achieve a GPA of

2.0 in the courses in the core or major requirements; some majors require a higher minimum GPA.

Readmission after Academic Dismissal

Students dismissed from the College for failure to meet the standards set forth in this policy may apply for readmission after a separation from the College of at least one fall or spring semester. Students who apply for readmission after this separation period must have their application reviewed by the Committee on Course and

Standing. Students wishing to apply for readmission should obtain information from the Counseling Center,

Building 1A, Room 109.

Testing

Academic Standards Policy

At the end of each semester, students must meet the following academic standards:

Credits atMinimum Grade Point Average tempted

0-12

13-24

25-above

1.50

1.75

2.00

CUNY Assessment Tests

Each undergraduate student must successfully complete The City University of New York Assessment

Tests in reading, writing, and mathematics unless exempted. All students, including transfer students, must take the tests before they may register for the first time as matriculated students.

Students are exempted from taking the CUNY Assessment Tests in reading and writing if their verbal score on the SAT is 480 or higher; if their verbal score on the

ACT is 20 or higher; or if their score on the New York

State Regents Examination in English is 75 or higher.

Students are exempt from the Math CUNY Assessment

Test if their mathematics score on the SAT is 500 or higher; if their mathematics score on the ACT is 21 or higher; or if their score on the New York State Regents

Examination in Mathematics A or Sequential II or III is

75 or higher; or by scoring 80 or higher on any of the new Regents examinations(Integrated Algebra, Geomery, Algebra 2 and Trigonometry) and successfully completing Algebra 2 and Trigonometry or a higher level course. However, all students must take Part III of the

COMPASS Mathematics Test for placement into appropriate mathematics courses.

External, non-CUNY transfer students who have completed a course in English composition of 3 credits or more with a minimum grade of C at another institution are exempted from the CUNY Assessment Test in reading and the CUNY Assessment Test in writing provided that the students are transferring from United

States-accredited colleges or universities. External transfer students who have completed a mathematics course of at least 3 credits with a minimum grade of C are exempt from CUNY Assessment Test in mathematics. However, all transfer students must take Part III of the COMPASS Mathematics Test for placement purposes. External transfer students with foreign credentials are subject to the CUNY Assessment Tests upon entry.

Students admitted to associate’s degree programs who fail one or more of the tests are expected to complete the remedial courses that qualify them to enter college-level writing and mathematics courses and pass all three CUNY Assessment Tests in one year, which may include, in addition to semesters, a pre-freshman and a post-freshman summer immersion course and a winter intersession workshop. Students for whom English is a second language (ESL students) have two academic years to pass the CUNY Assessment Tests in reading and writing. The tests are administered at the end of every academic intervention that students complete

(remedial or ESL courses, summer immersion, January intersession, or tutorial workshops). Students who do not pass the CUNY Assessment Tests within this time limit will be dismissed from the College.

Students may not enroll in college-level English or mathematics courses until the appropriate test has been passed. In addition, some courses require passage of one or more of the tests as prerequisites. A passing score on the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading is a prerequisite to all courses at the 200 level or higher.

All students required to take Part I and Part II of the

COMPASS Mathematics Test and who fail both Part 1 and Part II must complete a pre-freshman math immersion course.

No associate’s or bachelor’s degree will be awarded unless proficiency has been demonstrated.

COMPASS Reading Test

Graduation

Academic Policies 45

Students who fail the COMPASS Reading Test on entrance are required to take the appropriate 0-level reading course in their first semester.

CUNY ACT/Writing Sample

Students who score 6 on the CUNY/ACT Writing Sample Test on entrance are required to take the appropriate 0-level writing course within their first 12 equated credits. Students who score 5 or below on the C/AWST on entrance are required to take the appropriate 0-level writing course within their first eight equated credits.

COMPASS Mathematics Test

Students who have not passed each of the first two parts of the COMPASS Mathematics Test are required to take the appropriate 0-level mathematics course.

All students required to take Part I and Part II of the

COMPASS Mathematics Test and who fail both Part 1 and Part II must complete a pre-freshman math immersion course.

Placement Examinations

Placement examinations are offered by the Department of Biology and the Department of World Languages and

Literatures. These examinations determine placement at the appropriate course level. Students entering the

Health Sciences programs in which BIO 150 Human

Anatomy and Physiology I is a pre-major requirement must take the Biology Department Placement Examination. Students are referred to the Testing Office for information.

See the section on Attendance Policies for information on the special attendance policies that apply to 0-level courses.

Application for Graduation

In order to be considered for graduation, students must file an application with the Registrar. The deadlines to apply for graduation are March 1 for the spring and the summer term and October 1 for the fall term. There is no fee for this application. Students may apply online from the College’s Website at

www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/graduation or they may apply in person at The Hub located in Building 2A,

Room 106. Students must have completed a minimum of 34 credits to apply for an associate’s degree; 94 credits must be completed to apply for a baccalaureate degree. Bachelor’s degree candidates who have completed a second major or a minor and wish it to appear on their transcript should list the second major or minor on their application for graduation.

Students who have graduated but wish to take additional credits beyond the degree will be changed to the non-degree status and will be charged the higher non-degree rate per credit unless they have filed for a

46 Academic Policies second degree prior to the first day of classes. A change from non-degree to degree status on or after the first day of classes will not take effect until the next semester for tuition billing purposes. Non-degree students are not entitled to state or federal financial aid including federal loans.

Requirements for Graduation

Bachelor’s degree programs require a minimum of 120 credits with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C). Some Bachelor’s degree programs require more than the minimum credits and GPA; please consult the specific degree program for details. Associate’s degree programs require a minimum of 60 credits with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (C). Some Associate’s degree programs require more than the minimum credits and GPA; please consult the specific degree program for details. All degree programs require at least a 2.0 grade point average in the core or major course requirements to qualify for the degree. Some majors require a grade point average above 2.0. Please consult the specific degree program. If a student earns an INC in the semester that they expect to graduate, regardless of whether the INC course is needed for graduation, he/she may not graduate. The student may postpone the graduation to the next semester at which time a final grade must be received by the last day of classes for that semester, otherwise the grade will be changed to an FIN and will negatively affect the graduating GPA as well as cumulative GPA. If the student does not wish to postpone the graduating semester, a grade for the INC must be submitted by the conferral date. Once a student has been granted a degree, grade changes for courses taken in semesters prior to receiving the degree are not permitted. The successful completion of all general education and core or major requirements is required for graduation. All students must pass the three CUNY Assessment Tests.

Minimum Credits in Residence

Requirement

To obtain a degree, associate’s or baccalaureate, from the College of Staten Island, students must earn a minimum of 30 credits through courses taken at the

College. To qualify for a bachelor’s degree from the

College, students must also earn at least half (50%) of the credits required for the major through courses taken at the College. To obtain a One-Year Certificate from the College of Staten Island, at least half (50%) of the required credits must be earned in courses taken at the

College. their major provided they meet the requirements of the department as explained in the section on Degree Requirements.

Second Degree Requirements

To receive a second baccalaureate degree or a second associate’s degree from the College of Staten Island, students must complete a minimum of 30 credits in addition to the number of credits required for the first degree.

The

“Grandfather” Clause

Requirements in this Catalog were approved effective summer/fall 2012.

For Major and Minor Requirements, the

“Grandfather” clause provides protection from changes in degree requirements for students who maintain continuous enrollment in a program, curriculum, major, or minor.

However, when a student chooses a new program, curriculum, major, or minor, the student must satisfy the degree requirements for the program, curriculum, major, or minor in which he/she enrolled that are in effect in the semester in which the change was effective. Additionally, if a student does not attend the College for four consecutive fall and spring semesters, the student must satisfy the degree requirements in effect in the semester of their readmission.

For general education requirements only, the

“Grandfather

” clause provides that for ten years after the initial date of matriculation in which a student received a grade for at least one credit, a student may follow the general education requirements in effect the year of that initial matriculation. Students who do not have a break in attendance of more than four consecutive fall and spring semesters may continue to follow the general education requirements in effect the year of the initial matriculation even if that is more than ten years ago.

However, students who do not attend the College for four consecutive fall and spring semesters and who matriculated and received a grade for at least one credit more than ten years before the semester of readmission must follow the general education requirements in effect the semester of readmission.

Students may choose to follow the set of requirements for either general education or for their program, curriculum, major, or minor in effect at the time of their graduation by requesting to do so in writing to the Registrar.

General Policies

Graduation with Honors

Undergraduates who meet the qualifications will receive the associate’s or bachelor’s degree summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude as follows:

Cumulative GPA of at least 3.90: summa cum laude

Cumulative GPA of at least 3.75: magna cum laude

Cumulative GPA of at least 3.50: cum laude.

Students who have completed all of the requirements for the bachelor’s degree may graduate with honors in

Attendance Policies

The College has different attendance policies for regular courses and for remedial courses.

Regular Courses: A student who is absent for more than 15 percent of the class hours in the semester will be assigned a grade of WU (withdrew unofficially), subject to the discretion of the instructor. Fifteen percent equals eight hours for a course that meets four hours a

Academic Policies 47 week, six hours for a course that meets three hours a week. A student who does not attend a course at all will be assigned a grade of WN (never attended).

Remedial Courses: (all remedial courses in reading, writing, mathematics, and in English as a Second Language): A student who is absent seven or more hours

(in a course meeting four hours a week) will receive a grade of WU (withdrew unofficially), unless excused by the instructor. A student who is absent four or more hours (in a course meeting three hours a week) will receive a grade of WU (withdrew unofficially), unless excused by the instructor. A student who does not attend a course at all will be assigned a grade of WN (never attended).

Both policies give instructors discretion to permit fewer or more absences. Some instructors enforce strict attendance policies; others are more liberal, believing that the consequences of frequent absences are low grades.

Instructors will include their attendance policies in their syllabi and explain these policies at the beginning of the course.

Withdrawal from College and Leave of

Absence

Students who leave the College before the end of a term must file an official withdrawal request. Failure to do so will result in WU grades for all courses in progress, and the result will be a negative impact on the grade point average. Students intending to withdraw from the College must see a counselor and complete the required forms. There is no fee. Registration materials for the semester following withdrawal will be sent automatically. There is no formal leave of absence from the College for undergraduates.

Readmission

Undergraduate students who do not register for a semester and then decide to return must file an application for readmission to qualify for a priority registration appointment. Generally, readmission is routine. Students requesting a change in curriculum or major may be subject to a review of qualifications. To qualify for early registration, application for readmission must be filed by the deadline specified in the academic calendar published in the Semester Information. Students who do not apply for readmission by the deadline may be readmitted and register during the walk-in registration dates published in the Semester Information. Students who have been academically dismissed by the College will be readmitted only upon successful appeal to the Committee on Course and Standing. Applications may be filed online at www.csi.cuny.edu/registrar/forms.php4.

Repeating Courses

Remedial courses: Students may repeat a given remedial course only once.

Passing Grade: Students who receive a passing grade in a course (D or better) sometimes wish to repeat the course in the expectation of improving the grade. If a course is repeated, both grades will remain on the student’s transcript and both grades will be computed in the student’s grade point average, but the student will receive credit only once for the course. For example: a student takes HST 100 for three credits and receives a

D, then repeats the course and receives a B. The transcript will list HST 100 with the grade of D for the first time and with a grade of B for the second. The student will receive a total of three credits for HST 100, not six, but the three credits of D and the three credits of B will be calculated in the student’s grade point average. The repeated course may not count toward the 12 credits required for full-time and TAP status unless the Catalog states that the course must be repeated.

Failing Grade: An undergraduate student may repeat up to 16 credits of failed courses; if the subsequent grade is C or higher, this subsequent grade will be included in the calculation of the cumulative GPA. The failing grade(s) will not be included (although the course and the grade remain on the record). The cumulative

GPA will be used in determining if College admissions, progress, and graduation standards have been satisfied. F grades will be used in calculating the GPA for graduation honors and may affect the determination of admission to specific programs and progress in specific majors. If the subsequent grade is a D, both the original

F and the subsequent D will be included in the GPA calculation.

This policy is subject to the following limitations: a. The course in which the failing grade was received must have been originally taken after September 1,

1984 and repeated after September 1, 2002. Courses repeated between September 1, 1990 and August

31, 2002 will be governed by the policy in the

2001-2002 Catalog. b. No more than 16 credits of failing grades may be recalculated in the above manner. c. The 16-credit limit applies cumulatively to courses taken in all CUNY colleges. d. If two or more failing grades have been received for the same course and a grade of C or better is subsequently earned, all of the failing grades may be recalculated, subject to the 16-credit limit. e. The repeated course must be taken at the same college as the initially failed course. f. The failing grades remain on the academic record. g. The regulation applies to undergraduates only.

Auditing a Course

A student may audit a course by registering for the course and presenting a written statement of intent to audit the course, signed by the instructor, to the Registrar within the first three weeks of class. The Registrar will record a final grade of AUD, effective at the end of the semester. Once the declaration to audit has been made, the student may no longer choose to receive credit for the course. The regular tuition and fee schedule applies to audited courses.

48 Academic Policies

Undergraduate Students in Graduate

Courses

Undergraduate students with 90 or more credits and a

3.0 GPA may be granted permission to register for a graduate course for undergraduate credit. Permission is required from the course instructor and the coordinator of the graduate program offering the course; and must be noted on the registration form.

Permission to Take Courses at Other

Colleges

Students wishing to take a course at another college must receive permission in advance if the course is to be credited toward a degree at the College of Staten

Island. Permission to take courses at other colleges is granted only to currently enrolled matriculated students.

Applications for permit, which require the approval of the department chairperson and the Registrar, are available in the Registrar’s Office. Tuition for courses taken on permit at other CUNY colleges must be paid at the College of Staten Island during the regular registration period. The Bursar’s receipt for this registration, together with the approved permit form, will enable students to register at another CUNY college. Tuition and fees for a course taken on permit at a non-CUNY school must be paid directly to the host school. Courses taken on permit will be transferred to CSI with the grade assigned by the host college.

Students on permit must request that a transcript be sent from the host college to the Registrar at the College of Staten Island. A student who registers for permit courses but who is unable to complete the course registration at the host college should officially withdraw from the permit course(s) promptly. The University refund schedule applies to dropping permit credits unless the student presents a letter from the host college that the student was unable to register for the permit courses.

Independent Study, Internships, and

Experiential Learning

Current matriculated students may arrange independent study and internships in most of the fields of study in the

College’s curriculum. To arrange for such courses, students must take the initiative in approaching faculty sponsors and in defining the project. Independent study and internship forms are available in the Regis trar’s Office. Independent Study undergraduate courses are numbered 591-594 and Internships are numbered

595-598. Both are awarded one to four credits.

The following definitions and policies apply:

Independent Study (numbered 591-594 in the discipline)

Independent Study is defined as an individual library or laboratory research or creative arts project under the direct supervision of a full-time faculty member. All Independent Study courses will be designated as liberal arts and sciences courses.

Internships (numbered 595-598 in the discipline)

Internships are experiences in a work situation that integrate an academic area of study with work experience. Courses designated Internships are individual, non-classroom, extended learning projects. They require an onsite supervisor as well as a full-time faculty member as project sponsor. Internships require a daily log of activities, an assigned reading list or preparation of a relevant bibliography, and a final paper that summarizes the way in which goals were achieved and demonstrates the relationship of academic material to the work done during the internship.

Internship courses are considered non-liberal arts and sciences. Internship students may not receive credit for paid employment unless they demonstrate the relationship of an appropriate body of academic material to the work required in their employment. The policy on individual Internship projects does not govern the regularly established professional internships (e.g., medical technology, communications).

Internships in professional programs may have different limits and requirements.

Policies on Independent Study and

Internships

1. Credit for Independent Study is awarded for study or research outside normal course offerings; credit for

Internships is awarded for work experience related to an academic program, not for performing a job.

2. Students must have at least one introductory course or equivalent experience in an area as a prerequisite to Independent Study and Internships. Independent

Study students are required to spend at least three hours of work per week per credit. Internship students are expected to spend at least two hours per week per credit at the on-site location and at least one additional hour per week per credit in reading, study, and preparation.

3. No more than four credits will be granted for an Independent Study or Internship. Credit will be granted only once for the same or a similar work situation or placement. No more than nine credits of Independent

Study and Internship coursework will be accepted toward the 60+ credits required for the associate’s degree; no more than 15 credits of Independent

Study and Internship coursework will be accepted toward the 120+ credits for the baccalaureate degree. The nine-and 15-credit limits are the maximum for the combined number of Independent Study and

Internship credits. Enrollment in more than four credits of coursework in Independent Study and an Internship in any given semester is not encouraged; permission will be granted only in unusual circumstances. Interships in professional programs may have different limits and requirements.

4. Students interested in Independent Study or an Internship must make arrangements with a full-time faculty member to sponsor the project. Internship students also require an onsite supervisor to evaluate their project. The individuals involved will sign a contract stipulating the expectations for completion of

the course, evaluation criteria, and awarding of credit.

5. Arrangements for Independent Study and Internships must be made during the semester before the student wishes to enroll in these courses and must be approved by the faculty sponsor, onsite supervisor

(where applicable), and the chairperson of the department or coordinator of the program.

6. For Internships, at least one onsite visit must be made by the faculty sponsor during the semester. At this time a joint conference with all participants in the project will be held for evaluation. For all Independent Study and Internship students a meeting and an evaluation of progress with the faculty sponsor is expected at least bimonthly. Internships in professional programs may have different limits and requirements.

7. Independent Study and Internship proposals are kept on file in the Registrar’s Office. Registration for Independent Study and Internship courses must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester.

8. Independent Study and Internship courses may not be used to satisfy general education requirements for any degree program. Independent Study and Internship courses may be used as electives in fulfillment of core or major requirements only if the application explicitly states that the course may so be used.

Experiential Learning

Matriculated students who have completed 15 credits may receive a maximum of 15 credits for experiential learning. This learning must be at college level; it may match the content of specific courses or not. Credit is awarded by the appropriate department after detailed assessment of the documentation provided by the student to that department. Further information is available at the Office of Registrar, Building 2A, Room 110.

Credit-by-Examination

External Agencies:

The College will grant matriculated students a maximum of 30 credits on the basis of, among others, the following: Advanced Placement Courses (AP), Regents College Examinations, American College Testing Proficiency (ACT-PEP), and College Level Examination Programs (CLEP).

The College grants credit for designated CLEP General

Examinations. For CLEP introductory subject exams with separate essay test, the College requires that students take both the multiple-choice objective test and the separate essay test. Award of credit is based on performance on both parts of the subject exam. In order to receive credit, students must pass the subject examinations with a scaled score in at least the 50th percentile and minimally equivalent to a passing grade of C.

Academic departments or programs may authorize the assignment of specific course equivalents for credit-by-examination through outside agencies. Otherwise,

Academic Policies 49 such credits will be acceptable only as elective credits.

Credits granted by examination through outside agencies will appear on student records appropriately identified by type of exam, subject, number of credits, and P

(passing) grade. No credit will be awarded for a subject area examination in which the student has already taken an equivalent college course or completed a higher-level, more advanced college course. Based on faculty review and recommendations, the Office of Recruitment and Admissions monitors and coordinates the awarding of credit by examinations taken through outside agencies and the implementation of uniform College policy on credit-by-examination.

Departmental Challenge Examinations

At the discretion of academic departments or programs, students may take departmental challenge examinations to demonstrate college-level competency in courses that have not been taken at CSI (or at any other college), and for which no credit has already been received.

Academic Integrity, Plagiarism, and

Cheating

Integrity is fundamental to the academic enterprise. It is violated by such acts as borrowing or purchasing assignments (including but not limited to term papers, essays, and reports) and other written assignments, using concealed notes or crib sheets during examinations, copying the work of others and submitting it as one’s own, and misappropriating the knowledge of others. The sources from which one derives one’s ideas, statements, terms, and data, including Internet sources, must be fully and specifically acknowledged in the appropriate form; failure to do so, intentionally or unintentionally, constitutes plagiarism.

Violations of academic integrity may result in a lower grade or failure in a course and in disciplinary actions with penalties such as suspension or dismissal from the

College. More information on the CUNY policies on Academic Integrity can be found in Appendix iii.

Academic Freedom

The City University subscribes to the American Association of University Professors 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom, and the College of Staten

Island respects academic freedom for faculty and students as well as freedom in their personal lives for all individuals in the campus community.

50 Undergraduate Degree & Certificate Programs

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE & CERTIF-

ICATE PROGRAMS

For Graduate Degree Programs and Advanced Certificate Programs please refer to the Graduate Catalog.

Accounting (BS)

African America Studies (BA)

American Studies (BA)

Art (BA), BS)

Biochemistry (BS)

Biology (BS)

Biology (7-12) (BS)

Business (AAS), (BS)

Chemistry (BS)

Chemistry (7-12) (BS)

Cinema Studies (BA)

Communications (BS)

Computer Science (BS)

Computer Science/Mathematics (BS)

Computer Technology (AAS)

Dramatic Arts (BS)

Economics (BA), BS)

Electrical Engineering (BS)

Electrical Engineering Technology (AAS)

Engineering Science (AS), (BS)

English (BA)

English (7-12) (BA)

History (BA)

History (7-12) (BA)

Italian Studies (BA)

Italian Studies (7-12) (BA)

Information Systems (BS)*

International Studies (BA)

Liberal Arts and Sciences (AA), (AS)

Mathematics (BS)

Mathematics/Computer Science (BS)

Mathematics (7-12) (BS)

Medical Technology (BS)

Music (BA), (BS)

Nursing (AAS), (BS)

Philosophy (BA)

Philosophy and Political Science (BA)

Physics (BS)

Political Science (BA)

Psychology (BA),(BS)

Science, Letters, and Society (BA)

Science, Letters, and Society: Early Childhood (Birth-2)

(BA)

Science, Letters, and Society: Childhood (1-6) (BA)

Social Work (BA**), (BS)

Sociology/Anthropology (BA)

Spanish (BA)

Spanish (7-12) (BA)

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (BA)

*Admissions to this program is suspended pending further review.

**Admission to this program is suspended.

Certificate Program

Modern China Studies

Latin American, Carribbean, American Latino/a Studies

New York State Registration

The following listing gives the title of each of the undergraduate degree programs of the College and the Program Code number under which that program is registered with the New York State Department of Education,

Office of Higher Education and the Professions, Cultural

Education Center, Room 5B28, Albany, NY 12230;

1.528.474.5851.

BS

BS

Accounting

MHC Accounting

BA

BA

BA

BA

BS

African American Studies

MHC African American

Studies

American Studies

MHC American Studies

BA/BS Art

BA/BS MHC Art

BS

BS

BS

BS

BS

BS

Biochemistry

MHC Biochemistry

Biology

MHC Biology

Biology (7-12)

MHC Biology (7-12)

AAS, BS Business

MHC Business

32448

60284

34896

35536

34897

35537

34898, 02842

35538, 60265

34899

35539

34900

35540

25965

60324

01585, 82436

60266

BA

BA

BS

BS

BA

BA

BS

BS

BA

BA

BA

BA

BA

BA

BS

BS

BS

BS

BA

BA

BS

BS

Chemistry

MHC Chemistry

Chemistry (7-12)

MHC Chemistry (7-12)

Cinema Studies

MHC Cinema Studies

Communications

MHC Communications

35002

35541

25964

60325

34901

35542

90195

60267

34902

35543

BS

BS

BS

BS

AAS

BS

BS

BS

AAS

AS

Computer Science

MHC Computer Science

Computer Science/Mathematics

MHC Computer Science/Mathematics

Computer Technology

Dramatic Arts

MHC Dramatic Arts

BA/BS Economics

BA/BS MHC Economics

BS Electrical Engineering

MHC Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Technology

Engineering Science

34903

35544

01588

02847

60268

34904, 34905

35546, 35545

36549

36460

01601

01581

Engineering Science 02841

MHC Engineering Science 60285

English

MHC English

34909

35547

English (7-12)

MHC English (7-12)

History

MHC History

25967

60326

34908

35548

History (7-12)

MHC History (7-12)

25962

60327

Information Systems* 22250

MHC Information Systems* 60269

International Studies 34906

MHC International Studies 35549

BA

BA

BA

BA

Italian Studies 33961

MHC Italian Studies

Italian Studies (7-12)

34251

33973

MHC Italian Studies (7-12) 35117

Certificate

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latina/o Studies

AA/AS Liberal Arts And Sciences 01584, 01583

BS Mathematics

34976

34910

BS

BS

BS

BS

BA/BS

MHC Mathematics

Mathematics (7-12)

Music

35551

25961

Medical Technology 02856

MHC Medical Technology 60286

34911, 02845

35552, 60270 BA/BS MHC Music

Certificate

Modern China Studies

AAS

BS

BS

BA

BA

BA

BA

Nursing

Nursing

MHC Nursing

Philosophy

MHC Philosophy

Philosophy and Political

Science

MHC Philosophy and Politi-

31930

01591

81356

60271

34912

35553

34913

BS

BS

BA

BA

BA/BS

BA/BS

BA

MHC Political Science

Psychology

MHC Psychology

35556

02874,33782

60272, 60273

Science, Letters And Society 34916

BA

BA cal Science

Physics

MHC Physics

Political Science

MHC Science, Letters and

Society

Science, Letters And Society

(Education)

35554

34914

35555

34915

35846

35143

BA MHC Science, Letters, and

Society (Education)

BA*/BS Social Work

35845

20052*,

35043

60274, 35557

34917

BA*/BS MHC Social Work

BA

BA

Sociology/Anthropology

MHC Sociology/Anthropology

BA

BA

BA

BA

BA

BA

Spanish

MHC Spanish

Spanish (7-12)

MHC Spanish (7-12)

Women’s, Gender, and

Sexuality Studies

Women's, Gender, and

Sexuality Studies

35558

34918

35559

25963

60329

33905

60275

*Admissions to this program is suspended.

The City University of New York reserves the right, because of changing conditions, to make modifications of any nature in the academic programs and requirements of the University and its constituent colleges without advance notice.

Undergraduate Degree & Certificate Programs 51

52 Degree Requirements

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

This section provides detailed information on college preparation, testing, orientation, requirements applicable to all degree programs, liberal arts and sciences, core/major, minor, honors, general education, and information about the course numbering system at CSI.

College Preparatory Initiative (CPI)

The College Preparatory Initiative (CPI) is a collaborative effort between CUNY and the New York City Board of Education designed to strengthen the academic preparation of high school students.

Bachelor’s degree students and associate’s degree students entering CSI are expected to have a minimum of 16 CPI units, including four units of English, three units of mathematics, two units of laboratory science, four units of social sciences, two units of foreign language, and one unit of fine arts. nn

Core/Major Requirements

Programs leading to a degree (with the exception of the

AA and AS degrees in Liberal Arts and Sciences) require a concentrated study of a particular subject. This requirement is called the core requirement for associate’s degrees and the major requirement for bachelor’s degrees. The core and major requirements for each degree are listed under the degree.

Some cores and majors require courses that must be taken during the freshman and sophomore years to provide the background necessary for the required core or major courses. These courses are identified as pre-major and listed under the degree description.

Credit Requirements

With some exceptions, baccalaureate degree programs require the successful completion of 120 credits and associate’s degree programs require the successful completion of 60 credits. Exceptions are the following programs: Bachelor of Science (BS): Biology, Computer

Science, Engineering Science, Medical Technology;

Associate in Applied Science (AAS): Computer Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology, Nursing.

CUNY Assessment Tests

ENGLISH: Each student must be exempt or successfully complete The City University of New York Skills Assessment Tests in reading and writing.

MATHEMATICS: Each student must be exempt or successfully complete The City University of New York

Skills Assessment Test in mathematics, which tests proficiency in basic mathematics skills.

(Please refer to Testing for additional information.)

Students needing remediation are expected to complete the remedial courses that qualify them to enter college-level writing and mathematics courses in one year, which may include, in addition to two semesters, a pre-freshman and a post-freshman summer immersion course and a winter intersession workshop.

Course Numbering

ALPHA Designation

The section on Programs and Course Descriptions lists the requirements and courses for the degree programs in alphabetical order by the ALPHA designation for the courses in the discipline, from ACC for Accounting to

WGS for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

The description of core or major requirements is followed by the course descriptions in numerical order from 001-to 400-level courses.

500-Level Courses

Topics courses, independent study, and individual internships are designated at the 500 level with the alpha symbol for the discipline. Courses at the 500 level, by their very nature, have no registered description and are not listed under course descriptions for the disciplines.

Topics courses may be taught for a maximum of three semesters and may not be used to fulfill requirements.

The designations are topics courses: 500-590 (1 - 4 credits); independent study courses, 591-594 (1 - 4 credits); internships, 595-598 (1 - 4 credits).

Double Majors/Double Degrees

For students who wish to major in more than one field of study, complete a double major, or to earn two degrees

(double degrees), the following policies apply:

To major in more than one field of study, students must complete all of the core or major requirements for each of the fields. If the Pathways General Education requirements of the two fields differ, the student must complete the more restrictive and demanding of the two.

If the total credits required differ, the student must complete the larger number. To have the second core or major recorded on the final transcript the student must apply for both fields when filing for graduation. Upon satisfactory completion of the requirements, both fields of study will be recorded on the final transcript.

To receive a second degree, it is necessary to complete the requirements of the second field of study and to complete at least 30 credits more than the number of credits required to complete the first degree.

Degree Requirements 53

Electives

Each associate’s and bachelor’s degree program requires a specified total number of credits. Credits not counted toward general education, pre-major, or core/major requirements are electives. Students may freely choose their elective courses from among the courses offered at the College. However, students should keep in mind the liberal arts and sciences requirement; in some programs it may be necessary to choose as electives only those courses that are designated as liberal arts and sciences courses in order to accumulate the required number of liberal arts and sciences credits to qualify for the degree. Several programs have particular courses or groups of courses that are recommended as electives. Students should consult their adviser when choosing elective courses.

Pathways General Education

Requirements

The new general education model adopted by the

CUNY Board of Trustees it is implemented through a process known as Pathways. This process defines 30 credits of a Common Core general education requirement for all students at CSI and gives some parameters for up to 12 additional credits of general education requirements known as the College Option. Pathways also aligns gateway courses for a number of popular majors. Details about Pathways are available at www.cuny.edu/academics/initiatives/degreepathways.ht

ml

Course Numbering

Students who hold a completed Associates Degree must complete a maximum of 6 College Option credits.

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited post-secondary institution are considered to have completed general education requirements.

GPA

All students are required to achieve at least a 2.0 grade point average in their core or major requirements in order to earn an undergraduate degree at the College.

Some programs require a higher GPA.

Honors Requirements

Departmental Honors

Students may graduate with honors in their field of study in most bachelor’s degree majors. To receive honors, the student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in courses taken in the major and/or pass a comprehensive examination in the subject. The student must also complete an honors thesis or project. This last requirement is the heart of the honors program, for each student must work closely with a faculty member to define the project, carry out the research and investigation, and write the final report or prepare the final project.

Students may receive credit through independent study for their work on an honors project. The projects must be accepted by the department. Students who successfully complete these requirements will receive the notation on their transcript that they have graduated with honors in their field of study. For specific requirements, see the section on Honors Requirements under the bachelor’s degree program description.

Graduation with Honors

Undergraduates who meet the qualifications will receive the associate’s or bachelor’s degree summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude as follows:

Cumulative GPA of at least 3.90: summa cum laude

Cumulative GPA of at least 3.75: magna cum laude

Cumulative GPA of at least 3.50: cum laude.

Common Core Structure:

I. Required Core: 12 credits a. 6 credits of

“English Composition” (RECR) b. 3 (or more) credits of

“Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning

” (RMQR) c. 3 (or more) credits of

“Life and Physical Sciences”

(RLPR)

II. Flexible Core: 18 credits

Students must take six three-credit liberal arts and sciences courses, with at least one course from each of the following five areas and no more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary field. The five areas are: a. World Cultures and Global Issues (FWGR) b. U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) c. Creative Expression (FCER) d. Individual and Society (FISR) e. Scientific World (FSWR)

III. The College Option (COPR

– College Regular Liberal Arts) (COPN

– College Option Non Liberal Arts): 12 credits

The

“College Option” allows a Baccalaureate-granting institution, such as the College of Staten Island, to require up to an additional 12 credits for general education. For transfer students, this requirement can be reduced to 6 or 9 credits. For some students in majors that are accredited by outside agencies these credits may not be required.

Specifics of the Pathways Framework at the College of

Staten Island:

The guiding principle of the College of Staten Island's

Pathways Framework is to retain the current CSI general education program with as little loss and disruption as possible. Specifically, the General Education Committee believes that BS programs (excepting the BS in

Art, Business with International Business concentration,

Communications, Dramatic Arts, Music, and Social

Work), which do not currently include a language requirement, should not be obliged to add a new component to the existing general education provisions.

For Macaulay Honors College, Business (AAS), Computer Technology (AAS), Electrical Engineering Technology (AAS), and the Nursing (AAS) program please refer to the specific section of the Catalog addressing

54 Degree Requirements the Pathways General Education requirements for these programs.

The Engineering Science (AS) program, Engineering

Science (BS) program, Electrical Engineering (BS) program, the Medical Technology (BS) program, and the

Nursing (BS) program have received waivers from

CUNY to specify particular courses students must take in STEM areas of the Common Core, Flexible Core and/or the College Option. If students take different courses other than those specified in these areas, they will be certified as having completed the Pathways

General Education areas, but it may not be possible for them to finish their degree program within the regular number of credits. Please refer to the specific section of the Catalog addressing the Pathways General Education requirements for these programs.

Degree Requirements 55

I. Pathways Required Core 12 credits

*No student is required to complete more than 3 credits to fulfill the Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning or Life and Physical Sciences area requirement, but may choose to do so using the STEM variant.

I. Required Core: 12 credits, all 3-credit courses at the

100-level:

a. English Composition (RECR) 6 credits

English Composition

Course No. Course Title

ENG 111 Introduction to College Writing 3

ENG 151 College Writing 3

Credits Hours

4

4

3 or more credits* b. Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning

(RMQR)

Non-Stem Variant

Course

No. Course Title

MTH 102 Mathematics for Liberal Arts

MTH 121 Finite Mathematics

Credits Hours

3

3

3

3

Stem Variant

Course

No. Course Title

MTH 113

MTH 123

Introduction to Probability and

Statistics

College Algebra and Trigonometry

Credits Hours

4

MTH 130 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

Applied Statistics Using Comput-

MTH 214 ers

Applied Finite Mathematics &

4

3

4

MTH 221 Business

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

4

6

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 3

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 3

MTH 233

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

III

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

3

5

4

4

4

4

4

6

4

4

4

6 c. Life and Physical Sciences (RLPR) 3 or more credits*

Some courses in the Life and Physical Sciences area will have an associated required 1 credit/2 hour laboratory that is in the

College Option. To fulfill the general education requirements non-transfer baccalaureate students must take at least one course from this area with a linked laboratory. Associate students need not take such a course.

Non-Stem Variant

Course

No. Course Title

Contemporary Theories of the

Credits Hours

AST 102 Universe

AST 108 Survey of the Universe

BIO 103 Introduction to Biology

BIO 106 Principles of Biology I

CHM 104 Chemistry in a Nutshell

CHM 106 Chemistry for Today I

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Stem Variant

AST 120 Space Science I

Human Anatomy and Physiology

BIO 150 I

BIO 170 General Biology I

CHM 110 Principles of Chemistry I

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

GEO 100 Planet Earth

PHY 114 Introduction to Physics

PHY 116 Physics I

PHY 120 General Physics I

4

4

3

3

3

3

4

4

3

5

6

3

3

4

3

5

5

4

56 Degree Requirements

II. Pathways Flexible Core 18 credits*,**,***

II. Flexible Core 18 credits*,**,***

Students must take six three-credit liberal arts and sciences courses, with at least one course from each of the following five areas and no more than two courses in any discipline of interdisciplinary field. The five areas are: a. World Cultures and Global Issues (FWGR) b. U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) c. Creative Expression (FCER) d. Individual and Society (FISR) e. Scientific World (FSWR)

*At least six credits must be taken at the 200 level in the Flexible Core and College Option combined. Students are encouraged to take at least one 200 level course in the Flexible Core.

**At least one course chosen to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the Pluralism and Diversity

Requirement. Students are encouraged to select a course that fulfills this requirement in the Flexible Core.

***At least one course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the Contemporary World

Requirement. This course may be the same course as the one selected to fulfill the Pluralism and Diversity Requirement, provided that the course appears on both approved course lists. Students are encouraged to select a course that fulfills this requirement in the Flexible Core.

****To fulfill general education requirements non-transfer baccalaureate students must take at least one course from the Scientific World bucket with a linked laboratory. a. World Cultures and Global Issues Course List (FWGR)

Students pursuing either Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of

Science in Art, Business/International Business concentration,

Communications, Dramatic Arts, Music, and Social Work will be required to take an introductory or intermediate level language course unless they have tested or been exempted. All

STEM majors and other Bachelor of Science students may choose any course offered in this area.

Course No.

AFA/HST

105

ANT 100

ASL 112

CHN 112

FRN 112

GEG 100

GEG 101

HST 106

HST 115

ITL 112

POL 103

SPN 112

Course Title Credits

Contemporary African Issues

Understanding Our Worlds

Basic American Sign Language

I

Basic Mandarin Chinese I

Basic French I

Introduction to Geography

World Regional Geography

3

3

Africa Encounters Europe 3

Comparative Ancient Religion 3

Basic Italian I

Understanding the Poltical

3

World: An Introduction to Political Science

Basic Spanish I

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Hour s

3

3

3

3 b. U.S. Experience in its Diversity Course List (FUSR)

1. Students are required to take the following course to satisfy the FUSR requirement:

CredHour

Course No. Course Title

United States Issues Ideas and

COR 100 Institutions its

3 s

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

2. In addition to COR 100, the following courses have been designated as FUSR. Students may choose one of these courses to satisfy the sixth Flexible Core area.

CredHour its s Course No. Course Title

AFA/ HST

160

AFA 167

African American History 1619 to Present

The Black Experience

3

3

3

3

HON 122

POL 100

The Peopling of New York City 3

American Government and Politics c. Creative Expression Course List (FCER)

Course

No. Course Title

ART 100 Introduction to Visual Arts

3

Credits

3

COM 100 Introduction to Media

COM 101 Media Literacy

HON 121 The Arts in New York City

MUS 105 World Music

MUS 108 Introduction to Jazz History

MUS 110 Introduction to Music History

3

3

3

3

3

3 d. Individual and Society Course List (FISR)

Course

No. Course Title

ECO 101 Introduction to Economics

HST 100 Past and Present

Individual and Society in Ancient

HST 110

HON 224

Greece

Shaping the Future of New York

City

PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy

PHL 130 Introduction to Ethics

PSY 100 Psychology

SOC 100 Sociology

Credits

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Stem Variant

Course

No. Course Title

AST 160 Space Science II

BIO 160 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4

BIO 180 General Biology II

CHM 116 Principles of Chemistry II

CHM 142 General Chemistry II

3

3

3

Credits

4

CHM 240 Analytical Chemistry

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

4

4

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer Science 4

ENS 250/

PHY 250 Engineering Mechanics

GEO 102 Historical Geology

PHY 156 Physics II

PHY 160 General Physics II

PHY 240 Waves and Modern Physics 3

3

3

4

3

3

3

Hour s

3

3

3 e. Scientific World* Course List (FSWR)

Some course in the Scientific World area will have an associated required 1 credit/2 hour laboratory course that is in the

College Option. To fulfill the requirements non-transfer baccalaureate students must take at least one course from this area with a linked laboratory. Associate students need not take such a course.

Non-Stem Variant

Course

No. CourseTitle

Credits

AST 100

Contemporary Theories of the Solar

System

AST 110 Life in the Universe

BIO 108 Principles of Biology II

CSC 115

Introduction to Computer Technology

CSC 119 Computer Technology Concepts

CSC 140 Algorithms and Computation

ENS 102

Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Technology

Science and Technology in New

3

ENS 104 Introduction to Digital Technology 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

HON 223 York City

PHL 100 Introduction to Logic

PHY 107 Maxwell to Einstein and Beyond

3

3

3

Hour s

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

5

4

4

8

7

6

6

3

3

4

Hour s

5

3

3

3

3

3

Hour s

3

3

Degree Requirements 57

58 Degree Requirements

*No student is required to complete more than 3 credits to fulfill requirements in the Scientific World area but may choose to do so using the STEM variant.

Degree Requirements 59

III. Pathways College Option 12 credits

III. College Option 12 credits

The College Option allows a Baccalaureate granting institution, such as the College of Staten Island, to require up to an additional 12 credits for general education. For transfer students this requirement can be reduced to 6 or 9 credits. For some students in majors that are accredited by outside agencies these credits may not be required.

The College Option at CSI is marked by the college's grounding in a Liberal Arts tradition and its belief in challenging its students. Except for laboratory and language courses as outlined below, all courses taken in the College

Option will be at the 200 level or higher. The requirements are as follows:

Textual Aesthetic, and Linguistic Analysis (TALA): One 200-level or above course must be taken within the area of TALA.

Social Scientific Analysis (social science): One 200-level or above course must be taken within the area of social science.

Contemporary World (cont. wrld): One course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the Contemporary World requirement.

Pluralism and Diversity (p&d): One course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the

Pluralism and Diversity requirement.

Requirements below apply to students who are required to take 12 College Option credits. For those requiring 9 credits, they may be earned by taking two four-credit courses from either of the three main areas and a science lab.

For those requiring just 6 credits, these may be satisfied by taking two courses from any two of the three areas.

Cr/Hr All BA Majors and BS Majors which require 114-level language proficiency (BS in Art; Business/International Business concentration; Communications; Dramatic Arts; Music, Social Work)

4 cr/ 4 hr Social Scientific Analysis (social science)

3 cr/ 3 hr** Textual, Aesthetic, and Linguistic

Anlaysis (TALA)

1 cr/2hr

1 cr/2hr

Science lab co-requisite with Life and Physical Sciences (RLPR)

Science lab co-requisite with Scientific World (FSWR)

3cr/4hr** 114-level language***

0 cr/ 0hr**** Contemporary World (cont. wrld)

0 cr/0 hr**** Pluralism and Diversity (p&d)

At least six credits at the 200 level or higher in the Flexible Core and

College Option combined

BS Majors in STEM disciplines,

Accounting, Business, Economics,

Psychology

Social Scientific Analysis (social science)*

Textual, Aesthetic, and Linguistic

Anlaysis (TALA)*

Science lab co-requisite with Life and Physic Sciences (RLPR)

Science lab co-requisite with Scientific World (FSWR)

STEM credits

Contemporary World (cont. wrld.)

Pluralism and Diversity (p&d)

At least six credits at the 200 level or higher in the Flexible Core and

College Option combined

*STEM disciplines may allow students to replace either oneTALA or one Social Science requirement with a broadly-defined STEM course.

**3 credits is the minimum requirement. Students may opt to take course bearing 4 credits and either 3 or 4 hours to fulfill these requirements; additional credits will be applied towards electives.

***If the 114-level language requirement has been met through testing or exemption, an additional TALA or Social

Science course must be substituted.

****These requirements may be fulfilled by courses taken to complete the TALA or Social Science requirements.

60 Degree Requirements

Pathways College Option For Transfer Students

Pathways College Option For Transfer

Students

6*, 9**, 12*** credits

*Students who transfer with a completed Associate Degree must complete a maximum of 6 College Option credits.

1. Transfer students who have not demonstrated proficiency to the second university level in a foreign language and whose major and degree program requires this proficiency will complete the foreign language requirement of the College Option.

2. Transfer students whose major and degree program do not require language proficiency should complete enough credits in STEM (depending on their choice of major), TALA or Social Science buckets of the College

Option to bring the total to 6 credits.

3. Transfer students with a completed Associate Degree are encouraged to complete at least six credits at the

200 level.

**Students who transfer in with more than 30 credits but without an Associate Degree must complete a maximum of

9 College Option credits.

1. Transfer students who have not completed two science courses with laboratories must take two laboratory courses (2 credits, 4 hours).

2. Transfer students who have not demonstrated proficiency to the second university level in a foreign language and whose major and degree program requires this proficiency will complete the foreign language requirement of the College Option.

3. Transfer students who are not required to take a language for their degree program will take either a STEM course or a TALA/Social Science course depending on their major (3 credits).

4. Additional courses to complete 9 credits in the College Option hours must be chosen from TALA/Social Science in the College Option or any area in the Flexible Core to bring the total to 9.

5. Transfer students must complete at least four credits at the 200 level in the College Option.

***Students who transfer in to CSI with 30 or fewer credits must complete 12 College Option credits and all the requirements below, including the requirement to take 6 credits at the 200 level in the Common Core and College O ption combined.

Cr/Hr

4 cr/ 4 hr

All BA Majors and BS Majors which require 114-level language proficiency (BS in Art;

Business/International Business concentration; Communications;

Dramatic Arts; Music, Social Work)

Social Scienctific Analysis (social science)

3 cr/ 3 hr** Textual, Aesthetic, and Linguistic

Anlaysis (TALA)

1 cr/2hr Science lab co-requisite with Life and Physic Sciences (RLPR)

1 cr/2hr Science lab co-requisite with

Scientific World (FSWR)

3cr/4hr** 114-level language***

0 cr/ 0hr**** Contemporary World (cont. wrld)

0 cr/0 hr**** Pluralism and Diversity (p&d)

BS Majors in STEM disciplines,

Accounting, Business, Economics,

Psychology

Social Scienctific Analysis (social science)*

Textual, Aesthetic, and Linguistic

Anlaysis (TALA)*

Science lab co-requisitie with Life and Physic Sciences (RLPR)

Science lab co-requisite with

Scientific World (FSWR)

STEM credits

Contemporary World (cont. wrld.)

Pluralism and Diversity (p&d)

At least six credits at the 200 level or higher in the Flexible Core and

At least six credits at the 200 level or higher in the Flexible Core and

College Option combined College Option combined

*STEM disciplines may allow students to replace either on TALA or one Social Science requirement with a broadly-defined STEM course.

**3 credits is the minimum requirement. Students may opt to take course bearing 4 credits and either 3 or 4 hours to fulfill these requirements; additional credits will be applied towards electives.

***If the 114-level language requirement has been met through testing or exemption, an additional TALA or Social

Science course must be substituted.

****These requirements may be fulfilled by courses taken to complete the TALA or Social Science requirements.

Degree Requirements 61

College Option Social Scientific Analysis (Social Science)

These courses provide an introduction to the social sciences: the role of institutions, groups, and individuals in society. They examine human behavior and thought in its political, economic, social, cultural, and/or geographic context.

Students are introduced to the fundamental methodologies of the social sciences, such as, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, and the critical evaluation of evidence. Courses fulfilling this requirement are in the disciplines of African American studies, American studies, anthropology, communications, economics, geography, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies. Courses satisfying this requirement are marked (social science) at the end of the course description.

College Option Social Scientific Analysis (social science)

Course List

Courses that are marked with an asterisk (*) also fulfill the

Pluralism and Diversity requirement and are identified as (p&d) at the end of the course descriptions. Courses that are marked with a caret (^) also fulfill the Contemporary World requirement and are identified as (cont. wrld.) at the end of the course descriptions.

Course No. Course Title

AFA 160/HST 160 African American History: 1619 to the Present (FUSR)

AMS 101

ANT 100

ECO 101

GEG 100

America: An Introduction

Understanding our Worlds

3

3

(FWGR)

Introduction to Economics (FISR) 3

Introduction to Geography (FWGR) 3

Credit s

3

HST 100

HST 116

Past and Present (FISR)

Freshman Seminar in History

3

3

HST 160/AFA 160 African American History: 1619 to

HST 182/WGS

100 the Present (FUSR)

Women’s History and Feminist

INT 100

PHL 100

PHL 101

3

3

Theory

International Studies

Introduction to Logic (FSWR)

3

3

Introduction to Philosophy (FISR) 3

PHL 130

POL 100

3

3

POL 103

PSY 100

SOC 100

SOC 120

WGS 100/HST

182

Introduction to Ethics (FISR)

American Government and Politics

(FUSR)

Understanding the Political World:

An Introduction to Political Science

(FWGR)

Psychology (FISR)

Sociology (FISR)

Social Problems

Women’s History and Feminist

Theory

3

3

3

3

3

200-level courses with ENG 111 as a prerequisite (see course description for other prerequisites, which may include COR 100):

Course No. Title Credit s

4 AFA 211*/AMS

211*

AFA 247*/HST

266*

American Culture in Black and

White

People and Cultures of Africa 4

African Politics 4 AFA 253*/POL

253*

AFA 260*/HST

207*

AFA 262*/HST

262*

AFA 263*

History of Africa

African American History:

1619-1865

African American History:

4

4

4

62 Degree Requirements

AFA 265*/HST

265*

AFA 266*^/

HST 267*^

1865-Present

History of the Caribbean

Contemporary African Issues

AFA 269*/HST

269*

AFA 275*/GEG

275*

AFA 333*/HST

333*

AFA 361*/HST

361*

Blacks in Urban America:

1900-Present

Place, Race, and Racism

Colonialism and the African

Experience

The Heritage of Marcus Garvey and W.E.B. DuBois

AMS 210/PHL 210 American Philosophy

AMS 211*/AFA

211*

American Culture in Black and

White

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

AMS 212

AMS 214

Twentieth-Century America

America in the World

4

4

AMS 220/GEG 222 Geography of the United States 4

AMS 221/HST 221 The American Dream 4

AMS 222 The City in American Culture

AMS 224/HST 246 Religion in America

AMS 231 American Myths and Realities

AMS 251/HST 240 American Ideas

AMS 258/HST 258 Vietnam and America: 1945-1975 4

AMS 306*/ANT

306*/SOC 306*

Latinas/os in the United States 4

4

4

4

4

ANT 201*

ANT 202

ANT 205*

ANT 225*/COM

225*

ANT 306/AMS

306/SOC 306*

ANT 331*/ SOC

330*/WGS 330*

Cultural Anthropology

Physical Anthropology

Native American Societies

Multicultural Literacy

Latinas/os in the United States

Women and Work

4

4

4

4

4

4

ANT 350*

ANT 460*

Foraging Societies

Personality and Culture

CIN 204/POL 219 Politics, Cinema, Media

COM 225*/ANT Multicultural Literacy

225*

SOC 371*

ECO 250^

Media and the Margins

International Economics

ECO 251*/POL

251*^

ECO 252^/GEG

252^

ECO 256*

International Poltical Economy

Economic Geography

4

4

ECO 257*

ECO 285

EDD 252*/HST

252*

EDP 220*

Analysis of Underdeveloped

Areas

The Japanese Economy

Economics for Engineers

4

4

4

History of Education in the U.S. 4

Special Educational Needs of

People with Disabilities

4

GEG 222/AMS 220 Geography of the United States 4

GEG 223/HST 223 American Landscapes 4

GEG 225^ Cultural Geography 4

GEG 250^

GEG 252^/ECO

252^

GEG 260^

Conservation and Humanity

Economic Geography

Urban Geography

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

GEG 264^/POL

264^

GEG 275*/AFA

275*

HON 206^

Political Geography

Place, Race, and Racism

4

4

HST 201

HST 202

HST 203^

HST 204*

HST 206*^

HST 207*/AFA

260*

HST 208*^

HST 209*^

Non-U.S. Experience: Social

Sciences

History of Western Civilization

Antiquity to 1500

History of Western Civilization since 1500

The World Since 1914

Introduction to Asian Civilization 4

Modern China

History of Africa

4

4

4

4

4

4

HST 210*^

HST 211*

HST 212

HST 213*

HST 214

HST 215

HST 216

History of Modern Latin America 4

Modern Japan 4

History of Modern India

Japanese Civilization

History of the Ancient Near East

Chinese Civilization

4

4

4

4

Greece and the Hellenistic World 4

The Origins of Western Europe:

400-1000 CE

4

Byzantine Thought and 4

Civilization

Introduction to Women’s History

4 HST 217*/WGS

217*

HST 218

HST 219

The Roman World

Greek and Roman Mythology

4

4

HST 220 Medieval Thought and Civilization 4

HST 221/AMS 221 The American Dream 4

HST 222* Islam: Religion and Culture

HST 223/GEG 223 American Landscapes

4

4

HST 224

HST 225

HST 228

HST 229

HST 230

HST 231

HST 234*

HST 235*

Jewish History

History of Christianity

Renaissance and Reformation

Europe

History of Religion from Antiquity to Our Times

Early Modern England

Reacting to the Past

Asian Tigers Since 1945

The Modern Middle East

4

HST 236*

HST 238*/SLS

240*

Asian American History

World Civilization I

HST 239*/SLS

241*

World Civilization II

HST 240/AMS 251 American Ideas

4

HST 244

HST 245

U.S. History: 1607-1865

U.S. History: 1865-Present

HST 246/AMS 224 Religion in America

HST 248* NYC: History and Problems

HST 249*

HST 251*

Italian American History

History of the U.S. City

4

4

HST 252/EDD 252* History of Education in the U.S. 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

HST 257* The History of American

Immigration

4

HST 258/AMS 258 Vietnam and America: 1945-1975 4

HST 260 U.S. History, First Encounters to 4 the Present

Degree Requirements 63

64 Degree Requirements

HST 262*/AFA

262*

HST 263*/AFA

263*

HST 264*

HST 265*/AFA

265*

HST 266*/AFA

247*

HST 267*^/

AFA 266*^/

HST 269*/AFA

269*

HST 270

HST 271^

HST 272^

HST 273

HST 274

HST 275

HST 276

HST 277

HST 278^

African American History:

1619-1865

African American History:

1865-Present

The African Diaspora

History of the Caribbean

Peoples and Cultures of Africa

Contemporary African Issues

Blacks in Urban America:

1900-Present

Modern British History:

1700-1900

Modern British History: 1900 to the Present

Modern Germany

Medieval Russia

History of Modern Russia

Imperial Russia

History of Italy

Europe: 1815-1914

Twentieth-Century Europe

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

HST 284^ The Soviet Union and

Contemporary Russia

History of American Women HST 286*/WGS

286*

HST 291

HST 331*^

The Atlantic World

Black Intellectual Thought in the

African Diaspora

HST 333*/AFA 333 Colonialism and the African

HST 361*/AFA

361*

Experience

The Heritage of Marcus Garvey and W.E.B. DuBois

HST 386*/WGS

386*

HST 389*/WGS

389*

INT 200^

INT 201*^

INT 203*^/

WGS 203*^

The Recovery of Women's Past 4

Themes in American Women's

History

The World and the West:

Contemporary Issues

Latin American Perspectives

Gender in the Contemporary

World

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

MGT 223/POL 223 Public Administration

PHL 200/POL 201 Early Political Theory

PHL 202/POL 202 Modern Political Theory

PHL 204/POL 204 American Political and Legal

Thought

PHL 210/AMS 210 American Philosophy

PHL 213 Existentialism

PHL 216

PHL 217

PHL 220

PHL 221

PHL 223

PHL 224

PHL 236

PHL 237

PHL 240

Ideas and the World: 600

BCE-1600 CE

Ideas and the World: 1600 to the

Present

Experience and Knowledge

Logic and Scientific Method

4

4

4

Philosophical Thinking 4

Selected Issues in Metaphysics 4

Life and Death: Bioethics

The Tragic Dilemma

4

4

Philosophy of Religion 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

POL 201/PHL 200 Early Political Theory

POL 202/PHL 202 Modern Political Theory

POL 204/PHL 204 American Political and Legal

Thought

POL 219/CIN 204 Politics, Cinema, Media

POL 221 The American Presidency

POL 222 The American Legal System

POL 223/MGT 223 Public Administration

POL 231

POL 233

City Hall and Albany

CUNY Internship Program in New

POL 234

York: Government and Politics I

CUNY Internship Program in New

York: Government and Politics II

POL 235/SLS 235 The American Political System

POL 240*^

POL 241

Comparative Government

Western European Politics:

United Kingdom, France, Italy,

Germany

POL 244 From the Soviet Union to the

Commonwealth of Independent

States

Nazism and the Holocaust

International Political Economy

POL 246

POL 251*^/ECO

251*^

POL 252*

POL 253*/AFA

253*

POL 256*^

POL 259^

POL 260^

POL 261^

POL 264/GEG

264^

POL 338*

POL 342*

Middle East Politics

African Politics

East Asian Politics

International Security

International Politics: In Search of a New World Order

International Organizations

Political Geography

POL 349*

POL 353*

PSY 202

PSY 212

PSY 213*

PSY 215*

PSY 217*

PSY 226

PSY 235*/WGS

235*

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Civil Rights and Liberties

Comparative Politics of

Developing Countries

Comparative Human Rights

China: Politics and Foreign

Relations

Psychopathology

Social Psychology

4

4

4

4

Cross-Cultural Psychology

Psychological Perspectives on

Disabilities

Psychology and Chinese Culture 4

Theories of Personality 4

Gender and Sexuality 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

PSY 242

PSY 268*/WGS

268*

PSY 288

SLS 230

SLS 235

Developmental Psychology

Psychology of women

Cognitive Psychology

American Society

The American Political System

SLS 240*/HST

238*

SLS 241*/HST

239*

World Civilization I

World Civilization II

SLS 245/SOC 245 Contemporary Social Issues

SLS 325/SOC 325 Social Thought

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Degree Requirements 65

66 Degree Requirements

SOC 202*/WGS

202*

SOC 210

SOC 212

SOC 220

SOC 226

Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and

Class

4

Sociology of Health and Medicine 4

Criminology 4

Marriage and the Family

Socialization of the Child

4

4

Sociology of Women 4 SOC 230*/WGS

230*

SOC 232

SOC 238*/WGS

238*

SOC 240*^

Sociology of Aging

Sociology of Men

Minority Groups

SOC 245/SLS 245 Contemporary Social Issues

SOC 250 Sociology of Religion

SOC 255

SOC 260*^

Sociology of the Arts

Class, Status, and Power

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

SOC 270 The Community

SOC 274/SWK 274 Social Welfare

SOC 275

SOC 280

SOC 292

SOC 306*/ANT

306*/AMS 306*

Sociology of Education

Sociology and Politics

The Individual in Society

Latinas/os in the United States

SOC 325/SLS 325 Social Thought

SOC 330*/ANT

331*/ WGS 330*

Women and Work

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

SOC 340*

SOC 350*

SOC 371*/COM

371*

Ethnicity and Immigration 4

Psychosocial Aspects of Disability 4

Media and the Margins

SWK 274/SOC 274 Social Welfare

WGS 201* Introduction to Women's Gender

WGS 202*/SOC

202* and Sexuality Studies

Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and

Class

4

4

4

4

Gender in the Contemporary 4

World

Introduction to Women’s History

4

WGS 203*^/

INT 203*^/

WGS 217*/HST

217*

WGS 230*/SOC

230*

WGS 235*/PSY

235*

WGS 238*/SOC

238*/

WGS 268*/PSY

268*

WGS 286*/HST

286*

Sociology of Women

Gender and Sexuality

Sociology of Men

Psychology of Women

History of American Women

4

4

4

4

4

WGS 330*/SOC

330*/ANT 331*

WGS 386*/HST

386*

WGS 389*/HST

389*

Women and Work

The Recovery of Women's Past

Themes in American Women's

History

4

4

4

College Option Textual, Aesthetic, and Linguistic Analysis (TALA)

These courses introduce students to the literary, visual, and performing arts. Students will examine the historical and cultural aspects of various works, as well as methods for their analysis and/or creation. This requirement aims to encourage active inquiry into the complexity of language, art, and communication. Courses included in this category are of a general, fundamental nature. The 200-level courses have a significant writing component and subscribe to the principle of writing across the curriculum. Courses satisfying this requirement are marked (TALA).

College Option Textual, Aesthetic, and Linguistic Analysis

(TALA) Course List

Courses that are marked with an asterisk (*) also fulfill the

Pluralism and Diversity requirement and are identified (p&d) at the end of the course descriptions. Courses that are marked with a caret (^) also fulfill the Contemporary World requirement and are identified (cont. wrld.) at the end of the course descriptions.

Course No. Course Title

AMS 150/DAN

150

Dance History: Twentieth-Century

Survey

Credit s

3

ART 100 3

ART 120

ART 130

ART 150

CIN 100

CIN 111

Introduction to the Visual Arts

(FCER)

Introductory Drawing

Introductory Painting

Introductory Sculpture

Introduction to Film

Video I

3

3

3

3

3

COM 100

COM 101

DAN 150/AMS

150

DRA 100

MUS 105

MUS 108

MUS 110

MUS 120

MUS 125

PHO 101

Introduction to Media (FCER)

Media Literacy (FCER)

Dance History: Twentieth-Century

Survey

Introduction to the Theater

World Music (FCER)

Introduction to Jazz History

(FCER)

Introduction to Music History

(FCER)

Rudiments of Music

Introduction to Music Theory

Introduction to Photography

3

3

3

4

3

3

3

3

3

3

200-level courses

Course No. Title Credits

4 AFA 221*/ENH

221*

AFA 225

AFA 323*/ENL

392*

AMS 205*/ART

205*

The Black Writer in the Modern

World

Modern Art in Latin America

AMS 209/ART 209 Art and Society in America

AMS 230/CIN 230 American Film and American Myth

AMS 236/MUS

236

Music in American Life

American Musical Theater AMS 237/MUS

237

AMS 241

AMS 243

Popular Culture and Mass Society

American Humor

AMS 252

ANT 225*/COM

225*

ARB 340

ART 200

ART 201

ART 203

African American Literature

Contemporary Third World

Literature

American Art

Multicultural Literacy

Arabic Literature

History of Art to the Renaissance

History of Art after the

Renaissance

Art of the Ancient World

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Degree Requirements 67

68 Degree Requirements

ART 205*/ AMS

205*

Modern Art in Latin America

ART 207

ART 208*

Nineteenth-Century Art

Twentieth-Century Art

ART 209/AMS 209 Art and Society in America

ART 210 The Architect and Society

ART 240*/WGS

270*

CHN 315/LNG

315

Women and the Fine Arts

Languages in Contrast: English and Chinese

CIN 203^ Chinese Cinema

CIN 204/POL 219 Politics, Cinema, Media

CIN 230/AMS 230 American Film and American Myth

CIN 240* Third World Cinema

CIN 401

CIN 402

American Directors I

American Directors II

CIN 404

CIN 405

CIN 407

CIN 408

COM 200

COM 201

COM 225*/ANT

225*/

COM 371*/SOC

371*

DRA 215/ENH

212

DRA 272

ENH 205

ENH 206

French Directors I

French Directors II

European Cinema

Global Cinema

Media and Culture

History and Theory of Television

Multicultural Literacy

Media and the Margins

Modes of Drama

DRA 273

DRA 274

DRA 345/SPN 345 Spanish Theatre

DRA 426/FRN 426 Classical French Drama

DRA 465/SPN 465 Spanish Theatre in the 20th

Century

ENH 201

ENH 202

ENH 203

British Literature to 1800

British Literature since 1800

Literary History of the U.S. to 1855

ENH 204

Performance Histories (Ancient to

Early Modern)

Performance Histories

(1600-1900)

Performance Histories

(1901-Present)

Literary History of the U.S. since

1855

Classics of European Literature

Classics of Modern World

Literature

Asian Literature Before 1900 ENH 207*

ENH 208

ENH 209^

ENH 210

ENH 211

ENH 212/DRA

215

ENH 213

Contemporary Literature

Literature and Global Cultures

Introduction to Fiction

Introduction to Poetry

Modes of Drama

ENH 214

ENH 215

ENH 216

ENH 217

ENH 218

ENH 221*/AFA

221*

Nonfiction

Trends in Literature and Film

Literature and Humanities

The Bible and Later Literature

Introduction to Shakespeare

Introduction to the Study of

Literature

African American Literature

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

ENH 222*/WGS

222*

ENH 224*

Women and Literature

ENH 230

ENL 329*

U.S. Literature: Multicultural

Perspectives

Introduction to Language

Migration and Diasporas in

Literature and Culture

Modern Asian Culture

Women Novelists

ENL 335*

ENL 348*/WGS

348*

ENL 366*

ENL 368*/WGS

368*

ENL 384*/WGS

384*

ENL 385*/WGS

385*

ENL 386*/WGS

387*

ENL 390*/WGS

390*/

ENL 391*/WGS

391*

ENL 392*AFA

323*

ENL 395*

Walt Whitman

Queer Studies

Major Woman Author I

Major Woman Author II

Major Woman Author III

Studies in Women in Literature and the Arts

Woman as Hero

The Black Writer in the Modern

World

Mythic Concepts and Archetypes in Literature

ENL 396*/LNG

396*

ENL 397*/LNG

397*

ENL 398*

Studies in Global Literature I

Studies in Global Literature II

INT 203*^/WGS

203*^

Cultural Variety in the Literature of the United States

HON 205* Non-U.S. Experience: Humanities

FRN 426/DRA 426 Classical French Drama

Gender in the Contemporary World

Aspects of Contemporary China INT 230*^/LNG

230*^

LNG 230*^/INT

230*^

Aspects of Contemporary China

LNG 266*/WGS

266*

LNG 267*/WGS

267*

LNG 315/CHN

315

LNG 396*/ENL

396*

Women in European Literature to the Renaissance

Women in European Literature after the Renaissance

Languages in Contrast: English and Chinese

Studies in Global Literature I

LNG 397*/ENL

397*/

MUS 203*

MUS 236/AMS

236

MUS 237/AMS

237

MUS 239*

Studies in Global Literature II

Music History I - History of Jazz

Music in American Life

American Musical Theater

History of Jazz

PHL 243*^

PHL 344*

Comparative Religion

Eastern Philosophy

POL 219/CIN 204 Politics, Cinema, Media

SPN 325* The Civilization of Pre-Columbian

Spanish America

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

4

3

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Degree Requirements 69

mus

70 Degree Requirements

SPN 330* The Civilization of Spanish

America

SPN 345/DRA 345 Spanish Theatre

SPN 350* Introduction to Spanish American

Literature

SPN 465/DRA 465 Spanish Theatre in the 20th

Century

SPN 480* Literature of the Hispanic

Caribbean

WGS 201*

WGS 203*^/INT

203*^

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality

Studies

Gender in the Contemporary World

Women and Literature WGS 222*/ENH

222*

WGS 266*/LNG

266*

WGS 267*/LNG

267*

WGS 270*/ART

240*

Women in European Literature to the Renaissance

Women in European Literature after the Renaissance

Women and the Fine Arts

WGS 348*/ENL

348*

WGS 353

Women Novelists

WGS 368*/ENL

368*

WGS 384*/ENL

384*

WGS 385*/ENL

385

WGS 387*/ENL

386*

WGS 390*/ENL

390*

WGS 391*/ENL

391*

The Feminist Challenge in French

Literature

Queer Studies

Major Woman Author I

Major Woman Author II

Major Woman Author III

Studies in Women in Literature and the Arts

Woman as Hero

Any 300- or 400-level course in foreign literature or equivalent courses in other languages, if offered. Some of these courses require a reading knowledge of the language; others allow students without knowledge of the language to read the works in English translation.

Foreign language courses at the 300- or 400-level are included since many students place directly into these upper-level courses and need not pass through the prerequisite language courses.

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Degree Requirements 71

College Option Life and Physical Sciences Laboratory Course List

College Option Life and Physical Sciences Laboratory Course List (Non-Stem Variant))

Course No. Course Title Credit

AST 103

BIO 107

CHM 107

GEO 101

Galactic Laboratory

Principles of Biology I Laboratory

Chemistry for Today I Laboratory

Planet Earth Laboratory

1

1

1

1

College Option Life and Physical Sciences Laboratory Course List (Stem Variant))

Course No. Course Title Credit

BIO 171

CHM 111

General Biology I Laboratory

Principles of Chemistry I

Laboratory

1

1

CHM 121

GEO 103

PHY 121

General Chemistry I Laboratory

Historical Geology Laboratory

General Physics I Laboratory

1

1

1

72 Degree Requirements

College Option Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning Laboratory Course List

College Option Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning Laboratory Course List (Stem Variant)

Course No.

Course Title Credit

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1

College Option Scientifc World Laboratory Course List

College Option Scientifc World Laboratory Course List (Non-Stem Variant)

Course No. Course Title Credits

AST 101 Planetary Laboratory

AST 111 Life in the Universe Laboratory

1

1

BIO 109 Priniciples of Biology II Laboratory 1

CSC 117 Computer Technology Lab 1

1 CSC 141 Algorightms and Computation

Laboratory

ENS 103 Introduction to Electrical and

Electronic Laboratory

ENS 105 Introduction to Digital Technology

Laboratory

1

1

College Option Scientifc World Laboratory Course List (Stem Variant)

Course No. Course Title Credits

BIO 181 General Biology II Laboratory

CHM 117 Principles of Chemistry II

Laboratory

1

1

CHM 127 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1

GEO 103 Historical Geology Laboratory 1

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1

Degree Requirements 73

74 Degree Requirements

College Option 114-level Language Course List

College Option 114-level Language Course List

Course No. Course Title

ARB 114

ASL 114

CHN 114

FRN 114

ITL 114

SPN 114

Basic Arabic II

American Sign Language II

Basic Mandarin II

Basic French II

Basic Italian II

Basic Spanish II

4

4

4

4

Credit s

4

4

Degree Requirements 75

Contemporary World Course List

Contemporary World Requirement: Courses fulfilling this requirement are designed to provide an understanding of global and regional contexts. This requirement will cover contemporary global issues, ideas, and institutions. The courses will emphasize the interactions of societies along political, economic, and cultural dimensions. Courses will cover the development, formation, and impact of the global context and ways in which different nations, societies, and cultures influence and are influenced by global forces. Students will use comparative and historical analytic frameworks for understanding the contemporary world.

At least one course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the Contemporary World Requirement. This course may be the same course as the one selected to fulfill the Pluralism and Diversity Requirement, provided that the course appears on both approved course lists. Students are encouraged to select a course that fulfills this requirement in the Flexible Core.

These courses have ENG 151 and COR 100 as prerequisites, have a significant writing component, and subscribe to the principle of writing across the curriculum. Courses satisfying this requirement are marked (cont. wld.) at the end of the course description.

Courses that are marked with a (*) also satisfy the Pluralism and Diversity requirement and are identified as (p&d) at the end of the course descriptions.

The Contemporary World Course List

Course No.

AFA 266*/HST

267*

CIN 203

ECO 250

ECO 251*

ECO 252

ENH 209

GEG 225

GEG 250

Title

Contemporary African

Issues

Chinese Cinema

International Economics

International Political

Economy

Economic Geography

Literature and Global

4

4

Cultures

Cultural Geography 4

Conservation and Humanity 4

4

4

4

Credit s

4

GEG 252

GEG 260

GEG 264

HON 205

Economic Geography

Urban Geography

Political Geography

4

4

4

4

HON 206

HST 203

HST 206*

HST 208*

Non- U.S. Experience:

Humanities

Non-U.S. Experience: Social

Sciences

The World since 1914

Modern China

History of Modern Latin

America

Modern Japan

4

4

4

4

4 HST 209*

HST 210*

HST 267*

HST 271

HST 272

HST 278

HST 284

History of Modern India

Contemporary African

Issues

4

4

Modern British History: 1900 to the Present

4

Modern Germany 4

Twentieth-Century Europe 4

The Soviet Union and

Contemporary Russia

4

HST 331*

INT 200*

INT 201

INT 203*

INT 230*

Black Intellectual Thought in the African Diaspora

The World and the West:

Contemporary Issues

4

4

Latin American Perspectives 4

Gender in the Contemporary 4

World

Aspects of Contemporary

China

4

76 Degree Requirements

The Contemporary World Course List

Course No.

LNG 230*

PHL 243*

POL 240*

POL 251*

POL 256*

POL 259

POL 260

POL 261

POL 264

PSY 213*

SOC 240*

SOC 260*

WGS 203*

Title

Aspects of Contemporary

China

Comparative Religion

Comparative Government

International Political

Economy

East Asian Politics

International Security

International Politics: In

Search of a New World

Order

International Organizations 4

Political Geography 4

Cross-cultural Psychology 4

Minority Groups 4

Class, Status, and Power

Gender in the Contemporary

World

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Credit s

4

Pluralism and Diversity Course List

Pluralism and Diversity courses focus on questions of difference. More specifically, they examine issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, ethnicity, and ability. These courses deploy historical, theoretical, and critical scholarship to study the issues listed above.

At least one course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the Pluralism and Diversity requirements. Students are encouraged to select a course that fulfills this requirement in the Flexible Core.

Courses may be 200-, 300-, or 400-level. These courses have a minimum prerequisite of ENG 111. Courses that fulfill the Pluralism and Diversity requirement and are identified as (p&d) at the end of the course descriptions.

Courses that are marked with a caret (^) also fulfill the Contemporary World requirement and are identified as (cont. wrld.) at the end of the course descriptions.

Pluralism and Diversity Course List

Course Title

AFA 211 American Culture in Black and

White

AFA 221/ African American Literature

AFA 262 African American History

1619-1865

AFA 263 African American History

1865-Present

AFA 266^ Contemporary African Issues

Credits

4

4

ENH 221

AFA 247 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 4

AFA 253 African Politics

AFA 260 History of Africa

4

4

4

4

4

4 AFA 269 Blacks in urban America: 1900 to

Present

AFA 275 Place, Race, and Racism

AFA 323 The Black Writer in the Modern

World

AFA 333 Colonialism and the African

Experience

AFA 361 The Heritage of Marcus Garvey and W.E.B. DuBois

4

4

4

4

ANT 225 Multicultural Literacy

ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America

4

4

AMS 306 Latinas/os in the United States 4

Pluralism and Diversity Course List

Course Title

AMS 205 Modern Art in Latin America

AMS 211 American Culture in Black and

White

ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts 4

ANT 201 Cultural Anthropology

ANT 205 Native American Societies

4

4

ANT 225 Multicultural Literacy 4

ANT 306 Latinas/os in the United States 4

Credits

4

4

ANT 331 Women and Work

ANT 350 Foraging Societies

ANT 460 Personality and Culture

CIN 240 Third World Cinema

COM 225 Multicultural Literacy

COM 371 Media and the Margins

4

4

ECO 251^ International Political Economy 4

ECO 256 Analysis of Underdeveloped 4

Areas

ECO 257 The Japanese Economy

EDD 252 History of Education in the

United States

ENH 207 Asian Literature Before 1900

ENH 221 African American Literature

4

4

4

4

ENH 222 Women and Literature

ENH 224 U.S. Literature: Multicultural

Perspectives

ENL 329 Migration and Diasporas in

Literature and Culture

ENL 335 Modern Asian Literature

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

ENL 348

ENL 366

ENL 368

ENL 384

Women Novelists

Walt Whitman

Queer Studies

Major Woman Author I

4

4

4

4

4

ENL 385 Major Woman Author II

ENL 386 Major Woman Author III

ENL 390 Studies in Women in Literature and the Arts

ENL 391 Woman as Hero

ENL 392 The Black Writer in the Modern

World

ENL 395 Mythic Concepts and Archetypes in Literature

4

4

4

4

4

4

ENL 396 Studies in Global Literature I

ENL 397 Studies in Global Literature II

ENL 398 Cultural Variety in the Literature of the United States

EDP 220 Special Educational Needs of

People with Disabilities

GEG 275

HST 207

Place, Race, and Racism

History of Africa

4

4

4

HST 217 Introduction of Women's History 4

HST 222 Islam: Religion and Culture 4

4

4

4

HST 234 Asian Tigers since 1945

HST 238 World Civilization I

HST 239 World Civilization II

HST 251 History of the U.S. City

4

4

4

4

HST 252 History of Education in the

United States

4

HST 206^ Modern China 4

HST 208^ History of Modern Latin America 4

Degree Requirements 77

78 Degree Requirements

Pluralism and Diversity Course List

Course Title

HST 209^ Modern Japan

HST 210^ History of Modern India

HST 262 African American History

1619-1865

HST 263 African American History

1865-Present

HST 264 The African Diaspora

4

4

HST 265 History of the Caribbean 4

HST 266 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 4

HST 267^ Contemporary African Issues

HST 269 Blacks in Urban America

4

4

1900-Present

HST 286 History of American Women

HST 331^ Black Intellectual Thought in the

African Diaspora

4

4

HST 333 Colonialism and the African

Experience

HST 361 The Heritage of Marcus Garvey and W.E.B. DuBois

4

4

Credits

4

4

4

HST 386 The Recovery of Women's Past 4

HST 389 Themes in American Women's

History

4

INT 200^ The World and the West:

Contemporary Issues

INT 203^ Gender in the Contemporary

World

4

4

INT 230^ Aspects of Contemporary China 4

LNG 230^ Aspects of Contemporary China 4

LNG 266 Women in European Literature to the Renaissance

LNG 267 Women in European Literature after the Renaissance

LNG 396

LNG 397

Studies in Global Literature I

Studies in Global Literature II

4

4

4

4

MUS 203 Music History I - History of Jazz 3

NRS 305 Women's Health Issues Across the Lifecycle

3

PHL 243^ Comparative Religion

PHL 344 Eastern Philosophy

4

4

POL 240^ Comparative Government 4

POL 251^ International Political Economy 4

POL 252 Middle East Politics

POL 256^ Eastern Asian Politics

POL 253 African Politics

POL 338 Civil Rights and Liberties

4

4

4

4

POL 342 Comparative Politics of

Developing Countries

POL 349 Comparative Human Rights

POL 353 China: Politics and Foreign

Relations

PSY 213^ Cross-Cultural Psychology

PSY 215 Psychological Perspectives on

Disabilities

4

4

4

4

4

PSY 217 Psychology and Chinese Culture 4

PSY 235 Gender and Sexuality 4

PSY 268 Psychology of women

SLS 240 World Civilization I

SLS 241 World Civilization II

4

4

4

SOC 202 Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and

Class

4

Degree Requirements 79

Pluralism and Diversity Course List

Course Title

SOC 240^ Minority Groups

SOC 260^ Class, Status, and Power 4

SOC 306 Latinas/os in the United States 4

SOC 330 Women and work

SOC 340 Ethnicity and Immigration

4

4

SOC 350 Psychosocial Aspects of

Disability

SOC 371 Media and the Margins

Credits

4

4

4

4 SPN 325 The Civilization of

Pre-Columbian Spanish America

SPN 330 The Civilization of Spanish

America

SPN 350 Introduction to Spanish

American Literature

SPN 480 LIterature of the Hispanic

Caribbean

4

4

4

WGS 201 Women's, Gender, and Sexuality

Studies

WGS

203^

Gender in the Contemporary

World

4

4

WGS 217 Introduction to Women's History 4

WGS 222 Women and Literature 4

WGS 230 Sociology of Women

WGS 235 Gender and Sexuality

WGS 238 Sociology of Men

WGS 266 Women in European Literature to the Renaissance

WGS 267 Women in European after the

Renaissance

WGS 268 Psychology of Women

WGS 270 Women and the Fine Arts

WGS 330 Women and Work

4

4

4

4

4

WGS 348 Women Novelists

WGS 368 Queer Studies

WGS 384 Major Woman Author I

WGS 385 Major Woman Author II

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

WGS 386 The Recovery of Women's Past 4

WGS 387 Major Woman Author III 4

WGS 389 Themes in American Women's

History

4

WGS 390 Studies in Women in Literature and the Arts

4

WGS 391 Woman as Hero 4

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements

Courses are classified as liberal arts and sciences or as non-liberal arts and sciences. For undergraduate degrees, the New York State Department of Education requires that a portion of the credit hours in the degree program must be in the liberal arts and sciences. These requirements are:

Associate in Arts (AA) and Bachelor of Arts (BA), three-quarters of the credits shall be in the liberal arts and sciences

Associate in Science (AS) and Bachelor of Science (BS), one-half of the credits shall be in the liberal arts and sciences

Associate in Applied Science (AAS), one-third of the credits shall be in the liberal arts and sciences

CSI courses are classified as follows:

Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses

AFA African American Studies (except AFA 122,

80 Degree Requirements

AMS

ANT

ART

ECO

EDC

EDD

EDE

EDS

ENG

ENH

ENL

ENS

PHL

PHO

PHY

POL

PSY

SCI

SLS

SOC

SPN

ASL

AST

BIO

CHM

CHN

CIN

COM

COR

CSC

DAN

DRA

FNC/EC

O

FRN

GEG

GEO

HSS

HST

INS

INT

ITL

LNG

MGT/EC

O

MGT/PO

L

MTH

MUS

203)

American Studies

Anthropology

Art History (ART 100, 103, 104, 105, 106,

200, 201, 203, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211,

300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307,

308, 310, 311, 314, 319, 410, 411, 440,

441)

American Sign Language

Astronomy

Biology (except BIO 316)

Chemistry

Chinese

Cinema Studies (CIN 100, 203, 204, 210,

220, 230, 240, 271, 274, 301, 302, 303,

304, 305, 309, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405,

406, 407, 408, 436)

Communications (COM 100, 150, 200, 201,

203, 205, 211, 214, 220, 225, 230, 232,

241, 277, 312, 315, 332, 370, 371, 374,

400, 412, 415, 420, 425, 432, 438, 445,

450, 465, 475, 480, 490)

General Education

Computer Science (CSC 115, CSC 117,

CSC 119, CSC 126, CSC 140, CSC 141,

CSC 332, CSC 382 , CSC 490)

Dance (only DAN 150)

Dramatic Arts (DRA 100, 101, 260, 261,

272, 273, 274, 315, 350, 373, 380, 460, all

DRA/ENG, DRA/ENH, DRA/ENL,

DRA/FRN, and DRA/SPN courses)

Economics

Early Childhood Education (EDC 215, 216)

Education (EDD 252)

Elementary Education (EDE 200, 260)

Secondary Education (EDS 200, 201, 202)

English

English

English

Engineering Science (ENS 100, 250, 309,

310, 316, 331, 350, 356, 383, 384, 450,

471)

Finance/Economics (FNC/ECO 213, 214,

240, 315, 345, 360, and 370)

French

Geography

Geology

Honors College/Honors Seminar

History

Integrated Science

International Studies

Italian

Language

Management/Economics (only MGT/ECO

230, 261)

Management/Political Science (only

MGT/POL 223, 323, 339)

Mathematics

Music (MUS 105, 108, 110, 120, 125, 211,

212, 223, 224, 225, 226, 236, 237, 241,

242, 243, 244, 258, 322, 326, 338, 360,

400, 402, 403, 420, 422, 424, 430, 440,

441, 450, 460, 470)

Philosophy

PHO 101, 201, 314, 365

Physics

Political Science (except POL 335, 394)

Psychology (except PSY 103, 211, 318,

340, 368)

Science (only SCI 106)

Science, Letters, and Society

Sociology

Spanish

WGS

Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Non-Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses

ACC

AFA

Accounting

African American Studies (only AFA 122,

ARC

ART

BIO

BUS

CIN

203)

Architecture

Art (ART 120, 125, 130, 150, 160, 170, 220,

225, 230, 245, 250, 260, 270, 275, 280, 285,

305, 320, 325, 330, 340, 341, 342, 360, 370,

375, 380, 445, 475)

Biology (only BIO 316)

CET

COM

CSC

Business

Cinema Studies (except CIN 111, 112, 113,

120, 211, 212, 311, 312, 314, 390, 411, 497)

Civil Engineering Technology

Communications (COM 115, 210, 240, 249,

250, 251, 260, 261, 270, 271, 314, 317, 320,

341, 351, 380, 390, 492)

Computer Science (except CSC 115, CSC

DAN

DRA

EDC

EDD

EDE

EDP

EDS

117, CSC 119, CSC 126, CSC 140, CSC

141,CSC 332, CSC 382 and CSC 490)

Dance (except DAN 150)

Dramatic Arts (DRA 110, 131, 140, 141, 142,

210, 213, 214, 217, 220, 221, 230, 231, 233,

235, 270, 271, 310, 314, 320, 321, 331, 352,

370, 371, 375, 410, 420, 421, 430, 470, 490)

Early Childhood Education (except EDC 215,

216)

Education - General (EDD 400)

Elementary Education (except EDE 200,

260)

Special Education

Secondary Education (except EDS 200, 201,

202)

Electrical Engineering Technology ELT

ENS

ENT

FNC

HED

HMA

LGS

MDT

MGT

Engineering Science (ENS 102, 110, 220,

221, 241, 320, 336, 340, 341, 359, 380, 410,

416, 420, 422, 429, 430, 432, 434, 436, 438,

439, 440, 446, 459, 462, 464, 470, 480, 491,

492)

Engineering Technology

Finance (only FNC 220, 350)

Health Education

Medical Assistant

Legal Studies

Medical Technology

Management (except MGT/POL 223,

MGT/ECO 230, MGT/ECO 261, MGT/POL

323, MGT/POL 339)

Marketing

Music (MUS 115, 116, 123, 124, 130, 131,

MKT

MUS

144, 145, 150, 151, 164, 165, 180, 181, 190,

191, 215, 216, 232, 233, 234, 246, 247, 250,

251, 252, 253, 264, 265, 270, 280, 281, 290,

291, 301, 323, 325, 332, 340, 352, 353, 363,

364, 370, 380, 381, 383, 390, 391, 393, 431,

433, 436, 480, 481, 483, 490, 491, 493)

Nursing

Physician Assistant

NRS

PAT

PED

PHO

PHT

POL

PSY

Fitness for Life

Photography (except PHO 101, PHO 201,

PHO 314, PHO 365)

Physical Therapy

Political Science (only POL 335, 394)

Psychology (only PSY 103, 211, 318, 340,

368)

SEEK Orientation SKO

SPD

SWK

Student Services

Social Work

Internships and field study courses are non-liberal arts and sciences.

Degree Requirements 81

82 Degree Requirements

New Student Orientation Requirement

Students who enter the College with fewer than six credits are required to complete the orientation requirement.

Students are expected to complete this requirement during their first semester or prior to the completion of 12 equated credits.

To satisfy the requirement, students may choose between two options:

(A) Successful completion of a one-credit freshman orientation course:

SPD 101 Issues in College Life (2 hours; 1 credit) or

SKO 100 Freshman Orientation (2 hours; 1 credit)

(open only to SEEK students) or

(B) Complete the five components of the non-credit

College Life Unit Experiences (CLUE) program, which include:

Attendance at a general orientation session on such topics as the purposes of higher education, an overview of College policies and services, and an appreciation of diversity. Students should attend the orientation session prior to the beginning of classes. and

(C) Attendance at four CLUE-certified events: two

Personal Growth Experiences and two

Co-curricular Experiences. Personal Growth topics include study skills, career development, self-development, substance abuse, and pluralism. Co-curricular Experiences include events offered in conjunction with the scholarly, cultural, and civic programs presented regularly at the College.

Minor Requirements

In addition to completing the requirements of a major for a bachelor’s degree, students may choose to declare a minor. Students shall not declare minors in the same discipline as their majors. Requirements for completing a particular minor may be found in the section describing programs and courses in that field. Students are encouraged to consider taking a minor to guide their choice of elective courses into a coherent package and to enhance their career opportunities.

In order for a minor to be recorded on the student’s final transcript, the student must apply for the minor when filing for graduation.

Technology in Teaching and Learning

Technology is used in classes at the College of Staten Island to enhance students’ learning experience, reinforce class discussion, and provide better communication. In order for the College to successfully infuse technology in teaching and learning to enhance the College experience, the following applications are used: Blackboard, Internet search/research, Excel, Access, Email (with attachments), Word, PowerPoint

Students should anticipate using these applications and are expected to have some knowledge of them. The College requires and cultivates technological literacy in its students and employees. The Office of Information Technology at CSI offers tutorials and workshops for students. More information on technology tutorials and workshops is available on the College Website at http://www.csi.cuny.edu/studenthelpdesk/Training/index.htm

http://www.csi.cuny.edu/studenthelpdesk/Training/index.htm or call 718.982.3695.

Writing Across the Curriculum

Students develop college-level writing skills in courses that are chosen across the curriculum. Quality writing skills are learned in courses that include a significant writing component in the laboratory sciences, social sciences, literature, and languages.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 83

MAJORS, DISCIPLINES AND COURSE

DESCRIPTIONS

Accounting

(Bachelor of Science, Minor)

School of Business, Interim Founding Dean, Susan

Holak,Susan Holak, BS, MPhil, PhD

Building 3N, Room 219

Chairperson and Assocaite Professor Jonathan Peters

The program offers preparation for careers in finance and managerial accounting. For admission, continuation, and graduation from the Bachelor of Science degree program in Accounting, students must maintain a cumulative 2.5 GPA. This requirement does not apply to students enrolled in the AAS program, non-Accounting students pursuing an Accounting minor, or non-Accounting students enrolling in individual courses.

Accounting (BS)

Pre-Major Requirements: 39-43 credits

(Please note that the prerequisites for several Core courses include a specific math course (MTH 121, or

MTH 123, MTH 130, MTH 230, MTH 231). Students may also use this course to fulfill a General Education requirement)

ACC 114

ACC 121

BUS 160

Introduction to Accounting I

Introduction to Accounting II 4 credits

Business Law I

4 credits

3 credits

BUS 215

ECO 111

ECO 112

FNC/ECO

240

MGT 110

MGT/ECO

230

MKT 111

Information Management 4 credits

Introduction to

Microeconomics 4 credits

Introduction to

Macroeconomics

Managerial Finance

4 credits

3 credits

Organizational Theory and

Management

Introduction to Economic and Managerial Statistics

Marketing

3 credits

4 credits

3 credits

In addition to the course taken to satisfy

Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning

(RMQR), students must take an additional math course from the following list:

MTH 130 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

MTH 221 Applied Finite Mathematics and

Business Calculus

MTH 223 Technical Calculus

3-6 credits

3 credits

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

I

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

4 credits

4 credits

6 credits

3 credits

3 credits

II

MTH 236 Accelerated Calculus II 5 credits

Major Requirements: 37 credits

ACC 215 Intermediate Accounting I

ACC 225 Intermediate Accounting II

ACC 241

ACC 310

BUS 260

FNC/ECO

Federal Income Taxation I

Cost Accounting I

Business Law II

Managerial Finance II

345

Plus 16 additional credits in related subjects chosen with the written approval of the student's advisor.

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

4 credits

16 credits

Managerial Accounting

Note: Accounting majors may wish to take the examination for Certified Managerial Accountant.

Total Credits Required: 120

Applicants for Certified Public Accountancy

Accounting majors who wish to apply for admission to the State examination for public accountancy must complete all courses listed above and must include the following five courses, all of which qualify as part of the

16 credits of related subjects.

ACC 250

ACC 414

ACC 415

ACC 422

BUS/COM

211

Accounting Information

Systems

Advanced Accounting

CPA Problems and Current

Issues

Standards and Procedures of

Financial Audits

Communications in a

Corporate Setting

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

Honors

To graduate with honors in Accounting a student must have a 3.5 grade point average in business courses and must have a 3.25 grade point average overall. An honors thesis or project supervised by a member of the

Business faculty must be completed.

Accounting Minor

Minor Requirements: 18 credits

ACC 114 Introduction to Accounting I

ACC 121 Introduction to Accounting II

ACC 215 Intermediate Accounting I

Two courses in accounting at the 200 or 300 level

Accounting Courses

ACC 114 Introduction to Accounting I

4 hours; 4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

6 credits

84 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Introduction to the concepts and principles of accounting.

Data accumulation technique. Emphasis on preparation and interpretation of financial statements. Areas of concentration include the accounting cycle, accounting for sole proprietorship, and introduction to partnership and corporate accounting.

Prerequisite: MTH 030 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Math Assessment Test and the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing, and the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading or the equivalent.

ACC 121 Introduction to Accounting II

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of ACC 114. Partnership, corporations, and an introduction to cost accounting. Other topics discussed are current and long-term liabilities and statements of cash flow.

Prerequisite: ACC 114

ACC 215 Intermediate Accounting I

4 hours; 4 credits

Intense coverage of accounting principles, valuation, and accounting for current assets, plant assets, acquisitions, disposals, depreciation and depletion, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities, and concepts of present and future value. Emphasis is placed on pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and Accounting Principles Board.

Prerequisites: ACC 121

Pre- or corequisite: BUS 150 or BUS 250 or CSC 102

ACC 225 Intermediate Accounting II

4 hours; 4 credits

In-depth examination of longterm liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and income determination. Topics include bonds, stock issuance, retained earnings, leases, pensions, deferred taxes, and analysis of the statement of cash flow.

Prerequisite: ACC 215

ACC 235 Government and Not-for-Profit

Accounting

3 hours; 3 credits

Thorough discussion and analysis of accounting for state and local governments and other not-for-profit institutions such as universities, hospitals, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. Topics discussed will include budgetary accounting, fund accounting, account groups, and financial statements.

Prerequisite: ACC 215

ACC 241 Federal Income Taxation I

3 hours; 3 credits

A comprehensive study of federal income tax principles and concepts as they apply to individuals. Tax treatment of the individual is stressed initially with emphasis on rates and exemptions, concepts of gross income, recognition and realization of income, and capital gain and loss concepts. Additional topics include exclusions, deductions and credits, analysis of property transactions, federal tax research, preparation of individual federal income tax returns, and computer tax returns.

Prerequisite: ACC 121

ACC 250 Accounting Information Systems

4 credits; 4 hours

This course introduces the concept of computer information systems in accounting. The course has a two-pronged approach. First, the general accounting cycles (general ledger, A/R, A/P, etc.) in an accounting information system are introduced. Second, the accounting cycles are related to the use of computer information technology. Concepts such as flow charting, data flow diagrams, security, and control are stressed.

Prerequisites: ACC 121 and one of the following: BUS

150, BUS 250, CSC 102, or CSC 108/116/118

ACC 251 Federal Income Taxation II

3 hours; 3 credits

A broad study of the federal income tax pertaining to corporations and partnerships. A comprehensive study of tax accounting principles as applied to corporations and partnerships, corporate organization and reorganizations, corporate liquidations, corporate distributions, and special classes of corporations. Includes such areas as special deductions and computation of the normal tax, surtax, and tax on net long-term capital gains.

Prerequisite: ACC 241

ACC 300 International Accounting

4 hours; 4 credits

An overall view of the significant areas of transnational accounting that are relevant to accounting practices, procedures, and requirements of enterprises engaged in international operations. These areas include: foreign currency translation, accounting for inflation, financial reporting and disclosure, analyzing foreign financial statements, transfer pricing, and international taxation.

(Offered only at the American University of Rome.)

Prerequisites: ACC 114 and ACC 121

ACC 310 Cost Accounting I

3 hours; 3 credits

Principles of cost accounting applicable to job order and process cost systems. Additional topics include cost-volume-profit relationships, standard costing, variable costing, and budgets. Prerequisite: ACC 121

ACC 315 Analysis of Financial Statements

3 hours; 3 credits

The tools and techniques needed to explore the balance sheet, income statement, and the statement of cash flow.

Heavy emphasis is on the use of ratios to evaluate the statements. Not open to Accounting majors.

Prerequisites: ACC 121 and ECO 240 /FNC 240

ACC 318 New York State and Local Taxes

3 hours; 3 credits

A comprehensive study of various forms of State and municipal taxation, including personal income, unincorporated business, franchise, unemployment insurance, and occupancy taxes.

Prerequisite: ACC 121

ACC 414 Advanced Accounting

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive course in specialized areas of accounting.

Current topics, which have influenced the accounting

profession and the financial community, such as partnerships, accounting for business combinations, government accounting, and foreign operations, are studied.

Emphasis is placed on areas stressed on the CPA examination. The authoritative pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and its predecessor, the Accounting Principles Board, are interwoven into class discussions and problems assigned throughout the course. The application of advanced accounting theories to complex, practical problems is an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite: ACC 225

ACC 415 CPA Problems and Current Issues

3 hours; 3 credits

An analysis of the current areas of controversy in the accounting profession, such as pensions and deferred taxes. The course will also serve as an intensive review for the F.A.R.E. and A.R.E. portions of the CPA examination.

Prerequisite: ACC 225

ACC 422 Standards and Procedures of

Financial Audits

4 hours; 4 credits

Ethics, theory, procedures, and techniques of planning and performing the audit. Examines the attest function, generally accepted accounting principles, auditing and professional standards, and statistical testing techniques.

Prerequisites: ACC 225, MGT/ECO 230, and BUS 150 or

BUS 250, or CSC 102

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 85

Africa: AFA 247, 253, 260, 266, 333

Caribbean: AFA 223, 225, 265, 266

United

States:

AFA 202, 204, 221, 229, 262,

263, 267, 269, 321, 323, 361,

363

3. Two courses at the 300 level or above, one of which may be an independent study course

4. Foreign Language Requirement:

Demonstration of proficiency in a foreign language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

Electives: 43-47 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

20 credits

8 credits

0-4 credits

African American Studies Minor

Minor Requirements: 16 Credits

Sixteen credits of courses in African American Studies at the 200 level or above including one course from each of the following: Africa, the Caribbean, the United

States.

African American Studies

(Bachelor of Arts, Minor)

Interdisciplinary Program, March Hall (2N), Room 210

Director: Emmanuel Mbah, Assistant Professor

The purpose of this interdisciplinary program is to provide an understanding of selected aspects of African civilization, socio-cultural, and political institutions; contributions of African Americans; and their unique role in the United States.

The program includes courses in the history, music, art, drama, literature, and social-political life of Africa and the African Americans. The interdisciplinary approach is based on the premise that genuine understanding of the historical and cultural heritage of African Americans requires thorough and systematic training, control of the theoretical and methodological aspects of particular disciplines, as well as knowledge of the major assumptions of related disciplines. The program stresses the African continuity and the concept of the

“African Diaspora.”

African American Studies (BA)

Major Requirements: 31-35 credits

Students majoring in African American Studies must complete:

1. AFA/HST 160 African American History:

1619 to Present

2. Five courses at the 200 level including at least one in each of the following categories:

3 credits

African American Studies Courses

AFA 105 Contempory African Issues

(Also HST 105)

3 hours; 3 credits

An examination of post-colonial African issues, including the colonial legacy/neocolonialism; conflict and human rights; development, poverty and the debt problem; healthcare and infrastructure; globalization, democracy and multiparty politics; and, how these relate to the world at large. Not open to students who have completed HST

267 or AFA 266. (social science) (FWGR)

AFA 122 Black Dance Workshop

(Also DAN 122)

4 hours; 3 credits

Based on traditions of the peoples of Africa and the Caribbean, this course develops the technical language of

Black dance, emphasizing the cultural interaction of native tradition and Western influence; the retelling of legends and tales through dance while weaving intricate designs and rhythms disguised in unrecognizable symbolism.

AFA 160 African American History: 1619 to the

Present

(Also HST 160)

3 hours; 3 credits

From the forced migration of the first Africans in the 17th century to the contemporary struggles for equality; emphasis on such topics as slavery, abolition, Reconstruction, the origins of Jim Crow, urban migrations, the struggle for civil rights, non-violence, and the new militancy.

(social science) (FUSR) (COPR)

AFA 167 The Black Experience

3 hours; 3 credits

Drawing on the social sciences

—i.e. anthropology, history, political science, and sociology

—the course examines

86 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions the black experience in Colonial America and the United

States. (social science) (FUSR) Not open to students who have completed AFA 267.

AFA 202 African American Drama

(Also DRA 202)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the emergence of the Black Theater in the

United States and an examination of the theater as a manifestation of the Black genius.

AFA 203 Workshop in Black Theater

4 hours; 4 credits

A workshop expressly designed to explore experimental improvisational techniques and methods by utilizing a wide range of movements, sources, and materials. The workshop is concerned with the development of individual awareness and creativity through the active and personal discovery of movement and is open to all students interested in the potentialities of ethnic dance for attaining freedom of movement.

AFA 204 Ethnomusicology of African

Americans

4 hours; 4 credits

History of African American music with emphasis on its relation to religion and culture. Examination and analysis of the musical styles of spirituals, gospel hymns, blues, and jazz in their cultural setting.

AFA 205 African American Musical Theater

(Also DRA 205)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the musical theater of African Americans from its early beginnings in African culture to genius manifested in the 19th century, its influence on early vaudeville, its unique contribution to American musical theater, and the present-day popularity of its style. Current productions will be attended by the class and studied in detail when available.

AFA 211 American Culture in Black and White

(Also AMS 211)

4 hours; 4 credits

Mutual perceptions of Blacks and Whites in 19th- and

20th-century America, how these perceptions were born, and how they have changed. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AFA 221 African American Literature

(Also ENH 221)

4 hours; 4 credits

A sociological examination of African American literature as it has developed from the dynamic interaction between

Black and White communities and movements within the

Black community. Works by African American authors will be analyzed with respect to the dominant social forces of their times and the ideas about the historically persistent polemics of assimilation, separation, or cultural pluralism, and their relevance for Americans of African descent in their struggle for equality. (literature) (p&d) (COPR) (TA-

LA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

AFA 223 Comparative Black Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

The works of African, African American, and Caribbean writers are examined. The poetry and fiction of modern

African writers are considered with particular reference to the African personality, presence africaine, and negritude, the vision and image of Africa.

Prerequisite: ENG 111

AFA 225 Contemporary Third World Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the literature of the world of the politically and economically oppressed and exploited. The course will deal with such themes as oppression and protest; violence; the crisis of identity; music, language, and rhythm; humorous distance; ritual and magic; and conceptualization and abstraction. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

AFA 247 Peoples and Cultures of Africa

(Also HST 266)

4 hours; 4 credits

A descriptive survey of the peoples and cultures of the

African continent. Emphasis is on those features and/or qualities of the African pattern of life that are common to the African people as a whole. (social science) (COPR)

(p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, plus any college-level history course or COR 100

AFA 253 African Politics

(Also POL 253)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the colonial and post-colonial problems of Africa, and the developmental process in general.

Other topics to be discussed include the sociopolitical and historical-philosophical appeal of communism to Africa; ideology, strategy, and the communist model of development; and the idea of revolution as an agent of rapid transformation versus the Euro-American model of evolutionary change. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

AFA 260 History of Africa

(Also HST 207)

4 hours; 4 credits

Nineteenth-century African history, the story of European imperialism, and the emergence of modern, independent

Africa and its problems. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or any college-level history course

AFA 262 African American History: 1619-1865

(Also HST 262)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the African American experience in the Western hemisphere. Emphasis on the slave trade, slave life, slave revolts, and the struggle for freedom. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or any college-level history course

AFA 263 African American History: 1865 to the

Present

(Also HST 263)

4 hours; 4 credits

Continuing role of African Americans in the building of their own nations. Emphasis on freedom movements as shown in literature, in civil rights movements, and in nationalist and other political organizations. (social science)

(p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or any college-level history course

AFA 265 History of the Caribbean

(Also HST 265)

4 hours; 4 credits

Precolonial and colonial history of the Caribbean; an examination of the policies of the metropolitan powers, and the emergence of anticolonialist movements. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a World history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or any college-level history course

AFA 266 Contemporary African Issues

(Also HST 267)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of post-colonial African issues, including the colonial legacy/neocolonialism; conflict and human rights; development, poverty and the debt problems; healthcare and infrastructure; globalization; democracy, and multiparty politics; and, how these relate to the world at large. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a World history course. (p&d) (cont. wld.) (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, and COR 100 and any college-level history course or African American Studies course

AFA 267 The Black Experience

4 hours; 4 credits

A workshop designed especially for teachers, students, and professionals working in the Black community. The course will cover a wide range of topics in literature, music, dance, drama, economics, history, and anthropology.

AFA 269 Blacks in Urban America: 1900 to the

Present

(Also HST 269)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of various aspects of Black life in major

American cities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the causes of the migration; ecological development of Black communities; urban violence; Blacks’ participation in conventional and radical politics; Blacks in the labor force; and the impact of urbanization on the Black family.

For History majors and minors this is designated as a

United States history course. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or any college-level history course

AFA 275 Place, Race, and Racism

(Also GEG 275)

4 hours; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 87

This course explores how race is socially constructed and the role that place plays in the construction of racial and ethnic identities. From the formation of racialized places such as ghettoes and Chinatowns to media coverage of school shootings in suburbs, we will examine the how, why, and where of racism and discrimination. The focus will be on racial issues in the United States, coupled with case studies from other regions for comparative purposes. (social science) (COPR) (p&d).

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

AFA 321 Race, Law, and Public Policy in the

Contemporary United States

(Also POL 321)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of race relations in the United States through the prism of law and courts. In 1903,

W.E.B.DuBois wrote:

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.

” This course examines questions such as: How does race matter today? Does the struggle for racial justice persist? Should the government use racial categories in the pursuit of equality? Policy areas to be studied include desegregation and the problem of urban education, employment discrimination and equal opportunity in the workplace, among other topics.

Prerequisites: POL 100 or POL 235; ENG 151 Sophomore standing

AFA 323 The Black Writer in the Modern World

(Also ENL 392)

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of various recent and contemporary

Black authors, writing in all of the literary genres, and their grappling with traditional and changing environments. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

AFA 333 Colonialism and the African

Experience

(Also HST 333)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the experience of Africans under colonial rule from the average person to traditional chiefs or the aristocratic class. This course analyzes the reactions of various classes of African society to colonial rule, focusing on the methods used by Africans to manipulate

European colonial authorities, as well as the colonial response. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a World history course. (social Science)

(COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course or 200-level

African American Studies course and ENG 151

AFA 361 The Heritage of Marcus Garvey and

W.E.B. DuBois

(Also HST 361)

4 hours; 4 credits

Marcus Garvey, the man and the idealist, his influence on

African American consciousness; W.E.B. DuBois, the man and the thinker, his influence on African American consciousness and Pan-Americanism. (social science)

(COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

88 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

American Sign Language

Department of World Languages and Literatures, Building 2S, Room 109

Chairperson and Associate Professor Gerry Milligan

American Sign Language Minor

Minor Requirements: 12 credits

12 credits of courses in ASL (ASL) at or above the 200 level.

ASL 313 Advanced Communication in

American Sign Language

4 hours; 4 credits

Refinement of communication skills through presentations, translation, and critical study of the grammar of

American Sign Language through the analysis of selected literary works of advanced difficulty. Regular attendance in the World Languages and Literat ures’ Media

Center is required.

Prerequisite: ASL 215

American Sign Language Courses

ASL 112 Basic American Sign Language I

3 hours; 3 credits

A beginning course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for those who have had no previous work in the language. Regular attendance in the Modern

Languages Media Center is required.Not open to students who have taken ASL 113. (foreign lang.) (FWGR)

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Assessment Tests in

Reading and Writing

ASL 113 American Sign Language I

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the fundamentals of American Sign

Language (ASL) with particular attention to basic grammatical structures and the history of American Deaf persons. (foreign lang.). Not open to students who have completed ASL 112.

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing

ASL 114 American Sign Language II

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of American Sign Language I emphasizing vocabulary development and increased fluency in the language’s grammer and structure, as well as a further examination of Deaf culture. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Writing and successful completion of ASL 113 or its equivalent

ASL 213 American Sign Language III

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of American Sign Language II with emphasis on ordinal numbers, the use of vertical space, and further development of visual receptive skills. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL 114 or its equivalent

ASL 215 American Sign Language IV

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of American Sign Language III emphasizing stylistic variations, a command of the various registers available in the language, and expanded use of classifiers. Students will closely examine Deaf culture, art, and technology.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL 213 or equivalent

American Studies

(Bachelor of Arts, Minor)

Interdisciplinary Program, March Hall (2N), Room 203

Director: Associate Professor Catherine Lavender

American Studies is the interdisciplinary study of American cultures, both past and present. American Studies courses examine the arts, literature, history, and popular culture of the United States and, more generally, North

America. American Studies provides a strong foundation and essential skills for those preparing for careers in law, government, public history, archival management, education, social service, journalism, publishing, and communications. Individual courses in American

Studies are recommended as cultural background for students in any major.

American Studies (BA)

American StudiesRequirements: 39-43

Pre-Major Requirements: 3 credits

AMS 101 America: An Introduction

Major Requirements: 36-40credits

3 credits

American Literature

ENH 203 Literary History of the United

States to 1855

8 credits

4 credits

ENH 204 Literary History of the United

States since 1855

American History

4 credits

8 credits

HST 244 United States History:

1607-1865

HST 245 United States History:

1865-present

4 credits

4 credits

16

American Studies credits

16 credits beyond AMS 101, including at least two courses at the 300 level or above.

Research Seminar

AMS 311 American Cultural Experience 4 credits

Foreign Language Requirement

Demonstration of proficiency in a foreign

0-4 credits language through the intermediate level,

213 or above. 0-4 credits

Electives: 35-39

Total Credits Required: 120

Honors

Graduating American Studies majors may apply for graduation with honors in AMS. To graduate with honors a student must have:

Fulfilled the requirements for the AMS major

Earned a 3.5 grade point average or better in AMS courses

Been recommended for honors by the AMS Honors

Committee. To be recommended a student must have submitted a proposal for an honors thesis and have completed this thesis to the satisfaction of the

Honors Committee.

The honors thesis should be a substantial research paper supervised by a committee of two AMS faculty members. One member of this committee will be the primary supervisor with whom the student will register for up to eight credits of independent study. Candidates should ask an AMS faculty member of their choosing to be their primary supervisor. The primary supervisor and the program coordinator will appoint the other member of the candidate’s committee in consultation with the candidate. The thesis submitted need not be a new work; it can be an extension of a paper previously submitted in a course. Theses submitted to the Honors

Committee chair must have the signature of both members of the candidate’s committee on the title page.

Students planning to apply for graduation with honors must submit a one-page proposal for their Honors thesis, signed by the members of their committee, to the

AMS Honors Committee in the final semester of their junior year. Honors thesis for majors graduating in

January must be submitted to the AMS coordinator by

November 20 for majors graduating in June or by April 1 for majors graduating in August.

American Studies Minor

Minor Requirements: 23 credits

AMS 101 America: An Introduction

American literature (8 credits):

ENH 203 Literary History of the United

States to 1855

ENH 204 Literary History of the United

States since 1855

American history (8 credits):

HST 244 United States History:

1607-1865

HST 245 United States History:

1865-present

And any additional AMS course at the 200 level or above.

American Studies Courses

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

AMS 101 America: An Introduction

3 hours; 3 credits

Classic interpretations of American culture through a broad interdisciplinary survey of the men and women,

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 89 ideas, and events that have contributed to the American experience. The abiding ideas, values, and myths that have shaped the nation’s arts, actions, and beliefs, drawing from painting, architecture, film, music, history, and literature. From 17th-century witchcraft to

20th-century witch hunts, from General Washington to

General Hospital, from the assembly line to assembler language, from Revere to Rambo. (social science)

(COPR)

AMS 150 Dance History: Twentieth-Century

Survey

(Also DAN 150)

4 hours; 3 credits

Concentrating on the

“pioneers of modern dance

”–Duncan, Denishawn, Graham, Humphrey,

Weidman, and others

–as well as on the experimental and avant-garde, using lectures, demonstrations, video, and film to illustrate examples of outstanding choreography.

The course includes the dance of India and Black dance coordinated with professional concerts and student reports. Includes

“Happenings in Today’s World of Dance.”

No dance background required. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

AMS 205 Modern Art in Latin America

(Also ART 205)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the development of modern art in Latin

America. We will study the emergence of key art movements in Latin America and how artists participated in and responded to important historical events and social changes across the Americas. How have Latin American artists portrayed the idea of

“Latin America” or being

“Latino” in their work? Other issues will include: negotiating with their colonial past and with European models of modernity; art and revolution; the question of indigenous art forms and the

“popular”; diasporic continuities within Latin America, Latino experience in the United

States, and mestizaje (cultural mixing). (arts & com)

(p&d) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or ART 200 or

ART 201 or AMS 101

AMS 209 Art and Society in America

(Also ART 209)

4 hours; 4 credits

Three hundred years of American art, studied as an expression of American life. Works of art are viewed in terms of style and also as guides to the complexities of

American history and culture. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or ART 200 or

ART 201 or AMS 101

AMS 210 American Philosophy

(Also PHL 210)

(4 hours; 4 credits

A study of philosophy in America. Topics of inquiry will be selected from such movements and figures as the following: Puritanism, empiricism, idealism, and pragmatism; Jonathan Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Josiah

Royce, Charles S. Peirce, William James, John Dewey,

90 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

George Santayana, and Alfred North Whitehead. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 211 American Culture in Black and White

(Also AFA 211)

4 hours; 4 credits

Mutual perceptions of Blacks and Whites in 19th- and

20th-century America; how these perceptions were born, and how they have changed. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 212 Twentieth-Century America

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of selected works that are landmarks in the development of 20th-century American culture. Authors will include Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, Wright,

Miller, Mailer, and Beattie; Harrington, Friedan, and Galbraith. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 214 America in the World

4 hours; 4 credits

Cross-cultural perspectives on American values, arts, and events. What foreign observers have thought about the United States. How our experience has paralleled, or differed from, that of Europe since the 18th century. What the important similarities, differences, and influences are between Western and Eastern cultures. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 220 Geography of the United States

(Also GEG 222)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course explores the geographic variety of the United

States. The country’s physical characteristics are regionally diverse and provide an array of resources. Different populations have put them to use in various ways. The course traces who lives where, why, what they have found there and what have they done with it. Emphasis is placed on the contrasting threads of regional variation and national homogenization. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100

AMS 221 The American Dream

(Also HST 221)

4 hours; 4 credits

The hopes, the frustrations, and, particularly, the dreams of American society as observed by foreign and native commentators in the past and present. This course will attempt to assess not only the idealization of the American dream but also disillusionment with it as expressed by such writers as Franklin, Tocqueville, Emerson,

Whitman, Henry Adams, and Norman Mailer. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any American studies or history course

AMS 222 The City in American Culture

4 hours; 4 credits

Impressions and analyses (literary, social, historical, cinematic, and photographic) of the varied cultures, institutions, and environments that are the substance of

American urban life. A course that posits few facile solutions to the urban crisis but knows which questions are to be asked and which myths must be demolished if cities are ever to become humane and pleasurable organisms rather than death- and profit-bound ones. (social science)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 224 Religion in America

(Also HST 246)

4 hours; 4 credits

Addresses the development of religion

—Protestant,

Catholic, Jewish, and others

—in the context of American social, cultural, and intellectual history. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 230 American Film and American Myth

(Also CIN 230)

4 hours; 4 credits

The American film and its relationship to American myth, society, and culture. Topics to be included are: the

American West, the gangster, rural and urban life, the nature of war, race and class, comic views of America.

(arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100

AMS 231 American Myths and Realities

4 hours; 4 credits

American society, chiefly in the 19th and 20th centuries, and its problems, including democracy in an industrial order, the city, class stratification, and racial conflict, as seen by such representative realistic writers as Henry

James, Dreiser, Veblen, William Dean Howells, and

W.E.B. DuBois. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 236 Music in American Life

(Also MUS 236)

4 hours; 4 credits

The music-making and listening habits of the American people, examining the musical activities, the musicians, and the social setting. The course focuses on the history and significance of rock as an American and international phenomenon, exploring issues of gender, race, and the multicultural musical traditions that have enriched American popular music. This course develops the ability to understand music as an expression of cultural values, and does not require instrumental training or the ability to read music. This course does not meet requirements for the major or the minor in Music. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

AMS 237 American Musical Theater

(Also MUS 237)

3 hours; 3 credits

A survey of American musical theater and its development from the second half of the 19th century to our own times, considered in the context of a changing America.

Sousa, Herbert, Friml, Cohan, Kern, Gershwin, Bernstein,

Arlen, Weill, Thomson, and Copland are some of the composers whose works will be covered. (arts & com.)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111; for Music majors, MUS 120

AMS 239 The American Civil War

(Also POL 239)

4 hours; 4 credits

The course focuses on the civil and military aspects of the Civil War, including the events and issues leading up to the war, the struggle over the expansion of slavery, the

Union’s and the Confederacy’s military strategies, and analysis of key battles. The course will examine the presidency of Lincoln and will explore major constitutional issues, such as the right of secession and the problems of maintaining civil liberties during a civil war.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

AMS 241 Popular Culture and Mass Society

4 hours; 4 credits

Popular entertainment as the expression of American cultural values: television, radio, music, and sports; westerns, detective stories, and soap operas. Functional analysis of entertainment as the myth and ritual of mass society. The problems of aesthetic standards in a culture dominated by commercialized taste. Relationships between popular entertainment and political values. Readings from Durkheim, Ellul, McLuhan, Nye, and Browne.

(arts & com.) (CO) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

AMS 243 American Humor

4 hours; 4 credits

Humor in America shares some characteristics found in all cultures, past and present, and sometimes has seemed peculiarly

“native.’’ This course traces the variety and development of American humor from colonial days to the present through literature, drama, art, cartoons, and film. Humor will be examined as psychological phenomenon, as philosophical outlook, and as intellectual history. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

AMS 251 American Ideas

(Also HST 240)

4 hours; 4 credits

A major idea in American intellectual history will be examined from the perspective of two or more disciplines.

This course will demonstrate the interdisciplinary method and philosophy of American Studies. Puritanism, transcendentalism, the idea of freedom, social Darwinism,

Freudianism, and socialism are possible topics. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or AMS 101 or any history course.

AMS 252 American Arts

4 hours; 4 credits

A major artistic theme will be traced through two or more of the American arts. This course will demonstrate the interdisciplinary method and philosophy of American

Studies. Realism and romanticism, functionalism and formalism, naturalism and the genteel tradition, and organic form are possible topics. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 91

AMS 258 Vietnam and America: 1945-1975

(Also HST 258)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the history of American involvement in

Vietnam, the experience of Americans and Vietnamese who fought the Second Indochina war and its effects on

American society. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100 or any college-level history course

AMS 306 Latinas/os in the United States

(Also SOC 306/ANT 306)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the sociological and anthropological literature on Latinas/os in the United States. The main goal is to acquaint students with the most important economic, political, and social aspects that contemporary

Latino communities are experiencing. Using ethnographies, the course will focus on community formation, social movements, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality issues, immigration, and transnationalism. Class discussions will also address differences based on national origin, class, and generation. This is a reading and writing intensive course in which students are expected to conduct primary research. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ANT 201 and one of the following: SOC

200, SOC 201, SOC 240, or SOC 260

AMS 308 American Art Since 1945

(Also ART 308)

4 hours; 4 credits

The course will examine the development of American art since World War II.

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 200 or ART 201 or AMS

212 or ART 208,

AMS 309 U.S. Literature in Comparative Texts

(Also ENL 309/LNG 309)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines U.S. literature in a comparative, transnational frame by considering U.S. writing with relation to what lies outside national borders and emphasizing the role of international cultures, literatures, and politics in the development of U.S. writing. The course will cover, variously, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies (beyond U.S.-British), transpacific studies, and Africa-U.S. studies.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

AMS 311 The American Cultural Experience

4 hours; 4 credits

A senior seminar for American Studies majors who will do independent research on a common theme of the American experience and meet to discuss and analyze their findings. Examples of such topics are Puritan religion, the frontier, slavery, reform, feminism, big business, radicalism, literary naturalism, imperialism, and popular culture.

Prerequisite: A 200-level American studies course

AMS 335 Society and Culture in the United

States

(Also HST 335)

92 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

4 hours; 4 credits

Major artistic and intellectual developments in America from the 18th century to the present, and their relationship to changing social and political realities. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course or any

200-level American studies course and ENG 151

Anthropology Courses

See Sociology/Anthropology Section of the catalog

Arabic Courses

Department of World Languages and Literatures, Building 2S, Room 109

Chairperson and Associate Professor Gerry Milligan

ARB 214 Advanced Communication Skills in Arabic

4 hours; 4 credits

Refinement of written and oral expression through composition, translation, oral reports, and critical study of Arabic grammar based on the analysis of selected literary and cultural materials. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: ARB 114

ARB 340 Arabic Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to Arabic literature. The course focuses on the refinement of written and oral expression through composition, oral reports, and critical analysis of literary readings. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ARB 213 or ARB 214

Art

(Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Photography

Concentration, Minor)

(Photography Minor)

Department of Performing and Creative Arts, Center for the Arts (1P), Room 203

Chairperson and Associate Professor George Emilio

Sanchez

The Art program is designed for students interested in both studio art and art history. The department is located in the Center for the Arts with outstanding studio and workshop spaces.

Art (BA)

Pre-Major Requirements: 17 credits

Students who wish to major in Art or the

Art/Photography Concentration are required to complete the following pre-major courses:

ART 120 Introductory Drawing

ART 200 History of Art to the

Renaissance

3 credits

4 credits

ART 201 History of Art since the

Renaissance

In addition, students must complete two of

4 credits

6 credits the following three courses:

PHO 101* Introduction to Photography 3 credits

ART 130

ART 150

Introductory Painting

Introductory Sculpture

3 credits

3 credits

*Students interested in the Photography Concentration are required to choose PHO 101 as one of the two pre-major required courses.

Major Requirements: 31-35 credits

At least eight credits of art history courses beyond the

100 level.

ART 203 Art of the Ancient World

ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America

ART 207 Nineteenth Century Art

ART 208 Twentieth-Century Art

ART 209 Art and Society in America

ART 210 The Architect and Society

ART 211 History of Printmaking

ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts

ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art

ART 301 Baroque Art

ART 303 History of Photography

ART 305 Museum and Gallery Training

ART 308 American Art since 1945

ART 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography

ART 401 Contemporary Art: Ideas and Practices

ART 410 Major Artist I

ART 411 Major Artist II

ART 440 Contemporary Art Theory I

ART 441 Contemporary Art Theory II

At least six credits of studio art courses beyond the 100 level:

ART 220 Intermediate Drawing

ART 225 Portrait Drawing II

ART 230 Intermediate Painting

ART 245 Printmaking

ART 250 Intermediate Sculpture

ART 275 Studio Art Theory and Practice

ART 320 Advanced Drawing

ART 325 Portrait Drawing III

ART 330 Advanced Painting

ART 345 Intermediate Printmaking

ART 350 Advanced Sculpture

ART 375 Intermediate Studio Art Theory and

Practice

ART 445 Advanced Printmaking

AND

An additional 17 credits from art history or studio art courses beyond the 100 level.

AND

Foreign Language Requirement: 0-4 credits

Demonstration of preoficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

*ART 305 may only be used once towards fulfilling major requirements.

Electives: 26-30 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

All studio art courses are non-liberal arts and sciences.

Honors

To graduate with honors in art a student must have a

3.5 grade point average in art courses and must complete a body of independent work approved by one or more full-time art faculty advisers. The work should be presented in an exhibition if possible. Art history students may undertake the writing of a research paper with the approval and supervision of a faculty adviser.

Art (BS)

Pre-Major Requirements: 17 credits

Students who wish to major in Art or the

Art/Photography Concentration must complete the following pre-major courses:

3credits ART 120 Introductory Drawing

ART 200 History of Art to the

Renaissance 4 credits

ART 201 History of Art since the

Renaissance

In addition, students must complete two of the following three courses:

PHO 101*

ART 130

Introduction to Photography

Introductory Painting

4 credits

6 credits

3 credits

3 credits

ART 150 Introductory Sculpture 3 credits

*Students interested in the Photography Concentration must take PHO 101 as one of the two pre-major required courses.

Major Requirements: 34-38 credits

At least eight credits of art history courses beyond the

100 level:

ART 203 Art of the Ancient World

ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America

ART 207 Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 208 Twentieth-Century Art

ART 209 Art and Society in America

ART 210 The Architect and Society

ART 211 History of Printmaking

ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts

ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art

ART 301 Baroque Art

ART 303 History of Photography

ART 305* Museum and Gallery Training

ART 308 American Art since 1945

ART 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography

ART 401 Contemporary Art: Ideas and Practices

ART 410 Major Artist I

ART 411 Major Artist II

ART 440 Contemporary Art Theory I

ART 441 Contemporary Art Theory II

At least 26 credits of studio art courses beyond the 100 level:

ART 220 Intermediate Drawing

ART 225 Portrait Drawing II

ART 230 Intermediate Painting

ART 245 Printmaking

ART 250 Intermediate Sculpture

ART 275 Studio Art Theory and Practice

ART 320 Advanced Drawing

ART 325 Portrait Drawing III

ART 330 Advanced Painting

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 93

ART 345 Intermediate Printmaking

ART 350 Advanced Sculpture

ART 375 Intermediate Studio Art Theory and

Practice

ART 445 Advanced Printmaking

AND

Foreign Language Requirement: 0-4 credits

Demonstration of preoficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

*ART 305 may only be used once towards fulfilling major requirements.

Electives: 23-27 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

All studio art courses are non-liberal arts and sciences.

Honors

To graduate with honors in art a student must have a

3.5 grade point average in art courses and must complete a body of independent work approved by one or more full-time art faculty advisers. The work should be presented in an exhibition if possible. Art history students may undertake the writing of a research paper with the approval and supervision of a faculty adviser.

Art (BA): Photography Concentration

This concentration allows students interested in photography to receive the Bachelor’s degree in Art with a concentration in courses dealing with photographic technique, theory, and history.

Art BA or BS: Photography Concentration Four-Year

Plan

Pre-Major Requirements: 17 credits

Students planning to major in Art with the Photography concentration must complete the following pre-major courses, some of which may also satisfy general education requirements.

ART 120 Introductory Drawing

ART 200 History of Art to the

3 credits

Renaissance 4 credits

ART 201 History of Art since the

Renaissance 4 credits

PHO 101 Introduction to Photography 3 credits

And one of the following:

ART 130 Introductory Painting

ART 150 Introductory Sculpture

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

Major Requirements: 34-38 credits

Students who pursue a BA in Art with the Concentration in Photography must successfully complete:

A. Photography Courses 12 credits

PHO 201 Introduction to Darkroom

Techniques

3 credits

9 credits In addition, students must complete nine additional credits of photography courses at or above the 200-level, including one course at the 300- or 400-level.

PHO 206 Digital Photography 3

94 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

PHO 215 Historical & Alternative

Photographic Processes

4 credits

PHO 220 Intermediate Photography 3 credits

PHO 230 Color Photography 3 credits

PHO 240 Documentary Methods in

Photography

3 credits

PHO 250 Studio Photography I

PHO 305 Photography in New York

PHO 307 Art Digital Printing

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

PHO 314 Contemporary Issues in

Photography

PHO 315 Visiting Artist Workshop

ART 303 History of Photography

And one additional art history course at or above the 200-level.

4 credits

3 credits

PHO 320 The Photographic Portfolio 3 credits

PHO 360 Studio Photography II 3 credits

4 credits PHO 365 Conceptual and Aesthetic

Concerns of Image Making -

Photography III

B. Art History Courses 8 credits

4 credits

4 credits

C. The remaining 14 credits can be chosen from courses in ART and PHO beyond the

100 level.

D. Foreign Language Requirement:

14 credits

0-4 credits

Demonstration of preoficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

It is recommended that students complete an internship with an artist/photographer, museum, gallery or foundation.

NOTE: Courses may only be used once to fulfill a requirement area except PHO 315 which may be repeated for credit twice. ART 305 may only be used once towards fulfilling major requirements; it does not fulfill the art history requirement

Electives: 23-27 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

All studio art and photography courses are non-liberal arts and sciences. Most photography classes are non-liberal arts and sciences, except: PHO 305, PHO

314 and PHO 365.

Honors

To graduate with honors in art a student must have a

3.5 grade point average in art courses and must complete a body of independent work approved by one or more full-time art faculty advisers. The work should be presented in an exhibition if possible. Art history students may undertake the writing of a research paper with the approval and supervision of a faculty adviser.

Art (BS): Photography Concentration

The Art (BS) Photography Concentration is intended for students who have serious ambitions in the field of photography. Practical courses are complemented by a solid grounding in the history of the medium, theory and criticism. Our program supports the wide range of serious photographic directions.

Art BA or BS: Photography Concentration Four-Year

Plan

Pre-Major Requirements: 17 credits

Students planning to major in Art with the Photography concentration must complete the following pre-major courses, some of which may also satisfy general education requirements.

ART 120 Introductory Drawing 3 credits

ART 200 History of Art to the

Renaissance 4 credits

ART 201 History of Art since the

Renaissance 4 credits

PHO 101 Introduction to Photography 3 credits

And one of the following: 3 credits

ART 130 Introductory Painting

ART 150 Introductory Sculpture

3 credits

3 credits

Major Requirements: 34-38 credits

Students who pursue a BS in Art with the Concentration in Photography must successfully complete:

A. Art History Courses

ART 303 History of Photography

And one additional art history course at or above the 200-level.

B. Photography Courses

8 credits

4 credits

4 credits

26 credits

PHO 201 Introduction to Darkroom

Techniques

The remaining 23 credits can be chosen

3 credits from the following courses. Of those 23 remaining credits, at least three courses must be at or above the 300-level.

PHO 206 Digital Photography

23 credits

PHO 215 Historical & Alternative

Photographic Processes

4 credits

PHO 220 Intermediate Photography 3 credits

PHO 230 Color Photography 3 credits

PHO 240 Documentary Methods in

Photography

PHO 250 Studio Photography I

3 credits

3 credits

PHO 305 Photography in New York

PHO 307 Art Digital Printing

PHO 314 Contemporary Issues in

Photography

3 credits

4 credits

PHO 315 Visiting Artist Workshop 3 credits

PHO 320 The Photographic Portfolio 3 credits

PHO 360 Studio Photography II 3 credits

PHO 365 Conceptual and Aesthetic

Concerns of Image Making -

Photography III

4 credits

AND

Foreign Language Requirement: 0-4 credits

Demonstration of preoficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

It is recommended that students complete an internship with an artist/photographer, museum, gallery or foundation while studying at CSI.

NOTE: Courses may only be used once to fulfill a requirement area excet PHO 315 which may be repeated for credit three times. ART 305 may only be used once towards fulfilling major requirements; it does not fulfill the art history requirement.

Electives: 23-27 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

All studio art and photography courses are non-liberal arts and sciences. The BS degree requires a minimum of 60 credits in liberal arts and sciences. Most photography classes are non-liberal arts and sciences, except:

PHO 305, PHO 314 and PHO 365.

Honors

To graduate with honors in art a student must have a

3.5 grade point average in art courses and must complete a body of independent work approved by one or more full-time art faculty advisers. The work should be presented in an exhibition if possible. Art history students may undertake the writing of a research paper with the approval and supervision of a faculty adviser.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 95

ART 245 Printmaking

ART 250 Intermediate Sculpture

ART 275 Studio Art Theory and Practice

ART 320 Advanced Drawing

ART 325 Portrait Drawing III

ART 330 Advanced Painting

ART 345 Intermediate Printmaking

ART 350 Advanced Sculpture

ART 375 Intermediate Studio Art Theory and

Practice

ART 445 Advanced Printmaking

Art Minor

Minor (18 credits)

Two different paths may be taken to complete an Art minor:

Path I: Art History

ART 200 History of Art to the

Renaissance

ART 201 History of Art since the

4 credits

Renaissance 4 credits and at least 10 credits of art history beyond the 100 level:

ART 203 Art of the Ancient World

ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America

ART 207 Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 208 Twentieth-Century Art

ART 209 Art and Society in America

ART 210 The Architect and Society

ART 211 History of Printmaking

ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts

ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art

ART 301 Baroque Art

ART 303 History of Photography

ART 305 Museum and Gallery Training

ART 308 American Art since 1945

ART 401 Contemporary Art: Ideas and Practices

ART 410 Major Artist I

ART 411 Major Artist II

ART 440 Contemporary Art Theory I

ART 441 Contemporary Art Theory II

Path II: Studio Art

Students select three out of the following four courses:

ART 120 Introductory Drawing

ART 130 Introductory Painting

3 credits

3 credits

ART 150 Introductory Sculpture 3 credits

PHO 101 Introduction to Photography 3 credits and at least nine credits of studio art courses beyond the 100 level:

ART 220 Intermediate Drawing

ART 225 Portrait Drawing II

ART 230 Intermediate Painting

Art Courses

(See Photography for photography course descriptions.)

ART 100 Introduction to the Visual Arts

3 hours; 3 credits

A selective examination of the materials and forms of the visual arts -- including painting, sculpture, and architecture -- designed to provide students with a critical and historical framework for evaluating visual experience. The course will combine slide lectures and films with a number of museum and gallery visits. (arts & com.) (FCER)

(COPR) (TALA)

ART 106 Art in Rome

3 hours; 3 credits

A course designed to familiarize students with the vast artistic patrimony of Rome. Visits to archaeological sites, churches, palaces, museums, and galleries. The course is for the non-art major. It is conducted almost entirely on site. (Offered only at the American University of Rome.)

ART 120 Introductory Drawing

4 hours; 3 credits

This course studies drawing as a primary tool of vision and consequently as a means of apprehending the world around us. The essentials of perspective, anatomy, and drawing from observation are followed by an introduction to the analysis of compositional dynamics. Students may work from the human form, still life, and/or landscape.

Studio classes are tutorial by nature and are supplemented by group critiques, outside assignments, museum visits, written papers, and student presentations.

Students will become familiar with various drawing media, which may include charcoal, conté crayon, pastel, ink, and graphite. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

ART 125 Portrait Drawing I

4 hours; 3 credits

Basic study of the human head and facial expressions with particular attention to the problems of portraiture.

Students are introduced to basic concepts of proportion, perspective, anatomy, and drawing the human head/figure from observation. Various drawing media may be employed, such as: charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, and/or pastel. Studio classes are tutorial by nature and are supplemented by group critiques, outside assignments, museum visits, written papers, and student presentations.

96 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

ART 130 Introductory Painting

4 hours; 3 credits

The course is an introduction to the fundamentals of painting a picture. Students are first familiarized with materials, equipment, and studio maintenance. Basic pictorial concepts such as color, composition, perspective, space, and the picture plane are introduced. Studio classes are tutorial by nature and are supplemented by group critiques, outside assignments, museum visits, written papers, and student presentations. Students choose from a wide variety of unusual still lifes. They allow the student to return to his/her picture repeatedly over several weeks and outside of class time. Prolonged work allows the imagination to generate new possibilities from the initial attempt as the student is made to see as an artist does.

(arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

ART 150 Introductory Sculpture

4 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the fundamentals of creating sculpture.

Students work in a variety of sculptural media in conjunction with learning the formal principles and skills relevant to the creation of sculpture and the safe and responsible use of hand tools. Projects are introduced through class presentations, demonstrations and discussion. Studio work helps students to develop an understanding of and competency in material, technique, theoretical and conceptual aspects of sculpture. Media includes wood, stone,mixed-media construction, cardboard, clay, metal, and plaster. Some drawing is required for the development of individual projects. Contemporary and historical works are examined and researched in order to develop and support individual direction. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

ART 200 History of Art to the Renaissance

4 hours; 4 credits

This survey course will trace the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from their beginnings in the

Stone Age to the Early Renaissance. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the historical setting and the works themselves. Introduction to the history of the visual arts. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

ART 201 History of Art after the Renaissance

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of ART 200, this survey course traces further developments in the visual arts from the Renaissance to the works of the 20th-century masters. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

ART 203 Art of the Ancient World

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the art and architecture of predynastic

Egypt, the Near East, the Aegean, mainland Greece, and

Republican and Imperial Rome. While the course is, of necessity, a survey, particular emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the classical tradition. (arts & com.)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ART 100 or 103 or 104, and ENG 111

ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America

(Also AMS 205)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the development of modern art in Latin

America. We will study the emergence of key art movements in Latin America and how artists participated in and responded to important historical events and social changes across the Americas. How have Latin American artists portrayed the idea of

“Latin America” or being

“Latino” in their work? Other issues will include: negotiating with their colonial past and with European models of modernity; art and revolution; the question of indigenous art forms and the

“popular”; diasporic continuities within Latin America, Latino experience in the United

States, and mestizaje (cultural mixing). (arts&com) (p&d)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or ART 200 or

ART 201

ART 207 Nineteenth-Century Art

4 hours, 4 credits

An analysis of the principal currents of European and

American art from the revolutionary period through the origins of modernism in the last years of the century.

Topics to be covered include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. (arts & com.)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 208 Twentieth-Century Art

4 hours, 4 credits

An analysis of the principal developments in art from the end of the 19th century through the present. (arts & com.)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 209 Art and Society in America

(Also AMS 209)

4 hours; 4 credits

Three hundred years of American art, studied as an expression of American life. Works of art are viewed in terms of style and also as guides to the complexities of

American history and culture. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or ART 200 or

ART 201 or AMS 101

ART 210 The Architect and Society

4 hours; 4 credits

A selective review of the practice of architecture from antiquity to the present. The course will analyze changing formal and aesthetic concepts in the light of contemporaneous social and economic factors. (arts & com.)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 211 History of Printmaking

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of printmaking from its origins in the 15th century to the present. While the main emphasis will be placed on the relation of printmaking to contemporaneous activity in paintings, an effort will be made to define the individual character of such techniques as wood block-

printing, engraving, etching, mezzotint, aquatint, lithography, and screenprinting. The course will encourage connoisseurship by combining slide lectures with visits to museums and graphics studios.

Prerequisites: ENG 111; and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 220 Intermediate Drawing

4 hours; 3 credits

Concentrated study of the figure, complex problems in perspective and composition, detailed rendering in light and shade, and work in ink with brush and pen.

Prerequisite: ART 120

ART 225 Portrait Drawing II

4 hours; 3 credits

Basic study of the human head and facial expressions with particular attention to the problems of portraiture. For intermediate students.

Prerequisite: ART 125

ART 230 Intermediate Painting

4 hours; 3 credits

Representation of complex textures, problems of color, composition from figurative to abstract, and expression in the medium.

Prerequisite: ART 130

ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts

(Also WGS 270)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines the two-fold relationship of women to the fine arts; their role as subjects and as artists. Topics such as the portrayal of women as goddess, mother, and housewife, and as artist will be undertaken with a view to the social and historical input and implication of this imagery. The circumstances of women artists from the Renaissance to the present will also be considered.

(arts & com.) (COPR) (p&d) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and WGS 100 or ART 100, 200 or 201,

ART 245 Printmaking

4 hours; 3 credits

Instruction and practice in the fundamentals of the intaglio process; its relationship to the design and meaning of the print.

Prerequisites: ART 120 or ART 130

ART 250 Intermediate Sculpture

4 hours; 3 credits

An intermediate sculpture course that reinforces the fundamental processes, techniques and methods employed in creating sculpture. Students develop in-depth studio projects utilizing hand and power tools in a range of materials.Techniques include: modeling, fabricating, enlarging, carving and casting. By semester's end students will demonstrate a high level of competency with tools, their application and formulate studio projects which encom-

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 97 pass both the personal and historical perspectives. Students are required to maintin a detailed sketchbook and a mixed-media sketchbook, and to write and present a research paper on a selected sculpture exhibition.

Prerequisite: ART 150

ART 275 Studio Art Theory and Practice

4 hours; 3 credits

The aim of this course is to open a thorough understanding of two-dimensional organization in painting and drawing and, by extension, of three-dimensional concepts in sculpture. The study will involve a design analysis of selected paintings from the 15th and 16th centuries.

Students are expected to produce drawings and paintings based on these explorations.

Prerequisite: ART 120

ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art

4 hours; 4 credits

An attempt to differentiate and define the major stylistic developments in medieval and Renaissance art and architecture and to locate them within the broader context of contemporaneous European culture.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 301 Baroque Art

4 hours; 4 credits

An analysis of the Baroque style, which developed in Italy at the beginning of the 17th century and spread throughout Europe. Particular emphasis will be placed on discussion of the varying intellectual, religious, and socioeconomic factors that affected such important questions as the role of patronage.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and ART 100 or 200 or 201, or permission of the

ART 302 Garden Architecture in Italy

3 hours; 3 credits

An examination of the evolution of Italian garden architecture from the late Republican period to Neoclassicism with special emphasis placed on literary sources and with extensive site visits. (Offered only in the Study Abroad program at the Scuola Lorenzo di Medici in Florence.)

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 200 or ART 201

ART 303 History of Photography

4 hours; 4 credits

A critical study of the history of photography from its beginning in the early 19th century through contemporary developments. Topics to be covered include the aesthetic relation of form and content, portraiture, the documentary and abstract approaches, and color photography. The primary emphasis will be on photography as an art, but emphasis will be given to the development of photographic equipment, materials, and techniques as they influence the art. Students will utilize slides and books to study the work of major artists. No previous study of photography is necessary.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

98 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

ART 305 Museum and Gallery Training

4 hours; 4 credits

Students interested in studio art or art history are given an opportunity to combine theory and practical experience by working with an adviser at the College and in selected museums and private galleries in New York City.

Since serious commitment is essential, prospective students will be interviewed by the adviser before registration. Hours will be arranged. This course may be repeated once for credit, with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 308 American Art since 1945

(Also AMS 308)

4 hours; 4 credits

The course will examine the development of American art since World War II.

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 200 or ART 201 or AMS

212 or ART 208,

ART 310 Aspects of Renaissance Art

3 hours; 3 credits

This course examines the development of European art and architecture from 1400 to 1520, stressing the Italian contribution and focusing particularly on style, iconography, and patronage. (Offered only at the American University of Rome.)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 311 Baroque Art and Architecture

3 hours; 3 credits

An analysis of the Baroque style that developed in Italy at the beginning of the 17th century and spread throughout

Europe. Particular emphasis will be placed on discussion of the varying intellectual, religious, and socioeconomic factors that affected such important issues as patronage.

The role played by the city of Rome will be given particular consideration. (Offered only at the American University of Rome.)

Prerequisite: ART 100 or 200 or 201,

ART 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography

(also PHO 314 )

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will investigate contemporary issues in photography from aesthetic, art historical, and philosophical perspectives. It will be team-taught by an art historian and photographer. Students are strongly advised to take

ART 303 prior to enrolling.

Prerequisites: ART 100 or ART 200 or ART 201 or PHO

220 and ENG 151

ART 319 The Role of Art in the Modern World

3 hours; 3 credits

A seminar exploring the current ideas and debates regarding art’s role in the world. The class will investigate the nature of what the art activity was and is, as well as what purpose it served in the past and what purpose it serves currently. Oral presentations will be made. Concepts such as modernism, postmodernism, multiculturalism, and deconstruction will be introduced and discussed.

Prerequisites: Any 200- or 300-level studio art course and

ART 100 or ART 201,

ART 320 Advanced Drawing

4 hours; 3 credits

Individual studio projects and advanced figure compositions in all drawing media. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ART 220

ART 325 Portrait Drawing III

4 hours; 3 credits

Basic study of the human head and facial expressions with particular attention to the problems of portraiture. For advanced students. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ART 225

ART 330 Advanced Painting

4 hours; 3 credits

Individual studio projects with emphasis on development of personal direction. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ART 230

ART 340 Design Workshop I

4 hours; 3 credits

Introduces the student to the basic conceptual and executional skills necessary in the field of graphic design.

Areas to be covered will include two-dimensional space, color relationships, space relationships, and three-dimensional construction.

ART 341 Design Workshop II

4 hours; 3 credits

More advanced two- and three-dimensional problem solving with emphasis on the technical skills necessary for reproduction. Areas to be covered will include design problems and applications, typography, and methods of reproduction.

Prerequisite: ART 340

ART 345 Intermediate Printmaking

4 hours; 3 credits

Development of technical and expressive skills through selected areas of study in one or more of the graphic processes.

Prerequisite: ART 245

ART 350 Advanced Sculpture

4 hours; 3 credits

A continuation of ART 250. An advanced sculpture course that requires students to work closely with the professor to develop individual projects in media of their choice. Students prepare work suitable for submission in a graduate-student portfolio. By semester's end, students will have the ability to objectively critique and articulate

content and vision in ones work and concretely place it in an historical context. Students are required to maintain a detailed sketchbook that includes artistic vision, and to write and present an in-depth research paper on a selected exhibition of a sculptor. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ART 250

ART 375 Intermediate Studio Art Theory and

Practice

4 hours; 3 credits

A continuation of the study of two-dimensional systems and concepts. The central focus will be an understanding of the development and structure of Cubism and fragmented patterns. Studies will be made in both black and white and in color. Students are expected to produce drawings and paintings that transpose realist paintings into Cubist manner.

Prerequisite: ART 275

ART 401 Contemporary Art: Ideas and

Practices

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will cover the major transformations in contemporary art. Students will study developments in traditional media alongside the proliferation of new media practices. The class will address theoretical ideas and issues that have informed the work of contemporary artists and look at key writings by critics, art historians, and artists themselves.

Prerequisites: ART 200, ART 201 and a 300-level studio art class OR a 300-level photography class

ART 410 Major Artist I

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will explore the work of an artist of established historical importance as well as the context in which the artist worked and the art-historical and art-theoretical issues bearing on our effort to understand that artist. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENG 151; and ART 200 and ART 201 and a 300-level art history course,

ART 411 Major Artist II

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will explore the work of an artist of established historical importance as well as the context in which the artist worked and the art-historical and art-theoretical issues bearing on our efforts to understand that artist. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the instructor.

Prerequisite: ENG 151; and ART 200 and ART 201 and a

300-level art history course,

ART 440 Contemporary Art Theory I

4 hours; 4 credits

A seminar for advanced students in the arts. Part I will review the historical developments that led to the establishment of the New York School.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 99

ART 441 Contemporary Art Theory II

4 hours; 4 credits

The seminar will continue with an attempt to correlate individual student research on recent movements with the shifts in aesthetic theory from the 1930s to the present.

Prerequisite: ART 440

ART 445 Advanced Printmaking

4 hours; 3 credits

Individual projects in one or more of the printmaking processes. Emphasis on the development of individual style with a mature level of expression and the compiling of a portfolio of prints. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ART 345

ART 475 Advanced Studio Art Theory and

Practice

4 hours; 3 credits

This course will probe the inter-relationship of realist and abstract painting. Realism and abstraction will be compared and explored for the elements they share as well as for their differences. From a simple still life the student will develop studies that result in two distinct series of paintings, one abstract, the other realist. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ART 375

ART 480 Senior Project in Art and

Photography

4 hours; 3 credits

Open to Art and Photography majors who wish to complete their senior project exhibition. This course advances students in making the transition from college to the professional world of art-making. Prior to enrolling in this course, all students must have an existing body of highly developed studio work in painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, photography or installation. Through reading assignments and lectures, students will articulate, in written and oral forms, the aesthetic components of their creative practice while critically engaging with the work of their peers.

Prerequisite: ART 200 and ART 201 and senior standing

Corequisite: Any 300 level studio art or 300 level photography class

Photography Minor

(Minor)

Department of Performing and Creative Arts, Center for the Arts (1P), Room 203

Chairperson and Associate Professor George Emilio

Sanchez

Coordinator: Associate Professor Beatrix Reinhardt,

Center for the Arts (1P), Room 209

Pre-Minor Requirements: 6 credits

PHO 101 Introduction to Photography 3 credits

PHO 201 Introduction to Darkroom

Techniques

3 credits

Minor Requirements: 12 credits

At least 12 credits in photography at or above the 200 level.

100 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

The faculty strongly recommends at least one course that emphasizes the theoretical or historical underpinnings of photography chosen from: PHO 220, PHO

365, ART 303 (History of Photography), PHO 314 /ART

314.

Liberal Arts & Sciences Requirement:

Since most photography courses are non-liberal arts and sciences, students in this program should pay special attention to this requirement.

Photography Courses

PHO 101 Introduction to Photography

4 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the practice of photography. It is an introduction to photographic seeing and the visual grammar of photography. The class combines basic design problems, exercises in seeing elements of the medium, and the history and development of photography as an art form as well as basic principles and techniques of camera, photographic materials, processes, and techniques for image processing and print production are covered. (arts & com). (COPR) (TALA)

This course is a prerequisite for all other photography courses.

PHO 201 Introduction to Darkroom Techniques

4 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the practice of darkroom based black and white photography. A study of the history and development of black and white photography as an art form as well as basic principles and techniques of 35mm film camera and darkroom practice will be covered, including the use of a variety of films, developers, and papers. The course addresses mastery of materials as a creative tool.

Students are required to provide a 35mm manual SLR film camera. NOTE: Student must demonstrate through a portfolio a good understanding about the basics of camera techniques.

Prerequisite: PHO 101

PHO 215 Historical and Alternative

Photographic Processes

4 hours; 4 credits

Exploration and practice of historic and new methods and materials beyond the standard silver gelatin print. Students will learn to make pinhole cameras, paper negatives, wet-collodion negatives and ambroytpes, digital negatives for contact printing and different hand-coated printing processes. These practices will be put in historical and contemporary contexts by the introduction of different photographic movements, historical events, and through looking at the work of photographers using the processes.

Prerequisite: PHO 101 and PHO 201

PHO 220 Intermediate Photography

4 hours; 3 credits

The course combines an emphasis on interpretive camera and darkroom techniques with a thoughtful approach to the making of a photograph. Development of visual perception and individual style are emphasized. Included are fiber-based paper printing, toning, bleaching, pushed film processing, selective contrast, and an introduction to color.

Prerequisite: PHO 101 and PHO 201

PHO 230 Color Photography

4 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to expressive color photography,exploring the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic uses of color photography. This class provides an indepth study of the dynamics of color as a creative tool. Projects will explore the creative and technical possibilities of color film, and introduces students to computer tools that manipulate and enhance photographic images. Students will learn the skills to retouch and enhance these images from varied sources in order to create high-quality digital outputs.

Assignments are designed to help master basic techniques and expand the photographer's creative horizons.

Prerequisite: PHO 101 and PHO 201

PHO 240 Documentary Methods in

Photography

4 hours; 3 credits

An in-depth study of approaches and styles of documentary photography, and the concepts of narrative, sequence, story, and series, and their journalistic and artistic applications. An examination of how other photographers have employed these conventions in their work will be explored. Students will develop a body of work based on what they have learned.

Prerequisites: PHO 101 and PHO 201

PHO 250 Studio Photography I

4 hours; 3 credits

Photography studio techniques. Students will work both in large and small formats, utilizing tungsten and studio strobe lighting. Techniques of still life, portraiture, fashion, and figure photography will be stressed.

Prerequisite: PHO 201

PHO 305 Photography in New York

4 hours; 3 credits

An exploration of New York City and its boroughs as a classroom for learning about the practice, art and visual language of photography. The course will consist primarily of field trips to photography exhibitions and collections in New York City and involve the study and discussion of both historical and contemporary photography. Students will be required to participate in discussions, exchange thoughts and ideas, keep a detailed journal of thoughts and impressions from all field trips, complete assigned readings and write several reviews and research papers and give oral presentations about research. Students will produce a photographic portfolio of 20 photographs by the end of the semester. NOTE: It is recommended that students take an art history class prior to enrolling in PHO

305.

Prerequisites: PHO 101 and a minimum of one PHO

200-level course permission of photography coordinator

PHO 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography

(Also ART 314)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will investigate contemporary issues in photography from aesthetic, art historical, and philosophical

perspectives. It will be team-taught by an art historian and photographer. Students are strongly advised to take

ART 303 prior to enrolling.

Prerequisites: ART 100 or ART 200 or ART 201 or PHO

220 and ENG 151

PHO 315 Visiting Artist Workshop

4 hours; 3 credits

This course will consist of three individual workshops with fine arts photographers who will each teach a four-to five-week segment. Students will get acquainted with their work and have the opportunity to have in-depth discussions with the artists about their motivation, research, procedure, and execution processes used in creating their respective bodies of work. Students will be introduced to specific technical processes, readings, and theoretical concepts that each artist considers fundamental to his/her work process. Each workshop will conclude with a visual assignment that addresses the specific issues and techniques discussed. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: PHO 201 and PHO 220

PHO 320 The Photographic Portfolio

4 hours; 3 credits

Goals and marketing for photography. The definition and preparation of a personal photographic portfolio. A survey of ideas leading to a photographic direction, and the techniques necessary to realize the portfolio needed to pursue that direction.This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Any 200-level PHO course

PHO 360 Studio Photography II

4 hours; 3 credits

Methodology of producing pictures under totally controlled conditions. Lighting and camera techniques for portraiture, still life, and illustrations will be stressed. Both artistic concerns and professional studio practices are covered.

Prerequisite: PHO 250

PHO 365 Conceptual and Aesthetic Concerns of Image Making

– Photography III

4 hours; 4 credits

An appreciation of the intellectual bases of photographic works and their theoretical ramifications. Furthermore, it will expand the student’s critical and aesthetical understanding of the photographic image beyond the standard silver gelatin print. The course shall provide students with the intellectual tools to develop their own individual work and to critically determine if they have done so in a meaningful and substantial manner. Students will study a spectrum of motivations and expressions that exist in the field of photography and apply the gained knowledge to their work.

Prerequisites: PHO 201 and any other 200-level PHO course

Astronomy Courses

AST 100 Contemporary Theories of the Solar

System

3 hours; 3 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 101

The nature of the sun, moon, planets, comets, meteors, and meteorites; early and modern history of the Earth; the origin of the solar system; evolution of life on Earth and in the cosmos. Field trips and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required. Students may not receive credit for both INS 100 and AST

100. (science) (FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: AST 101

AST 101 Planetary Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Experiments on the properties of light and telescopes, the celestial sphere and time, eclipses, planetary orbits, meteors, sunspots, lunar geography, and observation work.

(science) (COPR)

Corequisite: AST 100

AST 102 Contemporary Theories of the

Universe

3 hours; 3 credits

A presentation of the galaxy, atomic structure, star populations, nuclear energy, stellar evolution, galactic structure, and the universe. Field trips and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required. (science) (RLPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: AST 103

AST 103 Galactic Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Experiments on atomic properties of matter, stellar atmosphere, variable and nova stars, galaxy classification, stellar clusters, and observation work. (science) (COPR)

Corequisite: AST 102

AST 105 Observational Astronomy

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Topics covered are aligning and using computerized telescopes; celestial coordinate systems; time keeping; observations of the planets, moon, sun, asteroidal motions, and variable stars; astrophotography with CCD imaging cameras; photometric techniques. Day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required beyond regularly scheduled hours. (science)

Prerequisites: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test, AST 100 or AST

102,

AST 108 Survey of the Universe

3 hours; 3 credits

A laboratory-embedded course covering topics exploring major concepts in our knowledge of the universe. Experiments and topics chosen from: the nature of the night sky, predicting celestial events, seasons, motions of the sun and moon, the nature of time and its measurement, the laws of motion and the force of gravity, the nature of light, the suns rotation and energy, radiometric dating, asteroid detection, planetary materials, atomic spectra, and galaxy classification, and Hubble’s Law. Field trips,

102 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions term paper, and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required. (science) (RLPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher

AST 110 Life in the Universe

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to astrobiology. Topics may include: life beyond the Earth; matter and energy, life on Earth (the basic building blocks of life, cells, DNA, the origins of life and evolution); life in our solar system; Mars; Jovian moons; the habitable zone around stars; the search for extraterrestrial intelligence; and interstellar travel. Field trips and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required. (science)(FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher

Corequisite: AST 111

AST 111 Life in the Universe Laboratory

2 hours; 1 credit

Experiments and activities on the nature of science, remote sensing, nature of life, genes, extreme environments, water and life, terraforming, habitable zones around stars, discovering extra-solar planets, the Drake equation, and aliens? (science) (COPR)(FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher

Corequisite: AST 110

AST 120 Space Science I

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Observations and telescopes. The structure and origin of the solar system, the sun-Earth connection, and space physics; space weather, comparative planetology. Laboratory emphasis will be on quantitative measures of celestial positions (i.e., astrometry, as well as solar system photometry). Field trips and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required. (science)

(RLPR) (STEM)

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 230 or MTH 231

AST 160 Space Science II

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Energy transport; stellar structure and evolution and origins; interstellar medium and star birth; galactic and extragalactic astronomy and cosmology; the Big Bang and beyond. Laboratory emphasis will be on stellar photometry and spectroscopy. Field trips and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required. (science) (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisite: AST 120

Corequisite: MTH 232

AST 396 Introduction to Astrophysics

3 hours; 3 credits

Celestial mechanics, electromagnetic radiations; their detectors and remote sensing; special relativity, stellar pulsation, general relativity and black holes, the nature and evolution of galaxies, origins, Newtonian and relativistic cosmology. Field trips and/or day and evening astronomical observation sessions will be required.

Prerequisite: AST 160

Biochemistry

(Bachelor of Science, Minor)

Department of Biology

Chairperson and Professor Charles Kramer, Building

6S, Room 143

Department of Chemistry

Chairperson and Associate Professor John Olsen,

Building 6S, Room 235

A degree in Biochemistry prepares students interested in working in the fast-growing biotechnology field; in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries; in research, product development, marketing, and sales; and in such related fields as teaching. For students who wish to pursue graduate study in the sciences or enter professional schools (medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy), a BS degree in Biochemistry is viewed quite favorably by admissions committees.

Biochemistry (BS)

Pre-Major Requirements: 38 credits

Students planning to major in Biochemistry must complete the following requirements. These courses may also be used to satisfy general education requirements.

A detailed guide to course choices for Biochemistry and

Chemistry majors is available from the Department of

Chemistry.

CHM 141 General Chemistry I 3 credits

CHM 121 General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 credit

CHM 142 General Chemistry II 3 credits

CHM 127 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 credit

BIO 170 General Biology I

BIO 171 General Biology I Laboratory

BIO 180 General Biology II

BIO 181 General Biology II Laboratory

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

BIO 205 General Physiology

PHY 120 General Physics I

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory

PHY 160 General Physics II

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory

Calculus sequence chosen from the following:

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory

MTH 230 Calculus I and Pre-Calculus or

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I and

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III or

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

MTH 236 Accelerated Calculus II

4 credits

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

10 credits

Major Requirements: 38-40 credits

CHM 240 Analytical Chemistry

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II

CHM/

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

BIO 370 Biochemistry I

CHM/

BIO 376 Biochemistry II

CHM 330 Physical Chemistry: Equilibria

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

CHM 336 Physical Chemistry: Processes 4 credits and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 103

CHM 337 Experimental Methods in

Physical Chemistry or

CHM 377 Biochemistry Laboratory and

Two biology electives chosen from:

BIO 312 Genetics

BIO 322* Evolution

BIO 326* Introduction to Bioinformatics and

Genomics

BIO 327 Molecular Biology

4 credits

4 credits

6-8 credits

BIO 332 Advanced Physiology

BIO 352 Cell Biology

BIO 365* Principles of Neurobiology

BIO 415 Mathematical Biology

BIO 428* Plant Physiology

BIO 442 Immunology

BIO 454* Advanced Cell Biology

BIO 460* Experimental Methods in Advanced

Genetics

*Requires pre or corequisites not in the pre-major requirements.

Electives: 0-2 credits

All Biochemistry majors are encouraged to take Independent Study (CHM 591-4 or BIO 591-4) to facilitate laboratory research as an elective.

Total Credits Required: 120

Honors

A student may be eligible for admission to the honors program in Biochemistry if he or she enters the senior year with a 3.5 grade point average. With the concurrence of a faculty supervisor, the student must submit

(by September 1) a one-page summary of a proposed research project. The chairperson of the department and the faculty supervisor will appoint a three-member committee to evaluate and/or modify the proposal (by

September 15), then grant or deny admission to the honors program.

Biochemistry Minor

Minor

Prerequisite Courses:

CHM 141, 121, 142, 127

BIO 170, 171, 180, 181

Requirements

CHM 240 Analytical Chemistry or

CHM 340 Instrumental Analysis

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II

CHM 370 Biochemistry I

Biology

Biology (BS)

8 credits

8 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Biochemistry Courses

Courses in biochemistry are listed under Biology and

Chemistry.

(Bachelor of Science, Biology/Bioinformatics, Medical

Technology, Secondary Education Preparation, Master of Science - see Graduate Catalog for information on graduate programs)

Department of Biology, Building 6S, Room 143

Chairperson and Professor Abdeslem El Idrissi

Study of the biological sciences is a major requirement for students who wish to specialize in such fields as plant or animal research, and for students who plan to enter various health professions, such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, medical technology, physician assistant, and physical therapy. The Department offers a varied and balanced program for biology and health profession majors, and three options in the BS degree program in Biology: Biology major, biology/adolescence education, and bioinformatics.

Option I - Biology Major

While pursuing honors research the student may receive eight credits for Independent Study (BIO 594 or

CHM 594), four each in the fall and spring semesters.

Additionally, it is highly recommended that the student begin work on the project during the summer or spring semester that immediately precedes the senior year.

Progress of the research will be monitored as follows:

(1) the student will meet with his or her committee by

November 1 of the first semester; (2) the student will submit a five-page progress report by January 15; (3) the committee will recommend for or against continuation in the program by February 1; (4) the student will submit a thesis, following the style of major journals, by

May 1; (5) the student will present an oral defense of the thesis to the committee, by the end of the final exam period.

The deadline dates noted above are based on a June graduation date, but corresponding guidelines may be designed for January graduation. In either case, it is expected that completion of the honors program will require at least one year of student research.

Pre-Major Requirements: 15-19 credits

A. All four of the following courses:

BIO 170 General Biology I

BIO 171 General Biology I Laboratory

BIO 180 General Biology II

BIO 181 General Biology II Laboratory

B. One of the following three units:

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory or

MTH 231 Analytical Geometry and

Calculus I

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory or

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory

C. One of the following two courses:

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

6 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

5 credits

1 credit

104 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

MTH 214 Applied Statistics Using

Computers

BIO 272 Biometrics

3 credits

4 credits

Major Requirements: 63 credits

A minimum grade of C is required for a biology course to be used to satisfy a prerequisite for a biology course required for the major requirements for the BS in Biology. To qualify for graduation, students must have at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA) in the courses that make up the Biology major.

A. Required courses

BIO 205

BIO 312

BIO 322

BIO 352

General Physiology

Genetics

Evolution

Cell Biology

OR

BIO 360 Ecology

B. One of the following courses:

BIO 370 Biochemistry

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

BIO 372 Cell Biochemistry

BIO 213 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

BIO 215 Invertebrate Zoology and Paleontology

BIO 228 Botany

C. One advanced six-hour laboratory course from the following: 3 credits

BIO 424 Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Laboratory

BIO 450 Experimental Methods in Animal

Physiology

BIO 452 Experimental Methods in Behavioral

Biology

BIO 454 Advanced Methods in Cell Biology

BIO 456 Experimental Methods in Ecology

BIO 458 Experimental Methods in Cell

Biochemistry

BIO 460 Experimental Methods in Advanced

Genetics

D. Elective Courses: At least four courses selected from the following:

Courses not selected in groups A, B, or C and these additional courses:

BIO 222 Field Biology

16 credits

BIO 225

BIO 230

Conservation Biology

Marine Biology and

Oceanography

BIO 240

BIO 314

BIO 318

BIO 324

Biology of Disease

General Microbiology

Histology

Developmental Biology

BIO 325/MDT 325 Diagnostic Molecular Biology

BIO 326 Introduction to Bioinformatics

BIO 327

BIO 332

BIO 338

BIO 346 and Genomics

Molecular Biology

Advanced Physiology

Behavioral Biology

General Virology

BIO 365

BIO/MTH 415

BIO 420

BIO 425

BIO 428

Principles of Neurobiology

Mathematical Biology

Comparative Endocrinology

Computational Molecular Biology

Plant Physiology

BIO 434

BIO 442

BIO 443

Comparative Physiology

Immunology

Scanning Electronic Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis

BIO 594 Biology Independent Study*

*Requires approval of the chairperson to be credited toward the major. BIO 594 may only be credited once toward the major.

E. Required related science courses: 24 credits

PHY 116 Physics I

PHY 156 Physics II

4 credits

4 credits

OR (with appropriate mathematics background)

PHY 120 General Physics I 3 credits

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory

PHY 160 General Physics II

1 credit

3 credits

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1 credit

AND

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

CHM 121 General Chemistry I Lab

CHM 142 General Chemistry II

CHM 127 General Chemistry II Lab

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

4 credits

4 credits

Electives: 4-8 credits

Total Credits Required: 128

Option II - Biology/Adolescence Education, grades

7-12

Pre-Major Requirements: 15-19 credits

A. All four of the following courses:

BIO 170 General Biology I

BIO 171 General Biology I Laboratory

BIO 180 General Biology II

BIO 181 General Biology II Laboratory

B. One of the following three units:

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory or

MTH 231 Analytical Geometry and

Calculus I

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory or

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory

C. One of the following two courses:

MTH 214 Applied Statistics Using

Computers

BIO 272 Biometrics

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

6 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

5 credits

1 credit

3 credits

4 credits

Major Requirements: 63 credits

A minimum grade of C is required for a biology course to be used to satisfy a prerequisite for a biology course required for the major requirements for the BS in Biology. To qualify for graduation, students must have at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA) in the courses that make up the Biology major.

A. Required courses

BIO 205 General Physiology

BIO 312 Genetics

BIO 322 Evolution

BIO 352 Cell Biology

OR

BIO 360 Ecology

B. One of the following courses:

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

BIO 228 Botany

C. One advanced six-hour laboratory course from the following:

4 credits

4 credits

BIO 370 Biochemistry

BIO 372 Cell Biochemistry

BIO 213 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

BIO 215 Invertebrate Zoology and Paleontology

3 credits

BIO 424 Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Laboratory

BIO 450 Experimental Methods in Animal

Physiology

BIO 452 Experimental Methods in Behavioral

Biology

BIO 454 Advanced Methods in Cell Biology

BIO 456 Experimental Methods in Ecology

BIO 458 Experimental Methods in Cell

Biochemistry

BIO 460 Experimental Methods in Advanced

Genetics

D. Elective Courses: At least four courses selected from the following:

16 credits

Courses not selected in groups A, B, or C and these additional courses:

BIO 222

BIO 225

BIO 230

BIO 240

BIO 314

BIO 318

Field Biology

Conservation Biology

Marine Biology and

Oceanography

Biology of Disease

General Microbiology

Histology

BIO 324 Developmental Biology

BIO 325/MDT 325 Diagnostic Molecular Biology

BIO 326 Introduction to Bioinformatics and Genomics

BIO 327

BIO 332

BIO 338

Molecular Biology

Advanced Physiology

Behavioral Biology

BIO 346

BIO 365

BIO/MTH 415

BIO 420

BIO 425

General Virology

Principles of Neurobiology

Mathematical Biology

Comparative Endocrinology

Computational Molecular

Biology

Plant Physiology BIO 428

BIO 434

BIO 442

BIO 443

Comparative Physiology

Immunology

Scanning Electronic

Microscopy and X-ray

Microanalysis

BIO 594 Biology Independent Study*

*Requires approval of the chairperson to be credited toward the major. BIO 594 may only be credited once toward the major.

E. Required related science courses: 24 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 105

PHY 116 Physics I

PHY 156 Physics II

4 credits

4 credits

OR (with appropriate mathematics background)

PHY 120 General Physics I

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory

3 credits

1 credit

PHY 160 General Physics II 3 credits

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1 credit

AND

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

CHM 121 General Chemistry I Lab

CHM 142 General Chemistry II

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

CHM 127 General Chemistry II Lab

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

1 credit

4 credits

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits

In addition to completing the pre-major and major requirements, students wishing to be recommended by the College for teacher certification must complete the following sequence of education courses for 24 credits:

F. Education Sequence 24 credits

EDS 201 Social Foundations of

Secondary Education

EDS 202 Psychological Foundations of

Secondary Education

4 credits

4 credits

EDS 304 The Pedagogy of Secondary

School in Science

EDS 318 The Secondary School

Curriculum In Science

4 credits

4 credits

EDS 400 Student Teaching in

Secondary Education 6 credits

EDS 401 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching in

Secondary Education 2 credits

A minimum grade of C is required for a biology course to be used to satisfy a prerequisite for a biology course required for the major requirements for the BS in Biology/Adolescence Education. To qualify for graduation, students must have at least a 2.5 grade point average

(GPA) in the courses that make up the Biology major.

Total Credits Required: 128

Option III - Biology/Bioinformatics

General education requirements: same as for Option I as shown above.

Pre-Major Requirements: 20-23 credits

A. All four of the following courses:

BIO 170

BIO 171

General Biology I

General Biology I Laboratory

BIO 180 General Biology II

BIO 181 General Biology II Laboratory

3 credits

1 credit

B. One of the following three units:

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus 6 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit or

MTH 231 Analytical Geometry and

Calculus I

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit or

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I 5 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit

C. BIO 272 Biometrics 4 credits

106 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

D. CSC

126

Introduction to Computer

Science 4 credits

Major Requirements: 82-83 credits

A minimum grade of C is required for a biology course to be used to satisfy a prerequisite for a biology course required for the major requirements for the BS in Biology/Bioinformatics. To qualify for graduation, students must have at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA) in the courses that make up the Biology major.

A. Required Courses

BIO 205 General Physiology 4 credits

BIO 312 Genetics

BIO 322 Evolution

BIO 352 Cell Biology or

BIO 360 Ecology

B. All of the following courses:

BIO 327 Molecular Biology

BIO/

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

CHM 370 Biochemistry I

BIO/

4 credits

CHM 376 Biochemistry II 4 credits

BIO 326 Introduction to Bioinformatics 4 credits

MTH/

BIO 415 Mathematical Biology

C. One advanced six-hour laboratory course from the following:

BIO 450 Experimental Methods in Animal

Physiology

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

BIO 452 Experimental Methods in Behavioral

Biology

BIO 454 Advanced Methods in Cell Biology

BIO 456 Experimental Methods in Ecology

BIO 458 Experimental Methods in Cell

Biochemistry

BIO 460 Experimental Methods in Advanced

Genetics

D. One elective from the following: 3-4 credits

Courses not selected in groups A or C and these additional courses:

BIO 213

BIO 215

BIO 228

BIO 240

BIO 314

BIO 318

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Invertebrate Zoology and

Paleontology

Botany

Biology of Disease

General Microbiology

Histology

BIO 324 Developmental Biology

BIO 325/MDT 325 Diagnostic Molecular Biology

BIO 332

BIO 338

Advanced Physiology

Behavioral Biology

BIO 365

BIO 372

BIO 428

Principles of Neurobiology

Cell Biochemistry

Plant Physiology

BIO 442

BIO 443

Immunology

Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis

E. Required related science courses:

4 credits CSC 211 Intermediate Programming

CSC 228 Discrete Mathematical

Structures 4 credits

CSC 326 Information Structures

CSC 424 Database Management

AND

4 credits

4 credits

PHY 116 Physics I

PHY 156 Physics II

4 credits

4 credits

OR (with appropriate mathematics background)

PHY 120 General Physics I 3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory

PHY 160 General Physics II

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory

AND

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

CHM 121 General Chemistry I Lab

CHM 142 General Chemistry II

CHM 127 General Chemistry II Lab

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

4 credits

4 credits

Total Credits Required: 128

For all three Biology BS degree program options, with permission of the program coordinator, BIO 150 and

BIO 160 Anatomy and Physiology I and II may be substituted for BIO 170 and BIO 171 General Biology I and

Laboratory, but BIO 150 and BIO 160 may not be used to satisfy the Scientific Analysis requirement in general education.

A student who has educational background or work experience that may be equivalent to the stated pre- or corequisite for a biology course should contact the chairperson of the Biology Department. If it is determined that a student has the appropriate background, a course requisite waiver will be issued.

Honors

The honors program in Biology is available to eligible seniors with a 3.5 grade point average or better. The program requires a minimum of one year to complete.

The student may receive up to eight credits for independent study (BIO 594) while completing the honors program. However, students do not automatically gain entrance into the honors program by registering for independent study.

To be accepted into the honors program, the student must first obtain approval from a full-time member of the department to carry out an honors research project.

This faculty member will then serve as the student’s adviser. Thereafter, the student will prepare and present a detailed written preliminary proposal of the honors research project for approval to a three-member departmental committee, consisting of the faculty adviser and two other faculty members. The committee will evaluate the proposal. After an oral presentation by the student and upon the recommendation of the committee, the student will be accepted into the program. The student will meet with his or her committee midway through the first semester for evaluation of the project.

In addition, the student will submit a written progress report to the committee at the end of the first semester.

On the basis of this report, the committee will decide whether the student should proceed further. If the student does not continue in the honors program, he or she may still acquire the credits for independent study.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 107

When the research is completed, the student is required to write up the research in the form of a thesis that will be evaluated at early and final stages by the committee.

The thesis format must adhere to that used by leading biological journals, or as outlined in the AIBS style manual. The ultimate decision on thesis format lies with the committee.

Corequisite: BIO 150

Note: Students planning to enter the programs in Nursing, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, or the Nuclear Medicine option in Medical Technology are assigned this course by the Department of Biology on the basis of scores attained on the Biology Placement Test.

Because it will take at least one year to complete the honors program in Biology, it is suggested that the student begin work during the summer immediately following the junior year.

Biology Minor

Minor

Prerequisite courses:

BIO 170 and 171

BIO 180 and 181

General Biology I and

Laboratory

General Biology II and

Laboratory

Requirements:

Four biology courses at the 200 level or above, at least two of which must have laboratory components.

Biology Courses

BIO 102 Human Body

4 credits

4 credits

14-16 credits

3 class hours, 1 recitation hour, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Survey course of gross anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the relation of structure to function and disease processes. Reading techniques and vocabulary problems of the biological sciences are emphasized.

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Test

This course may not be used to satisfy major requirements for the BS in Biology.

BIO 103 Introduction to Biology

3 hours; 3 credits

An Introduction to biological principles and how they apply to the structure and function of living organisms, especially the human body.(science) (RLPR)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MTH 020

BIO 105 Molecular Foundations of Cell

Function

1 lecture hour, 1 recitation hour; 1 credit; the course meets four hours per week for one-half semester

This course offers an introductory survey of molecular biology, cellular metabolism, and cellular mechanisms. It is designed to run concurrently with BIO 150 Human

Anatomy and Physiology I, and to provide the necessary background for the study of human anatomy and physiology. This course may not be used to satisfy the Scientific Analysis requirement.

Prerequisite: BIO 106 and BIO 107 or BIO 170 and BIO

171 with a minimum grade of C or a satisfactory score on the Biology Placement Test.

BIO 106 Principles of Biology I

3 hours; 3 credits

Introductory biology for non-science majors. Structure and function of the body and the effects of the environment on it. Fundamental biological principles and concepts and their applications to relevant concerns such as drug addiction, food additives, physical fitness, and the population explosion. Not credited toward the Biology major. (science) (RLPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: BIO 107

BIO 107 Principles of Biology I Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiences illustrating principles and topics discussed in BIO 106. (scientific analysis) (COPR)

Corequisite: BIO 106

BIO 108 Principles of Biology II

3 hours; 3 credits

Introductory biology for non-science majors (continuation of BIO 106). The role of biology in the world around us and the effects of the modern world on living things including ecology, pollution, and the extinction of species.

Diseases and their treatment through drugs and genetic engineering. Science and the role of the citizen. Not credited toward the Biology major. (science) (FSWR)

Prerequisites: BIO 106, BIO 107

Corequisite: BIO 109

BIO 109 Principles of Biology II Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiences illustrating principles and topics discussed in BIO 108. (science) (COPR) (FSWR)

Corequisite: BIO 108

BIO 146 Nutrition

3 hours; 3 credits

This course presents fundamental principles, concepts, and applications of normal nutrition. Stress will also be placed on the relation of good nutrition to good health.

Emphasis will be placed on the common restrictive diets generally used in medical office practice.

Open to non-medical assistant students as an elective.

May not be used to satisfy major requirements for the BS in Biology.

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or BIO 170 and 171 or BIO 106 and 107 or BIO 150

BIO 150 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

The first half of a comprehensive two-semester course in human biology. Integrated lecture and laboratory sessions deal with the structure and function of cells, tissues, and the following systems: integumentary, musculosketal,

108 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions blood-cardiovascular, immune, and respiratory. This course may not be used to satisfy general education degree requirements, except for Nursing AAS students.

(STEM)(RLPR)

Prerequisites: BIO 106 and BIO 107 or BIO 170 and BIO

171 with a minimum grade of C or a satisfactory score on the Biology Placement Test

Pre- or corequisite: BIO 105 or a satisfactory score on the

Biology Placement Test

Note: Students who have previously registered two or more times for BIO 150 will be permitted to register again only on a space-available basis, as determined at the close of registration. Students must receive a grade of C or better in BIO 150 and BIO 105 (when prescribed as a corequisite of BIO 150) to proceed to BIO 160. This is a required course for students planning to enter the programs in Nursing, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, or the Nuclear Medicine option in Medical

Technology programs.

BIO 160 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

This course is a continuation of BIO 150. Lecture and laboratory sessions deal with the structure and function of the urinary, digestive, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems. This course may not be used to satisfy general education degree requirements, except for Nursing AAS students. (STEM) (FSWR)

Prerequisites: BIO 105 or a satisfactory score on the Biology Placement Test, and BIO 150

BIO 180 General Biology II

3 hours; 3 credits

A continuation of BIO 170, including plant and animal diversity, microbes and disease, reproduction, development, patterns of inheritance, the origins of life, evolution, ecology, and selected topics. For science, Medical

Technology, appropriate pre-professional majors, and other interested students in consultation with an adviser.

(science) (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIO 170, Minimum grade of C in BIO 171, ENG 111, and MTH 123 or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: BIO 181

BIO 181 General Biology II Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

A continuation of BIO 171. A laboratory examination of the material covered in BIO 180. For science, Medical

Technology, appropriate pre-professional majors, and other interested students in consultation with an adviser.

(science) (COPR) (STEM) (FSWR)

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIO 170 and a minimum grade of C BIO 171 and ENG 111 and MTH

123 or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics

Assessment Test

Corequisite: BIO 180

Note: Students must receive a grade of C or better in

BIO 150 and in BIO 105 (when prescribed by the Department as a corequisite of BIO 150) to proceed to BIO

160. This is a required course for students planning to enter the programs in Nursing, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, or the Nuclear Medicine option in Medical Technology programs.

BIO 205 General Physiology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A study of systemic physiology with emphasis on cell physiology, homeostasis, and control mechanisms in vertebrates, particularly mammals. Laboratory exercises include physiographic studies of various systems. Required for Biology and Medical Laboratory Technology majors.

Prerequisites: BIO 160 or BIO 180 and 181; CHM 141 and CHM 121

BIO 170 General Biology I

3 hours; 3 credits

Fundamental biological principles of cell metabolism, energy transformations, and plant and animal functions including support, digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, and integration, and selected current topics.For science, Medical Technology, appropriate pre-professional majors, and other interested students in consultation with an adviser. (science) (RLPR) (STEM)

Pre or corequisite:ENG 111, MTH 123 or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: BIO 171

BIO 171 General Biology I Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Direct student involvement in the experimental demonstration of basic biological principles in plants and animals and the dissection of the fetal pig, with experiments oriented toward the understanding of the human body.

For science, Medical Technology, appropriate pre-professional majors, and other interested students in consultation with an adviser. (science) (COPR) (STEM)

Pre or corequisite:ENG 111, MTH 123 or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: BIO 170

BIO 213 Vertebrate Zoology

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A comparative study of the chordates with emphasis on both extant and extinct taxa, ecology, behavior and morphological and physiological specializations. Projects conducted outdoors at local field sites and a museum trip.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181

BIO 214 Biological Approach to Human

Sexuality

3 hours; 3 credits

Developmental anatomy of female and male reproductive systems, basic endocrinology and reproductive cycles; physiology of sexual functions; pregnancy and birth; fertility, stimulation, and control; sexual disorders, venereal disease, and other diseases including cancer; biological origins and variations of behavior. May not be used to satisfy the major requirements for the BS in Biology.

Pre- or corequisite: BIO 180 and 181 or BIO 160

BIO 215 Invertebrate Zoology and

Paleontology

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Taxonomy, ecology, evolution, paleontology, and phylogeny of the invertebrates, emphasizing the medical,

economic, and evolutionary importance of the various groups. Introduction to the use of zoological literature and preparation of a scientific paper.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181

BIO 222 Field Biology

2 class hours, 4 laboratory or field hours; 4 credits

This course provides instruction in standard procedures of collecting, preserving, and analyzing specimens and data observed during off-campus field trips. Analysis will include introduction to descriptive statistics; comparisons and indices of species diversity, dispersion, and community similarity. One field study will be made of animal behavior. One weekend field trip is scheduled. Reports using scientific format, labeled specimen collections, and a field notebook are required.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181

BIO 225 Conservation Biology

4 credits; 4 hours

The applied, integrative, and multidisciplinary science of maintaining the earth's biological diversity. The objectives of this course are to understand the conceptual foundations of conservation biology, the primary threats to biodiversity, the consequences of small populations, and approaches to solving conservation problems. Through reading assignments, discussions, exercises, field trips to local sites of conservation interest, exams and a presentation, the course will significantly foster student-active learning of conservation biology in an evolutionary and ecological context.

Prerequisites: BIO 180, BIO 181, ENG 111, MTH 123

BIO 228 Botany

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the major structural and functional characteristics of the groups of plants that comprise the plant kingdom: bacteria, algae, fungi, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Interrelationships of evolution, diversity, and ecology are stressed throughout the examination of all major disciplines of plant biology.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181

BIO 230 Marine Biology and Oceanography

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the chemical, physical, geological and biological processes governing the formation of the world's oceans and the distribution and ecology of its inhabitants. Lectures will introduce the biological, chemical, and geological features of saltwater environments, and field trips to local marine habitats and associated laboratory work will complement these lectures. The multidisciplinary character of marine biology and oceanography will be stressed. Fundamental principles in all disciplines are discussed.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181

BIO 232 Social Problems in Biology

3 hours; 3 credits

A course exploring the application of biology to crucial issues in the world today: drugs, pollution, overpopulation, birth control, abortion, the right to die, test-tube babies, genetic engineering, the rebuilding of humans, and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 109 the conquest of diseases. May not be used to satisfy the major requirements for the BS in Biology.

Prerequisites: BIO 102, or BIO 170 and 171, or BIO 106 and 107

BIO 240 The Biology of Disease

3 hours; 3 credits

Biological aspects of the major diseases of humans, including heart disease, cancer, autoimmune diseases such as arthritis and multiple sclerosis; hereditary diseases such as sickle cell anemia and hemophilia; and bacterial and viral diseases such as tuberculosis, colds, and influenza. Principles of immunology, chemotherapy, and genetic engineering are among the major concepts that will be studied. Effects of disease on human history will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: BIO 108 and 109, or BIO 180 and 181, or

BIO 160

BIO 242 History of Biology

3 hours; 3 credits

A survey of the historical development of some of the major biological concepts including an examination of the life and times of various biologists and the factors that influenced their work. Original scientific research papers will be read. May not be used to satisfy the major requirements for the BS in Biology.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181

BIO 272 Biometrics

4 hours; 4 credits

A course for science majors emphasizing applications of statistics to problems in experimental biology, field biology, and environmental science. It covers descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and design of experiments.

The following techniques are included: goodness of fit tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and regression, time series analysis, and nonparametric methods.

Prerequisites: BIO 160 or BIO 180 and 181; MTH 123 or

MTH 130

BIO 312 Genetics

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A study of the mechanics and molecular basis of inheritance. The lectures will cover patterns of inheritance, structure and function of nucleic acids, recombinant DNA, bacterial genetics, and population genetics. Laboratory exercises will include studying patterns of inheritance with Drosophila melanogaster and techniques related to recombinant DNA work. Required of Biology majors.

Prerequisites: BIO 205 and CHM 142 and CHM 127

BIO 314 General Microbiology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Topics will include immunology, biotechnology, and the metabolism, genetics, morphology, and growth of microorganisms. Required of Medical Technology majors.

Prerequisites: BIO 160 or BIO 180, BIO 181, and CHM

141

BIO 316 Clinical Microbiology

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

110 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Medical and diagnostic microbiology: a study of host microbe interactions, the principles and applications of the immune response, the epidemiology of infectious disease, and the pathogenesis of the major microbial diseases. In the laboratory the procedures used in laboratory diagnosis are applied. Required of Medical Technology majors. A non-liberal arts and sciences course, not credited toward the Biology major.

Prerequisite: BIO 314

BIO 318 Histology

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A study of the microscopic structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs with emphasis on functional correlations. Laboratory sessions include technical procedures for fixing, sectioning, staining, and mounting tissue specimens, and examination of prepared microscopic slides of human/mammalian tissues and organs.

Prerequisite: BIO 160 or BIO 205

BIO 322 Evolution

4 hours; 4 credits

The principles of the neo-Darwin theory of evolution; the origin and evolution of life; mechanisms of evolution and the roles of genetic variation, natural selection, isolation, and chance; species concepts and speciation; phylogeny; the tempo and mode of evolution; molecular evolution; the impact of genomics on evolutionary relationships; and an introduction to the use of pertinent scientific literature.

Prerequisite: BIO 312

BIO 324 Developmental Biology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Early development of representative organisms, including fertilization, cleavage, origin of germ layers, and organ systems; biochemical events during differentiation.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and 181; CHM 142

Pre- or corequisite: BIO 205

BIO 325 Diagnostic Molecular Biology

(also MDT 325)

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

This course will address the theoretical and practical framework for the understanding and application of molecular biology techniques in the clinical laboratory. The course material will cover the principles and applications of recombinant DNA technology including DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA amplification, and nonradioactive in situ hybridization (HISH) for the detection and identification of microorganisms associated with infectious diseases.

Prerequisites: BIO 314, CHM 142

BIO 326 Introduction to Bioinformatics and

Genomics

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Introduction to the representation and analysis of biological sequence and structural information. Description and use of nucleic acid, protein, structure, sequence motif, genome, literature, and other relevant databases. Overview and discussion of basic sequence manipulations and analyses including sequence assembly and editing, restriction and protease analysis, coding region identification, gene prediction, database searching and similarity analysis, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, PCR primer design, phylogenetic analyses, protein structure and property prediction, RNA structure prediction, microarray analyses, etc. Laboratory includes demonstrations and practical exercises illustrating the analyses and concepts presented and discussed in lecture.. Recommended: BIO 312, BIO 370, BIO 352 or the equivalent

Prerequisite: BIO 327 .

BIO 327 Molecular Biology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Principles and regulation of gene expression: nucleic acid and chromosome structure/function, transcription, RNA processing, and translation. Emphasis on eukaryotes and experimental analysis (recombinant DNA and other methods) of genomes, gene structure/function, and expression.

Prerequisites: BIO 312

BIO 332 Advanced Physiology

4 hours; 4 credits

An in-depth study of representative physiological mechanisms at the molecular and cellular levels of organization.

Course topics include the function of biological macromolecules, bioenergetics and metabolism, cell surface dynamics, functional microanatomy of neurons, neural information transfer and integration, organization of reflexes, hormones and other bioactive chemical messengers, renal regulation of the internal environment.

Prerequisite: BIO 160 or BIO 205

BIO 338 Behavioral Biology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

This course will cover the areas of animal behavior, neurophysiology, sensory physiology, and neuroendocrinology to provide an integrated point of view of the biological basis of behavior.

Prerequisites: BIO 205 and CHM 142

BIO 342 Advanced Human Anatomy

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

In-depth study of the human body with emphasis on the neuromuscular system. Examines structural interrelationships as a basis for normal functions. Directed laboratory experiences with cadaver dissection and skeletal materials and models.

Prerequisites: BIO 160 and acceptance into the Physical

Therapy or Physician Assistant Programs or permission of the appropriate program coordinator.

BIO 346 General Virology

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of major groups of viruses and includes structural and biochemical characteristics, cell-virus interactions, and viral diseases

It is recommended that students should take CHM 250 and BIO 312 prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites: BIO 205 and CHM 142.

BIO 350 Microbiology and Cellular Pathology

3 hours; 3 credits

A one-semester course that surveys the major groups of microorganisms with emphasis on those involved in human health problems. The principles of immunity and hypersensitivity, microbial control, and the principal microbial diseases are discussed. Not credited toward the

Biology major.

Prerequisite: BIO 160

Corequisite: BIO 351

BIO 351 Microbiology and Cellular Pathology

Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory exercises correlated with topics covered in

BIO 350.

Prerequisite: BIO 160

Corequisite: BIO 350

BIO 352 Cell Biology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

The eukaryotic cell is treated as a highly compartmentalized functional unit. Emphasis on cell cycle, DNA and chromosomal organization and functions, replication, transcription and translation, also organization and functional interrelationship of surface and internal membrane systems, exo/endocytosis and cytoskeleton. The lab component deals with selected topics illustrating key cell biology concepts. Required for Biology majors.

Biology majors require grade of C or better in prerequisite

Biology courses.

Prerequisites: BIO 205 and CHM 142

Corequisite: CHM 250

BIO 360 Ecology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

How interactions between organisms, and between organisms and the physical environment bring about adaptations in response to natural selection, and change in species diversity through evolutionary time. Population genetics, growth, and demography; competition; predation; and community and ecosystem structure and function are other major areas covered. Principles of ecology will be emphasized in laboratory work and in field studies of various natural habitats. Required for Biology majors.

Biology majors require grade of C or better in prerequisite

Biology courses.

It is recommended that students take BIO 215 or BIO

228 prior to taking this course.

Prerequisite: BIO 312.

BIO 365 Principles of Neurobiology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A study of basic mechanisms regulating activity of nerve cells including mechanisms of memory and brain disorders. Laboratory exercises include electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity in vitro and biochemical characterization of components of the nervous tissue.

Prerequisites: BIO 180 and BIO 181, or BIO 160

Corequisite: CHM 250

BIO 368 Neuroscience

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Examines the structure and function of the central nervous system and sensory receptors. Includes laboratory

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 111 sessions on the dissection of the human brain, examination of sections of the spinal cord and brain stem, and experiments with functions of the nervous system.

Prerequisites: BIO 332, BIO 342, PHT 200

BIO 370 Biochemistry I

(Also CHM 370)

4 hours; 4 credits

The major constituents of cells: physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Properties of enzymes including specificity and kinetics.

Prerequisite: CHM 256

Pre- or corequisites: PHY 110 and PHY 111, or PHY 116, or PHY 120 and PHY 121

BIO 372 Cell Biochemistry

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Chemical approaches to cell function: bioenergetics, cell replication, control of biosynthetic processes, and metabolism. Use of analytic methods to study the properties of cells and subcellular components.

Prerequisites: BIO 205, CHM 256

BIO 376 Biochemistry II

(Also CHM 376)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intermediary metabolism, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. Introduction to bioenergetics and biochemical genetics.

Prerequisite: BIO/CHM 370

Pre- or corequisites: PHY 150 and 151, or PHY 156, or

PHY 160 and 161

BIO 378 Radiation Biology

4 hours; 4 credits

The biological effects of chronic and acute exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying the events occurring during and after the interaction between macromolecules, isolated cells, organs, and entire organisms with irradiation. The effects of radiation at all levels of biological organization, and the biological basis for radiation safety practices are discussed.

Prerequisite: BIO 205

Pre- or corequisites: PHY 150 and 151, or PHY 156, or

PHY 160 and 161

BIO 382 Pharmacotherapeutics

3 hours; 3 credits

Pharmacodynamics of medicinal substances with respect to advanced receptor mechanisms and the action-effect sequence of drug activity. Emphasis is on the correlation between drug structure, pharmacologic activity, and the effect of drugs. Not credited toward the Biology major.

Prerequisites: BIO 350 and 351 or BIO 332; CHM 110 and 111 or CHM 141 and CHM 121

BIO 415 Mathematical Biology

(Also MTH 415)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will address the growing interaction between mathematics and the biological sciences and will provide a practical context for the mathematical description and analysis of biological processes. The emphasis will be on

112 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions the construction and analysis of models consistent with empirical data. Biological problems in ecology and conservation, epidemiology, cell biology, and neuroscience will be used to illustrate the equations, including especially nonlinear equations. The computer program

MATLAB will be used extensively.

Prerequisites: MTH 230 and MTH 231 or equivalent;

MTH 229, and one BIO 300-level course

BIO 420 Comparative Endocrinology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Role of major endocrine glands (including neuroendocrines) in cell function and metabolic pathways. Emphasis upon phylogeny and comparative physiology of the endocrine system. Pertinent methodology will be treated.

Prerequisites: BIO 205, CHM 256, and one additional physiology course

BIO 424 Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Laboratory

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Methods in the cloning, expression, isolation, and analysis of nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) and recombinant proteins; introduction to computer methods and analysis in biotechnology; DNA sequencing and sequence analysis; experimental approaches for the analysis of regulation of gene expression including transfection, report analysis, etc. Recommended students take BIO 312, BIO

370, or BIO 352 prior to this course.

Prerequisites: BIO 205, CHM 142, and CHM 127

Pre- or corequisite: BIO 327.

BIO 425 Computational Molecular Biology

3 hours; 3 credits

Overview of theoretical and computational methods in bioinformatics with an emphasis on the application of algorithms and use of statistical methods in nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis. Emphasis on the mathematical basis of sequence alignment including database searches using Smith-Waterman dynamic programming, pair-wise sequence alignment using dynamic programming and scoring matrices, and multiple sequence alignment using hidden Markov model and genetic algorithms.

Prerequisites: BIO 326, BIO 272 or MTH 214 and MTH

230 or MTH 231 or MTH 235

BIO 428 Plant Physiology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Examination of the basic physiological processes common to all vascular plants. Topics covered include cell structure and function, water transport, transpiration, photosynthesis, solute translocation, nutrient uptake, mineral nutrition, phytohormones, plant tropisms, growth, development, and reproduction. Laboratory exercises will include plant cells, water relations, tissue culture, photosynthesis, phytohormones, reproduction, competition, and symbiosis.

Prerequisite: BIO 205 or BIO 228

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 250

BIO 432 Clinical Pathology

3 hours; 3 credits

Study of the disease processes and their clinical manifestations beginning with the cellular and tissue levels leading to the organ level. Surveys medical conditions and their management as they relate to physical therapy practice. Areas include cardiology, orthopedics, autoimmune system, epidemiology.

Prerequisites: BIO 342, BIO 332

Corequisite: BIO 318

BIO 434 Comparative Physiology

4 hours; 4 credits

The study of the maintenance of internal homeostasis in different animal groups. Emphasis will be placed upon the phylogeny of the processes of regulation and integration.

Prerequisites: BIO 205 and BIO 213 or BIO 215

Corequisite: CHM 250

BIO 442 Immunology

2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

An introduction to immunology, with attention to the formation and nature of antibodies, the nature of antigens, and problems of antigen-antibody interactions. Such subjects as antibody-mediated hypersensitivity and histocompatibility are also considered.

Prerequisite: BIO 314 or BIO 350

BIO 443 Scanning Electron Microscopy and

X-ray Microanalysis

(Also CHM 443)

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

A course to familiarize undergraduate students with the principles and practices of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalyses. The course content will focus on the SEM and its modes of operation, electron beam-specimen interactions, image formation, generation of x-rays, x-ray spectral measurement, and qualitative and quantitative x-ray analyses. The lecture will present the historical and theoretical backgrounds to these integrated topics, and the laboratory will provide hands-on experiences for biological, materials, and polymer samples. The designed experiments will allow students to apply the techniques learned in class to realistic systems, and the laboratory reports will help students develop the skill in scientific and technical writing. This course is directed toward advanced biology/chemistry students.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

BIO 450 Experimental Methods in Animal

Physiology

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Procedures and instrumentation used in testing physiological phenomena. Some of the areas explored are muscle contraction, nerve responses, renal function, active transport, and basal metabolism.

Prerequisites: BIO 205, CHM 250

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 256

BIO 452 Experimental Methods in Behavioral

Biology

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Emphasis will be placed on the laboratory analysis of factors that influence the behavior of animals in the laboratory and field. Field trips will be required.

Prerequisites: BIO 338 and BIO 272 or MTH 214

BIO 454 Advanced Methods in Cell Biology

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Current procedures for the microscopic study of tissues and cells. Advanced histological procedures involving paraffin embedding, sectioning, and staining with selected reactions will be used to study normal and experimentally modified tissues. Autoradiography and enzyme histochemistry will also be examined.

Prerequisites: BIO 352 and CHM 142

BIO 456 Experimental Methods in Ecology

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Introduction to natural communities. Emphasis on quantitative methods for community and ecosystem analysis.

Field trips to be arranged.

Prerequisites: BIO 360 and either BIO 272 or MTH 214

BIO 458 Experimental Methods in Cell

Biochemistry

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

The course consists of the application of modern analytical methods to the study of the properties of cells and subcellular components. Emphasis will be placed on the mastering of laboratory techniques. Not credited toward the Biochemistry major.

Prerequisite: BIO 370 or 372

BIO 460 Experimental Methods in Advanced

Genetics

6 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Current procedures in basic recombinant DNA techniques will be utilized including DNA isolation, restriction digestion, ligation, and analysis of recombinant products.

Prerequisite: BIO 312

Business

(Bachelor of Science, Associate in Applied Science,

Minor)

School of Business, Building 3N, Room 235

Interim Founding Dean, Susan Holak, BS, MPhil, PhD

Department of Accounting & Finance

Chairperson and Professor Jonathan Peters

Department of Economics

Chairperson and Associate Professor Vasilios Petratos

Department of Management

Chairperson and Associate Professor Gordon DiPaolo

Department of Marketing

Chairperson and Professor Thomas Tellefsen

The Associate’s degree program offers options in Accounting, Finance, Information Systems, International

Business, Management, and Marketing.

Graduates may enter directly into the job market or continue study toward the bachelor’s degree and should consult an adviser and plan their programs accordingly.

Students can obtain both exemption from and course credit for BUS 150 by successfully completing four Mi-

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 113 crosoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) exams: Version

2002 or later, in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access.

For information on MOUS test standards and administration, see Microsoft Office Specialist Certification

Requirements at www.Microsoft.com.

Business (AAS)

Pathways Required Core: 12 credits

English Composition (RECR)

ENG 111 Introduction to College Writing

6 credits

3 credits

ENG 151 College Writing

Mathematical And Quantitative Reasoning

3 credits

3 or more

(RMQR) credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

MTH 121 Finite Mathematics 3 credits

MTH 123 College Algebra and Trigonometry 4 credits

MTH 130 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

Life and Physical Sciences (RLPR)

3 credits

6 credits

3 credits

5 credits

3 or more credits

Pathways Flexible Core: 9 credits

Select 3 courses from the following five areas with no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field in the Flexible Core. The five areas of the

Flexible Core are:

1. World Cultures and Global Issues (FWGR)

2. Creative Expression (FCER)

3. U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR)

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, and Institutions

4. Individual and Society (FISR)

5. Scientific World (FSWR)

NOTE: Students may take courses in STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World) that have 3 or more credits. This may result in students finishing their degree with more than the regular number of credits required.

Core Requirements: 28 credits

(Please note that the prerequisites for several Core courses include a specific math course (MTH 121, or

MTH 123, MTH 130, MTH 230, MTH 231). Students may also use this course to fulfill a General Education requirement)

ACC 114

ACC 121

BUS 160

BUS 215

ECO 111

OR

ECO 112

Introduction to Accounting I

Introduction to Accounting II

Business Law I

Information Management

Introduction to

Microeconomics

Introduction to

Macroeconomics

Managerial Finance I

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

FNC/ECO

240

MGT 110

3 credits

MKT 111

Organizational Theory and

Management

Marketing

3 credits

3 credits

114 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Specialization requirements: 7-8 credits selected from the following recommended courses:

Accounting:

Any two accounting courses above the level of ACC 121

Introduction to Accounting II.

Finance:

Any two finance courses at the 200 level or above.

Information Systems:

Two courses chosen from among the following: BUS

205 Data Communications and Networks for Business,

BUS 352 Introduction to Systems Analysis, CSC 126

Introduction to Computer Science.

International Business:

BUS 200 one additional course selected in consultation with the student’s adviser. (ECO 250 International Economics or ECO/POL 251 International Political Economy or POL 261 International Organizations)

Management:

Any two management courses at the 200 level or above.

Marketing:

Any two marketing courses at the 200 level or above.

Electives: 3-4 credits

Total Credits Required: 60

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

All courses designated ACC and BUS, and most courses designated FNC, MKT, and MGT are non-liberal arts and sciences. Courses double-listed with economics

(ECO) or political science (POL) are liberal arts and sciences.

Business (BS)

This program offers students a strong general business education together with the opportunity for a concentration in finance, international business, management, or marketing. The BS degree programs in Business and

Accounting are appropriate for graduate s of associate’s degree programs as well as for new and transfer students. For admission, continuation, and graduation from the Bachelor of Science degree program in Business, students must maintain a minimum cumulative

GPA of 2.5. A 2.5 GPA is not a requirement for students to enroll in the AAS program, for students pursuing a minor in the Business Department, or for students enrolling in individual courses.

Pre-Major Requirements: 39-43 credits

(Please note that the prerequisites for several Core courses include a specific math course (MTH 121, or

MTH 123, MTH 130, MTH 230, MTH 231). Students may also use this course to fulfill a General Education requirement)

MGT 110

MKT 111

FNC/ECO

240

ECO 111

Organizational Theory and

Management

Marketing

Managerial Finance

Introduction to

Microeconomics

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

4 credits

ECO 112

ACC 114

ACC 121

BUS 160

BUS 215

Introduction to

Macroeconomics

Introduction to Accounting I 4 credits

Introduction to Accounting II 4 credits

Business Law I

Information Management

4 credtis

3 credits

4 credits

MGT/ECO

230

Introduction to Economic and Managerial Statistics

In addition to the course taken to satisfy

4 credits

Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning

(RMQR), students must take an additional math course from the following list:

MTH 130 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

3-6 credits

3 credits

MTH 221 Applied Finite Mathematics and

Business Calculus

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

4 credits

6 credits

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 3 credits

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 3 credits

MTH 236 Accelerated Calculus II 5 credits

Major Requirements: 26-36 credits

Each student chooses one area of concentration beyond the pre-major requirements. Concentrations are available in Finance, International Business, Management, and Marketing.

Finance Concentration: 30 credits

FNC 111 Personal Financial

FNC/ECO

213

Management

Money and Capital Markets

ACC 315 Analysis of Financial

Statements

International Finance FNC300/

ECO 370

FNC/ECO

345

FNC 350

Managerial Finance II

Advanced Corporate

Finance

FNC/ECO

360 Investment Analysis

Plus one course chosen from ECO 318,

ECO 323, ECO 326

3 credits

4 credits

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

International Business Concentration: 34-36 credits

BUS 200

ECO 370/

International Business

International Finance

4 credits

FNC 300

BUS 415 Global Strategy and Decision

Making

4 credits

4 credits

OR

MGT 416 Decision Making 4 credits

Foreign Language 0-8 credits

Note: Students who are exempt from the foreign language course requirement must take additional credits from the courses listed below to complete the 34-36 credits required in the concentration.

1. Business: At least two courses chosen from the following:

MGT 325 International Management

MKT 320 International Marketing

BUS 598 Business Internship

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

At least one course chosen from each of the following categories:

2. Economics/Political Science

ECO 250 International Economics

ECO/GEG

252

Economic Geography

ECO 256 Analysis of Underdeveloped

Areas

ECO/POL

251

POL 261

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

International Political

Economy 4 credits

International Organizations 4 credits

3. Country Focus

BUS 420 Global Business Seminar:

Doing Business Abroad

HST 206

HST 208

HST 209

HST 210

Modern China

Modern Latin America

Modern Japan

Modern India

HST 235

HST 271

HST 272

HST 284

LNG/INT

230

Modern Middle East

Modern British History

Modern Germany

Soviet and Contemporary

Russia

Aspects of Contemporary

China

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Management Concentration: 26-28 credits

MGT 210 Management Process 4 credits

MGT 320

MGT 410

Management of Organizational

Behavior

Business Policy

4 credits

4 credits

MGT 416 Decision Making in Business 4 credits

Plus two (2) courses chosen from the following list or any other 200-level or higher MGT course: 6-8 credits

MGT 223 Public Administration 4 credits

MGT 314

MGT 322

MGT 325

BUS 200

Small Business Management 4 credits

Human Resource

Management

International Management

4 credits

4 credits

BUS /COM

211

BUS 238/

PHL 238

Introduction to International

Business

Communication in a

Corporate Setting

Ethical Issues in Business and Society

4 credits

3 credits

4 credits

MKT 215 Principles of Selling 4 credits

Plus any one (1) business-related course* with the written approval of the student’s adviser. 3-4 credits

*BUS 100 may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

Marketing Concentration: 26-28 credits

MKT 211 Advertising

MKT 310 Consumer Behavior

4 credits

4 credits

MKT 410

MKT 420

Marketing Research

Marketing Management

4 credits

4 credits

MGT 416 Decision Making in Business 4 credits

An additional six to eight credits selected from the following two lists including at least one course from list

A. Marketing courses:

MKT 213 Retail Store Organization and

Operation

3 credits

MKT 215 Principles of Selling 3 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 115

MKT 216

MKT 312

MKT 360

MKT 415

MKT 490

Sales Management

Advertising Copy and

Production

Internet Marketing

International Marketing

Marketing Seminar

3 credits

4 credits

Any MKT course(s) at the 200 level or higher

B. Additional courses:

BUS 200 Introduction to International

Business

4 credits

BUS/COM

211

Communications in a

Corporate Setting 3 credits

BUS 250

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

BUS 598

COM 250

COM 251

ECO 323/

MGT 324

ENL 112

ENL 212

FNC 111

PSY 214

Computer in Information

Processing

Business Internship

3 credits

Basic Design and Media

Graphics

Digital Imaging I

3-4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

Introduction to Econometrics 4 credits

Public Speaking

Discussion and Debate

Personal Finance

Mangaement

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

Psychology of Advertising 4 credits

NOTE: Please check the catalog for course prerequisites.

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Since most business courses are non-liberal arts and sciences, students in this program should pay special attention to this requirement.

Honors

To graduate with honors in Business a student must have a 3.5 grade point average in business courses and must have a 3.25 grade point average overall. An honors thesis or project supervised by a member of the business faculty must be completed.

Business Minors

Minors

The Business minors are available to students in any of the College’s bachelor’s degree majors.

Minor in Business

At least 15 credits from any ACC, BUS, FNC, MGT, or

MKT courses or ECO 101.

Minor in Finance

At least 17 credits of courses including:

ACC 114 Introduction to Accounting I

MGT 110 Organizational Theory and

Management

FNC/ECO

240 Managerial Finance I

FNC/ECO

345 Managerial Finance II

One additional finance course

4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

4 credits

3-4 credits

116 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Minor in Information Management

MGT/EC Introduction to Managerial

O 230 and Economic Statistics

BUS 352 Introduction to Systems

Analysis

BUS 205 Data Communications and

Networks for Business

BUS 334 Decision Support Systems or

ACC 250 Accounting Information

Systems

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Minor in Management

At least 18 credits of courses including:

ACC 114 Introduction to Accounting I 4 credits

MGT 110 Organizational Theory and

MGT 210

Management

Management Process

MGT 320 Management of

Organizational Behavior

One additional course in management at the 200 or 300 level

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

3-4 credits

Minor in Marketing

At least 18 credits of courses including:

ACC 114 Introduction to Accounting I 4 credits

MKT 111 Marketing 3 credits

MKT 211 Advertising

MKT 310 Consumer Behavior

4 credits

4 credits

One additional course in marketing at the

200 or 300 level 3-4 credits stand how copyright laws apply to software and the need to acknowledge material from outside sources, including online material and the work of others.

Corequisite: CSC 126

BUS 140 Business Communications

3 hours; 3 credits

Composition of effective business correspondence: credit and collection letters, request and response letters, job applications, résumés, and reports. Detailed attention is given to the principles of grammar, spelling, punctuation, and form as they apply to contemporary business writing.

BUS 150 Essential Software Tools for

Business

4 hours; 3 credits

This course is a hands-on introduction to the use of microcomputers in business. The emphasis will be on the operating system and practical use of the most popular application software including spreadsheets, word processing, and database management. Data exchange among different applications and usage of external databases will also be introduced. Not open to students who have successfully completed CSC 102.

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Note: Students can obtain both exemption from and course credit for BUS 150 by successfully completing four Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) exams, Versions

2002 or later, in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access.

For information on MOS test standards and administration, see Microsoft Office Specialist Certification Requirements at www.Microsoft.com.

Accounting courses are listed alphabetically under

ACC.

Business Courses

BUS 100 Introduction to Business

3 hours; 3 credits

The role of business is examined in relation to the environment, government, and society with the emphasis on decision making. An investigation is made of the major aspects of business practice including accounting, finance, management, marketing, data processing, and international business.

BUS 160 Business Law I

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to law and its relationship to business and the American legal system. The study of the law of contracts, agency, personal property, bailments, real property, mortgages, fire and casualty insurance, and accountant’s legal liability.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and successful completion of the

CUNY Assessment Test in Math or the equivalent

BUS 102 Entrepreneurship

3 hours; 3 credits

An in-depth examination of the requirements, process, and possible outcomes of starting a small business.

Students participate in computer simulation in which they propose, design, and launch a new business. Topics include market selection, product/service design, financing, marketing, organizing, and staffing a startup business.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the CUNY Assessment Tests in Writing, Reading, and Mathematics or the equivalent.

BUS 200 Introduction to International

Business

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of international business in relation to technological, competitive, economic, legal, social, and cultural factors. Introduction to the use of the Internet to develop the latest information for course assignments.

Major areas of analysis include the evolution of international business, the ongoing development of opportunities in international business, the growth in global e-commerce, and the responses of multinational firms to these opportunities. Introduction to international aspects of the traditional business functions of marketing, finance, management, and accounting.

Pre- or corequisites: (ECO 101 or ECO 112) and (MGT

110 or MKT 111)

BUS 135 Introduction to Information Systems

(Also CSC 135)

2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours; 3 credits

A hands-on laboratory course in the effective use of technology tools for problem solving. Students will under-

BUS 205 Data Communications and Networks for Business

4 hours; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 117 research, linear programming, PERT, and related materials.

Prerequisites: MGT 110 and MGT 230

Fundamentals of data communications, including hardware, basic components of communications, configurations, networks and applications, protocols, and software.

Detailed presentation of networks management and networks design fundamentals, including local networks.

Prerequisite: MTH 121 or MTH 123 or higher and BUS

150 or BUS 250 or CSC 102 or CSC 108 or CSC 116 or

CSC 118 or CSC 126

BUS 210 Government Policy and Multinational

Enterprises

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines the major issues affecting relations between multinational enterprises (MNEs) and home and host governments. Students will be exposed to the processes by which conflicting interests are resolved. The impact of international controls on MNEs by the United

Nations (UN), Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the European Economic

Community (EEC) will be examined in detail. (Offered only at the American University of Rome.)

Prerequisites: MGT 110 or BUS 100 and POL 100 or

POL 240

BUS 238 Ethical Issues in Business and

Society

(also PHL 238)

4 hours; 4 credits

Critical examination of economic and social responsibility of business in the U.S. and around the world; exploration of the appropriate scope of ethical involvement from the points of view of management and society; the limitations of responsibility and the establishment of ethical criteria for the evaluation of business performance; the role of public policy in shaping corporate responsibility; consideration of ethical issues arising from the changing nature and implementation of computer and information technology.

Prerequisites: ENG 111; PHL 101 or PHL 130 or MGT

110 or sophomore standing

BUS 211 Communications in a Corporate

(Also COM 211)

Setting

4 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to types of communication in business settings. These will include oral communication (with presentations) and written communication both within the organization as well as to external recipients (such as investors, government agencies, and the community).

Data communication both for internal needs and for external needs will be covered. Security for all types of communication will be discussed. This course will help students to master effective professional communication through skills development and applications in diverse organizational contexts.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and BUS 150 or BUS 250 or

CSC 102.

BUS 250 Computers in Information

Processing

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 3 credits

A business-oriented approach to the use of computers in the management of information systems. Study of hardware and software concepts as they relate to solving problems and making decisions in business organizations. Use of advanced software options and applications.

The laboratory component will involve projects utilizing widely used office productivity software available on microcomputers including spreadsheets, databases, presentations, and other software.

Prerequisites: ACC 114 and BUS 150 or CSC 102 or passing score on a departmental placement test demonstrating basic proficiency in Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, data presentations, and computer concepts

BUS 215 Information Management

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the use and application of Business

Information Systems and Technology. It examines how information technologies support business functions, satisfy management needs, and promote collaboration.

Students analyze and develop methods of information technology management for organizational effectiveness, strategic advantage, and value creation for different types of organizations. They discuss the impact of information technology on individuals, organizations, and society.

Students apply information technology and management concepts and skills to solve practical business problems.

Prerequisites: MGT 110

BUS 230 Quantitative Analysis of Business

(Also ECO 231)

and Economic Problems

3 hours; 3 credits

The application of mathematical techniques to business and economic problems. An introduction to operations

BUS 260 Business Law II

3 hours; 3 credits

The study of the Law of Sales, commercial paper (negotiable instruments), documents of title, and partnership.

The lecture and case study methods will be employed.

Prerequisite: BUS 160

BUS 310 International Trade

4 hours; 4 credits

This course presents an integrated treatment of theory, policy, and enterprise in international trade and investment. The course is directed toward the acquisition of knowledge and understanding of these subjects. Among the topics to be investigated are: foreign exchange rates, balance of payments, tariff and non-tariff trade barriers.

(Offered only at the American University of Rome.)

BUS 334 Decision Support Systems

4 hours; 4 credits

This course introduces modern approaches to management information systems methodologies and typical realizations. The use of computer systems and the data structures needed to implement small MIS environments and extensive network-based information systems will be covered. Current concepts from artificial intelligence and

118 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions database management will be used in designing and building effective information systems, ranging in complexity from simple retrieval systems to sophisticated decision support systems.

Prerequisites: CSC 126, ECO/MGT 230, BUS 352

BUS 352 Introduction to Systems Analysis

4 hours; 4 credits

An analysis of business needs to be satisfied by systems solutions. The systems development cycle. Determining systems requirements. Design of input, output, database, and processes. Controls of data integrity and security.

Managing a systems development project. Preliminary systems design.

Prerequisites: ACC 114 and one of the following computer courses: BUS 150 or CSC 126 or CSC 102,

BUS 360 Business Law III

3 hours; 3 credits

The study of the law of corporations, estates, trusts and wills, regulation of employment, and securities regulations (Federal Securities Acts) will be covered in depth.

Trade regulation, consumer protection, constitutional law, administrative law, criminal law, intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability will be discussed. The lecture and case study methods will be employed.

Prerequisite: BUS 260

BUS 405 Applied Concepts in Information

Systems

(Also CSC 405)

3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Examination of applied concepts in information systems.

Theory and methodology for the design, development, and implementation of large-scale reliable business software projects, and tools and techniques for managing business software projects will be discussed. Presentations and GUI interfaces will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: CSC 326 and BUS 352

BUS 410 Media Administration

(Also COM 410)

4 hours; 4 credits

A course dealing with the skills and concepts necessary for the competent management of a media production department. Topics include production planning and control, cost analysis procedures, contract and copyright law in relation to the media, and organization theory.

Prerequisites: COM 150, and COM 261 or COM 270 or

CIN 111

BUS 415 Global Strategy and Decision Making

4 hours; 4 credits

This advanced course builds on lower level Business courses and is recommended for all students enrolled in the Business degree with a concentration in International

Business. Students will have the opportunity to integrate earlier learning in the concentration to analyze business problems, develop strategies and policies and make specific business decisions. Students will choose a market and product and develop a full global business plan taking into account global and country macro and micro factors, ethical and cultural considerations, trade theory and knowledge from all functional areas.

Prerequisite: BUS 200 or ECO 250

Pre or corequisite: FNC 300/ECO 370

BUS 420 Global Business Seminar: Doing

Business Abroad

45 hours; 3 credits

International business is examined first-hand on site in a chosen country. This course is designed to combine a review of a particular country's economy using a cultural and historical perspective. Students will be exposed to the culture and history as well as the most important business functions in this particular country.

Prerequisites: Completion of pre-major requirements for

Accounting or Business; 3.0 GPA

Finance Courses

FNC 111 Personal Financial Management

3 hours; 3 credits

Discussion of the problems involved in handling personal financial matters: Topics will include managing credit and money, financial planning, asset allocation, taxes, life insurance, investments and securities, annuities, wills, trusts, retirement and estate planning, and budgeting.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and MTH 015 or MTH 020 or higher or equivalent score on CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test.

FNC 213 Money and Capital Markets

(Also ECO 213)

4 hours; 4 credits

The course examines financial markets from the standpoint of investors and users. Markets studied are those for money market instruments, T-bill futures, Ginnie Mae futures, T-bond futures, stocks, stock options, bonds, mortgages, and Eurocurrencies. Federal Reserve operations, U.S. Treasury operations, and international financing are considered with regard to their effects on financial markets.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and the CUNY Assesment Test in

Writing or equivalent and ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO

112

FNC 214 Money and Banking

(Also ECO 214)

4 hours; 4 credits

An analytical, institutional, and historical examination of the monetary systems of the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the operation of commercial banks, and to the powers, purposes, and performance of the Federal Reserve System. The influence of the quantity of money on the level of economic activity will be considered.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and the CUNY Assessment

Test in Writing and ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO 112

FNC 240 Managerial Finance I

(Also ECO 240)

3 hours; 3 credits

Examination of securities markets, analysis of methods of long-term financing, financial ratio analysis, budgeting, current asset management, present value concepts, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and dividend policy.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO 112

Pre- or corequisite: ACC 121 and MTH 121 or higher

FNC 300 International Finance

(Also ECO 370)

4 hours; 4 credits

The financial interrelationships between countries. Analysis of balance of payments, fixed and flexible exchange rates, the role of international reserves. Historical trends in payments and exchange; implications of the rise of the multinational corporation; current international policy problems facing the United States, other developed nations, and underdeveloped nations, and current institutional changes designed to meet them.

Prerequisite: FNC/ECO 240

FNC 315 Monetary Theory and Policy

(Also ECO 315)

4 hours; 4 credits

Theoretical and applied problems of monetary policy.

Emphasis is placed on contemporary developments.

Current controversies concerning the use of monetary policy, relationship to fiscal policy, and impact on economic activity.

Prerequisites: ECO 212 and either ECO/FNC 213 or

ECO/FNC 214

FNC 345 Managerial Finance II

(Also ECO 345)

4 hours; 4 credits

Working capital management, current asset management, sources of short-term financing, financial structure and use of leverage, valuation and rates of return, dividend policy and internal financing, mergers and acquisitions, and liquidation; includes computer lab for solving financial management problems.

Prerequisites: FNC/ECO 240 and MGT/ECO 230

FNC 350 Advanced Corporate Finance

4 hours; 4 credits

4A case problem approach to business policy including a theoretical and practical study of assets and liabilities, capital management, financial markets, and the legal concepts of corporate finance. Problems in industry structure, mergers, and acquisitions.

Prerequisite: FNC/ECO 345

FNC 360 Investment Analysis

(Also ECO 360)

4 hours; 4 credits

Survey of principles governing the investment of individual and institutional capital funds: the theory and mechanics of investments; general analysis and valuation procedures including quantitative and qualitative tests for judging security values; valuation of fixed income securities and common stocks. Introduction to the analysis of industrial, public utility, and government securities. Management of an individual investor’s portfolio.

Prerequisites: FNC/ECO 345 and FNC/ECO 213 or

FNC/ECO 214

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 119

FNC 416 Mathematics of Finance

(Also MTH 416)

Introduction to the mathematical theory of derivative pricing, binomial trees and martingales, Black-Scholes formula, stochastic differential equations, and Ito calculus;

Girsanov theorem

Prerequisite: MTH 311

Management Courses

MGT 110 Organizational Theory and

Management

3 hours; 3 credits

Theories of organization and management are developed, examined, and applied to business and nonprofit institutions. Evaluation of organizational structure and practice in light of these theories. Studies of leadership, small group behavior, creativity, communication, and the process of social change in the large business organization.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and MTH 025 or MTH 030, or permission of the Mathematics Department or an appropriate score on the CUNY Math Assessment Test.

MGT 210 Management Process

4 hours; 4 credits

Advanced study of organizational structure and practice in light of management theory. Management functions: planning, organizing, and controlling, along with the secondary functions of staffing, personnel management, and external representation will be studied.

Prerequisites: MGT 110, ECO 101 or ECO 111, ACC 114

MGT 223 Public Administration

(Also POL 223)

4 hours; 4 credits

A course examining concepts in the execution of public policy. Relationships of administrative process to the executive, legislative bodies, the public, special interest groups, the clientele, and the courts. Considers personnel administration and administrative law and regulation.

(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisite: ENG 111, COR 100

MGT 230 Introduction to Managerial and

(Also ECO 230)

Economic Statistics

4 hours; 4 credits

Development and application of modern statistical methods, including such elements of descriptive statistics and statistical inference as correlation and regression analysis, probability theory, sampling procedures, normal and binomial distributions, estimation, and testing of hypotheses.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CUNY Assessment Test in Writing and the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, and (ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112) and

(MTH 121 or MTH 123 or higher) and (BUS 150 or BUS

250 or CSC 102 or CSC 126)

MGT 261 Labor Relations

(Also ECO 261)

4 hours; 4 credits

120 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

History, theories, structure, and objectives of trade unionism. Grievance procedures, collective bargaining, union power, strikes and other weapons, mediation and arbitration. Government regulation of the labor sector.

Students will participate in the reenactment of actual arbitration cases.

MGT 314 Small Business Management

4 hours; 4 credits

An overview of the entrepreneur: definition, traits, and development; the role of the entrepreneur in our society and importance to the economy; the launching of a new venture; managing an ongoing venture; planning, financing, staffing, and control.

Prerequisite: MGT 110, MKT 111

MGT 320 Management of Organizational

Behavior

4 hours; 4 credits

A systematic, analytical approach to understanding, predicting, and controlling human behavior in organizations.

Consideration is given to the individual and the organization, groups and the organization, organizational development and leadership.

Prerequisites: MGT 110, ECO 101 or ECO 111

MGT 322 Human Resource Administration

4 hours; 4 credits

The course provides an introduction to the functions of the personnel executive. A historical and theoretical background is provided. Stress is placed upon the technical, analytical, and legal skills necessary in performing the job itself. Specific topics include recruiting and selecting, employee development, reward and penalty systems, job descriptions, records, and industrial relations.

Prerequisite: MGT 110

MGT 323 Public Policy Analysis

(Also POL 323)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of how government deals with problems in such areas as health, energy, environment, education, crime, and economic stability. In addition to focusing on substantive policies in these fields, the course will examine how problems come to government’s attention and analyze various techniques for determining whether a governmental program is successful.

Prerequisite: POL 100 or ECO 101

MGT 324 Introduction to Econometrics

(Also ECO 323)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will examine the relationship between economic theory and statistical measurement. It will deal mainly with the general linear regression and correlation model. A selected number of other statistical tools will also be treated. Emphasis will be on the understanding of the concepts rather than on their mathematical derivation.

Prerequisites: ECO 111, ECO 112, ECO/MGT 230

MGT 325 International Management

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of international management in relation to the international environment, cultural differences, and effective management strategies across cultures. Major areas of analysis including current worldwide developments, multiculturalism in organizations, managing a multicultural workforce, the role of culture and communication in international management, comparative country and culture analysis, international and multidomestic strategic management practices, and cross-cultural ethical dilemmas.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MGT 425.

Prerequisites: MGT 110 and (BUS 200 or MGT 210)

MGT 339 Administrative Law

(Also POL 339)

4 hours; 4 credits

Emphasizes the judicial, legislative, and executive control of decisions made by bureaucrats. Topics such as the possibility and scope of judicial review of administrative decision making; ripeness for review and exhaustion of administrative remedies; and the legislative veto. The

Administrative Procedure Act’s requirements for rule making and adjudication will also be analyzed.

Prerequisite: POL/MGT 223 or POL 336 or POL 338

MGT 410 Business Policy

4 hours; 4 credits

The course develops a conceptual framework for business planning through case analysis including the work of theorists, practitioners, and researchers in business policy and strategy planning.

Prerequisites: Completion of the business pre-major requirements and junior or senior standing

MGT 416 Decision Making in Business

4 hours; 4 credits

Analysis of the problems that face business managers.

The course involves participation in a simulated, computerized business game dealing with sales forecasting, marketing, production planning, personnel, pricing, and finance.

Prerequisites: Completion of the business pre-major requirements and junior or senior standing,

MGT 423 The Collective Bargaining Process

4 hours; 4 credits

The theory and practice of negotiating and administering collective bargaining agreements. Simulated collective bargaining exercises. Analysis of arbitration cases.

Prerequisite: MGT 261

Marketing Courses

MKT 111 Marketing

3 hours; 3 credits

Survey of the nature of the United States distributive system, covering the principles, policies, and practices used by manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers. Emphasis is placed on the planning, development, and efficient use of marketing tools and institutions in the creation and expansion of markets. Current trends and developments in modern marketing practice are analyzed.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and MTH 025 or MTH 030, or permission of the Mathematics Department or the equivalent score on the CUNY Math Assessment Test.

MKT 211 Advertising

4 hours; 4 credits

The course examines the principles and applications of advertising in modern business, details the procedures and techniques necessary for advertising campaigns and execution via preparation of a marketing/advertising plan, and stresses marketing/advertising strategy. Evaluation of social and ethical responsibilities of advertising.

Prerequisite: MKT 111

MKT 213 Retail Store Organization and

Operation

3 hours; 3 credits

Survey of the functions, principles, procedures, organization, and activities involved in retail store operations.

Current trends and developments in retailing practices are analyzed.

Prerequisite: MKT 111

MKT 215 Principles of Selling

3 hours; 3 credits

Sales strategy and methods; development of the sales plan; coordination of selling effort; budgeting; making the sales presentation; use of sales aids; critique and discussion.

Prerequisite: MKT 111

MKT 216 Sales Management

3 hours; 3 credits

A study of the problems of sales management: sales policies, selection and training of salespersons, methods of compensation and sales stimulation, sales administration and budgeting, and sales forecasting. Analysis and evaluation of current practices in sales management.

Prerequisite: MKT 111

MKT 310 Consumer Behavior

4 hours; 4 credits

The study of consumer behavior from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The course seeks to understand the role of the behavioral sciences (e.g., anthropology, sociology, psychology) in buying behavior and to integrate the theoretical world of the behavioral sciences with the practical world of marketing. Social, interpersonal, and mediating influences are examined and evaluated as a basis for marketing decisions.

Prerequisites: MKT 111, PSY 100 or SOC 100,

MKT 312 Advertising Copy and Production

4 hours; 4 credits

Creative and procedural techniques involved in planning, preparing, and producing advertisements for print and broadcast media. Problems and practice exercises are used to develop a working technical skill. Hands-on production experience in all media.

Prerequisite: MKT 211

MKT 360 Internet Marketing

4 hours; 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the use of the Internet and electronic commerce as a marketing tool. A major team project will require students to develop a marketing

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 121 plan along with a Website for a new or existing product or service. Data collection as well as legal and ethical issues, including security, surrounding commerce in a

Web-mediated environment will be discussed.

Prerequisites: MKT 111 and BUS 150 or BUS 250 or

CSC 102,

MKT 410 Marketing Research

4 hours; 4 credits

Encompasses survey of research processes, problem formulation, the types of problems for which market research is used, primary and secondary data collection methods, questionnaire design, and sampling plans.

Analysis and interpretation of data and research report formats.

Prerequisites: MKT 111, MGT/ECO 230, and MKT 211 or

MKT 310

MKT 320 International Marketing

4 hours; 4 credits

An analytical approach to solving international business problems considering the multiple environments of international business. This course requires the student to investigate the relationship of marketing strategy to cultural, economic, legal, political, and technological conditions in various national markets.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MKT 415.

Prerequisites: MKT 111

MKT 420 Marketing Management

4 hours; 4 credits

The course focuses on the major decisions facing marketing management in its attempt to harmonize the objectives and resources of the company with the opportunities found in the marketplace. The course is analytical in nature and draws heavily on the basic disciplines of economics, behavioral science, and mathematics.

Prerequisites: Completion of business core requirements,

MKT 310, senior standing,

MKT 490 Marketing Seminar

3 hours; 3 credits

The use of a selected broad-gauge marketing topic as a focal point for the semester’s work to bring about an integration of concepts and knowledge from a number of related disciplines. New ways of thinking about problems faced by marketing management are sought. Individual study by each student of a specific topic and preparation of a report giving the results of research.

Prerequisites: Completion of business core requirements, senior standing, and permission of the instructor

Chemistry

(Bachelor of Science, Minor; see Graduate Catalog for information on graduate programs)

Department of Chemistry, Building 6S, Room 236

Chairperson and Professor Qiao-Sheng Hu

A degree in chemistry or biochemistry is essential to anyone interested in working in the chemical or phar-

122 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions maceutical industries and in related fields such as teaching and chemical sales. The degree affords the opportunity to participate in pure chemical research, product development, marketing, and sales. A student with a BS in Chemistry may branch out and become involved in government jobs in geochemistry, toxicology, and environmental chemistry. The Chemistry major also might elect to work in the more medically oriented fields such as pharmacology, biochemistry, bioengineering, or medicinal chemistry or to enter the teaching profession.

For students who wish to pursue graduate study in the sciences or enter professional schools (medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy), a BS degree in Chemistry or Biochemistry is viewed quite favorably by admissions committees.

Chemistry (BS)

Pre-Major Requirements: 26-29credits

Students planning to major in Chemistry must complete the following requirements. A detailed guide to course choices for Biochemistry and Chemistry majors is available from the Department of Chemistry.

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

CHM 121 General Chemistry I

Laboratory

CHM 142 General Chemistry II

CHM 127 General Chemistry II

Laboratory

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

1 credit

PHY 120 General Physics I 3 credits

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory 1 credit

PHY 160 General Physics II 3 credits

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1 credit

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory

MTH 230 Calculus I and Pre-Calculus or

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I and

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III or

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

MTH 236 Accelerated Calculus II 10-13 credits

Major Requirements: 36 credits

CHM 240 Quantitative Chemistry

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

4 credits

4 credits

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits

CHM 330 Physical Chemistry: Equilibria 4 credits

CHM 336 Physical Chemistry: Processes 4 credits

CHM 337 Experimental Methods in

Physical Chemistry 4 credits

CHM 360 Inorganic Chemistry

Two additional chemistry electives at the

300 or 400 level or higher

4 credits

8 credits

All Chemistry majors are encouraged to take an Independent Study course (CHM 591-4) as an elective.

Total Credits Required: 120

Transfer students are expected to fulfill their advanced major requirements (300-level and higher) at the College of Staten Island.

Honors

A student may be eligible for admission to the honors program in Chemistry if he or she enters the senior year with a 3.5 grade point average. With the concurrence of a faculty supervisor, the student must submit (by September 1) a one-page summary of a proposed research project. The chairperson of the Department and the faculty supervisor will appoint a three-member committee to evaluate and/or modify the proposal (by September

15), then grant or deny admission to the honors program.

While pursuing honors research the student may receive eight credits for Independent Study (CHM 594), four each in the fall and spring semesters. Additionally, it is highly recommended that the student begin work on the project during the summer or spring semester that immediately precedes the senior year. Progress of the research will be monitored as follows: (1) the student will meet with his or her committee by November 1 of the first semester; (2) the student will submit a five-page progress report by January 15; (3) the committee will recommend for or against continuation in the program by February 1; (4) the student will submit a thesis, following the style of major journals, by May 1; (5) the student will present an oral defense of the thesis to the committee by the end of the final exam period.

The deadline dates noted above are based on a June graduation date, but corresponding guidelines may be designed for January graduation. In either case, it is expected that completion of the honors program will require at least one year of student research.

Preparation for Teaching (Grades 7-12)

See also Education/Adolescence Education.

Students who wish to be recommended for New York

State certification for teaching science at the secondary level (grades 7 - 12) must complete all general education, pre-major, and major requirements for the Chemistry BS. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.75 to be admitted into all adolescence education courses. Students must also include as electives the following Adolescence Education (EDS) course sequence offered by the Department of Education (24 credits):

Education Sequence 24 credits

EDS 201 Social Foundations of Secondary

Education

EDS 202 Psychological Foundations of

Secondary Education

EDS 304 The Pedagogy of Secondary

School in Science

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

EDS 318 The Secondary School

Curriculum in Science

EDS 400 Student Teaching in Secondary

Education

4 credits

6 credits

EDS 401 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching in Secondary

Education 2 credits

See the Catalog section on Education for additional requirements.

Chemistry Minor

Minor

Prerequisite courses:

CHM 141, 121, 142, 127

Requirements:

CHM 240 Analytical Chemistry or

CHM 340 Instrumental Analysis

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II and

One 300-level chemistry course

Chemistry Courses

CHM 100 Introduction to Chemistry

3 lecture hours,1 recitation hour; 3 credits

Course material includes matter and energy, atoms and molecules, the periodic table, nomenclature, equations, mole concept, stoichiometry, solutions.

Prerequisite: MTH 025 or MTH 030

Corequisite: CHM 101

Note: This course is intended for those students who have had no previous chemistry and for those returning to the subject after some years. The course is designed to prepare students for entry into CHM 141.

CHM 101 Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory

2 hours; 1 credit

A laboratory course emphasizing basic chemical laboratory techniques. The experiments provide illustrations of concepts discussed in CHM 100. Use of computer software for laboratory data analysis and computer-assisted instruction.

Corequisite: CHM 100

CHM 104 Chemistry in a Nutshell

3 hours; 3 credits

This combined lecture and laboratory course will introduce students to basic chemical concepts including atomic theory, the nature of molecules, chemical formulae and equations, bonding, gas laws, nuclear chemistry, oxidation-reduction, and acids and bases. Laboratory classes will accompany the lecture topics to illustrate the various topics introduced in the lecture. (science)

(RLPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020

CHM 106 Chemistry for Today I

3 hours; 3 credits

Basic chemical concepts including atomic theory, the nature of molecules, chemical formulae and equations, bonding, gas laws, nuclear chemistry, oxidation-reduction, and acids and bases. (science) (RLPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: CHM 107

CHM 107 Chemistry for Today I Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiences illustrating principles and topics discussed in CHM 106. (science) (COPR)

8 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 123

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 106

CHM 108 Chemistry for Today II

3 hours; 3 credits

A continuation of Chemistry 106. Topics will be chosen from among the following: fossil fuels and pollution, humankind’s effect on the environment, food additives, household chemicals, the chemistry of drugs and the human mind, farm chemistry, and plastics. (science)

Prerequisite: CHM 106

Corequisite: CHM 109

CHM 109 Chemistry for Today II Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiences illustrating principles and topics discussed in CHM 108. (science)

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 108

CHM 110 Principles of Chemistry I

3 hours; 3 credits

Modern concepts of the atom and chemical bonding, chemical calculations, states of matter, chemistry of water, purification of water, types of solutions, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and radioactivity. The concepts necessary for an understanding of our technological society are developed. (science) ( RLPR) (STEM)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Examination Test

Corequisite: CHM 111

CHM 111 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Experiments illustrating principles studied in CHM 110.

(science) (STEM) (COPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: CHM 110

CHM 116 Principles of Chemistry II

3 hours; 3 credits

Chemistry and biochemistry of carbon compounds. A study of the nomenclature, structure, properties, and reactions of organic and biochemical compounds. A number of special topics are discussed, some of which are the petroleum industry, giant molecules (synthetic and biopolymers), environmental chemistry, drugs, and oral contraceptives. (science) (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisites: CHM 110 and 111

Corequisite: CHM 117

CHM 117 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiments concerned with the synthesis, isolation, and purification and analysis of a variety of organic and biochemical compounds of the types considered in CHM 116. (science) (COPR) (STEM)

Prerequisites: CHM 110 and 111

Corequisite: CHM 116

CHM 121 General Chemistry I Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Experiments reinforce important chemical concepts discussed in lectures, teach modern lab techniques, and

124 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions emphasize present day interpretations of lab measurements. (science) (COPR) (STEM)

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 141

CHM 127 General Chemistry II Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

A continuation of CHM 121. Inorganic qualitative analysis. (science) (COPR) (STEM)

Prerequisite: CHM 121

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 142

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

3 lecture hours, 1 recitation hour; 3 credits

A study of the fundamental principles and laws concerning the structure and behavior of matter. The first semester covers atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, reactions, stoichiometry, and the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter. (science) (RLPR) (STEM)

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 123

Corequisite: CHM 121

Note: Students are advised that satisfactory completion of one year of high school chemistry or a college-level introductory chemistry course is essential preparation for this course.

CHM 142 General Chemistry II

3 lecture hours, 1 recitation hour; 3 credits

A continuation of CHM 141. Solution properties, reaction rates, equilibrium processes, thermochemistry and thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear and organic chemistry. (science) (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisite: CHM 141

Corequisite: CHM 127

CHM 240 Analytical Chemistry

4 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A study of the quantitative aspects of chemical changes, chemical equilibria, the stoichiometry and energetics of chemical reactions. Theory and laboratory in volumetric, opticometric, electrostatic, and kinetic methods of chemical analysis. An introduction to instrumental methods of analysis. (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisites: CHM 142 and 127

CHM 250 Organic Chemistry I

3 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

The structure and properties of organic compounds are examined. Emphasis is given to reactions and synthesis of aliphatic and aromatic molecules. Stereochemistry and organic reaction mechanisms are introduced and thoroughly discussed. (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisites: CHM 142 and CHM 127

CHM 256 Organic Chemistry II

3 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A continuation of CHM 250 with an emphasis on functional group chemistry and bioorganic chemistry. By the end of the two-semester sequence IR and NMR analysis are discussed in detail in conjunction with classical methods of structural determination.

Prerequisite: CHM 250

CHM 290 Introduction to Undergraduate

Research in Chemistry

2 hours; 2 credits

An introduction to the design and execution of original research in chemistry. This seminar course provides a framework to guide the laboratory activities of students who are beginning Independent Study courses with departmental faculty members, including ethics, safety, searching of the literature, planning of experiments, recording and interpretation of data, and presentation of results in oral, poster, and written formats.

Prerequisites: CHM 142 and 127

Co- or prerequisite: CHM 592

CHM 330 Physical Chemistry: Equilibria

4 hours; 4 credits

Chemical thermodynamics and its application to phase and chemical equilibria.

Prerequisite: MTH 233 or MTH 236, PHY 160, CHM 240

CHM 336 Physical Chemistry: Processes

4 hours; 4 credits

Kinetic theory and transport processes, introductory quantum and statistical chemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics.

Prerequisite: MTH 233 or MTH 236, PHY 160, CHM 240

CHM 337 Experimental Methods in Physical

Chemistry

8 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to techniques of physical measurement applied to chemical systems. Vacuum and gas handling techniques, optico-chemical methods, transport and electrochemical processes.

Corequisite: CHM 330 or CHM 336

CHM 340 Instrumental Methods of Chemical

Analysis

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Fundamental considerations underlying the theory and design of instrumental methods and procedures of analysis. General treatment of the operating characteristics of instruments. A consideration of ultraviolet-visible, infrared, nuclear magnetic, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy; column and gas chromatography; flame photometry; atomic absorption; polarography; fluorimetry; radiochemical and thermal analysis; electrophoresis; and other analytical methods. Basic instrumentation electronics, including operational amplifiers, triodes, transistors, and transducers.

Prerequisites: CHM 142 and CHM 127, CHM 240

CHM 350 Advanced Organic Chemistry

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the theory of bonding and structure; acids and bases; an introduction to physical organic chemical concepts and the application of these, together with stereochemical concepts, to the study of reaction mechanisms.

Prerequisite: CHM 256

Corequisite: CHM 330 or CHM 336

CHM 370 Biochemistry I

(Also BIO 370)

4 hours; 4 credits

Biochemistry and the living state. Regulation of energy-yielding and energy-requiring reactions in cells. Molecular components of cells, enzyme mechanisms, bioenergetics, and an introduction to biosynthetic principles.

Prerequisite: CHM 256

Pre or Corequisite: PHY 110 and PHY 111 or PHY 116 or

PHY 120 and PHY 121,

CHM 376 Biochemistry II

(Also BIO 376)

4 hours; 4 credits

Respiration, photosynthesis, membrane structure and transport, biosynthesis of macromolecules, biochemical genetics, and the regulation of metabolic activity in mammals.

Prerequisite: CHM 370 or BIO 370

Pre or Corequisite: PHY 150 and PHY 151 or PHY 160 and PHY 161 or PHY 156,

CHM 377 Experimental Biochemistry

8 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Through a study of a commonly occurring genetic defect, this course introduces students to biochemical concepts and techniques used in current research. Techniques used include protein purification, enzymology, Western blotting, RNA isolation, DNA isolation, PCR-amplification of mutated regions of genes, cloning of PCR products into vectors, culturing of mammalian brain cells, immunocytochemistry, and retrieving and processing of genetic information using various databases and software packages.

Prerequisite: CHM 240 or BIO 312 or BIO 352

Pre or Corequisite: CHM 370/BIO 370

CHM 360 Inorganic Chemistry

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

The course covers general bonding theories of inorganic compounds, symmetry elements and point groups, acid-base properties, coordination chemistry and reaction mechanisms, organometallic chemistry, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHM 240

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 330 or CHM 336 or CHM 340

CHM 442 Spectroscopy: Theory and

Applications

4 hours; 4 credits

Theory and applications of molecular spectroscopy in gases and condensed phases, including rotation, vibration, electronic, and magnetic resonance techniques. Applications to structural problems in biochemistry and polymer chemistry.

Pre- or corequisite: CHM 330 or 336

CHM 443 Scanning Electron Microscopy and

X-ray Microanalysis

(also BIO 443)

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 125

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

A course to familiarize undergraduate students with the principles and practices of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalyses. The course content will focus on the SEM and its modes of operation, electron beam-specimen interactions, image formation, generation of x-rays, x-ray spectral measurement and qualitative and quantitative x-ray analyses. The lecture will present the historical and theoretical backgrounds to these integrated topics, and the laboratory will provide hands-on experiences for biological, materials, and polymer samples. The designed experiments will allow students to apply the techniques learned in class to realistic systems, and the laboratory reports will help students develop the skill in scientific and technical writing. This course is directed toward advanced biology/chemistry students.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

CHM 452 Polymer Chemistry

4 hours; 4 credits

Principles of macromolecular synthesis by radical chain, ionic chain, step, and ring-opening polymerizations. Copolymerization, stereochemical regulation, and polymer reactions. Characterization of polymers with respect to molecular structure, shape, size distribution, and crystalline-amorphous structure.

Prerequisites: CHM 256, 330, and 336;

CHM 592 Independent Study for Research

2 credits

CHM 594 Independent Study for Honors

Research

4 credits

Chinese

(Minor)

Department of World Languages and Literatures

Chairperson and Associate Professor Gerry Milligan,

Building (2S), Room 109

All students with prior training in Chinese must take a proficiency examination to determine placement at an appropriate level.

Chinese Minor

Minor Requirements: 12 Credits

12 credits of courses in Chinese (CHN) at or above the

200 level.

Chinese Courses

CHN 101 Conversational Mandarin Chinese I

2 hours; 2 credits

This course is for those students interested in learning how to speak Mandarin Chinese to meet their educational and personal goals, or to address special needs in learning Mandarin. The course will focus on training the

126 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions students’ oral communicational skills through selected real-life situations and topics. The course will also introduce the phonetic system of Pinyin, some conversational skills, and sentence patterns. Cantonese or other dialect speakers can also use the course to practice the official

Mandarin pronunciation and oral language. This course does not fulfill the general education requirement.

CHN 102 Conversational Mandarin Chinese II

2 hours; 2 credits

This course is for those students who have completed

CHN 101 or have been placed into this level by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, and who are interested in continuing their studies of spoken Mandarin Chinese. The course will focus on training the students’ oral communicational skills through selected real-life situations and topics. The course will continue to review the phonetic system of Pinyin, and teach additional conversational skills and sentence patterns. Cantonese or other dialect speakers can also use the course to practice the official Mandarin pronunciation and oral language. After completing this sequence, students may wish to take additional courses that focus on reading and writing. This course does not fulfill the general education requirement.

Prerequisite: CHN 101

CHN 112 Beginning Mandarin Chinese I

3 hours; 3 credits

A beginning course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for those who have had no previous work in the language. Regular attendance in the World

Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.

Not open to students who have taken CHN 113 or CHN

120. (foreign lang.) (FWGR)

Prerequisites: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and Writing

CHN 113 Basic Mandarin Chinese I

4 hours; 4 credits

A beginning course in the fundamentals of Mandarin

Chinese. The course will teach Pinyin, the standard pronunciation system, daily-life vocabulary, and basic sentence structures through real-life situations. The course will focus on developing basic skills and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese, using a computer-assisted approach. (foreign lang.). Not open to students who have completed CHN

112.

Prerequisites: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Writing and the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading

Prerequisites: CHN 113 or placement. Passing the

CUNY Assessment Test in Writing and the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading.

CHN 120 Intensive Mandarin Chinese I

6 hours; 6 credits

A beginning intensive course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for students with no previous knowledge of Mandarin and who are interested in pursuing upper-division courses in Mandarin Chinese. By the end of the semester the student will have completed a program that provides a strong basis in the functional literacy in Mandarin. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: Passing the CUNY Assessment Tests in

Reading and Writing

CHN 213 Continuing Mandarin Chinese I

4 hours; 4 credits

This course is for those students who have successfully completed the second semester of Basic Mandarin Chinese or who have been placed into this intermediate level. Using computer-assisted technology, the course will further develop skills and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Greater emphasis will be placed on transitioning from spoken to written language. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: CHN 114 or placement. Passing the

CUNY Assessment Test in Writing and the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading.

CHN 215 Continuing Mandarin Chinese II

4 hours; 4 credits

This course is for those students who have successfully completed the first semester of Continuing Mandarin

Chinese (CHN 213) or who have been placed into this intermediate level. Using computer-assisted technology, the course will further develop skills and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin

Chinese. Greater emphasis will be placed on transitioning from spoken to written languages.(foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: CHN 213 or placement. Passing the

CUNY Assessment Test in Writing and the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading.

CHN 220 Intensive Mandarin Chinese II

6 hours; 6 credits

A continuing intensive course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for those who have successfully completed CHN 120 (Intensive Mandarin Chinese I), and are interested in pursuing upper-division courses in the language. Particular emphasis will be placed on written and oral communication based on selected cultural readings. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: CHN 120

CHN 114 Basic Mandarin Chinese II

4 hours; 4 credits

This is the second-semester beginning Chinese course.

The course will review the Pinyin pronunciation system, build up daily-life vocabulary, and teach basic sentence structures through real-life situations. The course will continue to focus on developing basic skills and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese, using a computer-assisted approach. (foreign lang.)

CHN 313 Advanced Communication Skills in

Mandarin Chinese

4 hours; 4 credits

Refinement of oral and written expression through oral reports, composition, translation, and critical study of readings that are of advanced difficulty and involve more complex grammatical structures.

Prerequisites: CHN 215 or equivalent

CHN 315 Languages in Contrast: English and

Chinese

(Also LNG 315)

4 hours; 4 credits

A systematic comparison of English and Chinese in various respects, e.g. phonology, morphology, syntax, information structure, and writing system. While the two languages differ from each other in many respects, which are the focus of this course, there are universals and general principles that hold true of both of them. The course is intended to cultivate students' ability to appreciate the differences between the two languages on the one hand and to seek the principles that apply to both

English and Chinese on the other. (literature) (COPR)

(TALA)

NOTE: This course is taught in English and may not be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and completion of one semester of foreign language or linguistic course or exemption from the Foreign Language requirement of General Education.

Cinema Studies

(Bachelor of Arts, Minor; Master of Arts - see Graduate

Catalog)

Department of Media Culture, Center for the Arts (1P),

Room 226

Chairperson and Professor Ying Zhu

The program leading to the BA in Cinema Studies combines courses in film history, theory, and criticism with studies in film and video production. The guiding philosophy of the program is that future filmmakers will expand their creative possibilities through critical studies of film while those who write about film will enhance their work through an understanding of the filmmaking process. This combination of theory and practice prepares students for a variety of career opportunities in the film world.

Cinema Studies (BA)

Critical Studies Concentration

Pre-Major Requirements: 6 credits

Students planning to major in Cinema Studies must complete the following pre-major requirements:

CIN 100 Introduction to Film

CIN 111 Video I

Major Requirements: 39-43 credits

Students majoring in Cinema Studies must complete the following courses:

CIN 120 Video II 3 credits

CIN 210 Film Theory

CIN 220 Film History

Film History, Theory and Aesthetics

4 credits

4 credits

12 credits

CIN 203, 204, 230, 240, 271, 274, 301, 303, 304, 305,

309, 401, 402, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 436, 497 (4 credits each)

Film Production

CIN 211, 212, 311, 312, 314 (3 credits each)

6 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 127

The remaining ten credits must be taken from within the cinema studies course offerings including at least seven credits at the 300 level or higher.

10 credits

Foreign Language Requirement

0-4 credits

Demonstration of proficiency in a foreign language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

Electives: 33 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Film production courses are non-liberal arts and sciences.

Production Concentration Pre-Major

Requirements: 6 credits

Students planning to major in the Production Option in

Cinema Studies must complete the following pre-major requirements:

CIN 100 Introduction to Film

CIN 111 Video I

Production Concentration in the Cinema Major

Requirements: 45-49 credits

Students majoring in Cinema Studies with the Production Option must complete the following courses:

CIN 120

CIN 210

CIN 220

CIN 497/CIN

Video II

Film Theory

Film History

Senior Project

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

390 4 credits

NOTE: The production option requires a senior thesis project in the form of short film or video. A senior thesis project must be approved by a member of the cinema faculty in the semester prior to undertaking the production in a CIN 300 or higher-level production course or independent study.

In addition to the above the following areas must be fulfilled:

A. Film History, Theory & Aesthetics at the

200 level or higher 12 credits

CIN 203, 204, 230, 240, 271, 274, 301, 303, 304, 305,

309, 401, 402, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 436 (4 credits each)

B. Intermediate Production

CIN 211, CIN 212, COM 261 (3 credits each)

6 credits

C. An additional 12 credits of production at the 300 or 400-level 12 credits

CIN 311, CIN 312, CIN 314, CIN 436, CIN 318/COM

318

(3-4 credits each)

D. Foreign Language Requirement 0-4 credits

Demonstration of proficiency in a foreign language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

Electives: 27 credits

Total Credits Required: 120 Credits

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Film production courses are non-liberal arts and sciences.

128 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Honors

To graduate with honors in Cinema Studies a student must have a 3.5 grade point average in cinema studies courses and must complete an honors thesis or project, which may include the production of a film, approved by a faculty adviser.

Cinema Studies Minor

Minor

Prerequisite courses: 6 credits

CIN 100 Introduction to Film

CIN 111 Video I

Minor requirements: 12 credits

CIN 210

Theory of Film

CIN 220

History of Film

One or more of the following courses: CIN

203, 230, 240, 274, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305,

309, 401, 402, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408

3 credits

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits ble topics include race, class, gender, ethnicity, globalization, colonialism, imperialism, nationalism and its discontents, as they relate to cinema and the media. (arts & com) (COPR) (social science) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100

CIN 210 Film Theory

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of film theory and its relation to international cinema of the silent and sound periods. Readings include the major theoretical works of various critics, philosophers, and filmmakers. Required for the Cinema Studies major.

Prerequisites: minimum grade of C in CIN 100 and ENG

111

CIN 211 Cinematography

4 hours; 3 credits

A basic workshop in cinematography. Visual exercises will focus on techniques of composition, lighting, and camera movement.

Prerequisite: CIN 120

Cinema Courses

CIN 100 Introduction to Film

4 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the terms and methods of film analysis.

The course emphasizes critical viewing and writing, with attention to cinematography, editing, sound, narrative, authorship, genre, and ideology. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

CIN 111 Video I

4 hours; 3 credits

An introductory workshop in the basic techniques of video production. Visual awareness as applied to composition and continuity is developed in a series of practical class projects. This course is a prerequisite for 200- and

300-level work in film/video production and is intended for

Cinema and Communications majors and minors. (arts

& com) (COPR) ( TALA)

Prerequsite: CIN 100 or COM 150

CIN 120 Video II

4 hours; 3 credits

An introductory course with an emphasis on digital video postproduction software. Students’ original material will be the basis for progressive exercises in non-linear editing platforms.

Prerequisite: CIN 111 or permission of the Department of Media Culture

CIN 212 Documentary Video

4 hours; 3 credits

Advanced training in the strategies, techniques, decision-making processes and structures of nonfiction videomaking.

Prerequisites: CIN 120

CIN 220 Film History

4 hours; 4 credits

Survey history of world cinemas. The course will consider research practices, historiography, film style, and industrial models of production; viewing and discussion of films by various American and international filmmakers.

Required for the Cinema Studies major.

Prerequisites: minimum grade of C in CIN 100 and ENG

111

CIN 230 American Film and American Myth

(Also AMS 230)

4 hours; 4 credits

An interdisciplinary consideration of American filmmaking practices in relation to national mythmaking. Topics include: American film genre (the Western, film noir, the musical, and other dominant narrative models); gender, race, and class identities in film; cinematic aesthetics and nationalism; and cinematic treatments of international cultural and political relations involving the United States.

(arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100

CIN 203 Chinese Cinema

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of Chinese cinema's major movements and events, featuring major directors from Hong Kong, the

People's Republic of China, and Taiwan. (cont wld.)

(TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

CIN 204 Politics, Cinema, Media

(also POL 219)

4 hours, 4 credits

Analyzes political and social aspects of cinema and media within historical and contemporary contexts. Possi-

CIN 240 Third World Cinema

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of cinema from and about the Third World that emphasizes the effort to construct an identity within a post-colonial multinational context. Considered and analyzed will be films from Africa, Latin America, the Middle

East, and Asia, as well as films of the diaspora made by emigrés. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: CIN 100

CIN 271 Women and Film

(Also WGS 271)

4 hours; 4 credits

Explores the historical trajectory of the representation and self-representation of women in film, with particular attention to the significant developments in the status and achievements of women as stars, screenwriters, directors, consumers, and spectators. Screenings of key films, techniques of critical analysis of the moving image, weekly readings, discussions, and lectures, will all help to shape this consideration of film representations of what gender is, and what it has produced, over a period of more than 100 years.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

CIN 274 Introduction to Screen Writing

(Also ENL 274)

4 hours; 4 credits

Writing for television and film. Class discussions of students’ work and the problems of creating in this field. Selected readings.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

CIN 301 Screen Adaptations

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the theory and practice of adapting literary fictions into narrative films and dramatic television programs.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 303 Screen Comedy

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of screen comedy. The course will consider comedy as a form of performance and as a mode of film practice, with attention to techniques that create laughter. Readings include critical and theoretical works on the nature of comedy and the role of the comic performer in generating meaning.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 304 Nonfiction Film and Television

4 hours; 4 credits

A critical and historical examination of nonfiction film and television practices including documentary, newsreels, television news, and

“reality TV.” This course analyzes the cultural, social, and ideological impact of film and television production as it has d eveloped since cinema’s origins.

Prerequisites: CIN 100 and ENG 151

CIN 305 Film Genres

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of film genre. The course examines the concept of genre in film and other media, while considering the formal characteristics, narrative patterns, characteristic themes, and conventions of one or more specific film genres.

Prerequisite: CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 309 Electronic Media: Alternative Video

Histories

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of the history and aesthetics of video from its inception with the development of the light-weight portapak in the mid-1970s. The relationship of video to television and cinema, its significance as an international

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 129 art practice supported by the major cultural institutions, and its use by individual artists and by media collectives are major themes in the course. Screenings of key videos, the critical vocabulary specific to the medium, weekly readings, discussions, and lectures, will frame this consideration of how video has managed to permeate our culture in little more than two generations.

Prerequisites: CIN 210 or CIN 220; ENG 151

CIN 311 Video Workshop

4 hours; 3 credits

Students will use advanced video equipment in the production of independent projects. Emphasis is placed on the ability of students to work in production crews. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: CIN 211

CIN 312 Non-Linear and Multimedia Production

4 hours; 3 credits

Individual projects in video and multimedia with an emphasis on digital post-production.

This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: CIN 120, and either CIN 211 or COM 261

CIN 314 Introduction to 16mm Filmmaking

4 hours; 3 credits.

This course will introduce students to the basics of 16mm reversal film production. Using Bolex cameras and 16mm bench editing, students will explore non-sync editing and the essentials of motion picture photography while executing individual and group projects in a hands-on workshop.

Prerequisite: CIN 211

CIN 318 Advanced TV Studio Production

(Also COM 318)

4 hours; 4 credits.

An advanced workshop in the techniques and concepts of live studio production. This course emphasizes a disciplined approach to practical application, the ability to work in production crews, and critical thinking as it relates to audience, message, and aesthetic choices. Students develop works through individual and group productions acquainting them with industry standards.

Prerequisite: COM 261

CIN 390 Media Internship

(also COM 390)

3-4 credits

An internship work and learning experience with a media organization or in positions engaging in communications practices. This may include work in the production, distribution, or exhibition of media material, as well as in public relations and advertising. Students are required to keep a work journal and write an analytical paper of their work experience. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: COM 200 or COM 203 or COM 205 or

COM 220 or COM 230 or COM 232 or CIN 210 or CIN

220, and the permission of a faculty advisor.

CIN 401 American Directors I

4 hours; 4 credits

130 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Study of film authorship in relation to one or more directors who worked in the United States film industry before

1960. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 402 American Directors II

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of film authorship in relation to one or more directors who produced films in the United States after 1960.

(arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 404 French Directors I

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of film authorship in relation to one or more directors who produced films in France before 1960. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 405 French Directors II

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of film authorship in relation to one or more directors who produced films in France after 1960, including those who are categorized as part of the

“New Wave.”

(arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 406 Postwar Italian Cinema

(Also LNG 406)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the political and cultural roots of Neorealism and of the personal style and vision of such postwar directors as Visconti, DeSica, Rossellini, Fellini, Antonioni, and Bertolucci.

Prerequisites: CIN 100 and ENG 111

CIN 407 European Cinema

4 hours; 4 credits

Specialized study of European cinema, with attention to films or filmmakers of one or more of the countries of

Europe. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 408 Global Cinema

4 hours; 4 credits

Specialized study of films produced outside of Europe and the United States. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and CIN 210 or CIN 220

CIN 436 Screen Writing

(Also ENL 436)

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of the craft of constructing the screenplay, treatment, synopsis, and shooting script. The student will work on the problems of creating the original filmscript as well as adapting a piece of existing material for the screen.

Prerequisite: CIN/ENL 274

CIN 497 Senior Project

4 hours; 4 credits

An interdisciplinary seminar focused on students’ honors and thesis projects in the Cinema major.

Prerequisite: 12 credits in 300-400-level cinema courses

Communications

(Bachelor of Science, Minor)

Department of Media Culture, Center for the Arts (1P),

Room 226

Chairperson and Associate Professor Cindy Wong

Communications (BS)

The program is designed to provide undergraduate students with a comprehensive and multidisciplinary liberal arts education, while introducing them to the field of communications and equipping them with specialized skills. The program offers the following areas of specialization: Media Studies, Corporate Communications,

Design and Digital Media, and Journalism. Students will study the history and theory of industries and forms, and engage in the production of diverse media, such as print, advertising, radio, film, public relations, television, the Internet, and other emerging media. This program is offered by the Department of Media Culture in collaboration with the Department of English and in association with the Department of Business and the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work.

Major Requirements: 48-58

Common Core: required for all concentrations: 27-32 credits

1. History and Theory of Communications 15 credits

CIN 100 Introduction to Film

COM 150 Introduction to

3 credits

Communications 4 credits

COM 203 Theories of Communications 4 credits

And one of the following:

CIN 220 Film History

COM 200 Media and Culture

4 credits

4 credits

COM 205 Media Industries

COM 220 History of Television and

Radio

4 credits

4 credits

COM 230 History of Print Media

COM 232 History of Design and Digital

Media

2. Practical and Applied

4 credits

4 credits

12-13 credits

1 credit COM 115 Introduction to Design and

Digital Media Environments

COM 315

COM 390

Media Analysis

Media Internship

4 credits

3-4 credits

4 credits COM 450 Communications Senior

Seminar

3. Foreign Language Requirement 0-4 credits

Demonstration of proficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

4. Areas of Specialization 21-26 credits

Communication majors must elect one of the following specializations: Media Studies, Corporate

Communications, Design and Digital Media, or

Journalism.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 131

Specializations:

I. Media Studies

The specialization in Media Studies prepares students for careers in media production and media research.

Students are introduced to the histories and theories of media, as well as the institutional and cultural contexts in which mediated communication occurs. They will gain production skills in video, radio, television, or digital media.

Requirements: 22 credits

CIN 111 Video I

Two of the following

CIN 204/ Politics, Film, Media

POL 219

ANT 225/

COM 225

CIN 240

Multicultural Literacy

Third World Cinema

Women and Film CIN 271/

WGS 271

CIN 309 Electronic Media: Alternative

Video Histories

3 credits

8 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

COM 371/

SOC 371

Media and the Margins

One of the Following:

CIN 120 Video II

4 credits

3 credits

COM 240 Media Workshop: Acting, Direction and

Production for the Media

COM 250 Typography & Design

COM 251 Digital Imaging 1

COM 261 TV Studio Production

COM 270 Radio Production

One of the Following: 4 credits

COM 317 Information Design

CIN 318/ Advanced TV Studio Production

COM 318

COM 320 Motion Graphics

COM 370 Web Design, Graphics and Theory

One of the Following: 4 credits

COM 415 Media Audiences

COM 420 Global Media

COM 425 Media Regulation

Note: Courses may only be used once to fulfill a requirement area.

II. Corporate Communications

The Corporate Communications area of specialization is designed for students to study communications and their practices for entry into media businesses, and corporate and non-profit settings. The curriculum provides knowledge of media organizations and their operations, theoretical frameworks of strategic communications and media, and their practical application in writing, digital media, public relations, advertising, and other communications practices.

Requirements: 22-23 credits

COM 205 Media Industries

COM 332 History and Theory of

Advertising and Public

Relations

COM 432 Corporate Communications

Practices

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

One of the following:

BUS 100 Introduction to Business

3 credits

MGT 110 Organizational Theory and Management

MKT 111 Marketing

One of the following:

MKT 211 Advertising

COM 251 Digital Imaging I

3-4 credits

ENL 277 Introduction to Journalism

MKT 310 Consumer Behavior

One of the following: 4 credits

COM 341 Communications Design Workshop

COM 370 Web Design: Graphics and Theory

COM 415 Media Audiences

COM 420 Global Media

COM 425 Media Regulations

COM/

ENL 465 Writing for the Media

COM/

ENL 475 Writing for Advertising and Public

Relations

Note: Courses may only be used once to fulfill a requirement area.

III. Design and Digital Media

The Design and Digital Media area of specialization is designed for students to study graphic design, digital imaging, and Web design for entry into positions in print and Web design, and publishing organizations. The curriculum emphasizes visual literacy and design history, theory, and technique. The practicum provides students with the opportunity to develop skills and competence using professional design software in one or more areas of practical and aesthetic application: graphic design, digital imaging, and the Web.

Requirements: 25-26 credits

COM 250 Typography and Design

COM 251 Digital Imaging I

COM 370 Web Design: Graphics and

Theory

Two of the following:

3 credits

3 credits

4 credits

7-8 credits

COM 313 Principles of Editorial Design

COM 317 Information Design

COM 341 Communications Design Workshop

COM 351 Digital Imaging II

One of the following:

COM 320 Motion Graphics

4 credits

COM 380 Web Design, Animation, and Theory

COM 451 Advanced Design and Digital Media

Workshop

COM 492 Senior Project for Design and Digital

Media

One of the following courses

CIN 111 Video I

3-4 credits

PHO 120 Basic Photography

ART 120 Introductory Drawing

ART 130 Introductory Painting

ART 245 Printmaking

COM 313 Principles of Editorial Design

COM 320 Motion Graphics

COM 332 History and Theory of Advertising and

Public Relations

COM 341 Communications Design Workshop

132 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

COM 351 Digital Imaging II

COM 380 Web Design, Animation, and Theory

COM 475 Writing for Advertising and Public

Relations

Note: Courses may only be used once to fulfill a requirement area.

IV. Journalism

The specialization in Journalism prepares students for entry-level positions in print, broadcast, online, and converged journalism. In an era where media is

“everywhere

”, the specialization also prepares students to critically produce, understand, and interrogate reporting and production practices, even if they are not full-time journalists. The curriculum also provides students with a broad background in communication and in English language, linguistics, and literature, and with the development of writing and reportorial skills suited to contemporary journalism. This area of concentration is offered in collaboration with the Department of English.

Requirements: 24 credits

Both of the following (8 credits)

COM/

ENL 277 Introduction to Journalism

COM 204 Introduction to Online

Journalism

One of the following (4 credits)

ENL 480 Studies in Advanced

Journalism

ENL 445 Journalism and Society

Two of the following (8 credits)

COM 412/

ENL 412

Broadcast Journalism

COM 438/ Newspaper Reporting

ENL 438

COM 446 Digital Design Journalists

One of the following (4 credits)

ENL 433 Nonfiction Writing

ENL 440 Magazine Writing

ENL 441 Writing about the Media

COM/ Writing for the Media

ENL 465

COM/ Writing for Advertising

ENL 475

CIN 212 Documentary Video

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Electives: 20-30 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

It is strongly recommended that students majoring in

Communications also elect a minor. The choice of a minor should be developed in accordance with the student’s career objectives in consultation with the student’s faculty adviser.

Honors

To graduate with honors in Communications, a student must have a 3.5 grade point average in communications courses and must complete an honors thesis or project approved by a faculty advisor.

Communications Minors

Minors

Minor in Media Studies: 17 credits

COM 150 Introduction to

Communications

CIN 111 Video I

One of the following:

COM 200 Media and Culture

COM 220 History of Radio and Television

COM/

4 credits

3 credits

4 credits

ANT 225 Multicultural Literacy

COM/

SOC 371 Media and the Margins

Two of the following:

COM 240 Media Workshop

COM 261 TV Studio Production

COM 270 Radio and Audio Production

CIN 120 Video II

6 credits

Minor in Corporate Communications: 16-17 credits

COM 115 Introduction to Design and

Digital Media Environments 1 credit

COM 150 Introduction to

Communications

COM 205 Media Industries

4 credits

4 credits

COM 332 History and Theory of

Advertising and Public

Relations

One of the following:

4 credits

3-4 credits

COM 251 Digital Imaging I

COM 370 Web Design: Graphics and Theory

COM/

ENL 412 Broadcast Journalism

COM/

ENL 438 Newspaper Reporting

COM/

ENL 465 Writing for the Media

COM/

ENL 475 Writing for Advertising and Public

Relations

Minor in Design and Digital Media:

COM 115 Introduction to Design and

18-19 credits

Digital Media Environments

COM 150 Introduction to

1 credit

Communications

COM 250 Typography and Design

COM 251 Digital Imaging I

Two of the following:

4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

7-8 credits

COM 313 Principles of Editorial Design

COM 317 Information Design

COM 320 Motion Graphics

COM 341 Communications Design Workshop

COM 351 Digital Imaging II

COM 370 Web Design: Graphics and Theory

COM 380 Animation Design

Minor in Journalism: 10-12 credits

7-8 credits Two of the following:

COM/

ENL 277 Introduction to Journalism

COM/

ENL 412 Broadcast Journalism

COM/

ENL 438 Newspaper Reporting

COM/

ENL 480 Studies in Advanced Journalism

One of the following: 3-4 credits

ENL 433 Nonfiction Writing

ENL 440 Magazine Writing

ENL 441 Writing about the Media

COM/

ENL 445 Journalism and Society

COM/

ENL 465 Writing for the Media

COM/

ENL 475 Writing for Advertising and Public

Relations

Communication Courses

COM 100 Introduction to Media

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to media, providing an overview of the media industries, as well as the political, social, and cultural uses of modern media. (arts & com.) (FCER)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and Writing

COM 101 Media Literacy

3 hours; 3 credits

Develops skills to become critical consumers and producers of media. Students will learn how to analyze and evaluate different forms of media such as newspapers, television, radio, magazines, video games, films, and websites. Students will also be introduced to making media, particularly social media, in an age in which anyone can be a media producer. (arts & com) (FCER)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and Writing

COM 115 Introduction to Design and Digital

Media Environments

1 hour; 1 credit

Introduces students to the fundamental tools, skills, and principles that are a prerequisite to using a computer for graphic design, digital imaging, and Web design. Students will be instructed in the computer's operating system, and introduced to the basic software programs and peripheral devices. This course is the prerequisite for all

COM production courses.

COM 150 Introduction to Communications

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the study of communications modes, codes, and institutions. The course also examines the histories, contexts, content, and reception of different media.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

COM 200 Media and Culture

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of interrelationships among media, cultural production, and their social, historical, political, and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 133 economic contexts. This course considers the interdisciplinary approaches of visual culture and cultural studies to understand the roles of institutions, groups, and individuals in creating and using cultural representations and engaging in cultural practices, with an emphasis on the integration of mediated cultural production into everyday life. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: COM 150

COM 201 History and Theory of Television

4 hours; 4 credits

History and Theory of Television examines the development of commercial television broadcasting, its genesis in radio, its creation of distinctive genres, and its change and diversification in the age of cable and satellite broadcasting. The course considers different theoretical approaches to the analysis of television, investigating theories of the effects of television, the impact of television on other media, and television’s “mythic” content.

(arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

COM 203 Theories of Communications

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the development of communications as an interdisciplinary academic field, drawing on rhetoric, social psychology, political science, sociology, anthropology, and other disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on theories of mass communication and media.

Students learn to make connections and distinguish between various theories and models.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in COM 150

COM 204 Introduction to Online Journalism

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduces students to the range of basic skills

–blogging, online reporting, podcasting, online video and audio

–necessary to operate successfully in the world of online journalism. The course will also familiarize students with some of the major intellectual issues that lie at the heart of the emergence of online journalism.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 , COM 115

COM 205 Media Industries

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of U.S. media organizations and their practices. This course explores the historical, regulatory, and economic context of their operations, highlighting contemporary issues of media convergence, conglomeration, ownership, regulation, policy, and the political economy of the media.

Prerequisite: COM 150

COM 211 Communications in a Corporate

Setting

(Also BUS 211)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to types of communication in business settings. These will include oral communication (with presentations) and written communication both within the organization as well as to external recipients (such as investors, government agencies, and the community).

Data communication, both for internal needs and for external needs, will be covered. Security for all types of

134 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

An intensive five-week course designed to introduce the student to the various capabilities and applications of desktop publishing. communication will be discussed. This course will help students to master effective professional communication through skills development and applications in diverse organizational contexts.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and BUS 150 or BUS 250 or

CSC 102.

COM 220 History of Radio and Television

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines the development of radio and television broadcasting systems in the United States, from their origins in

“wireless telegraphy” to the current age of multichannel cable and satellite transmission. The course considers different theoretical approaches to the analysis of radio and television; their distinct genres; economic, regulatory, technological, and aesthetic features of these commercial media and public broadcasting; and their roles as key social institutions.

Prerequisite: COM 150

COM 225 Multicultural Literacy

(Also ANT 225)

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of culture as it is defined by various disciplines and understood through prisms of class, race, gender, ethnicity, and the nation state. The class approaches literacy and culture from interdisciplinary perspectives, drawing on anthropology, sociology, literary theory, media studies, and gender studies. (social science) (arts & com) (p&d) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, COR 100; and any 100-level

ANT, COM, HST, POL, SOC, or WGS course

COM 250 Typography and Design

4 hours; 3 credits

A study of the communicative and aesthetic characteristics of graphic design and typography. The course focuses on the organization of visual space employing graphic design principles and strategies. Through the use of various digital techniques, students will produce graphic and typographic design projects.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in COM 115

COM 251 Digital Imaging 1

4 hours; 3 credits

A study of strategies in digital imaging production and treatment. Students will learn and employ digital design applications to composite images for print. Design exercises and projects emphasize problem solving, creativity, and presentation. Lectures focus on production and theory, referencing both historical and contemporary work as examples.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in COM 115

COM 261 Television Studio Production

4 hours; 3 credits

The emphasis is on studio production and the application of controlled studio techniques to the production of video programs. Increasingly complex projects will be planned, scripted, and carried through to a final edit.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and CIN 111

COM 230 History of Print Media

(Also ENL 230 )

4 hours; 4 credits

An introductory survey of the evolution of newspapers, periodicals, and the publishing industry, focusing on technological developments, major innovations, legal and ethical issues, and societal impact.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COM 150

COM 270 Radio Production

4 hours; 3 credits

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of radio production, theory, and practice. This includes audio principles and aesthetics; the purpose and operation of primary (microphones, tape machines, consoles, turntables) and secondary (compressors, equalizers, delays) studio equipment; and the techniques of the production process.

COM 232 History of Design and Digital Media

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of the work of major designers and the movements they started, from its origins in the printing press as well as the interrelationship of design and fine art. We will focus on mainstream uses of graphic design as well as countercultural/activist appropriation of design techniques.

Prerequisite: COM 150

COM 240 Media Workshop: Acting, Directing, and Producing for the Media

4 hours; 3 credits

An examination of the actor/director relationship as it applies in the various media: stage, film, and television.

Students will have an opportunity to work both as actors, directors, and screenwriters. Students will write, rehearse, and stage new screenplays.

Prerequisite: CIN 111

COM 249 Workshop in Typesetting

2 hours; 1 credit

COM 271 Radio/TV Newscasting

4 hours; 3 credits

This course provides students with an understanding of newscasting through an evaluation of the impact of broadcast news, and investigation of journalistic tenets and applications that include organizing, writing, and producing news programs.

Prerequisite: COM 261 or COM 270

COM 277 Introduction to Journalism

(Also ENL 277)

4 hours; 4 credits

A general introduction to the principles of journalism.

Work on reporting, editing, and layout, and an examination of distribution/feedback systems.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

COM 312 Theories of Mass Media

(Also ENL 312)

4 hours; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 135

A survey of contemporary communications theory defining the language, structure, systems, effects, and rhetoric of the mass media. Practical examples in journalism, advertising, publishing, radio, television, and film will be analyzed.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

COM 332 History and Theory of Advertising and Public Relations

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of advertising and public relations in the

United States. This course explores theories regarding their implications in relation to media institutions, politics, public opinion, society, and culture.

Prerequisite: COM 205

COM 313 Principles of Editorial Design:

Integration of Writing and Graphics

4 hours; 4 credits

Emphasis on the integration of publication design, graphics, information organization, and language.

Course topics focus on various formats of multi-page layout design for print, their meaning and significance; editorial concepts, and the publication process. Further emphasis is placed on group organization, collaboration, and co-authorship.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COM 250 or COM 317,

COM 341 Communications Design Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of theoretical and practical approaches to visual culture. This course focuses on the role of subject, voice, and audience in determining appropriate visual and verbal forms. Through the use of various digital techniques, students will produce graphic and conceptual design projects where layers of meaning are created through the combination of images and text.

Prerequisite: COM 251

COM 315 Media Analysis

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive theory and writing course introducing students to diverse approaches to media analysis, from semiotics, psychoanalysis, intertextuality, and discourse analysis. Students explore ways to read and understand different kinds of media texts, including print, audio, visual, and digital texts. Students will also learn to explore and explain their ideas and arguments in writing about media texts.

Prerequisite: COM 203

COM 351 Digital Imaging II

4 hours; 4 credits

An advanced creative, practical, and theoretical study of digital imaging as it is used in visual communication.

Students will enhance their understanding of design and visual practice through thematic digital imaging assignments. Technical topics include advanced features of hardware and software and digital camera use. Theoretical concerns focus on the evolution of digital imagery, digital photography, and representation.

Prerequisites: COM 250 and COM 251

COM 317 Information Design

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of the relationship between form and information. This course examines systems for organizing and presenting effective, efficient, and understandable information. Students will learn and employ vector-based computer illustration software to complete their assignments.

Prerequisite: COM 250

COM 370 Web Design, Graphics, and Theory

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of Web design, new media, digital culture, and cyberspace. This course is concerned with the technical skills of Web design and development, and the theoretical implications of Web-based design. Students will create projects employing Web design software. Along with production, COM 370 focuses on the psychological, cultural, social, economic, and political relationships associated with Internet culture.

Prerequisites: COM 203 and COM 251

COM 318 Advanced TV Studio Production

(Also CIN 318)

4 hours; 4 credits

An advanced workshop in the techniques and concepts of live studio production. This course emphasizes a disciplined approach to practical application, the ability to work in production crews, and critical thinking as it relates to audience, message, and aesthetic choices. Students develop works through individual and group productions acquainting them with industry standards.

Prerequisite: COM 261

COM 371 Media and the Margins

(also SOC 371)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the role of the mass media as cultural institutions that shape the images and self-images of marginalized groups. The course engages with definitions based on, but not limited to, age, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexuality. (P&D) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisites: COM 150 or a 100-level and 200-level

SOC or ANT course

COM 320 Motion Graphics

4 hours; 4 credits

A course focusing on the language and tools of motion graphics. Emphasis is on the construction of image, typography, and accelerated sequences, as well as historical and theoretical topics. Students will learn to integrate sound and image as they develop and storyboard their projects.

Prerequisite: COM 251 or CIN 120

COM 374 Mass Media in Modern Society

(Also SOC 374)

4 hours; 4 credits

Sociological analysis of the mass media: their comparative histories and organizations, and their political and social effects. Attention will be given to their persuasive role in propaganda and public opinion, as well as to their function in providing information and entertainment for the common culture.

136 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Prerequisites: COM 150 and a 200-level SOC or ANT course

COM 380 Web Design, Animation, and Theory

4 hours; 4 credits

A course focusing on digital animation for the Internet.

This course will cover the technical aspects of digital animation, as well as historical and theoretical topics. Students will create animations as stand-alone pieces and as components in Web pages.

Prerequisite: COM 370

COM 390 Media Internship

(also CIN 390)

3-4 credits

An internship work and learning experience with a media organization or in positions engaging in communications practices. This may include work in the production, distribution, or exhibition of media material, as well as in public relations and advertising. Students are required to keep a work journal, and write an analytical paper of their work experience. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: COM 200 or COM 203 or COM 205 or

COM 220 or COM 230 or COM 232 or CIN 210 or CIN

220, and the permission of the faculty advisor.

COM 410 Media Administration

(also BUS 410)

4 hours; 4 credits

A course dealing with the skills and concepts necessary for the competent management of a media production department. Topics include production planning and control, cost analysis procedures, contract and copyright law in relation to the media, and organization theory.

Prerequisites: COM 150, and COM 261 or COM 270 or

CIN 111

COM 412 Broadcast Journalism

(Also ENL 412)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the theory, history, and practice of modern newscasting. The class will also focus on the way that traditional broadcast is converging with digital video production and distribution in the creation of news.

Special emphasis will be placed on preparing material for broadcast on radio, television, and online. Readings will explore the economic realities of broadcasting, legal sanctions, and social impact. Students will monitor newscasts, analyze them, and write copy suitable for broadcast. For students wishing to register for the course

COM 100 is recommended.

Prerequisite: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204

COM 415 Media Audiences

4 hours; 4 credits

A comparison of industry and scholarly approaches to understanding media audiences and media effects, focusing on the medium of television. This course also draws cases from film, radio, and new media. We will examine the tools of media industry audience research

(such as audience measurement, ratings systems, and focus groups), as well as critical scholarship on the social impact of the fragmentation of the mass audience, and the results of ethnographic audience research.

Prerequisite: COM 315

COM 420 Global Media

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of contemporary media as global phenomena, stressing the multidirectionality of media flows, influences, power, and practices. Students explore global connections in different media, including print, electronic, audio, visual, television, film, as well as the interconnectedness of these media on a global scale.

Prerequisite: COM 315

COM 425 Media Regulation

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the regulation of media, including print, film, and telecommunications in the United States. The course examines the history of media regulation in terms of both the structure of media industries and their contents, including the First Amendment rights extended to individual expression and print, censorship and the limitations placed on broadcasting; the governance of intellectual property, in copyright and fair use laws; the role of the

Federal Communications Commission, trends in de- and re-regulation in recent decades, and the role of regulations in developing new media such as the Internet.

Prerequisite: COM 315

COM 432 Corporate Communications

Practices

4 hours; 4 credits

An extensive examination of corporate communications and public relations approaches, and their application.

Case studies and examples of a variety of corporate communications practices will be analyzed in terms of their meaning, purposes, and targeted publics to study and develop skills in building communications strategies, tactics, and execution techniques. Students will work on projects dealing with the planning and execution of strategic communications.

Prerequisite: COM 332

COM 438 Newspaper Reporting

(Also ENL 438)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the theory, history, and practice of modern reportorial journalism. The class will focus on the way that traditional newswriting is converging with other media forms online, yet remains a skill of its own with specific needs, ethics,and best practices. For students wishing to register for the course COM 100 is recommended.

Prerequisite: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204

COM 445 Journalism and Society

(Also ENL 445)

4 hours; 4 credits

Learning to

“read” and write the news. Analysis of the ways in which news stories define our understanding of society. The course will consider both the effect of print and broadcast journalism on politics, values, and social standards and the pressures on the press that define its values. Topics vary from term to term.

Prerequisite: (COM/ENL 277 and COM 204) and (COM

412/ENL 412 or ENL 438/COM 438 or COM 446)

COM 446 Digital Design for Journalists

4 hours; 4 credits

Digital design skills needed for developing skills in writing for traditional electronic media (such as radio and television) as well as new media (such as the Internet). This writing-intensive course emphasizes the translation of ideas into written text or spoken dialogue appropriate to the medium, genre, and target audience, as well as treatments, proposals, and other forms of pre-production writing.

Prerequisites: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204 or COM 317

COM 450 Senior Seminar in Communications

Research

4 hours; 4 credits

The capstone class for Communications majors. The course provides an overview of communications research and introduces students to basic research procedures, paradigms, and methods. Students learn research goals, methodologies, and strategies in communications. They use these tools to formulate a research problem of their own and to conduct research in libraries, through media resources, and through fieldwork.

Prerequisite: COM 315

COM 451 Advanced Design and Digital Media

Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

Workshop course designed for advanced students to complete extended projects. The students will apply their mastery of the concepts and skills of design and digital media to one large project or body of work; this work will be proposed by the student and agreed upon by the professor.

Prerequisites: COM 250 and COM 370

Pre- or corequisite: COM 314 or COM 341 or COM 317 or COM 320 or COM 351 or COM 380

COM 465 Writing for the Media

(also ENL 465)

4 hours; 4 credits

Developing skills in writing for traditional electronic media

(such as radio and television) as well as new media (such as the Internet). This writing-intensive course emphasizes the translation of ideas into written text or spoken dialogue appropriate to the medium, genre, and target audience, as well as treatments, proposals, and other forms of pre-production writing.

Prerequisites: 200-level COM course and ENG 151

COM 475 Writing for Advertising and Public

Relations

(also ENL 475)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the techniques of developing concepts and writing copy for advertising in print and broadcast media, and public relations material such as press releases, newsletters, brochures, and publicity material.

The course analyzes advertising, public relations, and other corporate communications tactics in terms of their

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 137 target audience, message, and effectiveness, as well as the channels of communication. Students will be assigned a number of writing projects including copywriting, concept development proposals, press releases, and newsletter articles.

Prerequisite: COM 332

COM 480 Studies in Advanced Journalism

(Also ENL 480)

4 hours; 4 credits

Analysis of the techniques required for good feature writing, magazine writing, personal journalism, investigative reporting, interviewing, etc. Overview of the changing journalism environment and the techniques and skills necessary to build a successful journalism organization.

Overview of the job and skills of a news editor. Emphasis amongst these different options varies from term to term.

Prerequisite: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204 ; COM/ENL

412 or COM/ENL 438 or COM 466

COM 490 Senior Project

2 hours; 1 credit

A laboratory/seminar in which students select a publication project to complete during the semester, including a written analysis of the writing, design, and management problems and skills related to the completion of the project. Problems, possible solutions, and final results will be shared seminar-style.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor

COM 492 Senior Project for Design and Digital

Media

4 hours; 4 credits

Advanced individual exploration of techniques and principles introduced in 200- and 300-level design and digital media courses. This course provides the opportunity for students to develop cohesive portfolios to a quality required for entry-level positions in the field. Critiques of student work will be held with fellow students and the faculty advisor periodically throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and COM 250 and COM

370

Pre- or corequisite: COM 314 or COM 341 or COM 317 or COM 320 or COM 317 or COM 380

Computer Science and Computer

Technology

(Bachelor of Science, Associate in Applied Science,

Minor; Master of Science - see Graduate Catalog)

Department of Computer Science, Building 1N, Room

215

Chairperson and Professor Louis Petingi

Computer User Responsibilities

Students are expected to be familiar with the computer user responsibilities detailed in Appendix ii.

138 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Computer Technology (AAS)

The College offers a Computer Technology program that focuses on general applications programming.

Students seeking a Bachelor’s degree in Computer

Science should consult the requirements for the BS in

Computer Science or the BS in Computer Science/Mathematics. students finishing their degree with more than the regular number of credits required.

Pre-Core Requirement: 4 credits

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science 4 credits

A grade of C or above in CSC 126 is required for continuation in the program. Students will be allowed to repeat the course, if necessary.

Pathways Common Core Requirements: 24-26

Pathways Required Core: 12-13 credits

English Composition (RECR) 6 credits

ENG 111 Introduction to College

Writing

ENG 151 College Writing

Mathematical and Quantitative

3 credits

3 credits

3 or more credits

Reasonsing (RMQR)

Students are required to complete the following courses:

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I*

Life and Physical Sciences

(RLPR)

3 credits

3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

AST 120 Space Science I 4 credits

BIO 170 General Biology I 3 credits

CHM 141 General Chemistry I 3 credits

GEO 100 Planet Earth

PHY 120 General Physics I

3 credits

3 credits

Pathways Flexible Core: 12-13 credits

Students may take no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field in the Flexible Core.

U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) 3 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, and Institutions

3 credits

Programming Sequence

Core Requirements: 28 credits

CSC 210 Applications Programming

OR

CSC 332 Operating Systems I (to be chosen in consultation with an advisor) 4 credits

Effective Fall 2013 CSC 332 is now a 3 credit course with a corequisite of CSC 305.

CSC 211 Intermediate Programming 4 credits

CSC 220 Computers and Programming 4 credits

OR

Two two-credit CSC courses at the 200-level or above

(excluding CSC 347 and CSC 490)

CSC/MTH

228

Discrete Mathematical

Structures

CSC 326 Information Structures

CSC 330 Object-Oriented Software

Design

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I 3 credits

Scientific World (FSWR) 3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

AST 160 Space Science II

BIO 180 General Biology II

4 credits

3 credits

CHM 142 General Chemistry II 3 credits

GEO 102 Historical Geology 3 credits

PHY 160 General Physics II 3 credits

In addition to the above, students must select 2 courses from the following areas of the

6 credits

Flexible Core:

1. World Cultures and Global Issues (WC)

2. Creative Expression (CE)

3. Individual and Society (IS)

Information Science

Core Requirements: 30 credits

MKT 111 Marketing

MGT 110 Organizational Theory and

Management

3 credits

3 credits

CSC 210 Applications Programming

CSC 211 Intermediate Programming

CSC 326 Information Structures

CSC 334 Computer System

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Fundamentals

Two two-credit CSC courses at the 200-level

4 credits or above (excluding CSC 347 and CSC 490) 4 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credits

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I 3 credits

Electives: 2-4 credits

Total Credits Required: 60

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Courses designated CSC are non-liberal arts and sciences.

*Also fulfills major requirement.

NOTE: Students may take courses in STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World) that have 3 or more credits. This may result in

Computer Science (BS)

The Computer Science program offers a full four-year curriculum in computer science that prepares students for careers as computer professionals and/or for graduate study. The major provides a broad-based back-

ground in computer science and includes courses in computer software, systems, mathematics, and computer engineering. A student, under the guidance of a computer science adviser, may also select additional courses to pursue particular interests. Students interested in transferring into the program from the two-year

Computer Technology program should consult the department chairperson.

Program Educational Objectives:

A few years after graduation, graduates will:

1. Hold responsible positions in computing related fields and/or be pursuing an advanced computing related degree;

2. Remain current in their field through the pursuit of life-long learning; and

3. Use their core computing and problem solving knowledge.

The program in Computer Science is accredited by the

Computer Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET,

111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, Maryland

21202-4012; 410.347.7700.

Pathways Common Core Requirements: 27-33 credits

Pathways Required Core: 12-13 credits

English Composition (RECR) 6 credits

ENG 111 Introduction to College

Writing

3 credits

ENG 151 College Writing

Mathematical and Quantitative

3 credits

3 or more credits

Reasonsing (RMQR)

Students are required to complete the following courses:

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I*

3 credits

NOTE: Students may be required to take a prerequisite for MTH 231

Life and Physical Sciences

(RLPR)

3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

AST 120* Space Science I

BIO 170* General Biology I

CHM

141*

4 credits

3 credits

General Chemistry I 3 credits

Planet Earth 3 credits GEO

100*

PHY

120*

General Physics I 3 credits

NOTE: Students will be required to register for the sequence of science courses in the pre-major.

Pathways Flexible Core: 19-20 credits

Students may take no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field in the Flexible Core.

1. U.S. Experience in its Diversity

(FUSR)

3 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 139

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, and Institutions

2. Scientific World (FSWR)

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

CSC

126*

Introduction to

Computer Science

3 credits

3 or more credits

4 credits

3. World Cultures and Global

Issues (WC)

3 credits

4. Creative Expression (CE) 3 credits

5. Individual and Society (IS) 3 credits

6. In additionto the above students must select 1 course from any of the Flexible Core areas.

3 credits

College Option 12 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

Social Science 4 credits

STEM MTH 232* Analytic

Geometry and

Calculus II

STEM* AST 120 or AST 160 or BIO

170/171 or BIO 180/181 or

CHM 141/121 or CHM

142/127 or PHY 120/PHY

121 or PHY 160/PHY 161 or

GEO 102/GEO 103

4 credits

4 credits

*Also fulfills pre major requirement.

NOTE: Students may take courses in STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World) that have 3 or more credits. This may result in students finishing their degree with more than the regular number of credits required.

Pre-Computer Science Sequence: 4 credits

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer 4 credits

Science

A grade of C or above in CSC 126 is required for admission to the Computer Science Baccalaureate program. Students will be allowed to repeat the course, if necessary.

Pre-Major Requirements: 27-30 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory

MTH 230

MTH 232

Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

Analytic Geometry and Calculus II or

MTH 229

MTH 231

MTH 232

Calculus Computer Laboratory

Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

Analytic Geometry and Calculus II

140 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

CSC 211

CSC 220 and

Intermediate Programming (4 credits)

Computers and Programming (4 credits)

AND

A one-year science sequence chosen from the list of courses below:

Space Science I and II AST 120/AST

160

BIO 170, 171

BIO 180, 181

CHM 141, 121,

CHM 142, 127

PHY 120, 121,

PHY 160, 161

General Biology I and II with laboratories

General Chemistry I and II with laboratories

General Physics I and II with laboratories

Four additional credits of science courses that provide the foundation for further study in the sciences. (4 credits)

Major Requirements: 56-57 credits

Students majoring in Computer Science must complete:

CSC/ Discrete Mathematical 4 credits

MTH 228

CSC 326

CSC 330

Structures

Information Structures

Object-Oriented Software

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 332

CSC 305

CSC/ENS

346

Design

Operating Systems I

Operating Systems

Laboratory

Switching and Automata

Theory

3 credits

1 credit

4 credits

CSC 347

CSC 382

CSC 430

CSC 446

Computer Circuits Laboratory 2 credits

Analysis of Algorithms 4 credits

Software Engineering

Computer Architecture

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 490

And

Seminar in Computer Science 3 credits

Two courses in Mathematics having MTH 232 or higher as a prerequisite (MTH 306 may not be used to fulfill this requirement).

Twelve credits from the following, at least eight credits must be taken in computer science courses. Only two

200-level courses may be included in the twelve credits.

CSC 223 Computer Hacking Revealed 2 credits

CSC 225 Introduction to Web

Development and the Internet

2 credits

CSC 226 Web Database Applications

CSC 227 Introductory Computer Game

Programming

CSC 229 Introduction to High Performance

Computing

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

CSC 235 Robotic Explorations

CSC 420 Concepts of Programming

2 credits

4 credits

Languages

CSC 421 Internet Data Communications and Security

4 credits

CSC 424 Database Management Systems 4 credits

CSC 427 Advanced Computer Game

Programming

CSC 429 Advanced High Performing

Computing

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 432 Operating Systems II

CSC 434 Compiler Construction

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 435 Advanced Data Communications 4 credits

CSC 438 Mobile Application Development 4 credits

CSC

462/

Microcontrollers 4 credits

ENS 362

CSC 470 Introductory Computer Graphics 4 credits

CSC 475 Image Processing in Computer

Science

4 credits

CSC 480 Artificial Intelligence

CSC 482 Discrete Simulation

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 484 Theory of Computation

OR

4 credits

An additional four credit MTH course having MTH 232 or higher as a prerequisite. MTH 306 may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

A grade of C or above in all CSC courses that are prerequisites for courses in the major requirements. Students will be allowed to repeat courses, it necessary.

NOTE: Students planning to pursue a higher degree in

Computer Science are recommended to take MTH 233.

Total Credits Required: 124

Computer Science

– Mathematics (BS)

The Departments of Computer Science and Mathematics offer a joint BS degree program in Computer Science and Mathematics that provides a balance between these two disciplines with an emphasis on their applied aspects and their relationship to each other.

Pre-Computer Science Sequence: 4 credits

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science 4 credits

A grade of C or above in CSC 126 will be required for admission to the Computer Science-Mathematics Baccalaureate program. Students will be allowed to repeat the course, if necessary.

Pre-Major Requirements: 17-21 credits

Students planning to major in Computer Science-Mathematics should complete the following requirements prior to their junior year.

Calculus sequence chosen from the following: 9-13 credits

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus 6 credits

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus II 3 credits

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus III 3 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit or

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I 3 credits

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus II 3 credits

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus III 3 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit or

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 141

MTH 235 Accelerated Calculus I

MTH 236 Accelerated Calculus II

4 credits

4 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit and

CSC 220 Computers and Programming 4 credits

CSC 211 Intermediate Programming 4 credits

2. Computer Science minor sequence for students with an interest in applications programming:

CSC 326 Information Structures

CSC 330 Object-Oriented Software

Design

4 credits

4 credits

Major Requirements: 52 credits

MTH/

CSC 228 Discrete Mathematical

Structures

Computer Science: 24 credits

CSC 326 Information Structures

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 330 Systems Programming:

Concepts of Software Design 4 credits

CSC 346 Switching and Automata

Theory

CSC 382 Analysis of Algorithms

4 credits

4 credits

Any two 400 level CSC advanced electives 8 credits

CSC 424 Database Management

Systems

4 credits and one course chosen from the following list:

CSC 332 Operating Systems I

CSC 420 Concepts of Programming

Languages

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 430 Software Engineering

CSC 435 Advanced Data

Communications

CSC 470 Introductory Computer

Graphics

CSC 480 Artificial Intelligence

4 credits

4 credits

4 Credits

4 credits

Computer Science Courses

Mathematics: 24 credits

MTH 311 Probability Theory and an

MTH 335

Introduction to Mathematical

Statistics

Numerical Analysis

4 credits

4 credits

MTH 338 Linear Algebra

MTH 339 Applied Algebra

4 credits

4 credits

Any two of the following:

MTH 330 Applied Mathematical Analysis I

8 credits

MTH 337 Applied Combinatorics and Graph

Theory

MTH 341 Advanced Calculus I

MTH 350 Mathematical Logic

MTH 370 Operations Research

MTH 410 Mathematical Statistics I

The courses in computer science are listed below. Students should consult a computer science adviser before registering for courses. CSC 102 Computing for Today is a general introductory course in computers. This course is not credited toward the major. CSC 115 fulfills the scientific analysis requirements. CSC 126 Introduction to Computer Science is the introductory course in the Associate’s degree Computer Technology program and the Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science program. CSC 126 is a general introductory course in computer science for engineering students and others with similar needs.

Electives: 0-5 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Computer Science Minor

Pre-Minor Requirements: 16 credits

MTH 123 College Algebra and

Trigonometry

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 220 Computers and Programming 4 credits

CSC 211 Intermediate Programming 4 credits

CSC 102 Computers for Today

6 hours; 4 credits

Basic computer concepts including hardware, operating systems, application software (word processing, spreadsheets, and database manager), networks, and the Internet. Internet protocols, Internet, intranets and the Web,

Web development, multimedia, research, privacy, cyber security, e-commerce, and ethical issues. Not open to students who have successfully completed a 200-level computer course or BUS 150.

Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the Math Proficiency/Placement Test or MTH 015 or MTH 020

Minor Requirements: 16 credits

Computer Science minor requirements can be met by completion of any one of the following sequences:

1. Computer Science minor sequence for students with an interest in computer engineering:

CSC/

MTH 228 Discrete Mathematical

Structures

4 credits

CSC 326 Information Structures 4 credits and two courses chosen from the following list:

CSC 332 Operating Systems I 4 credits

CSC 435 Advanced Data

Communications

CSC 446 Computer Architecture

4 credits

4 credits

CSC 112 Introduction to Word Processing

1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours - 7 weeks; 1 credit

The latest version of a popular word processing program will be taught. Topics will include creating and editing a file, using the speller and the thesaurus, formatting, printing, merging, footnotes, and macros.

Not open to students who have successfully completed

CSC 102.

CSC 114 Elements of Computer Programming for the Technologies

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

Elements of computer programming for the technologies; arithmetic and logical operations and functions, comparison operators, loops, subroutines, input and output. Programs will be written in a higher-level computer language.

142 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Specialized packages for technological applications will be used.

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 123

CSC 115 Introduction to Computer Technology

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction for non-science students to fundamental concepts in computers and technology including information representation, development and application of algorithms, network and communication principles, and critical evaluation of technology tools.

Not open to students who have taken CSC 119. (science)

(FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test.

Corequisite: CSC 117

CSC 116 Introduction to Database

1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours - 7 weeks; 1 credit

The latest version of a widely used database program will be taught. Topics will include creating and editing a file, sorting and indexing, printing reports and labels.

Not open to students who have successfully completed

CSC 102.

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

CSC 117 Computer Technology Lab

2 hours; 1 credit

A laboratory experience illustrating the principles and topics in CSC 115. Not open to students who have taken CSC 119. (science)(COPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: CSC 115

CSC 118 Introduction to Spreadsheets

1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours - 7 weeks; 1 credit

The latest version of a widely used spreadsheet program will be taught. Topics will include creating and problem solving using spreadsheets, entering data and formulas, correcting errors, the range, copy and formatting instructions, printing, tables, and graphs.

Not open to students who have successfully completed

CSC 102.

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

CSC 119 Computer Technology Concepts

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the concepts of representation, storage, usage, retrieval and protection of data in the digital world. (FSWR)

Not open to students who have taken CSC 115.

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test.

CSC 122 Computer and Windows

1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours; 2 credits

This course will introduce the novice to the essentials of

Windows usage. Topics will include controlling the Windows graphical environment, customizing the desktop, screensavers, running programs, copying data between programs, and managing files with the File Manager. The supplied programs of Windows, the accessories, will be explored: Write, Terminal, Paintbrush, Notepad, Cardfile,

Recorder, Calendar, and Calculator. Groups and the installation of programs will be taught. Not open to students who have completed CSC 326 or above.

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer Science

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Computing and information processing. Basic computer structure. Programming methodology: analysis, design, documentation, implementation, and evaluation. Algorithmic approach to problem solving. Computer solutions of several numerical and non-numerical problems.

(FSWR) (STEM)

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 123 or MTH 130 or MTH 230 or

MTH 231 or MTH 235

CSC 135 Introduction to Information Systems

(Also BUS 135)

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 3 credits

A hands-on laboratory course in the effective use of technology tools for problem solving. Students will understand how copyright laws apply to software and the need to acknowledge material from outside sources, including online material and the work of others.

Corequisite: CSC 126

CSC 140 Algorithms and Computation

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the major ideas of the science of computer programming such as abstraction, design, recursion, concurrency, simulations, and the limits of computation. Course includes an overview of the current social and ethical and scientific issues in the applications of programming, and the relevance of computer science concepts to society. (science)(FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test.

Corequisite: CSC 141

CSC 141 Algorithms and Computation

Laboratory

2 hours; 1 credit

Lab corequisite for CSC 140. (science) (COPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test.

Corequisite: CSC 140

CSC 205 Basic Desktop Publishing

1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours; 2 credits

A hands-on course designed to provide a practical introduction to the basics of text formatting and design. Text and graphics will be combined to produce printer-ready pages for publication. Topics will stress the transformation of otherwise plain-looking documents into professional-looking, more readable copy. Typefaces, type styles, type sizes and page layouts will be explored.

Prerequisite: CSC 102 or CSC 112

CSC 210 Applications Programming

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Application of programming techniques to problems in business and data processing. State-of-the-art software packages to analyze and manipulate data for standard business applications will be taught.

Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in either CSC 126 or

CSC 270

CSC 211 Intermediate Programming

3 hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

A second course in programming. Programming techniques emphasizing reliability, maintainability, and reusability. Module design and multi-file programs. Abstract data types. Data representation and conversion. Addresses, pointers, and dynamic storage allocation. Recursion and function parameters. User interface design.

Prerequisite: CSC 126 with a grade C or better (not open to students who had a C or better in CSC 310).

CSC 215 Assistive Technology for Universal

Applications

3 hours; 3 credits

An overview of the technological needs and the laws for accommodating persons with disabilities; descriptions of the technologies for persons with disabilities (blindness/visual impairments, audiological disabilities, physical disabilities, and cognitive disabilities); technologies used in the classroom, industry, independent living, and social interactions; training programs for these technologies. Hands-on labs with the appropriate technologies will be utilized.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

CSC 220 Computers and Programming

4 hours; 4 credits

Binary and hexadecimal number systems and digital representation of data. Introduction to computer systems organization, and architecture, processor,memory, and external devices. CPU instruction formats and execution, addressing techniques. Assembly language, programming techniques, program segmentation and linkage. The role of assembly language in software development. Students will complete computer projects in assembly language. Note: This course will be held in a laboratory.

Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in either CSC 126 or

CSC 270

CSC 223 Computer Hacking Revealed

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

A theoretical and practical survey of computer network and Web security, attack methods, and algorithms for defending computers and computer networks. Students learn about major security threats, methods and technologies used, and how threats affect the development and functioning of computer software and hardware.

Prerequisite: CSC 126

CSC 225 Introduction to Web Development and the Internet

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

An introduction to the Internet and Web page creation and management, using a markup language, a scripting language, a current editor, and a graphics program. Topics include incorporating graphics, sound, video and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 143 proper Web page development concepts. Students will prepare Web pages incorporating text, digitized images, scripts, animations, sound, and video. Not open to students who have completed CSC 114.

Prerequisites: MTH 123

CSC 226 Web Database Applications

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

This course offers students a mixture of theoretical and practical information on creating Web database applications. Students will learn open source technologies that are often combined to develop these applications. Student will model and design databases and query remotely located databases on the Web. Searching, browsing, storing user data, validating user input, managing user transactions, and security issues are discussed.

Prerequisites: CSC 126

CSC 227 Introductory Computer Game

Programming

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

This course covers the process of game development. It also discusses the importance of testing, and how developers use the results of testing to improve their games. Students will be expected to develop simple games, or portions of games, using appropriate game development tools.

Prerequisites: CSC 126

CSC 228 Discrete Mathematical Structures for

Computer Science

(Also MTH 228)

4 hours; 4 credits

A discrete mathematics course where concepts of discrete structures will be applied to computer science.

Topics include elementary set theory, logic, functions, relations, Boolean algebra, elements of graph theory, matrix representation of graphs, and matrix manipulations, mathematical induction, counting techniques and discrete probability theory..

Prerequisites: CSC 211; MTH 123 or MTH 130 or MTH

230 or MTH 231 or MTH 235

CSC 229 Introduction to High Performance

Computing

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

An introduction to High Performance Computing. Parallel memory architectures and programming models with an emphasis on the MPI programming model. Issues related to designing parallel programs will be discussed.

Examples of how to parallelize simple serial programs will be covered.

Prerequisites: CSC 126

CSC 235 Robotic Explorations

1 lecture hour; 3 laboratory hours; 2 credits

This course focuses on the theory behind robots and how it applies to existing platforms in the lab and in the field.

Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of robotics. Concepts such as robot architectures, sensing, control, locomotion, and ethics are explored via hands-on exercises using multiple robot platforms.

144 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Prerequisites: CSC 126 and MTH 123

CSC 270 Introduction to Scientific Computing

6 hours; 4 credits

Programming elements: operators, flow control, repetition, selection, logical conditions, arrays, data import, vectors, matrices, functions. Introduction to numerical techniques using scientific software: graphing, integration, roots of equations, linear equations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, interpolation, signal processing.

Not open to students who have successfully completed

CSC 120 or CSC 126.

Prerequisite: MTH 231

CSC 305 Operating Systems Programming

Laboratory

2 hours; 1 credit

Operating systems in practice. History of OS development. Methods of memory, process, file, and device management for specific OS. User command line interface. Developing software applications in OS environment.

Prerequisite: (CSC 220 or ENS 362) and CSC 326

Corequisite: CSC 332

CSC 310 Input/Output Operations and File

Management

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Files and file structures. Physical versus logical files.

Secondary storage devices and system software. Input/output and access techniques. File organizations, indexing and processing. The capabilities of file handling in at least one higher-level programming language will be explored.

Prerequisite: CSC 126

CSC 326 Information Structures

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Organization and processing of various types of information. Storage allocation techniques. Linear list structures including stacks and queues, deques, rings, and linked arrays. Tree structures and multilinked structures.

Advanced sorting and searching techniques. Scatter storage techniques. Recursive programming.

Prerequisites: CSC 211 or ENS 336; a knowledge of C programming language

CSC 330 Object-Oriented Software Design

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Large-scale software design issues, object-oriented design paradigms, encapsulation, polymorphism, inheritance, reusability, and specifics of an object-oriented language and associated development tools. Students will be required to implement a substantial and well-engineered project using an object-oriented language.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 332 Operating Systems I

3 hours; 3 credits

Introduction to operating systems. Task management and scheduling. Process and data management. Interrupts. Resource allocation and management. Time sharing. Deadlock mutual exclusion, and synchronization.

Memory management. (liberal arts and sciences)

Prerequisites: CSC 220 or ENS 362, and CSC 326

Corequisite: CSC 305

CSC 334 Computer System Fundamentals

4 hours; 4 credits

The course covers concepts of hardware and software systems and programming concepts common to the corporate data processing environment. Topics include fundamentals of hardware and software, rudiments of operating systems, and communication between microcomputers and mainframes. Various software application and utility packages utilizing both mainframes and microcomputers will be studied.

Prerequisite: CSC 211

CSC 346 Switching and Automata Theory

4 hours; 4 credits

Codes

—error checking and correcting capabilities. Boolean algebra, minimization of combinational circuits. Definition and representation of finite state automata and sequential machines. Equivalence of states and machines, congruence, reduced machines, and analysis and synthesis of machines.

Prerequisite: CSC 220

CSC 347 Computer Circuits Laboratory

4 hours; 2 credits

The design and implementation of circuitry found in modern computers. Physical realizations of minimized switching functions. Design and implementation of finite state machines including synchronous sequential circuits and asynchronous sequential circuits.

Prerequisite: CSC 346

CSC 382 Analysis of Algorithms

4 hours; 4 credits

Algorithm development, including running time analysis and correctness arguments. Topics include: asymptotic notation and complexity analysis; use of mathematical techniques to determine the computational complexity of algorithms such as sorting and searching. The course provides an introduction and analysis of elementary graph algorithms and programming techniques such as greedy, backtracking, and dynamic programming. Projects will be assigned to correlate the computational complexity and real-time execution time of the algorithms.

Prerequisites: CSC 326 and CSC/MTH 228 and MTH

232

CSC 405 Applied Concepts in Information

Systems

(Also BUS 405)

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

The course covers applied concepts in information systems. Theory and methodology for the design, development, and implementation of large-scale reliable business software projects and tools and techniques for managing business software projects will be discussed. Presentations and GUI interfaces will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: CSC 326 and BUS 352

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 145

CSC 420 Concepts of Programming

Languages

4 hours; 4 credits

Definition of programming languages, data types and declaration, storage allocation, statement types, operations, control structures, binding time, procedure, subroutine, function declaration, parameters, string manipulation. Several programming languages will be discussed and problems using these languages will be assigned.

Prerequisites: CSC 220 and CSC 326

CSC 430 Software Engineering

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Developing large-scale reliable software systems. Theory and methodology for the design and implementation of software systems from requirements analysis through design and implementation, testing, integration, and maintenance. Tools and techniques for all phases of a software system’s life cycle will be discussed. Documentation, testing, and management of large-scale systems.

A significant project will be required.

Prerequisite: CSC 330

CSC 421 Internet Data Communications and

Security

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Designed to present a thorough understanding of the

Internet structure, its functionality, and the technology.

This course covers networks and how they work; Internet protocols; Internet control protocols; Internet and www,

Internet clients and servers and their main features; Internet applications and related protocols; Internet and www security; encryption, public-key cryptography, authentication, and IP security.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 429 Advanced High Performance

Computing

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Foundations of parallel computing. Algorithms for shared- and distributed-memory systems. Parallel computer architectures, performance, decomposition techniques for parallel algorithms, parallel programming models such as Open MP and MPI models, analytical modeling of parallel algorithms. Classical parallel algorithms and their implementation on parallel machines and performance analysis will be discussed.

Prerequisites: CSC 326

CSC 432 Operating Systems II

4 hours; 4 credits

Concurrent processing. Linear and tree-structured address space. Resource allocation for multiprogramming.

Queuing and network control policies. Protection mechanisms. Case studies of various state-of-the-art systems and implementation of a small operating system.

Prerequisite: CSC 332

CSC 424 Database Management Systems

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to database systems, concepts and architecture; Conceptual data modeling with the Entity-Relationship Model; the Relational database model: concepts, languages, functional dependencies, database normalization and design; programming in SQL; concepts of integrity, security, transactions, concurrency, recovery, distributed and object-oriented databases are introduced.

Study of several real-world database management systems. Students are required to implement a database application project in the area of their major interest.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 427 Advanced Computer Game

Programming

4 hours; 4 credits

This course covers advanced principles and practices of computer game programming. The student will be exposed to the different aspects of game development including 2D and 3D asset creation, rendering and animation, sprites, AI for games, programming, and testing.

The course emphasizes the hands-on computer programming aspect. Students will work in groups to develop and program games.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 434 Compiler Construction

4 hours; 4 credits

Review of assembly techniques of symbol table techniques and macros, and of compilation, loading, and execution. One-pass compilation techniques. Translation of arithmetic expressions from prefix form to machine language. Detailed organization of a simple complete compiler.

Prerequisites: CSC 330 and CSC 326

CSC 435 Advanced Data Communications

4 hours; 4 credits

Concepts of circuit, packet, and message switched networks; local, campus, metropolitan, and wide area networks; concepts of data transmission; the emerging telecommunications industry, private networks, and integrated services digital networks.

Prerequisite: CSC 346

CSC 438 Mobile Application Development

4 hours; 4 credits

The principles of mobile app development. Topics wil include memory management; user interface building; input methods; data handling; GIS, network techniques and URL loading; and, finally, specifics such as GPS and motion sensing. Projects will be deployed in real-world applications. Course work will include project conception, implementation, and pilot testing of mobile phone software applications.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 446 Computer Architecture

(Also ENS 446)

4 hours; 4 credits

Instruction formats and addressing schemes. Arithmetic and logic unit design. Control unit design: hardwired and microprogrammed. Main memory technology. Virtual, high-speed, associative, and read-only memories. Programmable logic arrays. Computer organizations including stack, parallel, and pipeline. System structures: time sharing, multiprocessing, and networking. Digital communications. Input/Output systems; direct memory access.

146 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Prerequisite: CSC 346 or ENS 220 Prerequisites: MTH 311 and CSC 326

CSC 450 Honors Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

Students, with the approval of the department, work in teams on large-scale projects.

Prerequisites: Computer Science major with senior standing and departmental approval

CSC 462 Microcontrollers

(Also ENS 362)

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Introduction to microcontrollers with an overview of the

CPU architecture, instruction set, interface with target board, testing and program development using the structured assembly preprocessor. Interrupts and interrupt timing, analog-to-digital conversion and programming of peripheral chips will be some of the concepts covered in this class.

Prerequisite: ENS 220 or CSC 346

CSC 470 Introductory Computer Graphics

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of interactive computer graphics including the hardware and software components of computer graphics systems and mathematical handling of graphical objects. Algorithms for two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphics: windowing, clipping, and transformations. Viewing with parallel and perspective projections. Possible additional topics include: curves and surface modeling; realistic rendering (shading with illumination and material, shadowing, reflection and surface texturing).

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 475 Image Processing in Computer

Science

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the basic computational techniques and algorithms of digital image/video processing. The student will learn modern approaches to image acquisition, image enhancement, image compression, and image analysis.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

Pre or corequisite: MTH 338

CSC 480 Artificial Intelligence

4 hours; 4 credits

General introduction to artificial intelligence. Heuristic versus algorithmic methods. Purpose of heuristic programming, description of cognitive processes. Objective of work in artificial intelligence. Examples from special purpose programs, general problem solver, theorem proving, deductive question answering systems, learning, pattern recognition.

Prerequisite: CSC 326

CSC 482 Discrete Simulation

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to simulation. Discrete simulation models.

Review of basic probability and statistics. Random number generation. Design of simulation experiments. Analysis of data gathered. Simulation programming and languages. Application of simulation.

CSC 484 Theory of Computation

4 hours; 4 credits

The notion of an algorithm. Primitive recursive and partial recursive functions. Turing machines and other models of computation. Markov algorithms. Church thesis. Godel numberings and unsolvability results. Halting problem.

Post correspondence problem. Recursive and recursively enumerable sets. Concepts from formal language theory.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or above in (CSC 126 or CSC

270) and MTH 339 and (MTH 233 or MTH 236)

CSC 490 Seminar in Computer Science

3 hours; 3 credits

Invited speakers and students will lead discussions on the ethical and societal impact of the computer. Students will write and present papers on current research topics in the computing field.

Prerequisite: Computer Science major with senior standing

CORE 100

Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, Building

1A, Room 312

Dean Nan Sussman

Coordinator, Donna Scimeca, Marchi Building (2N),

Room 218

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, and

Institutions

3 hours; 3 credits

COR 100 is a required general education course that introduces CSI students to contemporary Am erica’s constitutional democracy, multiracial society, and market economy, using the tools of the social sciences. The course seeks historical perspective by examining three formative periods in U.S. history: the American Revolution and debate over the Constitution, the African American freedom struggle from slavery through the civil rights movement, and the evolving relationship between government regulation and the market economy during the

20th century. The course is writing intensive and is intended to develop logical, critical thought and expression.

(FUSR)

Note: This course is required for all degrees to fulfill the

US Experience and its Diversity area of the Flexible Core.

Prerequisite- or corequisite: ENG 111

CUNY Baccalaureate

Campus Coordinator: Suzy Shepardson, Room 101

Established in 1971, the CUNY BA/BS program is a small, University-wide alternate degree program intended for self-directed, academically strong students who have well-formulated academic and career goals.

Students who are admitted to the program work on an individualized area of specialization with guidance from a CUNY faculty member who agrees to serve as a mentor. Students in this alternate degree program must also satisfy a core of general education requirements.

Although students in the program are matriculated at

one CUNY college, they are free to take courses at any of the other CUNY colleges. To be eligible to apply, students must have a clear academic goal and must have completed at least 15 college credits with a grade point average of 2.50 or higher. The CUNY BA and BS degrees are fully accredited and are awarded by The

City University rather than by an individual college. The program operates under the auspices of the CUNY

Graduate School and University Center. Additional information may also

www.cunyba.cuny.edu. be obtained at

Dance

(Minor)

Department of Performing and Creative Arts

Chairperson and Professor George Emilio Sanchez

Coordinator: Associate Professor Charles Thomas,

Center for the Arts (1P), Room 224

The minor in Dance is available to students in all baccalaureate programs. In conjunction with a major in

Psychology, this minor prepares students for graduate work in dance therapy.

Requirements: 18 credits

Required courses:

DAN 101 Contemporary Dance

Technique I

DAN 111 Choreography I

DAN 184 Afro-Haitian Rhythms I

2 credits

3 credits

2 credits

Eleven credits to be selected from the following courses:

3 credits

DAN 150 Dance History:

Twentieth-Century

DAN 171 Improvisation I

DAN 172 Improvisation II

3 credits

2 credits

2 credits

DAN 231 Ballet I

DAN 232 Ballet II

DAN 261 Modern Jazz Dance I

DAN 262 Modern Jazz Dance II

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

DAN 331 Private Study in Dance 2 credits

It is recommended that DAN 160 Modern Dance Technique I or DAN 180 International Folk Dancing be taken as electives; these courses cannot be taken for credit toward the minor. A medical examination form must be on file in the College Health Center (Campus Center) prior to registration for DAN 160 and DAN 180.

Dance Courses

DAN 101 Contemporary Dance Technique I

3 hours; 2 credits

The progressive stages in the development of a technical vocabulary and movement patterns into the art form and expression of modern dance. Each stage develops naturally from the preceding one, contributing to the total advancement of the dance. For beginning students.

DAN 102 Contemporary Dance Technique II

3 hours; 2 credits

The progressive stages in the development of a technical vocabulary and movement patterns into the art form and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 147 expression of modern dance. Each stage develops naturally from the preceding one, contributing to the total advancement of the dance. For beginning students.

Prerequisite for DAN 102: DAN 101

DAN 111 Choreography I

3 hours; 3 credits

I: Elements of Composition; II: Dance Composition. The art of the dance as a creative expression that offers students the opportunity to explore the traditional and experimental approach to choreography through interaction of time, space, and energy. It commands a critical judgment of one’s own creative experience and expression.

For beginning students.

DAN 112 Choreography II

3 hours; 3 credits

I: Elements of Composition; II: Dance Composition. The art of the dance as a creative expression that offers students the opportunity to explore the traditional and experimental approach to choreography through interaction of time, space, and energy. It commands a critical judgment of one’s own creative experience and expression.

For beginning students.

Prerequisite for DAN 112: DAN 111

DAN 122 Black Dance Workshop

(Also AFA 122)

4 hours; 3 credits

Based on traditions of the peoples of Africa and the Caribbean, this course develops the technical language of

Black dance, emphasizing the cultural interaction of native tradition and Western influence; the retelling of legends and tales through dance rhythms and symbolism.

DAN 150 Dance History: Twentieth-Century

Survey

(Also AMS 150)

4 hours; 3 credits

Concentrating on the

“pioneers of modern dance

”–Duncan, Denishawn, Graham, Humphrey,

Weidman, and others

–as well as on the experimental and avant-garde, using lectures, demonstrations, video, and film to illustrate examples of outstanding choreography.

The course includes the dances of other countries, coordinated with professional concerts and student reports.

Includes

“Happenings in Today’s World of Dance.” No dance background required. (arts & com.) (COPR)(TALA)

DAN 160 Modern Dance Technique I

2 hours; 1 credit

Technical movement skills used in dance to further the appreciation of dance as an art form and experiment with dance movement for the beginning student. Professional dance films will be shown. Open to all students.

DAN 171 Improvisation I

3 hours; 2 credits

Experimenting with movement exploration to help develop sensitivity and creative response through free move-

148 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions ment patterns. Simple props sometimes used in improvising.

DAN 172 Improvisation II

3 hours; 2 credits

Experimenting with movement exploration to help develop sensitivity and creative response through free movement patterns. Simple props sometimes used in improvising.

Prerequisite for DAN 172: DAN 171

DAN 180 International Folk Dance

2 hours; 1 credit

Group dancing for both style and pleasure geared to the national characteristics and traditional folk dances from the British Isles, Russia, Germany, Greece, Israel, and the Scandinavian countries.

DAN 184 Afro-Haitian Rhythms I

3 hours; 2 credits

The history, theory, and practice of dance as performed in Haiti and other parts of the Caribbean. This course will introduce the student to the historical and anthropological sources of Afro-Haitian dance, as well as to its choreometrics.

DAN 185 Afro-Haitian Rhythms II

3 hours; 2 credits

The history, theory, and practice of dance as performed in Haiti and other parts of the Caribbean. This course will introduce the student to the historical and anthropological sources of Afro-Haitian dance, as well as to its choreometrics.

Prerequisite for DAN 185: DAN 184

DAN 201 Contemporary Dance Techniques III

3 hours; 2 credits

The progressive stages in the development of a technical vocabulary and movement patterns translated into the art form and expression of modern dance, each stage developing naturally from the preceding one, contributing to the total advancement of the dance. For intermediate students.

Prerequisite: DAN 102

DAN 202 Contemporary Dance Techniques IV

3 hours; 2 credits

The progressive stages in the development of a technical vocabulary and movement patterns translated into the art form and expression of modern dance, each stage developing naturally from the preceding one, contributing to the total advancement of the dance. For intermediate students.

Prerequisite: DAN 201

DAN 211 Choreography III

3 hours; 3 credits

Elements of composition. The art of the dance as a creative expression that offers students the opportunity to explore the traditional and experimental approach to choreography through interaction of time, space, and energy. It commands a critical judgment of one's own creative experience and expression. For intermediate students only.

Prerequisite: DAN 112

DAN 212 Choreography IV

3 hours; 3 credits

Elements of composition. The art of the dance as a creative expression that offers students the opportunity to explore the traditional and experimental approach to choreography through interaction of time, space, and energy. It commands a critical judgment of one's own creative experience and expression. For intermediate students only.

Prerequisite: DAN 111

DAN 231 Fundamentals of Ballet I

3 hours; 2 credits

Using the five fundamental positions of feet and legs, and the associated positions of the arms, a vocabulary of classical ballet is developed and combined into longer dance phrases. Emphasis is placed on fluidity of movement for mastery of expression.

DAN 232 Fundamentals of Ballet II

3 hours; 2 credits

Using the five fundamental positions of feet and legs, and the associated positions of the arms, a vocabulary of classical ballet is developed and combined into longer dance phrases. Emphasis is placed on fluidity of movement for mastery of expression.

DAN 261 Modern Jazz Dance I

3 hours; 2 credits

The course includes basic technique and style of dance used with rhythmic improvisation in contemporary American jazz dance.

DAN 262 Modern Jazz Dance II

3 hours; 2 credits

The course includes basic technique and style of dance used with rhythmic improvisation in contemporary American jazz dance.

Prerequisite: DAN 261

DAN 331, 332, 333, 334 Private Study in Dance

I, II, III, IV

2 credits each

Students interested in the development of style and technical skills necessary for performance may earn credit through study under an approved teacher in repertory class. Evaluation of the work will include performances in dance workshops and concerts. Registration is by permission of a full-time member of the dance faculty.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Disability Studies

(Minor)

Interdisciplinary Program

Director: Associate Professor Lacey Sloan, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work;

Building 1L, Room 204A

The minor in Disability Studies is an interdisciplinary course of study in which students select from a variety of courses concerned with matters of interest to persons with disabilities. The student is required to take a core set of courses in the social and psychological sciences supplemented by a choice from a list of disability-related courses. The minor may be taken in combination with any baccalaureate degree.

Requirements: 15-16 credits

SWK 107 Introduction to Developmental

Disabilities

3 credits

PSY 211 Methods of Applied

Behavioral Analysis

OR

PSY 215 Psychological Perspectives on Disabilities

4 credits

4 credits

SOC 350 Psychosocial Aspects of

Disabilities 4 credits

One additional course chosen from the following:

ASL 113 American Sign Language I 4 credits

CSC 215 Assistive Technology for

Universal Applications 4 credits

EDP 220 Special Education Needs of the Developmentally Disabled 4 credits

EDP 310 Survey of Exceptional

Children I 4 credits

EDP 311 Survey of Exceptional

Children II

NRS 230 Health in Persons with

Developmental Disabilities

4 credits

4 credits

PSY 464 Applied Behavior Analysis

SWK 440 Internship in Developmental

Disabilities

4 credits

4 credits

Dramatic Arts

(Bachelor of Science, Minor)

Department of Performing and Creative Arts

Chairperson and Associate Professor George Emilio

Sanchez

Drama Program Coordinator: Dr. Maurya Wickstrom,

Center for the Arts (1P), Room 203

This is a liberal arts Drama major. Students will acquire an inter-disciplinary education while simultaneously developing competence in the history, literature, theory, and practice of theater, performance studies, and performance art. The program is especially designed to introduce students not only to traditional acting but to a broad range of performance practices and their many social and professional applications. These include the development of skills in collaboration, creativity, and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 149 self-presentation that are valuable in any profession.

Students will have the opportunity to participate in faculty and student productions and, with faculty approval, to initiate their own performance/theater projects.

All courses will include both artistic and academic work.

All courses require attendance at theater and performance events in Manhattan and Brooklyn. All prospective Drama majors should request an academic advisor from the Drama faculty, and should expect to work with this advisor to maintain a record of academic excellence.

Dramatic Arts (BS)

Pre-Major Requirement: 4 Credits

DRA 110 Acting I 4 credits

Major Requirements: 44-48 credits

DRA 140 Theater Studies 4 credits

DRA 141 Theater Production 3 credits

DRA 142 Theater Production Lab I 1 credit

DRA 210 Acting II

DRA 221 Topics on Productions

4 credits

4 credits

Two courses chosen from the following: 8 credits

DRA 272 Performance Histories

(Ancient to Early Modern) 4 credits

DRA 273 Performance Histories

(1600-1900)

DRA 274 Performance Histories

(1901- Present)

Three courses chosen from the following:

DRA 315 Theater and Education

4 credits

4 credits

12 credits

4 credits

DRA 375 New Performance 4 credits

DRA 350 Theater for Social Action 4 credits

DRA 352 Theater and Therapy 4 credits

DRA 373 The Theatrical Imagination 4 credits

4 credits DRA 380 Women in Performance

One course chosen from the following:

DRA

217

DRA

331

Voice and Diction for

Performance and

Communication

Design for the Theater

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

DRA

321

Directing

One course chosen from the following:

DRA /

ENL

355

DRA/

Modern European Drama

ENL

361

DRA/

The Early Shakespeare

ENL

362

The Later Shakespeare

Foreign Language Requirement:

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

0-4 credits

150 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Demonstration of proficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

Electives: 20-26 Credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Honors

To graduate with honors in Dramatic Arts a student must have a 3.5 grade point average and must earn an

A on a junior or senior project.

Dramatic Arts Minor

Pre-minor requirements: 4 credits

DRA 110 Acting

Minor Requirements: 15 credits

At least 15 credits chosen from the following:

DRA 140 Theater Studies

DRA 141 Theater Production

DRA 142 Theater Production Lab I

4 credits

3 credits

1 credit

4 credits

4 credits

DRA 210 Acting II

DRA 217 Voice and Diction for

Performance and

Communication

DRA 221 Topics on Production

DRA 272 Performance Histories

(Ancient to Early Modern)

DRA 273 Performance Histories

(1600-1900)

DRA 274 Performance Histories

(1901-Present)

DRA 321 Directing

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

DRA 331

DRA 350

DRA 352

DRA 373

DRA 375

Design for the Theater

Theater for Social Action

Theater and Therapy

The Theatrical Imagination

New Performance

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits and one additional ENL course from the Drama BS Major Requirements.

Dramatics Arts Courses

DRA 100 Introduction to Theater

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to theater as an art form that brings together performance, text, directing, and design, as well as aspects of the culture in which it is created. Students can expect to engage in theater exercises to learn about performance, to read plays, to do small design projects, and to see at least one professional theater production. There may be a modest expense for tickets. (arts & com.)

(COPR) (TALA)

DRA 110 Acting I

4 hours; 4 credits

An introductory class in acting built on exercises that may include those that develop the physicality, discipline, dramatic imagination, connection to character, and improvisatory skills of the actor. Students may also study beats and units of action, character development, and scene study.

DRA 140 Theater Studies

4 hours, 4 credits

An initial overview of the leading texts, performance styles, and visual aesthetics of theater. The class will include performance work, key dramatic texts and their cultural contexts and production histories, an introduction to dramaturgy, and a focus on learning to write about plays and performance. Students must receive a B or better in this class to proceed with a Drama major.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

DRA 141 Theater Production

3 hours, 3 credits

Introduction to theory of stage design and technical theater through an exploration of types of theaters, different styles of scenery, costume and lighting design, textual analysis from a design point of view, sound effects and sound design, set construction drafting, white models, color wheel, sewing, and fabric swatches.

Corequisite: DRA 142

DRA 142 Theater Production Lab

2 hours, 1 credits

The practical application of design and technical skills to a specific production. Students will work on faculty or student productions, under the supervision of the instructor of Theater Production, and/or other production designers. May be repeated for credit.

Pre- or corequisites: Drama 141 and approval of either the instructor or the Performing and Creative Arts Department

DRA 202 African American Drama

(Also AFA 202)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the emergence of Black theater in the United

States, including the Harlem Renaissance, the radical theater of the 1960s and 1970s, and the work of contemporary Black playwrights and directors.

DRA 205 African American Musical Theater

(Also AFA 205)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the musical theater of African Americans from its early beginnings in African culture to genius manifested in the 19th century, its influence on early vaudeville, its unique contribution to American musical theater, and the present-day popularity of its style. Whenever possible, current productions will be attended and studied in detail.

DRA 210 Acting II

4 hours; 4 credits

This class will develop and deepen work begun in Acting

I. At th e instructor’s discretion, students may be introduced to various acting and performance methods. Students will have the opportunity to perform before an audience.

Prerequisite: DRA 110

DRA 215 Introduction to Drama

(Also ENH 212)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the variety of forms and themes of dramatic literature. Major problems treated by dramatists

will be examined, as well as genres: tragedy, comedy, farce, melodrama, tragicomedy, and the thesis play. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG 151

DRA 217 Voice and Diction for Performance and Communication

4 hours; 4 credits

Concentration on pronunciation, enunciation, accent reduction, diaphragmatic breathing, relaxation techniques, and body alignment. Especially good for anyone considering a career in the public arena, including politics, management, theater, education, and communications.

(Can be repeated for credit.)

DRA 221 Topics on Production

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the interdisciplinary issues that intersect with the play currently being directed by a member of the theater faculty. Students may also study alternative or updated versions of the play, and experiment with related performance genres. Plays will be chosen specifically for the richness of their historical and cultural scope. The instructor for this course and the director of the play, if they are not the same person, will work together on materials for this course. All students taking this course will be involved in some way in the production itself: as actors, assistant designers, carpenters, lighting technicians, or technical crew.

Prerequisite: DRA 140

DRA 235 Introduction to Stage Management

4 hours; 3 credits

Principles and practices of contemporary stage management. Interprets the function of the stage manager in the entire production process. Identifies the relationship of the stage manager to the director, designers, technical director, actors, stage hands, and costume and properties managers. Specifies responsibilities and practices.

Prerequisite: ENG 111

DRA 271 Performance II

4 hours; 3 credits

Performance of a play. Students will be involved in various aspects of theatrical presentation.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

DRA 272 Performance Histories (Ancient to

Early Modern)

4 hours, 4 credits

Survey of historical performance forms from Egyptian,

Sanskrit, and Greek, through the European Medieval theater, Asian theater through 1600, the European Renaissance, and the Spanish Golden Age. Performance will be considered in this class as an integral and vital part of social, political, and cultural dynamics. This survey will put the Western theater tradition in perspective as only one of many traditions that exist, or have existed, across the world at different times. Students who wish to continue in the major should earn a B- or better in the course. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 151 or DRA 140

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 151

DRA 273 Performance Histories (1600-1900)

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the English Restoration, French

Neo-Classicism and the comedies of Molière, and the ensuing century of diverse theatrical forms during the

1700s in England and France. Students will also study

Asian and African forms of performance and then the emergence of theater in the U.S., including populist entertainments like the Wild West show, minstrelsy, and melodrama, and move back to Europe for the beginnings of realism and naturalism with Ibsen and Chekhov. Performance will be considered in this class as an integral and vital part of social, political, and cultural dynamics.

Students who wish to continue in the major should earn a

B- or better in the course. (arts & com.) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 151 or DRA 140

DRA 274 Performance Histories (1901-Present)

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the range of 20th-century performance beginning with the historical avant-garde movements in Europe and the U.S. after World War I. It also includes

South Asian Indian, Asian, and/or South Asian performance forms, especially including cross- or intercultural experimentation. It may include the Harlem Renaissance, feminist theater, the experimental theater of the 1960s and 1970s, Latino theater, Gay theater, political street theater, performance art, image theater, and puppetry.

Performance will be considered in this class as an integral and vital part of social, political, and cultural dynamics. Students who wish to continue in the major should earn a B- or better in the course. (arts & com.) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 151 or DRA 140

DRA 310 Acting III

4 hours; 3 credits

Work on scenes, encouraging the actor to explore a variety of characters and to perform them before an audience.

Prerequisite: DRA 210

DRA 314 Media Workshop for Actors/Directors

(Also COM 314)

An examination of the actor/director relationship as it applies in the various media: stage, film, and television.

Students will have an opportunity to work both as actors and directors. New work from writing classes will be encouraged for student projects.

Prerequisite: COM 210

DRA 315 Theater and Education

4 hours; 4 credits

A theoretical and experiential approach to the ways that theater can be used as a tool by elementary and secondary school teachers. Students will study excerpts of key texts and learn theatrical games and exercises for application in the classroom.

Prerequisite: Any 200-level ENH course

DRA 321 Directing

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the complex art of directing. Students will begin by considering the question of what it is that a

152 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions director does, and developing a range of basic skills and theatrical languages. By the end of the class, students will have the opportunity to direct a scene. Students are required to act in the scenes and exercises directed by other students.

Prerequisites: DRA 110, DRA 373

DRA 331 Design for the Theater

4 hours; 4 credits

An overview of design practices in theater history with a combined emphasis on developing student skills in conceptualizing a design and preparing materials to present that design.

Prerequisites: DRA 141, DRA 142, DRA 373

DRA 345 Spanish Theater

(Also SPN 345)

4 hours; 4 credits

Discussion of ideas, background, and staging traditions of representative Spanish-language plays from the

Golden Age to the present. The course is taught in English. Readings and assignments in Spanish required for majors; readings and assignments may be done in English for non-majors. (literature) (COPR (TALA)

Prerequisite: SPN 313 or equivalent for those doing readings and assignments in Spanish; ENG 151 or a

200-level English course for those doing readings and assignments in English

DRA 350 Theater for Social Action

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the history and practice of community-based theater. Theater groups like the San Francisco Mime

Troupe, El Teatro Campesino, At the Foot of the Mountain, and The Heart of the Beast, will be studied as examples of how the significance of theater as an art form can be expanded through a commitment to social justice and aesthetic diversity.

Prerequisites: DRA 110; DRA 272 or DRA 273 or DRA

274

DRA 352 Theater and Therapy

4 hours; 4 credits

An overview of how theater and theater techniques can be applied for therapeutic needs and as an alternative to violence. Through exercises, students will be encouraged to experience their physicality, develop their ability to express their emotions, and to nurture individual insight and awareness of themselves and others. The work of Augusto Boal will form the foundation for the course.

Prerequisite: DRA 110, or any 200-level ENH course

DRA 354 English Drama to 1800

(Also ENL 354)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected works with emphasis on Elizabethan and Jacobean drama (exclusive of Shakespeare), and Restoration and 18th-century drama.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 355 Modern European Drama

(Also ENL 355)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the major dramatists of the modern European theater, with an emphasis placed upon the development of dramatic styles and themes, as well as the theatrical context in which the plays were produced.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 356 American Drama

(Also ENL 356)

4 hours; 4 credits

Readings of plays by O’Neill, Williams, Miller, and others who have dramatized the conflicts and predicaments of

20th-century Americans.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 357 World Drama to 1800

(Also ENL 357)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected plays from the Greeks to 1800.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 358 World Drama since 1800

(Also ENL 358)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected plays from 1800 to the present.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 359 Contemporary Drama

(Also ENL 359)

4 hours; 4 credits

Major figures, works, and movements in dramatic literature since World War II, with special emphasis on the last two decades.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 361 The Early Shakespeare

(Also ENL 361)

4 hours; 4 credits

A selection of Shakespeare’s work written before 1600: early and middle comedies, the major histories, the earlier tragedies, and the poems.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 362 The Later Shakespeare

(Also ENL 362)

4 hours; 4 credits

A selection of Shakespeare’s work written after 1600: the major tragedies, the problem plays, the late comedies and romances.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

DRA 373 The Theatrical Imagination

4 hours; 4 credits

Investigation of theater as a uniquely visual medium that is dependent on the imaginative use of bodies in sculpted space. Students will work to extend the use of their own bodies and experiment with diverse materials to learn to create imaginative stage images. They will also study the work of artists, sculptors, and theater artists who work in striking configurations of space, material elements, and bodies. The course is useful to all students of theater, whether they are interested in acting, directing, or design.

Prerequisites: DRA 140; DRA 272 or DRA 273 or DRA

274

DRA 375 New Performance

4 hours; 4 credits

A consideration of artists who work in performance art, solo performance, puppetry, performance-choreography, and performance-technology. Students will create their own works in one or more of these genres. Each student will be expected to write original performance texts. Students are welcome to work with video, film, and or

Web-based technology in this class.

Prerequisites: DRA 110, DRA 373

DRA 380 Women in Performance

(Also WGS 380)

4 hours; 4 credits

This class is a study of performing women, in particular women performance artists, who have made a significant difference in helping women’s images and voices to achieve greater representation in culture as a whole.

Students will study works by the artists, reviews and critical writing about the works, and create their own performances.

Prerequisite: Any 200-level ENH or WGS course

DRA 410 Acting IV

4 hours; 3 credits

Work on more complex scenes leading to their performance before an audience.

Prerequisite: DRA 310

DRA 426 Classical French Drama

(Also FRN 426)

4 hours; 4 credits

Plays of Corneille, Racine, Molière, with special emphasis on the continuing role of Molière in the world’s theater.

(literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent for those doing readings and assignments in French; ENG 151 for those doing readings and assignments in English

Prerequisites: At least two 300-level courses in dramatic literature or English

DRA 465 Spanish Theater in the 20th Century

(Also SPN 465)

4 hours; 4 credits

Principal tendencies in Spanish theater in the 20th century. Including an analysis of the major works of dramatists such as Benavente, Valle-Inclán, García Lorca, Mihura, Buero Vallejo, Alfonso Sastre, Carlos Muniz, Lauro

Olmo, Arrabal, Antonio Gala, and others. (literature)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: SPN 313 or equivalent

Dramatic arts students should also consider:

ENL 272 Playwriting I, ENL 373 Playwriting II, and ENL

435

Playwright’s Workshop.

DRA 470 Junior Project

4 hours; 4 credits

Student-initiated work that extends and develops his or her area of interest. Proposed to and supervised by a faculty member, a student might wish to develop an acting scene or monologue, direct a scene or one-act, design a puppetry piece or performance installation, do a

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 153 theater-based video piece, design a one-act, do an independent academic research project, or stage manage a production. The project is undertaken by an individual student, but that student may ask other students to participate in his or her project. Sophomores may be granted permission by a faculty member to do stage management and get credit for the Junior Project.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

DRA 490 Senior Project

4 hours; 4 credits

Same as the Junior Project but faculty members may agree to supervise more advanced work than when students are juniors.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Economics

(Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Business Specialization, Finance Specialization, Minor)

School of Business, Building 3N, Room 235

Interim Founding Dean, Susan Holak, BS, MPhil, PhD

Department Chairperson and Associate Professor Vasilios Petratos

The Economics program serves several different student needs. It provides a major in Economics for students interested in the study of the subject at the bachelor’s degree level or in preparation for graduate study of economics. A Business specialization and a Finance specialization are available for those interested in pursuing the bachelor of science degree in Economics.

The bachelor of arts degree requires that ¾ of the credits towards the degree be liberal arts and science courses. The bachelor of science degree requires that

½ of the credits towards the degree be liberal arts and science courses. For additional information please refer to Liberal Arts and Science Requirement section of the catalog.

Economics (BA)

Major Requirements: 44-48 credits

ECO 111

Introduction to Microeconomics 4 credits

ECO 112

Introduction to Macroeconomics 4 credits

ECO 210

Intermediate Microeconomics 4 credits

ECO 212

Intermediate Macroeconomics 4 credits

ECO/MGT

230

Introduction to Economic and

Managerial Statistics

ECO 323

Introduction to Econometrics

At least three additional ECO courses at the

300 or 400 level

4 credits

4 credits

12 credits

At least two additional ECO courses at the

200, 300, or 400 level 8 credits

Computer Proficiency Requirement: 0-4 credits

In addition, Economics majors must demonstrate computer proficiency in one of the following ways:

Successful completion of any course in computer science

Successful completion of BUS 150 Essential Software Tools for Business

154 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Demonstration of proficiency with computers in a manner satisfactory to the Economics faculty

(CSC 108, 112, 114, 116, 118, special focus, abbreviated courses, do not meet this requirement.)

Electives: 30-34 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement:

The New York State Department of Education requires that ¾ of the credit hours in a Bachelor of Arts (BA) program be liberal arts and sciences credits. For further information please refer to the Liberal Arts and Science

Requirement section of the catalog.

Honors

To graduate with honors in Economics a student must have a 3.5 grade point average in economics courses and must complete a thesis or project determined by the student and his or her faculty sponsor, and the course

POL/ECO/PHL 490 Senior Seminar in Political Science,

Economics, and Philosophy.

Economics (BS)

Within the major in Economics, the College offers two specializations, Business and Finance, combining the major in Economics with the study of selected courses in business. The program is administered jointly by the

Department of Political Science, Economics, and Philosophy and the Department of Business. The specialization adds courses useful to students who plan to pursue careers in business or finance and/or continue their education.

Economics BS

Major Requirements: 44-48 credits

ECO 111

Introduction to Microeconomics 4 credits

ECO 112

Introduction to Macroeconomics 4 credits

ECO 210

Intermediate Microeconomics 4 credits

ECO 212

Intermediate Macroeconomics 4 credits

ECO/MGT

230

Introduction to Economic and

Managerial Statistics

ECO 323

Introduction to Econometrics

At least three additional ECO courses at the

300 or 400 level

4 credits

12 credits

At least two additional ECO courses at the

200, 300, or 400 level 8 credits

Computer Proficiency Requirement: 0-4 credits

In addition, Economics majors must demonstrate computer proficiency in one of the following ways:

Successful completion of any course in computer science

Successful completion of BUS 150 Essential Software Tools for Business

Demonstration of proficiency with computers in a manner satisfactory to the Economics faculty

(CSC 108, 112, 114, 116, 118, special focus, abbreviated courses, do not meet this requirement.)

Electives: 30-34 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Economics BS: Business Specialization

Major Requirements: 53-57 credits

ECO 111 Introduction to Microeconomics 4 credits

ECO 112

ECO 210

Introduction to Macroeconomics 4 credits

Intermediate Microeconomics 4 credits

ECO 212

ECO/MGT

230

Intermediate Macroeconomics 4 credits

Introduction to Economic and

Managerial Statistics 4 credits

4 credits ECO 323 Introduction to Econometrics

At least two additional ECO courses at the

300 or 400 level 8 credits

At least one additional ECO courses at the

200, 300, or 400 level 8 credits

Computer Proficiency Requirement: 0-4 credits

In addition, Economics majors must demonstrate computer proficiency in one of the following ways:

Successful completion of any course in computer science

Successful completion of BUS 150 Essential Software Tools for Business

Demonstration of proficiency with computers in a manner satisfactory to the Economics faculty

(CSC 108, 112, 114, 116, 118, special focus, abbreviated courses, do not meet this requirement.)

Business Specialization: 17 credits

ACC 114 Accounting I

ACC 121

MGT 110

MKT 111

Accounting II

Organizational Theory and

Management

Marketing

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

ECO /FNC

240*

Managerial Finance I

3 credits

*This course cannot be used to fulfill the additional

200-level economics course major requirement.

Economics BS: Finance Specialization

Major Requirements: 55-59 credits

ECO 111 Introduction to

ECO 112

Microeconomics

Introduction to

ECO 210

ECO 212

4 credits

Macroeconomics 4 credits

Intermediate Microeconomics 4 credits

Intermediate

Macroeconomics 4 credits

ECO/MGT

230

ECO 323

ECO/FNC

214

Introduction to Economic and

Managerial Statistics 4 credits

Introduction to Econometrics 4 credits

Money and Banking

4 credits

Computer Proficiency Requirement: 0-4 credits

In addition, Economics majors must demonstrate computer proficiency in one of the following ways:

Successful completion of any course in computer science

Successful completion of BUS 150 Essential Software Tools for Business

Demonstration of proficiency with computers in a manner satisfactory to the Economics faculty

(CSC 108, 112, 114, 116, 118, special focus, abbreviated courses, do not meet this requirement.)

Finance Specialization: 27 credits

Part I: 8 credits

8 Credits in 300-level economics courses chosen from the following 5 courses:

ECO/FNC 315 Monetary Theory and Policy

ECO 336 Industrial Organization

ECO/FNC 360 Investment Analysis

ECO 370/FNC

300

International Finance

ECO 387 Managerial Economics

Part II: 19 credits

ACC 114 Accounting I

ACC 121 Accounting II

4 credits

4 credits

ECO /FNC

240

Managerial Finance I

3 credits

ECO/FNC 345 Managerial Finance II

FNC 350

4 credits

Advanced Corporate Finance 4 credits

NOTE: ECO/FNC 213 is a recommended elective.

Electives: 19-37 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement:

The New York State Department of Education requires that ½ of the credit hours in a Bachelor of Science (BS) program be liberal arts and sciences credits. For further information please refer to the Liberal Arts and

Science Requirement section of the catalog.

Honors

To graduate with honors in Economics a student must have a 3.5 grade point average in economics courses and must complete a thesis or project determined by the student and his or her faculty sponsor, and the course

POL/ECO/PHL 490 Senior Seminar in Political Science,

Economics, and Philosophy.

Minor in Economics

Minor Requirements: 24 credits

ECO 111

ECO 112

ECO 210

ECO 212

Introduction to

Microeconomics 4 credits

Introduction to

Macroeconomics 4 credits

Intermediate Microeconomics 4 credits

Intermediate Macroeconomics 4 credits

ECO

230/MGT 230

Introduction to Economic and

Managerial Statistics

One 300-or 400-level course in economics

4 credits

4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 155

Economics Courses

ECO 101 Introduction to Economics

3 hours; 3 credits

This course examines the principles of economics in the context of the operation of the United States economy.

Both microeconomic theory (behavior of firms and households) and macroeconomic theory (total output, inflation, employment and unemployment, economic growth) will be introduced as will economic approaches to social problems. (social science) (FISR) (COPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

ECO 111 Introduction to Microeconomics

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to microeconomic concepts and analysis.

Topics include: theory of the consumer, theory of the firm, choice under uncertainty, inter-temporal decisions, perfect competition, monopoly and monopsony, monopolistic competition, oligopoly and game theory, markets with imperfect information, and externalities and public goods.

Application of analytical tools to current economic problems.

Pre or corequisite: MTH 030 or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

ECO 112 Introduction to Macroeconomics

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to basic macroeconomic concepts such as national income accounting, levels of output and employment, government spending, taxation, debt, money supply, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and trade balance. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different fiscal and monetary policies on the aggregate behavior of individuals, firms and government. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the

United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance.

Pre or corequisite: MTH 030 or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

ECO 210 Intermediate Microeconomics

4 hours; 4 credits

A rigorous examination of the optimizing behavior of individual consumers and firms, the coordination of individual decisions through markets, and the evaluation of market outcomes. Emphasis is placed on deviations from perfect competition due to market power, strategic interdependence, externalities, asymmetric information, imperfect rationality, and on applications of microeconomic theory to policy debates.

Prerequisites: ECO 111 and MTH 121 or MTH 123

ECO 212 Intermediate Macroeconomics

4 hours; 4 credits

Aggregate economic analysis from the classical and the modern post-Keynesian point of view. The major objective is an understanding of the factors that determine the levels of national income, output, employment, overall prices, and rates of economic growth. The roles of consumption, investment, and alternative governmental poli-

156 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions cies are demonstrated. Measurement of national income and output is also studied.

Prerequisites: ECO 112 and (MTH 121 or MTH 123 )

ECO 213 Money and Capital Markets

(Also FNC 213)

4 hours; 4 credits

The course examines financial markets from the standpoint of investors and users. Markets studied are those for money market instruments, T-bill futures, Ginnie Mae futures, T-bond futures, stocks, stock options, bonds, mortgages, and Eurocurrencies. Federal Reserve operations, U.S. Treasury operations, and international financing are considered with regard to their effects on financial markets.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and the CUNY Assesment Test in

Writing or equivalent and ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO

112

ECO 214 Money and Banking

(Also FNC 214)

4 hours; 4 credits

An analytical, institutional, and historical examination of the monetary system of the United States with particular attention paid to the operation of commercial banks, and to the powers, purposes, and performance of the Federal

Reserve System. The influence of the quantity of money on the level of economic activity will be considered.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and the CUNY Assessment

Test in Writing and ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO 112

ECO 230 Introduction to Economic and

Managerial Statistics

(Also MGT 230)

4 hours; 4 credits

Development and application of modern statistical methods, including such elements of descriptive statistics and statistical inference as correlation and regression analysis, probability theory, sampling procedures, normal distribution and binomial distribution, estimation, and testing of hypotheses.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CUNY Assessment Test in Writing and the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, and (ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112) and

(MTH 121 or MTH 123 or higher ) and (BUS 150 or BUS

250 or CSC 102 or CSC 126)

ECO 231 Quantitative Analysis of Business and Economic Problems

(Also BUS 230)

3 hours; 3 credits

The application of mathematical techniques to business and economic problems. An introduction to operations research, linear programming, PERT, and related materials.

Prerequisites: MGT 110 and MGT 230

ECO 240 Managerial Finance I

(Also FNC 240)

3 hours; 3 credits

Examination of securities markets, analysis of methods of long-term financing, financial ratio analysis, budgeting, current asset management, present value concepts, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and dividend policy.

Prerequisite: ECO 101or ECO 111 and ECO 112

Pre- or corequisites: ACC 121 and MTH 121 or higher

ECO 250 International Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the effects and causes of trade between nations. Tariffs and non-tariff barriers to free trade will be analyzed, as will the effect of common markets on international trade. Historical patterns of international trade, and the theory and evidences of imperialism will be considered. The course will include an introduction to the financial aspects of international trade. (social science)

(COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO 112, ENG

151, COR 100 june 2013 cur prereq change

ECO 251 International Political Economy

(Also POL 251)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines the relationships among nation states, corporations, and key international trade and financial organizations in today’s global environment. It also examines how globalization and world politics affect distribution of economic wealth and, in turn, how economic growth/changes affect world politics and the global order. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.) (p&d)

Prerequisites: At least one political science or economics course, ENG 151, COR 100

ECO 252 Economic Geography

(Also GEG 252)

4 hours; 4 credits

Examination of how geographic factors influencing economic activity, and culture, technology, resources, location, and labor intersect to produce different economic environments, and how globalization and local conditions interact. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, COR 100

ECO 253 United States Economic History

(Also HST 253)

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the development of the U.S. economy and the factors influencing the pace of long-run economic growth. Key changes in technology, business organization, financial markets, and legal and government policy that have influenced the course of U.S. economic development are examined. For history majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100 and (ECO 101 or

ECO 111 or ECO 112) any college-level history course.

ECO 256 Analysis of Underdeveloped Areas

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of economic problems confronting underdeveloped countries and the exploration of possible solutions. Historical perspectives of economic development and general theories of retardation followed by specific policy issues facing economic planners. Problem areas to be discussed include social capital, agriculture, industry, manpower utilization, fiscal policy, foreign aid,

and the interaction of political, social, and cultural factors as they affect economic development. (social science)

(COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ECO 101, or ECO 111 and ECO 112, ENG

111, COR 100

ECO 257 The Japanese Economy

4 hours; 4 credits

This course explores factors that influence the contemporary economy of Japan: historical components, including the Meiji Restoration and the expansion of the Japanese empire, World War II and the post-war Allied occupation, more recent components, principles of Japanese business, management style, government-business relations, education, labor relations, trade restrictions and agreements, and influence on the U.S. economy, and

Japanese goals. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 and

ECO 112, ENG 111, COR 100

ECO 261 Labor Relations

(Also MGT 261)

4 hours; 4 credits

History, theories, structure, and objectives of trade unionism. Grievance procedures, collective bargaining, union power, strikes and other weapons, mediation and arbitration. Government regulation of the labor sector.

Students will participate in the re-enactment of actual arbitration cases.

ECO 376 The Nonprofit Institution

4 hours; 4 credits

The finances, management, and decision making of such nonprofit institutions as the university, school systems, governmental departments, hospitals, and foundations.

The effects of the nonprofit institution upon society.

Evaluation of the achievements of nonprofit institutions.

Prerequisite: ECO 101 or ECO 111 and ECO 112

ECO 285 Economics for Engineers

4 hours; 4 credits

An accelerated calculus-based course. Introduction to contemporary macroeconomic and microeconomic theory. Topics include output, unemployment, inflation, functioning of markets, government policy, and productivity.

The course concludes with engineering applications. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100; MTH 230 or MTH 231 or MTH 235, CSC 126 or CSC 270 or other evidence of equivalent proficiency with computers

ECO 291 Political Economy of War and Peace

(Also POL 268)

4 hours; 4 credits

An interdisciplinary introduction to political and economic decision making as it concerns national defense spending, focusing on such issues as the

“military-industrial complex,

” the draft, a volunteer army, the question of national priorities, the impact of war and peace on such economic problems as inflation, recession, employment, growth, and the federal budget.

Prerequisite: ENG 111

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 157

ECO 296 History of American Business

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of business in American life; theories of business evolution; the role of business in shaping

American social institutions and values; the effect of the

American social, political, and economic environment upon business thought and practice.

Prerequisite: ENG 111

ECO 315 Monetary Theory and Policy

(Also FNC 315)

4 hours; 4 credits

Theoretical and applied problems of monetary policy.

Emphasis is placed on contemporary developments.

Current controversies concerning the use of monetary policy, relationship to fiscal policy, and impact on economic activity.

Prerequisites: ECO 212 and either ECO/FNC 213 or

ECO/FNC 214

ECO 318 Economic and Business Forecasting

4 hours; 4 credits

Forecasting the nation’s economy and economic trends over the short term and the longer term. Also forecasts of business trends and sales of individual businesses will be considered within the economic framework.

Prerequisites: ECO 111, ECO 112, ECO/MGT 230

ECO 323 Introduction to Econometrics

(Also MGT 324)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will examine the relationship between economic theory and statistical measurement. It will deal mainly with the general linear regression and correlation model. A selected number of other statistical tools will also be treated. Emphasis will be on the understanding of the concepts rather than on their mathematical derivation.

Prerequisites: ECO 111, ECO 112, ECO/MGT 230

ECO 326 Introduction to Mathematical

Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

The use of mathematical analysis in solving economic problems. Methods of calculus, matrix algebra, deductive logic, and elementary set theory will be developed and employed to understand the equilibrium of the market, firm, and consumer. The uses and misuses of the mathematical method in economics will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: ECO 111, ECO 112, ECO 210, ECO 212 and (MTH 121 or MTH 123 or the equivalent)

ECO 327 Intermediate Mathematical

Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of ECO 326. Differential and difference equations, elementary dynamic models and stability of equilibrium, rigorous development of modern microeconomic and macroeconomic theory using the mathematical approach.

Prerequisite: ECO 326

158 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

ECO 330 Public Finance

4 hours; 4 credits

Analysis of the causes and effects of government expenditure and taxation in the United States economy.

Some treatment of determination of optimal types and amounts of government expenditure on goods and services, but greater emphasis on various types of taxation examined for equity, efficiency, role in fiscal policy, and effect on productive effort. Some attention to standards of income distribution and to inter-governmental fiscal relationships in the United States.

Prerequisite: ECO 210

ECO 331 Law and Economics

(Also POL 331)

4 hours; 4 credits

Fundamental concepts of economics, especially efficiency, will be utilized to explain and evaluate legal rulings.

The tools of economics will be employed to analyze not only tort, contract, and property principles, but also marriage and divorce law, criminal law, and constitutional issues such as abortion, the death penalty, and racial and gender-based discrimination.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112; BUS

160 or any two POL courses

ECO 332 Health Economics

4 hours: 4 credits

The demand and supply of medical care; the dynamics of competition in the health care industry, the role of government in medical care; general understanding of health care institutions, including Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, hospital and physician behavior, and pharmaceutical markets; and healthcare reform.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and ECO 101 or ECO 111 and sophomore standing;

ECO 333 Economics and Philosophy

(Also PHL 333)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will cover topics that overlap in the fields of economics and philosophy. It will enlighten economics majors about the philosophical underpinnings of Economics and introduce Philosophy majors to the more

“thoughtful” aspects of economics. Topics discussed will include: rational choice and ethics; social welfare; justice, efficiency, and equity; social choice; and game theory.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and any introductory-level economics or philosophy course

ECO 335 Behavioral Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

This course surveys the most salient dimensions known to the discipline of Behavioral Economics. It compares the traditional behavioral approaches in economics with those developed in recent times. Students in this course are introduced to various human irrationalities, their prevalence, causes, and economic consequences. Behavioral biases discussed in this class include sunk-cost fallacy, present-biased preferences, status quo bias, self-serving bias, gambler's fallacy, inequity aversion, reciprocity, endowment effect, disposition effect, greed and fear, and herd behavior. The course also encompasses the important implications of the above mentioned biases on several economic facets of social life such as saving and investment for retirement, insurance, education, and race and gender wage discrimination.

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and ECO 210

ECO 336 Industrial Organization

4 hours; 4 credits

The rise and development of industrial combinations and their effect on the structure and performance of the United States economy; models of monopoly and oligopoly pricing; analysis of the power of monopoly and oligopoly in relation to efficient allocation of resources, technological growth, inflation, and political influence; causes and effects of mergers; government policies aimed at the preservation of competition in industrial markets; and regulation of trade practices.

Prerequisite: ECO 210 and ECO 230

ECO 338 Government and Business

4 hours; 4 credits

The relationship between government and business in the United States will be investigated under three general headings: antitrust policy, regulation, and the promotion of specific business interests. Theoretical issues, historical developments, political and economic interrelationships, legislation and its judicial and quasijudicial interpretation relevant to each area will be explored.

Prerequisite: ECO 210

ECO 345 Managerial Finance II

(Also FNC 345)

4 hours; 4 credits

Working capital management, current asset management, sources of short-term financing, financial structure and use of leverage, valuation and rates of return, dividend policy and internal financing, mergers and acquisitions, and liquidation; includes computer lab for solving financial management problems.

Prerequisites: ECO/FNC 240 and MGT/ECO 230

ECO 352 Comparative Economic Systems

4 hours; 4 credits

An analysis of economic systems through formulation of abstract economic models and an analysis of actual economic societies, including comparison of capitalism and socialism.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112 and at least two other courses in the social sciences

ECO 360 Investment Analysis

(Also FNC 360)

4 hours; 4 credits

Survey of the principles governing the investment of individual and institutional capital funds: the theory and mechanics of investments, general analysis and valuation procedures including quantitative and qualitative tests for judging security values, valuation to fixed income securities and common stocks. Introduction to the analysis of industrial, public utility, and governmental securities.

Management of an individual investor’s portfolio.

Prerequisites: ECO/FNC 345 and FNC/ECO 213 or

FNC/ECO 214

ECO 361 Labor Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

A critical examination of theories of wage determination; factors responsible for wage differentials; the effect of unionism upon wages; empirical trends in wage differentials and average wage levels; wage push inflation, unemployment, minimum wage laws, and automation; human capital, educational expenditures, and manpower analysis.

Prerequisites: ECO 210 and ENG 151 and ECO 230

ECO 370 International Finance

(Also FNC 300)

4 hours; 4 credits

The financial interrelationship between countries. Analysis of balance of payments, fixed and flexible exchange rates exchange rates, the role of international reserves.

Historical trends in payments and exchange; implications of the rise of the multinational corporation; current international policy problems facing the United States, other developed nations, and underdeveloped nations, and current institutional changes designed to meet them.

Prerequisite: FNC/ECO 240

ECO 385 Engineering Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

Applications of economic theory and operations analysis in the formulation of business policies and decisions.

Marginal and incremental analysis of business opportunities, demand analysis and forecasting, production and price setting, capital budgeting and investment analysis, and regulation of business. Introduction to the techniques and applications of econometrics and linear programming. Not open to students who have successfully completed ECO 387.

Prerequisite: MTH 121 or MTH 123 or equivalent

ECO 387 Managerial Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

Applications of economic theory and operations analysis in the formulation of business policies and decisions. The course will include marginal and incremental analysis of business opportunities, demand analysis and forecasting, production and price setting, and regulation of business.

Introduction to the techniques and applications of econometrics and linear programming will also be included.

Topics will be studied through consideration of actual business cases and problems. Not open to students who have successfully completed ECO 385.

Prerequisites: MTH 121 or 123 or equivalent and ECO

210

ECO 388 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment

4 hours; 4 credits

An economic approach to the problems of depleting natural resources and environmental pollution. Intertemporal allocation of resources, recycling, renewable resources, energy, pollution, acid rain, global warming, ozone depletion. The role of markets and the role of government.

Prerequisite: ECO 210

ECO 389 Economics and Technology

4 hours; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 159

The economics of research and development in the single firm and the economy as a whole. Implications for society will be explored. Topics will include: determinants of research and development expenditures by the firm, selection and management of research and development projects, technological forecasting, the role of government and nonprofit organizations in research and development, the economics of the patent system, antitrust legislation, and technological innovation.

Prerequisite: ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112

ECO 390 History of Economic Thought

4 hours; 4 credits

The development of economic thought from antiquity to modern times. Emphasis on the contrast and similarities between such divergent schools of thought as mercantilism, the physiocratic school, the classical school, the socialist school, the historical school, and the neoclassical school. Prominent thinkers such as Aristotle, Aquinas,

Mun, Hume, Quesnay, Adam Smith, Ricardo, Malthus,

Mill, Cournot, von Thunen, Marx, Menger, Jevons,

Walras, Marshall, Keynes, Samuelson, Schumpeter, and von Hayek will be discussed, as will the periodic resurgence of various themes and the links between economic thought and economic history.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112

ECO 392 Urban Economics

4 hours; 4 credits

Economic factors in the emergence of urban centers and historical changes in their economic functions. Determinants of the size and location of cities and the occupational characteristics of the urban labor force. Analysis of the proper economic scope of local government and the financing of its expenditures. Allocating and pricing public services. Aspects of urban renewal and study of the urban ghetto.

Prerequisites: ECO 210 and ECO 230

ECO 395 Foundations of Modern Capitalism

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the historical and intellectual origins of capitalist society, the role of capitalism in the growth and development of modern industrial society, an evaluation of the future of capitalism.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 or ECO 111 or ECO 112 and at least two other courses in the social sciences

ECO 410 Seminar in Economic Analysis

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected topics in economic theory including production theory, capital theory, welfare economics, growth theory, and investment in human capital. Students prepare detailed presentations and analyses of classic works for discussion and evaluation.

Prerequisites: ECO 210, ECO 212, ECO 323

ECO 490 Senior Seminar in Political Science,

Economics, and Philosophy

(Also POL 490 and PHL 490)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected topics in which ideas and approaches from economics, political science, and philosophy either mesh or collide will be explored. Required of all students ex-

160 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions pecting to graduate with Honors in Political Science,

Economics, or Philosophy, but not limited to these students.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of at least

16 credits in intermediate and advanced social science courses and permission of the instructor.

Education

School of Education

Interim Founding Dean, Ken Gold, BA, MA, Phd

Department of Education

Chairperson and Associate Professor Eleni (Nelly)

Tournaki, Building 3S, Room 208

(See the Graduate Catalog for information on master’s degree programs.)

The College of Staten Island offers a full selection of programs to prepare students for certification as teachers at all levels. Students at the College do not major in Education; they major in academic subjects and complete a sequence of courses in teacher education that provides the academic work necessary for a recommendation for initial certification by the State of New

York. Students seeking initial certification from the

State Education Department of New York must pass the appropriate teacher certification examinations.

In 2011-2012, 96% of the College of Staten Island students taking the Content Specialty Test (CST) of the

New York State Teacher Certification Examination received a passing score. On the Liberal Arts & Sciences

Test (LAST), 99% passed. On the Elementary Assessment of Teaching Skills-Written Test (ATS-W),

100% passed. On the Secondary Assessment of

Teaching Skills-Written Test (ATS-W), 100% passed.

Education courses are identified and the descriptions arranged alphabetically according to the following designations:

EDA - Supervision and Administration

EDC - Early Childhood

EDD - General Education

EDE - Elementary Education (Childhood Education)

EDP - Special Education

EDS - Secondary Education (Adolescence Education)

(Graduate courses are described in the Graduate Cata-

log.)

Fieldwork

A New York State mandated 100 hours of fieldwork is required before student teaching.

Academic Major

Students in the Early Childhood Education program and in the Childhood Education program must complete the requirements for the major in Science, Letters, and Society leading to the BA degree. Completion of all degree requirements for the Science, Letters, and Society major with the Early Childhood Education sequence may require at least 121 credits.

Criteria for Entry into the Education Sequences

Students must have a GPA of 2.75 or above to enroll in introductory (foundations) education courses (EDC 215,

EDC 216, EDE 200, EDE 260, EDS 201, EDS 202).

Students whose GPAs are below 2.75 but above 2.6 may appeal for special permission to enroll in a foundations course. All students apply for admission to an educational sequence while enrolled in one of the foundations courses listed above. Students who are denied admission to an educational sequence may appeal the decision. Instructions for all appeal processes, including deadlines, are available in the department office, Building 3S, Room 208.

Criteria for Continuing in the Educational

Sequences

Students must develop and maintain a program portfolio as outlined in the program handbook. Students must earn a C+ or above in each education class. Students must maintain a 2.75 GPA throughout the program.

Students whose portfolio, course grades, and/or GPA do not meet program standards may appeal for special permission to continue in the program. Instructions for the appeal process, including deadlines, are available in the department office, Room 208 of the Education

Building (3S).

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Because most required education courses are non-liberal arts and sciences, students in education usually do not have room for non-liberal arts and sciences courses beyond those required for the education sequence. Students who take other non-liberal arts and sciences courses may find that they need to take more than 120 credits to complete their degree. Education courses that fulfill the Liberal Arts and Sciences requirement are marked (LA&S).

Teacher certification is governed by the New York State

Board of Regents and the New York State Education

Departments. These requirements are subject to change. Students are advised to contact the Department of Education for the latest degree requirements.

Early Childhood Education (Birth-2)

This program is designed for students wishing to specialize in the education of children from birth to second grade. It provides the academic course content necessary for New York State certification at the early childhood level.

Academic Major: 34-36 credits

Education Sequence: 32 credits

Students wishing to be recommended by the College for initial certification must successfully complete the following sequence of education courses, as well as the

Science, Letters, and Society major. Students are encouraged to begin the Early Childhood sequence in the sophomore year. To complete the sequence when 45 credits have been completed, it must be started by the beginning of the junior year. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.75 to be admitted to all early childhood courses.

EDC 215 Psychological Foundations of 3 credits

Early Childhood Education

EDC 216 Social Foundations of Early

Childhood Education

EDC 217 Affective Development of the

Child

EDC 218 Language Development in

Young Children and the

Educative Process

EDC 310 The Teaching of Reading and

Writing

EDC 332 Music in Early Childhood

EDC 340 Workshop in Mathematics and

Science for Early Childhood

EDC 350 Fieldwork in Preschool

Classrooms

EDC 360 Workshop in Social Studies

EDC 440 Student Teaching in

Kindergarten and Early

Primary Classrooms

EDC 402 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching (Early

Childhood)

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

2 credits

3 credits

4 credits

2 credits

Childhood Education (1-6)

This program provides the academic course content necessary for New York State certification as a childhood teacher at the first- through sixth-grade level (1-6).

Academic Major: 34-36 credits

Education Sequence: 32 credits

Students wishing to be recommended by the College for certification must successfully complete the following sequence of childhood education courses, as well as the Science, Letters, and Society major. In addition, students are required to submit and orally present an exit program portfolio for evaluation and approval to the

Education Department upon completion of the Education sequence. Students may enroll in the Childhood

Education sequence once they have 45 total credits earned including three credits in psychology, six in the social sciences, and/or philosophy, and ENG 151 (four credits). Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.75 to be admitted to all of the childhood education courses. Students receiving a grade of C or lower in any education course must repeat the course.

EDE 200 Social Foundations of

4 credits Education

EDE 260 Psychological Foundations of

Education 4 credits

EDE 301 Literacy Development and

Language Acquisition in

Elementary Education

EDE 302 Social Studies, Art, Reading, and Language Arts in

Elementary Education

EDE 303 Mathematics, Science, and

4 credits

6 credits

Music in Elementary Education 6 credits

EDE 400 Student Teaching in

Elementary Education 6 credits

EDE 402 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching in

Elementary Education 2 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 161

Adolescence Education

This program provides the academic course content necessary for certification as a teacher at the adolescence level in the fields of English, foreign languages, mathematics, science, and social studies.

Academic Major

Students must complete the requirements of a major in the field in which they plan to teach. This sequence provides the academic course content necessary for certification as a teacher at the adolescence level in the fields of biology, chemistry, English, foreign language, history, and mathematics disciplines.

Students planning to teach social studies major in History, and they complete at least 50 credits in the social sciences, including at least four credits in geography, at least four credits in U.S. history, and at least four credits in non-U.S. history.

Students planning to teach Mathematics must include, within the set of advanced courses required by the mathematics major, one or more upper-level mathematics courses covering (1) Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry and (2) history of mathematics. This requirement may be met by taking MTH 329 Geometry, and

MTH 306 History of Mathematical Thought.

Adolescence Education Sequence: 24 credits

Students wishing to be recommended by the College for certification must successfully complete the following sequence of education courses, as well as their academic major. To complete the sequence in two years it must be begun by the beginning of the junior year.

Students must have a minimum cumulative average of

2.75 to be admitted to all adolescence education courses.

EDS 201 Social Foundations of

Secondary Education

4 credits

4 credits EDS 202 Psychological Foundations of

Secondary Education

One of the following four-credit courses

EDS 315 The Secondary School Curriculum in the

Social Studies or

EDS 316 The Secondary School Curriculum in

English or

EDS 317 The Secondary School Curriculum in

Mathematics or

EDS 318 The Secondary School Curriculum in

Science or

EDS 319 The Secondary School Curriculum in

Foreign Language

One of the following four-credit courses

EDS 301 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in the Social Studies or

EDS 302 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in

English or

EDS 303 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in

Mathematics

162 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions or

EDS 304 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in

Science or

EDS 305 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in

Foreign Language and

EDS 400 Student Teaching in Secondary

Education

EDS 401 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching in Secondary

Education

6 credits

2 credits

Special Education

The College of Staten Island does not offer an undergraduate program in special education. Students seeking certification in special education are advised to pursue the undergraduate sequence in Childhood Education and the master’s program in Special Education.

Education Courses

For graduate courses in education see the Graduate

Catalog.

Note: Student teaching courses are graded P or F.

EDC - Early Childhood

EDC 215 Psychological Foundations of Early

Childhood Education

3 hours; 3 credits

An examination of the developing child, focusing on the period from birth through age eight, with an introduction to children with special needs. Major developmental theories are critically examined and are illuminated through students’ field experiences with children in diverse and inclusive settings. Recent research on child abuse and abduction is examined within the context of the teacher’s responsibilities. This course includes ten hours of fieldwork prior to student teaching. (LA&S)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, PSY 100 and a GPA of 2.75

EDC 216 Social Foundations of Early

Childhood Education

3 hours; 3 credits

A required multidisciplinary course for prospective early childhood teachers. Perspectives from such academic disciplines as philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology, political science, and economics are brought to bear on early childhood education in its relationships with contemporary society and with later education. The major purpose of this course is to bring the student to an initial understanding of how values, attitudes, and structures in society as a whole influence the education of young children. (LA&S)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and ENG 151, and a GPA of

2.75

EDC 217 Affective Development of the Child

3 hours; 3 credits

An examination of the relationship between the infant and the primary caretaker, and its importance in personality development. Influences on the primary relation, broadening of affectional ties; comparison of child rearing across and within cultures. Students learn to use a variety of observational approaches and recording techniques to increase their understanding of children who are developing normally and children with disturbances in development. School and community partnerships are explored for their emotional impact on children. Diverse infant and toddler programs are studied through 20 hours of fieldwork.

Prerequisites: EDC 215, EDC 216, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDC 218 Language Development in Young

Children and the Educative Process

3 hours; 3 credits

Theory and research in language development and the processes of language acquisition to inform program planning and development in inclusive educational settings. Students learn how to create, manage, and develop preschool curriculum areas such as dramatic play, block building, expressive arts, puzzles and manipulatives, nature study, and outdoor play to facilitate language acquisition and development. The course provides students with a range of alternative teaching strategies to meet the needs of linguistically diverse children.

Prerequisites: EDC 215 and EDC 216, or EDE 200 and

EDE 260, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

Corequisite: EDC 350

EDC 310 The Teaching of Reading and Writing

3 hours; 3 credits

An examination of the teaching of reading and writing within a developmental framework and introduction to programs, practices, and materials of reading/writing instruction in diverse and inclusive settings. The course provides students with a range of alternative teaching strategies for children with reading and writing delays.

The course also examines software in reading and writing for its usefulness in assessment and instruction.

Prerequisites: EDC 215 or EDE 200; EDC 216 or EDE

260; EDC 218; EDC 350; and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDC 332 Music in Early Childhood

3 hours; 3 credits

Learn to develop basic musical understanding and skills and music appreciation in young children through participation in singing, ear training, rhythmic movement, and playing musical instruments. Students learn to select materials and develop activities that are developmentally appropriate for the needs of young children with an emphasis on creativity and helping students to develop a culturally diverse musical repertoire. A variety of media and computer technologies are explored to determine how they can enhance musical experience. This course includes five hours of fieldwork.

Prerequisites: EDC 215 or EDE 200; EDC 216 or EDE

260, EDC 218; EDC 350; and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDC 340 Workshop in Mathematics and

Science for Early Childhood

3 hours; 3 credits

Techniques in building the child’s knowledge of properties of objects in the environment, concepts of class in-

clusion, seriation, and numbering, and the structuring of space and time. Students learn a range of strategies used by children with special needs. Informal and formal assessment tools are presented as well as classroom management strategies for whole-class and small-group instruction. Examination of software in early childhood mathematics and science instruction for its usefulness and developmental flexibility.

Prerequisites: EDC 215 or EDE 200; EDC 216 or EDE

260; EDC 218; EDC 350, MTH/SLS 217; and a GPA of

2.75 or above

EDC 350 Fieldwork in Preschool Classrooms

2 credits

This field-based course introduces students to preschool classrooms in diverse and inclusive settings. This course connects practice with prior education coursework and is especially related to the content of EDC 218 Language

Development through an Integrated Curriculum. In addition, students are given opportunities both to observe and to practice long- and short-term curriculum planning that reflects specific provisioning for children with special needs and linguistically diverse children. Students also practice a variety of observational approaches and recording techniques in order to assess the development of individual children. Students are observed interacting with small and larger groupings of children. Alcohol, tobacco, and drug abuse, and other dangers to children are discussed within the context of pre-natal and infant development with specific attention paid to the teachers’ role and responsibilities. Students will be in attendance at the assigned school three mornings a week for a full semester, which accounts for 150 hours of fieldwork prior to student teaching. Graded Pass (P) or Fail (F).

Prerequisites: EDC 215, EDC 216, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

Pre or corequisite EDC 217, EDC 218

EDC 360 Workshop in Social Studies

3 hours; 3 credits

An investigation of how multicultural imaginative historical narratives can be used as an ongoing structure within early primary grades to foster students’ intellectual development in diverse and inclusive educational settings.

To create these instructional materials, students will use the Internet and other media for educational applications.

Formal and informal assessment tools as well as classroom management strategies for whole-class and small-group interaction are presented. Particular attention is paid to fostering community relations. The course will offer students opportunities to develop the skills of history storytelling and facilitating discussions that provoke children’s imaginative and problem solving responses. Opportunities will also be given to develop history storytelling units that offer young children multiple media to represent thought. Workshops in creative dramatics and the plastic arts are explored to promote young children’s expressiveness and creativity. This course includes five hours of fieldwork.

Prerequisites: EDC 215 or EDE 200; EDC 216 or EDE

260; EDC 218; EDC 350; and a GPA of 2.75 or above

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 163

EDC 402 Reflection and Analysis in Student

Teaching (Early Childhood)

2 hours; 2 credits

This course is designed to supplement an enhance student teaching responsibilities occurring in EDC 440.

Candidates will have an opportunity to synthesize information learned throughout their program and produce and deliver meaningful, effective lessons addressing diverse learners and learning styles, as well as state and local standards. The course will also focus on assessing student learning and integrating technology into instruction. Several sessions will be devoted to New York City

Licensing and New York State Certification requirements for the reporting of child abuse and maltreatment, in addition to drug, alcohol and violence prevention training.

Prerequisites: EDC 217, EDC 310, EDC 332, EDC 340,

EDC 350, EDC 360; SLS 218 and SLS 262 and a GPA of

2.75 or above. In addition, students must meet each of the following criteria:

1. An overall grade point average of 2.75

2. A grade point average of 2.75 in all education courses

3. A minimal grade of C+ in all education courses

4. Three faculty recommendations, at least one from a professor who can attest to your performance in the field.

5. Satisfactory fieldwork evaluations

Corequisite: EDC 440

EDC 412 Reading in Primary and Upper

Elementary Classroom II

3 hours; 3 credits

The objective of this course is to enable students to apply principles of reading instruction to the actual field situation for individual children. Conferences and field supervision.

Prerequisites: EDC 215, EDC 216, EDC 310, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDC 440 Student Teaching in Kindergarten and Early Primary Classrooms

4 credits

Practice and problem solving in kindergarten and early primary classrooms. Designed for public schools. Students will be in attendance at the assigned school 25 hours a week for a complete semester for a minimum of

350 hours (175 hours in a kindergarten classroom and

175 hours in an early primary grade classroom). Students will be observed provisioning and interacting with small and larger groupings of children. Application for a student teaching assignment must be completed and filed with the Student Teaching Office the semester preceding the semester in which the student plans to student teach.

Students must also submit three letters of recommendation from full-time Education faculty. Graded Pass (P) or

Fail (F).

Prerequisites: EDC 217, EDC 310, EDC 332, EDC 340,

EDC 350, EDC 360; SLS 218 , SLS 262 and a GPA of

2.75 or above .

Corequisite: EDC 402

In addition, students must meet each of the following criteria:

164 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

1. An overall grade point average of 2.75

2. A grade point average of 2.75 in all education courses.

3. A minimal grade of C+ in all education courses

4. Three faculty recommendations, at least one from a professor who can attest to your performance in the field.

5. Satisfactory fieldwork evaluations

EDC 441 Student Teaching in Preschool and

Kindergarten Classrooms

6 credits

Practice and problem solving in preschool and kindergarten classrooms. Designed for preschool and daycare.

Students will be in attendance at the assigned school three days a week for a full semester. Application for a student teaching assignment must be completed and filed with the Student Teaching Office the semester preceding the semester in which the student plans to student teach. Students must also submit three letters of recommendation from full-time Education faculty. Graded Pass

(P) or Fail (F).

Prerequisites: EDC 320, EDC 330, and EDC 440; SLS

218 and SLS 261. In addition, students must meet each of the following criteria:

1. An overall grade point average of 2.75

2. A grade point average of 2.75 in all education courses

3. A minimal grade of C+ in all education courses

4. Three faculty recommendations, at least one from a professor who can attest to your performance in the field.

5. Satisfactory fieldwork evaluations

EDD - General Education

EDD 252 History of Education in the United

States

(Also HST 252)

4 hours; 4 credits

The history and social foundation of American education.

Topics include: the historical development of American public schools, the schools and race, the social function of compulsory schooling, the expansion of higher education in the post-World War II period, and the conceptual differentiation between schooling as socialization and education for personal growth. (social science) (COPR)

(p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100, or college-level history course

EDE - Elementary Education

EDE 200 Social Foundations of Education

The legal and judicial landmarks, social policies, and technological advances that affect schools and their diverse populations are analyzed. Ten hours are spent in varied education environments examining the relationship between theory and practice. (LA&S)

Prerequisites: 45 total credits earned that include six credits in the social sciences and/or philosophy, and ENG

151 and a GPA of 2.75

EDE 260 Psychological Foundations of

Education

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the developing child from preschool until adolescence. Major theories of development and the interaction among cognitive, social, and other aspects of development are emphasized. Children with different abilities are discussed, as are cultural, gender and socioeconomic factors. Ten hours of fieldwork in varied educational settings will increase awareness of individual differences and their implications for classroom learning.

(LA&S)

Prerequisites: 45 total credits earned that include three credits in psychology, and ENG 151 and a GPA of 2.75

EDE 301 Literacy Development and Language

Acquisition in Elementary Education

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of major theories in literacy and language acquisition from early to later childhood and of various strategies for creating literature-based reading/writing programs to encourage literacy at all levels and to provide for differences in motivation, learning needs, cultural heritage, and background experience. Students evaluate published materials and technological aids designed to facilitate literacy and language acquisition. The course provides students with a variety of methods to assist children with diverse language, reading, and writing competencies. Ten hours of field experience provide an opportunity to observe in varied and inclusive settings to evaluate diagnostic assessment techniques and interventions.

Cannot be taken concurrently with EDE 302.

Pre- or corequisites: Junior standing and either EDE 200 and EDE 260, or EDC 215 and EDC 216, or EDS 201 and EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above.

EDE 302 Social Studies, Art, and Reading and

Language Arts in Elementary

Education

3 lecture hours, 6 field hours; 6 credits

An examination of the structures and concepts of social studies, art, and reading and language arts for the elementary school. Appropriate connections among the disciplines are noted, relevant research on child development and learning is incorporated, and strategies to provide for students’ special needs are explored. Issues addressed include curriculum development, resources and materials, management, standards, assessment, and the educational application of technology. A fieldwork component of 36 hours provides opportunities to plan instruction, enhance communication skills in the disciplines, and connect theory to practice. Cannot be taken with EDE

303.

Prerequisites: EDE 301 and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDE 303 Mathematics, Science, and Music in

Elementary Education

3 lecture hours, 6 field hours; 6 credits

An examination of the structures and concepts of mathematics, science, and music for the elementary school.

Appropriate connections among the disciplines are noted, relevant research on child development and learning is incorporated, and strategies to provide for differing stu-

dent needs are explored. Issues addressed include curriculum development, resources and materials, management, standards, assessment, and the educational application of technology. A fieldwork component of 36 hours provides opportunities to plan instruction, enhance communication skills in the disciplines, and connect theory to practice. Cannot be taken with EDE 302.

Pre- or corequisites: MTH 217/SLS 217, EDE 200, EDE

260, junior standing, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDE 400 Student Teaching in Elementary

Education

6 credits

Practice and problem solving in student teaching in elementary schools. Students are required to be in attendance at an assigned school full-time, (8:30am-3:00pm) five days per week. Students will teach in grades 1-3 for part of the semester and in grades 4-6 for part of the semester. Application for a student teaching assignment must be completed and filed with the Student Teaching

Office the semester preceding the semester in which the student plans to student teach. Students must also submit three letters of recommendation from full-time Education faculty. To be taken concurrently with EDE 402.

Graded Pass (P) or Fail (F).

Prerequisites: SLS 218 and SLS 261, EDE 302 and EDE

303. In addition students must meet the following criteria:

1. An overall grade point average of 2.75

2. A grade point average of 2.75 in all education courses.

3. A minimal grade of C+ in all education courses

4. Three faculty letters of recommendation, at least one from a professor who can attest to your performance in the field.

5. Satisfactory field evaluations.

EDE 402 Reflection and Analysis in Student

Teaching in Elementary Education

2 hours; 2 credits

Student teachers reflect upon the educational philosophies that they have studied and the methodologies that they are implementing as they develop their own philosophical approaches to teaching and learning. The teacher’s role in developing environments that are safe and nurturing as well as intellectually stimulating and challenging for all students is examined. Hazards to children, including child abuse and substance abuse, will be discussed. To be taken concurrently with EDE 400.

Prerequisite: a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDP - Special Education

EDP 220 Special Educational Needs of People with Disabilities

3 hours; 3 credits

This course is required for teacher certification. The course examines current trends, including state and federal laws and regulations related to special education, in providing special education services to individuals

(pre-school, school-age, adult) with developmental disabilities. The approach of the course follows the process of assessment, instructional planning, instruction and evaluation of instruction in each of four areas of development

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 165 disabilities: sensory disabilities, physical disabilities, communication disabilities and behavioral disabilities.

The emphasis is placed on understanding instructional techniques, and how they meet the needs of the students with developmental disabilities. (social science) (COPR)

(p&d)

Prerequisite: ENG 111

EDP 310 Survey of Exceptional Children I

4 hours; 4 credits

EDP 311 Survey of Exceptional Children II

4 hours; 4 credits

The first half of this course provides an orientation to the physical, social, and psychological aspects and educational needs of students with physical handicaps and emotional disturbances, while the second half considers these aspects as they apply to students with learning disabilities and mental retardation. The survey includes philosophy, history, classification, characteristics, etiology, and special educational provisions as well as psychological and educational assessment procedures in special education. Active fieldwork experiences are required.

EDS - Secondary Education

EDS 201 Social Foundations of Secondary

Education

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of contemporary education. The issues of race, class, gender, ability, immigration, and language acquisition are examined for their impact on the learning of adolescents. The course deepens students’ understanding of the power that social, political, and economic forces have on the work of teachers and on the lives of adolescents, families, and communities. Students spend

15 hours in diverse and inclusive educational environments examining the relationship between theory and practice. (LA&S)

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 202 Psychological Foundations of

Secondary Education

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines major theories of pre-adolescent and adolescent development, with emphasis on implications for education. Major theories of development and the interaction between cognitive, emotional, and physical development are emphasized. Adolescents will be considered in the context of the larger community, with attention to language, culture, gender, and socioeconomic factors. Fifteen hours of fieldwork in diverse and inclusive secondary educational settings increase the student’s awareness of children with special needs and the implications for classroom learning. (LA&S)

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing including three credits of psychology and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 299 Education Fieldwork Seminar

1 credit

166 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

A focus on several aspects of development as a professional educator and the work that an educator does as identified in Continuum of Teacher Development. It will support and deepen understandings acquired during fieldwork experience in host schools undertaken before the student begins a formal education program. Particular focus will be on identifying answers to the questions:

What kind of a learner am I? How will this influence my teaching? How does a teacher reach students who have different learning styles? Aspiring teachers will continually reflect on their host school experience

Pre or corequisite: Permission of the Office of Fieldwork in the CSI Department of Education, a minimum of 50 hours of fieldwork along with the seminar. and providing for students’ differing special needs. A fieldwork component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202, EDS 318, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 305 The Pedagogy of Secondary School

of 2.75 or above

in Foreign Language

4 hours; 4 credits

Issues of teaching and learning a foreign language are examined with attention to planning, instruction, assessment, management, and the educational application of technology. Issues of language acquisition, written and oral communication, and grammar are explored in relation to developing strategies for instruction and providing for students’ differing special needs. A fieldwork component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202, EDS 319, and a GPA

EDS 301 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in the Social Studies

4 hours; 4 credits

Students explore a range of effective and differentiated strategies for designing, implementing, and assessing teaching and learning in the secondary social studies classroom. Issues of language and literacy acquisition related of the social studies are discussed and the uses of technology are highlighted. A fieldwork component of

35 hours is included.

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202, EDS 315, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 302 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in English

4 hours; 4 credits

Issues of teaching and learning English language arts and literature are examined with attention to planning, instruction, assessment, management, and the educational application of technology. Reading and learning activities and literature depicting multicultural settings are explored in relation to developing strategies for instruction and providing for students' differing special needs. A fieldwork component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202, EDS 316, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 307 Discovery Learning and

Interdisciplinary Instruction

4 hours; 4 credits

Development of a conceptual understanding of the teaching of transcending content defined by its subject areas. Discovery learning is explored and used to bridge the school disciplines and to address the different strengths and needs of adolescents. Students in Mathematics, English, History, Spanish, Biology, and Chemistry majors work together to create integrated curricula as relevant research on child development and learning is discussed. A 35 hour fieldwork component is included.

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above.

Corequisite: EDS 301 or EDS 302 or EDS 303 or EDS

304 or EDS 305

EDS 303 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in Mathematics

4 hours; 4 credits

Issues of teaching and learning mathematics are examined with attention to planning, instruction, assessment, management, and the application of technology. Mathematical concepts, structures, and language are explored in relation to developing strategies for instruction and providing for students’ differing special needs. A fieldwork component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202, EDS 317, and a GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 315 The Secondary School Curriculum in the

Social Studies

4 credits; 4 hours

This course focuses on the social studies curriculum for the secondary school and calls upon the students' preparation in the History major to inform their study, particularly with respect to the selection, scope, and sequence of topics. In this way, the curriculum is examined from the specialist's standpoint. Central to this examination is the process of transforming knowledge of contact and curriculum for the purpose of teaching and learning.

Topics include general principles for developing a social studies curriculum, connections to state and national standards, and resources for teaching the social studies.

A field work component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisite: EDS 201, EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above; admission into Adolescence Education program;

History major

EDS 304 The Pedagogy of Secondary School in Science

4 hours; 4 credits

Issues of teaching and learning science are examined with attention to planning, instruction, assessment, management, and the educational application of technology.

Scientific concepts, structures, and language are explored in relation to developing strategies for instruction

EDS 316 The Secondary School Curriculum in

English

4 credits; 4 hours

This course focuses on the English curriculum for the secondary school and calls upon the students' preparation in the English major to inform their study, particularly with respect to the selection, scope, and sequence of topics. In this way, the curriculum is examined from the

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 167 specialist's standpoint. Central to this examination is the process of transforming knowledge of contact and curriculum for the purpose of teaching and learning. Topics include general principles for developing an English curriculum, connections to state and national standards, and resources for teaching English. A field work component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisite: EDS 201, EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above; admission into Adolescence Education program;

English major

EDS 317 The Secondary School Curriculum in

Mathematics

4 credits; 4 hours

This course focuses on the mathematics curriculum for the secondary school and calls upon the students' preparation in the Mathematics major to inform their study, particularly with respect to the selection, scope, and sequence of topics. In this way, the curriculum is examined from the specialist's standpoint. Central to this examination is the process of transforming knowledge of contact and curriculum for the purpose of teaching and learning. Topics include general principles for developing a mathematics curriculum, connections to state and national standards, and resources for teaching mathematics. A field work component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisite: EDS 201, EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above; admission into Adolescence Education program;

Mathematics major teaching a language other than English. A field work component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisite: EDS 201, EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above; admission to the Adolescence Education program; Spanish major; Italian Studies major.

EDS 400 Student Teaching in Secondary

Education

6 credits

Practice and problem solving in student teaching in secondary schools. Students are required to be in attendance at an assigned school full-time, (8:30am- 3:00pm) five days per week for one full semester. Students will have a grades 7-9 and a grades 10-12 placement. Application for a student teaching assignment must be filed with the Student Teaching Office the semester preceding the semester in which the student plans to student teach.

Students must also submit three letters of recommendation from full-time Education faculty. To be taken concurrently with EDS 401. Graded Pass (P) or Fail (F).

Prerequisites: EDS 201, EDS 202 and (EDS 315 or EDS

316 or EDS 317 or EDS 318 or EDS 319)and EDS 301 or

EDS 302 or EDS 303 or EDS 304 or EDS 305.

Corequisite: EDS 401

In addition, students must meet each of the following criteria:

1. An overall grade point average of 2.75

2. A grade point average of 2.75 in all education courses

3. A minimal grade of C+ in all education courses

4. Three faculty letters of recommendation, at least one from faculty in the student’s major

5. Satisfactory fieldwork evaluations

EDS 318 The Secondary School Curriculum in

Science

4 credits; 4 hours

This course focuses on the science curriculum for the secondary school and calls upon the students' preparation in the Biology or Chemistry major to inform their study, particularly with respect to the selection, scope, and sequence of topics. In this way, the curriculum is examined from the specialist's standpoint. Central to this examination is the process of transforming knowledge of contact and curriculum for the purpose of teaching and learning. Topics include general principles for developing a science curriculum, connections to state and national standards, and resources for teaching science. A field work component of 35 hours is included.

Prerequisite: EDS 201, EDS 202, and a GPA of 2.75 or above; admission into Adolescence Education program;

Biology or Chemistry major

EDS 401 Reflection and Analysis in Student

Teaching in Secondary Education

2 hours; 2 credits

Student teachers reflect upon the educational philosophies that they have studied and the methodologies that they are implementing as they develop their own philosophical approaches to teaching and learning. The teacher’s role in developing environments that are safe and nurturing as well as intellectually stimulating and challenging for all students is examined. Hazards to children, including child abuse and substance abuse, will be discussed. To be taken concurrently with EDS 400.

Prerequisite: A GPA of 2.75 or above

EDS 319 The Secondary School Curriculum in

Foreign Language

4 credits; 4 hours

This course focuses on the foreign language curriculum for the secondary school and calls upon the students' preparation in the Spanish and Italian Studies majors to inform their study, particularly with respect to the selection, scope, and sequence of topics. In this way, the curriculum is examined from the specialist's standpoint.

Central to this examination is the process of transforming knowledge of contact and curriculum for the purpose of teaching and learning. Topics include general principles for developing a foreign language curriculum, connections to state and national standards, and resources for

Electrical Engineering

(Bachelor of Science)

Department of Engineering Science and Physics, Building 1N, Room 226

Chairperson: Professor Alfred Levine

Program Coordinator: Associate Professor Neophytos

(Neo) Antoniades, Building 4N, Room 201

Electrical Engineering (BS)

Pathways Common Core: 30 credits

Pathways Required Core: 12 credits

English Composition (RECR) 6 credits

168 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

ENG 111 Introduction to College

Writing

ENG 151 College Writing

Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning (RMQR)

3 credits

3 credits

3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

MTH

231*

Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

3 credits

NOTE: Students may be required to take a prerequisite for MTH 231.

Life and Physical Sciences

(RLPR)

3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

PHY

120*

General Physics I 3 credits

Pathways Flexible Core: 18 credits

Students may take no more than one course from any area and no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field in the Flexible

Core.

U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) 3 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR

100

United States: Issues, Ideas, and Institutions

3 credits

Scientific World (FSWR) 6 credits

Students are required to complete the following courses:

PHY

160*

General Physics II 3 credits

Engineering Mechanics 3 credits ENS

250*/

PHY

250*

In addition to the above, students must select

3courses from the following areas with no more than one course from any area and no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field.

3 credits World Cultures and Global Issues

(FWGR)

Creative Expression (FCER)

Individual and Society (FISR)

3 credits

3 credits

College Option

Scienc e Lab for

RLPR

PHY 121* General Physics I

Laboratory

12 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

Social

Scienc e

ECO 251* International Political

Economy

4 credits

1 credit

STEM MTH 232* or

MTH 233 or

PHY 240

Analytic Geometry and

Calculus II, Analytic

Geometry and

Calculus III or Waves and Modern Physics

3 credits

STEM CHM 141* General Chemistry I 3 credits

STEM CHM 121* General Chemistry I

Laboratory

*Also fulfills pre-major requirements.

1 credits

Note: This program has received a waiver to specify particular courses students must take in the Common

Core and College Option. If students take different courses in these areas, they will be certified as having completed the area, but it may not be possible for them to finish their degree program within the regular number of credits.

Pre-Major Requirements: 50 credits

Students beginning the Electrical Engineering program as freshmen should complete the following requirements:

ENS 100 Introduction to Engineering

Science

ENS 110 Engineering Graphics

2 credits

2 credits

ENS 136 Computer-aided Engineering I 1 credit

ENS 220 Introduction to Computer

Engineering

ENS 221 Digital Electronics Laboratory

4 credits

2 credits

ENS 241 Electrical and Electronics

Circuits 4 credits

ENS 249 Basic Measurement Laboratory 2 credits

ENS 250 Engineering Mechanics 3 credits

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science

ECO 251 International Political Economy

4 credits or

ECO 285 Economics for Engineers 4 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

I 3 credits

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

II

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

III

PHY 120 General Physics I

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

1 credit

PHY 160 General Physics II

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory

CHM 141 General Chemistry I

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

CHM 121 General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 credit

*MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus can be substituted for MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

Major Requirements: 60 credits

MTH 311 Probability and an Introduction to

Mathematical Statistics 4 credits

MTH 330 Applied Mathematical Analysis I 4 credits

MTH 431 Complex Analysis 4 credits

PHY 240 Waves and Modern Physics

ENS 310 Thermodynamics

3 credits

4 credits

ENS 331 Digital Signal Processing 4 credits

ENS 336 Computer-Aided Engineering II 4 credits

ENS 356 Theory of Electromagnetic

Radiation 4 credits

ENS 362 Microcontrollers

ENS 371 Systems Analysis

4 credits

3 credits

ENS 420 Analog and Digital Systems

Design

ENS 439 Systems Laboratory

ENS 485 Properties of Materials

4 credits

2 credits

4 credits

ENS 491 Advanced Engineering Design I 2 credits

ENS 492 Advanced Engineering Design II 2 credits

At least eight credits of advanced ENS electives chosen from the following: ENS

441, ENS 422, ENS 432, ENS 434, ENS

436, ENS 438, ENS 446, ENS 463, ENS

464, ENS 466, ENS 470, ENS 471, ENS

473 8 credits

The total number of ENS credits must be at least 56, as approved by an electrical engineering adviser.

Electives: 0-5 credits

Total Credits Required: 133

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Of the 133 credits required for the BS in Electrical Engineering, at least 66 must be in liberal arts and sciences courses. Most courses designated ENS are non-liberal arts and sciences; those ENS courses that are crosslisted in mathematics (MTH) or physics (PHY) are liberal arts and sciences.

Electrical Engineering Technology

(Associate in Applied Science, Minor)

Chairperson and Professor Alfred Levine

Interdisciplinary Coordinating Committee Chairperson:

Associate Professor Neophytos (Neo) Antoniades,

Building 4N, Room 201

This two-year career program, accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation

Board for Engineering and Technology (TAC/ABET, 111

Market Street, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202; telephone 410.347.7700), is designed to provide a theoretical and practical course of study in the basic principles and applications of electrical and electronics technology with emphasis on the computer. The curriculum includes classes in communications, microcomputers, and computer programming. Graduates are prepared for employment as systems field and customer engineers, facilities managers, junior programmers, and sales representatives in the computer and electronics industries and in firms using modern computer systems in PC support, communications, networks, programming, research, development, and sales. Graduates of the program may continue in the BS degree programs in

Computer Science, Engineering Science, or Economics at CSI. Students in bachelor’s degree programs may choose a minor in Electrical Engineering Technology.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 169

Electrical Engineering Technology

(AAS)

The Educational Objectives of our Electrical

Engineering Technology program are that our graduates shall:

1. Have the technical knowledge required for entry level positions in the various electrical/electronic industries.

2. Have the practical and professional skills needed to function effectively in a real world environment in the electric/electronic field.

3. Have sufficient academic backgrounds of a diverse nature that will allow them to continue their education towards a baccalaureate degree at an accredited institution or achieve career advancement in their chosen fields.

Pathways Common Core: 21-24 credits

Pathways Required Core: 12-14 credits

English Composition (RECR) 6 credits

ENG 111 Introduction to College

Writing

3 credits

ENG 151 College Writing

Mathematical and Quantitative

3 credits

3 or more

Reasoning (RMQR) credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

MTH 123 College Algebra and

Trignonometry*

4 credits

OR

MTH 130 Pre-Calculus Mathematics* 3 credits

Life and Physical Sciences (RLPR) 3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

PHY 116 Physics I*

OR

4 credits

PHY 120 General Physics I* 3 credits

Pathways Flexible Core: 9-10 credits

Students may take no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field in the Flexible Core.

U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) 3 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, 3 credits and Institutions

Scientific World (FSWR) 3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

PHY 156 Physics II* 4 credits

OR

PHY 160 General Physics II* 3 credits

In addition to the above, students must select one course from any of the

3 credits following areas of the Flexible Core.

1. World Cultures and Global Issues (FWGR)

2. Creative Expression (FCER)

3. Individual and Society (FISR)

170 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

*Also fulfills major requirements.

NOTE: Students may take courses in STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World) that have 3 or more credits. This may result in students finishing their degree with more than the regular number of credits required.

Major Requirements (52 credits)

ELT 113 Introduction to Electronics

ELT 114 Computer-Aided Technology

ELT 224 Electrical Circuit Analysis

ELT 225 Electrical Circuit Analysis

Laboratory

ELT 331 Electronics Laboratory

1 credit

1 credit

4 credits

1 credit

1 credit

ELT 334 Electronics

ENS 100 Introduction to Engineering

ENS 110 Engineering Graphics

ENS 220 Introduction to Computer

3 credits

2 credits

2 credits

Engineering or

4 credits

CSC 346 Switching and Automata Theory 4 credits

ENS 221 Digital Electronics Laboratory or

2 credits

CSC 347 Computer Circuits Laboratory 2 credits

ENS 362/

CSC 462 Microcontrollers

ELT 437 Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution

ENS 464 Embedded System Analysis

ELT 466 Telecommunications and

Network Technology

Physics Sequence (8 credits)

PHY 116 Physics I or

PHY 120 General Physics I and

PHY 121 General Physics I Laboratory

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

1 credit

PHY 156 Physics II or

PHY 160 General Physics II

4 credits

3 credits and

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1 credit

A sequence of at least seven credits of mathematics from the level of MTH 123 or higher from the following courses:

MTH 123 College Algebra and

Trigonometry

MTH 130 Pre-Calculus

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory

MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus

4 credits

3 credits

1 credit

6 credits

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3 credits

Total Credits Required: 64

Note: This program has received a waiver to specify particular courses students must take in the STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World). If students take different courses in these areas, they will be certified as having completed the Common

Core area, but it may not be possible for them to finish their degree program within the regular number of credits.

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement:

All courses designated ELT and ENT are non-liberal arts and sciences.

Electrical Engineering Technology

Minor

The minor in Electrical Engineering Technology is for students enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program.

Minor Requirement: 16 credits

ENS 102 Introduction to Electrical and

Electronic Technology

ENS 110 Engineering Graphics

ELT 113 Introduction to Electronics

ELT 224 Electrical Circuit Analysis

ELT 225 Electrical Circuit Analysis

Laboratory

MTH 123 College Algebra and

Trigonometry or higher

4 credits

2 credits

1 credit

4 credits

1 credit

4 credits

Electrical Engineering Technology

Courses

ELT 113 Introduction to Electronics

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Introduction to the study of electronics. Diode and transistor characteristics are discussed and used in the construction of an electronic device. Students design, photo-etch, and assemble a printed circuit. Characteristics of the device and component voltages are measured.

Prerequisite: MTH 030 or equivalent or higher

ELT 114 Computer-aided Technology

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Application of computer-based tools and simulations to analyze testing and debugging of electrical circuits and systems. Introduction to building virtual instruments.

Acquisition and measurements of electrical signals and data analysis through virtual instruments.

Pre- or corequisite: ELT 113

ELT 224 Electrical Circuit Analysis

4 hours; 4 credits

This course begins with physical electrical concepts and continues through the analysis of various specific circuit configurations with dc and ac sources. Topics include resistance capacitance, and inductance in series, parallel, and series-parallel connection, transient circuit analysis, ac analysis using phasors, single and polyphase power concepts, resonance and filters, network theorems, and transformer theory. Applications for the various circuits will also be discussed.

Pre- or corequisites: (MTH 030 and ENS 102) or MTH

123 or higher

ELT 225 Electrical Circuit Analysis Laboratory

3 hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiments will be performed using various instruments from analog meters to the digitizing oscilloscope. Experiments will be based upon validating the theory of Electrical Circuit Analysis as well as demonstrating the applications of the various circuit configurations. A detailed laboratory report will be written and/or oral presentation will be required for the experiments.

Pre- or corequisite: ELT 224

ELT 331 Electronics Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Semiconductor circuitry and electronics laboratory instrumentation. Transistor amplification, biasing, and frequency response. Transistor power amplifiers. Power supplies. Negative feedback and linear integrated circuit amplifiers. Introduction to computer-aided circuit analysis using the personal computer.

Prerequisites: ELT 113, ELT 224

Pre- or corequisites: ELT 334

ELT 334 Electronics

3 hours; 3 credits

Physics and characteristics of semiconductor solid state devices. Analysis and application of transistor circuits.

Time varying signal behavior of solid device circuits and systems including power applications and frequency response. Introduction to modulation and communications.

Prerequisites: ELT 113, ELT 224, MTH 123 or higher

ELT 345 Microprocessor Laboratory

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Experiments including register, memory, and stack operation. Data and address bus structure, signature analysis and other fault location techniques. Commercial microprocessor trainers based on 8085 and 2920 and logic analyzers will be used.

Pre- or corequisite: ELT 344

ELT 437 Electrical Power Transmission and distribution

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

Power and three-phase circuits power transmission, and transformers. Real and reactive power, power flow and power handling capacity of parallel lines. Long haul high voltage power transmission. Power distribution between two parallel lines. Three-phase distribution transformer configurations.

Prerequisite: ELT 331

ELT 442 Computer Hardware Technology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Study of the electrical and mechanical function of computer systems such as the advanced personal computer.

Hardware and software principles are explored. Topics include memory, video, communication, disk drives, printer, keyboard, assembler software, and debugging tools. Includes hands-on work with computer hardware and peripherals.

Prerequisite: ENS 221 or CSC 347

ELT 466 Telecommunications and Network

Technology

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 171

Fundamentals of signals and noise; digital signal formats and modulation techniques; speech and video signals.

Fiber optic, satellite and mobile communications fundamentals; cellular telephony and mobile radio networks.

Overview of telecommunication networking fundamentals focusing on access, metro and wide regions.

Prerequisites: ENS 221

Engineering Science

(Bachelor of Science, Associate in Science)

Department of Engineering Science and Physics, Building 1N, Room 226

Chairperson and Program Coordinator: Professor Alfred

Levine

The Engineering Science program seeks to guarantee that every student is prepared for a lifetime of creative engineering design work. There are many correct solutions to engineering design problems

–they differ in their simplicity, elegance, cost, and social and environmental impacts. Every student learns how to formulate problems, find correct solutions, and choose among these solutions for an efficient design. For most students, the first design experience is in the course ENS 220 Introduction to Computer Engineering. Next, in the laboratory, ENS 221 students take the paper designs worked out in ENS 220 and build, test, and evaluate their own designs. In ENS 362 Microcontrollers, the design, building, testing, and evaluation of more complicated engineering systems is performed. In this fashion, students are prepared to handle real-world design projects including related issues of economics, aesthetics, environmental problems, reliability analysis, and safety.

In the courses ENS 310, ENS 336, ENS 471, ENS 380,

ENS 441, ENS 450, and in all the electives, there is a formal design component incorporated. In these courses, the designs are tested and evaluated using computer simulation or calculation. The actual construction, testing, and evaluation of student designs occurs in the laboratory courses. The most important design experience for all students is obtained in the capstone courses

ENS 491 Advanced Engineering Design I and ENS 492

Advanced Engineering Design II. These are project-oriented courses in which students are asked to participate in the design of a major real-world system.

The BS degree program offers three specializations:

Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. The specialization in Computer

Engineering has been developed in collaboration with the Department of Computer Science.

The Engineering Science bachelor’s degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite

1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012).

Engineering Science (AS)

The Associate in Science in Engineering Science program prepares students for continuation in the BS pro-

172 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions gram in Engineering Science at the College of Staten

Island or in engineering programs at other institutions.

Pathways Common Core: 30 credits

Pathways Required Core: 12-14 credits

English Composition (RECR) 6 credits

ENG 111 Introduction to College

Writing

3 credits

ENG 151 College Writing

Mathematical and Quantitative

3 credits

3 or more credits

Reasoning (RMQR)

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I*

3 credits

Life and Physical Sciences (RLPR) 3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

PHY 120 General Physics I* 3 credits

Pathways Flexible Core: 18 credits

U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) 3 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, and Institutions

PHY 160 General Physics II*

ENS 250/

PHY 250

Engineering Mechanics*

3 credits

Scientific World (FSWR) 3 or more credits

Students are required to complete the following courses:

3 credits

3 credits

In addition to the above, students must select 3courses from the following areas with no more than one course from any area and no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field.

3 credits World Cultures and Global Issues

(FWGR)

Creative Expression (FCER)

Individual and Society (FISR)

3 credits

3 credits

*Also fulfills major requirements.

NOTE: Students may take courses in STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World) that have 3 or more credits. This may result in students finishing their degree with more than the regular number of credits required.

Core Requirements: 42 credits

ENS 100 Introduction to Engineering

ENS 110

Science

Engineering Graphics

2 credits

2 credits

1 credit ENS 136 Computer-Aided Engineering

ENS 220 Introduction to Computer

Engineering 4 credits

ENS 221 Digital Electronics Laboratory 2 credits

ENS 241 Electrical and Electronic

Circuits

ENS 249 Basic Measurement

Laboratory

4 credits

2 credits

ENS 250 Engineering Mechanics

MTH 229 Calculus Computer

Laboratory

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits*

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus II

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus III

PHY 120

PHY 121

General Physics I

General Physics I Laboratory

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

1 credit

PHY 160 General Physics II 3 credits

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1 credit

* MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus can be substituted for MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I

The remaining four credits should be chosen from the following courses:

3 credits CHM 141 General Chemistry I

CHM 121 General Chemistry I

Laboratory 1 credit

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science

ECO 285 Economics for Engineers

ENS 310 Thermodynamics

ENS 331 Digital Signal Processing

ENS 362 Microprocessors

MTH 330 Applied Mathematical

Analysis I

MTH 311 Probability and an

Introduction to Mathematical

Statistics

PHY 240 Waves and Modern Physics

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

Total Credits Required: 60

Note: This program has received a waiver to specify particular courses students must take in STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World). If students take different courses in these areas, they will be certified as having completed the Common

Core area, but it may not be possible for them to finish their degree program within the regular number of credits.

Engineering Science (BS)

Pathways Common Core: 30 credits

Pathways Required Core: 12 credits

English Composition (RECR)

ENG 111 Introduction to College

Writing

ENG 151 College Writing

6 credits

3 credits

3 credits

Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning (RMQR)

MTH

231*

Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I

3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

3 credits

NOTE: Students may be required to take a prerequisite for MTH 231.

Life and Physical Sciences (RLPR) 3 or more credits

Students are required to complete one of the following courses:

PHY

120*

General Physics I 3 credits

Pathways Flexible Core: 18 credits

Students may take no more than one course from any area and no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field in the Flexible Core.

U.S. Experience in its Diversity (FUSR) 3 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

COR 100 United States: Issues, Ideas, and Institutions

3 credits

Scientific World (FSWR) 6 credits

Students are required to complete the following courses:

PHY

160*

General Physics II 3 credits

ENS

250*/

PHY

250*

Engineering Mechanics 3 credits

In addition to the above, students must select 3courses from the following areas with no more than one course from any area and no more than two courses from any discipline or interdisciplinary field.

World Cultures and Global Issues

(FWGR)

Creative Expression (FCER)

Individual and Society (FISR)

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

College Option 12 credits

Students are required to complete the following course:

Social

Science

ECO

251*

International Political

Economy

4 credits

Science

Lab for

RLPR

STEM

PHY

121*

MTH

232* or

MTH 233 or

PHY 240

General Physics I

Laboratory

Analytic Geometry and Calculus II,

Analytic Geometry

1 credit

3 credits and Calculus III or

Waves and Modern

Physics

General Chemistry I 3 credits STEM CHM

141*

STEM CHM

121*

General Chemistry I

Laboratory

1 credits

*Also fulfills pre-major requirements.

Note: This program has received a waiver to specify particular courses students must take in the STEM areas of the Common Core (Mathematical and Quantitative

Reasoning, Life and Physical Sciences, and Scientific

World) and College Option. If students take different courses in these areas, they will be certified as having completed the Common Core and the College Option area, but it may not be possible for them to finish their degree program within the regular number of credits.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 173

Pre-Major Requirements: 50 credits

Students beginning the Engineering Science program as freshmen should complete the following requirements:

ENS 100 Introduction to Engineering

Science

ENS 110 Engineering Graphics

2 credits

2 credits

ENS 136 Computer-aided Engineering I 1 credit

ENS 220 Introduction to Computer

Engineering 4 credits

ENS 221 Digital Electronics Laboratory 2 credits

ENS 241 Electrical and Electronics

Circuits

ENS 249 Basic Measurement

Laboratory

ENS 250 Engineering Mechanics

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science

ECO 285 Economics for Engineers

4 credits

2 credits

3 credits

4 credits

OR

ECO 251 International Political Economy 4 credits

MTH 229 Calculus Computer Laboratory 1 credit

MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus I

MTH 232 Analytic Geometry and

Calculus II

MTH 233 Analytic Geometry and

PHY 120 General Physics I

PHY 121

Calculus III

General Physics I Laboratory

PHY 160 General Physics II

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

PHY 161 General Physics II Laboratory 1 credit

CHM 141 General Chemistry I 3 credits

CHM 121 General Chemistry I

Laboratory 1 credit

*MTH 230 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus can be substituted for MTH 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

Major Requirements: 60 credits

MTH 330 Applied Mathematical

Analysis I

MTH 311 Probability and an

Introduction to Mathematical

Statistics

4 credits

OR

MTH 331 Applied Mathematical

Analysis II 4 credits

PHY 240 Waves and Modern Physics 3 credits

ENS 310 Thermodynamics 4 credits

ENS 331 Digital Signal Processing

OR

ENS 450 Fluid Mechanics 4 credits

ENS 336 Computer-Aided Engineering

II 4 credits

174 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

CSC 332 Operating Systems I

AND

CSC 305 Operating Systems

Programming Laboratory

OR

ENS 356 Theory of Electromagnetic

OR

ENS 316 Dynamics

ENS 362

ENS 371

Radiation

Microcontrollers

Systems Analysis

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

CSC 326 Information Structures

OR

ENS 420 Analog and Digital Systems

Design

OR

ENS 380 Mechanics of Solids 4 credits

ENS 439 Systems Laboratory

OR

ENS 459 Applied Mechanics

Laboratory

ENS 485 Properties of Materials

ENS 491 Advanced Engineering

Design I

ENS 492 Advanced Engineering

Design II

Four credits of technical electives approved by an engineering science advisor.

2 credits

4 credits

2 credits

2 credits

4 credits

At least eight credits of advanced ENS electives 8 credits

The total number of ENS credits must be at least 57, as approved by an engineering science adviser.

Computer Engineering Specialization:

Courses fulfilling the pre-major and major requirements should include: ENS 100, ENS 110, ENS 136, ENS 220,

ENS 221, ENS 241, ENS 249, ENS 250, ENS 310, ENS

331, ENS 336, ENS 362,ENS 371, ENS 439, ENS 485,

ENS 491, ENS 492, CSC 326, and CSC 332.

The courses fulfilling the advanced ENS electives should be chosen from the following:

ENS 441, ENS 420, ENS 422, ENS 432, ENS 446, ENS

463, ENS 466, ENS 471

The courses fulfilling the technical electives should be chosen from the following:

CSC 330, CSC 430, CSC 435, CSC 480, CSC 482.

Electrical Engineering Specialization:

Courses fulfilling the pre-major and major requirements should include: ENS 100, ENS 110, ENS 136, ENS

220, ENS 221, ENS 241, ENS 249, ENS 250, ENS 310,

ENS 331, ENS 336, ENS 356, ENS 362,ENS 371, ENS

420, ENS 439, , ENS 485, ENS 491, and ENS 492.

The courses fulfilling the advanced ENS electives should be chosen from the following:

ENS 441, ENS 422, ENS 432, ENS 434, ENS 436, ENS

438, ENS 446, ENS 463, ENS 464, ENS 466, ENS 470,

ENS 471, ENS 473.

Mechanical Engineering Specialization:

Courses fulfilling the pre-major and major requirements should include: ENS 100, ENS 110, ENS 136, ENS 220,

ENS 221, ENS 241, ENS 249, ENS 250, ENS 310, ENS

331, ENS 336, ENS 380, ENS 362, ENS 371, ENS 439,

ENS 450, , ENS 485, ENS 491, and ENS 492.

The courses fulfilling the advanced ENS electives should be chosen from the following:

ENS 441, ENS 420, ENS 422, ENS 432, ENS 446, ENS

463, ENS 466, ENS 471.

Electives: 0-5 credits

Total Credits Required: 133

Honors

To graduate with honors in Engineering Science a student must meet the following requirements:

1. Fulfillment of all the requirements for the Engineering

Science degree

2. An overall grade point average of 3.5 and a grade point average of 3.5 in the major

3. Outstanding achievement as demonstrated by ONE or more of the following: a. Exceptional senior project b. Authorship in a paper or abstract at the refereed conference or journal proceedings in the field c. Major recognition award for undergraduate research work within the CUNY community

4. In order for the honors option to be awarded, the student needs to be nominated by faculty or apply before graduation and honors status will be judged and awarded by a departmental committee.

The Engineering Science program offers a number of senior-level electives for students interested in further work in a particular area of engineering and for students interested in graduate work in engineering. Students should consult an adviser in the program for details.

Concentrations are available in the following areas:

Computer Engineering - Communications and Networking

Computer Engineering - Operating Systems

Computer Engineering - Architecture and Organization

Computer Engineering - Artificial Intelligence

Electrical Engineering - Electronics

Electrical Engineering - Control Systems

Electrical Engineering - Communication Systems

Electrical Engineering - Energy Systems

Mechanical Engineering - Heat Transfer

Mechanical Engineering - Fluids and Aerodynamics

Mechanical Engineering - Biomedical Applications

Mechanical Engineering - Environmental Control

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Of the 133 credits required for the BS in Engineering

Science, at least 66 must be in liberal arts and sciences courses. Most courses designated ENS are non-liberal arts and sciences; those ENS courses that are crosslisted in mathematics (MTH) or physics (PHY) are liberal arts and sciences.

Transfer Program

Students who have graduated with a two-year Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree in one of the engineering technologies can be admitted to the BS degree program. Their previous courses are evaluated, and they are usually required to take such bridging courses as PHY 230 Physics for Engineers and CSC 126 Introduction to Computer Science or CSC 270 Introduction to

Scientific Computing, as well as additional mathematics courses.

The requirements for the transfer program are identical to those given above for the BS in Engineering Science.

Pre-Major Requirements:

Same as BS in Engineering Science

Major Requirements:

Same as BS in Engineering Science

Total Credits Required: 133

Engineering Science Courses

ENS 100 Introduction to Engineering

4 hours; 2 credits

Introduction to engineering disciplines, organizations, and ethics; basic engineering parameters; engineering standards and codes, principles for engineering data acquisition and presentations, and effective experimentation; engineering statistics and data analysis; problem solving and case studies illustrating engineering solutions.

Prerequisites: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, passing the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing, and passing the CUNY COMPASS Mathematics Test

Pre- or corequisite: ENS 110

ENS 102 Introduction to Electrical and

Electronic Technology

3 hours; 3 credits

Introduction to the nature, measurement, generation, and utilization of electricity in our modern world including industrial and consumer electronics, computers, robots, communications. (science) (FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: ENS 103

ENS 103 Introduction to Electrical and

Electronic Technology Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Measurement, AC and DC voltage, current, and power; series and parallel resistive circuits; transformers; resistive, inductive, and capacitive (RLC) circuits. Power circuits and house wiring. Signal measurements through oscilloscope. Half-wave and full-wave rectifiers. (science)(COPR)

Corequisite: ENS 102

ENS 104 Introduction to Digital Technology

3 credits; 3 hours

Digital revolution and its impact in social, economic, and environmental contexts. Fundamentals of digital electronics: logic operators and memory devices. Digital arithmetic: addition, subtraction, and multiplication. Intro-

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 175 duction to integrated circuits (ICs): Up-down counters, timers, analog to digital (A/D) and digital to analog (D/A) converters, and programmable devices. Course will cover several applications of digital technology in everyday life.

(science) (FSWR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: ENS 105

ENS 105 Introduction to Digital Technology

Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Fundamentals of digital electronics: logic operators and memory devices. Digital arithmetic: addition, subtraction, and multiplication. Introduction to integrated circuits (ICs):

BCD and binary up-down counters, timers, analog to digital (A/D) and digital to analog (D/A) converters, and programmable devices. Course will cover several applications of digital technology in everyday life. (science)

(COPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: ENS 104

ENS 110 Engineering Graphics

5 hours; 2 credits

CAD (computer-aided drafting) is used throughout the course. Othographic projections, and drawings, dimensioning, working drawings, graphs, laboratory sketches, vectors, 3D space, spatial analysis, isometric drawings.

Prerequisites: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, passing the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing, and passing the CUNY COMPASS Mathematics Test

ENS 136 Computer-Aided Engineering

3 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Application of computer-based tools and simulations to analysis testing and debugging of electrical circuits and systems. Introduction to building virtual instruments.

Acquisition and measurement of electrical signals and data analysis through virtual instruments.

Pre or Co-requisites: ENS 100

ENS 220 Introduction to Computer Engineering

4 hours; 4 credits

Number systems and codes. Logic functions, gates and assertion levels. Combinational circuit design and minimization. MSI and LSI circuits and their applications. Sequential machine fundamentals, analysis, and design.

Prerequisite: ENS 136 or ELT 114

Corequisite: MTH 123

ENS 221 Digital Electronics Laboratory

4 laboratory hours; 2 credits

Design, construction, testing, and evaluation of digital systems. Counters, registers, and multiplexers are used to build combinational circuits and sequential machines, including programmable system controllers.

Prerequisite: ENS 220

ENS 241 Electrical and Electronic Circuits

2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Analysis of linear time invariant passive and active circuits. Kirchoff's laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalents,

176 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions node and mesh analysis. Sinusoidal steady-state analysis and phasor diagrams. Signal waveforms, diodes, bipolar, and MOS transistors. Transistor-level digital circuit analysis and design. Analysis and design of single-stage amplifiers. Operational amplifiers and their applications.

Prerequisites: PHY 160 and MTH 232

ENS 249 Basic Measurements Laboratory

(Also PHY 309)

4 laboratory hours; 2 credits

Basic instrumentation and precise measurements in engineering applications. Design, construction, testing, and analysis of simple analog systems using the circuit design tools and simulation software. Comparison of measured data to simulated data and reconciliation of discrepancies are emphasized.

Prerequisite: ENS 241

ENS 250 Engineering Mechanics

3 hours; 3 credits

Three-dimensional vector algebra. Equivalence of force-coupled systems and equilibrium of rigid bodies.

Engineering application of statics. Analysis of trusses, frames, and machines. Friction and moment of inertia.

Introduction to stress and strain. (FSWR) (STEM)

Prerequisites: ENS 100, and PHY 120 and PHY 121, or

PHY 230

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 233

ENS 310 Thermodynamics

(Also PHY 310)

4 hours; 4 credits

Basic concepts: systems, temperature, work, and heat.

First and second laws of thermodynamics. Entropy, vapor, and gas power systems. Refrigeration and heat pump systems. Nonreacting gas mixtures and psychrometrics.

Prerequisite: PHY 160 or PHY 230

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 233 or MTH 236

ENS 316 Dynamics

(Also PHY 316)

4 hours; 4 credits

Rectilinear and curvilinear motion of particles and systems of particles. Energy and momentum methods. Kinematics of rigid bodies. Plane and three-dimensional motion of rigid bodies. Forces and accelerations. Conservative forces and conservation laws. Mechanical vibrations.

Prerequisites: ENS 250 and CSC 270 or CSC 126

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 331 Digital Signal Processing

4 hours; 4 credits

Representation and analysis of systems. Sampling and discrete systems. Solution of difference equations. Discrete Fourier series and transforms. Convolution. Z transforms and stability. Computer-aided design and analysis of digital filters. Hardware demonstrations using the Texas Instruments TMS 320C30 single-board DSP computer.

Prerequisites: ENS 221 or CSC 347, and MTH 232

ENS 336 Computer-Aided Engineering II

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

Application of numerical analysis and computer simulation to the solution of engineering design problems. Topics include optimization and error analysis; solution of nonlinear equations; systems of algebraic equations; data analysis; regression and interpolation; numerical differentiation and integration; solution of ordinary and partial differential equations; finite difference and finite element methods; and introduction to programming for parallel processing and multimode machine. Theory will be implemented with several projects emphasizing design applications.

Prerequisite: ENS 136 and CSC 126

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 350 Transport Processes

(Also PHY 350)

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to momentum, heat, and mass transfer. Introduction to continuous media, control volume formulation of conservation laws, momentum and energy consideration of fluid flow, heat transfer by conduction and radiation, mass diffusion, analogies and breakdown of analogies among momentum, heat, and mass transfer.

Prerequisites: ENS 310 and CSC 126 or CSC 270

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 356 Theory of Electromagnetic Radiation

(Also PHY 356)

4 hours; 4 credits

Production, propagation, scattering, and absorption of electromagnetic waves. Max well’s equations in differential form, wave equation, energy transfer, and the behavior of waves at metallic and dielectric surfaces.

Production of radiation by dipoles and its absorption. Design of antennas, wave guides, and other applications.

Prerequisites: PHY 160 and CSC 126

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 359 Mechanical Materials Laboratory

4 hours; 2 credits

Introduction to the measurement of mechanical properties of materials. Testing of materials in tension, compression, shear, and torsion. Experiments with beams and columns. Stress and strain measurement. Exercises involving design, building, testing, and evaluation.

Pre- or corequisite: ENS 380

ENS 362 Microcontrollers

(Also CSC 462)

2 class hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Introduction to microcontrollers with an overview of the

CPU architecture, instruction set, interface with target board, testing and program development using the structured assembly preprocessor. Interrupts and interrupt timing, analog-to-digital conversion and programming of peripheral chips will be some of the concepts covered in this class.

Prerequisite: ENS 220 or CSC 346

ENS 371 Systems Analysis

2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory; 3 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 177

Applications of Convolution. Complete responses of first, second, and higher order-circuits. Transient analysis and frequency response. Analog filter design.

Analogy to mechanical, fluid, and thermal systems. Introduction to feedback control system and the application of Laplace transform in analysis of response of dynamic systems.

Prerequisites: ENS 241, ENS 310,and MTH 330

Systematic design of integrated digital systems, using combinational, sequential, and MSI/LSI circuit chips.

Transistor and FET circuit analysis and design. Operational amplifiers. Design of linear and nonlinear analog systems based on op-amps.

Prerequisites: ENS 220 and ENS 241

ENS 380 Mechanics of Solids

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to engineering applications of static behavior of rigid and deformable systems. Definition of state of stress and strain at a point. Dependence of strain upon stress and temperature. Basic analysis of axial loading, pressure vessels, torsional strain, and stresses. Flexural loading and deflections. Stress-transforming equations and Mohr’s circle. Analysis of statically indeterminate members. Columns and buckling. Application to stress distribution and deformations.

Prerequisites: CSC 126 or CSC 270 and ENS 250

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 422 Signals and Noise

4 hours; 4 credits

Application of probability theory to engineering problems.

Topics include random signal models and their uses, linear prediction and signal modeling, filtering of stationary random signals, parameter identification by the maximum likelihood methods, noise reduction and signal enhancement filters, quantization noise, linear estimation and detection of signals.

Prerequisites: ENS 241 and senior-level status

ENS 383 Electrical Properties of Materials

(Also PHY 383)

3 hours; 3 credits

Electrons in atoms, electrons in crystals, contacts between materials and p-n junctions, bipolar transistors, optoelectronic devices, field-effect transistors, charge transfer devices, integrated circuits, solid state lasers.

Photo cells and LEDs.

Prerequisites: PHY 240, and CSC 126 or CSC 270

ENS 432 Digital and Analog Communication

Systems

4 hours; 4 credits

Bandwidth limitations on communication system capacity.

Review of Fourier transforms. Sampling theorems. Digital systems: PAM, PCM. Analog systems: AM, FM. Modulator and demodulator circuits. Introduction to probability theory and detection of signals in noise, information theory, and coding.

Prerequisites: ENS 241 and senior-level status

ENS 384 Mechanical Properties of Materials

(Also PHY 384)

3 hours; 3 credits

Structure of crystalline and noncrystalline solids. Phase transformations. Thermodynamics of multicomponent systems, surfaces, reaction rates, diffusion, and structural change. Mechanical properties, plasticity, strengthening.

Ceramics and polymers, electronic and optical properties, thermoelectricity, magnetism.

Prerequisites: ENS 310 and CSC 270

ENS 410 Heat Transfer

4 hours; 4 credits

Fundamental principles and objectives of heat transfer.

Steady-state and transient heat conduction. Forced and free convection in external and internal flows. Heat transfer during change of phase. Heat exchangers and heat transfer by radiation.

Pre- or corequisite: ENS 450

ENS 416 Applied Elasticity

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to the theory of elasticity, and application of advanced strength of materials concepts to the design of elements of machines and structures.

Prerequisite: ENS 380

Pre- or corequisites: MTH 331 and ENS 336

ENS 420 Analog and Digital Systems Design

4 hours; 4 credits

ENS 434 Energy Conversion

4 hours; 4 credits

Fundamental principles of conversion of such prime energy sources as chemical, nuclear, and solar into thermal, electrical, mechanical, and other forms of energy.

Applications of thermochemical, electrochemical, and electromagnetic devices. Power plants and energy transmission. Direct energy conversion.

Prerequisite: ENS 310

ENS 436 Electric Energy Systems

4 hours; 4 credits

Fundamental concepts and operational considerations of electric energy systems. Synchronous machines, power transformers, and high-energy transmission lines. Energy flow and load-flow analysis. Surge impedance loading and symmetrical fault analysis. Unbalanced systems analysis. Control problems and transient stability analysis.

Prerequisite: ENS 241

Pre- or corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 438 Power Plant Design and Analysis

4 hours; 4 credits

Thermodynamic cycles for power plants. Economic analysis of power plants. System performance characteristics and selection. Analysis of steam generation and turbine systems. Cooling tower design. Condenser design. System simulation and optimization.

Prerequisite: ENS 310

178 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

ENS 446 Computer Architecture

(Also CSC 446)

4 hours; 4 credits

Instruction formats and addressing schemes. Arithmetic and logic unit design. Control unit design: hardwired and microprogrammed. Main memory technology. Virtual, high-speed, associative, and read-only memories. Programmable logic arrays. Computer organizations including stack, parallel, and pipeline. System structures: time sharing, multiprocessing, and networking. Digital communications. Input/output systems; direct memory access.

Prerequisite: CSC 346 or ENS 220 evaluation of simple heat transfer and mechanical systems.

Prerequisite: ENS 249

Pre- or corequisite: ENS 450

ENS 466 Telecommunications and Network

Engineering

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

Fundamentals of signals and noise; digital signal formats and modulation techniques; speech and video signals.

Fiber optic, satellite, and mobile communications fundamentals; cellular telephony and mobile radio networks.

Overview of telecommunication networking fundamentals focusing on access, metro, and wide area regions.

Prerequisite: ENS 221

Pre- or corequisite: ENS 331

ENS 439 Systems Laboratory

4 laboratory hours; 2 credits

Students will undertake projects illustrating the principles, operation, and characteristics of electrical and electromechanical systems, operational amplifiers, digital filters, and transducers. Additional projects will involve modulation, transmission, and detection in analog and digital communication systems, and signal and image processing techniques. Projects will be designed and simulated using the appropriate hardware and software tools.

Measured data will be compared to simulated results.

These projects fulfill the course objective of translation of systems theory into operating circuitry and systems.

Prerequisite: ENS 249

ENS 441 Electrical Power Transmission and

Distribution

2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours; 4 credits, 6 hours

Power and three-phase circuits, power transmission, and transformers. Real and reactive power, power flow and power handling capacity of parallel lines. Long haul high-voltage power transmission. Power distribution between two parallel lines. Phase shift and auto transformers. Power fluctuations under abnormal transmission phase shift and auto transformers. Power fluctuations under abnormal transmission line conditions.

Transmission line faults. Three-phase distribution transformer configurations.

Prerequisite: ENS 241

Corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 463 Introduction to Nanotechnology

(also PHY 463)

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory; 4 credits

This is an introductory course on nanotechnology. It covers the physical basics of submicron- and nano-size structures, methods and materials of nanotechnology, characterization of nanostructures and their industrial applications. The course covers (i) mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of nanoscopic systems; (ii) engineering approaches in nano-electro-mechanics; nanoelectronics, and nanophotonics; (iii) practical computer simulation and design of nanodevices; (iv) practical nanofabrication of rudimentary nanodevices with focused ion beams.

Prerequisite: ENS /PHY 485

ENS 464 Embedded Systems Analysis and

Design

2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours ; 4 credits

An introduction to theoretical and experimental concepts in embedded design involving a microcontroller an will focus on the concept of engineering analysis and design.

It will serve as an integrating experience where students will build a microcontroller-based project that will be tested and documented in the laboratory. The course will emphasize engineering design subject to realistic constraints covering applications in areas such as energy conservation, biomedical instrumentation, space science, computer architectures, and robotics.

Prerequisite: ENS 362 or CSC 462

ENS 450 Fluid Mechanics

(Also PHY 450)

4 hours; 4 credits

Fluid properties, fluid statics, buoyancy and stability, fluids in rigid-body motion. Basic fluid equations in differential and integral form, Navier-Stokes equation. Euler equation, Bernoulli equation and engineering applications. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Internal incompressible viscous flow and flow measurement.

Prerequisite: ENS 310

Pre- or Corequisite: MTH 330

ENS 470 Introduction to Environmental

Engineering

4 hours; 4 credits

Principles of systems analysis as applied to environmental problems. Topics to be chosen from air and water pollution, energy utilization, thermal pollution, transportation systems, solid and liquid waste disposal, etc.

Prerequisite: ENS 310

ENS 459 Applied Mechanics Laboratory

4 hours; 2 credits

Experiments in conduction, convection, and radiation.

Experiments with floating body stability, fluid losses under different flow configurations. Experiments with engines, governors, and pumps. Design, building, testing, and

ENS 471 Control Systems

2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory; 3 credits

Concepts of feedback control system and the application of Laplace transform in analysis of response of dynamic systems. State space and transfer function models of

dynamic systems. System reduction and response analysis. Sensitivity, stability, and steady-state error analysis. Root locus and frequency response (Bode and

Nyquist) design methods, compensator design. Computer-aided analysis/design will be emphasized using engineering design and analysis tools.

Prerequisites: ENS 371, ENS 310 and ENS 336

ENS 473 Image and Video Processing in

Engineering

4 hours laboratory, 2 hours lecture; 4 credits

An introduction to digital image fundamentals, digital image systems, image enhancement, image transforms, image restoration, image segmentation, and image/video compression techniques with applications in areas of radar, forward-looking infra-red (FLIR), medical imaging, and astrophysics.

Prerequisites: ENS 331, ENS 336

ENS 485 Properties of Materials

(Also PHY 485)

4 hours; 4 credits

Structure of crystalline and noncrystalline solids. Defects in solids. Phase equilibrium and transformations, thermodynamics of multicomponent systems, surfaces, diffusions, and structural changes. Mechanical properties, plasticity, strengthening. Heat treatment. Electrical properties, conductivity, energy bands, semiconductors, superconductors, and devices. Optical and dielectric properties, optical fibers, and lasers. Magnetic and thermal properties. Material consideration in the engineering design process.

Prerequisite: PHY 240

ENS 491 Advanced Engineering Design I

4 laboratory hours; 2 credits

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence dealing with the major design experience, which provides an integration of the analytical techniques of engineering science and mathematics, and their application to engineering design. Topics covered: problem identification, formulation of the problem, proposed solution(s), theoretical foundation and simulation of the proposed solution.

Prerequisites: ENS 336 and ENS 362

Pre- or corequisite: ENS 439

ENS 492 Advanced Engineering Design II

4 laboratory hours; 2 credits

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence dealing with the major design experience. Topics covered: engineering standards; realistic constraints including but not limited to economic, environmental, social, ethical, and political considerations, manufacturability, health and safety, and sustainability; system design adaptation under realistic constraints; and design implementation and demonstration of functionality.

Prerequisites: ECO 285, ENS 471, ENS 491

English

(Bachelor of Arts, Minor, Concentration in Dramatic Literature; Master of Arts, see Graduate Catalog)

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 179

Department of English, Building 2S, Room 205

Chairperson and Associate Professor Ashley Dawson

The Department of English offers a major and a minor in

English with options in Literature, Writing, and Linguistics, and a minor in Speech. A concentration in Dramatic

Literature is offered in cooperation with the Department of Performing and Creative Arts. (See also section on

Dramatic Arts.)

English (BA)

Major Requirements: 44 credits

Literature Concentration (44 credits):

English: Literature Concentration Four-Year Plan

English (7-12): Literature Concentration Four-Year

Plan

Three Required Courses 12 credits

4 credits ENL 290 Introduction to Literary

Studies

ENL 300 British and American Literary

Traditions 1

4 credits

ENL 310 World Literature in Contexts 4 credits

At least one of the remaining courses must be pre-1800.

Required Coverage Areas (20 credits):

Students must take one ENL course in each of the following literary coverage areas, and no course may satisfy more than one coverage area.

1. British literature (including period, movement, or major figure).

2. American literature (including period, movement, or major figure).

3. Literature in translation (including period, movement, or major figure).

4. Literature written by women, American minorities, or

Third World writers (including period, movement, or major figure).

5. Genre or theme. ENL 323 (Coming of Age Narratives), which falls under this category, is strongly recommended for English majors in the Adolescence

Education Sequence.

Remaining Courses (12 credits)*:

These twelve credits may be linguistics, literature (ENL), or writing courses (ENL), or ENL 302 (Oral Interpretation of Literature).

*English majors in the Adolescence Education sequence are required to take ENL 323 (Coming of Age in

Literature) and either ENH 230 (Introduction to Language) or ENL 422 (Introduction to English Phonetics and Phonology).

Writing Concentration (44 credits):

English: Writing Concentration Four-Year Plan

English (7-12): Writing Concentration Four-Year

Plan

Three Required Courses 12 credits

ENL 290 Introduction to Literary

Studies

4 credits

180 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

ENL 300 British and American

Literary Traditions 1

4 credits

ENL 310 World Literature in Contexts 4 credits

Five ENL writing courses (20 credits at least 12 at the

300 or 400 level).

Remaining Courses (12 credits):

These twelve credits may be Linguistics (ENL), Literature (ENL), Dramatic Literature (ENL), or Writing (ENL).*

*English majors in the Adolescence Education sequence are required to take ENL 323 (Coming of Age in

Literature) and either ENH 230 (Introduction to Language) or ENL 422 (Introduction to Linguistics).

Linguistics Concentration (44 credits):

English: Linguistics Concentration Four-Year Plan

English (7-12): Linguisitics Concentration Four-Year

Plan

Three Required Courses 12 credits

4 credits ENL 290 Introduction to Literary

Studies

ENL 300 British and American

Literary Traditions 1

4 credits

ENL 310 World Literature in

Contexts

4 credits

Linguistics Courses (20 credits)

Linguistics courses may be selected from the following:

ENH 230 Introduction to Language

ENL 422 Introduction to Linguistics

ENL 423 Modern English Grammar

ENL 424 Language Change

ENL 425 History of the English Language

ENL 426 Language Acquisition and

Psycholinguistics

ENL 427 Sociology of Language

ENL 428 English Phonetics and Phonology

Remaining Courses (12 credits):

These twelve credits may be Linguistics (ENL), Literature (ENL), Dramatic Literature (ENL), or Writing (ENL).

*English majors in the Adolescence Education sequence are required to take ENL 323 (Coming of Age in

Literature) and either ENH 230 (Introduction to Language) or ENL 422 (Introduction to Linguistics).

Dramatic Literature Concentration (44 credits):

English: Dramatic Literature Four-Year Plan

English (7-12): Dramatic Literature Four-Year Plan

Three Required Courses 12 credits

ENL 290 Introduction to Literary

Studies

4 credits

ENL 300 British and American

Literary Traditions 1

ENL 310 World Literature in

Contexts

4 credits

4 credits

Dramatic Literature Courses (12 credits):

Dramatic Literature courses must be selected from the following:

Note: One pre-1800 course is required and one post-1800 course is required

ENL 361 The Early Shakespeare

ENL 362 The Later Shakespeare

ENL 354 English Drama to 1800

ENL 357 World Drama to 1800

ENL 355 Modern European Drama

ENL 356 American Drama

ENL 358 World Drama since 1800

ENL 359 Contemporary Drama

FRN 426 Classical French Drama

SPN 345 Spanish Theater

SPN 425 The Golden Age of Spanish Drama

ENL 272

ENL 373 Playwriting I, II

Dramatic Arts Courses (8 credits):

DRA 110 Acting I

DRA

141/

Theater Production

3 credits

3 credits;

1 credit

DRA 142

DRA 210 Acting II

DRA 213 Movement for the

Theater

DRA 217 Voice/Diction for

Performance and

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

Communication

DRA 221 Topics on Productions 4 credits

DRA 230 Set Design for the

Theater

3 credits

DRA 272 Performance Histories 4 credits

DRA 321 Directing 4 credits

Remaining Courses (12 credits):

These twelve credits may be Linguistics (ENL), Literature (ENL), Dramatic Literature (ENL), or Writing (ENL).*

*English majors in the Adolescence Education sequence are required to take ENL 323 (Coming of Age in

Literature) and either ENH 230 (Introduction to Language) or ENL 422 (Introduction to Linguistics).

Electives: 10-34 credits

Students in the Literature, Writing, or Linguistics options planning to complete the Adolescence

Education sequence may count the required education courses as electives.

Total Credits Required: 120

Honors

Graduating English majors may apply for graduation with honors in English. Candidates must have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher and must take an independent study with a full-time faculty member, in order to write an honors-quality paper, which will be submitted to the Honors Committee on the dates described below.

The paper submitted need not be a new work; it may be a revision or extension of a paper previously submitted in a course. Research papers, critical papers, and original works of prose or poetry are acceptable. Candidates should ask an English Department faculty member of their choosing to supervise the preparation of the paper; papers submitted to the Honors Committee must have the signature of this faculty member on the title page.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 181

Honors projects should demonstrate superior originality, depth, and research, and critical or creative intelligence.

Papers must be technically correct and research papers must have accurate MLA citations.

0-level writing course within their first 12 equated credits.

Students who score 5 or below on the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing on entrance are required to take the appropriate 0-level writing course within their first eight equated credits.

Students planning to apply for graduation with honors in

English are strongly urged to begin preparation of their

Honors projects before the semester of their graduation.

Papers for majors graduating in January must be submitted to the English Department Office (Building 2S,

Room 218) by November 20; papers for majors graduating in June or August by April 1st.

Department Policy for Independent Studies:

In order to take an Independent Study, students must have completed a minimum of 24 credits in the major with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Students may take no more than 8 credits of Independent Studies in the major.

Applications for Independent Studies must be completed and submitted to the department chair by 5:00 pm on

Friday at the end of the first full week of the semester in which the student is to complete the study. No Independent Studies may be offered during the winter and summer sessions.

Students needing remediation are expected to complete the remedial courses that qualify them to enter college-level writing courses in one year, which may include, in addition to two semesters, a pre-freshman and a post-freshman Summer Immersion course and a

Winter Intersession. Students for whom English is a second language (ESL students) have two academic years to pass the assessment tests in reading and writing. The tests are administered at the end of most academic interventions that students complete (remedial courses, Summer Immersion, January Intersession, or tutorial workshops).

0-Level Courses in Reading and

Writing for Native Speakers of

English

Adolescence Education Sequence: 24 Credits

Students wishing to be recommended by the College for certification must successfully complete the Adolescence Education sequence courses, as well as their academic major. The sequence may be begun in the sophomore year. To complete the sequence in two years it must be begun by the beginning of the junior year. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.75 to be admitted to all adolescence education courses. Please refer to the Education/Adolescence Education section of the Catalog for the Adolescence Education sequence course listing.

0-Level Courses in Reading and Writing for Native

Speakers of English

The following courses are designed for native speakers of English who fail the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and/or the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing.

ENG 001 Developmental Writing I

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Intensive work in writing with fluency and correctness in a variety of modes, both informal and formal.

Prerequisite: Score of 2-6 on CUNY/ACT Writing Sample

Test

English Minors

Minor in Linguistics

At least 12 credits of courses in linguistics.

Minor in Literature

At least 12 credits in ENL literature courses (at least one of which in literature before 1800).

Minor in Speech

At least ten credits of courses in speech.

ENG 002 Basic Reading

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Intensive work on reading, both fiction and nonfiction.

Emphasis on decoding, fluency, and accuracy. Frequent writing.

Prerequisites: Failing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, interview and placement by English Department reading coordinator or designer

Minor in Writing

At least 12 credits in writing (ENL), at least one at or above the 300 level.

ENG 003 Developmental Writing II

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Intensive work in revising, proofreading, and editing.

Prerequisites: Score of 2-6 on the CUNY Assessment

Test in Writing and passing grade in ENG 001

English Courses

CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and CUNY

Assessment Test in Writing

Students who fail the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading on entrance are required to take the appropriate

0-level reading course in their first semester.

Students who score 6 on the CUNY Assessment Test in

Writing on entrance are required to take the appropriate

ENG 004 Developmental Reading

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Introduction to college-level reading and techniques for improving comprehension. Frequent writing.

Prerequisites: Failing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and either interview and placement by English

Department reading coordinator or designer or passing grade in ENG 002

ENG 014 Reading for College

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

182 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Intensive work in college-level reading and techniques for improving comprehension. Frequent writing. An additional hour each week will be scheduled in the English Department Skills Center for instruction and practice in test taking.

Prerequisites: Failing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and either passing grade in ENG 004 or placement by English Department reading coordinator or designer

ENG 039 Reading for Non-Native Speakers of

English

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Emphasis on comprehension of longer fictional and textbook material.

Prerequisites: Failing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, interview and placement by English Department

ESL coordinator or designer

0-Level Courses in Reading and

Writing for Non-Native Speakers of

English

0-Level Courses in Reading and Writing for

Non-Native Speakers of English

The following courses are designed for those students who are not native speakers of English who fail the

CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and/or the CUNY

Assessment Test in Writing.

ENG 007 Developmental English for

Non-Native Speakers

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Intensive work in oral and written expression.

Prerequisites: Failing CUNY/ACT Writing Sample Test, interview and placement by English Department ESL coordinator or designer

ENG 008 Developmental Writing for

Non-Native Speakers of English

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Intensive work in writing.

Prerequisites: Failing CUNY/ACT Writing Sample Test, interview and placement by English Department ESL coordinator or designer

ENG 009 Basic Reading for Non-Native

Speakers of English

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Intensive study of the sounds and spellings of English.

Prerequisites: Failing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, interview and placement by English Department reading coordinator or designer

ENG 010 Developmental Reading for

Non-Native Speakers of English

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Introduction to college-level reading. Techniques for vocabulary expansion will be stressed.

Prerequisites: Failing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading, interview and placement by English Department reading coordinator or designer

ENG 037 Writing for Non-Native Speakers of

English

4 hours; 0 credit, 4 equated credits

Practice in writing the complete essay with review of necessary basic skills.

Prerequisites: Failing CUNY/ACT Writing Sample Test, interview and placement by English Department ESL coordinator or designer

General Education Writing Courses

All students in the College are required to complete

ENG 111 Introduction to College Writing and ENG 151

College Writing.

ENG 111 Introduction to College Writing

4 hours; 3 credits

Introduction to and development of critical and analytic writing/reading/thinking skills through class discussion of student work and selected texts. Intensive instruction in techniques for the planning, drafting, revising, and editing of college-level expository essays. Introduction to using the various research options available at the CSI Library.

(RECR)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading and the CUNY Assessment

Test in Writing.

ENG 151 College Writing

4 hours; 3 credits

This course builds on the work of ENG 111. It emphasizes expository and analytic writing and longer papers. Attention to reading, library skills, and research methods.

Sections may be focused on particular themes, to be announced in the Semester Information. (RECR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and passing the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading

ENH Literature Courses

ENH 201 British Literature to 1800

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of British literature in its cultural context from the early periods through the 18th century. (literature)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 202 British Literature since 1800

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of British literature in its cultural context since the early 19th century. Readings may include literature from

Ireland, Scotland, and parts of the British Commonwealth in addition to literature from England. (literature) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 203 Literary History of the United States to 1855

4 hours; 4 credits

American literary expression, ranging from the histories of the Puritans to the poetry of Walt Whitman, studied in the context of the developing American culture. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 204 Literary History of the United States since 1855

4 hours; 4 credits

A history of American literary expression, ranging from the poetry of Dickinson to the novels of Hemingway and

Faulkner. Special attention will be given to placing the works in the context of the developing American culture.

(literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 205 Classics of European Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the principal forms, themes, and values of older European literature from Greek times to the Renaissance. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 206 Classics of Modern World Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of major works and movements in modern and contemporary world literature. (literature) (COPR) (TA-

LA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 207 Asian Literatures Before 1900

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of works from Asia before the 20th century organized according to specific themes and issues. (literature)

(p&d) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 208 Contemporary Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of important figures and trends in literature since World War II. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 209 Literature and Global Cultures

4 hours, 4 credits

This course will investigate the traditions of cultural production that arose around the world during the last 100 years, focusing on artistic forms including fiction, nonfiction, theater, music, and film. (cont. wld.) (TALA)

(COPR)

Prerequisite: COR 100, ENG 151

ENH 210 Introduction to Fiction

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of various types of fiction. Special attention to such elements as plot, character development, setting, theme, point of view, style. (literature) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 211 Introduction to Poetry

4 hours; 4 credits

A critical study of the variety of poetry, focusing on such recurring themes as the artist, the hero, belief and alienation, self and society, fantasy and reality, and love. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 183

ENH 212 Introduction to Drama

(Also DRA 215)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the variety of forms and themes of dramatic literature. Major problems treated by dramatists will be examined, as well as genres: tragedy, comedy, farce, melodrama, tragicomedy, and the thesis play. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 213 Introduction to Nonfiction

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of great works of prose focusing on the ways they have been used to illuminate the self and society. Readings will be drawn from a variety of nonfiction genres such as autobiography, biography, letters and journals, journalism, essays, criticism, historical accounts and analysis, manifestos, theoretical treatises. (literature)

(COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 214 Trends in Literature and Film

4 hours; 4 credits

An investigation into the ways in which film has become a literary genre and what seem to be the future relationships between literature and film. (literature) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 215 Literature and Humanities

4 hours; 4 credits

The treatment of major humanistic concerns in literature.

The specific focus of each section will be announced in the Semester Information. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 216 The Bible and Later Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the Bible as a literary work and its importance as an influence on later literature. (literature) (COPR)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 217 Introduction to Shakespeare

4 hours; 4 credits

Representative works from across the spectrum of

Shakespeare’s career. The course is designed to introduce students to Shakespeare’s language, interests, visions, and styles and to give them a sense of his historical context. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 221 African American Literature

(Also AFA 221)

4 hours; 4 credits

A sociological examination of African American literature as it has developed from the dynamic interaction between

Black and White communities and movements within the

Black community. Works by African American authors will be analyzed with respect to the dominant social forces of their times and the ideas about the historically persistent polemics of assimilation, separation, or cultural pluralism, and their relevance for Americans of African descent in

184 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions their struggle for equality. (literature) (p&d) (COPR) (TA-

LA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENH 222 Women and Literature

(Also WGS 222)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of works by and about women drawn from a variety of periods and genres. (literature) (COPR) (p&d)

(TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 or any 200-level ENG course

ENH 224 U.S. Literature: Multicultural

Perspectives

4 hours; 4 credits

Literature by and about members of ethnic, racial, religious, sexual, and other minorities in the U.S. (literature)

(COPR) (p&d) (TALA)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG 151

ENH 230 Introduction to Language

4 hours; 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the study of language. It explores the following relationships: language and society; language and culture; language and thought; language and biology. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENH Linguistics Courses

ENH 230 Introduction to Language

4 hours; 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the study of language. It explores the following relationships: language and society; language and culture; language and thought; language and biology. (linguistics) (TALA)(COPR)

Prerequisite: ENG 151

200 Level ENL Writing Courses

ENL 265 Journal I

4 hours; 4 credits

During the semester, each student keeps a journal, including fragments of responses to whatever moments and situations (personal, domestic, social, cultural) about which he/she wishes to write. Students will be encouraged to develop these fragments and their connections as an understanding of them deepens. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 267 Craft of Creative Writing

4 hours; 4 credits

Craft of Creative Writing introduces students to the literary conventions of creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and playwriting. The course will explore the elements that set the genres apart, the elements they share, and the relationship between reading and writing. Texts will be taken from the four major genres and used as models for students’ creative writing. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 272 Playwriting I

4 hours; 4 credits

A course that will start with the writing of short dramatic scenes and will culminate in the writing of a one-act play or a single act of a larger play. Attendance at productions and reading from dramatic literature will be encouraged.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 274 Introduction to Screen Writing

(Also CIN 274)

4 hours; 4 credits

Writing for television and film. Class discussions of students’ work and the problems of creating in this field. Selected readings. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 277 Introduction to Journalism

(Also COM 277)

4 hours; 4 credits

A general introduction to the principles of journalism.

Work on reporting, editing, and layout, and an examination of distribution/feedback systems. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 280 Introd uction to Women’s Written

Expression

(Also WGS 280)

4 hours; 4 credits

A course to develop skill in both imaginative and critical writing based primarily on the students’ personal experiences, with some analysis of poetry and short stories written by selected women authors. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 281 Writing and Peer Tutoring

4 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Provides an in-depth knowledge of the skills of exposition and advanced prose style through the writing and criticism of expository essays. The student will work with students in need of help in the College’s English Learning

Center for two hours per week in addition to the four hours of classroom work. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisites: ENG 151, letter of recommendation from the student’s ENG 151 instructor, and permission of the instructor.

ENL 290 Introduction to Literary Studies

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the study of literature and specifically to the ways that people think, talk, and write about literature.

It addresses the basic questions of literary study and its vocabulary: What is literature? What are the main kinds of literature? What are the main approaches to the study of literature? The course includes reading and writing about a selection of major works that represent a variety of periods and movements. It offers the rudiments of the knowledge necessary for further study in the field. This course is required for all English majors.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

Pre or corequisite: Any 200 level ENH course

ENL Literature Courses

ENL 300 British and American Literary

Traditions 1

4 hours; 4 credits

A one-semester survey of British and American literature from the Medieval through the Romantic periods. It will include important works from many genres and modes, placing those works in their aesthetic and cultural contexts. This course is required for all English majors. Not open to students who took ENL 376.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENL 290

ENL 301 British and American Literary

Traditions 2

4 hours; 4 credits

A one-semester survey of British and American literature from the early nineteenth century through the twentieth century, including representative texts from at least three modern movements (such as Romanticism, Realism, and

Modernism). This course begins where ENL 300 leaves off and includes works from many genres and modes, placing those works in their aesthetic and cultural contexts. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature course .

Pre or Corequisite: ENL 290

ENL 302 Oral Interpretation of Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

The oral interpretation of poetry, drama, fiction, and historical speeches. Students will prepare for oral performance by reading aloud, raising questions of meaning, doing library research, writing paraphrases, comparing other interpretations, and consulting an author’s other works.

Pre- or corequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 312 Theories of Mass Media

(Also AMS 309/LNG 309)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines U.S. literature in a comparative, transnational frame by considering U.S. writing with relation to what lies outside national borders and emphasizing the role of international cultures, literatures, and politics in the development of U.S. writing. The course will cover, variously, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies (beyond U.S.-British), transpacific studies, and Africa-U.S. studies.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 310 World Literature in Contexts

4 hours, 4 credits

An exploration of the literatures of several cultures amid specific historical contexts, as well as a study of cultural differences and similarities and cross-cultural influences.

This course examines the literature of polities in at least three disparate geographical regions, during at least two historical periods. It engages students in a practice of literary criticism that sets the texts within particular historical formations, even as students pursue cross-cultural

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 185 study. This course is requirement for all English majors.

Not open to students who have completed ENL 365.

Pre- or corequisite: ENL 290

ENL 312 Theories of Mass Media

(Also COM 312)

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of contemporary communications theory defining the language, structure, systems, effects, and rhetoric of the mass media. Practical examples in journalism, advertising, publishing, radio, television, and film will be analyzed.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 314 Classical Greek and Roman Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

Readings in translation and discussion of works from

Homer to Tacitus. Special attention will be given to the characteristics of specific genres.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 315 Early Celtic Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

Examines older literature of the Celtic languages of the

British Isles and northwest Europe. Mythological, heroic, romance, and historical works may be considered. All works will be read in translation. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 316 Medieval Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the European contemporaries of Chaucer, including works dealing with Arthurian legends. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 317 English Literature prior to the

Renaissance

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of Old English and English Medieval literature through the 15th century. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 318 English Literature of the Renaissance

4 hours; 4 credits

A generic and thematic study of the nondramatic literature of 16th- and 17th-century England, with emphasis on

Spenser and the Sidney circle. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 319 European Literature of the

Renaissance and 17th Century

4 hours; 4 credits

Readings in translation of the major works of European literature from the late 14th century through the 17th

186 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions century.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 320 English Literature of the 17th Century

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of poets and prose writers of the period, from John Donne through John Dryden. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course ideas relating to immigration, exile, diasporization, globalization, multilingualism, and nationalism through literary, cinematic, and cultural creativity. Examples from world literature and culture are taught with an emphasis on cross-cultural contact and conflict within and beyond national contexts. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and women, minority and world literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 151

Pre or corequisites: 200-level ENH course

ENL 322 English Literature in the Age of

Reason

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of 18th-century England with emphasis on such authors as Addison, Steele, Swift, and Pope, and on the change in society during the period of the Enlightenment.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 330 The American Renaissance

4 hours; 4 credits

A detailed study of selected texts by Emerson, Thoreau,

Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman. The authors and their works are considered in relation to the social and philosophical backgrounds of their time.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and American literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 323 Coming of Age Narratives

4 hours, 4 credits

This course explores representations of adolescent experiences in a variety of historical and cultural contexts.

This course is required for all English majors in the

adolescence education sequence. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course.

Pre- or corequisite: ENH 218

ENL 324 Readings in English Romanticism

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of selected texts by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats, and others. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and

British literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 325 Readings in Victorian Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of important works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction of the period by such authors as Tennyson, Hopkins,

Dickens, G. Eliot, Arnold, Mill, Hardy. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and

British literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 326 European Literature: 1780-1850

4 hours; 4 credits

Readings in European literature and related intellectual texts of the Romantic period with a view toward tracing the emergence of a distinctively modern consciousness.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and literature in translation course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 329 Migration and Diasporas in Literature and Culture

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines literatures and cultures born of international and national migrations. Students explore

ENL 331 The Modernists I

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the development of the modernist sensibility from the symbolists through World War I. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 332 The Modernists II

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the modernist sensibility from the 1920s through the Existentialists.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature course.

Prerequisite: A ENH 200 level course

ENL 333 Modern Irish Writers

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of Anglo-Irish literature since the Renaissance, with emphasis on Yeats and Joyce. Includes readings from Synge, O’Casey, Kinsella, Behan, O’Flaherty, and

John Montague. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and British literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 334 Modern Russian Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of Russian literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and literature in translation course.

Prerequisite: A 200-level English course

ENL 335 Modern Asian Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of the world of Asia through literature.

Works of major modern writers of India, China, Japan, and Vietnam will be studied with a view to understanding changing beliefs and values. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and women, minority and world literature course.(p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 187

ENL 336 Postmodern American Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the concept of postmodernism as portrayed in contemporary American culture and literature.

The instructors may choose various themes and genres within this rubric. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and American literature course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

Corequisite: An ENH 200-level course nors, this is designated as a literature, British literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 343 Studies in 19th-Century European

Fiction

4 hours; 4 credits

Readings in European fiction, including Hugo, Balzac,

Stendhal, Zola, Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, and Tolstoy.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 337 The Comic Vision

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of comedy as a literary genre. Works will range from classical to modern and will cover the forms of comedy from farce to tragicomedy. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course.

ENL 338 Epic and Romance

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of these genres, their similarities and dissimilarities, from classical and medieval times to the present. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, genre, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 339 The Tragic Vision

4 hours; 4 credits

Themes and images evident in the Western tragic tradition, in all literary genres, will be examined. Relevant criticism will be studied to develop a framework for evaluation.For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 340 Autobiography and Biography

4 hours; 4 credits

An analysis of the autobiographical genre with attention to its evolution from the Middle Ages to the present. Biography will be discussed in contrast: the form of each, the structure of truth and illusion, the role of memory and imagination, the interaction of past and present, and the relation of the individual to society. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 344 American Fiction from 1885 until

World War II

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of major figures and movements in

American fiction from the Civil War until World War II.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, American literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 345 American Fiction since World War II

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of significant short fiction and novels since World War II together with a consideration of major movements and trends. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, American literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 346 Modern English Fiction through

World War II

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the development of the English novel since

1900 with special attention to such figures as Conrad,

Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, and Graham Greene. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature,

British literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 347 Major 20th-Century Novelists

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of major modern works of fiction from Europe,

Latin America, Asia, and Africa. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 341 Studies in 18th-Century Fiction

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of selected novels by Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Swift, Sterne, Prevost, Voltaire, Diderot,

Laclos, Wieland, Goethe, and others who contributed to the development of prose fiction. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, genre and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 348 Women Novelists

(Also WGS 348)

4 hours; 4 credits

Significant novels by such women authors as Jane Austen, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Willa Cather, Virginia Woolf, Doris Lessing, Jean Rhys. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, Women, Minority, and Third-World literature and genre course.

(p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 342 Studies in 19th-Century English

Fiction

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of major English novelists from Jane Austen through George Gissing. For English majors and mi-

ENL 349 English and Commonwealth Fiction since World War II

4 hours; 4 credits

188 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

An examination of major figures and trends in English fiction since World War II. Readings will be drawn from such authors as Kingsley Amis, Margaret Atwood, Margaret Drabble, Graham Greene, Doris Lessing, V.S.

Naipaul, and Salman Rushdie. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 350 American Poetry

4 hours; 4 credits

The course establishes the relationship between the poets’ personal histories and the American literary tradition, between their different temperaments and individualistic poetic styles. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, American literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 351 Modern English Poetry

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of British, Irish, and Commonwealth poetry in the

20th century. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 352 Major 20th-Century Poets

4 hours; 4 credits

Important 20th-century poets (some in translation) such as Rilke, Lorca, Mistral, Neruda, Ungaretti, Williams,

Thomas, and Pasternak. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a post-1800 and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 353 Contemporary Poetry

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of several of the most prominent poets living and writing in America and England today. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1800 and genre course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 354 English Drama to 1800

(Also DRA 354)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected works with emphasis on Elizabethan and Jacobean drama (exclusive of Shakespeare), and Restoration and 18th-century drama. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, genre, pre-1800, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 355 Modern European Drama

(Also DRA 355)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the major dramatists of the modern European theater, with an emphasis placed upon the development of dramatic styles and themes, as well as the theatrical context in which the plays were produced. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, genre, and dramatic literature, course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 356 American Drama

(Also DRA 356)

4 hours; 4 credits

Readings of plays by O’Neill, Williams, Miller, and others who have dramatized the conflicts and predicaments of

20th-century Americans. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, American literature, genre, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 357 World Drama to 1800

(Also DRA 357)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected plays from the Greeks to 1800. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, genre, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 358 World Drama since 1800

(Also DRA 358)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected plays from 1800 to the present. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, genre, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 359 Contemporary Drama

(Also DRA 359)

4 hours; 4 credits

Major figures, works, and movements in dramatic literature since World War II, with special emphasis on the last two decades. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, genre, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 360 Chaucer

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of Chaucer’s dream visions, Troilus

and Cressida, and The Canterbury Tales. Works to be read in Middle English. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 361 The Early Shakespeare

(Also DRA 361)

4 hours; 4 credits

A selection of Shakespeare’s work written before 1600: early and middle comedies, the major histories, the earlier tragedies, and the poems. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, pre-1800, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 362 The Later Shakespeare

(Also DRA 362)

4 hours; 4 credits

A selection of Shakespeare’s work written after 1600: the major tragedies, the problem plays, the late comedies and romances. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, pre-1800, and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 189

ENL 363 John Milton

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of the major works. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, British literature, and pre-1800 course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 381 Major American Author I

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major American author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and American literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 365 World Literature in Contexts

4 hours, 4 credits

An exploration of the literatures of several cultures amid specific historical contexts, as well as a study of cultural differences and similarities and cross-cultural influences.

This course examines the literature of polities in at least three disparate geographical regions, during at least two historical periods. It engages students in a practice of literary criticism that sets the texts within particular historical formations, even as students pursue cross-cultural study. This course is requirement for all English

majors.

Pre- or corequisite: ENH 218

ENL 368 Queer Studies

(also WGS 368 )

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the field of lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender and queer studies. Readings will be drawn from a variety of literary and critical works that explore sexual identity categories and their meaning in culture For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, women, minority and world literature, and genre course.(p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: ENG 151,

Prerequisite or corequisite: 200-level ENH course

ENL 382 Major American Author II

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major American author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and American literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 383 Major American Author III

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major American author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and American literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 384 Major Woman Author I

(Also WGS 384)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major woman author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and Women, Minority, and Third-World Literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 376 British and American Literary

Traditions

4 hours, 4 credits

A one-semester survey of British and American literature from the Medieval through the Romantic periods. It will include important works from many genres and modes, placing those works in their aesthetic and cultural contexts. This course is required for all English majors.

Pre- or corequisite: ENH 218

ENL 378 Major English Author I

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major English author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, and British literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 379 Major English Author II

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major English author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, and British literature course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 385 Major Woman Author II

(Also WGS 385)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major woman author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and Women, Minority, and Third-World Literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 386 Major Woman Author III

(Also WGS 387)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major woman author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and Women, Minority, and Third-World Literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 387 Major World Author I

(Also LNG 387)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major world author in

English translation. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and literature in translation course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 380 Major English Author III

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major English author.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, and British literature course.

ENL 388 Major World Author II

(Also LNG 388)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major world author in

English translation. For English majors and minors, this

190 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions is designated as a literature and literature in translation course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 389 Major World Author III

(Also LNG 389)

4 hours; 4 credits

Intensive study of the works of a major world author in

English translation. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and literature in translation course.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 390 Studies in Women in Literature and

(Also WGS 390)

the Arts

4 hours; 4 credits

This course ex amines women’s literature, art, and film as shaped by national culture, historical circumstances, class, and age. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and Women, Minority, and

Third-World Literature in translation course. (p&d) (TALA)

(COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 397 Studies in Global Literature II

(Also LNG 397)

4 hours; 4 credits

Focus on literature from outside the U.S. and Europe.

The specific emphasis will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in the Semester Information.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and Women, Minority, and Third-World literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 398 Cultural Variety in the Literature of the United States

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of literature offering perspectives on the diversity that comprises our American experience: ethnic backgrounds, races, religions, genders, sexual orientations, age groups, etc. Focus of the course varies from semester to semester. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, American literature, and

Women, Minority, and Third-World literature course.

(p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course.

ENL 399 Themes in Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of selected themes in literary works. The particular theme for the semester will be announced in the Semester Information. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course. This course may be taken more than once for credit.

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 391 Woman as Hero

(Also WGS 391)

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected readings from Greek drama through current literature, revealing the position and experience of women as heroes. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and women, minority and world literature course.(p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 392 The Black Writer in the Modern World

(Also AFA 323)

4 hours; 4 credits

An intensive study of various recent and contemporary

Black authors, writing in all of the literary genres, and their grappling with traditional and changing environments. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and Women, Minority, and Third-World

Literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 470 Senior Seminar in Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

Various topics in literature, differing from semester to semester. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature course.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor

300 and 400 Level ENL Writing

Courses

ENL 395 Mythic Concepts and Archetypes in

Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

The presence and influence of Jungian and folkloric concepts in past and current literature. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature and genre course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

Prerequisite: An ENH 200-level course

ENL 396 Studies in Global Literature I

(Also LNG 396)

4 hours; 4 credits

Focus on literature from outside the U.S. and Europe.

The specific emphasis will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in the Semester Information.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature, literature in translation, and Women, Minority, and Third-World literature course. (p&d) (TALA) (COPR)

ENL 370 Craft of Creative Nonfiction

4 hours; 4 credits

This course introduces students to the genre and focuses on literary aspects of nonfiction writing. The course explores elements that are specific to nonfiction as well as aspects that it shares with other literary genres. Texts may cover autobiography, memoir, journals, narrative journalism, and literary essays. Class discussions of students' work and selected readings. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENL 265 or ENL 267

ENL 371 Craft of Fiction

4 hours; 4 credits

The course explores the literary conventions that distinguish fiction as a genre. By considering models for their own creative writing, students will learn how to employ

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 191 basic narrative techniques in creating their own short fiction, the focus of which may include but not be limited to: image, voice, character, setting, and plot. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENL 267 or ENL 268

ENL 372 Craft of Poetry

4 hours; 4 credits

Students will explore the use of fundamental poetic devices through their own creative writing. The particular undertaking of employing concrete language to create image will be addressed throughout the course. Students will use assigned texts as models for the creation of original poems. Classroom critique of students' poetry. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENL 267 or ENL 270

ENL 431 Fiction Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

An advanced workshop, ENL 431 concerns aspects of formal technique in the writing of fiction. Students' work may be directed toward narrative sequencing, pacing, character development, dialogue, shifts in point-of view and tense, metafiction, and the many structures to which short and long works of fiction adhere and reinvent. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course. (liberal arts and sciences)

Prerequisite or Corequisite : ENL 267 or ENL 371

ENL 373 Craft of Playwriting

4 hours; 4 credits

This course provides students an introduction to the various elements of playwriting, including plot and character development, staging, and dialogue creation, as well as an opportunity to explore these elements through their own writing and the writing of others. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing and dramatic literature course.

Prerequisite: ENL 267 or ENL 272

ENL 432 Poetry Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

An advanced workshop, this course directs students with a particular emphasis on aspects of form. Students may write poems in free-verse and traditional forms, which may include the sonnet, the sestina, and the villanelle.

Students will use assigned texts as models for the creation of original poems. The course will involve classroom critique of students' poetry. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENL 267 or ENL 372

ENL 412 Broadcast Journalism

(Also COM 412)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the theory, history, and practice of modern newscasting. The class will also focus on the way that traditional broadcast is converging with digital video production and distribution in the creation of news.

Special emphasis will be placed on preparing material for broadcast on radio, television, and online. Readings will explore the economic realities of broadcasting, legal sanctions, and social impact. Students will monitor newscasts, analyze them, and write copy suitable for broadcast. For students wishing to register for the course COM 100 is recommended.

Prerequisite: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204

ENL 429 Autobiographical Writing

4 hours; 4 credits

A writing and discussion course for students who, working in various literary genres, will be exploring autobiography as the basis for content. Conferences and group sessions on the studentauthor’s work. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 430 Creative Writing

4 hours; 4 credits

A series of experiments in the writing of poetry and prose fiction, designed to develop writing skills through extensive practice. Production and publication of selected projects. Class meetings and individual conferences. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENL 267

ENL 433 Nonfiction Writing

4 hours; 4 credits

A course intended to develop the student’s skill in expository and critical writing. Attention will be given to the problems of structure and style with a view to writing with more persuasiveness. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 434 Creative Nonfiction Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

An advanced workshop in creative nonfiction. The class may focus on the outline and structure of nonfiction stories; on reporting techniques; choosing a narrative voice and strategy; and on crafting leads, overtures, and transitions. The workshop will also require substantial readings of nonfiction pieces. Texts may cover: autobiography, memoir, journals, narrative journalism, and literary essays. Class discussion of students' long work. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENL 267 or ENL 370

ENL 435 Playwriting Workshop

4 hours; 4 credits

An advanced workshop in playwriting. Skills developed in this course include the creation of more complex plots, dialogue, and characters, as well as greater expertise to critique the works of others with more depth and attention to detail. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENL 267 or ENL 373

ENL 436 Screen Writing

(Also CIN 436)

4 hours; 4 credits

Study of the craft of constructing the screenplay, treatment, synopsis, and shooting script. The student will work

192 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions on the problems of creating the original filmscript as well as adapting a piece of existing material for the screen.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: CIN/ENL 274 society. The course will consider both the effect of print and broadcast journalism on politics, values, and social standards and the pressures on the press, which define its values. Topics vary from term to term. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: (COM/ENL 277 and COM 204) and (COM

412/ENL 412 or ENL 438/COM 438 or COM 446)

ENL 437 Writing in the Business World

4 hours; 4 credits

Communications, reports, descriptive statements, promotional writing, etc., which form the basis for written work in business, advertising, and industry. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 438 Newspaper Reporting

(Also COM 438)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the theory, history, and practice of modern reportorial journalism. The class will focus on the way that traditional newswriting is converging with other media forms online, yet remains a skill of its own with specific needs, ethics, and best practices. For students wishing to register for the course COM 100 is recommended. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204

ENL 465 Writing for the Media

(Also COM 465)

4 hours; 4 credits

Developing skills in writing for traditional electronic media

(such as radio and television) as well as new media (such as the Internet). This writing-intensive course emphasizes the translation of ideas into written text or spoken dialogue appropriate to the medium, genre, and target audience, as well as treatments, proposals, and other forms of pre-production writing. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisites: A 200-level course COM and ENG 151

ENL 470 Senior Seminar in Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

Various topics in literature, differing from semester to semester. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a literature course.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor

ENL 440 Magazine Writing

4 hours; 4 credits

A writing and discussion course for students who want to break into the magazine publishing world. Writing for popular, specialized, little, and broad-circulation magazines will be covered, as well as the broader aspects of the publishing market. Conferences and group sessions on the studentauthor’s work. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 441 Writing about Media

4 hours; 4 credits

A writing and discussion course for students who are interested in producing articles and books concerning films, records, and television. Conferences and group sessions on the studentauthor’s work. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 442 Women’s Written Expression

(Also WGS 442)

4 hours; 4 credits

A seminar to develop skills in both imaginative and critical writing, incorporating an analysis and comparison of the stylistic developments of women authors. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 445 Journalism and Society

(Also COM 445)

4 hours; 4 credits

Learning to

“read” and write the news. Analysis of the ways in which news stories define our understanding of

ENL 475 Writing for Advertising and Public

(Also COM 475)

Relations

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the techniques of developing concepts and writing copy for advertising in print and broadcast media, and public relations material such as press releases newsletters, brochures, and publicity material. The course analyzes advertising, public relations, and other corporate communications tactics in terms of their target audience, message, and effectiveness, as well as the channels of communication. Students will be assigned a number of writing projects including copywriting, concept development proposals, press releases, and newsletter articles. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisites: COM 332

ENL 480 Studies in Advanced Journalism

(Also COM 480)

4 hours; 4 credits

Analysis of the techniques required for good feature writing, magazine writing, personal journalism, investigative reporting, interviewing, etc.Overview of the changing journalism environment and the techniques and skills necessary to build a successful journalism organization.

Overview of the job and skills of a news editor. Emphasis amongst these different options varies from term to term.

For English majors and minors, this is designated as a writing course.

Prerequisite: COM/ENL 277 and COM 204 ; COM/ENL

412 or COM/ENL 438 or COM 466

Linguistics Courses

These courses are intended for students who have completed their requirements in English and wish additional electives, as well as for students majoring in English.

ENH 230 Introduction to Language

4 hours; 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the study of language. It explores the following relationships: language and society; language and culture; language and thought; language and biology. (literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 422 Introduction to Linguistics

4 hours; 4 credits

The scientific study of language: sounds, grammar, words, animal communication, language families, etc.

Special consideration is given to the dialect of New York

City. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 423 Modern English Grammar

4 hours; 4 credits

The structure of English sentences, examined from both the transformational and traditional points of view. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 424 Language Change

4 hours; 4 credits

How languages change and why, using the English language and the Indo-European family as examples. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 425 History of the English Language

4 hours; 4 credits

How the sounds, grammar, spelling, and words of English came to be the way they are. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 426 Language Acquisition and

Psycholinguistics

(Also LNG 426)

4 hours; 4 credits

The course examines issues in psycholinguistics, especially those related to native, foreign, and second language acquisition: How is language learned? How do we acquire a second language? What are the characteristics of successful language learning? For English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Prerequisites: ENG 151

ENL 427 Sociology of Language

(Also SOC 427)

4 hours; 4 credits

Areas of discussion include language and class, language and sex, language and race, and language and

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 193 ethnicity. For English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151

ENL 428 English Phonetics and Phonology

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the sound system of language, with a focus on

U.S. English. A description of how particular speech sounds are articulated and how to use the International

Phonetic Alphabet to transcribe them. This course covers patterns that govern the distribution, variation, and changes that take place in the sounds of English. For

English majors and minors, this is designated as a linguistics course.

Pre- or corequisite: ENG 151

French

(Minor)

Department of World Languages and Literature, Building 2S, Room 109

Chairperson and Associate Professor Gerry Milligan

All students with prior training in French must take a proficiency examination to determine placement at an appropriate level.

French Minor

Minor Requirements:

At least 12 credits of courses in French at the 200 level or above.

French Courses

All students with prior training in French must take a proficiency examination to determine placement at an appropriate level.

FRN 101 French Conversation I

2 hours; 2 credits

Practical French for business, community relations, travel, and simple technical application. For beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Regular attendance in the World Languages and Literatures Media

Center is required.

FRN 102 French Conversation II

2 hours; 2 credits

A continuation of FRN 101. Regular attendance in the

World Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.

Prerequisite: FRN 101 or equivalent

FRN 112 Basic French I

3 hours; 3 credits

A beginning course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for those who have had no previous work in the language. Regular attandance in the Modern

Languages Media Center is required. Not open to students who have taken FRN 113. (foreign lang.) (FWGR)

Prerequisite: Passing CUNY Assessment Tests in Reading and Writing

194 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

FRN 113 Basic French I

4 hours; 4 credits

A beginning course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for those who have had no previous work in the language. Regular attendance in the World

Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.

(foreign lang.). Not open to students who have completed

FRN 112.

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Reading and passing the CUNY Assessment Test in

Writing

FRN 114 Basic French II

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of FRN 113. Regular attendance in the

World Languages and Literatures Media Center is required. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisites: FRN 113 or equivalent. Passing the CUNY

Assessment Test in Reading and passing the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing.

FRN 208 French for Native Speakers

4 hours; 4 credits

For students with fluency in spoken French but lacking experience in writing and reading the language.

FRN 213 Continuing French I

4 hours; 4 credits

Grammar review and more intensive training in the fundamentals of expression and communication. Regular attendance in the World Languages and Literatures Media Center is required. (foreign lang.)

Prerequisite: FRN 114 or equivalent

FRN 215 Continuing French II

4 hours; 4 credits

A continuation of FRN 213 with stress on written and oral composition and on selected cultural and literary readings of intermediate difficulty. Regular attendance in the World

Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.

(foreign lang.)

Prerequisite: FRN 213 or equivalent

FRN 313 Advanced Communication Skills

4 hours; 4 credits

Refinement of written and oral expression through composition, translation, oral reports, and critical study of the

French grammar based on the analysis of selected literary readings of advanced difficulty. Regular attendance in the World Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.(literature)

Prerequisite: FRN 215 or equivalent

FRN 325 French Civilization

4 hours; 4 credits

The art, literature, history, and political and social systems of the French-speaking world. A panoramic approach designed to provide a basic knowledge of French civilization.

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent

FRN 340 An Introduction to the Literature of

France

4 hours; 4 credits

A chronological survey of the literature of France from the

Middle Ages to the present. (literature)

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent

FRN 350 The Feminist Challenge in French

(Also WGS 353)

Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the most important women writers in French literature, focusing primarily on selected works of Christine de Pisan, Marguerite de Navarre, Madame de Staël,

George Sand, Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Françoise

Sagan, Nathalie Sarraute. Taught in French. (literature)

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent

FRN 426 Classical French Drama

(Also DRA 426)

4 hours; 4 credits

Plays of Corneille, Racine, Molière, with special emphasis on the continuing role of Molière in the world’s theater.

(literature) (COPR) (TALA)

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent for those doing readings and assignments in French; ENG 151 or a former ENG 200 course for those doing readings and assignments in English

FRN 450 Contemporary French Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

An analysis of representative masterpieces of

20th-century French literature from Proust, Gide, and

Malraux to Sartre, Camus, and Robbe-Grillet. (literature)

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent

FRN 465 French Existentialist Literature

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of French existentialist literature through the works of Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Proust, and Camus. (literature)

Prerequisite: FRN 313 or equivalent

Geography

(Minor)

Department of Political Science and Global Affairs

Chairperson and Associate Professor Richard Flanagan

Coordinator: Professor Deborah Popper, Marchi Hall

(2N), Room 238

Geography Minor

Minor Requirements: 15 credits

GEG 100 Introduction to Geography and

At least 12 credits at or above the 200 level.

Geography Courses

3 credits

GEG 100 Introduction to Geography

3 hours; 3 credits

This course provides an overview to the field of geography. It approaches the central issues of the discipline through a systematic fashion, exploring the basics of such themes as: physical geography, climate change,

political geography, cultural geography, urban geography, economic geography, agriculture, globalization, and resources and development. (social science) (FWGR)

(COPR)

GEG 101 World Regional Geography

3 hours; 3 credits

Introduction to the major world geographic regions and countries with emphasis on population, place, location, environment, and economic development. (social science) (FWGR)

GEG 212 Introduction to GIS

4 hours; 4 credits

The course introduces the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) production process from data modeling and acquisition to editing, analysis, and cartographic output. It is divided between lectures that introduce the theory and implications of GIS and lab exercises to familiarize students with the many applications of the software.Required for Geography majors, open to all students. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111

GEG 220 Geography of Western Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

Demographic, economic, and political effects on the nations of Western Europe of the intraregional variations in such fundamental geographic factors as geomatic position, climate, soils, minerals, and elevation. Emphasis on selected nations in the context of 20th-century industrial development. For Geography majors this is designated as a regional geography course.

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100

GEG 222 Geography of the United States

(Also AMS 220)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course explores the geographic variety of the United

States. The country’s physical characteristics are regionally diverse and provide an array of resources. Different populations have put them to use in various ways. The course traces who lives where, why, what they have found there, what have they done with it. Emphasis is placed on the contrasting threads of regional variation and national homogenization. For Geography majors this is designated as a regional geography course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100

GEG 223 American Landscapes

(Also HST 223)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of American landscapes through historical geography and history. This course examines the making of

American landscapes, including not only the

“natural” processes but also the social, cultural, and ideological forces that have shaped them. For Geography majors this is designated as a regional geography course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100, and any college-level history course.

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 195

GEG 225 Cultural Geography

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will provide a global context to explore various cultural issues while highlighting the role of human impact on places, landscapes, and the planet. Students will develop an understanding of the basic concepts of cultural geography, including those related to population, migration, religion, ethnicity, urbanization, agriculture, nature and environment, resource use, and territoriality.

For Geography majors this is designated as a geography topics course. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

GEG 250 Conservation and Humanity

4 hours; 4 credits

Analysis of the nature and extent of pollution and depletion of essential resources of humankind, with emphasis on food, water, and oxygen. Study will include inquiry into economic, legal, and political problems of control, detection, and prevention of pollution and depletion of resources. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, COR 100

GEG 252 Economic Geography

(Also ECO 252)

4 hours; 4 credits

Examination of how geographic factors influencing economic activity, and culture, technology, resources, location, and labor intersect to produce different economic environments, and how globalization and local conditions interact. For Geography majors this is designated as a geography topics course. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, COR 100

GEG 260 Urban Geography

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of urbanization, urban growth, and urban form, both within the metropolitan area and as part of a system.

The course examines how societies shape space to employ their human and physical resources to develop their urban landscapes and how old patterns are replaced by new ones as a result of economic, political, and social transformations. The course will cover urban geography in several societies. For Geography majors this is designated as a geography topics course. (social science)

(COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisite: ENG 151 and COR 100

GEG 264 Political Geography

(Also POL 264)

4 hours; 4 credits

All politics are embedded in geographical space. This course examines the ways in which people have territorially arranged the Earth’s surface, internal and external relationships of politically organized areas, the effects of political actions on social and economic conditions, and the significance of geographical factors behind political situations, problems, and conflicts within and between different territories. For Geography majors this is designated as a geography topics course. (social science)

(COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, COR 100

196 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

GEG 266 Environmental Ethics

(Also PHL 266)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course provides a critical forum to examine the roots and results of our attitudes toward the environment. How should we view the apparent connections between pollution, economic development, and poverty; what (if anything) do we owe future generations; how should we consider non-human animals in the environment; is there justice or injustice in environmental civil disobedience?

The course will draw on issues related to philosophy, geography, biology, economics, geology, and political science; and will challenge the exercise of global consciousness in

“real-world” terms.

Prerequisites: A 100-level course in philosophy or sophomore standing; ENG 151, COR 100

GEG 275 Place, Race, and Racism

(Also AFA 275)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course explores how race is socially constructed and the role that place plays in the construction of racial and ethnic identities. From the formation of racialized places such as ghettoes and Chinatowns to media coverage of school shootings in suburbs, we will examine the how, why, and where of racism and discrimination. The focus will be on racial issues in the United States, coupled with case studies from other regions for comparative purposes.For Geography majors this is designated as a geography topics course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d).

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

GEG 324 Environmental History

(Also HST 324)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the field of environmental history throughout the world, which is broadly defined as the study of humanity's relationships with the rest of nature over time.The course takes a global approach to the important problems, questions, and topics addressed by environmental historians, including landscape change, property regimes, deforestation , pollution, colonialism, disease, urbanization, resource conflict, climate change, natural disasters, conservation, preservation, sustainability, environmentalism, and environmental justice. For history majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG

151

Geology

(Minor)

Department of Engineering Science and Physics. Building 1N, Room 226

Chairperson and Professor Alfred Levine

Geology Minor

Pre-Minor Requirements: 8 credits

GEO 100 Physical Geology 3 credits

GEO 101 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 credit

GEO 102 Historical Geology 3 credits

GEO 103 Historical Geology

Laboratory

Minor Requirements: 15 credits

GEO 105 Environmental Geology

GEO 220 General Geophysics

GEO 320 Invertebrate Paleontology

GEO 322 Structural Geology

Geology Courses

1 credit

4 credits

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

GEO 100 Planet Earth

3 hours; 3 credits

An introduction to the physical characteristics of the planet Earth. The focus is on processes and interactions of the four components of the Earth system: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. An understanding of the human impact on Earth systems is also developed and maintained in perspective. Satellite information, aerial photography, maps, charts and other

Geographic Information Systems technologies are used to study planet Earth in this course. A full day field trip and a report on the field trip are required. (science)

(RLPR) (COPR) (STEM)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: GEO 101

GEO 101 Planet Earth Laboratory

2 hours; 1 credit

The study of planet earth; identification and methods of classifying earth materials; Using Satellite information, aerial photography, topographic maps, charts and Geographic Information Systems to study the surface of the earth. (scientific analysis) (COPR)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or higher or an appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: GEO 100

GEO 102 Historical Geology

3 hours; 3 credits

Geologic history of the Earth. Application of fundamental principles of stratigraphy to the reconstruction of paleogeographic, ancient sedimentary, and tectonic relationships. The evolution of life is traced from the fossil record.

Participation in scheduled field trips is required. (FSWR)

(STEM)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: GEO 103

GEO 103 Historical Geology Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Classification and identification of major fossil groups.

Interpretation of rock record with emphasis on stratigraphic correlation. Major geological features of the

United States. (science) (COPR) (STEM)

Corequisite: GEO 102

GEO 105 Environmental Geology

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Application of the principles of the Earth sciences to problems associated with urban and regional development. Water, minerals, and fuel resources, waste dispos-

al, subsurface storage, hazards of nature (earthquakes, fire, flood, landslides, extreme climate, and weather variations). Physical properties of rocks and soil. Case histories. Participation in scheduled field trips is required.

(science)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

GEO 110 Field and Environmental Geology of

Hawaii

45 lecture hours (minimum); 30 laboratory and field application hours (minimum)

A total of 75 hours.

4 credits

– 3 credits lecture and 1 credit laboratory

A supervised geologic study of the island of Hawaii, stressing the field and environmental geology of active volcanoes within a framework of plate tectonics and hot-spot geology. Fundamental igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to geologic mapping techniques, including the use of aerial photographs, topographic maps, and the Brunton compass in the construction of geologic maps and cross-sections. (Scientific Analysis)

Prerequisite: GEO 100 or equivalent course with the approval of the instructor.

GEO 220 General Geophysics

3 hours; 3 credits

Prerequisites: GEO 100, PHY 110 or 120,

The following courses are available through Independent

Study. Contact Assistant Professor A. Ohan, Department of Engineering Science and Physics

GEO 320 Invertebrate Paleontology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Prerequisites: GEO 100 or 102

GEO 322 Structural Geology

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours; 4 credits

Prerequisites: GEO 100 or 102

Health Education

Department of Nursing, Marcus Hall (5S), Room 213

Chairperson: Associate Professor Mary O’Donnell

The following course in health education is offered as a non-liberal arts and sciences elective. It may not be used to satisfy the College Physical Education Requirement.

HED 111 First Aid and Safety

2 hours, 2 laboratory hours; 3 credits

Theory and practice of first aid to the injured. Safety procedures when emergency first aid is needed and medical assistance is delayed. Includes cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), care and prevention of accidental injuries, and sudden illness.

History

(Bachelor of Arts, Minor; Master of Arts, see Graduate

Catalog )

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 197

Department of History, Marchi Hall (2N), Room 215

Chairperson and Associate Professor Eric Ivison

History (BA)

History Four-Year Plan

History (7-12) Four Year Plan

Major Requirements: 36-40 credits

HST 200

HST 300

Historical Method

Historiography

4 credits

4 credits

HST 401 Seminar in Advanced

Historical Study 4 credits

Twenty-four credits of history courses at the 200 level or higher, of which at least three courses must be at the

300 level including:

At least one history course designated as pre-1700 history

At least one history course designated as modern

European history

At least one history course designated as United

States history

At least one history course from a geographical area other than Europe or the United States, designated as World history

A 200-level geography course may be used to meet this

24-credit requirement. At most, one independent study course may be used to satisfy this requirement. The cumulative grade point average in history courses must be 2.0 or higher for graduation.

Foreign Language Requirement:

Demonstration of proficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above.

0-4 credits

Electives: 4-38

Total Credits Required: 120

Adolescence Education Sequence: 24 Credits

Students wishing to be recommended by the College for certification must successfully complete the Adolescence Education sequence courses, as well as their academic major. Students planning to teach social studies major in History and they complete at least 50 credits in the social sciences, including at least four credits in geography, at least four credits in U.S. history, and at least four credits in non-U.S. history. The sequence may be begun in the sophomore year. To complete the sequence in two years it must be begun by the beginning of the junior year. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.75 to be admitted to all adolescence education courses.

EDS 201 Social Foundations of

Secondary Education

EDS 202 Psychological Foundations of

Secondary Education

EDS 301 The Pedagogy of Secondary

School in Social Studies

EDS 315 The Secondary School

Curriculum in the Social

Studies

EDS 400 Student Teaching in

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

6 credits

198 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Secondary Education

EDS 401 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching in

Secondary Education

2 credits

Honors

To graduate with honors in the History major, a student must have a minimum of a 3.5 grade point average in courses in the major and a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. In addition, a student must complete either

HSSH 594: Independent Study Honors in History or a

Divisional Honors Seminar. Finally, a student must complete an honors thesis under the supervision of a

History faculty member who will oversee and approve each step of the thesis process. The research paper submitted as the thesis need not be a new work; it may be a substantial revision or extension of a paper previously submitted in a course at CSI. Students must submit a one-to two-page thesis proposal to their advisor and the coordinator of honors in History (Professor

Catherine Lavender) stating the scope of research or revisions as well as questions and new source materials to be addressed before registering for HSSH 594 or a

Divisional Honors Seminar. The 20-30 page thesis should demonstrate a superior command of the historical topic and evidence of rigorous critical thinking. The thesis must be approved by the faculty advisor and a second reader appointed by the coordinator of honors in

History.

History Minor

Minor

At least 12 credits of courses in history at or above the

200 level including courses from at least two of the following categories: pre-1700 history; modern European history; United States history; World history.

History Courses

HST 100 Past and Present

3 hours; 3 credits

An interdisciplinary approach to historical experience since the Renaissance, with particular emphasis on significant themes and events and on concepts such as freedom, power, social roles, bureaucracy, and historical cycles. (social science) (FISR)(COPR)

HST 105 Contemporary African Issues

(Also AFA 105)

3 hours; 3 credits

An examination of post-colonial African issues, including the colonial legacy/neocolonialism; conflict and human rights; development, poverty and the debt problem; healthcare and infrastructure; globalization, democracy and multiparty politics; and, how these relate to the world at large. Not open to students who have completed HST

267 or AFA 266. (social science) (FWGR)

HST 106 Africa Encounters Europe

3 hours; 3 credits

A study of the interactions between Africans and Europeans since the 15th century. This course examines African societies just prior to the Atlantic slave trade; its consequences for African, European, and American societies; colonialism and nationalism; and problems facing

African societies in the postcolonial and post-Cold war periods.(FWGR) (social science) Not open to students who have completed HST 290.

Pre or corequisite: ENG 111

HST 110 Individual and Society in Ancient

Greece

3 hours; 3 credits

A course examining social relations in the ancient Greek world through a variety of sources, which could include literature, history and archaeology. Themes and topics may include the soldier and the citizen, the aristocrat and the commoner, women and children both in their respective roles and in their mutual relations within the society in which they live. (social science) (FISR)

Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 111

HST 115 Comparative Ancient Religion

3 hours; 3 credits

Close reading and comparison among a range of religious texts coming from different regions of the ancient world. The texts are interpreted against their culture and historical backgrounds.(social science) (p&d) (FWGR)

Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 111

HST 116 Freshman Seminar in History

3 hours; 3 credits

An interdisciplinary approach to historical experience since the Renaissance with selected emphasis on significant themes and events, and on concepts such as freedom, power, social roles, bureaucracy, and historical cycles. The seminar is designed to give students special instruction in communications skills. It is offered in conjunction with a designated section of ENG 001. Students must register for both the seminar and the designated

English course. Students can receive credit for only one freshman seminar. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CUNY Assessment Test in Reading. Students who successfully complete the Freshman Seminar in History may not register for any additional 100-level courses in history without permission of the department chairperson.

HST 160 African American History: 1619 to the

Present

(Also AFA 160)

3 hours; 3 credits

From the forced migration of the first Africans in the 17th century to the contemporary struggles for equality, emphasis on such topics as slavery, abolition, Reconstruction, the origins of Jim Crow, urban migrations, the struggle for civil rights, nonviolence, and the new militancy.

(social science) (USED) (COPR)

HST 182 Women’s History and Feminist

Theory

(Also WGS 100)

3 hours; 3 credits

This course explores both the history of women’s experience and feminist interpretations of their historical condition. Emphasis is on the development of analytic and writing skills. (social science) (COPR)

HST 200 Historical Method

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the basic skills of historical reasoning, research, and writing. Students receive training in the interpretation of primary sources and the evaluation of historical data, and are acquainted with the notion of historiography. Particular emphasis is placed on the preparation of research papers and book reviews; the use of library, electronic, and archival resources; and the critical evaluation of secondary monographic works. Required for History majors, open to all students.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and any college-level history course

HST 201 History of Western Civilization:

Antiquity to 1500

4 hours; 4 credits

The historical development of Western civilization in ancient, medieval, and Renaissance times, with emphasis on the individuals, issues, ideas, institutions, and events that highlight its evolution. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 202 History of Western Civilization since

1500

4 hours; 4 credits

The historical development of Western civilization from the 16th century to the present. The focus is on Europe, but developments in other areas of the world are considered in relation to Western ideas. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 203 The World Since 1914

4 hours; 4 credits

Major political, economic, social, and cultural developments beginning with World War I. The course will focus on the processes of decolonization and modernization around the world. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 204 Introduction to Asian Civilization

4 hours; 4 credits

An introductory course on the nature of Asian civilization and culture. The first part will deal with an analysis of the historical role of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism; the second, with different paths to modernization emphasizing China, India, and Japan. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 206 Modern China

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of China from the 19th century to the present.

The course will analyze the character of early Western involvement and Chinese responses, the rise of Chinese communism, and China’s struggle to modernize. For

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 199

History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 207 History of Africa

(Also AFA 260)

4 hours; 4 credits

Nineteenth-century African history, the story of European imperialism, and the emergence of modern, independent

Africa and its problems. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 208 History of Modern Latin America

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the social, economic, political, and cultural development of Latin America since independence. The course will focus on the prevailing colonial influences on modern institutions; Cuba, Venezuela, and Brazil as developmental models; and on United States-Latin American relations. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science)

(COPR) (p&d) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 209 Modern Japan

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of themes in Japanese history, such as the indigenous roots of the late 19th-century transformation, the debate on the origins of military rule of the

1930s, the reasons for the economic success story of the post-war period, and the human and ecological cost of the great changes over the 19th and 20th centuries. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 210 History of Modern India

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the history of India from the end of the Mogul period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the nature of British imperialism, the Independence movement, and India’s attempts to modernize. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 211 Japanese Civilization

4 hours, 4 credits

A survey of Japanese history from the beginning of the historical period through the 18th century. The course will examine major themes such as the early Japanese traditions, China’s influence, the Japanese adaptation of Chinese ideas and institutions, the changing nature of elite status, relations with outsiders, and Japanese religious and philosophical traditions. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

(COPR) (social science) (p&d)

200 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 212 History of the Ancient Near East

4 hours; 4 credits

An interdisciplinary approach to ancient Near Eastern civilizations of the pre-Christian era. Attention will be given to the literature, history, mythology, philosophy, religions, art, and architecture of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, and ancient Palestine. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 213 Chinese Civilization

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of Chinese history from the beginning of the historical period through the 18th century. The course will examine major themes such as the imperial state, philosophical and religious traditions, the changing nature of elite status, relations with Inner Asia, and the agrarian-based society and the emergence of the commercial economy. For History majors and minors, this is designated as either a pre-1700 history course or a world history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 214 Greece and the Hellenistic World

4 hours; 4 credits

Introduction to the social, economic, political, and intellectual history of Greece from ca. 2000 BCE to the Hellenistic world of ca. 250 BCE. Integration of background with various aspects of Greek and Hellenistic culture, for example, philosophy, political thought, and religion. Emphasis on the interpretation of primary and secondary sources in historical study. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 215 The Origins of Western Europe:

400-1000 CE

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the history and culture of Western Europe from the dissolution of the Western Roman Empire to the year 1000. This period of change and transformation saw the settlement of migrating peoples in the former provinces of the Western Roman Empire and the emergence of new states and new societies. This course aims to introduce students to the political, social, cultural, and demographic changes that laid the foundations of modern

Europe. For History majors and minors, this is designated a pre-1700 course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 216 Byzantine Thought and Civilization

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of various aspects of the culture of the East

Roman or Byzantine Empire (ca. 600-1200 CE). Special emphasis is placed on the church, state, and social classes in the creation of a distinctive Byzantine civilization, identity, and world-view. This course also examines achievements in the arts, philosophy, literature, and spirituality. This course is interdisciplinary in approach and includes readings in historical documents and slide lectures. For History majors and minors, this is designated a pre-1700 course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 217 Introduction to Women's History

(Also WGS 217)

4 hours, 4 credits

An overview of the history of women and the role of gender in history, focusing especially on the period since the

1700s. The course will examine key texts regarding women and their status in world history and address the development of the discipline of women's history within the larger field of women's studies. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

(social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and COR 100

HST 218 The Roman World

4 hours; 4 credits

Aspects of Roman history in relation to the historical background, for example, the growth of the Roman constitution in the age of the republic, Rome’s expansion in the Mediterranean world, the Roman revolution, the principate, the problems of primary and secondary sources in historical study. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 219 Greek and Roman Mythology

4 hours, 4 credits

An overview of mythology as a cultural expression of the

Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations taught against a historical background. The course covers a period between 1200 BCE through 200 CE across the Mediterranean basin. For History majors and minors this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college level history course.

HST 220 Medieval Thought and Civilization

4 hours; 4 credits

Various aspects of the culture of the Middle Ages from the creation of the Carolingian empire (ca. 800-1300 CE) in relation to the historical background; special emphasis on the interaction of the church, state, and medieval social classes in the creation of a distinctive medieval civilization. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and includes readings in literature and slide lectures. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 221 The American Dream

(Also AMS 221)

4 hours; 4 credits

The hopes, the frustrations, and, particularly, the dreams of American society as observed by foreign and native commentators in the past and present. This course will attempt to assess not only the idealization of the American dream but also disillusionment with it as expressed by such writers as Franklin, Tocqueville, Emerson,

Whitman, Henry Adams, and Norman Mailer. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any American studies or history course

HST 222 Islam: Religion and Culture

4 hours, 4 credits

A survey course on Islam as a system of belief embodied in practice. Students will be introduced to a variety of interpretations of Islam from both Western and Islamic perspectives, from the medieval to the modern. Topics will include: the Qur'an, the Hadith, Islamic Law (Shari'a), philosophy, theology (Kalam), and the various intellectual tendencies (Sufi, Shi'a, Sunni) within the Islamic tradition.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 223 American Landscapes

(Also GEG 223)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of American landscapes through historical geography and history. This course examines the making of

American landscapes, including not only the

“natural” processes but also the social, cultural, and ideological forces that have shaped them. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 224 Jewish History

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of the Jewish people including their culture, religion, education, and economic conditions from the

Babylonian exile (586 BCE) through the present day; domination by Persia, Greece, and Rome; Jewish life in

Babylonia and neighboring Eastern lands; Jews in the

Western world from medieval to modern times; the development of Jewish communities and the distinctive features of life in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, England,

Russia, Poland, and the United States; the world wars and the Jews; the State of Israel. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 225 History of Christianity

4 hours; 4 credits

A cultural approach to early Christianity, featuring an examination of the New Testament; a study of the history of the medieval church and the emergence of Protestantism in the modern world. Examples of church art, architecture, and music in the Christian tradition. (social science) (COPR)

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 201

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 228 Renaissance and Reformation Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the interaction of the socioeconomic, intellectual, cultural, and religious trends of Europe from the close of the Middle Ages to the end of the 16th century.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 229 History of Religion from Antiquity to

Our Times

4 hours, 4 credits

A historical introduction to world religions from the Ancient Near East to modern times. The origin and history of monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), of religious philosophies (Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism), and of polytheisms, both ancient (Greek, Roman) and modern (Hinduism) will be the subject of this course.

(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 230 Early Modern England

4 hours; 4 credits

English history from the Reformation to the end of the

17th century. The emphasis is on political history and the underlying social and economic forces. Topics generally include Protestantism and the rise of capitalism, origins of the English Revolution, and the background to American colonial and constitutional history. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 231 Reacting to the Past

4 hours; 4 credits

A course that immerses students in three historic periods, widely separated in time and place, assigning them roles as actors in the events they are studying. Arguments come from works containing speeches and actions that the historical characters used in their times. The instructor functions as game master while the students play the game themselves. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100

HST 234 Asian Tigers since 1945

4 hours; 4 credits

Focus is on the

“Asian Tigers” (Hong Kong, Singapore,

South Korea, and Taiwan), and exploration of themes such as post-1945 development and its connection to the common cultural heritage shared by these places; the

British (Hong Kong and Singapore) and Japanese (South

Korea and Taiwan) colonial heritages; and the post-1945 economy. The course will also examine the relationship of these places to their respective hinterlands and the sense of identity of the respective populations in relation to the mainland and the world at large. Overall, this class will examine the proposition that there is an East Asian developmental model. For History majors and minors,

202 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 235 The Modern Middle East

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the main political, social, economic, and intellectual currents of the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis on historical background and development of current problems in the region. Topics of study include imperialism, religion, culture, women, class formation, oil, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 236 Asian American History

4 hours; 4 credits

An introductory survey of the major Asian groups in the

U.S. from their earliest migration to the present. The course will examine the immigration history, experiences, and major problems encountered by each group. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a United

States history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 238 World Civilization I

(Also SLS 240)

4 hours; 4 credits

A comparative study of the growth and development of the major global civilizations from earliest times to the onset of modernity. An overview of the development of civilizations, examining their structure and organization, characteristic ideas and institutions, and the processes of cultural diffusion and conflict within and between them.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: A minimum GPA of 2.75; ENG 111 and

ENG 151

HST 239 World Civilization II

(Also SLS 241)

4 hours; 4 credits

The growth and development of the major civilizations around the globe from the onset of modernity to present times, with particular attention to the changing relationships among global communities. (social science)

(COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: A minimum GPA of 2.75; ENG 111 and

ENG 151

HST 240 American Ideas

(also AMS 251)

4 hours; 4 credits

A major idea in American intellectual history will be examined from the perspective of two or more disciplines.

This course will demonstrate the interdisciplinary method and philosophy of American Studies. Puritanism, transcendentalism, the idea of freedom, social Darwinism,

Freudianism, and socialism are possible topics. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, and COR 100 or AMS 101 or any history course.

HST 244 United States History: 1607-1865

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the U.S. from the English colonization of Virginia to the Civil War. Attention will focus on the major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments of the period. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 245 United States History: 1865-Present

4 hours; 4 credits

A historical survey of the U.S. from the abolition of slavery to the present. Some of the topics to be examined are: Reconstruction, the development of industrial America, the Progressive movement, World War I, the Depression, World War II, the McCarthy Era, the Civil Rights movement, Feminist movement, and the Vietnam War.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a

United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 246 Religion in America

(Also AMS 224)

4 hours; 4 credits

Addresses the development of religion

—Protestant,

Catholic, Jewish, and others

—in the context of American social, cultural, and intellectual history. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 248 New York City: History and Problems

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of neighborhoods and communities of New

York City. Each student will study a community in detail by tracing its history, interviewing inhabitants, and creating plans for its future. Special emphasis on the culture, life, and governmental services of Staten Island and

Brooklyn. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science)

(p&d)(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 249 Italian American History

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the history of Italian Americans from their earliest migration to the present. Attention will focus on the generational problems of acculturation and the present position of Italian Americans in the community. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a United

States history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 251 History of the U.S. City

4 hours; 4 credits

An urban studies course with special emphasis on the impact of industrialization and immigration on the development of the U.S. city and urban culture. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 252 History of Education in the United

States

(Also EDD 252)

4 hours; 4 credits

The history and social foundation of American education.

Topics include: the historical development of American public schools, the schools and race, the social function of compulsory schooling, the expansion of higher education in the post-World War II period, and the conceptual differentiation between schooling as socialization and education for personal growth. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 253 United States Economic History

(Also ECO 253)

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the development of the U.S. economy and the factors influencing the pace of long-run economic growth. Key changes in technology, business organization, financial markets, and legal and government policy that have influenced the course of U.S. economic development are examined. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100 and (ECO 101 or

ECO 111 or ECO 112) any college-level history course.

HST 254 History of Staten Island

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the architectural, industrial, environmental, political, and ethnic history of the borough from colonial times through today. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 257 The History of American Immigration

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will examine the pushes and pulls leading to the immigration and (or) restriction of northwestern European, southeastern European, Caribbean, Asian, Mexican, and other groups. Such theories as the

“White Anglo-Saxon Protestant Ideal,

” the melting pot, and cultural pluralism are to be studied. Implications for neighborhood structures, educational policy, and politics will be discussed. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 258 Vietnam and America: 1945-1975

(Also AMS 258)

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 203

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the history of American involvement in

Vietnam, the experience of Americans and Vietnamese who fought the second Indochina war. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 260 U.S. History, First Encounters to the

Present

4 hours; 4 credits

A one semester survey of the United States History.

While designed to contribute to the liberal arts general education of CSI students and to the training of history majors, the course will be especially valuable to students intending careers as elementary and middle school social studies teachers, since it is based on the content and skills required of elementary and middle school social studies teachers in New York City and State. Students will collect primary and secondary materials in each of the time periods covered in the elementary school curriculum, including time-lines and maps, and New York

State, City, and Staten Island historical materials, thus assembling a portfolio to be used in their social studies classrooms. Emphasis will be on the skills students will foster in their own work as elementary school teachers: thinking, research and writing, interpersonal and group relations, sequencing and chronology, map and globe, and graph and image analytic skills. For history majors and minors, this is designated as a United States History course. (social science)(COPR) NOTE: Students majoring in SLS must take this course in order to satisfy the social science 200 level requirement.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 262 African American History: 1619-1865

(Also AFA 262)

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the African American experience in the Western hemisphere. Emphasis on the slave trade, slave life, slave revolts, and the struggle for freedom. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 263 African American History: 1865 to the

Present

(Also AFA 263)

4 hours; 4 credits

The continuing role of African Americans in the building of their own nation. Emphasis on freedom movements as shown in literature, in civil rights movements, in nationalist and other political organizations. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 264 The African Diaspora

4 hours; 4 credits

204 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

A survey of the historical connections of the African diaspora from pre-transatlantic slave trade to post-colonial movements. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111, COR 100 or any college history course

HST 265 History of the Caribbean

(Also AFA 265)

4 hours; 4 credits

Pre-colonial and colonial history of the Caribbean; an examination of the policies of the metropolitan powers, and the emergence of anticolonialist movements. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 266 Peoples and Cultures of Africa

(Also AFA 247)

4 hours; 4 credits

A descriptive survey of the peoples and cultures of the

African continent. Emphasis is on those features and/or qualities of the African pattern of life that are common to the African people as a whole. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 267 Contemporary African Issues

(Also AFA 266)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of post-colonial African issues, including the colonial legacy/neocolonialism; conflict and human rights; development, poverty and the debt problems; healthcare and infrastructure; globalization; democracy, and multiparty politics; and, how these relate to the world at large. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (p&d) (cont. wld.)(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 151, and COR 100 and any college-level History course or African American Studies course

HST 269 Blacks in Urban America:

1900-Present

(Also AFA 269)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of various aspects of Black life in major

American cities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the causes of the migration; ecological development of Black communities; urban violence; Blacks’ participation in conventional and radical politics; Blacks in the labor force; and the impact of urbanization on the Black family.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a

United States history course. (social science) (p&d)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 270 Modern British History: 1700-1900

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of selected problems of British social and political history in the 18th and 19th centuries. The origins and immediate impact of industrialization in Britain and the rise of the British Empire. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

(social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 271 Modern British History: 1900 to the

Present

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of selected problems of British social and political history in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Topics generally include the decline of empire, the creation of the welfare state, and the British role in the world wars. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern

European history course. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 272 Modern Germany

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of 19th- and 20th-century Germany

–cultural flowering, national unification, industrialization, world empire and war, fascism, and division into two states. Particular focus on the origins, nature, and consequences of

Hitler and the Nazi state. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

(social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 273 Medieval Russia

4 hours, 4 credits

A survey of Russian history from the tenth century to the reign of Peter the Great, with an emphasis on political, religious, social, and intellectual history. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 274 History of Modern Russia

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of Russian developments since the 18th century with special emphasis on the Russian Revolution and the history of the Soviet Union. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 275 Imperial Russia

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the history of Imperial Russia, from Peter the

Great to the Russian Revolution of 1917. For history majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and any college-level history course or COR 100

HST 276 History of Italy

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of Italy from the Renaissance to the present, examining Italian contributions to the formation of Western ideals and culture, the role of Italian cities in early capitalism and world expansion, the creation of Italy as a nation, and Italy’s contribution to the development of fascism and Euro-communism. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 277 Europe: 1815-1914

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of European civilization at the height of its vitality and world power; the evolution of mature capitalism; the transformation of society and the reorganization of power; the synthesis of national-liberalism at home and imperialism abroad; the challenge of emerging socialist forces on the left and new forms of conservatism on the right; the complex organization of international affairs that collapsed in 1914. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course. (social science) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 278 Twentieth-Century Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of selected aspects of European civilization in the

20th century. Major themes of the age, which run from the origins of World War I to the Cold War, will be selected for discussion. These will include such topics as the emergence of technocracy and the welfare state, the rise of fascism, the communist revolutions, the impact of modern warfare, European imperialism, irrationalism, and existentialism. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 279 History of the Balkans: 1453 to the

Present

4 hours; 4 credits

Overview of the social, economic, political, and cultural history of Southeastern Europe, starting with the Ottoman conquest in the 15th century and ending with the post communist transitions after 1989. Course emphasizes the Ottoman millet system, village household structure, the practice of multiple religions, imperial influences, the rise of regional and Mediterranean trading networks, 19th century National revolutions, pre-World War 1 modernization without industrialization, the state socialist system, and the challenge of post socialist European integration.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course. (social science)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 280 History of Science

4 hours; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 205

An examination of several major scientific world-views, such as Aristotelian and Newtonian physics, Darwinism,

Freudianism, and relativity. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 281 History of Work

4 hours; 4 credits

Work as a central experience in medieval, early industrial, and modern history. A study of employment choice, work satisfaction, the impact of technology, training, worker organizations, social consequences, the role of government, leisure, and the job milieu.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 283 Psycho-History

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the uses, methods, and styles of psychology in history writing. How mass behavior, as well as the personalities of heroes and geniuses, shape history. Special emphasis on psychobiography and on a mass movement, such as fascism.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 284 The Soviet Union and Contemporary

Russia

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the history of the Soviet Union and its successor states from 1917 to the present. For history majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course .(social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

HST 285 The World of the 21st Century

4 hours; 4 credits

This course uses history to examine the possible makeup of future society. Topics include the prospect of world government, limits of growth, and changes in morality and behavior as well as questions about the validity of projecting the future from past experience.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 286 History of American Women

(Also WGS 286)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course introduces students to broad themes in

American Women’s History from colonial times to the present and focuses on women as historical actors and on the historical forces shaping the construction of womanhood. The course will pay particular attention to differences among women with respect to race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (p&d) (COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

206 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

HST 290 The West and the World: Africa

Encounters Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the interactions between Africans and Europeans since the 15th century. This course examines African societies just prior to the Atlantic slave trade; its consequences for African, European, and American societies; colonialism and nationalism; and problems facing

African societies in the postcolonial and post-Cold War periods. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 291 The Atlantic World

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the diverse historical experiences that resulted from contact in the Atlantic world among the indigenous populations of the Americas, Europeans, and

Africans from the 15th through the 19th centuries. This course examines pre-Columbian historical development in the Americas, the European historical contexts of expansion, patterns of contact and settlement, the negotiation of indigenous peoples with European empires, the economic and social impact of slavery and emancipation, and the role of revolutions in the historical development of diverse social and political systems in the Western hemisphere. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a World history course. (social science)

(COPR)

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 and any college-level history course

HST 292 The West and the World:

Cross-Cultural Encounters in the

Medieval World

4 hours; 4 credits

A comparative and cross-cultural study of the consequences of encounters among pagans, Western and

Eastern Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Middle Ages. This course examines the diversity of the medieval world through patterns of exchange, interaction, and cultural fusion. The impact of conquest and settlement, cultural imperialism, and religious conversion will be discussed together with the natures of multicultural societies in the Middle Ages. For History major and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COR 100 or any college-level history course

HST 300 Historiography

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to key analytical concepts, schools of historiography, and great historians through the centuries, as well as major theories, methods, and historical interpretations. Required for History majors, open to all students.

Prerequisites: ENG 151, HST 200, and an additional

200-level history course.

HST 307 Medieval England

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of various aspects of English history during the Middle Ages, with special emphasis on the period from the Norman conquest (11th century) to the 14th century. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and will draw upon a wide variety of reading materials, historical and literary, to be supplemented by slide lectures in medieval English art and architecture. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 315 The European Discovery of America and the Encounter with the Native

Peoples: 1492 to 1581

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the European discovery of America and the conquest of the native peoples up to the establishment of an imperial system in 1581. Emphasis will be placed on the issue of the

“discovery” by Columbus in 1492; the impact of America on European thought; the character of the Spanish conquests of the Caribbean, Mexico, and

Peru; the role of the Catholic church in Hispanicizing the culture of those regions; and the creation of an imperial system. For History majors and minors this is designated as either a pre-1700 history course or a world history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 317 The Medieval Balkans and the

Ottoman Turks: 1204-1481

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the history of the Balkans and Asia

Minor (modern Turkey) between the years 1204-1481

CE. The decline of the Byzantine Empire, the ancient power in the region, set in motion a struggle for supremacy that ended with the emergence of the Ottoman Empire as a world power. This course discusses this historical process and the means by which competing states attempted to lay claim to concepts of world empire. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 318 Themes in Byzantine History

4 hours; 4 credits

This course examines themes in the history and culture of the medieval Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire

(Byzantium). It discusses important political, social, and cultural developments; analyzes the catalysts for change, both internal and external; discusses the interaction of

Roman political ideology, Christianity, and ancient Greek culture; and assesses the impact of Byzantium on other cultures as well as on its own peoples. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 319 Medieval Cities

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of aspects of the history and culture of medieval cities between 300-1200 CE from a comparative perspective. Starting with the transformation of ancient urban culture under the Christian Roman Empire, this course compares and contrasts urban life in three areas of the medieval world: Western Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic Middle East. Particular emphasis is

placed on: concepts of

“the city”; the state and the city; the impact of established religion; the urban economy; civic government and institutions; change and continuity; patterns of daily life; and causes of urban decline and revival. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 320 Topics in Ancient and Medieval

History

4 hours; 4 credits

Europe after the fall of Rome to the rise of the nation-state. The emergence of feudal classes, the Catholic church and the state, the rise of medieval cities,

East-West relations, Islam and the Byzantine Empire, political theory, and humanism. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 321 Themes In Classical and Hellenistic

History

4 hours; 4 credits

The history and culture of the Greek civilization and from its early times through its expansion in the Hellenistic period. This course discusses important issues in the development of classical Greece and its subsequent encounters with the history and culture of the Ancient Near

East and Egypt after the conquest of Alexander the

Great. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

Prerequisite: ENG 151 and any 200-level history course

HST 322 The Late Antique World

4 hours; 4 credits

This course addresses aspects of the history and culture of Late Antiquity (285-641 CE). It examines the historical watershed known as the

“End of the Ancient World” and the

“Birth of the Middle Ages” by analyzing the transformation of the Later Roman Empire into the medieval worlds of Germanic Europe, Byzantium, and Islam. Particular emphasis is placed on concepts of monotheism and universalism in an age of diversity and innovation; the synthesis of Christianity and Classical culture; imperial autocracy and the Christian church; social and intellectual changes; the nature of the economy and problems of imperial defense; and the collapse and transformation of the Roman State and emergence of its successors.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 323 Themes in Roman Republican and

Imperial History

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of Rome, from village to empire, through the discussion of political as well as social, economic, and cultural issues. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a pre-1700 course

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and any 200-level history course

HST 324 Environmental History

(Also GEG 324)

4 hours; 4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 207

An examination of the field of environmental history throughout the world, which is broadly defined as the study of humanity's relationships with the rest of nature over time. The course takes a global approach to the important problems, questions, and topics addressed by environmental historians, including landscape change, property regimes, deforestation, pollution, colonialism, disease, urbanization, resource conflict, climate change, natural disasters, conservation, preservation, sustainability, environmentalism, and environmental justice. For

History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 327 The World of Late Imperial China

4 hours; 4 credits

Cultural, social, economic, and political cultural life in

China during the late Ming dynasty and early Qing dynasty (ca. 15th to 18th centuries). Its chief aim is to give students already familiar with Chinese history an appreciation of late Chinese imperial civilization beyond political events and the historical narrative. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 328 Early Modern Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of the social and ideological forces that have created modern Europe from the collapse of feudal Europe to the end of the 18th century, including the Renaissance and Reformation, the rise of capitalism, the scientific revolution, and the Enlightenment. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 330 Nationalist Movements and the

Process of Independence in Africa

4 hours; 4 credits

The objective of this course is to provide a broad view of important historical developments on the African continent: nationalist movements and the process of independence. These movements occurred between 1945, at the end of World War II, and 1990, when the entire African continent was decolonized. The course will be divided into two parts: the first will discuss the causes of nationalist movements and the second will focus on the process of independence. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 331 Black Intellectual Thought in the

African Diaspora

4 hours; 4 credits

A seminar course that examines the foundations, implementations, and implications of intellectual thought(s) of the African diaspora from the period of slavery in the

Americas through the present. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science) (COPR) (cont wld) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 332 The Age of Revolutions: 1765-1820

4 hours; 4 credits

208 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

This course will begin by examining the Enlightenment in

Europe and the social and economic changes that resulted from European worldwide colonization. It will focus on the uprisings and revolutions from 1765 to 1820 that broke out in the Old and New Worlds, emphasizing the

Great Revolution in France. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 333 Colonialism and the African

Experience

(Also AFA 333)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the experience of Africans under colonial rule from the average person to traditional chiefs or the aristocratic class. This course analyzes the reactions of various classes of African society to colonial rule, focusing on the methods used by Africans to manipulate

European colonial authorities, as well as the colonial response. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course. (social science)

(COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course or 200-level

African American Studies course and ENG 151

HST 335 Society and Culture in the United

States

(Also AMS 335)

4 hours; 4 credits

Major artistic and intellectual developments in the U.S. from the 18th century to the present, and their relationship to changing social and political realities. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course or any

200-level American Studies course and ENG 151

HST 336 Themes in United States History:

1607-1788

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected topics in U.S. history from the colonial period through the establishment of a national government under the Constitution. The course will examine significant political, social, economic, and intellectual developments.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a

United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 337 Early American Republic: 1788-1850

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of major developments in the new nation, from the ratification of the Constitution to the Compromise of 1850. Topics will include political culture, the market revolution, westward expansion, the wars with

Britain and Mexico, slavery, and reform. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 338 Themes in United States History:

1877-1914

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected topics in U.S. history from the end of Reconstruction to the nation’s emergence as an international power. The course will examine significant political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 339 Themes in United States History:

1914-1945

4 hours; 4 credits

Selected topics in U.S. history from 1914-1945. The course will examine significant political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 340 United States Foreign Policy in the

20th Century

4 hours; 4 credits

The development of U.S. foreign policy from isolationism to empire. The focus will be on the expanding role of the

United States in world affairs and the impact of World

Wars I and II on contemporary society. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 344 War and Society in Modern America

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the impact of the Cold War and its resulting international tensions upon U.S. society. Among the topics are: the origins of the Cold War; the problem of defining loyalty in a democratic state; the role of the military in the nuclear age; secret intelligence operations and their influence upon a democratic society; and the quest for security in a divided world. All questions will be considered within the framework of an attempt to assess the

United States’ traditional values and define its national goals. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 347 Your Parents’ America

4 hours; 4 credits

The United States from World War II to the Vietnam War, using parents’ reminiscences. A study of the effects of

World War II and the Cold War, the growth of mass media, the youth gangs of the 1950s, the Civil Rights movement and rising expectations, the suburban dream, the cult of the automobile, the fear of atomic disaster, the sexual revolution, and changing patterns of child rearing.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a

United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 348 The Holocaust in European History

4 hours; 4 credits

A history and historiography of the Holocaust, covering both Western and Eastern Europe from 1933 to 1945.

The course will provide an analytical investigation of the role of anti-Semitism in the Holocaust, the rise of radical

right-wing movements in Europe, the development of

Nazi policy and racial science, the role of collaborator regimes, the role of non-state actors, and Jewish and non-Jewish responses. Consideration of debates concerning the causes and interpretations of genocide in modern Europe will be offered. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

Prerequisite: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 349 United States History since 1945

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of U.S. cultural, social, political, and diplomatic history from the conclusion of World War II to the present.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a

United States history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 350 Comparative Urban History

4 hours; 4 credits

A study of urban life in various periods and societies with a view toward spelling out similarities and differences.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 361 The Heritage of Marcus Garvey and

W.E.B. DuBois

(Also AFA 361)

4 hours; 4 credits

Marcus Garvey, the man and the idealist, his influence on

African American consciousness; W.E.B. DuBois, the man and the thinker, his influence on African American consciousness and Pan-Americanism. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United States history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 370 The Middle East and Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the relations between Western Europe and the non-Western Middle East as they evolved historically. In order to examine the Middle Eastern historical experience, the course begins with Christian conceptions of Islam in the medieval and early modern periods and explores whether and how the Christian representatives of Islam influenced Western discourses on the Middle

East in modern times. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a world history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 371 The 1960s in Europe

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the 1960s in Europe, the turbulent and transformative period between the era of decolonization in the 1950s and the descent into economic and political stagnation in the 1970s. In the course of a decade, the seemingly conformist and unchanging societies of the immediate post-Second World War period were shaken by social and political rebellion, leading to the brink of revolution in 1968 and far-reaching transformations in daily life. We will consider the impact of consumer society, sexual liberation, the student rebellions, the rise of feminism, the revolts of 1968 in both East and West, the failure of reform in the Communist Bloc, and the descent of political revolution into terrorism. For History majors

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 209 and minors, this is designated as a Modern European history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 375 Economic History of Soviet Russia

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the creation and development of the

Stalinist economic system in the USSR after 1928 and in the European part of the Soviet bloc after 1945. The economic structure and policy will be investigated as both cause and effect of internal policy and Soviet foreign policy, as well as its applicability as a model for development in the Third World. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 376 Nazi Germany

4 hours; 4 credits

The history of the rise of National Socialism and the Nazi regime in Germany. The course considers the position of

Nazism in German History, the heritage of German colonialism and the First World War, the reasons for the failures of German democracy, and the nature of the Nazi dictatorship: the role of Hitler, Nazi state and society, persecution, consent and resistance. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a Modern European history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 382 War and Society

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the study of war. The central focus of the course will examine why wars begin, how they are won and lost, and what kind of impact war has had on recent Western history.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 384 Social and Political Ideologies in the

Modern World

4 hours; 4 credits

A survey of the major social and political

“isms” that developed from the French Revolution to the mid-20th century, analyzing their historical context and content. Such topics as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism, imperialism, communism, and fascism will be considered.

For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern European history course.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 386 The Recovery of Women’s Past

(Also WGS 386)

4 hours; 4 credits

An examination of the history of women, beginning with ancient and classical notions of patriarchy in Mediterranean and Near Eastern cultures. Review of Jewish,

Christian, and Islamic prescriptions about women as a basis for understanding the changes in modern Western history.

Approximately half of the course will examine the past two centuries w hen women’s movements, feminisms, gender analysis, and sexual liberation evolved. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a modern

European history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

210 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

HST 389 Themes in American Women’s

History

(Also WGS 389)

4 hours; 4 credits

An exploration of selected themes in American women’s history from the Colonial era to the present. This course, which is organized either around a chronological period, a thematic topic, or a geographical region, also examines women’s historical methodology and literature. For History majors and minors, this is designated as a United

States history course. (social science) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 395 Foundations of Modern Society

4 hours; 4 credits

The rise of the modern state system, the origins of capitalism, the religious wars; the emergence of a secular society.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level history course and ENG 151

HST 401 Seminar in Advanced Historical Study

4 hours; 4 credits

The research seminar for the History major, in which each student will produce an original paper that is based upon primary sources and situated in the relevant secondary literature. Students will build upon methods and content learned in prior courses. Topics for the seminar will vary according to the instructor's interests and expertise.

Prerequisites: HST 200, HST 300, and any additional

300-level history course

Information Systems

(Bachelor of Science)

Interdisciplinary Program

NOTE: Admission to this program is suspended

pending further review.

Directors: Associate Professor Soon Chun, Building

3N,Room 226; Ms. Roberta Klibaner, Building 1N,

Room 208

The program in Information Systems, offered as an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Departments of

Business and Computer Science, prepares undergraduate students to enter business with advanced quantitative skills and a sophisticated understanding of technology. In addition, it offers an opportunity for professional development for students who have already started a career. Graduates of the program will be able to traverse the boundary between management and computer information technology and to plan organizational change, advise in the development of information systems, participate in their implementation, and interpret analytical and statistical models and data.

Responding to changes in business and technology, the program in Information Systems is designed to prepare students for careers as systems analysts, programmers, and designers; data administrators; information systems consultants; and managers in information technology.

In designing the curriculum, faculty in the departments have followed guidelines from the following professional organizations: the Association for Computing Machinery, the Data Processing Management Association, the

International Conference on Information Systems, and the Association for Information Systems.

A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for admission to and continuation in the Information Systems major and for graduation. There is no minimum GPA requirement for students enrolling in individual courses.

Information Systems (BS)

Pre-Major Requirements: 18-19 credits

Pre-major requirements that count toward general education requirements are marked with an asterisk (*).

ACC 114 Introduction to Accounting I 4 credits

ACC 121 Introduction to Accounting II 4 credits

BUS/

CSC 135 Introduction to Information

Systems or

CSC 102 Computers for Today

3 credits

4 credits or

BUS 150 Essential Software Tools for

Business

CSC 126 Introduction to Computer

Science

ECO 101* Economics

3 credits

4 credits

3 credits

MGT 110 Organizational Theory and

Management

MTH 229* Calculus Computer

Laboratory

MTH 231* Analytic Geometry and

Calculus

3 credits

1 credit

3 credits

Major Requirements: 61 credits

ACC 250 Accounting Information

Systems

BUS 205 Data Communications and

Networks for Business or

CSC 435 Advanced Data

Communications

COM/

BUS 211 Principles of Corporate

BUS 230/

Communication

ECO 231 Quantitative Analysis of

BUS/

Business and Economic

Problems

PHL 238 Ethical Issues in Business and

Society

BUS 334 Decision Support Systems

BUS 352 Introduction to Systems

Analysis

BUS/

CSC 405 Applied Concepts in

Information Systems

CSC 210 Applications Programming

CSC 211 Intermediate Programing

CSC 326 Information Structures

CSC 334 Computer System

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

level

ECO 210

Fundamentals or

Two two--credit CSC courses at the 200

Price Theory

2 credits

4 credits

ECO/

MGT 230 Introduction to Managerial and

Economic Statistics 4 credits

ECO/

FNC 240 Managerial Finance I

One additional course chosen from the following:

3 credits

4 credits

CSC 330 Object-Oriented Software Engineering

CSC 332 Operating Systems

CSC 421 Internet Data Communications and

Security

CSC 424 Database Management Systems

CSC 435 Advanced Data Communications

CSC 470 Introductory Computer Graphics

CSC 482 Discrete Simulation

MGT 320 Management of Organizational Behavior

MGT 410 Business Policy

MGT 416 Decision Making in Business

Electives: 0-7

Total credits: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Since most business courses and computer science courses are non-liberal arts and sciences courses, students in this program should pay special attention to this requirement. At least 60 credits of the 120 credit total must be in this area. See chapters on Business and

Computer Science for course descriptions.

Integrated Science

Department of Engineering Science and Physics, Building 1N, Room 226

Chairperson and Professor Alfred Levine

Department of Chemistry, Building 6S, Room 235

Chairperson and Associate Professor John Olsen

INS 100 Integrated Physical Science I

3 hours; 3 credits

For students whose major interests are not in science.

Elements of astronomy, early and present-day theories of the solar system. Development of the laws and theories basic to the study of humankind’s physical world: force and motion, gravitation, energy, properties of matter, heat, electricity, and magnetism. Students may not receive credit for both INS 100 and AST 100 Contemporary

Theories of the Solar System. (science)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

Corequisite: INS 101

INS 101 Integrated Physical Science I

Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations illustrative of subject matter of INS 100 and the scientific method. Experiments on motion of the Earth and moon; free fall;

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 211

Newton’s laws; properties of matter, heat, electricity, and magnetism. (science)

Pre- or corequisite: INS 100

INS 110 Integrated Physical Science II

3 hours; 3 credits

Structure of the atom; the periodic table; the chemistry of carbon, plastics, food, water, air, drugs, nuclear power; the study of the Earth, rocks, and minerals; volcanism, weathering, erosion, fossils, and Earth history. (science)

Prerequisite: MTH 020 or an appropriate score on the

CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test

INS 111 Integrated Physical Science II

Laboratory

2 laboratory hours; 1 credit

Preparation and study of simple chemicals, identification of rocks and minerals, elementary laboratory techniques.

(science)

Pre- or corequisite: INS 110

International Studies

(Bachelor of Arts and Minor)

Interdisciplinary Program

Director: Associate Professor Jane Marcus-Delgado

This International Studies major is an interdisciplinary major with a predominantly social science emphasis

–history, political science, economics–that allows for a measure of geopolitical specialization. Students choose courses from the categories of economics/geography, culture and society, and political science.

They also select classes that focus on a geographical area: Africa/Middle East, Asia, Caribbean/Latin America, or Europe.

Study Abroad: International Studies majors are strongly urged to plan and schedule a semester of study abroad in their junior or senior year through the Center for International Service.

Internship: International Studies majors are urged to plan and schedule an internship with an international organization through the Division of Humanities and

Social Sciences.

International Studies (BA)

International Studies Four-Year Plan

For the major in International Studies, two and one-half years of college-level study of the same language (one semester beyond the 215-level course) or evidence of proficiency at that level is required. All languages qualify.

Pre-Major Requirements: 12 credits

INT 100 Introduction to International

Studies and three of the following courses

ANT 100

ECO 101

Understanding Our World

Introduction to Economics

GEG 100

HST 100

POL 103

Introduction to Geography

Past and Present

Understanding the Political

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

3 credits

212 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

World

Major Requirements: 36 credits

Students will demonstrate fluency in a language other than English by successfully completing five semesters of study in a foreign language or by demonstrating proficiency through examination.

Within the major requirements at least 12 credits must be at the 300 level or above.

INT 367 Globalization and the World

System 4 credits

And

Five Courses chosen from the following two categories:

20

Credits

1. Economics, Politics, and Geography

BUS 200

ECO 250

GEG 225

GEG 250

ECO/GEG

252

Introduction to International Business

International Economics

Cultural Geography

Conservation and Humanity

Economic Geography

GEG 260

ECO 256

ECO 291

ECO 370/

FNC 300

POL 240

ECO/POL

251

POL 259

POL 260

Urban Geography

Analysis of Underdeveloped Areas

Political Economy of War and Peace

International Finance

Comparative Government

International Political Economy

POL 261

POL/GEG

264

POL 303

POL 342

POL 343

POL 349

POL 364

International Security

International Politics: In Search of New

World Order

International Organizations

Political Geography

Recent Political Theory

Comparative Politics of Developing

Countries

Democracy and Democratization

Comparative Human Rights

International Negotiations and Conflict

Management

Current American Foreign Policy

International Law

CUNY World Affairs Internship

POL 365

POL 375

POL 394

HST 340

SOC 260

SOC 280

SOC 340

2. Culture and Society

AFA 225 Contemporary Third World Literature

ANT 201 Cultural Anthropology

ANT/COM

225

ANT 365

ANT 370

U.S. Foreign Policy in the 20th Century

Class Status and Power

Sociology and Politics

Ethnicity and Immigration

Multicultural Literacy

Political Anthropology

Urban Anthropology

ANT 460

COM 200

COM/SOC

374

Personality and Culture

Media and Culture

Mass Media and Society

COM 420

CIN 204/

POL 219

CIN 240

CIN 408

ENH 206

ENH 209

ENL 329

ENL 396

ENL 397

HST 239/

SLS 241

HST 285

HST 350

HST 382

HST 388

PHL 243

Global Media

Politics, Cinema, and Media

Third World Cinema

Global Cinema

Classics of Modern World Literature

Literature and Global Cultures

Migration and Disporas in Literature and

Cultures

Studies in Global Literature I

Studies in Global Literature II

World Civilization II

The World of the 21st Century

Comparative Urban History

War and Society

Imperialism

Comparative Religion

PSY 213

SOC 200

SOC/ANT/

WGS 312

SOC 340

WGS/INT

203

And

AFA 223

AFA

247/HST

266

AFA/POL

253

AFA 260/

HST 207

AFA/ HST

333

HST 222

HST 235

HST 264

HST 330

Cross-Cultural Psychology

Sociological Theory

Food, Self, and Society

Ethnicity and Immigration

Gender in the Contemporary World

Three courses chosen from one of the of the following geographical areas:

(12 credits)

A. Three African/Middle East area courses that emphasize comparative or general issues chosen from the following:

Comparative Black Literature

Peoples and Cultures of Africa

African Politics

History of Africa

Colonialism and the African Experience

Islam: Religion and Culture

Modern Middle East

The African Dispora

Nationalist Movements and the Process of Independence in Africa

HST 370

POL 252

The Middle East and Europe

Middle East Politics

B. Three Asian area courses that emphasize comparative or general issues chosen from the following:

CIN 203 Chinese Cinema

CHN/LNG

315

ECO 257

ENH 207

ENL 335

HST 204

HST 206

HST 209

HST 210

HST 211

Languages in Contrast: English and

Chinese

The Japanese Economy

Classics of Asian Literature

Modern Asian Literature

Introduction to Asian Civilization

Modern China

Modern Japan

History of Modern India

Japanese Civilization

HST 213

HST 234

HST/AMS

258

PHL 344

POL 353

Chinese Civilization

Asian Tigers since 1945

Vietnam and America: 1945-1975

Eastern Philosophy

China: Politics and Foreign Relations

PSY 217 Psychology and Chinese Culture

C. Three Caribbean/Latin American area courses that emphasize comparative or general issues chosen from the following:

AFA 223 Coimparative Black Literature

AMS/ART

205

Modern Latin American Art

HST 208

HST/AFA

265

HST 291

HST 315

INT 201

POL 250

History of Modern Latin America

History of the Caribbean

The Atlanic World

The European Discovery of America and the Encounter with Native Peoples

Latin American Perspectives

Latin American Politics

SOC/ANT/

INT 305

SOC/ANT/

AMS 306

Power and Society in Latin America

Latinas/os in the United States

SOC/ANT/

INT 307

SPN 325

Caribbean Societies

SPN 330

SPN 350

Civilization of Pre-Columbian Spanish

America

Civilization of Spanish America

Introduction to Spanish American

SPN 455

SPN 480

Literature

Modern Spanish American Novel

Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean

D. Three European area courses that emphasize comparative or general issues chosen from the following:

ART 208

ART 300

ART 301

CIN 404

Twentieth-Century Art

Medieval and Renaissance Art

Baroque Art

French Directors I

CIN 405 French Directors II

CIN/LNG 406 Postwar Italian Cinema

CIN 407

ENH 201

European Cinema

British Literature to 1800

ENH 202

ENH 205

ENH 217

FRN 350

/WGS 353

GEG 220

HST 271

HST 272

HST 274

HST 276

HST 277

HST 278

HST 284

HST 375

ITL 320

British LIterature since 1800

Classics of European Literature

Introduction to Shakespeare

The Feminist Challenge in French

Literature

Geography of Western Europe

Modern British History: 1900 to the

Present

Modern Germany

History of Modern Russia

History of Italy

Europe: 1815-1914

Twentieth-Century Europe

Soviet Union & Contemporary Russia

Economic History of Soviet Russia

Italian Civilization and Culture

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 213

ITL 341

ITL 342

PHL 213

POL 241

POL 246

POL 340

WGS/LNG

256

WGS/LNG

266

WGS/LNG

267

Literary Survey I: Medieval Renaissance

Literary Survey II: Modern Italian Studies

Existentialism

Western European Politics

Nazism and the Holocaust

European Economic Community

Women and European Literature

Women in European Literature to the

Renaissance

Women in European Liteature after the

Renaissance

Electives: 30 credits

Total Credits Required: 120 credits

Honors

To graduate with honors a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average in courses in the major and an honors thesis must be completed under the supervision of the International Studies Coordinator in consultation with the members of the International

Studies Advisory Committee.

International Studies Minor

Minor Requirements

INT 100 Introduction to International

Studies

ECO 250 International Economics

POL 260 International Politics: In

Search of a New World

Order

3 credits

4 credits

4 credits

HST 239/

SLS 241 World Civilization II 4 credits

Students who minor in International Studies must take

INT 200 The World and the West: Contemporary Issues, which qualifies for fulfillment of the Contemporary

World requirement for general education.

Two years of college-level study of the same language

(one semester beyond the 213-level course) or evidence of proficiency at that level. All languages satisfy the requirement.

International Studies Courses

INT 100 International Studies

3 hours; 3 credits

This course examines the impact and implications of today’s dynamic international context for nations and their citizens. To operate in this global context, citizens, corporations, and governments must know other cultures and political-economic systems and how global forces influence domestic activities, both public and private. Analyzing the social, cultural, economic, and current political characteristics of the international environment, students will learn how these characteristics may affect their lives and choices. (social science) (COPR)

214 Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions

INT 200 The World and the West:

Contemporary Issues

4 hours; 4 credits

This interdisciplinary course will analyze contemporary issues in the dynamic relationship between countries and cultures described as

“the West” and the “non-West.”

Social, cultural, historical, political, and economic factors affecting this relationship will be considered. This course provides students the opportunity, skill, and knowledge to acquire and interpret information necessary for comparing and analyzing alternative models of

“the West” and the rest of the world, and the dynamic relationship between them. Students will examine news reports of current international issues involving such regions as Latin

America, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Asia. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

INT 201 Latin American Perspectives

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will analyze how Latin America has historically interacted with the West, and the West with Latin

America. Emphasis will be placed on the historical legacies of the encounters between the West and Latin

America, the geographical/social diversity of this area, an appreciation of the region’s artistic and literary contributions, as well as the technological challenges facing this part of the world today. (social science) (COPR) (cont. wld.)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

INT 203 Gender in the Contemporary World

(Also WGS 203)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to issues of gender worldwide. This interdisciplinary course draws on literary, cultural, social scientific, and historical approaches to explore the significance of gender in societies in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East, and to enable students to think critically about gender issues. (social science) (COPR)

(cont world) (P&D)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

INT 230 Aspects of Contemporary China

(Also LNG 230)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to various aspects of contemporary China, such as political and economic systems, philosophy, religion, music, drama, or medicine. It will be taught in

English. (cont. wld.) (TALA) (COPR) (p&d)

Prerequisites: ENG 151 and COR 100

INT 305 Power and Society in Latin America

(Also SOC 305/ANT 305)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course will offer students a general overview of the political, economic, and cultural forces shaping Latin

American societies. It will focus particular attention on social inequalities and the effects of contemporary global changes on the region. Readings and class discussions will address both specific countries and trends affecting the region more broadly.

Prerequisite: (SOC 200 or SOC 240 or SOC 260 or ANT

201)

INT 307 Caribbean Societies

(Also ANT 307/SOC 307)

4 hours; 4 credits

An introduction to the sociological and anthropological literature on Caribbean societies. The main objective is to acquaint students with the most important economic, political, and social aspects of the region. Using ethnographies, the course will focus on the development of plantation society, nation-state formation, race and ethnicity, gender, political economy, and transnationalism.

Class discussions will also address the issues of economic development, human rights, globalization, and

U.S. foreign policies on the region. This is a reading and writing intensive course in which students are expected to conduct primary research.

Prerequisite: INT 200 or INT 203 or any ANT or SOC

200-level course

INT 367 Globalization and the World System

(Also SOC/ANT 367)

4 hours; 4 credits

This course explores major issues and current approaches in sociological thinking on globalization and the world system. Globalization will be examined as a multifaceted phenomenon, encompassing changing economic and political forces and the movement of people, ideas, images, and technologies across national boundaries. Particular attention will be given to how global forces structure inequalities both across nations and within them.

Prerequisites: (SOC 200 or SOC 240 or SOC 260 or ANT

201)

Italian Studies

(Bachelor's of Arts, Minor)

Department of World Languages and Literatures, Building 2S, Room 109

Chairperson and Associate Professor Gerry Milligan

Italian Studies (BA)

Italian Studies Four-Year Plan

Italian Studies (7-12) Four-Year Plan

1. Track One: Italian Studies:

Pre-Major Requirements: 16 credits

Four semesters of college-level language study (ITL

113, ITL 114, ITL 213, ITL 213, ITL 215) or the equivalent (ITL 120, ITL 220, ITL 215). Students who enter the College with ability in Italian take a placement examination to determine the level at which they should begin language study. These courses may also be used to satisfy general education requirements.

Major Requirements: 36 credits

Students majoring in Italian Studies must complete the following requirements:

ITL 313 Advanced Communications

ITL 320 Italian Civilization and Culture

Course

4 credits

4 credits

Majors, Disciplines and Course Descriptions 215

ITL 341 Literary Survey I: Medieval

Renaissance

4 credits

ITL 342 Literary Survey II: Modern

Italian Studies

An additional 20 credits of Italian courses

4 credits

20 at the 300- or 400-level credits

One course may be taken outside of the department with the permission of the Italian Studies advisor.

These courses may be offered in fields such as English,

History, Art History, or Political Science. When necessary, one course may be completed as an independent study on a approved topic with a CSI faculty member.

Certain courses currently offered that are strongly suggested for majors include HST 249 Italian American

History, HST 276 History of Italy, ENL 399 Themes in

Literature: Italian/American Experience in Literature,

ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art.

2. Track Two: Preparation for Teaching Italian

Studies (Grades 7-12):

In addition to the requirements for the Italian Studies major, students wishing to be recommended by the

College for teacher certification must complete the following sequence of education courses for 24 credits:

EDS 201 Social Foundations of

Secondary Education

EDS 202 Psychological Foundations of

Secondary Education

EDS 305 The Pedagogy of Secondary

School in Foreign Language

EDS 319 The Secondary School

Curriculum in Foreign

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

Language

EDS 400 Student Teaching in Secondary

Education

EDS 401 Reflection and Analysis in

Student Teaching in Secondary

Education

See also Education/Adolescence Education.

6 credits

2 credits

Electives: 2-26 credits

Total Credits Required: 120

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirement

Most education courses are non-liberal arts and sciences.

Honors

To graduate with honors in Italian a student must have a

3.5 grade point average in Italian courses and must complete a special project under the direction of a faculty member. A faculty committee will vote on the recommendation for honors.

Minor

At least 12 credits of courses in Italian at the 200 level or above.

ITL 101 Italian Conversation I

2 hours; 2 credits

Practical Italian for business, community relations, travel, and simple technical application. For beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Regular attendance in the World Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.

ITL 102 Italian Conversation II

2 hours; 2 credits

A continuation of ITL 101. Regular attendance in the

World Languages and Literatures Media Center is required.

Prerequisite: ITL 101 or equivalent

ITL 112 Basic Italian I

3 hours; 3 credits

A beginning course in the fundamentals of expression and communication for those who have had no previous work in the language. Regular attendance in the Modern

Languages and Literatures Media Center is required. Not open to students who have taken ITL 113 or ITL 120.

(foreign lang.) (FWGR)

Prerequisite: Passing the CUNY Assessment Tests in

Reading and Writing