High Fidelity magazine March 1958

High Fidelity magazine March 1958
le magazine for music listeners march 60 cents
High fidelity
in this
issue
Why Wagner
Was No Lady
by Ashley Montagu
At Home With
the Shostakovitchs
a photographic visit
Hi -Fi Doctoring
Without Instruments
by
John
T.
Frye
the pause that will keep your records young
an exclusive feature of the new Glaser - Steers GS -77
Your records can be a lasting joy, their
original brilliance preserved for many
hundreds of performances. This takes
special care to guard against undue record wear. The new GS -77 handles records
more gently than any other automatic
record playing mechanism.
TURNTABLE PAUSE is a dramatic example
of this fact. During the record -change
cycle, the GS -77 turntable comes to a
complete halt, and doesn't resume motion
until the stylus has come to rest in the
run -in groove of the next record. This
completely eliminates the grinding action
which occurs where records are dropped
onto n moving turntable or disc.
The GS -77 TONE ARM affords further
protection. Improved mass distribution
and low pivot friction have so minimized
arm resonance and tracking error that
these flagrant causes of groove and stylus
wear are now virtually eliminated. In
addition, the arm has been so designed
that stylus pressure between the first and
top records in a stack does not vary
more than 0.9 gram.
SPEEDJIINDER goes
still further -for by
simply setting the appropriate stylus into
play position, the GS -77 automatically
plays at the correct record speed, and in
the microgroove position, intermixes 33'
www.americanradiohistory.com
and 45 rpm records regardless of their
sequence in the stack.
The GS-77 is the perfect high fidelity
It combines traditional
record changer.
turntable quality with modern automatic
conveniences and it does this with incredible mechanical simplicity. No wonder
-
...audiophiles are switching to the new
L A S E R- STEERS GS-77
See your hi -fi dealer today, or write to:
GLASER- STEERS CORPORATION
G
20
Main Street, Belleville 0, New Jersey
In Canada: Glaser- Steers of Canada. Ltd.. Trenton. lint.
Export: M. Simons & Sons Co.. Inc. N. Y. 7. N. Y.
Have the best in Hi -Fi Sound
e
e
e
and save with a
JenSen
E
High Fidelity Speaker
L
Now you can have famous Jensen authentic high fidelity loudspeaker
performance plus the fun and satisfaction of building your
own speaker system (and save money) with any one of Jensen's
eight Hi -Fi loudspeaker kits. Choose from kits ranging from the
modest KDU -12 two -way Budget Duette to the superlative
KT -31 Imperial 3 -way system. You can build your own enclosure,
build into your custom home music installation, or install in a
Jensen factory -built cabinet. In every speaker kit you get the same
high quality matched components used in Jensen's factory assembled
reproducers-and at far less cost, too. Select the kit that best fits
your budget and space, follow simplified plans, and enjoy the finest
in sound reproduction. Send for our free Catalog 165 -B.
INSTALL A JENSEN SPEAKER KIT
IN A JENSEN ENCLOSURE.
If you don't want to build your own
enclosure, you can install a Jensen speaker
kit in one of Jensen's many fine furniture
speaker cabinets. Catalog 165 -B gives com-
plete details and suggestions for cabinet -kit
combinations.
.
36 PAGE JENSEN MANUAL 1080
Thls Is your fluido to kit selection and enclosure
construction. Complote data and Instructions for
all Jensen Speaker Kits from the famous 3 -way
"Imperial" system to the budget cost 2- way "Duane'
system Describes Bass- Ultraflex and Back -loading
Folded Horn enclosures in complete detall with exploded views and simplified wiring Instructions.
JENSEN MANUAL 1080 -Not Each
50c
Model
Type
Frctue_ocy Rangetat
wer Rating (Watts)
KT-31t1
-7-7737Imperial
25- 11th-
oP
kmpedance (Ohms)
Components:
L-F ("Woofer ")
M -F (Mid -Range)
H -F ( "Tweeter" or
"Supertweeter" )
Networks
Controls
-3
KT-3211
-wa
IV kJ
-T
KT-21
'
Trl-pplex
Concerto-15
35
30
30-URL
KT-22
;
-waÿ
-35- -2-6-75-RFT8766
30-15.000
I6
16
P1SLLs
P15-LL
P16-LL
Pl2-NL
RP-201
RP-302
RP-201
RP-302
A-61: A-402
8T-917: ST-901
RP-102
A-204
ST-901
-1TMRFF--
A-8T
RP-102
A-204
KT-23
KOU -10
2 -way Duel te
temporary or Contemporary
-wad
40 15.000
2018
P12-RL
!
RP-103
A-204
ST-901
-f0
5(- 15.00)
8
P&RL
RP-103
Capacitor
I
KDU -12
Automobile
or Duet e Table
KOU -11
may
-
55-13,000
P69-RLt
69]101
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
P36-VH
Capacitor
Division of The Muter Co.
6601 S. Laramie Ave.
50- 15,000
4
RP-103
apae tor
523
4
Ing Wt. (Lbw)
43
29
3H
6S1
Net F1r ce
5184.60
5189.EíÓ 599.60 $73.00 s4
$24.76
51 0.50
Special "woofer" for " mperial" Back -Loading folded horn -not available separately. 16 x 9 Oval -not avallab e separately.
tttTlncludes M -1131 lotrarange equaliser -not available separately. **Special M -F and H -F Controls -not available separately.
tttL-F response depends on enclosure. (URL-Upper Hearing Limit).
8hI
Jensen
-75-
Chicago 38, Illinois
In Canada:
J. R. Longufape Co., Ltd., Toronto
In Mexico:
Radios
Y
Television, S.A., Mexico D.F.
1
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
Come
o- CELEBRATE!
PICKERIN''S
12th Anniversary
Special
-
THIS YEAR -1958 PICKERING & CO.
marks its twelfth year as leader in the field of
high quality transducers and precise electronic
devices for the most exacting engineering applications.
THIS YEAR -1958 PICKERING & CO.
announces its readiness for the new stereo -disk.
Yes, it is twelve years since PICKERING & CO.
was first with a high quality miniature magnetic
pickup for high fidelity reproduction from records and
broadcast transcriptions. And now, PICKERING & CO.
is ready for the stereo-disk with the STANTON 45/45,
a stereo model of the renowned FLUXVALVE cartridge.
THIS YEAR 1958 PICKERING & CO., in its
twelfth year of progress, will celebrate their anniversary
by giving each purchaser of a FLUXVALVE product a
bonus gift valued at ($6) six dollars to extend the
utility of the product they have purchased.
THIS YEAR -1958 marks another first for PICKERING & CO. with the PICKERING $6
BONUS BILL! Beginning February 1, 1958 and until April 15, 1958-each PICKERING
FLUXVALVE product will be packaged with a bonus bill valued at $6. Redeem it on the spot
at your PICKERING dealer.
NOW! When you buy a PICKERING FLUXVALVE Model 350, 370, or 194-D,
a
gift of a bonus bill for which you can receive
1. Any PICKERING `T- GUARD" sapphire stylus ... value $6 ... absolutely FREE!
2. A credit of $6 toward the purchase of any PICKERING 'T- GUARD" diamond stylus you
choose.
NOW! You can get the $24 amazing PICKERING 'h mil diamond stylus for only $18! ... or,
any of the other $18 diamond "T- GUARD" styli for only $12!
BUILD UP THE QUALITY OF YOUR HI -PI SYSTEM WITH A PICKERING FLUXVALVE
-
-
-
-
yofì,ve
-
1114D VNIPOISE
Pkkap Arm-This new ...
Model
FLUXVALVE TWIN
SERIES 3541-A turnover
cartridge providing a
rapid change of stylus
point radius. Available in
12 models featuring many
combinations of styli.
prices start at a modest $24.
FLUXVALVE SINGLE
SERIES 375 -A miniature
high quality cartridge for
use in any type of autochanger or manual player
arm. Available in 5 models. prices start at a low
517.85.
. integrated
lightweight
arm and cartridge assembly containing the
FLUXVALVE with ex.
elusive "T-Guard" stylus
is only a fraction of the
-
weight of conventional
tone arms. High compli.
ance and single frictionfree pivot bearing assure
distortionlcss tracking of
For those who con hear the difference
microgroove and standard
groove recordings. Avail able with the 1. I or 2.7
mil diamond stylus. Prices
front $59.85.
FINE QUALITY NIGH FIDELITY PRODUCTS
PICKERING & COMPANY, INC, Plainview,
Enjoy
a
demonstration at your hi.fi sound
studio... you'll
ay
N. Y.
hear the difference. For the dealer nearest you or for literature write Dept. Q-31
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
volume 8
number 3
ARTICLES
Why Wagner Was No Lady
John M. Conly
Editor
Roland Gelatt
Music Editor
Roy F. Allison
Audio Editor
Miriam
Manning
D.
34
Ashley Montagu
A Cat May Look at a King
What can't jazz convey that so- called
"serious" music call?
36
Charles Burr
Hi -Fi Doctoring Without Instruments
39
John
42
Nicholas Tikhomirov
How Music Became Classical
It was during the Renaissance that music
along with the other arts -began to assume its
present shape. From the Mass to the motet to the
44
Joseph Kerman
Jelly Roll Morton and All That Jazz
46
John
A scientist noted as champion of the gentler
sex deals with the puzzling fact that there have
been no great women composers.
Managing Editor
Joan Griffiths
Associate Editor
Roy Lindstrom
Art Director
At Home With the Shostakovitchs
Martha Jane Brewer
Editorial Assistant
A
Frances A. Newbury
Manager, Book Division
C. G.
R.
D.
Darrell
madrigal was the evolution.
Publisher
Byer
Associate Puh4:.her
A Hi -Fi Primer 123
Part VII of a basic instructional series.
Claire N. Eddings
Advertising Sales Manager
Andrew
J.
Csida
Marketing and
Merchandising Manager
REPORTS
Griffin
Books in Review
Music Makers
Record Section
Arthur
J.
S.
Wilson
Once again available on microgroove is
Alan Lomax's historic interview with one of the most
colorful figures in the early growth of jazz.
Charles Fowler
B.
Frye
phutugruphie uisit.
-
Burke
James Hinton, Jr.
Robert Charles Marsh
Contributing Editors
Warren
T.
When your Ruchmmninujf rumbles and
your Grieg is gritty, there is something you
can do before culling the serviceman.
J. Gordon Holt
Technical Editor
Circulation Manager
Lee Zhite
Western Manager
John H. Newitt
20
49
51
Records in Review;
a
A
D
V
E
R
T
I
S
I
Main Office
New York
1564 Broadway
Telephone: Plaza 7.2800
Chicago
John R. Rutherford & Associates,
Inc., 230 East Ohio St. Telephone:
Whitehall 4 -6715.
1520
Stereo
Tested in the Home
N G
Claire N. Eddings, The Publishing House
Great Barrington, Mass. Telephone 1300.
Los
Bruckner on Microgroove,
Discography by Saul Taishoff
99
113
Dynakit Mark Ill amplifier
Standard speaker system
Norelco Continental tape recorder
Wharfedale Flat- Baffle speaker system
EICO
Noted with Interest 4
As the Editors See It 33
On the Counter 14
Letters 9
Audio Forum 128
Professional Directory 136
Angeles
North Gower, Hollywood 28
Telephone: Hollywood 9 -5831
Trader's Marketplace 137
Advertising Index 142
High Fidelity Magazine
is published monthly by Audiocom, Inc., at Great Barrington, Mass. Telephone: Great Barrington
1300. Editorial, publication, and circulation offices at: Tho Publishing House, Great Barrington, Moss. Subscriptions:
s600 per year In the United Stoles and Canada. Single copies: 60 cents each. Editorial contributions will be welcomed
by the editor. Payment for articles accepted will be arranged prior to publication. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied by return postage. Entered os second closs molter April 27, 1951 at the post office at Great Barrington, Mass.,
under the act of March 3, 1879. Additional entry at the post office, Concord, N. H. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation.
Printed in the U. S. A. by the Rumford Press, Concord, N. H. Copyright © 1958 by Audiocom, Inc. The cover design
cad contents of High Fidelity Magazine ore fully protected by copyrights and must not be reproduced In any manner.
www.americanradiohistory.com
MARCH
1958
PRESENTS
.
.
cam, ,rtiÏA1190
Ah, me!
6
THE MODEL FOUR
A
complete -range loudspeaker system of distinctly superior performance
The
superiority of the KLH Model Four stems from an exeffort to bring as close to perfection as possible
haustive
every factor affecting
loudspeaker performance.
a two -way loudspeaker system housed in
12"O cabinet. The low- frequency section is the same
acoustic suspension mechanism used in the KLH Models Two and Three.
Its very low distortion and smooth extended low- frequency response result
The KLH
a
131H
Model Four is
x 25W x
in a quality of reproduction
which is unique among loudspeaker systems.
The high- frequency section uses a small diameter direct radiator
designed to operate as a piston throughout most of its range. Its wide
dispersion and exceptionally smooth extended frequency response immediately distinguish it as one of the very few available high-frequency
reproducers which fill every part of the room with sound free from
There is now available one of the
most revolutionary products ever to
come to our attention. The whole
radio industry is likely to change its
character; some businesses will coIlapse, others will burgeon. This remarkable unit, selling for only a little
over $12 list price, will enable you
to convert your present high -fidelity
amplifier to operate with a variable
reluctance cartridge! No kidding . .
that's what it says, right in the publicity piece, and there's a fine, heavily
retouched photograph of the unit to
prove that such a device is really
available. At last. Just think what
this means to the future of music
. now we can hear
reproduction
our records with a reluctance cartridge, by converting our high-fidelity
amplifiers with this doodad.
Just what do these people think
the "Mag Input" terminal is for, on
the hundreds of thousands of amplifiers now in use all over the
world? ?? Ah, me, indeed yes!
any harshness.
Unequaled smoothness throughout the mid range is achieved by use
of specially developed loudspeaker cones and by exceedingly careful
attention to the design of a cross -over network which integrates the lowand high.frequency speakers into a complete -range system of such smoothness that the presence of two different speakers is undetectable.
A new standard of quality control in the manufacture of loudspeakers was
introduced into the industry by KLH with the production of its Models One, Two,
and Three. The same scrupulous care is applied to the production of the Model
Four, thus assuring the uniformly high quality of every Model Four that leaves the
Kill factory.
Although the development of the Model Four involved extensive engineering
measurements, a truly fine loudspeaker system cannot he adequately described in
terms of numbers, graphs, or other technical data. An appreciation of the magnificent
performance of the Model Four can really be developed only by careful listening.
When you do listen to the Model Four, you will notice that its superiority as an
instrument for reproducing music becomes especially evident when it is compared,
at the same volume level, with any other loudspeaker system.
At selected dealers. $209.00 to $231.00.
Slightly higher in West and Far South.
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
30 CROSS STREET
4
CAMBRIDGE
CORPORATION
39.
MASSACHUSETTS
Copying Phonograph Records
Some months ago we published an
inquiry from a reader about the legal
aspects of copying records onto tape
for library use. We are very much
indebted to one of our readers for
giving a detailed opinion. He prefers
to remain anonymous, so we'll just
say "Thank you, sincerely" and publish the letter in full:
"In my last issue of HIGH FIDELrrY I notice an inquiry concerning
the legal aspects of copying of phonograph records by libraries for circulation to borrowers. While I am primarily a patent rather than a
copyright man, I have just finished an
article for a library periodical, on
photocopying by libraries of copyrighted materials. Perhaps, therefore,
the results of my investigation may
have some bearing on your inquiry,
though they did not directly concern
phonograph records.
"My advice to a library is: Don't.
Continued on page 6
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Jlze .R.Ca T/ctor.Society(great Music
... A SENSIBLE PLAN TO ENABLE YOU TO BUILD
A BALANCED RECORD LIBRARY UNDER GUIDANCE
HOROWITZ
HEIFETZ
RUBINSTEIN
THE WORLD'S GREATEST MUSIC
PERFORMED BY
BRAILOWSKY
WORLD-CELEBRATED ARTISTS
... at
a
.
45% saving the first year and 331/3% thereafter
...
IANDOWSKA
this can be done by building up your collection systematically, instead of haphazardly and always with the help
and the guidance of the distinguished panel listed below
-
MUSIC - LOVERS, in the
back of their minds, certainly intend to build up for themselves a representative record library of the World's Great Music.
Under this plan, since this can be
done systematically, operating costs
can be greatly reduced, thus permitting extraordinary economics for
the record collector. The remarkable Introductory Offer at the left
is a dramatic demonstration. It represents a 45% saving the first year.
MOST
BEGINNING MEMBERS WILL RECEIVE
The Nine
Symphonies of
*
Thereafter, continuing members
can build their record library at
almost a ONE -THIRD SAVING. For
every two records purchased (from
a group of at least fifty made available annually by the Society)
members will receive a f bird RCA
VICTOR Red Seal Record free.
tfir-"fte,
)
PIATIGORSKY
*
A cardinal feature of the plan is
The Society has a Selection Panel whose sole function
GUIDANCE.
to recommend "must- have"
works that should be included in
any well -balanced library. Members of the panel are as follows:
is
commentator, Chairman
Music Director, NRC
JACQUES BARZUN, author and music critic
JOHN M. CONLY, editor of 9ifgb 7idcfity
AARON COPLAND, composer
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN, music critic of San Francisco Chronicle
DOUGLAS MOORE, composer and Professor of Music, Columbia University
WILLIAM SCHUMAN, composer and president of Juilliard School of Music
CARLETON SPRAGUE SMITH, chief of Music Division, N. Y. Public Library
G. WALLACE WOODWORTH, Professor of Music, Harvard University
DEEMS TAYLOR, composer and
SAMUEL CHOTZINOFF, General
Beethoven
HOW THE SOCIETY OPERATES
Arturo
Toscan ini
THE NRC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CONDUCTING
IN AN ALBUM OF SEVEN 12 -INCH
LONG -PLAYING RECORDS FOR
a
small charge for postage)
CONDITION
IS
THAT BEGIN-
NING MEMBERS AGREE TO BUY SIX RCA
VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS
SOCIETY
N.tAßCFi
DURING THE
1958
FROM THE
NEXT
RCA
will
announced to members. One
be singled out as the
record -of -tbe- monfb, and unless
the Society is otherwise instructed
(on a simple form always provided), this record will be sent to
he
will always
the member. If the member does
not want the work he may specify
an alternate, or instruct the Society
to send him nothing. For every record purchased, members will pay
$4.98, the nationally advertised price
of RCA VICTOR Red Seal Records
(plus a small charge for mailing).
V 12-3
RCA VICTOR Society of Great Music
345 Hudson Street, New York 14, N. Y.
Nationally advertised price: $34.98
THE SOLE
Red Seal Records
c/o Book -of -the -Month Club, Inc.
$398
(plus
month, three or more
AEACH
E
VICTOR
Please register me as a member and send
me the seven-record Toscanini-Beethoven Album under the conditions stated
at the left and above, billing me $3.98.
plus postage. I agree to buy six addi-
tional records within twelve months
from the Society. Thereafter, if I continue, for every two records I purchase
from the Society, I will receive a third
RCA VICTOR record. free. To maintain
membership after the first year, I need
buy only four records from the Society
in any 12 -month period.
MR.
MILS.
(Please print plainly)
MISS
ADDRESS
CITY
ZONE.,-
-_- STATE,
NOTE: if you wish to enroll thraueh an authorised RCA VICTOR dealer. please O11 In here:
DEALER'S
CITY
NAME
ZONE.,...
YEAR
5
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 4
"Records, as such, are not copyrightable under our present statutes,
but that is far from giving carte
blanche to copy and circulate them.
First, the common law of unfair competition, quite aside from copyright,
has been held to protect a record
upon which the manufacturer has
spent a lot of money producing and
promoting. Second, although the
record is not copyrightable, the music
or other material recorded on it may
be, and if it is music, ASCAP is very
astute to protect its members' interests,
by actions for damages and injunction. Third, even if the recorded
matter has not been statutorily copyrighted, it still may be and probably
is protected by common law copyright if not `published,' and an injunction might lie for copying a
record. Whether selling or otherwise
circulating a record constitutes general publication of the recorded material is a point still at issue, to be
determined by the law of the state
where the record was made. Two
federal (federal jurisdiction required
by diversity of citizenship of the
parties) and a state case have held
that there is publication, and therefore dedication to the public; but a
decision of the U. S. Court of Appeals
for the Second Circuit has construed
the New York law to mean that there
is no publication. The U. S. Supreme
Court has not yet ruled. The commercial (not library) aspect was fully
discussed in an article and a note in
the Columbia Law Review for January and February, 1956.
"Although much classical music is
so old as to be in the public domain,
or was never copyrighted in this
country at all, the unfair competition
doctrine probably would still protect
the record manufacturer from unauthorized copying. In any case, it
would seem prudent for the library
to abstain from what probably is unlawful copying and circulation of
commercial phonograph records. This
is a very brief and undocumented
disquisition, but it's good law."
1/?EwOOc.tCt and friend
friend...
-
and how much they have in common
both topflight performers, both quality entertainers. You hear more about Mr.
Crosby because Bing belongs to everybody. Fleetwood belongs to those who want television that is truly different in
every way.
Fleetwood is, unmistakably, the finest television system
made. No manufacturing shortcuts are taken. You get the
benefit of the finest components assembled with consummate
care. Fleetwood is custom crafted in remote and self -contained control units for built -in installation anywhere in
your home
with sound outputs to your hi fi system.
Remote control is fully electronic. With the remarkable
Fleetwood Definition Control, you choose picture texture
most pleasing to you. You discover television anew in the
far superior quality of Fleetwood. Eliminate the weak point
of your home entertainment system ... see Fleetwood at your
hi fi dealer's.
-
9QEELtrood
®
What's a Watt?
CUSTOM TELEVISION
CRAFTED BY CONRAC, INC.
DEPARTMENT A, GLENDORA, CALIFORNIA
Having just received a release about
a product rated at "15 British Watts
(30 U. S. Watts)" we would like to
Export Division:
Frazar and Hansen, Ltd., 301 Clay St., San Francisco, Calif.
WRITE
FORA
INFORMATION
FREE
BOOKLET OF INSTALLATION IDEAS, COMPLETE
AND THE NAME
OF THE
DEALER NEAREST
point out once again, for the umpteenth time, that there is no technical
difference between a British and a
U. S. watt. If an amplifier is capable
of putting out, with a specified
YOU.
Continued on page 8
6
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
A
loudspeaker generates sound
by moving air. If the speaker cone
suspension is tight, the excursion
buckles and bends the cone during
operation. Stephens Trusonic
has engineered the speaker cone
in
"free suspension," mounting it
flexibly with
a
newly developed
plastic -impregnated compliance.
This allows the speaker cone
to move as
A COMPLETE LINE OF FULL -RANGE FREE -CONE SPEAKERS
8 ", 12"
and... the
The cone has
new 15"
a
a
true piston.
free excursion,
eliminating distortion,
giving
Sound reproduced by TRUSONIC
free -cone speakers is unbelievdistortion is pracably clean
clarity is
tically eliminated
crisp and refreshing. Engineered
by Bert Berlant and the TRUSONIC engineering staff, this new
line of speakers is the culmination of years of experience in
...
a
maximum bass
response and the best transient
response. The clarity and
...
definition of Stephens
Ink
Trusonic's new "free -cone
suspension" speakers herald
a new
engineering achievement
in high fidelity equipment.
audio equipment development.
There's a full range model in
three different sizes to meet your
individual needs ... the 80FR,
the 120FR and the new 150FR.
Hear them at your audio dealer's.
Listen ... you'll always hear more from:
ST= Px E w S T RLTS OAT
8 5 3 8
W A
R N E R
DRIVE,
C U L V E R
CITY,
C A L
I
F O R
N
I
A
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 6
amount of distortion, 15 British watts,
it will put out 15 U. S. watts with
the identical amount of distortion.
Some U. S. manufacturers talk of
their products in terms of, for example, "10 watts continuous, 20 watts
peak." So do the British! What our
release laddie was doing -he was
talking about speakers -was to say in
effect: "This speaker is capable of
handling 15 watts continuous, 30
watts peak." He could have said, "15
U. S. watts continuous, 30 British
watts peak" with equal accuracy.
In Boston? Then Note
. . .
Joe Cook, of Boston's station
nooDMANS
"The
Goodmans
speakers are
...
WCRB, has had an idea which may
appeal to those who want the absolute ultimate in fidelity. He's reviving the idea that chamber music
belongs in the home, and has arranged with a group of professional
musicians to play in concert in private
homes for a nominal fee. We don't
know just what will happen when
someone wants less bass or more highs,
but at least the possibilities for rearrangement of optimum room acoustics are almost unlimited. Given a
quartet, how do you arrange the
players? One in each corner? And so
on
but seriously, it's a fine idea.
Chamber music belongs in the home,
not on the enormous concert stage
so good luck to Joe Cook. His
phone is TWinbrook 3 -7080, Tuesday through Saturday evenings.
...
In Ithaca, N. Y.? Then Note
one of the uniformly
Audiospeaker Bulletin
...
good luck to them!
In Detroit, Mich.? Then Note
Rockbar Corp. Dept.
RG -15
.
The Music Committee of Willard
Straight Hall, Cornell University's
Student Union, is planning a high fidelity exhibition for the first week
in April. Be sure to see it
and
best lines on the market today."
Write for free 12
page brochure on
Goodmans extended
range loudspeakers,
multiple speaker
systems, speaker
enclosure kits and the
famous Goodmans
Acoustical Resistance
Units. We will also
send you the name of
your nearest dealer.
..
..
.
Ronald P. Sillman, 619 Kennesaw,
Birmingham, Mich., is forming a high fidelity music club
has a few
members now, wants more. Please get
in touch with him if you're interested.
...
1u1u
In Williams Bay, Wisc.?
Then Note
.
..
Electron Associates, Box 671, Williams Bay is looking for business . . .
sales of first -line merchandise, trade ins
and service of balky equipment. Put this address on your desk
if you live in southern Wisconsin or
northern Illinois.
...
Mamaroneck, N. Y.
8
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
ALLIEDS OWN knights HI -FI COMPONENTS
s- MONEY -SAVING HI -FI COMPARABLE TO THE FINEST
]e
* Advanced Design, Performance and Styling
* Outstanding For Superior Musical Quality
* You Get the Very Finest For Less
* Each Unit Guaranteed For One Full Year
I
(rte
_
Prejudice Deplored
Sm:
In the December issue under "Records in Review," I completely disagree
with your review of: Chaikin: Concerto for Accordion; Shishakov: Concerto for Balalaika; Gorodovskaya:
Suite for Orchestra of Folk Instruments; Vitolyn: Village Polka. Westminster XWN 18464.
If this is typical of the record reviewer's taste then "God help the
people" who swallow his prejudice
against these fine Soviet compositions
and the superb artists who performed
them. I'm no Communist nor a sympathizer in any way, shape or form,
but one who believes that all music
should be reviewed truthfully and
appraised honestly, not degraded because it isn't in our political camp. I
have noticed this same alarming trend
in reviews of David Oistrakh, Emil
Gilels, Sviatoslav Richter, Kurt San derling, Leonid Kogan (others also),
and many definitely high -fidelity Soviet orchestral recordings of late.
It certainly is disgusting to think
that you can't be more objective.
Donald I. Cohen
Omaha, Nebr.
Medal
NEW
knight
Stereophonic -Monaural Preamplifier
A flexible, high -gain 2- channel preamplifier, for use
with any monaural or stereo Hi -Fi System. Instant
switching from monaural to stereo; channel reverse
switch. Separate gain controls; Master volume control;
separate Bass and Treble; full phono and tape equalization; response, ± 1.0 db, 20- 20,000 cps; inputs
C.E., Pickering. Ceramic Phono, Tape Head A, Tape
Head B. Mic., Tuner A and B, Tape Pre and Aux.;
outputs
and B Recorder (20,000 ohms imp.), A
and B Main Outputs (cathode followers). Sire: 15 x
454 x 74". U.L. Approved. Shpg. wt.. 10 Iba
17950
Model KN -700. Net, F.O.R. Chicago, only
Features:
For Stereo or Monaural Use
2- Channel Tape or FM -AM
2- Channel Stereo Discs
Channel "Reverse" Switch
DC on All Tube Filaments
Full Equalization
-
-A
Scratch Filter
Loudness Switch
NEW
$7950
Only $7.95 down
knight 32-Watt Basic Hi -Fi Amplifier
Model KN -632
More Power For Your HI -Fi Dollar
Ideal For Stereo Systems
Distortion: 0.5% Mid -Frequencies
$7450
Variable Damping Control
Only $7.45 down
Amazing value -ideal for use with preamp above, either
singly for monaural use or in pairs for stereo. Response
± .5 db, 20 to 40,000 cps. Harmonic distortion at. rated
output, 0.5% (at mid -frequencies); never exceeds l55%
from 30 to 20,000 cps. Intermod. distortion at full output,
2 %. Sensitivity, is volt for rated output. Size: 774 :14H
z 5y5-. Shpg. wt., 24 lbs.
$7450
Model KN -632. Net F.O.R. Chicago, only
SELECT FROM A COMPLETE LINE OF MONEY- SAVING
Knight
HI -FI COMPONENTS
Correspondence Invited
Sm:
I recently
returned from London
where the Elgar centenary concerts
were magnificent. I would very much
appreciate hearing from any of your
readers who would be interested in
having more of Elgar's music available on records.
D. Dorricott
747A Palmerston Ave.
Toronto, Ont.
Canada
A & R
Men-Addendum
SIR:
Re installment II of "These Men Shape
Your Listening" by Hollis Alpert as
printed in your January issue, far be
it from me to detract in any measure
from the enormous credit due Wilma
Cozart and Bob Fine in building up
StereoMonaural
Preamplifier
$7950
30 -Watt Deluse
Hi -N Amplfier
32Watt Bask $7 50
Hi -Fi
Amplifia
14
IS-Watt "Bantam'
Hi-Fi Amplifie
SOAs
s64s0
J
Deluse FM -AM
Hi Ft Tuner
$9950
77
"Bantam"
FM-AM
Hr -Fi Tuner
$7450
14
"Uni -Fr"
$
Tuner-
Hess rase)
Amplifier
/
See
119
50
Tuna-
512950
10
-wan
"Mini -Fi"
HiFi Amplifier
Preamplifier
our 1958 Catalog for full details
RADIO
ALLIED
a«ttAtcaA
Hi; FL Ce4c1Jvc,
404 -PAGE
1958
ALLIED
HI -Fi components, complete music systems,
recorders, Public Address Equipment
-as well as Everything in Electronics.
Send for your FREE copy today.
world's largest selection of
Continued on next page
MARCH 1958
our
37th
ALLIED RADIO, Dept. 49.C8
100 N. Western Ave., Chicago 80, III.
year
Ship the following KNIGHT Hi -Fi Components:
s
CATALOG
Your Buying
Guide to the
$4295
Send FREE 1958
ALLIED
enclosed
404 -Page Catalog
Name
Address
City
Zone
State
J
9
www.americanradiohistory.com
LETTERS
Continued from preceding page
the Mercury classics line of LP and
stereo recordings.
I think it is worth noting, though,
that I functioned as Musical Director
for Mercury Classics from the inception of the Olympian series until September of 1956, at which time I resigned to accept a Fulbright grant to
Vi
-FM 88 90
195
1L100
Denmark...
105 108Mc
In Your FM Dial
Discover the Hidden Musc
with NEW
JERROLD
FM Range Extender
!
Simply connect a Jerrold FM Range Extender between the antenna
and your FM tuner or receiver
...
and enjoy all the FM stations
you've wanted to hear! Jerrold's FM Range Extender pre -amplifiers
boost the strength of signals at the antenna 18 times ... bring in
distant stations you never heard before... increase the enjoyment
of stations you now receive.
Retrospectively, we would like to point
out that Mr. Hall belatedly received
credit for his work at Mercury-in the
February article on the EastmanRochester Symphony. -Ed.
Features:
*
*
*
20 DB S/N ratio with
0.6 µv input
High
RF
gain and output
Dubbings Wanted
Full FM band width
Available
in
.
In my capacity at Mercury, I took
basic responsibility for choice of repertoire and for musical supervision of
all classics- recording sessions save
those which were done in England
during the summer of 1956. I was
likewise in charge of most of the tape to -disc mastering and personally
edited all domestically recorded tapes
during my tenure with the company.
Since my departure from the Mercury scene, Harold Lawrence, formerly of WQXR, took over most of
my musical and editing chores -and
this with the competence and taste
that one can expect from a first -rate
musician and sensitive colleague.
I trust, if he will accept the validity of the statements tendered herewith, that Mr. Lawrence and myself
deserve in Mr. Alpert's eyes inclusion
among the select company of those
who "Shape Your Listening."
David Hall
Wilton, Conn.
Sm:
two models for
either indoor or outdoor
operation.
Indoor Model 406A-FM
USE YOUR TV ANTENNA
I'd like to contact somebody in the
New York City area who recorded
the Boston Symphony concert of October 26: Hindemith's Die Harmonie
der Welt, and the Chicago Symphony
concert of November 1: Eppert's
Speed, and Schumann's Symphony
No. 2. I would like to exchange dub bings of them for tapes I have in my
collection.
TO IMPROVE FM RECEPTION
Use Jerrold's popular low -cost MULTI SET
COUPLER to connect your FM receiver to your
TV antenna
for greater FM pleasure.
...
See The Jerrold FM RANGE EXTENDER and MULTI SET COUPLER
at leading distributors or write:
JERROLD
i
ELECTRONICS
CORPORATION
Bob Seifert
479 Dimmick Lane
Glendale, Ohio.
Schonberg's Schumann
SIR:
The long awaited Schumann discography [Dec.] was appreciatively received. . . Mr. Schonberg hewed
close to the artistic line. But, a heavy
sardonic streak creeps in here and
there that spoils an otherwise objec-
Dept. PD 30, Philadelphia 3, Pa.
Continued on page 12
III
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
the
experts say...
in High Fidelity the best
buys`
KITS and WIRED
!7E/C04
are
BETTER ENGINEERING Since 1945 EICO has pioneered the
concept of test instruments in easy -to -build kit form has become world -famous
for laboratory- precision instruments at low cost. Now EICO is applying its vast
experience to the creative engineering of high fidelity. Result: high praise from such
authorities as Canby of AUDIO, Marshall of AUDIOCRAFT, Holt of HIGH FIDELITY,
Fantel of POPULAR ELECTRONICS, Stocklin of RADIO TV NEWS, etc.
as well as from the critical professional engineers in the field.t
-
-
SAVE
50%
Mass purchasing, and a price policy deliberately aimed to encourage mass sales,
make this possible.
EASY INSTRUCTIONS
EICO kit
You need no previous technical or assembly experience to build any
- the instructions are simple, step -by-step, "beginner-tested."
DOUBLE 5-WAY GUARANTEE Both EICO, and your neighborhood distributor,
guarantee the parts, instructions, performance ... as well as lifetime service and
calibration at nominal cost
for any EICO kit or wired unit.
...
BEFORE YOU BUY, COMPARE
At any of 1200 neighborhood EICO distributors
coast to coast, you may examine and listen to any EICO component. Compare
critically with equipment several times the EICO cost then you judge.
You'll see why the experts recommend EICO, kit or wired, as best buy.
-
f Thousands
of unsolicited testimonials on file.
at.'"
HFS2
Speaker System
If
14E790 FM Tuner
with "eye-ironic" tuning
Speaker System: Uniform loading & natural
bass 30 -200 cps achieved via slot -loaded split
conical bass horn" of 12 -ft path. Middles & lower
highs from front side of 81/2" cone, edge -damped
& stiffened for smooth uncolored response. Suspensionless, distortionless spike -shaped super- tweeter"
radiates omni -directionally. Flat 45. 20,000 cps, useful
to 30 cps. 16 ohms. HWD: 36 ", 151/4 ", 111/2 ".
. rates as excellent
unusually musical
really non -directional"
Canby, AUDIO. "Very
impressive"
Marshall (AUDIOCRAFT). Walnut or
Mahogany, $139.95. Blonde, $144.95.
...
...
-
-
HFT90 FM Tuner equals or surpasses wired tuners
up to 3X its cost. New, pre -wired, pre -aligned, tem-
perature- compensated "front end"
Sensitivity, 1.5 uy for 20 db quieting,
other kit tuners.
DM -70
-
HF60, HF50 Power Amplifiers
HF6I Preamplifier
HFS2
drift -free.
Is 6X
that of
traveling tuning eye.
cps-1 db. Cathode follower &
multiplex outputs. Kit $39.95'. Wired $65.95. Cover
HF50 50-Watt Ultra- Linear Power Amplifier with ex-
tremely high quality Chicago Standard Output Transformer. Identical in every other respect to HF60 and
same specifications up to 50 watts. Kit $57.95. Wired
$97.95. Matching Cover E -2 $4.50.
30 -Watt Power Amplifier employs 4 -EL84
power sensitivity output tubes in push-pull
parallel, permits Williamson circuit with large feedback & high stability. 2 -E281 full -wave rectifiers for
highly reliable power supply. Unmatched value in
medium -power professional amplifiers. Kit $38.95.
11E30
high
Wired $62.95. Matching Cover E-3 $3.95.
HF -32 30 -Watt
1
Integrated Amplifier Kit $57.95.
Wired $89.95.
HF12 12 -Watt Integrated Amplifier, absolutely free of
"gimmicks ", provides Complete "front end" facilities & true fidelity performance of such excellence
that we can recommend it for any medium -power high
fidelity application. Two HF12's are excellent for
stereo, each connecting directly to a tape head with
no other electronic equipment required. Kit $34.95.
Wired $57.95.
Two -Way Speaker System, complete with factory -built cabinet. Jensen 8" woofer, matching Jensen
compression- driver exponential horn tweeter. Smooth
clean bass; crisp extended highs. 70- 12,000 cps :' 6
db. Capacity 25 w. Impedance 8 ohms. HWU:
11" x 23" x 9 ". Wiring time 15 min. Price $39.95.
11E51
Response 20-20,000
'Less cover, excise tax incl.
$3.95.
Preamplifier, providing the most complete
control & switching facilities, and the finest design,
rivals the most
offered in a kit preamplifier, "
expensive preamps
is an example of high
.
engineering skill which achieves fine performance
with simple means and low cost."
Joseph Marshall,
AUDIOCRAFT. HF61A Kit $24.95, Wired $37.95, HF61
(with Power Supply) Kit $29.95. Wired $44.95.
HF61A
...
-
HF60 60 -Watt Ultra Linear Power
TO -330
Output
Transformer,
Amplifier, with Acro
provides
wide
band-
width, virtually absolute stability and flawless tranis one of the best -performing
sient response. "
amplifiers extant; it is obviously an excellent buy."
-AUDIOCRAFT Kit Report. Kit $72.95. Wired $99.95.
.
Matching Cover
E
-2 $4.50.
Integrated Amplifier with complete
and Chicago Standard Output
Transformer. Ultra- Linear power amplifier essentially
Identical to HF50. The least expensive means to the
highest audio quality resulting from distortion -free
high power, virtually absolute stability, flawless
transient response and "front end" versatility.
Kit $69.95. Wired $109.95. Matching Cover E -1 $4.50.
HF52
HF20
20 -Watt
Integrated Amplifier, complete with
finest preamp -control facilities, excellent output
transformer that handles 34 watts peak power, plus
a full Ultra- Linear Williamson power amplifier circuit.
Highly praised by purchasers, it Is established as
the outstanding value in amplifiers of this class.
Kit $49.95. Wired $79.95. Matching Cover E -1 $4.50.
Hires S'; higher in the West
HF12 Integrated Amplifier
HF52, HF20
Integrated Amplifiers
135
14
33 -00 Northern Boulevard,
Over
7
MAIL COUPON FOR CATALOG
50 -Watt
"front end" facilities
Million EICO instruments
1 9
F3 0
L.
EICO® 33.00 Northern Blvd., L.I.C. 1, N.Y.
Show me how to SAVE 50% on professional Test Instruments and High Fidelity.
Send me free catalog and name of neighborhood d
'butor.
Nome
Address
Zone ..... Stole
City
'
ut---1
Patents pending by Hegeman Laboratories
`_
Power Amplifier
N. Y.
world over.
I. C. 1,
in use the
HFS1
.
Speaker System
11
www.americanradiohistory.com
LETTERS
for Ultimate Fidelity
Continued from page 10
SHERWOOD=
tive and even poetic idea.... I
quote: `The symphonies of Mendelssohn are formally much superior specimens than the flawed Schumann
ones, but I would not trade the pretty
prissy five (my italics) of Mendelssohn for any one of Schumann's." We
may agree to the superiority of the
Schumann symphonies, yet not to
such absurd sarcasm.
Also, the choral music of Mendelssohn contains more than a germ of
Wagner's operatic musical elements.
His instrumental music contains an instantaneous atmospheric quality that
is world acknowledged. Further,
Mendelssohn was a robust man
hardly prissy. A fine account of Schumann was spoiled by an uncontrolled
tendency toward omniscience tinged
by overstressed subjectivity.
Leon Handler
Portland, Me.
-
Linguists Alerted
Sm:
Model
S -1000
II-36
amplifier- $109.50
watt
net.
outstanding honors bestowed, unsolicited,
by most recognized
testing organizations.
Why will your records sound better with the new
Sherwood 36 -watt amplifier, though you seldom play
them at levels exceeding 11/2 watts? Because amplifier peaks in many musical passages demand 100
watt peak capability -and the new Sherwood
S -1000 II delivers this instantaneous peak power
while operating at 11/2 watts!
S-1000 II front panel controls include 6 -db presence -rise button; record, microphone and tape -playback equalization; exclusive "center -set" loudness
control, loudness compensation switch, scratch and
rumble filters, phono level control, tape- monitor
switch 6 inputs, output tube balance control and test
switch on rear.
For complete specifications,
write Dept. H3.
SHERWOOD
SHERWOOD ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES, INC.
2802 West Cullom Avenue, Chicago 18, Illinois
I very much doubt that any Salzburger has ever been called "Her bertchen" (see Paul Moor's "The
Operator," Oct. 1957). More likely
possibilities are 'Bert]" or "Beterl."
Ellen Jane Halpern
Stamford, Conn.
Open Letter to A
&
R Men
SIR:
As your plans for 1958 are formulated,
I would like to suggest that the music
of Joachim Raff (1822 -1882) be examined as a possible artistic as well
as a profitable addition to your re-
corded repertory.
Eleven symphonies as well as many
smaller works are available. The music has a strong Brahmsian flavor.
Highly programmatic, it is romantic
following a classical structure and
combines polyphonic context with
elegant melody. Boldly orchestrated
for full orchestra and punctuated with
bright passages for brasses and percussion, this music certainly meets the
qualifications for a successful hi -fi
disc.
.
.
.
J. L. Sommerville
The "complete high
-rrK'y
fidelity home music center."
Indianapolis, Ind.
In New York hear "Accent on Sound" with Skip Weshner.
WBAI -FM, week nights, 9 P.M. In Los Angeles, KRHM-FM, 10 P.M.
HIGH FIDELITY \IACAZLNE
www.americanradiohistory.com
415A
Guaranteed
Frequency Range:
30- 14,000 cps
Price: $67.00
Pirés
ALTEC
Bìflex
application of a new principle in loudspeaker design
developed by ALTEC. The speakers have an efficient
frequency range far greater than any other type of
single voice -coil speaker and equal to or exceeding the
majority of two or three -way units. This truly amazing
frequency range which is guaranteed when the speaker
is properly baffled, is the result of the ALTEC developed viscous damped concentric mid -cone compliance.
This unusual compliance serves as a mechanical
crossover, providing the single voice -coil with the
entire cone area for the propagation of the lower frequencies and reducing the area and mass for the more
efficient reproduction of the higher ranges. Below 1,000
cycles per second the inherent stiffness of the Biflex
compliance is such that it effectively couples the inner
and outer sections of the cone into a single integral
unit. The stiffness of the compliance is balanced to the
mechanical resistance and inertia of the peripheral
cone section so that the mass of this outer section effectively prevents the transmission of sounds above 1,000
cycles beyond the mid- compliance and the cone uncouples at this point permitting the inner section to
operate independently for the reproduction of tones
Guaranteed
Frequency Range:
40-15,000 cps
Price: $54.00
408A
Guaranteed
Frequency Range:
60- 16,000 cps
Greatest Available Value in High Fidelity Loudspeakers
Biflex loudspeakers are the result of the practical
412 B
Price: $31.00
above 1.000 cycles. Proper phasing between the two
sections is assured by the controlled mechanical resistance provided by the viscous damping applied to the
mid -compliance.
In each of the three Biflex speakers this outstanding
cone development is driven by an edge -wound aluminum ribbon voice -coil operating in an extremely deep
gap of regular flux density provided by an Alnico V
magnetic circuit shaped for maximum efficiency.
Biflex speakers are perhaps the only true high fidelity
single voice -coil speakers made, and can be considered
to fill the complete speaker necessity for any system or
as the bass speaker component for more comprehensive systems intended to cover the entire audio
spectrum. Ask to hear these outstanding speakers at
your dealer's.
Write for free catalogue
ALTEC LANSING CORPORATION, Dept. 3H
1515 So. Manchester Avenue, Anaheim, Calif.
161 Sixth Avenue, New York 13, N.Y.
TUNERS, PREAMPLIFIERS, AMPLIFIERS, SPEAKERS, SPEAKER SYSTEMS, ENCLOSURES
Malta'
1958
13
www.americanradiohistory.com
The Stromberg- Carlson RF-460
8 -inch Transducer
The Stromberg- Carlson RF -475
15 -inch Coaxial Transducer
Power handling capacity: 18 watts
Power handling capacity:
Woofer -more than 100 watts
Tweeter -more than 32 watts
Frequency range: 45-14,000 cps
I. M. Distortion: 1.5%
200 cps and 7,000 cps at 2.8 volts. 1:1 ratio.
This input corresponds to an instantaneous
Woofer-30-1500 cps (when mounted in
Dispersion: 80°
I. M. Distortion: 1.4%
200 cps and 2,000 cps at 5.5 volts. 1:1 ratio.
This input corresponds to an instantaneous
Resonance in free air: Approx. 75 cps
Voice coils: % -inch on aluminum form
power input of 6 watts.
Magnet structure: 6.8 oz. Alnico V
Dispersion:
Woofer -180°
Tweeter -100° with acoustic lens multiple
layer dispersion system
Impedance: 8 ohms
Resistance: 5.2 ohms
Dimensions:
Diameter 51 inches
Depth 41 inches
Weight -3 lbs.
Resonance in free air:
Woofer-38 cps
Voice coils:
Price: $20.00 (Zone 1)
Woofer-3 -inch on aluminum form
Tweeter
-inch on aluminum form
-11
Magnet structure: 168 oz. Alnico V (parallel gap)
Flux density:
Woofer-15,500 Gauss
Tweeter -11,000 Gauss
Impedance: 16 ohms
Resistance:
Woofer -7.8 ohms
Tweeter -5.2 ohms
DC
Dimensions:
Diameter 151/16 inches
Depth 101 inches
Weight -401/2 lbs. net;
50 lbs. packed for shipment
Price: $179.95 (Zone 1)
Dr. Paul White,
Composer, Conductor,
Educator, in concert
with Rochester
Civic Orchestra.
INTEGRITY IN MUSIC
The musicians, the meter, the color, and interpretation
the conductor's choice of these is a measure of his
discernment and musical artistry. His choice, too, of
Stromberg- Carlson High Fidelity Components is determined by his artistic sensibilities. So, too, should yours.
"There is nothing finer than a Stromberg- Carlson"
...
SC
°x.so,
STROMBERG-CARLSON GO
A
D
I
V
I
S
1r DI CouHier
Power response: Linear within 3 db
Flux density: 13,000 Gauss
DC
the 11
Stromberg- Carlson Acoustical Labyrinth,
20.1500 cps)
Tweeter -1500 to 20,000 cps
3 db
fly
D
Frequency range:
power input of 4 watts.
Power response: Linear within
On
I
ON
O
F
G
E
N
E
R
A
L
D Y N A
1419 North Goodman Street
M
I
C
S
C O R
P
O
Rochester 3, N. Y.
R
A T
I
O N
C
1-9115
Electronic and communication products for home, industry and defense ...
including High Fidelity Consoles; School, Sound, Intercom and Public Address Systems
Metzner's new Starlight 80 TURNsells for $49.50; it has con-
TABLE
tinuously variable speed control from
16 to 84 rpm, center drive, a built -in
illuminated stroboscope that provides
exact speed adjustment, and an automatically retracting 45 -rpm center hub.
Allied's Knight KN -530 30 -watt
AMPLIFIER can be used with any hi -fi
system. Included are nine front -panel
controls, seven inputs, and outputs for
4 -, 8 -, and 18 -ohm speakers. Frequency response quoted is 20 to 40,000
cps, ±)í db at 30 watts; IM is said to
be less than 2% at rated output; harmonic distortion specified as h% at
middle frequencies, never exceeding
10 from 30 to 20,000 cps. Price is
$94.50.
The Klipsch Model H LOUDSPEAKER
gets its name from "Klipsch's Heresy"
and is the only noncomer, nonhorn
speaker in the company line. It is compatible with all other Klipsch models
and may be used as a second or third
stereo channel or in any other small speaker application. Further details
are available from the manufacturer.
Klipsch also has announced that all
its speaker systems are now provided with a CROSSOVER-BALANCING
NETWORK, the W -2 for systems using
the current standard tweeter, and the
W-5 for systems with the optional
1958 tweeter. Both the tweeter and
the network are available to owners
of equipment in which they are not
included. No price is given.
Just announced by Stancil- Hoffman
is the Minitape 13 -lb. battery- operated
TAPE RECORDER. It i3 available with
any standard speed and is said to have
flat response to 10,000 cps at 73: -ips
speed. Price is $494.
Four new bass -reflex SPEAKER SYSTEMS from Altec are: the Laguna
830A (two 15-in. woofers, one hornmounted tweeter; frequency response,
30 cps to 22 kc); the Capistrano 831A
(one 15 -in. woofer, one horn-mounted
tweeter; frequency range from 35 to
Continued on page 16
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
14
www.americanradiohistory.com
THE FISHER
ebahU
IN 1937, interest in high fidelity was confined to a small group
BACK
of dedicated audiophiles. At that time, they alone had the vision.
the knowledge, and the pressing enthusiastic interest that spurred them to
seek superior music reproduction. For the equipment necessary to enjoy
their hobby, many turned to one man -Avery Fisher.
He introduced his first high fidelity instrument in that year and, within a
short period of time, it was acclaimed the forerunner of a new era for music
lovers. Many of the features incorporated in those early instruments became.
and have remained, an indispensable part of high fidelity equipment.
FISHER 'Firsts' contain almost every high fidelity milestone down through
the years. It is important to note that today, after twenty -one years of high
fidelity leadership THE FISHER is still a hand -constructed product.
in its finest sense, and who recognize it when
they sec it, the ANNIVERSARY SERIES holds promise of immediate as well as
long range pride of ownership and enjoyment. Each instrument is, in its
own class, without an equal. Inspect them at your FISHER dealer today.
For those who seek quality
ed
MODEL 90-R
Gold Cascode FMAM Tuner -0.85 micro.
soft FM sensitivity! Designed for use with
an external audio control center. Permits
leads up to 100 feet without loss of signal.
MODEL 90-T
Gold Cascode FM -AM Tuner, with a complete Audio Control Center. 0.85 microvolt
FM sensitivity! New PRESENCE CON.
'T'ROL, Noise Filter and record equalization.
MODEL 90-C
Professionalrype Master Audio Control,
features a new PRESENCE CONTROL.
seven input channels, mixing and fading
facilities. Complete record equalization.
THE
"100"
30Watt Amplifier, handles 70.watt peaks!
Power response constant at full output
over the entire audible range. Z.MATIC
Variable Damping Factor Control.
THE "200"
GO.Watt Amplifier. handles 160-watt peaks.
Tremendous reserve power for present and
future needs. Hum and noise. 100 db
below full rated output!
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS OF THE "ANNIVERSARY SERIES"
FISHER RADIO CORPORATION
21 -25 44TH DRIVE
MARCH 195S
LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N. Y.
I
www.americanradiohistory.com
ON THE COUNTER
Continued from page 14
22,000 cps); the Corona 832A (same
components as Capistrano, but corner
design); and the Verde 833A (two
Duplex speakers, 35 to 22,000-cps
range). No prices.
The Spico Viscount indoor TV
AN-
has telescoping dipoles that
may be concealed in the antenna cabinet when not in use, and dial adjustments for tuning and fine tuning. It
retails for $19.95.
From Sherwood: a 36 -watt AMPLIFIER, the Model S -1000 II, with eleven
front -panel controls; outputs for 4, 8,
and 16 ohms. Specifications include
power output of 36 watts (72 watts
peak) at 1 #% IM; frequency response,
20 to 20,000 cps ±1 db at 36 watts;
preamp sensitivity, 2µv. Size of the
amplifier is 14 by 10% by 4 in. and the
price is $109.50 less cabinet, which is
available at extra cost.
Wendell Plastics is offering fortytwo patterns of Mellotone GRILLE CLOTH FABRIC. No prices are quoted.
Cletron has published an 8 -page
BROCHURE describing their medium priced Cathedral Series of loudspeakers.
Lafayette's LT -60 FM TUNER is a
9 -tube model with Armstrong circuitry,
Foster -Seeley discriminator, and AFC
for drift-free operation. Sensitivity,
according to specs, is 3 to 5 microvolts
for 20 to 30 db of quieting; harmonic
distortion, less than 1 %. The LT-60
sells for $49.95.
Clean Sound is a liquid ANTISTATIC
CLEANER and LUBRICANT offered by
Robins Industries. A 2 -oz. bottle with
a special sponge applicator costs $1.00.
Recently announced by Stephens is
a line of Bass -Plane LOUDSPEAKER ENCLOSURES to house their free -conesuspension speakers. Upright, lowboy,
and bookshelf models range in price
from $79.50 to $147.50 including
speakers.
Irish 400 double -play RECORDING
TAPE is made on a Mylar polyester
base and is claimed to withstand a pull
of 3 lbs. without deformation. One
7 -in. reel carries 2,400 ft. of tape and
costs $11.95.
Fisher's 90 -C master AUDIO CONTROL iS designed to supersede the 80C model. Harmonic and IM distortion
are said to be virtually unmeasurable.
Featured are eleven controls, seven
inputs, and a separate high -gain mike
preamp for mixing. Price: $119.50
(with optional mahogany or blond
cabinet at $9.95).
TENNA
ACOUSTIC SUSPENSION* SPEAKER SYSTEMS
AR-1
Quotation from
High Jideiity
(From Roy F. Allison's article "New Directions in High
a survey of progress in reproducing equipment design since 1952.)
«
Fidelity,'
t is difficult to draw
a line between new methods of exploiting old techniques and radically new developments in loudspeaker systems, but I will
risk a charge of arbitrariness by citing three of the latter produced
commercially during the past five years. First, the acoustic suspension
principle, by means of which linear deep-bass response was obtained
(with a decrease in average acoustic efficiency) from a very small system
for the first time."
*The acoustic suspension speaker requires a cabinet of small size,
so that the enclosed air -spring -- without which the special speaker mechanism
cannot operate properly- -will provide sufficient restoring -force to the
cone. This air -spring is more linear than the finest mechanical suspensions
that can be devised. Therefore the small enclosure, far from involving
a compromise with quality, has established new industry standards in
low- distortion speaker performance. (Covered by U.S. Patent 2,775,309
issued to E. M. Villc.hur, assignor to Acoustic Research, Inc.)
Prices for AR speaker systems, complete with cabinets, are $89.00
is available on request from
to $194.00. Literature
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC.
24 Thorndike St., Cambridge 41, Mass.
An
EARPHONE
AGGREGATE
Box
manufactured by Audio-Master Corp.
Continued on page 18
1(i
HIGH FIDELITY
www.americanradiohistory.com
M.ACAZLNTE
Ox ONE
ON
ONE
COMPACT CHASSIS!
THE FISHER
FM -AM Tuner
30 -Watt Amplifier
500"
Audio Control Center
on signals as low as one microvolt.' Harmonic
and IM distortion, inaudible! Hum and noise, 80 db below rated
output This is the sterling performance that will delight you at your first
meeting with THE FISHER "500" -and in the years ahead. And, as your
RELIABLE RECEPTION
!
acquaintance with the "500" grows, so also will its dependable, flexible
performance provide a never -ending source of pride and pleasure.
On one compact, integrated chassis, THE FISHER "500" combines an
extreme -sensitivity FM -AM Tuner, a powerful 30-Watt Amplifier (with
60 watts reserve for orchestral peaks) and a completely versatile Audio
Control Center. Just add a record changer and a loudspeaker system -and
you have a complete high fidelity installation for your home!
In appearance and construction, the quality of the "500" is instantly
apparent. The simple and easy -to -use arrangement of the controls and
control panel designation make it a delight to use whether by a novice
or a technically -minded high fidelity aficionado.
Flywheel tuning and a professional tuning meter for both FM and AM,
make for convenient station selection. The audio controls include a
Volume Control, continuously variable Bass and Treble tone controls, a
4-position Loudness Contour Control, and
equalization for all disc and tape recordings.
Chassis, LLF7
-
completeA / 950
SPECIFICATIONS OF THE FISHER
"500"
Operates on FM signals as low as I microvolt.
AM sensitivity is better than 3 microvolts.
Micro-accurate tuning meter for both FM
and AM.
Overall frequency response, uniform from 25 to 30,000 cycles, within 1 db.
Harmonic distortion, less than 0.5% at 30
watts.
IM distortion, less than 1% at 30
watts.
Hum and noise inaudible, (better
4 inputs,
than 80 db below full output.)
including separate tape playback preamplifier 4, 8 and 16 -ohm speaker conequalizer.
nections.
Separate monitoring output -listen
while you record. Seven simple controls, including 9- position Channel Selector with pinEasy -to -read
point channel indicator lights.
two -tone tuner dial. with logging scale. FM
Dipole and AM Ferrite Loop antennas included.
SIZE: 133/4," wide, 133i" deep, 6 7/8" high.
SHIPPING WEIGHT: 35 pounds.
Blonde, Mahogany or Walnut Cabinet, $19.95
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORPORATION 21 -25 44TH DRIVE
MARCH 1958
LONG ISLAND CITY-I, N.Y.
l7
ON THE COUNTER
Continued from page 16
CARTRIDGE
T H E
S
kai
Bans
If you always insist upon
T'
T H A
the very best, here is the one phono pickup for you:
the superlative new ESL C -6o Series electrodynamic cartridge.
Your ears will soon tell you of the C-6o Series perfection in record reproduction:
unmatched clarity, smoothness, and naturalness. No other pickup is so
truly musical.
The reasons why are many, including
a response
which is inherently linear,
unlike the inherently non- linear response of most pickups. The C -6o Series is
distinguished, too, by complete absence of system damping. Only an undamped
cartridge can actually have the extraordinarily small dynamic mass of the
C-6o Series (only one one- thousandth of one gram), its superb transient
response, and its
ability greatly to increase the life of records and styli.
Frequency response of the C-6o Series is flat within one db from t
S
cps
to
20,000 cps (Elektra ;5 test record), and response extends well beyond
3o,000 cps. No need to change the input resistor of your preamplifier for the
C -6o Series, because its magnificent performance is completely unaffected by
load resistance. And no transformer is required with modern preamplifiers.
Complete details of C -6o Series superiority may be obtained without cost from ESL.
Meanwhile, visit your record dealer's, and hear this cartridge that's years ahead!
T H E
dama/ic
COAXIAL LOUDSPEAKERS (Series 70()
to their line of British R & A imports.
Model 780 is an 8 -in. unit with a
C L E A N E R
with the dispenser across the Dust Bug bristles and plush pad, the changer is
power capacity of 15 watts; Model
7100 is 10 in. with a capacity of 20
watts; Model 7120 is 12 in. with a
power capacity of 25 watts. No prices
stated.
From Cable Covers Ltd. (British):
The CCL Universal earth clamp (or
GROUND CLAMP, to translate from the
King's English) . The clamp will fit on
a variety of sizes of pipe and is supplied with 8 in. of plated copper wire.
Bradford Audio has announced U.S.
distributorship for the Bakers Ultra
operated as usual. The Dust Bug sweeps each groove scrupulously clean just
12-in. LOUDSPEAKER.
R E C O R D
If you always
insist upon the very best, Isere is the one record cleaner for you:
the unique new ESL Dust Bug.
Experts the world over acclaim the Dust Bug as the surest, safest way to clean
records and eliminate surface static. They acclaim its convenience, too,
because the
Dust Bug cleans records automatically while they are being played.
The Dust Bug for record changers (above)
is easily slipped onto the arm
of your
changer. Special Dust Bug fluid is provided in a dispenser. After a wipe
before it is played by the stylus, and eliminates the record static which
would attract more dust.
Extend the life of your valuable records and styli with the ESL Dust Bug.
The changer model, with fluid in dispenser, costs only $4.75. If yours is
a manual player, the regular model Dust Bug is only $5.75 complete.
Try it at your dealer's today.
FOR
L
I
S T E N
I
N G
AT
I
T S
B E S T
Electro- Sonic Laboratories, Inc.
Dept. H
18
can distribute sound to as many as
twenty headsets. Price not stated.
For those who want to keep sound
low: Packard -Bell's Control-Master, a
REMOTE CONTROL POR TV, with selfcontained speaker. Price not stated.
Pentron has added the A-4 LP
magazine repeater to its line of TAPE
RECORDERS. Allows recording and continuous or intermittent playback of
sales messages, etc., ranging in length
from one to fifty -five minutes. No
price given.
Salmanson & Co., makers of AristoBilt ready -to -paint furniture have entered the hi -fi picture. Three unfinished -pine EQUIPMENT CABINETS designed to house a record player and
other audio gear are the result. Prices:
$28.90, $38.90, and $39.95.
Roberts Electronics Model 90 is a
TAPE RECORDER with hysteresis -synchronous drive motor and precisionbalanced flywheel; may be played
back through own 7 -in. speaker or external output to other equipment. Frequency response is quoted at 40 to
15,000 cps for 7l ips and 50 to 7,000
cps for 3% ips. Price is $299.50.
Pilot Radio is now marketing the
Model PT -1041 radio- phonograph
CONSOLE incorporating a Garrard RC88 changer. Cost is $575 and $585
depending on finish.
Ercona has recently added three
; 5-5 q Thirty- sixth Street
Long Island City 6, N.Y.
It
has a 20 -cps to
25,000-cps frequency response; has
been dust -, rust -, and damp -proofed;
and sells for $85.
Fen -Tone's Trix Sixty Special is a bidirectional ribbon-velocity MICROPHONE. Frequency response is ±2db
from 50 cps to 12 kc; cost is $96.50.
CBC Electronics is marketing a
Music Minder SWITCH for $11.95
which shuts off the entire hi -fi rig
after the last record has finished.
The latest RECORD CABINET from
Yield House stores 250 records and is
available as a kit for $24.95 or assembled with knotty-pine finish for $37.50.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Here's Another Great
OWL Development!
This is the E -V Carlton phase loaded enclosure
with recommended E -V components In place.
Exciting New PHASE LOADED Enclosures Make Hi -Fi History!
For the first time -and only from ELECTRO -VOICE -you
get performance from along-the -wall speaker enclosures which
approaches the performance of a corner horn! E -V does it with
the exciting new principle of PHASE LOADING, the most important advance in baffle design since the Folded Corner Horn!
Designed specifically for use along a wall, phase loaded cabinets give you almost a full added octave of bass range and
completely eliminate the "boomy" characteristics of bass
reflex enclosures.
Flat, fundamental response is obtained in two ways with
PHASE LOADING:
First, by placing the driver at the rear of the cabinet close
to the floor and facing the wall. The wall and floor act as
reflecting surfaces, close and almost equi-distant from the
driver cone, eliminating phase difference between reflections
and the source.
Secondly, PHASE LOADING permits a sealed cavity behind
the cone of precise volume. The compliance of this cavity is
made to react with the mass of the cone and the outside air
throughout the second octave, adding this range to the response not otherwise attainable except through corner horns.
E -V utilizes the most efficient type of crossover network.
The low crossover of 300 cps makes this system possible, for
higher frequencies are not propagated properly by indirect
bass radiators.
Other Phase Loaded Enclosures available:
The SUZERAIN, The DUCHESS and The EMPIRE
E -V offers a wide choice of corner horn and phase loaded
speaker enclosures, each carefully made by dedicated craftsmen, designed by audio experts, styled to integrate with furnishings in mahogany, limed oak or walnut. Products of E -V's
Martin Furniture Division.
E -V Development!
MID -BASS AND TREBLE DRIVER -HORN ASSEMBLY. A single
And Still Another Unique
coaxial driver exhausts into treble and mid -bass horn sections.
Ideal for phase loaded systems.
MT30 For use with deluxe components. Frequency response with recommended baffle assembly, 200 - 10,000
cps. Program material capacity, 30
watts, peak 60 watts.
MT3OB Frequency Response, 200 10,000 cps with recommended baffle
assembly. Program material capacity,
20 watts, peak 40 watts.
NO FINER CHOICE THAN
-
glecZ- ace
BUCHANAN, MICHIGAN
ELECTRO -VOICE, INC.
EXPORT: 13 EAST 40th ST.. NEW YORK 16, U.S.A. CABLES: ARLAB
www.americanradiohistory.com
Janslen
LISTEN TO
Hear the speaker
without a "voice"
The Model 130 Electrostatic Tweeter...
the most nearly perfect loudspeaker.
$184 in mahogany.
...
The Model 250
a Dynamic Woofer
specially designed for use with the
Electrostatic. $171 in mahogany.
The Z- 200... a combination of the 130 Electrostatic and 250
Dynamic. The woofer and tweeter are so smoothly matched and
blended that nearly perfect realism results. $329 in mahogany.
Most knowledgable high fidelity experts agree that a perfect loudspeaker should
reproduce music as it was originally recorded without adding to or subtracting
from the music. In pursuit of this aim, Arthur A. JansZen began his research
several years ago. The result of his explorations into new design concepts, new
materials and new principles was the JansZen Electrostatic loudspeaker...
now recognized by authoritative research groups and music lovers throughout
the world as
the most nearly perfect loudspeaker.
...
Why?
The JansZen Electrostatic has no "voice" of its own. It doesn't add to the
music
exaggerate the instruments
distort the sound. Instead, it reproduces music with a clarity that borders on the superb. The JansZen Electrostatic,
combined with the new JansZen Dynamic
widely acclaimed, low frequency
counterpart -gives you a complete high quality loudspeaker that produces the
...
...
-a
musical realism you've always wanted but could never obtain.
Listen to JansZen *. Write for literature and the name of your nearest dealer.
Hear the Music, Not the Speaker
u
Products of
:red b, Arthur
A. Jsr,zen
NESHAMINY ELECTRONIC CORP.,
Export Division: 25 Warren Street, N.Y.C. 7
Neshaminy, Pa.
Cable Simontrice, N.Y.
80016(n Rewew
Metropolitan Opera Annals. To every
devotee of opera in general and the
activities of the Met in particular it is
enough merely to announce that William H. Seltsam (also admired by
many discophiles for his International
Record Collectors Club disc- reissues),
who compiled the original Annals volume of 1947, now has brought it up
to date with a First Supplement: 19471957. As before, complete performance and cast data are augmented by
pertinent excerpts from press reviews
-not all of them laudatory, either! In
addition, the supplement contains a
foreword by Rudolf Bing, five pages
of artist photographs, an index, and a
list of errata in the 1947 publication
(H. W. Wilson & Co., $3.50).
Opera Annual, No. 4. Another slightly
older, more specialized, British series
of yearbooks, edited by Harold Rosenthal, admirably maintains its high
reputation for both authoritatively informative content and sumptuous appearance with a fourth volume centered around the 1956 -7 international
operatic season. Again there are summaries of activities in the United
States (Ericson and Milburn), Great
Britain (Rosenthal), Germany (Koegler), Vienna ( Wechsberg), and Czechoslovakia (Eckstein)
. specialized
essays on Covent Garden (Rosenthal), Weber's Oberon (Warrack),
Berlioz (Reid), New Opera Houses
(Ruppe!), Argentina (Pascal and Cebreiro), and-in lighter vein-on Italian Opera House Traditions (Hughes)
and Audience Manners and Mannerisms (Wechsberg)
. a survey of
complete opera recordings (Porter),
and documentary tabulations of world
opera houses, artists, and repertories,
and 1956 -7 premières and obituaries.
But, as always, the immediate impact
of the book is visual, for it is superbly
illustrated by 9 full -color plates and
42 pages of well-chosen photographs.
(Lantern Press, $6.00).
Calypso Song Book. Do you secretly
long to emulate Harry Belafonte, or
would you like to explore the calypso
repertory at your own piano? If so,
Belafonte's arranger, William Attaway,
himself a calypsonian composer as
well, has provided the words, tunes,
and simplified accompaniments of
some twenty -five haunting or ribald
examples, prefaced by informative
notes on the history and recent vogue
Continued on page 22
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
(Advert isement)
STEREO DISKS
what about them
are they any good
will they make my present equipment obsolete
should I wait before buying anything new
will disk replace tape
These and dozens of similar questions arc
on many lips tcxlay. FAIRCHILD RECORD-
ING,
as a
pioneer in cartridge development
and in development of stereo pickups, feels
Obligated to give its many faithful customers
its best possible answers on this newest of
audio developments.
As you undoubtedly know, FAIRCHILD is
the builder of the first commercial stereo
cartridge, and many major studios as well as
principal equipment manufacturers arc now
using the FAIRCHILD STEREO CARTRIDGE for test purposes. The first demonstration of stereo disks open to the general
public also used a FAIRCHILD stereo cartridge (in New York City on December 13,
1957 ). The following opinions arc based on
this intimate acquaintance in the field, but
they must be regarded as subject to change
although we believe that in all important
respects arc they substantially correct.
WHAT ARE STEREO DISKS? They, arc, to the
eye, exactly like current LP records. But, the
tiny groove carries the two independent signals required for the stereo- effect sound. By
using a special pickup and two independent
amplifying and speaker systems, a completely
new dimension is added to reproduced sound,
bringing it one step nearer the original.
MY SYSTEM
OBSOLETE? No, fortunately, they will not.
To add stereo it is only necessary to add a
second channel and the pickup designed for
these records. If you already enjoy stereo
tape, you may need only a new pickujs, and
possibly another prcamp. But you should
have a high quality turntable, such as the
FAIRCHILD 412 -1.
WILL
IS
STEREO
TURNTABLE
DISKS
MAKE
RUMBLE
MORE
SERIOUS
WITH STEREO DISKS? Yes, because stereo
pickups give a sound output for both lateral
and vertical motion, whereas conventional
pickups respond only to lateral motion.
Bence there is twice the opportunity for
pickup rumble with stereo playback and a
good table is a vital necessity.
CAN STEREO RECORDS BE PLAYED WITH
CONVENTIONAL CARTRIDGES? Yes, especially with those having high vertical compliance such as the FAIRCHILD 225A, XP -3
or 230. A cartridge with low vertical compliance will tend to wear the vertical signal
away, ruining the records for stereo use.
CAN CONVENTIONAL RECORDS BE PLAYED
WITH STEREO PICKUPS? Ycs, if the proper
coil connections are provided, as in the
XP -4, 603 or other FAIRCHILD stereo cartridges yet to be released.
HOW CAN BEST RESULTS BE ACHIEVED? By
all means, whenever possible, stereo records
should be played with stereo pickups and
LPs by cartridges especially designed to play
LPs. While stereo and LP are "compatible,'
each has its special problems and it is only
natural that equipment designed for
fic purpose will give the best results.
a
sped
WILL DISK REPLACE TAPE FOR STEREO USE?
so. Each system has its
advantages and we think that advances will
be made in both fields, just as has happened
in the past. The phonograph was thought to
be "dead" when radio arrived, but a few new
ideas proved it to be very live indeed
it is
now the basis of the entire HI -Fl industry.
We do not think
-
Similarly, past dite predictions that "tape
will replace phonograph records" and present
-phonograph records will replace tape" both
seem improbable to us. We think a healthy
competition which means improvements
-
-will continue.
WHAT ABOUT ARMS CAN I USE MY
PRESENT ARM FOR STEREO CAR TRIDGES? Stereo cartridges will require
four (or in some cases, three) wires instead of
the conventional two. Therefore any regular
arm will require at least the addition of
extra wiring. Many high quality arms will be
suitable for stereo, others not. FAIRCHILD
will supply adapters for converting single
channel arms to stereo, and doubtless other
manufacturers will do the saine.
UNDERSTAND THAT THERE ARE TWO
SYSTEMS POSSIBLE FOR RECORDING
and customer benefits
-
1
ON DISK. WILL BOTH BE IN
USE, OR WILL A CHANGE BE MADE?
We feel very sure about this one. No major
company, and most probably no recording
company at all, will issue commercially any
stereo disks until there is complete agreement, and all records both here and abroad
will undoubtedly be made by the same system. Since RIAA (Record Industries Asso.
ciation of America) and EIA (Electronic
Industries Association) have both publicly
announced approval of the 45.45 ( Westrex)
system, there seems little doubt that this
method of recording will be universally
adopted. ALL FAIRCHILD stereo cartridges
sold to date have been made for this system.
STEREO
AND HAVE THE
SOUND EQUIPMENT I CAN
GET, BUT I DON'T WANT TO BUY SOMETHING WHICH WILL BE OBSOLETE IN A
SHORT TIME. WHAT DO YOU RECOMMEND?
FIRST, we recommend the world- famous
I
WANT TO
BE UP TO DATE,
BEST POSSIBLE
FAIRCHILD type 225 Micradjust Cartridge
for the best value today in terms of sound
improvement obtained for dollars invested.
This cartridge, thanks to FAIRCHILD'S
policy of constant improvement, is vastly
superior even to earlier production of this
same model. Current production units feature greatly increased vertical compliance,
and unusually high lateral compliance also.
This means that your 225 will not damage
stereo records ( because of high vertical compliance) and that arm resonances will come
at extremely low frequencies. At the same
time, the 225 will work beautifully in
changers, since it is unusually rugged and
has almost zero flux leakage ( this means no
magnetic attraction for steel turntables,
which causes extra high needle pressure and
fast record wear). Even the least expensive
systems will show a night- and -day difference
in sound when a 225 is used for replacement.
The 225A is not a compromise cartridge,
usable on 78s and microgrooves, but is
specifically engineered for use with microgroove (33 or 45 RPM) records. It is your
best possible investment in improved sound
at its modest price of $37.50.
SECOND, we recommend our new Model
230. This latest cartridge is based upon the
XP -3 design, featuring air damping and
other advanced developments. (The XP.3 is
continued, however, for those who wish to
obtain its special custom features.) Model
230 contains so many changes and improvements in the FAIRCHILD moving -coil
design, that it was felt necessary to introduce
it as a new model. It does not replace the
225, but supplements it. The 230 is a
premium quality pickup, intended for use
only in high quality arms. Its tracking force
is lower, its vertical and lateral compliances
even higher, and its performance is better by
that little extra margin which is always diffi
cult to achieve or define. For this reason it
should be used only with the best associated
equipment -arms, turntables, amplifiers and
so on. For the man who has perfected his
system in most details, the 230 at 549.50 is
just what he needs.
XP.4 STEREO PICKUP. Ordinarily we do
not advertise XP products. As you know,
these arc advanced designs released on a
limited basis to experienced audiophiles and
other experimenters. Because of its XP
POLICY, FAIRCHILD has already available
the mechanisms for releasing the most advanced designs
in this case, the STEREO
CARTRIDGE. The XP.4 is a dual rotating
coil type of pickup, designed for the 45 -45
system. Its output is approximately 5 millivolts and it sounds just beautiful on all
stereo disks. Because of the limited production its price (579.50) is somewhat higher
than that of subsequent production models.
But it is a quality product, hand. crafted and
individually tested and, of course, guaran.
teed. Also available is the 282 Arm, designed
for use with either stereo cartridges or
monaural cartridges. Because of the plug -in
feature of the 280 series arms, this is the
ideal arm for best results with both stereo
and microgroove records.
-
Your dealer has full information on these
latest FAIRCHILD products. Ask him also
about the 412 series Turntables, the new
245 series Preamplifiers, and the superb
255A Power Amplifier, all designed for
optimum performance with stereo and there.
fore the perfect choice for all installations,
present or future.
whether pickups,
turntables, amplifiers (or recording equipment) it pays to consult FAIRCHILD, the
leader in AUDIO.
FOR THE BEST IN SOUND,
AND, for the latest information on stereo
disk, sec your FAIRCHILD dealer. He will
be kept up to date on developments and will
be able to give you sound advice. Or, write
for booklet (K)
FAIRCHILD RECORDING EQUIPMENT CO., Long Island City
NIAin
f
l'f.ti
1,
New York
2
www.americanradiohistory.com
1
BOOKS IN REVIEW
the finest turntable
Continued from page 20
of calypso singing and gaily adorned
by William Charmatz's two -color illustrations (McGraw -Hill, $2.95).
The Divine Quest in Music can be
safely recommended to clergymen
seeking apt materials for sermons or
Sunday- School talks dealing with music. But I can't imagine who else might
be willing to plough through Robert
Mendl's 265 -page "sweetness -andlight" survey of the "sublime" in tonal
art or to accept the devout author's
forced and protracted thesis that the
boundaries of "sacred" music are infinitely extensible (Philosophical Library, $7.50).
THEY'RE BOTH MADE BY GRAY!
America's First, Quality Turntable
designed for the new Stereo Discs!
Schubert's Songs. As every experienced lieder connoisseur knows, the
definitive study of the greatest songcomposer's works was produced by
Richard Capell in 1928. But that
priceless reference volume long has
been out-of -print, and Capell himself
died in 1954 before he could revise it
for reissue. Happily, Martin Cooner,
working from the author's notes and
with advice and new data From the
Schubertian authorities Otto Erich
Deutsch and Maurice Brown, now has
provided the long- needed revised second edition -surely as nearly ideal
product of combined scholarly analysis
and loving insight as is humanly possible to achieve (Macmillan, $6.00).
The new Gray 33 -H Turntable, designed specifically for stereo discs, is your best buy
in High Fidelity equipment. Since stereo disc reproduction demands turntable components with extremely low vibration, this insures the highest quality reproduction
of conventional microgroove recordings. Shock -mounted hysteresis synchronous
motor. Superior construction and a minimum of moving parts assure long troublefree life. Price $79.95.
Pirro's Bach. By some strange oversight, one of the standard critical
biographies of the baroque master,
originally published in 1906 by the
French musicologist André Pirro and
soon widely read and translated,
never has appeared in English until
a new American publishing house
(Orion) located in Italy set Mervyn
New Gray Micro -Balanced Tone Arm
Savill (as translator) and their Italwith Dual Viscous Damping!
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Three years of Gray research brings you exclusive dual viscous damping providing late. The materials, drawn largely
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designed for all popular cartridges. Adjustable stylus force. Price $34 for 12 -inch now thoroughly familiar in later biographies and studies; and nothing
and $36.50 for 16 -inch arm.
has been done to bring Pirro's text
up-to -date except for the editors' adNew Gray Micro -balanced Pressure Gauge
dition of a meager 4 -page selected
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Saves Your Styli, Your Records, Your Money!
discography. Admirable a scholar as
the author was (he died in 1943),
Incorrect pressure on your stylus produces distortion and record damage. The easy
to -use Gray pressure gauge helps you to check and adjust your tone arm, tells your his style now seems embarrassingly
flowery when it is not baldly matterat a glance when the stylus pressure is correct. Price $2.50.
of- fact -although probably the present
unidiomatic and indeed quite inept
translation is partly to blame. And
while the volume is handsomely
THE
GRAY
MANUFACTURING CO., 16 ARBOR ST., HARTFORD 1, CONN.
22
Continued on page 24
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
Livingston
Studios..,
recorded tapes get a
quality boost with Audiotape
Say "recorded tape" and chances are someone
will say "Livingston." Livingston Audio Products
in Caldwell, N. J., was one of the pioneers in
the recorded tape field. Today, the Livingston
library includes over 160 monaural tape titles
and more than 90 stereos. And the list is
expanding every month.
Art Cooper, executive vice -president at Livingston,
says, "In this high fidelity age, the
key to success in the recording business
is quality. Our engineers have chosen
equipment which they feel is the finest available.
We make inspections and maintenance checks
on this equipment every hour. And we approach
magnetic tape in the same way -constantly
testing and checking the quality. Our studies
have shown that Audiotape consistently
delivers outstanding performance. That's why
we've been an Audiotape customer for years."
Livingston is just one of the hundreds of
professional recording studios which rely on
Audiotape for the finest sound reproduction.
The complete line of professional quality
Audiotape offers a base material and thickness
to meet every recording need. And no matter
which type you select, you can be sure you're
getting the very finest tape that can be produced.
There's a complete range of reel sizes and
types, too, including the easy- threading
C -Slot reel for all 5 and 7 -inch Audiotapes.
Why settle for less, when professional -quality
Audiotape costs no more?
¡otcip.,
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AUDIO DEVICES, INC., 444 Madison Ave., N.
In Hollywood: 840 N. Fairfax Ave.
Y. 22, N. Y.
In Chicago: 5428 Milwaukee Ave.
Cables "ARLAB"
Export Dept.: 13 East 40th St., N. Y., 16
Rectifier Division: 620 E. Dyer Rd., Santa Ana, Calif.
MARCH 1958
-:;
www.americanradiohistory.com
BEST BUY
BOOKS IN REVIEW
IN HI -FI
Continued from page 22
printed and illustrated, the typeface
itself has an unappetizingly oldfashioned appearance, and -in my
copy at least-the binders have carelessly duplicated one form, pages 2742. Nevertheless, the work does remain a monument, however outdated
and flawed, particularly for its detailed program notes for the cantatas,
to which Pirro devoted disproportionate attention (Orion Press, via
Crown, $3.50).
Gustav Mahler. Walterians as well as
Mahlerians will rejoice in the reappearance, in a new translation supervised by Lotte Walter Lindt, of Bruno
Walter's heartwarming recollections
of his friend, mentor, and hero. Originally written in 1936 and published
here (1941) in a less satisfactory
translation, now long out of print,
the main text is unchanged, but there
is a new preface, and the passage of
years -which has seen a steady growth
of interest in Mahler and his music,
fostered in large part by recordings
lends new point and depth to Walter's insights into the demon -driven
composer-conductor's personality and
creative achievements (Knopf, $3.50).
NEW PG SERIES
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.
20PG 20 Watt High Fidelity Amplifier
deluxe amplifier with new styling and exceptional performance
.
the best buy
in the medium priced field. The new 20PG has greater flexibility of controls, new
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separate turnover and roll -off record compensators, new loudness control, wide range
bass and treble controls, rumble and scratch filters and six inputs including tape
head. The 20PG is designed for the audiophile who wants all the features and flexibility
of the finest amplifiers built and knows that 20 watts is all the power he can utilize in
his home.
A
-
SPECIFICATIONS
±
Frequency response:
20 to 30,000 CPS. at 1 watt.
± 1. DB.0.52008.
Power response:
to 20,000 CPS. at 20 watts.
Distortion: 1% harmonic and 2% intermodulation at 20 watts.
Feedback: 70 DB. plus throughout; 15 DB. around output transformer.
Outputs: 4, 8 and 16 ohms plus high impedance for tape recorder.
Sensitivity: Aux.; tuner; tape amp. channels
volts. Rhona channel -.008 volts at 20 watt
-.4
output.
75 DB. below rated output on high level inputs.
3.12A%7, 2.6L6G8 and 5U4G8.
Cabinet: In charcoal gray with brushed brass control plate.
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Hum and Noise:
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15PG8 15 Watt High Fidelity Amplifier. The all new deluxe 15PG8 has less pdwer but the same
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In charcoal gray and brass.
Net Price
69.50
IOPG8 10 Watt High Fidelity Amplifier. Here is new styling with a full set of controls providing
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head. Frequency Response: -!- 1 DB. 20 to 20,000 CPS. Distortion: 2% harmonic and 3% Intermodulation at 10 watts .
Net Price
55.00
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Ask your High Fidelity Dealer to demonstrate the
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where to buy.
tte
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.......____......._.
Name
Street
Wood Winds (General). Since Adam
Carse's superb Musical Wind Instruments (London, 1939) remains inexplicably out of print, Anthony
Baines fills a serious gap in the specialized literature with his Woodwind
Instruments and their History: a less
scholarly but more practical study
than that by Carse, and one which
may be even more useful to wind
players and students for its exhaustive
survey of technical details, fingerings,
reed making, etc. For the nonexecutant, however (especially the listener
who has learned to cherish the piquancies of wood winds primarily
through recordings), the outstanding
attractions of Baines's work are its
concise historical reviews, helpful 10page bibliography, and exceptionally
fine illustrations: some 78 figures and
musical examples, plus 16 pages of
photographs, including several x -ray
shots uniquely revelatory of innerbore designs and constructional details (Norton, $6.50).
.
Zone
State
LAYER -BUILT
COLOR-GUIDE
Before you build another kit see this new
method of Kit Assembly. Each kit is complete with all parts and Instruction Book.:
Wood Winds (The Clarinet). In reviewing Philip Bate's definitive study
of The Oboe (Oct. 1956) I did not
have first -hand knowledge of its predecessor in the same Williams & Norgate series (issued in the United
Continued on page 26
ol
HICE FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
UNQUESTIONED MASTERPIECES OF
RE ISION
'T
Thundering in from four points.of the compass, closing at 1200 knots,
the Blue Angels conver°j n the center of the field, slice by each other
With a maximum separation of 1feet. The U. S. Navy's Flight Demonstration
Team proceeds to give a demonstration of precision flying techniques at supersonic
speeds that the book" says can't be done. In diamond formation the
Blue Angels execute rolls, loops, changeovers and other intricate
maneuvers with only 3 tó.5 feet separating their Grumman Tiger jets.
Music that thunders, music that soars, music as light and clean as a vapor
trail across the blue pring sky is yours with a precision -built JBL Signature
loudspeaker s
JBL precision raises efficiency and accuracy
of reproduction
challenged levels. You hear music that is rich and clean,
distinct, pie*,
very real, with magnificent range and vivid transients.
A
most rewarding of all is the growing pleasure in music JBL precision brings.
Throughout your years of adventuring with music, sound from your JBL
speaker system retains its pristine freshness. Visit the Authorized JBL
Signature Audio Specialist in your community and hear the difference
precision makes. For his name and address and a free copy
of the latest JBL catalog, send us a card or letter.
.
,
SING SOUND, INC., 3249 CASITAS AVENUE, LOS ANGELES 39, CALIFORNIA
www.americanradiohistory.com
BOOKS IN REVIEW
INTRODUCING
Continued from page 24
N
the speaker that opens
a new world of sound!
For years, engineers have strived to achieve really BIG SPEAKER PERFORMANCE
IN SMALL SPACE. Today, we can say it has actually been done! Because the
Audette Sr. -the newest of hi- fidelity speakers -employs all the features of systems
any times its size! It is a two -way speaker system, with true Helmholz construction.
It has an extremely wide frequency range
(45- 17,000 cps), and an amazing balance of
natural sound. Yet it gives you all this in a cabinet measuring only 22" wide x 10h"
deep x 27" high, including matching legs! See it today, hear it today ... you'll recognize it as the perfect answer to the problem the hi- fidelity industry has long sought
to solve
- BIG
SPEAKER PERFORMANCE IN SMALL SPACE!
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IN MAHOGANY
$69.50
IN WALNUT OR BLONDE
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Superb two -way speaker performance
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KINI
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exclusive U.S. distributors
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WORTH
States by the Philosophical Library):
the late F. Geoffrey Rendall's The
Clarinet: Some Notes Upon its History and Construction (1954). Happily this now reappears in a second
edition (basically the same except for
an additional 2 -page subject index)
and proves to be every bit as valuable
a work as Batés. Similarly, it covers
not only its main subject, with an
aficionado's infectious enthusiasm,
but the whole family of related instruments-in this case, the sopranino
clarinets, basset horn, and bass clarinet. Again, too, there are excellent
black- and -white drawings and photographs of a wide variety of current
and early models, and the appendix
includes detailed lists of the musical
repertory and famous makers as well
as a short bibliography (Philosophical Library, $7.50) .
Lady Sings the Blues. The seamier
side of popular music -and the life of
a Negro jazz singer -is baldly exposed
in Billie Holliday's ultracandid autobiography written with the assistance
of William Dufty, who has the good
sense to preserve unretouched both
the salty language and frank self portrait of its subject. A shocking little
book, but one that cannot be put
down once it is started, either by admirers of Miss Holliday's singing or
any reader willing to learn what life
can be -both at its worst and its best
-on the other side of the tracks and
the other side of the spotlight (Popular Library paperback reprint, 350).
Thomas Mann Essays. Many of us who
have been waiting patiently for the
badly needed anthology of all Mann's
writings dealing in any way with music will be disappointed that the current paperback collection drawn from
the Essays of Three Decades (1947)
includes only two of those on musical
subjects. However, since these are the
famous "Suffering and Greatness of
Richard Wagner" (originally written
in 1933)
and "Goethe's Faust"
(1938), and since the six other essays
also rank among Mann's finest nonfiction, the present volume makes a
treasurable traveling and bedside corn panion for confirmed Mann devotees,
as well as an ideal introduction to the
late master for young people encountering him, outside his novels at least,
for the first time (Vintage Books,
$1.25).
e -0800
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
TR IP .'OLIT
INVITE a-4.'ERA
L
TO A
RSÑf
You will receive- without chargeUNDER THE CONDITIONS DESCRIBED BELOW
A METROPOLITAN OPERA PERFORMANCE OF
SCENES
FROM
\'Valhucrc
by RICHARD WAGNER
Teat/mil., MARGARET HARSHAW
MARIANNE SCHECH BLANCHE THEBOM
RAMON VINAY
HERMANN UHDE
NORMAN SCOTT
will) !The Metropolitan Opern Orchestra and Chorus
DIMITRI MITROPOULOS, conductor
ON TWO LONG -PLAYING HIGH -FIDELITY RECORDS
RETURNABLE WITHIN TEN DAYS IF YOU DO NOT
CARE TO SUBSCRIBE AFTER HEARING THESE RECORDS
Included with each recording is an illustrated brochure containing the text of the
opera as it is sung on the recording, with
an English translation when necessary. The
brochure also contains an appreciation of
the opera by an outstanding music critic.
._
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA RECORD CLUB
A BRANCH OF BOOK- OF -TIIE -MONTH CLUB, INC.
GIVEN TO YOU
IF
YOU AGREE TO BUY FOUR RECORDINGS DURING THE NEXT YEAR IN
A TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION TO THE METROPOLITAN OPERA RECORD CLUB
*
will have available
entire repertory of Metropolitan
Opera performances on long- playing
records. They may choose only those recordings they want.
In time members
the
*
Members are notified in advance of
each forthcoming opera, and have the
privilege of rejection if theydo notwant it.
*
The operas are carefully abridged for
home listening (by the Metropolitan
staff) to the length of one or two 12" LP
records.
*
The records are high- fidelity Vinylite
R.P.M. discs. When the opera is on
a single twelve -inch record the price is
$4.50; when it is an album of two twelve inch records, the price is $6.75. (A small
extra charge is added to cover the cost of
handling and shipping.)
331/3
*The
sole obligation of members of
The Metropolitan Opera Record Club
is to buy four recordings a year from
the nine to twelve that will be offered
each year.
.115 -3
345 Hudson Street, New York 14, N. Y.
Please enroll me as a subscriber to THE METROPOLITAN OPERA RECORD CLUB and send me. without
charge. the recording of SCENES FROM DIE WALKUERE.
I agree to buy four additional METROPOLITAN OPERA
RECORD CLUB recordings during the first year I am a
member. For each single -disc recording I accept I
will be billed $4.50; for each double -disc recording,
$6.75 (plus a small extra charge for handling and
shipping). I may cancel the subscription at any time
after buying the fourth recording. II I wiah to. I
may return the Introductory recording within 10
days, and the subscription will at once be canceled
with no further obligation on my part.
MOC 17
MR.
MRS.
(mesas PRINT PLAINLY)
-
Address
city
Zone Ho..... »...........
State
Iüenra prices
I
an mling n
u
Are the game In Canada. soil the Clot, ship. to
mbers. without any extra charge rar fluty. through
IhwkMlheM,mth Club (Canada). Ltd.
27
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
easy -to -build
high quality
Look...
how simply you can
assemble your very own high fidelity
system! Fun -filled hours of shared
pleasure, and an everlasting sense
of personal accomplishment are
just a few of the rewards. Heathkits
cost you only HALF as much as
ordinary equipment and the quality
is unexcelled. Let us show you
how easy it really is! ...
Step -by -Step
Assembly
(yr Install a .001 mid disc condenser from socket
D7 (NS) to ground I.
all (NS). Cut the
leads w that they an lust long enongh to
reach lad drew the condenser gloss to chassis, over the wins h indy present.
(
)
Cowed
470 KIT
resistor (7ellow.,Io1M.
yellow) from mete a7 (S) (3) to N (NS).
Yount as claw to the socket as passible.
Instructions
Read the step
...
.. .
perform the operation
. and check it off
it's just that simple!
These plainly-worded,
easy -to-follow steps
cover every assembly
operation.
-
HEATHKIT
Easy -to- follow
Pictorial
Diagrams
...
Detailed pictorial
diagrams in your Heathkit
construction manual
show where each and
every wire and part is
to be placed.
Learn -by -doing
Experience
For All Ages
..
.
Kit construction is not
only fun -but it is
educational too! You
learn about radio,
electronic parts and
circuits as you build
your own equipment.
Top Quality
Name -Brand
Components
Used in All Kits..,
Electronic components
used in Heathkits come
from well -known manu.
facturers with established
reputations. Your
assurance of long life
and trouble -free service.
2S
bookshelf 12 -watt
amplifier kit
MODEL EA -2
$2595
NEW
There are many reasons why this attractive amplifier is a tremendous dollar value. You get many extras not expected at this
price level. Rich, full range, high fidelity sound reproduction
with low distortion and noise ... plus "modern" styling, mak.
ing it suitable for use in the open, on a bookcase, or end table.
Look at the features offered by the model EA -2: full range frequency response (20-20,000 CPS
1
db) with less than 1%
distortion over this range at full 12 watt output -its own built -in
preamplifier with provision for three separate inputs, mag
phono. crystal phono, and tuner -RIAA equalization- separate
bass and treble tone controls -special hum control -and it's
easy -to- build. Complete instructions and pictorial diagrams
show where every part goes. Cabinet shell has smooth leather
texture in black with inlaid gold design. Front panel features
brushed gold trim and buff knobs with gold inserts. For a real
sound thrill the EA -2 will more than meet your expectations.
Shpg. Wt. 15 lbs.
t
TIME PAYMENTS AVAILABLE
ON ALL HEATHKITS
WRITE FOR FULL DETAILS
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
.a:
HEATHKIT
chairside enclosure kit
NEW
This beautiful equipment enclosure will
make your hi -fi system as attractive as any
factory-built professionally- finished unit. Smartly designed for maximum flexibility and compactness consistent with attractive appearance, this enclosure is intended to house the AM and FM tuners
(BC -1A and FM -3A) and the WA -P2 preamplifier, along with the
majority of record changers, which will fit in the space provided.
Adequate space is also provided for any of the Heathkit amplifiers
designed to operate with the WA -P2. During construction the tilt -out
shelf and lift-top lid can be installed on either right or left side as desired. Cabinet is constructed of sturdy, veneer- surfaced furniture grade plywood 4 and %' thick. All parts are precut and predrilled
for easy assembly. Contemporary available in birch or mahogany.
traditional in mahogany only. Beautiful hardware supplied to match
each style. Dimensions are 18' W x 24' H x 35%' D. Shpg. Wt. 46 lbs.
CE -1C Mahogany
CE -1 CB Birch
CONTEMPORARY
Be sure to specify
CE -1T Mahogany
TRADITIONAL
model you prefer
$4395
each
dr
high fidelity FM tuner kit
broadband AM tuner kit
For noise and static free sound reception, this FM tuner is your least
expensive source of high fidelity material. Efficient circuit design
features stablized oscillator circuit to eliminate drift after warm -up
and broadband IF circuits assure full fidelity with high sensitivity. All
tunable components are prealigned so it is ready for operation as soon
as construction is completed. The edge -illuminated slide rule dial is
clearly numbered for easy tuning. Covers complete FM band from
88 to 108 mc. Shpg. Wt. 8 lbs.
This tuner differs from an ordinary AM radio in that it has been designed especially for high fidelity. A special detector is incorporated
and the IF circuits are "broadbanded" for low signal distortion. Sensitivity and selectivity are excellent and quiet performance is assured
by a high signal -to -noise ratio. All tunable components are prealigned
before shipment. Incorporates automatic volume control, two outputs.
and two antenna inputs. An edge -lighted glass slide rule dial allows
easy tuning. Your "best buy" in an AM tuner. Shpg. Wt. 9 lbs.
MODEL FM -3A $25.95 (with cabinet)
MODEL BC-1A $25.95 (with cabinet)
HEATHKIT
master control preamplifier kit
pioneer In
"do -/t-yourself"
electronics
H EATH
MARCH 1958
Designed as the "master control" for use with any of the Heathkit
Williamson -type amplifiers, the WA -P2 provides the necessary compensation, tone, and volume controls to properly amplify and condition a
signal before sending it to the amplifier. Extended frequency response of
1% db from 15 to 35,000 CPS will do full justice to the finest program
material. Features equalization for LP, RIAA, AES, and early 78 records.
Five switch-selected inputs with separate level controls. Separate bass
and treble controls, and volume control on front panel. Very attractively
styled, and an exceptional dollar value. Shpg. Wt. 7 lbs.
MODEL WA -P2 $19.75 (with cabinet)
of Daystrom, Inc.
íjabsid/ari
C O M PA N Y
BENTON HARBOR 8, MICHIGAN
29
fik
HEATHKIT 25-WATT
MODEL W-5M
$5975
HEATHKIT 70-WATT
high fidelity amplifier kits
To provide you with an amplifier of top-flight performance,
yet at the lowest possible cost, Heath has combined the
latest design techniques with the highest quality materials
to bring you the W -5M. As a critical listener you will thrill
to the near-distortionless reproduction from one of the
most outstanding high fidelity amplifiers available today.
The high peak-power handling capabilities of the W -5M
guarantee you faithful reproduction with any high fidelity
system. The W -5M is a must if you desire quality plus
economy! Note: Heath kit WA -P2 preamplifier recommended. Shpg. Wt. 31 lbs.
HEATHKIT DUAL- CHASSIS
MODEL W3 -AM
$4975
MODEL W -6M
$10995
For an amplifier of increased power to keep pace with the
growing capacities of your high fidelity system, Heath
provides you with the Heathkit W -6M. Recognizing that as
loud speaker systems improve and versatility in recordings
approach a dynamic range close to the concert hall itself,
Heath brings to you an amplifier capable of supplying
plenty of reserve power without distortion. If you are looking for a high powered amplifier of outstanding quality,
yet at a price well within your reach, the W -6M is for youl
Note: Heathkit model WA -P2 preamplifier recommended.
Shpg. Wt. 52 lbs.
HEATHKIT SINGLE -CHASSIS
MODEL W4 -AM
$3975
high fidelity amplifier kits
One of the greatest developments in modern hi -fi reproduction was
the advent of the Williamson amplifier circuit. Now Heath offers
you a 20 -watt amplifier incorporating all of the advantages of
Williamson circuit simplicity with a quality of performance considered by many to surpass the original Williamson. Affording you
flexibility in custom installations, the W3 -AM power supply and
amplifier stages are on separate chassis allowing them to be
mountéd side by side or one above the other as you desire. Here
is a low cost amplifier of ideal versatility. Shpg. Wt. 29 lbs.
HEATHKIT
high fidelity
amplifier kit
MODEL A
$3550
-9C
For maximum performance and versatility at the lowest
possible cost the Heathkit model A -9C 20 -watt audio
amplifier offers you a tremendous hi -fi value. Whether for
your home installation or public address requirements
this power -packed kit answers every need and contains
many features unusual in instruments of this price range.
The preamplifier, main amplifier and power supply are all
on one chassis providing a very compact and economical
package. A very inexpensive way to start you on the road
to true hi -fi enjoyment. Shpg. Wt. 23 lbs.
30
In his search for the "perfect" amplifier, Williamson brought to
the world a now -famous circuit which, after eight years, still accounts for by far the largest percentage of power amplifiers in use
today. Heath brings to you in the W4 -AM a 20 -watt amplifier incorporating all the improvements resulting from this unequalled
background. Thousands of satisfied users of the Heath kit Williamson -type amplifiers are amazed by its outstanding performance. For many pleasure -filled hours of listening enjoyment
this Heathkit is hard to beat. Shpg. Wt. 28 lbs.
HEATHKIT
electronic
crossover kit
MODEL XO -1
$1895
One of the most exciting improvements you can make in
your hi -fi system is the addition of this Heathkit Crossover
model XO -1. This unique kit separates high and low frequencies and feeds them through two amplifiers into
separate speakers. Because of its location ahead of the
main amplifiers, IM distortion and matching problems are
virtually eliminated. Crossover frequencies for each channel are 100, 200, 400, 700, 1200, 2000 and 3500 CPS. Amazing versatility at a moderate cost. Note: Not for use with
Heathkit Legato Speaker System. Shpg. Wt. 6 lbs.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
HEATHKiT
"LEGATO"
high fidelity speaker system kit
Wrap yourself in a blanket of high fidelity music in its true form. Thrill to
sparkling treble tones, rich, resonant bass chords or the spine -tingling
clash of percussion instruments in this masterpiece of sound reproduction. In the creation of the Legato no stone has been left unturned to bring
you near -perfection in performance and sheer beauty of style. The secret
of the Legato's phenomenal success is its unique balance of sound. The
careful phasing of high and low frequency drivers takes you on a melodic
toboggan ride from the heights of 20,000 CPS into the low 20's without the
slightest bump or fade along the way. The elegant simplicity of style will
complement your furnishings in any part of the home. No electronic know how, no woodworking experience required for construction. Just follow
clearly illustrated step -by -step instructions. We are proud to present the
Legato -we know you will be proud to own itl Shpg. Wt. 195 lbs.
Y
MODEL 1-IH -1 -C
(imported white birch)
MODEL HH -1 -CM
(African mahogany)
$325°,°
HEATHKIT
HEATHKIT
BASIC RANGE
RANGE EXTENDING
high fidelity speaker system kits
MODEL
ss -1
53995
A truly outstanding performer for its
size, the Heathkit model SS -1 provides
you with an excellent basic high fidelity speaker system. The
use of an 8' mid -range woofer and a high frequency speaker
with flared horn enclosed in an especially designed cabinet
allows you to enjoy a quality instrument at a very low cost.
Can be used with the Heathkit "range extending" (SS-1B)
speaker system. Easily assembled cabinet is made of veneer surfaced furniture -grade -Ç plywood. Impedance 16 ohms.
Shpg. Wt. 25 lbs.
HEATH
Designed to supply very high and
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SS-1B
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Shpg. Wt. 80 lbs.
$9995
COMPANY
BENTON HARBOR 8, MICHIGAN
1
Free Catalog!
a
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1
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Please send the Free HEATHKIT catalog.
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ALSO SEND THE FOLLOWING KITS:
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Please enclose postage tor parcel post-expreu orders are shipped delivery
Enclosed find S
charges collect. All prices F.O.B Benton Harbor. Mich. NOTE: Prices subject to change without notice.
MARCH 1958
3
www.americanradiohistory.com
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PRESENTS A
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www.americanradiohistory.com
Of Puzzles and Perils in Boxes
OVER THE HORIZON and heading our way
comes something new and to some people
gather- appalling. (It doesn't appall me much.) It is the
hi-fi, pronounced always with the accent on the first
-I
syllable. \\'c sense its advent in the conversation of
schoolchildren, or of young adults newly suburbanized.
And, not infrequently, the master of revels on a TV
show will glad the heart of some deserving contestant
by making him owner of "a hi -fi."
This alarms the veteran fidclitarian, partly through a
semantic confusion. When, if cvcr, he himself uses the
term Iii -fi, he uses it to describe a cultural phenomenon
or a frame of mind. He knows of no such thing as "a
hi-fi." \\'hen he speaks of his acoustico- electronic gear,
he refers to it as a music system, or a sound system, or
perhaps a high -fidelity system or set (the word "rig" is
suPl)osed to convey the impression, true or false, that he
built most of it himself. and is getting rarer). !hardly
ever would it occur to him to clump it under the title
"a hi-fi." So what is a "hi -fi "?
A "hi -fi" is simply an old friend, once endangered by
extinction. now reappearing in new nomenclature. A
"hi-fi" is a phonograph.
Remember phonographs? There were a lot of them on
display floors in 1948. And then suddenly there were
almost none, as the joint impact of TV and the record
Speed War smashed the advance of living-room music.
All at once the record -listening army was reduced to
two small hardy bands of guerillas. On the far left flank,
the juvenile jukebox contingent, their flag the jaunty
beard of Mr. Mitch Miller. On the remote right, the
dauntless audiophiles. gloriously redolent of solder
steam, marching under such oddly varied leaders as
nn Scherchen.
Emory Cook and Dr. Hermann
There never was very much contact between the two
groups, but there is small doubt in my mind that both
did a great deal to keep alive, and to spread. the urge
to listen. They launched many a dashing raid into the
all kinds- recomsleepy -eared populace, and music
menced its advance. The audio irregulars especially made
their force felt among manufacturers, by dint of a peculiar, relentless, and highly articulate vocality, which
compensated for their lack of numbers.
What Mitch Miller's kids did was less evident until
lately, though it could be foreseen. They grew up and
became part of the buying public. They still have their
discipline: they want to listen. As yet they are only
vaguely aware of Beethoven, and some never will be.
-of
Neither do they appreciate the desirability of a fundamental resonance point below 50 cycles per second in a
loudspeaker array and, again, many of them never will.
However, some will. That's the point to keep in mind.
As analogy, take NBC -TV's production of Pinocchio. It
wasa poor thing, but quite probably it induced a number
of children to find and read the delightful original. And
those that didn't wouldn'I have anyway, ever. So nothing
was lost, whatever was gained.
The same thing applies to young \1r. and \Irs.
Doakcs, who buy from their local appliance store a $129
or $210 "hi-ti"-complete with four speeds. six watts,
and two modest loudspeakers-and some "pop" or
"mood" LPs to go with it. If they have the perceptive
potential between their Emirs of cars, they may well in
time discover good music and the fun of fitting it to
their listening room through home high -fidelity experimen tat ion.
And if they don't, why grieve about it -even you
component manufacturers who may be reading this?
Deplore it or not, there are people who don't care if
records sound like records, and who have no desire for
music that requires attention or stirs the intellect.
Still, as a loyal high -fidelity man, I'd like to sec the
makers of our beloved custom equipment show a little
more aggressiveness. especially along the nation's byways
and on its airwaves. A nonmctropolitan radio -TV dealer
I know says: "Iligh fidelity is simply a sway of going
broke." People don't want to pay him installation fees.
So he won't carry components. Couldn't a manufacturer
run a line of advertising occasionally. down under his
"audiophile net" prices, saying: "And remember. an
installation fee to a good service man is a worthwhile
investment. "?
Further, some time when I watch "The Price Is
Right" or one of its kindred television shows, I should
like to sec revealed to the price -guessing panel. and to the
enraptured audience and viewers, nor a mahogany -clad
"hi-fi," but a nicely glistening array of top -grade audio
components. And I'd like to hear some familiar names
mentioned. (Mac? Ilcrmon? Avery? You listening ?)
There isn't much point, either, in contending that this
kind of thing should be left up to the Institute of I Iigh
Fidelity \fanufacturers. The Institute must act with
democratic deliberation, i.e., slowly. A small volunteer
group of manufacturers could act at once, after nothing
but a few telephone calls. And I have a feeling the time
J. M. C.
to act is right now.
AS THE EDITORS SEE IT
www.americanradiohistory.com
by Ashley Montagu
Why Wagner Was No Lady
An anthropologist well known
as champion
of the gentler, stronger sex here ex-
pounds an original explanation of why we have never had a great [roman composer.
MANY YEARS AGO Anton Rubinstein wrote, in
his Music and Its Masters, "It is a mystery why it
should just be music, the noblest, most beautiful, refined,
spiritual and emotional product of the human mind.
that is so inaccessible to woman, who is a compound of
all these qualities." The my stery remains. There have
been great women singers, but not really many great
instrumentalists, although the contemporary presence
among us of Wanda Landowska and Myra (less suggests
the possibility that women instrumentalists of the first
rank may become more frequent in the future. Women.
it should be remembered, only in our own era arc beginning to emerge from a long period of social and economic subjection.
But, it will be rightly urged, there have been great
women novelists and even poets during this sane period, and we may even allow a painter or two; but there
is no composer of even second -rate rank among women.
What is the explanation?
don't know what the explanation is. No one does.
The most frequent conjecture has been that women just
don't have what it takes -the genius of musical composition, it is held, being homme and that of appreciating
it essentially femme. Another theory has it that since
woman is essentially emotional by nature, she does not
experience the necessity of replicating her emotions.
the emotions being part of herself. and as natural to her
1
as breathing. "She feels its influences, its control. and
its power; but she does not see these results as man looks
at them. He sees them in their full play, and can reproduce them in musical notation as a painter imitates the
landscape before him. It is probably as difficult for her
to express then as it would be to explain them. To confine her emotions within musical limits would be as
difficult as to give expression to her religious faith in
notes. Man controls his emotions, and can give an outward expression of them. In woman they arc the dominating element, and so long as they arc dominant she
absorbs music. Great actresses who have never been
great dramatists may express emotions because they
express their own natures; but to treat emotions as if
they were mathematics, to bind and measure and limit
them within the rigid laws of harmony and counterpoint, and to express them with arbitrary signs, is a
cold blooded operation, possible only to the sterner and
more obdurate nature of man." These words are from
George Upton's Woman in Music, and were written in
1880. I think there is more than a little that is of value
in what he says, but I am sure there is more involved in
the composition of music than the ability to treat emotions as if they were mathematics. Note an apparent
paradox: women, it appears. are unable to mathematicite their own emotions, but apparently they are
perfectly able to teach other persons to do so.
-
34
HIGIt FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
It is generally agreed that the greatest living teacher
of musical composition is a woman, Nadia Boulanger.
For many years Mme. Boulanger has been head of the
American Conservatory of Music at Fontainebleau.
Among her pupils have been such eminent contemporary composers as Aaron Copland, Marc Blitzstein,
Roy Harris, Darius Milhaud, Walter Piston, and Virgil
Thomson. This remarkable woman celebrated her seventieth birthday last September.
Nadia Boulanger has dismissed her own early attempts
at composition as "useless music." She is not a composer,
but a teacher of composers. Her knowledge of music is
said to be unequaled. Why is it, then, that she is not as
distinguished a composer as she is a teacher of distinguished composers?
The answer must be that she lacks the necessary qualities- whatever they may be -that make a composer
compost. She has had the opportunities and she possesses more than the necessary technical equipment,
but she has excelled as a teacher only and not as a
composer.
As for these necessary qualities that make a composer
compose, what are they? Again, no one knows. We cannot, therefore, say what their distribution may be in
each sex. It is possible, but not at all probable, that
women simply do not have them at all. What, then,
can be the explanation of the fact that no woman has
ever created an important and enduring work in music?
Let us try to unscramble this particular mystery. I
cannot promise that we shall succeed.
As a social biologist, that is, as a student of man as
the product of the interaction between his biological
character and his social experience, I have had occasion
to think long and earnestly over the differences in
achievement between the sexes. Are males by nature
better endowed than females? Is there any biological
basis for the sexual differential in achievement which is
everywhere observed? The answer to both questions is
in the negative. Indeed, upon examination of the evidence the indications are nearly all in favor of the female and against the male.
As is well known, sex is determined by chromosomal
structures known as sex-chromosomes. All females carry
in their ovaries thousands of ova containing exclusively
so-called X- chromosomes. The male sperm cells carry
sex-chromosomes of two kinds: about fifty per cent of
the spermatozoa carry exclusively X- chromosomes while
the other fifty per cent carry exclusively so- called
Y-chromosomes. When an X- bearing sperm hitches up
with an ovum, the resulting fertilized egg contains two
X- chromosomes, and this invariably develops into a
female. A female is double-X. When a Y- bearing sperm
fertilizes an ovum the result is an XY egg, and this always develops into a male. The X- chromosome is a
complete chromosome, well upholstered, well proportioned, and sort of top -drawer looking. The Y- chromosome, on the other hand, is called a chromosome at all
only by grace of the fact that it was discovered and
named by a prejudiced observer, a male; for it is the
merest iota of a thing, difficult to see through a microscope, and we now know that it is virtually empty.
The consequences of this difference in the chromosomal structure of the sexes arc of the first order of importance, for they determine the very lives of their
carriers. The 2 -X chromosome system of the female
provides her with a complementary set of building
blocks, so to speak. Where one chromosome may be
deficient in certain kinds of bricks, the other is almost
certain- to be able to supply them. Not so in the case of
the male. If he acquires from his mother an X-chromosome which is deficient, say, in certain building bricks
for vision, there will be nothing in his Y- chromosome
to compensate for the deficiency, and so his vision will
almost certainly be affected. That is why males are
eight times more frequently color -blind than females,
for example. That is also the reason why males often are
afflicted by hemophilia and females seldom are. This,
also, is the explanation of the female's greater constitutional strength, her greater physical resistance, her superior emotional resilience, and so weiter. And that
"und so weiter" covers a great deal.
The female, then, undoubtedly is biologically equipped
with an hereditary endowment superior to that of the
male. It surely does not seem possible that she is in any
way lacking in any potentialities with which the male is
endowed. Where would they be in the male's chromosomal structure, a structure which he obtains chiefly
from his mother?
Well, the male is taller, heavier, and bigger-boned,
on the average, than the female-where does he get the
potentialities for these physical traits from? If we assume that something in the Y- chromosome is responsible, then following the same line of reasoning we might
argue that something in the Y- chromosome is responsible also for the male's musical achievements. I think this
extremely unlikely in view of the virtual emptiness of
the Y- chromosome.
A more likely explanation is to be seen in the fact
that the male's metabolic rate is from five to six per
cent higher than that of the female's, and that gradients
of growth are determined by the sexual composition of
the developing egg along different metabolic rates,
yielding in the one case an organism that grows at a
faster rate, and therefore eventually becomes larger than
the slower growing organism. The analogy from size
will, therefore, not do.
Are we then to argue that the male's greater musical
achievement is due to some deficiency in him which the
female lacks? That the capacity for musical composition
is due to some imbalance in the male, like the imbalances
of the organ systems of the body which keep the organism in its steady states? Or like the sound of silence,
which is so soothing not because of what is there but
Continued on page 137
because of what is not?
35
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
a
cat
may
by CHARLES BURR
look
at
a
king
Last August we ran an editorial entitled "Orrery for Hipsters." The query: can jazz
curry content comparable to that of a good classical composition? Mr. Burr, something of a hipster, considerable of a classicist, sent us this r'ery interesting answer.
RAINY AFTERNOONS children play games
argue. \Ve are now, apparently, in a rainy
period of serious musical composition and consequently
in the midst of some enjoyable critical controversy. At
the heart of the battle is the still animate if ailing body
of modern music; and the head of the forces assailing it
is Mr. Henry Pleasants who, in his book The Agony of
the former musical dichotomy of serious and popular
arts with one all- purpose music. In Pleasants' view, in
fact, we are at this moment crossing an invisible barrier,
involving development from one principle to another
after the manner of the evolutions from monody to
Modern Music and various articles including one in
last August's limn FIDELITY, has sounded its doom
with a jazz beat.
In his book Mr. Plcasants has cogently described the
progress of European art music of past centuries as a
gradually total exploitation of its various elements
(harmony, melody, rhythm, orchestration) towards a
grand climax and a dead end. On harmony, for instance,
he writes: "Every combination or succession of combinations was felt to be tolerable if not pleasurable. The
ear no longer capable of tonal outrage can no longer be
fascinated by progression, excited by modulation, disturbed by dissonance, or assuaged by resolution and
cadence. Where everything goes. nothing matters! This
is the case with the average car today. It spells the end
of tonal harmony, and this, in turn, spells the end of
what we call serious music."
While this tradition of music is being left to die,
more or less gracefully, in an era of emptying concert
halls, Mr. Pleasants foresees and to some extent invokes
a new music based on the rhythmic formula of jazz.
This music is to be written for jazz orchestra or smaller
instrumental combinations, and while not "serious,"
it is to be music of major intention which will replace
the jazz beat.
ON
polyphony and from polyphony to harmonic music.
The present evolution is towards music dominated by
It seems to me that before we can take this evolutionary step without anxiety we must bury with appropriate honors the element of expressive meaning
often cited as belonging to serious music of the past and
beloved of program annotators and record- jacket writers. Furthermore, it seems fair to ask if jazz is capable
of being made the basis for so radical a change. Can it.
in fact, evolve at all?
Mr. Pleasants sees jazz as "a new art music shaped by
the intellectual and emotional character of the twentieth-century society." But he has elsewhere stated
flatly that "jazz does not lend itself to analysis in terms
of meaning." For my part, I do not believe that a music
not subject to analysis in terms of meaning is, properly,
an art music at all. Nor do I believe that jazz was shaped
by anything or anybody but the American Negro, his
white followers, and the later ramifications of United
States musical commerce.
Pleasants points out that the difference between jazz
and nonjazz lies in the basically different function of
the beat. In jazz it is the beat pulsation that is the
ground. In other Western music it is what might be
called the emotional time signature. Plcasants put it
36
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
admirably in his HIGH FIDELITY article: "When the
classical musician deviates
rhythmically,
he takes the
with him. When thc jazz musician deviates, the
beat remains where he left it, an explicit point of
beat
rhythmic reference...."
This doesn't take us all the way, though, since there
are works of serious music, so called, where the beat is
undeviating, and there are jazz pieces where an increase
or decrease of tempo takes place. The differentiation
is subtler than this.
The jazz beat, to my ears, is a very special thing, unlike even the strictest nonjazz beat as found in, say, a
Sousa march, the cancan music in Gattl Parisienne, or the
finale of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony. In the first
place, the jazz beat is not one beat but two, which is
why virtually all jazz is written in some multiplication
of two (2/4, 4/4). Between these two beats there is a
specific relationship that can be felt, if not easily described in words.
In effect the beat in jazz is like the human pulse or
heartbeat, the synonym for the immediate moment, for
action and movement in the absolute present. As such
it expresses the strongest kind of physical immediacy,
and therein lies its basic excitement. In terms of time
the ascendancy of the jazz beat keeps the music forever
keyed to the present moment.
Over this beat there is presented some kind of tune;
and if jazz is not subject to analysis in terms of meaning,
it is because the expressive meaning always is presented
totally, spontaneously, and right away. Once the
tempo and the tune arc chosen, the expressive meaning
is complete except for the element that makes jazz
complex and interesting -the improvisational nature of
what happens in performance. Even if improvisation is
planned beforehand, it is this individual and unpredictable element that makes one man's Sweet Lorraine
sweeter than anther's. In any case jazz pieces must
never be rendered simply as written by the composer.
This characteristic, too, keeps meaning in jazz steadfastly on the surface, tied to the beat that always means
Right Now. The real interest- producing jeopardy in
jazz is this jeopardy of performance: what, exactly, will
the trumpet do with its chorus; or where will the arrangement lead; or how will the vocalist bring it off?
There is a similarity here to the excitement in sports:
will the next pitch strike out the side or be sent into
the bleachers for a home run? Thc suspense is essentially
that of observing people doing something difficult and
MARCII 1958
extraordinary in the immediate moment, and I don't
think it would be grossly unfair to call jazz not an art
music but a sport music.
I think that the term art music implies a considered
clement, one specifically alien to music that exists primarily as execution. As with poetry, painting, architeeturc, an essential insight must have been achieved before
thc art materials can be arranged in form, and there is
a necessary time lag involved, a specific quality of not
being of the immediate moment. The clement of execution in serious music is (or should be) completely at the
service of this predetermined expressive meaning. The
essential reason for this is that our serious music stems
directly from a musical tradition, originally fostered by
religious and aristocratic institutions, where the expressive meaning of the music was all important.
Harmonically considered, it may have begun one
bright day in the dim past, when the Duke of Somewhere, to be facetious about it, turned to the servants
in his household who could double on instruments and
said: "Boys, the King and Queen just drove in. Play
something appropriate." What they played was the
major triad, and we have been playing it ever since and
still do when we wish to dignify the moment on behalf
of persons or institutions we wish to honor as noble.
Instrumental music making for the aristocracy made
for certain specific conditions. The "seriousness" of the
music was real. If you played for the King and you
goofed, believe me, this was serious. When you played
you sat still; you didn't move around. You played as
you were told, not as you felt like playing. You played
what your noble audience wanted to hear, not what you
might have liked to play. And you wore the household
livery so that you might not be mistaken for a guest.
Into this context the composer was injected as official
arranger of music to His Majesty or His Grace. He
showed his musicians exactly what to play and, reading
notes, the instrumentalist was cut off even more from
the experience of the audience. Head down, eyes following the page, motionless except for the practice of
his craft, he was almost completely out of contact with
his listeners. When the conductor came along the barrier
became even more definite. The only road between instrumentalist and listener, by now, was the mind and
art of the composer as expressed in the score. Therefore,
the mind and art of the composer became decisive, and
serious music rapidly became impossible without him.
As his scores became more complicated, the art of the
37
instrumentalist became increasingly demanding, indeed
breeding an artist who could by now no longer play at
all unless given a page of written music. The considered
aspect of serious music is mirrored in this dual artistic
relationship, and the only performance jeopardy proper
to serious music is the question: will it be performed
accurately as written and played with understanding?
When jazz came along, it offered music that undercut
the social rationale of the serious European * music inherited from the aristocracy. It spoke directly of physical
sensations: sex excitement, blues that were physical and
not neuro- psychological, real animal gaiety and bone tired fatigue. Most important, the original jazz musicians played what they felt, not what they were told to
feel. I believe it when I read that a jazz man could feel
too good to play blues. But whatever he played, he
read no notes, his head was up, he could move around
freely, talk to his audience if he wanted to. He could
do with his instrument exactly what he liked, change
its tone, make it squeak or bite or play it into a plumber's helper. And the audience, too, was free to move, to
dance, to sing along. The jazz- playing Negro, bottom
man on the social scale in the early days, had no starched
pretenses to uphold and no nobility to glorify but that
of his own musical vigor. He was his own composer,
because if one tune wouldn't do another would, and he
wrote many of them himself anyway. And he loved to
get into instrumental duels with other jazz men, just
for the sport of it.
Jazz happened to come along at just the right time to
be the first folk art in the era of mass musical communication. It entered a world that had a vast going sheet music business in popular tunes and then soon possessed
mechanical means, in the phonograph and radio, for
recording, duplicating, and dispensing this new instrumentalist's music in a way undreamed of in previous
times. Through these media the musical experience of
a particular moment could be made permanently available and also sampled immediately by a huge audience.
The effect was to give to the rise of a strictly metropolitan American folk music the appearance of a burgeoning universal art, simply because by 1925 or thereabouts
the means and the commercial reasons for communicating this new music were suddenly immensely enlarged.
It is elementary that the history of past jazz is told
in terms of phonograph records, that jazz exists only as
mechanical reproductions of actual moments of music,
tied to the present in every way. The future great moments in jazz of necessity will be recordings of what
happened at a particular time in a certain studio, or
night club, or festival shed.
Jazz has been threatened by a surfeit of love and
reverence -the urge to push it into Carnegie Hall. But
there is something in it that resists intellectualization.
Granted that Beethoven and some who followed him composed in revolutionary vein. they still were writing on behalf of Everyman rather than to him.
They couldn't easily write to him: he couldn't pay his way inl
38
Transplanted, it dries up, loses its rhythmic juices.
A certain cerebral element has indeed been introduced
into jazz today, in the music of the cool school. There
now exists the long-haired musician (the hair is on the
chin, not the head) who reads notes with the best serious
instrumentalists, who chooses his coartists on the basis of
whether or not they think alike no matter what they feel,
and whose entire reorientation is towards a new serious
respectability. Cool is a very good word for the music
he makes. It won't make you dance or laugh or get hot
under the collar, but it has all the latest chords. It is
pleasant enough and still jazz, I suppose, but it is jazz
for the head and not for the whole man.
If jazz is what I think it is -the immediate rhythmic
expression of vital feelings-then the cool, intellectual
(strictly uncommitted and nonparticipating) approach
can only belittle it. For jazz and jazzmen have had their
own nobility, the nobility of direct sensuous- kinetic
expression without apology. Intellectualization calls
forth ever more complicated and intricate contortions
of jazz in order to give it a sort of bogus prestige among
those who admire complexity for its own sake, exactly
in the manner that some modern music and poetry seek
stature through unintelligibility.
This brings us back to Pleasants' critique of the state
of harmony. He wrote that "every combination or succession of combinations was felt to be tolerable
Felt is wrong. They are not felt to be tolerable; they
are thought to be tolerable. The general failure to win
audiences of that modern music which practices an
indiscriminate use of dissonance demonstrates that the
tonal sense of the average listener is actively rejecting it,
and, therefore, is still very much alive and functioning.
Actually, audience empathy stops at a certain point
beyond which a complex of tones no longer stays within
the area of recognizable human emotional experience. It
is possible to represent human madness, or the functioning of machines, via such music, but this can never be
long admired by the ear which is waiting to recognize
normal humanity in the musical context.
Meanwhile the basic folk-music devices continue to
exist: the rising scale still means something optimistic
to us; we still hear cheerfulness in the songs of birds.
And in the sighs of lovers there still exists a kind of
dying fall representable in music that requires, in response to it, that we melt.
Well, you just can't melt to a jazz beat. And there are
many other emotional states available to both folk and
serious music that cannot be expressed in jazz. And this
is why any formal music derived solely from jazz cannot possibly be anything bat sterile.
There still exists, in other words, a specific need for
music which "carries the beat with it," which is keyed to
reflective states of mind and representations of human
aspiration. For this reflective-representational music there
is, and surely must always be, an audience, no matter what the size. Popularity
Continued on page 141
..."
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
H
Witho
Instruments
by JOHN
T.
FRYE
Around 1920, in an Arkansas town, a boy named John Frye had an incomprehensible urge to
build a radio the never had seen one). Since his parents were away, he proceeded to take the
innards out of the wall telephone and connect them with an antenna and a big, shiny piece
of coal that looked as if it might serve as a galena detector. It didn't, but Mr. Frye has been
an electronics experimenter ever since. He became a writer as well in the 1930s, preparing for
this difficult and thankless craft as a student at Indiana, Chicago, and Columbia Universities.
OR usually takes a dim view of self-diagnosis
an even dimmer view of self-medication. It is
not that he fears amateur competition, for eventually he
usually gets the patient anyway; but he knows from
experience that such self-doctoring is very likely to
aggravate the original illness or cause other serious, even
irreparable harm to the system. On the other hand, he
favors the administration of intelligent first aid; and he
seldom objects to treatment of minor cuts, scratches,
bruises, and headaches with the contents of the bathroom
medicine cabinet.
The service technician has a similar attitude toward
a music -system owner's attempt to "treat" any trouble
that may arise in his equipment. As long as these efforts
are confined to first -aid measures-substituting plug -in
units such as tubes and cartridges, trying to localize the
trouble by manipulating the controls, using nothing in
the way of tools except the five senses and ordinary
intelligence-the technician has no quarrel with the
owner. Many times the difficulty can actually be located
and remedied by these simple measures. Even when this
is not possible, the accurate cataloguing of the trouble
symptoms can be of great assistance to the technician
when he comes and may help cut down the repair time
and consequently the repair bill.
The farther the high -fidelity enthusiast lives from an
ADOCTDOCTOR
adequate service center, the more important it is that
he be able to perform simple checking and maintenance
operations. Otherwise, he may have to do without the
use of his equipment for several days and then pay several
dollars simply to have a fuse replaced or a loose plug
shoved back into its socket. This article has been prepared to help the non-technically -inclined hi -fi owner do
all he should do when his equipment fails and to enable
him to know when it is wise to desist and call in a qualified technician.
We must start with a few basic assumptions: (1) The
equipment was working quite satisfactorily before the
trouble showed up. We are concerned with locating some
kind of failure and restoring the equipment to normal
operation; critical evaluation of a system that is working
normally is beyond the scope of this article. (2) The
user has on hand an instruction manual that shows the
location and type of every tube in the equipment. (3) A
good replacement tube is available for every socket.
Having these at hand -at least for the amplifier system
is not an extravagance. Bought in advance they cost no
more than when purchased after a failure. (4) Access is
had -by owning, borrowing, of lighthearted stealing
to a test record, a stroboscopic turntable speed chart,
and a replacement pickup cartridge identical to the one
normally used.
-
39
MARCH 1958
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trouble; so it is probably the switch. If it is, replacement
is ordinarily a job for a serviceman.
Ask yourself this question: has the equipment been
left plugged in during a recent thunderstorm? If so, the
switch may be a lightning casualty, and there may be
other damage. Lightning does not have to strike your
house to injure your hi -fi equipment, nor does thc equipment have to be in operation during a thunderstorm to
suffer damage. Lightning striking near the power lines
miles away may induce a large voltage surge in your line
that can leap the gap of an open switch and destroy it,
damaging other components as well. Pulling AC plugs
during a severe thunderstorm is a wise safety measure.
The same thing applies to antenna leads for 1V or FM
tuners. Useful here arc little plastic -block 300 -ohm
plug-in connectors that nearly every electrical shop sells
for about fifteen cents. If you have reason to think
lightning maw have got into your equipment, be sure
and have your household insurance agent check with the
The best way to locate trouble in electronic equipment is to "corner" it. That is, you methodically notc
the symptoms, make tests, and substitute parts, each
time narrowing down the arca in which the difficulty
could be, until finally this process of elimination exposes
the offender. This is the method used by a professional
electronic technician, a clever auto mechanic, and, to a
degree, even by a good doctor. Let's apply it to a high -
fidelity system.
Suppose some evening you turn on the switch that
activates your music system, and nothing happens. Dial
lamps do not light; no slightest sound is heard from the
speakers; the turntable will not revolve; tubes stay
stone cold- nothing! First make sure the plug of the
main AC line cord of the system is making good connection with the wall socket. You would not think this
suggestion foolish if you knew how many service calls arc
completed by spreading the prongs of a line plug a trifle
and shoving it firmly into the ssall socket. :\ plug that
slips ill and out of its socket too easily should be viewed
with especial suspicion.
If nothing seems wrong with the AC plug, stop and
think a bit. (1'!ús is the part that requires the strongest
self -discipline. Doing something- anything -is always
easier than thinking!) Usually one of the units of the
system, such as a preamplifier, power amplifier, or control center, is plugged directly into a wall socket, and
then other units are plugged into auxiliary output
receptacles on the back of this unit or on the hack of
each other. For purposes of illustration, let's assume the
power amplifier is plugged into the wall socket, the
preamp is plugged into the back of the power amplifier
-assuming a preamp with its own power supply -and
the turntable is plugged into the rear of the preamp.
Current passes through the power amplifier switch
to the auxiliary sockets, and then through a Rise to the
power transformer of the power amplifier. Since neither
the preamplifier nor power amplifier lights up, current
is not reaching even the auxiliary AC sockets. First, let's
make sure power is available at the wall socket. Plugging
the turntable directly into the socket will decide this. If
the turntable still fails to revolve when switched on, the
trouble is in the house wiring. Probably the fuse in the
circuit feeding the socket is blown.
On the other hand if power is available at the household .\C socket, something must be wrong with either
the power amplifier's fuse or the power amplifier switch.
Cords, unless they are severely abused, seldom give
if the cost of repairing is not thc
responsibility of the insurance company. It may well be.
If the auxiliary sockets arc "live" when the amplifier
switch is turned on. but the amplifier itself remains dead.
then the amplifier fuse probably is open. In some amplifiers, a blown fuse may disable all the auxiliary sockets,
too; so check this in either case. Replace it with a new
one, using only the exact jute specified by the manufacturer of your amplifier. This is very important. Not all
"3- ampere" Ruses, for example, are alike, even though
they may hook the same and fit the same fuse holder. A
3- ampere "slow blow" fuse has characteristics quite
different from an ordinary 3- ampere type. Never yield
to the temptation to use a fuse larger than specified, for
any reason.
On the other hand, do not assume that a fuse failure
necessarily indicates something wrong with your amplifier. Sometimes a line surge will take out a fuse, or the
fuse element may be defective, or it may part from sheer
fatigue. If a new fuse of the specified type holds, you
have nothing to worry about.
But if the new fuse promptly goes out. too, remove
the rectifier tube and try another fuse. Usually von can
identify the rectifier by the fact that it is unpaired
(power tubes, for instance. always are paired) and its
code number probably 1eginswith a "5." If the new fuse
holds while the rest of the tubes in the amplifier light
up. turn oli- the amplifier. insert a new tube in the rectifier socket, and turn the amplifier back on. If the rectifier
tube has a glass envelope, keep your eye on the long
metal plates inside the tube. If they start to turn a dark
red, or if they flash a brilliant blue, switch off the amplifier at once. If you're quick enough, you may save a fuse.
Red or flashing rectifier plates indicate a short circuit
somewhere in the power supply -and a job for the service
technician. Sometimes. though, a gassy rectifier or one
with a broken filament lying against a plate will blow
fuses. In this case a new rectifier will clear the trouble.
service technician to sec
.
HMI
40
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FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Suppose you sec at least some of the tubes lighting
up, but absolutely no sound. not even the normal low
hum, is heard from the speaker. Carefully check the
leads, terminals. and plugs connecting the amplifier to
any crossover networks and thence to the speakers Pay
special attention to speaker leads; a short circuit here
can burn out an amplifier's transformer- expensive
business. Wiggle all plugs vigorously in their sockets to
make sure they arc making good connection. Try a new
rectifier tube. If none of these measures helps and if the
filaments of the output tubes are lighting. your trouble
is probably beyond the reach of first aid.
A more common experience is to have a normal "live"
sound, hum, or hiss from the speakers, but no program
material coming through. The first thing to do is to
switch to different program sources and sec if any of
them can be heard as usual. If an : \M or FM tuner
operates in customary fashion but the phono does not.
do not jump to the conclusion that the cartridge is bad.
In many combination amplifiers or separate preamplifiers, one or more tubes arc used exclusively to build up
the weak signals from the pickup cartridge. a tape deck.
or a microphone, while the comparatively robust signals
delivered by a tuner are inserted into the system "behind" these tubes. Failure of a preamp tube will cut out
low -level sources while high -level sources will be heard
normally.
When no program material at all can be heard, and
if all interconnecting cables arc intact and all plugs are
firmly seated in their sockets. the next thing to do is
start changing tubes. As in everything else. there is a
right way to do this. First, see if you can detect any dead
tubes. No glow in a glass tube or no warmth to the shell
of a metal one indicates a dead filament. and of course
such a tube should be replaced. However. a tube is much
more than a light bulb, and the fact its filament lights up
does not prove that the tube is performing its proper
function.
Since the tubes in the power amplifier usually are
more accessible than those in a separate preamplifier.
commendable. intelligent laziness suggests these be
changed first. Wear a glove to protect your hand from
burns and cuts in case a tube should break. Switch off the
amplifier and remove a tube. Be gentle. especially with
miniature tubes, for these are easily damaged. .\ steady
straight -up pull with a little rocking through a small arc
will usually do the trick. Just remember how your dentist
does it! Insert into the empty socket a new tube, double
checked to make sure it bears exactly the sime type
number as the one removed. Switch the amplifier back
on and see if the trouble has been cleared up. If not, turn
it off again. put back the tube you removed. replace the
one next to it with a new tube, and turn the amplifier
back on. Continue this process until the trouble has
been corrected or all of the tubes in the amplifier and
preamplifier have been changed. if it is an .\M or FM
tuner that delivers no signal, change the tubes in the
-
sane way. If the trouble still persists, start thumbing
the phone book for the number of your technician.
\\'hen only the phono is dead, make sure the cartridge
is properly seated in the arm, examine the leads from it
carefully, be certain the shielded cable going to the
preamplifier is not frayed through or short -circuited, and
check to see that it is properly plugged in. Substitute a
new cartridge if you have one or can borrow one. That,
plus changing the tubes in the preamplifier, is about all
you can do.
It is a tossup whether it is worse not to get sounds you
want from your speakers or to get sounds from them
you do not want. This is especially truc when the unwanted sound is hum. I turn is an annoying, sustained,
low -pitched sound, usually of 60- or I 20-cycle frequency.
A small amount of hum aihI only be noticeable during
quiet passages in the music, but a loud hum will chop up
tones the way a blown muffler does in a car.
The first rule in tracking down hum is to divide and
conquer, using the volume control and the program
selector switch. -Turn the volume control all the way
down and see if the hum disappears. If it does, the hum
must be originating ahead of the control; if not. behind
it. Next. switch to different input sources, such as the
phono pickup. tuner, etc. If the hum is heard on only
one source, you simultaneously exonerate all the circuit
between the program switch and the volume control,
and point an accusing finger at the source yielding the
hum. If the hum is coming from the phonograph only,
be certain the cartridge terminals are making a good
connection, that the leads coming from it are intact, and
that the shielded cable going to the preamplifier is electrically sound and is firmly plugged into its socket.
Check to be sure the cartridge is not in a strong magnetic
field, such as that often emanating from a power transformer, an electric clock, or a fluorescent lamp. Then try
changing the preamp tubes.
Hum coming from a microphone, tuner, or tape deck
may also originate from a poorly grounded cable shield;
so check these cables and their plugs carefully. In addition. change the tubes, if any. in the offending component. Heater -to- cathode leakage within a tube can be
a rich source of hum. If your preamp has level -set controls on the rear, turn clown any that are connected with
inputs not being used.
When the hum infects all program sources, change the
tubes ahead of the volume control or behind it, according
Continued on page 132
to where tests show the hum is
41
MARCH 1958
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'e
a photographic visit
;
At Home With the Shostakovitchs
OCCASION the Iron Curtain parts, but it is 'a rare occasion
when it opens to permit us sight of a musician's life as lived
behind the veil. Here, through the good offices of photographer
Nicholas Tikhomirov, we are allowed a glimpse of composer
Dmitri Shostakovitch en famille. The onetime concert pianist
whose massive symphonies and other musical works perhaps are
now the Soviet state's most important cultural export is shown
in the six -room Moscow apartment that is both studio and home.
ON
At fifty -one an intense, nervous artist -intellectual -vide the
two pairs of glasses which he is constantly changing and the
cigarette, almost a facial appendage -he reflects on a recent
composition and corrects the score thereof in his careful hand.
42
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In more relaxed momcnts Shostakovitch
indulges a passion (not unique to Russians) for a hard- fought game of chess,
which he plays with his twenty-one -yearold daughter Gallia; and as paterfamilias
he presides at the very Russian institution of the samovar. Son of a musical
family, he himself is father of a musical
son. Young Maxim, a student of composition at Moscow Conservatory, accompanies the elder Shostakovitch at
one of the two grand pianos that occupy
the living room, and the whole family
shares the pleasure of an extensive record
collection. But there is nothing chauvinistic about the Shostakovitch taste; papa
gets played -and Bach and Offenbach.
43
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by JOSEPH KERMAN
From tW Mass to the Madrigal...
How Music Became Classical
E fact is obvious enough: our general rough and
ready acquaintance with old art and old literature
does not extend to old music. In this curious area, even
people keenly interested in the arts are likely to find
themselves strangers. The man who likes Hamlet has
learned to like Schubert and Bach, but he cannot find
his bearings in Shakespeare's own musical environment.
Botticelli and Raphael he can place, and sense something
of their artistic personalities, but Josquin and Marenzio
mean little or nothing to him. And while the ordinary
music lover knows what to expect of a minuet or a concerto, he is uncertain of the very status -let alone the
a sixteenth-century Mass, motet, or madriaesthetic
gal. Which compositions are to be thought of as approximately on the level of a symphony, and which on the
level of a bagatelle?
This situation of course is bound to change, in an age
of paperbacks and LPs. But the large number of records
of old music already available makes for some confusion,
as well as for interest and opportunity. Record companies issue what is on hand, or what they hope will be
instantly agreeable, or what some single- minded musician
manages to promote; as a result, today's catalogues list
a fairly arbitrary selection of Renaissance music. The
listener who feels like making some sense out of it all
will not be satisfied with random jacket notes. He needs
some more general guidance, if only to be able to distinguish the main road of musical development from
beguiling but subsidiary byways.
The term for a guide "who shows strangers the curiosities of a place" is cicerone, a word derived from the
name of the famous Roman orator Cicero. Actually it is
particularly appropriate to begin with Cicero, since he
was the favorite classic author of the Italian humanists,
and it is to Italy and humanism that modern music owes
its main impetus. Music was a vital part of Renaissance
-of
culture, and developed within that culture just as significantly as did art and architecture, poetry and drama,
physical and political science. This becomes more and
more clear to students of music, though general accounts
-from Burckhardt's great basic study of a hundred
years ago, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, to
Wylie Sypher's lively paperback, Four Stages of Renaissance Style-never have granted music its proper place.
It was with more than antiquarian enthusiasm that
the Italian humanists investigated classic literature and
classic antiquities. Their aim was to make the values of
ancient Rome and Greece a part of their own existence.
The age was certain that the style makes the man; and
in the classics, notably in Cicero, the Renaissance found
its ideal of the good life. Now according to the classic
view, music plays a crucial role in the well -being of the
spirit. Music is a profound ethical and rhetorical force
which can move the emotions and regulate the soul; so
in Plato's Republic Socrates wants to banish certain
"modes" of music because they are dangerous to public
ethics. (A strange notion? but we too hear of the dangers
of "formalistic cacophony" or of rock'n'roll.) Furthermore, as the Greeks had insisted that music follow the
words closely, Renaissance musicians tried to make
music reflect its accompanying text. In this way they
hoped to make of music an expressive art-expressive
in order to move the soul into a more perfect harmony.
At first this thinking was slow in making its way. One
reason was purely geographical: art music was mainly
Northern in origin and inspiration. It is a strange fact
that Italy, the land we think of today as representing the
very embodiment of music, assumed no musical leadership during the Middle Ages. In the fifteenth century,
the great age of Italian humanism, musical tradition was
still in the hands of Frenchmen and Netherlanders; Italy
was content to import music and musicians, rather as
44
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England and America did in the nineteenth century.
Fifteenth-century music still shows a strong medieval
bias, together with signs of a new spirit.
The characteristic forms were the French chanson and
the Netherlandish Mass. The chanson is the more retrospective, a tiny art with links to music of the Gothic
period. The vocal melody is courtly, attenuated, and
elaborate, the instrumental counterpoints unsubstantial,
the musical form standardized -even stereotyped -as is
the poetry to which the music is set. This is music for
a cool clear voice with recorder, lute, and viol; the
sharply differentiated colors and the delicate filigree seem
to match the blue and gold miniatures of the Burgundian
Books of Hours. Some of these chansons, by Guillaume
Dufay, may be heard on a beautiful record by the Pro
Musica Antiqua of Brussels, directed by an American,
Safford Cape. This group, which has admirably performed and recorded much old music, has a special sympathy for the exquisite art of Dufay.
The Mass is made of sterner ingredients, much more
ambitious, and to us perhaps more indigestible. In the
fifteenth- century Mass, indeed, composers made the first
sustained effort in musical history to construct the large
form. To this end went the best efforts of the great
Netherlanders, Dufay, Okeghem, Obrecht, and the
young Josquin. They sought to bind together the Kyrie,
Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, and Agnus into a rational whole,
usually by means of a single melody as the basis of each
section. The result was a technical feat of great scope and
complexity, often mathematical in design, brilliant and
very long-so that few works of this monumental genre
are recorded or ever performed at all nowadays. Dufay's
Missa Caput, for instance, takes two full sides of a single
LP. One's first impression is of endless arabesque, powerful and fertile, and intensely mystical in effect; actually
everything is contained within a rigorous predetermined
scheme. One thing we note, and the humanists grimly
noted it too, is the lack of any effort at expressivity. Just
as in the chanson, the words are lost in tracery. And as
composers wrote one such Mass after another, to the
same texts every time, their fascination with technical
problems of unification and extension must have stifled
any interest in individual words or feelings.
But in spite of their purely musical preoccupation, it
was with Masses and chansons that Northern musicians
made their reputations and fortunes in Italy. At the end
of the fifteenth century, dozens of the best French and
Netherlandish singers were recruited for the brilliant
Renaissance courts and their attendant chapels. Under
Galeazzo Maria Sforza in Milan, Ercole d'Este in Ferrara, and Lorenzo de' Medici in Florence, composers
came in contact with the most influential artists, poets,
and philosophers. Both the atmosphere of humanism and
the unsophisticated quality of native Italian song made
for great changes in Netherlandish music, so that around
1500 a clear new style is recognizable, a rich amalgam of
Northern and Italian features. This style forms a solid
basis for sixteenth -century music. Its greatest practitioner was Josquin Des Prez, a Belgian who traveled
widely in Italy; its center may be thought of as the
Sistine Chapel at the height of the Renaissance papacy,
at a time when spiritual and temporal princes were not
so very different. Leo X, the Medici pope who is supposed to have said "Since God has seen fit to give us the
papacy, let us enjoy it," supported music as recklessly as
he did art and architecture. Leo is well known for his
encouragement of Bramante,
Continued on page 138
A Selective List of
Renaissance Music on Records
Guillaume Dufay. Five Sacred Songs. Pro
Musica Antiqua of Brussels, Safford Cape,
cond. Archive ARC 3003.
Dufay. Secular Works (Chansons). Pro
Musica Antiqua of Brussels, Safford Cape,
cond. EMS 206.
Dufay. Missa Caput. Ambrosian Singers,
Denis Stevens, cond. Oiseau Lyre OL 50069.
Josquin Des Prez. Tribulatio et angustia.
Schola Polyphonica, Henry Washington,
cond. "The History of Music in Sound, Vol.
3." RCA Victor LM 6016 (with other
works).
Heinrich Isaac. Missa Carminrun. Wiener
Akademie Kammerchor, Ferdinand Grossmann, cond. Westminster WL 5215.
G. P. da Palestrina. Missa papae Marcelli.
Netherlands Chamber Choir, Felix de Nobel,
cond. Epic LC 3045 (with other works).
Luzzasco Luzzaschi: Quivi sospiri. Luca
Marenzio: Sandi dal Paradiso. London
Chamber Singers, Anthony Bernard, cond.
"The History of Music in Sound, Vol. 4."
RCA Victor LM 6029.
Luca Marenzio and Claudio Monteverdi.
Madrigals on Texts from Il Pastor fido.
Golden Age Singers. Westminster \\'LE 105.
The English Madrigal School. Deller Consort, Alfred Deller, dir. Bach Guild BG 553,
Vols. 1 and 2.
Thomas Morley. Elizabethan Madrigals and
Other Works. Primavera Singers of the Ncw
York Pro Musica Antiqua, Noah Greenberg,
cond. Esoteric ES 520.
Claudio Monteverdi. Orfeo. Krebs, Guillaume, Mack -Cosack, et al.; Choir and Orchestra, August Wenzinger, cond. Archive
ARC 3035/6.
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MARCH 1958
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Once again available to fanciers of jazz-as -Americana is the famous recorded interview, made at
the Library of Congress in 1938, between folklorist
Alan Lomax and one of the key figures in the early
and inadequately documented growth of the artform.
ONE MAY DAY, in 1938, Alan Lomax invited an
aging, down -in-his -luck pianist, who had been lost
in obscurity and neglect for eight years, to come to the
Coolidge Auditorium of the Library of Congress to
reminisce, play the piano, and sing.
Lomax, who was assistant curator of the Library's
Folksong Archive, may have hoped to get some firsthand material on the early days of jazz in New Orleans,
Chicago, St. Louis, Memphis, and other points east and
west. But he could scarcely have realized how important
a piece of Americana he was about to capture.
The pianist was Jelly Roll Morton, not so obvious a
choice then as he seems now in retrospect. Morton's
faith in his destiny and his love of the grand style never
were quenched except by death. However, although his
Red Hot Peppers had been one of the most popular jazz
recording groups of the 1920s, he had not made a record
since 1930. As swing moved into its jazz ascendancy,
Morton had found himself ridiculed and rejected. Murray Kempton, now a New York newspaper columnist,
remembers traveling with a friend from Baltimore to
Washington at that time to see the great Jelly Roll.
They found him operating a dingy night club, so obviously poverty stricken that wooden crates were being
used for tables and chairs. Jelly had lost his audience, his
money, and most of his friends-but he had not lost his
style. There was nothing abject in his manner.
Creation led straight to Mr. Ferdinand Joseph La Menthe.
46
"Thieves broke in last night," he explained grandly
to his visitors, with a lordly gesture around the barren
room, "and stole all my fine wine."
This kind of braggadocio characterized Morton all his
life. Some people were amused or touched by it, but without doubt it antagonized others, especially since he was so
humorless about himself. His sense of self -importance was
immense. Once it led him to write a letter to President
Franklin D. Roosevelt proposing a means for ending the
Depression. The government, he suggested, should back
a Jelly Roll New Orleans Band in (say) Baltimore, using
unemployed local musicians. Then with the money made
from this obviously predestined success, the bands could
spread out chain-letter fashion to other cities until every
American musician was working again.
In similar vein was an abortive attempt at autobiography, beginning with two short paragraphs in which
the Creation, the discovery of the New World, and the
settling of Louisiana led with swift unerring logic to the
birth of Ferdinand Joseph La Menthe, later known as
Jelly Roll Morton.
Some of the qualities that drove him to such displays
of almost desperate bravado could also, however, help
him to rise brilliantly to a situation. That was certainly
what happened during those May afternoons in the
Coolidge Auditorium. He sat at a piano, a bottle of
whisky conveniently at hand, and, prodded by Lomax's
occasional questions, produced a perceptive, intimate,
and colorful portrait of some of the places where jazz
developed; of the people-musicians and otherwise
who gave these places their flavor; of early, previously
unrecorded styles and songs; and of his own life and
music. As he talked, he accompanied himself with accenting piano chords which emphasized the swinging
cadences of his rich, expressive voice. He sang, too, and
he played, and Lomax took it all down on acetate discs
with a portable recording machine.
For years the existence of Lomax's acetates haunted
the jazz world. They remained locked up in the Library
of Congress until the late 1940s, when they were issued
by Circle Records in twelve ponderous, expensive 78rpm albums. In 1950 Circle transferred them to twelve
LPs, but almost immediately thereafter went out of
business, thus drying up the source of the Morton LPs.
Now, remastered and fitted out with an excellent, informative series of supplemental notes by Martin Williams, the Morton Library of Congress LPs have been
returned to currency by Riverside.*
These twelve LPs are a record of something that can
-
JELLY ROLL MORTON: The Library of Congress Recordings, Vol. 1 -12.
Riverside 9001 -9012. $5.95 each.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZLNE
by JOHN S. WILSON
never happen again. There are still a few jazz veterans
around who can tell how things were in New Orleans,
or in Chicago, at one particular time or another. But
Jelly, a constant loner always on the move, traveled
more widely than any of his contemporaries, saw more,
had more to tell. And these recordings were made when
he could still play, when he could still reproduce with
what one may assume was reasonable accuracy the
styles of others and could still sing (with a little throat soothing help): "Oh, that good whisky!"
Actually these discs reveal
many listeners for
almost the first time- Morton's talent as a singer.
Until the time of the Lomax interview session, Morton
had sung on records only once, contributing a brief,
brash, jaunty vocal on the RCA Victor recording of
Doctor Jazz. Otherwise what we know of his singing
is derived from recordings made in the brief period between June and December 1939. Particularly notable
are his haunting and wistful Madtie's Blues (on General)
and Winin' Boy Blues (on both General and Bluebird)
and the more gruffly forthright I Thought I Heard
Buddy Bolden Say (again on both General and Bluebird).
None of these recordings is readily available today,
although stray copies of LP versions of the Generals,
once issued on both the Commodore and Jazztone labels but now cut out, may be uncovered by sharp -eyed
and assiduous hunters.
Mainly, however, the inimitable flavor of the Lomax
discs comes from Morton's almost hypnotic manner of
recounting an incident, his cyc for details, his fondness
for hyperbole (often structured on atrocious grammar),
and his flashes of warm, if limited, humor.
Morton, as has been noted, was without humor about
himself. And, although he fancied himself as a comedian, his studied efforts at comedy were dreadful -so
bad, in fact, that through some reverse alchemy they
become grimly funny (the liveliest example of this is
Animule Ball, in Volume Two). But he did have humor
of a different sort. It comes out in the obvious relish
that spreads through his voice as one memory kindles
another and the details of half-forgotten experiences
start flooding back to him.
The range of his recountals is wide. Lomax, primarily
a folklorist, guided Morton into areas that might not
have occurred to an out -and -out jazz interviewer. So
he talks and sings about such legendary New Orleans
characters as Aaron Harris, Robert Charles, and other
"tough babies "; of his rovings with a friend named
Jack the Bear; of life in the New Orleans streets half a
century ago. Closely woven in with this are his own
experiences as a boy in New Orleans, and later in the
-to
MARCH 1958
notorious Storyville section. He recalls the style and
character of the most famous early, unrecorded New
Orleans pianist, Tony Jackson, and dredges up memories of other, less well -known men who played in the
honky -tonks of those days -Alfred Wilson, Albert
Carroll, the Game Kid, Buddy Carter. With Morton,
it goes without saying, there is always comment and
pianistic illustration. In this case it extends to a brief
lecture on the (alleged) shortcomings of a pianist named
Benny French -very entertaining.
He expounds and illustrates his theories of jazz, the
use of the riff and the break, his insistence that jazz is
to be played "sweet, soft, with plenty rhythm." He
traces piano rags from Missouri down the river to New
Orleans, demonstrating the development of differences
in style. In a fascinating bit of pianistic reconstruction,
he shows how Tiger Rag was adapted from a French
quadrille.
There is an occasional display of seemly modesty.
Morton manages to cover the origins of scat singing,
for instance, without bringing himself into the picture
(he can tell us who did start it, though: one Joe Sims,
of Vicksburg). But part of Morton's charm as a narrator is his amusing (in retrospect) inability to pass by
anything that he deemed creditworthy without asserting at least a part -claim to it. After going through the
four parts of the quadrille which became Tiger Rag
( "call for partners," waltz strain, 2/4 strain, and what
Morton calls "mazooka" time), he introduces the jazz
version with the assertion, "It happened to be transformed by your performer at this particular time."
When Lomax, an alert straight man, asks, "Who named
it ?" Morton adds, "I also named it." His demonstration of the difference between the St. Louis style of
playing rags and the New Orleans, or Morton, style
brings forth the comment, "I changed every style to
mine." Even while he is accusing Clarence Williams of
taking credit for a song that he, Morton, wrote, the
egotist in Jelly suddenly recalls that "in fact, I happened
to be the man who taught Mr. Williams how to play."
Morton's talent as a low -pressure spellbinder is emphasized by the discovery that none of his boastfulness
detracts from his credibility as narrator of events in
which he is not seeking credit for himself. The recollections roll on and on, the songs and musical memories
fall, neatly and naturally, into place; and Morton's
rolling piano interpolations throb under, around, and
through it all. We may laugh when he says he changed
every style to his, but it's true. No matter what he is
playing or singing-the Miserere, a rag, the Frankie -andJohnny-like ballad of
Continued on page 134
47
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is where
the music
begins
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48
HIGH FIDELITY 1bIACAzINx
www.americanradiohistory.com
musk
by
11
IN THE CITY OF BERN about
twenty -five years ago,
maiden
aged ten was taken by her parents to a
performance of Salome at the local
opera house. Most young ladies of such
tender years would, we suspect, take
Strauss's shocker somewhat amiss. But
not this onc. Salome induced in her both
a strong love for the music of its composer and the desire to sing it herself. A
good thing too, since the girl's name
was Lisa Della Casa.
This and much else we learned the
other day at lunch with Miss Della
Casa, who seems to us one of the most
lustrous (if least publicized) singers of
our time. Shc combines opulence of
voice with utter dependability (as Elisabeth Rethbcrg did a generation ago); she
has musical taste and dramatic intelligence; and she is, surely, the most
beautiful woman to appear on the
Metropolitan stage since the days of
fabled Lina Cavalieri. With all this, she
is the very antithesis of the panoplied
prima donna. In Switzerland her home
is a thirteenth- century castle; but during her six -month stay in New York this
season she has been living in an apartment in Queens with her husband and
nine -year -old daughter, who attends a
nearby public school.
Lisa Della Casa's first hours upon the
stage were spent as a leading lady in an
amateur theatrical group directed by her
father, a physician in Bern. At the agc
of fifteen she was sent to Zurich to begin
serious musical study and vocal training.
There, seven years later, in 1943, Miss
Della Casa made her operatic debut, as
Mimi in La Bohème. For a while she
alternated between opera and operetta,
though she professes to have disliked the
latter greatly and is not at all happy that
she first became known in this country
through a recording of Lehár's Der
Zurewiisch. Her operatic idols were all
of the hochdramatisch variety -Erna
Schlütter, Maria Cebotari, Ljuba Welitsch, and Kirsten Flagstad.
a Swiss
ROLAND GELAIT
Her emergence from apprenticeship
occurred early in 1947, when she sang
the role of Zdenka in Strauss's Arabe/la
at Zurich. Strauss was then living in
Switzerland, and he supervised all the
rehearsals of this production. (A tape of
the performance still exists in the archives of the Swiss broadcasting system;
it is something we should very much
like to hear.) Strauss predicted a great
future for Della Casa as an interpreter
of his music. More to the point, Maria
Cebotari -the Arabella of this Zurich
refused on the grounds that she was unready to cope with the steely vocal
demands of those parts. Now she feels
able to do them justice and hopes she
will be asked again. Also she still wants
to fulfill her original operatic goal: to
perform the role of Salome.
Of the many Strauss heroines she has
portrayed (heroes, too, if you count
Oktavian) her favorite by far is Ara bella. Shc identifies herself closely with
the much -fêted young girl who resolutely waits for "the right onc." "Ara bella," she says, "gives me a chance to
act as I feel." She has sung the opera in
almost every major theater in the world.
and she is the Arabella in London's new
complete recording.
On the subject of records Miss Della
Casa has some stanch opinions. Shc refuses to listen to recordings of other
singers before her own conceptions are
strongly formulated. The celebrated
Lehmann- Schumann-Olszewska record-
Lisa Della Casa
cast -saw to it that Della Casa was
engaged as the Zdenka for a production
of Arabella at the 1947 Salzburg Festival.
Thc.eaftcr she encountered nothing
but smooth sailing in her voyage through
the Strauss repertoire and the opera
houses of Europe and America. In the
past decade she has sung Zdenka and
Arabella, the Countess in Capriccio,
Ariadne in Ariadne auf Naxos. and
Chrysothemis in Elekrra: moreover, she
shares with Lotte Lehmann the distinction of having undertaken all three roles
-Sophie, Oktavian, and the \larschallin
Der Rosenkavalier. A few years ago
Miss Della Casa was asked to sing Thc
Empress in The Frau ohne Schauen and
Helen in Die Aegyprische Helena, but she
-in
ing of Rosenkavalier never spun on the
Della Casa turntable until she had mastered all the roles in the opera. "Now."
she adds, "I listen to it often -and love
it." As for her own record making. she
much prefers to sustain the right mood
at the cost of a few minor vocal bobbles
than to patch together a note -perfect
performance without character. This
happily jibes with Decca- London's new
policy of recording opera in long uninterrupted segments. Lisa Della Casa is
convinced that the first "take" is usually
the best, and she recalls in proof thereof
that the version of Strauss's song September engraved on London 5093 was actually made as a test recording.
are in order
for Mark Mooney, Jr., who has devoted
a large part of the February issue of
Tape Recording Magazine to a detailed
history of magnetic recording. Thc
American side of the story gets undue
emphasis, but what's thcrc makes fascinating reading.
CONGRATULATIONS
49
M;ACS 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
Lucia: The Mad Scene
Madama Butterfly
Norma: The Costa Diva
La Sonnambula
"Not every generation can boast a successor to Malibran, Grisi and Jenny Lind.
Ours is fortunate in having La Callas." London Sunday Times (Oct. 20, 1957)
CALLAS
has recorded 14 complete operas
and 3 fabulous aria albums for Angel
Among them
...
...
Puccini: La Bohème
La Scala recording. `There are several good Bohèmes in the catalogue
but Angel's new one challenges the best of them,' Washington D. C. News.
`Astonishing dramatic poignance, voice ravishingly beautiful,' Chicago American
Bellini: La Sonnambula
La Scala recording. Just released. La Divina in one of her most famous roles.
Verdi: Rigoletto
The Callas trill ('comparable to that of Destinn's,' New York Times)
is only one of the many thrills of this Scala recording.
Puccini: Tosca
Prize-winning. `One of the finest opera recordings ever to appear in the United States,' Newsweek.
Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor
Famous Callas performance with the Mad Scene. `Takes one's breath away,' Opera News.
Callas Portrays Puccini Heroines
`The Queen of Opera' in 11 arias from Boheme, Butterfly, Turandot,
Gianni Schicchi, Suor Angelica, Mallon Lescaut.
ANGEL
`Aristocrats of High Fidelity"
Ask your dealer for complete list
At home in Milan
0
Recording for Scala -Angel.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
records in
Reviewed by
PAUL AFFELDER
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
RAY ERICSON
DAVID JOHNSON
NATHAN BRODER
PHILIP C. GERACI
ROBERT CHARLES MARSH
MURRAY SCHUMACH
ROY H. HOOPES, JR.
EDWARD L. RANDAL
CARL MICHAEL STEINBERG
Classical Music
Recitals and Miscellany
Spoken Word
O. B. BRUMMELL
51
64
72
HAROLD C. SCHONBERG
LOHN S. WILSON
World of Entertainment
Folk Music
Fi Man's Fancy
Best of Jazz
76
78
78
80
it to Gilds. The cadenza in the final
R.C.M.
movement is by Beethoven.
BACII: Partitas: No. 5, in G; No. 6, in
E minor; The Well-Tempered Clavier,
Book Il: Fugues: in E, in F sharp
minor
many fiddlers who have recorded these
works. His playing is not as intense as
that of some others, nor are his tempos
as breathtaking; they are, however, sensible and by no means dragging. If the
Siciliano of the Sonata lacks grace, the
great Chaconne has a rhythmic flow it
does not often have. Only Heifetz and
Milstein, it seems to me, are superior
here. Excellent recording.
N.B.
Glenn Could, piano.
COLUMBIA ML 5186.
BEETHOVEN: Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra, No. 4, in G, Op. 58
Although there is hardly a shortage of
recordings of this work, Gnuniaux's clef initely deserves attention. For one thing,
it fills the place of the Szigeti -Walter
version recently deleted from the catalogue, providing an edition in which
tradition and reserved classicism dominate the urge to strike sparks. Not that
either Crumlamc or Van Beinum can be
called dull, but their interest in communicating Beethoven is obviously
greater than their desire to create excitement -which is as it should be.
In my opinion this now is the version
to be preferred. Even though the Heifetz -Munch ( especially in stereo) is sonically superior, Epic's registration transmits everything of importance and projects the soloist with unusually clean
presence.
R.C.M.
CLASSICAL
12 -in.
$3.98.
Young Mr. Gould continues to gratify
with his poetic and imaginative performances of Bach. The flexible and seemingly free weaving of the voices in his
hands is actually possible only with complete control; only when one's fingers
do precisely what one wishes them to
do can embellishments be tossed off so
casually and naturally. Each of the
movements in the Partitas has a definite
character here: the Corrente of No. 6
is capricious, the
of No. 5 have a
Sarabande and Minuet
French elegance and
grace. One might disagree with a tempo
or two ( the Corrente of No. 5 seems too
fast), and the occasional faint humming
by the pianist adds nothing to the aesthetic quality of the music; but on the
whole these are fine readings whose only
near rivals are Tureck's.
N.B.
BACH: Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin, No. 1, in C minor; Partita for
Unaccompanied Violin, No. 2, in D
minor
Ruggiero Ricci, violin.
LONDON LL 1706. 12 -in.
$3.98.
In beauty of tone and in technical address Ricci is near the top among the
MARCH 1958
Emil Gilels, piano; Philharmonia Orchestra, Leopold Ludwig, cond.
ANGEL 35511. 12 -in. $4.98 (or $3.98 ).
The second of the two Beethoven concertos Gilels recorded in London and
the third of his complete edition to appear, this set reflects the merits of the
recently released No. 5. Once more, the
Central European tradition imposes discipline upon a robust Slavic temperament, producing music that has energy
and a sense of spontaneous creativity
without losing touch with the composer's dictates. And again the orchestra
and conductor offer an accompaniment
equal to the soloist's performance. No
one is likely to surpass the Schnabel recordings of this work, two of which are
still in the catalogue, but technically
they are faded. This is one of the best
of the newer editions.
I am puzzled about the first movement
cadenza. The notes say it is Beethoven's,
but it is not the Beethoven cadenza with
which I am familiar, nor can I find it
in my score where, I am told, all Beethoven cadenzas are given. A word from
Angel to clarify this would be welcome,
and until I hear differently I shall credit
BEETHOVEN: Concerto for Violin and
Orchestra, in D, Op. 61
Arthur Grumiaux, violin; Amsterdam
Concertgebouw Orchestra, Eduard van
Beinum, cond.
EPIC LC 3420. 12 -in. $3.98.
BEETHOVEN: Sonatas for Piano: No.
30, in E, Op. 109; No. 31, in A flat,
Op. 110; No. 32, in C minor, Op.
111
George Solchany, piano.
ANGEL 45014. 12-in. $3.98.
The three final Beethoven sonatas on one
record is a bargain package, but part of
Continued on page 54
51
The Tribulations and Triumphs of Fricsay's Fidelio
THE IMPRESSIVE list of singers testifies at once to the seriousness with
which the Deutsche Grammophon Cesellschaft, Decal's source for this album,
approached the task of recording Fidelio.
It is as well they were serious, and not
only because Of the demands the work
itself makes; both Toscanini ( RCA Victor). and Furtwängler ( HMV) had previously recorded Fidelio, and their performances were not of a kind to encourage lighthearted competition. Dec ca's Fidelio was made without benefit
of genius at the helm; and while no
one need be told that Fricsay could
not possibly outdo his more glorious colleagues, it is worth pointing out quite
explicitly that the performance he conducts is a very good one. In spite of its
disappointments, Fricsay's effort is, most
emphatically, not unworthy of Beethoven.
Leonie Rysanek is the most celebrated
Leonore in Europe today. I saw her in
the part in 1955 and still have vivid
recollections not only of an enormous
voice -rich, brilliant, though without
much warmth-but also of the extraordinary ease with which it was produced
and used. i was a little less impressed
with her interpretation of Leonore than
with her singing as such: not much was
conveyed of the mysterious meeting of
the human and the sublime in this
woman, and some weeks later I found
greater rewards in the interpretation of
Cré Brouwenctijn, a much deeper, if
vocally less brilliant, artist. Nevertheless,
my one experience of Rysanek was memorable, and all the greater was my disappointment at finding signs in this recently made recording of alarming vocal
deterioration. Most of the time the
voice is ravaged by tremolo, and the
magnificent control is lost: her singing
in "O namenlose Freude" amounts to
little more than a series of helpless
shrieks. Still, much of her work is compelling, especially in the earlier parts
of the first act. Though Modl (HMV)
has her own vocal shortcomings, mostly
in the nature of breathlessness, the vibrant warmth of her voice and the force
of her diction make her work completely
gripping. This is Leonore! Brampton
( RCA) is almost entirely inadequate.
Häfliger is a tenor with a clear and
sweet voice, a flexible technique, and an
elegant sense of phrase. Although in
America we generally hear heavier and
darker voices sing Florestan, the role
can respond well to a lighter sound. If
I have some reservations about Hidtiger, it is because he seems just a little
sentimental (surely Florestan should
sound proud rather than aggrieved) and
because the end of his aria is more suggestive of the careful tenor than of the
delirious and ecstatic prisoner. Both
Peerce (RCA) and Windgassen (HMV)
are magnificent, the latter even with his
occasional roughness; both are stimulated by working with conductors with
whom they feel more than ordinary rapport.
Fischer- Dieskau is marvelous. The part
engages all of his tremendous dramatic
imagination, while it gives him no opportunities to indulge in the affectations
that spoil some of his lieder singing. One
might not think of his as a Pizarro voice,
and usually a more snarling instrument
is preferred; but the very beauty of it
enables him to suggest in quite an extraordinary way a sense of real psychic
perversion. Janssen (RCA) is a good
Pizarro in a more ordinary way, but
Edelmann ( HMV) is quite a dull one.
Frick is effective as Rocco, Lenz is
a pleasant Jaquino, and the young
American bass Keith Engen is exceptionally imposing as Don Fernando.
Furtwängler also uses Frick, and in the
other parts has Rudolf Schock (the German James Melton ), who is a bit feeble,
and Alfred Poell. In these parts Toscanini
cast Sidor Belarsky, Joseph Laderoute,
and Nicola Moscona- singers of no great
distinction and linguists of spectacular
ineptness. Secfried does well as Altrzelline, not without becoming dangerously
coy once or twice, though neither in
freshness of voice nor in purity of musicianship is she comparable to Jurinac
( HMV) or the Eleanor Steber of 1944
(RCA).
Fricsay's reaching of the score is a bit
on the surface, and his concern with
elegance rather than force does not
Fischer-Dieskau: Pizarro par excellence.
make him an ideal Beethoven conductor. Nevertheless, he achieves some impressive things: the complete suspension
of all motion in the Pizarro-Rocco duet
at the words "Der kaum mehr lebt," the
sense of numbed fear conveyed during
the prisoners' chorus at " Sprecht leise,"
the shaping of the orchestral phrases
surrounding Florestan's "Gott! welch'
Dunkel hicr!," the exciting horn crescendos at the beginning of the Act II quartet. On the other hand, he makes nothing of the richness of detail in Marzelline's aria or of the powerful string figures in the trio "Cut, Söhnchen, gut"
-to pick out two points of conspicuous
failure. There are also frequent difficulties with tempos: the buoyant finale is
?
subjected to so many slight adjustments
of speed before Fernando's entrance
that it makes no effect at all.
The Munich opera orchestra is good
most of the time, but in Leonore's aria
the horns' tone is coarse and the rhythm
poor. The chorus sing well as prisoners,
but unchained they become rhythmless
and toneless shouters.
What this Fidelio does have that the
Toscanini and Furtwängler sets do not
offer is the complete spoken dialogue.
That it is dramatically necessary needs
no demonstration. What is less generally
realized is that the dialogue is musically necessary because the air spaces
between the numbers are part of Beethoven's plan. In one sense, then, Decca
has given us the first real Fidelio (discounting the 1950 Oceanic set, derived
from Leipzig radio tapes, which did have
dialogue but was otherwise of minor interest ). Sonnleithner's and Treitschké s
play is nothing without Beethoven's music; yet it is also true that the music
comes completely into its own only as
part of the design of the play.
I question, however, the wisdom of
assigning the lines to actors rather than
to the singers who would speak them
in the opera house. The device does
not always work well. Borchert's brisk
and rather intellectual sounding Rocco
has nothing to do with the character
Frick sings, and Walter Franck's Pizarro,
while quite effective in an ordinary villainous way, has no points of contact
with Fischer- Dieskau's unique interpretation. It is, moreover, wrong to assume
that good singers cannot handle the
Fide/in dialogue: the accomplishments
of Miidl and Frick in their record of
the grave -digging scene should remove
any doubts on this matter. I happen to
know that Rysanek speaks effectively,
and I am completely certain that confidence in Scefried and Fischer-Dieskau
would not have been misplaced.
The new Fidclio is a serious achievement, not free of serious limitations. The
sound is well captured, but the pressing
I heard suffers from the worst case of
groove echo 1 can recall. Out of deference to a silly, arty idea about the
format, the libretto is so arranged that
the German and English texts cannot
be read simultaneously.
CARL. MICHAEL STEINBERG
BEETHOVEN: Fidelio
Leonie Rysanek (s), Leonore; Irmgard
Surfried (s), slurzelline; Ernst Hälliger
(t), Florestan; Friedrich Lenz (t),
Jaquino; Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (b),
Don Pizarro; Gottlob Frick (bs), Rocco;
Keith Engen (bs ), Don Fernando. (Dialogue: Anne Kersten, Leonore; Ruth
Hellberg, Marzelline; Siegtnar Schneider, Florestan; Wolfgang Spier, Jaquino;
Walter Franck, Don Pizarro; Wilhelm
Borchert, Rocco.) Chorus of the Bavarian State Opera, Bavarian Stute Orchestra (Munich), Ferenc Fricsay, cond.
DECCA DXH 147. Two 12-in.
$9.96.
HIGA FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
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y.
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_
,
,
_.
,
y.
NEW MERCURY RECORD RELEASES:
CH TIME EASTMAN WIND ENSEMBLE. FENNELL. M050170
(B) REBPIGHI THE BIRDS: BRAZILIAN IMPRESSIONS.
LONDON SYMPHONY, DORATI. MG50153
(C)
BRAHMS VARIATIONS
ON A THEME BY HAYDN. OP. 56Á;
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53
the price in this case is a trio of unusually fast performances. At the brisk pace
Solchany sets, the slow movements
really never are very slow and the fast
passages become extremely quick. My
own preferences are for a more orthodox
and penetrating point of view, but these
performances are consistently achieved
in terms of their interpretative scheme
and are undeniably exciting. Those who
are more familiar with middle-period
Beethoven may find Solchany s versions
a more readily accessible entré to the
composer's later music than the Back haus. Schnabel, Petri editions which I
regard as more convincing.
R.C.M.
BEETHOVEN: Sonata for Violin and
Piano, No. 7, in C minor, Op. 30, No.
2 -See Mozart: Sonata for Violin and
Piano, No. 24, in F, K. 376.
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3, in E
flat, Op. 55 ("Eroica ")
Minneapolis Symphony, Antal Dorati,
cond.
12 -in. $4.98.
MERCURY MC 50141.
Apart from some willfulness in interpretation (the exaggerated detachment of
the staccato notes of the first violins in
bars 408 -18 of the finale), this is an
almost bluntly straightforward performance with the usual merits and flaws of
such an approach.
But where slid they locate the microphone? In loud passages, the tr pets
and timpani dominate the ensemble.
Indeed, whenever the timpani are playing. they provide most of the low tones,
blanketing the sound of the double
basses. Except in very lightly scored
passages, the details of the wind parts
are unclear; and the strings almost always have a reduced, "off -mike" sound,
as if Dorati were using only about five
first violins. Thehorns are generally hard
to pick out, with the vital horn solo at the
recapitulation of the first movement indistinct even at a high level.
The upshot is a disc that is not competitive with the fine Klemperer, Jochum,
and Markevitch sets.
R.C. \I.
BEETHOVEN: Trio No. 7, in B flat, Op.
97 ("Archduke ")
Emil Gilds, piano; Leonid Kogan, violin;
Mstislty Rostropovich, cello.
Mos rron MC 2010. 12 -in. $4.98.
This is an excellent tape of a splendid
performance. If, as it appears, it was
made by Soviet engineers, nothing could
be more welcome news for discophiles,
since there is an abundance of interesting music in the U.S.S.R. that out-ofdate recording methods have been unable to transmit to the rest of the world.
This i. a "three million ruble" trio of
superlative artists, all of whom have
been introduced to American audiences.
Their performance is the best modern
version of the score available, representing, as the best of the past have donc,
sensitive collaboration at the highest
Iced.
R.C.M.
BRAHMS: Lieder
Vier ernste Gesänge, Op. 121; Treue
Liebe, Op. 7, No. 1; Am Sonntag Morgen,
Op. 49, No. 1; Auf dem Kirchhofe, Op.
105, No. 4; Wie Melodien zieht es, Op.
105, No. 1; Alte Liebe, Op. 72, No. 1;
Bei dir sind meine Gedanken, Op. 95, No.
2; Wir wandelten, Op. 96, No. 2; Dein
blaues Auge, Op. 59, No. B.
Kirsten Flagstad, soprano; Edwin McArthur, piano.
Loxuov LL 5319. 12-in. $4.98.
If ever Flagstad was miscast, it is in the
"Four Serious Songs." She sings in what
is essentially a glorious monotone: that
is, with an extraordinary fullness of voice
employed with little dynamic variety.
The one time she does convey some
temperament in interpretation, in the
fourth song of the cycle, she makes the
music sound \Vagnerian -all but a Tod csverkündigung. While we can all marvel at the state of preservation of Flag stad's glorious voice, she is a long way
from the full meaning of the music. ( She
sings the first two songs in the correct
key and transposes the last two a semitone down.) Fischer-Dieskau remains the
most convincing exponent of the music on LP.
In the other Brahms songs on the reverse, Flagstad is impressive but overpowering: too much so for the delicate
lyricism of Auf dom Kirchhofe and Wir
wandelten, to mention but two. H.C.S.
BRAHMS: Variations on a theme of
Haydn, Op. 58a; Academic Festival
Overture, Op. 80; Tragic Overture,
Op. 81
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans
Knappertsbusch, cond.
LONDON LL 1752. 12-in.
$3.98.
If you want a deliberate, large-scale
reading of Brahms, Knappertsbusch is
your man. He is as unhurried as Gibraltar. At the end of the Academic Festival
Overture, where Brahms writes "macstoso," you get a maestoso that's really
maestoso and no nonsense about it. The
Haydn Variations unfold spaciously and
somewhat unexcitingly. No sins of commission or omission are present; but we
seem to have been brought up on a
more nervous kind of conducting, and
Knappertsbusch's disinclination to push
his players along may make the interpretation sound too thick for some listeners. On the other hand, listeners brought
up in a different tradition may espedaily appreciate this perfonnance. The
Tragic Overture receives an unexpectedly turbulent workout, though even
here Knappertsbusch ends up with considerably less tension than his vigorous
beginning would seem to foreshow. Fine
recorded sound.
H.C.S.
BUXTEHUDE: Cantatas: Alles, was ihr
tut; Was mich auf dieser Welt betrübt; Misaa brevis; Magnificat in D
Helen Boatwright, Janet Wheeler, sopranos; Russell Oberlin, countertenor;
Charles Bressler, tenor; Paul Matthen,
54
bass; Cantata Singers; String Orchestra,
Alfred Mann, cond.
U8ANia UR 8018. 12 -in. $3.98.
This disc, billed as a "250th anniversary
program" ( Buxtehude died in 1707),
offers four representative compositions of
varying types. Alles, was ihr tut is mostly
simple, songlike, and chordal; in the
Mass, on the other hand, the outstanding
trait is smooth, flowing counterpoint, Pal estrinian in texture, though not in tonality. In Was rnich auf dieser Welt betrübt-a cantata for soprano, two violins, and continuo -the soprano sings
three verses with continuo; the fiddles
play a ritornd before, Ietween, and
after the verses. In the Magnificat, solo
voices alternate with the chorus. All four
works are kvely and unpretentious, and
all are written with a skill that makes
Bach's admiration of this master understandable. Mrs. Boatwright, the solo soprano, as usual turns in a first-class job,
and the other soloists and the chorus are
all competent. I found it necessary to
turn up the bass considerably in order
to deepen the otherwise rather shallow
sound.
N.B.
FALLA:
Noches en los iardines de
España-See Rodrigo: Concerto for
Guitar and Orchestra.
GRANADOS: Danzas
37 ( complete)
Españolas, Op.
Eduardo del Pucyn, piano.
Eric LC 3423. 12-in. $3.98.
Somc months ago Capitol brought out a
disc of Smnetana's Czech Dances and
Polkas, played by Rudolf Firkusny, that
was sheer delight. Here is the equivalent
in the Spanish idiom. These twelve
Spanish Dances, composed at intervals
throughout Cranados' life and published
in four vol es, are vignettes in that
they do not have the breadth and complexity of Albéniz's Iberia or Granados'
own Goyescas, for instance. But they do
avoid the dripping Victorian sentimentality found in so many equivalent collections of Spanish music of that period.
Granados is sometimes light but, in these
pieces, seldom trite. He was an original
and fertile melodist, had a rich harmonic
sense, and -as one of the better pianists
of his time ( his dates are 1867-1918 )he was perfectly familiar with the resources of the instrument.
These dances, intensely national in
character, are rhytl
attractive, and
evocative. They are played extremely
well by Del Pueyo, who, on the basis of
this record ( and also the Iberia he
recorded about two years ago ), appears
to be a fine technician and a thoughtful
artist. His style is on the massive side,
but he has taste and he carefully refrains from overbalancing his interpretations on the louder side of the dynamic
scheme. Of several prior recordings of
these (lances, only Alicia de Larrocha, on
a Decca disc, challenges him. She is perhaps a bit more flexible and subtle; he
excitehas more strength and rhytl
Continued on page 56
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
NEW RED SEAL ALBUMS FROM
RCA VICTOR RECORDS FOR
efor)
1
RCAVICTOR
Brahms
POPS CAVIAR
ARTHUR FIEDLER
DOUBLE CONCERTO
ARTURO TOSCANINI
BOSTON POPS ORCHESTRA
/
NBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
BLOCH /SCHELOMO
WALTON CONCERTO FOR
PRINCE IGOR OVERTURE
POLOVETZIAN DANCES
RUSSIAN EASTER OVERTURE
IN THE STEPPES OF CENTRAL ASIA
VIOLONCELLO ANO ORCHESTRA
GREGOR PIATIGORSKY, 'CELLO.
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCH, MUNCH
\1 -2109
The master 'cellist performs the brilliant
concerto composed for him by Walton
a record première
and Bloch's Scltrlomo. New Orthophonic High Fidelity
1.
-
-
LM -2178
LM -2202
Never before available on Long Play,
this historic performance of the Brahms
Double Concerto once again affirms the
unique artistic powers of Toscanini.
Borodin's swirling rhythms and the rich
harmonies of Rimsky- Korsakoff, performed by the Boston Pops in exciting.
New Orthophonic High Fidelity.
RCAVICTOR
Prokofieff
Lieutenant Kije
Stravinsky
Song of the Nightingale
Reiner
Chicago
Symphony
NIGHTS '
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ARTUR RUBINSTEIN
SAN FRANCISCO
SYMPHONY
ENRIQUE JORDA
h
1:
LM -2150
LM -2181
A dazzling interpretation of two modern classics born of the Russian tradition.
A recording triumph that sets new standards in high fidelity sound reproduction!
Falla's colorful impressions for piano
and orchestra, and a Rubinstein recital
of solo piano compositions by Albeniz,
Falla, Granados, and N'Iompou.
(Save -on- Records Selection)
LN I -6056
The glorious voice of the great Caruso
at its peak. 30 selections, including best loved arias from Aida, 1 Pagliacci, Carmen, and La Bol:?me on two L.P.'s.
THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE ON
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55
1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
ment. Both performances are worth having. The new disc has a slight edge in
H.C.S.
recorded sound.
MILHAUD: Vocal Miscellany
Janine Micheau, soprano; Orchestre dc
la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire de Paris, Darius Milhaud, cond.
12 -in. $4.98 (or $3.98).
ANGEL 35441.
Milhaud's vocal music has been most
inadequately represented on records, but
this collection should go far toward correcting that inadequacy. It also should
go far toward correcting the all too prevalent notion that Milhaud's style does
not change.
First is the Cantate Nuptiale, a setting of four passages from the Song of
Sangs, written in 1937 for the golden
wedding of the composer's parents. It
brings out the pastoral, Provençal aspect
of Milhaud's imagination in an especially tender and cloquent fonn. Next
is
the
Quatre
Chansons dc
Ronsard,
which was composed for Lily Pons. This
is the virtuoso Milhaud, baroque, ornate,
effervescent, and inclined toward South
American Glance rhythms. The cycle
called Les Quatre Elémcnts is the elegant, fluid Milhaud one meets most often
in the string quartets. The last cycle in
the collection, Fontaines et Sources, belongs with the rugged, dramatic, robust
Milhaud of the symphonies.
In addition to these four song cycles,
the disc provides two short, quiet, tuneful arias from the opera Bolivar. The
performances are, of course, completely
authoritative, and the recording is first
class.
A.F.
MOZART: Sonata for Violin and Piano,
No. 24, in F, K. 378
Beethoven: Sonata for Violin and Piano,
No. 7, in C minor, Op. 30, No. 2
1
Leonid Kogan, violin; Gregory Ginsburg,
piano (in the Mozart ); Andrei Mitnik,
piano (in the Beethoven).
MoNrron MC 2011. 12 -in. $4.98.
In the Mozart Kogan has no serious competition in the current catalogue; in the
Beethoven he is up against the recent
Cntmiaux- Haskil edition on Epic. Since
the Mozart is a lovely sonata and beautifully played, this side alone is justification for acquiring the record. The Beethoven, however, is stated with equal
force and authority, performed somewhat more solidly than Gr-minus's version but retaining sensitivity. The piano
recording has a somewhat barrel -like
resonance in the Beethoven that makes
Haskil's accompaniment preferable, but
the engineering in the Mozart (presumably made at another session) is entirely
acceptable.
R.C.M.
OFFENBACH: Cafté Parisienne
Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra,
Felix Slatkin, tond.
CArrroL PAO 8405. 12 -in. $4.98.
Cuité Parisienne- light, frothy, highly
rhythmic, and brilliantly orchestrated
from various works of Offenbach -is per-
58
feet grist for the high -fidelity mill. Its
hi -fi aspects are certainly accentuated
here in a stunning display of sonic virtues. There have been a number of
glittering Caltés before but none that
shine as brightly as this from one end
of the tonal spectrum to the other. Capitol is amply justified in calling this disc
a "High Fidelity Showpiece "; and besides adorning the jacket with the usual
high -kicking cancan girls, it has included
some unusually sane and helpful guiding notes by Charles Fowler on what
to expect from your reproducing equipment while playing this record.
About the physical sound, then, I cannot cavil, but I must take a few exceptions to Slatkin's interpretation of the
music. There are times when he seems
to forget his locale. His tempos become
Am, and unduly weighty, especially in
the waltz movements, and his numerous
retards tend to convert this Offenbach
potpourri into a Gatti: Viennoise. Never theless, Slatkin manages to retain enough
of the light -hearted spirit in the work
to keep his version at or near the top
of the list.
P.A.
ganini wrote originally for violin and
guitar. It is well played, but not recorded with the clarity accorded the
P.A.
concerto.
PAGANINI: Concerto for Violin and Or-
RIMSKY- KORSAKOV: Christmas Ere:
Suite; Sadko, a Musical Picture; Flight
of the Bumble Bee; Dubinushka
chestra, No. 1, in E flat, Op. 6; Cantabile in D, Op. 17
Leonid Kogan, violin; Orchestre de la
Société Iles Concerts du Conservatoire
de Paris, Charles Bruck, cond. (in the
Concerto); Leonid Kogan, violin; Andrei
Mitnik, piano (in the Cantabile).
ANGEL 35502.
l2-in. $4.98 (or $3.98).
Of the seven extant recorded versions of
the Paganini Concerto (often referred to
as the D major ), this is the first to present in its entirety the orchestral exposition in the first movement. Add to
this the unidentified cadenza that Kogan
employs at the end of this same movement, and you have a performance of
the first movement that alone takes as
long as most readings of the whole concerto. This difficult cadenza, in fact, with
its numerous double- stops, is one of the
longest I have ever encountered anywhere, running to nearly five minutes.
Lest the foregoing remarks suggest
that I am not favorably inclined towards
this disc, let me hasten to add that Kogan
gives an altogether commanding account
of the concerto. His tone is big, finn, and
pleasing, and it is obvious from the
very beginning that he believes in what
he is playing. Perhaps he treats the music with more solidity and less froth than
do most of his competitors, but there is
nothing wrong in such an approach.
And if, on the technical side, be is
slightly off pitch in two or three doublestops, this should be no real cause for
complaint in an otherwise noteworthy
and note -perfect interpretation. Bruck,
on the other hand, might have laid a
slightly less heavy hand upxm the accompanifient in the tutti passages, lightening instead of emphasizing Paganinïs
unnecessarily full scoring. From the
standpoint of reproduction, the lustrous
sound here virtually puts to shame all
other recordings of the work.
Appended as an encore is a serenadelike Cantabile, n charming trifle that Pa-
The Love for Three
Oranges: Suite, Op. 33a; Scythian
Suite, Op. 20
PROKOFIEV:
London Symphony Orchestra, Antal Dorati, cond.
MERCURY MC 50157.
12-in. $4.98.
Dorati offers strongly rhythmed interpretations of these two relatively early but
nonetheless important Prokofiev scores.
His forward drive is more forcefully effective In the balletic Scythian Suite,
with its barbaric measures so closely related to those of its immediate predecesStravinsky 's Sacre du printemps,
than in the subtler, sardonically witty
excerpts (roin The Love for Three Oranges. Taken as a whole, though, these
are most acceptable presentations of both
works, well executed and cleanly, vibrantly reproduced.
P.A.
sor,
Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Ernest
Ansermet, cond.
LONDON LL 1733.
12 -in. $3.98.
As a companion piece to Ansermet's recent excursion into Rimsky-Korsakov
(London LL 1835), this offering makes
for very grateful listening. Most of the
nutsic is esoteric, but Rimsky has the
faculty of making friends with his listeners quickly. The suite from the opera
Christmas Eve. presumably arranged by
the composer himself, contains a brilliant
polonaise ( reminiscent of the one in Eugen Onegin) and a witches' sabbath to
challenge comparison with Mussorgsky
and leave \tendelssohn and Gounod
trailing in the dust. The "musical picturc" Sadko is not a suite taken from
the opera, but an early symphonic study
upon which Rimsky drew for the mid-
dle scenes of that mammoth work. Now
that the fine Bolshoi Theater performance of Sadko is no longer available,
Ansermet's glittering reading of its progenitor is no unwelcome substitute.
Dubinushka ('The Little Oak Stick "),
Rimsky's rousing but rather blatant orchestration of a tune much favored by
the young revolutionaries of 1905, gets
here its first LP performance, although
in the days of 78s it could boast versions
by Kousscvitzky and Fabien Sevitzky.
As for the Bumble Bee's Flight, it was
originally designed neither for fife, harmonica, nor banjo, but for full symphony
orchestra. Ansermet and the Suisse Romande Orchestra prove this fact in sixty one dazzling seconds.
The cover is a woeful example of that
chic pornography which appears to be
making the rounds of the art departments of the recording industry like an
endemic disease. Not so much offensive
as pathetic.
D.J.
Continued on page 58
I-ACTT FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Guardians of music's
THE GENTLEMEN ABOVE are members of Capitol
Records' famed record -rating "jury." Their job
is to pass judgment on every classical album
Capitol produces.
Like jurors everywhere, Capitol's jurymen have
been given their "instructions."
When they decide that an exceptional performance has been flawlessly recorded by Capitol's
creative staff and sound engineers -they then
best -kept
promise
permit the "Full Dimensional Sound" symbol to
be placed on the upper right hand corner of the
album cover.
It's the biggest promise in the smallest space in
all music.
Play a "Full Dimensional Sound" album next
time you are shopping for records. Hear how
jealously the 'guardians' above protect music's
best -kept promise.
Incomparable High Fidelity -Full Dimensional Sound Albums
MARCH
1958
57
RODRIGO: Concerto for Guitar and
Orchestra
}Falla: Noches en los jardines de Espacia
Narciso Yepes, guitar (in the Rodrigo);
Gonzalo Soriano, piano (in the Falla );
National Orchestra of Spain, Ataulfo Argenta, cond.
LONDON LL 1738. 12 -in. $3.98.
To play the guitar successfully with an
orchestra," Andres Segovia told me recently, "you must have a good, modest
conductor!" The late Ataulfo Argenta
conspicuously qualifies under Segovia's
requirements, since guitarist Yepes here
A New
-
SCHUBERT, Trios for Piano and
Strings: No. 1, in B flat, Op. 99; No.
2. in E flat, Op. 100
Felix Galimir, violin; Laszlo Varga, cello;
Istvan Nidíts, piano.
PERIOD SPL 735.
12-in. $4.98.
These lovely performances are seriously
marred, at least for the devout Schubertian, by an almost total neglect of
repeats and, what is more serious, two
cuts in the finale of the E flat Trio
amounting to 129 bars. By such means
Period manages to get both trios (over
an hour of music, despite the cuts) onto
Continued on page 60
Turandot, With a Full Measure of Faults and Felicities
TURANDOT occupied Puccini from
1920 until his death from a longneglected throat cancer in 1924. Containing both some of Puccini's most exciting writing and many of his greatest
failures, the opera was submitted to the
indignity of completion by the inadequate Franco Alfano, whose conclusion
manages to be at once perfunctory and
vulgar. Turandot succeeds best where
it is most new. The creation of a fairytale world, the invention of a highly
original pseudo- Oriental language, and
above all the psychological exploration
of a woman whose trouble is her repressed love ( how different from the
earlier Puccini heroines! ) -all this is handled with skill and confidence. Turandot
has pages as good as any in Puccini's
masterpieces, Gianni Schicchi and Il
Tabarro. But just as Gianni Schicchi is
marred by "O mio babbino caro," both
its most "popular" and its most popular
number, so Turandot suffers from its
constant lapses into the Puccini style of
the 1890s.
Puccini was willing to come to terms
with modern music. While he could not
possibly have absorbed Schoenbers s
Pierrot Lunaire into his own aesthetic
system, he seems to have respected and
understood the work when he heard it
in Florence soon after the war. And in
its own way, Il Tabarro is thoroughly
contemporary, not only in its sound surface but in its tightly integrated harmonic plan. In Turandot, Puccini, perhaps already fatigued by oncoming disease or discouraged by the relatively
slight success of 11 Tabarro, seems to
have been afraid of his own courage.
From the powerful concentration of the
opening scene, there is the disastrous
drop into Liù's "Signore, ascolta!' and
Calafs "Non piangere Liìa." We are
back with "Che gelida manina' and
"Mt chiamano Mimi." The later pieces
are not as pretty, but they do contain
all the mannerisms of text declamation,
harmony, and orchestration that were
established in Manon Lescaut thirty
years before. Worse is the failure of
Puccini's attempts at the grandiose.
Nothing is more embarrassing than the
impotence of the big "Dieci mila anni"
chorus, a most dreary Pomp and Circum-
58
receives an accompaniment that seems
just about ideal.
Joaquin Rodrigo's concerto is a gay
and unusually attractive piece. 1 have
found myself playing it just for fun
which doesn't often happen with review
records. The Falla is the only version
with Spanish pianist, orchestra, and conductor. The result is the best account of
the score available, although the Novaes
remains a more powerful account of the
solo part. In the new one, however, one
finds a unity of approach that is essential for the full realization of the impressionistic character of the music.
Well engineered, this is an outstanding record all around.
R.C.M.
.stance alla cinese. Still, Turandot has
its contingent of admirers, including
those who love it for the wrong reasons,
i.e. to show their superiority to the man
whose ideal is Bohème and Butterfly.
Those who are interested in Turandot,
and it is by no means a work to be ignored or rejected in toto, should be very
much pleased with the new recording.
Callas and Turandot: a perfect match
of singer and role! Callas has here her
usual limitations of a harsh and wobbly
sound above A, but nonetheless she is
a superb Turandot. Fernandi is a new
Schwarzkopf and Callas
tenor, and though the role of Calaf is
not very illuminating about a singer, he
seems from this evidence to be far and
away the best tenor to come out of
Italy in years. His voice is not only
powerful, but warm and beautiful as
well. The supporting gentlemen could
not have been better chosen. I was interested to hear the parts of the three
Ministers of the Imperial Household
sung "straight" as they probably were in
the original Toscanini production of
1926. Their trios are a little long to
sustain the nasal manner usually
adopted, and the three very fine character singers in this recording show that
Puccini's music is quite adequate to its
task here without the exaggerations that
have become traditional.
Veteran collectors of opera recordings
will remember the name of Giuseppe
Nessi, who appeared on more than a
dozen of the complete operas made in
Milan for Columbia and HMV during
the 20s and 30s. He must have provided
La Scala with many fine Parpignols,
Remendados, et al., and he even figures
in the history of Turandot as the creator
of the role of Pang. As the ancient Emperor Altoum here, he produces exactly
the right feeble quaver.
The inclusion of Schwarzkopf in this
cast cannot have resulted from a serious
attempt to answer the question "Who
is the singer best suited to the part of
Liù?" No doubt there were compelling
reasons for this bizarre decision, but the
customer can only feel cheated at being
offered a Liù who sings with a German accent and who has to drive her
naturally lovely voice into petulant
shrillness in order to make herself heard
among her strenuous colleagues. I am
sorry to say that I can only characterize
Schwarzkopf's participation as a disaster, both for herself and for what is
otherwise an unusually distinguished recording.
Serafin is a more than competent
guide through Puccini's somewhat disorganized score, and he gets beautiful
sounds from the Scala chorus and orchestra. Recording and accompanying
notes are up to Angel's high standards.
There is a recording of Turandot on
London, and its great glory is Tebaldï s
well-nigh perfect Liù. However, neither
the Turandot of Inge Borkh nor the
Calaf of Mario del Monaco can equal
what is offered on Angel.
CARL MICHAEL STEINBERG
PUCCINI: Turandot
( s), Turandot;
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (s), Liù; Eugenio Femandi (t), Calaf; Giuseppe
Nessi (t ), Emperor Altoum; Renato
Ercolani (t), Pang; Piero di Palma (t ),
Pong, Prince of Persia; Mario Borriello
(b ), Ping; Giulio Mauri (bs -b ), Mandarin; Nicola Zaccaria (bs ), Timur;
Chorus and Orchestra of Teatro alla
Scala (Milan), Norberto Mola, chorus
master, Tullio Serafin, cond.
ANGEL 3571 C /L. Three 12-in. $15.94.
Maria Meneghini Callas
HIGH
FIDEL=
MAGAZINE
STERN
DOUBLE BILL
Isaac Stern, who hails from
San Francisco, made his
Carnegie Hall debut on January
12, 1943 -the first and only
major violinist to have been
entirely American -trained.
Since then, happy box -office
personnel have been proudly
posting the SRO signs every
time he picks up his
250 -year -old Guarnerius violin.
Equally at home in Baroque,
Classical, Romantic and
Modern works, Stern, who is
of Russian origin, has a
particular affinity for modern
Russian music. His warm,
succulent tone and ear -dazzling
technique are just what is
needed to bring to life such
scores as the two Prokofiev
concertos. His performances
of them reveal him at his
faultless best.
PROKOFIEV: Concerto No. 1 in
D Major for Violin and Orchestra
-Isaac Stern, violinist
The New York Philharmonic,
-
Dimitri Mitropoulos, conductor;
Concerto No. 2 in G Minor
for Violin and Orchestra
The New York Philharmonic,
Leonard Bernstein, conductor.
ML 5243 $3.98
-
BLUES -OPERA
19th -CENTURY
PUBLICITY STUNT
Devotees of the piano music of
Beethoven have been noticeably
happier of late. The reason
a treasury of new recordings by
Rudolf Serkin, whose Beethoven
interpretations are undisputed
cornerstones of recorded piano
literature. His latest
undertaking: a set of variations
by Beethoven on a theme of
Diabelli. In 1823, the story
goes, an upstart composer publisher named Diabelli went
looking for a set of variations.
Theme in hand, he approached
Beethoven, Schubert, even the
11- year-old Franz Liszt. The
venture smacked of a publicity
stunt to promote the Diabelli
publishing house. But the
prettiness of the waltz tune
apparently stuck in Beethoven's
mind and tempted him. When
he sat down to it, he turned out
a grand total of thirty -three
variations -more than Diabelli
asked for or wanted. With
reason they have been called
the greatest set of variations
ever created for the piano.
BEETHOVEN: Variations on a
Theme by Diabelli- Rudolf
Serkin, pianist.
ML 5246 $3.98
-
WALTZ
PROS
Tchaikovsky and Strauss! You
may wonder what kind of
combination this is or what the
poet of the Lonely Heart has in
common with the Waltz King
of the Vienna of Franz Josef.
Just this -in three -quarter
time these two men are the
champs. Strauss is the
unchallenged expert in the
ballroom, while Tchaikovsky
has fashioned a host of the
most delicate and danceable
ballet waltzes-in the world.
Intermingled, and sumptuously
served up by Eugene Ormandy
and the Philadelphia
Orchestra, their waltzes serve
as a perfect foil for each other.
Ormandy and his men evoke
both the glitter and brilliance
of old Vienna and the sylphlike
grace of a Russian ballerina.
THE WONDERFUL WALTZES OF
TCHAIKOVSKY AND STRAUSS.
Waltz from Swan Lake Ballet,
Emperor Waltz, Waltz from
Serenade for Strings, Waltz
from Sleeping Beauty Ballet,
Blue Danube, Waltz of the
flowers, Roses from the South.
The Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy, conductor.
The exciting new music by
Harold Arlen is a suite of 17
selections, each drawn from a
larger work, "Blues- Opera."
whose world premiere is
scheduled to represent American music at the World's Fair
in Brussels this spring. A look
at the score shortly after the
opera was completed so fired
Andre Kostelanetz' admiration
for its freshness and lyricism
and authentically American
vigor that he urged an
orchestral suite be made from
it. Arlen was agreeable and
together they selected the
music for this suite. Thus, not
only do we have Mr. K. to thank
for an extremely engaging
performance of this music
with the New York Philharmonic.
but also for starting the ball
rolling. And once again we have
evidence of Kostelanetz'
enthusiasm for the outstanding
music of our time.
HAROLD ARLEN: Blues- Opera.
Andre Kostelanetz and his
orchestra.
CL 1099 $3.98
10" ANNIVERSARY
OF
LONG PLAYING RECORDS
COLUMBIA ' RECORDS
ML 5238 $3.98
"LISTEN IN
DEPTH"
ON COLUMBIA
PHONOGRAPHS
THE SOUND OF
GENIUS IS ON
COLUMBIA RECORDS
D,nson of CBS x " ColumDLi
Pncea are suggested list.
A
Still Only $3.98
www.americanradiohistory.com
"
.
&+
Morus
Avalable in Canada at sightly higher prices.
Reg
n
single disc. All rival versions devote
an entire LP to each work. Convenience
and economy aren't sufficient compensation for those who glory in Schubert's
"divine length" and demand every note
of it. But the playing of Calimir, Varga,
and Midis almost is. In the Opus 99
these three gentlemen come close to
equaling the classic Rubinstein- HeifetzFeuer mann version (RCA Victor LVT
1000) and they are perhaps unrivaled
in the Opus 100, although such names
as Busch, Serkin, Schneider, and Casals
are In the field. Their playing is characterized by an exquisite delicacy and a
perfect ensemble: all three are formidable virtuosos, but they turn this fact
into an advantage instead of a pitfall.
The balance of sound is slightly in
favor of cello and piano, but it may be
equalized by boosting the treble a bit.
D.J.
SIBELIUS: King Christian
11, Op. 27:
Orchestral Suite; The Tempest, Op.
109: Suite
Stockholm Radio Orchestra, Stig Westerberg, cond.
\VEsrauxs-ren X\VN 18529. 12 -in. $4.98.
We have on this disc one of the first
as well as the last sets of incidental
music by the late Finnish master. The
music for King Christian 11, a play written by Sibelius' friend Adolf Paul, is
roughly contemporaneous with Finlandia,
but it is entirely different. Though the
Sibelius stamp is on it, it has ample
drama without much of the brooding
Northern quality that was to come with
the later works. In its complete fonn it
Elégic,
comprises seven movements:
Musette, Minuet, Fool's Song, Nocturne,
Serenade, and Ballade. Of these, only
five are included here: Nocturne, Elégic, Musette, Serenade, and Ballade, in
that order. These movements were once
available on 78s issued many years ago
by Odeon In Europe, but this marks their
first, and most welcome, appearance on
microgroove.
Some of the music for Shakespeare's
Tempest was also once to he had on
older -speed discs, but until now only a
poor performance of the Berceuse had
invaded the LP catalogues. Of the Prelude and seventeen other numbers included by Sibelius in two suites, eleven
of the latter may be heard here, arranged
in a different order for better concert
balance. From the Suite No. 1, there are
the Humoreske, Caldron's Song, Scene,
Berceuse, and The Storm; from the
Suite No. 2, the Chorus of the Winds,
Intermezzo, Dance of the Nymphs,
Pr spero, Miranda, and The Naiads. Together with Tapiola, written about the
same time (1925), the Tempest music
was the last known orchestral creation
to come from Sibelius' pen. With its
wide range of moods, from the fierceness
of The Storm to the quiet delicacy of
Miranda, it constitutes one of his finest,
most acutely sensitive creations and, in
the opinion of Cecil Cray, the finest
theater music ever written.
Our thanks, then, to Stig Westerberg
and to Westminster for making all this
available to us, together with a wish
that the rest of both King Christian 11
and The Tempest may soon be forthP A.
coming.
STRAVINSKY: Fire Bird: Suite; P6trouchka: Suite
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Leopold
Stokowski, annd.
CAPITOL PAO 8407.
12 -in.
$4.98.
An amusing parlor game for seasoned
discophiles might be to try to figure out
how many different recordings Leopold
Stokowski has made of the Fire Bird
Suite. Some of them have been extremely good (I am thinking particularly of the second one with the Philadelphians, recorded on 78s during the
Late Thirties), while one or two showed
certain interpretative eccentricities.
This newest version is the strangest
of all One wonders, first of all, why,
of all the orchestras in the world, Stokowski should have chosen a German
one. The players sound as if they are
addressing the n :' for the first time:
the tone is often ponderous; and there
are several fluffed pasauges, especially
in the brasses. Add to this an exceptionally long reverberation interval in the
hall, for which the engineers have not
compensated, and the result is a sound
that is often blurred by overlapping
echoes. Stokowski performs the Fire Bird
Suite as scored; but there is little or no
subtlety in his conception, and he is inclined to overaccentuate certain voices,
thereby throwing everything out of balance. This is particularly disturbing in
the finale, where a series of glissandi in
the horns is pushed to the foreground
with disconcertingly raucous effect.
Pítrouchka fares no better. Also recorded by Stokowski on several previous occasions -and quite well, too-it
receives this time a tl
ping rendition
that completely misses either the carnival spirit or the tragic pathos intended
by the composer.
P.A.
SUPPE: Overtures
Light Cavalry; Jolly Robbers; Morning,
Noon and Night in Vienna; Poet and
Peasant; The Beautiful Galatea; Pique
Dame.
Halle
Orchestra,
Sir
John
Barbirolli,
cond.
MERCURY
MC 50100.
12-in.
$4.98.
It's easy to condemn the overtures of
Franz von Suppé as old -hat, but an encounter with this disc is likely to alter
the attitude of even the most jaded listener. Barbirolli and his men play this
music as if they believe in it, imparting
to it both dignity and excitement. Their
performances have a wonderful combination of rapierlike sharpness and commanding stature. \lercurys reproduction is well focused, and never too loud
or raspy, as has sometimes been the
case. Henry Krips and the Philharmonia
gave us an altogether splendid collection of Suppé overtures on Angel a few
months back, but the present record is
even better.
P.A.
60
TCHAIKOVSKY: The Sleeping Beauty,
Op. 68 (excerpts)
London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre
Monteux, cond.
RCA Vieron LM 2177. 12 -in. $4.98.
The London Symphony is not up to its
best in parts of this recording. The string
work is decidedly sloppy in the Pas
d'Action from Act I. The brasses blare
unrestrainedly when they get the opportunity -and Monteux gives them it
too often -thereby effacing such delicate details as the flute countermelody
in the recapitulation of the waltz. But
there can be no doubt that British orchestras have a genius for Tchaikovsky
ballet music. The Philharmonia has
proven this on Angel and the Royal
Opera Orchestra on RCA Victor. The
sound, when it is not overwhelming. is
admirable.
D.J.
TOMKINS: Miscellany
Vol. I: Musica Deo Sacra; Vol.
and Consort Music.
II:
Songs
The Ambrosian Singers; The In Nomine
Players, Denis Stevens, cond.
Exl'Enmsces ANONYMES EA 0027/28.
Two 12 -in. $4.98 each.
Thomas Tomkins (1572-16.58), organist
at \Vorcestcr Cathedral for most of his
life, was one of the extraordinarily gifted
group of composers that flourished in
England in the first half of the seventeenth century. From his Musica Deo
Sacra, a large collection of pieces for
the Anglican liturgy, we have here five
anthems, a psalm, part of a verse service, and three organ voluntaries. These
are all well made, serious, dignified
works. I was particularly struck by the
noble and rich-textured Thou Art My
King, the very moving Then David
Mourned, and the lovely Voluntary in A.
Vol. 11 contains ten polyphonic songs
and four instnamental pieces, played here
by a group of strings. The level of quality is high here, too. S
of the madrigals, in their expressive gravity, make
one think of Tomkins' friend John
Dowland; others are quite gay. Among
the latter is Adieu, Ye City- Prisoning
Towers, which in sense and spirit would
make a suitable theme song for the vacationer -in -the- country. Of the instrumental pieces, the Pavan in F is a
beauty, and the one in A minor hardly
less fine.
The singers here are not especially
outstanding individually, but together
they make an excellent ensemble under
the able and understanding direction of
their conductor, who has just published
N.B.
a book on Tomkins.
VIVALDI: The
Seasons
violin; I Solisti di Zagreb,
Antonio Janigro, cond.
VANGUARD BC 584.
12 -in. $4.98.
Jan Tomasow,
VIVALDI: The
Seasons; Concerto for
Two Trumpets and Orchestra, in C,
P. 75
Continued on page 62
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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The Big Hi -Fi Sound is the Decca New World of Sound
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or out of the barbershop!" DL 8664**
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sung by a regular 'who's -who' of an
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RECORDS
A NEW WORLD OF
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61
MAncH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
Georges Ales, violin; Roger Debnotte,
Maurice André, trumpets; Collegium
Musicum of Paris, Roland Douatte, cond.
PERIOD SHO 309. 12 -in. $1.98.
Both of the latest entries in the Seasons
sweepstakes are admirable runners. The
chief advantage of the Vanguard disc
is the strong, attractive, beautifully reproduced playing of Tomasow. The rest
of the Solisti sound a little rough on
occasion, and some of the tempos seem
a bit fast; there is less of this sort of
thing in Autumn and Winter than in
the first two concertos. All in all, a serious challenge to the leaders, which in
my opinion remain the Angel and RCA
Victor versions.
There are two points of interest about
the Period record. One is the fact that
although its tempos are more or less
normal, an extra concerto could be included. This Concerto for Two Trumpets (in C, not in E flat, as the sleeve
has it) is the same as the one recently
presented on Unicorn 1054. It is well
played in both recordings. The other
point of interest is the use of an organ
A Short Glimpse of a Great Man
THE SCENE of the 1957 Casals Fes tival was shifted from Prades and
Perpignan to Puerto Rico, Pablo Casals
desiring thereby to do honor to the country of his mother's birth. While conducting the first orchestral rehearsal,
the great musician suffered a heart attack, and it seemed for a time as though
the whole project would be called off.
But fortunately the festival had as assistant musical director the very capable
Alexander Schneider. Through his efforts
Puerto Rico was not deprived of the music of Bach, Mozart, and Schubert, although Casals was unable to direct it.
The present two discs are a sampling
of what was heard between April 22 and
May 8, 1957. All the music contained on
them was recorded at actual perform-
sonata. The string tone is hard and
(what is more surprising) the pitch is
often inexact. But matters improve considerably in the Schumannesque Andante
( although it, like the last movement, is
taken too slowly ). If Schneider is not
at his best here, we should remember
that he must have been a very busy and
harassed man, taking over Casals' duties,
as he did, at a moment's notice.
The other disc (ML 5236) contains
a decent but not outstanding performance of the first suite for orchestra by
Bach ( minus both minuets ), the very
un- Bachlike Capriccio ( well played by
Rudolf Serkin, though it should be done
on a harpsichord), and a portion of the
initial orchestral rehearsal at which Casals suffered his heart attack. My first reaction was to think this rehearsal eat, dropping a bit ghoulish. But the thrum
of the old man as he urges ( in English )
"Dfore-more- more -more -more piano," or
sings a phrase in a voice as utterly toneless as Toscanini's, or threatens "I don't
hear the chord
. I had better hear
the chord," or admits shyly "I know it is
difficult, but we
we must have the
tenderness" -all this amply justifies Columbia in putting the tape on LP.
The engineering in all selections except the Schubert rehearsal ( which
sounds as though it was taped with a
crystal mike) is very good, considering
the absence-of studio conditions.
...
DAVID JOHNSON
FESTIVAL
RICO
Pablo Casals
ances, and therefore one must put up
with frequent and distracting extraneous
noises-muffled cough~, rustling scores,
etc. But some of the music making is of
a caliber to outweigh even more serious
disadvantages.
The prize performance is the Mozart
Second Piano Quartet. Eugene Istomin
does not try to disguise the fact that the
work is in reality a miniature piano concerto, but his healthy exuberance never
obscures the string parts. Isaac Stern
does some ravishingly beautiful violin
playing, which makes one's initial disappointment all the keener when one
turns over the disc and begins to listen
to Alexander Schneider in the Schubert
82
CASALS
DE
PUERTO
Schubert: Symphony No. 8, in B minor
(Unfinished) (rehearsal performance ).
Bach: Capriccio on the Departure of his
Beloved Brother;
Suite No. 1, in C.
Mozart: Quartet for Piano and Strings,
in E flat, K. 493. Schubert: Sonata for
Violin and Piano, in A minor, Op. 137,
No. 2.
Festival Orchestra, Pablo Casals, cond.
(in the Symphony ), Alexander Schneider, cond. (in the Suite) ; Rudolf Serkin,
piano (in the Capriccio). Isaac Stern, violin; Milton Katims, viola; Mischa Schneider, cello; Eugene Istomin, piano (in the
Mozart). Alexander Schneider, violin,
Mieczyslaw Horszowski, piano (in the
Schubert ).
COLUMBIA ML 5236/7. Two 12 -in. $3.98
each.
instead of a harpsichord in The Seasons.
It is usually discreetly handled, but
there are moments when it makes the
bass sound ponderous. The sound in
general on this disc is rather sharp for
my taste.
N.B.
WAGNER: Die Walküre: Act II, "Todescerkündigung "; Act III (complete)
Kirsten Flagstad ( s), Brünnhilde; Marianne Schech (s), Sieglinde; Oda Balsborg ( s ), Gerhilde; Ilona Steingeber
(s), Ortlinde; Clare Watson ( s), Helm wige; Grace Hoffman (e), Waltraute;
Margarethe Bence (c), Schwertleite;
Anny Delorie (e), Siegrune; Frieda
Roesler (c), Grimgerde; Hetty Plüinacher (e), Rossweisse; Set Svanholm (t ),
Siegmund; Otto Edelmann (bs -b ), Wotan. Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra,
Georg Solti, cogd.
LONDON A 4225. Two 12 -in. $9.96.
Flagstad is astounding. She commands
a sound immense and rich, and she produces it with a power and steadiness
that shame many colleagues half her
age. These resources are at the service
of a musicality itself almost legendary,
and her taste and artistic integrity have
never allowed room for anything but
musical truth. In a profession that for
centuries has been a byword for vanity,
Flagstad has remained unspoiled by
years of adoration as a kind of divinity
in the Wagnerian cosmos; no one could
be less of a prima donna, and few are
more truly a first lady.
As performers grow older, especially
those with a rather specialized repertory,
one of two things tends to happen: either the performances become more
comprehending and profound and therefore more communicative, or they are
hammed up. It is one of the glories of
Flagstad's career that her conceptions
have in no way degenerated. At the
same time, the great disappointment
she has dealt us is in her failure to
deepen her own insights, and thus eventually ours, into the music she sings.
However handsomely she has produced
the sounds and turned the phrases of
Wagner's music, she always has been
psychologically inadequate to deal with
the complex creations of the nineteenth
century's greatest dramatist. No musical
problems and, even now, few vocal problems are beyond her, but she does not
have it in her to become Isolde or Brünnhilde.
Unforgettable is not too big a word
for some of Flagstad's phrases: "Hier
bin ich Vater: gebiete die Strafe!," for
example, where the utter simplicity is
so completely right. But the terror of
Briinnhildés opening "Schützt mich,"
the profound anguish of everything that
follows "War er so schmählich" are beyond her ability to communicate to my
satisfaction. As a singer, Flagstad is
marvelous: as Brünnhilde, she is too
neutral.
If Flagstad's statement that Edelmann
was the finest Wotan she had ever sung
with is to be taken literally, it is further
Continued on page 84
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
the new cias sics:
YEHUDI MENUHIN,
VIOLIN
BRAHMS - CONCERTO IN D MAJOR
music
Wal
fOY
strings
4K
At`
kkr P', (
-
Leopold Stokowski's mastery of orchestral strings has never been so apparent
as in these selections by Bach, Borodin,
Rachmaninoff and others. PÁ08415
Tch«di Alenuhin's interpretation of
Brahms' only violin concerto is breathtaking. Rudolf Kempe conducts the
Berlin Philharmonic.
PAO8410
_
4
-
Leonard
PENNARIO
piano
Erich
LEINSDORF
conducting
+_
iriitNGE1tS'PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Pianist Leonard Pennario's brilliant
new interpretation of a beloved concerto. Erich Leinsdorf conducts the Los
PA08417
Angeles Philharmonic.
TCHAIKOVSKY
Sull
CHOPIN!
LISZT
1111Firi
KENTNER
THE
-
Two of Beethoven's greatest sonatas
the tragic Appassionata and the heroic
Waldstein- superbly played by pianist
Louis Kentner.
PÁ08409
Winner of Budapest's Liszt Award and
Warsaw's Chopin Prize, pianist Kent ner performs well-known selections by
P8400
both composers.
duets
with the
spanish guitar
BEETHOVEN
THE LATE QUARTETS
A remarkable presentation by one of
the world's greatest guitarists. Flutist
Ruderman and contralto Salli Terri join
Almeida in a deeply moving album of
Brazilian and French music. PA08406
'fender, poignant music from the most
beautiful of all ballets faultlessly performed by the world famous Ballet
PA08416
Theatre Orchestra.
-
i
GOLDMnRi4
CONCERTO IN A MINOR
for violin and orchestra
4.
Laurindo Almeida, guitar
pAllEr eAllnalifSTRA
MILSTEIN
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11011Y NY]Un SI KING QUART1.1
Beethoven's most inspired quartets as
performed at the Edinburgh Festival
by the internationally acclaimed Hollywood String Quartet. Deluxe 5- record
PER8394
package with brochure.
THE PHILHARMONIA 0'C
conducted by HARRY BLECH
interplay between violin and orchestra, matchlessly
performed by violinist Nathan Milstein
and the Philharmonia Orch. PA08414
A concerto of delicate
Incomparable High Fidelity -Full Dimensional Sound Albums
6.,
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
evidence of a shallow view into the
world of Wagner's gods and men. I
never heard Schorr's Wotan except from
recordings, but I have heard and absorbed the very different interpretations
of Janssen, Berglund, Bjocrling, Frantz,
Schoeffler, and -most memorably-Hotter. I hear in Edelmann's coarse- grained
and hearty singing no suggestion at all
of the character into whose creation
Wagner poured so much of himself and
in which his tragic and sinister genius is
so movingly mirrored.
Marianne Schech is an impassioned
Sieglinde. In her agitation she flies dangerously sharp of true pitch once or
twice, but-as at the Metropolitan last
year-I find her portrayal wann and
satisfying. Brünnhilde's horsy sisters are
a healthy- sounding lot, so much so that
I wonder why Solti finds it advisable to
double the voices on many solo lines
during the "Ride." After all, the sound
of solo voices in unison is a rather special coloristic effect, and not one to be
used and abused by conductors at will.
My growing impression of Solti is that
of a conductor with a distinct tendency
toward sensationalism. I don't believe
I have over heard the Walküre score
realized in such blazing color ( I wouldn't
be surprised to hear that the Vienna
Philharmonic employs only archangels in
its brass choir ), but often powerful floods
of sound are unleashed far in excess of
Wagner's frequent p or inf. I also do
not find Solti's sense of temporal continuity quite compelling, and at one c:ru-
dal transition
( the
tempo change at
"Der Augen leuclitendes Paar ") there
is a distinct misreading of Wagner's intention.
On the whole, the "Todescerkiindigung" goes better. Flagstad deals perfectly with the solemnity required of
Brünnhilde here; and Svanholm has the
nobility, if not the youthful voice, to
make a very good Siegmund. However,
the use of a concert ending here is
deplorable. From the point at which the
music is cut off, five minutes remain to
the end of the act. Wotan and Sieglinde
were already on hand, and somewhere
in Vienna there must have been a bass
Introducing the Two -Hour Disc
WITH canned music here to stay.
it was inevitable that economy -( or
profit -) minded engineers would be in-
trigued by the challenge of pouring more
contents into the can without also having to increase its size. Five minutes on
12 inches of 78 grew to thirty minutes of
33%; even a doughnut -holed 7 -inch 45
grew from three to five to eight minutes.
Microgrooves more than tripled the number of music spirals per side; and variable
pitch recording came along to increase
even further the number of "lines per
inch" when the scoring warranted. Now
Vox has taken the 33 "can" and, at 16%
rpm, has poured nearly two hours of
music into its standard 12 -inch dimensions.
Four of the five discs contain classical
war horses: Tchaikovsky's Romeo and
Juliet, Symphony No. 6, and Piano Concerto No. 1 on VXL 1: Beethoven's
Coriolan Overture, Violin Concerto in
ll, Piano Concerto No. 5, Leonore Overture No. 3 on VXL 2; a potpourri of familiar pieces by Beethoven, Dvor"ák,
Schubert, Prokofiev, Rimsky- Korsakov,
Bizet, and Borodin on VXL 3 and 5.
VXL 4 is a musical Cook's tour of the
globe, punctuated by throbbing airplane
engines presumably to lend realism to
around- the-world voyaging. All the works
Vox has issued on these pioneer 16% -rpm
recordings already are in the catalogue
on the company's standard 33% speed.
Vox maintains that discs are compatible with any system comprising a turntable geared to what has come to be
known as "the fourth speed." The recommended stylus diameter is the same
.001 inch currently employed with 33%and 45 -rpm discs.
By high -fidelity standards, the sound
of these super- slow -motion recordings
is only fair. There is, understandably, a
muting of the higher frequencies, and
playback treble-boosting only tends to
increase distortion. On most of the records, however, the lower frequencies reproduce faithfully, with no muddiness
and with agreeably solid sound. In fact.
the records sound much like conventional
AM radio reception on a moderate -quality tuner, reproduced on a top -notch
high-fidelity system.
My chief criticism lies not so much
with the restricted upper-frequency range
as with stylus displacement irregularities
which show up annoyingly as fuzz. (This
same fault crops up occasionally on
standard LPs and often can be traced to
a dirty or deformed stamper.) Since this
sonic fuzz appears to some degree on all
of the 16% records Vox sent us, it appeared likely that a .001 inch stylus was
physically just too large to trace accurately at the reduced speed.
With this in mind, we played some of
the discs with .0005 and .0007 inch
styli. Unfortunately, the fuzzy reproduction persisted and rose to harrowing
peaks during loud passages, indicating
deficiencies more in the processing of
the particular records on hand than in
the 16% -rpm technique itself.
Once these inherently routine problems have been solved, 16% -rpm records
will offer the non-high -fidelity user a
bargain product admirably suited to his
pocketbook and to the standards of his
equipment. Furthermore, the high -fidelity listener will find them adequate fare
when his mood does not demand absolute
sonic satisfaction.
PHILIP C. GEBACI
ORCHESTRAL SELECTIONS
Standard orchestral works, played by
various orchestras and conductors.
Vox VXL 1/5. Five 12 -in. 16% rpm.
$6.95 each.
64
who could provide the nine measures
of Hunding's part. It seems that just a
little good will toward Wagner would
have persuaded all of the advisability of
continuing. Instead, at Siegmund's exit
to battle, the orchestra makes an impossible cadence, and in C major, not even
a whistle -stop in the composer's calculations, we are suddenly dumped out of
Wagner's fast -moving vehicle, musically
and dramatically in medias res. Will conductors and public never develop a mature distaste for these grisly amputations?
And now, how about a complete
Walkiire?
C.M.S.
RECITALS AND
MISCELLANY
LYRIC OPERA: "An Evening at the
Lyric Opera of Chicago"
Eugen Onegin: Letter
Scene. Boito: Mefistofele: L'altra notte,
in fondo al mare. Ponchielli: La Gioconda: L'amo come il fulgor del creato.
Saint-Saëns: Samson et Dalila: Mon
coeur souvre d to voix. Mascagni: Cavalleria Rusticana: Voi lo sapete. Mozart:
Le Nozze di Figaro: Voi che sapete.
Giordano: Andrea Chénier: Nemico
della patria.
Tchaikovsky:
Renata Tebaldi, soprano; Giulietta Si:Moneto, mezzo-soprano; Ettore Bastia nini, baritone; Orchestra of the Lyric
Opera of Chicago, Georg Solti, cond.
LONDON X 5320.
12 -in. $4.98.
This record preserves excerpts from n
concert in the fall of 1956, and I judge
it must have been quite an evening for
lovers of singing. Tebaldi does some of
her best work here, but as usual without
being able to avoid the main defects of
her style: a tendency to sing ever so
slightly flat and a blithe disregard of
words. The voice itself is of unbelievable
beauty and warmth, and I myself was so
intoxicated by the sheer sound that not
until my third hearing did I discover
that she gives the first line of Boito's
beautiful aria as " L'altra notte, in fon-
d000aaare."
Simionato's low register is now a little
rough, perhaps from her habit of driving it into that lady- baritone boom beloved of Italian mezzos. The top of the
voice sounds quite wonderful, and her
vivacious style is most effective in the
\iascagni and Saint -Saëns pieces. The
Mozart aria is a little constrained. The
two ladies join for a roof- raising version
of a really horrible duet from Gioconda.
Bastianini's Chénier solo is well done.
Solti's accompaniments are forcefully
conceived and, except for some bad solo
wind playing, well executed. The record
is alive with vocal electricity-the presence
of the public is obviously stimulating
but I fear that the applause on the record
will get to be terribly tiresome. Everything is sung in Italian.
C.M.S.
-
Continued on page 71
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All the drama of an exciting afternoon
at the Bullfights. Complete with book
of 24 full -color Bullfight Poster Reproductions. Volume
1
AFLP 1801
Exotic, tantalizing, authentic music
from the mysterious Middle East. Mohammed El- Bakkar and his Oriental
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the Ilalian
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FlOrull
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Steam engines
sounds of a vanishing era
captured
with earth- shaking dynamics in brilliant hi- fidelity. AFLP 1843
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Jo Basile, his accordion and orchestra
.. romantic rhythms with their own special
Parisian magic. AFLP 1815
spin a melodic spell of love
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AND HIS
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SULTAN OF
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and a breath- taking display of harmonica mastery and tonal effects
A loveable
never before recorded! AFLP 1830
Mohammed El- Bakkar, his Oriental
Ensemble and another great album of
tantalizing Music of the Middle East.
Volume 2 AFLP 1834
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Each record, in individual protective
polyethylene case, attractively
packaged in full -color jacket.
ANDRE MARCHAL: "The Art of André
Marchai"
Vol. 1: Bach: Clavieriibung, (Part III);
Vol. 2: "Masters of French Organ
Music."
André Marchai, organ.
UNlcoax UNLP 1048/47. Two 12 -in.
$3.98 each.
The first issue of Vol. 1 of this set, reviewed in February, was mislabeled and
recalled by the manufacturer. Of the
new release I can now report that the A
side offers a broad, majestic performance
of the great E fiat Prelude from Part III
of the Clarieriibung, and a reading of
the Fugue that is rather plodding at first
but picks up after a while. A thoroughly
convincing recording of these giant
works is still awaited.
Vol. 2 contains a group of attractive
pieces, mostly by seventeenth- century
composers. The weightiest work here is
Nicolas de Grigny's Veni Creator, in
which he set the four odd-numbered
verses of the hymn and rounded it off
with a splendid finale ( the even-numbered verses are chanted by the M.I.T.
Choir, directed by Klaus Licpmann ).
This is music of considerable distinction
and variety, if a bit long. Other composers represented on this disc are Louis
Couperin (Chaconne in B minor), Francois Couperin (Offertory, from the Parish
Mass), Titelouze (a Magnificat), Le
Bègue (Les Cloches), Marchand (Fond
d'Orgue), and Daquin (Noël). Marchai
plays here with deep understanding, fine
rhythm, and imaginative registration.
N.B.
5
OF
OPERA' S
GREATEST
VOICES
Giulietta
Mario
DEL MONACO
Ettore
BASTIANINI
SIM IONATO
...
Anita
CEROU ETTI
Cesare
SIEPI
in a SUPERLATIVE NEW
HIGH FIDELITY RECORDING
PONCHIELLI
DAVID AND ICOR OISTRAKHs Recital
Bach: Concerto for Two Violins, in D
minor, S. 1043; Trio Sonata for Two
Violins and Harpsichord, S. 1037. Tartini: Trio Sonata for Two Violins and
Harpsichord, in F. Vivaldi: Concerto
Grosso in A minor, Op. 3, No. 8.
IOCONDA
David Oistrakh, Igor Oistrakh, violins;
Hans Pischner, harpsichord; Gewandhaus Orchestra (Leipzig), Franz Konwitschny, cond.
12-in. $4.98.
DECCA DL 9950.
A
These are the most acceptable performances of baroque music by the
Oistrakhs that I have heard on records.
The Bach Concerto receives a clean,
straightforward performance free of the
overswcetness that marred the recent
recording by the same soloists on Monitor; and the Bach Sonata reading is as
attractive as the previously recorded
one (again by the same violinists, the
only ones to have recorded this work
so far) and has in addition the advantage of a harpsichord instead of a
piano. The Vivaldi makes up for the
overedited version of the same work,
with a finale that didn't belong to it,
that David Oistrakh recorded with Isaac
Stern and the Philadelphia Orchestra;
here everything is according to Hoyle.
The Tartini, finally, is a very pleasant
-4331
3
-12"
with libretto $14.94
Chorus and Orchestra of
The Maggio Musicale Fiorentino
conducted by
GIANANDREA GAVAZZENI
Oi1i9 Ou1
U
-
RECORDS
539 WEST 25TH STREET. NEW YORK I. N.
Y.
71
\I:utcH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
work, played with the skill and restraint
that also mark the other performances.
N.B.
First -class recording.
THE SPOKEN WORD
ALBEN W. BARKLEY: "Veep"
Alben W. Barkley, interviewed by Sidney Shalett.
$5.95.
FOLKWAYS FS 3870. 12 -in.
This recorded autobiographical portrait
of Alben W. Barkley is one more piece
of evidence that the tape recorder is becoming almost as indispensable to an author these days as the typewriter. When
Sidney Shalett was asked by Doubleday
in 1953 to help Alben Barkley prepare
his autobiography, he suggested taking
a tape recorder along on a vacation,
during which he planned to work with
Barkley on the book, and the "Veep"
agreed. They planned to work only an
hour or two a day, but so responsive
was Barkley to the recorded interview
that on many days they talked five and
six hours. Shalett finished his research on
the book (published in 1954 under the
title That Reminds Me) with forty -six
hours of recorded Barkleyana.
From the tapes this record was made.
It consists mostly of unrelated splices
of Barkley brought together with running commentary by Shalett. There is
no attempt to relate a unified "autobiography." Barkley talks about himself, his
early career, his relations with Roosevelt,
Truman, Adlai Stevenson, and others in
such a way as seldom to lose the listen-
Continued on page 74
What the Record Companies Plan to Do About Stereo
ADOPTION of the 45 -45 system (proposed by Westrex) for single- groove
stereo records is certain, now that it has
the approval of European record companies and of our own Electronic Industries Association. Indeed, some standards have been worked out already.
Probably most interesting of these is the
size of the reproducing stylus: it will
have a radius between 31 and % mil, compared to the 1 -mil stylus used for current LPs.
But as this is written (early in February), the record companies are still playing it close to their jackets when asked
about specific plans and release dates.
One reason for this attitude may be uncertainty concerning the availability of
low -cost playback equipment. Several
manufacturers and importers of high fidelity pickup cartridges have said that
they are ready to produce stereo pickups
when there are records to play; among
them are Electro- Sonic, Fairchild, FenTone, and Pickering. Electro-Voice is reported to be already in production with a
ceramic stereo cartridge priced at $19.50.
Although these may precipitate some
early record releases by smaller companies, they do not represent a potential
market big enough to warrant stereo-disc
releases by the majors. For that, we will
probably have to wait for the development and production of ready -made
stereo phonographs. It is logical to assume
that such phonographs-and possibly
adapter units for existing phonographsare in or beyond the design stage in the
laboratories of all large manufacturers of
ready -to -play equipment.
Another reason for making haste slowly
is the problem of compatibility. There is
no question that a stereo pickup will be
able to play a monophonic record or a
stereo record with equal facility.
Whether or not a monophonic pickup
can play a stereo record acceptably is,
however, another thing altogether. Standard LPs have very little vertical groove
motion; 45-45 stereo discs have quite a
lot, speaking comparatively. Since until
now there hasn't been any need for the
stylus of a pickup cartridge to have great
freedom of motion over a large vertical
distance, present-day cartridges -even
very good ones-differ widely in this
respect.
72
standard cartridge with a stylus that
relatively free to move in both lateral
and vertical directions will follow the
complex motion of a stereo -disc groove
easily, and will obtain from it a monophonic signal of excellent quality. If the
stylus is only moderately free to move
vertically, the sound it obtains from a
stereo record may also be good, but it is
probable that the record will be damaged for later playing with a stereo cartridge. And if the stylus is severely restricted in vertical motion, as some are,
the monophonic sound obtained from a
stereo record will be poor and the record
is liable to be utterly spoiled for future
stereo playback. We haven't yet had a
chance to make any extensive tests of
these effects, but an account of our experience with one stereo record-and one
stereo pickup -accompanies this report.
If the claimed compatibility of the
45-45 stereo system is really only a unilateral sort of compatibility, it poses a
serious problem for record companies and
their dealers. They will have to face a
long changeover period in which both
monophonic and stereo records are made
and stocked ( with the stereo discs selling
at higher prices, incidentally ). Two of
the biggest companies have expressed intentions to do just that, beginning in late
summer or early fall, and to make clear
statements to buyers that the new discs
should not be played on nonstereo equipment. In rebuttal, at least one major
record company considers decidedly premature any statement that a 45-45 disc
cannot be made completely compatible.
Too, it seems unlikely that record dealers
will greet the necessity for carrying two
parallel lines with enthusiasm; and as
for the fact that a 45-45 disc will sound
terrible played on present low -cost
phonographs, it may well be asked what
difference it will make. Do standard records sound any better on such units?
To summarize: it seems to us probable
that there will be some stereo records
on the market this spring, possibly by the
time this is in print, with the deluge beginning in earnest this fall; that there
will be plenty of hi -fi cartridges available
to play them with; and that any incompatibility problems will be solved or
quickly dermphasized, so that the period
of dual releases will be held to a minimum.
Roy F. ALLISON
A
is
THE FIRST stereo disc to be made
available for "test and laboratory
purposes" is Audio Fidelity's AFLP 1872.
It contains material cut by the Westrex
method and includes excerpts from AFST
1851, Marching Along with the Dukes of
Dixieland; and AFST 1843, Railroad
Sounds, Steam and Diesel.
This record was auditioned on a Fairchild Model 603 moving -coil cartridge and -arm combination and was heard in
direct A -B comparison with AFST 1851
(AFST 1843 was not available at listening time) and AFLP's 1851 and 1843,
the monophonic releases of the same
material.
The first and most obvious test-a comparison between the stereo disc and the
stereo tape- banished any question we
may have held with respect to the stereo
effect obtainable from the new stereo
discs. They are truly stereo discs, and the
sound from them was virtually indistinguishable from that obtained from the
tape (played on an Ampex A -122). The
Fairchild Model 603 translated the stereo
information excellently.
Trouble arose, however, when we cornpared the sound of the stereo disc
(played monaurally with the Model 603)
and the monophonic discs, but the blame
could be laid on microphoning, which
is close -to for the monophonic discs and
more widely spaced for stereo. Companies not contemplating parallel stereo monophonic releases will be forced to
compromise in their microphoning technique; but whether this compromise will
sacrifice one for the other, or both for
compatibility, remains to be seen.
The Fairchild Model 603 performed
with remarkable competence on all
monophonic discs, and appears to be a
really compatible pickup.
We did note some latitude in the response of monaural cartridges of various
brands to the stereo disc. Some performed beautifully, with a minimum of
distortion and full response. Others fared
not so well. But undoubtedly these problems will be worked out by manufacturers with an eye to the future, certainly by the time stereo discs are placed
on sale in the corner record mart.
PHILIP C. GERACI
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NEW FROM RCA CAMDEN
BIG -NAME RECORDINGS AT
1/2
THE BIG -NAME PRICE
12 INCH LONG PLAY ALBUMS ONLY
Boston
Symphony
Beethoven
Symphony No. 3
in E Flat, Op. 55
Koussevittky
Boston
Beethoven
IR0IC
Symphony No, 5
CLASSICAL
io C Miaor,
Kouaaevitzky /Boston Symphony
Debussy /La Mer
Ravel/ Rhapoodio Espagnole
Ratio/ Gymnopediea Noe. 1 and 2
Op 61
A;
Egmont
ALBUMS
Overture, ol 84
CAL 405
CAL
(CAl.
(CaNJ
Alexander Kipnis
'
in Russian Opera
t
OF
CCAMDlNJ
Symphony
GREAT
ART
$1.98 EACH
N)
,d
404
CAL 376
JOHN McCORMACK CC AMÓlN)
SINGS IRISH SONGS
/
GALLI-CORCI,.
CAL 410
CAL 415
AL GOODMAN ORCH.
CAL 407
CCAMOCN,
RODGERS a HAMMERSTEIN'S'
SOUTH PACIFIC
CAL 402
CCAMDENJ
THE WEST COAST
of
BROADWAY
NANCIE MALCOMB
and her Group
GREAT
POPU LAR
ALBUMS
SONS OF
THE PIONEERS
WAGONS
WEST
GET
I
IDEAS
TONY
MARTIN
CAL 421
CAL 422
CAL
CAL 409
CAL
412
(CAMDf N/
POP
PIPE
ORGAN
IN
HI -FI
GUY
4ill
tI
CAL 413
MELENDY
CAL 414
'._;
RCA
MANUFACTURER'S NATIONALLY ADVERTISED PRICE SHOWN- OPTIONAL.
AMEN
A
111.a11c.11
1958
HMV OF
uC10 COa'on11DO
011r11.C.
er's attention. And if an occasional listener's interest does flag, there is always
a famous Barkley story to revive it.
He tells several, almost all knee -slatpers.
From the microgrooves emerge the
an bewannth and humor of a real I
ing. The record reaches a climax with
Barkley's final speech in \Vashington
. I
and Lee University last April
would rather be a servant in the house
of the Lord," Barkley concludes, "than
to sit in the scat of the mighty." As he
finishes the speech there is a burst of
applause-but above the cheers you can
hear the sound of a man falling to the
floor. It is a sound I will not soon forget,
R.H.H., Ja.
and neither will you.
BIBLICAL READINGS
Selections read by the Speak Four Trio;
Paul Baker, dir.
Woim W 4013. 12-in. $4.98.
This record consists of a dramatic rendering of verses from six well -known
passages in the Old Testament: the First
Psalm; excerpts from the Book of Jonah;
the account of the birth and infancy of
Moses in Exodus 1 and 2; the story of
creation in Genesis 1 nul 2; the last
chapter of Ecclesiastes; and parts of
Joshua. Three voices are heard, sometimes in unison, sometimes separately
and often repeating the same words two,
three or four times in widely varying
tones, with the first voice peremptory,
the second plaintive, the third like a
far -off call, etc. The idea behind this
unusual procedure is, I believe, to present, simultaneously, the essence of these
Biblical classics and the total experience
of the surrounding drama.
It is a fine piece of execution. If the
purpose is, as I suspect, to express a
Continued on page 78
The New Audio Books: Length Isn't Everything
IF recognition by Time magazine can
be taken to signify that someone
or something has finally "arrived," then
I suppose we can safely say that spoken
word recordings -given full -blown recognition in the "Books" section of Time's
December 9, 1957 issue -now arc a
permanent facet of our contemporary
culture. This, of course, comes as no
surprise to the makers of Audio Books,
who have been producing their seven inch, 16 -rpm full-length talking books
since 1953 and whose most recent bundle of releases brings the total number
in their catalogue to twenty -two. Undoubtedly their audience also has increased with the introduction of inexpensive adapters for 333 -rpm turntables and the availability of commercial
turntables capable of handling four
speeds.
Perhaps the most significant change
in the most recent Audio Books is the
wider range of speaking talent that has
been called upon to read the selections.
In the past, most of the burden was
carried by the seemingly tireless vocal
chords of Marvin Miller, better known
as the narrator for the cartoon series
featuring Gerald McBoing Boing. In the
current releases, Mr. Miller is called
upon for only one volume -The Audio
Book of Great Essays-which is, however, the longest one of the group, containing forty-one essays by thirty -six different writers. Like any anthology it
should be approached only for an occasional essay, chosen to fit a particular
mood, never for steady listening. I cannot honestly say that the choice of Mr.
Miller to read the essays is one I fully
applaud. It seems to me that he tends
to react the serious pieces with a little
too much jocularity; that he sometimes
tends to put the emphasis on the wrong
things and in the wrong places; that in
handling sarcasm and satire he tends to
overact. Yet these are perhaps tenuous
objections, since the essays themselves
remain stimulating and engaging.
There is, however, certainly a difference between an acceptable reading
and an artistic one, and the difference
is very clear in the reading of The Red
Badge of Courage and that of The
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Air.
Hyde. Robert Ryan's rendition of the
former is perfectly unobjectionable, but
it fails to capture the anguish of youth
going into battle for the first time, which
Stephen Crane's novel itself makes the
reader feel. On the other hand, Gene
Lockhart's reading of Dr. Jekyll and
Mr. Hyde is an artistic masterpiece.
The important thing in Stevenson's classic horror talc is the stark contrast between the midnineteenth- century Lon don gentleman, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and
his monstrous creation, Edmund Hyde.
Mr. Lockhart portrays the hvo contrasting characters with remarkable effectiveness. In addition, he evokes the atmosphere of Victorian London as well as
the horror of Jekyll's self -imposed degradation with admirable conviction and
chilling success. Because the tale is so
familiar, it is too often forgotten that
Jekyll and !lyric is a first-rate classic
mystery, ranking with the best of Sherlock Holmes and Wilkie Collins' Woman
in White, if not The Moonstone. Listening to it again after not having read it
for many years was a thoroughly enjoyable experience.
Also of considerable interest are the
selections from Emerson as read by Lew
Ayres. Although sometimes Dr. Kildare
comes creeping in, Mr. Ayreti s reading
is a mature one and his voice is surprisingly suitable for the unembellished
language of the New England philosopher. Like the audiology of essays,
however, Emerson should be taken in
small doses.
For the kiddies, there is Cenc Lock hart's reading of Kipling's Just So Stories (selections from which also appear
on Cacdmon TC 1038). It is highly
recommended , especially for parents
whose eyes and voices tend to become
weary at sundown when the little ones
are just thirsting for knowledge. This
volume should take care of twelve bedtime sessions.
The collection of Shakespeare's complete sonnets is definitely the most uninspiring of the recent Audio Books, a
failure which I hesitate to attribute to
the Bard. The culprit must be Ronald
Colman whose somewhat restrained
reading in a rather droning voice fails
to communicate the emotional intensity
of the predominant themes-friendship
for a young man and passionate love
for the "dark lady."
Considering the Audio Books production as a whole, I feel that, generally
speaking, not enough consideration is
74
given to the choice of narrators. So far,
the company seems to have selected
merely competent readers, relying on
literary or dramatic content of the work
itself to sell the record. This, of course, is
better than nothing, and fine so long as
the selections are available on Audio
Books only. An adequately read volume
of Emerson's essays probably is better
than no audible volume at all. But as
the spoken -word recording projects of
other companies become more extensive,
the competition becomes keener. The
readings on the Audio Book volumes of
poetry, for instance, do not compare
with the poetry readings available on
other labels, and many people probably
would choose the apparently excellent
abridged Cuedmon recording of the Red
Badge of Courage (TC 1040) in preference to the routine, full -length Audio
Book version.
In other words, what we are learning
with each new spoken-word recording
is that the oral re- creation of a book is
as much an art as the writing of it, and
that it is not enough to be just a good
vocal typist.
H. Hooi'Es, Jn.
by
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON: The
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
Hyde
AUDIO BOOK CL 605. Four 7 -in. 16
rpm. $4.95.
STEPHEN CRANE: The Red Badge of
Courage
AUDIO BOOK CL 609. Six 7 -in.
16 rpm.
$6.95.
RUDYARD KIPLING: Just So Stories
Ammo Boox C 308. Five 7 -in. 16 rpm.
$5.95.
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: Sonnets
(complete)
AUDIO BooK CL 608. Three 7 -in. 16
rpm. $3.95.
RALPII WALDO EMERSON: Basic
Writings
AUDIO Boot: CL 606.
Five 7 -in. 16
rpm. $5.95.
THE AUDIO BOOK OF GREAT ES.
SAYS
AUDIO BooK
rpm.
$8.95.
CL 608.
Eight 7-in.
16
HICII FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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75
'l'hose who love Mr. Weill's Broadway
songs and who admire artistry in any
field will want this record.
Here at Home
"Sayonara: Music from the Soundtrack." RCA \'x-ron LOC 1041. $4.98.
Franz Waxman, one of the better Hollywood composers, has become the latest
to try to make East meet West harmoniously. No one will deny that Puccini
did it better. But Puccini was not called
upon to provide, among other sensations,
a sort of Japanese rock 'n' roll. I think,
all things considered, that Mr. Waxman
has done remarkably well. When he
works with Japanese themes his orchestration is delicately lyrical, yet marked
with stateliness. He certainly does much
better than Irving Berlin's title song,
which is slushy Tin Pan Alley.
"September Song and Other Songs by
Kurt Weill Sung by Lotte Lenya."
Columbia KL 5229. $5.98.
Long ago Miss Lenya established her
mastery of the cynical, melancholy,
sometimes boisterous songs of the Berlin
theater and night clubs of the Twenties.
In this decade the widow of Kurt Weill
has reasserted her authority in the revival of The Threepenny Opera and a
recording of Berlin theater songs (Columbia KL 5058). Now, in her latest
record, with the same husky, quavering voice that was never her forte, Miss
Lenya once again proves how great is
the power of sheer artistry.
Here she addresses herself to the songs
Weill wrote for Broadway. Her version
of "Trouble Man" from Lost in the Stars
is, I think, a masterpiece of pop singing
that may be remembered along with
Judy Garland's "Over the Rainbow" and
Ethel Waters' "Stormy Weather." It is
a study in anguish, so intense, so honest
that words and music are fused into
searing impact. To the "Saga of Jenny"
from Lady in the Dark she brings sly
humor and bogus tragedy, without sacrificing the tricky beat of this fine rhythm
number. In "Foolish Heart" from One
Touch of Venus, though lacking the
voice for this lovely waltz, she is inimitable at self- mockery. Her delivery of
"Sweet and Low," also One Touch of
Venus, is that of a grown woman, not a
simpering addict of rock 'n roll. She
brings tenderness to "A Boy Like You"
from Street Scene and buoyancy to
"Green Up Time" from Love Life. For
some reason, perhaps excessive caution,
she seems short on emotion in "September Song" from Knickerbocker Holiday.
76
.
"Annie Get Your Gun." RCA Camden
CAL 411. $1.98.
This record is notable for the full, rich
singing of "They Say It's Wonderful"
by Jimmy Carroll. I would like to hear
a disc of good Broadway songs by him.
piano dominates the next. A tasteful
choice of Parisian staples graces the
disc; the most delightful touch, however, is the inclusion of two medleys of
French children's songs -surely the most
enchanting in the world. The engineers
have more than done their part, and the
release merits a place -along with the
evocations of Michel Legrand and Frank
Chacksfield -in the top echelon of Parisian portraits.
"The Pump Room." Mercury MG 20280.
$4.98.
Until he came on television, David Le
Winter's smooth orchestra and their reticent arrangements were known only to
visitors to the Pump Room of Chicago's
Ambassador East Hotel. The style here
is the same; they know how not to
disturb the digestion when playing "Falling in Love with You," "I Concentrate
on You," or "Rumba Rhapsody."
"The Best of Irving Berlin." RCA Victor
LPM 1542. $3.98.
Reg Owen and his orchestra are good in
a sort of soft-shoe version of "Easter
Parade," but weak in rousing numbers
such as "Alexander's Ragtime Band."
Irving Berlin, who gives his songs plenty
of sweet melody, requires more brass in
an orchestra than Reg Owen has at his
disposal.
MtrmcAY SCHVMACH
Foreign Flavor
" Imperio Argentina Sings." Imperio Ar-
gentina, soprano; Orquesta Montilla,
Francisco Betoret, cond. Montilla
FM 102.
"La Fille de Madame Angot" (highlights), operetta in three acts by
Charles Lecocq. Soloists, chorus, and
orchestra, Jesus Etcheverry, dir. Epic
LC 3424. $3.98.
In his long, prolific lifetime, Charles Lecocq (1832-1918) wrote more than forty
operettas. Of these the most popular
and most enduring is La Fille de Madame Angot, first performed in 1872.
The plot, as is often the case in titis
genre, is both complex and feeble. Unfolding in the politically seething Paris
of the Directoire, the action involves the
poor heroine, Clairette, her wealthy rival.
Mlle. Lange, and the sometime object
of their affections, royalist poet Ange Piton In threee acts the triangle resolves
itself happily for the ladies; Piton is
left to the doubtful solaces of his verse.
The French cast fairly sparkles in this
deft tour of the operetta's high points.
In particular, Claudine Collar's expressive soprano voice shapes a winsome.
convincing Clairette. Jesus Etcheverry directs a close -textured performance, although he tends to understate the orchestra's role vis-ii-vis the singers. But
this, perhaps, is the proper approach to
such a cascade of pure melody.
84.98.
Ten songs from the Latin American film
hit El Ultimo Cuple, sung by its star,
the beauteous Imperio Argentina, whose
clear, full-bodied soprano wrings maximum dramatic value from the material
in the best Hispanic style. The songs
themselves are all hardy and very listen able perennials of the stripe of El Relicario. Francisco Betoret and the Orquesta
Montilla offer close -knit support, and the
engineers have provided a sonic frame
that displays Argentina in all her splendor.
"Bon Soir, Paris." Lucerne Festival Orchestra. Ernest Falk, cond. Period
RL 1921. $4.98.
Conductor Ernest Falk varies his arrangements so that an accordion etches
the melody of one selection, while a
"Oompah Time Inn Bavaria." Bands
directed by Paul Kuniss, Franz Reiter,
Will Glahe, and Heinz Winkel. London T\VB 91185. $4.98.
Abetted by stunning sound, four German
bands romp through a cheery assortment
of Bavarian
marches, polkas, and
waltzes. Maestros Kuniss, Reiter, Winkel,
and Glahe-each backed by his own
first -class ensemble -impart to the catchy
tunes the familiar beery-schmaltzy patina
that so becomes this kind of music.
"Tropical Cruise." Pedro Garcia and his
Del Prado Orchestra. Audio Fidelity
AFLP 1841. $5.95.
The tug of the tropics -as delineated on
Audio Fidelity's purple jacket notes -is
liard to resist. Swallowing hard, one
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
reads: "She'll uvcar that white silk
sheath that dings so. And you? You'll
have your summer tux -white coat and
bow tie. You 'll follow the trail left by the
scent of her perfume as you leave the
ship."
Even if you can't afford (1) a cruise
ticket, (2) a summer tux, or (3) a ben zedrex inhaler to sharpen up the old
sense of smell, $5.95 will get you the
next best thing -an album in which Pedro Carda and his orchestra offer a
sparkling danceable array of Latin melodies. The sound is crisp and clear. As for
me, I just spotted a white silk sheath.
¡Adios!
"Vienna on Parade." The Dentschmcister
Band; Singing Boys and Girls of the
Vienna Woods: Grinning Schrammel
Ensemble; Karl Jancik, zither; Hedy
Fussier, soprao; Karl Terkal, tenor.
Angel 35499. $4.98 (or $3.98).
Far and away the best of the attempted vinyl syntheses devoted to the
great city on the Danube. Angel's array
of talent would seem to represent something of a mílange. But it is this very
variety that finally captures something
of the city's musical ambiance. Everything, from 1Vienerbiut to the Harry
Lime 'l'heure, is expertly performed and
brilliantly recorded. No Viennesepseudo, neo, proto, crypto, or would -be
-should miss this one. O. B. BRUMMELL
You Never Know if You Can Sing High C Until You Try
Qcrre OFTEN when Barbara Ceokfeminine lead of Tite .Music Man,
this season's extraordinary Broadway hit musical with book, music. and
lyrics all by Meredith Willson -is riding
home in the subway with her hu,ha n d. a
little comedy is played. Other riders Mtn
have seen the show that evening will look
up from her picture in the souvenir program and study Miss Cook, in the nicely
curved flesh. They will look back at the
program; stare at her some more; then
confer. After a minute they will shake
their heads and agree, as one of them
say's, "Nope. Can't be." For Miss Cook
does not fit the popular conception of a
Broadway celebrity. ( She's now a disc
celebrity too, being featured with Robert Preston and others of the original
Music Man cast in Capitol's recent recording from the show -WAO 990,
$5.98). She looks in fact as though she
belongs on a stool in the corner ice cream parlor.
Tints the other day when Miss Cook
traced her career in Sardi's, where pretense is as predominant as the caricatures on the walls, she seemed as refreshing as cool buttermilk. In a white
sweater and dark skirt, blond hair
slightly windblown, creamy complexion
alive with her own color, and blue eyes
gleaming, she might just have come off
a ski slope. Not once during salad and
coffee did she wave or call across the
restaurant.
With engaging candor Miss Cook zigzagged through her life from childhood
and adolescence in Atlanta, to New
York City office work, Boston night club,
Pennsylvania summer camp, road company tour, off -Broadway revival, and,
finally, Broadway. The pattern itself
from child -trouping through adult discouragement -was not unusual. The
admissions, however, were.
Take, for example, Miss Cook's
straightforward account of how she became Cunegonde in Leonard Bernstein
short -lived musical version of Voltaire's
Candide. She had already been in the
flop Flaho oley, and was preparing her
role of Amish ingenue for Plain and
Fancy, when she was called to the telephone one day to answer a question
from Ethel Reiner, coproducer of Can dide. Miss Reiner wanted to know if
where she liad studied. "f almost blurted
out that I haul studied in high school in
Atlanta. But I held back and said: 'I
never have. I don't read music. I know
one note from another and that's about
all.' '
Then she sang for Mr. Bernstein.
After she had finished "Make the Man
Love Me," front A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, she realized the composer was not
overwhelmed. Fearfully, she added: "I
suppose you want to hear some high
notes." Mr. Bernstein agreed. "I offered
to do the Entrance Scene from Butterfly, but explained I didn't have my pianist. That was a mistake. Mr. Bernstein
took over the piano and sang all parts
from memory up to the Entrance. I
didn't know where to come in. I forgot
the words. When I finished, Mr. Bernstein said: 'Yoiu have great nmsical courage.'" She needed the courage. For,
after she had sung for Lillian Hellman,
who wrote the book, and for Tyrone
Guthrie, who directed, she found herself once more with Mr. Bernstein-and
the score. "I was terrified. The score
went up to E flat over high C."
Miss Cook dropped her knife and fork
and laughed infectiously, before resuming her story. Getting into The .Music
,flan was relatively simple. While working on a television production of Yeomen
of the Guard, she was told by costar
Alfred Drake that rumor had it she was
being considered for The Music Man.
"1 had never heard of it," confessed
Miss Cook. A few months later, after
one audition, the part was hers.
-
she could sing high C.
"I always say yes first, in such cases,"
said Miss Cook, "and find out later. 'l'he
truth is I had never sung over C." Leonard Bernstein s first question was to ask
MAACII 1958
.
r~:
e
9ir
41'
"
6,-lem.
"1
11111
Barbara Cook
-00!
The trek to Broadway began for Miss
Cook when most little girls are learning
to read and write. She was always singing, and by the time she was eight she
was taking tap lessons as well. By the
time she was in high school, she was
touring movie houses on Friday nights
as a supplement or substitute for free
dishes. "I sang 'Wishing' until it canto
out of my ears." Later in high school
she was in the chorus line of the Rosy
Theater in Atlanta.
"It was all wonderful training in learning how to behave in front of an audience but it doesn't carry much weight
when you come to New York and directors ask you what you've done."
Miss Cook toyed with the menu and
the possibility of some caloric -rich tasty.
She put both aside and sipped her coffee.
New York City became her immediate concern when she arrived with her
mother on what was planned as a twoweek visit but turned into eighteen
months in the typists' pool of an oil company.
"I would hate to go through that first
year and a half in New York again. I
paid far too much for rent. I was taking
two singing lessons a week. It boiled
down to about $15 a week for myself.
I just didn't know nothiui about how to
look for work in show business. Here I
was on an island of strangers. You know
two people, maybe. Two people out of
eight million."
Finally, she met an agent who knew
an :agent who was looking for talent for
the Darbury, a Boston night club. For
eight months site worked there in revues
built around the songs of Berlin, Gershucin, Rodgers, Kern, Porter. On the side
she did television work. From there, on
the advice of Vernon Duke, she worked
at Camp 'lluniment, in Pennsylvania,
where she was spotted by a man front
The Blue Angel, one of the more sophisticated New York clubs. Another audition and she was singing "Funny Valentine," "Little Girl Blue," "The Eagle
and Mc" at The Blue Angel. Came work
in a touring company of Oklahoma! playing Ado Annie to the Ali Hakim of her
husband, David Le Grant. 'l'lais led to
the part of Carrie in a revival of Camasel, and then Broadway.
Miss Cook finished off her lukewarm
coffee, reflected for a moment, then
grinned. "I must have been an awful
office worker. I never had my mind on
M.S.
anything but show business.
77
Continued from page 74
multitude of conflicting and discordant
emotional reactions to one particular situation, this purpose is accomplished
with abundant acting ability. Judged as
a theatrical performance, it is excellent.
But does this particular production
have real artistic value? This question
is bound to come up in the minds of
those who hear it. No doubt there will
be a variety of opinions about it as
surely as there is variety of tone and
interpretation in what it sets forth. To
me it seems to lack the wholeness and
harmony necessary for the presentation
of Biblical material or any other great
work of art. WALTER B. WRIGHT, S.T.B.
This is not to say that the record is
without value. It is worth more than
money simply to be introduced to such
a uniquely forceful and dynamic personality. And his talk most certainly
aroused in me a strong desire to learn
more about these matters; if it has the
same effect on other listeners, Dr. Teller may justifiably consider it successful
Rov F. ALLISON
indeed.
FOLK MUSIC
by Edward L. Randal
Ir
EDWARD TELLER: The Size and Nature of the Universe; The Theory of
Relativity
Informal discussions by Dr. Edward Teller.
SPOKEN ARTS
735.
12 -in.
$5.95.
Since coming to the United States in
1935 as professor of physics at George
Washington University, Budapest -born
Edward Teller has been at various times
a staff member of Los Alamos Scientific
Laboratory; a member of the Metallurgical Laboratory, Professor of Physics,
and a member of the Institute for Nuclear Studies at the University of Chicago; and Professor of Physics at the
University of California, as well as consultant to that institution's Radiation
Laboratory. He was intimately con-
cerned with planning and developing
the atomic bomb; and, as millions of
Americans who have followed the recent
national alann set off by Sputniks I
and 11 know, he is still a consultant to
the government on matters of scientific
interest and possibly the most eminent
physicist in the country.
We can be certain, then, that Dr.
Teller knows what he is talking about
when he tries to make us understand
something about the universe and Einstein's theory of relativity. What we
might not suspect until we hear this
record is the intensity with which he
feels the need to make us understand,
and the engaging, friendly wit that
marks his informal speech. My own
strong impression is that these talks were
quite extemporaneous or delivered with
the aid of a few notes at most.
Perhaps that is the weakness as well
as the strength of the record; for I must
confess that, even while holding me
spellbound, Dr. Teller didn't succeed in
making me accept the theory of relativity on an intuitive basis. There were
moments when I felt the mystery was
about to be revealed, but the key remained hidden. If his talk had been
organized more formally, it might have
been more successful. Two record sides
devoted to each of these subjects would
have given him opportunity to attack
relativity in more detail and to expand
on his discussion of the universe-in one
record side he could hardly touch on
many of its most fascinating aspects.
is a happy month that brings a
brace of discs featuring Richard
Dyer-Bennet and Susan Reed respectively. To my mind, each occupies a
dominant niche in the ranks of concertizing balladeers. Neither is a "folk
singer" as such; each brings musical
training to the genre and each possesses
superior talent. And finally, each knows
how to imprint his own musical personality upon a ballad.
Of the two, Dycr- Bennet is the more
original artist. While he approaches a
folk song with deep respect and an almost jealous regard for its integrity, he
is not afraid to "polish" it if such seems
indicated; nor does he hesitate to alter
words or melody or even to add verses
of his own composition. What emerges,
of course, is not a folk song in the true
sense. It is rather a traditional ballad
that has been transmuted, subtly and
successfully, into an art song of immediate appeal.
Of the four records Dyer-Bennet has
to date released under his own label,
the latest one-Richard Dyer-Bennet
No. 4 (DYB 4000 )- impresses me as the
finest. Ultranatural full -range sound,
silky surfaces, an unusually attractive array of ballads, and Dyer -Bennet's con ate artistry make this a record that
belongs in every collection, no matter
how small.
Thirteen of the eighteen songs on
Susan Reed Sings Old Airs (Elektra
EKL 126) have been culled from a ten inch predecessor released some four
years ago. In view of the technical advances in even this short period, it is almost startling to hear the plangent sound
of this reissue; even by today's highest
standards, the engineering remains outstanding. In recent years, Miss Reed has
forsaken the concert stage in favor of a
Greenwich Village antique shop, bestirring herself occasionally for a recording
session with neighboring Elektra. With
maturity, her once -light voice has taken
on a darker, richer coloration. Both in
repertory and engineering, this release
shows her at her best.
The cult of steam railroading -so
manifest in the model railroad secondhand marts, where a GP-9 diesel is
nothing and a 4-6-2 steamer commands
a premium price -harks back to an era
around the turn of the century when
railroading sparked American internal
expansion. When Thomas Wolfe was
young, the sound of a whistle on a
78
through freight could -and in Wolfe's
case did -awaken rhapsodies on faraway
things and places; the railroad was the
high road to romance. On Cabot's Songs
of the Railroad (CAB 503), the Merrill
Jay Singers, aided by luminous sound,
weave the musical portrait of the men
who built and ran and dreamed of
America's railroads. Conductor Merrill
Jay has assembled an ensemble of considerable musicall poise and has clearly
taken pains to preserve the ballads' original flavor. The result is musical Americana of a very high order.
A less impressive disc debut is that of
Gerard Campbell on London's The
Wandering Minstrel (LL 1714). A young
man out of Belfast, Campbell has a
rather amorphous style that brings no
particular focus to any of the ballads he
has chosen. In somewhat testy album
notes, noted Irish folksinger Richard
Hayward gives young Campbell aìa A
for effort. This corner concurs. but would
award a resounding A -plus to London's
engineers.
FI MAN'S FANCY
by Philip C. Geraci
"The Best of Golden Crest, High Fidelity in Good Taste." Golden Crest Records CRS 12. $1.98.
Here is another sampler, intended to provide a showcase for this young but
flourishing company's parade of sonic
appetizers. Twelve in number and each
one a complete selection (no fading in
and out), the program covers Bill Bell
and his tuba, Mark Laub and his organ,
Johnny Guarnieri, Allen Hanlon, Don
Redman, and so on. The recording is
topnotch, and those unfamiliar with
Crest's flair for the unusual in recordings
might do well to try this bargain album
for size.
"Concert Encores." Mantovani and his
Orchestra. London LL 30044. $3.98.
Typical Mantovani fare -Song of India, Perpetuam Mobile, Clair de Lune,
and the like. For background enjoyment,
the silky artistry perfectly fits the soothing scales. At the same time, with volume
up for intent listening, the full tonal
range and almost complete absence of
distortion enhance Mantovanï s intrinsically fluid styling. As delightfully pleasant and satisfying a record as anything
in the light classics line on discs.
"Hoch und Deutschmeister Kapelle."
Julius Herrmann, cond. London LL
1755.
$3.98.
The Hoch und Deutschmeister regimental band is to Austria as the band of the
Grenadier Guards is to England, and
the band of the Garde Républicaine to
France. The Deutschmeisterkapelle is
heard here in sixteen marches of European origin. The recording of these works
is far more sensational than the playing
Continued on page 80
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thereof. Exceptionally clean and undistorted sound almost makes up for the
lack of interpretative spirit -but not
quite.
"March Time." Eastman Symphonic
Wind Ensemble, Frederick Fennell,
cond. Mercury MC 50170. $4.98.
Side 1 of this record is dedicated to the
memory of Dr. Edwin Franko Goldman,
a Sousa -style champion of the march who
wrote, among a bounteous lot of well known pieces, the official march of the
Boy Scouts of America. Six of his works,
selected by Fennell ( who also wrote the
jacket notes), make up one of the most
enjoyable sides of any band record available. His Children's March, resplendent
with band -in- the -park bird calls, sleigh
bells, and assorted snaps and crackles
of varying timbre, is an instant hit with
youngsters. The members of the wind
ensemble sing the second chorus of a
piece called The Interlochen Bowl; their
voices blend as harmoniously as the instruments they play. Overside there are
marches by other composers whom Fennell considers tops in the field.
Although C. R. Fine's recording is a
bit muddy in spots, his attempt (and
Mercury's) to stretch the dynamics to
fit the mood shows such laudable intention that an occasional overload or two
can be overlooked. The resounding bass
drum sometimes clouds detail, however, and a little less of it might have
produced better instrumental separation.
"Overtures
. in Spades." New Symphony Orchestra of London, Raymond
Agoult, cond. RCA Victor LM 2134.
$4.98.
The recording, probably made for RCA
by its British affiliate (English Decca),
is a humdinger, with a resounding lower
region (fairly large hall acoustics), unbelievably powerful dynamics, excellent
balance, and marvelously sweet string
tone. The fi appeal of the works themselves (rousing overtures by Von Suppé,
Herold, Adam, and Auber) is, of course,
well established.
THE BEST OF JAZZ
by John S. Wilson
JULIAN
Swing
ADDERLEY:
EMARCY 36110.
Sophisticated
83.98.
Adderley's superbly confident, full -toned
attack and intense beat spill smoothly
from his alto saxophone throughout this
disc in selections deeply colored by the
blues. It is a rugged little group he
leads, functioning from basic jazz roots
on which are superimposed some modern stylings that avoid glibness by the
sturdiness of the foundation. Another
saving grace is the rough -hewn quality
of brother Nat Adderley's cornet, particularly when he injects himself into
,rune of Julian's mellifluous lines. Good
stun -bang fun most of the way.
SO
RUSTY BRYANT: Plays Jazz
DoT 3079. $3.98.
After establishing some reputation as a
tenor saxophonist in rock 'n' roll territory,
Bryant here switches to jazz with moderate success. He is refreshingly free of
mannerisms, has the flexibility to range
from a coarse, grainy tone to a light,
almost altoish sound; from a cool, suave
approach to a sharp, slicing attack. His
solos are developed with a repetitive
similarity of ideas, however, that drain
them of interest in the course of a full
LP when the only support is a rhythm
section. A slightly larger group might
have taken some of the heat off him.
DON BYRD-GICI GRYCE JAZZ LAB
QUINTET: Modern Jazz Perspective
COLUMBIA CL 1058. $3.98.
An attempt is made here to trace the
development of some modern jazz styles,
something done time and again on older
jazz forms but rarely tried on the post Swing idiom. It may be the discipline
imposed by this idea or it may be that
the Jazz Lab Quintet is getting expressively stronger but, whatever the reason,
the group has not often swung as explicitly and infectiously as it does in
these selections. Crycé s alto saxophone
has a positive projection only erratically
present in the past, while trumpeter
Donald Byrd plays in leaner, less ornate
lines than he often does. On two selections the group becomes an extremely
effective octet with the addition of Julius
Watkins, French horn; Sahib Shihab,
baritone saxophone; and Jimmy Cleveland, trombone.
JOHN COLTRANE: Blue Train
BLUE NOTE 1577.
$4.98.
Coltrane's hard, fierce tone slashes
through this disc like an urgent hack saw,
but he is completely overshadowed by
young Lee hforgan's fantastic excursions
on trumpet. Morgans horn crackles and
roars through the up -tempo selections
which, fortunately, dominate the disc.
The single ballad in the set is as tedious
as these affairs usually are in the hands
of such hard -toned modernists.
EDDIE COSTA -VINNIE BURKE TRIO
JUBILEE 1025.
$3.98.
The dark, driving piano that has spurred
several discs on which Costa has appeared as a sideman is given an excellent
display here. With only bassist Vinnie
Burke and drummer Nick Stabulas as
colleagues, he has an opportunity to
stretch out and flex his bright, lithe piano
muscles. On one selection he switches to
vibes, providing a plausible suggestion
of the origin of his hammered piano attack. The set contains only one slow
ballad, which is just as well since Costa
functions best at a cocky strut.
RUSTY DEDRICK: Salute to Bunny
COUNTERPOINT 552. $4.98.
The second Berigan tribute of the month
( the other being by Ruby Braff) leans
to a modernized treatment of tunes with
which Berigan was associated. In this
transposition, trumpeter Rusty Declrick,
about whom the "tribute" naturally revolves, is less successful than Jack Keller,
a light -fingered pianist, and John La
Porta, a surprisingly virile baritone saxophonist. Dedrick is at his best when he
plays straight-out, full -toned Berigan
style on the inevitable I Can't Get
Started.
DIXIE SMALL -FRY IN HI-FI
LIBERTY
3057.
$3.98.
An occasional shrill -voiced vocal ensem-
ble reminds the listener that the ages
of the musicians on this disc range front
eleven to thirteen. But even judged as
a novelty, two full sides of awkwardly
enthusiastic Dixie become wearing.
ROLF ERICSON AND HIS AMERICAN ALL -STARS
$3.98.
EMARCY 36106.
The All- Stars, a group taken to Sweden
in 1956 by Ericson, a Swedish trumpet
player who has worked on and off in the
States for the past decade, consist of
Cecil Payne, baritone saxophone, Duke
Jordan, piano, John Simmons, bass, Art
Taylor, drums. Spurred by Jordan's solid,
meat -and- potatoes piano and Payne's
playing -more vital and assertive than he
usually shows on records -the group has
a notably fresh, blithe quality. Jordan,
in particular, plays with exciting logic
and economy as his ideas pulsate along
on uncluttered, almost classic lines. Ericson, once a strong open-horn man, apparently has been drawn into the Miles
Davis orbit and now tends to mutter
and mumble instead of joining in the
essentially shouting, outgoing character
of his group.
FOUR ALTOS
PRESTIGE 7116.
$4.98.
The alto foursome is made up of Phil
Woods, Cene Quill, Sahib Shihab, and
Hal Stein-all of the neo- Parker school.
This overconcentration on one type of
alto performance eventually has a deadening effect on the ear. The most interesting of the four -if I have disentangled
the solos properly -is the least publicized, Hal Stein, who distinguishes himself with a warm, controlled tone and a
relatively calm lyricism. Woods's playing
is harsh but strongly propulsive, Quill's
overly ornate, Shihab's orderly and possibly the closest to Parker.
BUD FREEMAN'S SUMMA CUM
LAUDE ORCHESTRA: Chicago /Austin High School Jazz in Hi-Fi
RCA VicroR LP\I 1508. $3.98.
The risks attendant on attempts to recreate jazz performances, particularly adlib small -group performances, are clearly
illustrated on this disc. Jack Teagamden,
Pee Wee Russell, Jimmy McPartland,
Billy Butterfield, Peanuts Hucko, George
Continued on page 82
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vol. 3: the trio
the modern tenor "colossus" with the
nation's poll -winners: Shelly Manne on
drums; Ray Brown, bass -In, to quote the
New Yorker, "a fascinating new tour de
force from the Coast "-C3530
THE POLL WINNERS: BARNEY KESSEL
contemporary C3523
WITH SHELLY MANNE AND RAY BROWN
CONTEMPORARY C3535
the vital young Jazz pianist in his third
great CR album. "He plays with driving
abandon! " -Metronome Yearbook. Red
Mitchell, bass and Chuck Thompson,
drums -C3523
(_:ontcm!torary C3526
'Shelly Manne & his Friends (André Previn, and
Leroy Vinnegar)- Modern jazz performances of
songs from
1.11
Ça
ABNER
their first recording, "and everything
cooked!" Counce on bass; Jack Sheldon,
trumpet; Harold Land, tenor sax; Carl
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in king -size jazz performances -C3526
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Red Garland Paul Chambers
Phillc Joe Jones
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C3535
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Contemporary C 3532
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spontaneous combustion! The West
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Coast's great Rhythm Section (Paul
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Philly Joe Jones, drums) in an uninhibited blowing session -C3532
CONTEMPORARY RECORDS
lARCH 1958
Barney Kessel, guitar; Shelly Manne,
drums and Ray Brown, bass -1956 and
1957 top stars In the 3 major polls: Down
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Wettling, and others were assembled
along with Freeman in three groups that
took a second whack at selections which
some of them made memorable twenty
or thirty years ago and which, in the
original versions, are currently available
Not a Club, Not a Gimmick, No Strings
A
New Way to Buy Records
.And Saue Money Too
on LP.
On four selections dating from the
McKenzie- Condon Chicagoans' sessions
in the late Twenties -China Boy, Sugar,
Nobody's Sweetheart Freeman
Lisa,
joins with McPartland and Russell to
produce something akin to the shattering,
explosive quality of the Chicagoans'
style. Freeman is at his latter-day best
on these four, particularly on Nobody's
Sweetheart which he digs into with biting, charging intensity. Without in any
way overshadowing the originals ( which
can he beard on Columbia CL 632),
these are performances that justify
themselves.
This is not true of the remainder of
the disc, however, most of which is based
on the recordings Freeman made with
Tcagarden for Columbia in 1940 (reissued on Harmony 7046). Jack Hits
the Road, once an uncluttered little
masterpiece, is callously mutilated despite the presence of Teagarden. The
other selections hold to a level of adequate studio Dixie -which leaves them
several cuts below the bright exuberance
of the originals.
.
-
PREVIEWS
by
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Yeatinimtet
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The Deutschmeister Band, conducted
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GRIEG
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and Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of London. conducted by Artur
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NIGHT AND DAY
And Other Cole Porter Favorites
Joel Herron, his piano and
the orchestra. WP 60)9
LISZT
Hungarian Rhapsodies (Nos. 1{);
Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of
London. conducted by Hermann
KETELBEY
XY/N
RED GARLAND TRIO: Groovy
PRESTIGE 7113. $4.98.
In A Chinese Temple Garden, etc.;
In a day of one- fingered pianists, Carland's strong, full -range, two -handed
piano is particularly welcome. Here he
plays six varied pieces with a warmth,
Vienna State Opera Orchestra, conducted by Armando Aliberti. WP 6082
18190
SUPPE
Overtures: Light Cavalry, Poet 8
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TABU
And Other Latin American Dances
Ralph Font and his Orchestra
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consistency, and walloping rhythmic
drive having much of the same broad
appeal found in Erroll Corner's playing,
although Garland resorts to none of the
stylistic devices that Garner has developed. Unpretentious, straightforward,
and strongly swinging work.
STAN GETZ: In Stockhohn
VERVE 8213. $4.98.
Made with a Swedish rhythm section
during one of Cetz's trips to that coun-
ADDRESS
CITY
Fuller has been unimpressively thin toned and sluggish on his earlier recordings, but on most of this disc his
trombone is bright, breezy, and smooth flowing. He still gets tied tip at a slow
tempo, as he demonstrates on a ballad;
but, given a beat that moves with any
persuasiveness, his playing has warmth
and validity. He works here with baritone saxophonist Tate Houston and a
rhythm section headed by Sonny
Clark, a pianist of rare strength and
taste who does wonders with a gently
swinging waltz. Houston is strong -voiced,
lyrical when required, and has the gargle tone currently in fashion for baritone
saxophones.
DEUTSCHMEISTER DRUMS
BEETHOVEN.
Scherchen.
CURTIS FULLER: Bone and Bari
BLUE NOTE 1572. $4.98.
ZONE_STATE
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Continued on page 84
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THE TROUBADORS VIA KAPP HI -FI
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TROUBADORS IN SPAIN: Habanera, Malaguena, Amapola, La Golondrina, A Media Luz, La Violetera, El Relicario, The Breeze And I, Ay Ay
THE TROUBADORS IN ROME:
Estrellita, Jealousie. KL1069 $3.98 THE TROUBADORS IN THE LAND OF THE GYPSIES: Lonely Heart, Misirlou,
Little Star, Hora Rumania, Golden Earrings, Acacia Trees, Romany Life, Play Gypsies -Dance Gypsies, Little Gate, Play, Fiddle, Play,
Ay, Granada, La Paloma,
Shining Dark Eyes, Gypsy Fancy, Dance, Dance, Dance. KL -1070 $3.98
THE TROUBADORS
IN HAWAII: My Isle Of Golden Dreams, Blue Hawaii, The Moon Of Manakoora, Across The
Sea, Sweet Leilani, Song Of The Islands, Beyond The Reef, The One Rose (That's Left In
My Heart), Pagan Love Song, Kuu Ipo', Lovely Hula Hands, Aloha Oe. KL -1071 $3.98
JANE MORGAN
"THE FASCINATION GIRL"
Affair to Remember, Stars In My Eyes, It's Not For
Me To Say, Intermezzo, Around The World, My Heart Reminds Me, River Seine, Midnight In
Athens, Speak Low, Two Different Worlds, Yours Is My Heart Alone. KL -1066 $3.98
WITH THE TROUBADORS: Fascination, An
Send for long playing catalog.
KAPP RECORDS, INC., 119 W. 57th ST., NEW YORK 19, N. Y.
\I:utcrt
1958
S3
With remarkable little studio bands that
drew on the cream of the Ellington,
try, these performances suggest that
Getz found in Sweden an extremely relaxing atmosphere. He plays seemingly
without effort, with spirit, and with a
suaveness of tone unmarred by the fudgy
quality that has dimmed so much of his
work in the past. Pianist Bengt Hallberg
offers him a constantly stimulating challenge in his solos and a sensitive accompaniment.
and Goodman personnel. He
recorded a rough, buoyant, vital Sweethearts on Parade with one of these
groups, a performance in striking contrast to the routine grinding out of the
tune that he offers here. These are more
of the smooth- surfaced, faceless performances that have been par for such
Hampton small groups in recent years.
Basie,
LIONEL HAMPTON QUINTET: The
High and the Mighty
VERVE
8228.
TED HEATH AND HIS MUSIC: Showcase
$4,98.
LONDON
One of the selections Hampton plays on
this disc, on which he is backed by the
Oscar Peterson trio and Buddy Rich, is
Sweethearts on Parade. It serves as an
unhappy reminder of the days, more than
fifteen years ago, when he was recording
LL 1737.
$3.98.
These slick, precise performances are
representative of the Heath band's great
talents as a theater orchestra. There are
only brief moments of jazz feeling and,
as might be expected, not in such tunes
VANGUARD
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as Canadian Sunset or Armen's Theme,
but in a well -cushioned version of
Bernie's Tune and one of Don Lusher's
trombone specialties, Bone Idle.
TONY KINSEY
Comes On
LonwoM LL 1672.
QUINTET:
Kinsey
$3.98.
Kinseÿ s English group ( tenor and
baritone
saxophones,
piano,
bass,
drums) has an airy attack that serves
the dual purpose of imbuing its work
with a spirit of fun and keeping its
faster efforts from taking on frantic overtones. Working out of tightly voiced ensembles, the two saxophonists bring a
remarkable amount of variety to what
might seem to be a limited front-line.
Much of the group's floating power steins
from the lithe, pulsing ease of tenor
saxophonist Don Renck'', a good jazzman in any country. The arrangements
are perky and adventurous, and Kinsey
doesn't cavil at the tour de force -successfully carried off-of playing Sweet
and Lovely as a drum improvisation over
ensemble chords.
LEE MORGAN: The Cooker
BLUE NOTE 1578.
The Definitive Anthology
of Music of the Strauss Dynasty
PAULIK conducting the Vienna State Opera Orchestra
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MODERN MASTERPIECES FOR THE VIOLIN. Bartok: 2nd Rhapsody and Six Rumanian
Ravel: Kaddisch.- Milhaud:
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Bloch: Baal Shem (complete)
1 -12"
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Saudades do Brasil
-
Morgan's crisply fluent trumpet is paired
here with Pepper Adams' baritone saxophone in a varied program that includes an electrifying development of
the speciality Morgan uses with Dizzy
Gillespie's hand, Night in Tunisia; a
bright attack on Just One of Those
Things; and a slow, brooding version of
Lover Man. Morgan frequently races
through some of the forceful, beautifully
projected and surprisingly meaningful
passages which. are his forte; and, on
Lover Man, shows a sensitive and equally
effective style at a slow tempo. Adam
moves around his instrument easily and
has a driving beat, but his creative
limitations lead him into long and relatively empty passages.
PEREZ PRADO AND HIS ORCHESTRA: "Prez"
RCA V1croa LPM 1558. $3.98.
New York Post
BRAHMS: THE COMPLETE VIOLIN SONATAS.
$4.98.
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Prado's attempts to focus his Latin American barrage on jazz occupies one
side of this disc. For this purpose he has
borrowed Stan Kenton's wall -of -brass
style, added shades of Harry James's
trumpet, underlined them with a conga
drum and his own instructive grunts. Yet
Prado doesn't swing. His jazz is simply
blatant and static.
Ralph Berkowitz, piano
MUSICAL DIVERSIONS UNIQUE ON VANGUARD
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Piano paraphrases
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Viennese pianist
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1.12"
VRS -1005
SIBELIUS: Rakastava Op. 14 and Valse Triste
GRIEG:
Norwegian Dances Op.
WEAVERS
Sweeter
favorites)
than
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GERMAN UNIVERSITY SONGS
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Fran: Litschauer and the Vienna State Opera
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THE
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Erich Kunz baritone, with idole Chorus and
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84
MAX ROACH AND STAN LEVEY:
Drummin' the Blues
LIBERTY LRP 3064. $3.98.
Two groups, identical except for drummer and tenor saxophonist, alternate in
selections in which the intent seems to
be the production of muscular swing. On
this score at least, the ensemble with
Max Roach on drums and Bill Perkins
on saxophone easily outdrives the Stan
Continued on page 86
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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Levey -Bob Cooper Group. There is, naturally, a good deal of drumming which
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PETE RUGOLO AND HIS ORCHESTRA: Out on a Limb
ErrAncY 36115. $3.98.
Don't Play the Melody, an excursion
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latter the stars engage in frantic attempts
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agility. The ballad medleys are the customary collections of glue.
specializes.
VERVE
SITTIN' IN
The onetime Stan Kenton arranger serves
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VERVE
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8219.
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HIGH FIDELITY DISCOGRAPHY
No. 39
Bruckner
on Microgroove
by Saul Taishoff
l.It,..nn Archive
The author, born in Massachusetts and schooled at Harvard, is employed at present in
San Francisco by an industrial design firm. From 1949 to 1953, however, he worked for
the Haydn Society, whose Haydn Quartet series he produced. "Externals of style apart," he
asserts with some conviction, "there is much in common between Haydn and Bruckner!'
WITH THE rcccnt
arrival from Vienna of the Mats in
D minor, we now have available on records everything of major importance that Anton Bruckner wrote.
As it has so many others, microgroove has worked
this miracle, too. Before LP, Bruckner recordings were
few and far between, and fully half of those issued were
of the Seventh Symphony. his most popular work.
Now we arc able to survey the entire peak production
of this unique composer.
Recordings of Bruckner have, with few exceptions,
originated in Austria, Germany, and Holland -countries
in which his music occupies a strong position in the
concert repertory. Elsewhere, listeners must rely almost
entirely on records. To be sure, one or another of the
later symphonies- usually the Seventh-gets an occasional performance, but I have yet to discover the
American orchestra which every season plays even one
of these, not to speak of the earlier works. Deplorable
as this situation is for those of us who rank Bruckner
with the greatest composers, such neglect has at least
negative compensations, not the least of which is our
being spared terrible disappointment at the hands of
conductors who instead elect to play havoc with Brahms
and Tchaikovsky. Really good performances are also
rare on discs, of course; but records at least permit frequent hearings, so necessary for an understanding of
Bruckner's music, and the best of them may afford a
\Latch 1958
more powerful experience than we are likely to get in
concert halls since Furawänglcr is dead and Bruno
Walter virtually retired.
1 have listed Bruckner's works in more or less chronological order. For our present purpose their number is
not large, and there is nothing to be gained by arbitrarily separating the church music from the symphonies. If ever a composer lived whose works in different forms show the strongest interrelationships,
Bruckner was the man.
Mention must be made of the vexing but essential
problem of texts. During his lifetime Bruckner himself
constantly revised, and permitted or suffered others to
revise, virtually all of his major works. The result has
been complicated and often bitter controversy involving
the merits of various versions. One example of the argument at its most picayune is the on- again, off -again status
of the famous cymbal clash in the Adagio of the Seventh
Symphony (it is currently on again). Important differences do exist, however, among the so-called revised
and original versions of most of the works, and for the
record listener the most serious of them arc to be found
in the Fifth and NinthSymphonies. The fact that these
works are available on LP in both the original and revised versions indicates that the issue is far from done
with. My own preferences arc discussed under the appropriate headings.
Oaem uRE IN G MINOR (3 Editions
The Overture is the strongest of several
pieces which Bruckner composed more
or less as matriculation exercises towards
the end of his studies with Otto Kitzler,
an opera conductor in Linz. Bruckner
seems never to have counted it among
his works, and it had to wait until 1921
for publication and a first performance.
The Overture's comparative popularity
on records (in addition to the three
performances now available it had long
life in a 78 -rpm version led by Sir
Henry Wood) cannot be ascribed altogether to the short work's obvious
value as filler material. It is, in fact,
highly finished technically and very attractive. Of the real Bruckner there is
almost nothing.
Von Mlatacic's performance is the most
satisfying of the three. He holds his
fundamentally dramatic conception within the bounds of the music's late classic early romantic style. He also has by far
the finest orchestra and is given the
most beautiful recording. Van Otterloo
provides a solid, straightforward reading,
ably played. The recorded sound of his
dlise is, however, rather hard. The
Adler version is the only one that can not be recommended. This conductor
seems to detect Wagner'ss heavy shadow
hovering over the score; but portentousness is quite out of place here, and the
orchestra plays sluggishly, to boot.
-Lovro von Matacic. Philharnoni a Orchestra. ANGEL 35-18B (or 35359/60)
(with Symphony No. 4; Scherzo from
Symphony No. "0"). $9.96 (or $6.96).
-Willem van Otter loo, Hague Philharmonic. Eric SC 6006 (with Symphony No. 7 ). $6.96.
F. Charles Adler, Vienna Symphony.
SPA 24/25 (with Symphony No. 9).
-
$11.90.
Ps.uat 112 (1 Edition)
This Psalm for double chonis and orchestra, composed in 1863, is the earliest
choral work by Bruckner that most of
us are ever likely to hear. Like the
Overture in G minor, which preceded it
by just a few months, the Psalm shows
considerable formal mastery, but provides only a rare glimpse of the amazing,
individuality which burst forth a year
later in the Mass in D minor.
Bruckner apparently left the work unfinished. The published score, as well
as the recording undoubtedly derived
from it, solves the problem in a reasonably satisfactory manner by repeating
the whole intnxluction, except for the
Alleluia at the very beginning.
We owe the only recording-and it is
a good one -to the early days of LP,
when this Psalm and the later setting
of Psalen 150 took up the fourth side of
which featured the Sixth Syman all
phony. That set (WL 505.5/6) has been
discontinued, and Psalms and symphony
have gone their separate ways on single
records.
-Henry Swoboda, Vienna Academy
Chamber Choir, Vienna Symphony.
WesTauNs-rsa XWN 18075 (with Psalm
150; Strauss: {Slanderers Stuns ied).
$4.98.
"0" IN D MDNon,
1 Edition)
By 1895, one year before his death,
Bruckner had achieved sufficient stature
in the eyes of the Austrian Imperial
Court to be granted an apartment in
the caretaker's quarters of Vienna's Belvedere Palace. While gathering his belongings together in preparation for the
move, he ran across a Symphony in D
minor, written thirty years earlier and
since then laid aside and probably forgotten. The composer of nine greater
symphonies hastened to note on the score:
"Phis Symphony is wholly invalid. ( Only
an attempt)." His verdict kept the work
from being uncovered until 1924, when
it was finally performed and published
as one of the major observances of
Brnckner's centenary.
Bruckner was forgivably but unduly
harsh in judging his own "attempt."
Despite some structural weaknesses, it is
a perfectly respectable piece. The two
inner movements, presaging the magnificent Adagios and Scherzos of the numbered symphonies, are especially fine.
Unfortunately, Von Matacic's performance of the Scherzo lacks excitement. The
movement gets far better treatment in
a recently deleted Concert Hall recording of the whole symphony by the
Hilversum (Netherlands) Radio Orchestra under Henk Spniit (CHS 1142).
It is well worth hunting up.
-Von Matacie, Philharmonia Orchestra.
ANGEL 35486 (or 353.59/60, with Symphony No. 4; Overture in G minor).
$9.96 (or $0.96).
SYSIPHONy
No.
Selina° ONLY
(
IN D Mixon (1 Edition)
From 1856 to 1868, when he went to
live permanently in Vienna, Bruckner
was organist at the Linz Cathedral. Here
he had excellent luck in his superior,
Bishop Franz Joseph Rudigier, whose
intelligent and sympathetic treatment of
Bruckner stands in happy contrast to
the relationship between Mozart and his
Archbishop Colloredo. Rudigier sensed
the enormous, if largely latent, gifts of
his organist, and he encouraged Bruckner's animus studies with Simon Seeker
and Kitzler. He was well rewarded when
the Mass in D minor bad its first performance, in his church, in 1864. Rudigier is reported to have confessed to
Icing so
h moved by the music
that he could not pray.
We can believe him. The work rivals
Haydns Nelson Mass ( which Bruckner
probably knew by heart) in its intensity.
All of it is memorable, hut Bruckner's
truly apocalyptic setting of the Et
resurrexit portrays this central portion
of the Mass more meaningfully than
any other music with which I am
familiar.
Adler has a scum! understanding of
the required style, and the result is a
highly effective performance. The otherwise
lentified "Vienna Orchestra" is
probably a group from the Vienna Symphony, as in Adler's other Bruckner
recordings. The name of the chorus is
not only omitted, but its very participation receives no recognition, either on
the label or jacket. I would guess that
it is the Vienna Academy Choir and
MAss
90
that its services, like those of the orchestra, arc available to all solvent
record firms, but its true identification
permitted only to one.
us,
-Adler, Vienna Symphony and Chorus,
Soloists. SPA 72. $5.95.
I, IN C MINOR (1 Edition )
Bruckner completed the First Symphony
in 1866, and it received its first performance ender his direction in Linz two
years later. The work has been called
the most original first symphony ever
written. Aside from the matter of strict
SYMPHONY No.
rind accuracy ( the Symphony is
actually his third ), the accolade is justified.
The symphony was certainly too original for its first audience. Put down as
a bewildering failure, it had to wait
until 1891 for a second performance,
when Bruckner, who was always especially fond of it, dedicated it in a
revised version to the University of
Vienna in exchange for an honorary
doctorate. Even then, so discerning a
musician as Hugo Wolf was able to
make neither head nor tail of the work.
On the other hand, the score made a
profound impression on such conductors
as Billow and Richter.
The difficulty which listeners both then
and now have experienced with the
First probably lies in its special character, which seems to me unlike that
of Bnickner's later symphonies and
closer to the style of Mahler and the
early Schoenberg. In any case, it is full
of wonderful things, particularly certain
passages in the Adagio which Bruckner
equaled hut never surpassed.
A few years ago Re ' gton released
the first recording of the symphony on
its Masterseal label. The conductor, Volk mar Andreae, belied his reputation as
a Bruckner specialist, and inferior orchestral playing and recording added
to the disappointment. Adler's more
recent performance seems to me his
finest recorded contribution to Bruckner.
He conducts with enormous enthusiasm,
and the orchestra matches him. They
play the symphony in the same spirit in
which Bruckner wrote it: as if their
lives depended on it.
-Adler, Vienna Symphony. UNICORN
1015. $3.98.
MASS IN E MiNou
(1 Edition)
All that the second of Bruckner's three
mature Masses has in common with its
sisters is the genius of their composer.
Temporarily departing from the style of
the traditional symphonic \lass, he combined his own advanced harmonic idiom
with the complex polyphony of an earlier
age to create a work for the church
unique in nineteenth- century music. In
aeonlance with its stylistic basis and
perhaps with the cire
tance that it
was to have its first performance outdoors, Bruckner dispensed with full ordiestra and vocal soloists, and called
instead for an eight -part chorus with
wind and brass accompaniment.
Superficially, this Mass may have had
its origins in an attempt on the part
Hlctt FIDt3.rnwww.americanradiohistory.com
MAGAZINE
of the ever devout Bruckner to please
the advocates of Cecilianism, who sought
to rid the Roman Catholic Church of
such impurities as the Masses of Haydn
and Mozart. If this was indeed the
case, Bruckner succeeded in beating
them at their own game.
There have been two recordings, both
of which antedate LP. That by the
Aachen Cathedral Choir under T. B.
Rebmann probably introduced more
American listeners to the score than slid
any other. Although it was a good performance, the use of boys' voices in
the upper parts tended to overemphasize
the Palestrinian side of the work's stylistic coin. RCA Victor never transferred
this recording to microgroove.
'l'clefunkens version first reached us
after the war on Capitol 78s. In due
time Capitol dubbed the performance
to LP, but the transfer and processing
had defects common to much of that
company's work at the time. Happily,
the pressing now available on the Telefunken label is considerably better, although the sound is not up to today's
standards. The performance was always
excellent, apart from an inexplicable cut
of ten measures in the Gloria.
-Max Thum, Hamburg State Opera
Chorus and
88033. $4.98.
MASS IN
Orchestra.
TELEFCNKEN
F Mu on (1 Edition)
In the spring of 1887 Bruckner suffered
a nervous collapse so severe that it
brought him close to insanity. Three
months of treatment at a spa restored
him, and on his return to Linz he
began at once to work on this Mass.
Unquestionably the most ambitious of
Bruckner's Masses, it tends toward an
explicit monumentality relatively absent
in the earlier two. Johann Herbeck, the
Viennese conductor who had recognized
Bruckner's extraordinary accomplishment
in the D minor Mass, lumped the later
work with Tristan laud Isolde as "mistakes." The comparison could not have
displeased Bruckner, who had attended
the première of the opera in 1865 and
recognized its revolutionary importance
long before history was to do so.
The Credo is, as always with Snuck ncr, the most powerful movement; again,
he gives us his incredibly exciting best
in the Et resurrcxit. The most famous
section is the Benedictus, whose main
theme he was to use a few years later
in the Second Symphony. There is no
disputing Bruckner's expert handling of
this material, but it seems to me to
border on a saccharinity not elsewhere
encountered in his music.
The Viennese, who perform Masses
such as this one in their churches every
' stSunday, are past masters at a
ing its baroque qualities. Grossmann's
firm beat tempers the native ardor of
his charges most effectively. The soloists
are good- except for the bass, who has
the most to do and does it in a declamatory style that Bruckner never
can have intended.
-Ferdinand Grossman, Vienna Academy Chamber Choir, Vienna State Phil harmonia, Soloists. Vox PL 7940. $4.98.
MARCH
SvStrn «Nv No. 2, IN C MINon (l Edition)
The death of Simon Sechter in 1887
provided Bruckner with a long- sought
Opportunity to try his luck outside Linz.
The venerable theoretician ( death had
prevented Schubert from working with
him forty years before) had held down
the post of lecturer at the Vienna Comservatory. After a goxxl deal of hesitat'
-warranted, as it turned out -Bruckner
:,creptel an invitation to become his
successor.
With the Second Symphony, the first
large work that he completed in Vienna,
Bruckner immediately encountered the
hostility that was to plague him for
years to come. First the Philharmonic
refused the work as unplayable. Then,
when in 1873 he paid for a performance
under his own direction, Eduard Hans lick uttered the first of those tiresome
pronouncements on Bruckner's lack of
foam and longwindelness which have
been echoed a thousand times since.
Ironically, in his Second, Bruckner
made a conscious attempt, fortunately
only partly successful, to restrain the
inventiveness that had so completely
mystified listeners to the First a few
years hack. To gain clarity he inserted
long pauses between sections of movements (a practice which later was to
become organic in his scheme of things).
For the first time he also used folklike
material in movements other than the
Scherzo. He avoided the urgency of the
First and instead strove for broad lyricism.
These qualities, it seems to me, make
the Second a precursor of the Fourth
and Seventh, but it is a completely
winning achievement on its own, as
Ludwig Georg Jo chum's performance
ably demonstrates. He captures the singing essence of the score. and his orchestra responds in a manner worthy
of the man whose name it hears. The
recording is on a similarly high level.
-Ludwig Georg Joel , Linz Bnuckner
Orchestra. UaANIA URLP 402. $6.96.
No. 3, IN D MINOR (4 Editions)
Bruckner's "Wagner" Symphony, originally so called (by Bruckner himself )
by reason of its dedication, was completed in 1873. The score underwent
several revisions, the very first of which
expunged literal allusions to theme from
Tristan and the Ring.
The symphony's first performance in
1876 by Bruckner and the Philharmonic
-which, true to foram, had twice before
refused to play it- prnvidel the occasion
for one of Vienna's most notorious
scandals. Derision greeted Bruckner
the peel' , and by
when he nu
the tinte the work was finished only a
handful of people were left in the loll.
Among them were the publisher Rettig,
who brought the symphony out two
years later, and the young Gustav Mahler, who collaborated with a fellow student in arranging it for two pianos.
Wherever Bruckner's numsic is frequently performed, the Third is by far
the most popular of the earlier symSYMPHONY
phonics, a fact that accounts for the
relative plethora of recordings which it
has been given. Unfortunately, none
of them constitutes an adequate presentation of the work. \Valtcr Goehr's
performance with the Hilversum Radio
Orchestra for Concert Hall (CHS 1195)
came closest to hitting the mark, but it
is no longer listed in the catalogue.
Andreacs is the best of the four
versions currently available. Apart front
a rather vulgar reading of the slow
movement, he succeeds generally in projecting the grandeur in the score. He
also receives good orchestral support and
recording. Adler's leisurely approach
makes the music sound pedestrian. However, he has one advantage over the
others in that his two -record all
permits uninterrupted hearing of the
great Adagio. Knapp ertsbuseh is disappointing. Whatever his standing as a
Wagner conductor, he shows no insight
whatever here into the demands that
Bruckner makes. His performance proceeds by (its and starts, and the result
is incoherence. Fekete's has the distinction of having been the first recording
of the symphony ever made, but it is
hard to detect any other.
-Volkmar Andreae, Vienna Symphony.
Eric LC 3218. $3.98.
-Adler, Vienna Symphony. SPA 30/31
(with Mahler: Symphony No. 10).
$11.90.
-Hans Knappertsbusch, \'ienna Philharmonic. LoNUON LL 1044. $3.98.
-Zoltan Fekete, Salzburg Mozartcuun.
REIUINcroN 138. $3.98.
SYMPHONY No. 4, IN E FLAT ("ROMAN-
TIC") (9 Editions)
One of the most popular of Bruckner
symphonies-the most popular of all in
terms of frequency of recording -the
Fourth was also one of the most radically revised. Bruckner completed his
first version of the work in 1874, but by
the time it received its first performance
seven years later he had gone over it
twice and it boasted a new Scherzo and
Finale.
"Romantic" is the inscription at the
head of Bruckner's manuscripts of the
Fourth, and romantic this
certainly is, from its unforgettable opening
horn call to the maunnurih closing chords.
Between them, we hear one of Bruckner's most secular Adagios and as splendid a Scherzo as he ever composed.
After the work was written Bruckner
liked to elaborate on his title with fantic descriptions of the
ciful progn
various movements, but these are best
ignored.
Of the many versions available, Van
Otterloo's strikes me as the most satisfactory to live with. Here as usually elsewhere, he demonstrates an uncommon
ability to unfold a Bruckner score without
missing its wealth of detail yet without
indulging in profitless idiosyncrasy ( his
reading of the Seventh is a strange
exception; see below). Apart from an
occasional tentative moment in the horns,
his orchestra does very well. The recording lacks all the spaciousness one
would like, but it is wholly adequate.
In the Von Matacic performance both
.
91
1958
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orchestra and recording technique are
extraordinarily fine, but repeated listening has made me impatient with his
overly rich approach. Still, this is an exceptional recording and some may well
prefer it.
Jochum's recording is the most recent
of the lot. There are so many good
things about his reading that one can
only deplore all the more his inveterate
tendency to slow things down. Here he
interprets the Andante quasi Allegretto
to mean Adagio, and this is fatal to the
movement.
Abendroth is too ponderous for my
taste. However, his stately performance
is favored with an excellent orchestra
and surprisingly good recording. Anemia
afflicts Knappertsbusch here just as it
does in his version of the Third Symphony. Indeed, the Siegfried Idyll on
the fourth side of the set is so well done
that one wonders which work came as
the afterthought in London's scheduling
plans.
Two interesting performances by
Klemperer and Steinberg are vitiated by
consequences attendant upon their having been planned from the beginning, I
suspect, to occupy single records. With
Klemperer the limitation of space apparently brought about a reading so swift
that I can scarcely believe he conducted
it. Steinberg's tempos are just, but he
cuts sixty important measures from the
slow movement. A score in the archives
of Columbia University supplies evidence
that Bruckner sanctioned such a cut for
concert performances, but it ought not
to be carried over to recordings.
Of the two remaining versions listed
in the catalogue, Kempen'.s (Telefunken )
is no longer available and Tubbs's (Allegro), whatever its interesting origins,
emerges as an atrocity.
-Van Otterloo, Hague Philharmonic.
EPIC SC 6001 ( with Mahler: Kinderto-
tenlieder). $6.96.
-Von Matacic, Philharmonia Orchestra.
or 35359- 35360, ( with
Overture in G minor; Scherzo from Symphony No. "0"). $9.96 ( or $6.96 ).
-E. Jochum, Bavarian Radio Symphony.
DECCA DXE 146 ( with Symphony No.
7 ). $17.85.
-Hernian Abendroth, Leipzig Symphony. URANIA URLP 401. $6.96.
-Knappertsbusch, Vienna Phill)armonic.
(with Wagner:
LONDON LL 1250/1
Siegfried Idyll). $6.96.
-Otto Klemperer, Vienna Symphony.
Vox PL 6930. $4.98.
-William Steinberg, Pittsburgh Symphony. CAPITOL P 8352. $4.98.
ANGEL 3548B,
No. 5, W B FLAT ( 2 Editions)
Like its immediate predecessors, the
Fifth Symphony was written during a
time when Bruckner's fortunes were at
their very worst. The work underwent
hardly any revision until its first performance twenty years later at Graz
under Franz Schalk, one of Bruckner's
closest followers. ( Bruckner was too ill
to attend and, in fact, never did hear
the score.) On that occasion Schalk performed a version which differed strongly
from Bruckner's manuscript as we have
it. The whole symphony was radically
SYMPHONY
reorchestrated, and a cut of 122 measures was made in the Finale. Less
important, but indicative of Schalk's
basic confusion of Bruckner with Wagner, was his spectacular device whereby
a brass band seated above the orchestra
intoned the chorale which crowns the
work.
It is generally agreed that Bruckner
assented -how willingly, we shall probably never know -to these changes, and
in 1896 they found their way into the
published score. This is the text used in
the Knappertsbusch recording.
The Fifth was one of the first matters
taken up during the reassessment of
available Bruckner material which
reached its height during the 1930s.
The subsequent first performance of the
original version proved an eye -opener
and has led to its widespread use.
Pflüger plays it in his recording.
The Fifth is far and away Bruckner's
most imposing achievement before the
three last symphonies, differing from
them not in greatness but only in specific content. The expressive qualities of
the work come through in the original
version, while they all but disappear in
the revised one. A comparison between
the two Adagios perfectly illustrates this
crucial point: one of Bruckner's most
heart- rending movements is made to
sound downright jaunty]
Unfortunately, these faults are all
too prominent in the Knappertsbusch
performance. More is the pity, for the
Vienna Philharmonic is heard to far
better advantage here than in the Third
and Fourth.
Pflüger's is a much superior conception, and he goes a long way towards
realizing the symphony's enormous potential. The Leipzig orchestra seems here
to be made up of no such virtuosos as
the Viennese; nor is the sound a match
for London's. Nevertheless, this performance is the only possible choice.
There have been two other recordings
of the Fifth, both performed in the
original version. One of them, by Eugen
Jochum and the Hamburg Philharmonic,
came to us on LP via the postwar
Telefunken- Capitol route; it has since
been deleted. Far superior was Karl
Böhm's performance with the Saxonian
State Orchestra on 78s. RCA Victor
apparently did not consider this set
worthy of inclusion in its "Treasury of
Immortal Performances," and it was
never dubbed on microgroove. However,
its sound was superb for its time. Angel
might well release it in its new "Great
Recordings of the Century" series.
-Gerhard Pflüger, Leipzig Philharmonic.
URANIA URLP 239 ( with Weber: Symphony No. 1 ). $6.96.
-Knappertsbusch, Vienna Philharmonic.
LONDON LL 1527/8 ( with Wagner: Excerpts from Götterdämmerung). $8.98.
F ( 2 Editions )
Bruckner's only chamber work, except
for an early string quartet, had its origins
in a commission by Theodor Helhnesberger, leader of Vienna's foremost quartet of the time. The work was finished
in 1879, but Hellmesberger balked at
QUINTET FOR STRINGS, IN
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the Scherzo-I can hear him telling
Bruckner that it was unplayable -and
persuaded him to compose an "Intermezzo" as a substitute for the movement. Although the Quintet had a semiprivate performance by another group
in 1881, Hellmesberger did not get
around to playing it until 1885.
The Quintet is one of Bruckner's most
individual pieces, and for this reason I
do not recommend it to those who are
not familiar with the symphonies. The
Scherzo, which Hellmesberger feared,
turns out to be one of Bruckner's most
original -which is indeed saying a great
deal. In addition, the Adagio is very
fine; it is a particular favorite of Richard
Burgin, concert master of the Boston
Symphony, who has conducted it several times with the string section of the
Orchestra.
Both available recordings are good,
but the Koeckert group performs the
music with greater vitality. The Konzerthaus Quartet offers us a bonus in the
Intermezzo, but this is hardly enough
to tip the scales since the piece is the
only dull music by Bruckner on records.
-Koeckert Quartet; Georg Schmid,
viola. DECCA DL 9796. $4.98.
-Vienna Konzerthaus Quartet; Ferdinand Strangler, viola. VANGUARD VRS
480 (with Intermezzo for String Quintet). $4.98.
SYMPHONY No. 6, IN A (2 Editions)
The most neglected of Bruckner's later
works- Robert Haas calls it "the stepchild among its sisters"-was begun immediately after the String Quintet and
completed in 1881. Paradoxically, the
Sixth had to wait only two years for
a performance, although this consisted
only of the Adagio and Scherzo. In
1899 Mahler programed all four movements at one of his concerts with the
Vienna Philharmonic. The Symphony has
not been played very often since.
Over and over again one discovers
that lack of performance constitutes no
index to the quality of a symphony by
Bruckner, and the Sixth is no exception.
Apart from a knotty Finale, which unties itself with repeated listening, this
is a wholly entrancing work whose
magic even Tovey, who was hardly a
Bruckner enthusiast, could not resist.
The Westminster recording is one of
the best of that company's early issues.
Swoboda has a genuine feeling for the
symphony, and the orchestra catches it.
The excellence of the sound six years
after it was taken down attests to Westminster's technical primacy during LP's
uncertain early days.
Tempos that are far too brisk spoil
Ludwig Georg Jochum's performance.
His reasons for adopting them are mysterious, since his reading otherwise is
stylistically unerring. The sound is several cuts below Westminster's.
-Henry Swoboda, Vienna Symphony.
WESTMINSTER XWN 18074. $4.98.
-Ludwig Georg Jochum, Linz Bruckner
Orchestra. URANIA 7041. $3.98.
(2 Editions )
The Te Deum and the later Psalm 150
TE DEUM
are the only major choral works dating
from Bruckner's last years. The Te Deum
is by far the more important of the two.
Bruckner completed it in a first version
in 1881, but during 1883 and 1884
he radically revised the second half,
which now culminated in the tremendous fugue on "Non confundar in aeternuni." The main theme of this final
section plays a prominent role in the
Adagio of the Seventh Symphony, composed during this same period.
With the exception of the Seventh,
the Te Deum caught on with conductors and the public more rapidly
than any other Bruckner work. According to H. F. Redlich, Afahler (who was
one of its earliest champions) in his
own score crossed out the conventional
listing of forces necessary for performance and wrote: "For angelic tongues,
for Cod -seekers, tormented hearts and
for souls purified in flames."
It is probably more than coincidence
that \fahler's own greatest disciple has
elected the Te Deuln as his sole
recording of Bruckner. In any event,
his is a magnificent performance, and
the recorded sound is worthy of it. I
regard the absence of other Bruckner
recordings by Walter a near tragedy.
Surely Columbia, which often has proved
its willingness in the past to explore
repertory beyond the "fifty master-
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pieces," will do something to correct
this situation before it is too late.
Eugen Jochum's performance, which
originated in the late Forties, tends to
be routine. It was welcomed when nothing else was available -Brucknerites
have always been grateful for crumbs
but Walter has superseded it in every
way.
-Bruno Walter, Westminster Choir,
New York Philharmonic, Soloists. Common/. ML 4980 (with Mahler: Kinder totenlfeder). $3.98.
-Eugen Jochum, Munich Radio Symphony and Chorus, Soloists. DECCA DX
109 (with Symphony No. 8). $17.94.
-
No. 7, iN E (3 Editions)
Bruckner's tardy recognition in Germany
and Austria dates from the first performance of the Seventh Symphony under Nikisch at Leipzig in 1885. Completed two years earlier, the work marked the
beginning of successes for his music
which not even his enemies ( the word
is not too strong ) could withstand.
The persistence of the Seventh as
Bruckner's most popular Symphony
although lately I detect some signs of
favor towards the Eighth -is readily explained. For one thing, its sheer beauty
as flowing sound is irresistible. The
work's comparative freedom from Bruck nerian structural ( though not tonal ) complexities also makes it more accessible, of
course. Finally, the Adagio offers considerable extramusical value through its
association with Wagner, a pretty good
public relations man himself, whose
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The Seventh was by far the most frequently recorded of all Bruckner symphonies on 78 rpm. The most notable
version was a performance of the Adagio
alone by Furtwängler and the Berlin
Philharmonic which I have never heard
equaled; it was never released here.
Oddly enough, only three editions are
to be had on microgroove. None present
the Seventh in the best possible light.
It is hard, at first, not to be carried
away by Van Beinum's great orchestra
and London's superb recording, but before long one realizes that this conductor's
businesslike approach does not get to the
expressive core of the work. My negative reactions to his recordings of the
Seventh ( London released an earlier performance on 78s ) were confirmed for me
by his reading of the work with the
Philadelphia Orchestra at a Carnegie
Hall concert two years ago.
Van Otterloo sins in an opposite direction. He exaggerates Bruckner's "very
solemn and very slow" marking of the
Adagio to the point of languor, and the
movement all but falls apart. The Vienna
Symphony is no match for the Concertgebouw here, and Epic's sound cannot
compete with that of London.
Jochum's new recording is his second
of this work; the first, a wartime performance with the Vienna Philharmonic
for Telefunken, was released here on
LP by Capitol. It is a creditable job most
of the way. For once, this conductor
does not fall into mooning over a slow
movement. But one's gratification is short-
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lived: the Scherzo and Trio are taken at
a leaden pace. However, the Berliners
play beautifully and Deutsche Crammophon has supplied first -rate recording.
Van Beinum's must be the choice for
the moment, but the Seventh deserves
something better. Let's hope that it
receives it soon.
-Van Beinum, Amsterdam Concertgebouw. LONDON LL 852/3 ( with Franck:
Psyche). $6.96
-Van Otterloo, Vienna Symphony.
Eric SC 6006 (with Overture in G
minor). $6.96.
-E. Jochum, Berlin Philharmonic. DECCA
DXE 146 ( with Symphony No. 4).
$17.85.
No. 8, IN C MINOR (3 Editions)
After the elegiac lyricism of the Seventh,
Bruckner turned to tragedy on a scale
which dwarfs even the enormous Fifth.
He began the Eighth in 1884 and completed the scoring three years later. The
work was submitted to the conductor
Hermann Levi, of Bayreuth fame, who
declared it too long and unplayable as
it stood. Lack of understanding on the
part of a musician whom Bruckner called
his "father in art" proved too much for
him, and he experienced a breakdown
similar to the one that had afflicted
him twenty years before. Nevertheless,
as soon as he was strong enough he
began to revise the symphony. By 1890
he had finished this second version. It
was published, with cuts, in 1892, the
year in which the work received its
first performance under Richter in
Vienna.
Perhaps because the Eighth is Bruck ner's most complicated score, it also is
the most difficult to perform well. While
the first movement is probably the most
compact that he ever wrote, the Adagio
is the longest -and the most sustained
-in symphonic literature. Add to these
a Finale of epic proportions, and one
wonders that the work is performed at
all, let alone memorably.
The appearance of the postwar performance by Eugen Jochum and the
Hamburg Philharmonic on Deutsche
Crammophon 78s, subsequently transferred to LP by Decca, created a sensation among the faithful. It was hard to
believe that this almost legendary
colossus had at last been recorded, and
in what purported to be the original
version at that. Actually, this version
represented a combination by Robert
Haas, its editor, of elements found in
both of Bruckner's manuscripts.
Repeated listening soon awakened
reservations about Jochuin's approach:
his slow tempos, especially in the Adagio,
and his overeagerness to achieve effect
at the expense of line. Still, his performance was a step in the right direction, and it benefited by recording that
was excellent then and is adequate now.
The two later recordings were issued
at about the same time. I can recommend Van Beinum's performance of this
symphony even less than that of the
Seventh. The work loses much of its
essential ruggedness in his hands, and
we get something which sounds more
SYMPHONY
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like a symphony by Saint-Saëns than
Bruckner's greatest completed work.
However, his orchestra plays magnificently and Epic has provided excellent
sound. Like Jochum, Van Beinum employs the Haas edition.
We are left with Horenstein's version, which, all things considered, I think
is the most satisfactory. It is not a great
performance, but it approaches greatness. What Horenstein lacks is the
ability, regrettably reserved for the few,
to mold an entire movement from beginning to end. He gets strong support
from the orchestra, which I am told is
the Vienna Symphony; its playing here
is the best that it has contributed to
recorded Bruckner. Vox's sound is somewhat too close up for this kind of music,
but otherwise it is good. Horenstein uses
Bruckner's revision of 1890, which has
replaced the Haas edition as the officially
approved text.
The conductor of the Eighth Symphony in our time who never failed to
supply what all of these performances
lack in varying degree was Wilhelm
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In 1892 Bruckner took time out from his
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NO
HIGH FIDELITY M ACAZL\E
Reviewed by
PAUL AFFELDER
BEETHOVEN: Overtures: Leonore,
No. 3, Op. 72a; Coriolan, Op. 62
Boston Symphony
Munch cond.
Orchestra,
RCA Vieron BCS 48.
18 min.
Charles
$8.95.
The rapid pulse and occasionally shattering personal force of Mr. Munch are
dominant here, producing results that secure attention if not, necessarily, providing the approach to Beethoven one
finds most congenial. These are very
tight, exciting performances, losing some
breadth and majesty because of their
high temperature, but offering a compensatory sizzle. The recording seems
to have captured the feel of the original
R.C.M.
extremely well.
BERNSTEIN: West Side Story
Original Broadway Cast and Orchestra,
\lax Coberman, cond.
COLUMBIA TOB 13. Two 7 -in. 55 min.
$23.95.
Those who have seen the Jerome Robbins stage production of the BernsteinLaurents- Sondheim smash hit seem
agreed that its visual and balletic elements are so important that the music
alone can give only an inadequate notion of the work's spellbinding power.
Certainly many scenes in last fall's LP
version (OL 5230 ) are scarcely intelligible except insofar as memory or
imagination can fill in the missing stage
action. Nevertheless, I found the LP
alone, if no substitute for a theater seat,
obscurely exciting and, in a handful of
songs as well as the ribald "Gee, Officer
Krupke!" chorus, immensely relishable.
Now, in stereo, the sense of big audi-
torium space and electrifying immediacy
works miracles in dramatic impact and
aural satisfaction. Probably it also exposes more candidly the vocal deficiencies of the leading singers, Carol Lawrence and Larry Kert; but at the same
time it infuses their sentimental Tonight
and One Heart, One Hand with genuine
. spices
poignance
even more provocatively the America, Cool, and Officer Krupke ensembles
and endows
the diabolically clever scoring with even
...
MARCH 1958
R. D.
DARRELL
ROLAND GELATT
higher galvanic tension than the disc
conveyed. In short, the present release
strikes me as both the finest stereo recording of n stage work I have yet
encountered and something mighty close
to
masterpiece of musical Americana.
R.D.D.
BRAHMS: Ein Deutsches Requiem,
Op. 45
Teresa Stich -Randall, soprano; James
Pease, baritone; North German Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Carl Barnberger, cond.
CONCERT HALL RX 45. Two 7-in. 67
min.
$23.90.
Scores of this type with a large chorus
and orchestra, organ, and vocal soloists
seem ideal for stereo, so it's rather sad
to have to report that this one just
doesn't meet the mark. Stereo gives a
somewhat more spacious quality than
one finds in monaural versions, of course,
but here the recording is so soft in
focus as to cancel out that advantage.
In this voluptuous woolliness, the words
of the choral part are usually indistinguishable and often reduced to no more
than sibilants.
Neither soloist is particularly good,
and the conductor proceeds at a deliberate pace that produces an effect I
find both somber and wearying. Add to
this some strange post- session "adjustments" to the channels, and the result
is one I cannot recommend over the
first -class Kempe set (RCA Victor LM
6050).
R.C.M.
BERLIOZ: Le Carnaval romain,
Overture, Op. 9 -See Wagner: Die
Meistersinger: Prelude.
ROBERT CHARLES MARSH
like to know how music actually sounded
in St. Mark's Cathedral, Venice, over
three and a half centuries ago. The
problem is hardly solved by the present
collection of eight of the fourteen canzoni
di sonar from Giovanni Gabrieli's first
set of Symphonic sacrae (LP SPL 734 ).
for while modern trombones may not he
much different from Renaissance sack buts, present -day trumpets differ markedly in timbre from the old wooden-andleather cornetts (or zinken) that Gabriel;
called for. That hardly can be helped,
since few cornetts or cornett players are
available today, but it is unfortunate that
a closer practicable approximation to the
solution was not achieved simply by re-
cording the present performances in a
more cathedral -like, acoustical ambience.
Nevertheless, stereo makes a tremendous difference even with comparatively
unreverberant acoustics, and the present
works -with their ringing brass sonorities, responsive and echo writing, their
wondrously festive exuberance, and grave
ceremonial expressiveness-provide some
supreme aural thrills. Baron's skilled
group plays magnificently, if perhaps a
shade overintensely at times in the high
registers, but it is the music itself and
above all its sonic textures, contrasts, and
blends which spellbind us.
R.D.D.
HAYDN: Symphonies: No. 102, in
No. 103, in E flat ("Drum
Roll")
B flat;
Vienna State Opera ( Volksoper ) Orchestra, Magens Woldike, cond.
VANGUARD VRT 3009 -10. 24 min. and
28 min. respectively. $11.95 each.
HAYDN: Symphony No. 104, in D
("London")
GABRIELI, GIOVANNI: Symphoniac sacrae (1597): 8 Canzoni
Pasdeloup Orchestra (Paris), Louis Martin, tond.
CONCERT HALL EX 55. 26 min. $11.95.
New York Brass Ensemble, Samuel Baron,
cond.
PERIOD PST 6. 29 min. $11.95.
For the final tapes in the Woldike series
of the six last Haydn symphonies ( originally released on LP as VRS 491 -3),
Next to solving the mystery of "what
song the Syrens sang," the historically
minded audiophile of today would most
I can only repeat the praise I lavished
on the earlier four ( Sept. and Nov.
Continued on page 10I
99
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CHICAGO 16, ILLINOIS
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ROBERT CASADESUS
Phono
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Htctt
www.americanradiohistory.com
LAURITZ MELCHIOR
prof Wognoe,on fofo,
FIUt:LFrY \1AG:\ZI\I'.
1957 ), much as I'd like to find new
words to describe the individual merits
of the present works-and especially of
my special favorite, No. 102.
That I've been bewitched by Woldike, I'll be quick to admit, however
willing I am to agree that others
(Scherchen in particular) may have
given these works more overtly dramatic and larger -scaled canvasses. Martin, however, doesn't come close to
either the Scherchen or Woldike standards. His No. 104 is a superficial, tinrelaxed, imprecisely controlled performance, and in the present coarse, uneven
recording it is as stridently irritating as
the Woldike taping is aurally delightful.
R.D.D.
HINDEMITH: Concerto for Harp,
Wood Winds, and Orchestra; Concerto for Trumpet, Bassoon, and Orchestra; Kammermusik, Op. 24, No. 1
Little Symphony Orchestra of San Francisco, Gregory Millar, cond.
FANTASY FST 901. 46 mies.
$11.95.
Early Hindemith and late. The Kam mermusik dates from 1922; the two con certos-of which these are first recordings -were composed in 1949. All of this
is tuneful and ingeniously wrought
music, not out of Hindemith's topmost
drawer, but well worth the trouble that
Mr. Millar and his men have obviously
lavished on it. The Concerto for Harp
and Wood Winds opens with a beguilingly impressionistic first movement,
played here with lovely tonal refinement;
thereafter, unfortunately, the piece goes
downhill; a note-spinning middle movement, followed by a finale that makes
unfunny contrapuntal hash of Mendeissohrt s Wedding March. The Concerto
for Trumpet and Bassoon stays on a
more even keel and is written in Hindemith's best "Cothical" declamatory vein.
The Kammermusik ( not to be confused
with the much recorded Kleine Kam mermusik for wind quintet) is a wry,
astringent work straight out of the
Weimar Republic; it seems rather too
tame in this polished performance.
The sound favored by Fantasy's engineers is extremely dry -and very revealing of the composer's intricacies of
scoring. Stereo's directional potentialities
have not been abused; the effect here is,
as it should be, of a small compact
R.C.
body of players.
MOZART: Die Entführung aus dem
Serail
Marilyn Tyler (s), Constanze; Helen
Petrich (s), Blondchen; John van Kesteren (t ), Belmonte; Karl Schiebener
(t), Pedrillo; August Griebel (bs), Osmin; Cologne Opera Chorus and Ciirzenich Orchestra (Cologne), Otto Ackermann, cond.
CONCERT HALL !IX 52.
90 min. $23.90.
Reposing in the tape vaults of the major
companies are a respectable number of
complete stereo opera recordings, a good
portion of which will probably be re-
leased before the year is out. Meanwhile, Concert Hall has the domain of
stereo opera to itself. It is, I'm afraid, a
case of the one-eyes being king in the
land of the blind. Neither the previously
issued Bohème nor this Seraglio is anything to crow about.
Again we are offered a "concert version" of an opera, with the solo singers
on the left, the chorus on the right.
This time, however, a specious kind of
movement is introduced by having the
spoken recitatives come from the right hand channel-a wretched dodge that
becomes maddening when a character
speaks a line on the right one moment
and an instant later begins singing at the
opposite end of the stage (as, for instance, Pedrillo does in No. 13).
As far as the singers are concerned,
then, stereo adds nothing-in fact, makes
matters worse. There remains the orchestra, which after n poor start (in the shrill sounding Overture nothing scenes to
"congeal") provides some beautiful moments. The accompaniment of muted
violins to "O wie ängstlich" is magical,
and so is the floating wood-wind introduction to the "Wenn unsrer Ehre wegen" quartet that concludes Act H. Bits
like this give tantalizing promise of what
we can expect from other, better engineered, stereo operas.
John van Kesteren, a Dutch tenor, is
easily the outstanding member of this
cast. His light agile voice has just the
right quality of youthful ardor for the
part of Belmonte, his rhythmic sense is
good, and he knows how to shape and
pace an aria. The others are mediocre.
August Griebel is the most plaintive, retiring, ineffective Osmin imaginable;
Marilyn Tyler sounds unsure of herself
in Constanze's bravura passages and in
general seems too tentative in spirit for
the assured young lady she is supposed
to be portraying.
A few cuts are made in the music;
the dialogue is much abbreviated.
R.G.
In sum, a disappointment.
Schubert, an anticlerical youth of twenty-one when he began the score, deleted "Credo in unam Sanctam Catholicam" from the text, thereby producing a Mass that the church would not
use; but its heresy does not extend to its
music. Schubertians would do well to
investigate this tape; in spite of its flaws,
it is still capable of giving pleasure.
R.C.M.
SESSIONS:
Suite
The
Black
Maskers:
Eastman- Rochester Symphony Orchestra,
Howard Hanson, conci.
MERCURY `-IS 5 -16.
21 min.
$8.95.
Perhaps the most persuasive recent evidence of high fidelity's evangelical role
in winning friends for contemporary composers is that offered by Howard Han son's Mercury LP series. And certainly
the immediate as well as potential ability of stereo to augment further the
effectiveness of such evangelicism is most
convincingly demonstrated when one
compares the present Hanson taping
with its disc version (MG 50106). Brilliant as the latter is, the stereo recording
not only reveals the superb orchestral
performance even more transparently,
but discloses entirely new dimensions of
both it and the music.
In this metamorphosis the concert version of Roger Sessions' 1926 score for an
Andreyev drama assumes a grander stature than its early admirers ever dared
credit it with. No longer just a "promising" example of distinctively American
modernism, it now can be clearly recognized as a milestone in native creative
achievement. Better still, as reproduced
with such electrifying vitality as it is here,
The Black Maskers becomes at last a
work to be sensuously enjoyed as well
as academically admired.
R.D.D.
SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 2, in D,
Op. 43
SCHUBERT: Mass in A fiat
Anne Bolinger, soprano; Ursula Zollenkopf, contralto; Helmut Kretchnur, tenor;
James Pease, baritone; North German
Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Carl
Bamberger, cond.
HALL LX 58. 44 min.
CONCERT
$17.90.
Recorded by the same chorus, orchestra,
and conductor as the Brahms Deutsches
Requiem also issued by Concert Hall,
this tape turns out, as might be expected, to have very similar quality.
In this case the enunciation is a little
cleaner, although there are still too many
hissing sounds. The fullness is there, but
the stereo effect doesn't amount to a
great deal and the soloists are in rather
low relief.
(
Voice on one side, accom-
paniment on the other is not higher
fidelity but a gimmick.)
This is only the second time the Mass
in A flat has been recorded ( there is a
Vox LP in the catalogue), an indication
that even today there are beautiful
things awaiting discovery by A & R nun.
Philadelphia Orchestra,
randy, cond.
COLUMBIA
NMB 12.
Eugene
44 min.
Or-
$17.95.
On the recently issued new LP (ML
5207 ) of this work the playing and
reproduction are velvety-rich, but Orinanely seems so much concerned with
showing off this tonal opulence that he
has given us an interpretation far less
convincing than the first -rate version
( ML 4131) released ten years ago and
now discontinued.
In the stereo version, however, some
of the interpretative shortcomings seem
less apparent than on disc -or is it that
the sheer panorama of sound tends to
divert one's attention from them? Stereo
shows to particular advantage after the
first movement, because in the three
succeeding movements there is greater
dramatic interplay between sections of
the orchestra. Most of the instruments
can be placed fairly specifically. The
trumpets, however, are inclined to
Continued on page 103
101
MARCH 1958
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spread, leaving little illusion of direction; and the cellos, which sometimes
sound rather subdued and lack bite,
would have benefited from greater presence. The wider tonal spectrum afforded
by the dual -track pickup also reveals a
hit of helter -skelter violin playing in the
Scherzo.
Comparison with the Kletzki- Philharmonia version (English Columbia BTA
101 -2, issued here on LP as Angel
35314) shows the British recording to be
rounder and mellower tonally but less
incisive interpretatively. The Britishers
are not the Philadelphians, by any
means, though they play very well indeed. The principal difference is in the
superior quality of our domestic wood
winds. As noted by R. D. Darrell in his
review ( June 1957) of the English tapes
-the symphony is spread onto two reels
-EMI's coaxially mounted microphones
help to eliminate the center -hole effect.
These tapes also reveal that the orchestra is seated somewhat differently. In
characteristic British fashion, the bass is
rounder and fuller, and there is less emphasis on the highs, though not to their
detriment.
P.A.
STRAUSS, JOHANN: Die Fledermaus: Overture; Tales from the Vienna
Woods and Blue Danube Waltzes
Hallé
cond.
Orchestra, Sir John Barbirolli,
MERCURY
MDS 5-4.
STRAUSS,
Waltz; 1001
Waldmeister:
Polka
29 min.
$12.95.
Emperor
JOHANN:
Nights: Intermezzo;
Overture;
Feuerfest
( Baden -Baden ),
Jascha
Horenstein,
cond.
PHONOTAPES S 903. 34 min. $14.95.
Except for the composer himself ( who
has yet to appear in stereo as a conductor ), Monteux is the incomparable
Sacre interpreter; and the recent taping
of his latest version, with the Orchestre
du Conservatoire de Paris, admits no
competition on its own grounds. Luckily,
Horenstein's reading is radically different: less refined in orchestral performance, far less lyrically expressive, but
also more incisive, savage, and overtly
dramatic. The present recording, too,
while far less translucent and glowing
than RCA Victor's, is equally wide range and more forcefully "biting."
Hence, listeners for whom the Sacre is
primarily a tonal apotheosis of barbaric
energy well may find this Horenstein
version more exciting. They also may
prize it for its use of Stravinsky's 1947
revision of the 1913 score -which sloes
not, however, seem greatly changed,
at least insofar as I can determine, from
the original. But for most Stravinskians,
Horenstein even at his best falls far
short of the magisterial Monteux, who
reveals so much more eloquently the
evocation of primeval mystery which
more than any "barbaric" savageryappeals most to present -day ears and
sensibilities.
R.D.D.
TCHAIKOVSKY: The Nutcracker,
Op. 71: Suite
Symphony of the Air
CONCERTAPES 24 -8.
(
conductorless).
21 min.
$11.95.
Boston Pops Orchestra, Arthur Fiedler,
cond.
RCA VicroR BCS 62. 21 min. $8.95.
Manchester, England, is a long way from
Vienna, and Barbirollï s Strauss farther
yet from the echt Waltz King. One will
listen here in vain for authentic lilt and
Cemiitlichkeit, or even for the zither in
Tales from the Vienna Woods. What
one will hear is grandly recorded `big"
concert performances, played by a fine
orchestra and authentically reproducing
the broad acoustics of the Manchester
Free Trade Hall -as well as, less happily, Sir John's maximum contrasts between languishing lyricism and no less
romantic, weighty symphonic sonorities.
released on LP in MG
( Originally
50124.)
Drexler, on the other hand, has unmistakable Viennese feeling for his more
imaginatively chosen and varied program, but a too meager orchestra. Despite its size, however, it plays valiantly
and is reproduced with admirable crispness in clean, well -balanced, if not markedly sonorous stereo. The zestful treatments and the glassily bright, light
percussion hits are particularly effective
in the Feuerfest Polka and Waldmeister
Overture.
R.D.D.
Fiedler's competent but overly methodical performance is attractively recorded,
if by no means as magically as Rod zinskï s Sonotapings of the suite in part
and the ballet as a whole. But while
the Symphony of the Air version also
may lack Rodzinskï s poetry, it has a
special interest of its own -as an invaluable documentation both of that illfated organization's brilliant debut and
the ability of its former NBC Symphony
men to remember so well their Toscaninian schooling. This is, of course,
the same performance which in David
Sarser's single- channel recording was included in the privately distributed LP
of several years ago. But the present
stereo recording, although made simultaneously, was engineered -according to
then current news reports, but unconfirmed by the notes for the present
release-by C. E. Smiley of Livingston. In
its belated appearance it provides impressive proof that stereo techniques
were well beyond the experimental stage
even in 1954. The vibrantly clean, well balanced, and openly spread sound here
seems good even by present -day standards and must be particularly praised
for its buoyant vitality and authentic
reproduction of Carnegie Hall acoustics.
R.D.D.
South -West
German
Radio
Orchestra
Symphony of the Air (conductorless).
CONCERTAPES 510. 18 min. $7.95.
It is sad that Arturo Toscanini's incredible long conducting career fell just
short of stereophonic recording. ( During
his last months with the NBC Symphony,
RCA Victor did actually take down a
few broadcasts in stereo; but the results,
I am told, were unsatisfactory.) Only
stereo could have done full justice to
the titanic yet meticulously balanced
fortissimos that Toscanini evoked from
his orchestra. So the conductorless Symphony of the Air tapes, made a few
months after the Maestro's retirement,
are the closest thing we have to Toscanini-in- stereo.
These performances are, as everybody
knows, remarkable facsimiles; the tempos, the precision, the phrasing, the
gradations and inflections are all echt
Toscanini. And the recording is marvelously alive and spacious. Altogether
something to treasure.
R.G.
-
Vienna State Opera Orchestra, Josef
Drexler, cond.
Ln:NCsTox 721 BN. 28 min. $11.95.
STRAVINSKY: The Rite of Spring
WAGNER: Die Meistersinger: Prelude
}Berlioz: Le Carnaval romain, Overture,
Op. 9
MARCH 1958
More Briefly Noted
Lehuir: Gold and Silver Waltz ( with
Waldteufel: Skaters Waltz). Sonotape
SWB 7003, 16 min., $6.95.
Rich and gleaming stereo recordings by
an apparently small-scaled delegation
from the Vienna State Opera Orchestra,
hut one which-under Armando Ali herti's direction -knows how to perform
even hackneyed materials with the right
glow and toe-tickling animation.
Offenbach: La belle Hélène: OverLa Périchole (excerpts). RCA
Victor BCS 50, 18 min., $8.95.
A companion tape to the recently reviewed ACS 49, also drawn from the
"Offenbach in America" LP (LM 1990 ),
and including many of the best Gaité
Parisienne tunes. In Fiedler's vivacious
Boston Pops performances and flawless
stereo recording, this is vintage musical
champagne guaranteed to exhilarate.
tae;
Sousa: Potehatan's Daughter; The
Dwellers of the Western World: Suite;
The Stars and Stripes Forever. WFB
1401 S 2, 20 min., $9.98.
Welcome revivals of two of the March
King's less familiar works, one inconsequential for all its blustery vigor, but
the other a curious series of tone paintings purportedly depicting the Red,
White, and Black Man in America. The
Allentown Band under Albertus Meyer
plays them spiritedly and brings a refreshing briskness to the usually more
pretentious Stars and Stripes Forever.
Strong, broad recording and the unreverberant acoustics of performances
heard out-of -doors or in a large armory.
Solisti di Zagreb: "Eighteenth Century Christmas." Vanguard VRT 3017,
26 min., $11.95.
103
www.americanradiohistory.com
The major part of the similarly titled LP
program and of far more than seasonal
interest for its high -strung, yet heartfelt
performances of the Corelli and Torelli
Christmas Concertos, Op. 8, No. 8, and
Op. 8, No. 6 respectively. Unfortunately
the added Bach chorale- preludes ( Vorn
Himmel hoch, S. 606; Jesu, Joy of Man's
Desiring, S. 147, No. 10; and Lobt Gott,
S. 609 ) are played in romanticized yet
colorless string transcriptions by Kelemen, doing scant justice either to the
lovely music or to Janigro's musical insights.
Leonard Sorkin and George Sopkin.
Violin and Cello Recital. Concertapes
23 -2B, 31 min., $11.95.
Solo rather than duo performances ( with
piano accompaniments by Alexander
Joseffer ) of mostly familiar materials,
played with grim earnestness and strongly recorded, quite close -to, under rather
dry acoustic conditions. Most interesting
are the Bartók Rumanian Dances by
Sorkin and Sopkin's Saint-Saëns Allegro
appassionato, Op. 43 -the last apparently
never recorded before in this country.
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Sorkin Symphonette. Vivaldi: Concerto Grosso in D minor, Op. 3,
No. 11; Mozart: Eine kleine Nachtmusik; Bach -Stoessel: Prelude in E.
Concertapes 23-3A, 29 min., $11.95.
Originally released some years ago in a
single -channel taping, this small-stringensemble program of unflaggingly energetic, if at times overvehement, performances still seems admirably recorded, although it would benefit by
more reverberation and closer channel
blending. Albert Stoessel's transcription
of the whirling Bach Prelude, from the
sixth sonata for unaccompanied violin,
S. 1008, makes for particularly exciting
and -with its antiphonal part writing
effective stereo listening.
-
1957 Chicago -New York Audio
Show Stereophonic Demonstration
Tape. Sonotape CNY, 13 min., $6.95.
If you missed the shows themselves.
you still can share in the dramatic sonic
experience of the sensational Sonotape
demo-sampler of vivid bits from various
current stereo releases; a mercifully brief,
yet startling enough, series of natural
and man -made sound effects; plus concise commentary by Lloyd Moss and
his incredulous parrot -stooge, Henry.
Black Watch Pipe and Drum Tunes.
Black Watch Highland Regiment
Band. Phonotapes "Cameo" SC 410,
9 min., $4.98.
Anyone who has heard the Scottish band
in its American appearances will treasure
this memento which in stereo ( far more
impressively than in last year's single channel taping ) preserves not only the
shrill pipings and thunderous drummings
themselves, but also the dramatic sense
of constant motion as the band marches
round and round.
Continued on page 106
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
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"In a Monastery." Omegatape ST
55, 14 spin., $8.95.
This has nothing to do with Ketelbey's
famous piece, but is a completely off the- beaten -path documentation of the
spacious acoustics of the Vendanta Society's Ramakrishna Monastery in Southern California and the chanting of its
male choristers, variously accompanied
by an Estey harmonium and Indian or
Balinese percussion instruments. I can't
find much genuine artistic substance in
musical director James Barnes's own
compositions, but the excerpts from the
Aratrika Service and Bengali hymn
Kandana Baba Bandana have considerable exotic fascination as well as unmistakably genuine fervor.
"Railroad Sounds -Steam and Diesel." Audio Fidelity AFST 1843, 26
min., $12.95.
The motional illusions possible only in
stereo give the present taping an incalculable advantage over its LP version, but nearly a half hour of these
only too realistic switching -yard huffings
and puffings, clankings and hangings,
whistlings and hootings, is likely to be
too much for all except fanatical railroad
buffs or sheer -sound-fanciers.
"King of Organs." Bill Floyd, N. Y.
Paramount Theatre Wurlitzer. Cook
1150 ST, 33 min., $12.95.
The only recording in Emory Cook's
stereo- tape -debut list not previously released in binaural -disc form furnishes
irrefutable evidence that an Old Master
can learn new tricks while forgetting
none of his old ones. The program here
is conventional intermission pops stuff,
varied by a couple of sentimentalized
spirituals and a quasi -exotic Andalucia;
but Floyd eschews the worst excesses
and "novelty" effects of his console colleagues, his famous Wurlitzer has uncommonly attractive tonal qualities, and
the present recording-while never sensationalized-is the finest of its kind to
date, especially in its authenticity to the
expansive Paramount Theatre acoustics
and the varied locations (in depth as
well as lateral spread) of its multitudinous pipe -choir sound sources.
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"The Merry Macs: In Stereoville."
Stereotape ST 9, 12 min., $7.95.
In spite of its somewhat gruesome program title, this group sings with infectious rhythmic vitality as well as professional precision and avoidance of
overfancy barbershop mannerisms. The
responsive passages of Jingle Jangle are
particularly well suited for stereo reproduction, and the close recording is
excellent of its kind except for its unduly heavy accentuation of the string
bass in the accompanying rhythm section.
"Monk's Music." Thelonious Monk,
piano. Riverside ( via Livingston ) RT
7 -20 BN, 32 min., $11.95.
Not everyone, least of all myself, can
dig Monk's oddly original talents, especially in the baffling Off Minor and
Epistrophy included here; but the wayHIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
106
www.americanradiohistory.com
wardly rhapsodic Ruby My Dear is more
communicative, and the jaunty Well,
You Needn't tosses responsive passages
around in a manner ideally suited for
stereo reproduction. Coleman Hawkins
on sax and Art Blakey on traps are
outstanding among the pianist -leader's
sidemen.
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"Patti Page: In the Land of Hi -Fi."
Rugulo 's Orchestra. Mercury
Pete
MBS 3-2, 26 min., $10.95.
Energetically stimulated by Rugulo and
his men, Miss Page tries her best to
jazz things up ( and even go sultry in
Love for Sale); but she only sounds
convincing when she reverts to her
natural straightforward balladecring-as
in the eloquently accompanied I Didn't
Know about Love. The recording is admirably clean and well blended, and
happily for once the soloist is not too
IN
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"Sentimental Favorites." Lenny Herman Ensemble. Livingston 1098 BN,
27 min., $11.95.
This example of 'T'he Mightiest Little
Band in the Land" includes mildly
ragged versions of Londonderry Air and
Humoresque in addition to more orthodox dance fare, featuring an admirably
steady beat, occasional deft bits of piano
playing, and bright recording -but also
Lennie's own omnipresent accordion and
"organ."
"Four French Horns Plus Rhythm."
\tat Mathews, accordion. Dyna -Tapes
DY 3001, 28 min., $11.95.
Mathews' genuinely artistic accordion
here shares honors with Joe Puma's
scarcely less fine guitar playing and the
mellow sonorities of a French -horn quartet starring Julius Watkins in occasional
solo passages. The ensemble as a whole
does best with the gravely expressive
Corne Rain, Come Shine and a haunting
Lobo Nocho; but the six other pieces
are also imaginatively scored and performed, while the not -too -close or toodry recording, characterized by its
achievement of notable "spread" despite the rather marked channel separation, is extremely effective throughout.
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Presenting Scofield and Austin and
Twin Ivories. Stereophony A 130-1;
two 5 -in., 16 min., $6.95 each.
The same duo of Eddie S. and Bill A.
is featured, with rhythm accompaniment,
in both reels. In the former Mr. S.
presides at the console of a Hammond
organ whose squally sonorities expunge
most of the otherwise favorable impressions of rowdy liveliness in Twelfth
Street Rag, Alabammy Bound, etc. But
when both soloists are engaged with
piano keyboards, as in the second reel,
their ragtime virtuosity is far more relishable, especially in a zippy Sweet
Georgia Brown and an amusing Chopsticks Fantasy. Here, too, they also provide a welcome contrast in a quietly
lyrical Snowfall which shows off best of
all the clean, smoothly spread stereo
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MESSIAH EXCERPTS. VOL.
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A second volume of highlights from the famous Boston recording, following the critical acclaim earned by Vol. I -"one of the 10 best tapes of 1957."
JAZZ VARIATIONS ON PAL JOEY
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Rhythmic developments in jazz tempo from one of America's best known
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TWO FOR THE SHOW
A collection of popular show tunes by Tom and Jerry at the piano and
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STEREO FORUM
" YOU
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Perhaps you can help me to solve my
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It just seems that I can take any
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the correct balance once again.
Spencer J. Helms
Far Rockaway, N. Y.
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.. says Dr. Constantin Bakaleinikoff,
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Any complete solution of the balancing problem probably is impossible,
since it involves so many complex
factors: various stereo -tape manufacturers' practices; the varied acoustical
conditions (and natures of the particular music at hand) of recordings,
even those made by any one manufacturer; and, perhaps most significant of all, the varied room acoustics and aural tastes of borne listeners.
However, it can be safely said that
-as a rule -most home listeners tend
to worry over proper balancing in
inverse ratios to their stereo experience: as they grow accustomed to
stereo, they tend to settle on "standard" (for them) control adjustments
which serve satisfactorily for the
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instances. Perfectionists, of course,
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only for different makes but even for
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is the obvious one of calibrating one's
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Normally, tone control adjustments
are best confined to matching one's
system to specific listening -room
acoustical conditions and individual
aural tastes, and these should not
require constant readjustment for different tapes. Loudness, or volume,
control readjustments are certainly
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
108
www.americanradiohistory.com
required more frequently, yet with
experience specific settings should be
found which are suitable either for
most tapes of a given manufacturer
or for most tapes of specific types of
first release
music or specific recording locales.
In time, the problem is sure to
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it remains a nuisance for some listeners, a provocative challenge for many
others.
in the new
Tape- Storage Precautions
STEREO AGE
SIR:
Library
"JAll
FROM NEW YORK"
featuring
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What special precautions should I
take in storing my stereo tapes? I
know that magnetic fields must be
avoided and that temperature and
humidity extremes are dangerous, but
under ordinary living -room conditions,
do I need to go so far as to buy
metal cans to store my tapes in?
Higginbotham
W. A. Miller
New York, N. Y.
Coleman Hawkins
Joe Thomas
In professional practice irreplaceable
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Buster Bailey
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"Jay C." at his raw best
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...
the fine, too rarely heard horn of Joe
Thomas. And hear them all in
a
stereo
tape sound that is already commanding attention in the highest places of
fidelity: the new
...
the true
..
.
sound of Stereo Age Recordings. See
your dealer. Or order direct for immediate shipment. Enclose only $7.50.
We pay postage.
STEREO AGE
RE CORDING S
NEW.
JERSEY
Distributor-Dealer Inquiries Invited
for any unusually valuable items or
those most easily damaged-i.e. test
tapes). However, care should be
taken to make sure that your tape
shelves are placed well away from
radiators and other heat sources as
well as from any possible source of
radiating magnetic fields, such as
power transformers and loudspeakers.
And when demagnetizing your tape recorder heads, make sure never to
operate the demagnetizer close to
your tapes.
For maximum (acetate -base) tape
life, the temperature range should be
60° to 70° Fahrenheit and the relative humidity range 40% to 60%,
but the somewhat wider ranges
normally encountered in living rooms
are not likely to have harmful effects unless there are long intervals
of high temperature combined with
either very high or very low humidity. If a tape has been subjected
to such temperature and humidity
extremes, it should be returned to
normal conditions before playing.
(Mylar -base tape, of course, is much
more resistant to temperature and
humidity effects than the usual acetate -base type.)
.ell
.
.1`..
REGINA RESNIK
tapes her own
recordings on
That alone is not
the reason why
you should use
irish
ferrosheen
71-
Here's why
you should use
It's the best-engineered tape in the world
...gives you better highs...better lows...
better sound all around! Saves your tape
recorder, too- because the Irish FERROSHEEN process results in smoother tape
...tape that can't sand down your magnetic heads or shed oxide powder into your
machine. Price? Same as ordinary tape!
Available wherever quality tape is sold.
ORRadio Industries, Inc., Opelika, Alabama
Export: Morhan Ex porting Corp., New York,N. Y.
Canada: Atlas Radio Corp., Ltd., Toronto, Ontario
109
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
Everyone's an Expert
Tape Editor with the
It's Quick! It's Easy! It's Accurate!
Here's everything you need in one package for professional splicing of magnetic
recorder tapes PLUS complete, easy -tofollow instructions by Joel Tall, tape
editor of CBS! The EdiTall tape splicing
block has been used for years by tape
ditors-now it can be yours in this complete low -cost Splicing Kit.
KIT
CONTENTS
EditalI Tape Splicing Block
66 -ft. roll of splicing tape
Package of cutting blades
Marker pencil
Complete Instructions
At dealers everywhere or write
TECH LABORATORIES,
INC.
PALISADES PARK, NEW JERSEY
ROBINS' AUDIO ACCESSORIES
4%
q0
17.
12.
13.
I5.
OOT
19.
GIBSON GIRL® TAPE SPLICERS
I. "Hobbyist"
H-4
S
1.73
_.'Semi -Pro"
SP-4
3.50
3. Junior
TS4A -JR
6.50
4. Standard
TS4A-STD
8.50
5. Deluxe
TS4A -DLX 11.50
6. Industrial (5 sizes to 1^)
(net/ 55.00
ROBINS' TAPE AND PHONO ACCESSORIES
7. Splicing Tape
ST -500
.39
S. Head Cleaner
HC-2
1.00
9. Jockey Cloth for Tapes
JCT-2
1.00
I0. Tape Storage Cans
TC -7
.80
Tape Threader
Changer Covers (2 sizes/
Turntable Covers (2 sizes/
"Clean Sound" for Records
Jockey Cloth for Records
KlceNeedle
Phono -Cushion. 10-x12"
IB. Atomic Jewel
19. Acoustic Insulation
11.
i 2.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
TT -1
CC -1.2
CC -3.4
.98
2.00
2.50
1C -1
1.00
1.00
1.50
1.50
CS-4
NB -1
PC -10.12
SE -90
AM -9
M Ue.,lrr. Isrr.w lieu
ROBINS INDUSTRIES CORP.
lA. caf m "(w.ORK
5.00
2 75
do yole know
Ampro is now stacked -their 758 L
TAPE RECORDER has stacked stereo
heads (anyone still left staggering ?).
Contains built -in speakers for one
channel and may be purchased with
or without built -in amplifier; operates
at 7% or 3% ips. No price specified.
Two models from Telematic are
available either in kit form or completely wired. An AM -FM stereo
TUNER sells for $69.95 as the KB-402
(kit with prewired FM front end) or
$99.50 as the KB -402W (wired); sensitivity claimed is 0.9 for 20 db quieting and 1.8 for 30 db quieting; frequency response is within 1 db from
20 to 20,000 cps. A stereo AMPLIFIER
with two 20 -watt channels sells for
$82.50 as the KB -403 (kit) and
$109.50 (wired) as the KB -403W;
frequency response is said to be within 0.5 db, 20 to 20,000 cps. Cages are
available for both units at $3.95.
Tandberg's Model 3-Stereo TAPE
RECORDER /REPRODUCER has two built in playback amplifiers, three-speed
reproduction (1%, 3%, and 7ií), and
comes equipped with crystal mike and
12 ft. of mike cable. The unit sells
for $369.50, or for $469.95 as the
Model 3-266 Stereo with matched
speakers.
With the Westrex stereo disc the
news of the moment, the first press releases on 45/45 stereo playback cartridges are starting to trickle in. Fairchild's Model 603 STEREO CARTRIDGE
consists of two coils, one placed inside the other, mounted at right angles
to each other. Vertical components
produce an equal and in -phase output
from both coils while lateral components give an equal but out -of -phase
voltage from both. The cartridge is
mounted in a specially modified arm
and uses a %-mil diamond stylus. The
combination arm and cartridge is
being produced on a limited basis for
$250 (ouch).
Shure is marketing a stereo PLAYBACK ADAPTER KIT designed for all
Revere and Wollensak tape recorders.
It consists of a stacked stereo head
and is easy to use: the old head is
removed and replaced by the new
one: one set of leads goes to the amplifier and speaker in the recorder,
and the other set is carried to the
existing hi-fi system. No price is stated.
A new series of stereo RECORDED
TAPES has been announced by Living ston. These 5 -in. reels are called Livingstonettes and are available in either
stacked or staggered form for $6.95
each.
OF
LIFE
about cancer?
It's time you did! Last year
cancer claimed the lives of
250,000 Americans; 75,000 of
them lost their lives needlessly because they didn't
know the facts of life about
cancer. 800,000 Americans
cured of
are alive today
...
cancer... because they went
to their doctors in time. They
knew that a health checkup
once a year is the best insurance against cancer. Make an
appointment right now for a
checkup
and make it a
habit for life.
...
`i
.
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
The professional's
1
choice
r._.._
Series
8A
Made in England
errvgrap
world's finest HI -FI
tape recorder
The fact that professionals and musicians
have selected the FERROGRAPH as the
perfect answer to "studio quality" recording
tells more about its performance than any
words. If you demand the same high fidelity
that pleases the critical ears of these perfectionists, choose the FERROGRAPH for
it has been proven the finest!
your own
Dual- speed, dual track FERROGRAPH recorders are also available in custom models
(Series 66). Frequency Response ±2 db between 40 and 15,000 cps'; all models employ
3 motors with a synchronous hysteresis for
capstan drive. wow & flutter less than 0.2%.
33/, 71 /z ips
Model 3A /N
$379.50
$425.00
15 ips*
71/2
Model 3AN /H
At selected franchised dealers
...
-
ERCONA CORPORATION
.551
©o ©© ©©
110
THE
FACTS
ON THE COUNTER
r
(Electronic Division)
42. New York 17, N. Y.
Canada: Astral Electric) Co. Ltd.
44 Danforth Road, Toronto la
Fifth Ave.. Dept.
HIGH FIDELITY MACAZLNE
ookshop
Save yourself time and trouble by ordering your
books directly from us. Just fill in the coupon
below and mail it to us with your remittance.
SPEAKING OF PIANISTS
THAT CRAZY AMERICAN MUSIC
By ABRAM CHASINS
-
-
This is a book of wise, informal
and thoroughly informed
talk
about pianists by a man who has himself been a concert pianist, composer, teacher, and for more than a decade music director of the radio
station of The New York Times, WQXR. Abram Chasms speaks of 6freat
pianists and the music they play, of recordings, state sponsorship of
art, and the problems of artists in our society. A book for all who care
about music.
$4.00 258
By ELLIOT PAUL
An unorthodox, witty, highly opinionated, always fascinating account
of the development of American music
from pre- Revolutionary
days to jazz, boogie, and rock 'n' roll, by the author of The Lair Time
I Saw Paris. \Vhat he says carries weight. How he says it makes vigorous,
illuminating, sometimes searing reading. Not only for music lovers,
but for all who enjoy good, lively writing.
$4.00 259
-
WHAT TO LISTEN FOR IN MUSIC
HIGH FIDELITY
By AARON COPLAND
A Practical Guide
a book which made it possible for thousands
to increase their enjoyment of music through creative listening.
$3.95 247
By CHARLES FOWLER
The revised edition of
- -a
HIGH FIDELITY RECORD ANNUAL. 1955
HIGH FIDELITY RECORD ANNUAL 1956
Bolh edited by Roland Galan
Comments on the
"high Fidelity's
-
Here at last is the book for the beginner
one that neither under- nor
overrates his knowledge or ability to understand high fidelity. With
unusual clarity and in just the right amount of detail it explains the
principles involved and their application. Thus the reader is able to
exercise an informed and reasoned judgment as to what would best
suit his own taste, his available space, and his purse
in building, in
buying, or in adding to his high-fidelity system. In short
complete,
intelligible, and literate exposition for the novice high fidelitarian.
$4.95 234
first two anneals:
of reviewers intitules some of the best -known men
in the business. ['heir reviews not only are comprehensive in their emporiums of editions, but frequently they contain information about
certain works that is difficult to find elsewhere."- NOTES
panel
bewildered by the sheer number of discs
which are issued each year will find this book valuable as a means of
cu testa TatetNE
bringing; tinder uut of chain.''
"The record collector who
1955 Annual
See
-
54.95
201
is
-
1956
Annual
-
54.50
page 135 for RECORDS IN REVIEW 1957
The Third High Fidelity Annual
-
237
MAINTAINING HI -FI
FM STATIONS
UP -TO -DATE
A complete geographical listing
of FM stations in the United
States and Canada. Compiled by
Bruce G. Cramer directly from
FCC
THE BOOK OF
JAZZ
-A Guide to the
records
and
originally
printed in AUDIOCRAPr Magazine, the material has been
brought up-to-date and is now
available in booklet form.
264
500
Entire Field
By LEONARD FEATHER
A new kind of look which meets the need for a basic guide. Analyzes
each instrument, its major performers, the "anatomy of improvisation"
illustrate) for the tint time with music scores of fifteen great soloists.
$3.95 260
EQUIPMENT
By JOSEPH MARSHAU
A much- needed book on the
specialized approach necessary
to service high -fidelity equipment. The author discusses not
only electronic faults, but the
mechanical and acoustical defects which cause a hi -li system
to function less than perfectly.
The book is clearly written and
well indexed.
Hard cover, $5.00
232
Soft cover, $2.90
233
r
Book Department
THE
HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
JAZZ MAKERS
-
Edited by NAT SHAPIRO and NAT MENTOR
-
Here are the men and women who made jazz- their lives, conflicts,
written by America's best -known authorities and edited
aspirations
by the same men who produced Here isle Talkiñ In Ye.
$4.95 261
JAZZ:
ITS
EVOLUTION AND ESSENCE
-By
ANDRE HODEIR
"I think I've read about
book.... It is the first
everything on jarz and there's nothing like this
and only treatment of the aesthetics of jarz.
Secondly, it was written by a practicing musician in both the jar.. and
academic fields who is also a musicologist. And finally, it's a balanced
treatment which grinds no axe and will stand up over the years.'
Marshall Stearns.
Paler, SI.45 262
Leonard Feather's THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF JAZZ and THE ENCYCLOPEDIA YEARBOOK OF JAZZ -now handsomely boxed and attractively
piked- $12.50.
MAnCH 1958
263
Great Barrington, Mass.
I enclose $
for which please send nie, postpaid, the books
indicated by the circled numbers below. (No C.O.D.s or charge
orders, please.) Foreign orders sent at buyer's risk. Add 550 per
book for postage on foreign orders except Canadian.
Binder 7b $2.95
Unmarked binders $2.75 each
50íg each
HIGH FIDELITY RECORD REVIEW INDEXES
1956
1957
_; 1954
1955
-
NAME
201
ADDRESS
232
233
234
237
247
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
111
Bozak quality loudspeakers for the very best in sound
A straightforward and uncompromising approach to the problems of loudspeaker
design / respect for the esthetics of music and the laws of physics / the devoted
craftsmanship of the entire Bozak organization
these basic principles underlie
the total, exact re- creation of the power and detail of music that define Bozak
Sound. Hear the Bozaks at your Franchised Bozak Dealer, write us for literature.
...
THE
R. T.
BOZAK SALES COMPANY
112
DARIEN, CONN.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
tested in the Home
Equipment reports appearing in this section are prepared by members of HICII FIDELITYS staff, on the basis of actual use in
conjunction with a home music system, and the resulting evaluations of equipment are expressed as the opinions of the reviewer
only. Reports are usually restricted to items of general interest, and no attempt is made to report on items that are obviously
not designed for high -fidelity applications. Each report is sent to the manufacturer before publication; he is free to correct
the specifications paragraph, to add a comment at the end of the report, or to request that it be deferred (pending changes
in his product), or not be published. He may not, however, change the report. Failure of a new product to appear in TITH may mean
either that it has not been submitted for review, or that it was submitted and was found to be unsatisfactory. These reports may
not be quoted or reproduced, in part or in whole, for any purpose whatsoever, without written permission from the publisher.
in a matter of months. The manufacturer had found
Dynakit Mark III Amplifier
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer): a single- chassis basic
power amplifier kit. Rated power: 60 watts. IM distortion: less than
1.0% @ 60 watts out; less than 0.5% @ below 50 watts out. Frequency response: ±0.1 db, 20 to 20,000 cps; ±0.5 db, 6 to beyond
60,000 cps. Power response: ±1 db from 60 watts, @ below 1%
harmonic distortion, 20 to 20,000 cps. Square wave response: essentially undistorted 20 to 20,000 cps on loudspeaker load. Sensitivity:
1.6 RMS in for 60 watts out. Hum and noise: over 90 db below
60 watts. Damping factor: 15. Input: high -level high -impedance
from control unit. Controls: output tube bias adjust; AC power.
Outputs: 4, 8, and 16 ohms to speaker. Tubes: 6AN8, 2- KT -88,
GI-34. Dimensions: 9 in. long by 9 wide by 63: high. Price: $79.95.
MANUFACTURER: Dynaco, Inc., 617 N. 41st St., Philadelphia 4, Pa
Offering 10 more watts of power at a going rate of a
dollar per watt, the Mark III Dynakit aspires to even
lower distortion at normal operating levels than the 50watt Mark II, that was TITHed in the May 1956 issue.
And, although it may be difficult for Mark II users to
believe, the Mark III Dynakit does sound a shade better
than its predecessor.
The new model has some refinements that were not
found in the Mark II; a B+ filter choke, an additional
filter stage on the bias supply, a 4 -ohm output tap, and
KT -88 output tubes in place of the Mark II's 6CA7s.
The kit comes with most of its components already attached and soldered to a compact printed- circuit board,
and even the transformer leads are pre-cut to length,
stripped, and solder- tinned. Construction entails nothing
more than bolting the transformers, sockets, and circuit
board to the steel chassis, wiring them together, and
adding a few other small parts under the chassis. Total
working time: about 3 hours.
No problems were encountered in wiring our sample
unit. Everything went into place cleanly and neatly, the
instructions were lucidly written and free of ambiguities,
and even the output tube bias adjustment procedure
has been made about as foolproof as it can be. When
certain types of output tube are operated at or near
their maximum output power capacity, their bias voltage
is likely to be extremely critical -a slightly incorrect setting will increase distortion or wear out the output tubes
that some Dynakit Mark II owners were having troubles
as the direct result of measuring the bias voltage with
inaccurate test meters. To avoid this problem, the Mark
III and later model Mark Its are equipped with a precision resistor connected in series with the output tube
cathodes, and brought out to a test point at the preamppower outlet socket. The value of this resistance was so
chosen that, when the output tubes are properly biased,
they will pass just enough current to produce 1.56 volts
::cross the resistor, and 1.56 happens to be the exact voltage available from a fresh flashlight battery. Consequently,
The Mark Ill: 60 watts for $80.
the accuracy of your test meter is of no significance; you
merely take note of its reading from a new flashlight
cell, and then adjust the amplifier's bias control until
the same reading is obtained between the bias test point
and the amplifier chassis.
The extra B+ and bias -supply smoothing are welcome
additions to the new Dynakit, too, since they make the
amplifier's hum level much less dependent upon output
tube balance, and give more assurance that the hum
specification will still be met after many months of use.
On our instrument tests, the completed Mark III ex113
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
ceeded all its specifications by a healthy margin. Lowfrequency square-wave tests showed a slight downward
tilt (indicating a few degrees of bass phase shift and
normal sub -sonic attenuation), while high- frequency
square waves came out of the Mark III with scarcely a
trace of modification. The amplifier's high -frequency stability was found to be almost completely unaffected by
typical or atypical loads, including the heavy capacitive
load imposed by an electrostatic tweeter. Bass stability
was close to perfect, also regardless of output loading.
Direct comparison between the sound of the Mark II
and Mark III Dynakits revealed a very slight difference
in character, but I found it hard to decide which I preferred. Subjectively, the Mark III seemed to have a
subtly sweeter high end, and a better -defined, but slightly
less sumptuous low end than the Mark II. Both amplifiers
are equally transparent and lucid, both are almost totally
free of coloration, and both can deliver persuasively effortless, clean, and very musical sound at low or very
high listening levels.
On the basis of its sound alone, I think I would
choose the Mark III. Its other characteristics would simply
strengthen my conviction that this amplifier is an excellent
choice for the kit-building music listener who considers
the best present-day sound reproduction to be not quite
good enough. -J. C. H.
driven by the tweeter. This lily-shaped cone is about
4 inches high, and is attached to the perimeter of the
tweeter's voice coil. As this cone moves up and down, its
circumference at any given distance from the face of the
tweeter will vary, compressing and rarifying the surrounding air in much the same way as an ordinary cone, except
in this case the air disturbances are radiated outward in
all directions instead of from an essentially flat or plane
surface. As a result, there is no apparent change in high frequency response at any point around the cone, and
there is no possibility of horizontal high-frequency beaming. In addition, the cone's lily shape and its internal loading cone help to provide vertical diffusion, so this and the
outer radiation combine to create an essentially hemispherical radiating pattern.
Behind the woofer cone is a split horn using a conical
fiare instead of the more usual exponential expansion. Although typically less efficient than exponential horns, conical horns have more gradual cutoff below their low -fre-
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: The Mark Ill Dynakit costs only
$4.95 more than the 4-ohm-output model of the Mark II. Therefore,
its increase in price represents a cost of less than 50¢ per wattcertainly an all -time low price for increased power. In addition to
the increased power, we would like to mention that the appearance
of the Mark Ill has been improved over that of the Mark II, and its
finish has been designed to harmonize with that of the Dynakit pre-
Vertical woofer mounting and a lily- shaped
tweeter give the EICO
Standard essentially nondirectional distribution.
amplifier.
EICO Standard Speaker System
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer): a two -way loudspeaker
system incorporating direct radiators for middle and high frequencies
and rear horn loading for low frequencies. Frequency range: essentially flat from 45 to 20,000 cps, useful range from 30 to 40,000 cps.
Impedance: 16 ohms. Power rating: 30 watts program. Dispersion:
180 degrees horizontal, 90 degrees vertical. Dimensions: 36 in. high
by 15'. wide by 11'.2 deep. Finishes: mahogany, walnut, or blond
birch. Price: 5139.95 in mahogany or walnut; 5144.95 in blond.
MANUFACTURER: Electronic Instrument Co., 33 -00 Northern Blvd.,
Long Island City 1, N. Y.
This speaker has aroused considerable interest, discussion,
and disagreement among HIGH FIDELITYs staff members.
Some who have heard it think it possibly the most musical
and most realistic -sounding thing in its size or cost range.
Some are less enthusiastic about it, conceding its smoothness and freedom from distortion, but maintaining that
its sound is short of impact, even muted. Relevant to this
may be the fact that the EICO is more dependent upon
room acoustics than most speakers, probably in part because of its highly unorthodox design by Stuart Hegeman.
The top and three upper side areas of the EICO enclosure are open and covered with grille cloth. At the bottom of this open space is the woofer, face upward, with
its rear surface opening into the enclosure below. Directly
above the woofer is a concentrically mounted tweeter unit,
with a small inverted cone attached between its mounting
bracket and the end of the woofer's center pole piece. This
cone is immobile, serving only to improve the loading and
the dispersion of sounds from the top of the woofer cone.
Concentric with this fixed cone is another inverted cone
which is attached to the rim of the woofer's voice coil
form, to act as a "whizzer."
The tweeter cone is essentially the same as that at the
center of the woofer, except that this is the only cone
quency design limit, and thus give better cone loading
(for lower distortion and improved transient response) at
extremely low frequencies. However, conical horns are not
inherently capable of maintaining linear response
throughout the bass range, so EICO has selected a high efficiency woofer, and electrically equalized it to fill out
the system's bass range. The horn mouths are terminated
with slots, which further improve the loading on the cone,
help to smooth out the speaker's impedance characteristic,
and add an additional octave to the bass response.
There are two Helmholtz resonator chambers adjacent to
the horn throat. These function like selective mufflers, absorbing controlled amounts of energy at those frequencies
where horn resonances and internal reflections would otherwise create response peaks. The output from the horn is
slightly lower than that from the front of the woofer cone
at middle frequencies. Balance is obtained by a variable
equalizing circuit in the crossover network, which allows
midrange adjustment to suit the acoustics of the listening
room or the personal taste of the listener.
The result of this design is that highs and middles spray
out horizontally in an almost complete circle, rather than
projecting forward in a beam, and this may account for the
EICO's susceptibility to its environment. A conventional
loudspeaker in a large room directs its output toward
114
Continued on page 116
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
BELL HAS EVERYTHING YOU WANT
Bell Model 2300
Rated 50 watts at less than .5% total
harmonic distortion. Peak: 100 watts.
Frequency Response: 20- 20,000 cps ± .5 db.
More Features
Bell Model 2325
Rated 20 watts at less than .3% total
harmonic distortion. Peak: 40 watts.
Frequency Response: 20 -20.000 cps + .3 db.
More For Your Money, too
Bell Model 2315
Rated 12 watts at leas than .5% total
harmonic distortion. Peak: 24 watts.
Frequency Response: 20- 20,000 cps + .5 db.
Match your Bell amplifier with
a
SPECIFICATIONS...
for your Information:
NEW BELL FM -AM TUNER
In your home
entertainment center
To the man
who has a new Bell amplifier: Here's the Bell FM -AM Tuner
that makes your high fidelity system complete. It matches perfectly!
Pictured above are three Bell amplifiers with the daring "new look" in high
sleek, slim silhouette, only 4 inches high
and the feature that
fidelity
-a
-
women like best of all: Bell's exclusive Magic Touch-Control.
Now comes the Bell FM -AM Tuner, all decked out in a rich saddle -tan
finish that matches perfectly with the Bell high fidelity amplifier in your
home entertainment center. Made by Bell with more features for its modest
cost, this FM -AM Tuner has a low drift FM oscillator that keeps you
"on signal" even during warm -up periods.
There are many other features which you should check for yourself. Why
not stop in at your Bell dealer and ask for a demonstration today.
MARCH 1958
Bell Model 2520
FM -AM Tuner
FM Sensitivity: 2 u V for 20 db quieting.
AM Sensitivity: 5 u V for 20 db ein.
FM Frequency Response: 20- 20,000 cps! 1 db.
AM Frequency Response: 20 -5,000 cps 3 db.
t
Additional specifications available from your
Bell dealer or write Bell Sound Systems, Inc.,
555 Marion Road, Columbus, Ohio.
Sound Systems, Ind.
Columbus 7, Ohio
A Division Of Thompson Products, Inc.
Thompson Products, Ltd., Toronto
EXPORT OFFICE: 401 Broadway, New York 13, N.Y.
IN CANADA:
115
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 114
the listener, so that even at some distance, the sound corning directly from the speaker easily overrides the sound
echoing from the walls and ceiling. The room's acoustics
affect the sound mainly in the lower frequencies. The
EICO, however, does not direct its sound in any one
direction. When listened to from a distance in a large
room, the sound heard may consist of, roughly, half
room reverberation and half direct sound. So if the room
has any pronounced resonances, the EICO will bring
them out more than will most systems.
Experiments conducted in one large, fairly live room
showed that the resonance effect could be controlled simply
by sitting closer to the speaker. This is, incidentally, one
of its virtues: it yields comfortable and convincing sound
when heard from as close as two feet.
The EICO's bass performance was similarly influenced
by its environment (as is true with all loudspeakers).
so listener reactions to its low end varied from "remarkable"
to "unimpressive." In one room, the bass response slid off
fairly rapidly below 80 cycles; in another (smaller) room,
apparently linear response was maintained to around 40
cycles. In no case was there any detectable doubling, and
in all cases the bass was very tightly controlled and free
from hang -over effects.
In my own fairly small living room, where it behaved to
best advantage, the EICO Standard system proved able to
create a remarkable illusion of realism from all types of
program material. Circular radiation, as G. A. Briggs of
Wharfedale pointed out some years ago, not only takes
the curse off the point- source but, by bringing the backing
wall into play, moves the apparent source behind the
speaker. indeed, when I played some tapes that I had recorded from a microphone distance of, say, eight feet, the
EICO speaker seemed to put the musicians precisely eight
feet behind the system.
String tone was reproduced with a smooth, gutty rich-
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: The reporter is right about the unusual suitability of the EICO HFS-2 system for stereo. Its wide dispersion
and lack of beaming give coverage all over the whole room, so it is
not necessary to focus the speaker or to sit in a particular spot in the
room. While the speaker system has outstanding advantages for average
rooms, it has been used with excellent results for stereo demonstrations in large auditoriums.
May we also add that the EICO speaker system was field-tested
for a full year in small -lot production by its designer, A. S. Hegeman
(Hegeman Laboratories), and received excellent customer acceptance.
At the onset of full -scale production by EICO, it became feasible to
introduce further refinements in the manufacture to improve the
speaker's performance and structural strength, as well as to insure a
highly uniform product. Every loudspeaker system is individually and
extensively tested before it leaves the factory.
The "little sonic whiskers" which TITH's reporter observed in the
sound of the sample speaker were traced to o minor peak in its upper
frequency range. This has been eliminated in subsequent production
models of the Standard system.
Norelco Continental Tape Recorder
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer): a three -speed, half-track
portable tape recorder. Frequency range: 40 to 16,000 cps @ 714
ips; 50 to 8,000 cps @ 334 ips; 60 to 4,500 cps @ 1r/e ips. Signal/
noise ratio: 54 db. Speed variation: 0.2% @ 715 ips; 0.3% @
33/4 ips; 0.35% @ 1r/e ips. Reel capacity: 7 in. Inputs: two; from
microphone, and radio or high -level phono. Controls: volume, treble
tone, push buttons for Play, Record, Pause, Rewind, Stop, Fast Forward,
Off, 17/s, 3ii, 715. Rewind time: 2 min. for 1,200 ft. Adjustment:
bias current. Outputs: two, at low impedance, to external amplifier
and loudspeaker. Tubes: EF -86, ECC;83, EL -90, EZ -90, EM-81. Dimensions: 16 in. wide by 14 deep by 8,4 high, over-all. Weight: 28 lb.
Price: $269.50 East of the Rockies; $279.50 West Coast. MANUFACTURER: North American Philips Co., Inc.; 230 Duffy Ave., Hicksville,
N. Y.
By stressing operating simplicity rather than versatility,
Norelco's design engineers have produced a moderately priced recorder that is literally simple enough for a
ness. At times some hearers remarked on a subtle high frequency edginess in the sound-an effect aptly described
by one listener as little sonic whiskers, but since this was
absent from some recordings, it could conceivably have
been peaks in the recording microphones. The speaker's
useful upper range extended to well beyond my 16,500 cycle hearing limit, and its entire spectrum seemed very
linear and notably free of peaks and dips.
The EICO was an outstanding reproducer of wood -wind
and string timbres, and while brass was also very felicitously portrayed, there was not the projection or bite so
dear to lovers of dramatic sound. Bass transients were
well handled and, perhaps oddly, some of the deepest
bass notes were heard from this speaker in small listening
rooms. There was never any sensation of two sound
sources; the speakers blended faultlessly.
My conclusion about the EICO is that, under ideal conditions, it can sound most impressively realistic, and is
describable as an eminently musical reproducer. Ideal conditions seem to imply an average -size or smaller living
room, or fairly close listening in a large room. A note of
caution may be in order, though: what we tested was a
carefully crafted sample. This system probably requires
a great deal of precision in assembly, and quality control will be of great importance as production assumes
real volume.
I have not tried two of these systems for stereo, but the
EICO's compactness and dispersion characteristics would
suggest unusual suitability for such application.
For $140, this is a veritable bargain. Now, what about a
kit for, say, $100 ? -J.G.H.
116
The Continental has piano -key controls.
child to operate, yet is capable of producing superb
tapes. With the exception of volume and tone control,
all of the Continental's operating functions are selected
Continued on page 118
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TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 116
by piano -key push buttons. To start the unit running,
you simply depress that key which corresponds to the
desired operating speed (7!í or 3% ips, etc.). This turns
on the motor and amplifier, and selects the proper tape
equalization. The tape loads easily into a straight -line
slot in the head assembly, and the unit may be started in
the Record or Play mode by depressing the appropriate
key control. A safety interlock button prevents accidental
movement of the RECORD key.
The high -level input is electrically isolated from the
microphone channel, so that a limited form of mixing may
be carried out between the mike and, say, a phonograph
unit. The recorder's volume control varies both inputs
simultaneously, but if the high -level source has its own
volume control, this can be used for balancing the two
channels.
The Continental's record level indicator is a relatively
new type of electron -beam "magic-eye" tube, which gives
an unusually wide range of visual volume indication. The
indicator lights as soon as the recorder warms up, and is
permanently connected to the high -level input. As long as
the PLAY button is not depressed, any signal fed into the
high -level input will register on the volume indicator, so
the recording level may be set before starting to record.
Alternatively, the PAUSE button may be used during any
normal -speed operating mode, to stop or start the tape
motion instantly without disturbing any of the control
settings or without adding clicks while recording.
There are two output connections, labeled ourPt and
SPEAKER. Both are taken off following the recorder's 5watt single-ended power amplifier stage, and both pass
through the output transformer to provide a nominal
6-ohm output impedance. The SPEAKER output is, of
course, for an external loudspeaker. (There is a small
r
The unit will operate with its lid dosed.
speaker in the recorder, which is suitable for any noncritical listening. The recorder's cover has quite an effect
on this, by the way, so keep the cover closed when
listening to the built -in speaker.) When a jack is inserted
into the ourpuT connection, however, the amplifier circuitry is automatically modified to cut the tone control
out of circuit. silence the loudspeaker, and drop the output voltage to a level comparable to that from a typical
high -level input source.
Both inputs to the Continental are permanently isolated
from its output connections. This means that all programs
.118
being recorded must be monitored directly through the
main system instead of through the recorder, which is all
right as long as the external tuner or preamp has a special
tape output or two paralleled outputs. However, it also
means that headphones cannot be used for monitoring
a distinct disadvantage when using the recorder
for on- location recording jobs.
Finally, there are two "extra" features on the Continental which deserve honorable mention. One is a threedigit revolution counter which facilitates easy cuing to
any spot within the length of a tape. The other is a
relay- actuated shutoff switch, which will bring the mechanism to a halt when a strip of metal foil (applied to the
tape by the user) passes through the head assembly.
Instrument tests on the Norelco Continental showed its
distortion to be about on a par with that from most professional machines. Its speed regulation, judged by ear,
appeared to be well within its specified limits at each
speed. Hiss level was very low, and hum was measured at
48 db below tape overload level. Our tests showed frequency response at 7.5 ips, from the ourPtrr connection,
to be within +0 to -2.5 db from 40 to 14,000 cycles,
and within ±1 db from 50 to 13,000 cycles. This is
excellent performance at this operating speed, and the
recorder's low distortion is ample proof that its frequency
response is not being tricked up by dubious means.
The tone control gave a boost and cut range of about
10 db at 10,000 cycles, for signals coming out of the
SPEAKER output connection. Its normal flat position, for
tapes made on the Continental, occurred at the mid -way
setting of the control (corresponding to figure 3 on the
panel calibrations). When playing a tape recorded to the
NARTB standard equalization characteristic (which is
used for all commercially recorded tapes), the output
should be taken from the SPEAKER connection, and the
tone control should be set at a little above the 2 mark on
its dial. On our unit this gave playback equalization accuracy within ±1.5 db from 50 to about 12,000 cycles
when listening to commercially made tapes. The slight
deviations that occur tend to augment the extreme low
end (which for some tapes is an audible asset), give a
slight softening of the extreme high- frequency end, and
create an over-all flavor of subtle brilliance.
Recording and playing its own tapes. the Continental
proved able to reproduce almost flawlessly anything fed
into it. This would suggest that. if you use a good enough
output transformer in a tape recorder, passing the signal
through this need not seriously degrade the sound.
Mechanically, the Continental handled splendidly.
High -speed functions were smooth. winding was so even
that a rewound tape came out looking like a fresh reel,
and starts and stops were gentle enough to allow safe
usage of the extra-thin, extra -fragile, double -play tapes.
The mechanism seemed unusually immune to tape
"burbles" caused by uneven tape unwinding or sticky
splices, and modulation noise (the roughness that often
accompanies taped high -frequency tones) was lower than
that of some professional recorders.
All push -button controls are interlocked so that tapes
cannot be damaged by pushing the wrong key at the
wrong time. The keys function easily and positively, but
I would hesitate to venture a guess as to how long the
latching mechanisms (which hold down the keys when
they are depressed) will stand up with prolonged use.
I should also suggest, strongly, that Norelco include a
schematic diagram with each recorder, if for no other
reason than to assist a repair technician in times of
distress. A schematic would also be of interest to the
user who wishes to know why as well as how.
Continued on page 120
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Listening is your dynamic proof! With any Weathers
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audible to the human ear ... sound re-created at any
volume, any frequency, to "natural perfection". Audiophile or beginner, a Weathers Speaker is your finest
source to professional sound within your own home. This
achievement is made possible by Weathers exclusive
sonic principles: "radial damping" backwave control,
exclusive multiple octave crossover, and a new coneedge treatment resulting in the incredible smooth middle
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64
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Export: Joseph Plasencia, Inc., 401 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
The BARRINGTON -a powerful, 12- speaker
system, fills an auditorium, yet precisely
controlled at 1 /10 watt of audio power
for small room volume. Offers a fidelity
and smoothness of the full range of
sound heretofore possible only under
controlled laboratory conditions.
MARCH 1958
ONTE CARLO -a 6- speaker system,
graceful and elegant in design...versatile In application. Like all Weathers
speakers, Monte Carlo is a finely Inte
grated system offering distortion -free,
uninhibited, full range response of every
sound audible to human ear.
TI
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The FIESTA -a beautiful highly compact
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makes no compromise on full -range re-
sponse with true
fidelity
at every
frequency. Ideal where space is at a
premium. Ideal for multiple speaker installations for stereophonic sound.
119
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 118
The Norelco Continental's performance is quite up to
professional standards, even though it lacks the monitoring flexibility of most professional machines.-J.G.H.
Wharfedale Flat -Baffle Speaker System
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer): a three -way speaker
system mounted on a free -standing sand -filled flat baffle. Frequency
range: 30 to 20,000 cps. Impedance: 16 ohms. Dimensions: Custom
Model- 34 in. wide by 31 high by 12 deep; Deluxe Model- 351/2
in. wide by 311/2 high by 13 deep. Finishes: mahogany, walnut, or
blond. Prices: Custom, $199; Deluxe $249. DISTRIBUTOR: British
Industries Corp., BO Shore Rd., Port Washington, N. Y.
One function of any speaker baffle is to isolate the front
of the speaker from its rear, so that low- frequency air
pressures set up behind the cone cannot spill around
and cancel the desired pressures at the front, inhibiting
the speaker's inherent bass capabilities. The larger the
baffle board, the lower is the frequency to which this
front -to -leer isolation is maintained. A baffle of infinite
size (this sounds familiar!) would thus be able to maintain
full bass response to below the audible range, were it
not for the physical limitations of the speaker itself. Its
bass performance is affected by its radiating area (which
makes it progressively inefficient at decreasing frequencies), and by its natural cone resonance frequency, below
which there is a rapid diminution of response. Because
of these factors, early high -resonance-frequency loudspeakers produced thin bass when installed in even the
largest infinite baffle or flat baffle. So speakers were
mounted in horns, which effectively increase their radiating
area, or in resonant enclosures which use tuned cavities
to augment bass response.
The advent of moderate -priced high -powered amplifiers made it practical to design speakers having inherently low efficiency throughout their upper and middle
ranges, and increasing efficiency in the bass range. This
built -in bass boost, combined with a low cone resonance,
compensated for radiating deficiencies and made possible
infinite baffling with good bass response. Such speakers
also lend themselves very well to use on a flat baffle
which, to paraphrase Wharfedalé s Mr. Briggs, has no
cabinet resonances because there is no cabinet. Just to
make sure there were no flat -baffle resonances either, the
speaker panel on this Wharfedale system has been made
in two parallel layers with the intervening space filled
with sand
a plywood sandwich in the most literal
sense. The remarkable damping effectiveness of this sand
fill is immediately evident: the panel may be tapped,
pounded, or kicked without evoking anything more than a
dull thud.
Affixed to the panel are a 12 -inch woofer and a 10 -inch
wide -range speaker, connected in parallel. Both speakers
operate in unison at low frequencies, to move as much
air as possible; at higher frequencies the woofer's output
begins to fall off and the smaller one handles most of the
signal. Higher still, the system crosses over into a 3 -inch
cone tweeter. This is mounted face -upward at the top of
the panel, so as to provide essentially nondirectional radiation throughout the whole listening area. The speakers are
mounted asymmetrically to minimize cancellation due to
out-of -phase effects, and the net result is a system which
seems to emanate sound from a very large area instead
of from one or more distinct points. Subjectively, the
Wharfedale flat -baffle system appears to be a large window through which we can listen to the goings on in the
...
concert hall or studio behind it. I find the illusion very
convincing.
Apparently because of its rear radiation into the room,
I found it difficult to nm conclusive frequency response
tests on this system. Minor irregularities which were observed in one position in the room disappeared and were
replaced by others in another location, and low -bass
performance seemed more than usually dependent upon
room dimensions and speaker location. The best I could
do was establish trends, which suggested inherently
very smooth response from 5,000 down to 100 cycles,
and a gentle sloping off below that, with the system in a
smaller- than -average room. Output was still detectable at
50 cycles, and there was no audible doubling anywhere
within the bass range. In a large room, however, response
held up well to below 70 cycles, where it began to taper
off. There was still significant output at 35 cycles, and
slight pressure at 30 cycles.
Above 5,000 cycles, I observed a gradual response
rise to a maximum of perhaps 3 db in the vicinity of
10,000 cycles, a flat plateau from there to 13,000, and
then a progressive tapering off above that.
On musical material the Wharfedale system supported
its designer's contention that a sand-filled flat baffle is
free of cabinet resonances. It is uncolored and transparent, with tightly controlled and unobtrusive bass and
crisp, lucid middles and highs. In the small room, the
tweeter sounded as if it might have needed some attenua-
The Wharfedale free-standing speaker system.
tion (a level control could be added quite easily), although the over-all 'balance of the system generally was
judged to be excellent.
The system as a whole gave a nice illusion of openness
and breadth and had a great deal of that quality which
gives the impression of listening through the speaker
instead of to it. Musical timbres were reproduced accurately with but a trace of occasional brittleness, in the
smaller listening room, that could perhaps be attributed
to the slightly high tweeter level.
This isn't a system for sonic exhibitionists, but it
should have considerable appeal to many serious music
listeners. -J. G. H.
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: We were especially gratified at the
high praise received by the SFB /3 when played side by side with
speaker systems of other types at the 1957 Audio Shows. Listeners
seemed much impressed by the especially clean sound quality imported
by this particular approach to three-way speaker design. We also
wish to point out that, of course, the SF8 /3 was not designed for
use in "smaller -than- average" rooms. When used in a normal -sized
room, the low- frequency response is full, rich, and natural.
120
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
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EPi
lite lempo
Pie Affe-liw
i
F 10
IlteSpM.fq, \L.6.1 F.\.1n
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e
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See the new Guide Line at your dealer's today.
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THE ALLEGRO, Model A -10, is a complete 10 watt
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a
perfect mate for the new Tempo tuner.
THE ALLEGRO... $49.95
THE TEMPO, Model F -10, FM only tuner, incorporates an Armstrong circuit with limiter and a new
broad band Foster -Seeley discriminator. The Tempo
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The control panel is finished in copper.
THE TEMPO
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THE SONATA, Model FA -10, is the first really new
idea in a 3 in 1 chassis since the original Harman Kardon Festival. A high fidelity tuner. preamplifier
and 10 watt power amplifier, with emphasis on FM
and tape. A concentration of every important feature
in a compact, beautifully styled enclosure: FM with
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\I:\HCH 1958
121
PSor
HIGH
FIDELITY
COMPONENTS
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Here is a brilliantly engineered Pilot unit
that combines all the electronic components
necessary for a superlative high fidelity
system. Housed in a single enclosure
a supersensitive FM -AM tuner, a phono
and tape preamp, a complete audio control
section, and a superb amplifier. The simple
addition of a speaker and record player or
tape recorder completes the system.
The Tuner in the HF -42 features an
advanced limiter-discriminator circuit with
tuned RF for maximum sensitivity. Beacon
tuning with AFC assure precise station
selection on both FM and AM broadcasts.
The Preamp and Audio Control provides
equalization for tape heads as well as for
phono records. And there are separate bass,
and treble controls, separate loudness and
-
80 90
100
Ido 160
120
HF-42 3-in-1 Component Unit
volume controls, and a separate output for recording
on tape. Filtered DC is used on the tube heaters to
insure absolute hum -free performance.
The Amplifier section of the HF -42 is conservatively
rated at 20 watts (40 watts peak) at less than 1%
distortion, from 20 to 20,000 cycles, ± db.
1
The HF -42 3 -in -1 Component Unit has
proved so successful in custom high fidelity
installations that it is now used as the key
component in the Ensemble 1041, one of
Pilot's top Component -Console systems,
priced at $575 in mahogany.
If you have been looking for the ideal
components around which to plan your
high fidelity system, audition the HF -42 at
your hi -fi dealer. Or, if you prefer a prebuilt component system then hear this same
unit as it performs in the Ensemble 1041.
HF -42 complete, $216. Prices slightly
higher west of Rockies.
For complete details plus free booklet
"High Fidelity in the Home" -write to:
Pilot Radio Corporation, Long Island City
-
1,
www.americanradiohistory.com
N. Y.
part
7
i PrimPre
by John H. Newitt
The loudspeaker enclosure is a most important part of any high-fidelity system. Actually there are only a few really different basic types of enclosure, although there are
countless variations and modifications which have been given a variety of names. The
purpose of this article is to describe the basic types and their general characteristics.
IIS
POSSIBLE to classify the different basic types of en-
closure by names which describe generally their mode
o operation. For example, in direct radiator types of enclosure the loudspeaker diaphragm radiates directly into
the room. A horn enclosure, by contrast, has a long expanding sound channel (or a folded channel to conserve
space) between the loudspeaker diaphragm and the air
of the room. Another way of classifying an enclosure is
by its effect on the normal response of the loudspeaker
mechanism. An enclosure may be active or it may be
passive, depending upon whether it merely baffles the
sound from the speaker or takes an active part in changing the response of the speaker.
The characteristics of different enclosure types make
some better suited to certain applications than others. For
example:
1) An inexpensive hi -fi speaker mechanism (or a fullrange unit) can often be employed to greatest advantage
in an active enclosure, which will substantially enhance
its normal response. Bass refiexing is often employed for
such a purpose.
2) A very good woofer unit with a natural resonant
frequency well below the lowest frequency to be reproduced would not require bass enhancement by an active
enclosure, and would very probably be at its best in a
passive type of enclosure.
3) Direct radiator systems are less efficient than horn
enclosures and so require considerably higher power from
an amplifier to produce a given amount of acoustic power.
For the home, efficiency is of minor importance, especially
with the high -power amplifiers available today. In some
cases, however, acoustic efficiency cannot be so easily
ignored, and a horn may be the only system that is
practical.
There are many qualifications that can be made to
these simple generalizations, but one can readily see that
different types of enclosures may be employed for different reasons. A frequent mistake of the uninitiated is
misapplication; the wrong speaker and enclosure combination can bring great disappointment to the user.
On the other hand, there are several good ways to get
very nearly perfect acoustic reproduction; no single manufacturer has a corner on high-fidelity sound. It is only
necessary to choose how one wishes to go about accomplishing this end in the most practical way. Technically,
the aim is to produce a sound wave that is an exact
replica of the electrical wave form delivered by the amplifier; if this is accomplished, the resulting sound will be
the same no matter what reproducer system is used. The
fact that one speaker system sounds different from another is evidence that one or both are imperfect. If neither
one produces distortion of any kind, they must sound
exactly alike. It is just that simple.
A primary function of any enclosure is to prevent the
sound at the back of the speaker diaphragm from interacting with that at the front; all enclosures accomplish
this to a substantial degree. It is from this point onward
that the characteristics of various enclosures differ.
Just why it is necessary to keep the front and back
waves of a loudspeaker separated by a baffle may be seen
in Fig. 1A. Here is a loudspeaker suspended in space, with
its radiation pattern indicated by arclike lines. Since
VOID
PRESSURE
PRESSURE
ORE COMPLETE
AVE LEROTM
RAREFIED
HALF OF WAVE
COMPRESSED
RALFOF WAVE
Q
COMPRESSED AIR PARTICLES
RAREFIED AIR PARTICLES
A
ts
C
Fig. IA. Compressions f rom one side of unbaffied speaker tend
to fill in rarefactions created simultaneously on the other
side. Cancellation of sound occurs. Fig. 1B. Baffle separates
front and rear radiation, preventing this type of interference.
Fig. IC. At very low frequencies, longer wave lengths make
small baffle ineffective in separating front and back waves.
123
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
the diaphragm does the same thing to the air behind!
it as it does to the air in front (at low frequencies fort
which baffling is necessary) the wave patterns are identical. At any particular instant, however, rarefaction
(decompression) is taking place on one side of the
diaphragm, while compression is being produced on the
other side. This is to be expected because the loudspeaker
diaphragm is obviously moving away from the air on one
side when it is moving into the air on the opposite side.
Therefore, while the diaphragm does the same thing to
the air on both sides over a complete cycle, it is generating
opposite halves of the sound wave on each side at any one
time. When these opposite halves meet in space they
cancel, since the pressure part of one wave will fill the
void (rarefied) part of the other.
In technical terminology these waves are said to be
identical in form although opposed in phase; this is
the same thing as connecting two locomotives so as to pull
in opposite directions. In the bass reflex system we turn
one locomotive" around to help the other; in most other
systems we simply throw one away (the rear one), being
satisfied to have one unhampered vehicle in operation.
Fig. 1B shows how a baffle board acts to prevent fill -in
or cancellation of the waves on each side of the speaker.
Only the waves that can get around the end of the
baffle board will cancel, and the rest (a goodly portion
in this case) will be radiated. At very low frequencies,
however, the wave lengths are big enough that partial
cancellation does occur, as shown in Fig. 1C. Hence a flat
baffle board is effective only above a certain cutoff frequency, which is inversely proportional to its size.
From Fig. 1C it can be seen why low frequencies suffer
much more than do high frequencies in a baffle arrangement. Since the physical length of the wave is so long at
very low frequencies, all of it can cancel. As we make the
baffle larger, we can more completely prevent interference
of the lower- frequency energy. This can be visualized by
imagining what would happen if we shortened or lengthened the baffle. If the baffle were shortened, more of the
pressure wave from the front could escape around the
baffle edges and dissipate itself in the void of the rear
wave. As we make the baffle larger we obtain better
separation between the front and rear waves, and more
energy is free to radiate. When the baffle is of the size
shown, most but not all of the energy will get away. If we
want an even lower frequency response from our system,
we would have to increase the size of the baffle again since
the wave length will now be longer and would, therefore,
produce 'greater cancellation on the baffle shown.
High frequencies, because of their short wave lengths,
present no serious baffling problem; the speaker diaphragm
itself acts as a baffle (note Figs. IA and 1B -the first
two waves are baffled by the speaker). It is for this
reason that we can hear some sound from an unbaffled
speaker, although such sound is obviously lacking in bass.
Putting a speaker on a baffle several feet square while a
bassy record is playing will produce a quite dramatic
increase in bass response. We can conclude rightly both by
reason and by experiment that the baffle has a great effect
on the low- frequency response of a reproducer system.
Low- frequency sound energy is difficult and expensive
to procure. A good baffle is, therefore, of primary importance for bass reproduction. Since we would need a
flat -board baffle that approaches the size of a room wall
to do a really adequate job at the low end of today's
better hi -fi systems, we had better consider some extension
or modification of this scheme for practical purposes.
A first step in size reduction would be to fold back
the outer sections of a flat baffle to form an open -back
cabinet. This is the well known radio -set type of enclosure. The difference in performance between table-top
radios and console radios is largely a result of the fact
that a larger baffle is available in the latter. Such an
enclosure is hardly adequate for high fidelity, though,
because a reasonably decent baffle of this type would
still involve a monstrosity of a cabinet.
Closing -in the rear of the cabinet produces an "infinite"
baffle (Fig. 2); so called because the rear waves cannot
now possibly interfere with the front waves. But when
a complete enclosure of the rear is made, a new factor
comes into play. The enclosed air within the cabinet
acts as a cushion (spring) and, being directly coupled to
the loudspeaker diaphragm, it reduces the total compliance of the system and thereby raises its resonant frequency. A small cabinet acts as a very stiff cushion, raising
the resonant point of the system by a much greater amount
than would a large cabinet. Aside from the extra cost, a
radio set manufacturer would seldom resort to an infinitebaffle enclosure because the already high resonant frequency of the inexpensive speaker would be driven even
higher and would result in greater loss of bass.
Now, perhaps, it is evident why some hi -fi infinite baffle enclosures have huge dimensions. A large infinite
baffle (6 to 8 cubic feet for a 12-inch speaker) will raise
the speaker resonant point by as little as one or two per
cent, whereas an infinite -baffle enclosure of the average
radio cabinet size could raise the resonant point of the
speaker system by 10 per cent or more. It is obvious also
that a successful infinite -baffle type of system must consist
of a speaker with a very low resonant point, in a cabinet
of the proper size so that the resulting resonant point of
the reproducer system (cabinet and speaker) is still below
the lowest audio frequency to be reproduced.
A loudspeaker mounted between the walls of two
acoustically tight rooms so that the front of the diaphragm
radiates into one room and the rear of the diaphragm
radiates into the other would constitute a "perfect" infinite baffle, since the rear air cushion is so large as not
to affect measurably the resonant point of the speaker
involved. Under such conditions, the full response capability of a speaker mechanism can be realized in an unhampered manner and with complete baffling. A good infinitebaffle cabinet of moderately large size can so closely approach a "perfect" infinite baffle that there is likely to be no
noticeable difference. There is nothing wrong with mounting a speaker in a wall as a matter of convenience, however, if it seems to be preferable to a cabinet.
One problem to be solved with infinite baffles is what
to do with the back wave, since it is just as intense as
the front wave and represents a considerable amount
of energy at high volume. If not controlled, the back wave
could reflect from the walls of the rear enclosure and
interfere with the operation of the speaker diaphragm. This
is a very undesirable condition; it can affect the frequency
response and distortion quite adversely. The normal solution is to kill the rear wave by absorption. Any soft or
fluffy substance acts to absorb and dissipate sound; hard
surfaces tend to reflect it.
Continued on page 126
EDGE
COMPLIANCC
VOICE COIL
CENTERING COMPLIANCE
11R
CUSHION
f
1%EO
END
II
IMFINITEaAFFIEEMCIASURE
II
II
II
it
II
i- _. _
J
MECHANICAL EQUIVALENT
Fig. 2. Air inside infinite baffle acts as springy cushion, adding
to effective stiffness of a cone suspension. Total compliance
is thereby reduced, and natural resonant frequency is raised.
124
HICII FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
"University speakers
were top performers
on our Hi-Fi Holiday*
Concert Tour"
FRED WARING
...
"I had
always dreamed of applying hi -fi techniques to our live concerts
but I hadn't
thought it could be accomplished to my satisfaction. I presented the problem to University
engineers prior to launching our most recent nation -wide tour. Result? University provided
the most stirring sound I had ever heard in a concert hall, so dynamically effective that we
named our show 'Hi -Fi Holiday.'
«`Hi -Fi Holiday' made sound history ... it was sound success -and we plan to repeat the
tour. University deserves a low bow for their contribution to the success of our show
-a top performer most welcome to share the stage with The Pennsylvanians anytime.»
*First such live stage presentation in musical and high fidelity history.
AND HERE'S WHAT FRED WARING'S CHIEF
"Fred Waring's to-week 'Hi -Fi Holiday' needed loudspeakers which would withstand the abuse of a gruelling zoo -5oo miles per' day in a trailer truck. The
speakers had to be easy to set up in theaters, auditoriums and even large, hard-surfaced gymnasiums which,
each night, would be physically and acoustically different, yet produce high fidelity sound that would make
every seat 'front row center.'
"University loudspeakers were selected not only beSee your dealer
...
cause of their reputation for quality and reliability, but
also for their constancy of performance characteristics
which is extremely important to the exacting achieve-
ment of aural 'balance' and 'perspective.'
"We were happy to find that these technical objectives
could be accomplished using various speaker types and
systems from University's standard high fidelity line.
Not a single speaker failure occurred during the 20,000
mile cross- country tour."
Rusa Turner
for a demonstration of what University can do for youl
LISTEN
MARCH 1958
ENGINEER HAS TO SAY
alive/44® setota
University Loudspeakers, Inc., White Plains, N.Y.
6eZZet,
,.>
Drapes, rugs, upholstered furniture and people in a room
serve as excellent sound absorbers. Not all of the hard
surfaces must be covered but the majority of them should
be. In the case of an infinite -baffle cabinet, a half-inch
thickness of cotton batting tacked around the interior
surfaces is usually sufficient.
We could stop right here if the purpose of this article
were only to show one system that could produce the
ultimate in sound reproduction. The infinite baffle has
been and is still used in many of the better hi-fi systems.
Given the proper combination of speaker mechanism and
infinite -baffle enclosure, results can be obtained that are
as perfect as the present state of the art will allow. But
a speaker mechanism with a high resonant point will
actually show up worse in an infinite -baffle system than
it would in another enclosure such as the bass reflex. It
is important not to think of the infinite baffle as a "cure all" simply because it can be used in an excellent system.
The bass reflex enclosure, when properly employed, can
lower the normal response of a loudspeaker by as much
as an octave and can be made to add a considerable damping action to the diaphragm as well. Both of these features
are highly desirable with less than the best speakers. With
proper reflex cabinet design, inexpensive speakers can be
made to sound like units of much higher quality. The
reflex system is not a substitute for a really poor speaker;
a hi -fi grade speaker must be used as a minimum. Neither
is the system without some disadvantages. For a number
of reasons such as the necessity for critical adjustment,
tuning shift as the speaker ages, and incomplete baffling
below cutoff frequency, the bass reflex is not as desirable
as an infinite-baffle enclosure when an exceptionally good
speaker mechanism is available.
The big advantage of the reflex system is in its
compensation effect on speakers having a restricted low end response; in such cases, the advantages of the
structure far outweigh its rather minor disadvantages
and a net increase in 'quality is obtained by its use.
By contrast, an infinite baffle for a limited -range speaker
would actually decrease rather than enhance its capability. Blindly applying the infinite baffle in one case
simply because it was recommended or preferred in another case would be quite wrong.
The bass -reflex system, together with some of its typical
variations (which have been called all sorts of things
except bass-reflex) will be described in another article
of this series. It is a very important basic structure and
is presently in wide use. A discussion of the basic
elements will facilitate detection of the many variants.
A latecomer to the audio world is the acoustic suspension system. This is actually an infinite -baffle enclosure
that is equipped with a speaker mechanism having unusual characteristics. Co- design of the speaker and its
enclosure in this case are vital to the unique performance
obtained. One of the most unusual features is that a very
small size enclosure is not only permissible but is
actually desirable. Under the conditions we have just
FORCE
rORCE
NON-LINEAR
NPUi
ENERGY
6
D^
MECHANICAL
COIL
SPRING
described for the infinite baffle, this seems at first to be
contradictory, since an infinite baffle tends to raise the
resonant point of the system by providing added stiffness.
The speaker employed in the acoustic suspension system,
however, has such a compliant suspension in itself it
depends heavily upon the springiness of the enclosed air
to provide most of the cone -restoring force.
The acoustic structure is the spring system instead of
becoming an undesirable addition (as in the normal
case). This acoustic air cushion forms a perfect mechanical spring with exceptional mechanical linearity and,
since the cabinet is depended upon for supplying a decent amount of spring action, the physical size can be
small. In such a scheme, performance is not sacrificed
by using a small cabinet (as would be the case with a
conventional small infinite -baffle system); the small cabinet
just happens to be a desirable by- product of the over -all
plan to obtain a linear speaker suspension.
It is obvious that a very special speaker mechanism
having virtually no mechanical spring action in itself
must be used for the acoustic suspension system; a conventional loudspeaker mechanism would not be suitable.
A conventional speaker with its self -sufficient mechanical cone -restoring suspension cannot normally be operated with a very great diaphragm excursion if good
linearity of action is to be preserved. This is because
mechanical springs are not inherently linear in action
(see Fig. 3). To obtain reasonable linearity (fidelity)
a loudspeaker must be restricted in its operation to a
very limited portion of its possible excursion. This is
not true of an acoustic spring; it is completely linear
no matter how much it is compressed.
It is common to see two or more conventional bass
speakers employed in the better hi -fi systems in order
to maintain low individual diaphragm excursion. In an
acoustic suspension system, on the other hand, a large
excursion of the diaphragm is permissible due to the
perfect linearity of the acoustic spring and the liberal
design of the voice-coil magnet. Both a linear suspension
and a very homogenous magnetic field over the entire
excursion range of the voice coil are needed for distortion free operation. Such a unit can perform large diaphragm
excursions in a completely linear manner. High power at
low distortion can be produced from a single diaphragm.
These small units are, therefore, equal to or better than
two large woofers that require cabinets many times the
size of the acoustic suspension unit.
While the acoustic suspension system has unusual merit
from many standpoints, it can he equaled by a properly
designed conventional infinite -baffle system. Although the
enthusiastic users of acoustic suspension systems may
be loath to admit that anything can equal their reproducer in performance, there is no doubt at all about
the fact that nothing can come near it when small
size, power output, and quality are all considered as
being important factors. It is not completely without
some disadvantage, however.
Continued on page 131
-
A\
t
TRANSFER
CHARACTERISTIC
f
\
LI NEAR
TRANSFER
CHARACTERISTIC
r
TIGHT FITTING
PISTON
_....
I
o
(,ICI MOTION
¡
AIR
(PNEUMATIC)
SPRING
I
DEFLECTION OF SPRING
S
ENTRAPPED
AIR
D
_
DEFLECTION OF SPRING
Fig. 3. Deflection of a mechanical spring is inherently nonlinear; that is, a giren change in force produces different
amounts of deflection, depending on starting point. This effect in a conventional speaker suspension produces nonlinear
distortion. When air is used as primary restoring force, however, deflection and response are much more nearly linear.
126
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
Brightest star in the
hi -fi heavens...
the
CON N
organ
DIAGRAM OF RHAPSODY VOICE TA BS
AND COUPLERS
The ultimate in music enjoyment comes from the
music you make yourself. On a Conn organ, this
making of music is easy and the results are satisfyingly
beautiful and inspiring.
The Conn Rhapsody here pictured is a fine musical
instrument built to the standards of electronic perfectionism which the hi -fi fan today demands. Two 49note manuals, a 25 -note pedalboard and 27 rocker type control tabs activate the multivoiced tone system,
which includes three built -in high fidelity speakers.
Excitingly styled by Raymond Loewy in African, beige
mahogany or ebony finishes, the Rhapsody console is
only 50" wide, 377/e" high and 26h" deep.
The price of the Rhapsody is less than $2000. For
this, the perfect complement to your fine high fidelity
system, see your Conn organ dealer or send the coupon
below. Conn Organ Corporation, Elkhart, Indiana.
PEDAL VOICES
SOLO VOICES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Diapason 8
Soft Flute 8
Concert Flute
Soft String 8
Violin 8
1
4. Echo Bcss
15. Sub -Bass
8
16. Major Bass
ACCOMPANIMENT
17. Solo to Accomp 8
6. English Horn 8
18. Solo to Accomp 4
7. Oboe 8
19. Open Diapason
SOLO COUPLERS
8. Accomp to Solo 16
9. Unison Off
10. Solo 4
11. Solo 2 -2/3
12. Solo 2
13. Solo -3/5
1
20.
21.
22.
23.
8
Accomp Flute
Flute 8
Echo String 8
Cello 8
24. Reed 8
GENERAL
25. Tremolo L
26. Tremolo M
27. Tremolo F
CONN ORGAN CORPORATION
Dcpt. 11F -3
Elkhart. Indiana
Please send Conn Rhapsody Bulletin 3060.
Please send electronic description of Conn organ tone production.
Please send list of music recently arranged for Conn organ.
Name
Address
City
MARCH 1958
State
127
floating...
The only term that describes the
NEW BELT DRIVEN COMPONENTS
PROFESSIONAL Turntable.
This fully shock mounted 25 lb. turntable
operates precisely at 4 speeds
more than 70 db. below average noise
level. The operational excellence of this
turntable is attributed to its direct belt
drive
no idlers
which virtually
eliminates "wow" and "flutter." Rumble
is passé in the Professional as the whole
mechanism operates as if floated on air."
-
-
-
4
speed model PBT4- audiophile net only $109.00
3 speed model PBT- $99.50
Hear this wonderful turntable
at your dealer now or write for more
details to: Dept. A
professional
For those who
desire a 2 speed turntable
with many of the advanced engineering
features found in the PROFESSIONAL.
Model 45: 331h and 45. Model 78:
331h and 78. Both have the
-
famous Components Belt Drive for
rumble free performance at better than
65 db. below average recording level.
Both utilize a 4 pole constant
speed motor for wowfree speed
accuracy.
Audiophile net only $49.50.
Hear it at your dealer now or
write for more details to: Dept. A
COMPONENTS
CORPORATION
The
1
Input Level -Set Controls
Sm:
I am wondering whether you could
tell me whether excessive surface
noise is a necessary evil associated
with long -playing records, or whether
I have been omitting something important in my efforts to care for the
discs I own.
Some records I buy are tolerably
quiet, but even these become noisy
and scratchy after a few weeks of use.
Sm:
My preamplifier, which I built from a
schematic diagram published in a
technical magazine, is equipped with
individual screwdriver-adjustable volume controls on each input, as well
as a regular front-panel volume control.
The article describing the preamplifier identified these as level -set controls, but it did not tell what they are
for, nor how to adjust them. What i
would like to know is, should these
level -set controls be turned fully upwards and left there, or should I operate my front -panel volume control
full on most of the time and set the
level controls back?
Stan Mitchell
St. Louis, Mo.
I have tried washing them, and I
use anti-static fluids and nifty little
record cleaning devices, but still I am
bothered by loud clicks and pops.
Also, about one out of every three or
four records I buy seems to be excessively noisy when new.
Can you suggest what might be
the matter, or is this something that
simply cannot be avoided?
W. B. McAlpin
Utica, N. Y.
the
DENVILLE
Noisy Records
C
C
NEW JERSEY
turntable with the PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE
There are several things that you can
do to minimize record surface noise.
First, if you purchase your records at
a store rather than through the
mail, make a careful visual inspection
of the surface of each disc before
buying it, to see that it is not badly
scratched or grainy in appearance.
Shallow, broad scratches generally
will not be audible; the ones to watch
out for are the very fine, sharp -edged
scratches caused by grit in the record
envelope or by careless handling by a
previous shopper. If possible, you
should purchase your records from a
store that does not allow auditioning
of discs, and which returns all customer rejects to the factory rather
than back to the store stock. If you
buy by mail, it would pay you to buy
from a dealer who will personally inspect all discs before mailing them
off to you.
Once a record has been purchased,
it should be stored in a polyethylene
sleeve, in its jacket. Before each play
it should be cleaned with a special
record -cleaning fluid or cloth or, if
you use a pickup tracking at less than
three grams, with a dampened wad
of cheesecloth.
It is also possible that your observation of excessive surface noise is a
sign that some part of your highfidelity system is defective or is not
as good as it might be.
2
The input level-set controls on a preamplifier- control unit perform several
functions.
First, they allow all input channels
to be adjusted to approximately the
same volume, so that there will not be
drastic changes in volume when
switching from one input source to
another.
Second, they minimize overload of
the early stages of the control unit by
restricting the signal level that is fed
to them from external program
sources. In some control units, there
are one or two stages of amplification
preceding the main volume control,
so manipulating this front -panel control will not affect the strength of the
signals feeding the earlier stages. If
the input sources delivered very high
signals to the preamp, the early stages
would be overloaded were there no
input level -set controls for attenuating
the input signals.
Third, when a preamplifier- control
unit is equipped with a loudness control, input level -set controls allow this
to be operated within its proper range
of rotation. If level -sets or another uncompensated volume control are not
provided, the loudness control will
add more tonal compensation than is
needed, creating an imbalance in the
sound.
Preamplifier-control units which do
not have input level-set controls generally have their front -panel volume
control located ahead of any amplifying stages, where it doubles as an inHIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
put level -set and a volume control,
and prevents overload of the input
MORNING GLORY EIIONOGRAM COURTESY OI OLIVER READ COLLECTION
circuit.
When there
are separate
input
level-set controls, these should be adjusted by first turning the volume control to about its 2 o'clock setting, and
then advancing the phono channel
level -set until the audible sound is
just slightly louder than is normally
used for most listening. Then adjust
the other channel level-set controls
until they produce about the same
volume level.
Iwas almost
through with hi-fi...
Balanced Systems
SIR:
I have heard a
great deal lately
(mainly from dealers and well -meaning friends) about so- called balanced
systems, but none of my informants
seems to be able to explain just what
a balanced system is.
I'm hoping you can supply a lucid
answer, because I am told I should
have a balanced system, and I don't
know whether my present system is
balanced or imbalanced or unbalanced.
Thomas Gilchrist
Bronx, N. Y.
balanced system is one in which
the sonic coloration introduced by
one component is cancelled out by a
complementary coloration in another
component.
For instance, some pickup cartridges have a bright sound, and if
they are to give optimum results in
a system, they should be used with
a speaker whose character is subdued
rather than bright. On the other
hand, many loudspeakers tend to accentuate the range around 3,000 cycles, so a pickup for use with them
should exhibit a slight loss in this
range if the system is to provide natural balance.
Ideally, both the pickup and the
loudspeaker should be entirely free
of coloration, but in cases where economic considerations prevent the purchase of perfectly linear components,
these items should be chosen to complement one another.
A
Inductive Hum
Sm:
My system consists of a Bogen DB -130
amplifier, Rek-O-Kut turntable, Recoton DS -500 cartridge, and a University 315 speaker.
...until I heard a
NORELCO
speaker!
My brother -in -law is an electronic engineer.
He told me what hi -fi components I should
buy. He kept repeating something about series
impedance in crossover networks and shunt
capacitance with electrostatic driver loads.
My TV repairman also told me what to buy
-only he didn't agree with my brother-in -law.
He was hipped on push -pull -parallel triodes
in Class A. The salesman in the hi -fi salon
shook his head sadly about both of their
recommendations. I was ready to quit.
I started to negotiate with the antique shop
for their 1906 wind -up gramophone, complete
with morning -glory horn.
Then, at a friend's house, I heard a NORELCO
speaker in a NORELCO enclosure. Peace
swept over me in a warm, caressing tide. Man,
this sounded like music! Sweet highs.
smooth lows, clean middles -and not an
oscilloscope on the premises! I asked my
brother-in -law and my TV repairman to stop
confusing me. fired my psychoanalyst and
bought a NORELCO speaker. I have been a
delighted and electronically unencumbered
listener ever since. (You can be, too -and you
can get some valuable information you can
understand from North American Philips Co.,
Inc.. High Fidelity Products Division, 230
Duffy Avenue, Hicksville 2, Long Island, N.Y.)
NORELCO'
loudspeakers
With the phono and amplifier installed in a custom -built cabinet, I get
a very strong hum which varies in
a complete line of 5° to 12" high -fidelity speakers and acoustically engineered enclosures
Continued on next page
MARCH 1958
FOR
FULL
Continued from preceding page
Take sonic carbon tetrachloride and
(in a well -ventilated room) carefully
clean the brass motor shaft and both
of the brass pulleys. Also clean the
rubber surface of the idler wheel
which contacts these. Then clean the
contact surface of the raised portion
around the center of the underside
of the turntable itself. Now put the
new drive belts on in exactly the
same position as the old ones occupied, installing the lower belt first.
When these are in place, and before
replacing the turntable, turn the
player on and make sure the belts
are properly seated .so as to rotate
their respective pulleys. Each belt
should sit squarely over the raised
crown of its speed -change pulley. If
a belt rides upward or downward on
its pulley, this is because it was not
properly aligned on its crowned pulley drum.
Now turn the motor off, take some
fine motor oil, and put about three or
four drops of this between the turntable spindle and the sleeve which
surrounds it. Rotate the sleeve several
times to work the oil into the bearings.
Carefully replace the turntable,
rotating it back and forth while
settling it into place, and making
sure not to bend the rubber idler
wheel by jamming the turntable onto
the edge of it.
If this does not entirely eliminate
your trouble, the player should be
overhauled by the manufacturer, or
should be replaced with a new unit.
B.
K. Turzanski
Abercorn
Quebec, Canada
AUDIO
The hum you hear when your turntable is operated close to the amplifier is being induced from the amplifier's power transformer into the pickup's coil windings.
Very few pickups are designed to
operate within very close proximity
to a strong AC magnetic field (such
as is radiated from the average power
transformer), so the only remedy for
your hum problem is to install the
turntable and amplifier some distance
from each other, or to replace the
pickup cartridge with one having unusually low susceptibility to induced
hum.
SPECTRUM
hear the timpani in the symphony,
or the clarinet in a quartet? From vibrant
restless lows to delicate highs, Ultra- Linear
II reproduces the full audio spectrum the
way it should sound . . , smooth, clean,
natural. Graceful or tantalizing, music floats
out with an airiness that spells fatigue -free
listening hour after hour.
Do you
Acrosound Ultra- Linear II provides realistic
amplification with new Hybrid' feedback
that features complete stability and excellent square wave response on all types of
output loads. Complete printed circuit,
power transformer and choke are all made
by Acro plus the new TO-600 output transformer especially designed for the circuit
and constructed to the top standards of
Acro's world famous quality. Simple layout
provides top performance with only 2 hours
of construction time.
'pat. pending.
watts; response 20 cps. to
db. of 60 watts; less than 1%
IM distortion at 60 watts; hum level 90 db. below
full output; 1.8 volts RMS for 60 watts output; output
impedances are 4, 8, and 16 ohms; 7" x 151/4"
x 8" h.; tubes used are 12AU7, 12AX7, 0234, 2 -E134 or
6CA7; variable damping from 0.5 to 15; weight
30 lbs.; Color:-Two -tone metallic brown.
t
seen to rotate slightly when the speeá
selector knob is turned.
strength as the pickup moves across
the turntable. Yet when I remove the
turntable from the cabinet and place
it about three feet away, the hum
disappears.
What causes this interference? And
what can I do to eliminate it?
THE
Power output
20 kc. within
AUDIO FORUM
60
1
AVAILABLE THROUGH LEADING
DISTRIBUTORS 579.50 complete kit
(S83.00 west coast) ; S109.50 wired and
Sour Notes from a Turntable
Sm:
My high fidelity system, which I have
had for two years, consists of a Bogen
DB -110G amplifier, an Electro -Voice
SP-12B speaker, and a Garrard Model
T manual player with a GE RPX
cartridge.
During the last month something
has gone wrong with the system, in
that all records sound "sour" when I
play them. This is particularly true of
piano records.
Since there is no audio service
agency in this region to which I could
take my components for examination,
I am somewhat at a loss as to what
to do. From my description of the
trouble, can you suggest what might
be wrong? The tubes in the amplifier
seem to be all right.
Could it be the turntable? I can
hear a slight wheezing noise as it
revolves.
Arthur L. Vogelback
Sweet Briar, Va.
assembled (5113 west coast).
Acre Products, 369 Shun tans, Phila. 28, Pa.
Please send literature on illustrated Ultra Linear Il Amplifier.
Name
Address
I- City
Stale
ACRO PRODUCTS COMPANY
369
SHURS
LANE,
PHILADELPHIA 28,
PA.
Evidently your Garrard player has developed speed variation, due to aging
of its drive belts, or lack of lubrication, or both.
Order a pair of new rubber drive
belts for it (from the manufacturer
or from a mail-order radio .supply
house). Then remove the turntable,
and take off the belts that are strung
between the motor shaft and the
speed- change drive pulleys. These
pulleys are on the turret that can be
Tape Equalization
Sin:
I plan to
buy a tape deck which
would enable me to play recorded
tapes, and I plan to feed this through
the phono preamplifier channel on my
control unit.
Will this work, or will I need a
special tape preamplifier? One of my
available equalization settings is
marked NAB, and I wonder if this
is the same as NARTB?
James Faulkner
Forest Hills, N.
Y.
Tape equalization and disc equalization are two totally different things,
so unless your preamplifier includes
an input designed expressly for tape
playback, you will be obliged to purchase a tape preamplifier for use with
your playback deck.
The NAB and the NARTB are the
.mine organization (National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters), but their standard equalization curves for discs and tapes are
not the same. The NAB position on
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
130
www.americanradiohistory.com
your preamplifier
will supply NAB
(also called NARTB) equalization
for discs, but not for tapes.
The NAB /NARTB disc equalization curve calls for bass boost below
500 cycles, and treble rolloff amounting to 16 db at 10,000 cycles. The
tape equalization curve calls for bass
boost below 3,000 cycles, and no
high -frequency rolloif.
t
Custom Finish for Grille Cloth
Sm:
I recently built a speaker enclosure
for our recreation room, and finished
it with quick -drying Krylon spray
enamel, to match the other furniture.
However, I couldn't find any grille
cloth to blend with the enclosure's
color after I had finished it. As an
experiment, I tried spraying the Krylon spray on some ordinary plastic
grille cloth, in light coats, allowing a
few minutes of drying time between
coats. The spray covered the grille
cloth beautifully and solved my color
matching problem. The spaces between the plastic cloth strands didn't
become clogged, and the paint had
no effect at all upon the sound from
the speaker.
Only a few minutes were required
for the entire operation, and it saved
a lot of time which would have been
spent in trying (probably unsuccessfully) to find grille cloth of a suitable
shade and acoustic properties.
James D. Hardy
Upper Darby, Pa.
Between
any of these
""
aljeZ
hi fidelity
.s..
low cost
_
speaker
enclosures
This is an excellent idea. We've tried
it, and it works fine.
DSE-2
OSE -2
HI -FI PRIMER
Continued from page 126
The acoustic suspension system is
quite inefficient electrically, and requires a high -power amplifier for
drive. This, fortunately, is not a great
disadvantage since undistorted high
power is relatively easy to come by in
modern amplifiers.
The true horn woofer system, by
contrast, is very efficient; it can be
driven easily by a low -power amplifier and will operate under such conditions at low distortion. The advantages of this complex structure,
although technically sound, have been
somewhat diminished with the advent
of high -power low- distortion amplifiers
and greatly improved direct- radiator
systems. Technically, it is a perfectly
good system capable of excellent response but, from a cost and complexity
standpoint, it needs a hard look where
the home listener is concerned. For
auditorium work in which acoustic
efficiency is an important factor, it is
perhaps the most desirable system.
DSE -2
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aims sound, avoids off angle listening.
Corner effect enhances
Ask your distributor or
write for FREE catalog.
PRODUCTS COMPANY
MARCH 1958
speaker. Slanting front
Prices are net. All models
in blonde or mahogany,
same price.
DEPT. H, GENOA, ILLINOIS
131
www.americanradiohistory.com
Before you buy a Stereo system
read Crowhurst's
STEREOPHONIC
SOUND
World- famous audio authority Norman H. Crowhurst's
new book is the first true assessment of this exciting new medium for realistic sound. "Stereophonic Sound" adds a new dimension to high fidelity
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devoted to the theory of stereophonic sound, the differences it can make in listening pleasure, what
goes into making it successful, and what is needed
to bring out the best in the various systems available
or likely to be available. It covers such systems as
binaural, two- and three -channel stereophonic, stereo. and
the use of
sonic, and coded stereophonic
these systems with radio, disc, tape and other media.
It applies all this information to selecting the proper
loudspeakers and other components for the best
home stereo reproduction. The book also covers
stereo systems and techniques used for motion pictures. This book will give you the right approach to
stereo and save you hundreds of dollars by guiding
you to the choice of the right equipment
#209
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REPAIRING HI -FI SYSTEMS
by David Fidelman
Deals with finding the troubles and repairing the
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GUIDE TO AUDIO REPRODUCTION
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Treats design, construction, assembly and testing of
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HOW TO
SELECT 1. USE YOUR
TAPE
RECORDER
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by David Mark
For the user of magnetic tape recorders
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recorder
It will save you many dollöMl
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HOW TO SERVICE TAPE RECORDERS
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Discusses the tape reuniter and its operation.
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át167
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HF-3
HI-FI DOCTORING
Continued from page 41
originating. If your amplifier has a
hum- balance control, mark its position carefully so you can return to
it, and then turn it slowly one way
and the other to see if you can
reduce the hum. If not, return this
control to the position in which you
found it.
Let's make an important point about
this business of turning adjustment
screws. Marking a setting so that
you can return to it will work quite
well with hum-balance and level -set
controls that vary resistance, but this
method cannot be depended on to
return a trimmer capacitor or a coil tuning slug to its original electrical
value. A certain amount of inherent
"back lash" in such adjustments prevents this. Neuer touch an adjustment screw in an AM or FM tuner
unless you wish to pay for an expensive realignment job.
The vexing fact that you can get
too much of a good thing accounts
for another possible source of hum.
It is important that all units of the
system be connected to a common
ground, and leads in the connecting
cables normally tie all the chassis
together so that when one is
grounded all are grounded. You
might logically think that if one
ground lead between two chassis is
good, two would be better; but such
is not the case. A dual path between
two chassis sets up what is technically known as a "ground loop,"
and such a loop can produce hum.
Chassis that touch each other or are
in contact with a common metal object can set up such a loop; so make
sure nothing of this nature is present
in your equipment.
Another unwanted sound that
sometimes plagues the hi -fi enthusiast
is a buzzing or crackling sound,
heard only when certain notes are
reproduced by the speaker. It is
pretty maddening trying to locate
the source of this sound when it is
only intermittently triggered by a
musical passage. It is much easier if
you can select the track on a test
record that produces the rattle and
then play that tone while you do
your sleuthing. Look for a loose grille
cloth, loose screws in a speaker cabinet, a speaker not firmly mounted,
a chassis touching some metallic object or another chassis. Try tapping
the tubes lightly with a lead pencil
to see if possibly one might have
loose elements that are being vibrated by certain tones. Make sure
all plugs and connections are making
firm contact. If the sound is heard
132
only when playing records, examine
the cartridge and stylus carefully. A
loose or cracked stylus, or a cartridge
that has been damaged by rough
treatment, can easily cause the trouble. If the entire stylus assembly is
visible, inspection may show the
stylus to be imperfectly centered between its pole piece gap. Very gentle
bending with a small knife blade
applied to the base of the stylus
will remedy this. If there is still
trouble, try another cartridge. Do
NOT attempt to make any internal
adjustments on a pickup cartridge.
"Rumble" is another of the sounds
you can do without. This is a lowpitched shuddering sound that may
easily be confused with hum, but
true rumble is only heard when the
needle is resting on a record. The
most common source of nimble is
some sort of mechanical vibration,
produced by the turntable rotating
mechanism, and picked up by the
cartridge and amplified along with
the record material. Worn motor or
turntable bearings, aged or otherwise defective motor shock mounts,
flat spots on the drive wheels, or a
bit of foreign material on the turntable drive -rim surface are common
causes of rumble. If you know how
to reach these points on your particular turntable, check for these defects.
Another cause of horrendous bass
noise is acoustic feedback from the
speaker. When loud, low notes are
reproduced, they may shake the
turntable, and this low frequency
vibration is picked up, fed back, and
amplified once again to come out of
the speaker as a rumble. If this is
what is happening, the rumble naturally will disappear when the volume is turned down. Moving the
speaker farther away from the pickup or improving the shock mounting
of the turntable may cure it altogether.
When distortion is the complaint,
the symptom being simply aural discomfort, it is my advice that only
a limited amount of first aid should
be tried. If any of the tubes seem to
be overheating, turn the equipment
off at once and call the service techHIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
nician. In such a case the distortion
is just a symptom of something else
seriously wrong that could cause expensive damage.
If nothing seems to be overheating,
use the program switch to see if the
distortion is general or is confined
to one program source. See if it disappears at lowered volume control
settings. If it does, you know it is
originating between the volume control and the speaker, and changing
the tubes in that section should be
tried. If the distortion is present at
all volume levels and on all program
sources, changing the rest of the
tubes is worth trying.
When the distortion is noticed only
when the record player is in action,
try changing the cartridge, or at least
the stylus assembly. If the distortion
is in the form of "wavering" or "wowing," put a stroboscopic disc (available at most music stores) on top of
a record being played and examine
the pattern of the disc in the light
of a fluorescent lamp or a lowwattage bulb. If the pattern is perfectly still, your trouble is not in
the turntable; but if it shifts back
and forth or moves steadily in one
direction, your turntable is in need
of expert-not amateurl- attention.
Wavering can have other causes.
Of course YOU never would do this,
but some dopes who own turnover
cartridges forget to bring the 3 -mil
needle into play on a 78 -rpm record,
and the 1 -mil needle skitters from
side to side of that wide groove and
produces waver. In a tape recorder,
wow and waver usually are caused
by a capstan or pressure roller in
need of cleaning or by worn -out
pressure pads.
Writing an article of this sort is
like spelling `banana ": it is hard to
know where to stop. Many thick
books could be written without hope
of solving all the problems encountered by the myriad readers with their
diversified equipment. It is hoped,
though, that you have gained some
inkling of the method to be used in
running down simple troubles and
that you know a little more about
where you dare and dare not put
your cotton -picking fingers! When in
doubt, think first and then be confident.
Let me leave you with this final
bit of advice: do not be too quick
to call a service technician for subtle,
marginal distortion in your system.
It may be your mood. Remember
how the old bus runs like a ribbon
sometimes, so quiet you can hardly
tell it is running, and then there are
other days when it sounds like a real
bucket of bolts? That happens to
you and your hi -fi system, too!
There are many makes of direct radiator
loudspeakers. The design principles may be
considered stabilised and the published
specifications
frequently give
little
assistance in distinguishing between the
ordinary and the first -rate. The features
which place the Vitavox AK120 Series
Loudspeakers in an exclusive category are
the result of twenty -five years of continuous
and conscientious
development of the
what's so
Special
about
VI TA VOX ?
highest grade of precision audio components
which ' has made Vitavox the choice
wherever quality of performance.
adherence to
specification and utmost
reliability are considered factors of more
importance than low initial cost.
The range is comprehensive and Includes
models especially designed for horn loáding.
As a single unit reproducer, as
part of
a
multi- channel system or as the foundation
of such a system to which other components
can be added at a later date, there is no
more prudent choice than a Vitavox AK120
Series Loudspeaker.
Made in England by Vitavox Limited,
IN
THE
UNITED STATES
IN
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London,
N.W.g
ERCONA CORPORATION
FIFTH AVENUE
NEW,YORK, 17. N.Y.
551
THE ASTRAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD.
44 DANFORTH ROAD
TORONTO. 13
133
MARCH 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
JELLY ROLL MORTON
DYNAKIT
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he new Mark III includes all the sensational attributes of the popular Mark
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The Mark II is the best buy in high
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* Dyna
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lished specifications.
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Available from fending Hi -Fi dealers everywhere
Descriptive brochure available mu request
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DYNACO INC.
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Export Division:
25 Warren St., New York
134
7.
N. V.
Continued from page 47
Aaron Harris, the blues, or any of his
own creations -they all bear the unmistakable musical signature of Jelly
Roll Morton.
Three of these discs are almost entirely devoted to performances of his
own compositions, some of them the
most effective piano solos he ever
recorded. Volume Four, built around
the haunting quality he called "the
Spanish tinge," includes excellent
versions of Mania 'Nita, Creepy Feeling, and The Crave; Volume Six offers his classic, The Pearls, and a
hard -swinging 'version of Pep; while
Volume Ten, in addition to his familiar King Porter Stomp and Original Jelly Roll Blues, has a magnificent
realization of a work less famous:
Sweet Peter.
There is here, in fact, an able demonstration of every facet of Morton's
talent except his remarkable ability
as a band leader. His approach to the
piano was always orchestral. The distinguishing quality of his best work
with the Red Hot Peppers was his
effective translation of his piano style
to his orchestrations. At present, the
only collection of Morton Red Hot
Pepper numbers is to be found on
one sidé of a Jazztone disc (Johnny
Dodds is on the other). Three ten inch LP sets by the Red Hot Peppers
have been released in the past, one
by RCA Victor, two by "X," but all
have been discontinued.
The one glaring flaw in the Lomax
disc series is the complete absence
of anything approaching adequate
engineering, an obvious consequence
of the way in which the recordings
were made: on acetate discs, with
portable equipment, and by an amateur who was more concerned with
Morton than with machinery. Levels
vary, mike placement seems to be
happenstance, Morton's thudding
time- keeping heel rides over almost
all his piano passages. Further, the
original discs had a tendency to run
out at the wrong time, and this has
had to be carried through to the new
set: Riverside, considerately, has retained the side sequence of the original Circle LPs so that aficionados who
own some of the earlier set need not
pay again for portions they already
possess in order to get additional material. But these technical deficiencies
appear picayune in the face of the
whole presentation. Morton almost
seems on these discs to take on flesh and -blood presence.
Entertainment appeal aside, there is
importance to these discs. Morton
now has been dead seventeen years.
Most of the events he describes took
An Announcement
to Owners of
Klipsch
Loudspeakers
A
MORE
HIGHLY
RE-
fined crossover network has
recently been developed by Paul
W. Klipsch for
KLIPSCHORN
and
systems. Its adoption
brings us one more step nearer to
our goal reproduction of sound
which is identical with the
original.
Owners of KLIPSCHORN and
SHORTHORN loudspeakers and of
K -ORTHO drive systems may have
their networks modified by their
dealers or by the factory at a
nominal charge.
This is in keeping with our
policy of offering owners of
Klipsch systems the very latest
developments of our laboratory.
Research is being conducted constantly
every new development in the field of loudspeaker
design is fully tested
and
periodic reports are made to
owners so that they may continue to enjoy "the ultimate in
fidelity of music reproduction."
SHORTHORN
-
-
-
Write:
aILa LF-)ga
AND ASSOCIATES
MOPE, ARKANSAS
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
place a half -century ago. Yet Morton,
the man and the musician, here is
made available for close study forever. And so are the detailed pictures
he paints of long gone New Orleans,
Memphis, and backwoods Mississippi.
In its presentation and coverage,
this set of recordings is as inimitable
as the bouillabaisse of characteristics
blended in Morton; but there are
other articulate, widely experienced
jazz and folk musicians who could
give us phonographic documents
which might be of equal value. It's
not a suitable medium for everyone,
of course. A recent attempt to do
somewhat the same thing with Coleman Hawkins didn't come off. It had
not the interest and impact of the
Morton series, partly because it was
almost entirely personal, partly because Hawkins is not the raconteur
Morton was and, most important, because there was no music. Music of
a sort flows through every measure
of the Morton discs, which is as it
should be, for music is the heart of
this matter. A much more successful
effort in the saine vein has been produced by Folkways in the shape of
two discs on which Big Bill Broonzy
talks and sings about the blues, its
styles, its origins, and his lifelong
association with this special musical
form in interviews adroitly conducted
by Studs Turkel.
But there are others who have
much to tell us. Duke Ellington certainly has the attributes and back-
14u.1
n
w. to...
Records
in
Make mistakes
Review
ir
Thr Thd
ir,
High Fldd
MnwI
choosing LPs
and tapes?
To select the best
invest in
Records in R vi
1951
The Third High Fidelity Annual
Edited by Joan Griffiths
Associate Editor, HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
This book, the only one of its kind, contains over 900 reviews of
classical and semiclassical music, and the spoken word, that have
appeared in HIGH FIDELITY Magazine from July 1956 through June
1957. The reviews cover the merits of the performance, the quality
of the recording, and comparative evaluations with releases of
previous years. They are written by some of this country's most
distinguished critics.
-
ground that help make the Morton
series a success. Must the Duke retire
and bank his fires, before someone
realizes what a wealth of invaluable
materials is stored in his mind and
his fingers? And the Chicago jazz ferment should be documented on records before it is too late. Who is to
tell about it? Earl Hines? (Because
of the importance of supplying musical illustration, one gravitates toward
pianists. As a matter of fact, Riverside already has in its vaults a Lil
Armstrong documentary which might
spark this welcome progress.) The
development of bop and post -bop
jazz might also be worth documenting, soon if not now.
alphabetically by
The reviews are organized for easy reference
composer and, when the number of releases for any given composer
warrants, are divided further into classifications such as orchestral,
chamber music, ecc. An index of composers is included. The book
is printed in clear type on fine quality paper, attractively bound
and jacketed.
RECORDS IN REVIEW is published by The Wyech Press, an
affiliate of HIGH FIDELITY Magazine.
$4..95
The Wyelh Press
Graal /aningten, Massachusetts
__.__
I enclose S
for which please send me
copies of the new RECORDS
IN REVIEW. (No C.O.D., or charge orders, please.) Foreign orders sers) of buyer's risk. Add 550
per book for postage on foreign orden except Canadian.
NAME
ADDRESS
Continued on next page
MARCH 1958
135
www.americanradiohistory.com
DIRECTORY
PROFESSIONAL
CALIFORNIA
NEW YORK
Continued from preceding page
FREE
Indeed, it seems to me, the record
business could use something equivalent to the services performed by the
university presses in publishing. It is
undoubtedly too much to expect that
a commercial recording company
should commit itself to the production of a dozen LPs guaranteed to
have a limited sale. There is a commendable spirit of dedication in the
willingness of such labels as Riverside and Folkways to try to fill this
gap, but they ctnnot devote much
time or money to it.
Logically, this should be a project
for the Institute of Jazz Studies -if
the Institute had any money. It hasn't.
On the other hand, the Newport Jazz
Festival apparently has funds which
must, by virtue of its nonprofit status,
be put to proper use. There seems
to be the possibility here of a cooperative combination that could be of
immense value to jazz, both immediately and for the future: money from
Newport, background and production
from the Institute of Jazz Studies,
and release through a company experienced in handling such discs,
probably Riverside or Folkways.
We get a growing flow of books on
jazz, providing an ever deeper and
broader knowledge of its background.
development, and personalities. But
type and ink can give only the faintest
sense of the reality of jazz. Its actuality, the flavor of the music and of
the musician, can be caught only in
sound-even a recording as old and
technically imperfect as the Jelly Roll
Morton Library of Congress series
makes this abundantly clear.
....
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Continued from page 35
audio equipment. Rates are only 40¢
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Remittance must accompany copy and
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PRICES? TRY OURS! Everything in Hi -Fi. Factory sealed
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Association, Box 610 -HF, Omaha, Nebr.
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FOR SALE:
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WANTED: Genuine Klipschorn: must be excellent condiliion. Robert Bowe, 4132 Drummond Rd., Toledo 13,
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7"
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1
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And this brings us to the periphery
of a possible explanation. It is: that
what women are it is given to only a
few men to achieve; that, as Rubinstein and Upton were on the very
edge of implying, women are in themselves music, earthly harmonic systems
that make the music of the world,
whose greatest compositions lie in the
creation of harmonic human beings
attuned to the unuttered music that is
in the soul of everyone. The most
beautiful music in the world is made
by the loving mother to her child,
and it is no accident that the loveliest
and most moving songs of the human
spirit, in all cultures, take the form
of lullabies; and that much of the
world's music constitutes the projection of that love, a love that has been
inspired by women.
In short, I am suggesting that the
male is impelled-when possessed by
the necessary genius -to utter in music
what he is unable to express in himself; that it is, indeed, due to a lack
in the male that he is caused to express himself in the only way he can,
namely, through the creation of music
as a substitute for the expression of
those inner harmonies with which the
female is naturally endowed.
As is well known, genius in music
often expresses itself quite early, and
when it does so it is invariably in
boys. There is no record of a single
musical girl genius. It would seem
highly probable then that, since there
are usually more girls alive at any one
time and more of them receiving musical instruction than boys, there is
a genuine genetic basis for the sex
difference in compositional musical
ability. On a genetic basis we have
already seen that the deficiencies are
all with the male, so that what we
call compositional musical genius must
be due to a colligation of qualities
which never assume a similar form
in the female. If this is true, then it is
possible to predict that there will
never be a female composer of the
first rank. But "never" is a long time,
and the little genes in the chromosomes are labile and inherently capable of much variation; hence, a female composer of the first rank is not
an impossibility-she is simply a strong
improbability. If and when she does
make her appearance, she would, upon
the present theory, be a biological
freak. But the theory I have outlined
above may be wrong. I am not enamored of it.
I have long been impressed by the
fact that on intelligence tests women,
Continued on next page
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in general, do better than men. Everyone ought to know that when little
girls and boys enter school at about
the age of five years the girls are
about two years mentally ahead of
the boys, and they tend to maintain
that advantage. Until recently the
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only tests on which girls did not do
as well as boys were those relating
to arithmetical and mechanical abilities. In the last few years females are
beginning to do as well as males on
these tests. Why? Presumably because
there is greater freedom in the air
for females than there ever was before. In short, the increase in opportunity to participate in activities that
were formerly considered to be the
exclusive domain of the male may be
held largely accountable for the improvement in these test scores.
Is it possible that with the increase
in opportunities throughout the world
that somewhere, sometime, a great female musical composer will make her
appearance? It is possible, but for the
reasons I have given above I think it
highly unlikely.
If music be love in search of a word,
it is a language with which every
woman is born, but which men must
learn. Women speak this language in
their being. Men, in their being, can
at best speak it only to a limited degree. It is only in becoming that some
men can express themselves in this
language, by a sort of periphrasis, in
music.
CLASSICAL MUSIC
Continued from page 45
Raphael, and Michelangelo, but his
biographers complained that he loved
musicians above all others.
Music now began to reflect text and
mood, and to follow sensuous rather
than constructive principles. Interest
shifted from the Mass, with its unvarying liturgical text, to the motet,
with its possibilities for much wider
variety: composers began to set texts
of personal suffering (such as the
Penitential Psalms and various Passion texts), dramatic scenes from the
Bible (David's lament for Absalom,
the raising of Lazarus), and even
some classic or classicist poems. There
was new concern with clear declamation. These changes are all evident in
the work of Josquin, who has replaced Palestrina in critical estimation as the greatest composer of the
Renaissance. Like Monteverdi and
Beethoven, Josquin was a powerful,
imaginative, many -sided artist, a "wa-
tershed" figure who summed up one
period and then swept in a new one.
Unfortunately little of his music is
commonly known; records have not
been forthcoming. A motet, Tribulatio et angustia, unusually well sung
and recorded for the EMI -RCA Victor History of Music in Sound, shows
all the features of the new style in
capsule form. The somber mood of
the music was obviously influenced by
the words, a psahnlike lamentation
declaimed with clarity. The three
lines of the text are each divided in
two, and the whole is set in a carefully symmetrical fashion-recalling,
perhaps, Raphael's favorite triangle
structure. A single technique is used
for each of the six half-lines: balanced
canonic imitation between the four
voices. The a cappella texture is
smooth, dense and solemn, even and
measured -but not monotonous: out
of the rich flux at the end one word
stands out, "invocavi," the logical
climax of the text subtly but unmistakably emphasized. Leo X is said
to have wept tears of appreciation.
The perfect balance of all elements,
an expressive and moving effect, restraint, power and freedom -this music meets the humanists' demands and
embodies the typical High Renaissance ideal of beauty.
But as Burckhardt liked to point
out, the stability and confidence of
this era cracked under internal psychological strains as well as harsh
external political ones. Italian art
turned towards Mannerism, while
Italian thought was channeled by the
restrictions of the Counter -Reform.
Church music could survive in this atmosphere, but instead of developing
integrally, it accepted official conservatism as its direction. There is
something dispiriting about the image
of Palestrina sitting down to compose
his hundredth Mass. The best recording of the famous Pope Marcellus
Mass-Missa Papae Marcelli -is probably that of the Netherlands Chamber
Choir, conducted by Felix de Nobel.
This music has a new elegance, clarity,
and logic, but it seems bland and
repetitive after a Mass by Dufay or a
motet by Josquin. The true vigor of
the oncoming music was to flow from
elsewhere, outside the Church.
It realized itself in the madrigal,
the last great musical form of the
Renaissance. Based on the motet
style, the madrigal grew up in esoteric academies of Northern Italy, under literary tutelage, soon after the
terrible sack of Rome by the Holy
Roman Emperor Charles V in 1527.
This is secular music, at last, setting
Italian poetry, often of the highest
quality, and composed by Italians.
And now concern for the text has beHIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
come an obsession, the one guiding
principle. Josquin had declaimed
words correctly; the madrigalists
learned to declaim them beautifully,
making free use of a plain harmonic
style. Josquin had matched the mood
of his music to the text; the madrigalists developed a regular vocabulary
of musical analogues for individual
words, phrases, and concepts. Sometimes these were rather silly, as when
"chain" was represented by a long
roulade, or "eyes" by a pair of adjacent whole notes. But sometimes
they were richly expressive, as when
"sweetness" was set to floating chromatic harmonies, or "distress" to a suddenly mobile contrapuntal action. All
these devices, symbolic and expressive, became stock in trade for the
time, and for later centuries.
While there is not yet a single recording of Cipriano de Rore, one of
the great composers of the age and
the real founder of the madrigal, the
seriousness and expressive force of the
early madrigal can be gathered from
a Dante setting by a certain Luzzasco
Luzzaschi, Quivi sospiri, in which
every grief -laden word is painstakingly illustrated. Later on the madrigal, like its century, developed towards a decadent extremism, alternating between frivolity on the one
hand and exaggerated pathos on the
other; but whatever excesses the mad rigalists allowed themselves, they always had within reach some amazing
expressive effects. This is clear from
the Westminster record of madrigals
set to parts of Guarini s Pastor fido,
the sickly but extremely popular pastoral of the 1590s; each lyric is set
by the two best late madrigalists,
Luca Marenzio and Claudio Monteverdi. One has the impression of the
composers vying to milk these erotic
little poems of every emotional implication, to the delight of the humanist
academicians who patronized them.
We are much more at home with
the English madrigal, a genial late
import of the Italian variety, without
the late Italians' overrefinement. This
music is closer in spirit to Sidney's
Astrophel and Stella than to Donne's
Holy Sonnets, closer to Venus and
Adonis than to King Lear; still, the
madrigalist John Wilbye may be
claimed as the most sensitive musical
spirit of Shakespeare's time. A suave
pair of records by the Deller Consort
shows something of his range, from
the polished whim of Flora gave me
fairest flowers to the penetrating psychological study of Oft have I vowed.
In Italy musical humanism was
still vigorous at the very end of the
Continued on next page
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MARCH 1958
139
www.americanradiohistory.com
CLASSICAL MUSIC
Continued from preceding page
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Renaissance. A group of Florentine
intellectuals-among them Galileo's father, even more iconoclastic and quarrelsome than his son -proposed to revive the actual techniques of Greek
music. They meant to eliminate counterpoint in favor of one singer accompanying himself on a lyre," and
declaiming words in the manner of a
great actor or rhetorician. The result
(thoroughly un- Greek) was recitative
and opera, and, presently, Monteverdï s Orfeo of 1607. But to examine
this work would bring us into the era
of the baroque, past our destination;
and we can say a word only about
instrumental music, which was considered subsidiary by the Renaissance, as by ancient Greece. That music without words could be seriously
expressive seemed inconceivable; indeed, this concept is one of the most
original in modem Western culture.
Only with the Roman organist Giro lamo Frescobaldi in the seventeenth
century, and after him with Corelli
and Bach, did instrumental music attain a dignity comparable to that of
music composed to a text.
Yet the roots of instrumental music
too can be traced back to the sixteenth century. The Renaissance
founded modem music, as well as
modern painting, literature, and
thought. Essentially we think and feel
like the men of the Renaissance, and
there is no particular reason why the
art of Josquin and Marenzio should
seem more remote to us than that of
Leonardo or Shakespeare; the expressive quality that was the Renaissance
composer's goal finds a natural response in the listener today. We need
acquaintance with the repertory, of
course, and also some guidance as to
the main working principles of Renaissance music. Perhaps we can already say -certainly we can already
hope -that these needs are being met
by the LP revolution of the 1950s.
IA
Important
Starting with the April
issue, Trader's Marketplace classified space
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for advertisements from
individuals who wish
to sell or swap used
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Rates remain at 400
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address.
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1958
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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Continued from page 38
in terms of numbers is never the
criterion for art and never need be.
Music that is nonimmediate, that
uses a variable or nonjazz rhythmic
structuring, uses it to serve a specific,
considered imaginative purpose. It
carries above that rhythmic structure
the most highly developed fantasy
and ideation in terms of musical properties that men have so far devised.
The superior electrical
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And there is no other way to do this.
Where the beat is ironclad and all
controlling, this kind of dramatic recreation perishes because it is held
static. There is a meaningful element
in music which stands still so long as
the beat is predominant and perfect,
and this element is rhythmic in its
very nature, as well as harmonic.
jazz, on the other hand, cannot by
nature attempt to fulfill the considered imaginative functions of serious
music without disfiguring itself or
cooling itself out of existence. As the
beat becomes weaker and the vigor
of expression diminishes in favor of
whatever subtleties of instrumental
inventiveness, the path is chosen
away from the music of immediate
kinetic sensation, away from jazz as
jazz. A cat, in short, can look at a
king, but it cannot carry the weight
of the royal robes.
Music desperately needs to be both
art and sport, if it is to have both a
head and a body. Each music -jazz
and serious -has its own virtues,
though the virtues are not the same
and not to be confused. To ask one
to take over the virtue of the other
is to ask it to destroy itself, and to
no purpose. Like the celebrated rose,
jazz is jazz: its beat will make you
move with the moment, if rhythmic
music can. Serious music is the considered reflection of important human
experience: it will move you within
yourself, imaginatively, if you are
open to music at all. Unlike objects
not only cannot be compared, but
neither can do the work of the other.
Let them go in peace.
'Name:
I
Address
City
b
State-
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REK -O -KUT Co., Inc.
108th St., Corona 68, N. Y.
Export Maman E.D. N. Y.
Canada. Atlas Radio, Toronto
Dept.
NF, 38 -19
:
141
MmicLL 1958
www.americanradiohistory.com
ADVERTISING INDEX
TRADE IN
YOUR PRESENT HI -FI
EQUIPMENT for
the new
STEREOPHONIC TUNER
of highest quality
It incorporates many innovations which
will
keep it current for years to come.
Famous Scott "Wide Band" FM circuit
Unique AM detector design completely
free of distortion
Separate FM & AM Sections for stereophonic operation
Professional meter tuning
$ 1999s
,
Records
10.... Argos Products Co
11.... Arrow Electronics
12.... Audax, Inc.
23
13.... Audio Devices, Inc.
142
14....Audio Exchange
15.... Audio Fidelity Records ..65-70
136
16.... Audios
17.... Audiophile Records, Inc. ...95
18.... Bell Sound Systems, Inc.....115
19.... Bogen, David, Inc... Back Cover
20....Book of the Month, Inc...5, 27
112
21.... Bozak, R. T., Co.
32
22.... British Industries Corp.
57, 63, 92
23.... Capitol Records
136
24.... Carston Studios
25.
... Collaro
11m
32.... Decca
UNIQUE
SERVICES
SUCH AS:
,A
:6
127
6
81
136
Records, Inc.
61
Mfg. Corp...141
140
96
35.... Dyer- Bennet Records
97
36.... Dyna Music Corp.
134
37....Dynaco Inc.
33....DeWald Radio
34....Duotone Co.
FABULOUS TRADE -INS -Hi -Fi Bargains
We specialize in trading by mail
38.... EICO
39.... Electro -Sonic Laboratories,
TIME PAYMENT PLAN
(Metropolitan N. Y. Customers Only)
40
EXPERIENCED AND SPECIALIZED
HI -FI CONSULTANTS
43
FAMED SERVICE DEPARTMENT
r.(
48
59, 87
128
26....Columbia Records
27.... Components Corp.
28....Conn Organ Corp.
29.... Conrac, Inc.
30....Contemporary Records
31.... Customcrafters
BUY SCOTT AT AUDIO EXCHANGE
AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF AUDIO
EXCHANGE'S
16
130
136
9
136
13
110
106
50
131
136
141
.... Ampex Corp.
9.... Angel
SCOtt
330C AM -FM
.
1....ABC Paramount
8
(only for equipment bought from us)
CUSTOM INSTALLATIONS BY EXPERTS
HI -FI IS OUR ONLY BUSINESS
Write Dept. HFS for our unique Trade -Back
plan, Trading information and catalog.
65.... Kingdom
96
2.... Acoustic Research, Inc.
3.... Acro Products Co.
4.... Airex Radio Corp.
5.... Allied Radio Corp.
6.... Almo Radio Co.
Corp.
7.... Altec Lansing
Cancer Society
Inc.
.... Electro- Voice,
Inc.
41.... Elektra Records
42.... Ercona
....
Corp.
Expériences Anonymes
11
18
19
95
110
96
44.... Fairchild Recording Eqpt.
21
Corp.
102
45.... Ferrodynamics Corp.
110
42.... Ferrograph
136
46.... Fischer, Carl, Inc.
47.... Fisher Radio Corp. ....15, 17
29.... Fleetwood Television
(Costae, Inc.)
22....Garrard
Sales Corp.
48.... General Electric Co.
6
32
Inside Back Cover
49....Glaser-Steers Corp.
Inside Front Cover
8
50.... Goodman's Loudspeakers
51....Gray
Mfg. Co.
52.... Gromnses
THE HI -FI TRADING ORGANIZATION
159-19 Hillside Ave., Jamaica 32, N.Y.
AXtel 7 -7571
Branch stores at:
367 Mamoroneck Ave., White Plains, N.Y.
WHite Plains 8 -3380
836 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn 22, N. Y.
BUckminster 25300
CLOSED MONDAYS.
142
Parking at all stores
53.... Harman- Kardon, Inc.
54....Heath Co.
55.... Hi-Fi Headquarters
56.... Hi- Fidelity Electronic
57.... High- Fidelity House
58.... Holt Stereo
Page
No
Page
No.
American
h. 1.
;
Key
Key
22
24
121
28-31
136
Corp 136
136
140
66....Klipsch
Products Ltd.
&
.. .Lansing, James
B., Sound,
25
Inc.
97
68.... Leslie Creations
69. ... Livingston Audio Products ..107
71
70....London Records
26
65....Lorenz Speakers
67.
137
72....Marantz Co.
73....Mclntosh Laboratory, Inc....88
74....Mercury Record Corp. ..53, 75
75.... Minnesota Mining and
Manufacturing Co.
98
76.... Music Listener's Bookshop..111
59.... Neshaminy Electric Corp. 20
77.... Newark Electric Co.
140
North American Philips Co., Inc.
78.... Loudspeaker
129
79.... Tape Recorder
138
80.... Nuclear Products Co.
96
81....ORRadio Industries
Professional Directory
Custom
73
Victor Division.55, 79, 105
Record Market
97
87....Records in Review 1957. -.135
88....Record Review Index
97
89.... Reeves Soundcraft
107
90.... Revere Camera Co.
100
91....Rider, John F., Publisher 132
92.... Rigo Enterprises, Inc.
139
93....Robins Industries Corp
110
50....Rockbar Corp.
8
25....Rockbar Corp.
48
94....Schwann, W.
Ilermon Hosmer, Inc..117
96....Scott Martin
136
97....Seeco Records
97
98.... Sherwood Electronic
Laboratories, Inc.
12
99....Stephens TRU-SONIC Inc. ...7
100....Stereo Age Recordings, Inc..109
58.... Stereo by Holt
140
101.... Stereophonic Music
Society
102.... Stromberg
103....Superscope
Carlson
86, 136
14
108
104....Tandberg
85
107....Tradition Records
94
105.... Tech -Laboratories, Inc. ....110
106....Traders Marketplace
137
108....United Audio Products
109.... University Loudspeakers,
Inc.
110.... Vanguard
Inc.
Recording Society,
111....Vitavox Ltd.
112.... Vox
139
125
Productions, Inc.
118.
World Radio Lab
136
94
95.... Scott,
62....KLH Research & Development
4
Corp.
63....Kapp Records
83
Electronics
136
85.... RCA
86.... RCA
Walco
64.... Key
109
82.... Peck, Trevor, Co., Ltd. ....136
83.... Pickering & Co., Inc.
2
84.... Pilot Radio Corp.
122
52.... Precision Electronics, Inc....24
113.
1
60.... Jensen Mfg. Co.
61.... Jerrold Electronics Corp.....10
134
Associates
20
59....JansZen
....26
84
133
93
94
114.... Weathers Industries, Inc. ..119
115.... Webster Electric
104
116.... Westminster Recording Co...82
117.... Winegard Co.
141
119....Zax
141
97
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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dramatic new cartridge to bring you new heights in
New Full -range Reproduction General Electric's new VR a
magnetic cartridge makes possible "faithful" reproduction
from 20 through 20,000 cycles.
111
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lllnulnunun
J.1n11I01t1rinnn
performance!
the most exacting conditions.
Hear the difference! Ask for a demonstration at your Hi-Fi
dealer's, but be sure to insist on a genuine G -E VR it!
New 4 -Gram Tracking Force Lateral compliance of the VR tt
has been extended to 1.7 x 10-6 cm. per dyne, permitting a tracking force of only 4 grams to minimize record and stylus wear
-
Instant CLIP -IN -TIP Stylus Stylus replacements
can be
made instantly at home without removing cartridge from tone
arm. There is no need to discard an entire dual assembly
when only one tip is worn.
New Electrostatic Shielding In the VR It cartridge a new
electrostatic shielding prevents pickup of electrostatic interferences and hum. This shield also grounds the stylus assembly,
thus preventing the build -up of electrostatic charges from the
surface of the record.
New Lightweight Construction The microscopic precision
and strong, lightweight construction of General Electric's new
VR tt assures you continued pleasure and satisfaction under
For
firth,
infirmation write to: Specialty
Electronic- Component,. Dept.. Smion 11/358, Wen Geneve Street, Auburn, N. Y.
la Canari Canadian General Electric Company, 1119 Du frein Sirte,, Toronto 3, Canada.
GENERAL
ELECTRIC
Bogen
11111.11111111111111111111
1111111196
PR100A AUDIO CONTROL AND PREAMPLIFIER
You are looking at an instrument so flawless and versatile that it is far ahead of its time.
now or in the future. For instance,
It incorporates every feature you will ever need
...
the PR100A has eight inputs and two cathode -follower outputs. Ganged volume controls
simultaneously regulate two channels so that you can add "stereo" whenever you wish.
Push -button switches permit the instantaneous selection and level adjustment pf all program sources. Distortion? Virtually immeasurable. Frequency response? Beyond anything
you could ever use. Chassis: $119.50. Blonde or mahogany -finished enclosure: $7.50.
David Bogen Co., Paramus, N. J.
A Division of The Siegler Corporation.
Response: 10 to 100,000 cycles -0.!
Front Panel Controls: High -Frequency Roll -Off (6 positions);
Frequency Turn -Over (6 positions); Phono Selector (2 positic
Bass; Treble; Low Filter (5 positions); High Filter (5 positic
Volume; Loudness Contour Selector (5 positions); Input Sele
(6 push -button switches): Off, Monitor, Phono, Radio. Tape,
Chassis Controls: Level Adjust for Phono, Tape, Tuner, and
illary Inputs. Unique Tape Monitor operates while recording.
SPECIFICATIONS:
I
Write for complete catalog and /or send 25c for 56 -page
"Understanding High Fidelity" to Dept. H-3.
Bogen
HIGH
IDELITY
...because it sounds better
M A N
U
F A C T U
R E R
S
O F
HIGH
FIDELITY COMPONENTS. PUBLIC ADDRESS EQUIPMENT AND INTERCOMMUNICATION
www.americanradiohistory.com
S Y S
TE
t
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