Dell | PowerEdge 500SC | Service manual | Dell PowerEdge 500SC Service Manual

Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
System Overview
Basic Troubleshooting
Codes and Error Messages
Removing and Replacing Parts
Jumpers and Connectors
Using the System Setup Program
Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
© 2001 Dell Computer Corporation. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Computer Corporation is strictly forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell, PowerEdge, and Dell OpenManage are trademarks of Dell Computer Corporation; Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows NT are registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation; Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks, and Celeron is a trademark of Intel Corporation; IBM is a registered trademark of International
Business Machines Corporation; and Novell and NetWare are registered trademarks of Novell, Inc.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products. Dell Computer Corporation
disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and trade names other than its own.
Initial release: 31 Jul 2001
Back to Contents Page
Basic Troubleshooting
Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
Overview
Internal Visual Inspection
Initial User Contact
Running the System Diagnostics
External Visual Inspection
Getting Help
Observing the Boot Routine
Overview
This section describes basic troubleshooting procedures that can help you diagnose a system problem. These procedures can often reveal the source of a
problem or indicate the correct starting point for servicing the system.
A brief explanation of how to load and start the system diagnostics can be found in "Running the System Diagnostics."
We recommend that you perform the following procedures in the order presented.
Initial User Contact
When you first contact a user who has a problem, ask the user to describe the problem and the conditions under which it occurs. After the user describes the
problem, perform the following steps:
1.
Ask the user to back up any data on the hard drive if the system’s condition permits. See the documentation provided with the operating system or
applications software for information about backing up data.
2.
Ask the user to try to duplicate the problem by repeating the operations he or she was performing at the time the problem occurred.
If the user can not duplicate the problem, proceed to "External Visual Inspection."
3.
Observe the user to determine if he or she is making an error, such as typing an incorrect key combination or entering a command incorrectly.
If the problem is a result of user error, instruct the user in the proper procedure or direct the user to the appropriate user documentation for the correct
procedure. If the user is performing the procedure correctly, proceed to "External Visual Inspection."
External Visual Inspection
Improperly set switches and controls and loose or improperly connected cables are the most likely source of problems for the system, monitor, or other
peripherals (such as a printer, keyboard, mouse, or other external equipment). A quick check of all the switches, controls, and cable connections can easily
solve these problems.
The external visual inspection consists of a quick inspection of the exterior of the system, the monitor (if attached), the keyboard (if attached), any peripherals,
and cables. While performing the visual inspection, make any necessary corrections. To perform the external visual inspection, perform the following steps.
1.
Inspect the front panel LEDs for indication of component malfunction.
2.
Turn off the system, the monitor (if attached), and all peripherals.
3.
Verify that all power cables are properly connected to the system, the monitor and peripherals, and their power sources.
4.
Inspect connections to any attached devices including network cables, keyboard, monitor, mouse (if used), or keyboard/video monitor/mouse (KVM)
switch (if used), as well as any devices attached to the parallel and serial ports.
5.
Inspect all external monitor controls for any obvious damage or improper settings (if used). For proper settings of the video monitor controls, see the
documentation for the monitor.
6.
Inspect the keyboard (if used) to ensure that no keys are sticking. If one or more keys are sticking, it may be necessary to replace the keyboard.
7.
Inspect the exterior of the system, including all controls and indicators, and all user-accessible data storage devices for any signs of physical damage.
If the inspection reveals any problems, proceed to the appropriate procedure in "Removing and Replacing Parts." Proceed to "Observing the Boot
Routine," if the inspection does not reveal any problems.
Observing the Boot Routine
After you have performed an external visual inspection as described in "External Visual Inspection," you should boot the system and, while the boot routine is
running, observe the system for any indications of problems.
NOTE: Most of the steps in this procedure require observation of system functions and indications, some of which can occur simultaneously. It may be
necessary to reboot the system several times to complete all of these steps.
To perform the following procedure, you need a set of system diagnostics diskettes created from the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD.
NOTE: You can also run the system diagnostics from the utility partition by pressing <F10> during power-up.
To observe problem indications during the boot routine, perform the following steps:
1.
If the system is off, turn on all peripherals and the system.
2.
Insert the bootable system diagnostics diskette into the diskette drive and reboot the system. If you haven't created your set of diagnostics diskettes,
see "Using the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD," in the User's Guide.
3.
Check the power supply fan.
If the fan is not operating properly, troubleshoot the system power supply.
4.
Watch the <Num Lock>, <Caps Lock>, and <Scroll Lock> indicators on the upper-right corner of the keyboard. After all three indicators flash
momentarily, and following a long pause (approximately 30 seconds), the <Num Lock> indicator should light up and remain on (unless the Num Lock
option is set to Off in the System Setup program).
If these indicators do not flash on and off within approximately 10 seconds after the boot routine starts, troubleshoot the system power supply. If the
troubleshooting procedure indicates that the system power supply is operational, troubleshoot the memory.
5.
6.
During the boot routine, observe the system for any of the following indications:
¡
Beep codes — A beep code is a series of beeps that indicates an error condition. See "System Beep Codes."
¡
System error messages — These messages can indicate problems or provide status information. If a system error message appears, see "System
Messages."
¡
Diskette-drive and hard drive access indicators — These indicators light up in response to data being transferred to or from the drives. If either of
these indicators fails to light up during the boot routine, troubleshoot the diskette drive or hard drive subsystem, as appropriate.
Observe the monitor screen for the Diagnostics menu.
If the Diagnostics menu appears, see "Running the System Diagnostics."
7.
Insert another copy of the system diagnostics diskette into the diskette drive, and reboot the system. If the Diagnostics menu appears, see "Running the System Diagnostics." If the Diagnostics menu does not appear, proceed to "Internal Visual
Inspection."
Internal Visual Inspection
NOTICE: Before you proceed with the internal visual inspection described in this section, ensure that the user has saved all open files and exited all
open application programs, if possible.
A simple visual inspection of a system’s interior hardware can often lead to the source of a problem, such as a loose expansion card, cable connector, or
mounting screw. When you perform the visual inspection, see "System Features" to locate components referenced in the inspection procedure.
To perform the internal visual inspection, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect all the power cables from electrical outlets.
CAUTION: Before beginning to work inside the system, disconnect the power supply from the power source and the power supply cables from the
power supply.
2.
Remove the system cover as described in "System Cover and Support Beam."
CAUTION: The microprocessor and heat-sink assembly can get extremely hot during system operations. Be sure that it has had sufficient time to cool
before touching it.
CAUTION: When handling the microprocessor and heat-sink assembly, take care to avoid sharp edges on the heat-sink.
3.
Verify that the chip sets, memory modules, expansion cards, and microprocessor and heat-sink assembly are fully seated in their sockets or connectors.
4.
To ensure that the chip sets are fully seated in their sockets, press firmly on the top of each chip.
5.
To remove and reseat a microprocessor and heat-sink assembly, perform the steps described in "Microprocessor."
6.
To remove and reseat a memory module, perform the steps described in "Memory Modules."
7.
If you need to remove and reseat an expansion card, remove the card as described in "Expansion Cards," and carefully reinsert the card in its connector
until fully seated.
8.
Verify that all jumpers are set correctly.
For information about jumper settings, see "System Board Jumpers."
9.
Check all cable connectors inside the system to verify that they are firmly attached to their appropriate connectors.
10.
Replace the system cover and support beam.
11.
Reconnect the system and any attached peripherals to their power sources, and turn them on. If the problem persists, proceed to "Getting Help."
Running the System Diagnostics
The system diagnostics contain tests that aid in troubleshooting all major components of the system. These diagnostics can be run from the utility partition or from a set of diagnostics diskettes.
To create a set of diagnostics diskettes, see "Using the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD," in the User's Guide.
To start the system diagnostics, turn off the system, insert a bootable system diagnostics diskette into the diskette drive, and then turn on the system (you can
also activate the system diagnostics installed on the utility partition of your hard drive by pressing <F10> during power-up).
Starting the diagnostics causes the Dell logo to appear on the monitor, followed by a message indicating that the diagnostics is loading. Before the diagnostics
loads, a program tests the portion of main memory (RAM) required for loading the diagnostics. If a RAM error is detected, a message telling you which memory
module has failed appears on the screen.
If no errors are found in RAM, the diagnostics loads and a Diagnostics menu appears. This menu lets you choose different options or exit the diagnostics.
See "Running the System Diagnostics" in the system Installation and Troubleshooting Guide for detailed information about the system diagnostics.
Getting Help
If none of the troubleshooting procedures in this section or the tests in the system diagnostics reveals the source of the problem or leads to the proper
troubleshooting steps for determining the source of the problem, see the Support pages at http://support.dell.com. For instructions on contacting Dell, see
"Getting Help" in the system's Installation and Troubleshooting Guide.
Back to Contents Page
Back to Contents Page
Codes and Error Messages
Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
Overview
Diagnostics Messages
System Messages
Alert Log Messages From the System Management Server Agent
System Beep Codes
Front-Panel Indicators
Warning Messages
Back-Panel Indicators
Overview
This section describes beep codes and system error messages that can occur during system start-up or, in the case of some failures, during normal system
operation. The tables in this section list faults that can cause a beep code or system error message to occur and the probable causes of the fault in each case.
This section also suggests actions you can take to resolve problems indicated by a message.
If a faulty system does not emit beep codes or display system error messages to indicate a failure, you should run the appropriate tests in the system
diagnostics to help isolate the source of the problem. See "Running the System Diagnostics."
Several different types of messages can indicate when the system is not functioning properly:
l
System messages
l
System beep codes
l
Warning messages
l
Diagnostics messages
l
Alert log messages
l
Front-panel indicators
System Messages
System messages alert you to a possible operating system problem or to a conflict between the software and hardware. Table 1 lists the system error
messages that can occur and the probable cause for each message.
If the table does not lead to the source of the problem, run the appropriate tests in the system diagnostics (see the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide) to
assist in troubleshooting the problem.
NOTE: If you receive a system message that is not listed in Table 1, check the documentation for the application program that is running when the
message appears and/or the operating system documentation for an explanation of the message and recommended action.
Table 1. System Messages Message
Cause
Address mark not found Faulty diskette, CD, or hard drive
subsystem (defective system board).
Alert! Maximum memory
size exceeded.
Limiting memory size
to 2 GB
System supports up to 2 GB of
memory.
Alert! Single-bit
Improperly seated or faulty memory
modules.
memory error
previously detected in
xxxx xxxxh
Corrective Action
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Remove a memory module pair so that the maximum amount of memory is
2 GB or less. See "Memory Modules."
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help."
Alert! Previous
processor thermal
failure
The microprocessor exceeded its
recommended operating temperature
during the previous operating session.
Remove and replace the defective microprocessor. See "Microprocessor
and Heat-Sink Removal."
Alert! Primary
processor is out of
rev
System detected that the primary
processor is not the correct revision.
Replace the microprocessor. See "Microprocessor and Heat-Sink Removal."
Alert! Processor
thermal probe failure
detected
Faulty processor or defective system
board.
Replace the defective microprocessor. See "Microprocessor and Heat-Sink
Removal." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System
Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Alert! Unsupported
Unsupported memory module(s)
memory in DIMM slot(s) installed in specified slot(s).
Replace one or more memory modules so that the memory module pairs
are the same type. See "Memory Modules."
Alert! Uncorrectable
Improperly seated or faulty memory
modules.
memory error
previously detected in
xxxx xxxxh
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the
problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help."
Attachment failed to
respond
Diskette drive or hard drive controller
cannot send data to associated drive.
Replace the defective drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives." If the
problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Auxiliary device
Mouse cable connector loose or
Check the mouse cable connection. See "External Visual Inspection." If
failure
improperly connected, defective
mouse.
the problem persists, replace the mouse. see "Getting Help."
Bad command or file
name
Command entered does not exist, is
faulty, or is not in pathname specified.
Faulty command and syntax, or incorrect filename.
Bad error-correction
Faulty diskette, CD, or hard drive
code(ECC) on disk read subsystem (defective system board).
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Controller has failed
Boot: Couldn't find
NTLDR
A nonbootable diskette formatted with
Windows NT® was detected in the
diskette drive.
A nonbootable diskette is preventing the system from booting. Remove
the diskette to boot the system from the hard drive or from a bootable
diskette.
CAUTION! NVRAM_CLR
The NVRAM jumper is installed.
jumper is installed on
system board. Please
run SETUP
Remove the NVRAM jumper. See "Figure 1" for jumper location. Run the
System Setup program to correct the diskette drive type. See "Using the
System Setup Program," in the User's Guide.
CD-ROM drive not found Improperly connected or missing CD
drive.
Check that the CD drive unit is seated properly against the interposer
board on the peripheral cage. See "Inside the System" for the location of the CD drive. Replace the drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives." If
the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Data error
Faulty diskette, diskette drive, or hard
drive.
Replace the diskette, diskette drive, or hard drive. See "Removing and
Replacing Drives."
Decreasing available
memory
One or more memory modules
improperly seated or faulty.
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the
problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help."
Diskette drive 0 seek
failure
Faulty or improperly inserted diskette,
incorrect configuration settings in
System Setup program, loose diskette
drive interface cable.
Replace the diskette. Run the System Setup program to correct the
diskette drive type. See "Using the System Setup Program," in the User's
Guide. Check the interface cable and power cable connections to the
system board. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Diskette read failure
Faulty diskette, faulty or improperly
connected diskette drive.
Check the interface cable and power cable connections to the system
board. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Diskette subsystem
reset failed
Faulty diskette controller (defective
system board).
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Diskette write
protected
Diskette write-protect feature
activated.
Move the write-protect tab on the diskette.
Drive not ready
Diskette missing from or improperly
inserted in diskette drive.
Reinsert or replace the diskette.
Gate A20 failure
Faulty keyboard controller (defective
system board).
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
General failure
Operating system corrupted or not
installed properly.
Reinstall the operating system.
Hard disk controller
failure
Incorrect configuration settings in
System Setup program, improperly
connected hard drive, faulty hard drive
controller subsystem (defective system
board), or loose power cable.
Check the hard drive configuration settings in the System Setup program.
See "Using the System Setup Program," in the User's Guide. Reinstall the
hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives." Check the interface
cable and power cable connections to the system board. See "Removing
and Replacing Drives." If the problem persists, replace the system board.
See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Invalid configuration
information - please
run SETUP program
Incorrect configuration settings in
System Setup program, faulty battery,
or NVRAM jumper is installed.
Check the System Setup configuration settings. See "Using the System
Setup Program," in the User's Guide. Replace the battery. See "Battery."
Remove the NVRAM jumper. See "Figure 1" for jumper location.
Invalid CPU speed
detected
Microprocessor not supported by
system.
Install a correct version of the microprocessor in the specified
microprocessor connector. See "Microprocessor and Heat-Sink Removal."
Invalid NVRAM
configuration,
resource reallocated
System detected and corrected a
resource conflict when system
resources were allocated using the
System Setup program.
No action is required.
I/O parity interrupt
at address
Expansion card improperly installed or
faulty.
Reinstall the expansion cards. See "Expansion Cards." If the problem
persists, replace the expansion card.
Keyboard failure
Keyboard cable connector loose or
improperly connected, defective
keyboard, or defective
keyboard/mouse controller (defective
system board).
Check the keyboard cable connection. Replace the keyboard. If the
problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board Removal."
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Keyboard controller
failure
Defective keyboard/mouse controller
(defective system board).
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Memory address line
failure at address,
read value expecting
value
Faulty or improperly seated memory
modules or defective system board.
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the
problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help."
Diskette drive 1 seek
failure
Hard disk drive read
failure
Hard disk failure
Keyboard data line
failure
Keyboard stuck key
failure
Keyboard clock line
failure
Memory data line
failure at address,
read value expecting
value
Memory double word
logic failure at
address, read value
expecting value
Memory odd/even logic
failure at address,
read value expecting
value
Memory write/read
failure at address,
read value expecting
value
Memory allocation
error
Faulty application program.
Restart the application program.
Memory parity
interrupt at address
Improperly seated or faulty memory
modules.
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the
problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help."
Memory tests
terminated by
keystroke
POST memory test terminated by
pressing the spacebar.
No action is required.
No boot device
available
Faulty diskette, diskette subsystem,
hard drive, hard drive subsystem, or
no boot disk in drive A.
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board
Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
No boot sector on hard Incorrect configuration settings in
System Setup program, or no
drive
operating system on hard drive.
Check the hard drive configuration settings in the System Setup program.
See "Using the System Setup Program," in the User's Guide.
No timer tick
interrupt
Defective system board.
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Non-system disk or
disk error
Faulty diskette, diskette subsystem, or
hard drive subsystem.
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board
Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Not a boot diskette
No operating system on diskette.
Use a bootable diskette.
Read fault
Faulty diskette, diskette subsystem, or
hard drive subsystem (defective
system board).
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board
Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help.".
Reset failed
Improperly connected diskette drive,
CD drive, hard drive, or power cable.
Check the interface cable and power cable connections to the diskette
drive, CD drive, or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Reinstall the hard drive. Check the interface cable and power cable
connections to the system board. See "Getting Help."
ROM bad checksum =
address
Expansion card improperly installed or
faulty.
Reinstall the expansion cards. See "Expansion Cards." If the problem
persists, replace the expansion card. If the problem persists, replace the
system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see
"Getting Help."
Sector not found
Defective sectors on diskette or hard
drive.
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Seek error
Defective sectors on diskette or hard
drive.
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Seek operation failed
Faulty diskette or hard drive.
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Shutdown failure
Defective system board.
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
System halted
System microprocessor is not
supported.
Replace the unsupported microprocessor with a supported
microprocessor. See "Microprocessor and Heat-Sink Removal."
Time-of-day clock
stopped
Defective battery or faulty chip
(defective system board).
Replace the system battery. See "Battery." If the problem persists,
replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Time-of-day not set please run SETUP
program
Incorrect Time or Date settings,
defective system battery, or NVRAM
jumper is installed.
Check the Time and Date settings. See "Using the System Setup
Program," in the User's Guide. Remove the NVRAM jumper. See "Figure 1"
for jumper location. If the problem persists, replace the system battery.
See "Battery." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See
"System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Timer chip counter 2
failed
Defective system board.
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem
persists, see "Getting Help."
Unexpected interrupt
in protected mode
Improperly seated memory modules or
faulty keyboard/mouse controller chip
(defective system board).
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the
problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help."
Unsupported CPU speed
in CMOS
Microprocessor not supported by BIOS. Upgrade the BIOS. See "Using the System Setup Program," in the User's
Guide.
Utility partition not
available
<F10> key was pressed during POST,
but no utility partition exists on the
boot hard drive.
Create a utility partition on the boot hard drive. See "Using the Dell
OpenManage Server Assistant CD" in your User's Guide.
Write fault
Faulty diskette or hard drive.
Replace the diskette or hard drive. See "Removing and Replacing Drives."
Requested sector not
found
Write fault on
selected drive
System Beep Codes
When an error that cannot be reported on the monitor occurs during a boot routine, the system may emit a series of beeps that identify the problem. The
beep code is a pattern of sounds; for example, one beep followed by a second beep and then a burst of three beeps (code 1-1-3) means that the computer
was unable to read the data in NVRAM. This information is valuable to the Dell technical support representative if you need to call for technical assistance.
When a beep code is emitted, record it on a copy of the Diagnostics Checklist, in your System's Installation and Troubleshooting Guide, and then look it up in
Table 2. If you are unable to resolve the problem by looking up the meaning of the beep code, use the system diagnostics to identify a more serious cause.
See "Running the System Diagnostics."
Table 2. System Beep Codes
Code
Cause
Corrective Action
1-1-3
CMOS write/read failure
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
1-1-4
BIOS checksum failure
This fatal error usually requires that you replace the BIOS firmware. see "Getting Help."
1-2-1
Programmable intervaltimer failure
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
1-2-2
DMA initialization failure
DMA page register
write/read failure
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the
memory modules. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
1-2-3
1-3-1
Main-memory refresh
verification failure
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the
memory modules. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
1-3-2
No memory installed
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the
memory modules. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
1-3-3
Chip or data line failure in Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the
the first 64 KB of main
memory modules. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
memory
1-3-4
Odd/even logic failure in
the first 64 KB of main memory
1-4-
Address line failure in the
first 64 KB of main
memory
1-4-2
Parity failure in the first
64 KB of main memory
2-1-1
through
2-4-4
Bit failure in the first 64
KB of main memory
3-1-1
Slave DMA-register failure Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
3-1-2
Master DMA-register
failure
3-1-3
Master interrupt-mask
register failure
3-1-4
Slave interrupt-mask
register failure
3-2-4
Keyboard-controller test
failure
Check the keyboard cable and connector for proper connection. If the problem persists, run the
keyboard test in the system diagnostics to determine whether the keyboard or keyboard controller is
faulty. See "Running the System Diagnostics." If the keyboard controller is faulty, replace the system
board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
3-3-1
CMOS failure
Run the system board test in the system diagnostics to isolate the problem. See "Running the System
Diagnostics."
3-3-2
System configuration
check failure
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
3-3-3
Keyboard controller not
detected
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
3-3-4
Screen initialization
failure
Run the video test in the system diagnostics. See "Running the System Diagnostics."
3-4-2
Screen-retrace test
failure
3-4-3
Search for video ROM
failure
4-2-1
No timer tick
4-2-2
Shutdown failure
4-2-3
Gate A20 failure
4-2-4
Unexpected interrupt in
protected mode
Ensure that all expansion cards are properly seated, and then reboot the system.
4-3-1
Improperly seated or
faulty memory modules
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the
memory modules. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
4-3-3
Defective system board
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
4-3-4
Time-of-day clock
stopped
Replace the battery. See "Battery." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System
Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
4-4-1
I/O chip set failure
(defective system board)
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
4-4-2
Parallel-port test failure
(defective system board)
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
4-4-3
Math coprocessor failure
(defective
microprocessor)
Remove and reseat the specified microprocessor. See "Upgrading the Microprocessor." If the problem
persists, replace the microprocessor. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory Modules." If the problem persists, replace the
memory modules. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Replace the system board. See "System Board Removal." If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
4-4-4
Cache test failure
(defective
microprocessor)
Remove and reseat the specified microprocessor. See "Upgrading the Microprocessor." If the problem
persists, replace the microprocessor. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help."
Warning Messages
A warning message alerts you to a possible problem and asks you to take corrective action before the system continues a task. For example, before you
format a diskette, a message might warn you that you might lose all data on the diskette, as a way to protect against inadvertently erasing or writing over
the data. These warning messages usually interrupt the procedure and require you to respond by typing y (yes) or n (no).
NOTE: Warning messages are generated by either the application program or the operating system. See your Installation and Troubleshooting Guide and
the documentation that accompanied the operating system and application program for more information on warning messages.
Diagnostics Messages
When you run a test group or subtest in the system diagnostics, an error message might result. These particular error messages are not covered in this
section. Record the message on a copy of the Diagnostics Checklist (located in "Getting Help" in the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide, and then follow the
instructions in that section for obtaining technical assistance.
Alert Log Messages From the System Management Server Agent
The optional system management software generates alert messages for your system. For example, the server agent generates messages that appear in the
SNMP trap log file. Alert messages consist of information, status, warning, and failure messages for drive, temperature, fan, and power conditions. More
information about alert messages is provided in the system management software documentation found on the Online Documentation CD that shipped with
your system.
Front-Panel Indicators
The following indicators are on the system's front panel (see Figure 1 and Table 3):
Figure 1. Front Panel Indicators
1 CD drive activity indicator
2 Diskette drive activity indicator
3 System power indicator
4 Hard drive activity indicator
Table 3. Front-Panel Indicator Patterns
Indicator
Description
CD drive activity
Green LED blinks when activity is detected on the CD drive.
Diskette drive activity
Green LED blinks when activity is detected on the diskette drive.
System power indicator
LED displays a steady green light when the power supply is turned
on. Hard drive activity
Green LED blinks when activity is detected on the hard drives.
Back-Panel Indicators
The following indicators are on the system's back panel (see Figure 2 and Table 4):
Figure 2. Back-Panel Features and Indicators
1 Power connector
2 Mouse connector
3 Keyboard connector
4 Serial connector
5 Parallel connector
6 Video connector
7 USB connector (2)
8 NIC connector and 2 LEDs
9 PCI expansion card slots (5)
Table 4. Back-Panel Indicator Patterns
Indicator
Description
NIC (2 LEDs)
The LEDs display a steady green light when a link is detected. The
LEDs flicker when network activity is detected.
NOTE: If AC power is connected to the power supply, but the
system is turned off, the LEDs continue to function.
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System Overview
Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
Overview
Service Features
System Features
Technical Specifications
Overview
The PowerEdge 500SC is available in a tower version only. Your system provides a reliable platform that can be used for nonmission critical applications such as file and print server, and remote server locations. The system has one Intel® Pentium® III or Intel Celeron™ microprocessor.
The hard drive that boots your operating system has a utility partition containing complete diagnostics for your system. Also, a separate Dell OpenManage
Server Assistant CD is provided that includes diagnostics software that you can download to a set of diskettes.
This section describes the major hardware and software features of the system. It also describes hardware features that simplify servicing.
System Features
The system offers the following major features:
l
Intel® Pentium® III microprocessor with a speed of at least 1 GHz, an external bus speed of 133 MHz, and a 256 KB level 2 cache OR
l
Intel Celeron™ microprocessor with a speed of at least 800 MHz with an external bus speed of 100 MHz and a 128 KB level 2 cache l
A minimum of 64 MB of system memory, upgradable to a maximum of 2 GB by installing combinations of 64-, 128-, 256-, or 512-MB registered PC-133
SDRAM memory modules in the four memory module sockets on the system board
l
Support for up to three one-inch, internal IDE hard drives
l
A 250–330 W power supply
l
48X CD drive
l
Dual USB ports
l
9-pin serial port
l
25-pin parallel port
l
PS/2 compatible mouse and keyboard ports
l
Embedded 10/100 Mbps Ethernet
l
Optional IDE tape backup unit, DVD drive, or internal tape drive
The system board includes the following built-in features:
l
Five PCI slots located on the system board. Two are 64-bit, 33- or 66-MHz slots; three are 32-bit, 33-MHz slots.
l
An integrated VGA-compatible video subsystem with an ATI RAGE XL video controller. This video subsystem contains 4 MB of SDRAM video memory
(nonupgradable). Maximum resolutions are 1600 x 1200 x 65K colors (noninterlaced). For 640 x 480-pixel, 800 x 600-pixel, 1024 x 768-pixel, and 1280 x
1024-pixel resolutions, true-color is available.
l
Dual IDE controllers.
l
An integrated Intel 10/100 NIC, which provides an Ethernet interface.
l
Server management circuitry that monitors operation of the system fans as well as critical system voltages and temperatures. The server management
circuitry works in conjunction with the server management software.
Standard systems include a diskette drive and one IDE hard drive. It also includes an IDE CD drive in the externally accessible bay.
The following software is included with your system:
l
A system setup program for quickly viewing and changing the system configuration information for your system. For more information on this program,
see "Using the System Setup Program."
l
Enhanced security features, including a user password and a supervisor password, available through the System Setup program.
l
Diagnostics for evaluating your system's components and devices. For information on using the system diagnostics, see "Running the System
Diagnostics" in your Installation and Troubleshooting Guide.
Service Features
The system includes the following service features to make troubleshooting and repair easy and effective, in most cases without tools or service aids:
l
System diagnostics are available on the utility partition, which checks for hardware problems (if the system can boot). The system diagnostics can be
downloaded to diskettes from the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD.
l
Embedded server management hardware, which monitors temperatures and voltages throughout the system and notifies you if the system overheats, if
a system cooling fan malfunctions, if a processor overheats, or if a power supply or VRM fails.
The system chassis simplifies removing and replacing system components. You can replace the microprocessor or DIMMs without removing the system board.
Technical Specifications
Microprocessor
Microprocessor type
Intel Pentium III microprocessor with a minimum of 1 GHz, an external bus speed of 133 MHz, and a 256 KB level 2 cache
OR
Intel Celeron microprocessor at 800 MHz with an external bus speed of 100 MHz and a 128 KB level 2 cache
Front-side bus speed
Pentium III: 133 MHz
Celeron: 100 MHz
Internal cache
Pentium III: 256 KB Level 2 cache
Celeron: 128 KB Level 2 cache
Expansion Bus
Bus type
PCI
Expansion slots
Two 64-bit, 33/66-MHz slots
Three 32-bit, 33-MHz slots
Memory
Architecture
72-bit ECC PC-133 SDRAM
Memory module sockets
four
Memory module capacities
64, 128, 256, or 512 MB
Minimum RAM
64 MB
Maximum RAM
2 GB
Drives
Diskette drive
3.5-inch, 1.44-MB diskette drive
Tape drive
optional internal tape drive
IDE devices
three 1-inch, internal, IDE hard drive bays
CD drive
one IDE CD drive
Ports and Connectors
Externally accessible:
Serial (DTE)
one 9-pin connector; 16550-compatible
Parallel
one 25-pin connector (bidirectional)
Video
one 15-pin connector
PS/2-style keyboard
6-pin mini-DIN connector
PS/2-compatible
mouse
6-pin mini-DIN connector
USB
two USB-compliant 4-pin connectors
NIC
RJ45 connector for integrated NIC
Video
Video type
ATI Rage XL video controller; VGA connector
Video memory
4 MB
Power
DC power supply:
Wattage
one 250-W or 330-W power supply
Voltage
90–240 V, 47/63 Hz or 90–265 V, 47/63 Hz
System battery
CR2032 3.0-V lithium coin cell
Physical
Height
43.7 cm (17.2 inches)
Width
20.3 cm (8 inches)
Depth
44.5 cm (17.5 inches)
Weight
15.0 kg (33 lb), maximum configuration
Environmental
Temperature:
Operating
10° to 35° C (50° to 95° F)
Storage
–40° to 65° C (–40° to 149° F)
Relative humidity:
20% to 80 noncondensing
Maximum vibration:
Operating
0.25 G at 3 to 200 Hz at 1/2 octave/min
Storage
0.5 G at 3 to 200 Hz at 1/2 octave/min
Maximum shock:
Operating
left side and bottom half-sine pulse with a change in velocity of 50.8 cm/sec (20 inches/sec)
Storage
23-G faired-square wave with a velocity change of 508.0 cm/sec (200 inches/sec)
Altitude:
Operating
–15.2 to 3048 m (–50 to 10,000 ft)1
Storage
–15.2 to 10,600 m (–50 to 35,000 ft)
1 At 35°C (95°F), the maximum operating altitude is 914 m (3000 ft).
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Jumpers and Connectors
Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
Overview
System Board Labels
Jumpers—A General Explanation
Disabling a Forgotten Password
System Board Jumpers
Overview
This section provides specific information about the jumpers on the system board. It also provides some basic information on jumpers and describes the
connectors and sockets on the various boards in the system.
Jumpers — A General Explanation
Jumpers provide a convenient and reversible way of reconfiguring the circuitry on a printed circuit board. When installing replacement parts or reconfiguring
the system, you may need to change jumper settings on the system board. You may also need to change jumper settings on expansion cards or drives.
Jumpers
Jumpers are small blocks on a circuit board with two or more pins emerging from them. Plastic plugs containing a wire fit down over the pins. The wire connects
the pins and creates a circuit. To change a jumper setting, pull the plug off its pin(s) and carefully fit it down onto the pin(s) indicated.
NOTICE: Make sure the system is turned off before you change a jumper setting. Otherwise, damage to the system or unpredictable results may occur.
A jumper is referred to as open or unjumpered when the plug is pushed down over only one pin or if there is no plug at all. When the plug is pushed down
over two pins, the jumper is referred to as jumpered. The jumper setting is often shown in text as two numbers, such as 1-2. The number 1 is printed on the
circuit board so that you can identify each pin number based on the location of pin 1.
System Board Jumpers
Figure 1 shows the location of the configuration jumpers on the system board. Table 1 lists the function of these jumpers.
Figure 1. System Board Jumpers
Table 1. System-Board Jumper Settings
Jumper
Setting
Description
PASSWORD
(default) The password feature is enabled.
The password feature is disabled.
NVRAM
(default) The configuration settings are retained at system boot.
The configuration settings are cleared at next system boot. If the
configuration settings become corrupted to the point where the
system will not boot, install the jumper plug and boot the
system. Remove the jumper before restoring the configuration
information.
jumpered unjumpered
System Board Labels
Table 2 lists the connectors and sockets located on the system board.
Table 2. System Board Connectors and Sockets
Connector or Socket Description
BATTERY
Battery connector
COM1
Serial port connector
CPU
Microprocessor ZIF socket
DIMM_n
Memory module sockets
FDD
Diskette drive cable connector
FRONT PANEL
System front panel connector
LAN1
RJ45 Ethernet NIC connector
J12
System jumpers
KY
Keyboard connector
LPT
Parallel port connector
MS
Mouse connector POWER
Power connector
PRIMARY IDE
Primary IDE connector
SECONDARY IDE
Secondary IDE connector
SLOT_n
Ultra3 SCSI host adapter connector
SYS_FAN2
Fan connector
USB
USB connector
VGA
Video connector Disabling a Forgotten Password
The computer's software security features include a supervisor password and a user password, which are discussed in detail in "Using the System Setup
Program" of the User's Guide. A password jumper on the system board enables these password features or disables them and clears any password(s)
currently in use.
To disable a forgotten supervisor password or user password, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the power cord from its power source.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
See Figure 1 for the location of the password jumper (labeled PASSWORD) on the system board.
4.
Remove the jumper plug from the PASSWORD jumper.
5.
Replace the system cover and then reconnect the computer to an electrical outlet and turn it on.
The existing passwords are not disabled (erased) until the system boots with the PASSWORD jumper plug removed. However, before you assign a new
system and/or user password, you must install the jumper plug.
NOTE: If you assign a new system and/or user password with the jumper plug still removed, the system disables the new password(s) the next
time it boots.
6.
Repeat step 1.
7.
Install the jumper plug on the PASSWORD jumper.
8.
Replace the system cover and then reconnect the computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets and turn them on.
9.
Assign a new system and/or user password.
To assign a new system and/or user password, see "Using the System Setup Program".
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Removing and Replacing Parts
Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
Overview
Cooling Fan
Inside the System
Power Supply
System Cover and Support Beam
System Board
Front Bezel
Expansion Cards
Drive Cage
Memory Modules
Control Panel Assembly
Upgrading the Microprocessor
Drives
Battery
Cooling Shroud
Overview
The procedures in this guide require that you remove the cover and work inside the system. While working inside the system, do not attempt to service the
system except as explained in this manual and elsewhere in Dell documentation. Always follow the instructions closely. Make sure to review all of the
procedures in "Safety Instructions" in your System Information document.
This section provides servicing procedures for components inside the system. Before you start any of the procedures in this section, perform the following
tasks:
l
Perform the procedures described in "External Visual Inspection."
l
Read the safety information in the System Information document.
When there is no replacement procedure provided, use the removal procedure in reverse order to install the replacement part.
Recommended Tools
You need the following items to perform the procedures in this section:
l
The system diagnostics diskette set appropriate for your system
l
System User's Guide
l
System Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
l
Key to the system keylock
l
#1 and #2 Phillips screwdriver
l
Wrist grounding strap
Inside the System
In Figure 1, the system cover is removed to provide an interior view. Refer to this illustration to locate interior features and components discussed later in this
manual.
Figure 1. Inside the System (Right-Side View)
1 Drive cable
2 Power cables
3 Drive cage
4 Card guide assembly
5 Expansion card filler brackets (5)
6 System board
7 Cooling fan shroud
8 Power supply
The system board can accommodate up to five PCI expansion cards (two cards at 64-bit/66 MHz or 64-bit/33 MHz, and three cards at 32-bit/33 MHz).
The drive cage contains two externally accessible, 5.25-inch drive bays that provide space for up to two drives, including a CD or DVD drive and one other
device, such as a tape drive. The drive cage also provides space for up to two 1-inch IDE hard drives.
Additionally, the card guide assembly provides two additional brackets for a 3.5-inch diskette drive and a 1-inch IDE hard drive.
NOTICE: Do not install a hard drive in the lower card-guide assembly bracket next to the card guides. Installing a drive in the lower card-guide
assembly bracket is not supported in this system.
The DC power cables from the power supply provide power to the system board, drives, and any expansion cards that connect to external peripheral.
The wide ribbon cables are the interface cables for internal drives. For the diskette drive, an interface cable connects the drive to an interface connector on the
system board or on an expansion card. For IDE devices, interface cables connect the devices to an IDE connector on the system board (for more information,
see "Removing and Replacing Drives").
During an installation or troubleshooting procedure, you may be required to change a jumper. For information on the system board jumpers, see "System
Board Jumpers."
System Cover and Support Beam
NOTE: Before you begin any of the procedures in this section, see "Safety Instructions" in your System Information document.
NOTICE: To avoid damaging the system board, disconnect the power cable from the electrical outlet and from the back of the system, then press the
power button before you remove the system cover. The system board continues to receive a small amount of power when the system is turned off and
attached to an electrical outlet.
Removing the System Cover and Support Beam
1.
Lay the system on its right side, with the system foot stand off the edge of the work surface.
2.
Loosen the captive thumbscrew that secures the cover to the back of the system.
CAUTION: To prevent cuts, keep your hands clear of the metal edges on the system as you slide back the cover.
3.
Face the front of the system. Use your thumbs to press in both latches while pushing the cover backward. Move the cover back slightly, and then lift it
straight up (see Figure 2).
If necessary, use both hands and work one side at a time.
Figure 2. Removing the System Cover
1 Thumbscrew
2 Cover release latch
3 System foot stand
4.
Remove the screw from the support beam as shown in Figure 3.
5.
Pull the front end of the support beam until it snaps free from its fastener. Rotate the front of the beam upward until the hinged tabs on the back of the
beam clear their slots (see Figure 3).
Figure 3. Removing the Support Beam
1 Screw
2 Lock tab
3 Slot
4 Support beam
5 Slots (2)
6 Hinged tabs (2)
To replace the system cover, perform the following steps:
1.
Check that no tools or parts are left inside the system.
2.
Slip the support beam's hinged tabs into their slots and lower the beam until the lock tab snaps into the retaining slot (see Figure 3).
3.
Replace the screw you removed in step 4 of "Removing the System Cover and Support Beam."
4.
Fit the cover over the sides of the chassis and slide the cover forward until it locks in place.
5.
Secure the cover with the thumbscrew.
Front Bezel
To remove the front bezel of the system, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: See the safety instructions in your System Information document before working inside your system.
1.
Remove the system cover.
2.
Press the three tabs along the side of the bezel (see Figure 4).
3.
Swing the bezel away from the system, disengage the hooks, and carefully pull the bezel away from the system.
Figure 4. Front-Bezel Removal
1 Tabs (3)
To replace the bezel, insert the bezel hooks into the system slots, and snap the bezel back onto the system.
Drive-Cage Removal
To remove the drive cage, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any external devices, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the bezel.
4.
Disconnect the interface cable and the power cable from all drives installed in the drive cage. Note the location and orientation of all cables attached to
the drives.
5.
Remove the screw from the side of the drive cage (see Figure 5). Pull the drive cage toward you to unlock it from the system. Lift out the drive cage.
Figure 5. Drive-Cage Removal
1 Drive cage
2 Slots (10)
3 Screw
To install the drive cage, perform the following steps:
1.
With the slots on the drive cage extending slightly beyond the front of the system, lower the drive cage and slide it toward the back of the system until
the cage locks into place.
2.
Secure the drive cage to the system with the screw you removed in step 5 of "Drive Cage Removal."
3.
Connect the interface cable and the power cable to all drives installed in the drive cage.
4.
Replace the bezel.
5.
Replace the system cover.
Control Panel Assembly
In Figure 6, the control panel is shown removed from the system chassis.
Figure 6. Control-Panel Removal
1 Control panel board
2 Securing clip
3 Card guide assembly
To remove the control panel assembly, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Remove the system cover and support beam.
2.
Remove the bezel.
3.
Remove the diskette drive.
4.
Remove the screws securing the drive bracket (see Figure 9).
5.
While pressing the four card guide assembly securing clips, slide the drive bracket back until the clips are no longer securing the assembly to the front
panel.
6.
Press the card guide assembly securing clip located in the diskette drive bay and slide the card guide assembly and hard drive toward the back of the
system and lift them out of the system.
7.
Disconnect the ribbon cable from the system board connector (FRONT PANEL).
8.
Press the control panel assembly securing clip that secures the control panel bracket to the card guide assembly, and lift the control panel up and out of the card guide assembly.
To replace the control panel assembly, perform the following steps.
1.
Align the control panel assembly with the card guide assembly alignment pins and press down until the control panel assembly snaps into place.
2.
Connect the ribbon cable to the system board connector (FRONT PANEL).
3.
Align the card guide assembly's four securing clips with the slots in the front panel and press the assembly and hard drive toward the front of the
system until it snaps into place.
4.
Replace the diskette drive.
5.
Replace the screws securing the drive bracket
6.
Replace the bezel.
7.
Replace the system cover and support beam.
Removing and Replacing Drives
Your system includes bays or brackets for up to three 1-inch IDE hard drives or two 5.25-inch drives.
NOTICE: When replacing a hard drive, set the jumpers on the replacement hard drive to match the jumpers on the hard drive you removed. For
additional information about jumper settings on IDE drives, see "Configuring the EIDE Subsystem" in your system Installation and Troubleshooting Guide.
Removing and Replacing the Lower 3.5-Inch Hard Drive
To remove the hard drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any external devices, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the bezel.
4.
Remove the drive cage.
5.
Remove the three drive-mounting screws, two from the bottom and one from the left side (see Figure 7).
6.
Slide the hard drive out of the back of the drive cage.
Figure 7. Lower 3.5-Inch Hard Drive Removal and Replacement
1 Screws (3)
To replace the hard drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Slide the drive into the back opening of the bay over the two small grooves on the bottom of the bay.
2.
Secure the drive with three drive-mounting screws, two from the bottom and one from the left side.
3.
Reinstall the drive cage into the system.
4.
Replace the bezel.
5.
Replace the system cover.
6.
Plug your system and any external devices into their electrical outlets, and turn them on.
7.
See the drive documentation for instructions on installing any software required for hard drive operation.
Removing and Replacing the Upper 3.5-Inch Hard Drive
To remove the hard drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any external devices, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the bezel.
4.
Remove the drive cage.
5.
Remove the two screws securing the drive to the drive cage (see Figure 8). Insert your screwdriver into the reticular slot on the right side of the drive
cage to access the screw securing the right side of the drive.
6.
Slide the hard drive out the back of the drive cage.
Figure 8. Upper 3.5-Inch Hard Drive Removal and Replacement
1 Screws (2)
To replace the hard drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Slide the drive into the back opening of the bay over the two small grooves on the bottom of the bay.
2.
Secure the hard drive to the drive cage with two screws. To secure the screw on the right side of the drive, you must position the screw over the screw
hole through the back of the drive cage while inserting your screwdriver into the reticular slot on the right side of the drive cage.
3.
Reinstall the drive cage into the system.
4.
Replace the bezel.
5.
Replace the system cover.
6.
Plug your system and any external devices into their electrical outlets, and turn them on.
7.
See the drive documentation for instructions on installing any software required for hard drive operation.
Removing and Replacing a Hard Drive in the Card Guide Assembly
To remove the hard drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any external devices, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the bezel.
4.
Remove the screws securing the drive bracket (see Figure 9).
5.
Slide the drive bracket and hard drive toward the back of the system and lift them out of the system.
Figure 9. Card Guide Assembly Hard Drive Removal and Replacement
1 Hard drive and bracket
2 Card guide assembly
3 Drive-bracket mounting screws (2)
7.
Remove the screw securing the hard drive to the drive bracket, and rotate the drive out of the bracket (see Figure 10).
Figure 10. Detaching or Attaching the Hard Drive
1 Screw
2 Drive bracket
3 Tabs (2)
4 Tab holes (2)
5 Circuit board
To replace the hard drive in the card guide assembly, perform the following steps:
1.
Orient the drive with its circuit board facing the inside of the bracket.
2.
Align the bracket tabs with the two tab holes in the side of the drive, and rotate the drive into the bracket. Then secure the screw as illustrated in
Figure 10.
3.
Align the bracket tabs with the slots in the system, and slide the hard drive and bracket into place. Secure the bracket with the screws you removed in
step 4.
4.
Connect a power cable to the hard drive.
NOTICE: When you attach the interface cable to the hard drive, match the colored strip on the cable with pin 1 on the drive.
5.
Connect an interface cable to the hard drive.
6.
Replace the bezel.
7.
Replace the system cover.
8.
Plug your system and any external devices into their electrical outlets, and turn them on.
9.
See the drive documentation for instructions on installing any software required for drive operation.
Removing and Replacing Other Drives
Your system includes a diskette drive and a CD drive. You can add drives, such as DVD drives and tape drives, using the procedures in the following sections.
Removing and Replacing the CD Drive
To remove the CD drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any external devices, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the bezel.
4.
Remove the drive cage.
5.
Remove the three drive-mounting screws and slide the drive out of the drive bay (see Figure 11).
Figure 11. Removing and Replacing a CD Drive
1 Screws (3)
To replace the CD drive, slide the new drive into the bay, and secure the drive with the three screws (see Figure 11).
Removing and Replacing the Diskette Drive
To remove the diskette drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any external devices, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the bezel.
4.
Disconnect the power and interface cables from the back of the diskette drive.
5.
Press the two drive-release tabs, and slide the drive out of the drive bay (see Figure 12).
Figure 12. Removing and Replacing the Diskette Drive
1 Drive-release tabs (2)
To replace the diskette drive, perform the following steps:
1.
Before you install the new diskette drive, transfer the drive-release tabs from the drive you removed to the replacement drive.
2.
Slide the diskette drive into the drive bay until the two drive-release tabs engage (see Figure 12).
3.
Connect a power cable and the diskette drive interface cable to the diskette drive.
4.
Replace the bezel.
5.
Replace the system cover.
6.
Plug your system and any external devices into their electrical outlets, and turn them on.
7.
See the drive documentation for instructions on installing any software required for drive operation.
Cooling Shroud
To remove the cooling shroud, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any peripherals, and disconnect the power cable from the electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the shroud by squeezing the retaining clips on the top of the shroud and lifting it straight up (see Figure 13).
Figure 13. Removing and Replacing the Cooling Shroud
1 Cooling shroud
2 Retaining clips
3 Fan
To replace the cooling shroud, place the shroud in the fan assembly guide slots and slide the shroud straight down until the retaining clips snap in place.
Removing the Cooling Fan
1.
Turn off the system, including any peripherals, and disconnect the power cable from the electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the cooling shroud.
4.
While pushing the fan assembly upward, press the two release buttons on the back of the system and lift the fan assembly out of its retaining brackets
(see Figure 14).
NOTE: Do not lift the fan out of the system until you have disconnected the fan cable from the system board.
5.
After the fan has been released from the retaining brackets, disconnect the fan cable from the SYS_FAN2 connector on the system board and lift the fan
out of the system.
Figure 14. Removing the Fan
1 Release pins
To replace the fan, perform the following steps:
1.
Connect the fan power cable to the fan connector (SYS_FAN2) on the system board.
2.
Align the brackets on the back of the fan with the corresponding holes in the back-panel, and gently push down until the fan is firmly seated and the
release buttons are engaged (see Figure 14).
3.
Install the cooling shroud.
4.
Replace the system cover.
Power Supply
Your system contains a single nonredundant power supply.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
Figure 15. Power Supply Removal
1 Screws (3)
2 Nonredundant power supply
To remove the power supply, perform the following steps:
CAUTION: Avoid touching the cable connectors on the power supply. Wait 10 to 20 seconds after disconnecting the power cord before removing the
power supply or coming into contact with its cable connectors.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Disconnect the DC power connections:
a.
Remove the power cable from the system board connector (POWER).
b.
Remove the power cables from any devices installed in the drive bays.
4.
Remove the three hex-head Phillips screws securing the non-redundant power supply to the back and side of the system chassis (see Figure 15).
5.
Tilt the back power supply towards the front of the system and then lift the power supply straight up and out of the system chassis.
To install the power supply, perform the following steps:
1.
Lower the power supply into the chassis.
2.
Install the three hex-head Phillips screws securing the power supply to the back and side of the system chassis (see Figure 15).
3.
Connect the DC power connections:
a.
Connect the power cable to the system board connector (POWER).
b.
Connect the power cables to any devices installed in the drive bays.
4.
Install the system cover.
5.
Turn on the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
System Board Removal
To remove the system board, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover and support beam.
3.
Remove the cooling shroud.
4.
Remove the fan.
5.
Disconnect the DC power cable from the system board (POWER).
6.
Record the locations and remove all internal cables attached to the system board.
7.
Remove all external peripheral cables from their connectors at the back of the system.
8.
Remove the expansion cards.
9.
Remove the hex-head Phillips screw securing the system board to the back of the system chassis (see Figure 16).
Figure 16. Removing the System Board Securing the Hardware
1 System board
2 Phillips-head screw
10.
Lift the front of the system board to clear the mounting standoffs and slide the system board toward the front of the system chassis about 6.3 mm
(0.25-inch) see Figure 17.
11.
Carefully lift the system board up and out of the chassis.
Be sure to lift evenly and not twist the system board.
Figure 17. System Board Removal
1 Mounting standoffs
12.
Place the system board on a smooth, antistatic surface.
13.
Remove the microprocessor.
15.
Remove the memory modules.
To replace the system board, perform the following steps:
1.
Press the system board evenly into all the grounding tabs for the I/O ports on the back of the chassis and then, slide it to the rear about 6.3 mm (0.25inch) so that the mounting standoffs protrude through the system board.
2.
Tighten the hex-head Phillips screw to secure the system board to the back of the chassis.
3.
Install the memory modules.
4.
Install the microprocessor.
5.
Check to ensure the system board jumpers and switches are set to the same settings as the board you removed.
6.
Install the expansion cards.
7.
Connect all internal power and signal interface cables.
8.
Install the fan.
9.
Install the cooling shroud.
10.
Replace the system cover and support beam.
11.
Connect external peripheral cables.
12.
Connect the power to the system and turn the system on.
System Board Features
Figure 18 defines the system board features. Use this figure when replacing your system board or components that attach to the system board.
Figure 18. System Board Features
1 Keyboard (KY) and mouse (MS)
connectors
2 Fan connector (SYS_FAN2)
3 Microprocessor (CPU)
4 Memory module sockets (4) DIMM_x
5 Power connector (POWER)
6 Diskette drive cable connector (FDD)
7 Front panel connector (FRONT PANEL)
8 Primary IDE connector (PRIMARY IDE)
9 Primary IDE connector (Secondary IDE)
10 System jumpers (J12)
11 System battery connector (BATTERY)
12 expansion card slots (5) (SLOT_n) 13 RJ45 NIC connector (LAN1)
14 USB connector (2) (USBn)
15 Video connector (VGA)
16 Parallel port (LPT)
17 Serial port (COM1) connector
Expansion Cards
The system has five fixed expansion-card sockets.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
Figure 19. Expansion Card Removal
1 Filler brackets
2 Card guide
3 System board connector
4 Card connector
5 Expansion card
Expansion Card Removal
To remove an expansion card, perform the following steps.
1.
Remove the system cover and support beam.
2.
Disconnect any cables connected to the expansion card.
3.
Remove the screw from the card bracket (see Figure 19).
4.
Grasp the card by its top corners, and lift it from the system board.
5.
If you are removing the card permanently, install a metal filler bracket over the empty card-slot opening.
NOTE: Installing a filler bracket over an empty expansion slot is necessary to maintain Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification of
the system. The brackets also keep dust and dirt out of the system and aid in proper cooling and airflow inside the system.
6.
Replace the system cover and support beam, and then reconnect the system and peripherals to their power sources and turn on the system.
To install an expansion card, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.
2.
Remove the system cover.
CAUTION: See "Protecting Against Electrostatic Discharge" in the safety instructions in your System Information document.
See the documentation that came with the expansion card for information on configuring the card, making internal connections, or otherwise
customizing the card for your system.
3.
Unscrew and remove the filler bracket for the card slot you want to use. Save the screw to use when installing the expansion card later in this
procedure (see Figure 19).
4.
Align the cutout on the bottom of the card with the crossbar in the system board connector. Gently rock the card into the connector until it is fully seated
(see Figure 19).
If the card is full-length, insert the front end of the card into the corresponding card guide at the front of the system as you insert the card into its
connector.
5.
Secure the bracket on the end of the card with the screw you removed in step 3.
6.
Connect any cables required for the card as described in the card documentation.
7.
Replace the system cover and support beam.
8.
Plug your system and devices into their electrical outlets, and turn them on.
9.
Install any drivers required for the card as described in the card documentation.
Memory Modules
The four memory module sockets on the system board can accommodate 64 MB to 2 GB of registered SDRAM (see Figure 18).
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
System Memory Upgrade Kits
The system is upgradable to 2 GB by installing combinations of 64-, 128-, 256-, and 512-MB registered memory modules. If you receive an error message
stating that maximum memory has been exceeded, see "Codes and Error Messages." You can purchase memory upgrade kits as needed.
NOTE: The memory modules must be PC-133 compliant.
Memory Module Installation Guidelines
For optimum operation, install the memory modules starting with the DIMM_A socket (furthest from the microprocessor) and working toward the DIMM_D
socket, leaving no open sockets between installed memory modules.
Figure 20. DIMM Socket Locations
1 DIMM_D
2 DIMM_C
3 DIMM_B
4 DIMM_A
Table 2 illustrates several sample memory configurations based on these guidelines.
Table 2. Sample DIMM Configurations
Total Memory
DIMM_A
DIMM_B
DIMM_C
DIMM_D
64 MB
64 MB
—
—
—
128 MB
128 MB
—
—
—
256 MB
128 MB
128 MB
—
—
512 MB
256 MB
256 MB
—
—
768 MB
256 MB
256 MB
256 MB
—
1 GB
256 MB
256 MB
256 MB
256 MB
2 GB
512 MB
512 MB
512 MB
512 MB
Performing a Memory Upgrade
To perform a memory upgrade to the system board, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the power cord from its power source.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Locate the memory module sockets in which you will install or replace memory module pairs.
Figure 20 shows the order of the memory module sockets.
4.
Install or replace the memory modules as necessary to reach the desired memory total.
5.
Replace the system cover.
If you changed the amount of memory in the system, the system will complete the POST routine with an error message, indicating that the amount of
system memory has changed.
6.
The system detects that the new memory does not match the system configuration information, which is stored in nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM). The monitor
displays an error message that ends with the following words:
Press <F1> to continue; <F2> to enter System Setup.
7.
Press <F2> to enter the System Setup program and check the System Memory setting in the system data box on the System Setup screens. The
system should have already changed the value in the System Memory setting to reflect the newly installed memory.
8.
If the System Memory value is incorrect, one or more of the DIMMs might not be installed properly. Repeat steps 1 through 5 again, checking to make
sure that the memory modules are firmly seated in their sockets. 9.
Run the system memory test in the system diagnostics.
Installing Memory Modules
To install a memory module, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the power cord from its power source.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Locate the memory module sockets in which you will install a memory module.
Figure 20 shows the order of the memory module sockets.
4.
Press down and outward on the ejectors on the memory module socket, as shown in Figure 21, to allow the memory module to be inserted into the
socket.
Figure 21. Installing a Memory Module
1 Memory module
2 Cutouts (2)
3 Securing clips
4 Alignment notches
5 Connector
5.
Align the memory module's edge connector with the alignment keys of the memory module socket, and insert the memory module in the socket (see
Figure 21).
The memory module socket has two alignment keys that allow the memory module to be installed in the socket in only one way.
6.
Press down on the memory module with your thumbs while pulling up on the ejectors with your index fingers to lock the memory module into the
socket. When the memory module is properly seated in the socket, the ejectors on the memory module socket should align with the ejectors on the other
sockets with memory modules installed.
7.
Repeat steps 5 and 6 to install the remaining DIMMs.
8.
Perform steps 6 through 9 of the procedure, "Performing a Memory Upgrade."
Removing Memory Modules
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the power cord from its power source.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Locate the memory module sockets in which you will remove a memory module.
Figure 20 shows the order of the memory module sockets.
4.
Press down and outward on the ejectors on each end of the socket until the DIMM pops out of the socket (see Figure 22).
Figure 22. DIMM Removal
1 Memory module socket ejectors (2)
Upgrading the Microprocessor
To take advantage of future options in speed and functionality, you can upgrade the system microprocessor.
The microprocessor and its associated L2 cache memory are contained in a PGA package that is installed in a ZIF socket on the system board. The following
subsection describes how to upgrade or replace the microprocessor.
Microprocessor and Heat-Sink Removal
To remove the microprocessor and heat sink assembly, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in System Information document.
CAUTION: The microprocessor and heat-sink assembly can get extremely hot during system operation. Be sure the assembly has had sufficient time to
cool before you touch it.
CAUTION: When handling the microprocessor and heat-sink assembly, take care to avoid sharp edges on the heat sink.
1.
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the power cord from its power source.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
Remove the cooling shroud.
4.
Pressing down on the heat sink securing clip to release the clip from the retaining tab on the ZIF socket (see Figure 23).
5.
Remove the securing clip.
6.
Remove the heat sink and set it down with the underside of the heat sink facing up.
NOTICE: Note the orientation of the heat sink with respect to the microprocessor and its ZIF socket.
NOTICE: Be careful not to disturb the thermal grease applied to the underside of the heat sink, and to the top surface of the microprocessor. 7.
Pull the socket release lever straight up until the microprocessor is released (see Figure 24)
Figure 23. Securing Clip and Heat-Sink Removal
1 Securing clip
2 Heat-sink assembly
3 Microprocessor
4 ZIF socket
8.
Lift the microprocessor away from the ZIF socket and leave the release lever in the upright position so that the socket is ready for the replacement
microprocessor (see Figure 24).
Figure 24. Removing the Microprocessor
1 Microprocessor
2 Release lever
3 ZIF socket
Replacing the Microprocessor and Heat-Sink Assembly
To install the additional or replacement microprocessor and heat sink assembly, perform the following steps. This procedure assumes the system cover has been removed, the system power is off and power cords and peripheral cables are disconnected. 1.
Clean any thermal grease off the bottom of the heat sink with an alcohol wipe.
2.
If not already in the upright position, swing the ZIF arm up to the upright position.
The ZIF socket is now ready to accept a new microprocessor.
3.
Align the pin-1 corner of the microprocessor with the pin-1 corner of the ZIF socket (see Figure 25).
Figure 25. Pin 1 Identification
1 Pin 1 corner (golf triangle)
4.
Install the microprocessor in the ZIF socket.
Gently lower the replacement or upgrade microprocessor into the ZIF socket so that the processor pins exactly mate with the ZIF socket (see Figure 26).
Figure 26. Installing the Microprocessor
1 Pin 1 corner of microprocessor aligned with pin-1 corner of ZIF socket
NOTICE: Do not force the processor module into the socket. Even slight pressure can bend the microprocessor module pins.
5.
When the microprocessor is fully seated in the ZIF socket, rotate the socket release lever down until it snaps into place, securing the microprocessor.
6.
Apply a measured amount of thermal grease to the top of the microprocessor.
7.
Place the heat sink on top of the microprocessor (see Figure 27).
Figure 27. Installing the Heat Sink and Securing Clip
1 Securing clip
2 Heat-sink assembly
3 Microprocessor
4 ZIF socket
8.
Hook the end of the heat sink clip without the heat-sink latch to the tab on the edge of the socket facing the front of the system.
9.
Push down on and pivot the heat-sink latch until the hole on the clip latches onto the ZIF socket tab.
10.
Replace the cooling shroud.
11.
Replace the system cover.
12.
Press <F2> to enter the System Setup program and check the Processor 1 category matches the new system configuration.
See the system User's Guide for instructions.
13.
As the system boots, it detects the presence of the new processor and automatically changes the system configuration information in the System Setup
program. 14.
Enter the System Setup program, and confirm that the top line in the system data area correctly identifies the installed processor. See "Using the
System Setup Program."
15.
Run the system diagnostics to verify that the new microprocessor is operating correctly (see "Running the System Diagnostics").
Battery
The system battery maintains system configuration, date, and time information in a special section of memory when you turn off the system. The operating life
of the battery ranges from 2 to 5 years, depending on how you use the system (for example, if you keep the system on most of the time, the battery gets little
use and thus lasts longer). You may need to replace the battery if an incorrect time or date is displayed during the boot routine along with the following or
similar message:
Time-of-day not set -- please run SETUP program
Strike the F1 key to continue, F2 to run the setup utility
or
System CMOS checksum bad -- Run SETUP
Strike the F1 key to continue, F2 to run the setup utility
or
Invalid configuration information -- please run SETUP program
Strike the F1 key to continue, F2 to run the setup utility
To determine if the battery needs replacing: 1.
Reenter the time and date through the System Setup program. 2.
Turn off and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet for a few hours.
3.
Reconnect and turn the system on again. 4.
Enter the System Setup program. If the date and time are not correct in the System Setup program, replace the battery.
NOTE: Some software may cause the system time to speed up or slow down. If the system seems to operate normally except for the time kept in the
System Setup program, the problem may be caused by software rather than by a defective battery.
NOTE: If the system is turned off for long periods of time (for weeks or months), the NVRAM may lose its system configuration information. This situation
is not caused by a defective battery.
The battery is a 3.0-volt (V), coin-cell CR2032-type battery. To remove the battery, perform the following steps.
WARNING: Before you perform this procedure, you must turn off the system and disconnect it from its power sources. For more information, see the
safety precautions in your system information document.
WARNING: There is a danger of a new battery exploding if it is incorrectly installed. Replace the battery only with the same or equivalent type
recommended by the manufacturer. Discard used batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
1.
Enter the System Setup program and, if possible, make a printed copy of the System Setup screens.
See "Using the System Setup Program."
2.
Shut down the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
3.
Remove the system cover.
4.
Remove the battery (see Figure 18 for the battery location).
5.
Install the new battery with the side labeled "+" facing up (see Figure 28).
Figure 28. Battery Replacement
6.
Replace the system cover.
7.
Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system power.
8.
Enter the System Setup program to confirm that the battery is operating properly.
9.
Enter the correct time and date through the System Setup program's Time and Date settings. Also reenter any system configuration information that is no longer displayed on the System Setup screens, and then exit the System Setup program.
10.
To test the newly installed battery, power down and disconnect the system from the electrical source for at least an hour.
11.
After an hour, connect the system to an electrical source and turn on the power.
12.
Enter the System Setup program and if the time and date are still incorrect, replace the system board.
Back to Contents Page
Back to Contents Page
Using the System Setup Program
Dell™ PowerEdge™ 500SC Systems Service Manual
Overview
Using the System Password Feature
When to Use the System Setup Program
Using the Setup Password Feature
Entering the System Setup Program
Disabling a Forgotten Password
System Setup Main Screen
Responding to Error Messages
System Setup Options
Overview
This section describes the System Setup program, which is used to change the system configuration information stored in NVRAM on the system board. If the
system detects a discrepancy, an error message may appear on the screen that identifies the incorrect configuration settings. Many of these settings are
established using the System Setup program. The system then prompts you to enter the System Setup program to correct the setting.
When to Use the System Setup Program
You can use the System Setup program as follows:
l
To change the system configuration information default settings
l
To set or change user-selectable options
l
To restore system configuration settings following a service action
l
To enable or disable integrated devices in your system
After you set up your system, run the System Setup program to familiarize yourself with your system configuration information and optional settings. Dell
recommends that you print the System Setup screens (by pressing the <Print Screen> key) or write down the information for future reference.
Before you use the System Setup program, you need to know the kind of diskette drives(s) and hard drive(s) that are installed in you system. If you are
unsure of any of this information, see the Manufacturing Test Report that was shipped with your system. You can access the Manufacturing Test Report in the
Dell Accessories folder.
Entering the System Setup Program
Enter the System Setup program by performing the following steps:
1.
Turn on your system.
If your system is already on, shut it down and then turn it on again.
2.
Press <F2> immediately after you see the following message:
Press <F2> for System Setup
If you wait too long and your operating system begins to load into memory, let the system complete the load operation; then shut down the system and
try again.
NOTE: To ensure an orderly system shutdown, consult the documentation that accompanied your operating system.
You can also enter the System Setup program by responding to certain error messages. See "Responding to Error Messages."
System Setup Main Screen
The main System Setup screen displays the current setup and configuration information and optional settings for your system. (Typical examples are
illustrated in Figure 1.) Information on the System Setup screen is organized in five boxed areas:
l
Title box — The shaded box at the top of the screen lists the system name, and the revision number of the BIOS.
l
Configuration options — The remainder of the screen lists the options that define the installed hardware in your computer.
Fields beside the options contain settings or values; those that appear bright on the screen can be changed. Settings or values that you cannot
change (because they are determined by the system) appear less bright.
Some options have multiple fields, which may show settings or values as bright or less bright depending upon what settings or values you
entered in other fields.
l
Arrow key select functions: Prompts the user to select options using the up-arrow or down-arrow key.
l
F1 — Help: Displays help information for the option with a currently highlighted field.
l
Space bar, plus (+), and minus (-) keys: Changes the values for the selected option.
Figure 1. System Setup
Main Screen
System Setup Options
The following options or information fields appear on the main System Setup screen:
l
System Time — Resets the time on the system's internal clock.
l
System Date — Resets the date on the system's internal calendar.
l
Diskette Drive A: — Identifies the type of diskette drive installed in your system.
l
System Memory — Displays the amount of system memory. This option has no user-selectable settings.
l
Video Memory — Displays the amount of video memory. This option has no user-selectable settings.
l
CPU Information — Displays information related to the system bus and microprocessors. This screen has no user-selectable settings.
l
Primary Drive 0 — identifies the type of disk attached as the primary drive on IDE channel 0.
l
Primary Drive 1— identifies the type of disk attached as the primary drive on IDE channel 1.
l
Secondary Drive 0— identifies the type of disk attached as the secondary drive on IDE channel 0.
l
Secondary Drive 1 — identifies the type of disk attached as the secondary drive on IDE channel 1.
l
Max UDMA Mode — This option sets the maximum UDMA speed for all drives.
l
Boot Sequence — Displays the Boot Sequence screen, discussed later in this section.
l
Hard-Disk Drive Sequence — Displays the Hard-Disk Drive Sequence screen, discussed later in this section.
l
Integrated Devices — Displays the Integrated Devices screen, discussed later in this section.
l
PCI IRQ Assignment — Displays a screen that allows you to change the IRQ allocated to each of the three integrated devices on the PCI bus, as well
as any installed expansion cards that require an IRQ.
l
Console Redirection — This option activates or deactivates console redirection on the system.
l
System Security — Displays a screen which allows you to configure the system password and setup password features. See "Using the System
Password Feature"and "Using the Setup Password Feature." l
Keyboard Numlock — Determines whether your system boots with the Num Lock mode activated on 101- or 102-key keyboards (it does not apply to
84-key keyboards).
l
Report Keyboard Error — Enables or disables reporting of keyboard errors during the POST.
This option is useful when applied to self-starting servers or host systems that have no permanently attached keyboard. In these situations, selecting
Do Not Report suppresses all error messages relating to the keyboard or to the keyboard controller during POST. This setting does not affect the
operation of the keyboard itself if a keyboard is attached to the system.
l
Asset Tag — Displays the customer-programmable asset tag number for the system if an asset tag number has been assigned. To enter an asset tag
number of up to ten characters into NVRAM, follow the procedure in "Asset Tag Utility" in the system User's Guide.
Boot Sequence Screen
The Boot Sequence screen options determine the order in which the system looks for the files that it needs to load during system startup. Available options
include the diskette drive, CD drive, and hard drive. You can enable or disable a device by selecting it and pressing the spacebar. To change the order in which
devices are searched, use the <+> and <-> keys.
Hard-Disk Drive Sequence Screen
The Hard-Disk Drive Sequence screen options determine the order in which the system searches hard drives for the files that it needs to load during system
startup. The choices depend on the particular hard drives installed in your system. You can enable or disable a device by selecting it and pressing the
spacebar. To change the order in which devices are searched, use the <+> and <-> keys.
Integrated Devices Screen
The following devices on the system board are configured through this screen:
l
Network Interface Controller — determines whether the system's integrated NIC is enabled. Changes take effect after reboot.
l
NIC MAC Address — displays the address of the MAC address used by the integrated NIC. This field has no user-selectable settings.
l
Mouse Controller — enables or disables the system's mouse controller; disabling the mouse controller allows an expansion card to use IRQ12.
l
Serial Port 1 — configure the system's integrated serial port; the options can be set to Auto (the default) to automatically configure a port, to a
particular designation, or to Off to disable the port.
If you set a serial port to Auto and add an expansion card containing a port configured to the same designation, the system automatically remaps the
integrated port to the next available port designation that shares the same IRQ setting.
l
Parallel Port — configures the system's integrated parallel port.
l
Parallel Port Mode — controls whether the system's integrated parallel port acts as an AT-compatible (unidirectional) or PS/2-compatible (bidirectional)
port; to determine the correct mode to use, see the documentation that came with the peripheral device connected to the serial port.
l
USB Controller — enables or disables the system's USB ports; disabling the USB ports makes system resources available for other devices.
l
IDE Interface — enables or disables the system's IDE interface.
l
Diskette Controller — enables or disables the system's diskette drive controller; with Auto (default) selected, the system turns off the controller when
necessary to accommodate a controller card installed in an expansion slot.
System Security Screen
You can set the following security features through the System Security screen:
l
Password Status — When Setup Password is set to Enabled, allows you to prevent the system password from being changed or disabled at system
start-up.
l
To lock the system password, you must first assign a setup password in the Setup Password option and then change the Password Status option to
Locked. In this state, the system password cannot be changed through the System Password option and cannot be disabled at system start-up by
pressing <Ctrl><Enter>.
l
To unlock the system password, you must enter the setup password in the Setup Password option and then change the Password Status option to
Unlocked. In this state, the system password can be disabled at system start-up by pressing <Ctrl><Enter> and then changed through the System
Password option.
l
System Password — Displays the current status of your system's password security feature and allows you to assign and verify a new password.
NOTE: See the section "Using the System Password Feature" for instructions on assigning a system password and using or changing an existing system
password. See the section, "Disabling a Forgotten Password" found later in this chapter for instructions on disabling a forgotten system password.
l
Setup Password — Allows you to restrict access to your system's System Setup program in the same way that you restrict access to your system with
the system password feature.
NOTE: See "Using the Setup Password Feature" for instructions on assigning a setup password and using or changing an existing setup password. See
"Disabling a Forgotten Password" for instructions on disabling a forgotten setup password.
Exit Screen
After you press <Esc> to exit the System Setup program, the Exit screen displays the following choices:
l
Save Changes and Exit
l
Discard Changes and Exit
l
Return to Setup
Using the System Password Feature
NOTICE: The password features provide a basic level of security for the data on your system. However, they are not foolproof. If your data requires
more security, it is your responsibility to obtain and use additional forms of protection, such as data encryption programs.
Your system is shipped to you without the system password feature enabled. If system security is a concern, you should operate your system only with
system password protection.
You can assign a system password whenever you use the System Setup program. After a system password is assigned, only those who know the password
have full use of the system.
When the System Password option is set to Enabled, the computer system prompts you for the system password just after the system boots.
To change an existing system password, you must know the password (see "Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password"). If you assign and later
forget a system password, you need to be able to remove the computer cover to change a jumper setting that disables the system password feature (see
"Disabling a Forgotten Password"). Note that you erase the setup password at the same time.
NOTICE: If you leave your system running and unattended without having a system password assigned, or if you leave your computer unlocked so that
someone can disable the password by changing a jumper setting, anyone can access the data stored on your hard drive.
Assigning a System Password
Before you can assign a system password, you must enter the System Setup program and check the System Password option.
When a system password is assigned, the setting shown for the System Password option is Enabled. When the system password feature is disabled by a
jumper setting on the system board, the setting shown is Disabled by Jumper. You cannot change or enter a new system password if either of these settings
is displayed.
When no system password is assigned and the password jumper on the system board is in the enabled position (its default setting), the setting shown for
the System Password option is Not Enabled. Only when this option is set to Not Enabled can you assign a system password, using the following procedure:
1.
Verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.
2.
Highlight the System Password option and then press the left- or right-arrow key.
The option heading changes to Enter Password, followed by an empty seven-character field in square brackets.
3.
Type your new system password.
You can use up to seven characters in your password.
As you press each character key (or the spacebar key for a blank space), a placeholder appears in the field.
The password assignment operation recognizes keys by their location on the keyboard, without distinguishing between lowercase and uppercase
characters. For example, if you have an M in your password, the system recognizes either M or m as correct.
Certain key combinations are not valid. If you enter one of these combinations, the speaker emits a beep.
To erase a character when entering your password, press the <Backspace> key or the left-arrow key.
NOTE: To escape from the field without assigning a system password, press the <Tab> key or the <Shift><Tab> key combination to move to
another field, or press the <Esc> key at any time prior to completing step 5.
4.
Press <Enter>.
If the new system password is less than seven characters, the whole field fills with placeholders. Then the option heading changes to Verify Password,
followed by another empty seven-character field in square brackets.
5.
To confirm your password, type it a second time and press <Enter>.
The password setting changes to Enabled. Your system password is now set; you can exit the System Setup program and begin using your system.
Note, however, that password protection does not take effect until you reboot the system by turning the system off and then on again.
Using Your System Password to Secure Your System
Whenever you turn on or reboot your system by pressing the <Ctrl><Alt><Del> key combination, the following prompt appears on the screen when the
Password Status option is set to Unlocked:
Type in the password and... -- press <ENTER> to leave password security enabled. -- press <CTRL><ENTER> to disable password security. Enter
password:
If the Password Status option is set to Locked, the following prompt appears:
Type the password and press <Enter>.
After you type the correct system password and press <Enter>, your system boots and you can use the keyboard and/or mouse to operate your system as
usual.
NOTE: If you have assigned a setup password (see "Using the Setup Password Feature"), the system accepts your setup password as an alternate
system password.
If a wrong or incomplete system password is entered, the following message appears on the screen:
** Incorrect password. **
Enter password:
If an incorrect or incomplete system password is entered again, the same message appears.
The third and subsequent times an incorrect or incomplete system password is entered, the system displays the following message:
** Incorrect password. **
Number of unsuccessful password attempts: 3
System halted! Must power down.
The number of unsuccessful attempts made to enter the correct system password can alert you to an unauthorized person attempting to use your system.
Even after your system is turned off and on, the previous message is displayed each time an incorrect or incomplete system password is entered.
NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with System Password and Setup Password to further protect your system from
unauthorized changes. Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password
To delete or change an existing system password, perform the following steps:
1.
Enter the System Setup program by pressing the <F2> key. 2.
Select the System Security screen field to verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.
3.
Reboot your system to force it to prompt you for a system password.
4.
When prompted, type the system password.
5.
Press the <Ctrl><Enter> key combination to disable the existing system password, instead of pressing <Enter> to continue with the normal operation
of your system.
6.
Confirm that Not Enabled is displayed for the System Password option of the System Setup program.
If Not Enabled appears for the System Password option, the system password has been deleted. If you want to assign a new password, continue to
step 6. If Not Enabled is not displayed for the System Password option, press the <Alt><b> key combination to reboot the system, and then repeat
steps 4 through 6.
7.
To assign a new password, follow the procedure in "Assigning a System Password."
Using the Setup Password Feature
Your Dell system is shipped to you without the setup password feature enabled. If system security is a concern, you should operate your system with setup
password protection.
You can assign a setup password whenever you use the System Setup program. After a setup password is assigned, only those who know the password
have full use of the System Setup program.
To change an existing setup password, you must know the setup password (see "Deleting or Changing an Existing Setup Password"). If you assign and later
forget a setup password, you need to remove the computer cover to change a jumper setting that disables the setup password feature. Note that you erase
the system password at the same time.
Assigning a Setup Password
A setup password can be assigned (or changed) only when the Setup Password option is set to Not Enabled. To assign a setup password, highlight the
Setup Password option and press the left- or right-arrow key. The system prompts you to enter and verify the password. If a character is illegal for password
use, the system emits a beep.
NOTE: The setup password can be the same as the system password.
NOTE: If the two passwords are different, the setup password can be used as an alternate system password. However, the system password cannot
be used in place of the setup password.
After you verify the password, the Setup Password setting changes to Enabled. The next time you enter the System Setup program, the system prompts you
for the setup password.
A change to the Setup Password option becomes effective immediately (rebooting the system is not required).
Operating With a Setup Password Enabled
If Setup Password is set to Enabled, you must enter the correct setup password before you can modify the majority of the System Setup options.
When you start the System Setup program, the program prompts you to type the password.
If you do not enter the correct password three tries, the system lets you view, but not modify, the System Setup screens—with the following exceptions:
l
You can still modify the Date, Time, Keyboard Num Lock, and Speaker options.
l
If System Password is not enabled and is not locked via the Password Status option, you can assign a system password (however, you cannot disable
or change an existing system password).
NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with Setup Password to protect the system password from unauthorized changes.
Deleting or Changing an Existing Setup Password
To delete or change an existing setup password, perform the following steps:
1.
Enter the System Setup program and select the System Security screen option.
2.
Highlight the Setup Password option, and press the left- or right-arrow key to delete the existing setup password.
The setting changes to Not Enabled.
3.
If you want to assign a new setup password, follow the procedure in "Assigning a Setup Password."
Disabling a Forgotten Password
If the administrator or user forgets the system or setup password, you cannot operate the system or change settings in the System Setup program until you
change the password jumper setting to disable the passwords, and erase the existing passwords.
To disable a forgotten supervisor password or setup password, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Read the safety instructions in your System Information document.
1.
Remove the front bezel.
2.
Remove the system cover.
3.
See "System Board Jumpers" for the location of the password jumper (labeled "PASSWORD") on the system board.
4.
Remove the jumper plug from the PASSWORD jumper.
5.
Replace the system cover and then reconnect the computer to an electrical outlet and turn it on.
The existing passwords are not disabled (erased) until the system boots with the PASSWORD jumper plug removed. However, before you assign a new
system and/or setup password, you must install the jumper plug.
NOTE: If you assign a new system and/or setup password with the jumper plug still removed, the system disables the new password(s) the next time it
boots.
6.
Repeat steps 1 through 5.
7.
Install the jumper plug on the PASSWORD jumper.
8.
Replace the system in the rack and the system cover.
9.
Assign a new system and/or setup password.
To assign a new system password using the System Setup program, see "Assigning a System Password." To assign a new setup password using the
System Setup program, see "Assigning a Setup Password."
Responding to Error Messages
If an error message appears on your monitor screen while the system is booting, make a note of the message. Next, before entering the System Setup
program, refer to "System Beep Codes"and "System Messages" in "Codes and Error Messages" for an explanation of the message and suggestions for
correcting any errors.
NOTE: It is normal to receive an error message the first time you boot your system after installing a memory upgrade. In that situation, do not refer to
"System Beep Codes" and "System Messages." Instead, follow the instructions for performing a memory upgrade in "Performing a Memory Upgrade" in
"Installing System Board Options" in the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide.)
If you are given an option of pressing either <F1> to continue or <F2> to run the System Setup program, press <F2>.
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