Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game

Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game

UNITED STATES SOCCER FEDERATION

ADVICE TO REFEREES

ON THE LAWS OF THE GAME

Acknowledgments

The United States Soccer Federation’s National Referee Development Program is very pleased to acknowledge the work of the instructors who contributed to this seventh, updated edition of the

Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game.

The principal authors of the publication were Jim Allen, who doubled as editor, and Dan Heldman.

Substantial contributions to this updated edition came from Gil Weber, Ulrich Strom, Wally

Beaumont, Chuck Fleischer, and Michelle Maloney. Many of the additions and changes came about as the result of questions or suggestions from referees, players and coaches across the country.

Alfred Kleinaitis

Manager of Referee Development and Education

2007

Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game

Revised 2007

United States Soccer Federation, Inc.

1801 S. Prairie Avenue

Chicago, Illinois 60616

Telephone: 312/808-1300

Fax: 312/808-1301 www.ussoccer.com

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Table of Contents

Advice to Referees

Law 1 - The Field of Play

Law 2 - The Ball

Law 3 - The Number of Players

Law 4 - The Players’ Equipment

Law 5 - The Referee

Law 6 - The Assistant Referee and Fourth Official

Law 7 - The Duration of the Match

Law 8 - The Start and Restart of Play

Law 9 - The Ball In and Out of Play

Law 10 - The Method of Scoring

Law 11 - Offside

Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct

Part A. Fouls

Part B. Misconduct

Part C. Serious Foul Play and Violent Conduct

Part D. Denying an Obvious Goalscoring Opportunity

Law 13 - Free Kicks

Law 14 - The Penalty Kick

Law 15 - The Throw-In

Law 16 - The Goal Kick

Law 17 - The Corner Kick

Law 18 - Common Sense

Section 19 - Miscellaneous Matters

Index

[This page purposely left blank]

Advice to Referees

In early 1997, the International Football Association Board (IFAB) issued a general rewrite of the

Laws of the Game which took effect worldwide on July 1, 1997. This new text was the first complete revision of the Laws since the modern version was first issued seventy years ago. In 2000, the IFAB issued a major revision of the Questions and Answers to the Laws of the Game, which provided firm guidance on many principles behind the Laws of the Game.

Over that period, the seventeen Laws of the Game were augmented by IFAB decisions, interpretations, guidelines, instructions, and items of advice from both the IFAB and the Federation Internationale de

Football Association (FIFA). Further, the United States Soccer Federation (USSF) has issued additional instructions and guidance to clarify the IFAB's decisions and indicate how they were to be applied in the USA.

New advice in this edition reflects changes in the Laws of the Game for 2007-2008 and in the

Additional Instructions and Guidelines for Referees in the back of the Laws of the Game (2007-2008).

These changes and others will be shown through a vertical bar at the righthand edge of the page.

This book of Advice to Referees is specifically intended to give USSF referees, assistant referees and fourth officials a reliable compilation of those international and national guidelines remaining in force, as modified or updated. It is not a replacement for the Laws of the Game, nor is it a "how to" book on refereeing: It is an official statement of Federation interpretations of the Laws. However, the referee, coach, player, team official or spectator should remember that there are also other sources of information:

• the Laws of the Game, published annually by USSF from the text provided by the IFAB through

FIFA;

• the Additional Instructions and Guidelines for Referees, which replace the former Questions and

Answers;

• annual FIFA Circulars, as republished in designated USSF annual Memoranda;

• the USSF Guide to Procedures for Referees, Assistant Referees and Fourth Officials;

• entry-level referee clinics, in-service clinics and referee recertification clinics taught by USSF instructors;

• other official publications from the USSF instructional program, including articles in Fair Play and specific subject memoranda.

While every effort will be made to keep this Advice up to date through new editions, changes in the

Law or in interpretations by the IFAB and FIFA may result in an item becoming inaccurate or outdated. When this occurs, USSF will specify the relevant section of the Advice and will post the necessary changes on the referee web page, so that referees can mark their copy appropriately until a new edition can be published.

Advice to Referees presents official USSF interpretations of the Laws of the Game. Affiliated leagues, associations, competitions, and officials must implement them to the fullest extent possible.

Participants in affiliated matches must not impose personal, unsupported, or unofficial interpretations of any provisions of the Laws of the Game. If a point is not made in this Advice, look first to the relevant Law or Laws of the Game for the answer.

“Substituted players” are players who have been substituted, who are not permitted to return to the field in strict accordance with Law 3, and who nevertheless remain with their team in the bench or technical area. Whenever in this Advice the term “substitute” is used, it will include substituted players.

Throughout the Advice an asterisk (*) is used just as it is in the Laws of the Game:

• Unless covered by the Special Circumstances listed in Law 8 - The Start and Restart of Play

Law 1 - The Field of Play

1.1 DIMENSIONS

The length of the field must always exceed the width. The dimensions of the field of play may vary to enable players of different levels of skill and physical attributes to play the game. The size of the field of play and the width between the goal posts and height of the crossbar from the ground may be modified for matches between players of under 16 years of age, for women, for players over 35, and for players with disabilities, provided USSF approves the modifications.

1.2 SAFETY

Referees should arrive in plenty of time to inspect the field, goals, flags and markings for accuracy and safety. No part of the field surface or the goals and flagposts may be dangerous to the players. If the field conditions are dangerous or unsuitable for play, the referee must refuse to officiate the game and, unless there is a possibility that the problem can be corrected, should leave immediately after announcing his decision to both sides. Unresolved problems with the field that do not involve safety should be reported to the competition authority, even if the game is played.

1.3 GOALS

The goals must be securely anchored to the ground. For safety reasons, if the goals are not securely anchored to the ground, the match shall not be played.

1.4 FLAGPOSTS

The compulsory corner flagposts and the optional halfway flagposts should be no less than 5 feet high; anything shorter is dangerous to the players. If used, the optional halfway flagposts must be at least

1m/1 yard outside the touch line.

1.5 FIELD MARKINGS

The markings of the field should not be dangerous, must not protrude above the surface or be placed in ruts or hollows, and should be easily visible. The goal line should be the same width as the depth of the goal posts and the crossbar.

The lines belong to the areas of which they are the boundaries. The area beyond the goal line and crossbar and inside the goal net (if one is provided) is not part of the field of play. The ball touching any part of that line, either on the ground or breaking the vertical plane of that line, is within the area bounded by the line.

The optional line drawn outside the field of play, 10 yards from the corner arc and at right angles to the goal line, may not touch the goal line. The line allows the officials to judge that defenders keep the proper distance at the taking of the corner kick.

If a photographer's line is provided, it must be marked behind the goal lines in accordance with the rules of the competition.

If the lines are not marked properly, the referee should try to have proper markings put down by the home team before starting the game, time permitting.

1.6 NO PLAYER MODIFICATIONS TO THE FIELD

Goalkeepers or other players may not make unauthorized marks on the field of play. The player who makes such marks or alterations on the field to gain an unfair advantage may be cautioned for

unsporting behavior. Players may return bent or leaning corner flags to the upright position, but they may not bend or lean them away from the upright position to take a corner kick, nor may the corner flag be removed for any reason.

1.7 SUPERSTRUCTURE ON GOALS

It is not uncommon on public fields for the soccer goals to include structures attached to and above the crossbar (particularly where the goal is being used for other sports). If the ball strikes any part of such

a structure, apart from or in addition to striking a goal post or crossbar, the ball is considered to have

left the field even if, as a result of the contact, the ball remains on the field. The restart (goal kick or corner kick) is based on Laws 16 or 17.

1.8 DEALING WITH APPURTENANCES TO THE FIELD AND OUTSIDE AGENTS

(a) Required appurtenances

These are the goals, corner flags, and flagposts required by Law 1. Contact between these appurtenances and the ball or players is a normal part of play and requires no special consideration in determining the restart. In accordance with the Law, the restart is based on which team last played the ball. The referee and any assistant referee on the field are also considered to be part of the field of play.

(b) Non-regulation appurtenances (see 1.7)

These include superfluous items attached to the goal frame (such as the uprights on combination soccer/football goals) and not generally subject to movement. If the ball contacts these items, it is deemed to be automatically out of play and the restart is in accordance with the Law, based on which team last played the ball.

(c) Pre-existing conditions

These are things on or above the field which are not described in Law 1 but are deemed safe and not generally subject to movement. These include trees overhanging the field, wires running above the field, and covers on sprinkling or draining systems. They do not affect one team more adversely than the other and are considered to be a part of the field. If the ball leaves the field after contact with any item considered under the local ground rules of the field to be a pre-existing condition, the restart is in accordance with the Law, based on which team last played the ball. (Check with the competition for any local ground rules.)

(d) Outside agent

Tradition and common usage are very strong in soccer. Nowhere is this more true than in the definition of "outside agent." An "outside agent" (under any portion of the Laws of the Game) is anything that enters the field without the permission of the referee and plays or misdirects the ball or otherwise interferes with the game. This means that substitutes can be outside agents in some cases, as can dogs or coaches or spectators. Interference by any outside agent other than a substitute illegally on the field will result in the referee declaring a stoppage of play, restarting with a dropped ball where the ball was when play was stopped*. See Advice 3.17-3.20, 9.2, 10.7 and 14.7 for further guidance on dealing with outside interference. If the interference is by a substitute who has entered the field of play without the permission of the referee, the restart is an indirect free kick where the ball was when play was stopped*. The kick is taken after the substitute is cautioned and shown the yellow card.

Note: The difference between non-regulation appurtenances and pre-existing conditions is that, if the

ball makes contact with something like uprights or crossbar superstructure, it is ruled out of play even if the contact results in the ball remaining on the field. Where there is a pre-existing condition (such as an overhanging tree limb), the ball remains in play even if there is contact, as long as the ball itself

remains on the field. Referees must be fully aware of and enforce any rules of the competition

authority or field owner regarding non-regulation appurtenances.

Referees should note all deviations from Law 1 during the pregame inspection of the field, include them specifically in their pregame conference and, where advisable, inform the teams as to how they will be handled in accordance with this guidance.

Law 2 - The Ball

Law 2 does not require balls to be of a particular color or material. The referee may replace the original ball with one of a different color if this makes the ball more visible. The home team should supply the game ball, with several other suitable balls in reserve. At the higher levels of the game, leagues and competitions are urged to provide up to six balls around the field of play (together with persons whose responsibility it is to hand another ball to the players). When more than one game ball is provided for a match, the referee must inspect all balls to be used to ensure they meet the requirements of Law 2. If ball persons are available, the referee or fourth official should meet with them before the commencement of the match to brief them on their duties. Ball persons must serve both teams equally. Referees, assistant referees, and fourth officials must also ensure that extra balls do not enter the field.

Law 3 - Number of Players

Part A. The Correct Number of Players

3.1 ROSTERS AND DESIGNATIONS OF SUBSTITUTES

Know the number of substitutes specified by the competition. The Law now allows a team to list up to

18 players on its game roster. All players' and nominated substitutes' names must be provided to the referee before the start of the match. The practice of obtaining rosters at halftime, after the game, or not at all, is not permissible. If the rules of competition do not specify the number of substitutions and if the teams cannot agree on a mutually acceptable number, apply the terms of Law 3 to the letter. If the rules of competition do not require rosters or team lists, the referee will consider anyone in the vicinity of the field wearing an identifiable uniform and subject to being called on to play to be a player or substitute and subject to the referee's authority.

NOTE: "Substituted players" are players who have been substituted, who are not permitted to return to the field in strict accordance with Law 3, and who nevertheless remain with their team in the bench or technical area. Whenever in this Advice the term "substitute" is used, it will include substituted players.

3.2 LATE-ENTERING PLAYER

If a player whose name was given to the referee prior to the match is not able to enter the field in time for play to begin, due to late arrival or unreadiness of equipment or uniform, the player may subsequently enter the field. Before doing so, the player's equipment must be checked by the referee.

The referee may delegate this responsibility to the fourth official (if one has not been appointed, the assistant referees may be designated). If the inspection is performed by the referee, it can only occur at a stoppage of play and the player may enter the field at any point along the boundary lines. If the responsibility has been delegated, the player can enter the field either during a stoppage (at any point along the boundary lines) or during play (at any point along the touch line) after being checked by the designated official. In either case, the referee must beckon the player to enter the field (this responsibility cannot be delegated).

Note: The need for the referee's permission, i. e., the beckoning onto the field, applies to ALL cases of a player entering or re-entering the field, not just to a late-arriving player.

3.3 THE ALLOWED NUMBER OF PLAYERS

Many rules of competition specify the maximum number of players a team is allowed to have on the field at any given time. The Laws of the Game set this number at eleven for most matches, but a smaller number may be set by the competition authority for younger players. However, at any given time, the actual number of players allowed on the field may be smaller than the maximum if one or more players have been sent off for misconduct, has requested and received permission from the referee to be temporarily off the field (e. g., to have an injury tended to), or has been ordered from the field to repair equipment or to correct a problem with bleeding or blood on the uniform. Except for players sent off (with the result that their team is required to play with a lower maximum number), all other players temporarily off the field with the referee's permission or by the referee's order may return to the field only with the express permission of the referee.

Note: For dealing with more than the allowed number of players, see Advice 3.17-3.20.

3.4 SUBSTITUTION PROCEDURE

After the player being replaced has left the field, the referee must signal permission for the substitute to enter. A substitution is not complete and the substitute may not take part in the game until he or she has entered the field of play. Referees who deviate from the formal process by which a substitute becomes a player—whether in the interest of saving time or because the steps are thought to be too complex and cumbersome—do so at their own peril and will eventually discover that the Laws of the

Game specify the procedure for very good reasons. Deviations may lead to situations that the referee cannot settle within the Law. For example, a substitute might commit a violent act after being allowed to enter the field before the player being replaced has left. Then the referee must decide whether the act was misconduct and, if the guilty party is dismissed, whether the team plays short. Regardless of other deviations from the correct substitution procedure which the referee may allow, a substitute becomes a player for purposes of determining the consequences of misconduct when the substitute enters the field after being beckoned by the referee. When the substitute has become a player as a consequence of meeting this requirement, the player being replaced ceases to be a player.

Upon receiving permission from the referee, a player leaving the field is normally expected to exit from the closest point on the perimeter of the field. Referees should not permit exiting players to waste time by unnecessarily selecting a more distant exit point. Substitutes entering the field with the permission of the referee must do so at the halfway line.

Note: The Laws of the Game do not require that a player agree to be substituted even when the substitution has been requested by a team official or team captain. If the player refuses to leave the field, the substitution request must be denied.

3.5 PREVENTING DELAY DURING SUBSTITUTION

Referees should prevent unnecessary delays due to the substitution process. One source of delay is a request for a substitution that occurs just as a player starts to put the ball back into play. This often

(incorrectly) results in the restart being called back and retaken. Another common source of delay is a substitute player who is not prepared to take the field when the request to substitute is made. In each case, the referee should order play to be restarted despite the request and inform the coach that the substitution can be made at the next opportunity.

The referee shall not prevent a team from restarting play if the substitute had not reported to the appropriate official before play stopped.

During the pregame discussion, the role of each official in managing the substitution process should be discussed in detail. Every effort should made to ensure awareness of local substitution rules, to follow procedures which facilitate substitutions with a minimum of delay, to avoid overlooking valid substitution requests, and to prevent the substitution process from being abused by teams seeking to gain an unfair advantage.

3.6 ALLOWING SUBSTITUTIONS AND ADDING TIME

Except for situations described in 3.5, referees may not ignore or deny permission for a legal substitution that is properly requested. Although Law 3 requires that the referee be "informed before any proposed substitution is made," this does not mean that the referee can deny permission for any reason other than to ensure that the substitution conforms to the Law. Even if it seems that the purpose is to waste time, the referee cannot deny the request, but should exercise the power granted in Law 7 to add time lost through "any other cause." (Rules of those competitions that permit multiple

substitutions and re-entries can sometimes lead to confusion. Study the Advice under 8.3 regarding the start of the second half.)

If, before the start of a match played under the rules of a competition, a player is replaced by a named substitute without the referee having been notified, this substitute, now a player, is permitted to play, but should be cautioned for entering the field of play without the permission of the referee. This is considered to be an improper manipulation of the roster, rather than a substitution, and does not count against the number of substitutions the team is permitted to use.

3.7 TOO MANY SUBSTITUTIONS ALLOWED

If the referee allows more than the specified or agreed-upon number of substitutions and discovers this only after play has been restarted, this is a violation of Law 3. It is also a serious error by the referee.

The referee must remove the illegal substitute at the earliest opportunity and replace him or her with the former player, restarting as appropriate to the reason the ball was out of play. The referee must file a complete report.

3.8 LEAVING THE FIELD WITHOUT PERMISSION

The referee may caution a player who leaves the field without waiting for the permission of the referee when the substitution is requested.

3.9 LEAVING THE FIELD IN THE COURSE OF PLAY

If a player accidentally passes over one of the boundary lines of the field of play or if a player in possession of or contesting for the ball passes over the touch line or the goal line without the ball to beat an opponent, he or she is not considered to have left the field of play without the permission of the referee. This player does not need the referee's permission to return to the field.

An opponent may exploit a situation in which the goalkeeper has temporarily left the field in the course of play by quickly and correctly taking a throw-in or a corner kick. Even though the goalkeeper may still be returning to the field, a goal scored under these circumstances is valid. No offense has been committed.

3.10 ILLEGALLY ENTERING THE GAME

If a person who is not on the roster (or, if no roster is required, not clearly a member of the team) enters the game as a substitute, that person will be considered "illegal" and must be removed from the game. Such a person cannot be cautioned, as he or she is neither a player nor a substitute. (However, if the person is a player who has been substituted out of the game, then he or she may be cautioned, as he or she is still under the authority of the referee.) If the referee stopped the game to deal with this person, the restart would be an indirect free kick at the place where the ball was when play was stopped*. The referee will remove the illegal person at the earliest opportunity and, unless the team wishes to play short, allow the former player to return, restarting as appropriate to the reason the ball was out of play. There is no option for a second substitution until the next stoppage of play. The referee must file a complete report.

3.11 DEPARTING PLAYER MUST NOT INTERFERE WITH PLAY

If a player has received permission to leave the field, he or she must do so. If the player interrupts the exit to play the ball as play continues, the player should be cautioned for unsporting behavior. The game must be restarted with an indirect free kick taken by a player of the opposing team, from the place where the infringement occurred*.

3.12 NUMBER OF PLAYERS DURING KICKS FROM THE PENALTY MARK

Only the players who were on the field at the end of the game (or temporarily off the field for treatment of injury or repair of equipment) may participate in kicks from the penalty mark. The kicks from the mark phase of the match begins at the moment regulation play ends (including any overtime periods of play.) All players who are not injured must take a kick before anyone on the same team takes a second kick. Only the goalkeeper may be substituted in the case of injury during the kicks phase and only if the team has a substitution remaining from its permitted maximum. If a player is removed from the field or is unable to participate in the taking of the kicks due to an injury, the contest continues without him or her. Under no circumstances will a team be required to "reduce to equate" if the opposing team loses one or more players due to injury or misconduct. Although Law 3 requires that a match may not be started with fewer than seven players on each side, this does not apply to the taking of kicks from the penalty mark. If one of the teams is able to field only five or six players for the kicks, the taking of kicks may begin, and it may continue as long as there is one player left. Until a result is produced, both teams must continue to use their eligible players without duplication until all

(including the goalkeeper) have kicked, at which time players who have already kicked may kick again. If one team has fewer players than the other, it will need to begin using again its players who have already kicked sooner than will the opposing team.

Note: It is not necessary for players to kick in the same order if a second round of kicks is required.

(See also Advice 19.1 and 19.2.)

3.13 RETURN OF A PLAYER TEMPORARILY OFF THE FIELD

If a player has received permission from the referee to leave the field during play for treatment of an injury, that player must have the referee's permission to return to the field. If the ball is in play, such a player may only re-enter the field across either of the touch lines. When the ball is out of play, the player may re-enter across any of the boundary lines. Only the referee is authorized to allow an injured player to re-enter the field whether the ball is in play or not. If the injured player has not been replaced (as would likely be the case when the substitution procedures in Law 3 are fully in effect), the referee must be aware of when the player is able to return and should give permission to do so at the earliest opportunity in order to bring the player's team up to its permitted number of players.

If a player has been instructed to leave the field to correct bleeding, blood on the uniform, or illegal equipment, the procedure for permitting that player to return to the field is described in Advice 5.8.

3.14 PLAYER ELIGIBILITY AND THE REFEREE

The criteria for registering players in a league and/or for determining if a player is permitted to participate in any given match are set by the competition authority and may not be modified by the referee. The competition authority may require that the referee check rosters, player passes, and similar documentation as a prerequisite for allowing a player to participate in a match. Where the validity of any player's documentation or right to participate in the match is or becomes a matter of dispute between the two sides, with no resolution, the referee must allow the player to participate and then must include all details in the match report. (An example would be the case where one team says that the opposing player has been suspended and is not eligible to play in this game, but the player's team disputes this.)

If there is an obvious discrepancy between the player documentation and the player in question, and the referee can verify that the player and the documentation do not match one another, the player will not play. The referee will retain the documentation and forward it to the competition authority with the match report. In the absence of an obvious discrepancy or fabrication of player credentials, the issue

must be decided in favor of allowing the player to participate in the match, with full details included in the match report.

3.15 WHEN A TEAM MAY SUBSTITUTE OR MAKE AN EXCHANGE OF PLAYERS

Under the Laws of the Game, and unless the rules of the competition specify otherwise, teams may substitute at any stoppage of play. This is reinforced for youth play by USYSA Rule 302.2, which provides for substitution at any stoppage with the permission of the referee. The referee must be familiar with the rules of every competition he or she works in. (See Advice 19.6.)

An exchange of a field player for the goalkeeper is not a substitution and is permitted at any stoppage.

The referee must be informed of the change.

Part B. Fewer Than the Correct Number of Players

3.16 MINIMUM NUMBER OF PLAYERS

Although Law 3 specifies a minimum of seven players in order to start and continue a match, it is not always necessary for all seven to be physically on the field. Play must stop temporarily if a team drops below this minimum number as a result of a player requesting and receiving permission from the referee to leave the field temporarily for treatment of an injury or if instructed by the referee to leave the field to correct bleeding, blood on the uniform, or illegal equipment. If the referee is not satisfied that the team will be able to field the minimum number within a reasonable period of time, the referee must abandon the match and describe the circumstances fully in the match report.

Part C. More Than the Correct Number of Players

3.17 MORE THAN THE CORRECT NUMBER OF PLAYERS

If, while the game is in progress, the referee finds that a team has more than the allowed number of persons on the field, play must be stopped and the extra person identified and removed from the field.

Other than through referee error, this situation can occur only if someone enters the field illegally. The

"extra player" can include an outside agent (such as a previously expelled player or a spectator); a player who had been given permission to leave or been ordered off by the referee for correction of a problem, but re-entered without permission; or a substitute or substituted player who enters without permission and/or during play.

In all competitions, especially those that allow substituted players to return, the officials must be extremely vigilant in counting the number of players who leave and substitutes who enter to prevent problems of this nature. Similarly, players off the field temporarily who require the permission of the referee to re-enter must be monitored to ensure that they do not participate in play until this requirement and any others (e. g., inspection to confirm the correction of the equipment or bleeding problem) are met.

3.18 ACTION IF PLAY STOPPED FOR PERSON ILLEGALLY ON THE FIELD

(a) If the extra person is neither a player nor a substitute (as determined usually by the team's roster), that person is considered an "outside agent" and must be removed. That person, as an outside agent, has not committed misconduct and so no card may be displayed. In the special case of a player who has already been sent off and shown the red card but who returns to the field, no further action can be taken following removal other than to include full details in the match report. Play is restarted with a dropped ball where the ball was when play was stopped*.

(b) A player who has been given permission or was ordered to leave the field to repair equipment or for medical treatment or clean-up of blood must have the referee's permission to return. If this player returns to the field illegally, he or she must be removed, cautioned and shown the yellow card for entering the field of play without the referee's permission. The correct restart is an indirect free kick at the place where the ball was when play was stopped*.

(c) If a substitute or a player who has been replaced subsequently enters the field illegally, he or she must be cautioned for unsporting behavior. Under rules of competition which follow Law 3, a substituted player is not permitted to take any further active part in the match, though such a person may be permitted to stay in the team's technical area. If the illegal entry of the substitute was part of a substitution in which a player left the field, the player who left must return to the field. The correct restart is an indirect free kick at the place where the ball was when play was stopped*.

3.19 OFFENSE COMMITTED WHILE PERSON ILLEGALLY ON THE FIELD

(a) An outside agent (see Advice 1.8(d)) cannot commit an infringement of the Laws. (See 3.18(c))

(b) If a player who has been given permission or was ordered to leave the field to repair equipment or for medical treatment or clean-up of blood then returns to the field illegally (see 3.18(b)) and additionally commits a foul or misconduct while on the field illegally, he or she is nevertheless still a player and can be charged with committing a foul or misconduct and the restart would be determined accordingly. For example, if a player has been ordered from the field to correct equipment but reenters the field without the permission of the referee and then violently strikes an opponent during play, the restart would be a direct free kick for the striking foul (or a penalty kick if committed inside the player's own penalty area). The player is, of course, also sent off and shown the red card for this misconduct.

(c) Players who have been replaced and subsequently return to the field illegally (see 3.18(c)) cannot commit fouls, but can commit misconduct. If this person commits misconduct while on the field, he or she may be cautioned or sent off, as appropriate. The restart would be based on the illegal entry of the substitute, not for any misconduct which may be committed afterward.

3.20 GOAL SCORED WITH EXTRA PLAYER IN THE GAME

If the ball enters the goal with an "extra" player or person in the game, the following chart provides principles for determining whether a goal has actually been scored.

Who is Extra?

Discovered Before Kick-Off Discovered After Kick-Off

Attacker Goal Canceled

Goal Counts

Defender Goal Counts Goal Counts

This part of the process is simple and straightforward. The difficulty in this situation lies in determining the correct restart.

(a) If an extra player or person is discovered on the attacking team before the ensuing kick-off, the goal is disallowed in all cases. The restart will vary, depending on circumstances.

(1) Outside agent. The restart is a dropped ball* if the extra player was either a player who had been sent off or an outside agent (see Advice 1.8(d)). Referees must remember that already-substituted players remain under the authority of the referee and may be punished for misconduct, while outside agents may not.

(2) If the person was a player who had left the game with the referee's permission for injury or other reason, or to correct equipment or bleeding, and then re-entered without permission, the restart would be an indirect free kick for the opponents in the goal area*.

(3) If the extra person was a substitute who had entered the game without the referee's permission the restart is an indirect free kick for the opponents in the goal area*.

(b) If the extra person is discovered on the attacking team after the ensuing kick-off, the goal must be counted as the game has already restarted. The offending person is removed and the game is restarted in accordance with the Law. If the extra person is an outside agent and still on the field, the correct restart is a dropped ball at the place where the ball was when play was stopped. If the game was stopped for some other purpose, the game is restarted for that reason.

(c) If the extra person is a player or substitute on the defending team, the goal will count whether the discovery occurs before or after play is restarted.

Law 4 - Players' Equipment

4.1 WEARING UNIFORMS

It is implicit in the Law that each side wear a distinctively colored jersey, that shorts and socks be uniform for each team, and that the uniforms be distinguishable from the uniforms worn by the other team. However, the details of the uniform are governed by the competition authority and can vary widely from one match to another. The referee must know and enforce the rules of each competition worked. Players' jerseys must remain tucked inside their shorts, socks must remain pulled up, and each player must wear shinguards under the socks. All undergarments (slide pants, undershirts, etc.) which extend visibly beyond the required uniform must be as close as possible in color to the main color of the uniform part under which they are worn.

All players must wear jerseys or shirts that distinguish them from the referee and assistant referees. If the colors are the same, the players, not the referees, must change.

Remember that jersey/shirt and shorts must be two separate items, not a single unit.

4.2 SAFETY

The referee must inspect the players and their equipment to ensure that there is nothing dangerous to any player. Players may not wear anything that the referee considers dangerous to themselves or to their teammates or opponents. The referee may delegate all or part of this responsibility to one or both of the assistant referees.

4.3 JEWELRY

All items of jewelry are normally considered dangerous; however, referees should consider carefully any item of clothing or jewelry that is clearly religious or medical in nature and permit it to be worn if it is not dangerous and not likely to provide the player with an unfair advantage.

Players may not tape, cover up, or otherwise hide prohibited items. The player must still be prevented from participating in the match if the prohibited item continues to be worn.

The willful refusal by a player to remove illegal equipment (including items of jewelry), having been previously warned that such equipment cannot be worn on the field yet continuing to do so, is considered unsporting behavior.

4.4 GOALKEEPER UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT

Under Law 4, goalkeepers must wear a jersey color distinct from the players of both teams and the referee and assistant referees. In addition, goalkeepers traditionally wear items of clothing besides those prescribed under Law 4. These items include soft hats or caps, gloves, training suit bottoms, pants with special hip or thigh pads, jerseys with pads along the elbows and arms, and separate pads for knees or elbows. There is no problem as long as these items of clothing do not present a danger to any players, are of a color distinct from the uniforms of players of either team and are, in the opinion of the referee, clearly related to the goalkeeper's function. The referee should prevent any player other than the goalkeeper from wearing an item of clothing or equipment that is permitted to the goalkeeper under these criteria.

If the two goalkeepers' shirts are the same color and neither has another shirt to change into, the referee shall allow the match to proceed.

4.5 FOOTWEAR

Shoes are a required item of player equipment. If a player, due to a collision with an opponent or other cause, loses a shoe and immediately scores a goal, the goal would be valid. The player lost the shoe by accident and did not intentionally play without the shoe. It is within the referee's discretion to allow such a player to continue playing for a short while until the shoe is recovered and put back on.

4.6 INCORRECT UNIFORM OR EQUIPMENT

Instructing a player to leave the field to correct an illegal uniform or equipment does not require a report by the referee as this is not a "send-off" for misconduct. The inspection to confirm that the correction has been made is conducted by the referee or, if delegated by the referee in the pregame conference, by the fourth official or an assistant referee if a fourth official has not been appointed. The player must receive a signal from the referee before actually re-entering the field from the touch line during play or from the touch or goal line if during a stoppage.

The goalkeeper is allowed certain exceptions in the equipment he or she is permitted to wear. These exceptions are designed strictly for protection of the goalkeeper, in keeping with the requirement in

Law 4 to ensure player safety, not to ensure player superiority through artificial means. There is no provision for the goalkeeper or any other player to wear artificial aids to enhance their ability to play.

Therefore tacky substances on the hands or "sticky" gloves are illegal equipment and, if used, constitute unsporting behavior for which a caution should be given. The offending substance must be removed and offending gloves may be replaced by others that are not "doctored."

Players may not wear commercial, political, religious or personal statements on any part of the player uniform (normal manufacturer’s names and logos are excepted) or reveal such statements by removing any part of the uniform (whether the statement being revealed is on an undergarment or directly on the player’s skin). Referees do not have responsibility for sanctioning players who violate this restriction under ordinary circumstances, but they must include details of any violations in their match report.

Referees continue to have the authority to sanction players if what is displayed involves abusive, insulting, or offensive language or images.

Law 5 - The Referee

5.1 REFEREE UNIFORM

Referees may wear only the gold primary jersey or the black/white-, blue/black-, or red/black-striped alternate jerseys, and may wear only the approved socks. No other colors will be worn without express permission of the USSF. If the uniform colors worn by a goalkeeper and the referee or by a team (or both teams) and the referee are similar enough to invite confusion, the goalkeeper or the team(s) must change to different colors. Only if there is no way to resolve the color similarity, must the referee (and the assistant referees) wear the colors that conflict least with the players. Referees and assistant referees must wear the same color jerseys and the same style of socks, and all should wear the same length sleeves. The referee uniform does not include a hat, cap, or other head covering, with the exception of religious head covering. Referees must wear the badge of the current registration year.

Referees should select their shoes with an eye for both utility and appearance. Referees have to run on the field with at least as much speed and agility as do the players, so the shoes should enable them to do this under all field conditions. Players, team officials, and spectators often make initial judgments about the skills and knowledge of the referee based on appearance, and shoes can contribute significantly toward building that reserve of confidence. It is also occasionally important that players, who are frequently looking down at the ground, be able to identify the referee quickly by differences in the shoes. Accordingly, the referee's shoes should be predominantly black, clean, polished, and neatly tied.

5.2 REFEREE'S AUTHORITY

The referee's authority begins upon arrival at the area of the field of play and continues until he or she has left the area of the field after the game has been completed. The referee's authority extends to time when the ball is not in play, to temporary suspensions, to the half-time break, and to additional periods of play or kicks from the penalty mark required by the rules of the competition.

For a synopsis of when cards may be shown to players, substitutes, or substituted players, see Advice

5.17.

5.3 PREGAME

Before the game, the referee must discuss with the assistant referees and fourth official (if one has been assigned) the rules of the competition and the proper procedures and mechanics to be followed by each official (as prescribed in the USSF Guide to Procedures).

5.4 REFEREE SIGNALS

Referee signals should be restricted to those authorized by IFAB/FIFA (play on-advantage, penalty kick, indirect free kick, direct free kick, goal kick, corner kick, and caution or expulsion when showing the card), unless there is a clear need to communicate other information to the players or to the assistant referees and fourth official. Other signals or methods of communication intended to supplement (not replace) those described in the USSF Guide to Procedures are permitted only if they do not conflict with established procedures and only if they do not intrude on the game, are not distracting, are limited in number and purpose, and are fully agreed upon before the match. Such signals should be kept to an absolute minimum, and should not be demonstrative or draw undue attention to the referee (or the assistant referee). Although the routine use of signals which identify fouls is not generally recommended, referees should be prepared to quickly indicate what sort of foul has occurred when this may deter further questions, disagreements, misunderstanding, or dissent.

When starting or restarting the game, the referee may signal to both teams by using the whistle, a hand signal, a word or two, or a simple nod or other acknowledgment. Such a signal should be clearly understood by both teams.

5.5 TRIFLING INFRACTIONS

"The Laws of the Game are intended to provide that games should be played with as little interference as possible, and in this view it is the duty of referees to penalize only deliberate breaches of the Law.

Constant whistling for trifling and doubtful breaches produces bad feeling and loss of temper on the part of the players and spoils the pleasure of spectators."

This former International F.A. Board Decision (previously included in Law 5 as Decision 8) was removed from the Law only because it was felt to be an unnecessary reminder of the referee's fundamental duty to penalize only those violations that matter. The spirit, if not the words, of this

Decision remains at the heart of the Law. It is applicable to all possible violations of any of the Laws of the Game.

A trifling infraction is one which, though still an offense, has no significant impact upon play. A doubtful offense is one which neither the referee nor the other officials can attest to. Under no circumstances should the advantage clause be invoked for such “offenses.” The referee’s decision as to whether a player’s action is trifling or not is affected considerably by the skill level of the players.

However, the referee should remember to consider trifling offenses in determining persistent infringement of the Laws. Further, the referee may wish to talk to or warn a player regarding trifling infringements which, though considered trifling, may nonetheless lead to frustration and retaliation if they continue.

5.6 ADVANTAGE

Referees have the power to apply (and signal) the advantage upon seeing a foul or misconduct committed if at that moment the terms of the advantage clause (Law 5, 11th item) were met. Applying advantage permits the referee to allow play to continue when the team against which the foul has been committed will actually benefit from the referee not stopping play.

The referee must remember that the advantage applies to the team of the fouled player and not just to the fouled player. Soccer is a team sport and the referee is expected to apply advantage if the fouled player's team is able to retain or regain control of the ball.

The referee may return to and penalize the original foul if the advantage situation does not develop as anticipated after a short while (2-3 seconds). Referees should note that the "advantage" is not defined solely in terms of scoring a goal. Also, a subsequent offense by a player of the offending team must not be ignored while the referee allows the anticipated development of the advantage. Such an offense may either be recognized by stopping play immediately or by applying the advantage clause again.

Regardless of the outcome of the advantage call, the referee must deal appropriately with any misconduct at the next stoppage, before allowing play to be restarted. (See also 12.27.)

NOTE:

After observing a foul or misconduct by a player, the referee decides to apply advantage and within a second or so, the ball goes out of play across a boundary line. The referee may still penalize the original offense.

The referee may also apply advantage during situations that are solely misconduct (both cautionable and send-off offenses) or to situations that involve both a foul and misconduct.

The advantage applies only to infringements of Law 12 (fouls and/or misconduct) and not to infringements of other Laws. For example, there can be no advantage during an offside situation, nor may advantage be applied in the case of an illegal throw-in that goes to an opponent.

Referees must understand that advantage is not an absolute right. It must be balanced against other issues. The giving of the advantage is not required in all situations to which it might be applied. The referee may stop play despite an advantage if other factors (e.g., game control, severity of a foul or misconduct, possibility of player retaliation, etc.) outweigh the benefit of play continuing.

A common misconception about advantage is that it is about deciding if a challenge is a foul. On the contrary, that decision has already been made because advantage cannot be applied to anything which is not a foul (meaning a violation of Law 12). Advantage, rather, is a decision about whether to stop play for the foul. Accordingly, giving the advantage is "calling the foul" and thus it must be as obvious to the players as signaling to stop play.

Inconspicuous advantage signals are as much to be avoided as a whistle which cannot be heard.

Likewise, however, using the advantage signal to indicate that something is not a foul or misconduct, or is a doubtful or trifling offense, is equally wrong.

In determining whether there is persistent infringement, all fouls are considered, including those to which advantage has been applied.

5.7 STOPPING PLAY

The referee has the power to stop the match for any infringement of the Laws, to apply advantage under the appropriate conditions, or to decide that an infringement is trifling or doubtful and should not be called at all. However, the referee also has the power to stop play for other reasons, including misconduct for which the referee intends only to warn the player regarding behavior and not to issue a caution. In these circumstances, the referee should take care that ordering such a stoppage would not disadvantage the opposing team. As the stoppage will not have occurred for a foul or misconduct, play would be restarted with a dropped ball.

5.8 RETURN AFTER BLEEDING OR EQUIPMENT REMEDY

If a player is bleeding or the uniform is blood-soaked, the player must leave the field immediately to have the bleeding stopped and his or her skin and uniform cleaned as thoroughly as possible (replacing the uniform may be necessary to meet this requirement). Before the player can return to the field, the correction of the situation must be confirmed by an official—the referee or, if delegated by the referee in the pregame conference, the fourth official or, if there is no fourth official, an assistant referee.

Once the correction has been confirmed, the player can be permitted to return to the field if beckoned by the referee, even if play is continuing. The objective is to bring the team back to its authorized strength as soon as possible.

5.9 INJURIES

When the referee has stopped play due solely to the occurrence of a serious injury, the referee must ensure that the injured player is removed from the field of play (the refusal to leave or be removed could be considered a cautionable offense for unsporting behavior). If play is stopped for any other reason, an injured player cannot be required to leave the field but may be permitted to do so by the referee. The determination of what constitutes a "serious injury" should take into account the age of the player. Only the referee may permit the return to the field of play of a player who was permitted to

leave the field for treatment of an injury. This is not a substitution. The player who left the field for treatment of an injury may return during play with the permission of the referee, but only from the touch line. If the ball is out of play, the player may return with the permission of the referee across any boundary line.

Referees should avoid remaining in the area of the injured player once they have made their determination to stop play or to prevent play from immediately restarting while the injured player is being attended to on the field.

5.10 BEHAVIOR OF COACH AND BENCH PERSONNEL

Coaches or other team officials, one at a time, may provide tactical advice to their players, including positive remarks and encouragement. The referee should only take action against coaches or other

team officials for irresponsible behavior or for actions that bring the game into disrepute. A coach or other team official may not be cautioned or sent off nor shown any card; however, at the discretion of the referee, such persons may be warned regarding their behavior or expelled from the field of play and its immediate area. When a coach or other team official is expelled, the referee must include detailed information about such incidents in the match report.

The maximum numbers of substitutes and substitutions are set by the competition authority and with the agreement of the two teams within the requirements of Law 3. Additional people in the technical area, such as team members who are not named as players or substitutes (for the current game) on the roster or parents or other persons involved with the team, are permitted to be seated with the team in the technical area (or other designated team area) only if this is allowed by the competition authority.

Such persons will be considered team officials and are therefore held to the same standards of conduct specified in Law 5 as other team officials. Although team officials cannot commit misconduct or be shown a card, they may be ordered from the field for irresponsible behavior. Full details must be included in the match report.

5.11 TERMINATING A MATCH

The referee may terminate a match for reasons of safety (bad weather or darkness), for any serious infringement of the Laws, or because of interference by spectators. Only the competition authority, not the referee, has the authority to declare a winner, a forfeit, or a replay of the match in its entirety. The referee must report fully on the events.

5.12 ABANDONING A MATCH

The referee may abandon a match if there is an insufficient number of players to meet the requirements of the Law or the competition, if a team does not appear or leaves before completion of the game, or if the field or any of its equipment do not meet the requirements of the Laws or are otherwise unsafe. An abandoned match is replayed unless the competition rules provide otherwise.

NOTE: The difference between terminating a match and abandoning a match is a subtle one, but it is historically correct and supported by traditional practice.

5.13 CHANGING A DECISION AFTER PLAY HAS RESTARTED

A displayed red or yellow card can be canceled by the referee only if play has not restarted. If play has been restarted or if the match is over (including required periods of additional play and/or kicks from the penalty mark), no card may be displayed for any prior misconduct, but the facts must be recorded in the match report. If play has been restarted after an occurrence of misconduct, no card may subsequently be shown for that misconduct. However, a card can be shown after the end of any period

of play if advantage has been applied to misconduct and the end of the period of play is the very next stoppage. Under these circumstances, the referee is advised to display the card quickly.

If the referee discovers after play has restarted that an incorrect player was cautioned (yellow card) or sent off (red card), the display of the card cannot be changed and must be reported. The referee must provide in the match report all details relevant to the mistake. This situation must be distinguished from the referee's failure to display a red card and send off a player who has received a second caution in the same match. Upon discovering this error—including being informed by an assistant referee or the fourth official—the red card may be shown and the player sent from the field even if play has been

restarted.

The failure to send off a player after a second caution and the subsequent correction of this error does not invalidate any action by that player or by the team of that player during the period of the match following the moment the send-off should have occurred. The only exception is if the player's team scored a goal and the failure to send off the player is corrected before play is restarted, in which case the goal must be canceled.

The failure of the referee to include in the match report accurately and fully all cards displayed during play is a serious breach of the referee's responsibilities. In addition, the referee may not record cards as shown which have not been shown, although the facts of the player’s behavior may be included in the match report.

Referees may not decide to rescind a caution if the player who has already been charged with misconduct apologizes. All cautions must be reported.

5.14 CHANGING A DECISION ON AN INCORRECT RESTART

If the referee awards a restart for the wrong team and realizes the mistake before the restart is taken, then the restart may be corrected even though the decision was announced after the restart took place.

This is based on the established principle that the referee’s initial decision takes precedence over subsequent action. The visual and verbal announcement of the decision after the restart has already occurred is well within the Spirit of the Law, provided the decision was made before the restart took place.

5.15 REPORTING MISCONDUCT

When a player commits more than one form of misconduct at the same time (e. g., dissent and abusive language, denial of an obvious goalscoring opportunity and serious foul play, delaying the restart of play and failure to respect the required distance), the referee can use only one as the official reason for the caution or send off. The reason given should reflect whichever act of misconduct is considered the most serious. However, all misconduct committed by a player must be noted in the referee's report, including any behavior in addition to the official reason for the caution or send off. (See also Advice

12.37 and 12.38.)

5.16 APPLYING DISCIPLINE TO SUBSTITUTES

The referee's authority extends to all substitutes, whether called upon to play or not. While it is not possible for a substitute to commit or to be penalized for a foul, substitutes can be shown the appropriate card and cautioned or sent off for misconduct. [Note: See Laws 3 and 5, the Additional

Instructions and Guidelines for Referees, and the information on the fourth official for dealing with coaches and other team personnel.]

Substitutes can be cautioned and shown the yellow card only for unsporting behavior, dissent, or delaying the restart of play. They may be sent off the field and shown the red card for any of the

reasons provided in Law 12 but referees are advised that, if the misconduct involves violence, the match report should indicate that the send-off was for violent conduct. (The use of "serious foul play" as the reason for sending off a substitute should be avoided.)

5.17 DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER THE GAME

Misconduct committed by a player or a substitute prior to the start of the match, during the match, during breaks between playing periods is subject to a formal caution or a send-off, as appropriate.

Yellow and red cards, which are now mandatory indications of cautions and send-offs, may be shown only for misconduct committed by players, substitutes, or substituted players during a match. "During a match" includes:

(a) the period of time immediately prior to the start of play during which players and substitutes are physically on the field warming up, stretching, or otherwise preparing for the match;

(b) any periods in which play is temporarily stopped;

(c) half time or similar breaks in play;

(d) required overtime periods;

(e) kicks from the penalty mark if this procedure is used in case a winner must be determined.

(f) the period of time immediately following the end of play during which the players and substitutes are physically on the field but in the process of exiting.

Cautions issued prior to the start of the game or during breaks between periods are recorded and they are counted for purposes of sending a player from the field for receiving a second caution during the match. To prevent misunderstandings, the referee should inform officials of both teams before the first period of play begins of any cautions or send-offs occurring prior to the start of the match.

If a player or substitute is cautioned or dismissed for misconduct which has occurred during a break or suspension of play, the card must be shown on the field before play resumes.

If a player is dismissed before the match begins, the player may be replaced by a named substitute, but the team is not allowed to add any names to its roster and its number of permissible substitutions is not reduced.

Players or substitutes who have been sent off may not remain in the team area, but must be removed from the environs of the field. If this is not practical because of the age or condition of the player, the team authorities are responsible for the behavior of the player or substitute.

There can be no "temporary expulsion" of players who have been cautioned, nor may teams be forced to substitute for a player who has been cautioned.

Postgame: Any misconduct committed by players or substitutes after the field has been cleared must be described in the game report and reported to the competition authority. Since such misconduct cannot result in a formal caution or send-off, no card may be displayed. Referees are advised to avoid remaining in the area of the field unnecessarily.

5.18 DISCIPLINE DURING KICKS FROM THE PENALTY MARK OR EXTRA TIME

The Laws of the Game apply when additional time must be played or kicks from the penalty mark must be taken to satisfy a requirement by the competition authority that there be a winner of a match.

Misconduct during extra time or kicks from the penalty mark is treated as if it had occurred during regulation time.

Law 6 - The Assistant Referees and Fourth Official

6.1 ASSISTANT REFEREE DUTIES

"Assistant referees, where neutral, shall draw the referee's attention to any breach of the Laws of the

Game of which they become aware if they consider that the referee may not have seen it, but the referee shall always be the judge of the decision to be taken."

(Former International F.A. Board Decision 1 to Law VI)

6.2 ASSISTANT REFEREE SIGNALS

Assistant referee signals should be restricted to those authorized by IFAB/FIFA (offside and the far, center, and near positions; throw-in; corner kick; goal kick; and substitution) or the USSF (foul, infringement inside the penalty area, or other signals described in the USSF Guide to Procedures), unless there is a clear need to communicate information to the players or to the referee that cannot be communicated in any other way. (For further guidelines, see Advice 5.4.)

6.3 NO SIGNAL FOR FOULS OBSERVED BY THE REFEREE

Assistant referees should not signal at all for fouls or misconduct that clearly occur in the sight of the referee, that are doubtful or trifling, or for which the referee would likely have applied advantage.

Assistant referees may, however, bring such events to the attention of the referee at a stoppage of play.

6.4 MISSED ASSISTANT REFEREE SIGNALS

If the assistant referee signals a ball out of play, but the referee does not see the signal for an extended period, during which play is stopped and restarted several times, the assistant referee should lower the flag.

The FIFA Referee Committee has declared that it is impossible for the referee to act on the assistant referee's signal after so much play. If the referee misses the assistant referee's signal for offside, the assistant referee should stand at attention with the flag raised until the defending team gains clear possession or until a goal kick or throw-in is awarded to the defending team. To avoid such situations, the referee should make eye contact with the assistant referees as often as possible. In addition, the assistant referees must be alert for and mirror each other's signals if needed to assist the referee.

The assistant referee should maintain a signal if a serious foul or misconduct is committed out of the referee's sight or when a goal has been scored illegally. The referee should cover this situation during the pregame conference with the assistant referees.

6.5 RESPONSIBILITY FOR OFFSIDE

Among the specifically stated responsibilities of the assistant referee is to indicate "when a player may be penalized for being in an offside position." Because "it is not an offense in itself to be in an offside position," the assistant referee must interpret this responsibility to require that it is clear not only that

an attacker is in an offside position but also that that same player is involved in active play by interfering with play, interfering with an opponent, or gaining an advantage by being in the offside position (see Law 11)

. The assistant referee should use his or her unique perspective on the touch line as a trained, neutral official and provide the appropriate signal so that the referee can make a final determination as to whether the attacker will be penalized for an offside infringement.

6.6 CLUB LINESMEN

Where neutral assistant referees are not available, the referee may use club linesmen. Club linesmen should report to the referee before the start of the game for instructions. The referee should make it clear that the decision of the referee is final and must not be questioned. The relationship of club

linesmen to the referee must be one of assistance, without undue interference or any opposition. Club linesmen are to signal only when the ball is entirely over the goal line or touch line.

6.7 THE FOURTH OFFICIAL

In competitions where a fourth official is appointed, that official's role and duties must be in accordance with the guidelines approved by the International F.A. Board. For more details , see the

USSF publication "Guide to Procedures for Fourth Officials," as well as the Additional Instructions and Guidelines for Referees in the Laws of the Game.

6.8 FOURTH OFFICIAL DUTIES

In addition to performing such other duties as the referee may discuss during the pregame conference

(see USSF's Guide for Fourth Officials, 2001), the fourth official is expected to manage substitutions; report on violent conduct, irresponsible behavior in the technical area, and other misconduct which occurred outside the view of the referee and assistant referees; and advise the referee of any error in identifying players to be cautioned or sent from the field for misconduct.

Law 7 - The Duration of the Match

7.1 LENGTH OF HALVES

The referee may not arbitrarily shorten or lengthen the halves of a game where the time has been specified by the competition authority (league, tournament, etc.).

7.2 ADDING TIME

The amount of time the referee allows for time lost in either half of a game or in any overtime period for the reasons listed in Law 7 (Allowance for Time Lost) is entirely at the referee’s discretion.

Referees should remember that, in addition to the reasons listed in Law 7, there are “other causes” that consume time, such as kick-offs, throw-ins, dropped balls, free kicks, and replacement of lost or defective balls. Many of the reasons for stoppages in play and thus “lost time” are, however, entirely normal elements of the game. This should be taken into account in applying discretion regarding the time to be added. The main objective should be to restore playing time to the match which is lost due to excessively prolonged or unusual stoppages. The IFAB has strongly urged referees to take fully into account time lost due to injuries.

The addition of time to the first or second half of regular play (or to the first or second overtime period if this is being used in case of a tie) does not preclude further delays being taken into account by the referee if they occur during the additional time. Any announcement of additional time must therefore be understood to be a minimum estimate.

7.3 MISTAKEN ENDING

If the referee ends play early, then the teams must be called back onto the field and the remaining time must be played as soon as the error is detected. The halftime interval is not considered to have begun until the first period of play is properly ended. If the ball was out of play when the period was ended incorrectly, then play should be resumed with the appropriate restart (throw-in, goal kick, etc.). If the ball was in play, then the correct restart is a dropped ball where the ball was when the referee incorrectly ended play*.

If a period of play (first half or first overtime period) was ended prematurely and this fact was not discovered until the next period of play had been started, the referee will complete the match using the correct length of time for the period of play as prescribed by the competition authority and then include full details of the error in the match report.

7.4 DISCIPLINE DURING KICKS FROM THE PENALTY MARK OR EXTRA TIME

The Laws of the Game apply when additional time must be played or kicks from the penalty mark must be taken to satisfy a requirement by the competition authority that there be a winner of a match.

Misconduct during extra time or kicks from the penalty mark is treated as if it had occurred during regulation time.

Law 8 - The Start and Restart of Play

8.1 COIN TOSS

The decision made by the team winning the toss is only which end of the field to attack; the other team takes the kick-off. When extra time is played, the coin toss again decides only which end the team winning the toss will attack in the first extra period of play. The team that wins the toss at extra time also kicks off to start the second period of extra time. A separate coin toss is required for kicks from the penalty mark; however, in this case, the team whose captain wins the toss decides whether to take the first or the second kick.

8.2 THE KICK-OFF

The ball must be kicked and move forward. Only minimal movement is needed to meet this requirement. The kick-off must be taken by a player competing in the match, in accordance with the

Law, not by any non-player. Remember to note which team kicked off and in which direction the kick was taken.

8.3 PLAYER COUNT

Count the number of players in both teams before the beginning of each half and after any substitution.

The intelligent referee's signal to start the second half is a tacit acknowledgment that the persons on the field are players and the persons wearing a goalkeeper jersey are the goalkeepers—so long as the persons themselves are not illegal and the team is fielding the proper number of players. During a match played strictly in accordance with the requirements of Law 3—in other words, most matches other than youth games—the referee may discover that a player has changed places with the goalkeeper during the halftime break without informing the referee. Under the letter of the Law the referee should allow play to continue and then caution both players for unsporting behavior when the ball next goes out of play, but in most cases the offense is trifling and a brief word with the captain or coach about the requirements of the Law will suffice.

Where a player and the goalkeeper have changed places illegally and the player is now in possession of the distinctive goalkeeper jersey, that player has become the goalkeeper for the purpose of exercising the unique power of the goalkeeper to handle the ball within his own penalty area.

8.4 INADVERTENT WHISTLE

If the referee mistakenly blows the whistle to stop play, the proper restart is a dropped ball at the place where the ball was when the whistle was blown*.

8.5 DROPPED BALL

There is no requirement that players from both teams—or that any player—must take part at a dropped ball.

A dropped ball must be "dropped," not thrown down. The referee should hold the ball in the palm of the hand at waist level with the other hand on top of the ball. At the proper moment, the referee should then pull away the hand beneath the ball and let it drop, taking care that the players do not play it until it has hit the ground. If the dropped ball leaves the field without having been played, the ball must be dropped again where it was previously dropped. The goalkeeper may participate at dropped balls.

Referees should take care not to use this option as a means of avoiding a difficult but necessary decision as to which player committed an offense first and which player retaliated. The referee must

not use the dropped ball to restart play as a crutch in those cases where there is some question about the correct restart. The referee must make a decision and announce it firmly. See Advice 9.3.

Law 9 - The Ball In and Out of Play

9.1 BALL OUT OF PLAY

The ball is out of play when it has completely crossed the goal line or touch line, or when the referee has stopped play. The commission of a "supposed infringement" does not stop play; play can be stopped for any infringement only by the referee's signal.

However, while it is the signal of the referee that announces a decision, play is considered to have stopped when the decision is made, not when the decision is announced. Thus, no act can be considered a foul if it occurs after the referee has decided to stop play (or after the ball has left the field) but before the signal has actually been given. The referee is the sole judge of when he or she has decided to stop play. If the referee is acting on a signal from an assistant referee, the stoppage is considered to have occurred at the time of the assistant referee's signal.

9.2 PLAY THE REFEREE'S WHISTLE

If a whistle is heard as a result of spectator action or of activity on a nearby field and if a player, thinking that play had been stopped by the referee, then illegally handles the ball, the referee should treat this as outside interference and restart with a dropped ball. The referee must nonetheless be aware of the possibility that a player has committed unsporting behavior (pretending unawareness that it was not the referee’s whistle) and must be prepared to deal properly with this misconduct.

9.3 SIMULTANEOUS TOUCHES

The referee should promptly signal a clear decision on the direction for the restart when the ball appears to have gone off the field from "simultaneous" touches by members of both teams. Under the

Laws of the Game, it is not permissible to give a dropped ball restart in situations where the referee cannot decide which team has possession.

The players quickly identify referee indecision, and will use it to their advantage.

9.4 ILLUSTRATIONS OF BALL IN AND OUT OF PLAY

Ball in play

Ball rebounding from corner flagpost, goal post, or crossbar into field of play is in play

Ball in play

Ball out of play

Ball in play

Law 10 - The Method of Scoring

10.1 ONLY GOALS SCORED DURING PLAY ARE VALID

Only goals scored during playing time are valid. Balls that enter the goal after time has expired—in other words, after the referee has blown the whistle—cannot be scored as goals.

10.2 SIGNALING A GOAL

Law 10 defines the only method by which a goal can be scored. Referees should signal a goal only when it is absolutely clear that the ball has wholly crossed the goal line, beneath the crossbar and between the goal posts. If a referee signals a goal before the ball has wholly crossed the goal line, the goal is not valid. The game must then be restarted with a dropped ball*.

10.3 STOPPING PLAY BEFORE A POSSIBLE GOAL

If a referee whistles for an infringement of the Laws and then the ball wholly crosses the goal line, beneath the crossbar and between the goal posts, the goal is not valid. The game must be restarted in accordance with the nature of the infringement*.

10.4 FOULS COMMITTED WHILE A GOAL IS SCORED

If a defender infringes Law 12 in an attempt to prevent a goal but the ball continues into the goal and the referee has not signaled to stop play, the goal is valid and the player may be cautioned or sent off, depending on the nature of the misconduct. It would be improper under these circumstances to base the send-off on preventing a goal or denying a goalscoring opportunity, because a goal was actually scored. If the attacking team infringes the Laws of the Game before scoring a goal, then the goal is not valid. For dealing with obvious goalscoring opportunities, see the section on Law 12.

10.5 GOAL SCORED OFF AN OFFICIAL

If the ball accidentally hits the referee or an assistant referee on the field of play and rebounds into goal, the referee must award the goal. To avoid being touched by the ball or interfering with play, assistant referees should remain off the field of play as much as possible and referees should avoid the immediate area where players are contesting for the ball.

10.6 OWN GOAL

An "own goal" scored by a team against itself is valid and is given to the opposing team. However, a team cannot score against itself directly from any restart which it has performed and from which the ball has properly been put into play. In such a case, the restart is a corner kick (the ball has left the field across the goal line, not counted as a goal, last touched/played by a defender).

10.7 OUTSIDE INTERFERENCE AND RESTART

If a spectator or other outside agent enters the field when the ball is going into goal and tries to prevent a score before the ball passes wholly over the goal line, a goal shall be allowed if the ball goes into goal, unless the spectator or outside agent has made contact with the ball or has interfered with play. If

that occurs, the referee shall stop the game and restart it by dropping the ball at the place where the contact or other interference took place*.

A goal may not be allowed based on where the ball might have gone in the absence of such contact or interference. See Advice 14.7 for a different approach to handling burst ball and outside interference situations at the taking of a penalty kick.

10.8 TIED SCORE

A game may end with the score tied unless the rules of the competition state otherwise. However, only certain tie-breaking procedures are allowed by the Laws of the Game—two full equal periods of additional play and/or kicks from the penalty mark.

10.9 ILLUSTRATION OF GOAL OR NO GOAL

No goal

No goal

No goal

Goal

Law 11 - Offside

11.1 OFFSIDE POSITION

An offside position exists when a player is nearer the opponents' goal line than the next-to-last opponent and is ahead of the ball when the ball is touched/played by a teammate. Measure relative position by players' torsos, heads, and legs. No part of the attacking player other than the arms may be nearer the opponents' goal line than the torso, head or legs of the second-last defender. It is not necessary to "see daylight" between them for one to be considered nearer than the other. A player cannot be considered to be in an offside position under any circumstances when it is this player who last played the ball.

Here are two examples:

11.2 JUDGMENT OF OFFSIDE POSITION

The referee and assistant referees must judge offside position only when the ball is played by a teammate of the attacking player. The referee's decision to penalize the player for being in that position can be made at the moment the offside position is judged if the other requirements of Law 11 are met, but it can also be made at any time from that point forward until a new action on the field puts the attacker "onside" (see 11.15). The condition of being in an offside position (and the possibility of being penalized) continues no matter where that player may move, no matter where the ball may move, and no matter where the defenders may move. Only the occurrence of one of the events described in 11.15 can end this period.

It is not an offense to be in an offside position; it is an offense to interfere with play or with an opponent or to gain an advantage when in such a position. In such cases the referee is the sole judge and makes the final decision accordingly.

11.3 ACTIVE INVOLVEMENT

A player becomes "actively involved" in the play only when he or she is in the "area of active play."

This area shifts, widens, narrows, lengthens, or shortens, according to where the ball is going and who is "involved." Involvement includes attempting to play the ball or preventing others from having a fair play at the ball. Active involvement can occur without the ball being directly nearby. There are three elements in "active involvement." They are "interfering with an opponent," "interfering with play," and "gaining an advantage."

Active involvement may begin at any moment during the sequence of play. Here is a series of pictures showing how a player (A1) could be penalized for being offside, depending upon how the action unfolds.

In the first diagram, A moves toward the opponents' goal while player A1 looks on. When A shoots and the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper to A1 (second diagram), the subsequent goal attempt by A1 must be disallowed if A1, who was in an offside position when the ball was last played by A, became involved in active play and gained an advantage by moving to the ball. The offside position was noted when A shot the ball, but the offside infringement did not occur until the ball rebounded from the goalkeeper and A1 clearly moved toward the ball. (The indirect free kick would be awarded where A1 was when the teammate shot at goal, just outside the goal area.) However, if A shoots for goal and scores (third diagram), the goal must be allowed. Although A1 is in an offside position, he or she is not involved in active play.

11.4 INTERFERING WITH AN OPPONENT

"Interfering with an opponent"

means preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent's line of vision or movements or making a gesture or movement which, in the opinion of the referee, deceives or distracts an opponent. Interference can also include active physical or verbal distraction of the goalkeeper by an opponent as well as blocking the view of the goalkeeper.

A player who is in an offside position when the ball is played toward him by a teammate and who, in the opinion of the referee, attracts the attention of an opponent, drawing that opponent into pursuit, is guilty of interfering with an opponent.

11.5 INTERFERING WITH PLAY

"Interfering with play"

means playing or touching the ball passed or touched by a teammate. A player can be considered playing the ball even without touching it if, in the opinion of the referee or assistant referee, that player is making an active play for the ball and is likely to touch it. If contact is likely, the offense (offside) can be called when the official makes that determination, even if there is no contact with the ball.

An attacker in an offside position is not considered to be interfering with play (and, therefore, is not judged offside) if, in the opinion of the referee, another attacker starting from an onside position will clearly make first contact with the ball. In this situation, officials must refrain from calling an offside offense until they make this determination.

However, if in the process of playing the ball an attacker in an offside position makes a gesture or movement which deceives or distracts an opponent, then the offside offense must be called immediately, even if there is no touch on the ball. Note that in this situation the basis for judging offside would be "interfering with an opponent" rather than "interfering with play." Mere presence in

the general proximity of an opponent should not be considered a distraction for that opponent

.

The referee should only decide that a player is interfering with play or with an opponent if in the opinion of the referee, not in the opinion of the opponents, that player truly interferes with play or with an opponent in the area of active play. If so, then the player should be called offside.

Finally, note that a player in an offside position is not interfering with play if that player moves to

avoid making contact with the ball

.

11.6 GAINING AN ADVANTAGE

"Gaining an advantage by being in an offside position" means playing a ball that rebounds to the player off a post or crossbar or playing a ball that rebounds to him off an opponent having been in an offside position. It also means being near enough to the play to capitalize immediately on a defender’s mistake, having gained the advantage solely by being in the offside position. It is most often seen in situations where the ball rebounds from the crossbar, goalposts, or ‘keeper (whose contact with the ball is not controlled).

11.7 MAKING THE OFFSIDE DECISION

The assistant referee must not signal simply because a player is in an offside position, but must look for active involvement. Furthermore, if an assistant referee is in any doubt as to whether a player is in an offside position or if a player in an offside position is actively involved in play, the assistant referee is expected to decide in favor of the attacker; in other words, to refrain from signaling offside. The referee, too, must be certain that there is active involvement before deciding for offside.

NOTE: In no case should a player be declared offside for simply being in an offside position; being

"offside" means that the player has been actively involved in the play

—see Advice 11.3-11.6. See also the decision diagram at 11.16.

11.8 LEAVING THE FIELD TO AVOID OFFSIDE

If a player on the attacking side moves a little way beyond the boundary of the field of play to clearly show the referee that he or she is not interfering with play, this does not infringe the Laws. However, if the referee considers that such a movement has a tactical aim or is in any way a feint, and the player takes part in the game immediately after, the referee may deem this conduct to be unsporting behavior and issue a caution (yellow card). Play should be restarted in accordance with the Laws of the Game.

11.9 RETURNING TO THE FIELD TO PLAY THE BALL

If an attacking player passes beyond the boundary line for a moment in order to avoid an offside, but then re-enters the field of play and joins in the game and plays the ball that has been passed by a teammate, that player should be penalized for offside. The momentary departure from the field of play is not considered as leaving the field without the referee's permission and does not warrant a caution.

However, if the referee considers that the player has left the field for tactical reasons and has gained an unfair advantage by returning to the field of play, the player should be cautioned for unsporting behavior.

11.10 PUTTING AN OPPONENT IN AN OFFSIDE POSITION UNFAIRLY

If a defending player moves beyond his or her own goal line or across a touch line to place an opponent in an offside position, the referee should not stop play immediately to caution the defending player, but should allow play to continue. The attacker should not be punished for the position in which he or she has been unfairly placed; however, the referee should caution the defending player at the next stoppage of play for leaving the field of play without the referee’s permission.

11.11 DEFENDER LEGALLY OFF THE FIELD OF PLAY

A defender who leaves the field during the course of play and does not immediately return must still be considered in determining where the second to last defender is for the purpose of judging which attackers are in an offside position. Such a defender is considered to be on the touch line or goal line closest to his or her off-field position. A defender who leaves the field with the referee's permission

(and who thus requires the referee's permission to return) is not included in determining offside position.

11.12 OPPOSING ATTACKER ENTERS THE GOAL

If a forward in an offside position enters the goal (see illustration below) and a teammate kicks the ball into the goal, the goal is valid and the forward should not be punished if the forward remains stationary as the ball enters the goal and does not interfere with the opponents. If the forward moves or shouts as the ball enters the goal, and the referee believes this interference contributed to the scoring of the goal, the goal would not be valid. In this case, the forward would be punished for unsporting behavior, not for offside, and the restart would be a dropped ball,* as the forward was off the field of play.

11.13 LOCATION OF THE RESTART FOR OFFSIDE

Offside is punished where the infringement occurred. In other words, the indirect free kick should be taken from the place where the offside player was when the teammate played the ball. The kick should not be taken from the place where the second-to-last defender was nor where the player was at the moment the offside was called. If the player being penalized for offside was legally off the field when the teammate last played the ball, the restart will be taken from the point on the touch line where the player re-entered the field.

11.14 BECOMING "ONSIDE"

A player's offside position must be reevaluated whenever:

1. The ball is again touched or played by a teammate,

2. The ball is played (possessed and controlled, not simply deflected) by an opponent, including the opposing goalkeeper, or

3. The ball goes out of play.

The result of such a reevaluation, of course, may be that the player remains in an offside position based on still being beyond the second-to-last defender, the ball, and the midfield line. Referees must remember that a player cannot simply run to an onside position and become involved in play. The player's position with relation to the ball and the opponents must change in accordance with the Law.

In the case of the ball leaving the field in favor of the team whose player was in an offside position and actively involved in play (e. g., a corner kick or throw-in for the attackers), it is traditional to call the original offside offense. If the restart would be in favor of the opposing team (e. g., a goal kick or throw-in for the defenders), it is usually preferable to ignore the offside infringement, as the defending team's restart gives them the possession under circumstances not much different than the indirect free kick for offside—and often with less controversy.

11.15 ILLUSTRATIONS OF "NOT OFFSIDE"

These pictures illustrate three situations where there can be no offside. In the first, the player realizes he or she is an offside position; the player does not want to interfere with the opponents or with play, so the player stands still. This action is correct and should not be penalized. The second and third pictures illustrate that a player cannot be declared offside if the player receives the ball directly from a corner kick or a throw in. Note that this exemption applies only to the first player to receive the ball; any subsequent play of the ball to a teammate could result in an offside decision by the referee.

11.16 DIAGRAM FOR OFFSIDE DECISIONS (next page)

Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct

Part A. Fouls

12.1 WHAT IS A FOUL?

A foul is an unfair or unsafe action committed (1) by a player, (2) against an opponent or the opposing team, (3) on the field of play, (4) while the ball is in play. Deliberate handling of the ball is committed against the opposing team, not against a particular opponent. If any of these four requirements is not met, the action is not a foul; however, the action can still be misconduct.

Except for a handling offense, it is not necessary for the player’s action to be considered “deliberate” in the sense that the player intentionally set out to kick, push, trip, hold or otherwise foul the opponent.

If that were so, the referee would have to be capable of reading a player's mind. Under Law 12, the referee makes a decision based upon what he or she sees a player actually do—the result of the player’s action—not upon what might be in the player's mind.

12.2 THE DIRECT FREE KICK FOULS

Ten offenses are described in Law 12 for which, if play is stopped as a result, the restart is a direct free kick (or a penalty kick if committed by a team within its own penalty area). These offenses are referred to as direct free kick fouls. They are divided into two groups:

1. Six actions (kick, trip, jump at, charge, strike, or push, including the attempt to kick, trip, or strike) for which the referee must evaluate how the act was committed; and

2. Four actions (making contact with an opponent during a tackle prior to contacting the ball, holding, spitting, deliberately handling the ball) for which the referee need only decide if the act occurred.

Referees should not punish actions that are accidental or inadvertent. In the case of the first group, the action becomes an offense only if the referee decides that it was committed carelessly, recklessly, or with excessive force. In the case of the second group, the action alone is an offense, no matter how it was committed.

12.3 CARELESS, RECKLESS, INVOLVING EXCESSIVE FORCE

"Careless" indicates that the player has not exercised due caution in making a play.

"Reckless" means that the player has made unnatural movements designed to intimidate an opponent or to gain an unfair advantage.

"Involving excessive force" means that the player has far exceeded the use of force necessary to make a fair play for the ball and has placed the opponent in considerable danger of bodily harm.

If the foul was careless, simply a miscalculation of strength or a stretch of judgment by the player who committed it, then it is a normal foul, requiring only a direct free kick (and possibly a stern talking-to).

If the foul was reckless, clearly outside the norm for fair play, then the referee must award the direct free kick and also caution the player for unsporting behavior, showing the yellow card. If the foul involved the use of excessive force, totally beyond the bounds of normal play, then the referee must send off the player for serious foul play or violent conduct, show the red card, and award the direct free kick to the opposing team.

12.4 TRIPPING

Tripping or attempting to trip an opponent includes those situations in which the player moves under the opponent and uses the body to upset or upend the opponent. This is also known as "bridging."

Referees must carefully distinguish an act of tripping from the fact of being tripped. Tripping or attempting to trip is an offense if it is clearly directed at an opponent and causes the opponent to falter or fall. Players, however, may trip over or fall over an opponent as a result of natural play and no infringement of the Law has been committed.

12.5 CHARGING

The act of charging an opponent can be performed without it being called as a foul. Although the fair charge is commonly defined as "shoulder to shoulder," this is not a requirement and, at certain age levels where heights may vary greatly, may not even be possible. Furthermore, under many circumstances, a charge may often result in the player against whom it is placed falling to the ground

(a consequence, as before, of players differing in weight or strength). The Law does require that the charge be directed toward the area of the shoulder and not toward the center of the opponent's back

(the spinal area): in such a case, the referee should recognize that such a charge is at minimum reckless and potentially even violent. (See also Advice 12.14.)

It is not a violation of Law 12 for two players to charge the same opponent simultaneously, provided that each charge considered individually is conducted fairly and legally.

12.6 STRIKING

Striking can be performed by direct contact using hands, arms, elbows, head, or knees, or by throwing any object (including the ball). Striking as a foul occurs where contact is made with the opponent or where contact would have been made if the attempt to strike is unsuccessful. It is this location that determines the correct restart (direct free kick, penalty kick, indirect free kick, or dropped ball).

A player inside his or her own penalty area who reaches outside the area to strike an opponent or who throws an object other than the ball at an opponent who is located outside the penalty area has committed this offense at the location of the opponent. The restart would be a direct free kick if the striking occurred during play and both persons were on the field. If the opponent who was the target of the striking action had been inside the penalty area of the player doing the striking, the restart would be a penalty kick even if the player doing the striking had been outside the penalty area.

If the player’s action was not a foul—because the target of the striking was off the field at the time or the target of the action was not an opponent—the misconduct (violent conduct) would be punished by an indirect free kick where the player committing the striking was located.

If the action originated off the field entirely (whether by a player or a substitute), the restart is a dropped ball where the ball was when play was stopped (subject to the special terms of Law 8).

Striking using the ball as a thrown object presents the special issue of illegal handling if it is performed by a player other than the goalkeeper or by a goalkeeper outside his or her own penalty area. In this case, the illegal handling occurs first and the striking can only be considered misconduct, not a foul, since it occurred after play stopped. The handling offense determines the restart after the referee has dealt properly with the misconduct.

If any of these actions occurred during a stoppage of play, the restart is unchanged and is based on what caused play to be stopped in the first place.

Striking (as with kicking and spitting) should normally be considered misconduct (violent conduct or serious foul play – see Advice Section C of Law 12) of the gravest sort requiring a send-off and display of the red card. Only in the case of attempting to strike in which there is no contact should even the possibility of a caution be considered.

If a player, taking a throw-in, throws the ball at an opponent, the referee is presented with a gray area involving sound reading of the conditions of the game. This throw could be considered to be trifling, unsporting behavior, or violent conduct, depending on the force used. If the throw-in was correctly taken and the referee considers that the foul of striking has been committed, the restart would be a direct free kick from the point of contact. If the throw-in was not correctly taken and the referee considers that misconduct has been committed, the restart would be a retake of the throw-in(following the caution or the send-off), because the game was not restarted properly.

12.7 HOLDING

Holding an opponent includes the act of stretching the arms out to prevent an opponent from moving past or around. A player who blatantly holds onto or pulls an opponent or an opponent's clothing to play the ball, to gain possession of the ball, or to prevent an opponent from playing the ball should be cautioned and shown the yellow card for unsporting behavior. (See also Advice 12.14.)

12.8 MAKING CONTACT WITH THE OPPONENT

Making contact with the opponent before the ball when making a tackle is unfair and should be penalized. However, the fact that contact with the ball was made first does not automatically mean that the tackle is fair. The declaration by a player that he or she has played the ball is irrelevant if,

while tackling for the ball, the player carelessly, recklessly, or with excessive force commits any of the prohibited actions.

A foul committed while tackling an opponent with little or no concern for the safety of the opponent shall be cause for the player to be sent from the field and shown the red card for serious foul play.

12.9 DELIBERATE HANDLING

The offense known as "handling the ball" involves deliberate contact with the ball by a player's hand or arm (including fingertips, upper arm, or outer shoulder). "Deliberate contact" means that the player could have avoided the touch but chose not to, that the player's arms were not in a normal playing position at the time, or that the player deliberately continued an initially accidental contact for the purpose of gaining an unfair advantage. Moving hands or arms instinctively to protect the body when suddenly faced with a fast approaching ball does not constitute deliberate contact unless there is subsequent action to direct the ball once contact is made. Likewise, placing hands or arms to protect the body at a free kick or similar restart is not likely to produce an infringement unless there is subsequent action to direct or control the ball. The fact that a player may benefit from the ball contacting the hand does not transform the otherwise accidental event into an infringement. A player infringes the Law regarding handling the ball even if direct contact is avoided by holding something in the hand (clothing, shinguard, etc.).

12.10 RULE OF THUMB FOR "HANDLING"

The rule of thumb for referees is that it is handling if the player plays the ball, but not handling if the ball plays the player. The referee should punish only deliberate handling of the ball, meaning only those actions when the player (and not the goalkeeper within the ‘keeper’s own penalty area) strikes or propels the ball with the hand or arm (shoulder to tip of fingers).

12.11 USE OF THE SHOULDER

For purposes of determining deliberate handling of the ball, the "hand" is considered to be any part of the arm-hand from fingertip to shoulder. Using the top of the shoulder is not considered as using the hand. (A diagram showing the area of “the hand” is shown below.)

12.12 THE INDIRECT FREE KICK FOULS

A second group of offenses is described in Law 12 for which the correct restart is an indirect free kick.

These are referred to as "indirect free kick" fouls.

12.13 PLAYING IN A DANGEROUS MANNER

Playing "in a dangerous manner" can be called only if the act, in the opinion of the referee, meets three criteria: the action must be dangerous to someone (including the player committing the action), it was committed with an opponent close by, and the dangerous nature of the action caused this opponent to cease active play for the ball or to be otherwise disadvantaged by the attempt not to participate in the dangerous play. Merely committing a dangerous act is not, by itself, an offense (e.g., kicking high enough that the cleats show or attempting to play the ball while on the ground). Committing a dangerous act while an opponent is nearby is not, by itself, an offense. The act becomes an offense only when an opponent is adversely and unfairly affected, usually by the opponent ceasing to challenge for the ball in order to avoid receiving or causing injury as a direct result of the player's act.

Playing in a manner considered to be dangerous when only a teammate is nearby is not a foul.

Remember that fouls may be committed only against opponents or the opposing team.

In judging a dangerous play offense, the referee must take into account the experience and skill level of the players. Opponents who are experienced and skilled may be more likely to accept the danger and play through. Younger players have neither the experience nor skill to judge the danger adequately and, in such cases, the referee should intervene on behalf of their safety. For example, playing with cleats up in a threatening or intimidating manner is more likely to be judged a dangerous play offense in youth matches, without regard to the reaction of opponents.

12.14 IMPEDING AN OPPONENT

"Impeding the progress of an opponent" means moving on the field so as to obstruct, interfere with, or block the path of an opponent. Impeding can include crossing directly in front of the opponent or running between the opponent and the ball so as to form an obstacle with the aim of delaying progress.

There will be many occasions during a game when a player will come between an opponent and the ball, but in the majority of such instances, this is quite natural and fair. It is often possible for a player not playing the ball to be in the path of an opponent and still not be guilty of impeding.

The offense of impeding an opponent requires that the ball not be within playing distance and that physical contact between the player and the opponent is normally absent. If physical contact occurs, the referee should, depending on the circumstances, consider instead the possibility that a charging infringement has been committed (direct free kick) or that the opponent has been fairly charged off the ball (indirect free kick, see Advice 12.22). However, nonviolent physical contact may occur while impeding the progress of an opponent if, in the opinion of the referee, this contact was an unavoidable consequence of the impeding (due, for example, to momentum).

12.15 PLAYING DISTANCE

The referee’s judgment of “playing distance” should be based on the player’s ability to play the ball, not upon any arbitrary standard.

12.16 GOALKEEPER POSSESSION OF THE BALL

The goalkeeper is considered to be in possession of the ball while bouncing it on the ground or while throwing it into the air. Possession is given up if, while throwing the ball into the air, it is allowed to strike the ground. As noted in Advice 12.10, handling extends from shoulder to tip of fingers. While the ball is in the possession of the ‘keeper, it cannot be lawfully played by an opponent, and any attempt to do so may be punished by a direct free kick.

12.17 PREVENTING THE GOALKEEPER FROM RELEASING THE BALL INTO PLAY

An opponent may not interfere with or block the goalkeeper's release of the ball into play. While players have a right to maintain a position achieved during the normal course of play, they may not try to block the goalkeeper's movement while he or she is holding the ball or do anything which hinders, interferes with, or blocks the goalkeeper who is throwing or punting the ball back into play. An opponent does not violate the Law, however, if the player takes advantage of a ball released by the goalkeeper directly to him or her, in his or her direction, or deflecting off him or her nonviolently.

12.18 THE "SIX-SECOND" RULE

The goalkeeper has six seconds to release the ball into play once he or she has taken possession of the ball with the hands. However, this restriction is not intended to include time taken by the goalkeeper while gaining control of the ball or as a natural result of momentum. The referee should not count the seconds aloud or with hand motions. If the goalkeeper is making a reasonable effort to release the ball into play, the referee should allow the “benefit of the doubt.” Before penalizing a goalkeeper for violating this time limit, the referee should warn the goalkeeper about such actions and then should penalize the violation only if the goalkeeper continues to waste time or commits a comparable infringement again later in the match. Opposing players should not be permitted to attempt to prevent the goalkeeper from moving to release the ball into play.

12.19 SECOND TOUCH BY THE GOALKEEPER

After relinquishing control of the ball, a goalkeeper violates Law 12 if, with no intervening touch or play of the ball by a teammate or an opponent, he or she handles the ball a second time. This includes

play after parrying the ball.

Referees should note carefully Decision 2, which defines "control" and distinguishes this from an accidental rebound or a save.

In judging a second touch with the hands by the goalkeeper, referees must take into account tactical play which may seem unsporting but is not against the Laws of the Game or even the spirit of the game. If a goalkeeper and a teammate play the ball back and forth between them, the goalkeeper can handle the ball again legally so long as the teammate has not kicked the ball to the goalkeeper.

However, of course, an opponent can challenge for the ball during such a sequence of play. The

players are "using" but not "wasting" time. The referee's goal under these circumstances is to be close enough to manage the situation if the opposing team decides to intervene.

The "second possession" foul is punished only by an indirect free kick from the place where the goalkeeper handled the ball the second time*. Please note: A goalkeeper may never be punished with a

penalty kick for deliberately handling the ball within his or her own penalty area, even if the handling is otherwise a violation of another restriction in Law 12.

12.20 BALL KICKED TO THE GOALKEEPER

A goalkeeper infringes Law 12 if he or she touches the ball with the hands directly after it has been deliberately kicked to him or her by a teammate. The requirement that the ball be kicked means only that it has been played with the foot. The requirement that the ball be "kicked to" the goalkeeper means only that the play is to or toward a place where the ‘keeper can legally handle the ball. The requirement that the ball be "deliberately kicked" means that the play on the ball is deliberate and does not include situations in which the ball has been, in the opinion of the referee, accidentally deflected or misdirected.

NOTE: (a) The goalkeeper is permitted to dribble into the penalty area and then pick up any ball played legally (not kicked deliberately to the goalkeeper or to a place where the goalkeeper can easily play it) by a teammate or played in any manner by an opponent. (b) This portion of the Law was

written to help referees cope with timewasting tactics by teams, not to punish players who are playing within the Spirit of the Game.

12.21 BALL THROWN TO THE GOALKEEPER

A goalkeeper infringes Law 12 by touching the ball with the hands after receiving it directly from a throw-in taken by a teammate. The goalkeeper is considered to have received the ball directly by playing it in any way (for example, by dribbling the ball with the feet) before touching it with the hands. Referees should take care not to consider as trickery any sequence of play that offers a fair chance for opponents to challenge for the ball before it is handled by the goalkeeper from a throw-in.

NOTE: The goalkeeper may always handle the ball inside his/her own penalty area unless he/she:

• Takes more than 6 seconds while controlling the ball with his/her hands before releasing it from possession

• Regains hand control prior to a touch by another player

• Touches ball with the hands after it comes directly from a throw-in or deliberate kick to the 'keeper by a teammate

The restart for any of these infringements is an indirect free kick*.

12.22 CHARGING AN OPPONENT AWAY FROM THE BALL

A player who charges an opponent in an otherwise legal manner (i.e., not carelessly, recklessly, or with excessive force) but with the ball not within playing distance has infringed the Law. Such an "off the ball" charge is considered a form of impeding the progress of an opponent (even though contact has occurred) and is thus penalized with an indirect free kick restart for the opposing team. If the referee considers the charge to be careless, reckless, or involving excessive force, the restart is a direct free kick (or penalty kick).

12.23 CHARGING THE GOALKEEPER

Referees must carefully observe any charge against the goalkeeper and call as an infringement of Law

12 only those charges which are performed carelessly, recklessly, or with excessive force (direct free kick), are performed in a dangerous manner (indirect free kick), or prevent the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from the hands (indirect free kick). Charging the ‘keeper who is in possession of the ball must be considered an offense because, by definition, the charge cannot be for the purpose of challenging for control of the ball (see Advice 12.16). A goalkeeper can be otherwise legally charged if the ball is not in the goalkeeper’s possession (see Advice 12.16) but is being played by the goalkeeper in some other manner (e. g., dribbled at the feet, headed, etc.).

Part B. Misconduct

12.24 CATEGORIES OF MISCONDUCT

Law 12 identifies seven categories of action for which a player may be cautioned and shown the yellow card. Another seven categories of action are identified for which a player may be sent off the field (expelled or dismissed) and shown the red card. A player sent from the field under Law 12 may not be replaced (i. e., the team must continue the match with one fewer player) if the send-off occurs once play has begun. A substitute sent from the field for misconduct that occurs once play has begun also may not be replaced, but this does not alter the number of players his team may field. See Advice

5.17 for misconduct occurring prior to the start of play.

12.25 RESTARTS FOR MISCONDUCT

If play is stopped solely to deal with misconduct committed by a player on the field, the proper restart is an indirect free kick taken from the location of the misconduct*. If play is stopped solely to deal with misconduct committed by a substitute, for misconduct committed off the field of play, the restart is an indirect free kick taken from where the ball was when play was stopped*. If play is stopped for team officials who fail to conduct themselves in a responsible manner, the restart is a dropped ball where the ball was when play was stopped*. If play is stopped for a foul in addition to misconduct, the restart is determined by the foul. The restart cannot be a direct free kick unless the reason for the stoppage included a direct free kick foul. If misconduct occurs while play is stopped, the restart is determined by the original reason for the stoppage.

12.26 WHEN TO PUNISH MISCONDUCT

Law 5 empowers the referee to take “disciplinary action against players guilty of cautionable and sending-off offenses. The referee is not obliged to take this action immediately, but must do so when the ball next goes out of play.” If the referee has applied advantage and delayed punishment for misconduct until the next stoppage, the referee must act quickly at the next stoppage to prevent play from restarting so that the misconduct can be recorded and the proper card displayed. All misconduct recognized by the referee must be dealt with according to the Law, either by stopping play or by waiting until the next stoppage, even if this means that a restart must be delayed despite an apparent advantage for either team.

If the match has ended before a caution or send-off may be given, or if misconduct occurs after the end of the match, the referee may still display cards during the period of time immediately following the end of play in which the players and substitutes are in the area of the field but in the process of exiting.

(See Advice 5.17.)

12.27 A PHILOSOPHY ON CAUTIONS

The Laws of the Game identify seven cautionable offenses (Law 12). These include fairly specific actions (leaving the field without the permission of the referee), very general actions (unsporting behavior), and highly judgmental areas (dissent). In all cases, the referee is expected to evaluate a player’s behavior based on several factors:

Does the act meet the generally accepted and understood meaning of the offense?

Was the act, even if an offense, trifling?

Would the issuance of a caution for this misconduct likely have desirable results for game and/or player management?

If the player’s act meets the criteria for the offense, is not trifling, and its punishment will have a beneficial effect, the caution should be given. Whether the referee should stop play to do so or whether

play should be allowed to continue until the next stoppage involves the application of the same advantage concept that is used to decide whether to stop play for a foul.

Every caution must be given for one and only one of the seven reasons listed in Law 12. Player behavior, of course, may involve several forms of misconduct at the same time and the referee must decide whether to caution each one separately (in which case, the second caution must also be followed by a send-off and display of the red card) or to issue a single caution for the total behavior. If the latter is chosen, the referee must decide which specific reason in the Law will be reported as the basis for the caution. In either case, however, the referee should fully describe in the game report all misconduct the player has committed in addition to the misconduct for which the caution was given.

Whether a caution is “mandatory” or “discretionary” is often discussed among referees, but the use of these terms tends to obscure the primary issues central to handling misconduct and should therefore generally be avoided. The Laws of the Game require that the referee further decide whether the misconduct is not trifling and that the caution will result in a desirable change in player conduct. The referee’s judgment (discretion) is a critical element in deciding, for example, whether what a player has just said or done is dissent within the meaning of Law 12 and guidance from USSF (see the USSF memorandum on “Misconduct Involving Language/Gestures,” dated March 14, 2003). If the referee decides that it is “dissent,” then the offense must be considered cautionable, but this does not mean that the yellow card must be displayed.

The referee must then make a second decision—in this particular case involving this particular player at this particular point in the match, based on the way the match has proceeded so far—as to whether or not the dissent is trifling and whether or not displaying the card would have a positive effect on this player's behavior and the behavior of the other players in the game. Each caution must be approached in this way as a combination of mandatory and discretionary elements. In no case may a caution (or send-off) be delayed beyond the next restart. It must be given as soon as play is stopped, even if this means preventing a team from taking advantage of a quick restart (if the kick is taken, it must be called back and not taken until the delayed card is shown). No alteration of this procedure is permitted.

12.28 CAUTIONABLE OFFENSES

12.28.1 UNSPORTING BEHAVIOR

The following specific actions are considered cautionable as unsporting behavior. A player . . .

• Commits a direct free kick foul in a reckless manner

• Commits a direct free kick foul while tackling for the ball from behind without endangering the safety of an opponent

• Commits a tactical foul designed to interfere with or impede an opposing team’s attacking play (e.g., pushing an opponent, blatantly holding an opponent or an opponent's uniform, handling the ball deliberately)

• Commits an act which, in the opinion of the referee, shows a lack of respect for the game (e.g., aggressive attitude, inflammatory behavior, or taunting).

• Handles the ball deliberately to score a goal

• Fakes an injury or exaggerates the seriousness of an injury

• Fakes a foul (dives) or exaggerates the severity of a foul

• Interferes with or prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from the hands into play

• Verbally distracts an opponent during play or at a restart

• Unfairly distracts or impedes an opponent performing a throw-in

• Changes jerseys with the goalkeeper during play or without the referee's permission (both players must be cautioned)

• Engages in trickery to circumvent the goalkeeper's limitation on handling the ball played from a teammate's foot (the defender who initiates the "trickery" is cautioned, the decision does not require that the goalkeeper actually handles the ball, and the misconduct can occur during dynamic play or at a restart)

• Makes unauthorized marks on the field.

• Uses tobacco or a cellular or other mobile phone

• Engages in celebration of a goal which involves provocative, derisory or inflammatory actions, such as removing the jersey or covering the head with the jersey or a mask

12.28.2 DISSENT

Dissent is committed by words, actions (including gestures), or a combination of the two. The referee should evaluate dissent in terms of content (what exactly is said or done), loudness (the extent to which the dissent can be seen or heard widely), and whether it is clearly directed at an official

(including assistant referees and fourth officials). The objective in dealing with dissent is to support the spirit of the game, to maintain the authority of the officials, and to reduce the likelihood of such behavior becoming widespread. A goalkeeper who leaves the penalty area (not beckoned by the referee) to engage the referee or an assistant referee in debate regarding a decision has committed dissent.

12.28.3 PERSISTENT INFRINGEMENT

Persistent infringement occurs either when a player repeatedly commits fouls or infringements or participates in a pattern of fouls directed against the same opponent. Persistent infringement also occurs if a player repeatedly fouls multiple opponents. It is not necessary for the multiple fouls to be of the same type or all to be direct free kick fouls, but infringements must be among those covered in

Law 12 or involve repeated violations of Law 14. In most cases, the referee should warn the player that the pattern has been observed and, upon a subsequent violation, must then issue the caution.

Where the referee sees a pattern of fouls directed against a single opponent, it is proper to warn the team that the pattern has been seen and then to caution the next player who continues the pattern, even if this specific player may not have previously committed a foul against this single opponent.

If the pattern is quickly and blatantly established, then the warning should be omitted and the referee should take immediate action. In determining whether there is persistent infringement, all fouls are considered, including those to which advantage has been applied.

Examples of persistent infringement include a player who:

• Violates Law 14 again, having previously been warned

• If playing as a goalkeeper, wastes time, having previously been warned or penalized for this behavior

12.28.4 DELAYS THE RESTART OF PLAY

The following are specific examples of this form of misconduct (some of which may also be committed by substitutes):

• Kicks or throws the ball away or holds the ball to prevent or delay a free kick, throw-in, or corner kick restart by an opponent

• Fails to restart play after being so instructed by the referee

• Excessively celebrates a goal

• Fails to return to the field from a midgame break, fails to perform a kick-off when signaled by the referee, or fails to be in a correct position for a kick-off

• Performing a throw-in improperly with the apparent intention of being required to perform the throw-in again, thus wasting time

• Unnecessarily moving a ball which has already been properly placed on the ground for a goal kick

• Provokes a confrontation by deliberately touching the ball after the referee has stopped play

12.28.5 FAILS TO RESPECT THE REQUIRED DISTANCE

This category of misconduct covers the requirement to be at least ten yards away from an opponent's free kick or corner kick and to be at least two yards away from the location of the opponents’ throw-in.

12.28.6 ENTERS OR RE-ENTERS THE FIELD OF PLAY WITHOUT THE REFEREE'S

PERMISSION

Players who leave the field with the referee's permission also require the referee's permission to return to the field. (This permission may not be delegated. See Advice 3.2, 4.6, 5.8, 5.9.) Examples of this include a player who attempts to come onto the field:

• After being instructed to leave the field to correct equipment (mandatory caution)

• After leaving to receive treatment for an injury

• After leaving to receive treatment for bleeding or to replace a blood-soaked uniform

• Before receiving permission to enter as a substitute

12.28.7 DELIBERATELY LEAVES THE FIELD OF PLAY WITHOUT PERMISSION

Players who leave the field without the referee's permission most often do so for unsporting reasons— for example, to create an unfair offside situation (see Advice 11.10). They may also leave the field to indicate dissent or to "manage" the referee's next decision.

If a player does leave the field for some other reason without the referee’s permission to do so, and this results in gaining a tactical advantage for his or her team, the player has committed misconduct and must be cautioned and shown the yellow card.

Where it is apparent to the referee that the player leaving the field without permission has not done so to express dissent or to gain an unfair advantage (e. g., exited to change shoes or replace a torn jersey) and has merely forgotten to obtain permission (or thought he or she had obtained it), the referee should consider this a trifling breach of the Laws. A word/warning to the player should be sufficient in such circumstances, even if that player then re-enters the field without obtaining the referee's permission.

Leaving the field in the course of play (Advice 3.9) is not considered to be leaving the field of play without the referee's permission.

12.28.8 MISCONDUCT BY A SUBSTITUTE

Substitutes may be cautioned and shown the yellow card only for:

• Unsporting behavior

• Dissent

• Delaying the restart of play

If a substitute enters the field of play illegally, the caution must be for unsporting behavior. In general referees should implement these reasons for cautioning a substitute the same way they would interpret them if a player had committed the misconduct. This is particularly the case with dissent.

12.28.9 PROVOKING CONFRONTATION BY TOUCHING THE BALL

Referees should take all appropriate actions to prevent this tactic from being attempted in the first place. It is often possible to anticipate such player behavior and to stop its occurrence with a wellplaced word or gesture.

Further, the specific situations which are of concern are those in which a player is seeking to gain control of a ball when one or more opponents, who have the restart, are also attempting to possess the ball—thus "provoking a confrontation" which is the focus of the offense. Merely touching the ball after a stoppage is not an offense. The caution (for delaying the restart of play) should be reserved for those situations where a confrontation is actually provoked or is imminent or when a player persists in this behavior despite the referee's best efforts to prevent it.

12.29 SENDING-OFF OFFENSES

A player who commits serious foul play, violent conduct, a deliberate handling of the ball which denies a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity, or a foul which denies an obvious goalscoring opportunity must be sent from the field. These categories of misconduct are discussed in more detail in Sections C and D below. A player who commits any of the following actions will also be sent from the field:

• Spits at an opponent or any other person

• Uses offensive, insulting, or abusive language (including nonverbal language or actions)

• Receives a second caution in the same match

A substitute who commits any of these offenses except for serious foul play will also be sent from the field. If the misconduct by a substitute involves violence—no matter how, when, against whom, or where it was committed, the match report should indicate that the red card was shown for violent conduct.

12.30 HOW TO ADMINISTER THE SEND-OFF FOR A SECOND CAUTION

A player (or substitute) who receives a second caution must first be shown the yellow card for the second caution and then must be shown the red card for the sending-off offense. The second caution leading to dismissal from the field can occur at any time during the match (including the half time interval, additional periods of play, and kicks from the penalty mark). The accepted procedure is to display the cards in sequence, not at the same time.

12.31 EVALUATING LANGUAGE

The referee should judge offensive, insulting, or abusive language according to its content (the specific words or actions used), the extent to which the language can be heard by others beyond the immediate vicinity of the player, and whether the language is directed at officials, opponents, or teammates. In evaluating language as misconduct, the referee must take into account the particular circumstances in which the actions occurred and deal reasonably with language that was clearly the result of a momentary emotional outburst.

Referees must take care not to inject purely personal opinions as to the nature of the language when determining a course of action.

The referee's primary focus must be on the effective management of the match and the players in the context of the overall feel for the Spirit of the Game.

12.32 SEQUENTIAL INFRINGEMENTS OF THE LAW

If the referee has decided to stop play for an infringement of the Law (foul, misconduct, offside, or other reason) and another infringement of the Law occurs between the making of this decision and the actual signal to stop play, this subsequent violation must be treated as misconduct and handled appropriately.

Part C. Serious Foul Play and Violent Conduct

Soccer is a tough, combative, contact sport where the contest to gain possession of the ball should nonetheless be fair and sporting. Serious Foul Play and the related offense of Violent Conduct are strictly forbidden. They violate the Spirit of the Game and the referee must respond to them by stringently applying the Laws of the Game: The punishment is sending-off the offending player (or substitute in the case of Violent Conduct).

Referees must be particularly vigilant regarding offenses which are too severe for a caution and which include one or more of the following additional elements:

• Retaliation

• Tackling from behind during which a foul is committed

• One or both feet, with cleats showing, above the ground

• Violent or excessive force

• No chance of playing the ball

Such offenses are completely unacceptable to the Spirit of the Game, the enjoyment of spectators, the education of youth players, and the safety of the players themselves. All violations of the Law which meet these criteria must be called (stopping play or applying advantage) and the appropriate further punishment for misconduct must be administered.

When misconduct includes violent behavior, advantage should be used very sparingly, as it is normally better to deal with such behavior quickly, regardless of the impact of stopping play, in an effort to prevent any widening of the conflict through retaliation or opponents seeking justice which they might perceive was being denied by allowing play to continue.

12.33 SERIOUS FOUL PLAY

It is serious foul play when a player uses violence (excessive force; formerly defined as

"disproportionate and unnecessary strength") when challenging for the ball on the field against an opponent. There can be no serious foul play against a teammate, the referee, an assistant referee, a spectator, etc. The use of violence or excessive force against an opponent under any other conditions must be punished as violent conduct.

It is also serious foul play if a player commits any tackle which endangers the safety of an opponent.

In this case, the tackle may be from behind, from the side, or from the front.

This does not include serious misconduct by substitutes, who should be punished for violent conduct if they commit an act as described in the first paragraph of this section. (See 12.34.)

12.34 VIOLENT CONDUCT

It is violent conduct when a player (or substitute) is guilty of aggression towards an opponent (when they are not contesting for the ball) or towards any other person (a teammate, the referee, an assistant referee, a spectator, etc.). The ball can be in or out of play. The aggression can occur either on or off the field of play.

A player is unlikely to be “contesting for the ball” if the player’s action against the opponent occurs from behind and with the ball on the opposite side of the opponent or with the ball beyond playing distance.

12.35 RESTARTS

The restart for serious foul play is either a direct free kick or a penalty kick. Restarts are more complicated for violent conduct. This chart illustrates the restarts appropriate to incidents of violent conduct:

Part D. Denying an Obvious Goalscoring Opportunity

12.36 DENYING A GOAL OR AN OBVIOUS GOALSCORING OPPORTUNITY

There are two sending-off offenses that deal with denying an opponent a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity. These occur in cases where a player (or substitute): (a) denies the opposing team a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball (this does not apply to a goalkeeper within his or her own penalty area) or (b) denies an obvious goalscoring opportunity to an opponent moving towards the player's goal by an offence punishable by a free kick or a penalty kick. This would apply to any player other than the goalkeeper in his or her own penalty area who handles a ball to prevent it from entering the goal, whether the ball was last played by the opposing team or not.

12.37 JUDGING AN OBVIOUS GOALSCORING OPPORTUNITY

(a) Denying the opposing team a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball

The send-off offense for deliberate handling, number 4 under the seven send-off offenses, "denies the opposing team a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball (this does not apply to a goalkeeper within his own penalty area)," does not require any particular alignment of players for either team, but simply the occurrence of the offense under circumstances in which, in the opinion of the referee, the ball would likely have gone directly into the goal but for the handling.

Denying a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball would apply to any player (or substitute) other than the goalkeeper in his or her own penalty area who handles a ball to prevent it from entering the goal, even if the ball was last played by a member of the defending team.

A red card for denying a goal by handling cannot be given if the attempt is unsuccessful; in other words, if the ball goes into the goal despite the illegal contact. However, the referee should caution the player for unsporting behavior before restarting with the kick-off.

The referee must remember that many fouls, including deliberately handling the ball, occur in the penalty area and could result in a penalty kick but not a sending-off.

(b) Denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity by an offense punishable by a free kick or a penalty kick

In order for a player or substitute to be sent off for denying an "obvious goalscoring opportunity by an offense punishable by a free kick or a penalty kick" (number 5 under the seven send-off offenses), four elements must be present:

• Number of Defenders—not more than one defender between the foul and the goal, not counting the defender who committed the foul

• Distance to goal—the closer the foul is to the goal, the more likely it is an obvious goalscoring opportunity

• Distance to ball—the attacker must have been close enough to the ball at the time of the foul to continue playing the ball

• Direction of play—the attacker must have been moving toward the goal at the time the foul was committed

If any element is missing, there can be no send off for denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity.

Further, the presence of each of these elements must be "obvious" in order for the send-off to be appropriate under this provision of Law 12

If what a player or substitute does is both denying a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity and a foul involving the use of excessive force (violent conduct or serious foul play), only one reason for the send-off can be given. That reason should be the more serious misconduct (serious foul play or violent conduct), not the denying of a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity. Details about any other misconduct must be included in the match report.

Referees are reminded that offenses which deny a goalscoring opportunity are not limited to those punishable by a direct free kick or penalty kick but may include misconduct or those fouls for which the restart is an indirect free kick. An example would be a player, including the goalkeeper, hanging from the crossbar to play the ball away with his or her body.

Even if all these criteria are met, it is still the judgment and opinion of the referee that determines if the event was an obvious goalscoring opportunity.

12.38 PUNISHMENT

Denial of an obvious goalscoring opportunity is punished by sending off (red card) the guilty player, even though there may have been no contact between the players involved.

The card for misconduct is in addition to and does not change the punishment for any foul which might have been committed (e. g., handling, tripping, holding, etc.). If the offense was a direct free kick foul inside the defender's penalty area, this would include restarting play with a penalty kick.

12.39 APPLYING THE ADVANTAGE

Even if the referee makes use of the advantage clause during an obvious goalscoring opportunity, he or she can still punish the offender after the fact. In cases where a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity has been denied by handling or a foul, but the goal is scored as a result of an advantage being played, the referee must still caution the player for the original offense. This may be applied where the referee is satisfied that the advantage has ensued, where the goal is scored from the advantage after the original foul, no matter who scored it. If the foul was in fact a factor leading to the goal being scored (e. g., a defender handling the ball directly to another opponent who is thus able to score) the same principle will apply. If the original offense constituted SFP or VC then the appropriate sanction must be applied.

In cases where a goal or goalscoring opportunity has been denied by handling (DGH) or by a foul

(DGF), but advantage has been applied, it is advisable to stop play as soon as possible once it becomes clear that the offended team has not been able to benefit from the advantage. This would be the case when, after roughly 3-5 seconds and at least one subsequent play, the team was not able to maintain a successful attack. In such cases, of course, the referee should return to the original foul and, additionally, show the red card for the denied opportunity associated with the foul. Because circumstances vary from game to game, there is no single mandatory decision that would be universally correct. The referee must use discretion in making the decision, based on experience, game circumstances, and common sense.

12.40 ILLUSTRATIONS

Here are some illustrations to aid you in understanding the difference between situations that are obvious goalscoring opportunities and those that are not.

Figure 1 Figure 2

• In Figure 1, attacking player No. 9 is moving towards the opponents' goal. No. 9 has beaten defender

No. 6 and has only the goalkeeper in front of the goal. No. 9 has therefore an obvious goalscoring opportunity. No. 6 trips No. 9 from behind, denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity. The referee should send off No. 6 (red card) and award a penalty kick to No. 9's team. It would be a direct free kick if it had been committed outside the penalty area.

• Figure 2 shows the same situation as described in Figure 1, but with other defenders in addition to the goalkeeper between No. 9 and the opponents' goal. In this case there would be no sending-off, but a penalty kick would be awarded to No. 9's team. The referee retains the option to caution No. 6 for unsporting behavior.

The same punishments would have been given for any other direct free kick foul by the defending team in either of these situations. Impeding an opponent can also mean denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity, and this is covered in Figures 3 and 4, which illustrate holding and impeding, respectively.

Figure 3 Figure 4

• In Figure 3, attacking player No. 9 is moving towards the opponents' goal. The last defender (in addition to the goalkeeper) deliberately moves in front of No. 9 and makes contact to stop 9 from reaching the ball, therefore taking away from No. 9 an obvious opportunity to score a goal. The referee should send off the last defender and restart with a direct free kick for No. 9's team. If the offense had occurred in the penalty area, the proper restart would be a penalty kick. If there had been more defenders behind the defender, the referee would simply award a direct free kick to No. 9's team.

• Figure 4 is similar to the previous one, except that in this case the last defender (other than the goalkeeper) moves in front of No. 9 and impedes without making physical contact, so that No. 9 is prevented from reaching the ball, thus denying No. 9 the goalscoring opportunity. The referee should send off the last defender and restart with an indirect free kick. If there had been other defenders behind this defender, the defender would not be sent off.

The Diagrams published in the 1996-1997 Laws of the Game (then labeled "Serious Foul Play," but now called "denies a goal," etc.) continue to be valid guidance for judging obvious goalscoring opportunities and referees should continue to consult them. Diagrams 1-10 illustrate issues involved in deciding if a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity has been denied.

Diagram 1 Diagram 2

In Diagram 1, the attacker, No. 9, is moving towards goal with an obvious goalscoring opportunity when tripped by a defender. The defender must be sent off for denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity.

In Diagram 2, an attacker is moving towards goal when tripped by an opponent. The attacker does not, however, have an obvious goalscoring opportunity, because there are too many defenders between the attacker and the goal.

Diagram 3 Diagram 4

In Diagram 3, an attacker moving to goal with an obvious goalscoring opportunity attempts to move past the goalkeeper, who holds the attacker. A penalty kick is awarded and the goalkeeper must be sent off. (The referee must distinguish between this case and one in which the goalkeeper obviously

attempts to play the ball, misses the ball, and thus trips the attacker who is not heading directly for goal. That offense would still result in a penalty kick, but the goalkeeper would not be sent off.)

In Diagram 4, the goalkeeper inside the penalty area holds an attacker and a penalty kick is awarded.

The attacker is moving away from goal and so does not have an obvious goalscoring opportunity.

Diagram 5 Diagram 6

In Diagram 5, the attacker is tripped inside the penalty area and a penalty kick is awarded. There is, however, no obvious goalscoring opportunity since the player is moving away from goal.

In Diagram 6, the attacker, No. 11, is tripped but there is no obvious goalscoring opportunity since No.

11 is not moving towards goal. Direct free kick.

Diagram 7 Diagram 8

In Diagram 7, an attacker shoots for goal, but an outfield player punches the ball over the bar, thus preventing a goal being scored. This player must be sent off for denying a goal by deliberately handling the ball. If the defender had punched or handled the ball and the ball had entered the goal,

Law 12 would not require a send-off, but would require a caution for unsporting behavior.

In Diagram 8, an attacker, No. 10, plays the ball and a defender inside the penalty area deliberately handles it. A penalty kick is awarded. The defender would not be sent off, as there were too many defenders between the offense and the goal. If the ball had struck the defender on the hand accidentally, no offense would have been committed and play would have been allowed to continue.

Diagram 9 Diagram 10

In Diagram 9, the attacker, No. 11, is running on to a forward pass and has an obvious goalscoring opportunity. A defender jumps up and deliberately handles the ball, thus preventing an obvious goalscoring opportunity. The defender must be sent off and the game restarted with a direct free kick for No. 11's team.

In Diagram 10, an attacker is running on to a forward pass with an obvious goalscoring opportunity when the goalkeeper rushes from the goal and deliberately handles the ball outside the penalty area.

The goalkeeper must be sent off for denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity by handling the ball outside the penalty area. The game is restarted with a direct free kick for the attacker's team.

Law 13 - Free Kicks

13.1 FREE KICKS

This restart is called a "free kick" because it may be taken "freely" by the team to which it has been awarded—without interference, hindrance, or delay. Free kicks are awarded for fouls, misconduct, a combination of the two, offside, or certain other offenses (such as the "second touch"). A direct free kick is given if play is stopped for a direct free kick foul committed by a player against an opponent on the field of play (except when it is committed by a defender within his or her own penalty area—see

Law 14, Penalty Kick). An indirect free kick is given if play is stopped for any other foul or if play is stopped solely to deal with misconduct committed on the field by a player, or for offside. A free kick may be taken in any direction. (This does not apply to penalty kicks. See Law 14.)

13.2 REQUIRED DISTANCE FOR OPPONENTS

All opponents must be at least ten yards away in all directions from the location of the free kick.

Exceptions to the required distance are noted below (free kick for defenders inside their own penalty area, indirect free kick for the attacking team within ten yards of the opponents' goal, or a quick free kick by the attacking team). Referees should use discretion in cautioning for an infringement.

13.3 ENFORCING THE REQUIRED DISTANCE

If the referee decides to delay the restart and to enforce the required minimum distance, the referee must quickly and emphatically indicate to the attackers that they may not restart play until given a clear signal to do so. Under these circumstances, an attacker who restarts play without a signal should be verbally warned and, upon repetition, be cautioned for unsporting behavior. The free kick in such

cases must be retaken, regardless of the result of the original kick.

An opponent who moves closer to the spot of the kick (from any direction) before it is taken must be cautioned and shown the yellow card if the referee has delayed the restart to ensure that the opponents are at the minimum distance.

If one or more opponents fail to respect the required distance before the ball is properly put into play, the referee should stop the restart to deal with this infringement as required by the Law. The free kick must be retaken even if the momentum of play causes the ball to be kicked before the referee signals.

The infringement plus the referee's decision to deal with it cancel any apparent restart regardless of a delay in announcing the decision. However, referees are also expected to consider whether the infringement on the minimum distance was trifling (had no effect on the freedom of the attackers to restart) and, if so, to refrain from issuing a caution and to allow play to proceed.

The referee is expected to deal with opponents who fail to respect the required distance, even in situations in which they were induced to do so by attackers appearing to put the ball into play, but where the ball was not kicked (touched with the foot and moved).

An attacking team may exercise its right to take a free kick when the players see an advantage to do so even with an opponent closer than the minimum distance. However, they may not thereafter claim infringement of the distance requirement if the ball is kicked to an infringing opponent who is able to control the ball without moving toward it. In this case, because the attacking side has considered the encroachment trivial, the referee must accept what he or she has seen.

On the other hand, when the attacking team has exercised the option to restart play quickly and the opponent closer than the required distance moves toward the ball and performs an act that makes a difference in the play, such as blocking the kick, that player has committed an offense that must be

dealt with firmly in accordance with the Law. After the referee has cautioned the failure to respect the required distance, the original free kick must be retaken as required by Law 13.

13.4 QUICK FREE KICK

Law 13 requires all opponents to be at least ten yards away in all directions from the location of any free kick and it is the duty of these opponents to retreat the required distance as quickly as possible

without being directed by the referee to do so

. It is also the right of the team which has been given the free kick to start play quickly even if one or more opponents have not yet moved back the required distance, provided the other requirements of Law 13 have been met.

The referee should move quickly out of the way after indicating the approximate area of the restart and should do nothing to interfere with the kicking team's right to an immediate free kick. At competitive levels of play, referees should not automatically "manage the wall," but should allow the ball to be put back into play as quickly as possible, unless the kicking team requests help in dealing with opponents infringing on the minimum distance.

However, if advantage has been applied to misconduct and the referee has determined that a card is to be given, the referee must act quickly to prevent the restart in order for the misconduct to be recorded and the proper card shown, even if one or the other team would benefit from this delay.

13.5 BALL IN PLAY

The ball is in play (able to be played by an attacker other than the kicker or by an opponent) when it has been kicked and moved. The distance to be moved is minimal and the "kick" need only be a touch of the ball with the foot in a kicking motion. Simply tapping the top of the ball with the foot or stepping on the ball are not sufficient.

When the restart of play is based on the ball being kicked and moved, the referee must ensure that the ball is indeed kicked (touched with the foot in a kicking motion) and moved (caused to go from one place to another). Being "kicked" does not, for example, include an action in which the ball is dragged by continuous contact with the foot. Being "moved" does not, for example, include the ball simply quivering, trembling, or shaking as a result of light contact. The referee must make the final decision on what is and is not "kicked and moved" based on the spirit and flow of the match. In all events, the ball must be put into play properly.

The referee must judge carefully whether any particular kick of the ball and subsequent movement was indeed reasonably taken with the intention of putting the ball into play rather than with the intention merely to position the ball for the restart. If the ball is just being repositioned (even if the foot is used to do this), play has not been restarted. Likewise, referees should not unfairly punish for "failing to respect the required distance" when an opponent was clearly confused by a touch and movement of the ball which was not a restart.

The referee must make the final decision on what is a "kick" and what is "not a kick" based on his or her feeling for the game—what FIFA calls "Fingerspitzengefühl" (literally: “sensing with one’s fingertips”). The bottom line is that not everything that produces movement of the ball is a kick and thus would not legally put the ball into play in any of the kicking restarts.

13.6 FREE KICK IN OWN PENALTY AREA

When the free kick is awarded to the defending team inside its own penalty area, the minimum distance requirement applies in all directions around the location of the restart and all opponents must remain outside the penalty area until the ball has gone into play.

A free kick taken by the defending team from within its own penalty area must be kicked out of the penalty area on the first touch to be considered in play. The ball has not been properly put into play if, under these circumstances, it crosses the goal line before leaving the penalty area.

13.7 INDIRECT FREE KICK WITHIN 10 YARDS OF OPPONENTS' GOAL

Defenders (including the goalkeeper) may be closer than ten yards from an indirect free kick restart only if they are standing on the goal line and are between the goal posts. Referees must exercise special care not to restrict the kicking team's right to a quick indirect free kick simply in order to enforce this exception to the minimum distance requirement.

13.8 STOPPAGE FOR MISCONDUCT

When play is stopped solely to deal with misconduct committed by a player on the field, the indirect free kick is taken from the place where the misconduct occurred. If the referee applies advantage to the misconduct and subsequently stops play when the advantage no longer exists, the restart is still taken from the place where the original misconduct occurred.

13.9 SIGNAL FOR INDIRECT FREE KICK

The failure of the referee either to give the correct signal for an indirect free kick or to hold it for the required period of time does not change the nature of the restart, nor does it alter the requirement for a subsequent touch of the ball for a goal to be scored.

Note: This does not apply to an incorrect signal for a direct free kick. Suppose a DIRECT free kick is awarded just outside the opposing team’s penalty area and the referee raises an arm as if to signal for an INDIRECT free kick. If a defender were to touch the ball on its way to goal, a goal would be scored. To avoid that, the defenders deliberately make no attempt to play the ball, with the expectation that the referee, who is clearly signaling that the free kick is INDIRECT, would cancel the goal. In such a case, the referee CANNOT award the goal, even though it was scored directly from a

DIRECT free kick restart. The decision on the restart was correct, but the signal was not. If the referee had indicated a direct free kick first, rather than signaling for an indirect free kick, there would be no problem, but the referee cannot change his or her mind this time, as he or she has misled the defending team by raising an arm to indicate the indirect free kick. The only fair and correct thing to do here is to retake the kick as a direct free kick.

Law 14 - The Penalty Kick

14.1 PENALTY KICK DEFINED

The penalty kick is a ceremonial restart which is awarded when the defending team commits a direct free kick foul within its own penalty area. There is no requirement as to the severity or seriousness of the foul, the score of the game, the amount of time remaining in the period of play, the direction play was moving, the likelihood of a goal being scored, or any factor other than the commission of the foul itself inside the defender's penalty area. Referees are reminded that it is the location of the foul, not the position of the ball, which determines whether a penalty kick is the correct restart.

14.2 PLACEMENT OF THE BALL

The ball must be placed correctly at the penalty mark, regardless of the state of the pitch at this location. Moving the ball elsewhere, even with the apparent agreement of the players, is not permitted.

14.3 WHEN THE PENALTY KICK MAY BE TAKEN

The referee will not signal for the penalty kick to be taken until and unless the goalkeeper is on the goal line between the goal posts and facing the kicker (not turned away in an expression of unsporting behavior), the attacking player taking the penalty kick is clearly identified to the referee and the goalkeeper, and all players other than the kicker and goalkeeper are outside the penalty area, outside the penalty arc, and not nearer the goal line than the penalty mark. If the penalty kick is taken before the referee signals, the kicker should be warned and, upon repetition, cautioned for unsporting behavior. The kick must be retaken, regardless of the outcome of the first kick.

14.4 GOALKEEPER MOVEMENT

Once the referee signals for the penalty kick, the goalkeeper may move from side to side on the goal line, but may not move off the goal line (into the field or backward) until the ball has been kicked.

The requirement to be "on the goal line" is met even if one or both of the goalkeeper's feet are not physically touching the ground, so long as the goalkeeper has not moved forward or backward from the plane of the goal line.

14.5 RETAKING THE PENALTY KICK

If a penalty kick is ordered retaken, it is not necessary for the same player to perform the restart.

14.6 KICKING THE BALL FORWARD FOR A TEAMMATE

The identified kicker may play the ball forward for a teammate, who was properly positioned at the time the kick occurred, to run forward and play the ball.

14.7 BALL BURSTS/OUTSIDE INTERFERENCE DURING A PENALTY KICK

If, after the ball has been put into play, it is stopped or interfered with on its way to the goal by an outside agent or if it bursts on its way to the goal, the kick shall be retaken. Although the ball was put into play, the team given the penalty kick is deemed not to have had a fair opportunity to score under these circumstances. However, if the ball bursts or the interference occurs after the ball rebounds from a goalpost, crossbar, or goalkeeper or has been played legally in any other manner, the proper action is to restart with a dropped ball where the ball was when it burst or when the interference occurred. The referee is the sole judge of when a penalty kick is completed or was interfered with on its way to the goal.

14.8 PENALTY KICKS AT THE END OF THE HALF

Penalty kicks, once awarded, are taken regardless of the amount of time remaining in the half. If time expires or will expire before the restart can occur, the referee should announce this fact and indicate clearly that the penalty kick is now being taken "in extended time." No player other than the goalkeeper can participate in play after the penalty kick is taken. In case of an "extended time" penalty kick, the goalkeeper may be replaced, if necessary, by a substitute if the maximum number of substitutions has not been exceeded, or by an eligible player on the field. All players must remain on the field until the penalty kick has been completed. The referee has no authority to make the players leave the field or the vicinity of the penalty area for the taking of a penalty kick in extended time.

14.9 INFRINGEMENTS OF LAW 14

Other than the situation covered in 14.7, 14.12, and a "second touch" violation by the player taking the penalty kick, infringements of Law 14 occur only between the referee's signal for the restart and the ball being kicked and put into play properly. Violations of the Law prior to the referee's signal are handled the same as any other misconduct occurring while the ball is not in play. Violations after the ball has been put into play are handled the same as any other similar event occurring during regular play. All restrictions on player positioning and movement imposed by Law 14 end when the ball is properly put into play.

Infringements after the referee's signal but before the ball is in play may be committed by the kicker, the goalkeeper, or by any of their teammates. Violations of Law 14 by the kicker in particular include back heeling the ball (14.12), running past the ball and then backing up to take the kick, excessively changing directions in the run to the ball or taking an excessively long run to the ball (which, in the opinion of the referee, results in an unnecessary delay in taking the kick), or making any motion of the hand or arm which (in the opinion of the referee) is clearly intended to confuse or misdirect the attention of the ‘keeper). In almost all such cases, the referee should let the kick proceed and deal with the violation in accordance with the chart below, which outlines the proper restarts for clear infringements of Law 14. However, in the case of a kicker creating an unnecessary delay in taking the kick, the referee should intervene, if possible, warn the kicker to proceed properly, and signal again for the restart.

If the kicker plays the ball a second time (except with the hands) before it has been played by another player, an indirect free kick is awarded to the opponents*. If any player, including the kicker (and other than the goalkeeper in his or her own penalty area) deliberately handles the ball, this is treated as a violation of Law 12. If that player were a defender who rushed forward and handled the ball while it was on its way to the goal, the referee would stop play, punish the misconduct of the player who has infringed the Law, and restart with a new penalty kick. If a member of the attacking team committed misconduct, then the referee would stop play, punish the misconduct, and restart with an indirect free kick for the opposing team*.

See also Advice14.7.

This chart illustrates the proper restarts for clear infringements of Law 14:

Consequences of an Infringement of Law 14

Who infringed Law 14? What was the outcome of the kick?

Ball goes into goal Ball does not go into goal

Attacker (including the kicker)

RETAKE PENALTY KICK INDIRECT FREE KICK*

Defender (including the goalkeeper)

GOAL (KICK-OFF) RETAKE PENALTY KICK

Both attacker and defender

RETAKE PENALTY KICK RETAKE PENALTY KICK

*From where the infringement occurred

The following points must be kept in mind when applying the above decisions:

• “Ball does not go into goal” includes any result of the penalty kick other than the ball being kicked into the net (e.g., ball deflected over the goal line by the goalkeeper, ball kicked over the crossbar, ball saved and held by the goalkeeper).

• The violations at issue include: the goalkeeper moving off the goal line; the kicker engaging in unfair tactics while taking the kick; and any player other than the goalkeeper and the kicker entering the penalty area, entering the penalty arc, or moving closer to the goal line than the ball (i.e., failing to remain at least 12 yards from the goal line).

• It is not required for the same player to perform a penalty kick which the referee has ordered retaken.

The exceptions to the above chart of decisions are:

• If an attacker other than the identified kicker takes the penalty kick, play is restarted with an indirect free kick for the opposing team where the attacker illegally entered the penalty arc or penalty area, regardless of the outcome of any kick that may have been performed by this attacker.

• If the kicker plays the ball backward (any direction other than forward), play is restarted with an indirect free kick for the opposing team at the penalty mark, regardless of any further play that may result from the kicker’s action.

NOTE: A penalty kick being the punishment for an infringement which would otherwise be given a direct free kick restart, the kicker is allowed that same latitude in performing this kick as would be given in performing a free kick restart. Based on new guidance from the International Board, referees should not consider various deceptive maneuvers by the kicker to be a violation of Law 14. They should ensure that the run to the ball is initiated from behind the ball and the kicker is not using deception to delay unnecessarily the taking of the kick, and the kicker is not making any hand or arm gesture which, in the opinion of the referee, is intended to distract or misdirect the goalkeeper.

Except for misconduct by the kicker, cautions should not be given for first offenses under Law 14.

This includes failure by members of either team to maintain their required positions before the ball is in play or the goalkeeper who infringes on the requirement not to come off the goal line prior to the

penalty kick being taken. In all cases, referees should caution for persistent infringement if the same player infringes the requirement again. (See Advice 14.10.)

14.10 CAUTIONING FOR SUBSEQUENT INFRINGEMENTS OF LAW 14

If any requirement of Law 14 is infringed by any player other than the kicker after the referee signals for the kick, the referee should warn the player committing the violation and, upon a repetition (then or subsequently), caution the player for persistent infringement of the Laws of the Game. Such infringements include moving into the penalty area or the penalty arc, moving nearer the goal line than the penalty mark, having the kick taken by someone other than the identified player, and the goalkeeper moving off the goal line before the ball is in play. At all times, however, the referee is expected to distinguish between clear infringements of Law 14 and those which are merely doubtful or trifling.

If in fact a player does repeat an infringement of Law 14 on the same or a subsequent penalty kick, the referee must follow the same procedure as for first infringements, except that if play is stopped at any time during the process, the caution must be given before the restart. If play does not stop “naturally” for a goal, corner kick, goal kick, etc., the referee must stop the game, issue the caution, and then restart with an indirect free kick for the opposing team from the spot where the misconduct occurred*.

14.11 OTHER VIOLATIONS AT A PENALTY KICK

Although the referee is expected to allow a penalty kick to proceed despite a violation of Law 14 (see

Advice 14.9), this is not the case if a player violates some other Law before the ball is put into play.

Specifically, if a player commits violent misconduct before the penalty kick occurs (e.g., striking an opponent), the referee must stop further action, send off the offending player, and restart the penalty kick from the beginning.

14.12 KICKER BACK HEELS THE BALL

If, after the referee has signaled for the penalty kick to be taken, the identified kicker back heels or kicks the ball backwards to a teammate who kicks it into the goal, the International Board has determined that this particular violation of Law 14 is to be regarded as failure to follow the procedures outlined in Law 14. In this situation (whether the ball is subsequently kicked into the goal or not), the

restart is an indirect free kick for the opponents at the penalty mark.

Law 15 - The Throw-In

15.1 LOCATION OF THROW-IN

Although the throw-in is to be taken "from the point where [the ball] crossed the touch line," this requirement is satisfied if the restart occurs within approximately one yard (one meter) of this location, farther upfield or downfield or back from the touch line. A throw-in taken beyond this limit is an infringement of Law 15.

15.2 BALL IN PLAY FROM A THROW-IN

The ball is considered to have entered the field and is therefore in play if it touches, while still in the air, the outer edge of the vertical plane of the touch line and has left the thrower's hands.

15.3 PROPERLY TAKEN THROW-IN

A throw-in must be performed while the thrower is facing the field, but the ball may be thrown into the field in any direction. Law 15 states that the thrower "delivers the ball from behind and over his head." This phrase does not mean that the ball must leave the hands from an overhead position. A natural throwing movement starting from behind and over the head will usually result in the ball leaving the hands when they are in front of the vertical plane of the body. The throwing movement must be continued to the point of release. A throw-in directed straight downward (often referred to as a "spike") has traditionally been regarded as not correctly performed; if, in the opinion of the referee such a throw-in was incorrectly performed, the restart should be awarded to the opposing team. There

is no requirement in Law 15 prohibiting spin or rotational movement.

Referees must judge the correctness of the throw-in solely on the basis of Law 15.

The acrobatic or "flip" throw-in is not by itself an infringement so long as it is performed in a manner which meets the requirements of Law 15.

A player who lacks the normal use of one or both hands may nevertheless perform a legal throw-in provided the ball is delivered over the head and provided all other requirements of Law 15 are observed.

Here are some illustrations of foot positioning that is allowed or not allowed. The shaded areas indicate where the thrower’s foot touches the ground.

15.4 ILLEGAL OR IMPROPERLY TAKEN THROW-IN

Referees must distinguish between a throw-in which infringes on the requirements of Law 15 and one which is not properly taken such that the restart is said not to have been taken. In the first case

(infringement), possession of the restart is given to the opponents and taken from the same location;

under no circumstances may advantage be applied to a throw-in performed illegally. In the case of a throw-in which is not properly taken, the restart must be taken again by the same team from the same location.

A throw-in may not be performed from a kneeling position under any circumstances.

If the ball touches the ground outside the field before entering the field or if it does not enter the field at all, the throw-in has not properly been taken and must be performed again.

A throw-in which has been performed illegally, for which the referee has stopped play, cannot be given back to the same team in order to perform the restart again. The referee must either decide that the offense was trifling and not stop play, or award the throw-into the opposing team.

15.5 TRIFLING INFRINGEMENTS OF LAW 15

Referees are reminded that the primary function of the throw-in is to put the ball back into play as quickly as possible. At competitive levels of play, therefore, apparent technical infringements of Law

15 should often be deemed trifling or doubtful so long as an advantage is not obtained by the team performing the throw-in and the restart occurs with little or no delay.

15.6 NO GOAL DIRECTLY FROM A THROW-IN

Neither team may score a goal directly from a throw-in. If the ball is thrown directly into a team's own goal (no intervening touch or play), the correct restart is a corner kick. If the ball is thrown directly into the opposing team's goal, play is restarted with a goal kick.

15.7 OPPONENT BEHAVIOR AT A THROW-IN

All opponents must stand no less than 2 yards/meters from the point at which the throw-in is taken.

Opponents are prohibited from unfairly distracting, interfering with, or impeding a player who is putting the ball back into play on a throw-in. This is a cautionable offense for unsporting behavior.

This means that an opponent may not jump about or wave his or her arms in a distracting manner or move to block the freedom of movement of the thrower or the direction of the throw. Merely standing in front of the thrower, however, providing this position is maintained without movement and is at least 2 yards/meters from the location of the throw-in, is not an offense.

Referees should manage the minimum distance requirement at a throw-in in the same way they manage the minimum distance requirement for free kicks and corner kicks. (Among other things, this means that the thrower has the option of performing the restart even if an opponent is closer than two yards and that the referee should not ordinarily interfere with quick throw-in restarts to enforce the minimum distance unless this is requested by the thrower). If a player is cautioned for violating this requirement, it must be reported as a failure to respect the minimum distance.

15.8 THROW-INSTRIKES AN OPPONENT

A throw-in taken in such a way that the ball strikes an opponent is not by itself a violation of the Law.

The act must be evaluated separately as a form of striking and dealt with appropriately if judged to be unsporting behavior (caution) or violent conduct (send off from the field). In either event, if deemed a violation, the restart is located at the place where the throw-in struck the opponent. If the throw-in is deemed to have been taken incorrectly, the correct restart is a throw-in.

Law 16 - The Goal Kick

16.1 BALL PLACEMENT AT A GOAL KICK

The ball is placed so that it touches the ground within the goal area, including the lines which enclose it. The outer edge of the ball could extend beyond or outside the goal area itself and still meet this requirement.

Here are some examples of ball positions for goal kicks:

16.2 BALL IN PLAY FROM A GOAL KICK

The ball is in play when it is kicked beyond the penalty area into the field of play. A goal kick which results in the ball leaving the field before exiting the penalty area has not been properly taken and must be retaken. No infringement of any Law occurring before the ball leaves the penalty area can result in any restart other than a retaking of the goal kick.

16.3 SCORING DIRECTLY FROM A GOAL KICK

Only the team taking a goal kick can score a goal directly from this restart. There can be no "own goal" on a goal kick. If a properly taken goal kick goes directly into the goal of the kicking team (i. e., the ball left the penalty area into the field of play but was blown back), the proper restart is a corner kick for the opposing team. Because a team cannot score directly against itself from a goal kick, no

infringement of the Law by a member of the kicking team can be considered to have prevented a goal or a goalscoring opportunity within the meaning of Law 12 without some intervening play of the ball.

A goalkeeper who takes a goal kick, which passes outside of the penalty area and then returns in the direction of the goal, attempts to prevent the ball from entering the goal by handling it. Although the attempt is unsuccessful and the ball enters the net, the goal cannot be counted as the offense of

“second touch” has occurred and must result in an indirect free kick restart where the second touch occurred. Advantage is not applied because “second touch” is not a violation of Law 12 (see Advice

5.6). If the goalkeeper’s handling of the ball in these circumstances had been successful, the “second handling” offense would be called, but the goalkeeper could not be sent from the field and shown a red card for interfering with a goalscoring opportunity (goalkeeper handling, unless it occurred outside the penalty area, is exempt from the misconduct of handling to prevent a goal).

16.4 OPPONENTS MUST REMAIN OUTSIDE THE PENALTY AREA

An opponent who infringes on the requirement to remain outside the penalty area until the ball is in play should be warned and, upon a repetition, cautioned for persistent infringement. In any event, the goal kick is retaken.

16.5 TIME WASTING BY THE KICKING TEAM

Upon being awarded a goal kick, the defending team wastes time if the ball is clearly placed within the goal area in preparation for the restart and then is moved unnecessarily to another location. The referee may caution and show the yellow card for either persistent infringement or delaying the restart of play in situations where the offense is committed a second time by the same team after a warning is given.

Law 17 - The Corner Kick

17.1 BALL PLACEMENT FOR A CORNER KICK

The corner kick restart is taken from the corner on the side of the field nearest to where the ball crossed the goal line. In cases where the selection of the correct corner may be doubtful, the referee will decide and announce the correct corner clearly and firmly.

The requirement that the ball be placed within the corner arc is satisfied if the ball breaks the plane of the corner arc or of the lines which enclose the corner arc. In practice, this means that a ball properly placed for a corner kick could extend beyond the area of the corner arc, including beyond the field itself.

Here are some examples of ball positioning for corner kicks:

17.2 LOCATION OF THE KICKER AT A CORNER KICK

Law 17 does not limit where the player taking the corner kick must initiate this restart. The kicker may be off the field, either beyond the touch line or beyond the goal line.

17.3 BALL IN PLAY FROM A CORNER KICK

The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves. The act of kicking the ball includes any play of the ball with the foot, and only minimal movement is needed to meet the requirement. See Advice 13.5 for full details. Opponents must remain 10 yards/9.15 meters from the corner arc until the ball is in play.

17.4 RESTARTS IF BALL LEAVES FIELD FROM A CORNER KICK

If the ball is properly placed and, as a result of the kick, immediately leaves the field across the goal line, the correct restart is a goal kick. If the ball immediately goes across the touch line, the correct restart is a throw-in for the opposing team. Any movement of the ball is sufficient to put it into play.

17.5 KICKING TEAM MAY NOT SCORE AGAINST ITSELF

If the ball enters the attacking team's own goal directly from a corner kick, the correct restart is a corner kick for the opposing team. The kicking team cannot score against itself directly from a corner kick.

"Law 18" - Common Sense

"Law 18, still unwritten but frequently quoted as the ultimate goal of refereeing: 'Intelligence in the perception of the game, the attitude of the players, the place and the moment of the offense.'"

(Michel Vautrot, FIFA Referee Committee, FIFA Magazine, June 1997)

19. Miscellaneous Matters

19.1 LAWS GOVERNING KICKS FROM THE PENALTY MARK

All Laws of the Game, except for those clearly modified in the separate section of the Laws dealing with kicks from the penalty mark, are in effect during this procedure. In particular, this means that the player uniform requirements in Law 4 must be enforced. It also means that the officials must continue to enforce the requirement that no one except for the players taking part in this procedure may enter or be on the field of play once the procedure has begun.

The procedure for kicks from the penalty mark does not require that players kick in any particular order, that an order be established ahead of time, nor that a list of kickers must be provided to the referee. The only requirement the referee must enforce is that no player may kick again until all eligible players on his team have kicked. This principle continues into subsequent rounds of the procedure, if necessary. If a kick from the penalty mark must be retaken, it is not required that the same player perform the kick so long as the principle described here is applied in this case as well. In subsequent rounds, the players do not need to kick in the same order as they did in the previous round.

Once kicks from the penalty mark have begun, there is no further application of the “reduce to equate” principle. If a player must leave through injury or misconduct, that player may not be replaced and the opposing team does not have to reduce its numbers. (A goalkeeper who is injured may be replaced, but only if the team has substitutions remaining.)

The referee shall not abandon the game if a team is reduced to fewer than seven players during the taking of kicks from the penalty mark.

For further information on "reduce to equate" and "order of kickers," see Advice 3.12, as well as the procedures outlined in the Laws of the Game under Law 14 and Additional Instructions and Guidelines for Referees.

19.2 PLAYERS LEAVING THE FIELD DURING KICKS FROM THE PENALTY MARK

Once the procedure of taking kicks from the penalty mark has begun, players are not permitted to leave the field, even if they have already taken a kick. If a player leaves the field and is not available to take the prescribed kick (either for the first time or subsequently), the referee must stop the taking of kicks and declare the match abandoned. A full report regarding the situation must be submitted. (See also Advice 3.12.)

If a player leaves the field with the referee's permission to attend to an equipment problem, bleeding, or blood on the uniform, all requirements of the Law must still be followed in order for the player to return to the field (see Advice 5.8 and 5.9). If an injured player cannot return to the field, as declared by the team captain, or is sent from the field for misconduct, the kicks from the mark continue without that player.

19.3 THE ROLE OF THE TEAM CAPTAIN

The role of the team captain is not defined in the Laws of the Game. The captain usually wears an armband and is responsible to the referee for his or her team, but has no special rights or privileges.

By practice and tradition, certain duties fall upon the team captain:

• to see that the referee's decisions are respected by the captain's teammates and by team officials;

• to counsel a teammate who may be reluctant to leave the field at a substitution—but neither the captain nor the referee may insist that the player leave;

• to represent his or her team at the coin toss to determine which direction the team will attack to begin the game (and subsequent overtime periods) or which team will take first kick in kicks from the penalty mark;

• to be the team representative to whom the referee must go to obtain the name and number of players who will be excluded from participating in kicks from the penalty mark in order to match the size of the opposing team (which has fewer players on the field before the kicks from the penalty mark begin as a result of injury or misconduct).

19.4 WATER

Players who wish to drink water while play continues may do so only from the touch line and without leaving the field. Players may also drink water during stoppages at any of the boundary lines. If water containers are left along boundary lines outside the field, they must not interfere with the movement of the assistant referee or block his or her view of the length of the touch line. Under no circumstances may water containers of any sort be thrown onto the field, either during play or at stoppages (including the halftime break), nor may they be thrown from the field after a player has finished drinking.

19.5 RULES OF COMPETITION

The referee must be familiar with the rules of every competition he or she works in. No matter what the referee's personal feelings may be about unfamiliar rules or rules which are apparently inconsistent with the Laws of the Game, they must be enforced if the referee accepts the assignment—unless so doing would compromise the referee's fundamental responsibility for the safety of the players.

Index

Abandoning a match................................................................................................................................... 3.16, 5.12, 7.3, 19.2

Active involvement.....................................................................................................................................6.5, 11.3-11.7, 11.14

Adding time .................................................................................................................................................................... 3.6, 7.2

Advantage........................................................................... 5.4.-5.7,6.3, 12.2-12.28, 12.32, 12.39, 13.3, 13.9, 15.4, 15.5, 16.3

Allowing substitutions ..........................................................................................................................................3.5.- 3.7, 3.14

Applying the advantage .......................................................................................................................................... 12.27, 12.39

Assistant referee duties..........................................................................................................................................................6.1

Assistant referee signals........................................................................................................................................................6.2

Ball ........................................................................................................................................................................................2.1

Ball bursts/outside interference during a penalty kick ........................................................................................................14.7

Ball in play

From a corner kick ..........................................................................................................................................................17.3

From a goal kick..............................................................................................................................................................16.2

Ball kicked to the goalkeeper ............................................................................................................................................12.20

Ball out of play ......................................................................................................................................................... 6.4, 9.1 9.4

Ball placement

For a corner kick .............................................................................................................................................................17.1

For a goal kick.................................................................................................................................................................16.1

Ball thrown to the goalkeeper ...........................................................................................................................................12.21

Becoming onside ...............................................................................................................................................................11.15

Behavior of coach and bench personnel..............................................................................................................................5.10

Bleeding................................................................................................................ 3.3, 3.13, 3.16,3.20(a)(2), 5.8, 12.28.6, 19.2

Bridging...............................................................................................................................................................................12.4

Captain, role of ...................................................................................................................................................................19.3

Careless....................................................................................................................................... 12.2, 12.3, 12.8, 12.22, 12.23

Categories of misconduct ............................................................................................................................ 12.24, 12.28, 12.29

Cautionable offenses ................................................................................................................................... 12.26, 12.27, 12.28

Cautioning for repeated infringements of Law 14.............................................................................................................14.10

Cautions/Send-offs—When Not Permitted.................................................................................................................. 5.17, 5.10

Charging ............................................................................................................................................ 12.5, 12.14, 12.22, 12.23

Charging an opponent away from the ball........................................................................................................................12.22

Charging the goalkeeper ...................................................................................................................................................12.23

Club linesmen........................................................................................................................................................................6.6

Coin toss....................................................................................................................................................................... 8.1, 19.4

Common sense...................................................................................................................................................... 9.2, 12.39, 18

Criteria for an obvious goalscoring opportunity ..............................................................................................................12.37

Defender legally off the field of play .................................................................................................................................11.11

Delay during substitution ......................................................................................................................................................3.5

Deliberate................................................................................................................................ 5.5, 12.1, 12.20, 12.40 (passim)

Deliberate handling...................................................................................... 12.1, 12.2, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.28, 12.36, 14.9

Deliberately leaves the field of play without permission................................................................................................ 12.28.7

Denying a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity ..........................................................................................12.36-12.40

Departing player ........................................................................................................................................................ 3.11, 11.9

Dimensions of the field ..........................................................................................................................................................1.1

Direct free kick fouls .................................................................................................................................................12.2-12.11

Discipline to substitutes.......................................................................................................................................................5.16

Dissent.......................................................................................................................................... Law 3 Part D,12.27, 12.28.2

Dropped ball .............................. 1.8, 3.3, 3.10, 3.18, 3.20, 5.7, 7.2, 7.3, 8.4. 8.5,9.2, 9.3, 10.2 10.7, 11.12, 12.6, 12.25, 14.7

Enforcing the required distance ..................................................................................................12.28.5, 13.2, 13.3, 13.3-13.6

Enters or re-enters the field of play without the referee’s permission ........................................................................... 12.28.6

Excessive force .................................................................................12.2, 12.3,,12.8, 12.22, 12.23, 12.32, 12.33, 12,37, 12.38

Expel ........................................................................................................................................................................ 5.10, 12.24

Expulsion, temporary (not allowed) ....................................................................................................................................5.17

Fails to respect the required distance ............................................................................. 12.28.5, 13.,2 13.3, 13.5- 13.8, 14.10

Fair charge............................................................................................................................................................... 12.5, 12.14

Field markings.......................................................................................................................................................................1.5

Flagposts ...............................................................................................................................................................................1.4

Footwear ...............................................................................................................................................................................4.5

Foul (What is a foul?) .........................................................................................................................................................12.1

Fouls committed while a goal is scored .........................................................................................................10.4, 12.36-12.40

Fouls observed by the referee ...............................................................................................................................................6.3

Fourth official ..........................................................................2, 3.2, Law 3 Part D, 4.6, 5.3, 5.4, 5.8, 5.13, 6.7, 6.8 12.28.23

Free kick in own penalty area .............................................................................................................................................13.5

Free kicks ............................................................................................................................................................................13.1

Gaining an advantage ................................................................................................................................ 6.5, 11.2, 11.3, 11.6

Goal after time has expired .................................................................................................................................................10.1

Goal off an official ..............................................................................................................................................................10.5

Goalkeeper deflects ball over goal line and not into goal on penalty kick........................................................................14.11

Goalkeeper movement .........................................................................................................................................................14.4

Goalkeeper uniforms and equipment.....................................................................................................................................4.4

Goals .....................................................................................................................................................................................1.3

Holding...............................................................................................................................12.5, 12.7, 12.28.1, 12.40 (Diag. 3)

How to administer the send-off for a second caution ........................................................................................................12.30

Illegal or improperly taken throw-in ...................................................................................................................................15.4

Illegally returning to play............................................................................................................................................3.17-3.19

Illustrations of “not offside” .............................................................................................................................................11.16

Impeding an opponent .................................................................................................................... 12.14, 12.22, 12.40 (Fig. 4)

Inadvertent whistle ................................................................................................................................................................8.4

Incorrect uniform or equipment ............................................................................................................................................4.6

Indirect free kick fouls.............................................................................................................................................12.12-12.24

Indirect free within 10 yards of opponents’ goal ................................................................................................................13.6

Infringements of Law 14......................................................................................................................................................14.9

Interfering with an opponent ...............................................................................................................................................11.4

Interfering with play (not Offside)........................................................................... 5.5, 5.11, 10.5, 10.7, 12.289.1, 13.1, 14.7

Interfering with play (Offside).............................................................................................................................................11.5

Jewelry ..................................................................................................................................................................................4.3

Judgment of offside position................................................................................................................................................11.2

Kick-off............................................................................................................................................................8.2 (see also 8.1)

Kicker’s deception at penalty kick.......................................................................................................................................14.9

Kicking team may not score directly against itself..............................................................................................................17.5

Kicking the ball forward to a teammate ..............................................................................................................................14.6

Kicks from the penalty mark.............................................................................................................. 3.12, 5.17, 8.1, 19.1, 19.2

Leaving the field in the course of play........................................................................................................................ 3.9, 11.11

Leaving the field to avoid offside................................................................................................................................ 11.8, 11.9

Leaving the field to put an opponent in an offside position...............................................................................................11.10

Leaving the field without permission....................................................................................................................... 3.8, 12.28.7

Length of halves ....................................................................................................................................................................7.1

Lines ......................................................................................................................................................................................1.4

Location of the kicker at a corner kick ................................................................................................................................17.2

Location of the restart for offside............................................................................................................................. 11.3, 11.13

Location of throw-in............................................................................................................................................................15.1

Making contact with the opponent ......................................................................................................................................12.8

Making the offside decision .................................................................................................................................................11.7

Misconduct

Cautionable offenses.....................................................................................................................................5.9, 12.26-12.28

Cautioning for subsequent infringements of Law 14 .....................................................................................................14.10

Deliberately leaves the field of play without permission ............................................................................................ 12.28.7

Enters or re-enters the field of play without the referee’s permission........................................................................ 12.28.6

Fails to respect the required distance......................................................................................12.28.5, 13,2, 13.3, 13.4-13.6

Leaving the field without permission ................................................................................................................... 3.8, 12.28.7

Putting an opponent in an offside position unfairly.......................................................................................................11.10

Returning to the field to play the ball ..............................................................................................................................11.9

Sending-off offenses .............................................................................................................................................12.29-12.40

Terminating a match............................................................................................................................................... 5.11, 19.2

Unsporting behavior ...............................................................1.6, 3.11, 3.18, Law 3 Part D,8.3, 11.8, 11.10, 12.3, 12.28.1,

Missed assistant referee signals ............................................................................................................................................6.4

Mistaken ending ....................................................................................................................................................................7.3

No goal directly from a throw-in.........................................................................................................................................15.6

Number of players ..................................................................................................................... Law 3 passim, 5.12, 8.3, 12.24

Obvious goalscoring opportunity ........................................................................................................10.4, 12.29, 12.36-12.40

Offside

Defender legally of the field of play...............................................................................................................................11.11

Leaving the field to avoid offside ............................................................................................................................ 11.8, 11.9

Location of the restart for offside ......................................................................................................................... 11.3, 11.13

Offside position at the halfway line ...............................................................................................................................11.14

Putting an opponent in an offside position unfairly.......................................................................................................11.10

Returning to the field to play the ball ..............................................................................................................................11.9

Opponent behavior at a throw-in ........................................................................................................................................15.7

Opponents must remain outside the penalty area................................................................................................................13.7

Opposing attacker enters the goal.....................................................................................................................................11.12

Other violations at a penalty kick......................................................................................................................................14.11

Outside interference and restart...................................................................................................1.8, 3.17-3.19, 9.2,10.7, 14.7

Own goal .............................................................................................................................................................................10.6

Penalty kick defined ............................................................................................................................................................14.1

Penalty kicks at the end of the half......................................................................................................................................14.8

Persistent infringement................................................................................................................................................... 12.28.3

Placement of the ball......................................................................................................................................... 14.2, 16.1, 17.1

Player count ................................................................................................................................................................. 3.17, 8.3

Player modifications to the field............................................................................................................................................1.6

Players’ equipment..........................................................................................................................................................4.1-4.6

Playing distance .......................................................................................................................................... 12.14, 12.15. 12.22

Playing in a dangerous manner ........................................................................................................................................12.15

Pregame conference ................................................................................................................................ 4.6, 5.3, 5.8, 6.4, 19.3

Preventing the goalkeeper from releasing the ball into play......................................................... 12.17, 12.18, 12.23, 12.28.1

Properly taken throw-in ............................................................................................................................... 12.28.4, 15.3, 15.4

Putting an opponent in an offside position unfairly ..........................................................................................................11.10

Quick free kick.........................................................................................................................13.4 (see also 12.26, 13.2, 13.8)

Reckless ................................................................................................................ 12.2, 12.3, 12.5, 12.8, 12.22, 12.23, 12.28.1

Referee uniform .....................................................................................................................................................................5.1

Referee’s authority ................................................................................................................................................................5.2

Referee’s signals ...................................................................................................................................................................5.4

Required distance for opponents ......................................................... 12.29.5, 13.2, 13.3, 13.7,. 13.8, 14.3, 14.9, 14.10, 16.4

Restarts

If ball leaves field from a corner kick ..............................................................................................................................17.4

Retaking the penalty kick...........................................................................................................14.5 (see also 14.3, 14.7, 14.9)

Return after bleeding or equipment remedy ........................................................ 3.3, 3.13, 3.16, 3.17, 3.20, 5.8, 12.28.6, 19.2

Return after injury ............................................................................................. 3,3, 3.12, 3.123, 3.16, 3.20, 5.9, 12.28.6, 19.2

Returning to the field to play the ball ..................................................................................................................................11.9

Rules of Competition ...........................................................................................................................................................19.5

Safety ....................................................................................................................................................................... 1.2, 1.3, 4.2

Scoring directly from a goal kick ........................................................................................................................................16.3

Second touch by the goalkeeper ........................................................................................................................................12.19

Sending-off offenses.................................................................................................................................................12.29-12.40

Serious foul play.................................................................................................................12.3, Part C (passim), 12.33, 12.35

Signal for indirect free kick .................................................................................................................................................13.8

Signaling a goal ..................................................................................................................................................................10.2

Simultaneous fouls.................................................................................................................................................................8.5

Simultaneous touches ............................................................................................................................................................9.3

Spectator blows a whistle ......................................................................................................................................................9.2

Stoppage for misconduct .......................................................................................................................................... 12.25, 13.7

Stopping play before a possible goal.......................................................................................................................... 10.2, 10.3

Striking ................................................................................................................................................................................12.6

Substitutes .............................................................................................................................................................................3.1

Substitution procedure ..........................................................................................................................................................3.4

Terminating a match .................................................................................................................................................. 5.11, 19.2

Throw-in strikes an opponent..............................................................................................................................................15.8

Tied score ............................................................................................................................................................................10.8

Time wasting the by kicking team (goal kick)......................................................................................................................16.5

Too many substitutions..........................................................................................................................................................3.7

Trickery .............................................................................................................................................................. 12.21, 12.28.1

Trifling infractions ................................................................................................. 5.5, 5.76, 6.3, 12.6, 13.5, 14.10, 15.4, 15.5

Tripping...............................................................................................................................................................................12.4

Unauthorized marks ..............................................................................................................................................................1.5

Unfair advantage.......................................................................................................................................... 1.6, 4.3, 12.3, 12.9

Unsporting behavior .................................................................1.6, 3.11, 3.18, Law 3 Part D, 8.3, 11.8, 11.10, 12.3, 12.28.1,

Use of the shoulder............................................................................................................................... 12.5, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11

Violent conduct................................................................................12.6 (passim), 12.29, Part C (passim), 12.33- 12.35, 15.8

Water containers on the field ..............................................................................................................................................19.4

Wearing uniforms..................................................................................................................................................................4.1

What is a foul?.....................................................................................................................................................................12.1

When the penalty kick may be taken....................................................................................................................................14.3

Whistle from an adjacent field...............................................................................................................................................9.3

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement