Support Utilities - Teradata Documentation

Support Utilities - Teradata Documentation
Teradata Database
Support Utilities
Release 14.0
B035-1180-111A
January 2012
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Copyright © 2000 – 2012 by Teradata Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
Preface
Purpose
This book, Support Utilities, describes utility programs most often used to support Teradata
Database. These utilities are used primarily by Teradata Support personnel and field
engineers.
Caution:
These utilities manipulate Teradata Database at a low level. Incorrect use of these utilities can
damage your system. Before using these utilities, consult with the Teradata Support Center.
Chapter names reflect the utility common name followed by the name of the executable utility
program enclosed in parentheses, for example, Control GDO Editor (ctl). Use the executable
program name to start the utility from the command line or from Database Window.
Some utilities run only from Database Window (DBW). For information, see “Database
Window (xdbw)” in Utilities, Volume 1.
Audience
The utilities described in this book are used primarily by Teradata personnel, including:
•
Teradata Customer Services
•
Teradata Support Center
•
Teradata Field Engineers
Experienced utilities users can also refer to the simplified command descriptions in the
Utilities Quick Reference. This book provides the syntax diagrams for each Teradata Database
utility.
Supported Software Releases and Operating
Systems
This book supports Teradata® Database 14.0.
Teradata Database 14.0 is supported on:
•
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES)10
•
SLES 11
Note that SLES 11 will be supported after the initial release of Teradata Database 14.0.
Teradata Database client applications support other operating systems.
Support Utilities
3
Preface
Changes to This Book
Changes to This Book
Release
Utility
Description
Teradata Database 14.0
January 2012
Appendix A
Updated Syntax Diagram Conventions to mention mixed-case words in
syntax diagrams.
Configuration
• For ADD AMP command, Teradata Database will not automatically
assign a cluster number if none specified.
• For DEFAULT CLUSTER command, default cluster size is 2.
Configuration
• Moved chapter from Utilities manual to Support Utilities manual.
• Updates to account for new expanded range of vproc IDs.
• If a default cluster size is not specified using the DEFAULT CLUSTER
command, Teradata Database always defaults to a size of two.
Filer
• Added new -t diagnostic startup option.
• ASSIGN command allows assignment to global temp cylinders, type
GLOBALTYPECYL.
• New tjkind: NEWOLJ
• Changes for Teradata Columnar (column partitioning). Most
references to “rows” mean physical, file system level storage rows,
which each store one of several types of data: actual database table
rows, a series of column partition values, index structures, table
metadata (table header information), and others.
Reconfiguration
• Moved chapter from Utilities manual to Support Utilities manual.
• Added information about new online reconfiguration option.
• Noted that column-partitioned tables are NoPI tables.
Reconfiguration
Estimator
• Moved chapter from Utilities manual to Support Utilities manual.
• Updated output to show new estimates based on load levels.
• Documented new ABORT command.
Teradata Database 14.0
November 2011
4
Support Utilities
Preface
Additional Information
Additional Information
URL
Description
www.info.teradata.com/
Use the Teradata Information Products Publishing Library site
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• View or download a manual:
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Use Teradata @ Your Service to access Orange Books, technical
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developer.teradata.com/
Teradata Developer Exchange provides articles on using
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downloads.
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Teradata Database Optional Features
This book may include descriptions of the following optional Teradata Database features and
products:
Support Utilities
•
Teradata Row Level Security
•
Temporal Table Support
5
Preface
Teradata Database Optional Features
•
Teradata Columnar
•
Teradata Virtual Storage (VS)
You may not use these features without the appropriate licenses. The fact that these features
may be included in product media or downloads, or described in documentation that you
receive, does not authorize you to use them without the appropriate licenses.
Contact your Teradata sales representative to purchase and enable optional features.
6
Support Utilities
Table of Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Supported Software Releases and Operating Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Changes to This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Teradata Database Optional Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Chapter 1: Teradata Database Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Alphabetical Listing of Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
For More Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Physical Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Configuration Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Hosts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
PEs and AMPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
System Configuration and Reconfiguration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Message Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Configuration Utility Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
ADD AMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
ADD HOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
ADD PE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
BEGIN CONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
DEFAULT CLUSTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
DEL AMP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
DEL HOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
DEL PE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
END CONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Support Utilities
7
Table of Contents
LIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
LIST AMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
LIST CLUSTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
LIST HOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
LIST PE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
MOD AMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
MOD HOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
MOD PE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
MOVE AMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
MOVE PE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
SHOW CLUSTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
SHOW HOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
SHOW VPROC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
STOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Configuration Utility Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
The Teradata Database File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Starting Filer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Standard Startup Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Diagnostic Startup Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Filer Command Syntax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Entering Filer Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Command Usage Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Filer Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
Specifying Data Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Specifying Display Ranges (ordinalrange) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Specifying a WHERE clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Repairing Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Filer Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Filer Command Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Hex Dumps Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
List of Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
ALTCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
ALTWCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
8
Support Utilities
Table of Contents
ASSIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
BACKDOWNCHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
BADLIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
BLK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
CHECKSUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
CI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
CID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
DATE/TIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
DB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
DBD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
DBROW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
DELETE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
DEPOT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
DISABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
DISCARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
DISPLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
DROP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
DUMPDISK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
ENABLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
ERRORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
FIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
FIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
FREECACHE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
IDENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
INFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
INIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
INPUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
MEMBLK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
MEMCTX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
MEMDB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
MEMDUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
MEMROW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
MEMSORCTX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
MEMWCTX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
MEMWDB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
MEMWREC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
MI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
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Table of Contents
MODIFY REDO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
NEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
OUTPUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
PACK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
PATCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
PREV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
PRIORITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
QUARLIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
QUIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
RADIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
REALLOCDUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
REBUILDCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
REBUILDMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
RENAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
REPAIRSECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
RESETFREECYL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
ROW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
SCANDISK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
SCOPE (or VPROC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
SEGZERO (or SEG0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
SET FREECYL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
SHOWDEFAULTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
SRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
STAMP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
STORAGEINFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
SYNCSCAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
TABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
TABLEID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
TRACEPRINT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
TRASH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
VPROC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
WABC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
WAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
WCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
WCID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
WDB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
WDBD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
WDBREC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
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WFIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
WFLUSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
WMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
WREC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
WSUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Filer Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Chapter 4: Reconfiguration Estimator
(reconfig_estimator) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Online and Offline Reconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Configuration Maps and Reconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Disk Space for Reconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Before Starting Reconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
The Reconfiguration Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Reconfiguration Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MOVE AMP Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fatal AMPs During a Move-AMP Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effect of Hash Bucket Size Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effects on Journal Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effects on Tables with No Primary Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
255
255
256
256
256
256
Reconfiguration Utility Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
ABORT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
DISPLAY RETRY LIST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
RECONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
STATUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
STOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Reconfiguration Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
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Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Globally Distributed Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Configuration Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .270
New Versus Previously Initialized Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .270
Running System Initializer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .271
Configuration and Reconfiguration Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276
Appendix A: How to Read Syntax Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Syntax Diagram Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Appendix B: Starting the Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .285
Starting Utilities from Database Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .286
Starting Utilities from the Linux Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .288
Starting Utilities from HUTCNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .288
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .289
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .293
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CHAPTER 1
Teradata Database Utilities
This chapter lists the Teradata Database utilities that are documented in Utilities -Volume 1,
Utilities -Volume 2, and Support Utilities.
Alphabetical Listing of Utilities
Utility
Purpose
Abort Host
(aborthost)
Aborts all outstanding transactions running on a failed host, until the
system restarts the host.
AMP Load
(ampload)
Displays the load on all AMP vprocs in a system, including the number of
AMP worker tasks (AWTs) available to each AMP vproc, and the number of
messages waiting (message queue length) on each AMP vproc.
AWT Monitor
(awtmon)
Collects and displays a user-friendly summary of the AMP Worker Task
(AWT) in-use count snapshots for the local node or all nodes in Teradata
Database.
CheckTable
(checktable)
Checks for inconsistencies between internal data structures such as table
headers, row identifiers, and secondary indexes.
CNS Run
(cnsrun)
Allows running of database utilities from scripts.
Configuration Utility
(config)
Defines AMPs, PEs, and hosts, and describes their interrelationships for
Teradata Database.
Note: Configuration is documented in Support Utilities.
Support Utilities
Control GDO Editor
(ctl)
Displays the fields of the PDE Control Parameters GDO, and allows
modification of the settings.
Cufconfig Utility
(cufconfig)
Displays configuration settings for the user-defined function and external
stored procedure subsystem, and allows these settings to be modified.
Database
Initialization
Program
(DIP)
Executes one or more of the standard DIP scripts packaged with Teradata
Database. These scripts create a variety of database objects that can extend
the functionality of Teradata Database with additional, optional features.
DBS Control
(dbscontrol)
Displays the DBS Control Record fields, and allows these settings to be
modified.
Dump Unload/Load
(DUL, DULTAPE)
Saves system dump tables to tape, and restores system dump tables from
tape.
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Chapter 1: Teradata Database Utilities
Alphabetical Listing of Utilities
Utility
Purpose
Ferret Utility
(ferret)
Defines the scope of an action, such as a range of tables or selected vprocs,
displays the parameters and scope of the action, and performs the action,
either moving data to reconfigure data blocks and cylinders, or displaying
disk space and cylinder free space percent in use of the defined scope.
Filer Utility
(filer)
Finds and corrects problems within the file system.
Gateway Control
(gtwcontrol)
Modifies default values in the fields of the Gateway Control Globally
Distributed Object (GDO).
Gateway Global
(gtwglobal)
Monitors and controls the Teradata Database LAN-connected users and
their sessions.
Lock Display
(lokdisp)
Displays a snapshot capture of all real-time database locks and their
associated currently-running sessions.
Lock Logger
(dumplocklog)
Logs transaction identifiers, session identifiers, lock object identifiers, and
the lock levels associated with currently-executing SQL statements.
Modify MPP List
(modmpplist)
Allows modification of the node list file (mpplist).
Priority Scheduler
(schmon)
(SLES 10 only)
Creates, modifies, and monitors Teradata Database process prioritization
parameters.
Note: Filer is documented in Support Utilities.
All processes have an assigned priority based on their Teradata Database
session. This priority is used by Priority Scheduler to allocate CPU and
I/O resources.
Note: On SLES 11 systems, Priority Scheduler is managed by Teradata
Active System Management (ASM), and is configured using the Teradata
Viewpoint workload management portlets. For more information on those
portlets, see Teradata Viewpoint User Guide.
Query Configuration
(qryconfig)
Reports the current Teradata Database configuration, including the Node,
AMP, and PE identification and status.
Query Session
(qrysessn)
Monitors the state of selected Teradata Database sessions on selected logical
host IDs.
Reconfiguration
Utility
(reconfig)
Uses the component definitions created by the Configuration Utility to
establish an operational Teradata Database.
Reconfiguration
Estimator
(reconfig_estimator)
Estimates the elapsed time for reconfiguration based upon the number and
size of tables on the current system, and provides time estimates for the
following phases:
Note: Reconfiguration is documented in Support Utilities.
• Redistribution
• Deletion
• NUSI building
Note: Reconfiguration Estimator is documented in Support Utilities.
Recovery Manager
(rcvmanager)
14
Displays information used to monitor progress of a Teradata Database
recovery.
Support Utilities
Chapter 1: Teradata Database Utilities
Alphabetical Listing of Utilities
Utility
Purpose
Resource Check
Tools
(dbschk, nodecheck,
syscheck)
Identifies slow down and potential hangs of Teradata Database, and displays
system statistics that help identify the cause of the problem.
Show Locks
(showlocks)
Displays locks placed by Archive and Recovery and Table Rebuild
operations on databases and tables.
For details Archive and Recovery, see Teradata Archive/Recovery Utility
Reference. For details on Table Rebuild, see Utilities Volume 2.
System Initializer
(sysinit)
Initializes Teradata Database. Creates or updates the DBS Control Record
and other Globally Distributed Objects (GDOs), initializes or updates
configuration maps, and sets hash function values in the DBS Control
Record.
Note: System Initializer is documented in Support Utilities.
Support Utilities
Table Rebuild
(rebuild)
Rebuilds tables that Teradata Database cannot automatically recover,
including the primary or fallback portions of tables, entire tables, all tables
in a database, or all tables in an Access Module Processor (AMP). Table
Rebuild can be run interactively or as a background task.
Teradata Locale
Definition Utility
(tdlocaledef)
Converts a Specification for Data Formatting file (SDF) into an internal,
binary format (a GDO) for use by Teradata Database. The SDF file is a text
file that defines how Teradata Databaseformats numeric, date, time, and
currency output.
Teradata Network
Statistics
(tdnstat)
Performs GetStat/ResetStat operations and displays or clears Teradata
Database Network Services statistics.
Teradata Network
Tuner
(tdntune)
Displays and allows modification of Teradata Network Services tunable
parameters. The utility provides a user interface to view, get, or update the
Teradata Network Services, which are specific to tunable parameters.
Tpareset
(tpareset)
Resets the PDE and database components of Teradata Database.
Two-Phase Commit
Console
(tpccons)
Performs the following two-phase commit (2PC) related functions:
Task List
(tsklist)
Displays information about PDE processes and their tasks.
Update DBC
(updatedbc)
Recalculates the PermSpace and SpoolSpace values in the DBASE table for
the user DBC, and the MaxPermSpace and MaxSpoolSpace values of the
DATABASESPACE table for all databases based on the values in the DBASE
table.
Update Space
(updatespace)
Recalculates the permanent, temporary, or spool space used by a single
database or by all databases in a system.
• Displays a list of coordinators that have in-doubt transactions.
• Displays a list of sessions that have in-doubt transactions.
• Resolves in-doubt transactions.
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For More Information
Utility
Purpose
Verify _pdisks
(verify_pdisks)
Verifies that the pdisks on Teradata Database are accessible and are mapped
correctly.
Vproc Manager
(vprocmanager)
Manages the virtual processors (vprocs). For example, obtains status of
specified vprocs, initializes vprocs, forces a vproc to restart, and forces a
Teradata Database restart.
For More Information
16
For information on...
See...
starting the utilities
the appendix titled “Starting the Utilities”
utilities related to Teradata Database security
Security Administration
Archive and Recovery, FastExport, FastLoad,
MultiLoad, and TPump
the following client utility books:
•
•
•
•
•
Teradata Archive/Recovery Utility Reference
Teradata FastExport Reference
Teradata FastLoad Reference
Teradata MultiLoad Reference
Teradata Parallel Data Pump Reference
Support Utilities
CHAPTER 2
Configuration Utility (config)
The Configuration and Reconfiguration utilities, config and reconfig, are used to define the
AMPs and PEs that operate together as a Teradata Database. (The Reconfiguration utility is
described in Utilities Volume 2.)
Use Configuration to define the system: the interrelationships among the AMPs, AMP clusters
(logical groupings of AMPs), PEs, and hosts that are connected as a Teradata Database system.
(The Reconfiguration utility uses information from Configuration to configure the Teradata
Database components into an operational system.) You must access a system console to use
either utility.
Use the Configuration commands described in this chapter to add, delete, list, modify, move,
or show AMPs and PEs. Other steps in configuring a system involve the Parallel Database
Extensions (PDE) portions of Teradata Database, and are configured with the PUT utility.
For more information on PUT configuration steps, see the Parallel Upgrade Tool (PUT)
Reference, available from www.teradataatyourservice.com. After logging on to Teradata @ Your
Service, click Support Information, then select Operating Systems & Hardware from the
Support Document Content section to search for the document.
Runs From
The Configuration utility runs from Database Window or comparable interface to the
Teradata Database console subsystem, such as cnsterm.
For general information on starting the utilities from different interfaces, see Appendix B:
“Starting the Utilities.”
Physical Processors
The Configuration and Reconfiguration utilities are not responsible for the maintenance of
the physical environment in which the Teradata Database configuration is defined.
The AMPs and PEs exist within a previously defined physical configuration. Use the Parallel
Upgrade Tool (PUT) to configure parts of the physical configuration, such as creating Logical
Units (LUNs) on disk arrays.
For more information, see Parallel Upgrade Tool (PUT) Reference.
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Configuration Maps
Configuration Maps
Although the Configuration and Reconfiguration utilities are functionally independent,
normally they are used together to change the contents of working areas, called configuration
maps, in the node.
A configuration map:
•
Stores the identification and status of each vproc in the Teradata Database
•
Identifies the AMPs that constitute each AMP cluster
•
Identifies each PE and its associated host
The node contains these configuration maps:
•
The current configuration map, which describes the current arrangement and status of
vprocs in the system
•
The new configuration map, which includes changes and additions to the configuration
If you want to list or show information about or to delete a vproc, first you must have added it
to the applicable (new or current) configuration map.
If you want to add a vproc to the new configuration map, you must have defined the AMP or
PE through the use of the PUT utility.
These component types constitute a Teradata Database configuration:
•
Hosts (or clients)
•
PEs
•
AMPs
The following sections describe these components.
For more information, see Parallel Upgrade Tool (PUT) Reference.
Hosts
You can attach more than one host simultaneously to the Teradata Database. The hosts are
identified in the configuration by:
•
A host number
•
A logical host ID
•
An associated host type designator
You assign the host a number between 1 and 1023.
The host type designator specifies the host data format.
The system generates the16-bit logical host ID based on the assigned host number and the
host type. The value is equal to the host number + the host type value.
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PEs and AMPs
Host Type
Designator
Host Type
Value
Logical Host ID Range
(Host Number + Host Type Value)
IBM 370
(Mainframe)
IBM
0
1-1023
Communications
Processor
COP
1024
1025-2047
Motorola 68000,
RISC (Solaris, HP)
ATT3B
2048
2049-3071
Honeywell 6000
(Mainframe)
BULLHN
3072
3073-4095
Unisys OS1100
(Mainframe)
OS1100
4096
4097-5119
Connection Type
PEs and AMPs
You can associate PEs defined in a Teradata Database configuration with one or more host
computers or local area networks that also are defined in the configuration.
Typically, AMPs in a configuration are related to other AMPs through cluster assignments.
The placement of AMPs and PEs in a configuration is critical to the overall performance of the
Teradata Database.
System Configuration and Reconfiguration
When the Teradata Database is initialized, System Initializer (sysinit) procedures build a
default configuration map that describes the one target AMP involved in sysinit. This
configuration is stored in both the current and new configuration maps.
When the Teradata Database is operational, Configuration describes the complete system in
the new configuration map area.
As the system grows and changes, use Configuration to revise the new configuration map to
reflect these types of changes to the system:
Caution:
•
Addition and deletion of vprocs and hosts
•
Changes to cluster assignments
•
Changes to host assignments
When changing cluster assignments without adding AMPs, make sure that ample disk space is
available on all AMPs.
If the system determines that ample space is not available, the system stops. To recover,
perform a SYSINIT on the Teradata Database, which results in loss of all data. Teradata
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
Message Types
recommends that currentperm space should be less than 53% of the total maxperm space
before starting a change of clusters without adding AMPs.
After Configuration builds a new configuration map, the Reconfiguration utility redefines the
system configuration according to the new map. Reconfiguration copies the new
configuration map to the current configuration map.
For more information on the Configuration and Reconfiguration Utilities, see Support
Utilities.
Message Types
The application window running Configuration can contain the types of messages displayed
in the output subwindow.
Message
Description
Information
Indicates the status of a command or the result of an operation.
OK indicates that a command has been accepted or an operation has completed
successfully.
Prompt
Prompts for a response to a request or for confirmation of an action.
Error
Composed of a message code and text.
To view all error messages issued by Configuration, see Messages.
Configuration Utility Commands
The Configuration utility presents a command-line environment that allows the entry of
Configuration commands. The following table lists these commands and functions based on
activity. The commands are described in more detail in the sections that follow.
Activity
Command
Function
AMP operations
“ADD AMP”
Adds an AMP to the configuration map.
“DEFAULT
CLUSTER”
Allows Configuration to assign AMPs to clusters when a new
configuration is defined.
“DEL AMP”
Deletes an AMP from the configuration map.
“MOD AMP”
Modifies the attributes of an AMP.
“MOVE AMP”
Moves an AMP or group of AMPs to another AMP or group of AMPs.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
Configuration Utility Commands
Activity
Command
Function
Displaying system
attributes
“LIST”
Lists the vprocs and hosts described in the specified configuration.
“LIST AMP”
Lists the attributes of every AMP in the specified configuration.
“LIST CLUSTER”
Lists the attributes of every AMP in the specified configuration, ordered by
cluster number.
“LIST HOST”
Lists all hosts in the specified configuration.
“LIST PE”
Lists the attributes of every PE in the specified configuration.
“SHOW CLUSTER”
Shows all AMPs in a specified cluster.
“SHOW VPROC”
Shows the attributes of a specified vproc.
“SHOW HOST”
Shows information about a specified host.
“ADD HOST”
Adds a host to the configuration map.
“DEL HOST”
Deletes a host from the configuration map.
“MOD HOST”
Modifies a host in the configuration map.
“ADD PE”
Adds a PE to the configuration map.
“DEL PE”
Deletes a PE from the configuration map.
“MOD PE”
Modifies the attributes of a PE in the configuration map.
“MOVE PE”
Moves a PE or group of PEs to another PE or group of PEs.
“BEGIN CONFIG”
Begins a configuration session.
“END CONFIG”
Ends a configuration session and stores the new configuration map.
“STOP”
Stops Configuration.
Host operations
PE operations
Session control
Note: You can access Help information on Configuration by pressing the F7 key.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
ADD AMP
ADD AMP
Purpose
The ADD AMP command adds an AMP or a range of AMPs to the new configuration map.
Syntax
ADD AMP
mmmlist
AA
, CN = nnnn
GT05C001
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
the range of vproc numbers that is being added to the configuration.
AMP vprocs are numbered consecutively starting from 0 to a
maximum number of 16199.
CN = nnnn
the cluster number with which the AMP is to be associated.
The cluster number ranges from 0 to 8099.
Usage Notes
You can add an AMP or a range of AMPs to the Teradata Database in a well-defined order.
The AMP being added must have a vproc number equal to the number of AMPs currently
entered in the new configuration map. That is, given a system with a new configuration map
that describes n AMPs (whose vproc numbers are 0 through n-1), the only AMP that you can
add to the system now is the AMP with vproc number n.
Configuration verifies that the vproc number specified for the new AMP does not exist in the
new configuration map. When the ADD AMP command is accepted, the specified AMP is
added to the vproc list, and the system displays:
The AMP is added.
If you type the ADD AMP command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and ADD AMP is ignored.
Example 1
To add AMPs from vproc four to vproc seven in cluster three to the new configuration map,
type:
add amps 4 - 7, cn = 3
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ADD AMP
Note: The maximum number of AMPs that you can add to a cluster is 8. To assign AMPs to
clusters automatically, use “DEFAULT CLUSTER” on page 28.
Example 2
To add an AMP as vproc eight in cluster three to the new configuration map, type:
add amp 8, cn = 3
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ADD HOST
ADD HOST
Purpose
The ADD HOST command adds a host to the host list in the new configuration map.
Syntax
ADD
HOST
HN = nnnn
, HT =
A
IBM
AH
COP
ATT3B
BULLHN
OSII00
Syntax element …
Specifies …
HN = nnnn
the host number to be added.
GT05B002
Assign the host a number from 1 to 1023.
HT =
the host type to be added.
Usage Notes
For more information on hosts and host numbers, see “Hosts” on page 18.
This command creates the host group. When PEs are configured, they are assigned to a host
number. This grouping provides a host number used to refer to all the PEs.
Configuration checks for a valid host number and host type. You must type this command
before ADD PE commands that specify PEs to be associated with this host.
Example
To add host four to the configuration, type:
add host hn = 4, ht = ibm
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ADD PE
ADD PE
Purpose
The ADD PE command adds a PE or a range of PEs to the new configuration map.
Syntax
ADD PE
mmmlist, HN = nnnn
AP
GT05C003
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
the PE (or range of PEs) that is being added to the new configuration map.
PE vproc numbers start at the high end of their range (30719 or 16383,
depending on the system) and decrease consecutively.
HN = nnnn
the host number with which the PE (or PEs) is to be associated.
The host number ranges from 1 to 1023.
Usage Notes
Configuration validates the vproc number and host number. You must add the host number
to the new configuration map (through the ADD HOST command) before the PE associated
with the host can be described in the new configuration map.
After the ADD PE command is accepted, the specified PE is added to the vproc list, and the
system displays:
The PE is added.
If you type the ADD PE command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and ADD PE is ignored.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
ADD PE
Example 1
To add PE 30715 to host 10, type:
add PE 30715, hn = 10
Example 2
To add PEs from vproc 30715 to vproc 30712 in host 282, type:
add PE 30715 - 30712, hn = 282
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BEGIN CONFIG
BEGIN CONFIG
Purpose
The BEGIN CONFIG command begins the configuration session. Changes caused by
subsequent commands are recorded in the new configuration map.
Syntax
BEGIN CONFIG
BC
GT05A004
Usage Notes
When the BEGIN CONFIG command is accepted, you can type commands to describe the
new configuration map. The new configuration map is copied from main memory to disk
when a subsequent END CONFIG command is executed.
If you type the BEGIN CONFIG command when a configuration session is in progress, the
utility prompts whether to end the configuration session that is in progress:
The previous BEGIN CONFIG has not been ended. Do you want to abort it? - Answer Y(es) or N(o):
To abort the previous BEGIN CONFIG command, type Y.
To continue the configuration session in progress, type N.
The system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is ignored.
When a configuration session ends prematurely, the new configuration map is not updated,
and all changes are lost. A configuration session ends prematurely if one of these events
occurs:
Support Utilities
•
The configuration session is aborted as described above.
•
A STOP command is executed before an END CONFIG command.
•
A Teradata Database restart occurs.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
DEFAULT CLUSTER
DEFAULT CLUSTER
Purpose
The DEFAULT CLUSTER command indicates that Configuration is to assign AMPs to clusters
automatically for the specified configuration.
An AMP cluster is a collection of AMPs that are grouped together logically to provide fallback
capability for each other for tables that are created with the FALLBACK option. Each AMP in
a cluster contains a backup copy of a portion of the primary data for every other AMP in the
cluster.
Syntax
DEFAULT CLUSTER
DC
c
GT05A005
Syntax element …
Specifies …
c
the default cluster size.
The maximum value of c is 8. If you do not specify a default cluster
size, the default size is 2.
Usage Notes
Typically, you type the DEFAULT CLUSTER command at the end of a session during which
AMPs were added to the system.
When the DEFAULT CLUSTER command is executed, AMPs are assigned to clusters
automatically.
In a system with n AMPs, each cluster contains c AMPs and n/c clusters.
If n is not divisible by c, the last cluster will be no smaller than 50% less and not larger than
50% more than any other cluster. The number of clusters is adjusted accordingly.
After the DEFAULT CLUSTER command is accepted, AMPs are assigned to clusters, and the
system displays:
The cluster assignment is complete.
Execution of the DEFAULT CLUSTER command overrides all previous cluster assignments.
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DEFAULT CLUSTER
AMP cluster assignments should be defined with respect to the hardware configuration.
Usually, AMP failures result from hardware-related problems. AMP clustering assignments
should be defined as closely as possible to the following fault-tolerant strategy:
•
No two or more AMPs of a cluster reside in the same node cabinet.
•
No two or more AMPs of a cluster are serviced by the same disk array cabinet.
•
No two or more AMPs of a cluster are serviced by the same disk array controller.
Example 1
Typing DEFAULT CLUSTER 4 for a system of 15 AMPs results in a cluster size of 4. Two
clusters include 4 AMPs each, and 1cluster includes 7 AMPs.
Example 2
Typing DEFAULT CLUSTER 3 for a system of 16 AMPs results in cluster size of 3. Four
clusters include 3 AMPs each, and 1 cluster includes 4 AMPs.
Example 3
Typing DEFAULT CLUSTER 8 for a system of 16 AMPs results in a cluster size of 8. Two
clusters include 8 AMPs each.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
DEL AMP
DEL AMP
Purpose
The DEL AMP command specifies that an AMP or a range of AMPs is to be deleted from the
new configuration map.
Syntax
DEL AMP
mmmlist
DA
GT05C006
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
one or more vproc numbers to be removed from the configuration.
AMP vprocs are numbered consecutively starting from 0 to a
maximum number of 16199.
Usage Notes
If you delete an AMP, the AMP must have a vproc number equal to the highest number for
any AMP currently entered in the new configuration map.
That is, given a system with a new configuration map that describes n AMPs (whose vproc
numbers are 0 through n-1), the only AMP that you can remove from that configuration map
is the AMP with vproc number n-1.
Configuration verifies that the vproc number to be deleted exists in the new configuration
map.
After the DEL AMP command is accepted, the specified AMP is deleted from the vproc list in
the new configuration map, and the system displays:
The AMP is deleted.
If you type the DEL AMP command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and DEL AMP is ignored.
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DEL AMP
Example 1
To delete an AMP that is vproc seven of the new configuration, type:
da 7
Example 2
To delete AMPs that are vproc four to vproc six of the new configuration, type:
da 4 - 6
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
DEL HOST
DEL HOST
Purpose
The DEL HOST command specifies that a host is to be deleted from the new configuration
map.
Syntax
DEL
HOST
HN = nnnn
D
DH
GT05B007
Syntax element …
Specifies …
HN = nnnn
the host number to be deleted.
The host number ranges from 1 to 1023.
Usage Notes
Configuration verifies that a host with the specified number exists. After the command is
accepted, the specified host is deleted from the new configuration map, and the system
displays:
The host is deleted from new configuration map.
If you type the DEL HOST command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and DEL HOST is ignored.
You cannot delete a host from a configuration unless the host is no longer associated with any
PE that is defined in the configuration. For information, see “DEL PE” on page 33.
Example
To delete host 52, type:
dh hn = 52
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DEL PE
DEL PE
Purpose
The DEL PE command specifies that a PE or a range of PEs is to be deleted from the new
configuration map
Syntax
DEL PE
mmmlist
DP
GT05C007
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
the PE (or PEs) to be deleted from the new configuration map.
PE vproc numbers start at the high end of their range (30719 or 16383,
depending on the system) and decrease consecutively.
Usage Notes
Configuration verifies that the vproc number (or numbers) to be deleted exists in the new
configuration map.
When all PEs that are associated with a host have been deleted from the new configuration
map, you also must delete the host from the map.
After the DEL PE command is accepted, the specified PE (or PEs) is deleted from the vproc list
in the new configuration map, and the system displays:
The PE is deleted.
If you type the DEL PE command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and DEL PE is ignored.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
DEL PE
Example 1
To delete PE 16380, type:
del pe 16380
Example 2
To delete PEs from vproc 16344 to 16351, type:
del pe 16344 - 16351
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END CONFIG
END CONFIG
Purpose
The END CONFIG command validates and updates the new configuration map and
terminates a configuration session.
Syntax
END CONFIG
EC
GT05A009
Usage Notes
When the END CONFIG command is executed, Configuration validates the new
configuration map.
As a result, one of the these events can occur:
•
The session is terminated, the new configuration is accepted when the configuration
changes are validated, and the new configuration map is updated on disk.
The system displays:
The session is terminated and the new configuration is stored.
The Teradata Database is ready for reconfiguration.
•
The END CONFIG command is ignored because one of the following occurred:
•
A BEGIN CONFIG command was not entered, and, therefore, no configuration
session is in progress.
•
The Teradata Database has not completed startup.
•
The configuration changes were not valid; an error message that describes the problem
is displayed.
When the END CONFIG command is not executed successfully, the system displays:
The new configuration was not stored due to error(s) detected. Please
update the configuration and try END CONFIG again.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
LIST
LIST
Purpose
The LIST command lists the vprocs and hosts in the current or new configuration.
Syntax
LIST
L
SHORT
FROM
CURRENT
LONG
F
C
NEW
N
GT05R010
Syntax element …
Specifies …
SHORT
the compact configuration map. This is the default. It displays the contents of
the following commands:
• LIST CLUSTER
• LIST PE
• LIST HOST
LONG
the detailed configuration map.
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently. This is
the default.
If you do not specify the FROM keyword, the default map type is CURRENT,
and the current configuration map is displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
When you type the LIST command without any options, the system displays the short form of
the default (current) configuration map.
When you type the FROM option, you must specify the map type. No default type is supplied
for this form.
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LIST
Example
An example output generated by the LIST command is shown below:
------------AMP Array
------------Vproc-Id Range
Status
Cluster
Vproc-Id Range
Status
Cluster
--------------------- --------------------- -----------0, 16, 32, 48
Online
0
1, 17, 33, 49 Online
1
2, 18, 34, 50
Online
2
3, 19, 35, 51 Online
3
4, 20, 36, 54
Online
4
5, 21, 37, 53 Online
5
.
.
.
14, 30, 46, 62
Online
14
15, 31, 49, 63 Online
15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------PEs ARRAY
------------Vproc-Id Range
Status
--------------------16344-16354
Online
16355
Down
16356-16363
Online
16364
Down
16365-16377
Online
16378
Down
16379-16383
Online
------------------------------------HOSTs ARRAY
------------HostNo Logical HostID
Type
------ ----------------52
1076
COP
282
282
IBM
286
286
IBM
Connected PE Range
-----------------16368-16383
16344-16351
16353, 16355, 16357, 16359
16361, 16363, 16365, 16367
16360, 16362, 16364, 16366
In response to the LIST command, Configuration lists all AMPs, PEs, and hosts that are
included in the current configuration map. The following table lists the possible status of the
vproc in the previous example.
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Status
Description
Online
The vproc is participating in the current configuration.
Down
The vproc is not participating in the current configuration.
Hold
The vproc was offline during the preceding system execution and is in the process
of being recovered to the online state.
Newready
The vproc has been initialized but has not been added to the configuration.
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LIST AMP
LIST AMP
Purpose
The LIST AMP command displays the attributes of every AMP in the current or new
configuration map.
Syntax
LIST
AMP
L
LA
SHORT
FROM
CURRENT
LONG
F
C
NEW
N
1102A163
Syntax element …
Specifies …
SHORT
the compact configuration map of the AMP vprocs. This is the default.
This option contains only two fields:
• vproc-id range
• status
LONG
the detailed configuration map of the AMP vprocs.
This option contains three fields:
• vproc
• status
• cluster
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently.
This is the default.
The default map type is CURRENT. If you do not specify the map type,
the AMP configuration is displayed from the current map.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
The LIST AMP command displays the AMP configuration map.
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LIST AMP
Example 1
An example output generated by the LIST AMP command is shown below:
AMPs ARRAY
____________________________
Vproc-Id Range
______________
0-63
Status
_______
Online
Vproc-Id Range
_______________
Status
_______
Note: As indicated in the previous example, all the AMP vprocs are online, so the vproc-id is
blocked from the beginning vproc 0 to the ending vproc 63. If the system displays AMP vprocs
that have status other than online, the system lists their vproc-ids and status, as shown in the
following example.
AMPs ARRAY
____________________________
Vproc-Id Range
______________
0
13-14
16-62
Status
_______
Online
Online
Online
Vproc-Id Range
_______________
1-2
15
63
Status
_______
Fatal
Fatal
NewReady
Example 2
An example output generated by the LIST AMP LONG command is shown below:
AMPs ARRAY
____________________________
Vproc
_____
0
2
4
.
.
.
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Status
_______
Online
Fatal
Online
Online
Cluster
_______
0
2
4
14
Vproc
_____
1
3
5
63
Status
_______
Fatal
Online
Online
Online
Cluster
________
1
3
5
15
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LIST CLUSTER
LIST CLUSTER
Purpose
The LIST CLUSTER command displays the attributes of every AMP in the current or new
configuration map, ordered by cluster number.
Usage Notes
LIST
CLUSTER
L
SHORT
FROM
CURRENT
LC
LONG
F
C
NEW
N
GT05R012
Syntax element …
Specifies …
SHORT
the compact display of the attributes of every AMP in the current or new
configuration map, ordered by cluster number.
This option contains three fields:
• vproc-id range
• status
• CN
This is the default.
LONG
the detailed display of the attributes of every AMP in the current or new
configuration map, ordered by cluster number.
This option contains three fields:
• vproc
• status
• cluster
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently. This is
the default.
If you do not specify a map type, the current configuration map is displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
The LIST CLUSTER command displays the cluster configuration map. This map shows a list
of AMPs ordered by cluster number.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
LIST CLUSTER
Example
Example output generated by the LIST CLUSTER command is shown below:
AMPs ARRAY
_____________________
Vproc-Id Range
______________
0, 16, 32, 48
2, 18, 34, 50
4, 20, 36, 54
.
.
.
14, 30, 46, 62
Status
CN
Vproc-Id Range Status Cluster
_______ ________ _______________ ______ _______
Online
0
1, 17, 33, 49
Online
1
Online
2
3, 19, 35, 51
Online
3
Online
4
5, 21, 37, 53
Online
5
Online
14
15, 31, 49, 63
Online
15
AMPs ARRAY
_____________________
Vproc
______
0
2
4
.
.
.
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Status
______
Online
Online
Online
Cluster
________
0
2
4
Online
14
Vproc
_____
1
3
5
63
Status
______
Online
Online
Online
Online
Cluster
_______
1
3
5
15
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
LIST HOST
LIST HOST
Purpose
The LIST HOST command displays all hosts in a current or new configuration.
Syntax
LIST
HOST
L
SHORT
FROM
CURRENT
LH
LONG
F
C
NEW
N
GT05R013
Syntax element …
Specifies …
SHORT
the compact display of all hosts in a current or new configuration map. This
is the default.
This option contains these fields:
•
•
•
•
LONG
HostNo
Logical HostID
Type
Connected PE range
the detailed display of all hosts in a current or new configuration map.
This option contains these fields:
•
•
•
•
HostNo
Logical HostID
Type
Connected PE
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently. This is
the default.
If you do not specify the map type, the current configuration map is
displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
The LIST HOST command displays the host configuration map.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
LIST HOST
Example
An example output generated by the LIST HOST command is shown below:
HOSTs ARRAY
_______________________
HostNo
______
52
821
829
LogicalHostID
_____________
1076
821
829
Type
____
COP
IBM
IBM
Connected PE Range
__________________
16379-16383
16377
16378
Type
____
COP
Connected PE Range
__________________
16379
16380
16381
16382
16383
16377
16378
HOSTs ARRAY
_______________________
HostNo
______
52
821
829
LogicalHostID
_____________
1076
821
829
IBM
IBM
For information about the ranges of logical host IDs for all supported hosts, see “Hosts” on
page 18.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
LIST PE
LIST PE
Purpose
The LIST PE command displays the attributes of every PE in the current or new configuration
map.
Syntax
LIST
PE
L
LP
SHORT
FROM
CURRENT
LONG
F
C
NEW
N
GT05R014
Syntax element …
Specifies …
SHORT
the compact configuration map of the PE vprocs. This is the default.
This option contains only two fields:
• vproc-id range
• status
LONG
the detailed configuration map of the PE vprocs.
This option contains three fields:
• vproc
• status
• hostno
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently.
This is the default.
If you do not specify the map type, the current PE configuration map
is displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
The LIST PE command displays the PE configuration map.
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LIST PE
Example 1
An example output generated by the LIST PE command is shown below.
PEs ARRAY
_________________________
Vproc-Id Range
_______________
16343-16383
Status
_______
Online
Vproc-Id Range
_______________
Status
_______
Note: As indicated in the previous example, all the PE vprocs are online, so the vproc-id is
blocked from the beginning vproc 16343 to the ending vproc 16383. If the system displays PE
vprocs that have status other than online, the system lists their vproc-id and status, as shown
in the following example.
PEs ARRAY
_________________________
Vproc-Id Range
_______________
16343-16354
16356-16363
16365-16377
16379-16383
Status
_______
Online
Online
Online
Online
Vproc-ID Range
______________
16355
16364
16378
Status
_______
Down
Down
Down
Example 2
An example output generated by the LIST PE LONG command is shown below.
PEs ARRAY
_________________________
Vproc
Status
HostNo
______
_______
_______
16344
Online
282
16346
Online
282
16348
Online
282
.
.
.
16382
Online
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Vproc
______
16345
16347
16349
Status
______
Online
Online
Online
HostNo
_______
282
282
282
16383
Online
282
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOD AMP
MOD AMP
Purpose
The MOD AMP command specifies that an AMP or a range of AMPs is to be moved from one
cluster to another.
Syntax
MOD AMP
mmmlist TO CN = nnnn
MA
GT05C015
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
one or more vproc numbers to be moved from one cluster to another.
AMP vprocs are numbered consecutively starting from 0 to a
maximum number of 16199.
TO
the new cluster number entry.
CN = nnnn
new cluster number with which the AMP or AMPs are to be
associated.
The cluster number ranges from 0 to 8099. If you do not specify a
cluster number, it remains unchanged.
Usage Notes
Configuration verifies the vproc number(s) and cluster number.
After the MOD AMP command is accepted, the attributes of the specified AMP are modified,
and the system displays:
The AMPs attribute is modified in the new configuration.
If you type the MOD AMP command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and MOD AMP is ignored.
Example
To modify the cluster assignment of AMP four to AMP eight to be part of cluster one, type:
ma 4 - 8 to cn = 1
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOD HOST
MOD HOST
Purpose
The MOD HOST command changes the host type in the new configuration map.
Syntax
MOD
HOST
HN = nnnn
M
, HT =
MH
IBM
COP
ATT3B
BULLHN
OSII00
GT05R016
Syntax element …
Specifies …
HN = nnnn
the host number whose type is to be changed.
The host number ranges from 1 to 1023.
HT =
the host type.
Usage Notes
After the MOD HOST command is accepted, the type of the specified host is modified in the
new configuration map, and the system displays:
The host is changed in the new configuration map.
If you type the MOD HOST command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command
is ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and MOD HOST is ignored.
Example
To change the host type for host 52 to cop, type:
mh hn = 52, ht = cop
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOD PE
MOD PE
Purpose
The MOD PE command specifies that a PE or a range of PEs is to be moved from one host to
another.
Syntax
MOD PE
mmmlist TO HN = nnnn
MP
GT05C017
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
one or more vproc numbers to be assigned to a different host.
PE vproc numbers start at the high end of their range (30719 or 16383,
depending on the system) and decrease consecutively.
HN = nnnn
the new host number with which the PE (or PEs) is to be associated.
The host number ranges from 1 to 1023.
Usage Notes
Configuration validates the vproc number (or numbers) assigned to the PE (or PEs) and the
host number with which the PE (or PEs) is to be associated.
After the command is accepted, the specified PE (or PEs) is modified in the vproc list in the
new configuration map, and the system displays:
The PE attributes are modified in the new configuration map.
If you type the MOD PE command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored, and the system displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and MOD PE is ignored.
Example
To move PEs from vproc 16344 through vproc 16351 to host 286, type:
mod PE 16344 - 16351 to hn = 286
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOVE AMP
MOVE AMP
Purpose
The MOVE AMP command specifies that all data rows from an AMP or a group of AMPs are
to be moved to another AMP or group of AMPs.
Syntax
MOVE AMP
mmmlist
TO
nnnlist
MVA
GU01A015
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
the range of AMP vproc numbers being moved in the configuration.
nnnlist
the range of AMP vproc numbers that mmmlist is being moved to in the
configuration.
AMP vprocs are numbered consecutively starting from 0 to a maximum
number of 16199.
Usage Notes
The number of AMPs specified in mmmlist and in nnnlist must be the same. The following
applies.
AMPs in the …
Must be …
mmmlist
AMPs defined in the current configuration.
nnnlist
new AMPs only.
After the MOVE AMP command is accepted, Configuration displays:
The AMP range is moved.
If you type the MOVE AMP command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command
is ignored. Configuration displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and MOVE AMP is ignored.
If you type the MOVE AMP command and the ADD AMP command, and if the MOVE AMP
range of vproc numbers is before the ADD AMP range of vproc numbers, Configuration
displays:
Moved AMPS must follow added AMPs.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOVE AMP
If you type the MOVE AMP command and either the MODIFY AMP command or the DEL
AMP command, the commands are ignored. Configuration displays:
Addition, Deletion, and Moving of AMPS are mutually exclusive.
Note: Run the Reconfig utility to do the following:
•
Redistribute all rows from the moved AMPs
•
Change the configuration so that the moved AMPs are properly associated with the correct
nodes and/or disk arrays
For more information on MOVE AMP and the Reconfiguration utility, see Utilities Volume 2.
Example 1
To move AMP 0 in an existing eight-AMP system (AMPs 0-7) to a new AMP (AMP 8), type:
move amp 0 to 8
Example 2
To move AMPs 4-5 in an existing eight-AMP system (AMPs 0-7) to new AMPs (AMPs 8-9),
type:
move amp 4-5 to 8-9
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOVE PE
MOVE PE
Purpose
The MOVE PE command specifies that a PE or group of PEs is to be moved to another PE or
group of PEs.
Syntax
MOVE PE
mmmlist
TO
nnnlist
MVP
GU01A014
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmlist
the range of PE vproc numbers being moved in the configuration.
nnnlist
the range of PE vproc numbers that mmmlist is being moved to in the
configuration.
PE vproc numbers start at the high end of their range (30719 or 16383,
depending on the system) and decrease consecutively.
Usage Notes
The number of PEs specified in mmmlist and in must be the same. The following
applies.nnnlist
PEs in the …
Must be …
mmmlist
PEs defined in the current configuration.
nnnlist
new PEs only.
Note: You also can move PEs that are restricted to specific nodes, such as channel-connected
PEs, to other nodes.
After the MOVE PE command is accepted, Configuration displays:
The PE range is moved.
If you type the MOVE PE command before the BEGIN CONFIG command, the command is
ignored. Configuration displays:
BEGIN CONFIG is not entered, and MOVE PE is ignored.
Note: Run the Reconfig utility to change the configuration so that the moved PEs are properly
associated with the correct nodes and/or disk arrays.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
MOVE PE
Example 1
To move PE 16383 in an existing eight-PE system (PEs 16376 - 16383) to a new PE (PE 16375),
type:
move pe 16383 to 16375
Example 2
To move PEs 16380 - 16381 in an existing eight-PE system (PEs 16376 - 16383) to new PEs
(PEs 16374 - 16375), type:
move pe 16380-16381 to 16374-16375
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SHOW CLUSTER
SHOW CLUSTER
Purpose
The SHOW CLUSTER command displays all AMPs in a specified cluster for a current or new
configuration map.
Syntax
SHOW CLUSTER
CN = nnnn
SC
FROM
CURRENT
F
C
NEW
N
GT05R021
Syntax element …
Specifies …
CN = nnnn
the cluster number for which the appropriate AMPs are to be displayed.
The cluster number ranges from 0 to 8099.
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently. This
is the default.
If you do not specify a map type, the current cluster configuration map is
displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
The SHOW CLUSTER command displays the cluster configuration map.
Example
To display the current configuration map for cluster three and its associated AMPs, type:
show cluster cn = 3
An example output generated by the SHOW CLUSTER command is shown below.
OK, AMPs of cluster 3 are listed.
Vproc
Status
Cluster
Vproc
______ _______ ________
______
3
Online
3
7
11
Online
3
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Status
_______
Online
Online
Cluster
_________
3
3
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
SHOW HOST
SHOW HOST
Purpose
The SHOW HOST command shows information for a specified host.
Syntax
SHOW HOST
HN = nnnn
SH
FROM
F
CURRENT
C
NEW
N
Syntax element …
Specifies …
HN = nnnn
the host number.
GT05B019
The host number ranges from 1 to 1023.
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently.
This is the default.
If you do not specify a map type, the current configuration map is
displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
If you use FROM, you must specify a map type.
Usage Notes
The SHOW HOST command displays the host number, logical host ID, host type, and vproc
numbers of connected PEs.
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SHOW HOST
Example
To display information from the current configuration map about host 10, type:
show host hn = 10
An example output generated by the SHOW HOST command is shown below:
HOSTs ARRAY
___________________
HostNo
LogicalHostID
Type
Connected PE
___________________________________________________
10
17
IBM
16383
10
17
IBM
16382
10
17
IBM
16381
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
SHOW VPROC
SHOW VPROC
Purpose
The SHOW VPROC command displays the attributes of a specified AMP or PE vproc in a
current or new configuration.
Syntax
SHOW vproc
SV
mmmm
FROM
CURRENT
F
C
NEW
N
Syntax element …
Specifies …
mmmm
the vproc number of an AMP or PE.
GT05R020
Note: The AMP vproc number ranges from 0 to 16199, and the PE vproc
number ranges from 15360 to 16383.
FROM
that you will choose the type of configuration map to be displayed.
CURRENT
the configuration map that the Teradata Database is using currently. This is
the default.
The default map type is CURRENT.
If you do not specify a map type, the current configuration map is displayed.
NEW
the proposed configuration map.
Usage Notes
The following table lists what the SHOW VPROC command displays.
56
Type of vproc
Information displayed
PE
• Vproc number
• Status
• Host number with which the PE is associated
AMP
• Vproc number
• Status
• Cluster number
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
SHOW VPROC
Example 1
To display the attributes of PE vproc 16380 for the current configuration map, type:
show vproc 16380
An example output generated by the SHOW VPROC command is shown below:
Vproc
----16380
Status
-----Online
HostNo
---------821
Example 2
To display the attributes of AMP vproc six for the current configuration map, type:
show vproc 6
An example output generated by the SHOW VPROC command is shown below:
Vproc
----6
Support Utilities
Status
-----Online
Cluster
------2
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
STOP
STOP
Purpose
The STOP command stops Configuration.
Syntax
STOP
S
GT05A021
Usage Notes
When you type the STOP command, all AMP tasks created for Configuration are aborted, and
all storage allocated for Configuration is released.
Typing this command does not automatically update the new configuration map for the
current session.
The updating of the new configuration map is accomplished by the END CONFIG command.
The STOP command displays:
Config is about to be stopped.
Caution:
58
The STOP command does not warn you if the END CONFIG command has not been
executed. Be sure to type END CONFIG before using the STOP command.
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Chapter 2: Configuration Utility (config)
Configuration Utility Examples
Configuration Utility Examples
This section shows the process of adding vprocs to a Teradata Database.
Current configuration
New configuration
Four AMPS: 0, 1, 2, 3
Eight AMPS: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
Two PEs: 16383, 16382
Four PEs: 16383, 16382, 16381, 16380
Cluster 0: (0, 1, 2, 3)
Cluster 0: 0, 1, 4, 5
Cluster 1: 2, 3, 6, 7
Activities Performed
The configuration procedure described below performs three activities:
•
Adds AMPs
•
Adds PEs
•
Changes cluster assignments
For this demonstration, do the following in the Database window:
1
In the Database Window, select the Supervisor (Supvr) icon.
The Supervisor window appears.
Note: The PDE must be up and the Supvr window must display the status as “Reading”
before you can enter commands in the command input line.
2
In the Enter a command subwindow of the Supervisor window, type the following and
press Enter:
start config
The Supervisor window displays:
Started ‘config’ in window 1.
The window number represents the application window in which Configuration is
running. The Configuration window appears.
3
To begin the session, type the following in the Configuration window and press Enter:
begin config
4
To add AMPs numbered four through seven, type:
add amp 4
add amp 5
add amp 6
add amp 7
5
To add PEs numbered 16381 and 16380 to host number one, type:
add pe 16381, hn = 1
add pe 16380, hn = 1
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Error Messages
6
To assign AMPs to clusters automatically, type:
default cluster 4
7
To end the session, type:
end config
8
To verify the new configuration, type:
list
9
To stop configuration, type:
stop
You used Configuration to define the new system. Run the Reconfiguration utility next to
configure the defined Teradata Database components into an operational system.
For an example of how to run the Reconfiguration utility following the use of Configuration,
see Support Utilities.
Error Messages
For Configuration error messages, see Messages.
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CHAPTER 3
Filer Utility (filer)
The Filer utility, filer, enables trained personnel to display or modify data structures related to
the Teradata Database File System, including the Write-Ahead Logging (WAL) log. Use Filer to
find and correct problems within the file system and the WAL log.
Caution:
Filer works at a low level of the Teradata Database File System. Commands that manipulate
File System structures are potentially dangerous to the operation of your system if used
improperly. To use Filer, you should have a thorough understanding of the Teradata Database
File System.
Runs From
Filer runs from Database Window or comparable interface to the Teradata Database console
subsystem, such as cnsterm.
For general information on starting the utilities from different interfaces, see Appendix B:
“Starting the Utilities.”
The Teradata Database File System
The Teradata Database File System is not a general-purpose file system. It helps isolate the
Teradata Database from hardware platform dependencies, and supports the creation and
maintenance of database tables under the direction of Teradata Database.
The file system stores data in physical rows. A physical row is a general data structure that
consists of a row header (metadata that includes a unique row ID) and stored data. Each
physical row stores one of several kinds of data. For example:
•
A table row
•
A series of one or more column partition values
•
A table header (metadata for a table; every table has a header)
•
Index data structures
This list is not comprehensive; physical rows also store other types of data used by Teradata
Database.
To Filer and the file system, the kind of data stored in the physical row is immaterial. The
interpretation and differentiation is made by the higher-level database software that requests
and receives the data from the file system.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
Starting Filer
When this chapter uses the term “row” it generally refers to a physical row in the file system,
irrespective of the kind of data the physical row stores.
In the Teradata Database File System, a data block (DB) is a disk-resident structure that
contains one or more physical rows from the same table. Any single physical row is fully
contained within a DB, and every DB is fully contained within a cylinder. A cylinder is a unit
of contiguous physical memory that is allocated as a single unit.
For more information about data blocks and cylinders, see Database Design.
Starting Filer
Standard Startup Syntax
Start Filer from the Supervisor window of Database Window (DBW). Use the DBW start
command. For more information on the options available with the start command, see
“Database Window (xdbw)” in Utilities, Volume 1.
filer
-l
-i
-v
-h
-?
1102B222
Syntax Element
Description
-l
Starts Filer with file system locking disabled.
Use this option to avoid hang or deadlock situations caused by lock conflicts.
Because the file system locking protocols are not observed, Filer may see
inconsistent information.
Caution:
This option should be used only when Teradata Database is in the
Debug-Stop state. Use of the -l option at other times can cause a
database reset.
-i
Same as the -l option.
-v
Starts Filer on a single vproc. This is also known as running Filer in single user
mode.
If the -v vproc option of the DBW START command is specified together with
the -v option of Filer, Filer is started on the vproc identified by vproc,
otherwise, Filer is started on the control vproc, normally the AMP that is
running with the lowest vproc number. For more information on DBW
commands and options, see “Database Window (xdbw)” in Utilities, Volume
1.
Note: The SCOPE and VPROC commands are not allowed when Filer is run
in single user mode. For more information, see “SCOPE (or VPROC)” on
page 209.
-h
62
Displays the online help for Filer.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
Starting Filer
Syntax Element
Description
?
Displays the online help for Filer.
Usage Notes
Teradata Database and the Teradata Database File System need not be running when Filer is
started.
Caution:
Do not leave Filer running unattended because locks on segments (if any exist) could block
other tasks. Either quit Filer, or use the DROP command to release these locks.
Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner
The System Debugger and Coroner are used by qualified personnel to analyze and repair
serious system problems. Filer can be run from within System Debugger and Coroner.
•
When run from System Debugger, Filer does not observe file system locking protocols.
Because these protocols are normally used to avoid hang or deadlock situations, and to
prevent access to file system segments that are in use by other processes, improper use of
Filer from the System Debugger can result in file system corruption.
•
When run from Coroner, Filer presents a subset of the normal Filer commands that are
suitable to working with crashdump data. The Filer HELP command displays the Filer
commands that are available in the current context within which Filer is running.
Diagnostic Startup Options
Warning:
The Filer diagnostic options should be used only by trained Teradata personnel.
The Filer diagnostic options are used to repair a corrupted file system or WAL log. Users of the
diagnostic options should have sufficient knowledge to repair Teradata file system internal
structures, which includes a thorough understanding of the following subjects:
•
Teradata file system internal operation and structures
•
Basic Teradata file system startup sequence
Write Ahead Logging (WAL)
WAL is a log-based file system recovery scheme in which modifications to permanent data are
written to a log file, the WAL log. The log file contains change records (Redo records) which
represent the updates. At key moments, such as transaction commit, the WAL log is forced to
disk. In the case of a reset or crash, Redo records can be used to transform the old copy of a
permanent data block on disk into the version that existed at the time of the reset.
By maintaining the WAL log, the permanent data blocks that were modified no longer have to
be written to disk as each block is modified. Only the Redo records in the WAL log must be
written to disk. This allows a write cache of permanent data blocks to be maintained.
WAL protects all permanent tables and all system tables, but is not used to protect any type of
spool tables, volatile tables, or the Transient Journal (TJ), because TJ records are stored in the
WAL log.
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Starting Filer
The WAL log is maintained as a separate file system from the normal table area. Whole
cylinders are allocated to the WAL log, and it has its own index structure.
The WAL log data is a sequence of WAL log records and includes the following:
•
Redo records, used for updating disk blocks and insuring file system consistency during
restarts.
•
TJ records used for transaction rollback.
The WAL log is subject to many of the same problems as the normal file system, such as data
corruption from hardware, software, and operational problems. Filer provides commands to
display and modify the WAL log and its index so that trained personnel can diagnose and
repair such problems.
Database and File System Startup
File system startup is part of the normal sequence of events that are part of Teradata Database
system startup, as detailed below:
Teradata Database Startup
1
File system startup
2
Start the AMPs
3
Start the PEs
4
Voting for Transaction Recovery
5
Transaction Rollback
File System Startup
A normal startup of the Teradata Database file system starts the WAL log prior to starting the
normal file system. The key phases of Teradata file system startup include the following:
•
Build the WAL Master Index (WMI).
This is the index structure for the WAL log. The WAL log contains the Redo records and
the Transient Journal (TJ) records.
•
Perform Redo analysis and replay.
This scans the WAL log for Redo records and analyzes which records should be applied,
and replays the necessary modifications. Redo processing must be performed before the
MI is built to bring all the Cylinder Index (CI) structures up-to-date.
•
Build the Master Index (MI).
Because the WAL protocol allows for the delayed writing of modified blocks to their home
disk addresses, the blocks on disk are only completely valid after the Redo processing is
complete. When the processing is finished, the CIs have been updated to reflect any
cylinder migrates or other modifications that were performed. At this time, the building of
the MI can proceed.
The specific File System startup sequence on each AMP is as follows:
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1
Get the list of cylinders for this AMP from Teradata Virtual Storage (VS).
2
Validate Segment Zero (SEG0), the File Information Block (FIB), and MI.
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Starting Filer
3
Get the FSYS Trace segment.
4
Process the DEPOT blocks.
5
Process the WAL log:
6
a
Build the WMI.
b
Perform Redo analysis.
c
Perform Redo replay.
Start the File System.
a
If the MI is in memory and valid:
i
Clean up cylinder index descriptors (CIDs) with special flags.
ii
Rebuild the free sector list.
iii Clean up pending migrate flags.
b
c
7
If the MI is not in memory or is invalid:
i
Build the MI.
ii
Complete pending cylinder migrations.
Validate cylinders in FSYS structures against Teradata VS list.
Start File System background tasks.
When a system is corrupted, some or all of the above steps may be difficult to complete. The
Filer diagnostic options allow trained personnel to start Filer even when errors are
encountered during file system startup. The options also provide the ability to control which
phases of the file system startup sequence are executed. This allows users to skip the startup
phases which have errors and to use Filer to troubleshoot and repair the problems.
Errors encountered during WAL log startup or during Redo processing will generally abort
the startup. You can use the Filer diagnostic options to analyze the problems and possibly
recover from the errors.
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Starting Filer
Diagnostic Startup Syntax
To use the Filer diagnostic startup options, include them on the command line when starting
Filer from the Supervisor window of Database Window.
filer
diagnostics
-l
-i
-v
-h
-?
diagnostics
-t
-w -r vprocs
-u
-x
-y
-z
-n
-u -r vprocs
-x -r vprocs
-y -r vprocs
-z -r vprocs
-n -r vprocs
1102B223
The diagnostic options are described below. For an explanation of the non-diagnostic Filer
startup options see “Standard Startup Syntax” on page 62.
Syntax Element
Description
-u
Does not build the WMI, does not perform any Redo processing, but builds the
MI.
If a problem exists such that the WAL log cannot be built successfully, first start
Filer with the -x option. (If Filer does not present a command prompt, try
restarting Filer using both the -x and -w options.) Repair the log, and restart Filer
to perform Redo processing.
If Filer does not present a command prompt when started with the options
above, restart Filer using the -u option to skip building the WAL log and
performing Redo operations. Examine and repair the problem WAL cylinder
indexes (WCIs) and WAL data blocks (WDBs), and restart Filer again to perform
Redo processing.
If the WAL log is beyond repair, use the -u option again and run SCANDISK to
determine the health of the file system before any decision is made on how to
proceed next (such as deleting the complete WAL log).
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Syntax Element
Description
-w
Executes the normal file system startup process, but ignores most errors. Redo
processing continues even if errors are encountered during the Redo phase.
If the -w option is used with another diagnostic option, the -r option need be
specified only once. For example:
start filer -w -y -r 2
Use this option to clean up the WAL log and the file system as much as possible.
This option skips certain file system startup errors, such as software errors
related to the Redo process and its prerequisite conditions. Read errors and other
hardware-related errors are not skipped.
The Redo process attempts to process as much of the WAL log as possible, and
then the rest of the normal file system startup logic is executed.
It is highly recommended to run SCANDISK after the Redo process to determine
the structural integrity of the file system. See “SCANDISK” on page 189.
In cases where errors are encountered before the Redo phase, (for example, while
building the WAL log), you can use the -w option together with another
diagnostic option such as -z to skip both the errors and the Redo phase. This
allows you to start Filer and possibly repair the WAL log so that subsequent file
system startup and Redo processing attempts will succeed.
A log file is created for each vproc where Filer -w is invoked. You can check these
files for errors and warnings. See “Filer -w Error Log” on page 70.
-x
Builds the WAL Master Index (WMI), but does not perform Redo processing,
and does not build the Master Index (MI).
Use this option to examine and repair a corrupted WAL log. The option is useful
when errors are encountered during Redo processing or when building the MI.
The option provides the ability to examine and repair the WMI. It allows you to
inspect the WAL log without trying to process the log or build the file system.
It is highly recommended to run SCANDISK WAL to determine the structural
integrity of the WAL index structure. See “SCANDISK” on page 189.
Once repairs are completed, you can run Filer again to process the Redo records.
-y
Builds the WMI and performs Redo processing, but does not build the MI.
Use this option when the file system index structure is corrupt, and building the
MI causes Filer to abort. This option gives you the ability to examine and repair
the index structure.
Once repairs are completed, run Filer again to build the MI.
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Starting Filer
Syntax Element
Description
-z
Builds the WMI, does not perform Redo processing, but does build the MI.
Use this option when errors are encountered during Redo processing, and the
WAL log may be damaged beyond repair.
You can examine the file system to determine whether it can be salvaged. You can
determine whether it is possible to repair the WAL log sufficiently so that Redo
processing using the -w option can complete, or to ignore the WAL log and just
repair the file system index structure.
It is highly recommended to run SCANDISK and SCANDISK WAL to determine
the structural integrity of the WAL log and the file system. See “SCANDISK” on
page 189.
-n
Does not build the WMI, does not perform Redo processing, and does not build
the MI.
Use this option when serious problems exist in the file system which cause file
system startup to fail in the early stages.
This option executes as little file system startup logic as possible to bypass errors
so that Filer can be started. You can examine the file system to determine whether
it can be salvaged. Since key global file system structures are not rebuilt in this
mode, some commands, including a full SCANDISK, will be disabled.
-r vprocs
Starts Filer in the -w, -u, -x, -y, -z, or -n diagnostic mode on the specified vprocs.
The -r option must be used in conjunction with the other diagnostic options to
limit the scope of these diagnostic modes. vprocs can be one of the following:
• A single vproc number
• A comma-separated list of vproc numbers
• A range of vproc numbers in the form of start:end. For example, 2:5
represents vprocs 2, 3, 4, and 5.
• A combination of vproc numbers and ranges of vproc numbers separated by
commas
The syntax for vprocs is as follows:
,
number
number:number
1102A179
Filer will start using the specified diagnostic option on the vprocs specified by the
vprocs argument. Filer will start normally on the other vprocs.
Note: If Filer is started with the -v option to run Filer only on a single vproc, the
number of the vproc where Filer is running must be included in the -r vprocs
specification.
-t
Causes Filer invocation to create diagnostic files (dbgfil* and dbgftr*), which can
be used to debug problems related to the Teradata Database File System.
Diagnostic Option Usage Notes
Running Filer with the diagnostic options is only allowed on vprocs that are in a fatal state or
where the Teradata Database is not running. The -r option must be used with the diagnostic
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Starting Filer
options to specify the AMPs on which Filer should run diagnostically. On other AMPs, Filer
will run normally.
The -u, -x, -y, -z, and -n options are mutually exclusive; however, the -w option can be used in
combination with the -u, -x, -y, -z, or -n options.
Note the distinction between the -v and the -r vprocs options of Filer:
•
-v runs Filer on a single AMP vproc. To specify the vproc on which Filer runs, the -v
option of Filer is used together with the -v vproc option of the Database Window START
command. If the START command -v vproc option is not specified, Filer runs on the
control vproc of the node on which Filer was invoked.
•
-r vprocs runs Filer on all AMP vprocs in the system, but runs it in a diagnostic mode on
the AMP vprocs specified by vprocs. The -r vprocs option must be used in conjunction with
one or more of the other diagnostic Filer options. Filer runs its normal, non-diagnostic
mode on the other AMPs in the system, which were not specified by -r vprocs.
When using any of the diagnostic options, SCANDISK should be run at the level that is
available to the option. Initial results from SCANDISK will indicate whether the file system
structures are coherent. If repairs are made based on the SCANDISK result, SCANDISK
should be run again, either immediately after the repairs, or after quitting and restarting Filer
with the appropriate options. This will insure that the repairs resulted in a structurally correct
file system. See “SCANDISK” on page 189.
Some Filer commands are not available with certain diagnostic modes because these
commands depend on specific file system structures which may not be built when Filer is
started with those diagnostic options.
The following table shows the commands that are disabled for the various diagnostic options.
Commands not listed in the table are valid in all modes of Filer.
-u
-w
-x
-y
CID
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
FIND
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
MI
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
MODIFY
-n
Disabled
ROW
SCANDISK (Full)
Disabled
SCANDISK WAL
Disabled
SCANDISK WMI
Disabled
TABLE
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-z
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
WABC
Disabled
WAL
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
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Starting Filer
-u
WCID
-w
-x
-y
-z
-n
Disabled
Disabled
WFIND
Disabled
WFLUSH
Disabled
Disabled
WMI
Disabled
Disabled
WREC
Disabled
Disabled
WSUMMARY
Disabled
The diagnostic options have no direct effect on the Transient Journal (TJ). However, if manual
repairs are made to the WAL log, the TJ records might also be affected.
When Filer is started with any of the diagnostic options, an informational message will be
appended to the streams log(s) specifying which vprocs were affected.
Filer -w Error Log
When Filer is started with the -w option, a separate log file is created for each vproc where
Filer -w is invoked. By default, the log is created in /var/opt/teradata/tdtemp. The location and
name of the file is displayed on the Filer screen. The file logs any warnings and errors
encountered during Filer startup on that vproc.
After Filer is started, users should check the log files for errors or warnings, and take the
appropriate action to ensure that the file system structures are consistent. The log file is useful
for diagnosing WAL log problems, and identifying tables that may need repair.
Example 1
The following example shows the Filer screen when Filer is invoked with the -w option. The
output screen displays the location and names of the log files created.
To start Filer -w diagnostic mode on vproc 1, and have Filer run in normal mode on other
vprocs in the system, type the following into the Supervisor window of Database Window:
start filer -w -r 1
Filer shows the following output in the Filer Application window of Database Window, and
subsequent Filer commands are entered into this window:
Filer will be started with the -w option on the following VPROCs
VPROC(s) 00001 (0001)
Filer will be started normally on all other VPROCs
WARNING: The Filer option that you've entered allows you to run Filer in
a special diagnostic mode. Running in this mode can cause serious damage
to your data if you do not understand both the internals of the file
system and the basic startup sequence. Only trained field support
personnel should attempt to use these options.
Do you wish to continue?? (Y/N)
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Starting Filer
y
File System Debug Utility
_______
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____
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/
|/ \
____|
|
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/
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\___
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\____|
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/
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\____|
____
____|
/
|
\____|
|
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____
____|
/
|
\____|
Release 14.00.00.00 Version 14.00.00.00
Filer
Waiting for Filer Slave tasks to start
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
1 (0001)
response
Filer -w started on VPROC 1.
Startup information and errors will be logged
in the file /var/opt/teradata/tdtemp/filer.w1.120938.txt.
Mon Apr 07, 2011 18:19:18
4 of 4 amps have been selected
Filer ==>
Example 2
The following example starts Filer with the -w option on vprocs 2, 3 and 4, but starts Filer
normally (without the -w option) on all other vprocs.
start filer -w -r 2, 3, 4
This command can also be invoked using the following syntax:
start filer -w -r 2:4
Example 3
The following example starts Filer with the -y option on vprocs 1, 4 through 7, and 9, but
starts Filer normally on all other vprocs.
start filer -y -r 1, 4:7, 9
Example 4
The following example starts Filer with the -n option on vproc 3 only. Since the Filer -v option
(the second -v) is used, the target vproc (vproc 3 as specified by the -v 3 option) must be listed
in the arguments for the -r option.
start -v 3 filer -v -n -r 3
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Filer Command Syntax
Filer Command Syntax
Filer presents a command-line environment that allows the entry of Filer commands. This
section describes the general conventions involved in entering Filer commands.
Entering Filer Commands
The following is the general form for a command entry:
parameterlist
cmd
cmdoption
cmdoption
1102A192
Syntax Element
Description
cmd
The Filer command.
cmdoption
The options that are specific to the command that you type.
Different options pertain to specific commands. To determine the allowed
options, see the specific command.
parameterlist
The parameters included with specific commands.
Command Usage Rules
The following command usage rules apply to Filer commands:
•
•
A space is required between the following:
•
The cmdoption and the parameterlist
•
The cmd and the parameterlist if you do not specify cmdoption or if the cmdoption is at
the end of the command
You can combine multiple Filer commands on a single command line, as shown below:
command
;
command
;
GS04A004
•
Filer is case insensitive, which means that you can enter any command, keyword, or option
in uppercase, lowercase, or mixed-case letters.
•
If you end a command line with a backward slash (\), the command line continues on the
next line.
•
If an error occurs during processing of a string of commands, processing stops because the
latter commands usually depend on the correct processing of commands typed earlier, as
shown below:
ci /p 0001000600000024;delete /y
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In this case, if there is a problem accessing the CI, you might not want to execute the
DELETE command.
•
If an error occurs while parsing the command line, you can type a single question mark (?)
as the next command. Filer displays a list of alternatives expected by the parser at that
point of the syntax error.
If you type another single question mark (?) after Filer displays the alternatives, Filer
returns the HELP text for the command in question.
The following example shows help information about the RADIX command:
Filer ==>radix in dex
radix in de<-Syntax error->x
Filer ==> ?
Valid input at the point of error is:
;
end of command
Filer ==> ?
RADIX [ ( IN[PUT] | OUT[PUT] ) ] [ ( H[EX] | D[EC] )
Filer ==> ?
RADIX [ ( IN[PUT] | OUT[PUT] ) ] [ ( H[EX] | D[EC] ) ]
Sets the Flags for how to treat Unqualified number. Either Hex
(base 16) or Decimal (Base 10), respectively. See HELP NUMBER for a
description of unqualified INPUT. The initial setting of these Flags
are HEX. If neither INPUT nor OUTPUT is specified,
the command applies to both Flags. If neither HEX nor DEC is
specified, the current setting of the Flag is displayed.
Filer ==> ?
No more information available. Use HELP /L
•
Comments are allowed anywhere a blank is allowed. Enclose comments between braces
({}).
If Filer does not find a closing brace (}) on the line, Filer interprets the rest of the line as a
comment, as shown in the following example:
Filer ==> db 0 2 1fa { this is the broken data block
•
If you use a single question mark (?) in place of a legal syntactic element, Filer informs you
as to what you can type at that point in the command, as shown below:
Filer ==> output ?
Valid input at the ? is :
,
INTO
OVER
end of command
TO
ON
;
In this example, Filer accepts any of the following:
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•
A comma (,)
•
INTO
•
OVER
•
TO
•
ON
•
A semicolon (;)
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Other examples of using a single question mark (?) in place of a legal syntactic element are
shown below:
output
output
output
output
•
?
?{comment}
? {comment
{comment} ?
Unlike other commands, the PATCH command cannot be combined on the command
line with other commands. For more information, see “PATCH” on page 167.
Filer Modes
When started, Filer displays the Filer command prompt in the Filer application window of
Database Window:
Filer ==>
Filer enters different modes of operation, based on the last command entered. The modes are
generally associated with the hierarchical level of the file system architecture at which Filer is
currently operating. The Filer command prompt changes to reflect the current mode:
Filer ==>
mi /p
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
Mon Apr 21, 2008 16:06:26
4 of 4 vprocs responded with no messages or errors.
MI
(Range) ==>
Filer commands are prompt-sensitive:
•
Global and upper-level commands are valid at any prompt.
•
Lower-level commands are valid only under certain prompts that are initiated by upperlevel commands.
For more information on Filer command types, see “Filer Command Types” on page 92.
Filer retains data object parameters for the current level of operation until they are changed or
until Filer changes to a different mode. For example, once a range of rows has been specified
for Filer to act upon, subsequent commands will operate on those same rows, without
requiring re-entry of the row range specification. For more information, see “Stored Input
Values” on page 82.
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Specifying Data Objects
This section provides detailed information on the following:
•
“Numeric Input”
•
“Multitoken Parameters”
•
“Cylinders and Data Blocks”
•
“Rows and Row Ranges”
•
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)”
•
“Stored Input Values”
Numeric Input
Numeric values can be entered into Filer in either decimal or hexadecimal format. The default
numeric base for data input to and output from Filer depends on the radix settings for input
and output:
•
When the radix for input is decimal, Filer interprets numeric input as decimal numbers.
For example, a number entered as 45 will be interpreted as the value forty five.
•
When the radix for input in hexadecimal, Filer interprets numeric input as hexadecimal
numbers. For example, a number entered as 45 will be interpreted as the value sixty nine.
The initial radix setting in Filer is hexadecimal for input and output. For more information on
setting the radix, see “RADIX” on page 178.
The following special numeric formatting conventions can be used to force Filer to interpret
entered numeric values as decimal or hexadecimal, regardless of the radix setting:
•
Decimal values can be signified by adding a 0i or i prefix, or by adding a decimal point
suffix:
0i45 45. 0I45
•
Hexadecimal values can be signified by adding a 0x or x prefix, or by adding an h
suffix. Leading zeros are optional:
0x2D X2D 2Dh 002DH
The valid range of numeric values in Filer are unsigned 16-bit values, 0 through 65535 (0x0
through 0xFFFF), except when patching using /L or /W for 32-bit integers, in which case the
valid range is 0 through 4,294,967,295 (0x0 through 0xFFFFFFFF). For more information, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
You must separate two numbers on the same line from each other by a space or a comma.
Multitoken Parameters
Multitoken parameters, such as subtable identifiers, which are typed as three values, are typed
on a single line with one or more spaces separating the individual tokens. Filer also accepts
multitoken parameters separated by hyphens.
For example, Filer accepts either of the following as subtable identifiers:
0 200 0
0-200-0
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Filer Command Syntax
You can separate parameters from each other and from the command by spaces or a comma.
To specify a command option (cmdoption), type it on the same line as the command (cmd).
Cylinders and Data Blocks
•
Each cylinder has a 64-bit identifier, represented as a cylid in Filer commands. Cylids must
be entered as 16-character hexadecimal numbers regardless of the Filer input radix setting.
•
Data blocks are specified by a cylid, and by their starting sector number and length,
represented as sectornum and sectorcount in Filer commands. Type each of these
parameters as a single numeric value. The format for entering sectornum and sectorcount
values is subject to the input radix setting.
For more information on the formatting of numeric input and output, see “Numeric Input”
on page 75 and “RADIX” on page 178.
Rows and Row Ranges
For more information on the Teradata Database File System and physical rows, see “The
Teradata Database File System” on page 61.
Every physical row is uniquely identified by a row ID. A row ID specification, also referred to
as a ridspec or a rowspec, consists of an two 2- or 8-byte partition number, a 4-byte row hash
value, and a 4-byte uniqueness value.
The partition number is stored as 2-bytes if the numbers are in the range of 1 through 65535.
If the range is greater, 8-bytes are used. If the table is not partitioned, the partition number is
zero.
NoPI tables, which include all column-partitioned tables, have a 16- or 20-bit hash bucket
value in place of the 4-byte row hash value, and a corresponding 48- or 44-bit uniqueness
value. For more information on NoPI tables, see SQL Data Definition Language.
A physical row can store one of several types of data, such as table rows, a series of column
partition values, a table header (metadata about the table), index data structures, and other
types of data. Every physical row stores only one kind of data.
A range of rows, also called a ridrange, is specified by the ridspec of the starting and ending
rows:
start_rid_spec
TO end_rid_spec
1102B182
For purposes of input, the required and optional components of a ridspec depend on whether
the table containing the physical row is partitioned.
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Table Type
partitioned
Ridspec Syntax
row_partition
=
nonpartitioned
row_hash
=
row_partition
=
row_partition
=
row_hash
=
row_hash
=
row_uniq
=
1102A188
row_uniq
=
row_uniq
=
1102A187
Syntax Element
Description
row_partition
The partition number of the physical row. The partition number is a single
numeric value. It is the internal partition number used by the file system, which
is the value shown in Filer command output screens under the column
heading: part. The value must be between 0 and 9223372036854775807 (0 and
7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF in hexadecimal notation).
For tables with multiple levels of partitioning, each physical partition results
from the combination of all partitioning expressions in the PARTITION BY
clause for a specific set of values in the partitioning columns. This gives a single,
unique combined partition number, which is mapped to an internal partition
number. Although the combined partition number of a partition can change if
partition ranges are dropped or added for the partition level, the internal
partition number does not change.
For rows in nonpartitioned tables, the partition number must be zero, if
specified, or can be omitted from the ridspec.
row_hash
The row hash value of the physical row. The row hash determines the AMP to
which the physical row is distributed. The row hash consists of 2 numeric values,
usually shown in output screens under column headings h0 and h1.
For start_rid_spec:
• row_hash defaults to 0x0000 0x0000.
For end_rid_spec:
• row_hash defaults to the value of row_hash specified in start_rid_spec. If no
value for row_hash was specified in start_rid_spec, row_hash in end_rid_spec
defaults to 0xFFFF 0xFFFF.
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Syntax Element
Description
row_uniq
The system-generated uniqueness value which is used with the row hash value to
uniquely identify a physical row. The uniqueness value consists of two numeric
values, usually shown in output screens under column headings u0 and u1.
For start_rid_spec:
• If row_uniq is omitted, and no end_rid_spec is specified, all the rows in
row_hash are selected.
• If row_uniq is omitted, and an end_rid_spec is specified, row_uniq defaults
0x0000 0x0000.
For end_rid_spec:
• row_uniq defaults to the value of row_uniq specified in start_rid_spec. If no
value for row_uniq was specified in start_rid_spec, row_uniq in end_rid_spec
defaults to 0xFFFF 0xFFFF.
=
The program will use the most recently saved values for row_partition,
row_hash, or row_uniq.
The most recently specified values for row_partition, row_hash, and row_uniq
are stored. Separate values are stored for start_rid_spec and end_rid_spec.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
row_partition, row_hash, or row_uniq. An error is reported if a saved
start_rid_spec or end_rid_spec value is used for a partitioned table, but the table
referenced in the current command is not partitioned, and vice versa.
Example 1
Filer ==> showdefaults
The current object selected is Nothing
The current defaults are:
The present value for the = is:
Dec (Hex)
Cylinder Id = : 0000FFFFFFFFFFFF
Sector Number
972 (03CC)
Sector Count
16 (0010)
Memory Address
is undefined.
Length
is undefined.
Patch Offset
is undefined.
TID
0
26 1024 (0000 001A 0400)
Start Rowid
0
512
657
0 1059 (0000 0200 0291 0000 0423 )
End Rowid
65535
512
657
0 1059 (FFFF 0200 0291 0000 0423 )
Start WLSN
is undefined
End WLSN
is undefined
Where Clause
is undefined
Filer is running as a startable utility
Filer is running with Locking -- Enabled
Filer is running with Script Mode -Disabled
File System has Internal Tracing -- Enabled
Example 2
DB ==>
dbrow /m
ROW
length
rowid
flags presences
part hash0 hash1 uniq0 uniq1
------ ---- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- --------09CD 0000 7C6B 71AB 0000 0001
00
9C
0097 0000 7D47 ADC8 0000 0001
00
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0800
00D5
00D5
0097
0000
0000
0000
0000
7D57
823F
871F
8913
B91E
CDAE
7438
51BD
0000
0000
0000
0000
0001
0001
0001
0001
00
00
00
00
9C
99
99
91
For more information on table row structure, see Database Design.
Subtable Identifiers (tids)
Commands operate on subtables, rather than on tables. A table is a collection of subtables,
and a subtable is a collection of physical rows. Each subtable has physical rows that store one
particular type of data. For example, primary and fallback data subtables have data rows,
primary and fallback index subtables have index rows. table and the physical rows of table
header subtables contain table metadata.
Each subtable is identified by a subtable identifier (tid). The tid has two parts. The first part
identifies the table to which the subtable belongs. All subtables that are part of the same table
have the same table identifier as part of their tid. The second part identifies one of the
subtables that comprise the table, and indicate the subtable type.
A tid is defined as follows:
table_unique
type_and_index
=
1102B159
table_unique and type_and_index together uniquely identify a subtable.
Syntax Element
Description
table_unique
Unique identifier of the table to be acted upon.
The table can be uniquely identified in either of two ways:
1 Specify the name of the database to which the table belongs and the table
name, separated by a period. The names individually or together must be
delimited. The following formats are valid:
• "database_name.table_name"
• "database_name"."table_name"
• 'database_name.table_name'
• 'database_name'.'table_name'
2 Specify the unique numeric identifier of the table, which consists of two
numeric values separated by a space. The table identifier consists of the first
two numeric values returned by the TABLEID command. These two numbers
are common to all subtables that comprise the table.
Note: The format of the input numbers depends on the current radix setting,
which is displayed by the RADIX command.
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=
Specifies to use the most recently saved value for table_unique.
type_and_index
Uniquely identifies the subtable within the group of subtables that comprise a
table. The type_and_index identifies both the type of subtable, and the individual
subtable itself.
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The syntax for type_and_index is as follows:
type
/
index
/
variant
number
1102A095
Syntax Element
Description
type
The type of subtable. type can be one of the following:
Type
Description
*
All the subtables of this table.
H
The table header subtable.
Because table header subtables have any index and variant
specifications that follow an H type are ignored.
index
P
The primary data subtable.
F number
The fallback data subtable specified by number. The default is 1.
F*
All of the fallback subtables.
The index subtable to examine. If the index subtable is not given, it defaults to
the data subtable. Index 1 is the first secondary index, Index 2 is the second
secondary index, and so forth.
index can be one of the following:
Index
Description
number
A secondary index and can be used instead of specifying X
number. If you enter number by itself, then number must be a
multiple of 4 and it is interpreted in the following way:
•
•
•
•
80
number = 0 is the same as entering X0
number = 4 is the same as entering X1
number = 8 is the same as entering X2
number = 12 is the same as entering X3
and so forth.
*
All the indexes of the table.
D
The primary data index (same as X0 or 0).
X number
The secondary index specified by number. The default is 1.
X*
All the secondary indexes, starting at 0.
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Filer Command Syntax
Syntax Element
Description
variant
The possible subtables.
variant can be one of the following:
number
Variant
Description
*
All the possible variant subtables.
0
The default. If you do not specify variant, 0 is assumed.
1
The value during a Sort or Table Modify operation.
2
A value that is not used.
3
A value that is not used.
A single number that represents internally the type of subtable (header, primary
data, or fallback data), the index to use when ordering the physical rows (primary
data index or one of the secondary indexes), and the variant. The table header
has a type_and_index number of zero. Examples of these numbers are listed
below.
The following table gives examples that describe the type and index fields.
Subtable Description
Number
Type
Table header
0
H
Primary data subtable
1024
(0x0400)
P
First secondary index
1028
(0x0404)
First fallback table
2048
(0x0800)
Second secondary index of the third
fallback table
4104
(0x1008)
P/X1
F1
F1/D
F3/X2
P/*
All primary secondary indexes
P/X*
All fallback subtables
F*
All subtables of this table
*
Both tables during a sort of the first
secondary index
1029
(0x0405)
Type/Index/
Variant
P/D
All primary subtables
Sort table of the first secondary index
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Type/
Index
P/X1/1
P/X1/ *
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Filer Command Syntax
Example
Assume that table T4 is a table in database MYDB and has a table_number of 0 1198. Also
assume that input is accepted in hexadecimal format.
Some valid specifications of a tid for primary subtables of table T4 are as follows:
•
"MYDB.T4" 400
•
"MYDB.T4" 1024.
•
"MYDB"."T4" P
•
'MYDB'.'T4' 400 h
•
0 1198 400
•
0 1198 P
Stored Input Values
Filer stores the most recent values entered for the following parameters:
•
cylid
•
endcylid
•
length
•
memaddr
•
offset
•
row_hash
•
row_partition
•
row_uniq
•
sectorcount
•
sectornum
•
startcylid
•
tablenumber
•
tid
You can enter an equal sign (=) for any of these parameters to use the currently stored value.
These context values are position-dependent. (For example, values stored for a start_rid_spec
can be used only as part of a start_rid_spec argument in a later command and not as part of an
end_rid_spec).
The stored values are updated by the commands as well. For example, if you select a data
block, the stored value for the tid is updated to the subtable identifier of the data block, and
the RowIDs are updated to the first and last physical row in the data block.
Note: To use = to represent a stored value for a current command, you must have entered an
input value for that parameter in a previous command, or issued a previous command which
saved a value for that parameter. Use the SHOWDEFAULTS command to see the currently
stored values. For more information, see “SHOWDEFAULTS” on page 212.
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Filer Command Syntax
Specifying Display Ranges (ordinalrange)
The ordinalrange parameter is used to specify a range of objects relative to the current position
to be displayed.
ordinalrange can be used on the following commands:
•
DISPLAY
•
TABLE
•
WAL
When used on the …
ordinalrange …
DISPLAY command
restricts or expands the initial context, producing a different
resulting context. DISPLAY shows the objects in the new context.
Filer saves the context from a previous command, and the
ordinalrange is interpreted with respect to this initial context. The
initial context for the DISPLAY command can be a physical row,
subtable, CI, CID, DB, DBD, MI, WAL log record, WCI, WCID,
WDB, WDBD, WMI, or a range thereof (except for the MI and
WMI which are singular contexts).
TABLE command
restricts the range of physical rows to display, but does not influence
the resulting context.
An implicit initial context consisting of the physical rows of the
table, and the ordinalrange is interpreted with respect to this
context. The initial context for the TABLE command is always this
same row range context. No matter what is displayed, the resulting
context is always a subtable rather than a row range.
WAL command
restricts the WAL log records that are displayed.
The initial context is from the first WAL log record to the last, and
the ordinalrange is interpreted with respect to this context. The
resulting context is a WAL log record or WAL log record range;
therefore, the resulting context matches the records selected.
Note: The Filer online help refers to ordinalrange as rangeopt, but the usage is the same.
ordinalrange input is as follows:
start
TO stop
1102A092
start and stop are defined as follows:
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Filer Command Syntax
number
+
.
BEG
+
number
$
END
+
number
*
ALL
1102A076
Syntax Element
Description
BEG
BEG always refers to the first object in the context. If the context is singular, BEG and END refer
to the same object.
END
END always refers to the last object in the context. If the context is singular, BEG and END refer
to the same object.
+/- number
The meaning of +/- number without BEG/END depends on whether it is used on a DISPLAY,
TABLE, or WAL command:
When used on a …
+ number is equivalent to …
DISPLAY command
END + number, and – number is equivalent to BEG - number,
as described below:
• A + number is a displacement from the last object in the
context, expanding the context beyond the last object by the
specified number of objects.
• A - number is a displacement from the first object in the
context, expanding the context before the first object by the
specified number of objects.
TABLE command
BEG + number - 1, and – number is equivalent to ENDnumber, as described below:
• A + number is an ordinal row number, where 1 is the first
physical row.
• A - number is a backwards displacement from the last
physical row, so that -1 is the second to the last physical row.
The exception is if the TABLE command uses a wildcard for
the type part of the tid. In this case, the resultant context is
special (nothing), and the display is a multiple subtable display,
where each subtable is constrained by the ordinal range. For
each subtable, the BEG/END +/- number rules apply, except
that the – number construct is not allowed.
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Filer Command Syntax
Syntax Element
Description
WAL command
BEG + number - 1, and – number is equivalent to ENDnumber, as described below:
• A + number is an ordinal record number, where 1 is the first
WAL log record.
• A - number is a backwards displacement from the last
record, so that -1 is the second to the last WAL log record.
For examples, see “DISPLAY” on page 127, “TABLE” on page 217, and “WAL” on page 226.
BEG/END +/- number
Allows specifying an object relative to the first or last object of a context.
When used on a …
BEG/END +/- number can …
DISPLAY command
be used to expand or contract a context.
TABLE or WAL command
only restrict the initial context for display purposes.
.
If the current position encompasses a range of objects, then start or the period (.) means from
the first object in the range.
$
If the current position encompasses a range of objects, then stop or the dollar sign ($) means
from the last object in the range.
*/ALL
If you specify an asterisk (*) or ALL as the end field, ALL is translated into an end field. After an
operation involving ordinalrange, the context, including the currently selected object, is
adjusted to be these new objects just acted upon by this command.
Specifying a WHERE clause
The WHERE clause can be supplied to the DISPLAY, WAL, and WREC commands to restrict
selection based on row/record type or content. The constraint is in addition to the ridrange,
ordinalrange and wlsnrange constraints. For more information about these constraints, see the
description of the DISPLAY, WAL, or WREC command. Most of the constraints in the
WHERE clause apply to WAL log records only, and not to physical rows in normal tables.
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Syntax
WHERE
A
,
,
,
KIND=kind
ACTION=action
FLAGS=flags
A
NTASTATE=ntastate
,
,
TJKIND=tjkind
TJTABLE=tid
B
B
C
,
,
TJROW=rowid
TJTRANS=procnum transuniq
C
,
,
TRXSTATE=trxstate
D
,
TJHOST=number
,
,
TJREQUEST=number
TJRCVSESS=number
D
TJSESSION=number
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Syntax Element
Description
kind
Types of WAL log records to display. The following are the valid values.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
86
ALLOCSECT
BACKOUTSECT
BEFORECHECKSUM
CHECKPOINT
DBD
DIAGNOSTIC
FREECYL
FREELINEAGE
FSP
HDRMIGINFO
HDRONLY
NEWDB
NONTJ
ROW
ROWCOPY
ROWNEWSECT
SRD
TJRECORD
UNFSE
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Filer Command Syntax
Syntax Element
Description
action
Indicates the action to be redone in certain NONTJ records. The
following are the valid values.
• INSERT
• UPDATE
• DELETE
flags
The following are the derived flags values that are valid in the WHERE
clause.
• NTA
• NTABEGIN
• NTAEND
ntastate
The following are the valid values.
• OPEN
• CLOSED
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Syntax Element
Description
tjkind
Types of Transient Journal (TJ) records to display. The following are
the valid values.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
88
NILL
TIP
HSTSTRT
BEG
END
CLRDMP
FALL
DELTBL
BEFROW
DELROW
NEWROW
DELIDX
NEWIDX
MODTBL
DBLOK
PJTRNBEG
PJROW
DELPJ
DELALL
INSETB
TIPLOK
TIPAPJ
SESSEP
2PCVOTE
2PCABRT
2PCSTAT
IDT
REQABT
NEWTMPTBL
BEGSAVEPT
ENDSAVEPT
SAVEPTABT
NEWLOB
DELETELOB
DELPART
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Filer Command Syntax
Syntax Element
Description
tjkind (continued)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
TJTABLE tid
tid of the table referenced inside a TJ record. Some TJ records contain
the subtable identifier (tid) and row identifier for the applicable
physical row (the row to which the TJ record will be applied during
rollback). This is displayed as a 4-byte table number and 2-byte
typeandindex. However, as a TJTABLE argument, this is supplied in
the normal Filer tid format, using two numbers for the halves of the
table number, and a third number for the typeandindex. For more
information on tid formatting, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on
page 79.
TJROW rowid
rowid of the row referenced inside a TJ record. This is the RowID of
the database row that the TJ record applies to. For example, this
identifies the physical row whose update caused the TJ record to be
created.
TJTRANS procnum
transuniq
TJ record transaction identification. procnum and transuniq are both
numbers.
trxstate
For the TJ records, display only the TJ records for given transaction
states. The following are the valid values.
INSPART
QTNEWROW
QTDELROW
FATMODTBL
REPACT
MARKER
NUSIDEL
NUSIINS
BEFTHROW
BEFTHROWFLOAD
CRESNAPSHOT
REMSNAPSHOT
RELCHN
NESTEDDONE
NEWOLJ
• OPEN
• ABORTED
• CLOSED
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TJHOST number
TJ record host number.
TJSESSION number
TJ record session number.
TJREQUEST number
For the TJ records, display only the TJ records for these requests.
TJRCVSESS number
For the TJ records, display only the TJ records for these recovery
sessions.
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Usage Notes
You can use the Boolean OR operator with KIND and TJKIND. You can use the Boolean AND
operator for all other conditions. The != (not equal to) comparison operator is also allowed in
comparisons.
You can enter Keyword arguments in any order. Separate Keyword arguments (some of which
contain lists) with a space. Within a list, separate items with a comma.
KIND=TJRECORD implies a WAL type of TJ. The kind value NONTJ does not represent an
actual WAL log record kind, but is provided as a convenience, where KIND=NONTJ is
equivalent to KIND!=TJRECORD.
A mix of NONTJ and TJRECORD kinds is allowed. In qualifying records for display, if the
record is a NONTJ kind, the NONTJ selectors (kind, action, flags, and ntastate) are used. If the
record is a TJRECORD kind, then the TJ selectors (tjkind, tid, etc.) are used.
The NTASTATE, TRXSTATE, and TJRCVSESS arguments require special processing because
these values are not recorded in the log records. The log is read backwards to determine
transaction states or to find recovery session boundaries. It is then read forwards to display
selected log records, which can be further filtered by other arguments.
The WHERE clause provides selection from the WAL log in a single, integrated display stream,
displaying both NONTJ records and TJ records in time sequence when used with Filer
commands such as WAL and WREC.
Example 1
The following example selects checkpoint records and TJ BEG and END records for host 7.
wal /m where kind=checkpoint tjkind=beg,end tjhost=7
Example 2
The following example finds a TJ END record and deletes it. The output is not shown, but the
desired TJ END record with WLSN 43e72 is assumed to be found amongst the TJ END
records returned.
wal /L where tjkind=end
wrec /L 43e72
delete
y
//
//
//
//
display TJ END
set context to
request delete
confirm delete
records
record found
of selected record
request
Example 3
The following example finds all TJ records for open transactions from host 7.
wal /L where tjhost=7 trxstate=open
Example 4
The following example displays WAL insert records and TJ insert records.
wal /l where action=insert and tjkind=newrow
s
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Repairing Cylinders
Repairing Cylinders
Using Filer to make repairs to certain areas of the file system requires knowledge of data
structures related to the Teradata File System. Teradata Database allocates cylinders for data
storage of two basic types:
•
Normal cylinders are used for most file system storage, including PERM, SPOOL,
JOURNAL, and WAL.
Normal cylinders can be of two fixed sizes:
•
Small cylinders each have 3872 sectors. Each sector is 512 KB. Therefore a small
cylinder can store about 2 MB.
Small cylinders are used only to store WAL data on systems that have been initialized
using the sysinit utility.
•
Large cylinders are the size of six small cylinders, nearly 12 MB.
Large cylinders are used to store data from all table types except WAL and DEPOT on
systems that have been initialized using the sysinit utility.
•
Durable cylinders are used to store certain special file system objects, such as the master
index (MI) and file trace buffer (FTR). These are called “durable structures” because, after
they are created in the file system, they persist. Unlike normal cylinders, durable cylinders
are never freed back into general storage. Durable cylinders can be of any size.
Teradata Database employs a directory structure known as the cylinder map. The map stores a
list of all cylinders (small, large, and durable) on the system. Although it is unlikely, if one or
more entries in the map becomes corrupted, cylinders can lose their integrity: a durable
cylinder can appear to the file system incorrectly as a set of normal cylinders with invalid data,
or a set of contiguous small cylinders can appear a single large non-durable cylinder. Such
situations result in file system errors.
Use the following approaches to repairing such problems, depending on the nature of the
problem:
•
If a durable cylinders is misidentified as a set of normal small cylinders, the simplest
method of repair is to reallocate the durable structure, using the REALLOCDUR
command. The normal cylinder sized portions of storage that had been part of the durable
cylinder before reallocation can be returned to the pool of general cylinder storage using
the QUARLIST /R, BADLIST /R, ASSIGN, or INIT command.
Alternatively, an attempt can be made to manually repair the first CI of the durable
structure that was corrupted, such that it will again be recognized as a durable cylinder.
Once the CI has been repaired, use the REBUILDMAP command to force the Teradata
Database File System to again recognize the durable cylinder.
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•
When a set of normal small cylinders is misidentified as a large (non-durable) cylinder,
either use the ASSIGN command with the BREAKUP option, or use the PATCH
command to appropriate size the first CI of the cylinder set.
In either case, quit and restart Filer after the repairs. This restarts the file system with the
newly repaired CIs, which allows verification of the repairs.
For more information on Filer commands related to cylinder repair, see “ASSIGN” on
page 104, “BADLIST” on page 108, “INIT” on page 142, “PATCH” on page 167, “QUARLIST”
on page 175, “REALLOCDUR” on page 179, and “REBUILDMAP” on page 182.
Filer Commands
Filer Command Types
There are three general types of Filer commands:
•
Global commands can be run from any Filer prompt. They display information (help,
Filer defaults, current date and time), determine how Filer runs (redirect output and
input, set numeric format for output and input, enable and disable Filer features, set the
priority of the Filer process), and exit the Filer program.
•
Upper-level commands can be run from any Filer prompt. They direct Filer to display a
specific object in the file system, for example a cylinder index. The Filer prompt changes to
reflect the object type, for example CI for cylinder index. While the prompt shows a
particular object type, Filer accepts commands specific to objects at that level.
Most upper-level commands require one or more parameters that specify the particular
object on which to act. For example, each cylinder index is specified by a unique cylinder
ID (cylid). Filer remembers the specifications and continues to act on the same object
until either new parameters are entered that identify a different object at the same level, or
a command is entered that switches Filer to a different level in the file system hierarchy.
•
Warning:
Lower-level commands manipulate the currently selected file system object. These
commands behave slightly differently, depending on the currently selected object type.
While some of these commands are harmless, such as DISPLAY, DROP, NEXT and
PREVIOUS, others manipulate file system data that is critical to the operation of the
system.
You should be completely familiar with file system concepts and architecture before using the
lower-level commands. Improper use of these commands can seriously damage your system.
Hex Dumps Format
Some Filer commands display disk content as a “hex dump” of the byte values recorded on the
disk. Hex dumps are displayed in hexadecimal format, regardless of the radix output setting.
For example:
0000:
0010:
0020:
92
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07.08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F *................*
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27.28 29 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F * !"$%&’()*+,-./ *
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17.18 19 1A 1B 1C 1D 1E 1F *................*
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Filer Commands
The hexadecimal number in the first column represents the offset of the rest of the row from
the beginning of the file segment. In the example, the 0020 in the first column of the third row
means that the character that follows, having a hex value of 10, is 0020 bytes (32 bytes in
decimal notation) from the beginning of the segment. The last column in the row, delimited
by stars at each end, shows the ASCII representation of the hexadecimal numbers displayed in
the row.
List of Commands
Filer presents a command-line environment that allows the entry of the following Filer
commands, which are discussed in more detail in the sections that follow.
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Command
Description
“ACCESS”
Accesses a specific copy of a CI or DB segment located on DISK, DRAM,
or is the LATEST.
“ALTCI”
Makes the non-active CI copy the active copy, and the formerly active
copy the non-active copy.
“ALTWCI”
Makes the non-active WCI copy the active copy, and the formerly active
copy the non-active copy.
“ASSIGN”
Assigns a repaired cylinder back to a specified AMP and storage type.
Normally used after a cylinder that is in the bad list or quarantine list has
been repaired.
“BADLIST”
Displays list of bad cylinders, scans them for preliminary diagnosis,
initializes and releases unrepairable cylinders back to storage.
“BLK”
Selects the segment that starts at the specified cylinder and sector
number, determines the type of block, and displays it accordingly.
“CHECKSUM”
Validates, displays, and optionally repairs the checksum for a DB, WDB,
CI, or WCI segment.
“CI”
Selects and displays the Cylinder Index (CI) segment for the specified
cylinder.
“CID”
Selects and displays the Cylinder Index Descriptor (CID) for the
specified cylinder.
“DATE/TIME”
Displays the current system day, date, and time.
“DB”
Selects and displays the Data Block (DB) segment that starts at the
specified cylinder and sector number.
“DBD”
Displays the Data Block Descriptors (DBDs) of the current cylinder.
“DBROW”
Displays the physical rows of a DB.
“DELETE”
Deletes the currently selected object or range of objects, including all
descendants and antecedents.
“DEPOT”
Displays cylinder summary information for cylinders in the Depot, or
block summary information for blocks in a particular Depot cylinder.
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94
Command
Description
“DISABLE”
Sets a specific flag in the file system to FALSE, disabling certain features
of Filer. Most such flags are for internal use only.
“DISCARD”
Discards a rebuilt CI in memory without affecting the original CI.
“DISPLAY”
Shows a formatted display of the currently selected object or range of
objects. If you specify an ordinalrange, then DISPLAY shows a related
object or range.
“DROP”
Drops the access on the current object and returns to the default
prompt.
“DUMPDISK”
Selects the disk segment that starts at the specified cylinder and sector
number, determines the type of block, and displays it accordingly.
“ENABLE”
Sets a specific flag in the file system to TRUE, enabling certain features of
Filer. Most such flags are for internal use only.
“ERRORS”
Redirects diagnostic messages to a file that you specify or to the default
file, stderr.
“FIB”
Displays the File Information Block (FIB) and information about
cylinder usage.
“FIND”
Given the table and optional ridrange, displays the cylinders containing
the range.
“FREECACHE”
Displays the status of the free cylinder cache.
“HELP”
Provides context sensitive help for Filer commands.
“IDENT”
Identifies the objects in the specified sectors, and displays the properties
of the objects.
“INFO”
Displays details of a rebuilt CI that is still in memory, not yet written to
disk.
“INIT”
Initializes the current cylinder or range of cylinders to free.
“INPUT”
Directs Filer to read commands from a specified file rather than from the
default input file, stdin.
“MEMBLK”
Accesses the file system segment at the specified memory address,
determines the type of the segment, and returns a formatted display of
the segment.
“MEMCTX”
Returns a formatted display of a file system context structure
(ctxcontext_t) beginning at the specified memory address.
“MEMDB”
Returns a formatted display of a DB beginning at the specified memory
address.
“MEMDUMP”
Dumps memory in the hexadecimal format, starting at the specified
location for a specified length of bytes.
“MEMROW”
Formats a row beginning at the specified memory address.
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Filer Commands
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Command
Description
“MEMSORCTX”
Returns a formatted display of a context structure (sorcontext_t)
beginning at the specified memory address.
“MEMWCTX”
Returns a formatted display of a context structure (wtjcontext_t)
beginning at the specified memory address.
“MEMWDB”
Returns a formatted display of a WDB beginning at the specified
memory address.
“MEMWREC”
Formats a WAL log record beginning at the specified memory address.
“MI”
Selects and displays the Master Index (MI).
“MODIFY REDO”
Replays the specified WAL log records, or defines whether or not to
replay the WAL log records during the next file system startup.
“NEXT”
Displays the next row, WAL log record, DB, WDB, DBD, WDBD, CI,
WCI, CID, WCID or subtable.
“OUTPUT”
Redirects Filer output to a file you specify or to the default file, stdout.
“PACK”
Packs the segment to eliminate fragmentation.
“PATCH”
Modifies file system segments and other objects in memory.
“PREV”
Displays a previous row, WAL log record, DB, WDB, DBD, WDBD, CI,
WCI, CID, WCID or subtable.
“PRIORITY”
Sets the priority class of the Filer process.
“QUARLIST”
Displays list of quarantined cylinders, scans them for preliminary
diagnosis, initializes and releases unrepairable cylinders back to storage.
“QUIT”
Ends a Filer session.
“RADIX”
Sets the default radix (decimal or hexadecimal) used as the numeric base
for Filer data input and output.
“REALLOCDUR”
Reallocates durable cylinders.
“REBUILDCI”
Rebuilds the cylinder index for a specified cylinder.
“REBUILDMAP”
Rebuilds the map of allocated cylinders.
“RENAME”
Renames the currently selected segment to the specified location on the
disk.
“REPAIRSECTS”
Deletes specified overlapping data blocks from rebuilt CIs in memory.
“RESETFREECYL”
Resets the file system internal free cylinder count back to the correct
value.
“ROW”
Displays physical rows from one or more subtables. For a single subtable,
ROW sets the context to those rows.
“SCANDISK”
Verifies the integrity of the file system.
“SCOPE (or VPROC)”
Selects a set of vprocs that Filer will communicate with until Filer quits
or a different set of vprocs is selected.
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Filer Commands
96
Command
Description
“SEGZERO (or SEG0)”
Selects and displays Segment Zero (0).
“SET FREECYL”
Sets the file system internal Free Cylinder count to the specified number.
“SHOWDEFAULTS”
Displays the default settings and the saved context.
“SRD”
Returns a formatted display of all the Subtable Descriptors (SRDs) on
the current CI that have any rows from the specified subtable tid. If tid is
not specified, then all SRDs are displayed.
“STAMP”
Takes five hexadecimal numbers and converts them to a file system
timestamp.
“STORAGEINFO”
Displays per-AMP system control information for storage.
“SYNCSCAN”
Shows all currently running scans on an AMP that are eligible for the
synchronized full file scan feature.
“TABLE”
Displays rows from the subtable specified by tid.
“TABLEID”
Displays the table number of a specified table.
“TRACEPRINT”
Dumps the internal trace buffer of the file system. The cylid limits the
display to entries to that cylinder.
“TRASH”
Removes the FSG name of the copy of the currently selected segment in
memory, and retains access to it.
“VPROC”
Selects a set of vprocs that Filer will communicate with until Filer quits
or a different set of vprocs is selected.
“WABC”
Displays the WAL Append Buffer Control (WABC) structure.
“WAL”
Displays Write Ahead Logging (WAL) log records in an ordinal record
number range, such as the 10th through the 20th WAL log records.
“WCI”
Selects and displays the WAL Cylinder Index (WCI).
“WCID”
Selects and displays the WAL Cylinder Index Descriptor (WCID)
associated with the requested WAL log cylinder.
“WDB”
Selects and displays the WAL Data Block (WDB) segment that starts at
the specified cylinder and sector number.
“WDBD”
Displays the WAL Data Block Descriptors (WDBDs) of a WAL log
cylinder.
“WDBREC”
Displays WAL log records for a WDB.
“WFIND”
Displays the WAL log cylinders containing WAL log records in a given
range, or if no range is specified, then all of the WAL log cylinders.
“WFLUSH”
Manually force some or all of the WAL log records in memory to disk.
“WMI”
Returns a formatted display of the WAL Master Index (WMI).
“WREC”
Displays the WAL log records within a given range and within the
restrictions of the whereclause.
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Filer Commands
Support Utilities
Command
Description
“WRITE”
Forces the currently selected segment to disk.
“WSUMMARY”
Retrieves table IDs from WAL records within a given WAL log sequence
number (WLSN) range.
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ACCESS
ACCESS
Purpose
The ACCESS command drops access to the current CI or DB segment, and accesses a copy of
the same segment in the specified location. If a location is not given, ACCESS identifies the
copy of the segment that is currently accessed.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /X, /H, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
ACCESS
AC
/P
place
/S
/M
/L
/X
/H
/V
1102A162
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the segment. Nothing is displayed unless there is a
problem.
/S
Displays the segment in a short format. This is the default.
/M
Displays the segment in a medium-length format.
/L
Displays the segment in a long format.
/X
Displays the segment in an extended format.
/H
Displays the segment in hexadecimal.
/V
Verifies that the segment is logically correct, but does not display it.
place
The location of the segment you want to access. The valid values are
DISK, DRAM, or LATEST.
If you omit place, the ACCESS command identifies which copy of the
segment is currently accessed.
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ACCESS
Usage Notes
The ACCESS command must be invoked from a CI or DB context (as indicated by the
CI ==> or DB ==> prompt).
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ALTCI
ALTCI
Purpose
There are two copies of each CI, only one of which is active at any time. The active copy
reflects the current state of the cylinder. The ALTCI command makes the non-active copy the
active copy, and the formerly active copy the non-active one.
Note: This command can be used only when Teradata Database is not running on the affected
AMP; the AMP cannot be ONLINE.
Syntax
ALTCI
cylid
1102B193
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
Usage Notes
ALTCI can be used only when the scope is set to one vproc. For more information on the
SCOPE command, see “SCOPE (or VPROC)” on page 209.
Caution:
100
Picking the alternate copy of a CI might result in overlapping tableids/rowids across cylinders
and mismatches between the WCI and the blocks on the associated cylinder. After performing
this command, use scandisk to determine whether additional repairs are required.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
ALTCI
Example
Filer ==>
scope vproc 0
1 of 4 amps have been selected
Filer ==>
altci 000600000000000A
*** WARNING ***
Picking the alternate copy of a [W]CI might result in overlapping
tableids/rowids across cylinders and mismatches between the [W]CI
and the blocks on the associated cylinder. After performing this command,
use scandisk to determine whether additional repairs are required.
*** WARNING ***
Do you want to switch the effective copy to the alternate copy? (Y/N)
> y
vproc
0 (0000)
response
Active CI
--------Location
Blk Code
Version Number
WLSN
Stamp
:
:
:
:
:
PRIMARY
CI
16
(00000000000FD453)
Mon Jul 25, 2011 16:02:54.06 (1E F6 2D 4E 06)
Non-Active CI
------------Location
Blk Code
Version Number
WLSN
Stamp
:
:
:
:
:
SECONDARY
CI
2
(00000000000FD294)
Mon Jul 25, 2011 16:02:29.53 (05 F6 2D 4E 35)
New Active CI
------------Location
Blk Code
Version Number
WLSN
Stamp
:
:
:
:
:
SECONDARY
CI
2
(00000000000FD294)
Mon Jul 25, 2011 16:02:29.53 (05 F6 2D 4E 35)
Successfully alternated the CI.
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ALTWCI
ALTWCI
Purpose
There are two copies of each WCI, only one of which is active at any time. The active copy
reflects the current state of the WAL cylinder. The ALTWCI command makes the non-active
copy the active copy, and the formerly active copy the non-active copy.
Note: This command can be used only when Teradata Database is not running on the affected
AMP.
Syntax
ALTWCI
cylid
1102B194
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
Usage Notes
ALTWCI can be used only when the scope is set to one vproc. For more information on the
SCOPE command, see “SCOPE (or VPROC)” on page 209.
Caution:
102
Picking the alternate copy of a WCI might result in overlapping record numbers across
cylinders and mismatches between the WCI and the blocks on the associated cylinder. After
performing this command, use scandisk to determine whether additional repairs are required.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
ALTWCI
Example
Filer ==>
scope vproc 0
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
Tue Jul 03, 2007 16:47:39
1 of 8 amps have been selected
Filer ==>
altwci 0 2A
Active WCI
--------Location: PRIMARY
Blk Code: WCI
Version Number: 19
WLSN
Stamp
: (0000000000024E32)
: Wed Jul 11, 2007 15:28:36.51 (64 2F 95 46 33)
Non-Active WCI
------------Location: SECONDARY
Blk Code: WCI
Version Number: 3
WLSN
: (000000000000AF68)
Stamp
: Tue Jul 03, 2007 10:51:10.01 (5E 62 8A 46 01)
*** WARNING ***
Picking the alternate copy of a [W]CI might result in overlapping
tableids/rowids across cylinders and mismatches between the [W]CI
and the blocks on the associated cylinder. After performing this
command, use scandisk to determine whether additional repairs are
required.
*** WARNING ***
Do you want to switch the active copy to the alternate copy? (Y/N)
> y
y
Active WCI
--------Location: SECONDARY
Blk Code:
WCI
Version Number: 3
WLSN
: (000000000000AF68)
Stamp
: Tue Jul 03, 2007 10:51:10.07 (5E 62 8A 46 07)
Successfully alternated the WCI.
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ASSIGN
ASSIGN
Purpose
The ASSIGN command reassigns a cylinder back to a specified AMP and storage type.
ASSIGN is normally used after a cylinder that has been marked bad or quarantined has been
repaired.
Some types of errors can cause the file system to identify several contiguous small cylinders as
a single large cylinder. In these situations, the ASSIGN command can be used to break the
apparent large cylinder back into its component small cylinders, and reassign the small
cylinders back to their proper AMPs and storage types.
Note: This command can be used only when Teradata Database is not running on the affected
AMP.
Warning:
This command should be used only to reassign repaired cylinders back to their original AMP
vprocs. Improper use of this command can result in data corruption.
Syntax
ASSIGN
cylid
TYPEOFCYL=typeofcyl
TARGETVPROC=vproc_num_or_list
BREAKUP
TAR=vproc_num_or_list
BREAK
TARGETVPROC=vproc_num_or_list
TYPEOFCYL=typeofcyl
TAR=vproc_num_or_list
BREAKUP
BREAK
BREAKUP
BREAK
1102B198
104
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a small or large cylinder, entered as
a 16-character hexadecimal number.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
ASSIGN
Syntax Element
Description
TARGETVPROC=vproc_num_or_list
A list of the vproc numbers that identify the AMPs to which
the repaired cylinders will be assigned.
TAR=vproc_num_or_list
For large cylinders, from which several small cylinders will
be created, TARGETVPROC can be either:
• a single vproc number, to which all small cylinders will
be assigned
• If the BREAKUP option is specified, all resulting
small cylinders are assigned to the specified vproc.
• If the BREAKUP option is not specified, the large
cylinder itself will be assigned to the specified vproc.
• a list of vproc numbers, one for each of the newly
created small cylinders. The numbers must be separated
by commas, and should enumerate in order the AMP
numbers to which the resulting small cylinders will be
assigned.
Note: If more than one vproc is specified, the
BREAKUP option is implied.
For large cylinders, if TARGETVPROC is not specified, the
resulting small cylinders are assigned to the AMP vproc to
which the source large cylinder belonged.
TYPEOFCYL=typeofcyl
The type of storage to which the cylinders are assigned.
Valid types are:
• PERMCYL
• WALCYL
• JRNLCYL
• GLOBALTEMPCYL
• PSPOOLCYL
For large cylinders, if TYPEOFCYL is not specified, the
resultant small cylinders are assigned the same type as the
large cylinder they comprised. They can be assigned
different cylinder types by subsequently running the
ASSIGN command on each individual small cylinder.
BREAKUP
BREAK
Splits the specified large cylinder into smaller cylinders,
each with a new cylinder ID.
Note: The BREAKUP option should not be used for small
cylinders.
If TARGETVPROC, TYPEOFCYL, or both are specified,
the new cylinders will be explicitly assigned to the specified
vproc and storage type.
Usage Notes
The ASSIGN command is related to the /R option of BADLIST and QUARLIST. ASSIGN reassociates a repaired cylinder back to a specific AMP, while the /R option releases a repaired
cylinder back into the general storage pool.
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ASSIGN
For more information on the proper use of this command to repair durable file system
structures, see “Repairing Cylinders” on page 91
Example 1
The following example assigns a cylinder to a specific AMP and storage type.
Filer ==>
ssign 0006000200000044 typeofcyl=jrnlcyl targetvproc=vproc 3
Fri May 07, 2010 19:00:31: Assign command will assign Cylinder
0006000200000044 belonging to
vproc 2 with target cyltype of JOURNAL.
Do you wish to continue? (Y/N)
y
The following is the extent reserved on amp 3:
000600030000000C
Please quit filer and restart the database for the changes to take
effect.
Assign command completed successully
Example 2
Certain file system errors can cause several contiguous small cylinders to be misidentified as a
single large cylinder. The ASSIGN command can break such large cylinders back into their
component small cylinders, and assign the small cylinders back to their original AMP vprocs.
The following example demonstrates using the ASSIGN command to break a large cylinder
into its six component small cylinders, and assigns the small cylinders back to their original
AMP vprocs. In this case, the first cylinder is assigned to vproc 2, the next to vproc 4, and so
forth.
Filer ==>
assign 000600020000003F targetvproc=2,4,3,1,2,1 break
Fri Jan 08, 2010 02:03:32:
Assign command will split Cylinder 000600020000003F on vproc 2 and with
the specified type.
Do you wish to continue? (Y/N)
y
vproc
2 (0002)
response
The following are the reserved 6 small cylinders:
0001000200000021
0001000200000022
0001000200000024
0001000200000025
0001000300000018
0001000300000026
Please run rebuildci command on each small cylinder.
Then quit filer and restart the database for the changes to take effect.
Assign command completed successully
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BACKDOWNCHECK
BACKDOWNCHECK
Purpose
The BACKDOWNCHECK command shows whether the current file system can be backed
down to a previous version. If back down is not supported, the reasons are displayed.
Syntax
BACKDOWNCHECK
1102A234
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BADLIST
BADLIST
Purpose
The BADLIST command displays a per-AMP list of cylinders whose contents cannot be
determined.
Cylinders are designated as bad automatically when a data corruption in the cylinder index
prevents the system from determining the contents of the cylinder. A list of bad cylinders is
maintained on each AMP. AMPs that own bad cylinders are kept down, and the file system is
not started on these AMPs during Teradata Database system startup. To bring the AMPs back
up, use Filer to repair or reinitialize the bad cylinders.
The BADLIST command can scan these cylinders for possible diagnoses. After the bad
cylinders have been fixed, use the ASSIGN command to reassign the cylinders to an AMP and
storage type, or use the /R option of BADLIST to remove the cylinder from the list, making
the cylinder available for use from the general pool of storage cylinders.
For more information on the ASSIGN command, see “ASSIGN” on page 104.
Syntax
BADLIST
/P
/S
cylid
/R
cylid
/X
108
cylid
1102A199
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
/P
Prints the list of bad cylinders. This is the default.
/S
Scans a bad cylinder and attempts to diagnose problem. If no cylid is specified,
scans all bad cylinders.
/R
Initializes a bad cylinder and releases it back into the general storage pool. If no
cylid is specified, initializes and releases all bad cylinders.
/X cylid
Initializes the cylinder specified by cylid, but does not release it back to storage.
Used for durable cylinders, which should never be released to general storage,
such as those used for master indexes and startup information.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
BADLIST
Usage Notes
BADLIST can be used only when the Teradata Database is down.
The /R option is related to the ASSIGN command. The /R option releases a repaired cylinder
back into the general storage pool, while ASSIGN re-associates a repaired cylinder back to a
specific AMP.
For more information on the proper use of this command to repair large file system
structures, see “Repairing Cylinders” on page 91
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BLK
BLK
Purpose
The BLK (Block) command recognizes file system blocks and displays CI, WCI, DB, and WDB
blocks based on the block code in the block header. For other types of blocks, the command
indicates the block type. This command will also display DB or WDB blocks in Depot
cylinders.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
BLK
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/V
cylid
sectornum
=
=
sectorcount
=
/C
/Z
1102B196
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the block, but does not display it.
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
The display options: Short, Medium, Long, Hex, and Extended. The display
format depends on the block type. For descriptions of how the display options
are applied to the different block types, see the associated commands:“CI” on
page 113, “DB” on page 118, “WCI” on page 229, and “WDB” on page 232.
/V
Validates the block according to the block type, but does not display the block.
/C
For compressed data blocks, displays the uncompressed DB header information,
including extended header information pertaining to data compression.:
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the display when the
/S option is used.
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BLK
Syntax Element
Description
/Z
For compressed data blocks, displays:
• the uncompressed DB header information, including extended header
information pertaining to data compression.
• a hex format display of the compressed data stored in the DB. If the /Z option
is not used, the hex display shows the uncompressed data.
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the output when the
/x option is used.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
sectornum
The sector number of the entries to be displayed.
sectorcount
The number of sectors to examine, starting from sectornum, but not extending
beyond the end of the cylinder. This can be used for either normal or Depot
sectors. All blocks within this range are displayed.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount. For more information, see “Stored Input Values”
on page 82.
Usage Notes
If the requested sector is in a segment in memory, BLK displays the segment from memory. If
the segment is not in memory, BLK attempts to locate and display the sector from the file
system B-Tree structures.
If the requested sector is currently not in use in the file system, the requested sectors are read
directly from disk and displayed in hexadecimal format.
The DB command is similar to BLK, except it displays only Data Block segments. For more
information, see “DB” on page 118.
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CHECKSUM
CHECKSUM
Purpose
The CHECKSUM command validates and displays the checksum for a DB, WDB, CI or WCI
segment and optionally stores a recalculated checksum. If you specify the FIX option, the
CHECKSUM command attempts to repair any checksum mismatches if detected.
Syntax
CHECKSUM
DB
cylid
sectornum
=
cylid
=
CI
WDB
=
cylid
FIX
sectornum
=
WCI
=
cylid
=
1102E044
Syntax Element
Description
FIX
Overwrites the old checksum with a newly calculated checksum if there was an
error in the old checksum.
DB
The segment that contains the data rows saved on disk.
CI
The compound data structure that is saved on disk to describe the current state
of a cylinder.
WDB
The segment that contains the WAL log records and the TJ rows.
WCI
The structure that identifies the WDBs that are contained on the cylinder.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
sectornum
The sector of the entries displayed.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid or sectornum.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
cylid or sectornum. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
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CI
CI
Purpose
The CI (Cylinder Index) command accesses the latest copy of the CI for the given cylinder and
formats it in accordance with the display options.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /X, /H, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
cylid
CI
/P
/S
/M
/L
/X
/H
/V
FORCE
FIX
=
1102C014
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to this CI. If this cylinder is not a file system cylinder, an error occurs.
Nothing is displayed unless a problem occurs.
/S
Shows a formatted display of the following:
• header and trailer.
• first and last DBDs.
• first and last SRDs.
/M
Shows a formatted display of the following:
• header and trailer.
• all of the SRDs, with each one followed by the first and last DBDs for that
SRD.
/L
Shows a formatted display of the following:
• header and trailer.
• all of the SRDs, with each one followed by all of the DBDs for that SRD.
• the Free Sector (FSE) and the Unfree Sector (UNFSE) lists, if they exist.
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/X
Shows the same display as /L, but also include the timestamp and other details
from the DB for each DBD.
/H
Shows a hexadecimal dump of the requested CI.
/V
Verifies that the CI is logically correct, but does not display it.
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CI
Syntax Element
Description
FORCE
Formats as CI even if the block code indicates otherwise. Without FORCE, the
command fails on a mismatched block.
FIX
Filer will attempt automatic repair of the CI. You must supply the /V option with
the FIX option, and the Teradata Database must be down.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal number.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved value for cylid.
This option cannot be used unless input value has already been defined for cylid.
For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
If the segment acquired is not a CI, then an error occurs unless you specify FORCE, in which
case Filer will attempt to format the block as a CI.
The CI command output displays additional columns for the CI checksum (checksum),
checksum algorithm (ag), and checksum sample count (ct) fields in the CI header if the CI
currently has an associated checksum. The checksum and checksum algorithm are in both the
CID and the CI, providing both internal and external checksums. The count is only in the CI
and is used for either an internal or an external check.
In addition, the checksum, checksum algorithm, and checksum sample count fields contained
in the DBD structure are displayed for each DBD listed. The addition of these three checksum
fields to the DBD structure expands the width of the DBD display from 88 to 105 characters.
The value of the checksum sample count field is a byte in the range 0 – 128. This number
corresponds to the number of 32-bit words to sample per disk sector in the file system block.
The CI is stored on the first n sectors of each cylinder and describes only that cylinder. The CI
has a redundant copy immediately following it on the disk. The CI can reside in one of two
places:
•
Disk
•
DRAM
The default access is the latest copy of the CI.
The prompt for this selection is as follows:
CI ==>
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CI
The following commands are allowed at the CI prompt:
•
Lower-level commands DELETE, DISPLAY, NEXT, PACK, PATCH, PREV, TRASH, AND
WRITE. Although the current object selected can be the latest CI, the redundant CI, an
SRD, or a DBD, the prompt reflects the current object. NEXT and PREV always access the
latest copy of the next or previous CI. To get to the next or previous CI, when at an SRD or
DBD object, type one of the following:
•
CI =; NEXT
•
CI =; PREV
The display options for any of these commands are the same as that of the currently
selected object, either the CI or the SRD, and makes no difference on a DBD.
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•
Upper-level commands that switch Filer to another object or level within the file system.
•
Global commands, which include DATE, DISABLE, ENABLE, ERRORS, HELP, INPUT,
OUTPUT, QUIT, RADIX, and SHOWDEFAULTS.
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CID
CID
Purpose
The Master Index is the highest level of the file system structure and contains a sorted list of all
the Cylinder Index Descriptors (CIDs), which represent the cylinders in use. The CID
command displays the CID associated with the requested cylinder.
Syntax
CID
cylid
=
1102C016
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved value for cylid.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined
for cylid. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
The checksum and the checksum algorithm columns (checksum and ag) appear in both the
CID and the CI displays if there are associated checksums, providing both internal and
external checksums. The checksum sample count column (ct) appears only in the output of
the CI command, and is used for either an internal or an external check.
The prompt for this selector follows:
MI:CID ==>
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the MI:CID prompt:
116
•
DISPLAY
•
DELETE
•
NEXT
•
PATCH
•
PREV
•
WRITE
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DATE/TIME
DATE/TIME
Purpose
The DATE or TIME command shows the current system day, date, and time.
Syntax
DATE
GS04A013
TIME
GT06A027
Usage Notes
The DATE or TIME command shows a timestamp in the following format:
DDD mmm dd, yyyy HH:MM:SS
Support Utilities
Format …
Specifies …
DDD
the day of the week.
mmm dd, yyyy
the calendar month, day, and year.
HH:MM:SS
the time in hour, minutes, and seconds.
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DB
DB
Purpose
The DB (Data Block) command selects and displays the DB segment that starts at the specified
cylinder and sector number.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
DB
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/V
/C
/Z
FORCE
cylid
sectornum
=
=
sectorcount
=
1102C105
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the DB. If one does not exist, an error occurs. Nothing is displayed
unless a problem exists.
/S
A formatted display of the block, header, block trailer, and first and last row
header.
/M
A formatted display of the block, header, block trailer, first and last row header,
and the intervening row headers.
/L
A formatted display of the block, header, block trailer, first and last row header, the
intervening row headers, and the row content in hex following each row header.
/H
A formatted display of the DB header followed by the entire DB in hex.
/X
Same as /L.
/V
Verifies that the DB is logically correct but does not display it.
/C
For compressed data blocks, displays the uncompressed DB header information,
including extended header information pertaining to data compression.:
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the display when the /
S option is used.
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DB
Syntax Element
Description
/Z
For compressed data blocks, displays:
• the uncompressed DB header information, including extended header
information pertaining to data compression.
• a hex format display of the compressed data stored in the DB. If the /Z option is
not used, the hex display shows the uncompressed data.
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the output when the
/x option is used.
FORCE
Formats as DB even if the block code indicates otherwise. Without FORCE, the
command fails on a mismatched block.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal number.
sectorcount
The sector count.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for cylid,
sectornum, or sectorcount. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on
page 82.
Usage Notes
Since the DB command only displays parameters from the data block itself, this command
does not display any checksum field values for the DB. Checksum field values for the DB are
stored in the DBD in the CI. To display the checksum fields for a DB, either the DBD should
be displayed using the DBD command or use the CHECKSUM command.
A DB contains one or more rows, all of which are members of the same subtable. Any single
row is contained fully within a single DB. In addition, every DB must be fully contained
within a cylinder.
If count is omitted, Filer reads in the first sector of the block and obtains the sector count from
the DB header. If given, Filer attempts to display only the information contained in those
sectors.
If the segment accessed is not a DB, Filer displays a message indicating an assumed type,
unless you specify FORCE, in which case Filer tries to format the block as a DB. The prompt
for the DB selector is shown below:
DB ==>
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DB
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the DB prompt:
•
ACCESS
•
DBROW
•
DISPLAY
•
DELETE
•
NEXT
•
PACK
•
PATCH
•
PREV
•
RENAME
•
TRASH
•
WRITE
The BLK command is similar to DB, except it can display other types of segments in addition
to Data Blocks. For more information, see “BLK” on page 110.
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DBD
DBD
Purpose
The DBD (Data Block Descriptor) command displays the DBDs of the current cylinder.
Syntax
DBD
/H
tid
ridspec
sectornum
=
1102D015
Syntax Element
Description
/H
Shows a formatted display of all the DBDs in the current CI followed by a
display of the DBDs in hexadecimal.
tid
Shows only the DBDs from the subtable specified by tid for the current CI.
For more information on tid formatting, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on
page 79.
ridspec
Shows only the DBDs within the row(s) specified by ridspec within the
subtable (tid) for the current CI. For information on ridspec formatting, see
“Rows and Row Ranges” on page 76.
The online help lists this option as rowspec.
sectornum
Shows only the DBDs covering this sector of the cylinder.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for sectornum.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined
for sectornum. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
The DBD command must be invoked from a CI context (as indicated by the CI ==> prompt).
Without arguments, DBD shows all DBDs in the current CI.
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DBROW
DBROW
Purpose
The DBROW command displays the rows of a Data Block.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the row options (/S, /M, /L, /H) as /rowopt.
DBROW
DBR
/S
/M
/L
/H
1102A108
where:
Syntax Element
Description
/S or /C
Displays the row count without the block header.
/M or /I
Displays the row headers.
/L or /R
Displays the row headers, each followed by the formatted row.
/H
Displays the row headers, each followed by the row in hexadecimal.
Usage Notes
The DBROW command must be invoked from a DB context (as indicated by the DB>
prompt).
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DELETE
DELETE
Purpose
The DELETE command deletes the currently selected object or range of objects, including all
descendants and antecedents, meaning the delete cascades both up and down through the
index structure.
Warning:
The DELETE command can damage the File System B*Tree such that data can be removed or
lost permanently. If used incorrectly, changes might be irreversible.
Syntax
DELETE
/Y
GS04A063
Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the command.
Usage Notes
The selected object or range is from the last operation and is saved in the context. Executing
SHOWD displays the selected object or range. For more information, see “SHOWDEFAULTS”
on page 212.
The delete context can be a row, table, DB, DBD, CI, CID, WAL log record, WDB, WDBD,
WCI, WCID, and ranges thereof. If a WAL object is selected, DELETE cascades throughout the
WAL log index structure.
DELETE can apply to one, several or all AMPs, depending on the current scope. The DELETE
confirmation scope can span AMPs but is condensed into a single range. For some ranges,
DELETE is allowed only when the Teradata Database is down.
If there is a whereclause in the context, then only those rows or WAL log records that satisfy the
whereclause are deleted. For more information on the whereclause, see “Specifying a WHERE
clause” on page 85.
Only tables and rows can be deleted if running from remote DBW console with multiple
vprocs selected.
If the selected object is a CI, then the DELETE command effectively performs the same action
as the INIT command. For more information, see “INIT” on page 142.
For example, deleting a CI would remove the CID from the MI and all DBs with DBDs in the
CI.
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DEPOT
DEPOT
Purpose
The DEPOT command displays cylinder summary information for cylinders in the Depot, or
block summary information for blocks in a particular Depot cylinder.
Syntax
DEPOT
cylid
=
1102B110
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved value for cylid.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined for
cylid. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
The Teradata Database File System stages in-place writes of permanent and system tables
through a disk area called the Depot, which is a collection of cylinders. In-place modifications
are first written to the Depot and only then written to their original Home Disk Address
(HDA).
During system startup, the Depot is examined and any blocks that are found are read in,
validated, and re-written to their original HDA. This ensures that any blocks that might have
been partially written to their HDA, when a system outage occurred, can be rewritten as
complete blocks. Handling writes this way greatly reduces the possibility of a partial-write
scenario destroying pre-existing data. Any blocks partially written to the Depot will not pass
validation, and thus will not overwrite the previous version of the block that still exists at the
HDA.
Because a write to the Depot must be complete before the block is written to the HDA, an
interruption can only corrupt one of the copies of the block. A failed write to the Depot can be
recovered by applying the WAL log records to the copy of the block at the HDA. A failed write
to the HDA can be recovered by copying the block in the Depot over the block at the HDA.
The Depot can contain both DBs and WDBs. The contents of the Depot may be different each
time you view it since data is constantly moving in and out of the Depot.
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DISABLE
DISABLE
Purpose
The DISABLE command sets a specified flag in the file system to FALSE. This disables certain
features of Filer.
Syntax
,
DISABLE
DISA
flag
?
GS04C014
Syntax Element
Description
flag
Specifies the flag that will be set to false. The following flags are available:
• LOCKING
When locking is disabled, Filer does not observe the file system locking
protocols, which normally prevent system hangs and deadlocks. This
flag should only be disabled when Teradata Database is in the DebugStop state.
• SCRIPT, SCRIPT MODE, and SCRIPTMODE
When script mode is disabled, the Filer ABORT and INQUIRE
commands are enabled. Script mode is disabled by default. Script mode
should be enabled before running scripts that call Filer.
The following flags are for internal use only, and should not be disabled or
enabled:
•
•
•
•
•
•
?
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CHECK and CHECKTS
PANIC
STOP
SUSPEND
TPARESET
TRACE
Displays a complete list of available flags.
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DISCARD
DISCARD
Purpose
The DISCARD command discards the rebuilt CI or WCI that is currently in memory.
Syntax
DISCARD
1102A219
Usage Notes
This command can be used only from the REBUILDCI command prompt.
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DISPLAY
DISPLAY
Purpose
The DISPLAY command shows a formatted display of the currently selected object or range of
objects. If you specify an ordinalrange, then DISPLAY shows a related object or range.
Syntax
Note: You can type /dispopt and /rowopt at the beginning or end of the command.
DISPLAY
D
/dispopt
ordinalrange
whereclause
/rowopt
1102B120
Syntax Element
Setting Selections
Description
/dispopt
/P
/S
/M
/L
/X
/H
/Z
Specifies the format of the display output for the selected
object. The display options are dependent on the object
selected and may differ from those in the saved context.
/P
/S or /C
/M or /I
/L or /R
/H
Specifies the format of the display output for the selected
object. The row options are dependent on the object selected
and may differ from those in the saved context.
/rowopt
ordinalrange
Not all display options work with all object types. For
descriptions of how the display options are applied to
different object types, see the command for the selected
object, such as CI, WCI, DB, WREC, etc.
Not all row options work with all object types. For
descriptions of how the row options are applied to different
object types, see the command for the selected object, such
as DBROW, ROW, WDBREC, etc.
Used to establish a new context based upon the old context,
and then DISPLAY shows the objects in the new context.
The online help lists this option as rangeopt.
whereclause
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For a WAL log record range context, a WHERE clause can be
supplied to replace the current WHERE clause saved in the
context. For more information, see “Specifying a WHERE
clause” on page 85.
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DISPLAY
Usage Notes
The DISPLAY command is based on the current context, which may be a row, subtable, CI,
CID, DB, DBD, MI, WAL log record, WCI, WCID, WDB, WDBD, or WMI. Except for the MI
and WMI contexts, DISPLAY can also be based on a range selection.
The current context is established by the previous BLK, CI, CID, DB, DBD, DISPLAY, MI,
ROW, TABLE, WAL, WCI, WCID, WDB, WDBD, WMI, or WREC command. These
commands save a single object or range of objects as the context. This saved context can be
displayed using the SHOWDEFAULTS command. For more information, see
“SHOWDEFAULTS” on page 212.
If a prior command was a WAL command, the resulting context is a WAL log record or a range
of WAL log records. For the WAL all command, the context begins with the first record in
the WAL log and ends with the last record in the WAL log. This differs from the TABLE
command where the resulting context is a subtable rather than a row range.
You can use the ordinalrange argument of the DISPLAY command to expand the current
context to a larger range of objects of the same type. Similarly, you can use ordinalrange to
shrink a range to a smaller range or to a single object.
The standalone integers (without the BEG/END prefix) in an ordinalrange always refer to
objects outside the current context, so that positive values refer to objects past the end of the
current context, and negative values refer to objects before the beginning of the current
context, thus extending the context. For more information, see “Specifying Display Ranges
(ordinalrange)” on page 83.
Note: This differs from the interpretation of an ordinalrange for the TABLE or WAL
command, where positive integers without the BEG/END prefix are ordinal row/record
numbers, so that 1 is the first row or record. Negative integers without the BEG/END prefix
are backwards displacements from the last row or record. For more information, see “TABLE”
on page 217 and “WAL” on page 226.
The DISPLAY command with an ordinalrange functions similarly for a WAL log record, WDB,
WDBD, WCI, or WCID context, as it does for a Row, DB, DBD, CI, or CID context. Both
singular and range contexts are allowed.
If a prior command was a TABLE command which used a wildcard for the type part of the tid,
the resultant context is special (nothing), and this context is not usable with the ordinalrange
argument. For more information, see “TABLE” on page 217.
The whereclause for the WAL and WREC commands is applied in conjunction with the
ordinalrange or wlsnrange. The whereclause is recorded in the context and remains active for
subsequent DISPLAY, NEXT, and PREV commands. As the display context is expanded or
contracted, DISPLAY continues to use the whereclause in the context.
The whereclause for a DISPLAY command must be appropriate to the saved context, or the
DISPLAY command is rejected. For example, a whereclause is not allowed with a WCI context.
For more information about the whereclause, see “Specifying a WHERE clause” on page 85.
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DROP
DROP
Purpose
The DROP command drops its access on the current object and returns to the default prompt.
Syntax
DROP
GS04A065
Usage Notes
Filer always retains access to FIB and MI, even if the default prompt is showing.
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DUMPDISK
DUMPDISK
Purpose
The DUMPDISK command positions Filer at a specified disk segment, and displays the
contents according to the selected display options.
Syntax
DUMPDISK
DUMPDIS
cylid
sectornum
=
=
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/V
/C
/Z
sectorcount
=
1102D018
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the specified disk segment, but does not display it.
/S
Shows a short formatted display of the disk segment.
/M
Shows a medium-length formatted display of the disk segment.
/L
Shows a long formatted display of the disk segment.
/H
Shows a hexadecimal display of the disk segment.
/V
Verifies the disk segment and displays any errors encountered.
/C
For compressed data blocks, displays the uncompressed DB header information,
including extended header information pertaining to data compression.:
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the display when the
/S option is used.
/Z
For compressed data blocks, displays:
• the uncompressed DB header information, including extended header
information pertaining to data compression.
• a hex format display of the compressed data stored in the DB. If the /Z option
is not used, the hex display shows the uncompressed data.
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the output when the
/x option is used.
cylid
130
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
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DUMPDISK
Syntax Element
Description
sectornum
The sector number.
sectorcount
The number of sectors to display, starting from sectornum. If sectorcount is
omitted, DUMPDISK will display one sector.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount. For more information, see “Stored Input Values”
on page 82.
Usage Notes
If the type is invalid, the segment is displayed in the hexadecimal format. This command
differs from the BLK command because data is always dumped from disk.
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ENABLE
ENABLE
Purpose
The ENABLE command sets a specified flag in the file system to TRUE. This enables certain
features of Filer.
Syntax
,
ENABLE
ENA
flag
?
GS04C015
Syntax Element
Description
flag
Specifies the flag that will be set to true. The following flags are available:
• LOCKING
When locking is enabled, Filer observes the file system locking protocols,
which prevent system hangs and deadlocks. Locking is enabled by
default when Filer is started without the -l or -i command-line options.
• SCRIPT, SCRIPT MODE, and SCRIPTMODE
Script mode is disabled by default. When script mode is enabled, the
Filer ABORT and INQUIRE commands are disabled to allow a script to
run without interruption. Script mode should be enabled before
running scripts that call Filer.
The following flags are for internal use only, and should not be enabled or
disabled:
•
•
•
•
•
•
?
132
CHECK and CHECKTS
PANIC
STOP
SUSPEND
TPARESET
TRACE
Displays a complete list of available flags.
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ERRORS
ERRORS
Purpose
The ERRORS command redirects diagnostic messages to a file that you specify or to the
default file, stderr.
Syntax
ERRORS
TO
file
INTO
STDERR
OVER
ME
GT06C008
Syntax Element
Description
TO
Specifies that Filer is to write diagnostic messages to a new file or to
STDERR.
If the file specified exists, Filer returns an error.
INTO
Specifies that Filer is to append diagnostic messages to a specified file or to
STDERR.
If the file already exists, Filer appends the error messages to the end of the
file
If the file does not exist, Filer creates it automatically.
OVER
Specifies that Filer is to overwrite an existing file or STDERR with current
diagnostic messages.
If the file already exists, Filer writes over the file
If the file does not exist, Filer creates the file.
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file
The name of the destination file for diagnostic messages.
STDERR
The default file to which Filer writes diagnostic messages.
ME
A synonym for STDERR.
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ERRORS
Usage Notes
When you start Filer, it writes diagnostic messages to STDERR by default.
You can use the ERRORS command to redirect the diagnostic messages in the following ways:
•
To write to a new file only
•
To append an existing file
•
To overwrite an existing file
•
To display on your console
If you include the file parameter in the ERRORS command, the file you specify becomes the
destination for diagnostic messages redirected from STDERR.
If you type the ERRORS command without any options, Filer shows the name of the current
diagnostic messages file STDERR on your system console.
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FIB
FIB
Purpose
The FIB (File Information Block) command displays information about the file system and
cylinder usage, including WAL log cylinder and Depot cylinder usage.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H) as /dispopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
FIB
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
1102A201
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the FIB. Nothing is displayed unless a problem exists.
/S
Displays the fixed area of the FIB.
/M
Same as /S.
/L
Same as /M but also includes the Cylinder Allocation History Array and FTR
information.
/H
Displays the contents of the FIB in hexadecimal.
Usage Notes
The prompt for the FIB selector is as follows:
FIB ==>
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the FIB prompt:
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•
DISPLAY (without an ordinalrange)
•
DROP
•
PATCH
•
WRITE
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FIND
FIND
Purpose
The FIND command, given the subtable and optional RowID range, displays cylinders
containing the range with detail, depending on the options.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/S, /M, /L) as /dispopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
tid
FIND
F
ridrange
/S
/M
/L
1102B080
Syntax Element
Description
/S
Displays the first CID, SRD, and DBD for range.
/M
Displays the first CID, SRD, and DBD for range, as well as all CIDs and
the last SRD and DBD for range.
/L
Displays every CID, SRD, and DBD for range.
tid
the subtable of interest. For more information on tid formatting, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
ridrange
the portion of the subtable of interest. For more information on
ridrange formatting, see “Rows and Row Ranges” on page 76.
The online help lists this option as rowspec [TO rowspec].
Usage Notes
The range default is the entire subtable.
FIND sets the context to null.
If Filer is invoked from the Coroner mode of the debugger, gdb, the FIND command works in
a limited manner, displaying whatever is found in the dump. For information on invoking
Filer from the Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on
page 63.
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FREECACHE
FREECACHE
Purpose
The FREECACHE command displays the status of the free cylinder cache.
Syntax
FREECACHE
1102A227
Usage Notes
By default, the cache contains entries for up to 100 cylinders. The maximum number of
entries is determined by the Free Cylinder Cache Size setting in DBS Control. For more
information on Free Cylinder Cache Size, see the DBS Control chapter of Utilities.
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HELP
HELP
Purpose
The HELP command provides context sensitive help for Filer commands. The help displayed
is based on the mode that Filer is running in as indicated by the Filer prompt.
Syntax
HELP
H
/L
ALL
keyword
?
GT06C009
Syntax Element
Description
/L
Displays the command syntax and a description of the command. Without
/L, HELP displays only the command syntax.
ALL
Displays the help for all Filer commands, regardless of the current Filer
context.
keyword
Displays the help for the Filer command or parameter specified by keyword.
If you do not specify either a keyword or ALL, HELP displays help only for
the commands that are valid in the current context.
?
138
Displays the list of all the keywords for which help is available.
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IDENT
IDENT
Purpose
The IDENT command identifies the objects in the specified sectors, and displays the
properties of the objects.
Syntax
IDENT
ID
cylid
sectornum
=
=
sectorcount
=
1102C013
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
sectornum
The sector number.
sectorcount
The number of sectors to examine, starting from sectornum, but not extending
beyond the end of the cylinder.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount. For more information, see “Stored Input
Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
An object is identified even if the sector is not the first sector in that object.
A description of all DBs or WDBs in the specified area is provided for both normal and Depot
cylinders. Other objects or regions are identified but not described in detail.
IDENT accepts any cylid and sector number. Therefore, in addition to the DB sectors, CI,
FREE, MI, FIB, SEG0, etc. are also accepted and the owner identified.
IDENT also displays the WAL log objects containing WAL log sectors. For example, for a
sector in a data block, IDENT displays the SRD, DBD, database name, and table name. For a
sector in the cylinder index, IDENT indicates that the sector is in the CI. Wherever the sector
is, IDENT indicates the object, such as SEG0, FIB, MI, CI, DB, the cylinder’s free sector list,
WCI, WDB, or WAL log cylinder free list. The WMI is omitted because the WMI never is
written to disk.
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IDENT
If the storage has not yet been profiled, information on Grade and Temperature is not
displayed.
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INFO
INFO
Purpose
The INFO command displays information about the rebuilt CI or WCI that is currently in
memory.
Note: This command can be used only when Teradata Database is not running on the affected
AMP.
Syntax
INFO
1102A220
Usage Notes
This command can be used only from the REBUILDCI command prompt.
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INIT
INIT
Purpose
Warning:
The INIT command can damage the File System B*Tree such that data can be removed or lost
permanently. If used incorrectly, any changes might be irreversible.
The INIT command initializes the current cylinder or range of cylinders to free by deleting the
contained DBs, releasing the cylinder back into the general storage pool, and removing the
cylinder from the MI.
Syntax
INIT
/Y
1102A017
Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the
command.
Usage Notes
This command is not valid if the prompt reflects a range selection. The INIT command is
allowed only at the CI prompt.
INIT is the same as DELETE with a cylinder context. The command also initializes WAL log
cylinders. For information on how to initialize or remove other objects, see “DELETE” on
page 123.
INIT displays a confirmation prompt before initializing the cylinder.
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INPUT
INPUT
Purpose
The INPUT command directs Filer to read commands from a specified file rather than from
the default input file, stdin.
Syntax
INPUT
FROM file
IN
GS04B019
Syntax Element
Description
file
The name of a file you specify as the source of command input to Filer.
Usage Notes
When you first start Filer, it accepts input from the stdin file by default. Using the INPUT
command, you can redirect input from any file you specify.
Note: The input file must be located on the node that runs the control AMP. To determine
which node is running the control AMP, use the STATUS command of the Vproc Manager
utility. The control AMP is designated under the Logical Configuration with an asterisk.
When Filer reaches the end of the file you specify, Filer again accepts input from you.
You can nest the INPUT command inside command files to a maximum of nine files deep.
Example
The following command example shows the format for redirecting input from a file in a
specific directory:
Filer ==>
input from /home/user1/commands
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MEMBLK
MEMBLK
Purpose
The MEMBLK command accesses the file system segment at the specified memory address,
determines the segment type, and returns a formatted display of the segment.
Note: The MEMBLK command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X) as /dispopt. You can type
the options at the beginning or end of the command.
memaddr
MEMBLK
MEMB
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/C
/Z
=
1102C023
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the segment. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
C
/Z
The display options: Short, Medium, Long, Hex, and Extended. The display
format depends on the segment type. For descriptions of how the display
options are applied to the different segment types, see the associated
commands:“CI” on page 113, “DB” on page 118, “WCI” on page 229, and
“WDB” on page 232.
/C
For compressed data blocks, displays the uncompressed DB header
information, including extended header information pertaining to data
compression.:
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the display when
the /S option is used.
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MEMBLK
Syntax Element
Description
/Z
For compressed data blocks, displays:
• the uncompressed DB header information, including extended header
information pertaining to data compression.
• a hex format display of the compressed data stored in the DB. If the /Z
option is not used, the hex display shows the uncompressed data.
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the output when
the /x option is used.
memaddr
The memory address specifying the start of the segment.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined
for memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
The MEMBLK command is similar to the BLK command. See “BLK” on page 110.
MEMBLK might access obsolete copies of segments, so the displays might not be current. In
addition, sometimes segments are inaccessible from the System Debugger when run against a
dump. Segments that are inaccessible within the debugger are also inaccessible within Filer.
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MEMCTX
MEMCTX
Purpose
The MEMCTX command returns a formatted display of a file system context structure
(ctxcontext_t) beginning at the specified memory address.
Note: The MEMCTX command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
MEMCTX
MEMC
memaddr
=
1102A033
Syntax Element
Description
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the file system context structure
display.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined for
memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
The MEMCTX command displays the internal file system context structure, ctxcontext_t. To
display the saved Filer context information, use the SHOWD command. For more
information about the SHOWD command, see “SHOWDEFAULTS” on page 212.
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MEMDB
MEMDB
Purpose
The MEMDB command returns a formatted display of a data block (DB) beginning at the
specified memory address.
Note: The MEMDB command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X) as /dispopt. You can type
the options at the beginning or end of the command.
memaddr
MEMDB
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/C
/Z
FORCE
=
1102C034
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the DB. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/C
/Z
The options used to specify the format of the DB display. For detailed
information about these display options, see “DB” on page 118.
FORCE
Attempts to format and display the segment as a DB even if the segment
is not a DB.
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the DB display.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for
memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been
defined for memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input Values”
on page 82.
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MEMDB
Usage Notes
The MEMDB command is similar to the DB command. See “DB” on page 118.
MEMDB reports an error if the segment is not a DB. However, if you specify FORCE, Filer
tries to display the memory block as a data block.
MEMDB might access obsolete copies of segments, so the displays might not be current. In
addition, sometimes segments are inaccessible from the System Debugger when run against a
dump. Segments that are inaccessible within the debugger are also inaccessible within Filer.
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MEMDUMP
MEMDUMP
Purpose
The MEMDUMP command displays a hexadecimal memory dump defined by a starting
address and specified number of bytes.
Note: The MEMDUMP command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
MEMDUMP
MEMD
memaddr
256
=
length
=
1102A035
Syntax Element
Description
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the memory dump.
length
The amount of memory (in bytes) to be displayed. 256 is the default.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved values for memaddr or
length.
This option cannot be used unless the input values have already been defined for
memaddr or length. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
If length is omitted, 256 bytes are dumped.
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MEMROW
MEMROW
Purpose
The MEMROW command displays a row beginning at the specified memory address.
Note: The MEMROW command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the row options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H) as /rowopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
memaddr
MEMROW
MEMR
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
=
1102C036
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the physical row. Nothing is displayed unless there is a
problem.
Physical rows store one of several types of data, such as regular table
row data or column partition data.
/S or /C
Counts the number of physical rows selected. This is the default.
/M or /I
Displays only the row header information (length, RowID, and flags).
/L or /R
Formats the row header and the fields in the physical row.
/H
Formats the row header, and displays the entire physical row in
hexadecimal, including the row header.
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the row display.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for
memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been
defined for memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input
Values” on page 82.
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MEMSORCTX
MEMSORCTX
Purpose
The MEMSORCTX command returns a formatted display of a context structure
(sorcontext_t) beginning at the specified memory address.
Note: The MEMSORCTX command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
MEMSORCTX
MEMS
memaddr
=
1102A006
Syntax Element
Description
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the context structure display.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined for
memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
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MEMWCTX
MEMWCTX
Purpose
The MEMWCTX command returns a formatted display of a context structure (wtjcontext_t)
beginning at the specified memory address.
Note: The MEMWCTX command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
MEMWCTX
memaddr
=
1102A118
Syntax Element
Description
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the context structure display.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for
memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been
defined for memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input
Values” on page 82.
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MEMWDB
MEMWDB
Purpose
The MEMWDB command returns a formatted display of a WAL data block (WDB) beginning
at the specified memory address. It is similar to the WDB command. See “WDB” on page 232.
Note: The MEMWDB command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X) as /dispopt. You can type
the options at the beginning or end of the command.
memaddr
MEMWDB
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
FORCE
=
1102A112
Syntax Element
Description
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
The options used to specify the format of the WDB display. For detailed
information about these display options, see “WDB” on page 232.
FORCE
Attempts to format and display the segment as a WDB even if the block
code does not indicate a WDB.
memaddr
The memory address at which to begin the WDB display.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined
for memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on
page 82.
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MEMWREC
MEMWREC
Purpose
The MEMWREC command formats a WAL log record beginning at the specified memory
address.
Note: The MEMWREC command is available only when Filer is invoked from the System
Debugger or Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or
Coroner, see “Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X) as /nextopt. You can type
the options at the beginning or end of the command.
memaddr
MEMWREC
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
=
1102A113
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the WAL log record. Nothing is displayed unless there is a
problem.
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
The options used to specify the format of the WAL log record. For
detailed information about these display options, see “WREC” on
page 239.
memaddr
The memory address specifying the start of the WAL log record.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for
memaddr.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been
defined for memaddr. For more information, see “Stored Input
Values” on page 82.
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MI
MI
Purpose
The Master Index is the highest level of the B-Tree structure of the file system and contains a
sorted list of all the CI descriptors. The MI command displays the following:
•
The Master Index with the requested display option
•
The checksum contained in the CID for each one that is displayed with the command
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /V, /X) as /dispopt.
MI
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/V
/X
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1102A119
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the MI. Nothing is displayed unless a problem exists.
/S
Shows the fixed area and a formatted display of the first and last CID of the MI
segment.
/M
Same as /L.
/L
Shows the fixed area and a formatted display of all the CIDs in the MI
segment.
/H
Displays a hex dump of the MI segment.
/V
Verifies that the MI segment has all CIDs in the correct order, that all sectors
are accounted for, and matches the setting of the FIB.
/X
Same as /L.
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MI
Usage Notes
The prompt for the MI selector is shown below:
MI ==>
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the MI prompt:
•
DISPLAY (without an ordinalrange)
•
DROP
•
PATCH
•
WRITE
No checksum exists for the MI itself, however, if checksums are enabled, CIDs with checksums
will show additional checksum columns in the MI output screen.
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MODIFY REDO
MODIFY REDO
Purpose
The MODIFY REDO command replays or performs Redo processing on specified WAL log
records. The command also determines whether to perform WAL replay during the next file
system startup.
Warning:
Improper use of this command can lead to irreparable data loss.
Syntax
MODIFY
MOD
REDO
REPLAY
/Y
LINEAGE
LIN
wlsn
REPLAY WREC wlsnrange
ACTIVATE
NEXT
REDO
DEACTIVATE
NEXT
REDO
1102A180
Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the
command.
REPLAY
LINEAGE
Replays the records in the WAL log with the lineage value specified by wlsn.
wlsn
The lineage number that identifies the Redo records to be replayed by the
REPLAY LINEAGE option.
REPLAY WREC
Replays the WAL log record or range of records specified in the wlsnrange.
Warning: Filer will not perform any WAL log analysis before replaying the
records. Therefore, be absolutely sure that the specified records
must be replayed before using this option. An attempt to replay an
obsolete lineage may result in data loss.
Only modifications from complete NTAs are committed. If a range of records
is specified, Filer will attempt to replay closed NTAs and will skip or discard
modifications related to open NTAs in the portion of the log specified.
Warning: Filer will not perform any WAL log analysis before replaying the
records. Therefore, be absolutely sure that the specified records
must be replayed before using this option. An attempt to replay one
or more obsolete records may result in data loss.
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MODIFY REDO
Syntax Element
Description
wlsnrange
Selects one or a range of WAL log records based on the WAL log sequence
number (WLSN) in the record header.
To define wlsnrange, use this syntax:
wlsn
TO wlsn
1102B155
ACTIVATE
Replays the WAL log records during the next file system startup. Filer scans the
WAL log for the most recent checkpoint and restores that checkpoint as the
basis for the next WAL replay.
DEACTIVATE
Disables the replay of WAL log records during the next file system startup. This
option is useful in cases where so many repairs have been made to the file
system that attempting to replay WAL log records during the next file system
startup will likely fail.
Usage Notes
The MODIFY REDO command is useful for repairing systems that encounter problems when
attempting to replay WAL log records.
These commands are valid only if Filer is started when the Teradata Database is down.
Lineage refers to a chain of modifications that occurs on a particular block while the block is
in memory. A lineage chain begins when the first modification using WAL is made to an
unmodified block in memory. The chain “dies” when the block is written to disk with the
accumulated changes. To track a particular lineage, a lineage number is assigned to the block.
The MODIFY REDO REPLAY LINEAGE command allows you to process Redo records
belonging to a particular lineage.
When a transaction requires one or more changes to multiple blocks, the modifications are
tied together via an NTA (Nested Top Action). An NTA joins a series of WAL log records into
a single atomic unit. All records participating in a particular NTA must be written completely
to the WAL log to be complete. The MODIFY REDO REPLAY WREC command will not
process incomplete NTAs.
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MODIFY REDO
Example 1
The following example replays the WAL log records in the WLSN range from 00491D2 to
000491D4. Since the /Y option is not specified, Filer prompts for confirmation before
executing the command.
WREC ==>
modify redo replay wrec 00491D2 to 000491D4
You have chosen to attempt the replay of all records between
00000000000491D2 and 00000000000491D4 inclusive.
WARNING: This command performs the replay of the specified
WAL records WITHOUT performing the WAL Analysis.
Erroneous use of this command could potentially
lead to irrepairable data loss. Please be sure
this is the desired action before proceeding.
Are you sure you want to continue? (Y/N)
y
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
response
SKIPPED : Filer skipped
Record already
SKIPPED : Filer skipped
Record already
SKIPPED : Filer skipped
Record already
WAL record with wlsn 00000000000491D2
applied.
WAL record with wlsn 00000000000491D3
applied.
WAL record with wlsn 00000000000491D4
applied.
Filer attempted to replay a total of 3 record(s).
Example 2
The following example replays all of the WAL log records with a lineage value of 49163.
Filer ==>
modify /y redo replay lin 49163
You have chosen to attempt the replay of all
records with a linwlsn of 0000000000049163
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
REPLAYED:
REPLAYED:
REPLAYED:
REPLAYED:
REPLAYED:
REPLAYED:
Filer
Filer
Filer
Filer
Filer
Filer
response
replayed
replayed
replayed
replayed
replayed
replayed
WAL
WAL
WAL
WAL
WAL
WAL
record
record
record
record
record
record
with
with
with
with
with
with
wlsn
wlsn
wlsn
wlsn
wlsn
wlsn
0000000000049165
0000000000049166
0000000000049167
0000000000049168
0000000000049187
00000000000491BF
Filer attempted to replay a total of 6 record(s).
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MODIFY REDO
Example 3
The following example activates the replay of WAL log records in the next file system startup.
Filer ==>
modify redo activate next redo
You have chosen to enable the WAL replay on the next
File System startup.
Filer will search from the end of the WAL log for the
latest checkpoint and utilize that checkpoint for the
next startup.
Are you sure you want to continue? (Y/N)
y
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
response
The
checkwlsn
in segment zero has been updated to
00000000000491E5.
The chkptredowlsn
in segment zero has been updated to
00000000000491D8.
The maxdeletablewlsn in segment zero has been updated to
00000000000491D8.
Example 4
The following example deactivates the replay of WAL log records in the next file system
startup.
Filer ==>
modify /y redo deactivate next
You have chosen to disable the WAL replay on the next
File System startup.
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
response
The WAL replay has been deactivated for the next File System
startup.
To undo this command, you can issue the following:
MODIFY REDO ACTIVATE NEXT
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NEXT
NEXT
Purpose
The NEXT command displays the next row, WAL log record, DB, WDB, DBD, WDBD, CI,
WCI, CID, WCID or subtable.
Syntax
Note: You can type /dispopt or /rowopt at the beginning or end of the command.
NEXT
N
/dispopt
number
/rowopt
Syntax Element
Description
/dispopt
The display options, which are listed below.
GS04C066
Setting
Selection
Description
/S
show a short formatted display of the object. This is the default.
/M
show a medium-length formatted display of the object.
/L
show a long formatted display of the object.
/X
show an extended display of the object.
/H
show a hexadecimal display of the object.
/Z
For compressed data blocks, displays:
• the uncompressed DB header information, including extended header
information pertaining to data compression.
• a hex format display of the compressed data stored in the DB. If the /Z option
is not used, the hex display shows the uncompressed data.
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the output when the
/x option is used.
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NEXT
Syntax Element
Description
/rowopt
The row options, which are listed below.
Setting
Selection
Description
/P
Positions to the physical rows or table requested. At least one physical row must be
in the selected range. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
Physical rows store one of several types of data, such as regular table row data or
column partition data.
number
/C or /S
Count the number of physical rows selected. This is the default for all subtables
except the table header subtable.
/I or /M
Displays only the row header information (length, RowID, and flags).
/L or /R
Display the formatted row header and the fields in the physical row. This option is
the default for the table header subtable. However, this option will not be the
default formatted field display because the table header subtable is a special row
format and requires special formatting.
/H
Display the entire physical row in hexadecimal, including the row header.
The number of objects to display, starting with the first object following the end of the current context.
The default is 1.
Usage Notes
If number is specified, NEXT displays subsequent objects of the same type until the requested
number is reached. NEXT sets the context to the objects displayed.
If a whereclause is saved in the context, NEXT will apply the conditions of the whereclause. For
more information about the whereclause, see “DISPLAY” on page 127 and “Specifying a
WHERE clause” on page 85.
NEXT displays objects which follow the end of the current context as shown in the following
table.
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From …
NEXT displays …
row context
next rows within the table.
table context (whether a subset of rows was
displayed or ALL)
next subtables.
DB context
next DBs.
DBD context
next DBDs.
CI context
next CIs.
CID context
next CIDs.
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NEXT
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From …
NEXT displays …
WAL log record context
next WAL log records.
WDB context
next WDBs.
WDBD context
next WDBDs.
WCI context
next WCIs.
WCID context
next WCIDs.
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OUTPUT
OUTPUT
Purpose
The OUTPUT command redirects Filer output to a file you specify or to the default file,
stdout.
Syntax
OUTPUT
OUT
TO
file
INTO
STDOUT
OVER
ME
GT06C011
Syntax Element
Description
TO
Specifies that Filer is to redirect output to a new file or to STDOUT.
If the file exists, Filer returns an error.
INTO
Specifies that Filer is to append output to an existing file specified by file or to
STDOUT.
If the file exists, Filer appends the output to the end of the file.
If the file does not exist, Filer creates the file.
OVER
Specifies that Filer is to overwrite an existing file or STDOUT with new Filer
output.
If the file exists, Filer writes over the file.
If the file does not exist, Filer creates the file.
file
The name of a file you specify as the destination of Filer output.
STDOUT
The default file to which Filer writes output.
ME
A synonym for STDOUT.
Usage Notes
When you first start Filer, diagnostic messages are written to STDOUT by default. You can use
the OUTPUT command to redirect Filer output in any of the following ways:
164
•
To write to a new file only
•
To append an existing file
•
To overwrite an existing file
•
To display on your console
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OUTPUT
Note: The output file is located on the node that runs the control AMP. To determine which
node is running the control AMP, use the STATUS command of the Vproc Manager utility.
The control AMP is designated under the Logical Configuration with an asterisk.
When Filer redirects output to a file, all input and diagnostic messages are echoed to the
output file as well as to their usual destinations.
If you include the file parameter in the OUTPUT command, Filer uses that parameter as the
destination for output redirected from STDOUT.
If you type the OUTPUT command without any options, Filer displays the name of the
current output file STDOUT to your system console.
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PACK
PACK
Purpose
The PACK command packs the segment to eliminate fragmentation.
Syntax
PACK
/Y
GS04A068
Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the
command.
Usage Notes
Currently, only a CI and DB can be packed.
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PATCH
PATCH
Purpose
The PATCH command does the following:
•
Modifies file system segments while the segment is in memory, whether the segment is a
CI, a DB, the FIB, the MI, a row, or a WAL log segment or object. The modified segments
can later be forced to disk with the WRITE command. The PATCH command can also be
used with interior file system objects, such as a CID, SRD, DBD, WCID, and WDBD.
•
Automatically updates the checksum of the segment being modified when the modified
segment is written.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the patch options (/B, /C, /W, /S, /D, /L) as /patchopt. The syntax
diagram only shows the options at the beginning of the command, but you can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
PATCH
PAT
offset
/B
/C
/W
/S
/D
/L
1102A122
where the following tells how to address the segment being patched:
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Syntax Element
Description
/B or /C
Input is one byte at a time. You can type input as a number (0x0 to 0xFF) or a
character string delimited by apostrophes or double quotation marks (a
character is a string of length 1).
/W or /S
Input is one numeric Half Word (Short Integer, two bytes) at a time (0x0 to
0xFFFF). This is the default.
/D or /L
Input is one numeric Word (Long Integer, four bytes) at a time (0x0 to
0xFFFFFFFF).
offset
the first location to be patched is specified as offset bytes from the beginning
of the current selected object. In most cases, the current selected object is
reflected by the prompt, but in some cases, this might not be true. For
example, even though the prompt shows Row==>, the last selected object
can be one row or a range of rows. With a range of rows, the offset is
displaced from the beginning of the first row in the range.
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PATCH
Usage Notes
The prompt changes to indicate that Filer has entered Patch Mode.
The PATCH command syntax is the same, regardless of the current input prompt, except
when you are in PATCH mode already, in which case offset is optional. If omitted, offset
defaults to the current location.
If you type an invalid command, an error message is displayed, and the command is ignored.
When you type the PATCH command, it must be the only command on the command line
because the command switches from general command syntax to a specific command syntax.
Therefore, both the following command entries will generate an error:
CI /P 200; PATCH /W 1567H
PATCH /W 1567H;WRITE
After you issue the PATCH command, the prompt changes to reflect the Patch mode and the
object and address being patched. The current value of the cell open for patching is displayed
in both HEX and DECIMAL. Prompting continues until the DONE or CANCEL command is
issued, at which time the prompt is restored to what it was before patching started. The
following table describes what happens when exiting Patch Mode.
IF you exit Patch Mode using …
THEN …
DONE
changes are saved to the segment and other tasks will see the
changes immediately.
CANCEL
changes are not saved and the segment will be left exactly the
same as when you entered Patch Mode.
Because the checksum is stored externally, patching a single file system segment causes an
additional segment to be updated with the new checksum of the segment if checksums are
enabled on the block.
The commands allowed while patching are listed in the following table.
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PATCH
Subcommand/Syntax
Description
patchstuff
Replace the contents of the current cell with the input.
The general syntax for a patchstuff is as follows:
element, element, . . .
,
number
string
SKIP
GS04B073
SK
Syntax Element
Description
number
For a description, see “Numeric Input” on
page 75.
string
A list of characters delimited by apostrophes or
double quotation marks (only valid in /B or /C
mode). A closing delimiter is required. Two
consecutive delimiter characters translates to a
single character of the same type.
SKIP
Skips the contents of the current cell and moves
to the next cell.
Note: You can use a number, a string, or a combination of a number
and a string.
Do not change the value of this cell and move back the specified
number of cells. The default for number is 1.
BACK
number
GS04A081
Exit from Patch Mode and do not save the changes. Leave the segment
exactly as it looked when Patch Mode was entered.
CANCEL
1102A146
Exit from Patch Mode and save the changes to the segment. Now the
segment is patched, and modifications are visible to the outside world.
Specifying the /NOCHECKSUM option means that if checksums are
enabled on the segment being modified or written, the checksum is
not updated and written to the external segment that contains the
checksum.
DONE
/NOCHECKSUM
QUIT
Q
STOP
ST
END
EXIT
1102C083
PATCH
PAT
Change the options. The offset is counted from the start of the current
selected entity. If omitted, the current location is not changed.
offset
/B
/C
/W
/S
/D
/L
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You can type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
The syntax diagram only shows the options at the beginning.
1102A122
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PATCH
Subcommand/Syntax
REPEAT
ALL
Description
Take the patchstuff and repeat it the designated number of times or
until the end of segment if you specify ALL or *.
patchobject
*
number
GS04A034
Press Enter to move to the next cell without changing anything.
SKIP
SK
GS04B074
Any global command except QUIT command
All global commands behave exactly as they do in Command Mode.
For additional information, see “Filer Command Types” on page 92.
Example
DB ==> patch /b 0
Now entering PatchMode
Patch: DB : 0000 : 0000
Patch: DB : 0001 : 0008
Patch: DB : 0002 : 0006
Patch: DB : 0003 : 00f0
Exiting Patch Mode
DB ==>>
170
(
(
(
(
0)
8)
6)
240)
==>
==>
==>
==>
2
4
sk
done
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PREV
PREV
Purpose
The PREV command displays a previous row, WAL log record, DB, WDB, DBD, WDBD, CI,
WCI, CID, WCID or subtable.
Syntax
Note: You can type /dispopt or /rowopt at the beginning or end of the command.
PREV
PR
/dispopt
number
/rowopt
Syntax Element
Description
/dispopt
The display options, which are listed below.
GS04C069
Setting
Selection
Description
/S
show a short formatted display of the object. This is the default.
/M
show a medium-length formatted display of the object.
/L
show a long formatted display of the object.
/H
show a hexadecimal display of the object.
/X
show an extended display of the object.
/Z
For compressed data blocks, displays:
• the uncompressed DB header information, including extended header
information pertaining to data compression.
• a hex format display of the compressed data stored in the DB. If the /Z option
is not used, the hex display shows the uncompressed data.
If the scoped DB is not compressed, the output is similar to the output when the
/x option is used.
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PREV
Syntax Element
Description
/rowopt
The row options, which are listed below.
Setting
Selection
Description
/P
Positions to the physical rows or table requested. At least one physical row must be
in the selected range. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
Physical rows store one of several types of data, such as regular table row data or
column partition data.
number
/C or /S
Count the number of physical rows selected. This is the default for all subtables
except the table header subtable.
/I or /M
Displays only the row header information (length, RowID, and flags).
/L or /R
Display the formatted row header and the fields in the physical row. This option is
the default for the table header subtable. However, this option will not be the
default formatted field display because the table header subtable is a special row
format and requires special formatting.
/H
Display the entire physical row in hexadecimal, including the row header.
The number of objects to display, starting with the object just previous to the beginning of the current
context.
The default is 1.
Usage Notes
If number is specified, PREV displays previous objects of the same type until the requested
number is reached. PREV sets the context to the objects displayed.
If a whereclause is saved in the context, PREV will apply the conditions of the whereclause. For
more information about the whereclause, see “DISPLAY” on page 127 and “Specifying a
WHERE clause” on page 85.
PREV displays the objects previous to the beginning of the current context as shown in the
following table.
172
From …
PREV displays …
row context
previous rows within the table.
table context (whether a subset of rows was
displayed or ALL)
previous subtables.
DB context
previous DBs.
DBD context
previous DBDs.
CI context
previous CIs.
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PREV
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From …
PREV displays …
CID context
previous CIDs.
WAL log record context
previous WAL log records.
WDB context
previous WDBs.
WDBD context
previous WDBDs.
WCI context
previous WCIs.
WCID context
previous WCIDs.
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PRIORITY
PRIORITY
Purpose
The PRIORITY command allows you to set the priority of the Filer process.
Syntax
PRIORITY
=
priorityclass
SET
1102A183
Syntax element …
Specifies …
priorityclass
the priority of the Filer process.
Valid values for priorityclass are:
•
•
•
•
LOW, L, or 0
MEDIUM, M, or 1 (This is the default.)
HIGH, H, or 2
RUSH, R, or 3
Usage Notes
The values are not case-sensitive.
The PRIORITY command is most commonly used with the SCANDISK command.
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QUARLIST
QUARLIST
Purpose
The QUARLIST command displays a list of cylinders whose owning AMPs cannot be
determined.
Cylinders are designated for quarantine automatically when a data corruption in the cylinder
index prevents the system from determining the AMP to which the cylinder belongs. A list of
quarantined cylinders is maintained on a single AMP in each storage subpool, usually the
AMP with the lowest vproc number. AMPs that can potentially own these cylinders are kept
down, and the file system is not started on these AMPs during Teradata Database system
startup. To bring the AMPs back up, use Filer to repair or reinitialize the quarantined
cylinders.
The QUARLIST command can scan these cylinders for possible diagnoses. After the
quarantined cylinders have been fixed, use the ASSIGN command to reassign the cylinders to
their appropriate AMPs, or use the /R option of QUARLIST to remove the cylinder from the
list, making the cylinder available for use from the general pool of storage cylinders.
For more information on the ASSIGN command, see “ASSIGN” on page 104.
Syntax
QUARLIST
/P
/S
cylid
/R
cylid
/X
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cylid
1102A200
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
/P
Prints the list of quarantined cylinders.
/S
Scans a quarantined cylinder and attempts to diagnose problem. If no cylid is
specified, scans all quarantined cylinders.
/R
Initializes a quarantined cylinder and releases it back into the general storage
pool. If no cylid is specified, initializes and releases all quarantined cylinders.
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QUARLIST
Syntax Element
Description
/X cylid
Initializes the cylinder specified by cylid, but does not release it back to storage.
Used for durable cylinders, which should never be released to general storage,
such as those used for master indexes and startup information.
Usage Notes
After repairing a cylinder on the quarantine list, use the ASSIGN command to re-associate the
cylinder with its AMP. For more information, see “ASSIGN” on page 104.
The /R option is related to the ASSIGN command. The /R option releases a repaired cylinder
back into the general storage pool, while ASSIGN re-associates a repaired cylinder back to a
specific AMP.
For more information on the proper use of this command to repair large file system
structures, see “Repairing Cylinders” on page 91
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QUIT
QUIT
Purpose
The QUIT command ends a Filer session.
Syntax
QUIT
Q
STOP
ST
END
EXIT
GT06B013
Usage Notes
STOP, END, and EXIT are synonyms for the QUIT command.
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RADIX
RADIX
Purpose
The RADIX command displays or sets the default radix used as the numeric base for data
input to and output from Filer. as either hexadecimal or decimal.
Syntax
RADIX
RAD
INPUT
IN
HEX
H
OUTPUT
DEC
OUT
D
GS04B022
Syntax Element
Description
INPUT
Numeric input to Filer defaults to the radix you select, either hexadecimal
or decimal.
OUTPUT
Numeric output from Filer defaults to the radix you select, either
hexadecimal or decimal.
HEX
Numeric input to or output from Filer defaults to a radix of hexadecimal.
DEC
Numeric input to or output from Filer defaults to a radix of decimal.
Usage Notes
When you start Filer, the default radix for both input and output from Filer is hexadecimal.
If you omit both the INPUT and OUTPUT options from the RADIX command, the radix
(HEX or DEC) that you select applies to both numeric input and output.
You can select either INPUT or OUTPUT, but not both when changing the settings of Filer
data.
If you omit both the HEX and DEC options, Filer displays the current RADIX setting.
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REALLOCDUR
REALLOCDUR
Purpose
The REALLOCDUR command reallocates cylinders for a specified durable cylinder type.
Durable cylinders are special cylinders used by the file system itself, such as cylinders used to
store the master index (MI) and the file system trace buffer (FTR). Durable cylinders are not
available to be allocated for general storage.
Use REALLOCDUR when durable cylinders have been lost, or cannot otherwise be repaired.
This command allocates new durable cylinders for these structures. If cylinders which used to
be part of the durable cylinder remain on the bad or quarantine lists, they should be freed by
using the BADLIST /R or QUARLIST /R command, as appropriate. For more information on
these commands, see “BADLIST” on page 108, and “QUARLIST” on page 175.
Note: This command can be used only when Teradata Database is not running on the affected
AMP.
Syntax
REALLOCDUR
CYLTYPE = cyltype
1102A211
Syntax Element
Description
cyltype
Specifies the type of durable cylinders to be allocated.
cyltype can be one of the following:
• MICYL
Specifies that durable cylinders for the master index be reallocated.
• FTRCYL
Specifies that durable cylinders for the trace buffers be reallocated.
Usage Notes
Use this command when there are multiple large durable cylinders in the quarantine list. For
more information, see “QUARLIST” on page 175.
For more information on the proper use of this command to repair large file system
structures, see “Repairing Cylinders” on page 91.
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REBUILDCI
REBUILDCI
Purpose
The REBUILDCI command reconstructs a cylinder index from the sectors in the data area of
the cylinder. This command works for both regular cylinder indexes (CIs) and WAL cylinder
indexes (WCIs). REBUILDCI can be used when one or both copies of a CI or WCI have been
corrupted.
Note: This command can be used only when Teradata Database is not running on the affected
AMP.
Caution:
Freed sectors that contain obsolete data from previously removed tables and rows can be
restored to the index by the REBUILDCI command. Be aware of this possibility, and inspect
rebuilt cylinders before writing them to disk.
Syntax
REBUILDCI
cylid
1102A217
Usage Notes
The REBUILDCI command can be used only when Filer scope is set to a single vproc.
The index for the specified cylinder is rebuilt in memory, but is not committed to disk until
the WRITE command is issued.
A rebuilt index in memory must be written to disk or discarded before changing the scope or
quitting Filer.
Running this command switches Filer to the REBUILDCI mode, indicated by the
REBUILDCI command prompt. In this mode, the INFO, REPAIRSECTS, and DISCARD
commands can be used to inspect and modify the rebuilt index before it is written to disk.
Example
Filer ==>
rebuildci 000100050000018C
REBUILDCI is not allowed if more than one amp is selected
Filer ==>
scope 1
1 of 2 amps have been selected
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REBUILDCI
Filer ==>
rebuildci 000100050000018C
*** Note: Rebuilding a cylinder’s index could restore cylinder data that was previously
deleted or replaced. ***
Rebuild of CI 000100050000018C has been completed
Found
4 PERM
DB(s) representing
971 sector(s)
REBUILDCI ==>
quit
There is a rebuilt CI in memory. You must write or discard the rebuilt [W]CI before
changing the scope or quitting from Filer.
REBUILDCI ==>
write
WARNING!!: Writing the rebuilt CI will overwrite the existing CI on disk.
Are you sure you want to WRITE this ?? (Y/N)
y
Rebuilt [W]CI has been written to disk
FILER ==>
quit
Filer has exited
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REBUILDMAP
REBUILDMAP
Purpose
The REBUILDMAP command rebuilds the cylinder allocation map on a storage device after
the block code or cylinder ID control fields of a cylinder index have been manually changed or
patched. Such changes will not be effective until the allocation map has been rebuilt.
Rebuilding the map requires a Teradata Database restart, which is performed automatically by
REBUILDMAP.
Note: REBUILDMAP can be used only when Teradata Database is not running, and Filer
scope is set to a single AMP vproc. For more information on scope, see “SCOPE (or VPROC)”
on page 209.
Caution:
Rebuilding the allocation map on a device destroys the existing allocation map. For more
information on the proper use of this command to repair large file system structures, see
“Repairing Cylinders” on page 91.
Syntax
REBUILDMAP
cylid
1102A212
182
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
Specifies the original cylinder ID of the modified cylinder. cylid is the 64-bit
identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal number.
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RENAME
RENAME
Purpose
The RENAME command renames the currently selected segment to the specified location on
the disk.
Syntax
RENAME
/Y
cylid
sectornum
=
=
1102C009
Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the command.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
sectornum
The sector number.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid or sectornum.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
cylid or sectornum. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
RENAME makes a copy of the object in a new location. The original object remains in the
original location.
The corresponding DBD or CID must be updated to reflect the new location of the object.
This might involve deleting the DBD or CID which is pointing to the original copy of the
object and creating a new DBD or CID to point to the object in its new location.
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REPAIRSECTS
REPAIRSECTS
Purpose
The REPAIRSECTS command helps to resolve overlapping DBs on rebuilt CIs, and
overlapping WDBs on rebuilt WCIs.
Syntax
REPAIRSECTS
1102A218
Usage Notes
This command can be used only from the REBUILDCI command prompt.
Example
Filer ==>
info
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
response
REBUILDCI has rebuilt CI 000100050000018C on this vproc.
written to disk.
The DBs listed below have overlapping rowids:
Start Sectors
TableID
FirstrowID
02DE
0045
0000 0416 0404 *0000 97F6 D26A 0000 0001
0323
0045
0000 0416 0404 *0000 9BFA 3405 0000 0001
The DBs listed
Start Sectors
*00FC
*0048
*0140
*0047
*0185
*0045
below have overlapping sectors:
TableID
FirstrowID
0000 0416 0404 0000 7BF7 3EA8 0000 0001
0000 0416 0404 0000 7FF3 FB5F 0000 0001
0000 0416 0404 0000 83F3 5076 0000 0001
The rebuilt CI has not been
Lastrowkey
*0000 9BFB F9E2
*0000 9FFD BFFC
Lastrowkey
0000 7FF3 96E0
0000 83F2 F87B
0000 87F6 77EE
Rebuilt [W]CI has overlapping [W]DBs.
Run REPAIRSECTS command to resolve overlapping [W]DBs
REBUILDCI ==>
repairsects
The rebuilt CI has overlapping DBs.
To resolve this issue, remove some of the overlapping DBs.
First resolve any DBs that have overlapping sectors.
Then resolve DBs that have overlapping rowids (if any still exist).
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REPAIRSECTS
Enter the Start sector of the overlapping DB to remove, or
Enter ‘0’ to quit
0140
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
response
The specified [W]DBs have been deleted.
The DBs listed below have overlapping rowids:
Start Sectors
TableID
FirstrowID
02DE
0045
0000 0416 0404 *0000 97F6 D26A 0000 0001
0323
0045
0000 0416 0404 *0000 9BFA 3405 0000 0001
Lastrowkey
*0000 9BFB F9E2
*0000 9FFD BFFC
The rebuilt CI still has overlapping DBs.
Run REPAIRSECTS again to try to resolve the problem.
REBUILDCI ==>
repairsects
The rebuilt CI has overlapping DBs.
To resolve this issue, remove some of the overlapping DBs.
First resolve any DBs that have overlapping sectors.
Then resolve DBs that have overlapping rowids (if any still exist).
Enter the Start sector of the overlapping DB to remove, or
Enter ‘0’ to quit
0323
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
vproc
0 (0000)
response
The specified [W]DBs have been deleted.
REBUILDCI ==>
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RESETFREECYL
RESETFREECYL
Purpose
The RESETFREECYL command resets the file system internal free cylinder count back to the
correct value.
Syntax
RESETFREECYL
RESETFREE
GS04B053
Usage Notes
This command complements the SET FREECYL command.
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ROW
ROW
Purpose
The ROW command displays rows from one or more subtables. For a single subtable, ROW
sets the context to those rows.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the row options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H) as /rowopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
tid
ROW
ridrange
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
1102C022
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the physical rows or subtable requested. At least one physical row
must be in the selected range. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
Physical rows store one of several types of data, such as regular table row data
or column partition data.
/S or /C
Counts the number of physical rows selected. This is the default for all
subtables except the table header subtable.
/M or /I
Displays only the row header information (length, RowID, and flags).
/L or /R
Formats the row header and fields in the physical row. This option is the
default for the table header subtable; however, this option is not the default
formatted field display because the table header subtable has a special row
format and requires special formatting.
/H
Format the row header and display the entire physical row in hexadecimal,
including the row header.
tid
Specifies the subtable to display, which must include a typeandindex value.For
detailed information, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
ridrange
A range of rows selected based upon row identification in the row header
rather than the ordinal position within the subtable. For information on
ridrange formatting, see “Rows and Row Ranges” on page 76.
The online help lists this option as rowspec [TO rowspec].
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ROW
Usage Notes
The prompt for the ROW selector is shown below:
ROW ==>
The ROW command operates on subtables. In the Teradata Database, a subtable is a collection
of physical rows, and a table is a collection of subtables. The physical rows of a particular
subtable may store regular data rows, index rows, table header rows, column partition values,
or other types of data. Therefore, you can use the ROW command to display rows from the
primary data subtable, the table header subtable, a secondary index subtable, etc. For example,
to obtain a formatted display of the table header, use ROW /L x y H, 0 1 where x and y make
up the tablenumber which identifies the table, and H is the typeandindex value which identifies
the table header subtable. For more information on identifying tables and subtables, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the ROW prompt:
188
•
DELETE
•
DISPLAY (without ordinalrange)
•
DROP
•
NEXT
•
PATCH
•
PREV
•
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SCANDISK
SCANDISK
Purpose
The SCANDISK command validates the file system and reports any errors found, including
discrepancies in the following:
•
Key file system data structures, such as master index, cylinder index, and data blocks,
including those associated with the WAL log.
•
The RowIDs, including the partition numbers, for key physical rows should match the
values stored for those rows in the cylinder index and master index.
Note: “Physical row” means the low-level row structure that is managed by the file system. A
physical row may store a table row or the data from one or more column partitions.
•
Within a subtable, the internal partition number of a physical row being greater than or
equal to the internal partition number in the preceding row, if any.
•
Within a partition, physical rows occur in row hash order.
•
Within a subtable, all physical rows are either partitioned or nonpartitioned. (All physical
rows within a subtable have a partition value in their RowIDs, or all rows do not.)
In addition, SCANDISK calculates, modifies, and verifies a file system checksum for tables
with checksumming defined) and reports any discrepancies.
Note: The internal partition number is not validated for consistency with the result of the
partitioning expression applied to the partitioning columns in a logical row, or for consistency
with currently defined column partition numbers.
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SCANDISK
Syntax
A
SCANDISK
/S
CI
/M
DB
/L
FREECIS
FIX
MI
WAL
WCI
WDB
WMI
A
B
tid
ridrange
TABLE
TAB
tid1
ridspec1
TO tid2
ridspec2
B
inquire_opt
NOCR
CR
1102D127
Syntax Element
Description
/S
Scans the MI and WMI.
/M
Scans the MI, CIs, WMI, and WCIs.
/L
Scans the MI, CIs, DBs, WMI, WCIs, and WDBs.
CI
Scans the MI and CIs. The free CIs are also scanned unless a tid is provided.
DB
Scans the MI, CIs, and DBs. This is the default for the normal file system, which
can be overridden by the CI, MI, or FREECIS options. The free CIs also are
scanned unless a tid is provided.
FREECIS
Scans CIs of cylinders that the allocation map indicates are free. Reports any
cylinder for which the CI does not also indicate that the cylinder is free.
FIX
Used with FREECIS only. SCANDISK attempts to resolve discrepancies by
updating allocation map to match state of cylinder as indicated by the CI.
Remaining discrepancies, as from corrupted cylinder data, are reported.
Note: Run SCANDISK FREECIS without the FIX option before running it with
the FIX option. This allows for inspection of the initial output prior to attempting
to fix any problems.
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MI
Scans the MI only.
WAL
Scans the WAL log.
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Syntax Element
Description
WCI
Scans the WMI and WCIs.
WDB
Scans the WMI, WCIs, and WDBs. This is the default for the WAL log, which can
be overridden by the WCI or WMI options.
WMI
Scans the WMI only.
tid
Specifies the subtable to scan. For more information on tid formatting, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
ridrange
Restricts the scan of a subtable to the specified RowID range. For more
information on ridrange formatting, see “Rows and Row Ranges” on page 76.
The online help lists this option as rowspec [TO rowspec].
TABLE
Scans the specified subtable range. SCANDISK starts the scan at the subtable
location specified by tid1 and ridspec1, and ends the scan at the subtable location
specified by tid2 and ridspec2.
Note: The starting subtable location, tid1 ridspec1, must be less than the ending
subtable location, tid2 ridspec2.
If the starting subtable does not exist (that is, the table was deleted), SCANDISK
starts from the next tid which is greater than the starting tid. Similarly, if the
ending subtable does not exist, SCANDISK ends the scan at the tid which is just
less than the specified ending tid.
If the ending subtable is not specified, SCANDISK scans from the starting
subtable until the end of all the subtables, followed by the free CIs and the WAL
log.
For more information on tid formatting, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on
page 79. For more information on ridspec formatting, see “Rows and Row
Ranges” on page 76.
ridspec
The RowID specification used with the TABLE option to specify the subtable
locations to start and stop the scan. For more information on RowIDs and ridspec
formatting, see “Rows and Row Ranges” on page 76.
The online help lists this option as rowspec.
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Syntax Element
Description
inquire_opt
Displays the lowest tid and rowid being scanned among the AMPS involved. This
option also reports SCANDISK progress as a percentage of total time to
completion and displays the number of errors encountered so far.
The syntax for the INQUIRE option is as follows:
INQUIRE
INQ
-
NONE
number
timeopt
1102E422
• NONE specifies that only one INQUIRE request is sent for the SCANDISK
job.
• number is an integer that defines the time interval to send an INQUIER
request to display SCANDISK progress. If timeopts is not specified, number
defaults to SECONDS.
• timeopt specifies the time unit that number represents. It should be one of the
following:
• SECONDS, SECOND, SECON, SECO, SECS, SEC, S
• MINUTES, MINUTE, MINUT, MINU, MINS, MIN, M
• HOURS, HOUR, HOU, HO, HRS, HR, H
• DAYS, DAY, DA, D
For example, scandisk inquire 5 m will start a SCANDISK job which
reports SCANDISK progress every five minutes.
Note: The maximum time interval allowed is seven days.
NOCR
Specifies to use regular data block preloads instead of cylinder reads. This is the
default.
CR
Specifies to use cylinder reads instead of regular data block preloads.
Starting SCANDISK
You can start SCANDISK in two different modes:
•
Normal mode
•
Restartable mode
In normal mode, SCANDISK checks the file system structures from the beginning to the end
of the SCANDISK job based on the options selected. If SCANDISK is stopped or aborted in
the middle of the scan, you normally will have to rerun the job from the beginning, unless you
do the following:
1
Before aborting the SCANDISK job, send an INQUIRE request. For details, see “Checking
SCANDISK Status” on page 208.
2
When you see the output from the INQUIRE command in the application window,
manually capture the tid and rowid displayed, then abort the SCANDISK job.
You can restart the aborted SCANDISK job in one of the following ways:
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•
Start SCANDISK with the TABLE option, and pass the captured tid and rowid to the
TABLE option to indicate the subtable where the scan should restart.
•
Start SCANDISK using the restartscandisk.pl script with the -t option, and pass the
captured tid and rowid to the -t option.
In restartable mode, it is much easier to start a SCANDISK job, stop it, then restart it from the
place at which it was stopped. It is recommended that you start SCANDISK in restartable
mode if you want to restart it later.
Running SCANDISK in normal mode
To run SCANDISK in normal mode, enter the SCANDISK command at the Filer prompt.
Running SCANDISK in restartable mode
To run SCANDISK in restartable mode, execute the restartscandisk.pl Perl script at the
command line or at the Teradata Command Prompt. The following requirements apply when
running the script.
•
restartscandisk.pl must be executed in the Teradata environment. Therefore, to run the
script on a Linux system, make sure you have executed tdatcmd first to set up the Teradata
environment. For more information, see Appendix B: “Starting the Utilities.”
•
restartscandisk.pl must be run on the Control Node (the node running with the lowest
node ID number). To determine the Control Node, type cnscim -host at the command
line.
•
restartscandisk.pl configures Filer to use decimal numeric values as input and output.
Therefore, you must enter decimal values when specifying numeric input to the script. For
more information, see “RADIX” on page 178.
The syntax for restartscandisk.pl is shown below.
perl restartscandisk.pl
A
scandisk command
A
B
-i input filename
-o output filename
-t tid
ENA
DIS
ridspec
B
-tm time interval
-s AMP number
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Syntax
Element
Description
scandisk
command
The SCANDISK command and options you want to run.
input filename
The file to be used as input to the script. This file should contain the output from
the previously executed SCANDISK job.
Note: You must enter decimal values when specifying numeric input for
SCANDISK options, such as tid or ridspec.
Note: If you specify SCANDISK with the TABLE option, restartscandisk.pl will use
the TABLE option values and ignore this input file. In this case, SCANDISK can
only be manually restarted.
tid [ridspec]
Specifies the subtable and optionally, the row where SCANDISK should restart the
scan job. For more information on tid formatting, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)”
on page 79. For more information on RowIDs and ridspec formatting, see “Rows
and Row Ranges” on page 76 and “Rows and Row Ranges” on page 76. The online
help lists the ridspec option as rowspec.
Note: You must enter decimal values for tid and ridspec. If you specify SCANDISK
with the TABLE option, restartscandisk.pl will use the TABLE option values and
ignore these tid and ridspec values. In this case, SCANDISK can only be manually
restarted.
output
filename
The file which will store the SCANDISK output.
Note: You must specify an absolute path to this file. If you use a relative path, the
SCANDISK output from the application log may be redirected to a different
location than the output from restartscandisk.pl.
If you do not specify an output file or input file, the script will use the standard
output file (stdout). If you specify SCANDISK with the TABLE option,
restartscandisk.pl will use the TABLE option values and ignore this output file. In
this case, SCANDISK can only be manually restarted.
ENA
Specifies to start Filer with locking enabled, which means that Filer will observe the
file system locking protocols used to avoid hang or deadlock situations. This is the
default.
DIS
Specifies to start Filer with locking disabled. This option starts Filer with the -l
locking option, which means that Filer will not observe the file system locking
protocols used to avoid hang or deadlock situations.
For information about the -l locking option, see “Starting Filer” on page 62.
time interval
The time in seconds specifying the interval at which the INQUIRE request is sent
to display SCANDISK progress. The default is 600 seconds.
Note: The minimum time interval allowed is 600 seconds. If you enter a time
interval that is less than 600 seconds, restartscandisk.pl uses the default value of 600
seconds.
AMP number
194
Specifies the vproc number to be used with the Filer SCOPE command. The
SCANDISK command will be sent only to the specified vproc. For more
information, see “SCOPE (or VPROC)” on page 209.
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Usage Notes for the restartscandisk script
Note: If the file system data structures were fixed to repair a problem, and the location (tid
and rowid) where the previous SCANDISK halted is beyond the location where the file system
fix occurred, then Teradata recommends that you restart the SCANDISK job from the
beginning instead of restarting the scan at the location where it last halted.
Entering options to the restartscandisk script
There are many ways to enter options to the restartscandisk script. The following describes
how you can specify a SCANDISK command and options for the script to run.
IF you specify...
THEN...
a SCANDISK command
the script starts Filer to run the SCANDISK
command and any options specified.
an input file, but no SCANDISK command
the script starts Filer to run the SCANDISK
command and options used in the previous scan
job as specified in the input file.
an input file, and a SCANDISK command
the script will check if the submitted SCANDISK
command is the same as the command previously
executed. If the submitted command and options
are different from the previous command, the script
will display a warning and ask for confirmation to
run the new command.
no input file and no SCANDISK command
the script starts Filer to run SCANDISK with no
options.
The following describes how you can specify the location where SCANDISK should restart a
previous scan job.
IF you specify...
THEN...
an input file
SCANDISK restarts from the subtable specified by
the tid and rowid from the last INQUIRE
command in the input file.
the -t option with a tid and optional ridspec
SCANDISK restarts from the subtable specified by
tid and ridspec.
the TABLE option with the SCANDISK
command
the script ignores any input file, -t option, or
output file you specify, and runs SCANDISK with
the values of the TABLE option. To restart
SCANDISK later, you must manually capture the
last tid and rowid from the application window.
no input file, no -t option, and no TABLE
option
SCANDISK restarts the job from the beginning.
Note: You can specify either the -i option or the -t option, but not both options together.
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The following describes how you can specify where the SCANDISK output will be saved or
sent.
IF you specify...
THEN...
an output file
the output of SCANDISK is saved to this file.
an input file, but no output file
the script reuses the input file to save the output of
the SCANDISK job. The new output is appended
to the end of the file.
no input file and no output file
the output of SCANDISK is sent to the standard
output file (stdout).
The output from the restartscandisk script includes output from the INQUIRE command,
which contains the lowest tid and rowid scanned among the AMPS involved. This INQUIRE
output can be used to identify the location where a scan ended. When this output is saved to a
file, you can use the file as input to the restartscandisk script, by using the -i option. The script
restarts SCANDISK at the location specified by the tid and rowid from the last INQUIRE
command in the file.
If the database restarts while executing this script, the output file may not capture the
complete application window output. Therefore, the output file may not contain a restart
point for SCANDISK, or the restart point may be incorrect.
If the exact restart point is not important, you can still use this output file as input to restart
SCANDISK. However, if the exact restart point is important, then it is better to manually
capture the last tid and rowid from the application window, and use these values to restart
SCANDISK. You can pass the tid and rowid to the restartscandisk script using the -t option,
which restarts SCANDISK at the specified location.
If you do not use the -o or -i options to save the SCANDISK output to a file, then you must
manually capture the tid and rowid from the last INQUIRE command in the application
window if you want to restart SCANDISK later by using the -t option. It is recommended that
you use the -o or -i option to ease restartability.
Note: If you manually capture the SCANDISK output in the application window to a separate
log file, this file cannot be used as an input file to the restartscandisk script because the
application window log does not contain the output required by the restartscandisk script.
Aborting the restartscandisk script
You can use one of the methods listed below to interrupt the restartscandisk script and abort
the running SCANDISK job. For specific key sequences used to generate the signals specified,
see the documentation for signal generation for your Operating System platform.
196
•
Send a SIGINT signal (CTRL+C)
•
Send a SIGQUIT signal (CTRL+\, on Linux systems)
•
Enter the ABORT command in the application window where Filer is running
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In the first 2 cases, when the restartscandisk script receives the signal to abort, it displays the
current percentage of SCANDISK completion and requests confirmation to abort the scan
job. Upon confirmation, the script gracefully aborts the running SCANDISK. You can restart
the aborted SCANDISK job later by using the -i or -t option.
If you enter the ABORT command in the application window where Filer is running, the
script will gracefully abort the running SCANDISK job without asking for confirmation. You
can restart the aborted SCANDISK job later by using the -i or -t option.
If you abort SCANDISK when it is scanning free CIs or the WAL log, and you restart the scan
job, SCANDISK will restart the scan from the beginning of the particular stage where it was
aborted (either scanning free CIs or the WAL log).
restartscandisk errors and warnings
The restartscandisk script displays various error messages when it encounters problems. It also
displays warnings and informational messages to assist the user.
The following table lists possible error messages returned by the restartscandisk script, with
explanations and suggested remedies for each.
Error Message
Explanation
Remedy
The AMP number specified with the -s
option is invalid.
The user specified an invalid AMP
number with the -s option.
Specify a valid AMP number with
the -s option.
The AMP number specified with the -s
option is invalid. The AMP number is
greater than the total number of AMPs
in the system.
The user specified an AMP number that
is greater than the number of AMPs in
the system.
Specify an AMP number that is less
than the number of AMPs in the
system.
Cannot get the application window
number.
The Teradata Database restarted just
after the “start filer” command was
submitted.
Check the PDE state, and submit the
script when the PDE is running.
Cannot get the total number of AMPs in
the system to validate the specified AMP
number.
The script tried to verify that the AMP
number specified with the -s option is
not greater than the number of AMPs in
the system; however, it failed to get the
total number of AMPs present in the
system.
Verify that the DBS is running and
that you have the correct
permissions to run the
vprocmanager command.
cnscim -s failed.
The Teradata Database was restarted or
stopped after the script submitted the
“start filer” command.
If the database was restarted, wait
until the PDE is running, then
resubmit the script. If the PDE is not
running, start the PDE, then
resubmit the script.
ENA and DIS are options to the
restartscandisk script and cannot be used
as output file names. Please specify
another file name for the output file.
The user specified ENA or DIS as the
output file, which is not allowed since
ENA and DIS are options to the script.
Specify a file name other than ENA
or DIS for the output file.
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Error Message
Explanation
Remedy
Error encountered when submitting the
SCANDISK command to Filer. Possible
SCANDISK syntax error.
The script submitted the SCANDISK
command to Filer, and it received an
error from SCANDISK. The submitted
SCANDISK command may be invalid.
Make sure the SCANDISK
command you submit to the script is
valid. If you are not specifying a
SCANDISK command to the script,
and the error persists, report the
problem to the Teradata Support
Center.
Failed to open filename.
The script failed to open a needed file.
The file may be a temporary file used by
the script, the specified input or output
file, or cnstool.
Verify that the required file has the
correct permissions.
Filer cannot be started because all of the
interactive partitions are busy.
All of the application windows are
currently used for other purposes, and
the script cannot find an available
application window where Filer can be
started.
Run the script at a later time when
an application window is free.
Input file is invalid. Please specify a
correct input file to restart SCANDISK.
The user specified an invalid input file
which does not contain SCANDISK
output.
Specify an input file which contains
output from a previous SCANDISK
job. If multiple output files exist,
submit the latest output file as input
for restarting SCANDISK.
Output file is invalid. Please check the
output file name.
The user specified an invalid output file.
Check the path of the output file for
correctness. Do not specify a
directory name as the output file
name.
PDE must be running to start the
restartscandisk script.
The PDE is not running, and the script
cannot be started if the PDE is down.
Start the PDE, and submit the script
when the PDE is running.
The restartscandisk script cannot be run
on nodes other than the Control Node.
The user did not run the restartscandisk
script on the Control Node. The script
can be run only on the Control Node.
Run the script on the Control Node,
the node running with the lowest
Node ID number. To determine the
Control Node, run cnscim -host
from the command line.
SCANDISK command submitted with
incomplete options. Please resubmit the
SCANDISK command with all the
required options.
The user submitted a SCANDISK
command with incomplete options, and
Filer prompted for additional input.
Make sure the SCANDISK
command you submit to the script
includes all the required options.
The specified input file does not exist.
The user specified an input file that
does not exist.
Verify the path and file name of the
input file, and make sure that the file
exists.
Syntax Error: Invalid syntax or options
were entered for the restartscandisk
script.
The user specified invalid options to the
script.
Check the syntax and options
entered for the script, and verify that
they are correct.
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Error Message
Explanation
Remedy
Syntax Error: Please specify a time
interval with the -tm option.
The user specified the -tm option, but
did not specify a time interval.
Specify a time interval in seconds
with the -tm option. The time
interval must be 600 seconds or
more.
Syntax Error: Please specify an AMP
number with the -s option.
The user specified the -s option, but did
not specify an AMP number.
Specify an AMP number with the -s
option. The AMP number will be
used with the Filer SCOPE
command to limit the SCANDISK
scope.
Syntax Error: Please specify an input file
with the -i option.
The user specified the -i option, but did
not specify an input file.
Specify an input file with the -i
option.
Syntax Error: Please specify an output
file with the -o option.
The user specified the -o option, but did
not specify an output file.
Specify an output file with the -o
option.
Syntax Error: Please specify table
options tid[ridspec] with the -t option.
The user specified the -t option, but did
not specify a tid or ridspec.
Specify a tid and optional ridspec
with the -t option.
Syntax Error: -t option cannot be used
together with the -i option.
The user specified both -i and -t options
to the script.
Specify either the -i option or the -t
option. You cannot specify both
options together.
Syntax Error: The ENA and DIS options
cannot be specified together.
The user specified both the ENA and
the DIS options.
Specify either the ENA or the DIS
option. You cannot specify both
options together.
The time interval specified is invalid.
Please enter a number which represents
the number of seconds as the time
interval. The minimum time interval
allowed is 600.
The user specified the -tm option, but
the time interval specified is not a
number.
Specify a number which represents
the number of seconds as the time
interval. The time interval must be
600 seconds or more.
The vprocmanager command failed.
The script executed the vprocmanager
command to get the number of AMPs
in the system, and the command failed.
Verify that the DBS is running and
that you have the correct
permissions to run the
vprocmanager command.
The following table lists warnings and informational messages that may be displayed by the
restartscandisk script.
Message
Description
Already received abort request, please
wait...
The script already received the previous interrupt signal and is waiting until
Filer is in Read mode before it can process the abort request.
Based on the input file, SCANDISK will
restart scanning at the FREECIS stage.
Based on information from the specified input file, the restart point will be
FREECIS. That is, SCANDISK will start scanning the free cylinders. This implies
that all of the subtables in the system were scanned already.
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Message
Description
Based on the input file, SCANDISK will
restart scanning at the WAL log stage.
Based on information from the specified input file, the restart point will be the
WAL log. That is, SCANDISK will start scanning the WAL log buffers. This
implies that all of the subtables and free cylinders in the system were scanned
already.
Did not find any status to display.
If the script is interrupted, the status of the SCANDISK job is normally
displayed before aborting. In this case, the script has not submitted any
INQUIRE commands to Filer before the interrupt. Therefore, no status
information is available. The script will ask the user for confirmation before
aborting.
Filer is not in Read mode, please wait...
The script received an interrupt signal when Filer was not in Read mode and
could not accept the ABORT command. The script will wait until Filer is in
Read mode, then it will ask the user for confirmation to abort after displaying
the latest SCANDISK status.
Filer is starting, please wait...
The script has started Filer and is waiting for Filer to reach Read mode.
Initializing...
The script is submitting initial commands to Filer and has not submitted the
SCANDISK command yet.
The input file does not contain output
from an INQUIRE command for the
last SCANDISK job. Do you want to
check previous SCANDISK jobs for
status?
The specified input file does not contain INQUIRE command output from the
latest execution of SCANDISK. The script asks the user for confirmation to
check previous SCANDISK jobs to get a restart point. If the input file has output
from more than one SCANDISK job, then the latest SCANDISK job containing
INQUIRE command output will be used to determine the restart point.
The input file does not contain output
from an INQUIRE command.
SCANDISK will start the scan from the
beginning.
The specified input file does not contain any INQUIRE command output.
Therefore, the script cannot determine a restart point. The script will ask the
user for confirmation to start the scan from the beginning.
Processing the abort request, please
wait…
The script received an interrupt signal and is processing the abort request.
Restart point found in the input file.
Restart subtable is tid and RowID is
rowid. SCANDISK will restart from this
location.
The script found the restart point based on the last INQUIRE command output
in the input file. SCANDISK will restart at the specified tid and rowid.
The restartscandisk script received an
interrupt signal during the Initializing
stage.
The script received an interrupt signal before it could send the SCANDISK
command to Filer.
SCANDISK completed the scan job in
the previous run. Starting this scan job
from the beginning.
The input file indicates that the previous SCANDISK job was completed.
Therefore, the script will start a new SCANDISK job from the beginning.
The specified INQUIRE time interval is
less than 600 seconds. Setting the time
interval to the default value of 600
seconds.
The user specified the -tm option with a time interval that is less than the
minimum time interval allowed, which is 600 seconds. The script will set the
time interval to the default value of 600 seconds.
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Message
Description
Unable to get the current status.
If the script is interrupted, the status of the SCANDISK job is normally
displayed before aborting. However, since the user did not specify the -o or -i
option, the script cannot get the SCANDISK status.
It is recommended that the -o or -i option be used so that SCANDISK output
will be saved to a file, which allows the script to display status information
before aborting.
User specified an input file, but no
output file. Using the file filename as
both input and output file.
The user specified an input file, but did not specify an output file. The script will
reuse the input file as the output file.
User specified an input file, but no
SCANDISK command. Using previous
SCANDISK command: scandisk_cmd
The user specified an input file, but did not specify a SCANDISK command.
The script will submit the SCANDISK command used to run the previous scan
job as specified in the input file.
WARNING: No output file was
specified. To restart this SCANDISK job
later, capture the last tid and rowid from
the application window.
The user did not specify an output file. In order to restart this SCANDISK job
later, the user must manually capture the tid and rowid from the latest INQUIRE
output in the application window. It is recommended that the user specify an
output file to ease restartability.
WARNING: Previous SCANDISK
command and current SCANDISK
command are different.
The user is restarting a previous SCANDISK job and has specified both an input
file and a SCANDISK command. The submitted SCANDISK command is
different from the command used to run the previous scan job. In this case, the
user will be asked for confirmation to run the submitted command.
WARNING: Specifying the INQUIRE
option with the SCANDISK command
may result in more INQUIRE outputs
than expected. Use the -tm option to
display INQUIRE output instead.
The user specified the INQUIRE option with the SCANDISK command. Since
the restartscandisk script already sends periodic INQUIRE commands by
default, this will result in more INQUIRE commands sent than expected. The
user should use the -tm option to display INQUIRE output instead of using the
INQUIRE option with the SCANDISK command.
WARNING: You have specified the
TABLE option. The -i, -t, and -o options
will be ignored. To restart this
SCANDISK job later, capture the last tid
and rowid from the application window.
The user specified the TABLE option with the SCANDISK command. Therefore,
SCANDISK will run with the values of the TABLE option and ignore the -i, -t,
and -o options. The SCANDISK output will not be saved to a file. The user must
manually capture the last tid and rowid from the application window to restart
SCANDISK later.
Usage Notes
You can run SCANDISK while the system is online and the Teradata Database is available for
normal operations.
Teradata recommends you run SCANDISK in the following situations:
•
To validate data integrity before or after a system upgrade or expansion.
•
If you suspect data corruption.
•
As a routine data integrity check (perhaps weekly).
Note: A slight performance impact might occur while SCANDISK is running.
You can rearrange the order of the options following the SCANDISK command.
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If you do not type any options, SCANDISK defaults to DB and all subtables on the vproc. The
default scope is to scan both the normal file system and the WAL log, each from the lowest
(DB, WDB) level through the highest (MI, WMI). The free CIs are also scanned.
The SCANDISK command can be limited by the SCOPE command to scan, for example, just
one table, just the WAL log, or just certain AMPs. For more information, see “SCOPE (or
VPROC)” on page 209.
If you specify either tid or ridrange or both, all of the Teradata Database and CIs containing the
requested table and/or rows are verified.
If you use the TABLE option with the CI option, SCANDISK will check all of the cylinders
that contain the specified subtable range.
Note: The first and last of the cylinders checked may contain subtables outside of the specified
range because multiple subtables can reside on a given cylinder.
The lowest level file system structure that SCANDISK verifies is the data block. If you specify
RowIDs, SCANDISK will start and end the scan at the data blocks which contain the specified
rows. The entire data block is checked; therefore, rows outside of the specified row range may
also be checked since a DB contains multiple rows.
By default, SCANDISK uses regular data block preloads instead of cylinder reads. The CR
option allows you to run SCANDISK using cylinder reads to preload data into cylinder slots
which may improve SCANDISK performance. However, if other work also requires the use of
cylinder slots, the competition for slots could slow down SCANDISK and the other work. In
addition, the performance gain is dependent on the amount of data loaded, the distribution of
the data, and the average block I/O size.
The NOCR option lets you turn off cylinder slot usage by SCANDISK, which could result in
slower SCANDISK performance, but which will allow other work requiring cylinder slots to
progress unimpeded.
SCANDISK reports only what it finds when scanning is completed.
The output from SCANDISK may include table row identifiers (RowIDs).
A RowID consists of a 16-byte value, that includes the following information:
•
The first 8-bytes is the internal partition number of the row.
For a nonpartitioned table, the internal partition number is zero, and the internal
partition number is not actually stored in the row itself.
•
The next 8-bytes include a hash bucket value and uniqueness value for the row.
For more information on internal table row formats, see Database Design.
Note: Teradata recommends that you do not run SCANDISK FREECIS FIX directly. First, run
SCANDISK FREECIS and store and inspect the output. Then, run SCANDISK FIX. The
Teradata Database must be down in order to run SCANDISK FREECIS FIX.
If Filer aborts, or the system resets during a SCANDISK FREECIS operation, the recently freed
cylinders are marked as “unvalid” because Filer will not have completed validating them. The
AMPs that own these cylinders will be kept down when Teradata Database restarts. To bring
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the AMPs back up, start Filer again, set scope to the affected AMPs and reissue the SCANDISK
FREECIS command.
Example 1
The following example illustrates a typical way to start, stop and restart a SCANDISK job.
1
Start the restartscandisk.pl script with the -o option.
perl restartscandisk.pl -o /home/test/ofile.out
Because no SCANDISK command or input file was specified, the script runs the default
SCANDISK command from the beginning. That is, it runs SCANDISK with no options on
all subtables, free CIs, and the WAL log from the lowest (DB, WDB) level to the highest
(MI, WMI). The output of the scan is saved to the ofile.out file.
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Stop the running SCANDISK job by entering the ABORT command or sending a signal to
abort. For details, see “Aborting the restartscandisk script” on page 196.
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3
Restart the SCANDISK job at the point in which it was interrupted by issuing the
following command.
perl restartscandisk.pl -i /home/test/ofile.out
The output file from step one contains the location where the SCANDISK job was
stopped; therefore, it is used as the input file to restart SCANDISK at that point. Since an
input file was specified, but no SCANDISK command, the script starts the previous
SCANDISK command from step one. Since no output file was specified, the script will
reuse the input file and append the results of the restarted scan to /home/test/ofile.out.
Example 2
The following example illustrates one way to start, stop, and restart a halted SCANDISK job
from the location specified by a tid and ridspec.
1
Start the restartscandisk script.
perl restartscandisk.pl SCANDISK CI
Because no input file or tid[ridspec] were specified, the script runs the SCANDISK CI
command from the beginning. The output is not saved to a file, but is sent to the standard
output file (stdout).
2
Stop the running SCANDISK job by entering the ABORT command or sending a signal to
abort. For details, see “Aborting the restartscandisk script” on page 196.
3
Because the SCANDISK output was not saved to a file, you must manually capture the tid
and rowid displayed by the last INQUIRE command in the application window if you want
to restart this SCANDISK job.
4
If the tid and rowid displayed by the last INQUIRE command was 0 100 1024 0 1000
10000, you can restart SCANDISK from that location by issuing the following:
perl restartscandisk.pl -t 0 100 1024 0 1000 10000
Note: Because no SCANDISK command or input file was specified, the script runs the
default SCANDISK command (SCANDISK with no options) instead of the previous
SCANDISK CI command.
Example 3
SCANDISK with no options scans all subtables from the DB level examining DBs, CIs, the MI,
and free CIs. It also scans the WAL log at the WDB level, scanning WDBs, WCIs, and the
WMI. In the following example, SCANDISK is started in normal mode with no options. In
order to restart this scan job later, you must submit an INQUIRE request to SCANDISK
before aborting, and manually capture the tid and rowid from the last INQUIRE output in the
application window. To restart SCANDISK, submit the captured tid and rowid to the
SCANDISK command as part of the TABLE option, or restart SCANDISK using the
restartscandisk script with the -t option.
Filer ==>
scandisk
DB @ Cylinder 010100000000F4C2 Sector 16 (0010) length 1 (0001)
DB ref count doesn’t match DBD row Count
The scandisk found problems
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Example 4
The following is an example of output that SCANDISK generates when it finds an LSI
interrupted write pattern in a CI. In this example, SCANDISK is started in normal mode.
Filer ==>
scandisk ci
Mon May 06, 2008 15:12:20
vproc 0 (0000) response
Mon May 06, 2008 15:55:21
Mon May 06, 2008 15:55:21
0120 MAY 05 05:02:35 LUN
:Scandisk has been started on all AMP Vprocs in the SCOPE.
: CI @ Cylinder 010100000000F4C2
: LSI interrupted write pattern found in CI.
1111, Start Block 00004545, Blocks 0400
SRD
num
table id
firstdbd dbdcount offset
u0
u1
tai
---- ----- ----- ----- -------- -------- -----0001 0000 0494 0800
FFFF
0014
001E
Mon May 06, 2002 15:55:21 : Invalid DBD sector length of 14901 (3A35) found
Mon May 06, 2002 15:55:21 : Invalid DBD sector length of 26912 (6920) found
Mon May 06, 2002 15:55:21 : Invalid DBD sector length of 25972 (6574) found
Mon May 06, 2002 15:55:21 : Invalid DBD sector length of 12336 (3030) found
Mon May 06, 2002 15:55:21 : First rowid out of order dbds 18 (0012) and 19 (0013)
Example 5
The following is an example of output that SCANDISK generates when it finds an LSI
interrupted write pattern in a DB. In this example, SCANDISK is started in normal mode.
Filer ==>
scandisk db
Tue Feb 28, 2008 15:16:50 :Scandisk has been started on all AMP Vprocs in the SCOPE.
vproc 0 (0000) response
Mon May 06, 2008 15:12:20
1 of 1 vprocs responded with no messages or errors.
Type 'ABORT' to stop the command before completion
Type 'INQUIRE' to check on progress of command
Reading
vproc 0 (0000) response
Mon May 06, 2008 15:11:11 : CI @ Cylinder 010100000000F4C2
Mon May 06, 2008 15:11:11 : LSI interrupted write pattern found in DB.
0120 MAY 05 05:02:35 LUN 1111, Start Block 00004545, Blocks 0400
Mon May 06, 2008 15:11:11 : rows -1 (FFFFFFFF) and 0 (0000) are out of order
Example 6
In the following example, SCANDISK scans the employee.ttt data subtable at the DB level.
SCANDISK “employee.ttt” p
Example 7
In the following example, SCANDISK scans a range of rows in a primary data subtable.
SCANDISK “employee.ttt” p 09E8 C4AB to 4732 009C
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Example 8
In the following example, an INQUIRE command is sent per minute. Therefore, you get a
display of SCANDISK progress every minute.
Filer ==>
scandisk inq 1 m
Tue Apr 17, 2007
11:18:51 : Scandisk ALL will be started
On All AMP vprocs
Do you wish to continue based upon this scope?? (Y/N)
y
Command has been sent to Slave tasks.
Type 'ABORT' to stop the command before completion
Type 'INQUIRE' to check on progress of command
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:19:53
SCANDISK STATUS :
Slowest vproc
1 is 89% done
Fastest vproc
0 is 92% done
The scandisk is about
90% done
Scanning Table: 0 1001 1024
Scanning Row: 0 45284 58386 0 1
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:19:53
2 of 2 vprocs responded with no messages or errors.
Type 'ABORT' to stop the command before completion
Type 'INQUIRE' to check on progress of command
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:20:53
Everyone is Scanning FREE CIS
SCANFREE STATUS FOR SCANDISK:
Slowest vproc
1 is 38% done
Fastest vproc
0 is 42% done
The scanfree is about
40% done
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:20:53
2 of 2 vprocs responded with no messages or errors.
Type 'ABORT' to stop the command before completion
Type 'INQUIRE' to check on progress of command
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:21:53
Everyone is Scanning FREE CIS
SCANFREE STATUS FOR SCANDISK:
Slowest vproc
1 is 92% done
Fastest vproc
0 is 95% done
The scanfree is about
93% done
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:21:53
2 of 2 vprocs responded with no messages or errors.
Type 'ABORT' to stop the command before completion
Type 'INQUIRE' to check on progress of command
Tue Apr 17, 2007 11:22:01
2 of 2 vprocs responded with no messages or errors.
Tue Apr 17, 2007
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SCANDISK
Aborting SCANDISK
Since SCANDISK DB verifies that every byte in the file system is accounted for, this process
can be very time consuming. Therefore, you have the option of stopping the process by typing
the following command:
ABORT
.
GT06A021
ABORT can take up to 30 seconds to process.
After it is initiated, ABORT stops the SCANDISK process and reports the current status.
When the abort is successful, the following appears:
Are you sure you want to scandisk? (Y/N) y
Tue Feb 28, 2008 15:16:50 : Scandisk has been started on all AMP Vprocs
in the SCOPE.
Type ‘ABORT‘ to stop them before completion
Type ‘INQUIRE‘ to check on progress of command
ABORT
Abort request has been sent
Vproc 0 response
DB @ Cylinder 010100000000F4C2 Sector 16 (0010) length 1 (0001)
DB ref count doesn’t match DBD row Count
Tue Feb 28, 2008 15:16:50 : The scandisk found problems
Vproc 1 response
Tue Feb 18, 2008 15:16:50 : The scandisk found nothing wrong
Filer ==>
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SCANDISK
Checking SCANDISK Status
Because SCANDISK can take a long time to run, you might want to do a status check. You can
do this using the INQUIRE command below:
INQUIRE
.
INQ
GT01A005
INQUIRE displays the lowest tid and rowid being scanned among the AMPS involved, and
reports SCANDISK progress as a percentage of total time to completion. It also displays a list
of errors that occurred since the last INQUIRE command.
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SCOPE (or VPROC)
SCOPE (or VPROC)
Purpose
The SCOPE or VPROC command selects a set of vprocs that Filer will communicate with
until Filer quits or a different set of vprocs is selected.
Syntax
SCOPE
SCOPE VPROC
VPROC
ALL
number
,
(
number
)
TO number
Syntax Element
Description
ALL
Sets the scope to all vprocs.
number
Numeric identifier of a single vproc.
GS04C055
Usage Notes
In this mode, all subsequent Filer commands are sent to each vproc selected, and each vproc
responds with its answer. After this command is issued, most commands requiring
confirmation cannot be used.
The SCOPE and VPROC commands cannot be used if Filer is started in single user mode
using the -v start up option. For more information, see “Starting Filer” on page 62.
The SCOPE and VPROC commands cannot be used if Filer is started from the Debugger. For
information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or Coroner, see “Running Filer from
the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
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SEGZERO (or SEG0)
SEGZERO (or SEG0)
Purpose
The SEGZERO command selects and displays Segment Zero (0).
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /V) as /dispopt.
SEGZERO
SEG0
/P
/H
1102B129
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to Segment 0, but does not display it.
/H
Shows a hexadecimal display of Segment 0.
Usage Notes
This segment contains the following:
210
•
The information the file system needs to interface with the FSG kernel subsystem.
•
The flags that indicate to the file system what happened the last time the vproc was shut
down.
•
The FSG segment IDs of the MI and FTR trace buffer.
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SET FREECYL
SET FREECYL
Purpose
The SET FREECYL command sets the file system internal Free Cylinder count to the specified
number.
Syntax
number
SET FREECYL
SET FREE
/Y
1102C054
Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the
command.
number
The number of free cylinders.
An error occurs if less than the specified number of cylinders free already
exist.
Usage Notes
Use the RESETFREECYL command to reset the Free Cylinder count back to the correct value.
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SHOWDEFAULTS
SHOWDEFAULTS
Purpose
The SHOWDEFAULTS command shows the default settings and the saved context. The
command displays the current default radix for input and output, the current input, output,
and error file names, and the SCOPE defined, including what the equal sign (=) means, as
shown in the following example:
The present value for the = is: Dec (HEX)
In addition, SHOWDEFAULTS also displays WAL log context information.
Syntax
SHOWDEFAULTS
SHOWD
GS04B023
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SRD
SRD
Purpose
The SRD (Subtable Descriptor) command returns a formatted display of all the SRDs on the
current CI that have any rows from the subtable specified by tid. If you omit tid, all SRDs are
displayed.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L) as /dispopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
SRD
/P
/S
/M
/L
tid
1102B093
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the SRD with rows from the subtable, tid. This option is valid
only if you specify a tid. If this tid does not exist on this CI, the command
will position to the SRD of the next higher tid. Nothing is displayed unless
there is a problem.
/S
Displays the selected SRDs on the CI.
/M
Displays the first and last DBDs of each selected SRD, in addition to the
information displayed by the /S option.
/L
Displays all the DBDs of each selected SRD and the free sector entries, in
addition to the information displayed by the /S option.
tid
The subtable of interest. For more information on tid formatting, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
Usage Notes
The SRD command must be invoked from a CI context (as indicated by the CI> prompt).
The command formats the SRDs and DBDs associated with the specified tid. If you omit the
optional tid, then all the SRDs on the CI are selected and displayed. For more information, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
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STAMP
STAMP
Purpose
The STAMP command takes five hexadecimal numbers and converts them to a file system
timestamp.
Syntax
STAMP
number
number
number
number
number
GS04A024
Syntax Element
Description
number
number must be less than 256, since each number represents one byte of
the timestamp.
Usage Notes
The STAMP command can be used to see when a segment was created. It is used in debugging
when viewing a crash dump. The hex values at the offset where the time stamp is located can
be converted to a timestamp which can be compared to the current version of the segment.
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STORAGEINFO
STORAGEINFO
Purpose
The STORAGEINFO command displays storage control information for each AMP in the
current scope.
Syntax
STORAGEINFO
STORAGE
/M
1102B229
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Syntax Element
Description
/M
Shows how the cylinders are distributed among the different types of
storage and cylinder states.
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SYNCSCAN
SYNCSCAN
Purpose
The SYNCSCAN command shows all currently running scans on an AMP that are eligible for
the synchronized full-file scan feature.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/S, /M, /L) as /dispopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
SYNCSCAN
/S
/M
/L
216
tid
1102B084
Syntax Element
Description
/S
Displays global information and a one-line summary for each eligible
subtable.
/M
Same as /S, but also displays the process IDs of the tasks scanning each
subtable.
/L
Displays global information and detailed information for each task
scanning each subtable.
tid
The subtable of interest. For more information on tid formatting, see
“Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
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TABLE
TABLE
Purpose
The TABLE command displays rows from the subtable specified by the tid argument.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the row options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H) as /rowopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
TABLE
TAB
tid
ordinalrange
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
1102B083
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the physical rows or subtable requested. At least one physical row
must be in the selected range. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
Physical rows store one of several types of data, such as regular table row data or
column partition data.
/S or /C
Counts the number of physical rows selected. This is the default for all subtables
except the table header subtable.
/M or /I
Displays only the row header information (length, RowID, and flags).
/L or /R
Formats the row header and fields in the physical row. This option is the default
for the table header subtable; however, this option is not the default formatted
field display because the table header subtable has a special row format and
requires special formatting.
/H
Formats the row header and display the entire physical row in hexadecimal,
including the header.
tid
Specifies the subtable to display. The tid specification must include a
typeandindex value. For detailed information, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)”
on page 79.
ordinalrange
Selects the range of rows to display. No matter what is displayed, the resulting
context is the whole subtable.
For detailed information, see “Specifying Display Ranges (ordinalrange)” on
page 83.
The online help lists this option as rangeopt.
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TABLE
Usage Notes
The prompt for the TABLE selector is shown below:
TABLE ==>
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the TABLE prompt:
•
DELETE
•
DISPLAY
•
DROP
•
NEXT
•
PREV
Use the option definitions of the ROW command with these lower-level commands. The
current selected object can be a subtable or range of subtables. The prompt reflects the current
selection.
The TABLE command operates on subtables. In the Teradata Database, a subtable is a
collection of physical rows, and a table is a collection of subtables. The physical rows of a
particular subtable may store data rows, index rows, table header rows, column partition
values, or other types of data. Therefore, you can use the TABLE command to display rows
from the primary data subtable, the table header subtable, a secondary index subtable, etc. For
example, to obtain a formatted display of the table header, use Table /L x y H 1 where x and
y make up the tablenumber which identifies the table, and H is the typeandindex value which
identifies the table header subtable. For more information on identifying tables and subtables,
see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
The initial context for the TABLE command consists of the physical rows of the subtable, and
the ordinalrange argument is interpreted with respect to this context. Positive integers without
the BEG/END prefix are ordinal row numbers, where 1 is the first row. Negative integers
without the BEG/END prefix are backwards displacements from the last row, so that -1 is the
second to last row.
Note: This differs from the interpretation of an ordinalrange for the DISPLAY command,
where integers without the BEG/END prefix always refer to objects outside the current
context, so that positive values refer to objects past the end of the current context, and
negative values refer to objects before the beginning of the current context.
The resulting context from a TABLE command is a whole subtable, a subtable range, or null,
but never a row range. The ordinalrange can restrict the display to a subset of the resulting
context, even though this ordinalrange has no affect on the resulting context.
If the TABLE command uses a wildcard for the type part of the tid, the resultant context is
special (nothing), and this context is not usable with an ordinalrange argument. The display is
a multiple subtable display, where each subtable is constrained by the ordinal range. For each
subtable, the BEG/END +/- number rules apply, except that the - number construct is not
allowed.
For more information on ordinalrange, see “Specifying Display Ranges (ordinalrange)” on
page 83.
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TABLE
Example 1
The following command shows a medium display of the first five rows of table 1000 0 400:
Filer ==> table /m 1000 0 400 1 to 5
TableID:
1000 0000 0400
ROWS:
0000087B
SECTS:
0000117D
Example 2
The following example shows a row header for the second-to-the-last row of a user table. The
following command shows a medium display of the row header for the second-to-last row of
table employee.ttt:
table "employee.ttt" p end-1 /m
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TABLEID
TABLEID
Purpose
The TABLEID command displays the table number of the specified table when given the
database name and table name.
Syntax
TABLEID
"databasename. tablename"
"databasename". "tablename"
'databasename. tablename'
'databasename'. 'tablename'
1102A005
Syntax Element
Description
databasename
The name of the database containing the table for which the table
number will be displayed.
tablename
The name of the table for which the table number will be displayed.
Note: The database name and table name must be delimited by apostrophes or double
quotation marks, as indicated in the syntax diagram.
Usage Notes
This command is not allowed if the Teradata Database is in the Debug-Stop state.
A table is identified in the data dictionary by a table number (tvm.tvmid). Each table number
is unique across the whole system, rather than local to a database. Therefore, a table number
uniquely identifies a table in the system.
The TABLEID command displays the table number of the table specified by databasename and
tablename. The output of the TABLEID command is a numeric subtable identifier (tid), which
consists of three numbers:
•
The first two comprise the table number. This pair of numbers is used to uniquely identify
a table in the system.
•
The third is the typeandindex value, which specifies a kind of subtable, such as a table
header, data subtable, or a particular index subtable. TABLEID always returns a
typeandindex value of zero (0), which specifies the table header.
For more information on how to interpret a tid, see “Subtable Identifiers (tids)” on page 79.
The TABLEID command also sets the saved context to the located tid. (Use = in place of tid in
subsequent commands to reference the found tid.)
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TABLEID
The following rules apply when specifying databasename and tablename:
•
A period (.) is required to separate the database name from the table name.
•
You must use either apostrophes ( ' ) or double quotation marks ( " ) when typing a
database name and table name. The results are the same.
•
You can specify a fully qualified table name using any one of the methods suggested in the
syntax diagram with the following exceptions:
•
The object name itself includes an apostrophe, in which case you must enclose the
object name within double quotation marks.
Valid examples include the following:
•
tableid "xyz.mark’s table"
•
tableid "xyz"."mark’s table"
Invalid examples include the following:
•
•
tableid 'xyz.mark’s table'
•
tableid "xyz".'mark’s table'
The object name has a period, in which case you must type the fully qualifying
tablename in the form of "database"."tablename" or 'database'.'tablename'.
Valid examples include the following:
•
tableid "xyz.0’s"."mark’s table.2.53.00"
•
tableid 'xyz'.'table.0'
Invalid examples include the following:
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•
tableid "xyz.0’s.mark’s table.2.53.00"
•
tableid 'xyz.0’s.mark’s table.2.53.00'
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TRACEPRINT
TRACEPRINT
Purpose
The TRACEPRINT command dumps the internal trace buffer of the file system.
Syntax
TRACEPRINT
TRA
DUMPCOPY
DC
cylid
LAST number
=
1102D007
Syntax Element
Description
DUMPCOPY
Displays file system traces from a local trace copy buffer.
DC
When a file system error is detected, the trace copy buffer stores a copy of the
traces from when the error was detected. These traces are likely to contain
information about the cause of the error.
Although the regular system trace buffer also contains traces, early traces can be
overwritten due to the volume of trace information written, especially for larger
systems. In these cases, use the DUMPCOPY option to investigate the initial
trace information that is retained in the trace copy buffer.
This option is available only when Filer is invoked from the System Debugger or
started in Coroner mode.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
When a cylid is provided, the output is limited to traces associated with that
cylid.
LAST number
Only the last number entries are displayed.
=
Filer will use the most recently saved values for cylid.
This option cannot be used unless an input has already been defined for
cylid.For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
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TRASH
TRASH
Purpose
The TRASH command modifies the FSG segment to remove the associated disk address.
Access to trashed segments is retained, but they will not be written to disk.
Syntax
TRASH
TRAS
/Y
GS04B071
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Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the
command.
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VPROC
VPROC
The VPROC command is identical to the SCOPE command. For more information, see
“SCOPE (or VPROC)” on page 209.
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WABC
WABC
Purpose
The WABC (WAL Append Buffer Control) command displays the WABC structure.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/S, /M, /L) as /dispopt.
WABC
/S
/M
/L
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1102B115
Syntax Element
Description
/S
Displays only the WABC structure. This is the default.
/M
Displays the Buffer Control Array, in addition to the information displayed by
the /S option.
/L
Displays the Free Cylinder Array, in addition to the information displayed by
the /S and /M options.
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WAL
WAL
Purpose
The WAL (Write Ahead Logging) command returns a formatted display of WAL log records
based on an ordinal record number range, such as the 10th through the 20th WAL log records.
If no range is given, all of the records are displayed.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /X, /H, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
WAL
/P
/S
/M
/L
/X
/H
/V
226
ordinalrange
whereclause
1102A126
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the WAL log records. Nothing is displayed unless there is a
problem.
/S
Displays a count of the selected WAL log records.
/M
Displays the type, WLSN, and other generic WAL log record headers, in
addition to the information displayed by the /S option.
/L
Displays the type-specific WAL log record headers for NONTJ and TJ records,
in addition to the information displayed by the /M option.
/X
Displays the change data (before and after images) in hexadecimal, in addition
to the information displayed by the /L option.
/H
Displays the header in hexadecimal, in addition to the information displayed
by the /L option.
/V
Validates the WAL log records instead of displaying them. This option
performs as much checking as possible without running SCANDISK, which
requires starting the normal file system. See “SCANDISK” on page 189.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
WAL
Syntax Element
Description
ordinalrange
Specifies the range of WAL log records to be displayed by ordinal position. If
no range is given, all of the records are displayed. This differs from the TABLE
command, which requires an ordinalrange argument.
For more information, see “Specifying Display Ranges (ordinalrange)” on
page 83.
The online help lists this option as rangeopt.
whereclause
Restricts the selection to a subset of the WAL log records within the ordinal
range based on the field content of the records. For more information, see
“Specifying a WHERE clause” on page 85.
Usage Notes
The WAL command displays fully formatted WAL log records, including Transient Journal
(TJ) subtypes. It displays before/after image content in hexadecimal. WAL formats the WAL
log records according to the WAL log record kind. For more information on the WAL log
record kinds and sub-kinds, see “Specifying a WHERE clause” on page 85.
WAL displays WAL log records by ordinal record number. To choose records based on the
WAL log sequence number (WLSN) stored inside the records, use the WREC command. For
more information, see “WREC” on page 239.
The whereclause for the WAL command is applied in conjunction with the ordinalrange
argument. The whereclause is recorded as part of the context and remains active for
subsequent DISPLAY, NEXT, and PREV commands.
Like the TABLE command, WAL has an initial context and a resulting context. The initial
context is used to interpret the ordinalrange argument for the WAL command. The resulting
context is produced by executing the WAL command. The initial context is unrelated to prior
commands as explained below.
The initial context encompasses the first WAL log record to the last, and the ordinalrange for
the WAL command is interpreted with respect to this initial context. Therefore, the BEG and
END identify the first and last WAL log records. Similar to the TABLE command, positive
integers without the BEG/END prefix are considered to be ordinal record numbers, where 1 is
the first record. Negative integers without the BEG/END prefix are backwards displacements
from the last record, where -1 is the second to last record.
Note: This differs from the interpretation of an ordinalrange for the DISPLAY command,
where integers without the BEG/END prefix always refer to objects outside the current
context, so that positive values refer to objects past the end of the current context, and
negative values refer to objects before the beginning of the current context.
For more information, see “TABLE” on page 217, “DISPLAY” on page 127, and “Specifying
Display Ranges (ordinalrange)” on page 83.
The resulting context from a WAL command is a WAL log record or WAL log record range
that matches the records selected. The resulting context from a TABLE command is a whole
subtable, a subtable range, or null, but never a row range. For the TABLE command, the
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WAL
ordinalrange can restrict the display to a subset of the resulting context, even though this
ordinalrange has no effect on the resulting context. The WAL command does not adopt this
behavior.
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WCI
WCI
Purpose
The WCI (WAL Cylinder Index) command accesses the WCI of a given cylinder of the WAL
log and displays the WCI in accordance with the display options.
Warning:
The FIX option of the WCI command should be used by trained Teradata personnel only, and the
user must be absolutely sure that the option should be used. Inappropriate use of the FIX option
may result in data loss.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
WCI
cylid
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/V
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FORCE
FIX
=
1102B103
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the WCI. If this cylinder is not a WAL cylinder, an error occurs.
Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
/S
Displays the header, trailer, and the first and last WDBDs.
/M
Displays the same information as the /S option.
/L
Displays all of the WDBDs, in addition to the information displayed by the /S
option.
/H
Displays the WCI in hexadecimal.
/X
Displays the timestamp and other details from the WDB for each WDBD, in
addition to the information displayed by the /L option.
/V
Verifies that the WCI is logically correct, but does not display it.
FORCE
Attempts to format and display the segment as a WCI, even if the segment is
not a WCI. If the FORCE option is not used, the command fails on a
mismatched block.
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WCI
Syntax Element
Description
FIX
Warning: This option should be used by trained Teradata personnel only, and
the user must be absolutely sure that the option should be used.
Inappropriate use of this option may result in data loss.
Attempts automatic repair of the WCI. You must supply the /V option with the
FIX option, and the Teradata Database must be down.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value of cylid.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined for
cylid. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
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WCID
WCID
Purpose
The WCID (WAL Cylinder Index Descriptor) command displays the WCID associated with
the requested WAL log cylinder.
Syntax
cylid
WCID
=
1102B104
Syntax Element
Description
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal
number.
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved value for cylid.
This option cannot be used unless an input value has already been defined for
cylid. For more information, see “Stored Input Values” on page 82.
Usage Notes
The prompt for this selector looks like this:
MI:WCID ==>
In addition to global and upper-level commands, the following lower-level commands are
allowed at the MI:WCID prompt:
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•
DELETE
•
DISPLAY
•
NEXT
•
PATCH
•
PREV
•
WRITE
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WDB
WDB
Purpose
The WDB (WAL Data Block) command displays WAL log data blocks.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /H, /X, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
WDB
/P
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
/V
232
cylid
sectornum
=
=
FORCE
sectorcount
=
1102B106
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the WDB. If one does not exist, an error occurs. Nothing is displayed
unless there is a problem.
/S
Displays the header, trailer, and the first and last generic WAL log record headers.
/M
Displays all of the generic WAL log record headers, in addition to the information
displayed by the /S option.
/L
Displays the type-specific WAL log record headers for NONTJ and TJ records, in
addition to the information displayed by the /M option.
/H
Displays the header followed by the entire WDB in hexadecimal.
/X
Displays the change data (before and after images) in hexadecimal, in addition to
the information displayed by the /L option.
/V
Verifies that the WDB is logically correct, but does not display it.
FORCE
Attempts to format and display the segment as a WDB, even if the block type does
not indicate a WDB.
cylid
The 64-bit identifier of a cylinder, entered as a 16-character hexadecimal number.
sectornum
The sector number.
sectorcount
The sector count.
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Chapter 3: Filer Utility (filer)
WDB
Syntax Element
Description
=
Specifies that Filer should use the most recently saved values for cylid, sectornum,
or sectorcount.
This option cannot be used unless input values have already been defined for
cylid, sectornum, or sectorcount. For more information, see “Stored Input Values”
on page 82.
Usage Notes
The checksum in the WDB is intended to cover the time between writing the WDB to disk and
having filled the cylinder, finally writing the WCI and its WDBs to disk. The WCI is written
once when the cylinder is initialized and once when the cylinder is full. The WCI is not written
as each WDBD is added to the WCI in memory. In reading the WDBs in the last log cylinder
after a restart that lost cache, no WDBDs with external checksums exist on the disk; therefore,
internal checksums in the WDBs are used to validate the WDBs.
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WDBD
WDBD
Purpose
The WDBD (WAL Data Block Descriptors) command shows a formatted display of the
WDBDs in the current WCI.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/S, /X, /H) as /dispopt.
WLSN = WlsnNum
WDBD
/S
SECTOR = sectornum
/X
/H
1102B107
Syntax Element
Description
/S
Displays the WDBDs in a short format. This is the default.
/X
Displays the WDBDs in an extended format.
/H
Displays all of the WDBDs, followed by a display of the WDBDs in
hexadecimal.
WLSN = WlsnNum
Specifies a WAL log sequence number for which WDBDs will be displayed.
WlsnNum is an 64-bit value, the format of which is determined by the radix
setting. For more information, see “RADIX” on page 178.
SECTOR = sectornum
Specifies a sector number for which WDBDs will be displayed.
sectornum is a hexadecimal or decimal value, subject to the radix setting.
For more information, see “RADIX” on page 178.
Usage Notes
WDBDs are used to determine which WDBs exists and where they are located on a cylinder.
The WDBD command must be invoked from a WCI or WCI:WDBD context. The resulting
context is the selected range of WDBDs within the WCI.
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WDBREC
WDBREC
Purpose
The WDBREC command displays WAL log records for a WAL data block (WDB).
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the row options (/S, /M, /L, /H, /X) as /rowopt.
WDBREC
/S
/M
/L
/H
/X
1102B109
Syntax Element
Description
/S or /C
Displays a count of the WAL log records in the WDB.
/M
Displays the generic WAL log record headers.
/L
Displays the type-specific WAL log record headers for NONTJ and TJ
records, in addition to the information displayed by the /M option.
/H
Displays the WAL log record header in hexadecimal, in addition to the
information displayed by the /L option.
/X
Displays the change data (before and after images) in hexadecimal, in
addition to the information displayed by the /L option.
Usage Notes
The WDBREC command must be invoked from a WDB context (as indicated by the WDB>
prompt).
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WFIND
WFIND
Purpose
The WFIND command displays the WAL log cylinders containing WAL log records in a
specified range of WAL log sequence numbers or, if no range is specified, displays all WAL log
cylinders.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/S, /M, /L) as /dispopt. You can type the
options at the beginning or end of the command.
WFIND
/S
wlsnrange
/M
/L
1102B111
Syntax Element
Description
/S
Displays the first WCID and first WDBD within the range.
/M
Displays the first WCID, the first WDBD, all intervening WCIDs, and the last
WCID and last WDBD within the range.
/L
Displays all WCIDs and WDBDs within the range.
wlsnrange
Specifies one or a range of WAL cylinders and WAL data blocks based on the
WAL log sequence number (WLSN) in the record header. To define
wlsnrange, use this syntax:
wlsn
TO wlsn
1102B155
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WFLUSH
WFLUSH
Purpose
The WFLUSH command forces some or all of the WAL log records in memory to disk.
Syntax
WFLUSH
WLSN=wlsn
1102B116
Syntax Element
Description
wlsn
Flushes the WAL log to disk, up to and including the memory buffer
containing the specified WAL log sequence number (WLSN).
Usage Notes
Blocks of WAL log records are accumulated in memory buffers. When the current buffer fills,
a write is initiated, and a new buffer becomes the current buffer (that is, a “buffer switch”
occurs). A transaction can force the log to disk, up to a specified WLSN, to insure that the
transaction is recorded safely.
You can use the WFLUSH command to force some or all of the buffers to disk manually. If
writes are already in progress, WFLUSH waits for those writes to complete. If the current
buffer is flushed, a buffer switch occurs.
Flushing the WAL log to disk is a very simple, low risk operation. One reason to flush the WAL
log to disk is so that you can use normal Filer commands, such as WREC and WAL, to
examine recent log records. This might be necessary because Filer does not examine the log
buffers when displaying log records. For more information about the WREC or WAL
commands, see “WREC” on page 239 or “WAL” on page 226.
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WMI
WMI
Purpose
The WMI (WAL Master Index) command returns a formatted display of the WMI.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /L, /H, /V) as /dispopt.
WMI
/P
/S
/L
/H
/V
1102A114
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the WMI. Nothing is displayed unless there is a problem.
/S
Displays the header, trailer, and the first and last WCIDs of the WMI.
/L
Displays all the WCIDs in the WMI, in addition to the information
displayed by the /S option.
/H
Displays the WMI in hexadecimal.
/V
Verifies that the WMI is logically correct, but does not display it.
Usage Notes
The WMI command is also available when Filer is invoked from the System Debugger or
Coroner. For information on invoking Filer from the System Debugger or Coroner, see
“Running Filer from the System Debugger and Coroner” on page 63.
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WREC
WREC
Purpose
The WREC command returns a formatted display of WAL log records based on the WAL log
sequence number (WLSN) in the record header. If no range is given, all of the records are
displayed.
Syntax
Note: The online help lists the display options (/P, /S, /M, /L, /X, /H, /V) as /dispopt. You can
type the options at the beginning or end of the command.
WREC
/P
/S
/M
/L
/X
/H
/V
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wlsnrange
whereclause
1102A125
Syntax Element
Description
/P
Positions to the WAL log record. Nothing is displayed unless there is a
problem.
/S
Displays a count of the selected WAL log records.
/M
Displays the type, WLSN, and other generic WAL log record headers, in
addition to the information displayed by the /S option.
/L
Displays the type-specific WAL log record headers for NONTJ and TJ records,
in addition to the information displayed by the /M option.
/X
Displays the change data (before and after images) in hexadecimal, in addition
to the information displayed by the /L option.
/H
Displays the header in hexadecimal, in addition to the information displayed
by the /L option.
/V
Validates the WAL log records instead of displaying them. This option
performs as much checking as possible without running SCANDISK, which
requires starting the normal file system. For more information, see
“SCANDISK” on page 189.
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WREC
Syntax Element
Description
wlsnrange
Selects one or a range of WAL log records based on the WAL log sequence
number (WLSN) in the record header, instead of selecting the records by
ordinal position within the log.
If you do not specify a wlsnrange, the whole WAL log is displayed.
To define wlsnrange, use this syntax:
wlsn
TO wlsn
1102B155
whereclause
Restricts the selection to a subset of the WAL log records within the range
based on the field content of the records. For more information, see
“Specifying a WHERE clause” on page 85.
Usage Notes
The wlsnrange selects records based on the WAL log sequence number (WLSN) recorded
inside the log records. To select records by ordinal record number (such as 1st, 10th, or 5th
WAL log record from the end), use the WAL command, which accepts an ordinalrange
argument. For more information, see “WAL” on page 226.
The whereclause for the WREC command is applied in conjunction with the wlsnrange. The
whereclause is recorded as part of the context and remains active for subsequent DISPLAY,
NEXT, and PREV commands.
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WRITE
WRITE
Purpose
The WRITE command forces the currently selected segment to disk.
Syntax
WRITE
WRIT
/Y
/NOCHECKSUM
1102A215
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Syntax Element
Description
/Y
Prevents Filer from prompting for confirmation before executing the
command.
/NOCHECKSUM
If checksums are enabled on the segment being modified or written, the
checksum is not updated and written to the external segment that contains
the checksum.
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WSUMMARY
WSUMMARY
Purpose
The WSUMMARY command scans the WAL log and provides a list of table identifiers
referenced by non-TJ WAL records within a specified range of WAL log sequence numbers
(WLSNs).
Syntax
WSUMMARY
wlsnrange
1102A195
Syntax Element
Description
wlsnrange
Selects one or a range of WAL log records based on the WAL log
sequence number (WLSN) in the record header.
If wlsnrange is not specified, WSUMMARY retrieves table IDs from all
the WAL records.
To define wlsnrange, use this syntax:
wlsn
TO wlsn
1102B155
Filer Error Messages
All Filer error messages are directed by default to your system console screen.
Filer and file system error messages can be redirected through use of the ERRORS command.
For information on file system messages, see Messages.
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CHAPTER 4
Reconfiguration Estimator
(reconfig_estimator)
Run the Reconfiguration Estimator utility, reconfig_estimator, before running the
Reconfiguration utility described in Chapter 5: “Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig).”
Reconfiguration Estimator estimates the reconfiguration time based upon the number and
size of tables on your current Teradata Database system. Reconfiguration Estimator provides
time estimates for the following phases:
•
Redistribution
•
Deletion
•
NUSI building
Reconfiguration Estimator also validates the existence of tables enumerated in the ordering
lists for the redistribution and deletion phases of reconfiguration.
Note: Reconfiguration Estimator provides the most accurate estimates for add AMP
operations. Estimates for other operations, such as moving or deleting AMPs may be less
accurate.
Runs From
The Reconfiguration Estimator utility runs from Database Window or comparable interface
to the Teradata Database console subsystem, such as cnsterm.
Note: Reconfiguration Estimator should never be stopped using the Database Window stop
command. It can be stopped using the Reconfiguration Estimator ABORT command during
the following phases:
•
Entry of Reconfiguration Estimator parameters
•
Pseudo Reconfig (the simulated reconfiguration performed to estimate processing time)
•
Table level estimates.
Reconfiguration Estimator cannot be stopped while data loading is in progress. The data
loading phase is noted in the utility output screen.
The user account used to run Reconfiguration Estimator should be empty, and must be
granted the following privileges on itself:
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CREATE DATABASE
•
DROP DATABASE
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Usage Notes
•
CREATE TABLE
•
DROP TABLE
•
INSERT
•
DELETE
For example:
GRANT CREATE DATABASE ON REuser TO REuser
For general information on starting the utilities from different interfaces, see Appendix B:
“Starting the Utilities.”
Usage Notes
Reconfiguration Estimator time estimates are affected by how busy the system is while the
estimates are being generated. The accuracy of estimates is improved when other system work
is minimized, and best when Reconfiguration Estimator runs on an idle system.
Reconfig Estimator performs a sample run of the Reconfiguration utility in order to
determine estimation constants that are appropriate for the system. Because this process
involves inserting and deleting sample data, the program requires the user name and password
of an account that has rights to create and insert table rows. Create a user account exclusively
for the use of Reconfiguration Estimator. Grant the account all privileges specified above. The
account should have at least .5 to 1 GB of perm space per system AMP.
Best estimates are obtained when Pseudo Reconfig (as noted in the utility output) runs for five
to ten minutes on an idle system. The minimal time required to obtain reasonable estimates is
proportional to how busy the system is while the estimates are being calculated. For example,
if the system is only 10% idle, best estimates are obtained if the utility runs for 50 to 100
minutes. If Reconfiguration Estimator runs for less than an optimal time, run the utility again,
after increasing the amount of perm space assigned to the account used by Reconfig Estimator.
If Reconfiguration Estimator encounters any problems, the estimation process will abort and
return an error message.
Note: Do not run multiple instances of Reconfiguration Estimator simultaneously.
Related Topics
For more information on the reconfiguration process, see Chapter 5: “Reconfiguration Utility
(reconfig).”
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Usage Notes
Example
_______
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\___
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____
____|
/
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\____|
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____|
/
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\____|
____
____|
/
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\____|
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__|__
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____
____|
/
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\____|
Release 14g.00.00.225 Version 14g.00.00.286
Reconfig estimator Utility (May 08)
Reconfig Estimator is based upon the performance characteristics of 3 classes of systems:
1 - SYSTEM FAMILY TYPE 5100 OR EARLIER(3600/3300/3500/3400/4100/4300) .
2 - SYSTEM FAMILY TYPE 4400/4700/5150 .
3 - SYSTEM FAMILY TYPE 48XX/49XX/52XX OR LATER .
Reconfig Estimator is currently running on class 3 .
What class of system do you want to base the reconfig estimate on?[1,2,3]
3
Enter the total number of AMPs in the old configuration:
8
Enter the total number of AMPs in the new configuration:
16
Enter the total number of Moved AMPs in the new configuration:
0
Enter the total number of Nodes in the new configuration:
2
Enter the number of tasks you want to run during reconfig:
10
Enter the current hash bucket size (16 or 20):
20
Enter the new hash bucket size (16 or 20):
20
Enter an existing Username and Password for Loading Sample Data
or Press the Enter key to quit:
Enter UserName:
rkpest
Enter Password:
rkpest
Loading data for running pseudo reconfig at 11/11/10 14:18:27
Please wait...
Loading is complete at 11/11/10 14:20:38
Pseudo Reconfig Begins at 11/11/10 14:20:38
Please wait...
Pseudo Reconfig Ends at 11/11/10 14:21:33
Value of Constant for New Estimator is:0.529073
DBlk Sort
Redist Deletion
TableSize
RowCount NUSICount FB Size Flag Estimate Estimate Database.Table
--------- --------------- --------- -- ----- ---- -------- -------- --------------------------8.00KB
8
0 Y 63KB N
00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.RCConfiguration (0000H 0007H)
9.00KB
10
0 Y 63KB N
00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.Global (0000H 0019H)
...
13.00KB
12
0 Y 31KB N
00:00:00 00:00:00 TDWM.TDWMObjectAssn (0000H 088DH)
12.00KB
12
0 Y 31KB N
00:00:00 00:00:00 TDWM.TDWMRuleControl (0000H 088EH)
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Usage Notes
12.00KB
12
0
Y
31KB
N
00:00:00 00:00:00 TDWM.TDWMSetLimits (0000H 088FH)
The current configuration has: 1 Nodes with 8 AMPs
The new configuration will be: 2 Nodes with 16 AMPs
There are 8 AMPs added to the new configuration
The system has: 735 tables using 38.81MB of data
The estimated table redistribution time will be:
0.00 hours (for offline reconfig).
0.00 hours (for online reconfig with system 25% busy).
0.00 hours (for online reconfig with system 50% busy).
0.00 hours (for online reconfig with system 75% busy).
0.00 hours (for online reconfig with system 100% busy).
The estimated table deletion time will be:
0.00 hours (for offline reconfig).
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.01
hours
hours
hours
hours
(for
(for
(for
(for
online
online
online
online
reconfig
reconfig
reconfig
reconfig
with
with
with
with
system
system
system
system
25% busy).
50% busy).
75% busy).
100% busy).
This reconfig estimate is based upon 48XX/49XX/52XX OR LATER.
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Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
The Reconfiguration and Configuration utilities are used to define the AMPs and PEs that
operate together as a Teradata Database. (Configuration is described in an earlier chapter of
this manual.)
Reconfiguration is the second step of the configuration and reconfiguration process that
defines or modifies a Teradata Database system. Reconfiguration implements the Teradata
Database system that is described in the new configuration map created in a previous
Configuration utility session.
The Reconfiguration utility is most often used when adding nodes to an existing
configuration. In addition, use the Reconfiguration utility to change the following:
•
Relationships of AMP and PE vprocs to nodes
•
Clustering of AMP vprocs
•
Size of hash buckets
Other steps in configuring a system involve the Parallel Database Extensions (PDE) portions
of Teradata Database, and are configured with the PUT utility. For more information on these
configuration steps, see the Parallel Upgrade Tool (PUT) Reference, available from
http://www.info.teradata.com/.
For more information on considerations when planning a system reconfiguration, see the
Teradata Knowledge Article at this URL: http://cks.teradata.com/skb/i/KAP1AF072.
Caution:
Improper use of the Reconfiguration utility can result in data loss. Contact the Teradata
Support Center before performing a system reconfiguration.
Runs From
The Reconfiguration Utility runs from Database Window or comparable interface to the
Teradata Database console subsystem, such as cnsterm.
For general information on starting the utilities from different interfaces, see Appendix B:
“Starting the Utilities.”
Online and Offline Reconfiguration
Portions of the reconfiguration process require that no users be logged on to Teradata
Database, and that the system be quiescent. Reconfiguration ends with a system restart.
During these phases, the system is unavailable to users.
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Configuration Maps and Reconfiguration
Optionally, a large portion of reconfiguration can occur while users remain logged on to the
system. This process is called online reconfiguration, and can greatly increase system
availability during reconfiguration.
Note: Online reconfiguration does not support move AMP, delete AMP, and hash bucket size
change operations.
A special reconfiguration change log keeps track of changes to rows that will be moved to new
AMPs as a result of the reconfiguration. (When the transaction journal is purged, table
updates are written to the change log.) This allows the changes to be reapplied to the rows
after they have been moved. Note the disk space recommendations described in “Disk Space
for Reconfiguration” on page 249.
Offline reconfiguration is that portion of reconfiguration that happens when all users are
logged off the system, and the system is quiescent. When the entire reconfiguration process is
run offline, the overall reconfiguration can complete more quickly. However, the system
typically will be unavailable to users for a much longer period of time than for a comparable
reconfiguration that uses online reconfiguration.
Both online and offline reconfiguration allow user specification of the order in which tables
are processed. Teradata recommends explicit specification of this order. If an ordering is not
explicitly specified, tables are processed in table ID order. You specify the order by inserting
rows into special system tables that exist for that purpose. These tables are described below.
Configuration Maps and Reconfiguration
The Configuration utility describes the complete Teradata Database system in the new
configuration map area.
As the Teradata Database system grows and changes, use Configuration to revise the new
configuration map to reflect the following types of changes to the Teradata Database system:
•
Addition and deletion of vprocs and hosts
•
Changes to cluster assignments
Use the configuration maps to perform these tasks:
•
Store the identification and status of each vproc in the Teradata Database system
•
Identify the AMPs that comprise each AMP cluster
•
Identify each PE and its associated host
The Teradata Database system contains these two configuration maps:
•
The current configuration map, which describes the current arrangement and status of
vprocs in the Teradata Database system
•
The new configuration map, which includes changes and additions to the configuration
The new configuration map serves as input to the Reconfiguration utility.
Typically, Reconfiguration is used to alter the number of AMPs in a Teradata Database system.
The new configuration map includes the status of each AMP in a Teradata Database system.
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Disk Space for Reconfiguration
After Configuration builds a new configuration map, Reconfiguration redefines the Teradata
Database system configuration according to the new map. Reconfiguration copies the new
configuration map to the current configuration map on each node.
During reconfiguration, data is redistributed among AMPs if AMPs were added or deleted, if
cluster assignments were changed, or if hash bucket sizes are changed. Redistribution causes
hash bucket assignments to be recalculated. These assignments describe the AMPs responsible
for primary data and the AMPs responsible for fallback data.
Hash bucket arrays contain hash bucket assignments for each AMP:
•
Primary data rows for the current configuration
•
Fallback data rows for the current configuration
•
Primary data rows for the new configuration
•
Fallback data rows for the new configuration
Information that defines the new configuration is used during reconfiguration.
Disk Space for Reconfiguration
When changing cluster assignments or hash bucket sizes, ample disk space must be available
on all AMPs. If sufficient space is not available, Teradata Database stops. To recover,
reinitialize Teradata Database using the sysinit utility. Note that reinitializing the system
destroys all data, which would need to be restored from an archive backup.
Teradata recommends the following availability:
•
Before starting reconfiguration that involves a change of clusters, currentperm space
should be less than 53% of the total maxperm space (that is, at least 47% of system
maxperm must be available).
•
Before starting a reconfiguration that involves a change of hash bucket size, currentperm
space should be less than 25% of the total maxperm space (that is, at least 75% of system
maxperm must be available).
For online reconfiguration, additional disk space is needed for the Reconfiguration Journal.
The space used for this is determined by the RECONFIG command JOURNAL
MAXPERMSPACE setting. For more information, see “RECONFIG” on page 260.
Before Starting Reconfiguration
Before starting Reconfiguration:
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•
Verify that hardware is in place, properly configured, and online. Hardware configuration
is detailed in the hardware service manuals for your Teradata Database system.
•
Use the Vproc Manager utility to ensure all AMP-to-PE vprocs are online and ready. For
more information on Vproc Manager, see Utilities: Volume 2 (L-Z).
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•
Ensure adequate freespace is available for reconfiguration workspace. Depending on the
number of fallback tables in existence, changes in DBS clustering, and changes in hash
bucket size, reconfig can require a significant amount of freespace to distribute data rows.
This involves temporarily rewriting the rows to a new location.
•
NoPI tables will be skewed after a reconfiguration that changes the number of AMPs. To
help smooth out the data skew, these tables should be copied to a PI table, then back to a
NoPI table after the reconfiguration. To prevent skewing of NoPI table data during
reconfiguration, copy NoPI table rows into PI tables and delete the rows from the NoPI
tables prior to reconfiguration. Reinsert the rows into NoPI tables after the
reconfiguration.
Note: Column partitioned tables and column partitioned join indexes are NoPI tables.
•
Specify the order in which Reconfiguration should process tables during the redistribution
and deletion phases of reconfiguration.
To specify the order of table processing during the redistribution phase, insert a row for
each table to be redistributed into DBC.ReconfigRedistOrderV.
•
The DatabaseName and TableName fields specify a table.
•
The OrderNumber field should contain an integer, the value of which indicates when
the table will be processed relative to other tables in the list.
•
The ProcessOffline field indicates whether the table should be redistributed offline
only, when logons are disabled and the system is quiescent. It can be Y or N. The
default is N.
To specify the order of table processing during the deletion phase, create a separate list by
inserting rows into DBC.ReconfigDeleteOrderV.
For more information on the structure of these tables, see Data Dictionary.
If no ordering information is specified, tables are processed in table ID order.
Use the following strategies to choose the order of processing:
•
Redistribution ordering
The goal of ordering tables for the redistribution phase of reconfiguration is to
minimize the processing overhead by minimizing the use and handling of the
reconfiguration change log. Consequently, insert table names into the
DBC.ReconfigRedistOrderV in the following order:
•
Large, historical tables that are rarely modified should be redistributed first.
•
Large tables that have a small number of rows which undergo more frequent
modification should be redistributed next.
•
Lastly, redistribute small tables that are frequently modified.
Note: Tables undergoing large-scale changes should not be redistributed during online
reconfiguration. Flag these tables for offline redistribution by setting the
ProcessOffline field in the row to Y when the table name is inserted into the
redistribution list.
•
Deletion ordering
During the deletion phase, Reconfiguration deletes duplicate copies of rows that have
been redistributed. The goal of ordering tables for the deletion phase of
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reconfiguration is to make frequently used tables available as soon as possible.
Consequently, insert table names into DBC.ReconfigDeleteOrderV in the following
order:
•
First, allow Reconfiguration to delete largest tables that are needed by database
applications. This can prevent large table deletions from gating the end of the
reconfiguration process.
•
Next, delete any other tables required by database applications.
•
Finally, delete remaining tables that should finish the reconfiguration process and
be made available for any time-critical needs.
If there is no need for any tables to be made available before any others, there is no
need to specify an order for the deletion phase by creating an ordering list. In this case,
Reconfiguration deletes the duplicates in table ID order.
Use the Reconfiguration Estimator utility prior to running the Reconfiguration utility.
Reconfiguration Estimator validates the existence of the tables in the ordering lists. For
more information on Reconfiguration Estimator, see Chapter 4: “Reconfiguration
Estimator (reconfig_estimator).”
•
If the entire reconfiguration is to be done offline, with users logged off and Teradata
Database in a quiescent state (no activity):
•
Run the CHECK command of the CheckTable utility at the PENDINGOP level to
verify that no tables are in pending status:
CHECK ALL TABLES AT LEVEL PENDINGOP SKIPLOCKS PRIORITY = H;
Note: Do not use the CHECK command with the PARALLEL option when using the
PENDINGOP option and with users logged on. A hang will occur. For more
information on the CheckTable Utility, see Utilities Volume 1.
•
Ensure that online archive logging is not enabled for any database object.
Offline reconfiguration will not run if online archive logging is enabled. Use the
LOGGING ONLINE ARCHIVE OFF statement to turn off logging. You must specify
the name of the database or the names of the tables for which logging is enabled. For
more information, see SQL Data Definition Language.
•
•
Disable logons, and verify that the Teradata Database system is in a quiescent state.
After the offline reconfiguration is complete logons must be explicitly enabled again.
If the first portion of the reconfiguration is to be performed online (while users remain
logged on to Teradata Database):
•
Run the CHECK command of the CheckTable utility at level two to validate the
integrity of table data structures:
CHECK ALL TABLES AT LEVEL TWO SKIPLOCKS PRIORITY = H;
The Reconfiguration Process
This section summarizes the reconfiguration process. Individual Reconfiguration commands
are described in “Reconfiguration Utility Commands” on page 257.
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The Reconfiguration Process
As Reconfiguration runs, it performs these functions:
•
Checks the Teradata Database system status to ensure that reconfiguration is possible.
Disk storage capacity is checked to ensure that the Teradata Database system has sufficient
storage to accommodate the redistributed data in the event of a delete AMP
reconfiguration. Reconfiguration terminates if the Teradata Database system does not have
sufficient storage capacity.
After Teradata Database system status is verified, new hash bucket arrays are calculated
based on current and new configuration maps.
•
Redistributes primary and fallback data. Unique secondary index subtables, if any, are
redistributed also.
•
Deletes rows that were redistributed from AMPs on which they resided before the
redistribution. Nonunique secondary indexes, if any, are rebuilt.
•
Updates space accounting information, hash bucket arrays, and configuration maps.
Reconfiguration functions are completed sequentially in this order:
1
Before starting Reconfiguration, see “Before Starting Reconfiguration” on page 249.
2
Start the Reconfiguration utility from Database Window. For general information on
starting the utilities, see Appendix B: “Starting the Utilities.”
3
Start the reconfiguration process by typing RECONFIG at the Reconfiguration utility
command prompt. For more information on the RECONFIG command, see
“RECONFIG” on page 260.
The WITH PAUSE option causes reconfiguration to pause before entering the auto-restart
phase, the point beyond which reconfiguration will automatically restart if Teradata
Database restarts.
The point at which the auto-restart phase begins depends on the purpose of the
reconfiguration:
4
•
If reconfiguration is for adding, deleting, or moving AMPs, for cluster reassignments,
or for hash bucket size changes, the auto-restart phase begins at the beginning of table
redistribution.
•
For all other reconfiguration purposes, the auto-restart phase begins when that new
primary hash map is saved.
During the initialization of reconfiguration, the existence of all Teradata Database system
table headers on all AMPs is verified.
If a table header is missing, the table ID and the corresponding vproc ID from which the
header is missing are displayed in the Database Window.
At the end of the verification, the following message appears in the application window:
DBS Table Header verification failed, the missing header is available
on the Database Window. Repair all missing table headers before
reattempting Reconfiguration.
***** Depress the ENTER key to reset DBS.
At this point, you should switch to the Database Window to obtain a list of missing table
headers before resetting the Teradata Database system.
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Note: If this error condition occurs, contact the Teradata Support Center for procedures
to fix the missing headers.
5
Before entering the hash map calculation phase, Reconfiguration checks all AMPs for
active user sessions. If any users are logged on, Reconfiguration asks whether the
reconfiguration should continue online, allowing logons to remain enabled. If you
respond no, Reconfiguration issues an error message and halts.
6
Reconfig calculates hash map.
7
If you requested Reconfiguration to pause in step 3, Reconfiguration prompts:
Reconfiguration pauses before the auto-restart phase.
Do You Want to Abort? Type Y(es) or N(o).
8
Reconfiguration redistributes tables (including stored procedures, user-defined functions
(UDFs), user-defined methods (UDMs), and non-value-ordered hash indexes). Tables are
processed in the order specified in DBC.ReconfigRedistOrderV.
The Table Redistribution phase of Reconfiguration begins changes to data in the current
configuration. This is the auto-restart phase of reconfiguration, beyond which the process
must be run to completion. If the reconfiguration was run online, the ABORT command
can be used to stop the reconfiguration and discard all work that has been performed.
If the reconfiguration was run online to this phase, Reconfiguration now prompts to
disable logons and online archiving. When the system is quiescent, reconfiguration
continues offline.
In the table redistribution phase, Reconfiguration verifies that the table to be redistributed
exists on all online AMPs before table redistribution is started. This integrity check
identifies those database tables that are corrupted between initialization and this phase.
If a database table is missing from one or more of the online AMPs, the application
window shows this message:
Table DBName. TBLName
*** is missing from some of the online AMPs
*** This table is skipped.
9
Reconfiguration deletes moved rows from tables and rebuilds NUSIs. (For online
reconfiguration, this step is skipped.) Tables are processed in the order specified in
DBC.ReconfigDeleteOrderV, or in table ID order if no other order has been specified.
10 Reconfiguration saves the following:
•
New primary hash map
•
New fallback hash map
•
Current primary hash map
•
Current fallback hash map
•
Current configuration map
•
New configuration map
•
Backup IDs
11 Reconfiguration deletes new hash maps.
12 Reconfiguration saves bitmap hash table.
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13 Reconfiguration updates the following:
•
Disk space
•
Vproc configuration
14 If reconfiguration was started online, Reconfiguration now deletes moved rows from
tables and rebuilds NUSIs.
Deletion initially proceeds offline until:
•
All tables that must be processed during the offline deletion phase have been
processed. These include system tables and tables that have been explicitly specified for
offline deletion in DBC.ReconfigDeleteOrderV.
•
All tables that have not yet undergone deletion processing can be locked
simultaneously.
When those conditions are met, the database returns online and logons are enabled. As
each remaining table completes the deletion phase processing it is unlocked and becomes
available for general use.
If reconfiguration did not include an online deletion phase, the system needs to be
manually restarted, and Reconfiguration displays this message:
Restart DBS due to completion of Reconfiguration.
System is about to reset.
IF...
THEN...
a Teradata Database system restart occurs when
Reconfiguration is in the middle of the Hash Map
calculation phase
the following message appears:
a restart occurs after the first message and before
the second one
Reconfiguration will not start automatically during Teradata
Database system start up.
you are adding new AMPs before Reconfiguration
a 6140 error message displays if you start Reconfiguration manually
after the Teradata Database system comes up.
Hash Map Calculation Phase Begins.
{ Reconfig Phase one -- rcophas1 }
Hash Map Calculation Phase Ends.
6140: RECONFIG aborted due to improper disk
initialization procedure.
In this case, do the following:
1 use the ctl utility to change the Start DBS setting on the Debug
screen to Off. See the Control GDO Editor (ctl) chapter in
Utilities Volume 1 for more information on these utilities.
2 Restart Teradata Database.
3 Use the Vproc Manager utility INITVDISK command to initialize
the file system on the newly added AMPs. For more information
on the Vproc Manager utility, see Utilities: Volume 1 (A-K).
4 Use the ctl utility to set Start DBS back to On.
5 Restart Teradata Database.
6 Start the Reconfiguration utility from Database Window.
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Reconfiguration Considerations
15 You must drop and rebuild value-ordered join indexes and value-ordered hash indexes
before they can be used again after the offline portion of Reconfiguration.
Reconfiguration Considerations
MOVE AMP Operation
In a MOVE AMP operation, Reconfiguration copies all rows from the Move-From AMP to the
Move-To AMP.
Note: MOVE AMP is available only during offline reconfigurations.
You can move a range of AMPs to another range of AMPs; however, a one-to-one
correspondence between the Move-From AMPs and the Move-To AMPs must exist.
The following sequence discusses the state of these AMPs before, during, and after the
reconfiguration process.
1
The Parallel Upgrade Tool (PUT) is used to start the reconfiguration process. During this
step, PUT identifies new AMPs on the system. Some of these new AMPs may have been
added, and some may be targets of the MOVE AMP process. PUT must be used at this
time to identify which AMPs are the move-to AMPs and which are the move-from AMPs.
2
The Configuration utility (config) is used to complete the DBS configuration of AMPs in
regards to adding and moving AMPs, and defining the cluster configuration. The move-to
AMPs and the move-from AMPs specified in the config commands must match the
MOVE AMP definitions specified during the PUT process
3
Prior to and during most of the reconfiguration process, the Move-To AMPs are
configured as new AMPs, just as if you added them. Move-To AMPs have their own vproc
numbers and associated storage. PUT sets up the relationship between an AMP and its
storage.
4
The file system tracks which storage belongs to which AMPs by inserting the AMP number
in the cylinder indexes written with each cylinder. This allows the file system to verify that
multiple AMPs do not write to the same cylinder of storage.
5
When almost finished, Reconfiguration saves the Teradata Database configuration maps to
indicate the new configuration.
6
Reconfiguration notifies the file system to update the cylinder indexes to indicate the
change in storage ownership.
7
Reconfiguration sets a control flag to keep Teradata Database in a DOWN state and to
initiate a restart.
8
While Teradata Database is in a DOWN state, PUT changes the storage mapping between
the Move-From AMPs such that their storage is the storage that was previously associated
with the Move-To AMPs.
For additional information on the MOVE AMP command, see “Configuration Utility” in
Support Utilities.
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Fatal AMPs During a Move-AMP Operation
When Reconfiguration completes a MOVE AMP operation, change the PUT configuration to
associate the new storage and AMPs correctly. If the configuration is not changed, when
Teradata Database restarts the Move-To AMPs are marked FATAL.
Effect of Hash Bucket Size Changes
When changing the size of hash buckets, reconfig redistributes every row on the system. This
requires a large amount of free space, and requires substantial time because reconfig
maintains both the old and the new rows throughout the redistribution process.
Consequently, if the purpose of the reconfiguration is only a change in hash bucket size, it may
be preferable to run sysinit and restore the data from a backup, which would not require as
much memory and time. For more information on changing hash bucket sizes, see the
description of NewHashBucketSize section in the DBS Control chapter of Utilities.
Effects on Journal Tables
Reconfiguration deletes all journal tables (active, saved, and restored subtables). For online
reconfiguration, this is accomplished during the offline phase of redistribution.
Effects on Tables with No Primary Index
There are special considerations when reconfiguring a system that includes NoPI tables (tables
without primary indexes). NoPI tables include any table or join index that is column
partitioned.
Reconfiguring a system that includes NoPI tables can result in data skew for those tables.
When NoPI tables are initially loaded, their rows are distributed amongst the system AMPs in
a random fashion, rather than having the distribution based on primary index hash values.
Because the number of row hash values in a NoPI table is usually small, when a
reconfiguration involves changes in the number of AMPs, some AMPs may end up with
substantially more NoPI rows than other AMPs. Consequently, it is best to minimize the
number of NoPI tables on the system before performing a reconfiguration, especially in cases
where NoPI staging tables are large. For more information on NoPI tables, see Database
Design and SQL Data Definition Language.
Note: Permanent space in the database is divided equally among the AMPs of the system. If
the presence of NoPI tables on a reconfigured system causes appreciable data skew, permanent
space for the database may need to be increased to account for the AMPs that will need to
store more data.
For more information on NoPI tables, see SQL Data Definition Language and Database
Design.
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Reconfiguration Utility Commands
Reconfiguration Utility Commands
A reconfiguration session consists of reconfiguring the Teradata Database system according to
the new configuration map built by the Configuration utility.
Reconfiguration presents a command-line environment that allows the entry of the following
Reconfiguration commands, which are described in more detail in the sections that follow.
Command
Function
“ABORT”
Aborts the current reconfiguration process. All reconfiguration tasks
are aborted, all journaling is stopped, and all checkpoint information is
deleted. Allowed only during the redistribution phase of online
reconfiguration. Abort is not supported for offline reconfiguration.
“DISPLAY RETRY LIST”
Displays the names of tables that have been skipped and added to the
retry list.
“RECONFIG”
(or press F2)
Begins a session that changes the Teradata Database system
configuration according to the map provided by the Configuration
utility.
“STATUS”
Determines the status of Reconfiguration.
“STOP”
(or press F3)
Stops Reconfiguration.
To display help information on Reconfiguration, press F7 in Database Window.
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ABORT
ABORT
Purpose
Aborts the current reconfiguration process. All reconfiguration tasks are aborted, all
journaling is stopped, and all checkpoint information is deleted.
Note: The ABORT command can be used only during the redistribution phase of online
reconfiguration. ABORT is not supported for offline reconfiguration.
Syntax
ABORT
GT14A029
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DISPLAY RETRY LIST
DISPLAY RETRY LIST
Purpose
Displays the names of tables that have been skipped added to the retry list. During
reconfiguration, tables are skipped if they are locked or inaccessible for any reason.
Reconfiguration retries to access the tables approximately every 15 minutes until the tables
have become accessible, or until the reconfiguration process is aborted.
Syntax
DISPLAY RETRY LIST
D
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RECONFIG
RECONFIG
Purpose
The RECONFIG command starts the reconfiguration process, which changes the Teradata
Database system configuration. Prior to performing a reconfiguration, a new configuration
map must have been produced using the Configuration utility.
The command can also be used to change certain reconfiguration parameters after the process
has begun.
Syntax
RECONFIG
R
WITH
DISPLAY
ON
OFF
n TASKS
PRIORITY p
JOURNAL MAXPERMSPACEPCT=n
PAUSE
STATISTICS
ON
OFF
OFFLINE NOW
1180A014
Syntax element...
Specifies...
DISPLAY
whether to enable or disable output of Reconfiguration status (but not
statistics):
• ON enables output. (Default)
• OFF disables output.
n TASKS
the limitation of the number of Reconfiguration sessions running in
parallel.
n is a number from 0 through 10. The default is 10, for offline
reconfiguration, and 2 for online reconfiguration.
Specifying 0 tasks pauses the reconfiguration.
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RECONFIG
Syntax element...
Specifies...
PRIORITY p
the job priority settings to use for the reconfiguration. The default is to
assign the reconfiguration process a medium timeshare access level.
Available settings are determined by workload settings. For more
information about setting workload priorities, see the Teradata
Viewpoint User Guide, and documentation for the Workload related
portlets.
JOURNAL
MAXPERMSPACEPCT=n
the maximum percentage, n, that DBC.ReconfigJournalTbl table uses
out of the maximum DBC permanent space. When the maximum is
reached, Reconfiguration attempts to replay updates to the new AMPs
and purge as much of the ReconfigJournalTbl as possible.
The default is 10 percent.
OFFLINE NOW
that the reconfiguration process switch to offline mode as soon as all
users are logged off of Teradata Database and the system is quiescent.
This option is valid only when online reconfiguration is used.
PAUSE
whether Reconfiguration is to pause before entering the auto-restart
phase.
Each AMP stores the current phase of reconfiguration.
STATISTICS
whether to enable or disable output of Reconfiguration statistics:
• ON enables statistics. (Default)
• OFF disables statistics.
Usage Notes
The RECONFIG command can be used throughout the reconfiguration process to change the
values of TASK, PRIORITY, JOURNAL MAXPERMSPACE, and STATISTICS.
Example 1
To disable statistics output, type:
reconfig with statistics off
Example 2
To reconfigure with 10 control tasks and statistics output disabled, type:
reconfig with 10 tasks statistics off
Example 3
To reconfigure with eight control tasks and output display disabled, type:
reconfig with 8 tasks display off
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RECONFIG
Example 4
This example shows some output from the RECONFIG command. Reconfiguration output
displays the following:
•
Start and end time of each table processed during redistribution
•
Run-time statistics of the table process that includes statistics for all AMPs
This information is included with the deletion and NUSI building. The output might become
excessive for a large number of tables, so you might want to disable DISPLAY. If you disable
DISPLAY, you can still obtain status using the STATUS command.
Note: You can disable the table begin/completion output with the RECONFIG WITH
DISPLAY OFF command. You can disable the statistics output with the RECONFIG WITH
STATISTICS OFF command.
08/05/13 09:04:35
08/05/13 09:04:35
08/05/13 09:04:35
Statistics:
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
08/05/13 09:04:36
08/05/13 09:04:36
Statistics:
IOCount
AllAmps:
2,564
08/05/13 09:04:36
08/05/13 09:04:36
Statistics:
IOCount
AllAmps:
2,831
08/05/13 09:04:36
Statistics:
IOCount
AllAmps:
2,943
08/05/13 09:04:36
08/05/13 09:04:36
08/05/13 09:04:36
Statistics:
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
262
Task 01 Begin redistribution DBC.Global (0000H 0019H).
Task 00 Begin redistribution DBC.TransientJournal (0000H 001AH).
Task 00 End redistribution DBC.TransientJournal (0000H 001AH).
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
0
0
0
0
Task 02 Begin redistribution DBC.Owners (0000H 001BH).
Task 01 End redistribution DBC.Global (0000H 0019H).
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
2
0
0
0
Task 00 Begin redistribution DBC.Parents (0000H 001CH).
Task 02 End redistribution DBC.Owners (0000H 001BH).
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
18
0
0
0
Task 00 End redistribution DBC.Parents (0000H 001CH).
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
13
0
0
0
Task 01 Begin redistribution DBC.ErrorMsgs (0000H 001EH).
Task 00 Begin redistribution DBC.ChangedRowJournal (0000H 0020H).
Task 00 End redistribution DBC.ChangedRowJournal (0000H 0020H).
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
0
0
0
0
Support Utilities
Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
STATUS
STATUS
Purpose
The STATUS command allows you to determine the status of Reconfiguration at any time
during the process.
Syntax
STATUS
S
HH01A002
Usage Notes
STATUS is available at any time during Reconfiguration and includes the status of the
following:
•
Total number of tables processed for the redistribution, deletion, and NUSI phases
•
Total number of tables remaining to be processed for the redistribution, deletion, and
NUSI phases
•
Completion percentage according to the total number of bytes processed
•
Status of each non-idle, parallel reconfiguration control task
•
Completion percentage and name of table being processed for each non-idle, parallel
reconfiguration control task
Example 1
The following is an example of STATUS output during hash map calculation.
Current reconfig phase: Hash Map Calculation
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Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
STATUS
Example 2
The following is an example of STATUS output during redistribution.
Current reconfig phase:
Redistribution
Estimated time remaining: 00:19:21
Redistribution status - tables processed:
152
tables remaining:
26
70% of total bytes processed
Deletion/NUSI status - tables processed:
0
tables remaining:
178
0% of total bytes processed
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
69%
69%
69%
68%
69%
68%
64%
69%
69%
69%
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_12 (0000H 04C4H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_7 (0000H 04BFH)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_11 (0000H 04C3H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_15 (0000H 04C7H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_8 (0000H 04C0H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_13 (0000H 04C5H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_14 (0000H 04C6H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_9 (0000H 04C1H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_6 (0000H 04BEH)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_10 (0000H 04C2H)
Example 3
The following is an example of STATUS output during Deletion/NUSI rebuilding.
Current reconfig phase:
Redistribution
Estimated time remaining: 00:19:21
Redistribution status - tables processed:
152
tables remaining:
152
100% of total bytes processed
Deletion/NUSI status - tables processed:
152
tables remaining:
26
70% of total bytes processed
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
Reconfig
264
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
task
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
Processed
69%
69%
69%
68%
69%
68%
64%
69%
69%
69%
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_12 (0000H 04C4H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_7 (0000H 04BFH)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_11 (0000H 04C3H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_15 (0000H 04C7H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_8 (0000H 04C0H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_13 (0000H 04C5H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_14 (0000H 04C6H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_9 (0000H 04C1H)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_6 (0000H 04BEH)
RKPMED.SIW_XXXX_FB_10 (0000H 04C2H)
Support Utilities
Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
STOP
STOP
Purpose
The STOP command stops Reconfiguration.
Syntax
STOP
S
GT10B001
Usage Notes
The STOP command can be used only before the RECONFIG command is issued. To stop an
in-progress reconfiguration, use the “ABORT” command.
Reconfiguration Example
The following is a Reconfiguration example. Most of the detailed table redistribution text is
eliminated for brevity.
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Release 14g.00.00.225 Version 14g.00.00.286
RECONFIG Utility (Dec 94)
The RECONFIG program provides the user with a facility
to redistribute data when the configuration of a DBS is
changed by pressing the appropriate function key.
System Time (Reconfiguration): 11/11/10 13:08:57.
Enter command or
Press <F2> for Reconfig command
<F3> for Stop command
<F4> for Query or Status command
<F5> for Display Retry List command
<F7> for help>
r
Reconfig will use 16-bit bucket size.
Should reconfig run in online mode with logons enabled (y/n)? >
y
User prefer to run ONLINE on both REDISTRIBUTION and DELETION.
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Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
Reconfiguration Example
TableSize
--------4.00KB
RowCount
--------------4
NUSICount
--------0
FB
-Y
DBlk
Size
----63KB
Sort
Redist Deletion
Flag Estimate Estimate Database.Table
---- -------- -------- ----------------------------N 00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.RCConfiguration
(0000H 0007H)
N 00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.Global (0000H 0019H)
N 00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.TransientJournal
(0000H 001AH)
N 00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.Owners (0000H 001BH)
N 00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.Parents (0000H 001CH)
N 00:00:00 00:00:00 DBC.ErrorMsgs (0000H 001EH)
5.00KB
4.00KB
6
4
0
0
Y
N
63KB
63KB
15.00KB
16.00KB
834.00KB
...
10.00KB
394
394
6,854
0
0
0
Y
Y
Y
63KB
63KB
63KB
4
0
N
126KB
N
00:00:00
00:00:00
34.00KB
332
0
N
126KB
N
00:00:00
00:00:00
oarc_otop018db1.tab_jn
(4000H 09B9H)
oarc_oth004db1.tab_jn
(4000H 09BDH)
The current configuration has: 1 Nodes with 4 AMPs
The new configuration will be: 1 Nodes with 8 AMPs
There are 4 AMPs added to the new configuration
The system has: 1308 tables using 15.44GB of data
The estimated table redistribution time will be:
0.09 hours (for offline reconfig).
0.14 hours (for online reconfig with system 25% busy).
0.20 hours (for online reconfig with system 50% busy).
0.27 hours (for online reconfig with system 75% busy).
0.35 hours (for online reconfig with system 100% busy).
The estimated table deletion time will be:
0.21 hours (for offline reconfig).
0.33
0.47
0.64
0.84
hours
hours
hours
hours
(for
(for
(for
(for
online
online
online
online
reconfig
reconfig
reconfig
reconfig
with
with
with
with
system
system
system
system
25% busy).
50% busy).
75% busy).
100% busy).
This reconfig estimate is based upon 48XX/49XX/52XX OR LATER.
11/11/10 13:09:20 Hash Map Calculation Phase Begins
11/11/10 13:09:21 Hash Map Calculation Phase Ends
11/11/10 13:09:21 Table Redistribution Phase Begins
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 00 Begin redistribution TDSTATS.ExcludedTbl (0000H 0823H) online.
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 00 End redistribution TDSTATS.ExcludedTbl (0000H 0823H).
Statistics:
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
24
0
196
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 01 Begin redistribution TDSTATS.CommandsTbl (0000H 0825H) online.
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 00 Begin redistribution TDSTATS.CommandsBatchDtlTbl (0000H 0828H) online.
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 01 End redistribution TDSTATS.CommandsTbl (0000H 0825H).
Statistics:
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
24
0
280
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 00 End redistribution TDSTATS.CommandsBatchDtlTbl (0000H 0828H).
Statistics:
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
24
0
196
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 01 Begin redistribution TDSTATS.StatsTbl (0000H 0829H) online.
11/11/10 13:09:21 Task 00 Begin redistribution TDSTATS.udfConcat (0000H 082AH) online.
...
11/11/10 13:13:51 Task 01 Table in-use by Permanent Journaling, skipping oarc_oth004db1.tab_jn
(4000H 09BDH).
11/11/10 13:13:51 Task 01 End redistribution oarc_oth004db1.tab_jn (4000H 09BDH).
Statistics:
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
24
0
220
Online Redistribution Completed.
Reconfig is waiting for all Online Archive logging
activities to be turned off.
50 table(s) currently have Online Archive logging enabled.
DBC.ArchiveLoggingObjsV view can be used to retrieve
the objects that still have online archive logging enabled.
11/11/10 13:14:21 Task 29 Begin replay ReconfigJournal.
11/11/10 13:14:21 Task 29 End replay ReconfigJournal.
***********************************************************
* In order to finish, reconfig must now run offline.
*
* All sessions must logoff and logons must be disabled. *
***********************************************************
11/11/10 13:23:59 Task 29 Begin final replay ReconfigJournal.
11/11/10 13:23:59 Task 00 End redistribution load_mlppi.LINEITEM (0000H 09E7H).
Statistics:
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
11,999,546
1.58GB
143
50
135,599
11/11/10 13:23:59 Task 01 Begin redistribution DBC.RCConfiguration (0000H 0007H).
11/11/10 13:23:59 Task 29 End final replay ReconfigJournal.
11/11/10 13:23:59 Task 00 Begin redistribution DBC.Global (0000H 0019H).
11/11/10 13:23:59 Task 01 End redistribution DBC.RCConfiguration (0000H 0007H).
Statistics:
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
266
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Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
Reconfiguration Example
AllAmps:
...
11/11/10 13:24:22
Statistics:
AllAmps:
11/11/10 13:24:22
11/11/10 13:24:22
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:23
11/11/10 13:24:24
11/11/10 13:24:24
11/11/10 13:24:24
0
0.00KB
24
0
244
Task 00 End redistribution oarc_oth004db1.tab_jn (4000H 09BDH).
RowCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
0
0.00KB
24
0
160
Table Redistribution Phase Ends
Saving New Primary Hash Map Phase Begins
Saving New Primary Hash Map Phase Ends
Saving New Fallback Hash Map Phase Begins
Saving New Fallback Hash Map Phase Ends
Saving Current Primary Hash Map Phase Begins
Saving Current Primary Hash Map Phase Ends
Saving Current Fallback Hash Map Phase Begins
Saving Current Fallback Hash Map Phase Ends
Saving Current Configuration Map Phase Begins
Saving Current Configuration Map Phase Ends
Saving New Configuration Map Phase Begins
Saving New Configuration Map Phase Ends
Saving Backup IDs Phase Begins
Saving Backup IDs Phase Ends
Deleting New Hash Maps Phase Begins
Deleting New Hash Maps Phase Ends
Saving Bitmap Hash Table Phase Begins
Saving Bitmap Hash Table Phase Ends
Updating Disk Space Phase Begins
Updating Disk Space Phase Ends
Updating Vproc Configuration Begins
Updating Vproc Configuration Ends
System is about to be reset for reconfig online.
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Release 14g.00.00.225 Version 14g.00.00.286
RECONFIG Utility (Dec 94)
Restart RECONFIG
Reconfig already entered the irreversible phase on 11/11/10 at 13:24:51.
11/11/10 13:24:51 Old Table Deletion Phase Begins
11/11/10 13:24:52 Task 00 Begin deletion DBC.RCConfiguration (0000H 0007H).
11/11/10 13:24:52 Task 00 End deletion DBC.RCConfiguration (0000H 0007H).
Statistics:
FSysCallCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
0
0
688
11/11/10 13:24:52 Task 01 Begin deletion DBC.Global (0000H 0019H).
11/11/10 13:24:52 Task 00 Begin deletion DBC.TransientJournal (0000H 001AH).
11/11/10 13:24:52 Task 02 Begin deletion DBC.Owners (0000H 001BH).
...
11/11/10 13:25:07 Task 01 End deletion SYSUDTLIB.TestRelEqUdt_Ordering (0000H 0B74H).
Statistics:
FSysCallCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
0
0
660
11/11/10 13:27:23 Task 00 End deletion oarc_oth004db1.tab_jn (4000H 09BDH).
Statistics:
FSysCallCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
0
0.00KB
0
0
146
11/11/10 13:27:54 Task 01 End deletion load_mlppi.LINEITEM (0000H 09E7H).
Statistics:
FSysCallCount ByteCount TotSecs
CPUSecs
IOCount
AllAmps:
11,999,546
1.58GB
107
24
108,986
11/11/10 13:27:54 Old Table Deletion Phase Ends
System Time (Reconfiguration): 11/11/10 13:27:54
6179: Reconfig online finished.
RECONFIG is about to be stopped.
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Chapter 5: Reconfiguration Utility (reconfig)
Reconfiguration Example
268
Support Utilities
CHAPTER 6
System Initializer (sysinit)
The System Initializer utility, sysinit:
•
Initializes the Teradata Database
•
Creates or updates the DBS Control Record and other Globally Distributed Objects
(GDOs)
•
Initializes or updates configuration maps
•
Allows you to set the hash function value in the DBS Control Record
Runs From
System Initializer runs from Database Window or comparable interface to the Teradata
Database console subsystem, such as cnsterm.
Type start sysinit to start System Initializer from Database Window. System Initializer
completes after you respond to the last prompt in the user dialog. You can terminate sysinit
early by entering Quit in response to certain prompts. For a description of these prompts and
messages, see “Running System Initializer” on page 271.
For general information on starting the utilities from different interfaces, see Appendix B:
“Starting the Utilities.”
Before You Begin
Before you run sysinit, you should understand the following concepts.
Globally Distributed Objects
Globally Distributed Objects, (GDOs) are named objects that are kept consistent across all
nodes and vprocs in a Teradata Database system. GDOs typically store system settings and
configuration information that is shared by all nodes of the system.
Sysinit initializes several Teradata Database GDOs.
Depending on the state of the DBS Control Record, GDOs, and on the current configuration
when System Initializer is run, sysinit prompts for certain information, such as the hash
function to use for row distribution among AMPs, and the type of language support required.
For information on these prompts, see “Running System Initializer” on page 271.
Support Utilities
269
Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Before You Begin
Configuration Maps
Configuration maps define the current and new configuration of the Teradata Database
system vprocs. A configuration map:
•
Stores the identification and status of each vproc in the Teradata Database system
•
Identifies the AMPs that constitute each AMP cluster
•
Identifies each PE and its associated host
The Teradata Database system contains two configuration maps:
•
The current configuration map describes the current arrangement and status of vprocs in
the Teradata Database system
•
The new configuration map describes changes and additions to the configuration
Sysinit can create a new configuration map and keep or revise a current map. For new
configuration maps initialized by sysinit from the current configuration, the current
configuration can retain one AMP and all existing PEs. The new configuration can retain one
or all AMPs and all existing PEs.
New Versus Previously Initialized Systems
Running sysinit is part of the overall Teradata Database system initialization process. Sysinit
handles Teradata Database system configuration differently, depending on whether the system
is being initialized for the first time, or has been previously initialized on the same or a
previous version of Teradata Database
First-Time Initialization for New Systems
When used to initialize a new Teradata Database system, sysinit initializes a configuration that
includes all the vprocs defined in a vprocconfig GDO.
On a new, uninitialized, Teradata Database system (or on a corrupted Teradata Database
system whose configuration map cannot be read), sysinit creates a full configuration based on
the vprocconfig GDO. All vprocs are set to an online, operational state. If a problem exists
with any vproc, then a 0 PE, 1 AMP configuration is created. If a full configuration was
created, then you are given options later for selecting a particular configuration for the new
and old config maps.
Previously Initialized Systems
On a previously initialized Teradata Database system, sysinit retains the current configuration
map and prompts you to do one of the following:
Warning:
•
Retain the current configuration in the new configuration map
•
Select a different configuration for the current and the new configuration maps
Sysinit will destroy all user and dictionary data currently in the Teradata Database system.
Sysinit may reset the configuration settings stored in various GDOs and normally set using
various system utilities to default values for the new version of Teradata Database.
270
Support Utilities
Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
If you need to run sysinit on an existing system, first collect information from the following to
ensure that customized settings can be restored and set as required after the sysinit:
System Utilities:
•
Control GDO Editor (ctl)
•
DBS Control
•
TDN Tuner (tdntune)
•
Vproc Manager
System Control Files:
•
GDOs
•
vconfig.out file
•
UDF libraries (optional)
Running System Initializer
Warning:
Running sysinit on a previously initialized Teradata Database system destroys all existing data
and deletes all tables.
1
Start sysinit.
The following message appears:
W A R N I N G
This program will destroy all user and dictionary data on the system.
SYSINIT Master AMP Vproc is 0 at 11:25:42 on 04/04/11
If the Teradata Database system is running, sysinit displays:
The DBS is currently running!!!
SYSINIT cannot execute while the DBS is running.
Would you like to restart the system without the DBS (YES/NO)?
2
At the prompt, answer one of the following:
IF you answer...
THEN sysinit...
YES
• sets the Start DBS configuration option to Off.
The Start DBS setting can also be manually changed using the Control GDO
Editor (ctl) utility. It determines whether the database software is started
when PDE is started. For more information about the ctl utility, see the
“Control GDO Editor (ctl)” chapter in Utilities Volume 1.
• displays the following message and exits:
SYSINIT terminated without updating disks.
• automatically restarts PDE, the low level of Teradata Database, without
starting the higher-level DBS database software.
You must start sysinit again when PDE has restarted.
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Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
IF you answer...
THEN sysinit...
NO
displays the following message and exits:
Set the "Start DBS" flag to "Off" using the CTL utility
program and restart the system prior to running SYSINIT
again.
sysinit terminated without updating disks.
The startup process for Teradata Database involves first starting parallel database
extensions (PDE). These extensions create an operating environment that
supports the parallel features of Teradata Database. After PDE has started, the
Teradata Database DBS software is usually automatically started.
The Start DBS flag can be set to prevent the DBS software from starting after PDE
is started. This flag is set using the Control GDO Editor (ctl) utility. For more
information about the ctl utility, see the “Control GDO Editor (ctl)” chapter in
Utilities Volume 1.
3
Restart sysinit. The following message appears:
W A R N I N G
This program will destroy all user and dictionary data on the system.
A display indicating the console AMP vproc number, the current time, and the current
date, as shown below:
SYSINIT Master AMP Vproc is 0 at 11:25:42 on 04/04/11
4
System Initializer attempts to read the DBS Control Record.
The DBS Control Record is a Teradata Database globally distributed object (GDO) that
contains system settings for Teradata Database. Sysinit handles the DBS Control Record
differently, depending on whether the Teradata Database system was initialized previously
or is being initialized for the first time.
IF the DBS Control Record GDO...
THEN sysinit displays...
is corrupted or does not exist
A new DBS Control Record will be initialized to
default values.
exists
The existing DBS CONTROL GDO will be used.
Sysinit displays information from the current DBS Control
settings, and may prompt for further information or action
based on those settings.
One of the DBS Control settings specifies the hash function Teradata Database will use for
row distribution amongst AMPs. Universal hash is the default, and is recommended for all
new Teradata Database installations.
272
•
For existing Teradata Database installations, if the hash had previously been set to
something other than Universal or Pre-13.10 Universal, sysinit asks for confirmation,
and offers to change the hash type and language support mode.
•
For new installations, sysinit asks if you wish to use Universal Hash. If you respond No,
you are able to select one of the older hash functions for backward compatibility.
Support Utilities
Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
The following table describes the available hash types.
Hash Type
Description
Universal
The recommended hash for most Teradata Database installations.
Universal hash can be used with standard (non-Japanese) language
support or with Japanese language support.
Note: Japanese language support allows Japanese characters in object
names, sets the default DEFAULT CHARACTER SET for users, including
DBC, to UNICODE (rather than LATIN), and, when used with a
Japanese character set, allows loading longer strings (64K bytes rather
than 32K characters). Japanese character sets can be loaded in both
Japanese and Standard modes.
Pre-13.10 Universal
This hash type is supported for compatibility with earlier releases of
Teradata Database.
Kanji
Hash that supports Japanese language.
This hash type is supported for compatibility with earlier releases of
Teradata Database. For non-character data, it produces more hash
collisions than either of the Universal hashes.
International
Hash that supports international languages, excluding Japanese.
This hash type is supported for compatibility with earlier releases of
Teradata Database. For non-character data, it produces more hash
collisions than either of the Universal hashes.
The following table describes the differences between standard and Japanese language
support.
Support Utilities
Standard Language Support
Japanese Language Support
Object names can contain LATIN characters.
Object names can contain characters from the
JIS X 0201, and JIS X 0208 standard.
Object names are stored in the Data Dictionary
as UNICODE.
Object names are stored in the Data Dictionary
as UNICODE.
The object names are processed internally by the
database as LATIN.
The object names are processed internally by
the database as KANJI1.
The default character set is LATIN.
The default server character set is UNICODE.
273
Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
5
sysinit attempts to read the current configuration map.
IF a valid configuration map...
THEN sysinit...
does not exist or is corrupted
initializes the configuration to a full configuration based on
vprocconfig GDO and displays:
Config Map will be initialized.
does exist
retains the current configuration and displays:
The current configuration map has been read.
6
System Initializer displays a message about destroying user and dictionary data and
prompts you to confirm this action, as shown below:
SYSINIT is about to destroy all user and dictionary data.
sure that you want to do this? (YES/NO/QUIT)?
IF you answer...
THEN sysinit displays
YES
Deleting all tables...
NO or QUIT
before terminating:
Are you
SYSINIT terminated without updating disks.
7
If you answer YES, sysinit checks to see if AMP vproc 0 is defined or if the hardware
required to run AMP vproc 0 is available. If not, one of the following messages is displayed
before sysinit terminates:
AMP vproc 0 is not operational.
SYSINIT terminated without updating disks.
or
AMP vproc 0 is not defined.
SYSINIT terminated without updating disks.
sysinit will not initialize any AMPs that are not operational, that is, their VprocState is
NONODE. The following message is displayed if any are found:
The following AMPs are defined in the current configuration map and
the physical hardware required to run them is not available. Hence,
they will not be initialized by SYSINIT.
nnnn nnnn nnnn ...
where nnnn nnnn nnnn ... represent the vproc numbers of the AMPs in question.
8
For a previously initialized Teradata Database system where sysinit was able to read the
current configuration, sysinit first displays the current number of AMPs and PEs, as
follows:
Accessing the current configuration map...
The current configuration map includes:
4 PE(s) and 8 AMP(s)
274
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Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
9
If more than one AMP and one PE exist, sysinit displays four options for the current and
new configuration maps, as follows:
The current configuration map includes:
4 PE(s) and 8 AMP(s)
Enter a value for the current/new configuration maps:
1 for current:
4 PE(s) and
8 AMP(s)
new:
4 PE(s) and
8 AMP(s)
2 for current:
4 PE(s) and
1 AMP(s)
new:
4 PE(s) and
1 AMP(s)
3 for current:
0 PE(s) and
1 AMP(s)
new:
4 PE(s) and
8 AMP(s)
4 for current:
0 PE(s) and
1 AMP(s)
new:
0 PE(s) and
1 AMP(s)
10 Type a value for the current/new configuration maps (for most situations, choose
option 1):
1
11 System Initializer displays the following messages to confirm your selection:
Updating the new configuration to:
4 PE(s) and
8 AMP(s)
Updating the current configuration to:
4 PE(s) and
8 AMP(s)
Updating current hash maps...
12 Before terminating, sysinit prompts you for the following action:
Would you like to continue with startup (YES/NO)?
IF you answer...
THEN the following message appears...
YES
The CONTROL GDO has 'Start DBS' turned off.
This will prevent the database application from starting.
Would you like to turn it on (YES/NO)?
IF you answer...
THEN sysinit...
YES
restarts the PDE and DBS components of the
system.
The CONTROL GDO has 'Start DBS' turned off.
This will prevent the database application from starting.
Would you like to turn it on (YES/NO)?
IF you answer...
THEN sysinit...
NO
restarts only the PDE components of the system,
displays the following message and quits:
Don't forget to reset the "Start DBS"
flag to "On" using the CTL utility
program prior to restarting the
system.
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Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
IF you answer...
THEN the following message appears...
NO
Don't forget to set the "Start DBS" flag to "On" using
CTL utility program prior to restarting the system.
SYSINIT complete.
After displaying the message, sysinit quits.
Configuration and Reconfiguration Utilities
After the Teradata Database system is initialized, run the Configuration and Reconfiguration
utilities to define the AMPs and PEs that will operate together as a Teradata Database system.
The Configuration utility adds, changes, modifies, or displays vprocs or hosts in the new
configuration map. The Reconfiguration utility then redefines the Teradata Database system
configuration according to the new map.
For more information on the Configuration utility, see Utilities Volume 1. For more
information on the Reconfiguration utility, see Utilities Volume 2.
Examples
Example 1
This example shows that after the user started sysinit, a message stating that the Teradata
Database system is running appears, and sysinit terminates.
_______
|
|
___
|
/
|
--|
\___
__
|/
|
|
\
____
____|
/
|
\____|
|
|
____|
/
|
\____|
____
____|
/
|
\____|
|
__|__
|
|
|__
____
____|
/
|
\____|
Release 14.00.00.00 Version 14.00.00.00
SYSINIT Utility (June 2000)
*********************************************************************
*********************************************************************
*****
***
*****
W A R N I N G
***
*****
***
***** This program will destroy all user and dictionary data on ***
***** the system.
***
*****
***
*********************************************************************
*********************************************************************
SYSINIT Master AMP Vproc is 0 at 10:40:47 on 11/04/14.
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Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
The DBS is currently running!!!
SYSINIT cannot execute while the DBS is running.
Would you like to restart the system without the DBS (YES/NO)?
no
Set the "Start DBS" flag to "Off" using the CTL utility program
and restart the system prior to running SYSINIT again.
SYSINIT terminated without updating disks.
Example 2
The following example shows a complete sysinit session, including prompts, user responses,
and messages. The example assumes a previously configured Teradata Database with an
existing DBS Control Record and an existing current configuration map. Universal Hash is
accepted.
_______
|
|
___
|
/
|
--|
\___
__
|/
|
|
\
____
____|
/
|
\____|
|
|
____|
/
|
\____|
____
____|
/
|
\____|
|
__|__
|
|
|__
____
____|
/
|
\____|
Release 14.00.00.00 Version 14.00.00.00
SYSINIT Utility (June 2000)
***********************************************************************
***********************************************************************
*****
*****
*****
W A R N I N G
*****
*****
*****
***** This program will destroy all user and dictionary data on *****
***** the system.
*****
*****
*****
***********************************************************************
***********************************************************************
SYSINIT Master AMP Vproc is 0 at 16:32:15 on 11/10/22.
The existing DBSCONTROL GDO will be used.
System is being initialized to 20-bit hash buckets.
The HashFuncDBC value in the DBSCONTROL GDO is Universal
Universal hash is recommended for all new installations
Do you wish to use Universal Hash (YES/NO/QUIT)?
yes
Enable Japanese language support (YES/NO/QUIT)?
no
SYSINIT is about to destroy all user and dictionary data!!!
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Chapter 6: System Initializer (sysinit)
Running System Initializer
Are you sure that you want to do this (YES/NO/QUIT)?
yes
Deleting all tables...
Accessing the current configuration map...
The current configuration map includes:
1 PE(s) and 4 AMP(s)
Enter a value for the current/new configuration maps:
1 for current:
new:
1 PE(s)
1 PE(s)
and
and
4 AMP(s)
4 AMP(s)
2 for current:
new:
1 PE(s)
1 PE(s)
and
and
1 AMP(s)
1 AMP(s)
3 for current:
new:
0 PE(s)
1 PE(s)
and
and
1 AMP(s)
4 AMP(s)
4 for current:
new:
0 PE(s)
0 PE(s)
and
and
1 AMP(s)
1 AMP(s)
1
Updating the new configuration to:
1 PE(s) and
4 AMP(s)
Updating the current configuration to:
1 PE(s) and
4 AMP(s)
Updating current hash maps...
Would you like to continue with start up (YES/NO)?
yes
SYSINIT complete.
278
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APPENDIX A
How to Read Syntax Diagrams
This appendix describes the conventions that apply to reading the syntax diagrams used in
this book.
Syntax Diagram Conventions
Notation Conventions
Item
Definition / Comments
Letter
An uppercase or lowercase alphabetic character ranging from A through Z.
Number
A digit ranging from 0 through 9.
Do not use commas when typing a number with more than 3 digits.
Word
Keywords and variables.
• UPPERCASE LETTERS represent a keyword.
Syntax diagrams show all keywords in uppercase, unless operating system
restrictions require them to be in lowercase.
• lowercase letters represent a keyword that you must type in lowercase, such as a
Linux command.
• Mixed Case letters represent exceptions to uppercase and lowercase rules. The
exceptions are noted in the syntax explanation.
• lowercase italic letters represent a variable such as a column or table name.
Substitute the variable with a proper value.
• lowercase bold letters represent an excerpt from the diagram. The excerpt is
defined immediately following the diagram that contains it.
• UNDERLINED LETTERS represent the default value.
This applies to both uppercase and lowercase words.
Spaces
Use one space between items such as keywords or variables.
Punctuation
Type all punctuation exactly as it appears in the diagram.
Paths
The main path along the syntax diagram begins at the left with a keyword, and proceeds, left
to right, to the vertical bar, which marks the end of the diagram. Paths that do not have an
arrow or a vertical bar only show portions of the syntax.
The only part of a path that reads from right to left is a loop.
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279
Appendix A: How to Read Syntax Diagrams
Syntax Diagram Conventions
Continuation Links
Paths that are too long for one line use continuation links. Continuation links are circled
letters indicating the beginning and end of a link:
A
A
FE0CA002
When you see a circled letter in a syntax diagram, go to the corresponding circled letter and
continue reading.
Required Entries
Required entries appear on the main path:
SHOW
FE0CA003
If you can choose from more than one entry, the choices appear vertically, in a stack. The first
entry appears on the main path:
SHOW
CONTROLS
VERSIONS
FE0CA005
Optional Entries
You may choose to include or disregard optional entries. Optional entries appear below the
main path:
SHOW
CONTROLS
280
FE0CA004
Support Utilities
Appendix A: How to Read Syntax Diagrams
Syntax Diagram Conventions
If you can optionally choose from more than one entry, all the choices appear below the main
path:
READ
SHARE
JC01A010
ACCESS
Some commands and statements treat one of the optional choices as a default value. This
value is UNDERLINED. It is presumed to be selected if you type the command or statement
without specifying one of the options.
Strings
String literals appear in apostrophes:
'msgtext '
JC01A004
Abbreviations
If a keyword or a reserved word has a valid abbreviation, the unabbreviated form always
appears on the main path. The shortest valid abbreviation appears beneath.
SHOW
CONTROLS
CONTROL
FE0CA042
In the above syntax, the following formats are valid:
•
SHOW CONTROLS
•
SHOW CONTROL
Loops
A loop is an entry or a group of entries that you can repeat one or more times. Syntax
diagrams show loops as a return path above the main path, over the item or items that you can
repeat:
,
,
(
cname
3
4
)
JC01B012
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Appendix A: How to Read Syntax Diagrams
Syntax Diagram Conventions
Read loops from right to left.
The following conventions apply to loops:
IF...
THEN...
there is a maximum number of
entries allowed
the number appears in a circle on the return path.
there is a minimum number of
entries required
the number appears in a square on the return path.
a separator character is required
between entries
the character appears on the return path.
In the example, you may type cname a maximum of 4 times.
In the example, you must type at least three groups of column
names.
If the diagram does not show a separator character, use one
blank space.
In the example, the separator character is a comma.
a delimiter character is required
around entries
the beginning and end characters appear outside the return
path.
Generally, a space is not needed between delimiter characters
and entries.
In the example, the delimiter characters are the left and right
parentheses.
Excerpts
Sometimes a piece of a syntax phrase is too large to fit into the diagram. Such a phrase is
indicated by a break in the path, marked by (|) terminators on each side of the break. The
name for the excerpted piece appears between the terminators in boldface type.
The boldface excerpt name and the excerpted phrase appears immediately after the main
diagram. The excerpted phrase starts and ends with a plain horizontal line:
LOCKING
excerpt
A
A
HAVING
con
excerpt
where_cond
,
cname
,
col_pos
JC01A014
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Appendix A: How to Read Syntax Diagrams
Syntax Diagram Conventions
Multiple Legitimate Phrases
In a syntax diagram, it is possible for any number of phrases to be legitimate:
dbname
DATABASE
tname
TABLE
vname
VIEW
JC01A016
In this example, any of the following phrases are legitimate:
•
dbname
•
DATABASE dbname
•
tname
•
TABLE tname
•
vname
•
VIEW vname
Sample Syntax Diagram
,
CREATE VIEW
viewname
AS
A
LOCKING
cname
CV
LOCK
ACCESS
dbname
A
DATABASE
tname
FOR
SHARE
IN
READ
TABLE
WRITE
EXCLUSIVE
vname
VIEW
EXCL
,
B
SEL
B
MODE
expr
,
FROM
qual_cond
tname
C
.aname
C
HAVING cond
;
qual_cond
,
WHERE cond
GROUP BY
cname
,
col_pos
JC01A018
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Appendix A: How to Read Syntax Diagrams
Syntax Diagram Conventions
Diagram Identifier
The alphanumeric string that appears in the lower right corner of every diagram is an internal
identifier used to catalog the diagram. The text never refers to this string.
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APPENDIX B
Starting the Utilities
This appendix describes how to start Teradata Database utilities.
Teradata Database offers several user interfaces from which the utilities may be started and
run.
Interface
Description
Database Window
(DBW)
DBW is a graphical tool that connects to the Teradata Database console
subsystem (CNS). CNS provides console services to utility programs that
operate on the database level of Teradata Database. Console utilities
should be started from DBW.
Note: Operators must be members of the tdtrusted user group to run
console utilities, or must be logged in as root. Non-tdtrused users may be
explicitly granted access to the console using the CNS GRANT
command. For more information on the GRANT command, see the
Database Window chapter of Utilities.
For low bandwith connections, command-line interfaces to CNS are
available, such as cnsterm and cnstool. Information on cnsterm and
cnstool is available in man page online documentation.
A subset of the console utilities can be run from the Remote Console
portlet of Teradata Viewpoint. For more information, see the Teradata
Viewpoint User Guide.
Linux command line
Utilities that run directly from the command line are primarily those
that operate on the PDE level of Teradata Database.
Host Utility Console
(HUTCNS)
HUTCNS runs a subset of utilities from a channel-attached host
terminal. It runs only on the z/OS operating system.
Note: Not all utilities support all available user interfaces. For a listing of supported user
interfaces for each utility, see the documentation for each utility.
When started, some utilities present their own interactive command-line or graphical user
interfaces. These utilities allow browsing and entering information, and continue running
until they are explicitly stopped. Many utilities that present their own command environment
are stopped by entering the QUIT command.
Some utilities that run from DBW can be stopped by issuing the stop window_number
command from the DBW Supervisor window, where window_number is the numeric
identifier of the DBW application window in which the utility is running. For more
information on DBW, see Utilities Volume 1.
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Appendix B: Starting the Utilities
Starting Utilities from Database Window
Starting Utilities from Database Window
Database Window (DBW) is an X client program that requires an X server to be running on
the local machine. DBW supports standard X Windows display forwarding. To ensure that the
graphical user interface displays properly, you can use the standard -display option to
specify the host name or IP address of the local machine.
To start a utility from Database Window:
1
If not already done, set up the Teradata Database environment by typing:
tdatcmd
at the Linux command line.
2
Open DBW from the Linux command line by typing:
xdbw –display displayspec &
where displayspec is the name or IP address of the local machine, followed by a colon and
the server number, typically 0 or 0.0. For example:
xdbw -display myworkstation.mycompany.com:0.0 &
or
xdbw -display 192.0.2.24:0.0 &
The DBW main window opens.
3
286
Click the Supvr button to open the Supervisor (supv) window.
Support Utilities
Appendix B: Starting the Utilities
Starting Utilities from Database Window
4
Under Enter a command type:
start utilityname [options]
where utilityname is the name of the utility, and options can include any of the available
command-line options and arguments of that utility. utilityname is not case-sensitive.
The following message appears:
Started 'utilityname' in window x
where x is the number of one of the four available application windows DBW provides.
Each utility started runs in one of the four application windows. The title bar of the
application window and the corresponding button in the DBW main window change to
reflect the name of the running utility. When the utility stops running, the application
window and main window button revert to the default text title (that is, Appl1, Appl2, and
so forth).
Note: Up to four utilities can be run concurrently in DBW. The message “All Interactive
Partitions are busy!!” indicates that all four application windows are occupied. In this case,
one of the four running utilities must be quit before another can be started.
For more information on DBW and CNS commands, and on options that are available
with the START command, see Utilities Volume 1.
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Appendix B: Starting the Utilities
Starting Utilities from the Linux Command Line
Starting Utilities from the Linux Command Line
To start a utility from the Linux command line:
1
If not already done, set up the Teradata Database environment by typing:
tdatcmd
at the Linux command line.
2
On the command line type:
utilityname [options]
where utilityname is the name of the utility, and options can include any of the available
command-line options and arguments of that utility.
Note: Operators must be members of the tdtrusted user group or have root access to run
console utilities. Other users can run the utilities only if they have been explicitly granted
access using the GRANT command.
Starting Utilities from HUTCNS
HUTCNS is a console interface that runs a subset of the Teradata Database utilities from a
channel-attached host terminal. These utilities include: Query Session, Query Configuration,
Showlocks, and Recovery Manager. HUTCNS is available only on z/OS terminals.
To start a utility:
1
On the command line type:
HUTCNS
The HUTCNS screen appears:
****
****
**** Data Base Computer
*
*
*
* *
*
*
****
*
Program: DBS Console Interface
*
*
*
* *
****
****
****
Enter logon string as ‘TDPID/UserID,Password’
TDPID is the Teradata Database system name. After you enter the required information,
the terminal displays the following:
Enter the Utility to execute
- SESsionStatus
- CONfiguration
- LOCKsDisplay
- RCVmanager
First 3 characters are acceptable
2
Type the name or abbreviation of the specified utility.
The screen for the specified utility appears.
Note: To exit the utility from HUTCNS, type END or QUIT.
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Glossary
2PC
Two-phase Commit
AG
Allocation Group
AMP
Access Module Processor
ARC
Archive/Recovery
AWS
Administration Workstation
AWT
AMP Worker Task
BLK Block
BTEQ Basic Teradata Query
CI Cylinder Index
CICS
Customer Information Control System
CID
Cylinder Index Descriptor
CNS
Teradata Database Console Subsystem
CJ
Changed Row Journal
COP Communications Processor
DB
Data Block
DBQL
DBS
Database Query Log
Database System or Database Software
DBW
Database Window
DDL
Data Definition Language
DEM
Database Extensibility Mechanism
DML
Data Manipulation Language
Dwin Display Window
FIB
File Information Block
FSE
Free Sector
FSG
File Segment
FSP Free Space Percent
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289
Glossary
GDO Globally Distributed Object
GUI
Graphical User Interface
hex
Hexadecimal
HG
Host Group
HN Host Number
HOST
HUT
Teradata Database Host Software
Host Utility
HUTCNS
Host Utility Console
IMS
Information management system
LAN
Local area network
LOB Large Object
LSN Log Sequence Number
LSNSPEC
LSN Specification
LUN
Logical Unit
MDS
Metadata Services
MI Master Index
MLOAD
MultiLoad
MPP Massively Parallel Processing
NPPI
Nonpartitioned Primary Index
NTA Nested Top Action
NUSI Non-Unique Secondary Index
OCES
OJ
Optimizer Cost Estimation Subsystem
Ordered System Change Journal
OLTP Online Transaction Processing
PCT
PPI Cache Threshold
PDE
Parallel Database Extensions
PE
Parsing Engine
PG
Performance Group
PID
290
Process ID
Support Utilities
Glossary
PJ
Permanent Journal
PMPC
PPI
Performance Monitor and Production Control
Partitioned Primary Index
PROC
Procedural Management Subsystem
PUT
Parallel Upgrade Tool
QIC
Quarter-inch Cartridge
RBM
Resolver Base Module
ResUsage Resource Usage
RFC
Reservation Flow Control
RJ Recovery Journal
RP
Resource Partition
RSG
Relay Services Gateway
RSS
Resource Subsystem
SDF
Source Specification for Data Formatting
SECTORSPEC Sector Specification
SMP
Symmetric MultiProcessing
stdin
Standard Input
stdout
Standard Output
supv Supervisor Window
Supvr
Supervisor Icon
sysinit
System Initializer
SysView
System View
TCHN
Teradata Channel
TDGSS
Teradata Database Generic Security Services
TDP
Teradata Director Program
Teradata ASM
TGTW
TJ
TLE
Support Utilities
Teradata Active System Management
Teradata Gateway
Transient Journal
Target Level Emulation
291
Glossary
TPA
TZ
Trusted Parallel Application
Time Zone
UDF
User-Defined Function
UDM
User-Defined Method
UDT
User-Defined Type
UNFES
Unfree Sector
UPI Unique Primary Index
USI
Unique Secondary Index
UTC
Universal Coordinated Time
vdisk
Virtual Disk
vproc
Virtual Processor
WAL
Write Ahead Logging
WCI
WAL Cylinder Index
WD Workload Definition
WDB
WDBD
WLC
WLSN
WMI
292
WAL Data Block
WAL Data Block Descriptors
Workload Class
WAL Log Sequence Number
WAL Master Index
Support Utilities
Index
A
ACCESS command, Filer utility 98
ADD AMP command, Configuration utility 22
ADD HOST command, Configuration utility 24
ADD PE command, Configuration utility 25
ALTCI command, Filer utility 100
ALTWCI command, Filer utility 102
AMPs, Configuration utility 19
ASSIGN command, Filer utility 104
B
BACKDOWNCHECK command, Filer utility 107
BADLIST command, Filer utility 108
BEGIN CONFIG command, Configuration utility 27
BLK command, Filer utility 110
C
CHECKSUM command, Filer utility 112
CI command, Filer utility 113
CID command, Filer utility 116
Config utility. See Configuration utility
Configuration 19
Configuration maps, Configuration utility 18
Configuration maps, System Initializer utility 270
Configuration utility
AMPs 19
command overview 20
examples 59
hosts 18
maps 18
messages 60
overview 17
PEs 19
physical processors 17
starting 17
Configuration utility commands
overview 20
ADD AMP 22
ADD HOST 24
ADD PE 25
BEGIN CONFIG 27
DEFAULT CLUSTER 28
DEL AMP 30
DEL HOST 32
DEL PE 33
Support Utilities
END CONFIG 35
LIST 36
LIST AMP 38
LIST CLUSTER 40
LIST HOST 42
LIST PE 44
MOD AMP 46
MOD HOST 47
MOD PE 48
MOVE AMP 49
MOVE PE 51
SHOW CLUSTER 53
SHOW HOST 54
SHOW VPROC 56
STOP 58
Coroner, and Filer utility 63
Cylinders 62
D
Data blocks 62
Database Utilities overview 13
DATE command, Filer utility 117
DB command, Filer utility 118
DBD command, Filer utility 121
DBROW command, Filer utility 122
DEFAULT CLUSTER command, Configuration utility 28
DEL AMP command, Configuration utility 30
DEL HOST command, Configuration utility 32
DEL PE command, Configuration utility 33
DELETE command, Filer utility 123
DEPOT command, Filer utility 124
DISABLE command, Filer utility 125
DISCARD command, Filer utility 126
DISPLAY command, Filer utility 127
DROP command, Filer utility 129
DUMPDISK command, Filer utility 130
E
ENABLE command, Filer utility 132
END CONFIG command, Configuration utility 35
Error messages
Configuration utility 60
Filer utility 242
ERRORS command, Filer utility 133
293
Index
F
FIB command, Filer utility 135
File system 61
Filer utility
command syntax 72
command types 92
diagnostic startup options 63
entering multitoken parameters 75
entering numeric input 75
error log 70
error messages 242
file system startup 64
hex dumps format 92
modes 74
overview 61
physical rows 76
ridrange 76
ridspec 76
rows 76
rowspec 76
specifying a subtable identifier (tid) 79
specifying a WHERE clause 85
specifying data objects 75
specifying display ranges (ordinalrange) 83
starting 61
starting from the System Debugger and Coroner 63
stored input values 82
Teradata Database file system startup 64
Teradata Virtual Storage 91
Filer utility commands
overview 92
ACCESS 98
ALTCI 100
ALTWCI 102
ASSIGN 104
BACKDOWNCHECK 107
BADLIST 108
BLK 110
CHECKSUM 112
CI 113
CID 116
DATE 117
DB 118
DBD 121
DBROW 122
DELETE 123
DEPOT 124
DISABLE 125
DISCARD 126
DISPLAY 127
DROP 129
DUMPDISK 130
ENABLE 132
294
ERRORS 133
FIB 135
FIND 136
FREECACHE 137
HELP 138
IDENT 139
INFO 141
INIT 142
INPUT 143
MEMBLK 144
MEMCTX 146
MEMDB 147
MEMDUMP 149
MEMROW 150
MEMSORCTX 151
MEMWCTX 152
MEMWDB 153
MEMWREC 154
MI 155
MODIFY REDO 157
NEXT 161
OUTPUT 164
PACK 166
PATCH 167
PREV 171
PRIORITY 174
QUARLIST 175
QUIT 177
RADIX 178
REBUILDCI 180
RENAME 183
REPAIRSECTS 184
RESETFREECYL 186
ROW 187
SCANDISK 189
SCOPE 209
SEGZERO (SEG0) 210
SETFREECYL 211
SHOWDEFAULTS 212
SRD 213
STAMP 214
STORAGEINFO 215
SYNCSCAN 216
TABLE 217
TABLEID 220
TIME 117
TRACEPRINT 222
TRASH 223
VPROC 209
WABC 225
WAL 226
WCI 229
WCID 231
WDB 232
Support Utilities
Index
WDBD 234
WDBREC 235
WFIND 236
WFLUSH 237
WMI 238
WREC 239
WRITE 241
WSUMMARY 242
FIND command, Filer utility 136
FREECACHE command, Filer utility 137
G
Globally Distributed Objects (GDOs) 269
H
HELP command, Filer utility 138
Host, Configuration utility 18
I
IDENT command, Filer utility 139
INFO command, Filer utility 141
INIT command, Filer utility 142
INPUT command, Filer utility 143
J
Journal tables, Reconfiguration utility 256
L
LIST AMP command, Configuration utility 38
LIST CLUSTER command, Configuration utility 40
LIST command, Configuration utility 36
LIST HOST command, Configuration utility 42
LIST PE command, Configuration utility 44
M
MEMBLK command, Filer utility 144
MEMCTX command, Filer utility 146
MEMDB command, Filer utility 147
MEMDUMP command, Filer utility 149
MEMROW command, Filer utility 150
MEMSORCTX command, Filer utility 151
MEMWCTX command, Filer utility 152
MEMWDB command, Filer utility 153
MEMWREC command, Filer utility 154
MI command, Filer utility 155
MOD AMP command, Configuration utility 46
MOD HOST command, Configuration utility 47
MOD PE command, Configuration utility 48
MODIFY REDO command, Filer utility 157
MOVE AMP command, Configuration utility 49
Support Utilities
MOVE PE command, Configuration utility 51
N
NEXT command, Filer utility 161
No primary index (NoPI) tables, Reconfiguration utility 256
O
OUTPUT command, Filer utility 164
P
PACK command, Filer utility 166
PATCH command, Filer utility 167
PEs, Configuration utility 19
Physical processors, Configuration utility 17
Physical rows 76
PREV command, Filer utility 171
PRIORITY command, Filer utility 174
Q
QUARLIST command, Filer utility 175
QUIT command, Filer utility 177
R
RADIX command, Filer utility 178
REBUILDCI command, Filer utility 180
RECONFIG command, Reconfiguration utility 260
Reconfig. See Reconfiguration utility
Reconfiguration Estimator utility 243
overview 243
starting 243
Reconfiguration utility 247
before starting 249
commands overview 257
Configuration utility activities and 248
journal table effects 256
journal tables 256
MOVE AMP operation 255
new configuration map 248
no primary index (NoPI) tables 256
overview 247
process 251
starting 247
Reconfiguration utility commands
RECONFIG 260
STATUS 263
STOP 265
RENAME command, Filer utility 183
REPAIRSECTS command, Filer utility 184
RESETFREECYL command, Filer utility 186
Ridrange, Filer utility 76
Ridspec, Filer utility 76
295
Index
ROW command, Filer utility 187
Row range, Filer utility 76
Rows, Filer Utility 76
Rows, physical 76
Rowspec, Filer utility 76
S
SCANDISK command, Filer utility 189
SCOPE command, Filer utility 209
SEGZERO (SEG0) command, Filer utility 210
SETFREECYL command, Filer utility 211
SHOW CLUSTER command, Configuration utility 53
SHOW HOST command, Configuration utility 54
SHOW VPROC command, Configuration utility 56
SHOWDEFAULTS command, Filer utility 212
SRD command, Filer utility 213
STAMP command, Filer utility 214
STATUS command, Reconfiguration utility 263
STOP command, Configuration utility 58
STOP command, Reconfiguration utility 265
STORAGEINFO command, Filer utility 215
SYNCSCAN command, Filer utility 216
Syntax diagrams, how to read 279
sysinit. See System Initializer utility
System configuration 19
System Debugger, and Filer utility 63
System Initializer utility 269
and Configuration and Reconfiguration utilities 276
configuration maps 270
initializing Teradata Database 269
overview 269
running 271
starting 269
system setup 269
System reconfiguration 19
running on different platforms 285
starting on z/OS 288
V
VPROC command, Filer utility 209
W
WABC command, Filer utility 225
WAL command, Filer utility 226
WCI command, Filer utility 229
WCID command, Filer utility 231
WDB command, Filer utility 232
WDBD command, Filer utility 234
WDBREC command, Filer utility 235
WFIND command, Filer utility 236
WFLUSH command, Filer utility 237
WMI command, Filer utility 238
WREC command, Filer utility 239
WRITE command, Filer utility 241
WSUMMARY command, Filer utility 242
Z
z/OS, starting utilities on 288
T
TABLE command, Filer utility 217
TABLEID command, Filer utility 220
Teradata Database File System 61
cylinders 62
data blocks 62
Teradata Database Utilities overview 13
Teradata Virtual Storage
and the Filer utility 91
TIME command, Filer utility 117
TRACEPRINT command, Filer utility 222
TRASH command, Filer utility 223
U
Utilities
alphabetical listing 13
296
Support Utilities
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