And onto the sandwich. Four new ways to finesse that fillet

And onto the sandwich. Four new ways to finesse that fillet
FISH ON A BUdNsweet relish turn
Cottage Feast
p an
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to your own
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And onto the sandwich.
Four new ways to finesse that fillet
By Jane Rodmell
an
For a New Orle
rimp (or
g) uncooked sh
50
(2
oz
­devein 8
ed
in shrimp).
eled and deve
thaw frozen pe
1 tsp (5 ml)
d
(15 ml) oil an
Toss with 1 tbsp
te for an hour.
ra
ge
fri
g and re
Creole seasonin
oning, use
ve Creole seas
(If you don’t ha
ika, pepper,
cayenne, papr
a pinch each of
uté) shrimp
sa
r
yme.) Grill (o
th
d
an
o,
an
eg
or
d just
at until pink an
over medium he
es. Season
ut
in
m
4
3–
e than
cooked, no mor
p among
rim
pper. Divide sh
with salt and pe
moulade
Re
ot
Ro
with Celery
4 rolls and top
es 4.
(see p. 84). Serv
Photography Edward Pond
LE
DANISH-STYLM
ON
A
S
D
E
K
O
SM
d spread
d horseradish an
an
Mix sour cream
lmon (or
yer smoked sa
La
e.
ry
on hearty
. Top with a
ple, and radish
trout), sliced ap
on slices.
m
d serve with le
sprig of dill an
May 2015
cottagelife.com 83
UNA MELT
NEAPOLITAN) tuTna packed in oil, drained and
ch
n
2 cans (170 g ea
allot or 2 gree
85 g cans) • 1 sh
ur
fo
green
r
(o
ed
d
ix
ke
m
l)
fla
• !/2 cup (125 m
d
pe
op
ch
c,
y
el
onions, fin
d • 1 clove garli
ed and choppe
tt
pi
,
es
l)
iv
m
ol
k
(15
and blac
tard • 1 tbsp
(2 ml) Dijon mus
l
minced • !/2 tsp
45 ml) olive oi
0–
(3
ice • 2–3 tbsp
of
s
ice
sl
ick
fresh lemon ju
th
er • 4
ly ground pepp
ore
st
o,
st
pe
sil
• Salt and fresh
ba
• 4 tsp (20 ml)
d
ea
br
s
n
ia
ice
sl
al
4
It
rustic
r a recipe) •
emade (Blipp fo
m
ho
or
ht
ug
bo
ozzarella
slices buffalo m
ripe tomato • 4
tuna,
In a bowl, mix
375°F (190°C).
to
en
rd,
ov
ta
t
us
ea
m
Preh
, garlic,
n onions, olives
read
Sp
e.
st
ta
shallot or gree
on to
d olive oil. Seas
mato
to
a
e,
ur
lemon juice, an
ixt
m
d top with tuna
an
o
st
pe
d
an
ith
t
w
bread
a cookie shee
se. Arrange on
ee
st
ch
ju
d
se
an
,
ee
ce
ch
sli
ped and
d is lightly cris
bake until brea
4.
minutes. Serves
melts, about 5
BEST-EVER
BUTTER
Nothing beats the
simple luxury of
homemade butter.
It improves everything
it’s spread on, tastes
better than store
bought—especially
when the cream is
cultured—and wows
guests. It’s such a
cinch, kids can make it
themselves. They'll be
proud of their gourmet
contribution to dinner.
ential
The ess ich
dw
fish san nt,
e
im
d
n
co
dless
n
e
o
t
n
ope
n.
variatio
84 cottagelife.com
Remoulade
In a small bowl,
combine 1 cup
(250 ml) mayonnaise, 1 clove garlic, minced, 1 tsp
(5 ml) Dijon mustard, 2 green onions,
finely chopped, and
1 tbsp (15 ml) capers,
drained and minced.
Season to taste with
lemon juice, salt,
and pepper. Store
in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 3
days. Makes about
1 cup (250 ml).
May 2015
Celery Root
Remoulade
Peel 1 lb (500 g)
celery root and
1 carrot; grate or
cut into matchstick pieces, along
with !/2 fennel
bulb (optional).
In a large bowl,
toss together with
!/2 cup (125 ml)
Remoulade, !/4 cup
(60 ml) chopped
fresh parsley, and
a pinch of cayenne.
Season to taste.
Makes 6 cups
(1.5 L).
Shake the jar vigorously
until fat and buttermilk
separate. This takes
about 10 minutes. Pour
off the buttermilk and
reserve for another use.
Blipp the
tomato for
bonus fish
taco and basil
pesto recipes.
Add some ice-cold water
to the jar and knead the
butter with a spatula.
When the liquid turns
milky, pour it off, replace
the water, and knead
again. Repeat a few
more times, until the
water is clear. Drain and
stir in a pinch of salt.
Makes about !/2 cup
(125 ml).—Carolyn
Evans Hammond
FOOD STYLING: DAVID GRENIER. PROP STYLING: CATHERINE DOHERTY
To culture cream,
mix 1 cup (250 ml)
35% cream and 1 tbsp
(15 ml) plain yogurt
in a large shatterproof
jar (try a clean peanut
butter jar). Cover the
open jar with a tea
towel and leave for 24
hours at room temperature. Screw on the
lid and refrigerate for
2 hours. If there’s no
time to culture, just
use chilled 35% cream.
GRILL
GENIUS
Smoke ’n’
the water
Smouldering cooks
I’m regularly surprised to hear of people who don’t use wood smoke,
particularly those who will take the time to rub and mop their lowand-slow pork ribs—but don’t add the Holy Ghost of the barbecue
trinity. Making smoke in a gas or charcoal grill isn’t difficult, but
making lots of smoke, and making it last, can be tricky.
The A-Maze-N Tube
Smoker below is a
foolproof way to get
smoke from a grill.
Load the perforated tube with wood
pellets and light with
a torch. Because
it doesn’t require
an external heat
source, the tube
can be placed anywhere within the
grill chamber and
produces high volumes of quality
smoke for 2–6 hours,
depending on the
length of the tube.
($29.99–$44.99 U.S.,
amazenproducts.com)
86 cottagelife.com
To get smoke, you need hardwood chips or chunks, or pellets of
compressed hardwood sawdust. Any hardwood sold for outdoor
cooking—including fruitwoods, like apple and cherry, as well as
oak, pecan, and good old maple—works on meat, so don’t worry
about choosing a “wrong” smoke. It’s personal preference. I think
super-popular hickory makes everything taste like bacon and that
mesquite is downright nasty. But you might love them.
In a charcoal grill, simply toss wood for smoking onto the hot coals
to smoulder. Since small chips and pellets burn fast, you’ll have to
replenish them over long cooks, while chunks nestled in the coals
will usually go the distance.
Getting smoke from a gasser means you have to reduce airflow to
the wood bits so they smoulder without bursting into flame. Metal
smoker boxes hold the chips over a lit burner. No box? Place wood
chunks close enough to the flames to ignite and smoulder. With
smoking chips or pellets, wrap the fuel up tight in two layers of foil
or a disposable foil pan. Punch the package full of holes—the wood
needs just a little airflow. Foil packs are handy because you can put
them in just the right spot to burn properly. For long cooks, make
up a bunch and add them every few hours as necessary. For more
smoke, just use twice as many packs.—David Zimmer
May 2015
Should you soak
wood chips? After
carefully weighing dry and soaked
wood and building time and temperature data logs,
barbecue expert
Craig “Meathead”
Goldwyn concluded
that soaking wood
chips is not only
unnecessary but
also produces “bad”
smoke of the white,
grey, or black variety, rather than the
“good” kind, which
is thin, blue, and
almost invisible.
GOURMET
TIPS FOR
SPRING
Need a mission for
kids with cabin
fever? Take them on
a spring walk to pick
spruce tips. Tender
and lemony when
fresh, spruce tips
become more resinous in taste through
the season.
Nip off the buds
with your fingers
from early May to
early June when
they look like bright
green paintbrush
tips and are just
starting to shed their
bronze-coloured,
papery sheaths.
Try them in
stir-fries!
Get the right tree:
mature spruce
needles grow in
singles all the way
around the branch
and are four-sided
and sharp, while
other evergreens
(including poisonous yew) have needles that are flat or
bunched in groups
of two or more.
Rye raises the bar
Whisky lovers know the drill: the moment a spirit gets critical acclaim, the price rockets. We
have, however, a homegrown exception in Alberta Premium rye whisky, a “national treasure,”
according to Whisky Bible author Jim Murray. Even though this rich and spicy spirit won his
Canadian Whisky of the Year title four years in a row, it still retails for under $40 per litre in
most provinces. It works in sturdy classic cocktails, but the bold fruit, light caramel, and sweet
burn of this pure rye shine brightest when it’s savoured straight up.—Christine Sismondo
88 cottagelife.com
May 2015
DRINK
TICKET
TOP: LIAM MOGAN
Back at the ranch,
whiz equal parts
sugar and spruce
tips in a blender to
make spruce sugar;
add to tea for a
vitamin C boost.
Serve your little
foragers the fruits
of their labour in a
flavour-packed
sandwich by chopping up the tips and
adding to egg salad
or mayonnaise for
slathering on BLTs.
—Liann Bobechko
Apple five-spice
pound cake
Brush equal parts brown
sugar and butter on
thick slices of homemade
or store-bought pound
cake. Grill. Top with
grilled fruit and whipped
cream, yogurt, or ice
cream. Drizzle with butterscotch syrup.
Add 1 !/2 tsp (7 ml)
five-spice powder (or
pumpkin pie spice)
to flour mixture in
Twice-Grilled Pound
Cake. Toss 3/4 cup
(175 ml) peeled, diced
apple in 1 tbsp (15 ml)
flour. Fold into batter.
Blueberry orange
pound cake
Replace vanilla with
1 tbsp (15 ml) grated
orange zest. Toss
1 cup (250 ml) blueberries with 1 tbsp
(15 ml) flour. Fold
into batter.
Chocolate ginger
marble cake
Divide batter in half.
Add !/4 cup (60 ml)
chopped crystallized
ginger and 1 tsp (5 ml)
ground ginger to one
half and 2 tbsp (30 ml)
sifted cocoa to the
other. Drop alternate
spoonfuls into pan.
Run a knife through
to create marbling.
Twice-grilled
pound
pound cake
Bake this moist, versatile cake in the
’cue (or if you’re the traditional sort, in
the oven). Grill a second time (above)
and serve warm and toasty.—Jill Snider
11/2 cups all-purpose flour (375 ml)
1 tsp baking powder (5 ml)
1/4 tsp salt (1 ml)
1/2 cup butter, softened (125 ml)
1 cup sugar (250 ml)
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla (5 ml)
1/2 cup milk (125 ml)
90 cottagelife.com
May 2015
1. Preheat gas barbecue (or oven) to 350°F
(180°C). Turn off one side for indirect
cooking; place an oven thermometer on
the cool side and adjust flame to maintain
350°F (180°C). Line an 8 1/2" x 4 1/2" (1.5 L)
loaf pan with foil. Grease lightly.
2. In a small bowl, combine flour, baking
powder, and salt. In a large bowl, cream
butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time,
beating well. Beat on high for 2 minutes,
until light and creamy. Beat in vanilla.
Add flour mixture alternately with milk,
making three additions of flour and
two of milk, mixing until just blended.
3. Bake on unheated side of grill until
a toothpick inserted in the centre comes
out clean, 50–60 minutes. Cool in pan
on a rack for 15 minutes, then remove
cake and cool completely.
TIPS When baking in a barbecue, always
use indirect heat, checking the temperature with a reliable oven thermometer.
• For even browning, rotate the pan halfway through baking, and don’t use disposable foil pans—they’re too thin.
Introducing the
To create our new line of grilling &
entertaining products, we teamed
up with several food experts
to bring you a blend of classic,
contemporary and exotic flavours.
One thing they all have in common
is superb taste, and all are inspired
by great weekends at the cottage.
Use fricos
as a garnish,
or nibble
them with
wine, soup,
or salad.
For our full line and a list of
retail partners, please visit
Cheese crisps (fricos)
cottagelife.com/collection
Hot
Tip
Always start
with a clean,
well-oiled
grill for great
non-stick fish!
Advice for
cheeseheads
GRATE TIPS
A 4 oz (125 g) piece of cheese yields
about 1 cup (250 ml) when grated. Grate
firm Parmesan, Asiago, or Manchego
when cold, but let semi-soft mozzarella
and havarti warm up a bit. Add grated
cheese as a topping during the last 5–10
minutes of cooking.
THE BIG MELT
Relax and
refresh with
our Mango
Pineapple Salsa
Roquefort and feta don’t melt well—
they’re better crumbled last-minute into
a dish. For melting, try Gruyère, a Swiss
mountain cheese with big, nutty flavour;
sweet, full-flavoured farmhouse Gouda;
spicy Canadian cheddar; or rich, nutty
Fontina Val d’Aosta.
For a smooth cheese sauce, first make
a basic béchamel: gradually stir warm
milk into a warm roux of equal parts
butter and flour; continue stirring over
medium-low until smooth, 5–10 minutes. Remove from the heat—that’s the
secret—before adding grated cheese.
High heat and long cooking make cheese
protein seize up and its fat separate,
leaving a rubbery mess. Reheat cheese
sauce gently in a double boiler.
1. In a large, non-stick frying pan over
medium heat, place 3 or 4 mounds of
grated cheese (about 1 tbsp/15 ml each)
a few inches apart. Spread lightly
with a fork.
2. After about 1 minute, when edges of
cheese begin to brown, flip with a
nonstick spatula. After 30–60 seconds,
transfer cheese to paper towels.
3. Let your first batch of fricos cool
before tasting. They should be crisp and
toasted, but not too brown (adjust
timing as needed). Makes about 15 fricos.
TIP If you like, add lightly toasted
and crushed fennel or cumin seeds, or
smoked paprika, to the grated cheese.
SALT OR NO SALT?
Feta is best stored in its own salty brine—
if needed, top it up with 1/2 tsp (2 ml) of
salt dissolved in 1 cup (250 ml) of water.
When serving any cheese, however, skip
the saltines. Choose unsalted or lowsodium crackers; cheese is salty enough.
WASTE NOT
Chop leftover rind of ParmigianoReggiano into vegetable and bean soups.
And don’t worry about a little surface
mould on hard cheeses; just cut it off.
SAY CHEESE, CHEESE
Do you forget which cheeses you’ve
tried and liked? Take a pic of the label
or the store marker and you can check
your phone next time.—Jane Rodmell
What’s your favourite diner in cottage country and what’s its best dish?
Blipp the cheese photo to tell us more, or email cottagefeast@cottagelife.com
FOOD STYLING: RUTH GANGBAR. PROP STYLING: LAURA BRANSON
Tangy Dill
Fish Spice
the perfect
seasoning for
the perfect
catch.
4 oz hard cheese (such as Parmesan,
Asiago, or aged cheddar), grated (125 g)
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