1640-IN-042-A-07
General
General Setup
Setup
Table of Contents
Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
1640-IN-042-A-07
Powerup
............................................................................................... 3
1.1
Security ......................................................................................... 3
1.2
Moving Through the Screens ........................................................ 4
The Front Panel ........................................................................................ 4
2.1
Soft Keys ....................................................................................... 4
2.2
Screen Keys .................................................................................. 5
2.3
Cursor Keys .................................................................................. 6
2.4
The Keypad ................................................................................... 7
2.5
Machine Function Keys ................................................................. 7
2.6
Insta-Set Port ................................................................................ 7
Display Configuration .............................................................................. 10
System Messages ................................................................................... 15
System Monitor ....................................................................................... 16
Timeslot Error Monitor ............................................................................. 17
Timeslot Configuration ............................................................................ 19
System File Headers ............................................................................... 20
System File Sizes .................................................................................... 21
Powerup Setpoint Limits ......................................................................... 23
Recipe Setpoint Limits ............................................................................ 25
Module Information ................................................................................. 26
System Control ........................................................................................ 28
Serial Communications Setup ................................................................. 31
Cartridge Transfer ................................................................................... 34
Recipe Transfer ....................................................................................... 38
Real Time Clock ...................................................................................... 43
I/O and Control Relay Status .................................................................. 45
Timers, Counters, Temporary CRs and Hourmeters .............................. 46
Machine Control ...................................................................................... 48
Security Change Function ....................................................................... 49
21.1 Security Change Screen ............................................................. 49
21.2 Display Processor Modfile Additions for Security Change .......... 50
21.2.1 New Setpoints ...................................................................... 50
21.2.2 New Values .......................................................................... 50
21.2.3 New System Commands ..................................................... 50
21.2.4 New Module ASCII Strings .................................................. 50
21.2.5 New Module Displayable Messages .................................... 50
Alarm Log Function ................................................................................. 52
22.1 Alarm Log Screen ....................................................................... 52
22.2 Display Processor Modfile Additions for the Alarm Log Function 53
22.2.1 New Setpoints ...................................................................... 53
22.2.4 New Module ASCII Strings .................................................. 53
Setpoint Change Log Function ................................................................ 54
23.1 Setpoint Change Log Screen ...................................................... 54
23.2 Display Processor Modfile Additions for the Stpt Change Log ... 55
23.2.1 New Values .......................................................................... 55
23.2.3 New Module ASCII Strings .................................................. 56
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 1 of 60
General Setup
Figures
Figure 1.
Figure 2.1
Figure 2.2
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5.
Figure 6.
Figure 7.
Figure 8.
Figure 9.
Figure 10.
Figure 11.
Figure 12.
Figure 13.
Figure 14.
Figure 15.
Figure 16.1
Figure 16.2
Figure 16.3
Figure 16.4
Figure 17.1
Figure 17.2
Figure 18.
Figure 19.1
Figure 19.2
Figure 20.
Figure 21.
Figure 22.
Figure 23.
Powerup (User Screen Set) .......................................................... 3
Key Layout for Lumitech (41AA) and OPtima (41AC/41AE/41AM) 4
Key Layout for Lite 41AR .............................................................. 5
Display Config ............................................................................. 10
System Messages ....................................................................... 15
System Monitor ........................................................................... 16
Timeslot Monitor .......................................................................... 17
Timeslot Configuration ................................................................ 18
System Headers .......................................................................... 19
File Sizes ..................................................................................... 21
Powerup SP Limits ...................................................................... 22
Transfer SP Limits ....................................................................... 24
Module Search ............................................................................ 26
System Control ............................................................................ 27
RS-232 ........................................................................................ 31
Cartridge Transfer ....................................................................... 33
Changes to the Internal Memory Map ......................................... 36
Product Recipe ............................................................................ 37
Copy Insta-Set ............................................................................ 39
Edit Title ...................................................................................... 40
Clock ........................................................................................... 43
Time of Day (User Screen Set) ................................................... 44
CR Access (User Screen Set - Blow molding version shown) .... 44
Sequence (User Screen Set - Injection version shown) ............. 46
Hourmeters (User Screen Set) .................................................... 47
Machine Control (User Screen Set - Injection) ........................... 48
Security Change Screen ............................................................. 49
Alarm Log Screen ....................................................................... 52
Setpoint Change Screen ............................................................. 55
Table 1.1
Table 1.2
Table 1.3
Machine Function Key Definitions (Injection screens) .................. 8
Machine Function Key Definitions (Extrusion screens) ................. 8
Machine Function Key Definitions (Blow molding screens) .......... 9
Tables
NOTE
The screens shown in this section are those provided in the Barber-Colman screen set. Differences may
exist either due to editing or changes made in subsequent releases by Barber-Colman. The explanations
provided to support the screen functions still apply. In some cases, due to editing, all functions may not
appear on the screens.
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 2 of 60
General Setup
Figure 1. Powerup (User Screen Set)
1. Powerup
As delivered, the controller will powerup displaying a screen similar to Figure 1.
1.1 Security
Note that recent releases of display processor firmware/modfiles include the
ability to assign or change passwords from the operator station (an operation that formerly required screen editing). See "Logging Functions" at the
end of this (General Setup) section.
On powerup, security is at the default level (Level 1). Security levels are established when programming screens. Consult the Screen Editor Manual for default
security codes and specific information about creating or changing security codes.
The setpoint entry area for the security code is located on the Powerup screen (in
the user screen set) or the System Control screen (in the system screens set). If
it is necessary to change the security level, go to one of those screens, use the
arrow keys to select the security setpoint entry area, and type in the code for the
security level desired (see the screen editor). Observe the lower right of the screen.
An asterisk will appear for each character entered. Use the plus/minus key for any
dashes contained in the security code. Pressing Enter will cause the security to
change to the level indicated.
Level 1 is the lowest security level. Operating at Level 1 allows the least access
to the controller. Level 5 is the highest user security level. Operating at Level 5
allows the most access to the controller.
Only screens with a security level equal to or less than the operating security level
will be accessible.
If operating at Security Level 1, only Security Level 1 screens (or Paths) appear.
If operating at Security Level 2, only Security Level 1 & 2 screens (or Paths) appear.
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 3 of 60
General Setup
If operating at Security Level 3, only Security Level 1, 2 & 3 screens (or Paths) appear.
If operating at Security Level 4 or 5, Security Level 1, 2, 3 & 4 screens (or Paths) appear.
Note that once a screen is displayed, only those setpoints can be changed which
have an assigned security level (see the screen editor) less than or equal to the
operating security level.
1.2 Moving Through the Screens
Screens are divided into two major groups - system screens and user screens.
System screens contain information relating to general system operation and
troubleshooting. From any system screen, the Screen Up or Screen Down key can
be used to step through the continuous loop of all system screens. Keep in mind
that security level affects which system screens appear (at Security Level 4 all
system screens appear). The Page Back key can be used to return to the user
screen set.
Note that Page 3 Soft keys and the "Goto Screen Number Cmd" System Command
(Display Processor modfile) are the only means of accessing the system screen
set. Paths from one screen set to the other cannot be programmed.
User screens contain information relating to specific functions and applications.
From any user screen, the Screen Up or Screen Down key can be used to step
through the continuous loop of all user screens. The security level affects which
user screens and paths appear (at Security Level 4 all user screens appear).
2. The Front Panel
2.1 Soft Keys
The Soft keys are a group of 6 user definable (in the screen editor) keys located
directly beneath the display. They are the first 6 keys from the right (all of which are
the same size) and each may have a video label appearing above.
Page Key
Soft Keys
Cursor Keys
Numeric Keypad
Screen Keys
Insta-Set
Cartridge Port
Line Graph
Cursor Select
(and Contrast) Key
Machine
Function Keys
Enter Key
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Figure 2.1 Key Layout for Lumitech (41AA) and OPtima (41AC/41AE/41AM)
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 4 of 60
General Setup
If a key does have a video label appearing above it, the label could be either a "path"
to another screen or a "special function." Pressing a path key will cause the screen
identified by that path to appear on the display. Pressing a special function key will
cause the action to occur which is described by the label.
There are three different “pages” of video labels for the soft keys. The first two
pages are for paths within the user screen set. The third layer is for paths into the
system screen set.
A screen will always first appear with Page 1 paths (if there are any) showing.
Pressing the “Page” key (the slightly larger key to the left of the soft keys) once will
cause the Page 2 soft keys (if there are any) to appear. Pressing the Page key a
second time will cause the Page 3 soft keys - which contain the system paths (if
there are any) to appear.
Note that Page 3 Soft keys and the "Goto Screen Number Cmd" System Command
(Display Processor modfile) are the only means of accessing the system screen
set. Paths from one screen set to the other cannot be programmed.
Note that the security level will affect which soft keys of each page will appear. For
instance, if the controller is operating at security level 2 , the ONLY soft keys which
will appear will be paths to screens with Level 1 or Level 2 security. The security
level of a screen (AS WELL AS its path) is determined by the SCREEN.
2.2 Screen Keys
Screen keys are a vertical group of four keys located to the left of the arrow keys.
Screen Up; Screen Down
These two keys are used to move through the continuous loop of all system
screens or all user screens. Pressing the Screen Up key once will increment (i.e.,
Screen 1 to Screen 2) the display to the next screen in the loop for which there is
adequate security. Pressing the Screen Down key once will decrement (i.e.,
Screen 9 to Screen 8) the display to the next screen in the loop for which there is
adequate security.
Soft Keys
Page Key
Numeric Keypad
Cursor Keys
Screen Keys
Insta-Set
Cartridge Port
Line Graph
Cursor Select
(and Contrast) Key
Machine
Function Keys
Enter Key
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Figure 2.2 Key Layout for Lite 41AR
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 5 of 60
General Setup
Previous Screen
The Previous Screen key is used to toggle to the previous USER SCREEN. This
key is especially useful when it is necessary to examine or compare two screens
which do not have a path directly to one another. If the Previous Screen key is
pressed while a system screen is on the display, the LAST USER SCREEN to have
been displayed will appear.
Note that the Previous Screen key or the Goto Screen Number command are
the only means of returning from the system screen set to the user screen
set. Paths from one screen set to the other cannot be programmed.
Print Screen
The Print Screen key is meant to be used as a “screen dump” key. If a printer is
attached and enabled, pressing the Print Screen key will cause the screen to be
printed. Note that the controller must be equipped with the printer option (an
appropriate RS-232 daughterboard).
2.3 Cursor Keys
When a screen is first accessed, touching any of the Cursor keys causes the upper
most left setpoint or switch area to begin flashing. This flashing reverse video area
acts as a cursor. The Cursor keys are used to move the cursor from one reverse
video area to another. If the screen is accessed a second time, the cursor will
appear in the same area it occupied when the screen was exited.
Pressing the Right Cursor key will cause the cursor to move left to right, top to
bottom, across the screen. Once the cursor reaches the bottom most right setpoint
or switch area, it will advance to the upper most left setpoint or switch area.
Pressing the Left Cursor key will cause the cursor to move right to left, bottom to
top across the screen. Once the cursor reaches the upper most left setpoint or
switch area, it will remain at the upper most left setpoint or switch area.
Pressing the Up Cursor key will cause the cursor to move bottom to top and then
to the left most setpoint or switch area at the top of the screen. The cursor will then
remain at the upper most left setpoint or switch area.
Pressing the Down Cursor key will cause the cursor to move top to bottom and then
to the right most setpoint or switch area at the bottom of the screen. Once the cursor
reaches the bottom most right setpoint or switch area, it will advance to the upper
left most setpoint or switch area and continue.
Line Graph Cursor Select (and Contrast) Key
(Version 3.00 or later Display Processor)
When on a line graph screen, pressing this key will cause a small "key" graphic to
appear in the lower left corner of the screen, signifying that the line graph cursor
has been selected. With the line graph cursor selected, the cursor keys can be
used to move the line graph cursor up and down (or right and left).
On some models, the contrast can be adjusted by holding in this key and then
pressing either the up or down arrow key to correspondingly adjust the contrast
from light to dark. Once the contrast is set to satisfaction, go to the “Display Config”
screen in the system screen set and perform a “save display config.” The contrast
can be adjusted at any time during operation (without saving), but if the operator
station is powered down, then on powerup it will revert to the last saved contrast
setting.
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 6 of 60
General Setup
2.4 The Keypad
The telephone style keypad located on the right side of the operator station is used
for entering setpoints.
Use the cursor keys to move the cursor to the chosen setpoint area. Then use the
keypad to enter the number.
Entering a number is similar to using a calculator. Once any of the number keys
is pressed, a reverse video setpoint entry area will appear at the lower right corner
of the display. The setpoint entry area will show the proper field size as well as the
number of decimal places.
Numbers will enter from the right and advance to the left as other number keys are
pressed. Once the field is filled, the numbers will stop advancing. Pressing
additional keys will have no effect.
Pressing the backspace key will delete the digits one at a time beginning with the
last digit entered.
Pressing the backspace key before any of the number keys causes the numbers
displayed in the chosen setpoint to also be displayed in the setpoint entry area.
With Version 3.04 or later operator station CPU firmware, this area acts as a buffer
for multiple entry of an identical setpoint.
The plus/minus key is used for bipolar setpoints. Once a significant digit has been
pressed, the plus/minus key can be used to toggle the minus sign on or off. Note
that a plus sign is implied for positive numbers. If no sign appears next to a number,
it is a positive number. If a particular setpoint has been defined as unipolar, the
plus/minus key will not function with that setpoint.
Once the correct number is on display in the setpoint entry area, press the enter
key to move the number to the chosen setpoint area. Once the number is in the
setpoint area, it can be used by the system. Remember to Save changes.
2.5 Machine Function Keys
The displays are equipped with 24 user programmable machine function keys
which can be defined to act as momentary, on/off, toggle or selector switches.
On the Lumitech, OPtima and 41AR/41AZ Lite versions of operator stations, each
of the 24 switches has an associated LED (as shown in the table). On the 41AG Lite
version of operator stations, there are only 5 LEDs. Refer to the table for a list of
definitions used with each standard screen set. Note that if changes have been made
to the standard screen set, these definitions may have been changed. For complete
information on defining machine function keys, consult the Screen Editor Manual.
If the machine function keys are to be used, the CRs assigned to them must be
programmed into the logic program in the same manner as any control relay.
2.6 Insta-Set Port
The Insta-Set port is meant to hold a 32K byte by 8 bit memory cartridge. The
cartridge can be used to store logic programming, screens or recipes.
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 7 of 60
General Setup
Key
Key No. 1
Key No. 2
Key No. 3
Key No. 4
Key No. 5
Key No. 6
Key No. 7
Key No. 8
Key No. 9
Key No. 10
Key No. 11
Key No. 12
Key No. 13
Key No. 14
Key No. 15
Key No. 16
Key No. 17
Key No. 18
Key No. 19
Key No. 20
Key No. 21
Key No. 22
Key No. 23
Key No. 24
Definition
Type
Manual Mode
Close Clamp
Open Clamp
Setup Mode
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Semi-Automatic Mode
Retract (Eject Reverse)
Eject (Forward)
Run Mode
Inject Unit Forward
Inject Unit Back
n/a
n/a
Automatic Mode
n/a
n/a
n/a
Inject (Forward)
Suck Back (Inj Reverse)
Rotate Screw
Silence Mode (Alarms)
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Operator CR (On)
Momentary Switch CR
n/a
n/a
Momentary Switch CR
n/a
n/a
n/a
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
LED CR
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
41AG Control Relay
LED CR
Number
1979
1980
1981
1977
1978
1779
1773
1766
1776
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
1778
1764
1771
1775
1702
1768
n/a
n/a
1777
n/a
n/a
n/a
1767
1770
1774
1784
Table 1.1 Machine Function Key Definitions (Injection screens)
Key
Type
Key No. 1
Key No. 2
Key No. 3
Key No. 4
Key No. 5
Key No. 6
Key No. 7
Key No. 8
Key No. 9
Key No. 10
Key No. 11
Key No. 12
Key No. 13
Key No. 14
Key No. 15
Key No. 16
Key No. 17
Key No. 18
Key No. 19
Key No. 20
Key No. 21
Key No. 22
Key No. 23
Key No. 24
Momentary Switch CR
n/a
Op Sel SW 4, Pos2
n/a
Op Sel SW 1, Pos2
n/a
n/a
Momentary Switch CR
Momentary Switch CR
n/a
Op Sel SW 4, Pos1
n/a
Op Sel SW 1, Pos1
n/a
n/a
Momentary Switch CR
n/a
n/a
Op Sel SW 4, Pos1 (Off)
n/a
Op Sel SW 1, Pos1 (Off)
n/a
n/a
Momentary Switch CR
Definition
Start Drive
n/a
Process Heat
n/a
Auto Cool
n/a
n/a
Acknowledge Alarms
Stop Drive
n/a
Idle Heat
n/a
Manual Cool
n/a
n/a
Print Status Screen
n/a
n/a
Heat Off
n/a
Cooling Off
n/a
n/a
Print SPC Screens
LED CR
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
Lite
Control Relay
LED CR
Number
1979
1980
1981
1977
1978
1753
n/a
1894
n/a
1882
n/a
n/a
1760
1754
n/a
1893
n/a
1881
n/a
n/a
1761
n/a
n/a
1893 (Off)
n/a
1881 (Off)
n/a
n/a
1762
Table 1.2 Machine Function Key Definitions (Extrusion screens)
1640-IN-042-A-07
Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
Page 8 of 60
General Setup
Key
Definition
Type
Key No. 1
Key No. 2
Key No. 3
Key No. 4
Key No. 5
Key No. 6
Key No. 7
Key No. 8
Key No. 9
Key No. 10
Key No. 11
Key No. 12
Key No. 13
Key No. 14
Key No. 15
Key No. 16
Key No. 17
Key No. 18
Key No. 19
Key No. 20
Key No. 21
Key No. 22
Key No. 23
Key No. 24
Momentary Switch
Momentary Switch
Momentary Switch
Momentary Switch
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Momentary Pushbutton
Momentary Pushbutton
Momentary Pushbutton
Momentary Pushbutton
Operator CR (toggle)
Momentary Pushbutton
n/a
n/a
Momentary Pushbutton
n/a
Operator CR (toggle)
Operator CR (toggle)
Momentary Pushbutton
Momentary Pushbutton
Momentary Pushbutton
Momentary Pushbutton
LED CR
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Temp, Zone 1 & 7 Disable
Temp, Enable Outs Zone 1-24
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
41AG Control Relay
LED CR
Number
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
1779
1773
1766
1776
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
1778
1764
1771
1775
1702
1768
n/a
n/a
1777
n/a
1659
1658
1767
1770
1774
1784
1979
1980
1981
1977
1978
Table 1.3 Machine Function Key Definitions (Blow molding screens)
Note that the Machine Function Key Definitions are stored in the User screen set.
Note also that these definitions DO NOT match the key graphics of the 41AG operator station.
n/a means "not applicable" – switch not defined.
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
9
10
12
13
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
15
16
1
2
3
4
5
13
14
15
16
17
18
8
19
20
21
22
23
24
11
14
6
7
41AG
41AR
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
41AZ
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
41AA/41AC/41AM
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Page 9 of 60
General Setup
Figure 3. Display Config
3. Display Configuration
The Display Configuration screen will be similar to the screen shown in Figure 3.
The display configuration screen contains setpoints and switches used to configure the display.
Flash Reload Count (in seconds)
The flash reload count determines the rate at which the cursor flashes. This
setpoint is shipped from the factory set at approximately 0.30 seconds and should
be left somewhere close to that setting. Using a much faster or much slower setting
makes determining the location of the cursor difficult (leave it alone).
Scroll Rate Modes (in seconds)
The scroll rate setpoints determine the rate at which the flashing cursor moves from
one reverse video area to the next when a cursor key is pressed.
The scroll rate mode setpoints provide three “gears” for the scroll rate. When a
cursor key is initially held depressed, the cursor will move at the rate determined
by scroll rate mode 1. Releasing the key and then pressing that key or any other
cursor key will cause the cursor to move at the rate determined by scroll rate mode
2. Releasing the key again and then again pressing that key or any other cursor
key will cause the cursor to move at the rate determined by scroll rate mode 3.
These setpoints are initially shipped from the factory set at approximately 0.20
seconds. Try settings of 0.20; 0.15; and 0.10 for Scroll Rate Mode 1, 2 and 3,
respectively. Note that even if the setpoints are changed, the scroll rates will not
change unless the “Load Scroll Rates” switch is activated.
Scroll Dead Time (in seconds)
The scroll dead time setpoint determines how soon the cursor moves after a cursor
key is pressed. The scroll dead time setpoint is initially shipped from the factory set
at approximately 0.40 seconds (leave as is).
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Page 10 of 60
General Setup
Blank Reload Count (in seconds)
The blank reload count setpoint determines the time between keystrokes before
the display “blanks out.” The minimum setting is 60.00 (seconds). Setting this entry
to zero disables screen blanking (which may cause damage to the display).
This setpoint is initially shipped from the factory set at 600.00 seconds (10
minutes). Settings on the order of 300.00 seconds (5 minutes) might be desirable.
Anything less than 5 minutes could be a nuisance (Don’t mess with fractional
second settings).
Blank Timer (in seconds)
The blank timer value displays the time remaining before the display will blank out.
Each keystroke resets the count to the setpoint.
If the display blanks out, the next keystroke will just cause the display to turn back
on (this prevents setpoints from being accidently changed). The exception to this
is the machine function keys. If a machine function key is pressed while the
display is blanked, not only will the display turn on, but the action of the key occurs.
Keyword Setpoint (not shown on screen)
Beginning with Version 3.02 operator station software, a keyword setpoint was
added to the display configuration setpoints. The keyword function allows users to
create screens (using the screen editor) which can display "keywords" in a variety
of languages. The keyword setpoint determines the language in which keywords
are displayed. Refer to "Keyword Messages" in the OptiGrafix Screen Editor.
Min Security Reload (not shown on screen)
The minimum security reload setpoint is a timer setpoint (in seconds) used to
determine the starting point of a countdown to zero. The minimum setting is 60
seconds; the maximum setting is 655.35 seconds. Each keystroke resets the
count to the setpoint. Once this timer counts to zero, the security level will be set
to the "Timeout Security Level" (see below).
Timeout Security Level
The timeout security level setpoint determines the security level of the system after
the minimum security reload timer setting times out. This setting, along with the
timeout setting above, can be used to prevent an unattended machine from
inadvertently being left at a high security level. The minimum setting is 1 (Level 1)
and the maximum setting is 4 (Level 4).
Shift Path Keys
The shift path keys setpoint will cause the "softkeys" programmed at the bottom
of the screen to move toward the right and the "present screen number" and line
graph "key" to move to the left side of the screen. This setpoint is provided in order
to better align the softkey graphics on 41HC and 41VC operator stations with the
actual soft keys on those operator stations. A non-zero (1 to 4) entry will cause the
shifting to occur.
Disable TimeDate Display
This setpoint will cause the time and date display to not appear on screens. This
setpoint is provided for systems that may not include a real time clock function (like
a MACO DS/RS utilizing a PLC without a real time clock). A non-zero (1 to 4) entry
will cause the time and date to not appear.
Save Display Config
Momentarily enabling this CR causes the setpoints appearing on the Display
Config screen (and the keyword setpoint) to be stored to memory. The setpoints
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General Setup
are used the next time the display is reset or powered. Note that the Line Graph
Limits setpoints are included as part of the display configuration.
Note also that this is the only means of saving the Display Configuration setpoints
(they cannot be saved with a Recipe or Insta-Set no matter how they are
programmed in the screen editor). If the operator station is replaced, these
setpoints (if different from defaults) will have to be re-entered and saved.
In CPU firmware version 3.03 or earlier, the vector screen setpoints and printer
screen setpoints were saved as part of the display configuration. Beginning with
CPU firmware 3.04, these setpoints were changed so that they can be saved as
recipe or machine dependent (they are shipped as "recipe = no, machine = yes"
which will cause them to be saved with an "Insta-Set Save").
Load Display Config
If the display configuration setpoints have been changed, momentarily energizing
this CR will cause the new settings to be used. If this CR is not energized after
changing the setpoints (even though the display shows the new settings), the
display configuration setpoints will remain unchanged. Note that the Line Graph
Limits setpoints are included as part of the display configuration.
Init Display Config
Momentarily enabling this CR causes the display configuration setpoints to return
to their factory default settings. The setpoints must then be saved if they are to be
used after the next powerup or reset. Note that the Line Graph Limits setpoints
are included as part of the display configuration.
Enable ID Display
With this CR enabled, a four byte hexadecimal ID of the reverse video area
highlighted by the cursor will appear in the lower right corner of the display. Note
that Enable ID has priority over Enable Limit if both are on.
The first byte of the ID display identifies the address of the element. 11H is the first
board of a function. 12H would be the second board, etc.
The second byte identifies the function of the element. The functions are as
follows:
FUNCTION
HEX ID
Sequence
01H
Temperature (or T/C-Ana) 02H
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
03H
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana) 04H
Display Handler
20H
Display
25H
Communications
27H
Keyboard
28H
RS232/Printer
30H
RS485 (SPI)
38H
RS485 (Reserved)
39H
RS485 (Host)
3AH
Data Handler
40H
DECIMAL ID
1
2
3
4
32
37
39
40
48
56
57
58
64
The third and fourth bytes together are the hexadecimal identity of a specific
setpoint or CR within the functions shown above (convert the two bytes to their
decimal equivalent and locate the definition in the appropriate modfile.txt file).
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General Setup
Load Scroll Rates
If the scroll rate setpoints have been changed, momentarily energizing this CR will
cause the new settings to be used. If this CR is not energized after changing the
setpoints (even though the display shows the new settings), the scroll rates will
remain unchanged.
Sys Mess As Numbers
With this CR enabled, system messages will be displayed as a number (indicating
the message’s position within the message file. This number will appear in the
lower left corner of the screen. Use this utility if the message "Invalid System
Message" is displayed at any time other than during the loading of screens. "Invalid
System Message" could mean that the system is trying to display a message (from
the system screen message file) which does not exist.
Enable Limit Display
With this CR enabled, the high and low limit of whatever setpoint is highlighted by
the cursor will appear in the lower right corner of the screen (very useful). Note that
Enable ID has priority over Enable Limit if both are on.
Vector Screen 1 - 8
These setpoints (actually "Priority alarm screen 0" through "Priority alarm screen
7") are used to determine which screen will be displayed when a priority alarm
occurs. Vector Screen 1 corresponds to the Sequence modfile Priority Alarm 1
control relay, and so on. If the Priority Alarm 1 CR is energized (CR 2001), the
display will immediately vector to the user screen entered as the setpoint for Vector
Screen 1 (Priority alarm screen 0).
Note that beginning with V2.4 of the Op Station CPU firmware, V3.7 of the Display
modfile, and V2.C of the Sequence modfile, 5 additional setpoints and CRs were
added. To avoid confusion, a complete list is shown below:
Display Modfile
Setpoint
Priority alarm screen 0
Priority alarm screen 1
Priority alarm screen 2
Priority alarm screen 3
Priority alarm screen 4
Priority alarm screen 5
Priority alarm screen 6
Priority alarm screen 7
Priority alarm screen 8
Priority alarm screen 9
Priority alarm screen 10
Priority alarm screen 11
Priority alarm screen 12
Sequence Modfile
Control Relay
Priority Alarm 1
Priority Alarm 2
Priority Alarm 3
Priority Alarm 4
Priority Alarm 5
Priority Alarm 6
Priority Alarm 7
Priority Alarm 8
Priority Alarm 9
Priority Alarm 10
Priority Alarm 11
Priority Alarm 12
Priority Alarm 13
System
Address
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Note that there must be a means of clearing the Priority Alarm CR from the screen
to which it is vectored. If not, the display will remain locked on the vector screen
until the condition causing the alarm has cleared. Beginning with operator station
CPU firmware V3.04, a "Vector to Previous Screen" CR (CR 2018) was added.
Vector Screen 1 has the highest priority. Vector Screen 8 has the lowest priority.
If two alarms occur simultaneously, the display vectors to the highest priority. Once
that CR is cleared, the display will vector to the next existing alarm having the
highest priority, etc.
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General Setup
Vector screens are not affected by security level. If operating at Level 1 and a
priority alarm occurs which is supposed to vector the display to a Level 4 screen,
the display will vector to the Level 4 screen. Once that screen is displayed,
however, the operator will still be constrained to Level 1 security.
Entering a zero for a vector screen setpoint disables that vector screen.
Note that beginning with operator station CPU firmware V3.04, the Vector Screen
setpoints ("Priority Alarm Screen X") have been changed to allow the setpoints to
be saved (as Recipe or Machine dependent).
Printer Screen 1 - 8
These setpoints are used to determine which screens will be printed in the print
block mode. Note that the controller must be equipped with the printer option (an
appropriate RS-232 daughterboard).
Printer Screen 1 corresponds to Print CR 1, and so on. the Print CRs are located
in the Sequence Modfile (System Addresses 2009 - 2016). If Print CR 1 is
energized, the user screen(s) identified by the Printer Screen 1 setpoints (Printer
Screen 1.1 and Printer Screen 2.1) will be printed.
Printer Screen 1 has the highest priority. Printer Screen 8 has the lowest priority.
If print CR’s occur simultaneously, the highest priority screens will be printed first,
followed by the next highest, etc.
The Print Screen Button and the "On Demand" print function for SPC will not work
while these Print CRs are active. ALL operator station keys (except the machine
function keys) will be inactive for 3 seconds during printing. If you page through the
screens during printing and the screen is in the process of being written SCREEN
DATA CAN BE LOST!
A setpoint entry of zero disables a printer screen.
Note that beginning with operator station CPU firmware V3.04, the Printer Screen
setpoints ("Printer Screen 1.1 - 2.8") have been changed to allow the setpoints to
be saved (as Recipe or Machine dependent).
Note that CR 2017 (not included on the screen) is titled "Print Current Screen" and
is used to print whatever screen is presently displayed on the operator station.
Print 16 Screens
Beginning with operator station CPU firmware V3.04, a "Print 16 Screens" control
relay (CR 2019) has been added. Energizing this CR will cause all screens
identified by a print screen setpoint to be printed.
Line Graph Limits Setpoints
Beginning with operator station CPU firmware V3.04, the line graph limit setpoints
(Line Graph 1-4 Minimum and Line Graph 1-4 Maximum) have been changed to
allow the setpoints to be saved (as Recipe or Machine dependent).
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General Setup
260
FUNCTION TYPE ERROR
Figure 4. System Messages
4. System Messages
The System Messages screen (Figure 4) is used to check the occurence of System
Messages. System Messages are used to indicate critical and non-critical faults,
as well as to communicate to the User what is happening within the controller.
The last ten System Messages to occur will be displayed on this screen. The MOST
RECENT System Message will be displayed at the TOP of the list, followed by the
next most recent, and so on. The number to the left of the message is the
message’s position in the message file (in some cases a "blank" message could
be on display). Refer to the troubleshooting section for a list of messages,
definitions and plausible resolutions.
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General Setup
513
266
0
2
0
2
TIME SLOT RUNNING
FUNCTION NOT FOUND
Figure 5. System Monitor
5. System Monitor
The System Monitor screen (Figure 5) is used to help determine the reason for
powerup failures which result in timeslot not running. The screen logs the last 19
errors which have occurred and may have prevented timeslot from starting during
powerup or system reset. Refer to the troubleshooting section for a list of
messages and plausible resolutions.
In addition to the system message and system message number, the screen will
also display the function type (FT) and function member (FM) which caused the
message to be displayed.
Function types are as follows:
1
2
3
4
32
37
39
40
48
56
64
Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Display Handler
Display
Communications
Keyboard
RS232/Printer
RS485
Data Handler
Function member (FM) identifies which board of a particular function caused the
message to be displayed, such as temperature board 1, temperature board 2, etc.
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General Setup
802
0
8
0
0
0
CONTROL SEL TIMEOUT ERROR
Figure 6. Timeslot Monitor
6. Timeslot Error Monitor
The Timeslot Monitor screen (Figure 6) contains information used for troubleshooting timeslot errors. Each of the different modes of timeslot are listed along the
left of the screen:
STS
MTS
STM
STP
PTS
DHTS
RTR
(Sequence-to-Sequence)
(Module-to-Sequence)
(Sequence-to-Module)
(Sequence-to-Panel)
(Panel-to-Sequence)
(Data Handler-to-Sequence)
(Rack-to-Rack)
The Time column indicates the time (in microseconds) to successfully complete
that mode of timeslot (typically varies by 30 to 75 microseconds each cycle).
The Number of Errors column indicates the cumulative number of system errors
within each mode which have occurred since timeslot was started. The grand total
of all errors for all modes is shown as Total # of Errors.
The Last Err Code column displays the error code of the last error to occur in each
mode. The system message corresponding to the error code is also displayed. The
first system message is actual message number 256 (a blank message). Add 256
to the number displayed here and look that number up in the Troubleshooting
section of this manual.
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General Setup
For MTS and STM errors, FT, SLT and SLC are also shown for the last occurrence
of an error in that mode of timeslot. A message relating to the last error will be
displayed on the right side of the screen. Function types (FT) are as follows:
1
2
3
4
32
37
39
40
48
56
57
58
64
Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Display Handler
Display
Communications
Keyboard
RS232/Printer
RS485 (SPI)
RS485 (Reserved)
RS485 (Host)
Data Handler
Slot numbers (SLT) identify a specific card slot within the controller. Slots are
numbered 1-16 from left to right.
Slice (SLC) numbers identify a particular function on a board. If a board has only
one function, it will be slice #0. For the Sequence/Hydraulic board, Sequence is
slice #0 and Hydraulics is slice #1. For communications daughterboards, the lower
location (Slot 1) is slice #0, the middle is slice #1, and the upper (Slot 3) is slice #2.
1
4
1
0
0
0
0 12 12 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Figure 7. Timeslot Configuration
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General Setup
7. Timeslot Configuration
The Timeslot Configuration screen (Figure 7) is used for troubleshooting RLD
errors. Note that this screen is NOT included with (and will NOT function with)
systems equipped with Data Handler firmware earlier than V10.00 or V20.00). The
timeslot configuration screen is used to show which cards have been programmed
into the RLD that is currently loaded into the systems. All of the cards shown on
the screen must be present in order for the system to run.
If an asterisk is displayed to the left of one of the entries appearing on this screen,
the RLD downloaded to the system failed to locate a particular board of some type
which it was expecting to find. This indicates that either the wrong RLD was
mistakenly loaded into the system or that one or more boards are missing from (or
not responding to) the system.
The left-most digit of the display shows the controller number (usually "1").
Function types (FT) are as follows:
1
2
3
4
32
48
56
57
58
64
Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Display Handler
RS232/Printer
RS485 (SPI)
RS485 (Reserved)
RS485 (Host)
Data Handler
Function Member (FM) identifies which board of a particular function is not
responding (e.g., temperature board 1, temperature board 2, etc.).
V30 USER
11/Oct/94
13:11:42
M4000 STANDARD USER
V30
29/Jul/94
07:52:51
MACO System Scrns V01.01
SYS
V02 RLD
V02 RLD
V3.0
15 DEC 94 14:40:00
15 DEC 94 14:40:00
Figure 8. System Headers
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General Setup
8. System File Headers
The System Headers screen (Figure 8) is used to help identify the files being used
by the control system.
User screens, user config, user modfile, system screens, system config, system
modfile, timeslot, and RLD #1 must be present in order for the system to operate.
User SPC labels, user LG (line graph) labels, user math funct, and RLD #2 are all
optional (but must be present in order for the respective function to work).
(Note that LG, math, and RLD #2 are only available with system firmware version
20.XX or later).
The files are identified by their system header, which is automatically generated
(by the screen editor or RLD editor) when the file is created. The header consists
of a version number, a file identifier (screens, config, etc.), and a time and date
stamp which acts to uniquely identify a particular file.
System header version, time and date must match on all user files present.
System header version, time and date must match on all system files present.
System header version, time and date of the system and user files DO NOT have
to match (but they usually do).
User headers are the "application name" from the screen editor. User headers may
contain up to 28 characters. Refer to the screen editor manual for details.
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File Name
(appears on Screens)
DOS File Name
(appears on Computer)
User Screens
User Config
User Modfile
User SPC Labels
User LG Labels
User Math Funct
SCRN_LNK.OBJ
SCRN_CON.OBJ
SCRN_VER.OBJ
SCRN_SPC.OBJ
SCRN_LGR.OBJ
SCRN_MTH.OBJ
System Screens
System Config
System Modfile
SYS_LNK.OBJ
SYS_CON.OBJ
SYS_VER.OBJ
Timeslot Data
RLD #1
RLD #2
TIMESLOT.
RLD_SEQ_.M1
RLD_SEQ_.M2
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General Setup
66583
12150
13700
30032
1160
1268
168
5845
364
32096
Figure 9. File Sizes
9. System File Sizes
The File Sizes screen (Figure 9) is used to compare actual file size to the size of
the space available for that file.
Check this screen before making additions to any of the files listed here. If the
actual file size approaches the maximum, make an effort to eliminate unnecessary
or unused items from the files.
All of the "used" file sizes (except the timeslot data file) should be the same size
as shown on a personal computer when a "DIR" command is performed.
Note that presently, there is no maximum size displayed for the user screens file
or the system screens file. Version 3 or later system software will display the
maximum RLD file size.
The maximum size of the user and system screens files will depend on how much
memory is installed in the operator station (96k, 128k or 224k - Check the model
number of the operator station. A "2" in Field 6 indicates 96k of memory; a "3" in
Field 6 indicates 128k of memory; a "4" in Field 6 indicates 224k of memory). Note
that "1k" in this case equals 1024 bytes.
There is approximately 1k of "overhead" which must be subtracted from the
installed memory size. The "overhead" contains display configuration information.
Installed memory must be greater than:
Overhead + System Screens + User Screens.
So that:
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General Setup
96k
128k
224k
=
=
=
98,304 - 1024
131,072 - 1024
229,376 - 1024
= 97,280 total avail.
= 130,048 total avail.
= 228,352 total avail.
The maximum RLD size will depend on the controller (check the model number):
12-slot Injection (40BX)
12-slot Injection (42XX)
16-slot Injection (45XX)
12-slot Extrusion (50BX)
16-slot Extrusion (55XX)
16-slot Blowmolding (65XX)
4000 instructions
2000 or 4000 instructions
4000 or more instructions
1000 or 2000 instructions
4000 or more instructions
4000 or more instructions
Note that because of differences in individual RLD files, it is not possible to
determine EXACTLY how many instructions are possible for a given system.
Multiply the above number by eight and add 96. The result will approximately equal
the maximum file size (for example, with 4000 instructions, the maximum file size
would be approximately 32,096 bytes).
Note that if RLD #2 is not used, a "Function Not Found" error message will occur.
The RLD #2 values can be removed (using the screen editor) if they are not used.
2
1
4358
4
0
1300
Figure 10. Powerup SP Limits
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General Setup
10. Powerup Setpoint Limits
The Powerup SP Limits screen (Figure 10) is used to identify and correct powerup
setpoint limit errors. Timeslot will not start if a powerup setpoint is out of limits. Any
powerup setpoints which are out of limits will be displayed on this screen.
The screen also lists the setpoints in the system that the boards do not support.
These setpoints would be identified by not showing as out of limits on the screen.
The cause of these errors could be an invalidly programmed setpoint ID or the
inclusion of a setpoint that the software does not support (loading new screens into
a system with older software could cause this to happen).
The function type (FT), function member (FM), ID, low limit, actual setting and high
limit will be displayed for each powerup setpoint which is out of limits. Function
types (FT) are as follows:
1
2
3
4
32
37
39
40
48
56
64
Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Display Handler
Display
Communications
Keyboard
RS232/Printer
RS485
Data Handler
Function member (FM) identifies which board of a particular function caused the
message to be displayed, such as temperature board 1, temperature board 2, etc.
ID is the number that appears in the modfile.
Even though this information positively identifies a particular setpoint, it does not
indicate the screen which contains the setpoint.
Examine the setpoints listed as out of limits. If possible, just energize the “Set to
Minimum” CR. Doing this will set only those powerup setpoints which are out of
limits to their minimum (low) value.
If for some reason it is not advisable to set a particular setpoint to its minimum
value, use the information provided to help locate the setpoint.
There are two methods of locating the setpoint limit errors. The first method is to
use FT, FM and the ID to locate the setpoint in the TEXT files provided with the
modfiles in the screen editor.
The second method is to scroll through the screens on the operator panel until the
out of limits setpoint is found. Do this:
1. Scroll through the screens on the operator panel (pausing just long enough for
the screen to "write") until the system message "SETPOINT LIMIT ON
SCREEN" (#349) is displayed.
2. Once the screen is discovered, page up/down onto it. Watch carefully as the
screen writes itself on the display. The out of limit setpoint should be the last
setpoint to appear on the screen (it will not appear in the normal left-right, topbottom manner).
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General Setup
3. If the setpoint is not immediately visible, go to the display configuration screen
(in the system screen set). Activate the "Enable Limit Display."
4. Return to the screen with the setpoint limit error.
5. Scroll through each setpoint on the screen. Pause long enough for the high limit
(HL) and low limit (LL) to be displayed.
6. Compare each setpoint with the displayed limits.
7. Make a valid entry for the setpoint or edit the screen (using the screen editor)
to modify the setpoint limits.
8. Return to the powerup setpoint limits screen and make certain the setpoint is
within limits.
Once all the powerup setpoints are within limits, go to the System Control screen
(Figure 13) and energize “Save Setpoints.” Once the setpoints are saved, energize
“Reset System.” Return to the powerup setpoint limits screen and make certain all
setpoints are now within limits.
2
1
4353
0
1400
1300
Figure 11. Transfer SP Limits
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General Setup
11. Recipe Setpoint Limits
The Transfer SP Limits screen (Figure 11) is used to identify setpoint limit errors
encountered during recipe (or Insta-Set) transfers to the Active recipe.
Those setpoints that are out of limits will not be loaded into the system (and the
setpoint will remain as it was before the transfer occurred).
Any extra setpoints contained in the recipe (but not in the system) will not be loaded
into the system and will not be listed on this screen.
The list appearing on this screen will be cleared once another recipe (or Insta-Set)
is started.
The function type (FT), function member (FM), identifier (ID), low limit, out of limit
setpoint, and high limit will be displayed for each setpoint that would have been out
of limits were it loaded into the system. Use FT, FM and the ID to locate the setpoint
in the TEXT files provided with the modfiles in the screen editor. Function types
(FT) are as follows:
1
2
3
4
32
37
39
40
48
56
57
58
64
Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Display Handler
Display
Communications
Keyboard
RS232/Printer
RS485 (SPI)
RS485 (Reserved)
RS485 (Host)
Data Handler
Function member (FM) identifies which board of a particular function caused the
message to be displayed, such as temperature board 1, temperature board 2, etc.
ID is the number appearing in the modfile.
Once all the recipe setpoints are within limits, go to the System Control screen
(Figure 13) and energize “Save Setpoints.” Once the setpoints are saved, energize
“Reset System.” Return to the recipe setpoint limits screen to make certain all
setpoints are within limits. Go to the Product Recipe screen and do a "Copy InstaSet" or "Copy Recipe" (to save the setpoints to the Recipe).
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General Setup
1
3
0
0
2
48
1
1
1
2
01
01
0H
0H
TEMPERATURE
RS-232 PORT
Figure 12. Module Search
12. Module Information
The Module Search screen (Figure 12) is used to list identifying information about
all of the modules within the controller. Slot numbers (SLT) identify a specific card
slot within the controller. Slots are numbered 1-16 from left to right. Slice (SLC)
numbers identify a particular function on a board. If a board has only one function,
it will be slice #0. For the Seq/Hydraulic board, Sequence is slice #0 and Hydraulics
is slice #1. For communications daughterboards, the lower location (Slot 1) is slice
#0, the middle is slice #1, and the upper (Slot 3) is slice #2.
Function types (FT) are as follows:
1
2
3
4
27
28
29
30
31
32
37
39
40
48
56
57
58
64
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Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Analog I/O (Hdwre)
AC Input board (Std & High Density)
AC Output board (Std & High Density)
24 or 32 DC I/O Combo or DC Input board (Std & High Density)
Analog Out or DC Output board (Std & High Density)
Display Handler
Display
Communications
Keyboard
RS232/Printer
RS485 (SPI)
RS485 (Reserved)
RS485 (Host)
Data Handler
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General Setup
Function member (FM) identifies which board of a particular function caused the
message to be displayed, such as temperature board 1, temperature board 2, etc.
Version (VER) and revision (REV) identify the firmware used in that module.
Special (SPL) indicates non standard firmware is being used in the module. Field
(FLD) indicates field test software is being used in the module.
If a module error has been generated by a particular module, the error code
(actually the system message number in hexadecimal) will be displayed here (see
"System Message Definitions" in the troubleshooting section of this manual).
If the source of the error has been corrected or it is thought that the error will not
repeat itself, energize the “Clear Errors” CR and observe the screen. If the error
does not repeat, the problem may be solved. If the error returns, further troubleshooting will be necessary. Note that "Clear Errors" will not restart timeslot if it was
off (the system must be reset or repowered if timeslot was off).
Figure 13. System Control
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General Setup
13. System Control
The System Control screen (Figure 13) is used for a variety of system commands.
Save Setpoints
Energizing this area saves all active setpoints (to the Powerup recipe).
Beginning with Version 20.x6 Data Handler firmware, the powerup setpoints and
internal recipes are saved in the non-volatile battery RAM on the Data Handler
board. The save setpoints operations are performed faster and the operator
station will continue to update the screen while a save setpoint or recipe transfer
operation is in process. Math functions also continue to operate during a save
setpoint or recipe transfer operation.
Also beginning with Version 20.x6 Data Handler firmware, the powerup setpoints
are saved in two different and redundant areas. If power to the system is lost during
a save setpoints function, the second set of setpoints will still be valid. On
subsequent powerup, the system will use the valid set of setpoints. If power is lost
during the save process, the setpoints that get loaded to the system on powerup
could be either the latest setpoints or the prior set of setpoints. If one of the areas
is invalid, a save setpoints function will be initiated on powerup or reset in order to
correct the setpoints. This multiple storage of setpoints is done only with the
powerup setpoints and is NOT done with the internal recipes.
The Powerup setpoints stored in the non-volatile battery RAM will be cleared by
the system when screens are loaded into the system. On system reset, a save
setpoints function will automatically occur in order to write the setpoints into the
battery RAM.
This multiple storage of powerup setpoints occurs in the battery RAM on Data
Handler assemblies A-60010-0xx and A-60010-1xx. There is no battery RAM on
Data Handler assembly A-60010-2xx, therefore the second set of setpoints is
saved to the EEPROM. This storage in the EEPROM comes at the loss of 10
internal recipe storage blocks. A DIP switch on the A-60010-2xx Data Handler
must be set in order to enable the function. Once enabled, the function is latched
in by the presence of the alternate setpoint area and cannot be removed unless
the EEPROM is changed.
If switch number 4 of S1 on the Data Handler is depressed to the OFF side, then
the function is disabled. If switch number 4 is depressed to the ON side, then the
function is enabled. The function will not enable if the last ten (55-64) recipe blocks
are used by the internal recipes. If the number of recipe blocks does not change
to 54 whenthe DIP switch is set, then the blocks need to be freed up. This is done
by copying the internal recipes to a cartridge and then deleting the recipes from the
internal area. Once the system is powered down or reset, the function will be
enabled and the recipes can then be copied back to the system.
Restore Setpoints
Energizing this area causes all active setpoints to return to their last SAVED
setting. Say, for example, that some bright young engineer decides to manually
tune the machine. Instead of improving performance, every change results in
worse parts than before. Finally, the engineer gives up and calls over a technician
who then energizes the “Restore Setpoints” area. The tuning constants, along with
any other changed setpoints, return to the last SAVED setting.
Note that the example above does NOT apply to auto-tuned temperature tuning
constants since that data is saved in battery-backed RAM on the temperature card.
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Disable Outputs
Energizing this area will cause ALL outputs in the system to be disabled (the
message beneath the reverse video area will indicate the status).
6.0
WARNING:
Disabling the outputs does NOT turn OFF power to the outputs. Hazardous power
is still present at the output terminals and at the load.
DO NOT rely on disabled outputs if working on a machine. Make certain all power
is off before servicing!
WARNING!
Disabling the outputs does NOT turn OFF power to the outputs. Hazardous
power is still present at the output terminals and at the load.
DO NOT rely on disabled outputs when working on the
machine. Make certain ALL power is OFF before servicing!
Enable Outputs
During normal system operation, all outputs are enabled on powerup. Use this
area to toggle the disable outputs function above. Note that enabling the outputs
does NOT turn the outputs on, but only makes it possible for the outputs to be
turned on by the control algorithm (and sequence logic program).
Reset System
Enabling this area causes the controller (NOT the display - see "Display Config")
to go through its powerup routine. Powerup setpoints will be reloaded. Error codes
will be cleared. If a critical error has shut down timeslot, correcting the error and
resetting the system will allow timeslot to restart. Note that this is the only way to
restart timeslot (other than cycling power to the controller).
Stop Timeslot
Enabling this area causes timeslot to be turned off. Timeslot must be off when
downloading to the system. Once downloading is completed, reset the system (or
cycle power to the controller) to restart timeslot.
Save Hardware Setup
If for some reason it was necessary to change the hardware in the system, either
by adding a board or replacing a malfunctioning board, it may be necessary to save
the hardware setup. If a hardware setup error occurs, check the module information screen. Make certain the screen agrees with the actual system hardware. If
the two do not agree, make the correction and save the hardware setup.
Security
On powerup or system reset, security will be at the default level (Level 1). Security
levels are established when programming screens. See the Screen Editor Manual
for default security codes and specific information about creating or changing
security codes.
Enter a valid security code for the security level desired. The setpoint entry area
at the lower right corner of the screen will display an asterisk for each character
entered. Use the plus/minus key for any dashes contained in the security code.
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Pressing the Enter key will cause the security level to change to the level indicated.
Level 1 is the lowest security level. Operating at Level 1 allows the least access
to the controller.
Level 5 is the highest user security level. Operating at Level 5 allows the most
access to the controller.
Only screens with a security level equal to or less than the operating security level
will be accessible.
If operating at Security Level 1, only Security Level 1 screens (or Paths) appear.
If operating at Security Level 2, only Security Level 1 & 2 screens (or Paths) appear.
If operating at Security Level 3, only Security Level 1, 2 & 3 screens (or Paths)
appear.
If operating at Security Level 4 or 5, Security Level 1, 2, 3 & 4 screens (or Paths)
appear.
Multi-rack Operation and System Commands
The special function (system) commands in the system screen sets provided with
a multi-rack controller have their "Controller Number" ("Rack") set to "0," which is
the broadcast address. This address causes these commands to be performed at
the same time by all controllers in the system. Note that the broadcast address
should only be used for the special functions, which are:
Save Setpoints
Restore Setpoints
Disable Outputs
Enable Outputs
Reset System
Stop Timeslot
Save Hardware Setup
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Figure 14. RS-232
Note: If an RS-485 daughterboard is used, the "COMM 3 BAUD" setpoint must be added (from the RS-485
modfile) if all baud rates are to be available. If no baud rate setpoint is added to either the System or User
screen set (NOT in both), RS-485 operation will be limited to the default 9600 baud rate.
14. Serial Communications Setup
Note that even though use of a Parallel Printer and Converter Box are described
here, the simplest, most reliable means of downloading or printing is to use a
DEDICATED SERIAL PRINTER. Adding cables or components (i.e., converter
boxes) increases the risk of communications problems. Likewise, connecting and
disconnecting a printer, changing settings, etc., means that eventually something
will not be properly connected.
The RS-232 screen (Figure 14) is used to setup serial communications for the
system. This controller can have as many as three separate external devices
connected for use with serial communications. Daughterboards purchased for the
communications motherboard determine what type of device can be connected.
The COMM setpoints correspond to daughterboard locations on the motherboard:
COMM 1 is the bottom slot. COMM 2 is the middle slot. COMM 3 is the upper slot.
Examine the communications motherboard and determine the type and location
of whatever daughterboards are present (numbers are plainly marked on the
board). There are two different types of RS-232 daughterboards:
A-13405-00X
For communications (file transfer and Cimac 8000 Host Communications).
A-13405-10X or A-60055
For communications and printer functions (Screen Printouts and SPC Reports).
Enter a setpoint for each daughterboard. An RS-485 device requires a setpoint of
8 or 9. An RS-232 device requires a setpoint of 0, 1 or 2.
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Enter a baud rate setpoint for each device. The baud rate must match that of the
connected device. Note that for file transfer (screens, RLD, etc.), big files and fast
computers may cause problems (don’t use 19,200 for file transfer – if there are
problems with 9600, try 4800).
Some versions of the file transfer program (on the computer) contain a "Set
Timeout Delay" submenu. Make an appropriate selection of the computer clock
speed before beginning the transfer to the system. Beginning with Version 4.0 of
the transfer program, the proper timeout delay is automatically chosen.
The port control relays listed at the bottom of the screen indicate the status of any
ongoing communications. For RS-232 devices an asterisk will indicate the status
of each line. For RS-485 devices a “T” or an “R” will indicate direction (transmit or
receive) and an asterisk will indicate if data is actually being transmitted or received
(these are not “real time” indicators - they are meant only to show that communication is taking place).
Reset RS-232
If for some reason file transfer communications “hang up” or time out, energizing
this area will reset communications without interrupting the controller (DON’T use
this for printer reset - see “Clear Print”).
It is good practice to “Reset RS-232” before initiating any file transfer activity,
especially when connecting devices or powering up connected devices.
Printer Setup
If a printer is to be used, the following setpoint entries are also required. Make
certain the proper daughterboard is available and enter a setpoint of “2” (printer)
for that location on the motherboard.
If the message in the lower right corner of the screen is “Printer option NOT
available,” the proper daughterboard is missing. See controller installation and
wiring for an explanation of daughterboard locations.
Make certain the baud rate setpoint matches the baud rate of the printer or
converter (see Appendix A).
Enter a screens per page setpoint of one or two (two almost fill a sheet of paper
- note that this setpoint applies only to “print screen” situations and does not effect
SPC printing).
Printer Type
Enter a printer type setpoint: 0 for 9-Pin dot matrix; 1 for 24-Pin dot matrix. A 9 pin
dot matrix printer is relatively inexpensive, but some users prefer the higher quality
of a 24 pin dot matrix (at a slightly higher cost).
Refer to Appendix A for a list of compatible printers, as
well as switch settings and cable requirements.
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Clear Printer
If for some reason the print function “hangs up” or times out (or the printer cable
is disconnected), use the following procedure to reinitiate printing:
1. Turn OFF power to the printer until the "Printer Not Ready" message appears
on the screen (this takes approximately 10 seconds). DO NOT momentarily
cycle power to the printer.
2. Press the RESET button on the converter (if used).
3. Connect the printer cable (if necessary).
3. Turn ON power to the printer and wait until the "Printer Ready" message
appears on the screen (this takes approximately 2 seconds).
4. Energize the “Clear Print” area on the screen.
It is good practice to reset the converter and “Clear Print” before initiating any
printer activity, especially when connecting devices or powering up connected
devices. A form feed should occur when “Clear Print” is activated. The form feed
acts as an indication that printing is functioning properly. Note that Data Handler
firmware version 02.X6 (or V20.XX) and Printer firmware version 02.02 contain
new printout instructions. With these versions installed, the system will display a
"Printer Ready" system message to indicate all is well (or "Printer Not Ready").
Refer to 1640-MF-123-0-xx for information on floppy disk operation.
100 Robert Slickman, Inc.
9
08/06/93
09:17:25
Recipe
Figure 15. Cartridge Transfer
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15. Cartridge Transfer
IMPORTANT:
Screen set cartridges written with V3.02 Op Station firmware or RLD cartridges
spanning more than one cartridge and written with V3.02 Op Station firmware must
NOT be used in an operator station containing V3.01 or earlier firmware.
The Cartridge Transfer screen (Figure 15) is used to transfer files or recipes to or
from a cartridge. Note that there are no paths leading directly to this screen. Either
“page down” one screen from the Product Recipe screen or ‘page up” two screens
from the System Control screen. Three headings appear across the top of the
screen: Customer ID; Time/Date; and File Type. The information displayed under
these headings is read from the cartridge.
The files that may be contained on a cartridge are divided into four different groups:
RLD; System Screens; User Screens; and Recipes. These four groups should
each be maintained on SEPARATE cartridges.
RLD
A cartridge used for RLD must contain two different files: a Timeslot data file and
an RLD file.
The Timeslot data file and the RLD file MUST occupy the first two file positions (100
and 101) on a cartridge. Performing an “Initialize Cartridge” will remove any
previously saved files (of any type) from the cartridge and assure that the first two
file positions are empty.
RLD to Cartridge
Note that before transferring RLD to cartridge, Timeslot MUST be Off.
Go to the System Control screen and stop Timeslot.
Once a cartridge has been inserted (and file position 100 and 101 are determined
to be empty), pressing “RLD to Cartridge” will copy both the Timeslot Data file and
the RLD file to the cartridge. "Transfer Not Allowed" indicates the positions are
already occupied.
If the first cartridge does run out of space, the message “Insert Cartridge” will
appear at the bottom of the screen. Simply remove the first cartridge, insert a
second (initialized) cartridge and press “Continue Transfer.”
If the cartridge is not blank, first activate "Initialize Cartridge" and then "Continue
Transfer."
RLD to System (Controller)
Note that before transferring RLD to the controller, Timeslot MUST be Off.
Go to the System Control screen and stop Timeslot.
Insert the cartridge containing the RLD and TImeslot files (check for these files
under file type) and press “RLD to System.”
If the RLD file does happen to extend to a second cartridge, the message “Insert
Cartridge” will appear at the bottom of the screen. Simply remove the first cartridge,
insert the second and press "Continue Transfer."
System Screens
A cartridge used for System Screens must contain three different files: a System
Modfile file; a System Configuration file; and a System Screens file.
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These three files MUST occupy the first three file positions (100, 101 and 102) on
a cartridge. Additional file numbers may be required for future files.
Performing an “Initialize Cartridge” will remove any previously saved files (of any
type) from the cartridge and assure that the needed file positions are empty.
System Screens to Cartridge
Note that before transferring System Screens to cartridge,Timeslot MUST be Off.
Go to the System Control screen and stop Timeslot.
Once a cartridge has been inserted (and the needed file positions are determined
to be empty), pressing “System Screens to Cartridge” will copy the System Modfile
file; the System Configuration file and the System Screens file to the cartridge.
"Transfer Not Allowed" indicates the positions are already occupied.
If the System Screen set has been substantially expanded, a second cartridge may
be required.
If the first cartridge does run out of space, the message “Insert Cartridge” will
appear at the bottom of the screen. Simply remove the first cartridge, insert the
second (initialized) cartridge and press “Continue Transfer.”
If the cartridge is not blank, first activate "Initialize Cartridge" and then "Continue
Transfer."
System Screens to System (Controller)
Note that before transferring Screens to the controller, Timeslot MUST be Off.
Go to the System Control screen and stop Timeslot.
Insert the cartridge containing the System Modfile file, the System Configuration
file and the System Screens file (check for these files under file type) and press
“System Screens to System.”
If the System Screens file does happen to extend to a second cartridge, “Insert
Cartridge” will appear at the bottom of the screen. Simply remove the first cartridge,
insert the second and press “Continue Transfer.”
User Screens
A cartridge for User Screens must contain four different files: a User Modfile file;
a User Configuration file; an SPC Labels file (if present); and a User Screens file.
These files MUST occupy the first four positions (100, 101,102 and 103) on a
cartridge. Additional file numbers may be required for future files.
Performing an “Initialize Cartridge” will remove any previously saved files (of any
type) from the cartridge and assure that the needed file positions are empty.
User Screens to Cartridge
Note that before transferring Screens to cartridge, Timeslot MUST be Off.
Go to the System Control screen and stop Timeslot.
Once a cartridge has been inserted (and the needed file positions are determined
to be empty), pressing “User Screens to Cartridge” will copy the User Modfile file;
the User Configuration file; the SPC Labels file (if present); and User Screens file
to the cartridge. "Transfer Not Allowed" indicates that the positions are already
occupied.
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If the first cartridge runs out of space, the message “Insert Cartridge” will appear
at the bottom of the screen. Simply remove the first cartridge, insert the second
(initialized) cartridge and press “Continue Transfer.”
If the cartridge is not blank, first activate "Initialize Cartridge" and then "Continue
Transfer."
User Screens to System (Controller)
Note that before transferring Screens to the controller, Timeslot MUST be Off.
Go to the System Control screen and stop Timeslot.
Insert the cartridge containing the User Modfile file, the User Configuration file, the
SPC Labels file (if present) and the User Screens file (check for these files under
file type) and press “User Screens to System.”
If the User Screens file happens to extend to a second cartridge, the message
“Insert Cartridge” will appear at the bottom of the screen. Simply remove the first
cartridge, insert the second and press “Continue Transfer.”
Recipes
Normally Recipes are copied or saved using the Product Recipe Transfer screen.
The ability to copy or delete Recipes has been included on this screen mainly to
create room on the cartridge for other files. Check the "File Type" header to
determine whether the file is a recipe or an Insta-Set.
Initializing Cartridges
New cartridges MUST be initialized before using. Initializing used cartridges will
remove all files from the cartridge. “Delete Recipe” can be used to remove ANY
individual files from a cartridge.
With Version 20.X4 of the Data Handler firmware, the size of the user configuration file was
increased in order to allow for more setpoints to be used in each controller (in order to provide space
for the up to 12 temperature cards). This resulted in the movement of internal recipes.
On powerup, the system detects the location of the internal recipes. If they are detected at the old
location, the memory map will be set to that location and internal recipes will continue to be stored
there. The user configuration will be limited to a maximum of 24,572 bytes.
If the internal recipes are not found at the old location, the memory map will be set to store internal
recipes at the new location. The user configuration will be limited to a maximum of 28,060 bytes.
If the system is updated to use the new memory map, internal recipes must be copied to cartridge
and deleted from internal. On system reset or powerup, the new memory map will then be used.
Figure 16.1 Changes to the Internal Memory Map
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Abort
This command is used to end a failed attempt at transfer (not enough room, bad
cartridge, etc.).
Continue Transfer
This command is used if a second cartridge is required in order to complete a
transfer. The message “Insert Cartridge” will appear at the bottom of the screen.
Insert the second cartridge and press “Continue Transfer.”
Multi-rack and Cartridges
When a recipe is copied to a cartridge, there will be an entry generated for each
controller in the system. These entries must be located on the cartridge in
consecutive order. Data is read from the first controller and saved, then data is read
from the second controller and saved, etc. The recipe will not be copied to the
cartridge unless the recipes from all the controllers in the system fit on that
cartridge (use a blank cartridge).
When a recipe is copied from a cartridge back to the system, it is copied in reverse
order (the recipe of the last controller is copied first, etc.). It may be easier to tell
when the transfer is complete if the Blk/Sb for each controller is located on the
recipe transfer screen.
Recipes for secondary racks of a multi-rack control system cannot be deleted
individually. When the recipe for the first rack is deleted, recipes for the other racks
will automatically be deleted at the same time.
Refer to 1640-MF-123-0-xx for information on floppy disk operation.
Figure 16.2 Product Recipe
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16. Recipe Transfer
IMPORTANT:
Screen set cartridges written with V3.02 Op Station firmware or RLD cartridges
spanning more than one cartridge and written with V3.02 firmware must NOT be
used in an operator station containing V3.01 or earlier Op Station firmware.
The Product Recipe screen (Figure 16.2) is used to copy recipes to and from the
controller and cartridges.
Recipes
There are four different places within the controller where setpoints may reside.
The first is the Powerup recipe. These are the setpoints loaded into the system
when power is applied.
The second is the Internal recipes. These are the working recipes or setups saved
away for future use.
The third is the Cartridge recipes. These are also working recipes or setups saved
away (on cartridge) for future use.
The fourth is the Active recipe. These are the setpoints currently being used by the
system (and currently being displayed on the screens).
Note that recipes (or Insta-Sets) can be copied:
FROM Active TO Cartridge
or
FROM Internal TO Cartridge
or
FROM Cartridge TO Active
or
FROM Internal TO Active
or
FROM Active TO Internal
but NOT:
FROM Cartridge TO Internal
Saving Setpoints
There are two different formats for saving setpoints and control relays (refer to
Figure 16.3).
The first is to "Copy Insta-Set." Doing a Copy Insta-Set saves all (machine
dependent and recipe dependent) setpoints in the system. Those setpoints that
are not machine dependent or recipe dependent will NOT be saved (they will keep
the setting determined at screen editing time).
The second is to "Copy Recipe." Doing a Copy Recipe SP's saves ONLY the
Recipe dependent setpoints.
Setpoints are set to recipe dependent and/or machine dependent (they can be
both or neither) using the Screen Editor. Recipe dependent refers to a setpoint
which has been designated as relating directly to the mold being used. Examples
of recipe dependent setpoints would be temperature setpoints, ram positions and
injection pressures and flows. There is also a group of control relays (Setup CR's
1785-1824) which are considered recipe dependent.
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Machine dependent refers to a setpoint which has been designated as relating to
the machine and is independent of the mold being used. Examples of these
machine dependent setpoints would be sensor lengths, pressure ranges, sensor
calibration, temperature tuning, and cycle times. There is also a group of control
relays (CR’s1825 - 1848) which is considered machine dependent.
7.0
WARNING:
Stop the machine and turn OFF the pumps or drives BEFORE any recipe transfers
are attempted. It is likely that loading a new recipe into the system will cause the
position setpoints for clamp, ram and ejectors to change. Depending on what part
of its cycle the machine is in, the clamp or screw might move unexpectedly and
cause serious injury or death (or damage to the machine).
Multi-rack and Recipes
Each controller of a multi-rack system maintains its own set of internal recipes.
When the command is given to save to internal or read from internal, each of the
controllers begins the operation at the same time. Recipes will not be copied to the
internal area unless each of the controllers in the system has room enough
available for their respective recipe.
Part Number Setpoint
The Data Handler modfile now contains a setpoint ("PART NUMBER") that can be
added to the end of a recipe title and powerup title. In order to work, the setpoint
must be included in the system and have a non-zero entry. The entered number
will be placed in the last five character positions of the user entered recipe title (limit
titles to 24 alpha characters). This setpoint requires V20.x6 Data Handler firmware.
Setpoints with:
Recipe Dependent = YES
Machine Dependent = NO
Setpoints with:
Recipe Dependent = NO
Machine Dependent = YES
Setpoints with:
Recipe Dependent = YES
Machine Dependent = YES
Setup Control Relays 1825 - 1848
Setup Selector Switches 1849 - 1880
Setup Control Relays 1785 - 1824
These are saved with a "Copy Recipe"
These are saved with a "Copy Insta-Set"
Setpoints with:
Recipe Dependent = NO
Machine Dependent = NO
Momentary Switch CRs 1753 - 1784
Momentary Switch CRs 1913 - 1944
Operator CRs 1657 - 1752
Operator Selector Switches 1881 - 1912*
These are NOT saved
* Beginning with V20.x6 Data Handler firmware, a method was added for saving these CRs. Refer to the Data
Handler Programming section (1640-IN-034-0-XX).
Figure 16.3 Copy Insta-Set
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Figure 16.4 Edit Title
How to Create a Powerup Recipe
Powerup setpoints are those setpoints which will automatically be loaded into the
system on powerup or on system reset. Move the blinking cursor to “Save All SP’s”
(in the Powerup SP’s area) and press enter. After a short period of time, the system
message “Setpoints Saved” will appear.
Restoring Powerup Setpoints
It is possible to reload the powerup setpoints to the system without cycling power.
(If for some reason someone has changed a number of setpoints and the machine
is no longer working as well as it had been.)
Restoring setpoints will reload all setpoints which were in the system when the last
powerup recipe was SAVED. Restoring setpoints also loads all of the Setup CRs
and switches which were in the system when the last powerup recipe was SAVED.
Counters will NOT be cleared. Operator CRs #1657 through #1752 will NOT be
cleared. Operator Selector Switches #1881 through #1912 will NOT be cleared.
(Performing a System Reset WOULD clear the counters and the CRs.) Do this:
Move the blinking cursor to “Restore All SP’s” (in the Powerup SP’s area) and press
enter. After a short time, the system message “Setpoints Restored” will appear.
Saving Recipes (or Insta-Sets)
1. Go to the “Edit Title” screen (Figure 16.4).
2. If the displayed title is okay, skip to step 4.
3. Change the displayed title as desired (up to 29 characters).
a) Use the Left and Right functions (softkeys) to move the up arrow to the
character that is to be changed.
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b) Use "Scroll Up" or "Scroll Down" to scroll through the character set (use
"Up" or "Down" to move through the character set one character at a time).
If scrolling, press enter to stop scrolling.
c) Press the enter key to enter the new character.
d) Repeat as necessary. Once the title is correct, move the blinking cursor
to the “Accept Changes” area and press enter.
4. Return to the "Product Recipe” screen.
5. Activate the “Next” and “Prev” functions at the bottom of the screen to view
more recipes than can be displayed on a single screen. Displayed recipes will
change five at a time. Look for an unused recipe (a number that does not have
a title and date displayed to the right).
6. Set the “From” setpoint to zero.
7. Set the “To” setpoint to the number of an unused recipe. Numbers 1-60 are for
internal recipes (stored in the Data Handler board) and numbers 100-139 are
for cartridge recipes (stored in a cartridge). The message "Recipe Already
Exists" will be displayed if attempting to copy to an occupied file.
Note that a recipe can ONLY be copied to an empty recipe (an unused number).
If a recipe number is currently used, it must first be deleted before the transfer can
be performed.
8. If ALL setpoints (machine dependent and recipe dependent) are to be saved,
activate the "Copy Insta-Set" function. If ONLY the recipe dependent setpoints
are to be saved, activate the “Copy Recipe” function.
9. Wait for the recipe transfer to be completed. Do NOT remove the cartridge until
the transfer is complete. The transfer is complete when the message "RECIPE
TRANSFER COMPLETE" (or another error message) appears at the bottom
of the screen.
For a transfer to cartridge, the transfer is complete when the "Blk" (block) and "Sb"
(sub-block) numbers return to the value "99".
10. The new recipe title and present time/date will be displayed at the destination
recipe on the screen.
Copying a Recipe from Internal to a Cartridge
1. Go to the "Product Recipe" screen.
2. Activate the “Next Internal” and “Prev Internal” functions at the bottom of the
screen to view more recipes than can be displayed on a single screen.
Displayed recipes will change five at a time. Locate the recipe to be loaded into
the cartridge.
3. Set the "From" setpoint to the number of the recipe to be loaded into the
cartridge (1 - 60).
4. Set the "To" setpoint to an unused cartridge recipe number (100 - 139).
5. If the recipe is an Insta-Set (contains both machine dependent and recipe
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dependent setpoints), activate the "Copy Insta-Set" function. If the recipe is a
Recipe (contains only recipe dependent setpoints), activate the "Copy Recipe"
function. A "FILE TYPE ERROR" may be displayed if the wrong function
is activated. For example, the system may not allow an "internal" Insta-Set to
be copied to a cartridge using the "Copy Recipe" function.
6. Wait for the recipe transfer to be completed. Do NOT remove the cartridge until
the transfer is complete. The transfer is complete when the message "FILE
TRANSFER COMPLETE" (or another error message) appears at the bottom
of the screen.
7. The recipe title and the time/date the recipe was copied will be displayed for the
destination recipe of the cartridge on the screen.
Loading a Recipe (or Insta-Set) into the System
1. Go to the "Product Recipe" screen.
2. Activate the “Next” and “Prev” functions at the bottom of the screen to view
more recipes than can be displayed on a single screen. Displayed recipes will
change five at a time. Locate the recipe to be loaded into the system.
3. Set the “From” setpoint to the number of the recipe to be loaded into the system.
4. Set the “To” setpoint to zero (the system only allows recipe transfers to the
system through the "Active" recipe).
5. If the recipe is an Insta-Set (contains both machine dependent and recipe
dependent setpoints), activate the “Copy Insta-Set” function. If the recipe is a
Recipe (contains only recipe dependent setpoints), activate the “Copy Recipe”
function. A "FILE TYPE ERROR" may be displayed if the wrong function
is activated. For example, the system may not allow an "internal" Insta-Set to
be copied to a cartridge using the "Copy Recipe" function.
6. Wait for the recipe transfer to be completed. Do NOT remove the cartridge until
the transfer is complete. The transfer is complete when the message "RECIPE
TRANSFER COMPLETE" (or another error message) appears at the bottom
of the screen.
For a transfer to cartridge, the transfer is complete when the "Blk" (block)
and "Sb" (sub-block) numbers return to the value "99". If errors occur, go to the
"Recipe Setpoint Limits" screen to see which setpoints did not transfer.
7. The new recipe title and the present time/date will be displayed at the
destination recipe on the screen.
Deleting Recipes
Old or unwanted recipes (or Insta-Sets) can be deleted from the system. Note that
there is no way of recovering a recipe or Insta-Set once it has been deleted.
Deleting a recipe (or Insta-Set) is a two-step process:
1. Enter the recipe (or Insta-Set) number in “Delete Recipe” and press enter.
2. Move the cursor to “Delete Recipe” and press enter. Wait for the recipe to be
deleted. The process is complete when the message "RECIPE DELETE
COMPLETE" appears or the title, time/date have been erased from the screen.
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General Setup
Figure 17.1 Clock
17. Real Time Clock
The Clock screen (Figure 17.1) is used to set the real time clock. The real time clock
is used to display time (in the lower left corner of screens); to activate control
functions based on time; and to time/date stamp screen printouts and recipes.
Note that there is a setpoint available in the Data Handler modfile ("Date Format
0=US, 1=Eur") which can be programmed to this screen (using the screen editor)
and used to display time on the screen in either the US format (0= mm/dd/yy) or
the European format (1= dd/mm/yy).
To set the clock, first set Run/Set to "1." Enter the time and date (hours are set zero
to 23). Enter a number for month and weekday (as shown on the screen). Restart
the clock by setting the Run/Set setpoint to "0."
The Time of Day screen (Figure 17.2) shows the 12 time of day setpoints that can
be used to activate time based events. The screen is divided into two separate
groups. Group one contains 4 setpoints, each of which have four entries (day,
hour, minutes, and seconds). Group two contains 8 setpoints, each of which has
two entries; a unit and then a setpoint for the unit chosen.
Time of Day Timer
Each time of day timer has a corresponding CR which can be tested in the logic
program and then used to activate an output function. The CRs will energize when
the real time clock reaches the setpoint and deenergize when the clock no longer
matches the setpoint. For example, time of day timer #1 can be set up to activate
for one minute on every Monday at 8:30 am by entering the following setpoints:
Weekday
Hour
Minutes
Seconds
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=
=
=
2
8
30
99
(unused)
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Figure 17.2 Time of Day (User Screen Set)
Figure 18. CR Access (User Screen Set - Blow molding version shown)
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18. I/O and Control Relay Status
The CR Access screen (Figure 18) allows access to CRs to permit examination of
their status (energized or deenergized ). The energized state is indicated by an (*).
To call up a particular CR with a System Address (this would include any or all CR's
used in RLD), enter a 1 in the Function Type column and the System Address.
For those Status CRs which are accessible from this screen, enter the Function
Type and CR Access Code.
Function types (FT) are as follows:
1
2
3
4
48
56
57
58
64
Sequence
Temperature (or T/C-Analog)
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
RS232/Printer
RS485 (SPI)
RS485 (Reserved)
RS485 (Host)
Data Handler
See Sequence Logic Programming or the Control Relay Tables (both located in the
Controller Manual) for a complete listing of addresses and codes.
Multi-rack
A screen similar to Figure 18 will be required for each controller in a multi-rack
system. For control systems containing system addresses above 10,000 (multirack systems), the field size of the setpoints (System CR Num) appearing on these
screens may need to be increased to five digits (using the screen editor).
(Although, for a second controller, the control relay to be viewed can be entered
either as XXXX or 1XXXX.)
For control systems containing parison cards or a second sequence card, the
setpoint limit of the setpoints (System CR Num) appearing on this screen may need
to be increased to "9999" (using the screen editor).
Input/Output Status (Extrusion Screen Set Only)
The remainder of the screen shows the status (on or off) of sequence inputs (CR
1-24, Sequence Modfile) and sequence outputs (CR 97-144, Sequence Modfile).
An asterisk (*) will appear adjacent to the number when the control relay is
activated.
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Figure 19.1 Sequence (User Screen Set - Injection version shown)
19. Timers, Counters, Temporary CRs and Hourmeters
The Sequence screen (Figure 19.1) shows a number of sequence control functions;
specifically, timer setpoints and values, counter setpoints and values, the status of
a group of temporary CRs, and the status of a group of inputs and outputs.
Timers
Figure 19.1 shows a group of 20 (Timer 1-20, Sequence Modfile) On or Off Delay
timers. These particular timers have a range of 0 to 635.35 seconds. When the
input control relay is turned on (CR 193-212) the value will start incrementing
toward setpoint. When the timer times out, its output CR (CR 217-236) will activate.
Counters
Counters can be either up or down counting depending on how they are assigned
in the Sequence Logic program. This screen shows a group of eight counters
(Counter 1-8, Sequence Modfile). When the counter is enabled (CR 257-264),
each time the input (CR 273-280) is toggled on and off the value will either
increment toward setpoint or decrement from setpoint. When the setpoint is
reached, the output (CR 289-296) will activate.
Two non-volatile counters are also available (Counter 9-10, Sequence Modfile).
They function like the other counters except that their count survives if power is
cycled. When the counter is enabled (CR 265-266), each time the input (CR 281282) is toggled on and off the value will either increment toward or decrement from
setpoint. When setpoint is reached, the output (CR 297-298) will activate.
CR & Input/Output Status
The remainder of the screen shows the status (on or off) of temporary control relays
(CR 305-344, Sequence Modfile) and sequence inputs (CR 1-24, Sequence
Modfile) and sequence outputs (CR 97-144, Sequence Modfile). An asterisk (*) will
appear adjacent to the number when control relay is activated.
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Figure 19.2 Hourmeters (User Screen Set)
Event Timers
There are two event timer values (Event Timer 1 and 3, Sequence Modfile) and two
previous event timer values (Previous Event 1 and 3, Sequence Modfile). These
event timers are each controlled by an enable relay (CR 241 and 243) and a pause
relay (CR 249 and 251). Events begin on the rising edge of enable and continue
as long as enable is high and pause is low. The time will not change if enable is
low or pause is high (or both). Once enable is brought high, the value is cleared
and moved to the previous event position.
Hourmeters
The Hourmeters screen (Figure 19.2) is used for entering setpoints for the data
handler hourmeters and on-delay timers. Setpoint entry for the hourmeters
(Hourmeter 1-4, Data Handler Modfile) is from 00.0 to 6553.5 hours (273 days).
Each hourmeter has a corresponding input CR (CR 625-628, Data Handler
Modfile) which is used to start the hourmeter and an output control relay (CR 777780, Data Handler Modfile) which energizes when the accumulated time reaches
the setpoint.
The hourmeters will continue to accumulate time either up to 999999.9 hours (45.6
years) or until the Clear Hourmeter control relays (CR 629-632, Data Handler
Modfile) are energized.
Note that beginning with Data Handler firmware Version 20.x6, some new Data
Handler boards have additional hourmeters available. Refer to the Data Handler
Programming section (1640-IN-034-0-XX).
Each of the 8 on-delay timers has a setpoint (On-Delay Timer SP 1-8) with a range
of 0.0 to 6553.5 seconds. When the timer is turned on (CR 633-640, Data Handler
Modfile) the value will start incrementing toward setpoint. Each of the timers also
has an output control relay (CR 753-760, Data Handler Modfile) which will energize
when the timer times out.
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Figure 20. Machine Control (User Screen Set - Injection)
20. Machine Control
The Machine Control screen (Figure 20) provides control of a number of standard
machine functions, such as control of injection or ejectors, melt or screw decompression, setup functions and manual control functions such as open/close the
clamp, ejectors forward or retract, screw rotate, inject, and move the carriage
forward or back. In addition, there are readouts of Ram, Clamp, and Ejector
positions and screw RPM.
All of the functions shown can be activated from this screen (some can also be
activated from the machine function control switches on the operator panel).
Two different control actions are used with the control relays; Momentary and
Toggle. Momentary means that the control relay will turn on when a switch or area
on a screen is activated and turn off when the switch is released (the Enter key).
Toggle action requires touching the switch twice, once to turn the control relay on
and a second time to turn it off (or vice versa).
When writing the logic program, examine the control relays for the on or off state
in order to activate or deactivate the corresponding machine function. For
example: in order to achieve Screw Rotation, CR 1774 must be activated and used
in a logic path to energize the Screw Rotate control relay in the Sequence/
Hydraulics function. A printout of the screens (using the OptiGrafix™ Screen
Editor) can be used to identify the control relays programmed to any screen.
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122
4
35-3724
1947-98
Figure 21. Security Change Screen
21. Security Change Function
Note that this function is available ONLY on OPtima & Lite model operator stations.
21.1 Security Change Screen
The security change screen (figure 21) allows passwords to be changed at the
operator station (an operation that formerly required screen editing). Up to 40
different passwords per security level can be programmed from this screen. Enter
the number of the setpoint to be reviewed or changed. Once the existing password
is displayed, enter a new password. To accept the change, cursor to the active area
and press return.
The passwords will be stored in the display. On power-up (or Display Reset) the
display checks to see if new user screens have been downloaded. If new screens
have been downloaded, the display will automatically update the local passwords
to the passwords used in the new screen set. This update creates 40 password
positions per security level. If a screen set had more than 40 per level only the first
40 would be utilized. If there is less than 40 (more likely), then blanks will be loaded
in the remaining spaces. This automatic update means that if the local
passwords were different from those used in the newly dowwnloaded
screen set the local passwords will have to be re-entered.
There are several methods of securing the password display and limiting changes
to passwords for a given level. This can be accomplished by security level
(protection of the screen or individual elements) or by limiting the security pointer
range to less than its maximum of 200. For example, if the security pointer range
is limited from 0 to 120, then only levels 1, 2 and 3 (not 4 or 5) could be changed.
Note that level 5 security does not allow any additional changes beyond level 4,
so that setting a range of 0 to 160 can prevent a user from changing an OEM’s
highest level of security codes.
Refer to "Dip Switch Definitions" in the Op Station Installation & Wiring
Section for instructions on recovering from lost or corrupted passwords.
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21.2 Display Processor Modfile Additions for the Security Change Function
Following is a list of the changes to the display processor modfile relating to the
security change function.
21.2.1 New Setpoints
21.2.1.1 Password Change Pointer (V3.5)
The password change pointer setpoint is used to move to a specific position in the
password file.
21.2.1.2 New Password Change (V3.5)
The new password change setpoint is the setpoint used to enter a new password.
Once the new password is entered here, pressing enter will cause it to appear as
the “proposed password.”
21.2.2 New Values
21.2.2.1 Security Level Password Pointer (V3.5)
This value is used to display the security level of the current password change
pointer setpoint. The value will correspond to the levels shown in figure 1 above.
Password 1-40 are level 1; 41-80 are level 2; 81-120 are level 3; 121-160 are level
4; and 161-200 are level 5.
21.2.3 New System Commands
21.2.3.1 Accept New Password (V3.5)
Once a “proposed password” is displayed, this system command is used to make
the “proposed password” the “existing password.”
21.2.4 New Module ASCII Strings
21.2.4.1 Current Password (V3.5)
This module ASCII string is used to display the password currently pointed at by
the password change pointer setpoint. Note that the content of a module ASCII
string cannot be programmed (internal firmware determines the character string
that appears within the area). If programming this to a screen, be certain to assign
enough space for the entire string of 13 characters.
21.2.4.2 New Password (V3.5)
This module ASCII string is used to display the new (proposed) password. Once
the new password has been accepted, it will appear in both the current and new
message blocks. Note that the content of a module ASCII string cannot be
programmed (internal firmware determines the character string that appears
within the area). If programming this to a screen, be certain to assign enough space
for the entire string of 13 characters.
21.2.5 New Module Displayable Messages
21.2.5.1 Password Index Level 1-5 (V3.6)
These 5 module displayable messages can be used to display a message (for
instance, an operator’s name) with a specific password. In order to use this
function, you need to know how many passwords will exist for each security level.
Use the Message Editor (in the screen editor program) to create a series of
messages relating to each security level. Each series should start with a blank
message. For example, say that 3 operators require a Level 2 security password.
You will need 4 contiguous locations in the message file (a blank message, Tom,
Dick and Jane). Once the messages are created, use the screen editor to lay down
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General Setup
the “Password index level 2” message block and point to the blank message as the
message source. Whenever the password assigned to position 41 is being used
on the machine, the word “Tom” will appear as the message.
21.2.5.2 Password Index-complete (V3.6)
This module displayable message works in exactly the same manner as the
“Password Index Level x” messages described above except that this message
requires 201 positions in the message file (a blank message followed by a
message location for every potential password). This message has been created
in order to provide for the original (V3.5) version of the Security Change function.
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1
04/22/98 08:59 P# 1 L=4 305
04/22/98 09:01 P# 1 L=4 305
Temporary Control Relay No 1
Temporary Control Relay No 1
305
6
Figure 22. Alarm Log Screen
22. Alarm Log Function
Note that this function is available ONLY on OPtima & Lite model operator stations.
22.1 Alarm Log Screen
The alarm log screen (figure 22) is used to monitor state changes of a predetermined group of system alarms. Use the “Starting CR Address” setpoint to enter
the system address (see the control relay tables) of the first CR to be monitored.
Then enter a multiplier of 1 to 6. A multiplier of 1 causes 16 CRs (CR 305 - CR 320,
in the case above) to be monitored. A multiplier of 2 would monitor 32 CRs, etc.,
up to a total of as many as 96.
The programmer can position the contiguous block of CR’s anywhere within the
first sequence card function (CR’s 1 - 4096). The display will automatically shift the
entry to be “byte aligned” (partial bytes are not permissible). This means that if a
user enters a number that does not correspond to the first bit of a byte, the display
will change the entry. In addition, the user can define how many multiples of 16 are
to be monitored (up to a total of 96 relays). The CR’s are requested from the control
in groups of 16 and whatever time is required is added to the screen update rate.
This means that to be guaranteed to be included in the log, the alarm must have
been present for twice a given screen update rate (typically less than 2 seconds).
To clear the log, power down/power up both the display and the controller (this
assures that the last status is cleared from sequence). If this screen is printed using
the “vector screen” printing function, the printout will be of the last 20 alarms only.
To print other remaining pages, use page up or page down to display those alarms
and press the print screen key on the operator station.
Refer to figure 2. In this case, system address 305 (Temporary Control Relay 1)
has been entered as the starting address, along with a multiplier of 6. This results
in 96 total CRs (from 305 through 400) being monitored. The left side of the screen
is used to display a variety of information about a change to a specific control relay.
From left to right, respectively, there is the date, the time, the password number
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and security level at which the machine was operating (see the security change
function), the system address of the CR within the defined group, and an up or
down arrow. An up arrow indicates the CR has been energized. A down arrow
indicates the CR has been deenergized. Note that “password number” is the
number within a certain security level, so that “1 Level 4” above actual identifies
the security code at password pointer 121. The right side of the screen is used
for module displayable messages (created during screen editing) that relate to
each specific control relay. Use the Page up and Page down softkeys to move
through a complete listing of the logged state changes.
In reality, a block of control relays would probably be identified at the time that RLD
and screen programming takes place. The messages would have to be created
while programming screens. Reserve a group of (up to) 96 contiguous positions
(plus a blank message at the beginning of the group) in the user message file for
these messages. Make certain the area programmed to the screen is long enough
to display the entire (longest) message that could be displayed.
22.2 Display Processor Modfile Additions for the Alarm Log Function
Following is a list of the changes to the display processor modfile relating to the
alarm log function.
22.2.1 New Setpoints
CR Offset for Alarm Log
This is the setpoint used to determine the starting point of the logged control relays.
Enter the system address of the first control relay.
#CR Words for Alarm Log
This is the “multiplier” setpoint which is used to determine the total number of control
relays to be monitored. Control relays are assigned in groups of 16. An entry of “1”
assigns the first 16 relays from “CR Offset for Alarm Log”; an entry of “2” assigns 32
relays from there; an entry of 3 assigns 48 relays from there, etc. Note that this forces
the relays to be contiguous (a continuous group). Note also that this number should
be established when screens are programmed and then “locked” (by setting the low
limit equal to the high limit). This will prevent unwanted changes to the function, as
well as avoid possible mismatches with the message file (if the multiplier is set to a
number higher than is planned for in the message file).
22.2.2 New Values
Alarm Page Pointer
The number of the logged message at the top of the currently displayed page
(starts at “1” and, using the Page up softkey will increment upward 10 places at a
time through all 96 positions). Use the Page up or Page down softkeys to move
through the entire list of logged alarms.
22.2.3 New System Commands
Alarm Log Page Up/Page Down
These two system commands are used to move up or down through the entire list
of logged alarms.
22.2.4 New Module ASCII Strings
Alarm Log Display 1 - 20
These 20 module ASCII strings are used to display the logged information about
a change to a specific control relay. From left to right, respectively, there is the date,
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the time, the password number and security level at which the machine was
operating (see the security change function), the system address of the CR within
the defined group, and an up or down arrow. An up arrow indicates the CR has
been energized. A down arrow indicates the CR has been deenergized. Note that
“password number” is the number within a certain security level. Note also that the
content of a module ASCII string cannot be programmed (internal firmware
determines the character string that appears within the area). If programming this
to a screen, be certain to assign enough space for the entire string of 30 characters.
22.2.5 New Module Displayable Messages
Alarm Log Display Message 1 - 20
These 20 module displayable messages are used to display messages (from the
user message file) that the user created to relate to the control relays being
monitored. The messages would have to be created while programming screens.
Reserve a group of (up to) 96 contiguous positions (plus a blank message at the
beginning of the group) in the user message file for these messages. Make certain
the area programmed to the screen is long enough to display the entire (longest)
message that could be displayed.
23. Setpoint Change Log Function
Note that this function is available ONLY on OPtima & Lite model operator stations.
23.1 Setpoint Change Log Screen
The setpoint change log screen (figure 3) is used to monitor attempted setpoint
changes to the system. There is no “setup” required for this function.
This function logs the last 100 monitored setpoint changes. In order to be
“monitored,” the change must occur from the operator station and must be a control
setpoint (which means that setpoints modified by Math or a Host will NOT be
included in the log). In addition, setpoints resident in the display (line graph scaling,
SPC graphs, parison graphs, vector screens, etc.) will NOT be logged.
The log consists of: time, date, password code for a security level, security level,
old setpoint, new setpoint, four byte ID, and screen number where the change
occurred. The ID can be determined by enabling the ID display on the Display
Configuration screen or by looking it up in the modfile.
The last change will always be the top of the list. If this screen is printed using the
“vector screen” printing function, the printout will be of the last 20 changes only. To
print other remaining pages, use page up or page down to display those changes
and press the print screen key on the operator station.
Refer to figure 3 and the first logged setpoint change. The left side of the screen
is used to display a variety of information about when the change occurred and who
attempted the change. From left to right, respectively, there is the date, the time,
and the password number and security level at which the machine was operating
(see the security change function). The right side of the screen is used to display
information that identifies the specific setpoint. From left to right, respectively,
there is the “from” and “to” setting (1 > 0); the board address of the setpoint (“11”
is the first board of a particular function); the board function of the setpoint (“40”
is the data handler - see below); the setpoint id (10 00H converts to 4096 decimal
– see the modfile .TXT files: data handler setpoint 4096 is the real time clock Run/
Set setpoint); and finally the screen number on which that setpoint appears (272).
Use the Page up and Page down softkeys to move through a complete listing of
the logged setpoint changes.
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1
04/22/98
04/22/98
04/22/98
04/22/98
09:05
09:06
09:07
09:08
P#
P#
P#
P#
1 L=4
1 L=4
1 L=4
1 L=4
1>
0>
1>
0>
0
1
0
1
11
11
11
11
40
40
40
40
10
10
10
50
00
00
04
08
272
272
268
268
Figure 23. Setpoint Change Screen
FUNCTION
Sequence
Temperature
Hydraulic (or Ana I/O)
Parison (or Hi Spd Ana)
Display Handler
Display
Communications
Keyboard
RS-232/Printer
RS-485 (SPI)
RS-485 (Reserved)
RS-485 (Host)
Data Handler
HEX ID
01H
02H
03H
04H
20H
25H
27H
28H
30H
38H
39H
3AH
40H
DECIMAL ID
1
2
3
4
32
37
39
40
48
56
57
58
64
23.2 Display Processor Modfile Additions for the Setpoint Change Log Function
Following is a list of the changes to the display processor modfile relating to the
setpoint change log function.
23.2.1 New Values
Setpoint Change Page Pointer
The number of the logged setpoint change at the top of the currently displayed
page (starts at “1” and, using the Page up softkey will increment upward 10 places
at a time through all 96 positions). Use the Page up or Page down softkeys to move
through the entire list of logged setpoint changes.
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23.2.2 New System Commands
Setpoint Change Page Up/Page Down
These two system commands are used to move up or down through the entire list
of logged setpoint changes.
23.2.3 New Module ASCII Strings
Setpoint Change Display 1 - 20
These 20 module ASCII strings are used to display the date, time and security code
information about a change to a specific setpoint. From left to right, respectively,
there is the date, the time, the password number and security level at which the
machine was operating (see the security change function). Note that the content
of a module ASCII string cannot be programmed (internal firmware determines the
character string that appears within the area). If programming this to a screen, be
certain to assign enough space for the entire string of 30 characters.
Setpoint Change & ID 1 - 20
These 20 module ASCII strings are used to display information that identifies a
specific setpoint. From left to right, respectively, there is the “from” and “to” setting;
the board address of the setpoint (“11” is the first board of a particular function; “12”
is the second, etc.); the board function of the setpoint (see the previous page); the
setpoint id (displayed in hexadecimal – convert to decimal and see the modfile
.TXT files); and finally the screen number on which that setpoint appears. Note that
the content of a module ASCII string cannot be programmed (internal firmware
determines the character string that appears within the area). If programming this
to a screen, be certain to assign enough space for the entire string of 30 characters.
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Eurotherm Controls, Inc./Barber-Colman
741-F Miller Drive, Leesburg, VA 20175
Phone: 703-443-0000
Fax: 703-669-1300
http://www.barber-colman.com http://www.eurotherm.com
An Invensys Company
Copyright © 2003
Eurotherm Controls, Inc.
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