academic catalog - Bethany Lutheran College

academic catalog - Bethany Lutheran College
academic
catalog
Effective August 1, 2009
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Table of Contents
Mission Statement...................................................................................................5
Accreditation............................................................................................................5
Philosophy and Objectives.....................................................................................6
Organization and Administration...........................................................................8
Admissions and Academic Information.................................................................9
Fees and Payments................................................................................................ 11
Financial Aid........................................................................................................... 12
Academic Programs and Services....................................................................... 13
Academic Policies.................................................................................................. 14
Registration Policies.............................................................................................. 16
Bachelor of Arts Degree and Graduation Requirements.................................... 18
Majors, Minors and Degrees................................................................................23
Bachelor of Arts Curricula.....................................................................................24
Biology Major.........................................................................................................24
Broad Field Social Studies Major.........................................................................27
Business Administration Major............................................................................30
Chemistry Major....................................................................................................34
Church Music Major..............................................................................................35
Coaching Certificate...............................................................................................38
Communication Major..........................................................................................38
Education Major.....................................................................................................41
Engineering–Dual Degree Program.....................................................................44
English Major.........................................................................................................46
Exercise Science Major.........................................................................................49
History Major.........................................................................................................50
Liberal Arts Major..................................................................................................53
Mathematics Major................................................................................................61
Music Major...........................................................................................................63
Psychology Major..................................................................................................64
Religion Major........................................................................................................66
Sociology Major.....................................................................................................65
Studio Art Major....................................................................................................70
Theatre Major......................................................................................................... 74
Course Descriptions..............................................................................................77
Faculty.................................................................................................................. 132
Administration..................................................................................................... 137
Professional Staff................................................................................................. 139
Map....................................................................................................................... 141
Index..................................................................................................................... 142
Academic Calendar
The academic calendar is available on our website at www.blc.edu/calendar.
Legal Notice
The material contained in this catalog is for information only. The college reserves the right to revise
policies, amend rules, alter regulations, and change financial charges at any time in accordance with
the best interests of the institution. Check our Web site at www.blc.edu for updates.
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Bethany Lutheran College
general
information
4
Introduction
For over 80 years Bethany Lutheran College has provided quality education. It
has maintained a consistent commitment to graduating dedicated individuals who
demonstrate intellectual accomplishments, ethical judgment and cultural awareness.
Above all, the goal of the college has been to provide a Christian education focusing on
the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Bethany Lutheran College seeks to be a community of faith
and learning.
Mission Statement
Bethany Lutheran College, owned and operated by the Evangelical Lutheran Synod,
is a private, residential, liberal arts college committed to the teachings of the Bible as set
forth in the Lutheran Confessions. Bethany provides studies culminating in a Bachelor
of Arts degree. The college serves Lutherans and others by offering a challenging,
student-centered approach to education that fosters spiritual development, intellectual
and creative growth, self-understanding, and responsible citizenship. In keeping with its
heritage, Bethany aspires to produce students with a clear understanding of Christian
vocation, which encourages students to make the most of their God-given talents.
Location
The Bethany Lutheran College campus overlooks the Minnesota River Valley in
Mankato, Minnesota. The population in the Greater Mankato area is approximately
52,000 people. Mankato is located 80 miles southwest of Minneapolis/St. Paul, 80 miles
west of Rochester, and 50 miles north of the Iowa border.
Accreditation
Bethany Lutheran College is accredited by
The Higher Learning Commission and
a member of the North Central Association,
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504
(312) 263-0456 • www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org
Bethany Lutheran College is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota
Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is
not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer
to all other institutions.
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Philosophy and Objectives
of the College
Philosophy of the College
Bethany Lutheran College is a Christian Liberal Arts college. The college and the
Evangelical Lutheran Synod are committed to the Holy Scriptures, the inspired and
inerrant Word of God, as the sole authority for faith and life. The Lutheran Confessions
are accepted as the correct understanding of the teachings of the Holy Scriptures. This
commitment is summarized by the Reformation principles: Grace Alone, Faith Alone,
and Scripture Alone.
Specifically, the college confesses that through faith in Jesus Christ the individual
receives the forgiveness of sins and eternal life. Such faith is produced in human hearts
by the Holy Spirit through the Word and Sacraments.
The Christian faith governs the entire educational process at Bethany. Christian
education implies a unique perspective on the past, present, and future. It assumes a
specific view of people and their relationships both to God and to others. The college is
committed to the position that these relationships are to be understood in the light of the
knowledge that Jesus Christ is the Savior and the Lord of the universe.
Objectives of the College
In order to carry out the philosophy of the college, Bethany has the following
specific objectives for the students:
1. To grow in grace and in the knowledge of their Lord and Savior Jesus Christ by means
of the Gospel.
2. To practice independent critical thinking so that they are not shaken from the eternal
foundations on which their moral and spiritual growth is based.
3. To become responsible citizens, aware of social realities, through the study of American
and world cultural heritage as well as contemporary social, economic, and political
issues.
4. To develop an appreciation for art, music, and literature so that as educated young
people they will lead more full and satisfying lives.
5. To encourage an attitude of Christian stewardship with regard to their talents and
abilities that they be used for the glory of God and the welfare of mankind.
6. To increase their ability to use written and oral English effectively.
7. To secure a foundation in mathematics and the sciences for a better understanding
of the world.
8. To develop, through curricular and extracurricular experiences, positive attitudes
toward physical and mental health.
9. To acquire the necessary skills for achieving a satisfactory vocational adjustment.
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To fulfill these objectives, Bethany provides:
1. Religion courses, daily chapel services, and other opportunities for the exercise of the
Christian faith;
2. A Common General Education Core for all students; and
3. A growing number of majors culminating in a Bachelor of Arts degree.
Non-Discrimination
Bethany Lutheran College does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, age,
religion, national origin, marital status, disabilities, or veteran status in the administration
of its educational policies, admissions policies, financial aid programs and other school
administered programs. The College adheres to the requirements of Title IX of the 1972
Educational Amendments, Sec. 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the ADA
policy of 1990. The College is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant
international students. Concerns regarding Title IX should be directed to the College’s
Title IX Officer: Paulette Tonn Booker, 213 Old Main; 1-507-344-7840; ptbooker@
blc.edu.
Catalog Description
The catalog serves as a contract for Bethany Lutheran College students, faculty, and
staff. Bethany reserves the right to change the catalog information at any time without
notification. The most up to date catalog information may be found on the college
website www.blc.edu. Bethany students are solely responsible for their academic success.
Faculty advisors and staff members are always willing to guide the student, but BLC
employees do not assume any responsibility resulting in the student’s failure to comply
with the obligations listed in this catalog.
Catalog Selection: To earn a degree from Bethany a student must abide by the
academic policies and procedures according to the catalog requirements dated during the
time of entrance to Bethany, OR the catalog that represents major(s), minor(s), and/or
certifications approved after the student matriculated. Requirements must be met within
seven years of the catalog issue date.
Organization and Administration
Ownership and Control
Bethany Lutheran College is owned and operated by the Evangelical Lutheran
Synod.
General Officers
Rev. John A. Moldstad, Jr., Mankato, Minnesota, President
Rev. Glenn Obenberger, Tacoma, Washington, Vice President
Rev. Craig A. Ferkenstad, St. Peter, Minnesota, Secretary
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Board of Regents
Rev. Herbert C. Huhnerkoch, Chair................................................Kissimmee, Florida
Harold A. Theiste, Vice Chair.............................................. Pinehurst, North Carolina
Rev. Kenneth V. Schmidt, Secretary........................................... West Bend, Wisconsin
Willis Anthony, Ph.D...................................................................... St. Peter, Minnesota
Rev. Mark Bartels............................................................................Madison, Wisconsin
Paul T. Chamberlin . .................................................... South Chatham, Massachusetts
Rev. Erwin J. Ekhoff..........................................................................New Hope, Minn.
Lyle Fahning ............................................................................... Burnsville, Minnesota
James Minor..................................................................................Plymouth, Minnesota
Roland Reinholtz.........................................................................Middleton, Wisconsin
Rev. J. Kincaid Smith, D.Min........................................................Mankato, Minnesota
Rev. Joel Willitz............................................................................Bridgeport, Michigan
Advisory Members:
Dan R. Bruss, Ph.D.......................................................................Mankato, Minnesota
Rev. Larry A. Burgdorf .................................................................... St. Louis, Missouri
Rev. John A. Moldstad...................................................................Mankato, Minnesota
William Overn............................................................................. Burnsville, Minnesota
Administration
Dan R. Bruss, Ph.D. ........................................................................................President
Ronald J. Younge.....................................................Vice President for Academic Affairs
Steven C. Jaeger ........................................................ Vice President for Student Affairs
Daniel L. Mundahl.................................... Chief Financial and Administrative Officer
Arthur P. Westphal.............................................................. Chief Advancement Officer
Rev. Donald Moldstad...............................................Director of Campus Spiritual Life
History
Bethany opened its doors as a coeducational, liberal arts junior college of the
Evangelical Lutheran Synod in 1927. Bethany transitioned to a four-year, baccalaureategranting institution, awarding its first Bachelor of Arts degrees in May 2001.
The Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS), which operates Bethany, traces its roots
to the Norwegian immigrant movement of the mid-nineteenth century. Throughout
its history the Synod has consistently maintained its stance as a confessional Lutheran
church body. The ELS is in church fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran
Synod (WELS) and several European confessional Lutheran churches.
Since 1927 the college has had nine presidents or acting presidents: Rev. Holden
Olsen, 1927-29; Rev. Walter E. Buszin, 1929-30 (interim); Rev. Dr. Sigurd Christian
Ylvisaker, 1930-50; Rev. Dr. Bjarne Wollan Teigen, 1950-70; Rev. Raymond Branstad,
1970-77; Rev. Theodore A. Aaberg, 1977-78 (interim); Prof. Norman Holte, 1978-82;
Dr. Marvin G. Meyer, 1982-2002; Dr. Dan R. Bruss, 2003-present.
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Bethany Lutheran College
admissions and
academic
information
9
Data Privacy Policy
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act — Release of Information: Bethany
Lutheran College complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Students
have the right to inspect and review their educational records.
Directory Information
Bethany Lutheran College designates the following categories of student information
as public or “Directory Information.” Such information may be disclosed by the
institution at its discretion.
Category I: Student’s name, local address/phone, permanent address/phone, email address, date and place of birth, hometown.
Category II: Degree and awards/honors received and dates — including dean’s list,
dates of attendance (current and past), full- or part-time enrollment status.
Category III: Participation in officially recognized activities, participation in
officially recognized sports, weight/height of members of athletic teams, most recently
attended educational institution, major field of study, academic level, residency status,
photograph.
Students enrolled may withhold disclosure of any category of information under
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. To withhold disclosure, written
notice must be received in the Registrar’s Office by the end of the first week of classes of
the term. Bethany Lutheran College assumes that failure on the part of any student to
specifically request the withholding of categories of “Directory Information” indicates
individual approval for disclosure. Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Act may be referred to the Registrar. Forms can be found on the Campus
Web: http://campusweb.blc.edu/.
Student Consumer Information
In compliance with the Student Right-to-Know and the Campus Security Act
of 1990, Bethany Lutheran College is engaged in an ongoing study of retention and
graduation rates. Retention rates indicate that 76% of the Fall 2007 freshmen were
enrolled at the start of the next academic year.
Graduation Year of Freshmen
Rates:
Cohort:
2002
Percentage graduated within 150%
of the normal time to graduate:
75% earned a B.A.
80% of the cohorts are employed in their field or enrolled in graduate school.
Demographic statistics indicate that the Fall 2008 student body represented 23
states and 11 international countries.
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The Director of Campus Security makes available to all staff and students the
various policies regarding campus security. That office distributes statistics on various
types of crime which have occurred on campus.
Changes in Fees and Schedules
The college attempts to maintain all published charges throughout the academic
year but reserves the right to make adjustments and change procedures should unforeseen
conditions make it necessary.
Payment of Fees
All expenses and fees must be paid in advance of the first day of class. The college
will mail fall semester fee statements on August 1, and spring semester fee statements
on January 1. These statements will include credits for financial aid (except work-study,
which is paid directly to the student) and the tuition deposit.
Payment Options
Bethany realizes that individual student circumstances may not allow for lump sum
payments at the beginning of each semester. BLC has developed a monthly payment plan
that allows students and their parents to distribute the annual costs over an eight-month
period from September to April. Information will be sent out along with a contract on
August 1 of each year.
Overdue Payments
Students whose accounts are not paid by the first day of class in a semester will be
assessed an interest charge of one percent on the outstanding balance owed for each month
or part of a month for which the account is overdue. At mid-term of each academic year,
if an acceptable payment plan is NOT on file with the business office or if the planned
payments have NOT been made to the student’s account, the college reserves the right to
cancel a student’s classes, meal plan, and housing. The college withholds transcripts and
all official college documents until a student’s account has been cleared.
Refund Policy
A student who withdraws from school or drops credits (thereby reducing tuition)
during the first four weeks of a semester is entitled to a refund of part of the costs for the
semester. The following tables show the amount owed by the student.
Tuition/Fees
Student Owes
Prior to the 1st day of class:
0
1st week:
25%
2nd week:
35%
3rd week:
45%
4th week:
55%
After 4th week:
100%
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Room
1st week:
2nd week:
3rd week:
4th week:
After 4th week:
Student Owes
25%
35%
45%
55%
100%
Board
Prorated according to
percentage of term attended.
Divide number of weeks
attended by 17 to arrive
at percentage owed.
Financial Aid Policies of
Bethany Lutheran College
Bethany Lutheran College subscribes to the philosophy that the primary responsibility
for meeting college costs rests with students and parents. Consequently, any financial aid
supplied by the college supplements rather than replaces the financial assistance expected
from the family. All financial aid programs are dependent on the availability of funds.
Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy
In order to receive or continue to receive financial assistance from any federal, state,
or institutional student financial aid program, a student must maintain satisfactory
academic progress. A detailed satisfactory academic progress statement is available in the
Financial Aid Office.
Veteran Benefits
All courses and programs offered at Bethany Lutheran College are approved for
veteran’s educational benefits by the Minnesota State Approving Agency of the Minnesota
Department of Veterans Affairs. Veterans or veterans’ survivors planning to enroll should
contact their local Veterans’ Administration office and the Registrar of the college at an
early date so that application for benefits can be made. It should be noted that it is up to
the veteran to take this first step.
Students receiving U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Education assistance
will not be eligible for benefits to re-take course(s) that they have already successfully
completed simply to attempt a better grade. These students may retake the course(s) at
their own expense, and any repeated course(s) credits will NOT count in their current
enrollment towards full-time status.
Additional Information
Additional financial aid information can be found at: www.blc.edu/applyforaid.
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Academic Programs and Services
Bethany Lutheran College offers a number of programs and services designed to
assist students in their college careers. For additional information about academic affairs,
contact the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Academic Advising
Bethany stresses the importance of the advisor/advisee relationship. All members of
the faculty are available to advise students. Each student is assigned to a faculty advisor.
The advisor assists the student in selecting courses and planning class schedules each
semester as well as completing baccalaureate requirements. Students also are encouraged
to consult with the Registrar or Vice President for Academic Affairs at any time during
the year.
Although faculty and advisors will help the student choose appropriate courses, the
student is responsible for fulfilling all requirements. Degrees will be awarded only if all
requirements are met.
Academic Support Services
Bethany offers free academic support to all students in the specific areas of math,
writing, religious studies and Spanish. Academic Support Centers are open on a regular
schedule for students to walk in with questions. Tutors are current Bethany students who
work with fellow students on understanding course content, developing and improving
study skills, and ultimately succeeding independently. Personal tutors are also available
free of charge for most other academic areas and may be obtained by directly contacting
the Academic Support Services Coordinator.
Counseling Services
Academic success may sometimes be impeded by personal concerns that block
students’ focus or mental health. The Counseling Center was established by Bethany
Lutheran College to enhance the personal growth and development of its students.
The Center supports students in their academic pursuits and facilitates personal and
interpersonal learning and growth. The programs it provides are preventive as well as
remedial. Services are free and confidential.
Internships
Bethany recognizes the need for students to enhance their classroom learning
experiences through participation in internship programs. Part-time or full-time
experiences outside of the classroom that are closely related to the student’s specific
career and academic interests are required for the communication major. Internships
are also encouraged for other majors. For more information contact the Internship
Coordinator.
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Military Science (ROTC Program)
The resources and programs of ROTC (U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps)
are available to Bethany Lutheran College students. These resources include scholarships
and classes.
For complete information contact:
• The Department of Military Science
Minnesota State University, Mankato
(507) 389-6229 / email: jean.andresen@mnsu.edu
• The Registrar
Study Abroad
Study abroad is an excellent complement to on-campus programming. Students gain
a deeper understanding and appreciation of other cultures and learn about themselves,
their own country and culture. Early academic planning is key. The Study Abroad
Office offers individualized counseling on the variety of options available for semester
and summer programs.
Travel Courses
In addition to the standard curriculum, Bethany offers study tours designed to
broaden the student’s perspective, deepen understandings, and explore a variety of
culturally interesting destinations. Various departments sponsor credit generating travel
experiences. These opportunities are an important aspect of a liberal arts education.
Academic Policies
Bethany is a Christian Liberal Arts institution. Its fundamental purpose is Christian
growth and the pursuit of knowledge. Consequently the principle of ethical academic
integrity is an integral part of this community. Every student is expected to be honest.
Academic plagiarism, cheating and other misrepresentations are not condoned.
In order to uphold the standards of collegiate academics and the integrity of
Bethany Lutheran College, the Vice President for Academic Affairs may place a student
on academic probation or dismiss a student from college for academic irresponsibility.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend classes regularly. The instructors reserve the right to
lower student grades or drop students from class for excessive absences. Instructors will
state their attendance policies at the beginning of each semester.
Class Cancellation
Classes with unacceptably small enrollments may be cancelled for that semester by
the administration of the college.
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Classification of Students
Full-time: A student carrying at least 12 credits
Part-time:
3/4 time: A student enrolled for at least 9 credits but fewer than 12 credits.
1/2 time: A student enrolled for at least 6 credits but fewer than 9 credits.
Less than Half-time: A student enrolled for fewer than 6 credits.
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of college credit
earned. Freshman: 0-27 credit hours Junior: 65+ credit hours
Sophomore: 28+ credit hours Senior: 95+ credit hours
Credit Hours
College work is measured in credit hours. The value of each course given at the
college level is expressed in semester credits. To earn one semester credit, a student is
required to attend one 50-minute period of class work, or one laboratory period per week
throughout a given semester. A semester is a school term of 16 weeks.
Grades and Grade Point Averages
A grade report is issued to each student at midterm and at the end of each semester.
Only the final semester grade is recorded on the student’s permanent record. The midterm
grades are progress indicators and provide an opportunity for the instructor and advisor
to counsel with students and suggest ways of improving their academic performance.
Final grades are accessible via the campus web (campusweb.blc.edu).
Scholastic standing is expressed in terms of letter grades. The following system of
grades and honor points is used:
Grade
Rating
Honor Points
Grade
Rating
Honor Points
A
Excellent
4 per credit
D+
1.33 per credit
A3.67 per credit
D
Passing
1 per credit
B+
3.33 per credit
D.67 per credit
B
Good
3 per credit
F
Failing
0
B2.67 per credit
I
Incomplete
0
C+
2.33 per credit
credits Credit
0
C
Average
2 per credit
NC No Credit
0
C1.67 per credit
A student’s grade point average (GPA) is determined by adding all grade points and
dividing by the sum of all credits attempted. Example: if a student receives:
• an A in a four-credit course = 16 grade honor points,
• a B in a two-credit course = 6 grade honor points,
• a C- in a three-credit course = 5 grade honor points,
Total honor points = 27
Total credits = 9
Grade point average = 27 divided by 9 = 3.0
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Academic Honors
The Vice President for Academic Affairs publishes a Dean’s List each semester. This
gives recognition to students who have earned a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in
at least 14 academic credits.
Repeating Courses
Courses may be repeated to improve the letter grade. All courses attempted remain
a part of the permanent record but only the highest grade is computed into the GPA.
Students receiving U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Education assistance please
reference ‘Veteran Benefits’ on page 12.
Registration Policies
Academic Load
The normal class load for the semester is 15-18 semester hours. Full-time students
may register for 12-18 semester credits. After the first semester of attendance, those who
have maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or better may petition the Vice President for
Academic Affairs for permission to carry an additional load. A charge is made for each
credit hour in excess of 18, excluding applied music, intercollegiate athletics (VARS) and
COMM102-105, COMM115, COMM201, COMM302-305, COMM380, FRSM101,
THTR100, and THTR300. Students with outside employment should make necessary
adjustments in the number of hours they attempt to carry.
Auditing Courses
Registered full-time students may audit courses, at no charge, with the consent
of the instructor. Part-time students who audit are billed per credit. Auditors do not
engage in laboratory or studio activities and do not take examinations in courses audited.
Audited courses carry no credit and do not qualify for credit by special examination.
Pre-College Credit
Students who score 50 or higher on the College Level Examination Program
(CLEP), or 3 or higher on the Advance Placement Test (AP), or 5 or more on the higher
level exams of the International Baccalaureate (IB), are given advanced placement with
college credit. In addition, students who have taken college coursework through a postsecondary option program on the campus of an accredited college or university may
transfer academic credits with a grade of C or above. Fulfillment of general education
requirements is at the discretion of each department.
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Changes in Registration
Students should plan their academic programs carefully so that changes in
registration may be kept to a minimum. When necessary, the student may make course
changes after consultation with the advisor and the Registrar.
Drop-Add. A student who wishes to drop or add a course must first complete a “DropAdd” form, have the advisor sign it and submit it to the Registrar. Not attending
class does not constitute formal withdrawal.
Withdrawal from a Course. If a withdrawal from a course takes place during the first
week of a semester, the registration is cancelled. If a withdrawal occurs during the
second through the 10th week, a grade of W (Withdraw) is issued. If a withdrawal
takes place during the 11th through 12th week, a grade of WF (Withdrew-Failing)
or WP (Withdrew-Passing) is issued. A withdrawal after the 12th week will result
in an F grade. A WF is rated the same as an F in computing the grade point average.
Not attending class does not constitute formal withdrawal.
Adding a Course. A student may add a course only within the first 10 class days of the
semester.
Incompletes
If a student receives a grade of Incomplete (I), the incomplete work must be made
up within 30 calendar days. If a longer period of time has not been granted by special
permission, the incomplete will automatically be recorded on the student’s transcript as
an F.
Transcript of Record
Official and unofficial transcripts of academic record are available in the Registrar’s
office. A request form is available and must be signed by the student. Copies will not be
issued to a second party. Transcripts will not be released if the student has a balance due
in the business office. Faxed copies are not considered an official record. Faxed copies
will be sent for a charge of $10. Transcripts are not sent via e-mail.
Withdrawal from College
Students who wish to withdraw from college are required to obtain a withdrawal
form from the Registrar’s Office. This form must be presented to a number of offices
including the Business Office. The form must be returned to the Registrar’s Office
before a fee adjustment will be issued. Failure to comply with this requirement may
result in failing grades in the courses in which the student is enrolled and loss of refund
privileges. The refund schedule is available from the Financial Aid Office.
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Graduation Requirements
Bachelor of Arts Degree
To graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree (B.A.) from Bethany Lutheran
College, a student must:
1. Fulfill the Common General Education Core requirements or have transferred
equivalent courses* for a total of 55 credits;
2. Declare a major as soon as possible. If the student has not declared a major by the
time they earn 65 credits, a hold will be placed on their registration until a major
is declared.
3. Complete a major, fulfilling its specific requirements;
4. Earn a minimum of 128 credits, of which at least 42 will be from upper division
(three- and four-hundred level) courses; AND
5. Achieve an overall minimum GPA of 2.0.
* The last 33 semester credit hours must be completed on campus. A student may
transfer in a maximum of 65 lower division semester credit hours of academic
work.
Graduation Application Process
1. Apply for graduation ONE YEAR IN ADVANCE of the expected graduation date.
Turn in application forms to the Registrar’s Office.
2. The students must set up an appointment with their advisor, and bring the application
form to the appointment.
3. The advisor will run an audit for the student, discuss and plan the last two semesters
with the student. The advisor will attach all necessary documentation on the audit
to describe the academic plan. The advisor will sign the application and attach a
copy of the audit.
4. The form must also be signed by the department chair and the student will submit
the application and completed audit to the Registrar’s Office.
Graduation Ceremony
Bethany Lutheran College has a spring graduation. Students may participate in the
ceremony during the spring semester if they are enrolled in sufficient credits to total 128
for a B.A. The distribution of credits to satisfy the degree and a 2.0 grade point average
must also be met. If the degree requirements are met in the fall semester, the student may
participate in the spring graduation.
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Graduation with Honors
Students who earn a B.A. with a grade point average between 3.33 and 3.66 graduate Cum Laude, those with a grade point average between 3.67 and 3.89 graduate Magna
Cum Laude, and those with a grade point average of 3.9 or above graduate Summa Cum
Laude.
Common General Education Core
Bethany strives to facilitate holistic growth in each student. To engender spiritual,
intellectual, emotional, physical and social development in each student, Bethany has
designed a required Common General Education Core. Its aim is to give the student
a broad background of knowledge while at the same time preparing the student to
pursue specialized training for a specific vocation or profession. This Common General
Education Core is required for graduation with a B.A.
Objectives and Common General Education
Core Requirements
Understanding the Christian Faith - 14 credits
Objectives: (a) To grow in grace and in the knowledge of the Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ by means of the Gospel. (b) To foster moral and spiritual growth and encourage
independent, critical thought. All religious studies courses totaling 14 credits. The fulltime freshman and sophomore student is to be enrolled in one religion course each
semester, while juniors and seniors are to be enrolled in one religion course each year.
1st Year FALL: RELG110 Introduction to Christianity I............................................... 2 cr.
SPRING: RELG111 Introduction to Christianity II........................................ 2 cr.
2nd Year
FALL: RELG2XX (any RELG200 level class) or MUSC205.......................... 2 cr.
SPRING: RELG2XX (any RELG200 level class) or MUSC205..................... 2 cr.
3rd Year
FALL OR SPRING: One Upper Division RELG3XX or 4XX........................ 3 cr.
4th Year
FALL OR SPRING: One Upper Division RELG3XX or 4XX........................ 3 cr.
Understanding Computer Applications - 1 credit
Objective: To acquire the necessary skills for achieving a satisfactory vocational
adjustment.
COMS101 Computer Applications I................................................................. 1 cr.
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Understanding the Fine Arts - 3 credits
Objectives: To develop an appreciation of art, music, and theatre leading to a more
full and satisfying life. Choose course or courses for 3 credits:
MUSC102 Music Appreciation
MUSC111 Music Theory I
THTR101 Intro to Theatre
THTR102 Acting I
THTR100 Theatre Practicum
(1-2 credits)
Music Activities:
MUSC130 Choir (1)
MUSC135 Band (1)
MUSC190 Instrument
Instruction (1)
MUSC121 Music History I
MUSC122 Music History II
ARTS101 Intro to Art
ARTS102 2-D Design
ARTS105 Art History I
ARTS106 Art History II
ARTS107 Art History III
ARTS110 Drawing I
ARTS113 Photography I
ARTS114 Painting I
ARTS115 Ceramics I
ARTS116 Sculpture I
ARTS202 3-D Design
ARTS211 Life Drawing I
MUSC101 Music Fundamentals
Understanding History and Literature - 6 credits
Objectives: To develop an appreciation for history and literature leading to a more full
and satisfying life. Choose one course from each group:
I. History
HIST111 Ancient Medieval Europe
HIST114 Ancient World Civ.
HIST115 Med/Renaissance World Civ.
HIST116 Modern World Civ.
HIST117 Modern World History
HIST207 History of USA I
HIST208 History of USA II
PHIL202 Intro. to Philosophy
II. Literature
ENGL200 Intro. to Lit Studies
ENGL201 Classical Greek Lit.
ENGL202 Roman Lit.
ENGL203 Medieval/Ren. Lit.
ENGL204 Modern European Lit.
ENGL205 Intro. to Fiction
ENGL206 Intro. to Poetry and Drama
ENGL211 American Lit. I
ENGL212 American Lit. II
ENGL220 Non-Western Literature
Understanding Human Communication - 6 credits
Objective: To more effectively employ written and spoken English.
COMM110 College Composition..................................................................... 3 cr.
COMM111 Fundamentals of Speech................................................................ 3 cr.
Understanding the Physical World - 8 credits
Objective: To secure a foundation in mathematics and the sciences for a better
understanding of the world. Choose one course from each group:
I. Mathematics
MATH110 or above
(Excluding MATH120)
20
II. Laboratory Science
BIOL101 Principles of Biology
*BIOL151 General Biology I
CHEM100 Descriptive Chemistry
CHEM105 Chemistry of Art
CHEM107 General, Organic, and Biochemistry
*^CHEM113 General Chemistry I
PHYS101 Descriptive Physics
PHYS151 College Physics
^PHYS213 General Physics I
*Course required for Biology, Chemistry, Exercise Science, and pre-med majors
^Course required for Engineering majors
Understanding Social Institutions - 13 credits
Objective: To become responsible citizens, aware of social realities, through the study
of American and world cultural heritage as well as contemporary social, economic and
political issues. Choose one course from each group:
I. Human Behavior
(3 credits)
ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH210 World Prehistory
ANTH302 Violence
PSYC210 General Psych.
PSYC220 Human Growth
SOCL101 Intro. Sociology
SOCL105 Social Problems
SOCL201 Marriage and Family
II. Human Institutions
(3 credits)
BUSN101 Intro. to Business
#ECON203 Macroeconomics
#ECON204 Microeconomics
GEOG101 Physical Geography
GEOG102 Human Geography
PLSC105 American Government
PLSC106 World Politics
# Required for Business
Administration majors
III. International Language -
IV. Cultural Awareness
(3 credits)
ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH220 Globalization and
Cultural Change
COMM389 Intercultural Communication
COMM489 International Study Tour
ECON330 Comparative Economic Syst.
ENGL335 African-American Lit.
GEOG102 Human Geography
HIST445 The World of the 20th Century
HIST450 Civil Rights Movement
MUSC340 World Dance
MUSC440 World Music
PLSC106 World Politics
RELG350 Islam
SOCL101 Introduction to Sociology
SOCL235 Death and Dying
SOCL330 American Minorities
proficiency at the 102 level required
(4-8 credits)
GERM101 and 102 (German)
GREK101 and 102 (Greek)
HBRW101 and 102 (Hebrew)
LATN101 and 102 (Latin)
NORW101 and 102 (Norwegian)
SPAN101 and 102 (Spanish)
21
Developing Life Skills - 3 credits
Objective: To develop through curricular and extracurricular experience, positive
attitudes toward physical and mental health. Each student must complete two credits of
PHED215 Developing Life Skills.
All first-time freshmen must complete Freshman Seminar FRSM101 Orientation
to College. If a student transfers 15 or more credits into Bethany Lutheran College
FRSM101 is not required.
22
Majors, Minors
and Degrees
Bethany Lutheran Colleges offers programs leading to a baccalaureate degree,
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees
A major consists of a minimum of 36 credits, at least 18 of which are from upper
division courses. See the specific major description. Students may also earn secondary
teaching licensure from the State of Minnesota in the majors listed below with an
asterisk.*
Biology
History
Broad Field Social Studies*
Liberal Arts
Business Administration
Mathematics
Chemistry
Music
Church Music
Psychology
Communication
Religion
Education (licensure)
Sociology
Engineering–Dual Degree Program Studio Art*
English*
Theatre
Exercise Science
Minors
A minor consists of a minimum of 18 credits, at least 6 of which are from upper
division courses.
Art History
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Church Music
Communication
Communication Disorders
English
Health Communication
History
Information Systems
Mathematics
Music
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Spanish
Studio Art
Theatre
Western Philosophy
Certification
A certificate consists of a minimum of 14 credits, at least 8 credits are from upper
division courses. Bethany Lutheran College offers a Coaching Certificate in six sports.
See “Coaching Certification” for specific requirements.
23
Majors and Minors
Art History Minor
The minor in Art History requires:
• ARTS105 Art History I: Prehistoric to Gothic............................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS106 Art History II: Renaissance to Realism ........................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS107 Art History III: Impressionism to Contemporary . ....................... 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• ARTS342 Greek Art History.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS344 American Art History.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS346 Study of Non-Western Art............................................................. 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ARTS450 Art Theory and Criticism.............................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS452 Contemporary Issues in Art........................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations........................................ 3 cr.
• HIST115 Medieval/Renaissance World Civilizations..................................... 3 cr.
• HIST116 Early Modern World Civilizations.................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST117 Modern World History................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST315 History of Ancient Greece............................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST320 History of Ancient Rome................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST335 The High Middle Ages................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ARTS101 Introduction to Art......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS102 2-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS110 Drawing I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS202 3-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
Recommended: ARTS240 Masterpieces of the Western Tradition................. 3 cr.
Biology Major
Mission Statement
The Biology major is intended to prepare students for service of their Lord by
providing them with a working knowledge of living organisms, including humans. This
degree-program allows students to determine their own area of interest within the field
of biology, while providing a foundation of core principles. A student graduating with
this major can enter the workforce directly but will also be prepared for graduate school
in a wide variety of fields (e.g. medicine, physical therapy, ecology, dentistry, veterinary
sciences…).
24
Entry into the Major
A student desiring to enter the biology major must complete BIOL151 and BIOL152
with at least a C-. Entry will be granted for students who have met the following
requirements:
• Achieved a GPA of 2.0 or better in all college coursework.
• Achieved a grade of C- (1.67) or better in all biology coursework.
• Completed an interview with a member of the biology department.
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• BIOL151 General Biology I............................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL152 General Biology II........................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM113 General Chemistry I.................................................................... 5 cr.
• CHEM114 General Chemistry II................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH112 Trigonometry or higher ...........................................................3-5 cr.
• MATH120 Statistics . .................................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHYS151 and 152 College Physics I and II . .................................................. 8 cr.
or
• PHYS213 and 214 General Physics I and II.................................................. 10 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• BIOL340 Genetics.......................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL350 Cell Biology.................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL360 Microbiology.................................................................................. 4 cr.
Major Electives
15 credits minimum; 1 course must be upper division; limit of 2 SCIE courses.
• *BIOL203 Botany Pre-Req: BIOL151 and 152 . ............................................ 4 cr.
• *BIOL210 Zoology Pre-Req: BIOL151 and 152 ............................................ 4 cr.
• *BIOL221 Human Anatomy Pre-Req: BIOL151 .......................................... 4 cr.
• *BIOL222 Human Physiology Pre-Req: CHEM107 or 113 ......................... 4 cr.
• BIOL370 Ecology .......................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL480 Topics in Biology........................................................................ 3-4 cr.
• CHEM323 General Biochemistry.................................................................. 4 cr.
• HLTH470 Introduction to Diseases and Disorders........................................ 3 cr.
• PHED350 Kinesiology .................................................................................. 3 cr.
• PHED450 Exercise Physiology ...................................................................... 4 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science ............................................................................ 3 cr.
• SCIE340 Environmental Issues...................................................................... 3 cr.
*Per discretion of the instructor, consent may be granted for a student to enter class
despite lack of all prerequisites.
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Capstone
Students must take one of the following:
• BIOL490 Introduction to Human Gross Anatomy........................................ 5 cr.
• BIOL498 Biology Independent Research.................................................... 3-4 cr.
• BIOL499 Biology Internship...................................................................... 3-4 cr.
Strongly recommended:
• CHEM215 Organic Chemistry I.................................................................... 4 cr.
• MATH141 Calculus....................................................................................... 5 cr.
Biology Minor
The minor in Biology requires:
• BIOL151 General Biology I............................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL152 General Biology II........................................................................... 4 cr.
Electives: 15 credits minimum; a minimum of 3 from upper division courses;
no more than 2 SCIE courses:
• BIOL203 Botany............................................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL210 Zoology........................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL221 Human Anatomy............................................................................ 4 cr.
• BIOL222 Human Physiology......................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL340 Genetics.......................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL350 Cell Biology.................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL360 Microbiology.................................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL370 Ecology........................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL480 Topics in Biology........................................................................ 3-4 cr.
• BIOL490 Introduction to Human Gross Anatomy........................................ 5 cr.
• BIOL498 Biology Independent Research.................................................... 3-4 cr.
• BIOL499 Biology Internship...................................................................... 3-4 cr.
• CHEM323 General Biochemistry.................................................................. 4 cr.
• HLTH470 Introduction to Diseases and Disorders........................................ 3 cr.
• PHED350 Kinesiology................................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED450 Exercise Physiology....................................................................... 4 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science . ............................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science ............................................................................ 3 cr.
• SCIE340 Environmental Issues...................................................................... 3 cr.
26
Broad Field Social Studies
(BFSS) Major
Mission Statement
The BFSS major allows students to systematically study not only history but also a
variety of disciplines in the social sciences that complement history. History, by its very
nature, is interdisciplinary and this is most clearly expressed in this broad field major.
Entry into the Major
Students should declare BFSS as their intended major as early in their college
career as possible by filing a Declaration of Major and Change of Advisor form with the
registrar. The student’s advisor should be from the history department.
Formal acceptance into the major, however, occurs at the end of the sophomore
year. Students must complete at least two history and two social science courses from the
required lower division course with no less than a C+ in each course. Students must also
have a GPA of 2.0 or above. An application for acceptance into the major must then be
filed with the chair of the history department at the beginning of the student’s second
semester of the sophomore year. Students will be notified of formal acceptance into the
major by the chair of the history department, who will also notify the registrar.
Students who seek state licensure for secondary level (grades 5-12) teaching of
social studies must first meet all requirements for “Entry into the Education Major” (see
Education Majors) as well as all requirements for the BFSS major. Then students are
required to take the courses listed below with an asterisk AND the courses listed under
“State of Minnesota Teaching Licensure in Social Studies.”
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses: The Broad Field Social Studies major consists
of 57 credits so it does not require a minor. Twelve of the required 57 credits also fulfill
general education requirements.
• *ECON203 Principles of Macroeconomics.................................................... 3 cr.
• *GEOG101 Physical Geography..................................................................... 4 cr.
• *GEOG102 Human Geography..................................................................... 3 cr.
• *HIST207 History of USA Part I................................................................... 3 cr.
• *HIST208 History of USA Part II.................................................................. 3 cr.
• PLSC105 American Government................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• *ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology............................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL101 Introduction to Sociology.............................................................. 3 cr.
27
*Two of the following:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations........................................ 3 cr.
• HIST115 Medieval/Renaissance World Civilizations..................................... 3 cr.
• HIST116 Early Modern World Civilizations.................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST117 Modern World History................................................................... 3 cr.
*Students who seek state licensure must take HIST114 OR HIST116 and
HIST115 OR HIST117.
Required upper division course:
• RELG316 Comparative World Religions........................................................ 3 cr.
Major Electives
Fifteen additional credits in upper division history courses with at least three credits
from American history, three credits from European history and three credits from a
course dealing mostly with matters after 1815 (which may simultaneously fulfill either
the American or European requirement).
American History (choose at least one of the following): *either HIST410 OR
HIST420 is required for state licensure but NOT both):
• HIST410 The Era of the American Revolution.............................................. 3 cr.
• HIST420 The Constitution and Early Republic............................................. 3 cr.
• HIST430 The American Civil War and Reconstruction................................ 3 cr.
• HIST450 Civil Rights Movement................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST460 Religion in American History........................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST470 The Supreme Court and the American People............................... 3 cr.
• HIST480 Topics in American History............................................................ 3 cr.
European History (choose at least one of the following):
• HIST315 History of Ancient Greece ............................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST320 History of Ancient Rome................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST330 Dark Age Europe............................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST335 The High Middle Ages................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST340 Renaissance and Reformation History........................................... 3 cr.
• HIST345 Tudor and Stuart England.............................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST350 The French Revolution through Napoleon.................................... 3 cr.
• HIST360 Early and Imperial Russian History............................................... 3 cr.
• HIST365 The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union.............................. 3 cr.
Post-1815 courses (choose at least one of the following which may simultaneously
fulfill either the American or European requirement):
• HIST365 The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union.............................. 3 cr.
• HIST430 The American Civil War and Reconstruction................................ 3 cr.
28
• HIST445 The World in the 20th Century..................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST450 Civil Rights Movement................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST460 Religion in American History........................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST470 The Supreme Court and the American People............................... 3 cr.
Additional upper division electives (6 credits):
• ECON330 Comparative Economic System.................................................... 3 cr.
• *HLTH311 Drug Education........................................................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC330 Psychology of Adult Development / SOCL350 Aging in Society.. 3 cr.
• PSYC340 Social Psychology........................................................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC350 Abnormal Psychology (prerequisite PSYC210)............................... 3 cr.
• *PSYC360 Educational Psychology and Human Relations............................ 3 cr.
• PSYC420 Psychological Testing and Measurements...................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC430 Introduction to Physiological Psychology....................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC460 Facilitating Groups......................................................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science
or SCIE350 Technology in Society............................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL340 Rural and Urban Communities.................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL410 Sociological Theory....................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL440 Social Stratification....................................................................... 3 cr.
Recommended Religious Studies electives to compliment the BFSS major:
Lower division
• RELG203 The Life of Christ.......................................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG204 Israel’s History............................................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG206 The Young Church-Pentecost to Nicaea....................................... 2 cr.
Upper division
• RELG300-302 History of Christian Thought I, II, III..........................3 cr. each
• RELG320 Luther: His Ongoing Significance................................................ 3 cr.
• RELG321 History of the Lutheran Church.................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG350 Islam.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
Capstone
• *HIST490 Introduction to Historical Research and Writing......................... 3 cr.
• *HIST495 Senior Seminar in History............................................................. 3 cr.
29
State of Minnesota Teaching Licensure
in Social Studies
In addition to the BFSS major requirements students who seek state licensure for
secondary level (grades 5-12) teaching of social studies are required to take the courses
listed previously with an asterisk AND the following courses:
• EDUC200 Educational Foundations............................................................. 3 cr.
• EDUC210 Linguistics for Professionals . ....................................................... 1 cr.
• EDUC370 Introduction to the Exceptional Learner ..................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC401 Educational Technology and Media . .......................................... 2 cr.
• EDUC450 Curriculum Planning and Assessment ........................................ 2 cr.
• EDUC455 Classroom Management .............................................................. 1 cr.
• EDUC499 Teaching Internship and Seminars ............................................ 15 cr.
• HIST403 Native American Culture and Government .................................. 1 cr.
• HIST444 Methods In Teaching Social Studies (grades 5-12) ....................... 4 cr.
• HLTH206 Advanced First Aid or equivalent.................................................. 3 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development................................................ 3 cr.
Business Administration Major
Mission Statement
Bethany’s Business Administration major prepares students for leadership roles
in both profit and non-profit organizations through liberal arts and comprehensive
business studies. The major develops critical thinking, communication, and disciplinary
competence by foundational and advanced business study; exposure to current ethical,
social, political, and economic challenges; and experiential learning opportunities. The
major emphasizes Christian stewardship of time, talent, and treasure to serve others in
work, church, and community.
Entry into the Major
Pre-major courses:
• MATH110 Math Problem Solving
or MATH111 College Algebra................................................................... 4 cr.
• PHIL204 Ethics.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
• PSYC210 General Psychology......................................................................... 4 cr.
or PSYC220 Human Growth and Development....................................... 3 cr.
Recommended: SOCL101 Introduction to Sociology....................................... 3 cr.
30
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• ACCT207 Accounting I................................................................................. 4 cr.
• ACCT208 Accounting II................................................................................ 4 cr.
• ECON203 Principles of Macroeconomics...................................................... 3 cr.
• ECON204 Principles of Microeconomics...................................................... 3 cr.
• MATH120 Introduction to Statistics............................................................. 3 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• BUSN307 Business Communications............................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN310 Principles of Management............................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN330 Principles of Marketing................................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN350 Principles of Finance...................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN470 Administrative Policy.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ECON330 Comparative Economic Systems.................................................. 3 cr.
• MISY300 Software Applications..................................................................... 3 cr.
Major Electives
Students choose four electives, at least three of which must be BUSN courses from
the following:
• ARTS336 Graphics for the World Wide Web................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN333 Consumer Behavior....................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN351 Financial Institutions..................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN352 Investments.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN370 Legal Aspects of Sports.................................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN410 Leadership and Organizational Change........................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN420 Managing Human Resources........................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN430 Sport Marketing............................................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication......................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN440 Marketing Strategy........................................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN450 Risk Management.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN460 Advanced Financial Management................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN471 Sport Administration..................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN480 Topics in Business.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSNIND Independent Study in Business
• COMM318 Small Group Communication.................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM360 Visual Communication.............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM370 Organizational Communication................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC410 Industrial and Organizational Psychology...................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences............................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL350 Aging in Society............................................................................ 3 cr.
31
Internship/Practicum
Optional experiential (1-9) credits:
• BUSN399 Business Practicum . .................................................................. 1-3 cr.
• BUSN499 Business Internship.....................................................................1-9 cr.
Area of Emphasis
General Business Administration
• One elective each from Finance, Marketing, Management....................3 cr. each
• BUSN480 Topics in Business.......................................................................... 3 cr.
Finance
• BUSN351 Financial Institutions..................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN352 Investments.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN450 Risk Management.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN460 Advanced Financial Management................................................. 3 cr.
Marketing Research
• BUSN333 Consumer Behavior....................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication......................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN440 Marketing Strategy........................................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences............................................ 3 cr.
Consumer Marketing
• BUSN333 Consumer Behavior....................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN440 Marketing Strategy........................................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication......................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities
or SOCL350 Aging in Society................................................................... 3 cr.
PR/Marketing Promotion
• BUSN333 Consumer Behavior....................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication......................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN440 Marketing Strategy........................................................................ 3 cr.
• COMM360 Visual Communication.............................................................. 3 cr.
Recommended: ARTS336 Graphics for the World Wide Web......................... 3 cr.
Marketing Management
• BUSN333 Consumer Behavior
or BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN352 Investments
or BUSN450 Risk Management................................................................ 3 cr.
32
• BUSN410 Leadership and Organizational Change
or BUSN420 Managing Human Resources.............................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN440 Marketing Strategy........................................................................ 3 cr.
Human Resources/Organizational Development
• BUSN410 Leadership and Organizational Change........................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN420 Managing Human Resources........................................................ 3 cr.
• COMM318 Small Group Communication
or SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences................................... 3 cr.
• COMM370 Organizational Communication
or PSYC410 Industrial/Organizational Psychology................................... 3 cr.
Recommended: SOCL330 American Minorities
or SOCL350 Aging in Society.................................................................. 3 cr.
Management
• BUSN410 Leadership and Organizational Change
or BUSN420 Managing Human Resources ............................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN352 Investments
or BUSN450 Risk Management................................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN440 Marketing Strategy
or BUSN480 Topics in Business................................................................ 3 cr.
• COMM318 Small Group Communication
or COMM370 Organizational Communication....................................... 3 cr.
Sport Management
• BUSN333 Consumer Behavior....................................................................... 3 cr.
• BUSN370 Legal Aspects of Sports.................................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN430 Sport Marketing............................................................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN471 Sport Administration..................................................................... 3 cr.
Business Administration Minor
A minor in Business Administration requires:
• ACCT207 Accounting I................................................................................. 4 cr.
Two of the following:
• BUSN310 Principles of Management............................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN330 Principles of Marketing................................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN350 Principles of Finance...................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ECON203 Principles of Macroeconomics...................................................... 3 cr.
• ECON204 Principles of Microeconomics...................................................... 3 cr.
33
Choose two electives, one of which must be upper division:
• Any BUSN courses.......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM370 Organizational Communication................................................ 3 cr.
• ECON330 Comparative Economic Systems.................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH120 Introduction to Statistics............................................................. 3 cr.
• MISY300 Software Applications..................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences............................................ 3 cr.
Chemistry Major
Mission Statement
The Chemistry major at Bethany Lutheran College prepares students for careers
in chemistry related fields or advanced studies in chemistry, medicine, and other areas.
The major provides a thorough background in all major divisions of chemistry: organic,
inorganic, analytical, biochemical, and physical chemistry, while encouraging students
to continue studies in the humanities, arts, and social sciences.
Entry into the Major
Following the ACS Guidelines for Undergraduate Professional Education in
Chemistry, the following courses are required for the chemistry major. Any chemistry or
supporting course in which the student receives a grade of C- or lower must be repeated.
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• CHEM113 General Chemistry I.................................................................... 5 cr.
• CHEM114 General Chemistry II................................................................... 5 cr.
• CHEM215 Organic Chemistry I.................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM216 Organic Chemistry II.................................................................. 4 cr.
• MATH141 Calculus I..................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH142 Calculus II................................................................................... 5 cr.
• PHYS213 General Physics I............................................................................ 5 cr.
• PHYS214 General Physics II........................................................................... 5 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• CHEM313 Analytical Chemistry................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM314 Inorganic Chemistry.................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM323 General Biochemistry.................................................................. 4 cr.
• CHEM353 Physical Chemistry I.................................................................... 4 cr.
Major Electives
Two of the following:
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE340 Environmental Issues...................................................................... 3 cr.
34
Choose a minimum of six credits:
• CHEM301 Introduction to Environmental Management
or CHEM401 Chemical Information........................................................ 1 cr.
• CHEM324 Advanced Biochemistry............................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM354 Physical Chemistry II.................................................................. 4 cr.
• CHEM405 Advanced Organic Chemistry..................................................... 3 cr.
• CHEM480 Topics in Chemistry (may be repeated for credit)..................... 1-3 cr.
• CHEM495 Chemistry Seminar...................................................................... 1 cr.
• CHEM497 Research (arranged).................................................................. 1-3 cr.
Chemistry Minor
The chemistry minor will consist of a required foundation of three courses of lower
division chemistry and an additional three courses of advanced elective coursework.
• CHEM113 General Chemistry I.................................................................... 5 cr.
• CHEM114 General Chemistry II................................................................... 5 cr.
• CHEM215 Organic Chemistry I.................................................................... 4 cr.
Advanced electives – At least two of the following:
• CHEM313 Analytical Chemistry................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM314 Inorganic Chemistry.................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM323 General Biochemistry.................................................................. 4 cr.
• CHEM353 Physical Chemistry I.................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM405 Advanced Organic Chemistry..................................................... 3 cr.
• CHEM480 Topics in Chemistry.................................................................... 3 cr.
At least one of the following science (SCIE) courses:
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE340 Environmental Issues...................................................................... 3 cr.
Church Music Major
Mission Statement
Bethany offers Bachelor of Arts degree in Church Music. This degree is built upon
the understanding that music derives its purpose and strength from its role as a servant
of Christ and His church. Students majoring in church music may choose a course of
study emphasizing theory and composition, history and literature, choral conducting, or
organ performance.
Entry into the Major
Students should apply for admission into the degree program at the end of their
third semester. Acceptance into the music degree program requires a minimum 2.8 GPA
in the music coursework of the first two years, and three semesters of ensemble and
applied music.
35
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• MUSC111 Music Theory I............................................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC112 Music Theory II............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC114 Music Skills I................................................................................ 2 cr.
• MUSC115 Music Skills II............................................................................... 2 cr.
• MUSC121 Music History I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC122 Music History II........................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC161 Introduction to Conducting......................................................... 1 cr.
• MUSC205 Hymnody and Liturgics............................................................... 2 cr.
• MUSC207 Organ History and Literature...................................................... 2 cr.
• MUSC209 Service Playing............................................................................. 2 cr.
• MUSC211 Music Theory III.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC212 Music Theory IV.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC214 Music Skills III............................................................................. 2 cr.
• MUSC215 Music Skills IV............................................................................. 2 cr.
• MUSC261 Choral Conducting...................................................................... 3 cr.
Required upper division courses:
Five of the following:
• MUSC303 Music Communication and Technology...................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC340 Survey of World Dance................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC341 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque........................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC342 Music of the Baroque and Classic Era.......................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC343 Music of the 19th Century........................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC344 Music of the 20th Century.......................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC417 Counterpoint and Composition................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC418 Analysis and Composition............................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC440 World Music................................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC480 Topics in Music............................................................................ 3 cr.
Additional Requirements:
Eight credits of private lessons, at least two of which shall be in a secondary
performance medium.
A minimum of three credits of a supervised Church Music practicum (MUSC400)
in the second semester of the junior year or at any time during the senior year.
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Church Music Minor
A minor in Church Music requires:
Three of the following courses:
• MUSC111 Music Theory I............................................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC112 Music Theory II............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC121 Music History I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC122 Music History II........................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC161 Introduction to Conducting......................................................... 1 cr.
• MUSC211 Music Theory III.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC212 Music Theory IV.......................................................................... 3 cr.
Three of the following:
• MUSC205 Hymnody and Liturgics............................................................... 2 cr.
• MUSC207 Organ History and Literature...................................................... 2 cr.
• MUSC209 Service Playing............................................................................. 2 cr.
• MUSC261 Choral Conducting...................................................................... 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• MUSC303 Music Communication and Technology...................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC340 Survey of World Dance................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC341 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque........................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC342 Music of the Baroque and Classic Era.......................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC343 Music of the 19th Century........................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC344 Music of the 20th Century.......................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC417 Counterpoint and Composition .................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC418 Analysis and Composition............................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC440 World Music................................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC480 Topics in Music............................................................................ 3 cr.
Additional Requirements:
Six credits of ensemble music............................................................................. 6 cr.
Eight credits of private lessons, six in the primary performance
medium and two in a secondary medium.................................................. 8 cr.
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Coaching Certification
Upon completion of this program students will be certified to coach youth in the
sport of baseball, basketball, football, soccer, softball, and/or volleyball.
Core Requirements
The following courses are required:
• HLTH206 Advanced First Aid and CPR....................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED320 Social Aspects of Sports................................................................ 3 cr.
• PHED325 Sport Psychology........................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED330 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries....................................... 3 cr.
Choose a minimum of one of the following courses:
• PHED300 Methods of Coaching Baseball..................................................... 2 cr.
• PHED301 Methods of Coaching Basketball.................................................. 2 cr.
• PHED302 Methods of Coaching Football..................................................... 2 cr.
• PHED303 Methods of Coaching Soccer........................................................ 2 cr.
• PHED304 Methods of Coaching Softball...................................................... 2 cr.
• PHED305 Methods of Coaching Volleyball.................................................. 2 cr.
Communication Major
Mission Statement
The Communication major will engage students in the study of human
communication as a liberal art. It will help students to understand the discipline in
its multiple perspectives, ground them in the arts and sciences of rhetoric and poetic,
promote in them the capacity for creative and critical thought and expression, and assist
them to develop skills for communicating effectively with diverse audiences through
the wide variety of channels available today. Finally, this major will encourage students
to appreciate communication not only as the principal means for addressing the
uncertainties of this world, but also the powerful instrument for bringing the certainty
of God’s grace to all people, thereby healing the divisions that separate them from God
and from each other.
Entry into the Major
A student desiring to enter the communication major will make a formal application
to do so at some point following the successful completion of three college semesters.
Entry to the major will be granted based on the following qualifications:
1. Achievement of at least a 2.8 GPA in all of the pre-major communication
requirements.
2. Successful completion of an interview with a committee of communication
faculty in which the applicant demonstrates potential to make substantial progress in
each of the competencies around which the communication program is built.
Special circumstances may be considered by the communication division faculty.
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Pre-major requirements should ordinarily be taken in the first two college
years:
• COMM110 College Composition.................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM111 Fundamentals of Speech............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM212 Interpersonal Communication................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM240 Introduction to Mass Media...................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM295 Audio/Video Production I
or COMM297 Audio/Video Production II............................................... 1 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM210 Advanced Composition.............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM213 Introduction to Creative Writing............................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM230 Argument and Advocacy............................................................ 3 cr.
• PHIL201 Logic and Critical Thinking........................................................... 3 cr.
Core Requirements
All communication majors will be required to pass each of the following six core
courses with at least a C- grade:
• COMM314 Information: Discovery and Management................................. 3 cr.
• COMM318 Small Group Communication.................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM320 Language, Thought and Meaning............................................. 3 cr.
• COMM325 Processes of Criticism................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM340 Rhetorical Traditions................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM440 Communication Theory............................................................ 3 cr.
Major Electives
At least 33 upper division (300-400 level) communication (COMM) courses are
required for graduation with a communication major. While not required to do so,
students may with advance planning create “Areas of Emphasis” consisting of groups of
three or four upper division courses focusing on a particular aspect of communication
studies. Emphases may consist of COMM offerings combined with courses that deal
with communication in other disciplines — these courses all count toward the 33 credit
requirement.
Areas of Emphasis
“Emphases” (groups of three or four upper division courses also focusing on a
particular aspect of communication studies) provide communication majors maximum
flexibility in tailoring programs to fit their interests and needs. Emphases make the
communication major truly interdisciplinary, since courses can be drawn not only from
communication (COMM) offerings, but from other curricular areas as well.
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Internship Requirements
An essential component of the communication program, fieldwork experiences
(internships) provide opportunities for students to apply classroom learning in real-life
situations, explore career options, and build meaningful resumes.
Communication internships are available only to communication majors
COMM499. At least three UNPAID internship credits are required for graduation and
count toward major requirements. As many as seven additional credits may be earned as
upper division electives.
Students who minor in communication and desire an internship experience should
pursue one within their chosen major.
Communication Minor
The Communication minor requires:
• COMM314 Information: Discovery and Management................................. 3 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM318 Small Group Communication.................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM320 Language, Thought and Meaning............................................. 3 cr.
• COMM325 Processes of Criticism................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM340 Rhetorical Traditions................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM440 Communication Theory............................................................ 3 cr.
Six additional credits at the three- or four-hundred level
communication (COMM) courses......................................................... 6 cr.
Twelve additional credits communication (COMM) courses
at the two-hundred level or higher....................................................... 12 cr.
Communication Disorders Minor
(Speech Therapy)
This is a joint program between Bethany Lutheran College and Minnesota State
University, Mankato. While remaining full-time students at Bethany majoring in
communication, students take some needed courses, including a full semester (Fall of
Junior year) at MSU. If successful, students graduate from BLC in four years with a
Bachelor of Arts degree in communication, and a minor in communication disorders,
which can qualify them to apply for admission to master’s degree programs in
communication disorders at a variety of graduate schools. A graduate degree is required
to practice in this field.
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Minor Requirements
Along with fulfilling requirements for a communication major at Bethany, students
take the following courses at Minnesota State University, Mankato. () Indicates when
MSU offers courses F=Fall, S=Spring, and B=Both. See Minnesota State University
Academic Catalog for course descriptions.
Sophomore year:
• Introduction to Communication Disorders (B)
• Speech and Hearing Science (F) Prerequisite: College Math
Junior year:
• Speech and Language Development (F)
• Anatomy and Physiology of Speech (F)
• Basic Audiology (S), Prerequisite: Speech and Hearing Science
• Phonetics (F)
Junior and Senior years (recommended):
• Voice and Resonance Disorders (S)
• Child Language Disorders Lecture and Lab (F)
• Appraisal and Diagnosis (S)
• Stuttering (S)
• Speech Sound Disorders (F)
American Sign Language is recommended to fulfill the non-English language
requirement.
Education Major
Mission Statement
The Education major prepares men and women to integrate their faith while teaching
in a variety of settings. The education department believes that future teachers educated
from a Christ-centered perspective will be better prepared to meet the needs of children
in a multi-cultural society whether in public, private or Lutheran schools.
Elementary Education Scope
Bethany’s elementary education major offers Minnesota state-approved teaching
licensure for K-6 with 5-8 specialties in:
• Communication Arts and Literature
• Science
• Mathematics
• Social Studies
Students desiring to teach in Lutheran elementary schools take additional coursework
for certification by the Evangelical Lutheran Synod.
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Secondary Education Teaching Licensure Scope
Bethany’s secondary education teacher preparation program offers Minnesota stateapproved teaching licensure in:
• English (5-12) *See English, Teaching
• Social Studies (5-12) *See Social Studies, Teaching
• Visual Arts (K-12) *See Studio Art, Teaching
Students major and take required licensure courses in Studio Art, Broad Field Social
Studies, or English AND fulfill specified Education major requirements, including all
“Entry into the Education Major” requirements below.
Entry into the Education Major
The liberal arts serve as a foundation on which students build their professional
education sequence.
1. Successful completion of 55 credits of general education core courses including
EDUC200
2. An application to the education major
3. A one-page autobiographical essay
4. A transcript that verifies a 2.75 GPA in the core education major classes
5. A preliminary plan for matriculation through the major
6. Submission of the portfolio begun in EDUC200 with additional
entries from HIST207 and PSYC220
7. Interview with a three-member committee from the education department
8. A positive clinical experience report from EDUC200
9. Scores on the Praxis I
General Education (Pre-Major) Requirements
• ARTS101 Introduction to Art......................................................................... 3 cr.
• BIOL101 Principles of Biology........................................................................ 4 cr.
• CHEM107 General, Organic and Biochemistry....... (5-8 Science Specialty) 5 cr.
• COMM110 College Composition.................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM111 Fundamentals of Speech............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM210 Advanced Composition..................(5-8 Comm. Lit. Specialty) 3 cr.
• COMS101 Computer Applications I.............................................................. 1 cr.
• COMS102 Computer Applications II............................................................. 1 cr.
• EDUC210 Linguistics for Professionals.......................................................... 1 cr.
• ENGL211 American Literature I
or ENGL212 American Literature II......................................................... 3 cr.
• FRSM101 Orientation to College .................................................................. 1 cr.
• GEOG101 Physical Geography...................................................................... 4 cr.
• HIST111 Ancient and Medieval Europe
or HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilization................................. 3 cr.
• HIST207 History of USA I ........................................................................... 3 cr.
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• HIST208 History of USA II . .........................(5-8 Social Studies Specialty) 3 cr.
• HLTH206 Advanced First Aid or equivalent.................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH110 Math Problem Solving ................................................................ 4 cr.
• MATH111 College Algebra or MATH141 Calculus (5-8 Math Specialty).4-5 cr.
• MATH112 Trigonometry or MATH120 Statistics......(5-8 Math Specialty) 3 cr.
• MUSC101 Music Fundamentals
or MUSC102 Music Appreciation or Music Electives............................... 3 cr.
• PHED215 Developing Life Skills................................................................... 2 cr.
• PHYS101 Descriptive Physics ........................................................................ 4 cr.
• RELG110 Introduction to Christianity I........................................................ 2 cr.
• RELG111 Introduction to Christianity II....................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG electives (200 level).............................................................................. 4 cr.
• International Language................................................................................... 8 cr.
Additional Requirements:
• COMM212 Interpersonal Communication................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG upper division electives........................................................................ 6 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science............. (5-8 Science Specialty) 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities..................................................................... 3 cr.
The following courses must be taken PRIOR to taking any upper
level education courses
• EDUC200 Education Foundation/Philosophy.............................................. 3 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC360 Educational Psychology and Human Relations............................. 3 cr.
Professional Education Core Requirements
• EDUC315 Teaching Health and Human Performance.................................. 3 cr.
• EDUC320 Teaching Literacy and Communication....................................... 4 cr.
• EDUC325 Children’s Literature..................................................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC340 Teaching Social Studies................................................................ 3 cr.
• EDUC360 Teaching Science.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC370 Introduction to the Exceptional Learner ..................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC401 Educational Technology and Media............................................. 2 cr.
• EDUC425 Fine Arts in Elementary Education.............................................. 3 cr.
• EDUC430 Teaching Mathematics................................................................. 3 cr.
• EDUC450 Curriculum Planning and Assessment.......................................... 2 cr.
• EDUC455 Classroom Management .............................................................. 1 cr.
• EDUC485 Christian Vocation Seminar......................................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC499 Teaching Internship and Seminars ............................................ 15 cr.
• HIST403 Native American Culture and Government .................................. 1 cr.
• HLTH311 Drug Education............................................................................ 3 cr.
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Lutheran Elementary School Certification Courses
• EDUC400 Teaching the Christian Faith....................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC205 Hymnody and Liturgics............................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG203 The Life of Christ (may sub this course for RELG110)................ 2 cr.
• RELG204 Israel’s History (may sub this course for RELG111)..................... 2 cr.
• RELG209 Christian Doctrine I .................................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG210 Christian Doctrine II..................................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG335 Lutheran Confessions.................................................................... 3 cr.
(Consult with Director of Christian Education regarding course selection.)
Minnesota Licensure Requirements
• Complete all education courses with a C+ or above
• Maintain 2.75 GPA
• Pass the following tests:
• Praxis I: Academic Skills Assessments
• Praxis II: Principles of Learning and Teaching K-6;
Subject matter/content K-6; 5-8 specialty content
Important requirements of all students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree
in Education at Bethany Lutheran College:
1. Complete the Human Relations/Diversity Component
2. Complete all courses required for Minnesota State Licensure
3. Complete a minimum of one Middle School Specialty (5-8) OR major in
an area of interest
Engineering–Dual Degree Program
Mission Statement
The dual degree Engineering program at Bethany Lutheran College is designed
to give students who want to major in engineering the opportunity to do so while
taking advantage of the Christian liberal arts education offered at Bethany. This is a
program in which students will spend three years on the Bethany campus fulfilling
their general education requirements along with a broad spectrum of pre-engineering
and other science courses. After three years, the student will transfer to the University of
Minnesota, Institute of Technology for completing the engineering-specific coursework
in any of over a dozen engineering disciplines — usually requiring two more years. After
both sets of requirements are completed, the student receives a Bachelor of Science degree
in Engineering from the University of Minnesota and a Bachelor of Arts in the Physical
Sciences from Bethany — hence, this is called a dual degree program.
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Objectives
• To secure a foundation in mathematics and the sciences for a better understanding
of the created world in which we live.
• To develop understanding of physical systems in the context of our Creator.
• To more effectively communicate using both the terminology and core principles
of engineering and the physical sciences.
• To enable students to be critical of scientific research and literature.
• To develop the ability to integrate concepts from the full spectrum of the physical
sciences.
Entry into the Program
There are two separate entry points into the engineering and physical science major.
First, entry into the physical science portion of the program consists of the student
attaining an advisor in the physics department. Second, after successfully completing
the requirements listed below, the student must apply for admission into the engineering
program at the dual degree partner institution. The requirements for the second entry
phase are:
1. Successful completion of Bethany’s general education requirements
2. A grade of “C” or better and a cumulative GPA of 2.8 or higher in all of the core
requirements (see below).
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• CHEM113 General Chemistry I ................................................................... 5 cr.
• CHEM114 General Chemistry II................................................................... 5 cr.
• COMS103 Intro to Programming I................................................................ 3 cr.
• MATH141 Calculus I..................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH142 Calculus II................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH243 Multivariable Calculus................................................................ 4 cr.
• MATH260 Differential Equations................................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH351 Linear Algebra.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• PHYS213 General Physics I............................................................................ 5 cr.
• PHYS214 General Physics II........................................................................... 5 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• PHYS313 Statics and Dynamics..................................................................... 4 cr.
• PHYS314 Introduction to Electronics and Electrical Circuits........................ 4 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science
or SCIE330 Ethics in Science.................................................................... 3 cr.
45
Recommended courses:
• ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology................................................................ 3 cr.
• BIOL151 General Biology I............................................................................. 4 cr.
• COMS104 Intro to Programming II.............................................................. 3 cr.
• ECON203 Principles of Economics................................................................ 3 cr.
or ECON204 Principles of Microeconomics............................................. 3 cr.
• GEOG102 Human Geography....................................................................... 3 cr.
English Major
Mission Statement
The study of literature at Bethany Lutheran College will provide students with the
opportunity to develop and effectively use the English language. The reading, writing,
and interpretation that students undertake will be situated in the study of American,
British, and World literatures. This major explores the formal elements of literary texts,
and examines the social, historical, philosophical, and political contexts surrounding
authors, works, and literary movements.
Entry into the Major
Students wishing to major in English must pass the following courses with at least
a C+.
• COMM110 College Composition.................................................................. 3 cr.
• *ENGL200 Introduction to Literary Studies.................................................. 3 cr.
Students who seek state licensure for secondary level (grades 5-12) teaching of
English must first meet all requirements for “Entry into the Education Major” (see
Education Majors). Then, students are required to take the courses listed below with
an asterisk AND the courses listed under “State of Minnesota Teaching Licensure in
Communication Arts and Literature.”
Core Requirements
The English major consists of 33 credits. At least 18 credits must be 300-400 level
courses.
Required:
• *ENGL220 Non-Western Literature............................................................... 3 cr.
• *ENGL306 Shakespeare................................................................................. 3 cr.
• *ENGL350 Literary Criticism........................................................................ 3 cr.
• *ENGL495 Senior Seminar in Literature....................................................... 3 cr.
Three of the following:
• ENGL211 American Literature I (to 1865)..................................................... 3 cr.
• *ENGL212 American Literature II (1865 to Present Day)............................. 3 cr.
• *ENGL304 British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries................................ 3 cr.
• *ENGL305 British Literature: Romantics and Victorians.............................. 3 cr.
46
One of the following:
• COMM320 Language, Thought, and Meaning............................................ 3 cr.
• *ENGL320 The English Language................................................................. 3 cr.
Major Electives
Choose a minimum of two of the following:
• *COMM210 Advanced Composition............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM213 Introduction to Creative Writing............................................... 3 cr.
• COMM313 Advanced Creative Writing........................................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL201 Survey of Classical Greek Literature............................................. 3 cr.
• ENGL202 Survey of Roman Literature.......................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL203 Survey of Medieval and Renaissance Literature............................ 3 cr.
• ENGL204 Survey of Modern European Literature........................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL205 Introduction to Fiction................................................................. 3 cr.
• ENGL206 Introduction to Poetry and Drama............................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL335 African-American Literature......................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL360 Contemporary Poetry................................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL370 Christian Writers........................................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL480 Topics in Literature and Language............................................... 3 cr.
• THTR310 Theatre History and Literature I.................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR311 Theatre History and Literature II................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR420 Dramatic Theory and Criticism................................................... 3 cr.
Required Minor or Concentration
The student majoring in English must also fulfill the requirements for a concentration
within the Liberal Arts major or a minor offered by Bethany. Any of the concentrations
or minors offered by Bethany are acceptable for this requirement with the exception of
an English concentration or an English minor.
State of Minnesota Teaching Licensure In
Communication Arts and Literature
In addition to the English major requirements students who seek state licensure
for secondary level (grades 5-12) teaching of Communication Arts and Literature are
required to take the courses listed above with an asterisk AND the following courses:
• COMM102 Journalism Practicum, Newspaper............................................. 1 cr.
and/or COMM104 Journalism Practicum, Literary Magazine ................ 1 cr.
(Total of 2 Journalism Practicum credits required. Courses are repeatable.)
• COMM240 Introduction to Mass Media ..................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM317 Composition Theory and Practice . ........................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC200 Educational Foundations ............................................................ 3 cr.
• EDUC210 Linguistics for Professionals . ....................................................... 1 cr.
• EDUC370 Introduction to the Exceptional Learner ..................................... 3 cr.
47
• EDUC401 Educational Technology and Media . .......................................... 2 cr.
• EDUC450 Curriculum Planning and Assessment ........................................ 2 cr.
• EDUC455 Classroom Management .............................................................. 1 cr.
• EDUC499 Teaching Internship and Seminars ............................................ 15 cr.
• ENGL327 Adolescent Literature ................................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL444 Methods In Teaching 5-12 English.............................................. 3 cr.
• HIST403 Native American Culture and Government .................................. 1 cr.
• HLTH206 Advanced First Aid . .................................................................... 3 cr.
• HLTH311 Drug Education ........................................................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development ............................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC360 Educational Psychology and Human Relations............................. 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities .................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR101 Introduction to Theatre................................................................ 3 cr.
English Minor
A minor in English requires:
• ENGL200 Introduction to Literary Studies .................................................. 3 cr.
• ENGL350 Literary Criticism.......................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL205 Introduction to Fiction ................................................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL206 Introduction to Poetry and Drama............................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL211 American Literature I.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL212 American Literature II................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL304 British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries.................................. 3 cr.
• ENGL305 British Literature: Romantics and Victorians............................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM210 Advanced Composition ............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM213 Introduction to Creative Writing............................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM320 Language, Thought, and Meaning............................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL320 The English Language ................................................................. 3 cr.
One additional elective ENGL course,
or appropriate COMM or THTR course............................................... 3 cr.
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Exercise Science Major
Mission Statement
The Exercise Science major offers the student an opportunity to develop a positive
attitude toward physical and mental health, integrate liberal learning skills through
critical thinking, writing and speaking, and enables the student to demonstrate and
educate others on the importance of lifelong fitness of the mind and body. Exercise
science provides the opportunity for theoretical and practical knowledge and skills
needed to establish a lifestyle that promotes health and prevents disease. A graduate of
the exercise science major will be prepared for a career in fitness management and may
take the foundation of this course work to graduate school in pursuit of a master’s degree.
Students must complete 59 (26 pre-major and 33 core) credits with a C average to qualify
for graduation with a degree in exercise science.
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• BIOL221 Human Anatomy............................................................................ 4 cr.
• BIOL222 Human Physiology......................................................................... 4 cr.
• CHEM107 Life Science Chemistry
or BIOL101 Principles of Biology............................................................... 4 cr.
• HLTH103 Healthful Living
or HLTH240 Current Health Issues......................................................... 3 cr.
• HLTH201 Nutrition....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• HLTH206 Advanced First Aid....................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED215 Developing Life Skills................................................................... 2 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development................................................ 3 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• BIOL490 Introduction to Human Gross Anatomy....................................... 5 cr.
• HLTH311 Drug Education........................................................................... 3 cr.
• HLTH330 History and Philosophy of Wellness............................................ 3 cr.
• HLTH470 Introduction to Disease and Disorders ........................................ 3 cr.
• PHED310 Motor Learning and Behavior....................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED350 Kinesiology .................................................................................. 3 cr.
• PHED450 Exercise Physiology ...................................................................... 4 cr.
• PHED455 Strength and Conditioning .......................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED460 Exercise Testing and Prescription................................................ 3 cr.
• PHED480 Topics in Exercise Science............................................................ 3 cr.
Recommended courses:
• COMM330 Introduction to Health Communication .................................. 3 cr.
• COMM430 Health Communication Theory and Research ......................... 3 cr.
• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences ........................................... 3 cr.
49
Health Communication Minor
A minor in Health Communication requires the following courses:
• COMM212 Interpersonal Communication................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM330 Introduction to Health Communication................................... 3 cr.
• COMM430 Health Communication Theory and Research.......................... 3 cr.
• HLTH240 Current Health Issues................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL320 Research Method in Social Sciences.............................................. 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• HLTH103 Healthful Living........................................................................... 3 cr.
• HLTH260 Foundations of Health Education................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL105 Problems in Contemporary Society............................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL201 Marriage and the Family............................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication......................................... 3 cr.
• COMM370 Organizational Communication................................................ 3 cr.
• COMM375 Public Relations and Advertising................................................ 3 cr.
• HLTH330 History and Philosophy of Wellness............................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities...................................................................... 3 cr.
*Other courses may apply with prior written consent of program coordinator.
History Major
Mission Statement
History, while it may use tools of social science, the arts, science and religion, is still
basically humanistic — it tells the story of humankind. History offers a certain original
and important way of looking at the human experience. In contrasting the world’s past
with the present, history shows the complexity of human interactions and gives a clearer
and wider perspective. This is necessary for intelligent decision making in a democratic
society and a primary goal of a liberal arts education.
Entry into the Major
Students should declare history as their intended major as early in their college
career as possible by filing a Declaration of Major and Change of Advisor form with
the registrar. The student’s advisor should be from the history department. Formal
acceptance into the major, however, occurs at the end of the sophomore year. At least
of the required lower division history courses should be completed with no less than a
C+ in each course. Students must also have a GPA of 2.0 or above. An application for
acceptance into the major must then be filed with the chair of the history department at
the beginning of the student’s second semester of the sophomore year. Students will be
notified of formal acceptance into the major by the chair of the history department, who
will also notify the registrar.
50
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• HIST207 History of USA I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST208 History of USA II........................................................................... 3 cr.
Major Electives
Nine credits from the following:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations ....................................... 3 cr.
• HIST115 Medieval/Renaissance World Civilizations..................................... 3 cr.
• HIST116 Early Modern World Civilizations.................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST117 Modern World History................................................................... 3 cr.
Eighteen additional credits in upper division history courses with at least three
credits from American History, three credits from European History and three credits
from a course dealing mostly with matters after 1815 (which may simultaneously fulfill
either the American or European requirement).
American History (choose at least one of the following):
• HIST410 The Era of the American Revolution.............................................. 3 cr.
• HIST415 The Constitution and Early Republic............................................. 3 cr.
• HIST430 The American Civil War and Reconstruction................................ 3 cr.
• HIST450 Civil Rights Movement................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST460 Religion in American History........................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST470 The Supreme Court and the American People............................... 3 cr.
• HIST480 Topics in American History............................................................ 3 cr.
European History (choose at least one of the following):
• HIST315 History of Ancient Greece............................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST320 History of Ancient Rome................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST330 Dark Age Europe............................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST335 The High Middle Ages................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST340 Renaissance and Reformation Movements..................................... 3 cr.
• HIST345 Tudor and Stuart England.............................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST350 The French Revolution through Napoleon.................................... 3 cr.
• HIST360 Early and Imperial Russian History............................................... 3 cr.
• HIST365 The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union.............................. 3 cr.
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Post-1815 courses (choose at least one of the following which may simultaneously
fulfill either the American or European requirement):
• HIST365 The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union.............................. 3 cr.
• HIST430 The American Civil War and Reconstruction................................ 3 cr.
• HIST445 The World in the 20th Century..................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST450 Civil Rights Movement................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST460 Religion in American History........................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST470 The Supreme Court and the American People............................... 3 cr.
Additional upper division electives:
• HIST380 Topics in World History................................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST499 History Internship....................................................................... 1-3 cr.
Recommended religious studies electives to complement the history major:
Lower division
• RELG203 The Life of Christ.......................................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG204 Israel’s History............................................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG206 The Young Church-Pentecost to Nicaea....................................... 2 cr.
Upper division
• RELG300-302 History of Christian Thought I, II, III..........................3 cr. each
• RELG316 Comparative Religion.................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG320 Luther: His Ongoing Significance................................................ 3 cr.
• RELG321 History of the Lutheran Church.................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG350 Islam.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
Capstone
• LART490 Introduction to Research and Writing........................................... 3 cr.
• HIST495 Senior Seminar in History.............................................................. 3 cr.
History Minor
The minor in History requires the following courses:
• HIST207 History of USA I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST208 History of USA II........................................................................... 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations........................................ 3 cr.
• HIST115 Medieval/Renaissance World Civilizations..................................... 3 cr.
• HIST116 Early Modern World Civilizations.................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST117 Modern World History................................................................... 3 cr.
Nine additional credits must be earned in upper division
history (HIST) courses............................................................................ 9 cr.
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Information Systems Minor
The minor in Information Systems requires the following courses:
• COMS103 Introduction to Programming I.................................................... 3 cr.
• COMS104 Introduction to Programming II.................................................. 3 cr.
• MISY300 Software Applications..................................................................... 3 cr.
• MISY302 MIS in the Organization................................................................ 3 cr.
• MISY440 Project Management....................................................................... 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• BUSN307 Business Communication.............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM314 Information: Discovery and Management................................. 3 cr.
• COMM475 Media Ecology............................................................................ 3 cr.
• COMS320 Data Communications................................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE350 Technology in Society..................................................................... 3 cr.
Liberal Arts Major
Mission Statement
The Liberal Arts major is cross-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary. It integrates the
significant ways of looking at reality developed in the Western world — arts and letters,
theology, mathematics, physical sciences, and social sciences — in the quest for truth,
justice, and beauty.
Entry into the Major
Students should declare Liberal Arts as their intended major as early in their college
career as possible by filing a Declaration of Major and Change of Advisor forms with the
registrar. The student’s advisor should be from the area of the student’s concentration,
and must be approved by the director of the liberal arts major. Formal acceptance into
the major, however, occurs at the end of the sophomore year. Students must have a GPA
of 2.0 or above.
Core Requirements
1. A distribution of three- and four-hundred level courses in the following areas:
• Social Studies (2 courses)
• Arts and Humanities (3 courses)
• History (1 course)
• Science/Math (2 courses)
2. At least one concentration
3. LART490 Introduction to Research and Writing
and LART495 Senior Seminar Liberal Arts
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Concentrations
Integral to the liberal arts major are concentrations. The concentrations serve as
a focal point for the major, adding disciplinary depth. A student may not have both a
concentration and a minor in the same area.
Ancient and Medieval Studies
The concentration in Ancient and Medieval Studies requires:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations........................................ 3 cr.
• HIST325 History of the Western World in the Middle Ages......................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL201 Survey of Classic Greek Literature................................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL202 Survey of Roman Literature.......................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL203 Survey of Medieval and Renaissance Literature............................ 3 cr.
One of the following:
• HIST310 History of the Ancient Near East.................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST315 History of Ancient Greece............................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST320 History of Ancient Rome................................................................ 3 cr.
One of the following:
• GREK304 Advanced Greek: Plato’s Symposium............................................ 3 cr.
• HEBR304 Hebrew Prose................................................................................ 3 cr.
• PHIL330 History of Western Philosophy I..................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL450 Philosophical Readings................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG325 Psalms and Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ARTS342 Greek Art History.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR310 Theatre History and Literature I.................................................. 3 cr.
Art History
The concentration in Art History requires:
• ARTS105 Art History I - Prehistory to the Gothic Period............................. 3 cr.
• ARTS106 Art History II - Renaissance to the Realism.................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS107 Art History III - Impressionism to Contemporary......................... 3 cr.
Three of the following:
• ARTS342 Greek Art History.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS344 American Art History.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS346 Study of Non-Western Art............................................................. 3 cr.
• *ARTS450 Art Theory and Criticism............................................................. 3 cr.
One of the following:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilization.......................................... 3 cr.
• HIST115 Medieval/Renaissance World Civilization...................................... 3 cr.
• HIST116 Early Modern World Civilizations.................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST310 History of the Ancient Near East.................................................... 3 cr.
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• HIST315 History of Ancient Greece............................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST320 History of Ancient Rome................................................................ 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ARTS101 Introduction to Art......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS102 2-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS110 Drawing I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
Biology
The concentration in Biology requires:
• BIOL151 General Biology I............................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL152 General biology II............................................................................ 4 cr.
Electives (18 credits minimum; no more than 2 SCIE courses):
• BIOL203 Botany............................................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL210 Zoology........................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL221 Human Anatomy............................................................................ 4 cr.
• BIOL222 Human Physiology......................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL340 Genetics.......................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL350 Cell Biology.................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL360 Microbiology.................................................................................. 4 cr.
• BIOL370 Ecology........................................................................................... 4 cr.
• BIOL480 Topics in Biology........................................................................ 3-4 cr.
• BIOL490 Introduction to Human Gross Anatomy........................................ 5 cr.
• BIOL498 Biology Independent Research.................................................... 3-4 cr.
• BIOL499 Biology Internship...................................................................... 3-4 cr.
• CHEM323 General Biochemistry.................................................................. 4 cr.
• HLTH470 Introduction to Diseases and Disorders........................................ 3 cr.
• PHED350 Kinesiology................................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED450 Exercise Physiology....................................................................... 4 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science . ............................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science ............................................................................ 3 cr.
• SCIE340 Environmental Issues...................................................................... 3 cr.
Communication
The concentration in Communication requires at least two of the following:
• COMM314 Information: Discovery and Management................................. 3 cr.
• COMM318 Small Group Communication.................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM320 Language, Thought and Meaning............................................. 3 cr.
• COMM325 Processes of Criticism................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM340 Rhetorical Traditions................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM370 Organizational Communication................................................ 3 cr.
Two additional upper-division communication (COMM) courses, one of which
may be from the 200-level.
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English
The concentration in English requires:
• ENGL200 Introduction to Literary Studies .................................................. 3 cr.
• ENGL350 Literary Criticism.......................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL205 Introduction to Fiction ................................................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL206 Introduction to Poetry and Drama............................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL211 American Literature I.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL212 American Literature II................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• ENGL304 British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries.................................. 3 cr.
• ENGL305 British Literature: Romantics and Victorians............................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM210 Advanced Composition ............................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM213 Introduction to Creative Writing............................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM320 Language, Thought, and Meaning............................................ 3 cr.
• ENGL320 The English Language ................................................................. 3 cr.
One additional elective ENGL course,
or appropriate COMM or THTR course............................................... 3 cr.
History
The concentration in History requires three of the following:
• HIST114 The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations........................................ 3 cr.
• HIST115 Medieval/Renaissance World Civilizations..................................... 3 cr.
• HIST116 Early Modern World Civilizations.................................................. 3 cr.
• HIST117 Modern World History................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST207 History of USA I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST208 History of USA II........................................................................... 3 cr.
A minimum of three upper division history (HIST) courses.
A minimum of one of the following courses:
• ARTS342 Greek Art History.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS344 American Art History.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS346 Study of Non-Western Art............................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC341 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque........................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC342 Music of the Baroque and Classic Era.......................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC343 Music of the 19th Century........................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC344 Music of the 20th Century.......................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL330 History of Western Philosophy I..................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL331 History of Western Philosophy II................................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
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Mathematics
The concentration in Mathematics requires:
• MATH120 Introduction to Statistics............................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH141 Calculus I..................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH142 Calculus II................................................................................... 5 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
Music
The concentration in Music requires three of the following:
• MUSC111 Music Theory I............................................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC112 Music Theory II............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC121 Music History I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC122 Music History II........................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC211 Music Theory III.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC212 Music Theory IV.......................................................................... 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• MUSC303 Music Communication and Technology...................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC340 Survey of World Dance................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC341 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque........................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC342 Music of the Baroque and Classic Era.......................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC343 Music of the 19th Century........................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC344 Music of the 20th Century.......................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC417 Counterpoint and Composition................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC418 Analysis and Composition............................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC440 World Music................................................................................ 3 cr.
Two credits of applied music (private lessons).............................................. 2 cr.
Two credits of ensemble music....................................................................... 2 cr.
Natural Sciences
The concentration in the Natural Sciences requires:
Group 1
• CHEM107 General, Organic and Biochemistry............................................ 5 cr.
or
• CHEM113 General Chemistry I and............................................................. 5 cr.
• CHEM114 General Chemistry II................................................................... 5 cr.
Group 2
• PHYS151 College Physics I and...................................................................... 4 cr.
• PHYS152 College Physics II............................................................................ 4 cr.
or
• PHYS213 General Physics I and..................................................................... 5 cr.
• PHYS214 General Physics II........................................................................... 5 cr.
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Group 3
• BIOL101 Principles of Biology........................................................................ 4 cr.
or
• BIOL151 General Biology I............................................................................. 4 cr.
Group 4
Three of the following:
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE340 Environmental Issues...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE350 Technology in Society..................................................................... 3 cr.
Philosophy
The concentration in Philosophy requires 21 credits, distributed as follows:
Nine lower division credits:
• PHIL201 Logic and Critical Thinking........................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL202 Introduction to Philosophy............................................................. 3 cr.
• PHIL204 Ethics.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
At least one of the following:
• PHIL330 History of Western Philosophy I..................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL331 History of Western Philosophy II................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL450 Philosophical Readings................................................................... 3 cr.
Up to three of the following philosophy-related courses in any combination,
but no more than two courses from the same department (i.e., course prefix):
• COMM320 Language, Thought, and Meaning............................................ 3 cr.
• COMM325 Processes of Criticism................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM340 Rhetorical Traditions................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM385 Law and Ethics in Media........................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL350 Literary Criticism.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG300 Early Christian Thought I............................................................ 3 cr.
• RELG301 History of Christian Thought II................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG302 History of Christian Thought III.................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG420 The Rhetoric of Religion............................................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR420 Dramatic Theory.......................................................................... 3 cr.
Psychology
The concentration in Psychology requires:
• PSYC210 General Psychology......................................................................... 4 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC475 History and Systems of Psychology................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences............................................ 3 cr.
58
One of the following:
• PSYC310 Personality....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society...................................................................... 3 cr.
Two additional upper division psychology (PSYC) courses........................ 6 cr.
Religious Studies
The concentration in Religious Studies requires:
• Completion of the lower-division religious studies requirement..................... 8 cr.
• A total of five upper-division religious studies courses.................................. 15 cr.
Two of the following may be substituted for one of the above
religious studies courses:
• GREK304 Advanced Greek: Plato’s Symposium............................................ 3 cr.
• HEBR304 Hebrew Prose................................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST460 Religion in American History........................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society...................................................................... 3 cr.
Sociology
The concentration in Sociology requires:
• SOCL101 Introduction to Sociology.............................................................. 3 cr.
• Five additional courses from the sociology (SOCL) electives,
four of which must be upper division courses.......................................... 15 cr.
Spanish
The concentration in Spanish requires:
• SPAN203 Intermediate Spanish I................................................................... 4 cr.
• SPAN204 Intermediate Spanish II.................................................................. 4 cr.
• SPAN305 Conversation and Literature I ....................................................... 4 cr.
• SPAN306 Conversation and Literature II . .................................................... 4 cr.
One of the following:
• SPAN320 History and Culture of Spain......................................................... 3 cr.
• SPAN330 History and Culture of Latin America........................................... 3 cr.
• SPAN340 Survey of the Literature of Spain .................................................. 3 cr.
• SPAN350 Survey of the Literature of Latin America...................................... 3 cr.
Studio Art
The concentration in Studio Art requires:
• ARTS102 2-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS110 Drawing I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS202 3-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
Core art history - three of the following:
• ARTS105 Art History I - Prehistoric to the Gothic Period............................. 3 cr.
• ARTS106 Art History II - Renaissance to the Realism.................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS107 Art History III – Impressionism to Contemporary........................ 3 cr.
• ARTS240 Masterpieces of the Western Tradition.......................................... 3 cr.
59
One of the following emphases:
Ceramics emphasis
• ARTS115 Ceramics I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS215 Ceramics II..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS315 Ceramics III.................................................................................... 3 cr.
Drawing emphasis
• ARTS210 Drawing II...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS211 Life Drawing I................................................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS311 Life Drawing II............................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS312 Illustration I.................................................................................... 3 cr.
Graphic Arts emphasis
• ARTS230 Introduction to Desktop Publishing and Design . ........................ 3 cr.
• ARTS330 Electronic Imaging......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS332 Introduction to Multimedia Authoring/Flash............................... 3 cr.
Painting emphasis
• ARTS114 Painting I........................................................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS214 Painting II...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS314 Painting III..................................................................................... 3 cr.
Photography emphasis
• ARTS113 Photography I................................................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS213 Photography II................................................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS313 Photography III/Experimental....................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS413 Photography IV/Color................................................................... 3 cr.
Sculpture emphasis
• ARTS116 Sculpture I...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS216 Sculpture II..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS316 Sculpture III................................................................................... 3 cr.
Optional:
• ARTS450 Art Theory and Criticism.............................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS452 Contemporary Issues in Art........................................................... 3 cr.
Theatre
The concentration in Theatre requires:
• THTR101 Introduction to Theatre................................................................ 3 cr.
One of the following:
• THTR102 Acting I......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR105 Stage Craft.................................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• THTR210 Directing I.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR215 Rudiments of Theatrical Design................................................... 3 cr.
60
Three of the following:
• THTR310 Theatre History and Literature I.................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR311 Theatre History and Literature II................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR330 Period Style................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR420 Dramatic Theory and Criticism................................................... 3 cr.
Two credits of 100-level practicum................................................................ 2 cr.
Two credits of 300-level practicum................................................................ 2 cr.
Mathematics Major
Mission Statement
The Mathematics major at Bethany offers courses in both applied and theoretical
mathematics to prepare students for advanced studies as well as careers in mathematical
applications of scientific disciplines. It does this within a Christ-centered, liberal arts
framework that encourages breadth as well as depth of knowledge. Mathematics,
the study of patterns and structures more than of numbers, is presented as a means
to enable students to practice independent thinking so as not to be shaken from the
eternal foundation on which our moral and spiritual growth is based. Students develop
analytical reasoning and the ability to apply mathematical logic to solve problems, thus
improving critical thinking abilities.
Entry into the Major
A student wishing to major in mathematics must submit a formal application to
the major after completing MATH142. Extraordinary cases will be dealt with on an
individual basis. Upon receipt of the application, students will be granted entry into the
major if they have met the following requirements:
• Achieved an overall GPA of 2.5 or better
• Achieved a grade of C or better in all mathematics coursework
• Secured an advisor within the mathematics department
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• MATH141 Calculus I..................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH142 Calculus II................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH243 Multivariable Calculus................................................................ 4 cr.
• MATH295 Foundations of Abstract Mathematics......................................... 3 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• MATH341 Introduction to Analysis.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH351 Linear Algebra.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH450 Abstract Algebra.......................................................................... 4 cr.
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Major Electives
Required 13 credits:
• MATH260 Ordinary Differential Equations................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH321 Probability and Statistics I........................................................... 3 cr.
• MATH322 Probability and Statistics II......................................................... 3 cr.
• MATH380 Numerical Analysis..................................................................... 4 cr.
• MATH385 Mathematical Modeling.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MATH390 History of Mathematics............................................................... 3 cr.
• MATH440 Real Analysis............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MATH460 Partial Differential Equations...................................................... 4 cr.
• MATH470 Complex Analysis........................................................................ 4 cr.
• MATH480 Topics in Mathematics.............................................................1-4 cr.
• MATH499 Mathematics Internship............................................................ 1-2 cr.
Capstone/ Internship
• MATH491 Mathematics Colloquium............................................................ 2 cr.
Choose one of the following:
• MATH495 Senior Thesis................................................................................ 2 cr.
• MATH499 Mathematics Internship............................................................... 2 cr.
Mathematics Minor
The minor in Mathematics requires:
• MATH141 Calculus I..................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH142 Calculus II................................................................................... 5 cr.
• MATH243 Multivariable Calculus................................................................ 4 cr.
Electives - any three courses:
• MATH120 Introduction to Statistics............................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• Any Mathematics (MATH) course at the 200 level or above
(excluding MATH243)...........................................................................3-5 cr.
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Music Major
Mission Statement
Bethany offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music. This degree is built upon the
understanding that music derives its purpose and strength from its role as a servant of Christ
and His church. Students majoring in music may choose a course of study emphasizing
theory and composition, history and literature, conducting, or performance.
Entry into the Major
Students should apply for admission into the degree program at the end of their
third semester. Acceptance into the music degree programs requires a minimum 2.8
GPA in the music coursework of the first two years, and three semesters of ensemble and
applied music.
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• MUSC111 Music Theory I............................................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC112 Music Theory II............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC114 Music Skills I................................................................................ 2 cr.
• MUSC115 Music Skills II............................................................................... 2 cr.
• MUSC121 Music History I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC122 Music History II........................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC211 Music Theory III.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC212 Music Theory IV.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC214 Music Skills III............................................................................. 2 cr.
• MUSC215 Music Skills IV............................................................................. 2 cr.
Required upper division courses:
Five of the following:
• MUSC303 Music Communication and Technology...................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC340 Survey of World Dance................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC341 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque........................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC342 Music of the Baroque and Classic Era.......................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC343 Music of the 19th Century........................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC344 Music of the 20th Century.......................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC417 Counterpoint and Composition................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC418 Analysis and Composition............................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC440 World Music................................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC480 Topics in Music............................................................................ 3 cr.
Additional requirements:
Eight credits of applied music (private lessons).................................................. 8 cr.
Eight credits of ensemble music......................................................................... 8 cr.
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Music Minor
The minor in Music requires:
Four of the following:
• MUSC111 Music Theory I............................................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC112 Music Theory II............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC211 Music Theory III.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC212 Music Theory IV.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC121 Music History I............................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC122 Music History II........................................................................... 3 cr.
Three of the following:
• MUSC303 Music Communication and Technology...................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC341 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque........................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC342 Music of the Baroque and Classic Era.......................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC343 Music of the 19th Century........................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC344 Music of the 20th Century.......................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC340 Survey of World Dance................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC417 Counterpoint and Composition .................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC418 Analysis and Composition............................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• MUSC440 World Music................................................................................ 3 cr.
• MUSC480 Topics in Music............................................................................ 3 cr.
Additional Requirements:
Four credits of ensemble music.......................................................................... 4 cr.
Six credits of private lessons............................................................................... 6 cr.
Psychology Major
Mission Statement
Psychology studies the greatest work of God’s creation — human beings. The
psychology major at Bethany is designed to introduce the student to the science of
individual and group human behavior. The primary goal is to help students better
understand the providential love of God while preparing to help others.
Entry into the Major
Psychology majors must complete a formal application after completing three college
semesters. The following qualifications will be necessary for acceptance into the major:
• At least a 2.5 GPA in the first three semesters
• At least a 2.5 GPA in PSYC210, PSYC220
• Successful completion of an interview by the department
A major in psychology requires a minimum of 37 credits: 25 core credit requirements
and a minimum of 12 additional credits in a selected emphasis.
64
Required pre-major courses:
• BIOL101 Principles of Biology........................................................................ 4 cr.
• COMM212 Interpersonal Communication .................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG209 Christian Doctrine I...................................................................... 2 cr.
One of the following:
• COMM230 Argument and Advocacy............................................................ 3 cr.
• PHIL201 Logic and Critical Thinking........................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• MATH110 Math Problem Solving................................................................. 4 cr.
• MATH111 College Algebra............................................................................ 4 cr.
One of the following:
• ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology................................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL201 Marriage and the Family............................................................... 3 cr.
Recommended courses:
• MATH120 Introduction to Statistics............................................................. 3 cr.
• PHIL204 Ethics.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
Core Requirements
Understanding the field of psychology:
• PSYC210 General Psychology......................................................................... 4 cr.
• PSYC475 History and Systems of Psychology................................................ 3 cr.
Understanding human behavior:
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC310 Personality....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC340 Social Psychology........................................................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC350 Abnormal Psychology..................................................................... 3 cr.
Understanding the basics of research:
• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences............................................ 3 cr.
Training in helping skills:
• PSYC450 Principles and Strategies of Counseling.......................................... 3 cr.
Area of Emphasis
General Emphasis
• Any four upper division electives offered by the
psychology (PYSC) department............................................................... 12 cr.
Counseling Emphasis
• PSYC360 Educational Psychology and Human Relations ............................ 3 cr.
• PSYC420 Psychological Testing and Measurements ..................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC460 Facilitating Groups . ...................................................................... 3 cr.
65
Two of the following:
• HLTH311 Drug Education ........................................................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC430 Introduction to Physiological Psychology ..................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities .................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society ..................................................................... 3 cr.
Industrial/Organizational Emphasis
• PSYC410 Industrial/Organizational Psychology............................................ 3 cr.
(cross listed with COMM370 Organizational Communication)
• PSYC420 Psychological Testing and Measurements...................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC460 Facilitating Groups......................................................................... 3 cr.
Two of the following:
• BUSN333 Understanding Consumer Behavior.............................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN410 Leadership and Organizational Change........................................ 3 cr.
• BUSN420 Managing Human Resources........................................................ 3 cr.
Recommended courses:
• BUSN310 Principles of Management............................................................. 3 cr.
• BUSN431 Integrated Marketing Communication......................................... 3 cr.
• COMM375 Public Relations and Advertising................................................ 3 cr.
• COMM440 Communication Theory............................................................ 3 cr.
Psychology Minor
The minor in Psychology requires:
• PSYC210 General Psychology......................................................................... 4 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC475 History and Systems of Psychology................................................ 3 cr.
At least three other courses in psychology,
one of which must be upper division.......................................................... 9 cr.
Religion Major
Mission Statement
The mission of the Religion major in the Christian Liberal Arts curriculum
of Bethany Lutheran College is to prepare students for participation in the ongoing,
in-depth discussion of religion in church and society. The context of our study assumes
the perspective of confessional Lutheranism rooted in the Reformation heritage of
Scripture Alone, Grace Alone, Faith Alone, and Christ Alone. Its content includes the
rigorous study of the Lutheran tradition, the broader Christian tradition, the comparison
of that tradition with other major world religions, and an exploration of how the social
sciences and the field of communication connect with the study of religion. Course
selection within the major allows students to follow their interests either into a historical/
dogmatic emphasis or a Biblical studies emphasis, or to pursue a combination of both.
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Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• RELG110 Introduction to Christianity I........................................................ 2 cr.
• RELG111 Introduction to Christianity II....................................................... 2 cr.
• RELG2XX Second year religion elective........................................................ 2 cr.
• RELG2XX Second year religion elective........................................................ 2 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• RELG316 Comparative World Religions........................................................ 3 cr.
• RELG335 Lutheran Confessions.................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG420 Rhetoric of Religion...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society...................................................................... 3 cr.
Major Electives
Choose four of the following courses:
• RELG300 History of Christian Thought I:
Post-Apostolic Fathers to Chalcedon.......................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG301 History of Christian Thought II: Chalcedon to 15th Century .... 3 cr.
• RELG302 History of Christian Thought III:
17th Century Enlightenment to Modern & Post Modern......................... 3 cr.
• RELG320 Luther: His Ongoing Significance................................................ 3 cr.
• RELG321 History of the Lutheran Church in the U.S.................................. 3 cr.
• RELG325 Psalms and Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament................... 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG340 Apologetics.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG350 Islam.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG360 History of the Christian Church................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG380 Pauline Literature.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG382 Johannine Literature...................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG400 Church History Survey................................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG425 Influence of Eastern Religion upon American Culture................. 3 cr.
• RELG435 Post-Exilic and Intertestamental History & Literature................. 3 cr.
• RELG480 Topics In Religious Studies........................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG495 Senior Seminar In Religious Studies............................................. 3 cr.
• RELGIND Independent Study (per Instructor’s approval)............................ 3 cr.
Area of Emphasis
Completion of a minor in another academic discipline is required for this major.
Capstone
• LART490 Introduction to Research and Writing
or SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Studies..................................... 3 cr.
• RELG495 Senior Seminar In Religious Studies............................................. 3 cr.
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Religion Minor
The minor in Religion requires a minimum of 24 credits.
• RELG110 Introduction to Christianity I........................................................ 2 cr.
• RELG111 Introduction to Christianity II....................................................... 2 cr.
Two Religion (RELG) courses at the 200-level
(MUSC205 may be counted as one of these)......................................... 4 cr.
Four upper division RELG courses.............................................................. 12 cr.
Additional 2-3 RELG courses (depending on credits for a total of 24 credits, or
Two of the following:
• GREK304 Advanced Greek: Plato’s Symposium............................................ 3 cr.
• HEBR304 Hebrew Prose................................................................................ 3 cr.
• HIST460 Religion in American History........................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society...................................................................... 3 cr.
Sociology Major
Mission Statement
Sociology is the social science, which focuses on human behavior in society. The
specific objective of the major at Bethany is for students to become responsible citizens,
aware of social realities. The discipline uses scientific methods to analyze and understand
contemporary American social structures, human social behavior, and the organization
and functioning of groups.
Sociology at Bethany is an integrated major, which includes offerings in anthropology,
physical education, psychology and religious studies. It also looks beyond the confines
of the classroom and places students in real-life situations to learn and to apply their
knowledge for the betterment of society and for the glory of God.
Entry into the Major
Admission to the sociology major is granted by the department and includes
minimum requirements:
• A minimum GPA of 2.5
• A minimum of 32 earned semester credit hours
• SOCL101 Introduction to Sociology.............................................................. 3 cr.
Core Requirements
The major consists of 36 credits, at least 18 of which are from upper division courses.
Students are required to take the following four courses plus 24 additional credits from
the list of sociological offerings.
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• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences ........................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities
or ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology....................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL410 Sociological Theory....................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL440 Social Stratification....................................................................... 3 cr.
Major Electives
• ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology................................................................ 3 cr.
• ANTH210 World Prehistory.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ANTH220 Globalization and Culture Change............................................. 3 cr.
• ANTH302 Violence....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED320 Social Aspects of Sports................................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC340 Social Psychology........................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL105 Problems in Contemporary Society .............................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL201 Marriage and the Family .............................................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL235 Death and Dying ......................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL240 Criminal Deviance and Justice .................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities .................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society ..................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL350 Aging in Soc/PSYC330 Psychology of Adult Development.......... 3 cr.
• SOCL430 Collective Behavior and Social Movements.................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL480 Special Topics................................................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL499 Sociology Internship...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCLIND Independent Study....................................................................... 3 cr.
Sociology Minor
The minor in Sociology requires the following courses:
• SOCL101 Introduction to Sociology ............................................................. 3 cr.
Minor Electives
Five of the following courses, four of which must be upper division courses:
• ANTH102 Cultural Anthropology................................................................ 3 cr.
• ANTH210 World Prehistory.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ANTH220 Globalization and Culture Change............................................. 3 cr.
• ANTH302 Violence....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• PHED320 Social Aspects of Sports................................................................ 3 cr.
• PSYC340 Social Psychology........................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL105 Problems in Contemporary Society .............................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL201 Marriage and the Family .............................................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL235 Death and Dying ......................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL240 Criminal Deviance and Justice .................................................... 3 cr.
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• SOCL320 Research Methods in Social Sciences ........................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities .................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL345 Religion and Society ..................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL350 Aging in Soc/PSYC330 Psychology of Adult Development.......... 3 cr.
• SOCL410 Sociological Theory....................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL430 Collective Behavior and Social Movements.................................. 3 cr.
• SOCL440 Social Stratification....................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCL480 Special Topics................................................................................ 3 cr.
• SOCL499 Sociology Internship...................................................................... 3 cr.
• SOCLIND Independent Study....................................................................... 3 cr.
Spanish Minor
The minor in Spanish requires the following courses:
• SPAN203 Intermediate Spanish I................................................................... 4 cr.
• SPAN204 Intermediate Spanish II.................................................................. 4 cr.
• SPAN305 Conversation and Literature I ....................................................... 4 cr.
• SPAN306 Conversation and Literature II . .................................................... 4 cr.
One of the following:
• SPAN320 History and Culture of Spain......................................................... 3 cr.
• SPAN330 History and Culture of Latin America........................................... 3 cr.
One of the following:
• SPAN340 Survey of the Literature of Spain .................................................. 3 cr.
• SPAN350 Survey of the Literature of Latin America...................................... 3 cr.
Studio Art Major
Mission Statement
The Studio Art major provides curricular opportunities for the development of
technical skills, aesthetic judgment, and historical understanding. Participation in both
studio and art history courses stimulates critical thinking and refines creative potential
in the visual arts. The studio art major may choose to pursue a variety of interests:
oil painting, sculpture, ceramics, graphic design, or multimedia.
Entry into the Major
During the freshman and sophomore years, each student is expected to complete the
core curriculum. Entry into the major requires a minimum 3.0 GPA in all core studio
courses and a 2.0 GPA in all art history courses. Students must submit a portfolio of work
for review by the art department at the end of the sophomore year.
Students who seek state licensure for secondary level (grades K-12) teaching of art
must first meet all requirements for “Entry into the Education Major” (see Education
Major). These students are required to take all courses containing state standards in art
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(designated with an asterisk below) AND the courses listed under “State of Minnesota
Licensure Visual Arts.” Consult with the department chair for additional art course
requirements for an art major with secondary level licensure preparation.
Lower Division Core Requirements
Freshman core - 18 total credits:
• *ARTS102 2-Dimensional Design.................................................................. 3 cr.
• *ARTS110 Drawing I...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• *ARTS202 3-Dimensional Design.................................................................. 3 cr.
Core art history - three of the following:
• *ARTS105 Art History I - Prehistory to the Gothic Period............................ 3 cr.
• *ARTS106 Art History II - The Renaissance to Realism................................ 3 cr.
• *ARTS107 Art History III - Impressionism to Contemporary....................... 3 cr.
• ARTS240 Masterpieces of the Western Tradition.......................................... 3 cr.
Sophomore studio - minimum of 12 credits: : The freshman studio core must be
completed before second-tier studio courses (Drawing II, Painting II, etc.) may be taken.
These may, however, be taken concurrently when necessary.
• *ARTS113 Photography I................................................................................ 3 cr.
• *ARTS114 Painting I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS115 Ceramics I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• *ARTS116 Sculpture I..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS210 Drawing II...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS211 Life Drawing I................................................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS213 Photography II................................................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS214 Painting II...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS215 Ceramics II..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS216 Sculpture II..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• *ARTS230 Introduction to Desktop Publishing and Design ........................ 3 cr.
Upper Division Core Requirements
Upper division art history and criticism (8 credits) - Must include Senior
Exhibition (ARTS475) and either Art Theory and Criticism (ARTS450) or Contemporary
Issues (ARTS452)
• ARTS342 Greek Art History.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS344 American Art History.................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS346 Non-Western Art History.............................................................. 3 cr.
• *ARTS450 Art Theory and Criticism............................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS452 Contemporary Issues In Art........................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS475 Senior Exhibition........................................................................... 2 cr.
Area of Emphasis
The student is to choose one of three primary areas of emphasis: 2D, 3D, or Graphic
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Design. A minimum of 12 upper division credits is required for the major, with at least
six credits completed within the area of emphasis.
2-Dimensional emphasis:
• ARTS311 Life Drawing II............................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS312 Introduction to Illustration............................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS313 Photography III/Experimental....................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS314 Painting III..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS324 Painting IV..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS412 Illustration II.................................................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS413 Photography IV - Color................................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS414 Painting V ..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS424 Painting VI.................................................................................... 3 cr.
3-Dimensional emphasis:
• ARTS315 Ceramics III.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS316 Sculpture III................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS325 Ceramics IV................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS416 Sculpture IV................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS425 Ceramics V.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS426 Ceramics VI................................................................................... 3 cr.
Graphic Design emphasis:
• ARTS330 Electronic Imaging......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS332 Introduction to Multimedia Authoring/Flash............................... 3 cr.
• ARTS336 Graphics for the World Wide Web................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS430 Graphic Design Studio.................................................................. 3 cr.
Internship Opportunity
Students may apply through Career Services and the studio art department for the
completion of a program of practical experiences. Typical internship opportunities may
include graphic design, gallery management, and art education.
• ARTS499 Art Internship.............................................................................1-4 cr.
State of Minnesota Teaching Licensure
in Visual Arts
In addition to the Studio Art major requirements students who seek state licensure
for K-12 teaching of Visual Arts are required to take the courses listed above with an
asterisk AND the following courses:
• ARTS444 Methods in Teaching K-12 Art . ................................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC200 Educational Foundations ............................................................ 3 cr.
• EDUC210 Linguistics for Professionals......................................................... 1 cr.
• EDUC370 Introduction to the Exceptional Learner ..................................... 3 cr.
• EDUC401 Educational Technology and Media . .......................................... 2 cr.
• EDUC450 Curriculum Planning and Assessment ........................................ 2 cr.
• EDUC455 Classroom Management .............................................................. 1 cr.
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• EDUC499 Teaching Internship and Seminars............................................ 15 cr.
• HLTH206 Advanced First Aid . .................................................................... 3 cr.
• HLTH311 Drug Education ........................................................................... 3 cr.
• HIST403 Native American Culture and Government .................................. 1 cr.
• PSYC220 Human Growth and Development............................................... 3 cr.
• PSYC360 Educational Psychology and Human Relations ............................ 3 cr.
• SOCL330 American Minorities .................................................................... 3 cr.
Studio Art Minor
Art foundation core - 15 total credits
Studio:
• ARTS102 2-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS110 Drawing I....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS202 3-Dimensional Design................................................................... 3 cr.
Art History (two of the following):
• ARTS105 Art History I: Prehistoric to Gothic............................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS106 Art History II: Renaissance to Realism ........................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS107 Art History III: Impressionism to Contemporary . ....................... 3 cr.
• ARTS240 Masterpieces of the Western Tradition.......................................... 3 cr.
Advanced Studio - Minimum of nine credits from one of the three advanced
areas of emphasis.
2-Dimensional emphasis:
• ARTS210 Drawing II...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS211 Life Drawing.................................................................................. 3 cr.
• ARTS311 Life Drawing II............................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS312 Introduction to Illustration............................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS114 Painting ......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS214 Painting II...................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS314 Painting III..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS113 Photography.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS213 Photography II................................................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS313 Photography III/Experimental....................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS413 Photography IV/Color................................................................... 3 cr.
3-Dimensional emphasis:
• ARTS116 Sculpture......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS216 Sculpture II..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS316 Sculpture III................................................................................... 3 cr.
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• ARTS115 Ceramics......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS215 Ceramics II..................................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS315 Ceramics III.................................................................................... 3 cr.
Graphic Design emphasis:
• ARTS230 Introduction to Desktop Publishing and Design........................... 3 cr.
• ARTS330 Electronic Imaging......................................................................... 3 cr.
• ARTS332 Introduction to Multimedia Authoring / Flash.............................. 3 cr.
• ARTS336 Graphics for the World Wide Web................................................ 3 cr.
• ARTS430 Graphic Design Studio.................................................................. 3 cr.
Theatre Major
Mission Statement
Through classroom activities and in the regular practice of this diverse art form, the
theatre department at Bethany Lutheran College strives to encourage the development of
ethical Christian theatre artists who are able to employ their creative gifts with wisdom,
discernment, and an understanding of art’s potential. A Christ centered approach to
instruction in the theatre arts is at the very heart of the department’s existence.
The Theatre major, in accordance with the liberal arts philosophy, approaches this
discipline from a broad based (generalist) perspective. Within the major guidelines a
student may choose an emphasis in theatre production or performance. The total credits
include the fulfillment of the Common General Education requirements, the lower
division core requirements, the upper division core requirements, and theatre electives.
The theatre major requires 51 credits, which include a minimum of 32 upper level theatre
credits.
Core Requirements
Required lower division courses:
• THTR100 Theatre Practicum........................................................................ 3 cr.
• THTR101 Introduction to Theatre................................................................ 3 cr.
• THTR102 Acting I......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR105 Stage Craft.................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR210 Directing I.................................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following courses:
• THTR215 Rudiments of Theatrical Design................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR240 Oral Interpretation....................................................................... 3 cr.
Required upper division courses:
• THTR300 Theatre Practicum....................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR310 Theatre History I.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR311 Theatre History II........................................................................ 3 cr.
• THTR330 Period Style................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR420 Dramatic Theory and Criticism................................................... 3 cr.
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One of the following courses:
• THTR495 Senior Theatre Project.................................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR499 Theatre Internship........................................................................ 3 cr.
Electives
Choose five of the following courses:
• COMM318 Small Group Communication.................................................... 3 cr.
• COMM320 Language, Thought and Meaning............................................. 3 cr.
• COMM370 Organizational Communication................................................ 3 cr.
• COMM470 Performing for the Camera......................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL306 Shakespeare................................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR302 Acting II....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR340 Stage Dialects............................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR410 Directing II................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR460 Theatre Management................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR480 Topics in Theatre (repeatable by topic)..................................... 1-3 cr.
• THTR481 Advanced Design and Technical Seminar ................................ 1-3 cr.
Theatre Minor
The minor in Theatre requires the following courses:
• THTR100 Theatre Practicum . ..................................................................... 1 cr.
• THTR101 Introduction to Theatre ............................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR300 Theatre Practicum....................................................................... 2 cr.
Three of the following courses:
• THTR102 Acting I......................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR105 Stage Craft . ................................................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR210 Directing I ................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR215 Rudiments of Theatrical Design................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR240 Oral Interpretation....................................................................... 3 cr.
One of the following courses:
• THTR310 Theatre History I.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR311 Theatre History II........................................................................ 3 cr.
Two of the following courses:
• COMM470 Performing for the Camera......................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL306 Shakespeare................................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC335 Music Theatre............................................................................... 3 cr.
• MUSC435 Opera and Lyric Theatre.............................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR302 Acting II....................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR330 Period Style................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR340 Stage Dialects............................................................................... 3 cr.
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• THTR410 Directing II................................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR460 Theatre Management................................................................... 3 cr.
• THTR480 Topics in Theatre (repeatable by topic)..................................... 1-3 cr.
• THTR481 Advanced Design and Technical Seminar
(repeatable by topic)................................................................................ 1-3 cr.
• THTR495 Senior Theatre Project.................................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR499 Theatre Internship........................................................................ 3 cr.
Western Philosophy Minor
The minor in Western Philosophy requires 21 credits, distributed as follows:
Nine lower division credits:
• PHIL201 Logic and Critical Thinking........................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL202 Introduction to Philosophy............................................................. 3 cr.
• PHIL204 Ethics.............................................................................................. 3 cr.
At least one of the following:
• PHIL330 History of Western Philosophy I..................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL331 History of Western Philosophy II................................................... 3 cr.
• PHIL450 Philosophical Readings................................................................... 3 cr.
Up to three of the following philosophy-related courses in any combination,
but no more than two courses from the same department (i.e., course prefix):
• COMM320 Language, Thought, and Meaning............................................ 3 cr.
• COMM325 Processes of Criticism................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM340 Rhetorical Traditions................................................................. 3 cr.
• COMM385 Law and Ethics in Media........................................................... 3 cr.
• ENGL350 Literary Criticism.......................................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG300 Early Christian Thought I............................................................ 3 cr.
• RELG301 History of Christian Thought II................................................... 3 cr.
• RELG302 History of Christian Thought III.................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG330 Christian Social Thought.............................................................. 3 cr.
• RELG420 The Rhetoric of Religion............................................................... 3 cr.
• SCIE320 History and Philosophy of Science.................................................. 3 cr.
• SCIE330 Ethics in Science.............................................................................. 3 cr.
• THTR420 Dramatic Theory.......................................................................... 3 cr.
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Course Descriptions
ACCT207
Accounting I (4)
Principles and practices required to prepare and analyze business records are
introduced. Topics covered include the accounting cycle, internal control, accounts
receivable, inventories, current liabilities, depreciation, payroll accounting, and
partnerships.
ACCT208
Accounting II (4)
Topics introduced in ACCT207 are extended with coverage of corporate accounting,
long-term liabilities, cash flows, financial statement analysis, international accounting,
management accounting, budgets, variance analysis, and capital budgeting. Prerequisite:
ACCT207 or consent of instructor.
ANTH102
Cultural Anthropology (3)
Differences in culture, subsistence and technology, kinship and social organizations,
political and economic systems, and religion and ideology among the people of the world
are examined. Comparisons are made with familiar American culture.
ANTH210
World Prehistory (3)
Introduction to world prehistory as investigated by archeologists and physical
anthropologists. It provides a sampling of ancient societies and emphasizes the agricultural
revolution and the origins of urban life.
ANTH220
Globalization and Culture Change (3)
This course examines globalization as a worldwide phenomenon showing how
politics, economic, information technology, religion and other institutions have
contributed to changing the world. Theories and models of cultural change and global
problems are also addressed.
ANTH302
Violence (3)
The subject of violence is studied from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural
perspective. The nature of violence as exhibited in the individual, among family
members, in society and among the people of the world is described, discussed and
analyzed. Prerequisite: SOCL101 or PSYC210 or ANTH102.
ARTS101
Introduction to Art (3)
Introductory study of the techniques, philosophy, history, and vocabulary of the
visual arts. Lecture and hands-on studio exercises leading to the development of skills in
creative thinking, visual communication, and technique. Not intended for art majors.
ARTS102
2-Dimensional Design (3)
Foundation-level course exploring the fundamental components of art and their
application in drawing and painting. Emphasis placed on discovering creative solutions
to visual problems.
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ARTS105
Art History I: Prehistory to the Gothic Period (3)
Survey of man’s contribution to the visual arts in Western Civilization from
pre-history to the Renaissance. Aesthetic and philosophical background stressed.
ARTS106
Art History II: The Renaissance to Realism (3)
Survey of man’s contribution to the visual arts in Western Civilization from
Renaissance to Realism.
ARTS107
Art History III: Impressionism to Contemporary (3)
Survey of man’s contribution to the visual arts in Western Civilization from
Impressionism to contemporary.
ARTS110
Drawing I (3)
Introduction to visual expression in traditional drawing skills and materials.
Emphasis on perception and development of imagery.
ARTS113
Photography I (3)
The student must become familiar with film development and dark room techniques.
Historical perspective and evaluation of photography included. Two lectures and one lab
per week.
ARTS114
Painting I (3)
Introduction to traditional oil painting techniques. Emphasis on perception with
development in design, color, form and content.
ARTS115
Ceramics I (3)
Introduction to the basic methods of clay pottery and sculpture construction. Handbuilding as well as wheel-throwing techniques are developed.
ARTS116
Sculpture I (3)
This course will cover basic sculptural materials (wood, stone, plaster, construction/
assemblage) and look at sculpture in art history. Critical analysis of sculpture will be
emphasized.
ARTS202
3-Dimensional Design (3)
Study of the structural, perceptual and spatial properties of three-dimensional
forms. This course includes the building of models and sculpture out of a variety of
materials.
ARTS210
Drawing II (3)
Advanced problems in visual expression and developmental skills with a variety of
media. Emphasis on conceptual justification and perception. Prerequisite: ARTS110
or consent of instructor.
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ARTS211
Life Drawing I (3)
The systematic, academic study of human anatomy and the depiction of the human
figure in western art. Working from anatomy texts, the study of the old masters, and
direct observation, students will refine their drawing technique using a variety of media.
Emphasis given to direct observation and the accurate depiction of the figure in space.
Prerequisite: ARTS110.
ARTS213
Photography II (3)
Advanced photography techniques in both the darkroom and the field. Emphasis on
photo composition, content and critical analysis. Historical perspective is also included.
Two lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: ARTS113.
ARTS214
Painting II (3)
Advanced problems of visual expression in oil painting. Emphasis on perceptual
skills, scale, and surface. Prerequisite: ARTS114.
ARTS215
Ceramics II (3)
Advanced problems in hand building and wheel-throwing. The development of a
personal style is emphasized. Prerequisite: ARTS115.
ARTS216
Sculpture II (3)
A continuation covering sculptural materials and methods of working. Emphasis is
on looking at and talking about work critically. Prerequisite: ARTS116.
ARTS230
Introduction to Desktop Publishing and Design (3)
An introduction to the basic principles and practice of graphic design. Topics
include the creative process, presentation graphics, and the software typically used for
print design (Adobe InDesign).
ARTS240
Masterpieces of the Western Tradition (3)
Travel to Europe. Students study the major works of art and architecture from the
Western Tradition. The specific location and course design will be set each year.
ARTS311
Life Drawing II (3)
Continued study of the human form; drawing from life using a variety of mediums.
Prerequisite: ARTS211.
ARTS312
Introduction to Illustration (3)
Introduction to the field of commercial illustration. Topics include visual
communication, the creative process, self-promotion, and the development of a personal
style. A variety of media and conceptual frameworks will be considered. Prerequisites:
ARTS210 and ARTS311.
ARTS313
Photography III/Experimental (3)
Numerous photographic processes, from historical to modern, are studied and
practiced. Each week new processes are introduced for the students to expand upon for
critical analysis. Two lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: ARTS213.
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ARTS314
Painting III (3)
Development of a personal style, vision and body of artwork. Introduction to
techniques of egg tempera and fresco. Journal writing and analysis of artwork required.
Productive studio habits are needed to explore imagery and technique. Prerequisite:
ARTS214.
ARTS315
Ceramics III (3)
Development of a personal style, vision, and body of artwork. Students learn to
relate their work to historical and contemporary traditions. Prerequisite: ARTS215.
ARTS316
Sculpture III (3)
This course assumes the student is proficient with sculptural materials and is
familiar with critical analysis in order to begin developing a body of work that is linked
thematically or conceptually. Emphasis on the development of a working studio aesthetic.
Prerequisite: ARTS216.
ARTS324
Painting IV (3)
This course will allow the student to continue to develop a body of work as an
artist. A thorough understanding of various painting mediums is expected and must be
demonstrated. Journal and artistic biography in written form are continued in this class.
Prerequisite: ARTS314.
ARTS325
Ceramics IV (3)
This course will allow the student to continue to develop an area of expertise as an
artist. A thorough understanding of the procedures of running a ceramics studio from
clay body to finished artwork is expected. A body of consistent artwork will be completed
as well as journal writing and analysis of the art form. Prerequisite: ARTS315.
ARTS330
Electronic Imaging (3)
An exploration of the production of original design and illustration for print and
electronic delivery. Emphasis placed on the discovery of creative solutions to visual
problems. Programs used: Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. Prerequisite: ARTS230.
ARTS332
Introduction to Multimedia Authoring/Flash (3)
An introduction to the integration of imagery, text, sound, video, and animation for
electronic delivery along with associated web page development. Program used: Adobe
Flash. Prerequisite: ARTS330.
ARTS336
Graphics for the World Wide Web (3)
Introduction to the design principles and methods critical to the production of an
effective web site. Begins with the thorough study of HTML/XHTML and moves into
the creation of web pages using page design software. Program used: Adobe Dreamweaver.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
ARTS342
Greek Art History (3)
Overview of Greek art and its development from the Geometric to the Hellenistic.
All aspects of the visual arts, architecture, sculpture, numismatics and ceramics will be
included and related to the culture of its time.
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ARTS344
American Art History (3)
Study of America’s particular contribution to the International art scene.
Chronological development and regional styles as well as influence of Europe and other
cultures will be examined.
ARTS346
Study of Non-Western Art (3)
Rotating focus on one or more areas of non-Western art.
ARTS412
Illustration II (3)
Continued refinement of a consistent, recognizable artistic style. Emphasis placed
on conceptual development and the creation of a consistently professional portfolio.
ARTS413
Photography IV/Color (3)
Introduction to the world of color photography. Students will learn to shoot and
process color film and prints, as well as continue to develop their personal style. Two
lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: ARTS313.
ARTS414
Painting V (3)
Continued development of a body of work, to prepare for senior show. Students
propose a series of paintings or working with a specific theme and materials. For art
majors only that have a concentration in painting. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
ARTS416
Sculpture IV (3)
Continuation of development of individual work with emphasis on developing a
body of work that is ready for exhibition. Prerequisite: ARTS316.
ARTS424
Painting VI (3)
Continuation of Painting V. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
ARTS425
Ceramics V (3)
Prerequisite: ARTS325.
ARTS426
Ceramics VI (3)
Prerequisite: ARTS425.
ARTS430
Graphic Design Studio (3)
The culmination of all graphic design courses offered at Bethany. Intended to bring
together all areas of design previously studied in one major creative project. Emphasis
placed on portfolio development and consistency across media.
ARTS444
Methods in Teaching K-12 Art (3)
This course is required for students who seek state licensure for secondary level
(grades K-12) teaching of visual arts within the studio art major. Students must first
meet all requirements for “Entry into the Education Major.” Then they must meet all
requirements for the Studio Art “Entry into the Major.” This course contains a field
experience component and must precede enrollment in EDUC499 Teaching Internship
and Seminars (student teaching).
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ARTS450
Art Theory and Criticism (3)
Seminar on writing and speaking about art. Emphasis on formal analysis of various
art forms and effective communication of ideas. Expressing opinions, asking questions
and developing a style will be explored.
ARTS452
Contemporary Issues in Art (3)
An art history seminar course that focuses on current issues in the art world from the
past 10-15 years. Students will research, present and discuss what is happening in today’s
art world and visit galleries in the Twin Cities, Chicago or New York.
ARTS495
Senior Exhibition (2)
This course is to prepare the artist to present and display artwork. A resume and
portfolio must be completed. An exhibition will be scheduled and all aspects of the event
will be planned by the student. A gallery talk by the artist will be presented to the college
community.
ARTS499
Art Internship (3)
Art-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
worksite. Studio art majors only, by consent.
BIOL101
Principles of Biology (4)
An analysis of the underlying biological concepts in the areas of biochemistry,
cytology, physiology, genetics and ecology. Three lectures and one lab per week.
BIOL151
General Biology I (4)
First semester of a two-semester introduction to biological study. Emphasis is placed
on scientific processes, molecules, and cellular function. Three lectures and one lab per
week.
BIOL152
General Biology II (4)
Second semester of a two-semester introduction to biological study. Includes an
overview of living organisms and vertebrate organ systems. Three lectures and one lab
per week.
BIOL203
Botany (4)
Overview of the plant kingdom with study of anatomy, physiology, ecology, and
economic importance of plants. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites:
BIOL151 and BIOL152 or consent of instructor.
BIOL210
Zoology (4)
Overview of invertebrate and vertebrate animals with emphasis on adaptation and
ecology. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites: BIOL151 and BIOL152 or
consent of instructor.
BIOL221
Human Anatomy (4)
A systems approach to the structure of the human body. Three lectures and one lab
per week. Prerequisite: BIOL151.
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BIOL222
Human Physiology (4)
A study of the mechanisms and interrelationships within the organ systems of the
human body. A special emphasis on structure/function relationships. Three lectures and
one lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM107 or CHEM113.
BIOL340
Genetics (4)
Study of chromosomes, genes, DNA, and the regulation of genetic material. Three
lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites: BIOL151 and BIOL152.
BIOL350
Cell Biology (4)
Study of structure and processes within prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Three
lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites: BIOL151 and BIOL152.
BIOL360
Microbiology (4)
Study of viruses, bacteria, and protists with emphasis placed on culture methods and
their connection to human diseases. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites:
BIOL151 and BIOL152.
BIOL370
Ecology (4)
Study of organisms and their relationship with other organisms and their environment. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites: BIOL151 and BIOL152.
BIOL480
Topics in Biology (3)
Discussion of selected topics in biological sciences. Course is offered on a rotational
basis and may be repeated for credit with different topics.
BIOL490
Introduction to Human Gross Anatomy (5)
An advanced study of human anatomy using a regional approach. Cadaver dissection included. Prerequisite: BIOL221.
BIOL498
Biology Independent Research (3)
Biological research by arrangement with instructor. Literature design, review and
execution of biological experimentation.
BIOL499
Biology Internship (3)
Biology-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
work site. Biology majors only, by consent.
BUSN101
Introduction to Business (3)
Students are acquainted with the nature of business and its various activities. Forms
of ownership, management, marketing, human resources, finance, and accounting are
viewed in context of economic, social, political, technical, and industry environments in
which a business operates.
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BUSN307
Business Communications (3)
Effective business and professional communication in written, electronic, verbal,
nonverbal and team modes serve as the focus for this class. Students develop and
strengthen communication skills through a variety of methods, including analysis of
business and professional documents; in-class written, verbal, and team exercises; and
formal written assignments.
BUSN310
Principles of Management (3)
Traditional and contemporary management principles are examined and applied
in light of the driving force of change that affects all organizations. The principles of
teamwork, collaboration, participation, and learning are used to develop critical thinking
and analytical skills essential for success in today’s business world.
BUSN330
Principles of Marketing (3)
The marketing process and environment, marketing ethics, buyer behavior, targeting
and market research, e-commerce, and basic product, price, distribution and promotion
concepts serve as an introduction to the marketing function.
BUSN333
Consumer Behavior (3)
The consumption process and the direct and indirect factors that influence the
process will be examined. The relationship between consumer behavior and marketing
strategy will also be considered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
BUSN350
Principles of Finance (3)
The role of finance in organizations is introduced through study of principles and
theories of acquisition, control, and allocation of financial resources. Prerequisite:
ACCT207 or ACCT208.
BUSN351
Financial Institutions (3)
The course focuses on the structure, trends, and interrelationships of the monetary
and banking systems, particularly commercial banks, savings and loans, thrifts, insurance
companies, investment banking, mortgage companies, the secondary market, and the
FED. Prerequisite: BUSN350 or consent of instructor.
BUSN352
Investments (3)
Formation of investment policy for individuals and institutions, factors influencing
the value of securities, and techniques of portfolio selection and management are
presented. Prerequisite: BUSN350 or consent of instructor.
BUSN370
Legal Aspects of Sport (3)
Identification and application of various legal principles and ethics of the sport
industry. Different fields of law are introduced along with a survey of issues of concern
to the sports manager such as antitrust, legal aspects of risk for various constituencies,
labor, contractual relationships, and governance associations. Prerequisite: BUSN310
or consent of instructor.
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BUSN399
Business Practicum (1-3)
Practical experience in professional development, networking and/or initiating,
organizing, and completing a problem-solving consulting project for profit or non-profit
organizations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable.
BUSN410
Leadership and Organizational Change (3)
Models of leadership and their effect on organizational strategy, structure,
processes, decision-making, and change are presented. Organizational development and
transformational approaches to managing change, and potential outcomes of planned
organizational changes are also considered. Prerequisite: BUSN310 or COMM370 or
consent of instructor.
BUSN420
Managing Human Resources (3)
This course provides an essential overview of human resource management and its
relationship to strategic planning. The human resource functions of staffing, retention,
development, adjustment, and managing in all types of organizations will be examined
from a managerial perspective. Prerequisite: BUSN310 or consent of instructor.
BUSN430
Sport and Event Marketing (3)
Application of fundamental marketing concepts of the sport industry. Specific
topics covered include marketing research, event planning and execution, fundraising,
sponsorships, advertising, and assessment. Prerequisite: BUSN330 or consent of
instructor.
BUSN431
Integrated Marketing Communication (3)
Marketing communication and the coordination of separate promotion strategies
used to create the desired image and provide consistency and maximum communication
impact are explored. The course approaches integrated marketing communication from
a managerial focus on the full range of promotional tools available in today’s business
environment. Prerequisite: BUSN330 or consent of instructor.
BUSN440
Marketing Strategy (3)
Focus is given to development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing
strategies in complex organizational environments. Students are required to integrate a
variety of marketing management concepts, theories, and analysis techniques through
in-depth case study. Prerequisite: BUSN330 or consent of instructor.
BUSN450
Risk Management (3)
Survey of the effects of risk management and insurance on businesses and the
relationship of risk and insurance to public policy, legal liability, and economic security.
An introduction to insurance institutions and their structures is provided as well as
decision making relative to risk management. Prerequisite: BUSN350 or consent of
instructor.
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BUSN460
Advanced Financial Management (3)
Various tools for analysis of working capital management, capital budgeting, and
financial management are used as the basis for an in-depth examination of financial
management concepts and theories. Prerequisites: BUSN350 and BUSN352 or consent
of instructor.
BUSN470
Administrative Policy (3)
Business analysis, problem solving, decision-making, and critical thinking skills are
used to explore competitive strategy decisions facing organizations. Emphasis is placed
on team leadership, professional development, and managing self, peers, and supervisor.
Intended as a capstone for majors or minors only.
BUSN471
Sport Administration (3)
Application of fundamental management concepts of the sport industry. Topics
covered include the nature and scope of the sport industry and socio-historical
development. Critical decision areas such as strategy, human resources, marketing,
finance, ethics and risk management will be integrated through case study. Prerequisite:
BUSN310 or consent of instructor.
BUSN480
Topics in Business (3)
Specialized business topics not covered in electives are presented. Topics may include,
but are not limited to: business law, business ethics and stakeholder management,
management theory, quality management, e-commerce. Prerequisites: At least two of
the following: BUSN310, BUSN330, and BUSN350 or consent of instructor.
BUSN499
Business Internship (1-9)
Business-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
worksite. Business majors only, by consent.
CHEM100
Descriptive Chemistry (4)
Intended for the non-science major. Covers basic chemical principles and their
applications in society. The course will provide students with a basic academic and
intellectual understanding of the chemical principles and terminology that they will
encounter in their daily lives. Three lectures and one two-hour lab each week.
CHEM105
The Chemistry of Art (4)
This is a liberal arts general education chemistry course that uses the studio arts
to present a variety of concepts in chemistry. Lab and lecture are used to present and
study chemical phenomena associated with various areas of art. Three lectures and one
two-hour lab each week.
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CHEM107
General, Organic and Biochemistry (5)
A survey of chemical topics for students majoring in elementary education and
pre-allied health sciences. This course covers general chemical principles, names, reactions
and properties of organic compounds, and general biochemical topics needed for biology,
microbiology, physiology, and other advanced topics. Four lectures and one lab per week.
CHEM113
General Chemistry I (5)
An in-depth introduction to the principles of chemistry intended for students in
the physical sciences, pre-medical, pre-engineering and related fields. Topics include
atomic structure, periodicity, nomenclature, stoichiometry and bonding. Five lectures
and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in MATH111
or MATH141. High school chemistry is strongly recommended.
CHEM114
General Chemistry II (5)
A continuation of CHEM113. Covers advanced chemical principles including
intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and
nuclear chemistry. Five lectures and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite:
CHEM113.
CHEM215
Organic Chemistry I (4)
This course begins a full-year study of organic chemistry that focuses on synthesis,
structure, nomenclature and properties of organic compounds. Spectroscopic methods
for identification of compounds are introduced and used throughout the course. Three
lectures and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CHEM114.
CHEM216
Organic Chemistry II (4)
A continuation of CHEM215. Advanced topics in organic synthesis, multi-step
syntheses and advanced spectroscopic methods are covered. Three lectures and one
three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CHEM215.
CHEM301
Introduction to Environmental Management (1)
A survey of the major governmental agencies and laws that govern the use of
chemicals in the environment and consumer products. The course will cover management
responsibilities, technical and legal aspects of environmental management, and practical
guidance on when and how to request permits. Prerequisite: At least one year college
chemistry or consent of instructor.
CHEM313
Analytical Chemistry (4)
An introduction to the theories, chemical methods, and instrumental techniques
for solving a variety of real problems in chemical analysis. This course includes statistical
methods for evaluating and interpreting data, experimental design, theory of electronic
instruments, and exposure to computer based data acquisition systems. Three lectures
and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CHEM114 or consent of the instructor.
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CHEM314
Inorganic Chemistry (4)
Descriptive chemistry of the elements and an introduction to structure, bonding,
and reactivity in covalent molecular substances, main group elements, transition
elements, coordination compounds, and organometallic compounds. Three lectures and
one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CHEM114 or CHEM216 and consent of
the instructor.
CHEM323
General Biochemistry (4)
Introduction to structure and function of biomolecules, metabolism and
bioenergetics, and biological information flow, as well as biochemical laboratory methods.
Three lectures and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CHEM216.
CHEM324
Advanced Biochemistry (4)
An advanced study of biochemistry with an added emphasis on structure elucidation,
genetic information, metabolic regulation and biotechnology. Three lectures and one
three-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CHEM323.
CHEM353
Physical Chemistry I (4)
A calculus-based introduction to physical methods in chemistry. Topics include
gas laws, thermodynamics and equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetic theory and kinetics.
Three lectures and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisites: CHEM216 and
PHYS214.
CHEM354
Physical Chemistry II (4)
A continuation of CHEM353 focusing on quantum phenomena, spectroscopy,
and statistical thermodynamics. Three lectures and one three-hour lab each week.
Prerequisite: CHEM353.
CHEM401
Chemical Information (1)
An introduction to resources and methods used to search the chemical literature.
Topics include chemical abstracts, CASonline, citation indices, Beilstein, the patent
literature, and government publication (CFR, STIS, NTIS). Students who are engaged
in research will be required to take this course. Prerequisite: CHEM215.
CHEM405
Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
Advanced Organic Chemistry focuses on both physical organic chemistry and the
reactions and synthesis of organic chemistry as they apply to the synthesis of complex
organic molecules. Both areas are related, and special attention will be given to how the
physical properties affect the chemical properties of organic molecules. Prerequisite:
CHEM215 and CHEM216.
CHEM480
Topics in Chemistry (3)
Selected topics offered on a rotating basis. Course topics will include advanced
organic synthesis, advanced inorganic chemistry, instrumental methods of analysis,
spectroscopic methods, etc. Course may be repeated for credit with different topics; may
include a laboratory period.
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CHEM495
Chemistry Seminar (1)
Students prepare and present a seminar detailing the results of their chemical research
or on a review of literature on a topic agreed upon with the instructor. It is expected that
this course is a logical extension and conclusion to the student’s research experience
and provides valuable practical experience preparing and presenting information
in a professional manner. Required for all students who engage in research in lieu of
coursework electives.
CHEM497
Research (arranged) (1)
Independent research under the guidance of faculty member, culminating in a
senior thesis, research seminar, etc. Summer research programs may be able to count for
CHEM497 credit. Prerequisites: CHEM215 and consent of the instructor.
COMM102
Journalism Newspaper, Bethany Scroll (1)
Practical experience in writing, editing, layout, or photography with the college
newspaper, the Bethany Scroll.
COMM103
Journalism Practicum, Yearbook (1)
Practical experience in writing, editing, layout, or photography with the college
yearbook, the Fidelis.
COMM104
Journalism Practicum, Literary Magazine (1)
Practical experience in editing creative works and designing layout for two or more
issues of the college literary magazine. Consent of advisor required.
COMM105
Journalism Practicum, Broadcast Journalism (1)
Practical experience in writing, editing and producing a weekly television news
program, BLC News.
COMM110
College Composition (3)
While learning strategies that promote critical, creative, and collaborative drafting,
students practice college level writing in narrative, critical, and persuasive forms,
producing a portfolio of five to seven essays including a research paper.
COMM111
Fundamentals of Speech (3)
Study of the verbal communication process. An introductory course in the principles
of public speaking and language awareness. Includes the delivery of several types of
speeches as well as opportunities to evaluate speeches and speaking styles.
COMM115
Competitive Speaking (1)
This is an activity course involving participation in intercollegiate speech
tournaments.
COMM201
Photographic Journalism Practicum (1)
Practical experience in photography. Work is coordinated with college newspaper,
yearbook, and other college departments. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
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COMM210
Advanced Composition (3)
Students examine and practice advanced techniques, individual and collaborative,
for generating ethical, audience-oriented prose. Each student develops a specialized
portfolio corresponding with individual academic goals.
COMM212
Interpersonal Communication (3)
The study of human communication in informal settings, focusing on processes, selfconcept and self-disclosure, listening, language effects, nonverbal messages, assertiveness,
conflict, and relationships with family, with friends, and in the workplace.
COMM213
Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
Through regular writing to generate ideas and practice techniques, students fathom
the creative process as they are led from exploring personal experience to transforming
such experience into artful fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. Prerequisite:
COMM110.
COMM230
Argument and Advocacy (3)
While studying the requirements of cogent argument, students practice advocacy
and refutation in value and policy disputes, giving special attention to rational approaches
to moral issues. Prerequisite: COMM111 or consent of the instructor.
COMM240
Introduction to Mass Media (3)
Through study of the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the various print and
electronic media, students are encouraged toward intelligent appraisal of the contributions
and effects of mass media on individuals and on our culture.
COMM295
Audio/Video Production I (1)
Students receive instruction and hands-on experience with equipment for audio and
video production. Required of all communication majors. Freshmen require consent of
instructor.
COMM297
Audio/Video Production II (3)
Students learn and practice camera techniques, lighting schemes, audio design, and
interviewing and writing skills in the process of scripting and creating media productions
in the Bethany studio and the field. Prerequisite: COMM295. Recommended:
COMM105.
COMM301
Advanced Photojournalism Practicum (1)
Prerequisite: COMM201.
COMM302
Advanced Journalism Practicum Newspaper (1)
Advanced work with the student newspaper, the Bethany Scroll, for those with four
previous credits in COMM102.
COMM303
Advanced Journalism Practicum Yearbook (1)
Advanced work with the annual yearbook for those with four previous credits in
COMM103.
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COMM304
Advanced Journalism Practicum Literary Magazine (1)
Advanced work on the literary magazine for those with four previous credits in
COMM104.
COMM305
Advanced Journalism Practicum Broadcasting (1)
Advanced work on the weekly television news program, BLC News, for those with
four previous credits in COMM105.
COMM313
Advanced Creative Writing (3)
A course challenging students to choose one or two genres to focus on in some
depth. The course also requires a significant portfolio of work to be developed.
COMM314
Information: Discovery and Management (3)
Students consider the nature of information and its role in society and culture.
Against a background of research methods, they practice information gathering and
evaluation, and observe how it is effectively conveyed to audiences.
COMM315
Advanced Competitive Speaking (1)
Advanced participation in intercollegiate speech tournaments, for those with four
previous credits in COMM115. One credit per semester, repeatable.
COMM317
Composition Theory and Practice (3)
Theories and principles of rhetoric, composition and writing, and language as they
apply to the teaching of composition.
COMM318
Small Group Communication (3)
Students investigate group communication processes and theories. Key concepts
include roles, decision-making, conflict management, cohesiveness, and variables
affecting the small group dynamic such as power and gender.
COMM320
Language, Thought, and Meaning (3)
Students explore how language develops meaning, and how meanings affect
thought and behavior, focusing on symbolizing, naming, classifying; statements and
truth; emotional responses to words; and ethical aspects of language choices.
COMM325
Processes of Criticism (3)
Drawing on the work of theorists, students explore means of understanding rhetorical
expressions, then produce appropriate pragmatic, artistic, and ethical judgments expressed
in lucid speaking and writing.
COMM330
Introduction to Health Communication (3)
Students examine the multidimensional and interdisciplinary relationships
that characterize the field of health communication, exploring it in interpersonal,
organizational, and societal contexts.
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COMM340
Rhetorical Traditions (3)
Students learn the history and theories of rhetoric central to the Western humanistic
tradition, including classical, medieval, Renaissance, and contemporary (modern and
post-modern) periods, with some attention to non-western rhetoric.
COMM360
Visual Communication (3)
Students examine how visual imagery functions rhetorically in various media,
primarily film and television, establishing a visual aesthetic with a vocabulary and
framework for doing visual analysis. Prerequisite: COMM295.
COMM365
Images on Film (3)
Through critical viewing of landmark films and a study of film theory, students
expand their understanding of film as a central aspect of communication in our era.
COMM370
Organizational Communication (3)
Viewing organizations as created and characterized by communication, students
explore organizational culture, dynamics, leadership, management styles, and various
organizational models affecting communication.
COMM375
Public Relations and Advertising (3)
Students explore the history and functions of public relations and advertising in the
business and non-profit sectors, focusing on roles in organizational settings, audience
analysis, public opinion, media relations, and writing and budgeting principles. BUSN431
may be taken as a substitute course.
COMM380
Journalism (3)
Students step into the work of the news gatherer and reporter, focusing on
interviewing and information gathering techniques, news and feature writing, print and
video approaches, and the role of personal values and other variables that affect the
news.
COMM385
Law and Ethics in Media (3)
Students survey the history and current status of laws and regulations governing
the media, and explore ethical questions, beyond the purview of law, encountered by the
communication specialist.
COMM389
Intercultural Communication (3)
Students develop intercultural communication awareness and competence by
exploring concepts of macro- and micro-culture; family, social and gender roles; verbal
and non-verbal codes; acculturation and culture shock.
COMM397
Audio/Video Production III (3)
An advanced version of COMM297 with expanded requirements for students with
extensive production backgrounds. Open to students by petition only.
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COMM430
Health Communication Theory and Research (3)
Students examine scholarship in health communication, including the diversity of
theories and research, the need for research, appropriate questioning, and applications in
a variety of settings. Prerequisite: COMM330.
COMM440
Communication Theory (3)
Students explore contemporary theories and processes of communication, primarily
from a social science perspective, as well as the nature and process of theory building.
COMM460
Topics in Visual Communication (3)
Students focus on specialized visual topics, such as visual ethics in advertising, visual
imagery in politics, video production challenges, or writing for the screen.
COMM465
Editing for Film and Video (3)
Media production theory and practice with an emphasis on post-production.
Students write, produce, edit, and prepare for distribution an audio/video production
using non-linear editing technology. Prerequisites: COMM295 and COMM297 or
COMM360.
COMM470
Performing for the Camera (3)
Instruction in theory and opportunity for practice in the fundamentals of performing
for television and film productions, including playing to the camera, hitting marks,
shooting out of sequence, blocking, and other production considerations, particularly
those that contrast with acting on stage. Emphasis is placed on truthful acting within
the limits of camera medium. Prerequisite: COMM295.
COMM475
Media Ecology (3)
Students explore how new technology and communication media dynamically
affect and change individuals, society, and culture.
COMM480
Topics in Communication (3)
Students examine a variety of special media topics that emerge from the issues of the
day, the expertise of the instructor, and the special interests of students.
COMM489
International Study Tour (3)
There is no better way to understand communication in a culture different from
our own than to engage directly with the people of that culture. Against a background
of intercultural communication theory, students travel to a location where they examine
communication with a specific culture, after surveying its history, language and
people.
COMM499
Communication Internship (3)
Communication-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an
individual learning contract negotiated with student, department, and worksite. Three
credits of unpaid internship are required for graduation. Communication majors only, by
consent. 1-4 credits, repeatable up to 10 maximum. 3 credits apply to major requirements;
others applied as elective.
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COMS101
Computer Applications I (1)
Applications course focused on basic computing concepts and developing
competency using microcomputer software in the following areas: word processing, email, file management internet searching, basic graphics, and scanning.
COMS102
Computer Applications II (1)
Applications course focused on basic computing concepts and developing
competency using microcomputer software in the following areas: presentation graphics,
spreadsheet/charts, web page development, and movie editing.
COMS103
Introduction to Programming I (3)
Introductory course for computer science majors and minors in programming
using a high-level language. The emphasis is on problem solving, designing, writing,
and executing structured programs.
COMS104
Introduction to Programming II (3)
A continuation of COMS103. Advanced programming topics include searching,
sorting, data structures, and object-oriented concepts. Prerequisite: COMS103.
COMS320
Data Communications (3)
Introduction to network technology and design issues students may encounter as
information systems professionals. Topics include fundamentals of data transmission,
hardware, network topology, and protocols. Prerequisite: COMS103.
ECON203
Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
Theories of economic fluctuation, income determination, international trade, and
economic growth are introduced. Additional topics include the role of the banking
system in the economy and monetary and fiscal policies for economic stabilization.
ECON204
Principles of Microeconomics (3)
Theories of resource allocation and income distribution, value and the price system,
problems of individual firms and industries, and rationale for government regulation of
business and labor are examined.
ECON330
Comparative Economic Systems (3)
The origin, organization, and performance of modern theories of capitalism,
communism, planned socialism, and market socialism are presented. Contemporary
economies of the United States and selected countries from Eastern, Central, and
Western Europe, South America, and Asia are considered. Prerequisites: ECON203
and ECON204 or consent of instructor.
EDUC200
Education Foundations/Philosophy (3)
An overview of the field of education based on historical and current philosophical,
psychological and sociological foundations of American public and private education
from the perspective of the learner, the teacher and the parents. Includes field experience
in the elementary classroom. Prerequisite: PSYC220.
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EDUC210
Linguistics for Professionals (1)
This course serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics-phonetics,
phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, and the practical application of standard
written and spoken English grammar. Its purpose is to build foundational knowledge
regarding English language sounds and sound patterns, word and sentence structure and
linguistic meaning that will help the student develop proficiency in using and teaching
the language arts.
EDUC315
Teaching Health and Human Performance (3)
This course addresses the philosophy, objectives, curriculum, lesson planning,
instructional methods, and evaluation for establishing and maintaining an effective
school health and human performance program that promotes lifelong health and
physical activity. Students will also learn how to teach the exceptional child.
EDUC320
Teaching Literacy and Communication (4)
This course studies the methods and materials of and the interconnection among
all literacy skills: reading, writing, listening, thinking and speaking. Strategies for
teaching reading comprehension, word recognition, analysis skills, and vocabulary are
emphasized. A component on the identification, diagnosis and treatment of reading
problems included.
EDUC325
Children’s Literature (3)
This course is a survey of fiction, biography, fantasy, folk tales, poetry, informational,
and picture books for children from pre-kindergarten through middle school. Emphasis
is placed on selections that consider the developmental needs of children. Identifying
and critiquing books dealing with universal, cross-cultural, gender-fair and special needs
themes, as well as evaluating content in the light of Christian principles is an integral
part of the course. Attention is also given to exploring ways in which children can be
encouraged to respond to literature and story telling in teaching. (Cross-listed with
ENGL325.)
EDUC340
Teaching Social Studies (3)
This course is an overview of the methods, materials, and research related to the
teaching of elementary and middle school social studies. Emphasis is on curriculum
planning and content. Students will design materials, plan and teach lessons using
various social studies curricula and technology.
EDUC360
Teaching Science (3)
An overview of the methods, materials, and research related to the teaching of science
in the elementary and middle school curriculum. The focus is on the national science
education standards and Minnesota standards. Technology will be used to enhance the
teaching and learning of scientific knowledge and process. Students will explore, plan
and teach lessons using various science curricula.
95
EDUC370
Introduction to the Exceptional Learner (3)
This course provides an understanding of the exceptional learner and of the changing
field of special education. Topics include special education categories and terminology
reflecting current issues and laws; alternative program designs for meeting exceptional
needs (mainstreaming, inclusion and integration); the IEP (individual education plan);
assessments; parents’ rights; the role of parents, classroom teacher and special education
personnel; the origin and nature of exceptionalities and instructional strategies; and
differences in standards.
EDUC 380
Early Childhood Theory and Methods (3)
This course builds on the theoretical foundations of the young child’s development;
addresses the historical foundations for early childhood education; and explores
the current methods, materials and research for planning, and implementing a
developmentally appropriate curriculum and learning environment for children from
ages three through eight years of age. A clinical experience is taken concurrently with
this course. Prerequisite: PSYC325 and PSYC360.
EDUC400
Teaching the Christian Faith (3)
This course addresses the spiritual needs of the elementary school child, focusing
on the objectives, curriculum, lesson plans, and methodology for teaching Bible history,
catechism and hymnology. Emphasis is placed on the proper understanding, use, and
application of Law and Gospel. This course includes a practicum and is required for
teacher certification in the Evangelical Lutheran Synod.
EDUC401
Educational Technology and Media (2)
This course develops knowledge of both simple and complex media formats
in the classroom. The course focuses on computer technology for lesson design and
presentation, portfolio development, and classroom administration. Issues related to
educational technology are addressed.
EDUC425
Fine Arts for Elementary Education (3)
This course uses interdisciplinary models, procedures, methods, materials and
techniques to integrate, teach and develop an appreciation for art, movement, music,
theater, speech and creative thinking. It is especially designed for the classroom teacher
to be able to integrate the fine arts into the regular curriculum.
EDUC430
Teaching Mathematics (3)
This course introduces the philosophy, objectives, learning methods and techniques
for teaching mathematics in the elementary and middle school. Emphasis is placed on
applying learning theory to the teaching of mathematics. Students do lesson planning
and material preparation based on NTCM and Minnesota Mathematics Standards.
EDUC450
Curriculum Planning and Assessment (2)
This course provides the theoretical and practical foundation for curriculum design
and management of instruction and for the use of formal and informal assessment
strategies appropriate for evaluation and research.
96
EDUC455
Classroom Management (1)
This course explores the school and classroom environment and the relationships
among individuals that foster learning. Focus is on the practical aspects of classroom
organization and management for establishing and maintaining a safe and productive
classroom.
EDUC485
Christian Vocation Seminar (3)
This is the capstone course in which students are provided an opportunity
for integrating the study of scripture and faith with their discipline and across other
disciplines in the context of today’s world and the individual’s future vocation.
EDUC499
Teaching Internship and Seminars (15)
The teaching internship is a professional semester of full-time teaching experience
in approved cooperating schools under the direct supervision of selected cooperating
teachers and the Bethany Lutheran College education department faculty.
ENGL200
Introduction to Literary Studies (3)
This course is intended to introduce students to the analytical tools they will need
in order to read and write about literary texts: mastery of literary terminology, practice of
strategies used in discussing and writing about literature, including conducting literary
research and familiarization with the conventions for citation and bibliography in the
field.
ENGL201
Survey of Classical Greek Literature (3)
Study of the great works of ancient Greece. Will read either The Iliad or The Odyssey of
Homer, a number of Greek dramas, Plato. Attention to Greek geography and history.
ENGL202
Survey of Roman Literature (3)
The focus of this course is the Roman period, ranging from Lucretius’ De rerum
Natura to St. Augustine; emphasis on the basics of Roman history.
ENGL203
Survey of Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3)
Readings from Dante, Machiavelli, Bede, and Marlowe.
ENGL204
Survey of Modern European Literature (3)
Modern European literature from Voltaire to Camus. Major trends in thought
examined. Other authors include Dostoyevsky, Hegel, Marx, and Freud.
ENGL205
Introduction to Fiction (3)
The study of literary ideas and the genre of fiction, especially novels and short stories
written in English since 1800. Students will learn various ways to interpret, analyze, and
respond to works of literature.
ENGL206
Introduction to Poetry and Drama (3)
The study of literary ideas and the genres of poetry and drama, especially
Shakespearean drama and poems written in English since 1800. Students will learn
various ways to interpret, analyze, and respond to works of literature.
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ENGL211
American Literature I (3)
Readings in American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War: poetry,
philosophy, novel, short story, and other prose will be read and discussed; historical,
social, and cultural contexts will be provided in relation to the primary texts. Special
attention will be given to major literary movements of the period.
ENGL212
American Literature II (3)
Readings in American literature from the post-Civil War period to the present day:
drama, novel, short story, and other prose will be read and discussed; historical, social,
and cultural contexts will be provided in relation to the primary texts.
ENGL220
Non-Western Literature (3)
The study of a selection of major world authors from outside the traditional Western
literary canon, especially from Africa, Asia, and Eastern European cultures. Primary
focus will be given to contemporary works.
ENGL304
British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries (3)
Reading, analysis, and discussion of works of selected writers from the metaphysical
poets, Bunyan, Defoe, Swift, Blake, and many others, with attention to the historical,
intellectual, and social influences and to the major literary movements that still influence
writers today.
ENGL305
British Literature: Romantics and Victorians (3)
Study of several major writers of the 19th century, with a special emphasis on
Romanatic and Victorian poetry, Victorian prose, and the growth of the novel.
Relationships between these writers will be noted, as well as their lasting contribution to
the forms of poetry and prose.
ENGL306
Shakespeare (3)
The study of Shakespeare’s plays, sonnets, and epic poetry, with emphasis on
his dramatic forms, primarily comedies and tragedies. The course will emphasize
Shakespeare’s contribution to drama and his impact on the study of literature.
ENGL320
The English Language (3)
The study of the structure and form of the English language, including grammar,
phonology, syntax, and semantics.
ENGL325
Children’s Literature (3)
A survey of fiction, biography, fantasy, folk tales, poetry, informational, and picture
books for children from pre-kindergarten through middle school. Emphasis is placed on
selections that consider the developmental needs of children. Identifying and critiquing
books dealing with universal, cross-cultural, gender-fair and special needs themes, as well
as evaluating content in the light of Christian principles is an integral part of the course.
Attention is also given to exploring ways in which children can be encouraged to respond
to literature and story telling in teaching. (Cross-listed with EDUC325.)
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ENGL327
Adolescent Literature (3)
An introductory survey to the genre of texts targeted for adolescent/young adult
readers. Surveying the field, the course highlights and analyzes recent publications and
earlier texts, and the distinguishing features.
ENGL335
African-American Literature (3)
Study of the major African-American literary works: spirituals, poetry, essays, short
stories, and novels. This course will pay careful attention to how the historical and
ideological movements in American have impacted and been impacted by an AfricanAmerican literary tradition.
ENGL350
Literary Criticism (3)
A study and analysis of the development of literary theories and interpretations of
literary texts from ancient times to the present.
ENGL360
Contemporary Poetry (3)
A study of poets and poetry that represent significant movements in 20th century
poetic thought and style, both in English and in translation.
ENGL370
Christian Writers (3)
An overview of some of the outstanding Christian writers from St. Augustine to
C.S. Lewis, including fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.
ENGL444
Methods in Teaching 5-12 English (3)
This course is required for students who seek state licensure for secondary level
(grades 5-12) teaching of Communication Arts and Literature within the English major.
Students must first meet all requirements for “Entry into the Education Major.” Then
they must meet all requirements for the English “Entry into the Major.” This course
contains a field experience component and must precede enrollment in EDUC499
Teaching Internship and Seminars (student teaching).
ENGL480
Topics in Literature and Language (3)
An investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, styles, or forms,
allowing students a chance to experience depth in a specialized area of literature. May be
taken twice with different content.
ENGL495
Senior Seminar in Literature (3)
A capstone course designed to lead students to independently identify and apply
the major ideas and trends in criticism governing aesthetic philosophies of the literary
arts. The course will stress close reading of texts, in depth discussions, one-on-one
conferencing, leading to the students’ production of a high-caliber literary analysis and/
or study.
ENGL499
English Internship (3)
English-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
worksite. English majors only, by consent.
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FRSM101
Orientation to College (1)
Designed to give new students the information and skills necessary to succeed in
college. This course further seeks to promote an awareness of the goals of Christian higher
education as it relates to student growth and to a commitment to life-long learning.
GEOG101
Physical Geography (3)
The Earth is shaped by a complex array of processes which, when taken together,
produce our weather, climate, water movements, and landforms. This course examines
the various features of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere and
addresses various environmental concerns.
GEOG102
Human Geography (3)
Interrelationships between cultures and their environments are examined. Emphasis
is given to the aerial distribution and significance of populations, cultural origins,
subsistence, politics, economics, language and religion.
GERM101
Introduction to German I (4)
Introductory study of the fundamentals of the language; pronunciation, grammar,
and basic vocabulary. Goals are to achieve reading ability in simple German prose and
basic conversational skills.
GERM102
Introduction to German II (4)
Introductory study of the fundamentals of the language; pronunciation, grammar,
and basic vocabulary. Goals are to achieve reading ability in simple German prose and
basic conversational skills. Prerequisite: GERM101.
GERM203
Intermediate German I (4)
Systematic review of grammar and selected readings from German literature. Goals
are to further the development of skills in reading and composition and to enlarge the
student’s German vocabulary. Prerequisite: GERM102.
GERM204
Intermediate German II (4)
Systematic review of grammar and selected readings from German literature. Goals
are to further the development of skills in reading and composition and to enlarge the
student’s German vocabulary. Prerequisite: GERM203.
GREK101
Introduction to Greek I (4)
Introduction to classical and New Testament Greek grammar and syntax. Selected
and adapted readings from Classic Greek literature and from the Greek New Testament.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
GREK102
Introduction to Greek II (4)
Introduction to classical and New Testament Greek grammar and syntax. Selected
and adapted readings from Classic Greek literature and from the Greek New Testament.
Prerequisite: GREK101.
100
GREK203
Intermediate Greek: The New Testament I (3)
Selected material from Lukan and Pauline corpus. Special attention to the
peculiarities of Koine and Biblical Greek. Prerequisite: GREK102.
GREK204
Intermediate Greek: The New Testament II (3)
Readings from the Gospel of St. John and selections from John’s Epistles. Special
attention to the peculiarities of Johannine Greek in distinction to classical and other
Koine authors. Prerequisite: GREK203.
GREK304
Advanced Greek: Plato’s Symposium (3)
Readings from Plato’s Symposium. Frequent writing assignments designed to
enhance comprehension of Greek text and philosophical concepts.
HEBR101
Introduction to Hebrew I (4)
This course is a survey of the essentials of the grammar and syntax of Classical
(Biblical) Hebrew. Its primary purpose is to prepare students to work with the Hebrew
Old Testament.
HEBR102
Introduction to Hebrew II (4)
This course is a survey of the essentials of the grammar and syntax of Classical
(Biblical) Hebrew. Its primary purpose is to prepare students to work with the Hebrew
Old Testament. Prerequisite: HEBR101.
HEBR203
Intermediate Hebrew I (3)
This course consists of a review of the basic grammar and syntax of Classical (Biblical)
Hebrew, and the expansion of skills in the Hebrew language through the translation and
analysis of primarily narrative prose portions of the Old Testament, and a few selected
ancient texts from outside of the Bible. Prerequisite: HEBR102.
HEBR204
Intermediate Hebrew II (3)
This course consists of a review of the basic grammar and syntax of Classical (Biblical)
Hebrew, and the expansion of skills in the Hebrew language through the translation and
analysis of primarily narrative prose portions of the Old Testament, and a few selected
ancient texts from outside of the Bible. Prerequisite: HEBR203.
HEBR304
Hebrew Prose (3)
Includes selected readings in Hebrew prose from the historical books of the Old
Testament, and also the reading of selected extra-biblical Semitic inscriptions from the
Ancient Near East.
HIST111
Ancient/Medieval Europe (3)
An introduction to and survey of Western Civilization from its ancient origins in
Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Middle Ages. This course is designed for, but not
limited to, elementary education majors. It is not open to history or BFSS majors.
101
HIST114
The Rise of Ancient World Civilizations (3)
An introduction to and survey of the history of the world from the rise of the first
civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt, to ancient India and China and concluding
with Greece and Rome.
HIST115
Medieval/Renaissance World Civilizations (3)
An introduction to and survey of world civilizations from the end of Rome to ca.
1400. Includes early and later Medieval Europe and Islam, India and China and the rise
of civilizations in Africa, East Asia, and the Americas.
HIST116
Early Modern World Civillizations (3)
An introduction to and survey of the history of the world from the Renaissance
and Reformation in Europe through the fall of Napoleon, the rise and fall of Muslim
Empires, and further developments in Africa, the Americas, and East Asia.
HIST117
Modern World History (3)
An introduction to and survey of world history after the defeat of Napoleon in Europe
to the end of the 20th century, including industrialization, nationalism, neocolonialism
and its ending, the demise of the Soviet Union, and developments in Africa, East Asia,
and the Americas.
HIST207
History of USA I (3)
This course surveys the history of the United States from its Native American and
European colonial roots through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include the
American Revolution, Westward Expansion, and the Sectional Crisis.
HIST208
History of USA II (3)
This course surveys the history of the United States from the late 19th century to
the present day. Topics include the Indian Wars, Immigration, Progressive Era Reform,
the Great Depression and New Deal, the World Wars, the Cold War, the Civil Rights
Movement, and the War on Terrorism.
HIST310
Ancient Near East History (3)
This course is a survey of the major developments in the ancient history of
Mesopotamia and Egypt and surrounding lands. It begins with the time of the earliest
written records (ca. 3100 BC) and follows the course of events down to the dawning of
the Hellenistic Age (4th century BC). A number of key primary sources are examined.
HIST315
History of Ancient Greece (3)
A study of the major periods of the history of Greece starting with the Minoan
period. Special attention is focused on the ascendancy of Athens and the expansion of
the Greek world under Alexander the Great.
HIST320
History of Ancient Rome (3)
A study of the major periods in the history of Rome from the period of Etruscan
domination through the reign of the Emperor Justinian.
102
HIST325
History of the Western World in the Middle Ages (3)
A study of the major developments in Western civilization from the fall of Rome to
the Renaissance.
HIST330
Dark Age Europe (3)
The political, military, social, economic, and religious development of Europe from
the fall of Rome to the Norman invasion of England in 1066. Includes the Barbarian
invasions, Charlemagne, Byzantium, the rise of Islam, Viking raids, and the emergence
of a new European civilization by the 11th century.
HIST335
The High Middle Ages (3)
The political, military, social, economic and religious development of Europe
from the Norman invasion of England (1066). Includes the development of castles
and Romanesque, Gothic and early Renaissance art and architecture, the Crusades,
the rise of the universities, the Black Death, and the Hundred Years War, to the early
Renaissance.
HIST340
Renaissance and Reformation Eras (3)
The study of the life and institutions of Europe from the mid-14th century to 1648
during the transition from medieval to modern times, emphasizing changing cultural,
political, military and religious practices and beliefs, especially as contrasted from the
south to the north.
HIST345
Tudor and Stuart England (3)
A study of England’s “Golden Age” under the Tudor dynasty with Henry VIII,
Elizabeth I, and continuing through the Stuart dynasty. Includes a study of English
life and culture, the English Reformation and the struggle between Parliament and
the monarchy culminating in the English Civil War, execution of Charles I, and the
Glorious Revolution.
HIST350
French Revolution Through Napoleon (3)
An examination of revolutionary France from its root causes under Louis XIV
through the Reign of Terror and the Conquest of Europe by Napoleon. Relationships
between the revolution and the Enlightenment will be explored as well as the lasting
impact of the revolution.
HIST360
Early and Imperial Russian History (3)
A survey of Russian history from the ancient Slavic peoples, the Kievan Rus Empire
(Ukraine,) the Mongolian invasion, the rise of Moscovy and the Empire of Peter the
Great to the freeing of the serfs in 1861.
HIST365
The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union (3)
A survey of Russian history from the late Imperial period and WWI through the
Bolshevik Revolution, Civil War, WWII, Soviet Era and the final collapse of Soviet
Russia.
103
HIST380
Topics in World History (3)
An in-depth study of a particular people, culture, era or area outside the United
States such as the Middle East, China, Africa, pre-Columbian America, Renaissance
Italy, or Medieval Japan.
HIST403
Native American Culture and Government (1)
A seminar in which students explore specific current and historical events and sites
in Minnesota and/or Wisconsin to gain insight into the culture and tribal government
of Native Americans. The focus is on content and presentation to school groups.
Prerequisites: HIST207 and EDUC200. Preference given to education majors.
HIST410
The Era of the American Revolution (3)
An in-depth exploration into the background, causes, war, and consequences of the
American Revolution. Critical assessment of the historical interpretations of the era.
HIST420
Constitution and Early Republic (3)
This course explores the development, ratification, and legacy of the U.S.
Constitution from 1787 through the 1820s. In both primary and secondary documents,
students will explore American life under the Constitution with special attention to
questions of religion, race, gender, and individual rights. (Cross-listed with PLSC420.)
HIST430
The American Civil War and Reconstruction (3)
A study of the causes, conduct, and implications of the American Civil War, and an
examination of the major developments in the Era of Reconstruction.
HIST444
Methods in Teaching 5-12 Social Studies (4)
This course is required for students who seek state licensure for secondary level
(grades 5-12) teaching of social studies within the broad field social studies major.
Students must first meet all requirements for “Entry into the Education Major.” Then
they must meet all requirements for the broad field social studies “Entry into the Major.”
This course contains a field experience component and must precede enrollment in
EDUC499 Teaching Internship and Seminars (student teaching).
HIST445
The World in the 20th Century (3)
An examination of the forces and events that shaped the history of the world from
the late 19th century through the collapse of the Soviet Union and the rise of East Asia
into global prominence near the end of the 20th century.
HIST450
Civil Rights Movement (3)
This course examines the American Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to
1973. Topics include the Brown decision, the Montgomery bus boycotts, the student
movement, the northern urban housing crisis, differing strategies within and between
the black and white communities, the transformation of national political parties, the
woman’s liberation movement, affirmative action, and the relationship between religion
and politics.
104
HIST460
Religion in American History (3)
This course explores the role of religion, with particular emphasis on Christian
denominations, in major developments of American history. Students will grapple with
enduring questions concerning the relationship between church and state, the role
of personal faith in civic activism, and the viability of theological commitment amid
religious pluralism.
HIST470
The Supreme Court and the American People (3)
This course analyses the relations between the Supreme Court and the American
people from the Constitutional era to the present day. Students will explore competing
theories of jurisprudence as these have applied to the contested meanings of “equal
protection of the Laws” in regard to religion, race, gender, and individual rights.
HIST480
Topics in American History (3)
An in-depth study of a particular aspect of American history such as women’s history,
African history, the American West, Progressivism, McCarthyism, or the Cold War.
HIST495
Senior Seminar in History (3)
A capstone course designed solely for history and broad field social studies majors
where students will put their knowledge of historical topics and research together in order
to write and publicly present an original historiographical work. The use of some primary
source material is required. Prerequisite: LART490 or consent of instructor.
HIST499
History Internship (3)
History-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
worksite. Open only to history and broad field social studies majors, by consent.
HLTH103
Healthful Living (3)
A multidimensional approach to the study of basic lifestyle choices. Designed to
encourage and activate self-responsibility through knowledge gained with regard to
issues affecting body, mind, and spirit.
HLTH201
Nutrition (3)
The scientific study of nutritional needs throughout the life span; includes interaction
and function of nutrients in metabolic processes and examines dietary choices related to
behavior and health.
HLTH206
Advanced First Aid (3)
This course will provide the knowledge and skills necessary to help sustain life,
reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of sudden illness or injury in emergency
situations. Each student will be trained in First Aid/CPR and upon successful completion
of the course will receive certification.
HLTH240
Current Health Issues (3)
Explores recent and relevant concerns and controversies in the area of health. This
course is designed to encourage critical thought and analysis of current health issues.
Presents up-to-date opposing views on sensitive and complex issues.
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HLTH260
Foundations of Health Education (3)
Provides a common foundation for health education and promotion. The course
explores historical, philosophical and behavioral perspectives along with skills,
competencies and knowledge of health educators in various settings.
HLTH311
Drug Education (3)
An examination of drugs and drug use from the psychological, behavioral,
pharmacological, historical, legal, and clinical perspectives. Addresses the effects of drug
use on personal health and social functioning.
HLTH330
History and Philosophy of Wellness (3)
This course will introduce the student to wellness concepts from a historical
perspective, while focusing on various philosophies from which the present day concept
of total wellness has evolved. The essential nature and characteristics of wellness will
be examined within theoretical frameworks and philosophies, both past and present.
Prerequisite: HLTH103 or HLTH240.
HLTH470
Introduction to Diseases and Disorders (3)
An introduction to the pathology, etiology, symptomology, diagnosis, treatment,
and prognosis of the many human diseases and disorders. Prerequisites: BIOL221 and
BIOL222.
HUMT200
Study and Performance Abroad (1)
Offered in conjunction with the choir trips abroad. Course includes introduction to
the culture and history of the area to be visited.
LART490
Intro to Research and Writing (3)
Introduction to the aims, problems and techniques of research and writing. Including
practice in critical reading, the use of research tools and procedures.
LART495
Senior Seminar Liberal Arts (3)
Integration of the various facets of the liberal arts into a coherent personal
perspective on reality. Focus on the epistemological bases of the disciplines; translation
of liberal arts study into a productive life serving the needs of church and society.
Prerequisite: LART490.
LART499
Liberal Arts Internship (3)
Liberal arts-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
work site. Liberal Arts majors only, by consent.
LATN101
Introduction to Latin I (4)
Introduction to classical Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Daily assignments
designed to aid in application of skills. Second semester features adapted and elementary
Latin texts.
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LATN102
Introduction to Latin II (4)
Introduction to classical Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Daily assignments
designed to aid in application of skills. Second semester features adapted and elementary
Latin texts. Prerequisite: LATN101.
LATN203
Intermediate Latin: Cicero and Classical Authors (3)
Introduction to Latin prose and poetry with practical review of grammar.
Prerequisite: LATN102.
LATN204
Intermediate Latin: Virgil’s Aeneid (3)
Continued practice of reading Latin. Focus especially on the first and sixth books
of the Aeneid. Prerequisite: LATN203.
MATH097
Intermediate Algebra (0)
Designed to prepare students for Math Problem Solving or College Algebra.
Mathematical thought and reasoning developed through the study of polynomials,
factoring, rational expressions, exponents, roots and radicals, quadratic equations,
functions and graphing.
MATH110
Math Problem Solving (4)
A liberal arts mathematical course designed specifically to focus on the improvement
of problem solving skills and mathematical reasoning in many different areas. Topics
discussed will include mathematical modeling, probability, statistics, logic, exponential
growth, matrices, and chaos. Prerequisite: MATH097 or equivalent.
MATH111
College Algebra (4)
A study of functions, starting with the definition and focusing on the use of
functions in all forms to model the real world. Includes comparing linear and nonlinear
functions, transforming functions, looking at polynomial and rational functions globally
and locally, models of growth and decline and systems of equations. Prerequisite:
MATH097 or equivalent.
MATH112
Trigonometry (3)
Trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities
and conditional equations, solving triangles, polar coordinates, complex numbers, and
analytic geometry. Prerequisite: MATH111 or equivalent.
MATH120
Introduction to Statistics (3)
Beginning statistical theory and practice are introduced through topics of data
collection, sampling techniques, organization and presentation of data, measurement of
central tendency, probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions,
statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, linear regression and
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH111 or equivalent.
107
MATH141
Calculus I (5)
A study of limits and continuity of functions, derivatives, rules and applications of
differentiation, hyperbolic and inverse trigonometric functions, rates of change, singlevariable optimization, Newton’s method, and indefinite integrals. A wide variety of
applications from the physical, natural, and social sciences is explored. Prerequisite:
MATH112 or equivalent.
MATH142
Calculus II (5)
Definite integrals, applications of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques
and applications of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite
sequences and series, tests for convergence, Taylor’s theorem and Taylor polynomials.
Prerequisite: MATH141 or equivalent.
MATH243
Multivariable Calculus (4)
Plane and three-space vectors, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation,
Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH142.
MATH260
Differential Equations (3)
Solving differential equations including separable, homogeneous, linear and exact
equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, operators and
annihilators, Laplace transforms, systems of differential equations, numerical methods,
and applications of differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH142.
MATH295
Foundations of Abstract Mathematics (3)
This course is an introduction to the theory and methods of mathematical proof,
including the methods of contradiction and contraposition. The primary objectives are
for students to be able to read and write mathematical proofs. Subject material covered
may include set theory, logic, and number theory. Prerequisite: MATH142.
MATH321
Probability and Statistics I (3)
Probability and statistics is a calculus-based course covering introductory level topics
of probability and statistics, including probability, random variables and probability
distributions, joint probability distributions, and functions of random variables.
Prerequisite: MATH243.
MATH322
Probability and Statistics II (3)
Probability and statistics is a continuation of MATH321, covering introductory
level topics of probability and statistics, including statistical inference (both estimation
and hypothesis testing), analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite:
MATH321.
MATH341
Introduction to Analysis (3)
An introductory course in rigorous analysis, covering real numbers, sequences,
series, continuous functions, differentiation, and Riemann integration. Prerequisite:
MATH243 or consent of instructor.
108
MATH351
Linear Algebra (3)
A study of linear algebra, vector spaces, inner product spaces, norms, orthogonality,
eigenvalues, eigenvectors, matrices, and linear transformations. Prerequisite:
MATH142.
MATH380
Numerical Analysis (4)
This course introduces students to the design, analysis, and implementation of
numerical algorithms designed to solve mathematical problems that arise in the realworld modeling of physical processes. Topics will include several categories of numerical
algorithms such as solving systems of linear equations, root-finding, approximation,
interpolation, numerical solutions to differential equations, numerical integration, and
matrix methods. Prerequisites: MATH243 and MATH351.
MATH385
Mathematical Modeling (3)
Modeling is a course that covers techniques for analysis and decision-making for
industrial problems, discrete and continuous optimization, dynamical systems modeling,
and probabilistic methods in applied mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH260.
MATH390
History of Mathematics (3)
History of Mathematics is an introduction to the historical development of
fundamental mathematical concepts. Emphasis is placed on the development of
numeration systems, geometry and formal axiomatic systems, solutions of polynomial
equations, the development of calculus, and the impact of global events on the development
and proliferation of mathematical ideas. Prerequisite: MATH142.
MATH440
Real Analysis (3)
An extension of MATH341, the primary topics of this course include rigorous
developments of multivariate differentiation, Riemann and Riemann-Stieltjes
integration, sequences, series, continuous functions, and the topology of Euclidean
space. Prerequisite: MATH341.
MATH450
Abstract Algebra (4)
The three primary topics of this course are groups, rings, and fields. Groups will
be studied, including homomorphisms, normal subgroups, and the symmetric and
alternating groups. The theorems of Lagrange, Cauchy, and Sylow will be developed and
proven. Rings, including subrings, ideals, quotient rings, homomorphisms, and integral
domains will be covered. Lastly, finite and infinite fields will be discussed. Prerequisite:
MATH295.
MATH460
Partial Differential Equations (4)
The primary topics of this course include Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville and
boundary value problems, Cauchy problems and the method of characteristics, separation
of variables and Laplace transform methods. Numerical methods and selected topics are
also included. Prerequisite: MATH243 and MATH260.
109
MATH470
Complex Analysis (4)
Complex analysis is an introduction to functions of a complex variable. Topics
include the algebra and geometry of complex numbers, analytic functions, exponential
and logarithmic functions, complex integration, infinite series, residues and pole, and
conformal mappings. Prerequisite: MATH295.
MATH480
Topics in Mathematics (1-4)
Topics in Mathematics is a course designed to include topics outside the scope of our
other course offerings. Topics may include, but are not limited to, mathematical biology,
point-set and algebraic topology, graph theory, combinatorics, differential geometry, set
theory, number theory, advanced linear algebra, advanced abstract algebra, and Galois
theory. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
MATH491
Mathematics Colloquium (1)
Mathematics Colloquium is a one-credit capstone course intended to introduce
students to topics in mathematics that are not covered in other courses. This is done
through faculty and visiting professor presentations as well as student presentations of
selected topics or research. Prerequisite: MATH295 or consent of instructor.
MATH495
Senior Thesis (2)
The senior thesis satisfies the mathematics major capstone requirement and is
composed of a written report based on student research. Each student will be expected
to present their thesis to the Bethany community through a presentation in Mathematics
Colloquium. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (senior status normally required).
MATH499
Mathematics Internship (1-4)
A mathematics internship is a mathematics-related field experience with an
approved agency fulfilling an individual learning contract negotiated between student,
department, Internship Coordinator and worksite. Each student will be expected to give a
presentation of their internship to the Bethany community in Mathematics Colloquium.
Prerequisite: Consent of mathematics internship coordinator.
MISY300
Software Applications (3)
Using intermediate and advanced features of Excel and Access software to
improve individual and organizational productivity is the focus. Macros, functions,
scenario management, solver, special queries, pivot tables, multiple worksheets/3D
cell referencing, and data tables are included in a hands-on approach to providing
organizations with needed information. Prerequisites: COMS101 and COMS102 or
consent of instructor.
MISY302
MIS in the Organization (3)
Use of a systems approach in analyzing the role of information systems and
how information technology (IT) is changing the role of the organization manager.
Information systems and how they can be used to provide real business benefit will
be analyzed. Organizational change as it relates to IT development will be explored.
Prerequisite: MISY300.
110
MISY440
Project Management (3)
Develops MIS skills needed to define, plan, lead, monitor, and complete IT projects
for organizations. Emphasis will be on technical and communication skills needed to
manage changes and problems associated with project management. Work breakdown
structure, schedule, time estimate, network diagram, and contingency plans will be
included in projects. This course combines theory, techniques, group activities, and
computer tools to complete projects. Developing an MIS project for a “real” community
organization will be encouraged to combine the classroom learning with community
service. Prerequisite: MISY302.
MUSC101
Music Fundamentals (3)
Basic concepts of music theory: notation, scales, intervals, chords. No musical
background necessary.
MUSC102
Music Appreciation (3)
Introduction to music as artistic expression. No musical background necessary.
MUSC111
Music Theory I (3)
Building a foundation of diatonic harmonic vocabulary. Introduction to part-writing.
Students are encouraged to take MUSC114 concurrently. Prerequisite: MUSC101 or
satisfactory performance of Music Theory entrance exam.
MUSC112
Music Theory II (3)
Continuation of MUSC111. Melodic analysis and reduction. Students are
encouraged to take MUSC115 concurrently.
MUSC114
Music Skills I (2)
Ear training, sight singing, keyboard harmony, and beginning guitar. Melodic
and rhythmic dictation. Students are encouraged to take MUSC111 concurrently.
Prerequisite: MUSC101 or satisfactory performance of Music Theory entrance exam.
MUSC115
Music Skills II (2)
Continuation of MUSC114. Sight-reading, and melodic and rhythmic dictation.
Keyboard performance of harmonic progressions. Introduction to figured bass. Students
are encouraged to take MUSC112 concurrently.
MUSC121
Music History I (3)
Study of repertoire of major styles and composers. Middle Ages through the Baroque
era.
MUSC122
Music History II (3)
Study of repertoire of major styles and composers. Classical era into the 21st
century.
MUSC125
MUSC130
MUSC132
MUSC135
Choraliers (0)
Concert Choir (1)
Mary Martha Singers (0)
Concert Band (1)
111
MUSC140
MUSC152
MUSC155
Handbells (0)
String Ensemble (0)
Jazz Ensemble (0)
MUSC161
Introduction to Conducting (1)
Introduction to basic conducting patterns and problems. Student will demonstrate
leadership gestures and conduct a small group in folk melodies, hymntunes and chorales
in duple and triple schemes. Preparatory beat anacrusis, the fermata and release will also
be practiced.
MUSC181
ELS Certification Piano (1)
Private 30-minute lessons. Development of keyboard skills for the elementary
classrooms of the schools in the Evangelical Lutheran Synod, emphasizing basic keyboard
proficiency leading to the performance of folk song, hymnody and the music of the
Lutheran liturgy. Prerequisite: Consent of education department.
MUSC190
Instruction I (1)
Private 30-minute lessons.
MUSC190A
MUSC190B
MUSC190C
MUSC190D
MUSC205
Voice Instruction I
Piano Instruction I
Organ Instruction I
Instrument Instruction I
Hymnody and Liturgics (2)
History and development of liturgical practices and hymnody. Emphasis on the
Lutheran chorale, and the reformation of the liturgy. May substitute for religious studies
credit for students who have completed RELG110 and RELG111.
MUSC207
Survey of Organ History and Literature (2)
Broad historical survey of organ music, writings on organ music, and organ
design.
MUSC209
Service Playing and Repertoire (2)
Practical skills for the worship service. Varied hymn accompaniment. Vocal and
instrumental accompaniment. Building a repertoire. Prerequisite: MUSC190C or
consent of instructor.
MUSC211
Music Theory III (3)
Continuation of MUSC112. Emphasis on analysis. Study of fugue, and classical
forms. Part writing. Students are encouraged to take MUSC214 concurrently.
MUSC212
Music Theory IV (3)
Continuation of MUSC211. Analysis of music from the 19th into the 21st century.
Expansion of harmonic vocabulary. Students are encouraged to take MUSC215
concurrently.
112
MUSC214
Music Skills III (2)
Continuation of MUSC115. Chord progressions to include modulations. Keyboard
realization of modulations. Students are encouraged to take MUSC211 concurrently.
MUSC215
Music Skills IV (2)
Continuation of MUSC214. Reading of open choral and instrumental scores at the
keyboard, and figured bass. Students are encouraged to take MUSC212 concurrently.
MUSC261
Choral Conducting (3)
Techniques and rehearsal procedures. Repertoire and its historical place in
liturgy, especially as it applies to the Lutheran tradition. Prerequisite: MUSC101 or
MUSC111.
MUSC262
Instrumental Conducting (3)
The craft and tradition of instrumental conducting is explored through the study of
preparatory skills, pedagogical concepts, posture, beat patterns, “stick” technique, and
an introduction to Band and Orchestral repertory. Prerequisite: MUSC161.
MUSC290
Instruction II (2)
Private 60-minute lessons. Prerequisites: Two semesters of MU190 and consent of
instructor.
MUSC290A
MUSC290B
MUSC290C
MUSC290D
MUSC303
Voice Instruction II
Piano Instruction II
Organ Instruction II
Instrument Instruction II
Music Communication and Technology (3)
Development of skills in the use of electronic and computer-generated materials and
equipment. Music composition, arranging, and publishing.
MUSC335
Music Theatre (3)
A survey of the musical theatre, including history, repertory, form and style. From
Gilbert and Sullivan to the present.
MUSC340
Survey of World Dance (3)
A study of dance through form, style and rhetoric in various cultures. Prerequisite:
MUSC101 or MUSC111 or consent of instructor.
MUSC341
Music of the Renaissance and Baroque (3)
Examination of forms, composers, and musical ideals of Western music from 14501650. Prerequisites: MUSC121 and MUSC122.
MUSC342
Music of the Baroque and Classic Era (3)
Examination of the music of the high Baroque through the Classic era, from 16501800. Prerequisites: MUSC121 and MUSC122.
113
MUSC343
Music of the 19th Century (3)
Examination of forms, styles, and musical ideals of Romantic composers.
Prerequisites: MUSC121 and MUSC122.
MUSC344
Music of the 20th Century (3)
Beginning with Impressionism and Expressionism the course will explore music
produced in the last 100 years. Recommended: MUSC111, MUSC112, MUSC121,
MUSC122.
MUSC371
Piano Pedagogy (1)
Introduction to the teaching of piano. Students in the course will study various
approaches to piano instruction as well as methods and repertoire.
MUSC 372
Organ Pedagogy (1)
Through the study of a variety of organ method books the student will learn a
manner of teaching appropriate for the student at hand. In addition, methods of teaching
repertoire will be introduced, as well as how to develop an organ studio. Prerequisite:
MUSC190 and consent of instructor.
MUSC390
Instruction III (1)
Private 30-minute lessons. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MUSC390A
MUSC390B
MUSC390C
MUSC390D
MUSC400
Voice Instruction III
Piano Instruction III
Organ Instruction III
Instrument Instruction III
Church Music Practicum (3)
For church music majors. supervised practicum in the parish. Prerequisite: Consent
of instructor.
MUSC417
Counterpoint and Composition (3)
Study of strict species counterpoint. Analysis of 17th and 18th century counterpoint.
Application of the contrapuntal practices relative to current composition. Prerequisite:
MUSC212.
MUSC418
Analysis and Composition (3)
Principles of composition and arranging. Analysis of significant styles and forms.
Prerequisite: MUSC212.
MUSC435
Opera and Lyric Theatre (3)
A study of opera from the Florentine Camerata through Broadway Lyric Theatre.
Form and Style. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MUSC440
World Music (3)
Introduction to non-Western music of a diversity of cultures. Prerequisites:
MUSC101 or MUSC111 and consent of instructor.
114
MUSC480
Topics in Music (3)
Course content varies. Prerequisites: MUSC111, MUSC121, MUSC122, and
MUSC212 as well as the consent of instructor.
MUSC490
Instruct IV (2)
Private 60-minute lessons. For students preparing for recital. Prerequisites: Two
semesters of MUSC290 and consent of instructor, recital.
MUSC490A
MUSC490B
MUSC490C
MUSC490D
MUSC499
Voice Instruction IV
Piano Instruction IV
Organ Instruction IV
Instrument Instruction IV
Music Internship (3)
Music-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator and
worksite. Music majors only, by consent.
NORW101
Introduction to Norwegian I (4)
Introduction to the Norwegian language through contemporary texts, with some
discussion of history and culture of Norway.
NORW102
Introduction to Norwegian II (4)
Introduction to the Norwegian language through contemporary texts, with some
discussion of history and culture of Norway. Prerequisite: NORW101.
PHED106
Golf (0.5)
Additional fees required.
PHED107
Bowling (0.5)
Additional fees required.
PHED110
Downhill Skiing (0.5)
Additional Fees Required.
PHED114
Ballroom Dancing (0.5)
PHED120
Aerobic Conditioning (1)
Principles and practice of safe aerobic exercise.
PHED121
Introduction to Team Games (1)
This course will introduce the student to basketball, soccer, and volleyball. Intended
to increase skill, strategy and knowledge through lecture and active participation.
PHED122
Introduction to Lifetime Sports (1)
This course will introduce the student to badminton, racquetball, and tennis. Intended
to increase skill, strategy and knowledge through lecture and active participation.
115
PHED124
Weight Training (1)
Principles and practice of safe resistance training.
PHED215
Developing Life Skills (2)
A study of the interconnected dimensions that make up the human wellness concept.
Designed to encourage and activate self-responsibility through knowledge of physical
fitness, wellness and lifestyle management.
PHED216
Introduction to PE and Recreation (2)
This foundational course will broaden the student’s understanding of how the
philosophies, ethics, and programs of physical education and sport evolved, as well
as present the current status of these fields. The student will discover the diversity of
physical education and sport and the wealth of careers available in this field. Open to
students with sophomore status or above.
PHED220
Outdoor Recreation Leadership (2)
This course provides the fundamental knowledge, skills, and experience essential
for leadership in outdoor recreational activities. The course includes outdoor field
experiences such as orienteering, backpacking, hiking, and camping.
PHED300
Methods of Coaching Baseball (2)
Comprehensive introduction to the coaching profession. Emphasis is placed on
sport at the high school and serious club levels. Consideration is also given to coaching at
other levels, such as youth, recreational, and intercollegiate sport programs. The primary
goal of the course is to develop and enhance students’ knowledge and understanding
of concepts and techniques of coaching and their application to achieving important
objectives in working with athletes.
PHED301
PHED302
PHED303
PHED304
PHED305
Methods of Coaching Basketball (2)
Methods of Coaching Football (2)
Methods of Coaching Soccer (2)
Methods of Coaching Softball (2)
Methods of Coaching Volleyball (2)
PHED310
Motor Learning and Behavior (3)
An investigation of the nature of motor development, motor control, and motor
learning in individuals throughout the lifespan. Topics will focus on the interaction
between development of motor performance capabilities in the learner and the role of
the environment in facilitating the processes of motor skill learning and performance.
PHED320
Social Aspects of Sports (3)
This course will introduce the student to the complex field of sport as a psychological
and sociological phenomenon. Students will study social processes associated with sport,
including competition, socialization, conflict and change.
116
PHED325
Sport Psychology (3)
Course will familiarize students with those aspects of psychology that influence
performance and participation in sports and other sports related settings. Some topics
that will be discussed are self-esteem, motivation, stress, and imagery as it applies to one’s
ability to perform or willingness to participate in sports.
PHED330
Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3)
Basic prevention, care, evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.
PHED350
Kinesiology (3)
A study of the biomechanics of human movement. Prerequisite: BIOL221.
PHED450
Exercise Physiology (4)
A study of both acute and chronic exercise on the structure and function of the
human body. Prerequisite: PHED350.
PHED455
Strength and Conditioning (3)
A course designed to provide practical knowledge and experience in the area of
strength and conditioning. Topics include specificity, flexibility, plyometrics, core
stabilization, weight training, circuit training, and ergogenic aids.
PHED460
Exercise Testing and Prescription (3)
This is a course in applied techniques for the measurement of exercise bioenergetics,
neuromuscular performance, cardiopulmonary fitness, and other health components. A
particular emphasis is given to the development of fitness testing skills and knowledge
necessary for exercise testing certification.
PHED480
Topics in Exercise Science (3)
A capstone topics course in exercise science. This course will review the various
physiological, psychological, and administrative components involved in a comprehensive
health/fitness program. A special emphasis on cardiac concerns included.
PHIL201
Logic and Critical Thinking (3)
This course focuses on the construction and evaluation of logical arguments, with
applications to civic awareness and involvement. Attention is devoted to formal logical
analysis, including syllogisms and basic symbolic logic, as well as effective written
communication.
PHIL202
Introduction to Philosophy (3)
This course introduces the basic methods of philosophy by studying the traditional
problems of philosophy. Emphasis is placed on developing skills of reading and analyzing
philosophical writing, and executing analytic critiques of basic philosophy texts.
PHIL204
Ethics (3)
Through exposure to Western moral philosophies from antiquity through the
postmodern era, students explore the foundations of ethical standards and judgments.
These perspectives are then applied to the analysis of contemporary moral debates and
ethical case studies.
117
PHIL330
History of Western Philosophy I (3)
A survey of the development of philosophy, beginning with the Pre-socratic
philosophers through Thomas Aquinas. Major emphasis is on Plato, Aristotle, Augustine,
and Aquinas.
PHIL331
History of Western Philosophy II (3)
A survey of the development of modern philosophy, extending from Nominalism to
the present. Special emphasis is placed on the development of rationalism and empiricism,
with readings focusing on Descartes, Hume, and Kant.
PHIL450
Philosophical Readings (3)
A close reading of two major philosophical texts each semester. Selections vary;
course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: PHIL330 or PHIL331 and consent of
instructor.
PHYS101
Descriptive Physics (4)
Intended for non-science majors. Introductory study of some of the basic concepts
in physics with an emphasis on everyday applications. Topics covered include motion,
energy, heat, sound, electricity, and magnetism. Three lectures and one two-hour lab
per week.
PHYS151
College Physics I (4)
Beginning course for students without a calculus background. Includes basic
principles of bodies at rest and in motion, fluids, thermodynamics, vibrations, waves,
and sound. Prerequisite: MATH112.
PHYS152
College Physics II (4)
Continuation of PHYS151. Includes light, electricity, and magnetism. Three lectures
and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: PHYS151.
PHYS213
General Physics I (5)
Beginning calculus-level physics course. Topics include classical mechanics,
thermodynamics, waves, and sound. Four lectures and one two-hour lab per week.
Prerequisites: MATH141 and MATH142.
PHYS214
General Physics II (5)
Continuation of PHYS213. Topics include electricity, magnetism, and light. Four
lectures and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: PHYS213.
PHYS313
Statics and Dynamics (4)
Three-dimensional equilibrium; analysis of frames, machines and trusses; centroids
and second moments of various geometric shapes. Prerequisite: PHYS213.
PHYS314
Introduction to Electronic and Electrical Circuits (4)
Physical principles underlying modeling of circuit elements; first- and secondorder circuits, circuits in sinusoidal steady state. Experiments with simple circuits,
familiarization with basic measurement tools and equipment. Prerequisite: PHYS214.
118
PLSC105
American Government (3)
An analysis of the plan, structure, and operation of our national government with
reference also to state and local levels. Attention given throughout to issues in politics.
PLSC106
World Politics (3)
A study of contemporary international relations; forms of diplomatic interactions;
problems of conflict and cooperation.
PLSC420
The Constitution and Early Republic (3)
This course explores the development, ratification, and legacy of the U.S. Constitution
from 1787 through the 1820s. In both primary and secondary documents, students
will explore American life under the Constitution with special attention to questions of
religion, race, gender, and individual rights. (Cross-listed with HIST420.)
PSYC210
General Psychology (4)
Survey of the major concepts of psychology viewed from contrasting philosophies.
Designed for both majors and non-majors, this course gives students a general knowledge
base pertaining to the field of psychology and covers a wide range of topics (e.g, the
nervous system, sensation, consciousness, conditioning, memory, IQ, motivation,
emotion, development, stress, coping, assessment, therapy, and abnormalities.) Emphasis
is placed on the relevance of psychology to everyday life and faith.
PSYC220
Human Growth and Development (3)
A life-span perspective on human development, from conception to death. Students
gain knowledge of developmental domains (i.e., social, physical, intellectual, emotional,
and spiritual). Students gain an understanding of parenting issues and developmental
milestones. Class projects help students to apply these concepts to their own history. This
course is a prerequisite for EDUC200.
PSYC310
Personality (3)
An examination of the major psychological theories and the theorist’s personal
histories. Students become familiar with the theoretical models that psychology uses to
understand the problems and needs of people. In the context of a Christian perspective,
these theories are evaluated with regard to their truth claims, interrelationships and
relative value. Prerequisite: PSYC210.
PSYC325
Psychology of Child Development (3)
This course examines the development of children from conception through middle
childhood. Students gain knowledge of the developmental domains (e.g., physical,
social, intellectual, emotional, and spiritual). This course also provides an in depth
understanding of developmental milestones (i.e., a set of functional skills that most
children can do at a certain age range) during early and middle childhood.
119
PSYC330
Psychology of Adult Development (3)
An examination of the development of individuals from young adulthood through
the end of life. The process of adult development as interplay of biological, psychological,
and psychosocial aspects is examined. This course covers topics such as mate selection,
work, retirement, and bereavement. Prerequisite: PSYC220. (Cross-listed with
SOCL350.)
PSYC340
Social Psychology (3)
Examines how behavior, thoughts, and feelings of individuals influence, and are
influenced by, the behavior and characteristics of others. Topics include attitudes, personal
perception, social cognition, liking and friendship, altruism, aggression, conformity,
social exchange, and behavior of individuals within groups. Prerequisite: PSYC210.
PSYC350
Abnormal Psychology (3)
Examines the nature of characteristics of abnormal behavior, focusing on theories,
assessment, classification, and treatments. Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, eating
disorders, chemical dependency, and family problems. Prerequisite: PSYC210.
PSYC360
Educational Psychology and Human Relations (3)
Provides an understanding of how learning occurs and the implications for
instruction. Topics include the psychosocial developmental characteristics of the child;
student variability and diversity; issues of prejudice and discrimination; multi-cultural
education; group dynamics and positive social interaction. PSYC220, EDUC200, and
PSYC360 are the prerequisites for all upper division education courses.
PSYC410
Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3)
Survey of basic behavioral science research that contributes to industrial and
organizational psychology, including worker attitudes and theories of motivation,
organizational structure, communication, theories of leadership, decision making,
conflict resolution, and methods of personnel selection and appraisal.
PSYC420
Psychological Testing and Measurements (3)
Provides an understanding of tests and behavioral measurement techniques.
Students become familiar with intelligence, personality, and industrial, psychological
measures. The basic principles of behavior are introduced and students learn to design
and implement observation assessments. The course concludes with a formal poster
presentation, wherein students present to the campus the findings of their research.
PSYC430
Introduction to Physiological Psychology (3)
Examines humans from a biological perspective. The interplay between biology
and behavior is examined. Through close examination of how the brain develops from
conception through the first five years of life, students gain knowledge pertaining to the
role of the brain in emotion, sleep, learning and memory, sexual behavior, aggression,
and psychopathology. Students also scrutinize the role that the pharmaceutical industry
plays in the creation and treatment of physiological disorders. Prerequisite: BIOL101
or BIOL151.
120
PSYC450
Principles and Strategies of Counseling (3)
Students learn to conduct an effective interview. Interviews in counseling, social
work, personnel work, or the ministry are the focus. The student learns concepts,
methods and skills to develop competencies in helping relationships. Students gain
practical skills at interaction one-on-one. The student will practice listening skills and
develop a framework for counseling.
PSYC460
Facilitating Groups (3)
Investigation into the healing powers of groups and their utilization. This course
looks at how group leaders can provide opportunities for interpersonal support, team
building, and confrontation. The use of groups for enhancing the emotional growth
of the psychologically healthy and operant/classical conditioning in-group motivation
will be focus areas. Topics include stages of groups, group process, basic skills for group
leaders, and ethical concerns. Prerequisite: PSYC210.
PSYC470
Supervised Study in Psychology (3)
Offers an opportunity for first-hand learning experience within an area of interest.
Designed for psychology students, this course consists of both individual and group
work. Students first become familiar with career options available in psychology and
develop areas of interst. Students engage in professional development within psychology,
establish contacts within their areas of interest, and gain hands-on experiences in applied
settings. Prerequisite: PSYC210. Psychology majors only, by consent.
PSYC475
History and Systems of Psychology (3)
Capstone course designed to survey the history of psychology within the context of
Christianity. The focus is on major theorists and their ideas in relation to the historical
context and current psychological issues. A study of the models and areas in which
theology conflict and relate; particular attention is given to Biblical and psychological
theories on the concepts of motivation and guilt. Prerequisite: PSYC210.
PSYC499
Psychology Internship (3)
Psychology-related experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator, and
work site. Psychology majors only, by consent 1-3 credits, repeatable up to 6 credits.
RELG110
Introduction to Christianity I (2)
This course is Part I of the required sequence for full-time incoming students. It is
an introduction to the study of Christianity. Through selected readings, it focuses on the
nature of the Christian faith, the gospel, and the doctrines of Christianity. It serves also
as an introduction to the academic study of religion and theology.
RELG111
Introduction to Christianity II (2)
This course is Part II of the required sequence for full-time incoming students. It is
an introduction to the study of Christianity. Through selected readings, it focuses on the
nature of the Christian faith, the gospel, and the doctrines of Christianity. It serves also
as an introduction to the academic study of religion and theology.
121
RELG203
The Life of Christ (2)
This is a study of the historicity, person, life, and meaning of Jesus Christ for
humanity. A harmony of the four Gospel accounts provides the basic chronology.
RELG204
Israel’s History (2)
This course is a survey of the history of the people of Israel from the Patriarchal Age
(ca. 2000 BC) through the end of the Old Testament Era and into the Intertestamental
Period. Special emphasis is placed on the promises of God, and faith in those promises
as the great integrating theme of the Old Testament. The promises find their fulfillment
in the Christ of the New Testament.
RELG205
The Gospel According to Isaiah (2)
This course is an introduction to and study of the Book of the Prophet Isaiah.
Course content includes: (a) an examination of Isaiah’s place in the History of Israel and
in the larger context of the ancient world, (b) the poetics and rhetoric of the book, (c)
the theology of the book with special emphasis on Messianic prophecy, and (d) a basic
introduction to major issues in Isaiah scholarship.
RELG206
Acts of the Apostles (2)
A study of the Acts of the Apostles in its historical and biblical context.
RELG207
Paul’s Letter to the Roman Christians (2)
A close study of this instructive and interesting letter of St. Paul to the Christians
in Rome. The course seeks to develop a deeper appreciation of this epistle both for the
richness of its teachings and for its timeliness.
RELG208
The Christian Laity (2)
After reviewing the Means of Grace, the Priesthood of all Believers, the Theology
of the Cross, and the Public Ministry, these doctrines will be applied to the life of the
Christian layman in his congregation, at home, and in the secular world. The course will
also focus on evangelism.
RELG209
Christian Doctrine I (2)
A detailed study of the doctrines of the Bible with reference to their importance for
Christian faith and life. Topics include: Scripture, God, Law and Sin, the Person and
Work of Christ, Conversion, Faith, Justification, Good Works, and Prayer.
RELG210
Christian Doctrine II (2)
A continuation of Christian Doctrine I (the courses need not be taken in sequence),
it deals with the doctrines of Election, the Means of Grace, the Church, Ministry, Civil
Estates, and the Last Things.
RELG300
History of Christian Thought I:
Post-Apostolic Fathers to Chalcedon (3)
A survey of major developments in the history of Christian thought, doctrine and
practice of the early church, including the Post-Apostolic and Ante-Nicene fathers,
Augustine and the Council of Nicea to the Council of Chalcedon.
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RELG301
History of Christian Thought II: Chalcedon to 15th Century (3)
A survey of major developments in the history of Christian thought, doctrine, and
practice, with a concentration especially on the Latin Church, Western monasticism,
and the development of scholastic thought from the Council of Chalcedon to the 15th
century.
RELG302
History of Christian Thought III:
17th Century Enlightenment to Modern and Post Modern (3)
A survey of major trends in the history of Christian thought, doctrine, and practice
from the late 17th century to the present day, including the influences of Enlightenment
thought and fundamentalist reactions to modernist developments.
RELG316
Comparative World Religions (3)
The five major world religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and
Hinduism) are examined and discussed. Their central teachings are outlined and
compared.
RELG320
Luther: His Ongoing Significance (3)
The Lutheran Reformation is examined through the biography and selected writings
of Martin Luther. Chief emphasis is on the years to Luther’s death, with an examination
of the structure and themes of Luther’s thought.
RELG321
History of the Lutheran Church (3)
An outline of the history of Lutheranism in the United States, with special emphasis
on the theological position and trends of the various Lutheran bodies found in the U.S.
RELG325
Psalms and Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament (3)
This course is an introduction to and survey of the Book of Psalms, the Books of Job
and Ecclesiastes, and selected portions of the Book of Proverbs. It examines the origins,
literary artistry, theological content, and the use of these books across the ages.
RELG330
Christian Social Thought (3)
Controversial topics in contemporary Christianity are discussed on the basis of
Scripture and human reason. Topics include such issues as war, capital punishment, the
role of women, science, and sexuality.
RELG335
The Lutheran Confessions (3)
This course studies the Lutheran Book of Concord, the confessions of the Lutheran
Church. The course examines the basic historical background of each of the Lutheran
Confessional documents; the relationship between Scripture and the Confessional
writings; the normative nature and authority of the Book of Concord for Lutheran
Church confessional and church life.
RELG340
Apologetics (3)
This course examines the nature and purpose of apologetics theologically,
philosophically, historically, scientifically, equipping students to fashion an apologetic
within the contemporary postmodern and modern context.
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RELG350
Islam (3)
Islam, the fastest growing and second largest world religion, is examined and
discussed. Attention is given to its historical roots, major teachings, schisms, and
importance in the world today.
RELG360
History of the Christian Church (3)
A survey of the History of the Christian Church from the post-apostolic age
to the present. Major emphasis is on the Middle ages, reform movements, and postReformation. Prerequisite: RELG110 and RELG111.
RELG380
Pauline Literature (3)
Representative letters of the Apostle Paul will be studied in detail. The student will
be required to read through all of Paul’s letters, but the focus of the course will be a study
of selected letters, and will examine various critical issues raised in secondary literature.
RELG382
Johannine Literature (3)
The Gospel of John, John’s epistles, and the Revelation to John will be studied
in detail. The course will also examine various critical issues raised in secondary
literature.
RELG420
The Rhetoric of Religion (3)
A study of religion’s use of “multi-modal” strategies — words, silence, emotional
images, and even smells — conditioned by theological assumptions, to persuade. Central
attention is given to how secular rhetoric has influenced the Christian tradition.
RELG425
Influence of Eastern Religion Upon
American Culture and Thinking (3)
This course explores the influence of Eastern Religious thought upon American
culture beginning in the 19th century and marked by the Watershed 1893 Chicago
Parliament of Religions, which encouraged 20th century Ecumenism and the spread of
Buddhism, Hinduism Theosophy, Mind Cure, New Age and the contemporary SelfHelp Movement.
RELG435
Intertestament Period (3)
This course is an introduction to and survey of the Biblical period from about 500
BC to the birth of Christ. The core of the content includes the canonical Books of Ezra,
Nehemiah, Esther, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, and the 14 writings commonly
referred to as the Apocrrypha. The course examines the content of these writings and the
historical circumstances out of which they arose.
RELG480
Topics in Religious Studies (3)
Students examine a variety of special religion topics that emerge from present day
issues, the expertise of the instructor, and/or the special interests of the students.
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RELG495
Senior Seminar in Religious Studies (3)
Integration of the various facets of the liberal arts into a coherent personal
perspective on reality. Focus on the epistemological bases of the disciplines; translation
of liberal arts study into a productive life serving the needs of church and society.
Prerequisite: LART490.
SCIE320
History and Philosophy of Science (3)
This course examines the social and intellectual foundations of Western science
from antiquity to the present. Students will evaluate scientific achievements in their
respective historical, philosophical, cultural, and theological contexts, and compare
previous scientific understandings to present ones.
SCIE330
Ethics in Science (3)
Students will examine the ethical dimensions of contemporary science, including
standards of professional research and principles of biomedical ethics. Informed by both
theological and secular moral philosophies, students will explore how the meaning of the
human person is challenged by current scientific trends.
SCIE340
Environmental Issues (3)
Overview of environmental processes and the issues that face our society. Emphasis
is placed on developing skills to think critically about various environmental issues and
to formulate educated opinions about these issues.
SCIE350
Technology in Society (3)
This course is an interdisciplinary look at the advancements technology has made
in various disciplines such as biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and computer science.
The intent is to promote a positive attitude toward science, mathematics and technology
and to develop critical-thinking and problem-solving abilities at increasing levels of
complexity.
SOCL101
Introduction to Sociology (3)
This foundational class examines the structure of social groups and analyzes social
interaction. Emphasis is given to sociological theories and methodologies, which help
understand and explain human group behavior.
SOCL105
Problems of Contemporary Society (3)
The major social problems, which beset contemporary American society, are
identified, examined and analyzed. The issues include inequality, health, education,
poverty, family problems, crime, and substance abuse.
SOCL201
Marriage and the Family (3)
The social and cultural patterns of mate selection, marriage, and family interactions
are investigated. The Christian perspective and communication in relationships
throughout the life cycle are emphasized.
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SOCL235
Death and Dying (3)
Human responses to death, dying, and bereavement are studied in the socio-cultural,
interpersonal, and personal contexts. Funerals, suicide, euthanasia, and children’s
perceptions of death are among the topics discussed.
SOCL240
Criminal Deviance and Justice (3)
Criminal deviance and the social and legal process of defining crime and punishment
are examined. Topics include crime types, criminal careers, theories of crime causation,
and an introduction to crime control systems. Prerequisite: SOCL101 or SOCL105.
SOCL320
Research Methods in Social Sciences (3)
Knowledge of research design, its applications, and responsible conduct in research
will be acquired through lecture, discussion, text reading, case study, and a research
proposal. Analysis techniques will be introduced.
SOCL330
American Minorities (3)
The values, beliefs, demographics, and cultural patterns of American minorities and
U.S. society are examined from historic and contemporary perspectives. Topics include
race, ethnicity, gender, social economics, and disabilities.
SOCL345
Religion and Society (3)
The nature and role of religion in our increasingly diverse society are examined.
The varieties of religious beliefs, forms and practices and the effect of religion on society
are discussed.
SOCL350
Aging in Society (3)
The sociological, psychological and biological aspects of aging are examined.
Contemporary theories of aging and the gerontology research being conducted today are
introduced. (Cross-listed with PSYC330.)
SOCL410
Sociological Theory (3)
Subjects such as power, socialization, conflict, social order, and interpersonal
relations are examined in terms of classical and contemporary sociological theories.
Prerequisite: SOCL101 or SOCL105 or consent of instructor.
SOCL430
Collective Behavior and Social Movements (3)
Forms of collective behavior are analyzed and discussed. Topics include: crowds,
crazes, public opinions, collective hysteria, panic, rumor transmission, social conflict and
social change. Prerequisite: SOCL101 or SOCL105 or consent of instructor.
SOCL440
Social Stratification (3)
This class offers an overview of the causes, processes and consequences of social
stratification in society. Attention is given to social inequalities rooted in social class
structure, the organization of political power, and social hierarchies based on race and
gender differences. Prerequisite: SOCL101 or SOCL105 or consent of instructor.
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SOCL480
Topics in Sociology (3)
Topics of special interest are presented in a seminar format. Students are expected
to participate in special research, classroom discussion and reporting. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor.
SOCL499
Sociology Internship (3)
Sociology-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between student, department, Internship Coordinator, and
worksite. Sociology majors only, by consent.
SPAN101
Beginning Spanish I (4)
This introductory course to Spanish language and culture begins developing the
four basic-skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing with a focus
on meaningful communication in a Spanish setting.
SPAN102
Beginning Spanish II (4)
This is a continuation of Beginning Spanish I. Prerequisite: SPAN101 or placement
exam.
SPAN203
Intermediate Spanish I (4)
Development of conversational fluency is emphasized while the fundamentals of
grammar are reviewed and expanded. Cultural awareness is enhanced through selected
readings. Prerequisite: SPAN102 or placement exam.
SPAN204
Intermediate Spanish II (4)
This course is a continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Prerequisite: SPAN203.
SPAN305
Conversation and Literature I (4)
Short literary works stimulate discussion and help to build an understanding and
appreciation of Hispanic life and culture, with special attention given to Hispanic life
in the United States and Latin America. Selected grammar topics are reviewed and
expanded. Prerequisite: SPAN204 or placement exam.
SPAN306
Conversation and Literature II (4)
This course is a continuation of Spanish 305. The literary works focus on Latin
America in the past 50 years, helping to gain an understanding and appreciation of
recent history. Literary terminology and methods of literary interpretation are covered,
along with the review of selected grammar topics. Prerequisite: SPAN305 or consent
of instructor.
SPAN320
History and Culture of Spain (3)
An overview of the history and culture of Spain from pre-history to the present. Topics
include art, literature and politics. Prerequisite: SPAN306 or consent of instructor.
SPAN330
History and Culture of Latin America (3)
An overview of the history and culture of Latin America from the time of the
conquest to the present day. Topics include art, literature, and politics. Prerequisite:
SPAN306 or consent of instructor.
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SPAN340
Survey of the Literature of Spain (3)
A survey of the literature of some of the more important Spanish authors, past and
present. Prerequisite: SPAN306 or consent of instructor.
SPAN350
Survey of the Literature of Latin America (3)
A survey of the literature of some of the more important Latin American authors,
past and present. Prerequisite: SPAN306 or consent of instructor.
THTR100
Theatre Practicum I (1-2)
May be taken by the consent of instructor only. Credit granted to students submitting
at least 30 hours toward a theatrical production. The instructor determines the allotment
of credit gauged by the responsibility of the role the student is undertaking. May not be
taken in conjunction with other theatre practica. Offered on a credit/no credit basis. May
be repeated in the following areas: (a) acting or (b) technical theatre.
THTR101
Introduction to Theatre (3)
A class designed to acquaint students with the theatre arts. Play and text readings,
the viewing of live performances, critical writing assignments, and group discussion will
be utilized to enhance understanding and appreciation for the art as a whole.
THTR102
Acting I (3)
A rudimentary acting course, defining and exercising the actor’s tools of expression
within the body and voice. These tools are then applied to character structuring through
improvisational script analysis and scene work.
THTR105
Stage Craft (3)
An introductory course in contemporary staging techniques. This course contains
units on aesthetics, tools and safety, basic design, scene painting, lighting, construction
materials and building techniques.
THTR210
Directing I (3)
A fundamental exploration in the theory and practice of directing theatre,
culminating in the production of scenes from dramatic literature. Prerequisites:
THTR101, THTR102 and THTR105 or consent of instructor.
THTR215
Rudiments of Theatrical Design (3)
Acquaints students with the rudiments of theatrical design. Students will use various
materials and media, and will explore two- and three-dimensional rendering techniques,
in order to conceptualize the design elements of dramatic works. Prerequisite: THTR101
or THTR105 or consent of instructor.
THTR240
Oral Interpretation (3)
An introduction to performance that focuses primarily on the human voice. This
course deals with the vocal performance of various kinds of literature, including poetry
and prose, and emphasizes the implementation of textual analysis in order to make
performance choices. Basic anatomy of the vocal mechanism and proper techniques for
its use is covered.
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THTR300
Theatre Practicum II (1-2)
May be taken by the consent of instructor only. The 300 series practica will be
taken for a grade and will be repeatable for up to eight credits. These practica allow the
qualified student the opportunity to apply the techniques they have learned toward an
actual stage production. Journaling and an extra writing component will be expected.
Areas include acting, stage management, light design, scene/prop design, sound design,
costume design, and technical theatre.
THTR302
Acting II (3)
An examination of various theories on the art of acting in conjunction with applied
character development work. Prerequisite: THTR102.
THTR310
Theatre History and Literature I (3)
An historical overview of theatrical activity and plays from its origins to the
1600’s. The course will trace developments or changes in practice and major trends and
movements that shaped the art through time. Close readings of dramatic literature and
study of the contributions of individual theatre artists will supplement the scope of the
course. Prerequisite: THTR101.
THTR311
Theatre History and Literature II (3)
An historical overview of theatrical activity and plays from the 1600’s to the present
day. The course will trace developments or changes in practice as well as major trends
that shaped theatre through time. Close readings of dramatic literature and study of the
contributions of individual theatre artists will provide the supplement the scope of the
course. Prerequisite: THTR101.
THTR330
Period Style (3)
This course is an examination of the relationship between arts and culture during
major periods in history. Visual and conceptual choices are explored as to the ways
these relationships are used by directors and designers in the context of theatrical
collaboration.
THTR340
Stage Dialects (3)
This course will concentrate on several of the most often needed dialects for the
stage and thoroughly utilize the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).
THTR381
Advanced Design and Technical Seminar (3)
An examination of various topics within technical theatre and design. Specific
topics will be announced. Prerequisite: THTR215
THTR410
Directing II (3)
An exploration of the challenges involved in directing non-realistic and period plays.
Involves research and analysis of texts followed by an application of directing techniques.
Culminates in a production at least one short scene. Prerequisite: THTR210.
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THTR420
Dramatic Theory and Criticism (3)
The in-depth study of major writings on theatre and drama throughout the ages.
This is a seminar class wherein the student will focus on analyzing varying perspectives
of drama and theatre, and writing original criticism. Prerequisite: THTR101.
THTR460
Theatre Management (3)
A study of the particular challenges involved in the business of theatre. Includes
an examination of the various expenses involved with the theatre art form as well as
the means to provide capital to cover these expenses. Includes basic business practices.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
THTR480
Topics in Theatre (3)
An examination of various topics concerning the contemporary theatre artist.
Specific topics to be announced. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
THTR495
Senior Theatre Project (3)
Involves the integration of the various facets of theatre arts into a culminating project.
Objectives and goals established by the student and instructor. Deadlines established by
the department. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
THTR499
Theatre Internship (3)
Theatre-related field experience with an approved agency fulfilling an individual
learning contract negotiated between the student, the department, the Internship
Coordinator and the worksite. Only three credits may apply toward fulfilling requirements
for the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
VARS101
Varsity Softball (0.5)
Students may use a maximum of one credit of varsity participation to satisfy the
core general education requirements. Students participating in a varsity sport may not
register for the coinciding physical education offering. One-half credit will be earned for
each season involved.
VARS102
VARS103
VARS105
VARS106
VARS111
VARS112
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Varsity Basketball (0.5)
Varsity Soccer (0.5)
Varsity Volleyball (0.5)
Varsity Golf (0.5)
Varsity Baseball (0.5)
Varsity Tennis (0.5)
Bethany Lutheran College
faculty and
administration
131
Faculty
Peter J. Bloedel
Theatre
M.A., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1993
John P. Boubel
History
Ph.D., Marquette University
Milwaukee, Wisc.
At Bethany since 1998
Polly E. Browne
Education
Coordinator, Academic Mentoring
Ph.D., Capella University
Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 2003
Laura A. Buch
Mathematics
M.A., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2008
William S. Bukowski
Art
M.F.A., University of Wisconsin
Madison, Wisc.
At Bethany since 1980
Mark E. DeGarmeaux
Religious Studies, Norwegian, Latin
M.Div., Bethany Lutheran Theological Seminary, Mankato, Minn.
S.T.M., Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary
Mequon, Wisc.
At Bethany since 1995
Robert C. Hanna
English, Education
Coordinator, Secondary Education
Ph.D., University of North Carolina
Greensboro, N.C.
At Bethany since 2005
Mark O. Harstad
Religious Studies, Hebrew
M.Div., Bethany Lutheran Theological Seminary, Mankato, Minn.
M.A., University of Wisconsin
Madison, Wisc.
At Bethany since 1980
Chad J. Heins
Biology
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Doyle F. Holbird
Theatre
M.A., University of Wisconsin Superior, Wisc.
At Bethany since 2004
Biology
M.Div., Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Ind. Ph.D., Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Ill.
At Bethany since 2007
Ramona M. Czer
Lars O. Johnson
Matthew L. Caron
English, Communication
M.F.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1995
132
English, Communication
M.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1999
Lyle D. Jones
Adrian H. Lo
William B. Kessel
Jon L. Loging
Physical Education
M.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1990
Sociology, Religious Studies
Erling M. Bolstad Chair
M.Div., Bethany Lutheran Theological Seminary, Mankato, Minn.
Ph.D., University of Arizona Tucson, Ariz.
At Bethany 1986-96, since 2003
Julie M. Kjeer
Mathematics
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany 1990-99, since 2004
Peter M. Kjeer
Physics, Engineering
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Tiffany T. Young Klockziem
Health, Physical Education
Head Coach, Women’s Basketball
M.S., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Matthew D. Kuster
Biology, Physical Education
D.P.T., Creighton University
Omaha, Nebr.
At Bethany since 1999
Patricia J. Lind
Health, Sociology, Psychology
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1992
Music
M.M., Smith College Northampton, Mass.
At Bethany since 1996
Communication, Speech Team
M.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2001
Derick M. Lyngholm
Communication
Head Coach, Women’s Soccer
M.A., Bethel University
St. Paul, Minn.
At Bethany since 2007
Ryan C. MacPherson
History, Philosophy
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Ind.
At Bethany since 2003
Dennis W. Marzolf
Music
M.Div., Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Ind.
M.M., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1984
Janet L. Moldstad
Business
Glen Taylor Chair for Business
and Leadership
Ph.D., Walden University
Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Angela L. Murilla
Communication, Speech
Ed.D., Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 1999
133
Jonas K. Nissen
Communication, English
Ph.D., Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio
At Bethany since 1999
Eric C. Ouren
Art
M.F.A., University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa
At Bethany since 2000
Andrew T. Overn
Art
M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Ga.
At Bethany 1991-94 and since 1997
Robert F. Pipal
Physical Education
Head Coach, Men’s Soccer
M.S., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1998
Steven L. Reagles
Erling T. Teigen
Religious Studies, Philosophy
M.Div., Bethany Lutheran Theological Seminary, Mankato, Minn.
M.A., University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 1977
Timothy G. Tollefson
Music
M.A., Indiana State University
Terre Haute, Ind.
At Bethany since 2002
Mark E. Wiechmann
Psychology
M.S., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany 1978-80 and since 1983
Eric K. Woller
Chemistry
Ph.D., Montana State University
Bozeman, MT
At Bethany since 1996
Communication, Religious Studies
M.Div., Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary
Mequon, Wisc.
Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pa.
At Bethany since 1982
Jennifer A.D. Wosmek
Matthew E. Riehl
FACULTY EMERITI
Chemistry
Ph.D., University of Illinois
Urbana-Champaign, Ill.
At Bethany since 1999
Dean W. Shoop
Business, Accounting, Economics
M.B.A., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1981
134
Psychology
Ph.D., University of Kansas
Lawrence, Kans.
At Bethany since 2005
Arlene A. Hilding, Professor Emeritus
Norman S. Holte, President Emeritus
Rudolph E. Honsey, Professor Emeritus
Calvin K. Johnson, Professor Emeritus
Sigurd K. Lee, Professor Emeritus
Marvin G. Meyer, President Emeritus
Cynthia A. Weberg, Professor Emeritus
Administration
Orrin H. Ausen
Steven C. Jaeger
Silas V. Born
Christopher T. Johnson
Dan R. Bruss
Christopher G. Kind
Gregory W. Costello
Ruthann C. Kragh
Karl E. Fager
Theodore E. Manthe
Director of Library Services
M.S., University of Wisconsin La Crosse, Wisc.
At Bethany since 2003
Coordinator of Christian Education
Education, Psychology (adjunct faculty)
M.S., University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Wisc.
At Bethany since 1997
President
Ph.D., Montana State University
Bozeman, Mont.
At Bethany since 2003
Controller
B.A., University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa
At Bethany since 1979
Director of Athletics
M.S., University of Wisconsin
La Crosse, Wisc.
At Bethany since 2005
Sarah A. Harstad
Director of Alumni Relations and
Annual Giving
M.B.A., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn. At Bethany since 2005
Lois A. Jaeger
Director of Fine Arts
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1991
Vice President for Student Affairs
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1985
Director of Studio Services
Communication (adjunct faculty)
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Director of Development
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2007
Registrar
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2006
Dean of Student Services
Education/Freshman Seminar
(adjunct faculty)
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 2002
Juel O. Merseth
Director of Facilities
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2007
Ralph L. Miller
Director of Accounting
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1997
135
Donald L. Moldstad
Director of Campus Spiritual Life/
Chaplain
Religious Studies (adjunct faculty)
M.Div., Bethany Lutheran Theological Seminary, Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2005
Jonathan L. Moldstad
Director of Security Services
B.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2003
Daniel L. Mundahl
Chief Financial and
Administrative Officer
Coordinator of Paul Ylvisaker Center for Personal and Public Responsibility
M.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Lance W. Schwartz
Director of Marketing and
Public Relations
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1990
John M. Sehloff
Director of Information Technology
Biology, Computer Science (adjunct faculty)
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1984
136
Arthur P. Westphal
Chief Advancement Officer
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1984
Donald M. Westphal
Dean of Admissions
Sports Information Director
M.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1993
Paul G. Wold
Manager, Bookstore
B.A., University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 1995
Jeffrey W. Younge
Director of Financial Aid
M.B.A., University of St. Thomas
Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 1999
Ronald J. Younge
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Freshman Seminar (adjunct faculty)
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1967
Professional Staff
Ellen M. Bartscher
Computer Systems Specialist,
Information Technology Services
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2001
Tami L. Board
Data Specialist, Advancement
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2001
Paulette Tonn Booker
Manager of Employee Relations
Title IX Officer
Business (adjunct faculty)
M.B.A., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1999
Julie A. Ewert
Coordinator, Interlibrary Loan
and Circulation
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1992
Thomas G. Flunker
Coordinator of the Multi Ethnic Center
Admissions Counselor
B.S., Martin Luther College New Ulm, Minn.
At Bethany since 2007
Kathy L. Forsberg
Assistant Librarian, Cataloging
M.S., University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minn.
At Bethany since 1989
Tanya M. Homan
Admissions Counselor
B.A., Bethany Lutheran College
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2008
Erin A. Johnson
Assistant Librarian, Electronic Resources
M.S., Illinois State University
Normal, Ill.
At Bethany since 2006
Jonathan E. Kovaciny
Coordinator of Web Services
B.A., Bethany Lutheran College
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2001
Ryan P. Kragh
Assistant Director of Athletics
Head Coach, Baseball
B.S., University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, N.D.
At Bethany since 2001
Leigh Ann M. LaFave
Coordinator of Student Activities
and Intramurals
Head Coach, Softball
M.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2006
Dustin D. Lange
Admissions Counselor
B.A., Bethany Lutheran College
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2008
Linda S. Loge
Associate Dean of Admissions
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1996
Jonathan M. Marozick
Programmer
Computer Science (adjunct faculty)
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1996
137
Todd R. Marzinske
Manager of Network Systems
M.S., North Dakota State University
Fargo, N.D.
At Bethany since 1994
Mark S. Meyer
Patti J. Reagles, LGSW
Coordinator of Student Counseling
Sociology (adjunct faculty)
M.S.W., University of Wisconsin
Madison, Wisc.
At Bethany since 1996
Manager of Academic Computing
Computer Science, Education (adjunct
faculty)
M.A., Concordia University
St. Paul, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Lisa A. Shubert
David J. Norris
Coordinator of Publications
B.F.A., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2000
Coordinator of Career Services
and Internships
M.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2006
Paul J. Osterman
Estelle B. Vlieger
Head Athletic Trainer
B.S., Minnesota State University Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2007
Kurt W. Paulsen
Media Communication Specialist
Communication (adjunct faculty)
M.A., Savannah School of Art and Design, Savannah, Ga.
At Bethany since 2005
138
Manager of Administrative Computing
B.S., Minnesota State University
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 1999
Mary Jo H. Starkson
Admissions Counselor
B.A., Bethany Lutheran College
Mankato, Minn.
At Bethany since 2004
139
Index
Individual courses are not listed in this index. See the alphabetical listing of courses
beginning on page 74.
Academic Policies.............................. 14
Accreditation....................................... 5
Administration............................ 8, 137
Admissions.......................................... 9
Advanced Placement......................... 16
Advisor.............................................. 13
Art History Minor............................. 24
Attendance........................................ 14
Auditing Courses............................... 16
Data Privacy Policy .......................... 10
Dropping/Adding Courses ............... 17
Bachelor of Arts Degree............... 18, 23
Biology Major................................... 24
Biology Minor................................... 26
Board of Regents ................................ 8
Broad Field Social Studies Major....... 27
Business Administration Major......... 30
Business Administration Minor......... 33
Faculty Roster ................................ 132
Fees .................................................. 11
Financial Aid . .................................. 12
Freshman Seminar . .......................... 22
Freshmen ................................... 15, 22
Grade Point Average . ................. 15, 19
Grades . ............................................ 15
Graduation Requirements ................ 18
Campus ..................................... 5, 141
Certification...................................... 23
Chapel................................................ 7
Chemistry Major . ............................ 34
Chemistry Minor ............................. 35
Church Music Major......................... 35
Church Music Minor........................ 37
Class Load . ...................................... 16
Classification of Students ................. 15
Coaching Certification...................... 38
Common General Education Core.... 19
Communication Disorders Minor..... 40
Communication Major..................... 38
Communication Minor..................... 40
Counseling Services........................... 13
Course Changes ............................... 17
Course Descriptions ......................... 77
Credit by Special Examination ......... 16
Credit Hours . .................................. 15
140
Education Major ............................ 41
Engineering & Physical Science......... 44
English Major................................... 46
English Minor................................... 48
Exercise Science Major...................... 49
Expenses .......................................... 11
Health Communication Minor ........ 50
History Major .................................. 50
History Minor . ................................ 52
Honors . ..................................... 16, 19
Incompletes . .................................... 17
Information Systems Minor ............. 53
Internships ....................................... 13
Junior................................................ 15
Liberal Arts Major . .......................... 53
Location of College ............................ 5
Majors............................................... 23
Map................................................ 141
Mathematics Major........................... 61
Mathematics Minor........................... 62
Minors.............................................. 23
Mission Statement . ............................ 5
Music Major .................................... 63
Music Minor .................................... 64
North Central Association . ................ 5
Objectives, General Education ......... 19
Objectives of the College . .................. 6
Organization of the College ............... 7
Ownership and Control ..................... 7
Part-time Student ............................. 15
Payment of Fees ............................... 11
Philosophy and Objectives
of the College ................................. 6
Professional Staff ............................ 139
Psychology Major.............................. 64
Psychology Minor............................. 66
Semester Credits . ............................. 15
Senior................................................ 15
Sociology Major................................ 68
Sociology Minor................................ 69
Sophomore . ..................................... 15
Spanish Minor................................... 70
Studio Art Major............................... 70
Studio Art Minor.............................. 73
Study Abroad.................................... 14
Synod . ..................... 5, 6, 7, 8, 96, 112
Theatre Major................................... 74
Theatre Minor.................................. 75
Transcript . ................................. 11, 17
Transfer ...................................... 16, 18
Travel ............................................... 14
Tuition ............................................. 11
Veteran Benefits ............................... 12
Religion Major.................................. 66
Religion Minor.................................. 68
Refunds . .......................................... 11
Registration Policies ......................... 16
ROTC . ............................................ 14
Western Philosophy Minor................ 76
Withdrawal from a Course ............... 17
Withdrawal from College ................. 17
141
NOTES
142
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