Getting Started - Basics - Industrial Controls Knowledge Base

Getting Started - Basics - Industrial Controls Knowledge Base
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Quick start
Getting Started - Basics
Installation - First steps for beginners
PVSS II – Process visualization and control system
Version 2.0 (July 2004) – English • Basis: Version PVSS II 3.0.1 under Microsoft Windows
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
This document is aimed at automation engineers, project engineers and developers seeking solutions in
the fields of process visualization, instrumentation and control and Collaborative Manufacturing
Management (CMM).
With its scalable, modular system design, PVSS II provides a powerful and future-proof base for every
form of control-centre application. A client-server architecture is employed throughout the system,
allowing multi-user access with simultaneous multilingual capability. The spectrum of possible
configurations ranges from an autonomous single-PC system with minimum configuration to multicomputer applications for load distribution and whole multi-server clusters (distributed systems). Hotstandby server redundancy and full network redundancy satisfy even high availability demands.
The contents of this document were up to date at the time of writing and have been checked carefully.
Ongoing development to improve the product further may mean that certain information is no longer
valid and needs to be replaced by new data - please refer to the relevant customer information media
and contact ETM support if in doubt. The document may contain errors both in content and form, and
these cannot form the basis of any warranty claims. Many screenshots are based on one of several
possible display modes of the Windows XP operating system (style: silver) or Windows 2000 - slight
differences from other display modes are possible. To help the learning process, some modified
screenshots (collages etc.) are used that cannot be seen directly in the product in the form shown.
If you find any errors in this or other documents of the PVSS II Online Help, please notify us in writing by
e-mail to pvssdoku@etm.at or by a short FAX with the subject "DOKU" to +43 (0) 2682 – 741 – 107.
Please direct any complaints, ideas and requests to the relevant contact department listed at the end of
this document.
Trade marks, logos and product names of third parties, in particular the Microsoft Corporation, are
subject to relevant separate copyright and trademark laws.
Authors:
Beate Briss, Matthias Schagginger, Leo Knipp (all from ETM)
Document edition:
Version 2.0 – English – Microsoft Windows platforms, July 2004
© 2004, ETM professional control GmbH. Written approval by the author is required for any form of
duplication, modification or dissemination of the document or extracts of it.
All rights reserved.
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Contents
1
Introduction........................................................................................................................ 5
1.1
What is PVSS II? .............................................................................................................. 5
1.2
Terminology.................................................................................................................... 6
1.3
Typography..................................................................................................................... 7
2
Basic concepts.................................................................................................................... 8
2.1
Architecture..................................................................................................................... 8
2.2
Client-Server / Provider-Consumer.................................................................................... 9
2.3
Communication, Event orientation .................................................................................... 9
2.4
System, distribution, configurations ................................................................................. 10
2.5
Datapoint model, process image .................................................................................... 12
3
Installation ....................................................................................................................... 15
3.1
System requirements ...................................................................................................... 15
3.2
Installation process ........................................................................................................ 15
3.3
Opening the administration interface .............................................................................. 17
3.4
Demonstration project.................................................................................................... 18
3.5
Licensing....................................................................................................................... 19
3.6
Online Help.................................................................................................................. 21
4
Project administration ........................................................................................................ 22
4.1
Creating a project ......................................................................................................... 22
4.2
Starting, stopping .......................................................................................................... 23
4.3
Configuring a project..................................................................................................... 25
Console ........................................................................................................... 25
4.3.2
System Management......................................................................................... 26
4.3.3
Configuration files ............................................................................................ 26
4.4
Function buttons in Project Administration........................................................................ 27
4.5
After startup - First steps ................................................................................................. 27
5
Data model...................................................................................................................... 29
5.1
Datapoints as information carriers................................................................................... 29
5.1.1
Datapoint types ................................................................................................ 29
5.1.2
Datapoints ....................................................................................................... 30
5.1.3
Information at the datapoint element.................................................................. 31
5.2
Modelling datapoint types .............................................................................................. 32
5.3
Instancing ..................................................................................................................... 33
5.4
Settings for the datapoint element ................................................................................... 34
5.5
Addressing .................................................................................................................... 35
5.6
Functions at the device-oriented data object - configs....................................................... 36
6
Creating datapoints .......................................................................................................... 39
6.1
7
4.3.1
Creating custom datapoints in the PARA database editor .................................................. 39
Graphical user interfaces - "Panels" ..................................................................................... 41
3
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
7.1
Creating process displays - the graphical editor ............................................................... 41
7.2
Simple drawing operations ............................................................................................. 42
7.3
The Property sheet ......................................................................................................... 44
7.4
Making graphics properties dynamic (Simple Parameterization) ......................................... 45
7.5
Scripting in the graphic .................................................................................................. 47
7.6
Using ready-made symbols for displaying data................................................................. 48
7.7
The Preview in the graphical editor.................................................................................. 50
8
Contact ........................................................................................................................... 51
8.1
Head office ................................................................................................................... 51
8.2
Sales ............................................................................................................................ 51
8.3
Licensing....................................................................................................................... 51
8.4
Training ........................................................................................................................ 51
8.5
Support/Engineering ...................................................................................................... 51
4
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
1
Introduction
1.1
What is PVSS II?
"PVSS II" is the German abbreviation for "Process visualization and control system II", a software package
designed for the field of automation engineering. Its main application is in the operation and supervision
of technical installations using VDU workstations with full-graphics capability.
In addition to the visualization of the current process states, this application needs to be able to transfer
input values and commands to the process and its control devices. The operator does this interactively
using mouse, keyboard and other standard computer input devices, with the immediate response
displayed on the screen. Other core functions of the software include alerting the operator when critical
states occur or limits are exceeded, plus archiving of data for later display and analysis.
Such systems are usually called control systems or visualization systems or referred to by the acronyms
SCADA or HMI. SCADA stands for Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition and sums up the essence of
this software package particularly well. HMI stands for Human Machine Interface.
Fig. 1.1
Role of PVSS II within an
automation system
So PVSS II is the supervisory software for the control centre or the machine operating software. PC-based
servers and workstations are used as the hardware platform. Together with the control and regulation
devices of the automation platform (PLC1, DDC2, RTU3, ...) plus their sensors and I/O modules, these
create a complete automation system.
1
PLC…Programmable Logic Controller (industrial computer system for digital control and operation)
2
DDC…Direct Digital Control (family of control devices in building services management)
3
RTU…Remote Terminal Unit, Remote Telemetry Unit
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
1.2
Terminology
All technical and product-specific terms are explained when they are first used. A few particularly
important abbreviations are also listed here:
Acronym
Full term
Meaning
PVSS II
Process visualization and
control system (2nd
generation)
Product name of a software package (control and
visualization system) from ETM AG.
SCADA
Supervisory Control And Data
Acquisition
A master system for gathering data on a process and for
controlling/operating the process.
HMI
Human Machine Interface
The hardware and software for computer-based
operation and monitoring of processes.
DPT
Datapoint type
Object definition (class) of a structured datapoint as a
computerized representation of a real device. The
individual datapoints (instances) are derived from the
DPT. Thus the datapoint type is a sort of template.
DP
Datapoint
Structured device-oriented data object representing a
real device within the control system. A datapoint
contains one or more datapoint elements (process
variables).
DPE
Datapoint element
An item of process information within a device-oriented
datapoint. Every DPE corresponds to a value/state. In
addition to holding the value, the datapoint element
includes attributes giving the time stamp, quality
information and the originator.
DPA
Datapoint attribute
In addition to the value actually represented (= process
variable), each datapoint element contains a number of
extra attributes - quality information ("status"), time stamp
and originator as a minimum.
Config
Configuration
Control-system functions - "configs" - can be configured
at each datapoint element, for example a range check,
alert handling or archiving instruction.
UI
User Interface
The graphical user interfaces in PVSS II are also called
UIs. "Native Vision", the runtime interface, is specifically
often called the "UI".
GUI
Graphical User Interface
Generalized term for UI; see UI
API
Application Programming
Interface
The API in PVSS II lets the user integrate his/her own
functions and algorithms into PVSS II in the form of a
new manager (see section 2).
GEDI
Graphical editor
Used in PVSS II for creating the process displays,
symbols and dialog boxes.
PARA
Parameterization tool
Database editor for creating datapoint types and
datapoints, and for configuring them.
VISION
Visualization module
Abbreviation for the "Native Vision" runtime user
interface in PVSS II
PLC
Programmable Logic
Controller
Industrial computer system for controlling and operating
processes.
Tab. 1.1
Main abbreviations and their
meanings
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Acronym
Full term
Meaning
DDC
Direct Digital Control
Special class of control and operation systems for
building automation.
RTU
Remote Terminal Unit, Remote
Telemetry Unit
Telecontrol system
I/O
Input/Output
From the SCADA system viewpoint: data exchanged with
external devices (e.g. PLC)
ASCII
American Standard Code for
Information Interchange
Standardized protocol for storage and transmission of
characters/text. In PVSS II, the acronym is also used to
refer to the database import/export manager.
1.3
Tab. 1.1
Main abbreviations and their
meanings
Typography
Explanation
Explanatory text with bold formatting to emphasize certain passages
Anglicisms
(Programmable Logical Controller)
Step-by-step
Hotkey
[Ctrl] + [C]
Buttons
OK
,
Next
,
Menu, tab
Select the menu File Ö Settings Ö Save tab
Source code
main(){ dpSet(….)... // comment
Paths, file names C:\pvss\GettingStarted_3.0
Datapoint name
V2.state.open
Online Help reference
Module name
Tip box
GEDI, PARA, VISION, NG, NV, EV, Event Manager, Data, ...
*
Caution box
In-depth info
{Control Ö Control Graphic Ö Checkbox functions}
Tip
Caution
More detailed information at the end of that section
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
2
Basic concepts
2.1
Architecture
PVSS II has a highly modular design. The functions required are handled by functional modules
specifically created for different tasks. These modules are called "managers" in PVSS II; they are also
separate processes in software.
UI
UI
UI
Userinterface
Editor
Userinterface
Runtime
Userinterface
Runtime
CTRL
Controlmanager
x
DB
y
DatabaseManager
EV
Eventmanager
Visualization, Operation
Runtime = Vision, Graphical Editor = GeDI, Database Editor = PARA
API
Processing, Control
API-Manager
Script language = Control, Application Programming Interface = Manager API
CON
Process Image, History
Connection to
other systems
D
D
D
Driver
Driver
Driver
Fig. 2.1
A PVSS II system consists of
function-specific managers
known as managers
Communication u. Alarming = Event manager, History = Data manager
Process Interface
Driver: PLC, Field busses, DDC, Telemetry/RTU, Special drivers
The roles of the most important managers, shown in figure Fig. 2.1, are explained briefly below. This
diagram shows just a simple configuration, which may be far larger in practice. In fact there are also a
number of other managers in addition to those mentioned above, which are not dealt with further here.
Process interface
The process interface modules, referred to as drivers (D) in PVSS II, form the lowest level of a PVSS II
system. These are special programs that handle communication with the process control and field level.
As the possible forms of communication with PLCs or telecontrol nodes vary widely, there are a number of
different drivers to select from. The PLC employed and the associated communications bus therefore
decides which PVSS II driver shall be used. Put extremely simply, the driver is a module that converts a
specific protocol into the form of communications used internally by PVSS II. The driver reads online
states, measured values or counter readings from the field, and passes commands and setpoint values
back down to the controllers.
Process image, history
The central processing unit in PVSS II is called Event Manager (EV). This unit holds the current image of all
process variables in the memory. Every other function unit (Manager), which want to access the data,
receives these data from the process image of the Event Manager and do not have to communicate
directly with a controller. Vice versa a command from a control station is set as a value change in the
process image of the Event Manager in the first instance. Afterwards the responsible driver forwards the
value to the specific target device (e.g. PLC) automatically.
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
The Event Manager is a central data distributor, the communication center for PVSS II. Additionally this
manager executes also the alert handling and is in a position to make different calculation functions
autonomically.
The Data Manager (DB) sits to the side of the Event Manager. It constitutes the link to the database. It not
only handles the parameterization data of an application to be saved in such a database, but also the
archiving of value changes or alerts. When a user wants to retrieve historical (archived) data at a later
date, then the Data Manager also deals with this request and not the database itself.
Processing, Control
PVSS II includes numerous options for implementing one's own algorithms and processing routines. The
two main methods are the internal language Control (CTRL) and the API (Application Programming
Interface) general programming interface.
Control is an extremely powerful scripting language. The code is processed interpretively so does not
need compiling1. It has largely the same syntax as ANSI-C2, with some simplifying modifications. It is an
advanced procedural higher-level language that uses multithreading3. The language provides a
comprehensive function library for tasks in process control and visualization. Control can be used as a
self-contained process (CONTROL Manager), for animation and user-interface configuration (UI
Manager) or for standardized data-object based processing (Event Manager).
The API (PVSS API) is the most powerful form in which to add extra functions. It is implemented as a C++
class library and lets the software developer implement custom functions as additional self-contained
managers (forecasting system, simulation, design tools, proprietary databases, etc.).
Visualization, operation
The User Interface (UI) Managers form the interface with the user. These include a graphical editor
(GEDI), a database editor (PARA) and the general user interface of the application (Native Vision, UI). In
the User Interface, values are displayed, commands issues or alerts tracked in the List of alerts. Trends
and Reports are also normally included in the UI. In PVSS, the user interaction software runs completely
separately from the processing executing in the background - it merely provides a window on the live data
from the process image or the archived data in the history.
2.2
Client-Server / Provider-Consumer
The individual managers interact as in a true client-server architecture. This implies that the servers
execute their processing tasks and provide data independently of the client. In this model, servers are the
information providers.
A client, put rather simply, is the recipient or consumer of information, which it receives from the server.
This is often described as a Provider-Consumer relationship.
This role demarcation is not confined just to runtime visualization (NV, UI) and the Event Manager in
PVSS II; in fact all communications relationships between managers follow this principle.
2.3
Communication, Event orientation
Data processing and communication between the individual processes (managers) is normally performed
purely on an event-oriented basis in PVSS II. This means that spontaneous (immediate) processing or
1 Conversion process in which a program command is converted from source code into the machine code executable by the processor.
2 "C"... internationally standardized and extremely widely established higher-level programming language
3 Quasi-parallel processing of individual programs; the system itself performs processing monitoring.
9
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
transfer of a value occurs if and only if it changes. Conversely, in steady-state operation with no changes
in values, there is neither communications nor processing load.
Value xy
Data provider
Connections
Connect to xy
(e.g. Event Manager)
Data provider
Connections
Current value xy= 2
(e.g. Event Manager)
Data provider
Connections
(e.g. Event Manager)
Data provider
Time
(e.g. Event Manager)
Connections
Data consumer
(e.g. User Interface)
Data consumer
(e.g. User Interface)
New value xy= 3
W t
Data consumer
New value xy = 1
W t
Data consumer
(e.g. User Interface)
Fig. 2.2
Time sequence of eventoriented communication
(Connect-Callback)
(e.g. User Interface)
The system works very efficiently and is active "only on demand". An application programmer is provided
with all the necessary structures to do this: in accordance with the "Provider-Consumer" communication
role described in section 2.2, functions are provided which a user software module or interface
(consumer) can use to register with (connect to) changes in value from a data source (provider). Once
registered (connected), every new value is automatically transferred from the data provider to the
consumer and input to the specified processing.
The individual managers communicate via a TCP/IP message interface. This reliable and established form
of communication enables data transfer even between different computers and operating systems. The
global TCP/IP standard guarantees maximum reliability, compatibility and performance.
2.4
System, distribution, configurations
A structure made up of one Event Manager, one Data Manager and various other managers is called a
system in PVSS II. An Event and Data Manager alone already form an operational system, usually with at
least one driver (D).
All other managers e.g. a user interface (UI) or a Control Manager (CTRL), are only started when they are
needed. This enables scaling of the system according to need. Managers can be started and stopped
entirely during online operation without restarting the whole package.
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 2.3
Distribution of a PVSS II
system over several
computers; communication:
TCP/IP
Furthermore, not just one but several instances of a manager can also be started if required for all
manager types (UI, CTRL, D, API, …). Thus a number of user interfaces or drivers can be run from one
Event Manager for example. There is just one Event Manager and one Data Manager per system.
The modular design and neutral, TCP/IP-based communication mean that a PVSS system can be
distributed across a number of computers. This allows
ƒ
demorcation of functions
ƒ
load distribution
ƒ
operation across platform boundaries
This means that the customary division between workstation (UI Client) and server (EV, DM, …) is taken a
step further: Drivers, Control Managers or API´s can also run on different computers.
Public
Networks
GSM,
GPRS,
UTMS
Analog
ISDN
ADSL
xDSL
On-Call Service
Remote
Maintenance
Base automation (PLC, RTU,…)
Office
Base automation (PLC, RTU,…)
Process bus 1
Process bus 2
Switch
Router
Alarm printers
07:3
1
GSM
Modem
ISDN
DCF77
Modem Radio clock
07:3
1
DCF77
ISDN
Fig. 2.4
Possible configuration:
redundant client-serversystem with 4 operating
stations and home console
Engineering
Redundant servers
Ethernet-LAN
System
Maintenance
Operator 1
Operator 2
The distribution of the managers in a system to different computers is not confined to one operating
system platform. Many users employ Windows (2000, XP) for the user interfaces for example, while the
SCADA server runs under LINUX.
*
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Redundancy, distributed systems
PVSS II offers the option of running all server processes on two computers in the form of hot-standby
redundancy (see Online Help {Special functions Ö Redundancy}). With PVSS II it is also possible to
interconnect a number of autonomous systems into an overall system (multiserver architecture / distributed
system) simply and efficiently (see Online Help {Special functions Ö Distributed systems}). These "higher
value" configurations are not included in this introduction to PVSS II however.
Fig. 2.5
Hot-standby redundancy
and distributed systems
(multi-server architecture)
2.5
Datapoint model, process image
The variables of the process to be controlled and monitored must also find their way into the software at
the control desk. Every logic state, every measured value or setpoint value must correspond to a sort of
variable that represents this value within the system.
V02
M
PI09
Datapoint
Description
Units
Value
V02.state.closed
Valve V02 response,
Final position closed
-
TRUE
V02.cmd.open
Valve V02 command
Open
-
FALSE
Pressure reading
P109 actual value
bar
2.74
P
Fig. 2.6
Mapping of states, input
values and measured
values onto datapoints
(process variables)
…
PI09.value
…
These variables of the process image are called "datapoints" in PVSS II. Many different names are used
for these information carriers depending on the product or region (tag, process variable, PV, item, point,
I/O point, etc.).
12
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
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While standard SCADA systems assign a separate datapoint to every individual process variable, PVSS II
takes a more modern approach: nearly all information in the process belongs logically to an entity of
varying complexity: a device.
Real device
External signals
Ö
Ö
Ö
Õ
Õ
Õ
Ö
Ö
Valve (Gate valve)
RM
RM
RM
BEF
BEF
BEF
AL
AL
State signals open
State signals closed
Position
Open
Closed
Stop
Torque
Sum alert
Fig. 2.7
Signals from a real device
…
Management information
L Operating hours
L Plant label
L Type
…
Experience has shown that the number of related items of information of such a device typically lies
between 4 and 30. Intelligent modules such as digital controllers, function modules, robots etc. can well
exceed this number.
Instead of transferring these otherwise logically, closely related items of information to independent
variables, which would then make them completely separate from each other, PVSS II defines structured,
device-oriented datapoints instead. The datapoints are defined in a sort of tree structure which can have
as many branch levels as required.
Configs
Datapoint elements
Structure
DPT
Gate valve
Structure
Response
Commands
Structure
StateSignals
Structure
Structure
Alarms
Structure
Open
Torque
Open
Bool
Bool
Closed
Sum alert
Stop
Bool
Bool
Bool
Value range
Peripheral address
Conversion R Ö I
Smoothing
Default value
Bool
Close
Position
Float
Fig. 2.8
Structured datapoint as
a representation of a
real device (device
orientation)
Alert handling
Peripheral address
Archiving
Bool
Peripheral address
Authorization
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
The values of the actual process variables are saved on datapoint elements, the outer leaves of this tree
structure. Each process variable therefore corresponds to one datapoint element within a datapoint. In
addition, the tree structure can have as many nodes as necessary for clear organization of the data.
Each datapoint element is addressed individually via the name chain within the structure. The status
message "Open" in the above example can be addressed in full for instance by:
gate_valve.response.SateSignals.Open
Of course in practice one would use shorter names to save writing; nevertheless PVSS II allows character
strings of up to almost any length.
In addition to the name convention and a storage location for the actual value, certain process-control
functions can be defined at the datapoint, for example a range check, an alert handling procedure or a
statistical computation rule. Such functions defined at the datapoint element are called "configs" in
PVSS II. Only those configs that are actually needed at the datapoint element concerned are defined.
Datapoint type and datapoint
Thus the user can create a suitable datapoint type for each real device type (actuator, valve, stirrer,
regulator, intruder sensor, etc.). A datapoint is then derived from this datapoint type (a kind of template)
for each real device. In object-oriented software engineering, the datapoint type would be called a "class"
and the representation of an individual device (i.e. the datapoint) an "instance".
GateValve
Structure
GateValve
Structure
GateValve
Structure
Datapoint type Ö
GateValve
Structure
Response
Structur
StateSignals
Structure
Response
Structure
StateSignals
Structure
StateSignals
Structure
Open
Bool
Closed
Bool
Alarms
Open
Structure
Bool
Torque
Closed
Bool
Bool
Sum alert
PositionBool
Float
Response
Response
Structur
StateSignals
Structure
Command
Structur
Structure
Command
Structure
Alarms
Open
Command Structure
Bool
Structure
Alarms
Open
Structure
CommandBool
Torque Open
Stop
Stop
Bool GeneralFailureBool
Bool
Close
Bool
Structure
Alarms
Open
Structure
Bool
Torque
Closed
Bool Bool
Torque
Closed
Bool Bool
Open
Open
GeneralFailureStop
Bool
Position
Bool
Bool
Float
GeneralFailureStop
Position
Bool
Bool
Float
Close
Bool
Close
Bool
Bool
Bool
Fig. 2.9
Datapoints
slide valve 1 to 3 as
instances of the
datapoint type slide
valve
Close
Bool
tio
ntia
a
t
s
In
n
Bool
Position
Float
Thus creating and sometimes also configuring a large number of process variables representing a device
involves just a single operation. Pre-defined datapoint types representing a module (e.g. an operatingtime counter) can then be taken as a whole and used in a new datapoint type. New ultra-efficient
engineering opportunities present themselves using these hierarchically structured datapoints ("type-intype").
Changes to the datapoint type are also applied automatically to the datapoints (instances).
*
14
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
3
Installation
The system requirements and installation procedure described below only apply to version 3.0.1 of PVSS II
running under Windows 2000 or XP. For instructions for installing under Linux, please consult the Online
Help {Getting Started Ö Installation Linux}. The target computer specification with regard to speed, RAM
size and hard-disk capacity only applies to the applications and projects described in this document.
3.1
System requirements
Check that your computer meets the system requirements1 listed here before installing the software on it:
IBM compatible PC (Intel x86 architecture):
Minimum
Recommended
Processor: Intel Pentium or equivalent
P II 350 MHz
P IV 2.4 GHz
RAM
256 MB
512 MB
384 MB
512 MB
500 MB
1 GB
Monitor and graphics card (TrueColor)
1024 x 768
1280 x 1024
2-button mouse, US English keyboard
9
9
CD-ROM drive for installation
9
9
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
SP2
SP3
Microsoft Windows XP Professional/Home
SP1
SP1
Microsoft Internet-Explorer (V 5.5 or above)
9
9
Local administrator rights (for installation)
9
9
Local main user rights (for operation)
9
9
2
Virtual RAM (in addition to RAM on HDD)
Hard disk (spare capacity)
3
Standard network card (10/100)
Tab. 3.1
System requirements for
applications in this
introductory guide
9
Internet e-mail access is recommended as the simplest way of handling the licensing process. If this is not
available then phone or fax can be used.
3.2
Installation process
The installation described here includes all components required to run the examples in this manual on a
single computer, and for taking one's own first project engineering steps. The basic components for
1 The hardware requirements used in real process applications depend heavily on the project size and the rate of change of the process variables. Use high-quality robust
hardware with suitable specifications such as redundant PSUs or RAID hard disks. PVSS II supports and benefits significantly from dual- and multiprocessor operation. As
always for RAM, CPU and HDD, the more the merrier.
2 It is recommended to set the size of the virtual RAM to a value between one and two times the physical RAM. Select a value that is an integer multiple of 32 MB and specify
the same value for the initial size and the maximum size (no dynamic variation in virtual memory)
3 in addition to the virtual RAM requirements
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PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
operation and parameterization and three example projects1 are installed locally (single-user system).
Please consult the Online Help {Installation} for all other installation options.
The Readme.txt file in the root directory of the installation source (CD-ROM, network) contains both an
installation guide and a list of the latest changes and additions to the Online Help.
Before starting the installation, make sure that your system meets all the system requirements. In
particular, check that local administrator rights are granted for the operating system under the current
login.
Fig. 3.1
Installation options to be
selected for this guide
Close any programs that may be running and insert the CD-ROM “PVSS II Version 3.0.1 / Windows” (or
above) in your computer drive. Wait until the Setup program autostart option opens. Alternatively you can
start the program manually by running the file setup.exe in the root directory of the installation source.
The Installation dialog box guides you through the installation process.
Running other programs during the PVSS II installation phase can result in an incomplete or incorrect
installation. Also check that there are no programs running in the background. Furthermore, some
programs such as MS Outlook slow down the installation software dramatically.
1 two example projects (DemoApplication_3.0 und GettingStarted_3.0) and an empty project (Demo_3.0)
16
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Please perform each step of the Installation wizard as described below. Always use the default paths
suggested wherever possible, because all subsequent advice and instructions are based on these. Use the
default settings except for those options mentioned explicitly here, and click on the Next button
1.
Enter your full name and your company name
2.
Select the “user” installation option
3.
Select the 3 top options from the component selection (PVSS II DemoApplication,
PVSS II Getting Started Application and PVSS II Basis); do not change the other
options.
4. Confirm the directory where you want the files installed
(C:\Program files\ETM\PVSS2\3.0)
5. Confirm the installation directories for the applications (C:\pvss)
6. Confirm all subsequent prompts with Next .
PVSS II tells you that the installation process has finished once correct installation is complete. Depending
on which system components were already installed on the installation computer, it may be necessary to
restart the computer; the Setup program tells you if this is the case.
Otherwise you can just close this last dialog box and open the PVSS II administration programs via the
standard startup environment of your computer system. You can find further details in the Installation
section of the Online Help {Getting Started Ö Windows installation, Installation}.
Should you need to remove PVSS II from your system, use the uninstall program supplied with the
software, which you can run via Start Ö Programs Ö PVSS II 3.0 Ö "Uninstall PVSS II 3.0". Alternatively
you can use this option under Control Panel Ö Add or Remove Programs.
3.3
Opening the administration interface
PVSS II can now be started using the operating system Startup cascade via the path Start Ö Programs Ö
PVSS II 3.0 Ö PVSS Project Administration.
Fig. 3.2
Starting the "Project
Administration" user
interface of PVSS II
17
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
After startup, the list of all projects installed on the current computer is immediately displayed. In PVSS II a
"project" means an executable module (user interfaces, scripts, datapoints, etc.) created for an explicit
application. Several of such projects can be managed on one computer using a PVSS II parameterization
workstation, but normally only one individual project is ever open at any one time. Such projects are
sometimes also called "applications".
Fig. 3.3
Project administration
Administration userinterface for creating new
projects
Selecting a project from the list and clicking on the
startup environment. It is then ready to be started.
3.4
icon displays the selected project in the CONSOLE
Demonstration project
A project called DemoApplication_3.0 is also installed on the computer at the same time as the
installation. This is a standard demonstration project as also used by sales staff and trainers. The aim of it
is to demonstrate to the user a range of possible user-interface layouts and navigation options. The
Online Help dedicates a chapter to this application {PVSS DemoApplication}.
Fig. 3.4
DemoApplication_3.0 a demonstration project
for Sales and Training
18
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
It is highly recommended to take a closer look at this DemoApplication_3.0 from the viewpoint of the end
user, in addition to your own first project-engineering steps based on this document. Advanced users can
look at the DemoApplication_3.0 to find out about possible implementation steps that can be adopted in
their own applications. The DemoApplication_3.0 project is not dealt with further in this document.
3.5
Licensing
The PVSS II software package requires a manufacturer's licence. To protect the product from unauthorized
duplication, special activation is required for it to run. This is performed using either a hardwaredependent enable code (file) or hardware protection (USB/parallel port dongle). This authorization
defines both the explicit computer, on which the software package is authorized to run, and the system
configuration and size approved for this.
To activate the product for use, proceed as follows: in Project administration click on the
toolbar.
icon in the
Automatic licensing by e-mail
If you have an e-mail compatible connection on the computer to be used for the PVSS II installation, then
complete the dialog box as shown in Fig. 3.5 . Enter the name of your mail-out server (SMTP server) and
add additional contact details and the functions you require in the text part of the e-mail. Also enter the
address to which you want the granted licence to be sent (reply address). Then press the button
containing the green checkmark (tick) to send off the licence request. This direct option is only practicable
if your company is already a partner of ETM.
Manual licence request
By opening the dialog box mentioned above, the system determines the hardware-specific code of your
computer. It is displayed in the top right field 'Hardware code:' and can be saved as a text file using the
button. If you confirmed the default directory at installation, then this file can be found in the root
directory of the version directory.
C:\Program files\ETM\PVSS2\3.0\hw.txt
or
<PVSS_PATH>\hw.txt
If you are making a manual activation request for the computer concerned, then close this dialog box
again. You can send the aforementioned file directly to ETM, or another authorized licensing centre, by email, fax or letter, or read out its contents over the phone.
Details of a commercial product order are also required in addition to the hardware code. This order
specifies the required software configuration (number of datapoints, workstations, features, add-ons, etc.),
based on which an enable code suitable for the computer specified by you is generated. Please contact
your supplier or the ETM Sales department if you have any queries relating to the commercial product
order.
This enable code is passed to you in the form of a specially formatted text file. Please also save this file in
the version directory (as above).
C:\Program files\ETM\PVSS2\3.0\shield
or
<PVSS_PATH>\shield
19
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Make sure that this is the only file in this directory with the name "shield". Whether the file does or does
not (old version) have a *.txt extension is irrelevant. Just make sure that there is only one file with the
filename shield. You can do this either by renaming a supplied file shield.txt as shield (without the .txt
extension) or retaining the filename shield.txt and removing any other similarly spelt files shield*.*.
If any changes are made to the hardware configuration of the computer, the shield product activation file
may lose its validity. Please contact ETM in this case.
Fig. 3.5
Generating the hardware
code for the computer,
and automatic licence
request by e-mail
hw.txt
[license]
code = "hostname 10204190829"
version = 1
1. Installation
2. Getting HW code
3. HW.txt to ETM
4. shield from ETM
Fig. 3.6
Procedure for technical
licensing of PVSS II hardware-dependent
enable code ("shield")
shield.txt
[license]
#hw = 10204190829
code = “hostname 10204190829 "
sn
= “master_station"
expire = 0000.00.00;00:00:00,000
redundancy = 1
ui
= 10
….
If you are not yet an ETM customer but would still like to learn more about PVSS II using the Demo CD,
please contact the Sales department. If necessary they can grant you a limited-period evaluation licence.
*
20
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
If you try to run PVSS II without a valid licence, then the application warns you of this when it starts up. The
system will automatically shutdown without warning after 30min maximum.
Fig. 3.7
Automatic warning if
there is no licence
3.6
Online Help
PVSS II is supplied with a comprehensive Online Help facility. This was installed automatically with the
installation described above. You can access the Help system via the Windows Startup cascade {Start Ö
Programs Ö PVSS II 3.0 Ö PVSS Online Help}.
Fig. 3.8
Online Help system with
topic tree, fulltext search
and Index
The Help facility can also be opened from the various graphical user interfaces via the "?" menu option,
the
icon or buttons bearing the text Help . A specific topic is flashed up depending on the context.
The Online Help contains several thousand pages and handles the different operating system platforms in
parallel. To make it easier for beginners, this manual highlights relevant references to the corresponding
Help pages in the form {Chapter Ö Section}.
Also read the Readme.txt file in the installation source directory - in addition to details of the installation
process, this contains any recent changes to the Online Help made after going to press.
21
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
4
Project administration
In PVSS II a "project" means an executable module for fulfilling a process control or visualization task.
Normally just one project runs on one computer. Additional to the programs and basic components
provided with the installation, the project contains all specific parameterizations for a task. These basically
include:
ƒ
Datapoint types (definition of devices)
ƒ
Datapoints (variables of the process image / representation of devices)
ƒ
Panels (process displays, dialog boxes, symbols)
ƒ
Facility-specific processing routines (scripts, clock timers, recipes etc.)
ƒ
Configurations (archive settings, alerting, trends, etc.)
4.1
Creating a project
In order to be able to work with PVSS II, at least one project must exist on the computer. Three projects
have already been created and installed ready for use during the above installation (see Fig. 4.1). We
shall create our own new project, however, to be used for our own personal project-engineering steps, by
following the instructions below:
Fig. 4.1
Creating a new project
using the Project
Administration wizard
1.
Open the Project Administration program
(Start Ö Programs Ö PVSS II 3.0 Ö PVSS II Project Administration)
2.
Click with the mouse on the
3.
In the wizard, select the “Standard project” installation option and click on Next
4.
In the “Project name:” field enter a project name e.g. the character string “myGettingStarted”
5.
Use the mouse to select the “English - UK” option as the project language.
icon (“New”) or use the [Ctrl]+[N] hotkeys.
22
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
6.
Select the installation directory for the project using the directory selector or enter the path by
hand: C:\pvss\; then click on Next
7.
Confirm the dialog box that then opens with OK to create the project – wait while the database
is generated (this can take some time depending on the choice of language)
Every form of character string in PVSS II is case sensitive. Ensure that the name that you give always
matches exactly the spelling and case given here (applies to project names, names of graphics objects
and panels, variable names and much more).
*
Fig. 4.2
Selecting the project
language(s) and the
installation directory
If you move the mouse over toolbars and buttons, then context-sensitive texts explaining the functions are
displayed (tool tips).
*
Once the project has been created, the new project is displayed with its name in the Project
Administration program. It is now ready to be started for the first time (see section 4.2)
4.2
Project name
Version
Pmon Status
DemoApplication_3.0
3.0
not running
Demo_3.0
3.0
not running
GettingStarted_3.0
3.0
not running
myGettingStarted
3.0
not running
Fig. 4.3
Project list in the Project
Administration module
after creating
"myGettingStarted"
Starting, stopping
As soon as the required project has been created on the computer, the Project Administration program is
no longer needed. So select the required project with the mouse and then switch to the Console program
by clicking on the
icon. Alternatively you can open the Console program via the context menu
([right mouse-click] on the project line) and start the project immediately.
23
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 4.4
Starting a project via the
context menu in Project
Administration
A project to be started up individually can also be selected in the Console without needing to use the
Project administration program ("Project" combobox).
Fig. 4.5
Console as control
centre for one project Manager list with
operating status
The Console is the control centre of a project. Those managers that need to run in order to operate the
facility are specified here. Their startup order is also defined here, as are the necessary measures for
process monitoring.
Clicking on the green traffic-light icon
starts the selected project. The startup procedure, which runs
sequentially, can be viewed in the Console.
A project can also be closed from the Console by clicking on the red traffic-light icon. It is shut down in
the reverse order from the startup procedure. The coloured background of the first column always shows
the current operating states of the manager concerned.
24
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Project Administration
Edit configuration
file(s)
Lock Project
Language switch
Licensing
Version info / "About"
Online Help
Close Console
Start Project
Open Log Viewer
Current Project
Stop Project
Current
Operating Mode
2 runs
1 startup
0 stopped
Manager list
Manager numbers
Selected Manager
Start up sequence
Current Action
Start Manager
Stop Manager
Force Manager Stop
Startup Properties
Set Debug-Flags
Append Manager
Insert Manager
Fig. 4.6
Displays and function
buttons in the Console
Shift up in sequence
Shift down in sequence
Remove Manager
Rather than starting a project in full, each of the listed managers could also be started or stopped
individually manually. This is done either via the context menu [right mouse-click] in the
manager list or using the buttons arranged vertically on the right of the list. Note that some of the
managers can only be started (manually) if the Data and Event Manager are already running.
The Console works independently of the actual PVSS II system. If just the Console is closed, then the
managers started from it still continue to run. As soon as the Console is re-opened, it displays again the
current operating states of the managers. Thus during normal operation of the facility, it can remain
closed just like the Project Administration module.
4.3
Configuring a project
In addition to defining datapoints and drawing process displays, a number of configurations need to be
made in a PVSS II project. This includes parameterization of the process interface modules (drivers),
configuring distributed systems and setting the colour display for the alert panel. Such settings are
performed at three basic locations: Console, System Management and Configuration files:
4.3.1
Console
The managers belonging to a project are chosen in the Console. This is done simply using the buttons for
adding managers
properties.
. The dialog box that opens can be used to select a manager and define its startup
25
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 4.7
Adding a new manager
to the project and
specifying the startup
properties
Alternatively, the startup properties of a manager can also be defined directly in the Manager list of the
icon. The possible options are
Console by double-clicking on the relevant line or clicking on the
shown in the Online Help {Reference tables Ö Manager options}.
4.3.2
System Management
The System Management module is essentially a management centre for managing a huge range of
settings. It can be opened from the PARA database editor, the GEDI graphical editor or even from the
icon.
NATIVE VISION runtime user interface via the
*
Fig. 4.8
System Management:
Settings for the project
and various tools
4.3.3
Configuration files
PVSS II uses a number of configuration files for making certain project settings. This configuration facility
is used extensively, especially in conjunction with process interface modules (drivers). The main
configuration file is located in the project directory in the path
C:\pvss\myGettingStarted\config\
26
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
4.4
Function buttons in Project Administration
Start Console
Start project
Change properties
Stop project
Delete project
Copy project
Register new project
Create new project
Exit Project
Administration
Installed projects
4.5
Refresh list
Switch language
Licensing
Fig. 4.9
Functions in Project
Administration
About dialog
Online Help
PVSS version of
a project
Operation status
After startup - First steps
With a new project, a number of predefined manager entries appear in the Console. We will be adding
to these later, but to start with this environment provides everything we need. After starting the project by a
[left mouse-click] on the green traffic-light icon at the top to the right of the project name
(Console), and once the startup procedure is complete, your user interface should look something like
this:
Fig. 4.10
Windows opened after
startup: Graphical
editor, Console,
Projekt Administration,
Log Viewer
27
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
All managers running correctly are now displayed with the green status colour in the Console. If your
project startup was interrupted when the Event Manager was started, and the error message shown in Fig.
3.7 is displayed, then please read the Licensing topic in section 3.5.
The Project Administration program is not needed for the time being and can be closed. The Console is
also not relevant to the next steps, but can be left open during the project creation process. In many of the
following procedural steps, the Log Viewer flags up any possible input errors; it should therefore be
placed at the bottom of the screen, for instance, as a sort of information panel.
The following first steps into the world of structured datapoints can be made from the user interface of the
GEDI graphical editor, which is already open.
Fig. 4.11
Opening the PARA
database editor from the
Graphical editor user
interface
28
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
5
Data model
PVSS II lets you create your own personal device-oriented datapoints. The basic concept behind structured
datapoints has been presented in section 2.5. The following sections explain how to work with datapoints
in practice and also provide more in-depth background information.
5.1
Datapoints as information carriers
In order to work with PVSS II and be able to create user interfaces for operating the process, the carriers
of the information to be displayed must first be defined. These carriers are essentially variables whose
values each represent a live item of process information. These process variables are called datapoint
elements in PVSS II.
The PARA database editor is the tool normally used to display existing datapoints or create new ones. This
can be opened from the GEDI graphical editor already running using the
icon.
Datapoint tree
(TreeView for selection of datapoint elements)
Datapoint types
Fig. 5.1
PARA database editor
after startup
(First level only shows „device classes“)
Configuration window
(for selected datapoint element)
5.1.1
Datapoint types
After opening the database editor, the list in the left-hand field in Fig. 5.1 displays all datapoint types
available in the active project. Each of these datapoint types represents a whole class of devices or logical
units. Clicking on the "+" sign in front of the name of the datapoint type opens the list of datapoints
(instances/devices) of this type.
A datapoint type is a sort of template for structured datapoints. Structure, name and sometimes also
parameter settings are specified when the type is defined.
29
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 5.2
Datapoint type “PUMP1”
as template for a whole
class of devices
Before one can create a structured datapoint as representative of a device, a corresponding datapoint
type must be created as a template.
5.1.2
Datapoints
Each datapoint can represent a real device or a logical grouping of information. It is made up of one or
more datapoint elements in almost any structure. Each datapoint belongs to its datapoint type, and is
consequently displayed with its type in the PARA module. Double-clicking on the name of the datapoint
type or the "+" sign in front of the name opens the list of all datapoints of this type.
Fig. 5.3 shows two types provided as standard and their datapoints (instances). The datapoint type
ExampleDP_Float has 4 datapoints (instances) in this case. This datapoint type consists of just one
datapoint element and can therefore only represent one process variable. This corresponds to the typical
data model used in most SCADA systems, but is the exception rather than the rule for PVSS II. This type
(and also the other ExampleDP* types) are provided merely for test and demonstration purposes.
Datapoint type
Master datapoint
(a very special kind of instance)
Datapoint type
Data type „bool“
Datapoint elements
Structural element
Datapoints
(this one only with single element)
DPE of data type „float“
Fig. 5.3
Ready-made instances of
the datapoint types
ExampleDP_Float
and PUMP1
Config on a
structural element
The datapoint type PUMP1 shown on the right is more typical of the datapoint structure used in PVSS II. In
this case a large number of process variables make up the device-oriented datapoint. To start with,
PUMP1 has just a single datapoint instance. Even this is an exception: this is the master datapoint (MP),
which can display certain parameterization data for the type. The Online Help contains more details on
30
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
this {Project design Ö Mass parameterization Ö Datapoint type, Master Datapoint...}. There are no real
datapoint instances yet for the type PUMP1 because we have started with a new, initially empty project.
Value
DP type
Time stamp
DPE
Config
Fig. 5.4
PARA database editor datapoint type
ExampleDP_Float
with datapoint
ExampleDP_Arg1
Originator
Status (Quality)
Datapoint types and datapoints only exist within a project. Each of the projects on a computer can have
other datapoint types and datapoints even with the same names. The Import/Export option in the ASCIIManager can be used to transfer datapoint types or datapoints already created in one project to another
project. Online Help {ASCII Manager Ö ASCII Manager Panel}.
5.1.3
*
Information at the datapoint element
Each datapoint element represents primarily the value of a process value, but there is also some
additional information about this value that is very important. In PVSS II one refers to a complete process
image, because it represents all the key attributes of a captured value.
5.40 Value(5,4)
Time stamp (2003-12-14 14:59:47,981)
Status / Quality (good | 001001111001.
Originator
Fig. 5.5
Information at the
datapoint element value with attributes
(time, quality, originator)
(Tom Testman, UI-5)
These additional attributes of the value can also be seen in the PARA database editor (Fig. 5.4). This
screenshot also shows that there are two different fields for the value display:
31
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Original value
The value that was originally entered i.e. adopted by a controller.
This original value is always retained and can still be retrieved after
automatic corrections (default value enabled). Active write actions are
always performed on the original value.
Online value
The value that all function modules within PVSS II work with. Normally
it is an identical copy of the original value. Only if a value has been
identified as invalid for instance may a default value be displayed
here. When reading a datapoint element (display, processing), it is
always the online value that is accessed.
You can find more information on the subject of original-value preservation in the Online Help {PARA
module Ö Datapoint configs Ö _original (Original attributes)}.
5.2
Modelling datapoint types
In the previous sections we have looked at existing datapoints available from the start of any project.
Usually, however, we want to design our own device-oriented datapoints, in order to fulfil the specific
project or industry requirements as closely as possible.
As part of a small example, we need a couple of datapoints anyway, so we will configure their types
ourselves. A [right mouse-click] on the empty, white area of the datapoint tree opens a context
menu containing the option "Create datapoint type".
Fig. 5.6
Creating a new
datapoint type
“GS_PUMP” in the Dptype editor of the PARA
module
Selecting this option opens the datapoint type editor in which the required data structure can be
constructed easily:
1.
Replace the type name "NewDpType", already highlighted for renaming, with "GS_PUMP".
2.
Open the context menu with a [right mouse-click] and select "Insert node".
32
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
3.
Assign the name "state" to the inserted node.
4.
Repeat the "Insert node" operation directly at the node "state" to insert the sub-node "on".
5.
Assign the "bool" data type to the node "on" by a [right mouse-click] Ö Element type
Structure elements are identified by the folder icon, and outer elements have an icon that indicates the
specific data type (bool, int, float, etc.). Thus the
icon indicating a binary variable is displayed for the
“on” element in the far right of Fig. 5.7.
Fig. 5.7
Creating a structured
datapoint type in the Dptype editor of the PARA
module
Repeat steps 2. to 5. as many times as is necessary to construct the complete datapoint type as shown in
Fig. 5.8. Make sure that the elements .state.speed and .cmd.speed are each of data type "float".
Of course you can also rename and delete nodes in the process as well.
Fig. 5.8
Completed datapoint
type GS_PUMP in the
Dp-type editor view
Once you have finished constructing the datapoint type GS_PUMP, press OK in the Dp-type editor and
confirm the prompt with Yes .
5.3
Instancing
Datapoint types alone still cannot hold any process information - they are just a form of template for the
actual datapoints belonging to real devices. In order to create a device datapoint from the readymade
datapoint type GS_PUMP, we can again use the context menu from the tree view of the PARA module.
33
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 5.9
Creating a datapoint
“P1” of the datapoint
type “GS_PUMP” in
PARA
1.
Use the mouse to select the required datapoint type (GS_PUMP)
2.
[Right mouse-click] Ö Create datapoint opens a dialog box for entering the name
3.
Enter "P1" for the first pump and confirm with OK
If you now open the tree below GS_PUMP, you can see the complete datapoint P1 of type GS_PUMP.
Fig. 5.10
Datapoint P1 of
datapoint type GS_PUMP
in the structure view of
the PARA module
At the moment the elements of the datapoint P1 should be seen as purely internal information elements of
the control system, because no I/O addresses have been parameterized. Nevertheless, you can still make
changes to values, which are detected and processed by all the managers. The simplest way to change
the value of an internal datapoint element is in the Original value dialog box of the PARA module. This is
opened by a [left mouse-click] on the element itself or the “original” sub-element (config) in the
tree view (see also Fig. 5.4); after entering a new value in the “Original value” field and clicking on the
Apply button, the new value appears in the “Online value” field and the time stamp is updated to give the
time at which the new value was applied.
There is practically no limit to the number of datapoints that can be created on the basis of the GS_PUMP
datapoint type. The names of the datapoints must be unique within the system. In addition, names must
only contain standard alphabetic characters (letters), the digits “0-9” and the underscore character “_”.
Every datapoint name must begin with a letter or an underscore.
The datapoint elements are dynamic variables that represent the process or internal states of the control
centre. They are managed by the Event Manager and are held in its memory area. Nevertheless, the
datapoint elements are variables that can be accessed from any of the managers.
5.4
*
Settings for the datapoint element
The new datapoint P1 is now ready for use in our application. It is often desirable, however, to make a
few further settings for the elements. For example every element can carry the following additional
information
34
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
ƒ
Description
ƒ
Alias address (second, internal identification system in addition to the datapoint name)
ƒ
Number format (no. of digits before and after decimal point)
ƒ
Units
Fig. 5.11
Entering descriptive text,
number format and units
for the datapoint element
(Config: common)
The settings can be displayed by a [left mouse-click] on the "common" sub-element (config) for
each DPE. Complete the fields for the relevant elements of the datapoint P1 as shown in Fig. 5.11.
In a multilingual project, you can also enter the description in a choice of languages. The Online Help
contains details on multilingual projects {Multilingual capability}.
5.5
*
Addressing
From whatever location in PVSS II, device-based access to an individual element of a datapoint such as
P1 can be achieved by specifying the full element name. The datapoint element name for the actual
speed of pump P1 is shown in the field "DPE:" in the top-right of Fig. 5.11:
System1:P1.state.speed
System name:Datapoint name.Element1.Element2. …ElementN
The system name "System1" exists automatically in every new project created. This system name can also
be changed when connecting together several PVSS II systems in a "distributed system" (multi-server
cluster). We do not need to worry about it further for this example however.
When addressing local datapoint elements in the local system (which is always the case in this example),
the system name can be omitted. So we could also address the speed using:
*
35
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
P1.state.speed
The Online Help contains more information on addressing datapoints {CONTROL Ö Introduction to
CTRL Ö Addressing types}.
5.6
Functions at the device-oriented data object - configs
A number of extra attributes in addition to value, units, description etc., are used to characterize a
datapoint element in automation engineering. These include both purely informative attributes and
attributes used to define processing and alerting methods.
These additional parameters set at the datapoint element are called "configs" in PVSS II. We will now
demonstrate what the configs mean using the datapoint P1 by way of example: configs shall be used to
define a monitored range for the actual or setpoint value of the speed, and to apply a binary Alert
handling (alerting) procedure to the element .alarm .
Fig. 5.12
Inserting a rangemonitoring config
(pv_range) at the DPE
P1.state.speed
To do this, select the element P1.state.speed with the mouse, open the context menu by a [right
mouse-click] and select the option “Insert config” Ö PVSS value range. Open the sub-structure
below “.speed” in the tree view and then click on the “pv_range” config to set the range.
The name of the configs in the tree view in the PARA module may differ depending on the Project
engineering language (paramLang) that has been set.
*
36
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 5.13
Setting the valid range
for P1.state.speed
(config pv_range)
Define the range as shown above, and then follow the same procedure for the alert handling of the
datapoint element P1.alarm.
1.
Select the datapoint element P1.alarm in the tree view of the PARA module.
2.
In the context menu [right mouse-click] select “Insert config“ Ö “Alert handling”
3.
Expand the config structure below P1.alarm (double-click on the element or click on the “+”
in front of the element) and select the config “alert_hdl” .
4.
Make the settings shown in Fig. 5.14
a.
Select the alert class “060_alert” (alarm with priority 60).
b.
Under Range texts enter ”Pump fault” for the Alert range (1) and Ok for the Good
range.
c.
Select that alert handling shall be performed for the “_online.._value”.
d.
Finally enable alert handling by selecting the lower-left checkbox.
37
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 5.14
Parameterization of the
alert handling (alerting)
config for the datapoint
element P1.alarm
These rules are applied to the datapoint P1 as soon as the above steps are made - the parameter
settings have been adopted “online” and can be tested immediately without restarting the system.
Attempts to enter values outside the enclosed range [0 to 100] in the original-value dialog box of the
speed element now fail. If the value for the P1.alarm element is set to 1/TRUE, the alert state is
displayed in the Alert text field of the original-value view. The alert state colour is also displayed in the
Alert handling parameterization window (Fig. 5.14).
Now all the steps required have been performed for direct visualization of the pump P1 in a process
display. Were we working at the level of typical visualization packages, we could proceed with Section 7
on Designing the Process displays. To take full advantage of the added value offered by object
orientation, however, we advise working through the following sections on creating the data model.
*
In principle, every datapoint element can have its own personal set of configs. Thus the parameterizer
defines where a rage-check or an alert-handling is required, thereby configuring his data model to match
his own requirements. This gives a lean, scalable memory structure and saves CPU resources.
This freedom goes so far as allowing the same elements on datapoints of one and the same datapoint
type to accommodate different configs. This certainly pushes the design limits and optimization horizons
yet further for the application programmer, but is often not wanted because of the higher engineering
time involved and the loss of clarity. This is why PVSS II includes the facility of setting the parameters in
common and centrally for all datapoint instances of a type using what is known as a master datapoint.
See the Online Help {Project engineering Ö Mass parameterization}.
You can find more information on the configs available and their attributes in the Online Help {PARA
module Ö Datapoint configs}. A comprehensive reference table for all configs and attributes is included
in the Online Help {Reference tables Ö Datapoint configs}.
38
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
6
Creating datapoints
6.1
Creating custom datapoints in the PARA database editor
Section 5.3 has already explained with reference to Fig. 5.9 how to create an individual datapoint. This
always assumes that a suitably configured datapoint type already exists as a template. In the PARA
database editor, it is also possible to create datapoints that "inherit", in addition to the defined structure of
their datapoint type, the parameter settings for this type. To do this, however, a "master datapoint" must
first be created and configured. The following screenshots assume that additional datapoint types
(GS_LEVEL and GS_VALVE) have been created and have a configured master datapoint.
Please refer to the Online Help {Project engineering Ö Mass parameterization} to find out how to create
and configure a master datapoint.
Fig. 6.1
Creating the datapoint
T1 via the context
menu of the datapoint
type GS_LEVEL
To create a single datapoint, open the context menu for the datapoint type [right mouse-click]
and click on the "Create datapoint" option. Enter the name1 of the new datapoint in the dialog box that
opens; this is created as soon as you click on OK .
1.
Create a datapoint T1 for a datapoint type GS_LEVEL
2.
Create a another datapoint T2
Fig. 6.2
Datapoint type
GS_LEVEL with master
datapoint and the
datapoint instances T1
and T2
1 Datapoint names must begin with an alphabetic character (letter) or an underscore “_”; numbers can only be used after this. The case is important - these names are case
sensitive.
39
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Datapoints can only be created if at least one suitable datapoint type already exists. If datapoints are
created without there being a configured master datapoint for this type, then these datapoints only
"inherit" the structure, names of the elements and data types.
If there is also a configured master datapoint, then the datapoints also receive process-control functions
(configs). Which attributes of a config can be set individually at the datapoint is specified by the selection
of the respective PowerConfig.
*
Several datapoint elements at once can also be created in PVSS II in a single operation (the instances V1,
V2 and V3 of the datapoint type GS_VALVE are created below):
1.
In the context menu [right mouse-click] of the required datapoint type GS_VALVE,
select the option "Create multiple datapoints"
2.
In the next dialog box enter “V” in the field "Text before number" as the prefix for the datapoint
name, and specify the numbering range as “1” to “3” - so a single digit is enough for us in this
case (Min. no. of digits = 1).
3.
Leave the possible suffix for the datapoint name empty ("Text after number" field)
4.
Close the dialog box with OK and confirm the subsequent prompt.
Fig. 6.3
Creating a series of
datapoints with
automatic naming in the
PARA module
As soon as the datapoints have been created, the instance names (e.g. V1, V2 and V3) appear under
the relevant datapoint type (e.g. GS_VALVE) in the tree view of the PARA module.
The PARA database editor is an excellent tool for datapoint design and for prototypes. If. however, large
numbers of datapoints (devices) need to be created as the project advances, then this process is normally
performed externally in datapoint lists. These datapoints are then imported into PVSS II using the ASCII
manager - the chapters {Project engineering Ö Mass parameterization} and {ASCII Manager} of the
Online Help contain more information on this.
In the PARA module, datapoints can also be deleted individually via the context menu for the datapoint
type or datapoint. Several datapoints at once can also be removed.
*
*
40
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
7
Graphical user interfaces - "Panels"
7.1
Creating process displays - the graphical editor
In PVSS II, all graphical user interfaces for the process operator are called "panels". Regardless of whether
these are top-level diagrams, process displays, detailed views or operating and information dialog
windows, in PVSS II they are all seen technically as a "panel". They are created using the GEDI graphical
editor which we already met in section 4.5. Switch to the graphical editor or start it via the Console
([right mouse-click] from the Option "Windows Graphical editor" and click on the option "Start
manager").
Once open, click on the "New panel" icon
in the toolbar. Some of the user-interface settings can only
be configured in practice with a panel open. Toolbars and other views within the GEDI are implemented
as dockable views - you can position these elements around the outer edges of the application window to
suit, or move them wherever you want as windows.
Toolbar: Standard
Toolbar: Style
Toolbar: View
Symbol Catalog
(Reusable Objects)
Selected
Object
Fig. 7.1
Elements of the GEDI
graphical editor: drawing
plane, catalog, Property
sheet, etc.
Property Sheet
Status row
Toolbar: Layout
Toolbar: Object
The Online Help {GEDI module Ö Native GEDI} contains a detailed description of the menus and toolbars
of the GEDI graphical editor.
You can show and hide toolbars to give the view you want via the menu View Ö Toolbars. The most
important toolbar in the early stages of creating a panel is the Object bar.
41
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
7.2
Simple drawing operations
A drawing object is inserted by selecting a graphics object in the object bar and dragging a line or an 2D
shape across the panel surface. Fig. 7.2 names the available graphics primitives and widgets (complex
graphics objects) available for creating user interfaces.
Rectangle
Poly-line / Polygon
Freehand Line
Line
Primitive Text
Selection Mode
Radio Box
Combo Box
Selection List
Text Field, Input Field
Arc, Segment, Sector
Circle / Ellipse
Frame
Cascade Menu
Push Button
Check Box
Fig. 7.2
Object bar in the Native
GEDI: basic elements of
the user-interface design
Reference (Symbol)
Clock, Date
Bar Trend
Tab Pages
Spin Button
Trend
ActiveX Control
Table
Once the new graphics object has been generated, it initially remains selected for further processing. To
select a different object, simply click [left mouse-click] on the object required. The graphics
object currently selected is identified by green, rectangular selection elements around its outline.
To change the size of an object, drag the selection elements
with the mouse in the required direction. If
the mouse cursor is moved over the inner area of a selected graphics object, then the editing mode
changes automatically to move mode, and the mouse cursor becomes a 4-way arrow
; as long as this
arrow is displayed, the graphics object can be moved by dragging it across the panel surface. (For shapes
with a transparent background, drag on the outline.)
To select more than one object at once, hold down the [Shift] key after selecting the first object, and
click on the additional objects [left mouse-click].
Fig. 7.3
Selected rectangle (left)
and multiple selection
using the [Shift] key
(right)
42
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
During selection and drawing, the object position and the current object size are displayed in the status
bar in the lower right of the GEDI window.
Fig. 7.4
Coordinate system in the
panel, readings in the
status bar of the GEDI
The coordinate system used is based on the Window standard: the origin (0,0) is in the top left corner of
the panel; positive x-coordinates increase from left to right, positive y-coordinates from top to bottom.
Positive angles are in the mathematically positive direction (counter clockwise).
For practice, draw a few graphics objects in a new panel and try to change their size, position, colour and
orientation etc.
1.
Draw a 2D shape using the rectangle element (object bar)
2.
Select the shape with the mouse and move it
3.
Alternatively use the arrow keys [Å], [Ç], [Æ], [È] on your keyboard to move a
selected object. The object moves by one pixel every time you press the key, and by a grid
division if you hold down the [Ctrl] key at the same time.
4.
Click with the mouse on the green selection elements and drag in the directions shown - the
object size changes
5.
With an object selected, click on the
tool in the "Format" toolbar to select a different
background color (fill color, backcolor) from the colour selector.
6.
With an object selected, click on the
tool to select a different foreground color (colour for
boundaries and lines, forecolor) from the color selector.
7.
With an object selected, click on the
style respectively.
8.
Try out similar operations yourself and combine them in any way you wish
9.
You can now also display the result of your work in the Runtime view. You can click on the
icon or use the menu option File Ö Save & Preview to open a preview of what it will look like in
the runtime user interface. Save the as yet unsaved panel as "test1.pnl" in the default path
...\panels\ (see also section 7.7)
or
tool to select a different line thickness or
43
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
When creating an ellipse or a rectangle, hold the [Shift] key down while dragging with the mouse to
obtain an object with equal dimensions in the x- and y-directions i.e. a circle or a square. Similarly, hold
down the [Shift] key to retain proportionality when changing the size with the mouse.
If you select an element and then press the arrow keys Å, Ç, Æ, È with the [Shift] key pressed, you
will change the size of the object pixel by pixel.
When drawing a polygon or a polyline, keep holding the mouse button pressed as far as the second point
of the line, and then click for every additional point. You can change the geometry of ready-drawn
polygons and polylines via the menu Layout Ö Contour Ö Edit points.
The Online Help {GEDI module Ö Native GEDI} contains further details on the graphical editor.
7.3
*
*
*
The Property sheet
The Property sheet can be opened via the menu Edit Ö Properties or a [right mouse-click] Ö
Properties or using [Ctrl]+[P] on a panel / selected graphics object. It displays two tabs containing
the main information on an object.
Fig. 7.5
Property sheet for
parameterization of
graphics objects
The Property sheet can be used both for displaying information and for direct data entry. All the actions
performed previously in section 7.2 with the mouse or via the toolbars could also be achieved via the
Property sheet.
44
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
1.
The properties Left, Right, Top and Bottom can be used to change the position on the drawing
plane and to specify a new object size.
2.
The BackColor and ForeColor entries in the Property sheet let you change the fill color and line
color respectively
3.
The line thickness can be set using PenWidth in the Property sheet.
4.
The line style can be set using PenStyle in the Property sheet.
Thus in many respects, the Property sheet constitutes a second, alternative input option for designing
graphics objects. If the drawing plane itself is selected, then the setting options for the panel are displayed
in the Property sheet. For example, BackColor can be used to specify the background colour, or the
Width and Height properties used to set the width and height of the panel in pixels.
Many of the properties that can be set in the Property sheet at the parameterization stage, can also be
changed dynamically at runtime. This change can occur, for example, as a function of a process variable,
i.e. depending on the value of a datapoint element.
*
The parameterization stage means all operations that are performed during creation of an application. "At
runtime" refers to the displays and procedures that take place during operation. With the graphical user
interfaces, the graphical editor is mainly used at the parameterization stage, and the Native Vision
module at runtime.
The "Events" tab, the second tab in the Property sheet, is used for specifying the dynamic properties of the
object that will apply later at runtime. In PVSS II, all dynamic properties can be seen as responses to
events. These events could be:
ƒ
Opening the panel (in which the graphics object is located)
ƒ
Clicking on the graphics object
ƒ
Confirming an input by pressing the Enter key
ƒ
Receiving or losing the input focus
ƒ
…
Whenever such an event occurs, an action is executed automatically. The operations that make up such
an action after an event need to be defined. This can be done either via a Wizard (see section 7.4) or by
programming a Script (see 7.5).
If you wish to display an automatically updated process value in a panel, then this instruction must be
specified for the event "Opening the panel" i.e. in EventInitialize. Then right at initialisation, the panel
registers (connects ) itself to all changes in value of the datapoint element. Every subsequent change in
value then automatically results in execution of the "response", in this case the correct display of the value.
7.4
*
Making graphics properties dynamic (Simple Parameterization)
In order to be able to change properties of a graphics object as a function of process variables (datapoint
elements), an appropriate instruction is parameterized in the GEDI graphical editor using a Wizard
("Simple Parameterization"). The following section shows how to implement a status indicator in the form
of a coloured circle symbol for the Pump P1 data model created earlier.
45
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 7.6
Dynamic changes to
graphics properties parameterization in the
graphical editor
1.
Use the mouse to select the graphics object concerned
2.
In the "Events" tab of the Property sheet, click on the white column area beside "EventInitialize".
(You need to select this event because the operating-status indicator for P1 needs to be
displayed as soon as the process display is opened, and then continuously updated)
3.
A Parameter dialog box opens; click on the "Change color" checkbox and click on Next
4.
In the next step of the Wizard, select the "background color (fill color, text background")
checkbox in the top section and enable the "dependent on value" option in the lower section.
Click on Next to switch to the last step of the wizard.
5.
Click on the "datapoint selector" button
6.
on the left of the "datapoint element" input field
The Datapoint selector opens; navigate through the tree view to the element GS_PUMP Ö P1 Ö
state Ö on and click on OK .
7.
The selected datapoint element P1.state.on appears in the Datapoint element input field.
(You can also enter this character string directly)
8.
Using the combo-boxes, select a preset colour for the value 0 (FALSE) and the value 1 (TRUE)
respectively. Alternatively you can select any colours graphically using the Color selector.
9.
Click on Finish to conclude the parameterization process.
Fig. 7.7
Steps in the Wizard for
configuring an animation
for value-dependent
display of the
background color
46
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Test the finished result using the graphical editor Preview function (see section 7.7). The easiest way to
change the value of the datapoint element is to enter the value (0 / 1 or TRUE / FALSE) in the "Original
value" field in the Original value dialog window of the PARA module (see Fig. 5.4) and click on Apply to
set it.
You can follow the same procedure to parameterize value displays, bar graphs, buttons for issuing
commands or changing screens and many other parameterization options. Online Help {GEDI module Ö
Native GEDI Ö Simple Parameterization}.
7.5
Scripting in the graphic
As an alternative to using the Wizard, a user-defined script can also specify the dynamic properties of
graphics objects. For this option, do not click on the white column area in the Events tab of the Property
sheet but on the button with the three dots "..." on the far right; this opens the Script editor, where you can
create almost any animation instructions you wish.
Fig. 7.8
Creating a custom
animation by writing a
Control script
The script can contain programming code to access current and historical data as well as numerous
graphics properties. Although the Control language, with a syntax based on ANSI-C, is easy to learn, it
falls far outside the bounds of this document. You can find out more about it in the Online Help
{CONTROL Ö Introduction to CTRL or CONTROL Ö Control graphics}.
47
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
7.6
Using ready-made symbols for displaying data
The simplest way to create a graphical user interface is to use off-the-shelf symbols (references). PVSS II
comes with a whole set of these objects. They are a useful aid when getting started, and can also be used
as examples or building blocks in symbols designed yourself.
Open the Catalog view containing the ready-supplied graphics objects by selecting the menu option View
Ö Catalog Ö C:\Program files\ETM\PVSS2\3.0 (if you have selected a different program directory, specify
the path accordingly)
Fig. 7.9
Dsiplaying the readymade symbols via the
View menu in the
graphical editor
10. Create a new panel and save it under the name "myFirstPanel.pnl"
11. In the catalog section "STD_LEDS", select the standard symbol "Led_2" and drag it into the top
left of the drawing plane.
12. The parameterization dialog box opens; click on the "datapoint selector" button
of the "datapoint" input field
on the right
13. The Datapoint selector opens; navigate through the tree view to the element GS_PUMP Ö P1 Ö
state Ö on and click on OK .
14. The selected datapoint element P1.state.on appears in the Datapoint input field.
15. Remove the check mark from the "Alert handling color" checkbox
16. Click on OK in the parameterization dialog box for Led_2
17. Using the mouse, drag the inserted symbol Led_2 to make it slightly bigger.
The panel just created is now able to display the 'ON' operating status of our pump P1 in the form of a
stylised LED indicator. We will also provide a suitable input device so that we can change this value
directly from the panel as well. In addition, we want to display the current actual speed value as a pillar
indicator and make it possible to enter this analogue value in a text field.
48
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
Fig. 7.10
Inserted standard symbol
Led_2 with
parameterization dialog
box for specifying the
datapoint element
Fig. 7.11
Using ready-made
standard symbols for
creating panels
1.
Drag the standard symbol "switch_1" from the "STD_SWITCHES" catalog section into the panel
and place it beside the LED indicator.
2.
As before, select P1.state.on in the "Datapoint" field of the parameterization box.
3.
Drag the standard symbol "Pillar_transparent" from the "STD_INDICATORS" catalog section into
the bottom right of the panel.
4.
Specify the element P1.state.speed for the datapoint in the Parameterization dialog box.
5.
Also insert the standard symbol "Value" from the "STD_INPUTS" catalog section in the panel,
placing it beside the pillar indicator.
6.
Specify again the element P1.state.speed for the datapoint in the Parameterization dialog
box.
In all four standard symbols used so far, the "Datapoint" input field of the parameterization dialog box
initially contained the text "$dpe_value". This is what is known as a $-parameter (say "dollar
parameter"), which acts as a placeholder. For now we just need to accept that the first part tells us the
data type of the expected input, and the second part the type of the information sought. You can find
more information on this in the Online Help {CONTROL Ö Introduction to CTRL or CONTROLÖ
*
Introduction Ö CTRL parameters}.
$dpe_value
Ö
dpe…
value…
Datapoint element
Value
This is why you had to enter the name of the datapoint element whose actual value was to be displayed
via the standard symbol.
49
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
7.7
The Preview in the graphical editor
Click on the
icon or select the menu option File Ö Save & Preview to display the panel you have just
created in the Runtime preview of the GEDI. Click on the stylised switch and watch how the colour of the
LED indicator changes.
Fig. 7.12
Runtime preview of the
panel
“myFirstPanel.pnl”
in the graphical editor
(Save & Preview)
Click in the input field and type in a numerical value from the keyboard. The fill level of the pillar symbol
changes accordingly.
Alternatively, you can test that your panel display is working by entering the appropriate value in the PARA
Original value dialog box. To do this, switch to the PARA module and navigate to the datapoint type
GS_PUMP. Then navigate to the element P1.state.speed and select the original sub-node. In the
dialog box that opens (similar to Fig. 5.4), enter a new value in the "Original value" field and then click
on Apply ; the new setting is then displayed in the graphic.
*
The numerical value entered for P1.state.speed must lie inside the enclosed range [0 to 100]
because we have specified this in Fig. 5.13. If we attempt to set a value outside the range we are notified
immediately in a dialog box that opens from the selected standard symbol, and the value is not adopted.
*
The Preview (Save & Preview) of the GEDI graphical editor matches as closely as possible the display in the Native
Vision runtime user interface. Nevertheless, note that a few procedures may run more slowly in the preview (CTRL
scripts, Hover colours, etc.). Panel-in-panel displays are only shown properly in Native Vision.
When being used for normal operation of a process, the operating panels are displayed in their own
runtime user interface (Native VISION). This is added to the Console using the entry
PVSS00NV....Windows User interface. A required process display can be opened
automatically immediately at start up using the parameter -p panelname.pnl.
*
50
PVSS II Getting Started - Basics
Brief instruction / First steps
8
Contact
8.1
Head office
ETM International / Austria
ETM professional control GmbH
Kasernenstraße 29, A-7000 Eisenstadt
Phone: +43-2682-741-0 Fax: +43-2682-741-107
E-Mail: info@etm.at
Web: www.etm.at, www.pvss.com
8.2
Sales
Phone: +43-2682-741-0, +43-2682-741-144
Fax: +43-2682-741-107
E-Mail: sales@pvss.com
8.3
Licensing
Phone: +43-2682-741-0 Fax: +43-2682-741-107
E-Mail: license_pvss@etm.at
8.4
Training
Phone: +43-2682-741-0 Fax: +43-2682-741-107
E-Mail: competence@etm.at
8.5
Support/Engineering
Kasernenstraße 29, A-7000 Eisenstadt
Phone: +43-2682-741-0 Fax: +43-2682-741-107
E-Mail: product_center@etm.at
51
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