Ideas for A Isn`t for Fox by Wendy Ulmer Ideas included below

Ideas for A Isn`t for Fox by Wendy Ulmer Ideas included below
Ideas for
A Isn’t for Fox by Wendy Ulmer
Ideas included below:
 ABC book template
 Word families list
 ABC order in the library—lesson plan from Jane Mayott, SCPS librarian
 Use the sheet with the pictures on it. Students can either locate the picture that starts
with the letter in the line or they can locate the two rhyming words in the line.
 Use the story prompt to make alphabet book pages
Links:
 Publisher’s Guide at http://www.sleepingbearpress.com/educators/
 Author’s website: http://www.wendyulmer.com/
 More word families: http://prek-8.com/kindergarten/kindergarten_phonicswords.php
Other ideas:



Pair with Q is for Duck by Mary Etling or Tomorrow’s Alphabet by George Shannon
How can you tell the vultures from the dove?
What details do you see hidden in some of the pictures? (The zebras have the words
zig-zag in their stripes, one of the turtles has little turtle shapes on his shell IMO)
A isn’t for ______________________________;
B isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
A is for _________________________________
B is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
C isn’t for ______________________________;
D isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
C is for _________________________________
D is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
E isn’t for ______________________________;
F isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
E is for _________________________________
F is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
G isn’t for ______________________________;
H isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
G is for _________________________________
H is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
I isn’t for ______________________________;
J isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
I is for _________________________________
J is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
K isn’t for ______________________________;
L isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
K is for _________________________________
L is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
M isn’t for ______________________________;
N isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
M is for _________________________________
N is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
O isn’t for ______________________________;
P isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
O is for _________________________________
P is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
Q isn’t for ______________________________;
R isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
Q is for _________________________________
R is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
S isn’t for ______________________________;
T isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
S is for _________________________________
T is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
U isn’t for ______________________________;
V isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
U is for _________________________________
V is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
W isn’t for ______________________________;
X isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
W is for _________________________________
X is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
Y isn’t for ______________________________;
Z isn’t for ______________________________;
It isn’t for ______________________________.
It isn’t for ______________________________.
Y is for _________________________________
Z is for _________________________________
_______________________________________.
_______________________________________.
Word Families List
From www.enchantedlearning.com
ack
ad
ail
ain
ake
ale
all
am
ame
an
ank
ap
ar
ash
at
attack
back
black
crack
hack
Jack
knack
lack
pack
quack
rack
sack
snack
stack
tack
track
whack
Zack
ad
bad
brad
cad
clad
dad
doodad
glad
had
lad
mad
pad
sad
ail
fail
hail
jail
mail
nail
pail
rail
sail
snail
tail
wail
brain
chain
complain
explain
gain
grain
main
obtain
pain
plain
rain
slain
Spain
sprain
stain
strain
train
vain
awake
bake
brake
cake
fake
flake
Jake
lake
make
quake
rake
sake
shake
snake
stake
take
wake
ale
bale
dale
gale
kale
male
pale
sale
scale
stale
tale
whale
all
ball
call
fall
gall
hall
install
mall
small
squall
stall
tall
thrall
wall
cam
clam
dam
dram
exam
gram
ham
jam
lam
ma'am
Pam
ram
Sam
scam
slam
spam
swam
tam
tram
wham
yam
blame
came
fame
flame
frame
game
lame
name
same
shame
tame
an
ban
bran
can
clan
Dan
fan
flan
Fran
Jan
Japan
man
pan
pecan
plan
ran
scan
span
Stan
tan
than
van
bank
blank
crank
dank
drank
flank
frank
Hank
plank
prank
rank
sank
shrank
spank
tank
thank
yank
cap
clap
flap
gap
lap
map
nap
rap
sap
scrap
slap
snap
strap
tap
trap
wrap
yap
zap
afar
bar
car
czar
far
gar
guitar
jar
mar
par
scar
spar
star
tar
tsar
ash
bash
brash
cash
clash
crash
dash
flash
gash
gnash
hash
lash
mash
rash
sash
slash
smash
splash
stash
thrash
trash
at
bat
brat
cat
chat
fat
flat
gnat
hat
mat
pat
rat
sat
slat
spat
tat
that
vat
ate
aw
ay
eat
eel
eep
eet
ell
en
ent
est
ice
ick
ide
abate
ate
crate
date
debate
fate
gate
grate
hate
Kate
late
mate
plate
rate
relate
sate
skate
state
caw
claw
draw
flaw
gnaw
jaw
law
paw
raw
saw
slaw
straw
thaw
away
bay
bray
clay
day
decay
delay
display
flay
gay
gray
hay
jay
lay
may
nay
okay
pay
play
pray
quay
beat
cheat
cleat
eat
feat
greet
heat
meat
neat
peat
pleat
seat
treat
wheat
eel
feel
heel
keel
kneel
peel
reel
steel
wheel
beep
creep
deep
jeep
keep
peep
seep
sheep
sleep
steep
sweep
weep
beet
feet
fleet
greet
meet
sheet
sleet
street
sweet
tweet
bell
cell
dell
dwell
farewell
fell
hell
sell
shell
smell
spell
swell
tell
well
yell
amen
Ben
children
den
fen
gentlemen
glen
Gwen
hen
men
open
pen
then
ten
when
wren
yen
accent
bent
cent
dent
event
gent
lent
rent
scent
sent
spent
tent
vent
went
best
chest
crest
jest
nest
pest
quest
rest
test
unrest
vest
west
zest
dice
ice
mice
nice
price
rice
slice
spice
splice
thrice
twice
vice
brick
chick
click
flick
kick
lick
nick
pick
quick
Rick
sick
slick
stick
thick
tick
trick
wick
bride
decide
glide
hide
pride
ride
side
slide
stride
tide
wide
ray
relay
replay
say
slay
spray
stay
stray
sway
they
today
tray
way
ife
ight
ile
ill
in
ine
ing
ink
ip
it
oat
ock
og
fife
knife
life
strife
wife
bright
delight
fight
flight
fright
height
knight
light
might
night
plight
right
sight
slight
tight
tonight
bile
file
mile
Nile
pile
rile
smile
stile
tile
vile
while
bill
chill
dill
drill
fill
frill
gill
grill
hill
ill
Jill
kill
krill
mill
pill
quill
shrill
sill
skill
spill
still
swill
thrill
thrill
till
trill
will
bin
chin
din
fin
gin
grin
in
kin
pin
shin
skin
sin
spin
thin
tin
twin
win
within
brine
decline
define
dine
fine
line
mine
nine
pine
shine
shrine
sine
spine
swine
tine
twine
vine
whine
wine
bring
cling
fling
king
ping
ring
sing
sling
spring
sting
string
swing
thing
wing
wring
zing
blink
brink
drink
fink
ink
link
mink
pink
rink
shrink
sink
stink
think
wink
blip
chip
dip
drip
flip
grip
hip
lip
nip
quip
rip
ship
sip
skip
slip
snip
strip
tip
trip
whip
zip
admit
bit
fit
flit
grit
hit
it
kit
knit
lit
mit
pit
quit
sit
skit
slit
snit
spit
split
twit
wit
boat
coat
float
gloat
goat
oat
stoat
throat
block
clock
cock
crock
dock
flock
frock
hock
jock
knock
lock
mock
o'clock
rock
shock
smock
sock
stock
blog
bog
catalog
clog
cog
dog
fog
frog
hog
jog
log
slog
smog
oil
oke
oo
ood
ood
oof
oof
ook
oom
ool
boil
broil
coil
foil
oil
soil
spoil
toil
awoke
bloke
broke
choke
joke
poke
smoke
spoke
stoke
stroke
woke
yoke
boo
coo
goo
igloo
moo
shoo
too
woo
zoo
good brood goof hoof book bloom cool
hood food proof woof brook boom drool
stood mood roof
cook broom fool
wood
spoof
crook doom pool
hook gloom spool
look groom stool
nook loom tool
rook room
shook zoom
took
ore
orn
ot
ought
bore
chore
core
fore
gore
lore
more
ore
pore
score
shore
sore
spore
store
swore
tore
wore
yore
adorn
born
corn
forlorn
horn
morn
scorn
shorn
thorn
torn
worn
apricot
blot
bot
clot
cot
dot
forgot
got
hot
jot
knot
lot
not
plot
pot
rot
shot
slot
spot
tot
trot
ould
ouse
out
ow
ow
(rhymes (rhymes
with cow) with low)
bought could douse about bow
brought should grouse bout cow
fought would house clout chow
ought
louse gout how
sought
mouse grout now
thought
spouse out plow
wrought
lout sow
pout vow
scout wow
shout
snout
spout
stout
tout
trout
bow
blow
crow
flow
glow
grow
low
mow
row
show
slow
snow
sow
stow
throw
tow
oon
oop
balloon
goon
loon
moon
noon
soon
spoon
swoon
coop
droop
hoop
loop
scoop
snoop
stoop
troop
oot
oot
(long oo)
(short oo)
boot
hoot
scoot
shoot
foot
soot
op
bop
chop
cop
crop
drop
flop
hop
lop
mop
plop
pop
prop
sop
shop
stop
top
own
uck
ug
ump un
unk
brown
crown
down
drown
frown
gown
nightgown
town
buck
chuck
cluck
duck
luck
muck
puck
pluck
stuck
struck
truck
tuck
yuck
bug
dug
hug
jug
lug
mug
plug
pug
rug
shrug
smug
snug
thug
tug
bump
clump
dump
grump
hump
jump
lump
plump
pump
rump
slump
stump
thump
trump
bunk
chunk
drunk
dunk
flunk
funk
hunk
junk
lunk
plunk
punk
skunk
slunk
spunk
sunk
trunk
bun
fun
gun
nun
pun
run
shun
spun
stun
sun
Garrisonville Elementary School, Stafford County, Virginia
ELEMENTARY LIBRARY LESSON PLAN #1-
1
K
Title
ABC order in the library 2
AASL
National
Literacy
Standard
VA DOE
Standards
of Learning
Library
Skills
Mastery
Objective
Resources
Vocabulary
Activity
2.1.2 The information literate student is an independent learner and will organize knowledge so that it
is useful.
1.9, 1.11.a The student read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fictional texts and use
knowledge of alphabetical order by first letter.
The student will identify the letters of the alphabet in the stories, A isn’t for Fox, Old Black Fly,
and Animal ABC’s, and correlate that books in the library are arranged in alphabetical order.
A isn’t for Fox (E ULMER), Old Black Fly (E AYLESWORTH), Animal ABC’s (TS E HOOD),
Bothered, shoo, fly, honey, grocery store, pass, friend, dance class, desert, away, slurped
Pre-reading activity:
Predict what these stories will be about
Read A Isn’t for Fox and Old Black Fly
“We use our alphabet to find things in the library.”
After reading story, explain that books in “E” section are arranged in
ABC, (alphabetical) order on shelf
Show front, middle & end sections of “E” shelves
“When you want to find a book in the “E” section at which end do you
start?”
Have volunteer students practice finding books in the A section, B
section, etc.
If time, read Animal ABC’s
Closure
Comments
Rev. 7/2011
Write your letter in this box
_________ isn’t for ______________________________;
Your letter
write a thing that doesn’t start with your letter
It isn’t for _______________________________________
Write another thing that doesn’t start with your letter AND
rhymes with what you wrote on the line above
_________ is for ______________________________;
Your letter
write a thing that DOES start with your letter and a
description of it
Draw a picture of what your letter is for in this box
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Brown
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Ideas for
The Big Elephant in the Room by Lane Smith
Ideas below:
 Lesson plan from Brenda Love, Stafford County Public Schools librarian, on idioms
 Ideas from the Wild Geese Guides blog—included with permission. Email contact:
[email protected]
 Images of idioms from http://www.cccoe.net/social/SAIdiomintro.htm
 Complete the “Elephant in the School” paper.
 Bowtie template
Other ideas:
 What kinds of things do good friends do for each other? If one of your friends was being



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


picked on by a bully, what would you do? If one of your friends was wearing strange
clothes would you tell him or her? If you were team captain would you pick your friend
for your team?
Although they look very much alike, how were the two donkeys different from each
other? I’m thinking about visual differences mostly, not personalities.
Several of the pages require the visual to see what actually happened (for example, how
h “fixed” the computer). Read those pages without showing the picture and ask the
class to give suggestions on what the friend might have done.
Play Pictionary with easy idioms on the white board. Divide the class in half and then
form two teams from each half so that you have two games going at once. Have them
try to draw an idiom and have their team guess what they are drawing. If the team
guesses the idiom, they get a point. If someone can explain what the idiom means, they
get a second point. Of course, explain the idioms to the students so they know them
after the guessing is done. Some good ones to use that are not too hard and/or that
might be familiar to them are: raining cats and dogs, cat’s got your tongue, pain in the
neck, piece of cake, crocodile tears, a drop in the bucket, kick the bucket, pay through
the nose, skeleton in the closet, and snake in the grass.
Have students decorate bowties to wear using the pattern. Tape the completed bowtie
onto a strip of paper to wear around the neck. OR, make some fabric bowties out of
scraps of fabric to share for those who want to wear them.
Make elephant or donkey patterns using die cut shapes.
Put a big stuffed elephant in the room near where you will be telling the story. Don’t
explain why it is there.
Author interview: http://www.justonemorebook.com/2009/04/05/rock-stars-of-reading-part-3lane-smith-contd/


Below from
http://margodill.com/blog/2010/01/15/un-forgettable-friday-the-big-elephant-in-the-room-bylane-smith/
1. Idioms or expressions we use in everyday language are one topic you can discuss with
children after reading The Big Elephant in the Room. Ask students to help you make a list of
idioms (or expressions) they’ve heard. You may have to help them get started, or you may just
have to tell them some depending on their age. On the UsingEnglish.com website, they have an
idioms database that can help you with this lesson. Students can illustrate these to extend your
discussion.
2. Lane Smith’s story is obviously a book about friends or siblings. You can discuss with students
or your children how bow-tie donkey is feeling after red-shirt donkey confesses all those things
he did. What kind of friend is red-shirt donkey? How could he be a better friend? Once you have
a discussion with students, ask them to write about the topic of friendship in their reading
response journals. They can write about a friend they have, what it means to be a good friend,
or about what they like to do with their friends. Younger children can draw pictures.
3. So, what are the donkeys going to do about the elephant in the room in The Big Elephant in
the Room? Let children brainstorm their own ending to this book where the donkeys decide
what to do with Stanley. You can write the ending together as a class and let children illustrate
it.
List of idioms:
All ears
Ants in your pants
Arm and a leg
At the end of your rope
Axe to grind
Back to the drawing board
Barking up the wrong tree
Between the lines
Blood out of a stone
Blow your stack
Bone to pick
Bull in a China shop
By the skin of your teeth
Can of worms
Cold feet
Crash a party
Cry your eyes out
Don’t wash your dirty laundry in public
Down in the dumps
Eagle eyes
Elephant in the room
Feeling Blue
Fifth wheel
Grab the bull by its horns
Head is in the clouds
Heart of gold
Hook, line, and sinker
Horse of a different color
In the doghouse
It cost an arm and a leg
Jump the gun
Like a fish needs a bicycle
Make waves
Money talks
Opening a can of worms
Out on a limb
Piece of cake
Pull someone's leg
Pull your weight
Rock the boat
See the light
Stick out like a sore thumb
Tall story
Thin-skinned
Thrilled to bits
Walk on eggshells
Fish out of water
Go round in circles
a bummer
a class act
a couch potato
a fly on the wall
a horse of another color
a tough cookie
bark up the wrong tree
beat around the bush
bend over backwards
bent out of shape
break her heart
blow your top
don’t burn your bridges
call it a day
cat got your tongue
caught his eye
chewing the fat
clear the air
copycat
cost an arm and a leg
cut it out
crocodile tears
dog days of summer
don’t pull my leg
don't count your chickens
don't have a cow
down in the dumps
eagle eyes
eating crow
fishing for a compliment
get someone's goat
get it off your chest
get the ball rolling
give me a break
give me a hand
Written all over your face
You can say that again
give someone the boot
go ape
go behind someone's back
have a ball
have a canary
head over heels
hit the books
hit the sack
hold your horses
holy cow
I’m all ears
in the dark
in the dog house
in the red
it's raining cats and dogs
kick the bucket
left out in the cold
let the cat out of the bag
lose your cool
my two cent's worth
pick my brain
proud as a peacock
put on the back burner
read my mind
rock the boat
sharp as a tack
shoot the breeze
spill the beans
straight from a horse's mouth
it rings a bell
under the weather
up to one's ears
walk on eggshells
work like a dog
The Big Elephant in the School
If there was a big elephant in our school, where would it be? What would it be doing? Draw the
background of where your elephant would be in our school and write a sentence about it at the
bottom of the page.
My elephant is ____________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
From Wild Geese Guides
http://wildgeeseguides.blogspot.com/2010/01/big-elephant-in-room.html
Pre-reading:
What is a misunderstanding? How do they happen? What’s the best way to get over one?
Questions to consider:
1. A big elephant in a room is a big problem that people are trying not to talk about or think about.
Have you ever tried to ignore a big problem before?
2. List all the things that he thinks are the big elephant (or problem).
3. Do you think he really forced down that crunchy nut ice cream or not? What makes you think so
or not?
4. What one thing would you never let someone borrow (in case they might not bring it back?)
5. What happened to his computer? What’s the worst thing you’ve ever broken?
6. What’s the best thing to do about a bully? How can friends help with bullies? Can teachers help
too?
7. What do you do if there’s only one cool bike?
8. Can you keep a secret? Did he keep a secret for his friend? How hard is it to keep a secret?
9. Which part is your favorite? Why?
10. Will they still be friends? What do you think he might be most mad about now?
Classroom Management:
Create a No Elephants in the Classroom display to air out concerns and problems from the room,
playground, or bus. After reading the story together, provide an old ice cream container (and change the
flavor to Crunchy-Nut, of course) and leave elephant-shaped paper beside it for kids to write out their
concerns. Discuss at class meetings weekly. At the end of the year enjoy crunchy nut ice-cream party and
great friendships!
Reading:
Stories have three parts- a beginning, a middle and an end. Summarize what happened in each part.
Then, because good readers make connections between what they are reading and what they are
thinking. What does each part remind you of? Has something like this ever happened to you or a friend?
SUMMARIZE
In the beginning….
In the middle…
CONNECT
In the end…
Writing:
Lane Smith uses really small moments and great details to bring this story of two friends to life. Write a
small moment or single scene about two new friends who have a misunderstanding or disagreement
about something and use THE BIG ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM as your mentor text. You may even try
writing about another idiom! (Idiom ideas: beggars can’t be choosers, benefit of the doubt, out of the blue,
by the book, get to the bottom of, the best thing since sliced bread)
Music: Sing this song to the tune “Frere Jacques”
The big elephant
The big elephant
in the room
in the room
pretending he is not there
pretending that we don’t care
but we do!
You would too!
Art:
Illustrate the following idioms inspired by Lane Smith’s art!
Let’s CLEAR the AIR
UP IN ARMS
GO APE
The Big Elephant in the Room
Lesson Plan by Brenda Love, SCPS Librarian
Grade Level: 2 and 3
SOL: Reading 2.7 and 3.5: Read fiction and nonfiction using a variety of strategies:
Set a purpose for reading
Reading 2.5 and 3.5: Read and demonstrate the comprehension of fiction:
Make connections between previous experiences and reading
Objectives: Students will:
1. Identify and understand examples of idioms
2. Listen to the story The Big Elephant in the Room and explain the idiom in the story
3. Write the special meaning of an idiom and illustrate the literal meaning of the words in a silly way
Materials: The Big Elephant in the Room by Lane Smith, document camera
Books about idioms:
In a Pickle and Other Funny Idioms by Marvin Terban
My Momma Likes to Say and My Teacher Likes to Say by Denise Brennan-Nelson
There’s a Frog in My Throat by Loreen Leedy & Pat Street
The Cat’s Pajamas Wallace Edwards
Parts; More Parts; and Even More Parts by Tedd Arnold
Learning Activities:
1. Pre-reading activity:
-Explain that authors often use figurative language, a way of saying something other than the literal
meanings of the words, in their work. Examples are similes, metaphors, personification, alliteration,
onomatopoeia, alliteration and idioms. The VRC book in today’s lesson includes an idiom.
What is an idiom? Let students figure it out by giving them common examples such as:
Your eyes are bigger than your stomach.
You’re in the doghouse.
Put on your thinking cap.
- Use a document camera to show illustrations from some picture books about idioms and let students
guess what idioms are represented by the silly pictures and what their special meanings are.
2. Reading activity
-Read The Big Elephant in the Room and then identify the idiom and its meaning.
5. Post reading activity:
--Give students a list of idioms. Each student should select one idiom, write what people really mean
when they use it and then draw a funny illustration of what the words literally mean.
Students can share their work with their classmates.
Idioms
Something smells fishy
Don’t count your chickens before they hatch
Butterflies in your stomach
Eat like a horse
More fun than a barrel of monkeys
When the cat’s away the mice will play
It’s raining cats and dogs
As happy as a pig in mud
The straw that broke the camel’s back
Stir up a hornet’s nest
We got skunked
Keep this under your hat
The Big Elephant In The Room
By Lane Smith
Choose one of the idioms from the list and write it here:
Now write its special meaning:
Draw a picture that shows the literal meaning of the phrase. Be creative!
Ideas for
Colonial Voices: Hear Them Speak by Kay Winters
Ideas below:
 Point-of-view lesson from Tammy Hunt, SCPS 4th grade teacher
Links:
 Colonial New England Teachers’ Guide from the Boston Children’s Museum:
www.bostonkids.org
 Lesson plan from Deborah Hungerford, from the OnCUE Journal, Winter 2005
wwwstatic.kern.org/gems/cue/ColonialVoices.pdf
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SMART notebook lesson by Lori Bowers
http://exchange.smarttech.com/details.html?id=7b3956b7-981c-439d-a22345bd4f854afa
Lesson plan from www.ilfonline.org/clientuploads/YHBA/Int_ColonialVoices.pdf
Mentor text lesson from www.historyiscentral.org
http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.php?lid=911&type=educator
Economics ideas from Lynne Farrell Stover: Trouble is Brewing in Boston
author’s website http://www.kaywinters.com/
Booktalk idea from http://booktalkthree.blogspot.com
Illustrator’s website: http://www.dayhere.com/index.html
Other Ideas:
 Use the new media literacy strand in the English SOLs to have the students create a
political cartoon that would appear in the Printer’s newspaper.
Point of View/Roles of Revolutionary War Lesson using
Colonial Voices: Hear Them Speak
By Tammy Hunt, SCPS fourth grade teacher
SOL: 4.5 The students will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts.
k) Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.
VS.5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of Virginia in the American
Revolution by:
b) Identifying the various roles played by whites, enslaved African Americans, free African
Americans, and American Indians in the Revolutionary War era, including George
Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and James Lafayette.
Materials:

Roles Chart
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Picture Book – Colonial Voices: Hear Them Speak

Character Name Cards
Review Point of View and Opinion lessons from Reading Workshop. Then discuss the
different roles Colonial Americans could play during the Revolutionary War, as a
Patriot, as a Loyalist, or as a Neutralist. Make a chart with the roles categorized and
labeled.
Before reading the book, Colonial Voices: Hear Them Speak, identify the people whose
voices are speaking (see chart on end pages of book), write the characters’ names on
cards. Read the book and discuss the evidence in the text on each page that helps to
identify each character as a Patriot, a Loyalist, or a Neutralist. As each character’s
voice is identified according to the role they played, put the card with that
character’s name on the role chart in the correct column.
Ideas for using
Harry and Horsie by Katie Van Camp
Ideas below:
 Make cards with places on them and have the students arrange them in order from
what is closest to them to what is furthest away. OR, give small groups of students (2-3)
one card and have the class line up in the order of closest to furthest away. Check the
answers.
 Planet necklaces using the pictures of the planets included. They’re more fun if they’re
printed in color so you might want to just make a few to be shared rather than have
everyone make one.
Links:
 Harry and Horsie activity sheets from the publisher (coloring pages and word search)
http://www.harryandhorsie.com/activities/index.html
 Make your own horsie: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNCAqpYgt9Y
 Book website: www.harryandhorsie.com
 Interview with the author: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Sw_488zJ88
 Rocket craft: http://www.clel.org/content/literacy-based-crafts-rocket-ship
Other Ideas:
 Relate to non-fiction space books or old-timey picture books that use two or three
colors in their illustrations (Blueberries for Sal, Make Way for Ducklings, Bill Peet books)
 Hang planets from the ceiling so you feel like you’re in outer space.
 Dim the lights and read by the glow of a lava lamp or something similar.
 Traveling through space
 Bring in old time toys – jack in the box, train,
 How many times is Kitty pictured in the book? Kind of sneaky in some spots.
 How far did he travel to find Horsie?
 Memory game – tell them ahead of time that you will be testing them on what things
they see in the book. After reading make a class list of things that got taken into space
by the bubbles
 Before beginning the book ask the class “What are some things you would see in
space?” Write their answers on the board. See how many of your words show up in the
book as well as which words you might have missed.
 Make pictures using only the three primary colors and white, as in the book
 Tell the class ahead of time that you will be testing them on what things they see in the
book. After reading make a class list of things that got taken into space by the bubbles.
Or have students work in small groups to make a list and then see which group has the
most correct items.
 Bring in old time toys for the students to see – jack in the box, train, Raggedy Ann doll
 Blowing bubbles as students enter/while reading the book
Harry and Horsie: order by distance
My home
My school
Atlantic Ocean
Rocky Mountains
California
China
The moon
Saturn
Planet Necklaces
Ideas for
How Rocket Learned to Read by Tad Hills
Ideas below:
 Washington State Children’ Choice Award wikispace lesson on concept of print,
reprinted with permission of creator Charisse Tsukamoto and author Tad Hills
 Sight words and writing lesson for K-2 from Washington Children’s Choice Award
wikispace, reprinted with permission of the WCCA committee
 Consonant-vowel-consonant list of words for matching activities (K/1)
 Migration research: why doesn’t the bird teach in the winter? Have the class do a short
research activity with the worksheet. Each student picks a bird and fills in the sheet
with pictures that accompany each section.
Links:
 Learn to Read with Rocket (publisher’s packet)
http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/teachers_guides/9780375858994.pdf
 Wikkistix for creating letters—tactile learning-- http://www.wikkistix.com/
 Tad Hills article http://www.clcd.com/clcd/mai_hills_tad.php
Other ideas:
 Pair with nonfiction books about birds that migrate, The Goose That Almost Got Cooked
by Marc Simont, or any number of books about learning to read.
 Cards with letters on them (use letter cards from Learn to Read with Rocket packet). Let
kids arrange the letters to make the words in the book as you are reading. Give the
students cards with letters on them. Let students arrange the letters to make the words
in the book as you are reading the story. Or, put the letters on cards with magnets and
have students come up to the board to rearrange the letters and spell the words.
 After the story give them the letters in your school name or library and have them make
words with the letters.
 Make a list of the class’s favorite books – Rocket likes the story of Buster and wants to
read it again and again. What is a story you could listen to over and over? Make a chart
of the favorite books for all the classes in a grade level. OR, make an online survey and
have the kids take that to get the results.
 How does the bird know that Rocket is happy? (waggy tail) What are other signs that a
dog sends to let you know how it is feeling? (Mr. Barker growls)
 Make an alphabet book with the class to bind and give to them
 Make a list of the class’s favorite books – Rocket likes the story of Buster and wants to
read it again and again. What is a story you could listen to over and over?
 How does the bird know that Rocket is happy? (waggy tail) What are other signs that a
dog sends to let you know how it is feeling? (Mr. Barker growls)
 Rocket spells words in the winter – cold, sun, melt, wind – what are other words that go
with each season? Have students work in small groups or with a partner to list four
words for each season. Come back together as a group to compile the list of words
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Plastic magnet letters for creating sightwords—use any magnetic surface (filing cabinet,
side of desk, rolling cabinet)
Ipad app: Learn to Read with Rocket ($4.99)
Lesson idea by Roxanne Fields – Purposeful Teaching and Listening (reprinted with permission)
Objective: Students will learn about skills others in their class have, exercise their
listening/comprehension abilities, share with the class about their classmate’s activity and how
to do it.
 describe an activity they do quite well
 develop 3-5 easy steps to use to teach this skill/activity
 concisely share about their activity and teach the skill
 listen with purpose
 verbalize the steps they were just taught
After reading the book, have students think of something they can do quite well. Then have the
students come up with 3-5 easy steps they would use to teach a friend how to do their activity
(they can write these on an index card). Tell the students they will now be a student and a
teacher for the next few minutes. Partner up the students and have one of the students
share/teach about their well-known skill for the first 45 seconds or so, then have them give the
3-5 easy steps to their partner (allow about 1 minute). Next, have the “student” repeat the
steps back to their “teacher” to ensure they have the steps correct. Finally, have students
share about a skill/activity they just learned and the steps they would need to use to complete
this skill. Of course, then have the students and teachers switch roles. This activity will help
students to learn about others, listen with purpose, and recall facts…of course the “teacher”
will be there if needed.
From the Teaching Heart Blog:
I imagine this book being read in a kindergarten and first grade classroom where kids are
learning to read. Children will be able to make a text-to-self connection with the story. Rocket is
like a child first learning how to read. It’s really hard at first, but gets easier as he learns. His
teacher is there to help him and together they can do this! Soon Rocket begins to understand
that reading opens up a new world for him just as it will for all who learn to read.
Action Rhyme from www.storytimekatie.com
Action Rhyme: “Little Bird”
I saw a little bird go hop, hop, hop (hop three times)
I told the little bird to stop, stop, stop (hold out hand for stop)
I went to the window to say “How do you do?” (handshake)
He wagged his little tail and far away he flew! (shake tail and fly away)
Discussion questions from
http://www.wcmu.org/radio/childrens_bookshelf/cb_bookshelf_questions_2010.html
1. Ask the child the following questions: Why did Rocket refuse to learn to read at the beginning
of the story? Why did Rocket change his mind? Do you want to learn to read?
2. Are you starting to learn what the letters of the alphabet look like? What sounds do you
think are funny? What sounds do you like best? What sounds are hard to say?
3. Study the illustrations with the child and ask the child to find the following details: the
picture of the little bird holding a worm; Rocket’s tail sticking out from underneath a lilac bush;
the letter “b” with a picture of a butterfly; Rocket’s nametag; Emma and Fred; the letters ABC
written in the snow; Rocket being blown by the wind and a sign that says the word of the day is
DOG.
4. Little bird says that words are built one letter at a time. Is she correct? Can you sound out a
word by sounding out the letters? Give an example. Can you read any of the words in this
book?
bat cat dog fox box
sun net bag fan rat
van bed hen pig bug
tub sub pot mop top
rug tux can wig six
bib jet web red ten
How Rocket Learned to Read
By Tad Hill adapted by A. Cook
Synopsis:
Rocket, a fun-loving puppy, meets a very brilliant bird. Throughout the fall, Rocket learns his ABC,
listens to stories and starts writing letters. But winter comes and interrupts his lessons…what will
he do with his new knowledge?
AR:
Reading level – 2.9
Activity:
Mud Writing!
Materials:
Brown Finger Paint (see recipes!)
Paper – 12”x18” construction, butcher paper, water color paper
Pencil
Optional:
gallon baggies
Rocket handout
Crayons
Glue
Spelling list
Process:
1. Give each student a piece of paper
2. Give each student a glob of finger paint (about ¼ - 1/3 cup each)
3. Have them write words in it, draw pictures, draw a map, design a rocket!
Or
1. using about 10 – 12 feet of butcher paper, draw a line horizontally and have them play with the
fingerpaint.
2. While it is drying, have them color their ‘Rocket’.
3. Once the “mud” has dried, add some grass, flowers and trees.
4. Glue each child’s Rocket next to their word.
5. display!
Or
Using a gallon bag for each student, place individual globs of finger paint in each bag. Seal up!
Have them write their spelling words in it! Play hangman! Take it home!
Website:
Fun Book Talk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlDyFsv4uSU
Random House teacher guide
http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/teachers_guides/9780375858994.pdf
Meet Tad Hills
http://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/weblog/2010/09/bestselling-tad-hills-read-to-your-kids.html
Tad Hills website http://www.tadhills.com/
ELAR’s:
Reading:
1.1.1-Understand and apply concepts of print.
1.3: Build vocabulary through wide reading.
2.4.1 Understand how to give personal responses and make connections to text.
Visual Arts:
1.2.1 - Uses a variety of tools to explore ways of making lines and textures.
Fantastic Finger Paint Recipes
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1 c. flour
2 T. of salt
1 1/2 c. cold water
1 1/4 c. hot water
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Food coloring
Freezer paper (paint on shiny side )
Combine flour, salt, and cold water in a saucepan. Beat with a
wire whisk until smooth. Heat the mixture over medium heat.
Slowly stir in hot water. Continue stirring until mixture boils
and begins to thicken. Remove from heat. Beat with a whisk
until smooth. Divide the mixture into several different
containers. Add 4-5 drops of food coloring to each container
and stir.
Salt and Flour Finger Paint Recipes
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2 c. flour
2 tsp. salt
3 c. cold water
2 c. hot water
Add the salt to the flour in a saucepan. Pour in cold water
gradually and beat the mixture with an egg beater until smooth.
Add the hot water and boil the mixture until it becomes glossy.
Beat it until it is smooth. Mix in food coloring.
Food coloring
This is the recipe
*
*
*
*
2 cups of corn starch
1 cup of cold water
4.5 cups of boiling water
Liquid food colouring
Method:
Mix the corn starch with the cold water and stir together. Pour
in the boiling water and stir between each cup. It goes really
strange (you are basically mixing a hot oobleck goop) but keep
stirring and it literally seems to "melt" into a wonderful, custardlike consistency. We then separated it into individual jam jars
before adding colouring, but you can do it however you like and
this is the stage to add colour.
Finger Paint (Cooked Version)
What you need:
What to do:
2 cups flour
Mix flour and water and cook over low heat until thick.
4 cups cold water
Cool.
Food coloring or dry tempera
Add a pinch of salt.
Add dry tempera or food coloring, if desired.
Store in covered jar in refrigerator.
Kool-Aid Finger Paint
What you need:
2 cups flour
2 packs unsweetened Kool-Aid
1/2 cup salt
3 cups boiling water
3 tablespoons oil
What to do:
Mix wet ingredients into dry ingredients.
HOW ROCKET LEARNED TO READ
By: Tad Hills
Synopsis: Rocket, a fuzzy black-and-white pup, “loved to chase leaves and chew sticks,” and that’s
pretty much the height of his ambition. A little yellow bird mistakes Rocket’s napping for class
attendance, and she sets forth to teach him. Though at first resistant, Rocket gets sucked in by an
absorbing read aloud, and he becomes an eager pupil, learning all about the wonders of the alphabet
and the words it builds.
Suggested Reading Date: September
Activity Description:
Feed Rocket dog bone treats. (There are activities for: K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. Don’t forget to write
Rocket’s name in his tag.)
Kindergarten - I would give K. the black line page of Rocket to color. Don’t forget to write
Rocket’s name in his tag.)
First Grade – First graders will cut out the bone treat words they are able to read and feed
them to Rocket by pasting them around him.
Second Graders – will have the empty bone treats page and write their own words to feed
to Rocket.
Third Graders – will complete the Rocket activity booklet and share their experiences of
when/how they first learned to read and advice for beginning readers.
Extra Related Read: If you’d like to share another story instead of tackling activities,
students will LOVE Wolf! By Becky Bloom. A wonderful story of a wolf who initially is interested in
eating farm animals that are in the middle of reading, instead the wolf is intrigued by their intelligent
behaviors and sets off to learn how to read.
EALR’s/GLE’s:
Reading
2.1 Demonstrate evidence of reading comprehension
2.2 Understand and apply knowledge of text components to comprehend text.
2.3. Expand comprehension by analyzing, interpreting, and synthesizing information and ideas
in literacy and informational text.
AR Level : 2.9
Activity Created By: Charisse Tsukamoto, Kent School District, Kent, WA
Washington Children’s Choice Book Award Committee
Front cover of Rocket
booklet for gr.3 – for two –
sided copy
HOW ROCKET
LEARNED TO READ
BY_________________
__
Name __________________________________________________________________
Bird Migration Research
How Rocket Learned to Read by Tad Hills
My bird is __________________________________________________________
In the winter, my bird _________________________________________________
My bird eats _________________________________________________________
Ideas for
Machines Go to Work by William Low
Ideas below:
 Lesson plan using onomatopoeia from Carol Hugar, SCPS librarian, including matching
cards
Links:
 Onomatopoeia posters from www.instantdisplay.co.uk
 YouTube link to the author discussing his creative process:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIqZLwTZ1kI
 From http://booksavors.wordpress.com: Savorings for reading and in writing for
Machines Go to Work:
o Onomatopoeia – each machine is introduced with a sound it makes
o Informational – excellent mentor text for an All About Book unit of study
o Specific vocabulary – backhoe – stabilizers
o Repeating structure – Is the (machine) ....
o Prediction – excellent to begin teaching children in grades K and first
o Open full page flap
 Kid –created onomatopoeia examples:
http://www.worsleyschool.net/socialarts/onomato/poeiaentries.html
 Onomatopoeia lessons: http://www.brighthub.com/education/k-12/articles/71894.aspx
Other ideas:
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Community helper books – firemen, police
What are some vehicles that help us work or do our jobs? Who uses each of these
vehicles?
Do the train sound thing with your class at the end of the book. The parts are:
Mushroom
Fricassee chicken
Soup
(if you just got the handout and didn’t stay for the demonstration, you’re not gonna
have a clue what this means at all)
VARC: Machines Go To Work
Grade Level: K, 1, 2
Book: Machines Go To Work by William Low
Objective: Students will use the reading strategy “making predictions” when reading this book. We
will also talk about the sounds the machines make: Onomatopoeia
SOL Correlation:
Eng. K.1, K.2, K.11 K.8: making predictions
1.1, 1.2, 1.7, 1.9: making predictions, 1.11, 1.12
2.7, .2.8 making predictions, 2.10, 2.11, .2.12
Schedule: One 45 minute class plus time for check out.
Materials needed: Machines Go To Work by William Low
Lesson:
Pre-Reading Activity:
Review: is book fiction or nonfiction? How do you know? Show call number on spine label.
Read: Machines Go To Work by William Low. While reading, let kids help make the sounds and talk
about onomatopoeia with the second graders. Stop at each page with the big flap and have kids
discuss what will happen next. Then read to confirm predictions.
After-Reading Discussion:
What is a prediction?
What is onomatopoeia? Name some other onomatopoetic words: words that sound like their
meaning. Examples:
Joke: Knock, knock
Who’s there?
Boo
Boo Who?
Don’t cry!
Animal noises – have kids name some
Comic books – show examples
Activity: Kids will work with partners to play the Sounds Matching Game.
Copy and laminate the three power point slides. Make as many copies of each slide as needed. Cut
apart blocks and put in baggies.
Working with partners, students will match pictures to sounds.
Related books:
Rattletrap Car by Phyllis Root
Mr. Brown Can Moo by Dr.Seuss
Submitted by Carol Hugar
Moooo
Meow
Woof-Woof
Quack Quack
Honk Honk
Hee-haw
Neigh Neigh
Cockle-doodle-doo
Baa-baa
Maa-maa
Tweet Tweet
Hissssss
Crash!
Buzz Buzz
Knock Knock
Tick-tock
Clap Clap
Choo-choo
Clickety-clack
Sizzle, sizzle
Vrooom!
Vrooom!
ZOOM!
Hoo, Hoo, Hoo
Ding Dong
Squeak
Squeak
Ideas for
The Odd Egg by Emily Gravett
Ideas below:
 Lesson plan from Brenda Love, SCPS librarian, on oviparous animals
 Crocodile puppet template and photo
 Lesson plan from Mary Ann Wobbe, SCPS teacher, on sizing eggs from smallest to
largest.
 Predict which egg matches which animal: Print out pictures of birds and their eggs and
have them on the board. Have students try to match the bird to its egg before reading
the book. (birds-babies-eggs)
 World’s Best Egg template: Duck dreams of winning a trophy/ribbon for best egg. Have
kids design eggs using crayons, markers, glitter glue, sequins – whatever you can
tolerate!--and then award a prize for “World’s Best Egg.”
 Eggs Eggs Eggs lesson from Carol Hugar, SCPS librarian
Links:
 Story adaptation for ELL learners from http://unt.unice.fr/uoh/learn_teach_FL
 List of oviparous animals: http://www.ehow.co.uk/info_8435568_list-oviparousanimals.html
 Color by numbers template: http://www.emilygravett.com
 California Young Reader Medal (CYRM) idea booklet
www.californiayoungreadermedal.org/...2012/2Primary.pdf
 California Young Reader Medal (CYRM) readers’ theatre:
californiayoungreadermedal.org/...2012/3PrimaryRT.pdf
 Author’s website: http://www.emilygravett.com/
 Emily Gravett interview: http://authors.simonandschuster.com/EmilyGravett/35393029/author_revealed
Other ideas:
 Pair with An Extraordinary Egg by Lionni or Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones by Heller
 Why hasn’t duck laid an egg? Because he’s a boy!!
 ID types of birds – flamingo, owl, parrot, chicken, robin
 Show pictures of bird eggs and match to bird
 Characteristics of birds – owl is always reading, parrot talks
 Match baby birds to their parents – which ones look like parents, which ones don’t
 Predict what will come from duck’s egg. What clues do we have about it – size, shell
design/color
 Have photographs of each of the types of birds in the book on display so students can
see what they really look like.
 Possibly share this book in the springtime when birds are laying eggs and you are talking
about the various types of animals that hatch from eggs.
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Introduce the story by showing the cover and asking students to predict what they think
the story will be about. Read and discuss each page as you go (Ask students questions
such as, “How does the owlet know how to do math problems already?” or “Do you
know why the baby parrot says, I’m a pretty boy?”).
Read all the pages leading up to when Duck’s egg begins to crack. Then stop reading
and ask the students to guess what they think is inside of Duck’s egg. Provide students
with a cracked egg cutout (attached with a brad) and have students draw a picture
‘inside’ the egg of what they think will hatch out of the egg as well as write a sentence
or two describing what animal they chose and why. After they have created their guess,
you might ask, “What clues did you use to figure out what animal was inside?” Let
students share their guesses aloud showing their own hatching egg pictures.
Finish the book, beginning where you left off. Ask questions such as, “What happened
to all of the other animals when the alligator hatched?” “What is alligator wearing on
the last page?” and “Where did the scarf and booties come from?” Mention how the
size of the egg might also be a clue that the author was trying to give to indicate that the
animal inside was going to be big.
The Odd Egg
Lesson Plan by Brenda Love, SCPS Librarian
Grade Level: 2
SOL: Reading 2.5: Read fiction and nonfiction using a variety of strategies independently
Reading 2.8: Read and demonstrate the comprehension of fiction
Reading 2.9: Demonstrate comprehension of information in reference materials
Oral Language: 2.2: Expand listening and speaking vocabularies
Science 2.: Understand that animals undergo a series of orderly changes in their life cycles
Objectives: Students will:
1. Identify animals that are oviparous
2. Listen to the story The Odd Egg
3. Identify/share 5 interesting facts about an oviparous animal from a nonfiction Nature’s Children book
Materials: The Odd Egg by Emily Gravett, Nonfiction Nature’s Children books and variety of animals
White boards, markers, paper, pencil and crayons, PowerPoint: Who Laid That Egg?, plastic eggs
Learning Activities:
1. Pre-reading activity:
-Ask students to name some animals that lay eggs
-Give students white boards and markers. Tell them to write the name of each animal they see in the
PowerPoint”Who Laid That Egg?” After the picture of the animal hatching from its egg appears on the
slide have students write down the name of the animal on their boards. Then click on the slide to reveal
the animal’s name. There are 17 different animals in the slide show.
2. Reading activity
-Before reading The Odd Egg, let students predict what the story may be about.
After reading, show an earlier VRC book that is about a crocodile and ducks: Guji Guji by Chih –
YuanChen
5. Post reading activities:
--Before class, put one name of an egg laying animal in a plastic egg for each student in the class. Have
each student pick one of these eggs from a basket.
- Each student will use a Nature’s Children on the animal they selected to do the following:
Identify and write down at least 5 interesting facts about the animal
Draw a picture of the animal in its habitat
Each student will share the facts about their animal with the class
There is also a color by number picture of the duck and egg in the story at www.emilygravett.com
Who Laid
That Egg?
Butterfly Eggs
Spider Egg Sack
Salmon Eggs
Frog Eggs
Snake Egg
Lizard Egg
Sea Turtle Egg
Alligator Egg
Robin Eggs
Duck Egg
Hummingbird Egg
Owl Eggs
Ostrich Eggs
Eagle Egg
Flamingo Egg
Penguin Egg
Platypus Eggs
Animals that lay eggs
are called OVIPAROUS
Odd Egg
By: Emily Gravett
Lesson By: Mary Anne (Malstrom) Wobbe
Characters: Duck
Other birds
Summary of Book: All the birds in the story have laid eggs except
Duck. Duck found a large egg (white with green dots). Duck thought it
was a beautiful egg but the other birds laughed at him and the egg. All
the birds’ eggs start to hatch. The book starts with the smallest egg
hatching and continues showing eggs hatch until the largest egg
hatches. The page sizes also continue to get larger until the page is
eventually a full size page. All the birds have their babies but Duck is
still waiting wonder what will be in his egg. Soon the egg starts to creak
and crack. Out comes a large alligator and “Snap” he eats all the
birds.
Objectives: Students will…
1. Listen to the story.
2. Identify animals that hatch from eggs.
3. Put eggs in order by size from smallest to largest.
4. Make a book that is similar to the pages in the book Odd
Egg. (The book will show eggs from smallest to largest
and what hatches from each egg.)
Teacher Input:
1. Read the story and class discussions.
Guided Practice:
1. Create a brainstorm list of animals that hatch from eggs.
2. Show pictures of different eggs and the animals that
hatch from each kind of egg.
3. Discuss the characteristics of the eggs. (size, color)
4. Place the pictures of the eggs in order from smallest to
largest.
5. Discuss how the pages in the book start with the small
egg illustrated on a small page and the pages continually
get larger as the eggs get larger.
Independent Practice:
1. Each student chooses 5 animals that hatch from a variety
of size eggs.
2. The teacher gives each student a book which is made of
pages that start small and gradually gets larger. On each
page, the students illustrate an egg and the animal that
hatches from that egg.
3. Students label each animal that hatches from the egg.
Closure:
1. After the students have completed their book, the teacher
and class can review the plot of the story.
2. Teacher will remind the students of the objective of the
lesson and assignment.
3. Students will share their book with a partner.
Birds/Babies/Eggs
WORLD’S BEST EGG!!
Name: __________________________________________________________________
From The Odd Egg by Emily Gravett
Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer
Only Otis
Only The Little Engine
That Could
Both Stories
Armadillo Readers’ Choice 2010-2011
© Round Rock Independent School District, Library Services
Ideas for
Otis by Loren Long
Ideas below:
 Compare/contrast and Venn diagram charts for Otis and The Little Engine that Could
Links:
 Author’s website: www.lorenlong.com
 Ideas from the Texas Armadillo Award packet, 2010-2011:
https://www.roundrockisd.org/index.aspx?page=3666

Ideas from the Choose to Read Ohio toolkit:
http://oh.webjunction.org/ctrobooks2011


Activities for Otis: http://www.lorenlong.com/otis/otis_activities.html
Youtube links:
o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOHUFenpN5Q
Loren Long discusses the book
o http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=8_KP77pjmsc
Penguin story time (six part YouTube series)
Part 1: introduction
Part 2: the ideas behind the story
Part 3: read aloud
Part 4: what did we learn?
Other Ideas:
 From Grand Island, NE public schools:
Verbal/Linguistic: Assign students the character roles of Otis, the little calf, the
farmhands, the yellow tractor, the fire chief, and the fire truck. It is helpful if you have
signs with a picture of each character to give to the students. Ask the students to tell
you what little calf’s problem is. Have the little calf stand in the "mud." Ask who came
first to help the calf? Then, have the farmhands stand next to the calf. Repeat the
activity until you reach Otis. If you repeat the activity once or twice, every student will
get at least one turn.
 From Kate Narita’s Blog http://katenarita.blogspot.com/2010/01/otis.html
o Naturalist Otis and the little calf like to sit under the farm’s apple tree and look
down at the farmstead below. Bring several different varieties of apples to
school for students to sample. After sampling, have students vote which one was
their favorite on the rating card. Click here for pdf or Pages download. Feel free
to change the apples or the ranking criteria on the Pages document. Have your
advanced students create a pictograph representing that class’s results. Assign
the other students in pairs to research about each variety of apples. Point them
to Produce Oasis to find their facts. Have them use PhotoBooth to make a video
of their findings.
o Intrapersonal In the middle of the story, Otis is replaced by a new, shiny, bigger
tractor. The illustration shows Otis sitting behind the barn with weeds growing
up and around him. Pretend you are Otis at this point in the story and make an
inference using the illustrations about how you would be feeling if you were Otis.
Write a letter to the farmer telling him how you are feeling about this change on
his farm.
o Interpersonal Otis, a tractor, and a baby calf make unlikely friends. They sit
under the apple tree, play leap frog with the hay bales, and play down by the
muddy pond. Create a Kidspiration web about one friend you have. In the center,
use PhotoBooth to take a photo of your friend. Under the photo, write a list of
five adjectives describing special qualities about your friend. Then, in the web,
show several different activities you like to do with your friend.
o Body/Kinesthetic This activity builds student confidence, strengthens
community, and helps get rid of the jitters. Better yet you can do it during
transition time. The little calf mirrors Otis’s movements. Ask one of your
students to pretend to be Otis. This student will move a part of his or her body
and all of the other students will mirror his or her movement. Switch leaders
often.
o Visual/Spatial Loren Long highlights his personified character by juxtaposing
primary colors with a monochromatic background. Give students brown, black,
or gray construction paper and white chalk. Ask the children to draw a landscape
with white chalk. Then, they can choose a primary chalk color and personify a
vehicle. Check out the Book Buddies section for more books with personified
vehicles.
o Musical Check out the book John Deere: Crazy About Tractors Songs and sing
them with your class. This url lets you listen to song previews:
http://www.amazon.com/John-Deere-Crazy-About-Tractor/dp/B002LB6EMY
o Logical/Mathematical Gather students on the rug and give each student a
whiteboard or clipboard to record addition problems. Tie a long rope onto a
large object and tell the kids to pretend the object is the calf. Have a small
number of students/farmhands come and hold the rope. Then ask more students
to come and hold the rope. How many students tried to pull the calf out of Mud
Pond? If you’re working on subtraction, start with the larger number or students
and have some of them leave the scene.
o Questions
 Otis is a little red tractor. What is a tractor, and what are tractors used
for? Talk about farm machines and the different kinds of work they do.
 This story takes place on a farm. Talk about farms and what happens on
them. What do people use that comes from farms? How are farms
different now than they were in the past?
 Many kinds of animals live on a typical American farm. List the animals
you might find on a farm. In what ways are those animals useful to
people? Contrast wild and domesticated animals.


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Farmers are people who live and work on farms. What tasks do farmers
do? Do they get paid for their work? How?
 Otis and the little calf were friends and liked to do many things together,
like play leap frog, ring-around-the-rosy and sit quietly under the apple
tree. What kinds of things do you like to do with your friends? What are
your favorite games to play?
 When the little calf is stuck in the mud, many try to get her out: people,
the big yellow tractor and even the fire truck. Who is finally able to get
the calf out of the mud? Does being smaller than others mean you can’t
do the same things? Does being bigger and stronger mean you can do
more?
Chocolate fountain (mud pond) and dip things in it
Compare with Little Engine that Could, Mike Mulligan
Things you would do with your best friend/on your free time
Why old things are better sometimes than new things
Inventions timeline – how things have changed – radio, black and white TV, color TV, flat
panel, etc. or phone
How come Otis can “unwind” at night all by himself and with the calf but when the
farmer parks him behind the barn he can’t see the farm because of the weeds? He can
obviously move so why doesn’t he? And when he comes to save the calf it is obvious
that he is alive so why does the farmer treat him like a machine?
Chant Otis’s sound whenever it is appropriate – putt puff puttedy chuff
What sound does the new yellow tractor make? Brainstorm ideas
Wear your overalls and farm hat when doing this story
How can Otis get her out of the pond?
Eat apples
Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer
Otis
Armadillo Readers’ Choice 2010-2011
© Round Rock Independent School District, Library Services
The Little Engine That Could
Ideas for
Testing the Ice by Sharon Robinson
Links:
 activities from Illinois School Library Association packet (ISLA)
www.islma.org/pdf/monarch/Testing%20the%20Ice.pdf

booktalk/websites from the South Carolina Picture Book Award packet
http://studysc.org/sc-book-award/2011-2012-sc-picture-book-award-nominees

activities/links from the Chickadee Award (Maine)
chickadeeaward.org/2010-2011/Booklet2011.doc

discussion ideas from the Green Gables Bookstore (Ontario)
http://www.greengablesbooks.com/00pdfs/MM%20Testing%20The%20Ice%20Oct%2009.pdf






Illustrator interview on Scholastic: http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3753448
YouTube book trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6K_8z-29nwk
Jackie Robinson at bat craft: http://www.crayola.com/crafts/detail/jackie-robinson-at-bat-craft/
Game footage (primary source): http://sportsvids.com/video.php?videoId=TVRJMU1RPT0=
Jackie Robinson links from: http://blog.richmond.edu/openwidelookinside/archives/2919
From Grand Island, Nebraska public schools http://www.gips.org/district-services/technology/studentprojects/golden-sower-2011-2012/primary-nominees4/testing
o Verbal/Linguistic Write about someone you know who is a hero. What did he/she do that was
so important? What steps did he/she take to overcome adversity? Write two paragraphs on
what it would be like if you were a black athlete during the time period of Jackie Robinson. How
would you feel? What types of things would you have to deal with?
o This book begins by telling you the time, the setting, and the main characters. Create a
Kidspiration word web that tells the time, setting, characters, problem, and resolution. Add
graphics to support the information.
o The title tells us that the story is a BIOGRAPHY. Look on the internet for the definitions of
different kinds of stories: a biography, tall tale, a legend, a folktale, a fairy tale, a fable, and a
myth. Create a table with Pages. For headings, use Type of Story, Definition, Important
Elements, and an Example of each. Conclude by telling what is your favorite type of story and
why.
o Choose a biography from the biography section in your library that you can read. (Find the
template in Kidspiration under social studies/biography to share information about the famous
person.)
o Naturalist Some science experiments you can do with ice:
http://www.exploratorium.edu/ronh/cool_experiments/index.html
Try this additional ice experiment: This experiment is a little complicated to set up. Find a thin
strip of wood about 1½ inches wide, ½ inch thick, and a couple of feet long. Set it up bridging
the backs of two chairs and sink or across a bathtub. Make a loop of thin copper wire about 1 to
1½ feet in diameter by twisting the ends securely. Place the loop over the wood. Get an ice
cube or one of the blocks from the previous activities and put it on top of the wood but under
the loop. Hang something heavy from the loop. You may try tying the loop through the handle
of a plastic jug filled with water. The loop now is applying great pressure to the ice cube.
o
o
o
o
o
Within ten minutes, you should be able to see the loop beginning to pass through the cube.
Eventually, the loop makes it all the way through, but the cube will still be in one piece. The ice
refreezes behind the wire when the pressure is released.
In “Testing the Ice”, the story includes a scene in the wintertime when the Robinson’s lake froze
over. Go on the internet and find information about ice on ponds and lakes. Create a
multimedia project explaining how ice forms on ponds.
http://www.helium.com/items/532525-how-ice-forms-on-a-pond
http://www.blurtit.com/q367169.html
For the sounds of ice cracking on a pond:
http://boingboing.net/2010/01/17/cracking-ice-sheets.html
Intrapersonal: Sharon Robinson, the author of the story, who is Jackie Robinson’s daughter, at
the end of the story says, “Now years have passed, and we understand even more how much
courage it took for my father to step on that ice. In fact, Dad showed the same courage on the
ice that day as he did when he broke the color barrier in baseball.”
A hero is someone who shows courage or noble qualities. Who is someone you consider to be a
hero? Write a journal entry telling why this person is a hero. (You may use Pages or write it in
your own hand.)
Interpersonal: Interview someone who remembers life in the 1950's. Prepare at least four
questions about life then verses now. What things have changed since 1955? What has stayed
the same? Create a Venn diagram to show research results, and write a summary to show what
you have learned about changing times.
Body/Kinesthetic: Create a dramatization in a small group, of the scene on the ice. You will
need characters to be the children and someone to be Jackie, creeping out on the ice a little at
a time with a broom and a shovel.
Visual/Spatial: Research Jackie Robinson. Make a timeline of important events in his life.
Look at the illustrations by Kadir Nelson. Notice how well he shows the character’s emotions.
Divide a paper into four sections and draw a self-portrait showing how you look when you feel
mad, sad, happy, and surprised.
OR
Use the PhotoBooth program to create self-portraits to go beyond the usual mad, sad, happy,
and surprised facial expressions, to EXPECTANT, SERIOUS. PROUD, AMAZEMENT, and
DETERMINED. (Adapted from Scholastic.com activities for “Testing the Ice”.)
Create your own portrait of Jackie Robinson, and include a few things that shaped his life.
What other things were happening in the world in 1955? Use a world map to show at least
three events and write a paragraph describing each.
Musical: Find a song from Jackie Robinson’s time period, and then come up with your own lyrics
regarding his life.
Listen to The Ballad of Davy Crockett at http://kids.niehs.nih.gov/lyrics/davy.htm.
Learn how to write a ballad at http://www.studyguide.org/ballad_writing_how_to.htm.
Write your own ballad to the tune of Davy Crockett about how Jackie Robinson broke the color
barrier in major league baseball. You can look on the internet at the web sites below to find
information about Jackie’s life:
o Jackie Robinson websites for further study or enrichment by Scholastic:
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3751764
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/collection.jsp?id=154
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113378631
http://www.biography.com/articles/Jackie-Robinson-9460813
http://www.jackierobinson.com/about/bio.html
o Logical/Mathematical
Create word problems using baseball as a theme. Try these baseball math games online:
http://www.funbrain.com/math/
http://www.prongo.com/math/
http://www.mathplayground.com/gsmbegin.html
QUESTIONS- Have you ever experienced a time when you were afraid to do something, but you
did it anyway? How did that feel? *Why do you think Jackie Robinson did the things he did,
even though he was scared?
Other books:
Other books by Sharon Robinson- Jackie’s Gift, Safe at Home, Slam Dunk, Promises to Keep: How Jackie
Robinson Changed America, Jackie's Nine: Jackie Robinson's Values to Live By

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Sharon Robinson websiteshttp://www.sharonrobinsonink.com/
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/contributor.jsp?id=2004
Kadir Nelson website http://www.kadirnelson.com/
Other ideas:
 Other books for children about Jackie RobinsonA Picture Book of Jackie Robinson” by David Adler
Jackie Robinson: Strong Inside and Out by Time For Kids Editors, Denise Louis Patrick
 Baseball jerseys
 Pair with a Jackie Robinson biography
 “skate” figure eights and other numbers
 Water cycle tie in – what state is it in during summer, winter?
Lesson Plan for the Virginia Reader book Testing the Ice by Sharon Robinson
Jodi Odlum – SCPS Kindergarten teacher
This is a great story to share during Black History Month and while talking about civil
rights – I plan to tie it in with learning about Martin Luther King, Jr. This is also a great
book to share during the character education month about courage. You can discuss about
how courageous Jackie Robinson had to be to join the all-white baseball team at that time
in history.
Explain to the students that this is a non-fiction book and what the term non-fiction means.
After reading the story, ask students to imagine being alive in the 1950’s and to write about
how they might feel if they were in Jackie Robinson’s shoes. Reread the page when Mr.
Rickey talks with Mr. Robinson about whether or not he’d like to play professional baseball,
discussing the part about why Jackie would most likely face name-calling, threats, and
physical attacks.
Have students write a response to, “Would you say yes or no when asked whether or not
you’d like to play in the all-white professional baseball league in the 1950’s?” Younger
students could write, “I would say ____________ because ____________________________________.”
Ideas for using
We Are in a Book by Mo Willems
Ideas below:

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
Pig and elephant masks to go with readers’ theatre
Lesson plan using voice by SCPS teacher Cynthia Smith
Lesson plan using sentence types—by unknown
Blank speech bubbles
Links:
 Teachers’ guide from Pigeon Presents
http://www.pigeonpresents.com/teachersguides/EandP_eventkit1011.pdf
Other ideas:
 Search for “faces showing emotion” as a Google Image search, print cards with
emotions on them – make a face that conveys that emotion. Identify the emotions in
the book: anger, concentration, hilarity, fear, worry, sadness, surprise

 Create a Readers’ theatre for your students by adapting the two voices into a script
 Have students read the book with a partner with each person taking one of the parts (if
you have multiple copies of the book)
 Pair students up and give them small white boards (or pieces of paper if you don’t have
white boards) One student writes a word on the board and shows it to his or her
partner for them to read aloud. They have to read whatever is written. Take turns.
Have them work together to write a word for another pair.
 Make pipe cleaner glasses like elephant – use four pipe cleaners: 1 for each lens. Use
the tail of the pipe cleaner to make the bridge of the glasses. One pipe cleaner for each
earpiece. Fold it in half and then twist to make the earpiece.
 Eat bananas during/after reading
 If you could make someone say any word at all, what would it be?
 Work with a partner. Write a word and show it to your partner for them to read aloud.
They have to read whatever you write! Use white boards.
 Look at punctuation and tailor your reading appropriately.
 Read joke books to each other.
We Are In A Book!
By
Mo Willems
Grade Level: 2
SOL: Writing 2.7, 2.8, 2.12
Objectives: Students will listen to the book We Are In A Book by Mo
Willems. Students will identify feelings of characters throughout story by
locating declarative, interrogative, exclamatory sentences using punctuation.
Materials: We Are In A Book and other Elephant and Piggie books by Mo
Willems. Elmo to project pages.
Pre-reading activity: Predict what story will be about. Discuss “word
bubbles” to show who is talking.
Learning Activities: After reading We Are In A Book, discuss the use of
punctuation to express feelings: period, question mark, exclamation mark.
Locate several of each mark to demonstrate its use. Reread story with
students listening and looking for questions. When one or two are found,
write them on the whiteboard. Read again looking for statements, and again
looking for exclamatory sentences. As a class, read the written sentences
with expression.
Another activity could be to divide the class into boys and girls, and reread
with boys reading Elephant’s words, and girls reading Piggie’s words with
expression.
Writing Activity: Students could write a simple example of each sentence
and illustrate.
Extensions: Read other Mo Willems’ books; Yo! Yes? and Ring! Yo? By Chris
Raschka
Lesson Plan for We Are in a Book
Written by Mo Willems
Grade: K
By Cynthia Smith
Topic: Voice
Goals: The student will read the story using proper inflection.
Objective:
 The student point out the word bubbles in the story.
 The student will discriminate between the colors of the word bubbles.
 The student will notice the variations of text size in the story.
 The student will read the story in a reader’s theater format using voice and
inflection based on character and text size.
Materials: The book We are in a book, construction paper, glue, scissors and
crayons.
Procedure:
1. Introduction
a. The students will look through the book and a point out anything
unusual that they notice. The teacher will give leading questions that
lead the students to notice the word bubbles and various size of text.
b. The students will brainstorm reasons why the author used various
text size and various word bubble colors. The teacher will give
leading questions to lead the students to the correct answers. (Color
match character colors.) (Text size matches voice inflection)
2. Development
a. The teacher will read the book without using inflection in her voice
and the teacher will read the story again with voice inflection.
3. Practice
a. The students will make Piggie and Elephant masks and will break up
into partners. Two students will “read” the book reader’s theater
style using voice and inflection.
4. Independent Practice
a. The students will create their own Elephant and Piggie picture using
text size and word bubbles.
b. Students may make a complete story in comic book style.
5. Closure
a. The student will share their Elephant and Piggie story using voice and
inflection.
6. Accommodations
a. Students may make a complete story in comic book style.
b. Students may work with a partner and use peer support if needed.
7. Checking for Understanding
a. Students will look at another Elephant and Piggie book and orally tell
the teacher why the author used word bubbles and various text size.
Check out the Mo Willems Website and the Elephant and Piggie Event Kit.
http://www.pigeonpresents.com/teachersguides/EandP_eventkit11.pdf
http://www.mowillems.com/
© www.freeprintables.org
Ideas for
What Pet to Get? by Emma Dodd
Ideas Below:
 Sorting activity—good pets/bad pets
 Animal tracks (from endpapers) match animal tracks to animals
Links:
 Pet crafts from DLTK: http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/pets.html
 Animal tracks: http://www.bear-tracker.com/mammals.html
Other ideas:
 From texaslibrarian.com: Text-to-text connection with Stanley and the Class Pet by
Barney Saltzberg. Jack is asking his mother what pet shoud they get. The book lends
itself to classifying and predicting. Students may predict what Jack’s mother will say
when he suggests one of his outlandish pet ideas such as an elephant, polar bear, t-rex,
and a shark. It’s fun to read these two books together with one book for a class pet and
the other for a home pet and discuss the difference between the two places and how
that makes a difference in what pet is chosen
 List of animals before beginning the book. Then, adjectives that would describe them as
a pet. Too __________
 Writing activity: If I could get any pet I would get a ___________________. I could
______________________ with my pet. I would name it
___________________________________.
 Animal sound effects – elephant, lion, polar bear, t rex, etc.
 There are a lot of cleaning products in the book. Assemble some of them plus animal
cleaning products. Have the students predict which ones would be used to groom
animals. Cleaning things pictured in book: rubber gloves, hand soap, sponge, bucket,
shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, bubble bath, rubber ducky. List other supplies you
would need for a pet
 Clap and chant: what pet to get? What pet to get?
Image sources
• Slide two: free clipart from www.dltk.com
• Slide three: free clipart from
www.arthursclipart.org
• Slide four: free clipart from
www.thekidzpage.com
• Slide five: free clipart from
www.classroomclipart.com
Identifying Animal Tracks
TRACKS
ANIMAL
BEAR
usually leave 5-toed tracks with a human-like or distant heel
mark
RACCOON
Front feet are "hand-like". Back feet are longer. Not all toes
show.
WOLF
Wolf tracks are similar to the tracks of some large breeds of
dogs but are generally larger and more elongated, with
broader toe pads and a larger heel pad.
COYOTE
Similar to wolf tracks but smaller in size.
RED FOX
Red fox tracks show four toes and claws. The foot of the
red fox is covered with hair, so toes can be indistinct.
Red foxes have callous pads on their toes that
sometimes show up in the prints. There is also a
chevron-shaped callous pad on the heel pad of the foot.
Large dog
Dogs, bears and weasels (badgers, skunks, weasels, otters)
tracks usually show claw marks
DEER
Tracks have two toes (hooves), that make an upside-down
heart-shaped track.
OPOSSUM
Tracks show five toes on the front foot and five toes on the
rear, including the opposable thumb. The thumb lacks a claw.
Beaver
Hind tracks are 6-7 inches long, front tracks are 2-3 inches
long. Hind print show five toes, front print show four or five
toes. Hind foot has webbing between toes.
Rabbit
Tracks are often indistinct due to the hair on the bottom of
the feet. Tracks are in groups of four prints, with the cluster
usually measuring six to nine inches long.
Skunk
Tracks show five toes on the front foot and five on the hind
foot. The front tracks usually show claw marks farther ahead
of the toe marks than the rear prints do. This is because the
skunk has longer claws on the front feet to use in digging up
roots and insects.
Pet Accordion Book
Cut out the pets and paste them on the correct place.
Overlap and glue the book patterns to make an accordion book.
Copyright c by KIZCLUB.COM. All rights reserved.
I Love Pets!
tortoise
by
4
hamster
dog
1
5
goldfish
bird
2
6
cat
rabbit
3
7
GLUE
Copyright c by KIZCLUB.COM. All rights reserved.
If I could get any pet….
Name: _______________________________________________
If I could get any pet I would get a(n) _______________________.
I could do this with my pet ________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
I would name my pet ___________________________________.
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