Job growth, demand spur new apartments

Job growth, demand spur new apartments
Coupons start on Page 31.
Find even more online at
Russell Burns | 25
Founder of Austin Namaste promotes
affordability and access to yoga for
young adults and children
NORTHWEST AUSTIN edition
impactdeals.com
Volume 6, Issue 11 | Dec. 20, 2012–Jan. 30, 2013
Job growth, demand
spur new apartments
By Lyndsey Taylor
Vast job growth and high
demand for rental properties
have driven developers to build
1,120 units in the North Austin area during the next 12–16
months with 8,120 units expected
to be built in the overall Austin
area, said Robin Davis, manager
at Austin Investors Interests LLC,
which provides market research
on multifamily apartment properties and trends for the Austin
and San Antonio areas.
“Employment in those [North
Austin] areas is going to justify
those units,” Davis said. “I think
that’s an area where some major
employers are adding positions,
and there is a bit of growth.”
Since September, more than
2,200 new jobs have been
Illness/injury
Broken bone
Chest pain
Spinal cord/back injury
Labor
announced by companies including HID Global, Indeed.com, General Motors, Yodle and SecureNet.
On Dec. 6, the City of Austin
approved a $1.6 million economic
development agreement package
for Visa Inc. that would create 794
jobs in Northwest Austin.
Overall apartment occupancy
in Austin is 95.8 percent. In the
North Austin area, occupancy is
at 95.5 percent, which is the highest since 2000 when occupancy
topped 97 percent, according to
the historical absorption report
for North Austin area ZIP codes
from AII.
Few apartment complexes have
been built in the area to help fill
demand, and in the past year, only
one new complex has opened,
Promesa off RM 2222.
Disclaimer:
This chart
is not an
exhaustive
list of
illnesses
and injuries.
Source:
Urgent Care
Association
of America
Austin ISD
considering
bond election
Board of trustees to
discuss potential bond
package projects
Rendering courtesy WDG Architecture Dallas, PLLC
Complexes under construction in North Austin
By Kelli Fontenot
The Kenzie at The Domain is slated to open its first apartments by next fall.
Filling demand
By next fall, many of the new
apartment complexes will have
the first units available for renters.
At The Domain, three developments are under way on Esperanza
Crossing: Domain III, Domain
IV and The Kenzie. Domain III is
expected to be completed in May
with rent projected to be between
$899–$1,365, leasing agent Oscar
Mendoza said. At the corner of
Domain Drive, Domain IV is
Need for choices, convenience
aid rise of health care facilities
By Amy Denney
Minor fracture
The growth of urgent care facilities in
Austin seemed to appear overnight to Dr.
Casey Cochran, director of occupational
medicine for the three Pro Med Medical
Care Centers in Austin.
Urgent care providers in Northwest Austin have cited a number of reasons for the
sudden growth, such as a lack of options for
urgent care providers, an anticipated swell
in the number of insured residents needing
health care, convenience and area population growth. Many say the growth of urgent
Retail
clinic
Stitches
Sprains/strains
Foreign object in eye/nose
Urgent
care
Rash
Ear or sinus pain
Coughs, sore throat
Vaccinations
Cold, flu symptoms
Emergency
room
Be Fit guide | 20
Stay on track with your New Year’s
fitness resolutions by checking out
these locally owned businesses
slated to be completed by summer
and will have 228 units and about
14,000 square feet of retail space,
said Jonathan Brown, senior associate at JHP Architecture.
Next to the Westin Hotel, The
Kenzie is scheduled to open its
first units by fall and be completed
in summer 2014. CEO Doug
Chesnut of Dallas-based StreetLights Residential said target renters for the property include young
See Apartments | 15
Urgent care expands in NW Austin
Poisoning
X-rays
www.impactnews.com
care is attributed to more than one cause.
“Part of it is the way people’s lifestyles are
now; they’ve been more mobile. They move
around more, so they don’t have a long,
established history with a physician. That’s
part of it,” Cochran said.
Dr. Bernard Swift Jr., who owns San Antonio–based Texas MedClinic, said he decided
to open two facilities in Austin, including
one at MoPac and Parmer Lane, because
he thinks the city does not have a dominant
urgent care player in the market. He attributes urgent care growth to convenience.
“[People] don’t want to have to make an
appointment with their family doctor and
then wait,” he said.
See Urgent care | 16
Zed’s | 19
New Head Chef Jacob Hilbert
encourages taking risks with food
Austin Bazaar | 18
Music store donates instruments to
schools, local organizations
There’s no question that millions of dollars would be needed
to improve local and districtwide
educational programs as well as
facilities in Austin ISD, Superintendent Meria Carstarphen
said at her State of the District
address in November. The question is how to get those funds.
“Our only option to address
serious facility needs is to rely
on bond funding, which in
2008 funded new schools like
Gorzycki [Middle School],
Baldwin [Elementary School]
and our new North Central
elementary school, in rapidly
growing parts of town to address
overcrowding,” she said.
In January, an AISD board of
trustees–approved Citizens Bond
Advisory Committee is expected
to present its preliminary scope of
work for projects to be included in
a potential bond. The cost of facilities changes such as plumbing and
electrical upgrades is estimated
to be $350 million, Carstarphen
said. Board recommendations to
address overcrowding with new
schools, expand academic and
fine arts programs and facilities,
and improve athletic facilities
would bring the cost of a potential
bond to more than $850 million,
she said.
The board of trustees has not
yet approved a bond election,
See Bond | 17
impactnews.com
Austin launches online map,
directory for small businesses
The city’s Small Business Development
Program developed LocallyAustin.org that
allows users to search for local shops
2 | NEWS | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 3
Contents
821 Grand Avenue Parkway, Ste. 411
Pflugerville, TX 78660 • 512-989-6808
www.impactnews.com
Publisher & Chief Executive Officer
John P. Garrett, [email protected]
Publisher - Austin Metro
Claire Love, [email protected]
Northwest Austin
General Manager | Katherine Kennedy
Editor | Amy Denney
Reporter | Lyndsey Taylor
Lead Designer | Jason Suarez
Account Executive | Courtney Moorman
Account Coordinator | Annie-Lee Taylor
Staff Writers | Gene Davis, Kelli Fontenot, Peter
McCrady, Joe Olivieri
Editorial management
Executive Editor | Cathy Kincaid
Managing Editor | Shannon Colletti
Associate Editor | Annie Drabicky
Copy Editor | Andy Comer
Creative Director | Derek Sullivan
Ad Production Manager | Tiffany Knudtson
Administrative management
Chief Operating Officer | Jennifer Garrett
Chief Financial Officer | Darren Lesmeister
Business Director | Misty Pratt
Circulation & Operations Manager | David Ludwick
About us
Most of us have heard
the reasons why we should
shop local: It supports the
local economy, promotes
local jobs, increases the
number of choices we have
to shop and helps “Keep
Austin Weird.”
This holiday season I am even more
excited to shop local because in August, I
became a first-time aunt, and my husband
and I are excited about doting on our niece.
Since we don’t have any children of our
own, baby stores are one retail market that
I have not explored. Fortunately, the City
of Austin has launched an online directory
and map that allows users to look up locally
owned stores by category, such as children’s
boutiques or pizza joints, or by browsing
an area of town on the map. Check out our
Web story about it at www.impactnews.com
or play around with the online resource at
www.locallyaustin.org to find new locally
owned businesses for yourself.
Reader Feedback
Where do you plan to do the majority of your holiday
shopping this year?
Online
53%
Local shops
John and Jennifer Garrett began Community
Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pflugerville, Texas.
The company’s mission is to build communities of
informed citizens and thriving businesses through
the collaboration of a passionate team. Now, with
13 markets in the Austin, Houston and Dallas/
Fort Worth metro areas, the paper is distributed to
more than 850,000 homes and businesses.
Subscriptions
Subscriptions to our other editions are available for
$3 per issue. Visit impactnews.com/subscription.
19%
Big-box retailers
12%
Homemade/regifting
7%
Other
Supporting local businesses and helping
them thrive is one of our key missions at
Community Impact Newspaper. It is why we
choose to highlight locally owned businesses in our profiles and guides, such as
this month’s Be Fit Guide on Pages 20–21.
The guide is aimed at helping our readers
kick-start any fitness-related New Year’s
goals they might have or find a new way
to enjoy working out. Take a cardio dance
class, put on a pair of boxing gloves or
settle into the downward dog yoga pose. I
hope this issue helps you find what you are
looking for this holiday season, and we at
Community Impact Newspaper wish you a
safe and happy holiday season and new year!
3%
Press releases | [email protected]
Advertising | [email protected]
Comments | [email protected]
M•E•D•I•A
I N C O R P O R A T E D
©2012 JGMedia, Inc., All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any
portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.
1%
7 Calendar
9 News Report
Strong sales, lessons learned
after United States Grand Prix
13 Education
Updates from Austin, Pflugerville
and Round Rock ISDs
Amy Denney
Editor
[email protected]
Features
Connect Online
Check out the new and improved
impactnews.com
Easily browse or search news articles from your
community or across the state.
18 Business
Austin Bazaar
Stay informed with daily, online-exclusive community
news and information.
19 Dining
Zed’s
Learn about upcoming events with the community
calendar.
20 Guide
Get fit in the new year with these locally owned businesses
Make your voice heard by commenting on articles or
participating in online polls.
Subscribe to our e-newsletter at
impactnews.com
Holiday markets
Contact us
4 Impacts
11 City and County
5%
Not exchanging gifts
News
Follow us on Twitter @impactnews_nwa
Results from an unscientific Web survey, collected 11/21/12–12/11/12
Special F1 service went smoothly
Find us on Facebook at
impactnews.com/nwa-facebook
“I took the rail down from Howard Station Saturday afternoon.
All went well at that time. However the train was delayed by
over 30 minutes ... While I was in no hurry, MetroRail wasn’t
exactly the smooth sailing they make it out to be.”
—Bill James
Find local coupons online at
impactdeals.com
23 Nonprofit
Restore A Voice
24 Guide
New Year’s Eve events
25 People
Russell Burns promotes yoga through
classes, festivals
26 Regional Report
Abridged stories from our other papers
29 Neighborhood
Milwood—78727
30 Real Estate
Happy Holidays from
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We will be closed from Christmas Eve through New Year’s Day.
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4 | NEWS | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
IMPACTS
183 183A
TOLL
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Lake Creek
Pkwy.
45
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Mall Dr.
9
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Sandy Knight launched Math Boot
Camp, a math tutoring business for
parents, on Oct. 1. Knight offers tutoring
in areas from pre-kindergarten math
concepts to high school calculus that
helps parents better assist their children
with homework. She runs the business
from her Northwest Austin home.
www.mathbootcampaustin.com
18
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Now Open
1 On Oct. 2, Greg Ray opened
GoodFellows, 8863 Anderson Mill Road,
Ste. 101. The store offers gluten-free
prepared meals such as chicken cannelloni,
lasagna, chicken gumbo, Bombay shrimp
soup and seasonal items such as holiday
fruitcake. The facility also makes breads,
desserts, fresh organic pastas and mills
seven types of gluten-free flours in-house.
512-351-9294, www.goodfellowsfoods.com
2 Creekside Psychotherapy offers
services for children, adolescents, adults,
couples and families. The office, located at
8133 Mesa Drive, Ste. 104, opened Nov. 1.
Creekside psychotherapists specialize in
areas such as treating depression, bipolar
and anxiety disorders, substance abuse,
and family conflict. 512-538-0558,
www.creeksideatx.com
3 Dr. Eric Wu opened Capital
Chiropractic and Acupuncture in
October at 13740 Research Blvd. Wu
provides chiropractic and acupuncture
services to patients dealing with ailments
such as lower back pain, headaches and
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11
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.
allergies. Wu also performs needle-less
acupuncture, which uses an electrical
current. 512-436-3798, www.drericwu.com
4 Charlotte, N.C.–based Diamonds
Direct opened Dec. 14 in The Domain
at 11104 Domain Drive next to Dick’s
Sporting Goods. The business cuts out the
middleman from the buying process and
passes on savings to customers on loose
and mounted diamonds. 512-691-9950,
www.diamonds-direct.com
5 Destination XL opened Nov. 20 in The
Shops at Arbor Walk, 10515 N. MoPac,
Bldg. H. The store carries men’s big and
tall clothing for casual, business and
activewear, including full suits. Brands
include Tommy Bahama, Polo, Ralph
Lauren, Dockers and Nautica. The store
has a tailor on-site. 512-418-8557,
www.destinationxl.com
6 On Dec. 7, Elizabeth Stevenson
opened a franchise of Blue Glue Bikinis
at The Domain, 11506 Century Oaks
Terrace, Ste. 108. The store carries
swimsuits, flip-flops, jewelry, handbags,
and hats for women and children. This is
next to the Disney Store. Fuego offers a
variety of jewelry, accessories, novelty
items and apparel. 512-331-0886,
www.shopfuego.com
10 Nik’s Italian Kitchen + Bar opened in
October at 7900 N. RM 620. The restaurant
uses sauces that are made fresh daily and
serves dishes such as eggplant parmesan,
spaghetti and ravioli. 512-487-5999,
av www.niks620.com
14
Blvd.
i
cNe
35
1325
TOLL
nd
Anderson Mill Rd.
21
1
TOLL
45
620 Pecan Park
1
Po
620
.
vd
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16
3
19 15
.
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45
TOLL
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183A
183
the company’s second location in the U.S.
512-833-9113, www.blue-glue.com
7 Brio Tuscan Grille opened Dec. 8 in
the Arboretum, 10000 Research Blvd.,
Ste. C. The national chain serves Italianinspired food, such as pasta dishes,
steaks, salads and flatbreads. Entree
choices include crab and shrimp cakes,
veal marsala and artichoke-crusted beef
medallions. 512-794-1234,
www.brioitalian.com
8 Ken and Susan Swanson opened
electronic cigarette store Ion Vapor at the
end of November. The couple operated the
website www.xt9ecigs.com for two years
before deciding to open a retail store and
rebrand as Ion Vapor. The retail store, 8650
Spicewood Springs Road, Ste. 112, sells
electronic cigarettes and accessories such
as batteries, chargers and the liquid flavors
that goes inside the cigarettes.
512-800-3833, www.ionvapor.com
9 Fuego, a new women’s boutique
based out of the Pacific Northwest,
opened in late September at Lakeline
Mall, 11200 Lakeline Mall Drive, Ste. F11,
Mary’s Sweet Spot Bakery launched in
October. Mary Foss operates the business
out of her Northwest Austin home and
sells cupcakes, cookies, pies, cakes and
speciality breads such as pumpkin and
banana. She rotates flavors seasonally and
is able to take large orders for parties and
events. 512-336-0129,
www.maryssweetspotbakery.com
Coming Soon
11 In the spring, Arhaus is expected to
open in The Domain between Gloria’s and
the Microsoft Store at 3409 Esperanza
Crossing. The store carries furniture for
the living room, dining room, bedroom
and home office as well as rugs, bedding
and home decor items.
www.arhaus.com
12 Philip and Rachelle Forbes plan to
open a franchise of Anytime Fitness
in mid-January at the Market at
Parmer, 12407 N. MoPac, Ste. 350. The
5,000-square-foot fitness facility offers
members 24/7 access to strength training
and cardio equipment as well as tanning
services. 512-202-6174,
www.anytimefitness.com
13 In mid-January, It’s About Yogurt, a
self-serve frozen yogurt shop that has a
toppings bar, is scheduled to open at the
Trails at 620 Shopping Center, 8300 N.
RM 620.
14 FroYoPOP, a locally owned frozen
yogurt shop, is slated to open in the spring
in a new 1,000-square-foot retail operation
at Lakeline Mall, 11200 Lakeline Mall
Drive, Ste. C18, near JCPenney and Macy’s.
15 Michaels, a Texas-based arts and crafts
chain store, is planning to open a new
location next to H-E-B Plus in Lakeline
Market, 14028 N. US 183. Company
officials could not confirm whether the
new 21,440-square-foot location will
replace the company’s store across Toll
impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 5
Compiled by Amy Denney
183A on Lakeline Mall Boulevard. No
opening date has been confirmed.
www.michaels.com
Relocations
17 On Nov. 5, SailPoint relocated from
6034 W. Courtyard Drive to 11305 Four
Points Drive, Bldg. 2, Ste. 100. SailPoint
is an identity and access management
provider that helps large organizations
with security and compliance needs. The
company has hired more than 100 new
employees companywide in the past year
and plans to continue to grow, according
to a company spokesperson.
512-346-2000, www.sailpoint.com
Lyndsey Taylor
16 Aim and Focus Karate relocated in
October to 8516 Anderson Mill Road, Ste.
100. The business has classes for each belt
rank in the Korean martial art of tang soo
do, which focuses on defensive moves.
There is also an after-school program
available. Ben Johnson founded Aim and
Focus in 2000. 512-257-8552,
www.aimandfocus.com
1
Greg Ray, along with his wife, Janine, opened gluten-free store GoodFellows on Oct. 2. The store sells prepared meals, makes its own breads, desserts and organic pastas, and mills seven types of gluten-free flours.
2
Amy Denney
18 McSpadden’s Tire and Automotive
opened its third location in the former
CPR Automotive, 14824 N. I-35, in
November. The auto shop can do full body
repairs on any vehicle make or model.
Services include air conditioning and
heating repairs, alignment, brakes and
timing belt repairs. McSpadden’s has been
in Austin since 1999. 512-989-2878,
www.mcspaddenautomotive.com
Lyndsey Taylor
Expansions
Creekside Psychotherapy opened Nov. 1 at 8133
Mesa Drive, Ste. 104. The business specializes in
areas such as treating depression and family conflict.
6
Elizabeth Stevenson opened a location of Blue Glue
Bikinis in The Domain. The store sells swimsuits and
other related apparel and accessories.
20 Noble Pig Sandwiches, 11815 N. RM
620, Ste. 4, announced in December that
it plans to open a second location farther
south by mid-summer and rebrand as
Noble Sandwich Co. The sandwich shop
is known for making its sandwiches from
scratch as well as its house-cured meats
and pâtés. 512-382-6248,
www.noblepigaustin.com
Under New Ownership
21 Wayne Ray took over ownership of
City Automotive in October, changed the
name to City Wide Automotive and added
transmission repair to its services. The auto
shop does full-body repairs on any vehicle
make or model. Other services include
general repair, brakes and tuneups. 16301
FM 1325. 512-388-3338,
www.autorepairaustintx.net
Classroom | Correspondence | Online
Call a Campus Today!
Austin
512-244-3545
7
Brio Tuscan Grille opened Dec. 8 in the Arboretum
next to Estancia Churrascaria and Blue Baker. The
eatery serves entrees such as grilled salmon and
angel hair pasta.
In the News
22 Volusion was named the No. 10 job
creator in the United States in the software
industry and the No. 8 job creator in Texas
in Inc. Magazine’s inaugural Hire Power
Awards announced Dec. 4. Volusion
provides tools for companies to open an
online store. Volusion created 176 jobs
from 2008–11 and plans to continue hiring
in 2013. The company also relocated from
Capital of Texas Hwy. to 1835-A Kramer
Lane at the end of October.
800-646-3517, www.volusion.com
The Texas Department of Transportation
has added I-35 to its real-time mapping
system, DriveTexas, which shows issues
affecting traffic, such as accidents,
construction, road closures or weather.
Users can also find real-time information
Amy Denney
Amy Denney
19 Bella Nail Salon is expected to open
a second location in early 2013 next
to the new H-E-B Plus at 14028 N. US
183. Construction on the strip center is
planned to begin Jan. 15. The salon’s first
location is on Feathergrass Court in The
Domain next to Dillard’s. 512-719-9996,
www.bellanailsalontx.com
If a career in Real Estate, Loan
Originator, Inspection or Appraisal
interests you, give us a call or go to
ChampionsSchool.com and learn more
about becoming a licensed professional.
21
From left: Manager Mike Myhre and mechanics Jim
Brooks and Richard Cook all worked at City Automotive for many years. In October, it changed ownership and is now called City Wide Automotive.
regarding closures on frontage roads,
ramps and cross streets by visiting
www.drivetexas.org or www.txdot.gov.
On Dec. 1, residents in 19 Central Texas
counties—including all or parts of Hays,
Travis and Williamson counties—began
transitioning to 10-digit dialing when
making phone calls. The Public Utility
Commission of Texas estimates that it will
run out of area code 512 phone numbers
by late 2013 and has approved an area code
737 overlay. Mandatory 10-digit dialing
begins June 1, and 737 phone numbers
will begin to be issued July 1. www.puc.
texas.gov/agency/topic_files/tx512_first_
customer_notice_eng-sp.pdf
San Antonio
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6 | NEWS | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
What a difference
three days make.
At Blue Baker, our artisan baking
process takes three days. It’s a
process that requires small batches,
traditional techniques and simple,
honest ingredients to craft remarkably
flavorful bread. Stop by our artisan
bakery café for pastries. Sandwiches.
Soup. Salads. Stone-oven pizza. And,
of course, our made-from-scratch
breads. Learn more about artisan
baking at bluebaker.com. And while
you’re there, download our daily
specials calendar.
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Delivery and catering for groups large and small: 512.346.BLUE
impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 7
CALENDAR
December
8 Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease
‘The Boar’s Head Pageant,’ a Medieval Christmas
workshop
Senior Helpers of Central Texas hosts
workshops for professionals and families on
topics such as coping with dementia and
Alzheimer’s disease. Dementia specialist
Teepa Snow speaks on how to have positive
interactions with loved ones. 9 a.m.–noon
(Session I on interaction strategy for health
care professionals), 6–8 p.m. (Session II
for families and caregivers). Free. Balcones
Country Club, 8600 Balcones Club Drive. 512388-4357. www.seniorhelpers.com/centraltx
21–24 Keep Christmas Weird
Gateway Church hosts a Christmas concert
featuring live music by Miles Zuniga, Dan
Dyer, George Devore, Lex Land, The Reliques,
Lainey Wright and Jayme Ivison. Attendees
are encouraged to bring nonperishable food
and toiletry items to be donated to a food
pantry. See the website for concert times
at both the Northwest and South Austin
locations and to download free tickets. Free.
Gateway Church, 7104 McNeil Drive.
512-837-2162. www.keepchristmasweird.com
Bethany United Methodist Church hosts a
variety of Christmas Eve activities, including a
service where children recreate scenes from
the Nativity. Contemporary and traditional
worship services are also held. See the
website for a complete schedule of service
times. 3–11 p.m. Free. Bethany United
Methodist Church, 10010 Anderson Mill Road.
512-258-6017. www.bethany-umc.org
Grammy Award–winning pianist Yefim
Bronfman plays an evening of classical music
with the Austin Symphony, conducted by Peter
Bay. Bronfman performs music by Johannes
Brahms and Benjamin Britten. The Austin
Symphony performs Brahms’ “Tragic Overture”
and Britten’s “Sinfonia da Requiem.” 8 p.m.
$23–$54. The Long Center for the Performing
Arts, 701 W. Riverside Drive. 512-476-6064.
www.austinsymphony.org
24 Choral concert
11–13 Austin Home & Garden Show
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church hosts
several events for Christmas Eve, including
a candlelight choral concert and a midnight
Mass featuring chanting of the Christmas Eve
Liturgy. See the website for full schedule. 4
p.m.–midnight. Free. St. Matthew’s Episcopal
Church, 8134 Mesa Drive. 512-345-8314.
www.stmattsaustin.org
26–30 Ghosts of Christmases Past
Austin Ghost Tours hosts 90-minute trolley
tours that take attendees through downtown
Austin and relates the stories of ghostly
events that have happened during the
holidays. Call for reservations, tour times and
pick-up locations. $25. 512-853-9826.
www.austinghosttours.com
Courtesy St. Albert Catholic Church
11–12 Yefim Bronfman concert
24 Christmas Eve candlelight services
St. Albert the Great Catholic Church has put on “The Boar’s Head Pageant” for the past 10 years. The
boar’s head is symbolic of the slaying of the wild boars that once terrorized English villages.
The 15th annual Austin Home & Garden
Show features products and services from
designers, installers, contractors and builders
for pools, spas, landscape, and decks. 2–7
p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Sat.; 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Sun. $8.50 (adults), $6 (seniors and retired
military), free (active military and children 16
years and younger). Palmer Events Center,
900 Barton Springs Road. 210-408-0998.
www.austinhomeandgardenshow.com
Jan. 5
13 3M Half Marathon
Luca said she thinks St. Albert the Great is the only Catholic parish in the state that still
performs the show. The performance has been a tradition for the church for 10 years, she
said. Audience members are encouraged to sing along to the music and to dress in period
costumes. Attendees have the chance to mingle with the cast before and after the show, and
complimentary hot wassail, or spiced apple cider, and cookies are served after the one-hour
performance. 7 p.m. Free (general admission), $10 (reserved seating). St. Albert the Great
Catholic Church, 12041 Bittern Hollow. 512-837-7825. www.boarsheadaustin.com
By Lyndsey Taylor
St. Albert the Great Catholic Church hosts a Medieval Christmas Celebration, featuring an
elaborate musical performance with with an orchestra and 125 cast members dressed in
period costumes to tell the story of the Magi. “The Boar’s Head Pageant” tells the story of the
ultimate good and its triumph over evil through the theatrical performance.
“The goal [of the performance] is community building for families to get to know each other in
a fun environment while working on a group project,” said Francoise Luca, a producer of the
show. “And what a better project than to entertain their fellow parishioners?”
The 3M Half Marathon starts at the corner
of Stonelake Boulevard and Capital of Texas
Hwy. and ends near 18th Street. The route
is mostly downhill with long straightaways
and water stations every other mile along
with power drinks at miles four, eight and 12.
Registration is capped at 7,000 participants.
6:45 a.m. $100. Stonelake Boulevard and
Capital of Texas Hwy. 512-984-7223.
www.3mhalfmarathon.com
29 ‘Snowmen at Work’ storytime
Worth the trip
13 Get Fit! at Ballet Austin
18–21 Austin Shrine Circus
A free day of fitness features classes in areas
such as conditioning, Pilates, Zumba, and
massage and stress. Children’s classes are
also available. See the website for a complete
class schedule. 1:30–5:30 p.m. Free. Ballet
Austin’s Butler Dance Education Center, 501
W. Third Street. 512-476-9051.
www.balletaustin.org/getfit
The 2013 Shrine Circus has a Broadway
theme, including new music and costumes
for the hundreds of circus performers and
animals. The event features Bengal tigers,
trapeze artists, flaming baton juggling,
dancing elephants and motocross riders.
Various times. $8.50–$34.50. Cedar Park
Center, 2100 Avenue of the Stars, Cedar Park.
512-600-5000. www.2013circus.com
January
6 Dodgeball tournament
The Jewish Community Center of Austin hosts
a dodgeball tournament for participants age
18 and older. Participants can register online
with teams of six to 10. 11 a.m. $12 per
person (in advance), $15 (day of event). Dell
Jewish Community Campus, 7300 Hart Lane.
512-635-8000. www.shalomaustin.org
Jan. 16–Feb. 10 ‘The Lion King’
Animals of the African Pridelands are brought
to life by the cast of more than 40 actors in
“The Lion King.” Broadway Across America
presents the national tour directed by Julie
Taymor. The musical score features songs by
Elton John and Tim Rice. See the website for
ticket prices and showtime information. Bass
Concert Hall, 2350 Robert Dedman Drive.
512-477-6060.
www.broadwayacrossamerica.com/austin
19 Wedding show
The Shoal Crossing Event Center hosts its
first wedding show featuring disc jockeys,
photographers, and cake and flower vendors.
Sterling Affairs provides complimentary
appetizers, and a cash bar is available. 1–5
p.m. Free. Shoal Crossing Event Center, 8611
N. MoPac. 512-261-0142
20 Family Fun Day
The Jewish Community Center of Austin
hosts its inaugural Family Fun Day with a
circus theme, featuring interactive games,
arts and crafts, rides and live music.
Proceeds from the Family Fun Day benefit the
Jewish Community Center’s early childhood
program. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. $25 (before Jan.
13), $35 (Jan. 13–20). Dell Jewish Community
Campus, 7300 Hart Lane. 512-735-8014.
www.shalomaustin.org/ffd
Online Calendar
Courtesy Catherine Jackson
Dec. 31–Jan. 2 Blue Man Group
The Blue Man Group is performing three days
at the Long Center. The theatrical group uses
no spoken language and combines music,
comedy and technology in its shows. 2:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. $29–$69. The Long Center for
the Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside Drive.
512-457-5100. www.thelongcenter.org
Courtesy Joan Marcus
Courtesy Darbe Rotach
Children can enjoy a reading of “Snowmen at
Work” followed by crafts. 11 a.m. Free. Barnes
& Noble, 10000 Research Blvd., Ste. 158.
512-418-8985. www.barnesandnoble.com
To submit Northwest Austin events, visit
www.impactnews.com/events/submit.html.
19 Austin Gorilla Run
Monkey-suit up for a 5K run to raise funds
for the endangered mountain gorillas of
Rwanda and Uganda. The Mountain Gorilla
Conservation Fund hosts an after-party. Gorilla
suits are provided, which participants may
keep. 9 a.m. $50–$99.85 (adults), $35–$50
(children ages 12 and younger). First Street
bridge at Riverside Drive. 720-524-0272.
www.austingorillarun.com
For a full list of Northwest Austin events, visit
www.impactnews.com/nwa-calendar.
To have Northwest Austin events included in the print
edition, they must be submitted online by the second
Friday of the month.
Sponsored by
8 | NEWS | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 9
NEWS REPORT
Strong sales, lessons learned after Grand Prix Just in case
you missed
a day...
Austin officials were unsure how long
it would be before the city gets the official tally of how much the United States
Grand Prix added to the local economy.
City spokeswoman Roxanne Evans
said that the official economic analysis
will include hotel and motel taxes, sales
taxes, and alcohol and beverage sales.
Anecdotal evidence from local businesses suggests that the Formula One
race met expectations as a significant
economic boost during the Nov. 16–18
weekend.
Circuit of The Americas reported total
attendance during race weekend was
265,499. 117,429 visitors attended the
main event, the Grand Prix on Nov. 18.
Restaurants
Austin’s Warehouse District hosted
Austin Fan Fest, a street festival showcasing F1 sponsors and local vendors,
during the F1 weekend.
David Tripoli, an operating partner of
Truluck’s Restaurant Group, said representatives from COTA and coordinating
company Music & Events Group met
with the district to hammer out details.
He said he first knew that it would be
a successful weekend a week before the
race when reservations rolled in.
“I can tell you the district was packed,”
he said. “The district was so afraid of the
street closures and deliveries. We experienced record sales days back to back.
For its first year, COTA and the planning
company did a really good job.”
Food truck The Peached Tortilla had
set up shop in the racetrack’s Grand
Plaza that weekend.
Owner Eric Silverstein said he could
not disclose sales figures but said the
truck did well.
“It was a good event for exposure and
for people trying out our food,” he said.
He said that for its first year, there
were parts of the experience that could
have been streamlined.
“At the end of the day, we were happy
to be a part of it,” he said.
The weekend had started out slowly for
More Home Slice Pizza, General Manager Jeff Mettler said.
“It wasn’t quite as much business as a
normal week, but we had all of the seats
full,” he said. “I think we got good results
from social media. We posted the wait
and let locals know that it actually was a
good weekend to come down.”
He added that the restaurant probably
did 90 percent of its normal weekend
business by the end of Nov. 18.
Casino Eighmey, owner of Casino El
Camino on East Sixth Street, said the
weekend had been a disappointment.
He said that he had sent staffers home
throughout the race weekend.
“A lot of my compatriots and I
Annie Drabicky
By Joe Olivieri
Red Bull Racing, Lotus and Ferrari jockey for position at the 2012 United States Grand Prix on Nov. 18 at
Circuit of The Americas. Many businesses reported experiencing boosts in sales during the weekend.
By the numbers
$300 million—Forecast annual impact of Formula One on local and regional economy
More than 3,300—Number of people who used
the MetroAirport shuttle Nov. 15–19
120,000—COTA visitor capacity
23—Percent up from usual MetroAirport service
117,429—Attendance of 2012 United States
Grand Prix
2,300—Helicopter landings and takeoffs
21,725—Passengers who departed from AustinBergstrom International Airport on Nov. 19
18,000—Number of passengers during Austin
City Limits on Oct. 15
9,098—Number of passengers screened through
security from 4–9 a.m. Nov. 19
5,365—Number of passengers screened through
security from 4–8 a.m. Nov. 12
5,500—MetroRail ridership on Friday, Nov. 16
3,300—Typical Friday MetroRail ridership
1,160—Number of cyclists who used the bike
valet services during the race weekend
2,000—Food and beverage employees hired
1,100—Event day staff hired
450—Event volunteers
2.2 million—Pounds of ice needed for race
weekend
12,000—Pounds of french fries served
32,736—Gallons of beer on hand for race
weekend
6,300—MetroRail ridership on Saturday, Nov. 17
5.32—Distance, in miles, if all hot dogs on hand
during race weekend were laid end to end
1,200—Typical Saturday MetroRail ridership
Sources: City of Austin, Capital Metro, COTA
overordered on everything,” he said.
“What happened was that the powers
that be were promoting it so much that it
scared away our regulars.”
Eighmey said fans who spent eight
hours at the track probably came back,
ate dinner and were disinterested in
going downtown in large numbers.
Hotels and transportation
Sean Sorrell, senior managing director
with commercial real estate intermediary
HHF, said that F1 fans stayed in Austinarea hotels for an average of three to four
nights to watch the race.
Leslie Pchola, general manager of the
Austin Hilton, said that all of the hotel’s
800 rooms were full during race weekend. “The difference with the F1 traveler
is that their focus was to be at the track
and at F1-related events,” she said. “Folks
Call Us & Skip
The Waiting Room!
got out, had breakfast and went out to
the track. Later, they went out at night
and came back late.”
Farther south, Buda hotels enjoyed
increased business as well, said Alisha
Workman, Buda director of tourism.
The city’s five hotels were at full capacity, as were two 40-seat shuttles taking
visitors to the track, she said.
“We are closer than people think,” she
said. “We are just 15 minutes away from
the track.”
Edward Kargbo, president of Yellow
Cab Austin, said his cabs logged 15,000
trips, up from 8,000–9,000 during a
regular weekend.
He said he was impressed with the
transportation plan and that travel had
gone smoothly. He said drivers were
making up to 13 to 20 trips a day and
earning $700–$900 per day.
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Our Two Locations
I’ll be here for you
You pass them daily, yet probably never notice the more than
30,000 fire hydrants standing strong in Austin. Austin water
maintains 3,600 plus miles of water distribution system that feeds
Austin’s fire hydrants. Austin water crews are ready 24 hours a
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Learn more about how Austin Water is clearly reliable at
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austintexas.gov/department/water
impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 11
CITY AND COUNTY
Compiled by Peter McCrady and Joe Olivieri
Travis County
Austin
Council increases funding by
$15.5M for water treatment plant
On Nov. 27, the Travis County
Commissioners Court approved a new
policy for offering tax abatements to
companies.
The policy’s stated purpose is to
attract new businesses to stimulate the
economy, enhance the tax base and assist
with workforce development.
For a company to be eligible for a base
incentive, it must plan to invest at least
$25 million in new construction and
create at least 100 full-time, nonseasonal jobs. It must also have a human
resources benefits policy and build in
certain areas of the county.
In addition, the company must pay
Amy Denney
County adopts new rules
for economic incentives
The county contracted with Apple Inc. this year.
employees an hourly wage that equals or
exceeds the county’s minimum wage. If those conditions are met, the county
may grant the company a tax abatement
of up to 45 percent of its property taxes.
A company can earn additional incentives for meeting goals for job creation,
eco-friendly building design and hiring
economically disadvantaged employees.
Williamson County
Commissioners enact burn
ban due to weather patterns
A countywide 30-day burn ban was
enacted Dec. 4 based on neutral weather
patterns and a continued lack of rain in
the region.
Jarred Thomas, Williamson County
Emergency Management specialist, asked
the Williamson County Commissioners
Court to enact the ban, as the area is still
recognized by the U.S. Drought Monitor as
being in a moderate to severe drought.
“I think until we get some more rain that
this is going to be the safest route for us to
take,” Thomas said.
Winter is a concern for Thomas and the
county’s emergency management, as lower
temperatures and lower humidity mean
fires can spread easily.
The Water Treatment Plant 4 project
received about $15.5 million in additional
funding Dec. 6 with Austin City Council’s
unanimous approval.
The initial total cost of the project was
about $508 million, with about $359
million allocated for construction. The
additional funding brings the construction
contract up to $374 million and the total
cost of the project to about $524 million.
Jason Hill, Austin Water Utility spokesman, said the $15.5 million will be built
into the utility’s debt service bonds.
One of the concerns expressed by council regarded the flexibility of $359 million
budgeted for the project. According to
council members, many thought the $359
million was a maximum guaranteed
price rather than just an estimate for the
construction costs.
Mayor Lee Leffingwell said he understood from the outset that $359 million for
construction costs was an estimated figure
and that costs could change.
Most residents who signed up to speak
to the council on the topic chimed in on
the vein of “we told you so.”
“We said there were going to be cost
overruns,” said Roy Waley, vice chairman
of the Sierra Club Austin Regional Group.
Austin, state announce incentive
deals with Visa to create 794 jobs
The City of Austin and the State of Texas
announced Nov. 21 two economic development packages with Visa Inc. that would
create 794 jobs in Northwest Austin with
an average annual salary of $113,351.
Visa would invest $27.2 million in
property in the Research Park III building at 12301 Research Blvd. Visa would
also retain 47 existing jobs. City Council
approved Dec. 6 a performance-based
grant of $1.56 million over 10 years.
Meetings
Austin City Council
Austin City Hall, 301 W. Second St.
512-974-2497, www.austintexas.gov/
department/city-council
Jan. 17 and 31, 10 a.m.
City Council meetings are aired live on
cable Channel 6 and webcast live at
www.austintexas.gov/department/
channel-6.
Travis County
Commissioners Court
700 Lavaca St., www.co.travis.tx.us/
commissioners_court
Meetings are every Tuesday at 9 a.m.
Williamson County
Commissioners Court
710 S. Main St., Georgetown
512-943-1550, www.wilco.org
Meetings are every Tuesday at 9:30 a.m.
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12 | NEWS | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
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impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 13
EDUCATION
Austin ISD
Pflugerville ISD
AISD and Texas Civil Rights
Project disagree on funding
inequity in area districts
are false. The TCRP’s report stated that
AISD supports the private subsidization of higher-income schools with
funds including direct contributions and
grants, sometimes by as much as $1,000
per student more than the funds to support students in lower-income schools.
AISD said it could not verify that and the
TCRP did not make it clear how it got
that number.
AISD’s accounting of activity funds is
in line with standard accounting practices, AISD Chief Financial Officer Nicole
Conley-Abram said.
“I don’t think that they proved that
there is inequity in the district,” ConleyAbram said. “I’m not saying that there are
not inequities in the district; I’m just saying their methodology did not prove that.”
The TCRP made 10 recommendations
for how AISD can improve. AISD is working to determine what funding inequities
exist in the district, Conley-Abram said.
By Kelli Fontenot
Inequity in Austin ISD’s school funding
was the message of a Texas Civil Rights
Project report released in September. The
advocacy group claimed schools in some
parts of town—such as West Austin—are
wealthier and have better education and
resources than those in poorer areas. This
December AISD responded, saying some
of the claims in the report are false and
based on anecdotal or incomplete data.
TCRP filed suit against Clint ISD in El
Paso County in August regarding funding inequity and could consider similar
litigation against AISD, according to TCRP
Director Jim Harrington.
“We are disappointed that AISD administrators answered our report with bureaucratic deflection and defensiveness rather
than responding to our call to engage the
community in an honest dialogue about
how to achieve greater equity in all of our
schools,” he said in a news release.
AISD’s Budget and Finance Department said many claims in TCRP’s report
District seeks solutions
AISD board trustees have considered
implementing a funding system based on
the number of students in a school and
those students’ needs, Conley-Abram
said. Such a program would replace the
current method basing school funding
on staff size. AISD expects to come out
with some early conclusions about what
the data show regarding inequity in early
spring, she said.
AISD to address inequity
According to AISD, two essential questions must
be answered before drawing conclusions about
funding inequities in the district:
• Horizontal equity: Do schools and students
with similar needs receive appropriately equal
funding? This is also known as “equal treatment of equals.” For example, does a student
on the free and reduced-lunch program at one
school receive the same funding as a student
on the same program at another school?
• Vertical equity: Do schools and students with
different needs receive appropriately different
funding? A school with a greater population
of students who cost more to educate should
receive more funding than an “average” school
to compensate for this difference. This is also
known as the “unequal treatment of unequals.”
The district is working to find the answers to
these questions as part of its analysis of its
current funding model, according to AISD Chief
Financial Officer Nicole Conley-Abram.
Source: Austin ISD
Round Rock ISD
Trustees vote to censure Romere
for allegedly violating board policy
Board evaluates committee
that reviews sex ed changes
By Lyndsey Taylor
The Round Rock ISD board of trustees
discussed the structure of the Student
Health Advisory Council at its Dec. 13
meeting, but made no decisions about
the specifications, such as the size, term
limits or who appoints the officers.
The SHAC makes recommendations
to the board regarding student health,
including sex education. Changes that
it proposed to the sex ed curriculum
were dropped from the Nov. 15 meeting
agenda when board members discovered
SHAC members were not appointed by
Lyndsey Taylor
By Lyndsey Taylor
Resident Cheryl Vernon addresses the RRISD
board Nov. 15 regarding the sex ed curriculum.
the board, which is a state requirement.
“I think it was an oversight, but I do
think it deserves a little bit more investigation and [to] find out how did we just
miss it,” Trustee Chad Chadwell said.
The Round Rock ISD board of trustees
voted Nov. 27 to censure trustee Terri
Romere three times for allegedly refusing
to comply with board policy.
The board voted 5-1, with trustee Pauline Law as the lone dissenter on each vote.
Censure is a formal statement of disapproval with no further consequences.
Trustees censured Romere on allegations
of violating sections of board policy related
to ethics and compliance with board operating procedures.
The board previously voted to censure
Romere in April for conduct unbecoming
of a trustee.
Pflugerville ISD redraws middle
school maps for upcoming year
By JP Eichmiller
Pflugerville ISD is faced with the same
dilemma as many growing families: Too
many children and not enough room.
Regardless of whether the district is prepared or not, new children keep pouring
into its schools. During the past decade,
district enrollment expanded by 7,767 students—more than 51 percent, according to
PISD data. The results are predictable: As
more students arrive, the district is forced
to add staff, build new schools, and regularly shift its school boundaries—a process
known as redistricting.
With the pending opening of Cele
Middle School in August, PISD has again
been forced to redistrict its middle school
boundaries. The PISD board of trustees
voted Nov. 15 to redraw the boundaries
prior to the 2013–14 school year—a move
that will shift about 800 students into new
schools.
“All of our middle schools were either
at capacity or over capacity,” PISD spokeswoman Amanda Brim said. “When we
built Cele [Middle School], it was primarily
to relieve that. But that also gave us a little
bit of room to adjust some of the other
campuses as well ... so that they weren’t
over capacity, either.”
Park Crest, Dessau and Kelly Lane
middle schools are all exceeding capacity.
With the opening of Cele Middle School,
those schools, along with Westview Middle
School, which is located at 1805 Scofield
Lane in North Austin, will see enrollment
numbers drop for the 2013–14 school year.
Redistricting, however, is not as simple
as shifting lines on a map to even out
enrollment numbers. For district officials,
it’s a matter of balancing school capacities with population demands and growth
projections.
The new Cele Middle School boundary is
being carved out of areas formerly served
by Kelly Lane and Dessau middle schools.
PISD is also altering the boundaries of
Westview and Park Crest middle schools.
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impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 15
New apartments
Driving demand
In the past 10 years, average
rent prices have increased from
$639–$826 in 2002, depending
on unit size, to $768–$1,082 for
the third quarter of 2012, according to AII’s Market Comparison
Report, which includes data for
the 78726, 78727, 78729, 78750,
78758 and 78759 ZIP codes.
Davis said rent has increased
about 5 percent each year because
the supply of apartment housing
has not been able to meet high
demands. However, once the new
units enter the market in the next
12–16 months, rent is less likely
to continue to rise at the levels it
has been, with the exception of
higher-end apartments that are
entering into the overall Austin
coming to North Austin
45
TOLL
There are several new apartment complexes,
some still in the development stage, in North
Austin. Austin Investor Interests breaks down
the North Austin area into four regions.
nM
ill
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Broadstone at the Arboretum
8
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Domain III
9
Promesa
4
Domain IV
10
Springs at Tech Ridge
5
Domain V
11
Wells Branch Center
6
The Kenzie
Blv We
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Source: Austin
Investor Interests
4 5
6 3
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on
NORTH 7
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Dr.
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Midtown Commons
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7
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Addison on Burnet
rB
1
d.
Esperanza
Crossing
Bu
360
market, she said.
Sandy Eckhardt, president of the
Austin Apartment Association,
said one reason demand is so high
is because many people are preferring apartment living despite
their ability to purchase a home.
For those moving to Austin, apartment living is often the preferred
choice, she said.
Although some may prefer
apartment living, the housing
market in Northwest Austin is
one of the hottest in the city, said
Leonard Guerrero, chairman of
the Austin Board of Realtors. He
said home sales are up 20 percent
for the entire Austin market.
“That is a pretty substantial
10
Tech
Ridge
Blvd.
De
ar B l
Br
L am
2
d.
v d.
Bl
tr ic
Me
Great
Hills Trl.
NORTHWEST
HILLS
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ma
McNeil Dr.
lR
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Jollyville
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number and pretty noteworthy for
any marketplace,” he said.
Job growth
Some developers have attributed the growth of new apartment
construction to the vast number
of jobs flooding into Austin. Construction is under way on Apple’s
Americas Operations Center at
Parmer Lane and Delcour Drive.
The company plans to hire more
than 3,600 new employees.
Across the street from the new
center will be Monterra Luxury
Apartments at 13401 Legendary
Drive. It will have 256 units ranging in rent from $875–$1,400 with
the first units slated to open this
austincc.edu
512-490-6633
y.
.
Map not to scale
summer, Epoch Properties President Kyle Rivas said.
“Our primary rationale for
building it is that there continues
to be a need for rental communities in that area with all of the job
growth that is there today and
what plans to be there with Apple,”
he said.
Eckhardt said Apple’s expansion will bring not only new Apple
employees to the area, but also
people constructing the facility.
“This area is prime for those
particular renters,” she said.
Find related stories at impactnews.com.
Keyword Search
Classes start January 14. Register NOW.
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professionals employed by Apple
Inc., IBM Corp. and Dell Inc.
“Northwest Austin is a strong
technology job market that continues to grow,” Chesnut said.
“This market provides a concentration of young professionals
working for IBM, Dell and Apple.
StreetLights also values the urban
condition of The Domain. The
Domain has great walkable streets
to restaurants and shops that our
residents value.”
A fourth apartment complex,
Domain V, located on Esperanza
Crossing between Domain Drive
and Burnet Road, is now in the
design phase, Brown said.
Near The Domain at Burnet
Road and Esperanza Crossing,
Endeavor Real Estate Group is
planning a multifamily building
that is scheduled to start construction in 2013. Dubbed the Addison
on Burnet in site plans submitted
to the city, the project would have
392 units and is expected to open
in early 2014.
South of US 183 off North
Lamar Boulevard, construction
on Phase II of Midtown Commons is under way and is expected
to be completed by July. The new
construction includes 246 units
with rent projected to be between
$1,000–$1,500. Midtown Commons is located adjacent to the
MetroRail Crestview station.
Mark Fowler, vice president of
development and a principal with
Dallas-based Trammell Crow
Co., said the primary reason for
developing Phase II is because
demand for new apartments has
been strong and consistent since
Phase I opened in 2009. He said
depending on how well Phase II
does, additional complexes could
be built.
“Our leasing has been in the
95th percentile occupancy rate for
the last two-plus years,” he said.
East of I-35 on Parmer Lane
near where General Motors is
planning its IT innovation center,
the Springs at Tech Ridge Apartments is under construction. Jean
Jones, marketing project specialist
for Continental Properties Company Inc., said the first units are
scheduled for completion in June
with the entire complex to be finished by January 2014. The gated
community will feature 342 units
in 12 buildings with rent projected
to be from $675–$1,325.
Two other projects have the
potential to be built. Broadstone
at the Arboretum, 10011 Stonelake
Bvld., is waiting on permit approval
and a project at 14900 N. I-35 near
Wells Branch Parkway is waiting
on funding for two multifamily
projects on the 45.6-acre tract.
One project that might not
come to fruition is a 300-unit
complex that was planned for 8100
Burnet Road where a Ross Dress
for Less now stands. The multifamily development project has
been dropped, likely because of
neighborhood opposition, Davis
said, citing AII’s recent records.
Bur ne
Continued from | 1
La
Apartments
Apartments
16 | NEWS | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
Urgent care
Health care facilities
9
Lake Creek
Blvd.
8
183
3
A nd
ers
ill
1
TOLL
Mc
Neil
Wells B
Dr.
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ra
Retail clinics
on M
Pa
1 2 MinuteClinic
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MedSpring Urgent Care
11
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MoPac
13
360
NextCare Urgent Care
4
vd
6
Br
ak
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.
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10 Pro Med Medical
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Texas MedClinic
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Austin Emergency Center
12 5
First Choice ER
10
183
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on
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Emergency rooms
12
13
14
15
.
35
uR
Concentra
14
Great
Hills Trl.
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Austin Regional Clinic Urgent Care*
er
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Austin Diagnostic Clinic EasyCare*
lR
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Burne
4
5
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8
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11
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Jollyville
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Urgent care
35
is growing in Northwest Austin.
R d.
ssa
7
620
retail clinics, urgent care
and emergency rooms
De
2
The number of options for
45
TOLL
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.
Blvd
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Sp p r in
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Types of care
Urgent care facilities are able to handle
minor emergencies such as minor fractures,
cuts and infections. Most are staffed with
physicians and are open seven days a week
with extended hours. They can handle more
injuries and illnesses than retail walk-in
facilities, which are located inside existing
retail businesses, such as Walgreens, CVS/
pharmacy or Walmart. Retail clinics are
most often staffed with nurse practitioners
or physicians assistants and are able to handle minor illnesses such as flu symptoms,
fevers, rashes and vaccinations.
MedSpring Urgent Care opened its first
facility in August 2011 at RM 620 and
Anderson Mill Road. Since then, five more
have opened in Austin, five opened in Houston and two are planned for Chicago.
“We know we have an increasingly mobile
society where people are moving from city
to city,” MedSpring President and CEO
Heath Schiesser said. “One of the times
when people are most in need of a walk-in
physician is when they are traveling or have
moved to a new city.”
Another alternative to visiting a traditional emergency room attached to a hospital are freestanding ERs. These facilities
describe themselves as emergency rooms
with the ability to handle life-threatening
situations such as chest pain and broken
bones. Two are slated to open in the Northwest Austin area in early 2013. First Choice
ER, which already has a Pflugerville location, is remodeling the former Blockbuster
location at 10407 Jollyville Road.
Austin Emergency Center is planning to
open its first location on Far West Boulevard
by the end of January, and a second one is
planned for South Lamar Boulevard. Managing partner Dr. Tom Vo said the facility
will operate just like standard ERs attached
to hospitals but offer the benefit of little to
no wait time and better accessibility with
parking.
“There is a need in Austin, particularly
because in Austin, you really don’t have a
choice,” he said of freestanding ERs.
Michelle Robertson, president and CEO
of Seton North Group, which includes
Bl
Continued from | 1
Seton Northwest Hospital
St. David’s North Austin Medical Center
*These locations offer after-hours services for urgent care needs.
Seton Northwest Hospital, said the health
care community is concerned that patients
are visiting urgent care centers continually
instead of seeing their family doctor.
“We need to make sure we’re promoting a
continuum of care,” she said. “With episodic
care, there is a chance you will miss something. [Urgent care] should not replace a
person’s medical home.”
Since summer 2011, Seton has offered
patients the option to make an appointment
in the hospital’s ER through www.setoner.
com for situations that are not life-threatening for better convenience.
History of urgent care
Laurel Stoimenoff from the Urgent Care
Association of America said the concept
of urgent care began in the late 1970s and
gained respect as a viable option when a person could not see his or her physician.
Cochran said Pro Med started in Wichita,
Kan., in the 1970s and, as far as he knows, it
was the first urgent care facility to open in
Austin and in Texas. Back then, he said Pro
Med was called a minor emergency center
because the city had few ERs and hospitals.
“As you had more hospitals develop emergency rooms with trained emergency staff,
board-certified emergency room doctors,
the standard of care for that level of service
kind of outgrew these freestanding facilities,” he said.
Stoimenoff said the UCAOA defines the
scope of urgent care as facilities with a lab
and X-ray machine on-site and the ability to
administer medications and IVs.
“Urgent care centers are all focused on
the same thing: providing a broad scope of
high-quality, non-emergency care on a noappointment basis,” she said. “The cost of
care in the urgent care setting is significantly
less than when a patient is seen in the ER.”
Driving the growth
People who have health insurance generally will pay a $25–$50 copay to visit an
urgent care facility, while ER copays are
typically $100–$200, Schiesser said. Even for
patients without health insurance who pay
out of pocket, the cost is far less at urgent
care facilities than ERs, he said. Swift said
this reduced cost for health care is another
reason for growth of urgent care facilities.
“Historically, people without access to
care generally go to the emergency room
for non-emergency situations, which is
inappropriate because of the high cost and
inconvenience,” he said.
Vo said that with the new health care initiatives, Texas will not have enough facilities to handle the influx of people needing
health care. Freestanding ERs will be able to
alleviate overloaded standard ERs, he said.
“More people will be insured, and ERs are
going to be saturated because people don’t
have primary care physicians,” Vo said.
But Cochran said he has doubts about
those theories. He said what is more likely to
happen is that urgent care facilities initially
will see growth while patients still have private health coverage but that the trend will
die down.
“We’ve been here for 30 years,” he said. “As
a business model, I think we’ve weathered
the storms. We’ve seen clinics like this come
and go in town.”
Schiesser said for illnesses or incidents
that are not life-threatening, urgent care is
a more affordable option than ERs. He said
that as deductibles and copays increase,
more people might choose urgent care for
minor emergencies. In the 2012 Employer
Health Benefits annual survey from the
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 34 percent of people with insurance have a deductible greater than $1,000 a year for single
coverage and 14 percent have a deductible
greater than $2,000 in the Southern U.S.
region. The foundation is a nonprofit that
focuses on major U.S. health care issues.
“That trend towards increased deductibles
is only going to continue, even with reform,”
Schiesser said. “I think you’ll see more and
more people who are aware of what things
cost and [are] thoughtful about what’s the
right place to go. That’s one of the reasons
we’re bullish on urgent care.”
Find related stories at impactnews.com. Keyword Search
Urgent care
or
Health care
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impactnews.com • December 2012 | NEWS | 17
Bond
Continued from | 1
but it did approve the timeline for its 2013
bond package, enabling such an election to
take place as soon as May. It has been four
years since the last district bond passed,
and if voters approved a new bond, the
average taxpayer with a $200,000 home
would pay about $69 per year or $5.75 per
month, Carstarphen said.
How a bond package forms
In May, the AISD board of trustees
directed the administration to establish a
committee to develop recommendations
on a scope of work for a proposed new
bond program for the district.
The CBAC is a group of parents, teachers and community leaders. This fall, the
CBAC received campus plans from every
school in the district, according to CBAC
Co-chairman Albert Hawkins. The committee reviewed facility infrastructure
needs to determine what to include in the
scope of a bond proposal.
The CBAC developed a timeline for how
bond
IMPACTplans
- will be developed and shared. In
October, the board approved the timeline
and discussed which might come first—a
bond election or a tax ratification election
(TRE). Carstarphen said the CBAC and
different stakeholder groups agreed that
the bond should come before a potential
TRE. Both could take place in 2013.
The CBAC recommended Feb. 25 as
the date to order a bond election, March
1 as the last day to order a special election
and May 11 to hold a bond election.
A bond election would have a major
effect, according to AISD Chief Operations
Officer Lawrence Fryer.
“That’s going to be districtwide,” Fryer
said. “It will have specific projects and a
recommended scope that will be directly
focused … down to the school level.”
The CBAC is putting the finishing touches
on its scope of work, but some of the superintendent’s annual academic and facilities
recommendations (AAFRs) could end up
as part of a bond package, Fryer said.
Each year, preliminary AAFRs are supplemented by research, discussion and vetting with the community, Fryer said. Some
AAFRs would require funding from a new
revenue stream, donors, grants, a TRE or
a new AISD bond, while others would not
change the district’s budgetary needs.
Estimated budgets and funding sources
for the projects were detailed in fact sheets
and posted on AISD’s website for the community to access, Executive Director of
Facilities Paul Turner said. Not all AAFRs
will be in the bond, but the board did refer
a few of the AAFRs to the CBAC to consider for the potential bond.
The board recommended the CBAC consider these AAFRs:
• Renovations at Rosedale School and
Clifton Career Development School
• Fine arts program facility additions
and renovations
CHOLAR • ARTIST • ATHLETE • SERVANT
RECYCLE YOUR
Christmas Tree
INTO A LOCAL
RESOURCE
2013
Curbside Collections
City of Austin curbside customers can recycle their trees at the
curb! Please remove all decorations from tree. Trees will be
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Zilker Park Drop-Off
All residents can drop off their trees for recycling at Zilker Park
• Parity and equity in career and technical
education, including further consideration of science, technology, engineering
and mathematics (STEM) initiatives
linked to a proposed University of Texas
medical school in Austin
• Improvements to secondary athletic
programs and facilities.
Two public hearings will provide more
information on the bond, Turner said. One
meeting is set for Jan. 22 at the Crockett
High School cafeteria at 6:30 p.m., and the
second is set for Jan. 29 at 6:30 p.m. in the
Reagan High School cafeteria.
The board would need to finalize the
potential bond package in February.
Find related stories at impactnews.com. Keyword Search
AISD
61% Male
68% Hispanic
17% African-American
82% Over-age (by one or more years)
69% Qualified for free or reduced-price meals
90% Between ages 15 and 18
28% Were ninth graders
24% Were 10th graders
30% Were 12th graders
Source: 2010 AISD study conducted by Johns Hopkins University
Responsive Education Solutions program aims to prevent Lanier dropouts
High school dropouts in Austin ISD are the target of Responsive Education Solutions, a program at Lanier
High School that aims to help dropouts and at-risk students graduate. This year, one of AISD’s proposed annual academic and facilities recommendations (AAFRs) was to continue the partnership with ResponsiveEd.
The school on Payton Gin Road first implemented the program in August, according to AISD Chief Operations
Officer Lawrence Fryer. ResponsiveEd, a statewide community of tuition-free, public charter schools, helps
at-risk students complete high school through college preparatory programs. With more than 60 schools,
ResponsiveEd claims to be the state’s largest charter school district.
The program has seen more success so far than the DELTA and Twilight programs, former AISD trustee
Christine Brister said.
“It’s clear that ResponsiveEd at Lanier and Travis [high schools] is serving a population that we’ve not been
able to retain,” she said. “This has really been a good program for us to retain those children, and move
them on through the system and get them prepared for college.”
The recommendation for the 2013–14 school year proposed extending the contract with ResponsiveEd at
Lanier as well as at Travis High School, Fryer said, adding the long-range timeline for recommendations
shows a possible extension of the program to another school in 2015–16.
Source: Austin ISD
A
SCHOLAR • ARTIST • ATHLETE • SERVANT
Athlete
or Artist?
Why not both?
The St. Andrew’s Difference
At St. Andrew’s, we believe daily exposure to the arts is
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013
essential to a 21st century education. Fine arts classes
Jan.
6, extend
2013 to the
begin in the Sunday,
first grade
and
Upper School where
more than
2512,
course
offerings
Saturday,
Jan.
2013
are taught in the amazing new Dell Fine Arts Center.
2013
Our commitmentSunday,
to the artsJan.13,
complements
an already
robust and diverse academic curriculum that helps
Trees
collected
Zilkerasare
turned into much which will be
every student
reach
his or her at
potential
a scholar,
artist, athlete,
and servant.
available
on a first-come, first-served basis to Austin residents
Compared to other schools, St. Andrew’s has a
different approach to athletics — not only is daily P.E.
a must in lower grades, but for older students,
sports aren’t in competition with other activities (yes,
pun intended!). In fact, our athletes are usually active
in many areas of school life, not only in sports.
We strive to arrange the school day so students
can take advantage of the opportunities available
to them in the arts, in academics, in service,
or in any other area without having to choose just one.
St. Andrew’s
Episcopal
School
of alternative
drop-off
Well rounded athletes — another example of the
St. Andrew’s Difference. For many more examples,
visit us online or on campus.
For more information and a list
visit austinrecycles.com
>> Learn more at sasaustin.org/difference
sites call 3-1-1 or
Lower and Middle Schools: 1112 West 31st Street, 78705 • 512.299.9800
Upper School: 5901 Southwest Parkway, 78735 • 512.299.9700
www.sasaustin.org
facebook/sasaustin
Bond
Key AISD high school dropout characteristics
The St.from
Andrew’s
Difference
10 a.m. to
2 p.m. on the following dates:
on to
January
Commitment
the Arts 16.
— another example of the
St. Andrew’s Difference. For many more examples, visit us
online or on campus.
or
St. Andrew’s
Episcopal School
>> Learn more at sasaustin.org/difference
Lower and Middle Schools: 1112 West 31st Street, 78705 • 512.299.9800
Upper School: 5901 Southwest Parkway, 78735 • 512.299.9700
www.sasaustin.org
facebook/sasaustin
18 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
BUSINESS
Austin Bazaar
Music store donates instruments to local programs
Austin Bazaar is Suman
Singh’s first business, but he
has always been interested
in entrepreneurship.
I
sets, guitars, ukuleles and saxophones. It carries more than 180
brands, including its own brand,
Barcelona, which makes a variety
of instruments from guitars and
basses to flutes and saxophones.
Porter said the brand offers a
more affordable way for people to
learn to play an instrument.
Porter said the company has
about 25 employees, about a third
of whom are musicians, which
helps in providing good service.
“We want to find people that
are passionate about the kind
of work that we do,” he said. “It
certainly helps in our industry
to have musicians working with
us because they care about the
product, and they care about the
end result.”
In November, Austin Bazaar
hosted a fundraiser for Barbara
Jordan and River Oaks elementary schools and nonprofits Rock
Raizer, Museum of Culture Arts
Houston and Kids in a New
Groove. Austin Bazaar regularly
donates to these organizations
and others in the local community, web content editor Larissa
Williams said.
She said MOCAH comes
by about every four months to
collect a donation of mostly
scratched or dented instruments
for public works of art and its
instrument repair classes. Austin
Bazaar also donates instruments that are still new but were
returned.
Kids in a New Groove uses its
donations for music classes and to
mentor children in foster care in
Texas, Williams said. Singh said
they try to help out any music
programs or organizations in the
area that need donations.
“What we try to do is help
music programs because schools
are closing down music programs, and budget cuts are
happening,” he said. “So if there
is something we can help with,
especially kids’ music programs,
we try to do that.”
The retail store carries keyboards, guitars,
children’s instruments and drum sets.
Guitar brands for sale include Fender.
Austin Bazaar
2306 Howard Lane, Ste. C
512-200-4877
www.austinbazaar.com
ll
We
1
TOLL
s Br
Ho
anch Pk
w
y.
n 2005, violinist Seetha Singh
had collected so many musical instruments and equipment that the spare bedroom in
her house was filled to the brim,
so her husband, Suman, built a
website to sell them online.
A year later, the Singhs’ business had grown so much that
they moved the merchandise into
a warehouse and called their new
business Austin Bazaar. In July
2011, they opened a retail store on
Howard Lane.
Sales and marketing manager
Todd Porter said the goal for the
retail store was to create a place
where people of all experience levels, from those looking to rekindle
their love of music to the professional musician on tour, can find
what they need.
“Whatever it is, we want to be
there for you,” he said.
Austin Bazaar sells equipment
and instruments, including keyboards, children’s instruments,
electronic and acoustic drum
Photos by Lyndsey Taylor
By Lyndsey Taylor
wa
rd
Ln
.
Thomas
Sinclair
Blvd.
impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 19
DINING
Zed’s
Restaurant’s new chef open to creativity with food
Zed’s
501 Canyon Ridge Drive
512-339-9337
www.zeds.bz
he did add a few dishes that fit with the
menu’s comfort food concept.
“We serve duck, we serve lamb, we serve
filet, beef, things that are usually thought
of as part of the untouchable, upper-end
bistro, fine-dining restaurant, but we sort
of really try to present them in a way that is
accessible and comfortable,” he said.
Many customers order the beef dishes,
such as the short ribs, Hilbert said, but
other dishes that sell well are the chicken
pot pie and chicken-fried ribeye.
“Those are lure items for me; it’s like,
‘Come on, try those, and if that’s good,
then let’s go out a little farther out on the
branch,’” he said. “Chicken-fried steak,
there are only so many things you can do
with it.”
Hilbert said he loves to make the braised
lamb shank and the roasted duck, which
is similar to a French dish known as confit
duck made with the leg of a duck.
“Those are the dishes where I’ve sort of
had the most fun because I think if you
really know food, and you come here and
you have that duck and are presented with
the massive half confit duck with the beans
and the cornbread, it will occur to you that
there’s something learned going on here
that’s playful,” he said.
Being that Austin is a music town,
Zed’s hosts live music on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday nights. Depending on the
weather, Josselson said Zed’s can set up a
stage on the back lawn where people can sit
on blankets.
“Austin is just such a music town, [so] we
felt we wanted to contribute,” she said.
35
Pa
ss
L a m a r B l vd.
W
hen Zed’s opened two years ago in
the Tech Ridge development, the
vision was to create an oasis where
residents could get away from the hustle
and bustle but still be in Austin.
Although the restaurant has undergone
chef and menu changes, General Manager
Laura Josselson said that vision remains
intact. The restaurant has outdoor pools
filled with koi, a waterfall, a back lawn
where customers can sit on blankets to
enjoy live music and a 1-mile walking path.
“People are happy to see changes here,”
Head Chef Jacob Hilbert said. “A lot of the
locals in the area really want this restaurant
to work because there aren’t a lot of nice
restaurants around here, there aren’t a lot
of places where they can go experience an
attractive ambience and cool environment.”
Four months ago, Hilbert moved his
family from North Carolina to take the
role as head chef at Zed’s. He has spent 20
years in the food service industry and has
owned three restaurants, which is a huge
step up from his first food job as a pork
glazer for HoneyBaked Ham, he said.
Hilbert didn’t grow up in a culinary
family but became fascinated by food when
he was 15 years old and traveled with his
mother to France where he experienced his
first emotional connection to food.
“This was really a conscious decision of
mine,” he said of becoming a chef. “I really
love cooking. I’ve always been sort of, I
guess you could say, a creative person by
nature.”
He said he did not change too many
items on the menu when he was hired, but
allen P a
cC
M
Canyon
Ridge Dr.
Yager Ln.
rm
er
Ln
.
Photos by Amy Denney
By Amy Denney
Jacob Hilbert moved to Austin from North Carolina to take the job as the head chef at Zed’s.
Main menu
Although the restaurant serves a great deal
of beef, Head Chef Jacob Hilbert said his
favorite dish is the roasted duck ($27.50).
Here is a selection of other items available.
Braised lamb shank: A Moroccaninspired dish with a lamb shank served with
couscous, turnips, carrots, garlic and olives
($25)
Roasted chicken: Half a chicken
marinated in beer and roasted, served with
whipped potatoes and roasted vegetables
($15.75)
Chicken-fried ribeye: Topped with black
pepper gravy and served with whipped
potatoes and roasted vegetables ($16)
Filet mignon: A 7-ounce filet with a coffee
and chili rub served with whipped potatoes
and asparagus ($34)
The roasted duck is served with cornbread and
baked beans, which are cooked with pork sausage.
Appetizers and desserts
Bang Bang Shrimp: Fried shrimp served
with potato, Spanish tortilla, sesame seeds
and spicy sriracha sauce ($12.50)
Calamari: Thin ribbons of carrots, squash
and zucchini fried with calamari ($12.50)
Baby bellas: Portabella mushroom caps with
sun-dried tomato vinaigrette and caramelized
onions ($10.50)
Lemon meringue tart: Homemade pie
shell with lemon curd, fresh berries and
toasted meringue ($7)
Peanut butter cup and chocolate torte:
Chocolate brownie cake with peanut butter
and chocolate Bavarian creams ($8)
Head Chef Jacob Hilbert said the Bang Bang
Shrimp is a fusion of Asian and Spanish flavors.
SERIOUSLY
TRANSPARENT.
3-TIME GOLD AWARD WINNER FOR
FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY.
Learn more at capmetro.org/aboutus
20 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
be fit guide
Martial Arts
Duval Rd.
d.
tR
r ne
Bu
12001 Burnet Road
512-490-1200
www.yogayoga.com
Boxing
.
pickup programs and summer camps are
also available. Third Coast offers three-, sixand 12-month programs, he said. One such
program is the Black Belt Club, for those who
are committed to achieving a black belt.
Classes are offered for ages four and older.
Third Coast Martial Arts offers year-round
classes for all belt levels and offers belt
testing. Seay said most of the class sizes
are usually between 15–20 students, and
monthly lessons are about $100. After-school
8108 Mesa Drive, Ste. C-101
512-302-5425
www.thirdcoastmartialarts.com
El
Sa
li d
o
Pk
wy
.
sport Brazilian jiu-jitsu, personal training and
self-defense training in Muay Thai and mixed
martial arts. Monthly costs for classes vary
between $59–$69.
11416 N. RM 620, Ste. A
512-547-6739
www.johnsgymatx.com
“Most of the people who come in here are not
huge bodybuilders or powerlifters,” he said.
The gym attracts local neighborhood
residents and women who want to learn how
to use the equipment or free weights. Smith
said he aims to make anyone feel comfortable
in the gym, and he does not hesitate to show
members how to use the equipment and train
with it if they want to tone a certain area or
lose weight.
Monthly membership is $30, and initiation
fees for new members are between
Park B
d
end D
r.
D r.
d.
620
ic Blv
.
en
ill Rd
Metr
on M
rB
ers
da
And
The gym has an outdoor back area where
members can sprint, lift or flip giant tires and
use the rowing machine. Smith said the gym
has equipment for strongman training, such
as the concrete Atlas stones and the farmers
walk, which consists of two steel poles with
handles and weights on either end. The
power room allows members to do squats,
bench press or dead lifts, even if they are not
training for a competition.
Amy Denney
Lyndsey Taylor
Steve Smith opened Big Tex Gym with
the idea of creating a neighborhood gym
that focuses on hardcore training, such as
powerlifting.
“Boxing is empowerment,” he said.
The gym has an official boxing ring, martial
arts mat area and more than 30 kickboxing
bags. Classes include one-hour boxing,
cardio boxing, bootcamps, women’s only,
pro boxing and cardio kickboxing. Ramseier
said the gym’s motto is “family fitness,
self-defense and hard-training.” The gym
offers classes in Zumba, ground-fighting
kA
ve
Ce
Ramseier said other benefits to boxing
besides relieving stress include learning selfcontrol or new skills and feeling a sense of
accomplishment.
His goal for young adults and children is to
help them learn self-discipline, control and
focus, he said. Seay said he tries to help
them achieve something they did not think
they could accomplish and to exceed their
expectations.
ec
Hardcore training
John’s Gym, located on RM 620 at
Anderson Mill Road, has boxing classes for
people of all ages and experience levels,
owner John Ramseier said. He said boxing
involves learning how to punch properly,
with an emphasis on self-control rather than
fighting.
“What’s great about our boxing classes is
that it suits all levels [of experience],” he said.
“The message really is relieving stress, having
fun and just being with a group of like-minded
individuals that are just looking for a place to
have fun via [a] unique workout experience.”
d.
The business has been operating for 15
years and has five locations, Gonzalez said.
On the third Friday of the month donation
classes are offered, and 100 percent of
proceeds go to an organization of Yoga
Yoga’s choosing. Classes are $17 each,
$108 for eight or $229 for 20 classes.
sR
Unlimited monthly passes are $99 while
annual passes are $1,295 with access
to special events, unlimited classes and
discounts on retail items. Passes may be
used at any of the five Yoga Yoga locations.
r i ng
Gracy
Farms Ln.
St
Sp
MoPac
Yoga Yoga also offers teacher training classes
for those who want to become certified.
Workshops are held at all Austin locations
and include in-depth discussions on topics
related to the mind, body and spirit.
Spic
ew
oo
“The whole purpose of doing this is to help
kids and adults learn goal setting and to help
achieve those goals,” he said.
d
Yoga Yoga classes range from the meditative
form of Kundalini to the rejuvenation and
relaxation forms of Ashtanga, Hatha, Hatha
flow and Vinyasa. Pre- and postnatal classes,
as well as children’s yoga, featuring dance,
storytelling and interactive are also offered.
For one-on-one instruction, those interested
can sign up for private classes.
Dr.
He said American taekwondo uses a mix
of traditional taekwondo and American
kickboxing stances. The business has
two locations on Mesa Drive, across the
street from each other. Seay, who has been
teaching martial arts for about 25 years,
said martial arts involves learning the ageold techniques to utilize the senses, mind
and body.
sa
“What we offer is everything from the stressrelieving yoga to the very vigorous yoga for
the athlete, to the meditative yoga for the
spiritual seeker,” he said.
Me
At Third Coast Martial Arts, owner John
Seay said classes focus on American
taekwondo and other mixed martial arts.
Lyndsey Taylor
Yoga Yoga Manager Mark Gonzalez said
yoga offers many benefits, including stress
relief, weight loss and body awareness.
Annie Drabicky
Yoga
2013
$25–$100. Personal training starts at $50 per
session. New members receive a free training
session. Discounts are available for those in
the military or police officers and firefighters.
1921 Cedar Bend Drive, Ste. A-130
512-363-7376
www.bigtexgym.com
impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 21
If your New Year’s resolution is to get fit and healthy, this guide is intended to
show you how to find a workout you love. From boxing and martial arts to dance
and yoga, these locally owned businesses offer different fitness options.
Compiled by Amy Denney and Lyndsey Taylor
Personal training
Children
Christina Muller, owner of Passionately
Fit on Hyridge Drive off the MoPac frontage
road, said personal training can be a great
alternative to going to the gym, and many of
her clients enjoy the privacy and affordability
her business offers.
“Our goal is for this to be a place where they
can get body awareness and social skills,”
said Marla Kincaid, manager of the Parmer
Lane location. “We want this to be fun. This is
not a competitive environment.”
sa
e D r.
MoPac
3509 Hyridge Drive
512-331-1872
www.passionatelyfit.net
Other classes include an introduction to
hip-hop or break dancing, ballet basics
for adults, belly dancing and Sexy Stiletto
Fit, which Randolph said focuses on
empowering women with choreography while
wearing high-heeled shoes. Dance Austin
Studio has classes for children, such as jazz
funk, creative movement and break dancing.
ro
Me l
se
.
Trl
break daily camps are $37 per child per day.
A $10 discount per student is offered for those
who pay on or before the first of the month.
The business is also available for parties on
Saturdays.
6001 W. Parmer Lane, Ste. 430
512-219-9930
www.capgym.com
be
rg
Ln
Burne
Single classes are $15 but, 30-day, threemonth and six-month passes are available.
The five-class pass is $65, and the 10-class
pass is $120.
9012 Research Blvd., Ste. C-5
512-323-9760
www.danceaustinstudio.com
.
The gym has more than 130 classes each
week, and members can take cycling classes
on the outdoor terrace that overlooks the lake
or a yoga class on the paddle boards.
Membership is $64 monthly with three- and
six-month or yearly packages available.
Nonmembers can purchase a $20 day pass
for access to the gym and lake activities such
Seton Center
Pkwy.
Rd.
nd
t R d.
Ru
Pure Austin Fitness offers access to the
0.66-mile trail around the lake, an outdoor
sand volleyball court and an indoor 30-foot
climbing wall, which Boggiano said is one of
the main features in the gym. An introduction
to rock climbing is offered once per week,
and members climb using a safety harness.
ville
Metric
Blvd.
183
183
Jolly
Amy Denney
“Most swim, but what’s gained a lot of
popularity is the stand-up paddle boarding,”
he said.
Amy Denney
Pegged as the indoor gym for outdoor
people, Pure Austin Fitness owner Beto
Boggiano said the location on Braker Lane
near Quarry Lake has attracted a lot of
members who enjoy swimming, kayaking
and training for triathlons. He said the gym
offers one of the safest places for open-water
swimming in the area.
“[Dance] is a creative outlet, and it gets the
focus off the stresses of the day,” she said.
Most classes are 55 minutes long, but
Randolph said she has a couple of 25-minute
lunchtime classes, such as the B.A.M.!
Express (butt, abs and major muscle
groups). The studio also has a class called
Go-Go Cardio Mix that is similar to Zumba. It
incorporates a mix of dance routines to hiphop, pop and R&B music.
r.
Gym
From jazz and ballet to hip-hop and Zumba,
Dance Austin Studio has a variety of dance
and cardio classes for any age and fitness
level, owner Chi Chi Randolph said.
Randolph said dancers can expect to burn
anywhere between 500 and 800 calories in
one of the classes because by nature, dance
is fitness.
il D
Heinemann
Dr.
Tuition ranges from about $70–$126,
depending on frequency and duration. Winter
Dance
Ne
.
Other classes include educational and
athletic programs such as the CAPS Mom’s
Day Out for children ages 3–5. Children
can experience arts and crafts, gymnastics
activities and participate in world discovery,
where they learn about various topics such
as firefighters and polar bears. For pumpkin
week, they explored and learned about the
inside of a pumpkin. Most classes are 45
minutes to one hour in length, Kincaid said.
motivation and accountability. One-on-one
sessions are $35 for 30 minutes or $50 for
50 minutes. For two people, sessions cost
$25 each for 30 minutes and $35 each for 50
minutes. First session is free.
Muller also has clients use the Bosu, which
a half ball with a hard plastic bottom used
for balancing and strength straining. Many of
her clients come in for a three- to six-month
jump-start on their workouts and others stay
for years. She said she communicates with
clients through text messages and email for
Mc
Ln
183
Corpus Christi Dr.
er
Me
R
rm
dg
St
Av eck
e.
“There are so many things you can do with a
stability ball,” she said.
l le
Pa
Hy
vi
The gym has programs for toddlers, starting
with the parent and tot class, up through
teenagers and uses USA Gymnastics
curriculum. Kincaid said the goal for some of
the older students is to help them increase
their strength and balance.
d.
Dr.
Jo
lly
ri
Besides offering one-on-one sessions, Muller
said she can work with groups of two or three
because many of her clients enjoy working
out with a friend or significant other. She
focuses on full-body workouts because the
body has more than 600 muscles, she also
and concentrates on cardiovascular strength
flexibility. Typically a client will use the exercise
bike or do jumping jacks for a minute before
using free weights and stability ball.
Amy Denney
“There are a lot of people who are intimidated
by a gym,” Muller said.
Lyndsey Taylor
At Capital Gymnastics, the motto is “Where
kids go to have fun.” Children can learn many
different facets of gymnastics, including vault,
beam, floor, bars and trampoline.
Stonelake
Blvd.
MoPac
Br
ak
er
Ln
.
as kayaking or stand-up paddle boarding.
During warmer months, the gym has a monthly
splash and dash that is $10 for a swim and run
and is open to the public.
4210 W. Braker Lane
512-342-2200
www.pureaustin.com
22 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
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12/12/12 4:10 PM
impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 23
NONPROFIT
Restore A Voice
by the numbers
Nonprofit provides care for human trafficking victims
The average age a girl enters prostitution
in the U.S.
By Amy Denney
L
arry Megason was on a trip to Haiti
to provide clean water solutions
when he was approached by five
men, four of whom carried machetes, who
were offering a 7-year-old girl for sex for $9.
That trip opened his eyes to the growing
problem of human trafficking, not only
internationally, but also in Central Texas.
Megason, a Cedar Park resident, said
he wished he could have done something
to help the girl, so in 2011, he founded
Restore A Voice in Austin to help human
trafficking victims in Central Texas and
raise awareness to stop it. In the past two
years, he has been building rapport with
local law enforcement in the victims services unit, and with other nonprofits with
similar missions. With all the focus that
the issue has gotten in the media, Megason
said it is the cause du jour.
“We know that we have an open window
in the human trafficking issue right now
that over the next two years or so, everyone is going to be talking about it, but at
the end of that two- or three-year period,
nobody is going to be talking about it, but
it’s still going to be happening,” he said.
Mission to help
Initially, Restore A Voice had a narrow
focus of providing care for females ages
11–18 who have been victims of human
trafficking and sexual exploitation in Central Texas. Restore A Voice is often contacted by other law enforcement agencies
throughout both the state and the nation
to provide help for victims. Megason said
the nonprofit has helped 20–25 girls and
women in some way in the past two years.
“There’s so few care-giving facilities in
the country that they can come from anywhere,” Megason said.
By using volunteers who are licensed to
provide therapy, Megason said Restore A
Voice can offer what he calls a continuum
of care where girls receive care for their
basic needs as well as care that is specific to
their individual experiences.
“Even though we’re going to have some
things that are very similar, we’re going
to tailor to each one of those girls [as to]
what’s best for her need for her to experience freedom and dignity that’s deserving
of any human being, but particularly a
young girl,” he said.
Looking ahead
Megason has big goals for 2013 that
include raising funds to hire a program
developer and a child placement administrator so the nonprofit can place girls
in homes with families who have been
trained to help with therapy. He said the
setup will be similar to the foster care
system.
In November, Restore A Voice was gifted
a home that, when it opens in the spring,
will serve as a transitional living space for
women ages 18–25 while they go through
therapy. Megason said the nonprofit will
begin working with law enforcement agencies in January to develop an intake and
assessment process for victims.
Because charitable giving has been
on the decline in general for nonprofits,
Megason said many organizations look to
other ways they can generate revenue. At
Restore A Voice, another goal for 2013 is
opening a retail resale store in the spring to
help bring in revenue. Megason said it will
be staffed by volunteers, and the community can donate items to the store.
“A volunteer can’t come in and visit
with a girl because they’re not trained
and equipped to do that, but they can give
something, they can work with you and
help in lots of other ways,” he said.
A third goal is increasing the nonprofit’s
continuum of care by opening a day center
where girls can come and go for food, clean
clothes, a shower and counseling. The
center could open by mid-2013.
The number of people indicted as the result of human trafficking
investigations between January 2007 and January 2011 in Texas
The average number of children in commercial sex
trafficking and prostitution each year in the U.S.
How much perpetrators make in the human trafficking industry each year worldwide
The number of children identified as victims
between January 2007 and January 2011 in Texas
The average number of people worldwide trapped in some form of forced labor
Source: Texas Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force, International Labor Organization,
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, U.S. Department of Justice
“One of the reasons we’re doing this is
that we’ve discovered over our research
that a girl will come and go as many as
seven times before she’ll come and stay,”
he said.
To prevent children from becoming
victims, Megason said he plans to launch a
program called “Liars and Posers” at summer camps and in schools to teach middle
and high school students how to know
when they can or cannot trust someone.
“We want to educate our young people
who liars and posers are so they can begin,
when they are in the situation of a new
friendship, [to] carefully evaluate, ‘Is this
going to be a friend of mine or someone I
can’t trust at all?’” Megason said.
By the end of 2013, Megason said he
would like to work with local authorities
to open what is known as a john school.
Using a court-mandated system, he said
offenders arrested for soliciting prostitutes
can, instead of going to jail or paying a
fine, attend the school to learn the true
purpose of a woman, that they are not
property and how to respect women.
Supportive volunteers
While some volunteers help organize
fundraisers, others such as Jeanne Marie
Ellis donate their professional skills and
time. Ellis owns her own strategic planning business, and flew to Washington,
Oregon, Atlanta and Ohio to research
other facilities to learn the best practices.
“It’s been inspiring but not easy,” she
said. “It’s heart-wrenching.”
Megason said he and his volunteers have
all felt the call to dedicate their time to
helping victims find dignity and freedom
from human trafficking.
“This is the last best thing I will do
with my life. Nothing is going to be more
important than what I’m doing right now,”
he said.
Restore A Voice
512-660-2812
www.restoreavoice.org
Hutto
I-35
79
Cedar Park
Round Rock
620
Pflugerville
1
I-35
360
183
Austin
130
290
71
Location
in Kyle
ARC_CommImpact_ARC-Access_11272012_10x2.95.indd 1
11/27/2012 12:46:47 PM
24 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
NYE
New Year’s Eve in Austin
Austin fiddler who plays a mix of classic country and
originals, regularly plays at the Broken Spoke and
Ginny’s Little Longhorn Saloon.
Live music
Willie Nelson at ACL Live
The Red Headed Stranger will be playing familiar
hits at the Moody Theater. Willie Nelson is headlining the ACL Live New Year’s Eve Concert that
features opener Iron and Wine, the evolving folk
music project from Sam Beam. KGSR radio personality Andy Langer is hosting the show, and Father Time
is scheduled to make an appearance, according to
ACL Live.
keep the party going.
8:30 p.m.
Starting at $175
200 Lavaca St. • 512-542-3600
www.whotelaustin.com/nye
9 p.m.
$20
3201 S. Lamar Blvd. • 512-442-6189
www.brokenspokeaustintx.com
Dining
Opa’s
Parties
The city’s family-friendly festival will once again
bring music, art installations and fireworks to Auditorium Shores. The annual free event is alcohol-free.
Opa’s is offering a freshly cooked Greek dinner
with dishes such as leg of lamb, lemon chicken and
baklava. The wine bar and restaurant will have a
champagne toast and a performance by The Deann
Rene Band.
5 p.m.
Free
800 W. Riverside Drive
www.austintexas.gov/department/austins-new-year
8 p.m.
$45
2050 S. Lamar Blvd. • 512-326-8742
www.opacoffeewine.com
Austin’s New Year
7:30 p.m.
Starting at $59.50
310 W. Willie Nelson Blvd. • 512-225-7999
www.acl-live.com
The Family Stone
at the Topfer Theatre
The Family Stone, the soul group with multiple Rock
‘n Roll Hall of Fame members, is making its first
appearance at Zach’s new Topfer Theatre on New
Year’s Eve. The Family Stone will play hits from Sly
& The Family Stone, including “Everyday People,”
“I Want to Take You Higher,” and “Dance to the
Music,” according to a news release from Zach
Theatre.
Siena Ristorante Toscana
Chef Harvey Harris has come up with a New Year’s
Eve four-course set menu for the Italian restaurant.
Beef tartar, crabmeat- and scallop-stuffed pasta,
beef tenderloin and chocolate torte are included.
Courtesy Melissa Cha
7:30 and 10 p.m.
Starting at $35
1510 Toomey Road • 512-476-0541
www.zachtheatre.org
Hyatt Regency
Grupo Fantasma, the Austin-based 10-piece musical collective, is bringing its brand of Latin funk to
the Beauty Ballroom. Opening the show is Foot
Patrol, the proudly weird funk group that performs
love songs about feet.
A party for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transexual
community as well as its allies and friends is happening at the Hyatt Regency Hotel on Lady Bird Lake.
The party will have a performance from The Susan
Arbuckle Band, appetizers, a cash bar, champagne
toast and breakfast buffet at midnight.
9 p.m.
Starting at $25
2015 E. Riverside Drive
thebeautyballroom.ticketfly.com
8 p.m.
Starting at $125
208 Barton Springs Road • 512-477-1234
www.afabaustin.com
Stephen F’s Bar
Courtesy Youri Lenquette
The Mumm Champagne–sponsored party has live
Prohibition-era jazz by The Danielle Reich Band,
champagne, craft punches and a New Year’s toast.
Alvin Crow at the Broken Spoke
For people looking to honky-tonk their way into
the New Year, Alvin Crow is playing a New Year’s
Eve show at the Broken Spoke. Crow, a longtime
9 p.m.
Starting at $65
701 Congress Ave. • 512-457-8800
www.austin.intercontinental.com
Sway
For New Year’s Eve, the Modern Thai restaurant is
serving dinner, an open bar with beer, wine, sake
and champagne, and entertainment and dancing
courtesy of DJ Honeycomb.
8 p.m.
$150
1417 S. First St. • 512-326-1999
www.swayaustin.com
Trio at the Four Seasons
Trio Restaurant has a five-course prix fixe dinner
that includes smoked trout, roasted suckling pig,
prime beef filet and sturgeon. Included in the cost
is admission to the Lobby Lounge New Year’s Eve
Party.
5 p.m.
$95 per person
98 San Jacinto Blvd. • 512-685-8300
www.triorestaurantaustin.com/news
W Hotel
Why have just one New Year’s Eve countdown
when you can have three? The party that is taking
over the second floor of W Hotel Austin and outdoor
terrace will celebrate multiple countdowns in
partnership with W Austin’s coast-to-coast partner
hotels. An open bar, food and a performance by
Austin-based rock group Quiet Company will help
Courtesy Trio
Grupo Fantasma
at Beauty Ballroom
5 p.m.
$75 per person
6203 N. Capital of Texas Hwy. • 512-349-7667
www.sienaaustin.com
impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 25
NEW RECYCLING
REQUIREMENTS
ARE NOW IN EFFECT!
Lyndsey Taylor
Affected properties:
75
units+
Russell Burns founded several businesses and events geared toward introducing Austinites to yoga.
100,000
sq. ft.+
PEOPLE
Russell Burns
Instructor promotes health
awareness through yoga
By Lyndsey Taylor
Russell Burns was driving northwest on
US 183 one morning in 1995 when a car
hit the front tire of his Toyota truck, rolling the vehicle seven times before coming
to a stop.
Burns survived the crash and said the
accident made him want to search for
meaning in life and to help others. In
doing so, he discovered yoga.
“That wreck changed my life,” he said.
“It made me realize that, through no doing
of your own, driving to work, obeying the
laws, doing the same thing I do every day
for years, somebody else changing a lane
could take your life away, just like that.”
In 2011, Burns founded Austin Namaste
LLC, and he has collaborated with others
to develop several events, including the
Austin Yoga Festival, Free Day of Yoga and
Austin Yoga Conference. He also teaches
10 yoga classes a week in various forms of
yoga, such as Hatha, Vinyasa, Ashtanga,
gentle and restorative.
“Yoga is a great place to be right now,” he
said. “I’ve never been happier or paid less.”
Burns founded the Austin Yoga Festival in 2011 with a goal of making yoga
accessible and affordable to people and to
expose them to the benefits of practicing it.
The festival raises money and collects food
donations for the Capital Area Food Bank
of Texas and Community Yoga Austin.
In 2013, Burns said he plans to launch
the Austin Yoga Conference Bazaar and
Rave at the Palmer Events Center in the
spring. It is planned to be a drug- and
alcohol-free event that features music,
vendors, yoga and dance to promote health
and fitness awareness.
“Yoga is my life. I get up, I talk about
yoga, I teach yoga, I arrange yoga events or
I do yoga. That’s my day, every day,” Burns
said. “I think that everybody should have
the opportunity to see what it’s about.”
Before becoming a yogi, Burns worked
in the boating business for many years,
putting boats together from scratch, and as
a salesman, service manager, and finance
manager. He is also a musician, artist,
photographer and entrepreneur.
Burns, 49, did not start practicing yoga
until he was 38. He said that if he had
been exposed to yoga at a younger age, he
probably would have found self-esteem,
happiness and self-fulfillment earlier in
life. Although the Austin Yoga Festival is
the only outlet Burns has to expose young
adults and children
Yoga is a great
to yoga, he said he
would like to develop place to be right
regular programs for
now. I’ve never
them through Austin
been happier or
Namaste or a partpaid less.
nership with another
organization.
—Russell Burns,
“I want to see kids
yoga promoter
not only be healthy
physically but also mentally,” he said.
Burns said that anyone can do yoga,
and creating more programs that are
affordable and accessible to people will
clear up misconceptions about yoga, such
as people thinking they are not flexible or
fit enough.
“Through yoga, what many people discover is that they are just being themselves
and being comfortable with who they are,”
he said. “It’s all they need to be happy.”
Burns’ partner of nine years, Joan Bertino, said she has never met anyone with so
many talents and ideas as Burns.
“I think he is a humanitarian,” Bertino
said. “I think he sees how important it
is to relate to people and to put people
first. He puts a lot of heart and soul into
everything he’s doing. When he started
embracing yoga, it made sense. It’s the
thing that makes him feel sane. Russell
inspires me to be a better person. I hope I
do the same for him.”
Multifamily residential properties
with 75 units or more
Commercial office buildings
100,000 square feet or larger
Top News
OFFICE PAPER
PLASTICS #1 & #2
GLASS
“
CARDBOARD
ALUMINUM
”
Learn the requirements.
Ask questions. Find resources.
Get started today at
austintexas.gov/commercialrecycling
26 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
REGIONAL­—Abridged stories from our other editions
Top stories
Lake Travis From 2000
to 2010, the Western Travis
County area has seen some
of the highest percentage of
growth in population in Austin.
The City of Austin itself saw the
third-biggest rise nationally in
population percentage during
the same span and the highest
percentage growth nationally
from 2010 to 2011, according to
U.S. Census Bureau data.
The under-18 population
of Western Travis County
residents rose as well, reaching
13,354, according to 2010 census
data. The rise in youth population coupled with a focus on a
healthy lifestyle has spurred a
rise in youth sports complexes.
“I think [population growth]
is something we can lose sight
Large retailers add stability to Austin area shopping centers
to interested businesses because
of anchor tenants’ importance
to Sunset Valley.
When an anchor tenant
leaves, spaces can also be
divided and leased to smaller
tenants, and existing tenants
can relocate. When Whole
Foods Market came into The
Shops at Arbor Trails, Haverty’s
moved out of the endcap space
to give the specialty foods
retailer that location. The decision made good business sense,
Joseph Christopher said.
“Everybody in a buyers’ market
wants a grocery anchor tenant.
That’s very desirable. It’s somebody that’s going to put more eyes
on your business multiple times
per week,” he said.
As Palmer puts it, “As a
business owner, the one true
constant you can always count
on is going to be change.”
the Waller Creek Conservancy,
which was formed in 2010 by
local business and philanthropic
leaders to oversee the design and
construction of the surface of
Waller Creek. “In other cities, these signature parks really
attract people throughout the
community, and that’s what we
intend to do.”
McDonald said flooding is
a key issue for Waller Creek
because it collects runoff from
I-35 and from an area that
extends from Highland Mall to
Lady Bird Lake.
“The tunnel is integral to this
project,” she said. “Without the
tunnel, we wouldn’t be in this
place because anything we did
to the surface would be kind of
washed out with the next big
flood.”
The city began construction on
the tunnel about 18 months ago,
and it is about 60 percent complete. It will be 5,600 feet long,
extending from Waterloo Park to
Lady Bird Lake near the Waller
Creek Boathouse.
The shafts in the tunnel will be
able to accommodate a combined
maximum of about 9,750 cubic
feet per second of water during
a flood event. According to the
December 2008 Waller Creek
Watershed Restudy, peak flow
rate during a 100-year flood is
8,247 cubic feet per second.
vis County
ra
2010
Total:
245,037
vis County
ra
2000
Total:
222,684
vis County
ra
1990
Total:
161,903
The under-18 population in Travis County has risen constantly over the past
few decades, but it has been moving westward, resulting in a rise of youth
sports complexes in Western Travis County.
Full story by Kelli Fontenot
Full story by Peter McCrady
2020*
*projected
Source: U.S. Census
Courtesy Jeff Wilson
Central Austin Progress
continues on the Waller Creek
project, with construction on
the Waller Creek tunnel more
than halfway complete and a
final design chosen for surface
development.
Officials said they hope the
project, which affects 28 acres of
downtown land, or 11 percent of
downtown, will unite the entire
community.
“I think there’s this idea that
this is for downtown. This is
for everybody,” said Stephanie
McDonald, executive director of
vis County
ra
Total:
284,060
News
Waller Creek tunnel
work moves forward
Full story by Kyle Webb
Youth numbers increasing every decade
T
leasing director, but not every
anchor space in Southwest Austin is filled.
Nestled within an enormous
parking lot at the intersection of West William Cannon
Drive and West Gate Boulevard
is Community Renaissance
Market, which closed last year.
Community Renaissance Market served as an incubator for
small businesses, said Christopher M. Gibbons, director
of project leasing for Venture
Commercial Real Estate, which
is looking for a new tenant for
the building.
The former Sprouts Farmers Market on Brodie Lane in
Sunset Valley closed nearly a
year ago, and that building also
remains vacant, City Administrator Clay Collins said. The city
can’t simply select a new tenant,
he said, but its staff can—and
must—be as helpful as possible
T
Southwest Austin Commercial real estate is active in
Southwest Austin, according
to local agents. Major shopping center The Shops at Arbor
Trails recently achieved 100
percent occupancy, said Garrett
Christopher, property manager
for Christopher Commercial
Inc., which manages leasing
for The Shops at Arbor Trails
and Escarpment Village. In
October, Randy Palmer’s South
Austin Gym and Events Center
opened in the vacant Cherry
Creek Plaza space last occupied
by Goodwill, bringing new
customers to the strip mall, gym
owner Randy Palmer said.
When a large business opens,
it revitalizes the area, Palmer
said. He is now offering classes
and plans to host sports events.
Anchor tenants are vital,
according to Joseph Christopher, Christopher Commercial
of because we see it, we experience it on a daily basis, but it is
still pretty remarkable,” Austin
Demographer Ryan Robinson
said. “I think we have only
seen the beginning of growth
and development in the Austin
area.”
One reason that the youth
population in Western Travis
County may be on the rise is the
number of families with children is decreasing in the Austin
urban core.
Robinson said that families
are moving from those centralized neighborhoods to a
more suburban setting and are
replaced by individuals. This is a
pattern that will continue going
forward, he said.
T
Source: Neal Kieschnik, UCR
Population trends lead to more youth
sports complexes in Travis County
An anchor tenant
is typically the
business that
occupies the
largest amount
of space in a
shopping area.
It usually brings
in a great deal of
foot traffic and
often serves basic
needs. Depending
on the size of a
shopping center,
an anchor’s size
might range from
15,000 to more
than 100,000
square feet.
T
What makes a retail anchor tenant?
impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 27
Business
Impacts
A to Z Dog
Ranch
Spicewood Up a
gravel driveway and
past several locked
gates, roughly 20 dogs
run and sniff the air,
wag their tails and
enjoy the wide open
spaces.
A business dedicated to the
boarding and grooming of dogs,
A to Z Dog Ranch is on the outskirts of Spicewood Springs on 5
acres of land.
In September 2009, owner
Wendee Phoenix moved to Spicewood Springs with her husband,
David Wilson. Phoenix said the
idea to open a dog ranch started
when she began looking after the
pets of family and friends, then
progressed as she spent more and
more time around dogs.
“I worked at a similar place
in Spicewood Springs,” Phoenix
said, referring to The Spicewood
K9 Club, a dog-boarding business owned by Julia Weiss.
The dog park days—days
where dog owners come and
Full story by Gene Davis
t.
.
rS
vd
lli e
He
La
m
K in
ar
ne
Bl
yA
ve .
Co
the
rS
t.
The Natural Epicurean Academy
of Culinary Arts
1700 S. Lamar Blvd.
512-476-2276
www.naturalepicurean.com
Dining
hang out with their dogs at the
ranch—are mutually beneficial. Phoenix said it allows her
a chance to see how the owner
interacts with his or her dog,
and the owner gets a chance to
know her and what the dog’s day
entails.
Full story by Courtney Griffin
K a th
y Ln
.
71
ds B
lvd.
A to Z Dog Ranch
21115 Kathy Lane
Spicewood
512-264-2224
www.atozdogranch.com
Williamson
County Regional
Animal Shelter
Georgetown In the
2011–12 fiscal year,
more than 4,000 cats
and dogs were adopted
from the Williamson
County Regional Animal Shelter, said Cheryl Schneider, Williamson County Animal
Services director.
That’s compared to a total
intake of 7,733 animals, including cats, dogs and rabbits;
livestock such as chickens and
goats; wildlife such as bats, deer
and birds; domestic pets such as
hamsters and guinea pigs; and
even a kangaroo.
The shelter was founded in
March 2007 as a central facility
for animal intake and adoption
in the county. Schneider, who
joined WCRAS in October 2007,
said the shelter has been “bursting at the seams” with homeless
animals since its opening.
“We were over capacity on
day one. We did not have the
space in this shelter for the
number of animals that come
Korri Kezar
JP Eichmiller
Despite its dilapidated appearance, Mendenhall believed she
had found an ideal location.
“It felt like a gamble while we
were doing construction,” she
said. “We had comments from
guys doing the construction that
it would never work in Round
Rock. So that scared me a bit, but
I had the faith.”
Full story by JP Eichmiller
.
pas
s St
Main
as S
Rock A
ve .
L am
M ay
Round
t.
Main
St.
Krave Wine Bar & Bistro
121 E. Main St.
512-382-5446
www.kravewinebar.com
Mon.–Sat. 11 a.m.–close
St.
in,” Schneider said. “To this
day, [we have] several hundred
more animals coming in than
the year previous.”
To cope with space shortages,
WCRAS works with other rescue groups such as Honorina’s
Cat Rescue, Austin Pets Alive
and the Austin and Williamson County Humane Societies,
which take in dogs and cats and
allow people to adopt them from
those programs.
Full story by Korri Kezar
Williamson County
Regional Animal
Shelter
1855 S.E. Inner Loop
Mon.–Fri. noon–6 p.m.,
Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
512-943-3322
http://pets.wilco.org
rsity
Unive
Ave.
SE Inner Loop
Round Rock When
Susan Mendenhall
discovered Round
Rock, she saw a city
ripe with opportunity.
While others rejected
the idea that the city
was fertile ground for an upscale
wine bar and bistro, Mendenhall believed there existed an
untapped market of customers
eager to patronize an alternative
to chain restaurants and bars.
“My sister and I decided we
were going to make a life change
and do something for ourselves,”
she said. “We did some research
on the area and saw it growing.”
Mendenhall and her sister
Kim Hiler, who both grew up in
Alaska, decided to take a chance
that a wine bar could work in
Round Rock and began the process of creating Krave Wine Bar
& Bistro.
“I was just driving around and
saw this building for lease,” Mendenhall said. “It was boarded up
and had dirt floors—it was the
ugliest building on the block.”
Austin Longhorn Kitchen
opened at 1009 W. Slaughter
Lane in late August. Manager Martin Hernandez said
the food trailer sells brisket,
chicken and beef fajitas, burgers, tacos, Mexican candy and
snow cones, and also caters
events. 512-905-0587
Coming Soon
Nonprofit
Krave Wine
Bar & Bistro
Pflugerville PBK Stem &
Stein opened Oct. 8 at 111 E.
Main St. The restaurant features Southern-style comfort
food and offers customers
more than 20 beers on tap and
more than 50 choices of wine.
512-251-3810,
www.pbkstemandstein.com
Rollingwood Nothing
Bundt Cakes opened Nov. 30
in the Mira Vista Shopping
Center. The store, located at
2785 Bee Caves Road, Ste. 333,
specializes in gourmet and
seasonally decorated bundt
cakes. 512-329-8333,
www.nothingbundtcakes.com
Lake Travis
Bee Creek Rd.
hl a
n
Natural Epicurean has an
internship program that has
placed students at restaurants
such as Uchi, located at 801 S.
Lamar Blvd. Despite not teaching how to cook meat, Goldstein said the school provides
students with the knowledge
needed to prepare almost any
dish.
Hi g
Gene Davis
Central Austin In
a town where TexMex and barbecue
seem to be the most
popular foods, Rich Goldstein, owner of The Natural
Epicurean Academy of Culinary Arts, said his vegan and
vegetarian cooking school has
carved out a unique and growing niche.
Natural Epicurean teaches
professional and public classes
focused on natural, vegetarian ingredients. Goldstein said
although vegetarian and vegan
cooking is a smaller niche, it is
growing.
Goldstein, a co-owner of
the Yoga Yoga studios, bought
Natural Epicurean three years
ago. A lifelong proponent of
health and well-being, he said
he saw the cooking school as
another way to improve peoples’ lives through wellness.
Now Open
Courtney Griffin
The Natural
Epicurean
Academy of
Culinary Arts
Austin A second location
of Houndstooth Coffee is
expected to open in early 2013
in the Frost Bank Tower, 401
N. Congress Ave. The first
location, 4200 N. Lamar Blvd.,
opened in May 2010, and the
new location will serve coffee
beans roasted in small batches
along with beer and wine.
Weekends will feature food
pairings prepared by a downtown restaurant.
www.houndstoothcoffee.com
Austin Tropical fish store
Fish Gallery is scheduled to
open an Austin location at
6500 N. Lamar Blvd. in early
2013. The store offers both
fresh- and saltwater fish;
supplies including plants,
gravel, food, and stock and
custom tanks; and provides an
aquarium cleaning service.
800-303-9615,
www.thefishgallery.com
Austin A Goodwill Job Help
Center is expected to open
in the spring at 9111 S. First
St., adjacent to the Goodwill
store. The center will provide
assistance in finding jobs.
512-280-2204,
www.austingoodwill.org
28 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
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impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 29
REAL ESTATE
Data compiled by
Patti Simon
Coldwell Banker United
512-913-4124
[email protected]
Featured neighborhood
Milwood, 78727
Overview
Mc
Nei
Featured homes
.
l Dr
Pa
rm
er
Ln
.
Jo
Dr
.
183
Rd
.
lR
he
le
va
d.
Am
vil
r st
ll y
Du
Build-out years: 1978–85
Builders: Milburn
Low/high square footage: 751–2,846
Low/high home values: $49,950–$282,000
HOA dues (estimated): $0–$30 monthly
Amenities: Community pool, sports court
Nearby attractions: Arboretum, The Domain,
Arbor Walk, Balcones District Park
MoPac
On the market (As of Dec. 11, 2012)
No. of homes for sale
Property taxes:
Austin Community College
Austin ISD
Central Health
City of Austin
Round Rock ISD
Travis County
0.095100
1.242000
0.078946
0.050290
1.380000
0.050010
6315 Avery Island Ave.$179,950
3 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath
1,689 sq. ft.
Agent: John Faulk, Coldwell Banker United
Realty 512-689-4242
4616 Sidereal Drive
$219,500
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
1,700 sq. ft.
Agent: Chesney Coker, Tower Realty Austin
512-289-4261
5706 Shreveport Drive$149,900
3 Bedrooms / 2 Bath
1,277 sq. ft.
Agent: Phillip Baird, Keller Willams Realty
512-289-5738
3713 Aspendale Cove
$219,900
3 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath
1,695 sq. ft.
Agent: John Porter, Coldwell Banker United
Realtor, 512-563-8176
4
No. of homes under contract
9
Avg. days on the market
31
Home sales (Dec. 2011–Dec. 2012)
No. of homes sold in last year
Square footage Low/High
83
768–2,846
Selling price Low/High
$89,900/$259,900
Austin ISD Schools
• Summitt Elementary School
• Murchison Middle School
• Anderson High School
Round Rock ISD Schools
• Jollyville Elementary School
• Canyon Vista Middle School
• Westwood High School
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30 | FEATURES | Community Impact Newspaper • Northwest Austin Edition
REAL ESTATE
Market Data Northwest Austin
On the market (November 2012)
Market Data provided by
Austin Board of Realtors
512-454-7636
www.abor.com
Monthly home sales
Number of homes for sale/Average days on the market
Price Range
Less than $149,999
Number of homes sold/Average price
78727
78729
78750
78758
78759
5 / 93 days
3 / 324 days
7 / 87 days
26 / 74 days
8 / 62 days
Month
78727
78729
78750
78758
78759
November 2012
14 / $192,657
19 / $192,924
21 / $272,386
18 / $144,450
35 / $297,514
$150,000–$199,999
7 / 88 days
34 / 62 days
12 / 62 days
12 / 81 days
3 / 13 days
November 2011
13 / $159,350
16 / $190,555
23 / $326,183
26 / $90,644
21 / $322,527
$200,000–$299,999
12 / 72 days
21 / 124 days
18 / 67 days
3 / 59 days
11 / 57 days
October 2012
25 / $198,512
36 / $177,665
32 / $312,342
26 / $145,814
36 / $335,672
$300,000–$399,999
3 / 26 days
3 / 132 days
11 / 71 days
2 / 228 days
15 / 64 days
September 2012
32 / $207,275
25 / $188,883
26 / $276,620
17 / $136,556
27 / $313,338
$400,000–$499,999
2 / 100 days
-
10 / 72 days
-
10 / 111 days
August 2012
34 / $193,993
27 / $194,996
25 / $302,828
19 / $142,712
43 / $305,756
35 / $194,560
33 / $196,764
33 / $305,948
27 / $109,016
46 / $326,717
$500,000–$599,999
1 / 2 days
-
4 / 51 days
-
9 / 142 days
July 2012
$600,000–$799,999
-
-
3 / 146 days
-
2 / 142 days
June 2012
28 / $211,582
24 / $193,060
52 / $300,424
25 / $137,656
64 / $338,495
$800,000–$999,999
-
-
-
-
1 / 59 days
May 2012
26 / $202,585
28 / $187,201
61 / $342,389
33 / $127,539
46 / $300,900
$1 million +
-
-
-
-
April 2012
27 / $204,038
19 / $185,124
32 / $296,842
26 / $137,019
41 / $294,708
-
Property Listings
ZIP code guide
ZIP code Subdivision
Address
Bed/Bath
Price
Sq. ft.
Agent
Phone
Agency
78726
Canyon Creek
11117 Calavar Drive
5br/2ba
$319,000
2,455
Doreen Dillard
512-346-1799
Coldwell Banker United Realtor
78726
Canyon Creek
11157 Rio Vista Drive
4br/2ba
$305,000
2,686
Doreen Dillard
512-346-1799
Coldwell Banker United Realtor
78726
Versante Canyon
11912 Mira Vista Way
3br/3ba
$448,479
2,562
Sarah McAloon
512-791-7776
Sisu Realty & Associates
78729
Milwood
13019 Debarr Drive
3br/2ba
$215,000
1,502
Huston Dorris
512-413-6780
Keller Williams Realty
78729
Milwood
7508 Dallas Drive
3br/2ba
$214,900
2,255
Chris Ott
512-637-8429
Keller Williams Realty
78729
Milwood
7624 Tovar Drive
3br/2ba
$195,000
1,830
Kyle Pfaffe
512-436-3650
Keller Williams Realty
78729
Milwood
13243 Darwin Lane
4br/2ba
$257,500
2,052
Mariella Rivero
512-762-7731
Keller Williams Realty—RR
78750
Balcones Village
9019 Balcones Club Drive
3br/2ba
$499,000
3,300
Richard Ryon
512-751-2319
Stanberry & Associates
78750
Colina Vista
7328 Colina Vista Loop
3br/2ba
$292,000
2,374
Tracy Johnson
512-636-5423
Keller Williams Realty
78750
Forest at Villages Spicewood
8600 Lemens Spice Trail
4br/3ba
$559,900
3,974
Ed Lundry
512-401-6300
Keller Williams Realty
78750
Jester Point
7400 Jester Blvd.
4br/3ba
$440,000
3,052
Karen Graf
512-925-8775
Pacesetter Properties
78750
Spicewood at Balcones Village
11101 Spicewood Parkway
4br/2ba
$325,000
2,146
Ryan Kucera
512-589-7308
Keller Williams—Lake Travis
78750
Spicewood at Bullcreek
10006 Brightling Lane
3br/3ba
$699,000
4,154
Arlene Maze
512-789-1892
Carol Dochen Realtors Inc.
78750
Spicewood Estates
9309 Ashton Ridge
4br/4ba
$669,900
4,391
Ed Lundry
512-401-6300
Keller Williams Realty
78750
Spicewood Estates
10539 Grand Oak Circle
5br/4ba
$529,900
3,450
Ed Lundry
512-401-6300
Keller Williams Realty
78750
Spicewood Village Condo
11512 Tin Cup Drive
3br/2ba
$225,000
2,054
Mary Beth Kamnetz
512-589-9845
Pacesetter Properties
78750
Village at Anderson Mill
11901 Geode Drive
3br/2ba
$185,000
2,018
Kim Horther
512-423-6018
Keller Williams Realty
78750
Villas Anderson Mill Condos
1096 Verbena Drive
2br/2ba
$145,000
1,374
Jennie Vickers
512-422-6943
Travis Real Estate
78758
Gracywoods
11940 Meadowfire Drive
4br/2ba
$229,500
2,116
Jill Leberknight
512-294-7296
Keller Williams Realty
78758
Parmer Lane Heights
2304 Galway St.
3br/2ba
$135,000
1,323
Robert Hachtel
512-699-0786
Realty Austin
78758
Quail Creek West
1504 Rutland Drive
3br/2ba
$149,900
1,314
Jennifer Mehis
512-217-1887
Realty Austin
78758
Village at Walnut Creek
12003 Shady Springs Road
4br/2ba
$257,999
2,124
Eric Pampe
512-751-0484
Turnquist Partners Realtors
78758
Wooten Village
8611 Brookfield Drive
2br/1ba
$119,500
963
Gregory Hodge
512-381-6827
RE/MAX Capital City III
78759
Arboretum Village Condo
11603 Ladera Vista Drive
2br/2ba
$275,000
1,774
Brian Copland
512-576-0288
Realty Austin
78759
Arbors
8210 Bent Tree Road
1br/1ba
$89,900
635
Susan McVicker
512-917-3018
Coldwell Banker United Realtor
78759
Great Hills
6302 Senecio Cove
3br/2ba
$395,000
2,214
Beth Perkins
512-797-7349
Keller Williams Realty
78759
Hillcrest Mesa Townhomes
8128 Greenslope Drive
2br/2ba
$295,000
1,875
Arlene Maze
512-789-1892
Carol Dochen Realtors Inc.
78759
Loop Condo
9525 Capital of Texas Hwy.
2br/2ba
$184,500
1,022
Benjamin Phillips
512-965-9236
Turnquist Partners, Realtors
78759
Mesa Village Condo
4159 Steck Ave.
3br/2ba
$159,900
1,344
Tracy Johnson
512-636-5423
Keller Williams Realty
78759
Neelys Canyon Condo
8200 Neely Drive
1br/1ba
$160,000
887
Jeanne White
512-751-7582
Amelia Bullock, Realtors
78759
Northwest Estates
4200 Greenridge Place
4br/2ba
$419,000
2,057
Jane Gamel
512-750-6711
Amelia Bullock, Realtors
78759
Oak Forest
7211 Fireoak Drive
4br/2ba
$356,200
2,311
Mary Battaglia
512-767-6787
Coldwell Banker United Realtor
78759
Ridge at Balcones
8413 Saber Creek Trail
4br/3ba
$394,900
2,298
Naila Ismail
512-422-4653
Private Label Realty
78726 Four Points
78727 West Parmer/MoPac
78729 Anderson Mill/McNeil east
78750 Anderson Mill/McNeil west
78758 MoPac/Braker
78759 Great Hills/Arboretum
13243 Darwin Lane
$257,500
10539 Grand Oak Circle
$529,900
11603 Ladera Vista Drive
$275,000
4200 Greenridge Place
$419,000
Residential real estate listings added to the market between 11/13/12 and 12/11/12 were included and provided by the Austin Board of Realtors, www.abor.com. Although every effort has been made to ensure the timeliness and accuracy of
this listing, Community Impact Newspaper assumes no liability for errors or omissions. Contact the property’s agent or seller for the most current information.
impactnews.com • December 2012 | FEATURES | 31
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