Programme Specification

Programme Specification

1. Programmes:

Programme Title

Head of School

Head of Department/Programme Leader

Programme Contact

Minimum Duration of Study

Maximum Duration of Study

Mode of Study

Award to be Conferred

Exit Awards

Source of Funding

2. Date of Production/Revision

17 June 2014

3. SCQF Level:

10

3.1 Credits:

480

4. Awarding Institution:

University of Glasgow

5. Teaching Institutions:

GSA

6. Lead School/Board of Studies:

Mackintosh School of Architecture

Bachelor of Architecture (Hons)

Professor Christopher Platt

Alan Hooper

Alan Hooper

48 months

72 months

Full-time and Part-time

Bachelor of Architecture (Hons)

Stage 3 Bachelor of Architecture

Stage 4 Bachelor of Architecture (Hons)

SFC

Page 1 of 22

7. Programme Accredited By:

Programmes validated by Royal Institute of British Architects

Programme prescribed by Architects Registration Board

8. Entry Qualifications

8.1 Highers

8.2 A Levels

Highers at ABBB (min.) at one sitting, to include English and

Mathematics or Physics, and preferably Art – OR – AABB if over two sittings.

A Levels at ABB (min.) at one sitting – OR - AAA over two sittings to include English and Mathematics or Physics. If these A levels do not include English and Maths or Physics, then these subjects are required at GCSE level at Grade A. General Studies will not be considered.

8.3 Other

8.4 IELTS Score Required on

Entry

9. Programme Scope:

Selected applicants are invited to interview and are required to produce a portfolio of creative work for discussion.

6.5 IELTS (with a minimum of 5.5 in each component)

The programme is predominantly studio and project-based, supported, in the first three stages by lectures in two assessed Subject Areas: Architectural Technology (AT) and History of Architecture and Urban Studies (HAUS). The lecture series associated with both subject areas supplement the principles of architectural design introduced and developed through the studio, and enrich the intellectual and cultural context for the study of architecture. Beyond the subject lectures there are additional lectures, seminars, presentations and design events that provide a stimulus for the studio projects where design principles are applied in practice.

The increasing complexity of studio projects, stage on stage, is founded on greater programmatic and contextual demands, alongside a growing rigour in the application of appropriate in the ‘making’ of architecture.

Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the programme introduce students to a wide range of studio practices through architecture, through GSA’s Common Academic Framework (CAF), enabling students to engage with GSA’s wider academic community and to contextualise their practice in relation to other disciplines.

Stage 3 students engage with students from institutions and disciplines related to architectural practice in preparing for the ensuing “year out” in practice.

The Stage 4 studio, supported by Architectural Technology input, regards Glasgow as its urban laboratory staging a range of projects within the dense urban core of the city.

Page 2 of 22

10. Programme Aims:

The aims of the programme are:

The aim of the programme is to produce confident and independent designers, with a grasp of intellectual and aesthetic rigor demanded by the discipline of architecture, an appreciation of a creative, scholarly activity and with a growing maturity in making judgments.

The specific aims are for students to: a. Approach learning as a creative activity that becomes progressively more self-motivated and self-directed, leading to an ability to sustain enquiry, while developing an ability to share knowledge with peers. b. Achieve fluency and confidence in expressing architectural ideas through a wide range of media and to find the appropriate means for testing them. c. Discover and develop a sensibility towards architecture that can be expressed through words, drawing, models and other appropriate media. d. Nurture a thirst for intellectual and aesthetic exploration, an ability to enhance knowledge through research and reflection, and gain a respect for scholarship. e. Connect to the culture of architecture, relating this new world to their own experience of buildings and places, how they are used, made and interpreted. f. Develop a critical understanding of architecture and design within a wide historical, social, cultural, political and environmental context. g. A pass at the end of Stage 3 leads to exemption from the ARB and RIBA Part 1 examinations.

The criteria for these examination are embedded in the aims and learning outcomes of the programme.

10.1 Stage 1 Aims:

The aim of Stage 1 is for all students to develop an awareness of creativity within the discipline of architecture, and to learn the appropriate means to express their ideas in a confident and coherent manner. Students are encouraged to apply the principles of architectural technology as a means of expressing architectural quality and character. Architecture is set, both in the studio and lectures, within an historical, social and economic context.

The specific aims are to: a. Introduce the conceptual framework and terminology necessary to enter a creative and critical discussion of architecture, to understand its historical development and to be able to explain and discuss design proposals. b. Learn how to experience architecture, particularly how to look intently and through observation, to explore the intellectual and aesthetic content of great buildings. c. Acquire the fundamental skills involved in architectural design, using a range of media that include free-hand and observational drawing, ruled, scaled and measured drawing, drawing

Page 3 of 22

and modelling by computer, physical model making, fabrication of proto-types, photography and collage. To use these skills to explore and explain ideas with clarity. d. Learn to plan and compose a simple building that responds creatively to its function and its site, and to explore how such a building would be constructed. e. Achieve a basic knowledge of the principles of building and construction and of the materials and processes employed, and begin to apply them in designing a simple building where the choice of construction and materials contributes to the quality and character of the design. f. Achieve a sufficient knowledge of environmental science to understand the nature of human comfort in the environment and its consequences for architectural design. g. Provide a historical overview of the nature and development of architecture and the built environment and the changing role of the architect. h. Provide an overview of the architect in practice - the role and required skills of the architect within society, and of how information necessary for the design of a building is organised and an understanding of how to acquire, retrieve and use it. i. Develop the ability to take responsibility for learning, and develop organisational skills to undertake a programme of study in a scholarly manner.

10.2 Stage 2 Aims:

The aim of Stage 2 is to promote the process of design as an acquired skill, with a increasing emphasis on design research and documentation to substantiate design decisions and support design proposals.

Skills acquired in Studio Work 1 are developed more fully along with new skills through a series of increasingly complex design projects. Architectural Technology is emphasised as integral to the design process and as a means of expressing architectural ideas through the alignment of the

Studio Work 1 course and the Architectural Technology 1 course. Studio discourse is informed by the History of Architecture and Urban Studies courses enabling students to develop their ability to critically engage with architecture in an historical, social and economic context.

The specific aims are to achieve: a. The ability to organise the design of simple buildings, particularly in plan and section, in response to their external context and constraint in order to satisfy the demands of the building programme and its users. b. A basic knowledge of the social, economic and political factors that influence architectural design. c. A historical understanding of architecture related to the history of ideas and the changing role of the architect. d. The ability to formulate and articulate clear intentions, and to test design ideas against them.

Page 4 of 22

e. An integrated knowledge of building construction, structural systems, material choices and energy transfer mechanisms and the ability to synthesize them into a coherent project that expresses architectural intentions. f. A basic understanding through analysis of building performance including computer applications. g. The ability to organise and systematise working practices, and to reinvest them with the knowledge gained through critical reflection. h. The ability to work with others and manage discourse through public debate and exhibition. i. A working knowledge of 2D and 3D CAAD systems sufficient to use them to develop a design project. j. The ability to communicate ideas, intentions and solutions with a growing architectural sensibility through the choice of appropriate media.

10.3 Stage 3 Aims:

The aim of Stage 3 is to develop students’ growing design skills and architectural sensibilities gained in Stages 1 and 2 in preparation for the ensuing ‘year out’ in an architect’s office, and subsequent entry to an architectural ARB/RIBA Part 2 programme. Additionally Professional

Studies is introduced in Stage 3 to better prepare students for their ensuing year in practice.

Stage 3 combines studio-based projects and a self-directed programme of study, marking a greater emphasis on student-led learning. Students are introduced to working as part of an interdisciplinary team, and make presentations of their work to a professional audience.

The Studio projects are intended to develop a student’s ability to undertake architectural design and a range of scales, from urban design to the detailed design of a building, demonstrating appropriate knowledge and understanding.

Urban design issues are explored through the study of a small town leading to an architectural intervention informed by the town study analysis. Architectural technology and the principles of sustainable design are integrated into the studio with specialists working directly with studio tutors and students.

The History of Architecture and Urban Studies 3 course develops a comprehension of architecture within an historical, social and economic context and enables students to critically evaluate and comment on architecture.

The specific aims are to: a. Form an articulate and critical, personal and ethical position. b. Use intellectual and aesthetic rigor, assembling the evidence to substantiate architectural judgments.

Page 5 of 22

c. Demonstrate ability to research and critically evaluate original source material, to explore and record design decisions, and to be able to reflect upon them. d. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate and comment on buildings and their performance in relation to a range of social, economic and physical criteria, as well as identifying and explaining their architectural significance. e. Demonstrate an understanding of sustainable design through the siting, arrangement and construction of a building. f. Demonstrate the ability to design a building that articulates the difference between public and private realms through the building arrangement on the site along with the building form, structure, construction, and special quality of the internal environment. g. Work with initiative, independence, and with others; valuing collaboration and exchange; to develop design ideas and make public presentations of them. h. Acquire sufficient skill and knowledge of current practice and procedures, including the use of CAAD, to enter a professional office for a year of supervised practical training.

Each student will develop a portfolio of work that demonstrates the achievement of the stage’s competence, as described in the Joint Criteria of ARB & RIBA – Part 1, and be able to achieve employment in architecture or a related field.

10.4 Stage 4 Aims:

The aim of the Stage 4 courses is to extend design skills within a rigorous creative studio environment, provide the opportunity to explore architecture as a response to the contemporary city, and to give students the opportunity to place architecture within the framework of cross school creative practices.

The aim is for students to be able to: a. Critically appraise the factors that shape housing design, urban design and urban building and use this understanding to prepare architectural designs and design studies that identify and apply a coherent design approach to these issues. b. Investigate how buildings are used and occupied in order to develop and analyse project briefs and to be able to explore how proposed design solution might be occupied. c. Undertake research and analysis and apply it in designing. Finding out what type of research is relevant, what questions to ask, and which formats to record the findings to best serve as a springboard to design decisions. d. Undertake strategic thinking - exploring options, setting parameters and objectives and testing design ideas against them comparing likely outcomes in order to make critical judgments about the likely effect of design decisions. e. Produce designs which are supported by an explicit strategy for dealing with structural loads

(gravity, wind etc.), energy (heat, light, sound, vibration etc.) and for the choice of materials that together contribute the architectural expression of the proposition.

Page 6 of 22

f. Record key design decisions and be able to reflect upon them. g. Find a sense of direction and be able to develop and sustain a line of enquiry - being able to identify and develop design ideas thematically as well as undertaking sequential "problem solving". h. Develop a critical position as an individual designer and contribute this to the on-going studio debate. i. Demonstrate through a written and /or practical programme of study a line of enquiry undertaking relevant research and producing a coherent conclusion.

11. Intended Learning Outcomes of Programme:

After full participation in and successful completion of the programme, students should be able to:

11.1 Intended Learning Outcomes of Stage 1

Knowledge and Understanding

A broad knowledge of the subject of architecture and discipline of architectural design.

Awareness, through observation, of the intellectual and aesthetic content of significant buildings.

A basic knowledge of the briefing and performance of buildings.

An overview of the role of the architect and an understanding of how information necessary for the design of a building is organized.

Applied Knowledge and Understanding

Confidence in using the basic skills involved in architectural design, using a range of media to explore and explain ideas and proposals with clarity. The ability to record design process and key design decisions.

Execute simple defined projects supported by restricted, areas of research, development or investigation and identify and implement relevant outcomes.

Ability to plan and compose a simple building.

A basic knowledge of building construction and materials, structural design, and the ability to apply them in coherent design projects.

Sufficient knowledge of environmental science to understand the nature of human comfort in the environment and its consequences for architectural design.

Page 7 of 22

A basic knowledge of the emergence and development of Architecture as a specialized activity in the field of the built environment, and of the evolution of its elements.

A basic knowledge of the relationship between man and the built environment through social behaviour and the pattern of settlement

Professional Practice: Communication, Presentation, Working with Others

Generic Cognitive Skills

Present and evaluate arguments, information and ideas concerning the discipline of architecture.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

A sufficient knowledge of 3D modelling to present a simple design project

Communicate ideas, information and work comprehensibly in visual, oral and written forms.

Convey complex ideas in a well-structured and coherent form to peers and staff

Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others

Exercise some autonomy & initiative and independence in carrying out set project briefs.

Demonstrate reasonable ability to manage time and physical resources in relation to set project briefs as an individual and a group member.

Take account of Health &Safety regulations in studio practice and adhere to safe working practices.

A basic understanding of collaboration with peers to develop design ideas

Page 8 of 22

11.2 Intended Learning Outcomes of Stage 2

Knowledge and Understanding

A broad knowledge of the scope, defining features, and main areas of the discipline of architecture.

An understanding, through observation, of the intellectual and aesthetic content of significant buildings.

An understanding and interpretation of the briefing and performance of buildings.

An understanding of the role and required skills of the architect.

Applied Knowledge and Understanding

Confident ability to use a wide range of media to predict the outcome of design decisions and be able to test design proposals against the stated aims of a given design brief.

The ability to begin to organize and system design processes.

The ability to record key design decisions and reflect upon them.

Execute moderately complex defined projects supported by selected areas of research, development or investigation and identify and implement relevant outcomes.

Ability to plan and compose simple buildings in some detail.

An integrated knowledge of building construction and materials, structural design, and energy transfer mechanisms synthesized incoherent design projects that express architectural intentions.

An understanding of themes of art and architecture in significant periods of history.

An understanding of the social, economic and political factors that influence architectural design.

Professional Practice: Communication, Presentation, Working with Others

Generic Cognitive Skills

Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues which are within the common understanding of the discipline.

Critically evaluate evidence-based responses to defined problems.

Page 9 of 22

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

A working knowledge of 2Dand 3D CAAD systems applied to develop aspects of a design project.

Communicate and articulate ideas, information and work in a clear and concise way in visual, oral and written forms.

Convey complex information to a range of audiences and for a range of purposes.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others

Exercise autonomy and initiative in carrying out set project briefs.

Demonstrate ability to manage time and physical resources in relation to set project briefs as an individual and a group member.

Take account of Health &Safety regulations in studio practice and adhere to safe working practices.

An understanding of collaboration with peers to develop design ideas

An awareness of ethical and professional issues.

11.3 Intended Learning Outcomes of Stage 3

Knowledge and Understanding

A broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of the scope, main areas and boundaries of the discipline.

A critical understanding, through observation, of the intellectual and aesthetic content of self- selected buildings.

A critical understanding and interpretation of the briefing and performance of buildings. An awareness of how an architectural practice operates.

An understanding of the relationship between architectural practice and the construction industry.

Applied Knowledge and Understanding

Fluency in the selection of media to predict the outcome of design decisions and be able to test design proposals against the stated aims of a given design brief.

The ability to explore, compare and record options as part of the design process, and critically and reflectively evaluate key design decisions.

Page 10 of 22

Execute complex defined projects supported by areas of research, development or investigation and identify and implement relevant outcomes.

Ability to plan and compose buildings exhibiting greater complexity of function and social role.

A researched and integrated knowledge of building construction and materials, structural design, and energy transfer mechanisms synthesized in coherent design projects that express architectural intentions. And considerations of a sustainable environment.

A detailed understanding of selected themes of art and architecture in significant periods of contemporary history.

A detailed understanding of the components of settlement in relationship to human activities and social, economic and political factors that influence architectural design.

Demonstrate reflective evaluation across a range of design projects over a sustained period *

Demonstrate a breadth and depth of learning in relation to multiple design projects at a range of scales over a sustained period*

Demonstrate development of design proposals with integrated technology benefiting from design iterations over a sustained period*

Demonstrate growing academic judgement and independence in the undertaking of a selfselected elective*

Professional Practice: Communication, Presentation, Working with Others

Generic Cognitive Skills

Undertake critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues relevant to contemporary discipline of architecture.

Make judgments where data/information is limited or comes from a range of sources.

Draw on a range of sources in making judgments.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

With sufficient skill and knowledge of current practice and procedures in CAAD to enter a professional office for a year of supervised practical training.

Successfully communicate and articulate ideas, information and work in a considered way in visual, oral and written forms to a professional level.

Make formal and informal presentations on topics in the discipline to a range of audiences.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others

Exercise autonomy and initiative in carrying out and interpreting set project briefs.

Page 11 of 22

Demonstrate professionalism in managing time and physical resources in relation to set project briefs as an individual and a group member.

Take account of Health &Safety regulations in studio practice and adhere to safe working practices.

An understanding of the value and the ability to collaborate with peers and others; to develop design

 ideas and make public presentations

Deal with ethical and professional issues.

* Learning Outcomes apply to full academic sessions only

11.4 Intended Learning Outcomes of Stage 4

Knowledge and Understanding

Knowledge that covers and integrates most of the principle areas, features boundaries, terminology and conventions of the discipline of architecture.

A critical understanding, of the intellectual and aesthetic content of self-selected buildings and support architectural judgments.

Researched and critical evaluation of the briefing and performance of buildings.

A professional level of knowledge of the legal and managerial context of architectural practice.

A professional level of knowledge of the duties and responsibilities of architects, as defined and described in Codes and Standards relating to their professional practice.

Applied Knowledge and Understanding

Demonstrate reflective evaluation across a range of complex design projects over a sustained period.*

Demonstrate a breadth and depth of learning in relation to multiple complex design projects at a range of scales over a sustained period.*

The ability to define what type of research is relevant, what questions to ask, and which formats to record the findings to best serve as a springboard to design decisions.

A sense of direction and be able to develop and sustain a line of enquiry – being able to identify and develop design ideas thematically as well as undertaking sequential problem solving.

Undertake strategic thinking – exploring options, setting parameters and objectives and testing design ideas against them and comparing likely outcomes in order to make critical judgments about the likely effect of design decisions.

Page 12 of 22

Execute complex defined and self- defined projects of research, development or investigation and identify and implement relevant outcomes.

Ability to plan and compose buildings exhibiting complexity in terms of function, scale and context.

Research and critical evaluation of how a strategic choice of construction, materials and environmental approaches can determine the character of an architectural design project.

Research and critical evaluation of selected themes of art and architecture in significant periods of contemporary history

Research and critical evaluation of urban settlement in relationship to social, economic, political and cultural factors that influence architectural design

Professional Practice: Communication, Presentation, Working with Others

Generic Cognitive Skills

Critically identify, define, conceptualise and analyse complex problems and issues relevant to contemporary discipline of architecture.

Make judgments where data/information is limited or comes from a range of sources.

Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills

Communicate and articulate ideas and information fluently and work comprehensively in visual, oral and written forms to a professional level.

Make formal presentations about specialist topics to informed audiences.

Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others

Exercise autonomy and initiative in carrying outset project briefs and self-directed programme of study.

Demonstrate ability to manage time and physical resources in relation to set project briefs and self-directed programmes of study as an individual and a group member.

Take account of Health & Safety regulations in studio practice and adhere to safe working practices.

A developing critical position as an individual designer and contribute this to the on-going studio debate.

Deal with complex ethical and professional issues.

* Learning outcome applicable to Full Session Courses only

Page 13 of 22

12. Assessment Methods: Principles and Process

Work is assessed and feedback given against the particular aims and learning outcomes for each course and these outcomes relate back to those for the Stage as explained in the Programme

Specification.

Assessment is both Formative and Summative. Formative assessment, where marking is advisory, applies to studio submissions and allows students to make improvements before the final submission. Summative assessment, where the mark is final, applies to formal written examinations, some aspects of course work and to the final marking of the portfolio by the

Internal Examination Board.

In each course, students are required to complete a coursework assignment and/or sit a formal written examination. Coursework may be in the form of essay, presentation or technical study.

Coursework assignments will be formatively assessed, with assignments being set and submitted in either term 1 or term 2. This formative feedback will be returned to students no later than the end of term 2. Elements of course work not receiving a pass, may be retrieved and resubmitted during term 3, the date set by the course tutors. Assessment of such resubmitted course work will move to a summative status and receive no more than a D3 grade.

Formal written examinations will be assessed on a summative basis.

The final grades for the course will be an aggregation of the examination and coursework grades where appropriate, with each having appropriate weighting towards the final grade.

Where a student has failed a course, or courses, at the June diet, a re-sit assignment will be set for each course failed. The assignment may be in the form of essay, technical study or formal written examination, as appropriate. The assignment will be assessed on a summative basis and receive no more than a D3 grade.

Feedback is given at presentations and reviews of Studio Work normally mid-session and is advisory. Students receive written feedback on progress and on how to develop their work.

Study Abroad and Visiting Students:

Prior to undertaking a partial year exchange, students will be summatively assessed at the midsession point. Students failing at this point will not proceed to exchange, but will re-join the main cohort. In that instance the summative grade will be treated as a formative grade.

13. Learning and Teaching Approaches:

The curriculum for the B Arch (Hons) has two distinct elements; the studio project work in the studio courses, and specialist subjects in the remaining courses of each stage.

The studio course is project based and learning and teaching methods are devised to develop and enhance individual creativity and to promote self-motivation and independent learning.

Specialist subject courses are lecture/ seminar based. Specialist subjects support and inform studio work and are wherever possible articulated to specific studio projects.

Page 14 of 22

At Stage 4 students undertake a self-directed programme of study through the Research Project

4 course ranging from written texts to making models.

Studio Project Work

Studio projects are normally directed and guided by academic staff and are key to the structure of the learning experience. Projects provide a structure of engagement with particular concepts, methods or approaches that allow the individual student space for investigation and interpretation.

Projects are used extensively to ensure that the student’s experience of the Programme is coherent, and are used to direct the development of their individual skills and creative abilities.

The studios are central to the teaching of architecture and to the life of the school. They are multipurpose spaces with computers and drawing boards, areas for presentations and critique, a small technical library and a student-run coffee bar that is often used for informal meetings and as a venue for presentations.

Architects have to learn about how people use space and how to work with other people – the studio is our laboratory where individually and collectively we make places in which to work, share ideas, and at times retreat. The success of the school and its students is dependent on the active life of the studio and student involvement is essential. The life and use of the studio is a major topic for discussion at Programme Committee meetings and meetings of the joint staff student consultative committee, the Student Forum.

Delivery of Projects

Tutorials:

Students are assigned a design tutor for each project. Students are exposed to a range of tutors and approaches throughout the stage and particularly in reviews and workshops. In addition, students may request tutorials from any of the stage tutors, if available, or from any tutor in the school, should they wish to do so. Some specialist tutors are available at particular times on some projects.

There is a mixture of one-to-one tutoring by an individual tutor and group tutorials where there may be more than one tutor. The purpose is to discuss work in progress and, like a seminar, the quality of the discussion is closely related to the thoroughness of preparation. It provides practice in presenting and discussing projects and an opportunity to share ideas and learn from each other through comparison of the different design approaches being explored by colleagues. It is good practice to keep notes of the discussion. Tutorial timetables are provided weekly and students are either allocated a time for a tutorial or are expected to request a tutorial at a time of their choosing. The tutorial timetable indicates when tutors are available for tutorials so that students can programme their time accordingly. In all stages students are expected to attend a tutorial at least once a week. A student who cannot attend their tutorial for any reason should notify their tutor, either directly or via the school office. A record is kept of attendance at tutorials.

Individual Tutorial:

The individual tutorial is usually a desktop discussion focused on a specific aspect of a current design project and may either involve a design tutor and/or specialist discipline tutor. Depending on the level, or the complexity of a project there may be two tutorials a week rather than one when the intensity of the project demands appropriate input.

Group Tutorial:

The group tutorial is effective at the beginning of a project when general topics are to be discussed.

Page 15 of 22

Normally this would consist of approximately 10/15 students, two tutors and last for 1-2 hours.

However variations to this pattern exist throughout the school and depending on the length and complexity of the project groups may reduce to 4/6 students and these are designed to be discursive. Students are encouraged to keep a record of all tutorial discussion.

Peer Tutorial:

Throughout the Programme students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and as part of this experience are expected to help each other informally as individuals or group members.

Group Seminar:

Differing from a group tutorial focussed on a design project the students can be brought together to discuss a theme or issue that avoids scrutiny of individual work. This may be theoretical or pragmatic.

Reviews:

The review is where each student (or student group) presents, explains and justifies their design project to a panel of tutors (and visiting critics), and to their colleagues, all of who participate in discussion and critical appraisal of the project. This is the forum where comprehensive and clear work can be shared and the critique can tease out the implications of design decisions and help place the project into a wider context.

A successful presentation needs to be designed so that the key ideas are readily apparent. The work presented needs to be comprehensive, readable and carefully selected and edited so as to tell the story of the project.

The format for a review is the presentation of work, usually drawings or models supported by a brief verbal description of the main principles and ideas that underpin the project. Digital presentations may be suitable and advice should be sought from the studio tutor. There are a number of benefits in exhibiting the work and for the student this is often the first moment when they see the full range of their production displayed all together.

The reviews, even the final reviews, are held before the completion of the project so that there is time to act on the criticism prior to assessment. It is good practice to present projects with a view to discussing areas where advice is most needed and to get a colleague to keep notes of the discussion.

Interim Review or Critique:

Usually this is a pin-up of work done to date on a project at appropriate intervals depending on the duration and intensity of a project.

Students have to present their work in front of a panel of critics and peers for scrutiny. It is meant to be discursive and offer advice on the best Programme of action leading to the final review.

Written feedback is offered.

Final Review or Critique:

These are held at the conclusion of a project following the same mode as the interim review but with an emphasis on discussing the consequences of the proposition. The student will also be given advice on how the project could be improved and this may be undertaken before a term by term progress interview or the internal examination at the end of the year. Written feedback is offered.

Page 16 of 22

Peer Review or Critique:

Students are encouraged to practice visual and verbal communication and to develop critical faculties with their peers in preparation for a tutor chaired review.

Interim Progress Interview:

Usually involving a student self-assessment this interview allows students and tutors to recap on the previous terms performance and discuss a student’s strengths and weaknesses.

Lecture/Seminar Programme:

Most subject teaching is lecture based supported by seminars. The purpose of a lecture is threefold: to introduce large groups to basic principles often explained through a description of exemplary projects or situations; to place this information in a broader academic and cultural context; and in demonstrating the process and rhetoric of argument, both spoken and visual. They are a launch pad for further learning.

14. Relevant QAA Subject Benchmark Statements and Other External or Internal Reference Points:

Academic: http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/architecture2010

Professional: http://www.architecture.com/Files/RIBAProfessionalServices/Education/Validation/Validation

Procedures2011Section102updatedwitheffectfrom1Sept2012

15. Additional Relevant Information:

Enrichment of Learning Experience

Student Exchange:

Students at MSA are able to undertake a period of exchange with our partner institutions, some of which are funded through the Erasmus Exchange Programme. Students are invited to apply for a partial-session exchange during the academic session preceding the academic session in which the period of exchange is intended. In general partial-session exchanges are offered in Stage 3 (B’Arch) and Stage 5 (Diploma), with the opportunity to exchange with our Australian partners in Stage 4

(B’Arch). In general students undertaking a period of exchange in Stage 3 are eligible to undertake a further period of exchange in Stage 5. However students who undertake an exchange with our

Australian partners in Stage 4 will not be permitted to take a further period of exchange in Stage 5.

To be eligible for exchange students must achieve a minimum aggregate grade of B3 in the academic session preceding the academic session in which the period of exchange is intended.

Additionally Stage 3 students intending going on exchange in the latter half of the academic session must achieve a min D3 pass in all MSA partial-credit courses in the first half of the academic session.

Guest Lectures:

The MSA Friday afternoon Guest Lecture series, which takes place in terms 1 and 2, has UK and international guest speakers from practice and related areas. This is open to all GSA students

Page 17 of 22

and staff, as is the GSA Friday Event lecture series, on Friday mornings.

MSA Research Forum:

The MSA Research Forum meets regularly, where staff, research students and invited guests present their research, to exchange ideas and stimulate debate. These events are open to all staff and students.

Study Visits:

Experiencing buildings and places first hand is an important part of the school’s philosophy.

Study Visits offer a valuable opportunity to experience a city, its culture, and its buildings and, at times, to meet members of its architectural community -practitioners and students.

There are two types of study visits: those that are to a location of general architectural interest, and those to places that relate directly to the project at hand and demand more focused on-site research.

Students are encouraged to attend Study Trips if possible, but alternative provisions are made for those who are unable to do so. Prior briefing and subsequent discussion are the related teaching input and a range of staff accompany the trip.

Students are expected to keep sketchbooks to record their impressions and studies and to edit them, and photographs, as a journal for their portfolio.

Exhibitions and the Grace and Clark Fyfe Gallery:

The school has its own gallery that houses a programme of exhibitions of architecture and related subjects. Students are encouraged to exhibit their work to the public. The gallery provides such a venue for the exhibition of studio work in progress, completed projects, the outcome of master- classes or for students to arrange their own shows.

The school has a strong record of placing student work in venues such as the Lighthouse, the

RSA and in galleries throughout Glasgow and beyond.

Honorary Professors:

Honorary professors are employed to share their specific expertise, knowledge, skill and experience to the delivery of the programme. They provide an external professional context and perspective to the programmes of study.

Mackintosh Architectural Students’ Association:

As well as the GSA Students’ Association, the students of the Mackintosh School of Architecture, at each stage, elect representatives to the Mackintosh Architecture Students’ Society. MASS organises seminars, lectures and social events throughout the year.

The Student Forum:

The Forum is student led and meets once per month. Items for discussion include housekeeping and cross-school activities. Generally the issues discussed are less programme-oriented, than those covered in the Programme Committees.

Page 18 of 22

16. Programme Structure and Features:

In the Full-time Mode the courses are taken as follows:

FULL-TIME MODE

Stage 1 and 2 (F1 + F2) Stage 3 (F3)

Studio Work (60 credits)

Architectural Tech (30 credits)

History of Architecture and

Urban Studies (20 credits)

Studio Practices (10 credits)

Studio Work (50 credits)

Architectural Tech (30 credits)

History of Architecture and

Urban Studies (20 credits)

Prof Studies (10 credits)

Inter. Design (10 credits)

Total: 120 Credits Total: 120 Credits

In the Part-time Mode the courses are taken as follows:

PART-TIME MODE

Stage 1 and 2 (P1 + P2)

Studio Work (60 credits)

Architectural Tech (30 credits)

History of Architecture and

Urban Studies (20 credits)

Studio Practices (10 credits)

Stage 3 (P3)

Studio Work (50 credits)

Inter. Design (10 credits)

Total: 120 Credits

17. Can exemptions be granted?

Total: 60 Credits

Yes No

If yes, please explain:

18. Does the programme comply with GSA APEL policy?

Yes No

If no, please explain:

Page 19 of 22

Stage 4 (F4)

Studio Work (60 credits)

Architectural Tech (20 credits)

Research Project 4 (30 credits)

Prof Studies (10 credits)

Total: 120 Credits

Stage 3 (P4)

Architectural Tech (30 credits)

History of Architecture and

Urban Studies (20 credits)

Prof Studies (10 credits)

Total: 60 Credits

GSA/MSA recognizes that applicants come from a wide variety of social, cultural and educational backgrounds and are willing to consider applications for admission from those who do not have the published conventional qualifications for admission and/or who wish to gain recognition for formal or informal study undertaken elsewhere .

19. Are there any arrangements for granting advanced entry?

Yes No

If yes, please explain:

In accordance with the GSA APEL policy undergraduate applicants can apply for advanced entry through the undergraduate admissions process.

20. Are there any arrangements for allowing students to transfer into the programme?

Yes No

If yes, please explain stating requirements and levels to where this can apply:

GSA students may transfer into Architecture from other programmes subject to interview with the

B Arch (Hons) Programme Leader and meeting the entry requirements for the B Arch (Hons)

Programme. Students out with GSA can apply for advanced entry in accordance with the GSA APEL policy.

21. Are there any arrangements for allowing students to transfer into other programmes?

Yes No

If yes, please clarify:

Architecture students may transfer to other programmes within GSA subject to acceptance by the appropriate programme leader. Exit awards are available to students on the successful completion of each stage of the B Arch (Hons) who wish to leave the programme or transfer to other programmes out with GSA.

22. What are the requirements for progressing from each stage?

Students must obtain passes in all courses to proceed into the next Stage. A student who fails a course of 20 credits or less following a re-sit exam in August will be permitted to repeat that course in the following session. A student who fails a course of more than 20 credits must repeat all courses.

Page 20 of 22

23. Please confirm that the programme follows GSA Examination Board policy and procedures, including External Examiner participation:

Yes No

A full list of current GSA External Examiners for all programmes can be found at the following link: http://www.gsa.ac.uk/about-gsa/our-structure/academic-services/external-examiners/

If no, please explain:

24. Please explain programme management and committee arrangements up to, but not including, Boards of Study:

PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT

The relationship of the main committees and staff responsible for management of the programme as follows:

Board of Studies:

The Board of Studies carries overall responsibility for the management of the School of Architecture and all standing committees of the MSA report to it. It is responsible for all Programme Committees and Consultative Committees within the School. The Board of Studies then reports up to the

GSA Undergraduate Committee. The Board of Studies meets once per term.

The Board is responsible to the GSA Undergraduate Committee for all policies and procedures relating to the taught Programmes, for quality assurance and enhancement, including:

Annual Programme Monitoring, periodic and thematic reviews, proposals for new Programmes or modifications to existing ones, assessment arrangements, nominations for new External Examiners, and for responding to External Examiners’ reports action and student feedback. It is responsible to the GSA Research Committee for all academic matters relating to research.

It comprises the Professor of Architecture (Convener), the Deputy Head of School, Programme

Leaders, Stage Leaders, Subject Leaders, all elected student representatives (Undergraduate,

Graduate and Postgraduate), the Academic Support Manager, the GSA Undergraduate Coordinator, the Architecture Librarian, the SRC President.

Programme Committees:

Programme Committees monitor the delivery of the programmes; discuss the response to the

External Examiners’ reports and QLT questionnaires. The Programme Committees meet once per term and report to the Board of Studies.

The committee comprises, the Programme Leader (convenor), Stage Leaders from Stages

1,2,3,4 Subject Leaders, The GSA Undergraduate Coordinator, the Architecture Librarian, the SRC

President and two elected Student Representatives from each of the four stages.

Student Representatives:

Students elect two representatives for each Stage of the Programme within the first two weeks of the session. The Stage representatives are required to liaise with their student cohort and represent their cohort on the Student Forum, Undergraduate Programme Committee and Board of

Page 21 of 22

Studies. Each Stage is represented by one SRC representative briefed by the SRC.

Planning and Management Committees:

In preparation for the Programme Committees the academic staff involved hold regular Programme planning and management meetings throughout the session.

Student Forum:

The student-led Student Forum meets once per month. Items for discussion include the running of the café bar, events, cross-school activities, and housekeeping. It reports to the Board of Studies.

It is convened by one of the students, with student representation from each stage of the Degree,

Diploma and Postgraduate Programmes, and Programme Leaders, and can invite other staff as required.

25. Please explain the systems and arrangements regarding: a) Quality assurance of the management, operation and monitoring of the programme

The B Arch (Hons) Programme is subject to external periodic review including ELIR, RIBA revalidation every five years and ARB prescription on an annual basis.

Internal QAA includes the PMAR and QEAP processes which articulate with GSA strategic planning.

The programme committee structure enables constant evaluation and where necessary modification of the management and operation of the programme. The committee structure articulates with the student representative structure to ensure that student feedback informs all aspects of programme management and operation, including QLT student feedback for every course.

The GSA committee structure can be found at the following link: http://www.gsa.ac.uk/media/875399/GSA_Committee_Structure_Web.jpg

b) Student feedback and representation

Student Representatives:

Each Stage has two student representatives elected by their peers within the first two weeks of the session. The Stage representatives are required to liaise with their student cohort and represent their cohort on the Student Forum, Undergraduate Programme Committee and Board of

Studies. Each Stage has one SRC representative briefed by the SRC.

c) Programme based student support

All students are allocated a pastoral tutor whose remit is to provide non-academic support within the school of architecture. Students can also seek assistance or support from their studio tutor,

Programme Leader or Head of School.

The Student Forum is student-led, and meets once per month. Items for discussion include the running of the café bar, events, cross-school activities, and housekeeping. The Forum reports to the

Board of Studies and is convened by a student, with student representation from each stage of the

Degree, Diploma and Postgraduate programmes. Programme leaders attend with other staff attending by invitation.

Page 22 of 22

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement