CURRICULUM/GEN ED COMMITTEE AGENDA for February 2

CURRICULUM/GEN ED COMMITTEE AGENDA for February 2
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CURRICULUM/GEN ED COMMITTEE
a standing committee of the Educational Advisory Council
AGENDA
for
February 2, 2005
3:00 pm
Sylvania CC Oak Room
Informational Items from the Curriculum Office:
o
o
o
(These items do not require curriculum committee recommendation)
Experimental Course Requests
ƒ BI 199 – Intro to Wildlife Conservation & Management
ƒ CG 199 – Job Readiness
ƒ BCT 199A – Basic Wood Veneering
ƒ NUR 199 – Nursing Student Success Skills
Course Inactivations
ƒ WR 228 – Police Report Writing
ƒ DE 80 –
ƒ PSY 280B – Community Service and Action Seminar
Distance Learning Modality Approvals
ƒ None this month
OLD BUSINESS .
1. ASL 130 – Deaf Studies
Diversity Designation – review request on appropriate form
128. WLD 9960 – Sculpture Welding Practice (See previous Agenda for detail)
New Course Request – Review with new title
129. WLD 9961 – Sculpture Welding Practice
New Course Request – Review with new title
130. WLD 9962 – Sculpture Welding Practice
New Course Request – Review with new title
131. WLD 9963 – Sculpture Welding Practice
New Course Request – Review with new title
NEW BUSINESS
178. SOC/PS 280B – Community Service and Action Seminar
Description Change: See complete request for detail
Requisite Change: See complete request for detail
Outcomes Change: See complete request for detail
178a. SOC/PS 280B – Community Service and Action Seminar
Contact/Credit Change from 3 lecture to 2 Lecture
179. CG 0690 – Stopping Test Anxiety
Course Number Change: CG 110
Description Change: See complete request for detail
Outcomes Change: See complete request for detail
180. CG 209 – Job Finding Skills
Outcomes Change: Add “4. Identify appropriate workplace attitudes and behaviors that
contribute to job success.”
181. CG 209 – Job Finding Skills
Credit Contact Hour Change:
Lecture: Current 1
Proposed 1 to 3
Contact: Current 1
Proposed 1 to 3
Credits: Current 1
Proposed 1 to 3
182. CG 130 – Today’s Careers
Description Change: See complete request
Requisite Change: Drop RD & WR 115 prerequisite
Outcomes Change: See complete request
183. CG 104A – Career Development
Title Change: Career and Life Planning
Description Change: delete “or instructor permission”
Requisite Change: delete “or instructor permission”; RD & WR 115 recommended
184. CG 140B – Career Development
Title Change: Career and Life Planning
Description Change: delete “or instructor permission”
Requisite Change: delete “or instructor permission”; RD & WR 115 recommended
185. RAD 216 – Radiography Registry Review
New Course
186. RAD 240 – Radiographic Clinic VIII
Contact/Credit Hour Change:
Lab: Current 10
Proposed 8
Contact: Current 10 Proposed 8
Credits: Current 10 Proposed 8
187. OMT 111 – General Medical Terminology
Title Change: Introduction to Medical Terminology
188. MTH 91 – Intermediate Algebra Part I
New Course
189. MTH 92 – Intermediate Algebra Part II
New Course
190. MTH 111A – College Algebra for Liberal Arts
Requisite Change: Add “or MTH 92”
191. MTH 111B – College Algebra-Business, Management, Life & Social Science
Requisite Change: Add “or MTH 92”
192. MTH 111C – College Algebra for Math, Science & Engineering
Requisite Change: Add “or MTH 92”
193. MTH 211 – Foundations of Elementary Math I
Requisite Change: add “MTH 92”
194. BCT 100 – Introduction of the Construction Industry
Title Change: Overview of the Construction Industry
Description Change: See complete request for details
195. BCT 102 – Blueprint Reading for Building Construction
Title Change: Residential Printreading
196. BCT 103 – Construction Materials and Methods I
Title Change: Residential Materials and Methods
197. BCT 116 – Alternative Building Design
New Course
198. BCT 120 – Floor Framing
Requisite Change: Delete BCT 102, BCT 104
199. BCT 121 – Wall Framing
Requisite Change: Delete BCT 102, BCT 104
200. BCT 123 – Roof Framing 2
Requisite Change: Delete BCT 104, BCT 106
201. BCT 129 – Mechanical Systems for Kitchens and Bath
New Course
202. BCT 133 – Materials and Methods II
Title Change: Materials and Methods Commercial Construction
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: Delete prerequisites
203. BCT 134 – Construction Scheduling w/MS Project
Title Change: Construction Scheduling
Requisite Change: Delete prerequisites
204. BCT 150 – Mechanical and Electrical Facilities
Title Change: Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing
205. BCT 202 – Business Principles for Construction
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: Delete “…required by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board.”
206. BCT 203 – Interior Finish
Prerequisite Change: Add “or instructor permission”
207. BCT 211 – Remodeling
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
208. BCT 213 – Advanced Blueprint Reading
Title Change: Commercial Print Reading
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: replace “instructor approval” with “industry experience in blueprint
reading suggested.”
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
209. BCT 218 – Woodworking Projects
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: Delete prerequisites
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
210. BCT 220 – Professional Cabinetmaking II
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: Delete prerequisites
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
211. BCT 225 – Construction Project Management
Description Change: See complete request for details
212. BCT 244 – Kitchen and Bath Cabinet Installation
New Course
213. BA 242 – Introduction to Investments
Description Change: Add “Recommended: MTH 20”
214. CAS 231 – Publisher
New Course
215. CAS 123 – Production Keyboarding
Description Change: Delete “CAS 216” recommendation; Add “Additional lab hours may
be required, consult instructor.”
Prerequisite Change: Current None; Add CAS 216
216. CAS 133 – Basic Computer Skills – MS Office
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
217. DH 208 – Community Oral Health I
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
218. DH 208 – Community Oral Health I
Contact/Credit Hour Change:
Lecture: Current 1
Proposed 2
Load: Current .068 Proposed .136
Contact: Current 1
Proposed 2
Credit: Current 1
Proposed 2
219. DH 250 – Public Health
Title Change: Research Methods
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
220. DH 250 – Public Health
Contact Credit Hour Change:
Lecture: Current 2
Proposed 1
Load: Current .136 Proposed .068
Contact: Current 2
Proposed 1
Credits: Current 2
Proposed 1
221. DH 252 – Community Oral Health II
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
222. DH 252 – Community Oral Health II
Contact/Credit Hour Change:
Lecture: Current 1
Proposed 2
Load: Current .068 Proposed .136
Contact: Current 1
Proposed 2
Credit: Current 1
Proposed 2
223. ALC 56 – Basic Study Skills Lab
Title Change: Tutoring Lab
Description Change: No previous description. See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: No previous outcomes. See complete request for details
224. ALC 70 – Technical Math Support
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
225. WR 90 – Writing 90
Requisite Change: Add “with a ‘C’ or better.”
226. RD 90 – Reading 90
Requisite Change: Add “with a ‘C’ or better.”
227. RD 90A – Reading 90
Title Change: Reading 90A
Requisite Change: Add “with a ‘C’ or better.”
228. RD 115 – College Reading
Requisite Change: add “(C or better)”
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
229. PT 108 – Litho Press
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Lecture: Current 1
Lab: Current 3
Contact: Current 4
Credits: Current 2
230. PT 110 – Litho Press II
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Lecture: Current 3
Proposed 2
Proposed 3
Proposed 5
Proposed 3
Proposed 2
Lab: Current 9
Proposed 3
Contact: Current 12 Proposed 5
Credits: Current 6
Proposed 3
231. PT 153 – Electronic Layout – PhotoShop
New Course
232. PT 155 – Electronic Layout – QuarkXPress
New Course
233. CIS 284 – Network Security
New Course
234. CIS 285 – Security Tools
New Course
235. CIS 286 – Computer Forensics
New Course
236. CIS 287M – Microsoft Server Security
New Course
237. ARCH 103 – Architectural Graphics 3
Course Number Change: ARCH 100
Title Change: Graphic Communication for Designers
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: Delete prerequisites
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
237a. ARCH 113 – Working Drawings 3
Description Change: See complete request for detail
Outcomes Change: See complete request for detail
238. ARCH 121 – Structures 1
Description Change: Delete “Recommended: DRF 117 and ARCH 126 or equivalent”
239. ARCH 126 – Introduction to AutoCAD
Description Change: Delete “Recommended DRF 117 and CIS 120”
240. ARCH 131 – Sustainable Structures
Description Change: See complete request for details
241. ARCH 137 – AutoCAD Architectural Desktop
Description Change: See complete request for details
242. ARCH 140 – Introduction to CHIEF ARCHITECT
Description Change: Delete “Recommended DRF 117 and CIS 120”
243. ETC 103 – Introduction to Emergency Telecommunication
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
244. ETC 104 - Emergency Telecommunications-Call-Taking
Description Change: Emergency Telecommunications-Call-Taking
245. ETC 105 - Crisis Intervention
Title Change: Crisis Intervention & Critical Incident Stress Management
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
246. ETC 108 – Transcription for Telecommunicators
Description Change: See complete request for details
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
247. ETC 110 - Communication Center Operations - Basic Skills
Description Change: See complete request for details
248. ETC 111 – Communication Center Operations – Advanced Skills
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: Previous: None; New: ETC 110
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
249. GD 116 – Intermediate Typography
Requisite Change: Previous: None; New: GD 140
250. AM 103 – Engine Performance I
Requisite Change: add AM 112
251. AM 106 – Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
Requisite Change: add AM 101, 112
252. AM 113 – Engine Performance II
Requisite Change: add AM 112
253. AM 123 – Engine Performance III
Requisite Change: add AM 112
254. AM 133 – Engine Performance IV
Requisite Change: add AM 112
255. INSP 220 – Fire and Life Safety
New Course
256. INSP 225 – Multi-Family Housing
New Course
257. INSP 260 – Oregon Inspection Certificate
New Course
258. INSP 151 – International 1 & 2 Family Structural Code
Title Change: International Residential Code: Structural
Description Change: See complete description for detail
259. INSP 152 – International 1 & 2 Family Mechanical Code
Title Change: International Residential Code: Mechanical
Description Change: See complete description for detail
260. INSP 251 – Uniform Building Code 1
Title Change: International Building Code 1
Description Change: Replace “Uniform Building Code” with “International Building Code”
261. INSP 252 – Uniform Building Code 2
Title Change: International Building Code 2
Description Change: Replace “Uniform Building Code” with “International Building Code”
262. INSP 253 – Uniform Building Code 3
Title Change: International Building Code 3
Description Change: Replace “Uniform Building Code” with “International Building Code”
263. INSP 255 – International Mechanical Code 1
Descr Change: Replace “Uniform Mechanical Code” with “International Mechanical Code”
264. INSP 256 – International Mechanical Code 2
Descr Change: Replace “Uniform Mechanical Code” with “International Mechanical Code”
265. ID 121 – Interior Products and Materials II
Title Change: Sustainable Materials for Residential Interiors
Description Change: See complete request for details
Requisite Change: Add ID 120
Outcomes Change: See complete request for details
266. FOT 101 – Fiber Optics I
New Course Number: TE 9101
267. FOT 102 – Fiber Optics II
New Course Number: TE 9102
268. FOT 103 – Fiber Optics: Inside Plant
New Course Number: TE 9103
269. FOT 104 – Fiber Optics: Outside Plant
New Course Number: TE 9104
270. FOT 201 – AMP ACT I
New Course Number: TE 9201
271. FOT 202 – AMP ACT II
New Course Number: TE 9202
272. FOT 203 – AMP ACT III
New Course Number: TE 9203
273. HE 242 – Stress and Human Health
Requisite Change: delete prerequisites
274. HE 254 - Weight-loss and Personal Health
New Course
275. MM 238 – Creating Professional DVD-Video
New Course
4 Credit Conversion Sub-Committee
Committee has not met since last report.
Curriculum Course Designation Request
Transfer List B Designation
Current course number:
Current course title:
Does the course rely on primary text or
texts which address, analyze or comment
upon the question of what it means to be
human? Does it use secondary or
summation materials and to what degree?:
Does the course focus on questions of
value, ethics, belief; and does the course
attempt to place such questions in a
historical context?:
Does the course attempt an examination or
analysis of the discipline to which it
belongs; in other words, does the course
provide students with a way of seeing the
approach to the subject or subjects
involved as one way among others of
discussing text?:
ASL 130
Deaf Studies
This course uses two textbooks, Journey into the
Deaf-World, Dawn Sign Press 1996 by Lane,
Hoffmeister & Bahan and Legal Rights: The Guide
for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People by National
Center Law of the Deaf. This course also includes
some readings from current issues (media) and
articles on other topics related to Deaf studies
throughout the term. Videos also will be shown to
the students during the class. In short, the course
focuses on what it means to be a member of a Deaf
community.
Yes, this course introduces the students to Deaf
people and the Deaf community from both the
cultural and pathological points of view.
Traditionally, there have been two ways of looking at
Deaf people. The pathological view, held by most
educators and medical professionals, claims that
deaf people are disabled or defective, unequal to
hearing people and in need of fixing . The cultural
view held by Deaf people themselves, and by
linguists and others who are knowledgeable about
the deaf community, hold that Deaf people
constitute a linguistic and cultural minority which has
long been oppressed by the hearing world. This
course explores both beliefs and traces their
evolution through history. The course discusses the
values and beliefs of the Deaf community, their
struggle for equal rights and their organizations and
activities. It includes the paradox that Deaf people,
who do not see themselves as a disability group,
must define themselves as such in order to have
their rights respected under the law.
In its discussions of language and education, the
course asks students to look at varying viewpoints
and historical trends and the impact those have on
the Deaf community. Students look at the
relationship between beliefs about language and
culture and the institutions intended to serve the
Deaf community, both those within the community
itself and those imposed by the hearing majority.
Does the course attend to the role that
language plays in the discipline and in
ways the subject is understood and has
been understood?:
The course discusses the struggle and controversy
between American Sign Language and other sign
communication systems throughout the history.
American Deaf people have always known that
American Sign Language is the true language of
their community, in spite of many other views that it
is not a language. Since a well-known linguist,
William Stokoe, proved that ASL is a language in the
1960 s, ASL has slowly become accepted and
respected as the language of the Deaf people. The
course introduces the "Deaf President Now"
movement in March 1988, which has a great impact
on the increase in ASL classes taught in Modern
Language programs and on Deaf people as a whole.
"Deaf President Now" gives Deaf people reason to
have pride in their language and increases
employment opportunities in teaching ASL and
related fields. ASL as a language finally has earned
the respect and recognition from hearing people.
Does the course provide students with
access to the thinking and feelings of the
disciplines respected and acknowledged
contributors? :
The textbooks provide students with the various
perspectives from deaf, Deaf, hard-of-hearing, latedeafened people on their positive and negative
experiences. Also there is an in-class activity
compromised of a Deaf community panel. The
instructor invites several deaf people with different
education, socioeconomic status, language &
communication styles, and cultural and pathological
backgrounds. The students have an opportunity to
ask questions of the Deaf community panel and
discuss their experiences.
Does the course provide students an
opportunity to meaningfully interact with
the texts of the discipline and with each
other, through discussion and writing about
the perspectives on the human condition
that such texts provide?:
The class includes a combination of lectures,
readings, class discussions and in-class activities.
Students are required to attend at least one Deaf
community event and write a paper about it. During
the class, each student is able to share their
observations and experience after they have
attended such an event and learned the purpose of
the organization that sponsored the event. This
event helps students to be aware of many
organizations or publications, services, activities and
whom they serve and for what purposes.
Does the course and the discipline to
which it belongs value and seriously
examine the subjective response to human
experiences?:
Overall the Deaf Studies course seriously examines
the importance of viewing Deaf people as a cultural
minority group within American majority. Although
Deaf people share many American values, they also
have their own unique Deaf values, beliefs,
language and rules of interaction. Students focus on
this particular response to human experience.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description,Requisites,Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Soc/PS280B
Current course title: Community Service and Action Seminar
Proposed transcript Com Service/Action Seminar
title:
Current description: Provides a forum for students engaged in cooperative education
worksite placements in the social sciences to develop personal,
group, and organizational skills for a successful community service
and career development experience. Seminar becomes
interdisciplinary and team-taught, integrating psychological, political
science and sociological perspectives to enhance the service ethic.
Proposed
description:
This interdisciplinary seminar provides an integrative framework for
students engaged in community service and cooperative education
work. Focuses on social interaction, group and organizational
processes, and public policies related to service, advocacy, and
social change placements.
Reason for
Psychology is no longer a partner in the seminar, and course may
description change: be taught by one instructor in the online format.
Current learning
outcomes:
1. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively within groups to
achieve organizational goals.
2. Demonstrate increased, effective personal involvement in
community issues and public policy-making.
3. Demonstrate awareness of career options consistent with
personal interests and values.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
1. Demonstrate the ability to communicate and work effectively in a
range of organizational frameworks engaged in service, advocacy
and social change.
2. Demonstrate increased effective personal involvement in
community issues and public policy.
3. Develop interpersonal, organizational, and political skills to
advance individual and collective interests.
Reason for learning New learning outcomes represent changed course content and
outcomes change: focus. Career options are not a direct focus of the seminar.
Current
corequisites:
Proposed
corequisites:
Soc280A or PS280A or C, 1, 2, or 3 credit hours
Is there an impact
on other SACs:
yes
Same
We are informing the Psychology SAC, which will decide on
Inactivation or other options. Both Soc and PS SACs must approve
these changes.
Is there an impact
on other
depts/campuses:
yes
Implem_term:
Implem_year:
This course is currently required for Gerontology Certificate and
Degree. This program is under Soc SAC.
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Jan Abushakrah
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Current course number: SOC 280B / PS 280B
Current course title:
Community Service & Action Seminar
Current lecture hours:
Proposed_lecture:
Current load:
Proposed load:
Current credits:
Proposed credit hours:
3
2
Reason for change:
This course was originally an interdisciplinary, team-taught course in
political science, sociology, and psychology. The psychology
department has dropped its involvement, and we have thus adjusted the
course content to focus more on sociological and political science
issues.
Are outcomes affected?: YES
Are degrees/certs
YES
affected?:
Is there an impact on
departments or
campuses:
YES
Currently, this course is only being offered on the Sylvania campus, but
there are plans to office it at other campuses. It is required by the
Gerontology Certificate & Degree, including the Distance Learning
Certificate slated to begin Fall 2005.
Is there potential conflict YES
with another sac?:
This is a cross-listed PS and SOC course. The Psychology SAC
withdrew from the course, SAC meeting, 12/20/2004. Jan Abushakrah
will "shepherd" the curriculum change through PS and SOC.
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact email:
Jan Abushakrah
[email protected]
DATE:
1/30/2005
PREPARED BY: Jan Abushakrah
COURSE NUMBER: Soc/PS280B
COURSE TITLE: Community Service and Action Seminar
CREDIT HOURS: 2
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 2
LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK:
LAB HOURS PER WEEK (INCLUDES CO-OP, PRACTICUM OR CLINICAL):
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 10
SPECIAL FEE: N/A
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: This interdisciplinary seminar provides an integrative framework
and cooperative
education work. It focuses on social interaction, group and organizational processes, and public policies related t
placements. Co-Requisite:
Enrollment in at least 1 hour Soc/PS280A, or PS280C.
INTENDED OUTCOME(S) FOR THE COURSE:
1. Demonstrate the ability to communicate and work effectively in a range of organizational frameworks engaged
2. Demonstrate increased effective personal involvement in community issues and public policy.
3. Develop interpersonal, organizational, and political skills to advance individual and collective interests.
COURSE ACTIVITIES & DESIGN: (OPTIONAL) Course activities can include a variety of readings, discussions,
problem-solving analyses, group and individual exercises, and reflective journals related to the course content.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: (CASE STUDIES, GROUP PROJECTS, INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS, Q
through a
variety of individual and group projects, presentations, case studies, field research, and reflective journals.
COURSE CONTENT: (THEMES, CONCEPTS, ISSUES, COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS)
1. Developing active listening and communication skills
2. Understanding the helping relationship, and developing basic helping skills
3. Building community and promoting empowerment
4. Practicing mediation, principled negotiation, and alternatives to adversarial conflict
5. Analyzing group and organizational processes, and learning how to work effectively in diverse contexts
6. Exploring the dynamics of service, advocacy, and social change organizations
7. Developing basic political lobbying skills
8. Exploring the process of developing, implementing, and influencing public policy
9. Exploring values and ethics involved in professional service, advocacy, and social change work
10. Appreciating diversity and working effectively with diverse populations
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number, Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course number: CG 0690
Proposed course number:CG 110
Current course title:
Stopping Test Anxiety
Current description:
This course is designed to teach students ways of coping with
excessive test-taking anxiety. Students will learn the techniques of
progressive relaxation and test-taking strategies to be used as tools
for reducing test anxiety.
Proposed description:
This course is to develop strategies to manage anxiety, improve
study and test taking skills, identify and reduce barriers to test-taking,
and incorporate techniques of relaxation.
Reason for description Further development of course and desired outcomes.
change:
Current learning
outcomes:
1. Understand emotions that trigger the test anxiety response.
2. Demonstrate progressive relaxation techniques.
3. Develop additional test-taking skills to enhance student success.
4. Use new knowledge to increase higher satisfaction during tests
and with test results.
5. Develop higher self-esteem as a result of increased success on
tests, and increased self-awareness.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
1. Recognize thoughts and emotions that trigger anxiety response.
2. Demonstrate positive study and test taking skills that enhance
student success.
3. Use new knowledge for successful test taking.
4. Demonstrate relaxation techniques.
5. Assess course effectiveness.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
Further development of course
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
winter
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Catherine Sills
[email protected]
no
no
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
CG 209
Current description:
Explores a broad range of job search techniques, including
building a job network, compiling appropriate information for job
applications, targeting cover letters and resumes, typical interview
questions and techniques. Promotes an overall understanding of
the job search process.
Job Finding Skills
Proposed description: Explores a broad range of job search techniques, including
building a job network, compiling appropriate information for job
applications, targeting cover letters and resumes, typical interview
questions and techniques. Promotes an overall understanding of
the job search process and job success.
Reason for
description change:
This course is being expanded to variable credit; 1, 2, or 3
credits. The new description reflects the changes being made in
the course.
Current learning
outcomes:
Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
1) Identify personal characteristics and professional skills that
relate to appropriate career choices.
2) Research current occupational and job market information
integrating acquired knowledge of personal characteristics and
professional skills.
3) Utilize decision-making skills to develop appropriate job search
plans and materials.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
1) Identify personal characteristics and professional skills that
relate to appropriate career choices.
2) Research current occupational and job market information
integrating acquired knowledge of personal characteristics and
professional skills.
3) Utilize decision-making skills to develop appropriate job search
plans and materials.
4) Identify appropriate workplace attitudes and behaviors that
contribute to job success.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
This course is being expanded to variable credit; 1, 2, or 3
credits. The new outcomes and concepts include appropriate onthe-job behaviors, attitudes, and skills.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other yes
depts/campuses?:
This change to increased and variable credit is due to a
cooperative agreement between the CG SAC and the PCC
Sylvania Machine Technology program, which needed such a
course for their students.
Implementation term: winter
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Catherine Sills
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Contact/Credit Hour Change
Current course number:
Current course title:
CG 209
Job Finding Skills
lecture hours:
Current
1
Proposed
1 to 3
Total contact hours:
1
1 to 3
credits:
Reason:
1
1 to 3
Course has been revised to include content and
skill building in workplace expectations and
appropriate workplace behaviors.
Are outcomes affected?:
YES
Are degrees/certs affected?:
No
lab hours:
lec/lab hours:
load:
Is the an impact on other depts. or YES
campuses?:
Change is due to cooperative agreement between
CG SAC and Machine Technology program.
Is there potential conflict with
another sac?:
YES
Change is due to cooperative agreement between
CG SAC and Machine Technology program.
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Winter
2005
Contact name:
Contact email:
Catherine Sills
[email protected]
This CCOG has not been submitted
electronically.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Requisites, Learning Outcomes
CG 130
Current Course
Number:
Current Course Title: Today's Careers
Current Description: Discuss how technology is affecting the work place, current labor
market trends, traditional and alternative work styles, and what
employers expect of employees. Covers different ways to gather
information about specific occupations. Presents a variety of career
areas, and helps develop a plan for next steps. Provides
opportunities for self-exploration, and analysis of our changing work
world. Prerequisite: College level reading or writing skills as defined
by placement in WR 115, or RD 115, or instructor permission.
Proposed
Description:
Explores career opportunities and how technology and the global
economy are impacting jobs in the United States. Introduces various
career areas and covers how to research occupations. Provides
information about different types of employers and industries within
our changing work world.
More accurately reflects what is being taught in the course. Better
Reason For
Description Change: describes original intent of course.
1. Utilize various self assessment tools.
2. Research current occupational information integrating acquired
knowledge of personal characteristics
3. Utilize acquired knowledge to make informed career related
decisions
Proposed Learning 1.Identify the impact of technology and the global economy on
careers in the United States.
Outcomes:
2.Describe how different jobs are grouped and represented in the
United States.
3.Research occupations of interest.
Reason For Learning Further differentiates CG130 from CG140.Focus is on understanding
Outcomes Change: current conditions in the world of work as well as information
pertaining to specific careers. Deemphasizes self exploration.
Current Learning
Outcomes:
Current
Prerequisites:
Proposed
Prerequisites:
RD & WR 115
NONE
no
Will This Impact
Other Sacs?:
no
Will This Impact
Other
Dept/Campuses?:
Implementation
Term:
Implementation
Year:
winter
Contact Name:
Contact E-Mail:
Simone Frank
[email protected]
2005
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Requisites
Current Course Number:
CG 140A
Current Course Title:
Proposed Course Title:
Reason For Title Change:
Career Development
Career and Life Planning
More accurately reflects course content.
Current Description:
This course provides students with the tools needed to
make informed career decisions. Students will assess
skills, values, interests, personality, obstacles, attitudes
and approaches to decision making. The course provides
instruction on how to research career information, gain
access to information materials, and methods of exploring
careers. Prerequisite College-level reading and writing
skills, as defined by placement into WR 115 or RD 115 or
instructor permission.
Proposed Description:
This course provides students with the tools needed to
make informed career decisions. Students will assess
skills, values, interests, personality, obstacles, attitudes
and approaches to decision making. The course provides
instruction on how to research career information, gain
access to information materials, and methods of exploring
careers. College-level reading and writing skills, as defined
by placement into WR 115 or RD 115 recommended.
Reason For Description
Change:
Changed prerequisite requirement
Current Learning
Outcomes:
Students who successfully complete this course will be
able to:
1.Identify personal characteristics that relate to appropriate
life choices pertaining to work, leisure, and education.
2. Research current occupational information integrating
acquired knowledge of personal characteristics.
3. Utilize decision-making skills to affect life-long changes;
i.e., to make informed choices.
Proposed Learning
Outcomes:
no change
Current Prerequisites:
Proposed Prerequisites:
RD 115& WR 115 or instructor permission
RD 115 or WR115 recommended
Will This Impact Other
Sacs?:
Will This Impact Other
Depts/Campuses?:
no
Implementation Term:
Implementation Year:
winter
2005
Contact Name:
Contact E-Mail:
Simone Frank
[email protected]cc.edu
no
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description, Requisites
Current Course
Number:
Current Course Title:
Proposed Course
Title:
Reason For Title
Change:
Current Description:
CG 140B
Proposed
Description:
This course provides students with the tools needed to make informed
career decisions. Students will assess skills, values, interests,
personality, obstacles, attitudes and approaches to decision making.
The course provides instruction on how to research career information,
gain access to information materials, and methods of exploring
careers. College-level reading and writing skills, as defined by
placement into WR 115 or RD 115 recommended
Reason For
Description Change:
changed prerequisite
Current Learning
Outcomes:
Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
1.Identify personal characteristics that relate to appropriate life choices
pertaining to work, leisure, and education. 2. Research current
occupational information integrating acquired knowledge of personal
characteristics. 3.Utilize decision-making skills to affect life-long
changes; i.e., to make informed choices.
Proposed Learning
Outcomes:
no change
Career Development
Career and Life Planning
More accurately reflects course content
This course provides students with the tools needed to make informed
career decisions. Students will assess skills, values, interests,
personality, obstacles, attitudes and approaches to decision making.
The course provides instruction on how to research career information,
gain access to information materials, and methods of exploring
careers. Prerequisite: College-level reading and writing skills, as
defined by placement into WR 115 or RD 115, or instructor permission
Current Prerequisites:
Proposed Prerequisites:
RD115 or WR115 or instructor permission
RD115 or WR115 recommended
no
Will This Impact Other Sacs?:
Will This Impact Other Depts/Campuses?: no
Implementation Term:
Implementation Year:
winter
2005
Contact Name:
Contact E-Mail:
Simone Frank
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
Course title:
Transcript title:
RAD 216
Radiography Registry Review
Radiography Registry Review
Lecture hours:
Weekly contact hours:
Total credits:
2
2
2
Reason for new course:
This had been imbedded in another course but needs to stand separately
for use of Web CT. It needed a separate CRN for testing purposes, etc.
Course description:
Provides review of the major content areas appearing in the national
certification examination. Requires class participation, review of radiation
protection, equipment operation and maintenance, image production and
evaluation, radiographic procedures and patient care. Students must
demonstrate an understanding of these subjects by successful completion
of unit examinations and at least one mock registry examination.
Prerequisite(s):
Prereq/concurrent:
Corequisite(s):
None
RAD 240
None
Learning outcomes:
Students will demonstrate competency in all subject content areas.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar courses
existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Required
Is there impact on degrees or NO
certificates:
Is there an impact on another NO
dept or campus?:
Have other sacs been
contacted?:
Description of contact:
NO
Is there an increase in costs
for library or av dept?:
NO
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Summer
2005
Joan Daly
[email protected]
COURSE NUMBER:
COURSE TITLE:
CREDIT HOURS:
NUMBER OF WEEKS:
I.
RAD 216
PREPARED BY: Virginia Vanderford
Radiography Registry Review
2
11
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION
Prerequisite/Concurrent: RAD 240. Provides review of the major content areas appearing in the national
certification examination. Requires class participation, review of radiation protection, equipment operation
and maintenance, image production and evaluation, radiographic procedures and patient care. Students
must demonstrate an understanding of these subjects by successful completion of unit examinations and at
least one mock registry examination.
II.
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION
RAD 216 is required as part of the Radiography Program and must be successfully completed prior to
sitting for the national certification examination. Prior to enrolling in this course the student must be
accepted into the Radiography Program and have successfully completed all prerequisite courses.
III.
INTENDED OUTCOME FOR THE COURSE:
Demonstrate competency in all subject content areas.
IV.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN
The student will demonstrate knowledge in all content areas by actively participating in course activities
that include both individual and group projects. Attendance is required and is calculated into the final
course grade.
V.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES
1.
Successful completion of all course assignments.
2.
Successful completion of all unit examinations.
3.
Pass mock registry examination in preparation for the national certification examination.
VI.
COURSE CONTENT
The student will demonstrate an understanding of the following themes, issues, concepts and develop the
following skills:
THEMES, CONCEPTS, ISSUES
Radiation Protection
Equipment Operation and Maintenance
Image Production and Evaluation
Radiographic Procedures
Patient Care
COURSE CONTENT/OUTCOME GUIDE
DATE:
December, 2004
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Change
Current course
number:
Current course title:
RAD 240
Radiographic Clinic VIII
Current lab hours:
10
Proposed lab hours: 8
Total contact hours:
Proposed contact
hours:
10
8
Current credits:
Proposed credit
hours:
10
8
Reason for change:
Removing imbedded didactic portion to stand separately as it's own
course for registry preparation.
Are outcomes
affected?:
Are degrees/certs
affected?:
Impact on
departments
campuses:
Is there potential
conflict with another
sac?:
NO
No
NO
NO
Implementation term: Summer
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact email:
Joan Daly
[email protected]
COURSE NUMBER:
COURSE TITLE:
CREDIT HOURS:
CLINICAL HOURS PER WEEK:
NUMBER OF WEEKS:
I.
RAD 240
Radiography Clinic VIII
8
32
11
PREPARED BY: Joan Daly
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
Prerequisite: RAD 230. Provides clinical education experience in affiliated hospital
radiology department under supervision of registered radiographer and radiologist.
Includes application of equipment manipulation and operation, radiological imaging
procedures, radiation protection and patient care. Requires clinical competencies,
objectives, evaluations, attendance, terminal clinical competencies in radiological
imaging and demonstrate competency in written and oral medical communications and
mathematical functions.
II.
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION
The student will learn the necessary skills that are required to function in the clinical
area as a radiologic technologist, and will demonstrate proper work ethic as a
radiographer and health care provider. The course is designed as Competent/Proficient
Level 4.
Radiography Clinic VIII (RAD 240) is required as part of the Radiologic Technology
degree program. It is also a prerequisite to taking the American Registry of
Radiography. Transferability of credit depends entirely upon the institution to which the
student wishes to transfer. Prior to enrolling in this course the student must be accepted
in the Radiography Program and have successfully completed the prerequisite courses.
III.
INTENDED OUTCOME FOR THE COURSE:
Competently perform the duties of an entry level radiographer.
IV.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN
Level 4 COMPETENT/PROFICIENT:
The student must have the ability to perform all skills accurately and demonstrate
knowledge and judgement independently within an appropriate time frame and
parameters. The student must demonstrate the ability to critique images to satisfy the
diagnostic needs of the department and demonstrate the ability to “run” a radiographic
room independently with indirect supervision. The student must satisfactorily meet this
level to warrant program graduation.
a:\rad240.2004
1
Attendance and active participation in clinical activities is required. The student will
perform independently doing routine radiography for each assigned area during the
term; select exposure factors; provide patient care; demonstrate appropriate
communication and interpersonal skills; minimize radiation to patient, self and other
personnel; and complete assigned room objectives.
Indirect supervision by a radiographer will be provided by the clinical affiliate at all times.
Students’ radiographs must be reviewed by either a radiographer, physician or
radiologist prior to releasing the patient or submitting the radiographs.
Safety is extremely important, and is taught throughout this program. Pertinent safety
points are noted in this course.
V.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
1.
2.
3.
Complete remaining required clinical competencies and terminal competencies.
Complete (5) clinical rotations, successfully.
Complete the clinical syllabus, room objectives and film critiques, successfully.
_____________________________________________________________________
VI.
COURSE CONTENT:
The student will demonstrate understanding of the following themes, issues, concepts,
and develop the following skills:
THEMES, CONCEPTS, ISSUES
Technique Chart Formulation
Radiographer’s Job Duties
Quality Improvement/Assurance
COMPETENCIES OR PROCESS SKILLS
1.
Perform the duties of an entry level radiographer for a given clinical rotation
(to include general, fluoroscopic, mobile, surgical and emergency procedures).
2.
Develop a technique chart for an adult spine, pelvis, ribs and mobile chest, and
pediatric chest, pelvis and abdomen.
3.
Evaluate a Diagnostic Imaging Department’s Quality Improvement/Assurance
Program.
a:\rad240.2004
2
a:\rad240.2004
3
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title
Current course number: OMT 111
Current course title:
General Medical Terminology
Proposed course title:
Introduction to Medical Terminology
Proposed transcript title: Intro to Medical Terminology
Reason for title change: More accurately reflects the emphasis of course content distinguishes this 3 credit hour course from 4 credit hour MP
111 General Medical Terminology
Will this impact other
sacs?:
no
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Joanne Harris
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
MTH 91
Course title:
Transcript title:
Intermediate Algebra Part I
Intermediate Algebra Part I
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact hours:
Total credits:
1
3
2
Reason for new
course:
To change the experimental MTH 99A course into the real MTH
91 course (1st half of MTH 95).
Course description:
Functions are investigated graphically, numerically, symbolically
and verbally in real world settings. The concept of a function is
introduced, with emphasis on linear and rational functions.
Technology is integrated into all aspects of the course, as
appropriate. Students communicate results in oral and written
form. Graphing calculator required TI-89 recommended. Must
take both MTH 91 and MTH 92 to satisfy MTH 95 requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MTH 65 and placement
into WR 115.
Prerequisite(s):
Prereq/concurrent:
MTH 65 or MTH 70
Placed into WR 115
Learning outcomes:
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
Creatively use mathematical and other problem solving
strategies to formulate problems, to solve problems using
multiple approaches, and to interpret results.
Make mathematical connections by recognizing and creating
linear and rational models of nontrivial real world situations.
Demonstrate mastery of linear and rational functions.
Meet the prerequisites for the study of college-level
mathematics.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Required
2
Is there impact on
YES
degrees or certificates:
Description of impact Those programs where MTH 95 is the last mathematics course
on deg/cert:
needed (i.e. MTH 91, 92 will do the same as MTH 95 in terms of
finishing the program).
Is there an impact on
another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs been
contacted?:
NO
Is there an increase in NO
costs for library or av
dept?:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Matthew Funk
[email protected]
COURSE OUTCOME GUIDE
FACULTY SHALL “INSTRUCT STUDENTS, USING APPROVED COURSE
OUTCOME GUIDES DEVELOPED BY COLLEGE-WIDE SUBJECT AREA
FACULTY.” (Article 5.32, 2000-2004 Agreement)
PREPARED BY: Matthew Funk
DATE: January 24, 2005
COURSE NUMBER: MTH 91
COURSE TITLE: Intermediate Algebra Part I
CREDIT HOURS: 2
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 1
LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK:
2
LAB HOURS PER WEEK:
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 10
SPECIAL FEE:
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
Functions are investigated graphically, numerically, symbolically and verbally in real
world settings. The concept of a function is introduced, with emphasis on linear and
rational functions. Technology is integrated into all aspects of the course, as appropriate.
Students communicate results in oral and written form.
Graphing calculator required – TI-89 recommended. Must take both MTH 91 and MTH
92 to satisfy MTH 95 requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MTH 65 and placement into WR 115.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
•
•
•
•
Creatively use mathematical and other problem solving strategies to formulate
problems, to solve problems using multiple approaches, and to interpret results.
Make mathematical connections by recognizing and creating linear and rational
models of nontrivial real world situations.
Demonstrate mastery of linear and rational functions.
Meet the prerequisites for the study of college-level mathematics.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:
All activities will follow the premise that formal definitions and procedures evolve from
the investigation of practical problems. In-class time is primarily activity/discussion
emphasizing problem solving techniques. Activities will include group work.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: Assessment shall include:
1. At least two proctored closed book examinations.
2. Assignments that offer an opportunity to express mathematical concepts in writing.
Assessment should be made on the basis of using correct mathematical syntax,
appropriate use of the English language, and explanation of the mathematical concept.
3. At least two of the following additional measures:
a. Take-home examinations.
b. Graded homework.
c. Quizzes.
d. Group projects.
e. In-class activities.
f. Attendance.
g. Portfolios.
h. Individual projects.
i. Individual student conference.
COURSE CONTENT (Themes, Concepts, Issues, Competencies, and Skills):
THEMES:
• Linear and rational functions
• Graphing
• Algebraic manipulation of absolute value equations and inequalities
• Algebraic manipulation of rational equations, including complex fractions
• Technology
• Problem solving
• Critical thinking
• Communication
• Group work
• Data analysis
SKILLS:
1.0 FUNCTIONS
The goal is to investigate functions represented graphically, symbolically,
numerically and verbally in real world settings. Technology shall be integrated,
as appropriate, in all aspects.
1.1 Given a function represented graphically:
1.1.1 Identify and interpret the domain and range of the function.
1.1.1a Use interval notation to describe the domain and range of a
function.
1.1.2 Identify and interpret the horizontal and vertical intercepts of a
function.
1.1.3 Evaluate f(a); solve f(x) = a, f(x) = g(x), f(x) > g(x), etc.
1.2 Graph functions represented symbolically, numerically, or verbally:
1.2.1 Select the independent and dependent variables.
1.2.2 State plausible domain and range values of the function.
2.0 LINEAR FUNCTIONS
The goal is to explore, analyze, and master linear functions.
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
Demonstrate the prerequisite skills of:
2.1.1 writing the equation of a line given two points or given a graph.
2.1.2 graphing linear functions using a variety of methods.
Solve applications in which students must find the equation of a linear
function using y = mx + b and y − y1 = m(x − x1).
Solve linear systems of three equations in three unknowns, and
applications.
Solve compound linear inequalities of one variable presented in symbolic
form, representing solutions using number-line notation, set-builder
notation, and interval notation.
Solve absolute value equations and inequalities, expressing solutions to the
latter using number-line notation, set-builder notation, and interval notation.
3.0 RATIONAL EXPRESSIONS AND EQUATIONS (INCLUDING COMPLEX
FRACTIONS)
The goal is to algebraically manipulate rational expressions and to solve rational
equations.
3.1 Simplify, multiply, and divide rational expressions.
3.2 Add and subtract rational expressions.
3.3 Simplify complex fractions.
3.4 Solve rational equations.
3.5 Applications to formulas, and modeling problems involving work and
motion.
4.0 TECHNOLOGY
The goal is to use technology to enhance understanding of concepts in this course.
4.1
4.2
Demonstrate the skills of
4.1.1 entering equations in the y = menu
4.1.2 setting domain, range, scale values, and using some zoom
features
4.1.3 incorporating the graphing functionalities of
4.1.3a zero/root
4.1.3b fmax, fmin
4.1.3c value/eval
4.1.3d intersect
4.1.4 using the table feature
Use the abs feature of the calculator to
4.2.1 find the absolute value of given real numbers
4.2.2 graph absolute value functions
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
MTH 92
Course title:
Transcript title:
Intermediate Algebra Part II
Intermediate Algebra Part II
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
1
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
2
Weekly contact hours: 3
Total credits:
2
Reason for new
course:
To change the experimental MTH 99B course into the real MTH
92 course (2nd half of MTH 95).
Course description:
Functions are investigated graphically, numerically, symbolically
and verbally in real world settings. Radical, quadratic, and
exponential functions are explored. Technology is integrated
into the course, as appropriate. Students communicate results
in oral and written form. Graphing calculator required TI-89
recommended. Must take both MTH 91 and MTH 92 to satisfy
MTH 95 requirements. Prerequisite: Successful completion of
MTH 91 and placement into WR 115.
Prerequisite(s):
Prereq/concurrent:
MTH 91
Placed into WR 115
Learning outcomes:
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
Creatively use mathematical and other problem solving
strategies to formulate problems, to solve problems using
multiple approaches, and to interpret results.
Make mathematical connections by recognizing and creating
radical, quadratic, and exponential models of nontrivial real
world situations.
Demonstrate mastery of radical and quadratic functions.
Demonstrate familiarity with exponential functions.
Meet the prerequisites for the study of college-level
mathematics.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Required
Is there impact on
YES
degrees or certificates:
Description of impact Those programs where MTH 95 is the last mathematics course
on deg/cert:
needed (i.e. MTH 91, 92 will do the same as MTH 95 in terms of
finishing the program).
Is there an impact on
another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs been
contacted?:
NO
Is there an increase in NO
costs for library or av
dept?:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Winter
2006
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Matthew Funk
[email protected]
COURSE OUTCOME GUIDE
FACULTY SHALL “INSTRUCT STUDENTS, USING APPROVED COURSE
OUTCOME GUIDES DEVELOPED BY COLLEGE-WIDE SUBJECT AREA
FACULTY.” (Article 5.32, 2000-2004 Agreement)
PREPARED BY: Matthew Funk
DATE: January 24, 2005
COURSE NUMBER: MTH 92
COURSE TITLE: Intermediate Algebra Part II
CREDIT HOURS: 2
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 1
LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK:
2
LAB HOURS PER WEEK:
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 10
SPECIAL FEE:
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
Functions are investigated graphically, numerically, symbolically and verbally in real
world settings. Radical, quadratic, and exponential functions are explored. Technology is
integrated into the course, as appropriate. Students communicate results in oral and
written form. Graphing calculator required – TI-89 recommended. Must take both MTH
91 and MTH 92 to satisfy MTH 95 requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MTH 92 and placement into WR 115.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
•
•
•
•
•
Creatively use mathematical and other problem solving strategies to formulate
problems, to solve problems using multiple approaches, and to interpret results.
Make mathematical connections by recognizing and creating radical, quadratic, and
exponential models of nontrivial real world situations.
Demonstrate mastery of radical and quadratic functions.
Demonstrate familiarity with exponential functions.
Meet the prerequisites for the study of college-level mathematics.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:
All activities will follow the premise that formal definitions and procedures evolve from
the investigation of practical problems. In-class time is primarily activity/discussion
emphasizing problem solving techniques. Activities will include group work.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: Assessment shall include:
1. At least two proctored closed book examinations.
2. Assignments that offer an opportunity to express mathematical concepts in writing.
Assessment should be made on the basis of using correct mathematical syntax,
appropriate use of the English language, and explanation of the mathematical concept.
3. At least two of the following additional measures:
a. Take-home examinations.
b. Graded homework.
c. Quizzes.
d. Group projects.
e. In-class activities.
f. Attendance.
g. Portfolios.
h. Individual projects.
i. Individual student conference.
COURSE CONTENT (Themes, Concepts, Issues, Competencies, and Skills):
THEMES:
• Radical, quadratic, and exponential functions
• Graphing
• Algebraic manipulation of radical expressions and equations
• Algebraic manipulation of quadratic equations
• Algebraic manipulation of simple exponential equations
• Technology
• Problem solving
• Critical thinking
• Communication
• Group work
• Data analysis
1.0 RADICAL EXPRESSIONS AND EQUATIONS
The goal is to algebraically manipulate radical expressions and to solve radical
equations.
1.1 Find nth roots.
1.2 Explore the properties of rational exponents including the product rule,
quotient rule and power rule.
1.3 Use the product rule to multiply and simplify radicals.
1.4 Use the quotient rule to divide and simplify radicals.
1.5 Add and subtract radical expressions.
1.6 Rationalize denominators and numerators.
1.7 Solve radical equations.
1.8 Explore applications of radicals in geometric applications, such as the
Pythagorean Theorem and the distance formula.
2.0 QUADRATIC FUNCTIONS
The goal is to explore, analyze, and master quadratic functions.
2.1 Demonstrate the prerequisite skills of:
2.1.1 graphing (by hand) a quadratic function in standard form,
f(x) = ax2 + bx + c, by identifying the axis of symmetry, vertex,
horizontal, and vertical intercepts.
2.1.2 using the quadratic formula from memory.
2.1.3 solving quadratic equations using graphs, square roots, and
factoring.
2.2 Solve quadratic equations for complex solutions.
2.2.1 Add, subtract, and multiply complex numbers.
2.2.2 Conjugates and division of complex numbers and powers of i.
2.2.3 Distinguish between exact and approximate solutions of quadratic
equations.
2.3 Explore quadratic functions in vertex form, f(x) = a(x − h) 2 + k.
2.3.1 Convert from standard form to vertex form by completing the
square.
2.3.2 Investigate a, h, and k in terms of transformations.
2.3.3 Graph quadratic functions that are in vertex form.
2.4 Solve quadratic applications graphically and symbolically.
2.4.1 Applications to minimum and maximum problems.
2.4.2 Determine a reasonable domain and range.
2.4.3 All variables in applications shall be appropriately defined with
units.
2.4.4 Interpret results and check for reasonableness.
2.4.5 Identify and solve equations that are quadratic in form
2.4.6 Given three non-collinear points, find the quadratic function
passing through them algebraically,
2.5 Distinguish quadratic functions from other functions, given symbolically and
graphically.
3.0 EXPONENTIAL FUNCTIONS
The goal is to explore and analyze exponential functions.
3.1 Investigate exponential functions of the form: f(t) = abt.
3.2 Preview the natural base e.
3.3 Graph exponential functions represented symbolically, numerically or
verbally.
3.4 Generate tables for exponential functions represented graphically, verbally,
or symbolically.
3.5 Distinguish exponential functions from other functions given symbolically
and graphically.
3.6 Match an exponential function given in symbolic form to its graph.
3.7 Solve exponential equations algebraically, using the method of equating
bases.
3.8 Find the exponential equation through two points.
3.9 Solve exponential applications graphically.
3.9.1 Determine a reasonable domain and range.
3.9.2 All variables in applications shall be appropriately defined with
units.
3.9.3 Explain, in context, the following geometric properties of an
exponential function represented graphically, symbolically,
numerically and verbally: Vertical intercept, asymptote, increasing
and decreasing.
3.10 Construct new functions from old functions.
3.10.1 Composition of functions
3.10.2 Inverse functions
4.0 TECHNOLOGY
The goal is to use technology to enhance understanding of concepts in this course.
4.1
4.2
Demonstrate the skills of
4.1.1 entering equations in the y = menu
4.1.2 setting domain, range, scale values, and using some zoom
features
4.1.3 incorporating the graphing functionalities of
4.1.3a zero/root
4.1.3b fmax, fmin
4.1.3c value/eval
4.1.3d intersect
4.1.4 using the table feature
Calculate roots of numbers using rational exponents on the calculator.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
MTH 111A
College Algebra for Liberal Arts
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
MTH 95
MTH 92 or MTH 95
Current prerequisites/concurrent:
Proposed prerequisites/concurrent:
Placement into WR 115
Placement into WR 115
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Matthew Funk
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
MTH 111B
College Algebra- Business, Management, Life &
Social Science
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
MTH 95
MTH 92 or MTH 95
Current prerequisites/concurrent:
Placement into WR 115
Proposed prerequisites/concurrent: Placement into WR 115
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Matthew Funk
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
MTH 111C
College Algebra for Math, Science, &
Engineering
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
MTH 95
MTH 92 or MTH 95
Current prerequisites/concurrent:
Proposed prerequisites/concurrent:
Placement into WR 115
Placement into WR 115
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Matthew Funk
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
MTH 211
Foundations of Elementary Math I
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
MTH 95 or higher
MTH 92 or MTH 95, or higher
Current prerequisites/concurrent:
Proposed prerequisites/concurrent:
Placement into WR 121
Placement into WR 121
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Matthew Funk
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title
Current course
number:
BCT 100
Current course title:
Proposed course
title:
Proposed transcript
title:
Reason for title
change:
Introduction to the Construction Industry
Overview of the Construction Industry
Current description:
Course Description: Study of management functions in the
construction industry. Planning and scheduling, project
organization and communications, cost control, project and
contract administration, and project close out. Basic construction
industry operation knowledge, or instructor’s permission required.
Proposed
description:
Study of management functions in the construction industry.
Planning and scheduling, project organization and
communications, cost control, project and contract administration,
and project close out. The instructional approach is based on the
general contractor's point of view, and the intent is to provide a
good working knowledge of construction project management
procedures.
Reason for
description change:
We want to incorporate the addendum into the description. We,
also, want to remove the stated prerequisite "Basic construction
industry operation knowledge, or instructor’s permission required."
and clean up the wording.
Overview of Construction
Too many students read the Course Title and think that this class
would not be relevant to someone with years of experience
working in construction. This is not true. We think the proposed
title better reflects the intent of the course and will help stop the
confusion.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Richard Edwards
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title
Current course number:
BCT 102
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript title:
Blueprint Reading for Building Construction
Residential Printreading
Residential Printreading
Reason for title change:
Since we only teach residential, and not commercial,
printreading in the course, the new title more accurately
reflects the course content.
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Kirk Garrison
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title
Current course number: BCT 103
Current course title:
Construction Materials and Methods I
Proposed course title: Residential Materials and Methods
Proposed transcript title: Residential Materials/Methods
Reason for title change: Since this course covers the materials and methods used in
residential, and not commercial, construction, the new title
more accurately reflects what is being taught in the course.
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Kirk Garrison
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
BCT 116
Course title:
Transcript title:
Alternative Building Design and Construction I
Alt Building Design & Const I
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
yes
.324
6
3
Reason for new
course:
This is one of three courses the BCT department is implementing
to teach "green" principles. This and the other two courses, one of
which has already been approved (BCT 206 Sustainable
Construction Practice, are designed to cover sustainability issues
and alternative building construction methods.
Course description: This course introduces students to natural green building
principles used in the design and construction of alternative
buildings such as straw bale, cobb and rammed earth. Student
teams will develop designs by constructing scaled models, and will
then prepare and deliver presentations that defend and promote
their designs.
Learning outcomes: Practice the efficient use of natural and man-made resources in
building construction. Solve building construction problems using
mathematics and natural science. Design a structure using natural
green building principles. Effectively communicate design and
construction strategies.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
NO
degrees or
certificates:
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs
NO
been contacted?:
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation term: Summer
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
Course Number:
BCT 116
Course Title:
Alternative Building Design and Construction I
Course Instructor:
Spencer Hinkle
Credits:
3
Lecture/Lab hrs/week:
6
Number of weeks:
11
Course Description:
This course introduces students to natural green building principles used in the
design and construction of alternative buildings such as straw bale, cobb and
rammed earth. Student teams will develop designs by constructing scaled
models, and will then prepare and deliver presentations that defend and promote
their designs.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
•
•
•
•
Practice the efficient use of natural and man-made resources in building
construction.
Solve building construction problems using mathematics and natural
science.
Design a structure using natural green building principles.
Effectively communicate design and construction strategies.
Outcome Assessment Strategies:
•
•
•
Based on the given use and location of a building, students will determine
alternative building type, solar orientation, shape, and roof style.
Student teams will construct a model of their design.
Student teams will produce PowerPoint presentations showing why they
chose their design and orientation, why the customer should choose their
design, and how they used math and science to support their conclusions.
Themes, Issues & Concepts:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scaling
Internet research
Sustainable Design
Sustainable Materials
Sustainable Methods
Estimating
Quality
Durability
•
•
•
•
Flexibility
Adaptability
Quality Control
Environmental Stewardship
Process Skills:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Research
Interviewing
Persuasion
Teamwork
Evaluation
Critique
Questioning
Presentation
Organization
Critical Thinking
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
BCT 120
Floor Framing
Current prerequisites:
BCT 106, BCT 102, BCT 104 or
departmental approval
Proposed prerequisites:
BCT 106, or department approval
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Robert Steele
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
BCT 121
Wall Framing
Current prerequisites:
BCT 106, BCT 102, BCT 104 or
departmental approval
Proposed prerequisites:
BCT 106, or department approval
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Robert Steele
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course
title:
BCT 123
Current
prerequisites:
BCT 122, BCT 104, BCT 106 or instructor approval
Proposed
prerequisites:
BCT 122 or instructor approval
Current learning
outcomes:
Learners will work safely, as prescribed by OSHA regulations, to
carry out the tasks related to roof framing to industry standards.
Learners will efficiently and accurately estimate roof framing
materials, use the rafter square, rafter tables, rafter framing formulas
and appropriate terminology. Learners will layout, cut and assemble
shed roofs, gable roofs, hip roofs, gable end studs, barge rafters,
fascia, ceiling joists, bird blocking, trusses, and roof sheathing.
Roof Framing 2
Proposed learning Learners will work efficiently, accurately to meet industry standards.
outcomes:
Learners will work safely following OSHA regulations, to carry out the
tasks related to roof framing. Learners will estimate roof framing
materials, using framing formulas and appropriate terminology.
Learners will layout, cut and assemble gambrel roofs, dormer roofs,
bay roofs, California blind valley roofs, Greek return eaves, closed
soffits, skylight framing and related sheathing.
Is there an impact no
on other sacs:
Is there an impact no
on other dept or
campus:
Implem_term:
Implem_year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Robert Steele
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
BCT 129
Course title:
Transcript title:
Mechanical Systems for Kitchens and Bath
Mechanical Sys. Kitchen & Bath
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
yes
Reason for new
course:
This course is designed to augment curriculum offered in BCT 211
Remodeling and help students gain a basic understanding of the
electrical, plumbing, mechanical and lighting systems used in
kitchen and bath remodeling.
Course description:
Covers electrical, plumbing, HVAC systems used in residential
kitchens and baths. Students will become familiar with the
appliances, fixtures and equipment associated with each system.
Code requirements and restrictions will be examined and applied
to remodeling case studies. Students will design general and task
lighting systems for kitchens and baths.
.204
3
3
Learning outcomes: Identify the components of existing kitchen and bath mechanical
systems Design kitchen and bath lighting systems that supply
satisfactory general and task lighting Design effective kitchen and
bath ventilation systems Recognize and specify appliances,
fixtures and equipment that fit customer needs Incorporate safe
and code compliant mechanical systems into kitchen and bath
designs
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
NO
degrees or
certificates:
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs
NO
been contacted?:
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation term: Winter
Implementation year: 2006
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
Date:
01/24/05
Prepared by: Spencer Hinkle CKD
Course Number: BCT 129
Course Name: Mechanical Systems for Kitchens and Baths
Credits: 3 Cr.
Lecture Hr./Week: 3
Number of Weeks: 11
Course description for Publication:
Covers electrical, plumbing, HVAC systems used in residential kitchens and baths. Students
will become familiar with the appliances, fixtures and equipment associated with each
system. Code requirements and restrictions will be examined and applied to remodeling case
studies. Students will design general and task lighting systems for kitchens and baths.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
• Identify the components of existing kitchen and bath mechanical systems
• Design kitchen and bath lighting systems that supply satisfactory general and task
lighting
• Design effective kitchen and bath ventilation systems
• Recognize and specify appliances, fixtures and equipment that fit customer needs
• Incorporate safe and code compliant mechanical systems into kitchen and bath
designs
Outcome Assessment Strategies:
• Students will develop an on-line web “favorites” folder including major lighting,
appliance, plumbing fixture, equipment and hardware product catalogs.
• Students will demonstrate the ability to read appliances and fixture specifications
• Students will write a three page paper comparing a choice of the following - cooking
fuels, electric cook-top elements, faucet materials and construction, lighting
systems, heating systems, or cooling systems
• Students will design a general and task lighting systems for a kitchen or bath
• Students will complete two multiple choice, short answer mastery exams.
Themes, issues and concepts:
• Elements of the electrical system
• Planning for electrical needs
• Kitchen and bath lighting
• Kitchen and bath exhaust systems
• Engineering duct work for low sound and proper air movement
• Kitchen and bath plumbing systems
• Natural and bottled gas
• Heating systems
• Cooling
• Heat pumps
• Kitchen appliances
• Kitchen and bath plumbing fixtures
• Kitchen and bath equipment
Process Skills:
• Research, including internet resources
• Verbal communications
• Written communications
•
Networking
• Critical thinking
• Teamwork
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Description, Requisites
Current course number: BCT133
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript title:
Reason for title change:
Materials and Methods II
Materials and Methods Commercial Construction
Materials for Commercial Cnstr
We want to change the title to better reflect the proposed course
description.
Current description:
Continuation of Construction Materials and Methods I with
emphasis on commercial construction techniques and methods
including building systems and assemblies.
Proposed description:
Materials and Methods used in commercial construction.
techniques and methods including building systems and
assemblies.
Reason for description
change:
This class was originally designed to be a continuation of
Materials and Methods I. Materials and Methods I focuses on
materials and methods used in residential construction. It is our
opinion that the differences in materials and methods used
between residential construction and commercial construction are
so great that it is better to have each of these classes stand alone.
Current prerequisites:
BCT 103
Proposed prerequisites: None
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Richard Edwards
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Requisites
Current course number:
BCT 134
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript title:
Reason for title change:
Construction Scheduling w/MS Project
Construction Scheduling
Construction Scheduling
We do not wish to be tied to one particular software
package.
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
BCT 104
None
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
winter
2006
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Richard Edwards
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title
Current course
number:
BCT 150
Current course title: Mechanical and Electrical Facilities
Proposed course title: Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing
Proposed transcript Mech, Elec and Plumb
title:
Reason for title
change:
The term 'Mechanical' often times is interpreted to mean all of the
trades in CSI Division 15 (Heating, Ventilating and Cooling,
Plumbing, Fire Protection) but, not everyone knows that. We felt
that it is important to let people know that Plumbing is covered in
this course.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: winter
Implementation year: 2006
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Richard Edwards
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
BCT 202
Current description:
Business Principles for Construction
To learn fundamental business principles and practices used in managing
a construction company; learn how to establish objectives in marketing,
operations and finance, and understand the relationship between those
business activities; study planning and management methods for achieving
objectives; learn the general legal requirements of a construction business
in Oregon (employer requirements, accounting and record keeping
practices and compliance with the Construction Contractors Board).
Proposed description: To learn fundamental business principles and practices used in managing
a construction company. Establish objectives in marketing, operations and
finance, and understand the relationship between those business activities.
Study planning and management methods for achieving objectives. Learn
the general legal requirements of a construction business in Oregon
including employer requirements, accounting and record keeping
practices.
Reason for
We need to remove references to the Construction Contractors Board
description change: since we are not an official training center for the CCB.
Current learning
outcomes:
•
•
•
•
•
Proposed learning
outcomes:
•
•
•
•
•
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
To identify typical business issues and study methods for business
decisions and problem solving
Understand the legal requirements and value of record keeping
Develop business management forms or checklists for monitoring
activities
Understand how to delegate and assign roles and responsibilities
Achieve learning objectives on business principles required by the
Oregon Construction Contractors Board.
To identify typical business issues and study methods for business
decisions and problem solving
Understand the legal requirements and value of record keeping
Develop business management forms or checklists for monitoring
activities
Understand how to delegate and assign roles and responsibilities
Achieve learning objectives on business principles.
We need to remove references to the Construction Contractors Board
since we are not an official training center for the CCB.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Richard Edwards
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title
Current course number:
BCT 203
Current course title:
Interior Finish
Current Prerequisite
Proposed Prerequisite
BCT 106
BCT 106 or instructor permission
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Kirk Garrison
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Current course
number:
Current course title:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
BCT 211
Remodeling
Current description:
This class provides a collaborative learning framework in which
students utilize skills learned from previous classes in Hand and
Power Tool Safety and Use, Print reading and Basic Trades
Builders Math to renovate a residential structure. Students will
design, develop materials lists, estimate costs and time needed to
complete the projects, apply for permits, construct and finish the
project within the space and time limitations of the course.
Students will work cooperatively on work crews in the classroom
and in the workshop to practice different roles that maintain
safety, efficiency and quality.
Proposed
description:
Because of the variety of projects and number of specialty trades
engaged in remodeling, this course will focus on business
principles and construction strategies most commonly
encountered by the remodeler. This course covers the business
principles associated with running a successful remodeling
company; the steps necessary in acquiring a building permit;
communicating effectively with sub contractors and clients; handson remodeling projects involving framing, concrete, interior and
exterior finish, and basic electrical, plumbing and mechanical
ventilation. Prerequisites: BCT 102, BCT 104 and BCT 106 or
instructor approval
Reason for
description change:
To improve on, and bring course description up to date
Current learning
outcomes:
1. Students will work together to create a comprehensive checklist
to help them maintain a clean and safe work site, and to provide
barriers and caution indicators to all workers, visitors and
pedestrians in or near the site.
2. Students will complete a reference manual for obtaining
building permits from their local building department. The manual
will contain pertinent information such as when permits are
necessary, proper procedures for obtaining permits, address,
telephone number and contact person at the building department,
the costs for obtaining a permit and the necessary inspections.
3. Students will design working drawings for a remodeling project,
with a materials list, a time of completion estimate and a cost
estimate. Students will examine each others drawings for
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
accuracy of details and measurements and conformity to code
requirements.
4. Students will maintain a journal on the uses of various tools
they use for the first time in the class. The journal will include
specific descriptions and primary uses of the tool and their own
experience using the tool and any related accessories. Students
will document tips and strategy for safe and efficient use of the
tool.
Evaluate building systems, including structural and mechanical,
and apply such knowledge to building design requirements.
Develop effective demolition and construction strategies through
site and design examination
Assemble all necessary documentation, calculate the cost and
obtain building permits
Safely and effectively apply carpentry skills to remodeling tasks
and projects Prepare contract documents, using industry
standards for written and graphic communication.
Accurately develop materials and labor costs for prospective
remodeling projects
Exhibit organizational and communication skills required to bring
remodeling projects from initial concept to competition.
To improve on, and bring outcomes up to date
Current prerequisites: Prerequisite include BCT 102, BCT 104, and BCT 106.
Proposed
Prerequisites: BCT 102, BCT 104 and BCT 106 or instructor
prerequisites:
approval
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description, Requisites, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
Proposed course
title:
Proposed transcript
title:
Reason for title
change:
BCT 213
Current description:
Covers typical residential and commercial plans and practices.
Presents skills for reading residential/commercial blueprints and
applying knowledge to construction property. Residential plans are
reviewed for detail terminology and basic print reading before
moving into commercial plans. Prerequisite BCT 102
Proposed
description:
Covers typical commercial and civil construction plans and
practices. Presents skills for reading blueprints and applying that
knowledge to commercial construction projects. Prerequisite: BCT
102 or industry experience in blueprint reading suggested
Reason for
description change:
Since BCT 102 is a prerequisite for BCT 213 the residential
concepts are already covered. This creates unnecessary
redundancy in this class.
Current learning
outcomes:
To perform commercial building and civil construction tasks,
including project planning, materials identification and assembly
by reading and interpreting architectural prints. To assess plans
and specifications for adequate and or accurate information. To
communicate information found in those documents.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Perform commercial building and civil construction tasks, including
project planning, materials identification and assembly by reading
and interpreting architectural prints. Assess plans and
specifications for adequate and/or accurate information. Effectively
Communicate information found in commercial prints documents
using verbal, written sketching
Advanced Blueprint Reading
Commercial Print Reading
Commercial Print Reading
The SACC is changing the focus of two similar classes, BCT 102
and BCT 213. BCT 102 will focus on residential construction and
BCT 213 will focus on commercial construction. BCT 102 will
remain a prerequisite for BCT 213.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Needed additions determined by the SACC
Current
prerequisites:
Proposed
prerequisites:
BCT 102 or instructor approval.
BCT 102 or industry experience in blueprint reading suggested
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Requisites, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
BCT 218
Current description:
Designed for independent work on cabinet projects. Required to
present shop drawings for instructor approval before beginning.
Students must supply their own materials. Prerequisite: BCT 216
or 217 or 219; or instructor permission
Woodworking Projects
Proposed description: Designed for independent work on cabinet projects. Required to
present shop drawings for instructor approval before beginning.
Students must supply their own materials. Instructor will evaluate
student knowledge of hand and power tool safety at first class
meeting to determine whether skill level is appropriate for
independent work.
Reason for
description change:
This is an enrichment class, not part of the BCT certificate
requirements. Due to the limited offering of prerequisites many
students wanting to take the class are unable to. Also, many of
the students enter the class at a skill level above the prerequisite
level. Because the instructor is constantly having to override the
prerequisites, a test has been developed to help determine
student skill level. This test is currently administered to all new
students so that the instructor can recommend they stay or take
one of the prerequisite classes.
Current learning
outcomes:
To design or select a woodworking project appropriate for their
own ability.
To practice appropriate safe shop and tool safety while working
collaboratively with other students
To accurately and efficiently machine, assemble and finish
woodworking projects
Proposed learning
outcomes:
To design and/or select woodworking projects appropriate to skill
level.
To practice appropriate shop and tool safety while working
collaboratively with others
To accurately and efficiently machine, assemble and finish
woodworking projects
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Better wording
Current prerequisites: BCT 216 or 217 or 219; or instructor permission
Proposed
None
prerequisites:
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
BCT 220
Current description:
Expands on the materials, hardware, outsourcing alternatives,
equipment and techniques necessary to produce industry
standard cabinetry covered in BCT 219. Learn and demonstrate
the safe use of both portable and stationary power equipment.
Includes cabinet construction using the 32 mm system,
fundamentals of kitchen design, kitchen planning, universal
design, and drafting techniques specific to the cabinet industry.
Covers the construction of stile and rail doors.
Proposed
description:
Expands on the data management, materials, hardware,
outsourcing alternatives, equipment and techniques necessary to
produce industry standard cabinetry covered in BCT 219. Includes
cabinet construction using the 32 mm system, and stile & rail door
making. Cabinet installation methods for kitchens and baths are
covered including room preparation, cabinet layout, cabinet
storage, cabinet and countertop installation, appliance installation,
and moldings. Kitchen and bath design skills will be developed by
hand drafting assigned case studies. Prerequisite: BCT 219
Reason for
description change:
Just sharpening the focus of the class. More time will be spent on
cabinet installation and customer communications.
Current learning
outcomes:
To design and construct industry standard cabinets by formulating
and interpreting cabinet shop drawings.
To design machine and build cabinets using the 32 mm system.
To build cabinet systems adhering to the National Kitchen & Bath
Association design rules.
To safely and appropriately use stationary and portable power
tools and hand tools for cabinet machining, assembly and
finishing.
To draft quality shop and working drawings. To install cabinetry to
industry standards.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Design and construct industry standard cabinets Safely and
appropriately use stationary and portable power tools and hand
tools for cabinet machining, assembly and finishing.
Draw accurate, shop and working drawings using industry
accepted presentation standards. Install cabinetry, countertops,
molding and appliances to industry standards
Practice effective verbal, written and illustrative communication
Professional Cabinetmaking II
skills with designers, architects , cabinetmakers and clients
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Sharpening focus Removing "To" from the beginning of each
outcome, Adding communication skills as an outcome
Current prerequisites: BCT 219
Propose prereqs:
None
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2006
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
Current course title:
BCT 225
Construction Project Management
Current description:
Course Description: Study of management functions in the
construction industry. Planning and scheduling, project
organization and communications, cost control, project and
contract administration, and project close out. Basic construction
industry operation knowledge, or instructor’s permission required.
Proposed
description:
Study of management functions in the construction industry.
Planning and scheduling, project organization and
communications, cost control, project and contract administration,
and project close out. The instructional approach is based on the
general contractor's point of view, and the intent is to provide a
good working knowledge of construction project management
procedures.
Reason for
description change:
We want to incorporate the addendum into the description. We,
also, want to remove the stated prerequisite "Basic construction
industry operation knowledge, or instructor’s permission required."
and clean up the wording.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Richard Edwards
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
COURSE NUMBER:
BCT 244
COURSE TITLE:
TRANSCRIPT TITLE:
Kitchen and Bath Cabinet Installation
Kitch and Bath Cab. Install
LECTURE HOURS:
LAB HOURS:
LEC/LAB HOURS:
LOAD TOTAL:
WEEKLY CONTACT
HOURS:
TOTAL CREDITS:
yes
.216
4
2
REASON FOR NEW
COURSE:
This course is designed to teach basic concepts in cabinet
installation which the BCT department has not been able to
integrate into other classes. Cabinet installation is a high
paying skill sub-set of the remodeler and/or cabinetmaker.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will learn professional installation methods of
kitchen and bath cabinetry. Room preparation, cabinet
layout, cabinet storage, cabinet and countertop installation,
appliance installation, moldings will be covered. Customer
relations and job site management techniques will be
explored.
LEARNING OUTCOMES: Prepare a kitchen or bath jobsite for cabinet installation by
assessing working drawings, cabinets and site conditions
Effectively layout and install kitchen and/or bath cabinets
Effectively layout and install countertops and appliances
Maintain client confidence through the use of effective
communication and job management skills
COURSE FORMAT:
On Campus
ARE THERE SIMILAR
COURSES EXISITING:
NO
REQUIRED OR
Elective
ELECTIVE:
IS THERE IMPACT ON
NO
DEGREES OR
CERTIFICIATES:
IS THERE AN IMPACT
NO
ON ANOTHER DEPT OR
CAMPUS?:
HAVE OTHER SACS
NO
BEEN CONTACTED?:
IS THERE AN INCREASE NO
IN COSTS FOR LIBRARY
OR AV DEPT?:
IMPLEMENTATION
TERM:
IMPLEMENTATION
YEAR:
Spring
CONTACT NAME:
CONTACT E-MAIL:
Spencer Hinkle
[email protected]
2006
Date:
11/22/04
Prepared by: Spencer Hinkle
Course Number: BCT 244
Course Name: Kitchen and Bath Cabinet Installation
Credits: 2 Cr.
Lecture Hr./Week: 4
Number of Weeks: 11
Course description for Publication:
Students will learn professional installation methods of kitchen and bath cabinetry. Room
preparation, cabinet layout, cabinet storage, cabinet and countertop installation, appliance
installation, moldings will be covered. Customer relations and job site management
techniques will be explored.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Prepare a kitchen or bath jobsite for cabinet installation by assessing working drawings,
cabinets and site conditions
Effectively layout and install kitchen and/or bath cabinets
Effectively layout and install countertops and appliances
Maintain client confidence through the use of effective communication and job management
skills
Outcome Assessment Strategies:
• Students will develop and organize a three ring binder “Reference Manual” complete
with tool lists, materials lists, forms, and installation procedures
• Students will map a kitchen or bath jobsite and install cabinets complete
• Students will complete two multiple choice, short answer and true and false mastery
exams that covers the course themes, issues and concepts
Themes, issues and concepts:
• Standard cabinet nomenclature
• Cabinet installation tools and equipment
• Face frame and frameless cabinets
• Using and installing cabinet fillers and trim
• Communicating with the customer before, during and upon completion of the
installation
• Communicating with subcontractors before, during and upon completion of the
installation
• Unloading, inspection and storage of cabinetry, appliances, fixtures and other
kitchen and bath equipment
• Measuring and verifying jobsite conditions
• Appliance and equipment documentation
• Cabinet mapping at the jobsite
• Cabinet fastening systems
• Countertop installation
• Jobsite management
Process Skills:
• Reading scaled working drawings for installation information
• Measuring and marking with metric and imperial tape measure
• Reconciling unit dimensions with total dimensions
• Using cabinet installation tools
• Sketching to reveal patterns and meanings through visualization.
• Documenting to facilitate jobsite management
• Working collaboratively with installation team members
• Interpreting manufactures documentation and instructions
• Critical thinking
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
BA 242
Introduction to Investments
Current description:
No change - just adding a recommended
course
Proposed description:
No change - just add the following:
Recommended: MTH 20
Reason for description
change:
Students need to be aware that they need to
know math before taking BA 242.
Will this impact other sacs?: no
Will this impact other
no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Diana Ellis
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
CAS 231
Course title:
Transcript title:
Publisher
CAS 230 Publisher
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
1
Reason for new
course:
4
5
3
Current desktop publishing software company (Adobe) will not be
updating currently used program (PageMaker), which is also cost
prohibitive for students. Also, Publisher is a component of MS
Office and would be more readily available and affordable for
students.
Course description: Students will use a desktop publishing software program to design
and create effective publications that combine text, graphics,
illustrations, and/or photographs such as announcements, fliers,
advertisements, and reports. Create, import, and manipulate text,
graphics, and/or templates through program tools and features.
RECOMMENDED: Placement into RD 115 or WR 115; prior
knowledge and use of Windows technology and CAS 216 or
instructor approval This course is presented in a hands-on lecturelab format. Other methods such as instructional work sheets,
videotapes, demonstrations, or one-on-one instruction may be
used. Out-of-class preparation may be required.
Prerequisite(s):
None
Learning outcomes: Students will be able to:
• Utilize and manage features of the desktop publishing
program to produce publications efficiently and effectively.
• Use critical thinking skills to independently produce
publications.
Course format:
On Campus
Course format:
Online
NO
Are there similar
courses existing:
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
degrees or
certificates:
Is there an impact
on another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs
been contacted?:
NO
NO
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation
term:
Implementation
year:
Fall
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Art Schneider
[email protected]
2005
Course Outcome Guide
Date: January 2005
Prepared by: Kelly Peden, Barb Kaufman
Course Number:
CAS 231
Course Title: Publisher
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours Per Week: 1
Lecture/Lab Hours Per Week:
4
Number of Weeks: 12
Course Description for Publication:
Students will use a desktop publishing software program to design and create effective
publications that combine text, graphics, illustrations, and/or photographs such as
announcements, fliers, advertisements, and reports. Create, import, and manipulate text,
graphics, and/or templates through program tools and features. RECOMMENDED: Placement
into RD 115 or WR 115; prior knowledge and use of Windows technology and CAS 216 or
instructor approval
This course is presented in a hands-on lecture-lab format. Other methods such as instructional
work sheets, videotapes, demonstrations, or one-on-one instruction may be used. Out-of-class
preparation may be required.
Special Fee: Computer Lab Fee, $8
Intended Outcome(s) for the Course:
Students will be able to:
•
•
Utilize and manage features of the desktop publishing program to produce publications
efficiently and effectively.
Use critical thinking skills to independently produce publications.
Outcome Assessment Strategies:
A letter grade will be issued for this course. Assessment tasks may include:
•
•
•
Production tests
Objective tests
Projects with original work
Themes, Concepts, Issues
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Desktop publishing terminology and basic design principles
Creating, editing, and using templates to produce publications
Creating, importing, and manipulating graphics
Creating and manipulating text
Formatting paragraphs, tables, and lists
Enhancing documents through special effects
Using color effectively
Importing and manipulating text and graphics from other sources
Linking Publisher publications with other software applications
May also include:
•
•
•
Effective design and layout rules used in publication industry
Create Web pages from a Publisher publication
Create, edit, and print long publications including supporting pages
Competencies, Skills
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Learn basics of desktop publishing software.
Use and edit templates to create publications.
Import graphics.
Move, size, and crop graphics appropriately.
Create and import text.
Apply attributes of size and style to text to enhance documents.
Use automatic features of software efficiently.
Use color appropriately and effectively.
Demonstrate proper file management techniques.
Demonstrate safe handling and use of hardware and software.
Link Publisher publications with other software applications.
May also include:
•
•
Create Web pages from a Publisher publication.
Create supporting pages for multi-page publications, such as index or table of contents.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Requisites
Current course
number:
Current course title:
CAS 123
Production Keyboarding
Current description:
Rapid keyboarding and accurate proofreading of business letters,
memos, reports, and tables. Increased speed and accuracy of
keyboarding skills. English communication skills necessary.
Recommended: Qualify for RD 115 or WR 115; CAS 216; OS
120, keying 45 wpm by touch; or instructor permission.
Proposed
description:
Rapid keyboarding and accurate proofreading of business letters,
memos, reports, and tables. Increased speed and accuracy of
keyboarding skills. English communication skills necessary.
Prerequisite: CAS 216. Recommended: Qualify for RD 115 or WR
115, OS 120 (Business Editing Skills), keying 45 wpm by touch.
Additional lab hours may be required, consult instructor.
Reason for
description change:
The SAC recognized that students need to possess knowledge of
MS Word in order to succeed in the class. The "recommended"
requirement was not working.
Current
prerequisites:
Proposed
prerequisites:
None
CAS 216
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Art Schneider
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
CAS 133
Current description:
This is a hands-on computer literacy course for beginners.
Includes mouse and windows basics and file management. Use
word processing, spreadsheet, and database software.
Introduction to email and Internet basics. Recommended: Qualify
to enter RD115 or WR115. Keyboarding by touch is
recommended. Additional lab hours may be required.
Basic Computer Skills - MS Office
Proposed description: This is a hands-on computer literacy course for beginners.
Includes mouse and Windows basics and file management. Use
MS Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, email, and Internet basics.
An overview of the MyPCC Portal website is also included.
Qualify to enter RD115 or WR115. Keyboarding by touch is highly
recommended. Additional lab hours required.
Reason for
description change:
To include the new content we added with the credit change.
Current learning
outcomes:
Use specialized vocabulary associated with computers and
software
Use software applications to create basic business documents
Use basic file management to organize files
Use and Understand Basic Internet and Email Tools
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Use specialized vocabulary associated with computers and
software
Use MS Office applications to create basic business
documents
Use basic file management to organize files
Use and Understand Basic Internet and Communications Tools
Select and use appropriate software for a specific task
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
To include the new content we added with the credit change.
Will this impact other yes
sacs?:
How other sacs may
be impacted:
I have contacted other SAC Chairs about the changes.
Will this impact other yes
depts/campuses?:
How other
depts/campuses will
be impacted:
I have contacted other SAC Chairs about the changes.
Implementation term: fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Art Schneider
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Current course number:
Current course title:
Lecture
Lab
Lec/Lab
Load
Contact
Credits:
CAS 133
Basic Computer Skills - MS Office
Current
1
Proposed
3
4
2
5
3
5
4
Reason for change:
1. Added an overview of the "MyPCC Portal". This will
improve student's skills in using and understanding e-mail
and introduce the other features of MyPCC. This will be a
great overview for students when instructors use MyPCC for
their course work.
2. Added hands-on training for MS PowerPoint. This
additional content will improve the student’s understanding
and use of PowerPoint. We have been asked by other
programs to include this application.
3. Changed Access (database application) to a hands-on
component. This change will result in greater understanding
of the content and will lead to a basic understanding and
use of the application.
Are outcomes affected?:
Are degrees/certs affected?:
YES
YES
Impact on
Departments campuses:
YES
I have contacted other SAC's and received no concerns.
Is there potential conflict with
another sac?:
Impact on sacs:
Implem. Term:
Contact name:
Contact email:
YES
I have contacted other SAC's and received no concerns.
Fall 2005
Art Schneider
[email protected]
Date: December 8, 2004
Prepared by: Linda Bruss, Pat Lewis, Verna Reardon, Art Schneider, Russ Erdman
Course Number: CAS 133
Course Title: Basic Computer Skills/MS Office
Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours per Week: 3
Lecture/Lab Hours per Week: 2
Number of Weeks: 12
Course Description for Publication:
This is a hands-on computer literacy course for beginners. Includes mouse and Windows
basics and file management. Use MS Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, email, and Internet
basics. An overview of the MyPCC Portal website is also included. Qualify to enter RD115
or WR115. Keyboarding by touch is highly recommended. Additional lab hours required.
Intended Outcome(s) for the Course:
•
•
•
•
•
Use specialized vocabulary associated with computers and software
Use MS Office applications to create basic business documents
Use basic file management to organize files
Use and Understand Basic Internet and Communications Tools
Select and use appropriate software for a specific task
Outcome Assessment Strategies:
A letter grade will be issued for this course. Assessment tasks will include:
• Performance tests
• Objective tests
May include:
• Projects
• Porfolio
• Additional assignments
• Skill assessment software
• Presentations
Themes, Concepts, Issues
Terminology and Vocabulary
• Parts of computer system
• Software: Applications and Operating system
Windows Concepts
• Windows navigation
• Multi-task applications
• File-management (reinforce and emphasize throughout the length of the course)
Basic Word Processing Concepts
Basic Spreadsheet Concepts
Basic Presentation Concepts
Basic Internet Skills
• Browsers
• Searching
• Ethics
Basic Communication Skills
• Email
• Attachments
• Overview of MyPCC Portal
• Netiquette
Basic Database Concepts
Competencies, Skills
Identify components of a computer system
Identify types of software applications and operating systems
Windows skills, including:
Use the mouse to:
• navigate Windows and applications
• open, close and work between applications
• access "short-cut menus" using right-mouse button
Develop skill in basic file management throughout the course including:
• moving/copying/renaming/deleting files
• creating/renaming/deleting folders
Use Windows Accessories
• Notepad and/or Wordpad
• Paint
Use Control Panel to modify desktop properties
Word Processing Skills
• Create and edit one page Word documents
• Copy/Move/Paste text
• Create and edit a multi-page Word document
• Format and enhance Word documents
• Insert Clipart
Internet Skills
• Identify and use Internet browser features
• Use Search tools
• Understand Internet Ethics
Communication Skills
• Send and receive email
• Send and open email attachments
• Introduce basic MyPCC Portal website including basic navigation, email, calendar
and course tools
• Identify proper netiquette rules
Spreadsheet Skills
• Create and edit basic Excel spreadsheets
• Format and enhance spreadsheets
• Use Auto Sum and create basic formulas
• Create basic charts using Chart Wizard
Database Skills
• Create and Edit a database
• Format and enhance a database
• Create Queries
• Sort and filter a database
• Create and print Reports
Presentation Skills
• Create and edit basic PowerPoint presentations
• Use template, color schemes, animation, slide transition
• Insert images including digital pictures
CAS 133 CCOG Update
Rationale for Changing from 3 credits to 4 credits
1. Added an overview of the "MyPCC Portal". This will improve student's skills in using and
understanding e-mail and introduce the other features of MyPCC. This will be a great overview
for students when instructors use MyPCC for their course work.
2. Added hands-on training for MS PowerPoint. This additional content will improve the student’s
understanding and use of PowerPoint. We have been asked by other programs to include this
application.
3. Changed Access (database application) to a hands-on component. This change will result in
greater understanding of the content and will lead to a basic understanding and use of the
application.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
DH 208
Community Oral Health I
Current description:
Provides knowledge and skills necessary to function as an oral
health educator for groups of varied populations.
Proposed
description:
Introduction to national and local public health issues and
initiatives for delivering care to varied populations.
Reason for
description change:
Gaining 1 credit hour from course inactivation (DH 212) General
public health course content will be removed from DH 250 and
placed here, the first course in a three course series.
Current learning
outcomes:
Discuss dental health education and promotion Use the dental
hygiene process of care in lesson planning Identify target
populations and discuss barriers to care Explore oral health
program planning
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Associate historical development of dental hygiene to the
mission of oral public health Discuss the federal, state and local
structure of oral public health Identify barriers to accessing oral
health care Explore legislative initiatives and movements that
address and improve access to care issues Identify various
payment methods, insurance plans and government role in
funding oral health care
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Proposed course description and credit hour changes. The
student will have a better introduction to Community Oral Health
to prepare them for Community Oral Health II and III.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: fall
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Cara Kao-Young
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Current course number:
Current course title:
Lecture hours:
lab hours:
lec/lab hours:
load:
Total contact hours:
credits:
Reason for change:
Are outcomes affected?:
DH 208
Community Oral Health I
Current
1
Proposed
2
.068
1
1
.136
2
2
Adding course content from DH 250 – Public
Health
YES
Are degrees/certs
affected?:
No
Impact on departments
campuses:
NO
Is there potential conflict
with another sac?:
NO
Implem. Term:
Implem. Year:
Winter
2006
Contact name:
Contact email:
Cara Kao-Young
[email protected]
COURSE NUMBER: DH 208
COURSE TITLE: Community Oral Health I
CREDIT HOURS: 2
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 2
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 11
SPECIAL FEE:
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: Introduction to national and local oral public
health issues and initiatives for delivering care to varied populations.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
™ Associate historical development of dental hygiene to the mission of oral public health.
™ Discuss the federal, state and local structure of oral public health.
™ Identify target populations and discuss barriers to care.
™ Explore legislative initiatives and movements that address and improve access to care issues.
™ Identify various payment methods, insurance plans and government role in funding oral health
care.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
1. Quiz
2. Midterm
3. Participate in a simulated town hall discussion of water fluoridation
4. Comprehensive final exam
THEMES, CONCEPTS AND ISSUES:
Historical public health concerns and efforts
The “Public Health Model”
Fluoridation
Access to oral health care, barriers, risk factors and financing.
SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES:
1.
Discuss the history of public health and dental public health with special emphasis on the
Surgeon General’s Report on Oral Health in America.
2.
Explore Healthy People 2010 and relate the goals on a national, state, and local level.
3.
Recognize various roles of the dental hygienist, including the public health dental hygienist.
4.
Explore water fluoridation as one of the top ten public health measures in the U.S.
5.
Describe a typical water fluoridation program and compare the benefits with other forms of
fluoridation.
6.
Identify and list the steps of the public health model.
7.
Discuss the problem of access to care in the United States and compare this to the health care
system of other countries.
8.
Describe current health financing options and discuss proposals for future health and dental
care plans.
9.
Identify high risk populations with dental needs and discuss the barriers to the delivery of
oral health care.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
DH 250
number:
Current course title: Public Health
Proposed course title: Research Methods
Reason for title
change:
The course content relating to Public Health is shifting to
Community Oral Health I (DH 208), the first of a three course
series. This leaves the content relating to research methods only.
Current description: Introduces public health criteria, epidemiological studies, and
basic statistics in preparation for community dental health work.
Proposed description: Introduction to epidemiological studies and basic statistics in
preparation to critically evaluate evidence-based research of oral
health.
Reason for
description change:
Course content will eliminate general public health and focus on
research only.
Current learning
outcomes:
Identify public health efforts concerning oral health including
research, education, funding, and provision of care. Use
statistical concepts to interpret epidemiological research. Discuss
current public health issues relating to the field of dental hygiene.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Relate the importance of epidemiology to oral health care issues.
Differentiate between peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed
literature. Use statistical concepts to interpret epidemiological
research. Analyze and determine validity of current research
related to oral health issues.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Proposed title, description, credit hour, and learning outcomes
change.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: winter
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Cara Kao-Young
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Current course number:
Current course title:
Lecture hours:
lab hours:
lec/lab hours:
load:
Total contact hours:
credits:
DH 250
Public Health
Current
2
Proposed
1
.136
2
2
.068
1
1
Reason for change:
Moving part of the course content to DH 208
Are outcomes affected?:
YES
Are degrees/certs affected?:
No
Impact on departments
campuses:
NO
Is there potential conflict with
another sac?:
NO
Implem. Term:
Implem. Year:
Winter
2006
Contact name:
Contact email:
Cara Kao-Young
[email protected]
COURSE NUMBER: DH 250
COURSE TITLE: Research Methods
CREDIT HOURS: 1
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 1
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 10
SPECIAL FEE:
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: Introduction to epidemiologic studies and basic
statistics in preparation to critically evaluate evidence-based research of oral health.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
1. Differentiate between peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed literature.
2. Use statistical concepts to interpret epidemiologic research.
3. Analyze and determine validity of current research related to oral health issues.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Quizzes
Midterm Exam
Demonstrate the use of a dental index to identify the prevalence of a dental health need.
Evaluate a research article, identify the validity and provide a written report.
Comprehensive final examination
THEMES, CONCEPTS AND ISSUES:
Epidemiology for oral health
Current research
Statistical analysis of research data
Explore dental indices and identify effectiveness of each
SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES:
1.
Explain how epidemiological studies and research, especially as it relates to oral disease in a
population, affects society and the dental profession.
2.
Describe a variety of methods of surveying and calculating the caries and periodontal disease
status for various populations.
3.
Define statistical terminology and discuss how it applies to research.
4.
Discuss the importance of evidence-based research and implementation for the future of the
dental hygiene profession.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
DH 252
Community Oral Health II
Current description:
Students become familiar with, and involved in current community
projects which provide dental services, research, and education
Proposed
description:
Students utilize public health program planning models to develop
and participate with community oral health programs for various
populations
Reason for
description change:
The focus of course two in the three course series is developing
and participating in service-learning projects
Current learning
outcomes:
Recognize the various dental projects, clinics, research efforts and
other facilities in the local area and provide treatment in a public
health setting Design and implement an oral health program for a
community population
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Recognize various dental projects, clinics, research efforts and
other facilities in the local area and provide treatment in a public
health setting Design and implement an oral health program using
a public health model Explore various communication styles with
various populations, with an emphasis on cultural competence
Discuss dental health education and promotion
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Gaining 1 credit from Public Health (DH 250) This is the perfect
place to insert a dedicated unit on cultural competence
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: winter
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Cara Kao-Young
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Current course number: DH 252
Current course title:
Community Oral Health
Lecture hours:
lab hours:
lec/lab hours:
load:
Total contact hours:
credits:
Current
1
Proposed
2
.068
1
1
.136
2
2
Reason for change:
Adding course content related to cultural
competency
Are outcomes affected?: YES
Are degrees/certs
affected?:
No
Impact on departments
campuses:
NO
Is there potential conflict NO
with another sac?:
Implem. Term:
Implem. Year:
Winter
2006
Contact name:
Contact email:
Cara Kao-Young
[email protected]
COURSE NUMBER: DH 252
COURSE TITLE: Community Oral Health II
CREDIT HOURS: 2
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 2
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 10
SPECIAL FEE:
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: Students utilize public health program planning
models to develop and participate with community oral health programs for various populations.
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION: Prerequisite: Completion of DH 208 with a grade of C or
better.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
1. Recognize the various dental projects, clinics, research efforts and other facilities in the local
area and provide treatment in a public health setting.
2. Design and implement an oral health program for a community population.
3. Explore communication styles with various populations, with an emphasis on cultural
competence.
•
•
•
•
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
Evaluation of student rotations
Quizzes
Written progress report on the program developed by the student for a community population including
surveys, population profile, goals and objectives, communication log, and mentor evaluations
Comprehensive final examination
THEMES, CONCEPTS, ISSUES
Local agencies providing dental services, education or research.
Assessing dental needs and building rapport with a community population.
Conduct and analyze a survey for student-run project.
Dental health education and promotion in the community.
SKILL COMPETENCIES:
1. Provide dental hygiene services in a public health setting.
2.
Identify a target population that demonstrates a need for oral health intervention.
3.
Conduct a minimal analysis of data produced by a survey of the target group.
4.
Design and implement a dental health program to address the health need.
5.
Select and create materials to teach dental health concepts.
6.
Effectively communicate with a liaison for the target population with whom the student will
develop their dental health program (student run project.)
7.
Continue discussion, exploration of public health initiatives.
8.
Explore basic Spanish dental terminology.
9.
Discuss communication styles and health beliefs of various populations and relate them to the
delivery of oral health.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
CHANGE: Course Title, Course Description, Learning Outcomes
CURRENT COURSE NUMBER:ALC 56
CURRENT COURSE TITLE: Basic Study Skills Lab
PROPOSED COURSE TITLE: Tutoring Lab
PROPOSED TRANSCRIPT TITLE: Tutoring Lab
REASON FOR TITLE CHANGE:
This course is a lab for students wanting to improve reading, writing, and/or math skills in
a self-paced format. It isn't a class on study skills, although effective study skills will be
encouraged.
CURRENT DESCRIPTION: None.
PROPOSED DESCRIPTION:
Self-paced individualized reading, writing, and/or math instruction in lab setting. Content
varies depending upon interest and diagnosed needs. May include computer-assisted or
small group instruction; tutoring; textbook/workbook assignments; or audio/video.
REASON FOR DESCRIPTION CHANGE: Course description has never been listed.
CURRENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: None.
PROPOSED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Intended Outcomes for the Course:
• Demonstrate college preparatory grammar and punctuation skills needed for
transfer-level writing courses.
• Demonstrate spelling, vocabulary, and study skills needed to transfer to collegelevel English courses.
• Demonstrate appropriate reading skills for analysis and comprehension of a
variety of written texts.
• Demonstrate appropriate mathematical skills for entry into higher- level math
courses.
• Exhibit successful college student behavior.
Outcomes Assessment Strategies:
• Quizzes
• Written papers
• Reading summary paragraphs
• Teacher observations
• Self evaluation
• Mid-term and final exams
• Portfolios with log entries
• Final written paper
• Final oral book review
Course Content Outcomes (Themes, Concepts, and Issues)
• Reading and comprehension
• Structural analysis of different paragraph forms
• Writing process
• Vocabulary: context clues, dictionary skills, and spelling
• Paragraph development
• Essay development
• Grammar and punctuation
• Basic mathematical concepts (numerical, graphic, algebra)
• Use of lab's self-paced learning resources -- tutorials, computer programs, video
and others.
REASON FOR LEARNING OUTCOMES CHANGE:
Learning outcomes have never been listed.
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER SACS?: no
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER DEPTS/CAMPUSES?: no
IMPLEMENTATION TERM: winter
IMPLEMENTATION YEAR: 2005
CONTACT NAME: Laurel Spillum
CONTACT EMAIL: [email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Learning Outcomes
Current course
ALC 70
number:
Current course
Technical Math Support
title:
Current
Competencies & Skills: The student will be able to:
learning
• Read a ruler as well as add & subtract feet/ inches/ and fractions of an inch.
outcomes:
• Read and locate dimensions/dimension lines on blueprints and solve for missing dimensions
in linear applications.
• Read and write decimal numbers accurately to the millionth place.
• Make rough estimates, round whole and decimal numbers and check for reasonable
answers.
• Demonstrate ability to read a micrometer.
• Understand the concept of tolerances and solve to find limits for manufacturing parts.
• Identify metric prefixes and convert from one metric unit to another by using powers of ten.
• Locate and use the following calculator functions: square root, cube roots, exponents with
the Pythagorean theorem, fractions, mixed numbers, improper fx, pi, scientific notation,
reciprocals, signed numbers, and memory in/recall. (optional: degrees/minutes/seconds,
right triangle trig and inverse functions).
• Change from one calculator mode to another using the Fix, Scientific, Degrees, Normal and
Computations buttons.
• Identify the differences between 1, 2 & 3 dimensional items.
• Substitute/solve/label linear equations for diameter, circumference, perimeter & length of an
arc.
• Substitute/solve/label for the area of squares, rectangles, triangles, trapezoids, irregular
areas & circles.
• Substitute/solve/label for the volume of cubes, rectangular solids, triangular solids,
trapezoidal solids and cylinders.
• Convert measurements in 1, 2 & 3 dimensions.
• Be able to calculate ID and OD of a circular item.
• Solve percent application exercises including increases/decreases
• Use order of operations as applied to the listed situations.
OPTIONAL: Find the length of the side and/or degrees of an angle using right triangle trig. As
well as add/subtract degrees, minutes and seconds.
OPTIONAL: Solve a variety of problems using direct and inverse proportion.
OPTIONAL: Electricity. Reading simple schematics and finding current, voltage drops, watts,
and resistance in series, parallel and series/parallel circuits.
OPTIONAL Units: Sheet Metal Bend Allowance, Hydraulics, Motor Efficiency, Force & Load
Formulas, etc.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Competencies & Skills: The student will be able to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Read a ruler as well as add & subtract feet/ inches/ and fractions of an inch.
Read and write decimal numbers accurately to the millionth place.
Make rough estimates, round whole and decimal numbers and check for
reasonable answers.
Demonstrate ability to read a micrometer.
Understand the concept of tolerances and solve to find limits for
manufacturing parts.
Identify metric prefixes and convert from one metric unit to another by using
powers of ten.
Locate and use the following calculator functions: square root, cube roots,
exponents with the Pythagorean theorem, fractions, mixed numbers,
improper fraction, pi, scientific notation, reciprocals, signed numbers, and
memory in/recall. (Optional: degrees/minutes/seconds, right triangle trig
and inverse functions).
Identify the differences between 1, 2 & 3 dimensional items.
Substitute/solve/label linear equations for diameter, circumference,
perimeter & length of an arc.
Substitute/solve/label for the area of squares, rectangles, triangles,
trapezoids, irregular areas & circles.
Substitute/solve/label for the volume of cubes, rectangular solids, triangular
solids, trapezoidal solids and cylinders.
Convert measurements in 1, 2 & 3 dimensions.
Be able to calculate ID and OD of a circular item.
Solve percent application exercises including increases/decreases
Use order of operations as applied to the listed situations.
Solve a variety of problems using direct and inverse proportion.
OPTIONAL:
•
•
•
Change from one calculator mode to another using the Scientific, Degrees,
Normal and Computations buttons.
Read and locate dimensions/dimension lines on blueprints and solve for
missing dimensions in linear applications.
Find the length of the side and/or degrees of an angle using right triangle
trig. As well as add/subtract degrees, minutes and seconds.
•
Electricity. Reading simple schematics and finding current, voltage drops,
watts, and resistance in series, parallel and series/parallel circuits.
OPTIONAL UNITS:
Sheet Metal Bend Allowance, Hydraulics, Motor Efficiency, Force & Load
Formulas
To update the curriculum, which is not
Reason for learning outcomes change:
much.
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Winter 2005
no
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number: WR 90
Current course title:
Writing 90
Current prerequisites:
Writing Placement score above 35 or successful completion of
Writing 80 and Reading Placement score above 35 or
successful completion or RD 80.
Proposed prerequisites: Writing Placement score above 35 or successful completion of
Writing 80 and Reading Placement score above 35 or
successful completion or RD 80 with a "C" or better.
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Frieda R. Campbell-Peltier
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
RD 90
Reading 90
Current prerequisites:
Reading placement score above 35 or successful
completion of RD 80
Reading placement score above 35 or successful
completion of RD 80 with a "C" or better
Proposed prerequisites:
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Frieda R. Campbell-Peltier
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Prerequisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript title:
Reason for title change:
RD 90A
Reading 90
Reading 90A
Reading 90A
To correct error in the Course Catalog
Current prerequisites:
Reading placement score above 35 or successful
completion of RD 80
Reading placement score above 35 or successful
completion of RD 80 with a "C" or better
Proposed prerequisites:
Will this impact other sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Frieda R. Campbell-Peltier
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites, Learning Outcomes
Current course number: RD 115
Current course title:
College Reading
Current learning
outcomes:
Intended Course Outcomes:
After successful completion of Reading 115 students will be
able to:
Read a variety of genres analytically, accurately, and efficiently
Read at a variety of rates Apply comprehension and
organizational strategies to essays, textbooks, and literature
Apply a variety of methods to expand and retain vocabulary
Respond to texts both verbally and in writing, presenting ideas
and opinions based on the reading Access campus support
services and other learning resources
Outcome Assessment Strategies: Assessment may include,
but is not limited to:
1. Speed reading and comprehension tests/activities
2. Quizzes on vocabulary and correct usage
3. Midterm and comprehensive final
4. Group/individual work demonstrating comprehension
strategies
5. Group/individual work demonstrating vocabulary usage
6. Book review/project of novel, biography, or autobiography
7. Other assessment activities may include:
a. 5-10 hours on computer reading software with an analysis
b. Conference with instructor
c. Portfolio
d. Individual projects, such as flash cards, outlines, maps,
diagrams,note-taking methods, career exploration readings
(i.e., Discover program), Service Learning
Themes and Concepts
Recurring themes and concepts that students will work with
include
1. Main idea/thesis/controlling idea
2. Supporting details
3. Organizational patterns
4. Comprehension and rate
5. Eye movements and motor skills
6. Inferential and critical reading
7. Passive vs. active reading
8. Etymology and Greek and Latin roots/affixes
9. Parts of speech Skills Critical thinking skills Phrasing skills
Skimming, scanning, and rapid reading skills Dictionary
skills/reference skills Vocabulary skills- Determining meaning
from context Determining meaning from word parts, most
common Latin/Greek roots and affixes
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Intended Course Outcomes:
After successful completion of Reading 115 students will be
able to:
Read a variety of genres analytically, accurately, and efficiently
Read at a variety of rates Apply comprehension,
organizational, and critical thinking strategies to essays,
textbooks, and literature
Apply a variety of methods to expand and retain vocabulary
Respond to texts in written and in oral form, presenting ideas
and opinions based on the reading
Access campus support services and other learning resources
Outcome Assessment Strategies:
Assessment may include, but is not limited to:
1. Speed reading and comprehension tests/activities
2. Quizzes on vocabulary and correct usage
3. Midterm and comprehensive final
4. Group/individual work demonstrating comprehension
strategies
5. Group/individual work demonstrating vocabulary usage
6. Book review/project of novel, biography, or autobiography
7. Other assessment activities may include:
a. 5-10 hours on computer reading software with a selfevaluation
b. Conference with instructor
c. Portfolio
d. Individual projects, such as flash cards, outlines, maps,
diagrams,note-taking methods, career exploration readings
(i.e., Discover program), Service Learning, PowerPoint
presentation
Themes and Concepts:
Recurring themes and concepts that students will work with
may include
1. Main idea/thesis/controlling idea
2. Supporting details
3. Organizational patterns
4. Comprehension and rate
5. Eye movements and motor skills
6. Inferential and critical reading
7. Active vs. passive reading
8. Etymology and Greek and Latin roots/affixes
9. Parts of speech Skills Skills that students will learn may
include Study skills previewing, annotating, notetaking,
mapping, diagramming, summary/response writing Critical
thinking skills analyze, synthesize, evaluate, compare Phrasing
skills Skimming, scanning, and rapid reading skills Dictionary
skills/reference skills Vocabulary skills- Determining meaning
from context Determining meaning from word parts, most
common Latin/Greek roots and affixes
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Revisions needed to more accurately reflect course content
Current prerequisites:
Asset score 42 and above or successful completion of Reading
90, or successful completion of ENL 260 (Upper Advanced
Reading).
Proposed prerequisites: Asset score 42 and above or successful completion of Reading
90 (C or better), or successful completion of ENL 260 (Upper
Advanced Reading).
Will this impact other
yes
sacs?:
How other SACs may be
impacted:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
yes
How other
depts/campuses will be
impacted:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
winter
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Cecelia Guinee
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Hour Revision
Current course number:
PT108
Current course title:
Litho Press
lecture hours:
lab hours:
lec/lab hours:
load:
Total contact hours:
credits:
Current
1
3
Proposed
2
3
4
2
5
3
Reason for change:
More accurately reflect time spent lecturing /
demonstrating. Better fit with proposed Publishing
Technology EST Certificate
Are outcomes affected?:
NO
Are degrees/certs affected?: No
Impact on departments
NO
campuses:
Is there potential conflict with NO
another sac?:
Implem. Term:
Implem. Year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact email:
thom perry
[email protected]
DATE: 2/1/05
PREPARED BY: T.Perry
COURSE NUMBER: PT 108
COURSE TITLE: Litho Press
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 2
LECTURE / LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 3
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 12
SPECIAL FEE(S): The student will be charged normal tuition costs.
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
Covers materials, procedures and theories which make possible the production of
printed materials using a small lithographic press. Topics include safety, operation of the
printing press, paper, ink, and bindery operations.
Course Prerequisite(s): Pt 136 Electronic Layout
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION:
Course content and text require that the student read and write English at the WR115
level or above and perform basic math functions at the MTH20 level or above.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:
Litho Press consists of topical lectures supported by visual media, demonstration,
explanations and discussions....the concepts of which are then combined into several
hands-on industry-oriented projects and exercises.
ASSESSMENT:
Students will be evaluated by various methods which may include one or more of the
following: projects, examinations, homework-reports or assignments including group
problem solving.
INTENDED COURSE OUTCOMES:
Students should be able to:
* Demonstrate safe work habits when running equipment and using supplies/ materials
in the pressroom
* Identify paper characteristics (ie grain direction and basis weight) and their role basic
press operations
* Evaluate and compensate for variances in color consistently and flow characteristics of
printing inks
* Set-up, operate and run one and two-color jobs on a single-color lithographic press
REQUIRED STUDENT COMPETENCIES:
At the completion of this course students should be able to:
* Pass a written pressroom operations safety test and follow proper procedures when
running equipment
* Identify common parts and adjustments necessary for consistent quality operation of a
small litho press
* Solve basic ink and paper problems as they occur when running jobs on the press and
in the bindery on the paper-folder
* Mix custom-color inks to specific color standards and use them to runs a single color
print job to color match standard
* Produce high quality one and two-color print jobs from provided metal-plates on a
variety of paper stocks
* Wash-up small press and leave it operationally ready for the next operator
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Current course number:
PT110
Current course title:
Litho Press 2
Current lecture hours:
Current lab hours:
Current lec/lab hours:
Current load:
Total contact hours:
Current credits:
Current
3
9
Proposed
2
3
12
6
5
3
Reason for change:
Better fit with proposed Publishing
Technology EST Certificate
Are outcomes affected?:
NO
Are degrees/certs affected?:
No
Impact on departments campuses:
NO
Is there potential conflict with another sac?: NO
Implem. Term:
Implem. Year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact email:
thom perry
[email protected]
DATE: 2/1/05
PREPARED BY: T.Perry
COURSE NUMBER: PT 110
COURSE TITLE: Litho Press 2
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 2
LECTURE / LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 3
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 12
SPECIAL FEE(S): The student will be charged normal tuition costs.
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
Covers print-production procedures, industry terminology and offset press operation
including techniques necessary to reproduce halftones and other fine detail images on
coated and uncoated paper.
Course Prerequisite(s): PT 136 Electronic Layout, PT 108 Litho Press
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION:
Course content and text require that the student read and write English at the WR115
level or above and perform basic math functions at the MTH20 level or above.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:
Litho Press 2 consists of topical lectures supported by visual media, demonstration,
explanations and discussions...the concepts of which are then combined into industryoriented projects and exercises.
ASSESSMENT:
Students will be evaluated by various methods which may include one or more of the
following: projects, examinations, or other assignments including group problem solving.
INTENDED COURSE OUTCOMES:
Students should be able to:
* Demonstrate safe work habits while running equipment and using supplies & materials
in the pressroom
* Identify & compensate for different paper& ink variables which need to be controlled for
successful quality press operation
* Print one, two, or process color jobs on one or both sides of coated and uncoated
paper stock from provided metal plates
* Finish and perform the basic bindery operations necessary to complete a print job for
customer delivery
REQUIRED STUDENT COMPETENCIES:
At the completion of this course students should be able to:
* Read and interpret production information from a job ticket and record time spent and
material usage
* Pass a written test on safe pressroom operations and practice safe operational
procedures at all times
* Identify and compensate for various paper and ink variables, as they occur, during
press operation
* Maintain proper ink-and-water balance during extended press runs and compensate for
improper levels
* Recognize the need for and make appropriate impression adjustments to compensate
for different paper thickness
* Make-ready, run, and shut-down press for multiple-color press-runs on coated &
uncoated paper stocks
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
PT153
Course title:
Transcript title:
Electronic Layout - PhotoShop
Electronic Layout - PhotoShop
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact hours:
Total credits:
2
3
5
3
Reason for new
course:
Reconfigured / reduced credit version of (6 credit) course
we've taught for many years. Better fit with proposed
Publishing Technology EST Certificate.
Course description:
A basic course in Adobe PhotoShop for print-production.
Includes image acquisition, manipulation and output
procedures for 4-color process printing.
Prerequisite(s):
Prereq/concurrent:
Corequisite(s):
None
PT136
None
Learning outcomes:
Set up a PhotoShop file, navigate within the document
and save the resulting file to disk. Arrange the workspace
to maximize productivity and allow for the manipulation of
multiple images. Create an image with text and graphic
elements positioned as per customer provided
specifications. Scan, color correct and retouch several
color photographic images and black & white logos.
Position several PhotoShop images into a template,
digital-proof, film-imageset, and final proof results.
PreFlight, proof and print both composite and colorseparated document file onto both paper and film.,
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Required
Is there impact on
YES
degrees or certificates:
Description of impact
on deg/cert:
proposed Publishing Technology EST Certificate
Is there an impact on
another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs been NO
contacted?:
Is there an increase in NO
costs for library or av
dept?:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
thom perry
[email protected]
DATE: 1/19/2005
PREPARED BY: T.Perry
COURSE NUMBER: PT 153
COURSE TITLE: Electronic Layout - PhotoShop
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 2
LECTURE / LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 3
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 12
SPECIAL FEE(S): The student will be charged normal tuition costs.
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
This course covers advanced basic image selecting, editing and image
scanning procedures using Adobe PhotoShop on Macintosh computers.
Course Prerequisite(s): PT 136 Electronic Layout - PageMaker
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION:
Course content and text require that the student read and write
English at the WR115 level or above and perform basic math functions
at the MTH20 level or above. The student must also have
satisfactorily completed PT 136 Electronic Layout - PageMaker or be
prepared to demonstrate competency in the use of the Macintosh
computer at the intermediate level...this is NOT an introductory
course in computer operations.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:
Electronic Prep - PhotoShop consists of topical lectures supported by
visual media, demonstration, explanations and discussions...the
resulting information is then combined into project-oriented projects
and exercises. These exercises and projects are evaluated against
posted industry-standard examples, unsatisfactory projects are
repeated until they meet the standard.
ASSESSMENT:
Students will be evaluated by exercise and project accuracy and
timeliness (70%), a midterm reading and terminology quiz (10%) and a
final in-class project-test (20%) incomplete is NOT a grading option.
INTENDED COURSE OUTCOMES:
Students should be able to:
* Setup a new PhotoShop file, navigate around within the document and
save the resulting file to disk
* Arrange the workspace so as to maximize productivity and allow
manipulation of multiple images
* Create a image with the text and graphic elements positioned as per
customer provided specifications
* Scan, color-correct and clean-up several reflection color
photographic images and black / white logos
* Position several PhotoShop images into a template, digital-proof,
film-imageset, and final-proof results
* PreFlight / proof / and print, composite and color-separated all
document files to both paper and film
* Actively participate in discussion of field-trip, print-plant
visitations and submit required evaluations
* Maintain production-time logs for all projects completed, based on
customer supplied work-orders
REQUIRED STUDENT COMPETENCIES:
At the completion of this course students should be able to:
* Explain how analog images can be converted to digital images and
the relevance of different color models
* Demonstrate how to select various tools and palettes, adjust their
preferences and save them with the file
* Identify the selection tools and show how to increase or decrease a
selection by using multiple tools
* Create a simple path from within a scanned object using the pen
tool(s) and save it as a clipping path
* Demonstrate how to isolate different elements within an image to
different layers to create a layer-set
* Explain the relationships between PPI, DPI, and LPI and explore how
color gamuts affect image quality
* Calibrate a desktop system using Adobe Gamma to compensate for
visual differences in color displays
* Move and manipulate selections and layers to create a composite
image from several separate files
* Find and create different brush shapes so as to maximize the effect
of various painting tools / techniques
* Demonstrate text styling alignment and positioning to create a mask
and apply appropriate Layer Effects
* Manipulate multiple layers using the various blending modes to
create a specific customer-defined effect
* Manage color and Alpha channels with masks to include quick-mask
techniques for selecting objects
* Create and manage paths with the pen-tool, convert them to
selections, and apply various edge effects
* Explore the various filter and filter-groups
available...distinguish between creative and production filters
* Read a histogram and adjust the levels of an image to improve the overall
hilites, midtones and shadows
* Interpret the curves of an image and adjust the color tonal range
of the image to improve its reproduction
* Color correct an image using the adjustment layers with Hue and
Saturation, Levels and Curve effects
* Convert 4-color image(s) into representative duo-tone images, place
into template, proof and print
* Transform selected images using layers in conjunction with grids
and guides to maintain aspect ratios
* Print / proof all files to a black and white lazer network printer
as well as collecting the file and elements for output to a remote
color proofer or film imagesetter / platemaker
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
PT155
Course title:
Transcript title:
Electronic Layout - QuarkXPress
Electronic Layout - QuarkXPres
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact hours:
Total credits:
2
3
5
3
Reason for new
course:
Reconfigured / reduced credit version of (6 credit)
course we've taught for many years. Better fit with
proposed Publishing Technology EST Certificate.
Course description:
A course in advanced image edition and page-layout
production proceedures using QuarkXPress on
Macintosh computers.
Prerequisite(s):
Prereq/concurrent:
Corequisite(s):
None
PT136
None
Learning outcomes:
Setup a new QuarkXPress file, navigate within the
document and save the resulting file to disk. Manage
the print-production workflow, setup a prepress work
environment and customize Quark's preferences and
settings. Create a document with text and graphic
elements and position them as per customer provided
specifications. Format existing text and graphic frames
using the proper tools ie. guides, grids, margins and
rulers. Place and edit text files using both character and
paragraph formatting for the creation of style sheets.
Create and place objects and comples shapes using the
Quark and Adobe Illustrator pen tools. Work with colors
and frames for process-color, spot-color, tints and
blends. PreFlight, proof and print PDF composite and
color-separated document files.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Required
Is there impact on
YES
degrees or certificates:
Description of impact
on deg/cert:
proposed Publishing Technology EST Certificate
Is there an impact on
another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs been NO
contacted?:
Is there an increase in NO
costs for library or av
dept?:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
thom perry
[email protected]
DATE: 1/19/2005
PREPARED BY: T.Perry
COURSE NUMBER: PT 155
COURSE TITLE: Electronic Layout - QuarkXPress
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK:2
LECTURE / LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 3
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 12
SPECIAL FEE(S): The student will be charged normal tuition costs.
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
This course is concerned with advanced image editing / assembly
proceedures using QuarkXPress and Adobe Illustrator on Macintosh
computers.
Course Prerequisite(s): PT 136 Electronic Layout - PageMaker
ADDENDUM TO DESCRIPTION:
Course content and text require that the student read and write
English at the WR115 level or above and perform basic math functions
at the MTH20 level or above. The student must also have
satisfactorily completed PT 136 Electronic Layout - PageMaker or be
prepared to demonstrate competency in the use of the Macintosh
computer at the intermediate level...this is NOT an introductory
course in computer operations.
COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:
Electronic Prep - QuarkXPress consists of topical lectures supported
by visual media, demonstration, explanations and discussions...the
resulting information is then combined into project-oriented projects
and exercises. These exercises and projects are evaluated against
posted industry-standard examples, unsatisfactory projects are
repeated until they meet the standard.
ASSESSMENT:
Students will be evaluated by exercise and project accuracy and
timeliness (70%), a midterm reading and terminology quiz (10%) and a
final in-class project-test (20%) incomplete is NOT a grading option.
INTENDED COURSE OUTCOMES:
Students should be able to:
* Setup a new QuarkXPress file, navigate within the document and save
the resulting files to disk
* Manage a print-workflow, setup a prepress work envorinment and
customize Quark prefs and settings
* Create a document with text and graphic elements positioned as per
customer provided specifications
* Format existing text and graphic frames using the proper tools ie.
guides, grids, margins and rulers
* Place and edit text files using character and paragraph formatting
for the creation of style sheets
* Create and place objects and complex shapes using the Quark and
Adobe Illustrator pen-tools
* Work with colors and frames for process-color, spot-color, tints and blends
* PreFlight / proof / and print PDF, composite and color-separated
document files
REQUIRED STUDENT COMPETENCIES:
At the completion of this course students should be able to:
* Identify various kinds of electronic mechanicals that can be
produced using Quark, page-layout software
* Open an existing Quark document and demonstrate a basic knowledge
of keyboard / menu commands,
* Demonstrate an understanding the various palettes and palette
options avilable within this program
* Create a basic file management system for opening, saving /
resaving, reverting and deleting files
* Demonstrate the functional differences between text and picture
boxes and their related tools and options
* Create margin, column and ruler guides based on an underlying
baseline grid that relates to the text size
* Set-up, modify and link custom placeholders using the several shape
and freehand line drawing tools
* Flow and format basic word-processing text into a QuarkXPress
document formatted with placeholders
* Demonstrate text styling alignment, element positioning and the
other basic rules of page layout for print
* Duplicate and align elements both visually and mathematically using
the palettes and keyboard commands
* Scale and resize elements as well as skew and rotate objects on the
page...or within their frames / boxes
* Distinguish between display (headline) type and text (body) type by
point sizes and styles
* Import text into linked placeholders and resolve overflow issues,
including page jumps and broken links
* Use the measurement palette and character dialog box to format
words, sentences or selections
* Use the paragraph format box and measurement palette to indent,
justify, adjust spacing and set text tabs
* Place text on custom path shapes, control the position of text on
the path, and adjust its baseline positon
* Apply, create and edit both character and paragraph style sheets
from the style palette
* Import, scale / resize and crop images within their place holders
as well as anchor images to a text block
* Manage the image links to the origional files and update them when
the origional image is modified
* Format and color frames and backgrounds using the default colors
and blends provided by the program
* Create / define new spot-colors and process-builds that will output
properly to film or color proofers
* Print files to a black and white lazer network printer as well as
collecting the file and elements for output to a remote color proofer
or film imagesetter / platemaker
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
Course title:
Transcript title:
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
CIS 285
Network Security
Network Security
3
3
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
3.42
Weekly contact hours: 6
Total credits:
4
Reason for new
course:
Course description:
Increase in demand for security in network administration.
Prerequisite(s):
CIS 279M, CIS 279L of instructor permission
None
None
Prereq/concurrent:
Corequisite(s):
Part of a sequence designed to prepare students for an entry-level
position as a network administrator. The course focuses on the
knowledge and skills necessary to maintain system security and to
install, configure and maintain a local area network with common
Internet applications. Use of Open Source software and
CompTIA’s Security+ certification objectives are emphasized.
Learning outcomes:
On completion of this course the student will be able to design,
install, and administer a secure LAN consisting of the client and
server computers. Also, the student will be able to install and
administer common Internet applications and various security
tools. The student should be able to pass the CompTIA Security+
certification exam (not administered by PCC).
Course format:
On Campus
Online
Course format:
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Elective
Is there impact on
NO
degrees or certificates:
Is there an impact on
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs been
contacted?:
Is there an increase in
costs for library or av
dept?:
NO
Implementation term:
Spring
2005
Implementation year:
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
NO
NO
Sandra Koester
[email protected]
Version
Date
Prepared by
Course
Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Lecture Hours
per week
Lab Hours
per week
Lecture/Lab
Hours
per week
Number of
Weeks
Special Fee
Course
Description for
Publication
Prerequisites
Expected
Student
Outcomes
Course
Activities and
Design
Outcome
Assessment
Strategies
Course Content and Outcome Guide
3
24 Jan., 2005
Mike Neal
CIS 284
Network Security
4
3
3
0
11
Lab fee is levied at the current lab fee rate as published in the PCC catalog.
Part of a sequence designed to prepare students for an entry-level position as a network
administrator. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain
system security and to install, configure and maintain a local area network with common
Internet applications. Use of Open Source software and CompTIA’s Security+
certification objectives are emphasized.
Either CIS 240M, CIS279L or consent of instructor (several years experience as a network
administrator).
On completion of this course the student will be able to design, install, and administer a
secure LAN consisting of the client and server computers. Also, the student will be able to
install and administer common Internet applications and various security tools. The
student should be able to pass the CompTIA Security+ certification exam (not
administered by PCC).
The course consists of lectures, group discussion, and lab assignments. Lab assignments
include both individual lab assignments and group lab assignments.
1. Differentiate and explain common access control models.
2. Differentiate and explain common methods of authentication.
3. Identify non-essential services and protocols and know what actions to take to
reduce the risks of those services and protocols.
4. Identify common attacks and specify the appropriate actions to take to mitigate
vulnerability and risk.
5. Identify various types of malicious code and specify the appropriate actions to take
to mitigate vulnerability and risk.
6. Reduce the risks of social engineering.
7. Explain and apply auditing, logging and system scanning.
8. Implement common types of remote access technologies.
9. Configure and administer email security.
10. Explain and apply basic Internet security.
11. Configure and administer directory security.
12. Explain and manage file transfer protocols.
Course
Content
(Themes,
Concepts,
Issues,
Competencies,
and Skills)
13. Administer basic security as applied to wireless technologies.
14. Explain and manage security concerns and concepts of Infrastructure Security types
of devices.
15. Explain and secure various types of media.
16. Explain and apply the concepts behind various security topologies.
17. Differentiate common types of intrusion detection, be able to explain the concepts
of each type, and manage the implementation and configuration of each kind of
intrusion detection system.
18. Explain and apply concepts of security baselines.
19. Install, configure and administer the implementation and configuration of intrusion
detection.
20. Identify and explain different kinds of cryptographic algorithms.
21. Explain how cryptography addresses security concept.
22. Explain concepts of PKI (Public Key Infrastructure).
23. Identify and be able to differentiate different cryptographic standards and protocols
24. Explain concepts of Key Management and Certificate Lifecycles
25. Explain and apply the concepts of physical security.
26. Develop, explain and implement a disaster recovery plan.
27. Develop, explain and implement a business continuity plan.
28. Explain and apply the concepts and uses of various types of policies and
procedures.
29. Explain the concepts of privilege management.
30. Explain and apply the concepts of various topics of forensics.
31. Explain and apply concepts of risk identification.
32. Explain the security relevance of the education and training of end users,
executives and human resources.
33. Explain and apply documentation concepts related to security.
1. Security practices.
2. Security policies.
3. Legal and ethical considerations of information systems security.
4. Security topologies.
5. Certificates and certificate authorities.
6. Symetric and asymetric encryption.
7. Key management.
8. Authorization and authentication.
9. Secure communications.
10. Virtual private networks.
11. Analysis and management practices.
12. Patch management.
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
CIS285
Course title:
Transcript title:
Security Tools
Security Tools
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
1.38
1.38
Reason for new
course:
Rapid increase in employment for security administrators.
Course description:
Prepares network administrators to apply information security
concepts and Open Source applications to manage security in
Windows and Linux/Unix information systems. Topics include
analysis and management tools, firewalls and packet filters, port
and vulnerability scanners, sniffers, intrusion detection, encryption,
wireless and forensics
Prerequisite(s):
CIS285 or instructor permission
3.42
6.00
4
Learning outcomes: On completion of this course the student will be able to select and
apply security applications.
Course format:
Course format:
On Campus
Online
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
NO
degrees or
certificates:
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs
been contacted?:
Description of
contact:
YES
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation term: Fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Mike Neal
[email protected]
Version
Date
Prepared by
Course
Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Lecture Hours
per week
Lab Hours
per week
Lecture/Lab
Hours
per week
Number of
Weeks
Special Fee
Course
Description for
Publication
Prerequisites
Expected
Student
Outcomes
Course
Activities and
Design
Outcome
Assessment
Strategies
Course Content and Outcome Guide
2
24 Jan., 2005
Mike Neal
CIS 285
Security Tools
4
3
3
0
11
Lab fee is levied at the current lab fee rate as published in the PCC catalog.
Prepares network administrators to apply information security concepts and Open Source
applications to manage security in Windows and Linux/Unix information systems. Topics
include analysis and management tools, firewalls and packet filters, port and vulnerability
scanners, sniffers, intrusion detection, encryption, wireless and forensics.
CIS284 or consent of instructor (several years experience as a network administrator and
basic knowledge of network security).
On completion of this course the student will be able to select and apply security
applications
The course consists of lectures, group discussion, and lab assignments. Lab assignments
include both individual lab assignments and group lab assignments.
Through exams and lab assignments students will be assessed to determine if they are able
to:
1. Explain and apply operating system hardening techniques.
2. Differentiate and explain common secure network architectures.
3. Explain and apply packet filtering.
4. Install, configure and administer stateful firewalls.
5. Create VPNs through firewalls.
6. Explain the concepts, features and uses of port scanners.
7. Install, configure and apply port scanners and related add-ons.
8. Identify, explain and classify types of security vulnerabilities.
9. Differentiate and explain vulnerability scanners.
10. Install, configure and administer vulnerability scanners.
11. Explain TCP/IP header fields and their values.
12. Explain the concepts, features and uses of protocol analyzers.
13. Install, configure and apply protocol analyzers.
14. Differentiate and explain the use of host intrusion detection systems.
15. Differentiate and explain the use of network intrusion detection systems.
16. Install, configure and apply host intrusion detection systems.
Course
Content
(Themes,
Concepts,
Issues,
Competencies,
and Skills)
17. Install, configure and apply network intrusion detection systems.
18. Differentiate and explain common analysis and management tools.
19. Install, configure and apply common analysis and management tools.
20. Differentiate and explain common encryption and VPN tools.
21. Install, configure and apply common encryption and VPN tools.
22. Explain the security risks of wireless LANs
23. Perform a wireless security assessment.
24. Differentiate and explain common incident response practices.
25. Install, configure and apply common forensic analysis tools.
26. Explain the concepts and practices of managing forensic evidence.
1. Security practices.
2. Legal and ethical considerations of information systems security.
3. Security policy.
4. Security topologies.
5. Hardening tools and techniques.
6. Security tools including, Firewalls, VPNs, port scanners, vulnerability scanners,
sniffers, network intrusion detection systems, host intrusion detection systems, log
monitor and notification applications, analysis and management tools, encryption
applications, key management, secure shell and file transfer applications, password
crackers, wireless security assessment tools and forensic tools.
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
CIS286
Course title:
Transcript title:
Computer Forensics
Computer Forensics
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
1.38
1.38
Reason for new
course:
Rapid increase in employment for security administrators.
Course description:
Introduces computer security administrators to computer forensics.
Topics include setup and use of an investigator�s laboratory,
computer investigations using digital evidence controls, processing
crime and incident scenes, performing data acquisition, computer
forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery,
investigative report writing, and expert witness testimony. Maps to
the IACIS certification
Prerequisite(s):
CIS 285 or instructor permission
3.42
6.00
4
Learning outcomes: On completion of this course the student will be able to discuss
and participate in incident response, computer forensics
investigations, recovery of digital evidence, testimony on evidence,
and reporting on computer investigations
Course format:
On Campus
Course format:
Online
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
degrees or
certificates:
NO
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs
been contacted?:
Description of
contact:
YES
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation term: Fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Mike Neal
[email protected]
Version
Date
Prepared by
Course
Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Lecture Hours
per week
Lab Hours
per week
Lecture/Lab
Hours
per week
Number of
Weeks
Special Fee
Course
Description for
Publication
Prerequisites
Expected
Student
Outcomes
Course
Activities and
Design
Outcome
Assessment
Strategies
Course Content and Outcome Guide
2
19 Jan., 2005
Mike Neal
CIS 286
Computer Forensics
4
3
3
0
11
Current lab fee rate as published in the PCC catalog.
Introduces computer security administrators to computer forensics. Topics include setup
and use of an investigator’s laboratory, computer investigations using digital evidence
controls, processing crime and incident scenes, performing data acquisition, computer
forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery, investigative report writing,
and expert witness testimony. Maps to the IACIS certification.
CIS 284 or instructor permission (for students with several years experience as a security
and network administrator).
On completion of this course the student will be able to discuss and participate in incident
response, computer forensics investigations, recovery of digital evidence, testimony on
evidence, and reporting on computer investigations.
The course consists of lectures, group discussion, and lab assignments.
Through exams and lab assignments students will be assessed to determine if they are able
to:
1. Define and discuss the concepts of computer forensics.
2. Explain the career of a computer forensics professional.
3. Explain and apply the concepts of computer investigations.
4. Setup and operate in an investigator's office and laboratory.
5. Select and apply current computer forensics tools.
6. Identify and apply current practices for processing crime and incident scenes.
7. Explain and apply digital evidence controls.
8. Explain and perform forensic analysis in various operating system environments.
9. Explain the boot processes and disk structures of various operating system
environments.
10. Identify and apply current practices for data discovery recovery and acquisition.
11. Conduct basic computer forensic analysis.
12. Demonstrate the recovery of image files.
13. Conduct basic network forensic analysis.
14. Perform e-mail investigations.
Course
Content
(Themes,
Concepts,
Issues,
Competencies,
and Skills)
15. Act as expert witness and report results of investigations.
1. Computer forensics.
2. Computer investigations.
3. Computer forensics laboratory.
4. Computer forensics tools.
5. Crime and incident scenes
6. Digital evidence practices.
7. Data and image recovery.
8. Network monitoring and forensic analysis.
9. E-mail recovery and analysis.
10. Testimony and reporting.
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
CIS287m
Course title:
Transcript title:
Microsoft Server Security
Microsoft Server Security
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
1.38
1.38
Reason for new
course:
Course description:
Rapid increase in employment for security administrators.
Prerequisite(s):
3.42
6.00
4
Prepares IT security professionals working in medium to large
computing environments to implement authorization and
authentication strategies, use certificates and certificate
authorities, use Encrypting File System, create secure baselines,
use Software Update Services enhance data transmission
security, wireless network security, perimeter security and secure
remote access. The primary focus will be Windows Server 2003
with some client content. Maps to MS 70-299
CIS 240M or instructor permission
Learning outcomes: On completion of this course the student will be able to design,
install, and administer a secure LAN consisting of the client and
server computers. Also, the student will be able to install and
administer various security tools. The student should be able to
pass the Microsoft 70-299 certification exam (not administered by
PCC).
Course format:
On Campus
Course format:
Online
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
NO
degrees or
certificates:
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs
YES
been contacted?:
Description of
contact:
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation term: Fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Mike Neal
[email protected]
Version
Date
Prepared by
Course
Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Lecture Hours
per week
Lab Hours
per week
Lecture/Lab
Hours
per week
Number of
Weeks
Special Fee
Course
Description for
Publication
Prerequisites
Expected
Student
Outcomes
Course
Activities and
Design
Outcome
Assessment
Strategies
Course Content and Outcome Guide
2
19 Jan., 2005
Mike Neal
CIS 287M
Microsoft Server Security
4
3
3
0
11
Lab fee is levied at the current lab fee rate as published in the PCC catalog.
Prepares IT security professionals working in medium to large computing environments to
implement authorization and authentication strategies, use certificates and certificate
authorities, use Encrypting File System, create secure baselines, use Software Update
Services enhance data transmission security, wireless network security, perimeter security
and secure remote access. The primary focus will be Windows Server with some client
content. Maps to Microsoft certification exam.
Either CIS 240M or consent of instructor (several years experience as a network
administrator).
On completion of this course the student will be able to design, install, and administer a
secure LAN consisting of the client and server computers. Also, the student will be able to
install and administer various security tools. The student should be able to pass the
Microsoft 70-299 certification exam (not administered by PCC).
The course consists of lectures, group discussion, and lab assignments.
Through exams and lab assignments students will be assessed to determine if they are able
to:
1. Implement, manage, and troubleshoot security policies.
2. Deploy and troubleshoot security templates.
3. Configure security based on computer roles.
4. Implement, manage, and troubleshoot patch management infrastructure.
5. Implement, manage, and troubleshoot security for network communications.
6. Configure, deploy, manage and troubleshoot ipsec policies.
7. Plan and implement security for wireless networks.
8. Deploy, manage, and configure SSL certificates.
9. Configure security for remote access users.
10. Configure authentication for secure remote access.
11. Configure and troubleshoot VPN protocols.
12. Manage client configuration for remote access security.
13. Plan, configure and troubleshoot authentication, authorization, and PKI.
Course
Content
(Themes,
Concepts,
Issues,
Competencies,
and Skills)
14. Plan group structure.
15. Install, manage, and configure certificate services.
1. Security practices and policies.
2. Security templates.
3. Computer roles and security.
4. Patch and upgrade practices.
5. Secure communications.
6. Ipsec, VPN and SSL.
7. Wireless security.
8. Remote access security.
9. Authentication, authorization and public key infrastructure.
10. Certificates and certificate authorities.
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number, Course Title, Course Description, Requisites,
Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Proposed course
number:
Current course title:
Proposed course
title:
Proposed transcript
title:
ARCH 103
Reason for title
change:
Because of change in sequencing "Architectural Graphics 3" no
longer makes sense. This class will now come before Graphics 1
and 2.
ARCH 100
Architectural Graphics 3
Visual Communication
Visual Communication
Current description: This course addresses the fundamentals of perspective drawings
as a communicative device. Students will develop perspective
skills, build a graphic vocabulary and establish a language of
architectural communication using both conventional hand drawing
and computer models.
Proposed
description:
This course addresses the fundamentals of perspective drawings
as a communicative device. Students will develop perspective,
freehand sketching and diagramming skills, build a graphic
vocabulary and establish a language of architectural
communication.
Reason for
description change:
Better describes course content.
Current learning
outcomes:
Develop knowledge and skills in the proper methods of developing
one-point perspectives. Develop knowledge and skills in the
proper methods of developing two point perspectives. Develop
knowledge and skills in the proper methods of adding shade and
shadow to perspectives. Develop knowledge and skills in the
proper methods of representing surface features using a black and
white format. Develop knowledge and skills in the proper methods
of using color in renderings.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Strengthen seeing/drawing skills. Develop skill and confidence in
freehand sketching. Develop skill and confidence in diagramming.
Develop an understanding of diagramming as a recording tool, a
design tool and a presentation tool. Develop skill and confidence
in freehand perspective drawing.
Reason for learning With the increased influence of computer aided design in industry
outcomes change:
and education, the need for teaching freehand sketching as a
communication tool has developed.
Current
prerequisites:
Proposed
prerequisites:
ARCH 101,122,123,132,126,136
None
Will this impact other yes
sacs?:
How other sacs may This course is presently an elective for Interior Design.
be impacted:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Elizabeth Metcalf
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ARCH 113
Current description:
Covers site development, including surveying existing grades,
locating existing and future buildings, driveways, parking and
landscaping, plus drawing site plans.
Proposed
description:
Covers site development, including surveying existing grades,
locating existing and future buildings, driveways, erosion control and
storm water management, plus drawing site plans.
Reason for
description change:
Addition of erosion control and storm water management to
curriculum.
Current learning
outcomes:
Develop knowledge and skills in the proper methods of organizing
raw site information into a presentable site plan. Develop knowledge
and skills in the proper methods of developing a site plan. Develop
knowledge and skills in the proper methods of site surveying and
elevation drawings. Develop knowledge and skills in the proper
methods of representing surface features using a black and white
format. Develop knowledge and skills in the proper methods of using
color in renderings
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Develop knowledge and skills in the proper methods of organizing
raw site information into a presentable site plan. Develop knowledge
and skills in the proper methods of developing a site plan. Develop
knowledge and skills in the proper methods of site surveying and
elevation drawings. Develop knowledge and skills in the proper
methods of representing surface features using a black and white
format. Develop knowledge and skills in erosion control. Develop
knowledge and skills in storm water management.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
New requirements for erosion control and storm water management.
Working Drawings 3
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: Spring 2005
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course number:
Current course title:
ARCH 121
Structures 1
Current description:
Covers drawing building sections, structural framing and
foundation details. Recommended: Drafting 117 and Arch
126 or equivalent.
Proposed description:
Covers drawing building sections, structural framing and
foundation details.
Reason for description
change:
No longer recommend DRF 117 or ARCH 126
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Elizabeth Metcalf
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ARCH 126
Current description:
Introduces AutoCAD software as a design tool. Instructions will be
given in the operation of both hard disk and flexible disk data
storage, and plotting. Class covers creation, retrieval and
modification of drawings that meet industry standards using basic
AutoCAD commands. This course is 30 total contact hours and is
also worth 60 LU credits to AIA members. Recommended: DRF
117 and CIS 120.
Proposed
description:
Introduces AutoCAD software as a design tool. Instructions will be
given in the operation of both hard disk and flexible disk data
storage, and plotting. Class covers creation, retrieval and
modification of drawings that meet industry standards using basic
AutoCAD commands. This course is 30 total contact hours and is
also worth 60 LU credits to AIA members.
Reason for
description change:
No longer recommend DRF 117 or CIS 120
Introduction to AutoCAD
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Elizabeth Metcalf
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Current course
number:
Current course title:
Course Description
ARCH 131
Current description:
Through multi-media presentations, question and debate, this
course will look at theories of shelter before technology. We will
rediscover indigenous architecture from around the world, while
taking an environmental perspective of innovations that came
from these ideas in today’s world of alternatives such as
earthships, poured earth, strawbale, recycled houses, and more.
Proposed
description:
This course will focus on creating buildings that are sited,
designed, constructed, operated and maintained for the health
and well being of the occupants, while minimizing impact on the
environment.
Reason for
description change:
The previous description was too specific for the course content.
Sustainable Structures
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Elizabeth Metcalf
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ARCH 137
Current description:
Explores advanced features of AutoCAD including 3-D, as it
applies to architecture and includes an introduction to
"Architectural Desktop" software. Prerequisite: ARCH 136 or DRF
136.
AutoCAD Architectural Desktop
Proposed description: Introduction to Architectural Desktop which offers a variety of
tools not available in the base AutoCAD drafting package. It
includes a collection of objects representing the most common
architectural components such as walls, doors, windows, stairs
and roofs. Prerequisite: ARCH 136 or DRF 136.
Reason for
description change:
Better describes the course content.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Elizabeth Metcalf
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ARCH 140
Introduction to CHIEF ARCHITECT
Current description:
Introduces Chief Architect software as a design and drafting tool,
and its applications to the architectural field. Class covers
creation, retrieval and modification of drawings that meet
industry standards using basic Chief Architect commands. This
course is also worth 60 LU credits to AIA members.
Recommended: DRF 117 and CIS 120.
Proposed
description:
Introduces Chief Architect software as a design and drafting tool,
and its applications to the architectural field. Class covers
creation, retrieval and modification of drawings that meet
industry standards using basic Chief Architect commands. This
course is also worth 60 LU credits to AIA members.
Reason for
description change:
No longer recommend DRF 117 or CIS 120
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Elizabeth Metcalf
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ETC103
Introduction to Emergency Telecommunications
Current description:
Introduces the field of emergency communications. Includes
history, role of the dispatcher, field operations (police, fire and
emergency medical), radio broadcasting, telephone techniques,
radio codes and equipment operation. Presents an overview of
federal, state and local law enforcement computer systems.
Proposed
description:
Same as above except last sentence changed to: Presents an
overview of federal, state and local agencies and their respective
communications systems. Addendum to Description: Meets
academic requirements of the State of Oregon, basic
telecommunicator course for state certification. Meets
requirements of the National Academies of Emergency Dispatch,
Emergency Telecommunicator Course for national certification.
Reason for
description change:
Course Revision
Current learning
outcomes:
Students will be able to describe the evolution of emergency
communications as a profession and the changing role of the
telecommunicator. Students will be able to identify the
metropolitan area communication centers, their chief
responsibilities and jurisdiction. Students will be able to describe
the main components of the emergency communications system
and the function of each. They will be able to identify the proper
techniques for use of two-way radios, multi-line telephone
systems, computer-aided dispatch software and audio recording
devices, following written standard operating procedures.
Demonstrate skills in interpersonal communications, such as,
questioning techniques, relaying information, documenting using
clear, concise and accurate verbiage. Maintain open lines of
communication with emergency services providers. Demonstrate
a high degree of understanding of terminology used in
emergency services and be able to carry out requests quickly
and accurately based upon interpretation of the discipline
specific terminology. Define the following issues as they apply to
emergency services: liability, confidentiality, privacy.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Same as above, plus: Explain the differences between criminal
and civil laws Demonstrate the ability to classify crimes based
upon legal definitions.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Course revision
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Carol Bruneau
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
ETC104
Current course title: Emergency Telecommunications-Call-Taking
Current description: Develops communication skills necessary to deal with fire and
medical emergencies. Focuses on fire terminology, knowledge
of fire apparatus, department protocols, triage principles, and
medical pre-arrival instructions. Emphasizes the use of
resource materials. Includes the interrelationship between field
units, police, fire and medical and their roles at incident
scenes.
Proposed
description:
Introduction to the field of emergency communications, with an
emphasis on: history, roles of dispatchers in fire and medical
emergencies. Confidentiality and liability issues and personality
characteristics of emergency services personnel are explored.
An overview of the structure and organization of the fire service
and of the emergency medical dispatch system. Includes the
terminology of the fire service and medical field and application
of protocols for emergency response. Addendum to
Description: Meets academic requirements of the State of
Oregon, Department of Public-Safety Standards and Training,
Basic Telecommunicator course for state certification. Meets
requirements of the National Academies of Emergency
Dispatch for national certification.
Reason for
description change:
Course Revision
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Carol Bruneau
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ETC105
Crisis Intervention
Proposed course
title:
Proposed transcript
title:
Reason for title
change:
Current description:
Crisis Intervention & Critical Incident Stress Management
Proposed
description:
Focuses on the emotional and psychological needs of police,
telecommunicators, firefighters, emergency medical providers and
other emergency responders in dealing with daily crisis and
trauma situations. Explores both individual crisis and large scale
disasters impacting entire communities. Evaluates the resources
available to responders and to the public. Examines the Critical
Incident Stress Management model and how it is utilized within
various agencies. Teaches methods and techniques for dealing
with high stress incidents and the accumulated stress of long-term
emergency service careers.
Reason for
description change:
Program Revision
Current learning
outcomes:
Students will be able to identify the effects of crisis situations and
traumatic events on individuals. Students will be able to describe
the physical and psychological response to high stress. Students
will be able to analyze personality types and how an individual's
type classification predicts their response to specific situations.
Examine various types of life altering events and explain how
these events impact individuals, families and communities.
Crisis Intervention & CISM
Program Revision
Focuses on the needs of local police, dispatchers and other inservice practitioners or pre-service students in crisis intervention.
Includes discussing and demonstrating some tools and techniques
of crisis intervention through simulation and role-playing.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Same as above, plus the following: Organize a defusing or
debriefing within the parameters of the CISM model. Apply the
principles of the CISM system in a controlled scenario.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Course revision
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Carol Bruneau
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ETC108
Current description:
Covers how to transcribe information received aurally using actual
tape recorded radio transmissions, or recorded scripted exercises.
Emphasizes accuracy, spelling and completeness of message.
Instructor
Proposed
description:
Develops keyboarding skills based upon information received
aurally. Utilizes dictation of emergency response information, such
as locations, names, and numeric data in various formats. A
variety of software applications are used, including Word, Excel,
Critical and several Computer-Aided Dispatch Programs.
Simulated emergency telephone calls, radio broadcasts and tape
recorded incidents are used to practice skills inputting data,
accurately recording, abbreviating, coding and formatting
information. Speed, accuracy and brevity are important
components of this course. A keyboarding ability of approximately
25 wpm is recommended.
Reason for
description change:
Current learning
outcomes:
Revised Course
Proposed learning
outcomes:
All of the above, plus: Demonstrate the ability to complete job
specific forms and create documents using specific formats.
Create various records and compile statistical information,
including chronological, detailed records of events and allocation
of resources.
Transcription For Telecommunicators
Students will be able to record complete and accurate information
using a computer keyboard and based upon verbal information.
Students will be able to appropriately apply questioning
techniques to obtain required information. Students will be able to
enter data into a computer-aided dispatch system, in an accurate
and efficient manner, utilizing established rules and procedures.
Demonstrate skills in interpersonal communications, such as,
questioning techniques, relaying information, documenting using
clear, concise and accurate verbiage. Maintain open lines of
communication with emergency services providers. Demonstrate
an ability to multi-task using communication skills, motor and
cognitive skills.
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Revised Course
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Carol Bruneau
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
ETC110
Current course title: Communication Center Operations - Basic Skills
Current description: Introduces operational procedures used in emergency
communications and hands-on use of communications center
equipment, such as two-way radios, multi-line telephones,
recorders and computers, including record keeping and data
retrieval.
Proposed
description:
Introduction to the emergency communications simulator lab.
This course involves the use of emergency communications
equipment and standard operating procedures to simulate
actual emergency calls and situations. Overview of the roles
and responsibilities of emergency communications
professionals in their work environment. Application of
methods and theory obtained through classroom
presentations, in an interactive lab setting, using radio,
telephone, computers, recording equipment and various preemployment screening tools.
Reason for
description change:
Course Revision
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Carol Bruneau
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description, Requisites, Learning Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
ETC111
Communication Center Operations - Advanced Skills
Current description:
Focuses on use of the Oregon Law Enforcement Data System
and computer software simulating Computer Aided Dispatch
Programs.
Proposed
description:
Introduction to the art of multi-discipline emergency response
dispatching in an emergency communications simulation center.
The course involves the use of emergency communications
equipment and the application of policies, procedures and
protocols to specific situations. Scenarios will be complex, may
involve multiple responses and may have a high level of impact on
individuals or the community. Identification and notification of a
wide variety of resources both local and state will be included in
simulation.
Reason for
description change:
Course Revision
Current learning
outcomes:
Students will be able to answer emergency and non-emergency
telephone calls, through role-playing, determine the level and
urgency of response, through various questioning techniques.
Students will be able to appropriately apply rules of prioritizing to
simulated emergency calls. Students will be able to enter data into
a computer-aided dispatch system, in an accurate and efficient
manner, utilizing established rules and procedures. Demonstrate
skills in interpersonal communications, such as, questioning
techniques, relaying information, documenting using clear,
concise and accurate verbiage. Maintain open lines of
communication with emergency services providers. Demonstrate
a high degree of understanding of terminology used in emergency
services and be able to carry out requests quickly and accurately
based upon interpretation of the discipline specific terminology.
Demonstrate the appropriate application of written policy and
procedures to simulated situations.
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Current
prerequisites:
Proposed
prerequisites:
Students will be able to answer emergency telephone calls,
through role-playing, determine level and urgency of response,
correctly apply call type, prioritize and assign field units and
identify available resources. Students will be able to appropriately
apply policies and procedures to the handling of simulated
emergency calls. Students will be able to enter data into a
computer-aided dispatch system, in an accurate and efficient
manner, utilizing established rules and procedures. With an
emphasis on obtaining and recording information in a prescribed
timeframe. Demonstrate skills in interpersonal communications,
such as, questioning techniques, relaying information,
documenting using clear, concise and accurate verbiage, while
dealing with difficult, uncooperative or challenging callers.
Students will develop communication skills and learn to apply
various techniques in questioning a variety of callers, including
those with language barriers, those in emotional crisis and those
in life-threatening situations. Maintain open lines of
communication with emergency services providers. Relay critical
information, which can impact the outcome of a life or death
situation. Demonstrate a high degree of understanding of
terminology used in emergency services and be able to carry out
requests quickly and accurately, based upon interpretation of the
discipline specific terminology. Demonstrate the appropriate
application of written policy and procedures to complex simulated
situations.
Course Revision
None
ETC110
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Carol Bruneau
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
GD 116
Intermediate Typography
Current corequisites:
Proposed corequisites:
GD 140
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Cece Cutsforth
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
AM103
Engine Performance I
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
AM 108, 101, 102
add AM 112
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Paul Sackman
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
AM106
Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
AM 108, 102
add AM 101, 112
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Paul Sackman
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
AM113
Engine Performance II
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
AM 108, 101, 102, 103
add AM 112
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Paul Sackman
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
AM123
Engine Performance III
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
AM 108, 101, 102, 103, 113
add AM 112
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Paul Sackman
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Current course number:
Current course title:
AM133
Engine Performance IV
Current prerequisites:
Proposed prerequisites:
AM 108, 101, 102, 103, 113, 123
add AM 112
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Paul Sackman
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
INSP 220
Course title:
Transcript title:
Fire and Life Safety
Fire and Life Safety
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
3
0
0
3
3
Reason for new
course:
Course work is required to support new changes in the state and
federal building codes structure.
Course description:
This course reviews Oregon Fire and Life Safety standards
including building occupancies and exit systems; hazardous
materials regulations; and fire protection systems. This course,
when taken with commercial building code and commercial plan
review classes will provide the background for Oregon Fire and
Life Safety Plan Review.
3
Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall have
satisfactorily accomplished the goals and objectives listed in the
Course Content and Outcome Guide; understand the use and
application of building occupancies and exit systems; hazardous
materials regulations; fire protection standards; and the use and
application of the Oregon Administrative Rules.
Course format:
On Campus
Required or elective: Required
Is there impact on
degrees or
certificates:
YES
Description of impact Related Building Inspections Degrees and Certificates will be
on deg/cert:
adjusted by substitution - dropping an existing and nonconforming
course in favor of INSP 220.
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs
NO
been contacted?:
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation
Fall
term:
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Mark Hagen
[email protected]
Course Content and Outcome Guide
DATE: 01-10-2005
COURSE NUMBER: INSP 220
COURSE TITLE: Fire and Life Safety
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS: 3
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 11/12
PREPARED BY: Gillespie/Hagen
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
This course reviews Oregon Fire and Life Safety standards including building occupancies and
exit systems; hazardous materials regulations; and fire protection systems. This course, when
taken with commercial building code and commercial plan review classes will provide the
student with the background for Oregon Fire and Life Safety Plan Review.
Students must be capable of reading and communicating in the English language and may be
required to pass a listening competency test administered by the department. Students who may
have a disability and wish an accommodation should make arrangements to meet with the
instructor outside of class to discuss specific requests. Any request for accommodation may
require that documentation of disability be reviewed by the Office of Disabilities.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall have satisfactorily accomplished the
goals and objectives listed in the Course Content and Outcome Guide; understand the use and
application of building occupancies and exit systems; hazardous materials regulations; fire
protection standards; and the use and application of the Oregon Administrative Rules.
COURSE ACTIVITIES & DESIGN:
This course will be presented by means of lecture and discussion. Lectures are supplemented
with selected reading assignments.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
Evaluation procedures and grading criteria will be discussed during the first class meeting.
Individual and classroom discussions, completed assignments, attendance and classroom
participation, exams, quizzes, and worksheets may be used to assess outcomes.
COURSE CONTENT:
1.0 ADMINISTRATION
A. Research, testimony and legal enforcement.
B. Correspondence, consultation and explanation.
C. Permits, prepare and maintain records, policies and procedures.
2.0 OCCUPANCIES
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Occupancy type.
Type of construction.
Occupant load.
Specific occupancy and use hazards.
Evaluate special fire protection features.
3.0 EGRESS AND SAFTEY
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Egress doors.
Stairs, ramps and balconies.
Exit access.
Access to buildings, windows and roofs.
Emergency and standby power.
Hazards to fire fighters.
4.0 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Management plan.
Material safety date sheets.
Control areas.
Special hazards.
Flammable and combustible liquids and gases.
Storage of combustibles.
5.0 FIRE PROTECTION
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Water supply for fire protection.
Sprinklers, standpipes and alternate automatic fire extinguishing systems.
Fire alarm and detection systems.
Portable extinguishers.
Smoke control systems.
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
INSP 225
Course title:
Transcript title:
Multi-Family Housing
Multi-Family Housing
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
3
0
0
3
3
Reason for new
course:
Course work is required to support new changes in the state and federal
building codes structure.
Course description:
This course reviews building codes as applied to multi-family housing
types including townhouse, row house and apartment houses. This
course, when taken with residential and commercial building codes will
provide the specific background for the enforcement of a Low-Rise
Code.
Learning outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall have
satisfactorily accomplished the goals and objectives listed in the Course
Content and Outcome Guide; understand the use and application of
building codes to multi-family housing types such as townhouses, row
houses and apartment houses.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
3
Required or elective: Required
Is there impact on
degrees or
certificates:
YES
Description of impact Related Building Inspections Degrees and Certificates will be adjusted
on deg/cert:
by substitution - dropping an existing and nonconforming course in favor
of INSP 225.
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs been NO
contacted?:
Is there an increase
in costs for library or
av dept?:
NO
Implementation term: Fall
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Mark Hagen
[email protected]
Course Content and Outcome Guide
DATE: 01-10-2005
PREPARED BY: Gillespie/Hagen
COURSE NUMBER: INSP 225
COURSE TITLE: Multi-Family Housing
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS: 3
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 11/12
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
This course reviews building codes as applied to multi-family housing types including
townhouse, row house and apartment houses. This course, when taken with residential and
commercial building codes will provide the student with the specific background for the
enforcement of a Low-Rise Code.
Students must be capable of reading and communicating in the English language and may be
required to pass a listening competency test administered by the department. Students who may
have a disability and wish an accommodation should make arrangements to meet with the
instructor outside of class to discuss specific requests. Any request for accommodation may
require that documentation of disability be reviewed by the Office of Disabilities.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall have satisfactorily accomplished the
goals and objectives listed in the Course Content and Outcome Guide; understand the use and
application of building codes to multi-family housing types such as townhouses, row houses and
apartment houses.
COURSE ACTIVITIES & DESIGN:
This course will be presented by means of lecture and discussion. Lectures are supplemented
with selected reading assignments.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
Evaluation procedures and grading criteria will be discussed during the first class meeting.
Individual and classroom discussions, completed assignments, attendance and classroom
participation, exams, quizzes, and worksheets may be used to assess outcomes.
COURSE CONTENT:
1.0 OCCUPANCIES
A.
B.
C.
D.
Occupancy type.
Type of construction.
Occupant load.
Occupancy based code requirements.
2.0 CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS
A.
B.
C.
D.
Foundations.
Floors and walls.
Roof.
Fire Resistive requirements
3.0 EXIT SYSTEMS
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Public yards, right-of-ways, and common areas.
Egress doors.
Stairs, ramps and balconies.
Hallways and corridors.
Glass and windows requirements.
4.0 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS
A.
B.
C.
D.
Water supply for fire protection.
Sprinklers, standpipes and alternate automatic fire extinguishing systems.
Fire alarm and detection systems.
Portable extinguishers.
5.0 MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Ventilation and fresh air requirements.
Exhaust systems.
Heating systems.
Supply and return ducts
Smoke control systems.
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
INSP 260
Course title:
Transcript title:
Oregon Inspection Certificate
Oregon Inspection Certificate
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
2
0
0
2
2
Reason for new
course:
Ultimately, this is a preparatory course for the Oregon
Inspection Certification examination.
2
Course description: This course reviews Oregon construction standards, such as
architectural barrier regulations and the Oregon Administrative
Rules an inspector may enforce. This course is intended to be
taken near the end of the student’s code studies.
Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall
have satisfactorily accomplished the goals and objectives listed
in the Course Content and Outcome Guide; understand the use
and application of Oregon construction standards; Oregon
architectural barrier, and energy code requirements; and the
use and application of the Oregon Administrative Rules.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Required
Is there impact on
degrees or
certificates:
YES
Description of
Related Building Inspections Degrees and Certificates will be
impact on deg/cert: adjusted by substitution - dropping an existing and
nonconforming course in favor of INSP 260.
Is there an impact
on another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs
been contacted?:
NO
Is there an increase NO
in costs for library or
av dept?:
Implementation
term:
Implementation
year:
Fall
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Mark Hagen
[email protected]
2005
Course Content and Outcome Guide
DATE: 12-20-2004
PREPARED BY: Gillespie/Hagen
COURSE NUMBER: INSP 260
COURSE TITLE: Oregon Inspection Certificate
CREDIT HOURS: 2
LECTURE HOURS: 2
NUMBER OF WEEKS: 11/12
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
This course reviews Oregon construction standards, such as architectural barrier regulations and
the Oregon Administrative Rules an inspector may enforce. This course is intended to be taken
near the end of the student’s code studies.
Students must be capable of reading and communicating in the English language and may be
required to pass a listening competency test administered by the department. Students who may
have a disability and wish an accommodation should make arrangements to meet with the
instructor outside of class to discuss specific requests. Any request for accommodation may
require that documentation of disability be reviewed by the Office of Disabilities.
INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student shall have satisfactorily accomplished the
goals and objectives listed in the Course Content and Outcome Guide; understand the use and
application of Oregon construction standards; Oregon architectural barrier, and energy code
requirements; and the use and application of the Oregon Administrative Rules.
COURSE ACTIVITIES & DESIGN:
This course will be presented by means of lecture and discussion. Lectures are supplemented
with selected reading assignments.
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:
Evaluation procedures and grading criteria will be discussed during the first class meeting.
Individual and classroom discussions, completed assignments, attendance and classroom
participation, exams, quizzes, and worksheets may be used to assess outcomes.
COURSE CONTENT:
1.0 OREGON CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS
A. Legislative regulation.
B. Oregon Building Code Division requirements.
2.0 OREGON ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS.
A. Which building types are regulated.
B. When accommodations are required.
3.0 OREGON ENERGY REQUIREMENTS
A. Which building types are regulated.
B. How to calculate building conservation requirements.
C. Where energy conservation is required.
4.0 OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES
A. Where to find administrative rules.
B. Interpreting administrative rules.
C. Application of administrative rules.
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
CHANGE:
Course Title,Course Description
CURRENT COURSE
NUMBER:
INSP 151
CURRENT COURSE TITLE: International 1 & 2 Family Structural Code
PROPOSED COURSE
International Residential Code - Structural
TITLE:
PROPOSED TRANSCRIPT Intern Resid Code - Struct
TITLE:
REASON FOR TITLE
CHANGE:
State of Oregon has changed code books. Title should
reflect current building codes.
CURRENT DESCRIPTION:
Covers Code as applied to residential buildings and
basic methods of wood framing. This course is 40 total
contact hours and also worth 80 HSW credits to AIA
members.
PROPOSED DESCRIPTION: Covers residential building code as applied to
residential construction practices. This course is 40 total
contact hours and also worth 80 HSW credits to AIA
members.
REASON FOR
More accurate course description. Course has not
DESCRIPTION CHANGE:
changed, only the code book required by the State of
Oregon.
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER no
SACS?:
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER no
DEPTS/CAMPUSES?:
IMPLEMENTATION TERM:
IMPLEMENTATION YEAR:
spring
2005
CONTACT NAME:
CONTACT E-MAIL:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
CHANGE:
Course Title, Course Description
CURRENT COURSE
NUMBER:
CURRENT COURSE TITLE:
PROPOSED COURSE
TITLE:
PROPOSED TRANSCRIPT
TITLE:
INSP 152
REASON FOR TITLE
CHANGE:
State of Oregon has changed code books. Title should
reflect current building codes. This course uses the same
code book as INSP 151.
International 1 & 2 Family Mechanical Code
International Residential Code - Mechanical
Intern Resid Code - Mech
CURRENT DESCRIPTION:
Covers the Mechanical Code as applied to residential
buildings including heating and cooling systems. This
course is 30 total contact hours and also worth 60 LU
credits to AIA members.
PROPOSED DESCRIPTION: Covers residential building code as applied to residential
mechanical systems. This course is 30 total contact hours
and also worth 60 LU credits to AIA members.
REASON FOR
More accurate course description. Course has not
DESCRIPTION CHANGE:
changed, only the code book required by the State of
Oregon. This course uses the same code book as INSP
151.
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER no
SACS?:
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER no
DEPTS/CAMPUSES?:
IMPLEMENTATION TERM:
IMPLEMENTATION YEAR:
spring
2005
CONTACT NAME:
CONTACT E-MAIL:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title,Course Description
Current course
number:
INSP 251
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript
title:
Reason for title
change:
Uniform Building Code 1
International Building Code 1
International Bldg Code 1
State of Oregon has changed code books. Title needs to reflect
current building codes used.
Current description:
Covers non-structural standards of the Uniform Building Code,
including occupancy classifications, building area height and
location limits, exit requirements and fire resistive standards. This
is 30 total contact hours and is also worth 60 HSW credits to AIA
members.
Proposed description: Covers non-structural standards of the International Building
Code, including occupancy classifications, building area height
and location limits, exit requirements and fire resistive standards.
This is 30 total contact hours and is also worth 60 HSW credits to
AIA members.
Reason for
The "Uniform Building Code" is now titled the "International
description change:
Building Code." Course has not changed, only the code book title
has changed.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description
Current course
number:
INSP 252
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript
title:
Reason for title
change:
Uniform Building Code 2
International Building Code 2
International Bldg Code 2
Current description:
Study of the Uniform Building Code, including occupancy
requirements, finish materials, glazing, plastics, chimneys, and
fireplaces. This is 30 total contact hours and is also worth 60
HSW credits to AIA members.
State of Oregon has changed code books. Title needs to reflect
current building codes used.
Proposed description: Study of the International Building Code, including occupancy
requirements, finish materials, glazing, plastics, chimneys, and
fireplaces. This is 30 total contact hours and is also worth 60
HSW credits to AIA members.
Reason for description The "Uniform Building Code" is now titled the "International
change:
Building Code." Course has not changed, only the code book
title has changed.
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
CHANGE:
Course Title, Course Description
CURRENT COURSE
NUMBER:
CURRENT COURSE TITLE:
PROPOSED COURSE
TITLE:
PROPOSED TRANSCRIPT
TITLE:
REASON FOR TITLE
CHANGE:
INSP 253
Uniform Building Code 3
International Building Code 3
International Bldg Code 3
State of Oregon has changed code books. Title needs to
reflect current building codes used.
CURRENT DESCRIPTION: Study of the Uniform Building Code, including handicapped
access requirements, energy conservation and
prefabricted construction. This is 30 total contact hours and
is also worth 60 HSW credits to AIA members.
PROPOSED
DESCRIPTION:
Study of the International Building Code, including
handicapped access requirements, energy conservation
and prefabricted construction. This is 30 total contact hours
and is also worth 60 HSW credits to AIA members.
REASON FOR
DESCRIPTION CHANGE:
The "Uniform Building Code" is now titled the "International
Building Code." Course has not changed, only the code
book title has changed.
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER no
SACS?:
WILL THIS IMPACT OTHER no
DEPTS/CAMPUSES?:
IMPLEMENTATION TERM: spring
IMPLEMENTATION YEAR: 2005
CONTACT NAME:
CONTACT E-MAIL:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Current course
number:
Current course title:
Course Description
INSP 255
International Mechanical Code 1
Current description:
Study of the Uniform Mechanical Code, including combustion
air, warm-air heating systems, venting of appliances and ducts.
This course is 30 total contact hours and also worth 60 LU
credits to AIA members.
Proposed description: Study of the International Mechanical Code, including
combustion air, warm-air heating systems, venting of appliances
and ducts. This course is 30 total contact hours and also worth
60 LU credits to AIA members.
Reason for description The "Uniform Mechanical Code" is now titled the "International
change:
Mechanical Code." Course has not changed, only the code book
title has changed.
Will this impact other
sacs?:
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
no
Curriculum Course Request Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Description
Current course
number:
Current course title:
INSP 256
Current description:
Study of the Uniform Mechanical Code, including ventilation
systems, cooling, mechanical refrigerating equipment, heat
producing appliances, commercial hoods and kitchen ventilation.
This course is 30 total contact hours and also worth 60 LU credits
to AIA members.
International Mechanical Code 2
Proposed description: Study of the International Mechanical Code, including ventilation
systems, cooling, mechanical refrigerating equipment, heat
producing appliances, commercial hoods and kitchen ventilation.
This course is 30 total contact hours and also worth 60 LU credits
to AIA members.
Reason for
description change:
The "Uniform Mechanical Code" is now titled the "International
Mechanical Code." Course has not changed, only the code book
title has changed.
Will this impact other no
sacs?:
Will this impact other no
depts/campuses?:
Implementation term: spring
Implementation year: 2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Tom Gillespie
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Title, Course Description, Requisites, Learning
Outcomes
Current course
number:
Current course title:
Proposed course title:
Proposed transcript
title:
Reason for title
change:
ID 121
Interior Products and Materials II
Sustainable Materials for Residential Interiors
Sustainable Mtls Res Int
Recommendations of SACC and Advisory
Committees/update needed National Council for Interior
Design Qualifications (national exam) now includes
knowledge of sustainable issues as part of the definition of
an interior designer.
Current description:
Analyzes and evaluates materials utilized in interior design
including walls, ceilings, counters, accessories, and other
products.
Proposed description:
Analysis and evaluation of sustainable products used in
interior design.
Reason for description Recommendations of SACC and Advisory
change:
Committees/update needed National Council for Interior
Design Qualifications (national exam) now includes
knowledge of sustainable issues as part of the definition of
an interior designer.
Current learning
outcomes:
Proposed learning
outcomes:
Please see ID 121 online CCOG dated 2/10/98
Reason for learning
outcomes change:
Update needed to reflect current design practice
Current prerequisites:
MTH 20 or placement into MTH 60; WR 115 or placement
into WR 121.
1. Understand what qualifies a material to be labeled an
environmentally low impact product.
2. Research, evaluate and apply environmentally responsible
products to interior applications.
3. Develop resources of appropriate environmentally
responsible products.
4. Develop critical thinking skills to identify 'green wash'
versus environmentally responsible products.
Proposed
prerequisites:
: ID 120, WR 115 or placement into WR 121; MTH 20 or
Will this impact other
sacs?:
yes
How other sacs may
be impacted:
The Architecture program now requires this course in their
Sustainable Building Certificate, and faculty have agreed on
course description, content, etc.
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
yes
How other
The Architecture program now requires this course in their
depts/campuses will be Sustainable Building Certificate, and faculty have agreed on
impacted:
course description, content, etc.
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
JoAnn M. Thomas
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 101
TE 9101
Fiber Optics I
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 102
TE 9102
Fiber Optics II
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 103
TE 9103
Fiber Optics: Inside Plant
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 104
TE 9104
Fiber Optics: Outside Plant
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 201
TE 9201
AMP ACT I
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
fall
Implementation year:
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 202
TE 9202
AMP ACT II
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Course Number
Current course number:
Proposed course number:
Current course title:
FOT 203
TE 9203
AMP ACT III
Will this impact other sacs?:
no
Will this impact other depts/campuses?: no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Sandy Miller
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Revision Form
Course Changes for Number, Title, Description, Prerequisites, and Outcomes
Change:
Requisites
Does this correspond
YES
with a conversion
request?:
Current course number: HE 242
Current course title:
Stress and Human Health
Proposed description:
Remove: Prerequisite: Placement into WR 121 or instructor
permission
Reason for description This is the only health course with a prereq. It is causing many
change:
registration difficulties. We believe students will best be able to
make a decision after attending the first class meeting. Some
students are giving up registering when encountering this
prerequisite block.
Current prerequisites: wr 121 or instructor permission
Proposed prerequisites: none
Will this impact other
sacs?:
no
Will this impact other
depts/campuses?:
no
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
spring
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Marshall Meyer
[email protected]
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
Course title:
Transcript title:
HE 254
Weight-loss and Personal Health
Lecture hours:
3 credits
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
3 credits
Weekly contact hours:
Total credits:
3 credits
Reason for new
course:
TO address the specific issues of weight control and weightloss. Combining information on diet and exercise with extensive
work on motivation, behavior change and life time weight
management.
Course description:
To learn the basics on weight control, weight-loss, diet and
exercise. To set a realistic weight-loss/fitness goal to work on for
the quarter. To become familiar with the Recreational facilities
and classes that PCC has to offer. To get motivated and moving
toward a healthy lifestyle.
Prerequisite(s):
Prereq/concurrent:
Corequisite(s):
None
None
None
Learning outcomes:
How to set a realistic and specific weight and exercise goal.
What tools can be used to increase chances of
losing/maintaining weight How much, how often and what types
of exercise are best for lifetime weight control. Motivation,
relapse control, & behavior substitution will be discussed.
Gen/ed list:
YES, Gen. Ed. Requested
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective:
Elective
Is there impact on
NO
degrees or certificates:
Is there an impact on NO
another dept or
campus?:
Have other sacs been YES
contacted?:
Description of contact:
Is there an increase in NO
costs for library or av
dept?:
Implementation term:
Implementation year:
Fall
2005
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Karen Morgan
[email protected]
COURSE CONTENT & OUTCOMES GUIDE
REQUIRED FORMAT
DATE:
Jan 27, 2005
PREPARED BY: Karen A. Morgan
COURSE NUMBER:
COURSE TITLE: Weight Management and Personal Health
CREDIT HOURS: 3
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0
LAB HOURS PER WEEK (INCLUDES CO-OP, PRACTICUM OR CLINICAL): 0
NUMBER OF WEEKS:
SPECIAL FEE: 0
COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:
Course examines the current obesity epidemic and explores weight loss and diet options
for the individual from a holistic perspective, including social, emotional, and physical
dimensions of human health.
INTENDED OUTCOME (S) FOR THE COURSE:
Demonstrate an understanding of how behavioral, environmental, cultural and genetic
factors influence body weight and obesity.
Develop media literacy skills to analyze current diet fads, weight loss trends and
treatment.
Design and implement a specific, personalized weight control plan.
Demonstrate an understanding of the personal health risks associated with excess
body weight and obesity.
Demonstrate the ability to find reliable, safe, scientifically sound information
regarding methods of weight control.
COURSE ACTIVITIES & DESIGN: (OPTIONAL)
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: (CASE STUDIES, GROUP PROJECTS,
INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS, QUIZZES, TEST)
Course term project
Journaling
In class group projects
In class presentation
Examination
Nutrition assessment
Self-assessments
Process Skills:
Self- Reflection
Communication Skills:
Oral and written communication
Cooperative group work
Computer literacy
Information Access Skills
Collect data
Access current information
Evaluate effectiveness
COURSE CONTENT: (THEMES, CONCEPTS, ISSUES, COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS)
Increase knowledge on the Obesity epidemic in America.
Analyze how behavior, environment, culture and genetics influence a person’s chances
of becoming obese.
Learn to put together a comprehensive lifetime weight control plan.
Know the impact obesity has on the human body and the disease process
Relate behavior change models to prevention and treatment of obesity
Analyze current food and diet fads for accuracy.
State the guidelines for healthy eating provided by the U.S. Government
Identify the six nutrient groups, their uses within the body and good food sources for
each.
Discuss the chemistry of food and metabolism and how they relate to the following
Define lean body mass and discuss how body composition relates to optimal health.
Identify and describe impact obesity has on an individual’s emotional and social health
Outline the relationship between weight management and physical activity.
Curriculum Course Request Form
New Course
Course number:
Course title:
Transcript title:
MM 238
Creating Professional DVD-Video
Creating ProfessionalDVD-Video
Lecture hours:
Lab hours:
Lec/lab hours:
Load total:
Weekly contact
hours:
Total credits:
3
3
Reason for new
course:
To offer industry standard video compositing and effects
experiences for Multimedia students.
.342
6
4
Course description: Introduction to the creation of custom DVD-Video using
professional level authoring software, such as Apple DVD Studio
Pro. Digital video created in MM 235, and/or from other sources
will be integrated with audio, graphics, and other assets. Custom
navigation, menus, chapters, and interactivity will be developed.
Encode uncompressed audio into highly compressed Dolby digital
AC-3 streams, and incorporate into the DVD authoring software for
full 5.1-channel surround sound. Final DVD projects are intended
for use in standard home entertainment DVD players.
Prerequisite(s):
MM140, and MM235, or instructor permission
Learning outcomes: The student will be able to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Design, specify, storyboard and bid on the completion of an
interactive DVD-Video title.
Specify, install, operate and maintain an Apple DVD-Video
authoring work station.
Manage DVD-Video production workflow, scheduling, and
budgeting (monetary & bit wise.)
Create, prepare and encode video content as DVD-Video assets.
Create, prepare and encode audio content as DVD-Video assets.
Create, prepare and encode graphic content as DVD-Video
assets.
Author DVD-Video projects incorporating title, still & motion
menus, multiple tracks, chapters, stories, alternate angles,
alternate audio streams, subtitles, slideshows and web links.
•
•
•
Test, debug, and evaluate a DVD-Video project identifying items
for improvement and implement identified changes.
Archive production assets and project files.
Present a completed DVD-Video project to the class.
Course format:
On Campus
Are there similar
courses existing:
NO
Required or elective: Elective
Is there impact on
degrees or
certificates:
NO
Is there an impact
on another dept or
campus?:
NO
Have other sacs
been contacted?:
NO
Is there an increase YES
in costs for library or
AV dept?:
Approximately $100 will be required for the purchase of the
required course text book, and related references.
Implementation
term:
Implementation
year:
Spring
Contact name:
Contact e-mail:
Michael Cleghorn
[email protected]
2005
Course Content and Outcomes Guide
Date: January 8, 2005
Prepared By: MM SAC
Course Number: MM 238
Course Title: Creating Professional DVD-Video
Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours Per Week: 3
Lab Hours Per Week (Includes Co-op, Practicum or Clinical): 3
Number Of Weeks: 11
Course Description For Publication:
Introduction to the creation of custom DVD-Video using professional level authoring software, such as
Apple DVD Studio Pro 2. Digital video created in MM 235, and/or from other sources will be
integrated with audio, graphics, and other assets. Custom navigation, menus, chapters, and
interactivity will be developed. Encode uncompressed audio into highly compressed Dolby digital AC-3
streams, and incorporate into the DVD authoring software for full 5.1-channel surround sound. Final
DVD projects are intended for use in standard home entertainment DVD players. Prerequisites: MM
140, and MM 235, or instructor permission.
Intended Outcome(s) For The Course:
The student will be able to:
• Design, specify, storyboard and bid on the completion of an interactive DVD-Video title.
• Specify, install, operate, and maintain an Apple DVD-Video authoring workstation.
• Manage DVD-Video production workflow, scheduling, and budgeting
• Create, prepare, and encode video, audio, and graphic content as DVD-Video assets.
• Author DVD-Video projects incorporating title, still & motion menus, multiple tracks, chapters,
stories, alternate angles, alternate audio streams, subtitles, slideshows, and web links.
• Test, debug, and evaluate a DVD-Video project identifying items for improvement and
implement identified changes.
• Archive production assets and project files.
• Present a completed DVD-Video project to the class.
Course Activities and Design:
This course will be presented with varied forms of lecture, demonstration, practical exercise and
review, in order to provide the information necessary for you to complete a final project. Each class
will begin with a lecture covering specific concepts, ideas, and methods to illustrate daily learning
objectives. After each lecture the class will follow along with practical exercises that help
demonstrate the concepts, ideas, and methods presented.
Outcome Assessment Stratagies: (Group Projects, Individual Projects, Quizzes, Test)
The completion of a final project will determine the majority of the grade. However, a combination of
attendance, in-class participation, and weekly assignment completion will be factored into the final
grade. Students will also be required to complete “time sheets” documenting out-of-class and lab
hours spent on final projects.
MM 238 CCOG
1 of 2
1/8/05
Course Content: (Themes, Concepts, Competencies, and Skills)
DVD physical formats
DVD logical formats
DVD-Video Workflow
Planning, storyboarding, and scheduling
Preparing graphics with Photoshop
Still “Layered” menu
Slideshow images
Motion “Overlay” menu
MPEG structure
MPEG encoding/compression
QuickTime/Final Cut Pro/Compressor
Audio formats, bit depth, sample rate
Audio sample rate conversion
Dolby Digital (AC-3) encoding using A.Pack
5.1 surround recording, mixing, mastering and encoding
Bit Budgeting
Importing assets
Using Tracks
Slideshows
The Menu Editor
Markers, Chapters, Stories
Multiple Angles, Multiple Audio Streams
Web links
Wide screen
Languages
Subtitles
Building & formatting
Previewing & testing with DVD Player
Test, debug and repair
Final output to disc
Project archival
MM 238 CCOG
2 of 2
1/8/05
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