null  User manual
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
KITSUNE1
Page 1 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
1. HIGH CONCEPT ...................................................................................................................... 3
1.1. The Pitch ................................................................................................................................ 3
1.2. The Core Concept.................................................................................................................. 3
2. GAME DESIGN AND SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................ 4
2.1. Story Preface ......................................................................................................................... 4
2.2. Story....................................................................................................................................... 4
2.3. Main Player Characters ......................................................................................................... 4
2.4. Story Mode Overview. ............................................................................................................ 5
2.5. Sixty Seconds of Play – An Excerpt from Single Player Story Mode ..................................... 7
2.6. Control Specifications .......................................................................................................... 10
2.7. The Basics. .......................................................................................................................... 11
2.8. Basic Stand-Up Attacks. ...................................................................................................... 12
2.9. Advanced Stand-Up Attacks. ............................................................................................... 12
2.10. Dazed Attacks .................................................................................................................... 13
2.11. Downed Attacks: ............................................................................................................... 13
2.12. Grappling Attacks............................................................................................................... 14
2.13. Running Attacks ................................................................................................................. 14
2.14. Ground Attacks. ................................................................................................................. 15
2.15. Advanced Defense. ............................................................................................................ 15
2.16. Weapon Use and Defense ................................................................................................. 16
2.17. Environmental Attacks and Defense. ................................................................................. 16
3. ENEMY OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................... 17
3.1. Enemy Types ....................................................................................................................... 17
3.2. Artificial Intelligence. ............................................................................................................ 19
4. GAME RULES ........................................................................................................................ 20
4.1. Winners / Losers .................................................................................................................. 20
4.2. Scoring ................................................................................................................................. 20
5. CORE GAME SYSTEMS SPECIFICATIONS......................................................................... 21
5.1. Collision and combat............................................................................................................ 21
5.2. Move Customization ............................................................................................................ 22
5.3. Skill Progression. ................................................................................................................. 22
6. SIGHTS AND SOUNDS ......................................................................................................... 23
6.1. Camera ................................................................................................................................ 23
6.2. Visual Depiction ................................................................................................................... 23
6.3. Sound................................................................................................................................... 24
6.4. Music .................................................................................................................................... 24
7. LEVEL STRUCTURE PLAN .................................................................................................. 25
8. KEY ART TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINE FEATURES .......................................................... 26
9. COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS .................................................................................................... 27
10. IMAGE NOTES ..................................................................................................................... 28
Page 2 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
1. HIGH CONCEPT
1.1. The Pitch: Kitsune immerses the player in the ultra-violent world of a small town
ready to go up in figurative flames. Encompassing a range of hand-to-hand combat
control and customization unprecedented in a fighting-action title, the breaking of bones
is about to become up-close and personal.
This excerpt of a Final Fight arcade flyer depicts the heritage
and violent style that Kitsune seeks to deliver.2
1.2. The Core Concept:
Kitsune kicks ass, providing the player with a sense of
participating in the stylized chaos of an all-out bar brawl or street fight. A threedimensional, third-person take on the intense, side-scrolling beat ‘em ups of the past,
the expanded mechanics and customization in Kitsune translate into lasting single and
multiplayer replayability.
The player assumes the role of Jake Lisowski, a “bouncer for hire” who comes to a
small, Rust Belt town in 199X after stabilizing business in one of south Chicago’s
seediest joints. Driven primarily by cash, he is wooed to a trouble small town in the
Midwest after taking a lucrative offer. Having grown up in a Polish neighborhood in
Chicago’s South Side, Lisowski dropped out of Chicago University’s economics
program after realizing his penchant for fighting and cash was satiated by bouncing in
the most undesirable of establishments.
Not physically imposing in terms of size, Lisowski is often underestimated by a potential
opponent leading up to physical conflict. A collegiate All-American wrestler coupled
with his independent study of Muay Thai, Lisowski will often dynamically disarm and
neutralize any over-grown, meth-fueled, adult adolescent who shows up to the bar
looking to cause problems. Standing a solid 5’ 9”, 170 lbs, he is compact yet explosive
enough to take down the bigger man. He has built a reputation as a relatively
unassuming, yet dangerous brawler who finds far more than be bargained for in Star
City, Indiana…
Pick up and play accessibility seamlessly blends with a deep and robust one-versusmany combat engine. Join a friend in coop to take down degenerate hordes. With tight
controls, hundreds of fighting moves, environmental weapons, the “Bonebreaker” critical
submission system, and waves of unique enemies, Kitsune provides a one-of-a-kind,
white-knuckled, fighting experience.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
2. GAME DESIGN AND SPECIFICATIONS
Platform: Xbox 360
Genre: Beat ‘em up / Action / Fighting
Number of Players: up to 2
2.1. Story Preface: Traditionally, the story that surrounds a typical “beat ’em up” makes no effort
to cover that is some sort of clichéd afterthought, “Let’s get a guy in a white muscle shirt,
jeans, taped fists, and tennis shoes to not call the cops, go into the street, and start beating
down what look like rejects from the Village People in an attempt to save his kidnapped
girlfriend.” It is either that or an interpretation of The Warriors meets Fist of the North Star
localized for a Western audience. Or in the case Rockstar’s last beat ‘em up attempt, literal
use of The Warriors.
Like many of the beat ‘em up classics, Kitsune is based on the notion of “arcade quality
game play” first and having “fun”. But this doesn’t mean that some relative semblance of a
feasible story can’t be fleshed out to help immerse the player in the experience. The “beat
’em up” and a decent story do not have to be mutually exclusive. And yet, borrowing from
nearly every bad martial-arts / action movie from the 1980’s still isn’t a bad idea…
2.2. Story: The collapse of manufacturing work in unassuming Star City, Indiana has left the
population economically susceptible to nefarious, coercive forces deciding their fate.
Unemployment, alcoholism, and other drug use (primarily crack cocaine and heroine) grip the
residents. Bribery and corruption negate law enforcement. Such problems have left this town
a site for, among other decaying institutions, an increasingly seedy bar known as the Sly Fox.
A newly enlisted bouncer arrives there to find a depth of depravity that has seized the town.
The violence, corruption, and drug-trafficking go much further than that of unemployed,
uneducated, testosterone-filled yokels out of control at a tavern, strung out on “smack” and
“crack”. The world of Kitsune depicts a lawless, hyperbolized vision, similar to that of a late
1980’s evening news cast depicting stylized urban blight, violence, and drugs. The
manifestation of this is “The Organization, which essentially “governs” the town. Ultimately,
the bouncer must evolve from someone who is simply “in it for the money” to a figure with
greater purpose.
2.3. Main Player Characters: There are two avatars initially available for use in Story Mode.
Jake Lisowski is the “bouncer” and main protagonist in Kitsune. His
rust-colored hair and unassuming dress does not intimidate at first,
but his crooked nose, cauliflower ears, and neck scars suggest he’s
no stranger to a fight. Coupled with his steel glare and cold-blood,
Lisowski is prone to unleash hell when provoked.
A closer look reveals his body serving as a canvas for an elaborate,
nine-tailed fox (or Kitsune) tattoo. This image from Japanese folklore
coils down from his back down around his forearms, serving as
homage to his Polish surname and preoccupation with Japanese
mythology.
Lisowski3
Unknown to Lisowski, he will begrudgingly mirror the imagery that
adorns him and become what he has sought to avoid: a protector of
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Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
those unable to defend themselves.
Jorge is a “promoter” and a grizzled Brazilian martial arts practitioner
who also trains Lisowski for a price. He once worked on the
automotive line assembling transmissions. Once that dried up he
began operating Vale Tudo training and fights in an abandoned
warehouse. “The Organization” typically leaves Jorge relatively
autonomous as long as he provides a hefty cut of the profits he
generates from the bets and blood flowing on his “arena” floor.
Jorge proudly wears a bandana depicting Brazilian national colors. His
gray, gnarled dreads and blind right eye belie his strength and
exceptional technique. There is little wasted movement in his game;
his wealth of experience gives him a fight I.Q. advantage in any
skirmish.
Jorge
When “The Organization” gets too deep into Jorge’s pockets and gets
personal, he decides to help Lisowski by biting the hand that feeds.
2.4. Story Mode Overview: Kitsune focuses on performing violent techniques in one-versusmany hand-to-hand fights. Techniques are selected from a gradually increasing arsenal of
relatively easy-to-perform fighting moves as the player guides Lisowski through multiple,
linear levels of the Story Mode. A Tutorial takes place at Lisowski’s initial bouncing gig in
Chicago during his last night prior to recruitment to Star City. This highlights the initial
controls, on-screen indicators, and nature of play. Each area will have its share of challenges
in the form of enemy attack waves. Successfully knocking out or disabling these enemies
through combat and use of the surrounding environment is the primary goal. The nature of the
depraved forces preying on the citizens of Star City is revealed to Lisowski as the player
guides him through this mode. Jorge is also available in the one or two player mode. Twoplayer mode is available through Xbox Live or system link (no split screen).
Screen mock-up with HUD
The player moves Lisowski in each level through a variety of interior and exterior areas as
viewed on the main game play screen. Lisowski is capable of a wide range of offensive and
defensive striking, submission, and grappling moves to neutralize enemies. Certain contextual
situations also allow the use of weapons and obstacles in the immediate environment.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
Pressing various face buttons and the Directional Pad (D-Pad) or Left Analog Stick provides
the majority of Lisowski’s offense. The player can produce customizable combinations that
leave enemies in a sea of broken bones and crimson, but button-mashing does not carry the
player very far. The Left Bumper issues defense commands against attempted grapples and
submissions. The Right Bumper defends against strikes. A well-timed button press (within a
fraction of a second) elevates a regular blocking or evasive maneuver to an interception of an
arm or leg and allows for further immediate input to turn momentum against the enemy. The
end of each level poses a significant challenge or boss for Lisowski to take down.
The main HUD reduces screen clutter to maintain a sense of immersion. A running count of
Breakpoints (Image 003), Cash (Image 004), and a Bone Breaker Meter (Image 005)
featuring Critical Nodes occupy the upper-left of the screen. Damage to Lisowski and
enemies is reflected through their detailed, individual textures and selling of injuries. Break
Points are awarded through a scoring system that tabulates a score based on how rapidly,
efficiently, or spectacularly the player deals damage to specific enemy types. Breakpoints
determine the availability of moves, which can be purchased at the Customization Screen.
Lisowski is awarded Cash in fixed amounts per downed enemy. The player uses cash to pay
for training that enables Lisowski to incorporate new striking (Muay Thai, Karate, Boxing or
brawling), submission (Jiu-jitsu, Aikido, Catch wrestling), and grappling (Greco-Roman,
Sambo, Pro-Wrestling style) techniques into his arsenal.
Bonebreaker Meter
The Bone Breaker Meter continues to increment based on successful attacks. The more
varied, stylish, and effective player attacks are, the better the meter increments. Reaching a
Critical Node on the Bone Breaker Meter allows the player to inflict a debilitating Bone
Breaker attack on the enemy. In turn, Break Points tally up greater amounts. Environmental
Attacks in particular spur more Breakpoint opportunities. These are mostly contextual, based
on Lisowski, enemy, and environmental obstacle position and enemy status. They often
incorporate excessive force (e.g. slamming an enemies head through nearby car window,
taking and slamming their head/extremity using a car door, etc.)
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
At the end of the level, bonuses are awarded for player performance and Lisowski’s move set
can be tweaked and altered to suit the style of the player at the Customization Screen.
Lisowski trains in an abandoned warehouse where underground Vale Tudo fights take place.
Jorge shows Lisowski new techniques for a price. New techniques and move set adjustments
can be practiced here. Subsequent plays through the Story Mode allow the player to try
different techniques in their move sets.
2.5. Sixty Seconds of Play – An Excerpt from Single Player Story Mode:
Lisowski Player
Raven – Enemy
type
Screen mock-up; displays in game scenario
The player views a brief, real-time cut-scene introducing the main avatar, Lisowski. He
approaches his first evening of work as the bouncer on the floor of the dingy Star City tavern,
the Sly Fox. The bartender shows concern over a developing situation where a billiardsplaying patron, a local biker thug breaks a cue in drunken frustration. The same customer
shoves the bartender upon being reprimanded and orders him to bring another round. The
patron’s actions are encouraged by three additional burly, whiskey-fueled cohorts. Lisowski
must step in to diffuse the situation, but those who have worn out their welcome will not go
quietly.
Intercepting and reversing an enemy attack with a pool cue
The player moves Lisowski (black figure) in real time with either the Left Stick or D-Pad. A
thug (green figure) initiates an attack with a pool cue. With a properly timed press of RB,
Lisowski intercepts the attack. Immediately following this act, pressing X and A
simultaneously breaks the cue in half. A portion of the shattered cue in hand, retaliation with
a back fist strike sends the assailant down in a spray of blood and lost teeth. Breakpoints, a
form of numerical technique currency, are issued for the successful player attacks. The
Bonebreaker meter fills significantly for successfully defending a high-powered attack. The
player leaps from the couch, clapping Cheetos-stained hands together in joy over the
spectacular K.O. just witnessed! Yet several enemies remain.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
Five-hit roundhouse combo
A five-hit combination (covered in the Tutorial) in unleashed towards the nearest approaching
enemy, knocking him down. Two additional enemies continue to approach simultaneously, so
a decision needs to be made. The player can continue a grounded attack on the downed
enemy at his own peril, or stand up to the other remaining enemy. Attack durations and crowd
control are constant considerations while playing.
Block
Elbow out of rear grapple
Standing up to face the two oncoming assailants, holding RB initiates a blocking animation
which deflects damage from an incoming punch combination. However, the other enemy
opens his attack with a grappling animation. The player fails to properly time an LB press to
deflect or reverse the enemy grapple attempt. Lisowski, now wrapped up from behind, is
pummeled by the other enemy with a series of lefts and rights. The Bonebreaker meter is
decremented by the successful enemy attacks. Lisowski still has substantial health, so when
the player presses A, he uses both feet to kick the enemy away his front. A timed press of RB
performs reverse elbow smashes which stun the rear enemy, resulting in Lisowski’s release.
Four-hit uppercut combo
Another four-hit combo pops the forward enemy up with and uppercut. This sends him back
into a cocktail table, breaking it into pieces.
Lisowski selling fatigue / injuries
The player realizes Lisowski is hurt as he sells his injuries; too many successful consecutive
enemy attacks or damage results in a K. O. Lisowski actually regains health over time. There
is no on-screen meter indicating his or the enemy’s exact health status. Textures and
animations represent damage to specific body parts and accumulated damage. Lisowski my
clutch a body part, have bruises or a bloody face and clothes.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
Lisowski connects with a running punch
The third enemy is now rising to his feet, with a dazed enemy remaining behind Lisowski.
Using R trigger and pressing towards the dazed enemy sends Lisowski into a sprint. Pressing
A delivers a bone-crushing right hand, downing the enemy. Since the Bonebreaker meter has
now filled a critical notch; the player can now use a Bonebreaker maneuver.
Lisowski uses grapple strikes and finishes the enemy with a Bonebreaker Technique
X-ray-style images such as these briefly appear
when Bonebreaker Techniques are used to
emphasize the nature of breaking bones. Here are
examples of a broken leg (left) and broken neck
(right).4
The player moves Lisowski toward the newly risen, yet weakened enemy. Grappling the
enemy with B put the enemy in a front headlock. Taps of the X or A buttons deal a series of
Muay Thai-style knees. Simultaneously pressing X and A puts the enemy in a guillotine choke,
which is a Bonebreaking Technique, or a submission that neutralizes enemies. The
accumulated critical notch is utilized. A Breakpoints bonus is reflected in the total Breakpoints
with fanfare. A semi-transparent X-ray image of a skull appears in the corner of the screen to
dynamically illustrate the cracked vertebrae in the enemy’s neck. The attack is replayed from
multiple camera angles to allow the player to revel in the carnage.
A brief cut-scene starts. The bartender, who has been watching the fight from behind the bar,
comments in astonishment. Meanwhile, the remaining thug escapes through the bar entrance
to spread the news of the conflict. The bartender tells Lisowski that things will get worse, and
that the violence will certainly escalate as a result. Breakpoints are tallied and bonuses are
issued for the commendable player performance.
The Customization Screen is presented with Jorge’s makeshift arena as the backdrop. This
screen displays the move slots and various positions allowing the player to use Breakpoints to
purchase new available moves that unlock with successive level completions. Moves can be
swapped, altered, added, or removed during this segment between levels. More action awaits
the player. Let’s take a detailed look at the basic controls.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
2.6. Control Specifications
Basic controls are predicated on exact,
more arcade-style digital controls. Use of
an arcade style stick, such as the Hori
EX2, would be recommended for this game
and its input is color-coded. The default
controller layouts differ based on the type of
controller used. However, the movements
mentioned throughout this document
default to the stock Xbox controller :
Xbox Controller
Left analog stick, D-pad or Joystick–
Move the player in a range of directions.
Stock player movement would be digital in
nature, so on or off; one default movement
speed.
Right analog stick – N/A
X, B – Light attack; while standing, running,
enemy on the ground, grappling enemy;
use of weapon
A, X – Strong attack; while standing,
running, enemy on the ground, grappling
enemy; use of weapon; confirms menu
selection
Hori EX2 Arcade Stick
B, Y – Grapple; while standing, running,
enemy on the ground, grappling enemy;
throw
weapon/item;
cancel
selection/previous menu
Y, Right Bumper (RB) – Action/contextual
action/pick-up, discard weapon
Left Bumper (LB), Left Trigger (LT)
Block/reverse grapple
–
Right Bumper (RB), Right Trigger (RT) –
Block/reverse strike
Left Trigger (LT), Left Bumper (LB) –
Switches the camera directly behind the
player
Right Trigger (RT), A – Run
Start – confirm menu option/ pause game
Move lists and options can be accessed
from the pause screen.
Back – cancel menu option/ pause game
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
2.7. The Basics: Get around the levels of Kitsune with basic input.
Walk: Press the Left Stick or D-pad to move Lisowski 8 directions at a default walking speed. He will
automatically “lock on” to face the nearest enemy.
Run: Press the Left Stick or D-pad while holding RT run in a specific direction. Releasing the direction and
remain holding RT to continue to run. Release RT to stop. If no direction is pressed while pressing RT,
Lisowski defaults in the lock-on direction of the nearest enemy.
Quick Attack: Press X to perform a quick striking attack. Results are based on player, enemy, and
environmental context as well as Left Stick or D-pad movement and timing in a combination window. These
often set up more powerful attacks.
Heavy Attack: Press Y to perform a heavy striking attack. Again, results are based on player, enemy,
environmental context as well as Left Stick or D-pad movement and timing in a combination window. These
take more time to pull off and may be best set-up with Light Attacks.
Grappling: Press B to initiate grappling the enemy in a front headlock. This sets up close-quarters striking,
submissions, and throws. Stronger enemies need to be weakened prior to grappling them straight away.
Blocking a strike: Press RB to block / defend enemy strikes and weapon attacks. Not all attacks can be
blocked (Image 015). Grapple and ground strikes are also mitigated by RB.
Evading a grapple: Press LB to side-step through the hands of an enemy’s grapple attempt (Image 019). A
successful dodge will leave the enemy vulnerable for a few frames as he recovers. Ground mount and guillotine
attempts are also evaded with LB.
Evasive maneuvers: Run and tap either RB or LB to perform an evasive maneuver such as a forward roll or
handspring (Image 020). Add style to your attacks and make the enemy look foolish!
Camera: Press LT to reorient the camera slightly above and behind Lisowski. See section 7.1 for specifications
regarding the camera.
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
2.8. Basic Stand-Up Attacks: To really kick ass, the player strings together various potential
attack combinations.
This starts as a three-punch combination (two jabs and a body shot) with three presses of X within a timed,
“combination window”. A fourth press can be either X, A, or towards A resulting in different finishes. Success
with any of these possibilities results in the same outcome, knocking the enemy down. Ground attacks are
available for downed enemies and are covered in section 2.10.
2.9. Advanced Stand-Up Attacks: More complex combinations can be used to incur different
enemy conditions. Exploiting these conditions may result in prolonged combinations inflicting
greater damage. Strikes that incur these conditions also have guard-crushing capabilities to
open up enemies that turtle.
Here, the fourth move following the standard X, X, X combo is towards X, resulting in a right hook that dazes a
standing enemy. This dazed enemy status provides a different context for further player attacks.
The fourth move following the standard X, X, X combo is away X, resulting in a low kick that drops the enemy
to one knee. This downed enemy status provides another, different context for further player attacks.
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2.10.
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
Dazed Attacks: Hit the dazed enemy hard!
A dazed opponent is temporarily left open with no defenses, and can be struck with various Quick or Heavy
Attacks combined with Left Stick or D-pad input. These typically knock the enemy down and deal extra
damage.
Even more attack options are available to the player when a standing enemy is dazed. Press towards B or
away B when facing a dazed enemy to perform bone-crunching throws and slams. Surrounding enemies can
also be knocked down or dazed from a collision with a throw. Press B with no Left Stick or D-Pad input to
grapple the weakened enemy in a headlock for more attacks. Press X and A simultaneously to perform a
Bonebreaker technique that consumes a Critical Node. The technique in this instance breaks the enemy’s
arm with a flying jujigatame, or cross-style arm bar.
2.11.
Downed Attacks: Down on one knee, the enemy is wide-open for devastating attacks.
Again, more devastating attack options open up to the player with this downed enemy status. Press X or A for a
Quick or Heavy Attack to throw respective strikes. Press B to lift then drop the enemy on the back of his head.
Press X and A simultaneously to perform a Bonebreaker technique that consumes a Critical Node. The
technique in this instance is a triangle choke that causes the enemy to pass out.
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
2.12.
Grappling Attacks: After grappling a standing enemy with B, another tier of close
quarters strikes, throws, and submissions is available to the player. The second player
character, Jorge, demonstrates these techniques.
Out of a front headlock position, press X or A and perform accompanying Left Stick or D-pad input to perform
various strikes. Lighter strikes can be combined and repeated; heavier strikes do more damage and typically
knock the enemy down. Press away X to specifically attack encroaching enemies while maintaining a grapple
position. In this instance, the kick can daze a standing enemy, buying the player time to finish off the grappled
enemy. Press towards B to throw an enemy in the direction Jorge faces. This can be used as a method of
crowd control since hits are registered when flying bodies collide with other nearby enemies. Press X and A
simultaneously to perform a Bonebreaker technique that consumes a Critical Node. Here, another enemy is
taken out of commission with a broken arm.
While in the grapple position, press LB to switch to a rear grapple position. From here, more strikes, throws, and
submissions can be performed.
2.13.
Running Attacks: Sprint towards an enemy and knock his block off!
Run with RT then strike an enemy with X or A. Quick Attacks may daze an enemy; Heavy Attacks typically
knock the enemy down. Press B to perform a running throw or grapple. Here, Jorge drives an enemy face-first
into the ground. Running attacks are particularly effective on dazed enemies. And yes, by pressing X and A
simultaneously while running, Bonebreaker Techniques are available (not pictured).
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2.14.
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
Ground Attacks: Inflict more pain after knocking an enemy down, but not out.
Strike a grounded enemy with X or A. Press B to set up for a series of “ground and pound” offense.
Press X or A to perform mounted ground strikes. Incur as much damage as possible until the enemy squirms
away or is knocked out. Press B to transition to a front headlock / ground guillotine. This produces another
context for different attacks. From this position, as with all others, if a Critical Node is available, press X and A
simultaneously to execute a Bonebreaker Technique.
Again, more strikes, throws, and submissions can be performed from the grounded guillotine position.
2.15.
Advanced Defense: Anticipate enemy attacks to turn defense into offense.
A well-timed press of RB may intercept certain enemy strikes instead of merely blocking. This happens during
select key frames just before an attack connects, and provides the player with an offensive opening. However,
not all enemy strikes can be intercepted. Lisowski intercepts an enemy punch and retaliates with respective
player input to inflict damage. Jorge is able to intercept a kick and deal damage with respective player input.
These counters must be performed within a very small window before the enemy escapes the player’s brief
grasp.
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
A well-timed press of LB may intercept certain enemy grapple attempts instead of evading them. Again, this
happens during select key frames just before a grapple connects, and provides the player with an offensive
opening. However, not all enemy grapple attempts can be intercepted. Lisowski traps the enemy’s arms;
quickly press B to launch the enemy with an overhead throw. Press X or A to strike or X and A simultaneously
to use a Bonebreaker Technique (not pictured).
The window for the player to perform strike, grapple, and weapon intercepts correlates with the capacity of the
Bonebreaker Meter. The greater this capacity, the greater the window of frames to intercept attacks.
2.16.
Weapon Use and Defense: A bar stool, beer stein, or pool cue can be plenty
effective in the right hands. Weapon use is primarily “one and done”. A successful strike or
throw results in a dazed condition for the enemy. Follow up and combine attacks!
Pick up a weapon: Press Y when Lisowski is near an object or weapon to pick it up. Press Y again to discard
it.
Strike / swing: Press X or A to perform different strikes with a weapon (pictured).
Throw: Press B to throw it at the enemy.
Reverse: Gamble and time a press of the RB to intercept an incoming weapon attack. Press A to shift
momentum in your favor.
2.17.
Environmental Attacks and Defense: The player can use environmental
obstacles to change up ultra-violent tactics. For example, when fighting in a parking lot,
different attack contexts may appear when engaged near a parked car.
B (dazed enemy, near car)
Lisowski opens car door and slams enemy head in the door (pictured).
Towards B (dazed enemy, near car)
While a dazed enemy stands near a parked car, press towards B to put the enemy head first through a car
window.
RB (near door of car, enemy attacking)
In the same manner as a strike intercept attack, a well-timed press of RB while Lisowski has his back towards a
car allows him dodge an enemy punch instead of grabbing his arm. This results in the enemy putting his fist
through a car window. Quickly press B to then slam the enemy’s arm in a car door.
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
3. ENEMY OVERVIEW
3.1. Enemy Types: The majority of featured enemies are of the “popcorn” variety. They attack in
waves and have substandard skill sets when compared to the player character. Stronger
“mini-bosses” appear at the end of level subsections. End bosses appear at the end of full
levels.
Enemies range from bikers fueled with a breakfast of home-cooked rock and shots of Jack, to
mysterious, martial arts tough guys in the upper realm of “The Organization”. Let’s take a
look at a few of these rejects:
Raven likes his women as cheap as his whiskey. He rides a
custom Narley Stevenson and has a penchant for picking on
smaller guys, so he thinks he’s bad-ass. A low-level “streetteamer” for “The Organization”, he runs his own small crew that is
all about drugs, gambling, and general misconduct.
Raven dishes out punishment with a formidable left-hand, and due
to his 6’ 8” stature he tosses most opponents around with ease. He
likes to hang out with degenerate stoner and wannabe rapper,
Clint.
Raven
Clint “Casper” Graham is a southern-fried idiot who was Carver
High’s All-American point guard until he started hitting the bong
way too often. Still donning his old jersey, he’s another low-level
degenerate of “The Organization” who likes to push others around
and brag about his “rappin’ skillz”.
Clint is often heard saying “damn, bro!”, and is easily recognizable
with his lame mohawk, pawn store jewelry, and 40 oz. of malt
liquor. Eschewing dignity for effectiveness, he will sink to the
lowest levels to gain an advantage in a fight.
Clint
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
Haywood is a “gangsta” extraordinaire who is never too far from a
food source. He grew up in Star City with a long standing family
history as his Uncle Zed runs the most acclaimed BBQ joint in the
tri-county area. Famous for its home-grown, pulled-pork, most
patrons don’t realize the nature of operations that Haywood
oversees on Zed’s farm. Let’s just say that if “The Organization”
wants to make someone “disappear”, a trip to Zed’s pig farm is
guaranteed…
Haywood’s general demeanor seems fairly jovial considering the
murder he carries out for a living. Those who disrespect his
business, Adidums, or sweet, high-fade pay the penalty.
Haywood’s fists are loaded with gold, and imprints from their
impact last for days.
Haywood
M. Edgar recently returned from Japan where his professional
shoot-fighting career has earned him the unoriginal nickname,
“Deadly Gaijin”. Tempered in rigorous Japanese dojos, he
combines lethal kicks with Strong Style and jiu-jitsu knowledge.
Once trained by Jorge, M. Edgar returned to Star City to serve
“The Organization”, for which his hot temper and physical ability is
well-compensated. He can often be found competing in the local,
underground Vale Tudo fights where he has severely crippled
opponents and worse…
M. Edgar
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
3.2. Artificial Intelligence: Offensively and defensively, the player character has statistical
advantages over any single member of the relatively low-ranking enemy waves occupying the
“front lines”. Since the earliest incarnations of the genre starting with Technos’ Renegade, the
priority of the enemy AI is to use their advantage of sheer numbers to “trap” the player.
Individual AI tendencies are supposed to result in emergent “mob mentality”.
Bosses display more comprehensive offensive and defensive techniques. They are more
inclined to intercept techniques and perform Bonebreaker Techniques of their own. Bosses
then appear as standard enemy characters as the player progresses through to the later
levels of the game. This maintains a transitive relationship with the player avatar’s increased
statistical strengths and increased arsenal of techniques.
The enemies in Kitsune are imbued with tendencies activated by flags based on individual
percentages assigned to attack types. Player character status, individual enemy health status,
and fellow enemy position and quantities determine enemy attacks.
For example, if a player character is knocked down with greater than 60% health within the
enemy’s line of sight (120 degrees in width within a set radius distance), the default enemy
may have downed attacks set to execute at certain percentages. These percentages may
change based on certain aforementioned conditions (such as player health). Setting the
player health in another range elicits different behaviors, as health correlates with downtime:
Player status: Knocked down
Enemy behavior
Move to attack
position:
Light Attack %
Move to attack
position:
Heavy Attack %
Move to attack
position:
Grapple %
(ground mount)
Move to a
randomized spot at a
set radius from
downed player and
await player’s rise to
feet
> 60%
health;
nearest
enemy
> 60%
health;
not
nearest
enemy
<= 60% health,
> 30% health;
nearest enemy
<= 60% health,
> 30% health;
not nearest
enemy
<= 30%
health;
nearest
enemy
<= 30%
health;
not nearest
enemy
20%
0%
40%
15%
10%
25%
10%
0%
20%
5%
30%
20%
5%
0%
20%
0%
60%
20%
65%
100%
20%
80%
0%
35%
Enemy AI behavior sample breakdown
These percentages could fall under greater flags that perform mass tendency alterations,
such as aggression, cowardice, etc. The overall attack tendencies then fluctuate based on a
flagged status, such as health or enemy numbers, to provide more seemingly organic enemy
behaviors.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
4. GAME RULES
4.1. Winners / Losers: The victory condition is to take out the heart of “The Organization” which
has its grip on the town. Through hand-to-hand combat violence, level by level, mission by
mission, the player attempts to further weaken the Organization to reach the victory condition.
This too, may provide the player characters with fulfillment or redemption
Losing occurs if the player avatar is knocked out. A knock out is sustained from repeated,
successful enemy attacks. The scope of damage varies depending on the type and quantity
of attacks registered, in addition to the amount of defensive statistics the player avatar has.
Damage is registered through textures and overall player presentation, NOT a bar or meter
that displays health.
The player may continue when knocked out and start at the beginning of the last level
reached. Saves are available in between levels. Overall, the Story Mode should take the
player roughly 6 to 8 hours to complete.
4.2. Scoring: Each successful move results in a base score depending on the executed move
and the type of enemy attacked. To score Breakpoints effectively in Kitsune, the player
must vary attacks, dispatch enemies quickly, and defend well. Button mashing or spamming
the same attack multiple times within a timed window is discouraged and penalized with less
potential Breakpoints. In other words, a Double Dragon-style elbow-fest is frowned upon by
the scoring algorithm. Enemy A.I. also reacts unfavorably and will tend to predict spammed
attacks. Varying use of Bonebreaker Techniques and Environmental Attacks is
encouraged as Breakpoint bonuses result from their use. Cash drops are generally fixed and
depend solely on the type of enemy knocked out.
Breakpoint and relative Cash bonuses are calculated at the end of a level based upon avatar
health conditions multiplied by the number of enemies knocked out. Some levels portions
feature fixed areas where multiple enemies knocked out within a certain amount of time incurs
a bonus based on a value and multiplier for ticks left on the clock.
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
5. CORE GAME SYSTEMS SPECIFICATIONS
Games, particularly fighting titles, are sapped of fun if collision detection is sloppy or if
player input is not responsive. Replayability can also suffer if there are “too few moves”,
or ways of beating people up.
5.1. Collision and combat: The collision detection has to be spot on to properly reflect the
priorities for striking, blocking, countering, and guard-crushing. Accurate collision and physics
is also crucial in presenting immersive environmental damage.
As illustrated in sections 2.7 – 2.17, the basic combat engine revolves around the status
relationship between the player, the enemy(s), and the environmental context. For example,
when referencing the controller interaction model previously discussed in sections 2.7 – 2.17,
and the player avatar (Lisowski) and enemy are both standing, the following button
combinations offer different results depending upon type of input other factors:
X, X, X, X
Jab, jab, body shot, left hook (knocking the enemy down)
X, X, X, towards X
Jab, jab, body shot, right hook (which results in a standing, dazed opponent)
The left hook combo finisher acts as a quicker, single-hit strike that does decent damage, plus
it knocks the enemy down upon impact. This causes more immediate downtime for the enemy
and provides an opportunity for the player to deal with another oncoming attacker.
The right hook finisher, hitting deep enough, may multi-hit (collision is detected early on in the
frames) and it also has guard-crushing abilities. Most importantly, it dazes an enemy if the
preceding body shot lands and he is unable to block the right hook at all. What the right hook
gains in potential additional damage and set-up capabilities comes at the expense of slightly
more input complexity and time (maybe a fraction of a second, but that can be a huge
difference in the flow of the fight) on the part of the player.
Another example involves enemy status or context altering interpretation of equivalent player
inputs:
B (standing enemy)
Puts enemy in a front headlock for Grapple Attacks
B (standing enemy near car)
Slams the enemy’s head in a car door
Here the context controls the nature of the attack given the same input. Environmental objects
or entities project a radius that checks the nature of events. This area, coupled with fulfilled
Boolean conditions such as enemy presence, status, and player input triggers canned
animations for certain attacks (such as smashing heads in car doors).
Additionally, grounded, dazed, and downed enemy statuses are timed by individual health
statistics and counts. There less available health, the greater amount of time an enemy
spends in a vulnerable condition (dazed, down).
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
5.2. Move Customization: Customization is available between levels to manipulate the ways
the character fights. The Customization portion is centered on the quantity of Break Points
acquired during play. Breakpoint totals determine the unlocking of new moves as the player
progresses through the games. These moves are purchased with Cash.
Player characters will have the same fundamental “move templates” available, although not
initially filled to capacity with techniques. Existing techniques in the default move sets can be
swapped out for new ones purchased with Cash. Button combinations, status of the player,
enemy placement and quantities, environmental conditions, and weapons will all be subject to
customization through these templates. Here are some options given a specific combination:
Condition: Standing facing ready enemy
X, X, X, X
(Jab, jab), body shot, left hook (knocking the enemy down)
X [Jab (current)] change to:
Short elbow
Left hook
Horizontal Chop
Short knee kick
Etc.
This would be applicable to all scenarios, with the list(s) expanding as the player progresses.
The player tests the combination in Jorge’s training area before continuing on to the next
level. By the later levels of the game, the player character maxes out combo possibilities and
becomes the type of fighter the player prefers.
5.3. Skill Progression: Building up an individual skill set based on six basic statistical
categories. Level progression dictates availability of these statistical enhancements. Each
category addresses a particular offensive or defensive trait that can be raised a maximum of 6
levels (increments). These upgrades are purchased in increments with Cash. They are
relatively expense when compared to some moves. Subsequent increments also increase in
price (an estimate of 150% per increment).
Striking: increases numerical damage from striking moves by a fixed percent per increment
Grapple: increases numerical damage from throws by a fixed percent per increment;
increases grapple and ground mount time allowances in frames in relation to enemy damage
Submission: increases “Bone-breaking” damage from submissions by a fixed percent per
increment
Defense: reduced in damage taken from enemy attacks by a fixed percentage per increment
Health: increases overall capacity for total sustained attack damage by a fixed percentage
per increment
Speed: overall movement and some striking frame speeds are increased by a fixed
percentage per increment
Critical: Adds a Critical Node to the Bonebreaker Meter, for a maximum of 9; also increases
the amount the meter fills per successful attack by a fixed percentage per increment
Page 22 of 28
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Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
6. SIGHTS AND SOUNDS
Gritty, visceral graphics and sound play important roles in Kitsune.
6.1. Camera: The primary perspective is a third-person, behind-the-back view. The camera is
elevated and panned out far enough to reveal foreground and a field of vision on all sides of
the avatar. Player-controlled, “on-the-fly” camera control is provided as well. A fixed camera
may be required in situations to provide with the best game play perspective, especially
concerning interior shots. Overall, securing a proper camera system is integral to the game
play.
The default camera starts out slightly above and behind the player, but does not maintain a
strict behind-the-back view as it follows the avatar during the course of action. If the player
continuously moves in one direction or stops input altogether for about one full second, the
camera will swing in back behind the player. Otherwise a press of LT aligns the camera to
the default position.
6.2. Visual Depiction: Overall, the tone of the art is expressed through a muted, somewhat
monochromatic master color scheme in the vein of Epic’s Gears of War 2 (Image 052) or
Rockstar’s Manhunt. The color red is emphasized to depict the splatter of blood from high
impact strikes. Grimy bars, seedy parking lots, and rural and urban decay permeate the
levels.
Gears of War 25
Manhunt6
Aerial shot of a factory in Gary, IN7
Interior shot of a steel mill in Gary, IN
Page 23 of 28
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Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
A collage of images featuring dilapidated portions of Gary, IN8
6.3. Sound: Exaggerated sound effects in Kitsune may be most important to the actual player
immersion. Sense of weight is important in communicating the degree of violence and
physical damage absorbed by the human body. A snap, crackle, and pop of bones coupled
with sickening thuds needs to be heard when arms get jerked out of sockets and necks are
broken. In game dialogue amidst characters during cut-scenes and game play keep the
player abreast of avatar and enemy status.
6.4. Music: This takes a prominent role in assisting with the atmosphere of Kitsune. Industrial
(i.e. Ministry), metal (i.e. Pantera), and “gangsta rap” (i.e. Geto Boys) tunes from the time
period accompany the derelict environments in the game, music of this type helps to
emphasize the game’s violent motif. Industrial music is particularly befitting due to the
influence of Chicago’s own Wax Trax! Records in the 1980’s with bands such as several
Ministry side projects and My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult.
Page 24 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
7. LEVEL STRUCTURE PLAN
The general structure of the game is level based with arcade-style progression. The game world is
primarily linear; the player to moves from point A to B without back-tracking to previous
subsections. The player physically moves and battles the enemy to get through the various
subsections of the levels. These are defined scrolling subsections that are passable once all
attacking enemies are defeated. This is NOT an “open”, sandbox, or free-roaming game world.
Some real-time cinematic or transitional screens are used to illustrate longer distance travel and
intermittent trips back to the Sly Fox.
The player encounters the big city levels during the Tutorial and towards the end of the game.
Big city levels reference sections of exaggerated Chicago and its outskirts. Some levels have a
more “industrial” quality, representative of South Chicago and the Lake Michigan shore. Besides
the tutorial, earlier levels play out in Star City. These levels show decrepit physicality of a town
subject to the loss of manufacturing jobs and excessive regimented, economic blight applied by
“The Organization”.
Level Structure Diagram (level designations are tentative)
Game play takes place in various building and city street settings. Key locations include the main bar
and player HQ, the Sly Fox, as well as the “warehouse arena”. These are usually visited between
the major levels of the game to save progress and perform character customization. Occasional
“bouncing” and Vale Tudo “missions” are also available between the main playable levels, taking
place at the Sly Fox and Warehouse areas. This structure is essentially an iterative loop.
Each level has various subsections. For instance, the second “Streets” level starts out in the Sly Fox.
The fight spills out into the parking lot out front, and then continues through an alley and into portions
of the downtown area.
The estimated amount of levels intended for the game is roughly 10 to 12.
Page 25 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
8. KEY ART TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINE FEATURES
A custom procedural animation engine [like"ANT" (EA’s ANimation Toolkit), used in Madden 2009]
combined with canned move animations and Havok Physics. Team Ninja’s Ninja Gaiden 2, with its
presentation of complex terrains and fast moving, multiplayer action has set a benchmark for thirdperson action games. A distinguishing feature that Kitsune would retain is the inability of the
player to engage/disengage a manual “lock-on” of sorts. The engine handles this engagement
automatically, with the avatar focusing on the nearest available enemy.
The goal of the engine is to handle physics in real-time when applicable as opposed to the use of
canned animations. The engine may need to favor lower background and character poly counts to
dedicate processing power to handling physics computation if necessary. For example, the action
and result of getting tossed through a plate-glass window should not appear the same every time.
A consideration of the engine is to feature visible, location-specific damage, similar to car models
and textures in modern racing games.
Lighting and particle effects will be used for dramatic or atmospheric effect, but so as not to
distract the player from actual game play. No Tekken “hit sparks” or glowing “strike tracers” are
intended for this game. Going the Virtua Fighter route is intended; more realistic sweat, dust, and
facial/body contortions convey the success and failure of attacks.
Page 26 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
9. COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS
Competition
Kitsune
The Warriors: Solid combat, but with
additional activities (stealing, tagging,
etc.); more “sandbox” and mission
inspired level designs; last generation
visuals and sound; no digital control
option; not for Xbox 360
Unique to X360 platform; direct focus on
combat and fast action; fighting incorporates
more environmental interaction; unique
scoring, customization, and art direction;
original IP
Ninja Gaiden 2: Exhilarating weaponbased melee combat; several different
weapons to master; Karma system
(scoring mechanism); no digital control
option; no 2 player mode; somewhat
excruciating difficulty / imbalance
Exhilarating hand-to-hand combat with digital
control; environmental attacks and
destruction; unique scoring, customization
and art direction; multiple difficulty levels; lack
of “cheap” and off-screen enemy attacks;
multiplayer option
God Hand: Deep fighting mechanics
and customization; no digital control
option; no 2 player mode; brutally
difficult; zany story; last generation
visuals and sound; not for Xbox 360;
limited availability?
Deep fighting with digital control; balanced
difficulty; gritty, more serious story and art
direction; state-of-the-art visuals, animation,
audio, and environments; fighting
incorporates environmental interaction;
multiplayer option
SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) Analysis:
Strengths
 Hundreds of moves with vast character
customization
 Brutal, ultra-violent combinations
 Destructible environments and
environmental attacks
 Gritty, visceral art direction
Opportunities
 Bring the brawling genre back to the
gaming forefront?
 Ability for gamers to download new
content (new moves, characters, and
stages)
Weaknesses
 Not a “sandbox” type of game
 “Old-school” scoring mechanics may put
some modern or “casual” gamers off
Threats
 Potential imbalance or brokenness in
fighting mechanics slips through testing,
especially considering the customization
options present
Page 27 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
11/26/08
Kitsune for Xbox 360, Final GDD v1.1
10. IMAGE NOTES
1
Kitsune is a deity or spirit from Japanese folklore. It often represents wisdom, trickery, or guardianship. This
sketch design is an approximation of Lisowski’s (a Polish surname itself a reference to “fox”) back tattoo;
retrieved November 1, 2008 from Google Images; artist unknown;
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s125/Chaos_Unleashed/Kitsune.jpg.
2
Image from the European arcade flyer of Capcom’s Final Fight; obtained from The Arcade Flyer Archive
November 1, 2008, http://www.arcadeflyers.com/?page=thumbs&db=videodb&id=4182.
3
This and other player and enemy character images are courtesy of the awesome character edit mode from
Fire Pro Wrestling R (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_Pro_Wrestling_Returns) for Sony PlayStation 2. These
are two-dimensional approximations used to convey rough character types and move sets. Thanks to Human
and Spike for making the game.
4
Images from Sega’s Giant Gram 2000: All Japan Pro Wrestling 3 for Dreamcast / NAOMI.
5
Gears of War 2 image retrieved November 8, 2008
http://www.qj.net/uploads/articles_module/66673/gears_of_war_02_qjpreviewth.jpg.
6
Manhunt image retrieved November 8, 2008 from
http://blog.wired.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/08/24/manhunt4.jpg.
7
Aerial view of Gary, Indiana shore; harsh industry depicts style of some “big city” levels; retrieved November
10, 2008 from http://philip.greenspun.com/images/200606-i80-helicopter-trip/gary-indiana-lakefront-aerial10.4.jpg.
8
Various images of Gary, Indiana that depict hypothetical portions of Star City and the outlying Chicago areas;
retrieved December 3, 2008 from http://www.iconocast.com/000000000000003/Z2/News1_7.jpg
Page 28 of 28
Confidential
Copyright 2008 Grant Flannery
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