CACFP Manual - Child Care Resources Inc.

CACFP Manual - Child Care Resources Inc.
Manual
Child & Adult Care Food Program
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Welcome to the
Child & Adult Care Food Program
The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is part of the National School Lunch
Act. It is designed to help train you to provide nutritious meals and snacks for the
children in your care and to help you pay for the food.
When child care providers serve meals and snacks according to the CACFP meal pattern
and keep daily records, they are paid on a per meal basis.
This manual is designed to help you understand the meal pattern requirements and record
keeping procedures, as well as provide you with other helpful information on menu
planning, infant feeding and nutrition education.
Child Care Resources Inc. administers the Child and Adult Care Food Program in
accordance with the USDA policy that does not permit discrimination because of race,
color, sex, handicap, age, national origin, or religion. For more information, write to the
Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250 or the Office of Equal Opportunity,
USDA, Washington, DC 20250.
© Child Care Resources Inc., 2003
Introduction/TOC - Page 2
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Table of Contents
Policies Section
CACFP Policies ............................................................................................................... 2
Adverse Action Policy .................................................................................................. 3-5
Meal Pattern Section
Child Care Meal Pattern (Ages 1 to 12 years) .................................................................... 2
Milk ............................................................................................................................... 3
Meats and Meat Alternates ........................................................................................... 4-5
Fruits, Vegetables and juices .......................................................................................... 6-7
Grains and Breads ........................................................................................................ 8-9
Child Care Infant Meal Pattern ...................................................................................... 10
Reimbursable Infant Foods ............................................................................................. 11
Claim for Reimbursement Section
General Guidelines .......................................................................................................... 2
Record Keeping and Reimbursement ............................................................................... 3
Monthly Meal Count Sheet Instructions .......................................................................... 4
Understanding Tier 1 and Tier 2 Reimbursement Rates ...................................................... 5
Multicultural Recipes Section
Sooji Halwa / Mango Fruit Salad ..................................................................................... 2
Chinese Spring Rolls or Egg Rolls / Brazilian Baked Bananas ............................................. 3
Thai Noodles with Peanut Sauce / Pineapple Pilaf ............................................................. 4
Dolmeh .......................................................................................................................... 5
Dutch Pancake ................................................................................................................ 6
Resources Section
The Food Guide Pyramid for Young Children ................................................................. 2
Feeding Little Children .................................................................................................... 3
Infant Feeding ............................................................................................................. 4-5
Top Ten Nutrients ........................................................................................................... 6
Foods Containing Vitamin A and Vitamin C .................................................................... 7
Foods Containing Calcium and Iron ................................................................................ 8
Sample Breakfast Menus .................................................................................................. 9
Sample Lunch or Supper Menus .................................................................................... 10
20 Day Min-N-Match Lunch Menus ................................................................................ 11
Super Snack Suggestions ................................................................................................. 12
Measurements (What Equals What) ................................................................................. 13
Food Label at a Glance .................................................................................................. 14
Safety and Sanitation ................................................................................................. 15-16
Income Tax Preparation Information ......................................................................... 17-18
Introduction/TOC - Page 3
Policies
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
CACFP Policies
1. All family child care homes must satisfy three requirements to participate in the CACFP:
•
Be licensed with the state of North Carolina
•
List with CCRI’s Child Care Search
•
Attend a CACFP orientation
2. All family child care providers new to the CACFP will be visited during the first four
weeks of participation in the CACFP. This visit will be done by appointment. All
subsequent visits will be unannounced. Providers will be visited 3 times a year.
3. At the monitoring visits, menu records and meal attendance records will be reviewed.
Providers will not be reimbursed for any meals that have not been recorded or are found
to be incomplete at the time of the home visit. Consultants will conduct visits at the
provider’s mealtimes to observe meals in progress. If providers eat out, they need to
document this on their menu and provide a receipt for the meal.
4. All necessary forms for enrolling children in the Food Program and for recording menus
and attendance at meals are provided free to providers on the Food Program
5. As a sponsoring organization, CCRI reserves the right to conduct random parent surveys.
6. Each provider will periodically receive nutrition education materials and ideas for use
with the day care children.
7. Free nutrition workshops will be held throughout the year. Providers will be mailed a
quarterly newsletter, The Grapevine, which will list upcoming workshops. Providers may
sign up by calling their food program consultant. Food Program participants need to
attend one of these workshops a year.
8. Child Care Resources Inc. sponsors the CACFP in accordance with agency and USDA
guidelines that do not permit discrimination because of race, color, age, national origin,
sex, handicap, or religion. Day care homes participating in the CACFP must also follow
these guidelines. The Civil Rights poster must be displayed in your home to let parents
and the public know of your participation.
Policies - Page 2
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Procedures Governing Termination of the DCH
Provider Agreement for Clause
(A) Disqualification and Administrative Reviews for Day Care Homes: The Agricultural
Risk Protection Act of 2000, requires a procedure for the termination of participation
by day care homes (DCH) in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) and
gives DCH providers the opportunity to request an administrative review prior to
termination by their sponsoring organization (SO). This sets forth those procedures
leading to a termination for cause and referral of the DCH provider for placement on
the National disqualified list.
(B) Serious Deficiencies: Examples of serious deficiencies, which, if not corrected, could
result in a provider’s termination for cause include, but are not limited to:
a. Submission of false information on the application and/or false claims for reimbursement;
b. Simultaneous participation under more than one sponsoring organization;
c. Non-compliance with program meal pattern or failure to keep required records;
d. Conduct or conditions that threaten the health or safety of a child(ren) in care, or
the public health or safety;
e. Determination that the day care home has been convicted of any activity that
occurred during the past seven years and that indicated a lack of business integrity,
including fraud, antitrust violations, embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction of records, making false statements, receiving stolen property,
making false claims, obstruction of justice, or any other activity indicating a lack of
business integrity; or the concealment of such a conviction
f.
Any other circumstances related to non-performance under the sponsoring organization day care home agreement
(C) Notice of Deficiency: Upon such finding, a Notice of Serious Deficiency(ies) will be
mailed to the provider, with a copy to the State agency. Such notice will be mailed to
the provider address as listed on the agreement, via USPO, Certified Return Receipt
Requested. Inability of the Post Office to deliver such notice will not negate such
notice. Delivery will have been considered to have been made. Such notice will include:
a. Specifics of the serious deficiency(ies) and notice that the determination is not
subject to administrative review
b. The actions to be taken by the DCH to correct the serious deficiency(ies) and time
allotted, not to exceed 30 days
c. Notice that failure to fully and permanently correct the serious deficiency(ies)
within the allotted time will result in the proposed termination of the DCH
agreement and the disqualification of the DCH and its principals; and
d. The voluntary termination by the DCH of its agreement with the SO after having
Policies - Page 3
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Procedures Governing Termination of the DCH
Provider Agreement for Clause - (continued)
been notified that it is seriously deficient will still result in the formal termination
of the DCH by the State institution and placement of the DCH and its principals
on the National disqualified list.
(D) Successful Corrective Action: If the DCH corrects the serious deficiency(ies) within
the allotted time and to the Sponsoring Organization’s satisfaction, the SO will notify
the DCH that is has rescinded its determination of serious deficiency and will provide
a copy of the rescinding notice to the State agency.
(E) Proposed Termination of Agreement and Disqualification: If timely corrective action is
not taken to fully and permanently correct the serious deficiency(ies) cited, the SO
will issue a notice to the DCH, proposing to terminate the DCH agreement for cause.
The SO will provide a copy of the notice to the State agency. The notice will:
e. Explain the opportunity for an administrative review of the proposed termination
and inform the DCH that it may continue to participate and receive Program
reimbursement for eligible meals served until the administrative review is concluded;
f.
Inform the DCH that termination of the home’s agreement will result in the
home’s termination for cause and disqualification; and that if the DCH seeks to
voluntarily terminate its agreement after receiving the notice of intent to terminate,
the DCH will still be placed on the National disqualified list.
(F) Procedure for Seeking Administrative Review:
1. Such notice must be made by the DCH within 5 working days of receipt of the
Notification to Terminate via:
1.1. USPO Certified Mail, to the attention of the Director of Provider Services,
Child Care Resources Inc, 4601Park Rd. Charlotte, NC 28209 — or, handdelivery to and signed for by a representative of the Child Care Resources Inc.
4601Park Road, Charlotte, NC 28209 during regular business hours of 8am
to 5pm, Monday through Friday.
2. Such notice and request for an Administrative Review must include a written
explanation of the basis for review and: 1.1.
Documentation to support the
request and Name(s), address(s), phone number(s) and relationship(s) of any
witness(s) who request to appear in sworn support of the provider facts to be
presented.
(G) Administrative Review Procedures:
1. The SO Director of Provider Services will appoint an independent panel whose
members will not have been involved in the termination decision. The SO Director
of Provider Services will contact the DCH provider to establish a time and place for
the review to be conducted no later than 15 working days following CACFP receipt
of the request for review.
Policies - Page 4
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Procedures Governing Termination of the DCH
Provider Agreement for Clause - (continued)
2. The review panel will be provided with
2.1. SO documentation to support the proposed termination action, together with
a list of potential witnesses
2.2. DCH appeal documentation and/or potential witness list
2.3. Rules and regulations of the CACFP as published in the Federal Register and
applicable rules of the State agency
2.4. Any other applicable records requested by the Review Panel
3. The review panel will decide the case upon presentation, or may take up to (5)
working days to make a determination.
4. Such determination will be furnished in writing to both parties within five working
days of its issuance with a copy sent to the State agency. All findings will be final
and binding on both parties.
(H) Reimbursement Payments During the Period of Appeal: The SO will continue to pay
any valid claims for reimbursement for eligible meals until the provider’s agreement is
terminated, including the period of any administrative review, with the exception of:
1. If the termination is related to health or safety issues involving imminent threat to
the health or safety of a child or, if the DCH provider has engaged in activities that
threaten the public health or safety,
2. If the termination is based on the submission of a false or fraudulent claim
It is always the case that a sponsoring organization may not pay any claim, or
portion of a claim, that it believes to be invalid. This is not a “suspension” of
Program participation, but rather a denial based on the normal process for reviewing claims.
(I)
Termination of the DCH provider agreement for “convenience”: Termination for
convenience means that SO has terminated the agreement for reasons unrelated to the
provider’s performance under the contract. Because termination for convenience is not
based on fault, providers who have their agreement terminated for convenience are not
placed on the National disqualified list.
(J)
Provider’s Ability to Terminate the Agreement with the Sponsoring Organization: A
DCH provider will continue to have the right to terminate its agreement with the SO
for convenience, subject to any stipulations by the State agency governing the administration of the CACFP. Section 243(f ) of ARPA amended section 17(f)(3) of the
NSLA prohibits providers from transferring to a new sponsoring organization more
than once a year.
Policies - Page 5
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Procedures Governing Termination of the DCH
Provider Agreement for Clause - (continued)
(K) Cases related to health or safety issues involving imminent threat to the health or
safety of a child:
a. If State or local health or licensing officials have cited a day care home for serious
health or safety violations, the SO must immediately suspend the DCH participation in the CACFP, prior to any formal action to revoke the home’s licensure or
approval.
b. If the SO determines that there is an imminent threat to the health or safety of
participants at a day care home, or that the DCH has engaged in activities that
threaten the public heath or safety, and the licensing agency cannot make an
immediate onsite visit, the SO will immediately notify the appropriate authorities
and take action that is consistent with the recommendations and requirements of
those authorities
c. The SO will notify the DCH that its participation has been suspended, that the
DCH has been determined seriously deficient, and that the SO proposes to terminate the DCH agreement for cause. The SO will provide a copy of the notice to the
State agency.
d. The notice will:
1.
Specify the serious deficiency(ies) found and the DCH opportunity for an
administrative review of the proposed termination
2.
State that participation, including all Program payments, will be suspended
until the administrative review is concluded and if the administrative review
official overturns the suspension, the DCH may claim reimbursement for
eligible meals served during the suspension
3.
Inform the DCH that termination will result in the placement of the DCH
on the National disqualified list
4.
State that if the DCH seeks to voluntarily terminate its agreement after
receiving the notice of proposed termination, the DCH will still be terminated for cause and disqualified.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Provider Signature)
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Director of Provider Services, Child and Adult Care Food Program)
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Provider Name Printed
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
(Provider DOB)
(Provider #)
(Dated)
Policies - Page 6
Meal Patterns
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Child Care Meal Pattern
Food Components
Ages 1-2
Ages 3-5
Ages 6-121
Breakfast for Children (Select all three components for a reimbursable meal)
1 milk (fluid milk)
1/2 cup
3/4 cup
1 cup
1 fruit/vegetable (juice2, fruit and/or vegetable)
1/4 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 slice
1/2 serving
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/2 slice
1/2 serving
1/3 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1 slice
1 serving
3/4 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
3
1 grains/bread , bread or
cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or
cold dry cereal or
hot cooked cereal or
pasta or noodles or grains
Lunch or Supper for Children (Select all four components for a reimbursable meal)
1 milk (fluid milk)
2
2 fruits/vegetable (juice , fruit and/or vegetable)
3
1 grains/bread , bread or
cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or
cold dry cereal or
hot cooked cereal or
pasta or noodles or grains
1 meat/meat alternate (meat or poultry or fish4 or
alternate protein product or
cheese or
egg or
cooked dry beans or peas or
peanut or other nut or seed butters or
nuts and/or seeds5 or
yogurt6
1/2 cup
3/4 cup
1 cup
1/4 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 slice
1/2 serving
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/2 slice
1/2 serving
1/3 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1 slice
1 serving
3/4 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1 oz.
1 oz.
1 oz.
1/2
1/4 cup
2 Tbsp.
1/2 oz
4 oz.
1 1/2 oz.
1 1/2 oz.
1 1/2 oz.
3/4
3/8 cup
3 Tbsp.
3/4 oz.
6 oz.
2 oz.
2 oz.
2 oz.
1
1/2 cup
4 Tbsp.
1 oz.
8 oz.
Supplement for Children (Select two of the four components for a reimbursable snack)
1 milk (fluid milk)
2
1 fruit/vegetable (juice , fruit and/or vegetable)
3
1 grains/bread , bread or
cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or
cold dry cereal or
hot cooked cereal or
pasta or noodles or grains
1 meat/meat alternate (meat or poultry or fish4 or
alternate protein product or
cheese or
egg or
cooked dry beans or peas or
peanut or other nut or seed butters or
nuts and/or seeds5 or
yogurt6
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
3/4 cup
1/2 slice
1/2 serving
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/2 slice
1/2 serving
1/3 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1 slice
1 serving
3/4 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1 oz.
1 oz.
1 oz.
1/2
1/4 cup
2 Tbsp.
1/2 oz/
1 1/2 oz.
1 1/2 oz.
1 1/2 oz.
3/4
3/8 cup
3 Tbsp.
3/4 oz.
2 oz.
2 oz.
2 oz.
1
1/2 cup
4 Tbsp.
1 oz.
2 oz. or 1/4 cup
2 oz. or 1/4 cup
4 oz. or 1/2 cup
1
Children age 12 and older may be served larger portions based on their greater food needs. They may not be served
less than the minimum qualities listed in this column.
2
Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength
3
Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain
or enriched or fortified.
4
A serving consists of the editable portion of cooked lean meat or poultry or fish
5
Nuts and seeds may meet only one-half of the total meat/meat alternate serving and must be combined
with another meat/meat alternate to fulfill the lunch or supper requirements
6
Yogurt may be plain or flavored, unsweetened or sweetened
Meal Patterns - Page 2
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Milk
Milk is the primary source of calcium in a child’s diet, as well as an excellent source of protein, riboflavin, and vitamin D. Milk must be served at breakfast, lunch, and supper, and it
may be served as one of the two snack components for children 1 year through 12 years old.
Guidelines for Serving Milk
•
There is no substitute for fluid milk on the CACFP.
•
The milk must be pasteurized.
•
Milk may be plain or flavored; whole, low fat, skim or buttermilk. The difference is in
the fat content, not in the nutrients. Flavored milk does have added sugar.
•
Reconstituted dry milk is not creditable and this includes the instant packages of hot
chocolate.
•
Whole milk is recommended for children between 1 and 2 years of age. Whole, low fat,
or skim milk is suitable for older children.
•
If a child has milk intolerance or a milk allergy, providers must have a statement from a
health professional stating such and recommending what should be served instead.
•
Infants under 1 year old must be fed iron-fortified formula or breast milk. (See infant
feeding section of this manual)
The following foods made with milk
are NOT CREDITABLE in place of milk.
Ice cream
Pudding
Yogurt (is creditable as a meat alternate)
Cheese (is creditable as a meat alternate)
Egg nog
Cream soups
Evaporated milk
Cream cheese
Meal Patterns - Page 3
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Meats and Meat Alternates
A meat or meat alternate must be served at lunch and supper, and may be served as one of
the two components at snack. Meat products are important for growing children because
they are a good source of protein and iron. Some of the foods that satisfy the meat requirement include:
•
Beef
•
Cheese
•
Chicken
•
Dried Beans
•
Eggs
•
Fish/Shellfish
•
Lamb
•
Peanut Butter
•
Pork
•
Turkey
•
Yogurt
Guidelines for Choosing Meats
1. A serving of meat is understood to be cooked, lean meat without bone.
2. Commercially prepared combination meat dishes often do not contain enough meat to
satisfy CACFP requirements, and it is very difficult to determine the exact amount in
each serving. Therefore, we recommend that you serve homemade products whenever
possible. However, if you want to serve store-bought Ravioli, Pot Pies, Frozen Pizzas,
etc., you must supplement this with another meat source such as a cheese slice or
boiled egg.
3. Most young children cannot eat the full-required amount of peanut butter on one
sandwich. If necessary, supplement with another meat alternative.
4. Bologna, luncheon meat and hot dogs must be made without bread fillers to satisfy
the meat requirement.
5. You must serve 100% cheese. Cheese foods, cheese spreads, cheese products are not
100% cheese.
6. The weight of breading on certain meat products such as fish sticks or chicken patties
does not count toward the meat requirement.
Meal Patterns - Page 4
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Meats & Meat Alternates
APPRO
XIMA
TE weight of typical meat servings:
APPROXIMA
XIMATE
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 fish sticks = 1 oz. meat
3 oz. breaded fish patty
= 1.5 oz. meat
3 oz. breaded chicken patty = 1.5 oz. meat
1 large chicken drumstick = about 1.8 oz. meat
1 large chicken thigh = about 2.1 oz. meat
1 large chicken breast = about 2.4 oz. meat
1 large chicken back = about 1.9 oz. meat
1 large chicken wing = about 1.9 oz. meat
6.5 oz. can of tuna = 5.7 oz. meat
1 lb. raw ground beef = 11.2 oz. cooked meat
1 lb. raw sausage = 7.52 oz. cooked meat
1/3 cup corned beef hash = 1 oz. meat (and 1/8 c. vegetables)
1 lb. spareribs = 6.24 oz. meat
The following foods are
NOT CREDITABLE as meat:
Bacon (except Canadian Bacon)
Liver Pudding
Liver Mush
Cream cheese
Powdered cheese such as in macaroni dinners
Tofu
Pigs feet
Oxtail
Neck bones
Meal Patterns - Page 5
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Fruits, Vegetables & Juices
Fruits and vegetables are an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C.
They also provide fiber to aid in digestion and carbohydrates for energy. Fruits and/or
vegetables must be served with breakfast, lunch, and supper, and they may be served as one
of the two snack components.
Guidelines for Choosing Fruits & Vegetables
1. At least 2 fruits and/or vegetables must be served at lunch and supper. Together these
must total the minimum serving size listed on the Meal Pattern Chart.
2. A combination fruit or vegetable dish counts as one serving. For example, if fruit
cocktail, tossed salad, vegetable soup, etc. are served, another fruit or vegetable must also
be served with the meal.
3. Dried beans and dried peas may be counted as a meat or vegetable, but not both in the
same meal.
4. Potatoes are a vegetable and may not be substituted for a grain/bread.
5. Try to serve a vitamin A rich food at least twice a week, and a vitamin C rich food every
day
6. You may serve fresh, frozen or canned fruits and vegetables. Generally, fresh is the most
nutritious and canned the least nutritious. In an effort to reduce sugar content in
canned fruit, it is best to choose fruit packed in its own juices.
7. Fruits combined with other ingredients may be counted toward meeting the requirement if there is enough fruit per child, i.e., homemade banana pudding, Jell-O with
fruit cocktail, apple pie, to meet the minimum requirement. Products must be homemade. When serving pie or pudding, record amount of fruit/vegetable used.
8. Juices should be 100% full-strength juices. Read label carefully.
9. Juice and milk cannot be served together as the only components of a snack. They may
be served together at breakfast, because a grain/bread product is also served.
Meal Patterns - Page 6
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Fruits, Vegetables & Juices (continued)
APPRO
XIMA
TE serving sizes of fruits and vegetables:
APPROXIMA
XIMATE
•
1 small apple = ½ c. fruit
•
1 small banana = ½ c. fruit
•
¼ small cantaloupe = ½ c. fruit
•
18 grapes
•
½ grapefruit = ½ c. fruit
•
1 small orange = ½ c. fruit
•
1 small peach = ½ c. fruit
•
1 small pear = ½ c. fruit
•
3 plums = ½ c. fruit
•
1 medium tangerine = ½ c. fruit
•
1 cup vegetable soup = ¼ c. vegetables
= ½ c. fruit
The following foods are
NOT CREDITABLE
as fruits or vegetables:
Catsup
Relish
Hominy
Potato chips
Potato sticks
Popcorn
Plain Jell-O
Coconut
Tang
Lemonade
Kool-Aid
Hi-C
Gatorade
Jelly, jams or preserves
Apple Butter
Fruit roll-ups
Beverages labeled “drinks” or “cocktails”
Meal Patterns - Page 7
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Grains & Breads
Breads and other products made from grains provide carbohydrates for energy and are a good
source of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and iron. Whole grain products are also high in fiber. A
bread or grain product must be served at breakfast, lunch and supper, and it may be used as
one of the two snack components. Generally 1 serving according to the product label meets
the meal pattern for 6 –12 year old children and ½ serving for 1 –5 year olds. Some of the
foods that meet the grain and bread requirement include:
•
Bread, rolls, biscuits
•
Crackers
•
Cereal (hot or cold)
•
Grits
•
Rice
•
Pasta (noodles, spaghetti, macaroni)
•
Cornbread
•
Pancakes or waffles
Guidelines for Choosing Grains & Beads
1. ALL grain and bread products including cereal must be whole grain, enriched or fortified to be creditable on the CACFP.
2. In a lunch or supper meal, the grain or bread must serve the customary function of
bread, an accompaniment to or a recognizable integral part of the main dish (not merely
as an ingredient).
3. Grain/bread products with sugar as the first ingredient are not creditable.
4. Grain/bread products with 3 or more of these ingredients listed are not creditable:
brown sugar, corn syrup, dextrose, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, high-fructose corn
syrup, honey, lactose, maltose, maple syrup, molasses, sucrose, sugar.
The following foods are
NOT CREDITABLE
as grain/breads:
Potatoes (are creditable as a vegetable)
Potato chips or corn chips
Popcorn
Breadings on precooked fish and chicken
Meal Patterns - Page 8
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Meal Patterns
Grains & Breads (continued)
The CACFP strongly encourages providers NOT to serve grains/breads that are high in sugar
and fat because these foods tend to be lower in vitamins and minerals, may be more expensive to serve, and do not teach healthful eating habits. You may serve these foods only at
breakfast and snacks and only twice in one week. Breakfasts and snacks containing these
foods served more than twice in one week will be disallowed. The main ingredient by
weight of these high sugar and fat foods must be enriched or whole grain meal or flour.
Grains and Breads Limited to Twice a Week at Breakfast and Snack
•
Cereal bars
•
Cinnamon rolls/sweet rolls/honey buns
•
Coffee cake
•
Danish pastry
•
Doughnuts
•
Granola bars
•
Sweetened cereal (10 grams or more sugar per ounce)
•
Toaster pastries
•
Toaster strudels
•
Turnovers
Grains and Breads Limited to Twice a Week at Snack
•
Bread pudding (home-made)
•
Brownies
•
Cakes (unfrosted only)
•
Cookies
•
Frosted graham crackers
•
Ginger bread
•
Rice cereal treats
•
Rice pudding (home-made)
•
Snack chips: bagel, corn, cornmeal, nacho, taco, tortilla, whole-grain (potato chips are
not creditable)
•
Sopapillas
•
Sweet pie crust
Meal Patterns - Page 9
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Child Care Infant Meal Pattern
Birth through 3 months
4 months through 7 months
8 months through 11 months
Breakfast
4-6 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
4-6 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
0-3 tbsp. infant cereal1,4
6-8 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
and
2-4 tbsp. infant cereal1 and
1-4 tbsp. fruit and/or vegetable
Lunch or Supper
4-6 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
4-8 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
0-3 tbsp. fruit and/or vegetable4
0-3 tbsp. infant cereal1,4
6-8 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
and
1-4 tbsp. fruit and/or vegetable
and
2-4 tbsp. infant cereal1
and/or
1-4 tbsp. meat, fish, poultry, egg
yolk, cooked dry beans or peas;
or
1
/ 2 - 2 oz. cheese;
or
1-4 oz. cottage cheese, cheese
food, or cheese spread
Supplement (Snack)
4-6 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
4-6 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
2-4 fl. oz. formula1 or breast milk2,3
or fruit juice5
0-1/ 2 bread4,6
0-2 crackers4,6
1 Infant formula and dry infant cereal shall be iron-fortified.
2 It is recommended that breast milk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months.
3 For some breast-fed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breast milk per feeding, a
serving of less than the minimum amount of breast milk may be offered, with additional breast milk offered if the
infant is stil hungry.
4 A serving of this component shall be optional.
5 Fruit juice shall be full-strength.
6 Bread and bread alternates shall be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour..
Meal Patterns - Page 10
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Reimbursable Infant Foods
Meal
Component
Fruits &
Vegetables
Meat/ Meat
Alternative
Reimbursable
Not Reimbursable
Comments
„ Baby foods which list fruit
or vegetable as the first
ingredient
„ Baby food dinners which
list fruits or vegetable as
the first ingredient
„ Baby foods fruit and
vegetables which contain
multiple fruits or
vegetables and list fruit or
vegetable as the first
ingredient
„ Baby foods in the jarred
cereal with fruit category
„ Plain strained baby food
meats (beef, chicken,
turkey, lamb, veal, ham)
„ Baby food combination
dinners
„ Gerber 2nd TM foods and
baby food meat products
(beef and beef gravy,
chicken and chicken
gravy, ham and ham
gravy, lamb and lamb
gravy, turkey and turkey
gravy and veal and veal
gravy
„ Baby foods in the dessert
category (will generally
have dessert or pudding
as part of the product
name)
„ Meat sticks, or finger
sticks
„ Commercial fish sticks,
other commercial breaded
or batter fish or seafood
products, canned fish with
bones, hot dogs and
sausages
Plain fruit and vegetable
commercial baby food
products are generally
considered to contain a
higher quantity of fruit or
vegetable and provide more
nutrition for the dollar than
those with a variety of
additional non-fruit or nonvegetable ingredients.
It is difficult to determine
the actual amount of
various food components in
baby food combination
dinner and they generally
have less nutritional value
than single-ingredient
meats. Fish sticks, canned
fish, hot dogs, sausages,
nuts, seeds and seed butters
can cause an infant to
choke or may cause an
allergic reaction.
„ Yogurt, nuts, seeds and/or
seed butters
Bread and Cracker, „ Breads (white, wheat,
whole wheat, French,
and Infant Cereal
„ Iron fortified dry infant
cereals containing fruit
Italian all without nuts)
„ Biscuits, Bagels, English
muffins (all without nuts)
„ Pita Bread, rolls, soft
tortillas
„ Commercial jarred baby
food cereals which are
"wet"
„ Ready to eat breakfast
cereal (cold dry) and
breakfast cereals (cooked)
„ Crackers (saltines or snack
crackers, matzo crackers,
animal crackers, graham
crackers, made without
honey, Zwieback, teething
biscuits
„ Any iron-fortified dry
cereal especially
formulated for and
recognized as cereal for
infants that is routinely
mixed with breast ilk or
iron-fortified infant
formula
Fruit Juice
„ Full-strength fruit juice
„
Vegetable juices and fruit
juices with yogurt
Bread and crackers must be
prepared in a form that is
suitable for an infant to use
as finger food and reduces
the risk of choking (small
thin strips). Providers do
not need to calculate the
amount of bread or the
numbers of crackers that
constitute a serving size in
the Infant Meal pattern
because the serving size
range starts at zero. Honey
in baked goods could
contain Clostridium
botulinum spores which can
cause serious foodborne
illness in infants.
It is recommended that fruit
juice containing or fortified
with vitamin C and
pasturized fruit juice be
served.
Meal Patterns - Page 11
Claim for
Reimbursement
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Claim for Reimbursement
General Guidelines
In order to receive reimbursement for meals, providers must be accountable for the food served
to children. This means daily records must be kept. Providers record menus on Daily Menu
Record Form. Providers record daily attendance and the number of children served on the
Monthly Meal Count Form. A Child Enrollment Form for each child is required when he/she
starts on the food program. In addition, an Infant Formula/Breast Milk Provision Form is
requied for each infant when he/she starts on the Food Program.
Important things to remember about meal service and record keeping:
1. You may claim 2 meals and 1 snack, or 2 snacks and 1 meal per child per day.
2. Always record attendance at the point of service
3. If you claim more than one snack each day (AM, PM or EVE), you must record a menu for
each snack. You may either record different menus in the space provided for recording snack
on the Daily Menu Record or if you serve the same foods for all snacks each day, you may circle
the AM, PM or EVE on the left side of the Daily Menu Record and write “Same menu for all
snacks.”
4. If you use a typed cycle menu, you must write the day of the week next to the date and initial
each day to indicate that you did serve the foods typed. If you do not serve the exact foods
typed on the menu, simply draw a line through through the food that is typed and write above it
what you actually served.
5. You may claim only your licensed capacity, unless you have been approved to claim your own
school-age children.
6. You may claim your own children if you meet income guidelines and we have the Eligibility
Application on file and if your own children eat with at least one day care child.
7. Children are eligible for the CACFP from birth until their 13th birthday.
8. You may not charge parents an extra fee for meals, nor ask them to provide food for their
children that you claim.
9. If you provide different foods to different children (such as infants or children with food
allergies), be sure to record all foods.
10. The Daily Menu Record and the Monthly Meal Count Forms must be filled out every day.
11. If you wish to serve non-creditable foods on special occasions (such as ice cream for birthdays),
do not claim reimbursement for that meal.
12. You may claim reimbursement for meals purchased in restaurants if the meal meets the CACFP
guidelines. Record the food served the same as any other meal and attach the receipt to the
menu.
13. A Provider claiming an infant on the CACFP must offer to buy formula that meets the CACFP
requirements. If a parent accepts the provider’s offer to buy the formula, the provider must
attach copies of formula receipts to the infant’s menu. If the only component required for an
infant’s meal is formula, the provider may only claim the meal if she buys the formula.
Claim for Reimbursement - Page 2
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Claim for Reimbursement
Record Keeping and Reimbursement
Providers must keep daily records of menus and meal attendance. All of these records need
to be mailed to Child Care Resources Inc. after the last meal is recorded for the month. If
the report is not mailed promptly, there is a risk of the report arriving late. Reports that
arrive late (after the 4th of the month) will be paid the following month.
When records are received, they are checked for the following:
1. There is a menu for every meal claimed on the Monthly Meal Count Form.
2. Only approved meals and approved number of children are claimed.
3. The Monthly Meal Count Form and the Daily Menu Record Form are signed and dated.
4. Menus submitted meet the CACFP meal pattern guidelines of approvable foods.
If there are errors or discrepancies in any of the above, the following actions
are taken:
1. Payment is denied for any meal for which there is no menu.
2. Payment is denied for any meals served for which the provider does not have approval.
3. Payment is denied for any meals served in excess of the approved number of children.
4. Payment is denied for any meals served to children that have no Child Enrollment Form
and Formula/Breast Milk Provision Form for infants on file at CCRI and the provider.
5. An unsigned Monthly Meal Count Form will be mailed back to the provider for a
signature. It would need to be received back properly signed before the provider could
receive payment for that month.
Checks will be mailed to providers from our office by the 20th of the month.
Providers will be notified in writing on their check stubs of any errors in their records or any
meals that are disallowed.
All records will be kept on file in the Child Care Resources Inc. office for 3 years.
Providers should keep all Monthly Food Reimbursement Check Stubs for tax records. This is
proof of CACFP reimbursement.
Claim for Reimbursement - Page 3
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Claim for Reimbursement
Monthly Meal Count Sheet Instructions
•
Print the claim month, year and your name and your provider number on the lines
provided at the top.
•
Print the enrolled childrens’ first and last name and ages in the spaces provided.
•
Always record attendance at the point of service
•
Every day, record each child’s attendance at meals under his/her name. Please print the
initial of the meal (B,A,L,P, S, or E.) in the block.
•
Record attendance at :
Breakfast under B
AM snack under A
Lunch under L
PM Snack under P
Supper under S
Evening Snack under E
•
At the end of each day record the total number of children in attendance that day in the
column named Total Daily Attendance. This is not the number of meals served, but the
number of children in attendance that day that are enrolled on the Food Program.
•
Time In and Time Out records are required if you claim more than your licensed
capacity.
•
At the end of the month please total each meal for each child and write the number on
the line at the bottom of the page with the corresponding letter representing the meal.
•
Immediately sign and date the form. Mail the white copy to Child Care Resources Inc.
with your menus and any new Child Enrollment and/or Infant Formula Breast Milk
Provision Forms attached.
FOOD PROGRAM P
APER
WORK
PAPER
APERWORK
DUE ON THE 4TH OF THE MONTH
TO CHILD CARE RESOURCES INC.
CHECKS MAILED TO PROVIDERS FROM OUR
OFFICE ON THE 20TH OF THE MONTH
Claim for Reimbursement - Page 4
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Claim for Reimbursement
Understanding Tier 1 & Tier 2 Reimbursement Rates
Tier 2 reimbursement rate is the lower rate of meal reimbursement. All licensed Family
Child Care Providers are eligible for this rate.
Tier 1 reimbursement rate is the higher rate of meal reimbursement. Licensed Family Child
Care Providers must qualify for this higher rate.
Qualifying for the higher Tier 1 rate of meal reimbursement:
1. Elementary School Assignment: If the elementary school that is assigned to a Licensed
Family Child Care Provider’s home receives Free or Reduced Price Lunch for at least
50% of its students AND if it is in a school system that does not have magnet schools or
does not bus children out of their neighborhood, then the provider qualifies for the Tier
1 rate of meal reimbursement.
2. Census Data: If a Licensed Family Child Care Provider’s home is located in an area
where at least 50% of the children have family incomes less than the guidelines, the
provider will qualify for the Tier 1 rate of meal reimbursement.
3. Provider’s Family Income: If a Licensed Family Child Care Provider’s family income is
less than the guidelines, the provider will qualify for the Tier 1 rate of meal reimbursement and the provider’s own children are eligible to be enrolled in the Food Program.
If a provider does not qualify to become a Tier 1 Provider, she/he may choose to either
become a Tier 2 Low Rate Provider OR a Tier 2 Mixed Rate Provider.
A Tier 2 Low Rate Provider chooses to receive the lower rate of meal reimbursement for all
meals for all enrolled children.
A Tier 2 Mixed Rate Provider chooses to give Eligibility Applications to enrolled children’s
parents and if CCRI receives them and if they qualify, than those children’s meals would be
reimbursed at the higher Tier 1 rate. If CCRI does not receive a qualifying Eligibility
Application OR if they do not qualify than those children’s meals would be reimbursed at
the lower Tier 2 rate. These Eligibility Applications are confidential. Parents mail them
directly to CCRI and Food Program consultants may not tell providers if parents qualify.
Claim for Reimbursement - Page 5
Multicultural
Recipes
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Recipes
SOOJI HALWA (A popular food in India)
from: Tikli Patnaik
Ingredients:
½ cup canola oil
2 cups cream of wheat
1 cup sugar
2 cups milk
1 cup raisins
1 cup cashew nuts (omit nuts when
serving children under 3 years old)
Procedure:
In a frying pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the cream of wheat and stir it
around in the oil about 5-7 minutes. Be careful not to burn it. Decrease the stirring
time if you need to. Add the raisins, cashew nuts, sugar and milk, stirring
continuously until well mixed. Reduce the heat and stir another 5 minutes or until
all the liquid is absorbed.
MANGO FRUIT SALAD
Ingredients:
2 cups mango pulp
2 cups fruit cocktail
3 cups yogurt*
Procedure:
Pour all the ingredients into a salad bowl and mix them well.
Mango is one of the favorite fruits of Indian people. Meets snack requirement for 6
children.
*Yogurt is used in our American version. The original version used whipped cream
and marshmallow cream.
Recipes - Page 2
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Recipes
CHINESE SPRING ROLLS OR EGG ROLLS
From: Renee’ Fauchier
Ingredients:
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. sesame oil
¾ tsp. Chinese cooking wine
(other cooking wines OK)
2 tsp. soy sauce
½ cup cooking oil
1 tsp. cornstarch
1 pkg. spring roll shells or wraps*
1 cup shredded chicken or shrimp
½ cup fine shredded carrots
1 cup fine shredded cabbage
1 tsp. sugar
Procedure:
Mix all ingredients (#2 through #9) in a large mixing bowl.
Place about two tablespoons full in the center of one shell or wrap.
Fold the wrap and seal it with moistened cornstarch, just a drop
or two at each edge. Deep fry for 3 minutes until both sides turn golden brown.
*Spring Roll or Egg Roll Wraps are available at most grocery stores.
BRAZILIAN BAKED BANANAS
from: Lisa Feder
Here’s a recipe to end your feast on a sweet note – Brazilian-style!
Ingredients:
6 medium bananas
½ cup fresh orange juice
1 Tbsp. Fresh lemon juice
¼ cup brown sugar
2 Tbsp. Butter
1 cup grated coconut
Procedure:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees
1. Let kids peel bananas. Then have them slice bananas lengthwise with plastic
knives, and place them in a buttered casserole dish.
2. Have the children measure and mix together orange and lemon juices.
Add sugar, then pour mixture over bananas. Have them slice butter into small
pieces and place on bananas.
3. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes then remove from oven. Add coconut before
serving. Enjoy!
This meets the fruit requirement for 6 preschool age children.
Recipes - Page 3
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Recipes
THAI NOODLES WITH PEANUT SAUCE
By: Mary Ann Dammes & Laurie Manahan
A nutritious recipe from Thailand using a worldwide favorite – peanut butter!
Ingredients:
½ cup peanut butter (8 Tbsp.)
¼ cup soy sauce
5 Tbsp. sugar
2 Tbsp. hot water
2 cups Oriental Noodles
1. Ask the children to help you measure and mix peanut butter, soy sauce, sugar and
water in one saucepan.
2. Cook sauce over medium heat for five minutes. Stir until sauce has consistency of
mayonnaise. If needed, add water to thin sauce.
3. Cook noodles according to instructions. Drain and place in large mixing bowl.
4. Pour peanut sauce over noodles. Let children take turns mixing.
5. Serve in small bowls. You may want to show children how to use chopsticks!
Meets the requirement for 1 bread and 1 meat for 8 preschool age children.
PINEAPPLE PILAF
Ingredients
½ cup chopped onion
2 tsp. vegetable oil
1-½ cups brown Basmati rice
2 Tbsp. dried currants, raisins or diced dried apricots
3 cups water
½ tsp. salt
1 cup fresh pineapple, (or canned, unsweetened), diced
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves
1 tsp. (or to taste) chili pepper, minced and seeded
2 Tbsp. flaked coconut toasted in dry skillet until golden brown
In an nonstick skillet with a tight-fitting lid, combine the onion and oil. Cook,
stirring, over low heat until onion is golden brown. Stir in the rice and cook, stirring,
one minute. Add water, currants, salt, and heat to boiling. Stir once, cover and cook
over low heat until water is absorbed and rice is tender (about 45 minutes). Do not lift
lid or while rice is cooking. Combine pineapple, cilantro and chili in a bowl and toss to
blend. When the rice is cooked, let cool uncovered for 20 minutes. Add the pineapple
mixture and spoon serving dish. Sprinkle with coconut before serving.
Meets the requirements for 1 bread and 1 fruit and vegetable for 6 preschool age children
Recipes - Page 4
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Recipes
DOLMEH
Dolmeh is a meat dish enjoyed in Iran. This meat and rice mixture is stuffed into
green pepper, eggplant, tomatoes, cabbage leaves or grape leaves. For this recipe, use
stuffed peppers.
Ingredients:
8 green peppers (check to make sure they will stand up in the pan)
3 lbs. of lean ground beef
1 cup, long-grain or basmati rice
1-2 tbl. spoons chopped garlic
3 tbl. spoons of raw fresh chopped herbs, mint, basil, dill, parsley
1 large onion
2 tbl. spoons of vegetable oil
2 tbl. spoons of tomato paste
Use salt and pepper to taste
•
•
Wash and cut the top off the green peppers (save the top, it will be used as a lid for
the stuffed pepper)
Clean the inside of the peppers
(Optional)
In a deep sauce pan boil four inches of water or enough to cover the peppers in a standing
position. Place the peppers in the boiling water for five minutes. This will reduce the
bitter taste in the peppers. Throw out the water and do not leave any inside the peppers.
They will continue to cook if water is left inside.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Chop and saute the onion until golden yellow
Add the ground beef, cook about 15 minutes on medium heat to brown the meat
Add 1 cup of water and simmer anouther 5 minutes
Add rice and seasonings to beef mix and cook on medium heat 15 minutes
Stuff the peppers with 2 or 3 spoons of the meat mixture, keeping in mind that
the rice will continue to expand
Put the peppers in the large deep pan. To keep them standing up, use potatoes if
there is extra space in the pan
Put the tops back on the peppers
Add 1/2 cup of water to the pan. Cook at medium heat until the water steams.
Steam about 10 minutes. This allows the rice to absorb the flavors of the peppers.
Depending on how much you serve a child, this recipe could count as a vegetable (green
pepper) and meat (beef ).
Recipes - Page 5
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Recipes
DUTCH PANCAKE
This puffy pancake will delight your children
Ingredients:
1 tablespoon butter
2 eggs
½ cup milk
½ cup all-purpose flour
1½ cups blueberries, rasberries, or sliced strawberries
1 tablespoon sugar
½ cup vanilla yogurt
Preheat oven to 425o F. Heat an empty 8 or 9-inch pie pan in the oven. Melt butter
in the bottom of the pie pan. Combine eggs, milk, and flour in a blender and process
on high until smooth. Pour batter into pie pan and bake for 25 minutes. While
pancake is baking, mash berries with sugar. Set aside. Remove pancake from oven, cool
for five minutes, then top with yogurt and berries. Cut into 6 wedges and serve.
Makes 6 servings and counts as a grain bread and fruit component.
Recipes - Page 6
Resources
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Resources - Page 2
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Feeding Little Children
1. Remember to allow children to wash their hands before and after each meal.
2. Children often prefer soft, bland or lukewarm foods. Do not season their food to meet
your adult tastes.
3. Serving finger foods can save you time and effort in feeding and cleaning up after
children and finger foods allow children the satisfaction of doing something for themselves. Serve them often.
4. Do not give food as a reward or withhold food as a punishment.*
5. Never force a child to eat everything on their plate. The “clean plate club” can set up
the child for bad eating habits later in life.
6. Introduce new foods in small amounts and one at a time. Do not force a child to try it.
Encourage by setting a good example yourself.
7. Establish a mealtime routine. Children feel comfortable with routines because they
know what to expect. Soon they will be able to do many of the steps without your help
or reminders.
8. Teach children about the nutritional value of food early. Instead of “I want you to drink
all of your milk,” say: “Milk will help you have strong bones like a football player/ice
skater.” Or instead of, “Eat all your vegetables and make me happy,” say: “Eating all
your vegetables will give you vitamins to make you strong.”
9. Children’s tastes are continually changing. Just because a food is rejected one day does
not mean that it will be rejected next week. Wait a few weeks – try again.
10. Involve the children in food preparation as often as possible. They are more likely to eat
a food they have helped wash, cut or cook.
11. Use child-size tables and chairs or booster chairs. Imagine how difficult it would be for
you to eat with your chin at table level.
12. Make your meals appealing by serving foods in a variety of colors, shapes, sizes and
textures.
13. Make mealtime pleasant. We recommend that the providers sit and eat with the
children using this opportunity to encourage conversation. Serving family style helps to
develop a child’s overall development.
14. Spills will happen. Accept them and let the child help with clean up. Never scold for
accidents.
_____________________________________________________________
*Statement of Rule 1801, #4
·
Discipline shall in no way be related to food, rest or toileting.
·
No food shall be withheld or given as a means of discipline.
Resources - Page 3
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Infant Feeding
1. Infants enrolled on the CACFP must be fed according to the CACFP guidelines unless
the parent brings a written feeding plan from a health professional.
2. Mecklenburg County Health Department regulations require that formula be prepared
at home and brought to the day care in labeled bottles.
3. Infants must be served formula or breast milk until they are one year old.
4. Cow’s milk is not recommended for infants until one year of age and is not reimbursable as a meal component. Feeding cow’s milk to infants before 12 months of age can:
• Lead to iron deficiency anemia
• Cause bleeding in the infant’s gastrointestinal tract
• Put stress on an infant’s kidneys from excessive amounts of sodium, potassium,
chloride and protein
5. Breast milk is the ideal source of nutrition for infants under one year of age and is
reimbursable as a meal component. Breast milk provides many benefits to infants
including:
• Improved digestibility
• Immunity to viral and bacterial diseases
• Reduced risk of allergies, asthma, respiratory and diarrheal disease
6. The use of infant feeders is not recommended. When infants are introduced to solid
foods, they should be spoon-fed.
7. Babies are ready for semi-solid foods when they can:
• Hold their necks steady and sit with support
• Draw in their lower lips as a spoon is removed from their mouths
• Keep food in their mouths and swallow it rather than pushing it out
Resources - Page 4
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Infant Feeding
(continued)
8. Do not feed infants directly from a jar of baby food. Once the infant’s saliva gets in a jar
of baby food, bacteria contaminates the food and whatever food is left in a jar must be
thrown out. With a clean spoon, serve enough for the baby’s meal into a dish, recap the
jar and refrigerate it overnight and serve the remainder the following day.
9. Infants should be introduced to new foods one at a time. If the food has not caused an
allergic reation after several days, another food may be introduced. The recommended
schedule for introducing new foods is as follows:
•
Cereal – rice, barley, oatmeal, wheat, corn
•
Fruits and Vegetables – yellow ones (except corn) such as bananas, squash, sweet
potatoes, pears, peaches, etc., followed by the green ones, such as beans, peas,
greens, etc.
This schedule is recommended so that foods that are least likely to cause allergies are
introduced first.
10. Only single item baby foods are acceptable on the CACFP. This makes it easier to judge
exactly how much meat, fruit, or vegetable the child is receiving. It also makes it easier
to trace a food allergy. Mixed dinners or desserts are not creditable on the CACFP.
11. Juice should be served to infants in a cup, not a bottle. When they are old enough to
have juice they are old enough to drink from a cup. This is to prevent tooth decay
caused by pooling of juice around the teeth.
Resources - Page 5
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Top Ten Nutrients
Nutrient
Needed for
Sources
Protein
Building new tissue, maintaining
healthy body cells, part of enzymes,
hormones, hemoglobin, antibodies
Meat, poultry, fish, dried beans and
peas, eggs, cheese, milk
Carbohydrate
Energy and fiber
Cereal, bread, potatoes, dried
beans, corn, sugar
Fat
Energy, cell structure, to carry fatsoluble vitamins, for essential fatty
acids
Shortening, oils, butter, margarine,
salad dressings
Vitamin A
Building body cells, bone growth,
healthy teeth, vision in dim light,
healthy mucous membranes in
digestive tract, nose and mouth
Dark green and deep yellow fruits
and vegetables, butter, fortified
margarine, milk
Vitamin C
Healing wounds, bone repair, growth
of body cells, healthy gums and blood
vessels, protection against infection
Citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables,
broccoli, cantaloupe, strawberries,
cabbage
Thiamin (B1)
Releasing energy from carbohydrates,
promotion of good digestion and
appetite, growth, muscle tone, healthy
nerves
Bread and cereal products, meats
Riboflavin (B2) Releasing energy from food, healthy
skin, tongue, mouth and lips, good
vision
Milk, meats, green leafy vegetables,
bread and cereal products
Niacin (B3)
Releasing energy from carbohydrates,
healthy digestive system, skin, mouth
and tongue, healthy nervous system
Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, bread and
cereal products
Calcium
Bone and teeth formation, blood
clotting, regular heartbeat
Milk, cheese, dark green leafy
vegetables
Iron
Hemoglobin, which carries oxygen
from the lungs to the body cells,
prevention of anemia
Meats, liver, dry beans, oatmeal,
enriched bread and cereal products
Resources - Page 6
Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Foods Containing Vitamin A and Vitamin C
Vitamin A
Apricots
Broccoli
Cherries
Escarole
Mackerel
Milk
Papaya
Plantain
Pumpkins
Sweet potato
Turnip
Beet greens
Cantalope
Chicory greens
Kale
Manderin oranges
Mustard greens
Peas
Plums
Spinach
Swiss chard
Watermelon
Bok choy
Carrots
Collards
Liver
Mangos
Nectarines
Peppers - sweet red
Prunes
Squash - winter
Tomato
Viitamin C
Apple
Bean sprouts
Black berries
Brcooli
Cantaloupe
Chicory
Clams
Grpaefruit
Kale
Kumquat
Mango
Nectarine
Orange
Peach
Peppers- sweet greean, red
Plum
Radishes
Rutabaga
Squash summer & winter
Tangelo
Turnips
Asparagus
Bean - green, yellow
Blueberries
Brussels sprouts
Cauliflower
Chili peppers
Collards
Guava
Kiwi
Liver
Mussels
Okra
Papaya
Pear
Pinapple
Poke greens
Rasberries
Snowpeas
Strawberries
Tangerine
Watercress
Banana
Bean - lima
Bok choy
Cabbage
Chard
Chinese cabbage
Escarole
Honeydew
Kohlrabi
Manadrin orange
Mustard greens
Inion
Parsnips
Peas
Plantain
Potato
Romaine lettuce
Spinach
Sweet potato
Tomato
Watermelon
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Foods Containing Calcium and Iron
Calcium
Almonds
Enriched grains
Salmon
Whole grains
Iron
Beans - black
Black-eyed peas
Chickpeas
Enriched grains
Mackerel
Pine nuts
Pumpkins seeds
Shrimp
Trout
Whole grains
Cheese
Macerel
Sardines
Yogurt
Cottage cheese
Milk
Spinach
Beans - lima
Chard
Clams
Kidney beans
Mussels
Pinto beans
Raisins
Soybeans
Turkey
Beef
Chicken
Eggs
Lentils
Oysters
Prunes
Rice
Spinach
White beans
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Sample Breakfast Menus
1. Milk
Peeled apricot pieces
Bagel
11. Milk
Baked apple surprise
Warm pita bread
2. Milk
Blueberries
Pancake
12. Milk
Dried cranberries (1/4 c.)
Corn flakes
3. Milk
Warm peaches-chopped
French toast
13. Milk
Warm applesauce
Soft pretzel
4. Milk
Pineapple tidbits
Cream of Wheat
14. Milk
Cantaloupe balls
English muffin
5. Milk
Strawberry puree
Waffle
15. Milk
Banana slices
Cheerios
6. Milk
Orange/pineapple juice
Muffin
16. Milk
Madarin orange sections
Breakfast cake
7. Milk
Raisins (1/4 c.)
Oatmeal
17. Milk
Plum wedges
Corn muffins
8. Milk
Grapefruit section
Biscuits
18. Milk
Kiwi slices
Banana bread
9. Milk
Red and green grapes - halved
Cinnamon toast
19. Milk
Cherries - pitted
Oat granola
10. Milk
Rasberries
Dutch pancakes (see Recipes Section)
20. Milk
Papaya pieces
Warm rice
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
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Sample Lunch or Supper Menus
1. Homemade beef stew (with potatoes,
carrots, peas)
tossed salad (tomatoes, cucumbers)
whole wheat bread
milk
9. Meat loaf
Baked potatoes
green beans
cornbread
milk
2. Baked chicken with noodles
spinach
couscous* with dried apples & raisins
milk
10. Peanut butter and banana sandwiches
cheese chunks
red picled beets
bread and sandwich
milk
3. Fish sticks
coleslaw
peaches
plain muffins
milk
4. Salmon patties
peas
orange sections
saltine crackers
milk
5. Sliced ham
AuGratin potatoes
broccoli
rolls
milk
6. Grilled cheese sandwich
carrot/celery sticks
baked apples
milk
7. Turkey burger
baked beans
stir-fry veggies
burger bun
milk
8. Egg salad sandwich
pear halves
raw broccoli/cauliflower
bread from sandwich
11. Tuna salad
okra
diced apple
pita bread
milk
12. Grilled chicken breast
lima beans
squash
corn bread
milk
13. Homemade meat sauce
zucchini
baked apple
pasta
milk
14. Beef tips
baked sweet potatoes
lentils
biscuits
milk
15. Pinto beans
turnip greens
corn on the cob
corn sticks
milk
16. Hamburger
tater tots
jello with fruit cocktail
hanburger buns
milk
*Couscous is a traditional North African grain dish (see recipe)
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
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20-Day Mix-N-Match Lunch Menus
Main Dish
Vegetables
Tacos
Chili
Meatloaf
Tuna burgers
Egg salad sandwiches
Macaroni & cheese
Spaghetti & meatballs
Cheeseburger
Black eyed peas
English muffin pizzas
Fish sticks
Toasted cheese sandwiches
Peanut butter and banana sandwich*
Cheese and tomato sandwiches
Ham sandwiches
Chicken or turkey salad sandwiches
Salmon
Tuna salad sandwiches
Navy beans
Chicken
Green peppers in tomato sauce
Cabbage slaw
Carrots
Celery sticks
Broccoli
Green peas
Peas and carrots
Cauliflower
Brussel sprouts
Cucumber coins
Tossed spinach greens
Cherry tomatoes
Green beans
Asparagus
Green limas
Harvard beets
Vegetable medley
Summer squash
Sweet potatoes
Potato salad with potato
French fries
Fruit
Bread
Purple plum
Nectarines
Pears
Cranberry sauce
Canned apricot halves
Melon
Grapefruit
Cherries
Kiwi
Oranges
Strawberries
Sliced peaches
Raisins
Pineapple chunks
Red raspberries
Tangerines
Bananas
Apples
Blueberries
Mango
Sour dough bread
Corn bread
Bagels
Pastas
Rye bread
Muffins
Pumpernickel bread
Oatmeal bread
Rice
Cracked wheat bread
Raisin bread
Biscuits
Pita flat bread
Italian bread
Soft pretzels
Rolls
Couscous
Popovers
Taboulli (mixture of grains)
Bread sticks
Note: Vegetables can be served raw or cooked, peeled or un-peeled, buttered, creamed, scalloped with
different sauces, bake, French fried, sautéed, boiled, mashed or mixed into salads. Don't let your own likes or
dislikes limit your choices! Encourage children to taste new food.
*Add extra protein
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Super Snack Suggestions
1. Couscous 1
currants and apples
2. Banana shake
bread sticks
1.
Couscous - bread alternative: Prepare like you
are cooking rice. Serve it with vegetables and
seasonings as a main or side dish for dinner, as
a tasty breakfast cereal with milk, raisins/
currants and honey, as a salad or as a snack.
2.
Banana Shake - one (1) whole banana, one (1)
cup of milk, three (3) ice cubes, and one (1)
teaspoon vanilla. Combine all ingredients, mix
in the blender until the ice is finely crushed.
(2 servings)
3.
Zucchini Pizza - one (1) large zucchini cut
lengthwise, one (1) medium tomato chopped,
¼ teaspoon of basil, ¾ cup of low fat mozzarella cheese; use your choice of meat (chicken,
turkey, tuna, etc.)
2
3. Zucchini pizza
milk
3
4. Bagel
juicy juice
5. Raw vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower,
radishes, celery)
milk
low-fat dip (optional) 4
Cut zucchini lengthwise into ¼ inch thick
strips. Bring ½ inch of water to a boil in a
skillet. Add zucchini strips. Cover and cook 3
minutes over medium heat. Drain zucchini
strips and place on a foil-lined baking sheet.
Top with chopped tomato basil, chicken, and
Mozzarella cheese. Bake at 400° for twenty
minutes. Cool slightly before serving. Makes 5
servings.
6. Boiled egg
whole wheat crackers
7. Spanish rice
refried beans
taco shells
8. Baked pita bread
humus 5
9. Turkey/chicken rollups
grape juice (100%)
4.
Low Fat Dip - one (1) cup of light sour cream,
one (1) cup of light mayonnaise, one (1)
teaspoon dill, ½ teaspoon garlic, one (1)
teaspoon parsley. Stir all ingredients together,
add seasonings as needed.
5.
Hummus (meat alternate) 1 (15 ounce) can chickpeas
2 tablespoons sesame seeds rinsed and
drained
1 tablespoon
lemon juice
1 green onion cut into ½ inch pieces
1 small clove garlic
2 tablespoons plain nonfat yogurt
10. Sliced mangos
milk
11. Soft pretzels
warm applesauce sprinkled w/cinnamon
12. Rice cake topped with peanut butter or
pineapples rings
Position knife blade in food processor bowl;
add all ingredients and process until bean
mixture is smooth. Transfer to a small serving
bowl. Cover and chill mixture thoroughly.
Serve with assorted crudités, such as carrots,
celery, snow peas, broccoli flowerets, and
radishes.
13. Yogurt 6
in-season fruit
oats and millet (extra)
14. Cottage cheese
blueberries, strawberries
15. Banana raisin bread
milk
16. Baked spring roll
milk
7
Yields: 1- ½ cups (about 18 calories per
tablespoon). 1 oz. - Tablespoon
6.
Yogurt - Blend or mix all the ingredients
together and serve.
7.
See Multi-Cultural Recipe section for
preparation.
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Measurements
(What equals what)
60 drops = 1 teaspoon
3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup
5 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon = 1/3 cup
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
1 oz. = 2 tablespoons
8 oz. = 1 cup
1 lb. = 2 cups
4 cups = 1 quart
1 egg = 3-4 tablespoons
1/4 lb. Nuts – 1 cup chopped
1 apple or 1 zucchini or 1 carrot = 1 cup grated
1 cup of rice or 1 cup beans or 1 cup macaroni = 2 - 3 cups cooked
1 orange = 6 - 8 tablespoons juice
1 lemon rind = 2 teaspoons grated
1 banana = 1/3 cup mashed
1 green onion = 1 tablespoon chopped
1 ear of corn = 1/2 cup of kernels
1 lb. of cheese = 4 cups grated
1 lb. of flour = 4 cups
1 lb. of sugar = 2 cups
1 lb. of brown sugar = 2-3/4 cups
1 envelope of dry yeast = 1 tablespoon
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Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
The Food Label at a Glance
The food label carries an up-to-date, easier to use nutrition information guide, which is
required on almost all packaged foods. The guide serves as a key to help in planning a
healthy diet. (The illustration below is only a sample.)
Nutrition Facts: This title signals that the
label contains the required information
Amount per serving:
Serving sizes are (1)
more consistent
across product lines;
(2) are stated in
both household
and metric
measures; and (3)
reflect the amounts
people actually eat.
List of nutrients:
This list covers
those nutrients
most important to
the health of today’s
consumers. Most
consumers need to
worry about getting
too much of a
certain nutrients (fat,
for example) rather
than too few
vitamins or minerals,
as in the past.
Calories per gram:.
The label of larger
packages like this
one tell the number
of calories per gram
of fat, carbohydrate,
and protein
Nutrition F
acts
Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (114g)
Servings Per Container 4
Amount Per Serving
Calories 90
Calories from Fat 30
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 3g
Saturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 300mg
Total Carbohydrate 13g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Sugars 3g
5%
0%
0%
13%
4%
12%
Protein 3g
Vitamin A 80% • Vitamin C 60%
Calcium 4%
• Iron 10%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie
diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower
depending on your calorie needs:
Calories:
2,000
2,500
Total Fat
Less than
65g
80g
Sat Fat
Less than
20g
25g
Cholesterol
Less than
300mg
300mg
Sodium
Less than
2,400 mg 2,400mg
Total Carbohydrate
300g
375g
Dietary Fiber
25g
30g
Calories per gram:
Fat 9 • Carbohydrate 4 • Protein 4
Calories from Fat:
Calories from fat are
shown on the label
to help consumers
meet dietary
guidelines that
recommend people
get no more than
30 percent of the
calories in their
overall diet from fat.
Percent Daily Value:
This shows how a
food fits into the
overall daily diet.
A note about daily
values: Some daily
values are
maximums, as with
fat (65 grams or
less). Others are
minimums, as with
carbohydrate (300
grams or more.)
On the label of
larger packages
such as the one
pictured here, the
daily values for a
2,000 calorie diet
and a 2,500 calorie
diet are listed.
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Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Safety and Sanitation
Prevent Cross-Contamination (the spread of germs from food to food, person to food,
or equipment to food)
•
Wash hands often, yours and the children’s.
•
Wash and sanitize dishes and food preparation equipment.
•
Wash your hands and wash and disinfect work surfaces immediately after preparing raw
meat or poultry and before preparing the next food.
•
Keep leftover food separate from freshly made food.
•
Taste test foods the safe way with a clean spoon and a clean small bowl.
•
Keep the kitchen and serving area clean by washing, sanitizing and disinfecting surfaces.
•
Use disposable gloves in certain circumstances when cleaning up any body fluids, giving
first aid, changing soiled diapers, handling linens or equipment soiled with body fluids.
Wash Hands the Best Way
• Wash hands in the bathroom sink or another hand washing sink, not the kitchen or food
preparation sink.
•
Wash hands using liquid soap rubbing together for at least 20 seconds including
forearms, between fingers and under fingernails.
•
•
Rinse hands thoroughly.
Dry hands with a paper towel and use it to turn off faucets before throwing it away.
Clean, Sanitize, and Disinfect
• Clean surface to remove visible food, crumbs, or dirt before sanitizing or disinfecting.
• Sanitize by soaking clean dishes or equipment in a chlorine solution of one tablespoon of
household chlorine bleach mixed with one gallon of cool water.
•
Disinfect by wiping with a stronger chlorine solution of 1/4 cup household chlorine
bleach mixed with one gallon of cool water and allow to air dry.
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
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Safety and Sanitation (continued)
Control Food Temperatures
• Store foods in the refrigerator at 40o F or below - check the thermometer daily.
•
Store frozen foods at 0o F or below - check your thermometer daily.
•
•
Cover or wrap all foods stored in refrigerator or freezer.
•
Cool hot food uncovered in shallow pans less than two-inches deep in the refrigerator.
When food is cooled, immediately cover and refrigerate.
Store dry foods in a cool place, in sealed containers and at least six inches above the
floor.
Food Preparation
• Thaw frozen food the safe way - in the refrigerator or under cold, running water.
•
Keep hot foods hot above 140o F and cold food cold below 40o F.
•
Test the internal temperature of foods with a metal-stem thermometer:
— Cook beef, pork, ham, veal and lamb to internal temperature of 160o F
— Cook chicken, turkey, duck, and goose including stuffing to 180o F
— Cook seafood to internal temperature of 165o F
— Cook eggs or egg dishes to internal temperature of 160o F
Food Service
• Keep hot foods hot above 140o F and cold foods cold below 40o F
•
•
Allow hot foods to cool before serving so children can eat safely
Food left out at room temperature for 2 hours or more can spoil and cause illness if
eaten and should be thrown out
Questions on F
ood Safety ?
Food
Call USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-800-535-4555
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Child Care Resources Inc.
Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Income Tax Preparation for Family Child Care
Providers
Use this summary only as a guideline in preparing your tax return. Consult the instructions
accompanying the tax forms you use. If you have questions about your return, you should
contact the IRS or a qualified tax preparer.
A family Child Care Home is considered a small business and you will need to complete the
following tax forms:
• 1040 Individual Income Tax Return
•
Schedule C Profit or Loss from Business or Profession
•
Schedule SE Social Security Self-Employment Tax (If your profit was $400 or more)
As a small business operator, you should keep detailed records (including receipts and
canceled checks) of all income and expenses.
Income usually includes:
• Parent fees for child care
• Payments from Social Services for child care
• Payments from Child Care Resources Inc. for child care
• Food Program reimbursements
• Grants from the state or local organizations for the purchase of equipment or home
improvements
Expenses that are 100% deductible usually include:
• Food costs for the child care business - save receipts for both child care and family food
• Travel expenses for the business such as shopping, transporting children to or on field
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
trips, going to training classes, et. - record date, destination and mileage
Advertising for the buisiness such as newpaper ads, flyers and signs
Child care professional association dues, subscription to periodicals and books
Child care training costs such as workshop fees or conference fees
Supplies used only for child care such as arts and crafts materials, laundry detergent,
toilet paper, tissue, paper towels, baby wipes, etc.
Equipment used only for child care such as toys, cribs, bedding, cots, books, etc.
Child care employees or labor costs such as substitute provider or family members’ labor
Family child care liability and accident insurance
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Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Manual
Resources
Income Tax Preparation for Family Child Care
Providers (continued)
Expenses that are partially deductible (Time/Space percentage) usually include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mortgage interest
Property tax
Rent
Homeowner’s or renter’s insurance
Home improvements such as new carpeting in rooms used for child care
House repairs such as new windows
Home maintenance such as yard service or house cleaning service
Utilities
Depreciation of your house if you own it
Depreciation of durable goods such as fence, furniture or playground equipment
How to figure your Time-Space Percentage
Time Percent is the number of hours in the year that you are in business divided by the total
number of hours in a year (8,760)
Space Percent is the number of square feet in your home used regularly for business divided
by the total number of square feet in your home.
Time Percent X Space Percent = Time-Space Percent
Example:
A provider is open 12 hours a day, 5 days a week and
uses 1,700 square feet of her 1,800 square foot home.
Time Percent is 3,120 hours open for business a year
8,760 hours in a year
= 36 %
Space Percent is 1,700 square feet in home used for business
1,800 total square feet in house
= 94%
Time-Space Percent
36% x 94% = 34%
Resources - Page 18
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