live well! advice for today 1

live well! advice for today 1
1
LIVE WELL!
ADVICE FOR TODAY
Enjoy Nutrient-Rich Foods as the Foundation of a Healthy Diet
Nutrient-rich foods give you the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients for the fewest calories. To live well, build your
daily eating plan with nutrient-rich foods first, including:
• Variety of colorful fruits and 100% fruit juices
• Whole, enriched and fiber-rich grain foods
• Variety of vibrantly colored vegetables, including dark
• Low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese, and yogurt
green vegetables, starchy vegetables, red-orange
• Lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, beans, nuts and seeds
vegetables, beans and peas, and other vegetables
Smart Portion Size Guide
Comparing your portion sizes to everyday objects helps you choose the amounts that
are right for you. Use the portion size guide below to gauge how much you’re eating.
To find your personal daily food plan with the amounts from each food
group that are right for you, go to ChooseMyPlate.gov
.
Fruits
• 1 medium apple or orange
= a baseball
• 1/2 cup raisins
= a large egg
• 1 cup 100% fruit juice
= 1 small (8 oz) carton
Vegetables
• 1 cup vegetables
= a baseball
• 1 cup raw, leafy vegetables
= a baseball
• 1 small baked potato
= a computer mouse
Grains
• 1/2 cup cooked cereal, pasta or rice
= a computer mouse
• 1 cup dry cereal
= a baseball
• 1 bagel
= a hockey puck
• 1 tortilla
= a small salad plate (7-inch)
• 1 pancake or waffle
= a music CD
• 4 small cookies such as vanilla wafers
= 4 casino chips
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
Protein Foods
• 3 ounces cooked meat, poultry or fish
= a deck of cards
• 2 tablespoons peanut butter
= a golf ball
• 1/2 cup beans
= a computer mouse
• 1/2 oz nuts
=a ping pong ball
Dairy
• 1 cup milk
= a small (8 oz) chug
• 1 cup yogurt
= an 8-ounce yogurt container
• 1-1/2 ounces hard cheese
= about 3, 1-inch cubes
• 2 ounces processed cheese (American)
= pad of 3 x 3 inch sticky paper
2
LIVE WELL! MAKING NUTRIENT-RICH CHOICES
FROM THE MYPlate GRAIN GROUP
The MyPlate Grains Group
• The Grains Group includes any food made
from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley
or another cereal grain. Bread, pasta,
oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas and
grits are examples of grain products.
Grains are divided into two subgroups—
whole grains such as whole-wheat bread, oatmeal
and brown rice—and nutrient-enriched
refined grains such as white bread
and white rice.
• Foods in the Grains Group provide important
nutrients such as B vitamins, minerals and fiber.
Whole grains may help reduce the risk for heart
disease and some cancers and help with weight
management. Enriched refined grains are fortified with
the B vitamin folic acid to help prevent neural tube defects
during pregnancy and possibly heart attacks and strokes.
They can contain twice as much folic acid as whole grains.
The small steps to the right can help you make nutrient-rich
choices from MyPlate’s Grains Group. This means getting the
most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—but not too
many calories—from the foods you choose.
Grains Group
Make at least half your grains whole
Make at Least Half Your Grains Whole.
Eat at least 3 ounces of whole-grain cereals,
breads, crackers, rice or pasta every day.
• To get whole grains, choose foods that
name one of the following whole-grain
ingredients first on the label ingredient list:
brown rice, bulgur, whole-grain barley,
graham flour, oatmeal, whole-grain corn,
whole oats, whole rye, whole wheat, wild rice.
Make it Easy. Adding whole-grain foods to
your eating plan is easy with quick ideas like these.
• Breakfast (or snack) on a whole-grain cereal.
• Try quick-cooking versions of oatmeal,
barley and brown rice.
• Make sandwiches with whole-wheat
or whole-rye bread.
• Use whole-wheat pasta in your favorite recipes.
It comes in a variety of shapes.
• Snack on whole-grain crackers
or “light” microwave popcorn.
Make Smart Calorie Choices.
Get the most nutrition for the fewest calories
from foods in the Grains Group.
• Opt for breads made with little or no fat such as
sandwich breads, pita bread, English muffins,
small bagels and bread sticks.
• Combine unsweetened
whole-grain/high-fiber cereals with your
favorite regular enriched cereal.
• Buy baked tortilla chips and crackers.
• Prepare pasta salad with enriched pasta,
lots of veggies and lowfat dressing.
• Use the Nutrition Facts label to compare the calories
and fiber in grain foods such as breads, bagels,
crackers, muffins and cereals.
Visit ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about the
Grains Group and access tools to help you plan, analyze, and
track your diet and physical
activity.
.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
3
LIVE WELL! MAKING NUTRIENT-RICH CHOICES
FROM THE MYPlate VEGETABLE GROUP
The MyPlate Vegetable Group
MyPlate recommends to make half your plate
fruits and vegetables.
• The Vegetable Group includes any vegetable or 100%
vegetable juice whether fresh, frozen, canned or dried.
Foods in this group provide important nutrients such
as potassium, folate, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E
and fiber and may help reduce the risk for heart
disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers.
• Beans and peas (legumes) are also included in
this group for their fiber, vitamins and minerals.
Beans and peas are unique because they are also
part of the Protein Group. Count beans and peas
as either a vegetable or a protein food in your
daily food plan.
The small steps to the right can help you make nutrientrich choices from MyPlate’s Vegetable Group. This means
getting the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—
but not too many calories—from the foods you choose.
Vegetable Group
Vary your veggies
Vary Your Veggies. From asparagus to zucchini,
you’ll reap a bounty of vitamins, minerals
and phytonutrients when you choose
from a colorful variety of vegetables.
• Get lots of dark green veggies like broccoli,
spinach, romaine lettuce and collard greens.
• Pick plenty of orange veggies like carrots,
sweet potatoes, pumpkin and butternut squash.
• Eat more beans and peas such as pinto beans,
kidney beans, split peas and lentils.
• Mix it up even more with favorites like tomatoes,
potatoes and corn and less familiar options like
artichokes, eggplant and parsnips.
Take Veggie Short Cuts.
Vegetables come in a variety of
convenient options that need little or no preparation.
• Pick up pre-washed bags of salad greens and spinach.
• Choose no-chop veggies like baby carrots,
cherry tomatoes, broccoli and cauliflower
florettes, precut celery and sugar snap peas.
• Line your freezer with frozen vegetables—
they go from microwave to table in minutes.
• Stock up on canned beans such as garbanzo
beans and kidney beans. After a quick rinse with
water, they’re ready to use in soups and salads.
• Store a variety of potatoes in your pantry.
Bake, roast, boil or microwave for an easy side dish.
Make Smart Calorie Choices.
Get the most nutrition for the fewest calories
from foods in the Vegetable Group.
• Shop for veggies that are fresh, plain frozen
or canned in water.
• Use the Nutrition Facts label to check the calories
and fat in vegetables prepared with butter or sauces.
• Prepare beans and peas without added fats.
Visit ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about the
Vegetable Group and access tools to help you plan, analyze,
. physical activity.
and track your diet and
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
4
LIVE WELL! MAKING NUTRIENT-RICH CHOICES
FROM THE MYPlate FRUIT GROUP
The MyPlate Fruit Group
MyPlate recommends to make half your plate
fruits and vegetables.
• The Fruit Group includes any fruit or 100% fruit
juice. Fruits may be fresh, frozen, canned or dried.
Foods in this group provide important
nutrients such as potassium, folate, vitamin
C and fiber and may help reduce the risk for
heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers.
The small steps to the right can help you make nutrientrich choices from MyPlate’s Fruit Group. This means
getting the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients
—but not too many calories—from the foods
you choose.
Fruit Group
Focus on Fruits
Focus on Fruits. For maximum nutrient-richness
and great taste, pick a variety of colorful fruits.
• Fill your cart with brightly-colored fruits such as
blueberries, strawberries, oranges, apricots, kiwi,
cantaloupe, watermelon and red, green and purple grapes.
• Choose fresh fruits in season when they’re less
expensive and most flavorful. Ask produce
department staff which fruits are in season now.
• Stock up on canned and frozen fruits when they’re on sale.
• Avocado is a fruit, too. Top your salad with a few slices or pair it
with an exotic fruit such as mango for a refreshing fruit salsa.
Get Your Fruit Fast. Fruits come
in a variety of convenient options that
need little or no preparation.
• Select easy-to-eat fresh fruits such as apples,
bananas, oranges, plums, peaches and grapes.
• Pick up pre-cut packages of melon,
pineapple or fruit salad.
• Buy bags of frozen blueberries, strawberries,
peaches and mangos to use in smoothies, muffins and desserts.
• For on-the-go options, stock up on dried fruits such as
raisins, cranberries and apricots, unsweetened applesauce
cups or single-serve fruits canned in water or 100% fruit juice.
• Buy single-serve containers of 100% fruit juice for lunches.
• Try frozen 100% fruit juice bars for a refreshing dessert.
Make Smart Calorie Choices. Get the most nutrition
for the fewest calories from foods in the Fruit Group.
• Shop for fruits that are fresh, frozen without added
sugar or canned in water.
• To reap the benefits of dietary fiber,
choose whole or cut-up fruit most often.
• Select fruit juices labeled as 100% fruit juice,
such as orange juice or grapefruit juice.
• Use the Nutrition Facts label to compare the calories in fruits
canned in water, 100% fruit juice, light syrup and heavy syrup
and to check the serving size and calories for dried fruits.
Visit ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about the Fruit
Group and access tools to help you plan, analyze, and track
your diet and physical activity.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
5
LIVE WELL! MAKING NUTRIENT-RICH CHOICES
FROM THE MYPLATE DAIRY GROUP
The MyPlate Dairy Group
MyPlate recommends three cups of fat-free or lowfat milk
or equivalents like yogurt and cheese daily for most people.
• The Dairy Group includes milk, yogurt and cheese as well
as milk-based desserts such as ice cream,
frozen yogurt and pudding made with milk.
Milk, cheese and yogurt provide nine
essential nutrients such as calcium,
potassium, vitamin D and protein. These nutrients
help build and maintain bone mass and may reduce
risk for the bone-thinning disease, osteoporosis.
Potassium also helps regulate the body’s fluid
balance and maintain healthy blood pressure.
The small steps to the right can help you make nutrientrich choices from MyPlate’s Dairy Group. This means getting
the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—but not
too many calories—from the foods you choose.
Dairy Group
Get your calcium-rich foods
Get Your Calcium-Rich Foods.
Choose fat-free or lowfat milk, yogurt and
other milk products most often.
• Serve milk at meals and with snacks.
• Top pizza, casseroles and veggies
with shredded cheese.
• Use plain yogurt as a base for dips
or to dollop on baked potatoes.
• Slip cheese slices onto sandwiches.
Make it Quick. These tips can help
you get your Dairy Group foods—fast.
• Order a latte made with fat-free or lowfat milk.
• Make oatmeal or tomato soup
with milk instead of water.
• Stock up on cheese sticks,
yogurt cups and yogurt drinks
for calcium-rich snacks.
• Top fruit with your favorite yogurt
for a homemade parfait dessert.
Make Smart Calorie Choices.
Try these tips to get the most nutrition
for the fewest calories from Dairy Group foods.
• Choose fat-free or lowfat milk, yogurt
and cheese.
• When you shop, use the Nutrition Facts
label to compare the amount of calories and
fat in different types of Dairy Group foods.
• If your family usually drinks whole milk,
try stepping down to reduced-fat (2%),
then lowfat (1%) and finally fat-free (skim) milk.
• Stock a few cans of evaporated fat-free milk
to use in coffee and to replace cream in recipes.
• For a sweet treat, try “light” ice cream
or frozen yogurt.
Visit ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about the Dairy
Group and access tools to help you plan, analyze, and track
your diet and physical. activity.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
6
LIVE WELL! MAKING NUTRIENT-RICH CHOICES
FROM THE MYPlate protein GROUP
The MyPlate Protein Group
• The Protein Group includes meat, poultry, fish, beans
and peas (legumes), eggs, nuts and seeds.
Foods in this group provide important
nutrients such as protein, B vitamins, iron and
zinc needed to boost the immune system,
build and repair muscle, fuel activity
and help your brain function, as well
as vitamin E and potassium for a
healthy heart.
• Beans and peas are unique because they are
also part of the Vegetable Group. Count beans
and peas as either a protein food or
a vegetable in your daily food plan.
The small steps to the right can help you
make nutrient-rich choices from MyPlate’s
Protein Group. This means getting the most
vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—
but not too many calories—from the foods
you choose.
Protein Group
Go lean with protein
Go Lean with Protein. Choose lean or lowfat meats
and skinless poultry. Twice a week, make seafood the protein on
your plate. Add variety with beans, eggs, nuts and seeds.
• For lean cuts of beef, look for the words “loin” or “round” in
the name such as tenderloin, sirloin or round steak. Lean pork
choices include pork loin, tenderloin, or lean ham. Lean lamb
choices include leg, loin, and shank.
• Choose lean ground poultry
and ground beef that’s at least 90% lean.
• Select fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids,
such as salmon, trout and herring.
• For sandwiches, go with lean roast beef, turkey or ham.
Or try peanut butter, almond butter or soy nut butter.
• Vary your breakfast routine with eggs. Enjoy an egg-andveggie scramble or an egg white omelet.
Try Time-Trimming Tips. Save steps and get your
protein-rich foods, too.
• Pick up recipe-ready meats such as lean
beef strips for a stir-fry or cubes of lamb for stew.
• Buy quick-cooking fish filets or boneless, skinless chicken
breasts or turkey cutlets.
• Stock your pantry with canned and pouch fish,
and your freezer with frozen fish and shellfish.
• Prepare and refrigerate protein-rich hard-cooked
eggs to tote in your lunch.
• Canned beans, such as black beans or pinto beans, are an easy
way to add protein and fiber to soup and chili or on a salad.
• Keep nuts, seeds and soy nuts on hand for quick snacks.
Make Smart Calorie Choices. Get the most nutrition
for the fewest calories from foods in the Protein Group.
• Trim away visible fat from meat before cooking and remove
poultry skin. Drain any fat that appears during cooking.
• Bake, broil or grill meat, poultry and fish.
• Flavor your meat, poultry and fish with herbs or use
lowfat sauces.
• Prepare beans and peas without added fats.
Visit ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about the Protein
Group and access tools. to help you plan, analyze, and track your
diet and physical activity.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
7
LIVE WELL! oils and solid fats
making smart choices
Did you know your body needs some fat for good health?
Dietary fats help your body absorb vitamins A, D, E, and K,
and carotenoids. They supply essential fatty acids that children
need for proper growth. For all of us, fats help keep our skin
healthy and brain and nervous system functioning smoothly.
MyPlate advice refers to two forms of fat in foods—oils and
solid fats. Oils and solid fats are a mixture of saturated fatty
acids and unsaturated fatty acids. Oils contain more monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Solid fats contain
more saturated fats and/or trans fats than oils. Most foods
contain varying amounts of the different types of fats. For
instance, olive oil and salmon are rich sources of heart-healthy
monounsaturated fats but also contain some saturated fats,
while beef, pork and poultry are often thought of as only
containing saturated fat but are also rich sources of monounsaturated fats.
MyPlate recommends choosing foods that contain monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, and cutting back
on foods that contain saturated fats and trans fats. The
important point to understand is that you can’t single out
one food or type of fat, because all foods with fat contain a
mixture of the different types of fats. The trick is to choose
foods with oils and solid fats wisely and in the right amounts
for you.
MyPlate meal plans include daily recommended amounts
for oils because they provide essential fats, but oils are not
pictured in the MyPlate symbol as they are not a food group.
A Primer on Oils
Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature. Oils include
vegetable oils used in cooking, the oil found naturally in
certain foods such as nuts, olives, avocados and some fish,
and in foods made with oil such as mayonnaise, salad dressing
and soft (tub or squeeze) margarine.
Most oils are high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats,
and low in saturated fats. Most of the fats you eat should be
the unsaturated types. They provide vitamin E, don’t raise LDL
(“bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood and contain essential
fatty acids. Oils from plant sources (vegetable oils and nut
oils) do not contain any cholesterol. A few plant oils, however,
including coconut oil, palm oil, and palm kernel oil, are high
in saturated fats and act like solid fats.
MyPlate gives you a daily allowance for oils depending on
your daily calorie budget, which is based on your age,
gender and physical activity level. For example, for someone
who needs 2,000 calories a day, MyPlate recommends 6
teaspoons of oil a day. Check the chart below for the amount
of oils in some common foods.
Amount of Oils in Common Foods
Oils
Amount of Food Amount of Oil
Vegetable oils (canola, corn,
1 Tbsp
3tsp
cottonseed, olive, peanut, safflower,
soybean and sunflower)
Foods rich in oils:*
Margarine, soft (trans fat free)
1 Tbsp
2½ tsp
Mayonnaise
1 Tbsp
2½ tsp
Mayonnaise-type salad dressing
1 Tbsp
1 tsp
Italian dressing
2 Tbsp
2 tsp
Thousand Island dressing
2 Tbsp
2½ tsp
Olives, ripe, canned
4 large
½ tsp
Avocado
½ med
3 tsp
Peanut butter
2 Tbsp
4 tsp
Peanuts, cashews and almonds,
1 oz
3 tsp
dry roasted
Sunflower seeds
1 oz
3 tsp
Source: ChooseMyPlate.gov
.
*Avocados and olives are part of the Vegetable Group; nuts and seeds are part of
the Protein Foods Group. Soft margarine, mayonnaise, and salad dressings are
mainly oil and are not considered to be part of any food group.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
7
LIVE WELL! oils and solid fats
MAKING SMART CHOICES
Go Slow with Solid Fats
Solid fats are fats that are solid at room temperature, like butter and shortening, and are mostly a mix of saturated or trans
fats. Solid fats are found in animal foods as well as many baked goods such as pastries, cookies and pies, and can be made
from vegetable oils through a process called hydrogenation. Most saturated fats raise both “bad” and “good” cholesterol
levels in the blood. However, not all saturated fats act the same. An example of a type of saturated fat that does not affect
blood cholesterol levels is stearic acid, which is found in meat and chocolate.
Trans fats raise “bad” cholesterol levels in the blood, but have no effect on “good” cholesterol levels. There are two types
of trans fats—man-made and naturally occurring. Man-made trans fats found in snack foods and baked goods such as
cookies, crackers, donuts, and pastries act very differently than those that occur naturally in low amounts in meat, dairy
products, cabbage and peas. While man-made trans fats have been found to increase the risk of heart disease, naturally
occurring trans fat have been shown to have heart-healthy and cancer-protective benefits and may reduce the risk of diabetes.
Make Smart Oil Changes
• Choose a cooking oil that is high in unsaturated fats.
Some good choices are canola, corn, cottonseed, olive,
peanut, safflower, soybean and sunflower oil.
• Use soft (tub or squeeze) margarine with
0 grams of trans fat per serving. Check the
Nutrition Facts label to be sure.
• Try a slice of mashed avocado as a sandwich spread.
• Add flair to your food with a dash of
flavorful walnut or sesame oil.
• Get essential fatty acids called “omega-3s” from fatty
fish, such as salmon, trout and herring. MyPlate advises
including fish on the menu twice each week.
• Sprinkle a few sunflower seeds or
chopped walnuts on your salad.
Get Savvy about Solid Fats
• Use vegetable oil or cooking spray instead of butter,
stick margarine or shortening for cooking and baking.
• Choose lean meats and skinless poultry.
Trim away visible fat from meat before
cooking and remove poultry skin.
• When choosing milk, yogurt and cheese,
go fat-free or lowfat.
• When you shop for baked goods such as cookies and
crackers, check the Nutrition Facts label for products
with 0 grams of trans fat per serving.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
Fascinating Fat Facts
• Oils and solid fats both contain about 120
calories per tablespoon. So, although you
need some oils for good health, don’t overdo it.
• Get to know heart healthy fats. While olive oil
may be known for containing heart-healthy
monounsaturated fats, the same holds true for
beef and pork. In fact, about half the fat in pork
and beef is monounsaturated. Likewise, milk,
cheese and yogurt products contain this
heart-healthy fat as well.
• Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a special
type of trans fat that may promote health.
Small amounts are found naturally in milk
products, lamb and beef. Research is showing
that CLA may play a role in preventing disease
such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes.
• A few plant oils, including coconut oil,
palm oil and palm kernel oil are high in
saturated fats, so MyPlate
classifies them as solid fats.
Visit ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about Oils
and Solid Fats and access tools to help you plan, analyze,
and track your diet and physical activity.
8
LIVE WELL! TIPS TO SLIP MORE NUTRIENTS
INTO YOUR BREAKFAST
Eating the nutrient-rich way means getting the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—but not too many calories—
from the foods you choose. Below is an assortment of quick, easy and tasty tips to boost the nutrient richness of your breakfast.
Are you looking for easy-to-make meals that
Eye-Opening Breakfast Ideas
taste great and are good for you? The selection
• For a “fiber-full” breakfast, top a bowl
below features delicious nutrient-rich meals
of whole-grain or high-fiber cereal with
you can mix and match to suit your taste buds
blueberries, strawberries, sliced bananas
and calorie budget.
or any favorite fruit.
• For a calcium boost, make oatmeal with
BREAKFAST
fat-free milk instead of water. For extra fiber
200-300 Calorie Breakfasts
and nutrients, mix in some raisins, dried
Trustworthy Traditional:Top 1 cup
cranberries, cherries or blueberries, too.
unsweetened cereal with 1/2 cup
• Customize fruit compote by mixing colorful
berries or a 6-inch banana and
1/2 cup fat-free or lowfat milk.
favorites such as orange or grapefruit sections,
The Eye-Opener: Wrap 1/2 cup
kiwi slices, pineapple chunks and cantaloupe
shredded lowfat mozzarella cheese,
cubes. The more colors you mix, the more
1/2 cup roasted green and red pepper slices
potassium, vitamin C and other nutrients
and 2 teaspoons horseradish mustard inside
you get.
2 ounces deli-sliced lean roast beef.
Enjoy with 1/2 cup orange juice.
• When you make pancakes, waffles and
muffins, sneak in some whole grains by
300-400 Calorie Breakfasts
replacing one-half of the white flour with
Good-to-Go Breakfast Sandwich:Place 1
poached
egg, 1 ounce Canadian bacon
whole-wheat flour. Grains give you fiber
and
1
ounce
fat-free or lowfat cheese between
and important minerals such as iron,
two toasted whole-grain English muffin halves.
magnesium and selenium.
Power Pop-Up: Toast a 4-inch
• Order your cappuccino or latte made with
whole-grain toaster waffle and top
fat-free milk. You’ll get all the calcium and other
with 1 cup lowfat or fat-free yogurt
and 1/2 cup mixed berries.
essential nutrients in milk without the fat.
Bountiful
Burrito: Roll up 1 scrambled egg,
• Start your day with veggies—and all
1/2 cup shredded lowfat cheddar cheese,
the nutrients they provide. Whip up an
2 ounces cooked ground beef (at
omelet or scrambled eggs with chopped fresh
least 90% lean), 1/2 cup cooked
diced potatoes and 2 tablespoons
spinach, avocado, tomatoes, peppers or
salsa in a 6-inch whole-wheat tortilla.
any favorite vibrant veggie.
• For a breakfast-style burrito—and a protein
400-500 Calorie Breakfasts
Living Well Lift-Off: Smooth 2
and fiber boost—fold eggs, beans, shredded
tablespoons peanut butter on a
lowfat cheese and vegetables into a whole3-inch toasted whole-grain bagel.
wheat tortilla.
Serve with 1/2 cup orange juice.
• Team your breakfast with a glass of
Rainbow Fruit Parfait: Layer 1 cup
100% orange juice to up your intake
fat-free or lowfat yogurt with
1/2 cup blueberries, 1/2 cup sliced
of vitamin C, folate and potassium.
strawberries and 1/2 cup sliced kiwi.
• For a veggie breakfast hash, sauté shredded
Sprinkle with 1/2 cup lowfat granola.
carrots, zucchini, peppers, onions and
uncooked hash browns in canola oil until
Tip: To plan, analyze, and track your
tender. Mix in one egg and cook until egg is
food and physical activity, go to
thickened and no visible liquid egg remains.
ChooseMyPlate.gov/supertracker.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
9
LIVE WELL! TIPS TO SLIP MORE NUTRIENTS
INTO YOUR lunch
Eating the nutrient-rich way means getting the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—but not too many calories—
from the foods you choose. Below is an assortment of quick, easy and tasty tips to boost the nutrient richness of your lunch.
Are you looking for easy-to-make meals that
Lunchtime Soup
taste great and are good for you? The selection
and Sandwich Tips
below features delicious nutrient-rich meals
• Prepare lower sodium condensed tomato soup
you can mix and match to suit your taste buds
with fat-free milk instead of water to add
and calorie budget.
calcium, protein and vitamin D.
• Soup up your veggie intake. Stir frozen
LUNCH
chopped spinach or mixed vegetables into
200-300 Calorie Lunches
lower sodium canned soups.
Tuna on Toast: Mix 3 ounces water-packed tuna
• Make sandwiches on fiber-rich bread
with 1-1/2 tablespoons light mayonnaise. Spread
such as whole-wheat or whole-rye.
on 2 slices toasted whole-wheat bread and top
with romaine lettuce and 2 slices tomato.
Add creamy avocado slices—they contain
Serve with a small orange.
healthy oils and folate, potassium and
Pita and Peanut Butter Surprise:
vitamin E. Choose sandwich fillings such
Spread 1 tablespoon peanut butter inside
as lean roast beef, ham or turkey.
a 4-inch whole-wheat pita pocket and
• Load up sandwiches and hamburgers
stuff with 1/2 cup sliced strawberries.
Serve with 1 cup fat-free milk.
with nutrient-rich romaine lettuce, tomato
slices, cucumbers, onions or any other
300-400 Calorie Lunches
veggies that suit your taste buds.
Delicate Delight:Toss 1-1/2 cups baby spinach
leaves with 1/2 chopped hard-cooked egg,
• For more protein and calcium, add a slice
1/2 cup strawberries and 1 tablespoon slivered
of cheese to your sandwich.
almonds. Sprinkle with 1 ounce crumbled
• Top a lean roast beef sandwich with tomatoes
feta cheese and 2 tablespoons lowfat raspberry
and fresh spinach. The heme iron in the beef
vinaigrette dressing. Serve with a small dinner roll.
and the vitamin C in the tomatoes help you
The Comfort Zone: Spread 2 slices whole-wheat bread
with 1-1/2 teaspoons butter. Make a sandwich with 2
absorb the iron from the spinach.
ounces sliced lowfat cheese, such as smoked mozzarella,
• For an easy way to get protein, vitamins and
and grill. Serve with 1 cup tomato basil soup.
minerals, try an old favorite—peanut butter
Dressed-Up Leftovers:Slice 3 ounces leftover grilled or
and 100% fruit spread on enriched bread.
roasted sirloin steak. Mix with 1 cup romaine lettuce,
• For a quick “nicoise salad,” toss canned
1/2 cup cherry tomatoes and 2 tablespoons crumbled
blue cheese. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons
tuna and tomato, olive and cooked potato
lowfat balsamic vinaigrette dressing.
slices with mixed greens. Add vinaigrette
400-500 Calorie Lunches
dressing just before serving.
Decision-Free Favorite:Place 3 ounces lean ham
and 2 ounces lowfat Swiss cheese on a whole-grain
bun. Top with 2 tablespoons stone-ground mustard and
romaine lettuce. Accompany with a small sliced apple.
Bistro Bite: Layer 3 ounces sliced lean roast beef
on a sourdough roll and top with spicy arugula
leaves and 2 tablespoons mashed avocado. Serve
with 1 ounce sweet potato chips (about 10 chips).
Tip: To plan, analyze, and track your
food and physical activity, go to
ChooseMyPlate.gov/supertracker.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
10
LIVE WELL! TIPS TO SLIP MORE NUTRIENTS
INTO YOUR dinner
Eating the nutrient-rich way means getting the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients—but not too many calories—
from the foods you choose. Below is an assortment of quick, easy and tasty tips to boost the nutrient richness of your dinner.
Are you looking for easy-to-make meals that
Nutrient-Rich Dinner Hints
taste great and are good for you? The selection
• Use lean ground beef that is at least 90% lean
below features delicious nutrient-rich meals
in tacos, chili and spaghetti sauce. Protein-rich in- you can mix and match to suit your taste buds
take of beef boosts your vitamin B12, zinc and iron. and calorie budget.
• Toss a multi-hued salad of dark greens such as
spinach or romaine lettuce, cherry tomatoes,
DINNER
orange or yellow peppers and purple onion. The
300-400 Calorie Dinners
more colors, the wider variety of nutrients you
Good-for-You Grill: Marinate 3 ounces salmon
get. Top with chopped hard-cooked egg for highin orange juice. Grill with 1/2 cup baby red potatoes,
quality protein, B vitamins, vitamin E and iron.
1/2 cup onions and 6 asparagus spears tossed with
1 teaspoon olive oil. Serve with a crusty whole-grain roll.
• Try whole-wheat macaroni in macaroni and
Mex to the Max: Fill a 6-inch taco shell with
cheese—a tasty way to enjoy a whole-grain
3 ounces cooked shredded chuck shoulder
food and calcium-rich dairy.
pot roast, 2 tablespoons chopped tomatoes,
• Shred carrots or zucchini into meatloaf,
1/4 cup shredded spinach leaves, 2 tablespoons shredded
casseroles, quick breads and muffins to add
lowfat Cheddar cheese and 2 tablespoons avocado salsa.
Enjoy with 1/2 cup fat-free refried beans on the side.
nutrients and fiber.
Palate-Pleasing Primavera: Sauté 2 teaspoons garlic in
• Slip a whole grain into stuffed peppers
1 tablespoon olive oil. Toss in 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes,
or tomatoes by using bulgur, brown rice or
1/2 cup broccoli, 1/2 cup asparagus, 1/2 cup mushrooms
whole-wheat couscous in the filling.
and 2 tablespoons shredded carrots. Cook until the
vegetables are tender. Mix with 1 cup cooked penne
• Pork is loaded with the B-vitamin thiamin. Savor
pasta and top with 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese.
a stir-fry made with lean pork strips, shredded
cabbage and crunchy water chestnuts. Serve
400-500 Calorie Dinners
The Well-Dressed Burger: Place a cooked 3-ounce
over enriched white rice for B vitamins and iron.
ground beef patty (at least 90% lean) on a whole• Add extra chopped tomatoes, peppers, zucchini,
grain bun. Top with romaine lettuce, 2 slices tomato
mushrooms and onions to soup, chili, pasta sauce
and 2 slices red onion. Serve with 1/2 cup three-bean salad.
or lasagna.
Very Veggie Pizza: Spread a 3-ounce whole-grain pizza
• For a sizzling salad, grill lean beef or lamb steak
crust with 1/2 cup marinara sauce. Layer with thin slices
of the following: 1/2 cup roasted potatoes,
with a variety of veggies such as Portobello
1/2 cup red onions and 1/2 cup green and red
mushrooms, zucchini, peppers, tomatoes and
peppers. Top with 1/2 cup shredded lowfat mozzarella
onions. Slice and place atop colorful salad greens.
cheese. Bake according to crust package directions.
• For a tangy taste and boost of potassium, top a
Family Favorite: Top 1 cup cooked whole-wheat pasta
baked potato with avocado or plain lowfat
with 3 ounces cooked ground skinless turkey breast or
90% or leaner ground beef mixed with 1/2 cup Italianyogurt and fresh herbs.
style
tomato sauce. Serve with 1 cup spinach salad
• Feature fruit for dessert—and get vitamin C and
tossed with 1 tablespoon lowfat Italian dressing.
fiber, too—by serving a slice of angel food cake
smothered with strawberries or blueberries.
Tip: To plan, analyze, and track your
• Oven roast sliced potatoes with chicken pieces,
food and physical activity, go to
rosemary and garlic. For a vegetarian version,
ChooseMyPlate.gov/supertracker.
roast sliced potatoes, red, green and yellow
peppers, onion and garlic tossed with olive oil
and a dash of balsamic vinegar.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
11
LIVE WELL! EATING THE NUTRIENT-RICH WAY
ON THE GO
It’s easy to eat the nutrient-rich way—even when you’re in a time crunch. This means getting the most vitamins, minerals and
other nutrients—but not too many calories—from the foods you choose. Try these ideas the next time hunger strikes when
you’re on the go.
Fast Snacks on the Home Front
• Whole-grain cereal mixed into
fruit-flavored lowfat yogurt.
• Lean roast beef, ham or turkey rolled up
in a whole-wheat tortilla plus
a handful of cherry tomatoes.
• Baked tortilla chips and black bean or avocado dip.
• A scoop of lowfat or fat-free cottage
cheese with sliced strawberries or
cantaloupe cubes.
• Whole-grain pita bread triangles and flavored
hummus (chick pea dip) such as sun-dried tomatoes and
basil, roasted red pepper, extra garlic—even jalapeno!
• A refreshing frozen 100% fruit juice bar. Try strawberry,
raspberry, orange or pineapple.
• “Trail mix” made with bite-size shredded
wheat squares, peanuts and dried
berries or raisins—or custom-create a
mix with your own favorite ingredients.
• 100% orange juice in a single-serve container.
• Potatoes sliced into sticks or rounds and baked
at 450 degrees for 25 minutes (turn once).
Serve with salsa.
Quick Picks from the
Vending Machine or
Convenience Store
• Calcium-rich fat-free or lowfat
yogurt or yogurt drinks.
• Protein-packed beef jerky.
• Lower sodium vegetable or tomato
soup and whole-grain crackers.
• Fresh vegetable salads
with low-calorie dressing.
• Packages of
baby carrots,
broccoli florets or
celery sticks.
• Part-skim mozzarella cheese sticks.
• Whole-grain cereal bars.
• Packets of nuts, sunflower seeds or trail mix.
• Bags of baked chips or lowfat popcorn.
• Fresh fruit, fruit salads,
dried fruit or fruit cups.
• Fat-free or lowfat regular
or flavored milks.
• 100% fruit or vegetable juices.
Make-it-through-the-Day
Desk Drawer Stashes
• Instant oatmeal packets in flavors such
as cinnamon, apple, banana and blueberry.
• Vegetable, bean, split pea or lentil soups in
heat-and-serve cans or instant dry soup cups.
• Small packs or cans of water-packed tuna and small
cans of veggies (don’t forget the can opener!).
• A jar of peanut butter, almond butter or cashew butter
and crackers. Snack size bags of nuts or trail mix.
• Light microwave popcorn. Bonus: popcorn is a whole-grain food.
• Raisins, dried apricots and single-serve shelf-stable
containers of peaches or pears packed in water or juice.
• Single-serve containers of 100% fruit juice such as orange juice.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
12
LIVE WELL! EATING AWAY FROM HOME
THE NUTRIENT-RICH WAY
Many people purchase and eat at least one meal away from home each day. Whether you’re at the drive-through window,
the office cafeteria or a fine dining restaurant, you can eat the nutrient-rich way. This means getting the most vitamins, minerals
and other nutrients—but not too many calories—from the foods you choose. It’s easy to do when you make choices like these.
At the Fast Food Place…
• Small burgers or grilled chicken sandwiches
topped with lettuce, tomato and onion
(hold the mayo or special sauce).
• Roasted veggie wraps.
• Entrée salads with grilled
chicken and low-calorie dressing.
• Bean burritos or grilled steak tacos
with avocado and lots of lettuce and tomato.
• Thin-crust pizzas made with tomatoes,
spinach, mushrooms and onions.
• Baked potatoes topped with
broccoli or beef chili and a sprinkling
of shredded cheese.
• Yogurt parfaits made with
strawberries and blueberries.
• Bags of sliced apples or cups
of fresh fruit or Mandarin oranges.
• Fat-free or lowfat regular or
flavored milk or 100% orange juice.
In the Office Cafeteria…
• Oatmeal, shredded wheat
or raisin bran cereal.
• Whole-grain bagel or English
muffin with peanut butter or
a slice of lowfat cheese.
• Omelet filled with tomatoes,
mushrooms and spinach
(or any veggie) paired with toast.
• Vegetable, bean, split pea or lentil soup.
• Lean roast beef, ham or turkey sandwich piled high
with veggies on whole-grain bread. Add zing, but
almost no calories, with horseradish or spicy mustard.
• Steamed veggies sprinkled with
shredded cheese or sliced almonds.
• A salad bar creation of dark greens and other
colorful veggies, avocado slices, sunflower
seeds and fruit. Top with lowfat dressing.
• Fat-free or lowfat regular or flavored milk
or 100% orange juice.
When Dining Out…
• Minestrone soup, gazpacho or crudités (raw veggies).
• Salads made with deep greens such as spinach,
arugula and romaine lettuce.
• Lean entrees such as beef sirloin,
pork tenderloin, skinless turkey breast,
fish or seafood. Ask for sauces on the side.
• Baked potatoes topped with salsa, avocado or grilled veggies.
• Kabobs made with chunks of lean beef, lean pork, lean
lamb or chicken breast and zucchini, tomato, peppers and onions.
• Stir fries loaded with broccoli, carrots, cabbage and peppers
plus lean beef, lean pork, chicken breast or tofu.
• Pasta dishes made with tomato-based sauces.
• Dishes made with brown rice, wild rice or whole-wheat pasta.
• Enriched and whole-grain breads, rolls and crackers.
• Sweet endings such as fruit cups, berries,
melon slices, fruit sorbet or biscotti.
• Fat-free or lowfat regular or flavored milk
or 100% fruit or vegetable juice.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
13
LIVE WELL!
FITTING IN “FUN” FOODS
Eating the nutrient-rich way doesn’t mean that “fun” foods such as favorite snacks, desserts—or even indulgent meals—
are off-limits. Here’s why:
Everyone has a daily calorie budget based on their age,
gender and physical activity level. In a healthy eating
plan, most of that calorie budget is spent first on
nutrient-rich foods, which give you the most vitamins,
minerals and other nutrients for the fewest calories.
USDA's MyPlate refers to the calories from solid fats and
added sugars as "empty calories" because they add
calories to the food but few or no nutrients, including
vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber. When nutrient-rich
forms of foods are chosen first, there may be a small
amount of extra calories left to spend on “fun” foods.
The extra calories can also be used for foods within food
groups that contain solid fats or added sugars, such as
cuts of meat marbled with fat, vegetables
topped with butter or margarine, or
sweetened cereals.
To help you maintain a balanced
lifestyle, remember to keep empty
calories low, get your quota of nutrient-rich foods and
be active. Follow the tips here to eat the nutrient-rich
way and fit in fun favorites, too.
Build your daily eating plan on a variety of nutrient-rich
foods first, including:
• Variety of colorful fruits and 100% fruit juices
• Variety of vibrantly colored vegetables, including dark
green vegetables, starchy vegetables, red-orange
vegetables, beans and peas, and other vegetables
• Whole, enriched and fiber-rich grain foods
• Low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese, and yogurt
• Lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, beans, nuts and seeds
Be wise about portion size. Trimming portion
sizes of foods with extra fats and sugars helps you enjoy
them without overdoing it.
• When dining out, savor a serving of prime rib that’s
about the size of a deck of cards. Share
the rest or take it home for another meal.
• Eat one less slice of pizza than usual.
• Enjoy a single scoop of ice cream instead
of a double.
• Slice a skinnier piece of cake or pie.
• Use one pat of butter or margarine instead of two.
Use simple swaps to save calories. Saving
some calories from extra fats and sugars lets you spend
them on favorite foods elsewhere in your eating plan.
• Top salads with low-calorie salad dressing
instead of regular salad dressing.
• Try light versions of cream cheese and sour cream
or swap for plain fat-free or lowfat yogurt.
• Exchange a sweetened soft drink for a
no-calorie version.
• Use a sugar substitute on cereal and in coffee.
Be physically active each day. The more you
move, the bigger your calorie budget and the
more likely you are to maintain a healthy weight.
For good health and to burn calories, total at least
30 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity
each day. More is even better!
• Walk, bike or skate everywhere you can—to work,
to the store, to a friend’s house—or around the block.
• Volunteer for household jobs like vacuuming, washing
windows, gardening, raking leaves or shoveling snow.
• Take an aerobics, spinning, weight-lifting or Pilates class.
• Join the office softball or bowling team or go
out dancing.
• Schedule family “activity time.” Walk after
dinner, enjoy the neighborhood playground
or play a game in your own backyard.
Tip: To plan, analyze, and track your
food and physical activity, go to
ChooseMyPlate.gov/supertracker.
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
14
LIVE WELL! THE NUTRITION FACTS LABEL…
YOUR GUIDE TO NUTRIENT-RICH FOODS
The Nutrition Facts label is your guide to making the most nutrient-rich food choices while staying within your daily calorie
budget. You’ll find it on most packaged foods in the supermarket and frequently on posters and in brochures for fresh foods
such as produce, fish and meat.
Here’s what the Nutrition Facts label shows you:
Serving Size
The serving size for this food is one package. All the nutrition numbers listed are
based on this amount. Compare the serving size to the amount you eat and adjust
the numbers as needed. For example, if you ate only half the package of this food,
you’d divide the numbers shown by two (e.g., 130 calories).
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Nutrition Numbers
The label lists the number of Calories and the number of Calories from Fat
in one serving. Also listed are the grams of Total Fat, Saturated Fat, Trans Fat,
Total Carbohydrate, Dietary Fiber, Sugars, Protein and milligrams of Cholesterol
and Sodium. Sometimes labels list extra information. For example, this label lists
the grams of Monounsaturated Fat and Polyunsaturated Fat and milligrams
of Potassium.
Percent Daily Values
These percentages show how much of each nutrient one serving provides in a
2,000-calorie diet. For this label, one serving of food provides 11% of the Total Fat
and 15% of the Calcium recommended for the day.
Hit Your Targets…Not Too High
For nutrients we sometimes get too much of (Fat, Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and
Sodium), your daily goal is to total 100% or less of the Daily Value. There is no Daily
Value for Trans Fat, but experts recommend keeping intake as low as possible.
Hit Your Targets…Not Too Low
For nutrients such as Potassium, Dietary Fiber, Calcium, Iron, Vitamin A and Vitamin
C, your daily goal is to reach 100% of the Daily Value. Look for foods that are good
sources (10-19% of the Daily Value) or excellent sources (20% or more of the Daily
Value) of nutrients like these. This label shows that one serving of the food is an
excellent source of Dietary Fiber and Vitamin A and a good source of Potassium,
Calcium and Iron.
Did You Know?
Some important vitamins and minerals are not required to appear on the Nutrition Facts Label (although the manufacturer sometimes chooses to list them). For example, a serving of beef stew is an
excellent source of vitamin B12 and zinc, but the amounts and % Daily Value may not be on the la.
bel. To learn about the nutrients in each of MyPlate’s food groups, go to ChooseMyPlate.gov
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
15
LIVE WELL!
NUTRIENT RICH SHOPPING LIST
Grains
Bagels
Brown rice
Bulgur/Cracked wheat
Corn flakes
Couscous
Enriched white bread
Flour tortillas
Oatmeal
Pasta noodles
Popcorn
Pretzels
Wheat cereal
White rice
Whole-grain barley
Whole-wheat bread
Whole-wheat crackers
Whole-wheat cereal
Whole-wheat sandwich
buns and rolls
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
Vegetables
Arugula
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Carrots
Green beans
Green cabbage
Green onion
Green, orange, red
and yellow bell peppers
Mushrooms
Peas
Potatoes
Radishes
Red cabbage
Red onions
Red potatoes
Romaine lettuce
Spinach
Summer squash
Sweet corn
Sweet potatoes
Tomatoes
Zucchini
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
Fruits
Avocados
Apricots
Bananas
Blueberries
Cantaloupe
Cherries
Cranberries
Dried plums
Figs
Grapes
Grapefruit
Kiwifruit
Mangoes
Oranges
Peaches
Pineapples
Plums
Raisins
Raspberries
Strawberries
Watermelon
100% fruit juice
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
Protein Foods
Beans and Seeds
Almonds
Black beans
Chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
Kidney beans
Lentils
Peanut butter
Peanuts
Pinto beans
Pumpkin seeds
Soy beans
Sunflower seeds
Tofu
Walnuts
Beef
90-95% lean ground beef
Bottom round roast or steak
Brisket, flat half
Eye round roast or steak
T-Bone steak
Top sirloin steak
Chicken
Skinless chicken breast
Skinless chicken thigh
Skinless ground chicken breast
Eggs
Dairy
Fat-free or lowfat cheese
American
Cheddar
Cottage Cheese
Mozzarella
Parmesan
Ricotta
Swiss
Fat-free or lowfat milk
Fat-free or lowfat yogurt
Lactose free milk
Lactose reduced milk
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
© 2012, Nutrient Rich Foods Coalition. May be duplicated for instructional purposes.
Fish and Shellfish
Cod
Flounder
Halibut
Mussels
Salmon
Shrimp
Tilapia
Tuna, canned in water
Pork
Turkey
Lamb
Tenderloin
Boneless loin roast
Boneless loin chops
Skinless ground turkey breast
Skinless turkey breast
Skinless turkey thigh
Leg
Shank
Loin
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
Oils
Avocado oil
Canola oil
Olive oil
Safflower oil
Soybean oil
Sunflower oil
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
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