Technical Specifications Manual - ISAT Portal

Technical Specifications Manual - ISAT Portal
Technical Specifications
Manual for Online Testing
For Technology Coordinators
2016–2017
Published March 7, 2017
Prepared by the American Institutes for Research®
Descriptions of the operation of the Test Information Distribution Engine, Test Delivery System,
and related systems are property of the American Institutes for Research (AIR) and are used
with the permission of AIR.
Technical Specifications Manual
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Section I. Introduction to the Technical Specifications Manual............................................................. 1
Manual Content ........................................................................................................................................ 1
Document Conventions ............................................................................................................................ 2
Intended Audience .................................................................................................................................... 2
Other Resources ....................................................................................................................................... 2
Section II. Network Configuration and Testing ........................................................................................ 3
Network Configuration .............................................................................................................................. 3
Guidance for Determining Required Bandwidth ................................................................................... 3
Required Ports and Protocols .............................................................................................................. 4
Configuration for Domain Name Resolution ......................................................................................... 5
Configuring Session Timeouts ............................................................................................................. 5
Data Caching ........................................................................................................................................ 5
Configuring Quality of Service and Traffic Shaping ............................................................................. 5
Configuring for Certificate Revocations ................................................................................................ 5
Network Diagnostic Tools ......................................................................................................................... 6
AIR’s Network/Bandwidth Diagnostic Tool ........................................................................................... 6
Windows-Specific Tools ....................................................................................................................... 6
OS X-Specific Tools ............................................................................................................................. 7
Multi-Platform Tools .............................................................................................................................. 7
Section III. Hardware Configuration .......................................................................................................... 8
Connections between Printers and Computers ........................................................................................ 8
Wireless Networking and Determining the Number of Wireless Access Points ....................................... 8
Section IV. Software Configuration ........................................................................................................... 9
Configuring Commercially Available Browsers ......................................................................................... 9
Enabling Pop-Up Windows ................................................................................................................... 9
Enabling Text-to-Speech on Firefox ................................................................................................... 10
Optimal Installation Scenario for Secure Browsers ................................................................................ 10
Configuring Windows for Online Testing ................................................................................................ 11
Disabling Fast User Switching ............................................................................................................ 11
Enabling Web Fonts in Internet Explorer 11....................................................................................... 15
Installing Windows Media Pack for Windows 8.1 N and KN .............................................................. 16
Configuring ZoomText to Recognize the Secure Browser ................................................................. 16
Configuring Mac OS X for Online Testing .............................................................................................. 17
Disabling Exposé or Spaces .............................................................................................................. 17
Disabling Application Launches from Function Keys ......................................................................... 18
ii
Technical Specifications Manual
Table of Contents
Disabling Updates to Third-Party Apps .............................................................................................. 19
Disabling Updates to iTunes .............................................................................................................. 20
Disabling Look-Up Gesture ................................................................................................................ 21
Disabling Display of Notification Center ............................................................................................. 21
Disabling Spaces and Application Launches from the Command Line ............................................. 22
Disabling Spaces and Application Launches on Remote Machines .................................................. 22
Preparing to Install Secure Browser 8.0 or later on OS X 10.11 ............................................................ 23
Configuring Linux for Online Testing ...................................................................................................... 24
Adding Verdana Font.......................................................................................................................... 24
Configuring iOS ...................................................................................................................................... 25
Configuring for Guided Access ........................................................................................................... 25
Configuring Using Autonomous Single App Mode ............................................................................. 26
Using Automatic Assessment Configuration ...................................................................................... 34
Removing the Emoji Keyboard ........................................................................................................... 34
Disabling Dictation .............................................................................................................................. 35
Configuring Android ................................................................................................................................ 35
Enabling the Secure Browser Keyboard ............................................................................................ 35
Disabling the Multi-Window on Samsung Tablets .............................................................................. 37
Disabling the Stylus on Samsung Galaxy Note .................................................................................. 39
Configuring Chrome OS ......................................................................................................................... 39
Disabling Auto-Updates for Chrome OS ............................................................................................ 39
Limiting Chrome OS Updates to a Specific Version ........................................................................... 40
Installing CloudReady on PCs and Macs ............................................................................................... 40
Section V. Text-to-Speech Requirements............................................................................................... 43
Overview of Text-to-Speech ................................................................................................................... 43
Using Text-to-Speech ......................................................................................................................... 43
How the Secure Browser Selects Voice Packs .................................................................................. 43
About NeoSpeech Voice Packs for Windows..................................................................................... 44
Configuring Windows Text-to-Speech Settings ...................................................................................... 45
Configuring OS X Text-to-Speech Settings ............................................................................................ 46
Text-to-Speech and Mobile Devices ....................................................................................................... 47
Voice Packs Recognized by Desktop Secure Browsers ........................................................................ 47
Voice Packs for Windows ................................................................................................................... 47
Voice Packs for OS X ......................................................................................................................... 48
Appendix A. URLs Provided by AIR ........................................................................................................ 49
URLs for Non-Testing Sites .................................................................................................................... 49
URLs for Testing Sites ............................................................................................................................ 49
iii
Technical Specifications Manual
Table of Contents
TA and Student Testing Sites ............................................................................................................. 49
Online Dictionary and Thesaurus ....................................................................................................... 50
Appendix B. Technology Coordinator Checklist ................................................................................... 51
Appendix C. Scheduling Online Testing................................................................................................. 52
Number of Computers and Hours Required to Complete Online Tests ................................................. 52
Sample Test Scheduling Worksheet ...................................................................................................... 52
Appendix D. User Support ....................................................................................................................... 53
Appendix E. Change Log.......................................................................................................................... 54
iv
Technical Specifications Manual
List of Tables
List of Tables
Table 1. Document Conventions ................................................................................................................... 2
Table 2. Average Bandwidth Used by Secure Browser for Testing .............................................................. 4
Table 3. Ports and Protocols for Test Delivery System ................................................................................ 4
Table 4. Domain Names for OCSP ............................................................................................................... 5
Table 5. Recommended Ratios of Devices to Wireless Access Points ........................................................ 8
Table 6. Profile Keys for Features in iOS 8.1.3 or Later ............................................................................. 27
Table 7. Voice Packs on Mobile Versions of the Secure Browser .............................................................. 44
Table 8. Voice Packs Recognized by Secure Browsers—Windows........................................................... 47
Table 9. Voice Packs Recognized by Secure Browsers—OS X................................................................. 48
Table 10. AIR URLs for Non-Testing Sites ................................................................................................. 49
Table 11. AIR URLs for Testing Sites ......................................................................................................... 49
Table 12. AIR URLs for Online Dictionaries and Thesauruses................................................................... 50
v
Technical Specifications Manual
Introduction to the Technical Specifications Manual
Section I. Introduction to the Technical Specifications
Manual
This manual provides information about hardware, software, and network configurations for
running various testing applications provided by American Institutes for Research (AIR).
The System Requirements for Online Testing lists the minimum hardware and software
requirements for online testing. Ensure your hardware complies with those requirements
before undertaking the tasks described in this manual.
Manual Content
This guide contains the following sections:
•
Section I, Introduction to the Technical Specifications Manual, provides information about
network and internet requirements, general hardware requirements and software
requirements, and configuring text-to-speech settings.
•
Section II, Network Configuration and Testing, provides information about configuring
networks, and lists helpful networking diagnostic tools.
•
Section III, Hardware Configuration, provides guidance regarding the proper infrastructure
for printers and wireless access points (WAP).
•
Section IV, Software Configuration, outlines configurations for operating systems (desktop,
laptop, and mobile).
•
Section V, Text-to-Speech Requirements, outlines configurations for enabling text-to-speech
settings on desktop operating systems. This section also lists the voice packs recognized by
the secure browser on those operating systems.
•
Appendix A, URLs Provided by AIR, lists AIR’s URLs that should be whitelisted in your
firewalls.
•
Appendix B, Technology Coordinator Checklist, lists the activities required to prepare a
facility for online testing.
•
Appendix C, Scheduling Online Testing, provides a worksheet for estimating the required
time to administer an online test.
•
Appendix D, User Support, explains how to contact the help desk.
•
Appendix E, Change Log, provides updates on the manual.
1
Technical Specifications Manual
Introduction to the Technical Specifications Manual
Document Conventions
Table 1 describes the conventions appearing in this user guide.
Table 1. Document Conventions
Element
Description
Note: This symbol accompanies helpful information or reminders.
Warning: This symbol accompanies information regarding actions that may cause loss of
data.
Tip: This symbol accompanies advice about performing a task efficiently.
Intended Audience
This publication is intended for technology coordinators responsible for configuring the
hardware, software, and network in a school’s online testing environment. You should be
familiar with the following concepts:
•
Networking—Bandwidth, firewalls, whitelisting, and proxy servers.
•
Configuring operating systems—Control Panel in Windows, System Preferences in OS X,
Settings in iOS, and the Linux command line.
•
Configuring web browsers—Settings in Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and Internet Explorer.
Other Resources
•
For information about supported operating systems, see the System Requirements for
Online Testing.
•
For information about installing secure browsers, see the Secure Browser Installation
Manual.
•
For information about securing a computer before a test session, see the Test Administrator
User Guide.
The above resources as well as test administration manuals and user guides for other systems
are available on the ISAT portal (http://idaho.portal.airast.org/).
2
Technical Specifications Manual
Network Configuration and Testing
Section II. Network Configuration and Testing
Your network’s configuration has a significant impact on Test Delivery System’s (TDS)
performance. An improperly configured network can slow a TDS’s responsiveness, and possibly
impact students’ scores or an assessment’s integrity. The following sections provide guidance
on properly configuring your network, and list popular tools for diagnosing network
bottlenecks.
Network Configuration
This section provides guidance or requirements pertaining to networking configurations for
online testing.
Guidance for Determining Required Bandwidth
Bandwidth is the measure of a network’s capacity or utilization, usually measured in terms of
bits per second. Your network should have enough bandwidth to support online testing at the
required performance level. For example, if a testing program requires that web browsers
display test items within 10 seconds after sending a request, then the network must have
enough bandwidth to support that requirement.
In an online testing environment, the following factors contribute to determining the required
bandwidth:
•
Number of Students Simultaneously Testing—As the number of students testing at one
time increases, the required bandwidth also increases.
•
Size of the Test Content—The size of a test’s content is determined by two factors: (1) the
number of items on the test and (2) the average size of each item. The more items a test
contains and the larger the average test item, the higher the bandwidth requirement for a
given test. For example, some writing tests have a few questions to which the student
composes a response, and these tests are small. In contrast, some science tests have
animations or simulations; these tests are large.
•
Hubs or Switches—LAN performance can be hindered when hubs are used instead of
switches. A hub broadcasts signals from various network devices to propagate across the
network, potentially saturating the network and causing traffic competition or data
collisions. If you use hubs, ensure they have enough bandwidth to handle the propagation.
•
ISP Router—For Internet networks, the most common bottleneck is the ISP’s router
connection, which typically operates at speeds of between 1.5M bits per second and 100M
bits per second. Network administrators should spend time prior to test administration
determining if their Internet infrastructure has the capacity to accommodate online testing
at the required performance level.
•
Encryption—Encryption at WAPs may contribute to bandwidth usage. If you use encryption,
ensure the WAPs have enough bandwidth to prevent degradation of performance.
3
Technical Specifications Manual
•
Network Configuration and Testing
Required Response Time—When a network’s bandwidth cannot service the amount of data
requested by clients, latency starts to accumulate and the students experience delays.
Ensure your network’s bandwidth is high enough to support the required response times
between the browsers and the servers.
Table 2 displays the estimated average bandwidth used by the secure browser for testing.
When designing your network for online testing, ensure that the available bandwidth can
support these values.
Table 2. Average Bandwidth Used by Secure Browser for Testing
Number of Students Testing
Concurrently in School or
Building
Average Estimated Bandwidth
Consumed During
Subsequent Startup of Secure
Browsera
1
8K bits/second
50
400K bits/second
Average Estimated Bandwidth
Consumed During Testingb
5–15K bits/second
250–750K bits/second
(0.25–0.75M bits/second)
100
800K bits/second
500–1500K bits/second
(0.5–1.5M bits/second)
a
Bandwidth consumed when opening the secure browser and accessing an assessment for the first time
is significantly more than when opening the secure browser and accessing an assessment
subsequently. This is because the initial launch of the secure browser downloads non-secure
cacheable content (not test content) that can be immediately accessed upon opening the secure
browser later.
b
The values in this column are based on averages from tests in a variety of subjects.
Required Ports and Protocols
Table 3 lists the ports and protocols used by the Test Delivery System. Ensure that all content
filters, firewalls, and proxy servers are open accordingly.
Table 3. Ports and Protocols for Test Delivery System
Port/Protocol
Purpose
80/TCP
HTTP (initial connection only)
443/TCP
HTTPS (secure connection)
4
Technical Specifications Manual
Network Configuration and Testing
Configuration for Domain Name Resolution
Appendix A, URLs Provided by AIR, lists the domain names for AIR’s testing and non-testing
applications. Ensure the testing machines have access to a server that can resolve those names.
Configuring Session Timeouts
Session timeouts on proxy servers and other devices should be set to values greater than the
average time it takes a student to participate in a test session or to complete a given test. For
example, if your school determines that students will test in 60-minute sessions, then consider
setting the session timeout to 65 or 70 minutes.
Data Caching
Data caching is a technique by which an intermediate server checks if it can serve the client’s
requests instead of a downstream server. While data caching is a good strategy in some
situations, its overhead is detrimental in the online testing environment. Ensure all
intermediate network elements, such as proxy servers, do not cache data.
Configuring Quality of Service and Traffic Shaping
If your testing network includes devices that perform traffic shaping, packet prioritization, or
Quality of Service (QoS), ensure the URLs in Appendix A, URLs Provided by AIR, have high
priority.
Configuring for Certificate Revocations
AIR’s servers present certificates to the clients. The following sections discuss the methods used
to check those certificates for revocation.
Certificate Revocation List
To use a certificate revocation list, ensure your firewalls allow the URL http://crl.verisign.com/.
Online Certificate Status Protocol
To use the Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP), ensure your firewalls allow the domain
names listed in Table 4. The values in the Patterned column are preferred because they are
more robust.
Table 4. Domain Names for OCSP
Patterned
Fully Qualified
*.thawte.com
oscp.thawte.com
*.geotrust.com
oscp.geotrust.com
*.ws.symantec.com
oscp.ws.symantec.com
5
Technical Specifications Manual
Network Configuration and Testing
If your firewall is configured to check only IP addresses, do the following:
1. Get the current list of OCSP IP addresses from Symantec. The list is available at
https://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/enterprise/other_resources/OCSP_Upgrade__New_IP_Addresses.txt.
2. Add the retrieved IP addresses to your firewall’s whitelist. Do not replace any existing IP
addresses.
Network Diagnostic Tools
You should do a performance analysis of your networking infrastructure to identify any
bottlenecks that may impact test performance. The choice of diagnostic tool depends on the
operating system running the tool, the network administrator’s technical knowledge, and the
desired level of network analysis. A number of network diagnostic tools are available, as
described in the following sections.
AIR’s Network/Bandwidth Diagnostic Tool
AIR provides a diagnostic tool that can be directly accessed from the student sample test login
page.
1. On the sample test login page, click Run Diagnostics. The Diagnostic Screen page opens.
2. In the Network Diagnostics section, select a test.
3. Select the approximate number of students who may take that test at one time.
4. Click Run Network Diagnostics Tests.
The tool displays your current upload and download speed as well as a general idea of whether
you can reliably test the number of students you entered in step 3. You may want to run this
test several times throughout the day to verify that your upload and download speeds remain
relatively consistent.
Windows-Specific Tools
PRTG Traffic Grapher
PRTG (www.paessler.com/prtg) monitors bandwidth usage and other network parameters via
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). It also contains a built‐in packet sniffer. A
freeware version is available.
NTttcp
NTttcp (www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/network/TCP_tool.mspx) is a multithreaded,
asynchronous application that sends and receives data between two or more endpoints and
reports the network performance for the duration of the transfer.
6
Technical Specifications Manual
Network Configuration and Testing
Pathping
Pathping is a network utility included in Windows. It combines the functionality of the ping and
tracert commands by providing details of the path between two hosts and ping‐like statistics
for each node in the path based on samples taken over a time period.
OS X-Specific Tools
Network Utility.app
This tool is built into OS X.
Multi-Platform Tools
Wireshark
Wireshark (www.wireshark.org) is a network protocol analyzer. It has a large feature set and
runs on most platforms including Windows, OS X, and Linux.
TCPDump
TCPDump (http://sourceforge.net/projects/tcpdump) is a common packet sniffer that runs
from the command line on Linux and OS X. It can intercept and display data packets being
transmitted or received over a network. A Windows version WinDump is available
(www.winpcap.org/windump/).
Ping, NSLookup, Netstat, Traceroute
This is a set of standard UNIX network utilities. Versions of these utilities are included in Linux,
Windows, and OS X.
Iperf
Iperf (http://sourceforge.net/projects/iperf/) measures maximum TCP bandwidth, allowing the
tuning of various parameters and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) characteristics. Iperf reports
bandwidth, delay jitter, and datagram loss.
7
Technical Specifications Manual
Hardware Configuration
Section III. Hardware Configuration
This section provides topology guidance for printers and WAPs. It also provides a reference for
hardware configurations that support Braille testing.
Connections between Printers and Computers
Test Administrators can print test session information and approve students’ requests to print
stimuli or test items (for students with the print-on-request accommodation). Nevertheless, to
maintain a secure test environment, the Test Administrator’s computer should be connected to
a single local or network printer in the testing room, and only the Test Administrator’s
computer should have access to that printer.
Wireless Networking and Determining the Number of Wireless
Access Points
Wireless networking standards have evolved over the years, with the following being the most
commonly deployed:
•
802.11ac has a theoretical throughput of up to 1G bits per second.
•
802.11n has a throughput of up to 300M bits per second.
•
802.11g has a theoretical throughput of up to 54M bits per second.
•
802.11b has a theoretical throughput of 11M bits per second.
The recommended number of devices supported by a single wireless connection depends on
the standard used for the connection. The two most common networking standards are
802.11g (54Mbps) and 802.11n (300Mbps). Table 5 lists recommendations for network
topology in which the WAP provides 802.11g and the testing devices provide 802.11g, 802.11n,
or a mixture of the two. Refer to your WAP documentation for specific recommendations and
guidelines for these or other standards.
Table 5. Recommended Ratios of Devices to Wireless Access Points
Testing Device
Ratio of Devices to 802.11g WAP
Ratio of Devices to 802.11n WAP
802.11g
20
40
802.11n
20
40
Mix of 802.11g and
802.11n
20
40–50 (depending on the mix of
wireless cards used)
Recommendations for 802.11ac routers are under investigation.
Regardless of the number of WAPs, each should be configured to use WPA2/AES data
encryption.
8
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Section IV. Software Configuration
This section describes how to configure the operating systems and web browsers for online
testing.
Configuring Commercially Available Browsers
This section describes how to configure commercially available browsers (Chrome, Safari,
Firefox, and Internet Explorer) for online testing.
Enabling Pop-Up Windows
AIR’s systems provide informational messages or warnings using pop-up windows. Therefore,
enable pop-up windows on those web browsers using AIR’s systems.
The following list describes how to enable pop-up windows on many browsers. If your browser
is not on this list, consult its user documentation.
Enabling Pop-Up Windows for All Domains
The following instructions enable pop-up windows for all domains. If you prefer to limit pop-up
windows to only those coming from AIR’s domains, use the instructions in Enabling Pop-Up
Windows only for AIR domains.
•
Firefox (Windows): Tools > Options > Content > clear Block pop-up windows. (Firefox on
OS X and Linux is similar.)
•
Chrome: Menu > Settings > Show advanced settings (at the bottom of the screen) > Privacy
> Content Settings > Pop-ups > mark Allow all sites to show pop-ups.
•
Chrome browser on Android tablets: Menu > Settings > Advanced > Content Settings >
Block pop-ups > clear checkbox.
•
Internet Explorer: Internet Options > Privacy tab > clear Turn On Pop-up Blocker.
•
Safari: Safari > clear Block Pop-Up Windows.
•
iOS Safari: Settings > Safari > Block Pop-ups (toggle to “off” mode).
Enabling Pop-Up Windows only for AIR domains
You can allow pop-up windows only from AIR’s domains. The following list describes how to
enable domain-specific pop-up windows on many browsers. If your browser is not on this list,
consult its user documentation. The list of AIR domains to use in these instructions appears in
Appendix A, URLs Provided by AIR.
•
Firefox: Tools > Options > Content > click Exceptions. Enter domain names and select Allow
for each.
9
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
•
Chrome: Menu > Settings > Show advanced settings (at the bottom of the screen) > Privacy
> Content Settings > Pop-ups > click Manage Exceptions. Enter the domain names and
select Allow for each.
•
Internet Explorer: Internet Options Privacy tab > Settings. Enter the domain names and click
Add for each.
•
Safari and iOS Safari: N/A
•
Chrome on Android tablets: N/A
Enabling Text-to-Speech on Firefox
Firefox versions 45 and later includes a webspeech feature that provides text-to-speech. By
default this feature is disabled. If you want to use webspeech with Firefox, enable it using the
following procedure.
To enable webspeech on Firefox
1. In the Firefox address bar, type about:config. A warning appears.
2. Click I’ll be careful, I promise. A list of preferences appears.
3. In the Search field, type media.webspeech.synth.enabled.
4. Double-click the preference so that its value changes to true. See Figure 1.
Figure 1. Enabling webspeech on Firefox
5. Restart Firefox.
Optimal Installation Scenario for Secure Browsers
The Secure Browser Installation Manual describes several scenarios for installing the secure
browser. Some scenarios describe how to install the secure browser into a shared network
folder, and students run the secure browser from that folder. This is arguably the fastest way to
deploy the secure browser in a testing environment, but there are some performance impacts.
Running the secure browser creates competition among the students’ clients for two resources:
LAN bandwidth and shared disk drive. This performance impact can be avoided by installing the
secure browser locally on each machine.
10
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Configuring Windows for Online Testing
This section describes how to configure Windows for online testing.
Disabling Fast User Switching
Microsoft Windows (Vista, 7, 8.0, 8.1, 10, and 11) has a “Fast User Switching” feature that
allows more than one user to be logged in at the same time. This is a security risk because
students can potentially start a new Windows session during the test and use that session to
search the Internet for answers. The following sections describe how to disable Fast User
Switching for different versions of Windows. (There is no need to manually disable Fast User
Switching on Windows 10 or 11.)
Disabling Fast User Switching in Windows Vista and 7
This section describes how to disable Fast User Switching under Windows Vista and Windows 7.
The process is similar for later versions of Windows.
11
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Option A: Access the Group Policy Editor
The following procedure describes how to disable Fast User Switching using the Group Policy
Editor. Some editions of Windows Vista do not support this configuration through the Group
Policy Editor; in such cases, configure Fast User Switching through the registry. See Option B
below for instructions.
1. Click Start, type gpedit.msc in the search box.
The Local Group Policy Editor window appears.
2. Navigate to Local Computer Policy >
Computer Configuration > Administrative
Templates > System > Logon.
3. Double-click Hide entry points for Fast User
Switching.
4. Select Enabled, and click OK.
5. Close the Local Group Policy Editor window.
12
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Option B: Access the Registry
The following procedure describes how to disable Fast User Switching using the Windows
registry.
1. Click Start, type regedit.exe in the Start
Search dialog box, and press Enter.
2. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE >
Microsoft > Windows > CurrentVersion >
Policies > System.
3. Right-click the System folder.
4. Click New, DWORD (32-bit) value.
5. Type HideFastUserSwitching and press Enter.
6. Double-click the HideFastUserSwitching value.
7. In the Value data field, enter 1.
8. Click OK.
9. Close the Registry Editor.
Disabling Fast User Switching in Windows 8.0 and 8.1
The following procedure describes how to disable Fast User Switching under Windows 8.0 and
8.1.
1. In the Search charm, type gpedit.msc.
Double-click the gpedit icon in the Apps
pane. The Local Group Policy Editor window
opens.
2. Navigate to Computer Configuration >
Administrative Templates > System >
Logon.
3. In the Setting pane, double-click Hide entry
points for Fast User Switching.
13
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
4. Select Enabled and then click OK.
5. In the Search charm, type run. The Run dialog
box opens.
6. Enter the command gpupdate /force into
the text box and then click OK. (Note the
space before the backslash.)
7. The command window opens. When you see
the message Computer Policy update has
completed successfully, this will be your
notification that Windows has successfully
disabled Fast User Switching.
14
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Enabling Web Fonts in Internet Explorer 11
Some applications, such as sample tests or THSS, display test items that may require web fonts.
The following procedure describes how to enable web fonts in Internet Explorer 11.
To enable web fonts in Internet Explorer:
1. In Internet Explorer, open the tools menu
and select Internet Options. The Internet
Options dialog box opens.
2. Click the Security tab.
3. Click the Custom Level button. The Security
Settings dialog box opens.
4. Scroll to Font Download and mark the
Enable radio button.
5. Click OK. The Security Settings dialog box
closes.
6. Click OK. The Internet Options dialog box
closes.
15
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Installing Windows Media Pack for Windows 8.1 N and KN
Some versions of Windows 8.1 are not shipped with media software installed. As a result, you
may need to install software to enable students to listen to and record audio as well as watch
videos.
Microsoft provides additional information as well as a download package for computers with
the following Windows 8.1 versions:
•
Windows 8.1 N
•
Windows 8.1 N/K with Bing
•
Windows 8.1 Enterprise N
•
Windows 8.1 Pro N
•
Windows 8.1 Pro N/K for EDU
AIR encourages downloading this software and ensuring it works with sample websites and
video and audio files prior to installing the Windows secure browser. Installation instructions
are provided on Microsoft’s download page.
Microsoft Resources:
•
About the Media Feature Pack for Windows 8.1 N and Windows 8.1 KN Editions: April 2014
(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2929699/en-us)
•
Download Media Feature Pack for N and KN Versions of Windows 8.1
(http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=42503)
Configuring ZoomText to Recognize the Secure Browser
When displaying a test with a print-size accommodation above 4× magnification, the secure
browser automatically enters streamlined mode. If you want to retain the standard layout of a
test but display it with a print magnification above 4×, then consider using ZoomText—a
magnification and screen-reading software that you can use with the secure browser. Use the
following procedure to ensure ZoomText recognizes the secure browser.
1. If ZoomText is running, close it.
2. In the Windows Explorer, go to the installation directory for your version of ZoomText. For
example, if you have ZoomText version 10.1:
o Go to C:\Program Files (x86)\ZoomText 10.1\ (Windows 64-bit)
o Go to C:\Program Files\ZoomText 10.1\ (Windows 32-bit).
3. In a text editor, open the file ZoomTextConfig.xml.
4. Search for line containing the D2DPatch property, similar to the following:
<Property name="D2DPatch" value ="*,~dwm,~firefox,~thunderbird"/>
16
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
5. In the value attribute, add the prefix for your state’s secure browser:
<Property name="D2DPatch" value
="*,~dwm,~firefox,~idsecurebrowser,~thunderbird"/>
6. Save the file, and restart ZoomText.
Configuring Mac OS X for Online Testing
This section describes how to configure Mac OS X for online testing.
Disabling Exposé or Spaces
Mac OS X 10.7 and later includes an Exposé or Spaces feature that allows running more than
one desktop session. This is a security risk because students can potentially start a new desktop
session during the test, and use that session to search the Internet for answers. The following
procedure explains how to disable Exposé or Spaces on those versions of OS X. (You can disable
Spaces quickly from the command line; see Disabling Spaces and Application Launches from the
Command Line for details.)
To disable Exposé or Spaces:
1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences.
2. Click Keyboard. The Keyboard window
opens.
3. Click the Keyboard Shortcuts or Shortcuts
tab.
17
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
4. In the left panel, click Mission Control. The
right panel lists all Mission Control options.
5. In the right panel, clear the following
checkboxes:
o Move left a space
o Move right a space
o Switch to Desktop 1
To re-enable Exposé or Spaces, follow steps 1–4, and mark the boxes for spaces.
Disabling Application Launches from Function Keys
When students use the secure browser for testing, the Test Delivery System conducts regular
checks to ensure that other applications are not open. These checks help maintain the integrity
of the secure test environment.
Starting with OS X versions 10.7 and later, some Mac computers are factory configured to
launch iTunes and other applications by pressing the function keys (e.g., F8) on the keyboard. If
a student accidentally presses the function key, the secure browser assumes that a forbidden
application is running and pauses the student’s test. To avoid this scenario, disable the use of
function keys to launch applications.
The following instructions are based on OS X 10.9; similar instructions apply for other versions
of OS X. (You can disable application launches quickly from the command line; see Disabling
Spaces and Application Launches from the Command Line for details.)
To disable application launches from function keys:
1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences.
2. In System Preferences, click Keyboard. The
Keyboard window opens.
18
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
3. In the Keyboard window, mark Use all F1,
F2, etc. keys as standard function keys.
If you need to launch iTunes or another
application, press the Fn key and then press
the desired function key. This combination will
launch the application. (Doing so while taking
a test causes the secure browser to pause the
test.)
Disabling Updates to Third-Party Apps
Updates to third-party apps may include components that compromise the testing
environment. This section describes how to disable updates to third-party apps.
The following instructions are based on OS X 10.9; similar instructions apply for other versions
of OS X.
To disable updates to third-party apps:
1. Log in to the student’s account.
2. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences.
The System Preferences dialog box opens.
3. Click App Store. The App Store window
opens.
4. Mark Automatically check for updates.
5. Clear Download newly available updates in the background.
6. Clear Install app updates.
Mark Install system data files and security updates.
19
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Disabling Updates to iTunes
Updates to iTunes may be incompatible with the secure browser. This section describes how to
disable updates to iTunes.
The following instructions are based on OS X 10.9; similar instructions apply for other versions
of OS X.
To disable updates to iTunes:
1. Log in to the student’s account.
2. Start iTunes.
3. Select iTunes > Preferences.
4. Under the Advanced tab, clear Check for
new software updates automatically.
5. Click OK.
20
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Disabling Look-Up Gesture
OS X versions 10.7 and later include a look-up gesture; highlighting a word and then tapping
with three fingers on the trackpad displays a dictionary for the highlighted word—a feature that
can compromise testing security. This section describes how to disable the look-up gesture.
The following instructions are based on OS X 10.9; similar instructions apply for other versions
of OS X.
To disable the look-up gesture:
1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences.
2. Click Trackpad. The Trackpad window
opens.
3. Click the Point and Click tab.
4. Clear the Look up checkbox.
Disabling Display of Notification Center
OS X versions 10.10 and later include Notification Center, which displays system information
when swiping to the left with two fingers from the right edge of the trackpad. Depending on its
contents, Notification Center can compromise testing security. This section describes how to
disable the gesture for displaying Notification Center.
The following instructions are based on OS X 10.10; similar instructions apply for later versions
of OS X.
To disable the gesture for displaying Notification Center:
1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences.
2. Click Trackpad. The Trackpad window
opens.
3. Click the More Gestures tab.
4. Clear the Notification Center checkbox.
21
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Disabling Spaces and Application Launches from the Command Line
The sections Disabling Exposé or Spaces and Disabling Application Launches from Function Keys
describe how to configure OS X through the desktop. This section describes how to perform
those configurations from the command line, which can be faster than working through the
desktop. To perform this task, you need to be familiar with logging in to OS X machines through
Terminal or other terminal emulator.
To disable spaces and application launches from the command line:
1. Log in to the machine as the user that runs the secure browser.
2. Enter the following commands:
defaults write com.apple.symbolichotkeys AppleSymbolicHotKeys -dict-add 79
"{enabled = 0; value = {parameters = (65535,123, 262144); type = standard; }; }"
defaults write com.apple.symbolichotkeys AppleSymbolicHotKeys -dict-add 80
"{enabled = 0; value = { parameters = (65535, 123, 393216); type = 'standard'; };
}"
defaults write com.apple.symbolichotkeys AppleSymbolicHotKeys -dict-add 81
"{enabled = 0; value = { parameters = (65535, 124, 262144); type = 'standard'; };
}"
defaults write com.apple.symbolichotkeys AppleSymbolicHotKeys -dict-add 82
"{enabled = 0; value = { parameters = (65535, 124, 393216); type = 'standard'; };
}"
TIP You can paste these lines into a text file, and run the file from the command line.
These commands modify the file ~/Library/Preferences/
com.apple.symbolichotkeys.plist.
3. If you logged in to a computer running OS X 10.8.5 or later, log out and then log back in.
If you need to restore Spaces and the default application launchers, repeat steps 1–3. In step 2,
change enabled = 0 to enabled = 1.
Disabling Spaces and Application Launches on Remote Machines
The sections Disabling Exposé or Spaces, Disabling Application Launches from Function Keys,
and Disabling Spaces and Application Launches from the Command Line describe procedures
for configuring a secure test environment in OS X. This configuration is stored in the file
~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.symbolichotkeys.plist. If you have many OS X testing
machines, it may be easier to push this file to those machines instead of configuring each one
individually.
22
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
You can push the configuration file to remote machines using a variety of tools, such as the
following:
•
File Distributor
•
Apple’s Active Directory Client and Directory Utility
•
Apple’s Open Directory and Profile Manager
•
Centrify & PowerBrokers Identity Enterprise
•
Apple Remote Desktop
Preparing to Install Secure Browser 8.0 or later on OS X 10.11
When installing a new copy of Secure Browser 8.0 or later on OS X 10.11 (El Capitan),
Gatekeeper indicates the program is from an unidentified source. This is because Gatekeeper
does not recognize the secure browser’s application signature. You need to adjust OS X’s
security settings prior to the installation, and then reset the settings after the installation.
(Gatekeeper does recognize the secure browser’s installation signature when upgrading to
Secure Browser 8.0 or later on OS X 10.11, so you do not need to perform this procedure when
upgrading.)
To prepare OS X 10.11 for installing Secure Browser 8.0 or later:
1. Open System Preferences.
2. Choose Security and Privacy.
3. Under General, click the lock and type your password to enable changes.
23
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
4. Under Allow apps downloaded from, choose Anywhere, and choose Allow From Anywhere
in the confirmation message.
Choose Anywhere
to install
secure browser 8.0
on OS X 10.11
5. Install the secure browser. Detailed installation instructions are available in the Secure
Browser Installation Manual.
6. After installing the secure browser, restore your security settings.
Configuring Linux for Online Testing
This section describes how to configure Linux for online testing.
Adding Verdana Font
Some tests have content that requires the Verdana TrueType font. Therefore, ensure that
Verdana is installed on Linux machines used for testing. The easiest way to do this is to install
the Microsoft core fonts package for your distribution.
•
Fedora, Red Hat, and openSUSE—Follow the steps in the “How to Install” section of the
following website: http://corefonts.sourceforge.net/.
•
Ubuntu—In a terminal window, enter the following command to install the msttcorefonts
package:
sudo apt-get install msttcorefonts
24
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Configuring iOS
This section describes how to configure mobile devices running iOS.
Configuring for Guided Access
Guided Access restricts the iOS to a single application and prevents taking screenshots. This
ensures a secure test environment. (You may want to use Single App mode, which is easier to
enable and activate than Guided Access; for more details about this configuration, see
Configuring Using Autonomous Single App Mode.)
The procedure in this section only enables Guided Access; to activate Guided Access before a
test, see the Test Administrator User Guide.
To configure for Guided Access:
1. Tap Settings.
2. Navigate to General > Accessibility >
Learning, and turn on Guided Access.
3. Set the passcode for Guided Access. (Test
Administrators use this passcode to
deactivate Guided Access after a test.)
a. Tap Set Passcode.
b. Enter a passcode.
c. Confirm the passcode.
4. Save the passcode in a safe place. There is
no ability to retrieve a forgotten passcode.
25
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
5. On devices with iOS 7 or later, disable
keyboard functions by doing the following:
Figure 2. Keyboard Settings for iOS 8.1 (other
versions of iOS are similar)
a. Under Settings, tap General > Keyboard.
b. Turn off all settings.
Configuring Using Autonomous Single App Mode
If you have iOS tablets running version 7.1 or higher, and if you have a Mac running version
10.10 or higher, then you can use Autonomous Single App Mode (ASAM) to quickly create a
secure testing environment on all iPads used for testing. (Tablets running a version earlier than
7.1 require Guided Access; for details about this configuration, see Configuring for Guided
Access.) Compared to Guided Access, ASAM requires less time to prepare for test sessions;
there is no need to activate Guided Access on each iPad before each test session.
Overview of Autonomous Single App Mode and the Secure Testing Environment
To manage multiple iPads using ASAM, you need to do the following:
Step 1: Creating a Mobile Device Management Profile
Step 2: Restricting Features in iOS 8.1.3 or later
Step 3: Creating a Supervisory Profile
Step 4: Placing iPads in Autonomous Single App Mode
After completing these three steps, each time a student starts a test, the iPad enters ASAM and
the test environment is secure.
Step 1: Creating a Mobile Device Management Profile
The first step in provisioning iPads with ASAM is to create an MDM profile. Any profile with
default settings is compatible with the secure browser. However, you may wish to restrict
certain features in devices with iOS 8.1.3 or later (see Step 2: Restricting Features in iOS 8.1.3 or
later). Deploy the profile to a host that the iPads can access.
26
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Creating an MDM profile is beyond the scope of this specification manual. The following
references provide introductory information:
•
IT in the Classroom, available at https://www.apple.com/education/it/mdm/.
•
Apple Configurator Help, available at https://help.apple.com/configurator/mac/2.0/.
•
Pro tip: Use OS X Server Profile Manager for MDM, available at
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/pro-tip-use-os-x-server-profile-manager-for-mdm/.
Step 2: Restricting Features in iOS 8.1.3 or later
You must restrict features in supervised devices with iOS 8.1.3 or later that may give students
an unfair testing advantage, including the dictionary, predictive keyboard, spell check, autocorrection, and share selected text.
Note: The current version of Apple Configurator does not allow you to restrict these features.
You must use a third-party MDM solution such as Casper or AirWatch to create a profile that
implements these restrictions.
To restrict features in iOS 8.1.3 or later:
•
In the Custom Settings section of the MDM solution, insert the profile key for each of the
features listed in Table 6.
Table 6. Profile Keys for Features in iOS 8.1.3 or Later
a
Feature
Profile Key
Value
Dictionary, Share Selected
Texta
<key>allowDefinitionLookup
</key>
False
Predictive Keyboard
<key>allowPredictiveKeyboa
rd</key>
False
Spell Check
<key>allowSpellCheck</key>
False
Auto-Correction
<key>allowAutoCorrection</
key>
False
Share Selected Text is available since iOS 9. Disabling Dictionary also disables this feature.
27
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
The following snippet turns off the iPad’s auto-correction feature. The snippets for dictionary,
predictive keyboard, and spell check are similar.
<dict>
<key>allowAutoCorrection</key>
<false />
<key>PayloadDisplayName</key>
<string>Restrictions</string>
<key>PayloadDescription</key>
<string>RestrictionSettings</string>
<key>PayloadIdentifier</key>
<string>31eb53ac-3a08-46f7-8a0a-82e872382e15.Restrictions</string>
<key>PayloadOrganization</key>
<string></string>
<key>PayloadType</key>
<string>com.apple.applicationaccess</string>
<key>PayloadUUID</key>
<string>56199b2c-374d-4152-bc50-166d21fa9152</string>
<key>PayloadVersion</key>
<integer>1</integer>
</dict>
Step 3: Creating a Supervisory Profile
To create a supervisory profile:
1. On a Mac 10.10 or later, download and install Apple Configurator from the Mac App Store.
When the installation completes, open Apple Configurator.
28
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
2. Click Prepare, then Settings. The Settings window appears.
Figure 3. Settings Window in Apple Configurator
29
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
3. Click + below the Profiles list and select Create New Profile…. A configuration window
appears.
4. In the General section, in the Name field, enter a name for the profile.
5. In the Restrictions section, click Configure. A list of restrictions appears.
6. Make any required changes to the restrictions, or retain the default settings.
7. Click Save. You return to the Settings tab, and the profile appears in the Profiles list.
8. Click
to export the profile to the Mac.
Creation of the supervisory profile is complete.
30
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Step 4: Placing iPads in Autonomous Single App Mode
TIP: Installing on multiple iPads at once Before starting this procedure, connect the iPads to
the Mac through a USB hub. That way you can perform the installation on many of them at one
time.
To install the MDM profile, supervisory profile, and secure browser:
1. On the Mac where you performed Step 3: Creating a Supervisory Profile, open the Apple
Configurator.
2. From the Apple Configurator menu, select Preferences. The Preferences window opens.
3. Under General, clear the Automatically refresh and Remove apps and profiles
Configurator did not install checkboxes.
4. Close the Preferences window.
5. Back in Apple Configurator, click Prepare, then Settings. The Settings window appears (see
Figure 3).
6. In the Name field, enter a name to apply to the iPads.
7. Optional: Mark the Number sequentially starting at 1 checkbox. This adds a number to
each iPad’s name. For example, if the Name field is Garden Elementary School, and if three
iPads are connected, each device receives the name Garden Elementary School 1, Garden
Elementary School 2, and Garden Elementary School 3.
8. Set Supervision to On.
31
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
9. Click Organization Info… The Organization Info window appears.
10. In the Name field, enter ISAT and then click Done. The Organization Info window closes.
11. If the profile you created in Step 3: Creating a Supervisory Profile does not appear in the
Profiles list, import it by doing the following:
a. Click + below the Profiles list and select Import Profile….
b. Navigate to the profile you saved in step 8 on page 32, and then click Open.
12. Mark the checkbox for the profile you want to prepare onto the iPads (see Figure 3).
13. Connect each iPad to the Mac via a USB cable or USB hub.
14. On each connected iPad, uninstall any existing versions of the secure browser.
15. In the Apple Configurator, under the Prepare tab, click Prepare at the bottom of the
window. A confirmation message appears.
32
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
16. Click Apply in the confirmation message. Preparation starts and may take several minutes,
after which the iPad restarts. The Apple Configurator displays progress messages during the
prepare.
Note: iOS Upgrade Apple Configurator may force the iPads to upgrade to the latest version of
iOS.
17. After the iPad restarts, follow the prompts on the iPad to configure it until the home screen
appears.
18. Optional: Confirm the supervisory profile is installed on the iPad. Go to Settings > General >
Profiles. The profile name you used in step 4 on page 30 appears under Configuration
Profiles.
19. On the iPad, download and install the MDM profile you created in Step 1: Creating a Mobile
Device Management Profile.
20. After the MDM profile installation completes, install the secure browser onto the iPad. You
can take a copy of the secure browser for iOS from http://idaho.portal.airast.org/. (Detailed
instructions for installing the secure browser are in the section “Installing the Secure
Browser on iOS” of the Secure Browser Installation Manual.)
21. Optional: After installation completes, test it by doing the following:
a. Open the Secure Browser.
b. Log in to a test site.
c. Select a test, have the TA approve the test.
d. Start the test. The iPad enters ASAM.
22. Repeat steps 13–21 to prepare additional iPads.
23. In the Apple Configurator, click Stop and close the Apple Configurator.
Setting the iPad into ASAM is complete. When a student starts a test, the iPad enters ASAM
mode.
33
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Using Automatic Assessment Configuration
If you are using iPads with iOS 9.3.2 or later, you can use Automatic Assessment Configuration.
This configuration includes a preset profile in the AIRSecureTest app that automatically
suppresses the features listed in Table 6.
Caution: Conflicting MDM Profiles MDM profiles for managed iPads override the automatic
assessment configuration. If you want to use automatic assessment configuration, delete any
existing MDM profiles from the Apple Configurator.
Removing the Emoji Keyboard
Emoticons are characters that express an
emotion or represent a facial expression,
such as a smile or a frown. Some text
messaging apps replace sequences of
characters with an emoticon, such as
replacing :-) with .
Figure 4. Emoji Keyboard
iOS has an Emoji keyboard that contains
emoticons. This keyboard, if activated, can
be confusing for test-takers or scorers. Use
the following procedure to remove the
emoji keyboard from an iOS device.
To remove the Emoji keyboard:
1. Tap Settings.
2. Navigate to General > Keyboard.
3. Tap Keyboards.
4. Delete Emoji from the list by sliding
it to the left.
34
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Disabling Dictation
Starting with iOS version 8, a dictation feature is available. As students speak into an iOS device,
the dictation feature suggests words or spelling that may compromise testing security. Use the
following procedure to disable dictation.
To disable dictation:
1. Tap Settings.
2. Navigate to General > Keyboard.
3. Turn off Enable Dictation.
Configuring Android
This section describes how to configure mobile devices running Android.
Enabling the Secure Browser Keyboard
The default keyboard for the Android allows predictive text, which may provide students with
hints for answers to tests. For this reason, the secure browser for Android requires that a
mobile secure browser keyboard be configured for the secure browser itself. The secure
browser keyboard is a basic keyboard, with no row for predictive text functionality.
The first time you open the Mobile Secure Browser on an Android tablet, you will be prompted
to select the secure browser keyboard.
About the Secure Browser Keyboard and General Settings
Once the secure browser keyboard is set, it becomes the default keyboard for all Android
tablet applications, not just for the secure browser. If you want to return to the default Android
keyboard after using the secure browser, you will need to navigate to Settings > Language &
Input and uncheck the secure browser keyboard.
If you change back to the default Android keyboard, you will be prompted to select the secure
browser keyboard the next time you open the secure browser. The secure browser will not
allow you to access the student login page until the secure browser keyboard has been
selected.
The following procedure describes how to enable the secure browser keyboard. The screen
shots were taken with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 2; other Android versions may vary.
1. Select the secure browser icon on the home
screen.
35
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
2. A Change Keyboard message appears. Tap
Close.
3. Tap Set up input methods. The Language
and Input settings screen opens.
4. Select the checkbox next to AIRSecureTest
so that a checkmark appears.
5. You will be prompted to acknowledge that
this selection is okay. Select OK to continue.
Note: This action allows the mobile secure
browser to use the secure browser
keyboard.
6. Navigate to the secure browser to open it.
(You can use the application switcher or go
back to “Home” and select the secure
browser icon.)
7. You will be prompted to change the
keyboard. Select Close.
8. The Android tablet’s default keyboard will
still be selected.
9. Select the checkmark or circle for the
AIRSecureTest keyboard.
36
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
10. Select Continue. You will be prompted to
complete the application launch using the
preferred method.
11. Select AIRSecureTest (ensure it is shaded
and highlighted blue) and then select
Always.
12. You will need to acknowledge that the
secure browser’s default settings have
changed. (This is a result of selecting the
secure browser keyboard.)
13. Select OK.
Disabling the Multi-Window on Samsung Tablets
Samsung tablets are equipped with a multi-window feature to display app launchers.
Depending on the available app launchers, the multi-window can compromise testing security.
To avoid this scenario, disable the multi-window on Samsung tablets.
The following instructions are based on Android 4.4 on a Samsung tablet; similar instructions
apply for other versions of Android on Samsung tablets.
37
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
To disable the multi-window:
1. Tap Settings.
2. Navigate to Device > Sound and
display.
3. Turn off Multi window.
38
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
Disabling the Stylus on Samsung Galaxy Note
The Samsung Galaxy Note stylus is capable of launching apps—a situation that can compromise
testing security. To avoid this scenario, disable the stylus feature.
To disable the stylus:
1. Tap Settings.
2. Navigate to Controls > Voice and input methods.
3. Tap S Pen.
4. Disable all of the available features.
Configuring Chrome OS
This section describes how to configure auto-updates to Chrome OS.
Disabling Auto-Updates for Chrome OS
Because AIR supports Chrome OS up to a specific version, you may want to disable autoupdates. For example, if AIR supports up to Chrome OS version 49, and version 49 is installed
on your Chromebooks, you can prevent auto-updates to any later version. (Alternatively, you
can allow auto-updates to a specific version supported by AIR; for details, see the section
Limiting Chrome OS Updates to a Specific Version.)
39
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
To disable auto-updates for Chrome OS:
1. Display the Device Settings page by following the procedure in Manage device settings,
https://support.google.com/chrome/a/answer/1375678?hl=en. The steps in that procedure
assume that your Chromebooks are managed through the admin console.
2. From the Auto Update list, select Stop auto-updates.
3. Click Save.
Limiting Chrome OS Updates to a Specific Version
Because AIR supports Chrome OS up to a specific version, you may want to prevent your
Chromebooks from auto-updating beyond that version. For example, if AIR supports up to
Chrome OS version 49, and version 48 is installed on your Chromebooks, you can allow autoupdates up to version 49, and prevent auto-updates to any later version. (Alternatively, you can
disable auto-updates entirely; for details, see the section Disabling Auto-Updates for Chrome
OS.)
To limit Chrome OS updates to a specific version:
1. Display the Device Settings page by following the procedure in Manage device settings,
https://support.google.com/chrome/a/answer/1375678?hl=en. The steps in that procedure
assume that your Chromebooks are managed through the admin console.
2. From the Auto Update list, select Allow auto-updates.
3. From the Restrict Google Chrome version to at most list, select the required version.
4. Click Save.
Installing CloudReady on PCs and Macs
CloudReady is a reduced-feature operating system, built on the same technology as Chrome OS,
that runs on hardware with limited resources. If your school or district has older hardware that
does not run newer versions of Windows or OS X, consider installing CloudReady on those
machines. This installation can postpone or prevent a costly hardware upgrade.
Warning: Loss of data The procedure described in this section erases all data on the
computer on which you are installing CloudReady. Be sure to back up all necessary data
before starting this procedure.
To install CloudReady:
1. Ensure the computer on which you are installing CloudReady—
o is one of the supported models listed in
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yPxKAmNFaJwk0kwikF5iROFMOxiinmkW_9KeI1
u5jVo/edit?pli=1.
o has a USB port.
40
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
o can boot from a USB drive.
2. Purchase a Neverware license for the computer. Licenses are available from
http://www.neverware.com/. (Bulk licenses may be available.)
3. If you received a USB drive from Neverware with the CloudReady image, proceed to
step 18. Otherwise, prepare a bootable image by following steps 4 through 17. Ideally,
perform these steps on a computer on which the Google Chrome web browser is already
installed.
4. Obtain a blank 8 GB USB drive.
5. Install Google Chrome if it is not already installed.
6. In a web browser, go to the URL for the image file provided to you by Neverware. This URL
downloads a file with a name similar to cloudready_site646.bin. Note the location of the
file on your computer.
7. Insert the USB drive into the computer.
8. Start Chrome, and navigate to the Chrome web store at https://chrome.google.com/
webstore/.
9. Search for the app Chromebook Recovery Utility.
10. Click ADD TO CHROME, and in the confirmation prompt click Add app.
11. After installation, click Launch App.
12. Click
in the top-right corner and select Use local image.
13. Navigate to the file image file that you downloaded in step 6.
14. In the next screen, select the USB drive you inserted in step 7.
41
Technical Specifications Manual
Software Configuration
15. Click Continue.
16. In the next screen, click Create Now. The recovery utility creates a bootable image of
CloudReady onto the USB drive. This operation takes 15–30 minutes.
17. When copying is complete, eject the USB drive from the computer.
18. On the computer where you are installing CloudReady, do the following:
a. Back up all files you want to save. The installation procedure erases all data on the
computer.
b. Boot the computer from the USB drive. Booting and installation take 10–15 minutes,
depending on your hardware. When the installation is complete, your computer turns
off.
c. Remove the USB drive, and power on the computer.
d. Install the AIRSecureTest Kiosk App; see the Secure Browser Installation Guide for
details.
42
Technical Specifications Manual
Text-to-Speech Requirements
Section V. Text-to-Speech Requirements
This section contains information about text-to-speech requirements.
Overview of Text-to-Speech
Using text-to-speech requires at least one voice pack to be installed on testing computers.
A number of voice packs are available for desktop computers, and AIR researches and tests
voice packs for compatibility with the secure browsers. Additionally, not all voice packs that
come pre-installed with operating systems are approved for use with online testing. The voice
packs listed at the end of this section have been tested and are whitelisted by the secure
browser.
Using Text-to-Speech
Students using text-to-speech for the practice tests must log in using a supported secure
browser. Students can also verify that text-to-speech works on their computers by logging in to
a practice test session and selecting a test for which text-to-speech is available.
Note: We strongly encourage schools to test the text-to-speech settings before students take
operational tests. You can check these settings through the diagnostic page. From the student
sample test login screen, click the Run Diagnostics link, and then click the Text-to-Speech
Check button.
How the Secure Browser Selects Voice Packs
This section describes how AIR’s secure browsers select which voice pack to use.
Voice Pack Selection on Desktop Versions of Secure Browsers
When a student who is using text-to-speech starts a test, the secure browser looks for voice
packs on the student’s machine. Upon recognizing an approved voice pack, the secure browser
uses the one with the highest priority.
If any of the approved voice packs has also been set as the default voice on the computer, then
that voice pack will always get the highest priority.
Voice Pack Selection on Mobile Versions of Secure Browsers
The mobile secure browser uses either the device’s native voice pack or a voice pack embedded
in the secure browser. Additional voice packs downloaded to a mobile device are not
43
Technical Specifications Manual
Text-to-Speech Requirements
recognized by the mobile secure browser. Table 7 lists the voice packs used by mobile versions
of the secured browser.
Table 7. Voice Packs on Mobile Versions of the Secure Browser
Platform
Voice Pack Used by Secure Browser
iOS 7.0–10.x
Native iOS voice pack.
Android
Native Android voice pack.
Chrome OS
Native Chromebook voice pack.
About NeoSpeech Voice Packs for Windows
Pursuant to an agreement between NeoSpeech and the American Institutes for Research (AIR),
authorized users may download and install specific licensed NeoSpeech voice packs for use on
supported Windows computers (Windows Vista, 7, 8.0, 8.1, 10, and 11).
These voice packs can be used instead of the default Windows voice packs for English and the
commercial Spanish voice packs from Cepstral. (The default Windows voice packs as well as the
Cepstral voice packs for Windows may still be used for text-to-speech, if desired.)
•
The Julie voice pack is for English text-to-speech users.
•
The Violeta voice pack is for Spanish text-to-speech users.
The NeoSpeech voice pack is to be used only in conjunction with, and not separate from, the
online assessments provided by AIR’s Test Delivery System.
The NeoSpeech voice packs can be downloaded from TIDE. Installation instructions are also
available in TIDE.
44
Technical Specifications Manual
Text-to-Speech Requirements
Configuring Windows Text-to-Speech Settings
This section explains how to configure Windows for using text-to-speech with the secure
browser. The text-to-speech feature is available on Windows versions as listed in the System
Requirements document.
The instructions in this section are for Windows 7. The process is similar for other versions of
Windows.
1. Open the Control Panel window, and
select Speech Recognition.
2. In the Speech Recognition window, select
Text to Speech.
3. Configure default text-to-speech
preferences.
a. Voice selection: If multiple voice packs
are available, select the default voice.
b. Select Preview Voice to see whether
the selected voice requires a rate
adjustment.
c. Voice speed: If necessary, adjust the
voice speed. Drag the slider to make
the voice speak slower or faster. To
listen to the rate, select Audio Output.
d. When you are done, click OK to save
your settings and then close the
Speech Properties window.
45
Technical Specifications Manual
Text-to-Speech Requirements
Configuring OS X Text-to-Speech Settings
This section explains how to configure Mac OS X for using text-to-speech with the secure
browser. The text-to-speech feature is available on OS X versions as listed in the System
Requirements document.
The instructions in this section are for OS X 10.9. The process is similar for other versions of
OS X.
1. Open System Preferences, and select
Dictation & Speech.
2. In the Text to Speech section, configure
your default text-to-speech preferences.
o System Voice: If multiple voice packs
are available, select the default voice.
o Select Play to see whether the selected
voice requires a rate adjustment.
o Speaking Rate: If necessary, adjust the
voice speed. Drag the slider to make
the voice speak slower or faster. To
listen to the rate, select Play.
o When you are done, click the red X in
the upper left corner to save your
settings and close the Speech window.
46
Technical Specifications Manual
Text-to-Speech Requirements
Text-to-Speech and Mobile Devices
Text-to-speech (TTS) includes a feature that allows students to pause and then resume TTS in
the middle of a passage. The pause feature does not work on mobile devices. Consequently,
consider testing students who require TTS on desktop or laptop computers.
Voice Packs Recognized by Desktop Secure Browsers
The tables in this section display the voice packs for Windows and OS X that are currently
recognized by the secure browser.
Voice Packs for Windows
Table 8. Voice Packs Recognized by Secure Browsers—Windows
Vendor
Voice Pack
Language
Windows (pre-installed)
Julie
English
Windows (pre-installed)
Kate
English
Windows (pre-installed)
Michael
English
Windows (pre-installed)
Michelle
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MSAnna
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MS_EN-GB_HAZEL
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MS_EN-US_DAVID
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MS_EN-US_ZIRA
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MSMary
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MSMike
English
Windows (pre-installed)
MSSam
English
Windows (pre-installed)
Paul
English
Windows (pre-installed)
Violeta
Spanish
Cepstral (commercial)
Cepstral_David
English
Cepstral (commercial)
Cepstral_Marta
Spanish
Cepstral (commercial)
Cepstral_Miguel
Spanish
NeoSpeech (commercial)
VW Julie
English
NeoSpeech (commercial)
VW Violeta
Spanish
47
Technical Specifications Manual
Text-to-Speech Requirements
Voice Packs for OS X
Table 9. Voice Packs Recognized by Secure Browsers—OS X
Vendor
Voice Pack
Language
Mac (pre-installed)
Agnes
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Alex
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Bruce
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Callie
English
Mac (pre-installed)
David
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Fred
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Jill
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Junior
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Kathy
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Princess
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Ralph
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Samantha
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Tom
Spanish
Mac (pre-installed)
Vicki
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Victoria
English
Mac (pre-installed)
Diego
Spanish
Mac (pre-installed)
Javier
Spanish
Mac (pre-installed)
Marta
Spanish
Mac (pre-installed)
Monica
Spanish
Mac (pre-installed)
Paulina
Spanish
Infovox (commercial)
Heather Infovox iVox HQ
English
Infovox (commercial)
Rosa Infovox iVox HQ
Spanish
48
Technical Specifications Manual
URLs Provided by AIR
Appendix A. URLs Provided by AIR
This appendix presents information about the URLs that AIR provides. Ensure your network’s
firewalls are open for these URLs.
URLs for Non-Testing Sites
Table 10 lists URLs for non-testing sites, such as Test Information Distribution Engine, Online
Reporting System, and Learning Point Navigator.
Table 10. AIR URLs for Non-Testing Sites
System
URL
Portal and secure browser installation files
Idaho.portal.airast.org
Single Sign On System
maac.sso.airast.org
Test Information Distribution Engine
maac.tide.airast.org
Test Delivery System – Student Interface
id.tds.airast.org/student
Online Reporting System
id.reports.airast.org
Teacher Hand-Scoring System
id.tss.airast.org
URLs for Testing Sites
Testing sites provide test items as well as support services such as dictionaries and thesauruses.
TA and Student Testing Sites
Testing servers and satellites may be added or modified during the school year to ensure an
optimal testing experience. As a result, AIR strongly encourages you to whitelist at the root
level. This requires using a wildcard.
Table 11. AIR URLs for Testing Sites
System
URL
TA and Student Testing Sites
*.airast.org
Assessment Viewing Application
*.tds.airast.org
*.cloud1.tds.airast.org
*.cloud2.tds.airast.org
49
Technical Specifications Manual
URLs Provided by AIR
Online Dictionary and Thesaurus
Some online assessments contain an embedded dictionary and thesaurus provided by MerriamWebster. The Merriam-Webster URLs listed in Table 12 should also be whitelisted to ensure
that students can use them during testing.
Table 12. AIR URLs for Online Dictionaries and Thesauruses
Domain Name
IP Address
media.merriam-webster.com
64.124.231.250
www.dictionaryapi.com
64.124.231.250
50
Technical Specifications Manual
Technology Coordinator Checklist
Appendix B. Technology Coordinator Checklist
This checklist can be printed out referred to during review of networks and computers used for
testing.
Activity
Estimated Time
to Complete
Target Completion
Date
Reference
Verify that all of your school’s
devices that will be used for
online testing meet the
operating system
requirements.
5–10 hours
3–4 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
System
Requirements
Verify that your school’s
network and Internet are
properly configured for testing,
conduct network diagnostics,
and resolve any issues.
5–10 hours
3–4 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Network
Configuration and
Testing
Install the secure browser on
all devices that will be used for
testing.
5–10 hours
3–4 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Secure Browser
Installation Manual
Enable pop-up windows and
review software requirements
for each operating system.
5–10 hours
1–2 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Software
Configuration
On Windows computers,
disable Fast User Switching.
5–10 hours
1–2 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Disabling Fast User
Switching
On Mac 10.7–10.12, disable
Spaces in Mission Control.
5–10 hours
1–2 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Disabling Exposé or
Spaces
Install any required text-tospeech software on devices
that will be used for testing
and verify that installation.
5–10 hours
1–2 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Text-to-Speech
Requirements
On iPads, ensure that Guided
Access or ASAM is enabled
and that TAs know how to
activate Guided Access.
5–10 hours
1–2 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Configuring for
Guided Access
On Android tablets, ensure
that the secure browser
keyboard is enabled.
5–10 hours
1–2 weeks before
testing begins in
your school
Enabling the
Secure Browser
Keyboard
If a student can access
multiple user accounts on a
single computer, you are
encouraged to disable the
Fast User Switching function.
51
Technical Specifications Manual
Scheduling Online Testing
Appendix C. Scheduling Online Testing
Number of Computers and Hours Required to Complete Online
Tests
We recommend that schools arrange their computer resources to accommodate the number of
students who will be testing at the same time for ease of test administration. The Sample Test
Scheduling Worksheet below shows how to estimate the number of testing hours needed to
administer one testing opportunity.
Note: This worksheet may need to be modified based on your network setup. You may want to
work with your Test Administrator to adapt this worksheet as necessary so that you do not risk
overloading your wired or wireless network.
Sample Test Scheduling Worksheet
For each school, enter the following for each online test:
Number of computers available for testing at once:
Number of students who need to take the test:
Number of Test Administrators who need a computer:
Estimated number of hours needed per student to complete the test. This
estimate should include approximately 15 minutes for students to get set up
and logged in as well as the average estimated time to complete the test.
Number of hours that must be scheduled to administer the test:
(students + TAs) x hours ÷ computers =
Example:
•
School A has a total of 60 student computers available for testing at once.
•
120 students in grade 5 will need to take the Math assessment.
•
Number of hours needed to administer test: 120 students x 1 hour per student ÷ 60
computers = 2 hours (plus 15 minutes for setup).
52
Technical Specifications Manual
User Support
Appendix D. User Support
If this document does not answer your questions, please contact the ISAT Help Desk.
The Help Desk will be open Monday–Friday from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Mountain Time (except
holidays).
Idaho Help Desk
Toll-Free Phone Support: 1-844-560-7365
Email Support: IDHelpDesk@air.org
If you contact the Help Desk, you will be asked to provide as much detail as possible about the
issues you encountered.
Include the following information:
•
Test Administrator name and IT/network contact person and contact information
•
EDUIDs of affected students
•
Results ID for the affected student tests
•
Operating system and browser version information
•
Any error messages and codes that appeared, if applicable
•
Information about your network configuration:
o Secure browser installation (to individual machines or network)
o Wired or wireless Internet network setup
53
Technical Specifications Manual
Change Log
Appendix E. Change Log
Location
Change
Date
Throughout the document
Cut over from 2015-2016
8/4/2016
Configuring ZoomText to Recognize the
Secure Browser
Improved motivation for using ZoomText
8/17/2016
Configuring for Certificate Revocations
Updated link of OCSP IP address
3/7/2017
54
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising