RS-422 and RS-485 Application Note

RS-422 and RS-485 Application Note
RS-422 and RS-485
Application Note
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 Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
RS-422/485 Application Note
Cover Page
© Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
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Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1: OVERVIEW................................................................................1
INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................1
DATA TRANSMISSION SIGNALS..........................................................................1
Unbalanced Line Drivers .............................................................................1
Balanced Line Drivers..................................................................................1
Balanced Line Receivers ..............................................................................3
EIA STANDARD RS-422 DATA TRANSMISSION .................................................3
EIA STANDARD RS-485 DATA TRANSMISSION .................................................6
TRISTATE CONTROL OF AN RS-485 DEVICE USING RTS....................................9
SEND DATA CONTROL OF AN RS-485 DEVICE.................................................11
CHAPTER 2: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION ...............................................13
NETWORK TOPOLOGIES ...................................................................................13
TWO WIRE OR FOUR WIRE SYSTEMS ..............................................................13
TERMINATION .................................................................................................16
BIASING AN RS-485 NETWORK .......................................................................17
EXTENDING THE SPECIFICATION ......................................................................19
CHAPTER 3: SELECTING RS-422 AND RS-485 CABLING ....................20
NUMBER OF CONDUCTORS ..............................................................................20
SHIELDING.......................................................................................................20
CABLE CHARACTERISTICS ...............................................................................20
CHAPTER 4: TRANSIENT PROTECTION OF RS-422 AND RS-485
SYSTEMS .........................................................................................................23
WHAT DOES A SURGE LOOK LIKE? ...................................................................23
Surge Specifications ...................................................................................23
Common Mode vs. Differential Mode ........................................................25
GROUND ≠ GROUND........................................................................................26
TRANSIENT PROTECTION USING ISOLATION .....................................................27
Isolation Theory .........................................................................................27
Isolation Devices ........................................................................................28
TRANSIENT PROTECTION USING SHUNTING .....................................................28
Shunting Theory .........................................................................................28
Connecting Signal Grounds .......................................................................29
Shunting Devices ........................................................................................29
COMBINING ISOLATION AND SHUNTING ..........................................................29
SPECIAL CONSIDERATION FOR FAULT CONDITIONS .........................................31
CHOOSING THE RIGHT PROTECTION FOR YOUR SYSTEM ...................................31
RS-422/485 Application Note
Table of Contents
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i
CHAPTER 5: SOFTWARE ...........................................................................33
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................33
RS-422 SYSTEMS ............................................................................................33
RS-485 DRIVER CONTROL ..............................................................................33
RS-485 RECEIVER CONTROL ..........................................................................34
MASTER-SLAVE SYSTEMS ...............................................................................34
Four Wire Master-Slave Systems ...............................................................34
Two Wire Master-Slave Systems.................................................................34
MULTI-MASTER RS-485 SYSTEMS ..................................................................35
SYSTEMS WITH PORT POWERED CONVERTERS ................................................35
CHAPTER 6: SELECTING RS-485 DEVICES ...........................................36
CHAPTER 7: SOURCES OF FURTHER INFORMATION......................38
APPENDIX A: EIA SPECIFICATION SUMMARY ..................................39
APPENDIX B: EIA STANDARD RS-423 DATA TRANSMISSION .........41
ii
Table of Contents
RS-422/485 Application Note
© Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
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Chapter 1: Overview
Introduction
The purpose of this application note is to describe the main elements of an
RS-422 and RS-485 system. This application note attempts to cover enough
technical details so that the system designer will have considered all the
important aspects in his data system design. Since both RS-422 and RS-485
are data transmission systems that use balanced differential signals, it is
appropriate to discuss both systems in the same application note. Throughout
this application note the generic terms of RS-422 and RS-485 will be used to
represent the EIA/TIA-422 and EIA/TIA-485 Standards.
Data Transmission Signals
Unbalanced Line Drivers
Each signal that transmits in an RS-232 unbalanced data transmission
system appears on the interface connector as a voltage with reference to a signal
ground. For example, the transmitted data (TD) from a DTE device appears on
pin 2 with respect to pin 7 (signal ground) on a DB-25 connector. This voltage
will be negative if the line is idle and alternate between that negative level and a
positive level when data is sent with a magnitude of ±5 to ±15 volts. The RS232 receiver typically operates within the voltage range of +3 to +12 and -3 to
-12 volts as shown in Figure 1.1.
Balanced Line Drivers
In a balanced differential system the voltage produced by the driver
appears across a pair of signal lines that transmit only one signal. Figure 1.2
shows a schematic symbol for a balanced line driver and the voltages that
exist. A balanced line driver will produce a voltage from 2 to 6 volts across its
A and B output terminals and will have a signal ground (C) connection.
Although proper connection to the signal ground is important, it isn't used by a
balanced line receiver in determining the logic state of the data line. A
balanced line driver can also have an input signal called an “Enable” signal.
The purpose of this signal is to connect the driver to its output terminals, A
and B. If the “Enable” signal is OFF, one can consider the driver as
disconnected from the transmission line. An RS-485 driver must have the
“Enable” control signal. An RS-422 driver may have this signal, but it is not
always required. The disconnected or "disabled" condition of the line driver
usually is referred to as the “tristate1” condition of the driver.
1
The term “tristate” comes from the fact that there is a third output state of an
RS-485 driver, in addition to the output states of “1” and “0.”
RS-422/485 Application Note
1
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Figure 1.1
Figure 1.2
2
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Balanced Line Receivers
A balanced differential line receiver senses the voltage state of the
transmission line across two signal input lines, A and B. It will also have a
signal ground (C) that is necessary in making the proper interface connection.
Figure 1.3 is a schematic symbol for a balanced differential line receiver.
Figure 1.3 also shows the voltages that are important to the balanced line
receiver. If the differential input voltage Vab is greater than +200 mV the
receiver will have a specific logic state on its output terminal. If the input
voltage is reversed to less than -200 mV the receiver will create the opposite
logic state on its output terminal. The input voltages that a balanced line
receiver must sense are shown in Figure 1.3. The 200 mV to 6 V range is
required to allow for attenuation on the transmission line.
EIA Standard RS-422 Data Transmission
The EIA Standard RS-422-A entitled “Electrical Characteristics of
Balanced Voltage Digital Interface Circuits” defines the characteristics of RS422 interface circuits. Figure 1.4 is a typical RS-422 four-wire interface.
Notice that five conductors are used. Each generator or driver can drive up to
ten (10) receivers. The two signaling states of the line are defined as follows:
a. When the “A” terminal of the driver is negative with respect to the “B”
terminal, the line is in a binary 1 (MARK or OFF) state.
b. When the “A” terminal of the driver is positive with respect to the “B”
terminal, the line is in a binary 0 (SPACE or ON) state.
Figure 1.5 shows the condition of the voltage of the balanced line for an
RS-232 to RS-422 converter when the line is in the “idle” condition or OFF
state. It also shows the relationship of the “A” and “B” terminals of an RS422 system and the “-“ and “+” terminal markings used on many types of
equipment. The “A” terminal is equivalent to the “-“ designation, and the “B”
terminal equivalent to the “+” designation. The same relationship shown in
Figure 1.5 also applies for RS-485 systems. RS-422 can withstand a common
mode voltage (Vcm) of ±7 volts. Common mode voltage is defined as the
mean voltage of A and B terminals with respect to signal ground.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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3
Figure 1.3
Figure 1.4
4
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Figure 1.5
RS-422/485 Application Note
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5
EIA Standard RS-485 Data Transmission
The RS-485 Standard permits a balanced transmission line to be shared in
a party line or multidrop mode. As many as 32 driver/receiver pairs can share
a multidrop network. Many characteristics of the drivers and receivers are the
same as RS-422. The range of the common mode voltage Vcm that the driver
and receiver can tolerate is expanded to +12 to -7 volts. Since the driver can
be disconnected or tristated from the line, it must withstand this common mode
voltage range while in the tristate condition. Some RS-422 drivers, even with
tristate capability, will not withstand the full Vcm voltage range of +12 to -7
volts.
Figure 1.6 shows a typical two-wire multidrop network. Note that the
transmission line is terminated on both ends of the line but not at drop points
in the middle of the line. Termination should only be used with high data rates
and long wiring runs. A detailed discussion of termination can be found in
Chapter 2 of this application note. The signal ground line is also
recommended in an RS-485 system to keep the common mode voltage that the
receiver must accept within the -7 to +12 volt range. Further discussion of
grounding can be found in Chapter 3 of this application note.
6
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Figure 1.6
RS-422/485 Application Note
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7
Figure 1.7
8
RS-422/485 Application Note
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An RS-485 network can also be connected in a four-wire mode as shown
in Figure 1.7. Note that four data wires and an additional signal ground wire
are used in a “four-wire” connection. In a four-wire network it is necessary
that one node be a master node and all others be slaves. The network is
connected so that the master node communicates to all slave nodes. All slave
nodes communicate only with the master node. This network has some
advantages with equipment with mixed protocol communications. Since the
slave nodes never listen to another slave response to the master, a slave node
cannot reply incorrectly to another slave node.
Tristate Control of an RS-485 Device using RTS
As discussed previously, an RS-485 system must have a driver that can be
disconnected from the transmission line when a particular node is not
transmitting. In an RS-232 to RS-485 converter or an RS-485 serial card, this
may be implemented using the RTS control signal from an asynchronous serial
port to enable the RS-485 driver. The RTS line is connected to the RS-485
driver enable such that setting the RTS line to a high (logic 1) state enables the
RS-485 driver. Setting the RTS line low (logic 0) puts the driver into the
tristate condition. This in effect disconnects the driver from the bus, allowing
other nodes to transmit over the same wire pair. Figure 1.8 shows a timing
diagram for a typical RS-232 to RS-485 converter. The waveforms show what
happens if the VRTS waveform is narrower than the data VSD. This is not the
normal situation, but is shown here to illustrate the loss of a portion of the data
waveform. When RTS control is used, it is important to be certain that RTS is
set high before data is sent. Also, the RTS line must then be set low after the
last data bit is sent. This timing is done by the software used to control the
serial port and not by the converter.
When an RS-485 network is connected in a two-wire multidrop party line
mode, the receiver at each node will be connected to the line (see Figure 1.6).
The receiver can often be configured to receive an echo of its own data
transmission. This is desirable in some systems, and troublesome in others.
Be sure to check the data sheet for your converter to determine how the
receiver “enable” function is connected.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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9
Figure 1.8
10
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Send Data Control of an RS-485 Device
Many of B&B Electronics’ RS-232 to RS-485 converters and RS-485
serial cards include special circuitry, which is triggered from the data signal to
enable the RS-485 driver. Figure 1.9 is a timing diagram of the important
signals used to control a converter of this type. It is important to note that the
transmit data line is “disabled” at a fixed interval after the last bit, typically
one character length. If this interval is too short, you can miss parts of each
character being sent. If this time is too long, your system may try to turn the
data line around from transmit to receive before the node (with the Send Data
converter) is ready to receive data. If the latter is the case, you will miss
portions (or complete characters) at the beginning of a response.
RS-422/485 Application Note
11
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Figure 1.9
12
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Chapter 2: System Configuration
Network Topologies
Network configuration isn’t defined in the RS-422 or RS-485 specification.
In most cases the designer can use a configuration that best fits the physical
requirements of the system.
Two Wire or Four Wire Systems
RS-422 systems require a dedicated pair of wires for each signal, a
transmit pair, a receive pair and an additional pair for each handshake/control
signal used (if required). The tristate capabilities of RS-485 allow a single
pair of wires to share transmit and receive signals for half-duplex
communications. This “two wire” configuration (note that an additional
ground conductor should be used) reduces cabling cost. RS-485 devices may
be internally or externally configured for two wire systems. Internally
configured RS-485 devices simply provide A and B connections (sometimes
labeled “-“ and “+”).
Devices configured for four wire communications bring out A and B
connections for both the transmit and the receive pairs. The user can connect
the transmit lines to the receive lines to create a two wire configuration. The
latter type device provides the system designer with the most configuration
flexibility. Note that the signal ground line should also be connected in the
system. This connection is necessary to keep the Vcm common mode voltage
at the receiver within a safe range. The interface circuit may operate without
the signal ground connection, but may sacrifice reliability and noise immunity.
Figures 2.1 and 2.2 illustrate connections of two and four wire systems.
RS-422/485 Application Note
13
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Figure 2.1 Typical RS-485 Four Wire Multidrop Configuration
14
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Figure 2.2 Typical RS-485 Two Wire Multidrop Network
RS-422/485 Application Note
15
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Termination
Termination is used to match impedance of a node to the impedance of the
transmission line being used. When impedance are mismatched, the transmitted
signal is not completely absorbed by the load and a portion is reflected back into
the transmission line. If the source, transmission line and load impedance are
equal these reflections are eliminated. There are disadvantages of termination as
well. Termination increases load on the drivers, increases installation
complexity, changes biasing requirements and makes system modification more
difficult.
The decision whether or not to use termination should be based on the cable
length and data rate used by the system. A good rule of thumb is if the
propagation delay of the data line is much less than one bit width, termination is
not needed. This rule makes the assumption that reflections will damp out in
several trips up and down the data line. Since the receiving UART will sample
the data in the middle of the bit, it is important that the signal level be solid at
that point. For example, in a system with 2000 feet of data line the propagation
delay can be calculated by multiplying the cable length by the propagation
velocity of the cable. This value, typically 66 to 75% of the speed of light (c), is
specified by the cable manufacture.
For our example, a round trip covers 4000 feet of cable. Using a
propagation velocity of 0.66 × c, one round trip is completed in approximately
6.2 µs. If we assume the reflections will damp out in three “round trips” up and
down the cable length, the signal will stabilize 18.6 µs after the leading edge of a
bit. At 9600 baud one bit is 104 µs wide. Since the reflections are damped out
much before the center of the bit, termination is not required.
There are several methods of terminating data lines. The method
recommended by B&B is parallel termination. A resistor is added in parallel
with the receiver’s “A” and “B” lines in order to match the data line
characteristic impedance specified by the cable manufacture (120 Ω is a
common value). This value describes the intrinsic impedance of the
transmission line and is not a function of the line length. A terminating resistor
of less than 90 Ω should not be used. Termination resistors should be placed
only at the extreme ends of the data line, and no more than two terminations
should be placed in any system that does not use repeaters. This type of
termination clearly adds heavy DC loading to a system and may overload port
powered RS-232 to RS-485 converters. Another type of termination, AC
coupled termination, adds a small capacitor in series with the termination resistor
to eliminate the DC loading effect. Although this method eliminates DC loading,
capacitor selection is highly dependent on the system properties. System
16
RS-422/485 Application Note
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designers interested in AC termination are encouraged to read National
Semiconductors Application Note 9032 for further information. Figure 2.3
illustrates both parallel and AC termination on an RS-485 two-wire node. In
four-wire systems, the termination is placed across the receiver of the node.
Figure 2.3 Parallel and AC Termination
Biasing an RS-485 Network
When an RS-485 network is in an idle state, all nodes are in listen
(receive) mode. Under this condition there are no active drivers on the
network. All drivers are tristated. Without anything driving the network, the
state of the line is unknown. If the voltage level at the receiver’s A and B
inputs is less than ±200 mV the logic level at the output of the receivers will
be the value of the last bit received. In order to maintain the proper idle
voltage state, bias resistors must be applied to force the data lines to the idle
condition. Bias resistors are nothing more than a pullup resistor on the data B
line (typically to 5 volts) and a pulldown (to ground) on the data A line.
Figure 2.4 illustrates the placement of bias resistors on a transceiver in a twowire configuration. Note that in an RS-485 four-wire configuration, the bias
resistors should be placed on the receiver lines. The value of the bias resistors
is dependent on termination and number of nodes in the system. The goal is to
generate enough DC bias current in the network to maintain a minimum of 200
mV between the B and A data line. Consider the following two examples of
bias resistor calculation.
2
Refer to Chapter 7 for information on National Semiconductors Application
Notes.
RS-422/485 Application Note
17
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Bias Resistor
Bias Resistor
Figure 2.4 Transceiver with Bias Resistors
Example 1. 10 node, RS-485 network with two 120 Ω termination
resistors
Each RS-485 node has a load impedance of 12KΩ. 10 nodes in parallel
give a load of 1200 Ω. Additionally, the two 120 Ω termination resistors
result in another 60 Ω load, for a total load of 57 Ω. Clearly the termination
resistors are responsible for a majority of the loading. In order to maintain at
least 200mV between the B and A line, we need a bias current of 3.5 mA to
flow through the load. To create this bias from a 5V supply a total series
resistance of 1428 Ω or less is required. Subtract the 57 Ω that is already a
part of the load, and we are left with 1371 Ω. Placing half of this value as a
pullup to 5V and half as a pulldown to ground gives a maximum bias resistor
value of 685Ω for each of the two biasing resistors.
18
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Example 2. 32 node, RS-485 network without termination
Each RS-485 node has a load impedance of 12KΩ. 32 nodes in parallel
give a total load of 375 Ω. In order to maintain at least 200 mV across 375Ω
we need a current of 0.53 mA. To generate this current from a 5V supply
requires a total resistance of 9375Ω maximum. Since 375 Ω of this total is in
the receiver load, our bias resistors must add to 9KΩ or less. Notice that very
little bias current is required in systems without termination.
Bias resistors can be placed anywhere in the network or can be split
among multiple nodes. The parallel combination of all bias resistors in a
system must be equal to or less than the calculated biasing requirements. B&B
Electronics uses 4.7KΩ bias resistors in all RS-485 products. This value is
adequate for most systems without termination. The system designer should
always calculate the biasing requirements of the network. Symptoms of under
biasing range from decreased noise immunity to complete data failure. Over
biasing has less effect on a system, the primary result is increased load on the
drivers. Systems using port powered RS-232 to RS-485 converters can be
sensitive to over biasing.
Extending the Specification
Some systems require longer distances or higher numbers of nodes than
supported by RS-422 or RS-485. Repeaters are commonly used to overcome
these barriers. An RS-485 repeater such as B&B Electronics’ 485OP can be
placed in a system to divide the load into multiple segments. Each “refreshed”
signal is capable of driving another 4000 feet of cable and an additional 31 RS485 loads.
Another method of increasing the number of RS-485 nodes is to use
low load type RS-485 receivers. These receivers use a higher input impedance
to reduce the load on the RS-485 drivers to increase the total number of nodes.
There are currently half and quarter load integrated circuit receivers available,
extending the total allowable number of nodes to 64 and 128.
RS-422/485 Application Note
19
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Chapter 3: Selecting RS-422 and RS-485 Cabling
Cable selection for RS-422 and RS-485 systems is often neglected.
Attention to a few details in the selection process can prevent the costly
prospect of re-pulling thousands of feet of cable.
Number of Conductors
The signal ground conductor is often overlooked when ordering cable. An
extra twisted pair must be specified to have enough conductors to run a signal
ground. A two-wire system then requires two twisted pair, and a four-wire
system requires three twisted pair.
Shielding
It is often hard to quantify if shielded cable is required in an application or
not. Since the added cost of shielded cable is usually minimal it is worth
installing the first time.
Cable Characteristics
When choosing a transmission line for RS-422 or RS-485, it is necessary
to examine the required distance of the cable and the data rate of the system.
The Appendix to EIA RS-422-A Standard presents an empirical curve that
relates Cable Length to Data Rate for 24 AWG twisted-pair telephone cable
that has a shunt capacitance of 16 pF/ft. and is terminated in 100 ohms (see
Figure 3.1). This curve is based on signal quality requirements of:
a). Signal rise and fall time equal to, or less than, one-half unit interval at
the applicable modulation rate.
b). The maximum voltage loss between driver and load of 6 dB.
20
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Figure 3.1
Losses in a transmission line are a combination of AC losses (skin effect),
DC conductor loss, leakage, and AC losses in the dielectric. In high quality
cable, the conductor losses and the dielectric losses are on the same order of
magnitude. Figure 3.2 is included in this application note to point out the
significant difference in performance of different cables. This chart shows
Attenuation versus Frequency for three different Belden cables. Note that the
polyethylene cables offer much lower attenuation than PVC cables.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Figure 3.2
Another approach to choosing transmission line is the “E-GRADE
Program,” which has been established by Anixter Bros. Inc. Anixter is a
worldwide distributor of wiring system products. Under this program, Anixter
divides data interface cables into four categories as follows:
E-GRADE 1
E-GRADE 2
E-GRADE 3
E-GRADE 4
LIMITED DISTANCE
STANDARD DISTANCE
EXTENDED DISTANCE
MAXIMUM DISTANCE
Simple charts are used to help the user select the proper cable without any
technical understanding of the cable parameters. This program divides the
usage categories into EIA-232-D, EIA-422-A, and EIA-423-A. When using
this literature, use the EIA-422-A charts for choosing RS-485 cable.
22
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Chapter 4: Transient Protection of RS-422 and RS-485
Systems
The first step towards protecting an RS-422 or RS-485 system from
transients is understanding the nature of the energy we are guarding against.
Transient energy may come from several sources, most typically environmental
conditions or induced by switching heavy inductive loads.
What does a surge look like?
Surge Specifications
While transients may not always conform to industry specifications, both the
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the International
Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) have developed transient models for use in
evaluating electrical and electronic equipment for immunity to surges. These
models can offer some insight into the types of energy that must be controlled to
prevent system damage.
Both IEC 1000-4-5: 1995 “Surge Immunity Test” and IEEE C62.41-1991
“IEEE Recommended Practice on Surge Voltages in Low-Voltage AC Power
Circuits” define a “1.2/50µs - 8/20µs combination wave” surge which has a 1.2
µs voltage rise time with a 50 µs decay across an open circuit. The specified
current waveform has an 8 µs rise time with a 20 µs decay into a short circuit.
Open circuit voltages levels from 1 to 6 kV are commonly used in both the
positive and negative polarities, although, under some circumstances, voltages as
high as 20 kV may be applied. Figures 4.1 and 4.2 illustrate the combination
wave characteristics. In addition, IEEE C62.41 also specifies a 100 kHz “ring
wave” test. The ring wave has a 0.5 µs rise time and a decaying oscillation at
100 kHz with source impedance of 12Ω as shown in Figure 4.3. Typical
amplitudes for the 100 kHz ring wave also range from 1 – 6 kV.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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1.2/50 uSecond Voltage Wave
1
0.9
0.8
0.7
V(t) / Vp
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0
0
20
40
60
80
100
Time, us
Figure 4.1 Combination Wave Voltage Waveform
8/20 uSecond Current Wave
1
0.8
V(t)/Vp
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
Time, us
Figure 4.2 Combination Wave Current Waveform
24
RS-422/485 Application Note
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100kHz Ring Wave
1
0.8
0.6
V(t)/Vp
0.4
0.2
0
-0.2
-0.4
-0.6
-0.8
0
5
10
15
Time, us
20
25
30
Figure 4.3 100 kHz Ring Wave
Common Mode vs. Differential Mode
Identifying the type of surges that may threaten a system is an important part
of selecting the appropriate levels and methods of transient protection. Since
each of the conductors in a data cable travels through the same physical space, it
is reasonable to expect transients caused by environmental or current switching
to be “common mode” that is, present on all data and ground conductors within
the data cable. In some installations, there may be another source of unwanted
energy to consider. If there are high voltage cables running anywhere near the
data cables, the potential for a fault condition exists as a result of insulation
failures or inadvertent contact by an installer. This type of surge could contact
any number of conductors in the data cable, presenting a “differential” surge to
the data equipment. Although the voltages and currents associated with this type
surge are much lower than the types of surges modeled by ANSI or IEC, they
have a particularly destructive quality of their own. Instead of dissipating within
several milliseconds, they can exist in a steady state condition on the data
network.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Ground ≠ Ground
Realizing that transient energy can be high frequency in nature leads to
some disturbing observations. At frequencies of this magnitude, it is difficult to
make a low impedance electrical connection between two points due to the
inductance of the path between them. Whether that path is several feet of cable
or thousands of feet of earth between grounding systems, during a transient event
there can be hundreds or thousands of volts potential between different
“grounds”. We can no longer assume that two points connected by a wire will
be at the same voltage potential. To the system designer this means that
although RS-422/485 uses 5V differential signaling, a remote node may see the
5V signal superimposed on a transient of hundreds or thousands of volts with
respect to that nodes local ground. It is more intuitive to refer to what is
commonly called “signal ground” as a “signal reference”.
How do we connect system nodes knowing that these large potential
differences between grounds may exist? The first step towards successful
protection is to assure that each device in the system is referenced to only one
ground, eliminating the path through the device for surge currents searching for a
return. There are two approaches to creating this idyllic ground state. The first
approach is to isolate the data ground from the host device ground, this is
typically done with transformers or optical isolators as shown is Figure 4.4. The
second approach is to tie each of the grounds on a device together (typically
power ground and data ground) with a low impedance connection as shown in
Figure 4.5. These two techniques lead us to the two basic methods of transient
protection.
Device
Vcc
Isolated Power
Port
Data Lines Out
Optical
Isolation
Figure 4.4 Isolated RS-485 Device
26
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Vcc
Port
Device
Data Lines
Ground line
Local Chassis Ground Connection
Figure 4.5 RS-485 Device with Signal Ground
Connected to Chassis Ground
Transient Protection using Isolation
Isolation Theory
The most universal approach to protecting against transients is to
galvanically isolate the data port from the host device circuitry. This method
separates the signal reference from any fixed ground. Optical isolators,
transformers and fiber optics are all methods commonly used in many types of
data networks to isolate I/O circuitry from its host device. In RS-422 and RS485 applications, optical isolators are most common. An optical isolator is an
integrated circuit that converts the electrical signal to light and back, eliminating
electrical continuity. With an isolated port, the entire isolated circuitry floats to
the level of the transient without disrupting data communications. As long as the
floating level of the circuitry does not exceed the breakdown rating of the
isolators (typically 1000 - 2500 volts) the port will not be damaged. This type of
protection does not attempt to absorb or shunt excess energy so it is not sensitive
to the length of the transient. Even continuous potential differences will not
harm isolated devices. It is important to note that isolators work on common
mode transients, they cannot protect against large voltage differences between
conductors of a data cable such as those caused by short circuits between data
and power circuits.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Isolation Devices
Optical isolation can be implemented in a number of ways. If a conversion
from RS-232 to RS-422 or RS-485 is being made, optically isolated converters
are available. Optically isolated ISA bus serial cards can replace existing ports
in PC systems. For systems with existing RS-422 or RS-485 ports, an optically
isolated repeater can be installed. Examples of each of these type devices can be
found in the B&B Electronics Data Communications catalog.
Transient Protection using Shunting
Shunting Theory
Creating one common ground at the host device provides a safe place to
divert surge energy as well as a voltage reference to attach surge suppression
devices to. Shunting harmful currents to ground before they reach the data port
is the job of components such as TVS (often referred to by the trade name
Tranzorb), MOV or gas discharge tubes. These devices all work by “clamping”
at a set voltage, once the clamp voltage has been exceeded, the devices provide a
low impedance connection between terminals.
Since this type of device diverts a large amount of energy, it cannot tolerate
very long duration or continuous transients. Shunting devices are most often
installed from each data line to the local earth ground, and should be selected to
begin conducting current at a voltage as close as possible above the systems
normal communications levels. For RS-422 and RS-485 systems, the voltage
rating selected is typically 6 - 8 volts. These devices typically add some
capacitive load to the data lines. This should be considered when designing a
system and can be compensated for by derating the total line length to
compensate for the added load. Several hundred feet is usually adequate.
To apply these type products correctly they should be installed as close to
the port to be protected as possible, and the user must provide an extremely low
impedance connection to the local earth ground of the unit being protected. This
ground connection is crucial to proper operation of the shunting device. The
ground connection should be made with heavy gauge wire and kept as short as
possible. If the cable must be longer than one meter, copper strap or braided
cable intended for grounding purposes must be used for the protection device to
be effective. In addition to the high frequency nature of transients, there can be
an enormous amount of current present. Several thousand amps typically result
from applications of the combination wave test in the ANSI and IEC
specification.
28
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Connecting Signal Grounds
Since a local ground connection is required at each node implementing
shunt type protection, the consequences of connecting remote grounds together
must be considered. During transient events a high voltage potential may exist
between the remote grounds. Only the impedance in the wire connecting the
grounds limits the current that results from this voltage potential. The RS-422
and RS-485 specification both recommend using 100 ohm resistors in series with
the signal ground path in order to limit ground currents. Figure 4.6 illustrates the
ground connection recommended in the specification.
Figure 4.6 Signal Ground Connection between two nodes
with 100 ohm resistor
Shunting Devices
There are two types of shunting devices to choose from. The least
expensive type is single stage, which usually consists of a single TVS device on
each line. Three stage devices are also available. The first stage of a three-stage
device is a gas discharge tube, which can handle extremely high currents, but has
a high threshold voltage and is too slow to protect solid state circuits. The
second stage is a small series impedance which limits current and creates a
voltage drop between the first and third stage. The final stage is a TVS device
that is fast enough to protect solid state devices and brings the clamping voltage
down to a safe level for data circuits.
Combining Isolation and Shunting
Installing a combination of both types of protection can offer the highest
reliability in a system. Figures 4.7 and 4.8 illustrate two means of implementing
this level of protection.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Device
Vcc
Isolated Power
Shunting Device
Port
Data Lines Out
Ground line
Earth Ground
Figure 4.7 Isolated node with shunt protection to earth ground
Device
Shunting Device
Vcc
Isolated Power
Port
Data Lines
Signal Ground
Figure 4.8 Isolated port with ungrounded shunt protection
The method shown in Figure 4.7 is recommended, in this case isolation
protects the circuit from any voltage drops in the earth ground connection. The
shunt devices will prevent a surge from exceeding the breakdown voltage of the
isolators as well as handling any differential surges on the cable. Figure 4.8
illustrates a method recommended for cases where there is no way to make an
earth ground connection. Here, the shunt device’s function is to protect the port
from differential surges, a differential surge will be balanced between conductors
by the shunting device, converted to common mode. The isolation provides
protection from the common mode transient remaining.
30
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Special Consideration for Fault Conditions
Data systems that could be exposed to short circuits to power conductors
require an extra measure of protection. In these cases its recommended to add a
fuse type device in addition to shunting type suppression, as shown in Figure 4.9.
When a short circuit occurs, the shunt suppression will begin conducting, but
shunting by itself cannot withstand the steady state currents of this type of surge.
A small enough fuse value should be chosen so that the fuse will open before the
shunt device is damaged. A typical fuse value is 125 mA.
Device
Vcc
Data Lines
125 mA Fuse
Signal Ground
Earth Ground
Figure 4.9 Fused port protection
Choosing the right protection for your system
While it is hard to predict what type and level of isolation is correct for a
system, an educated guess should be made based on the electrical environment,
physical conditions and cost of failures in downtime and repair costs. Systems
connected between two power sources, such as building to building, office to
factory floor, or any system covering long distances should require some level of
transient protection. Table 4.1 is a comparison of transient protection
techniques.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Table 4.1 Comparison of Protection Techniques
Optical Isolation
Shunting
Requires no ground reference
Adds no loading to data lines
Higher complexity
Effective on common mode
transients
Not dependent on installation
quality
Requires an external power source
Not affected by long term or
continuous transients
32
Must have low impedance ground path
Presents additional capacitive loading to data
lines
Lower complexity, uses passive components
Effective on both common and differential
mode transients
Can be improperly installed by user
No power required
Subject to damage by long duration
transients
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Chapter 5: Software
Introduction
RS-422 and RS-485 are hardware specifications. Software protocol is not
discussed in either specification. It is up to the system designer to define a
protocol suitable for their system. This chapter we will not attempt to define a
protocol standard, but will explain some of the issues that should be considered
by the system designer, whether writing or purchasing software.
RS-422 Systems
RS-422 system software differs little from the familiar point-to-point RS232 communication systems. RS-422 is often used to simply extend the distance
between nodes over the capabilities of RS-232. RS-422 can also be used as the
master node in a four-wire master-slave network described later in this chapter.
When selecting or writing software for RS-422 systems the designer should be
aware of the signals being used by the hardware in the system. Many RS-422
systems do not implement the hardware handshake lines often found in RS-232
systems due to the cost of running additional conductors over long distances.
RS-485 Driver Control
The principle difference between RS-422 and RS-485 is that the RS-485
driver can be put into a high impedance, tristate mode, which allows other
drivers to transmit over the same pair of wires. There are two methods of
tristating an RS-485 driver. The first method is to use a control line, often the
RTS handshake line, to enable and disable the driver. This requires that the host
software raise the RTS line before beginning a transmission to enable the driver,
then lower the RTS line after the completion of the transmission. Since only a
single RS-485 driver can be enabled on a network at one time it is important that
the driver is disabled as quickly as possible after transmission to avoid two
drivers trying to control the lines simultaneously, a condition called line
contention. Under some operating systems it can be difficult to lower RTS in a
timely manner and this method of driver control should be avoided altogether.
The second method of RS-485 driver control we refer to as Automatic Send
Data Control. This type of control involves special circuitry that senses when
data is being transmitted and automatically enables the driver as well as
disabling the driver within one character length of the end of transmission. This
is the preferred method of driver control since it reduces software overhead and
the number of potential pitfalls for the programmer.
RS-422/485 Application Note
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RS-485 Receiver Control
The RS-485 receiver also has an enable signal. Since RS-485 systems using
a two-wire configuration connect the driver to receiver in a loopback fashion,
this feature is often used to disable the receiver during transmission to prevent
the echo of local data. Another approach is to leave the RS-485 receiver enabled
and monitor the loopback data for errors which would indicate that line
contention has occurred. Although a good loopback signal does not guaranty
data integrity it does offer a degree of error detection.
Master-Slave Systems
A master-slave type system has one node that issues commands to each of
the “slave” nodes and processes responses. Slave nodes will not typically
transmit data without a request from the master node, and do not communicate
with each other. Each slave must have a unique address so that it can be
addressed independent of other nodes. These type systems can be configured as
two-wire or four-wire. Four-wire systems often use an RS-422 master (the driver
is always enabled) and RS-485 slaves to reduce system complexity.
Four Wire Master-Slave Systems
This configuration reduces software complexity at the host since the driver
and receiver are always enabled, at the expense of installing two extra
conductors in the system. The Master node simply prefixes commands with the
appropriate address of the slave. There is no data echo or turn around delays to
consider. Since each of the slave transmitters share the same pair of wires, care
must be taken that the master never requests data from multiple nodes
simultaneously or data collisions will result.
Two Wire Master-Slave Systems
Two wire configurations add a small amount of complexity to the system.
The RS-485 driver must be tristated when not in use to allow other nodes to use
the shared pair of wires. The time delay between the end of a transmission and
the tristate condition becomes a very important parameter in this type system. If
a slave attempts to reply before the master has tristated the line, a collision will
occur and data will be lost. The system designer must know the response time or
turn around delay of each of the slave nodes and assure that the master will
tristate its driver within that amount of time. B&B Electronics’ Automatic Send
Data control circuits tristate the driver within one character length of the end of a
transmission.
34
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Multi-Master RS-485 Systems
Each node in a multi-master type RS-485 system can initiate its own
transmission creating the potential for data collisions. This type system requires
the designer to implement a more sophisticated method of error detection,
including methods such as line contention detection, acknowledgement of
transmissions and a system for resending corrupted data.
Systems with Port Powered Converters
RS-232 to RS-422 or RS-485 converters that derive their power from the
RS-232 port are becoming more common in data systems. A good programming
practice is to set unused handshake outputs to a high voltage state in systems
using any type of RS-232 to RS-422 or RS-485 converter. This will assure the
best possible operating conditions for all converters used.
RS-422/485 Application Note
35
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Chapter 6: Selecting RS-485 Devices
When purchasing devices for an RS-485 system many pitfalls can be
avoided by determining the device’s communications characteristics before the
system design is complete. Knowing what questions to ask up front can save a
lot of troubleshooting in the field. The following device characteristics are all
things that should be answered in the system design stage.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Is the device configured for two-wire or four-wire systems?
Is a signal ground connection available?
Is the device isolated? Does it contain surge suppression?
What value bias resistors (if any) are used in the device? Are they
accessible for modification?
Is the device terminated? Is it accessible for modification?
What is the device’s response time (turn around delay)?
What is the programmable address range of the device?
What baud rate, or range of baud rates, is supported?
If possible it is often useful to have a schematic of the serial port of each
device in a system. The schematic can provide additional information that may
be useful in troubleshooting or repairing any problems in the data system.
36
RS-422/485 Application Note
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RS-422/485 Application Note
37
© Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
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Chapter 7: Sources of Further Information
EIA Standards and Publications can be purchased from:
GLOBAL ENGINEERING DOCUMENTS
7730 Carondelet Avenue
Clayton, MO 63105
Phone: (800) 854-7179
FAX: (314) 726-6418
GLOBAL ENGINEERING DOCUMENTS
15 Inverness Way East
Englewood, CO 80112
Phone: (800) 854-7179
FAX: (303) 397-2740
Global Engineering Documents web site can be found at http://global.ihs.com.
Related data interface standards are:
a) EIA-232-E
Interface between data terminal equipment and date circuitterminating equipment employing serial binary data
interchange (ANSI/IEA-232-D)
b) EIA-422-A
Electrical characteristics of balanced voltage digital interface
circuits
c) EIA-423-A
Electrical characteristics of unbalanced voltage digital
interface circuits
d) EIA-485
Standard for electrical characteristics of generators and
receivers for use in balanced digital multipoint systems
e) EIA-449
General purpose 37-position and 9-position interface for data
terminal equipment and data circuit-terminating equipment.
f) EIA-530
High speed 25-position interface for data terminal equipment
and data circuit-terminating equipment
g) EIA/TIA-562 Electrical characteristics for an unbalanced digital interface
Manufacturers of integrated circuit data transceivers often offer practical
application information for RS-422 and RS-485 systems.
National Semiconductor’s Interface Data Book includes a number of excellent
applications notes. These notes are also available online at
http://www.national.com/. A search engine is provided to search the text of the
available application notes. Entering “422” or “485” as search criteria to get a
current list of related application notes.
38
RS-422/485 Application Note
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Appendix A: EIA Specification Summary
EIA RS-422 Specification Summary
Parameter
Driver Output Voltage
Open Circuit
Driver Output Voltage
Loaded
Driver Output Resistance
Driver Output
Short-Circuit Current
Driver Output Rise Time
Driver Common Mode
Voltage
Receiver Sensitivity
Receiver Common-Mode
Voltage Range
Receiver Input Resistance
Differential Receiver
Voltage
Conditions
RT = 100 Ω
Min
Max
10
-10
2
-2
A to B
Per output to
common
RT = 100 Ω
100
±150
10
RT = 100 Ω
±3
Vcm ≤ ±7
-7
Units
V
V
V
V
Ω
mA
% of Bit
Width
V
±200
+7
mV
V
±10
±12
Ω
V
V
4000
Operational:
Withstand:
EIA RS-485 Specification Summary
Parameter
Driver Output Voltage
Open Circuit
Driver Output Voltage
Loaded
Driver Output ShortCircuit Current
Driver Output Rise Time
Driver Common Mode
Voltage
Receiver Sensitivity
Receiver Common-Mode
Voltage Range
Receiver Input Resistance
Conditions
RLOAD = 54Ω
Per output to
+12V or –7V
RLOAD = 54Ω
CLOAD = 50 pF
RLOAD = 54Ω
Min
1.5
-1.5
1.5
-1.5
Max
6
-6
5
-5
±250
Units
V
V
V
V
mA
30
% of Bit Width
-1
3
V
-7
±200
+12
-7 ≤ Vcm ≤ +12
12K
RS-422/485 Application Note
mV
V
Ω
39
© Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
B&B Electronics Mfg Co – 707 Dayton Rd - PO Box 1040 - Ottawa IL 61350 - Ph 815-433-5100 - Fax 815-433-5104
B&B Electronics Ltd – Westlink Comm. Pk – Oranmore, Galway, Ireland – Ph 353-91-792444 – Fax 353-91-792445
EIA RS-232 Specification Summary
Parameter
Driver Output Voltage Open
Circuit
Driver Output Voltage Loaded
Driver Output Resistance,
Power Off
Driver Output Short-Circuit
Current
Driver Output Slew Rate
Maximum Load Capacitance
Receiver Input Resistance
Receiver Input Threshold
Output = Mark
Output = Space
Conditions
3 KΩ ≤ RL ≤ 7
KΩ
-2V ≤ Vo ≤ 2V
3V ≤ VIN ≤ 25V
Min
5
3000
Max
25
15
Units
V
300
V
V
Ω
500
mA
30
2500
7000
V/µs
pF
Ω
-3
3
V
V
EIA RS-423 Specification Summary
Parameter
Driver Output Voltage
Open Circuit
Driver Output Voltage
Loaded
Driver Output Resistance
Driver Output ShortCircuit Current
Driver Output Rise and
Fall Time
Receiver Sensitivity
Receiver Input Resistance
40
Conditions
RL = 450 Ω
Min
4
-4
3.6
-2V ≤ Vo ≤ 2V
Baud Rate ≤ 1K Baud
Baud Rate ≥ 1K Baud
Vcm ≤ ±7V
Max
6
-6
6
Units
V
V
V
50
±150
Ω
mA
300
30
µs
% Unit
Interval
mV
Ω
±200
4000
RS-422/485 Application Note
© Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
B&B Electronics Mfg Co – 707 Dayton Rd - PO Box 1040 - Ottawa IL 61350 - Ph 815-433-5100 - Fax 815-433-5104
B&B Electronics Ltd – Westlink Comm. Pk – Oranmore, Galway, Ireland – Ph 353-91-792444 – Fax 353-91-792445
Appendix B: EIA Standard RS-423 Data Transmission
RS-423 (EIA-423) is another standard used in point to point
communications. RS-423 data transmission uses an unbalanced line driver
that connects to an RS-422 type balanced line receiver as shown in Figure B.1.
The RS-423 line driver is unique to this system. It produces voltage similar to
RS-232 but has a slew rate control input that is used to limit rise times and
cross talk on the data lines. Typical adjustment on the slew rate control is
from 1 to 100 µs. This is done by the proper selection of one resistor on the
wave shape control input.
Figure B.1
RS-422/485 Application Note
41
© Copyright B&B Electronics -- Revised October 1997
B&B Electronics Mfg Co – 707 Dayton Rd - PO Box 1040 - Ottawa IL 61350 - Ph 815-433-5100 - Fax 815-433-5104
B&B Electronics Ltd – Westlink Comm. Pk – Oranmore, Galway, Ireland – Ph 353-91-792444 – Fax 353-91-792445
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