Georgia SRTS Bicycle Rodeo Toolkit

Georgia SRTS Bicycle Rodeo Toolkit
Georgia SRTS Bicycle Rodeo Toolkit
A bicycle rodeo is a bicycle skills event which gives kids the chance to learn, practice, and develop
bike-riding skills. Some rodeos are designed as large, municipal events with skills activities,
exhibits, and games, while others are much smaller in format, and can take place during a
physical education class. Throughout the rodeo, kids receive immediate feedback on their biking
skills and have the chance to keep practicing a
skill if needed. The goal of any bicycle rodeo is to
provide an opportunity for kids to learn, practice,
and demonstrate their bicycle handling skills in a
fun, noncompetitive atmosphere.
This Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource
Center Bike Rodeo Toolkit is designed to help
you plan and hold a successful bike rodeo,
taking into account number of participants,
participant skill level, and space/volunteers
available.
This page intentionally blank.
Acknowledgements
This bicycle rodeo toolkit draws heavily upon the great work done by the Cornell University Extension
Associate and Bicycle Safety Specialist Lois Chaplin and her colleagues. We thank them for their excellent
work.
We would also like to thank Brent Buice, Executive Director of Georgia Bikes!; Katelyn DiGioia, Bicycle
and Pedestrian Coordinator, Georgia Department of Transportation; and other reviewers for their input
and guidance.
Last, but not least, we would like to thank the many volunteers across Georgia and around the country
putting on bicycle rodeo events to spread the joy and health benefits safe bicycling can offer those of all
ages.
Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource Center Staff
This page intentionally blank.
Table of Contents
Introduction........................................................ 1
Station Description Chart .................................... 2
Rodeo Planning & Logistics ................................ 3
Station Descriptions.........................................
Station 1: Registration and Inspection...........
Station 2: Bicycle and Helmet Fit..................
Station 3: Starts and Stops...........................
Station 4: Scanning......................................
Station 5: Safe on Sidewalks.........................
Station 6: Rock Dodge.................................
Station 7: Demon Driveway..........................
Station 8: Crazy Crossroads..........................
Station 9: Putting It All Together...................
10
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
Evaluation........................................................ 29
Conclusion....................................................... 29
Glossary........................................................... 31
Appendix........................................................ 35
Certificate of Participation (Elementary) ....... 36
Certificate of Participation (Middle) .............. 37
Event Flyer (Middle)(Editable) ......................... 38
Event Flyer (Elementary)(Editable) ................... 39
Ticket to Ride .............................................. 40
Sample Props ............................................. 42
Example News Release ................................ 43
Student Pre/Post Survey ............................... 45
Volunteer Survey ......................................... 46
Parent Survey .............................................. 47
Permission Slip & Photo/Video Releases ....... 48
Pre-Event Parent Email ................................. 50
Post-Event Parent Email ............................... 51
This page intentionally blank.
Introduction
While there are many ways to organize and operate a bike rodeo, this toolkit presents a bike rodeo as a
series of stations teaching different bicycle skills, organized by age group.
The cast of characters required for a bike rodeo is as
follows:
• Participants from kindergarten to 8th grade
• Older student volunteers from 9th to 12th
grade (optional)
• Station leaders responsible for facilitating each
station
• Adult volunteers responsible for assisting the
station leader and participants
Not all stations are appropriate for all age groups or
skill levels. Not all stations will fit in smaller spaces.
We’ve included a station description chart on page 2
to help you determine what stations are right for your
situation.
The chart walks/bikes you through:
• What stations you should consider using based
on approximate skill level of participants
• The amount of space you will need to
successfully run each station
• The number of volunteers you will need
• The materials you will need
Depending on the number of participants, volunteers
can operate all stations continuously or move with the
participants from one station to the next. The latter requires fewer staff.
After you’ve decided the type of bike rodeo to hold, this toolkit details the steps involved in planning a
bike rodeo, the elements that should be included in your bike rodeo based on your available resources, a
description of each bike rodeo station (including the materials required and facilitation instructions), as well
as helpful bike rodeo collateral templates, including:
• completion certificates
• a press release
• a permission slip template
• a bike rodeo event timeline
• event flyers
• bike rodeo props
Additional tools for hosting bicycle and walking events in Georgia can be found at www.saferoutesga.org.
1
Station Description Chart
Station Name
Age Group
Materials Needed
Space Needs
All
• Station Sign
• Table(s)
• Chairs (s)
• Hang Tags
• Tire Pump
• Rags, Lubricants
• Wrenches, Pliers, Screwdrivers
• Bicycle Repair Stand(s) (Optional)
2. Bike and Helmet Fit
All
560 square feet / 4 parking
• Station Sign
• Seat Adjustment Tools (Allen Wrench/Pliers) spaces
3. Starts and Stops
All
• Station Sign
• Demonstration Bicycle
4. Scanning
All
• Station Sign
• Cardboard "Car"
1. Registration and
Inspection
5. Safe on Sidewalks
6. Demon Driveway
7. Crazy Crossroads
8. Rock Dodge
9. Putting It All Together
Skill Exercise: Slow Race
Skill Exercise: Serpentine/
Slalom
• Station Sign
• Two Cardboard "Cars"
• Cardboard Bush
All
• One real car for sight obstruction (optional)
• Cardboard stop sign
• Chair or other means to hold up stop sign
• Station Sign
Intermediate and • Cardboard “car”
Advanced
• One cardboard bush for sight obstruction
• One real car for sight obstruction (optional)
• Station Sign
• Cardboard "Car"
Intermediate and • Stop Sign
• Chairs or other means to hold stop sign
Advanced
(optional)
• Two real cars or bushes for sight
• Station Sign
Intermediate and
• Obstacles (Sponges, 1/2 tennis balls,
Advanced
beanbags)
• Station Sign
• Cardboard "Car"
• Stop Sign
• Chairs or other means to hold stop sign
Advanced
• Hazards (Sponges, beanbags, etc.)
• Real cars or bushes for sight obstructions
• Pedestrians crossing the street
410 square feet / 3 parking
spaces
Staff Needs
One station leader and
at least one additional
volunteer
One station leader and
at least one additional
volunteer
One station leader and
1,120 square feet / 7.5 parking
at least one additional
spaces
volunteer
One station leader and
1,320 square feet / 9 parking
at least one additional
spaces
volunteer
1,164 square feet / 8 parking
spaces
One station leader and
at least two additional
volunteers
1,645 square feet / 11 parking
spaces
One station leader and
at least one additional
volunteer
3,560 square feet /24 parking
spaces
One station leader and
at least two additional
volunteers
640 square feet / 4 parking
spaces
One station leader and
at least one additional
volunteer
Depends on location available
(long driveway, closed section
of roadway, etc.
One station leader and
at least one additional
volunteer depending
on what elements you
include
All
• Station Sign
990 square feet / 7 parking
spaces
One station leader
All
• Station Sign
• 15-20 traffic cones
840 square feet / 6 parking
spaces
One station leader and
one additional
volunteer
Figure 1
2
Rodeo Planning & Logistics
The earlier you start planning a bike rodeo, the
better. Three months in advance, you can form a
planning committee to handle things like finding
a venue, arranging for volunteer support, securing
supplies, publicizing the event, and other tasks.
The sample timeline on page 4 lays out one
potential way you could plan your bike rodeo. The
information below goes into more detail about the
different tasks associated with bike rodeo planning.
Create a Planning Committee
Organizing a bicycle rodeo is a satisfying, enjoyable
job, and while one person can certainly make all
the necessary arrangements, it may make sense
to spread the workload around. Luckily, there are
many local organizations and members of your
community who will be excited to participate in
planning and carrying out your bike rodeo. Start
by making a list of these folks, a list of tasks, and
a timeline, so you’ll be ready to ask for assistance.
Including local officials on your planning committee
will make tasks like finding an event location much
easier. After you’ve completed these tasks, begin
reaching out to potential volunteers.
Bike rodeo supplies
Contact information for local bicycle
clubs and shops can be found by
searching the Connect Locally sections of
the League of American Bicyclists’ website
using your ZIP Code at bikeleague.org
Older Student Engagement
Volunteer support resources include:
• Safe Routes to School committee
• local service organizations
• parent-teacher associations
• school administrators
• local health department
• bicycle shop owners
• cycling clubs
• your local law enforcement agency
Middle and high school students can serve as
volunteers, especially if the school has a bicycle club,
runs a bicycle repair shop, or the students work in
one outside of school. Student volunteers without this
experience should be given a thorough explanation
of their responsibilities before the event begins.
These students will enjoy helping younger students,
and may want to be involved with your school’s Safe
Routes To School program in the future -- perhaps by
leading a bicycle train.
In many communities, police have been invited to
inspect or register bicycles at rodeos. With more
and more agencies forming bike patrol units, you
may find them an increasingly valuable resource.
A bike mechanic is an asset at the bike inspection
station. Sometimes, local bike shops or your local
bike club will provide a volunteer with some tools
and bicycle maintenance and repair expertise.
Having a first aid kit and perhaps even medical
staff on site is important. Depending on the size
and location of your event, the medical presence
could be anywhere from first aid-trained volunteers
to a school nurse or EMT crew.
3
Example Bike Rodeo Planning Timeline
Three Months Prior
•
•
•
•
•
Assemble Bike Rodeo Planning Committee
Pick prospective site and date for event, and get
approval from relevant authorities. Be sure to consider
rain dates and backup indoor locations as well.
Contact local bike shops and clubs for bicycle inspection
volunteers and loaner bikes.
Solicit sponsorships from local businesses and service
organizations
Reach out to prospective volunteers (especially local
high school and middle school students).
Two Months Prior
•
Contact volunteers with event information, including a
description of their duties.
Six Weeks Prior
•
Begin publicity campaign to attract participants using
press releases sent to local media, backpack mail at
participating schools, and social media.
For school-based bike rodeos, send permission slips and
photo/video release forms home to be filled out and
returned.
Arrange for medical support for the event.
•
•
Three Weeks Prior
•
•
Finish creating event materials, including props and
handouts for participants and volunteers.
Make a sufficent number of copies of these materials.
One Week Prior
•
Meet or otherwise communicate with volunteers to explain
their roles and how the different stations of the bike rodeo
will work together.
Day Before Event
•
•
•
Check the weather for the event.
Set up station layouts using spray chalk, sidewalk chalk or tape.
Set up other event materials including tables and chairs.
Event Day
•
•
•
•
Arrive at event site early.
Handle any last minute logistics.
Make sure you have sufficient event materials.
Have fun!
4
Choosing a Location and Date
Hold the event at a convenient playground,
gymnasium, or parking lot. Hard-surfaced, level,
and traffic-free areas are best. Ideally, your location
should provide the opportunity to run at least a
portion of the course on a street or driveway. If a
lightly-trafficked street is convenient to the event
site, contact local officials to see if they can close
the street to vehicular traffic during the event.
Publicity
Publicizing your event will improve turnout and
also inspire others to host their own bicycle
rodeos. Don’t forget to promote your event
through local newspapers, radio, and television,
as well as through social media like Twitter and
Facebook, and school messaging avenues like the
school’s website and backpack mail. If your event
is held in conjunction with other community or
school activities, you have built-in publicity! Cosponsorship helps support the educational goals
of the program by introducing it to more people.
Invite local media to the event so they can see what
it’s all about.
An empty school parking lot is a great place for a bike rodeo
Older Student
Engagement
Funding
Middle and high school
students can run a
refreshment area at the
event as a fundraiser
for a school club.
Bike rodeo costs include purchasing materials
needed to facilitate the event, printing promotional
materials, refreshments and participant awards.
Sponsors, such as local bicycle shops, sporting
goods stores, grocery stores, etc. can help cover
the cost of these expenses.
Helmets
In Georgia, all bicyclists under the age of 16 must
wear a helmet when riding a bike. Helmets must
meet either American National Standards Institute
or Snell Memorial Foundation impact standards
because these organizations have tested helmets
to ensure they provide a certain level of protection
in the event of a crash. All bike rodeo participants
should be wearing helmets.
Certificates and Refreshments
You may decide to give certificates of participation
to all who complete the course. These certificates
can act as a reminder to participants of the skills
they learned in the bicycle rodeo. Certificates
can be given out as students finish completing all
stations or they can be presented at a later time,
perhaps in conjunction with a school assembly.
Ensure all bike rodeo participants have a
helmet. Reach out to local bike shops and health
departments to see if they have free or steeply
discounted helmets to offer to attendees. Contact
your local Safe Kids organization (www.safekids.org/
united-states-0) to see if they have helmets available.
If you are not able to find helmets courtesy of other
organizations, consider purchasing several helmets to
loan participants during the event. You can sanitize
them between uses by using sanitizing wipes.
A well-fed volunteer is a happy one. Consider
having coffee for parents, and water, juice, fruit,
etc. for participants. Contact local commercial
establishments that may be willing to contribute
healthy snacks.
5
Staff and Volunteer Needs
The Station Description Chart on page 2 will help
you decide which stations should be included in
your bike rodeo, in addition to giving you an idea
of how many volunteers you will need. If you are
moving one or two groups of students through
the bike rodeo stations one at a time, you will
need fewer volunteers than if you’re operating
a continuous bike rodeo as part of a larger
community event. That being said, most stations
will be difficult to manage without extra
help, so be sure to coordinate a volunteer
presence beforehand.
Older Student Engagement
In many Georgia school districts,
community service is a graduation
requirement and students may be
eager to participate.
This toolkit was piloted using six stations, fifteen
students, and nine staff. While this ratio of staff to
students was okay, staff members who participated
in the pilot expressed that even more staff would
have been helpful. It is suggested that for a
rodeo with any number of students, you
have at least 12 staff and/or volunteers on
hand. As the number of students increases, scale
up the number of volunteers at a rate of one per 10
students.
Some tasks can be
handled by last-minute
recruits (such as parents
or older children),
who can assist the
instructors or serve
as evaluators at each
station. This allows
instructors to actively
direct the bicyclists.
However, a bike rodeo can be successful using any
number of volunteers and staff. You can make it
work with what you’ve got. If you’ve planned the
bike rodeo well, there’s no reason it won’t be a fun,
enriching experience, no matter the volunteers
involved.
Planning and Designing the Course
Bike rodeos are not just for those who already
know how to ride a bike. Students using “balance”
bikes or training wheels will be able to successfully
participate in many of the stations, learning safe
bicycling behaviors as they become more confident
bicyclists.
Be prepared for a mix in the age range and
skill level of participants. The event’s success
will depend upon the trainer’s ability to work
individually with each participant, develop a sense
of their skill level, help them feel confident and
accomplished, while taking them one step further
along the learning curve.
A warm-up pit can provide some
diversion in your bike rodeo course. The
trainer in the pit can work with those
needing special attention. The warm-up
pit gives participants a chance to fool
around and release some energy. Those
less adept at balance and control can also
work on the serpentine and slow race
(described in the glossary).
If this is your first bike rodeo or if you have limited
space, start with a Beginner event, which only
includes the Registration and Inspection, Bike and
Helmet Fit, Starts and Stops, Scanning and Hand
Signals and Safe on Sidewalks stations. This type
6
of event is particularly appropriate for the younger
bicyclists (usually ages 5-8) just learning how to ride
a bike, and is relatively easy to set up.You’ll be able
to inspect their bikes, make necessary adjustments
for a good fit, and teach them how to start, stop,
and scan. A sample bicycle rodeo layout can be
found on page 6.
by bicyclists. Children will learn more quickly with a
roadway that is full-size and realistic than with one
where they have to pretend.
The Advanced event builds on the intermediate
elements by providing an opportunity for
participants to practice their bicycle skills in more
realistic settings on a closed road or long driveway.
Intermediate event stations are appropriate for
older participants who can quickly demonstrate
basic riding proficiency and can be challenged
by practicing more complex bicycle skills and
situations.
For each event, space permitting, include a freeride area and/or a warmup pit, where participants
can practice their skills independently.
If you have limited space, time, and support, you
might consider using only the Crazy Crossroads
(Station 7). By setting up an intersection you
can have a lot of meaningful fun with a group of
bicyclists. They can practice starts, stops, yielding
to others, making turns, and going straight. Add a
crosswalk and have pedestrians too.
Two stations in the Intermediate event include
simulated roadway situations. If you are unable
to use an actual road, be sure to create roadways
with at least 10-foot wide lanes. It should look as
much like a real road as possible. For example,
parked cars should be included along the station
roadways as visual hazards commonly experienced
175’
Rock
Dodge
8
Finish
Station 9 takes place
on a real street.
Crazy
Crossroads
1
Registration/
Bike
Inspection
2
7
Scanning
4
Slow
Race
Serpentine
Bike/
Helmet Fit
Optional Warmup Pit
Demon
Driveway
Safe on
Sidewalks
6
Start - Stop
5
Figure 2: Sample Station Layout
7
3
Start
118’
Supplies
For general use:
• Table(s) for registration station
• Chairs
• Name Tags
• Pens and markers
• Station Identification Signs
• Certificates of Participation
• Tickets To Ride
• Rubber bands
• Trash bags
Older Student Engagement
Station props can be created as part
of a school’s arts curriculum. This
approach integrates bicycle skills
and safety training into the larger
school curriculum and saves event
organizers a significant amount of
time.
For course setup:
• Tape measure or measuring wheel
• Masking tape, spraycan chalk, sidewalk
chalk, traffic cones, halved tennis balls, bean
bags or some other means ofcourse marking
Use spraycan chalk for
easy course outlining.
For the stations:
• Pencils
• Clipboards (one per station)
• Basic tools and tire pump for bike
inspection station, including set of English
and metric Allen keys
• Props (Samples found on page 36 in
appendix)
• Cardboard cars (five or six needed for
full course)
• Real Car (one for Demon Driveway
station)
• Cardboard bush or fence
• Stop sign (cardboard or real) (one for
Crazy Crossroads and Safe on Sidewalks
stations)
• Drainage grate (cardboard, carpet
swatch, doormat, etc.) (one needed)
Non-mandatory supplies:
• Bikes for participants without them
• A balance bike for those who don’t know how to ride, but still want to
participate
• Helmets for participants without them
• Refreshments
• Educational information (brochures)
A volunteer holds a cardboard car
Keep participant traffic flow in mind.
As you set up your bike rodeo course,
note carefully where each station starts
and finishes. You may find it necessary to
limit access to the course by using natural
boundaries or putting a ribbon around the
perimeter.
Orientation
Each Station Leader should be very clear on the
purpose of the station they will manage, as well
as being familiar with the activities taking place
elsewhere in the rodeo. They should be oriented to
the objectives and procedures of the stations prior
8
If you’re interested in streamlining the process
of securing materials needed to run a rodeo, you
may want to assemble a “kit” of the specialty items
(especially if this will become a regular event).
to the day of the event. Use the following station
descriptions to orient Station Leaders, and give
each one a photocopy or pdf link of the description
of the station they will be operating. After the
course is laid out, review each station with the
entire cast of volunteers.
Also, to capitalize on the success of your bike rodeo
and reduce the amount of setup time required
to run subsequent events, consider establishing
a permanent bicycle rodeo course as part of a
renovated playground or in an unused parking lot
by working with a local school or your community’s
Parks and Recreation Department.
Conclusion
Conclude the bicycle rodeo with some sort of
wrap-up activity for the participants, i.e. a group
picture or handing out certificates. This conclusion
provides the opportunity to reinforce the bicycle
safety lessons learned during the rodeo.
The course represents a tangible community
investment in bicycle and pedestrians safety
education and provides a permanent safe space
where young bicyclists can practice their riding skills.
Be sure you have follow-up publicity and write
thank you letters to sponsors and volunteers. Ask
participants, parents, and volunteers to tell you
what worked and what you can improve upon for
next time. Also, take your own notes to ensure an
even more successful bike rodeo next time.
There are many examples across the country and
world that you can emulate, including Peoria, Illinois’
“Bike Safety Town” (bit.ly/1tn3gSR), Santa Monica,
California’s Bike Campus (bit.ly/1tn3klt, and Utrecht,
Netherlands’ Traffic Garden (bit.ly/WzA3tc)
Registration table with Tickets to Ride and Certificates of Participation
9
Station Descriptions
Biking in the Starts and Stops station
Teaching hand signals in the Scanning and Hand Signals station
Crossing the driveway in the Safe on Sidewalks station
Preparing to dodge obstacles in the Rock Dodge station
10
Station 1:
Registration and Inspection
Objective
Check the mechanical safety of the bicycle before
riding.
Staff Needs
This station can be a bottleneck if there
are too few volunteers due to its hands-on
nature. Securing skilled volunteers would be
very helpful to ensure this does not occur.
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer to perform bicycle inspection/repair.
Materials/Supplies
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

If you have a bike registration program in
your town, make sure all bikes are registered
as part of this station.
Station Sign
Tickets To Ride
Student Pre-Survey
Rubber bands
Tire Pump
Rags and chain lubricant
Wrenches, pliers, screwdrivers
Table(s)
Chair(s)
Pens or Pencils
Bicycle Repair Stand(s) (Optional)
Procedure
Hand out a Ticket To Ride to each participant as
they come to the station to check the parts of the
bicycle that need to be inspected. Also, hand each
student a pencil and a pre-survey to fill out. This
pre-survey asks three question about the student’s
knowledge of certain aspects of safe biking.
Remember that depending on their reading level,
some students may need the questions read to
them one-on-one.
Look over the bike, checking that the seat and
handlebars are securely fastened, the brakes aren’t
worn, the chain is not loose or rusty, and the tires
are properly inflated.
This is an opportunity to work together in a handson experience. Go through the Ticket To Ride form
with the child so she or he is able to identify how
her or his bike could become better performing.
Students listen to instructions at the Registration and
Inspection Station
If a participant has a bike but doesn’t know how to
ride it, volunteers at this station should temporarily
remove the pedals of the participant’s bike so s/
he can use it as a balance bike to get more out
of each subsequent station. The pedals should be
reattached at the end of the bike rodeo.
11
Registration and Inspection
Questions
Talk with the participants about why it is important
to keep her or his bike in high-performing
condition. To get the conversation going, ask
questions such as:
• What happens if screws and bolts are loose on your bike? How do they get loose?
• What kind of brakes does your bike have?
• What could happen to your brakes that would cause them not to work?
What happens if your brakes don’t work?
• Why do your handlebars need to be tight?
• Where and how do you adjust your seat?
As each participant is leaving the station, loop the
Ticket To Ride with your comments around one of
the bicycle handlebars. Volunteers in subsequent
stations will use the other side of the Ticket To Ride
(Appendix pages 40-41) to comment on how the
participant handled the station content, and any
constructive feedback they may have.
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
Filling out a Ticket To Ride
12
Registration and Inspection
Station 2:
Bicycle and Helmet Fit
Objective
Check to ensure that both the bicycle and helmet
properly fit the rider.
Background
Nobody should attempt to ride a bicycle that is too
big or too small for them. Bikes that are too big or
too small can be difficult to maneuver.
One of the most common adjustments is the height
of the seat. For beginners, it’s best for the child to
be able to have her or his feet flat on the ground
while seated on the bike. As confidence and skills
develop, the seat should be raised so the knee is
just slightly bent and the feet are on the pedals
(when one pedal is at the 12 o’clock position and
the other is at the 6 o’clock position) and the child
is seated.
Staff Needs
A student gets her helmet fitted by a bike rodeo volunteer
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer to fit helmets and adjust bicycle seat
height.
Materials/Supplies
• Station Sign
• Pliers
• Allen Wrench
Procedure
Bike height: Have the child straddle the bike. S/he
should be able to stand flatfooted over the bike with
at least an inch of clearance above the top tube.
Seat height: If the seat is too low, it is best not
to raise the seat to the desired height all at once.
Instead, raise it an inch or so, explaining to the
rider that once they’re used to the new height,
they should get the seat raised a bit more. Knees
should not touch the handlebars.
Brakes: If the bike is outfitted with hand brakes,
check to see that the rider can properly grasp the
brake levers. Do they know which is the front
brake? Rear brake?
Helmets: Most helmets come with sizing pads to
help insure a proper fit. Adjust the straps so the
helmet sits level and snug. The rule of thumb is for
13
Bicycle and Helmet Fit
the front of the helmet to come within two fingers
of the wearer’s eyebrows, the straps to form a
“V” around each ear, and there are two fingers of
room between their neck and the strap when it is
fastened.
If the helmet will not fit the rider even after
adjusting the straps, consider providing the rider
with a correctly-fitted loaned helmet for the
duration of the bicycle rodeo.
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station content and providing
constructive feedback.
Skill Level
Two fingers between eyebrows
and helmet
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Helmet strap forms a “V”
shape around ears
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
Two fingers can fit between
helmet strap and neck
Helmet is secure when pushed
front to back and left to right
Helmet Fitting Guidelines
Courtesy: Olympia,WA City Government
Helmet fitting adjustments being made
14
Bicycle and Helmet Fit
Station 3: Starts and Stops
Objective
To teach bicyclists how to start and stop their
bicycles safely and efficiently.
Background
We think that kids will figure out how to start and
stop, so teaching these skills is often an overlooked
part of bicycle education. The result can be poorly
controlled starts and skidding stops. The bike rodeo
is a good time to introduce safer, more efficient
maneuvers.
Staff Needs
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer.
Materials
• Station Sign
• Demonstration Bicycle
Start and Stop students listening to instructions
Procedure
Starts: Demonstrate how to get started using the
Power Pedal method.
First, straddle the bicycle with both feet on the
ground; do not sit on the seat.
Then, raise the right pedal to the two o’clock
position (see photo); this provides the power to
start.
Next, put your right foot on the pedal with your
left foot still on the ground.
Finally, push off with your left foot and at the
same time, stand on the raised pedal; do not
pedal after pushing off.
Power Pedal Start Position
Courtesy: Lois Chaplin
Coast to a stop while standing on the pedal that
has been pushed down.

Bicycles with coaster brakes (where you
pedal backwards to stop) can be difficult to get
into the Power Pedal position, so be sure to
clearly demonstrate how to do so.
Stops: Discourage stops that are executed by
dragging feet. For coaster brakes, make sure the
rider knows how to pedal backwards to apply
pressure that stops the bike. For hand brakes, make
sure the rider squeezes the brake levers evenly with
both hands. They need to know that using only
one brake is not the best way to stop and can be
dangerous (pitching over the handlebars or skidding
out of control).
15
Starts and Stops
Hand brakes are not the best choice for small
children, so young riders who have them should
receive sufficient training so they can use them
effectively.
How to stop and dismount: You should instruct
participants how to stop and dismount safely.
20 ft
Tell students to slow down by using the brakes.
Then, as the bike nears a stop, instruct them
to put their weight on a pedal in the “down”
position as they slide off the seat.
Waiting
Area 1
13 ft
Then, have them take their other foot off the
pedal and prepare to place it on the ground
when they’re going slowly enough.
If participants are using hand brakes, be sure to
instruct them to keep pressure on both brake levers
as they are slowing and dismounting.
In your Power Pedal demonstration, you should
model appropriate stopping and dismounting
behaviors in addition to showing how to safely
start.
86 ft
Practice Area
60 ft
When you’ve finished demonstrating starting and
stopping, two or three participants at a time should
copy your starting and stopping examples as they
glide from one end of the station area to the other.
When the participants are comfortable with this
procedure, have them place their second foot
on the other pedal, sit on the seat, and continue
pedaling.
Waiting
Area 2
This station may run shorter than subsequent
stations. If this is the case, have participants play
the Slow Race game (Instructions in Glossary) on
the Starts and Stops course until it’s time to switch
to the next station.
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
Skill Level
13 ft
Figure 3: Station 3
Schematic Diagram
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
16
Starts and Stops
Station 4: Scanning and Hand Signals
Objective
To teach bicyclists to look behind for traffic without
swerving or falling and to signal to other road users.
Background
Participants must learn to scan while not deviating
from their path of intended travel. If the participant
uses mirrors on their bicycle, scanning is still a
necessary skill because they may ride a bicycle
without them.
Staff Needs
A volunteer holds cardboard car while student uses turn signals
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer.
Materials
Bicycling
Hand Signals
LEFT TURN
RIGHT TURN
OR
STOP
SafeRoutesGA.org
If students express
interest in installing
mirrors on their bicycle,
you should direct
them to the bike shop
volunteers staffing
Station 1, if present, so
the participant can learn
about where to get
them and how they are
installed.

It is not possible
to safely use hand
signals without being
able to control the
bicycle with one hand.
Make sure that each
participant can do so.
If participants haven’t
developed this skill yet,
add a run-through of
this station that focuses
on riding using only one
hand.
• Station Sign
• Cardboard car
Procedure
All participants should be taught appropriate hand
signals. The diagram on the left illustrates the
hand signals. Demonstrate each signal and have
participants follow your example.
After learning these hand signals, each participant
should ride the course six times or as time allows
— a few times making left turns and a few times
making right turns.
The first time, they should concentrate
on staying in a straight line. For the less
experienced, this may be a big challenge. On
the following run through the course, tell them
you are going to call their name (or say “look”)
and they are to look back and tell you whether
or not there is a car coming by saying “Car!” or
“No Car!”. Hold the cardboard car sign in front
of you when there is a car coming and to your
side when there is no car.
Stay about ten feet behind the participant as
they ride the course.
On the third run, ask them to scan behind them
and then signal a turn. Then, have them repeat
this scanning and signalling three more times.
Bicycling Hand Signals
(Poster 11”x17” format
available on GA SRTS
website)
17
Scanning and Hand Signals
Questions
• Why do you need to look behind you when you’re bicycling? Basic answer: to see
cars, pedestrians, and other bicyclists before
making a turn.
Remind participants to scan before giving hand
signals.
• Do you think you can continue to ride straight ahead when you scan?
Explain that the natural tendency is to swerve when
scanning behind.
• Have you ever used mirrors when riding your
Cardboard Car
Courtesy: Lois Chaplin
bicycle? If so, why?
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
3 ft
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
If you’re short on signs, you can hold your hands
high over your head to represent a car coming or
down to your sides to represent no car coming.
88 ft
Older Student Engagement
Consider having student volunteers hold and
operate the cardboard cars in this exercise, leaving
the station leader more time to focus on assisting
participants.
13 ft
Waiting
Area
Figure 4: Station 4
Schematic Diagram
The course should be long
enough that students can
look back, see if a car is
coming, continue pedaling,
and then signal.
20 ft
18
Scanning and Hand Signals
Station 5: Safe on Sidewalks
Objective
To teach children how to ride safely on sidewalks
while respecting pedestrians and other sidewalk
users, and successfully cross intersections and
driveways,
Background
For young children, bicyclists who lack confidence,
and those who would otherwise have to negotiate
potentially dangerous roadways, the sidewalk
may be the safest place to ride. Learning how
to properly ride on the sidewalk and cross at
intersections will give participants another tool to
help them safely navigate around their community.
Materials
• Station Sign
• Two Cardboard Cars
• Cardboard Bush
• One real car as a sight obstruction (optional)
• Cardboard stop sign
• Chair or other means to hold up stop sign
A student stops when she sees a car in the driveway
Know your local sidewalk bicycling ordinances
and share them with participants.
Staff Needs
One station leader and at least three additional
volunteers.
When possible, use a real sidewalk for this station.
Procedure
Set up the station with one or two volunteers
acting as pedestrians along the sidewalk and
one holding a cardboard car in the driveway that
crosses the sidewalk.
Volunteer-operated
cardboard car
5 ft
20 ft
7 ft
25 ft
Actual car parked
77 ft
Figure 5: Safe on Sidewalks Layout (Can be run concurrently as part of Demon
Driveway and Crazy Crossroads. See Course Map)
Adapted from Lois Chaplin
19
Safe on Sidewalks
The sidewalk width in this station should be
determined at the discretion of the station leader in
response to local context and participant skill level.
Explain to participants that they should pedal down
the sidewalk, negotiating the different conditions
along it. They should make sure that there is
enough space to pass safely and that there is no
one coming in the other direction on the sidewalk.
Older Student Engagement
If there is enough space to pass safely, you should
instruct participants to slow their speed and pedal
past the pedestrian’s left side.
Consider having older students hold and operate
the cardboard cars in this exercise or act as
pedestrians on the sidewalk, leaving the station
leader more time to focus on assisting participants.
Teach participants to let pedestrians know they are
about to pass by saying, “Bicycle passing on your
left!” This will make the pedestrian aware that a
bicyclist is passing them, and reduce the chances of
a crash.
Help participants figure out when to announce
their intent to pass -- not too far away from the
pedestrian so that the pedestrian can’t hear them,
and not so close to the pedestrian so that they are
already passing as they announce themselves. If
there is no room to pass the pedestrian, instruct
participants to dismount and walk their bicycle,
waiting until space becomes available before
continuing to bicycle.
What To Look For
• Did the participant safely pass pedestrians while announcing their presence?
• Did they look left, right, and left and right
again when crossing the driveway?
Teach participants that as they approach a
driveway or street, they should slow down and
look left, right, left, right to make sure a car isn’t
entering the street or driveway. In this station,
a volunteer will be moving a cardboard car to
simulate a car entering or leaving the driveway, in
addition to volunteers acting as pedestrians.
• Did they look both ways and wait for there to
be no traffic when crossing the street?
Questions to Ask Participants
• How many of you ride on the sidewalk?
• Do you ever bike past pedestrians or those in
wheelchairs?
• How do you pass these sidewalk users?
• Do you ever get off your bicycle to pass on the
The volunteer “car” holder will be simulating a car
entering or leaving the driveway by holding the
car up to mean a car is present, and holding it to
the side to mean a car is not present). If a car was
present the first time the student looked, see that
the student looks again to make sure there is no
car entering or exiting the driveway before they
proceed to bicycle across the driveway.
sidewalk?
• Who has the right of way on the sidewalk?
Basic answer: Pedestrians. Bicyclists are just
guests on the sidewalk. They should be
courteous and respectful.
When participants approach the end of the
sidewalk, you should instruct them to dismount and
cross the street as a pedestrian, looking left, right,
left and right for traffic before crossing when it is
safe to do so.
Send students down the sidewalk one at a
time. Wait until the student on the course has
finished before sending the next student.
Practicing slowing down or walking their
bicycle past pedestrians during this station will give
participants extra practice on slow-riding and start/
stop skills.
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
20
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
Safe on Sidewalks
Station 6: Demon Driveway
Objective
To teach participants to stop before they enter the
roadway and look both ways to determine if it is
safe before turning onto the street.
Background
Children who live in suburban neighborhoods can
become accustomed to not having much traffic
on residential streets. They often enter the street
without looking because they don’t expect traffic.
When children begin to ride on streets in unfamiliar
neighborhoods or non-residential areas, looking
both ways before entering the street becomes
especially important.
Bicycling down a practice driveway after looking for traffic
Courtesy: WABikes.org
Because children are smaller than adults, they often
cannot see over cars and other things that block
their view of the roadway. Likewise, other road
users may not easily see them. Children should
be taught to always stop and look for traffic before
entering the street.
Staff Needs
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer.
If available and safe, use a real
Materials
•
•
•
•
driveway closed off from traffic.
Station Sign
Cardboard car
One cardboard bush as a sight obstruction
One real car as a sight obstruction (optional)
7 ft
5 ft
Actual car
parked
20 ft
Volunteeroperated
cardboard car
28 ft
Figure 6: Demon Driveway Station Layout
(Can be run concurrently as part of Safe on
Sidewalks and Crazy Crossroads)
77 ft
21
Demon Driveway
Procedure
As discussed in greater detail in Station
3: Starts and Stops, a Power Pedal occurs
Have participants think about the driveways and
alleys they use to get to the sidewalk and street
and some of the things in the street that block their
vision.
Explain that they should pretend they are in their
neighborhood waiting on the curb or at the mouth
of a driveway or alley waiting to enter the street.
They should look left, right, left, and right for
traffic, wait for there to be no traffic, then turn onto
the street using a Power Pedal. Have them practice
turning left and right into the street and going onto
the correct side for their direction of travel.
when the bicyclist prepares for takeoff by
positioning a pedal in the ten o’clock position.
This allows for quick momentum and minimal
hesitation when the coast is clear. Traffic
conditions can quickly change, so a fumble at
the takeoff can make it difficult to safely enter
the roadway.
Teach the participants to walk bicycles from the
place where they are parked to the place where
they will enter the street, such as from their garage
to the end of the driveway. This step removes the
temptation to continue riding out into the road
without first stopping and checking for traffic. If
they cross the sidewalk while walking their bike,
they should first check to make sure no one is
walking or biking on it.
Bicyclists should stop at the mouth of the station’s
driveway and check for traffic. The “car” holder will
be changing the traffic often and randomly (holding
the car up means traffic; to their side means no
traffic). If there was traffic the first time they looked,
see that they look again to make sure there is no
traffic. The bicyclist should proceed onto the street
when it is safe to do so.
Cardboard Car
Courtesy: Lois Chaplin
Questions
• Do you ride down a driveway to get to the
•
•
•
What To Look For
• Did the participant stop at the end of the
•
driveway where they can see and be seen by
traffic?
• Did the participant look left, right, left, and
• Did the participant use the Power Pedal
Basic answer: the right-hand side
successfully?
do they look left, right, left, and again?
• When they enter the roadway, do they end
up on the correct side for their direction of
travel?
Basic answer: I’m shorter than some of the
things that block my view and the view of
others looking my way.
• What side of the roadway should you be
biking on?
right again?
• If there was traffic the first time they looked,
street or sidewalk at the start of a bike trip?
Do you ever stop at the end of the driveway?
Why is it important to stop at the end of the
driveway?
Do you usually look for traffic and people
walking on the sidewalk or along the street?
Why might a motorist be unable to see you?
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
22
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
Demon Driveway
Station 7: Crazy Crossroads
Objective
To teach participants appropriate behavior at
intersections, i.e. to stop at stop signs, wait for
traffic, look in both directions, position themselves
for a Power Pedal, and cross when there is no
conflicting traffic.
Younger than
10 years old
Background
10 ft Children too often don’t think about the risk
involved in not stopping at an intersection or
the importance of looking in all directions for
10 ft incoming traffic. They should learn to travel
through intersections safely by stopping,
looking for traffic, being seen, and signalling, if
necessary, before proceeding.
10 years old
and up
Cardboard car
Actual car
parked
30 ft
5 ft
Staff Needs
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer.
Materials
10 ft
•
•
•
•
•
10 ft 8 ft
Figure 7: Crazy Crossroads Diagram
Station Sign
One or two cardboard cars
Chairs or other means to hold stop sign
Stop Sign
Two real cars or bushes as sight obstructions (optional)
• Pedestrian(s) crossing the street
(optional)
Procedure
As participants approach the stop sign, they
should check sidewalks and crosswalks for
pedestrians.
Stop line at stop sign.
Courtesy: drivinginstructorblog.com
As discussed in greater detail in Station
3: Starts and Stops, a Power Pedal occurs
when the bicyclist prepares for takeoff by
positioning a pedal in the ten o’clock position.
This allows for quick momentum and minimal
hesitation when the coast is clear. Traffic
conditions can quickly change, so a fumble at
the takeoff can make it difficult to safely enter
the roadway.
Participants should stop and wait behind
the “stop line” (shown to the left) if anyone
is about to cross, then pull just far enough
forward to get a good view of traffic, put one
pedal in the proper position for a Power
Pedal, wait until the intersection is clear,
signal, and cross the street.
Remind each rider that it is not safe to
just follow a friend. They must look for
traffic themselves to decide if it is safe to
go. Their friend will wait for them in a safe
location on the other side of the intersection.
23
Crazy Crossroads

Let participants know that if two or
more bicyclists are riding together, they
can “take the lane” and bike abreast
of each other (i.e. side by side), but
that they should cross the intersection
separately.
Volunteers running this station will need to
determine which left-turn technique to teach
the participants. The two different methods
can be seen in the station diagram.
Those less experienced, especially those riding
on the sidewalk, should walk their bike along
crosswalks (first going straight through the
intersection, then going left on the crosswalk on the
other side of the intersection). More experienced
participants may be able to learn and safely use a
left hand turn as they go through the intersection.
Proper roadway position is very important for
bicyclists. When riders find themselves too far to
the right on the roadway, they are less visible to
motorists and less able to make a safe maneuver.
Suggest that participants bicycle at least four feet
from the edge of the travel lane.
Send the participant through the intersection with
instructions to go straight or make a turn.
What To Look For
Courtesy: Davis Enterprise
• Did the participant stop in the correct place?
• Did the participant move to where they can
see and be seen?
• Did the participant look left, right, left and
right before signaling?
• Did the participant prepare for a Power
Pedal?
Questions
• What is an intersection?
• What might be in the way to block
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
your view?
• Why might a car driver not see you?
• Why should you stop at all stop
signs and red lights?
• If you’re riding with a friend and s/
he goes through an intersection
ahead of you, should you assume
it’s safe for you to go through too?
24
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
Crazy Crossroads
Station 8: Rock Dodge
Objective
To teach bicyclists balance and control and how to
avoid small, unexpected hazards while riding
Background
Bicyclists often fail to notice roadway hazards
before it is too late. Negotiating road hazards is
essential to biking safely and enjoyably.
Staff Needs
One station leader and at least one additional
volunteer
Materials
• Station Sign
• Halved tennis balls, bean bags,
sponges, or a piece of carpet shaped like a
drain grate for obstacles
Procedure
This station is designed to simulate a situation
where a bicyclist is traveling at a good speed down
the roadway and suddenly encounters an obstacle.
While a “fast” speed is relative to the age and
ability of each rider, in most cases, the hazard
appears suddenly, and riders need to react quickly.
The placement of pairs of sponges close together is
designed to make sure the bicyclist doesn’t simply
make a big swerve around the “rock.” When done
properly, the rear wheel of the bicycle should pass
just around the obstacle.
Bicycle tire caught in drain grate
Courtesy: BikePortland

Optional: Set up two courses
side-by-side with different spacing
between the sponges to handle two
proficiency groups.
Start by asking participants to ride fast -whatever that speed is for them. This will
recalibrate their bicycling speed for this station,
since the skill cannot be practiced at a snail’s
pace.
40 ft
6”-12” apart for those
younger than 10.
3”-6” apart for those
older.
20 ft
Finishing Area
10 ft
24 ft
Waiting
Area
13 ft
Figure 8: Rock Dodge Station Layout
3-5’ for those
younger than 10.
2-3’ for those older.
25
Rock Dodge
The biggest mistake participants can make
with this exercise is not going fast enough
toward the obstacle or making the maneuver
too slowly, not because participants will
always be riding at top speed, but because
this station is designed to simulate an obstacle
suddenly appearing.
Next, have participants ride straight toward the
object and steer around it at the last moment. They
should steer by turning the handlebars first one
way (to avoid the object), and then turning back
the other way to put the bike back on the original
intended line of travel.
Questions
• What kinds of hazards do you find while
bicycle riding? Basic answer: glass, rocks,
drain grates, potholes, sticks, etc.
• Why do you need to be careful? Basic answer:
to avoid falls, flat tires, or ending up in the
path of a car
Discuss that it is important to avoid hazards
without swerving.
• How fast do you usually ride?
• Have you had to avoid hazards riding in the
past. If so, how?
What To Look For
• Do both front and back wheels avoid the
hazard?
• Was there quick turning action?
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
A student navigates the Rock Dodge course at speed
26
Rock Dodge
Station 9: Putting It All Together
Objectives
Participants benefit from practicign the skills
learned in other bicycle rodeo stations.
Staff Needs
One station leader and multiple additional
volunteers to act as pedestrians and cars.
Materials
•
•
•
•
•
•
Station Sign
Multiple Cardboard cars
Intersection or driveway
Chairs or other means to hold stop sign
Stop signs
Real cars or bushes for sight obstructions (optional)
• Pedestrians crossing the street
• Hazards (Sponges, pylons, “drain grates”)
• Whatever else from previous stations you
wish to include
Students put their bike safety skills to the test
Procedure
Use a real roadway or intersection; consider
setting up a group ride in a safe area
The procedure for this station depends on how
rodeo organizers set it up. There will likely be
elements incorporated from the Crazy Crossroads,
Demon Driveway, Safe on Sidewalks, and Rock
Dodge stations. Regardless, explain to participants
that this station will test the bicycle skills they’ve
learned in previous stations.
What To Look For
• Did the participant use the Power Pedal to
• If riding on the sidewalk, did the participant
start riding?
safely pass a pedestrian by announcing her
intent beforehand, and safely passing on the
left?
• Did the participant look left, right, left, and
right before entering the roadway?
• Did the participant ride too close to parked
cars, instead of the recommended four foot
minimum distance?
• Did the participant show proper scanning
technique before maneuvering into a turning
position?
• Did the participant properly execute their
As participants complete this
station, volunteers should
complete the relevant row of
the Ticket To Ride (Appendix
pages 40-41) on the participant’s
bike, commenting on how
the participant handled the
station’s content, and providing
constructive feedback.
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
turn?
27
Putting It All Together
This page intentionally blank.
Evaluation
Conclusion
With planning, great volunteers, and enthusiasm,
everyone honed their bicycling skills, learned
something new, and had fun. In order to improve
your event for next time and find out just how
much students learned, hand out the post-survey to
students and provide volunteers and parents with
their evaluation forms. You can use the feedback
from these cards to make your next bike rodeo
even better! Sample post-survey and evaluation
cards can be found in the Appendix.
At the end of your event, be sure to complete the
following tasks as part of a whole-group debriefing:
• Hand out certificates of participation
(examples found in Appendix)
• Ask the students debrief questions like “What
did you learn?” and “What was your favorite
part?”
• Thank volunteers
Remember that depending on their reading level,
some students may need the questions read to
them one-on-one.
• Discuss the benefits of biking
We want to know what worked and what didn’t too.
Send us an email at info@saferoutesga.org to tell us
about your experience.
Thank you for taking the time to set up a
valuable learning experience for the youth of your
community.
Filling out a post-event evaluation
29
• Talk about your school’s Safe Routes to
School program
This page intentionally blank.
Glossary
Balance Bike
A bicycle without pedals designed for those
learning how to ride a bicycle. Users begin by
walking while standing over the bike seat, then
progress to walking while sitting in the seat, striding
and gliding while sitting in the seat, and then riding
a normal bicycle. Balance bikes teach users how to
steer and balance.
Cardboard Car
A hand-held prop, usually made of cardboard or
foam core, with a drawing of a vehicle on it. This
prop is used to simulate traffic. When the car holder
has the cardboard car at her side, it means there is
no traffic. When it is held in front of her, it means
there is traffic approaching. (Photos of all props are
in the appendix.)
Cardboard Car
Courtesy: Lois Chaplin
Bicycling
Hand Signals
Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource Center
LEFT TURN
RIGHT TURN
Bicycle Owner
Inspector
Check items that need improvement
Frame
OR
STOP
___ Is it straight?
___ Is it clean?
___ Is frame strong enough?
___ Is the fork bent or twisted?
Wheels and Tires
___ Do they spin properly?
___ Are they centered and secure
in the frame?
___ Is the rim round?
___ Are all spokes in place and
secure?
___ Are the tires free of bulges,
cuts & worn spots?
Brakes
___ Are they working and secure?
___ Do they stop the bike smoothly?
___ If hand brakes, are cables and
shoes in good condition?
Drive Train
___ Is the chain complete & in good
condition?
___ Is the chain guard attached safely?
___ Is the gear cable frayed, broken,
or missing?
___ Does it have the proper tension?
___ Is it clean?
___ Has it been lubricated?
___ Are pedals in good condition?
Other
___ Are reflectors on the front, rear &
wheels of the bicycle?
___ Is the seat in good condition and
at proper height?
___ Are there front and rear lights
visible from 500 feet?
___ Are the hand grips and the
handlebar tight?
___ Are fenders secure and not loose?
___ Is there a horn or bell?
Comments for Parents
SafeRoutesGA.org
Bike Hand Signals
The Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource
Center assists K-8 schools with services that may
include (but are not limited to) the following:
• Developing a customized Safe Routes to
School plan
• Conducting walkability/bikability
assessments
• Developing bike/ped safety trainings
• Hosting a Walk to School Day event
• Coordinating with local planners, engineers,
and law enforcement regarding school safety
issues
Bike
Inspection
Checklist
Ticket To Ride
Bike Inspection Side
Hand Signals
Bicyclists are required by law to indicate their intent
to turn by using hand signals. A left turn signal is
made by extending the left arm. A right turn can
be made by either bending the left arm up at the
elbow or extending the right arm. (Point in the
direction you want to go!) When working with
children, first make sure they can handle a bicycle
and feel comfortable taking one hand away from
the handlebars before they attempt to make a turn
signal. Signaling should be taught to participants in
conjunction with scanning.
Ticket To Ride
A Ticket To Ride is used to track a participant’s
progress through the bike rodeo. Printed on
31
cardstock, it hangs from the handlebars of each
participant’s bicycle using a rubber band. It includes
space for notes about the bike’s inspection and
comments about the bicyclist’s performance at each
station (sample in appendix). Participants keep the
Ticket To Ride after the bike rodeo.
Lane Position
Lane position refers to where a bicyclist rides on
the roadway in relation to the edge of pavement.
Lane positioning is important when riding along
the roadway and when traveling through an
intersection. A common error among bicyclists is
to be too far to the right and, thus, not be seen by
a motorist. If a bicyclist makes a left hand turn from
the right curb, she is at great risk of being hit by
a motorist (oncoming or from behind). Bicyclists
should be at least four feet from the edge of the
street or from parked cars.
Finally, it’s very important for all bicyclists to
remember that walking a bike through the
crosswalks at an intersection that they’re
uncomfortable bicycling across is always an option.
The League of American Bicyclists
A national advocacy organization dedicated to
creating a Bicycle Friendly America for everyone.
Low Stress Roadway
Bicyclists choose where they ride based on how
comfortable and safe they feel. Bicycle level of
stress is based on the assumption that bicyclists not
only want to ride on a street that’s physically easy
to ride on, but that they also want to limit the stress
that results from conflict with cars and trucks, as
well as having to concentrate for long periods of
time while riding on busy and fast roadways. Low
stress bicycle facilities are best for children. These
include streets with speed limits 25 miles per hour
or less and not many cars; streets with bike lanes,
speed limits 25 miles per hour or less, and two or
three travel lanes; trails and greenways; and bicycle
facilities protected from traffic by curbs, parked
cars, or some other means of separation from
traffic.
Power Pedal
A fast, efficient start-up maneuver. Straddle the
bike with one foot on a pedal placed in the “two
o’clock” position. Start by pushing down with that
foot and have the second foot ready for the second
pedal. Sit on the seat and continue pedaling.
Power Pedal Start Position
Courtesy: Lois Chaplin
32
Safe Kids Georgia
This organization promotes changes in attitudes,
behaviors, laws and the environment to prevent
accidental injury to children. Bike rodeo organizers
should consider reaching out to local Safe Kids
chapters to see if they have helmets that could be
given out to bike rodeo participants. Their website
is www.safekidsgeorgia.org.
Scan or Scanning
The technique of looking around for traffic,
especially behind you. Bicyclists must remember
to look for traffic, and must be able to look behind
without dangerously unintentionally swerving from
their line of travel.
Sidewalk
A paved pathway for people to walk on, usually
alongside a roadway. According to Georgia law,
no one older than 12 can legally ride a bicycle on
the sidewalk. Once bicyclists are about 10 years
old and have developed some basic handling skills,
they are generally safer on the street. Sidewalks
have a number of hazards for fast moving bicyclists,
including pedestrians, driveways, and side streets.
Additionally, at intersections, motorists do not
expect bicyclists to come from the sidewalk, which
can create a dangerous situation.
Station
A module in a bike rodeo. Each station teaches a
different bicycle safety skill.
Station Leader
The person responsible for facilitating a certain
station. The station leader instructs participants,
asks questions, and demonstrates appropriate
bicycling behavior.
“Take the Lane”
A phrase that refers to when one or many bicyclists
ride in the center of a travel lane. There are many
reasons for taking the lane, including the lane being
too narrow for motorists to safely pass and debris
and hazards along the right edge of the roadway.
33
A skill building exercise which helps
bicyclists hone their low speed balance skills.
The race course is approximately 75 feet
long with one-foot wide lanes. Contestants
start the race together, and the last one
across the finish line (no weaving or placing
a foot on the ground) wins.
Example Serpentine Course
Courtesy: Lois Chaplin
34
A place for people to walk, and for only the very youngest of cyclists to be ri
Once cyclists are about 10 years old and have developed some basic handli
they are generally safer on the street. Sidewalks have a number of hazards
Slow Race
SERPENTINE OR SLOLOM
The optional area of the bicycle rodeo where
participants can practice riding under supervision
of volunteers.
Serpentine/Slalom
A skill building exercise which develops a
bicyclist’s coordination and balance. The
course is usually set up with traffic cones
placed four to six feet apart; the bicyclist
maneuvers through and around them. A
rough course diagram is at right.
A skill building exercise which develops
a cyclist's coordination and balance. The
course is usually set up with traffic
cones placed four to six feet apart; the
cyclist maneuvers through and around
them.
Warmup Pit
SIDEWALK
A person assisting the station leader at a station.
The volunteer may help organize participants, use
station props, reset station objects after they’ve
been moved, and any other tasks suggested by the
station leader.
This figure shows an aerial view of cone placement for a sample serpentine course. The dotted li
represents the path of the cyclist.
Volunteer
Appendix
Certificate of Participation (Elementary) ....... 36
Certificate of Participation (Middle) .............. 37
Event Flyer (Middle)(Editable) ......................... 38
Event Flyer (Elementary)(Editable) ................... 39
Ticket to Ride .............................................. 40
Sample Props ............................................. 42
Example News Release ................................ 43
Student Pre/Post Survey ............................... 45
Volunteer Survey ......................................... 46
Parent Survey .............................................. 47
Permission Slip & Photo/Video Releases ....... 48
Pre-Event Parent Email ................................. 50
Post-Event Parent Email ............................... 51
35
36
Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource Center
School/Organization Name
Completed The
Participant Name
Organizer Signature
Date
Bike
Rodeo
37
Safe Routes
to School
GEORGIA
Georgia Department of Transportation
WhT:
Middle School Walk Audit Booklet
This Walk Audit Guide was prepared by
the Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource Center,
funded by the Georgia Department of Transportation.
Wh:
WhRe:
WhN:
StY In ToCh!
38
What:
Why:
Where:
When:
STAY IN TOUCH!
39
Print Double Sided Top-Bottom.
Bicycle Owner
Inspector
Check items that need improvement
Frame
___ Is it straight?
___ Is it clean?
___ Is frame strong enough?
___ Is the fork bent or twisted?
Wheels and Tires
___ Do they spin properly?
___ Are they centered and secure
in the frame?
___ Is the rim round?
___ Are all spokes in place and
secure?
___ Are the tires free of bulges,
cuts & worn spots?
Brakes
___ Are they working and secure?
___ Do they stop the bike smoothly?
___ If hand brakes, are cables and
shoes in good condition?
Comments for Parents
Bike
Inspection
Checklist
40
Drive Train
___ Is the chain complete & in good
condition?
___ Is the chain guard attached safely?
___ Is the gear cable frayed, broken,
or missing?
___ Does it have the proper tension?
___ Is it clean?
___ Has it been lubricated?
___ Are pedals in good condition?
Other
___ Are reflectors on the front, rear &
wheels of the bicycle?
___ Is the seat in good condition and
at proper height?
___ Are there front and rear lights
visible from 500 feet?
___ Are the hand grips and the
handlebar tight?
___ Are fenders secure and not loose?
___ Is there a horn or bell?
Skill Level
Comments
Registration/
Inspection
Bicycle/
Helmet Fit
Starts/
Stops
Scanning
Safe on
Sidewalks
Rock
Dodge
Demon
Driveway
Crazy
Crossroads
Putting It
All Together
Instructions: For each station, place a plus sign if student skillfully completed
station or place a checkmark if there is room for improvement. Write additional
comments for the student if necessary.
Ticket To Ride
41
36
42
Bike Rodeo News Release
The template news release on the next page can be tailored to officially engage the media about your
upcoming bike rodeo. The news release can be used to attract both event participants and positive
media attention.
Using the Template
•
Fill in the bracketed areas with your organization/event information
•
Logo: We encourage you to use the Georgia Safe Routes to School logo, and to add your
organization’s logo as well. You may also choose to print the news release on your
organization’s letterhead.
•
Contact Information: It is important to choose a point person for the news release who will be
available both once the release is distributed and throughout the event. Use the contact
phone number that has the greatest likelihood of reaching the person.
•
Length: The ideal news release is no longer than one page in length.
•
Identify Media Contacts: If you are working with a school on this bike rodeo, consider reaching
out to that school district’s communications staff to get a list of media contacts to reach out
to.
•
Distribution: A few days or the day before the event, distribute the release to local media
contacts (television, radio, newspaper, and news websites). Email, fax, mail, tweet, Facebook,
and hand-delivery are all ways to distribute the release.
•
Materials: Have copies of the news release available at the event. In addition, you may also
compile a press kit, including fact sheets and backgrounders.
•
Encourage: Suggest that a reporter with school-age children bring her/him to participate in
the event.
.
43
For immediate Release
[Release date]
[Logo here]
Contact:
[Name, number and email]
[City, County, area] school(s)/organization(s) Teach Safe Bicycling with Upcoming Bike
Rodeo on [Date]
[City, State] -- [Name of School, participating organizations, etc.] in [city or county] will hold a bike
rodeo on [Date] at [Time] to help students learn biking skills. The event features stations that teach
participants how to properly maintain a bike, fit a bike and a helmet, ride safely in the street and
sidewalks, and negotiate driveways and intersections. All participants will have a chance to learn,
practice, and demonstrate their bicycle handing skills in a fun, noncompetitive atmosphere. Bring a
bicycle and a helmet!
Event organizers expect [number] of people to participate and encourage all interested to register for
the event at [Link] or talk to their teachers at [School Name]. Those interested in volunteering at the
bike rodeo, especially high school students interested in satisfying part of their community service
graduation requirement, should contact [Name] at [Phone Number] to learn more. Upon completing
na
the bicycle rodeo events, participants will receive [awards, certificates, etc.] and be entered i
drawing to win [award name].
For additional local information, please contact [name] at [phone number, if possible, give a cell
phone number that allows media to contact the individual during the event.]
Established in August 2009, the Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource Center works with elementary,
middle, and high schools to create school-based SRTS teams aimed at encouraging children to walk and
bike to school safety. The Resource Center offers resources, materials, incentives, and technical
assistance to schools interested in creating a local Safe Routes to School program. School Outreach
Coordinators provide program support and guidance to Partner
schools. School-based Safe Routes to School program activities are
centered on Education, Encouragement, Enforcement and Evaluation.
The Resource Center’s five school outreach coordinators have
established partnerships with over 411 schools. More than 180 local,
regional and state agencies and organizations are Friends of the Safe
Routes to School program. For more information, visit www.SafeRoutesGA.org or call 1.877.436.8927.
44
Bike Rodeo
Student Pre-Survey
Name_______________________________________________________________________
How can you tell if your helmet is fitted securely on your head?
Do you use bicycle hand signals? What are the signals you use?
When crossing a street on your bike, do you look both ways for traffic? Do you cross in the crosswalk?
Bike Rodeo
Student Post-Survey
Name_______________________________________________________________________
What are the four steps of helmet fitting?
What are the three bicycle signals? When are they used?
If your friends are crossing a street, is it safe for you to follow them? How do you safely cross a street?
45
Bike Rodeo
Volunteer Survey
Name_______________________________________________________________________
Did the event seem well run? Were event instructions clear and explained well?
Did you feel you had the appropriate amount of responsibility? Were there enough volunteers?
What could be improved for next time?
Are you willing to help with another bike rodeo in the future?
Bike Rodeo
Volunteer Survey
Name_______________________________________________________________________
Did the event seem well run? Were event instructions clear and explained well?
Did you feel you had the appropriate amount of responsibility? Were there enough volunteers?
What could be improved for next time?
Are you willing to help with another bike rodeo in the future?
46
Bike Rodeo
Parent Survey
Name_______________________________________________________________________
Child’s Name_______________________________________________________________
Did the event seem well run and meet your expectations?
Were there any skills you wish had been taught that weren’t?
What did you learn today about safe bicycling?
Are you more willing to let your child bike to school now? If not, what additional training is
needed or what else need to change?
Bike Rodeo
Parent Survey
Name_______________________________________________________________________
Child’s Name_______________________________________________________________
Did the event seem well run and meet your expectations?
Were there any skills you wish had been taught that weren’t?
What did you learn today about safe bicycling?
Are you more willing to let your child bike to school now? If not, what additional training is
needed or what else need to change?
47
Bike Rodeo
Permission Slip & Photo Video Release
Participating Child’s Name:
The above named child has my permission to participate in the Bike Rodeo that is being conducted by the
Organizer:
at Location:
on
Date:
for the purpose of teaching bicycle safety skills. This workshop is not a contest
or trick riding program. I agree that my child will obey the rules set down by the staff conducting the
workshop to maintain a safe environment.
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Name:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Signature:
Date:
My child has a bicycle s/he will be
bringing to the Bike Rodeo.
My child has a helmet s/he will
be bringing to the Bike Rodeo.
My child does not know how to
ride a bicycle.
My child’s bicycle can be shared
with other students who don’t
own bicycles at this event.
I hereby give permission for images of my child, captured during the Bike Rodeo through video, photo and
digital camera, to be used solely by School/Organization:
and
the Georgia Safe Routes to School Resource Center in promotional material and publications, and waive
any rights of compensation or ownership thereto.
Participating Child’s Name:
Age:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Name:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Signature:
Date:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Email Address:
48
BiE RoEo
PeMiSiN SlP & PhTo ViEo ReEaE
Return by Date:
Participating Child’s Name:
The above named child has my permission to participate in the Bike Rodeo that is being conducted by the
Organizer:
at Location:
on
Date:
for the purpose of teaching bicycle safety skills. This workshop is not a contest
or trick riding program. I agree that my child will obey the rules set down by the staff conducting the
workshop to maintain a safe environment.
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Name:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Signature:
Date:
My child has a bicycle s/he will be
bringing to the Bike Rodeo.
My child has a helmet s/he will
be bringing to the Bike Rodeo.
My child does not know how to
ride a bicycle.
My child’s bicycle can be shared
with other students who don’t
own bicycles at this event.
I hereby give permission for images of my child, captured during [Event Name] through video, photo and
digital camera, to be used solely by [Organization/School Name] and the Georgia Safe Routes to School
Resource Center in promotional material and publications, and waive any rights of compensation or
ownership thereto.
Participating Child’s Name:
Age:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Name:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Signature:
Parent/Legal Guardian’s Email Address:
Date:
Safe Routes
to School
GEORGIA
Georgia Department of Transportation
49
Sample Parent Letter/ Email – Before Event
Dear Parent,
Your child has the opportunity to participate in an event that will give her or him a chance to learn about,
and practice, safe bicycling skills. The Bicycle Rodeo includes a safety inspection and a series of skills
stations directly related to everyday bicycling situations. Participants will practice starting and stopping,
riding on the sidewalk, the safe way to exit a driveway, how to look for traffic, negotiating an intersection,
and avoiding common road hazards. [Tailor this paragraph to describe what skills the bike rodeo will actually
include.]
[Date] [Time] [Location]
Please encourage your child to attend this worthwhile event. S/he will need to bring a bicycle, a helmet,
and a signed permission slip. There is no charge for participating, and parents are encouraged to ride
along. Why don't you bring your bicycle and join the fun?
This program is being sponsored by [Your Organization]
Sincerely,
[Event Organizer Name]
Another option for organizers: Send home the hang tag along with the permission slip and ask the
parents to fill it out with their child and bring it to the event.
50
Sample Parent Letter/Email – After Event
Dear Parent,
Today your child learned some basic bicycling skills and safety tips. S/He is well on her/his way to
reaping the lifelong health benefits that safe bicycling brings.
Thank you for bringing your child to the bike rodeo. But your job isn’t over!
Your next task is to reinforce the behaviors learned today. The overarching safety principle discussed
today was “predictability.” Being a more predictable bicyclist is being a safer cyclist and allows pedestrians
and motorists to anticipate the bicyclist’s movements.
Bicycling will help your child become healthier, more independent, and more engaged with the world
around her/him. Here are some points to stress with your child to make sure her/his rides are just as safe
as they are fun:
•
RIDE WITH TRAFFIC: In keeping with the “predictability” principle, when your child is riding in the
street, they should ride in the direction of traffic. This is because riding against traffic puts bicyclists
where motorists least expect them. Bicyclists riding with traffic are in a more predictable place to
motorists.
•
STOP AND LOOK BEFORE ENTERING A STREET: Riding into the street without stopping is a very
unpredictable behavior and can put your child in an unsafe situation. Explain to your children that they
must get in the habit of always stopping and looking for traffic at the end of a driveway, parking lot, or
alley. Have them practice by looking left, then right, then left again, and right again.
• STOP AT ALL STOP SIGNS AND RED LIGHTS: This practice greatly increases predictability. Often,
kids break this rule when riding with friends or when they are distracted. Stopping for traffic control
devices should be stressed so it becomes a reflex.
•
LEARN TO SCAN/:LOOK BEHIND FOR TRAFFIC: Many kids have been taught to signal before
turning, but not enough attention has been placed on looking behind them first. Explain to your child
that scanning allows them to pick the most predictable, safest time to signal and turn.
•
WEAR A HELMET: In Georgia, all bicyclists under the age of 16 must wear a helmet when riding a
bike. According to the law, helmets must meet either American National Standards Institute or Snell
Memorial Foundation impact standards (https://georgiabikes.org/index.php/resources/35/76-gabicycle-laws). Local bike shops and health departments are generally aware of special programs that
could be set up to offer helmets for very reasonable prices. It is highly recommended that bicyclists of all
ages wear a CPSC approved helmet while bicycling, especially parents and other adults who set an
example for others. Most helmets come with sizing pads to help ensure proper fit. Adjust the straps so
the helmet sits level and snug.
51
•
RIDE THE RIGHT SIZE BICYCLE: Riding a property fitted bicycle is an important aspect of safe riding.
A child should be able to stand flatfooted over the bike with at least an inch of clearance above the top
tube. S/he should be able to adequately reach the pedals while seated (slight bend in knees).
Riding a bicycle that is too big or too small can be dangerous for children. While ill-fitting hand-medown bicycles may appear to make financial sense, they can put your child in harm’s way. There are
many programs locally that match affordably-priced, appropriate size bicycles with children who want
to ride. Consider reaching out to your local bicycle shop or bicycle club to learn more about programs
in your area. Contact information for local bicycle clubs and shops can be found by searching the
Connect Locally section of the League of American Bicyclists’ website using your ZIP Code:
http://bikeleague.org/
•
MAKE YOUR OWN DECISIONS: Stress to your child that she or he needs to stop, look, and decide for
him or herself if the road is clear before crossing a street or making a turn. It is not safe to just follow a
friend. Also, as a parent or guardian, you are in a position to help your child decide where it is safe to
ride. Be aware of the road conditions around your home, and work with your child to figure out the
safest places to ride.
A FINAL NOTE
Having her or his own transportation gives your child mobility, responsibility, and a sense of freedom
which will help their personal growth. Thank you for allowing your child to participate
and for helping them learn how to do it safely. If bicycling is not already a family activity, give it a try!
Learn more about bicycle and pedestrian safety at these great websites: saferoutesga.org, georgiabikes.org,
saferoutesinfo.org, bikeleague.org, and pedbikeinfo.org
For further information contact [Contact Information]
Sincerely,
[Your Name]
52
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising