Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
70C-877-06a
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
MANAGEMENT SUMMARY
The Series 90 family of computer systems was introduced
in 1973 to provide an upward growth path for users of
Sperry Univac's 9000 Series and Series 70 systems. The
original Series 90 model, the 90/70, is no longer marketed.
The 90/60, initially a scaled-down version of the 90/70,
now offers the same memory capacity and processor speed
as the 90/70. The 90/60 is still actively marketed, but it is
no longer in new production.
Introduced in 1976, the 90/80 is the largest member of the
Series 90 family. It provides a growth path from the 90/60,
90/70, and large-scale Series 70 systems, and also
competes with the IBM 370/158 and 3031 processors.
In a move designed to provide upward compatibility
between the byte-oriented Series 90 systems and the wordoriented Series 1100 systems, Sperry Univac announced
the 1100/60 Attached Virtual Processor (AVP) in October
1980. The 1100/60 AVP is a special-purpose CPU that
enables execution of applications written for the Series 90
VS/9 operating system concurrently with applications
written for the OS 1100 operating system. Several VS/9
software products, including IMS, have been modified for 1>
The 90/60 and 90/S0 are the largest
members of Sperry Univac's Series 90 family
of byte-oriented, IBM-compatible computers. The VS/9 virtual memory operating
system supports concurrent processing,
interactive processing, and data communications.
MODELS: 90/60, 90/S0-2, 90/S0-3, and
90/80-4.
CONFIGURATION: From 512K to 8192K
bytes of main memory and from two to eight
I/O channels.
COMPETITION: Burroughs B 2900, B 3900,
B 5900, and B 6900; Digital Equipment
DECSYSTEM 2040; Honeywell DPS 7; IBM
3031,4331, and 4341; and NCR VS585.
PRICING: Purchase prices for basic systems
range from $2S4, 1S4 to $972,064.
CHARACTERISTICS
MANUF ACTURER: Sperry Univac Division, Sperry
Corporation, P.O. Box 500, Blue Bell, PA 19424. Telephone
(215) 542-4011.
MODELS: Sperry Univac 90/60, 90/80-2, 90/80-3, and
90/80-4. The 90/70 and the original 90/80 are no longer
marketed.
DATA FORMATS
BASIC UNIT: 8-bit byte. Each byte can represent one
alphanumeric character, two decimal digits, or eight binary
bits. Two consecutive bytes form a 16-bit "halfword," four
consecutive bytes form a 32-bit "word, " and eight consecutive
bytes form a 64-bit "doubleword."
FIXED-POINT OPERANDS: Can range from 1 to 16 bytes
(1 to 31 digits plus sign) in decimal mode; 1 halfword (16 bits)
or 1 word (32 bits) in binary mode. Certain operations use a
doubleword (63-bit integer field plus sign) in binary mode.
FLOATING-POINT OPERANDS: Standard floating-point
hardware provides for addition, subtraction, multiplication,
division, loading, storing, and sign control of short or long
format operands. The short format provides 24-bit precision
and is represented by one word, which uses bit 0 for the sign,
bits 1 through 7 for the exponent, and bits 8 through 31 for the
fraction. Long format is represented with a doubleword
which provides 56-bit precision; the long format is similar to
the short format except that the fraction is contained in bit
positions 8· through 68. A guard digit is carried by the
hardware for intermediate "place holding" during addition/
subtraction, multiplication, comparison, and halving.
Extended-precision floating-point is available only on the
90/80.
The Sperry Univac 90/80 computer system is available in three
models: the 90/80-2, 90/80-3, and 90/80-4. The performance level of
the 90/80-2 is about 25 percent less than that of the 90/80-3. The
90/80-4 is a high-performance model that includes a high-speed
buffer memory and provides about 35 percent greater performance
than the 90/80-3.
MARCH 1983
INSTRUCTIONS: 2, 4, or 6 bytes in length, specifying 0,1, or
2 main storage addresses, respectively.
INTERNAL CODE: EBCDIC or ASCII, depending upon
setting of a mode bit in the program status word by certain
processor instructions. The processor is sensitive to zone fields
and edit control characters.
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© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
70C-877 -06b
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
1:> use with the 1100 Series. In addition, a series of programs
are available to facilitate conversion from VS/9 to OS
1100.
PROCESSORS AND PERIPHERALS
The 90/60 processor offers an instruction repertoire that
includes the complete IBM 360/50 set of instructions.
Architectural features include Dynamic Address
Translation, writeable control storage, and MOS main
memory. Minimum main memory is 512K bytes,
expandable to 2048K bytes. The processor cycle time is 200
nanoseconds.
The 90 /80 system is available in three models: the 90/80-2,
90/80-3, and 90/80-4.
The entry-level 90/80-2 system includes a 130-nanosecond
CPU with 1024K bytes of main memory, a peripheral
processor with one 183-KBS byte multiplexer and four
1500-KBS block multiplexer channels, system console,
power distribution panel, and motor/alternator. Main
memory is expandable to 2048K bytes, and the I/O
subsystem is expandable to 16 channels through the
addition of an F20 11-00 interface extender. The peripheral
processor provides 240 block multiplexer subchannels in
the basic system and up to 496 subchannels in the
expanded configuration. The 90/80-2 can be upgraded to
90/80-3 status using the F2756-0 I upgrade kit.
The 90/80-3 is nearly identical to the 90/80-2, differing
only in processor cycle time and memory capacity. This
higher-performance version features a machine cycle time
of 98 nanoseconds, providing about 30 percent more
internal performance than the 90/80-2. The basic 90/80-3
configuration includes the CPU with 2048K bytes of main
memory, expandable to 4096K bytes, a peripheral
processor with one 183-KBS byte multiplexer and four
1500-KBS block multiplexer channels, system console,
power distribution panel, and motor I alternator. Like its
smaller counterpart, the I/O subsystem for the 90/80-3 is
expandable to 16 channels through the F20 11-00 interface
extension.
The basic 90/80-4 system includes the 98-nanosecond
CPU, 2048K bytes of main memory, a 5-channel group
consisting of one byte multiplexer channel and four block
multiplexer channels, a 32K-byte high-speed buffer, and a
system console. Memory is expandable to 8192K bytes in
2048K-byte increments. The I/O subsystem can be
expanded by adding up to three additional block
multiplexer channels.
The 90/80 systems are designed around two processors, an
Instruction Processor and a Peripheral Processor, each
with separate processing capabilities.
The Instruction Processor is the processing and control
portion of the 90/80 system. It contains the sequencing
and controls for interrupt action, timing facilities, initial
1>
program loading, and instruction execution.
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MAIN STORAGE
STORAGE TYPE: MOS (metal oxide semiconductor).
CAPACITY: 90/60-from 512K to 2048K bytes in
increments of 256K or 512K bytes.90/80-2-1024K or2048K
bytes. 90/80-3-2048K, 3072K, or 4096K bytes. 90/80-42048K 4096K, 6144K, or 8192K bytes.
CYCLE TIME: 600 nanoseconds per 4-byte access in the
90/60; 490 nanoseconds per 8-byte access in the 90/80. The
90/80-4 also features odd/even interleaving; eight bytes are
fetched from each of two banks on each memory cycle.
HIGH-SPEED BUFFER: The 90/80-4 contains a 32K-byte
butTer made up of bipolar memory with an access time of 55
nanoseconds. The butTer is organized in two 16K-byte
sections, one for instructions and one for operand data. On
memory store operations, data is automatically written
through to memory.
CHECKING: In all models, a single-bit error-correcting,
double-bit error-detecting code is appended to each 32-bit
word. Upon reading each word from memory, single-bit
errors are automatically corrected and transferred, while
multiple-bit errors are detected and flagged for appropriate
program action.
STORAGE PROTECTION: The standard storage protection feature uses 16 keys to provide read and/or write
protection for 2048-byte -blocks of storage. An interrupt is
generated whenever a read or write instruction is attempted in
an unauthorized storage location. Storage protection is also
provided through the virtual address structure, which does
not allow users to map into each other's address space.
RESERVED STORAGE: The first 604 bytes of main storage
in the 90/60 and the first 1024 bytes in the 90/80 are reserved
to hold specific operating information.
CENTRAL PROCESSORS
REGISTERS: The programmer has access to sixteen 32-bit
genend registers that are used for indexing, base addressing,
and as accumulators. (A second full set of 16 registers is used
by the operating system.) Four doubleword floating-point
registers are standard.
DYNAMIC ADDRESS TRANSLATION: This feature,
standard in all 90/60 and 90/80 central processors, translates
virtual storage addresses into real main memory addresses as
each instruction is executed. The DAT feature incorporates a
Translation Lookaside ButTer (TLB) consisting of eight 32-bit
registers in the 90/60 and thirty-two 32-bit registers in the
90/80. Addresses are 24 bits in length, and include a 4-bit
block designator, a 4-bit segment designator, a 4-bit page
designator, and a 12-bit displacement designator.
The total addressable virtual memory space is 8,388,608
bytes, organized into a hierarchy of blocks, segments, pages,
and bytes. A page consists of 4,096 bytes, one segment
includes 16 pages, one block contains 16 segments, and the
entire addressable virtual memory space comprises 8 blocks.
Block, segment, and page tables are maintained in main
storage for each executing program, the contents of which are
used to construct physical main memory addresses for each
instruction.
The TLB maintains the real page addresses for the eight most
recently referenced pages, all of which can be examined
concurrently within 30 nanoseconds. If a "TLB hit" occurs (in
which the block, segment, and page designators of the
instruction match a real page address in the TLB), the TLB
page address is concatenated with the instruction's 12-bit
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
MARCH 1983
~
70C-877 -06c
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
TABLE 1. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UNIVAC 90/60 AND 90/80 SYSTEMS
SYSTEM CHARACTERISTICS
Date of introduction
Principal operating system
Relative performance level
Monthly rental, basic system**
Monthly maintenance, basic system
MAIN STORAGE
Type and Size
Cycle time, nanoseconds
Bytes fetched per cycle
Interleaving
Minimum capacity, bytes
Maximum capacity, bytes
Increment size, bytes
Error correcting
HIGH-SPEED BUFFER
Type
Cycle time, nanoseconds
Capacity, bytes
i
PROCESSING UNIT
Cycle time, nanoseconds
Floating-point arithmetic
Extended floating-point arithmetic
Decimal arithmetic
Programmable registers:
User -programmable
Executive use only
Floating-point
Instruction repertoire:
Non-privileged 9400/9480
Non-privileged Series 70
Non-privileged IBM System/36O
Non-privileged IBM System/37O
Total instructions
Dynamic Address Translation (OAT):
Type***
Translation time, nanoseconds
(assumes OAT hit)
No. of page entries
Range of memory covered by OAT
I/O CONTROL
No. of channels per system,
maximum
Aggregate data rate, bytes per
second
High-speed channels:
Type of channel
No. of high-speed channels
No. of subsystems per channel
Data rate, bytes per second
Byte multiplexer channels:
No. of subsystems
No. of subchannels
Data rate, bytes per second
90/60
90/80-2
90/80-3
90/80-4
October 1973
VS/9
1.00
$8,289
$1,752
October 1977
VS/9
2.60
$21,802
$3,054
October 1977*
VS/9
3.50
$27,852
$3,928
May 1978
VS/9
4.80
$26,544
$4,244
4KMOS
600
4
No
524,288
2,097,152
262,144 or
524,288
Yes
16K MOS
490
8
No
1,048,576
2,097,152
1,048,576
16K MOS
490
8
No
2,097,152
4,194,304
1,048,576
16K MOS
490
8
2 to 1
2,097,152
8,388,608
2,097,152
Yes
Yes
Yes
None
None
None
Yes
Bipolar
150
32,768
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
200
Yes
No
31 chars. max.
130
Yes
Yes
31 chars. max.
98
Yes
Yes
31 chars. max.
98
Yes
Yes
31 chars. max.
16
16
4
16
16
4
16
16
4
16
16
4
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
144
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
154
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
154
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
154
TLB
32
TLB
32
TLB
32
TLB
32
8
32,768
32
131,072
32
131,072
32
131,072
5
8
8
8
5,700,000
8,000,000
8,000,000
8,000,000
Selector
1-4
8
1,100,000
Block mux.
4-7
8
1,500,000
Block mux.
4-7
8
1,500,000
Block mux.
4-7
8
1,500,000
8-16
15-63
175,000
8-16
256
183,000
8-16
256
183,000
8-16
256
183,000
*Original 90/80 computer was introduced in June 1976 and was equivalent in performance to the 90/80-3.
**One-year lease.
***TLB =Translation Lookaside Buffer.
MARCH 1983
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
I
70C-877-06d
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
t> The microprogrammed Peripheral Processor provides the
input/ output processing facilities for the 90/80. This
design frees the Instruction Processor from handling
input/ output processing, thereby gaining the efficiencies
of specialized design as well as the added benefits of
distributing the central processing workload.
Sperry Univac offers a wide variety of peripheral
equipment for the 90/60 and 90/80 systems. Mass storage
devices include the 100-megabyte 8430 Removable Disk
Subsystem; the 200-megabyte 8433 Removable Disk
Subsystem; and the 8450 Dual Disk Drive, a fixed-media
unit with a capacity of 307 megabytes. The 90/60 and
90/80 systems support the Uniservo 14, Uniservo 16,
Uniservo 22/24, and Uniservo 30 Series magnetic tape
drives. Card readers and band printers are also available
for use with the 90/60 and 90/80 systems.
Communications capabilities are provided through the
Multi-Channel Communications Controller (MCC),
which supports up to 128 half-duplex or 64 full-duplex
communications lines. The MCC has a peak throughput
capacity of 25,000 characters per second and can
concurrently support up to eight different line speeds
ranging from 45 to 56,000 bits per second.
SOFTWARE SUPPORT
The principal operating system for the 90/60 and 90/80
systems is VS/9, a virtual memory operating system that
offers functional capabilities for concurrent processing,
data communications, and interactive processing. VS /9
provides file management capabilities, reliability and
recovery capabilities, and accounting functions.
Communications support is provided by the Virtual
Integrated Communications Access Method (VICAM).
VICAM is a set of generalized software components that
provide a wide range of functions for user applications. A
set of prescribed procedures in the form of macro
instructions affords the user an interface to remote devices
and message files.
Information management capabilities are provided by
DMS/90, a generalized data base management system
based on CODASYL specifications, and IMS/90, an online storage and retrieval system.
Available programming languages include Cobol,
Fortran, Basic, RPG / II, and Assembler. A Virtual
Memory Editor (EDT) can be used for modifying sourcelanguage programs stored in VS /9 files in sequential or
indexed sequential format.
USER REACTION
Ten users of Sperry Univac's 90/60 and 90/80 systems
responded to Datapro's 1982 survey of general-purpose
computer users. Out of a total of 13 CPUs, 5 were
90/60s and 8 were 90/ 80s. The oldest system had been
in use since September 1975; the newest, since January
1981.
t>
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displacement address to form the required real main memory
address.
The DAT uses a 3-table look-up procedure to develop real
page addresses for instructions that are not found in the TLB.
The block, segment, and page designators in the instruction
point to locations in the block, segment, and page tables
maintained in main memory by the operating system for each
program. The translation process requires between three and
four main storage cycles to generate a real address.
CONTROL STORAGE: In addition to main storage, a fast
writeable control storage is available for the microprograms
used to support integrated emulation, floating-point
hardware, microdiagnostics, and the native-mode instruction
set. The floating-point hardware is included in the basic
prices. The cycle time of this separate MOS memory is 80
nanoseconds per 72-bit word access. Data is loaded into the
writeable control storage via a cassette prepared by Sperry
Univac support personnel. An additional control storage
module is available to support SMOOTH.
INSTRUCTION REPERTOIRE: In the 90/60, all 132 nonprivileged instructions of the IBM System/360 instruction set
are provided. Also included are an add immediate instruction,
an emulation aid instruction, and floating-point instructions.
The standard instructions handle fixed-point binary
arithmetic, decimal arithmetic using variable-length operands
in packed formats, packing and unpacking, radix conversion,
editing, loading, storing, comparing, shifting, branching, and
logical operations, as well as instructions for handling ASCII
or EBCDIC characters.
The 90/80 system native instruction set is upward-compatible
with the 90/60 instruction set. In addition, the 90/80 native
instruction set includes all non-privileged instructions of the
IBM System/370 universal instruction set, plus extended
floating-point capabilities and instructions unique to the
90/80 system.
INSTRUCTION TIMES: All times are for register-toindexed-storage (RX) instructions, except where indicated,
and are estimated in microseconds.
Binary add/subtract (32 bits)
2.10
1.27
0.96
6.18
4.32
3.25
2.95
12.20
6.15
4.62
4.41
29.10
15.42
11.58
11.19
6.83
5.23
3.94
3.55
35.60
22.58
16.87
16.75
72.15
30.18
22.65
22.35
16.20
8.47
7.76
6.52
15.90
5.07
4.06
3.63
22.50
6.41
5.22
4.23
Branch on condition
1.20
Load (32-bit binary)
Store (32-bit binary)
Load multiple (six 32bit registers)
Move (16 bytes)*
Compare (16 bytes)*
2.10
2.40
7.50
0.671.15
1.22
1.37
2.54
0.400.84
0.92
1.07
2.13
0.260.53
0.55
0.63
1.77
11.70
15.30
3.58
3.62
3.01
2.97
2.17
2.50
Floating-point add/ subtract
(short)
Floating-point multiply
(short)
Floating-point divide
(short)
Floating-point add/ subtract
(long)
Floating-point multiply
(long)
Floating-point divide
(long)
Add decimal (IO-digit
packed data)*
Compare decimal (10digit packed data)*
Pack decimal (10 digits)*
0.58
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*Storage-to-storage instructions.
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
MARCH 1983
70C-S77-06e
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
1:> We asked the users to check off, from a list provided, the
significant advantages of their systems and any significant
problems encountered. The Sperry Univac 90/60 and
90/80 systems received 32 specific mentions of advantages
and 13 mentions of problems. The table below lists the
advantages and problems most frequently cited for the
90/60 and 90/80, as well as the corresponding figures for
all mainframes rated in our survey.
Percentage of Responses
90/60 &
90/S0
All
Mainframes
50.00
52.54
40.00
54.68
40.00
30.54
Significant Advantages:
System is easy to expand/
reconfigure.
Users are happy with response
time.
Productivity aids help us keep
costs down.
Significant Problems:
Vendor did not provide promised
software or support.
Vendor enhancements/changes
to hardware/software are hard
to keep up with.
30.00
14.48
30.00
17.56
In regard to the second problem listed above, one user
wrote: "Univac's system of'patching'the operating system
(VS /9) is extremely difficult to keep up with, understand,
and implement."
The users were also asked to rate the system in 14 specific
categories as "Excellent," "Good," "Fair," or "Poor." The
following table summarizes the users' ratings of the 90/60
and 90/80 systems.
Excellent Good Fair
Ease of operation
Reliability of mainframe
Reliability of peripherals
Maintenance service:
Responsiveness
Effectiveness
Technical support:
Trouble-shooting
Education
Documentation
Manufacturer's software:
Operating system
Compilers & assemblers
Applications programs
Ease of programming
Ease of conversion
Overall satisfaction
4
6
5
3
4
4
2
5
2
I
4
3
I
Poor W A *
5
0
1
2
0
0
0
3.40
3.40
3.10
6
5
0
3
0
0
3.40
2.90
6
5
7
2
4
I
0
0
2.70
2.70
2.90
0
0
1
0
I
0
3.50
3.22
2.44
3.40
3.00
3.10
5
7
3
6
4
9
2
0
0
4
0
I
0
*Weighted Average on a scale of 4.0 for Excellent.
To obtain additional input from the survey respondents,
we interviewed two of them in January 1983. Both were
using 90/60 systems at the time of the survey, but have
recently upgraded the systems.
The first user interviewed had installed a 90/60 system in
1978 as a replacement for a Honeywe112020. This user said 1:>
MARCH 1983
~
The above instruction timings have been calculated assuming
no channel interference. Instruction timings for the 90/80-4
also assume a 90-percent buffer storage hit rate.
EMULA TION: Emulation features are available for IBM
System/360 and /370 DOS and for Sperry Univac Series 70
TDOS and DOS through the Spectra Mode of Operation
(SMOOTH) hardware.
CO NSO LE: The 90/60 system console consists of a keyboard
with operator controls and a Uniscope 100 CRT display unit.
The standard mode of operation provides for display of
messages on the CRT screen; hard copy is provided by the
console printer as an optional feature under VS/9, but is
required for operation under OS/4. Under VS/9, those error
messages which are printed on the console printer with OS/4
are written on direct-access storage for subsequent high-speed
printing at the system manager's convenience. The hard copy
console printer operates at up to 30 cps and connects to the
processor via the multiplexer channel; it uses one physical
controller connection on the multiplexer. The system console
can be switched by the multiple channel switch to operate on a
selector channel for diagnostic purposes if required.
The 90/80 system console consists of a keyboard, a Uniscope
200 CRT 1920-character display unit, switches, and
indicators housed in a cabinet that is separate from the
peripheral processor. The system console communicates with
the processor through the byte multiplexer channel, and
includes all controls and indicators necessary to operate and
monitor the operation of the system. The operator controls
consist of an alphanumeric typewriter keyboard, cursor
control keys, editing keys, control keys, and indicators.
As an optional feature, an incremental printer can be
connected to the 90/80 system console to provide additional
hard copy output. It can be used to duplicate messages
displayed on the visual display screen and to log informative
messages that need not be displayed or responded to. The
incremental printer, mounted in a separate cabinet, has a 96character set (including upper case and lower case) and a 132position print line, prints up to 200 characters per second, and
has a paper feed rate of 30 lines per second.
INPUT/OUTPUT CONTROL
I/O CHANNELS: The basic 90/60 Processor has one
standard multiplexer channel. It can physically connect up to
7 low-speed systems and a multi-channel communications
controller (MCC) for a total of 15 subchannel addresses. Two
subchannel expansion features provide an expansion
capability of addressing up to 63 subchannels. The maximum
aggregate multiplexer channel transfer rate is 175,000 bytes
per second.
One selector channel is standard on the 90/60, and three
additional selector channels can be added. The second
selector channel is housed in the processor cabinet, and the
third and fourth require the channel expansion cabinet.
A Direct Control feature is available as an option supported
by the user's own code. It is used to provide a special interface
between two 90/60 or 90/80 processors and includes two
instructions for transfer of control information between the
processors.
The Peripheral Processor provides the I/O processing
facilities for the 90/80 system. It permits a maximum of eight
I/O channels. The minimum 90/80 system includes one byte
multiplexer channel and four block multiplexer channels. The
maximum number of byte multiplexer channels is two per
peripheral processor. The maximum number of block
multiplexer channels is six, unless the second byte multiplexer
channel is not selected; in this case, up to seven block
multiplexer channels may be configured. Each block ~
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
70C-877-06f
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
TABLE 2. MASS STORAGE
8430
8433
8450
Disk
Disk
Disk*
2 to 16
1 removable
2 to 16
1 removable
2 to 16
1 HDA
100
200
307
Tracks/segments per drive unit
Average access time, milliseconds
Average rotational delay
Data transfer rate, bytes/second
7,676
27
8.3
806,000
15,352
30
8.3
1,257,000
16,800
23
8.3
1,260,000
Controller model
5039-97
5039-97
5040-95
Can be intermixed
with other 8400
Series drives
Can be intermixed
with other 8400
Series drives
Fixed-head option
available; can be
intermixed with
other 8400 Series
drives
Subsystems
Cabinets per subsystem
Disk packs/HDAs per cabinet
Capacity, megabytes
Comments
*Supported by 90/80 processor only.
I:> that he experienced "a lot of problems" during the
conversion, which involved changing all applications
software. The conversion took about a year to complete.
The 90/60 has been upgraded to a 90/70, and the user is
well satisfied with the system.
The second user interviewed upgraded from a 90/60 to a
90/70 and then to a 90/80. This user has also installed a
Sperry Univac 1100/60 system, and expects to spend
about two years converting his applications from the
90/80 to the 1100/60. He commented that he has been a
Sperry Univac customer for many years and is very happy
with the vendor's service.
The users ' ratings and comments indicate that they are
generally well satisfied with the 90/60 and 90/80 systems.
Of the 10 survey respondents, seven said they would
recommend the system to other users, two said they would
not, and one was undecided.D
~
multiplexer channel has eight physical connections to which
control units can be attached.
Data transfers between a 90/80 block multiplexer channel
and main storage are 8-byte parallel. A block multiplexer
channel, in conjunction with a control unit designed for block
multiplexer operation, can disconnect and reselect devices
between transfers of blocks of data within command chains.
This operation permits concurrent execution of channel
programs for several devices on one channel by multiplexing
blocks of data. This capability applies only to non-shared
subchannels of the block multiplexer channels; i.e., only one
device is assigned per subchannel.
Subchannel storage in the 90/80 peripheral processor is
pooled for block multiplexer channels and is expandable
from the basic 240 subchannels up to 496 subchannels
through the subchannel storage expansion feature. The
subchannel storage pool provides 16 shared sub channels and
224 non-shared subchannels, expandable up to 480. Shared
sub channels are assigned to devices at installation time. Nonshared subchannels are dynamically assigned as I/O
. operations are being initiated. Operations for which no
subchannel storage is available are initiated and executed as if
to a selector channel.
©
When operating with a shared subchannel, the channel does
not disconnect for command chaining as is the case with the
selector channel. However, when ending status is presented,
the channel disconnects and becomes available to other
channel devices. When the pool of non-shared subchannels
has been exhausted or the block mUltiplexing control bit in
control register 0 is zero, and a START-I/O instruction is
executed on the block multiplexer channel, the channel
operates as a selector channel. The channel remains busy until
the pending interrupt conditions are accepted by the
instruction processor.
The 90/80 peripheral processor- has one byte multiplexer
channel provided with the basic system configuration. A
second byte multiplexer channel can be added. Each byte
multiplexer channel has eight physical connections to which
standard control units (for such devices as a card reader, card
punch, or line printer) and a multi-channel communications
controller can be attached. The number of physical
connections to each byte multiplexer channel can be
expanded to 16. Each byte multiplexer channel provides 256
non-shared subchannels, 128 for communications devices.
The byte multiplexer has two modes of operation: multiplexer
and control-unit-force-burst. In the multiplexer mode, the
channel facilities are shared by a number of concurrently
operating I/O devices, with the I/O interface being assigned
to a control unit only long enough to transfer one byte of data.
Upon completion of this data exchange, the I/O interface is
available to another control unit requesting service, with this
operation continuing until all units requesting service have
been serviced. The operation repeats itself until all units are
completely serviced. In the control-unit-force-burst mode, the
control unit stays connected to the I/O interface until normal
termination is signaled by the control unit for the device (Le.,
until the byte count goes to zero or the end of the record is
detected). Data transfers between a byte multiplexer channel
and main storage are 4-byte parallel.
CONFIGURATION RULES: On the 90/60, high-speed
peripheral devices (tape and disk drives) must be connected to
a selector channel. Up to eight control units can be connected
to each selector channel, and up to eight or 16 drives can be
connected to each control unit. Low-speed devices, including
the multi-channel communications controller, card readers,
line printers, and the system console, are normally connected
to the multiplexer channel, which can accommodate up to 16
control units and 63 subchannel addresses .
On ·dIe 90/80, high-speed peripheral devices must be
co...decl to' a .block Rlultiplexer channel, and low-speed ~
1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
MARCH 1983
70C-877-06g
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
TABLE 3. INPUT/OUTPUT UNITS
Number
of Tracks
Recording
Density,
Bits/Inch
Encoding
Uniservo 14
7
7
7
9
9
200
556
800
800
1600
NRZI
NRZI
NRZI
NRZI
PE
60
60
60
60
60
12,000
33,400
48,000
48,000
96,000
Uniservo 16
7
7
7
9
9
200
556
800
800
1600
NRZI
NRZI
NRZI
NRZI
PE
120
120
120
120
120
24,000
66,720
96,000
96,000
192,000
Uniservo 22
9
9
800
1600
NRZI
PE
75
75
60,000
120,000
Uniservo 24
9
9
800
1600
NRZI
PE
125
125
100,000
200,000
Uniservo 30
7
7
7
9
9
200
556
800
800
1600
NRZI
NRZI
NRZI
NRZI
PE
200
200
200
200
200
40,000
111,200
160,000
160,000
320,000
Uniservo 32
9
9
1600
6250
PE
GCR
75
75
120,000
470,000
Uniservo 34
9
9
1600
6250
PE
GCR
125
125
200,000
780,000
Uniservo 36
9
9
1600
6250
PE
GCR
200
200
320,000
1,250,000
Printing
Speed
Print
Positions
Horizontal
Spacing,
Chars.llnch
Vertical
Spacing,
Lines/Inch
Form
Size,
Inches
0770-00
0770-02
0770-04
800 Ipm
1400 Ipm
2000 Ipm
132
132
132
10
10
10
6 or 8
6 or 8
6 or 8
3.5 to 22.0
in. wide, 24.0
in. long
0776-00
0776-02
0776-04
760lpm
·900 Ipm
1200 Ipm
136
136
136
10
10
10
6 or 8
6 or 8
6 or 8
4.0 to 18.75
in. wide, 24.0
in. long
Card
Equipment
Columns
Speed,
Cards/Min.
Input
Hopper
Capacity
Output
Stacker
Capacity
Options
0716-95 Card Reader
80
600
2400
22000-card
stackers
51 - or 66-col.
cards, validity
checks, translators
0716-99 Card Reader
80
1000
2400
22ooo-card
stackers
Same as 0716-95
0604-99 Card Punch
80
250
1000
21000-card
stackers
Read/punch
feature
Magnetic
Tape Units
Printers
~
devices to a byte multiplexer channel. Each block multiplexer
channel connects up to eight high--speed subsystems. Up to
seven block multiplexer channels are available (one standard
and six optional). The byte multiplexer channel connects up
to eight subsystems, including the operator console, and is
expa,ndable through an option to connect up to 16
subsystems. A second byte multiplexer is optionally available.
MARCH 1983
Tape Speed
Inches/Sec.
Transfer
Rate,
Bytes/Sec.
The seventh block multiplexer channel and the second byte
multiplexer channel are mutually exclusive.
SIMULTANEOUS I/O OPERATIONS: Concurrently with
computing, the 90/60 processor can control multiple I/O
operations with a combined data rate of up to 175,000
bytes/second on the multiplexer channel, plus one I/O
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
~
70C-877-0Sh
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
~
operation with a data rate of up to 1.1 million bytes/second
on each selector channel.
In the 90/80 system, the microprocessor of the 90/80
Peripheral Processor controls channel operations. Once the
Instruction Processor initiates an I/O operation, the channel
is able to execute this operation independently. Data transfers
between peripheral devices and main storage can be
performed by all channels concmrently. Control logic is
provided to monitor the data transfers among the channels
and to assist in servicing the many conditions that can occur
during the transfer of data. The maximum aggregate I/O data
transfer rate of a peripheral processor is eight million bytes
per second. The maximum byte multiplexer channel data
transfer rate is an aggregate of 183,000 bytes per second. The
maximum block multiplexer channel transfer rate is 1.5
million bytes per second.
MASS STORAGE
Disk storage subsystems available for the 90/60 and 90/80 are
listed in Table 2.
INPUT/OUTPUT UNITS
Magnetic tape units, printers, and punched card equipment
are listed in Table 3.
COMMUNICATION CONTROLS
VS/9: Announced in February 1975, VS/9 offers functional
capabilities for concurrent processing, data communications,
and interface processing. The virtual memory features of
VS/9 allow programs to be located in memory in noncontiguous pages of 4,096 bytes each that are swapped in and
out of main memory space of 8 million bytes, and its multiprogramming facilities can manage a theoretical limit of
over 120 concurrent tasks.
The allocation of processor resources among tasks is
accomplished by a supervisory scheduling algorithm, a
hardware interval timer, and a system table of task queues.
The tasks in the active queues compete for central processor
time, with interactive tasks and those with higher priorities
receiving larger time slices than batch tasks and lower priority
tasks. Input/ output-bound tasks are given attention before
compute-bound tasks. Priority levels can by dynamically
adjusted during execution to bias the system toward batch or
interactive processing.
VS/9 supports Class I and Class II problem programs. Class I
programs remain resident in contiguous main memory
locations and are not paged. Class II programs operate in the
virtual memory mode, are allocated in 4K-byte pages,. and
require only the working set of each program to be resident in
main memory for execution. Pages are paged out when they
have been modified and the system requires pages of a higher
priority. Pages that have been least used are paged out first if
they have been modified, while those that have not been
modified are simply overlaid.
MULTI-CHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLER (MCC): The MCC is a programmable
communications control unit that is designed to relieve the
host processor of line and terminal polling. Applications
supported by the M CC include remote job entry or remote
batch processing, interactive program development,
transaction processing, inquiry/response, data collection, and
message switching.
Program scheduling is performed automatically by priority
level on either a first-in, first-out or first-in, first-fit basis. After
the expiration of a specified number of minutes, a first-in,
first-fit program automatically reverts to first-in, first-out
status. VS/9 makes extensive use of re-entrant input and
output spooling routines, although user programs can also
request dedicated card readers and printers.
The MCC is available in three versions. Modell can handle a
maximum of 16 half-duplex or full-duplex lines, ModellA
accommodates up to 32 half- or full-duplex lines, and Model
2 can be configured with up to 64 full-duplex or 128 halfduplex lines. The MCC supports line speeds ranging from
45.45 to 56,000 bits per second, with a maximum total
throughput capacity of 25,000 characters per second. It
operates under control of the host central processor and
performs character sequence detection and insertion, code
translation, and cyclic, longitudinal, and vertical redundancy
character generation and checking.
The VS/9 File Management System automatically allocates
files to mass storage devices and maintains a System File
Catalog of file use and current and previous generations of
files. Files can be assigned to public or private volumes and
can be classified by owners as shared or non-shared. Both
read-only or read-write access to files can be specified, with
optional password protection. Data is allocated to disk in
blocks of 2,048 bytes. File access methods supported include
SAM, ISAM, PAM (Primary Access Method for random
access), EAM (Evanescent Access Method for temporary
files), BTAM (Basic Tape Access Method), and RAM
(Relative Access Method).
A Test Assistance Program allows individual lines, line
adapters, modems, and terminals to be tested off-line without
disrupting production processing. Software support for the
communications network is created through a system
generation procedure designed to facilitate the addition of
new lines and line types.
DCP: The 90/60 and 90/80 also support the Distributed
Communications Processor / 40 (DCP / 40), a front-end
processor developed for the 1100 Series. Please refer to
Report 70C-877-12 (1100/60).
SOFTWARE
OPERATING SYSTEMS: Originally, two operating
systems were available for the 90/60 and 90/80 systems:
OS/4, an enhanced version of the Sperry Univac 9400 Disk
Operating System; and VS/9, an enhancement ofthe original
VMOS (Virtual Memory Operating System) that was
developed for Series 70 systems. VS/9 is now the principal
operating system. OS/4 is no longer being enhanced, but is
still maintained at its current level for the convenience of those
customers using it.
VS/9 reliability and recovery capabilities include a Hardware
Error Recovery System (HERS) that analyzes mainframe
errors and attempts to recover from transient errors. The
Basic Processor Exerciser (IHBPXR) exercises internal CPU
logic in an on-line environment to detect malfunctions
primarily associated with arithmetic logic. The Virtual
Interactive Machine Test Program (VIMTPG) allows on~line
generation and execution of input/output test programs.
VS/9 accounting functions include the collection of data on
the utilization of system resources identified by user and/ or
account number, a billing routine to generate a report based
on that data, and a SNAP (System Net Activity Program)
that monitors CPU, I/O, and paging activity and maintains
statistics on response times, system load, task scheduling, and
task page-size characteristics and the availability offile paging
space.
Interactive processing capabilities provided by VS/9 include
Extended Basic, Fast Fortran for fast compilation and
immediate execution of Fortran programs, APL/90, a
Virtual Memory Editor for file creation, deletion, and
modification, a Cobol Program Development System
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
MARCH 1983
~
70C-877 -06i
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
~
(CODE), a Desk Calculator mode of operation, Sort/Merge,
and the Interactive Debugging Aids.
VIRTUAL INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS
ACCESS METHOD (VICAM): VICAM is a set ofsharable
generalized software components that provide a wide range of
functions for user applications. A set of prescribed procedures
in the form of macro instructions affords the user an interface
to remote devices and message files. The communications
network (lines, terminals, buffers, and queues) is defined by
an assembly process. This network definition is loaded
dynamically in response to a user program request and is
placed in an area within the executive called the
communications control area (CCA). Functional components of VICAM are the Message Control Program
(MCP) and the Communications User Program (CUP).
VICAM memory space is protected as part of the Executive.
It operates at Executive priority and not as a user program.
The MCP is a modular software package that is capable of
supporting either simple or complex communications
environments. A single MCP provides concurrent support for
multiple user message processing programs that use a variety
of terminals and line types. MCP prevents conflicting facility
assignments and releases facilities when jobs terminate. User
programs are provided with macro programs that control
table generation, handle data transfers to and from userspecified buffer areas, initialize and control communication
facilities, and perform dynamic terminal and poll table entry
alterations in the communications control areas.
ANS 68 Cobol functional processing levels include:
Nucleus-Level 2, Table Handling-Level 3, Sequential
Access-Level 2, Direct Access-Level 2, Sort-Level 2,
Segmentation-Level 2, and Library Functions-Level 2.
This compiler also features a fully functional report writer
facility that is not compatible with the ANS standard.
The BGCOB compiler is designed to be compatible with IBM
F-Ievel Cobol and with Sperry Univac Series 70 Cobol.
FORTRAN: VS/9 Fortran (BGFOR) is an extension of
ANS Fortran IV that is compatible with IBM H-level Fortran
and produces optimized object code. It also provides
comprehensive program error diagnostic and debugging
facilities, and optionally produces a diagnostic file that can be
interrogated by a post-compilation diagnostic utility.
VS/9 Fast Fortran is designed primarily to provide fast
compilation of source programs, followed by immediate
execution. It also provides a comprehensive set of error
diagnostics to catch many common programming errors. The
language acceptable to Fast Fortran is highly compatible with
VS/9 Fortran.
REPORT PROGRAM GENERATOR: The VS/9 RPG II
compiler is functionally compatible with Sperry Univac
OS/3, OS/4, and Series 70 RPG compilers, as well as with
IBM RPG II. The RPG II compiler generates an object
program and automatically allocates the necessary storage
locations, provides linkage to I/O operations, and includes
constants and other designated information.
The part of VICAM that Sperry Univac calls the
Communications User Program (CUP) is the user-generated
coding that processes incoming messages and generates any
applicable response messages. This program interfaces with
the Message Control Program through macro instructions
provided for this purpose. These macros control the sending
and receiving of messages, message routing and switching,
time and date stamping, sequencing and sequence checking,
source ID validation, message queue maintenance,
destination validation, length checking, and priority control.
Multiple message processing programs can operate
concurrently under VS/9, subject to the availability of system
resources. Program-oriented networks operating under
control of a message processing program are able to create
files of information that can be processed concurrently on
another network by another message processing program.
BASIC: An extended Basic is offered under the VS/9
Operating System. The Sperry Univac Basic language is
similar to the original language developed at Dartmouth
College, but contains extensions to the arithmetic and control
statements, file processing, and matrix commands. Basic
source programs can be catalogued for subsequent compileand-execute operation.
COMMUNICATIONS-ORIENTED SOFTWARE (COS):
COS is maintained for compatibility with the Sperry Univac
Series 70 systems. It has been superseded by VICAM, and no
future enhancements are planned. COS is a modular
communications system that handles message communications traffic, code translation, queuing on intermediate
storage, message logging, and transferring of messages to and
from Communications User Programs.
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (IMS/90):
IMS/90 is an interactive, transaction-oriented file
management system designed for use by non-technical
personnel. It requires no restructuring or reformatting of
existing data files and uses DMS/90 (below) to access data
base files. The IMS/90 data definition processor assists users
in defining the format and valid data values for each field and
also in defining which files can be modified.
COBOL: Sperry Univac offers three Cobol compilers for use
under VS/9: American National Standard (ANS) 74 Cobol,
ANS 68 Cobol, and BGCOB. In addition, the ANS 68 Cobol
compiler runs under OS/4.
Each file defined to IMS/90 can be secured against
unauthorized access by assigning it a password. The password
can be altered readily from day to day. Data is also protected
from destruction by an automatic recovery /rollback feature
and the automatic generation of a journal file for use by
recovery routines.
All of the VS/9 compilers are pageable programs. Source
input can be retrieved from a cataloged file on disk, from a
card deck, from a remote terminal, or from a disk-resident
Cobol source library file. The compilers generate Class II
programs, and the generated object modules are written on
disk.
ANS 74 Cobol functional processing levels include:
Nucleus-Level 2, Table Handling-Level 2, Sequential
I/O-Level 2, Relative I/O-Level 2, Sort-Merge-Levell,
Segmentation-Levell, Library-Levell, Debug-Level 2,
and Interprogram Communication-Level 2.
MARCH 1983
ASSEMBLER: The OS/4 Assembler is directly compatible
with 9400 BAL and is very similar to, although not totally
compatible with, the Assembler languages for the Sperry
Univac 9200/9300 systems and the IBM System/360. The
VS/9 Assembler supports predefined sets of macro variable
symbols, allows macros to be defined anywhere in source
programs, and permits multiple levels of sub lists in macroinstruction operands.
One component of IMS/90, defined record management,
constructs each record dynamically, just before delivering it to
the action program that requested it. There is one data
definition record for each data definition; therefore, each data
definition record can describe several subfiles along with the
defined files. The defined file/subfile concept eases the
problem of system enhancements. New applications can be
added which require expansion to existing disk records, yet
new data definitions can include definitions of the old subfiles,
so that the action programs and the terminal operator
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
~
70C-877-06j
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
~
procedures invoked in the old applications can be used
unchanged.
The Uniform Inquiry Update Element (UNIQUE) query
language provides a file inquiry and update capability. For
each input message submitted, the terminal operator receives
an answer so that he or she is quickly and constantly informed
of the results of the commands. These commands are OPEN,
CLOSE, DISPLAY, DELETE, OK, CANCEL, ADD,
NEXT, CHANGE, LIST, MORE, DETAIL, ASSIGN, and
SHOW.
IMS/90 also provides two sets ofterminal commands, one for
remote terminals and one for the master terminal. Remote
terminal commands can be used to resolve various
administrative or operational problems, or for educational
purposes. The master terminal commands enable control of
the communications network and assist in monitoring the
system. IMS/90 is described in further detail in Report 70E877-01.
DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DMS/90): DMS/90
operates on the 90/60 and 90/80 under the VS/9 Operating
System. DMS/90 is designed in conformance with the
CODASYL Data Base recommendations and represents a
subset of these specifications. Its functional capabilities,
therefore, are similar to those provided by DMS 1100, the
data base management system for the Sperry Univac 1100
Series computers, although there is no compatibility between
the two systems at the machine level. DMS/90 is described in
detail in Report 70E-877-01.
VS/9 UTILITY ROUTINES: The VS/9 utility routines are
single-purpose programs which perform utilitarian tasks
required in the day-to-day operation of a computer facility.
These routines can be grouped into five categories:
precompilation routines, postcompilation routines, linkage
editors and loaders, media conversion routines, and system
support utilities.
Precompilation routines are programs used to maintain
libraries of source language programs or elements of
programs. The source language library facilities are designed
to aid the programmer in program preparation and to lend
efficiency to the development of large programming projects.
The specific routines and their functions are:
Cobol Library Update (COBLUR)-used for the
maintenance of a Cobol source library on direct-access
devices.
Macro Library Update (MLU)-used to create, update,
or delete entries on a direct-access resident library of
Assembler macros.
Source Library Update (SLU)-used in conjunction with
the Assembler, this routine permits creating, updating,
and deleting entries from a direct-access resident library of
assembly-language source statements.
Postcompilation routines are programs designed to aid in
achieving error-free compilations and to preserve the
resultant object modules. The specific routines and their
functions are:
Assembler Diagnostic Routine (ADIAG)-provides the
user with the facility for interrogating, from a terminal, the
error file created by the Assembler during the assembly
process.
Background Compiler Diagnostic Routine (BDIAG)provides the facility for interrogating the error file created
for the Fortran and Cobol compilers. The compilers write
the program and diagnostic listings to VS/9's SYSLST
file.
Library Maintenance Routine (LMR)-provides the
facilities necessary to create, update, delete, copy, and
modify object modules in disk-resident libraries.
The linkage editor and loader routines are used to bind object
modules into programs, load the programs, and, optionally,
to provide the structure needed internally to support
interactive debugging aid (IDA) operations.
System support utilities are system service programs designed
primarily for use by the system administrator in performing
his/ her function of administering, controlling, and
maintaining viable computer system operations. They
provide such facilities as file backup, system updating, volume
initialization, and tape maintenance. The functions of these
routines are as follows:
FILSAV -provides a tape-oriented file maintenance
facility that can be used in a batch or interactive mode. The
system administrator can use this routine to maintain
system files on a magnetic tape, usually for backup. All
users can utilize the routine for saving and restoring
catalogued files on tape.
VS/9 Self-Loading System (SLS)-a multipurpose utility
that runs in a self-contained environment. The heart of the
SLS is the self-loading I/O handler (SLIOH) and a
number of VS /9 error recovery modules that, when linked
together, make up a mini-operating system that can run
one job at a time. The SLS provides the user with the
facilities to build system residence, initialize volumes, copy
VS/9 volumes from disk to tape or tape to disk, dump
virtual memory and system files, and print the contents of
a resident emergency dump tape.
Media conversion routines give the user additional facilities
for displaying all or parts of files or volumes on a terminal (in
an interactive task) or on a printer (for large volumes). The
user can dump direct-access data to tape, reload direct-access
data from tape, or copy data from one direct-access volume to
another. In addition, he/ she can initialize direct-access
volumes for use by the file management system. A
comprehensive set of utilities enables the user to perform
device-to-device conversion for his/her files.
VS/9 INTERACTIVE SERVICE PROGRAMS: The VS/9
interactive service programs provide functions and facilities
designed to simplify the user's task of interfacing with his/her
data files and programs. These programs include the Virtual
Storage Editor (EDT), Interactive Debugging Aid (IDA), the
Cobol Program Development System (CODE) and Test File
Generator (TFG). and Sort/Merge.
EDT can be executed in either the batch or interactive mode,
and will read or write SAM or ISAM files wholly or in part.
With this editor it is possible to create, copy, delete, compare,
and concatenate files, and to add, delete, and modify text
within files. It also provides comprehensive facilities for
defining procedures and for searching and restructuring files.
EDT operates on text in virtual storage, and therefore makes
very few references (or accesses) to physical storage devices.
ID A provides the user with the facility for testing and
modifying programs written in Assembler, Cobol, or Fortran
without having to include the debugging statements at
compilation or assembly time. The user can use the same
symbols for debugging that were used in writing the program.
ID A can be used in batch or interactive mode. Commands are
provided to start, stop, and resume execution of the object
program; to examine the program and its results; and to
modify the contents of virtual storage. IDA supports an audit
mode that records the recent branches a program has taken.
CODE provides facilities through which the Cobol
programmer, with a minimum command set, is able to utilize ~
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
MARCH 1983
70C-877-06k
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
~
aU the power of the system without having to learn every
software component involved in the effort. All files required
for the program are automatically maintained by the
subsystem. Using a set of 28 commands, the programmer can
create, modify, edit, and delete source program statements;
maintain and update source program files; define his/ her own
abbreviations or use standard abbreviations for language
elements; verify syntax and compile the program; retrieve and
analyze compiler-generated diagnostic messages and correct
the source; load and execute the program; save the compiled
program in an object module library; debug the program
using symbolic IDA facilities while applying corrections
directly to the source program; and use the TFG to create test
data for debugging the program.
The Test File Generator (TFG) is an enhancement to CODE.
It uses its own set of CODE-oriented commands to allow the
programmer to create public disk files of any record
description containing virtually any combination of test data.
Files created by the generator can also be used as data files by
the Assembler, Fortran, or RPG programs, with only a
skeletal Cobol compilation as the prerequisite for producing
them.
The VS/9 Sort/Merge (DSORT) runs as a Class II pageable
program. It may run as either a batch or interactive task. The
user defmes control fields and specifies various options for a
sorting or merging application in sort/merge control
statements. The program may be invoked by other user
programs that require a sortl merge capability. The major
options available to the user include: full record sort, record
selection sort, tag sort, and file merge. User-written
subroutines can be incorporated to tailor the program for
individual requirements such as non-standard input files. All
input and output operations are performed using the VS/9
file management system.
APPLICATIONS PROGRAMS: Application programs
currently available under VS/9 include: UNIS 90 (Univac
Industrial System); WIMS (Wholesale Inventory Management System); Management Control System 90 (planning
and scheduling, cost control, and reporting); Mathematical
Programming System 90 (linear programming, mixed integer
programming, etc.); AUTOFORM (Automatic Text
Formatting System); Statistical Analysis (biomedical
statistics); FINAN-9 (Financial Series); Interactive
Management Science Series (linear programming, critical
path scheduling, and exception reports); Engineering Design
and Interactive Analysis Series (electronic circuit analysis,
continuous systems simulation, etc.); and ICES (Integrated
Civil Engineering System).
software) plus a 1228-megabyte disk storage subsystem
consisting of four 8450 disk units and one controller, a
200KBS magnetic tape subsystem consisting of six Uniservo
24 tape units with integrated controller, two 1400-lpm 077002 printers, a 1000-cpm 0716-99 card reader, and a 250-cpm
0604-99 card punch. The purchase price is $1,537,798,
monthly maintenance is $7,463, and monthly rental on a oneyear contract is $43,950.
90/80-4 SYSTEM: Consists of a 90/80-4 processor (with
6144K bytes of main memory, 32K bytes of buffer memory,
peripheral processor, byte multiplexer channel, four block
multiplexer channels, operator console, motor alternator,
and VS/9 software) plus a 2456-megabyte disk storage
subsystem consisting of eight 8450 disk units and a dualaccess controller, a magnetic tape subsystem consisting of
eight 780KBS Uniservo 34 tape drives and a dual-channel
controller, two 2000-lpm 0770-04 printers, a 1000-cpm 071699 card reader, and a 250-cpm 0604-99 card punch. The
purchase price is $2,409,796, monthly maintenance is $13,253,
and monthly rental on a one-year contract is $73,085.
SOFTWARE AND SUPPORT: Sperry Univac software is
still largely "bundled," and the equipment prices listed above
include most of the software described in this report and all
normal educational courses and professional assistance.
However, the UNIS (Univac Industrial System) application
program is separately priced. Monthly charges for the UNIS
modules are listed under "Software Prices" at the end of this
report.
CONTRACT TERMS: The standard Sperry Univac use and
service agreements allow unlimited use of the equipment
(exclusive of the time required for remedial and preventive
maintenance). There are no extra-use charges. The basic
maintenance charge covers maintenance of the equipment for
nine consecutive hours a day between the hours of 7 a.m. and
6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Extended periods of
maintenance are available at premium rates. The premiums
for additional coverage are a percentage of the base
maintenance rate and are as follows:
Hours of Coverage
Monday through Friday
Saturday
Sunday and Holidays
4
8
5
7
8
9
10 12
o
5
9
10 12
BASIC 90/60 SYSTEM: Consists of 90/60 processor (with
512K bytes of main memory, one multiplexer channel, one
selector channel, and VS/9 software) plus system console, a
600-megabyte disk storage subsystem consisting of three 8433
disk drives and one controller, a magnetic tape subsystem
consisting of four 192KBS Uniservo 16 tape units and one
controller, a 1400-lpm 0770-02 printer, a 1000-cpm 0716-99
card reader, and a 250-cpm 0604-99 card punch. The purchase
price is $673,650, monthly maintenance is $5,116, and
monthly rental on a one-year contract is $18,854.
90/80-2 SYSTEM: Consists of a 90/80-2 processor (with
1024K bytes of main memory, four block multiplexer
channels, one byte multiplexer channel, console, and VS/9
MARCH 1983
©
18 20 24
10 15 20 25 30
II 12
14 15
14 16
18 20
Maintenance service performed outside the contracted
maintenance period is subject to the following rates:
PRICING
EQUIPMENT: All necessary control units and adapters are
included in the indicated prices for the following
configurations. The quoted one-year rental prices do not
include equipment maintenance.
16
Min. charge per call
Each add'. hour
Each add'. 1,4 hour
Monday through
Friday
Saturday,
Sunday and
Holidays
$264
$300
132
150
33
38
For users who elect not to contract for maintenance with
Univac, the same per-call rates apply.
Sperry Univac offers reduced maintenance rates for multipleproces..'mr installations. The percent premiums listed below
apply to installations containing two or more processors or
systems of the same type and located at the same address.
Twu-Processor Installation
Hours of ('on'rage
Monday through Friday
Saturday
Sunday and Holidays
1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
9
16
24
o
10
6
7
9
12
25
12
15~
70C-877-061
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
Three or More Processors
Hours of Coverage
Monday through Friday
Saturday
Sunday and Holidays
9
16
24
o
5
5
7
9
20
9
12
6
LONG-TERM LEASES: In addition to the basic one-year
and five-year leases shown in the accompanying price list,
Sperry Univac offers a seven-year lease to state and local
governments and to educational institutions. Educational
institutions are eligible for an additional 10 percent discount.
The discount does not apply to maintenance service charges.
EQUIPMENT PRICES
Monthly
Maint.
1-Year
Lease *
5-Year
Lease*
$ 284,184
$1,752
$ 8,289
$ 6,710
349,700
2,393
11,586
8,250
27,965
277
934
658
36,805
610
1,766
866
9,000
38
263
210
5,570
38
173
130
5,364
28
156
125
1,800
2,160
8
16
53
63
43
51
8,748
48
255
205
8,568
48
250
203
3,564
9,900
16
99
104
289
85
235
20,268
9,900
141
90
591
290
480
248
798,250
3,054
21,802
16,353
798,250
3,054
21,802
16,353
25,750
146
702
528
45,064
170
1,230
924
90/80-3 Processor with 2,097,152 bytes of main storage, peripheral
processor with one byte multiplexer channel and four block multiplexer channels, key-in storage protection, system console, power
distribution panel, and motor alternator; expandable to 4,194,304
bytes
90/80-3 Processor; same as 3044-97, but can be upgraded to a
90/80-4
Storage; expands 90/80-3 storage from 2,097,152 to 3,145,728 bytes
Storage; expands 90/80-3 storage from 3,145,728 to 4,194,304 bytes;
requires F2672-98
90/80-3 to 90/80-4 Upgrade Option for 3044-90 processor
1,019,700
3,928
27,852
20,889
869,064
3,371
23,733
17,804
45,064
45,064
170
170
1,230
1,230
924
924
103,000
873
2,812
2,110
90/80-4 Processor with 2,097,152 bytes of main storage, 32K-byte
buffer storage, one byte multiplexer channel, four block multiplexer
channels, two-way memory interleave, and system console; expandable to 8,388,606 bytes
F2672-96
Storage; expands 90/80-4 storage from 2,097,152 to 4,194,304 bytes
Virtual Accelerator Module; increases the performance of the 90/80-3
F3319-oo
or 90/80-4 processor by as much as 20 percent
*Lease prices do not include equipment maintenance.
972,064
4,244
26,544
19,914
90,128
41,200
343
99
2,460
1,071
1,848
844
Purchase
90/60 PROCESSOR AND MAIN STORAGE
3024-91
3024-89
7025-81
7025-79
90/60 Processor with 524,288 bytes of main storage, one multiplexer
channel, one selector channel, general register stack, floating-point
controls, channel programming, storage protection, and two interval
timers; expandable to 2,097,152 bytes
90/60 Processor; same features as 3024-91 processor, but with
1,048,576-byte memory; expandable to 2,097,152 bytes
Storage Expansion; 262,144 bytes; expands main storage from
524,288 to 786,432 bytes or from 786,432 to 1,048,576 bytes
Storage Expansion; 524,288 bytes; expands main storage from
1,048,576 to 1,572,864 bytes or from 1,572,864 to 2,097,152 bytes
90/60 PROCESSOR FEATURES
F2629-oo
F2oo7-01
F1519-oo
F1518-oo
F1518-01
F1337-99
1916-00
F1335-oo
F1591-oo
4014-99
0772-00
Performance Enhancement Option; increases instruction execution
speed of 90/60 processor by 25 percent
Performance Enhancement Option; increases instruction execution
speed by additional 15 percent; requires F2629-oo
Expanded Interface; expands multiplexer to 15 subsystems (16 if
F1518-00 is present)
Subchannel Expansion; expands multiplexer up to 31 channels
Subchannel Expansion; 32 additional multiplexer channels; requires
F1518-00
Selector Channel; up to 1,111 KBS; maximum of three; selector
channels 3 and 4 require 1916-00 channel expansion cabinet
Channel Expansion Cabinet for third and fourth F1337 selector
channels
Direct Control; interface for another 90/60 processor
Programmable Emulator; provides programmable control for SMOOTH
operation using special hardware instructions
System Console; includes Uniscope 100 CRT
Console Printer; 30 cps
90/80 PROCESSORS AND MAIN STORAGE
3044-99
3044-91
F2756-01
F2672-99
3044-97
3044-90
F2672-98
F2672-97
F2743-99
90/80-2 Processor with 1,048,576 bytes of main storage, peripheral
processor with one byte multiplexer channel and four block multiplexer channels, key-in storage protection, system console, power
distribution panel, and motor alternator; expandable to 2,097,152
bytes
90/80-2 Processor; same as 3044-99, but can be upgraded to a
3044-90
90/80-2 to 90/80-3 Upgrade Option for 90/80-2 processor with
2,097,152 bytes of main storage; requires F2672-99 storage expansion; subsequent expansion must be as a 90/80-3
Storage; expands 90/80-2 storage from 1,048,576 to 2,097,152 bytes
3044-89
©
1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
MARCH 1983
....
70C-S77-06m
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
EQUIPMENT PRICES
Purchase
Monthly
Maint.
1-Year
Lease *
5-Year
Lease*
~ 90/S0 PROCESSOR FEATURES
9,900
15,840
15,840
86
47
47
330
348
348
248
295
295
15,840
47
348
295
15,840
47
348
295
15,840
47
348
295
16,800
50
369
317
16,800
50
369
317
2,160
5
47
40
1,440
5
32
26
4,800
13
106
90
4,800
13
106
90
10,200
18,000
109
28
211
493
211
369
Control Unit; controls up to eight 8430 or 8433 disk drives; minimum
of two drives per system
16-Drive Expansion; provides the capability to connect up to 16 8430
or 8433 disk drives to a 5039 control
57,600
408
1,496
972
5,760
56
211
137
Disk Drive; 100 megabytes; minimum of two required
8430 Dual Access; provides dual access and simultaneous readl
write operations on any two 8430 drives; required on both drives
in the subsystem; also requires two 5039 controls and two selector
channels
Dual Channel; provides non-simultaneous access to one 5039 control
from two selector channels
Disk Pack; 100 megabytes
8430 to 8433 Upgrade
18,720
2,160
177
5
684
56
444
61
3,460
23
97
82
1,440
8,640
82
53
313
35
205
8433-00
F1223-00
F2021-00
Disk Drive; 200 megabytes
Disk Pack; 200 megabytes
8433 Dual Access; provides dual access and simultaneous readl
write operation on any two 8433 drives; required on both drives
in the subsystem; also requires two 5039 controls
27,360
1,820
1,630
258
997
66
59
649
43
39
8450-99
8450-97
Dual Disk Drive; 307 megabytes
Dual Disk Drive; 307 megabytes; includes one megabyte of fixedhead storage
8450 Fixed-Head Conversion; converts an 8450-99 to an 8450-97
8450 Dual Access; provides dual access and simultaneous readl
write operations on any two 8450 drives; requires two 5040
controls
Control Unit; controls up to eight 8450 disk drives; can control up to
eight 8430/8433 drives with F2836-oo
Dual Control for 8450 drives; also provides two controls for 84301
8433 drives via F2836-00
8430/8433 Capability; provides the capability to connect up to eight
8430 or 8433 drives to the 5040-95 control in addition to the basic
eight 8450 drives; mutually exclusive with F2719-01
8450 Expansion; provides capability for adding eight additional 8450
drives to 5040-95 control; mutually exclusive with F2836-00
Dual Channel; provides non-simultaneous access to a 5040 control
from two block multiplexer channels
66,600
74,600
346
382
2,439
2,723
1,583
1,811
13,600
2,688
34
19
285
64
228
48
102,000
555
2,916
1,944
176,448
969
5,416
3,521
2,400
13
65
45
7,680
56
173
130
4,080
23
92
78
15,475
16,723
120
131
372
401
285
308
0782-99
F1920-03
F1920-04
F1920-05
F1922-00
F1920-06
F1922-01
F1922-02
F2011-00
F1921-00
F1914-00
F1915-01
F1916-01
8508-99
Console Printer; 30 cps
Fifth Block Multiplexer Channel
Sixth Block Multiplexer Channel; requires F1920-03; last channel
position must be a block multiplexer channel; cannot be used with
F1920-05, F1922-00, F1922-01, or F1922-02
Sixth Block Multiplexer Channel; requires F1920-03 and F1922-01;
used when a second byte multiplexer has been installed; cannot be
used with F1920-04, F1920-06, or F1922-oo
Sixth Block Multiplexer Channel; requires F1920-03; last channel
position must be a byte multiplexer channel; cannot be used with
F1922-01, F1920-04, or F1920-05
Seventh Block Multiplexer Channel; requires F1920-04; cannot be
used with F1920-05, F1922-oo, F1922-01, or F1922-02
Second Byte Multiplexer Channel; cannot be used with F1922-oo,
F1922-02, F1920-04, or F 1920-06
Second Byte Multiplexer Channel; requires F1922-oo block multiplexer channel; cannot be used with F1922-01, F1920-04, F1920-05,
or F1920-06
Extended Interface; expands byte multiplexer channel interface to
provide capability for up to 16 subsystems
Subchannel Expansion; provides 256 additional block multiplexer
subchannels
Direct Control; provides an interface between a 90/80 and a 90/60
or another 90/80; requires comparable feature in other processor
90/60 Mode; provides capability for 90/80 to operate as a 90/60
processor; required for operation with OS/4
370 Mode; provides capability for 90/80 to operate as an IBM 370
Motor Alternator
MASS STORAGE
5039-97
F2047-00
8430-99
F2020-00
F2046-00
F1230-00
F2342-00
F2717-99
F2718-99
5040-95
5040-93
F2836-00
F2719-01
F2835-00
MAGNETIC TAPE UNITS
Uniservo 14 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 1600 bpi, PE, 96KBS
Uniservo 14 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 1600/800 bpi, PE, 961
48KBS
*Lease prices do not include equipment maintenance.
0870-03
0870-04
MARCH 1983
©
1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
~
70C-877-06n
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
EQUIPMENT PRICES
Purchase
Monthly
Maint.
1-Year
Lease*
15,475
120
372
285
1,248
8
29
23
1,248
8
29
23
22,015
167
500
383
1,348
5
32
26
4,593
34
110
89
5,990
5,990
4,343
4,343
2,800
5,990
34
34
21
21
15
27
144
144
104
104
93
136
120
120
80
80
75
109
Uniservo 16 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 1600 bpi, 192KBS
Uniservo 16 Magnetic Tape Unit; 7-track, 200/556/800 bpi, 241
66.72/96KBS
Simultaneous Feature for Uniservo 16 tape units; requires two
controls
Dual Density Feature for 0862-00 tape units; control must contain
0826-00 or Fl028-96
7- to 9-Track Non-Simultaneous Conversion Feature for 0862-02
tape units; converts to 0862-00 ($100 field installation charge)
Uniservo 16 Non-Simultaneous Control; controls up to 16 Uniservo
16 tape units
Dual Channel; permits non-simultaneous operation on two channels
of one processor or on one channel on each of two processors
7-Track NRZI for 5017-00 control
9-Track NRZI for 5017-00 control
9-Track NRZI for F0823-99 or F1753-99
7-Track NRZI plus data conversion for F0826-00
7-Track NRZI native mode plus data conversion for F0826-00
Provides capability to add 7-track tape units to 5017-00; excludes
use of F0826-00
Simultaneous Operation for 5017-00 control; provides second
control modu Ie
22,032
22,032
228
228
559
559
390
390
914
22
17
2,284
54
40
502
Uniservo 22 Subsystem; includes two Uniservo 22 tape drives and
control for up to eight Uniservo 22 or Uniservo 24 drives
Uniservo 22 Magnetic Tape Drives; includes two dual-density PE/NRZI
drives; 1600/800 bpi, 9-track, 75 ips
Uniservo 24 Subsystem; includes two Uniservo 24 tape drives and
control for up to eight Uniservo 24 or Uniservo 22 drives
Uniservo 24 Magnetic Tape Drives; includes two dual-density PE/NRZI
drives; 1600/800 bpi, 9-track, 125 ips
Dual Channel Feature; provides non-simultaneous operation on two
channels of one processor or one channel on each of two processors
Translation Feature; translation is ASCIl/EBCDIC, fieldata/EBCDIC, or
fieldata/ASCIl
Second Translation Feature
5-Year
Lease*
~ MAGNETIC TAPE UNITS (Continued)
0870-05
F2194-00
F2194-02
F2194-03
5045-99
5045-02
F0825-00
F0823-89
F0826-01
Fl028-15
Fl028-16
Fl028-84
F1753-97
0862-00
0862-02
F0936-99
F0937-00
Fl040-00
5017-00
F0825-00
F0823-99
F0826-00
Fl028-96
Fl028-95
Fl028-92
F1753-99
Fl029-00
5058-00
5058-02
5058-06
5058-08
F0825-oo
F2627-oo
F2627-01
5042-00
F2131-oo
F2132-99
F2135-00
F2137-oo
Uniservo 14 Magnetic Tape Unit; 7-track, 800/556/200 bpi, NRZI,
48/33/12KBS
Dual Density; adds 9-track NRZI to 0870-03 tape unit; requires
F0826-01 in control unit
Converts 0870-05 7-track unit into a 9-track PE unit ($106 field
installation charge)
Converts 0870-05 7-track unit into a 9-track PE/NRZI unit; requires
F0826-01 in control unit
Uniservo 14 Control; controls up to eight Uniservo 14 tape units;
includes cabinet space for two tape units
Auxiliary Cabinet; provides power distribution and space for one or
two additional Uniservo 14 tape units
Dual Channel; permits non-simultaneous operation on two channels
of one processor or on one channel on each of two processors
7-Track NRZI for 5045-99 control
9-Track NRZI for 5045-99 control
9-Track NRZI for F0823-89 or F1753-97
7-Track NRZI plus data conversion for F0826-01
7-Track NRZI native mode plus data conversion for F0826-01
Provides capability to add 7-track tape units to 5045-99 control;
excludes the use of F0826-01
Uniservo 30 Series Control; controls up to eight Uniservo 30, 32, 34,
or 36 tape units
9-Track NRZI for 5042-00 control
7-Track NRZI for 5042-00 control
Dual Channel; provides additional 1/0 channel for 5042-00 control
16-Drive Addressing; must be added to all control units
Uniservo 30 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 1600/800 bpi, PE/NRZI,
320/160KBS
0872-02
Uniservo 30 Magnetic Tape Unit; 7-track, 800/556/200 bpi, NRZI,
160/111/40KBS
F2123-oo
7- to 9-Track Conversion; converts 0872-02 tape unit to 0872-00
tape unit
0873-00
Uniservo 32 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 6250/1600 bpi. GCR/PE,
470/120KBS
0873-02
Uniservo 34 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 6250/1600 bpi, GCR/PE,
780/200KBS
*Lease prices do not include equipment maintenance.
0872-00
28,560
223
726
4,593
34
110
89
5,990
5,990
4,176
4,176
3,654
5,760
34
34
21
21
15
27
144
144
96
96
86
126
114
120
74
74
66
96
18,960
132
415
335
75,840
411
2,129
1,580
47,040
267
1,320
980
83,520
455
2,349
1,740
54,720
311
1,540
1,140
4,593
34
110
89
2,064
15
52
36
2,064
15
52
36
48,143
399
1,290
953
3,171
1,915
5,229
835
26
13
44
5
84
42
138
22
63
32
104
15
30,335
251
860
601
30,335
251
860
601
87
65
3,287
27,552
227
799
546
31,448
261
916
623
© 1-983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
~
MARCH 1983
70C-877 -060
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
EQUIPMENT PRICES
Purchase
Monthly
Maint.
1-Year
Lease *
5-Year
Lease*
4,011
34
106
80
33,674
279
982
667
Card Punch and Control; 250 cpm
Read/Punch Feature for 0604-99
Card Reader and Control; 600 cpm
Card Reader and Control; 1000 cpm
Short Card Feature; 51 columns
Short Card Feature; 66 columns
Validity Check Feature
Alternate Stacker Fill Feature
Dual Translate Feature; provides additional ASCII translator
1ooo-cpm Upgrade; upgrades 0716-95 card reader to 0716-99 card
reader
31,968
7,152
12,192
15,504
1,968
1,968
816
528
1,104
3,312
251
95
101
168
17
17
5
66
664
156
267
339
45
45
18
12
25
72
536
130
190
275
32
32
14
8
18
50
56,304
64,896
86,686
4,416
2,880
372
487
742
26
5
1,300
1,498
3,187
102
66
1,041
1,196
2,074
82
53
F2230-oo
F2230-01
F2230-02
Line Printer; 800 Ipm
Line Printer; 1400 Ipm
Line Printer; 2000 Ipm
160 Print Positions
Expanded Character Set Control; required for character sets with
more than 48 characters
Speed Upgrade; upgrades 0770-00 to 1400 lines per m nute
Speed Upgrade; upgrades 0770-00 to 2000 lines per m nute
Speed Upgrade; upgrades 0770-02 to 2000 lines per m nute
8,592
30,382
21,790
116
249
133
198
1,159
961
155
559
404
F1536-oo
F1536-01
F1537-oo
F1537-03
F1537-04
F1537-05
F1537-06
F1537-09
F1537-11
F1537-12
F1537-13
F1537-14
F1537-15
Print Cartridges:
48-character alphanumeric Business
48-character alphanumeric Scientific
94-character ASCII
68-character universal ISO OCR-B
68-character universal OCR H-14
58-character Cobol-Fortran-Business
177-character International
24-character Numeric
68-character universal OCR-A
68-character universal OCR-B
68-character universal 77L
63-character modified Fortran
63-character modified ASCII
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
958
1,080
1,363
122
50
765
864
1,090
100
40
34
34
34
34
34
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
~ MAGNETIC TAPE UNITS (Continued)
F2125-oo
0874-00
Tape Speed Conversion; converts a Uniservo 32 tape unit at 75 ips
to a Universo 34 unit at 125 ips
Uniservo 36 Magnetic Tape Unit; 9-track, 6250/1600 bpi, GCR/PE,
1250/320 KBS; for 90/80 processors only
PUNCHED CARD EQUIPMENT
0604-99
F0875-oo
0716-95
0716-99
F1487-oo
F1487-01
F1488-oo
F1498-oo
F1530-99
F1529-oo
PRINTERS
0770-00
0770-02
0770-04
F1533-oo
F1534-oo
0776-00
0776-02
0776-04
F2217-oo
F2245-oo
F2216-oo
F2216-01
F2216-07
F2216-08
F2216-09
F2216-10
F2215-oo
F2215-03
F2215-05
F2215-06
F2215-11
F2215-12
F2215-13
F2215-20
F2215-21
F2215-23
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
462
Line Printer; 760 Ipm
Line Printer; 900 Ipm
Line Printer; 1200 Ipm
Speed Upgrade; upgrades 0776-00 to 900 lines per minute
Expanded Character Set Control; required for character sets with
more than 64 characters
Print Cartridges:
48-character alphnaumeric Business
48-character alphanumeric Scientific
24-character Numeric
63-character modified Fortran
63-character modified ASCII
48-character OCR-A
94-character ASCII
68-character universal ISO OCR-B
58-character Cobol-Fortran-Business
177-character International
68-character universal OCR-A
68-character universal OCR-B (ECMA-11)
68-character universal 77L
94-character optimized ASCII
68-character optimized ISO OCR-B
128-character OCR-A
36,570
41,340
52,150
4,770
1,910
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
1,270
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
~
*Lease prices do not include equipment maintenance.
MARCH 1983
284
340
388
56
5
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
70C-877-06p
Computers
Sperry Univac 90/60 and 90/80
EQUIPMENT PRICES
Purchase
~
Monthly
Maint.
1-Year
Lease*
5-Year
Lease*
MULTI-CHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLER**
8579-82
8579-81
8579-80
F2262-99
F1800-01
F1793-99
F1793-98
F1793-97
F2264-011
-99
F2264-021
-98
Multi-Channel Communications Controller 1 (MCC 1); includes
processor with 32K bytes of storage expandable to 128K bytes,
real-time clock, power protect, interface to CPU, multiplexer
channel, operator console with CRT and keyboard, and Scanner 1
for attachment of up to 16 half- or full-duplex lines
Multi-Channel Communications Controller 1A (MCC 1A); same as
MCC 1 except includes Scanner 1 Expansion F2262-99
Multi-Channel Communications Controller 2 (MCC 2); same as MCC
1 except includes Scanner 2 for control of 16 half- or full-duplex
lines, expandable to a maximum of 128 half-duplex or 64 full-duplex
lines
MCC 1 to MCC 1A Expansion
Manual Channel Switch; provides capability to switch an MCC
between multiplexer channels of two Series 90 host processors
16K-byte Storage Expansion; expands MCC 2 storage from 32K to
48K bytes
16K-byte Storage Expansion; expands MCC 1 or MCC 1A storage
from 32K to 48K, 64K to 80K, or 96K to 112K bytes; expands MCC
2 storage from 64K to 80K or 96K to 11 2K bytes
16K-byte Storage Expansion; expands MCC 1, MCC 1A, or MCC 2
storage from 48K to 64K, 80K to 96K, or 112K to 128K bytes
64-Port Parameter Module; provides MCC 2 with high-speed register
storage for up to 64 half-duplex or 32 full-duplex lines; maximum
of one per MCC 2; excludes use of F2264-02 and -98
128-Port Parameter Module; provides MCC 2 with high-speed register
storage for up to 128 half-duplex or 64 full-duplex lines; maximum
of one per MCC 2; excludes use of F2264-01 and -99
52,416
325
1,092
820
61,872
381
1,289
966
78,816
477
1,642
1,230
9,456
4,305
54
23
197
83
150
62
10,300
53
250
195
10,300
53
250
195
10,300
53
250
195
2,496
14
52
39
3,456
18
72
54
F1801-01
Line Base II; provides interface and control for up to 16 line adapters
on MCC 2; maximum of 7 per system
600
3
15
11
F1796-00
Dual Dial Adapter-Type I; provides interface to two Bell 801 ACU's;
maximum of four per MCC 1 or eight per MCC 1A
Line Adapter-Asynchronous Type I; contains two full- or half-duplex
serial modem interfaces (RS-232C and CCITI-V24); attaches to
MCC1A
Line Adapter-Asynchronous Type I; compatible with MIL-STD-188C
Line Adapter-Synchronous Type I; contains two full- or half-duplex
serial modem interfaces (RS-232C and CCITI-V24) for MCC 1 or 1A
Line Adapter-Synchronous Type I; compatible with MIL-STD-188B/C
872
5
23
18
630
4
18
14
630
900
4
4
18
24
14
19
900
4
24
19
Wideband Adapter-Type I; provides capability to connect two synchronous full-duplex lines for operation at up to 66K bps
Active Line Indicator I; displays the line activity on data sets connected
to MCC 1 or 1A; includes capacity for 16 displayed lines
TWX Line Adapter-Type I
Telex Interface-Type I; provides dual interface between F1798-00
Line Adapter and Telex lines in the United States; requires 8591-00
and F1798-00 on MCC 1 or MCC 1A
Line Adapter Expansion Cabinet-Type I; provides power and housing
for F2373-00
1,743
15
45
35
528
2
12
9
1,320
1,520
8
8
33
38
25
29
4,524
25
113
85
600
8
15
13
760
9
19
16
920
11
23
20
600
8
15
13
760
9
19
16
1,160
11
29
25
760
9
19
16
F1798-00
F1798-01
F1799-00
F1799-01
F1814-00
F1866-01
F2371-00
F2373-00
8591-00
F1828-00
F1828-01
F1828-02
F1829-00
F1826-00
F1826-01
F1827-00
Asynchronous Line Adapter-Type II; provides full- or half-duplex
interface to asynchronous data sets conforming to RS-232C or
CCITI-V24 and -V28
Asynchronous Line Adapter-Type II; same as F1828-00, but also
provides a reverse channel of up to 5 bps asynchronous for Bell
202 type modems
Asynchronous Line Adapter-Type II; same as F1828-00, but also
provides a supervisory channel of up to 150 bps asynchronous
Asynchronous Line Adapter-Type II; provides a full- or half-duplex
interface for compliance with MIL-STD-188C and MIL-STD-188100 low-level interface
Synchronous Line Adapter-Type II; provides a full- or half-duplex
interface to synchronous data sets conforming to RS-232C and
CCITI-V24 and -V28
Synchronous Line Adapter-Type II; same as F1826-00, but also
provides a supervisory channel of up to 1 50 bps asynchronous
Synchronous Line Adapter-Type II; provides a full- or half-duplex
interface for compliance with MIL-STD-188C and MIL-STD-188100 low-level interface
*Lease prices do not include equipment maintenance.
**No longer manufactured.
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
~
MARCH 1983
70C-877-06q
Computers
Sperry Univc 90/60 and 90/80
EQUIPMENT PRICES
~
MULTI-CHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLERS** (Continued)
F1832-00
F1830-00
F1834-00
F1831-00
F1836-00
F1835-00
Asynchronous Relay Line Adapter-Type II; provides an asynchronous full- or half-duplex interface optionally compatible with either
20-75 mA neutral or 10-40 polar telegraph lines
Wideband Line Adapter-Type II; provides capability to connect one
synchronous full- or half-duplex line for operation at 19.2, 50, or
90.8K bps; used with AT&T 300 Series Data Sets
Wideband Line Adapter-Type II; same as F1830-00, but conforms
to CCITT-V35
Dial Adapter Single-Type II; provides interface to one Bell 801 ACU
Telex Line Adapter-Type II
TWX Line Adapter-Type II
Monthly
Maint.
1-Vear
Lease*
600
8
15
13
920
11
23
20
920
11
23
20
600
600
600
8
8
8
15
15
15
13
13
13
Purchase
---
5-Vear
Lease*
*Lease prices do not include equipment maintenance.
**No longer manufactured.
SOFTWARE PRICES
Monthly
Rental
6530-00
6130-01
6201-01
APU90
UTS 400 Cobol (VS/9)
UTS 400 EDIT
6504-00
6504-02
6504-04
UNIS 90 OS/4 Master Data Processor
UNIS 90 OS/4 Inventory Management
UNIS 90 OS/4 Production Planning and Scheduling, and Work Order Management; requires 6504-00 and 6504-02
6513-00
6513-02
6513-04
6513-97
6513-98
6513-99
UNIS 90 VS/9 Master Data Processor
UNIS 90 VS/9 Inventory Management
UNIS 90 VS/9 Production Planning and Scheduling, and Work Order Management; requires 6513-00 and 6513-02
UNIS 90 VS/9 Master Data Processor and Inventory Management
UNIS 90 VS/9 Inventory Management, Production Planning and Scheduling, and Work Order Management
UNIS 90 VS/9 Master Data Processor, Inventory Management, Production Planning and Scheduling, and Work
Order Management
MARCH 1983
$200
83
44
© 1983 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED
75
75
125
150
300
300
450
600
75011
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