Cameo Business Modeler UserGuide

Cameo Business Modeler UserGuide
Business Modeler
USER GUIDE
18.1
No Magic, Inc.
2015
All material contained herein is considered proprietary information owned by No Magic, Inc. and is not to be
shared, copied, or reproduced by any means. All information copyright 2009-2015 by No Magic, Inc. All Rights
Reserved.
CONTENTS
1
GETTING STARTED
8
Introducing Main Concepts
8
Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) standard
Business Motivation Model standard 9
Supportive Diagrams 9
8
Cameo Business Modeler Editions and Features 9
Cameo Business Modeler Analyst Edition 9
Cameo Business Modeler Architect Edition 9
Installing Cameo Business Modeler 10
Licensing Information 11
Switching to Business Modeling Perspectives
Creating BPMN Projects 11
11
Creating Empty Business Model 12
Creating Business Model with Initial Set of Diagrams
2
12
BUSINESS PROCESS MODEL AND NOTATION CONCEPTS 14
Common BPMN Elements
14
Definitions 14
Artifacts 15
Anchor 15
Text Annotation 15
Association 16
Group 16
Error 17
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Process
Activities 18
17
18
Tasks 20
SubProcesses 25
Call Activity 28
Sequence Flow 29
Start Events 30
None Start Event 31
Message Start Event 31
Timer Start Event 32
Compensation Start Event 32
Conditional Start Event 33
Escalation Start Event 33
Error Start Event 34
Signal Start Event 34
Multiple Start Event 35
Parallel Multiple Start Event 36
Intermediate Catch Event 36
None Intermediate Event 36
Message Catching Intermediate Event 37
Timer Catching Intermediate Event 37
Conditional Catching Intermediate Event 38
Link Catching Intermediate Event 38
Signal Catching Intermediate Event 39
Multiple Catching Intermediate Event 40
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CONTENTS
Parallel Multiple Catching Intermediate Event 40
Intermediate Throwing Event 41
Message Throwing Intermediate Event 41
Link Throwing Intermediate Event 41
Signal Throwing Intermediate Event 42
Compensation Throwing Intermediate Event 42
Escalation Throwing Intermediate Event 43
Multiple Throwing Intermediate Event 43
Boundary Events 44
Message Boundary Event 44
Timer Boundary Event 45
Escalation Boundary Event 45
Error Boundary Event 46
Cancel Boundary Event 47
Compensation Boundary Event 47
Conditional Boundary Event 48
Signal Boundary Event 48
Multiple Boundary Event 49
Parallel Multiple Boundary Event 49
End Events 50
None End Event 50
Message End Event 51
Error End Event 51
Escalation End Event 52
Cancel End Event 52
Compensation End Event 53
Signal End Event 53
Terminate End Event 54
Multiple End Event 54
Gateways
54
Exclusive Gateway 55
Inclusive Gateway 56
Parallel Gateway 56
Event Based Gateway 57
Complex Gateway 58
Items and Data 59
Data Object 59
Data Store 59
Data Input and Data Output 60
Data Association 60
Compensation
61
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
63
Collaboration 64
Pool and Lane 64
Message Flow 66
Message 69
Conversation 69
SubConversation 69
Call Conversation 70
Conversation Link 71
Participant 71
BPMN Choreography Diagram
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CONTENTS
Choreography 72
Choreography Activities
73
Choreography Task 74
SubChoreography 76
Call Choreography 77
Numbering Elements 78
Numbering Schemas
78
Multilevel with Owner Number 78
Multilevel without Owner Number 79
Consecutive with Owner Number 79
Consecutive without Owner Number 80
Element Types Numbering Sequence
81
XPDL Support 82
BPMN2 XML support 82
3
SUPPORTIVE DIAGRAMS CONCEPTS
Business Motivation Diagram
84
84
Ends Concepts 85
Vision 85
Goal 85
Objective 86
End Concept Relationships 86
Means Concepts 87
Mission 87
Strategy 87
Tactic 88
Business Policy 88
Business Rule 89
Mean Concept Relationships 89
Influencer Concepts 92
External Influencer 92
Internal Influencer 92
Influencing Organization 93
Influence Concepts Relationship 94
Assessment Concepts
94
Assessment 94
Risk 95
Potential Reward 95
Assessment Concept Relationships 95
Business Data Diagram
97
Class 97
Association 98
Generalization 98
Organization Structure Diagram 99
Resource 100
Organization Unit 100
Role 101
Person 101
Information system 102
Composition 103
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CONTENTS
Process Definition Diagram
103
Package 104
Relationships 104
Usage 105
Dependency 105
Realizes 106
Governs 106
Guides 106
BPMN Tables
107
BPMN Processes Description Table 107
BPMN Resources Description Table 108
BPMN Business Data Description Table 108
BPMN Activities Description Table 109
BPMN Matrices
110
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices 110
BPMN Data Usage Matrices 111
BPMN Processes Structure Map 113
4
USING CAMEO BUSINESS MODELER
114
Using Common BPMN Elements 114
Using BPMN Process Diagram 115
Creating BPMN Process Diagram 115
Creating and Using Tasks 116
Creating and Using SubProcesses 117
Using Activities 119
Creating and Using an Event 121
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow 124
Creating and Using Data Items 125
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams 129
Using BPMN Collaboration Diagram
129
Creating BPMN Collaboration Diagram 130
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes 130
Creating and Using Message Flow 134
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes 136
Creating and Using Participant 139
Using BPMN Choreography Diagram 139
Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram 140
Using Choreography Activity 140
Creating and Using Choreography Task 143
Creating SubChoreography 145
Creating Call Choreography Activity 146
Using BPMN Tables and Matrices
147
Creating BPMN Processes Description Table 147
Creating BPMN Resources Description Table 148
Creating BPMN Business Data Description Table 149
Creating BPMN Activities Description Table 149
Modifying BPMN Table 150
Creating BPMN Resources Usage Matrix 152
Creating BPMN Data Usage Matrix 153
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CONTENTS
Modifying BPMN Matrices 154
Using Organization Structure Diagram
154
Creating Organization Structure Diagram
Creating and Using Resources 155
154
Using BPMN Element Numbers 157
Exporting Models to XPDL 159
Exporting Models to BPMN2 161
5
CAMEO BUSINESS MODELER GUI
Business Model Creation Wizard
6
164
164
APPENDIX I: VALIDATION RULES 168
Incoming Sequence Flow is not created for End Event 168
Error code is not specified for an Error or Error is not defined for an Error End Event 169
Too few outgoing Sequence Flow are detected for an Event-Based Gateway 169
A Start Event is not defined for an Event SubProcess 170
An Intermediate Boundary Event does not have outgoing Sequence Flow 170
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Catch Event 171
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Throw Event 171
Outgoing Sequence Flow is not defined for a Start Event 172
Resource is not defined for a Task 172
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for a Task 173
Name is not defined for a Task 173
Type is not defined for a Data Object, Data Input, Data Output and Data Store 174
A Representer is not specified for a Lane 174
A Documentation is not specified for a BPMN Activity and Resource elements 175
A Message is not referenced by Message Flow 175
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1
GETTIN G STA RTE D
Cameo Business Modeler is a tool that provides a solution for modeling and analyzing business processes. This
tool allows you to represent and analyze business process models based on the Business Process Modeling and
Notation (BPMN) standard, define organization structure and business data as well as business motivation based
on Business Motivation Model (BMM) standard.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Introducing Main Concepts
• Cameo Business Modeler Editions and Features
• Installing Cameo Business Modeler
• Licensing Information
• Creating BPMN Projects
1.1 Introducing Main Concepts
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) standard
• Business Motivation Model standard
• Supportive Diagrams
1.1.1 Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) standard
The Business Process Modeling and Notation is a standard created by the Object Management Group (OMG).
BPMN provides the capability of describing internal business procedures in a graphical notation and enables
organizations to communicate these procedures in a standard manner. Furthermore, the standardized graphical
notation facilitates the understanding of performance collaborations and business transactions between
organizations. This ensures that businesses will understand themselves and other business participants better.
Cameo Business Modeler provides support for the process modeling with BPMN2 standard, business concepts
and organization structure definition, and BMM standard support for business goals definition. It also includes
BPMN model validation, business analysis tables, matrices, relation maps, reports, manuals, and samples.
Cameo Business Modeler provides capabilities for model exchange via XPDL files import and export, BPMN2 XMI
export.
The BPMN2 standard consists of the following three major parts:
• Process, which shows business processes, events, and messages.
• Collaboration, which shows how a process is implemented among collaborators and displays
details of conversations among participants.
• Choreography, which provides a view of message/information flows among participants.
The following diagrams are supported:
• BPMN Process Diagram
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Cameo Business Modeler Editions and Features
• BPMN Collaboration Diagram
• BPMN Choreography Diagram
1.1.2 Business Motivation Model standard
The Business Motivation Model (BMM) is a standard created by the Object Management Group (OMG). This
standard is designed to develop, communicate, and manage business plans. The model identifies and defines the
elements of business plans, the motivating factors to establish the business plans, and how all these factors and
elements are interconnected.
You can find full details about BMM at http://www.omg.org/technology/documents/br_pm_spec_catalog.htm
The following diagrams are supported:
• Business Motivation Diagram
1.1.3 Supportive Diagrams
Cameo Business Modeler also supports diagrams that allow for specifying additional information about business
model.
The following diagrams are supported:
• Process Definition Diagram
• Business Data Diagram
• Organization Structure Diagram
1.2 Cameo Business Modeler Editions and Features
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Cameo Business Modeler Analyst Edition
• Cameo Business Modeler Architect Edition
1.2.1 Cameo Business Modeler Analyst Edition
The Cameo Business Modeler Analyst Edition is developed for designing business models and BPMN diagrams.
It provides intuitive usability in drawing diagrams and active validation suites to detect incorrectly created models.
The Analyst Edition is suitable for business analysts or those who need a well-defined business modeling tool.
The Analyst Edition is compatible with MagicDraw Teamwork Server and is available in demo, evaluation, and
stand-alone versions.
1.2.2 Cameo Business Modeler Architect Edition
Cameo Business Modeler is suitable for business architects or people requiring a comprehensive business
modeling tool.
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Installing Cameo Business Modeler
Cameo Business Modeler Architect edition includes all capabilities of Analyst edition, and adds additional
modeling capabilities.
Architect Edition is equipped with additional types of diagrams:
• dependency matrix
• relation map
• generic table
The Architect Edition delivers project decomposition feature so that projects can be split into parts which can be
shared by team members. This tool also features model differencing in which the users can spot differences
between two project versions.
It is also capable of running passive validation suites, an extension from active validation suites in the Analyst
Edition.
Cameo Business Modeler provides capabilities for model exchange via XPDL files import and export, BPMN2 XMI
export.
The Architect Edition is compatible with MagicDraw Teamwork Server and available in demo, evaluation,
standalone, and floating license versions.
1.3 Installing Cameo Business Modeler
You can download the latest version of Cameo Business Modeler from the official No Magic website http://
www.nomagic.com/products/cameo-business-modeler.html.
You can install or run Cameo Business Modeler using either an installer or a non-install package.
To install Cameo Business Modeler on Windows OS using the installer
1. Double-click Cameo_Business_Modeler_<version>_win.exe. The Setup Wizard will automatically
add the Cameo Business Modeler shortcuts to the Start menu and desktop.The shortcut is also
available in the installation directory.
To install Cameo Business Modeler on Unix OS using the installer
1. Using the command-line prompt go to the directory wherein you have downloaded the installer.
2. Type the command: sh./Cameo_Business_Modeler_<version>_unix.sh.
To install Cameo Business Modeler on Mac OS X using the installer
1. Double-click Cameo_Business_Modeler_<version>_mac.dmg and drag the launcher to the
Applications folder (or to any folder) to install the tool.
You can create additional folders for different Cameo Business Modeler version in the Mac OS X Applications
folder so that the new client does not overwrite the old client. After installing Cameo Business Modeler to several
folders, you will be able to import the configuration of the previous Cameo Business Modeler version.
To install Cameo Business Modeler to a newly created folder on Mac OS X
1. Create a folder and name it, for example, Cameo Business Modeler 17.0.
2. Drag Cameo_Business_Modeler_<version>_mac.dmg to Applications/Cameo Business Modeler
17.0.
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Licensing Information
To run Cameo Business Modeler using a non-install package
1. Download Cameo_Business_Modeler_<version>_no_install.zip.
2. Extract the files.
3. Run Cameo Business Modeler (be sure a JVM has been installed):
• On Windows OS, double-click cbm.exe in the bin directory.
• On Unix OS, double-click cbm.sh in the bin directory.
• Mac OS X, double-click Cameo Business Modeler.app.
Since Cameo Business Modeler is a Java application, you will need both Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and the
installation file to run the tool successfully. If you do not have a JVM installed on your computer, you can install
JVM together with Cameo Business Modeler. Information about the latest Java ports is available at http://
www.nomagic.com/support/jvm-list.html.
If your operating system (OS) is Windows and JVM runs on your computer,
you can install Cameo Business Modeler immediately
1.4 Licensing Information
For more information about the licensing mechanism description, see “Licensing Information” in MagicDraw
UserManual.pdf.
1.5 Switching to Business Modeling Perspectives
The business modeling perspectives are dedicated to business process modelers. The perspectives offer a
simplified user interface by showing the features that are relevant to business process modeling and hiding the
others that are not.
Cameo Business Modeler offers two business modeling perspectives. They are as follow:
• Business Analyst perspective that provides set of most often used elements of BPMN standard.
• Business Architect perspective that provides all BPMN elements.
To switch to the Business Analyst or Business Architect perspective
1. From the main menu, click Options > Perspectives > Perspectives. The Select Perspectives
dialog will open.
2. Select Business Analyst or Business Architect appropriately and click Apply.
Related external resource
“Customizing and Selecting Perspective” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf.
1.6 Creating BPMN Projects
To create a new project from template, you can choose one of the following templates:
• A BPMN2 Project, which provides the workspace for business process modeling. This project is
empty.
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Creating BPMN Projects
• A Business Model Creation Wizard, which provides workspace with predefined the initial set of
diagrams.
• A Business Model project, which provides workspace with predefined project structure and
guidelines how to create business model.
1.6.1 Creating Empty Business Model
To create a new workspace for an empty project
1. Do one of the following:
• On the main menu, click File > New Project.
• Click the
button on the File toolbar.
• Press Ctrl + N.
2. In the New Project dialog, select the project template under the Business Process Modeling
domain.
3. Specify the file name in the Name box.
4. Click the ... button to define the location for storing your newly created project in your computer.
5. Click OK.
If you work not in the Business Analyst perspective, a message asking whether
you want to change the perspective will open. Click Yes to switch to the
Business Analyst perspective supporting business modeling diagrams.
1.6.2 Creating Business Model with Initial Set of Diagrams
To create a new workspace with initial set of diagrams
1. Do one of the following:
• On the main menu, click File > New Project.
• Click the
button on the File toolbar.
• Press Ctrl + N.
2. In the New Project dialog, select Business Model Creation Wizard under the Business
Process Modeling domain.
3. Specify the file name in the Name box.
4. Click the ... button to define the location for storing your newly created project in your computer.
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Creating BPMN Projects
5. Click OK. The Business Model Creation Wizard window opens.
6. Define Business Concepts and click Next.
7. Define Organization Units and click Next.
8. Define Roles and click Next.
9. Define Business Processes and click Finish.
If you work not in the Business Analyst perspective, a message asking whether
you want to change the perspective will open. Click Yes to switch to the
Business Analyst perspective supporting business modeling diagrams.
Related references
Business Model Creation Wizard
Related external resource
“Working with Projects” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
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2 B USIN ESS PROCE S S MODE L
AN D NO TATION CONCE P TS
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Common BPMN Elements
• BPMN Process Diagram
• BPMN Collaboration Diagram
• BPMN Choreography Diagram
• Numbering Elements
• XPDL Support
• BPMN2 XML support
2.1 Common BPMN Elements
The following section defines the BPMN elements that can be used in several BPMN diagrams, such as Process,
Collaboration, and Choreography diagrams.
Common BPMN2 elements are described in the following sections:
• Definitions
• Artifacts
• Error
2.1.1 Definitions
Description
The Definitions element is a root model in a business modeling project. This element is the outermost containing
object for all BPMN elements. It defines the visibility scope and the namespace for all of the BPMN elements in a
model.
Example
Figure -- Definitions element in Containment tree
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Common BPMN Elements
2.1.2 Artifacts
Artifacts provide modelers with the capability to show additional information about a process.
This information is not directly related to a sequence
or message flow of the process.
Types of Artifacts are as follows:
• Anchor
• Association
• Group
• Text Annotation
2.1.2.1 Anchor
Description
An Anchor is used to associate a Text Annotation, Note, or Comment with the other diagram elements.
Example
Figure -- Anchor associating Text Annotation with Activity
Related element
Text Annotation
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related external resource
“Note” and “Comment” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
2.1.2.2 Text Annotation
Description
A Text Annotation allows a modeler to provide additional information about elements for the reader of a BPMN
diagram.
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Common BPMN Elements
Example
Related element
Anchor
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
2.1.2.3 Association
Description
An Association relation can be drawn between any BPMN elements.
This element also can denote an Activity that is used for a Compensation.
Notation
Figure -- Association from Compensation Boundary Event to Compensation task
Related element
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
2.1.2.4 Group
Description
A Group element represents an informal visual grouping of the diagram graphical elements.
A group shows all elements that belong to the same category. This type of grouping does not affect a sequence
flow within the Group. A category name appears on the diagram as a Group label.
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BPMN Process Diagram
Example
Figure -- Group showing elements in same category
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
2.1.3 Error
Description
An Error represents the content of an error event or the fault of a failed operation. An Error is generated when
there is a critical problem in the processing of an Activity or when the execution of an operation fails.
Related elements
Start Events
Boundary Events
End Events
2.2 BPMN Process Diagram
Description
A BPMN Process Diagram describes a sequence or flow of activities in an organization that shows how the
business works. The diagram shows activities, events, and data that trigger or feed business activities. A BPMN
Process Diagram is similar to the UML Activity diagram with a much richer set of default message types and
business process styles of notations.
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BPMN Process Diagram
Example
Figure -- BPMN Process diagram
Related element
BPMN Process
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
2.2.1 BPMN Process
Description
A BPMN Process element defines a process performed in an organization. This element is a container for the
BPMN Process diagram and its elements. Process diagram describes how a process is performed.
Notation
Related element
Tasks
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
2.2.2 Activities
An Activity is a work that is performed within a business process. An Activity can be atomic or non-atomic
(compound). There are three types of Activities that are part of a Process:
• Tasks
• SubProcesses
• Call Activity
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BPMN Process Diagram
If the Activity property Is For Compensation is set to true, the Activity will be used for compensation, which means
that this Activity will be activated only when a Compensation Event is detected and initiated under the
Compensation Event visibility scope. The Compensation indicator (marker) is displayed for all activities that are
used for the compensation.
• Compensation Task with Compensation indicator
• Compensation SubProcess with Compensation indicator
Activities can be repeated sequentially, essentially behaving like a loop. The presence of loop characteristics
signifies that an Activity has the looping behavior. There are two types of looping characteristics defined in BPMN:
• Standard Loop
A Standard Loop indicator (marker) displayed in an Activity shape shows that the looping behavior
based on a boolean condition is defined for this Activity. Additional looping characteristics can be
defined, and the Activity will loop as long as the boolean condition is true. The condition is
evaluated for every loop iteration and can be evaluated at the beginning or end of the iteration. In
addition, a numeric cap can be optionally specified, but the number of iterations cannot exceed
this cap.
• Task with Standard Loop marker
• SubProcess with Standard Loop marker
• MultiInstance Loop
A MultiInstance Loop indicator shows that a desired number of Activity instances can be created.
The instances can be executed in parallel or sequentially. Either expression is used to specify the
desired number of instances or a data driven setup that can be used.
• Task with MultiInstance Loop marker for parallel instances
• SubProcess with MultiInstance Loop marker for parallel instances
• Task with MultiInstance Loop marker for sequential instances
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BPMN Process Diagram
• SubProcess with MultiInstance Loop marker for sequential instances
The Compensation, Multi-instance Loop, and Standard Loop indicators can be added
to all types of Activities.
Related procedure
Using Activities
2.2.2.1 Tasks
A Task is an atomic Activity within a process flow. A Task is used when the work in a process cannot be broken
down into finer levels of detail. Generally, an end-user and/or application are used to perform the task when it is
executed. Types of Tasks used in business process modeling are as follows:
• Task
• Service Task
• Send Task
• Receive Task
• User Task
• Manual Task
• Business Rule Task
• Script Task
2.2.2.1.1 Task
Description
A Task that has no specified behavior defined.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Service Task
Send Task
Receive Task
User Task
Manual Task
Business Rule Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
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BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.1.2 Service Task
Description
A Service Task is a task that uses some sort of service, which could be a Web service or an automated
application.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Receive Task
User Task
Manual Task
Business Rule Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.1.3 Send Task
Description
A Send Task is a simple task that is designed to send a message to an external participant. Once the message
has been sent, the task is completed.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Receive Task
User Task
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BPMN Process Diagram
Manual Task
Business Rule Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.1.4 Receive Task
Description
A Receive Task is a simple task that is designed to wait for a message to arrive from an external participant
(relative to the Process). Once the message has been received, the task is completed.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Send Task
User Task
Manual Task
Business Rule Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.1.5 User Task
Description
A User Task is a typical workflow task where a human performer performs the task with the assistance of software
and is scheduled through a task list manager of some sort.
Notation
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BPMN Process Diagram
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Send Task
Receive Task
Manual Task
Business Rule Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.1.6 Manual Task
Description
A Manual Task is a task that is expected to be performed without the aid of any business process execution engine
or application, for example, installing a telephone at a customer location.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Send Task
Receive Task
User Task
Business Rule Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
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BPMN Process Diagram
2.2.2.1.7 Business Rule Task
Description
A Business Rule Task provides a mechanism for a process to provide inputs to a business rules engine and to get
the output of calculations that the business rules engine might provide.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Send Task
Receive Task
User Task
Manual Task
Script Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.1.8 Script Task
Description
A Script Task is executed by a business process engine. A modeler or an implementer defines a script in a
language that the engine can interpret. When the task is ready to start, the engine will execute the script. When
the script is completed, the task will also be completed.
Notation
Related elements
Activities
Task
Service Task
Send Task
Receive Task
User Task
Manual Task
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BPMN Process Diagram
Business Rule Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Tasks
2.2.2.2 SubProcesses
A SubProcess is an Activity whose internal details have been modeled using activities, gateways, events, and
sequence flows. A SubProcess is a graphical object within a process. It can be “opened up” to show a lower-level
process. SubProcesses define a contextual scope that can be used for attribute visibility and a transactional scope
for the handling exceptions of Events or for compensation.
A collapsed view of a SubProcess hides its details while an expanded view shows its content. A collapsed
SubProcess uses a plus sign (+) to distinguish itself from a Task.
Different types of SubProcesses used in business process modeling are as follows:
• SubProcess
• AdHoc SubProcess
• Event SubProcess
• Transaction
2.2.2.2.1 SubProcess
Description
A SubProcess is used to create a context for an exception handling that applies to a group of activities.
A collapsed SubProcess can be used as a mechanism to show a compact and less clutter group of parallel
activities.
Notation
• Expanded SubProcess
• Collapsed SubProcess
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BPMN Process Diagram
Example
Figure -- Expanded SubProcess
Related elements
Activities
AdHoc SubProcess
Event SubProcess
Transaction
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using SubProcesses
2.2.2.2.2 AdHoc SubProcess
Description
An AdHoc SubProcess is a specialized type of SubProcess, which is a group of activities that have no required
sequence relationships. A set of activities can be defined for the process, but the sequence and number of
performances for the activities are determined by the performers of the activities.
Notation
• Expanded
• Collapsed
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BPMN Process Diagram
Related elements
Activities
SubProcess
Event SubProcess
Transaction
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using SubProcesses
2.2.2.2.3 Event SubProcess
Description
An Event SubProcess is an ordinary SubProcess whose Triggered By Event property is set to true. It is not a part
of a normal flow of its parent process - there is no incoming or outgoing sequence flow.
An Event SubProcess may occur many times. Unlike the standard SubProcess that uses the flow of the parent
process as a trigger, it has a Start Event as a trigger. Whenever the Start Event is triggered while the parent
process is active, the Event SubProcess will start.
The Start Event icon of a collapsed Event SubProcess will be displayed on the top left corner of the SubProcess.
Notation
• Expanded
• Collapsed
• Collapsed (with its own Start Event)
Related elements
Activities
SubProcess
AdHoc SubProcess
Transaction
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
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Related procedure
Creating and Using SubProcesses
2.2.2.2.4 Transaction
Description
A Transaction is a specialized type of SubProcess whose special behavior is controlled through a transaction
protocol (such as WS-Transaction).
Notation
• Expanded
• Collapsed
Related elements
Activities
SubProcess
AdHoc SubProcess
Event SubProcess
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
2.2.2.3 Call Activity
Description
A Call Activity identifies a point in a process where a global process is used. The Call Activity acts as a wrapper for
the invocation of the global process within the execution. The activation of the Call Activity results in the transfer of
control to the called global process.
A Call Activity shares the same notation as a Task or SubProcess with a thick line around the boundary of its
shape.
The BPMN2 Call Activity corresponds to the Reusable SubProcess of BPMN 1.2, and the BPMN2 SubProcess
corresponds to the Embedded SubProcess of BPMN 1.2.
Notation
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Example
Figure -- Call Activities Referencing Process
Related elements
BPMN Process
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
2.2.3 Sequence Flow
Description
A Sequence Flow is used to show the order of flow elements in a process or a choreography.
The source and target of a Sequence Flow must be from a set of the following elements:
• Events (Start, Intermediate, and End events)
• Activities (Task and SubProcess for Processes)
• Choreography Activities (Choreography Task and Sub-Choreography)
• Gateways
A Sequence Flow can optionally define a condition expression indicating that a token will be passed down the
Sequence Flow only if the expression is evaluated to be true.
A Condition expression is typically used when the source of a Sequence Flow is a Gateway or an Activity. A
conditional outgoing Sequence Flow from an Activity is with a mini-diamond (indicator) at the beginning of the
Sequence Flow.
A Conditional Sequence Flow outgoing from a Gateway does not have
a mini-diamond at the beginning of the Sequence Flow.
A Sequence Flow, which has an exclusive, inclusive, or complex gateway, or an Activity as its source, can also be
defined as a default Sequence Flow. The default Sequence Flow is represented with a backslash.
A default Sequence Flow will be taken (a token is passed) only if all of the other outgoing Sequence Flows from an
Activity or Gateway are not valid, meaning that their condition expressions are false.
Example
Figure -- Sequence Flow between two Tasks
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Figure -- Conditional Sequence flow
Figure -- Default Sequence Flow
Related elements
Start Events
Intermediate Catch Event
Intermediate Throwing Event
End Events
Task
SubProcess
Choreography Task
SubChoreography
Gateways
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Process Diagram
2.2.4 Start Events
A Start Event indicates where a particular process starts. In terms of sequence flows, a Start Event starts the flow
of a process, and thus cannot have any incoming sequence flows.
When a Start Event is owned by an Event SubProcess, it can be:
• Interrupting. The Start Event interrupts the process contained in the Event SubProcess. The
Interrupting Message Start Event is drawn with a solid border.
• Non-Interrupting. The Start Event does not interrupt the process contained in the Event
SubProcess and starts parallel flow. The Interrupting Message Start Event is drawn with a dashed
border.
Types of Start Events are as follows:
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• None Start Event
• Message Start Event
• Timer Start Event
• Compensation Start Event
• Conditional Start Event
• Escalation Start Event
• Error Start Event
• Signal Start Event
• Multiple Start Event
• Parallel Multiple Start Event
2.2.4.1 None Start Event
Description
A None Start Event does not have a defined trigger that invokes the start of a process.
Notation
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.2 Message Start Event
Description
A Message Start Event means that a message from a participant has arrived and triggered the start of a process.
A Message Start Event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Message Start Event name if the name is specified.
• A Message Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
• An Operation Ref property if the name and Message Ref are not specified.
Notation
• Interrupting Message Start Event
• Non-interrupting Message Start Event
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Related elements
Start Events
Message
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.3 Timer Start Event
Description
A Timer Start Event allows a particular time and date or cycle setting, for example, on Mondays at 9 A.M., to
trigger the start of a process.
A Timer Start Event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Timer Start Event name if the name is specified.
• A Time Cycle property name if the name is unspecified.
• A Time Date property if the name and Time Cycle are unspecified.
Notation
• Interrupting Timer Start Event
• Non-interrupting Timer Start Event
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.4 Compensation Start Event
Description
A Compensation Start Event triggers an in-line Compensation Event SubProcess only. The event is triggered
when the compensation occurs.
Notation
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Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.5 Conditional Start Event
Description
A Conditional Start Event is triggered when a condition is specified, become true. For example, “S&P 500 changes
by more than 10% since opening” or “Temperature above 300C”.
A Conditional Start Event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Conditional Start Event name if the name is specified.
• A Condition property value if the name is unspecified.
A conditional expression of an event must become “false”, and then “true”
before the event can be triggered again.
Notation
• Interrupting Conditional Start Event
• Non-interrupting Conditional Start Event
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.6 Escalation Start Event
Description
An Escalation Start Event implements measures to expedite the completion of a business Activity.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• An Escalation Start Event name if the name is specified.
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• An Escalation Code property value if the name is unspecified.
An Escalation Start Event triggers an in-line Event SubProcess only.
Notation
• Interrupting Escalation Start Event
• Non-interrupting Escalation Start Event
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.7 Error Start Event
Description
An Error Start Event triggers an in-line Event SubProcess only.
This event displays either of the following on the diagram:
• An Error Start Event name if the name is specified.
• An Error Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.8 Signal Start Event
Description
A Signal Start Event means that a signal, which has been broadcast from another process, has arrived and
triggered the start of a process.
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A Signal Start Event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Signal Start Event name if the name is specified.
• A Signal Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
• Interrupting Signal Start Event
• Non-Interrupting Signal Start Event
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.4.9 Multiple Start Event
Description
A Multiple Start Event indicates that there are multiple ways to trigger a process. However, only one is required.
Notation
• Interrupting Multiple Start Event
• Non-interrupting Multiple Start Event
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
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2.2.4.10 Parallel Multiple Start Event
Description
A Parallel Multiple Start Event indicates that there are multiple triggers required before a process can be initiated.
Notation
• Interrupting Parallel Multiple Start Event
• Non-Interrupting Parallel Multiple Start Event
Related element
Start Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5 Intermediate Catch Event
An Intermediate Catch Event indicates that something is happening between the start and end of a process.
Intermediate Events affect the flow of a process, but do not start or directly terminate the process.
You can use Intermediate Catch Event to:
• Show where messages are expected or sent within a process.
• Show delays that are expected within a process.
• Interrupt normal flow through exception handling.
Types of Intermediate Catch Events are the following:
• None Intermediate Event
• Message Catching Intermediate Event
• Timer Catching Intermediate Event
• Conditional Catching Intermediate Event
• Link Catching Intermediate Event
• Signal Catching Intermediate Event
• Multiple Catching Intermediate Event
• Parallel Multiple Catching Intermediate Event
2.2.5.1 None Intermediate Event
Description
A None Intermediate Event does not have a defined trigger.
This event is used to model methodologies that use events to indicate some changes in a state of process.
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Notation
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.2 Message Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Message Catching Intermediate Event is used to receive a message.
This event causes a process to continue if it is waiting for the message.
A Message Catching Intermediate Event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Message Catching Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Message Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
• An Operation Ref property if the name and Message Ref are not specified.
Notation
Related elements
Message
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.3 Timer Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Timer Catching Intermediate Event acts as a delay mechanism based on a particular time and date, or cycle, for
example, on Mondays at 9 A.M.
This Event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Timer Catching Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Time Cycle property name if the name is unspecified.
• A Time Date property if the name and Time Cycle are unspecified.
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Notation
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.4 Conditional Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Conditional Catching Intermediate Event is triggered when a condition becomes true.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Conditional Catching Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Condition property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.5 Link Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Link Catching Intermediate Event provides the capability to connect two sections of a process. You can use this
event to either:
• Create looping situations or to avoid long sequence flow lines, as “Off-Page Connectors” to print a
Process across multiple pages, or as generic Go To objects within a Process level.
• Catch a link from a Link Throwing Intermediate Event.
You can only use one Link Event for each single Process level, meaning that it cannot link a parent Process with a
SubProcess.
A Link Catching Intermediate Event displays either of the following:
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• A Link Catching Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Source property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Example
Figure -- Link Catching Intermediate Event
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.6 Signal Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Signal Catching Intermediate Event is used to receive a signal.
This event displays either of the following on the diagram:
• A Signal Catching Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Signal Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Signals in business process modeling are used for general communications within and across process levels.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
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Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.7 Multiple Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Multiple Catching Intermediate Event signifies that multiple types of events can be caught. Only one of the
defined event triggers is required.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.5.8 Parallel Multiple Catching Intermediate Event
Description
A Parallel Multiple Catching Intermediate Event signifies that multiple types of events are caught. All of the defined
event triggers are required to trigger this event.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Catch Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
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2.2.6 Intermediate Throwing Event
An Intermediate Throwing Event indicates that something is happening between the start and end of a process.
Intermediate Events affect the flow of a process, but do not start or directly terminate the process.
You can use Intermediate Throwing Events to show extra work required.
Types of Intermediate Throwing Events are as follows:
• Message Throwing Intermediate Event
• Link Throwing Intermediate Event
• Signal Throwing Intermediate Event
• Compensation Throwing Intermediate Event
• Escalation Throwing Intermediate Event
• Multiple Throwing Intermediate Event
2.2.6.1 Message Throwing Intermediate Event
Description
A Message Throwing Intermediate Event is used to send a message.
This Event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Message Throwing Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Message Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
• An Operation Ref property if the name and Message Ref are not specified.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Throwing Eventt
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.6.2 Link Throwing Intermediate Event
Description
A Link Throwing Intermediate Event is used to throw a link to a Link Catching Intermediate Event.
This event displays either of the following:
• A Link Throwing Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Target Link Event property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
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Related element
Intermediate Throwing Eventt
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.6.3 Signal Throwing Intermediate Event
Description
A Signal Throwing Intermediate Event is used to send a signal.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Signal Throwing Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Signal Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Throwing Eventt
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.6.4 Compensation Throwing Intermediate Event
Description
A Compensation Throwing Intermediate Event indicates that a compensation is necessary.
If an Activity, which has been successfully completed, is identified, then it will be compensated.
If no Activity is identified, all successfully completed Activities visible from a Compensation Throwing Intermediate
Event will be compensated in reverse order of their sequence flows. To be compensated, the Activity must have a
Boundary Compensation Event or contain a Compensation Event SubProcess.
Notation
Related elements
Compensation
Intermediate Throwing Event
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Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.6.5 Escalation Throwing Intermediate Event
Description
An Escalation Throwing Intermediate Event raises an Escalation.
This event displays one of the following on the diagram:
• An Escalation Throwing Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• An Escalation Code property value if then name is unspecified.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Throwing Eventt
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.6.6 Multiple Throwing Intermediate Event
Description
A Multiple Throwing Intermediate Event signifies that multiple types of events are thrown. All of the defined
triggers will be thrown by this event.
Notation
Related element
Intermediate Throwing Eventt
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
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2.2.7 Boundary Events
A Boundary Event is an Intermediate event which can be placed on the boundary of any of the following activities:
• SubProcess, Task, or Call Activity
• SubChoreography, Choreography Task, or Call Choreography
Boundary Event indicates that while attached-to Activity is running, event is listening for the trigger signal.
Boundary Event types:
• Interrupting Boundary Event aborts Activity and Process is continued of exceptional flow. This
event is drawn with a solid border.
• Non-Interrupting Boundary Event splits process to parallel flows. This event is drawn with a
dashed border.
Figure -- Error Boundary Event attached to SubProcess
Types of Boundary Events are as follows:
• Message Boundary Event
• Timer Boundary Event
• Escalation Boundary Event
• Error Boundary Event
• Cancel Boundary Event
• Compensation Boundary Event
• Conditional Boundary Event
• Signal Boundary Event
• Multiple Boundary Event
• Parallel Multiple Boundary Event
2.2.7.1 Message Boundary Event
Description
A Message Boundary Event is triggered by an arrived message. Once triggered, it changes a normal flow into an
exception flow or parallel.
A Message Boundary Event displays any of the following on the diagram:
• A Message Boundary Event name if the name is specified.
• A Message Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
• An Operation Ref property if the name and Message Ref are not specified.
Notation
• Interrupting Message Boundary Event
• Non-interrupting Message Boundary Event
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Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Message
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.2 Timer Boundary Event
Description
A Timer Boundary Event, which is attached to the boundary of an Activity, change a normal flow into an exception
flow upon being triggered. A particular time-date or cycle, for example, on Mondays at 9 A.M., can be specified to
trigger a Timer Boundary Event.
A Timer Boundary Event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Timer Boundary Event name if the name is specified.
• A Time Cycle property name if the name is unspecified.
• A Time Date property if the name and Time Cycle are unspecified.
Notation
• Interrupting Timer Boundary Event
• Non-interrupting Timer Boundary Event
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.3 Escalation Boundary Event
Description
An Escalation Boundary Event is used to catch an escalation.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
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• An Escalation Boundary Event name if the name is specified.
• An Escalation Code property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
• Interrupting Escalation Boundary Event
• Non-interrupting Escalation Boundary Event
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.4 Error Boundary Event
Description
An Error Boundary Event reacts to (catches) a named error or any error if no name is specified.
This Event always interrupts the Activity to which it is attached. The boundary of the event is always solid.
An Error Boundary Event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• An Error Boundary Event name if the name is specified.
• An Error Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
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2.2.7.5 Cancel Boundary Event
Description
A Cancel Boundary Event is used within a Transaction SubProcess.
This type of Event must be attached to the boundary of a SubProcess and will be triggered if the following
conditions are satisfied:
• A Cancel End Event is reached within the Transaction SubProcess.
• A Transaction Protocol Cancel message is received while a transaction is being performed.
A Cancel Boundary Event always interrupts the Activity to which it is attached. The boundary of the event is
always solid.
Notation
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.6 Compensation Boundary Event
Description
A Compensation Boundary Event is used to catch a Compensation Event. The event will be triggered by a
compensation event. When the event is triggered, a Compensation Activity, which is associated with it, will be
performed.
The Compensation Boundary Event in this sense does not affect the interrupting or non-interrupting aspect.
Compensations can only be triggered after the completion of an Activity to which they are attached. Thus, they
cannot interrupt the Activity. The boundary of the event is always solid.
Notation
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Compensation
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
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Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.7 Conditional Boundary Event
Description
A Conditional Boundary Event is triggered when a specified condition becomes true. When the event is triggered,
it will change a normal flow of a Process into an exception flow.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Conditional Catching Intermediate Event name if the name is specified.
• A Conditional property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
• Interrupting Conditional Boundary Event
• Non-interrupting Conditional Boundary Event
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.8 Signal Boundary Event
Description
A Signal Boundary Event can receive a Signal. In this context, it will change a normal flow into an exception flow
upon being triggered.
A Signal Event differs from an Error Event because it defines a more general, non-error condition for interrupting
Activities, such as the successful completion of another Activity, and it has a larger scope than the Error Event
does.
Signal Boundary Event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Signal Boundary Event name if the name is specified.
• A Signal Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
• Interrupting Signal Boundary Event
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• Non-Interrupting Signal Boundary Event
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.9 Multiple Boundary Event
Description
A Multiple Boundary Event indicates that there are multiple triggers assigned to the Event. Only one of the
specified triggers is required. The Event that occurred changes a normal flow into an exception flow.
Notation
• Interrupting Multiple Boundary Event
• Non-Interrupting Multiple Boundary Event
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.7.10 Parallel Multiple Boundary Event
Description
A Parallel Multiple Boundary Event indicates that there are multiple triggers assigned to the event and all of them
are required to trigger it.
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Notation
• Interrupting Parallel Multiple Boundary Event
• Non-Interrupting Parallel Multiple Boundary Event
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8 End Events
An End Event indicates where the path of a process ends. In terms of sequence flows, an End Event ends the flow
of a process, and thus, does not have any outgoing sequence flow.
Types of End Events used in business process modeling are the following:
• None End Event
• Message End Event
• Error End Event
• Escalation End Event
• Cancel End Event
• Compensation End Event
• Signal End Event
• Terminate End Event
• Multiple End Event
2.2.8.1 None End Event
Description
A None Start Event does not have a defined result.
Notation
Related elements
Boundary Events
Activities
End Events
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Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8.2 Message End Event
Description
A Message End Event indicates that a message will be sent when a process is completed.
This event displays any of the following on a diagram:
• A Message End Event name if the name is specified.
• A Message Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
• An Operation Ref property if the name and Message Ref are not specified.
Notation
Related elements
End Events
Message
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8.3 Error End Event
Description
An Error End Event indicates that a defined error will be generated, resulting in the termination of all of the
currently active threads in a particular SubProcess.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• An Error End Event name if the name is specified.
• An Error Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Related elements
End Events
Error
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Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8.4 Escalation End Event
Description
An Escalation End Event indicates that an Escalation should be triggered. Other active threads are not affected by
this event and continue to be executed.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• An Escalation End Event name if the name is specified.
• An Escalation Code property value if the name is unspecified.
Notation
Related element
End Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8.5 Cancel End Event
Description
A Cancel End Event is used within a Transaction SubProcess. It indicates that the transaction will be canceled and
a Cancel Boundary Event attached to the SubProcess boundary will be triggered. It also indicates that a
Transaction Protocol Cancel message have to be sent to all entities involved in the transaction.
Notation
Related element
End Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
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2.2.8.6 Compensation End Event
Description
A Compensation End Event indicates that a compensation is necessary.
• If an Activity, which has successfully been completed, is identified, that Activity will be
compensated.
• If no Activity is identified, all successfully completed Activities visible from the Compensation End
Event will be compensated in reverse order of their sequence flows.
To be compensated, an Activity must have a Compensation Boundary Event or contain a Compensation Event
SubProcess.
Notation
Related elements
End Events
Compensation
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8.7 Signal End Event
Description
A Signal End Event indicates that a signal will be broadcast when the end has been reached.
This event displays either of the following on a diagram:
• A Signal End Event name if the name is specified.
• A Signal Ref property value if the name is unspecified.
A signal, which is broadcast to any process that can receive it,
can be sent across process levels or pools.
Notation
Related element
End Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
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2.2.8.8 Terminate End Event
Description
A Terminate End Event indicates that all activities in a process have to be immediately ended, including all the
instances of multi-instance activities. The process will be ended without any compensation or event handling.
Notation
Related element
End Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.8.9 Multiple End Event
Description
A Multiple End Event shows that there are multiple consequences of ending a process and all of them occur, for
example, multiple messages might be sent.
Notation
Related element
End Events
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using an Event
2.2.9 Gateways
A Gateway allows you to control the flow of a process through a sequence flow. The term Gateway implies that
there is a gating mechanism that either allows or disallows passage through the Gateway. Tokens that arrive at the
gateway can be merged as inputs and/or split as outputs.
If the flow of a process does not need to be controlled,
process does not need a gateway.
Types of Gateways are as follows:
• Exclusive Gateway
• Inclusive Gateway
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• Parallel Gateway
• Event Based Gateway
• Complex Gateway
2.2.9.1 Exclusive Gateway
Description
A diverging Exclusive Gateway (Decision) is used to create alternative paths within a process flow. This is
basically the diversion point in the road for a process. Only one alternative path can be taken for a given instance
of the process.
A Exclusive Gateway can be thought of as a question that is asked at a particular point in the process. The
question has a defined set of alternative answers. Each question is associated with two or more condition
expressions associated with outgoing sequence flows of the Gateway.
A converging Exclusive Gateway is used to merge alternative paths. All incoming sequence Flows tokens will be
routed to the outgoing sequence flow without synchronizing them.
There are two icons defined for an Exclusive Gateway in the BPMN2 Specification.
It can be displayed with or without an internal marker.
Notation
• Without an Internal Marker Exclusive Gateway
• An Internal Marker Exclusive Gateway
Example
Figure -- Diverging Exclusive Gateway
Related elements
Gateways
Sequence Flow
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
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2.2.9.2 Inclusive Gateway
Description
A diverging Inclusive Gateway (Inclusive Decision) is used to create not only alternative but also parallel paths
within a process flow. Unlike an Exclusive Gateway, it evaluates all condition expressions. The true evaluation of
one condition expression does not exclude the evaluation of the other condition expressions. All of the sequence
flows with true evaluation will be traversed by a token.
Since each path is considered to be independent, all combinations of the paths may be taken, from zero to all.
However, it should be designed in such a way that at least one path is taken.
A converging Inclusive Gateway is used to merge a combination of alternative and parallel paths. A control flow
token arriving at an Inclusive Gateway may be synchronized with some other tokens that arrive later at this
Gateway.
Notation
Example
Figure -- Diverging Inclusive Gateway
Related elements
Gateways
Sequence Flow
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
2.2.9.3 Parallel Gateway
Description
A Parallel Gateway is used to synchronize (combine) and create parallel flows.
Notation
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Example
Figure -- Parallel Gateway
Related elements
Gateways
Sequence Flow
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
2.2.9.4 Event Based Gateway
Description
An Event Based Gateway represents a branching point in a process where alternative paths that follow the
gateway are based on the events that occur rather than on the evaluation of expressions using process data (as
with an Exclusive or Inclusive Gateway). A specific event, usually the receipt of a message, determines which path
will be taken. Basically, an Event Based Gateway is used when a decision made by another participant is based
on data that are not visible to the process.
Notation
Example
Figure -- Event-Based Gateway
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Related elements
Gateways
Sequence Flow
Intermediate Catch Event
Intermediate Throwing Event
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
2.2.9.5 Complex Gateway
Description
A Complex Gateway can be used to model complex synchronization behavior. An Activation Condition is the
Complex Gateway’s property, which is used to describe precise behavior.
Notation
Example
The activation condition specifies that tokens on three out of five incoming sequence flows are needed to activate
the gateway. Which token the Gateway will produce is determined by the conditions on the outgoing sequence
flow as in the split behavior of an Inclusive Gateway.
Figure -- Complex Gateway
Related elements
Gateways
Sequence Flow
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
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BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
2.2.10 Items and Data
The traditional requirement of process modeling is to be able to model the items (physical or information items)
that are created, manipulated, and used during the execution of a process. This requirement is fulfilled in BPMN
through various constructs: Data Objects, Item Definition, Properties, Data Inputs, Data Outputs, Messages, Input
Sets, Output Sets, and Data Associations.
2.2.10.1 Data Object
Description
A Data Object is an element that stores or conveys items during process execution. The Data Object elements
must be contained within the process or SubProcess elements.A Data Object element can optionally reference a
DataState element, which is the state of data contained in a Data Object.
A Data Object element, which references an element marked as a collection, is visualized differently.
Notation
• Data Object
• Data Object that is collection
Related elements
Class
Resource
Data Association
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Data Items
2.2.10.2 Data Store
Description
A Data Store provides a mechanism for activities to retrieve or update stored information that will persist beyond
the scope of a process.
Notation
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Related elements
Class
Resource
Data Association
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Data Items
2.2.10.3 Data Input and Data Output
Description
Activities and processes often require data in order to execute. In addition, they may produce data during or as the
result of the execution.Data requirements are captured as Data Input. The produced data are captured using a
Data Output notation.
Notation
• Data Input
• Data Output
Related elements
Class
Resource
Data Association
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Data Items
2.2.10.4 Data Association
Description
A Data Association is used to model how data are pushed into or pulled from item-aware elements. Tokens do not
flow along a Data Association. Therefore, they have no direct effect on the flow of a process.
Alternatively, Data Objects can be directly associated with a Sequence Flow to represent the same input or output
Data Associations. This is a visual shortcut that is stored in a model as two Data Associations
• from Activity to Data Object
• from Data Object to Activity
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Example
Figure -- Data Association showing flow of Data Object
Figure -- Sequence Flow representing the same Input/Output data associations
Related elements
Data Object
Data Store
Data Input and Data Output
Sequence Flow
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Data Items
2.2.11 Compensation
Description
A Compensation in business process modeling is concerned with undoing steps that have already been
successfully completed because their results and possible side effects are no longer desired and need to be
reversed. If an Activity is still active, it cannot be compensated and needs to be canceled. The cancellation of a
SubProcess can produce a compensation of the already successfully completed portions of an active Activity.
A Compensation is performed by a compensation handler. A compensation handler performs the steps necessary
to reverse the effects of an Activity. For a SubProcess, the compensation handler will have access to the
SubProcess data once they have been completed (“snapshot data”).
A compensation handler is a set of Activities that is not connected to other portions of the BPMN model. The
compensation handler starts with either of the Compensation Events:
• Compensation Boundary Event
• The handler’s Start Event (in case of a Compensation Event SubProcess)
A compensation handler connected through a boundary event can only perform a “black-box” compensation of the
original Activity. This compensation is modeled with a specialized Compensation Activity, which is connected to
the boundary event through an association. The Compensation Activity, which can be either a Task or a
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SubProcess, is marked to show that it is used for compensation only and is located outside the normal flow of the
Process.
Figure -- Compensation handler connected through Compensation Boundary Event
Another way to model a compensation is using a compensation handler, which starts with a Start Event of an
Event SubProcess that is contained within a Process or SubProcess. Just like any other Compensation Activities,
a Compensation Event SubProcess is located outside the normal flow of a process. The Event SubProcess, which
is marked with a dotted line boundary, has access to data that are part of the parent, which is a snapshot at the
point in time when the parent has been completed. A Compensation Event SubProcess can recursively trigger a
compensation for activities contained in its parent.
Example
Figure -- Compensation defined by Event SubProcess
Related elements
BPMN Process
SubProcesses
Compensation Start Event
Escalation Throwing Intermediate Event
Compensation Boundary Event
Association
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
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Related procedure
Using Activities
2.3 BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Description
A Collaboration represents the interactions between two or more business entities. A Collaboration diagram
depicts a global point of view. It shows the interactions between participants in general.
A Collaboration contains two or more pools, representing the participants in the collaboration. Messages
exchanged between the participants are shown by message flows that connect two pools together (or objects
within the pools).
Figure -- Collaboration diagram with two Black Box Pools
Figure -- Collaboration diagram with two Pools showing process
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A Collaboration diagram can also show distinct conversations between collaborating participants in a domain.
Communications are defined by the conversations, participants, and conversation links between them.
Figure -- BPMN Collaboration diagram with Conversations
The elements of a BPMN Process diagram can be displayed on the BPMN Collaboration diagram.
Related element
BPMN Process
Related diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
2.3.1 Collaboration
Description
A Collaboration element provides a description of collaborations between pools. This element is a container for a
BPMN Collaboration diagram and its elements.
Related elements
Pool and Lane
Participant
Related diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
2.3.2 Pool and Lane
Description
A Pool represents a participant in a collaboration. The participant can be a specific partner entity, for example, a
company, or it can be a more general partner role, such as a buyer, seller, or manufacturer. Graphically, a Pool is
a container to partition a process from the other pools.
A Pool can contain a process, or it can be a black box.
A Pool with suppressed content will display a multi-instance marker if the participant referenced by the pool has a
minimum multiplicity value of two or more.
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A Lane is a sub-partition within a pool. Lanes are used to organize and categorize activities within a pool
according to function or role. They are as follows:
• internal roles, for example, Manager and Associate
• systems, for example, an enterprise application
• internal departments, for example, shipping or finance
In addition, Lanes can be nested in a pool. For example, there could be an outer set of Lanes for company
departments and an inner set of Lanes for the roles within each department
Notation
• Pool that contains a process or black box
• Pool with suppressed content
• A Pool with Suppressed Contents Referencing a Multi-instance Participant
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Example
Figure -- Pool with nested Lanes
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Message Flow
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
2.3.3 Message Flow
Description
A Message Flow is used to show the flow of messages between two participants who are prepared to send and
receive them.
• A Message Flow must connect separate Pools. It can be connected
to the pool boundary or an element inside the pool.
• A Message Flow cannot connect two elements in the same Pool.
Messages that are sent by a Message Flow can be displayed on a diagram in two ways:
• overlapping the Message Flow
• associated with the Message Flow
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However, they can also be hidden.
Example
Figure -- Message Flows between two pools.
Figure -- Messages overlapping Message Flows
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Figure -- Messages associated with Message Flows
Figure -- Message Flows between Pools Inner elements
Related element
Pool and Lane
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
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2.3.4 Message
Description
A Message represents the content of communications between two participants. It is passed by a message flow
and is sent or received by a message event.
Notation
Related elements
Message Flow
Choreography Task
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating and Using Message Flow
Creating and Using Choreography Task
2.3.5 Conversation
Description
A Conversation is an atomic element for a BPMN Collaboration diagram. It represents a set of message flows that
is grouped together.
A Conversation can involve two or more Participants. A Conversation Link path will be from a Conversation to the
involved Participants (Pools).
Notation
Related elements
Pool and Lane
Conversation Link
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
2.3.6 SubConversation
Description
A SubConversation is a conversation node considered as a hierarchical division within a parent’s conversation.
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A SubConversation is represented as a graphical object within a BPMN Conversation diagram, but it can also be
opened up to show a lower-level conversation, which consists of message flows, communications, and/or other
SubConversations. A SubConversation shares the participants of its parent conversation.
Notation
Related elements
Pool and Lane
Conversation Link
Conversation
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
2.3.7 Call Conversation
Description
A Call Conversation identifies a place in a conversation where a Conversation is used.
Notation
• Call Conversation that does not call any conversation.
• Call Conversation calling Global Conversation
Related elements
Collaboration
Pool and Lane
Conversation Link
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
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2.3.8 Conversation Link
Description
A Conversation Link is used to connect conversation nodes (Communication, SubConversation, and Call
Conversation) to and from Participants (Pools).
Example
Figure -- Conversation Link notation
Related elements
Collaboration
SubConversation
Call Conversation
Conversation
Related diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
2.3.9 Participant
Description
A Participant represents a specific partner entity, such as a company and a more general partner role, for
example, a buyer, seller, or manufacturer who is a participant in a collaboration. A Participant is often responsible
for the execution of a process enclosed in a pool.
Participant element can be contained only in Collaboration or Choreography and represent Resource.
Related elements
Pool and Lane
Conversation
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Using BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
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BPMN Choreography Diagram
2.4 BPMN Choreography Diagram
Description
A Choreography formalizes the way business participants coordinate their interactions. A Choreography is a type
of process, but its purpose and behavior are different from a standard BPMN process.
A standard process defines the flow of activities of a specific partner entity or organization. In contrast, a
Choreography formalizes the way business participants coordinate their interactions. The focus is not on the work
performed within these participants, but rather on the information (messages) exchanged between them.
A Choreography is a definition of expected behavior, basically a procedural business contract between interacting
participants. It shows the messages exchanged and their logical relations. This allows business partners to plan
their business processes for inter-operation without introducing conflicts.
Figure -- BPMN Choreography diagram
A BPMN Choreography diagram is based on the UML Activity diagram and includes restrictions and extensions as
defined by BPMN.
Types of Choreography elements are as follows:
• Choreography
• Choreography Activities
Related elements
Choreography
Choreography Activities
Error
Intermediate Catch Event
Intermediate Throwing Event
Boundary Events
End Events
Gateways
Related diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Choreography Diagram
2.4.1 Choreography
Description
A Choreography is a container for a BPMN Choreography diagram and its elements.
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
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2.4.2 Choreography Activities
A Choreography Activity is an abstract element. It represents a point on a choreography flow where an interaction
occurs between two or more participants.
There are three types of Choreography activities defined in business process modeling:
• Choreography Task
• SubChoreography
• Call Choreography
The shape of a Choreography Task, SubChoreography, or Call Choreography consists of two or more participant
compartments and one name compartment. One of the participants can be selected as an initiating participant.
The color of the initiating participant compartment is the same as the color of the name compartment. The other
participants compartments are gray.
Figure -- Compartments on Choreography Activity shape
The looping properties of a Choreography Activity can be specified. They can be repeated sequentially, essentially
behaving like a loop. The presence of loop characteristics signifies that the Choreography Activity has looping
behavior. There are two types of Looping characteristics defined in BPMN:
• Standard Loop
A Standard Loop marker displayed on a name compartment of a Choreography Activity shape
shows that the looping behavior based on a boolean condition is defined for this Activity.
Additional looping characteristics can also be defined: the Activity will loop as long as the boolean
condition is true. The condition is evaluated for every loop iteration and can be evaluated at the
beginning or end of the iteration. In addition, a numeric cap can be optionally specified, but the
number of iterations cannot exceed this cap.
• Choreography Activity with Standard Loop marker
• SubChoreography with Standard Loop marker
• Multi-instance Loop
A Multi-instance Loop marker shows that a desired number of Choreography Activity instances
can be created. The instances can be executed either in parallel or sequentially and each will be
identified using a different marker.
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• Choreography Task with Parallel MultiInstance Loop marker
• SubChoreography with Parallel MultiInstance Loop marker
• Choreography Task with sequential MultiInstance Loop marker
• SubChoreography with sequential MultiInstance Loop marker
Multi-instance Loop and Standard Loop markers can be added to all
types of Choreography activities.
There are circumstances when a Choreography Activity references a multi-instance participant (the minimum
multiplicity property value for a participant is 2 or greater). A multi-instance participant represents a situation where
there is more than one possible related participant involved in a Choreography. If this is the case, a MultiInstance
marker will be displayed in the participant compartment of a Choreography Activity shape.
Related diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Using Choreography Activity
2.4.2.1 Choreography Task
Description
A Choreography Task is an atomic Activity in a choreography process. It represents one or more messages
exchanged between two Participants.A Choreography Task can display messages that are defined by the
referenced Message Flows. The messages connected to an Initiating Participant compartment are white and
those connected to a Non-Initiating Participant compartment are gray.
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Notation
Example
Figure -- Choreography task corresponding to BPMN Collaboration diagram
Figure -- Choreography task with Messages Corresponding to BPMN Collaboration diagram
Related elements
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
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BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating and Using Choreography Task
Using Choreography Activity
2.4.2.2 SubChoreography
Description
A SubChoreography is a compound Activity that can include choreography activities and define their flows. It can
be expanded to show its details within the choreography in which it is contained.
It can also be displayed in a collapsed view to hide its details. A collapsed SubChoreography is indicated with a
plus sign (+) to distinguish itself from a Choreography Task.
Notation
Example
Figure -- Expanded SubChoreography
Figure -- Collapsed SubChoreography
Related elements
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Choreography Activities
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
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BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating SubChoreography
Using Choreography Activity
2.4.2.3 Call Choreography
Description
A Call Choreography identifies the point in a process where a global choreography is used. It acts as a place
holder to include a choreography element it is calling.
A Call Choreography is with a thick border.
Notation
• Call Choreography
• A Call Choreography referencing another Choreography is marked with a plus (+) sign.
Related elements
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Choreography Activities
Choreography
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating Call Choreography Activity
Using Choreography Activity
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Numbering Elements
2.5 Numbering Elements
Cameo Business Modeler offers an automatic numbering feature to number specific types of BPMN elements.
Each element number is saved in an ID property of element specification.
Figure -- BPMN Process Diagram showing element numbers
Numbering elements are described in the following sections:
• Numbering Schemas
• Element Types Numbering Sequence
2.5.1 Numbering Schemas
Types of numbering schemas predefined for BPMN elements are as follows:
• Multilevel with Owner Number
• Multilevel without Owner Number
• Consecutive with Owner Number
• Consecutive without Owner Number
2.5.1.1 Multilevel with Owner Number
Description
A Multilevel with Owner Number numbering schema provides multilevel element numbering. An Element owner
(BPMN Process, BPMN Collaboration, or Choreography) number is displayed before the element number.
Example
Figure -- Multilevel Numbering style with element owner number
A Multilevel with Owner Number numbering schema is the default schema
for all BPMN diagram elements.
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Numbering Elements
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Element Numbers
2.5.1.2 Multilevel without Owner Number
Description
A Multilevel without Owner Number numbering schema provides multilevel element numbering. An Element owner
(BPMN Process, BPMN Collaboration, or Choreography) number is not included in the element number.
Example
Figure -- Multilevel Numbering style without element owner number
When a Multilevel without element number numbering schema is used, the numbers
in a project are not unique. Elements with the same number can exist in multiple
diagrams.
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Element Numbers
2.5.1.3 Consecutive with Owner Number
Description
A Consecutive with Owner Number numbering schema provides non-multilevel element numbering. An Element
owner (BPMN Process, BPMN Collaboration, or Choreography) number is displayed before the element number.
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Numbering Elements
Example
Figure -- Consecutive Numbering style with element owner number
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Element Numbers
2.5.1.4 Consecutive without Owner Number
Description
A Consecutive without Owner Number numbering schema provides non-multilevel element numbering. An
Element Owner (BPMN Process, BPMN Collaboration, or Choreography) number is not included in the element
number.
Example
Figure -- Consecutive numbering style without owner number
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Element Numbers
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Numbering Elements
2.5.2 Element Types Numbering Sequence
Cameo Business Modeler uses a predefined sequence of numbers for specific element types as described in
table.
Element Type
Description
BPMN Process
A BPMN Process is numbered in the scope of a project. A BPMN Process number has
“P” as a prefix.
BPMN Collaboration
A BPMN Collaboration is numbered in the scope of a project. A BPMN Collaboration
number has “C” as a prefix.
Choreography
A Choreography is numbered in the scope of a project. A Choreography number has
“CH” as a prefix.
Flow Node
A Flow Node element is numbered in the scope of an owner element (BPMN Process,
BPMN Collaboration, or Choreography). The elements that belong to the Flow Node
element type category are as follows:
• All types of tasks
• All types of Subprocesses
• Call activities
• Choreography tasks
• Sub-choreographies
• Call choreographies
• All types of gateways
• All types of events
Item Aware Element
An Item Aware Element is numbered in the scope of an owner element. An Item
Aware Element number has “D” as a prefix.
The elements that belong to the Item Aware element type category are as follows:
• Data Object
• Data Store
• Data Input
• Data Output
• Property
Conversation Node
A Conversation Node element is numbered in the scope of an owner element. A
Conversation Node number has “Conv” as a prefix.
The elements that belong to the Conversation Node element type category are as
follows:
• Conversation
• Sub-conversation
• Call Conversation
Resource Role
A Resource Role element is numbered in the scope of an owner element. A Resource
Role number has “RR” as a prefix.
The elements that belong to the Resource Role element type category are as follows:
• Human Performer
• Performer
• Potential Owner
• Resource Role
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XPDL Support
Figure -- Numbered BPMN Process, BPMN Collaboration, and Choreography in Containment tree
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Element Numbers
2.6 XPDL Support
XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) is a serialization format for BPMN. XPDL provides a file format that
supports all BPMN process definition description properties. It defines a description of both model element
properties and graphical descriptions of the diagram. With XPDL, Cameo Business Modeler can export or import
process definitions for or from other products to read. It also allows you to exchange your models with other tools
to perform further model simulation, execution, or deployment.
Cameo Business Modeler supports export of BPMN models to XPDL Version 2.2. This version is backward
compatible with previous versions of XPDL and can be used to export BPMN2 and BPMN 1.x models.
Cameo Business Modeler supports importing from XPDL Versions 2.0, 2.1, and 2.2 to BPMN2. Business process
models created with other tools (e.g. Visio, BizAgi, Process Architect, etc) can be imported to Cameo Business
Modeler.
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedure
Exporting Models to XPDL
2.7 BPMN2 XML support
Cameo Business Modeler supports exporting BPMN2 models as BPMN2 Diagram Interchange files. The BPMN2
Diagram Interchange is a format for interchanging BPMN2 diagrams between tools. Its reduced ambiguity allows
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BPMN2 XML support
the users to exchange BPMN models between tools more conveniently. You can export a BPMN2 diagram as a
BPMN2 Diagram Interchange file (BPMN2 XMI).
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Exporting Models to BPMN2
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3 S UPPORTIVE DIA GRA MS
C O N C EPTS
This chapter describes how to create and modify supportive diagrams, BPMN Matrices, Tables, and Process
Structure Map.
The chapter contains the following sections:
• Business Motivation Diagram
• Business Data Diagram
• Organization Structure Diagram
• Process Definition Diagram
• BPMN Tables
• BPMN Matrices
• BPMN Processes Structure Map
3.1 Business Motivation Diagram
Description
The Business Motivation Model designed to develop, communicate, and manage business plans. The model
identifies and defines the elements of business plans, the motivating factors to establish the business plans, and
how all these factors and elements are interconnected.
Example
Figure -- Business Motivation Diagram
Related elements
Ends Concepts
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Business Motivation Diagram
Means Concepts
Influencer Concepts
Assessment Concepts
3.1.1 Ends Concepts
The Ends elements show what an organization wants to achieve.
There are three types of End elements:
• Vision
• Goal
• Objective
• End Concept Relationships
3.1.1.1 Vision
Description
A vision is a state where an organization wants to achieve in the future. It is common that a vision is made up of
many aspects rather than concentrated on a specific factor of the business problem. It is the final, possibly
unattainable, state the organization would like to accomplish. It does not describe how the organization will
achieve the state. A Vision is often compound, rather than focused toward one particular aspect of the business
problem. It is supported or made operative by Missions and amplified by Goals.
Notation
Related elements
Ends Concepts
End Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.1.2 Goal
Description
Unlike vision, a goal should generally be attainable and should be more specifically oriented to a single aspect of
the business problem. A Goal is a statement about a state or condition of the enterprise to be brought about or
sustained through appropriate Means. A Goal amplifies a Vision.It indicates what must be satisfied on a continuing
basis to effectively attain the Vision.
Notation
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Business Motivation Diagram
Related elements
Ends Concepts
End Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.1.3 Objective
Description
An Objective is a statement of an attainable, time-targeted, and measurable target that the enterprise seeks to
meet in order to achieve its Goals.
Notation
Related elements
Ends Concepts
End Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.1.4 End Concept Relationships
The relationships that are allowed between elements are as follows.
Relationships Description
Amplifies
This link connects Goal to a Vision. Meaning that the Goal
gives an emphasis on what must be done over a prolonged
period to achieve the desired Vision.
Quantifies
This link connects Objective to a Goal. Meaning that the
Objective provides a specific time frame (for example, in June
2013) to work towards the Goal and it also gives a basis for
evaluating whether the Goal is being accomplished.
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Example
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Business Motivation Diagram
Related element
Ends Concepts
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.2 Means Concepts
The Means elements provide a method to achieve the ends.
There are five types of Means elements:
• Mission
• Strategy
• Tactic
• Business Policy
• Business Rule
• Mean Concept Relationships
3.1.2.1 Mission
Description
A Mission indicates the ongoing operational Activity of the enterprise. The Mission describes what the business is
or will be doing on a day-to-day basis.
A Mission makes a Vision operative. It indicates the ongoing Activity that makes the Vision a reality. A Mission is
planned by means of Strategies.
Notation
Related elements
Means Concepts
Mean Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.2.2 Strategy
Description
A Strategy is one component of the plan for the Mission. A Strategy represents the essential Course of Action to
achieve Ends (Goals in particular). A Strategy usually channels efforts towards those Goals.
A Strategy is more than simply a resource, skill, or competency that the enterprise can call upon. It is accepted by
the enterprise as the right approach to achieve its Goals, given the environmental constraints and risks.
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Business Motivation Diagram
Notation
Related elements
Means Concepts
Mean Concept Relationships
Related diagrams
Business Motivation Diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.1.2.3 Tactic
Description
A Tactic is a Course of Action that represents part of the detailing of Strategies. A Tactic implements Strategies.
For example, the Tactic “Call first-time customers personally” implements the Strategy “Increase repeat business.”
Tactics generally channel efforts towards Objectives. For example, the Tactic “Ship products for free” channels
efforts towards the Objective “Within six months, 10% increase in product sales”.
Notation
Related elements
Means Concepts
Mean Concept Relationships
Related diagrams
Business Motivation Diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.1.2.4 Business Policy
Description
A Business Policy is a Directive that is not directly enforceable whose purpose is to govern or guide the enterprise.
Business Policies provide the basis for Business Rules. Business Policies also govern Business Processes.
Notation
Related elements
Means Concepts
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Business Motivation Diagram
Mean Concept Relationships
Related diagrams
Business Motivation Diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.1.2.5 Business Rule
Description
A Business Rule is a Directive, intended to govern, guide, or influence business behavior, in support of Business
Policy that has been formulated in response to an Opportunity, Threat, Strength, or Weakness. It is a single
Directive that does not require additional interpretation to undertake Strategies or Tactics. Often, a Business Rule
is derived from Business Policy. Business Rules guide Business Processes.
Notation
Related elements
Means Concepts
Mean Concept Relationships
Related diagrams
Business Motivation Diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.1.2.6 Mean Concept Relationships
The following table provides the relationships that exist between element types and their meaning.
Relationship
Description
Makes Operative
This link connects Mission to a Vision.
Meaning that the Mission lists every continuing
Activity to ensure the Vision.
Component Of
This link connects Strategy to a Mission.
Meaning that the Strategy is the method or
course of action that will be employed to
achieve the Mission.
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Example
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Business Motivation Diagram
Relationship
Description
Implements
This link connects Tactic to a Strategy.
Meaning that the Tactic realizes Strategies.
Enables
This link connects Strategy to a Strategy or
Tactic to a Tactic. Meaning that a Strategy/
Tactic makes another Strategy/Tactic doable.
That is to say the latter Strategy/Tactic
provides an opportunity for the former
Strategy/Tactic to be carried out. Use this link
to associate Strategy to another Strategy or
Tactic to another Tactic.
Effects Enforcement Level
This link connects Tactic to a Business Rule.
Meaning that the Tactics influences the
enforcement level of Business Rule.
Formulated Based On
This link connects Strategy or Tactic to a
Business Policy or Business Rule. Meaning
that the Strategy or Tactic is planned according
to what result the Business Policy or Business
Rule desires.
Channel Efforts Towards
This link connects Strategyto a Goal, or Tactic
to an Objective. Meaning that the Strategy is
coordinated as activities aimed towards Goals
as Tactic towards Objective. For example, the
Tactic “Free delivery” channels efforts towards
the Objective “5% increase in sales within 3
months.”
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Example
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Business Motivation Diagram
Relationship
Description
Governs
This link connects Business Policy or
Business Rule to a Strategy or Tactic.
Meaning that the Business Policy or Business
Rule determines the Strategy or Tactic.
Basis For
This link connects Business Policy to a
Business Rule. Meaning that the Business
Policy is the key to achieve Business Rule.
Supports Achievement Of
This link connects Business Policy or
Business Rule to a Goal or Objective.
Meaning that the Business Policy provides an
idea or reason to develop the Strategy or
Tactic.
Acts As Regulation
This link connects a Business Policy or a
Business Rule to External Influencer.
Example
Related element
Means Concepts
Related diagrams
Business Motivation Diagram
Process Definition Diagram
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Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.3 Influencer Concepts
The Influencer elements come up with the factors that are influencing the ends achievement of the organization.
Types of Influencer elements are as following:
• External Influencer
• Internal Influencer
• Influencing Organization
• Influence Concepts Relationship
3.1.3.1 External Influencer
Description
External Influencer is this outside an enterprise's organizational boundary that can impact its employment of
Means or achievement of Ends. External Influencer is usually categorized as follows:
• Competitor: A rival enterprise in a struggle for advantage over the subject enterprise.
• Customer: A role played by an individual or enterprise that has investigated, ordered, received, or
paid for products or services from the subject enterprise.
• Environment: The aggregate of surrounding conditions or Influencers affecting the existence or
development of an enterprise.
• Partner: An enterprise that shares risks and profit with the subject enterprise (or is associated with
the subject enterprise to share risks and profit) because this is mutually beneficial.
• Regulation: An order prescribed by an authority such as a government body or the management
of an enterprise.
• Supplier: A role played by an individual or enterprise that can furnish or provide products or
services to the subject enterprise.
• Technology: The role of technology, including its developments and limitations — there may be
prerequisites for use of technology; there may be enterprise Activity that technology enables or
restricts.
Notation
Related elements
Influencer Concepts
Influence Concepts Relationship
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.3.2 Internal Influencer
Description
Internal Influencer is an enterprise that can impact its employment of Means or achievement of Ends.
Internal Influencer is usually categorized the following:
• Assumption: Something that is taken for granted or without proof.
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Business Motivation Diagram
• Explicit Corporate Value: An ideal, custom, or institution that an enterprise promotes or agrees
with that is explicitly set forth and declared.
• Implicit Corporate Value: A corporate value that is not explicitly declared but nonetheless
understood by some or all of the people in an enterprise.
• Habit: A customary practice or use.
• Infrastructure: The basic underlying framework or features of a system.
• Issue: A point in question or a matter that is in dispute as between contending partners.
• Management Prerogative: A right or privilege exercised by virtue of ownership or position in an
enterprise.
• Resource: The resources available for carrying out the business of an enterprise, especially their
quality.
Notation
Related elements
Influencer Concepts
Influence Concepts Relationship
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.3.3 Influencing Organization
Description
An Influencing Organization is an organization that is external to the enterprise modeled in a given enterprise
BMM, and that influences that enterprise.
An Influencing Organization is the source of Influencer. The Influencer may have multiple sources, or none.
Notation
Related elements
Influencer Concepts
Influence Concepts Relationship
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
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Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.3.4 Influence Concepts Relationship
The following table provides the relationship that exists between element types and the meaning.
Relationship
Description
Is Source Of
This link connects Influencing Organization to an
Influencer (External Influencer or Internal Influencer).
Meaning that the Influencing Organization is the source of
Influencer. An Influencer may have multiple sources, or
none.
Example
Related elements
Influencer Concepts
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.4 Assessment Concepts
The Assessment element is the Influencer's assessment of the organization ends and means including the
activities, events, and data that trigger or feed business activities.
There are three types of Assessment elements:
• Assessment
• Risk
• Potential Reward
• Assessment Concept Relationships
3.1.4.1 Assessment
Description
An Assessment is a judgment of some Influencer that affects the ability of organization to employ its Means or
achieve its Ends. In other words, an Assessment expresses a logical connection or fact type between Influencers
and the Ends and/or Means of the business plans. In this way, an Assessment indicates which Influencers are
relevant to which Ends and/or Means.
Notation
Related elements
Assessment Concepts
Assessment Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
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Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.4.2 Risk
Description
A Risk is a category of Impact Value that indicates the impact and probability of loss. Some Risks are expressible
as formulas, for example:
• Probability of loss (for example, 5% probability)
• Potential loss (for example, $500,000 loss)
• Unit-of-measure (for example, loss in USD)
Notation
Related elements
Assessment Concepts
Assessment Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.4.3 Potential Reward
Description
A Potential Reward is a category of Potential Impact that indicates the probability of gain. Some Potential Rewards
are expressible as formulas, for example:
• Probability of gain (for example, 30% probability)
• Potential gain (for example, $40,000 gain)
Notation
Related elements
Assessment Concepts
Assessment Concept Relationships
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.1.4.4 Assessment Concept Relationships
Description
The following table provides the relationships that exist between element types and their meaning.
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Business Motivation Diagram
Relationship
Description
Identifies
This link connects Assessment to a Potential Reward or
Risk. Meaning that the Assessment points out some
possible Potential Reward or Risk that is/are significant to
that Assessment. Each possible consequence serves as
an appraisal of the worth, value, or quality of some aspect
of the Assessment in specific terms, types, or dimensions.
Provides
Impetus
This link connects Assessment to a Business Policy or
Business Rule. Meaning that the Assessment is the
driving force for the Business Policy or Business Rule.
Affects
Achievements
This link connects Assessment to a Vision, Goal, or
Objective. Meaning that the Assessment has an impact on
the End outcomes.
Affects
Employment
This link connects Assessment to a Mission, Strategy,
Tactic, Business Policy or Business Rule. Meaning that
the Assessment has an impact on the use of Means.
Judgement
For
This link connects Assessment to a Influencer (External
Influencer or Internal Influencer). Meaning that the
Assessment is the Influencer’s judgment that influences
the organization’s ability to carry out its Means or achieve
its Ends.
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Example
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Business Data Diagram
Related element
Assessment Concepts
Related diagram
Business Motivation Diagram
3.2 Business Data Diagram
Description
A Business Data diagram provides possibilities to define what business concepts are used in business processes.
The diagram shows classes that represent concepts we can identify in a business area. Therefore, it allows
defining properties and relations between classes. Class elements identified in Business Data diagrams are
represented by Data Object elements and can be reused later in the BPMN Process diagram.
Business Data Diagram is based on UML Class diagram. It is a simplified version of the class diagram that
includes only model elements needed for business data definitions.
Example
Figure -- Business Data Diagram showing Classes
Related elements
Class
Association
Generalization
3.2.1 Class
Description
A Class element represents data or a concept that is related to problem area and is used by business processes.
To define more information about a class, you can add class properties for the class.
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Business Data Diagram
Notation
• Class
• Class with properties
Related elements
Association
Generalization
Data Object
Related diagrams
Business Data Diagram
BPMN Business Data Description Table
BPMN Data Usage Matrices
3.2.2 Association
Description
An Association link shows that particular classes are related to each other. Association links may have names
defined – names help to read diagrams. You can also specify multiplicity at the end of an Association.
Example
Figure -- Association between two Classes with Multiplicity at the End
Related element
Class
Related diagram
Business Data Diagram
3.2.3 Generalization
Description
A Generalization link shows that one class provides grouping criteria for sets of other classes. Generic class may
define sets of properties, that are applicable to all the specific classes. The Generalization link can be among
classes.
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Organization Structure Diagram
Example
Figure -- Generalization link defining Properties to all specific Classes
Related element
Class
Related diagram
Business Data Diagram
3.3 Organization Structure Diagram
Description
An Organization Structure Diagram represents the hierarchical structure of an organization. This diagram allows
showing organization departments, roles inside departments, and actual persons inside an organization. The
diagram can also represent the reporting structure of an organization.
Example
Figure -- Organization Structure diagram
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
Composition
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Organization Structure Diagram
3.3.1 Resource
Description
The Resource is used to specify resources that can be referenced by Process. These Resources can be human
resources as well as any other resource assigned to Activities during Process execution time.
Multiple processes can utilize the same Resource.
Resource can be element of the Organization structure such as Organization Unit, Role or Person.
Related elements
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
Pool and Lane
Activities
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
Organization Structure Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Related Procedure
Using Organization Structure Diagram
3.3.2 Organization Unit
Description
An organization represents a group of persons, associated for a particular purpose. An Element may denote an
organization, a department, or a working group inside an organization. e. g., the company, sale department, etc.
This element is combined with the Participant definition.
Notation
Related elements
Resource
Role
Person
Information system
Pool and Lane
Activities
Choreography Activities
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Organization Structure Diagram
Related diagrams
Organization Structure Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Related Procedure
Using Organization Structure Diagram
3.3.3 Role
Description
A Role is a type of contact point or a responsible person, e. g., cashier, ticket seller counter, etc. Roles may belong
to an organization. This element is combined with the Resource Role definition.
Notation
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Person
Information system
Pool and Lane
Activities
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
Organization Structure Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Related Procedure
Using Organization Structure Diagram
3.3.4 Person
Description
A Person is a type of human that is recognized by law as the subject of rights and duties. This element is
combined with the Resource Role definition.
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Organization Structure Diagram
Notation
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Information system
Pool and Lane
Activities
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
Organization Structure Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Related Procedure
Using Organization Structure Diagram
3.3.5 Information system
Description
An Information System is a type of hardware or a software, e. g., international sales system, ticket reservation
system, etc. Information system can be used by Process or Process Activity.
Notation
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Pool and Lane
Activities
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
Organization Structure Diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
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Process Definition Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Related Procedure
Using Organization Structure Diagram
3.3.6 Composition
Description
A Composition is a key relationship that shows how organization structure is composed. For example, one
organization unit can be a part of a parent organization.
Example
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
Related diagrams
Organization Structure Diagram
Related Procedure
Using Organization Structure Diagram
3.4 Process Definition Diagram
Description
A Process Definition diagram is a tool for initial process analysis. The diagram allows you to draw business
processes, group them into packages, and define the relations between those processes.
When the initial process definition has been completed, a process flow can be provided in a BPMN Process
diagram, which can be created for each process.
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Process Definition Diagram
Example
Figure -- Process Definition diagram
Related elements
BPMN Process
Package
Assessment Concept Relationships
3.4.1 Package
Description
Package groups together processes and other model elements. You can organize all types of model elements into
packages. The Packages themselves can be nested within other Packages.
Notation
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.4.2 Relationships
Process Definition diagram has relationships as follows:
• Usage
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Process Definition Diagram
• Dependency
• Realizes
• Governs
• Guides
3.4.2.1 Usage
Description
A Usage is a relationship in which one element requires another element (or set of elements) for its full
implementation or operation.
Example
Related element
BPMN Process
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.4.2.2 Dependency
Description
A Dependency indicates a semantic relationship between two model elements (or two sets of model elements).
Dependency indicates a situation in which a change to a supplier (target) element may require a change to a client
(source) element in the dependency.
A Dependency is shown as a dashed arrow between model elements. The model element at the start point of the
arrow (the client element) depends on the model element at the arrowhead (the supplier element). The arrow can
be labeled with an optional individual name.
Example
Related element
BPMN Process
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
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Process Definition Diagram
3.4.2.3 Realizes
Description
Realizes shows that a BPMN Process can realizes a Strategy or Tactic.
Example
Related element
BPMN Process
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.4.2.4 Governs
Description
Governs shows that a Business Policy governs BPMN Process.
Example
Related element
BPMN Process
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.4.2.5 Guides
Description
Guides shows that a Business Rule guides a BPMN Process.
Example
Related elements
BPMN Process
Strategy
Tactic
Business Policy
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BPMN Tables
Business Rule
Related diagram
Process Definition Diagram
3.5 BPMN Tables
BPMN tables allow the quick creation of BPMN elements as well as easy review and modification of their
properties. You can review a group of elements as one set in the same place by using these tables.
Types of BPMN tables in Cameo Business Modeler are as follows:
• BPMN Processes Description Table
• BPMN Resources Description Table
• BPMN Business Data Description Table
• BPMN Activities Description Table
Besides the predefined BPMN tables, you can create the Generic Table that
is available in the Architect edition.
Related external resource
“Generic Table” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
3.5.1 BPMN Processes Description Table
Description
A BPMN Processes Description table is designed to display or edit processes descriptions in a table form. You can
display existing processes or create new processes in this table.
Example
Figure -- BPMN Processes Description table
Related elements
BPMN Process
BPMN Tables
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Processes Description Table
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BPMN Tables
3.5.2 BPMN Resources Description Table
Description
A BPMN Resources Description table is designed to display or edit resources description in a table form. You can
display existing Resources or create new ones in this table.
BPMN defines four types of Resources as follows:
• Resource
• Organization Unit
• Role
• Person
• Information System
You can display all of them in a BPMN Resources Description table.
Example
Figure -- BPMN Resource Roles Description table
Related elements
Resource
BPMN Tables
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Resources Description Table
3.5.3 BPMN Business Data Description Table
Description
A BPMN Business Data Description table is designed to display or edit class descriptions in a table form. You can
display existing classes or create new classes in this table.
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BPMN Tables
Figure -- BPMN Business Data Description table
Related elements
Class
BPMN Tables
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Business Data Description Table
3.5.4 BPMN Activities Description Table
Description
A BPMN Activities Description table is designed to display or edit selected process activities descriptions in a table
form. A BPMN Activities Description table is created for a BPMN Process.
Figure -- BPMN Activities Description table
Related elements
Activities
BPMN Tables
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Activities Description Table
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BPMN Matrices
3.6 BPMN Matrices
A BPMN matrix is designed to explore relations between different types of elements. There are two types of BPMN
matrices in Cameo Business Modeler:
• BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
• BPMN Data Usage Matrices
Besides the predefines BPMN matrices, you can also use the Dependency Matrix
that is available in the Architect edition.
Related external resource
“Dependency Matrices” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
3.6.1 BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Description
A BPMN Resources Usage Matrix is designed to review and edit an allocation of Resource Roles for BPMN
Activities. The Resource Roles used in an Activity show a Resources property in a BPMN Activity specification
dialog.
A BPMN Resources Usage Matrix presents information about BPMN Activities in rows and Resource Roles in
columns. Each arrow in the matrix shows if a Resource Role is used by an Activity.
You can define Resource Roles usage for all BPMN Activities by assigning or removing the Resource Roles to or
from the Activities.
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BPMN Matrices
Example
Figure -- BPMN Resource Usage Matrix
Related elements
BPMN Process
Activities
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
BPMN Matrices
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Resources Usage Matrix
3.6.2 BPMN Data Usage Matrices
Description
A BPMN Data Usage Matrix shows what data classes are used in BPMN Processes and SubProcess. Data
Objects represents classes in a BPMN diagram.
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BPMN Matrices
A BPMN Data Usage Matrix presents information about all BPMN Processes and SubProcesses in rows and
Classes in columns. Each row in the matrix shows if a class is used in a BPMN Process or SubProcess diagram
as a Data Object.
Example
Figure -- BPMN Data Usage Matrix
The BPMN Data Usage Matrix is read-only.
Related elements
BPMN Process
SubProcesses
Class
BPMN Matrices
Related diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedure
Creating BPMN Data Usage Matrix
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BPMN Processes Structure Map
3.7 BPMN Processes Structure Map
Description
A BPMN Processes Structure Map diagram allows you to represent the structure of processes in a project. The
processes are grouped into packages on the diagram. And each process may itself contains other processes,
which in turn may contain other processes. The diagram makes the processes easier to understand and helps you
analyze how they are organized.
A BPMN Processes Structure Map diagram shows packages, processes, subprocesses, and tasks from a
selected scope.
Example
Figure -- BPMN Processes Structure Map
Related elements
Package
BPMN Process
Activities
Related diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related external resource
“Relation Map” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
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4 U S IN G C AM E O B US INE S S
M O DELER
This chapter provides the main procedures of Cameo Business Modeler and contains the following sections:
• Using Common BPMN Elements
• Using BPMN Process Diagram
• Using BPMN Collaboration Diagram
• Using BPMN Choreography Diagram
• Using BPMN Tables and Matrices
• Using Organization Structure Diagram
• Using BPMN Element Numbers
• Exporting Models to XPDL
• Exporting Models to BPMN2
4.1 Using Common BPMN Elements
Some BPMN elements can not be represented on any BPMN diagram. You can use these elements as data types
for specifying values of other element properties. This kind of elements can be created in the Containment tree.
To create a BPMN element in the Containment tree
• Right-click a package in the Containment tree. On the shortcut menu, click New Element > BPMN
Element, and select a BPMN element that you want to create.
To open an element Specification window
Do one of the following:
• Right-click a selected symbol and from shortcut menu, select Specification.
• Double-click a symbol on the Diagram pane or in the Model Browser.
• Select a symbol on the Diagram pane and press the ENTER key.
• The element Specification window opens when you add a model element to an owning model
element in its Specification window. The second Specification window opens on top of the first.
Use the Back to or Forward to arrow buttons for switching between windows.
Related element
Common BPMN Elements
Related external resource
“Specification Window” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
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4.2 Using BPMN Process Diagram
A BPMN Process diagram can also contain the elements
of a BPMN Collaboration diagram.
The following sections describe how to create and specify a BPMN Process diagram:
• Creating BPMN Process Diagram
• Creating and Using Tasks
• Creating and Using SubProcesses
• Using Activities
• Creating and Using an Event
• Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
• Creating and Using Data Items
• Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.2.1 Creating BPMN Process Diagram
You can create a BPMN Process diagram from
• BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Process diagram from the BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar.The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Process diagram.
The owner of Process diagram has to be a BPMN Process.
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Process diagram from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Process Diagrams. The
BPMN Process Diagrams dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Process diagram.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Process diagram from the shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
1. Right-click the package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram
> BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Process Diagram.
2. Type the name for a created BPMN Process diagram.
Related diagram
BPMN Process Diagram
Related procedures
Creating and Using Tasks
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Creating and Using SubProcesses
Using Activities
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Creating and Using Data Items
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.2.2 Creating and Using Tasks
There are multiple types of Tasks that you can create in a BPMN Process diagram.
To create a Task
1. Open a Process diagram.
2. On the diagram pallet, click the Task button and select a type of Task you need to create.
To change a task type
• Right-click a Task and select a new Task type.
Figure -- Changing Task type
Related element
Tasks
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
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Creating and Using SubProcesses
Using Activities
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Creating and Using Data Items
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.2.3 Creating and Using SubProcesses
A BPMN diagram can display subprocesses with different symbol properties. They are as follows:
• An expanded SubProcess can contain inner shapes.
• A collapsed SubProcess cannot display inner shapes. A plus sign (+) marker will be displayed for
a collapsed subprocess.
If the Is Triggered By Event property of a SubProcess is set to true, it will call an Event SubProcess and will be
drawn with a dashed border.
There are two specific types of SubProcesses:
• Transaction SubProcess. It is represented with double borders.
• AdHoc SubProcess. It is represented with an AdHoc marker on its shape.
To create a SubProcess
1. Open a Process diagram.
2. On the diagram pallet, click the arrow next to the SubProcess and select needed type of
SubProcess.
To expand a SubProcess
Do either:
• Right-click a SubProcess shape and from the shortcut menu select Symbol(s) Properties. Then
in the Symbol Properties dialog click to clear the Suppress Content.
• Right-click a SubProcess shape and then on the shortcut menu click to clear Suppress Content.
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To collapse SubProcess
Do either:
• Right-click a SubProcess shape and then on the shortcut menu click to select Suppress Content.
• Right-click a SubProcess shape and from the shortcut menu select Symbol(s) Properties. Then
in the Symbol Properties dialog click to select the Suppress Content.
To mark a created SubProcess as an event SubProcess
Do either:
• Right-click the SubProcess and on the shortcut menu click to select Triggered By Event.
• Open the SubProcess Specification window. Select the Triggered By Event check box.
Figure -- Marking SubProcess as Event SubProcess
To convert a SubProcess to a Transaction SubProcess or AdHoc SubProcess
• Right-click the SubProcess and from the shortcut menu select Refactor > Convert To > More
Specific > AdHoc SubProcess or Transaction SubProcess.
To convert a Transaction SubProcess or AdHoc SubProcess to a SubProcess
• Right-click the Ad Hoc SubProcess or Transaction SubProcess and from shortcut menu select
Refactor > Convert To > More General> SubProcess.
To display a Start Event icon on a Event SubProcess
1. Create an expanded Event SubProcess.
2. Create a Start Event to the Event SubProcess.
3. Right-click the SubProcess and click to select the Suppress Content check box.
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Related element
SubProcesses
Related Diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Tasks
Using Activities
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Creating and Using Data Items
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.2.4 Using Activities
This section will describe how to use Activities in a BPMN process diagram. Activities (Tasks, Subprocesses, and
Call Activities) can have the following specific markers displayed on their shapes:
• Compensation
• Standard loop
• MultiInstance loop (parallel)
• MultiInstance loop (sequential)
To add a Compensation marker to an Activity
Do either:
• Right-click an Activity and select Is For Compensation.
• Open the Activity Specification window. Click to clear the Is For Compensation check box and
click Close.
Figure -- Adding Compensation Marker to Activity
To add a Loop marker to an Activity
• Right-click an Activity and click to select Standard Loop or MultiInstance Loop.
To display a MultiInstance Loop (sequential) marker on a MultiInstance Loop activity
Do either:
• Right-click an Activity with a MultiInstance Loop (parallel) marker and on the shortcut menu select
Is Sequential.
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• Open the Activity with a MultiInstance marker Specification window. Select Is Sequential and
then click Close.
Figure -- Displaying MultiInstance Loop Marker on MultiInstance Loop Activity
To convert an Activity to another type of Activity
• Right-click a Task, SubProcess, or Call Activity and from the shortcut menu select Refactor >
Convert To and then select an Activity type to which you need to convert the selected Activity.
To display Resources assigned for Activities
• Right-click the diagram pane and then do one of the following:
• On the shortcut menu, click to select the Show Assigned Resources check box (see
the following figure).
• From the shortcut menu, select Diagram Properties and in the open dialog, set the
Show Assigned Resources property value to true.
Related element
Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Tasks
Creating and Using SubProcesses
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Creating and Using Data Items
To open an element Specification window
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
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4.2.5 Creating and Using an Event
This section will describe how to create and specify Events in BPMN diagrams.
To create an Event
• On the Process diagram pallet, click a desired event button and then select a type of Event.
Figure -- Selecting to create new Start Event
To create a Boundary Event
1. On the Process diagram pallet, click the Boundary Event (Message) button and then select a
type of Boundary Event.
2. Click an Activity or Choreography Activity in the diagram.
To change an Event type
You can change an Event type for Start, Intermediate, Boundary,
or End Events.
• Right-click a created Event and select a new Event type.
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Figure -- Selecting new Event type on Event’s shortcut menu
To change a Start Event to non-interrupting
Not all Start Event types can be non-interrupting. The command Is Interrupting
is only available for the following Start Event types:
• Message Start Event
• Timer Start Event
• Escalation Start Event
• Conditional Start Event
• Signal Start Event
• Multiple Start Event
• Parallel Multiple Start Event
Do either:
• Right-click the Start Event and on the shortcut menu click Is Interrupting > False.
• Open the Start Event Specification window. It the Is Interrupting property box, select False and
click Close.
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To change a Boundary Event to non-interrupting
Not all Boundary Event types can be non-interrupting. The command Cancel
Activity is only available for the following Boundary Event types:
• Message Boundary Event
• Timer Boundary Event
• Escalation Boundary Event
• Conditional Boundary Event
• Signal Boundary Event
• Multiple Boundary Event
• Parallel Multiple Boundary Event
Do either:
• Right-click the Boundary Event and on the shortcut menu click Cancel Activity> False.
• Open the Boundary Event Specification window. In the Cancel Activity property box, select
False, and then click Close.
Related elements
Start Events
Intermediate Catch Event
Intermediate Throwing Event
Boundary Events
End Events
Activities
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Tasks
Creating and Using SubProcesses
Using Activities
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Creating and Using Data Items
To open an element Specification window
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Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.2.6 Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
A Sequence Flow connects Activities, Choreography Activities, Events, and Gateways. A Conditional Sequence
Flow has a condition expression and is drawn with a mini-diamond marker at the beginning of the Sequence Flow.
A default Sequence Flow is indicated with a backslash at the beginning of the Sequence Flow.
To create a Sequence Flow
Do either:
• Click an Activity on the diagram. On the Smart Manipulators toolbar click the Sequence Flow
button.
• Click the Sequence Flow button on the diagram pallet and connect appropriate shapes on the
diagram pane.
To add a condition to Sequence Flow
Do either:
• Select the created Sequence Flow, open its Specification window and enter the Condition
Expression property value.
• Select the created Sequence Flow and type the condition between the brackets.
A Conditional Sequence Flow outgoing from a Gateway is displayed without
a mini diamond marker.
To set a default Sequence Flow
A default Sequence Flow can be specified for Activities (Tasks, Subprocesses,
and Call Activities) or exclusive, inclusive, and complex Gateways.
1. Select the Sequence flow on the diagram pane.
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2. On the Smart Manipulator toolbar, click the Make Default button.
A default Sequence flow does not have a condition expression.
To change direction of Sequence Flow
• Right-click the Sequence Flow and from the shortcut menu, select Refactor > Reverse Direction.
Related element
Sequence Flow
BPMN Process Diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Tasks
Creating and Using SubProcesses
Using Activities
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using Data Items
To open an element Specification window
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.2.7 Creating and Using Data Items
You can create the following data items in a BPMN Process diagram:
• Data Object
• Data Store
• Data Input and Data Output
You can mark a Data Object as a collection.
With a Data Association, you can connect a data item to other elements of the BPMN Process diagram.
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To create a data item
• On the Process diagram pallet, click Data Object and select needed Data item.
To create a new Data Object, which is typed by a classifier
• Select the classifier in the Containment tree and drag it to a BPMN Process or BPMN
Collaboration diagram.
To specify a type of Data Item
Do either:
• In the Containment tree, select an element and drag it on the Data Item.
• Right-click the Data Item, from the shortcut menu, select Type and choose the needed type.
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• Open the Specification window and select a Type.
To mark a Data Object as collection
Do one of the following:
• Right-click the Data Object and from the shortcut menu choose Is Collection > true.
• Open the Data Object Specification window, Is Collection property set to true.
To create a Data Association between two data items
1. On the Process diagram pallet, click the Data Association button.
2. On the diagram pane
• Click an element, which will be the source of the Data Association.
• Click an element, which will be the target of the Data Association.
• The source or target of a Data Association can only be a Data Object, Data Store,
Data Input, or Data Output.
• The other end of the Data Association should always be an activity or event.
To display a Data Object directly connected to a Sequence Flow
A Data Object connected to a Sequence Flow is a visual shortcut of two Data Associations.
In the model, the Data Associations still exist, and the Data Object connecting to the
Sequence Flow will be displayed.
1. Draw a Data Association from an Activity to a Data Object.
2. Draw another Data Association from the Data Object to another Activity.
3. Draw a Sequence Flow from the first to the second Activity.
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4. Right-click the Data Object and select Show Connected to Sequence Flow from the shortcut
menu.
Figure -- Displaying Data Object directly connected to Sequence Flow
Related element
Common BPMN Elements
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Tasks
Creating and Using SubProcesses
Using Activities
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
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4.2.8 Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
You can navigate to
• higher level BPMN diagrams
• related Process diagrams
To navigate to a higher level BPMN diagrams
• At the bottom left corner of the diagram pane, on the toolbar, click the
button and select
higher level BPMN diagram.
To navigate to a related Process diagrams
• At the bottom left corner of the diagram pane, on the toolbar, click the
button and select
related process diagram.
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Tasks
Creating and Using SubProcesses
Using Activities
Creating and Using an Event
Creating and Using a Sequence Flow
Creating and Using Data Items
4.3 Using BPMN Collaboration Diagram
A BPMN Collaboration diagram can contain the elements
from a Process diagram.
The following sections describe how to create and specify a BPMN Collaboration diagram.
• Creating BPMN Collaboration Diagram
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• Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
• Creating and Using Message Flow
• Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
• Creating and Using Participant
4.3.1 Creating BPMN Collaboration Diagram
You can create a BPMN Collaboration diagram from
• BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Collaboration diagram from the BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Collaboration diagram.
The owner of Collaboration diagram has to be a BPMN Collaboration.
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Collaboration diagram from the main menu
1. On the main menu click Diagrams > BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Collaboration Diagram. The
BPMN Collaboration Diagrams dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Collaboration diagram.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Collaboration diagram through the shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
1. Right-click a package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram >
BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Collaboration Diagram.
2. Type the name for the diagram.
Related diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Using BPMN Process Diagram
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
Creating and Using Message Flow
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
Creating and Using Participant
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.3.2 Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
A Pool in a BPMN collaboration diagram represents a participant of a collaboration. A Pool can have its inner
process flows defined. You can add the elements from a BPMN Process diagram to a pool. You can also hide the
pool details by displaying a “black box” pool. A Pool can also have inner lanes.
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To create a Pool from Diagram pallet
1. On the Collaboration Diagram pallet, click Horizontal Pool and select a needed type of Pool.
2. Select Resources and click OK.
To create a Pool with a representing Resources from the Containment tree
• Drag a Resource, Organization, Post, or Person from the Containment tree to a BPMN
Collaboration diagram pane.
To create a Pool with a suppressed content
• On the Collaboration Diagram pallet, under Conversations click Participant (Pool).
To add Lane to a Pool
Do either:
• Right-click a Pool, point to Insert Inner Lanes or Insert Lanes and select a lane type.
• Right-click a Pool header and click to select Insert Lanes.
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To open a Pool Specification window
• Right-click the Pool header and select Specification.
To specify a model element represented by a Pool or Lane
A Pool can represent a BPMN Resource element or UML classifier element.
Do either:
• Click a Pool or Lane header on the diagram. On the Smart Manipulators toolbar click the
Represents button.
• Open the Pool or Lane Specification window, click Represents and select the represented
elements from drop down list.
Any type of element you can select only from Specification window.
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• Select a represented element in the Containment tree and drag it to the Pool or Lane header on
the diagram.
To hide a Pool content on a diagram (to display a “black box” pool)
• Right-click a Pool header and from the shortcut menu select one of the following:
• Suppress Pool Content
• Symbol(s) Properties and in the open dialog set the Suppress Pool Content
property value to true.
A Pool with suppressed content that references a MultiInstance Participant will be displayed with a MultiInstance
marker.
To display a MultiInstance marker on a Pool
1. Open the Specification window.
2. Click Represents and select a represented multi-instance Participant.
A MultiInstance marker can be displayed only on a Poll
with suppressed contents.
To review the Pool or Lane traceability information
• Open the Specification window, click Traceability.
Figure -- Pool Traceability information
Related elements
Resource
Participant
Pool and Lane
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
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Related diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Creating and Using Message Flow
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
Creating and Using Participant
To open an element Specification window
4.3.3 Creating and Using Message Flow
To draw a Message Flow between two elements or Pools
Do either:
• On the Collaboration diagram pallet, click Message Flow button and connect appropriate shapes.
• Select the Pool header and on the Smart manipulator toolbar, click the Message Flow button.
A Message Flow must connect two different Pools
or inner elements of different Pools.
To create a new Message for a Message Flow, which is typed by a classifier, by using drag and drop operation
• Select the classifier (Class, Input Set, Output Set, or Error) in the Containment tree and drag it to
a Message Flow on a Collaboration diagram.
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To create a Message for a Message Flow from the Smart Manipulator toolbar
You can create a Message in a BPMN Process, Collaboration,
Choreography, or SubProcess element.
1. On the diagram pane, select a Message Flow path and on the Smart Manipulator toolbar, click the
Referenced Messages button. The Select Message dialog opens.
2. Select a Collaboration where you want to create a new message and click the Creation Mode
button.
3. Select a Collaboration element and click the Create button.
4. Click OK.
Figure -- Creating Collaboration element in Select Message dialog
To change a Message display mode
• Right-click a Message Flow and from the shortcut menu select one of the following:
• Show Message and select a message display mode.
• Symbol(s) Properties and select the needed Show Message property value.
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To change direction of Message Flow
• Right-click the Message Flow and from the shortcut menu, select Refactor > Reverse Direction.
Related elements
Message
Message Flow
Pool and Lane
Related diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
Creating and Using Participant
4.3.4 Creating and Using Conversation Nodes
A Conversation groups messages exchanged among collaboration participants.
To create a Communication between two Pools
1. Create a Conversation and Pool.
2. Create a Conversation Link from the Conversation to a Pool.
3. Draw another Conversation Link from the Conversation to another Pool.
A Pool requires a specified Representing Resource.
To select Message Flows grouped by a Conversation
1. Do either:
• Open the Conversation shape Specification window. Select the Message Flow Refs
property value cell and then click the ... button.
• Select a Communication shape and on the Smart Manipulator toolbar, click the
Message Flows button.
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The Select Message Flows dialog opens.It shows all Message Flows that are grouped by a
Conversation.
Figure -- Displaying Message Flows in Select Message Flows dialog
2. Select one or more Message Flows and click OK.
When the Show Message Flows Related to Participants check box
is selected, only the message flows that exist in a project between the
Representing Participants of the pools connected by a Conversation
will show.
Click to clear the check box to see all message flows in a project.
You can also assign a Message Flow to a Conversation by dragging it from the
Containment tree to a Conversation shape on the BPMN Collaboration diagram.
To create a SubConversation
• On the diagram pallet, click SubConversation.
A SubConversation can contain inner Conversation Nodes (Conversation and SubConversation).
To create a Conversation Node for a SubConversation
Do either:
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• Select SubConversation and on the Smart manipulator toolbar, click the SubConversation button.
• Open the Specification window, select Conversation Nodes in the property group list on the left.
Click the Create button and select a Node type. Type the name and click Close.
Figure -- Creating Conversation Node in SubConversation Specification window
A CallConversation can reference Collaboration or Global Conversation.
To create a CallConversation
• On the diagram pallet, click SubConversation.
Related elements
Conversation
SubConversation
Call Conversation
Message
Message Flow
Pool and Lane
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Related diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
Creating and Using Message Flow
Creating and Using Participant
4.3.5 Creating and Using Participant
To create a Participant
• Right-click the BPMN Collaboration or Choreography element in the Containment tree and from
the shortcut menu, select New Element > BPMN Element > Participant.
To create a multi-instance Participant
1. Right-click a created Participant in the Containment tree and select Specification from the
shortcut menu. The Participant Specification window opens.
2. In the Participant Specification window, under the Multiplicity category in the General property
group, type the Minimum property value (“2” or greater).
The Minimum Multiplicity value of a MultiInstance participant property
must be “2” or greater.
Related elements
Participant
Pool and Lane
Choreography Activities
Related diagrams
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Using BPMN Collaboration Diagram
Using BPMN Choreography Diagram
4.4 Using BPMN Choreography Diagram
The following sections describe how to create and specify a a BPMN Choreography diagram:
• Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram
• Using Choreography Activity
• Creating and Using Choreography Task
• Creating SubChoreography
• Creating Call Choreography Activity
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4.4.1 Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram
You can create a BPMN Choreography diagram from
• BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Choreography diagram from the BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN2 Diagram toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner of the Choreography diagram.
The owner of Choreography diagram has to be a BPMN Choreography.
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Choreography diagram from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Choreography Diagrams. The
BPMN Choreography Diagrams dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Choreography diagram.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Choreography diagram from the shortcut menu of the package in the Containment tree
1. Right-click the package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram
> BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Choreography Diagram.
2. Type the name for the BPMN Choreography diagram.
Related element
Choreography
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Using Choreography Activity
Creating and Using Choreography Task
Creating SubChoreography
Creating Call Choreography Activity
Navigation Between BPMN Diagrams
4.4.2 Using Choreography Activity
This section describes how to create and model choreography activities in a BPMN Choreography diagram. You
can specify a list of Participants in a Choreography Activity from
• Specification window
• Smart Manipulator toolbar
• Drag-and-drop operation
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To specify a list of Participants from the Specification window
1. Do either:
• Select the Choreography Activity on the diagram pane and on the Smart Manipulator
toolbar, click the Participants button.
• Open the Specification window, click the Participants property value cell and then
click ... button.
The Select Recourse dialog opens.
2. In the open dialog, select Resources.
3. Click OK.
Figure -- Selecting Resources in Select Resource dialog
You need to specify at least two Participants for a Choreography
Activity.
The MultiInstance Participants on a Choreography shape will be displayed with
a MultiInstance marker in the Participants’ compartment.
To specify a list of participants from the drag-and-drop action
• Drag a Resource from the Containment tree to a Choreography Activity on diagram pane.
• Hold down SHIFT to select multiple elements that are grouped together.
• Hold down CTRL to select multiple elements that are not grouped together.
To specify an Initiating Participant in a Choreography Activity
A Choreography Activity needs the Initiating Participant property value
to be specified.
1. Open the Choreography Activity Specification window.
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2. Click the Initiating Participant property value cell and select a Resource.
To add a Loop marker to a Choreography Activity
• Right-click a Choreography Activity and select Standard Loop or MultiInstance Loop.
To display a MultiInsatance Loop (sequential) marker on a MultiInstane Loop Choreography Activity
Do either:
• Right-click a Choreography Activity with the MultiInstance Loop (parallel) marker and select Is
Sequential.
• Open the Choreography Activity with the MultiInstance Loop marker Specification window. Select
the Is Sequential check box.
Related elements
Choreography Activities
Participant
Resource
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram
Creating and Using Choreography Task
Creating SubChoreography
Creating Call Choreography Activity
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Creating and Using Participant
To open an element Specification window
4.4.3 Creating and Using Choreography Task
A Choreography Task can have references to Message Flows, existing among referenced Resources.
To create a Choreography Task
• On the diagram pallet, click Choreography Task.
To select Message Flows referenced by a Choreography Task
1. Open the Choreography Task Specification window.
2. Select Message Flow property value cell and click the ... button. The Select Message Flows
dialog opens.
3. Select the Message Flows and click OK.
Figure -- Selecting Message Flows
If the Message Flows, which are referenced by a Choreography Task, have the Messages
specified, they will be displayed and attached to the Choreography Task in the diagram.
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To specify Messages for a Choreography Task
1. Create a BPMN Collaboration diagram with Pools representing Resources and Message Flows
with Messages.
Figure -- Pools, Resources, and Message Flow
2. On a BPMN Choreography diagram and create Choreography Task.
3. Open the Choreography Task Specification window. Specify the Participants for the Participant
Refs property and a Participant for the Initiating Participant Ref property.
4. Select the Message Flow property and click the ... button. The Select Message Flows dialog
opens. Select the Message Flows you have created in step 3 as the Message Flow property
value and click Close.
• Initiating Messages (connected to an initiating Participant compartment) will be
displayed in yellow.
• Non-initiating messages (connected to a non-initiating Participant compartment)
will be displayed in gray.
To hide the Messages for a Choreography Task
Do either:
• Right-click a Choreography Task and select Show Messages.
• Right-click a Choreography Task and click Symbol(s) Properties. The Symbol Properties dialog
opens. Select Show Messages.
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Related elements
Choreography Task
Resource
Participant
Message
Collaboration
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram
Using Choreography Activity
Creating SubChoreography
Creating Call Choreography Activity
Creating and Using Pool and Lanes
Creating and Using Message Flow
To open an element Specification window
4.4.4 Creating SubChoreography
A SubChoreography can be displayed with different symbol properties:
• An Expanded SubChoreography can contain inner shapes.
• A Collapsed SubChoreography cannot display inner shapes. A plus sign (+) marker is displayed
for a collapsed subprocess.
To create SubChoreography
• On the Choreography diagram pallet, click SubChoreography and select a needed
SubChoreography.
To expand a SubChoreography
Do either:
• Right-click a SubChoreography and on the shortcut menu select Suppress Content.
• Right-click a SubChoreography and select Symbol(s) Properties. The Symbol Properties
dialog opens. Select or clear the Suppress Content and click OK.
To collapse a SubChoreography
Do either:
• Right-click a SubChoreography and on the shortcut menu clear the Suppress Content.
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• Right-click a SubChoreography and select Symbol(s) Properties. The Symbol Properties
dialog opens. Clear the Suppress Content and click OK.
Related element
SubChoreography
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram
Using Choreography Activity
Creating and Using Choreography Task
Creating Call Choreography Activity
4.4.5 Creating Call Choreography Activity
A Call Choreography Activity holds a reference to a Choreography.
To create a Call Choreography Activity
1. On the diagram pallet, click Call Choreography Activity. The Select Behavior dialog opens.
2. Select a Choreography Activity.
3. Click OK.
To change the element called by a Call Choreography Activity
Do either:
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• Right-click a Call Choreography Activity and click Called Choreography Ref. Select a
Choreography from the elements list.
• Open the Call Choreography Activity Specification window. Click Called Choreography Ref and
select a Choreography as property value.
Related element
Call Choreography
Related diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Choreography Diagram
Using Choreography Activity
Creating and Using Choreography Task
Creating SubChoreography
Creating Call Choreography Activity
To open an element Specification window
4.5 Using BPMN Tables and Matrices
The following sections describe how to create and use a BPMN tables and matrices:
• Creating BPMN Processes Description Table
• Creating BPMN Resources Description Table
• Creating BPMN Business Data Description Table
• Creating BPMN Activities Description Table
• Modifying BPMN Table
• Creating BPMN Resources Usage Matrix
• Creating BPMN Data Usage Matrix
• Modifying BPMN Matrices
4.5.1 Creating BPMN Processes Description Table
You can create a BPMN Processes Description Table from
• BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Processes Description Table from the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Processes Description Table.
3. Click OK.
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To create a new BPMN Processes Description Table from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Processes
Description Tables. The BPMN Processes Description Tables dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Create Diagram Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Processes Description Table.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Processes Description Table from the shortcut menu of the package in the Containment
tree
1. Right-click a package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram >
BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Processes Description Table.
2. Type the name for the created BPMN Processes Description Table.
Related element
BPMN Process
Related diagram
BPMN Processes Description Table
Related procedure
Modifying BPMN Table
4.5.2 Creating BPMN Resources Description Table
You can create a BPMN Resources Description Table from
• BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Resources Description Table from the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner for the BPMN Resources Description Table.
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Resources Description Table from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Resources
Description Tables. The BPMN Resources Description Tables dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Create Diagram Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Resources Description Table.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Resources Description Table from the shortcut menu of a package in the Containment
tree
1. Right-click a package the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram >
BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Resources Description Table.
2. Type the name for a created BPMN Resources Description Table.
Related elements
Resource
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Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
Related diagram
BPMN Resources Description Table
Related procedure
Modifying BPMN Table
4.5.3 Creating BPMN Business Data Description Table
You can create a BPMN Business Data Description Table from
• BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Business Data Description Table from the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog
opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner on the BPMN Business Data Description Table.
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Business Data Description Table from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Business Data
Description Tables. The BPMN Business Data Description Tables dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Create Diagram Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Business Data Description Table.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Business Data Description Table from the shortcut menu of a package in the Containment
tree
1. Right-click a package the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram >
BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Business Data Description Table.
2. Type the name for a created BPMN Business Data Description Table.
Related element
Class
Related diagram
BPMN Business Data Description Table
Related procedure
Modifying BPMN Table
4.5.4 Creating BPMN Activities Description Table
• You can create a BPMN Activities Description Table from
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• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
BPMN Activities Description Table is recommended to be created inside
a BPMN Process or Choreography.
To create a new BPMN Activities Description Table from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Activities
Description Tables. The BPMN Activities Description Tables dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Create Diagram Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Activities Description Table.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Activities Description Table from the shortcut menu of the package in the Containment
tree
1. Right-click a package of the BPMN Process or Choreography diagrams in the Containment tree,
select New Diagram > BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Activities Description Table.
2. Type the name for a created BPMN Activities Description Table.
Related element
Activities
Related diagram
BPMN Activities Description Table
Related procedure
Modifying BPMN Table
4.5.5 Modifying BPMN Table
To create a new element in a BPMN table
• Click the Add New button on the Table Edit toolbar.
To add an existing element to a BPMN table
Do either:
• In the Containment tree, select one or more Resources and drag them to the table.
• Hold down SHIFT to select multiple elements that are grouped together.
• Hold down CTRL to select multiple elements that are not grouped
together.
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• Click the Add Existing button on the Table Edit toolbar. The select element dialog opens, select
element you need to add to the table and click OK.
To select more than one element, click the Multiple Selection
button.
To remove an element from a BPMN table
• Select the element in the table and click the Delete From Table button on the Table Edit toolbar.
To delete an element from both a BPMN table and the model
• Select the element in the table and click the Delete button on the Table Edit toolbar.
To display columns of the table
1. On the Table Edit toolbar, click Show Columns.
2. From the menu, select properties to be shown in the table.
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To edit element property value in a cell
The property can be edited if it is not locked.
1. Click a cell.
2. Do either:
• Edit the value directly in the selected cell.
• Click the
button. The property value editor dialog opens.
To export a BPMN table to the *.html, *.csv, or *.xlsx format
1. On the BPMN table toolbar, click Export. The Choose file dialog opens.
2. Do either:
• Browse for a location to save a table in.
• Type the exported table name.
• Select the exported table format.
3. Click Save.
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Processes Description Table
Creating BPMN Resources Description Table
Creating BPMN Business Data Description Table
Creating BPMN Activities Description Table
Related external resource
“Generic Table” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
4.5.6 Creating BPMN Resources Usage Matrix
You can create a BPMN Resources Usage Matrix from
• BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Resources Usage Matrix from the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Resources Usage matrix.
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Resources Usage Matrix from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Resources Usage
Matrices. The BPMN Resources Usage Matrices dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Create Diagram Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Resources Usage Matrix.
4. Click OK.
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To create a new BPMN Resources Usage Matrix from the shortcut menu of the package in the Containment tree
1. Right-click a package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram >
BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Resources Usage Matrix.
2. Type the name for the created BPMN Resources Usage Matrix.
Related elements
Activities
Resource
Related diagram
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
Related procedure
Modifying BPMN Matrices
4.5.7 Creating BPMN Data Usage Matrix
You can create a BPMN Data Usage Matrix from
• BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new BPMN Data Usage Matrix from the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar
1. Click the
button on the BPMN Tables and Matrices toolbar. The Create Diagram dialog opens.
2. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Data Usage matrix
3. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Data Usage Matrix from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN Tables and Matrices> BPMN Data Usage Matrices.
The BPMN Data Usage Matrices dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Create Diagram Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the BPMN Data Usage Matrix.
4. Click OK.
To create a new BPMN Data Usage Matrix from the shortcut menu of the package in the Containment tree
1. Right-click a package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram >
BPMN Tables and Matrices > BPMN Data Usage Matrix.
2. Type the name for the created BPMN Resources Usage Matrix.
Related elements
Activities
Data Object
Class
Related diagram
BPMN Data Usage Matrices
Related procedure
Modifying BPMN Matrices
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4.5.8 Modifying BPMN Matrices
To change a row/column scope
Do either:
• In the Model Browser, select one or more elements you wish to see on your matrix and drag them
to the Row Scope/Column Scope box in the Criteria area.
• Click the ... button next to the Row Scope/Column Scope box and in the opened dialog select
what elements you wish to see on your matrix. Click OK.
To change resource assignment to an Activity for BPMN Resources Usage Matrix
Do either:
• Double-click the cell to create/remove a relationship between Activity and resource.
• Right-click the cell and from the shortcut menu select Resource.
To save a BPMN Matrices as *.csv
• On the BPMN Matrix toolbar, click the
button to save your matrix as a Comma Separated
Values ( .csv) file. The file can be opened with MS Excel.
Related diagrams
BPMN Resources Usage Matrices
BPMN Data Usage Matrices
Related procedures
Creating BPMN Resources Usage Matrix
Creating BPMN Data Usage Matrix
Related external resource
“Dependency Matrix” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
4.6 Using Organization Structure Diagram
The following sections describe how to create and use a Organization Structure diagram.
• Creating Organization Structure Diagram
• Creating and Using Resources
4.6.1 Creating Organization Structure Diagram
You can create an Organization Structure diagram from
• BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
• main menu
• shortcut menu of a package in the Containment tree
To create a new Organization Structure diagram from the BPMN2 Diagrams toolbar
1. Click the
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2. Type the name and select the owner of the Organization Structure diagram.
3. Click OK.
To create a new Organization Structure diagram from the main menu
1. On the main menu, click Diagrams > BPMN2 Diagrams > Organization Structure Diagrams.
The Organization Structure Diagrams dialog opens.
2. Click the Create button. The Specification window opens.
3. Type the name and select the owner of the Organization Structure diagram.
4. Click OK.
To create a new Organization Structure diagram from the shortcut menu of the package in the Containment tree
1. Right-click the package in the Containment tree and from the shortcut menu, select New Diagram
> BPMN2 Diagrams > BPMN Organization Structure Diagram.
2. Type the name for the Organization Structure diagram.
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
Information system
Related diagram
Organization Structure Diagram
Related procedure
Creating and Using Resources
4.6.2 Creating and Using Resources
You can create a Resource inside a package. The Resource is not displayed on a BPMN2 diagram as it is
represented by a Pool, Data Object, and Choreography Task.
To create a Resource on a Organization Structure diagram
• On the Organization Structure Diagram pallet, click the Resource button.
To create a Resource in the Containment tree
• Right-click a package in the Containment tree. On the shortcut menu, click New Element > BPMN
Element > Resource.
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To change a type of Resource
• Right-click the Resource and on the shortcut menu select needed Resource type.
To review traceability information related to a Resource
1. Right-click a created Resource in the Containment tree and click Specification to open the
Resource Specification window.
2. In the Resource Specification window, select Traceability.
Figure -- Traceability information of Resource
Related elements
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Person
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Using BPMN Element Numbers
Information system
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related procedure
Using BPMN Element Numbers
4.7 Using BPMN Element Numbers
Most BPMN elements can have specified their IDs. Element ID is automatically created for BPMN Process,
Collaboration, and Choreography diagram flow elements and conversations. The element IDs are displayed (in
gray) in the following places:
• On a diagram. The ID is displayed above or before the name of element.
• In the Model Browser. The ID is displayed in front of the name of element.
• In the Specification window. The ID is below the Name property.
Automatic elements numbering is turned off in all the projects that are created using
BPMN2 Project templates.
To specify or change a BPMN element’s ID manually
1. Open the Specification window of element.
2. Type a number in the Id property value box.
To turn on/off automatic elements numbering in a project
1. On the main menu, click Options > Project. The Project Options dialog opens.
2. In the Project Options dialog, click General project options in the options list on the left.
3. Click to clear the Use Element Auto-numbering check box and then click OK.
Figure -- Use Element Auto-numbering property in Project Options dialog
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To hide an element Id on a diagram
• Right-click the diagram pane and then do one of the following:
• On the shortcut menu clear the Show Elements Id.
• From the shortcut menu, select Diagram Properties. Clear the Show Elements Id
check box.
To hide element numbers in the Containment tree
1. On the main menu, click Options > Project. The Project Options dialog opens.
2. In the Project Options dialog, click General project options in the options list on the left.
3. Click to clear the Display Element Number check box and then click OK.
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Exporting Models to XPDL
To edit elements numbering
1. Right-click an element on the BPMN2 diagram and select Element Numbering from the shortcut
menu. The Element Numbering dialog opens.
2. Change elements numbers into desired ones at the right side in this dialog.
3. Click OK.
To change displayed numbering style for element symbols on a diagram
1. Right-click an element on the BPMN2 diagram and select Symbol(s) Properties.
2. In the Symbol Properties dialog, select the Element Number Display Mode property value from
the drop-down list.
3. Select the Show Number Tag Name check box to show prefix id = before an element number.
Related element
Numbering Elements
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
Related external resource
“Generic numbering mechanism” in MagicDraw UserManual.pdf
4.8 Exporting Models to XPDL
Cameo Business Modeler supports BPMN 2.0 model export to XPDL 2.2.
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Exporting Models to XPDL
The support for XPDL 2.2 allows you to export your BPMN Processes and Collaborations to XPDL 2.2 format. A
separate XPDL file is then created for each exported BPMN Process or Collaboration diagram.
• XPDL 2.2 does not support BPMN Choreography and Conversation elements
from BPMN Collaborations.
• Export to XPDL File is available from Architect edition only.
To export multiple BPMN Processes or Collaborations to XPDL
1. On the main menu, click File> Export To > XPDL File. The Export to XPDL dialog opens.
Figure -- Exporting Multiple BPMN Processes or Collaborations to XPDL
2. Select the Selected BPMN Processes/Collaborations option button and choose the diagrams
you want to export from the BPMN Processes/Collaborations list.
Press and hold down the Ctrl key to select multiple BPMN Processes
or Collaborations.
3. Click the ... button next to the Working Directory box to specify the place for saving the exporting
project.
4. Click Save.
To export an active BPMN Process or Collaboration to XPDL
1. Do either:
• On the main menu, click File > Export To > XPDL File.
• Right-click the BPMN Process or Collaboration diagram in the Containment tree and
from the shortcut menu, select Tools > Export To XPDL File.
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The Export to XPDL dialog opens.
Figure -- Exporting selected BPMN Process/Collaboration diagram to XPDL
2. Select the Active BPMN Process/Collaboration option button.
3. Do either:
• Type the name for a destination directory in the Xpdl File box.
• Click the ... button next to the Working Directory box to specify the place for saving
the exporting project.
4. Click Save.
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
4.9 Exporting Models to BPMN2
Cameo Business Modeler supports BPMN model export to BPMN2.
The support allows you to export your BPMN Processes, Collaborations or Choreographies to BPMN2 file.
Export to XPDL File is available from Architect edition only.
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To export BPMN Processes, Collaborations or Choreographies to BPMN2
1. On the main menu, click File> Export To > BPMN2 File. The Export to BPMN2 File dialog
opens.
2. Select the Selected BPMN Processes/Collaborations/Choreographies option button and
choose the diagrams you want to export from the BPMN Processes/Collaborations list.
Press and hold down the Ctrl key to select multiple BPMN Processes
or Collaborations.
3. Click the ... button next to the Working Directory box to specify the place for saving the exported
file.
4. Click Save.
To export an active BPMN Process, Collaboration or Choreographies to BPMN2
1. Do either:
• On the main menu, click File > Export To > BPMN2 File.
• Right-click the BPMN Process or Collaboration diagram in the Containment tree and
from the shortcut menu, select Tools > Export To BPMN2 File.
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The Export to XPDL dialog opens.
2. Select the Active BPMN Process/Collaboration/Choreographies option button.
3. Click the ... button next to the BPMN2 File box to specify the place for saving the exporting
project.
4. Click Save.
Related element
BPMN2 XML support
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
BPMN Collaboration Diagram
BPMN Choreography Diagram
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5 C A M EO BUS INE S S MODE LE R
GUI
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Business Model Creation Wizard
5.1 Business Model Creation Wizard
The Business Model Creation Wizard is used to compose the initial information about the process model
• Business concepts
• Organization Units
• Roles
• Business Processes
The wizard consist of these steps:
1. Introduction.
2. Define general concepts used to describe business operations.
3. Define representing an organization or organizational departments.
4. Define roles that exist in the organization.
5. Define business processes that exist in the organization.
Step #1: Introduction
This step provides you information about Business Model Creation Wizard.
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Step #2: General concepts specification
This step is designed to specify Business Concepts, which are used as data objects in the described business
processes.
Step #3: Organization Departments specification
This step is designed to define Organization Unit, which represents an organization or organizational departments.
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Step #4: Roles specification
This step is designed to define resources for business processes.
Step #5: Process specification
This step is designed to define business processes that exist in the organization.
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Business Model Creation Wizard
After the wizard is finished, you will get the business model with the initial set of diagrams, which you will be able
to define in detail.
Relate elements
Activities
BPMN Process
Class
Resource
Organization Unit
Role
Related diagrams
BPMN Process Diagram
Business Data Diagram
Organization Structure Diagram
Process Definition Diagram
Related procedures
Creating Business Model with Initial Set of Diagrams
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6 APPEN D IX I: VA L IDA TION
RULES
Abbreviation
Validation Rule
COM3001
Incoming Sequence Flow is not created for End Event
COM3002
Error code is not specified for an Error or Error is not defined for an Error End Event
COM3003
Too few outgoing Sequence Flow are detected for an Event-Based Gateway
COM3004
A Start Event is not defined for an Event SubProcess
COM3005
An Intermediate Boundary Event does not have outgoing Sequence Flow
COM3006
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Catch Event
COM3007
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Throw Event
COM3008
Outgoing Sequence Flow is not defined for a Start Event
COM3009
Resource is not defined for a Task
COM3010
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for a Task
COM3011
Name is not defined for a Task
COM3012
Type is not defined for a Data Object, Data Input, Data Output and Data Store
COM3013
A Representer is not specified for a Lane
COM3014
A Documentation is not specified for a BPMN Activity and Resource elements
COM3015
A Message is not referenced by Message Flow
6.1 Incoming Sequence Flow is not created for End
Event
Abbreviation
COM3001
Description
An end event is detected without the connected incoming sequence flow. Each end event should have at least one
incoming sequence flow.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
End Event
Solution
Create an incoming sequence flow for the validated end event.
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Error code is not specified for an Error or Error is not defined for an Error End Event
6.2 Error code is not specified for an Error or Error is
not defined for an Error End Event
Abbreviation
COM3002
Description
An Error Code is not specified for an Error that is defined (or Error is not defined) for an Error End Event.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Error End Event
Solution
Create an Error element and specify the Error Code for it. The created Error Create element must be defined for
an Error End Event.
6.3 Too few outgoing Sequence Flow are detected for
an Event-Based Gateway
Abbreviation
COM3003
Description
Too few outgoing Sequence Flows are detected for an Event-Based Gateway. An Event-Based Gateway should
have two or more outgoing Sequence Flows.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Event-Based Gateway
Solution
Create two or more outgoing sequence flows for validated Event-Based Gateway.
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A Start Event is not defined for an Event SubProcess
6.4 A Start Event is not defined for an Event
SubProcess
Abbreviation
COM3004
Description
A Start Event is not defined for an Event SubProcess (a Start Event must be defined within each Event
SubProcess).
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Event SubProcess
Solution
Create a Start Event within the validated Event SubProcess. The Start Event must be followed by Sequence
Flows.
6.5 An Intermediate Boundary Event does not have
outgoing Sequence Flow
Abbreviation
COM3005
Description
An Intermediate Boundary Event without outgoing Sequence Flow is detected. An Intermediate Boundary Event
should have at least one outgoing Sequence Flow.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Boundary Event
Solution
Create one more outgoing Sequence Flows for the Intermediate Boundary Event.
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Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Catch Event
6.6 Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for
an Intermediate Catch Event
Abbreviation
COM3006
Description
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Catch Event. An Intermediate Catch Event
should have both (incoming and outgoing) Sequence Flows.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Intermediate Catch Event
Solution
Create the missing outgoing or incoming Sequence Flow for the validated Intermediate Catch Event. An
Intermediate Catch Event should have both (incoming and outgoing) Sequence Flows.
6.7 Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for
an Intermediate Throw Event
Abbreviation
COM3007
Description
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for an Intermediate Throw Event. An Intermediate Throw Event
should have both (incoming and outgoing) Sequence Flows.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Intermediate Throw Event
Solution
Create a missing outgoing or incoming Sequence Flow for the validated Intermediate Throw Event. An
Intermediate Throw Event should have both (incoming and outgoing) Sequence Flows.
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Outgoing Sequence Flow is not defined for a Start Event
6.8 Outgoing Sequence Flow is not defined for a Start
Event
Abbreviation
COM3008
Description
Outgoing Sequence Flow is not defined for a Start Event. Each Start Event should have at least one outgoing
Sequence Flow.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Start Event
Solution
Create outgoing Sequence Flow for the validated Start Event. Each Start Event should have at least one outgoing
Sequence Flow.
6.9 Resource is not defined for a Task
Abbreviation
COM3009
Description
Resource is not defined for a Task. Task should have a defined Resource.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Task
Solution
Define a Resource for the validated Task.
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Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for a Task
6.10 Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing
for a Task
Abbreviation
COM3010
Description
Incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow is missing for a Task. A Task that is not defined within an Ad Hoc SubProcess
should have incoming and outgoing Sequence Flows.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Task
Solution
Create an incoming/outgoing Sequence Flow for a validated Task.
6.11 Name is not defined for a Task
Abbreviation
COM3011
Description
Name is missing for the Task element. It is recommended to name all Task elements.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Task
Solution
Specify name for each task.
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Type is not defined for a Data Object, Data Input, Data Output and Data Store
6.12 Type is not defined for a Data Object, Data Input,
Data Output and Data Store
Abbreviation
COM3012
Description
A Type is missing. Each Data Object, Data Input, Data Output, and Data Store elements should have assigned
Type.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Data Object, Data Input, Data Output, Data Store
Solution
Assign type for the Data Object, Data Input, Data Output, and Data Store elements. Data Object with assigned
Type can be created automatically by dropping a class element into Business Process diagram.
6.13 A Representer is not specified for a Lane
Abbreviation
COM3013
Description
Representer is missing for a Lane. Each Lane should have specified Resource as Lane Representer.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Lane
Solution
Use a smart manipulator of a Lane to select a Resource as Lane Representer.
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A Documentation is not specified for a BPMN Activity and Resource elements
6.14 A Documentation is not specified for a BPMN
Activity and Resource elements
Abbreviation
COM3014
Description
Documentation is missing. Each BPMN activity and Resource element should be documented in the model.
Element documentation is used for model reports.
Severity
Info
Context Element
Task, Call Activity, Resource
Solution
Specify the documentation for the validated elements. Documentation is widely used in generated model reports.
6.15 A Message is not referenced by Message Flow
Abbreviation
COM3015
Description
A Message is missing. Each Message Flow relationship should reference a Message.
Severity
Warning
Context Element
Message Flow
Solution
Assign a Message for the validated Message Flow. A Message can be assigned using smart manipulator on a
Message Flow or in the Message Flow specification dialog.
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