Gary Fisher Cronus 2010, CRONOS User manual

Gary Fisher Cronus 2010, CRONOS User manual
cronus
2010 service information
Service Information
Cronus 2010
The Gary Fisher Cronus is the lightest, strongest frameset we have ever made. To accomplish this, we have used shaped and very thin-walled carbon tubes. Because of its unique features, the Gary Fisher Cronus requires different or additional assembly techniques, provided here:
+ Carbon fiber care
+ Headset bearing installation
+ Front hub and fork integration
+ Bottom bracket bearing installation for a variety of bottom bracket types
Check www.fisherbikes.com for updates.
These instructions are written for an experienced mechanic. If you need further
information, refer to your bicycle owner’s manual, the instructions in a bicycle mechanic’s handbook, or consult your dealer.
Please save these instructions for future reference.
2 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Table of Contents
Working with Carbon Fiber Parts.....................................................................................................................1
Cutting a carbon fiber steerer......................................................................................................................... 2
To cut the steerer................................................................................................................................................... 3
Headset Installation............................................................................................................................................... 4
Special Care Information..................................................................................................................................... 4
Inspecting the Headset........................................................................................................................................ 6
Fender Installation...................................................................................................................................................7
FCC Steering System............................................................................................................................................ 9
Crankset Installation...........................................................................................................................................10
SRAM GXP................................................................................................................................................................. 11
Shimano HollowTech............................................................................................................................................. 14
Campagnolo UltraTorque...................................................................................................................................18
Inspecting the bottom bracket..................................................................................................................... 20
FSA MegaExo AL....................................................................................................................................................21
Cronus Crankset Troubleshooting.................................................................................................................24
Bearing play in a GXP crank or bottom bracket assembly.................................................................24
Crank is rubbing or there is excessive drag............................................................................................ 25
GXP triple crankset can’t be properly preloaded.................................................................................. 25
3 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Working with Carbon Fiber Parts
Carbon fiber parts are different from metal parts, so they require different treatment.
Keep carbon away from sharp edges or excessive pressure
Carbon fiber composite can be damaged by sharp edges or clamping mechanisms
which cause a point load, or a high pressure area. The clamps on some parts are not
compatible with carbon; some stems, seat post clamps, etc. have sharp edges and/or
clamps that create pressure points. Before installing any carbon fiber part, or attaching
any component to an existing carbon fiber part, make sure the parts or components are
carbon-compatible.
As carbon frames have gotten lighter and lighter, you can now feel movement in the tubes
when you squeeze them. This is normal and no reflection of the strength of the frame.
However, repeated compression of the sides of the tubes is not good for them, and could
eventually lead to frame damage. Do not squeeze the frame tubing with your fingers, and
especially never clamp the tubing in any mechanical device, including car racks.
Clean carbon parts before installation
With the interfaces of metal parts, grease is used on the clamping surfaces to prevent
corrosion. When making adjustments, always grease the threads and shoulders of bolts.
Grease reduces corrosion and allows you to achieve the correct tightness without
damaging tools.
However, with most carbon parts you should avoid grease. If grease is applied to a carbon
part that is clamped, the part may slip in the clamp, even at the recommended torque
specification. The carbon part can be assembled in a clean, dry state. As an alternative,
we recommend the following special carbon prep products:
+ Tacx carbon assembly compound
+ Fiber Grip™ carbon fiber assembly gel from Finish Line
On the other hand, the bearing seats of the Cronus frameset do require grease, as
explained in these instructions.
Never modify the fork, frame, or components
The parts of the Cronus frameset have been carefully designed to meet the strength and
function requirements of safe riding. Modifying these parts in any way may make the bike
unsafe. As an example, removing the redundant wheel retention tabs on fork tips could
make the fork less functional.
Suspension forks can add stress to a bike frame. Never add a suspension fork to a road
bike, or change style and/or length of forks. If you are unsure if a fork is compatible
with a frame, call Gary Fisher customer service. Any modification of a frame, fork, or
components means that the bike no longer meets our specifications and will therefore
void the bike’s warranty.
4 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Cutting a carbon fiber steerer
These instructions explain the best practices for cutting a carbon fiber steerer tube.
Warning! A steerer that is damaged by incorrect
cutting, installation or maintenance is unsafe and
could break, causing loss of control and injury.
Follow the instructions carefully.
About cutting carbon fiber
High quality carbon fiber composite behaves like a solid; if the layers of carbon are
correctly bonded together, there will be no layers or loose fibers apparent. Your job when cutting the steerer is to avoid damage to the steerer that might separate layers or leave loose fibers. Done correctly, there is no need to dress the steerer with tape
before cutting, or to dress it with epoxy after cutting.
Measure twice, cut once
Before cutting the steerer, make sure the steerer length is correct. Remember these
requirements:
+ Place at least two spacers under the stem (two 5mm spacers are acceptable).
+ Do not stack more than 40mm of spacers.
+ Use a stem with circumferential clamps; never use a wedge-type stem.
Use the correct tools in the correct manner
+ Do not scratch or score the steerer below the cut line; any damage to the tube
surface (scratches, cracks, or torn or loose fibers) can compromise the strength of the steerer.
+ Allow the saw to do the work; instead of cutting cleanly, excessive pressure tends to pull on or tear the carbon.
+ Always cut toward the center of the steerer, which helps prevent splintering of the carbon. This requires turning the steerer in the saw guide. Keep the cut aligned correctly so that the finished cut is even and perpendicular to the centerline of the steerer.
+ Avoid inhaling the carbon fiber dust that occurs during the cutting process.
Materials and tools needed
+ Bench vise
+ Saw guide to create a perpendicular cut (e.g. Park Tool Threadless Saw Guide #SG-6)
+ Hacksaw with Carbide Grit hacksaw blade
+ Fine grit sandpaper (220 - 400 grit)
+ File: smooth tooth or mill bastard
5 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
To cut the steerer
1. Clamp the saw guide securely in the bench vise.
2. Clamp the steerer in the saw guide.
+ Be careful not to crush the steerer; do not overtighten.
3. Using only light pressure on the saw blade, cut about halfway through the steerer
(Figure 1).
+ Be careful not to create loose fibers—on the inside or the outside the steerer.
4. While keeping the cut aligned with the cutting guide, rotate the fork 180 degrees in Figure 1. Use light pressure when cutting.
the guide (Figure 2).
5. Finish cutting the steerer.
6. Loosen the saw guide slightly and push the steerer through until the end can be
dressed. Retighten.
7. Working away from the crown, file the outside corner off the cut end of the steerer.
(Figure 3)
+ You can also use sand paper for this step. Sandpaper is less aggressive and a bit more forgiving.
8. With the sandpaper, smooth the end of the steer tube and the inside corner
(Figure 4).
+ T
his can be done with a “shoeshine” movement or by rotating and reciprocation with the
sandpaper.
Figure 2. Turn the fork over so that cutting is always
toward the center; this prevents loose fibers
9. Remove the fork from the saw guide.
10. Inspect for frayed, loose, or broken fibers. Repair as needed.
+ If, despite your care, some individual fibers break free, treat the fibers with care because if one is pulled or moved, it could “zipper” down the length or the steerer. + If a loose fiber area is small and short, you can repair it. To repair, glue the fiber in place with
two-part epoxy. Finish by lightly sanding with 220 or 400 grit sandpaper.
+ If you see loose fibers extending more than one-half the length of the steerer, have the fork
evaluated by Fisher before repairing or installing.
The fork is now ready for you to complete the fork installation.
Figure 3. File away from the crown (NOT toward it)
Figure 4. Smooth the inside of the steerer with fine-grit
sandpaper
6 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Headset Installation
Headset spacers
Bearing cover
The headset of the Cronus uses a 1.5” lower bearing and 11/8” upper bearing (Figure 5).
The bearings are slip-fit into the frame. There are many benefits to this design, and one is
Shims
Centering washer
Upper bearing
that the Cronus headset is a tool-less installation. The bearings are slip fit, so a headset
press or fork race setting tool are not needed.
Special Care Information
Lower bearing
The fork on the Cronus frame has several unique features that require special care to
avoid frame damage:
+ With a carbon steerer, do not use a star-fangled nut; use only the compression nut
assembly supplied with the fork.
+ Do not cut or machine the fork crown or head tube; never use facing tools.
+ Do not use a hammer to install the bearings.
+ Make sure the stem clamp is designed correctly and is free of burrs.
+ If you choose to cut the steerer, follow all normal procedures and cautions
regarding carbon fiber composite parts. If you are not familiar with these
procedures, consult your dealer.
Tools and materials required
+ Top cap assembly
For carbon steerer: Compression nut assembly PN 408118
+ Stem
+ Optional headset spacers, maximum of 40 mm including bearing cover (Figure 18)
+ Bearing cover, conical
Aluminum
5 mm
PN 404691
15 mm
PN 404689
Carbon
5 mm
PN 404690
15 mm
PN 404687
+ Shims, 1mm
+ Centering washer
+ Upper bearing, 11/8”
Steel
PN 271111
Stainless steel
PN 271112
+ Lower bearing, 1.5” PN 290413
+ Fork
+ Rock “N” Roll Super Coat grease
+ 4 and 5 mm allen wrenches
+ Torque wrench
7 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Figure 5. Cronus headset parts and spacers
To install the bearings
1. Apply a light coat of grease to the inner race of the lower bearing.
2. Install the bearing on the steerer (Figure 6).
+ The bearing is symmetrical, so either side is “right-side up.”
3. Apply a liberal coat of grease to the bearing seats of the head tube, both top and bottom (Figure 7).
4. Slide the steerer (with the bearing installed) through the head tube (Figure 8).
5. Slide the upper bearing down the steerer and into the frame.
6. Slide the centering washer onto the steerer (Figure 9).
Figure 6. Lower bearing on fork crown
Figure 7. Greasing upper bearing saddle
Figure 8. Inserting the fork through the head tube
Figure 9. Slide the centering washer onto the steerer
8 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
To install the shims, bearing cover, and spacers
Fisher installs three 1mm shims between the centering washer and the bearing cover
to ensure an adequate space between the bearing cover and the top of the head tube.
There should be at least 0.5 millimeter space to prevent contact or interference.
1. Slide the three shims onto the steerer.
2. Slide the bearing cover onto the steerer (Figure 10).
3. Measure the gap between the head tube and the bearing cover.
+ In some cases, all three shims may provide more clearance than necessary. In this case, remove
shims until there is only one millimeter of space between the head tube and the bearing cover
(Figure 11).
4. Slide the headset spacers and the stem onto the steerer.
Figure 10. The bearing cover and one spacer on the steerer
5. Install the headset top cap and adjusting bolt.
+ For a carbon steerer, do not use a star-fangled nut. Use the special adjusting plug.
6. Adjust the headset.
+ T
he Cronus headset uses an angular contact bearing system, so the headset will rotate
freely with a wide range of tension. Make sure there is no free play, but do not overtighten
the bearings because they might wear prematurely.
7. Tighten the stem clamp bolts to the manufacturer’s recommendation.
8. Follow the steps in “Inspecting the Headset.”
Figure 11. Measure the distance from the head tube to the
bearing cover
Inspecting the Headset
Once a month inspect the headset of your bicycle to see that it is not loose, nor too tight. If your headset bearings are loose or too tight, do not ride the bicycle.
Readjust the bearings or take your bike to your Gary Fisher dealer for service.
To check is the headset is too loose
1. Stand over the top tube of your bicycle with both feet on the ground.
2. Apply the front brake firmly while you rock the bicycle forward and backward.
3. Look, listen, and feel for looseness of the headset bearings.
To check is the headset is too tight
1. With the front wheel off the ground, slowly rotate the fork and handlebar to the right and left.
2. Look, listen, and feel for any grinding noises, or stickiness or binding at any point in the rotation.
9 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Fender Installation
This section explains how to install front and rear fenders on a Cronus using the
accessory dropout adapters and custom brake attachment nuts. Each dropout adapter,
or “eyelet,” is a special screw with an eyelet. The brake attachment nut includes a bolt
that threads into the nut.
Description
Part number
Custom dropout eyelet w/locknut, set of four
Eyelet (2)
295468
Locknut (2)
300381
Figure 12. Threaded hole in left rear dropout
Custom brake nut w/inside screw, set of two
Nut (FT)
297424
Nut (RR)
297728
Installing the eyelets
1. With a 25mm hex, remove the plugs that cover the threaded holes in the rear dropouts
and fork tips (Figure 12).
2. Thread a locknut onto each eyelet, and thread the eyelet into the dropout (Figure 13).
3. Align the eyelet and secure its position by tightening the locknut.
Figure 13. Eyelet with locknut installed in dropou
Attaching the bridge clips
1. Loosen and remove the interior screw from the brake nut (Figure 14).
2. Position the bridge clip and place the interior screw through the attachment hole
(Figure 15), but do not tighten.
Continued next page
Figure 14. Removing interior screw from brake nut
Figure 15. Fender bridge clip held by interior screw
10 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Finishing the installation
1. Attach the foot of the rear fender.
If the fender has a clip instead of a hole, remove the clip fastener with a drill. If necessary, use the
drill to enlarge the empty hole.
2. Place a screw through the hole in the foot of the fender and thread it into the frame
(Figure 16). Tighten to 40-60 Lb•in (4.5-6.8 Nm).
3. Put the wheels back onto the bike.
4. Attach the fender struts to the fenders and eyelets (Figure 17).
5. Adjust the struts for clearance and centering around the tire.
Figure 16. Screw holding foot of fender to frame
6. Tighten all the hardware: the bridge clip mounting screws, the strut attachments at
the eyelets, and the strut adjusters at the fenders.
Figure 17. Fender strut attached to eyelet
11 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
FCC Steering System
The Cronus uses the FCC (Fisher Control Column) with a special front hub that is mated
to the front fork. This mating creates a unified structure that is extra strong and extra
stiff, which makes the bicycle corner and handle better. The result is a hub/fork interface
that is 25% stiffer. And with a weight penalty or a few grams at most.
Wider hub flanges
One way to increase handling precision is to use a front wheel that is stiffer laterally.
To make the Cronus front wheel stiffer, we have increased the width of the hub flanges
(Figure 18). This increase in flange width spreads out the spokes, increasing the bracing
Figure 18. Wide stance of hub flanges, and outboard
placement of fork legs relative to the dropouts
angle of the spokes. A wider bracing angle makes the front wheel stiffer laterally with
no increase in weight.
The wider bracing angle requires that the fork legs be slightly wider so that they do not
contact the spokes. The wider stance of the legs also increase lateral stiffness, so that
part is a win-win.
There is a downside, however. In a race, you might need a spare front wheel. This is not
a problem because the Cronus uses a standard 100mm OLD (Over Locknut Dimension)
hub. Any wheel in the follow vehicle will work fine. But your Cronus wheel will not work
in a different bike because the hub flanges or the spokes can contact the blades of a
“standard” fork. The consequences of this type of contact should be obvious.
Large-diameter end caps on hub
Another way to increase steering precision is to reduce fork leg “twist” that occurs as
the fork is loaded laterally and torsionally, like what occurs when the bike is cornering on
anything less than a perfectly smooth surface.
On most wheels, the biggest source of this twist is the movement between the fork tips
and the hub, even with the quick-release correctly tightened. The easiest way to reduce
this motion is to increase the contact area between the hub end faces and the fork tips.
That is exactly what we did with the Cronus (Figure 19). The larger end faces create a
“block” for the fork tips to rest against. We also gave the fork custom, over-sized faces
to mate with this special hub.
Again, there is a downside. You can still use a wheel from the race vehicle, but your Cronus
wheel can not be used with a different fork. The large faces of the FCC might completely
miss the dropout face on a different fork such that engaging the quick release can put a
bending load on the hub axle and damage the bearings.
Do not put the FCC front wheel in another bike
The hub flanges or the spokes of the Cronus front wheel can contact the blades of a “standard” fork. The consequences of this type of contact should be obvious
The large faces of the FCC might completely miss the dropout face on a different
fork such that engaging the quick release can put a bending load on the hub axle and
damage the bearings
12 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Figure 19. Large diameter hub end faces mater to
oversized fork tips
Crankset Installation
SRAM GXP
These instructions explain how to install a SRAM/TruVativ/Bontrager GXP crankset
Part description
SRAM
Kit
404700
Ceramic kit
411814
Drive side parts
Bearing
281824
instructions, available at: http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/2005_gxp-05-r5-e.pdf
Ceramic
Bearing
293617
Tools and materials required
Seal
281820
Wave washer
282866
(Figure 20) in a new Cronus. To complete the installation, you will also need the SRAM
+ Crankset and bottom bracket
Non-drive side parts
+ 8 mm allen wrench
Bearing
282864
+ Bearing installation tool - PN 404694
Ceramic
Bearing
293618
Seal
282865
+ Rock “N” Roll Super Coat grease
+ Bottom bracket parts
+ TruVativ GXP installation instructions
+ Do not install axle shield that comes in kit 404700
Wave washer
Figure 20. SRAM bearing set
13 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Seal
Bearing
Bearing with lip (facing in)
Metal seal
To install the bearings
1. Apply a liberal coat of grease to the contact surfaces of one bearing and the drive side
of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 21).
2. Slide a bearing onto the installation tool.
+ E
ither side of the drive-side bearing is the “right side.” The non-drive bearing on GXP systems
has a lip (Figure 22). Install the bearing so that the lip faces in.
3. Press one bearing into the drive side of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 23).
+ To remove the installation tool, press the release tab.
4. Repeat steps 1-3 for the other bearing on the non-drive side.
Figure 21. Greasing the bearing and the frame saddle
Figure 22. Grease on the frame and the non-drive side
bearing (with the lip facing in)
Figure 23. Pressing the bearing into the frame
To install the drive-side crankarm
When handling the seals, avoid bending them. A bent seal will rub on the bearing,
creating drag.
1. Apply a light coat of grease to the bearings on the face and the axle contact surface.
2. Apply a light coat of grease to the metal inside of one bearing seal (Figure24).
Continued
Figure 24. Greasing the bearing covers
14 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
3. Install the wave washer and with the grease facing up, slide the bearing seal onto the
axle (Figure 25).
4. Apply a light coat of grease to the bearing contact area of the axle (Figure 26).
+ T
he grease areas should be about 1 inch (25 mm) wide. On the drive side, start at the bearing
seal. On the non-drive side, start at the splines and apply toward the drive side of the axle.
5. Insert the axle through the drive-side bearing in the bottom bracket (Figure 27).
To install the non-drive side crankarm
1. Apply a light coat of grease to the inside of the metal bearing seal.
2. With the grease side toward the bearing, slide the bearing seal onto the axle (Figure
28).
Figure 25. Sliding the wave washer and bearing cover onto
the axle
3. Follow the TruVativ GXP installation instructions to complete to install the non-drive
crank arm.
4. Tighten the crank bolt to 420-480 Lb•In (48-54 N•m).
5. Follow the steps in “Inspecting the bottom bracket.”
To remove the bottom bracket bearings
The Cronus bottom bracket bearing system is designed to be a slip fit. However, after the
first installation some bearings might be tight. If the bearings do not easily come out by
hand, you may use the following method to remove them.
Figure 26. Greasing the axle
1. Slide the crank axle into the bearing so that the bearing is over the non-drive side of
the axle, about 1 inch (25 mm) from the non-drive end.
2. Gently rock the axle while you pull the axle out.
Inspecting the bottom bracket
Every 3 months check the bottom bracket adjustment.
To check the bottom bracket bearing adjustment
Figure 27. Sliding the axle through the bearings
1. Lift the chain from the chainrings.
2. Rotate the crank so that one of the arms is parallel to the seat tube.
3. Put one hand on the crank arm and one hand on the seat tube, and attempt to move
the crank arm laterally toward and away from the seat tube.
4. Spin the cranks.
If the crank feels or sounds loose, or if the motion stops abruptly or you hear a
grinding noise coming from the bearings, readjust the bearings or take the bike to
your Gary Fisher dealer.
Figure 28. Metal bearing cover in place over the bearing
15 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Shimano HollowTech
These instructions explain how to install a Shimano HollowTech (Figure 29) in a new
Cronus. To complete the installation, you will also need the Shimano instructions, available
at: http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/techdocs/content/cycle/SI/Dura-Ace/FC-7800-
Part description
Shimano
Kit
404699
Ceramic kit
411813
Drive side parts
7803/SI_1F30H_En_v1_m56577569830605111.pdf.
Tools and materials required
+ Crankset and bottom bracket
+ Shimano FC16 crank arm installation tool
Bearing
281824
Ceramic
bearing
295213
Seal
281820
Wave washer
-
Non-drive side parts
+ 5 mm Allen Wrench
Bearing
281824
+ Bearing installation tool PN 404694
Ceramic
bearing
295213
Seal
281820
+ Rock “N” Roll Super Coat grease
+ Bottom bracket parts
Seal
Figure 29. Shimano bearing set
16 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Bearing
Bearing
Seal
To install the bearings
1. Apply a liberal coat of grease to the contact surfaces of one bearing and the drive side
of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 30).
2. Slide a bearing onto the installation tool.
+ Either side of the bearing is the “right side.”
3. Press one bearing into the drive side of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 31).
+ To remove the installation tool, press the release tab.
4. Repeat steps 1-3 for the other bearing on the non-drive side.
Figure 30. Greasing the bearing and the frame seat
Figure 31. Pressing the bearing into the frame
17 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
To install the drive-side crankarm
When handling the seals, avoid bending them. A bent seal will rub on the bearing,
creating drag.
1. Apply a light coat of grease to the bearings on the face and the axle contact surface.
2. Apply a light coat of grease to the metal inside of one bearing seal (Figure 32).
3. With the grease facing up, slide the bearing seal onto the axle (Figure 33).
4. Apply a light coat of grease to the bearing contact area of the axle (Figure 34).
+ T
he grease areas should be about 1 inch (25 mm) wide. On the drive side, start at the bearing
seal. On the non-drive side, start at the splines and apply toward the drive side of the axle.
5. Insert the axle through the drive-side bearing in the bottom bracket (Figure 35).
Figure 32. Greasing the bearing covers
Figure 33. Sliding the bearing cover onto the axle
Figure 34. Greasing the axle
Figure 35. Sliding the axle through the bearings
18 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
To install the non-drive side crankarm
1. Apply a light coat of grease to the inside of the other bearing seal.
2. With the grease side toward the bearing, slide the bearing seal onto the axle (Figure 36).
3. Align the non-drive crank arm with the groove on the axle and slide the crank onto the axle.
+ The non-drive crank arm should point 180 degrees opposite of the drive-side crank arm.
4. With the plastic installation tool, press the crank onto the axle (Figure 37) as far as it will go.
5. Release the installation tool and spin the cranks 10 to 20 revolutions.
Figure 36. Pressing in the second bearing cover
6. Follow the Shimano instructions to complete the installation.
7. Follow the steps in “Inspecting the bottom bracket.”
To remove the bottom bracket bearings
The Cronus bottom bracket bearing system is designed to be a slip fit. However, after the
first installation some bearings might be tight. If the bearings do not easily come out by
hand, you may use the following method to remove them.
1. Slide the crank axle into the bearing so that the bearing is over the non-drive side of
the axle, about 1 inch (25 mm) from the non-drive end.
2. Gently rock the axle while you pull the axle out.
Inspecting the bottom bracket
Every 3 months check the bottom bracket adjustment.
To check the bottom bracket bearing adjustment
1. Lift the chain from the chainrings.
2. Rotate the crank so that one of the arms is parallel to the seat tube.
3. Put one hand on the crank arm and one hand on the seat tube, and attempt to move
the crank arm laterally toward and away from the seat tube.
4. Spin the cranks.
If the crank feels or sounds loose, or if the motion stops abruptly or you hear a grinding
noise coming from the bearings, readjust the bearings or take the bike to your Gary
Fisher dealer.
19 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Figure 37. Pressing the crank arm onto the axle
Campagnolo UltraTorque
The Cronus uses a special bearing system that has no parts that thread into the frame.
Part description
Campagnolo
Kit
407383
Drive side parts
Instead, the bearings are a slip-fit into the frame. However, the Campagnolo UltraTorque
system requires you to attach bearing supports (seal seats) to the bottom bracket shell
of the Cronus (Figure 38). This section explains how to do that.
The seal seats might fit into the frame tightly. In this case, you might need to tap the
cups with a soft-faced mallet. However, do not use a hammer or bearing press to install
clean and free of debris.
Tools and materials required
To complete the installation, you will also need the Campagnolo instructions, available at:
http://www.campagnolo.com/pdf/7225306_Ultra_torque_05_07.pdf.
Also read the warning: http://www.campagnolo.com/pdf/7225365_warning_Ultra_
Torque_0607.pdf
+ Crankset and bottom bracket (bearings come pressed onto the axle halves)
+ Plastic crank arm installation tool
+ LocTite® 638 retaining compound, TCG 408082
+ LocTite® primer 7649, TCG 408083
+ 5 mm Allen Wrench
+ Rock “N” Roll Super Coat grease
+ Bottom bracket parts
Wave washer
Figure 38. Campagnolo bearing set
20 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Washer
Seal seat
Washer
Campy part
Seal seat
281825
Washer
281826
Non-drive side
parts
the bearings into the frame. If the bearing fit is too tight, make sure the seal seats are
Bearing
Bearing
Bearing
Bearing
Campy part
Seal seat
281825
Wave
washer
281827
Washer
281826
To install the seal seats
1. Clean all surfaces to be bonded (bottom bracket shell, seal seats) with alcohol wipes or similar (Figure 39).
2. Apply a thin film of LocTite Primer to the outer step of the bearings cups and the
outer shoulder of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 40). Allow the primer to evaporate
completely.
3. Apply LocTite 638 to the faced of the seal seat that contacts the bottom bracket shell.
4. Press the seal seat into the frame (Figure 41). If needed, tap lightly with a soft-faced mallet.
+ Let the LocTite cure for at least 24 hours before inserting the bearings.
Figure 39. Cleaning bonding surfaces with an alcohol wipe
Figure 40. Applying LocTite primer to the outer step of the
bearing cups
Figure 41. Inserting the bearing cups into the bottom
bracket shell
To install the non-drive side bearings
The non-drive side bearings are part of the crankarm.
1. Insert a washer into the non-drive side seal seat.
2. Apply a liberal coat of grease to the contact surfaces of the bearing (Figure 42) and
the non-drive side seal seat (Figure 43).
Continued
Figure 42. Greasing the bearings
21 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
3. Insert the Wave washer into the non-drive side seal seat (Figure 44).
4. Slide the non-drive side axle through the seal seat and bottom bracket shell (Figure 45).
To install the drive side bearings
The drive-side bearings are attached to the crankarm.
1. Insert a washer into the drive side seal seat.
2. Apply a liberal coat of grease to the contact surfaces of the bearing (Figure 42) and the drive side seal seat (Figure 43).
3. Slide the drive side axle through the seal seat and bottom bracket shell.
Figure 43. Greasing the bearing cups
4. Line up the splines of the bottom bracket axle and press the axle together. If
necessary, tap the ends together with the heel of your palms.
5. Insert the crank bolt from the drive side (Figure 46) and tighten to 380 Lb•In (43 N•m).
6. Follow the steps in “Inspecting the bottom bracket.”
To remove the bottom bracket bearings
With the Campagnolo system, each of the two bearings are pressed onto one of the
halves of the bottom bracket axle. To remove the bearings, follow the Campagnolo
service instructions.
Figure 44. Inserting the Wave washer (after the washer)
on the non-drive side
Inspecting the bottom bracket
Every 3 months check the bottom bracket adjustment.
To check the bottom bracket bearing adjustment
1. Lift the chain from the chainrings.
2. Rotate the crank so that one of the arms is parallel to the seat tube.
3. Put one hand on the crank arm and one hand on the seat tube, and attempt to Figure 45. Inserting the non-drive side axle
move the crank arm laterally toward and away from the seat tube.
4. Spin the cranks.
If the crank feels or sounds loose, or if the motion stops abruptly or you hear a
grinding noise coming from the bearings, readjust the bearings or take the bike to your Gary Fisher dealer.
Figure 46. Tightening the axle bolt
22 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
FSA MegaExo AL
These instructions and parts are for the aluminum FSA cranks only. The current “B” kit will not work for FSA carbon cranks.
The Cronus uses a special bearing system that has no parts that thread into the frame.
Instead, the bearings are a slip-fit into the frame (Figure 47). This section explains how to install the bearings and crankset.
Part description
FSA
BB90 bearing kit “B”
293227
Drive side parts
Bearing
300162
Seal
294668
Non-drive side
parts
The bearings might fit into the frame tightly. In this case, you might need to tap them
Bearing
300162
with a soft-faced mallet. However, do not use a hammer or bearing press to install the
Seal
294668
bearings into the frame. If the bearing fit is too tight, make sure the bearings are clean
and free of debris.
Tools and materials required
To complete the installation, you will also need the FSA instructions, available at:
http://www.road.fullspeedahead.com/downloadfly.aspx?download=downloads/
Install_MegaExoAlloy.pdf.
+ Crankset and bearings (bearing shields come pressed onto the bearings)
+ 5 mm Allen Wrench
+ Rock “N” Roll Super Coat grease
+ Bottom bracket parts
Bearing with shield pressed on
Bearing with shield pressed on
Figure 47. FSA bearing set
23 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
To install the bearings
1. Apply a liberal coat of grease to the contact surfaces of one bearing and the drive side of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 48).
2. With the plastic bearing shield facing out, press one bearing into the drive side of the bottom bracket shell (Figure 49).
3. Repeat Steps 1-2 for the other bearing on the non-drive side.
To install the drive-side crankarm
1. Apply a light coat of grease to the axle surface where the bearings will be in contact
Figure 48. Greasing the bearing and the frame saddle
(Figure 50).
+ T
he grease areas should be about 1 inch (25 mm) wide. On the drive side, start at the bearing
seal. On the non-drive side, start at the splines and apply toward the drive side of the axle
2. Insert the axle through the drive-side bearing in the bottom bracket (Figure 51).
Figure 49. Pressing the bearing into the frame with the
shield on the outside
Figure 50. Greasing the axle
Figure 51. Sliding the axle through the bearings
24 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
To install the non-drive side crankarm
1. Align the non-drive crank arm with the groove on the axle and slide the crank onto the axle.
+ The non-drive crank arm should point 180 degrees opposite of the drive-side crank arm.
2. Install the FSA crank bolt and tighten to their torque specifications (Figure 52).
3. Follow the FSA instructions to complete the installation.
4. Follow the steps in “Inspecting the bottom bracket.”
To remove the bottom bracket bearings
The Cronus bottom bracket bearing system is designed to be a slip fit. However, after the first installation some bearings might be tight. If the bearings do not easily come out by hand, you may use the following method to remove them.
1. Slide the crank axle into the bearing so that the bearing is over the non-drive side of the axle, about 1 inch (25 mm) from the non-drive end.
2. Gently rock the axle while you pull the axle out.
Inspecting the bottom bracket
Every 3 months check the bottom bracket adjustment.
To check the bottom bracket bearing adjustment
1. Lift the chain from the chainrings.
2. Rotate the crank so that one of the arms is parallel to the seat tube.
3. Put one hand on the crank arm and one hand on the seat tube, and attempt to move the crank arm laterally toward and away from the seat tube.
4. Spin the cranks.
If the crank feels or sounds loose, or if the motion stops abruptly or you hear a
grinding noise coming from the bearings, readjust the bearings or take the bike to your Gary Fisher dealer.
25 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Figure 52. Pressing the crank arm onto the axle
Cronus Crankset
Troubleshooting
This section describes problems that occasionally occur, and possible solutions. If these
solutions do not solve a problem, contact Customer Service.
Bearing play in a GXP crank or
bottom bracket assembly
The crank feels loose when grasped at the pedal end and rocked side-to-side.
Cause
Solution
Wave washer not
compressed fully
First, verify that the crank has been tightened to 420-480
Lb•In (50-57 Nm). Most issues with play in GXP crankarms
are resolved when the arms are properly tightened.
If this does not solve the issue, add a 0.5mm washer/
spacer (PN 294162) between the wave washer and seal
(Figure 53) to increase the bearing preload.
This is usually caused by
insufficient torque on
the non-drive crank arm.
In rare instances a
tolerance stack can
be created by the five
critical parts: non-drive
bearing, drive bearing,
drive-side seal, bottom
bracket shell, and axle
length.
Spline of GXP
crankarm is
undersized
+ We have seen some
variation in the
tolerance of GXP
crankarms.
+ If the installation
torque is not
sufficient, the crank
arm will not completely
compress the shield
and bearing race.
26 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Spacer
Wave washer
Seal
Figure 53. SRAM bearing set
Remove the crankarm and re-install with plenty of grease.
Verify that the crank has been tightened to 420-480
Lb•In (50-57 Nm).
Re-check the bearings after installation. The GXP
axle spline is tapered, so it requires that the crank be
completely tightened to seat on the axle.
Bearing
Crank is rubbing or there is excessive drag
If you notice that the crank arms rotate poorly, there are several possible issues.
Cause
Solution
Out of spec or bent non-drive
metal seal
Install a new metal seal (same Part
Number: 282865). We have revised the
metal seal by adding a ring of material,
0.3mm thick, to the seal around the inner
diameter. This will move the outer edge
of the seal away from the bearing.
+ T he inside chamfer of the metal seal
(Figure 54) rubs on the outer race
of the bearing.
Metal seal
Figure 54. SRAM bearing set
+ The metal seal deforms under the
compressive load of the non-drive
arm and rubs on the outer race of
the bearing.
Bearing not seated properly
+ A tight bore can cause the installer
to think the bearing is seated when
it is not.
When properly installed the bearing will
not sit even with bottom bracket shell.
+ Enduro bearing: 0.75mm inside the shell.
+ GXP non-drive bearing: 0.25mm outside
the shell
GXP triple crankset can’t be
properly preloaded
Although some cranksets change the arm configuration to add clearance for a third
Spacer
chainring, the GXP crankset uses a longer axle. Without additional spacers, a longer axle
will not compress the bearing..
Cause
Solution
Different axle lengths require
different spacers
Install a 5mm thick spacer (Part Number
291276) between the wave washer and
the red bearing seal (Figure 55).
Triple GXP crank axles are 5mm longer
than doubles.
27 | GARY FISHER SERVICE INFORMATION
Seal
Wave washer
Figure 55. SRAM bearing set
Bearing
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