optodisplay user`s guide
OPTODISPLAY
USER’S GUIDE
FORM 723-060620—JUNE, 2006
43044 Business Park Drive • Temecula • CA 92590-3614
Phone: 800-321-OPTO (6786) or 951-695-3000
Fax: 800-832-OPTO (6786) or 951-695-2712
www.opto22.com
Product Support Services
800-TEK-OPTO (835-6786) or 951-695-3080
Fax: 951-695-3017
Email: support@opto22.com
Web: support.opto22.com
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Form 723-060620—June, 2006
Copyright © 1998–2005 Opto 22.
All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America.
The information in this manual has been checked carefully and is believed to be accurate; however, Opto 22
assumes no responsibility for possible inaccuracies or omissions. Specifications are subject to change without
notice.
Opto 22 warrants all of its products to be free from defects in material or workmanship for 30 months from the
manufacturing date code. This warranty is limited to the original cost of the unit only and does not cover installation,
labor, or any other contingent costs. Opto 22 I/O modules and solid-state relays with date codes of 1/96 or later are
guaranteed for life. This lifetime warranty excludes reed relay, SNAP serial communication modules, SNAP PID
modules, and modules that contain mechanical contacts or switches. Opto 22 does not warrant any product,
components, or parts not manufactured by Opto 22; for these items, the warranty from the original manufacturer
applies. These products include, but are not limited to, OptoTerminal-G70, OptoTerminal-G75, and Sony Ericsson
GT-48; see the product data sheet for specific warranty information. Refer to Opto 22 form number 1042 for
complete warranty information.
Cyrano, Opto 22 FactoryFloor, Optomux, and Pamux are registered trademarks of Opto 22. Generation 4, ioControl,
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All other brand or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies or
organizations.
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Table of Contents
Welcome to OptoDisplay ..................................................................... Intro-i
About This Guide..............................................................................................................Intro-i
Document Conventions ............................................................................................Intro-ii
Other FactoryFloor Resources ........................................................................................Intro-iii
Documents and Online Help....................................................................................Intro-iii
Product Support.......................................................................................................Intro-iii
Installing OptoDisplay ....................................................................................................Intro-iv
System Requirements .............................................................................................Intro-iv
Installation Requirements ................................................................................Intro-iv
Additional Hardware Requirements.........................................................................Intro-v
Multiple Video Cards.........................................................................................Intro-v
Controller and I/O Hardware.............................................................................Intro-v
Firmware Requirements ..........................................................................................Intro-vi
Chapter 1: Quick Start............................................................................... 1-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 1-1
Opening the Project.............................................................................................................. 1-1
Saving the Project ................................................................................................................ 1-3
Examining the Project........................................................................................................... 1-5
Configuring a Controller ....................................................................................................... 1-6
Adding a Dynamic Attribute............................................................................................... 1-13
Adding a Graphic................................................................................................................ 1-17
Downloading to the Controller........................................................................................... 1-23
Running the Project ............................................................................................................ 1-25
Adding More Graphics ....................................................................................................... 1-27
Fine-Tuning the Visuals............................................................................................... 1-30
What’s Next?...................................................................................................................... 1-30
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Chapter 2: What Is OptoDisplay? ..............................................................2-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 2-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 2-1
About OptoDisplay ............................................................................................................... 2-1
Configurator and Runtime Applications........................................................................ 2-1
OptoDisplay Terminology .............................................................................................. 2-2
Planning a Project................................................................................................................. 2-3
Project Design ............................................................................................................... 2-3
Project and Operator Interface Security........................................................................ 2-4
Window Design............................................................................................................. 2-4
Using Multiple Monitors ............................................................................................... 2-5
OptoDisplay Windows.......................................................................................................... 2-5
OptoDisplay Configurator Main Window...................................................................... 2-6
Hiding the Menu Bar .............................................................................................. 2-6
Toolbox .......................................................................................................................... 2-7
Tool Definitions ...................................................................................................... 2-7
Toolbox Coordinates and Object Dimensions ........................................................ 2-8
Configurator Draw Windows ........................................................................................ 2-8
Redrawing an Active Draw Window...................................................................... 2-8
OptoDisplay Runtime Main Window ............................................................................ 2-9
Changing How the Main Window Appears in Runtime......................................... 2-9
Hiding the Menu Bar .............................................................................................. 2-9
Runtime Project Windows........................................................................................... 2-10
Configuring How Draw Windows Appear in Runtime ......................................... 2-10
Runtime Event Log Viewer .......................................................................................... 2-11
Chapter 3: Working with Projects.............................................................3-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 3-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 3-1
How Projects Are Organized ................................................................................................ 3-1
Creating a Project ................................................................................................................. 3-2
Extending a Project Across Multiple Monitors ............................................................. 3-3
Protecting a Project with a Password .................................................................................. 3-3
Opening a Project ................................................................................................................. 3-3
Saving a Project.................................................................................................................... 3-4
Save Project...................................................................................................................3-4
Save Project As ............................................................................................................. 3-4
Save Project and Load Runtime ....................................................................................3-5
Saving Versions of a Project ......................................................................................... 3-5
Closing a Project................................................................................................................... 3-5
Customizing a Project ........................................................................................................... 3-6
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Modifying Default Project Properties............................................................................ 3-6
Creating an MS-DOS Batch File.................................................................................... 3-7
Batch File Example ................................................................................................. 3-8
Chapter 4: Configuring Controllers & Tags ............................................ 4-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 4-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 4-1
Configuring Controllers ........................................................................................................ 4-1
Adding a Backup Controller........................................................................................... 4-4
Configuring Tags .................................................................................................................. 4-5
Searching for Tags in an OptoDisplay Project .............................................................. 4-7
Finding and Replacing Tags in an OptoDisplay Project ................................................ 4-8
Optimizing Controller Communications................................................................................ 4-9
Polling and Time-Out Errors .......................................................................................... 4-9
Time-Out and Retries Parameters................................................................................. 4-9
Re-Enable Period ......................................................................................................... 4-10
Choosing a Re-Enable Time ................................................................................. 4-10
Refresh Times and Freshness Values ......................................................................... 4-10
Correcting Tags from a Strategy ........................................................................................ 4-10
When To Use AutoCorrect Tags.................................................................................. 4-11
Using AutoCorrect Tags .............................................................................................. 4-11
Chapter 5: Working with Graphics........................................................... 5-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 5-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 5-1
Using Draw Windows .......................................................................................................... 5-1
Creating and Deleting Draw Windows ......................................................................... 5-2
Making a New Draw Window ............................................................................... 5-2
Copying an Existing Draw Window........................................................................ 5-2
Deleting an Existing Draw Window....................................................................... 5-2
Modifying Draw Windows ............................................................................................ 5-2
Opening and Closing Draw Windows ........................................................................... 5-4
Working with Multiple Windows........................................................................... 5-5
Drawing Graphic Objects ..................................................................................................... 5-5
Using Key Combinations ............................................................................................... 5-6
Selecting Graphic Objects.................................................................................................... 5-8
Selecting One Object..................................................................................................... 5-8
Handles and Selection Marks ....................................................................................... 5-9
Selecting Several Objects ............................................................................................. 5-9
Selecting All Objects................................................................................................... 5-10
Deselecting One or More Objects............................................................................... 5-10
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Grouping and Locking Graphics.......................................................................................... 5-10
Grouping Objects......................................................................................................... 5-11
Ungrouping Objects..................................................................................................... 5-11
Locking Objects in a Draw Window............................................................................ 5-11
Changing Lines and Fills..................................................................................................... 5-11
Applying or Changing Line Attributes ......................................................................... 5-11
Applying or Changing Fill Attributes ........................................................................... 5-12
Importing Graphics .............................................................................................................5-13
Importing a Bitmap Graphic ........................................................................................ 5-13
Importing a Metafile or JPEG Graphic ........................................................................ 5-14
Importing a Graphic from the Symbol Factory ............................................................ 5-14
Bitmap Graphics in Symbol Factory ..................................................................... 5-14
Saving Objects as Bitmaps................................................................................................. 5-15
Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting ..................................................................................... 5-15
Copying and Pasting an Object ................................................................................... 5-15
Duplicating an Object.................................................................................................. 5-16
Moving and Resizing Graphics ........................................................................................... 5-16
Moving Graphics ......................................................................................................... 5-16
Resizing Graphics ........................................................................................................ 5-17
Resizing Multiple Graphics to Equal Dimensions ................................................ 5-17
Reshaping Graphics..................................................................................................... 5-18
Changing Stacking Order.................................................................................................... 5-18
Deleting Objects ................................................................................................................. 5-19
Aligning Graphics ............................................................................................................... 5-19
Rotating and Flipping Graphics .......................................................................................... 5-20
Working with Text ..............................................................................................................5-21
Adding Text ................................................................................................................. 5-21
Editing Text.................................................................................................................. 5-21
Formatting Text ........................................................................................................... 5-21
Working with Numeric Tables ........................................................................................... 5-22
Creating a Numeric Table ........................................................................................... 5-22
Configuring a Numeric Table ...................................................................................... 5-23
Printing Graphics ................................................................................................................ 5-24
Chapter 6: Using Animated Graphics........................................................6-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 6-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 6-1
About Animated Graphics .................................................................................................... 6-1
Adding Dynamic Attributes to Graphics............................................................................... 6-2
Assigning a Dynamic Attribute ..................................................................................... 6-2
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Assigning Multiple Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic ................................................... 6-3
Security Settings for Graphics and Dynamic Attributes ............................................... 6-4
Important Considerations for User- and Group-Level Security Settings ............... 6-4
Configuring Security Permissions for a Graphic Object......................................... 6-4
Available Dynamic Attributes ....................................................................................... 6-6
Alarm Point............................................................................................................. 6-6
Controller Status .................................................................................................... 6-7
Display Controller Status ....................................................................................... 6-8
Download Recipe ................................................................................................... 6-9
Execute Menu Item ................................................................................................ 6-9
Fill Color................................................................................................................ 6-10
Horizontal Position ............................................................................................... 6-12
Horizontal Size (Width)......................................................................................... 6-13
Horizontal Slider................................................................................................... 6-14
Launch Application............................................................................................... 6-15
Line Color.............................................................................................................. 6-16
Rotate ................................................................................................................... 6-17
Send Discrete ....................................................................................................... 6-18
Send String........................................................................................................... 6-19
Send Value ........................................................................................................... 6-20
Text Color ............................................................................................................. 6-21
Text In (from Controller) ....................................................................................... 6-22
Upload Recipe ...................................................................................................... 6-24
Vertical Position ................................................................................................... 6-25
Vertical Size (Height)............................................................................................ 6-26
Vertical Slider....................................................................................................... 6-27
Visibility/Blink ...................................................................................................... 6-28
Windows .............................................................................................................. 6-29
Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes......................................................................... 6-31
Copying Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic................................................................... 6-31
Pasting Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic.................................................................... 6-31
Deleting Dynamic Attributes from a Graphic.............................................................. 6-31
Viewing Dynamic Attributes .............................................................................................. 6-32
Dynamic Attributes for Individual Objects .................................................................. 6-32
Viewing Tags for One or More Objects....................................................................... 6-32
Dynamic Attributes for All Objects ............................................................................. 6-32
Using the TagInfoView Utility Program................................................................ 6-33
Scanning to Update Graphics............................................................................................. 6-34
How Window States Affect Scanning ........................................................................ 6-34
Scan Groups ................................................................................................................ 6-35
Refresh Time Groups................................................................................................... 6-35
Freshness Values and How They Affect Scanning ..................................................... 6-36
Configuring Scan Rates and Freshness Values........................................................... 6-36
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Chapter 7: Working with Trends ...............................................................7-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 7-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 7-1
About Trends ........................................................................................................................ 7-1
Types of Trends ............................................................................................................. 7-2
Working With Basic Trends ................................................................................................. 7-2
Creating a Basic Trend .................................................................................................. 7-2
Modifying a Basic Trend ............................................................................................... 7-3
Configuring Basic Trend Pens ....................................................................................... 7-5
Optimizing Pen Settings ................................................................................................ 7-6
Working with SuperTrends .................................................................................................. 7-6
Creating a SuperTrend .................................................................................................. 7-6
Modifying a SuperTrend................................................................................................ 7-7
Configuring X-Axis Parameters ..................................................................................... 7-9
Configuring Y-Axis Parameters ................................................................................... 7-10
Configuring Zoom Parameters..................................................................................... 7-10
Configuring Hot Keys................................................................................................... 7-11
Configuring SuperTrend Pens...................................................................................... 7-13
Memory Requirements for SuperTrend Pens....................................................... 7-13
Setting an Individual Pen ..................................................................................... 7-14
Using SuperTrend Log Files................................................................................................ 7-15
Configuring SuperTrend Logging................................................................................. 7-15
What Is Remote SuperTrend Logging? ................................................................ 7-15
Choosing a Computer to Save SuperTrend Log Files.................................................. 7-16
Remote SuperTrend Logging Example ................................................................. 7-16
Choosing a Location for SuperTrend Log Files............................................................ 7-17
Saving a Log in Text or Binary Format ........................................................................ 7-19
Changing Log File Formats .......................................................................................... 7-19
Viewing Binary Log Files ............................................................................................. 7-20
Important Guidelines for Using This Utility.......................................................... 7-20
Converting a SuperTrend Log File for Viewing .................................................... 7-21
Using XY Plots .................................................................................................................... 7-21
Creating an XY Plot ..................................................................................................... 7-21
Modifying an XY Plot................................................................................................... 7-22
Configuring Individual Plots in an Object.................................................................... 7-23
Chapter 8: Configuring Trigger-Based Events.........................................8-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 8-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 8-1
What’s a Trigger-Based Event?............................................................................................ 8-1
Historic Data Logs ................................................................................................................ 8-2
Tag Types You Can Save to a Historic Log ................................................................... 8-2
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Configuring a Historic Data Log .................................................................................... 8-2
Defining the Historic Data Log File ........................................................................ 8-4
Configuring a Historic Log Point............................................................................. 8-7
Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger........................................................................ 8-7
Notification When a Trigger Has Stopped............................................................. 8-8
Setting Log File Line Format................................................................................... 8-9
About Data Log File Names and Formats ..................................................................... 8-9
Naming Log Files.................................................................................................... 8-9
Naming Files Using Rollover ................................................................................ 8-10
Data Log Elements ............................................................................................... 8-10
Launching Applications ...................................................................................................... 8-11
Configuring an Application Launch ............................................................................. 8-11
Selecting a Working Directory for a Launched Application................................. 8-13
Selecting the Application File to Run................................................................... 8-14
Selecting a Trigger to Launch an Application...................................................... 8-14
Notification When an Application Has Been Launched ...................................... 8-15
Sounds................................................................................................................................ 8-15
Configuring a Sound.................................................................................................... 8-15
Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds......................................................... 8-16
Window States................................................................................................................... 8-17
Configuring Trigger-Based Window States ................................................................ 8-17
Recipes ............................................................................................................................... 8-19
Basic Recipe File Format ............................................................................................. 8-19
Recipe Download File.................................................................................................. 8-20
Recipe Upload File....................................................................................................... 8-22
Re-using a Destination File .................................................................................. 8-23
Activating Recipe Downloads and Uploads................................................................ 8-23
Configuring a Recipe Download.................................................................................. 8-23
Configuring a Recipe Upload....................................................................................... 8-25
Selecting a Download/Upload Recipe File Directory........................................... 8-26
Selecting a Trigger to Start the Recipe Upload/Download ................................. 8-27
Notification When Recipe Has Been Downloaded/Uploaded............................. 8-27
Alarming ............................................................................................................................. 8-28
Configuring Alarm Points ............................................................................................ 8-28
Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications.......................................... 8-31
Setting Conditional Alarm Points......................................................................... 8-32
Entering Discrete Alarm Conditions..................................................................... 8-34
Entering Alarm Values.......................................................................................... 8-35
Setting Controller Status Alarm Points................................................................ 8-36
Adding Alarm Graphics ............................................................................................... 8-37
Setting the Alarm Format..................................................................................... 8-39
Assigning Alarm Hot Keys.................................................................................... 8-40
Configuring Project Alarms ......................................................................................... 8-41
Alarm Runtime and User Options......................................................................... 8-41
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Alarm Logging Options......................................................................................... 8-42
Alarm Sound Options ........................................................................................... 8-45
Chapter 9: Using OptoDisplay Runtime....................................................9-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 9-1
In This Chapter .............................................................................................................. 9-1
Runtime Versions ................................................................................................................. 9-1
Using Monitor-Only Runtime and Configurator ............................................................ 9-2
Setting up Runtime............................................................................................................... 9-2
General Settings............................................................................................................ 9-3
Setting Up the Initial State of Windows................................................................ 9-3
Setting Date Format ............................................................................................... 9-4
Setting Up the Main Window ................................................................................ 9-4
Configuring On-Screen Keyboard........................................................................... 9-4
Setting Up Startup Events......................................................................................9-5
Setting Up Runtime Exit ......................................................................................... 9-6
Controller Settings ........................................................................................................ 9-6
Changing Global Controller Color Options ............................................................. 9-7
Synchronizing Controller Clocks with a PC ............................................................ 9-7
Changing Colors to Indicate a Null Pointer Variable ............................................. 9-7
Security Settings ........................................................................................................... 9-8
Restricting the Operator......................................................................................... 9-8
Enabling the Event Log Viewer .............................................................................. 9-9
Logging Operator Actions....................................................................................... 9-9
Encrypting and Decrypting the Operator Action Log File............................................ 9-10
Configuring the Event Log File ....................................................................................9-11
Using Runtime .................................................................................................................... 9-13
Opening a Project ........................................................................................................ 9-13
Using the Event Log Viewer ........................................................................................ 9-14
Working with Controllers ............................................................................................ 9-14
Switching between Controllers............................................................................ 9-14
Checking Controller Status................................................................................... 9-16
Viewing Error Messages ...................................................................................... 9-18
Viewing Average Scan Time ................................................................................ 9-18
Working with Alarms .................................................................................................. 9-19
Modifying Alarm Points........................................................................................ 9-20
Using SuperTrends in Runtime....................................................................................9-21
Switching between Historical and Real-Time Modes ......................................... 9-22
Using XY Plots in Runtime........................................................................................... 9-22
Appendix A: OptoDisplay Troubleshooting ............................................ A-1
In This Section.............................................................................................................. A-1
How to Begin Troubleshooting............................................................................................ A-1
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1. Read any Error Messages .........................................................................................A-2
2. Check Communication with the Controller ...............................................................A-2
3. Review Other Sections in this Appendix...................................................................A-3
4. Call Product Support..................................................................................................A-3
Problems Displaying a Project..............................................................................................A-3
Changing Monitor Color Depth .....................................................................................A-3
Problems Saving a Project....................................................................................................A-4
Making an Empty String Visible...........................................................................................A-4
User Permissions in Microsoft Windows.............................................................................A-5
Other Troubleshooting Tools................................................................................................A-6
Checking File Versions for FactoryFloor ........................................................................A-6
Generate Scanner Information Files (SIFs)....................................................................A-7
Appendix B: OptoDisplay Errors .............................................................. B-1
In This Section...............................................................................................................B-1
Types of Errors......................................................................................................................B-1
Error Messages in OptoDisplay Runtime .............................................................................B-2
Controller Errors ............................................................................................................B-2
Communication Data Server Errors...............................................................................B-6
Ethernet Errors...............................................................................................................B-7
File Access Errors ..........................................................................................................B-8
Historic Log Errors .........................................................................................................B-9
Launch Application Errors .............................................................................................B-9
Port Errors......................................................................................................................B-9
Recipe Upload/Download Errors.................................................................................B-12
Scanner Errors .............................................................................................................B-13
Server Messages/Errors..............................................................................................B-14
System Errors ..............................................................................................................B-17
Appendix C: OptoDisplay Files ................................................................. C-1
Appendix D: OptoDisplay Menu Reference ............................................ D-1
In This Section...............................................................................................................D-1
OptoDisplay Configurator Menus.........................................................................................D-1
File Menu.......................................................................................................................D-1
Edit Menu ......................................................................................................................D-3
View Menu ..................................................................................................................D-10
Style Menu ..................................................................................................................D-10
Text Menu ...................................................................................................................D-12
Configure Menu...........................................................................................................D-14
Tools Menu..................................................................................................................D-15
Window Menu.............................................................................................................D-16
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Help Menu .................................................................................................................. D-16
OptoDisplay Runtime Menus ............................................................................................ D-17
File Menu.................................................................................................................... D-17
View Menu ................................................................................................................. D-17
Alarm Menu................................................................................................................ D-17
Window Menu............................................................................................................ D-18
Help Menu .................................................................................................................. D-18
OptoDisplay Index ............................................................................... Index-1
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Welcome to OptoDisplay
Welcome to OptoDisplay™, Opto 22’s human-machine interface (HMI), alarming, and trending
software for Microsoft® Windows® 2000® and Windows XP operating systems. OptoDisplay is
a part of the Opto 22 FactoryFloor® suite of products.
OptoDisplay lets you easily create graphical, on-screen operator interfaces to monitor and
manage control applications running on Opto 22 industrial controllers. With OptoDisplay, you can
present real-time controller information to the operator, set alarms to notify the operator of
changing data, and visually track trends in the data using graphs. Additionally, you can configure
the interface to allow the operator to change values such as alarm thresholds.
About This Guide
This user’s guide teaches you how to use OptoDisplay, including how to design an OptoDisplay
project, configure and connect a controller, and monitor information in your operator interface.
This guide assumes that you are already familiar with Microsoft Windows on your personal
computer, including how to use a mouse, standard menus and commands, and how to open,
save, and close files. If you are not familiar with Windows or your PC, see the documentation
from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
Here’s what is in this user’s guide:
Chapter 1: Quick Start—A short lesson to get you up and running with an OptoDisplay project
as quickly as possible. You’ll use a sample project to learn how to work with graphics, assign
dynamic attributes, and run a project.
Chapter 2: What Is OptoDisplay?—An introduction to OptoDisplay, basic design and
programming concepts, and OptoDisplay controls and windows.
Chapter 3: Working with Projects—An explanation of what OptoDisplay projects are, the
files they’re made of, and how they’re organized.
Chapter 4: Configuring Controllers & Tags—Detailed procedures on configuring controllers
and I/O from an OptoControl strategy for use in an OptoDisplay project.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
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Chapter 5: Working with Graphics—Detailed steps for working with graphics—including
assigning animation attributes—and the windows in which graphics appear.
Chapter 6: Using Animated Graphics—Covers how to assign dynamic attributes to on-screen
objects to create an animated, real-time display of I/O information.
Chapter 7: Working with Trends—Explains how to create and configure graphs to track data
from I/O points over time.
Chapter 8: Configuring Trigger-Based Events—Explains how to use historical logging,
application launching, sounds, recipes, and how to change window states based on events.
Chapter 9: Using OptoDisplay Runtime—Describes how to customize configurable Runtime
features and what you’ll see during a Runtime project session.
Appendix A: OptoDisplay Troubleshooting—Gives tips for solving problems you may
encounter while building and using your OptoDisplay project.
Appendix B: OptoDisplay Errors—Explains warnings and error messages you may see while
running a program in OptoDisplay Runtime.
Appendix C: OptoDisplay Files—Lists all OptoDisplay files located in the OptoDisplay
directory.
Appendix D: OptoDisplay Menu Reference—Lists all commands and other options available
from the menu bar.
OptoDisplay Index—Provides an alphabetical list of key words and the pages on which they
are located.
Also included is a master FactoryFloor Glossary, which defines terms used in the FactoryFloor
suite of products, located at the back of the OptoServer User’s Guide binder.
Document Conventions
The following conventions are used in this document:
• Italic typeface indicates emphasis and is used for book titles. (Example: “See the
OptoDisplay User’s Guide for details.”)
• Names of menus, commands, dialog boxes, fields, and buttons are capitalized as they
appear in the product. (Example: “From the File menu, select Print.”)
• File names appear either in all capital letters or in mixed case, depending on the file name
itself. (Example: “Open the file TEST1.txt.”)
• Key names appear in small capital letters. (Example: “Press SHIFT.”)
• Key press combinations are indicated by plus signs between two or more key names. For
example, SHIFT+F1 is the result of holding down the shift key, then pressing and releasing
the F1 key. Similarly, CTRL+ALT+DELETE is the result of pressing and holding the CTRL and ALT
keys, then pressing and releasing the DELETE key.
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
• “Click” means press and release the left mouse button on the referenced item.
“Right-click” means press and release the right mouse button on the item.
• Menu commands are referred to with the Menu➞Command convention. For example,
“File➞Open Project” means to select the Open Project command from the File menu.
• Numbered lists indicate procedures to be followed sequentially. Bulleted lists (such as this
one) provide general information.
Other FactoryFloor Resources
Documents and Online Help
To help learn and use the FactoryFloor suite of products, the following resources are provided:
• Online Help is available in OptoControl, OptoDisplay, OptoServer, and most of the
OptoUtilities. To open online Help, choose Help➞Contents and Index in any screen.
• OptoControl User’s Guide, OptoDisplay User’s Guide, and OptoServer User’s Guide
give step-by-step instructions for using each of these products. The OptoServer User’s
Guide binder also contains a master FactoryFloor Glossary, which defines terms for all
FactoryFloor products.
Online versions (Adobe® Acrobat® format) of these and other FactoryFloor documents are
available from the Help menu in your FactoryFloor application. To view a document, select
Help➞Manuals, and then choose a document from the submenu.
• OptoControl Command Reference contains detailed information about each command
(instruction) available in OptoControl.
• Two quick reference cards, OptoControl Commands and Beginner’s Guide to
OptoControl Commands, are located in the front pocket of the OptoControl Command
Reference.
• FactoryFloor resources are also available on the Opto 22 Web site at
factoryfloor.opto22.com. You can conveniently access this and other sections of the
Opto 22 Web site using the Help menu in your FactoryFloor application. Select
Help➞Opto 22 on the Web, and then select an online resource from the submenu.
Product Support
If you have any questions about FactoryFloor, you can call, fax, or e-mail Opto 22 Product Support.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
iii
Phone:
800-TEK-OPTO (835-6786)
951-695-3080
(Hours are Monday through Friday,
7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific Time)
Fax:
951-695-3017
Email:
support@opto22.com
Opto 22 website:
www.opto22.com
NOTE: Email messages
and phone calls to
Opto 22 Product Support
are grouped together
and answered in the
order received.
When calling for technical support, be prepared to provide the following information about your
system to the Product Support engineer:
•
•
•
•
Software and version being used
Controller firmware version
PC configuration (type of processor, speed, memory, operating system)
A complete description of your hardware and operating systems, including:
– jumper configuration
– accessories installed (such as expansion daughter cards)
– type of power supply
– types of I/O units installed
– third-party devices installed (e.g., barcode readers)
• Specific error messages seen.
Installing OptoDisplay
OptoDisplay installation is easy and quick. Insert the FactoryFloor CD in your CD-ROM drive, and
the installation wizard should appear. If the wizard does not appear, start Windows Explorer and
navigate to your CD-ROM drive. Double-click Setup.exe to begin installation.
If you have trouble installing OptoDisplay or need 3.5-inch disks rather than a CD, contact
Opto 22 Product Support at 800/835-6786 or 951/695-3080.
System Requirements
Installation Requirements
Here’s what you need to install and run OptoDisplay:
• A computer with at least the minimum processor required for your version of Microsoft®
Windows® (1 GHz Pentium®-class or better recommended). Additional computer
requirements include:
iv
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
– Ethernet capability, if using an M4-series controller with M4SENET-100 Ethernet
adapter card.
– An RS-232 serial port and serial cable, for downloading firmware updates to a
controller.
• Microsoft Windows XP or Windows 2000® workstation operating system with the most
recent service packs.
•
•
•
•
•
At least 128 MB RAM (256 MB recommended)
At least 150 MB of available hard drive space
VGA or higher resolution monitor (Super VGA recommended)
Mouse or other pointing device
Installed Windows printer (optional).
IMPORTANT: If your OptoDisplay project uses many basic trends, SuperTrends, or XY Plots, we
strongly recommend adding RAM to your computer beyond the amount suggested here. See
“Memory Requirements for SuperTrend Pens” on page 7-13 for more information on memory
requirements.
Additional Hardware Requirements
Multiple Video Cards
If you plan to use multiple monitors for your operator interface, you can display the interface you
create in OptoDisplay on more than one monitor as long as all monitors use identical video cards.
Controller and I/O Hardware
OptoDisplay works with OptoControl strategies running on an Opto 22 controller. To download
and run OptoControl strategies, you’ll need the following hardware:
• Opto 22 controller
• Opto 22 SNAP brains, I/O units, bricks, or brain boards
• Opto 22 SNAP, G4, or G1 I/O modules.
To communicate with a controller, the following additional hardware is required:
• One of the following communication methods:
– Standard RS-232 serial port
– Ethernet card
– Contemporary Controls PCA66 series ARCNET card
– Contemporary Controls PCI20 ARCNET cards (PCI20-CXS, PCI20-FOG-ST, or PCI20-485)
– Opto 22’s AC24AT, AC37, or AC422AT adapter cards.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
v
• Serial cables or ARCNET coaxial cables and hubs, for multidrop connections from the PC to
the controllers. Opto 22 recommends the Contemporary Controls Mod Hub series of active
hubs. The appropriate expansion cards are:
– EXP-CXS Coax Star
– EXP-FOG-ST Fiber ARCNET
– EXP-485 Twisted pair ARCNET (DC coupled).
NOTE: If you are using a G4LC32ISA or G4LC32ISA-LT controller, you can communicate with it
through the ISA bus in your PC.
Firmware Requirements
Firmware is loaded on your controller so that you can download and run OptoControl strategies.
If your controller’s firmware is not at the required release number, you’ll receive an error
message. You can download firmware to your controller using the OptoTerm utility included with
FactoryFloor. See the Troubleshooting appendix of the OptoControl User’s Guide for instructions
on using this software to download firmware to a controller.
NOTE: If you have a non-flash controller, you need to contact Opto 22 Product Support for an
EEPROM upgrade.
vi
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 1
Chapter 1
Quick Start
Introduction
The quickest way to get familiar with OptoDisplay is by working through a simple example. Our
example will use a cookie factory to show you how easy it is to use OptoDisplay. You’ll learn how
to start OptoDisplay, open and save a project, and assign an OptoControl strategy to the project.
Then you’ll bring in a bitmap, add some animation attributes, and watch your project in action.
We’ll repeat this process to fine-tune the visuals and we’ll end up with a final “working” cookie
factory.
NOTE: If you can’t access a controller at the moment, you can still do everything in the Quick Start
up to the point of running your project.
In This Chapter
Opening the Project ................................ 1-1
Saving the Project .................................. 1-3
Examining the Project............................. 1-5
Configuring a Controller ......................... 1-6
Adding a Dynamic Attribute ................. 1-13
Adding a Graphic ......................................... 1-17
Downloading to the Controller .................... 1-23
Running the Project...................................... 1-25
Adding More Graphics................................. 1-27
What’s Next?................................................ 1-30
Opening the Project
Let’s start by opening our sample project. OptoDisplay projects contain windows, graphics, and
other information needed to produce an animated operator interface.
1. To start OptoDisplay, click the Windows Start button and select Programs➞Opto
22➞FactoryFloor 4.1➞OptoDisplay➞OptoDisplay Configurator.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-1
QUICK START
The OptoDisplay main window opens:
2. Select File➞Open Project to open the sample project.
3. In the Open Project dialog box, navigate to Opto 22\Shared.
NOTE: If your OptoDisplay directory does not contain a subdirectory named Shared, you may
not have installed your sample projects and strategies. Run the OptoDisplay installation
program again and select just the Example Files component of OptoDisplay. See “Installing
OptoDisplay” on page iv for specific installation instructions.
4. In the Shared directory, double-click the Cookies subdirectory, and then double-click the
Display subdirectory to reach the project file we will use.
5. Double-click the project file cfactory.mmi to open it.
6. Click the Maximize button
1-2 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
at the top of the window to maximize the window.
QUICK START
The main window should now look like the example shown below.
Saving the Project
Now let’s save the project. First we’ll save the project to its original name in case any changes
have been made, and then we’ll save the project to a new name.
To save the project to its original name, select File➞Save Project.
NOTE: If no changes have been made to the project since it was last saved, no messages appear
when this save occurs.
Saving the project to a new name allows us to make changes to the project while leaving the
original alone. To save the project to a new name, do the following:
1. Select File➞Save Project As.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-3
QUICK START
The Save As dialog box opens:
To easily organize the files that make up an OptoDisplay project, each project should be
located in its own directory. This means the new project shouldn’t simply be renamed and
saved in the current directory.
2. Click the Up One Level button
to move up to the Cookies folder.
3. Now click the Create New Folder button
.
A new folder appears in the list of folders and files.
4. Type the name “My Display” to replace “New Folder,” then press ENTER.
5. Double-click the folder to open it.
6. Now click once in the File name field, and type “cfactory” to name the project.
7. Click Save.
1-4 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The project is saved as “cfactory.mmi” in the My Display directory, and a Save As
Complete message box appears to let you know that any changes you make from now on
are made to the new file in the My Display directory.
8. To complete saving the project, use Windows Explorer to copy the bitmap file dough.bmp
from our original Display directory to the new project directory My Display that we created
earlier in step 3.
Examining the Project
This particular OptoDisplay project models a simple cookie factory that uses the following
components:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A tank of pre-mixed cookie dough
A tank of chocolate chips
An oven
A visual inspection station
Some plant air to blow out bad cookies
A conveyor belt to move material between the different components.
At the start of the process, a measured amount of dough is dropped onto the conveyor belt. The
dough moves first under the chip tank to receive some chips, and then into the oven to be baked.
The next stop is an inspection station, where rejected cookies are blown off the belt. The good
cookies go to shipping. Should anything go wrong, we also have some alarms built in to stop the
process when necessary.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-5
QUICK START
The window for the cookie factory project is shown below.
This window is called a draw window, because in OptoDisplay Configurator it’s where you can
create and position graphic objects and other elements for your operator interface. This is also
where you assign animation characteristics, or dynamic attributes, to graphic objects. Floating
on top of the window is a toolbox with all the tools you need to draw graphic objects.
The Cookie Factory window shows two tanks (one for the dough and one for the chips), a
conveyor, an oven and inspection station, a few valves, and a start button.
Configuring a Controller
We’ll start out by configuring a controller so that our graphics are tied to actual I/O points in an
OptoControl strategy. It’s okay if you don’t have the same I/O points as the ones configured in
the strategy; you’ll just need to configure your controller so that our example project will
recognize it. The OptoControl strategy we mentioned will be downloaded to your controller later
so we can actually see things running. We’ll briefly go through the configuration process, but this
process is covered in greater detail in Chapter 4, “Configuring Controllers & Tags.”
1. Choose the Configure➞Controller(s) command.
1-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The Controllers dialog box appears:
2. Click the Add button.
The Strategy File Name Selection dialog box appears. This dialog box is much like the Open
Project dialog box we used to find our cookie factory project.
3. Change directories to the C:\Opto22\Shared\Cookies\Control directory.
4. Select the cfactory.cdb file, and then click Open.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-7
QUICK START
The Controller Properties dialog box appears. Notice that the OptoControl strategy you just
picked is shown in the Strategy field.
5. To define your controller in the Primary Controller box, click the upper Browse button (in the
Primary Controller group).
The Select Controller dialog box opens:
6. Click Add to add a controller.
1-8 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The Select Connection Type dialog box appears. From this point in the setup you will need
to make choices and enter data based on the controller you wish to access.
7. Select the appropriate connection type for the type of controller connected to your PC:
• Direct, if the controller is connected directly to your computer
• Ethernet, if the controller is connected via Ethernet
• Server, if the controller is located on a network
For this example, we will use a direct connection to the controller. If your PC is not directly
connected to your controller, configure your controller as necessary to use one of the other
connection types. See Chapter 4 in the OptoControl User’s Guide for more information. You
can also just follow along with our example, but you will not be able to connect to
OptoDisplay Runtime if your hardware and settings differ.
8. Select Direct, and then click Next.
The Configure Direct Connection dialog box opens:
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-9
QUICK START
9. Enter the name “Cookie Controller” for the controller.
It’s usually a good idea to give the controller a descriptive name. Note that the controller
name can contain letters, numbers, and spaces only.
10. Enter the controller’s address.
You can read this from a display if your controller has one, or by examining its address
jumper configuration if it doesn’t.
11. Select a port on your computer through which OptoDisplay will communicate with the
controller.
If you have already used OptoControl or OptoTerm, you may already have the correct port
configured and listed in the Ports list. If this is the case, select this port, click Finish, and go
to step 17. You can also click on the port name and click on Modify to view or change its
configuration. See Chapter 4, “Configuring Controllers & Tags,” for more information on
how to do this.
12. Assuming you do not already have your port configured, click Add.
The Opto 22 Port Selection dialog box appears. In this dialog box, you will select the type of
port through which your PC communicates to your controller. For this example, we are
using the COM port, which is a serial connection.
13. Select COM Port, and then click Next.
1-10 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The Configure COM Port dialog box appears:
14. Enter a descriptive name for this port and enter other communication data as required for
your port type.
Due to the range of possible communication configurations, we can’t provide a universal
answer that covers what to put in these fields. Do make sure, however, that the values you
enter correspond to your actual communication configuration. Chapter 4, “Working with
Controllers,” in the OptoControl User’s Guide for more information on adding, modifying,
and deleting controllers. For this example, we use a value of 1 for the number of retries and
a time-out value of 1000.
15. Enter information in all available fields, and then click Finish when done.
16. Make sure the correct port is highlighted in the Configure Direct Connection dialog box,
and then click Finish.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-11
QUICK START
In the Select Controller dialog box that’s open, the newly configured controller appears in
the Configured Controllers list.
17. Select the new controller, and click OK.
The Controller Properties dialog box appears with the new controller listed in the Primary
Controller group.
18. Click OK.
1-12 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The Controllers dialog box appears with our new controller highlighted.
19. Click OK to finish configuring the controller.
Adding a Dynamic Attribute
Let’s assign an attribute to the Start button that will start the cookie factory display.
1. Click the Select tool in the OptoDisplay Configurator toolbox as shown below.
2. Now double-click the Start button in the Cookie Factory window.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-13
QUICK START
Some small black boxes called sizing handles appear around the button. They indicate that
the button is currently selected. The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box also opens:
Notice that the dialog box has two separate groups of attributes: Controller Driven
Attributes and Operator Driven Attributes. Controller-driven attributes are attributes that
are driven by tag values from the OptoControl strategy we assigned to the project.
Operator-driven attributes are driven by an operator’s interaction with a graphic object in
OptoDisplay.
We’re going to choose the operator-driven attribute Send Discrete to send a discrete value
to the controller. The OptoControl strategy interprets the value as a signal to start the
cookie factory.
3. In the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, select Operator Driven Attribute➞Send
Discrete, and then click Edit.
1-14 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The Dynamic Attribute - Send Discrete dialog box opens:
4. Click the Tag Selection button
OptoControl strategy.
to configure the tag we want to connect to in the
The Tag Selection dialog box appears. Notice that the Cookie Controller is highlighted in
the Controller list.
5. Select Integer in the Item Type group and Start_Flag in the Item Name group, and then
click OK.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-15
QUICK START
The Dynamic Attribute - Send Discrete dialog box appears with the new tagname listed in
the Tag group.
6. Click OK.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box appears with a check mark next to Send
Discrete in the Operator Driven Attributes list.
7. Click OK to complete adding the dynamic attribute and close the dialog box.
1-16 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
Adding a Graphic
Now let’s add a portion of cookie dough underneath the first tank. Rather than drawing our
cookie, we’re going to use a drawing of a cookie saved as a bitmap graphics file (or bmp). This
file is located in the My Display directory.
1. Select File➞Choose Bitmap.
The Choose A Bitmap dialog box appears:
2. Double-click the Dough.bmp file to select the cookie bitmap.
3. Now choose the Bitmap tool in the OptoDisplay Configurator toolbox as shown below.
4. Click the cursor right above the conveyor belt and underneath the first vessel.
If the graphic is a little out of place, it can easily be moved to the correct position using the
Select tool.
5. Choose the Select tool in the toolbox, and then click the bitmap graphic to select it.
Nine square sizing handles appear around the graphic.
6. Put your cursor within the sizing handles, click your mouse, and drag the cookie to the
correct position above the conveyor belt and underneath the first vessel.
Besides visually placing the graphic, you can also use the arrow keys on the keyboard or
use the X: and Y: coordinates displayed in the toolbox to help you place the cookie. We
suggest coordinate locations X:135 and Y:284, but your coordinates may differ.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-17
QUICK START
Now let’s give the bitmap graphic some attributes to animate it. To make the cookie look like it’s
moving across the conveyor belt, we’ll configure an attribute to affect its horizontal position.
7. Double-click the cookie bitmap graphic.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box opens:
8. In the Controller Driven Attributes list, double-click Horizontal Position.
The Dynamic Attribute - Horizontal Position dialog box appears. We need to configure a tag
to which we will connect the cookie bitmap graphic. This time we’ll connect it to a value
OptoDisplay reads from the controller.
9. Click the Tag Selection button
1-18 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
.
QUICK START
The Tag Selection dialog box appears:
10. Select Cookie Controller from the Controller group, Down Timer from the Item Type group,
and timer from the Item Name group, and then click OK.
11. In the Dynamic Attribute - Horizontal Position dialog box, enter the following values, using
the TAB key to move from field to field:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Value At Left: 7
Value At Right: 0
Movement Left: 0
Movement Right: 360
Reference: Left
Deadband: 0
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-19
QUICK START
When complete, the dialog box should look like the example below.
12. Click OK to close the dialog box.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box appears:
Now we need to configure an attribute that will make the cookie dough appear to drop out of the
first vessel.
13. Double-click Visibility/Blink in the Controller Driven Attribute list.
1-20 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The Dynamic Attribute - Visibility/Blink dialog box opens:
14. In the group Setup by, select Current Value.
15. Click the Tag Selection button
.
The Value Tag Selection dialog box appears:
16. Select Down Timer as the Item Type and timer as the Item Name, and then click OK.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-21
QUICK START
17. Fill in the remaining fields in the Dynamic Attribute - Visibility/Blink dialog box so that it
looks like the example below:
18. Click OK.
In the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box that appears, notice that the Visibility/Blink
controller-driven attribute is checked. In the Operator-Driven Attributes list, a Not
Available button
appears next to the Horizontal Slider attribute. This means that this
attribute cannot be configured because other dynamic attributes that have already been
configured will conflict with the attribute.
p
19. Click OK to close the dialog box.
1-22 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
20. Save the project by selecting File➞Save Project.
21. Close OptoDisplay Configurator by clicking the Close Window button
.
Downloading to the Controller
Let’s try running our project and see if there’s anything we need to change.
In order to see our animated display, we have to run the OptoDisplay Runtime program. But
before we do that, we need to download our OptoControl strategy to the controller.
NOTE: OptoControl strategies are usually downloaded to a controller for convenience using the
OptoControl application. However, we’ll download our OptoControl strategy using a FactoryFloor
utility called OptoTerm. To learn more about downloading strategies to a controller, see the
OptoControl User’s Guide.
1. Click the Windows Start button and select Programs➞Opto 22➞FactoryFloor
4.1➞OptoUtilities➞OptoTerm.
The OptoTerm window appears, displaying the name of our controller.
2. Select Cookie Controller, and then choose File➞Download➞Download Forth Files to
download the run file for our OptoControl strategy.
The Download File dialog box opens:
3. Click Browse and change directories to the C:\Opto22\Shared\Cookies\Control directory.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-23
QUICK START
4. Select “cfactory.crn” and click Open.
The file should be listed in the Download file dialog box. By clicking once in the File to
Download text box, you can use your right arrow key to view the whole name of the file
we’re downloading. Notice that the strategy file ends with a .crn extension. This type of
file is known as an OptoControl run file.
5. Click OK to continue our download.
A Download Progress screen appears briefly to display how the download of the strategy
to the controller is proceeding.
After the strategy has downloaded to the controller, we’ll start the strategy running on the
controller. For convenience, we’ll stay in OptoDisplay Configurator and start the strategy by
entering commands in OptoTerm’s terminal window. A more common method is to start the
strategy while running OptoControl.
6. When the download is finished, select Tools➞Start Terminal.
1-24 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
The terminal window appears. Notice that the window now has the same title as our
controller, and is ready to accept any Forth commands we enter in the list area.
Let’s type in a Forth command to verify that the controller is communicating properly. Commands
are case-sensitive, so make sure you enter the commands exactly as shown below.
7. Click your cursor right next to the right-arrows >> and then type the following command:
PTIME
8. Press ENTER.
The time to which the controller’s internal clock is set is displayed.
9. Next, type the following command:
_RUN
10. Press ENTER.
This time we’ll only see the double-arrow prompt >> on the next line. The strategy in our
controller is now running.
11. Close the OptoTerm window by clicking the Close Window button
12. Close OptoTerm by clicking the Close Window button
.
.
Running the Project
It’s time to run the project and see what our display can do.
1. Click the Windows Start button and choose Programs➞Opto 22➞FactoryFloor
4.1➞OptoDisplay➞OptoDisplay Runtime.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-25
QUICK START
The main window for OptoDisplay Runtime appears. The window is empty since we have
not loaded our project yet.
2. In the Runtime window, choose File➞Open Project.
3. In the Open Project dialog box that opens, navigate to the
C:\Opto22\Shared\Cookies\Display\My Display directory, and then double-click the
cfactory.mmi project.
The Event Log Viewer window should appear, displaying messages about the OptoDisplay
Runtime session. You’ll see a message showing that the controller is connecting to
OptoDisplay’s scanner.
At the bottom of the window, you’ll see the Auto Restore on New Message option
selected. This means anytime OptoDisplay Runtime issues a message (that is, an error or
status message), the Event Log Viewer will become the active, or topmost, window on the
Windows desktop.
4. Click the Close button to close the Event Log Viewer window.
1-26 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
QUICK START
5. Start the cookie factory by clicking the on-screen Start button.
Watch the cookie dough drop out of the first tank and move down the conveyor. Notice that
the cookie appears to move outside of the oven and inspection stations. We also need to
draw some chips coming out of the second tank as its flap opens.
Now that you have an idea of what the attributes you configured actually can do, let’s go
back to OptoDisplay Configurator and complete these details on the display.
6. Close OptoDisplay Runtime by clicking the Close Window button
.
Adding More Graphics
1. Click the Windows Start button and select Programs➞Opto 22➞FactoryFloor
4.1➞OptoDisplay➞OptoDisplay Configurator to open OptoDisplay Configurator.
2. Click the Circle tool in the Configurator toolbox as shown below.
We’re going to use the Circle tool to draw some chips coming out of the second tank.
3. With the Circle tool selected, use your cursor to draw little circles similar to this:
.
4. Choose the Select tool from the Configurator toolbox and select your group of chips.
Nine sizing handles and several selection handles appear within the chips.
5. Group the separate chip circles by selecting Edit➞Group, or by right-clicking the mouse
and choosing Group from the pop-up menu.
6. Click and drag the chips until they’re located below the second tank and above the
conveyor belt.
7. If your chip graphic is too big, place the cursor over the bottom right corner sizing handle,
click on the handle, and shrink the size of the graphic by moving it diagonally to the upper
left.
Now we will assign a graphic attribute to the chips so they appear to fall out of the second tank
when its flap opens.
8. Double-click the chips graphic object.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-27
QUICK START
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box opens:
9. Double-click the Visibility/Blink attribute from the Controller Driven Attributes list.
The Dynamic Attribute - Visibility/Blink dialog box appears:
10. Select Discrete in the group Setup by.
11. Click the Tag Selection button
1-28 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
to choose the tag to be connected to this attribute.
QUICK START
The Discrete Tag Selection dialog box opens:
12. Select Digital Multifunction Output Point as the Item Type and Chip_Dispense_Valve as
the Item Name, and then click OK.
The Dynamic Attribute - Visibility/Blink dialog box appears. Your dialog box should look like
the example shown below:
13. Click OK to close the dialog box.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 1-29
QUICK START
14. Click OK again to close the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box.
Fine-Tuning the Visuals
Remember how the cookie looked traveling outside the oven and inspection stations? We’ll
quickly fix that by making the cookie bitmap graphic the rearmost graphic on the screen. This
way, when it travels by the stations, it will appear to go through them.
1. With the Select tool, click the portion of dough on the conveyor belt.
2. Right-click the mouse, and from the pop-up menu that appears choose
Edit➞Z-Order➞Send to Back.
The graphic will now appear to travel through the oven and inspection stations, not in front
of them.
3. To save the project and start OptoDisplay Runtime to see the display working properly,
select File➞Save Project and Load Runtime.
There are a few more things you can explore on your own. Notice that when you pass your cursor
over the setpoint boxes (SP), a black outline appears. Click on one of the boxes and an attribute
dialog box appears. You can go back to the Configurator and see how this attribute was set up.
You might also want to look at the tank flap attributes.
What’s Next?
After stepping through this chapter, you should have a handle on how simple it is to use
OptoDisplay. By taking the time up front to step through our short demo, you’re now ready to
explore the many possibilities available.
Proceed to Chapter 2, “What Is OptoDisplay?” to learn more about planning and designing an
operator interface. You’ll also find out more about the windows and menus that make up
OptoDisplay Configurator and OptoDisplay Runtime.
At some point you may also want to take a look at the projects Example1 and Example2, found
in the “Examples” folder under OptoDisp. You’ll get ideas for various graphics you can use within
your own OptoDisplay projects.
1-30 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 2
Chapter 2
What Is OptoDisplay?
Introduction
This chapter provides a general overview of using OptoDisplay, including information on what
it’s used for, project structure and design, and general terms you’ll encounter.
In This Chapter
About OptoDisplay ................................. 2-1
Planning a Project................................... 2-3
OptoDisplay Windows ................................... 2-5
About OptoDisplay
OptoDisplay is a software package used to create human-machine interfaces (HMIs), or operator
interfaces, for monitoring control systems. You can use OptoDisplay to create an HMI that will
monitor an OptoControl strategy running on an Opto 22 industrial controller, providing real-time
and historical information to the operator about the performance of different parts of a control
system.
OptoDisplay is one component of the FactoryFloor suite of Windows 32-bit software for industrial
automation. Other components include OptoControl, the visual control language for writing
control applications, and OptoServer, which provides networking and DDE/OPC capability.
Configurator and Runtime Applications
Two primary software applications make up OptoDisplay: OptoDisplay Configurator and
OptoDisplay Runtime.
OptoDisplay Configurator—Use OptoDisplay Configurator to create a project that contains
graphics that appear on the computer monitor to represent your control process. The project also
contains information on how these graphics are connected to data in an OptoControl strategy
running on a controller, and defines how the graphics’ attributes change as this data changes.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 2-1
WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
OptoDisplay Runtime—Use OptoDisplay Runtime to run the project created in OptoDisplay
Configurator. Running the project means that the attributes of the graphics on the computer
monitor (such as size, position, or color) are continuously updated based on data provided by the
controller. If controls such as buttons and sliders are part of the OptoDisplay project, the operator
can use on-screen controls to change values that appear. This is how OptoDisplay is used to
control processes as well as monitor them.
FactoryFloor also includes a separate “monitor-only” version of the OptoDisplay Runtime
application. This version of OptoDisplay Runtime is functionally identical to the regular Runtime
application, except that it cannot be used to send values to a controller. This can be useful for
industrial projects where no operator intervention is required.
The Event Log Viewer, which is part of OptoDisplay Runtime, starts automatically when
OptoDisplay Runtime is started. The Event Log Viewer displays a window that posts messages
about OptoDisplay communication activity. Typically, it pops up above all other windows when
a message is posted, but this feature can be disabled.
OptoDisplay Terminology
Project—A collection of draw windows, historic logs, sounds, recipes, graphics, and all their
attributes that has been developed with the OptoDisplay Configurator. When the project is
saved, several files are created.
• The main project file, which has an .mmi extension.
• Draw window files are created automatically for each draw window used to display
graphics in a project. These files have sequentially numbered file extensions starting with
an uppercase .W (for example, .W01, .W02, and so on).
These project files, together with OptoDisplay Runtime, present an animated graphics interface
for a control system. See Appendix C, “OptoDisplay Files” for a complete list of the files that
make up an OptoDisplay project.
Windows—OptoDisplay projects have one or more draw windows inside the OptoDisplay main
window. A draw window is essentially a blank page on which you place, draw, or edit graphics
and other elements that will make up your operator interface. A draw window has static
attributes of position, size, and color. It also has visual states of open, closed, or iconified.Your
project design determines the number of draw windows and their contents.
A main window is the area of the display where you can view your application. Following the
conventions used in most Microsoft Windows applications, a main window contains a menu bar
that allows you to select various command options, and a title bar that displays the full project
path.
Objects—Objects include draw windows, graphics, alarm triggers, and trends (or graphs). There
are two types of objects: static and dynamic. Static objects do not change while OptoDisplay
Runtime is running. Dynamic objects change appearance, or cause the appearance of other
OptoDisplay objects to change while the project is running.
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WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
Tags—A tag refers to data items, such as variables, I/O points, or PID loops, from an
OptoControl strategy. To access tags in a project, select the OptoControl strategies for the
project. All tags in the selected strategies are then available to OptoDisplay. Tags are used to
animate your operator interface through connections to graphic objects and their dynamic
attributes. As the values of tags change through controller- or operator-driven attributes, the
appearance of the graphics change. Tags are also used as triggers to initiate system events such
as sounds, historic logging, and window configurations.
Connections—A connection is made in OptoDisplay when an OptoControl tag is selected as
either the source that will change a graphic, or as the tag destination for any data changes
entered by the operator.
Planning a Project
An OptoDisplay project is made up of a collection of windows and other elements you create and
configure in the OptoDisplay Configurator. You add graphics to the windows to create an
operator interface, and then connect to I/O data and variables in the tagname database of the
associated OptoControl strategy.
NOTE: The OptoControl strategy is the program running on your Opto 22 industrial controller.
See the OptoControl User’s Guide for complete instructions for creating OptoControl strategies.
Once the windows and attributes of the OptoDisplay project have been configured using
OptoDisplay Configurator, the project can be viewed in action with OptoDisplay Runtime. When
OptoDisplay Runtime is started, the project communicates with a controller. As the control
program runs on the controller, values and states of tagnames in the OptoControl strategy
database are continuously updated. This changing data in turn modifies the attributes (such as
size and position) of the graphics that are connected to the tagnames. The end result is an
animated, continually updated display that shows the status of a control process.
Project Design
The usefulness of your OptoDisplay project ultimately depends on how effective the display, or
operator interface, is. To create an effective operator interface, you may want to consider these
tips when you’re designing your project:
• Know your control process. If possible, be familiar with both the theoretical operation of
the process and the “hands-on” tasks required of the operator.
• Find out what the end user of your project, the operator, needs to know at different points
in time. Use this information to determine the information that will appear on the display.
• Consider the following ways to use and organize windows in a display:
– A single window can display an overall picture of the control process, and is helpful in
quickly assessing the general state of all operations.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 2-3
WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
– Individual windows can display a closer look at the operations associated with
different stations. The individual windows can contain detailed information and
provide controls that would be difficult to present in a single window.
Project and Operator Interface Security
OptoDisplay supports several important security features, including operator authentication,
encrypted logging of operator actions, and password protection for the project files. You can
configure your OptoDisplay project to do the following:
• Allow or deny operator access to the HMI, as well as the use of individual on-screen
controls, based on users and groups defined in a Microsoft Windows network. (See
“Security Settings for Graphics and Dynamic Attributes” on page 6-4.)
• Log all HMI use and operator actions to an encrypted archive. (See “Security Settings” on
page 9-8.)
• Assign a password to the OptoDisplay project to prevent unauthorized users from opening
it in the OptoDisplay Configurator authoring application. (See “Protecting a Project with a
Password” on page 3-3.)
• Assign a password to individual windows in an OptoDisplay project to prevent
unauthorized users from opening them. (See “Modifying Draw Windows” on page 5-2.)
Window Design
When you create a new project, a project window and one or more draw windows will be
available in the OptoDisplay main window. After deciding which windows you will use for your
project, consider the design of individual windows and how they interact with other windows.
This is where the organization of your windows comes into play. For example, you could have the
operator use the Runtime menu commands to view different windows, or you could design
buttons to let an operator jump directly to related windows.
Keep in mind that the visual state of a window can affect the performance of OptoDisplay and
the controller. The more windows that are open or iconified, the slower the response from the
controller, because it needs to update the I/O point information associated with those windows.
Window states, listed below, also affect how the OptoDisplay Runtime software application
scans the controller and updates graphics.
• An open window causes Runtime to scan the controller for data for that window.
• An iconified window causes Runtime to scan for data, but graphics in the iconified window
are not updated.
• A closed window causes Runtime to not scan for data for that window.
• Trends within a window can be configured to have Runtime scan or not scan for data.
Other choices you will have to make are whether a window should be pop-up or full-screen, and
whether a window’s visual state is affected by another window. We will cover these and other
2-4 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
aspects of configuring windows in Chapter 5, “Working with Graphics,” and Chapter 9, “Using
OptoDisplay Runtime.”
Using Multiple Monitors
An additional project planning decision is whether to design your OptoDisplay project to use
more than one monitor. The additional display space gained from using multiple monitors offers
advantages such as being able to keep numerous windows open permanently. However, you
should consider the additional hardware cost and extra desktop space a multiple monitor setup
requires.
An important factor to also consider is that each window in an OptoDisplay project requires
computer memory (RAM). If you plan to display several windows on multiple monitors, the
computer running the OptoDisplay project may need to have additional memory installed.
Hardware and software requirements for using multiple monitors are described in “System
Requirements” on page -iv. For steps to set up an OptoDisplay project to use multiple monitors,
see “Extending a Project Across Multiple Monitors” on page 3-3.
OptoDisplay Windows
As mentioned previously in “About OptoDisplay,” OptoDisplay is composed of two software
applications, Configurator and Runtime. This means there are two environments in which you
will use OptoDisplay. In learning about the windows that make up OptoDisplay, we will first
discuss the main components of the Configurator environment, and then explore the Runtime
environment.
OptoDisplay uses standard Microsoft Windows conventions, so as you use Configurator and
Runtime, you’ll recognize familiar window elements such as title bars and the menu bar, as well
as controls such as the minimize, maximize, and close buttons.
NOTE: If you need more information on working with Microsoft Windows, refer to the
documentation from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 2-5
WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
OptoDisplay Configurator Main Window
When you first start OptoDisplay Configurator and create a new project, your screen should look
similar to this:
The Configurator main window consists of a title bar and a menu bar, along with other standard
Windows elements, and contains the toolbox and one or more draw windows.
Title Bar
Menu Bar
Toolbox
Draw
Window
Hiding the Menu Bar
If you need additional space to position draw windows, you can hide the menu bar to use the
space it occupies. If you do this, note that you won’t be able to access commands on the menu
bar.
To hide the menu bar, do one of the following:
• Select View➞Hide Menu Bar
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WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
• Press ESC on the keyboard.
To view the menu bar again, press ESC on the keyboard.
Toolbox
The toolbox contains a set of graphical icons that represent tools you can use in the Configurator.
Click any tool to select it, and then use it in the draw window. Also, below the graphical icons,
the toolbox displays coordinates and object dimensions to aid you in your drawing tasks.
Toolbox Coordinates
Object Dimensions
If you want to use the space the toolbox occupies, you can hide the toolbox by selecting
View➞Hide Toolbox. To open the toolbox again, select View➞Show Toolbox.
Tool Definitions
Each tool in the toolbox, arranged from left to right across the top of the toolbox, and then across
the bottom, is described below. For more details about any tools available in the toolbox, see
Chapter 5, “Working with Graphics.”
Use the following tools as described below:
Select tool—select, move, and size text and graphics.
Line tool—draw lines.
Rectangle tool—draw rectangles and squares.
Round rectangle tool—draw rectangles and squares with rounded corners.
Ellipse tool—draw ellipses and circles.
Polygon tool—draw multi-sided objects.
Polyline tool—draw multiple-line-segment objects.
Curve tool—draw single curved lines or multiple-line-segment curved lines.
BMP tool—place a bitmap.
Text tool—add text to draw windows.
Trend tool—place trend charts in draw windows.
SuperTrend tool—place real-time and historic trends in draw windows.
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WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
Alarm tool—place alarm graphics in draw windows.
XY Plot tool—place x- and y-axis plots in draw windows.
Numeric table tool—place numeric tables in draw windows.
Toolbox Coordinates and Object Dimensions
Just underneath the tools, you can see the toolbox coordinates and object dimensions. The
coordinates show the cursor’s position (in pixels) when it is over a draw window. The X: and Y:
coordinates are read with the axis zero-points at the top-left corner of the draw window. If you
create an object, the object’s dimensions (width and height) are shown next to W: and H:,
respectively.
Configurator Draw Windows
Configurator draw windows are where all graphics for your OptoDisplay project are drawn and
edited. They contain the graphics and other elements you work with to create your display.
Title Bar
Draw
Window
Workspace
Redrawing an Active Draw Window
You can redraw an active draw window in OptoDisplay Configurator by selecting View➞Redraw.
Incomplete graphics (such as an incomplete polygon) in the draw window are removed when you
select this command.
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WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
OptoDisplay Runtime Main Window
When you start OptoDisplay Runtime, what appears on screen should look similar to this:
Title Bar
Menu Bar
Runtime
Main
Window
Open
Project
Windows
Event Log
Viewer
The Runtime main window consists of a title bar, a menu bar, other standard Windows elements,
project windows, and the Event Log Viewer. Much like a frame, Runtime’s main window contains
all the elements and actions that occur during Runtime use.
If you need additional space to position project windows and other windows in Runtime, you can
hide the menu bar to use the space it occupies. If you do this, note that you won’t be able to
access commands on the menu bar.
Changing How the Main Window Appears in Runtime
You can configure the main window so that it appears without a title bar or menu bar, and also
change several other settings. See “Setting up Runtime” on page 9-2 to learn how to configure
elements of the main window.
Hiding the Menu Bar
While working with an OptoDisplay project in Runtime, you can gain additional space on your
screen by hiding the menu bar. To hide the menu bar, do one of the following:
• Select View➞Hide Menu Bar
• Press ESC on the keyboard.
To view the menu bar again, press ESC on the keyboard.
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WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
Runtime Project Windows
After you’ve opened a project in Runtime, you see the project windows.
Title Bar
Draw
Window
Workspace
Project windows are the Configurator draw windows that you created for the project. Notice that
when you launch your project in Runtime, these windows are the same size and in the same
relative position as when you closed the Configurator project. (Depending on certain
configuration options, the relative positions of the windows may differ slightly from those in the
Configurator project.)
Project windows are composed of a title bar and a workspace. The title bar displays the name of
the window, and the workspace contains all of the graphics work you did in the Configurator.
Configuring How Draw Windows Appear in Runtime
You can define how a draw window appears in OptoDisplay Runtime, including its visual state
(closed, iconified, or open), relative position, and other settings. See “Using Draw Windows” on
page 5-1 for instructions and more information.
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WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
Runtime Event Log Viewer
The Event Log Viewer contains a list of system errors and messages that occur during Runtime.
The most recent messages appear in the list, but when there are more messages than can
reasonably fit, scroll bars appear so that you can view older messages.
You can also double-click any message to view its entire contents, if they are not already
completely visible. The Event Log Viewer can be manipulated like any other standard window.
There is only one significant option available with this window, and that is the group marked
Auto Restore on New Message. Select Enabled or Disabled to configure how the Event Log
Viewer appears during Runtime. If “Auto Restore on New Message” is enabled, the Event Log
Viewer dialog box automatically jumps to the foreground when a new event message is received.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 2-11
WHAT IS OPTODISPLAY?
2-12 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 3
Chapter 3f
Working with Projects
Introduction
This chapter explains how to work with projects. You’ll find out how project files are organized,
and then learn how to create, open, and save a project. An optional, advanced procedure for
customizing how OptoDisplay Configurator starts is also presented.
In This Chapter
How Projects Are Organized .................. 3-1
Creating a Project ................................... 3-2
Protecting a Project with a Password .... 3-3
Opening a Project ................................... 3-3
Saving a Project ............................................. 3-4
Closing a Project ............................................ 3-5
Customizing a Project .................................... 3-6
How Projects Are Organized
An OptoDisplay project is a collection of all the files created in OptoDisplay Configurator that
define one operator interface. The project includes the windows you create, bitmaps that appear
in them and their attributes, and any other elements you set up. See Chapter 2, “What Is
OptoDisplay?” to learn more about the various components of an OptoDisplay project. Also see
Appendix C, “OptoDisplay Files” for a complete list of files associated with OptoDisplay.
Each OptoDisplay project should be located in its own directory. You’ll find that separate
directories make keeping track of any one project’s files easier, especially when you back up the
project or copy the files to disk. Though not recommended, multiple projects can be stored in the
same directory if necessary.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 3-1
WORKING WITH PROJECTS
Creating a Project
To create a new project in OptoDisplay Configurator, follow these steps:
1. Select File➞New Project.
The New Project dialog box that appears should look similar to the example below.
Dialog boxes in OptoDisplay follow common Microsoft Windows conventions, so you’ll
recognize familiar items such as the file list, the Up One Level button, and the File name
field.
NOTE: If you need more information on how to use dialog boxes or other common parts of
Microsoft Windows, refer to the documentation from Microsoft and your computer
manufacturer.
2. Type a project name in the File name field.
When you’re done creating the new project file, this name is automatically appended with
the suffix .mmi, indicating an OptoDisplay project file.
3. If you want to save your project in a new directory, follow the sub-steps below, and then
continue with step 4.
a. Click the Create New Folder button.
The new folder you created appears in the list of files and folders. The name of the new
folder should be highlighted, meaning you can enter a new name for the folder.
b. Type a new name for the folder, preferably one that includes the project name.
c. Double-click the new folder to open it.
4. Click Open to create the project.
If you have selected a directory that already includes a project, a warning message
appears, and you’ll be allowed to try again.
When you click Open, the project is created, and a draw window and toolbox appear within the
Configurator’s main window. The untitled draw window is where you will begin drawing your
3-2 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
WORKING WITH PROJECTS
operator interface. The toolbox contains several icons representing graphic drawing tools. We
will discuss the toolbox more in Chapter 5, “Working with Graphics.”
Extending a Project Across Multiple Monitors
If you are designing your OptoDisplay project to use multiple monitors connected to the same
computer, after creating the project simply extend OptoDisplay Configurator’s main window
across the monitors you want to use. For hardware and software requirements for using multiple
monitors, see “System Requirements” on page iv.
Protecting a Project with a Password
You can protect your OptoDisplay project with a password to prevent others from opening and
modifying the project using OptoDisplay Configurator. The project can still be opened and run in
OptoDisplay Runtime.
To protect your project with a password, do the following:
1. Select File➞Password Protect Project.
The Enter Project Password dialog box opens.
2. Type a password in the Enter Password field.
3. Type the same password a second time in the Confirm Password field.
4. Click OK.
Your OptoDisplay project now cannot be opened in OptoDisplay Configurator without entering
the password.
Opening a Project
To open an existing project in OptoDisplay Configurator or OptoDisplay Runtime, follow these
steps:
1. Select File➞Open Project.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 3-3
WORKING WITH PROJECTS
(Configurator only) If you already have an open project, you will be asked if you want to
save it. Click Yes or No, or click Cancel to close the Save Project dialog box.
The Open Project dialog box appears.
2. Navigate to the folder where your project is located.
3. Double-click the file in the list to open the project. (You can also select the file, and then
click Open.)
The project opens with any windows positioned just as you last left them.
NOTE: If the project has been protected with a password, the Enter Password dialog box
appears. Type the password for this project and click OK to open the project.
Saving a Project
There are three options for saving a project in OptoDisplay Configurator: Save Project, Save
Project As, and Save Project and Load Runtime.
Save Project
To save your project to the same file name you opened or created, Select File➞Save Project. If
there have been no changes to the project since you last saved it, no messages appear when this
save occurs.
Save Project As
1. To save the project with a new name, select File➞Save Project As.
2. In the Save As dialog box, type a project name in the File name field.
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WORKING WITH PROJECTS
When you’re done saving the project file with a new name, this name is automatically
appended with the suffix .mmi, indicating an OptoDisplay project file.
3. If you want to save your project in a new directory, follow the sub-steps below, and then
continue with step 4.
a. Click the Create New Folder button.
The new folder you created appears in the list of files and folders. The name of the new
folder should be highlighted, meaning you can enter a new name for the folder.
b. Type a new name for the folder, preferably one that includes the project name.
c. Double-click the new folder to open it.
4. Click Save to save the project with a new file name.
Save Project and Load Runtime
To save your project to the same file name you opened or created, and then start the project in
OptoDisplay Runtime, select File➞Save Project and Load Runtime. This option is particularly
useful when you are testing a project and switch often between the Configurator and Runtime
components.
Saving Versions of a Project
When developing an OptoDisplay project, you can save progressively numbered versions of the
project files (for example, MyProject_01, MyProject_02, etc.). Having these “snapshots” of your
project as you develop it can be valuable if you need to return to an earlier version, or need to
trace the steps you took while building the OptoDisplay project.
To automatically create a numbered version of modified OptoDisplay project files each time you
save the project, select File➞Auto Increment Version. Project (.MMI) and window (.WXX) files
will be copied, renamed with a version number, and placed in the same directory as the current
project. Other project files such as background bitmap images and similar graphics are not
copied.
Closing a Project
To close the current project you have open, select File➞Close Project. If you’ve modified the
project since it was last saved, you will be asked if you want to save those changes before
closing the project.
Only one project can be open at any one time in OptoDisplay. Creating or opening a project
automatically closes any currently open project first. When this happens, you will be asked if you
want to save changes if they haven’t been already saved.
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WORKING WITH PROJECTS
Customizing a Project
NOTE: The following section presents advanced procedures for customizing how OptoDisplay
starts up and opens a project. These procedures are not required to run OptoDisplay
Configurator or Runtime, or to open projects.
Modifying Default Project Properties
After you’ve loaded a project for the first time, you’ll notice that every time you start OptoDisplay
Configurator, the application knows which project to load, what sizes the windows are, and
several other startup conditions. At some point, you may want to change these initial
OptoDisplay conditions. To do so, you can run the Windows system Registry Editor utility to
modify these conditions.
WARNING: Use the Windows Registry Editor carefully. It is strongly recommended that you
make a backup copy of your Windows Registry before continuing with this procedure. Without a
backup copy, if you delete the wrong properties and cannot return the Registry to its original
state, application and system files can become unusable and will have to be reinstalled.
1. From the Windows Start menu, select Run.
The Run dialog box appears.
2. Enter the following command in the Open field and press ENTER:
regedit
The Registry Editor window appears. You should see several folders listed under My
Computer.
3. Open the HKEY_CURRENT_USER folder, and then continue to open each of the following
sub-folders as they appear:
– Software
– Opto22
– OptoDisplay
– Configurator or Runtime
– Start up
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WORKING WITH PROJECTS
In the Start up folder you’ll see several properties defined, as shown below.
Delete these
properties to reset
OptoDisplay’s
startup
configuration.
4. Select the following properties:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Height
Maximized
Project Name
Width
X
Y
Do not select the (Default) property.
5. Select Edit➞Delete, or press DEL on the keyboard.
6. Select Registry➞Exit to close the Registry Editor.
OptoDisplay has now been initialized to its original startup conditions, and will open as if no
project had ever been loaded.
Creating an MS-DOS Batch File
You can use an MS-DOS batch file to have OptoDisplay Runtime open and run a project. The
batch file you create can be associated with an icon on the Windows desktop. This is a
convenient way for an operator to quickly start an OptoDisplay project without having to search
for the project file in a dialog box.
To create a batch file to open a project in OptoDisplay Runtime, do the following:
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 3-7
WORKING WITH PROJECTS
1. Open an empty text file using Windows Notepad or another text editor.
2. Enter specific commands to perform the following tasks:
• Change drives to the drive containing the project.
• Change directories to the directory containing the project.
• Start OptoDisplay Runtime.
3. Now save the file using the .bat file extension.
Once you have created the batch file, you can make a Windows shortcut of this file and place it
on the Windows desktop for easy access. Alternately, you could place the shortcut in the
Windows Start Up folder so the project starts to run when the computer starts up.
Batch File Example
Here’s an example of a batch file that opens a project in OptoDisplay Runtime:
E:
cd “\strategies\first strategy”
\Opto22\OptoDisp\OptoDisR “first strategy.MMI”
Here’s what each line of the batch file does:
• The first line changes drives to the E: drive.
• The second line changes directories to the directory “\strategies\first strategy.”
• The last line starts OptoDisplay Runtime, located in \Opto22\OptoDisp, using the project
called “first strategy.MMI.”
3-8 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 4
Chapter 4
Configuring Controllers & Tags
Introduction
This chapter shows how to define the connections to Opto 22 controllers and I/O points, or
“tags,” that OptoDisplay requires.
In This Chapter
Configuring Controllers .......................... 4-1
Configuring Tags..................................... 4-5
Optimizing Controller Communications ......... 4-9
Correcting Tags from a Strategy.................. 4-10
Configuring Controllers
OptoDisplay uses the data values a controller receives from I/O points and integer, float, and
string variables to change the attributes of on-screen graphics. (I/O points are defined when you
create an OptoControl strategy; for more information, see the OptoControl User’s Guide.) For an
OptoDisplay project to receive this information on individual I/O points (called tags), you must
first define a connection to an Opto 22 controller.
Follow these steps to select and configure a controller:
1. Start OptoDisplay Configurator and open a project that will be associated with the
controller.
2. Select Configure➞Controllers.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 4-1
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
The Controllers dialog box opens:
If you have not previously configured a controller for the OptoDisplay project you opened,
the Name list is empty and only the Add button is available.
3. To locate an OptoControl strategy running on the controller you want to connect to, click
Add.
4. In the Strategy File Name Selection dialog box that opens, navigate to the OptoControl
strategy that is running on the controller you plan to select.
NOTE: You can also connect to a controller that is running an Opto 22 Cyrano strategy. To
view available Cyrano strategies, select “OptoControl and Cyrano” from the Files of type
drop-down menu.
5. Select the strategy file and click Open.
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
The OptoControl strategy you selected appears in the Strategy field of the Controller
Properties dialog box:
Now you need to enter the name of the primary controller from which OptoDisplay will
receive I/O point information. Remember that this controller must be running the
OptoControl strategy you selected.
6. Click the Browse button in the Primary Controller group.
The Select Controller dialog box appears:
All controllers that have been configured to connect to your PC are listed, whether or not
they are associated with your strategy. If you previously configured a controller for use
with OptoControl, for example, it would appear here, even if it didn’t appear earlier when
you opened the Controllers dialog box.
NOTE: If the controller you want to use doesn’t appear in the Select Controller dialog box,
you must connect and configure this controller to make it available. Instructions for adding,
modifying, and deleting controllers appear in Chapter 4, “Working with Controllers,” in the
OptoControl User’s Guide.
7. To choose a controller that connects with OptoDisplay, select its name and click OK.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 4-3
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
The controller you have added appears in the Controller Properties dialog box:
8. In the Re-enable field, enter the number of seconds OptoDisplay waits before checking for
a response from a controller.
Increasing this delay, called the re-enable time, allows the computer running OptoDisplay
to perform other tasks during this waiting period. The default re-enable time is 30.00
seconds. See “Optimizing Controller Communications” on page 4-9 for detailed information
on selecting a re-enable time for your project.
Adding a Backup Controller
OptoDisplay lets you designate a backup controller that is used automatically in case your
primary controller fails or becomes unavailable. Control is returned to the primary controller
when it becomes available again. Like the primary controller, the backup controller must be
connected to the PC that is running OptoDisplay. The type of connection (such as direct or
Ethernet), does not have to be the same as the connection type to the primary controller.
Configuring the backup controller is identical to configuring the primary controller.
1. If necessary, first start OptoDisplay Configurator and open a project that is associated with
the controller.
2. Select Configure➞Controllers, then double-click the controller for which you will
designate a backup controller.
3. In the Controller Properties dialog box, click the Browse button in the Backup Controller
group.
NOTE: If you need to add a new controller to the list of available controllers, see Chapter 4,
“Working with Controllers,” in the OptoControl User’s Guide. When done, continue with
step 4 below.
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4. In the Select Controller dialog box that appears, choose a backup controller from the list
and click OK.
The name of the backup controller you added now appears in the Controller Properties
dialog box:
5. When all the parameters are correct, click OK.
The Controllers dialog box appears with the controller you have configured in the Name
list.
6. At this point, you can:
•
•
•
•
Click Add to configure another controller.
Click Modify to change the configuration of a selected controller.
Click Delete to remove a selected controller.
Click OK to close the Controllers dialog box and finish configuring controllers.
Configuring Tags
Graphics in OptoDisplay can be linked directly to the values of OptoControl tags, so you will
configure tags quite often as you develop OptoDisplay projects. Tags are configured using the
Tag Selection dialog box, which you can access from many dialog boxes in OptoDisplay
Configurator by clicking the Tag Selection button
.
The tags that appear in the Tag Selection dialog box are actively filtered; rather than display all
possible item types and item names, only the item types available for the selected controller
appear in the Item Type list, and only the item names available for a selected item type appear
in the Item Name list. For detailed information on item types and names in OptoControl
strategies, see the OptoControl User’s Guide.
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
To select a tag, complete the fields as follows:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
A Select the controller that contains the tag you wish to use. If only one controller is
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
available, it is automatically selected. Choosing a controller updates the Item Type list
(B) so that it displays only the “Value” or “Discrete” OptoControl data types in that
controller’s OptoControl strategy.
Select the type of data you wish to use. The list contains only the “Value” or “Discrete”
data types defined in the selected controller’s OptoControl strategy. (The data types that
appear depend on which data type was selected in the “Setup by” field in the preceding
dialog box.) When you select a specific item type, a list of all the tags of that selection
type appears in the Item Name list box (C). Your Item Type selection also determines
the options available in the Selected Fields group (D).
This is an alphabetical list of the available OptoControl tags of the type specified in the
Item Type list. Select the tag you want to use from this list.
The item type of the tag you select determines which of these fields, if any, need to have
contents specified. If an entry is not needed, then the option is not available.
Specifies the data that is associated with the selected tag. For example, if the selected
tag is of Item Type PID, then the available fields are Error, Enable, A/M, Input, Output,
Setpoint, etc. If the tag Item Type is Digital Multifunction Input Point, the available field
is State. If the tag Item Type is Float, the Field list box is disabled.
If the base type is Integer, a specific bit in the range specified may be selected from the
integer.
If the selected Item Type is one of the Table types and only a single element of the table
is desired, enter the index of that element in this field.
To select multiple elements from Item Type Table, use the Start Index to specify the first
element and Num Elements to specify how many.
If a controller-driven attribute is being edited, select the refresh time group to be used
for scanning. All tags that are defined as part of the same refresh time group are
scanned at the same time. A time group with a refresh time of 0 seconds is scanned as
quickly as the speed of the communication link permits.
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J Click OK to save your settings. (Click Cancel to close the dialog box without making any
changes.)
NOTE: For the item type PID, the fields Input and Setpoint function identically.
Searching for Tags in an OptoDisplay Project
You can search an OptoDisplay project to find where an OptoControl tag has been used.
1. Select View➞Find Tag
The Find Tag dialog box appears.
A
B
C
D
E
F
A Select the controller that contains the tag you wish to find. Choosing a controller
updates the Select Tag list (B) so that it displays only the tags available in that
B
C
D
E
controller’s OptoControl strategy.
Select the tag you wish to find. The list contains only the tags defined in the selected
controller’s OptoControl strategy.
Select one or more OptoDisplay objects to search for the tag selected in (B). For
example, if Windows is selected, then any graphic in a project window will be searched
for the selected tag.
Format and display your search results using the following options:
• Select Highlight Tag to automatically select the object containing the tag being
searched for.
• Select Show Report to automatically open in Windows Notepad a report listing all
tags found. The report is displayed after the search is complete.
Click Find Next to start searching for a tag. After a tag is located, click Find Next again
to continue searching. When no more tags are found, the Find Tag dialog box will close.
If Show Report in (D) is selected, the report of tags found will be displayed in Windows
Notepad.
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
F Click Done to close the Find Tag dialog box.
Finding and Replacing Tags in an OptoDisplay Project
You can find and replace tags in an entire OptoDisplay project, or just in one or more selected
graphics. This find and replace feature works with tags for a control engine, item name, table
index, or bit index.
1. In a draw window in OptoDisplay Configurator, select the graphics you want to search and
replace tags in. To search graphics in the entire OptoDisplay project, select at least one
graphic on the screen.
2. Select Edit➞Replace. (You can also right-click on a graphic and select Replace from the
pop-up menu.)
The Find and Replace dialog box appears.
A
B
C
D
E
A Select “All windows” to search and replace in all windows in the OptoDisplay project,
B
C
D
E
or select “Chosen graphics” to search and replace tags in just the graphics you’ve
selected.
Select the type of tag to search and replace.
Enter the name of the tag to find. If “Control Engine” is selected in (B), you can choose
the name of the control engine from a drop-down menu. For the other tag types, enter
the name of the tag exactly as it appears in the ioControl strategy.
Enter the name of the tag to replace the tag found in (C). The replacement item must
be the same kind of item as the item being searched for. If “Control Engine” is
selected in (B), you can choose the name of the control engine from a drop-down menu.
For the other tag types, enter the name of the tag exactly as it appears in the ioControl
strategy.
Click OK to start the search, or click Cancel to close the dialog box without any changes.
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
Optimizing Controller Communications
Your OptoDisplay project will communicate frequently with the controller to update the tag
information. Before you set up your OptoDisplay project—or if you encounter communication
problems when running the project—review the following information about how OptoDisplay
communicates with a controller. For detailed information about adding, modifying, or deleting a
connection to a controller, see Chapter 4, “Working with Controllers,” in the OptoControl User’s
Guide.
Polling and Time-Out Errors
OptoDisplay polls controllers sequentially, which means that it sends out a command and waits
for the response. Under normal conditions, the controller will respond immediately. OptoDisplay
then sends the next command and waits for the response.
There are some situations when a controller may not respond, perhaps due to a power loss at the
controller or to a break in the communications link. When this happens, a time-out error is
generated in the following sequence:
• If the controller does not respond within the time specified by the time-out parameter, and
if the retries parameter is set to a value of one or more, then OptoDisplay will try to send
the same command to the same controller and wait for a response. This time-out/retry
cycle will continue until OptoDisplay has made the original attempt plus the number of
additional attempts specified by the retries parameter.
• If all attempts to communicate with the controller fail, then a time-out error occurs and
OptoDisplay disables communications with that controller for a period specified by the
re-enable parameter. At the end of the re-enable period, OptoDisplay will again attempt to
communicate with the controller. If it is not successful, the time-out/retry/re-enable cycle
will occur again.
Time-Out and Retries Parameters
During the time-out/retry cycle described above, OptoDisplay will not communicate with any
other controllers. The computer running the OptoDisplay project may also become sluggish or
unresponsive, making it difficult to access menu options and other applications. If the time-out
period is long or the number of retries is high, computer performance may suffer when a
communication problem occurs.
Select the time-out, retries, and re-enable parameters carefully. Optimum values will depend on
the specifics of each particular system. You can change the time-out and retires parameters
when adding or modifying a connection to a controller; specifically, you do this when configuring
the computer port that OptoDisplay will use to communicate with the controller. The re-enable
parameter is set when adding a controller to your OptoDisplay project.
See “Re-Enable Period” below for more information about selecting the re-enable period. For
detailed information about adding, modifying, or deleting a controller connection, see Chapter 4,
“Working with Controllers,” in the OptoControl User’s Guide.
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
Re-Enable Period
The re-enable period (that is, the period of time during which communication is disabled to the
controller that caused the time-out error) has two purposes:
• It allows the computer running the OptoDisplay project to continue to operate correctly
while communication problems are occurring.
• It allows OptoDisplay to automatically re-establish communications when the controller
comes back online.
During the re-enable period, OptoDisplay continues to poll any other configured controllers.
Meanwhile, the computer running the OptoDisplay project returns to normal operation.
Choosing a Re-Enable Time
Re-enable times are set when you add a controller to your OptoDisplay project, or modify a
controller already associated with the project. See “Configuring Controllers” on page 4-1 for
specific instructions on how to enter a re-enable time.
When selecting a re-enable time, do not select a value that is too low. If the re-enable time is
too short, the computer running the OptoDisplay project may become unresponsive when
communication problems occur. The re-enable parameter should be set to a fairly high value (30
seconds, for example, which is the default setting). For an OptoDisplay project that references
multiple controllers, the re-enable period for each controller should be set long enough to allow
for normal polling when one controller goes off-line.
Refresh Times and Freshness Values
For information on configuring refresh times, freshness values, and other settings used for
updating graphics in an OptoDisplay project, see “Scanning to Update Graphics” on page 6-34.
Correcting Tags from a Strategy
When you select an OptoControl strategy to use with your OptoDisplay project, OptoDisplay
automatically imports that strategy’s tagname database. This is unlike most other HMI software
applications, which require you to create a separate SCADA database in addition to the strategy
or control program itself.
This tight connection with the strategy’s tagname database, however, can sometimes cause
problems when the current OptoControl strategy used by an OptoDisplay project is modified.
OptoDisplay may incorrectly read the tags associated with the resulting strategy. OptoDisplay
Configurator includes a feature called AutoCorrect Tags that fixes most tag errors that may occur
this way.
The AutoCorrect Tags feature works by comparing all tagnames, IDs, and table index references
that are used with dynamic attributes in the OptoDisplay project. If discrepancies are found
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
between the items in the tagname database and the OptoDisplay project, the errors that can be
corrected are fixed. Both corrected tags as well as those that could not be corrected are listed in
the results report AutoCorrect Tags generates.
When To Use AutoCorrect Tags
It’s generally advisable to use the AutoCorrect Tags option after making any changes to the
OptoControl strategy associated with your OptoDisplay project. You should also run AutoCorrect
Tags if you use an OptoControl strategy that was converted from an earlier Cyrano strategy.
There are some tag errors in an OptoDisplay project that AutoCorrect Tags cannot fix. These
errors include if you do either of the following:
• Delete a tag from a strategy
• Shorten the length of a table in a strategy
You may also get unreliable results if you delete a tag from a strategy, and then create a new tag
with the same name.
Using AutoCorrect Tags
IMPORTANT: Always save changes to your OptoDisplay project before using the
AutoCorrect Tags option.
If you don’t want to use the corrections made by AutoCorrect Tags, simply close the project
without saving. Remember that not saving the project means you will lose any other changes you
have made to the project.
Follow these steps to correct tags in your OptoDisplay project:
1. Select Tools➞AutoCorrect Tags.
The following warning appears:
If OptoDisplay finds any problems with the tags and can fix them, it will do so. The
changes, however, won’t become a permanent part of your project until you actually save
the project.
2. To correct tags, click Yes. (Click No to close the window and not make any changes.)
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The Windows application WordPad launches, displaying a results file that describes any
problems AutoCorrect Tags may have found with the tags from the strategy. The results file
has a name of the form Opton.$$$, where n is an arbitrary number.
The following illustration shows a sample results file created by AutoCorrect Tags:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
Here’s an explanation of what the results file contains:
A Name and location of the results file created by AutoCorrect Tags.
B Date and time the file was created.
C Warning message that reports that the table length of RecipeFloatTbl changed from an
old length of five elements to a new length of three elements. “Location” shows where
the tag was used in the OptoDisplay project. In this example, it was found in a window
called “master,” attached to an ellipse at x: and y: coordinates of 38 and 159, with the
color dynamic attribute.
D Error message that the tag “HistoricLogTrigger2” is no longer part of the OptoControl
strategy, and this could not be corrected by the AutoCorrect Tags tool. The tag was used
as the start trigger for a historic log called “Mass Storage.”
To fix this error, you’ll have to assign another tag in your OptoDisplay project to use as
the start trigger for this historic log. (Note that OptoDisplay won’t recreate the
connection to the tag if you open your OptoControl strategy and add the old tagname
again. Internally, OptoDisplay can’t correlate the old tagname and the new, similarly
named tag.)
E Warning message that the tagname “DOWNLOAD_TRIGGER” changed to
“ACTIVATE_DOWNLOAD” in the strategy. The old and new tagnames are reported, and
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CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS & TAGS
the OptoDisplay project is corrected to use the new tagname. The tag was used in a
recipe called “Peanut Butter Cookies” as its trigger.
F Warning message that multiple errors have been found for one tagname:
• The table name “RecipeIntegerTbl” changed to “RecipeIndex,” and its length
changed from five elements to three elements. The OptoDisplay project is updated
with this change.
• An “index into table out of bounds” error was detected and couldn’t be corrected.
Specifically, the project tried to use the fifth element of the table
(RecipeIntegerTbl[4]), but the fifth element no longer exists. To correct this
problem you must specify a valid index. The tag was used in a recipe called
“Peanut Butter Cookies.” When the recipe is successfully downloaded,
OptoDisplay writes a value to this notification tag.
G The final tally of all the warnings and errors found by AutoCorrect Tags is reported here.
Note that if you run AutoCorrect Tags again, you will see only those errors that were reported as
“cannot correct.” The other reported errors have been corrected.
When you no longer need the Opton.$$$ file, you can delete the file from your hard drive.
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4-14 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 5
Chapter 5
Working with Graphics
Introduction
This chapter describes how to use OptoDisplay Configurator to create and edit graphic objects,
and how to import images. It also describes how to configure the windows in which these items
appear.
In This Chapter
Using Draw Windows ............................ 5-1
Drawing Graphic Objects ....................... 5-5
Selecting Graphic Objects ...................... 5-8
Grouping and Locking Graphics............ 5-10
Changing Lines and Fills....................... 5-11
Importing Graphics ............................... 5-13
Saving Objects as Bitmaps................... 5-15
Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting ....... 5-15
Moving and Resizing Graphics .................... 5-16
Changing Stacking Order ............................. 5-18
Deleting Objects .......................................... 5-19
Aligning Graphics......................................... 5-19
Rotating and Flipping Graphics.................... 5-20
Working with Text........................................ 5-21
Working with Numeric Tables ..................... 5-22
Printing Graphics.......................................... 5-24
Using Draw Windows
Draw windows in OptoDisplay Configurator are “blank pages” where you place, create or edit all
the graphics for your OptoDisplay project. These windows also contain trend, SuperTrend, and
alarm objects. When you create a draw window, you can define its size, position, and color, as
well as its state (open, closed, or iconified) in which it appears when the project opens in
OptoDisplay Runtime.
Draw windows can be protected with a password, and be set up to open when an alarm is
triggered. You can also configure whether menus, borders, and other standard window elements
appear.
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Creating and Deleting Draw Windows
When you create a new OptoDisplay project, one draw window appears in the main project
window. To create additional draw windows, you can create a new window, or copy an existing
draw window and its attributes.
Making a New Draw Window
1. Select Windows➞New.
The Window Properties dialog box opens.
2. Enter a name for the window, and configure other settings as necessary.
See “Modifying Draw Windows” below for instructions on configuring draw windows.
3. Click OK when done.
The new draw window appears in the project window.
Copying an Existing Draw Window
1. Select Windows➞Copy.
The Window Properties dialog box opens.
2. Enter a new name for the window, and configure the existing settings if necessary.
See “Modifying Draw Windows” below for instructions on configuring draw windows.
3. Click OK when done.
The new draw window appears in the project window.
Deleting an Existing Draw Window
1. Using the Select tool, click on a draw window to select it.
2. Select Windows➞Delete.
3. Click Yes in the message box that appears to confirm the deletion.
Modifying Draw Windows
You can change many properties of a new or existing draw window, such as the window’s
position, color, and behavior, among other properties. These properties are set in the Windows
Properties dialog box. To open this dialog box, do one of the following:
• Create a new draw window or copy an existing one.
• Click on a draw window to select it, and then choose Windows➞Properties.
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WORKING WITH GRAPHICS
The Window Properties dialog box appears.
A
B
C
E
F
D
G
H
I
A Enter the name of the draw window. This name appears in the window’s title bar unless
the title bar is hidden by deselecting the “Caption” option in the Control group (D) .
B Enter the X and Y coordinates where the window appears in the project window. The X
and Y coordinates indicate the location, in pixels, of the draw window’s upper-left
corner; the upper-left corner of the project window has X and Y coordinates of 0.
C Enter the width and height of the draw window. Width and height are measured in
pixels.
D Use the options in the Control group to configure the appearance of the draw window.
Select or deselect the following options:
Border—Hides or displays the narrow edge of the window. This option must be
selected for the other options in the Control group to be available.
Caption—Hides or displays the bar at the top of the window where the window name
appears. This option must be selected to move the window within the larger project
window.
Size handles—If selected, lets you resize the window by clicking and dragging an
edge or corner of the window.
System menu—Hides or displays the small system menu icon and the Close Window
button located at the top of the window. This option is unavailable if the Caption option
has not been selected.
Minimize box—Hides or displays the standard Windows close box in the upper-right
corner of the window. This option is unavailable if the System menu option has not
been selected.
E Use the items in the Runtime Options group to configure how the window opens when
the project is run in OptoDisplay Runtime. Select or deselect the following options:
Always in memory (fastest access)—If selected, the window’s information is
loaded and saved in the computer’s memory when the project runs. Use this option for
a window that you know will be opened and closed often. This option is selected
automatically if you place an alarm graphic in a window.
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Normally, only windows that have been opened or iconified are saved in memory. If
you use this option with many windows, more computer memory is required, and your
OptoDisplay project will require more time to start up. Using this option with fewer
windows uses less memory, and your project will start up more quickly.
Open when there are new alarms—If selected, a closed or iconified window that
contains an alarm graphic will open when the alarm is triggered. This option is only
available if a window contains an alarm graphic that is set to summary or detailed
view. For more information on configuring alarms, see “Adding Alarm Graphics” on
page 8-37.
Disable close if there are active alarms—If selected, prevents an open window
that contains one or more active alarms from being closed. All active alarms in a
window must be acknowledged before the window can be closed. For more
information on working with alarms, see “Working with Alarms” on page 9-19.
Allow controller switching—If selected, all graphics in the window can use data
from the same OptoControl strategy running on a different controller. The operator
switches between controllers in Runtime. For more information on using data from
multiple controllers, see “Switching between Controllers” on page 9-14.
F To assign a password to a window, click here and then enter a password in the dialog
box that appears. When a password is assigned to a draw window, a closed window
cannot be opened without first entering the password. (Open windows that are iconified
or hidden are not affected.)
You cannot assign a password to a window that both contains an alarm and has the
Runtime option “Open when there are new alarms” selected.
G Use the options in the Behavior group to set how the window appears on-screen when
the project is run in OptoDisplay Runtime. Select one of the following options:
Child—prevents the window from being moved or minimized outside the boundaries
of the main project window.
Popup—lets the window be moved or minimized outside of the main project window.
H To set the background color of a window, click the color square and then select a color
in the dialog box that appears.
I Click OK to save your settings.
Opening and Closing Draw Windows
To open or close a draw window in your OptoDisplay project, do the following:
1. From the Windows menu, select Open or Close.
The Open Windows or Close Windows dialog box appears.
2. Click the name of the window you want to open or close, and then click OK.
See “Working with Multiple Windows” on page 5-5 to learn how to select or deselect
multiple window names.
Other ways of opening and closing windows include the following:
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WORKING WITH GRAPHICS
• To open a window that has been opened previously, select its name from the bottom of the
Windows menu.
• To close a window in which the system menu appears, click the Close Window button
in the upper-right corner.
Working with Multiple Windows
There are several ways to select or deselect multiple window names in the Open Windows or
Close Windows dialog box.
•
•
•
•
To select individual window names, hold down the SHIFT key and click each window name.
To highlight all names in the list, click Select All.
To not select any name in the list, click Deselect All.
To easily close or open all but one window, click on a single name and then click Inverse.
Drawing Graphic Objects
Once you’ve opened a project in OptoDisplay Configurator, you can use the drawing tools in the
OptoDisplay toolbox to create graphic objects in your active window.
Follow these general steps to draw a graphic object:
1. If your toolbox is not visible, select View➞Toolbox to see the toolbox as it appears below.
(You can close the toolbox by selecting View➞Hide Toolbox.)
2. Select a drawing tool from the toolbox by clicking on it.
The cursor will turn into a crosshair.
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WORKING WITH GRAPHICS
3. Click the crosshair in a window, then drag it in any direction to create a graphic.
In the example above, the Round Rectangle tool
was selected.
Using Key Combinations
By pressing various key combinations when using a drawing tool, you can alter the appearance
of the graphic object you draw. The table below shows key combinations that can be used with
various drawing tools:
Tool
Description
Use
Select tool
Used to select, move, and resize graphic objects.
Line tool
CTRL+Line
Draws straight lines.
tool
Rectangle tool
Draws squares and rectangles.
CTRL+Rectangle
tool
Draws squares with the reference point in the top
left corner.
SHIFT+Rectangle
tool
Draws rectangles with the reference point in the
center.
SHIFT+CTRL+Rectangle
tool
Round Rectangle tool
CTRL+Round
Rectangle
tool
SHIFT+Round
Rectangle
tool
SHIFT+CTRL+Round
Rectangle tool
5-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Draws constrained straight lines at angles of 90
degrees.
Draws squares with the reference point in the
center.
Draws squares and rectangles with rounded
corners.
Draws squares with rounded corners with the
reference point in the top left corner.
Draws rectangles with rounded corners with the
reference point in the center.
Draws squares with rounded corners with the
reference point in the center.
WORKING WITH GRAPHICS
Tool
Description
Use
Ellipse tool
Used to draw circles and ellipses.
CTRL+Ellipse
tool
Draws circles with the reference point in the top left
corner.
SHIFT+Ellipse
tool
Draws ellipses with the reference point in the
center.
SHIFT+CTRL+Ellipse
tool
Draws circles with the reference point in the
center.
Polygon tool
Used to draw polygons as follows:
• Drag and click to form vertex points.
• Double-click the last vertex to close the
polygon.
Sizing handles appear around the object. If you
can’t select the polygon later with the Select tool,
the polygon is not complete. Refresh the window
(View➞Redraw) to remove incomplete graphics.
Polyline tool
Used to draw connected lines as follows:
• Drag and click to draw connected lines.
• Double-click on the last line drawn to finish
the polyline.
Sizing handles appear around the object. If you
can’t select the polyline later with the Select tool,
the polyline is not complete. Refresh the window
(View➞Redraw) to remove incomplete graphics.
Bezier Curve tool
Used to draw curves as follows:
• Click at least four points in the draw window
to draw a curve.
• Thereafter, click points one at a time in
groups of three to continue drawing the
curve.
• Double-click the last point to finish the curve.
Sizing handles appear around the object. If you
can’t select the curve later with the Select tool, the
curve is not complete. Refresh the window
(View➞Redraw) to remove incomplete graphics.
Bitmap tool
Used to place bitmap graphic files selected with
File➞Choose Bitmap. Once the bitmap has been
chosen, just click to place the bitmap in the
window.
Text tool
Used to write text. Put your cursor where you want
the text to start. Type your text. When finished,
click the mouse away from the text you just typed.
Modify text by selecting it with the Select tool and
by using Edit➞Edit Text.
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WORKING WITH GRAPHICS
Tool
Description
Use
Trend tool
Used to draw graphs that display real-time data
against time.
See Chapter 7, “Working with Trends” for more
information.
SuperTrend tool
Used to draw graphs that display both real-time
and historical data against time.
See Chapter 7, “Working with Trends” for more
information.
Alarm tool
Used to draw objects that display alarms and other
status information.
See Chapter 8, “Configuring Trigger-Based
Events” for more information.
XY Plot tool
Used to draw graphs that display data plotted on x
and y axes.
See Chapter 7, “Working with Trends” for more
information.
Numeric Table tool
Used to display data from up to four numeric
tables.
See “Working with Numeric Tables” on page 5-22
for more information.
Selecting Graphic Objects
You can use the Select tool to choose one or more graphic objects in a draw window.
Selecting One Object
The simplest way to select a graphic object in a window is to just click on it with the Select tool.
You can also select a graphic by clicking and dragging.
1. Choose the Select tool
from the toolbox.
2. Click the cursor just outside the graphic object you want to select and drag the cursor
completely over the object.
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A selection box should appear as shown below:
After you release the mouse button, several sizing handles and one selection mark appear
around the selected object.
Selection Mark
Sizing Handle
Handles and Selection Marks
When a graphic object is selected, several solid black sizing handles appear, along with one
transparent selection mark. The selection mark shows you whether you’ve selected a single
graphic object or several objects in a group. Each graphic object in a group has a selection mark.
Sizing handles can be used to resize the graphic, which we’ll talk about a little later in this
chapter.
Selecting Several Objects
There are a few ways to select multiple graphic objects. The simplest way is to click and drag.
1. Choose the Select tool
from the toolbox.
2. Click the pointer just outside the objects you want to select and drag the pointer across the
group of objects you want to select.
Make sure that you include all the objects within the selection box that appears.
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After you release the mouse button, several sizing handles and one selection mark will
appear around the selected objects.
Another way to select several objects is to choose the first graphic using the Select tool, then
hold down the SHIFT key and click on each additional object you want included in the selection
group. Notice that a selection handle appears on each object you add to your group of objects.
Selecting All Objects
To select all the graphic objects that appear in your active window, choose Edit➞Select All
(ALT+E+S). You can also right-click and choose Select All from the pop-up menu.
Deselecting One or More Objects
The easiest way to deselect one or all graphics is to click anywhere outside the sizing handles.
All of the handles disappear and no graphics are selected.
From a selected group of objects, you may need to pick some graphics you actually want as part
of a final selection group. You can do this using key combinations.
• To deselect an object within a group of selected objects, hold down the SHIFT key and click
on the object you don’t want to include.
• To select only one object within a group of selected objects, hold down the CTRL key and
click on the object. This deselects all other objects.
Grouping and Locking Graphics
You can combine two or more graphic objects into a group so that they are handled as one object.
You can then manipulate the graphic as one unit. As a unit, the grouped graphics can be selected,
moved, resized, and have dynamic attributes assigned. You can also lock the position of a graphic
in a draw window so it can’t be moved.
CAUTION: If you group objects, OptoDisplay Runtime processes only the dynamic attributes
assigned to the group. Dynamic attributes assigned to individual members of a group are ignored.
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If a group is later ungrouped, any previously configured dynamic attributes of the individual
graphics will be recognized and processed in Runtime.
Grouping Objects
1. Select two or more graphics.
2. Choose Edit➞Group. (You can also right-click and choose Group from the pop-up menu.)
There will be no visible change, but the objects are collected into one group.
Ungrouping Objects
1. Select a set of graphics that were previously grouped.
2. Choose Edit➞Ungroup, or right-click and choose Ungroup from the pop-up menu.
You will see the sizing handles still appear around the former group. Click off the graphics
and then click on an individual graphic. You will see it’s not part of the group anymore.
Locking Objects in a Draw Window
After you’ve arranged several objects in a draw window, sometimes it can be useful to lock the
position of one or more items so they aren’t accidentally moved. To lock one or more objects,
select the item(s) and choose Edit➞Lock Position. To unlock objects, select the item(s) and
choose Edit➞Unlock Position.
Changing Lines and Fills
You can change the line and fill style of objects you’ve already drawn, or set the default for
objects you’re about to draw.
NOTE: If you select more than one object and the graphics have different line or fill attributes, no
attributes will appear in the menus and dialog boxes for each attribute. However, you can still
select new attributes for all selected lines.
Applying or Changing Line Attributes
1. Do one of the following:
• To change attributes for one or more existing objects, select the object(s) using the
Select tool.
• To set attributes for subsequent graphics that you create, do not select any object.
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2. Choose the line attributes you want to apply to the selected object(s):
• To change the line color, select Style➞Line Color, then choose a color from the Color
dialog box and click OK. (You can also right-click the object, then choose Line➞Color
from the pop-up menu.)
• To change the line width, select Style➞Line Width, then enter a pen width in the Pen
Width dialog box and click OK. Pen widths are measured in pixels. (You can also
right-click the object, then choose Line➞Width from the pop-up menu.)
• To change the line style, select Style➞Line Style, then choose a line style from the list
that appears (shown below). (You can also right-click the object, choose Line➞Style
from the pop-up menu, then select a line style from the list that appears.)
• To change the opaque or transparent attributes of a line, select the appropriate
attribute from the Style menu. Note that these attributes can be applied only to
non-solid lines with a line width of one pixel.
The transparent attribute lets an object’s color show between the dashes in a line, and
the opaque attribute lets the background color of the window show between the
dashes in a line. Samples of opaque and transparent line attributes are shown in the
example below.
Opaque
Transparent
Applying or Changing Fill Attributes
1. Do one of the following:
• To change attributes for one or more existing objects, select the object(s) using the
Select tool.
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• To set attributes for subsequent graphics that you create, do not select any object.
2. Choose the fill attributes you want to apply to the selected object(s):
• To change the fill color, select Style➞Fill Color, then choose a color from the Color
dialog box and click OK. (You can also right-click, choose Fill➞Color from the pop-up
menu, choose a color from the Color dialog box, and click OK.)
• To change the fill pattern, select Style➞Fill Pattern and choose a fill attribute. A fill
color other than white needs to be in effect in order to see the new fill pattern. (You
can also right-click, choose Fill➞Pattern from the pop-up menu, and choose a pattern.)
• To change the background color used behind a fill pattern, select Style➞Background
Color, then choose a color from the Color dialog box and click OK. (You can also
right-click, choose Background➞Color from the pop-up menu, choose a color from the
Color dialog box, and click OK.)
Importing Graphics
You can easily import bitmap graphics, Windows metafile graphics, and JPEG images into an
OptoDisplay window to enhance or add detail to your operator interface. For your convenience,
OptoDisplay also includes the Symbol Factory, a large library of graphics designed especially for
industrial applications.
A bitmap graphic is a picture, drawing, or other image saved in Microsoft Windows BMP file
format. Bitmap graphic files have the file extension .bmp. If you’d like to use bitmap graphics in
your project which have been saved in another graphic file format, such as TIFF (file extension
.tif), you must first convert the file to BMP format. Commercial and shareware applications that
can do this are widely available; two popular commercial image editing and conversion
applications for Microsoft Windows are Paint Shop Pro from Jasc Software, and Photoshop from
Adobe Systems Incorporated.
A Windows metafile is a drawing saved in the Microsoft Windows metafile (WMF) format.
Metafile graphics have the file extensions .wmf or .emf. Unlike a bitmap graphic, a metafile
maintains its resolution when resized and will not appear jagged or blurred. There is a variety of
clip art and other graphics available in WMF format; for example, Microsoft Office often includes
an assortment of clip art in WMF format.
The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) file format is a highly compressed format commonly
used for photographs. This format is often used for displaying images in a Web browser.
Importing a Bitmap Graphic
To import a bitmap graphic into your OptoDisplay project, first choose the bitmap image you want
to use, and then use the Bitmap tool to place the bitmap in the window.
1. Select File➞Choose Bitmap.
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2. In the Choose A Bitmap dialog box that appears, navigate to the folder that contains the
bitmap graphic you want to use, and then select the file name and click Open.
3. Select the Bitmap tool
the window.
in the toolbox and click the pointer in the desired location in
The bitmap is centered at the location you have clicked.
Importing a Metafile or JPEG Graphic
To import a Windows metafile or JPEG graphic into your OptoDisplay project, do the following:
1. Select Edit➞Paste from File➞Import (Metafile or JPEG). (You can also right-click and
select Import Metafile or Import JPEG from the pop-up menu.)
2. In the Import dialog box that appears, navigate to the folder that contains the graphic you
want to use, and then select the file name and click Open.
The selected file is placed in the active draw window.
You can also import a metafile or JPEG graphic used in another program by copying or cutting the
graphic to the Windows clipboard, and then pasting it in the project draw window.
Importing a Graphic from the Symbol Factory
To import a graphic as a metafile graphic from the Symbol Factory into your OptoDisplay project,
do the following:
1. Select Edit➞Paste from File➞Symbol Factory. (You can also right-click and select Symbol
Factory from the pop-up menu.)
The Symbol Factory window opens.
2. Browse through the categories and thumbnails of graphics until you find the graphic that
you want to use.
3. Click the graphic and drag it into the OptoDisplay draw window.
You can also select Edit➞Paste as Picture (.wmf) Only.
The selected graphic is now available as a metafile graphic in the active draw window. The
Symbol Factory window will remain open until you close it, or until you exit OptoDisplay
Configurator.
Bitmap Graphics in Symbol Factory
Although Symbol Factory graphics are provided as metafiles, you can also import these graphics
as bitmaps. To import a graphic as a bitmap graphic from the Symbol Factory into your
OptoDisplay project, do the following:
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1. Select Edit➞Paste from File➞Symbol Factory. (You can also right-click and select Symbol
Factory from the pop-up menu.)
The Symbol Factory window opens.
2. Browse through the categories and thumbnails of graphics until you find the graphic that
you want to use.
3. Click the graphic and then select Edit➞Copy.
4. Switch to the OptoDisplay draw window and select Edit➞Paste.
The selected graphic is now available as a bitmap graphic in the active draw window. The
Symbol Factory window will remain open until you close it, or until you exit OptoDisplay
Configurator.
Saving Objects as Bitmaps
After creating one or more objects in a draw window, you may want to save the object as a
bitmap graphic file. This is useful, for example, if you want to document your operator interface.
NOTE: Saving a graphic object as a bitmap graphic file is not the same as copying an object, then
pasting it into another window. When an object is saved as a bitmap, it loses all dynamic
attributes and other properties it has been configured with.
1. Use the Select tool to select the graphic you want to save as a bitmap.
If you don’t select a graphic, the entire active window will be saved as a bitmap file.
2. Select File➞Save as Bitmap.
3. In the Save As Bitmap dialog box that appears, navigate to the desired folder and enter a
file name. (You can enter a three-letter extension other than .bmp, but the file will still be
saved as a bitmap image.)
4. Click Save to save the image.
Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting
There are two ways that you can make copies of graphics you’ve created or added to a window.
You can copy one or more graphics to the Windows clipboard, or duplicate the selected graphic(s)
in the same window without affecting the contents of the clipboard.
Copying and Pasting an Object
1. Select one or more graphic objects.
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2. Choose Edit➞Copy. (The keyboard shortcut for this command is CTRL+C or CTRL+INS. You can
also right-click and choose Copy from the pop-up menu.)
The selected objects are copied to the Windows clipboard.
3. Click on the window where you want to paste the object(s).
4. Choose Edit➞Paste. (The keyboard shortcut for this command is CTRL+V or CTRL+INS. You
can also right-click and choose Paste from the pop-up menu.)
The clipboard contents are pasted in the center of the active window.
Duplicating an Object
1. Select one or more objects.
2. Choose Edit➞Duplicate. (The keyboard shortcut for this command is CTRL+D. You can also
right-click and choose Duplicate from the pop-up menu.)
A copy of the graphic is placed immediately below the selected graphic. Note that the
contents of the Windows clipboard are not affected by duplicating an object.
Moving and Resizing Graphics
To build your operator interface, you will need to be able to position, resize, and reshape graphic
objects. This is done using the Select tool with different options. (Objects can also be positioned
and resized by entering values in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box; see Chapter 6,
“Using Animated Graphics,” for more information.)
Moving Graphics
1. Choose one or more objects to move using the Select tool
.
2. To move an object, click the object (but not on a sizing handle) and drag it to the new
position.
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You can’t drag objects from one window to another. You must copy or cut objects to move
them between windows.
Moving object
from here...
...to here.
Resizing Graphics
1. Select one or more objects to resize using the Select tool
.
2. To resize an object, position the pointer over a square handle, click, and drag.
As illustrated below, the pointer turns into an arrow, and the size of the object changes
relative to the sizing handle you’re dragging.
3. When the object(s) are the size you want, release the mouse button.
Resizing Multiple Graphics to Equal Dimensions
When multiple graphics are selected, they can be resized equally so that all the graphics have
the same height and width.
1. Using the Select tool
, choose two or more objects to resize.
2. Select Edit➞Size, then one of the following options:
• Grow to Largest Height—All selected objects are resized to the height of the tallest
object selected.
• Grow to Largest Width—All selected objects are resized to the width of the widest
object selected.
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• Shrink to Smallest Height—All selected objects are resized to the height of the
smallest object selected.
• Shrink to Smallest Width—All selected objects are resized to the width of the least
wide object selected.
You can also select these options by right-clicking on the selected objects, selecting Size
from the pop-up menu, then choosing a Grow or Shrink option.
Reshaping Graphics
You can adjust the individual points that make up a polyline, polygon, or Bezier curve object.
1. Using the Select tool
, select a polyline, polygon, or Bezier curve object.
2. Select Edit➞Edit Points, or right-click and choose “Edit Points” from the pop-up menu.
3. Move the cursor over a point on the selected object.
When the cursor is over a point on the object, the point is highlighted with a small black
square.
4. Click the highlighted point, drag it to the desired location, and then release the mouse
button.
The highlighted point will appear in the new location.
5. When you are done adjusting points on the object, click outside of the object to deselect it.
Changing Stacking Order
As objects are placed in draw windows, they’re assigned a stacking order (or “Z-order”) to define
which object appears in front of or in back of another object. The position of objects in this
stacking order can be modified as follows:
1. Select one object, or multiple objects that have been grouped together.
2. Choose Edit➞Z-Order and select Bring to Front or Send to Back. (You can also right-click,
choose Z-Order from the pop-up menu, and select Bring to Front or Send to Back.)
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As shown below, if you select Bring to Front, the graphic is moved to the front of other
graphics. Likewise, if you select Send to Back, the graphic is moved behind other graphics.
Before Bring to Front
After Bring to Front
Deleting Objects
There are several ways to delete an object in a window. Depending on the commands you use,
the method you choose may affect the contents of the Windows clipboard.
1. Select one or more objects. (Use Edit➞Select All to select all objects.)
2. Delete the graphics using one of the following methods:
• To cut an object and save it in the Windows clipboard so you can use it elsewhere,
choose Edit➞Cut, or press SHIFT+DEL, or press CTRL+X, or right-click and choose Cut from
the pop-up menu.
You can paste the object into another window or elsewhere in the same window.
• To permanently delete an object, choose Edit➞Delete, or press the DEL key, or
right-click and choose Delete from the pop-up menu.
The objects are not copied to the clipboard and cannot be retrieved.
Aligning Graphics
You can align selected objects based on common edges, or based on common centers through
objects. You can also adjust the space between objects.
1. Select the objects you want to align.
You have to select at least two objects to enable this command.
2. Select the Edit➞Align command and choose an option to base the alignment on. (You can
also right-click and choose Align from the pop-up menu.)
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The following illustration shows the results of applying the different alignment options:
Before Alignment
After Left Align
After Center Align
After Right Align
After Top Align
After Middle Align
After Bottom Align
After Space Evenly Vertically
After Space Evenly Horizontally
Rotating and Flipping Graphics
You can rotate objects in 90° increments, or flip graphics around a central horizontal or vertical
axis.
1. Select one or more objects.
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2. Choose Edit➞Flip/Rotate and select an option, or right-click and choose Flip/Rotate from
the pop-up menu.
•
•
•
•
To flip a graphic from right to left (or vice versa), choose Flip Horizontal.
To flip a graphic from top to bottom (or vice versa), choose Flip Vertical.
To rotate a graphic clockwise 90°, select Rotate Clockwise.
To rotate a graphic counterclockwise 90°, select Rotate CounterClockwise.
Working with Text
The Text tool is a convenient way to label, title, and add impact to your graphics. Text that you
add to a graphic can be changed at any time, and formatted using different fonts, font sizes, and
colors.
Adding Text
1. Choose the Text tool from the toolbox, or right-click and select Text from the pop-up menu.
2. Click the cursor where you want to place your text.
You can also choose to place the text somewhere other than its final location, work on the
text until it’s ready to use, and then move it to the desired location.
3. Type the text.
4. When you’re done with the text you want to type, click outside the text area.
The text you’ve just typed is now an object, and you can select it and manipulate it like
other objects.
Editing Text
1. With the Select tool, choose the text object you want to modify.
2. Choose Edit➞Edit Text, or right-click and choose Edit Text from the pop-up menu.
3. Enter the new text in the Edit Text dialog box that appears, then click OK.
The text object is now modified with the new text.
Formatting Text
1. With the Select tool, choose the text object you want to modify.
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2. Choose a formatting option from the Text menu, or right-click the text object and select an
option from the pop-up menu. The following formatting options are available:
• Font—Changes the font family used for the text in a text object. You can use any fixed
•
•
•
•
or TrueType font family installed on the computer.
Size—Changes the size of the characters in a text object.
Color—Defines the color in which the text appears.
Background—Defines the color of the area directly behind a text object. This
formatting option is only visible when the Opaque attribute is selected.
Style—Changes the weight, italicization, and other characteristics of the characters in
a text object. Styles available are Normal, Bold, Italic, Underline, and Strikeout.
The text object is now modified with the format changes.
See“Text Menu” on page D-12 of Appendix D, “OptoDisplay Menu Reference” for additional
information on creating and formatting a text object.
Working with Numeric Tables
Using ioDisplay’s Numeric Table tool
, you can add an object to display the contents of
numeric tables used in an ioControl project. In a single onscreen object, you can display the
contents of up to four separate numeric tables. The tables can contain either 32-bit integers or
floating point values.
Creating a Numeric Table
1. Select the Numeric Table tool in the toolbox.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
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The numeric table object that appears should resemble the example below:
Configuring a Numeric Table
After creating a numeric table object in a draw window, you must specify which table(s) will be
displayed. For each table, you can optionally specify which table elements will be displayed.
1. Double-click the numeric table object with the Select tool.
The Configure Table dialog box appears.
2. In the Appearance section, choose the background color and font used in the numeric table
object.
– To select background color, click the white square next to Background Color, select a
color in the Windows color selector that appears, and then click OK.
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– To select the font used, click Font, select a font in the Windows font selector that
appears, and then click OK. If you want the header of each table column to use the font
you selected, select “Use same font for header.”
3. In the Configure Tables window, do the following for each table you want to display:
a. Click Table.
The Configure Tables dialog box appears.
b. Enter a description for the table.
c. Click the Tag Selection button
and in the Tag Selection dialog box that appears,
select a table to display. To learn more about configuring tags in your project, see
“Configuring Tags” on page 4-5.
d. To display a range of elements in the table you select, enter a start index and the
number of elements to be displayed.
For a selected numeric
table, enter a starting
index (usually 0) and the
number of table elements
to use (500 maximum).
e. Click OK to exit the Tag Selection dialog box.
f. Click OK to exit the Configure Tables dialog box.
g. If you want to display another table in the numeric table object, click another Table
button, otherwise click OK to complete configuration.
Printing Graphics
To print the displayed windows, select File➞Print to display the Print dialog box. If the settings
are correct for your printer, click OK.
If you need to change printer settings, click the Properties button in the Print dialog box. You can
also change the printer settings without printing the Configurator screens by selecting the
File➞Printer Setup command.
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CHAPTER 6
Chapter 6
Using Animated Graphics
Introduction
This chapter describes how to animate graphics to show how I/O data and other values change
in real time. It also describes how OptoDisplay scans data from controllers to update its graphics,
and how you can adjust this scanning to optimize your OptoDisplay project for best performance.
In This Chapter
About Animated Graphics ...................... 6-1
Viewing Dynamic Attributes........................ 6-34
Adding Dynamic Attributes to Graphics. 6-2
Scanning to Update Graphics ...................... 6-34
Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes6-31
About Animated Graphics
As your OptoControl strategy runs on the controller, values and states of tags in the OptoControl
strategy database are continuously updated. OptoDisplay uses this changing data to modify
attributes (such as size, position, and color) of the graphics that you have connected to the tags.
The end result is an animated, continually updated display that shows status information about
a control process.
To animate graphics, you must assign dynamic attributes to objects you’ve drawn. These are
attributes that make the graphic object change based on the values read from or sent to
controllers, based on events that happened, or based on how the operator interacts with the
interface.
Two types of dynamic attributes can be assigned to a graphic object: controller-driven attributes
and operator-driven attributes.
Controller-driven attributes are always assigned to a particular tag (I/O point, value, etc.) in
an OptoControl strategy running on an attached controller. This type of attribute changes a
graphic as tags are read from a controller. For example, if a tag reflects a lower-level alarm
condition for a process, the attached graphic can change color to red to alert the operator.
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Operator-driven attributes are assigned to a graphic object. These attributes change the
graphic as an operator interacts with the interface. As a result, events may be triggered, or new
tag values may be sent to an attached controller. For example, if an operator clicks a graphic that
looks like a button, a valve is closed.
Adding Dynamic Attributes to Graphics
As you finish drawing your operator interface, you can start assigning dynamic attributes to some
of the on-screen graphics. We will begin by explaining the general process you’ll use to assign
dynamic attributes to an object, and then give detailed explanations of each attribute that can
be assigned.
Assigning a Dynamic Attribute
1. Choose the Select tool from the toolbox and double-click the graphic to which you want to
assign a dynamic attribute. (You can also click the graphic once and select Edit➞Edit
Dynamic Attributes.)
NOTE: Dynamic attributes can only be assigned to one object at a time. If you want several
objects to have the same attributes, select the objects, and then choose Edit➞Group to
make them one object. (You can also right-click on the selected graphics and choose Group
from the pop-up menu.) Remember that if you ungroup the objects, the attributes you
configured when they were a group aren’t retained.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box appears:
At the top of the dialog box is a brief description of the item selected, including its location
(x and y coordinates) and dimensions (width and height) in the draw window. You can
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change the location and dimensions of the graphic by entering new values in place of the
current ones. (You can’t change the dimensions of a text graphic.)
2. Choose an attribute you want to configure in either the Controller-Driven Attributes or
Operator-Driven Attributes list, and then click the Edit button for that list.
The dialog box that appears will differ depending on the attribute you selected. The options
and features of each attribute are covered in detail in “Available Dynamic Attributes,”
which starts on page 6-6.
3. Configure the attribute as required, and then click OK to return to the Graphic Dynamic
Attributes dialog box.
4. If you made any changes to operator-driven attributes, complete these options:
• Focus-frame enabled—If this option is checked, a light border will appear around
the graphic in Runtime when the operator moves the cursor over it. This border can be
used as a visual aid to let the operator know that an event will occur when the graphic
is clicked. (You must still configure additional dynamic attributes for the graphic so
these events can occur.)
• Beep enabled—If this option is checked, the operator will hear a beep when the
graphic is clicked. Use this as an audio confirmation.
• Hot Key—This feature associates a keystroke sequence with a graphic that has a
dynamic attribute assigned and configured. A hot key is a key on the keyboard that,
when pressed (sometimes in combination with an optional CTRL or SHIFT key), will
activate the associated graphic’s operator-driver attributes. This lets the operator use a
keystroke sequence instead of using the mouse to click on the graphic, allowing
OptoDisplay Runtime to be operated without a mouse or similar device.
NOTE: The hot key will work only for graphics that are in an opened or minimized
window; closed windows will not be affected.
5. To clear an attribute you’ve configured, simply highlight the attribute and click Clear.
You should see an empty checkbox beside the attribute. Sometimes after you configure an
attribute and return to the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, the Not Available
indicator
appears in the checkbox for another attribute. This symbol means that you
cannot configure that type of dynamic attribute for this object as a result of the attribute
you just configured.
6. When you’re done configuring dynamic attributes for this object, click OK to save your
settings and close the dialog box.
Assigning Multiple Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic
If you assign more than one dynamic attribute to a graphic object, the attributes will execute in
the order in which they were assigned when you run the project in OptoDisplay Runtime. For
example, if you assign a button the Send Discrete dynamic attribute, and then assign the same
button the Send Value dynamic attribute, that is the order in which the attributes will execute
when the operator clicks the button.
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USING ANIMATED GRAPHICS
Security Settings for Graphics and Dynamic Attributes
Your application requirements and the environment in which it is used may require strict control
over accessing and using the operator interface you create in OptoDisplay. You can configure
your OptoDisplay project to provide this level of security by defining user authentication
permissions for individual onscreen graphic objects. This authentication is based on the users
and groups defined in a Microsoft Windows network.
When the OptoDisplay project is run in OptoDisplay Runtime, an operator who clicks on an object
with security permissions is prompted to enter a Windows network username and password. If
the login information is incorrect, or if the operator is not permitted to use that object, an alert
message is displayed. If runtime operator logging is active for the project, the login
attempt—successful or not—will be added to the runtime operator log.
Important Considerations for User- and Group-Level Security Settings
There are several important considerations to keep in mind when configuring user- and
group-level authentication for a graphic object.
• By default, all operators have permission to use an object. It isn’t necessary to configure
security if all operators will have permission to change the tag value for the object.
• Security permissions cannot be configured for the Send Discrete dynamic attribute when it
is configured as “Direct” or “Reverse”.
• When the project is running in OptoDisplay Runtime and an object is clicked, “Deny
Access” security permissions have priority over “Grant Access” permissions. This means
that if a user has been granted access, but is a member of a group that has been denied
access, the user will not be able to use the onscreen object.
Configuring Security Permissions for a Graphic Object
To assign user- and group-based security permissions to a graphic object, do the following:
1. Double-click the graphic object to which you will assign one or more operator-driven
dynamic attributes.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box opens. Note that the Security button on the
right side is not active.
2. Double-click an operator-driven attribute that you want to use, configure it as needed, and
then click OK.
NOTE: Security permissions are not applied to individual dynamic attributes, but are applied
to all dynamic attributes selected before you click the Security button. If a graphic object
needs to have multiple dynamic attributes, make sure to select and configure all attributes
before configuring security settings.
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In the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box that is again visible, the Security button is
now active.
After configuring one or
more operator-driven
dynamic attributes,
click Security to
configure user- and
group-level
authentication for the
graphic object.
3. Click Security.
The Define Security Permissions dialog box opens.
A
B
C
D
E
F
A Select the Windows network domain that contains the users and/or groups to whom you
B
C
D
E
F
want to grant or deny access to the graphic object.
Select the Windows user or group to whom you want to grant or deny access to the
object.
For the selected user or group, select Grant Access or Deny Access.
Click Show Configured Users to view all permissions currently assigned for the graphic
object.
Click Clear All to erase all configured permissions for the graphic object.
Click OK to save changes, or keep Cancel to close the dialog box without any changes
being made.
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Available Dynamic Attributes
You can add the dynamic attributes listed below to a graphic. Note that not all attribute types
are available for all types of graphics; only attributes that can be used with a particular graphic
type appear in the Dynamic Attributes dialog box.
Dynamic Attribute
Type
See Page
Alarm Point
controller-driven
6-6
Controller Status
controller-driven
6-7
Display Controller Status
operator-driven
6-8
Download Recipe
operator-driven
6-9
Execute Menu Item
operator-driven
6-9
Fill Color
controller-driven
6-10
Horizontal Position
controller-driven
6-12
Horizontal Size (Width)
controller-driven
6-13
Horizontal Slider
operator-driven
6-14
Launch Application
operator-driven
6-15
Line Color
controller-driven
6-16
Rotate
controller-driven
6-17
Send Discrete
operator-driven
6-18
Send String
operator-driven
6-19
Send Value
operator-driven
6-20
Text Color
controller-driven
6-21
Text In (from Controller)
controller-driven
6-22
Upload Recipe
operator-driven
6-24
Vertical Position
controller-driven
6-25
Vertical Size (Height)
controller-driven
6-26
Vertical Slider
operator-driven
6-27
Visibility/Blink
controller-driven
6-28
Windows
operator-driven
6-29
Alarm Point
Use this attribute to change the color of a graphic object based on the state of an alarm point.
You can use this attribute with circles, rectangles, and polygons. By default, the color of the
graphic corresponds to the Normal, or unalarmed, state. For more information about configuring
alarm points and using alarms in a project, see “Alarming” on page 8-28.
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Double-click Alarm Point in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
A The names of the alarm points configured for the project appear here. Click an alarm
point in the list, and then set the colors that will be used for the graphic object in the
Discrete group (B) or the Value group (C).
Alarm points that monitor digital points are configured as discrete alarm points, and
have only two states: On and Off. Alarm points that monitor analog points are
configured as value alarm points have the states HiHi, Hi, Normal, Lo LoLo, Ack’ed, and
Silenced. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 8-28 for more information about
setting up alarm points.
B To select colors for a discrete alarm point’s On and Off states, click the color box for each
state and then choose a color in the dialog box that appears. If you have selected an
alarm point for a digital I/O point, only the Discrete group will appear in the Dynamic
Attribute - Alarm Point dialog box.
C To select colors for a value alarm point’s HiHi, Hi, Normal, Lo LoLo, Ack’ed, and Silenced
states, click the color box for each state and then choose a color in the dialog box that
appears. If you have selected an alarm point for an analog I/O point, only the Value
group will appear in the Dynamic Attribute - Alarm Point dialog box.
D Click OK to save your settings.
Controller Status
Use this attribute to change the color of a graphic object based on the status of one or more
controllers. You can use this attribute with circles, rectangles, and polygons.
NOTE: When the Controller Status dynamic attribute is selected, all other input dynamic
attributes are disabled.
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If the Controller Status attribute is used to monitor multiple controllers, the graphic object will
display the status color for the controller that is in the most critical condition. Least critical to
most critical status is shown below:
Least Critical
Most Critical
Attached
Last Known
Value
Comm
Failure
Double-click Controller Status in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
A The names of the controllers configured for the project appear here.
Select a controller. To select multiple controllers, hold down the CTRL key and click
each one you want to select.
B To select all controllers in the list, click Select All.
C To select colors for a controller’s state, click the color box for the state and then choose
a color in the dialog box that appears.
D Click OK to save your settings.
Display Controller Status
Use this attribute to display status information about a controller, or manually attach or detach
it, by clicking on a graphic object. You can use this attribute with circles, rectangles, and
polygons.
To configure this attribute, do the following:
1. Double-click Display Controller Status in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box.
2. Select a controller from the list that appears.
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3. Click OK to save your settings.
Download Recipe
Use this attribute to download a recipe file to a controller when a graphic is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text. For more information about recipes, see “Recipes” on page 8-19.
Double-click Download Recipe in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
B
A
C
D
E
F
A Enter the directory location of the recipe file. Use the Browse button B to quickly enter
B
C
D
E
F
a directory name.
Click to quickly find the recipe file directory for A. Use the Select Download File
Directory dialog box that appears to navigate to the desired directory, and then click OK.
Choose the source of the recipe file name:
• If you choose Fixed Name, D is highlighted.
• If you choose Prompt for name, the operator will be prompted for the recipe file
name.
• If you choose From Mistic string, E is highlighted.
If Fixed Name was selected in C, enter the name of the recipe file located in Directory
(A). Notice the file extension is .rcp.
If From Mistic String was selected in D, use the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. The Tag Selection dialog box
is displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more
information about this dialog box.
Click OK to save your settings.
Execute Menu Item
Use this attribute to run a single Runtime command when an object is clicked. This is useful if
you want to hide the menu bar and only allow limited access to certain items. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text.
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Double-click Execute Menu Item in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
Select a command from the Menu Item list and click OK. (Click Cancel to close the dialog box
without making any changes.)
Fill Color
Use this attribute to change a graphic’s fill color based on a tag value from the controller. This is
a controller-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and
polygons.
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Double-click Fill Color in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
B
A
C
D
E
F
G
H
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As the tag
B
C
D
E
F
G
value changes in the OptoControl strategy, the graphic’s fill color will change.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a discrete value (with a value of ON or
OFF), or whether it’s a current value you’re looking for. If you choose Discrete, the D
group is highlighted; if you choose Current value, the E group is highlighted. The choice
you make in this selection must match the tag choice you can made in A.
Select the color you want for the ON state by clicking on the color field below ON. The
Color dialog box appears; choose a color and then click OK. Repeat this step for the OFF
state.
Enter a value in each Cutoff Value field to specify the range of values for each color
group configured in the color fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each
Cutoff value field must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter
one. After the warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff value field requiring a value.
To configure a color for the range set up in E, click on a color field. The Color dialog box
appears; choose a color and then click OK. Repeat this step for each color field you want
to change.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from each Cutoff value to determine the actual
value at which the color will change to the next color field. For example, let’s say the
Cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the color fields are red, yellow, green, blue, and
black. The Deadband is 3. A tag with a value of 9 is read. The next tag value read is 11.
The graphic color remains yellow because the value read is within the deadband range,
even though a value of 11 is in the green range.
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H Click OK to save your settings.
Horizontal Position
Use this attribute to adjust the horizontal position of a graphic based on a tag value from the
controller. This is a controller-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round
rectangles, ellipses, and polygons, polylines, curves, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Horizontal Position in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As the tag
B
C
D
E
F
G
value changes, the graphic’s horizontal position is changed.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about
configuring this dialog box.
Enter the leftmost and rightmost value for the tagname in A. For example, if you know
your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a
subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
Enter the leftmost and rightmost movement the object can change. The movement units
are in pixels. Suppose your left and right values are 0 and 100, and your left and right
movements are 0 and 200. When the tag value is 50, the object will be moved 100 pixels
to the right.
Select the reference point for the object. The choices are left, center, and right. The
Horizontal Size (Width) dynamic attribute must also be configured in order for this option
to affect the graphic.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine if the graphic’s movement will actually change. Using our previous example
in D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 50. The next tag
reading must be greater than 55 in order for the graphic to move.
Click OK to save your settings.
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Horizontal Size (Width)
Use this attribute to adjust the width of a graphic based on a tag value from the controller. This
is a controller-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, polylines, and curves.
Double-click Horizontal Size (Width) in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As the tag
B
C
D
E
F
G
value changes in the OptoControl strategy, the graphic’s width is changed.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Enter the maximum and minimum value for the tagname in A. For example, if you know
your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a
subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
Enter the maximum and minimum percentage the object can change. The percentage
range is from 0 to 1,000 percent. Suppose your minimum value is 0 and your maximum
value is 10, and the minimum and maximum percentages range is 0 to 200. When the
tag value is 10, the object will be twice as big as you’ve originally drawn it. When the
tag value is 5, the object will be the same size you’ve drawn it, which is 100 percent.
Enter the anchor point for the object. This is the reference point on the object from which
the graphic changes. The choices are left, center, and right.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine if the graphic’s width will actually change. For example, let’s say the values
are 0 to 100, the percentages are 0 to 100, and the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has
a value of 10. The next tag reading must be greater than 15 in order for the graphic to
change.
Click OK to save your settings.
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Horizontal Slider
Use this attribute to configure a horizontal slider when a graphic is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, and bitmaps.
Double-click Horizontal Slider in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. The distance
B
C
D
E
F
the horizontal slider is moved affects the value sent to the tag in the controller.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Enter the leftmost and rightmost value for the tagname in A. For example, if you know
your tag values can be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a
subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
Enter the leftmost and rightmost movement the object can change. The movement units
are in pixels. Suppose your left and right values are 0 and 100, and your left and right
movements are 0 and 200. If you move the tag 100 pixels to the right, the tag value sent
will be 50.
Select the reference point for the object. The choices are left, center, and right. Note
that you must also separately configure the Horizontal Size (Width) dynamic attribute to
use this option.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the tag value should be changed.
Using our previous example in D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value
of 50. The next graphic movement must be greater than 55 in order for the tag value to
change.
G Click OK to save your settings.
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Launch Application
Use this attribute to start an application when a graphic is clicked. This is an operator-driven
attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Launch Application in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
B
D
A
C
E
F
G
H
A Enter the working directory you want to be in when you start the application. Use the
Browse button B to quickly enter a directory name.
B Click to find the directory for A. The Working Directory Selection dialog box appears.
C
D
E
F
G
H
Use it to navigate to the desired directory and click OK when you’re done.
Enter the complete path and file name of the application you want to launch. Use D to
quickly enter the path.
Click to find the path and application name for C. The Application Manager Executable
File Selection dialog box appears. Use it to select an application and click Open when
you’re done.
(Optional) Enter the name of a string tag to use to append to the path entered in C. The
string appended may be a file name the launched application should open. Use the Tag
Selection button
to choose the tagname. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed
so you can select a tag. Use
to clear an entry you may have made in this field.
Select Single Instance to have OptoDisplay Runtime check whether the graphic has
previously launched an application that is currently running. If the graphic has not
previously started a currently running application, the application will be launched.
Select Multiple instances to allow the graphic to start more than one instance of an
application.
Note that the Single Instance option doesn’t limit the number of active sessions of an
application that is launched by other graphics and triggers. For example, if the graphic
launches a Microsoft Word session, that graphic can’t launch any other application
until the Word session ends. However, a trigger-based event can launch a second,
separate session of Word, so two Microsoft Word sessions will be running
concurrently.
Click here to configure how the application window will appear. Your choices are
Normal, Minimized, and Maximized.
Click OK to save your settings.
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Line Color
Use this attribute to change a line color or the line color around a graphic based on a tag value
from the controller. This is a controller-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles,
round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, polylines, and Bezier curves.
Double-click Line Color in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
B
A
C
D
E
F
G
H
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking B. As this tag value changes in the
B
C
D
E
F
G
OptoControl strategy, the graphic’s line color changes.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a discrete value (with a value of ON or
OFF), or whether it’s a current value you’re looking for. If you choose Discrete, the D
group is highlighted; if you choose Current value, the E group is highlighted.
Select the color you want for the ON state by clicking on the color field below ON. The
Color dialog box appears; choose a color and click OK. Repeat this step for the OFF state.
Enter a value in each Cutoff Value box to specify the range of values for each color group
configured in the color fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each Cutoff
value box must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter one.
After the warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff Value box requiring a value.
To configure a color for the range set up in E, click on a color field. The Color dialog box
appears from which you can choose a color and then click OK to accept. Repeat this step
for each color field you want to change.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from each cutoff value to determine the actual
value at which the color will change to the next color field.
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For example, let’s say the cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the color fields are
red, yellow, green, blue, and black. The deadband is 3. A tag with a value of 9 is read.
The next tag value read is 11. The graphic’s color remains yellow because the value
read is within the deadband range, even though a value of 11 is in the green range.
H Click OK to save your settings.
Rotate
Use this attribute to rotate a line based on a tag value from the controller. This is a
controller-driven attribute and is available for lines only.
Double-click Rotate in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
value changes in the OptoControl strategy, the graphic’s line rotates.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
C These fields are used to specify the return data from the tag that will produce the
maximum counterclockwise (CCW) and maximum clockwise (CW) rotation. The Value at
Max CCW may be either less than or greater than the Value at Max CW, so that rotation
may proceed in either direction as the data from the tag increases or decreases.
Therefore, the term “exceeds” is used below to indicate a value that may be either
greater than or less than the CCW or CW Max value.
When the tag returns data that is equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CCW to
OptoDisplay, the graphic will rotate counterclockwise as far as possible, as specified
by the Max CCW Rotation value explained below. When the tag returns data that is
equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CW Rotation to OptoDisplay, the graphic will
rotate clockwise as far as possible, as specified by the Max CW Rotation value
explained below.
D These fields are used to specify the maximum counterclockwise and clockwise rotation
angle that the graphic may undergo (in degrees from its configured location). The
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entered values must be non-negative numbers. The Max CCW Rotation angle is
achieved when the tag returns data that is equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CCW,
as explained above. The Max CW Rotation angle is achieved when the tag returns data
that is equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CW, as explained earlier in this section.
E The rotation anchor point is used to specify the fixed location that the graphic rotates
around. This location is specified in terms of an offset (in units of pixels) from the
centerpoint of the graphic at its configured location.
In the Horizontal field, enter a negative value to specify a position that is to the left of
the configured location or enter a positive value to specify a position that is to the right
of the configured location. In the Vertical field, enter a negative value to specify a
position that is above the configured location or enter a positive value to specify a
position that is below the configured location. If a value of zero is specified for both
fields, then the graphic will rotate about its centerpoint.
F Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine if the line’s rotation angle should change.
For example, let’s say the deadband is 2. A tag with a value of 50 is read. The next tag
value read is 51. The line does not rotate because the value read is within the deadband
range.
G Click OK to save your settings.
Send Discrete
Use this attribute to send a discrete value to a tag in the controller when a graphic is clicked. This
is an operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Send Discrete in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
F
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A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. This tag will
B
C
D
E
F
receive the tag value entered by the operator or configured in this dialog box.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Select the source of the value to be sent to the tag. If you select Fixed data, the setting
selected in field D is sent to the tag. If you select Prompt for data, the field in E is
activated and you can enter a message that will prompt the operator to select a discrete
state for the tag.
If Fixed Data was selected in C, enter the setting to be sent to the tag. The Set option
turns the tag on; Clear turns the tag off; Toggle changes the tag to the opposite of its
current state (from on to off, or from off to on); Reverse changes the tag’s state to off
when the mouse is clicked on the graphic, and on when the mouse button is released;
Direct changes the tag state to on when the mouse is clicked on the graphic, and off
when the mouse is released.
If Prompt for Data was selected in C, enter a message here that will prompt the operator
to select a tag state. Two buttons will be displayed to the operator. Enter the labels for
the Set Button and the Clear Button. The Set Button sends a discrete value to set the
tag to the on state, and the Clear Button sends a discrete value to set the tag to the off
state.
Click OK to save your settings.
Send String
Use this attribute to send a string to the controller when a graphic is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Send String in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
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A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. This tag will
B
C
D
E
F
receive the string tag entered by the operator or configured in this dialog box.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Select the source of the value to be sent to the tag. If you select Fixed data, the setting
selected in field D is sent to the tag. If you select Prompt for data, the field in E is
activated and you can enter a message that will prompt the operator to enter a string to
send to the tag.
If Fixed Data was selected in C, enter the string to send to the tag.
If Prompt for Data was selected in C, enter a message to prompt the operator to enter
a string. Choose the Hide characters option if you don’t want the text entered by the
operator to be displayed.
Click OK to save your settings.
Send Value
Use this attribute to send a value to a tagname in the controller when a graphic is clicked. This
is an operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Send Value in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
F
D
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. This tag will
receive the tag value entered by the operator or configured in this dialog box.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
C Select the source of the value to be sent to the tag. If you select Fixed data, the value
entered in field E is sent to the tag. If you select Prompt for data, the field in F is
activated and you can enter a message that will prompt the operator to input a value to
send to the tag.
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D Choose Set to assign the sent value to the tag equal, or choose Offset to add the value
to the tag.
E If Fixed Data was selected in C, enter the value to send to the tag.
F If Prompt for Data was selected in C, enter a message to prompt the operator for a
value. Enter a minimum and maximum value the entered data should be within.
G Click OK to save your settings.
Text Color
Use this attribute to change the color of text in the interface based on a tag value from a
controller. This is a controller-driven attribute and is available for grouped objects and text.
Double-click Text Color in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
changes value in the OptoControl strategy, its value will determine the color of the text.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
C Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a discrete value (with ON and OFF values),
or whether it’s a current value you’re looking for. If you choose Discrete, the D group is
highlighted; if you choose Current value, the E group is highlighted. The choice you
make in this selection must match the tag choices you made in A.
D If you selected Discrete in C, this field is activated and you can select the color you want
for the ON state by clicking on the color field below ON. The Color dialog box appears;
choose a color and then click OK to accept. Repeat this step for the OFF state.
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E Enter a value in each Cutoff value field to specify the range of values for each color
group configured in the color fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each
Cutoff value field must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter
one. After the warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff value field requiring a value.
F To configure a color for the range set up in E, click on a color field. The Color dialog box
appears; choose a color and click OK. Repeat this step for each color field you want to
change.
G Enter a value to be added and subtracted from each Cutoff value to determine whether
any changes in color should occur.
For example, let’s say the Cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the color fields are
red, yellow, green, blue, and black. The Deadband is 3. A tag with a value of 9 is read.
The next tag value read is 11. The text color remains yellow because the value read is
within the deadband range, even though a value of 11 is in the green range.
H Click OK to save your settings.
Text In (from Controller)
Use this attribute to read a tag from a controller and display various strings to the operator. You
can read in a numeric value, a string, or a discrete value, and set up a string that will be displayed
based on what was received. This is a controller-driven attribute that is available for a text
object.
The # character in the text object indicates where the text string should be displayed. Only one
# is needed to display an entire string. If there’s no # sign within the text object, then the string
will be appended to the end of the text object.
You can configure how a floating point number is displayed by using a decimal point along with
the # signs. For every decimal place you want displayed after a decimal point, use a # sign. For
example, your text object could say: “Low level reading: ###.#.” Your tag value is 200.55, so your
displayed string is: “Low level reading: 200.6.” The extra # signs to the left of the decimal point
aren’t required, but are useful for determining how much space the text will require in your
display.
Double-click Text In (from controller) in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
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A
B
C
E
F
D
G
H
A Enter an OptoDisplay tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
changes value in the OptoDisplay strategy, its value will determine the effects on the
graphic. The tagname you enter is affected by C.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Choose whether the tag you’re reading is a numeric value, a discrete value (with ON and
OFF values), or a string. If you choose Value, fields D and E are activated. If you choose
Discrete, the F group is activated. The choice you make in this selection must match the
choice you made in A.
If you choose Value, the value read will be converted into a string based on the rules
mentioned at the beginning of this “Text In” section.
If you choose Discrete, use F to enter the strings that will be displayed for the ON and
OFF states. If you choose String, the text string from the controller is displayed.
If you selected Value in C, enter the value to be added and subtracted from the
previously read tag value to determine whether the new value is displayed.
Select the format in which numeric values will be displayed: decimal, hexadecimal,
binary, or exponential. Hexadecimal numbers are prefixed with “0X” and appear in
uppercase letters. Float values may not be displayed as hexadecimal or binary.
Select the text justification for the string from the controller.
This section is highlighted if Discrete was chosen in C. Enter the string to be displayed
if the tag’s discrete value is ON, and enter the string to be displayed if the tag’s discrete
value is OFF.
Click here to save your settings. (Click Cancel to close the dialog box without making
changes.)
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Upload Recipe
Use this attribute to upload a recipe file from a controller when graphic is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text. For more information about recipes, see “Recipes” on page 8-19.
Double-click Upload Recipe in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
A Enter the directory location of the recipe format file. Use the Browse button B to quickly
B
C
D
E
F
select a directory name. The recipe format file is used to tell the controller what data to
read. Often, it’s the original downloaded recipe. For example, the number of lines with
data values represents how many values should be read from the controller.
Click to quickly find the recipe format file directory for A. The Select Format File
Directory dialog box appears. Use it to navigate to the desired directory and click OK
when you’re done.
Choose the source of the recipe format file name:
• If you choose Fixed name, D is highlighted.
• If Prompt for name is selected, the operator is prompted for the recipe format file
name.
• If From Mistic string is selected, E is highlighted.
If Fixed Name was selected in C, enter the name of the recipe format file located in
directory A. Notice the file extension is .rcp.
If From Mistic string was selected in C, use the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe format file name. The Tag Selection
dialog box is displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for
more information about this dialog box.
Enter the directory location of the recipe file that will receive the information. Use G to
quickly enter a directory name.
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G Click to quickly find the recipe file directory for F. The Select Destination File Directory
dialog box appears. Use it to navigate to the desired directory and click OK when you’re
done.
H Choose the file name for the recipe data that will be read from the controller.
• If you choose Fixed Name, I is highlighted.
• If Prompt for Name is selected, the operator is prompted for the recipe file name.
• If From Mistic string is selected, J is highlighted.
I If Fixed Name was selected in H, enter the name of the file to receive the information.
This file will be located in F. Notice the file extension is .rcp.
J If From Mistic string was selected in H, use the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the file name. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag.
K Click OK to save your settings.
Vertical Position
Use this attribute to adjust the vertical position of a graphic based on a tag value from the
controller. This is a controller-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round
rectangles, ellipses, and polygons, polylines, curves, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Vertical Position in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
changes value in the OptoControl strategy, its value will determine the effects on the
graphic.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
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C Enter the top and bottom values for the graphic. For example, if you know your tag values
D
E
F
G
will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a subset of this range
such as 0 to 50.
Enter the maximum top and bottom movement the object can change. The movement
units are in pixels. For example, if your bottom and top values are 0 and 100, your bottom
and top movements are 0 and 200, and your point of reference (E) is from the bottom
when the tag value is 50, the object will be moved 100 pixels from the bottom.
Enter the reference point for the object. This is the reference point from which the object
will move. The choices are top, center, and bottom. The Vertical Size (Height) dynamic
attribute must also be configured in order for this option to affect the graphic.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the graphic’s position will actually change. Using our previous
example in D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 50. The next
tag reading must be greater than 55 in order for the graphic to move.
Click OK to save your settings.
Vertical Size (Height)
Use this attribute to change the height of a graphic based on a tag value from the controller. This
is a controller-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
and polygons.
Double-click Vertical Size in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
changes value in the OptoControl strategy, its value will determine the effects on the
graphic.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
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C Enter the maximum and minimum value for the tagname in A. For example, if you know
your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a
subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
D Enter the maximum and minimum percentage the object can change. The percentage
range is from 0 to 1,000. Suppose your minimum value is 0 and your maximum value is
10, and the minimum and maximum percentages range from 0 to 200. When the tag
value is 10, the object will be twice as big as you’ve originally drawn it. When the tag
value is 5, the object will be the same size you’ve drawn it, which is 100 percent.
E Enter the anchor point for the object. The choices are top, center, and bottom.
F Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the graphic’s height will actually change.
For example, let’s say the values are 0 to 100, the percentages are 0 to 100, and the
deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 10. The next tag reading must be greater
than 15 in order for the graphic to change.
G Click OK to save your settings.
Vertical Slider
Use this attribute to configure a vertical slider when a graphic is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, and bitmaps.
Double-click Vertical Slider in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. The amount
of movement the vertical slider makes affects the value sent to the tag in the controller.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
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C Enter the top and bottom values for the tagname in A. For example, if you know your tag
values can be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a subset of
this range, such as 0 to 50.
D Enter the maximum top and bottom movement the object can change. The movement
units are in pixels. This means if your bottom and top values are 0 and 100, and your
bottom and top movements are 0 and 200, if you move the tag 100 pixels toward the
bottom, the tag value sent will be 50.
E Select the reference point for the object. The choices are top, center, and bottom. Note
that you must also separately configure the Vertical Size (Height) dynamic attribute to
use this option.
F Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the tag value should be changed.
Using our previous example in D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is written and has a
value of 50. The next graphic movement must be greater than 55 in order for the tag value
to change.
G Click OK to save your settings.
Visibility/Blink
Use this attribute to make a graphic visible or invisible or to cause it to blink based on a tag value
from the controller. This is a controller-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles,
round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons, polylines, curves, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Visibility/Blink in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following:
A
C
D
E
F
G
H
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A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
B
C
D
E
F
G
changes value in the OptoControl strategy, its value will determine the effects on the
graphic.
To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about this
dialog box.
Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a discrete value (with ON and OFF values),
or whether it’s a current value you’re looking for. If you choose Discrete, the D group is
highlighted; if you choose Current value, the E group is highlighted. The choice you
make in this selection must match the tag choices you made in A.
Select the visibility state you want for the ON state from the drop-down list options.
Your choices are Invisible, Visible, Slow Blink, Med. Blink, and Fast Blink. In the same
manner, choose the visibility state for the OFF state.
Enter a value in each Cutoff Value field to specify the range of values for each visibility
group configured in the visibility fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each
Cutoff Value field must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter
one. After the warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff Value field requiring a value.
To configure a visibility state for the ranges set up in E, click a visibility field’s
drop-down button. Your choices are Invisible, Visible, Slow Blink, Med. Blink, and Fast
Blink. In the same manner, choose the visibility state for each range of values.
Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the graphic’s visibility will actually change.
For example, let’s say the Cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the visibility fields are
Invisible, Visible, Slow Blink, Med. Blink, and Fast Blink. The Deadband is 2. A tag is read
with a value of 10. The next value read must be greater than 12 in order for the graphic to
change.
H Click OK to save your settings.
Windows
Use this attribute to change window states when a graphic is clicked. This is an operator-driven
attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, bitmaps, and text.
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Double-click Windows in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
F
E
G
H
I
A Initially, this list shows all the windows available for the project. Select the window that
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
has the window state you want to change. You can also select more than one window
by using a couple of key combinations. One way is to select a window, press SHIFT, and
click on another window name in the list. This selects all the windows in between the
two window names. Another way is to select a window name, press the CTRL key, and
click on each window name you want selected.
Use to insert the selected window(s) in D. The window name will be inserted above the
highlighted window(s) in D.
Use to add the selected window(s) to the bottom of the window list in D. The window
name will be inserted after the last window in D.
Lists the windows and what window state they will go to when the graphic is clicked.
Use this group as a handy window state assignment key for the windows you’ve
highlighted in A. When the windows are copied over to D, you will see they all have the
default window state you’ve assigned. The window state choices are Open, Close, and
Iconify.
Use this group to change any window states listed in D. Highlight one or more windows
and select the new window state action. Your choices are Open, Close, and Iconify.
Use this group to modify the window name list in D. The Remove Selected option
removes only those windows you’ve highlighted; the Remove All option removes all
windows from the list; and the Deselect All option deselects and quickly unhighlights all
window names.
For all windows left in A, use this grouping to affect their window states. For example,
if a window state is open and the graphic is clicked, the window state can stay the
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I
same, be iconified, or be closed. Likewise, you can alter the window states of closed
and iconified windows.
Click OK to save your settings.
Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes
Once a dynamic attribute has been added to an on-screen graphic object, you can easily assign
those attributes to other graphics using copy and paste. You can also quickly delete all dynamic
attributes from a graphic.
Copying Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic
To copy a set of dynamic attributes from one object to another, do the following:
1. With the Select tool
, click the graphic whose dynamic attributes you want to copy.
Choose Edit➞Copy Dynamic Attributes to copy the attributes to the Windows clipboard.
You can now assign these dynamic attributes to another graphic using Edit➞Paste
Dynamic Attributes.
Pasting Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic
To paste a set of dynamic attributes that were copied to the Windows clipboard, do the
following:
1. With the Select tool
dynamic attributes.
, choose one or more graphics to which you want to paste the
2. Choose Edit➞Paste Dynamic Attributes, and then do one of the following:
• To delete any existing dynamic attributes the object may already have, choose Delete
Existing.
• To add the copied attributes to existing attributes and replace any that might be of the
same type, select Replace Duplicates.
• To add the attribute to existing attributes and not change any attributes that might be
of the same type, select Ignore Duplicates.
Deleting Dynamic Attributes from a Graphic
To delete all dynamic attributes from a graphic, do the following:
1. With the Select tool
want to delete.
, choose one or more graphics that have dynamic attributes you
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2. Choose Edit➞Delete Dynamic Attributes.
Viewing Dynamic Attributes
As you develop or document an OptoDisplay project, it can be useful to know about the dynamic
attributes and tags used by the objects in the project’s windows.
Dynamic Attributes for Individual Objects
To view the dynamic attributes configured for an individual graphic object or a group of objects,
select one or more objects in a window and then do one of the following actions:
• Right-click the mouse, and select Dynamic Attributes from the pop-up menu.
• Press CTRL-A
• Press CTRL and then right-click the mouse.
The dynamic attributes assigned to that object or objects will be shown in the Dynamic Attributes
window.
Viewing Tags for One or More Objects
To view the tags that a particular object or objects is connected to, click the object (or group of
objects), and move the cursor over it. The tags used will be shown next to the cursor.
Dynamic Attributes for All Objects
To generate a report that lists the dynamic attributes for all objects in all project windows, as
well as all the alarm points configured for a project, do the following:
1. In OptoDisplay Configurator, select View➞Dynamic Attributes.
2. In the dialog box that opens, select one or more windows whose dynamic attributes you
want to view and click OK.
The Microsoft Windows Notepad application opens and displays a report similar to the
following example:
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Project Name: C:\Opto22\OptoDisplay\Examples\Cookies\Display\cfactory.mmi
---------------------------------------------------------------------Window: Cookie Factory
**********************
Group
X = 530
Y = 332
W =
86
H =
28
H =
3
Operator-Driven Dynamic Attribute Tags
Send Value:
Cookie Controller:Conveyor_Speed_Control.Value
Refresh Group: Group 0
Source
: Prompt for Data
Destination: Set
Message
: Enter Conveyor Speed
Min. Value : 0.00
Max. Value : 100.00
Group
X = 133
Y = 213
W =
21
Controller-Driven Dynamic Attribute Tags
Visibility/Blink:
Cookie Controller:Dough_Dispense_Valve.State
Refresh Group: Group 0
Setup By : Discrete
On
: Invisible
Off
: Visible
Using the TagInfoView Utility Program
After you have selected View➞Dynamic Attributes, you can use a small utility program called
TagInfoView to sort and view the tag information in greater detail. The tag information is
displayed in Windows Notepad.
1. Select View➞Launch TagInfoView Utility.
2. In the Tag Information Viewer dialog box that opens, verify that the TagInfo.txt file appears
in the file field at the top.
3. In the Sort By sections, select how you want the tag information sorted.
4. Click Display Results.
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Scanning to Update Graphics
As you configure your project and connect OptoControl tags to OptoDisplay objects, you’re
setting up the connections that will animate your graphics in OptoDisplay Runtime as the tag
data changes. OptoDisplay acquires this tag data using an internal scanner that monitors one or
more controllers. Understanding how the scanner works and how it gets its data will help you
optimize your system’s performance.
Scanning is OptoDisplay’s process of requesting data about I/O points and variables from the
Opto 22 controller. When the controller receives this request, it must first determine if its data
for the requested tags is current. If the data is not current, the controller will access the I/O units
connected to it and request the latest readings. This tag information is then sent back to
OptoDisplay. Depending on the data and how it is connected to objects in your OptoDisplay
project, graphic objects then change their attributes.
Because the controller must determine if its readings are current (and in some cases actually
retrieve the information from I/O points), and then process this information and return it to
OptoDisplay, a noticeable delay may occur. This is why it is important to optimize your control
system and your operator interface by making the scanning process as efficient as possible.
How Window States Affect Scanning
In OptoDisplay, you can define three states for windows that appear in a project: open, iconified,
and closed. The state of a window determines how tags for that window will be scanned and
whether or not the display is updated. See “Window Design” on page 2-4 for more information
on defining window states in a project.
To ensure best performance, consider the following points when designing your OptoDisplay
project:
• Have only a few windows open in Runtime to reduce the chance the scanner will overrun.
Open windows always have their tags scanned, so having fewer open windows reduces
the work required of the OptoDisplay scanner. (An open window is any window that’s open
on the screen, not just the active, or topmost, window.)
• Present windows in their reduced, or iconified, state. Iconified windows scan their tags,
but don’t update the display, thus reducing the heavy Windows graphics overhead.
Since the iconified window does not update the display, that time can be used by other
open windows. However, keep in mind that since an iconified window still scans its data,
the communication overhead is unchanged.
• Present closed windows that can be opened on demand by the operator. Closed windows
do not update the display or scan values unless there’s a trend in the window. If a window
has a trend, OptoDisplay always scans for data, unless the trend was configured with
scanning disabled. (See Chapter 7, “Working with Trends” for more information on
configuring trends.)
A window should be closed if the information in the window is no longer needed. This
greatly reduces the communication and graphic burden on the system.
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Scan Groups
When OptoDisplay scans the controller for data, it combines data items into scan groups. This is
because sending data in one large group is faster than sending several smaller data requests.
OptoDisplay uses four different types of scan groups: window, trigger, trend, and historic log.
• Window scan groups contain all the tags connected to objects displayed in a window.
The tags in a window’s scan group are scanned based on the state of the window. If the
window is closed, then no scanning occurs for that window, unless it contains a trend.
• Trigger scan groups contain all tags connected to a trigger-based event, such as starting
an application or playing a sound. You can configure trigger scan groups to scan based on
the state of a window.
• Trend scan groups contain all tags connected to a basic trend or SuperTrend. You can
configure trend scan groups to always scan, to scan only when specific events occur, or to
scan based on the state of a window.
• Historic log scan groups contain all tags connected to a historic log. You can configure
historic log scan groups to always scan, to scan only when specific events occur, or to scan
based on the state of a window. Historic log scan groups can be configured with start and
stop trigger options to start and stop scanning tags.
NOTE: Keep in mind that the number of points configured in trends and in historic logs can
dramatically impact system speed.
For more information on how window states affect scanning, see “How Window States Affect
Scanning” on page 6-34.
Refresh Time Groups
Each tag connected to an OptoDisplay graphic belongs to a refresh time group that determines
how often the tag is scanned. You define the characteristics of refresh time groups by setting a
scan rate and a freshness value. See “Configuring Scan Rates and Freshness Values” on
page 6-36 to learn how to set these values.
System performance is directly affected by how a refresh time group is set up, so it’s important
to define refresh time groups carefully. Follow these guidelines when configuring refresh time
groups for your project:
• To minimize scanner overrun errors, avoid using scan rates of less than 0.5 second on a
large number of points.
• Select scan rates that reflect the rate at which the process variables change. For example,
the outside air temperature changes slowly, and could be scanned every 15 minutes or so.
• As a good engineering practice, select the slowest possible scan rate that is acceptable for
each scan group. This will help prevent the system from being overloaded by needlessly
scanning too much information too quickly.
• Use multiple scan groups, and stagger the scan interval for the groups by selecting scan
times that are not even multiples of each other. This prevents the OptoDisplay project from
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periodically scanning data from multiple scan groups at the same time. Try to use prime
numbers (numbers only divisible by 1 or themselves) whenever possible.
• If the amount of data being scanned is too much for the selected scan rate, decrease the
scan rate to better match what the actual throughput will allow.
If doing this does not improve scanning, then there may be too much data being requested
from one controller, or there may be too much data being scanned by one computer, or
both. To eliminate the bottlenecks, you may need to add more controllers, divide the
OptoDisplay projects over multiple computers, or both.
Freshness Values and How They Affect Scanning
In addition to the scan rate, another parameter that you must set for a refresh time group is its
freshness value. A freshness value is the time difference between when a tag was last read from
an I/O unit by the controller and the time OptoDisplay requests the data. A freshness value is
smaller than or equal to a scan rate because a scan rate is the regular scanning interval for a tag.
The following steps occur when a point is scanned:
1. When OptoDisplay requires a tag update, the OptoDisplay scanner requests the data from
the controller.
2. The controller checks the “age” of its current tag value.
• If it’s less than or equal to the freshness value, this value will be sent back to
OptoDisplay when the controller is ready to send its information to OptoDisplay.
• If it’s greater than the freshness value, the controller will request a data update from
the I/O unit for that tag.
Note how the freshness value affects the system’s throughput. The longer the controller must
wait for responses from I/O units to provide “fresh” data, the longer it takes to respond to
OptoDisplay with the information. This waiting time can impact your system’s performance.
Having a longer freshness value (that is, a value closer to the value of the scan rate) helps
improve performance. The communication overhead (the communication time between
OptoDisplay and the controller) isn’t affected by the freshness value, but the controller’s waiting
time is. The scan rate does, however, affect the communication overhead because it defines how
often OptoDisplay will ask the controller for new data.
Configuring Scan Rates and Freshness Values
You assign refresh time groups whenever you configure a tag based on how often you think it
makes sense to update the tag. (Note that the same refresh time group is usually used by several
tags.) For example, an analog point reading an outside temperature would use a longer scan rate
since the temperature isn’t likely to change suddenly. On the other hand, a digital point that’s
monitoring the on/off state of a valve would need a shorter scan rate to accurately reflect
whether a valve is open or closed.
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To configure scan rates and freshness values, choose Configure➞Refresh Times.
The Refresh Times dialog box appears:
A
B
C
D
E
F
A Up to fourteen refresh time groups are available, divided between two tabs in the
B
C
D
E
F
Refresh Times dialog box.
In the Name column, you will see the refresh time group names. By default, their names
are “Group 0", “Group 1", and on up to “Group 6." You can change these default names
if you wish.
Names can be up to 15 characters long, but avoid using the ! and | characters in the
name. Spaces are also valid characters, but when referencing names with spaces,
don’t omit the spaces or substitute the “_” character for spaces.
In the Value field of the Scan Rate column, enter a number from 1 to 9999. In the Units
field, select a unit of time from the Units drop-down list. (Unit options are milliseconds,
seconds, minutes, hours, days, and months.)
The greater the value, the more time between I/O readings and the fewer times the
controller is scanned. The scan rate must be greater than or equal to the value in the
Freshness field.
The Freshness column has similar fields to those in the Scan Rate column. In the Value
field, enter a number from 1 to 9999. In the Units field, select a unit of time from the
Units drop-down list. The unit options are: milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, days,
and months. The freshness value must be less than or equal to the value in the Scan
Rate field.
Select the Enable scanner overrun notification check box to post scanner overrun
warning messages in the Event Log during Runtime. If this box is unchecked, scanner
overrun warning messages will be ignored by OptoDisplay Runtime.
Click OK to save your settings.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 6-37
USING ANIMATED GRAPHICS
6-38 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 7
Chapter 7
Working with Trends
Introduction
This chapter describes how you can create and configure graphs that display real-time and
historical information about selected I/O points.
In This Chapter
About Trends........................................... 7-1
Working With Basic Trends.................... 7-2
Working with SuperTrends..................... 7-6
Using SuperTrend Log Files ......................... 7-15
Using XY Plots.............................................. 7-21
About Trends
OptoDisplay trends are graphical objects that visually plot controller values, including I/O points
and . Using a trend, you can show how real-time and historical data changes over time, or how
one set of data relates to another one. In OptoDisplay Runtime, trends are created when active
I/O point values, or tags, are read from an OptoControl strategy running on a controller and
visually plotted.
Tag values are graphed on a two-dimensional x-axis and y-axis coordinate system. Depending on
the type of trend used, the x-axis can represent time or a set of tag values. The y-axis can
represent either the range of values for a tag or a set of tag values. You can set features for each
trend line used, and there is no limit to the number of trends that can be displayed in a window.
For trends that graph data over time, the maximum time span supported is 14 days.
You can easily set or modify the following elements in a trend:
•
•
•
•
X- and y-axis ranges and the major and minor divisions that appear on the chart
Graph backgrounds and border colors
Pen colors for trend lines
Tag value scanning, which can be turned on or off for a specific trend.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-1
WORKING WITH TRENDS
Types of Trends
There are three types of trends that you can use in an OptoDisplay project: basic trends,
SuperTrends, and XY plots. Basic trends and SuperTrends graph controller values over time, but
support different numbers of trend lines and have other differences. XY plots graph data from
two numeric tables, using one set of data for x-axis values and the other for y-axis values.
• Basic Trends—Using a basic trend, up to four trend lines can be displayed on any one
trend chart. Unlike a SuperTrend (described below), which can graph historical data, basic
trends can only graph real-time data. See “Working With Basic Trends” below for more
information.
• SuperTrends—Using a SuperTrend, up to 16 trend lines can be displayed on any one
trend chart. SuperTrends can graph both real-time and historical data. See “Working with
SuperTrends” on page 7-6 for more information.
• XY Plots—Using an XY plot, up to six individual trend lines can be displayed on any one
XY plot. XY plots can only graph data in numeric tables. See “Using XY Plots” on page 7-21
for more information.
Working With Basic Trends
You can use basic trends to graph real-time tag information using up to four pens.
Creating a Basic Trend
1. Select the basic trend tool
from the toolbox and position the cursor where you want
the trend to begin in the window.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
7-2 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
WORKING WITH TRENDS
The trend that appears should resemble the example below:
Y-axis Layout
• Label Position = Left
• Label Range:
- Max Val = 100
- Min Val = 0
• Minor Divisions = 4
• Major Divisions = 5
• Label Intervals = 1
X-axis Layout
• Minor Divisions = 2
• Major Divisions = 4
• Label Intervals = 2
Label Position = Bottom
Label Format = Hours, Minutes, and Seconds
Modifying a Basic Trend
Choose the Select tool and double-click the trend.
The Trend Configuration dialog box appears:
A
B
E
F
C
G
D
H
I
M
N
O
J
K
P
Q
L
R
A Enter the name of the trend here.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-3
WORKING WITH TRENDS
B Use these pen configuration buttons to associate each pen with one OptoControl tag, to
C
D
E
F
G
define its pen color and width, and to specify a range of values for the tag. You can
configure up to four pens per trend. See “Configuring Basic Trend Pens” on page 7-5 for
more information.
Click here to enter the chart’s background color. In the Color dialog box that appears,
choose a color and click OK.
Click here to enter the chart’s border color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose
a color and click OK.
Enter the time span the trend represents. (Remember that the time span is indicated on
the x-axis). Choose the time units from the drop-down list. Your choices are seconds,
minutes, or hours. The maximum time span is 14 days, or 336 hours.
Select the refresh time here. Choose from one of seven refresh time groups. The scan
rate and freshness values appear in parentheses alongside the refresh group number.
All tags associated with the pens in B are scanned at the same rate.
You can find out more about refresh times in “Scanning to Update Graphics” on
page 6-34. Also see “Optimizing Pen Settings” on page 7-6 to learn how pen settings
affect how OptoDisplay communicates with a controller.
Choose whether to disable a trend based on the state of its window. If you disable the
trend, the tags associated with the pens in B won’t be updated with new data from the
OptoControl strategy until the trend is enabled again. Disabling a trend saves the
controller processing time, since it doesn’t have to respond to regular requests from
OptoDisplay for tag updates.
NOTE: Trends that are enabled are always updated, regardless of the window’s visual
state (normal, iconified, etc.). This means OptoDisplay continually requests data from
the controller to update its trends. Keep this in mind when you’re considering the
number of enabled trends you are including in the project. The more enabled trends you
have, the more the controller has to spend time reading its I/O to update the data.
H Enter the number of major x-axis divisions for the trend. This is the number of main
sections the trend is divided into. You can also choose a color for the major divisions by
clicking the Color field. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis divisions, the lines dividing the major divisions appear
thicker than the minor divisions.
I
Enter the number of minor x-axis divisions for the trend. This will be the number of
sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum number of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor x-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In
the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
J Enter how often you want the major x-axis labeled.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis labels, if you enter 1, every major division is labeled; if you
enter 2, every other major division is labeled.
K Enter the label position for the x-axis. By default, the x-axis is labeled at the bottom, but
you can choose to label the top, top and bottom, or have no labeling at all.
7-4 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
WORKING WITH TRENDS
L Enter the label format by checking off any combination of hours, minutes, and seconds.
M
N
O
P
Q
R
The label appears in the following format: HH:MM:SS, where HH is hours, MM is
minutes, and SS is seconds.
Enter the number of major y-axis divisions for the trend. This is the number of main
sections the trend is divided into. You can also choose a color for the major divisions by
clicking the Color field. In the dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
Enter the number of minor y-axis divisions for the trend. This will be the number of
sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum number of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor y-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In
the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
Enter how often you want the major y-axis labeled.
Enter the label position for the y-axis. By default, the y-axis is labeled on the left, but
you can choose to label the right, left and right, or have not labeling at all.
Enter the minimum and maximum values for the y-axis.
Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Basic Trend Pens
Click a pen configuration button in the Trend Configuration dialog box.
The Trend Pen Configuration dialog box appears:
A
B
D
C
E
F
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking B.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
C
D
E
F
can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 to learn more about configuring
tags in your project.
Enter the maximum and minimum value the tag selected in A can be.
Click here to choose a pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and
click OK.
Enter the width of the line you want created by the pen. The width is specified in pixels.
Click OK to save your settings.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-5
WORKING WITH TRENDS
Optimizing Pen Settings
The scan rates you select when configuring a pen can impact the speed and performance of your
OptoDisplay project and the controller. When selecting scan rates for long trends, you should
choose optimal scan times for the pens as follows:
1. Determine the trend width in pixels by using the X: value in the Coordinates window.
a. Subtract the X: value of the left trend border from the X: value of the right trend border.
b. Divide the trend width in seconds by the trend width in pixels.
For example, an eight-hour trend that is 500 pixels wide yields a number of 57.6 seconds
(8 x 3600/500).
2. Round this to the nearest increment of 10.
In the example, the value would be rounded up to 60 seconds. This means that for optimum
OptoDisplay performance, the trend should not be updated more frequently than every 60
seconds.
NOTE: A small compromise to increase the accuracy of the trend is to divide the result by
four. In our example, this would result in a scan time of every 15 seconds. Using a 15-second
scan time allows a maximum of four readings per pixel on the trend. Updating any faster than
that is counterproductive; the excess data is discarded, and the extra requests for data from
the controller add overhead to the control system.
Working with SuperTrends
SuperTrends are trends that can track both real-time and historical data. You can also use up to
16 pens with a SuperTrend; basic trends support only four pens. SuperTrends are drawn and
configured in OptoDisplay Configurator, like any other on-screen object, but the charts can also
be manipulated by the operator in OptoDisplay Runtime. See “Using Runtime” on page 9-13 to
learn how to use SuperTrend options in Runtime.
Creating a SuperTrend
1. Select the SuperTrend tool
from the toolbox and position the cursor where you want
the trend to begin in the window.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
7-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
WORKING WITH TRENDS
The SuperTrend that appears should resemble the example below:
If you do not draw the SuperTrend wide enough, some of the command buttons will be
placed in a second row.
Modifying a SuperTrend
Choose the Select tool and double-click the trend.
The SuperTrend Setup dialog box appears:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
A Choose the trend type here. If you select Combined, you can switch between real-time
and historical trending when the project is running.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-7
WORKING WITH TRENDS
B Click here to enter the chart’s background color. In the Color dialog box that appears,
C
D
E
F
G
H
choose a color and click OK.
This field shows which computer will collect SuperTrend data. If “Local Computer”
appears, SuperTrend data is collected by the computer running OptoDisplay Runtime. If
the name of another computer appears, it is a remote computer that has been previously
selected. See “Using SuperTrend Log Files” on page 7-15 to learn how to choose this
remote computer.
Click here to set up the historical log file. (You don’t need a historical log for real-time
trends.)
Select whether the historical log will be saved to a file in text or binary format. When
the SuperTrend data is saved in ASCII text format, the file includes a header that
contains information about tags assigned to the SuperTrend pens. When the data is
saved in binary format, the file does not include this header. Historical trend information
saved in a binary file is usually graphed more quickly than trend information that is
saved in a text file.
If there are existing data files for a SuperTrend and the file format is switched between
text and binary, the Select Log File To Convert To dialog box will appear. In this dialog
box, you can select a log file to convert to the appropriate format. See “Saving a Log in
Text or Binary Format” on page 7-19 to learn more about switching between text and
binary file formats.
Select the refresh time here. You can choose from one of seven refresh time groups. The
scan rate and freshness values appear in parentheses alongside the refresh group
number. You can find out more about refresh times in “Scanning to Update Graphics” on
page 6-34. All tags associated with the pens in this trend will be scanned at the same
rate.
Choose whether to disable a trend based on its window’s state. If you disable the trend,
the tags associated with the pens won’t be updated with new data from the OptoControl
strategy until the trend is enabled again. Disabling a trend saves the controller
processing time by not having to respond to regular requests from OptoDisplay for tag
updates.
Click OK to save your settings.
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
Configuring X-Axis Parameters
Click the X-axis tab to configure x-axis parameters for the SuperTrend.
A
B
C
D
E
A Enter the time span (x-axis) the trend represents. Choose the time units from the
B
C
D
E
drop-down list. Your choices are seconds, minutes, hours, and days. The maximum time
span is 49 days, or 1,176 hours.
Enter the number of major x-axis divisions for the trend. The trend will be divided into
this number of main sections. You can choose a color for the main section dividers in D.
The lines dividing the main sections will appear thicker than the lines dividing the minor
sections.
Enter the number of minor x-axis divisions for the trend. The major sections will be
divided into this number of minor sections. The minimum number of divisions is one. You
can choose a color for the minor section dividers in D.
Click on the boxes to set the colors for the major divisions, minor divisions, and labels.
In the Color dialog box that appears for each item, choose a color and click OK.
Click OK to save your settings.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-9
WORKING WITH TRENDS
Configuring Y-Axis Parameters
Click the Y-axis tab to configure y-axis parameters for the SuperTrend.
C
A
B
D
E
A Enter the number of major y-axis divisions for the trend.
B Enter the number of minor y-axis divisions for the trend.
C Click here to select the scaling.
–
If you choose Default, the trend will always have the same fixed scale. You must
enter values for the Default Max. Value and Default Min. Value. These values
specify the range of pen tag values. This scaling is static and cannot be changed in
Runtime.
– If you choose Pen, the trend will have the scale of the active pen.
D Click on the boxes to set the colors for the major divisions, minor divisions, and labels
in the trend. If you want the y-axis to use the color of the pen that’s currently active,
select Active Pen Color.
In the Color dialog box that appears for each item, choose a color and click OK.
E Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Zoom Parameters
When a SuperTrend is in historical mode, the operator can zoom in to view a more detailed
section of the trend, or zoom out to view a less detailed section of the trend. Click the Zoom tab
7-10 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
WORKING WITH TRENDS
to set magnification levels. The Zoom page, shown below, configures the zoom levels by defining
scales for the x-axis.
A
B
C
D
A Enter the amount of time to display on the trend while in zoom in/zoom out mode. Unit
choices, selected from the dropdown box, are seconds, minutes, hours, or days.
B Enter the amount of time that constitutes one major division while in zoom in/zoom out
mode. Unit choices, selected from the dropdown box, are seconds, minutes, hours, or
days.
C Enter the number of minor divisions per major division while in zoom in/zoom out mode.
This number must be 1 or greater.
D Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Hot Keys
All of the buttons that appear at the bottom of a SuperTrend can be associated with a
combination of keystrokes called a hot key. If a button has a hot key configured, the operator can
either click on the button or press the hot key combination. This way the operator can use the
SuperTrend without needing a mouse.
NOTE: If a command is only available in historical mode, its associated hot key will also work
only in historical mode.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-11
WORKING WITH TRENDS
To configure hot keys, click the Hot Keys tab.
A
B
C
D
A This field displays the Runtime commands that may be associated with a hot key.
Highlight a command to configure a hot key for it, or to view the existing hot key
settings.
B Check the box labeled Ctrl if you want the CTRL key to be part of the hot key. Check the
box labeled Shift if you wish the SHIFT key to be part of the hot key. You may select none,
one, or both.
C This drop-down box lists all available keys that can be hot keys. Make sure that you do
not assign a hot key to more than one SuperTrend command.
D Click OK to save your settings.
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
Configuring SuperTrend Pens
Unlike a basic trend, a SuperTrend can plot trend lines for up to 16 tag values (pens). Pens 1
through 8 are configured under the “Pens 1-8” window shown below. Pens 9 through 16 are
configured identically under the tab “Pens 9-16.” There is one row for each pen.
C
D
E
A
B
F
A Check this box to enable the pen in this row (uncheck the box to disable the pen). The
B
C
D
E
F
pen is enabled automatically when it is first created.
Once a pen is configured, its name appears here.
Click here to select the pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color
and click OK.
Click here to configure a pen or to modify its configuration. The SuperTrend Pen #
configuration dialog box appears. Configure the pen and click OK. The pen name will be
listed in B.
Click here to clear the pen configuration.
Click OK to save your settings.
Memory Requirements for SuperTrend Pens
When several SuperTrends, each using several pens, are used in an OptoDisplay project, the
memory requirements for the PC running the project can become very high. Keep this in mind
when developing your OptoDisplay project. Use the following formula to determine the amount
of RAM required for each pen in a SuperTrend:
⋅ SuperTrend's x-axis time span (sec.)RAM required per pen (bytes) = 19.2
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SuperTrend's scan rate (sec.)
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-13
WORKING WITH TRENDS
As an example, the memory required for each pen in a SuperTrend having a six-hour scan time
(21,600 sec.) and a 500 msec. scan rate (0.5 sec.) would be calculated as follows:
19.2
⋅ 21600 sec.-----------------------------------= 829,400 bytes
0.5 sec.
This is approximately 800 KB for each pen. If this SuperTrend contained five pens, for example,
it would use 4,000 KB of RAM, or just under 4 MB.
Setting an Individual Pen
Click the Modify button for a pen in the SuperTrend Setup dialog box.
The SuperTrend Pen dialog box appears. (The number of the pen to be configured is shown in the
title bar.)
A
B
C
D
F
G
E
H
A Enter a SuperTrend pen name, if desired. By default, when a tag is selected in B, the
B
C
D
E
name will be the same as the tagname. In Runtime, this name is displayed in the
SuperTrend’s Active Pen drop-down list.
Enter an OptoControl tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button in C.
To enter a tagname in B, click here and select a tag in the Tag Selection dialog box that
appears. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about selecting and
configuring tags.
These fields configure the range of displayed data points:
• The Max Value, or maximum value, is the tag value that will position the pen at the
top of the trend. If a scanned value of the tag is greater than the Max Value, the
point will be plotted but will not be visible on the trend.
• The Min Value, or minimum value, is the tag value that will position the pen at the
bottom of the trend. If a scanned value of the tag is less than the Min Value, the
point will be plotted but will not be visible on the trend.
Click in the box next to Color to choose a pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears,
choose a color and click OK. Enter the width of the line you want created by the pen. The
width is specified in pixels.
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
F Click here to have point markers displayed for every scanned point. Point markers make
it easy to identify scanned data. In historical mode, you can click on a scanned point to
display its data (value, time scanned, etc.).
G Choose a point marker width, which is measured in pixels.
H Click OK to save your settings.
Using SuperTrend Log Files
Tag value data that is graphed in the SuperTrend chart can be saved to historic log files for later
viewing. Using the buttons and other controls on a SuperTrend chart, the operator can open and
view these log files while the project is running in OptoDisplay Runtime. This section shows how
to configure SuperTrend settings in your project to define how and where SuperTrend log files
are saved. To learn how to use SuperTrend controls, see “Using SuperTrends in Runtime” on
page 9-21.
NOTE: SuperTrend historic log files are similar to historic data logs, but are created and saved as
separate files due to the additional pen information that a SuperTrend can collect.
Configuring SuperTrend Logging
Two steps occur when a SuperTrend log file is created:
• Data is collected—Data for the SuperTrend historic log is first collected from the
controller being monitored. If the same OptoDisplay project is running on more than one
computer, each computer collects data from the controller.
• Data is saved—After the log data is collected, it is saved as either binary files or ASCII
text files. These files can be saved automatically on the local computer’s hard drive or on
another computer that is accessible over a network.
The first item, data collection, occurs automatically and cannot be changed. You can, however,
specify how and where SuperTrend log data is saved.
What Is Remote SuperTrend Logging?
Remote SuperTrend logging is a way to select a single computer that will save SuperTrend log
data to a file. When you designate a computer to save SuperTrend log data, other computers
running the same OptoDisplay project no longer save this data to a file. These other computers,
however, will continue to collect SuperTrend information and display it on-screen.
Designating a remote computer to save SuperTrend data prevents the problem of multiple
computers saving the same SuperTrend data to the same location, which results in duplicate data
and slower graphing of log information. Remote SuperTrend logging also prevents file access
problems that may occur when more than one computer tries to open a data file at the same time.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-15
WORKING WITH TRENDS
Choosing a Computer to Save SuperTrend Log Files
Follow the steps below to choose a local or remote computer that will save the SuperTrend log
files. If you select a remote computer, it must be running the same OptoDisplay project as the
local computer.
NOTE: Choosing a computer to save SuperTrend log files does not select the location where
these files are saved; it only designates the computer that will do the work of saving the file.
If you plan to run the same OptoDisplay project on multiple computers and these computers will
save SuperTrend data to the same location, it is recommended that you select a remote
computer—also running the project—to improve the performance of SuperTrend graphing and
file access.
1. Select Configure➞Remote SuperTrend Logging.
The Remote SuperTrend Logging dialog box appears.
2. Do one of the following:
• To have the local computer save SuperTrend data to a file, select Local Computer and
click OK.
The Local Computer setting will apply to each computer that is running this
OptoDisplay project, which means that each computer will save a SuperTrend log file.
• To have a remote computer running the OptoDisplay project save SuperTrend data to a
file, do the following:
i. Select Remote Computer and click Browse.
ii. Navigate in the file tree that appears (similar to Windows Explorer) until you find the
computer that will save SuperTrend data.
iii. Select that computer in the list and click OK.
When your project is running, only that remote computer will save SuperTrend data to
the log file. The Remote Computer setting will apply to each computer that is running
this OptoDisplay project. With this setting selected, each computer will display the
data, but will not save it to a file.
Remote SuperTrend Logging Example
The following example shows one way that remote SuperTrend logging might be configured for
multiple computers running the same OptoDisplay project.
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
The illustration below shows the required settings to have the computer PC 1 save SuperTrend
log files. With these settings, computers PC 2 and PC 3—all running the same OptoDisplay
project—would display SuperTrend data on-screen, but would not save SuperTrend log files.
PC 1
PC 2
PC 3
Choosing a Location for SuperTrend Log Files
After selecting a local or remote computer that will save SuperTrend log files, you must select
the location where these files will be saved. SuperTrend log files can be saved in the project
directory of the computer running the OptoDisplay project, or in a remote directory (for example,
on a network server).
To choose where SuperTrend log files will be saved, do the following:
1. Double-click on a SuperTrend to open the SuperTrends Setup dialog box.
2. Click the Log File button.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-17
WORKING WITH TRENDS
The Historic Log File Configuration dialog box appears.
3. Do one of the following:
• To save SuperTrend log files locally in the OptoDisplay project directory, select Use
Project Directory and click OK.
SuperTrend log files will now be saved locally in the same directory as your
OptoDisplay project. The Use Project Directory setting will apply to each computer that
is running this OptoDisplay project, which means that each computer will save
SuperTrend log files in its local project directory.
NOTE: If you have selected a remote computer to save SuperTrend log files, the Use
Project Directory option will not be available. You must click Browse and select a
directory from the list of network directories that appears, even if the directory you
select is the same as the project directory.
• To save SuperTrend log files in a location other than the OptoDisplay project directory,
follow these steps:
i. Select Name and click Browse.
If you have selected remote SuperTrend logging, the Choose Remote Logging Location
dialog appears. Otherwise, the Select Directory dialog box appears.
ii. Navigate in the file dialog box that appears until you find a computer and directory
(Choose Remote Logging dialog box) or mapped local or network drive and directory
(Select Directory dialog box) where you want to save SuperTrend log files.
iii. Select the directory where the files will be saved and click OK.
When your project is running, SuperTrend log files will be saved in the remote directory
you specified. This setting will apply to each computer that is running this OptoDisplay
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
project; each computer will save SuperTrend log files in the remote directory you
selected.
Saving a Log in Text or Binary Format
When you configure the SuperTrend object, you can choose to save a SuperTrend historic log file
in either text or binary format.
Text—When saved as an ASCII text file, a SuperTrend historic log file includes a header with
information about tags assigned to the SuperTrend pens. One advantage of saving a log file in
text format is accessibility—the file can be opened and viewed using any text editor, such as
Windows Notepad. The disadvantage to this file format is that when a large amount of historical
trend information is opened and graphed in a SuperTrend chart, the chart may be drawn slowly.
Binary—When a SuperTrend historic log file is saved in binary format, the file does not include
a header containing information about tags assigned to the SuperTrend pens. A major advantage
to saving a log file in binary format is speed—historical trend information from a binary file is
usually graphed much more quickly than when using the same information from a text file. A
disadvantage to binary file format is that the data cannot be opened and read using a text editor.
Changing Log File Formats
To change the file format of an existing SuperTrend historic log file between text and binary in
OptoDisplay Configurator, perform the steps listed below. (You will need to have previously run
your OptoDisplay project and collected historical data for log files to be present.)
1. Double-click a previously configured SuperTrend object that has generated one or more
historic log files.
The SuperTrend Setup dialog box appears with either Text File or Binary File selected,
depending on how you originally configured the SuperTrend.
Options to choose
the file format of a
SuperTrend
historic log file
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-19
WORKING WITH TRENDS
2. If Text File is selected, choose Binary File; if Binary File is selected, choose Text File.
The Select Log File to Convert to dialog appears. In the example below, text files that can
be converted to binary format appear in the list:
3. Highlight a log file to convert and then click OK.
4. Now click OK to close the SuperTrend Setup dialog.
Viewing Binary Log Files
While you can’t view the contents of a SuperTrend historic log file saved in binary format, a
simple software utility (including source code) is included with OptoDisplay that lets you convert
binary log files to text format in order to view their contents. (The utility can also convert text
files to binary format.) Once you have converted a binary SuperTrend historic log file to text
format, you can easily view its contents using a text editor or other application.
NOTE: This utility creates a separate, new file in text (or binary) format that is not used by
OptoDisplay. The format of the original SuperTrend historic log file is not changed. If you want
to change the format in which this original log file is saved, see “Changing Log File Formats” on
page 7-19.
Important Guidelines for Using This Utility
• Do not rename or modify any original SuperTrend historic log files. These are files with the
file extension .Tnn (for example, .T00, .T02, etc.; the number depends on how many
SuperTrends are saving historic data).
• If you rename the new files that are created by the utility, do not use the name or file
extension of the original SuperTrend historic log file.
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
• If you convert a text file to binary format, the header information in the text file will be
removed. This information cannot be recovered, even if you convert the binary file back to
text format.
Converting a SuperTrend Log File for Viewing
To convert a SuperTrend historic log file, open a DOS window and at the command prompt enter:
STRNDCVT.EXE [log file]
where [log file] is the name of the SuperTrend historic log file to be converted. For example, to
convert a log file named RH021615.T00, you would enter:
STRNDCVT.EXE RH021615.T00
The format change occurs automatically: If the log file is in binary format, it will be converted to
text; the new text file has the extension .txt. If the file is in text format, it will be converted to
binary; the new binary file has the file extension .bin.
Using XY Plots
You can use XY plots to graph real-time tag information. XY plots do not graph data over time,
but instead plot points on a two-dimensional graph using data from two float or integer numeric
tables in the OptoControl strategy. (See Opto 22 form 724, the OptoControl User’s Guide, for
information on using numeric tables in a strategy.)
The value in each element of the numeric tables defines the coordinates for a single point on the
x-axis and y-axis coordinate system. The example below shows how two numeric tables, each
having three elements, would be used to draw three consecutive points on an XY plot.
Table
Element
Numeric_Table_1
Numeric_Table_2
XY Coordinates
0
3
8
(3,8)
1
5.25
10
(5.25,10)
2
2
3.3
(2,3.3)
An XY plot is useful in applications where one value must be graphed against another value.
Common examples in industrial settings include graphing temperature versus pressure,
displacement versus input, or voltage versus current.
Creating an XY Plot
1. Select the XY Plot tool
from the toolbox and position the cursor where you want the XY
plot object to begin in the window.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-21
WORKING WITH TRENDS
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
The XY plot that appears should resemble the example below:
Y-Axis Layout
• Label Position = Bottom
• Max. Val = 100
• Min. Val = 0
• Major Divisions = 5
• Minor Divisions = 2
X-Axis Layout
• Label Position = Left
• Major Divisions = 5
• Min. Val = 0
• Minor Divisions = 2
• Max. Val = 100
Modifying an XY Plot
Choose the Select tool and double-click the XY plot.
The XY Plot Configuration dialog box appears:
D
E
A
B
C
F
G
J
K
H
L
I
M
N
A Enter the title of the XY plot here.
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WORKING WITH TRENDS
B Click a color button to enter the color for the chart, the chart’s background, and the
C
D
E
F
chart’s border. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
Select the Allow Range Change in Runtime checkbox to allow the user to change the
x-axis and y-axis range values in OptoDisplay Runtime.
Use the plot configuration buttons to define up to six individual plotted points in the XY
plot. Each individual plot uses x-axis and y-axis coordinates from two OptoControl tags.
You can also define the plotted point’s color and width, and specify line style and
whether a legend should appear. See “Configuring Individual Plots in an Object” on
page 7-23 for more information.
Check this box to display a configured individual plot (uncheck the box to hide the plot).
Enter the number of major x-axis divisions for the XY plot. This is the number of main
sections the graph is divided into. You can also choose a color for the major divisions by
clicking the Color field. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis divisions, the lines dividing the major divisions appear
thicker than the minor divisions.
G Enter the number of minor x-axis divisions for the XY plot. This will be the number of
sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum number of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor x-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In
the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
H Enter the minimum and maximum values for the x-axis.
I Enter the label position for the x-axis. By default, the x-axis is labeled on the left, but
you can also choose to have the label on the right or on both sides.
J Enter the number of major y-axis divisions for the XY plot. This is the number of main
sections the graph is divided into. You can also choose a color for the major divisions by
clicking the Color field. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis divisions, the lines dividing the major divisions appear
thicker than the minor divisions.
K Enter the number of minor y-axis divisions for the XY plot. This will be the number of
sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum number of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor y-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In
the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
L Enter the minimum and maximum values for the y-axis.
M Enter the label position for the y-axis. By default, the y-axis is labeled at the bottom, but
you can also choose to have the label at the top, or at both top and bottom.
N Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Individual Plots in an Object
Click the configuration button for an individual plot in the XY Plot Configuration dialog box.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 7-23
WORKING WITH TRENDS
The Configure XY Plot dialog box appears:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
A Enter an OptoControl tagname here that will provide the x-axis values. Click B to open
the Tag Selection dialog box.
B To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag for a numeric table. For the table you select, also enter the starting index
(usually 0) and the number of table elements to be used in the plot. The fields for these
values are shown in the illustration below. Up to 50 table elements can be used for an
individual plot. To learn more about configuring tags in your project, see “Configuring
Tags” on page 4-5.
For a selected numeric
table, enter a starting
index (usually 0) and the
number of table elements
to use (50 maximum).
C (Same as A above, but sets the tag used for the y-axis.)
D (Same as B above.)
E Click here to choose a pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and
click OK.
F Enter the width of the line you want created by the pen. The width is specified in pixels.
G Select the Show Legend in Runtime checkbox to have the names of the tags used appear
under the graph’s x-axis.
H Select Draw Connecting lines to have lines connect each x-y coordinate.
I Click OK to save your settings.
7-24 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CHAPTER 8
Chapter 8
Configuring Trigger-Based Events
Introduction
In this chapter, you will learn how to make different types of events occur based on the value of
a tag in an OptoControl strategy. These events include saving a historic data log, launching an
application, playing a sound, changing a window’s state, downloading and uploading a recipe to
the controller, and starting an alarm.
In This Chapter
What’s a Trigger-Based Event?............... 8-1
Historic Data Logs .................................. 8-2
Launching Applications ........................ 8-11
Sounds .................................................. 8-15
Window States ............................................ 8-17
Recipes......................................................... 8-19
Alarming....................................................... 8-28
What’s a Trigger-Based Event?
In OptoDisplay, you can make things happen based on the value of a tag in an OptoControl
strategy. When the tag equals a specific value or falls within a defined range of values, it starts,
or triggers, an event that you have specified.
You can use trigger-based events in many different ways. Here are a few examples:
• Monitoring temperature—Play a recorded warning sound to indicate an alarm condition
if a tag exceeds a value.
• Changing control system parameters for different products—Download a new
recipe (series of values) to a controller when a tag reaches a set value.
• Logging non-standard conditions or errors—Print a log whenever monitored tags fall
outside a previously defined range of values.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 8-1
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
Historic Data Logs
A historic data log lets you collect and store data from your control process to a file on your
computer, or on a remote computer on a network. Once it is saved in a file, historic data about
your control process can be used by applications such as Microsoft Excel to generate reports, or
the data can be archived for later reference.
NOTE: To ensure that the correct time and date information appear in a historic data log, make
sure to set the time and date on your PC prior to starting OptoDisplay.
By default, historic data logging begins when OptoDisplay starts scanning the controller for data,
and ends when OptoDisplay stops scanning the controller for data. (Scanning starts when the
OptoDisplay project is opened in Runtime, and stops when the project is closed.) You can use a
start or stop trigger, however, to start or stop historic data logging only when a tag, for example,
is within a range of preset values, or a preconfigured number of samples have been taken. Start
and stop triggers may be attached to any controller variable.
Tag Types You Can Save to a Historic Log
You can record the following types of tags in a historic data log:
•
•
•
•
Integers and integer tables
Floats and float tables
Strings
Discretes.
With integer tables and float tables, you can select individual elements, groups of elements, or
all elements in the table. See the OptoControl User’s Guide for more information on working with
tables in an OptoControl strategy.
NOTE: To save data from more than one controller, you must create a separate historic log file
for each controller that will be monitored. Data from multiple controllers cannot be saved in the
same historic log file.
Configuring a Historic Data Log
To configure a historic data log in your OptoDisplay project, choose Configure➞Historic Data
Log. In the Historic Logs dialog box that appears do the following:
• Click Add to create a new historic data log.
• Highlight an existing log and click Modify to change it.
• Highlight an existing log and click Delete to remove it.
If you are creating or changing a historic log file, the Historic Log Configuration dialog box will
appear.
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CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
M
K
L
N
O
A Enter the name of the historic log here. Use this name to refer to the historic log group
you’re configuring. (This name does not affect the name of the historic log file that is
saved to disk.)
NOTE: The name in this field must be different from all historic logs within the project
or you will get an error message when you exit the dialog box.
B This field shows a unique numeric identifier for the historic log. This identifier, which
C
D
E
F
G
H
starts out at 00 and increases sequentially, is used as the last two characters of the
three-character file name extension for a historic log file. The first character of this file
name extension is an uppercase “H”, so with the identifier, a typical file name extension
for a historic data log would be “.H00”
Select a previously configured refresh time group to scan the historic log point tags. This
scan rate applies to every log point configured within this historic log. For more
information on setting up refresh time groups, see “Refresh Time Groups” on page 6-35.
Click to specify the directory where the historic log file should be saved, the file name
and format, and, if applicable, the rollover parameters for the file. See “Defining the
Historic Data Log File” on page 8-4 for more information.
This list shows all configured historic log points for this log file. The order of the points
in the list (top to bottom) is the order in which the points will be logged. To change the
order of the list, select a point, and then choose one of the Move buttons in J.
Click to add a historic log point to the end of the historic log point list (E). See
“Configuring a Historic Log Point” on page 8-7 for more information.
Click to insert a historic log point above a highlighted historic log point.
Lets you modify the highlighted historic log point.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 8-3
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
Deletes the highlighted historic log point from the list (E).
Highlight the log point you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down to
change the position of the point in the historic log point list.
Click to configure the OptoControl tag that will start scanning the listed historic log
points. Check the Enabled box to make the start trigger active. See “Configuring a Start
or Stop Trigger” on page 8-7 for more information.
Since the start trigger can be activated only from a non-triggered state, you must also
configure a stop trigger at L or a number of scan times at M.
Click to configure the OptoControl tag that will stop scanning the listed historic log
points. Check the Enabled box to make the stop trigger active. A stop trigger is required
only when you have configured a start trigger. Additionally, a stop trigger is
edge-sensitive and only activates on a false-to-true state transition. See page 8-7 for
more information on setting up a stop trigger.
Another way to stop scanning the historic log points is to set the number of samples, or
times the points are scanned. Select Number of Samples, and then enter a discrete
number of samples to take once the start trigger occurs.
Click this button to assign a value to a tag when historic log sampling has stopped.
Check the Enabled box to make notification active. See “Notification When a Trigger
Has Stopped” on page 8-8 for more information.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Historic Log
Configuration dialog box.
Defining the Historic Data Log File
You can name the historic data log file, determine where it will be located, configure how the
data lines will appear, and define its rollover parameters in the Historic Log File Configuration
dialog box.
NOTE: The historic data log file is not the same log file used to record data from a SuperTrend.
A SuperTrend historic log file contains different data about log points, and is configured
separately from a historic data log file. See “Using SuperTrend Log Files” on page 7-15 for more
information. Alarm log files, which contain data about alarms that have been triggered, are also
different from historic data log files. See “Alarm Logging Options” on page 8-42 for more
information.
If you want to save data from more than one controller, you should create a separate historic log
file for each controller that will be monitored. If data from multiple controllers is saved in the
same historic log file, it is difficult to identify data that corresponds to a specific controller.
To define a historic data log file, click the Log File button in the Historic Log Configuration dialog
box and enter information in the Historic Log File Configuration dialog box that appears.
8-4 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
A Choose the directory where the historic log file will be saved. Click Name and enter the
directory path in the field next to it, or click Browse to find a directory path. Click Use
Project Directory to save the historic log file to the OptoDisplay project directory. (This
occurs by default if you don’t specify a location.)
B Select Automatic, Fixed, or From Mistic string to determine how the historic log file
name will be created, and then fill in additional information as needed for that option.
If the Automatic option is used, log files are named based on the rules described in
“About Data Log File Names and Formats” on page 8-9. If you select this option, files
are named using the rollover convention if required; this is described on page 8-10. If
rollover is not used, the file is named “histlog.Hnn,” where nn is the two-digit historic
log ID number. The Automatic option is used by default if you do not select another
option.
C If you selected the Fixed option in B, enter a file name here. The file name can be any
valid, eight-character DOS file name and doesn’t require a three-character file
extension. Note that if you don’t specify an extension, one is not added automatically.
You must configure and enable a Start Trigger for this type of file (see page 8-16).
When the trigger starts the historic data log, the new data is appended to the file if the
file already exists. If the file doesn’t already exist, it is created. The rollover naming
convention doesn’t apply to this type of file name.
D If you selected the From Mistic string option, enter an OptoControl string tagname here.
Use the Tag Selection button
to quickly enter the tag containing the name of the
historic log file. You must configure and enable a Start Trigger for this type of file (see
page 8-16). When the trigger starts the historic log, the string containing the file name
is read, and the new data is appended to the log file if the file already exists. If the file
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 8-5
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
doesn’t already exist, it is created. The rollover naming convention doesn’t apply to this
type of file name.
If the Mistic string in D is an invalid file name, the default name of the log file is
created using the following rules:
• If the Mistic string is empty, the project directory is added to E and the extension
is an uppercase “H” followed by the historic log ID number.
• If the Mistic string is not empty and a project directory is not specified as the
directory path, the Name in A is added to E.
• If the project directory is specified as the path, or the previous step failed, the
project directory is added to E and the extension is an uppercase “H” followed by
the historic log ID number. If the project directory is read-only or there is not
enough room left on the drive containing the project directory, an error message
indicates the file could not be created.
Enter a default file name in E in case the file name in D is invalid. The file name can be
any valid, eight-character DOS file name. The three-character file extension is assigned
by OptoDisplay, and will start with an uppercase “H” followed by the historic log’s ID
(for example: .H00 if the ID is 00).
Click to configure the character, or delimiter, used to separate the data in the log file, to
choose the type of quotes used for each data line, and where to insert carriage returns.
You configure these parameters in the Line Format dialog box that appears. See
page 8-9 for more information.
Enter the number of lines of data your PC will save to a memory buffer before writing
the information to the historic log file. When choosing a number, keep in mind that the
lower the number of buffered data lines, the more frequently the computer has to write
to the file. Alternately, the higher the number of data lines buffered in memory, the more
data that will be lost if your PC loses power or has a system failure. A valid entry is any
number between 0 and 999; the default is 20 lines.
Enter the maximum number of historic log files that can be created using rollover before
the oldest file is overwritten. For example, if you enter 10 and your rollover time period
is set to hours, you will have 10 historic log files created for 10 hours of data before the
oldest file is overwritten with new data. See page 8-10 for more information on rollover
settings.
Choose the rollover time period here. Select None to have all logged data placed in a
single data file named HISTLOG.Hnn, where nn is the two-character identifier assigned
to the historic log. Logging begins when the Start Trigger is activated, and data collected
will be appended to the existing data file. The size of the file is limited only by available
disk space.
Select Keep file open to leave the log file open to allow data to be appended to the
historic log file more quickly. If you leave this box unchecked (the default setting), the
file is closed after each time data is written to it. This provides greater data integrity
than leaving the file open.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
8-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
Configuring a Historic Log Point
1. To add or change a historic log point in the Historic Log Configuration dialog box, click
Append or Insert to add a point, or click Modify to change a point.
The Historic Log Point Configuration dialog box appears:
2. (Optional) Enter a user-defined name for the historic log point.
3. Click the Tag Selection button
and select an OptoControl tag to be a historic log point.
See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about selecting tags.
4. (Optional) If you picked a tag of type float, enter a number in the Floating Point Resolution
box to specify how many places after the decimal point you want recorded.
5. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger
1. To configure which tag and value will start or stop historic logging, click Start Trigger or
Stop Trigger in the Historic Log Configuration dialog box.
The Historic Log Configuration dialog box for either Start Triggers or Stop Triggers appears.
These dialog boxes are identical. (The Historic Log Start Trigger Configuration dialog box is
shown below.)
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 8-7
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
2. Click the Tag Selection button
Trigger.
and select an OptoControl tag to be a Start or Stop
See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more information about selecting tags.
3. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup By group.
Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the historic log. Current Value sets the tag
value that will trigger the historic log. To set a Current Value, select an operator in the
drop-down menu, and then enter a value to compare the tag to.
Notification When a Trigger Has Stopped
When historic logging has stopped, you can set a tag to a given state or value. This tag setting
will act as a flag to indicate data isn’t being added to the log file anymore.
1. Click Notification in the Historic Log Configuration dialog box.
The Historic Log Stop Trigger Notification dialog box appears:
2. Click the Tag Selection button
to quickly select an OptoControl tagname. See
“Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for more about the Tag Selection dialog box.
3. Select Set or Offset and enter the appropriate value in the Value Out field. Choose Set to
replace the tag’s current value with the number in the Value Out field. Choose Offset to add
that number to the tag’s current value.
8-8 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
Setting Log File Line Format
1. To define how lines of data are stored in the historic log file, click Line Format in the
Historic Log File Configuration dialog box. The Line Format dialog box appears:
2. In the Line Format dialog box, select from the choices in the Delimiter group a character
(delimiter) that will separate data in the log file. To use a delimiter that’s not listed, choose
Other and enter the character you want to use. Select Include space after delimiter to put a
space after each delimiter.
3. From the choices in the drop-down list “Quotes Around Strings,” select the quotes that will
appear around each string in the log file.
4. To insert a carriage return after a certain number of data elements, select the check box
“Carriage return every” and enter the number of data elements.
The maximum number of elements that can be entered is 99,999. This option is intended
for historic logs with very long data lines which are read by programs that cannot handle
long data lines. The date and time information at the beginning of a data line are not
counted as data elements. See “About Data Log File Names and Formats” below for more
information about data elements in log files.
About Data Log File Names and Formats
Naming Log Files
There are three ways you can name a historic log file: by using a fixed name, by building the name
using a string tag, or by letting the file name be created automatically. If you let OptoDisplay
create the file name automatically, the file name will be histlog.H##, where ## is the
two-character identifier assigned to the historic log by the Configurator. The .H## is the common
extension that identifies all historic log files.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 8-9
CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
Naming Files Using Rollover
File rollover is used to divide historic log information among several data files. You can configure
how often a new data file is created; after the time limit has expired, another historic log file is
created and data is rolled into the new file.
Historic log files with names determined automatically by OptoDisplay use the rollover format
(see “Naming Log Files” on page 8-9). The rollover format does not apply to files with fixed
names or file names constructed from OptoControl strategy string tagnames.
Historic log files using file rollover follow this naming pattern:
• Months: RMyymm.H##
• Days: RDyymmdd.H##
• Hours: RHmmddhh.H##
where yy= year, mm= month, dd= day, hh= hour, and ## represents the two-character historic log
ID number.
The rollover time period for historic log files can be based on months, days, or hours.
Hours If hours are selected as the rollover period, a new data file is created at the top of every
hour. For example, if data logging were triggered at 8:30 a.m., the first data file would contain
data from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Thereafter, data files will contain one hour’s worth of data for
every hour thereafter, 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., etc.
Days If days are selected as the rollover period, a new data file is created every day at midnight.
For example, if data logging were triggered at 7:00 p.m. on the 5th, the first data file would
contain data from 7:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. on the 5th. Thereafter, data files will contain data from
midnight the 5th to midnight the 6th, midnight the 6th to midnight the 7th, etc.
Months If months are selected as the rollover period, a new data file is created on the first day
of every month at midnight. For example, if data logging started on January 27th, the first data
file would contain data from the 27th of January to the 31st of January. Thereafter, data files
will contain data from the 1st of February to the end of February, the 1st of March to the 31st of
March, etc.
Data Log Elements
Historic data logs consist of header lines and data lines.
Header Line The first line of the file, a header line shows the name of each data field. Lines of
data samples then follow the header line. Every time OptoDisplay is closed and restarted, a new
header line is appended to the log file, so a log file may have more than one header line.
Here’s an example:
Date,Time,CNTR1:Float.TEMP208,CNTR1:Float.PRES209,CNTR1:Float.LEVEL218
Date and Time show where timestamp information will appear in the data lines.
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CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
CNTR1:TEMP208, CNTR1:PRES209, and CNTR1:LEVEL218 show that information will be
recorded for three OptoControl tags: TEMP208, PRES209, and LEVEL218. These tags are all on
the controller named CNTR1.
Data Lines Data lines follow a header line, and have the following format:
Date<delimiter>Time<delimiter>TAG1<delimiter>TAG2. . .TAG1000<crlf>
Date is the current system date with the format: YYYY/MM/DD, where YYYY=year, MM=month,
DD=day.
Time is the current system time with the format: hh:mm:ss, where hh=hour, mm=minute,
ss=seconds.
TAG1...TAG1000 are valid OptoControl tags with the format: Controller_Name:Item_Type.Tag.
<delimiter> is any printable ASCII character.
<crlf> is a carriage return, line feed.
Here’s an example of what the file may look like:
Date,Time,Cookie:Float.TEMP208,Cookie:Float.PRES209,Cookie:Float.LEVEL218
1996/03/01,17:00:00,120.02,14.96,12.09
1996/03/01,18:00:00,120.06,14.98,12.03
1996/03/01,19:00:00,120.03,14.99,12.02
1996/03/01, 20:00:00,120.04,15.01,12.05
In this sample file, data is being sampled every hour from a controller named “Cookie,” and a
temperature (TEMP208), pressure (PRES209), and tank level (LEVEL218) are being recorded.
Launching Applications
You can use OptoDisplay to start, or launch, other applications in two ways:
• By configuring a dynamic attribute for a graphic, and then selecting the graphic during
Runtime. See Chapter 6, “Using Animated Graphics” to learn how to do this in OptoDisplay
Configurator.
• By configuring an application manager to associate a tag with an application, and then
launching the application using triggers. This is the method of starting an application we
will cover in this section.
Configuring an Application Launch
To use OptoDisplay Configurator to configure an application launch using a trigger, choose
Configure➞Applications, and in the Application Managers dialog box that appears do the
following:
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 8-11
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• To create a new application manager, click Add. You can configure up to 1,000 application
managers per project.
• To change an existing application manager, highlight it and click Modify.
• To remove an existing application manager, highlight it and click Delete.
If you are creating or changing an application manager, the Application Manager dialog box will
open:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
A Enter the name of the application manager here. This name refers to this application
B
C
D
E
launch setup, and must be different from all application managers within the project.
Enter the path name of the working directory to use after launching the application. If a
working directory isn’t specified, the current project directory is used. Click Browse to
quickly choose a directory path in the Working Directory Selection dialog box (see
page 8-13).
Enter the path and file name of the program you want to run when the trigger condition
occurs. Click Browse to quickly choose the path and file name in the standard Windows
file selection dialog box.
(Optional) Select a string tag from the OptoControl strategy to be appended to the
Command Line string in C. If the appended string is a command line option, a space
must be included in the Command Line string to separate it from the main command line
Use the Tag Selection button
to select the string tagname. See“Configuring Tags”
on page 4-5 for more information on tags. Click the Clear button
to quickly remove
an entry from D.
Select Single instance to have OptoDisplay Runtime check whether the trigger has
already launched a session, or instance, of an application. If the trigger hasn’t already
launched the application, it will be started. Select Multiple instances to let the trigger
start any number of sessions of the same application.
The Single Instance option doesn’t prevent an application from being launched by other
graphics and triggers, so multiple instances of an application can still occur. For
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example, if a trigger launches a Microsoft Word session, it can’t launch any other
application until this Word session ends. A toggled graphic or another trigger,
however, could launch another session of Word, so two instances of the same
application would be running concurrently.
Caution: Running multiple instances of the same application on your PC is not
recommended. Just like running several different applications at the same time, running
multiple instances of the same application requires additional memory and other system
resources. This may slow your PC’s performance, as well as that of OptoDisplay
Runtime.
F Select how the application’s window will appear on-screen: Normal, Minimized, or
Maximized.
G Click Trigger to select the OptoControl tag used to trigger the application launch. The
trigger is edge-sensitive and only activates from a non-triggered state. See “Selecting
a Trigger to Launch an Application” on page 8-14 for more information.
H Click Notification to assign a value to a tag when an application is successfully
launched. See “Notification When an Application Has Been Launched” on page 8-15 for
more information. A check mark in the Notification enabled box indicates a notification
tag is configured.
I Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Application
Manager dialog box.
Selecting a Working Directory for a Launched Application
1. To set up the working directory the launched application should use, click Browse in the
Application Manager dialog box.
2. In the Working Directory Selection dialog box that appears, navigate to the working
directory path and click OK. (Click Network to select a network drive.)
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Selecting the Application File to Run
1. To choose the application you want to run, in the Application Manager dialog box click the
Browse button next to the Command Line field.
2. In the Application Manager Executable File Selection dialog box that appears, navigate to
the application you’d like to run, highlight it, and click OK.
Selecting a Trigger to Launch an Application
1. To select the trigger that will launch an application, click Trigger in the Application
Manager dialog box.
The Application Manager Trigger Selection dialog box appears:
2. Enter the name of the trigger in the Name field. Use the Tag Selection button
choose a tag from the Tag Selection dialog box.
to quickly
3. Select Discrete or Current value in the Setup by group.
Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the application. Current Value sets the tag
value that will trigger the application. To enter a value in the Current Value field, select an
operator in the drop-down menu, and then enter a value to compare the tag to.
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Notification When an Application Has Been Launched
You can set a tag to a given state or value when an application has been successfully launched
by a trigger.
1. Click Notification in the Application Manager dialog box.
The Launch Application Trigger Notification dialog box appears:
2. Click the Tag Selection button
to quickly select an OptoControl tag as the flag to
indicate the application was launched successfully. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for
more information about configuring tags.
3. Select Set or Offset, and then enter the value that will be sent to the tag in the Value Out
field. Choose Set to replace the tag’s current value with the number in the Value Out field.
Choose Offset to add that number to the tag’s current value.
Sounds
Sounds can provide important feedback, such as alerts or warnings, for the operator using your
OptoDisplay project. You can add sounds to your OptoDisplay project by configuring triggers to
start and stop standard Windows sound files. To use this capability, the PC running the project
must have a properly configured sound card and corresponding system software, as well as a set
of speakers. You can use both digitized sound (.WAV) and MIDI music (.MID) files in your project.
Sounds can also be used with project alarms. If both an event and an alarm occur, causing
multiple sounds to play, the sounds will alternate. See page 8-45 for more information on setting
up sounds to work with alarms.
Configuring a Sound
To configure a sound, choose Configure➞Sounds, and in the Sounds dialog box that appears:
• Click Add to add a new sound event. You can configure up to 1,000 sound events per
project.
• Highlight an existing sound event and click Modify to change it.
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CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
• Highlight an existing sound event and click Delete to remove it.
If you are creating or changing a sound event, the Sound Configuration dialog box will appear:
A
B
C
D
E
F
A Enter a name for the sound event. No two sound events in a project may have the same
B
C
D
E
F
name.
Click Browse and select the sound file you want to play in the standard Windows file
selection dialog box that appears. If the Use project directory option is checked, you can
only choose sound files located in your project directory.
Click Start Trigger to configure a trigger to start playing the sound. See “Configuring
Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds” below to learn how to configure this trigger.
Select the Play sound option if you want the sound to play a specific number of times
before stopping. Enter the number of times the sound will play in the field next to the
option. The default value is one.
Click Stop Trigger to configure a trigger to stop the sound that is playing. See
“Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds” below to learn how to configure this
trigger.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds
1. To configure the tag and value that will start or stop a sound, click Start Trigger or Stop
Trigger in the Sound Configuration dialog box
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The Sound Trigger Configuration dialog box for either Start Triggers or Stop Triggers
appears. These dialog boxes are identical. (The Sound Start Trigger Configuration dialog
box is shown below.)
2. Use the Tag Selection button
box.
to quickly choose a tag from the Tag Selection dialog
3. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup by group. Current value sets the tag value
that will trigger the sound. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then enter a
value to compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the sound.
Window States
You can use a trigger to modify the appearance of windows that appear in Runtime. Changing
the appearance of windows can be effective when you want to immediately attract an operator’s
attention, or to prompt operators to take the next action.
Configuring Trigger-Based Window States
To configure a window state, choose Configure➞Window States, and in the Window Managers
dialog box that appears:
• Click Add to add a new window manager. You can configure up to 1,000 window managers
per project.
• Highlight an existing window manager and click Modify to change it.
• Highlight an existing window manager and click Delete to remove it.
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If you are creating or changing a window manager, the Window Manager Configuration dialog
box will appear:
To set up a window manager, do the following:
1. Enter the name of the window manager in the Name field.
2. Click Pop Window to configure window states for one or more windows. See “Windows”
on page 6-29 for more information about changing window states.
3. Click Trigger to configure the trigger that will change the window state.
The Window Manager Start Trigger Configuration dialog box appears:
4. Use the Tag Selection button
box.
to quickly choose a tag from the Tag Selection dialog
5. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup By group. Current Value sets the tag value
that will trigger the change in window state. Select an operator in the drop-down menu,
and then enter a value to compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state
trigger the change in window state.
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Recipes
Recipes are ASCII text files used to download data to a control engine and to upload data back
to a PC running OptoDisplay. Recipes are very useful for batch processes where system variables
are pre-determined and vary between runs or product types. You can also use recipes to save
critical process settings and then create more recipes, or to restore a system after a failure.
Recipe download files are used to send process data and chart control instructions to a control
engine (see “Recipe Download File” on page 8-20). Recipe upload files record values currently
being used in table elements on a particular table (see “Recipe Upload File” on page 8-22). To
create either a download or upload file, first see “Basic Recipe File Format” below.
This section contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
“Basic Recipe File Format”
“Recipe Download File” on page 8-20
“Recipe Upload File” on page 8-22
“Activating Recipe Downloads and Uploads” on page 8-23
“Configuring a Recipe Download” on page 8-23
“Recipe Upload File” on page 8-22
Basic Recipe File Format
Download and upload recipe files both use the basic recipe format described here. To create a
recipe file, first read this section and then see either “Recipe Download File” on page 8-20 or
“Recipe Upload File” on page 8-22.
A recipe text file contains one or more OptoControl integer, float, or string table tags and values.
You can create or modify a recipe file using any text editor or word processor that can save files
in ASCII format.
As shown in the example, each recipe file contains at least one OptoControl table tag followed
by data values and blank lines. Recipes may also contain comments, and a download recipe
might include chart control instructions as well.
Comment
OptoControl
table tag
Table element
values
Blank lines
(two carriage returns)
/Recipe file for Peanut Butter Cookies
/
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.Temps
1:300.0
2:350.0
4:200.0
7:150.0
/End of recipe file
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Comment Line—Any line that starts with a / (forward slash) is a comment, and is ignored by
OptoDisplay. Use comments to explain the recipe and to make notes.
OptoControl Tag—Identifies the table tag in the OptoControl strategy that the recipe uses.
Only integer, float, and string tags are valid tag types. The tag is in the following format:
<Control Engine Name>:<Table Type>.<Table Name>
• <Control Engine Name> is the Opto 22 control engine name.
• <Table Type> includes one of the following keywords: Integer Table, Float Table, or
String Table. They identify the variable type and are separated from <Control Engine
Name> by a colon (:).
• <Table Name> is the OptoControl table tagname. It must be of the type specified by
<Table Type>. A period (.) separates it from <Table Type>.
Element values—These are the values downloaded to the control engine or uploaded to the
PC.
Blank line—This is a required element of a recipe file. Make sure to create a blank line at the
end of a data list and at the end of the file by entering two carriage returns.
Recipe Download File
This section describes how to create a recipe download file. Before you begin, see “Basic Recipe
File Format” on page 8-19. For a description of how to configure OptoDisplay for a recipe
download, see “Configuring a Recipe Download” on page 8-23
A download file provides an efficient method for making changes to program variables without
having to manually enter the data. For example, let’s say you have a cookie factory that makes
chocolate chip cookies in the morning and peanut butter cookies in the afternoon. After making
the chocolate chip cookies you can download a recipe to the control engine that contains new
values for the peanut butter cookies.
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This example has four table elements and one chart control instruction:
A
B
Table elements
C
D
Chart control
instruction
/Recipe file for Chocolate Chip Cookies
/
/My_table is a table with 10 elements
/This recipe will download values to 4 elements
/
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.My_table
34.0
3:98.6
35
9:2.5
Cookie_Controller:Chart.My_Chart
RUN
/End of recipe file
The table elements in the example are used as follows:
A No index reference is indicated for the first data value, 34.0. Therefore, by default it is
assigned to zero or My_table[0].
B The next line, 3:98.6, has an index reference of 3. This means the value 98.6 would be sent
to My_table[3], the fourth element of the table.
C The next value, 35, would be sent to My_table[4].
D The last data line, 9:2.5, would send 2.5 to the tenth element, My_table[9]. Make sure to
leave the next line blank by entering two carriage returns after the last data line. The blank
line indicates that all the data for that particular table has been specified. Do not put blank
lines between lines that contain data for the table.
Chart control instructions such as RUN, STOP, SUSPEND, and CONTINUE control the
execution state of one or more OptoControl charts when a recipe file is downloaded. You can use
a chart control instruction to start a chart that can then move downloaded table values to other
program variables.
Chart control instructions have the following format:
<Control Engine Name>:Chart.<Chart Name>
<Chart State>
• <Control Engine Name> is the name of the Opto 22 control engine.
• Chart identifies the keyword identifying this line as a chart instruction. “Chart” is
separated from <Control Engine Name> by a colon (:).
• <Chart Name> is the OptoControl strategy chart name, and is separated from Chart by a
period (.).
• <Chart State> is the chart instruction, and must include one of the following keywords:
STOP, RUN, SUSPEND, or CONTINUE. This instruction must be on the line following the
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<Chart Name>. The last line in a chart control instruction must be a blank line and contain
only a carriage return.
Recipe Upload File
This section describes how to create a format file for a recipe upload. Before you begin, see
“Basic Recipe File Format” on page 8-19. For a description of how to configure OptoDisplay for a
recipe upload, see “Configuring a Recipe Upload” on page 8-25
A recipe upload records the values currently being used in table elements on a particular table.
You can use these values to improve the production process. For example, using the cookie
factory analogy, if after downloading the peanut butter cookie recipe and starting the cooking
process, you then decide to add more sugar or cook the cookies longer, you can modify one or
more of the table values (either by an OptoDisplay SendValue, or from OptoControl debugger) and
then upload the new recipe. The next time you make peanut butter cookies, you can re-download
the new recipe.
An upload format file tells OptoDisplay which table elements to upload to a destination file (or
results file) on the PC. The format file has the basic recipe file format, but does not usually
contain data.
For a format file to be valid, there must be at least one table element index (e.g., 2:), and there
must be an index for every table element to be uploaded, even if starting at element zero.
Table element
indexes
/Recipe file for macadamia Nut Cookies
/
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.Temps
0:
1:
2:
34:
40:
41:
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.My_table
0:
2:
5:
/End of upload format file
As shown in the example, you can include table element indexes for multiple tables. Remember
to put a blank line before each new section of data and at the end of the file by entering two
carriage returns at the end of the line.
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Re-using a Destination File
After an upload, the destination file (or results file) contains data, and it may contain chart control
instructions. If you re-use a destination file as a format file, the data and any control instructions
are ignored by the control engine. Therefore, you can also use the destination (or results) file as
a recipe download file.
/Recipe file for macadamia Nut Cookies
/
My_Controller:Integer Table.My_Int_Table
0: 1
1: 100
Data
Chart control
instruction
My_Controller:Float Table.My_Float_Table
0: 1.234
1: 100.567
Cookie_Controller:Chart.My_Chart
RUN
/End of download recipe file
Activating Recipe Downloads and Uploads
You can configure a recipe to download or upload to a control engine in two ways:
• Animated Graphic—By configuring a dynamic attribute for a graphic—when the
operator selects the graphic, the recipe action will occur. See Chapter 6, “Using Animated
Graphics” to learn how to do this.
• Trigger—By configuring a trigger that associates a tag with a recipe action—when the
tag value meets a defined value, the recipe action will be triggered. We will cover this
method of starting a recipe action in the next two sections, “Configuring a Recipe
Download” and “Configuring a Recipe Upload.”
Configuring a Recipe Download
To configure a recipe to download using a trigger (or “download recipe manager”), choose
Configure➞Recipes, and in the Download Recipes section of the Recipe Managers dialog box
that appears, do the following:
• To create a new download recipe manager, click Add.
• To change an existing download recipe manager, highlight it and click Modify.
• To remove an existing download recipe manager, highlight it and click Delete.
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If you are creating or changing a download recipe manager, the Download Recipe Manager
dialog box appears:
A
B
D
C
E
F
G
H
A Enter the name of the download recipe manager. This name is used to refer to the recipe
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
group you’re configuring in the Configurator. The name in this field must be different
from all recipe managers in this project.
Choose the directory the recipe file resides in. You can type the directory in the edit box
or click Browse to quickly find and enter the path.
Choose the source of the recipe file name.
• If you choose Fixed name, D is highlighted.
• If you choose Prompt for name, the operator will be asked for the name of the
recipe file to be downloaded.
• If From Mistic string is selected, E is highlighted.
If Fixed name was selected in C, enter the name of the recipe file located in directory
B. Notice the file extension is .rcp.
If From Mistic string was selected in C, click the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. See “Configuring Tags” on
page 4-5 for more information about using tags.
Click Trigger to select an OptoControl tagname that will trigger the download recipe
action. The trigger can be activated only from a non-triggered state. See “Selecting a
Trigger to Start the Recipe Upload/Download” on page 8-27 to learn how to configure
this trigger.
Click Notification to assign a value to a tag when a recipe has successfully downloaded.
Check the Enabled box to make notification active. See “Notification When Recipe Has
Been Downloaded/Uploaded” on page 8-27 for more information.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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Configuring a Recipe Upload
To configure a recipe to upload using a trigger (or “upload recipe manager”), choose
Configure➞Recipes, and in the Upload Recipes section of the Recipe Managers dialog box that
appears, do the following:
• To create a new upload recipe manager, click Add.
• To change an existing upload recipe manager, highlight it and click Modify.
• To remove an existing upload recipe manager, highlight it and click Delete.
If you are creating or changing an upload recipe manager, the Upload Recipe Manager dialog box
appears:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
A Enter the name of the upload recipe manager. This name is used to refer to the recipe
group you’re configuring in the Configurator. The name in this field must be different
from all recipe managers in this project.
B Choose the directory the recipe file resides in. You can type the directory in the edit box
or click Browse to quickly find and enter the path.
C Choose the source of the recipe file name.
• If you choose Fixed name, D is highlighted.
• If you choose Prompt for name, the operator will be asked for the name of the
recipe file to be uploaded.
• If From Mistic string is selected, E is highlighted.
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D If Fixed name was selected in C, enter the name of the recipe file located in directory
B. Notice the file extension is .rcp.
E If From Mistic string was selected in C, click the Tag Selection button
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. See “Configuring Tags” on
page 4-5 for more information about using tags.
Click Browse and choose the directory location of the recipe file that will receive the
information.
Choose the source of the recipe file name.
• If you choose Fixed name, D is highlighted.
• If you choose Prompt for name, the operator will be asked for the name of the
recipe file to be uploaded to.
• If From Mistic string is selected, E is highlighted.
If Fixed name was selected in C, enter the name of the recipe file located in directory B.
If From Mistic String was selected in C, click the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. See “Configuring Tags” on
page 4-5 for more information about using tags.
Click Trigger to select an OptoControl tagname that will trigger the upload recipe action.
The trigger can be activated only from a non-triggered state. See “Selecting a Trigger to
Start the Recipe Upload/Download” on page 8-27 to learn how to configure this trigger.
Click Notification to assign a value to a tag when a recipe has successfully uploaded.
Check the Enabled box to make notification active. See “Notification When Recipe Has
Been Downloaded/Uploaded” on page 8-27 for more information.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Download/Upload
Recipe Manager dialog boxes.
Selecting a Download/Upload Recipe File Directory
1. To set up the directory that the recipe will be uploaded to or downloaded from, click
Browse in the Download/Upload Recipe Manager dialog box.
You will need to do this when you choose the directory for the download recipe file, the
upload format file, or the destination upload file. Since all three options show very similar
dialog boxes, we will only discuss one of them.
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2. In the Upload Recipe Manager dialog box, click Browse.
3. In the Select Format File Directory dialog box that opens, navigate to the working directory
path and click OK. (Click Network to select a network drive.)
Selecting a Trigger to Start the Recipe Upload/Download
1. To select the trigger that will start a recipe upload or download, click Trigger in the
Download/Upload Recipe Manager dialog box.
The Recipe Trigger Configuration dialog box appears:
2. Enter the name of the trigger in the Name field. Use the Tag Selection button
to quickly
choose a tag from the Tag Selection dialog box. See “Configuring Tags” on page 4-5 for
more information about tags.
3. Select Discrete or Current value in the Setup by group. Current value sets the tag value that
will trigger the recipe download/upload. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and
then enter a value to compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger
the application.
Notification When Recipe Has Been Downloaded/Uploaded
1. Click Notification in the Download/Upload Recipe Manager dialog box.
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The Recipe Download Completed Notification dialog box opens:
2. Click the Tag Selection button
to quickly select an OptoControl tag as the flag to
indicate the recipe upload or download was successful. See “Configuring Tags” on
page 4-5 for more information about configuring tags.
3. Select Set or Offset, and then enter the value that will be sent to the tag in the Value Out
field. Choose Set to replace the tag’s current value with the number in the Value Out field.
Choose Offset to add that number to the tag’s current value.
Alarming
You can incorporate alarm features into your operator interface by adding an OptoDisplay alarm
graphic. In a project, alarm graphics monitor alarm points associated with OptoControl tags, and
alert the operator when pre-defined alarm conditions are reached. Alarm information can be
logged to a file or sent to a printer.
Configuring Alarm Points
Like a historic log point, an alarm point is linked to an OptoControl tag. When an alarm point
matches a defined alarm state, it is displayed on all alarm graphics that include that alarm point.
If configured to do so, an alarm point can also be sent to any configured file or printer log.
Once it is set up, an alarm point can be included in any number of alarm graphics in an
OptoDisplay project. (Data for an alarm point can still be collected if the alarm point has not been
included in a graphic.) You can easily generate a report that lists all the alarm points for a project;
see “Viewing Dynamic Attributes” on page 6-32 for more information.
1. To configure an alarm point, choose Configure➞Alarm Points.
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The Alarm Points dialog box that opens lists configured alarm points. The “Ref Count”
column shows the number of alarm windows in which each alarm point is used.
2. Do one of the following:
– Click Add to create a new alarm point.
– Highlight an existing alarm point and click Modify to change it.
– Highlight an existing alarm point and click Delete to remove it.
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If you are creating or changing an alarm point, the Alarm Point dialog box appears:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
A Enter a name for the alarm point here. The name of each alarm point in a project must
B
C
D
E
be unique and must be less than 128 characters. The OptoControl tagname appears by
default.
Displays the name of the OptoControl tag that you select with C.
Click the Tag Selection button
to select an OptoControl tag for the alarm point. Note
that the choice of tags available is determined by the type of tag you select in E.
Enter a deadband value to be added to or subtracted from the previously read tag value.
This value adds a buffer, or deadband, that the next value read must be above or below
to trigger the alarm point. For example, let’s set the deadband at 5. If a tag is read and
has a value of 50, the next tag reading must be greater than 55 or less than 45 for the
alarm point to be triggered.
Select the type of tag to be linked to the alarm point.
• Choose Discrete for discrete tags, such as a digital input. Selecting this option
enables the Discrete page in the Alarm Point dialog box. See “Entering Discrete
Alarm Conditions” on page 8-34 for configuration information.
• Choose Value for analog points, floats, or similar values. Selecting this option
enables the Value page in the Alarm Point dialog box. See “Entering Alarm Values”
on page 8-35 for configuration information.
• Choose Controller Status to link the status of a controller to the alarm point. The
alarm will be triggered whenever the linked controller is not in Attached state. See
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F
G
H
I
J
K
“Setting Controller Status Alarm Points” on page 8-36 for configuration
information.
Click here to display the Alarm Notification dialog box, where you can have a specified
value written to a selected tag when the alarm point enters an alarm condition. See
“Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” below for information on setting
up alarm notification.
Select Enabled to make Alarm Notification active. (You can’t select Enabled until Alarm
Notification is configured.)
Click here to display the Alarm Clear Notification dialog box. Use this dialog box to have
a tag value be set or cleared when the current alarm returns to Normal from an alarmed
state. See “Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” below for information
on setting up alarm notification.
Select Enabled to make Alarm Clear Notification active. (You can’t select Enabled until
Alarm Clear is configured.)
Click here to display the Acknowledge Notification dialog box, where you can have a
specified value written to a selected tag when the alarm point is acknowledged by the
operator. See “Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” below for
information on setting up acknowledge notification.
Select Enabled to make Acknowledge Notification active. (You can’t select Enabled
until Acknowledge Notification is configured.)
Choose Condition to make the alarm point dependent on the value of another tag. Click
the Modify button (I) to select the tag and define the conditions it needs to meet.
Select Always Enabled for the alarm point not to be dependent on the value of another
OptoControl tag.
If you’ve selected Condition in H to make the alarm point dependent on the value of
another tag, click Modify and configure the tag and conditions in the Alarm Point
Conditional Enabling Setup dialog box that appears. See “Setting Conditional Alarm
Points” on page 8-32 for configuration information.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Setup, Discrete,
and Value pages of the Alarm Point dialog box.
Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications
You can have a value sent to a tag when any of the following alarm events occur:
• An alarm occurs
• An active alarm is acknowledged
• An active alarm returns to Normal from an alarmed state
To configure an alarm point for these events, click Alarm, Alarm Clear, or Acknowledge in the
Alarm Point dialog box.
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The Alarm Notification, Alarm Clear, or Acknowledge Notification dialog box appears. These
dialog boxes are identical. (The Alarm Notification dialog box is shown below.)
1. Click the Tag Selection button
to select an OptoControl tagname. See “Configuring
Tags” on page 4-5 for more about selecting tags.
2. In the Setup By group, select Discrete or Value.
• Discrete specifies an on/off trigger state for the selected tag. (The tag must have a
discrete basetype.) After you select Discrete, define the trigger value by choosing one
of the following options:
– Set—Switches the trigger state to On.
– Clear—Switches the trigger state to Off.
– Toggle—Switches the trigger state from its current condition to the opposite (for
example, On is switched to Off).
• Value defines the floating point or integer value that is written to the tag. After you
select Value, define the value by choosing one of the following options, then entering a
value in the Value Out field:
– Set—Replaces the tag’s current value with the value you enter in the Value Out
field.
– Offset—Adds the value you enter in the Value Out field to the tag’s current value.
3. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Setting Conditional Alarm Points
1. To make the alarm point dependent on the value of another tag, select Condition in the
Alarm Point Setup page, then click Modify.
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The Alarm Point Conditional Enabling Setup dialog box opens:
2. Configure the tag and conditions.
3. Click the Tag Selection button
compared to a value you define.
and select an OptoControl tag. This tag’s value will be
4. Select Discrete or Current value in the Setup by group. Current Value sets the tag value
that will trigger the alarm point. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then enter
a value to compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the alarm
point.
NOTE: Triggers are edge sensitive, and only activate on a positive transition from a
non-triggered state.
5. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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Entering Discrete Alarm Conditions
If you selected Discrete in the Setup by field on the Alarm Point Setup page, complete the alarm
point setup by configuring the alarm’s state in the Discrete page.
1. To select the state of the alarm condition tag, select True/On to have the alarm point be in
the alarm state when the associated tag is “on” for discretes, or “true” for integer bits.
Select False/Off to have the alarm point be in the alarm state when the associated tag is
“off” for discretes or “false” for integer bits.
2. Select the check box next to Normal to have the normal state displayed in history windows
and logs. The normal state is the opposite of the alarm state.
3. Enter an integer value between 0 and 999 in the Priority fields to define an alarm value for
each alarm level. The highest priority is represented by 999, and 0 represents the lowest.
Priority values can be useful in Runtime for displaying the relative importance of alarm
points, and for filtering out alarms with lower priorities.
4. (Optional) In the Comment fields, enter text that will be displayed in alarm graphics for
each alarm level. The comment can have a maximum of 256 characters. This comment can
display information about the alarm point, for example, or provide instructions to the
operator.
5. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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Entering Alarm Values
If you selected Value in the Setup by field on the Alarm Point Setup page, complete the alarm
point setup by configuring the alarm’s state in the Value page.
You must define values for each alarm level that will be used with the alarm point. The following
alarm levels are available:
• HiHi alarms occur when the tag value is greater than or equal to the HiHi value.
• Hi alarms occur when the tag value is greater than or equal to the Hi value and less than
the HiHi value.
• Normal is between the Hi and Lo values.
• Lo alarms occur when the tag value is less than or equal to the Lo value and greater than
the LoLo value.
• LoLo alarms occur when the tag value is less than or equal to the LoLo level.
For each alarm level you want to use with the alarm point, do the following:
1. Select Enable to use an alarm level that you have configured. At least one alarm level
(HiHi, Hi, Lo, or LoLo) must be enabled. If a level is enabled, it will be displayed in alarm
graphics and logs.
2. To set an alarm level to a constant value, select Value and enter a number in the Value
field.
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3. To define the relative importance of an alarm point, enter an integer value between 0 and
999. (The highest priority is represented by 999, and 0 represents the lowest.)
Priority values can be useful in Runtime for displaying the relative importance of alarm
points. Additionally, in Runtime, you can filter out alarms with lower priorities.
4. When an alarm point value is reached, you can define how long it must continue at that
value (the persistence time) before the alarm point is triggered. Click More and enter the
Persistence Time in milliseconds or seconds.
5. When an alarm point value remains at a triggering level after the alarm has been triggered
and acknowledged, you can define how much time must elapse before the alarm point is
re-triggered. Click More and enter the Re-Alarm Time in milliseconds or seconds.
6. To set an alarm level to the current value of a tag, select Tag and click the Tag Selection
button
.
7. (Optional) In the Comment field, enter text that will be displayed in alarm graphics for each
alarm level.
The comment can have a maximum of 256 characters. This comment can display
information about the alarm point, for example, or provide instructions to the operator.
8. Select the Operator Adjustable check box to allow the operator to modify the conditions of
this alarm point. See “Alarm Runtime and User Options” below to learn how to define
these conditions.
9. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Setting Controller Status Alarm Points
If you selected Controller Status in the Setup by field on the Alarm Point Setup page, complete
the alarm point setup by selecting a controller from the list on the Controllers page. Only
controllers that have been added to the OptoDisplay project are available. See “Configuring
Controllers” on page 4-1 for more information on adding primary and backup controllers to an
OptoDisplay project.
NOTE: When the Controller Status option is selected, no other feature in the Alarm Point dialog
box is available.
To configure an alarm point based on controller status, do the following:
1. Click the Controllers tab in the Alarm Point dialog box.
2. In the list of available controllers, select the controller that will be linked to the alarm
point.
3. If you want to change the Detached by User or Detached on Error priority levels, enter a
new value in the corresponding field.
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Using the default settings, these priority levels cannot be filtered out by the user since they
are higher than 999. If you want the user to be able to filter out controller status alarms,
set either—or both—values to 999 or less.
4. Click the Setup tab and enter a name for the alarm point in the Name field.
5. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
Adding Alarm Graphics
Alarm graphics can be placed and resized just like a trend or any other graphic object. You can
place multiple alarm graphics in any window.
1. To create an alarm graphic, select the Alarm tool
from the Toolbox.
2. Click and drag a large rectangle, and release the mouse.
An alarm graphic similar to the example below appears:
3. To configure alarms for this graphic, choose the Select tool
graphic.
and double-click on the
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The Alarm Configuration dialog box opens:
A
B
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A The Alarm Points list shows configured alarm points that are associated with the alarm
graphic. To add an alarm point to the list, click B. To remove an alarm point from the list,
click C.
B Click Add to add an alarm point to the ioDisplay project. In the Alarm Points dialog box
that appears, you can select previously configured alarm points or configure new points
as needed. To select more than one alarm point at a time, press and hold the OPTION key
and then click each point you want to add. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 8-28
for information on adding and configuring alarm points.
C Select an alarm point in the list and click Delete to remove it from the alarm graphic. The
alarm point is not deleted from the ioDisplay project or from any other alarm graphic.
D Choose the type of the alarm graphic by selecting Detailed, Summary, or History.
• Detailed alarms treat each alarm point state as a separate alarm condition. The
operator must acknowledge each alarm point before its name is cleared from the
alarm graphic.
For example, if an alarm is in the Lo state and changes to the LoLo state, alarms for
both states are listed in the graphic. Alarm points can be selected and acknowledged
from a detailed alarm.
• Summary alarms display only the state of the current alarm.
For example, if an alarm is in the Lo state and changes to the LoLo state, only the LoLo
state alarm is listed in the graphic. Alarm points can be selected and acknowledged
from a summary alarm.
• History alarms list each change of state for each alarm point. Alarm points
cannot be acknowledged from a history alarm.
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E For each of the following items, click a color square and select a color in the Color dialog
F
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box that appears.
• Alarm points in an alarm condition
• Alarm points that have been acknowledged
• Alarm points that have returned to their normal state
• Alarm points that have been silenced
• Background color of an alarm graphic
Click Alarm Font to select the font used in the alarm graphic.
Select Use for Header to have the alarm font you selected appear in the alarm graphic’s
column headers.
Click Column Format to set the information that appears on the alarm graphic. In the
Alarm Format dialog box that appears, select the information the alarm graphic will
display, and the width alarm graphic columns will appear on screen. See “Setting the
Alarm Format” below for configuration information.
Click Hot Keys to configure keys on the keyboard that the operator can use to
acknowledge alarms. In the Alarm Hot Keys dialog box that appears, select keys or key
combinations the operator can use to acknowledge one or more alarms. Only detailed
and summary alarm graphics can have hot keys. See “Assigning Alarm Hot Keys” on
page 8-40 for more information.
Enter a number to set the maximum number of alarm point lines a history alarm graphic
can contain. When this number is exceeded, the oldest alarm point is removed to make
room for the new point. The History alarm type must be selected for this option to be
available.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Alarm
Configuration dialog box.
Setting the Alarm Format
You can customize the alarm information that appears when an alarm graphic is displayed on
screen, or when an alarm log file is sent to a printer.
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1. In the Alarm Format dialog box, shown below, select the check box next to the name of
each column that you want to appear in the alarm graphic or printed alarm log:
2. For each column name that you want to use, enter the desired column width (in pixels) in
the Width field.
For alarm graphics, the widths are an approximate guideline for how wide the columns will
appear on screen. For printed alarm logs, the widths are absolute values. If a number or
text cannot fit into a printer column, it will be truncated.
Assigning Alarm Hot Keys
Alarm hot keys are keystrokes or keystroke combinations that the operator can quickly use to
respond to alarms. When a hot key is defined for an alarm, pressing a key on the keyboard (along
with an optional CTRL or SHIFT key) performs the same action as clicking the mouse on an object.
NOTE: Hot keys can also be defined for dynamic objects in an OptoDisplay project, but these hot
keys are defined separately from alarm hot keys. See “Adding Dynamic Attributes to Graphics”
on page 6-2 to learn how to set up hot keys for a dynamic graphic.
You can define hot keys for the Acknowledge, Acknowledge All, and Select List functions.
• Acknowledge and Acknowledge All have the same effect as clicking those buttons on
an alarm graphic.
• Select List is used to highlight the alarm point list on the display. Once the alarm point list
is highlighted, cursor keys can be used to select alarm points for acknowledgment.
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Alarm hot keys are configured in the Alarm Hot Keys dialog box, which is shown below:
To configure hot keys for an alarm, select a key in the drop-down list for the function you want
to use. If you want to use the CTRL and/or SHIFT keys in combination with the key you’ve chosen,
select Ctrl, Shift, or both.
Configuring Project Alarms
To configure alarm features for the whole project, select Configure➞Alarming Setup and
configure the following settings as needed in the Alarming Setup dialog box:
Alarm Runtime and User Options
1. To set options for how an alarm appears in OptoDisplay Runtime as well as how a user can
work with alarms in an OptoDisplay project, click the Options tab.
The Options page appears. (This page appears by default when this dialog box opens.)
2. To set how an alarm appears in OptoDisplay Runtime, select one or more of the following
options in the Runtime Options group:
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• All alarms enabled at startup—Enables all alarms when the project starts in Runtime.
• Alarms Enabled menu item—Makes the Alarms Enabled menu available for the user to
enable and disable all alarms.
• Priority Filter menu item—Makes the Priority Filter menu available for the user to
control whether to view all alarms, or only alarms exceeding a specified priority value.
• Display message box for new alarm points—Makes a dialog box appear containing
information about the alarm point. The user can acknowledge the alarm in this dialog
box, or close it and acknowledge the alarm at a later time.
3. To define the changes a user can make to an alarm in OptoDisplay Runtime, select one or
more of the following options in the User Adjustable group:
• Enable/Disable Alarm Levels—Allows the user to enable or disable alarm points
• Alarm Level Values—Allows the user to change alarm point values
• Alarm Level Priority—Allows the user to change alarm point priorities.
4. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Alarm Logging Options
1. To set options for how alarm data is sent to a printer or saved in a file, click the Logging
tab.
The Logging page appears:
2. To choose a printer to send alarm data to, select Printing Enabled and then choose a printer
from the Selected Printers list. If you want to use a printer that does not appear on the list,
you will need to install the printer so that it can be accessed from your PC. Refer to the
documentation from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer if you are not sure how to
do this.
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Note that if you move the OptoDisplay project from one Windows operating system to
another, you must reselect the printers.
3. To choose the alarm information that appears on the printed alarm log, click the Column
Format button. In the Alarm Format dialog box that appears, set the format in which the
alarm graphic will appear on screen and the information it will contain. See “Setting the
Alarm Format” on page 8-39 for configuration information.
4. If you want History Alarm windows to be refreshed (have their contents updated) each time
they open, select Reload History Alarms. This option is only available when file logging has
also been enabled.
5. To save a log file of alarm data to disk, select File Logging Enabled and click File Setup.
In the Alarm Logging File Access dialog box that opens, you can configure the name,
location, line format, and other settings for the log file where the alarm data will be saved.
A
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A Choose the directory where the alarm log file will be saved. Click Name and enter the
directory path in the field next to it, or click Browse to find a directory path. Click Use
Project Directory to save the alarm log file to the OptoDisplay project directory. (This
occurs by default if you don’t specify another location.)
B Select Automatic, Fixed, or From Mistic string to determine how the alarm log file name
will be created, and then fill in additional information as needed for that option.
If the Automatic option is used, log files are named based on the rules described in
“About Data Log File Names and Formats” on page 8-9. If you select this option, files
are named using the rollover convention if required; this is described in more detail on
page 8-10. If rollover is not used, the file is named “alarmlog.alm.” The Automatic
option is used by default if you do not select another option.
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C If you selected the Fixed option in B, enter a file name here. The file name can be any
D
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valid, eight-character DOS file name and doesn’t require a three-character file
extension. Note that if you don’t specify an extension, one is not added automatically.
If you selected the From Mistic string option in B, enter an OptoControl string tagname
here. Use the Tag Selection button
to quickly enter the tag containing the name of
the alarm log file. When the trigger starts the alarm log, the string containing the file
name is read, and the new data is appended to the log file if the file already exists. If
the file doesn’t already exist, it is created. The rollover naming convention doesn’t apply
to this type of file name.
If the Mistic string in D is an invalid file name, the default name of the log file is
created using the following rules:
• If the Mistic string is empty, the project directory is added to E and the extension
.alm is used.
• If the Mistic string is not empty and a project directory is not specified as the
directory path, the Name in A is added to E.
• If the project directory is specified as the path, or the previous step failed, the
project directory is added to E and the extension .alm is used. If the project
directory is read-only or there is not enough room left on the drive containing the
project directory, an error message indicates that the file could not be created.
Enter a default file name here in case the file name used in D is invalid. The file name
can be any valid, eight-character DOS file name. The three-character file extension .alm
is assigned by OptoDisplay.
Click to configure the character, or delimiter, used to separate the data in the log file, to
choose the type of quotes used for each data line, and where to insert carriage returns.
You configure these parameters in the Line Format dialog box that appears. See
page 8-9 for more information.
Enter the number of lines of data your PC will save to a memory buffer before writing
the information to the alarm log file. When choosing a number, keep in mind that the
lower the number of buffered data lines, the more frequently the computer has to write
to the file. Alternately, the higher the number of data lines buffered in memory, the more
data that will be lost if your PC loses power or has a system failure. A valid entry is any
number between 0 and 999; the default is 20 files.
Enter the maximum number of alarm log files that can be created using rollover before
the oldest file is overwritten. For example, if you enter 10 and your rollover time period
is set to hours, you will have 10 alarm log files created for 10 hours of data before the
oldest file is overwritten with new data. See page 8-10 for more information on rollover
settings.
Choose the rollover time period here. Select None to have all logged data placed in a
single data file named alarmlog.alm. Logging begins when the OptoDisplay project is
loaded, and data collected will be appended to the existing data file. The size of the file
is limited only by available disk space.
Select Keep file open to leave the log file open to allow data to be appended to the
alarm log file more quickly. If you leave this box unchecked (the default setting), the file
is closed after each time data is written to it. This provides greater data integrity than
leaving the file open.
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K Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Alarm Sound Options
NOTE: To play sound files, the PC running the project must have a properly configured sound card
and corresponding system software, as well as a set of speakers. You can use both digitized
sound (.wav) and MIDI music (.mid) files in your project.
1. To define an alarm sound and the conditions when it is played, click the Sound tab.
The Sound page appears:
2. To enter the name of the sound you want played, click Browse and locate the sound file.
If you select Use Project Directory, the sound file must reside in the project directory. This
option is useful if the project directory might be moved to a different location.
NOTE: Only one sound file can be selected in the Alarming Setup dialog box, but OptoDisplay
has other ways of playing sounds. See “Configuring a Sound” on page 8-15 for more
information.
3. Select an option to determine how many times the sound will play when a new alarm
occurs:
• Play sound once when any alarm is active—The sound plays once, then stops.
• Play sound continuously when any alarm is active—The sound continues to play until
the operator acknowledges all active alarms.
• Play sound continuously until any alarm is acknowledged—The sound continues to
play until the operator acknowledges at least one active alarm.
4. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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CHAPTER 9
Chapter 9
Using OptoDisplay Runtime
Introduction
This chapter describes the versions of OptoDisplay Runtime that can be used, and explains how
to customize features that are available when your project runs in OptoDisplay Runtime. It also
explains how to use features that an operator sees and works with when using Runtime.
In This Chapter
Runtime Versions.................................... 9-1
Setting up Runtime................................. 9-2
Using Runtime.............................................. 9-13
Runtime Versions
Two versions of OptoDisplay’s Runtime application are provided with OptoDisplay: the regular
version and a monitor-only version. The primary difference between these two versions is that
the monitor-only version of OptoDisplay Runtime does not allow values to be sent to a controller.
This can be a useful feature for OptoDisplay projects where operator intervention is not required
or must be prohibited.
The monitor-only version of OptoDisplay Runtime has the following features:
• The File and Help menus are the only menu items displayed. If the OptoDisplay project has
been configured to hide the menu bar, however, even these menus are not visible. See
“Restricting the Operator” on page 9-8 for information on configuring the menu bar in
Runtime.
• The only operator-driven dynamic attribute that can be used in the Runtime monitor-only
version is opening or closing windows. Keep this in mind when developing the OptoDisplay
project; if there is a window that you do not want the operator to see, for example, do not
use the open/close dynamic attribute with a graphic object.
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Using Monitor-Only Runtime and Configurator
OptoDisplay Configurator’s feature Save Project and Load Runtime lets you switch quickly from
Configurator to Runtime, and is a convenient way to test an OptoDisplay project as you develop
it. The Save Project and Load Runtime feature uses the regular version of OptoDisplay Runtime.
To use the monitor-only version of Runtime with this feature, you must change the file name of
the application.
1. In Windows Explorer, change the file name of the regular version of OptoDisplay to a
temporary name.
For example, change “OptoDisR.exe” to “orig_OptoDisR.exe” or something similar.
2. Now change the file name of the monitor-only Runtime application to the original name of
the regular version. This is done by changing “OptoDsRX.exe” to “OptoDisR.exe”.
After making these changes, the monitor-only version of Runtime will start when you select Save
Project and Load Runtime in OptoDisplay Configurator. To use the regular version of Runtime
again, reverse the steps above.
Setting up Runtime
You can configure some of the ways that an OptoDisplay project appears in Runtime. Using
OptoDisplay Configurator, you can specify which windows are open or closed, whether the menu
is displayed, and whether or not the operator can exit the program. You can also customize
options for the Event Log Viewer, a window that displays messages about the status and other
characteristics of an OptoDisplay project.
NOTE: If you want to run your OptoDisplay project on a computer with multiple monitors, in
OptoDisplay Configurator simply extend the project’s main window across the monitors you want
to use. When you open the project in Runtime, the main window will appear the way you
positioned it over the monitors. For more information on using multiple computer monitors, see
“System Requirements” on page -iv and “Using Multiple Monitors” on page 2-5.
To set up a project for Runtime, select Configure➞Runtime from the OptoDisplay Configurator,
then configure the settings in the Runtime Setup dialog box.
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General Settings
Refer to the table below for instructions on configuring a particular option group under the
General tab in the Runtime Setup dialog box.
For the Option Group
See
Draw Window Initial State
“Setting Up the Initial State of Windows” on page 9-3
Date Format
“Setting Date Format” on page 9-4
Main Window Style Options
“Setting Up the Main Window” on page 9-4
Keyboard Setup
“Configuring On-Screen Keyboard” on page 9-4
Runtime Startup
“Setting Up Startup Events” on page 9-5
Runtime Exit
“Setting Up Runtime Exit” on page 9-6
Setting Up the Initial State of Windows
To configure how the project’s windows will look when the project is first opened in Runtime,
check the Use Default check box, and then click Define Default to set the default options. In the
Pop Window dialog box that opens, select windows and configure whether the window is
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opened, closed, or iconified. See “Using Draw Windows” on page 5-1 for additional options for
configuring window states in Runtime.
Setting Date Format
Use the Date Format options to change how the date appears in Alarm windows, SuperTrend
objects, and historic log files. When you switch from one date format to another, any
SuperTrends placed in a window are immediately updated to reflect the selected date format.
You can select one of two date formats:
• MM-DD-YYYY displays the date as month, day, and year.
For example, October 31, 1999 would be displayed as 10-31-1999.
• DD-MM-YYYY displays the date as day, month, and year.
For example, October 31, 1999 would be displayed as 31-10-1999.
Setting Up the Main Window
To choose the elements that appear in a project’s main window, select any of the following
options in the Main Window Style Options group:
• Always Maximized keeps the main window completely open, covering the entire screen.
When this option is selected, the minimize and maximize button options are not available;
deselect Always Maximize if you want to choose the minimize or maximize options.
• Use Custom Caption lets you enter a title that will appear in the title bar of the main
window. Enter the title in the Custom Caption field.
If a customized caption ends with a hyphen (-), the project file name is added to the
caption.
• Title Bar displays the Windows title bar for the main window. If space is limited on your
operator interface, deselect this option to slightly increase the viewable area that’s
available.
If you deselect the Title Bar option, note that all options within the group except for Always
Maximized are unavailable.
Configuring On-Screen Keyboard
To set up your OptoDisplay project to run on a touchscreen terminal, select Use On-Screen
Keyboard for Touchscreens in the Keyboard Setup group. When this option is selected, you can
use an on-screen keyboard for graphics that are configured using dynamic attributes to send
strings and values.
NOTE: You cannot enter a project password on an on-screen keyboard.
Additionally, when Use On-Screen Keyboard for Touchscreens is selected, you can choose the
option Include ’Insert ASCII’ in Screen-Keyboard. With this second option selected, if a graphic
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has been configured using a dynamic attribute to send a string to the controller, the operator can
enter any character value between 0 and 255.
Setting Up Startup Events
You can configure events to occur when an OptoDisplay project starts in Runtime, including
clearing control words from memory and generating a diagnostic log file.
Clear control words—To define whether OptoDisplay control words are cleared from a
controller’s memory (RAM) when a project starts, select “Clear words from controller” in the
Runtime Startup option group. OptoDisplay creates control words in a controller’s memory to
optimize communications throughput when scanning, but if a project is saved, run, and modified
repeatedly, control words may use up available memory.
This option should be selected when a single OptoDisplay project is communicating with one or
more controllers. You should not select the “Clear words from controller” option if two or more
OptoDisplay projects are communicating with one or more controllers.
Generate Scanner Information File—When a project is running in OptoDisplay Runtime,
information about the scan groups, refresh groups, and tags that are being scanned for the
connected controllers can be recorded in a text file called a scanner information file. With the
information in this file and the information generated using View➞Dynamic Attributes in
OptoDisplay Configurator, you can diagnose scanner bottlenecks and/or provide the information
to Opto 22 Product Support to help them diagnose possible problems with scanner throughput.
The scanner information file contains the following:
• Header describing how to correlate the information with a log generated by the OptoSnif
utility.
• List of refresh groups configured for the project
• List of scan groups used internally by OptoDisplay
• For each configured controller, the name and total number of tags beings scanned for that
controller
• For each configured controller, scan groups in descending order (based on the number of
tags scanned by a group)
• For each configured controller, tags for each refresh group that are being scanned
• Total number of controllers and tags for the OptoDisplay project.
NOTE: When Generate Scanner Information File is selected, all windows in a project will be
opened when the project starts in OptoDisplay Runtime. The windows will be closed or returned
to their originally configured state after approximately two seconds. If a project’s windows
contain large bitmap and metafile graphics, or if a large number of SuperTrends are used in the
project, problems may occur if opening all project windows simultaneously exceeds your PC’s
available memory.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-5
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
Setting Up Runtime Exit
Each time you exit OptoDisplay Runtime, the program displays a small prompt to confirm that you
really want to close the application. This confirmation message is shown by default. To not
display the confirmation message, select the Disable Exit Confirmation option. This option can
be useful if you run OptoDisplay Runtime as a service under Windows.
Controller Settings
Refer to the table below for instructions on configuring a particular option group under the
Controller tab in the Runtime Setup dialog box.
For the Option Group
See
Off-line Controller Color Options
“Changing Global Controller Color Options” on
page 9-7
Synchronize Controller Clocks to PC “Synchronizing Controller Clocks with a PC” on
Clock
page 9-7
Null Pointer Color
9-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
“Changing Colors to Indicate a Null Pointer Variable”
on page 9-7
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
Changing Global Controller Color Options
If a controller is detached by a user or detaches due to an error, you can have all graphics with
dynamic attributes tied to that controller change color to indicate the controller’s state. To do
this, select a Detached by User color and a Detached on Error color, and then click the Enable
Graphic Color Change checkbox.
If any graphic in the project uses the View Controller Status dynamic attribute, this graphic will
still change color based on controller status. If the color used for this dynamic attribute is
different from the offline controller color, a message confirms which color settings you want to
use.
Synchronizing Controller Clocks with a PC
For projects that record historic data in a log file, it’s a good practice to periodically synchronize
the internal clock of a connected controller with that of the PC running the OptoDisplay project.
1. Enter how often the synchronization occurs (1–99 days).
2. Enter the time at which the synchronization occurs.
3. Select the Enable Auto Synchronization checkbox.
If you want to synchronize the controller clock with the PC’s clock every time the project starts in
OptoDisplay Runtime, select the Synchronize at Runtime Startup checkbox.
Changing Colors to Indicate a Null Pointer Variable
An OptoDisplay project can reference an OptoControl strategy that contains pointer variables.
(For information on using pointer variables, see the OptoControl User’s Guide.) To configure a
graphic to change color if a pointer variable has a null value, select the Null Pointer Graphic color
you want to use in the Null Pointer Color section.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-7
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
Security Settings
Refer to the table below for instructions on configuring a particular option group under the
Security tab in the Runtime Setup dialog box.
For the Option Group
See
Security Options
“Restricting the Operator” on page 9-8
Event Log Options
“Enabling the Event Log Viewer” on page 9-9
Runtime Logging
“Logging Operator Actions” on page 9-9
Restricting the Operator
There are a few ways to limit how the operator can use OptoDisplay Runtime:
• To prevent the operator from exiting OptoDisplay Runtime, select Prevent User Exit in the
Security Option group. Once the project starts in Runtime, an operator won’t be able to exit
the OptoDisplay Runtime application.
• To hide the menu bar from the operator, select Hide Menu Bar Permanently. This restricts
operator interaction with Runtime menu commands to only what you’ve defined in the
project itself. The ESC key will not activate the menu bar, and pressing the F1 key won’t
invoke the Runtime online help system.
9-8 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
You can also configure a graphic so that Runtime commands execute when the graphic is clicked.
This is done by assigning Runtime menu commands to the graphic using the Execute Menu Item
dynamic attribute; see “Execute Menu Item” on page 6-9 for instructions.
Enabling the Event Log Viewer
The Event Log Viewer in OptoDisplay Runtime is a window that displays messages about system
events and communication transactions of a project. This window has an option for the operator
to choose whether the window is enabled or disabled during the Runtime session, and another
option for the operator to choose whether to display startup error messages. By default, the
Event Log Viewer is enabled when Runtime starts; deselect “Start enabled” in the Event Log
options group to keep the window from opening.
To keep the Event Log Viewer from being disabled (not displayed), select the option Prevent
Disabling in the Event Log options group.
See “Using the Event Log Viewer” on page 9-14 for information on using the Event Log Viewer in
Runtime, and “Configuring the Event Log File” on page 9-11 to learn about setting the format in
which Event Log files are saved.
Logging Operator Actions
When an operator uses an OptoDisplay project in Runtime, general information about how and
when the project is used can be recorded in the Runtime Operator Log File. Detailed information
such as which onscreen controls were used and which values or states were changed can also
be recorded in this log file. For security, the log file can be optionally encrypted.
NOTE: You can also configure security settings for an object to restrict its use to authenticated
users and groups. See “Security Settings for Graphics and Dynamic Attributes” on page 6-4 to
learn how to configure user and group authentication for a graphic object.
Data Recorded in the Runtime Logging File When the OptoDisplay project runs in OptoDisplay
Runtime, the following information about operator actions is recorded:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Date—Date of action (month/day/year)
Time—Time of action (24-hour)
Action Taken—Description of action and OptoDisplay project file used
Controller—Controller running the OptoControl strategy that the OptoDisplay project is
accessing
Tag—Complete name of tag being modified
Old Value—tag value before being modified
New Value—tag value after being modified
User—Name of user logged into computer running OptoDisplay project
Computer—Computer running the OptoDisplay project
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-9
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
In this example, the log shows that the operator “edgar” opened and closed the OptoDisplay
project “cfactory.MMI” using the computer “MFG-00”.
OptoDisplay Runtime Operator Log File
Line Formats:
Date
Time
Action Taken
User
Computer
12/11/2003
10:22:28.230
Open project: cfactory.MMI executed
edgar
MFG-00
12/11/2003
10:59:57.442
Close project: cfactory.MMI executed edgar
MFG-00
The next example shows that the same operator “edgar” changed the setpoint value of
“fTemperatureSetpoint” from 200 to 150 on the same project.
OptoDisplay Runtime Operator Log File
Line Formats:
Date
Time
12/11/2003 10:56:06.852
Controller
Tag
Old Value
Cookie Controller
Cookie Controller:fTemperatureSetpoint 200.0000
New Value
User
Computer
150.0000
edgar
MFG-00
Configuring the Runtime Operator Action Log File To record operator actions, open the Security
tab of the Runtime Setup dialog box and do the following:
1. Select Enable Runtime Operator Action Logging.
2. If necessary, change the header line to meet your application’s requirements.
3. Click Log File.
The Runtime Logging File Setup dialog box appears. Configuring a Runtime logging file is
identical to configuring a Runtime event log; follow the instructions in “Configuring the
Event Log File” on page 9-11 and then return to step 4 below.
4. Select Encrypt Log File if you want the log file saved as an encrypted document. See
“Encrypting and Decrypting the Operator Action Log File” on page 9-10 for information on
using encrypted files.
Encrypting and Decrypting the Operator Action Log File
To save a Runtime Operator Action log file in an encrypted format, select Encrypt Log File in the
Security tab of the Runtime Setup dialog box.
To decrypt the log file, do the following:
1. In OptoDisplay Configurator, select View➞Decrypt Operator Log File.
9-10 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
The log file decryption window opens.
2. Click Browse next to the “Log file to decrypt” field and locate the encrypted operator action
log file.
3. Click Browse next to the “Destination log file name” field and select a filename and
location where the decrypted file will be saved.
Skip this step if the default name and destination for the decrypted file is acceptable.
4. Select “View decrypted file in Notepad” to automatically open the file in Windows
Notepad after it is decrypted.
When this option is selected, you can also select “Delete decrypted file after viewing” to
have the file deleted automatically when Notepad closes.
5. Select “Delete encrypted log file” to have the encrypted log file deleted automatically after
it is decrypted.
6. Click Decrypt to decrypt the file.
7. Click OK to close the log file decryption window.
Configuring the Event Log File
As events occur in a project in Runtime, messages with a date and time stamp are posted to the
Event Log Viewer. These messages can be saved to an event log file so that the data can be used
in other applications, such as Microsoft Excel or Microsoft Access. Event log files can also be
archived to provide an operations record for an OptoDisplay project. A project can only have one
event log file active (open) at a time.
You can determine where the event log file will be located, configure how the data lines will
appear, and define its rollover parameters in the Event Log File Configuration dialog box.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-11
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
1. To configure an event log file, select Configure➞Event Log.
2. Select Enabled in the Event Log Configuration dialog box to automatically create an event
log file when you start the OptoDisplay project in Runtime.
3. Click File Setup to customize the event log file.
The Event Log File Configuration dialog box appears:
A
B
C
E
D
F
G
H
A Choose the directory where the event log file will be saved. Click Name and enter the
directory path in the field next to it, or click Browse to find a directory path. Click Use
Project Directory to save the event log file to the OptoDisplay project directory. (This
occurs by default if you don’t specify a location.)
B Automatic is the only choice for creating the event log file name, and is selected by
default.
C Click to configure the character, or delimiter, used to separate the data in the log file, to
choose the type of quotes used for each data line, and where to insert carriage returns.
You configure these parameters in the Line Format dialog box that appears. See “Setting
Log File Line Format” on page 8-9 for more information.
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USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
D Enter the number of lines of data your PC will save to a memory buffer before writing
E
F
G
H
the information to the event log file. When choosing a number, keep in mind that the
lower the number of buffered data lines, the more frequently the computer has to write
to the file. Alternately, the higher the number of data lines buffered in memory, the more
data that will be lost if your PC loses power or has a system failure. A valid entry is any
number between 0 and 999; the default is 20 files.
Enter the maximum number of event log files that can be created using rollover before
the oldest file is overwritten. For example, if you enter 10 and your rollover time period
is set to hours, you will have 10 event log files created for 10 hours of data before the
oldest file is overwritten with new data. See “Naming Files Using Rollover” on
page 8-10 for more information on rollover settings.
Choose the rollover time period here. Select None to have all logged data placed in a
single data file named eventlog.msg. Logging begins as soon as the project starts
running, and data collected will be appended to the existing data file. The size of the file
is limited only by available disk space.
Select Keep file open to leave the log file open to allow data to be appended to the event
log file more quickly. If you leave this box unchecked (the default setting), the file is
closed after each time data is written to it. This provides greater data integrity than
leaving the file open.
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Using Runtime
Opening a Project
When your OptoDisplay project is complete and you’re ready to run it, there are two ways you
can start OptoDisplay Runtime and open a project:
• Click the Windows Start button, select Programs➞Opto 22➞FactoryFloor
4.1➞OptoDisplay➞OptoDisplay Runtime, and then select File➞Open Project.
In the Open Project dialog box that appears, select the OptoDisplay project you want to
open.
• With a project open in OptoDisplay Configurator, select File➞Save Project and Load
Runtime.
Changes to the current project in OptoDisplay Configurator are saved, and the project is
opened in Runtime.
When the project opens, it will start running and you’ll see the operator interface created in
OptoDisplay Configurator. The initial state of the draw windows that appear (open, closed, or
iconified) is determined by the Runtime setup configuration. Unless you chose to hide the menu
bar when you configured the project, the menu bar for the main window also appears.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-13
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
Using the Event Log Viewer
The Event Log Viewer is started at Runtime by default. This window displays a list of
communication transactions and error messages for a project.
If the event log viewer is not open, choose View➞Event Log to open it. The window that appears
will be similar to the following example:
A
B
A The list area posts event messages as they occur. Messages will have a date and time
stamp, and a brief message describing the communications event that occurred. These
messages are described in the appendix “OptoDisplay Troubleshooting.”
Messages posted to the Event Log can also be saved to a disk file. Refer to
“Configuring the Event Log File” on page 9-11 for more information about doing this.
B To make the Event Log Viewer appear in the foreground whenever a new message is
posted, select Auto Restore on New Message. This option won’t be available if the
Event Log Viewer was disabled when the project was set up in OptoDisplay
Configurator.
After reviewing the message, you can keep the Event Log Viewer window open, or close it
using the Close button.
Working with Controllers
While running an OptoDisplay project in OptoDisplay Runtime, there are several ways to view
and work with one or more controllers that are running the OptoControl strategy the project uses.
Switching between Controllers
If a draw window’s properties have been set to allow switching between controllers, you can
access different controllers that are running the same OptoControl strategy. When you switch
controllers in Runtime, graphics that display controller data will be updated to show data from
9-14 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
the newly selected controller. If five controllers are all running the identical strategy, for
example, you only have to create one draw window instead of making a separate window for
each controller. For instructions on setting up a draw window, see “Modifying Draw Windows”
on page 5-2.
There are some important considerations to note when using this feature:
• Additional controllers that you want to switch between must be associated with the
OptoDisplay project using the Configure➞Controllers menu item.
• If you switch to a different controller and then exit OptoDisplay Runtime, when the project
is restarted the default controller for the project—not the one you switched to
earlier—will be selected.
• Trends and SuperTrends must have the Disable Scanning option set to either “When
Closed” or “When Minimized and Closed.”
• All tags for the graphics in the window must reference the same controller.
• Tagnames should not include the name of a controller. For example, in OptoControl you
shouldn’t name a variable “Controller1_flowrate” if the strategy uses a controller named
“Controller1.”
•
•
•
•
Controller names must be at least three characters in length.
The “Always in memory” windows property should not be selected.
Alarms and graphics using the Alarm Point controller-driven attribute may not be used.
Recipes cannot be used.
To switch between controllers, start the OptoDisplay project and do the following:
1. Select Window➞Switch controllers.
The Select Window(s) for Controller Switching dialog box appears.
2. Select the name of the window you want to view.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-15
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
3. Select the name of the controller you want to view.
4. Click OK.
Graphics with dynamic attributes now use values from the controller you selected. The
name of the currently connected controller appears in the window’s title bar.
Checking Controller Status
To check the status, attach/detach, and synchronize the clock of one or more controllers used by
a project, select View➞Controller(s).
NOTE: You can also check the status of a controller by clicking a graphic object that has been
configured with the Controller Status dynamic attribute. See “Controller Status” on page 6-7 for
more information.
The Controller List dialog box appears:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
A The Controller Name list shows controllers that have been defined for the project.
B
C
D
E
F
Highlight the name of a controller to see information about it in the Controller group in
the dialog box.
The name of the primary controller appears in the Primary field.
If a backup controller has been configured for the primary controller, its name appears
in the Backup field.
The status of the controller, ATTACHED or DETACHED, appears here. See F for more
information about this controller status.
This shows the time interval OptoDisplay waits before attempting to reattach to a
controller from which it detached after an error occurred.
Click Detach to keep OptoDisplay from scanning the selected controller for data. If you
detach the controller, OptoDisplay won’t try to scan that controller for data and
9-16 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
G
H
I
J
K
unnecessary error messages won’t be posted to the Event Log Viewer and file. You may
need to detach the controller if you need to physically replace the controller.
Click Details to see complete information on a selected controller. Information appears
in the Inspect Controller dialog box.
Click Sync to PC’s Time/Date to synchronize the selected controller’s internal clock with
that of the PC running the OptoDisplay project.
Click Sync All to PC’s Time/Date to synchronize the internal clocks of all listed
controllers with that of the PC running the OptoDisplay project.
If the Enable Auto Synchronization option was turned off in OptoDisplay Configurator,
select the Enable Auto Synchronization checkbox to turn this option on.
Note that selecting this option only affects the OptoDisplay project while it is currently
running in OptoDisplay Runtime. It does not change the project settings.
Click Close to save your settings and close the dialog box.
To view detailed information about a controller, select a controller in the Controller List dialog
box and click Details.
The Inspect Controller dialog box opens:
L
A
B
C
H
I
D
E
F
J
K
G
A This shows the model of the Opto 22 controller.
B This shows the version of the controller’s software kernel.
C The available RAM (memory) in the controller appears here.
D This section shows the name, time and date, and status of the OptoControl strategy
loaded on the controller. If a strategy archive has been saved to the controller, the name
of the archive is also listed here.
E This shows the current time and date set on the controller. If you want to synchronize
the controller’s date and time with the date and time of the PC running OptoDisplay,
click J.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-17
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
F If the controller reported any errors, the number of errors appears here. To view more
information about the errors, click K.
G If there were any errors in OptoDisplay communicating to the controller, the error
H
I
J
K
L
messages appear here.
This shows the version of the controller’s software loader.
This displays the time it takes to send a request to the controller or receive information
back from it.
Click Sync to PC’s Time/Date to have the controller’s time and date match that of the
computer running OptoDisplay.
Click View Errors to see more information about errors reported by the controller. See
“Viewing Error Messages” on page 9-18 for details on the information shown in the
dialog box that appears.
Click the Close Window button
to close the dialog box.
Viewing Error Messages
If any errors were reported by the controller in the Inspect Controllers dialog box, you can click
View Errors to find out more about them.
The View Errors dialog box that appears shows the error number and its code, its description, and
the chart and block the error occurred in. (You can easily look up the error code in the OptoControl
Command Reference, Opto 22 form number 725.)
Do one of the following:
• Click the Pop First Error button to remove the first error in the error list and in the controller.
• Click the Clear Errors button to clear all errors from the error list and the controller. (The Go
To Error button is not available.)
• Click Close when you’re finished inspecting the errors.
Viewing Average Scan Time
Select View➞Average Scan Time to view the average scan time for each controller that is active
and scanning. This information can help diagnose possible communication problems between
9-18 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
the controller and OptoDisplay Runtime. At least ten scans must have been completed before an
average scan time is provided.
Working with Alarms
If an alarm in an OptoDisplay project has been configured to let the operator do so, you can
modify alarm points that appear, as well as change how the alarm information appears in the
window.
You may see detailed, summary, and history alarms in an OptoDisplay project if it has been
configured to let the operator do so. See “Adding Alarm Graphics” on page 8-37 to learn more
about these types of alarms.
The sample alarm window below contains detailed, summary, and history alarm graphics.
A
B
C
D
E
F
A To sort the information that is displayed, click the column name of the item you’d like to
sort by. All the alarm data that appears will be sorted based on the values in that
column. Click the column name again to reverse the sort order.
B To change the location where columns appear in an alarm graphic, click the name of a
column and drag it to a new location.
C To acknowledge and turn off a single active alarm, select an alarm and click
Acknowledge. When an alarm has been acknowledged, it changes color so it can be
easily identified.
D To acknowledge and turn off all active alarms, click Acknowledge All.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-19
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
E (Detailed alarms only) To silence a single active alarm, select an alarm and click Silence.
Silencing an alarm is similar to acknowledging an alarm, and the alarm will not re-alarm
until it has been unsilenced. When an alarm has been silenced, it changes color so it
can be easily identified.
F (Detailed alarms only) To unsilence an alarm that has been silenced, select an alarm and
click UnSilence.
Modifying Alarm Points
You may be able to modify alarm points in the OptoDisplay project if it has been configured to let
the operator do so. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 8-28 to learn more about configuring
alarm points. Also see “Configuring Project Alarms” on page 8-41 for information about setting
alarm options in Runtime.
Alarm point settings can be changed in each one of the four alarm ranges available: HiHi, Hi,
Normal, Lo, and LoLo. Each alarm point state has a value that defines its range:
•
•
•
•
HiHi alarms are greater than or equal to the HiHi Value.
Hi alarms are greater than or equal to the Hi value and less than the HiHi value.
Lo alarms are less than or equal to the Lo value and greater than the LoLo value.
LoLo alarm are less than or equal to the LoLo level.
The normal state is between the Hi and Lo values. Each level can enabled or disabled, but at least
one alarm state (HiHi, Hi, Lo, or LoLo) must be enabled.
To view the alarm point settings, select Alarms➞Modify Alarm Points.
A
9-20 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
B
C
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
A Select this check box to enable the alarm level for an alarm range.
B Enter the value for an alarm level in the Value field.
C To set a priority for an alarm point, enter an integer value between 0 and 999.
Priority fields define an integer value for each alarm level, and can be useful for
displaying the relative importance of different alarm points. Additionally, you can filter
out alarms with lower priorities.
Using SuperTrends in Runtime
If a SuperTrend graphic is included in an OptoDisplay project, you can control how you view the
trend data that appears in the SuperTrend window. For example, you can zoom in to see a smaller
slice of a trend line, or, if historical data is being collected, switch between views of real-time
and historical data.
A sample SuperTrend window appears below. It shows the controls you can use to display
SuperTrend information. Note that most of the controls that appear below are available only
when historical mode has been selected.
To beginning
Back one screen
Active pen selector
Active pen scaling adjustment
Zoom out
Historical mode
Normal view Zoom
Real-time mode
Controls
Zoom in
Back one major division
Forward one major division
Forward one screen
To end
Scrolling Controls
• Use scrolling controls to move back and forth in a chart of historical data.
• Use zoom controls to magnify or demagnify your view of a chart.
• To select an active pen, click the drop-down list and select a pen from the names that
appear. If the y-axis scaling was based on pens (see “Configuring Y-Axis Parameters” on
page 7-10), the scale of the active pen will be displayed.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide 9-21
USING OPTODISPLAY RUNTIME
• To change the scale of an active pen, click the Active pen scaling tool and enter new
minimum and maximum values in the dialog box that appears.
Switching between Historical and Real-Time Modes
If a SuperTrend is both a historical and a real-time trend (that is, historical data is being
collected), you can easily change views to see real-time or collected historical data.
1. To switch between historical and real-time modes, click the Historical mode button
the Real-time mode button
.
or
When you switch from Real-time mode to Historical mode, the SuperTrend Historic Log
Files dialog box opens, listing the names of SuperTrend historic log files and the time each
log started and stopped recording.
2. To view a SuperTrend historic log file, select a file and click OK. Note that you will need to
select a log file each time you switch to historical mode.
The information in the log file will be shown in the SuperTrend chart. Use the controls at
the bottom of the chart to view the information. (These controls are described on
page 9-21.)
3. When you are finished viewing the SuperTrend historic log file, click the Real-time Mode
button to return to the real-time view of SuperTrend information.
Using XY Plots in Runtime
You can change the range of values used for the x-axis and y-axis of an XY plot object if this
option has been set in OptoDisplay Configurator. To change range values, right-click on the XY
plot and in the dialog box that appears enter new minimum and maximum values for each axis.
9-22 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
APPENDIX A
Appendix A
OptoDisplay Troubleshooting
This appendix provides tips and procedures for resolving problems you may encounter while
creating or running your OptoDisplay project.
If you are having problems with creating an OptoControl strategy, see Appendix A, “OptoControl
Troubleshooting,” in the OptoControl User’s Guide. For information about types of errors and lists
of error messages that may appear in OptoDisplay Runtime, see Appendix B, “OptoDisplay
Errors.”
In This Section
How to Begin Troubleshooting ...............A-1
Problems Displaying a Project................A-3
Problems Saving a Project......................A-4
Making an Empty String Visible ....................A-4
User Permissions in Microsoft Windows ......A-5
Other Troubleshooting Tools ..........................A-6
How to Begin Troubleshooting
Most errors that you encounter in OptoDisplay occur when you run your project in the Runtime
component. Runtime errors can be the result of several factors: problems communicating with
the controller, problems in communication between the controller and I/O, or problems in how
an on-screen object is configured. Errors occurring in OptoDisplay Configurator, on the other
hand, are usually due to incorrect values being entered in dialog boxes.
The following steps may help you track down the cause of an OptoDisplay error:
OptoDisplay User’s Guide A-1
1. Read any Error Messages
Error messages in OptoDisplay Configurator appear in standard message windows. These
messages usually indicate how to correct the reported problem, as shown in the examples
below:
Error messages in OptoDisplay Runtime appear in the Event Log Viewer as the project runs. To
open the Event Log Viewer window, select View➞Event Log. The error messages appear along
with other diagnostic information related to your project, as shown in the example below:
Diagnostic
information
from the
controller.
The reported
error appears
here.
The controller
reporting the
error appears
here.
See Appendix B, “OptoDisplay Errors,” for information about error messages that may appear in
OptoDisplay Runtime.
2. Check Communication with the Controller
If no error message appears, or the error indicates that there may be a communication problem,
first check whether the PC running OptoDisplay is communicating with the controller. Next, check
that communication settings specific to OptoDisplay are configured correctly.
a. Follow the communication troubleshooting procedure in Appendix A, “OptoControl
Troubleshooting,” in the OptoControl User’s Guide. If this does not resolve the
communication problem, return to this page and continue with the step below.
b. Check the following communication settings that are specific to OptoDisplay:
A-2 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
• Refresh time(s)—determines how frequently a tag on a controller is scanned by
OptoDisplay.
• Re-enable time—determines how long OptoDisplay waits after a time-out error has
occurred before it attempts to communicate with a controller.
See Chapter 4, “Configuring Controllers & Tags” and “Scanning to Update Graphics” on
page 6-34 to learn how these settings are configured and optimized.
3. Review Other Sections in this Appendix
Check the other sections in this appendix for the following items:
• If the colors in on-screen graphics are incorrect or change repeatedly, see “Problems
Displaying a Project” on page A-3.
• If you are having problems saving project files to your hard drive or other storage location,
see “Problems Saving a Project” on page A-4.
• If an on-screen text string object disappears when you run the project, see “Making an
Empty String Visible” on page A-4.
• If you are having problems accessing controllers on a computer running Microsoft
Windows 2000 or Windows XP, see “User Permissions in Microsoft Windows” on
page A-5.
4. Call Product Support
If you cannot find the help you need in this book or the OptoControl User’s Guide, call Opto 22
Product Support. See “Product Support” on page iii for contact information.
Problems Displaying a Project
When running an OptoDisplay project, you may encounter problems with how graphics appear
on the monitor. (For example, alarm colors might not appear correctly, or might change as the
project runs.) Bitmap graphics that you have imported into your project also might not appear
correctly.
If these or similar errors occur, check the color depth of the monitor on which the OptoDisplay
project is running. If the color depth of the display is set to 256 colors (or “8-bit”), change the
setting to 65,536 colors (“16-bit”) or greater. The number of colors available depends on the
video card installed in your PC, but most PCs can display at least 16-bit color.
Changing Monitor Color Depth
To change the color depth of your monitor in Microsoft Windows 2000 and Windows XP, follow
these steps:
OptoDisplay User’s Guide A-3
1. From the Windows Start menu, choose Settings➞Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Display icon.
3. Click the Settings tab in the Display Properties dialog box that opens.
4. In the Colors group, click the drop-down menu and select the number of colors that you
want to use.
5. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
For additional information on changing monitor settings in Windows, see the documentation
from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
Problems Saving a Project
When trying to save a project in OptoDisplay Configurator, you may see an error message stating
that no storage space is available on the computer’s hard drive. If this message appears, yet you
know that there is enough storage space for the OptoDisplay project files, check to see if one or
more files are marked “Read Only.”
To do this, open the OptoDisplay project folder in Windows Explorer, right-click on a project file,
and select Properties from the pop-up menu that appears. If the file is marked Read Only, the
check box “Read Only” at the bottom of the Properties window is checked. Clear this check box,
click OK to close the Properties window, and try saving the project again in OptoDisplay
Configurator.
For additional information on viewing file properties in Windows, see the documentation from
Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
Making an Empty String Visible
In an OptoDisplay project, if a text string object in a display sends an empty string to a controller,
the text string object becomes invisible and can’t be selected again. This might happen, for
example, if an operator accidentally cleared a field while entering values in a display.
This problem occurs because the controller’s string variable is empty, so when the text string
object linked to this variable checks the controller, it has nothing to display.
To correct this condition, do the following:
1. Open the OptoDisplay project.
2. Draw or import a graphic object to be used as a push button.
The graphic should be approximately the same size as the text string object.
A-4 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
3. Double-click on the new graphic object and, in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box
that opens, double-click “Send String” from the Operator Driven Attributes list.
4. In the Dynamic Attributes - Send String dialog box that appears, select “Prompt for Data”
in the Source group and click OK.
5. Click OK to close the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box and save your changes.
6. Now place the new graphic object behind the text string object as follows:
a. Using the Select tool, select the graphic object and move it until it’s directly over the
text string object.
b. With the graphic object still selected, choose Edit➞Z-Order➞Send to Back.
7. Save your project and run it in OptoDisplay Runtime.
If you click in the area of the text string object and new push button graphic object, the
Enter String dialog box should appear, even if an empty string has been sent to the
controller.
User Permissions in Microsoft Windows
When you set up controllers on a computer running the Microsoft Windows 2000 or Windows XP
operating systems, typically you are using the computer with top-level “administrator”
privileges. If someone later uses this same computer to run a FactoryFloor application, but logs
in to the computer with lower-level, non-administrator privileges, the FactoryFloor application
may not recognize controllers that have been previously configured.
If this problem occurs, you can modify the Windows permissions to let specific users access
previously configured controllers without having administrator access. This is done using the
Registry Editor utility.
WARNING: Use the Windows Registry Editor carefully. It is strongly recommended that you
make a backup copy of your Windows Registry before continuing with this procedure. Without a
backup copy, if you delete the wrong properties and cannot return the Registry to its original
state, application and system files can become unusable and will have to be reinstalled.
1. From the Windows Start menu, select Run.
The Run dialog box appears.
2. Enter the following command in the Open field and press ENTER:
regedt32
The Registry Editor main window appears with several open windows inside it.
3. Select the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE window to make it active.
4. Double-click the Software folder in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE window.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide A-5
5. Select the Opto22 folder.
6. Select Security➞Permissions.
The Registry Key Permissions dialog box opens. Make sure that “Opto22” appears next to
Registry Key at the top of the window.
7. Click Add.
8. In the Add Users and Groups dialog box, select the name of the appropriate group or
domain from the List Names From drop-down list.
9. In the Names list, select the name of the user or group that will get controller access and
then click Add.
10. If it is not already selected, choose “Full Control” from the Type of Access drop-down
menu.
11. Click OK.
12. In the Registry Key Permissions dialog box, select the Replace Permission on Existing
Subkeys checkbox and click OK.
13. Select Registry➞Exit to close the Registry Editor.
14. Restart the computer.
The user or group you added can now use controllers without having administrator access.
Other Troubleshooting Tools
Checking File Versions for FactoryFloor
Sometimes problems may be caused by older or misplaced files. Product Support may ask you to
run OptoVersion to check the versions and paths of your Opto 22 .DLL and .EXE files. Here’s how:
1. From the Start menu, choose Programs➞Opto 22➞FactoryFloor
4.1➞OptoUtilities➞OptoVersion.
2. In the OptoVersion window, click Find.
The utility searches your hard drive and prints a list of Opto-related files found.
3. To see more information on any file, double-click its name. To sort the list in a different
order, click any column heading.
4. To e-mail the information to Opto 22 Product Support, click E-mail.
A-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
The utility saves the list to a file named Version.bd in the same directory that contains
OptoVersion.exe. If you use Microsoft Outlook as your e-mail program, a new message
automatically appears addressed to Product Support, with the version file attached.
5. If you use Microsoft Outlook, add comments to the new message and click Send.
6. If you use another e-mail program, attach the Version.bd file to an e-mail message and
address the message to support@opto22.com, along with an explanation of the problem
you’re experiencing.
Generate Scanner Information Files (SIFs)
When a project is running in OptoDisplay Runtime, information about the scan groups, refresh
groups, and tags that are being scanned for the connected controllers can be recorded in a text
file called a scanner information file. With the information in this file and the information
generated using View➞Dynamic Attributes in OptoDisplay Configurator, you can diagnose
scanner bottlenecks and/or provide the information to Opto 22 Product Support to help them
diagnose possible problems with scanner throughput.
The scanner information file contains the following:
• Header describing how to correlate the information with a log generated by the OptoSnif
utility.
• List of refresh groups configured for the project
• List of scan groups used internally by OptoDisplay
• For each configured controller, the name and total number of tags beings scanned for that
controller
• For each configured controller, scan groups in descending order (based on the number of
tags scanned by a group)
• For each configured controller, tags for each refresh group that are being scanned
• Total number of controllers and tags for the OptoDisplay project.
NOTE: When Generate Scanner Information File is selected, all windows in a project will be
opened when the project starts in OptoDisplay Runtime. The windows will be closed or returned
to their originally configured state after approximately two seconds. If a project’s windows
contain large bitmap and metafile graphics, or if a large number of SuperTrends are used in the
project, problems may occur if opening all project windows simultaneously exceeds your PC’s
available memory.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide A-7
A-8 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
APPENDIX B
Appendix B
OptoDisplay Errors
This appendix lists error messages you may see while running a project in OptoDisplay Runtime.
The cause of each error message is described, and, if possible, corrective action you can take to
resolve the problem.
In This Section
Types of Errors ........................................ B-1
Error Messages in OptoDisplay Runtime.......B-2
Types of Errors
While using the Configurator and Runtime components of OptoDisplay, several types of errors
may occur due to incorrect equipment setup, out-of-date files, or equipment failure. These errors
generally fall into three categories:
• Runtime Errors—These may occur while running a project in OptoDisplay Runtime. Most
of these errors can be traced to controller configuration problems or configuration
problems with the I/O unit(s) connected to the controller. Runtime errors can be further
grouped into several subcategories based on the type of error that occurs; see “Error
Messages in OptoDisplay Runtime” on page B-2 for lists of error messages in each
subcategory.
• Configurator Errors—These may occur as you use OptoDisplay Configurator to create a
project (for instance, adding a dynamic attribute to a graphic object). Errors most commonly
occur when entering data into a dialog box; if an error occurs while doing this, simply
re-enter an appropriate value and continue.
• Windows Errors—These may occur while using either the Runtime or Configurator
components of OptoDisplay. The most common Windows errors occur when too many
applications are running at the same time, reducing the amount of memory available for
the operating system. These errors are issued by the Microsoft Windows operating system
running on your computer; see the documentation from Microsoft and your computer
manufacturer for more information about Windows errors.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-1
Error Messages in OptoDisplay Runtime
Error messages that appear in OptoDisplay Runtime can be grouped into several categories,
which appear in the table below. Messages for each category, as well as possible causes for the
error and corrective actions to resolve it, are listed for each category.
NOTE: Many of these error messages also appear when running OptoControl. For additional
troubleshooting information, see Appendix A, “OptoControl Troubleshooting,” and Appendix B,
“OptoControl Errors,” in the OptoControl User’s Guide.
Runtime Error Category
See
Controller Errors
page B-2
Communication Data Server Errors
page B-6
Ethernet Errors
page B-7
File Access Errors
page B-8
Historic Log Errors
page B-9
Launch Application Errors
page B-9
Port Errors
page B-9
Recipe Upload/Download Errors
page B-12
Scanner Errors
page B-13
Server Messages/Errors
page B-14
System Errors
page B-17
Controller Errors
The controller may report the following errors. The source of the error may be the controller, or
one or more I/O units connected to the controller.
Error Message
Possible Causes
Bad character in controller
name
Some of the characters that were once valid in Cyrano
strategies are invalid characters in OptoControl. Check
the controller name in the OptoControl or Cyrano
strategy.
Bad length for controller name
Check the length of the controller name. Try setting up
the controller name again.
Bad table index
The index for the specified table is out of range. Make
sure you are not accessing an invalid range of table
elements.
B-2 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Error Message
Possible Causes
Buffer overrun error
This error occurs if the data returned from the I/O units is
too long (>255 characters) or too short (data length is 0).
Check for possible noise interference, proper
termination, or other factors that may affect
communication lines to the controller.
Bus error
This error is usually caused by a problem in the kernel or
library. It could also be caused by a failure in the
controller hardware. The failure may be due to a bad
memory or port device. When this error occurs, the chart
in the controller that caused the error is stopped. If this
error occurs, make sure that all cards in the controller are
properly seated.
Command not valid on
specified board
This error indicates that an I/O unit received a command
from the controller that it did not understand. A new
command may have been added that is not supported by
an older I/O unit. An update to the I/O unit’s EPROM may
be required.
Communications watchdog
error
The communication link watchdog timer has timed out.
The controller is unable to communicate with one or
more I/O units. This error might be caused by improper
wiring or termination.
Compile only error. A command
or “word” was encountered that
cannot be used when
compiling.
A custom Forth word on the controller could not be
compiled during scanning. Custom Forth words are used
to accelerate scanning by collecting queries of several
tags into one word.
Controller EPROM out of date
The controller EPROM version on the controller does not
meet the minimum version requirements for this version
of the software. The minimum required EPROM version
is identified as the version in the Help➞About dialog.
Controller strategy date stamp
invalid
The date stamp for the current strategy was not currently
obtained from the controller. Check connections with the
controller.
Controller strategy date/time
incompatible
The date and time stamp recorded on the controller for
the current strategy does not match the date and time of
the strategy file that was used to configure the
OptoDisplay project. OptoDisplay Runtime operation will
continue. Any tags that may have changed can cause
scanning errors. The OptoDisplay Configurator should be
run to update the internal strategy time stamp recorded
in the OptoDisplay project and to verify connections to
any tags that may have changed.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-3
Error Message
Possible Causes
Controller strategy file name
incompatible
This error commonly occurs when a new or modified
strategy is downloaded to a controller and OptoDisplay
Runtime is started. If OptoDisplay was configured with a
strategy file that does not match the one in the controller,
this error will be reported.
Controller strategy invalid
OptoDisplay did not find a strategy at the controller
during the verification process. Make sure a strategy was
downloaded to the controller before trying to run
OptoDisplay.
Controller strategy time stamp
invalid
The time stamp for the current strategy was not correctly
obtained from the controller. Check connections with the
controller.
Data field error
The I/O unit did not receive enough characters. This
error indicates a problem between the controller and the
I/O unit. It can be caused by different baud rate settings
on the controller or I/O unit. Check the communications
jumpers.
Definition not finished
An incomplete user-defined command was downloaded
to the controller. This error can occur if a library file was
downloaded with an incorrect Forth word definition.
Dictionary full error. Controller
dictionary is full and no more
“words” can be defined.
The controller has insufficient memory to compile a new
Forth word used to accelerate scanning. Each custom
word contains queries for several tags found in the same
scan group. The increase in scanning efficiency is
achieved by making a single query to the controller to
obtain values for all the tags compiled into the custom
Forth word. This reduces the overhead required when
each tag is queried individually. If this error occurs, the
software’s scanner will revert to querying each tag
individually, which is called a “Slow Scan.”
Empty stack error. Controller
attempted to perform an
operation that expected data on
the controller stack.
The controller generates this error during a download or
while running. A command is requesting more items from
the stack than are available. Example: An ENDIF (Forth
“THEN”) without a corresponding IF.
Execute only error. A command
or “word” was encountered that
cannot be used when
compiling.
The controller encounters a program instruction that it
cannot execute. During Runtime, this error may indicate
a corrupt program file.
First character in controller
name must be alpha
Make sure the controller name in the OptoControl
strategy or Cyrano strategy begins with an alphabetic
character.
Invalid channel error
This error occurs when a command attempting to use an
unconfigured channel is sent to the controller.
B-4 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Error Message
Possible Causes
Invalid command error
The controller received an invalid command from the
host.
Invalid delay error
This error occurs with digital I/O units when you try to
start a square wave, generate N pulses, or generate a
time-proportional output (TPO), with a delay time less
than 10 milliseconds on more than eight output positions.
Invalid event error
This error occurs when you try to enable an event entry
or define a reaction before the event has been defined.
Invalid kernel
The controller’s kernel has been corrupted. Re-download
the kernel.
Invalid limit error
An I/O unit receives data that contains an illegal value.
The controller has sent a command to an I/O unit which
contains out-of-range data. Check your controller
program to see if calculated values are within
module-configured ranges.
Invalid module error
This error occurs when a command is sent that requires
a different channel configuration than the one presently
in use. For example, you issued a command to turn on
an output on a channel that’s configured as an input.
Mistic kernel only supports
Cyrano strategies (.gml)
OptoDisplay determined that the kernel running on the
controller only supports Cyrano strategies. The strategy
you’ve associated your project with is an OptoControl
strategy.
OptoKernel only supports
OptoControl strategies (.cdb)
OptoDisplay determined that the kernel running on the
controller only supports OptoControl strategies. The
strategy you’ve associated with your project is a Cyrano
strategy.
Out of memory
The program and data in the controller have exceeded
the available controller memory. This error usually
occurs during program download. During Runtime, this
error occurs when OptoDisplay is compiling custom
Forth words for compressed scanning. These words may
be compiled anytime an OptoDisplay Runtime window is
initially opened.
Pointer was NULL
An invalid object type was passed in the OptoControl or
Cyrano strategy. If you’ve written your own Forth words
to the controller, make sure they are defined properly.
Otherwise, contact Opto 22 Product Support.
Power-up clear expected
because the controller has
powered up. Expecting an “A”
command.
After a power failure on an I/O unit, a Power-up Clear
command is expected before any other command. The
Controller will automatically send this command, and
OptoDisplay will report the occurrence.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-5
Error Message
Possible Causes
Receive error
The controller receives a message it does not
understand. This error may be caused by wiring or noise
problems between the host computer and the controller.
Return checksum error
This error indicates a problem with the communication
link. A checksum error often occurs when the local bus or
remote bus networks are not wired, terminated, or biased
properly.
Stack full error. Controller stack
has grown too big.
The stack on the controller cannot grow any further. This
error may be caused by an error in a library file, an
include file, or words downloaded by OptoDisplay.
Undefined command (from
M4SENET)
An undefined command was received by the controller
from the M4SENET card. Contact Opto 22 Product
Support.
Warning word is already
defined although a redefinition
will be allowed
A Forth word already defined in the controller was
received and will be redefined.
Word abort while port unlocked
This error was generated by the controller after the
UNLOCK command was issued.
Communication Data Server Errors
The following Communication Data Server errors are generated if an error occurred while trying
to communicate to the controller:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Cannot acquire lock
Access to the controller was attempted but unsuccessful.
Wait and attempt to access the controller again, or try
resetting the controller.
Connection handle invalid
Internal error. Wait and attempt to access the controller
again, try resetting the controller, try rebooting the
computer, or contact Opto 22 Product Support if the
previous suggestions are unsuccessful.
Connection setup error
The controller connection setup is invalid. Contact
Opto 22 Product Support.
Connection type invalid
The controller connection type is invalid. Wait and
attempt to access the controller again, reset the
controller, or contact Opto 22 Product Support.
Controller handle invalid
Internal error. Wait and attempt to access the controller
again, try resetting the controller, try rebooting the
computer, or contact Opto 22 Product Support if the
previous suggestions are unsuccessful.
B-6 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Error Message
Possible Causes
Controller setup error. Name
may be bad.
A problem was detected with the controller name. Try
setting up the controller again.
Invalid controller name.
Controller not configured (name
not in Registry). Make sure the
controller name is not
misspelled.
The controller name specified is invalid. Try configuring
the controller again.
Invalid parameter in
OptoCom.dll API call
This error may occur if you’re using Opto 22’s .dll files
with a third-party application (such as Visual Basic) to
communicate directly to the controller. Make sure you’re
using the call properly.
No controller in Registry
The controller was not found in the Windows Registry.
Try configuring the controller again.
No port in Registry
The controller was not found in the Windows Registry.
Try configuring the controller again.
Out of memory in OptoCom.dll
Contact Opto 22 Product Support.
RPC binding error. NetBIOS
might not be running.
Make sure NetBIOS is running properly.
RPC call error
Make sure NetBIOS is running properly.
Ethernet Errors
The following Ethernet errors are generated if an error occurs while OptoDisplay is trying to
connect to or operate with an Ethernet network:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Ethernet: Error with Registry
entries
There was an error with the entries in the Windows
Registry. Try setting up the controller again.
Ethernet: Function does not
exist error
An Ethernet communication problem. Make sure TCP/IP
is enabled.
Ethernet: Incorrect length of
receive string
An Ethernet communication problem. Make sure TCP/IP
is enabled.
Ethernet: Receive error
An Ethernet communication problem. Make sure TCP/IP
is enabled.
Ethernet: Send error
An Ethernet communication problem. Make sure TCP/IP
is enabled.
NetBios: Error creating own
name in network
A session did not terminate properly. Try rebooting your
computer.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-7
Error Message
Possible Causes
NetBios: Error with Registry
entries
Try setting up the controller name again.
TCP/IP: Cannot connect error
An Ethernet communication problem. Make sure TCP/IP
is enabled.
TCP/IP: Invalid socket
An Ethernet communication problem. Make sure TCP/IP
is enabled.
File Access Errors
The following File Access errors are generated by OptoDisplay if an error occurred while
OptoDisplay is working with files or with historic logs:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Bad string, using default file
name.
The tag name used as a source for a file name could not
be used. The default file name will be used instead. The
default file name was set up in the Configurator.
Can’t make directory
A directory could not be created. Check if the directory is
being created in a read-only directory. Change the
protection to allow you to create it.
Directory now created.
Status message indicating that the directory was
created.
Drive is full. Writing has been
suspended.
A file was being written to a drive, but not enough free
space was available to complete the transaction. Free up
some space on the drive to continue.
Drive is no longer full. Writing
has been resumed.
Status message indicating that the destination drive has
enough space available to complete the file writing
transaction.
Initial Writing of file: File name
Status message indicating that a file name is going to be
created.
Invalid directory bad directory
name. Using default.
The specified directory could not be used. The default
directory will be used instead. The default directory was
set up in the Configurator.
B-8 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Historic Log Errors
The following error message may appear if an error occurs with a historic log:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Scan error: [Scanner Error]
while accessing: tag name
A scanner error occurred while trying to access a tag
name. Check the Scanner errors list for a complete
description.
Launch Application Errors
The following error messages may appear if an error occurred while working with the Launch
Applications feature of OptoDisplay:
Error Message
Possible Causes
File not found
The executable file specified for a launch application
setup could not be found. Verify the directory where the
file actually resides.
Path not found
The drive/directory path specified for the executable in a
launch application setup does not exist. Verify the actual
path of the executable file.
Scan error - [Scanner Error]
while accessing: tag name
A scanner error occurred while trying to access a tag
name. Check the Scanner Errors section for more details
about the error.
WinExec error #
A Windows executable error occurred. Check Microsoft
help sources for clarification about the error number.
Working directory invalid
The working directory specified for a launch application
setup is incorrect. Verify the drive and path.
Port Errors
The following errors are generated by OptoDisplay if a port-related error occurred:
Error Message
Possible Causes
ARCNET could not transmit
The OptoCom.dll could not receive notification from the
ARCNET adapter that it is ready to transmit data. Ensure
the ARCNET adapter is installed properly and connected
to the network.
Baud rate is not correct
The software baud rate setting does not match the
hardware baud rate setting.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-9
Error Message
Possible Causes
Checksum or CRC error
The computed CRC checksum does not match that in
the received message. Check hardware connections to
the controller.
Controller acquired by other
process
Another host machine has the controller’s host port
locked. The host port is locked when any host machine is
downloading new Forth words for either an OptoDisplay
or OptoControl application. An OptoDisplay session
downloads new Forth words during startup or when a
window is opened for the first time in that session. During
this period, all communication is suspended between
other hosts running OptoDisplay sessions and the
controller. Upon completion of the Forth word download,
the port is unlocked and communication resumes with all
OptoDisplay sessions connected to the controller.
Verification of communications is provided by the
“Attaching to Scanner” message.
Could not construct port. Open
call failed.
The first call to this port failed because the host computer
was out of memory.
Could not create or duplicate
(cannot find) a handle
Contact Opto 22 Product Support.
Could not find other nodes in
ARCNET
There are no other ARCNET nodes on the network.
Could not read value(s) from
Registry
The registry could be corrupt. Contact Opto 22 Product
Support.
Could not write new entry to
Registry. If in Windows 2000 or
Windows XP, make sure you
have administrative rights.
There was a problem writing information to the registry.
Contact your network administrator.
Invalid address error
The driver sent a command that included a controller
address outside the limits of 0 and 255.
Invalid MwDriver handle
This is an internal OptoDisplay error. Contact Opto 22
Product Support.
Invalid port error. WinRT
drivers might not have started.
This error occurs when a device, such as an AC37 or
AC42, has been configured but does not exist at
Runtime. Check your device configuration.
Invalid protocol error
This is an internal OptoDisplay error. Contact Opto 22
Product Support.
Out of handles to open. Close
some controllers.
OptoServer ran out of DDE handles. Reduce the number
of sessions you have connected. The maximum is 16
handles.
Out of space in the serial data
global array
Reduce the serial communication sessions to
OptoServer down to 16.
B-10 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Error Message
Possible Causes
Please reboot for changes in
the Registry to take effect
Reboot your computer so that changes to the registry are
activated.
Port already locked on
controller
The communication port configured to talk to one or
more controllers is being used by another application.
Check the Windows Program Manager to see what other
applications are running. Programs that use the
computer serial ports, such as modem programs, may be
running and using the port.
Port setup failed
At Runtime, the OptoDisplay software was unable to
initialize the I/O driver. This is probably caused by a
memory allocation problem. Exit Windows and restart
Runtime.
Send error. Possible cause for
ARCNET: bad cable, bad
address, power shut off, etc.
This error is usually caused by not having a
Clear-to-Send (CTS) signal on the RS-232 port. No
message will be sent. Check hardware connections with
the controller.
Short on data error
The OptoCom.dll did not receive the required number of
bytes from the controller. Check connections with the
controller.
Timeout. No response.
Possible cause: bad cable, bad
address, power shut off, etc.
A response was not received from the controller in the
Timeout period specified for the port. Check the Timeout
settings for the port. If they’re adequate, check hardware
connections with the controller.
Undefined command. The
controller did not understand
the command
An internal OptoDisplay error occurred. The error that
occurred is not recognized by OptoDisplay. Possibly, a
tag doesn’t exist in the controller strategy. Run the
Tool➞AutoCorrect Tags command from the
Configurator to try and find the invalid tag.
WinRT: Mutual exclusion could
not be created
Information could not be written to the registry. Try
rebooting the PC, or contact Opto 22 Product Support.
WinRT: Mutual exclusion could
not be deleted
This is a warning message. No action is required; the
Windows operating system will take care of this later.
WinRT: Registry entry already
exists
The controller name and address already exist.
Re-check the names of the configured controllers.
WinRT: Specified device could
not be found in Registry
Configure the device again. Check port setup and
addressing.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-11
Recipe Upload/Download Errors
The following error messages are displayed if an error occurs while downloading or uploading a
recipe:
Error Message
Possible Causes
A scanner error while
accessing tag: tag name (tag
name not found)
A scanner error was encountered while scanning a tag
name. Check the Scanner Errors for more details about
the error.
An unknown error occurred on
the indicated line. (Recipe
Upload)
An unknown error occurred during the upload. Check the
recipe file at the indicated line number. If you need
additional help to resolve the problem, contact Opto 22
Product Support.
Could not find the selected
directory for the recipe
destination file. Please check to
ensure the path is correct.
(Recipe Upload)
The path configured for the destination file of the
uploaded recipe is invalid. Make sure the drive/directory
path is correct.
Could not find the selected
directory for the recipe format
file. Please check to ensure the
path is correct. (Recipe Upload)
The path configured for the format file of the uploaded
recipe is invalid. Make sure the drive/directory path is
correct.
Could not find the selected
recipe format file. Please check
to ensure the file name is
correct.
The file name configured for the format file of the
uploaded recipe was not found. Make sure you
configured the correct tag name.
Could not make directory for
Destination File: (Recipe
Upload)
The path configured in the destination path could not be
created. Check the drive specified in the path. Also
check the read/write protection of the directory.
Invalid type specified. Valid
types are: “Integer Table, Float
Table, String Table, and Chart”
An invalid type was specified in the recipe. Only tags of
types integer table, float table, string table, and chart are
allowed in a recipe.
Scan error - scanner error while
accessing: tag name
A scanner error occurred while trying to access a tag
name. Check the Scanner Errors section for more details
about the error.
String for destination file was
empty: (Recipe Upload)
An OptoControl tag name was configured to contain the
name of the destination file, but its contents were empty.
Make sure you configure the correct tag name.
String for format file was empty
An OptoControl tag name was configured to contain the
name of the format file, but its contents were empty.
Make sure you configured the correct tag name.
The recipe file does not exist!
(Recipe Upload)
The recipe upload file does not exist. Verify the spelling
of the file.
B-12 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Error Message
Possible Causes
The specified chart state is
invalid. Valid states are Run,
Stop, Suspend, or Continue.
Make sure the chart state sent in a chart control
instruction was Run, Stop, Suspend, or Continue.
The specified controller does
not exist in this project.
The controller specified in the recipe’s OptoControl tag is
not recognized by this project. Verify the controller name
for the tag name requested. Check the controller’s
spelling.
The tag info is formatted
incorrectly. Should be:
“Controller:Tag Type.Tag
Name”
The syntax for the OptoControl tag is incorrect. Make
sure it follows this pattern: Controller Name:Tag
Type.Tagname, where Controller Name is the name of
the controller; Tag Type is “Integer Table,” “Float Table,”
“String Table,” or “Chart;” and Tagname is the name of
an OptoControl tag or chart name of the type specified in
Tag Type.
The tag value is formatted
incorrectly. Should be: “Index
(optional): Value”
Check the syntax of the tag value(s) specified for the
indices. Make sure a colon separates the index from the
actual value, and also verify that the index is within the
table’s range.
Uploaded/Downloaded to File:
file name
Status message indicating file name was uploaded or
downloaded.
Scanner Errors
The following Runtime error messages are displayed if a scanning error occurred:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Attaching to scanner
This message appears when trying to reestablish
communications with the controller.
Controller ID not found
The controller ID used for the scan item cannot be found
in the list that is maintained internally to OptoDisplay.
Detaching from scanner by
user
This message appears during Runtime when the user
has manually disconnected the host from the controller in
the Controller Manager dialog.
Detaching from scanner on
error
This message appears when the number of retries has
been exceeded by the host when trying to reestablish
communications with the controller.
Float value illegal. Value
ignored.
An error occurred when converting data from a controller
into a float variable used in OptoDisplay. The value is not
used to update graphics during this scan period.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-13
Error Message
Possible Causes
Incorrect packet size (switched
to slow scan)
The response packet from the controller does not contain
the correct amount of data during a compressed scan.
This error may be due to a failure in the custom Forth
word compiled for OptoDisplay to assist in scanning. If
the Forth word fails, it is no longer used and the system
reverts to scanning all tags separately. This mode is
called “slow scan.”
Internal sequence error
(switched to slow scan)
An internal OptoDisplay error occurred when updating
graphics with values obtained from a custom Forth word
used during scanning. This custom Forth word is no
longer used and the system reverts to scanning all tags
separately. This mode is called “slow scan.”
Receive error
The expected number of characters was not received
from the controller.
Scanner overrun error
The internal OptoDisplay scanner is unable to scan all of
the I/O data requests at the rate configured by the user.
This error can occur if too many points have been
configured at too fast a scan rate. Slow down the scan
group times. This error can also occur if the controller
takes too long to provide the data at the configured rate.
Task start failed
A task on the controller has failed to start as directed by
OptoDisplay.
Unexpected controller
response (out-of-sync)
Sequence IDs are placed in all commands to the
controller from the host. Each ID is compared to the one
found in the response from the controller to ensure that
messages do not go out of synchronization. If this
problem persists, run the OptoSniff utility to record
communications between the controller and the host and
report the problem to Opto 22 Product Support.
Server Messages/Errors
The following Runtime error messages are displayed if an OptoServer server error occurred:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Alternate server DOWN
The primary or backup server is down. If the primary
OptoServer node was running, the backup node is down;
if the backup node was running, the primary OptoServer
node is down.
Alternate server UP
A status message indicating the backup/primary server is
connected to OptoServer. If the primary OptoServer
node was running, the backup node is up; if the backup
node was running, the primary OptoServer node is up.
B-14 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Error Message
Possible Causes
Both servers DOWN
The primary and backup servers are down. Verify that
the OptoServer port configuration in OptoServer matches
the actual physical configuration of the equipment. Also
verify that the network is working.
Both servers UP [switched to
primary]
The primary and backup servers are connected to
OptoServer. The primary OptoServer node is connected
to OptoDisplay.
Connecting to server (pinging
server)
OptoDisplay is attempting to connect to OptoServer.
Controller name not found on
server or network error
OptoDisplay attempted to verify that a controller is
registered with OptoServer but the controller was not
found. Make sure it was registered with OptoServer in
the OptoServer Administrator. Verify the controller name
is spelled correctly.
Controller not defined
OptoDisplay attempted to verify that a controller is
registered with OptoServer, but the controller was not
found. Make sure it was registered with OptoServer in
the OptoServer Administrator. Verify that the controller
name is spelled correctly.
Could not connect to server.
OptoDisplay version too old for
server.
OptoDisplay could not connect to OptoServer because
the version of OptoDisplay is too old for OptoServer.
Could not connect to server.
OptoServer version too old for
server.
OptoDisplay could not connect to OptoServer because
the version of the OptoServer program is too old for
OptoDisplay.
Current server DOWN [no
alternate]
The primary/backup OptoServer server is down and an
alternate server was not configured. Make sure
OptoServer is running.
Current server UP
Status message indicating that the primary or backup
OptoServer server is up and running.
Disconnecting from server
Indicates that OptoDisplay is disconnecting from
OptoServer. Possible causes are that a network
communication error occurred, or OptoDisplay is simply
terminating its connection to OptoServer.
Error connecting to server (ping
FAILED)
OptoDisplay could not communicate or connect to
OptoServer.
Internal Error - server
improperly configured
Contact Opto 22 Product Support. The data collected
after this error occurs is unreliable.
Network communication
FAILED
OptoDisplay tried to communicate to OptoServer and
OptoServer could not receive the message. Verify that
OptoServer is running and the network connections are
working properly.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-15
Error Message
Possible Causes
Network error while configuring
server (group add FAILED)
OptoDisplay was in the process of configuring
OptoServer with a group when a failure occurred. Verify
that OptoServer is running and the network connections
are working properly.
Network error while configuring
server (item add FAILED)
OptoDisplay was in the process of configuring the server
with a tag name when a network error occurred. Verify
that OptoServer is running and the network connections
are working properly.
Network error while configuring
server (project disable FAILED)
OptoDisplay was in the process of disabling a project
from the server when a network error occurred. Verify
that OptoServer is running and the network connections
are working properly.
Network error while configuring
server (project enable FAILED)
OptoDisplay was in the process of enabling a project to
the server when a network error occurred. Verify that
OptoServer is running and the network connections are
working properly.
Network error while connecting
to server (add FAILED)
OptoDisplay could not connect to OptoServer because of
a network error. Verify that OptoServer is running and
the network connections are working properly.
Network initialization FAILED
Connection to the network failed. Verify that NetBIOS
protocol was configured for the network.
Server data overrun
OptoDisplay could not keep up with the data OptoServer
is providing. This error could happen if the OptoDisplay
PC is busy with CPU-intensive window operations and
tasks. Increase the scan rates for these data items or
alleviate the demands on the PC.
Server temporarily locked by
another client (project lock
FAILED)
The server is locked by an OptoDisplay project while the
OptoDisplay project is built and established to
OptoServer. This lock keeps another OptoDisplay project
from building and taxing the OptoServer resources.
OptoDisplay will try again later.
Switched to alternate server
Status message indicating that OptoDisplay switched to
the backup server if it had been using the main server, or
it switched to the main server if it had been using the
backup server.
Verification of server
configuration FAILED
OptoDisplay was verifying that OptoServer was scanning
the correct number of items, and the verification failed.
Try your project again. If the error repeats itself, contact
Opto 22 Product Support. Any data returned may be
invalid.
B-16 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
System Errors
The following error is displayed if a system error occurred:
Error Message
Possible Causes
System: Floating point error N
caught by signal handler
The data returned from the controller was detected to
have a floating point error. This error could have
occurred during data manipulations at the controller.
Verify that the data has been handled or cast properly
according to its type.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide B-17
B-18 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
APPENDIX C
Appendix C
OptoDisplay Files
This appendix lists the files used in an OptoDisplay project, including those created automatically
when a project is saved. Use this information as a reference when you are looking through your
OptoDisplay files or working directory.
OptoDisC.exe
OptoDisplay Configurator executable program file.
OptoDisR.exe
OptoDisplay Runtime executable program file.
OptoDsRX.exe
OptoDisplay Runtime monitor-only version executable program file.
*.$$$
ASCII text file created by OptoDisplay Configurator using the AutoCorrect
Tags option. The file displays any changes made by the AutoCorrect Tags
tools to tagnames from Cyrano (.gml file extension) strategies that were
incompatible with OptoDisplay. The file also lists tagname errors that
could not be corrected.
*.alm
Alarm log file.
*.bin
SuperTrend log file saved in binary format.
*.bmp
Bitmap file, created by other programs or by OptoDisplay. Graphics saved
as bitmaps from OptoDisplay are not saved with any dynamic attributes
that may have been configured.
*.cdb
Main strategy file from an OptoControl program. Lists all objects and other
global information used in a program, as well as controller configuration
information.
*.gml
Main strategy file for a Cyrano program. Lists all objects and other global
information used in a program, as well as controller configuration
information.
*.H##
Historic log file, created by OptoDisplay Runtime.
*.ini
The OptoDisplay initialization file created by OptoDisplay Configurator.
Microsoft Windows typically names the file type as a Configuration
Settings file.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide C-1
*.mmi
Main project file for an OptoDisplay project.
*.msg
Event log file, created by OptoDisplay Runtime.
*.rcp
Recipe file, created by a text editor. Used to send a set of parameters or to
read a set of parameters from a controller.
*.smb
Symbol file, created by OptoDisplay Configurator. Symbol files contain
graphic objects and their configured attributes for use in OptoDisplay
projects.
*.T##
SuperTrend historic log file, created by OptoDisplay Runtime.
*.txt
Dynamic attribute (or “tag info”) report file, created by OptoDisplay
Configurator.
*.W##
Draw window file, generated by the OptoDisplay Configurator.
C-2 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
APPENDIX D
Appendix D
OptoDisplay Menu Reference
This appendix lists in detail the contents of OptoDisplay menus for both Configurator and
Runtime components. Note that if a keyboard shortcut is available for a menu command, the
shortcut is listed next to the command in the menu as shown in the example below:
Keyboard
shortcut
Command
Many menu commands can also be accessed by right-clicking on an object or in a window, and
then choosing the command from the pop-up menu that appears.
In This Section
OptoDisplay Configurator Menus...........D-1
OptoDisplay Runtime Menus.......................D-17
OptoDisplay Configurator Menus
File Menu
New Project—Creates a new project. After selecting this menu option, choose a location and
provide a name for the project in the dialog box that appears.
Open Project—Opens an existing project. After selecting this menu option, navigate to and
select the project you want to open in the dialog box that appears. Only one OptoDisplay project
may be open at a time.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide D-1
Close Project—Closes the project that is currently open. If the project has been modified, you
are prompted to save changes.
Save Project—Saves any modifications to the files for the current project.
Save Project As—Saves any modifications to the current project to a name and project
directory. This menu option is similar to Save Project, except that you can specify a new name
and location for the saved project in the dialog box that appears. This is a good way to make a
copy or a backup version of a project.
You can also copy an OptoDisplay project to a different computer or drive without using the Save
Project As menu option. To do this, create a directory on that computer or drive, then copy all the
files from the original directory to the new directory using Windows Explorer. See Appendix C,
“OptoDisplay Files,” for a complete list of files associated with an OptoDisplay project.
Save Project and Load Runtime—Saves the current project and then opens it in OptoDisplay
Runtime. This is a quick way of switching between Configurator and Runtime when you are
developing a project.
Project Path—Displays the full directory path to the project’s saved location. The project’s path
is also displayed in the title bar, but if it is too long to fit there, you can use this command to see
the directory path.
Password Protect Project—Lets you protect your OptoDisplay project with a password to
prevent others from opening and modifying the project using OptoDisplay Configurator. The
project can still be opened and run in OptoDisplay Runtime.
Configurator Options—Sets a startup option that automatically opens the last project that
was open the last time Configurator was run.
Choose Bitmap—Selects a bitmap file for use in the project. After selecting this menu option,
in the dialog box that appears, navigate to and select the bitmap you want to include in the
project. Use the Bitmap tool to place the selected bitmap in the project’s draw window.
Save As Bitmap—Saves the selected graphic(s) as a bitmap. After selecting this menu option,
in the dialog box that appears, specify a file name and location for the new bitmap. If no graphics
are selected, then everything in the draw window is saved to the bitmap file name. Any dynamic
attributes you have configured are not saved with the bitmap.
Printer Setup—Selects an available printer and sets its attributes.
Print—Prints the contents of any displayed main and draw windows. You can specify the
number of copies to be printed and other options in the Printer Setup command.
(Previous File List)—Displays the names and directory paths of projects that had been
previously opened in Configurator.
Exit—Closes the current Configurator windows and exits the application. If you modified the
current project, you will be prompted to save it.
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Edit Menu
Undo/Redo—(Available only when you have performed an action that can be undone or
redone.) Reverses an earlier action you have performed, or repeats an action performed earlier.
For example, if you have deleted a graphic object from a window, select Undo to restore the
graphic. If, after restoring the graphic, you decide again to delete it, select Redo to repeat the
earlier deletion. You can undo up to 50 actions.
Cut—(Available only when you have selected something.) Copies selected graphics onto the
clipboard and removes them from the draw window. Cutting something replaces anything stored
there previously.
Copy—(Available only when you have selected something.) Copies selected graphics onto the
clipboard without removing them from the draw window. Copying something to the clipboard
replaces anything stored there previously.
Paste—(Available only when something has been copied or cut into the clipboard.) Inserts a
copy of the clipboard contents into the middle of the active draw window.
Delete—(Available only when you have selected something.) Removes selected graphic(s) from
a draw window. Unlike the Cut command, Delete removes the selection without placing it in the
clipboard; once you delete something, you cannot retrieve it.
Duplicate—(Available only when you have selected something.) Creates a duplicate of the
selected graphic(s). The duplicate is placed directly below the selected graphics. Duplicating a
selected graphic does not use the clipboard.
Select All—Selects all the completed graphics in the active draw window. Anything that is not
selected within the active draw window when you use this command may be incomplete.
Incomplete graphics can be erased by using the Redraw command under the View menu.
Replace—Modifies tagnames attached to a graphic or graphics. Allows you to link graphics to
a different controller, item name, table index, or bit index. You can find and replace tags in the
entire project, or just in the selected graphic(s).
Z-Order—(Available only when you have selected something.) Positions selected graphics in
front of or in back of other graphics. The following choices are available:
• Bring to Front—(Available only when you have selected something.) Positions the
selected graphics in front of any other objects in the window.
Before Bring to Front
After Bring to Front
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
D-3
• Send to Back—(Available only when you have selected something.) Positions the
selected graphics in back of any other objects in the window.
Before Send to Back
After Send to Back
Align—(Available only when you have selected more than one object.) Aligns selected objects
in a variety of ways. The following choices are available:
• Left—Aligns the left edges of the selected graphics. All selected graphics are moved left
to align with the left-most graphic in the group.
Before Left-Align
After Left-Align
• Center—Aligns the vertical centers of the selected graphics. All selected graphics are
moved left or right to align their centers with an imaginary vertical line down the center of
the selected graphics.
Before Center-Align
After Center-Align
• Right—Aligns the right edges of the selected graphics. All selected graphics are moved
right to align with the right-most graphic in the group.
Before Right-Align
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
After Right-Align
• Top—Aligns the top edges of the selected graphics. All selected graphics are moved up to
align with the top-most graphic in the group.
Before Top-Align
After Top-Align
• Middle—Aligns the horizontal centers of the selected graphics. All selected graphics are
moved up or down to align their centers with an imaginary horizontal line running across
the center of the selected graphics.
Before Middle-Align
After Middle-Align
• Bottom—Aligns the bottom edges of the selected graphics. All selected graphics are
moved down to align with the bottom-most graphic in the group.
Before Bottom-Align
After Bottom-Align
• Space Evenly Vertically—Distributes the selected graphics so there is an equal amount
of vertical space between each object.
Before Space Evenly Vertically
After Space Evenly Vertically
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
D-5
• Space Evenly Horizontally—Distributes the selected graphics so there is an equal
amount of horizontal space between each object.
Before Space Evenly Horizontally
After Space Evenly Horizontally
Flip/Rotate—(Available only when you have selected one or more objects.) Changes the
orientation and rotation of objects. The following choices are available:
• Flip Horizontal—Removes selected graphics and replaces them with mirror images of
the graphics flipped over a vertical center point. Text, trends, bitmaps, and metafiles have
their positions changed but are not mirrored.
Horizontal Flip of a Single Graphic
Horizontal Flip of Multiple Selected Graphics
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
• Flip Vertical—Removes selected graphics and replaces them with mirror images of the
graphics flipped over a horizontal center point. Text, trends, bitmaps, and metafiles have
their positions changed but are not mirrored.
Vertical Flip of a Single Graphic
Vertical Flip of Multiple Selected Graphics
• Rotate Clockwise—Rotates the selected graphic 90 degrees clockwise. If more than one
graphic is selected, the center of rotation is the center of the smallest rectangular area that
contains all the graphics. Text, trends, bitmaps, and metafiles cannot be rotated, and any
selection of multiple graphics that includes one of these cannot be rotated.
Clockwise Rotation of a Single Graphic
Clockwise Rotation of Multiple Selected Graphics
• Rotate Counterclockwise—Rotates the selected graphic 90 degrees counterclockwise. If more than one graphic is selected, the center of rotation is the center of the
smallest rectangular area that contains all the graphics. Text, trends, bitmaps, and
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
D-7
metafiles cannot be rotated, and any selection of multiple graphics that includes one of
these cannot be rotated.
Counterclockwise Rotation of a Single Graphic
Counterclockwise Rotation of Multiple Selected Graphics
Group—(Available only when you have selected more than one object.) Gathers any
combination of two or more graphics into a single graphic object. You can then select the object,
move it, size it, or assign dynamic attributes to it as a single entity. In Runtime, only the dynamic
attributes assigned to the grouped object are processed; any dynamic attributes assigned to
individual objects that make up the group are ignored, including trends.
Ungroup—(Available only when you have selected a grouped object.) Splits a graphics object
on which the Group command has been used into its original individual components. This allows
each graphic object to be individually selected. If any of the graphics had individual dynamic
attributes prior to grouping, those dynamic attributes will be restored, and then configured and
processed at Runtime.
Copy to File—(Available only when you have something selected.) Saves the selected object(s)
to a file and saves any dynamic attributes you’ve assigned to the object(s). Specify the file name,
location, and file format when prompted. The default file name extension is .smb.
Save Metafile As—(Available only when you have a metafile graphic selected.) Saves a
selected Windows metafile graphic to a file. Specify the file name, location, and file format when
prompted. You can save the selected metafile graphic to the Windows 3.1-compatible Windows
Metafile (WMF) format, or to the Enhanced Metafile (EMF) format used by later versions of
Microsoft Windows. Note that Windows 3.1 cannot read graphics saved in EMF format.
Windows metafiles have the file name extensions .wmf and .emf.
Paste from File—Retrieves graphics from a file or from an included library of industrial
graphics. You can select a graphic using the following menu commands:
• Built-in symbols—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved as an
OptoDisplay symbol file. A dialog box prompts you for the file name, location, and file
format of the file you’d like to open. (Symbol files have the file extension .smb.) Click
the Open button to import the selected graphic.
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OptoDisplay User’s Guide
• Symbol Factory—Select this to choose a graphic from a large library of graphics
designed for industrial applications. These graphics are in Windows metafile (WMF)
and other file formats. When the Symbol Factory window opens, browse through the
categories and thumbnails provided to find an appropriate graphic, and then
double-click the graphic to copy it to the Windows clipboard. (Another way to copy a
graphic in the Symbol Factory is to select it and click the Copy button.)
Now click on the OptoDisplay project draw window to make it active, and then select
Paste from the Edit menu to add the copied graphic to the window. (You can also paste
the graphic by pressing CTRL+V on the keyboard, or by right-clicking and selecting Paste
from the pop-up menu.)
• Import metafile—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved in either WMF
or EMF (Enhanced Metafile) format. A dialog box prompts you for the file name,
location, and file format of the file you’d like to open. (Metafiles have the file
extensions .wmf and .emf.) Click the Open button to import the selected graphic.You
are asked to navigate to and select an appropriate file.
Edit Dynamic Attributes—(Available only when you have something selected.) Connects a
graphic to an OptoControl data item. After selecting this menu option, all applicable dynamic
attributes are shown in the dialog box that opens. Select input dynamic attributes or output
dynamic attributes when prompted. For example, you can set up connections so the value of a
OptoControl tag changes the color and fill size of a graphic. With output dynamic attributes, you
can change the value of a tag as you “slide” the graphic on the screen.
Many different combinations of dynamic attributes are possible, and different dialog boxes are
used to assign dynamic attributes to a graphic. For example, when a trend is selected, the Trend
Configuration dialog box is displayed.
Copy Dynamic Attributes—(Available only when you have a single graphic selected and a
controller is configured.) Creates and stores in the clipboard a copy of the selected graphic’s
dynamic attributes.
Paste Dynamic Attributes—(Available only when you have something selected and have
previously copied dynamic attributes to the clipboard.) Assigns copied dynamic attributes to a
graphic. You can paste dynamic attributes to one or more selected graphics. You can delete
existing attributes, or replace or ignore any duplicate attributes.
Delete Dynamic Attributes—(Available only when you have something selected.) Removes
dynamic attributes of a selected graphic. You can delete the dynamic attributes of more than one
selected graphic.
Edit Text—(Available only when you have a text object selected.) Changes text in a text object.
Select the text with the Select tool, choose this menu item, and then edit the text in the dialog
box that appears.
Edit Points—(Available only when you have a polygon, polyline, or Bezier curve selected.)
Changes individual points in a polygon, polyline, or Bezier curve. Select the object with the Select
tool, choose this menu item, and then click and move individual points on the object.
Lock/Unlock Position—(Available only when you have something selected.) Locks the
position of one or more items in a draw window.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
D-9
View Menu
Hide Menu Bar—Hides the menu bar. The ESC key toggles the menu bar on and off.
Hide/Show Toolbox—Hides or displays the Toolbox. The Toolbox shows the tools you need to
create a project in OptoDisplay Configurator. If the Toolbox is hidden, the Show Toolbox
command is displayed in this menu.
Configure Grid—Displays a Grid dialog box that prompts you to toggle on or off both the Grid
and the Snap On feature. Grids can aid your work in the draw window. You can also enter a Grid
size in the Grains/Units area of the dialog box. The Grid size refers to the spacing of Grid points,
measured in pixels. For example, a Grid size of 10 means a grid point will appear every 10 pixels.
Sometimes grids do not appear because the grid size is too big for the draw window. You cannot
display the Grid without specifying a Grid size first.
Hide/Show Grid—(The Grid must first be displayed using the Grids menu item.) Hides or shows
the Grid. If the Grid is hidden, the Show Grid command is displayed.
Turn Snap On/Off—(The Grid must first be displayed using the Grids menu item. Also activate
the Snap On feature in the same dialog box.) Toggles the Snap On feature on or off. Snap On
cannot work without an active Grid. If Snap On is enabled, the Turn Snap Off command is shown.
Redraw—Redraws the contents of the active draw window. Incomplete graphics (such as an
incomplete polygon) in the draw window are removed when you select this command.
Dynamic Attributes—Generates a text file listing the dynamic attributes of objects in one or
more draw windows. This report also lists the configured alarm points in the OptoDisplay project.
Style Menu
Use the Style Menu to control the drawing attributes of the graphic tools. Whenever a graphic
such as a line or rectangle is drawn, the selected style attributes are applied. Combining different
style settings allows you to draw an almost infinite variety of graphics. Text attributes, including
font style, color, and size, are assigned in the Text menu.
NOTE: Trends and bitmaps are not affected by style settings.
Line Color—Presents a color palette you can use to assign or change the line color of the
selected graphic. If no graphic is selected, the color you choose is set as the default and is then
applied as the line color to all graphics you subsequently draw.
D-10 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Line Width—Assigns or changes the line width of the selected graphic. Line widths are shown
in pixels. If no graphic is selected, the line width you choose is set as the default and is then
applied to all graphics you subsequently draw.
Sample Line Widths
Line Style—Assigns or changes the line style of the selected graphic. If no graphic is selected,
the line style you choose is applied to all graphics you subsequently draw. Line styles other than
solid apply only to objects with a line width of 1. Line widths greater than 1 are always solid. The
Invisible line style is used with rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons. If these
objects are drawn with the invisible line style, the border line around the object is not displayed;
in order to see them, you must apply a fill.
Sample Line Styles
Example of Invisible Line Style
Fill Color—Assigns or changes the fill color of the selected graphic. If no graphic is selected,
the fill color you choose is applied to all graphics you subsequently draw. Fill colors only affect
rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons.
Background Color—Assigns or changes the color used behind the fill pattern of the selected
graphic. If no graphic is selected, the background color you choose is applied to the fill pattern
of all graphics you subsequently draw. Background colors for fill patterns only affect rectangles,
round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons.
Fill Pattern—Assigns or changes the fill pattern of the selected graphic. If no graphic is
selected, the fill pattern you choose is applied to all graphics you subsequently draw. Fill patterns
only affect rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons. If you select a Fill Pattern and
your selected objects still remain unfilled, it may be that the Fill Color is set to white (or a color
equal to its background), or that the Fill Pattern is set to Invisible. Also, you cannot apply more
OptoDisplay User’s Guide D-11
than one Fill Pattern to any graphic. This includes using a Percent fill, which fills an object with
a percentage of black, creating levels of gray.
Example of Solid and Invisible Fill
Example of Percent Fills
Example Fill Patterns
Opaque—Determines how non-solid primary graphics, such as dotted and dashed lines,
interact with overlapping graphics and background colors. When the opaque style is set,
overlapped graphics and background colors are overwritten.
Transparent—The opposite of Opaque, Transparent also determines how non-solid primary
graphics, such as dotted and dashed lines, interact with overlapping graphics and background
colors. When the transparent style is set, overlapped graphics and background colors are
overwritten only by the solid portion of the line.
Text Menu
The Text menu items allow you to control text attributes. Text attributes may be set before the
text is placed in the draw window, or changed after it is placed. Style attributes selected from
the Style menu do not affect text.
D-12 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Font—Assigns or changes the font of the selected text. If no text is selected, the font you choose
is set as the default and is then used for all text you subsequently place. OptoDisplay supports
all TrueType fonts, as well as the ones shown below:
Examples of Supported Fonts
Size—Assigns or changes the size of the selected text. If no text is selected, the size you choose
is set as the default and is then used for all text you subsequently place. Specify the size of the
text in points; any value between 5 and 500 may be used.
Examples of Prop Serif Font at Different Point Sizes
Color—Assigns or changes the color of the selected text. If no text is selected, the color you
choose is applied to all text you subsequently place. OptoDisplay also supports custom color
creation.
Background—Assigns or changes the background color of the selected text. If no text is
selected, the background color you choose is applied to all text you subsequently place.
Background colors only apply to opaque text; transparent text is not affected by this setting.
Text Style—Assigns or changes the style of the selected text. If no text is selected, the style
you choose is applied to all text you subsequently place. OptoDisplay supports normal, bold,
italics, underline, and strikeout text styles. You can apply multiple styles to text. For instance, you
can apply both bold and italics to any text.
Examples of Text Style
OptoDisplay User’s Guide D-13
Opaque—Determines how text appears when overlapping other objects. Opaque style is
applied to text just like any other style. If the text is set to Opaque, objects under the text will be
overwritten by the text background color.
Example of Opaque Text
Transparent—Determines how text appears when overlapping other objects. The opposite of
opaque, if the text is set to transparent, objects under the text will remain visible and unaffected
by the text background color.
Example of Transparent Text
Configure Menu
Controller(s)—Selects which OptoControl strategy (or strategies) are used for this project. The
OptoDisplay Configurator uses the information from the strategy to connect the appropriate
OptoControl data item to the dynamic attribute of a dynamic object. The Controller Properties
dialog box prompts for the OptoControl strategy. If an OptoControl strategy is not configured for
this project, dynamic attributes cannot be assigned to any dynamic objects.
Refresh Times—Changes the scan time and freshness values for a refresh time group. The
Refresh Time dialog box prompts you for the new times. See Chapter 5, “Working with Graphics,”
for more information about configuring refresh times.
Alarm Points—Displays all configured alarm points by user-specified names. This dialog box
also allows you to add, modify, or delete alarm points. See Chapter 8, “Configuring Trigger-Based
Events,” for more information about alarm points.
Alarming Setup—Configures alarming features. The Options page sets up various Runtime
options, the Logging page sets up file and printer logging, and the Sound page sets up sound
functions. See Chapter 8, “Configuring Trigger-Based Events,” for more information.
Historic Data Log—Creates historic logs. A Historic Log List dialog box is displayed and lists
the historic log files that have been created. This command allows you to modify which points
are recorded and how frequently data is logged to the files. See Chapter 8, “Configuring
Trigger-Based Events,” for more information about historic data logs.
Event Log—Records a message caused by an event to a disk file. You can change parameters
such as the number of messages saved, the delimiter used between messages, and the file
rollover period. File name extensions are .msg. The number of files retained on disk for an event
log is also set within the Event Log File Configuration dialog box. When the limit is reached
during Runtime, the file with the oldest time stamp is deleted. See Chapter 9, “Using OptoDisplay
Runtime,” for more information about event logs.
D-14 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
SuperTrend Remote Logging—If the same OptoDisplay project is running on more than one
computer, this menu item selects the local or networked computer that will save SuperTrend
data. See “Working with SuperTrends” on page 7-6 for more information about configuring
SuperTrends and collecting data from them.
Applications—Adds or modifies application managers for use in the project. The Application
Manager List dialog box displays available application managers for the project. The Application
Manager Configuration dialog box lets you select the program file, working directory, launch
options, initial display view, and trigger for the application manager. See Chapter 8, “Configuring
Trigger-Based Events,” for more information about launching applications based on a trigger.
Sounds—Selects sounds and assigns their trigger for use in the project. The Sounds dialog box
lists the available sounds for the project. The Sound Configuration dialog box lets you configure
start and stop triggers with the Trigger dialog box. The Sound Configuration dialog box also
prompts you for the sound file. See Chapter 8, “Configuring Trigger-Based Events,” for more
information about triggering sounds.
Window State—Adds or makes changes to existing window managers. The Window Manager
List dialog box displays all currently configured window managers and allows access to the
Window Manager Configuration dialog box. The Window Manager Configuration dialog box
allows you to change triggers with the Window Manager Start Trigger dialog box and control the
draw window visual state with the Pop Window dialog box. See Chapter 8, “Configuring
Trigger-Based Events,” for more information about trigger-based window states.
Recipes—Configures download or upload of recipes to a controller by a trigger. This method of
recipe management does not require a graphic to be selected during Runtime for the recipe
action to occur. See Chapter 8, “Configuring Trigger-Based Events,” for more information about
trigger-based recipe uploads and downloads.
Runtime—Defines the initial setup of the draw windows at Runtime. For example, you may
want to have certain draw windows pop up and have others iconified when the project starts.
This command can also be used to prevent the user from exiting OptoDisplay Runtime when this
project is loaded. See Chapter 9, “Using OptoDisplay Runtime,” for more information about
configuring the Runtime session.
Tools Menu
AutoCorrect Tags—Run this tool when you first configure a strategy for your project. The tool
verifies tagnames from a strategy for compatibility with OptoDisplay and changes the tagnames
where necessary. Some characters that may have been used in the Cyrano tags, such as /, are
illegal characters for a tagname in OptoDisplay. The tool creates a text file with the file extension
.$$$ that summarizes the changes that were made by the tool to any tagnames. Refer to
“Correcting Tags from a Strategy” on page 4-10 for more information about this command.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide D-15
Window Menu
OptoDisplay Configurator allows you to configure several draw windows per project. The
Window menu items control the number and properties of each draw window in a project. You
can create draw windows, delete draw windows, copy draw windows, and change properties of
existing draw windows.
New—Creates a new draw window and adds it to your project. You can specify the new
window’s name, size, behavior, and other attributes. You must provide a unique name for each
draw window.
Open—Opens draw windows that are configured but are currently closed. Select which window
to open from a list of all draw windows that are closed. Draw windows that are open when a
project is saved are open when the project is started at Runtime. This can be modified using the
Configure➞Runtime menu command.
Close—Closes draw windows that are currently open. Select which window to close from a list
of all draw windows that are open. Draw windows that are closed when a project is saved are
closed when the project is started at Runtime. This can be modified by using the
Configure➞Runtime menu command.
Copy—Duplicates the active draw window. You must enter a unique name for the duplicate and
specify any properties you wish to change. All graphics and their connections in the copied
window remain the same in the new copy.
Delete—Removes the active draw window from the project. All graphics and their connections
in the active draw window are also deleted. Use caution since deleted draw windows cannot be
recovered.
Properties—Modifies the properties of the active draw window. You can change the window’s
name, size, behavior, position, color, and other attributes.
(Open Window List)—Displays the names of up to nine currently opened or iconified windows.
Select a draw window’s name from this list to display that draw window and bring it to the front.
If more than nine windows are open, a menu item named More Windows is added, which you
can use to select a window’s name from a list to display it. A window must be open or iconified
to be listed.
Help Menu
Contents and Index—Starts Help and displays help topics for OptoDisplay Configurator.
Manuals—Opens the online version of the printed OptoDisplay User’s Guide. This document is
in Adobe Acrobat format, and the Acrobat Reader application is required to view it.
Opto 22 on the Web—Lists useful links to information on the Opto 22 Web site. Your PC must
have an installed Web browser and be connected to the Internet to access these links.
About OptoDisplay Configurator—Displays version information about OptoDisplay
Configurator.
D-16 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
OptoDisplay Runtime Menus
Runtime menus provide access to the Runtime commands. These commands allow you to open
and close projects, view the event log, and view the controller configurations.
File Menu
Open Project—Loads an existing project created by the OptoDisplay Configurator. You must
navigate to and select the project you want to open. Scanning and animation begin immediately
once the project is loaded.
Project Path—Displays the project’s full directory path. You can also see the project’s path
displayed in the title bar, but if it’s too long to fit there, you can use this command.
Printer Setup—Selects an available printer and sets its attributes.
Print—Prints the OptoDisplay Runtime window. You can specify the number of copies to be
printed and also set up the options available in the Printer Setup command.
Exit OptoDisplay Runtime—Stops the scanner, closes all Runtime windows, and exits the
OptoDisplay Runtime.
View Menu
Hide Menu Bar—Hides the menu bar. The ESC key toggles the menu bar on and off.
Controller(s)—Displays a list of all of the controllers that are configured for the project. Select
a controller and press the Details button to display the Controller Status dialog box, which shows
each controller’s status and allows you to disconnect OptoDisplay from a controller. See Chapter
9, “Using OptoDisplay Runtime,” for more information about Runtime controller status.
OptoCom—Displays the OptoCom.DLL version and path.
Event Log—Displays the Runtime system event log. This log contains system errors and
messages received during Runtime. The list box contains the most recent system event
messages generated by OptoDisplay. Each message consists of a date and time stamp, and
message text. The message text describes events such as communications and I/O errors. Use
the scroll bar to view prior messages. If the text of the message is too wide to completely fit in
the list box area, you can double-click the message to display it all.
Alarm Menu
Modify Alarm Points—Allows the operator to change parameters for alarm points in the
OptoDisplay project if it has been configured to let the operator do so. See “Setting up Runtime”
on page 9-2 for more information about configuring Runtime options for the operator. Also see
“Configuring Alarm Points” on page 8-28 to learn more about configuring alarm points.
OptoDisplay User’s Guide D-17
Alarm point settings can be changed in each one of the five alarm ranges available: HiHi, Hi,
Normal, Lo, and LoLo. Each alarm point state has a value that defines its range.
Alarms Enabled—Disables alarming, including all alarm graphics, sound, and logging. This can
be useful when starting or stopping a process during which alarm conditions may be expected to
happen. This menu item can be initially enabled or disabled through the Alarming Setup dialog
box in the Configurator. It can also be permanently grayed out and made inaccessible by
unchecking the Alarms Enabled menu item option in the Alarming Setup dialog box.
Priority Filter—The priority filter level menu items can be used to accept only those alarm
points with a certain priority level. For example, during a startup or shutdown procedure, you may
wish to receive only the most serious alarms. The priority for each alarm point is configured in
the Alarm Point dialog box in the Configurator.
Window Menu
Open—Opens any Runtime window that is currently closed. An Open Window dialog box
displays a list of closed windows from which you can select the window to open.
Close—Closes any currently open or iconified Runtime window. A Close Window dialog box
displays a list of currently open windows from which you can select the window to close.
Switch Controllers—Use to connect to different controllers running the same OptoControl
strategy. Select one or more project windows and then select a controller. All objects with
dynamic attributes will now use tag values from that controller. See “Working with Controllers”
on page 9-14 for more information.
Open Window List—Displays currently open or iconified windows. Up to nine window names
are displayed. Select a window’s name from this list to display that draw window and bring it to
the front. If more than nine windows are open, a menu item named More Windows is added; use
More Windows to select a window’s name from a list to display it. A window must be open or
iconified for it to be listed.
Help Menu
Contents and Index—Starts Help and displays help topics for OptoDisplay Runtime.
Manuals—Opens the online version of the printed OptoDisplay User’s Guide. This document is
in Adobe Acrobat format, and the Acrobat Reader application is required to view it.
Opto 22 on the Web—Lists useful links to information on the Opto 22 Web site. Your PC must
have an installed Web browser and be connected to the Internet to access these links.
About OptoDisplay Runtime—Displays version information about OptoDisplay Runtime.
D-18 OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Appendix E
OptoDisplay Index
A
B
acknowledging alarms, 31
adding
alarm, 28
backup controller, 4
controller, 1
graphic object, 5
historic data log, 2
sounds, 15
alarms
acknowledging, 31
adding, 28
comments for operator, 36
configuring alarm points, 28
configuring for entire project, 14
configuring individually, 14, 18
disabling, 18
displaying comments for operator, 34
graphic objects, 37, 39
hot keys, 40
logging options, 42
modifying in OptoDisplay Runtime, 20
notification, 31
printing log, 42
silencing, 20
sounds, 45
viewing in OptoDisplay Runtime, 19
animated graphics
and OptoControl tags, 3, 5
configuring, 1
dynamic attributes, 1
applications, launching, 11, 15
AutoCorrect Tags, 10, 11, 15
results file, 12
batch (.BAT) file, using for startup, 7
bitmap graphic
importing, 13
saving graphic object as, 15
C
changing
controller properties, 1
size of graphic objects, 16
tagnames, 3
window state, 17
checking controller status, 16
closing
project, 5
configuring
basic trends, 5
controller, 1
date format, 4
historic data log, 14
hot keys, 3
on-screen keyboard, 4
security settings, 4
sounds, 15
SuperTrends, 7, 13
tags, 5
window states, 17
XY plots, 22
control words, 5
controller
adding to project, 1
checking communications with, 2
clearing OptoDisplay words, 5
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Index-1
configuring, 1
configuring backup, 4
optimizing communications with, 9, 34
switching between, 4, 14
viewing error messages, 18
controller-driven attributes, 1
definition, 1
copying
dynamic attributes, 31
graphic objects, 15
project files, 2
correcting tags from a strategy, 10
creating
basic trend, 2
project, 2
SuperTrend, 6
customizing project startup, 6
Cyrano strategies, using, 11
D
date
setting format of, 4
deleting
dynamic attributes, 31
graphic objects, 19
designing an OptoDisplay project, 3
displaying alarm comments to operator, 34
downloading
OptoControl strategy using OptoTerm, 23
recipes to a controller, 9, 23
draw window
closing, 4
creating, 2
definition, 2
deleting, 2
modifying, 2
opening, 4
using in project, 1
drawing tools, 7, 5, 10
dynamic attributes
assigning to graphic object, 1, 9
controller-driven, 1
copying, 31
deleting, 31
generating report of, 32
granting or denying operator use of, 4
Index-2
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
operator-driven, 2
pasting, 31
viewing, 32, 10
dynamic objects, 2
E
errors
error messages, 2, 1
Event Log, 11, 14, 17
Event Log Viewer, 11, 9, 14
time-out, 9
viewing controller messages, 18
Event Log, 11, 14, 17
Event Log Viewer, 11, 9, 14
definition, 2
exporting graphic objects, 15
F
finding and replacing tags, 8
finding tags, 7
firmware requirements, vi
freshness values, 36
configuring, 36
definition, 36
G
graphic objects
alarms, 37, 39
aligning, 19, 4
and Symbol Factory, 13, 14
assigning dynamic attributes to, 9
changing size, 8, 16
copying, 15
deleting, 19
drawing, 5
exporting, 15
fill color and pattern, 12, 11
flipping, 20, 6
grouping, 11, 8
handles, 9
importing bitmap graphics, 13
importing Windows metafiles, 13, 14
locking position of, 11
moving, 16, 18
rotating, 20, 6
selecting, 8, 9
stacking order of, 18
ungrouping, 11, 8
updating, 34
XY plot, 2
H
hardware requirements, iv
help
available documents, iii
error messages, list of, 2
online, iii
Opto 22 Product Support, iii
See also troubleshooting, 1
historic data logs
adding, 2
configuring log files, 14
configuring points, 7
definition, 2
file formats, 10
filenames, 9
notification when logging stops, 8
saving, 10
scan groups, 35
historic log files
tag types recorded, 2
historical trending
switching to in OptoDisplay Runtime, 22
hot keys
in alarms, 40
in SuperTrends, 11
I
importing
bitmap graphics, 13
JPEG graphics, 13
Windows metafiles, 14
installing OptoDisplay, iv
J
JPEG graphics
defined, 13
importing, 13
K
keyboard
configuring hot keys, 3
configuring on-screen keyboard, 4
hot keys in SuperTrends, 11
L
launching applications, 11, 15
notification, 15
trigger, 14
working directory, 13
log files
decrypting, 10
encrypting, 10
M
main window
options, 4
menu bar
hiding from operator, 8
hiding in OptoDisplay Configurator, 6
menus
OptoDisplay Configurator, 1
OptoDisplay Runtime, 17
messages
Event Log, 11, 17
Event Log Viewer, 11, 14
viewing controller errors, 18
Microsoft Windows
modifying permissions in, 5
monitor-only version of OptoDisplay Runtime,
2
features, 1
monitors, multiple
requirements, v
using, 5, 3, 2
mouse
hot keys in alarms, 40
N
notification
alarms, 31
application launched, 15
historic log files, 8
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Index-3
recipe download/upload, 27
numeric table tool, 22
O
objects
definition, 2
opening
project, 3
operator
restricting activity, 8
operator-driven attributes, 1, 3
definition, 2
optimizing communications with controller, 34
Opto 22 FactoryFloor
definition, 1
Opto 22 Product Support
contacting, iii
OptoControl
and OptoDisplay, 3, 1
definition, 1
using pointers from, 7
OptoDisplay
and Cyrano strategies, 11
built-in graphics library, 14
customizing, 6
definition, i, 1
files, list of, 1
firmware requirements, iv
hardware requirements, iv
system requirements, iv
OptoDisplay Configurator
definition, 1
draw window, 8
hiding menu bar, 6
main window, 6
menus, 1
OptoDisplay Runtime
clearing OptoDisplay words from controller,
5
configuring startup events, 5
definition, 2
Event Log Viewer, 11
interacting with SuperTrends, 21
interacting with XY plots, 22
main window, 9
menus, 17
Index-4
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
monitor-only version, 2, 1
project options, 2
project window, 10
restricting the operator, 8
running project, 3
setting date format, 4
OptoTerm, 23
OptoVersion, 6
P
password
assigning to individual windows, 4
assigning to project, 4
pasting
dynamic attributes, 31
graphic objects, 15
pens
configuring basic trend pens, 4, 5
configuring SuperTrend pens, 13
optimizing settings, 6
performance
and visual state of windows, 4
pointers
indicating null variable, 7
printing, 17
displayed windows, 24
project
closing, 5
components of, 3
copying, 2
creating, 2
customizing, 7
customizing startup
by modifying default startup properties,
6
using MS-DOS batch (.BAT) file, 6
definition, 2, 1
designing, 3, 1
opening, 3
options in OptoDisplay Runtime, 2
organizing files, 1
saving, 4
R
real-time mode
switching to in OptoDisplay Runtime, 22
recipes
downloading to a controller, 9, 23
file formats, 19
notification, 27
selecting a trigger, 27
uploading from a controller, 25
re-enable period, 4, 10
refresh time groups, 35
reports
dynamic attributes, 32
retries parameter, 9
Runtime Operator Action Log File
configuring, 10
decrypting, 10
encrypting, 9, 10
S
saving
graphic object as bitmap graphic, 15, 2
project, 4
scan rates
and window states, 34
configuring, 36
scanner information file
generating for diagnostics, 5
scanning, 34
freshness values, 36
optimizing, 34
refresh times, 14
scan groups, 35
security
and the Event Log Viewer, 9
configuring, 4
described, 4
logging operator actions, 9
restricting the operator, 8
setting in Runtime, 8
setting Windows user- and group-based
authentication, 4
selecting
graphic objects, 8, 9
setting data format in project, 4
silencing alarms, 20
sounds, 15
adding to alarms, 45
configuring, 15
digitized sound files (.WAV), 15
MIDI music files (.MID), 15
start and stop triggers, 16
static objects, 2
SuperTrends
configuring pens, 13
configuring settings, 7
configuring x-axis, 9
configuring y-axis, 10
creating, 6
definition, 2
hot keys, 11
using in OptoDisplay Runtime, 21
zoom parameters, 10
Symbol Factory, 14
system requirements, iv
T
tags
configuring, 5
correcting, 10
definition, 3
finding, 7
finding and replacing, 8
replacing, 3
verifying, 15
Technical Support. See Opto 22 Product Support, iii
text
adding, 21
changing color, 13
changing font, 13
changing style, 12
editing, 21
formatting, 21
transparency with other objects, 14
time-out errors, 9
title bar custom caption, 4
toolbox, 7, 5
hiding or showing, 10
trends
and system performance, 4
configuring basic trend pens, 5
configuring SuperTrend axes, 9, 10
configuring SuperTrend pens, 13
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
Index-5
creating a basic trend, 2
creating a SuperTrend, 6
definition, 1
hot keys in SuperTrends, 11
interacting with SuperTrends, 21
interacting with XY plots, 22
scan groups, 35
types of trends, 2
trigger-based events
alarms, 28
definition, 1
historic data logs, 2
launching applications, 11
recipes, 23
sounds, 15
window states, 17
troubleshooting
dynamic attributes used in an object, 32
errors and messages, 1
generating scanner information file, 5
Opto 22 Product Support, iii
problems displaying a project, 3
problems saving project files, 4
problems using Windows 2000 or XP, 5
steps to diagnose problems, 1
text string object disappears, 4
viewing controller error messages, 18
U
updating graphics, 34
Index-6
OptoDisplay User’s Guide
uploading recipes, 25
V
verifying tags, 15
viewing alarms in OptoDisplay Runtime, 19
W
windows
and control system performance, 4
definition, 2
draw, 16
effect on scan rates, 34
main window options, 4
states, 17
ways to use in a display, 3
Windows metafiles
importing, 14
with MS-DOS batch (.BAT) file
starting project from, 7
X
XY plots, 2
and numeric tables, 21
configuring individual trend lines, 23
creating, 21
modifying, 22
using in OptoDisplay Runtime, 22
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