Headset incorporating a microphone and an earphone

Headset incorporating a microphone and an earphone
United States Patent
Marvin C. Negley
Clarinda, Iowa
[72] Inventor
[21 1
ll113,588,384
App]. No.
784,101 '
[22] Filed
[45] Patented
Dec. 16, 1968
June 28, 1971
[73] Assignee
Electro Voice, Incorporated
Buchanan, Mich.
3,280,273
10/1966
3,381,773
3,388,767
5/1968
6/1968
. . . . ..
179/156
Schenkel ................. ..
Wilson ..................... ..
Flygstad et al . ,
. . r ...
179/180X
l79/156X
Primary Examiner-William C. Cooper
AttorneyfBurmeister, Palmatier and Hlamby
ABSTRACT: A dynamic microphone transducer and an
[54] HEADSET INCORPORATING A MICROPHONE
AND AN EARPHONE
U.S.Cl ...................................................... ..
179/156,
179/ 180
[51]
Int. Cl ....................................................... .. H04m l/05,
[50]
Field of Search .......................................... ..
H04r H28
[56]
half-shell to carry the sound from the earphone transducer to
the ear of the user. Porous discs made of sintered metal are
preferably mounted in the tubes for damping resonances
179, 147, 180
Olney et a1 .................. ..
l79/l02
mounting the headset on one of the temples of a pair of
References Cited
10/1949
from the front half-shell. An ear tube is connected to the rear
therein. The headset is supported by a mounting member hav
ing front and rear clips of generally circular curvature for
resiliently engaging the half-shells to hold them together. The
half-shells are preferably formed with recesses for receiving
the clips in substantially ?ush relation to the half-shells. The
179/156,
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,485,405
which fit together to form a casing. Sound is brought to the
microphone transducer by a voice tube extending forwardly
24 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.
[52]
earphone transducer are mounted in front and rear half-shells
mounting member preferably includes a temple clip for
2,933,145
4/1960
DiMattia .................... ..
179/156)(
3,184,556
5/1965
Larkin ........................ ..
179/ 156
eyeglasses. A swivel joint is preferably provided between the
temple clip and the front and rear clips.
PATENTEU JUH281SH
3,588,884
SHEET 1 OF 2
‘
[NVENTOR
77Za1211/lrz 61776169
3588.384
PATENTEB JUH28 1971
SHEET 2 [IF 2
l
3,588,384
2
HEADSET IINCORPORATHNG A MICROPHONE ANID AN
EARlPl-IONIE
This invention relates to a headset which incorporates both
a microphone and an earphone, and thus may be used very ad
vantageously in various communications services. For exam
The illustrated headset 110 comprises a casing 16 which is di
vided into front and rear half-shells l8 and 20. Preferably,
each half-shell is in the form of a generally cylindrical cup.
The half-shells l8 and 20 may be molded at low cost from
suitable plastic materials, but may also be made of metal or
various other materials.
As shown to best advantage in FIG. 6, a microphone trans
ducer 22 is mounted in the front half-shell 118 while an
earphone transducer 24 is mounted in the rear half-shell 20.
ple, the headset is especially well adapted for use by airplane
pilots and other crew members in connection with radio and
intercom equipment.
The headset of the present invention is extremely small and
light in weight, so that it may be used with great comfort and
These transducers 22 and 24 may be generally cylindrical in
shape. Preferably, they are of the dynamic or moving coil
type. The transducers 22 and 24 may he slipped into and out
of the half-shells l8 and 20 for easy assembly and disassembly.
As shown in FIG. 7, the microphone transducer 22
convenience over a long period of time. The headset is so
small and light that it may be mounted very advantageously on
one of the temples ofa pair ofeyeglasses.
While the concept of a temple type headset has been dis
closed in the prior art, the headset of the present invention is
preferably comprises a diaphragm 22a which carries a mova
much more advantageous than anything disclosed previously.
Thus, for example, the headset of the present invention is con
ble voice coil 2212. A permanent magnet 220 is positioned
within the voice coil 22b. The diaphragm 22a is cemented or
structed so that it may be assembled and disassembled without
otherwise secured to a mounting ring 22d. The magnet 220 is
the use of tools. Accordingly, the manufacture of the headset
cemented
or otherwise secured within a centering ring 22e,
20
is greatly facilitated. Moreover, it is easy to service the headset
mounted on the ring 22d. Damping washers 22f and 22g may
in the ?eld, if maintenance is ever necessary.
be mounted around the magnet 22c behind the ring 222. As
In general, the headset of the present invention comprises a
shown, a cup-shaped housing or pot 22h is mounted between
casing which is divided into ?rst and second half-shells which
the rear end of the magnet 22c and the rear side of the ring
are normally directed forwardly and rearwardly. The half 25 22d. The ring 22d and the pot 22h are preferably made of
shells are preferably in the form of generally cylindrical cups,
magnetically permeable material. Set screws 22i may be
adapted to ?t together with their open ends opposite each
threaded through the rear side of the pot 22h to press the
other. A microphone transducer is mounted in the ?rst half
washers 22fand g against the ring 22a. The voice coil 22b has
shell, while an earphone transducer is mounted in the second
leads 22j which are connected to a terminal board 22k,
half-shell. A microphone tube extends from the ?rst half-shell
disposed behind the pot 22h.
to carry sounds to the microphone transducer. An earphone
When the diaphragm 22a is vibrated by sound waves, the
tube extends from the second half-shell to carry sounds from
voice coil 22b is moved relative to the magnet 22c, with the
the earphone transducer to the ear of the user. A mounting
result that voltages are induced in the voice coil. The
member is secured to the half-shells and is provided with
earphone transducer 24 may be of a construction similar to
means for holding them together in assembled relation. 35 that of the microphone transducer 22. Each of the transducers
Preferably, such means comprise ?rst and second clips on the
22 and 24 has a substantially flat frequency response over a
mounting member, adapted to engage the ?rst and second
wide frequency range, so as to afford a high degree of ?delity.
half-shells. The clips are preferably of a circular curvature and
A microphone tube 26 projects forwardly from the front
are adapted to be received in recesses formed in the half
half-shell l8 and is adapted to carry sounds to the microphone
shells. The recesses are formed in such a manner that the clips
transducer 22. The microphone tube 26 is curved so as to ex
tend to a point near the mouth of the user. The microphone
tube 26 may be made of plastic or some other suitable materi
are ?ush with the half-shells. Preferably, the mounting
member is equipped with a temple clip, adapted to be secured
to one temple of a pair of eyeglasses. A swivel joint is
al.
preferably provided between the temple clip and the body of
As shown to best advantage in FIG. 5, the microphone tube
the mounting member. A headband may be substituted for the 45 26 is preferably mounted on a hollow tubular stub or nipple 28
projecting forwardly from the front hal?shell 18. The illus
temple clip, ifdesired.
The half-shells preferably comprise semicircular lateral pro
trated stub 28 has a tapered end portion 30 to receive the
jections which form a tube or stub for receiving an electrical
microphone tube 26. An annular shoulder 32 is formed on the
stub 28 at the rear end of the tapered portion 30. As shown,
cable, whereby the necessary electrical connections are
50
established to the microphone and earphone transducers.
the microphone tube 26 has an enlarged rear end portion,
Various other objects, advantages and features of the
adapted to be tightly ?tted around the tapered portion 30 and
present invention will appear from the following description,
the shoulder 32. When the microphone tube 26 is in place, the
taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:
shoulder 32 acts in the manner of a barb to retain the enlarged
FIG. 1 is a general side elevation of a headset to be 55
described as an illustrative embodiment of the present inven
portion 34.
tron.
trated microphone tube 26. The tip 36 may be made of various
plastics or other suitable materials. As shown, the tip 36 is in
serted into an enlarged portion 38 formed on the front end of
the microphone tube 26. The end of the enlarged portion 38 is
FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the headset.
FIGS. 3 and 4 are sectional views, taken generally along the
lines 3-3 and 4-4 in FIG. ll.
FIG. 5 is an exploded or disassembled view of the headset,
A hollow tip 36 is mounted on the front end of the illus
bent or crimped into an annular peripheral groove 40 formed
with certain portions in section.
in the tip 36. In this way the tip 36 is securely retained.
FIG. 6 is another exploded view with the components in dif
To improve the ?delity of the microphone, it is preferred to
ferent positions from those shown in FIG. 5.
mount a damping member 42 in the microphone tube 26. In
FIG. 7 is an exploded view of the microphone transducer 65 this case, the damping member 42 is in the form of a porous
employed in the headset.
disc, tightly ?tted into the rear portion of the tip 36. The
As just indicated, FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate the general con~
porous disc 42 may be made of sintered metal, preferably sin~
struction ofa headset 10, to be described as an illustrative em~
tered stainless steel. The porous disc 42 provides for the
bodiment of the present invention. The illustrated headset 10
passage of sound along the microphone tube 26, while afford
is extremely compact and light in weight, and is adapted to be
ing a damping action to suppress resonances in the tube. The
mounted on one of the temples 12 of a pair of eyeglasses I4.
suppression of such resonances reduces the magnitude of
This style of mounting is generally very convenient for air
resonant peaks and extends the frequency response, with the
plane pilots and other crew members who usually wear sun
result that the ?delity of the microphone is greatly improved.
glasses. However, it is also very convenient to mount the head
set on a suitable headband.
An earphone tube 44 extends from the rear half-shell 20 to
75 carry sounds to the ear of the user. The earphone tube 44 is
3
3,588,384
4
preferably made of a ?exible plastic material, but may be
made of various other materials.
curvature. The ?ngers 104 are adapted to be snapped around
the half-shells l8 and 20. Preferably, the half-shells are
formed with recesses 106 for receiving the ?ngers 104 so that
the clips 100 and 102 will be ?ush with the half-shells 18 and
20. The snug engagement between the ?ngers 104 and the
As shown, the earphone tube 44 is connected to a hollow tu
bular stub or nipple 46 projecting axially from the rear half
shell 20. The stub 46 has a tapered rear portion 48 formed
with an annular shoulder 50 at its front end. As illustrated, the
recesses 106 prevents any relative movement between the
half-shells 18 and 20 when the clips 100 and 102 are mounted
earphone tube 44 has an enlarged end portion 52, adapted to
be tightly ?tted around the stub 46. The tapered portion 48
makes it easy to push the enlarged portion 52 around the stub
46.
It will be seen that the earphone tube 46 is bent so as to ex
tend downwardly and then laterally into the ear of the user. As
shown, the earphone tube 44 comprises an upper L-shaped
section 54, a lower L-shaped section 56, and a tip 58 adapted
to extend into the ear canal of the user. The lower section 56
has a reduced upper end portion 60 which may be snugly
?tted into the upper section 54 to provide a swivel joint, which
allows for adjustment of the angle of the lower section 56.
The tip 58 is adapted to be ?tted around the end of the
lower section 56. Thus, the tip 58 has an inner po45ion 62 of
on the half-shells.
10
As shown to best advantage in FIG. 3, the mounting
member 98 is provided with a temple clip 108 which is
generally U-shaped and is adapted to snap over the temple 12
of the eyeglasses 14. The clip 108 has an outer leg 110 which
is tapered for greater ?exibility and comfort.
A swivel joint is preferably provided between the temple
clip 108 and the mounting member 98. As shown, the swivel
joint is provided by a rivet 112 which extends through an
opening 114 in the inner leg 116 ofthe clip 108. The rivet 112
also extends through an opening 118 in the mounting member
98. It will be seen that the rivet 112 is recessed into the inner
leg 116 so that the rivet will not interfere with the mounting of
reduced inside diameter, adapted to be retained between
the clip 108 on the temple 12 of the eyeglasses 14.
?anges 64 and 66 on the end of the lower section 56.
The rivet 112 provides a swivel whereby the angle of the
To improve the ?delity of the earphone, it is preferred to
headset may be adjusted relative to the temple 12 of the
mount a damping member 68 in the earphone tube 44. As
shown, the damping member 68 is in the form ofa porous disc 25 eyeglasses 14. It will be understood that the clip 108 may be
' oi- cylinder, snugly ?tted into the lower portion of the upper
section 54. As before, the porous disc 68 is preferably made of
sintered stainless steel or some other sintered metal. The
porous disc 68 provides for the passage of sounds along the
earphone tube 44, while affording a damping action to sup
mounted on a suitable headband, rather than on the temple
12. Alternatively, a headband may be substituted for the clip
108.
The headset 10 may readily be disassembled in the ?eld by
removing the clips 100 and 102 from the half-shells 18 and 20.
press resonances in the tube. In this way, the ?delity of the
The sleeve 82 is also removed from the cable stub 78. It is then
possible to separate the half-shells 18 and 20. Moreover, the
The front and rear half-shells l8 and 20 ?t together in axi
microphone and earphone transducers 22 and 24 may be
earphone is greatly improved.
ally aligned relation. Thus, the open rear end of the front half 35 removed from the half-shells l8 and 20. Thus, any defective
part may readily be replaced. The headset may then be reas
shell 18 ?ts against the open front end of the rear half-shell 20.
sembled
by snapping the clips 100 and 102 into the recesses
Formations are preferably provided on the half-shells l8
106 in the half-shells 18 and 20.
It is easy to adjust the headset 10 so that the earphone tube
?t into a recess or groove 72 in the front half-shell 18. The 40 44 ?ts properly into the ear of the user. The temple clip 108
and 20 to keep them in axial alignment. As shown, the rear
half-shell 20 is formed with a ?ange or tongue 70, adapted to
positions of these inter?tting parts could be reversed.
Moreover, various other inter?tting parts could be provided.
The illustrated half-shells 18 and 20 are formed with hollow
semicircular member 74 and 76 projecting laterally to form a
may be slid along the temple 12 of the eyeglasses 14.
Moreover, the casing 16 may be swiveled about the rivet 112
to change the angle of the headset. The lower section 56 of the
earphone tube 44 may be swiveled relative to the upper sec
tubular stub 78 for an electrical cable or cord 80. The cable 80 45 tion 54. While these adjustments will accommodate most
situations, the upper section 54 may also be supplied in vari
provides the necessary electrical connections to the
ous sizes.
microphone and earphone transducers 22 and 24. A sleeve or
The illustrated headset is shown as being right-handed in
cover 82 is preferably ?tted around the outside of the stub 78
that the headset is adapted to be mounted on the right-hand
to exclude dust from the casing 18 and to prevent any undue
strain upon the electrical cable 80 where it enters the stub 78. 50 temple 12 of the eyeglasses 14. However, the headset is rever
sible so that it may be arranged to be left~handed, adapted to
The sleeve 82 has an enlarged portion 84 which ?ts snugly
be mounted on the left-hand temple. To provide such reversi'
around the stub 78. The other end of the sleeve 82 is formed
bility, the recesses 106 in the half-shells 18 and 20 are
with a smaller portion 86 which ?ts snugly around the cable
80.
disposed at diametrically opposite points and are symmetrical,
As shown, a metal lug 88 is clamped or otherwise secured to 55 so that the clips 100 and 102 are reversible between the left
and right-hand sides of the casing 16. This will be evident from
the end of the cable 80. A single screw 90 may be employed to
FIG. 4, from which it will be seen that the mounting member
secure the lug 88 to the microphone transducer 22, with a
98 may readily be reversed from right to left.
spacing washer 92 therebetweeri. The lug 88 may afford a
Thus, when the headset is to be made left-handed rather
ground connection between the microphone transducer 22
60 than right-handed, the clips 100 and 102 are disengaged from
and the shield of the cable 80.
the half-shells l8 and 20 and the mounting member 98 is
As shown in FIG. I, a plug or other connector 94 is con
moved to the other side of the casing 16, whereupon the clips
nected to the end of the cable 80. A transistorized ampli?er 96
are again snapped around the half-shells and into the recesses
is preferably mounted within the plug 94. The ampli?er 96
106. The direction of the ear tube is reversed from left to right
provides a preampli?er for the microphone transducer 22.
by turning the lower section 56 about the swivel joint 60. The
The casing 16 of the headset 10 is provided with a mounting
microphone tube 26 is repositioned and may be bent as neces
member 98, adapted to support the headset on the temple 12
sary. Alternatively, the right-handed microphone tube may be
of the eyeglasses 14, while also holding the half-shells 18 and
replaced with a left-handed tube.
20 together in assembled relation. The illustrated mounting
member 98 is in a disengageable clamping relation to the half~
shells 18 and 20. Preferably, the mounting member 98 com
prises front and rear clips or clamps 100 and 102, adapted to
Various other modi?cations, alternative constructions and
equivalents may be employed, as will be understood by those
skilled in the art.
lclaim:
l. A headset, comprising the combination of a casing in
As shown to best advantage in FIGS. 2-4, the clips 100 and
102 comprise ?exible resilient ?ngers 104 having a circular 75 cluding ?rst and second half-shells,
a microphone transducer mounted in said ?rst half-shell,
engage the front and rear half-shells l8 and 20.
3,588,384
6
a microphone tube extending from said ?rst half~shell for
said clamps for mounting the headset on one of the tem
carrying sounds to said microphone transducer,
an earphone transducer mounted in said second half-shell,
an ear tube extending from said second half-shell for carry
ing sounds from said earphone transducer to the ear of 5
the user,
and a mounting device having means removably engaging
said ?rst and second half-shells for retaining said half
ples of a pair of eyeglasses.
113. A headset according to claim 12, including a swiveljoint
between said temple clip and said clamps.
M. A headset according to claim l, in which said half-shells
comprise ?rst and second laterally extending semicircular
members ?tting together to form a cable entrance tube,
and a connecting cable mounted in said tube for supplying
shells in assembled relation.
2. A headset according to claim 1, in which said means com
electrical connections to said transducers.
15. A headset according to claim 11., in which said ?rst and
second half-shells are generally in the form of cylindrical cups
prise clip means resiliently engaging said ?rst and second half
shells.
with open ends ?tting together in axially aligned relation.
3. A headset according to claim ll, in which said means com
16. A headset according to claim 15, in which said half
prise ?rst and second clips resiliently engaging said ?rst and
shells are formed with inter?tting parts for maintaining align
second half-shells.
15 ment therebetween.
41. A headset according to claim l, in which said means com
17. A headset according to claim 16, in which said parts
prise ?rst and second clips of generally circular curvature
comprise a ?ange on one of said half-shells and a recess on the
resiliently engaging said ?rst and second half-shells,
other half-shell for receiving said ?ange.
said half-shells having curved formations for receiving and
B8. A headset according to claim ll, including a porous
retaining said clips.
20 metal member mounted in said microphone tube for damping
5. A headset according to claim 1, in which said half-shells
resonances therein.
are generally cylindrical in shape,
said means including ?rst and second clips of generally cir
cular curvature resiliently engaging said half-shells.
19. A headset according to claim 1, including a porous
metal member mounted in said earphone tube for damping
resonances therein.
6. A headset according to claim 5, in which said half-shells 25
20. A headset according to claim ll, including porous metal
are formed with peripheral recesses for receiving and retain
members mounted in said tubes for damping resonances
ing said clips.
therein.
7. A headset according to claim 5, in which said half-shells
21. A headset according to claim 1, including damping
are formed with recesses for receiving said clips in generally
means mounted in said microphone tube for suppressing
?ush relation to said half-shells.
30 resonances therein.
8. A headset according to claim 5, in which said mounting
22. A headset according to claim ll, including damping
member comprises a temple clip connected to said ?rst and
means mounted in said earphone tube for suppressing
second clips for fastening the headset to one of the temples of
resonances therein.
a pair of eyeglasses.
23. A headset according to claim 1, including damping
9. A headset according to claim 8, including a swivel mount~ 35 means mounted on both of said tubes for suppressing
ing between said temple clip and said ?rst and second clips.
resonances therein.
10. A miniature headset according to claim 1, in which said
24. A headset according to claim 1, in which said half~shells
are generally cylindrical in shape,
headset on one ofthe temples ofa pair of eyeglasses.
said means including ?rst and second clips of generally cir
11. A headset according to claim 10, including a swivel joint 40
cular curvature resiliently engaging said half-shells,
between said temple clip and said mounting member.
said half-shells being formed with peripheral recesses for
12. A miniature headset according to claim ll, in which said
receiving and retaining said clips,
means comprise first and second clamps removably engaging
said clips being reversible between the left and right-hand
said ?rst and second half-shells,
sides of said half-shells.
said mounting member including a temple clip connected to 45
mounting member comprises a temple clip for mounting the
50
55
65
75
mg?
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION
Patent No.
3,588, 384
Inventor(s)
Dated
June 28, 1971
Marvin C. Negley
It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent
and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:
r
Column 3, line 20,
In Fig.
"po45ion" should read ——portion-—.
5 of the drawings,
"52 " should be read as -—62——
where it is applied to the inner
portion of the tip 58.
Signed and sealed this 15th day of February 1972.
{SEAIJ
Attest:
EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR.
Attesting Officer
ROBERT GOTTSCHALK
Commissioner of Patents
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