File - KRISTEN MOWAT
FAUM Student Center Design Programme
Cast building, Dafoe RD, University of Manitoba campus,
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Kristen Mowat
April 8, 14
Table of Contents
Section 1.............................1
Section 2.............................2
Section 3.............................5
Section 4.............................6
Section 5.............................8
Section 6.............................10
Section 7.............................13
Section 8.............................17
Section 9.............................21
Section 10...........................22
References..........................24
i
List of Figures
1) Exterior Cast Building....................................1
2) Interior S/W View; Cast Building....................6
3) View from Above; Cast Building.....................6
4) Mezzanine Level; Cast Building.....................6
5) Exposed Systems; Cast Building....................7
6) Loading Door; Cast Building..........................7
7) Zoning Plan 1................................................18
8) Zoning Plan 2................................................19
9) Mez Zoning Plan...........................................20
10) Vertical Zoning............................................20
11) Wheeler Center Front; Precedent................23
12) Wheeler Center Interior; Precedent.............23
13) Wheeler Center Section; Precedent.............23
14) Wheeler Center Front Night; Precedent......23
ii
List of Tables
1) FF&E.......................................................................8
2) Washroom and Water closet Requirements.............13
3) Egress Requirements...............................................13
4) Criteria for One Exit.................................................16
5) Adjacency Matrix.....................................................17
iii
Section 1: Introduction
This document is intended to act as a design and communication guide that will aid the development and creation of a new FAUM
student center which would be located in the Cast building found on the University of Manitoba campus. The center would act as a hub
for socialization, private and collaborative work, as well as a space for crits, reviews and work display. The project will be a renovation
and provide students with a center that combines their most observable needs.
The site consists of the Cast building located on the South side of the JAR building and provides around 4000 square feet with a second
floor mezzanine. The building has adjacent access to the main road on the South side, as well as JAR off the North. Off the West side is
a large grass lawn, and just beyond that, access to the other FAUM building, Arch II. The ED2 space is within proximity as well, located
in the basement of Education found behind JAR. The space is currently being used for student and staff projects, exploration and study
of concrete casts and other moulding developments. While the building has a relatively small footprint, the space offers various zones
for a new multi-use space.
The client for which this center is being constructed is the University of Manitoba, Faculty of Architecture. “Established in 1913, it was
the second in Canada and the first to offer four post-graduate built environment degree programs. The current facilities for the faculty
were completed in 1959, and the school was re-organized in 1963 to form the faculty which would soon encompass the undergraduate
(Environmental Studies) and graduate programs”1. The vision statement for the program states “The faculty of architecture aspires
to offer widely recognized and highly valued design and planning undergraduate and graduate programs that promote a respectful,
collegial, interdisciplinary culture of teaching, scholarship and service within the University and beyond”2. These values display a strive
for excellence and understanding of all levels of educational learning which can be accompanied by FAUM’s mission statement which
proposes “to provide exceptional teaching, scholarship and community service in architecture, city planning, environmental design,
interior design, landscape architecture and emerging areas of design education and practice”3. These important goals and beliefs of
the faculty should be considered throughout the production of the FAUM student center.
Basic information regarding the users of the student center could include currently enrolled FAUM students, FAUM professors,
students from other faculties, professors from other faculties and guest speakers.
Fig.1: Exterior Cast Building
1
Section 2: Contextual Features
While the FAUM student center will cater toward the needs and wants
of the average FAUM student, other types of users will see the space as
a location for supplies, study space and entertainment. The user profiles
can be broken down into 3 categories as follows:
Primary users: Currently enrolled FAUM students, FAUM professors and
security services
Secondary users: FAUM professors, students from other faculties and
cleaning staff
Tertiary users: service people, maintenance, professors from other
faculties, guest speakers and parents
Looking more closely at the data of currently enrolled FAUM students4,
demographic information can be found and considered when planning
the center. The following information provides context for the campus
and faculty:
• 288 undergrad students out of 25,363 total U of M undergrad students
are part of FAUM
• 487 is the total number of FAUM students
o 257 are full time students
o 11 are part time students
• 288 undergrad students in FAUM
o 145 are female
o 112 are male
• 199 graduate student in FAUM
o 109 are female
o 80 are male
• 23.2 is the mean age found on the U of Manitoba campus
• 21 is the most common age found on the U of Manitoba campus
Aside from numerical data, a demographic forecast for the FAUM
student center, based off personal experience, could find that ED2
students will use the space rarely due to their building location set
furthest from the center and the reluctant nature to mingle with
older years due to inexperience and insecure place within the faculty.
Premasters and masters students will use the center frequently
but not constantly as they require less equipment and services to
complete their work and more individual study or quite space. ED3/
ED4 will use the space constantly as they are within the closest
proximities to the center and are in constant need of services,
utilities and spaces to work. The space will also be female dominant
based off female to male enrollment ratio, and this could potentially
influence the center design.
Social and/or political issues surrounding the new center could
include an “ownership” issue. Due to the location of the student
center in such close proximity to JAR, Arch II students, as well as ED2
students may feel as though they are intruding on a landscape/urban
planning/interiors center. Emphasis on portraying the FAUM student
center as a resource for all years and disciplines would be necessary
to remove this stigma.
Near future trends for FAUM as a faculty and as part of the U of
Manitoba campus can be distilled as; the FAUM faculty is trying
to provide students with a greater sense of identity (faculty wear,
public events etc), attempting to create more mingling between
years, streams and groups and increasing the ease and efficiency of
students working process. These ideas can be taken from the vision
and mission statements, as well as personal experience of faculty
goals.
2
Designing the FAUM student center involves considering the needs, wants and
preferences of all users within the space with a distinct focus on the primary users
requirements. The following categories disclose some of the primary users’ desires or
necessities.
Aside from the needs and wants listed here, secondary
and tertiary users may require additional semi private
seating (separate from student social zones).
• Behavioural needs
•
Group work
•Socialize
•Relax
•Sleep
•Eat
•Entertain
•Present
•
Meet (academically and socially)
•Communication
•Privacy
•
Create/ print/ photograph
• Psychological needs
•
Safety/ security
•
Ample light (artificial and natural)
•
Control over environment (lighting, temperature, arrangements)
•Comfort
•
Identity of FAUM students
•
Social support
•
Inspiration/ stimulation
•
Relaxation and calming space
•
Privacy (individually and as a FAUM student)
• Special needs and preferences
•Accessibility
•
Large amounts of pin up space
•
Large working surfaces (cutting board surface, built in rulers, easy clean)
•
Large amount of electrical outlets
•
Large recycle bins
•
ATM machine
•
Debit and/or credit abilities
•
Projection screen
3
With 3 levels of user groups predicted to interact with the student
center, a user analysis will combine the needs and wants with a potential
frequency of each activity users could engage in. Below are the types of
activities and predicted number of users for each task. The activities are
listed in order of most frequent to least.
• Private/Individual study or work
o WHO: Current FAUM students (minimize non FAUM students using
this service)
o NUMBER: The centers private/individual study or work zone should
be able to accommodate up to 10 users at one time
•Socialization (academic and non)
o WHO: Current FAUM students, non FAUM students, FAUM and non FAUM professors; any other users as well, as socialization is a basic human function
o NUMBER: The centers lounge zone should be able to
accommodate 15-20 users at one time, however, socialization can occur
anywhere within the center (group work, food services and print/edit/
create spaces)
The overall total number of users the center would be able to
accommodate at one time would be approximately 85-95. This
includes primary, secondary and tertiary users. This total would be
reached if each zone was being used to its full capacity. The total
number could increase to approximately a maximum of 115 users at
one time, if the review/crit/presentation space was expanded due to
a special event during regular student center hours. On an average
day, secondary and tertiary users will only make up approximately
5-10 head count of the total number of users, most occupants will be
FAUM students.
• Group Work
o WHO: Current FAUM students
o NUMBER: The centers group work zone should be able to
accommodate 10-15 users at one time
• Printing/Editing/Creating
o WHO: Current FAUM students (minimize non FAUM students
using these services)
o NUMBER: The centers printing/editing/creating zone should be
able to accommodate 15-20 users at one time
• Food Service/Eating/Prep
o WHO: Current FAUM students, FAUM professors, non FAUM
students; all user types are able to use food services when and if needed
o NUMBER: The centers food service/eating/prep zone should be
able to accommodate 8-10 users at one time
• Review/Crit/Presentation
o WHO: Current FAUM students, FAUM professors, guests,
parents
o NUMBER: The centers review/crit/presentation zone should
be able to accommodate 20-25 users at one time with the possibility of
expanding the space to accommodate 30-40 users at one time
4
Section 3: Project Goals
To aid the design process of the student center, 4 project goals have been developed to focus
the centers intentions, services and functions. These goals pay attention to organization, form
and image and role of the center within the FAUM campus interaction. They also have been
built upon previous research, personal experience and interactions with other FAUM students.
1)
2)
3)
4)
Create a space for FAUM students to relax and socialize
Develop a center to better FAUM student creativity and working process
Give FAUM students a sense of identity and presence on campus
Develop a central location that attracts all years and disciplines to encourage mingling
5
Section 4: Cast Building Analysis:
The cast building is approximately 4000 square feet with a square floor plan and a mezzanine
level consisting of approximately 1240 square feet5. The second level includes floor to ceiling
windows along the North West wall and includes a skylight over the larger portion of the floor
plate. The open view from the mezzanine to below, gives views toward the loading dock door
(large loading door on North wall) to scattered windows which puncture the East wall and
allow light to fill the mezzanine level. The main entrance is located on the West wall under the
mezzanine bridge. Users are directed through a short passageway before the building opens up
to expose the full volume. The 1 staircase found pre-existing in the space, allows one way access
to the mezzanine level and directions traffic both up and down along the same path.
Fig.2: Interior S/W View; Cast Building
The interior atmosphere consists of an industrial feel with exposed systems on ceilings and
walls. Walls are exposed concrete block with piping and structures dispersed among the wall
surface. A concrete block half partition wall currently divides the space under the mezzanine
from the open volume area as well as pillars and columns which separate sections of the main
floor. A lower central beam runs across the main open volume at approximately 12-14 feet from
floor. This beam acts as visual separation and splits the space in half from the mezzanine view.
On the East wall a small plumbing section has been provided in addition to the majority of the
plumbing found along the North wall. The building is equipped with generous electrical outlets
and the electrical panel can be found against the North wall. All other utilities (gas, water,
heating and cooling) can also be found along the North wall.
Emergency exit doors can be found at the main entrance on the West wall and next to the
loading door on the North wall. Each exit door is equipped with fire alarm pulls as well as an
additional pull located at the top of the stairs on the mezzanine level. A fire extinguisher can be
found at the North wall emergency exit door in the current building configuration.
Fig.3: View from Above; Cast Building
Fig.4: Mezzanine Level; Cast Building
6
Developing the center as a renovation project allows the space to
be stripped of any unwanted features and to consider any current
features which could be beneficial to the new design. Below is a list of
potential features to be demolished and features to be maintained.
• Demolish
• Non-structural beams (unclutter and streamline the space)
• Wall mounted light fixtures
• Wall mounted shelving system
• Current HVAC unit (replace with new, concealed unit)
• Maintain
• Loading dock door
• Open to below mezzanine level
• Raw industrial exposed systems
Fig.6: Loading Door; Cast Building
Along with features to maintain and demolish comes the benefits and
constraints of the space. Below is a list of pro’s and con’s regarding the
buildings features, location and function.
•Pro’s
•
Large open floor plan
•
Mezzanine provides private zone
•
Steel columns help to form hubs throughout the main floor
•
Concrete flooring is easy to clean
•
Unfinished- easy to renovate
•
Ample amount of outlets
•
Pre-existing HVAC system
•
Pre-existing ceiling fans
Large loading dock door for deliveries
•
•
Central location on campus
•
Close to FAUM services
Fig.5: Exposed Systems; Cast Building
•Con’s
Exposed systems to be streamlined and functional
•
•
Large open volume allows for noise pollution
•
Minimal large windows to allow natural light
•
Dim space
•
No pre-existing accessible vertical circulation
High ceilings make placing walls and forming spaces difficult
•
•
Entrance not easily noted
•
Not centrally located among FAUM buildings (ownership issues)
7
Section 5: Functional Requirements
Space
Lounge
Group
Work
Print
Edit
Create
Private
Study
FF&E
Comfort seating.....................
Comfort lounge seating.........
Small horizontal surface.........
Medium horizontal surface.....
Task lighting...........................
General lighting.....................
Electrical outlet......................
Window coverings..................
Large horizontal surface.........
Medium horizontal surface.....
Supply storage.......................
Task seating............................
General lighting.....................
Task lighting...........................
Electrical outlet......................
Computer and monitor...........
Printer....................................
Flatbed scanner......................
Light table..............................
Paper cutter...........................
Task seating............................
Material storage.....................
Recycle bin.............................
Horizontal surface..................
Electrical outlet......................
General lighting.....................
Comfort seating.....................
Individual desks......................
Space partitions.....................
General lighting......................
Task lighting...........................
Electrical outlet......................
Quantity
Dimensions LxWxH
Atmosphere
4-6
3-4
4-6
4-6
As Needed
As Needed
8-10
As Needed
1-2
3-5
1-2
20-30
As Needed
As Needed
8-10
2
31” x 31” x 31”
60” x 30” x 32”
Min 24” x 24” x 22”- Max 36” x 36” x 24”
Min 36” x 18” 18”- Max 42” x 24” x 24”
15” x 5” 15”
36” x 7” 2”
N/A
N/A
Min 72” x 60” x 39”- Max 96” x 60” x 39”
Min 48” x 36” x 36”- Max 60” x 21” x 72”
Min 48” x 21 x 60”- Max 60” x 21” x 72”
Min 12” diameter x 30”- Max 18” dia. x 30”
36” x 7” 2”
15” x 5” 15”
N/A
Ea. set approx. 12” x 6” x 14”
Ea. 30” x 24” x 30”
20”x 14” x 3”
Min 60” x 36” x 36”- Max 72”x 36” x 36”
36” x 15”
Min 12” diameter x 30”- Max 18” dia. x 30”
Min 48” x 21 x 60”- Max 60” x 21” x 72”
24” x 30” x 42”
Min 36” x 30” x 36”- Max 48” x 36” x 36”
N/A
36” x 7” 2”
31” x 31” x 31”
30” x 30” x 30”
24”L x 18”H
36” x 7” 2”
15” x 5” 15”
N/A
The interior elements should aim to keep
the structure and architectural features
unfinished and industrial while adding
color and creative inspiration through
furniture, lighting and display zones.
Colors and accents should provide fresh,
bright pops of hue around the space and
be highlighted through accent lighting.
The furniture should be modular and
adaptive to new groups of users and
not limit the formation of micro zones
within the center. Bright even lighting
can provide good conditions for working,
while task lighting can scatter throughout
the space playing with zone boundaries
and overall lighting conditions. The
center should feel open and welcoming
and represent the values and beliefs of
the FAUM users.
2 (B/W and Color)
2
1
1
10-15
2
2
6
5-7
As Needed
10
10
As Needed
As Needed
10
10 ( 1 per desk)
8
Space
Food Prep
Food
Purchase
and Eating
Review/
Crit/
Present
Work
Display
FF&E
Quantity
Dimensions LxWxH
Fridge...................................
2
Counter space.......................
As Needed
Microwave............................
2
Sink- double..........................
1
Paper towel dispenser...........
2
Storage.................................
As Needed
Vending machine.................. 3 (coffee, tea, juice)
Water bottle drinking fountain..
1
Commercial fridge................
1
Snack display........................
As Needed
Computer and monitor.........
1
Cash till.................................
1
Debit machine......................
1
ATM......................................
1
As Needed
Eating surface.......................
As Needed
Garbage/ Recycle..................
As Needed
General lighting....................
As Needed
Accent lighting......................
1
Telephone service.................
5-7
Electrical outlet.....................
Min 16.5 cubic ft- Max 20 cubic ft
Min 96”L x 24”D- Max 180” x 24”
Min 0.9 cubic ft- Max 1.2 cubic ft
30” x 20” x 10”D
10” x 8” x 15”
Under cabinet. 24”D
Min 74” x 28” x 68”- Max 84” x 36” x 68”
15” x 20” x 18”
48” x 30” x 72”
Wall mount. N/A
Ea. set approx. 12” x 6” x 14”
15” x 13” x 6”
7” x 3.5” x 4”
15” x 18” x 52”
24”D x 120”L
24” x 30” x 42”
36” x 7” 2”
Wall mount N/A
N/A
N/A
Vertical pin up surface...........
A Frames...............................
Display donkeys....................
Task seating..........................
Projector...............................
Projector screen....................
Horizontal surface.................
Speakers...............................
Microphone..........................
General lighting....................
Accent lighting......................
Electrical outlet.....................
Wall surface...........................
Accent lighting......................
General lighting.....................
Electrical outlet.....................
Wall mount N/A
66” x 24” x 72”
30” x 12” x 18”
Min 12” x 12” x 30”- Max 18” x 18” x 30”
12” x 12” x 4”
60” x 84”
Min 48” x 28” x 36”- Max 60” x 28” x 60”
18” x 18” x 24”
N/A
36” x 7” 2”
Wall mount N/A
N/A
N/A
Wall mount. N/A
36” x 7” 2”
N/A
As Needed
2-3
8-10
25-40
1
1
2-3
As Needed
2-3
As Needed
As Needed
6-10
As Needed
As Needed
As Needed
5-7
Atmosphere
The interior elements should aim to keep
the structure and architectural features
unfinished and industrial while adding
color and creative inspiration through
furniture, lighting and display zones.
Colors and accents should provide fresh,
bright pops of hue around the space and
be highlighted through accent lighting.
The furniture should be modular and
adaptive to new groups of users and
not limit the formation of micro zones
within the center. Bright even lighting
can provide good conditions for working,
while task lighting can scatter throughout
the space playing with zone boundaries
and overall lighting conditions. The
center should feel open and welcoming
and represent the values and beliefs of
the FAUM users.
9
Section 6: Technology Requirements
As an extension from the FF&E requirements, the student centre will require very specific and
detailed types of structures and systems to allow the space to meet users’ particular needs and
desires. The 3 main categories of systems include electrical, plumbing and mechanical. Below is a
list of necessities for each zone within the student center in relation to the 3 types of systems.
Electrical needs:
The student centers electrical system will be heavily used on a daily basis and should feature the
ability to deliver a range of voltages to varying outlets throughout the space. This system needs
to be able to supply each zone with a minimum of 5 electrical outlets found along various planes
(wall, ceiling and horizontal surface mount). The private study zone will require an outlet per desk
to sustain electronics and the electrical circuit must be able to handle a large load at any given
time. Students will be using outlets to charge electronics, food services will use outlets for vending
machines, fridges, microwaves etc. and all lighting will operate along the system as well. The entire
main floor volume will be fitted with a stereo system with speakers scattered across the main level.
The desk clerk should have the capability to play ambient music and this system should maintain
the ability to have various volume levels, be able to be hooked up to a computer system and
connect via Bluetooth to various electronics.
Needs by zone:
• Review:
o General light
o Accent light
o Projector
o Microphone
o Laptop
o Projector screen
o Outlets (wall and ceiling mount)
• Food Services:
o Fridge
o Cash till
o Debit machine
o General light
o Vending machines
o Microwave
o Computer/ monitor
o ATM
o Outlets (wall mount)
o Telephone service
• Lounge:
o General light
o Task light
o Charge electronics
o Outlets (wall and horizontal surface mount)
• Group Work:
o General light
o Task lighting
o Charge electronics
o Small tools
o Outlets (wall and horizontal surface mount)
1o
• Print/Edit/Create:
o Computer/monitor
o Printer
o Light table
o Scanner
o Outlets (wall and horizontal surface mount)
o General lighting
• Private study:
o General light
o Task light
o Outlets (wall and horizontal surface mount)
• Utility/ Washroom:
o Circuit breaker
o General lighting
o Outlets (wall mount)
• General:
o Sound system throughout main floor- speakers and blue tooth connection to laptop
o Security features
* Cameras- main and back door locations as well as interior space
* Emergency call buttons
* Card read entry system (after hours)
* Automatic door lock (after hours)
* Exterior building lighting
o Emergency exit signs
o Fire alarms
o Light control panels (switches)
Plumbing needs:
The student centers plumbing needs should include standard plumbing
features to allow for water access and the ability to dispose of liquids.
To reduce the centers environmental impacts, the use of low flush
toilets could be considered for water conservation and the installment
of automatic sinks would assist in reducing wasted water via running
faucets. The system should be equipped to properly handle the amount
of users along with the activities which will engage the plumbing system.
Needs by zone:
• Lounge:
o N/A
• Group Work:
o N/A
• Review:
o N/A
• Food Services:
o Sink (double basin)
o Floor drain
o Vending machines
o Water fountain
• Print/edit/create:
o N/A
•Utility/Washroom:
o Sinks
o Floor drain
o Toilets
o Water tanks
11
Mechanical needs:
The student centers heating desires will require a system which is able to provide even and
reliable temperature throughout the entire space. The ability to adjust the temperature
whenever needed or desired will be capable by the attending desk clerk working in the food
service zone. Adjustments should be felt within a short period of time. Another feature
which would enhance the centers comfort levels could include a system which allows vents
on the mezzanine level and main level, to be operated separately so that each zone can be
adjusted accordingly. The mezzanine may get warmer due to its smaller scale, large amount
of computers and or electronics and the rising heat from the main floor.
The cooling or AC system will allow an even a reliable temperature throughout the space.
The system should be able to keep the building at a set temperature to ensure the building
remains cool in hot summer months. Adjustability by the desk clerk will be possible and
any adjustments should be noticed within a half hour. The cooling system should be kept
as quiet as possible to not cause distraction or interruption in the center. Cooling process
should occur with even air distribution to eliminate cool zones under ventilation grates.
The general air ventilation system should be constantly filtering and circulating the air
throughout the center. Use of ceiling fans would also provide extra air movement and slight
temperature control, adjustable by any user via switches on wall surfaces. Ceiling fans
should be placed within close proximity to the mezzanine level to help expel hot air from
the second level. Ventilation will also need to be provided in the utility/washroom zone to
prevent and remove any odors and sustain fresh air.
Needs by zone:
• Lounge:
o Heating
o Cooling
o Ventilation
o Sprinklers
o Ceiling fans
• Group Work:
o Heating
o Cooling
o Ventilation
o Sprinklers
o Ceiling fans
• Review:
o Heating
o Cooling
o Ventilation
o Sprinklers
• Food Services:
o Heating
o Cooling
o Ventilation (general and odor removal)
o Sprinklers
o Ventilation control switch
• Print/edit/create:
o Heating
o Cooling
o Ventilation
o Sprinklers
o Ceiling fans
• Utility/Washroom:
o Heating
o Cooling
o Ventilation
o Sprinklers
o Furnace
o Cooling system
o Sprinkler/ alarm system
12
Section 7: Building Code and Safety Issues
When developing a space it is important to be aware of the codes and regulations which imply
to any and all features of the space. The new FAUM student center can be classified as a type
A2 and below are some of the codes and guides which apply to occupancy type A2 according to
the Nation Building Code of Canada. The following section information has been taken from the
Nation Building Code of Canada, 2010, volume 2, Division B6.
7
8
13
Section 9.9.8.6 Mezzanine means of egress
9
14
Section 9.9.11 Exit Signs 10
9.9.11.2. VISIBILITY OF EXITS
1) Exits shall be located so as to be clearly visible or their locations shall be clearly indicated.
9.9.11.3. EXIT SIGNS
1) Every exit door shall have an exit sign placed over it or adjacent to it if the exit serves
a) a building that is 3 storeys in building height,
b) a building having an occupant load of more than 150, or
c) a room or floor area that has a fire escape as part of a required means of egress.
2) Every exit sign shall
a) be visible on approach to the exit,
b) except as permitted in Sentence (3), consist of a green pictogram and a white or lightly tinted graphical
symbol meeting the colour specifications referred to in ISO 3864-1, “Graphical symbols – Safety colours and safety signs
– Part 1: Design principles for safety signs in workplaces and public areas,” and
c) conform to the dimensions indicated in ISO 7010, “Graphical symbols – Safety colors and safety signs –
Safety signs used in workplaces and public areas,” for the following symbols (see A-3.4.5.1.(2)(c) in Appendix A):
i) E001 emergency exit left,
ii) E002 emergency exit right,
iii) E005 90-degree directional arrow, and
iv) E006 45-degree directional arrow.
3) Internally illuminated exit signs shall be continuously illuminated and
a) where illumination of the sign is powered by an electrical circuit, be constructed
in conformance with CSA C22.2 No. 141, “Emergency Lighting Equipment,” or
b) where illumination of the sign is not powered by an electrical circuit, be constructed in conformance
with CAN/ULC-S572, “Photoluminescent and Self-Luminous Signs and Path Marking Systems.”
4) Externally illuminated exit signs shall be continuously illuminated and be constructed in
conformance with CAN/ULC-S572, “Photoluminescent and Self-Luminous Signs and Path
Marking Systems.” (See A-3.4.5.1.(4) in Appendix A.)
5) The circuitry serving lighting for externally and internally illuminated exit signs shall
a) serve no equipment other than emergency equipment, and
b) be connected to an emergency power supply as described in Sentences 9.9.12.3.(2), (3) and
6) Where no exit is visible from a public corridor, from a corridor used by the public, or from
principal routes serving an open floor area having an occupant load of more than 150, an exit sign conforming to Clauses
(2)(b) and (c) with an arrow or pointer indicating the direction of egress shall be provided
9.9.11.4. SIGNS FOR STAIRS AND RAMPS AT EXIT LEVEL
1) In buildings that are 3 storeys in building height, any part of an exit ramp or stairway that continues up or down
past the lowest exit level shall be clearly marked to indicate that it does not lead to an exit, if the portion beyond the exit
level may be mistaken as the direction of exit travel.
15
Section 3.4.2.2, table 3.4.2.2 11
Section 3.4.1.10, table 3.4.2.1B
12
13
• Accessible vertical circulation-elevator requirements:
Section 3.6.1.4
3.5.3.3 FIRE SEPERATION FOR ELEVATOR
MACHINE ROOMS
1) Except as permitted by sentence 2, a room containing
elevator machinery shall be seperated from all other parts
of the building by a fire seperation having a fire resistance
fire rating not less than that required for the vertical
service space containing the elevator hoistway.
2) A room containing elevator machinery needs to be
seperated from the elevator hoistway that it serves
provided the room and the hoistway are seperated from
all other parts of the building by a fire seperation having
a fire resistance rating not less than that required for the
vertical service space containing the elevator hoistway.
16
Section 8: Spatial Requirements
Considering all previous sections and the guides or requirements previously stated, the
student center can be built upon the necessary criteria list above. The following information
will focus on spatial planning and understanding relationships between various regions of the
center.
• Total square footage of the building site:
o 4000 sq ft main level
o 1240 sq ft mezzanine level
• Adjacency matrix:
This matrix is applicable to both main floor zoning plans and focuses on the relationships
between zones, the connections can also be found on the plans via circulation/relation
mapping.
17
• Zoning study main floor 1:
• Square footage of each zone found on the main floor of zoning
study 1:
o Lounge: ~560
o Group work: ~680 combined
o Food service: ~ 256
o Review/presentation: ~450 (expandable)
o Display: ~ 30
o Accessible circulation: ~200
o Utility/washroom: ~400
• Pros of zoning study 1:
o Food services in close proximity to loading door (easy deliveries)
o Food services in close proximity to the main entrance
o Review/presentation space in close proximity to main entrance
o Expansive room for Review/presentation space
o Minimal wasted space
o Large social lounge
o Mixed use space (lounge and group work)
o Fluid adjacencies between lounge and group work (social zones)
o Good sight lines from group work space to display wall (inspiration and information)
• Cons of zoning study 1:
o Review/presentation space adjacent to group work space (noise pollution)
o Review/presentation space may have issues with windows on East wall
o Wide spread lounge may increase noise volume
- Strong connection
- Weak connection
Fig.7: Zoning Plan 1
N
18
• Zoning study main floor 2:
• Square footage of each zone found on the main floor of zoning
study 2:
o Lounge: ~400
o Group work: ~500 combined
o Food service: ~ 390
o Review/presentation: ~400 (expandable)
o Display: ~ 40
o Accessible circulation: ~200
o Utility/washroom: ~400
• Pros of zoning study 2:
o Food services in close proximity to loading door (easy deliveries)
o Food services in close proximity to the main entrance
o Lounge captures South views
o Group work spaces maintains social vibe
o Fluid adjacencies between lounge and group work (social zones)
o Expansive room for Review/presentation space
o Review/presentation space utilizes 2 wall surfaces
o Sight lines from group work space to display wall (inspiration and information)
o Greater separation between Review/presentation space and social zones
Utility/
Washroom
Accessible
Circulation
Loading
Food Service
Group Work
Group
Work
Display
Review/
Presentation
Lounge
Food Service
• Cons of zoning study 2:
o Food services are dispersed across the space
o Review/presentation space may receive noise pollution from social zones
o Wasted space along central axis
o Combining large group space with large lounge space may produce loud volumes
- Strong connection
- Weak connection
N
Fig.8: Zoning Plan 2
19
• Zoning study mezzanine level:
• Square footage of each zone found on the mezzanine level zoning
study:
o Print/edit/create: ~460
o Private study: ~480
• Pros of zoning study:
o Print/edit/create space remains semi private to reduce non FAUM student usage
o Private study is removed from the other zones
o Private study has the ability to create a noised controlled space
o Print/edit/create zone will maintain low to medium noise level
• Cons of zoning study:
o Without the creation of walls, the Private study is still open to noise pollution
o Print/edit/create is separated from group work space
Private Study
Circulation
Private Study
Print/ Edit/
Create
N
Fig.9: Mez Zoning Plan
• Vertical zoning looking at North wall view:
• Pros of vertical zoning study:
o Social zones are housed in the same space
o Low to medium noise level zones are housed in the same space
o Louder noise zones kept on main floor (remove chance of stomping/banging)
• Cons of vertical zoning study:
o Without walls or partitions the Private study space would be open to noise from below
Fig.10: Vertical Zoning 20
Section 9: Design Guidelines 14
The following principals are key elements which aid in providing an overview of the entire program. The issues, objectives
and concepts below will relate the centers issues, values and goals from previous research and information gathered
through personal experience and relations with other FAUM students.
• Guideline 1:
o Issue: Noise levels
Objective: The building should allow for areas of high noise levels and areas of low noise levels
Concept: Consider constructing spaces within the double volume
Concept: Consider new methods of personal volume cancellation or control
Concept: Consider keeping loud and quite zones separate
• Guideline 2:
o Issue: Hygienic Appearance
Objective: Areas directly adjacent, physically or visually, to the main entrance, should maintain a clean, fresh appearance
Concept: Consider use of durable and easy clean fabrics
Concept: Consider material and tool/utensil storage
Concept: Consider removing messy or cluttered areas from proximity of entrance
• Guideline 3:
o Issue: Social Circulation
Objective: The building should provide benefits and attractions for all years, levels and disciplines from the FAUM society
Concept: Consider placing facilities in closer proximity to one another compared to pre-existing ones
Concept: Consider an open plan with shared work areas to promote mingling
• Guideline 4:
o Issue: Image
Objective: The building should display and exude the nature and values of FAUM students
Concept: Consider using new technology and materials
Concept: Consider flexible and modular systems that allow the space to be constantly reshaped and reformed
Concept: Consider demonstrating the students connection with the building and the faculty by displaying work and forming spaces for inspiration
21
Section 10: Precedent Analysis 15 16 17
Name: The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center
Architect: Ann Beha Architects
Total square footage: 5000 sq ft
Location: Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Major spaces: The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center is made of 3 major spaces which include the main entry/gathering space, the
café or dining area and an area of classrooms. Additional minor spaces include the connection tunnels which join the neighboring buildings to the
center and the washrooms.
Design information: The building is separated by a variation of levels and each floor is host to 1 or 2 specific zones or activities. The building has
3 levels consisting of the underground tunnel, main ground level and the third top floor which connects to a neighboring building. Circulation
between the main entry and café/basement levels is maintained by a staircase running through a large open volume; however the top floor is
closed off and separated from the two below due to the nature of its activities.
Character/Appearance: The center consists of predominantly rectilinear forms and lines comprised of steel and glass. The building aims to
combine visibility with opacity and kept the interior less finished, rawer and exposed to help set the student center apart from its historic
neighbors. Exposed concrete on walls and flooring, along with a steel staircase, mimic the exterior appearance. The interior is warmed somewhat
with light wood accents along the ceiling and a splash of royal blue adds a cool vibrancy to the space.
Explanation of precedent choice: Looking at the modest footprint of the site, I wanted to find a space that was able to create a successful student
center on a similar scale as the CAST building, the Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center is comparable in square footage and in shape
and is an excellent example of a well-functioning small student center. Just as the program states, CAST is to act as a social connection space
for students of the faculty and that is precisely what the W.S.N.L Center does. Acting as a hub and connection point for students to link up, find
services or travel to the greater campus is a main function of both centers.
Visually both cast and W.S.N.L Center stand out in contrast to their neighboring buildings due to their modern look against the more historic
background of older campus buildings. W.S.N.L Center helps to make adjacent buildings more useful and strengthen the edge of the campus;
the same goals can be said for the new FAUM student center as it aims to streamline student process by combining services in a more convenient
manor. Both centers can and would act as a welcoming feature for both campus and faculty users and connect students with each other, food
services and other amenities needed to sustain a positive work experience.
The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center also complies with the design language of the CAST building. Keeping with the idea of exposed
concrete walls, simple unfinished design, use of glazed sections and skylights, space for student gatherings, food/dining services and visual art
display, the two centers have very similar image inside and out. Just as CAST does, the Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center has strong
street presence and creates inquiry about the space. Both centers also provide an outdoor area to allow users to continue learning and socializing
outside of the center.
22
Fig.12: Wheeler Center Interior; Precedent
Fig.11: Wheeler Center Front; Precedent
Fig.13: Wheeler Center Section; Precedent
Fig.14: Wheeler Center Front Night; Precedent
23
1) University of Manitoba, History, 2014, Accessed: 03/25/14. http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/about/history/43.htm
2) University of Manitoba, Location, History & Alumni, 2014, Accessed: 03/25/14. http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/locationhistoryandalumni.html
3) Ibid.
4) University of Manitoba, IS Book, 2012, Accessed: 03/25/14. http://umanitoba.ca/admin/oia/media/2011-2012_IS_BOOK_Final_Apr_22_2013.pdf
5) CKW, Ground Floor Plan and Mezzanine Plan, University of Manitoba, 2014, Accessed: 03/13/14. https://jump.umanitoba.ca/cp/ips/grouptools/fileshare/FileshareIndex.jsp?groupID=63612
6) National Research Council of Canada, Canadian Commission on Building and FIre Codes and Institution for Research in Construction, National Building Code
of Canada vol.2 Division B (Ontario: National Research Council Canada, 2010)
7) Ibid, 3.7.22
8) Ibid, 3.4.3.3
9) Ibid, 9.9.8.6
10) Ibid, 9.9.11
11) Ibid, 3.4.2.2
12) Ibid, 3.4.1.10
13) Ibid, 3.6.1.4
14) R Kumlim, Architectural Programming: Creative Techniques for Design Professionals ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995), 126-133.
15) Archdaily, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center / Ann Beha Architects, 2011, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://www.archdaily.com/140185/the-wheeler-school-nulman-lewis-student-center-ann-beha-architects/
16) Architype, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center / Ann Beha Architects, 2014, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://architype.org/project/the-wheelerschool-nulman-lewis-student-center/
17) Ann Beha Architects, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://www.annbeha.com/the-wheeler-school-nulman-lewisstudent-center#
24
Figures:
1) University of Manitoba, Laboratory, 2008, Accessed: 04/01/14. https://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/cast/laboratory/index.html
2) Kristen Mowat, Interior S/W View; Cast Building, Photograph, 2014
3) Kristen Mowat, View from Above; Cast Building, Photograph, 2014
4) Kristen Mowat, Mezzanine Level; Cast Building, Photograph, 2014
5) Kristen Mowat, Exposed Systems; Cast Building, Photograph, 2014
6) Kristen Mowat, Loading Door; Cast Building, Photograph, 2014
7) CKW, Ground Floor Plan, University of Manitoba, 2014, Accessed: 03/13/14, (Edited by Kristen Mowat) https://jump.umanitoba.ca/cp/ips/grouptools/fileshare/
FileshareIndex.jsp?groupID=63612
8) Ibid
9) CKW, Mezzanine Plan, University of Manitoba, 2014, Accessed: 03/13/14, (Edited by Kristen Mowat) https://jump.umanitoba.ca/cp/ips/grouptools/fileshare/
FileshareIndex.jsp?groupID=63612
10) GBR Architects, Building Section, University of Manitoba, 2014, Accessed: 03/13/14, (Edited by Kristen Mowat) https://jump.umanitoba.ca/cp/ips/grouptools/
fileshare/FileshareIndex.jsp?groupID=63612
11) Archdaily, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center / Ann Beha Architects, 2011, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://www.archdaily.com/140185/the-wheeler-school-nulman-lewis-student-center-ann-beha-architects/
12) Ibid
13) Ibid
14) Ibid
25
Bibliography
Ann Beha Architects, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://www.annbeha.com/the-wheeler-school-nulman-lewis-student-center#
Archdaily, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center / Ann Beha Architects, 2011, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://www.archdaily.com/140185/the-wheelerschool-nulman-lewis-student-center-ann-beha-architects/
Architype, The Wheeler School Nulman Lewis Student Center / Ann Beha Architects, 2014, Accessed: 03/22/14. http://architype.org/project/the-wheeler-schoolnulman-lewis-student-center/
CKW, Ground Floor Plan and Mezzanine Plan, University of Manitoba, 2014, Accessed: 03/13/14. https://jump.umanitoba.ca/cp/ips/grouptools/fileshare/FileshareIndex.jsp?groupID=63612
GBR Architects, Building Section, University of Manitoba, 2014, Accessed: 03/13/14, (Edited by Kristen Mowat) https://jump.umanitoba.ca/cp/ips/grouptools/fileshare/FileshareIndex.jsp?groupID=63612
National Research Council of Canada, Canadian Commission on Building and FIre Codes and Institution for Research in Construction, National Building Code of
Canada vol.2 Division B (Ontario: National Research Council Canada, 2010)
R Kumlim, Architectural Programming: Creative Techniques for Design Professionals ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995), 126-133.
University of Manitoba, History, 2014, Accessed: 03/25/14. http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/about/history/43.htm
University of Manitoba, IS Book, 2012, Accessed: 03/25/14. http://umanitoba.ca/admin/oia/media/2011-2012_IS_BOOK_Final_Apr_22_2013.pdf
University of Manitoba, Laboratory, 2008, Accessed: 04/01/14. https://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/cast/laboratory/index.html
University of Manitoba, Location, History & Alumni, 2014, Accessed: 03/25/14. http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/locationhistoryandalumni.html
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