UM EN RAD ISM 900 EN BD - RSP Supply Industrial Automation

UM EN RAD ISM 900 EN BD - RSP Supply Industrial Automation

User manual

UM EN RAD ISM 900 EN BD

Order No.: —

900 MHz Trusted Wireless Ethernet radio with MOTR-9™

User manual

900 MHz Trusted Wireless Ethernet radio with MOTR-9™

Designation:

Revision: I

UM EN RAD ISM 900 EN BD

This user manual is valid for:

Designation

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B

Version Order No.

2900016

2900017

2901205

2013-09-09

2476_en_I

PHOENIX CONTACT

Internet

Subsidiaries

Published by

Please observe the following notes

User group of this manual

The use of products described in this manual is oriented exclusively to:

– Qualified electricians or persons instructed by them, who are familiar with applicable standards and other regulations regarding electrical engineering and, in particular, the relevant safety concepts.

– Qualified application programmers and software engineers, who are familiar with the safety concepts of automation technology and applicable standards.

Explanation of symbols used and signal words

This is the safety alert symbol. It is used to alert you to potential personal injury hazards. Obey all safety measures that follow this symbol to avoid possible injury or death.

There are three different categories of personal injury that are indicated with a signal word.

DANGER

This indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.

WARNING

CAUTION

This indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.

This indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate injury.

This symbol together with the signal word

NOTE

and the accompanying text alert the reader to a situation which may cause damage or malfunction to the device, hardware/software, or surrounding property.

This symbol and the accompanying text provide the reader with additional information or refer to detailed sources of information.

How to contact us

Up-to-date information on Phoenix Contact products and our Terms and Conditions can be found on the Internet at: www.phoenixcontact.com

Make sure you always use the latest documentation.

It can be downloaded at: www.phoenixcontact.net/catalog

If there are any problems that cannot be solved using the documentation, please contact your Phoenix Contact subsidiary.

Subsidiary contact information is available at www.phoenixcontact.com

.

PHOENIX CONTACT GmbH & Co. KG

Flachsmarktstraße 8

32825 Blomberg

GERMANY

Should you have any suggestions or recommendations for improvement of the contents and layout of our manuals, please send your comments to: [email protected]

PHOENIX CONTACT

Please observe the following notes

General terms and conditions of use for technical documentation

Phoenix Contact reserves the right to alter, correct, and/or improve the technical documentation and the products described in the technical documentation at its own discretion and without giving prior notice, insofar as this is reasonable for the user. The same applies to any technical changes that serve the purpose of technical progress.

The receipt of technical documentation (in particular user documentation) does not constitute any further duty on the part of Phoenix Contact to furnish information on modifications to products and/or technical documentation. You are responsible to verify the suitability and intended use of the products in your specific application, in particular with regard to observing the applicable standards and regulations. All information made available in the technical data is supplied without any accompanying guarantee, whether expressly mentioned, implied or tacitly assumed.

In general, the provisions of the current standard Terms and Conditions of Phoenix Contact apply exclusively, in particular as concerns any warranty liability.

This manual, including all illustrations contained herein, is copyright protected. Any changes to the contents or the publication of extracts of this document is prohibited.

Phoenix Contact reserves the right to register its own intellectual property rights for the product identifications of Phoenix Contact products that are used here. Registration of such intellectual property rights by third parties is prohibited.

Other product identifications may be afforded legal protection, even where they may not be indicated as such.

PHOENIX CONTACT

Table of Contents

1 Overview..................................................................................................................................1-3

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

Features of the Trusted Wireless Ethernet Radio ............................................... 1-3

Radio Description ............................................................................................... 1-3

1.2.1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD ......................................................................... 1-3

1.2.2

1.2.3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS ................................................................ 1-4

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B ...................................................................... 1-6

Network Topology .............................................................................................. 1-6

1.3.1

1.3.2

Example of Master/Slave Topology .................................................... 1-7

Repeater Topology ............................................................................. 1-8

Data Encryption .................................................................................................. 1-8

DHCP Server...................................................................................................... 1-9

Operator Authentication and Management ......................................................... 1-9

Ethernet Terminal Server.................................................................................... 1-9

2 System Planning ......................................................................................................................2-3

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

Accessing the site .............................................................................................. 2-3

Path Quality Analysis .......................................................................................... 2-3

Signal Strength ................................................................................................... 2-3

Antennas and Cabling ........................................................................................ 2-4

2.4.1

Coaxial Cable Considerations ............................................................. 2-5

2.4.2

2.4.3

Antenna Mounting Considerations ...................................................... 2-5

Maintaining System Performance ....................................................... 2-6

3 Installation ...............................................................................................................................3-3

3.1

3.2

3.3

Mounting ............................................................................................................ 3-3

Making Connections and Powering Up............................................................... 3-6

3.2.1

Power Connections ............................................................................. 3-6

3.2.2

3.2.3

Ethernet Connections ......................................................................... 3-8

Serial Port Connections ...................................................................... 3-8

Antenna Connections ....................................................................................... 3-11

4 Programming the Radio ...........................................................................................................4-3

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.8

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

Configuring a PC to Communicate with the Radio .............................................. 4-3

Logging into the Radio........................................................................................ 4-3

Viewing Device Information ................................................................................ 4-4

General Device Information ................................................................................ 4-5

Local Diagnostics ............................................................................................... 4-6

General Configuration ........................................................................................ 4-7

LAN Configuration ............................................................................................. 4-8

SNMP Configuration........................................................................................... 4-9

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4.9

4.10

4.11

4.12

4.13

4.14

4.15

4.16

4.17

4.18

Configuring the Network Filter .......................................................................... 4-10

Configuring the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… .......................................................... 4-12

4.10.1

Network Settings ............................................................................... 4-13

4.10.2

Radio Settings .................................................................................. 4-13

Radio Security .................................................................................................. 4-15

4.11.1

Static AES ......................................................................................... 4-15

Frequency Blocking .......................................................................................... 4-16

I/O Ports ........................................................................................................... 4-17

4.13.1

Ethernet Port ..................................................................................... 4-17

4.13.2

4.13.3

Serial Ports ....................................................................................... 4-19

Data Streaming ................................................................................. 4-20

Passwords........................................................................................................ 4-21

Store and Retrieve Settings .............................................................................. 4-22

Performance ..................................................................................................... 4-23

Maintenance..................................................................................................... 4-25

Monitoring/Reports ........................................................................................... 4-27

5 Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only) .....................................5-3

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.6

5.7

RAD I/O Communications................................................................................... 5-3

5.1.1

Modbus TCP I/O Emulation Operation ................................................ 5-3

5.1.2

5.1.3

System Overview ................................................................................ 5-3

I/O System Configuration Overview .................................................... 5-4

5.1.4

5.1.5

Configuring Radios Connected to I/O ................................................. 5-5

Configuring Radios Connected to the PLC /Modbus Master ............... 5-7

I/O Module Descriptions ..................................................................................... 5-8

5.2.1

Connecting and Configuring the I/O Modules ..................................... 5-9

Addressing the Remote I/O ................................................................................ 5-9

Rotary Switches ............................................................................................... 5-16

Register Scaling ............................................................................................... 5-16

5.5.1

Digital Channels ................................................................................ 5-16

5.5.2

5.5.3

5.5.4

Analog Channel Scaling .................................................................... 5-17

Pulse Input Channels ........................................................................ 5-17

Pulse Output Channels ..................................................................... 5-17

Wiring and Fail Condition DIP Switches for the I/O Modules ............................ 5-19

5.6.1

Analog Input Module ......................................................................... 5-19

5.6.2

5.6.3

Digital Input Module .......................................................................... 5-20

Analog Output Module ...................................................................... 5-21

5.6.4

5.6.5

5.6.6

5.6.7

Digital Output Module ....................................................................... 5-22

Combination Input/Output Module .................................................... 5-23

Digital Pulse Input Module ................................................................ 5-24

Digital Pulse Output Module .............................................................. 5-27

Accessing the XML file ..................................................................................... 5-28

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Table of Contents

6 Troubleshooting .......................................................................................................................6-3

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

LED indicators .................................................................................................... 6-3

RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) ......................................................... 6-4

General Troubleshooting .................................................................................... 6-5

Resetting the IP Address .................................................................................... 6-6

6.4.1

6.4.2

DOS command ................................................................................... 6-6

Hardware Reset .................................................................................. 6-6

7 Technical and Ordering Data ...................................................................................................7-3

7.1

7.2

Ordering Data ..................................................................................................... 7-3

7.1.1

Products ............................................................................................. 7-3

7.1.2

Accessories ....................................................................................... 7-3

Technical Data ................................................................................................... 7-4

A Technical Appendix ................................................................................................................ A-1

A 1

A 2

Structure of IP Addresses .................................................................................. A-1

A 1.1

Valid IP Parameters ........................................................................... A-1

Assigning IP Addresses..................................................................................... A-1

A 2.1

Special IP Addresses for Special Applications ................................... A-3

A 2.2

A 2.3

A 2.4

Value 255 in the Byte ......................................................................... A-3

Subnet Masks .................................................................................... A-3

Examples for Subnet Masks and Computer Bits ................................ A-5

B Appendices............................................................................................................................. B-1

B 1

B 2

B 3

List of Figures .................................................................................................... B-1

List of Tables ..................................................................................................... B-5

Explanation of Terms......................................................................................... B-7

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Section

1

This section informs you about

– general features of the radio overview of network topologies wireless security and management

Overview .........................................................................................................................................1-3

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

Features of the Trusted Wireless Ethernet Radio ............................................... 1-3

Radio Description ............................................................................................... 1-3

1.2.1

1.2.2

1.2.3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD .......................................................................... 1-3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS ................................................................. 1-4

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B ...................................................................... 1-6

Network Topology .............................................................................................. 1-6

1.3.1

1.3.2

Example of Master/Slave Topology ..................................................... 1-7

Repeater Topology .............................................................................. 1-8

Data Encryption .................................................................................................. 1-8

DHCP Server...................................................................................................... 1-9

Operator Authentication and Management ......................................................... 1-9

Ethernet Terminal Server.................................................................................... 1-9

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1-1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

1-2

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Overview

1 Overview

1.1

Features of the Trusted Wireless Ethernet Radio

The Phoenix Contact Trusted Wireless Ethernet series of radio transceivers are capable of transmitting Ethernet data using wireless transmission methods. This manual describes the

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radios.

Some of the features of this series include:

– MOTR-9™ 900 MHz, 1 W radio board

Functions as a master, repeater or slave

Selectable 125, 250, or 500 kbps transfer speeds with 128/192/256-bit AES encryption

RS-232 and RS-422/485 ports allow integration of serial devices onto Ethernet networks (built-in device server)

Programming and network diagnostics are accessed through an integrated, IT-friendly web server without additional software

Modbus RTU/TCP compatible for process and industrial applications

Maximum network size of 4096 radios

1.2

Radio Description

1.2.1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD is a rail-mounted radio with a protection rating of IP20. The radio features an RJ45 connector for connection of Ethernet devices as well as RS-232 and

RS-485/422 ports, which gives it the capability of sending serial data to another transceiver

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1-3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

over the radio link. The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD features an RF link dry contact for indicating a radio link and an RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) voltage test point to aid installation and troubleshooting.

End Bracket

End Bracket

Ground Terminal

Block

Figure 1-1

Antenna Connection

RS-232 LEDs

RS-232 port

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RF Link

Po

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Removable Connectors

Status LED

RS-422/485 LEDs

RF Link LEDs

WAN LEDs

RJ-45 Ethernet port

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RSSI port

1.2.2

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS includes all the functions of the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD but includes a bus connector. The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio differs physically from the

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD in that it has a 5-pin BUS connector on the side of the unit (see

Figure 1-2). This BUS connector allows analog, digital, or frequency input/output modules

to be connected (see Section 5). It also has a Modbus/TCP Gateway and an Ethernet

1-4

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Overview

Terminal Server. The I/O modules are accessed using Modbus/TCP protocol through an master radio (gateway). The I/O values are also available for read-only applications via an embedded XML file.

End Bracket

Main Antenna Connection

End Bracket

Ground Terminal

Block

RF Link

Po we r

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Removable Connectors

Status LED

RS-422/485 LEDs

RF Link LEDs

WLAN LEDs

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RS-232 LEDs

RSSI port

Bus cover

RJ-45 Ethernet port

RS-232 port

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5-pin female bus connector

Figure 1-2 RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS with bus connection detail

5-pin male bus connector

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

1.2.3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B is a dedicated slave radio. It has no serial ports but is interoperable with the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radios.

Removable Power Connector

1 2 3 4 End Bracket

Ground Terminal

Block

Antenna Connection

Status LED

B

A

RF Link

GND

Po wer

FLBL-2938-04R1

ANT 1

S

TAT

U

S

WAN LEDs

N

WA

WANLINK

R

SS

I

RAD

-I

S

M-900-EN-BD-B

RSSI port

RJ-45 Ethernet port

Figure 1-3 RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B

1.3

Network Topology

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radio can be configured to operate as either a master, slave or repeater. Depending on the configuration, radios provide different functions within the wireless network. These different functions result in a variety of network topologies.

When determining a network topology, the following guidelines apply:

– All wireless devices connected to the master are configured on the same subnetwork as the wired network interface, and can be accessed by devices on the wired network.

– A transceiver configured as a master can only communicate with devices configured as slaves or repeaters. Conversely, devices configured as slaves can only communicate with masters and repeaters.

1-6

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Overview

1.3.1

Example of Master/Slave Topology

In a master/slave arrangement, the master radio typically acts as the connection to a wired network.

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Figure 1-4 Master/Slave topology

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

PLC

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1-7

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

1.3.2

Repeater Topology

The repeater functionality of the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… supports several topologies.

1.3.2.1

Repeater Mode

Figure 1-5 shows three radios configured to extend the range of the data transmission by

“repeating” the transmission.

Master Repeater Slave

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

PLC

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

PLC

1-8

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Figure 1-5 Repeater topology

1.4

Data Encryption

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radio features optional static 128/192/256-bit AES encryption.

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) was selected by the National Institute of

Standards and Technology (NIST) in October 2000 as an upgrade from the previous DES standard.

AES is currently approved for military use, and utilizes a 128/192/256-bit block cipher algorithm and encryption technique for protecting computerized information.

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Overview

1.5

DHCP Server

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radio is compatible with networks that use a Dynamic Host

Control Protocol (DHCP) server for allocating IP addresses. In addition, a master can be configured to function as the DHCP Server for a network.

1.6

Operator Authentication and Management

Authentication mechanisms are used to authenticate an operator accessing the device and to verify that the operator is authorized to assume the requested role and perform services within that role.

Access to the management screens for the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… family of radios requires entering an ID and password.

The user name and password are case sensitive.

The factory defaults are:

Configuration screen access

Username:

Password:

Admin admin

Monitoring screen access

Username: Monitor

Password: monitor

1.7

Ethernet Terminal Server

The Ethernet Terminal Server mode allows serial data to be encapsulated and transmitted over Ethernet. In master/slave topology, the master must have the Ethernet Terminal enabled.

Serial data packaged within TCP or UDP protocol is sent from some device and received by the radio acting as the Ethernet terminal. The Ethernet terminal strips off the TCP/UDP protocol headers and sends the serial data out on one of the serial streams. The wireless link then distributes this data to all other radios’ serial ports connected to that serial stream.

If the serial protocol is addressable, e.g., Modbus, DF1, etc., the end device will ignore any data that is not addressed to it.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

1-10

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Section

2

This section informs you about

– factors that affect radio performance antenna and cable selection

System Planning .............................................................................................................................2-3

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

Accessing the site .............................................................................................. 2-3

Path Quality Analysis .......................................................................................... 2-3

Signal Strength ................................................................................................... 2-3

Antennas and Cabling ........................................................................................ 2-4

2.4.1

Coaxial Cable Considerations ............................................................. 2-5

2.4.2

Antenna Mounting Considerations....................................................... 2-5

2.4.3

Maintaining System Performance ........................................................ 2-6

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2-1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

2-2

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System Planning

2 System Planning

2.1

Accessing the site

To achieve the best radio performance possible, the installation sites have to be given careful consideration. The primary requirements for a reliable installation include:

Antenna placement that allows for line-of-sight or adequate signal strength

Primary power source that provides required current

Protection of radio equipment from exposure to weather or temperature extremes

Suitable entrances for antenna, lightning arrestor, interface or other required cables - if using remote antennas.

These requirements can be quickly assessed in most applications. A possible exception is the first item, verifying that a clear line-of-sight exists. A non-obstructed path is ideal; however, minor obstructions in the signal path will not always block communication. In general, the need for a clear path becomes greater as the transmission distance increases.

2.2

Path Quality Analysis

With the exception of short-range applications, a path loss study is generally recommended for new installations. The exceptions include distances of less than 305 m (1000 ft.) where no test is required in 90% of applications, and where a test is done with a functional Phoenix

Contact radio set to the desired wireless mode, transmit data rate and transmit power setting. A path loss study predicts the signal strength reliability and estimates the fade margin of a proposed radio link. While terrain, elevation and distance are the major factors in this process, a path loss study also considers antenna gain, coaxial cable loss, transmitter power and receiver sensitivity to arrive at a final prediction.

Path loss studies are normally performed by a communications consultant, wireless hardware vendor or a system integrator who uses topographic maps or a software path analysis to evaluate a proposed path.

Although path studies provide valuable assistance in system planning, they are not perfect in their predictions. It is difficult, for example, to consider the effects of man-made obstructions or foliage growth without performing an actual on-air test. Such tests can be done using temporarily installed equipment.

2.3

Signal Strength

The strength of radio signals in a well-designed radio network must exceed the minimum level needed to establish basic communication. The excess signal is known as the fade margin, and it compensates for variations in signal level which may occur from time to time due to foliage growth, minor antenna misalignment or changing atmospheric losses.

While the required amount of fade margin differs from one system to another, experience has shown that a level of 20 dB above the receiver sensitivity threshold is sufficient in most systems. RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… modules provide a means for direct measurement of

received signal strength using a DC voltmeter. Consult Section 6.2, “RSSI (Received Signal

Strength Indicator)” for more information.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

2.4

Antennas and Cabling

The single most important item affecting radio performance is the antenna system. Careful attention must be given to this part of an installation, or the performance of the entire system will be compromised. Quality high-gain antennas should be used at all stations. The antennas should be specifically designed for use at the intended frequency of operation and with matching impedance (50

).

Antennas are made by several manufacturers and fall into two categories: omnidirectional

and yagi directional (see Figure 2-1). An omnidirectional antenna provides equal radiation

and response in all directions and is, therefore, appropriate for use at master stations which must communicate with an array of remote stations scattered in various directions.

Omnidirectional antennas should also be used where clients will be mobile.

OMNI

Round Reflector Antenna

Vertical

Aperture Angle

YAGI

Directional Antenna Vertical

Tran s mit and

Receive Range

Horizontal

Aperture Angle

Figure 2-1 Omni and directional antenna performance characteristics

At remote-fixed stations, a directional antenna, such as a yagi antenna, is typically used.

Directional antennas confine the transmission and reception of signals to a relatively narrow beam width, allowing greater communication range, and reducing the chances of interference from other users outside the pattern. It is necessary to aim these antennas in the desired direction of communication, i.e., at the master station.

The end of the antenna (farthest from support mast) should face the associated station.

Final alignment of the antenna heading can be accomplished by orienting it for maximum received signal strength.

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System Planning

2.4.1

Coaxial Cable Considerations

The importance of using a low-loss antenna coaxial cable is often neglected during radio installation. Using the wrong cable can cause huge reductions in efficiency, and these losses cannot be recovered with any amount of antenna gain or transmitter power.

For every 3 dB of coaxial cable loss, half the transmitter power will be lost before reaching the antenna. The choice of coaxial cable to use depends on: 1) the length of cable required to reach the antenna, 2) the amount of signal loss that can be tolerated, and 3) cost considerations. For long-range transmission paths, where signal is likely to be weaker, a low-loss cable type is recommended.

For a short range system, or one that requires only a short antenna coaxial cable, a less efficient cable may be acceptable, and will cost far less than large diameter cable. To judge

the effectiveness of various cables at 916 MHz, refer to Table 2-1.

Table 2-1

Cable Type

RG-58

RG-213

LMR 400

LMR 600

Cable Types and Signal Loss at 916 MHz

Loss (dB/100 ft.)

16.5 dB

7.6 dB

3.9 dB

2.5 dB

2.4.2

Antenna Mounting Considerations

The antenna manufacturer’s installation instructions must be strictly followed for proper operation of a directional or omnidirectional antenna. Using proper mounting hardware and bracket ensures a secure mounting arrangement with no pattern distortion or de-tuning of the antenna. The following recommendations apply to all antenna installations:

Mount the antenna in the clear, as far away as possible from obstructions such as buildings, metal objects, dense foliage, etc. Choose a location that provides a clear path in the direction of the opposite antenna. If the antenna is co-located with another antenna, try to get at least 0.3 m (1 ft.) separation, either vertically or horizontally, between the two.

Polarization of the antenna is important. Most systems use a vertically-polarized omnidirectional antenna at the master station. Therefore, the remote antennas must also be vertically polarized (elements perpendicular to the horizon). Cross-polarization between stations can cause a signal loss of 20 dB or more.

When installed indoors, the radio must be grounded. Rail-mount versions are grounded through the mounting rail and a ground lug used on wall-mount versions. A surge arrestor must be used on the antenna for outdoor installations.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

2.4.3

Maintaining System Performance

Over time, any communications system requires a degree of preventative maintenance to ensure peak operating efficiency. Periodic checks of master and remote sites should be made to identify and correct potential problems before they become threats to system operation. The following areas should be given special attention:

Antennas and Coaxial Cable

Visually inspect the antenna and coaxial cable for physical damage, and make sure the coaxial connections are tight and properly sealed against the weather. When using directional antennas, be sure that the antenna heading has not shifted since installation.

The SWR (Standing Wave Ratio) of the antenna system can be checked from time to time using a through-line wattmeter. Defects in the antenna system will frequently show up as reflected power on the meter. It is good practice to accept only a maximum reflected power of about 5%; this corresponds to an SWR of approximately 1.5:1. For any condition exceeding this value, search for and correct the cause – damaged antenna, defective or improperly installed connectors, water in the coaxial feedline, etc.

2.4.3.1

Cable Connections

All power, data, and ground connections should be secure and free of corrosion.

2.4.3.2

Power Supply

The voltage of the station power supply should be measured to verify that it is within the operating specifications for the radio. If possible, the radio should be keyed during this test to ensure maximum current draw from the supply. Batteries, if used, should be checked for charge level and signs of leakage or corrosion.

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Section

3

This section informs you about

– mounting the radio power connections to the radio connecting Ethernet and serial communication connecting the antenna

Installation .......................................................................................................................................3-3

3.1

3.2

3.3

Mounting ............................................................................................................ 3-3

Making Connections and Powering Up............................................................... 3-6

3.2.1

Power Connections.............................................................................. 3-6

3.2.2

3.2.3

Ethernet Connections .......................................................................... 3-8

Serial Port Connections ....................................................................... 3-8

Antenna Connections ....................................................................................... 3-11

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3-1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

3-2

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Installation

3 Installation

3.1

Mounting

Figure 3-1 shows a typical RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radio installation using a Phoenix

Contact power supply, end clamps and a grounding block.

End bracket

End bracket

RF Link

Po wer

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Ground terminal block

To protective

Earth Ground

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Power supply

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Typical installation

To power source

Figure 3-1

When mounting the radio on a standard 35 mm mounting rail, end clamps should be mounted on both sides of the module(s) to stop the modules from slipping on the rail (see

Figure 3-1).

Modules are installed from left to right on the mounting rail. Install modules to mounting rail as described in the following steps.

WARNING:

Never install or remove a module while power is applied to any component on the rail.

Before installing or removing a module, disconnect power to the entire station. Make sure work on the entire station is complete before switching power back on.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

WARNING:

Do not connect or disconnect any connector while power is ON. This can cause arcing that could damage electronics or cause personal injury.

1.

Attach the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… module to the mounting rail by positioning the

keyway at the top of the module onto the mounting rail (see Figure 3-2).

Then rotate the module inward until the release latch locks the module in place on the rail. Next, check that the module is fixed securely to the rail by lightly pulling outward on the module.

Installation

1

Position on rail

2

Push in

Removal

3

Lift off rail

2

Rotate out

1

Open latch

Figure 3-2 Installation and removal from a mounting rail

3-4

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Installation

2.

Continue attaching any other module(s) to the mounting rail as described in Step 1.

Use end clamps on each side of the modules to hold them in place on the mounting rail.

3.

When all modules are installed, place an end clamp tight up against the left side of the leftmost module on the mounting rail. Then place a second end clamp tight up against the right side of the rightmost module on the mounting rail.

Ground clips built into the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… make contact with the upper edge of the rail during installation. This provides a ground path from the module to the rail. This feature allows all modules to be grounded through the mounting rail to a single earthground.

4.

Connect the mounting rail to protective earth ground using a grounding terminal block.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

3.2

Making Connections and Powering Up

3.2.1

Power Connections

External interconnecting cables are to be installed in accordance to NEC, ANSI/NFPA70

(for US applications) and Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, CSA C22.1 (for Canadian applications) and in accordance to local country codes for all other countries.

Connect a regulated Class 2 DC power source to the transceiver. The supply voltage can range from 12 to 30 V DC with a nominal voltage of either 12 V DC or 24 V DC recommended. The power supply must be able to supply 250 mA of current at 24 V DC.

Figure 3-3 shows an installation using a Phoenix Contact MINI power supply.

+ –

RF Link

Po wer

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Ground terminal block

To protective

Earth Ground

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Figure 3-3

L(+)

N(-)

Power connections for the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

+24V GND A

Power RFLink

B

1 2 3 4

3-6

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Installation

Figure 3-4 provides additional connection details to wire the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD.

7 mm

(0.28 in.)

0.2-2.5 mm

2

(14-24 AWG)

RF Link

Po we r

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Torque screws to

0.5-0.6 Nm (14-

24 lb f

-in.

Figure 3-4 Wiring requirements

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

3.2.2

Ethernet Connections

Connect a CAT5 Ethernet cable between the port on the transceiver and the network adapter card on the computer. Use either a crossover (C/O) or straight-through (1:1) cable as the radio has autocross functionality. The cable should not exceed 100 m (329 ft.) in length.

Screw terminals

RS-422/485

RF Link

Po wer

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Ethernet

Cable (RJ45)

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

3-8

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DB-9 Connector

(RS-232)

Figure 3-5 Port connections

3.2.3

Serial Port Connections

Serial ports are used to transfer data to and from other devices. Configuration is done through the Ethernet port.

RS-232 Connections

When the correct RS-232 cable is used to connect the radio (see Figure 3-5) to the

computer or PLC/industrial instrument, the TX LED on the radio will light. (This TX LED will also flash when data is passed.)

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Installation

There are two types of serial port cables that both have DB-9 (9-pin D-sub) connectors (see

Figure 3-6). One is called a straight-through 9-pin serial port cable and the other is called a

null modem cable. On a straight-through cable, it is wired as just that – straight through, in other words, pin 1 is connected to pin 1, pin 2 to pin 2, etc.

A null modem cable crosses over pins 2 and 3 (transmit and receive data) and also crosses over pins 7 and 8 (clear-to-send [CTS] and ready-to-send [RTS]). A null modem cable allows two devices to be connected together when they both function as data terminal equipment (DTE), or when they both function as data communications equipment (DCE).

By swapping the pins, it connects inputs to outputs and vice versa for proper operation.

Equipment with serial ports can be designed as either DTE or DCE. This determines the functions of pins 2 and 3, and 7 and 8. For example, if pin 7 is an output on one end, then it will have to be an input on the other end. Computers are typically DTE devices while modems and radio modems are DCE. Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), flow computers and other industrial instruments could be either DCE or DTE.

To connect a DCE device to a DTE device, a straight-through cable is used. To connect two

DCE devices together or to connect two DTE devices together, a null modem cable is required.

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Figure 3-6 RS-232 wire diagrams and pinouts

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

RS-422/485 Connections

The radio can also be connected to external devices using RS-422 or RS-485. Both 2-wire and 4-wire configurations are supported. Although the 4-wire configuration supports full duplex communications, the radio is only half duplex over the air.

RS-485 2-wire connection RS-422 4-wire connection

– +

Power RF Link

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit Receive Power RF Link

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit Receive

Figure 3-7

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RS-422/485 2-wire and 4-wire connections

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

3-10

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Installation

3.3

Antenna Connections

An antenna should be connected to the connector on the top of the radio, labeled

ANT 1

.

The connector on the radio is an MCX socket. An antenna must be connected at all times to provide a load for the RF power amplifier.

RF Link

Po wer

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Antenna Connection

(Antenna 1)

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

MCX Plug

Figure 3-8 Antenna connection

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

3-12

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Section

4

This section informs you about

– configuring the PC to communicate with the radio using the web-based configuration software

Programming the Radio ..................................................................................................................4-3

4.14

4.15

4.16

4.17

4.18

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.8

4.9

4.10

4.11

4.12

4.13

Configuring a PC to Communicate with the Radio .............................................. 4-3

Logging into the Radio........................................................................................ 4-3

Viewing Device Information ................................................................................ 4-4

General Device Information ................................................................................ 4-5

Local Diagnostics ............................................................................................... 4-6

General Configuration ........................................................................................ 4-7

LAN Configuration ............................................................................................. 4-8

SNMP Configuration........................................................................................... 4-9

Configuring the Network Filter .......................................................................... 4-10

Configuring the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… .......................................................... 4-12

4.10.1

Network Settings ............................................................................... 4-13

4.10.2

Radio Settings ................................................................................... 4-13

Radio Security .................................................................................................. 4-15

4.11.1

Static AES.......................................................................................... 4-15

Frequency Blocking .......................................................................................... 4-16

I/O Ports ........................................................................................................... 4-17

4.13.1

Ethernet Port...................................................................................... 4-17

4.13.2

4.13.3

Serial Ports ........................................................................................ 4-18

Data Streaming .................................................................................. 4-18

Passwords........................................................................................................ 4-20

Store and Retrieve Settings .............................................................................. 4-21

Performance ..................................................................................................... 4-22

Maintenance..................................................................................................... 4-24

Monitoring/Reports ........................................................................................... 4-26

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4-2

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Programming the Radio

4 Programming the Radio

4.1

Configuring a PC to Communicate with the Radio

The instructions below are for a Windows® 2000 operating system. Other operating systems will be similar but not identical. You may need to be logged in as an administrator to make these settings.

1.

2.

3.

4.

Go to the “Network Connections” dialog box, and then select “Local Area Connections”.

Right-click and select “Properties” from the context menu.

Highlight “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)”, and then click the “Properties” button (see

Figure 4-1).

Click the “Use the following IP address” button and enter

192.168.254.xxx

(xxx can be between 2 and 253) in the “IP address” field.

Enter

255.255.255.0

in the “Subnet mask” field, and then click the “OK” button.

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Figure 4-1 “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties” dialog box

4.2

Logging into the Radio

1.

2.

3.

Apply power to the transceiver and run a browser program (such as Internet Explorer) on the computer. Wait approximately 10 seconds for the radio to boot up.

Enter the following IP address into the “Address” field of the browser https://192.168.254.254

Enter the default case-sensitive credentials:

Username: Admin

Password: admin

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

4.

Check the “Agree to the terms and conditions” box, and then click the “Sign In” button.

Figure 4-2 “Sign-in” screen

Powering multiple radios with factory default IP addresses will cause a network conflict, and incorrect parameters may be set in the radios. When programming radios for the first time, it is important to apply power to only one radio at a time, and change the IP address of each radio to a unique IP address (and different from the PC). Once each radio has a unique IP address they can be powered on together. The IP address of the radio can be

changed under “Configuration… LAN… IP Configuration” and is described under Section

“LAN Configuration” on page 4-8. The new IP address must be known in order to gain

access to the radio in the future.

4.3

Viewing Device Information

– After signing in, the home page shows the following basic information.

4-4

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Figure 4-3 “Home” screen showing device configuration

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Programming the Radio

The fields in this screen are:

Name/Location

is a user adjustable field. Information on where this radio was installed or the site name is shown here. The factory default is “default location.”

LAN IP Address:

Network ID:

The System Security ID is shown here. The factory default is “default.”

Device Mode

shows if the device has been programmed as a master, slave or repeater.

Contact:

The name of the individual responsible for the operation of this radio is shown here.

Time:

The time of the radio’s internal clock.

Date:

The date of the radio’s internal clock.

Uptime:

Uptime shows how long the radio has been in operation.

Status:

This tells you if the radio is operating normally or if it has encountered any internal or configuration errors.

4.4

General Device Information

Click on “Device Information… General” in the left navigation column to view the current network configuration and device version of the transceiver.

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Figure 4-4 “General Device Information” screen

LAN IP Address:

An IP address is the logical address of a network adapter. The IP address uniquely identifies this radio on the network.

LAN Subnet Mask:

A subnet mask is a bit mask used to tell how much of an IP address identifies the subnetwork the host is on and how much identifies the host.

LAN Default Gateway:

A default gateway is a node on the network that serves as an master to a different network (possibly the Internet).

LAN MAC Address:

Media Access Control address (MAC address) is a unique identifier attached to most forms of networking equipment. It is the physical address of the hardwired

Ethernet port that is permanently assigned by the manufacturer.

Radio MAC Address:

There are separate MAC addresses for the radio and the physical

Ethernet port. This is the MAC address for the MOTR-9 radio.

Serial Number:

This is the manufacturer’s serial number of the radio.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Firmware Version:

Identifies the version of software loaded into the radio. This is important in the event upgrades become available.

Hardware Version:

Identifies the version and revision level of the circuit boards.

Radio Firmware Version:

Identifies the firmware version of the radio board.

Radio Serial Number:

The radio’s unique serial identification number.

4.5

Local Diagnostics

Click on “Device Information… Local Diagnostics” in the left navigation column to view the current status of the radio. This screen mimics the LEDs on the radio. For more information

on the status LEDs, see “LED indicators” on page 6-3.

Figure 4-5 “Local Diagnostics” screen

4-6

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Programming the Radio

4.6

General Configuration

Click on “Configuration… General” in the left navigation column to access the radio configuration parameters.

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Figure 4-6 “General Configuration” screen

The following fields are displayed:

Device Name/Location:

This field accepts text data to name this radio or location. This is only used to help the network administrator identify this radio from others.

Host Name:

This is the host name.

Domain Name:

Enter the domain name of this radio in this field, if desired. This information is text only, and has no impact on network operation.

Contact:

Enter the name of the network administrator or individual responsible for this equipment, if desired.

System Time and Date:

The time and date may be entered manually, synced with the PC’s internal clock, or downloaded from an NTP Server. The radio uses a super capacitor to allow it to retain the date and time in the event of a power outage.

To use an NTP server, the PC must either be connected to the LAN/WAN where it resides or the PC can be connected to the Internet. Either way, enter the server address. One example is the University of Houston’s NTP server, which requires the address be entered as follows: tick.uh.edu

Click the “Submit” button to write the configuration to the radio.

If no functions are performed for 10 minutes, the program will exit and all parameters must be re-configured. It is generally good practice to click the “Submit” button after all parameters are entered on each screen.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

4.7

LAN Configuration

This configuration step can be skipped if the radio is functioning as a repeater.

Click on “Configuration… LAN… IP Configuration” in the left navigation column to access the parameters related to configuring the network communication.

4-8

PHOENIX CONTACT

Figure 4-7 “LAN - IP Configuration” screen

The following fields are displayed:

LAN Link Speed and Duplex:

This determines the speed the radio communicates with the wired LAN, if applicable. Leave the setting at AUTO to have the radio determine the speed.

The radio and the device it is hardwired to must be set the same.

LAN IP Address:

Select the method your network uses to obtain IP addresses. If you are using static IP addresses, enter the IP address you wish to assign to the radio. Each device on the network must have a different IP address.

If there is a DHCP server on the network that will be used to assign IP addresses to the RAD-

ISM-900-EN-BD… modules, select “Use DHCP To Get IP Address”.

If the IP address is changed from the factory default, you will need to know this in order to log back into the radio for future configuration changes. If DHCP addressing is used, additional software may be necessary to determine the IP address based on the MAC address of the radio.

Enter a Subnet Mask and Default Gateway, if desired.

To access the Internet though this device, enter the IP address of the domain name server(s) under DNS 1 and DNS 2.

Click the “Submit” button to write the configuration to the radio.

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Programming the Radio

4.8

SNMP Configuration

The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) forms part of the Internet protocol that monitors the health and welfare of network equipment such as routers and computers.

To configure SNMP, click on “Configuration… LAN… SNMP Configuration” in the left

navigation column (see Figure 4-8).

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radios generate SNMP traps when one of the following events occurs:

– Cold start – when the device powers up.

Warm start – generated when the user invokes the Reboot option in the web interface.

Link up – generated whenever the slave configuration is changed after the wireless slave interface is restarted.

Link down – generated whenever the slave configuration is changed before the wireless slave interface is restarted.

Authentication failure – generated when the user fails to authenticate via the web interface.

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Figure 4-8 “LAN-SNMP Configuration” screen

SNMP Agent:

To disable SNMP, click Disable. SNMP v2c is enabled by default with the following settings:

Table 4-1

Community

Public

Private

Net

Default SNMP settings

Source

192.168.254.1

192.168.254.1

192.168.254.1

Access Control

Read only

Read/Write

Notify

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Community Settings:

The community setting is a string of up to 30 characters. The community name acts as a password and is used to authenticate messages sent between an SNMP slave and a device containing an SNMP server. The community name is sent in every packet between the slave and the server.

Source:

(IP Access List) The IP access list identifies those IP addresses of SNMP managers permitted to use a given SNMP community. An example of the network address format is 192.168.42.182/24. The subnet mask of the network is typically annotated in written form as a “slash prefix” that trails the network number.

Access Control:

Sets the read/write access for the community.

Secure User Configuration Settings:

This is the configuration for SNMP version 3.

User Name:

A string of up to 30 characters.

Authentication Type:

Indicates the algorithm used for authentication; it can be either MD5 or SHA, the latter one being the better algorithm.

Authentication Key:

A string of characters used for authentication. Maximum length is

42 characters.

Encryption Type:

Defines the encryption algorithm used by the SNMP protocol, and it can be either DES or AES. AES is the strongest encryption algorithm.

Encryption Key:

A string of up to 32 characters.

System Information:

Location:

The device’s physical location, a string of up to 64 characters.

Contact:

The person who manages the device, a string of up to 64 characters.

Engine ID:

Each SNMPv3 agent has an engine ID that uniquely identifies the agent in the device. The engine ID may be set by the network administrator and is unique to that internal network. It is a string of up to 48 characters.

Click the “Submit” button to write the configuration to the radio.

4.9

Configuring the Network Filter

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… has the capability of allowing or denying data packets to pass through an Ethernet port and then be broadcast over the wireless network. Packets can be filtered by IP address or by MAC address. Without the Network Filter, Ethernet traffic that is not destined for a remote device connected to a slave radio will be broadcast over-the-air.

This uses up bandwidth and may pose a security risk. The Network Filter allows a user to ensure only packets destined for remote devices connected via the radio link are sent overthe-air.

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Programming the Radio

To configure the radio parameters, click on “Configuration… LAN… Network Filter” in the left navigation column.

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Figure 4-9 “LAN - Network Filter Configuration” screen

The network filter allows features associated with a firewall to be implemented directly in the radio. By filtering out traffic that is not intended for any of the end devices connected via the radio link, the over-the-air bandwidth will be reserved for relevant data. In turn, this may allow configuring the radio network to a lower over-the-air data rate which will improve reception and/or improve range.

This feature is most commonly implemented on a master radio that may also be connected to a PC with internet access. This prevents internet traffic from being broadcast over the radio network. In some installations it may be desirable to enable it on a slave radio, if the slave radio is connected to several end devices that may need to communicate directly to one another.

To utilize the Network Filter, click the “Enable” button to begin setting rules to filter traffic.

Packets can be blocked or allowed to pass based on the rules defined in the

Network Filter

Rule

section. After enabling the specified rule, click the “Submit Network Filter Rule” button.

It will then be possible to enter rules in the “Add Network Filter Rule” screen.

To log whenever a packet is blocked based on the rules, click the “Enable” button under

Network Filter Logging. Occurrences of a blocked packet will be logged in the System Log.

Note that only one entry is logged for all occurrences of a blocked packet per rule.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Network Filter Rules:

Traffic can be filtered by IP address, MAC address or port number, or both IP address and port number or both MAC address and port number. A specific address or a range of addresses can be entered. In the “Field” menu, choose if the rule is to apply to

Source

(data coming from a radio or device),

Destination

(data going to a remote radio or device

(destination), or

Any

(data going to or from a radio or device).

After each rule is entered, click the “Add Rule” button. Each rule will then be shown in the

Active Network Filter Rules

section. Once all rules are entered, click the “Submit Network

Filter Configuration” button to write the configuration to the radio.

Network filter rules can be entered using SNMP following the MIB.

NOTE:

For an allow rule, if only the IP or MAC addresses of the end Ethernet devices connected to each slave radio are entered, you will not be able to communicate with the slave radios, via the RF link, for the purpose of changing configuration settings or remote diagnostics.

Be sure to enter the slave/repeater radio’s IP/MAC addresses in addition to the end

Ethernet devices.

4.10

Configuring the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

To configure the radio parameters, click on “Configuration… Radio… Settings” in the left navigation column.

4-12

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Figure 4-10 “Radio - Settings” screen

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Programming the Radio

4.10.1

Network Settings

Network ID:

This specifies the network on which the radio operates. To communicate to another radio, it must reside on the same network with the same network ID. Enter a value between

1

and

4096

, in decimal format.

Repeaters in Network:

This feature only needs to be set in the master radio. The repeaters and slaves within the network will automatically detect the settings.

Retransmit Broadcasts:

Enabling this feature forces the master radio to repeat every packet that is to be sent by unassured (broadcast) delivery. This feature is only available in master mode. The default is

1

.

Retries:

Defines the number of communication retries a frame may undergo before being discarded. The default is

3

, and is available in slave and repeater modes. The user may select zero to 255 tries.

Hop Pattern ID:

This feature is calculated directly from the network ID. If there are multiple networks in an area, ensure that the hop patterns are not the same. If they are, change one of the network ID numbers.

4.10.2

Radio Settings

Radio Mode:

Allows the user to select the radios mode of operation. Operational modes include Master, Slave and Repeater.

Radio ID:

A radio identification number that identifies the radio to other radios. This value must be unique on a given network. Enter a value between

1

and

4096

, in decimal format.

Data Rate:

The over the air data rate used by the radio protocol. This feature is set to

500kbps by default and is available in all three operational modes. The user may select between 125, 250 or 500 kbps. Decreasing the data rate decreases the channel width, which can improve performance in noisy environments.

Frame Size:

The user may select between Latency, Balanced, or Throughput. Smaller frames have less latency between each transmission and transfer less data. In applications with high levels of interference, Latency mode may be used to hop faster.

Larger frames hop more slowly (which may be more susceptible to interference) and send more data on each channel, which is useful for protocols that have large payloads.

This feature is set to

Latency

by default and is available in all three data rates. Latency mode has a packet size of 110 bits, Balanced has a packet size of 264 bits and

Throughput has a size of 440 bits.

Roaming:

Determines whether the radio may roam to acquire any master in the network or if a predetermined master is chosen for the slave or repeater. This feature is set to

Yes

by default, allowing any slave or repeater to connect to any master on its respective network.

Tx Power:

The transmit power of the radio. This feature is set to

+30 dBm

by default and is available in all three operational modes. The user may select between

+10 dBm

and

+30 dBm

in 1-dBm increments.

Fixed Master ID:

Defines the master or repeater radio address when roaming in disabled. This feature is disabled by default and is available in the slave and repeater operational modes. The Fixed Master ID may be between

1

and

4094

.

Alternate Fixed Master ID:

Alternate masters that can specified if the master listed in

Fixed Master ID field is unavailable. If Roaming is set to “No” and the radio is unable to link to the radio ID entered in the “Fixed Master ID” field, it will attempt to link to the radio

ID entered in the “Alternate Fixed Master ID 1” field. if the “Use Alternate Master ID” check box is enabled. If the radio is unable to link to Alternate Fixed Master ID 1, it will

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

attempt to link to the radio ID entered under “Alternate Fixed Master ID 2” field. Either of the alternate masters can be disabled by clearing the check box next to the ID field.

This setting applies to slaves and repeaters only. Note that the antennas must be selected such that all possible paths to repeaters are within the antenna’s beam width.

Before clicking a different item in the left navigation column, click the “Submit” button to transfer the changes from the browser tool to the radio. An additional message appears

(see Figure 4-11) prompting to either click the “Apply Radio Changes” button or reboot the

unit (radio). If the button is clicked, the radio re-starts the firmware and additional configurations can be made using the options in the left navigation column. This requires approximately 5 seconds. If the radio is rebooted, the reboot process requires approximately 2 minutes.

Figure 4-11 “Apply Radio Changes” button

4-14

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Programming the Radio

4.11

Radio Security

To enable over-the-air data encryption, select Configuration… Radio… Security (see

Figure 4-12).

4.11.1

Static AES

Static AES Security

- Enter a 32-digit hexadecimal “Key” for 128-bit encryption, a 48-digit hexadecimal “Key” for 192-bit encryption, a 64-digit hexadecimal “Key” for 256-bit encryption or click the “Key Generator” button and have the program generate a key automatically. Copy the key into all slave or repeater radios. They must have the same key in order to communicate.

Figure 4-12 Static AES security screen

Click the “Submit” button to write the configuration to the radio.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

4.12

Frequency Blocking

To configure frequency blocking, click on “Configuration… Radio… Frequency Blocking” in the left navigation column.

Figure 4-13 Frequency Blocking

In applications where there is a known interference problem, frequency bands can be blocked in the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radios to decrease packet loss. The amount of RF spectrum that can be blocked depends on which RF Data Rate is used.

Up to three separate frequency ranges can be blocked. The sum of the frequency ranges cannot exceed those listed in the table. The “Available Spectrum” field indicates how much more of the band can be blocked.

After inserting all frequency ranges that would cause known interference, click the “Submit”

button. An additional message appears (see Figure 4-14) prompting to click the “Apply

Radio Changes” button. This will reboot the unit and the settings will take effect.

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Figure 4-14 “Apply Radio Changes” button

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Programming the Radio

4.13

I/O Ports

4.13.1

Ethernet Port

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… can be configured to receive and transmit I/O data between devices connected to the Ethernet port of a master radio and a serial port of a slave radio.

To configure the Ethernet ports, click on “Configuration… I/O Ports… Ethernet Ports” in the left navigation column. Two advanced functions are available.

RS-485 RS-485

RS-232

Figure 4-15

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Master radio

Ethernet device

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Slave radio

Ethernet device to radio to radio serial data transfer

RS-232

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Gateway/Ethernet Terminal Radio

Enabling this feature allows data on the Ethernet port of the master radio to be redirected to the serial port(s) of the slave radios.

In the “Ethernet Terminal Port Parameters” field, enter a TCP port number. Only the data that uses this TCP port is forwarded through the serial ports. From the “Protocol type” dropdown menu, select either

TCP

or

UDP

.

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Figure 4-16 “Ethernet Ports Configuration” screen

From the “Connect to Stream” drop-down menu, select channel

1

or

2

. The Ethernet terminal port channel selected must be different from the one used for the Modbus/TCP serial channel selected; they cannot use the same serial channel.

In a broadcast configuration, the same master radio serial channel must be used as the slave radio’s serial channel in order to transmit data through the TCP ports.

The same serial channel must be selected when configuring the RS-232 or RS-422/485 port(s) on the remote radio(s). When finished, click the “Submit” button.

Modbus/TCP Gateway

Enabling this feature allows the radios to emulate a Modbus TCP to Modbus RTU converter.

Modbus TCP data packets are converted to Modbus RTU packets and redirected out the radio’s serial port(s).

4.13.2

Serial Ports

Data can be transferred between the serial port of a master radio and the serial port of a slave radio.

There are two independent serial channels (1 and 2) that allow use of the two physical serial ports on each radio (RS-232 and a RS-422/485 port). The serial port function varies depending on the radio mode of operation. Serial data transmitted from a slave radio’s serial

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Programming the Radio

port will only be available at the serial port of the master radio. Serial data transmitted from a master radio’s serial port will appear at the serial port of each slave (broadcast mode) as

shown in Figure 4-15 and Figure 4-17.

RS-485 RS-485

RS-232 RS-232

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Master radio

Figure 4-17 Radio to radio serial data transfer

Slave radio

To configure the RS-232/422/485 ports, click on “Configuration… I/O Port… Serial Ports” in the left navigation column.

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Figure 4-18 “Serial Ports Configuration” screen

The Baud Rate, Data Bits, Stop Bits, Parity, and Flow Control settings must match those of the serial device that will be connected to the port. Click the option buttons and select from the drop-down menus to configure the parameters for appropriate port, either RS-232 or

RS-485. The following fields are duplicated between the RS-232 and RS-485 ports:

Baud Rate:

Sets the speed data that flows in/out the serial port.

Data Bits

: Sets the number of bits that make up each character.

Parity:

Sets the error checking method.

Stop Bits:

Sets the number of bits that signify the end of a character.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Flow Control

(RS-232 only): Prevents buffer overflow when data streaming into the radio arrives faster than it can be sent out the serial port. The radios have a 600-byte buffer. Buffer overflow occurs when transmitting a message larger than 600 bytes because the over-theair data rate is much higher than the serial port data rate. Enable flow control to resolve this.

Full/Half Duplex

(RS-422/485 only): Sets the communication method.

Connect to Stream:

There are two independent serial streams available for network-wide serial data. There are also two independent local channels that can be used.

Click the “Submit” button to write the configuration to the radio.

4.13.3

Data Streaming

Data streaming is used to prevent buffer overflow when data streaming into the radio arrives faster than it can be sent out the serial port.

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radios have a 600-byte buffer. Buffer overflow occurs when transmitting a message larger than 600 bytes because the over-the-air data rate is much higher than the serial port data rate.

To configure the data streams, click on “Configuration... IO ports... Data streaming” in the left navigation column.

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Figure 4-19 “Data Streaming Mode Configuration” screen

The buffer is configured on a per-channel basis with each channel (serial 1, serial 2, local 1 and local 2) allowing configuration in either character mode or packet mode.

All radios on the same channel must be set to the use the same mode.

Character mode:

Passes data on the first available hop without waiting for the entire packet. Recommended for high data throughputs where checks are not necessary.

Packet mode:

Collects entire packet before sending data over the air. Recommended for smaller data transfers and where a short delay in a packet at the controller could cause an error, e.g., Ethernet IP.

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Programming the Radio

4.14

Passwords

There are administrator passwords and monitor passwords. The administrator can make changes to the configuration while a monitor can only view information.

To change or set passwords, click on “Configuration… Passwords” in the left navigation column.

Figure 4-20 “Configuration - Password Modification” screen

To change either password, the appropriate password must be entered in all three fields.

Click the “Submit” button when finished.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

4.15

Store and Retrieve Settings

To save the configuration parameters to the PC hard drive, load the factory default parameters, or send the configuration to the radio, click on “Configuration… Store Retrieve

Settings” in the left navigation column.

Figure 4-21 “Configuration -Store Retrieve Settings” screen

A passphrase is required to protect/validate the file before it can be saved or retrieved from the PC. It prevents unauthorized users from applying the system configuration file to an unauthorized node to gain access to the network.

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Programming the Radio

4.16

Performance

Several aspects of the device’s performance can be monitored. “LAN Performance” screen

(see Figure 4-22) provides information on how the Ethernet network is operating. The

“Radio Performance” screen (see Figure 4-24) offers data on how well the information is

being transmitted over the air. The “Serial Performance” screen (see Figure 4-23) presents

statistics on the RS-232/422/485 data.

To access these screens, click on “Configuration… Performance…” in the left navigation column, and then click the desired sub-menu. Each section contains a field to set the refresh interval (in seconds) of the page.

Figure 4-22 “LAN Performance” screen

Figure 4-23 “Serial Performance” screen

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

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Figure 4-24 “Radio Performance” screen

The “Radio Performance” screen displays diagnostic information about the quality of the wireless link. The upper fields provide received packet diagnostics and the lower fields display transmitted packet diagnostics.

Frames Received:

This is the total count of the frames received by the radio.

Receive Errors:

The total amount of errors in the frames that were received by the radio.

Receive Frames Dropped:

This is the number of frames that were dropped due to an error detected. A high number of dropped frames may indicate a high level of interference.

Success Percent:

The percentage of successfully received packets in the wireless link.

Lost Link Count:

The number of times that the radio lost link since the last power cycle.

Frames Transmitted:

The total number of frames transmitted by the radio.

Frames Retried:

The total number of frames that were sent more than once because an acknowledgement was not received from another radio.

Transmit Frames Dropped:

The number of frames that were dropped without being successfully received by another radio because the maximum number of retries was reached. A high number of dropped frames may indicate a high level of interference.

Frames Repeated:

The total number of frames repeated by the radio (repeaters only).

Repeat Frames Retried:

The total number of frames that were sent more than once because an acknowledgement was not received from another radio (repeaters only).

Repeat Frames Dropped:

The number of frames that were dropped without being successfully received by another radio because the maximum number of retries was reached. A high number of dropped frames may indicate a high level of interference

(repeaters only).

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Programming the Radio

4.17

Maintenance

Various maintenance capabilities are included within the management software.

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Figure 4-25 “Software Updates” screen

There are two separate firmware files for the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… radios. The first file controls the features and functions of the device as a whole. The MOTR-9 radio board has a separate firmware file to control the RF functions. Firmware update files may be released that update one or both files.

Figure 4-26 “Utilities” screen

To access the “Utilities” screen, click on “Maintenance… Network Utilities” screen in the left navigation column. The screen includes a field to enter an IP address or host name. Click the “Ping” button to find out if it is online and functional.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

The “Utilities” screen also includes a “Traceroute” field. Enter an IP address or host name in the field and click the “Traceroute” button to show the path a packet of information takes to get to its destination.

Figure 4-27 “Reboot Device” screen

The “Reboot Device” screen allows the user to reboot the device from the connected computer. This is convenient if the device is located in a remote location and is not easily accessible.

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Figure 4-28 “Radio Test” screen

The “Radio Test” screen allows transmit and receive tests to be performed. Click the

“VSWR Measurement” option button to disable the frequency-hopping mechanism and begin a constant carrier transmission at 902.7 MHz for a period of 30 seconds. This function can be used to do VSWR tests on antennas and coaxial cable, or perform antenna alignment.

Click the “Background Noise Measurement” option button to perform a sweep of the 902-

928 MHz band to take a measurement of the RF noise on each channel. The average and peak measurements will be displayed.

For accurate measurements, all other RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… devices in the network should be powered down to prevent the radio transmissions from being measured.

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Programming the Radio

4.18

Monitoring/Reports

Several screens are available that provide additional information to the user.

Figure 4-29 “Monitoring - Web Access Log” screen

Click on “Monitoring/Reports… Web Access Log” in the left navigation column to display a list of system facility messages involving web access. The log documents the user who made the changes with a date and time stamp. For example, this log records if the encryption mode was set, if the operating mode was changed, etc. The Web Access Log continues to accumulate listings until cleared. To clear the listings, click the “Clear” button.

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Figure 4-30 “Monitoring - Radio Status” screen

– Click on “Monitoring/Reports… Radio Status” to review statistics on the device’s current status.

RSSI

: The average signal strength of all packets received by the radio. A value of

-151 dBm indicates no RF link.

Units configured as a Master will not display a valid RSSI value.

Link Status

: This field will display active if a valid RF packet was received within the last 5 seconds. Otherwise, this field will display inactive.

Supply (Battery) Voltage

: Displays the voltage of the supply that is currently powering the device.

Temperature

: Displays the temperature of the device in degrees Celsius.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Figure 4-31 “Monitoring - Bridging Status” screen

Click on “Monitoring/Reports… Bridging Status” to review statistics on the interface between the radio and Ethernet connection.

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Section

5

This section informs you about

RAD I/O communications

I/O Module descriptions addressing remote I/O rotary switches register scaling wiring and fail condition DIP switches accessing the XML file

Bus Configuration for I/O Modules

(RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)..............................................................5-3

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.6

5.7

RAD I/O Communications................................................................................... 5-3

5.1.1

5.1.2

Modbus TCP I/O Emulation Operation................................................. 5-3

System Overview ................................................................................. 5-3

5.1.3

5.1.4

5.1.5

I/O System Configuration Overview ..................................................... 5-4

Configuring Radios Connected to I/O .................................................. 5-5

Configuring Radios Connected to the PLC /Modbus Master................ 5-7

I/O Module Descriptions ..................................................................................... 5-8

5.2.1

Connecting and Configuring the I/O Modules ...................................... 5-9

Addressing the Remote I/O ................................................................................ 5-9

Rotary Switches ............................................................................................... 5-16

Register Scaling ............................................................................................... 5-16

5.5.1

5.5.2

Digital Channels................................................................................. 5-16

Analog Channel Scaling..................................................................... 5-17

5.5.3

5.5.4

Pulse Input Channels ......................................................................... 5-17

Pulse Output Channels ...................................................................... 5-17

Wiring and Fail Condition DIP Switches for the I/O Modules ............................ 5-19

5.6.1

Analog Input Module .......................................................................... 5-19

5.6.2

5.6.3

Digital Input Module ........................................................................... 5-20

Analog Output Module ....................................................................... 5-21

5.6.4

5.6.5

5.6.6

5.6.7

Digital Output Module ........................................................................ 5-22

Combination Input/Output Module ..................................................... 5-23

Digital Pulse Input Module ................................................................. 5-24

Digital Pulse Output Module .............................................................. 5-27

Accessing the XML file ..................................................................................... 5-28

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5-1

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5-2

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5 Bus Configuration for I/O Modules

(RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.1

RAD I/O Communications

5.1.1

Modbus TCP I/O Emulation Operation

Modbus TCP data is sent into the radio configured as the Modbus Gateway. The data is directed to a specific TCP port number (502 for Modbus). This data is then converted to

Modbus RTU protocol and sent to all other radios in the network on one of the two available serial streams. At the remote radios, the Modbus packets are sent to the I/O ports (RS-232,

RS-485/422 or the I/O modules) that are assigned to that serial stream.

If the serial stream is assigned to I/O modules on a RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS and the

Modbus node address of the radio matches that in the packet, a standard Modbus RTU response packet will be generated. The analog I/O values are stored in the 4xxxx registers, the digital input values are stored in the 1xxxx series registers, and the digital outputs are controlled by writing to the 0xxxx registers. The 8-position rotary switch on the top of each

I/O module determines the register where each module's I/O will be located (see Table 5-1

and Table 5-2).

When a Modbus RTU response packet is received at the master radio, the radio converts the Modbus RTU packet back into a Modbus TCP packet and sends the data through the

Ethernet port to the host device.

5.1.2

System Overview

The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio allows up to eight RAD I/O modules to be controlled by a Modbus (RTU or TCP) based PLC/PC (or other Modbus master device). The group of

RAD I/O modules, connected to a RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio, act as a single Modbus slave I/O station, and communicate over a wired or wireless serial communications stream to a Modbus TCP or Modbus RTU master PLC (or other type of controlling device).

Typical I/O Applications

Many application configurations are possible including the following:

1.

A master PLC connected to any RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio and configured as either a master or slave. Configured as wireless, the master PLC controls RAD I/O attached to remotely mounted RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radios in slave mode.

2.

– a) b)

Master PLC connects to the radio's serial port and uses Modbus RTU.

Master PLC connects to the radio's Ethernet port and uses Modbus TCP.

A master PLC connected to a RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio and configured as a master. The master PLC controls both locally attached RAD I/O and controls I/O attached to remotely mounted RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radios in slave mode.

Master PLC connects to the radio’s serial port and uses Modbus RTU

Master PLC connects to the radio’s Ethernet port and uses Modbus TCP

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Additional System Flexibility

1.

2.

Any RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio can be used in applications where a master PLC communicates wirelessly to distributed PLCs that are attached to remotely mounted

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radios.

I/O communications uses only one of the two serial communication streams allowing the other stream to be used simultaneously with other devices connected to the unused serial and Ethernet ports.

5.1.3

I/O System Configuration Overview

To enable communications between the RAD I/O and a Modbus-based master, the following radio settings need to be configured.

1.

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio connected to the I/O: a) b)

The Modbus address and communications timeout of the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-

BUS radio must be set.

The I/O must be assigned to the serial or local communication stream that will be controlling them.

NOTE:

For applications where a single master is polling multiple RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS I/O stations, all the I/O stations must be set to the same serial communications stream.

2.

c) d)

When the I/O is used as a stand-alone remote I/O station, the radio is typically configured as a slave.

If the PLC/Modbus master connects to a RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio in order to use its I/O as an additional, locally mounted I/O, the radio can be configured as a wireless master. In this case, the radio’s master settings must also be configured

(refer to “Typical I/O Applications” on page 5-3).

Any RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio connected to the PLC /Modbus master: a) b) c)

The serial (RS-232) port or Ethernet port connected to the Modbus master may be assigned to a serial communication stream.

If the master is a Modbus TCP (Ethernet) device, the Modbus gateway function must be enabled. This converts the Modbus TCP commands to the Modbus RTU commands. These commands are used by the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS unit to control the I/O. The communication conversion is one-way. Only Modbus TCP commands are converted to Modbus RTU commands. A serial Modbus RTU master cannot use the Modbus gateway function to talk to other Modbus

TCP-based I/O.

The radio must be configured as a master.

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.1.4

Configuring Radios Connected to I/O

PLC Interface Configuration

To enable communication between the RAD I/O and a Modbus-based master, the Modbus address and Communications Timeout must be set, and a communications stream must be assigned. These parameters are found on the PLC Interface Configuration web page.

Configure the radio as described in the following steps so the I/O modules can be accessed.

1.

Click “Configuration… I/O Ports… PLC Interface” on the left-hand menu.

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Figure 5-1 “PLC Configuration” menu

2.

3.

4.

5.

Set

PLC Emulation Mode.

To enable communications between the RAD I/O and a Modbus-based master, the

PLC Emulation mode must be set to

MODBUS

.

Enter the

PLC Address

.

Enter the Modbus node address that you wish to assign to the radio. The address should be between 0 and 254 and must be different from all other Modbus devices in the network. A wrong address setting will result in the PLC address box resetting to 0.

Enter a

Timeout

value.

The timeout setting controls a communications watchdog timer that triggers the I/O fault mode in the event communications between the PLC/Modbus master and the I/O are disrupted. The timeout default setting is 5 seconds. Enter a value between 0 and

999 seconds. A “0” setting disables the communications watchdog timer. For more

detailed information, see “Timeout Setting for I/O Control” on page 5-5.

Enter the value to

Connect to a Stream

.

One of the two serial or local communication streams must be dedicated to handle the communication to and from the I/O. Select either of the two serial or local channels.

Since only one stream can control all the I/O in the system, the channel selected must be the same for the Modbus master, and all I/O connected to all radios.

Timeout Setting for I/O Control

A communications timeout setting is needed because there can be many intermediate radio or Ethernet segments between the Modbus (RTU or TCP) master device and the various slave radio’s I/O. Due to the multiple intermediate segments, communications can be stopped even though the radio link or Ethernet link to the radio is intact. The timeout function compares the elapsed time between the last Modbus read or write commands, and a preset value. If the actual time exceeds the timeout preset, the radio assumes that the I/O modules are no longer under control, and sets all the I/O attached to the radio to their fault state. The value should be set to the slowest machine or process function that the I/O (attached to the radio) is controlling.

It is important to note that the I/O will not fail to its fault off condition in the event of an RF link loss. The I/O will only fail to the fault off condition when the timeout setting value is reached.

Enter a value of “0” will disable the watchdog, and the fault condition will also be disabled.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

I/O Timeout Diagnostics

In the event of a timeout, the STATUS LED flashes (at a fast two flashes per second rate) indicating an application error. At the same time, the status LEDs on the I/O module(s) will turn off completely when a Modbus application error exists. In addition, the radio sends an

Ethernet error message via SNMP and makes an entry into the diagnostic log web page.

When communication is re-established by the next Modbus read or write command, the watchdog is reset, I/O communications automatically resume, an “I/O is Operational” SNMP message is sent and a web-based diagnostic log message is entered.

Figure 5-2 Example of SNMP diagnostic error message

Duplicate I/O Addresses

NOTE:

If I/O modules are installed with duplicate addresses (rotary switch settings), the I/O data will be erroneous. When installing or changing I/O modules, ensure that the status LEDs indicate a valid I/O configuration before reading or writing data to the I/O. Failure to do this may result in unexpected machine or process operation.

Control I/O from One Source

The I/O is designed for control in a typical Modbus (RTU or TCP) master slave system. For proper system operation, only one Modbus RTU or Modbus TCP master is allowed to control the I/O modules. If a second Modbus master attempts to connect, the first will be disconnected. The RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio allows the I/O to be controlled from either Ethernet-based Modbus TCP or serial interface-based Modbus RTU masters. When assigning the PLC I/O function to a communications stream, ensure that there is only one source controlling the I/O: either a single Ethernet master source or a single serial source, but NOT both. If two I/O control sources are assigned to the I/O stream, the error message

shown in Figure 5-3 is generated.

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

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Figure 5-3 Error message – Multiple I/O communication control sources on same channel

5.1.5

Configuring Radios Connected to the PLC /Modbus Master

General Configuration

To connect a RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio to a Modbus master device – either Modbus

RTU serial, or Modbus TCP Ethernet based (i.e., a PLC or PC-based controller), the radio

must be configured as a master (refer to Figure 4-7 on page 4-8).

Configuration when Connecting to a Modbus RTU Master Controller

Modbus RTU masters connect to either the RS-232 or RS-422/485 serial ports on the radio.

1.

Configure the serial port’s physical parameters (baud rate, stop bits, etc.) (refer to “I/O

Ports” on page 4-17).

2.

Configure the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS communication stream to the same communication stream as that used by the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS unit’s I/O (refer

to “Serial Ports” on page 4-18).

Configuration When Connecting to a Modbus TCP Ethernet Master Controller

Modbus TCP master devices connect to the Ethernet port on the radio.

1.

Configure the Ethernet port’s link speed and duplex settings (refer to “LAN

Configuration” on page 4-8).

2.

3.

Configure the Modbus Gateway parameter to “Network Gateway” and enter “502” as

the port number (refer to “Modbus/TCP Gateway” on page 4-18).

Configure the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS communications stream to the same communications stream as that used by the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS unit's I/O (refer

to “Serial Ports” on page 4-18).

Ensure that there is only one source controlling the I/O: either a single Ethernet master source, or a single serial source, but NOT both on the same communications stream.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5.2

I/O Module Descriptions

There are seven different I/O modules that can be used with the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS radio. They are powered from the radio through the 5-pin male/female connector on either side of the radio and I/O module. They feature an 8-position rotary switch on the top of each module for addressing.

Analog Input Module – RAD-IN-4A-I

This module has four (4) 0-22 mA current inputs. It can either accept powered loops or provide the power for a loop. The power supply for the loops is common to the radio's power supply.

Analog Output Module – RAD-OUT-4A-I

This module has four (4) 0-22 mA current outputs. It can accept either powered loops or provide the power for a loop. Each current loop is optically isolated. Internally there are four

DIP switches that determine what happens to each current channel if the radio link is lost – either “fail to 2 mA” or “maintain the last known value.”

Digital Input Module – RAD-IN-8D

This module has eight (8) digital inputs. Each input requires a voltage to trigger it. Each channel is optically isolated.

Digital Output Module – RAD-OUT-8D

This module has eight (8) digital outputs. Each output is a normally open dry contact.

Internally there are eight DIP switches that determine what happens to each channel if the radio link is lost – either “fail open” or “maintain the last known value.”

Analog/Digital I/O Module – RAD-IN+OUT-2D-1A-I

This module has a mix of inputs and outputs – 1 analog input, 1 analog output, 2 discrete inputs and 2 discrete outputs. Internally there are DIP switches that determine the fail condition of the outputs in a similar fashion as described in the above modules.

Pulse Input Module – RAD-IN-2D-CNT

This module has two configurable pulse or frequency inputs. A 5-position DIP switch inside the module is used to set the mode of each channel, as well as the input impedance, coupling, speed, and input type (single-ended or differential). It is compatible with the following common pulse generating devices:

– AC sine wave output devices such as magnetic transducers.

Digital pulse output devices such as microprocessor-based flow meters.

Mechanical relay pulse output devices or toggle switches.

Pulse Output Module – RAD-OUT-2D-CNT

This module has two configurable pulse or frequency outputs. A 4-position DIP switch inside the module is used to set the mode of each channel as well as the speed (high or low).

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.2.1

Connecting and Configuring the I/O Modules

1.

2.

3.

4.

Remove the plastic housing from the output modules and set the fail condition DIP

switches as desired for each channel. Refer to “Wiring and Fail Condition DIP Switches for the I/O Modules” on page 5-19 for more details.

Connect the I/O modules and radio to the mounting rail, and slide them together so the

5-pin male/female connectors mate.

Set the 8-position rotary switch on the I/O modules so each I/O module connected to the radio has a unique address.

Wire the analog and discrete signals. Next, connect the antenna and apply power.

5.3

Addressing the Remote I/O

Table 5-1 Modbus Memory Map

00xxx

1 Reserved

2 Reserved

3 Reserved

4-16 Reserved

17-24 Module #1 digital outputs

25-32

33-40

Reserved

Module #2 digital outputs

41-48

49-56

57-64

65-72

73-80

81-88

89-96

97-104

105-112

Reserved

Module #3 digital outputs

Reserved

Module #4 digital outputs

Reserved

Module #5 digital outputs

Reserved

Module #6 digital outputs

Reserved

Each radio must have a unique Modbus address programmed into it. I/O modules attached to each radio have their analog, discrete, or frequency inputs and outputs mapped to registers. When a command from the master PLC (through the Modbus TCP Gateway radio) is broadcast to all remote radios, they read the address to determine if they should respond. Within each command there is a read or write request to certain registers.

Table 5-1 and Table 5-2 are address maps that correlate each I/O channel to a Modbus

register. The different columns relate to different address ranges. For instance, the module

#1 digital outputs are maintained in registers 00017 - 00024.

Note that the registers 40001, 40002, and 40003 show the RSSI, internal temperature and power supply voltage. The RSSI is presented as a positive number. Add the negative sign to determine the RSSI in –dB. For example, if 67 is the value in the register, the RSSI is

-67dB. The internal temperature is expressed in degrees Celsius and the power supply voltage in volts.

10xxx

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Module #1 digital inputs

Reserved

Module #2 digital inputs

Reserved

Module #3 digital inputs

Reserved

Module #4 digital inputs

Reserved

Module #5 digital inputs

Reserved

Module #6 digital inputs

Reserved

40xxx

RSSI

Power Supply Voltage

Temperature

Reserved

Module #1 raw analog inputs

Module #1 raw analog outputs

Module #2 raw analog inputs

Module #2 raw analog outputs

Module #3 raw analog inputs

Module #3 raw analog outputs

Module #4 raw analog inputs

Module #4 raw analog outputs

Module #5 raw analog inputs

Module #5 raw analog outputs

Module #6 raw analog inputs

Module #6 raw analog outputs

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5-9

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Table 5-1

569

570

571

572

159

160

161

162

501-508

509-516

517-524

525-532

565

566

567

568

533-540

541-548

549-556

557-564

151

152

153

154

155

156

157

158

113-120

121-128

129-136

137-144

00xxx

Module #7 digital outputs

Reserved

Module #8 digital outputs

Reserved

145 Reserved

146 Reserved

147

148

149

150

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Modbus Memory Map (continued)

10xxx

Module #7 digital inputs

Reserved

Module #8 digital inputs

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Module #1 digital inputs

Module #2 digital inputs

Module #3 digital inputs

Module #4 digital inputs

Module #5 digital inputs

Module #6 digital inputs

Module #7 digital inputs

Module #8 digital inputs

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

5-10

PHOENIX CONTACT

40xxx

Module #7 raw analog inputs

Module #7 raw analog outputs

Module #8 raw analog inputs

Module #8 raw analog outputs

Reserved

Reserved

Module #1 digital inputs

Module #1 digital outputs

Module #2 digital inputs

Module #2 digital outputs

Module #3 digital inputs

Module #3 digital outputs

Module #4 digital inputs

Module #4 digital outputs

Module #5 digital inputs

Module #5 digital outputs

Module #6 digital inputs

Module #6 digital outputs

Module #7 digital inputs

Module #7 digital outputs

Module #8 digital inputs

Module #8 digital outputs

Module #1 scaled analog inputs

Module #2 scaled analog inputs

Module #3 scaled analog inputs

Module #4 scaled analog inputs

Module #5 scaled analog inputs

Module #6 scaled analog inputs

Module #7 scaled analog inputs

Module #8 scaled analog inputs

Module #1 digital inputs

Module #2 digital inputs

Module #3 digital inputs

Module #4 digital inputs

Module #5 digital inputs

Module #6 digital inputs

Module #7 digital inputs

Module #8 digital inputs

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

954

955

956

957

950

951

952

953

769

770

771

772

765

766

767

768

701-708

709-716

717-724

725-732

733-740

741-748

749-756

757-764

Table 5-1 Modbus Memory Map (continued)

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

00xxx

Module #1 digital outputs

Module #2 digital outputs

Module #3 digital outputs

Module #4 digital outputs

Module #5 digital outputs

Module #6 digital outputs

Module #7 digital outputs

Module #8 digital outputs

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

10xxx

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

40xxx

Module #1 scaled analog outputs

Module #2 scaled analog outputs

Module #3 scaled analog outputs

Module #4 scaled analog outputs

Module #5 scaled analog outputs

Module #6 scaled analog outputs

Module #7 scaled analog outputs

Module #8 scaled analog outputs

Module #1 digital outputs

Module #2 digital outputs

Module #3 digital outputs

Module #4 digital outputs

Module #5 digital outputs

Module #6 digital outputs

Module #7 digital outputs

Module #8 digital outputs

Module #1 ID

Module #2 ID

Module #3 ID

Module #4 ID

Module #5 ID

Module #6 ID

Module #7 ID

Module #8 ID

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5-11

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Table 5-2 Modbus Pulse Memory Map

25

26

27

28

20

21

22

23

24

00xxx

17 Module #1 Input 1 Value Control Bit

18 Module #1 Input 2 Value Control Bit

19

39

40

41

42

35

36

37

38

29

30

31

32

33 Module #2 Input 1 Value Control Bit

34 Module #2 Input 2 Value Control Bit

43

44

45

46

51

52

53

47

48

49 Module #3 Input 1 Value Control Bit

50 Module #3 Input 2 Value Control Bit

5-12

PHOENIX CONTACT

40xxx

Module #1 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #1 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #1 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #1 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #1 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #1 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #1 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #1 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #1 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #2 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #2 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #2 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #2 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #2 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #2 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #2 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #2 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #2 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #3 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #3 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Input 2 LSW Value

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

Table 5-2

00xxx

58

59

60

61

54

55

56

57

62

63

64

65 Module #4 Input 1 Value Control Bit

88

89

90

91

84

85

86

87

76

77

78

79

72

73

74

75

66 Module #4 Input 2 Value Control Bit

67

68

69

70

71

80

81 Module #5 Input 1 Value Control Bit

82 Module #5 Input 2 Value Control Bit

83

Modbus Pulse Memory Map (continued)

40xxx

Module #3 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #3 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #3 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #3 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #3 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #3 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #3 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #4 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #4 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #4 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #4 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #4 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #4 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #4 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #4 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #4 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #5 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #5 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #5 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #5 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

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5-13

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Table 5-2

104

105

106

107

100

101

102

103

00xxx

92

93

94

95

96

97 Module #6 Input 1 Value Control Bit

98 Module #6 Input 2 Value Control Bit

99

108

109

110

111

112

113 Module #7 Input 1 Value Control Bit

114 Module #7 Input 2 Value Control Bit

115

120

121

122

123

116

117

118

119

124

125

126

127

128

129 Module #8 Input 1 Value Control Bit

Modbus Pulse Memory Map (continued)

40xxx

Module #5 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #5 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #5 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #5 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #5 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #6 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #6 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #6 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #6 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #6 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #6 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #6 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #6 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #6 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #7 Input 1 LSW Value

Module #7 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #7 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #7 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #7 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #7 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #7 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #7 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #7 Output 2 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #8 Input 1 LSW Value

5-14

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

Table 5-2 Modbus Pulse Memory Map (continued)

00xxx

130 Module #8 Input 2 Value Control Bit

131

136

137

138

139

132

133

134

135

140

141

142

143

144

40xxx

Module #8 Input 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Input 1 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Input 1 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Input 2 LSW Value

Module #8 Input 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Input 2 LSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Input 2 MSW Value Store (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Output 1 LSW Value

Module #8 Output 1 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #8 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

Module #8 Output 2 LSW Value

Module #8 Output 2 MSW Value (Pulse mode only)

Module #8 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation LSW

Module #8 Output 1 Absolute or Differential Operation MSW

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5-15

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5.4

Rotary Switches

On the top of each I/O module is an 8-position rotary switch. In the address maps in

Table 5-1 and Table 5-2 there are references to module numbers. These module numbers

refer to the position of the rotary switch. Each module must have a different number.

5-16

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Figure 5-4 I/O module 8-position rotary switch

5.5

Register Scaling

5.5.1

Digital Channels

A digital output channel can be turned on by writing a “1” to the digital output register, and off by writing a “0” to the output register.

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.5.2

Analog Channel Scaling

Analog channels are scaled as follows:

Current Input =

(Register Value) • 22 mA

32767

Current Output =

(X mA) • 32767

22 mA

5.5.3

Pulse Input Channels

If the input channel is set to frequency mode, the value displayed in the corresponding register will be the input signal frequency in Hz (0-32 kHz).

If the pulse input channel is set to counter mode, each channel will have a 32-bit register

(two consecutive 16-bit registers) assigned to it. The first (LSW) register keeps the current count (up to 32,767). To manually reset a channel to zero (0), simply write a “1” to the coil register that corresponds to that channel. Refer to the address map in this section to determine the correct register. A channel is reset to zero when the coil transitions from a “0” to a “1.”

NOTE:

If a pulse input channel is set to counter mode, you may need to periodically reset the register to prevent overflow. To reset a channel to zero, simply write a “1” to the coil register that corresponds to that channel. Refer to the address map to determine which register. A reset command is executed when the coil transitions from a “0” to a “1.”

5.5.4

Pulse Output Channels

If the output channel is set to frequency mode, the value entered in the corresponding register will be the output signal frequency in Hz (0-32 kHz). In frequency mode, the only register that will respond to PLC commands is the least significant word (LSW). Because the most significant word (MSW) exceeds the maximum pulse frequency that the module can produce, any values written to it will be ignored.

If the pulse output channel is set to counter mode, each channel will have a 32-bit register

(two consecutive 16-bit registers) assigned to it. The counter mode has two different types of operations: (1) absolute count and (2) differential count. The two modes are described in the following paragraphs.

Absolute Mode

Pulses produced = New pulse count - Previous pulse count

In absolute mode, the total number of pulses provided is equal to the pulse output register value.

For example, if the previous value in the register was 5 and a new value of 15 is written, 10 pulses will be produced. However, if a new value of 3 were written, the pulse module would produce enough pulses to wrap the 32-bit register around until it is reset to 0 and then deliver 3 more pulses. Therefore, the pulse register should be cleared periodically.

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Differential Mode

Pulses produced = New pulse count

In differential mode, the number of pulses produced is equal to each new value written to the pulse output register.

For example, if a value of 10 was written to the pulse output register, 10 pulses would be produced. If a new value of 5 were written, 5 more pulses would be produced.

To initialize absolute or differential counts, refer to the address map to determine which registers are used to control the operation mode. Absolute mode is initialized by writing 0 to both control registers: differential mode is specified by writing 1 to the LSW and 0 to the

MSW.

Clearing A Counter Register

To clear a counter register when using Modbus RTU protocol, use function code 16

(multiple register write) and write a value of 0 (LSW), -32768 (MSW) to the pulse output counter.

NOTE:

When counter mode is selected, if the number of counts to be delivered is not complete before a new pulse count is written to the register, the new counts are added to the existing count.

NOTE:

(For OPC Servers)

If using an OPC server, it may not write the clear register values with a single instruction.

Use differential mode if the OPC server commands cannot clear the counter. There is no need to clear counters in differential mode.

5-18

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5.6

Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

Wiring and Fail Condition DIP Switches for the I/O

Modules

5.6.1

Analog Input Module

If using the Analog Input Module, use the wiring diagram shown in Figure 5-5.

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Figure 5-5 RAD-IN-4A-I Analog Input Module wire diagram

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5-19

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5.6.2

Digital Input Module

If using a Digital (Discrete) Input Module, use the wiring diagram shown in Figure 5-6.

5-20

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Figure 5-6 RAD-IN-8D Digital Input Module wire diagram

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.6.3

Analog Output Module

If using the Analog Output Module, use the wiring diagram shown in Figure 5-7.

Inside the Analog Output Module are DIP switches that allow the user to determine the status of each channel if the RF link is lost. The options are Maintain Last State and Fault

Off to a current value of approximately 2 mA. Release the top part of the housing to access the internal DIP switches.

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Figure 5-7 RAD-OUT-4A-I Analog Output Module wire diagram

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5-21

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5.6.4

Digital Output Module

If using the Digital Output Module, use the wiring diagram shown in Figure 5-8.

Inside of the Digital Output Module are DIP switches that allow the user to determine the status of each channel if the RF link is lost. The options are Maintain Last State or Fault Off

(open circuit). Release the top part of the housing to access the internal DIP switches.

5-22

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Figure 5-8 RAD-IN-OUT-8D-REL Digital Output Module wire diagram

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.6.5

Combination Input/Output Module

If using the Combo Module, use the wiring diagram shown in Figure 5-9.

Inside of the Combo Module are DIP switches that allow the user to determine the status of each channel if the RF link is lost. The options are Maintain Last State or Fault Off (open circuit). Release the top part of the housing to access the internal DIP switches.

2476_en_I

Figure 5-9 RAD-OUT-8D-REL Digital Output Module wire diagram

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5-23

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5.6.6

Digital Pulse Input Module

The Digital Pulse Input Module accepts pulse signals from many different types of devices.

5-24

PHOENIX CONTACT

Figure 5-10 RAD-IN-2D-CNT Pulse Input Module wire diagram

Backup Power

The Digital Pulse Input Module will retain its pulse count if power is removed; however, it will not record any new pulses. Terminals 5 and 6 are used for connecting the backup power supply to the module. If primary power (through the bus connector from the radio) is lost, the backup power supply allows the module to continue to record pulses. The backup power terminals will not supply power to the transceiver or any other module on the bus connector.

DIP Switch Settings

Refer to Figure 5-9 on page 5-23 for DIP switch configurations.

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Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

AC/DC Coupling

Set the jumper to AC Coupling if the pulse voltage will never drop below 3.6 V with respect to the transceiver's power supply negative. This would apply where there is a DC bias voltage added to the pulse input voltage, and the DC bias exceeds 3.6 V, such as in a ground loop condition. All other applications, including an AC sine wave input, should be set to DC Coupling.

Low/High Input Impedance

The low impedance setting has an input impedance of 1 k



and the high setting has an impedance of 90 k

. High impedance should be used with magnetic transducers to prevent the current draw from dropping the voltage below the 100 mV AC peak-to-peak minimum.

The low impedance setting should be used with digital and relay interfaces because the additional current draw will prevent electrical noise from causing false pulse counts.

Counter/Frequency Operating Mode

The pulse input values can be stored in the PLC register in two formats; either a count of the number of pulses or a frequency value. The frequency setting will take the average number of pulses every second.

Low/High Speed Operation

The low speed pulse setting is restricted to a maximum input frequency of 2 Hz with a minimum pulse width of 70 ms. The high speed setting is designed for pulse frequencies up to 32 kHz and requires a 10 µs minimum pulse width. Use the low speed setting for mechanical pulse generating devices such as relays and the high speed setting for all other applications. The low speed setting prevents contact bounce from being recorded as pulses.

Single Ended/Differential Input

If the pulse signal is expected to be of negative polarity with respect to ground, set the module to a different input. If the signal is to remain positive at all times, set it to single ended.

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5-25

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Diagnostic LEDs

There are four diagnostic LEDs on the Digital Pulse Input Module. See Figure 5-11 for the

meaning of each LED.

5-26

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Figure 5-11 Description of RAD-IN-2CNT Digital Pulse Input Module LEDs

2476_en_I

Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

5.6.7

Digital Pulse Output Module

The Digital Pulse Output Module accurately reproduces pulse counts or frequency outputs from data contained in PLC registers. It is compatible with mechanical relays and electronic pulse input devices. Upon power loss, the pulse output is set to 0 Hz.

2476_en_I

Figure 5-12 RAD-OUT-2D-CNT Digital Pulse Output Module wire diagram

DIP Switch Settings

The DIP switch settings listed below are applicable for both channel 1 and channel 2. Refer

to Figure 5-12 for DIP switch configurations.

Counter/Frequency Mode

When counter mode is selected, the module will output a specific number of pulses as determined by the PLC value written to it. If frequency mode is selected, the pulse output module will generate pulses with a 50% duty cycle. In frequency mode, the low or high speed switch setting is ignored.

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5-27

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Low/High Speed Operation

This switch setting only impacts counter mode. If high speed is selected, the pulses will be sent at a frequency of 10 kHz with a 50% duty cycle. If low speed is selected, the pulses will be sent at a frequency of 10 Hz also with a 50% duty cycle.

Diagnostic LEDs

There are three diagnostic LEDs on the Digital Pulse Output Module. See Figure 5-13 for

the meaning of each LED.

5-28

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Figure 5-13 Description of RAD-OUT-2D-CNT Digital Pulse Output Module LEDs

5.7

Accessing the XML file

To access the read-only XML file containing the status of the I/O modules, do the following:

1.

Open a web browser and enter the IP address of the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS with connected I/O modules.

2.

Log onto the radio using the appropriate password. Then click the link on the left-hand menu to view the file. To access the file using a custom program, such as a Microsoft

Excel spreadsheet, enter the IP address of the radio to be accessed in the following format:

– https://aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd/iodata.xml

2476_en_I

Bus Configuration for I/O Modules (RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS only)

Figure 5-14 is an example of how the data is displayed for two I/O modules with rotary

switch settings 5 and 6:

Figure 5-14 Example of data display

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5-29

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

5-30

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2476_en_I

This section informs you about

LED indicators and their meaning connecting and measuring signal strength using the RSSI test port diagnosis of various problems

Section

6

Troubleshooting ..............................................................................................................................6-3

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

LED indicators .................................................................................................... 6-3

RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) ......................................................... 6-4

General Troubleshooting .................................................................................... 6-5

Resetting the IP Address .................................................................................... 6-6

6.4.1

DOS command .................................................................................... 6-6

6.4.2

Hardware Reset................................................................................... 6-6

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6-1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

6-2

PHOENIX CONTACT

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Troubleshooting

6 Troubleshooting

6.1

LED indicators

Figure 6-1 defines the LED indicator meanings for the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD radios.

Figure 6-1

2

3

4

5

Power RF Link

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit Receive

1

6

7

8

9

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

LED locations

Table 6-1

No.

1

2

2

3

2

4

2

5

2

6

7

8

9

1

2

LED Descriptions

LED Name

Status

RS-485 RX

RS-485 TX

RS-232 RX

RS-232 TX

RF Link

RF Data

WAN Speed

WAN Link

LED Color LED Status

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

ON

Flashing slowly

Flashing fast

Flashing

Flashing

Flashing

Flashing

ON

Flashing

ON

OFF

Flashing

Typical application error is an invalid configuration

Not applicable for RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B

Description

Normal operation

Internal error

Application error

1

RS-422/485 data receive

RS-422/485 data transmit

RS-232 data receive

RS-232 data transmit

RF link is established

Data is being transferred/received

100Base-T connection

10Base-T connection

Data is detected on Ethernet port

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6-3

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

6.2

RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator)

The RSSI test point allows measurement of the received radio signal at each slave radio

(see Figure 6-2). RSSI will not function on a master because there is no method of

determining which slave is connected. The RSSI is a voltage output, ranging from

0-3.5 V DC, and can be measured using a standard voltmeter.

The positive connection for the multimeter is made on the RSSI test point of the radio and the negative connection to the power supply ground. An adapter is available that will connect to the RSSI connector to allow permanent monitoring of the RSSI voltage

(Order No. 0201744 for the test connector and Order No. 0201663 for the insulating sleeve).

RF Link

Po wer

FLBL-2938-03R2

Transmit

Receive

Common probe (–) to terminal No. 2 (GND)

0 to 3.5 V DC

6-4

PHOENIX CONTACT

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

Figure 6-2

Positive probe (–) to

RSSI connector

RSSI voltage strength check

-65

-70

-75

8 0

8 5

-90

-50

-55

-60

-95

-100

-105

1.50

Figure 6-3

2.00

2.50

Volts

Signal strength to voltage comparison

3 .00

3 .50

500 kbps

250 kbps

125 kbps

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Troubleshooting

6.3

General Troubleshooting

When troubleshooting a network, the first step is to ensure there is a good radio signal.

Once a good signal is established, check the wiring between the radio and external devices.

After the wiring is verified, adjust any configuration parameters.

The most practical method of troubleshooting a system is to place all of the components on a table so that all radios are within 3 m (10 ft.) of each other. This way there will be a strong radio signal, and programming each radio will not involve traveling to a remote site. Refer to

Table 7-1 to help identify various problems and possible solutions.

Table 6-2 Troubleshooting Procedures

PROBLEM

Unable to open web-based management

No radio link when radios are within 3 m (10 ft.) of each other.

No radio link (field installed)

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

SOLUTION

Ensure power is applied to radio.

Ensure cable is connected between PC and radio

(WAN LINK LED will be on if cable is connected).

Verify network settings of PC match network settings of radio.

The LAN Link and Duplex selection in the radio must match the settings of the connected, wired network. Select Auto if in doubt.

Confirm IP address of radio. If IP address is unknown, it can be set using a DOS command.

See Section 6.4, “Resetting the IP Address”.

1.

2.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Ensure one radio is programmed as a master and the others as slaves.

Confirm security settings match in each radio.

Check to ensure antennas are connected and aimed properly.

Inspect antenna connections; they must be tight and corrosion free.

Increase the mounting height of the antenna to improve the line-of-sight.

Install larger gain antenna (and/or decrease coaxial cable loss).

Check the power supply to ensure sufficient current capacity.

Make sure the center pin of the antenna’s coaxial cable is not shorted to ground.

PHOENIX CONTACT

6-5

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Table 6-2 Troubleshooting Procedures

PROBLEM

Able to send data, but no response from remote device

1.

SOLUTION

Verify network settings in remote device match those of the radios and LAN.

a) b) c) d)

Each device must have a unique IP address in the same network (e.g. 192.168.254.xxx).

The Subnet Mask must be the same in each device.

The LAN Link and Duplex selection in the radio must match the settings of the connected, wired network. Select Auto if in doubt.

Ensure encryption settings match in all units.

6.4

Resetting the IP Address

If the IP address is unknown, access to the radio can be restored by changing the IP address using either a DOS command or a hardware reset.

6.4.1

DOS command

Click the “Start… Run” buttons and type “cmd” in the “open” field. Click the “OK” button and a DOS window opens. At the prompt, do the following steps.

1.

Type “arp -s (desired IP address) (MAC address of radio)” in the DOS window.

2.

3.

For example: arp -s 192.168.254.200 00-aa-00-62-c6-09

Click the “Enter” button.

Type “ping -l 1040 (IP address)” in the DOS window.

For example: ping -l 1040 192.168.254.200

The character in “ping -l” is a lower case “L.” If the IP address assignment is successful, a reply message appears. To abort the ping, press the <Ctrl>+<C> keys.

6.4.2

Hardware Reset

2.

3.

4.

The hardware reset will restore the default IP address 192.168.254.254 as well as the default user passwords “admin” for the Admin user and “monitor” for the Monitor user. To initiate a hardware reset,

1.

Disconnect power from the radio.

Insert a jumper across pins 2 and 3 on the DB-9 RS-232 port.

Reconnect power.

Once startup is complete, remove the jumper.

6-6

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2476_en_I

Troubleshooting

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B Reset Button

Without the RS-232 port, the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B relies on a reset button accessed through the venting slots in the bottom of the housing.

Screwdriver

Reset button

2476_en_I

Figure 6-4 RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B Reset button

1.

Locate the reset button on the bottom of the radio within the second middle vent.

NOTE:

Press the reset button gently. You should feel a soft click as it is pressed. If pressed too hard, it can damage the connection to the circuit board or damage the circuit board itself.

2.

3.

4.

Use a flat screwdriver to press and hold the reset button for approximately 10 seconds with the radio powered on and fully booted.

After approximately 10 seconds, release the reset button and allow the radio to reboot.

Once rebooted, the radio will return to the factory password defaults and an IP address of 192.168.254.254.

For technical support, contact Phoenix Contact Technical Service. Please have the model number of the radio available.

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6-7

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

6-8

PHOENIX CONTACT

2476_en_I

Section

7

This section informs you about

Ordering information

Technical data

Technical and Ordering Data ..........................................................................................................7-3

7.1

7.2

Ordering Data ..................................................................................................... 7-3

7.1.1

7.1.2

Products .............................................................................................. 7-3

Accessories ........................................................................................ 7-3

Technical Data ................................................................................................... 7-4

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

7-2

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2476_en_I

Technical and Ordering Data

7 Technical and Ordering Data

7.1

Ordering Data

Description

Radio

, 900 MHz

Radio

, 900 MHz includes bus connection

Radio

, 900 MHz, without serial port

7.1.1

Products

Type

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B

Order No.

2900016

2900017

2901205

Pcs.Pkt.

1

1

1

7.1.2

Accessories

Description Type

Module,

8-channel digital input

Module,

8-channel digital output with relays

Module,

4-channel analog input

Module,

4-channel analog output

Module,

8-channel digital input and 2-channel analog output

Module,

pulse input

Module,

pulse output

RAD-IN-8D

RAD-OUT-8D-REL

RAD-IN-4A-I

RAD-OUT-4A-I

RAD-IN+OUT-2D-1A-I

RAD-IN-2D-CNT

RAD-OUT-2D-CNT

Antenna

, 0 dB gain, omni-directional, 1.8 m (6 ft.) cable, MCX connector (male) RAD-ISM-900-ANT-OMNI-0-6

Antenna

, 3 dB gain, omni-directional fiberglass, type N connector (female) RAD-ISM-900-ANT-OMNI-FG-3-N

Antenna

, 6 dB gain, omni-directional fiberglass, type N connector (female)

Antenna

, 6.5 dB gain, yagi-directional, 7.6 m (25 ft.) RG213 cable, type N connector (male) CN-UB, and MCX-to-N adapter

Antenna

, 6.5 dB gain, yagi-directional, 15.2 m (50 ft.) LMR400 cable, type N connector (male) CN-UB, and MCX-to-N adapter

Enclosure

, NEMA 4X pre-wired, includes MINI-UPS, power distribution and surge protection for 900 MHz radio system

Cable

, 7.6 m (25 ft.) RG213 with type N connectors (male)

Surge protection

, bulkhead mount for 900 MHz radio

Adapter cable

, 1.2 m (4 ft.) RG316 with type N (male) and MCX (male) connectors

RAD-ISM-900-ANT-OMNI-FG-6-N

RAD-ISM-900-ANT-YAGI-6.5-25-

AS

RAD-ISM-900-ANT-YAGI-6.5-50-

AS

RAD-SYS-NEMA4X-900

RAD-CAB-RG213-25

CN-UB-280DC-BB-ASSY

RAD-CON-MCX90-N-SS

2867827

2917188

2867597

5603859

2885207

Order No.

2867144

2867157

2867115

2867128

2867322

2885223

2885236

2867160

2867791

2885579

2867827

1

1

1

1

1

Pcs.Pkt.

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

PHOENIX CONTACT

7-3

2476_en_I

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

General Data

Mounting

Dimensions (W x H x D)

Weight

Case material

Operating temperature

Storage temperature

Relative humidity

Degree of protection

LED indicators

Supply Voltage

Power

Connection

Current consumption, maximum

RF Link contact

Serial Ports

1

Port connections

Baud rate (bps)

1

Not applicable for RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B

Ethernet

Port connection

Ethernet transmission rate

Wireless Interface

Frequency

Transmit power

Antenna connector

Receive sensitivity

RSSI test point

Approval/Conformance

FCC/IC

UL

7-4

PHOENIX CONTACT

7.2

Technical Data

NS35 mounting rail (EN 60715)

52 x 99 x 115 mm (2.1 x 3.90 x 4.5 in.)

296 g

Polyamide PA non-reinforced with aluminum heatsink

-40 to 65°C (-40 to 149°F)

-40 to 75°C (-40 to 167°F)

10 … 95% non-condensing

IP20

Status: solid indicates normal operation; flashing indicates error

RS-485TX: flashing indicates RS-422/485 data transmitting

RS-485RX: flashing indicates RS-422/485 data receiving

RS-232TX: flashing indicates RS-232 data transmitting

RS-232RX: flashing indicates RS-232 data receiving

RF LINK: solid when RF link is established; flashes with no radio connection

RF DATA: flashes when data is sent/received

WAN LINK: flashes when data is detected on Ethernet port

WAN SPEED: solid when 100Base-T connection exists

12 … 30 V DC, Class 2

Screw-type terminal, 12-24 AWG

250 mA @ 24 V DC

0.5 A 30 V DC

RS-232; 9-pin D-sub female

RS-422/485; 4-pin pluggable screw terminal block

300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 54900, 115200

RJ45

10/100 Mbps

902-928 MHz

10 mW (10 dBm) – 1 W (30 dBm); adjustable in 1-dBm increments

MCX female

500 kbps: -92 dBm

250 kbps: -98 dBm

125 kbps: -102 dBm

0 … 3.5 V DC

Part 15, Section 247

Class I, Div. 2 Groups A, B, C, D

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Technical Appendix

A 1 Structure of IP Addresses

A 1.1

Valid IP Parameters

IP parameters comprise the following three elements: “IP address,” “subnet mask,” and

“default gateway/router.”

Valid IP Addresses are:

000.000.000.001 to 126.255.255.255 and 128.000.000.000 to 223.255.255.255

Valid Subnet Masks are:

255.000.000.000 to 255.255.255.252

Default Gateway/Router:

The IP address of the gateway/router must be in the same subnetwork as the address of the switch.

A 2 Assigning IP Addresses

The IP address is a 32-bit address. See Figure A-1. The IP address consists of a network part and a user part. The network part consists of the network class and the network

address. There are currently five defined network classes (see Table A-1). Classes A, B,

and C are used in modern applications, while classes D and E are hardly ever used. It is therefore usually sufficient if a network device only “recognizes” classes A, B, and C.

Figure A-1 Location of bits within the IP address

With binary representation of the IP address, the network class is represented by the first bits. The key factor is the number of “ones” before the first “zero.” The assignment of classes

is shown in Table A-1. The empty cells in the table are not relevant to the network class and

are already used for the network address.

With binary representation of the IP address, the network class is represented by the first bits. The key factor is the number of “ones” before the first “zero.” The assignment of classes

is shown in Table A-1. The empty cells in the table are not relevant to the network class and

are already used for the network address.

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A-1

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Table A-1 Class Assignments

Class A

Class B

Class C

Class D

Class E

Bit 1

0

1

1

1

1

Bit 2

0

1

1

1

Bit 3

0

1

1

Bit 4

0

1

Bit 5

0

The bits for the network class are followed by those for the network address and user address. Depending on the network class, a different number of bits are available, both for

the network address (network ID) and the user address (host ID) (see Table A-2).

Table A-2 Network and User Class Bit Assignments

Network ID

7 bits

14 bits

21 bits

21-bit multicast identifier

27 bits

Host ID

Class A

Class B

Class C

Class D

Class E

IP addresses can be represented in decimal or hexadecimal form. In decimal form, bytes are separated by dots (dotted decimal notation) to show the logical grouping of the

individual bytes (see Figure A-2).

The decimal points do not divide the address into a network and user address. Only the value of the first bits (before the first “zero”) specifies the network class and the number of remaining bits in the address.

Class A

0.0.0.0 - 127.255.255.255

Class B

128.0.0.0 - 191.255.255.255

Class C

192.0.0.0 - 233.255.255.255

Class D

224.0.0.0 - 239.255.255.255

Class E

240.0.0.0 - 247.255.255.255

Figure A-2

7 bits

0 Network ID

14 bits

24 bits

Host ID

16 bits

1

1

1

0

1 0

1 1 0

1 1 1 1 0

Network ID

21 bits

Host ID

8 bits

Network ID

28 bits

Identifier for multicast group

27 bits

Reserved for future applications

Host ID

Structure of IP Addresses

A-2

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Assigning IP Addresses

A 2.1

Special IP Addresses for Special Applications

Certain IP addresses are reserved for special functions. The following addresses should not be used as standard IP addresses.

127.x.x.x Addresses

The class A network address “127” is reserved for a loopback function on all PCs, regardless of the network class. This loopback function may only be used on networked

PCs for internal test purposes.

If a telegram is addressed to a PC with the value 127 in the first byte, the receiver immediately sends the telegram back to the transmitter. In this way, it is possible to check, for example, whether the TCP/IP software is correctly installed and configured.

As the first and second layers of the ISO/OSI reference model are not included in the test, they should be tested separately using the ping function.

A 2.2

Value 255 in the Byte

Value 255 is defined as a broadcast address. The telegram is sent to all the PCs that are in the same part of the network. Examples: 004.255.255.255, 198.2.7.255 or

255.255.255.255 (all the PCs in all the networks). If the network is divided into subnetworks, the subnet masks must be observed during calculation, otherwise some devices may be omitted.

0.x.x.x Addresses

Value 0 is the ID of the specific network. If the IP address starts with a zero, the receiver is in the same network.

Example: 0.2.1.1 refers to device 2.1.1 in this network. The zero previously signified the broadcast address. If older devices are used, unauthorized broadcast and complete overload of the network (broadcast system) may occur when using the IP address 0.x.x.x.

A 2.3

Subnet Masks

Routers and gateways divide large networks into several subnetworks. The subnet mask is used to assign the IP addresses of individual devices to specific subnetworks. The network part of an IP address is not modified by the subnet mask. An extended IP address is generated from the user address and subnet mask. Because the masked subnetwork is only recognized by the local PC, this extended IP address appears as a standard IP address to all the other devices.

Structure of the Subnet Mask

The subnet mask always contains the same number of bits as an IP address. The subnet mask has the same number of bits (in the same position) set to “one”, which is reflected in the IP address for the network class.

Example: A Class A IP address contains a 1-byte network address and a 3-byte PC address. Therefore, the first byte of the subnet mask may only contain 1s (ones). The remaining bits (three bytes) then contain the address of the subnetwork and the PC. The extended IP address is created when the bits of the IP address and the bits of the subnet mask are ANDed. Because the subnetwork is only recognized by local devices, the corresponding IP address appears as a “normal” IP address to all the other devices.

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A-3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Application

If ANDing the address bits gives the local network address and the local subnetwork address, the device is located in the local network. If ANDing gives a different result, the

data telegram is sent to the subnetwork router. Figure A-3 shows an example of a Class B

subnet.

Decimal Notation: 255.255.192.0

Binary Notation: 1111 1111.1111 1111.1100 0000.0000 0000

Class B Subnet Mask Bits

Using this subnet mask, the TCP/IP protocol software distinguished between devices that are connected to the local subnetwork and devices that are located in other subnetworks.

Example: Device 1 wants to establish a connection with device 2 using the above subnet mask. Device 2 has an IP address of 59.EA.55.32. The IP address for device 2 is displayed as follows:

Hexadecimal Notation: 59.EA.55.3

Binary Notation: 0101 1001.1110 1010.0101 0101.0011 00102

The individual subnet mask and the IP address for device 2 are then ANDed bit-bybit by the software to determine whether device 2 is located in the local subnetwork.

ANDing the subnet mast and IP address for device 2 is as follows:

Subnet Mask: 1111 1111.1111 1111.1100 0000.0000 0000

AND

IP Address: 0101 1001.1110 1010.0101 0101.0011 0010

Result after ANDing: 0101 1001.1110 1010.0100 0000.0000 0000

After ANDing, the software determines that the relevant subnetwork (01) does not correspond to the local subnetwork (11) and forwards the data telegram to a subnetwork router.

Figure A-3 Example for a Class B Subnet Mask

A-4

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Assigning IP Addresses

A 2.4

Examples for Subnet Masks and Computer Bits

Table A-3 Examples for Subnet masks and computer bits

Subnet Mask

255.255.255.252

255.255.255.248

255.255.255.240

255.255.255.224

255.255.255.192

255.255.255.128

255.255.2545.0

255.255.254.0

255.255.252.0

255.255.248.0

...

...

255.128.0.0

255.0.0.0

Computer/Host ID

2 Bits

3 Bits

4 Bits

5 Bits

6 Bits

7 Bits

8 Bits

9 Bits

10 Bits

11 Bits

...

...

23 Bits

24 Bits

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A-6

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B Appendices

B 1 List of Figures

Section 1

Figure 1-1:

Figure 1-2:

Figure 1-3:

Figure 1-4:

Figure 1-5:

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD ........................................................................ 1-4

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD-BUS with bus connection detail ...................... 1-5

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B .................................................................... 1-6

Master/Slave topology ....................................................................... 1-7

Repeater topology ............................................................................. 1-8

Section 2

Figure 2-1: Omni and directional antenna performance characteristics ............... 2-4

Section 3

Figure 3-1:

Figure 3-2:

Figure 3-3:

Figure 3-4:

Figure 3-5:

Figure 3-6:

Figure 3-7:

Figure 3-8:

Typical installation ............................................................................. 3-3

Installation and removal from a mounting rail ..................................... 3-4

Power connections for the RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD… .......................... 3-6

Wiring requirements ........................................................................... 3-7

Port connections ................................................................................ 3-8

RS-232 wire diagrams and pinouts .................................................... 3-9

RS-422/485 2-wire and 4-wire connections ..................................... 3-10

Antenna connection ......................................................................... 3-11

Section 4

Figure 4-1:

Figure 4-2:

Figure 4-3:

Figure 4-4:

Figure 4-5:

Figure 4-6:

Figure 4-7:

Figure 4-8:

Figure 4-9:

Figure 4-10:

“Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties” dialog box ............................. 4-3

“Sign-in” screen ................................................................................ 4-4

“Home” screen showing device configuration .................................... 4-4

“General Device Information” screen ................................................. 4-5

“Local Diagnostics” screen ................................................................ 4-6

“General Configuration” screen .......................................................... 4-7

“LAN - IP Configuration” screen ......................................................... 4-8

“LAN-SNMP Configuration” screen .................................................... 4-9

“LAN - Network Filter Configuration” screen .................................... 4-11

“Radio - Settings” screen ................................................................. 4-12

PHOENIX CONTACT

B-1

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RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

Section 5

Figure 4-11:

Figure 4-12:

Figure 4-13:

Figure 4-14:

Figure 4-15:

Figure 4-16:

Figure 4-17:

Figure 4-18:

Figure 4-19:

Figure 4-20:

Figure 4-21:

Figure 4-22:

Figure 4-23:

Figure 4-24:

Figure 4-25:

Figure 4-26:

Figure 4-27:

Figure 4-28:

Figure 4-29:

Figure 4-30:

Figure 4-31:

“Apply Radio Changes” button ......................................................... 4-14

Static AES security screen ............................................................... 4-15

Frequency Blocking ......................................................................... 4-16

“Apply Radio Changes” button ......................................................... 4-16

Ethernet device to radio to radio serial data transfer ........................ 4-17

“Ethernet Ports Configuration” screen .............................................. 4-18

Radio to radio serial data transfer .................................................... 4-19

“Serial Ports Configuration” screen .................................................. 4-19

“Data Streaming Mode Configuration” screen .................................. 4-20

“Configuration - Password Modification” screen .............................. 4-21

“Configuration -Store Retrieve Settings” screen ............................... 4-22

“LAN Performance” screen .............................................................. 4-23

“Serial Performance” screen ............................................................ 4-23

“Radio Performance” screen ............................................................ 4-24

“Software Updates” screen .............................................................. 4-25

“Utilities” screen ............................................................................... 4-25

“Reboot Device” screen ................................................................... 4-26

“Radio Test” screen ......................................................................... 4-26

“Monitoring - Web Access Log” screen ............................................ 4-27

“Monitoring - Radio Status” screen .................................................. 4-27

“Monitoring - Bridging Status” screen .............................................. 4-28

Figure 5-1:

Figure 5-2:

Figure 5-3:

Figure 5-4:

Figure 5-5:

Figure 5-6:

Figure 5-7:

Figure 5-8:

Figure 5-9:

Figure 5-10:

Figure 5-11:

Figure 5-12:

“PLC Configuration” menu ................................................................. 5-5

Example of SNMP diagnostic error message .................................... 5-6

Error message – Multiple I/O communication control sources on same channel .................................................................................... 5-7

I/O module 8-position rotary switch .................................................. 5-16

RAD-IN-4A-I Analog Input Module wire diagram .............................. 5-19

RAD-IN-8D Digital Input Module wire diagram ................................. 5-20

RAD-OUT-4A-I Analog Output Module wire diagram ....................... 5-21

RAD-IN-OUT-8D-REL Digital Output Module wire diagram ............. 5-22

RAD-OUT-8D-REL Digital Output Module wire diagram .................. 5-23

RAD-IN-2D-CNT Pulse Input Module wire diagram ......................... 5-24

Description of RAD-IN-2CNT Digital Pulse Input Module LEDs ....... 5-26

RAD-OUT-2D-CNT Digital Pulse Output Module wire diagram ........ 5-27

B-2

PHOENIX CONTACT

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Section 6

Appendix A

Figure 5-13:

Figure 5-14:

List of Figures

Description of RAD-OUT-2D-CNT Digital Pulse Output

Module LEDs ................................................................................... 5-28

Example of data display ................................................................... 5-29

Figure 6-1:

Figure 6-2:

Figure 6-3:

Figure 6-4:

LED locations ..................................................................................... 6-3

RSSI voltage strength check .............................................................. 6-4

Signal strength to voltage comparison ............................................... 6-4

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD/B Reset button ............................................... 6-7

Figure A-1:

Figure A-2:

Figure A-3:

Location of bits within the IP address ................................................ A-1

Structure of IP Addresses ................................................................. A-2

Example for a Class B Subnet Mask ................................................. A-4

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B-3

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

B-4

PHOENIX CONTACT

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Section 2

Section 4

Section 5

Section 6

Appendix A

B 2 List of Tables

Table 2-1: Cable Types and Signal Loss at 916 MHz .......................................... 2-5

Table 4-1: Default SNMP settings........................................................................ 4-9

Table 5-1:

Table 5-2:

Modbus Memory Map......................................................................... 5-9

Modbus Pulse Memory Map ............................................................. 5-12

Table 6-1:

Table 6-2:

LED Descriptions ................................................................................ 6-3

Troubleshooting Procedures .............................................................. 6-5

Table A-1:

Table A-2:

Table A-3:

Class Assignments ............................................................................ A-2

Network and User Class Bit Assignments.......................................... A-2

Examples for Subnet masks and computer bits ................................. A-5

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B-5

RAD-ISM-900-EN-BD…

B-6

PHOENIX CONTACT

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AES (Advanced

Encryption Standard)

AES-CCMP

Bandwidth

Bit

Browser

CTS (Clear To Send)

Default Gateway

DHCP (Dynamic Host

Configuration Protocol)

DNS - (Domain Name

System [or Service or

Server])

B 3 Explanation of Terms

A symmetric 128-bit block data encryption technique developed by Belgian cryptographers

Joan Daemen and Vincent Rijmen. The U.S. government adopted the algorithm as its encryption technique in October 2000, replacing the DES encryption it used. AES works at multiple network layers simultaneously.

AES-Counter Mode CBC-MAC Protocol (AES-CCMP) is the encryption algorithm used in the 802.11i security protocol. It uses the AES block cipher, but restricts the key length to

128 bits. It incorporates two sophisticated cryptographic techniques (counter mode and

CBC-MAC), and adapts them to Ethernet frames to provide a robust security protocol between the mobile client and the access point.

The transmission capacity of a given device or network.

A binary digit.

An application program that provides a way to look at and interact with all the information on the World Wide Web.

A signal sent by a wireless device, signifying that it is ready to receive data.

A device that forwards Internet traffic from the local area network.

A networking protocol that allows administrators to assign temporary IP addresses to network computers by “leasing” an IP address to a user for a limited amount of time instead of assigning permanent IP addresses.

An Internet service that translates domain names into IP addresses. Because domain names are alphabetic, they’re easier to remember. The Internet, however, is really based on

IP addresses. Every time you use a domain name, a DNS service must translate the name into the corresponding IP address. For example, the domain name www.example.com might translate to 198.105.232.4. The DNS system is, in fact, its own network. If one DNS server doesn’t know how to translate a particular domain name, it asks another one, and so on, until the correct IP address is returned.

A specific name for a network of computers.

A message included in data packets that can increase wireless efficiency.

Domain

DTIM (Delivery Traffic

Indication Message)

Dynamic IP Address

Encryption

Ethernet

Firewall

Firmware

A temporary IP address assigned by a DHCP server.

Encoding data transmitted in a network.

IEEE standard network protocol that specifies how data is placed on and retrieved from a common transmission medium.

A set of related programs located at a network gateway server that protects the resources of a network from other networks.

The programming code that runs a device.

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Fragmentation

Breaking a packet into smaller units when transmitting over a network medium that cannot support the original size of the packet.

A protocol used to transfer files over a TCP/IP network.

FTP (File Transfer

Protocol)

Gateway

Half Duplex

Hardware

A device that interconnects networks with different, incompatible communications protocols.

Data transmission that can occur in two directions over a single line, but only one direction at a time.

The physical aspect of computers, telecommunications and other information technology devices.

The communications protocol used to connect to servers on the World Wide Web.

HTTP (HyperText

Transport Protocol)

Infrastructure

IP (Internet Protocol)

IP Address

IPSec (Internet Protocol

Security)

ISM band

(Industrial Scientific

Medical band).

LAN

MAC (Media Access

Control) Address

Mbps (MegaBits Per

Second)

Network

Node

Packet

Passphrase

Ping (Packet INternet

Groper)

A wireless network that is bridged to a wired network via an access point.

A protocol used to send data over a network.

The address used to identify a computer or device on a network.

A VPN protocol used to implement secure exchange of packets at the IP layer.

A license-free portion of the spectrum open to all users.

The computers and networking products that make up a local area network.

The unique address that a manufacturer assigns to each networking device.

One million bits per second; a unit of measurement for data transmission.

A series of computers or devices connected for the purpose of data sharing, storage, and/ or transmission between users.

A network junction or connection point, typically a computer or work station.

A unit of data sent over a network.

Used much like a password, a passphrase simplifies the WEP encryption process by automatically generating the WEP encryption keys.

An Internet utility used to determine whether a particular IP address is connected to the network.

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Port

PPPoE (Point-to-Point

Protocol over Ethernet)

PPTP (Point-to-Point

Tunneling Protocol)

RADIUS (Remote

Authentication Dial-In

User Service)

RTS Threshold

Roaming

Router

RTS (Request To Send)

Server

SPI (Stateful Packet

Inspection) Firewall

Spread Spectrum

SSID (Service Set

IDentifier)

Static IP Address

Static Routing

Subnet Mask

Explanation of Terms

A 16-bit number (1-65535) used by TCP and UDP for application (services) identification on a given computer. More than one application can be run at a host simultaneously

(e.g., internet server, mail client, FTP client, etc.). Each application is identified by a port number. In other words, it is the identifier for a logical connector between an application entity and the transport service.

A type of broadband connection that provides authentication (username and password) in addition to data transport.

A VPN protocol that allows the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) to be tunneled through an IP network. This protocol is also used as a type of broadband connection in Europe.

An AAA (authentication, authorization and accounting) protocol for applications such as network access or IP mobility. It is intended to work in both local and roaming situations. It is a client/server protocol and software that enables remote access servers to communicate with a central server to authenticate dial-in users and authorize their access to the requested system or service. RADIUS allows a company to maintain user profiles in a central database that all remote servers can share. It provides better security, allowing a company to set up a policy that can be applied at a single administered network point. Having a central service also means that it’s easier to track usage for billing and for keeping network statistics. RADIUS is a de facto industry standard used by a number of network product companies and is a proposed IETF standard. RADIUS was originally developed by Livingston Enterprises for their

PortMaster series of Network Access Servers, but later (1997) published as RFC 2058 and

RFC 2059 (current versions are RFC 2865 and RFC 2866). The DIAMETER protocol is the planned replacement for RADIUS, but is still backwards compatible.

The number of bytes used for the RTS/CTS handshake boundary. When a packet size is greater than the RTS threshold, the RTS/CTS handshake is performed.

The ability to take a wireless device from one access point’s range to another without losing the connection.

A networking device that connects multiple networks together.

A networking method of coordinating large packets through the RTS threshold setting.

Any computer whose function in a network is to provide user access to files, printing, communications and other services.

A technology that inspects every incoming packet of information before allowing it to enter the network.

A wide-band radio frequency technique used for more reliable and secure data transmission.

A Service Set ID is a network ID unique to a network. Only clients and access points that share the same SSID are able to communicate with each other.

A fixed address assigned to a computer or device that is connected to a network.

Forwarding data in a network via a fixed path.

An address code that determines the size of the network.

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Switch

A device that connects computing devices. A LAN switch allows the grouping of network devices to limit network traffic.

TCP (Transmission

Control Protocol)

TCP/IP (Transmission

Control Protocol/Internet

Protocol)

UDP (User Datagram

Protocol)

VPN (Virtual Private

Network)

A network protocol for transmitting data that requires acknowledgment from the recipient of data sent.

A set of instructions a computer uses to communicate over a network.

A network protocol for transmitting data that does not require acknowledgment from the recipient of the data that is sent.

A security measure to protect data as it leaves one network and goes to another over the

Internet.

WAN (Wide Area Network)

A network that provides communication services between devices in a geographic area larger than that served by a local area network or a metropolitan area network. A WAN may use or provide public communication facilities.

WINS - (Windows Internet

Naming Service)

A system that determines the IP address associated with a particular network computer

(name resolution). WINS supports network client and server computers running Windows operating system and can provide name resolution for other computers with special arrangements. Determining the IP address for a computer is a complex process when

DHCP servers assign IP addresses dynamically. For example, it is possible for DHCP to assign a different IP address to a client each time the machine logs on to the network. INS uses a distributed database that is automatically updated with the names of computers currently available and the IP address assigned to each one. DNS is an alternative system for name resolution suitable for network computers with fixed IP addresses.

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