DAIMLERCHRYSLER CORPORATION
DAIMLERCHRYSLER CORPORATION
Performance Standard
Category Code: L-2
EASL Req: No (See Section 11.0)
NO: PF-10540
Date Published: December 11, 2001
Change: -
ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC
MODULES AND MOTORS – 2004 E/E ARCHITECTURE
1.0 GENERAL
1.1 Purpose of the Standard
This standard is an acceptance specification for the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements of
electrical and electronic components and modules that reference this standard. NOTE THAT THE
ELECTRICAL REQUIREMENTS ARE REFERENCED IN A SEPARATE DOCUMENT, PF-10541. These
requirements have been developed to assure compliance with present and anticipated domestic and
foreign regulations and customer satisfaction regarding the EMC of vehicle E/E systems for MY 2004 and
beyond applications. This standard is partially harmonized with Mercedes MBN 10284-2.
1.2 Use of this Standard
This standard applies to electrical and/or electronic components or modules that reference this standard
for their EMC requirements. These components are referred to in this standard as the component,
module, motor or using the generic term DUT (device(s) under test).
THE RECOMMENDED PROCEDURE FOR ASSURING EMC COMPLIANCE FOR AN ELECTRONIC MODULE, ELECTRICAL
COMPONENT OR MOTOR IS TO REFERENCE THIS EMC PERFORMANCE STANDARD (PF) IN THE DUT PF, CATIA
MODEL OR PRE-SOURCE PACKAGE AND PROVIDE THE SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION NEEDED TO CLASSIFY THE
DUT FUNCTIONS AND IDENTIFY ANY EXCEPTIONS, DEVELOP AN EMC TEST PLAN AND CONFIRM THAT DV AND PV
TESTING IS COMPLETED AT A CORRELATED LAB AND THAT THE SPECIFIED REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DUT ARE MET.
THE SUPPLIER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ASSURING THAT THE TESTS ARE PERFORMED TO MEET THE REQUIREMENTS AS
SPECIFIED IN THE RELEASING DOCUMENT, WHICH REFERENCES THIS STANDARD. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
DAIMLERCHRYSLER PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY AND THE PRODUCT ENGINEER TO VERIFY THAT THE SUPPLIER
PERFORMS THESE TESTS AND THAT THE REQUIREMENTS ARE MET. DAIMLERCHRYSLER RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
PERFORM AUDIT TESTING ON SAMPLE PARTS TO VERIFY COMPLIANCE WITH THIS STANDARD.
Basic Definitions:
-
-
As specified. In this document this means as specified in the DUT Performance Standard / drawing.
Category. In this document, electronic modules, electric motors and inductive devices are classified
into categories and subcategories that determine which of the requirements in this PF apply to the
component.
DUT PF. The DaimlerChrysler Corporation Performance Standard for the DUT (see Releasing
Document).
Function. The intended operation of a module for a specific purpose. The DUT can provide many
different functions, which are defined (including functional class and acceptable performance), by the
DUT performance standard.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
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Functional Class. In accordance with SAE J1113-1, with modification, DUT functions are divided into
four classes based on criticality of component function relative to vehicle operation. The functional
class determines the required test level for the component, refer to Appendix A for typical function
list.
Performance Response. In accordance with SAE J1113-1, Appendix A, with modification, the
performance of DUT functions when subjected to a disturbance is divided into four responses (or
regions of performance). These are defined in section 7.0.
1.2.1 Requirements for Applying this Generic Standard to a Specific Component
The releasing department, in cooperation with the appropriate product team EMC engineer, shall
determine the following and specify in the module or component performance standard along with
reference to this EMC PF:
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CATEGORY of electronic component or module (refer to Tables 1, 2, 3, 4 and definitions in 7.0)
DUT FUNCTIONS and their FUNCTIONAL CLASS (affects test levels, refer to definitions and Appendix A)
ACCEPTABLE PERFORMANCE LIMITS for these functions (to establish criteria for Response I, II or III)
DUT LOCATION OR OTHER FACTORS that may affect the appropriate requirements. Refer to Table 1
and paragraph 3.5.1 Electromagnetic Immunity Requirement, paragraph 3.6.1 Conducted RF
Emissions Requirement, paragraph 4.3.1 Motors Conducted RF Emissions Requirement and
paragraph 4.4.1 Magnetic Field Emissions (DUT location in vehicle); paragraph 3.5.2.B LFC &
paragraph 3.5.7.B Magnetic Field Immunity Test (remote battery applications) and paragraph 3.2.3
Load Dump Transient Test (Case 1, 2, or 3) (DCS Compatibility).
TABLE 1: FACTORS AFFECTING MODULE REQUIREMENTS
Factor
Affected Paragraphs in this Standard
DUT Category
Refer to Tables 2 and 3
Optional – Must be specified in
DUT PF to apply
Module Location in Vehicle
Remote Battery Location
DCS Compatibility
3.5.2 C-F, 3.7, Appendix B, Appendix C
3.5.1, 3.6.1, 4.3.1, 4.4.1
3.5.2.B, 3.5.7.B
3.2.3 A, B or C
Starter motors, snow plow motors, similar high current motors and alternators are not covered by this
standard. These devices are subject to evaluation at the vehicle level. Electroexplosive devices (EEDs)
or initiators are not covered by this standard, refer to PF9607 or the USCAR Initiator Technical
Requirements and Validation Standard.
1.2.2 Test Plans and Lab Correlation
FOR DV OR PV DATA SUBMISSION, AN APPROVED TEST PLAN SIGNED BY THE APPROPRIATE DAIMLERCHRYSLER
PRODUCT TEAM EMC ENGINEER, IS REQUIRED. Test plan templates are available to facilitate test plan
development. The test plan for the DUT shall include the method of monitoring the DUT for effects and
critical timing or operating parameters that may affect the testing of the DUT.
The responsibilities of the releasing department and the appropriate E/E Systems Department for internal
EMC testing of modules are further detailed in Procedure for Scheduling System Level EMC Testing, LP-
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
384-D-20. For EMC testing at outside labs refer to Procedure for Controlling E/E Supplier System Level
EMC Testing, LP-388C-65.
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE SUPPLIER TO DEVELOP A CORRELATED EMC LAB FACILITY OR UTILIZE THE
SERVICES OF CORRELATED OUTSIDE LABORATORIES FOR THEIR DV AND PV TESTING. Refer to the contact list
in paragraph 12 or contact the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of Scientific Laboratories (Dept.
5140) of DaimlerChrysler, Auburn Hills, U.S.A. for information on the EMC lab correlation process and
test plan templates. It is important that EMC evaluations are made initially at the engineering
development level with prototype parts to assure cost-effective compliance.
1.2.3 Categories for DUT
TABLE 2: ELECTRONIC MODULE CATEGORIES AND SUBCATEGORIES (1)
MODULE CATEGORY
REQUIREMENTS (PARAGRAPHS IN THIS STANDARD)
P (passive)
All paragraphs except 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6 and all 4.x
A (analog)
All paragraphs except 3.3, 3.5.3, 3.5.7, 3.6 and all 4.x
O (oscillator)
All paragraphs except 3.3, 3.5.3, 3.5.7, 3.6.4 and all 4.x
D (clocked digital)
All paragraphs except 3.3, 3.5.3, 3.5.7, 3.6.4 and all 4.x
/MS (magnetically
sensitive input)
Shall meet the requirements for magnetic immunity in paragraph 3.5.7
/R (regulated power)
Shall meet the system equivalent requirements for DUT powered from
regulated supplies in paragraphs 3.2.1.A and 3.3
/S (with audio output)
Shall meet the additional requirement for audio outputs in paragraph 3.5.3
and the requirements for magnetic immunity in paragraph 3.5.7
/X (with motor, excludes
small servo motors)
Shall meet the additional requirements in paragraphs 4.4 and 4.5
/Y (with relay)
Shall meet the additional requirements in paragraph 4.5
(1) Subcategories are indicated by a / preceding the letter designator. Note that more than one
subcategory may apply. For example, a digital electronic device including a motor and relay would be
a category D/XY. Refer to section 7.0 for definitions of categories and subcategories.
TABLE 3: ELECTRIC MOTOR CATEGORIES AND SUBCATEGORIES (1)
ELECTRIC MOTOR CATEGORY
REQUIREMENTS (PARAGRAPHS IN THIS STANDARD)
BCM (brush commutated
motor)
All paragraphs except all 3.x
/C (with attached controller)
All paragraphs except 3.2, 3.3, 3.5.3, 3.5.7 & 3.6
ECM (electronically
commutated motor)
All paragraphs except 3.2, 3.3, 3.5.3, 3.5.7, 3.6.3 and 4.3
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 3
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
TABLE 3: ELECTRIC MOTOR CATEGORIES AND SUBCATEGORIES (1)
ELECTRIC MOTOR CATEGORY
REQUIREMENTS (PARAGRAPHS IN THIS STANDARD)
ID (inductive devices)
All paragraphs except all 3.x, 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4
/R (solenoid or relay)
Solenoids and relays shall also meet the requirements in paragraph
4.4
/P (pulsed at 100 Hz+)
Shall meet the additional requirements in paragraph 4.3
(1) Subcategories are indicated by a / preceding the letter designator. Note that more than one
subcategory may apply. For example, an inductive device that is a pulsed solenoid would be a
category ID/RP. Refer to section 7.0 for definitions of categories and subcategories.
1.2.4 Organization of this Standard
TABLE 4: ORGANIZATION OF THIS STANDARD
1.0 GENERAL...............................................................................................................................................1
1.1 PURPOSE OF THE STANDARD .......................................................................................................1
1.2 USE OF THIS STANDARD ...............................................................................................................1
1.2.1 Requirements for Applying this Generic Standard to a Specific Component ...........2
1.2.2 Test Plans and Lab Correlation.................................................................................2
1.2.3 Categories for DUT ...................................................................................................3
1.2.4 Organization of this Standard....................................................................................4
1.2.5 Additional Information................................................................................................6
1.3 Relationship to Other Standards ...............................................................................................6
1.4 Limitations on Usage .................................................................................................................6
1.5 Location of Definitions / Abbreviations / Acronyms ...................................................................7
2.0 SPECIAL TEST EQUIPMENT AND TEST CONDITIONS .....................................................................7
2.1 GENERAL ....................................................................................................................................7
2.2 POWER SUPPLIES ........................................................................................................................7
2.3 BROADBAND ARTIFICIAL NETWORKS (BANS) OR RF ISOLATORS ...................................................7
2.4 DEFAULT TOLERANCES ................................................................................................................7
2.5 DEFAULT PARAMETERS ................................................................................................................7
3.0 EMC REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC MODULES......................................................................7
3.1 GENERAL ....................................................................................................................................7
3.2 SUPPLY VOLTAGE TRANSIENTS ....................................................................................................8
3.2.1 Requirement ..............................................................................................................8
3.2.2 Supply Voltage Spike Test ........................................................................................9
3.2.3 Load Dump Transient Test........................................................................................9
3.3 INPUT AND OUTPUT LINE TRANSIENTS ........................................................................................10
3.4 ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE (ESD) ...........................................................................................10
3.5 ELECTROMAGNETIC IMMUNITY ....................................................................................................12
3.5.1 Requirement ............................................................................................................12
3.5.2 Conducted Immunity - Low Frequency Test (LFC) 15 Hz to 250 kHz ....................13
3.5.3 Conducted Immunity - Audio Feedthrough Test .....................................................14
3.5.4 Conducted Immunity - Direct RF Power Injection Test (DRFI) ...............................14
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
TABLE 4: ORGANIZATION OF THIS STANDARD
3.5.5 Radiated Immunity - TEM Cell Test ........................................................................15
3.5.6 Radiated Immunity - Module Anechoic Test Chamber (MATC) Test......................16
3.5.7 Magnetic Field Immunity Test .................................................................................16
3.6 CONDUCTED RF EMISSIONS ......................................................................................................17
3.7 RADIATED RF EMISSIONS TESTS (OPTIONAL) .............................................................................19
4.0 EMC REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC MOTORS ...........................................................................19
4.1 GENERAL ..................................................................................................................................19
4.2 SUPPLY VOLTAGE TRANSIENTS ..................................................................................................20
4.3 CONDUCTED RF EMISSIONS ......................................................................................................20
4.4 MAGNETIC FIELD EMISSIONS ......................................................................................................22
4.5 CONDUCTED TRANSIENT EMISSIONS...........................................................................................22
5.0 RELIABILITY / DURABILITY REQUIREMENTS..................................................................................23
6.0 PRODUCT ASSURANCE ....................................................................................................................23
6.1 DESIGN VERIFICATION ...............................................................................................................23
6.2 PRODUCTION VALIDATION AND CONTINUING CONFORMANCE .......................................................23
6.3 VEHICLE TESTING ......................................................................................................................23
7.0 DEFINITIONS.......................................................................................................................................23
8.0 CONTROL ............................................................................................................................................28
9.0 GENERAL INFORMATION ..................................................................................................................28
10.0 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................................29
11.0 ENGINEERING APPROVED SOURCE LIST ....................................................................................30
12.0 PUBLICATION INFORMATION .........................................................................................................31
FIGURE 1:
FIGURE 2:
FIGURE 3:
FIGURE 4:
FIGURE 5:
FIGURE 6:
FIGURE 7:
TABLE 1:
TABLE 2:
TABLE 3:
TABLE 4:
TABLE 5:
TABLE 6:
TABLE 7:
TABLE 8:
TABLE 9:
TEST PULSE #1............................................................................................................ 32
TEST PULSE #2............................................................................................................ 32
TEST PULSE #3A ......................................................................................................... 33
TEST PULSE #3B ......................................................................................................... 33
TEST PULSE #5A (Load Dump) ................................................................................... 34
TEST PULSE #5B (Load Dump with Suppression Network) ........................................ 34
LIMITS FOR CONDUCTED RF EMISSIONS ............................................................... 35
FACTORS AFFECTING MODULE REQUIREMENTS ..................................................... 2
ELECTRONIC MODULE CATEGORIES AND SUBCATEGORIES (1) ............................ 3
ELECTRIC MOTOR CATEGORIES AND SUBCATEGORIES (1) ................................... 3
ORGANIZATION OF THIS STANDARD ........................................................................... 4
SUPPLY VOLTAGE TRANSIENTS................................................................................... 8
VOLTAGE SPIKE LEVELS ............................................................................................... 9
ESD TESTS..................................................................................................................... 11
ESD CALIBRATION PULSE PARAMETERS (150 PF, 2 K OHMS) ............................... 11
RF IMMUNITY TESTS..................................................................................................... 12
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 5
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
TABLE 4: ORGANIZATION OF THIS STANDARD
APPENDIX A:
APPENDIX B:
APPENDIX C:
APPENDIX D:
FUNCTIONAL STATUS CLASSIFICATION EXAMPLES .......................................... 1
RADIATED RF EMISSIONS - TEM CELL ................................................................. 1
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT RADIATED EMISSIONS .................................................... 1
BROADBAND ARTIFICIAL NETWORK (BAN) or RF ISOLATOR DESIGN
REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................... 1
APPENDIX E: SCHEDULE OF RF IMMUNITY TEST FREQUENCIES............................................ 1
APPENDIX F: GROUNDING CONFIGURATIONS FOR MODULE EMC TESTING......................... 1
APPENDIX G: EMC TESTING INFORMATION FOR MODULE / SYSTEM WITH J1850 BUS ....... 1
APPENDIX H: EMC DESIGN FOR BRUSH COMMUTATED DC ELECTRIC MOTORS ................. 1
APPENDIX J: GENERAL EMC DESIGN INFORMATION................................................................. 1
APPENDIX K: EMC TESTING INFORMATION FOR MODULE / SYSTEM WITH CAN BUS .......... 1
APPENDIX L: COMPARISON OF PF-10540 TO PF9326-D............................................................. 1
1.2.5 Additional Information
Component testing to the requirements of this standard represents an empirical risk analysis of
component performance versus derived approximations to known environmental threats and customer
satisfaction requirements. The development of this standard is based on extensive experience in
achieving correlation to expected vehicle performance with a high level of predictability. However, EMC
testing, by its nature, is subject to more variation than mechanical testing. Because of coupling variability
and measurement uncertainty, correlation between component level performance and final performance
in the complete vehicle cannot be exact. In order to maintain a competitive and quality product, vehicle
EMC testing will be performed to evaluate overall integrated system performance. Vehicle level analysis
is not a substitute for component conformance to this standard. Refer to paragraph 6.3.
This standard is supported by the referenced lab procedures that provide additional detail on test
equipment, set up and procedures. These lab procedures are subject to periodic updates. It is the
responsibility of the supplier to maintain current lab procedures for their testing. Refer to the definitions in
this standard and in the references for clarification of terms.
1.3 Relationship to Other Standards
This standard is a part of a series of standards intended to assure electromagnetic compatibility in vehicle
electrical and electronic systems. During the module design process, reference should be made to
DaimlerChrysler design standards DS-150 and DS-151 for information on PC board layout and the SAE
J1752 series for techniques to evaluate the RF emissions potential of integrated circuits. The industry
standard for module testing is the SAE J1113 series. The vehicle electrical system design should follow
the guidelines in DS-108. At the vehicle system evaluation level, DaimlerChrysler design standard DS149 provides vehicle EMC requirements and the SAE J551 series is the industry standard for vehicle
EMC testing. SAE J1113 and J551 documents have been correlated with the equivalent international
(CISPR & ISO) documents to the extent possible. See references.
1.4 Limitations on Usage
The optional requirements of TEM Cell Radiated Emissions in Appendix B and IC Radiated Emissions in
Appendix C and the optional requirements in paragraphs 3.5.2.C-F, LFC for signal lines, must be
specified in the DUT PF if they are to apply. Any additions to or deviations from this standard that may be
required are to be called out in the DUT Performance Standard or on the drawing that references this
standard and described in the DUT test plan.
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
1.5 Location of Definitions / Abbreviations / Acronyms
Definitions, abbreviations & acronyms can be found in section 7.0 beginning on or about page 26. Basic
definitions needed to assist in the development of a DUT test plan are also included in section 1.2.
2.0 SPECIAL TEST EQUIPMENT AND TEST CONDITIONS
2.1 General
The required test equipment specifications, test setup and test procedure are listed in the corresponding
lab procedures (see References, 10.0). All test equipment used for measurement shall be calibrated on a
minimum annual basis traceable to NIST or other equivalent national standard laboratory using ISO
Guide 25 or ISO 17025 as a reference.
2.2 Power Supplies
For tests that require 13.5 V dc, a power supply that conforms to the requirements in SAE J1113-1 shall
be used.
2.3 Broadband Artificial Networks (BANs) or RF Isolators
BANs are required for the Direct RF Power Injection and Conducted RF Emissions tests. Refer to
Appendix D for BAN design information and performance requirements.
2.4 Default Tolerances
- Voltage and current: +/- 5%.
- Time intervals, distances, energy, power and field strength: +/- 10%.
- Resistance, capacitance, inductance and impedance: +/- 10%.
2.5 Default Parameters
- Supply voltage shall be +13.5 +/- 0.5 V dc.
- Tests shall be run at ambient (room) temperature of 23 +/- 5 degrees C (73.4 +/- 9 degrees F).
- Tests shall be run at ambient humidity ranging from 20% to 80% RH.
3.0 EMC REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC MODULES
3.1 General
The DUT shall operate as specified with up to 200 microhenries of series inductance (typical BAN) in the
supply voltage line(s) (required for conducted RF immunity and emissions tests of the DUT). If this series
inductance inhibits data transfer on signal or bus lines, a high data rate BAN has been developed for
testing these lines. Check with the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of DaimlerChrysler
Corporation Scientific Laboratories for details.
3.1.1 Sample Size
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 7
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
Three samples of the DUT are normally required for testing. The DUT test pIan shall specify the number
of samples to be tested and the strategy for testing based on anomalies encountered. If the DUT has a
coated printed circuit board, an additional sample that is uncoated and unpotted is required if
modifications are to be investigated. Significant variation in test results among the three samples tested
will require further investigation.
3.1.2 System Exerciser
A test fixture, or DUT exerciser, provided by the supplier or the DaimlerChrysler releasing department,
shall be used to electrically simulate the DUT vehicle system and to exercise all of the required functions
of the DUT. This system exerciser shall operate during the DUT testing without adverse effect. The
system exerciser shall be able to simulate the appropriate load characteristics, i.e., equivalent resistance,
capacitance and inductance as expected in a production vehicle. This is particularly critical for inductive
and pulse width modulated (PWM) circuits.
3.1.3 Order of Tests
A DUT is expected to pass all tests, regardless of the order of tests. Normally, higher stress level tests
will be performed at the end of the test sequence.
3.2 Supply Voltage Transients
3.2.1 Requirement
The DUT shall be monitored during operation while being subjected to the following supply voltage
transients. These pulses are applied simultaneously to the battery and ignition lines and any inputs or
outputs sourced from battery or ignition voltage as configured in a DUT's complete system except
paragraphs 3.2.2 which is both line by line and all lines simultaneously. For all the supply voltage
transients, there shall be no damage to the DUT, no lockups of the DUT requiring power off reset and no
effect on stored data or false diagnostic indication (Response II, except where specified otherwise).
Incandescent lamp life will be deteriorated by applied voltages greater than rated voltage. The DUT shall
be tolerant of transient voltages generated by the operation of its own system (Response I). Refer to
Table 5.
TABLE 5: SUPPLY VOLTAGE TRANSIENTS
A.
Paragraph
Number
Transient
Pulse
Performance
Response
Class A
Performance
Response
Class B
Performance
Response
Class C & D
3.2.2
Pulse #1, Fig 1
Pulse #2, Fig 2
Pulse #3A, Fig 3
Pulse #3B, Fig 4
II
II
II
II
II
I
I
I
II
I
I
I
3.2.3
Load Dump, Figs 5&6
II
II
II
DUT powered from regulated supplies in other modules (subcategory R) shall be tested as a
system with the sourcing module or an equivalent power supply. This requirement is waived if the
sourcing module PF specifies that, for all the supply voltage transients, the output of the sourcing
module's regulated supply meets the requirements of the subcategory R module.
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
B.
For paragraph 3.2.2, supply voltage spikes: Class A functions and all functions for pulse #1 are
allowed Response II; Class B, C and D functions of the DUT shall not be affected by pulses #2, #3A
and #3B (Response I). Pulse # 1 includes a 3 s dropout during which most DUT will reset, this is to
be ignored as Response II applies for the specified test interval (the DUT shall recover normal
operation at the end of the test). These voltage spikes are referenced to a ground plane under the
DUT (see ISO 7637 for more detail).
3.2.2 Supply Voltage Spike Test
The DUT shall be subjected to repetitive voltage spikes with reference to SAE J1113-11. For test pulses
and levels refer to Table 6 and Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 which illustrate the open circuit waveforms and
specific parameters for test pulses #1, #2, #3A and #3B. The pulses are applied with the supply voltage
input to the DUT. Verify that the transient simulator provides isolation between transients and the DUT
power supply. The pulse in Figure 1 is referenced to ground; all other pulses are referenced to DUT
supply voltage. At the start of the test, the pulse level shall be ramped up to the specified level in 5
approximately equal increments after which the specified pulses are applied for 10 minutes each, except
20 minutes for pulse 1, resulting in approximately 120 applications of Pulse #1, 1200 of Pulse #2 and
600,000 each of Pulses #3A and #3B. The DUT shall also be tested in a powered-down state, if
appropriate, to check for inadvertent turn on (applies to modules that have logic power-up capability).
Refer to LP-388C-39 for test procedure.
TABLE 6: VOLTAGE SPIKE LEVELS
Pulse Number
Supply Voltage Test
I/O Transients Test
1
-100 V
N/A
2
+100 V
+30 V & -30 V, Vr = 0
3A
-150 V
-60 V, Vr = 0
3B
+100 V
+45 V, Vr = 0
3.2.3 Load Dump Transient Test
The DUT shall be subjected to load dump voltage transients. For test level refer to Figure 5, Test Pulse
#5A, which illustrates the open circuit waveform and specific parameters for this pulse. This pulse shall
be obtained from a capacitive discharge load dump simulator with an internal source resistance (Ri) of 0.5
ohm that can deliver 125 joules of energy to a 0.5 ohm resistive load when set for an open circuit voltage
value of 105 V. This may be verified, without a dc bias, by integration using the voltage or current versus
time plot or by measuring the voltage across this load to have a peak value of 43.5 V or greater with a
90/10 fall time of 95 ms or greater. At the start of the test, the pulse level shall be ramped up to the
specified level in 5 approximately equal increments after which the specified pulses are applied. The test
consists of 5 pulses applied 2 minutes apart. In all cases, the clamping voltage under load, across the
DUT, must be less than 40 volts.
A.
Case 1 - load dump protection shared between key modules: DUT that provide shared vehicle load
dump protection (as specified by the releasing department) shall be tested to verify the peak current
sinking capability and the clamping voltage under load. DUT expected to sink greater than 40 amps
peak current (e.g. engine controller) shall be tested with an additional 1 ohm of resistance in series
with the simulator. DUT expected to sink greater than 25 amps peak current (e.g., airbag control
module) shall be tested with an additional 2 ohms of resistance in series with the simulator. For all
other DUT, this open circuit pulse is to be clamped to an equivalent vehicle system level (40 V
maximum, ramping to 35 V max at 100 ms and 25 V max at 200 ms) by connecting a vehicle
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
suppression model in parallel across the load dump output, refer to Figure 6, Test Pulse #5B.
B.
Case 2 – load dump protection in a (single) centralized location: For these applications, the engine
controller, airbag control module or other modules shall not be expected to sink load dump current.
DUT that provide a centralized load dump clamp (e.g. zener protected power distribution center or
PDC) shall be tested with the full simulator output with no additional series resistance, refer to
Figure 5. For all other DUT, this open circuit pulse is to be clamped to an equivalent vehicle with
simulated avalanche diode suppression in the alternator system level (36 V maximum) by
connecting an alternator simulator suppression model in parallel across the load dump output.
C.
Case 3 - alternator avalanche diode load dump protection: for modules integrated in a vehicle
system that provides avalanche diode load dump protection in the alternator, the load dump test
pulse applied to the DUT shall be clamped to the avalanche diode clamp level (32 V maximum) by
an alternator equivalent suppression model.
Refer to LP-388C-36 for test procedure.
3.3 Input and Output Line Transients
3.3.1 Requirement
Subject Subcategory R modules to voltage transients on input and output lines while monitoring the DUT
during operation. There shall be no damage to the DUT, no lockups of the DUT requiring power off reset
and no effect on stored data or false diagnostic indication (Response II). Class B, C and D functions of
the DUT shall not be affected by these voltage transients (Response I).
3.3.2 Test
Subcategory R modules shall be subjected to repetitive voltage spikes that are capacitively coupled to the
line under test. These voltage transients are the pulses illustrated in Figures 2, 3 and 4. For this test, the
amplitudes of the pulse in Figure 2 are +30 V and -30 V, the amplitudes of the pulses in Figures 3 and 4
are -60 V and +45 V respectively and Vr =0, see Table 6. These pulses shall be applied line by line to all
input and output lines. The test pulses are referenced to module ground, the voltages are set open circuit
and the pulses are applied for 5 minutes each. Refer to LP-388C-39 for test procedure.
3.4 Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)
3.4.1 Requirement
The DUT shall be subjected to ESD as described in SAE J1113-13, with modifications as given below in
paragraph 3.4.2. All DUT shall be subjected to the un-powered DUT test in paragraph 3.4.2.A and DUT
that are accessible to the occupants in a vehicle, or in readily accessible underhood or trunk locations,
shall be subjected to the appropriate powered DUT test in paragraph B or C. For the unpowered DUT
test in paragraph 3.4.2.A, there shall be no damage to the DUT and the DUT shall operate as specified,
without effect on stored data, after the test. This is considered Response IV in this case as the DUT is
not being monitored during the test and no judgement about effects can be made. For the powered DUT
tests in paragraphs 3.4.2 B and C, the DUT shall be monitored during operation.
There shall be no lockups of the DUT requiring power off reset and Class C and D functions of the DUT
shall not be affected by the ESD (Response I), Class A and B functions are allowed Response II. Refer
to Table 7.
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TABLE 7: ESD TESTS
Paragraph
Number
Test
3.4.2.A
Handling
3.4.2.B
Operating –
in Vehicle
accessible
Class A and B
Operating –
outside
Vehicle
accessible
3.4.2.C
Class C and D
Response IV, Direct: +/- 3, +/- 4 kV, Air: +/- 4, +/- 8 kV, 150 pF & 2000 ohm
Response II
Response I
+/- 4, +/- 8, +/- 15 kV with 330 pF and 330 ohm
Response II
Response I
+/- 4, +/- 8, +/- 15 kV with 150 pF and 330 ohm
3.4.2 Tests
For these tests, the ambient humidity shall be monitored and maintained in the range of 20% to 60% RH.
The pulse produced by the ESD simulator shall be characterized using a calibrator as described in IEC
801-2 (1 GHz coaxial target) with parameters as given in Table 8. The pulse shall be measured with a
storage scope (sampling rate of 1 giga samples per second minimum) which shall be shielded from the
coaxial target and ground plane assembly.
Air gap discharge verification is difficult, so the direct contact verification shall be used if air gap
verification is not repeatable due to environmental or target conditions.
TABLE 8: ESD CALIBRATION PULSE PARAMETERS (150 PF, 2 K OHMS)
Parameter
Direct Contact Discharge
Air Gap Discharge
Voltage
3 kV
4 kV
4 kV
8 kV
Peak Current
10 A
14 A
10 A
14 A
Rise Time
< 1 nsec
< 3 nsec
A.
The DUT shall be placed on a 50 mm nonconductive spacer centered over a metallic ground plane
with all leads disconnected except that all low impedance ground terminals shall be connected via a
low impedance path to the ground plane. The case, if conductive and case grounded in the vehicle
application, shall be similarly connected to the ground plane. The DUT shall be subjected to a
direct contact test with 3 discharges at each test voltage to each connector pin (including unused
pins) with a minimum of 2 seconds between discharges. Test voltages shall be +/- 3 kV and +/- 4
kV. If direct contact test capability is not available, an air gap discharge test may be used with test
voltages of +/- 4 kV and +/- 8 kV; however, this test is subject to greater variation in results. Use an
ESD simulator with a probe of 150 pF and 2000 ohms.
B.
DUT that are accessible to occupants inside the vehicle shall be tested using the configuration of
LP-388C-42, (DUT operating test). The DUT shall be subjected to 10 discharges at each test
voltage across an air gap to occupant accessible points, including any metal case, with a minimum
of 5 seconds between discharges. Test voltages shall be +/- 4 kV, +/- 8 kV and +/- 15 kV from an
ESD simulator with a probe of 330 pF and 330 ohms.
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
C.
For DUT that are in underhood or trunk locations, the test of paragraph 3.4.2.B shall be modified
replacing the ESD simulator probe to one of 150 pF and 330 ohms.
Refer to LP-388C-42 for test procedure.
3.5 Electromagnetic Immunity
The default modulation for the RF immunity tests is continuous wave (CW). Other modulation techniques
may be appropriate if the known DUT characteristics indicate a potential for reduced immunity to
modulated signals. This information, if known, shall be incorporated in the DUT EMC test plan. The
minimum dwell time for the immunity tests is 3 seconds. If the DUT or its software require a longer dwell
time for comprehensive testing, this shall be incorporated in the DUT EMC test plan.
Refer to Appendix E for the list of standard RF immunity test frequencies. The increments between test
frequencies in this list are based on assumed maximum Q factors for the DUT inputs and outputs. If the
DUT is known to have higher than normal Q factors on some of its inputs and outputs, this information
shall be incorporated into the DUT EMC test plan to decrease the increments between the test
frequencies. If the harmonics of the immunity test set up are at least -20 dBc (below the carrier), the
frequency may be incremented from the lower limit to the upper limit, otherwise the increments shall be
from the upper frequency limit to the lower limit. Normally, testing is to the level that applies for the
Response I immunity requirement for the most critical class of function for the DUT. If effects are
encountered, thresholding shall be performed to determine the actual immunity level for other responses
and functional classes. Refer to Appendix G for special adaptations for J1850 bus testing, Appendix K for
CAN bus testing adaptations and to Appendix J for general EMC design information.
3.5.1 Requirement
A wide range of factors including location, wiring interconnects and the shielding effectiveness of the
vehicle affects the actual EMC performance of a system as installed in a vehicle. Module test levels are
typically lower than whole vehicle test levels due to an assumed level of shielding provided by the vehicle
body. Instrument clusters and overhead consoles are in locations where shielding effectiveness cannot
be assumed and therefore they shall meet the radiated immunity requirements for field strength (3.5.5
and 3.5.6) for one class higher than the actual functional class (except actual Class C function
requirement is 150 V/m for Response II) to allow for this increased risk of RF exposure. Other modules in
exposed or unshielded locations, or any electronics in a nonmetallic vehicle, may also require special
considerations in order to maintain the required vehicle immunity levels in DS-149. This shall be
specified in the DUT PF and EMC test plan. There shall be no damage to the DUT and it shall conform to
the requirements of Table 9, while being subjected to the following electromagnetic immunity
(susceptibility) tests.
TABLE 9: RF IMMUNITY TESTS
Performance
Response
Class A
Performance
Response
Class B
Performance
Response
Class C
Performance
Response
Class D
LFC
#
#
#
#
DRFI
Response I at
100 mW
Response II
below 10 MHz
Response I at
200 mW
Response II
below 10 MHz
Response I at
400 mW
Response II
below 5 MHz
Response I at
800 mW
Response II
below 5 MHz
Paragraph
Number
Test
3.5.2
3.5.4
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
TABLE 9: RF IMMUNITY TESTS
Paragraph
Number
3.5.5
3.5.6
Performance
Response
Class A
Performance
Response
Class B
Performance
Response
Class C
Performance
Response
Class D
TEM
I: 20 V/m
II: 40 V/m
III: 60 V/m
IV: 100 V/m
I: 40 V/m
II: 60 V/m
III: 100 V/m
I: 60 V/m
II: 100 V/m
I: 100 V/m
II: 200 V/m
MATC
I: 20 V/m
II: 40 V/m
III: 60 V/m
IV: 100 V/m
.2* – 1 GHz
I: 40 V/m
II: 60 V/m
III: 100 V/m
.2 - 2 GHz
I: 60 V/m
II: 100 V/m
.2 - 4 GHz*
I: 100 V/m
II: 200 V/m
.2 - 1 GHz
II: 150 V/m
1 GHz - 4 GHz*
Test
Note: I, II, III or IV refers to performance response (see Definitions) and # refers to Response I for all
lines except Response II for signal lines over necessary operating frequency range (see Definitions)
* Option to test from 80 MHz and to 18 GHz if called out in the DUT EMC test plan
3.5.2 Conducted Immunity - Low Frequency Test (LFC) 15 Hz to 250 kHz
The DUT shall be subjected to conducted immunity testing as described in SAE J1113-2, with
modifications as given below. The complex input impedance of most module lines results in distortion of
the applied sine wave. In order to maintain a consistent reference for these measurements, the voltage
that will be applied to the DUT shall be measured across a 4 ohm load substituted for the DUT
(substitution method). The power needed to achieve the voltage(s) given below across a 4 ohm load
shall be mapped out for each test frequency, and this calibrated power shall be used to generate the
signal voltage applied to the DUT, which then replaces the 4 ohm load. In addition, the current into the
DUT shall be monitored and limited to 1 amp (rms) from 15 Hz to 25 kHz, ramping down at 20 dB per
decade from 25 kHz to 250 kHz (100 mA at 250 kHz). Monitor the voltage applied across the DUT and
use this value for relative thresholding if effects are encountered. Refer to LP-388C-33 for test
procedure.
A.
Apply 1.0 V rms (0 dBV rms, 2.83 V p-p for sine wave) from 15 Hz to 25 kHz, ramping down at 20
dB per decade from 25 kHz to 250 kHz (100 mV rms at 250 kHz) simultaneously to all lines that can
receive direct conducted noise through a low impedance path from the vehicle electrical power
system (e.g. switched ignition power feed lines, battery power feed lines, ground side switched
loads).
B.
For vehicle applications where the battery is located remotely from the alternator (trunk, rear seat,
etc.) the increased impedance of the battery cable limits the ability of the battery to suppress ripple
voltage on the power distribution system remote from the battery location. Therefore, for this
vehicle configuration, electronic modules will experience higher system ripple voltages if they are
sourced from a power distribution center (PDC) that is not located adjacent to the battery (within 0.5
m). Therefore, for DUT applications using a vehicle power distribution system with a remote battery
and non-adjacent PDC the following test replaces paragraph 3.5.2.A: Apply 2.0 V rms (6 dBV rms,
5.66 V p-p for sine wave) from 15 Hz to 25 kHz, ramping down at 20 dB per decade from 25 kHz to
250 kHz (200 mV rms at 250 kHz) simultaneously to all lines that can receive direct conducted
noise through a low impedance path from the vehicle electrical power system (module power feeds
and ground side switched loads with remote vehicle battery and non-adjacent PDC location).
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
The following optional requirements are intended for special applications and apply only if specified in the
DUT PF: If the series injection technique cannot be used, due to line impedance limitations, parallel
injection shall be employed. In parallel injection, the transformer secondary has one lead referenced to
ground and the other is capacitively coupled to the line under test. For parallel injection, the reactance of
this coupling capacitor determines the low frequency limit for this test. DUT with multiple grounds shall be
subject to injection on the other ground lines relative to the lowest impedance or ‘reference’ ground. All
levels shall ramp down at 20 dB per decade from 25 kHz to 250 kHz.
C.
Apply 316 mV rms (-10 dBV rms) to non-dedicated signal and/or load lines (represents attenuated
conducted noise).
D.
Apply 158 mV rms (-16 dBV rms) to dedicated signal and/or load lines (represents coupled noise).
E.
Apply 50 mV rms (-26 dBV rms) to dedicated signal and/or load lines that use twisted pair or
shielded wire (unbalanced pairs) for attenuation of coupled noise.
F.
Apply 316 mV rms (-10 dBV rms) to balanced lines injected as a common mode signal.
NOTE: Signal lines are allowed Response II over the necessary operating frequency range.
3.5.3 Conducted Immunity - Audio Feedthrough Test
For DUT with audio outputs (subcategory S), the residual level measured on these outputs propagated
through the DUT from the 1.00 V rms (0 dBV rms) signal (measured across a 4 ohm load) applied to the
power feed(s) as described in paragraph 3.5.2 shall be sufficiently attenuated so as not to exceed the
following limit line extending from 125 Hz to 20 kHz: beginning at 20 dB below the applied 1.00 V rms
signal (100 mV rms, or –20 dBV rms) at 125 Hz, linearly decreasing at the rate of 10 dB per octave of
frequency increase to 60 dB below the applied signal (1.0 mV rms, or –60 dBV rms) at 2 kHz and
continuing at 60 dB below the applied signal (1.0 mV rms, or –60 dBV rms) from 2 kHz to 20 kHz. Refer
to LP-388C-TBD for test procedure.
3.5.4 Conducted Immunity - Direct RF Power Injection Test (DRFI)
The DUT shall be subjected to direct RF power injection, line by line, on all input and output lines
specified in the test plan, including unused connector pins. This test is over the nominal frequency range
of 500 kHz to 500 MHz, refer to Appendix E for specific test frequencies (535 kHz to 501 MHz actual).
This test uses a 50 ohm, 10 dB attenuator in the injection network and a broadband isolator (BAN - see
Appendix D) between each DUT line and its termination, except that low impedance (< 50 ohm) dedicated
sensor or load lines shall be injected at the DUT without using an isolator. As this is a pin by pin test,
exercise care to minimize cross coupling from the line under test to adjacent lines. The 10 dB attenuator
limits the power at the DUT line under test to one tenth, or less, of the input power and minimizes the
effect of reflections caused by the impedance discontinuity at the injection point. Balanced lines shall be
injected with a common mode signal. Some lines may be considered balanced over part, but not all, of
the frequency range. DUT with multiple grounds are subject to injection on one ground relative to
another. For module grounding configurations, refer to Appendix F. A quick scan at the specified output
power noting the frequency range of any effects followed by a thresholding scan over these identified
effect frequency ranges is the preferred test procedure. For the thresholding scan, the output power is
incremented up to the required level at each test frequency. Care shall be taken to avoid equipmentswitching transients. The DUT shall be monitored for effects.
This test is described in SAE J1113-3. Class A and B functions are allowed Response II for frequencies
below 10 MHz and Class C and D functions are allowed Response II for frequencies below 5 MHz. If the
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
series inductance of the BAN inhibits data transfer on signal or bus lines, a reduced inductance
(increased bandwidth) BAN is available for testing these lines with corresponding modifications to
required test frequency ranges. Check with the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of
DaimlerChrysler Corporation Scientific Laboratories for details. The power measured into a 50 ohm load
at the output of the 10 dB attenuator shall be as given below:
-
Class A functions: 100 milliwatts from 0.5 MHz to 500 MHz
-
Class B functions: 100 milliwatts from 0.5 MHz to 25 MHz, increasing at the rate of 3 dB per octave to
200 milliwatts at 50 MHz, and 200 milliwatts from 50 MHz to 500 MHz
-
Class C functions: 200 milliwatts from 0.5 MHz to 25 MHz, increasing at the rate of 3 dB per octave
to 400 milliwatts at 50 MHz, and 400 milliwatts from 50 MHz to 500 MHz
-
Class D functions: 400 milliwatts from 0.5 MHz to 25 MHz, increasing at the rate of 3 dB per octave
to 800 milliwatts at 50 MHz, and 800 milliwatts from 50 MHz to 500 MHz
Refer to Appendix E for power levels between 25 and 50 MHz. Refer to LP-388C-32 for test procedure.
3.5.5 Radiated Immunity - TEM Cell Test
The DUT shall be subjected to radiated immunity testing with reference to SAE J1113-24 over the
frequency range of 10 kHz to 200 MHz, refer to Appendix E for specific test frequencies. The TEM cell
shall have a VSWR not to exceed 1.3:1 (empty cell) from 10 kHz to 200 MHz. The TEM cell shall use a
feedthrough filter assembly (see reference in LP-388C-34) to provide RF isolated interfacing between the
DUT and its system simulator outside the cell.
The DUT shall be connected to the feedthrough filter assembly with an unshielded wiring harness of 610
+/- 51 mm (24 +/- 2 in.) in length (the recommended TEM cell has 450 mm septum to floor spacing). This
unshielded wiring harness shall run diagonally directly from the DUT connector(s) to the TEM cell
bulkhead connectors located behind the TEM cell door. Any excess length shall be fastened with nonconductive tape to the TEM cell floor at the bulkhead connector end. The DUT shall be located in the
approximate center of the TEM cell, midway between the septum and floor; it may be shifted off center to
allow for a direct harness routing but it shall remain in the center two thirds volume of the cell. The
position of the DUT and routing of the harness shall be consistent and documented.
DUT shall be tested in two orthogonal orientations: (i) with the main circuit board in the DUT parallel to
the TEM cell floor (vehicle mounting surface down) and (ii) with the main circuit board perpendicular to the
TEM cell floor or rotated 90 degrees about its vertical axis if perpendicular to the cell floor is not feasible
due to exceeding the 1/3 floor to septum distance. These two orientations shall be chosen from the six
possible orthogonal orientations, to allow visibility of the DUT, if required, and to maintain a consistent
and repeatable routing of the DUT harness. To this end, the DUT connector(s) will usually be orientated
toward the TEM cell door. The VSWR shall be monitored with the DUT under test and the data is
indeterminate if this VSWR is greater than 2:1. The specified RF field shall be calculated and verified
using the known TEM cell characteristics (substitution method). The DUT response to this applied RF
field shall be as given below:
-
Class A functions: Response I to 20 V/m, Response II to 40 V/m, Response III to 60 V/m, Response
IV to 100 V/m
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
-
Class B functions: Response I to 40 V/m, Response II to 60 V/m, Response III to 100 V/m
-
Class C functions: Response I to 60 V/m, Response II to 100 V/m
-
Class D functions: Response I to 100 V/m, Response II to 200 V/m
Refer to LP-388C-34 for test procedure.
3.5.6 Radiated Immunity - Module Anechoic Test Chamber (MATC) Test
The DUT shall be subjected to radiated immunity testing with reference to SAE J1113-21, using an
absorber lined shielded chamber with test region uniformity as specified in LP-388C-35. The DUT shall
be a minimum of 1 meter from the antenna and any other conductive surface and a minimum of 1 meter
from any absorber. Vertical polarization shall be used. Refer to Appendix E for specific test frequencies
in the ranges specified. Above 2 GHz, the RF field may be pulsed. The DUT shall be tested in three
mutually perpendicular orientations (principal planes): (i) with the main circuit board in the DUT parallel to
the chamber floor (vehicle mounting surface down), (ii) with the main circuit board perpendicular to the
chamber floor edge on to the antenna and (iii) with the main circuit board perpendicular to the chamber
floor and broadside to the antenna. These three orientations shall be chosen from the six possible
orthogonal orientations, to allow visibility of the DUT, if required, and to maintain a consistent and
repeatable routing of the DUT harness and direct exposure of DUT apertures to the antenna. To this end,
for modules in a metal case, the DUT connector(s) will usually be orientated upward or toward the
antenna. Wiring harness length and routing shall be controlled and documented. The RF field shall be
mapped out in the anechoic chamber for level and uniformity without the DUT present. The low
frequency limit for this test may be extended down to 80 MHz if called out in the DUT EMC Test Plan.
The DUT response to this applied calibrated RF field (substitution method) shall be as given below:
-
Class A functions: Response I to 20 V/m, Response II to 40 V/m, Response III to 60 V/m, Response
IV to 100 V/m from 200 MHz to 1 GHz.
-
Class B functions: Response I to 40 V/m, Response II to 60 V/m, Response III to 100 V/m from 200
MHz to 2 GHz.
-
Class C functions: Response I to 60 V/m, Response II to 100 V/m from 200 MHz to 4 GHz.
-
Class D functions: Response I to 100 V/m, Response II to 200 V/m, from 200 MHz to 1 GHz and 150
V/m from 1 GHz to 4 GHz.
Refer to LP-388C-35 for test procedure.
3.5.7 Magnetic Field Immunity Test
For subcategory MS modules only: DUT that incorporate components sensitive to magnetic fields (e.g.,
Hall effect sensors or magnetic pickups) shall be subjected to magnetic field immunity testing as
described in SAE J1113-22, (frequency range modified). Alternately, a test loop at a distance of 50 mm
from the periphery of the DUT may be used.
A.
The DUT shall be exposed to a magnetic flux density of 160 dBpT (dB picotesla) from 15 Hz to 60
Hz and above 60 Hz this shall decrease at a rate of 5 dB per octave to 105 dBpT at 30 kHz. The
DUT shall be exposed to a flux density of 160 dBpT from 15 Hz to 60 Hz using a sine wave and as
generated by the harmonics of a 160 dBpT 60 Hz square wave above 60 Hz as a quick screen to
assure compliance. A sine wave scan using the 5 dB per octave decreasing limit shall be
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
performed only if there are effects noted during the square wave test.
B.
For vehicle applications where the battery is located other than in the engine compartment, the
routing of high current carrying conductors near vehicle electronics raises the magnetic
environment. DUT in severe magnetic environments (e.g. located within 0.5 meter of a battery
cable or other power feed carrying 50 amps or more of current) shall be tested at 160 dBpT over the
full frequency range.
Refer to LP-388C-58 for test procedure.
3.6 Conducted RF Emissions
3.6.1 Requirement
The conducted RF emissions from the DUT shall be below the levels that present a significant risk of
producing radiated emissions that would interfere with vehicle radio receivers and electronic systems.
For most module locations in a metallic vehicle, the vehicle body provides some shielding. However, the
risk of interference increases for modules in exposed or unshielded locations that have enhanced visibility
to the vehicle antenna(s). For front mounted vehicle antennas, these exposed locations are the high
instrument panel area (instrument cluster) and the overhead console. For vehicles with rear-mounted
antennas or nonmetallic body panels, other locations may have enhanced visibility to the vehicle
antenna(s).
The conducted emissions limit levels are defined in paragraphs 3.6.2 and 4.3.2 and in Figure 7. For
electronic DUT, the measured conducted RF narrowband emissions shall not exceed the conducted
emissions limit level 2. For electronic modules in exposed or unshielded locations, the measured
narrowband emissions may need to comply with level 1 in order to meet vehicle emission levels. For
DUT outputs identified as broadband sources according to the procedure specified in LP-388C-41, the
measured broadband emissions shall not exceed level 3 for long operating duration sources and level 4
for short operating duration sources. Note that both narrowband and broadband emissions may be
present at some DUT outputs.
Dedicated signal and/or load lines from the DUT that use shielded wire for attenuation of coupled noise
are allowed one level (10 dB) above the limit that would otherwise apply.
Mechanically commutated and electronically controlled dc electric motors shall not exceed the conducted
emissions limit level 3 (long duration) and level 4 (short duration). Electronically commutated and
controlled dc electric motors shall not exceed the conducted emissions limit level 2 (long duration) and
level 3 (short duration). Refer to Appendix G for special adaptations for J1850 bus testing and Appendix
K for CAN bus testing adaptations.
Measurements shall be made over the following frequency ranges:
150 kHz to 2 MHz and 2 MHz to 200 MHz
An additional measurement shall be made over the frequency range of 200 MHz to 500 MHz if the noise
emissions from 180 to 200 MHz exceed 5 dB below the limit. Measurements over this frequency range
are for advisory information only.
The frequency range of 100 Hz to 150 kHz shall also be measured, for advisory information only, if called
out in the DUT PF or test plan.
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
3.6.2 Conducted RF Emissions Limit Levels (Refer to Figure 7)
-
Level 1, electronic DUT in high instrument panel area may need to meet this level:
110 dBuV rms for frequencies from 100 Hz to 50 kHz. For signal lines, intentional signals are
excluded over this frequency range.
110 dBuV rms at 50 kHz linearly decreasing at the rate of 60 dB per decade of frequency increase to
50 dBuV rms at 500 kHz.
50 dBuV rms for frequencies from 500 kHz to 6 MHz.
40 dBuV rms for frequencies from 6 MHz to 30 MHz.
30 dBuV rms for frequencies from 30 MHz to 500 MHz.
-
Level 2, for electronic DUT and some motor evaluations, see paragraph 4.3.2:
110 dBuV rms for frequencies from 100 Hz to 74 kHz. For signal lines, intentional signals are
excluded over this frequency range.
110 dBuV rms at 74 kHz linearly decreasing at the rate of 60 dB per decade of frequency increase to
60 dBuV rms at 500 kHz.
60 dBuV rms for frequencies from 500 kHz to 6 MHz.
50 dBuV rms for frequencies from 6 MHz to 30 MHz.
40 dBuV rms for frequencies from 30 MHz to 500 MHz.
-
Level 3, for long operating duration broadband sources and Level 4 for short operating duration
broadband sources, refer to paragraph 4.3.2.
3.6.3 Test for Electronic DUT
This test evaluates the radiated RF emissions potential that the DUT will present when installed in a
vehicle. In order to assess this risk from the DUT, a measurement of open circuit or simulated open
circuit RF voltage, referenced to ground, is made at all DUT input and output terminals, including unused
connector pins. For module grounding configurations, refer to Appendix F. This test evaluates the RF
characteristics of a printed circuit board (PCB), including the ground plane and bypassing effectiveness.
It is at the prototype PCB level where the diagnostic capabilities of this test facilitate cost-effective
improvements in the RF emissions performance of the module or component.
The DUT shall be powered from a nominal 13.5 Vdc supply or 12 to 14 volt storage battery. The power
supply, if used, shall have low conducted RF emissions that will not affect the test results. If a storage
battery is used, its terminal voltage, under load, must not be below 12.0 V dc. Preferably, the DUT shall
be operated with the minimal input and output connections consistent with ‘essentially normal’ oscillator
frequency and logic activity. Necessary inputs and outputs shall be connected to their terminations
through appropriate broadband isolators (BAN)s, except where special situations apply. An alternative is
to use the full BAN isolated setup from the DRFI test. For outputs that drive PWM or inductive loads, a
representative load shall be connected to the line under test if the typically broadband RF output due to
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
the switching activity is to be evaluated. This loaded characteristic is only to be evaluated if called out in
the DUT PF or test plan and THE MEASUREMENT IS LIMITED BY THE DYNAMIC RANGE OF THE
PREAMP. The measurement shall be made using a 500 ohm to 1000 ohm nominal input impedance
(10X to 20X) probe (50 ohm output impedance) connected through a blocking capacitor to a preamplifier
(if used) and a spectrum analyzer. A preamplifier may be used for measurements to levels 1 and 2 only
from 2 to 500 MHz, if needed for measurement to the specified levels. Do not use a preamp for
measurements above level 2. If a preamp is used, assure that the preamp is not being overloaded by the
DUT signal voltage by switching in 10 dB of attenuation between the probe and the preamp and verifying
that the signal voltage from the preamp to the analyzer is attenuated by 10 dB at 2 MHz. Measurements
above 150 kHz are at 10 kHz resolution bandwidth and 30 kHz video bandwidth. Above 2 MHz, a
shielded room is required to provide an ambient level low enough for measurement to the levels
specified. Refer to LP-388-C-41 for test procedure, which includes calibration, system correction factor,
ambient measurement and the use of ferrite clamps on the probe cable to reduce variability.
3.6.4 Test for Electronically Commutated Electric Motors
This test evaluates the simulated open circuit RF voltage, referenced to ground, appearing at all motor
input and output lines. The RF emissions conducted out on the battery, ignition or control lead(s) of the
motor shall be measured with the motor connected to its power source through a motor isolator (BAN).
Acceptable power sources are a fully charged 12 V automotive type storage battery or a dc power supply
with adequate current capacity and low conducted RF emissions that will not affect the test results. The
measurement shall be made using a 500 to 1000 ohm nominal input impedance (10X to 20X) probe (50
ohm output impedance) connected through a blocking capacitor to a preamplifier (if used) and a spectrum
analyzer. A preamplifier is not normally needed for measurement of primarily broadband devices. Do not
use a preamp for measurements above level 2 or below 2 MHz. If a preamp is used, assure that the
preamp is not being overloaded by the DUT signal voltage by switching in 10 dB of attenuation between
the probe and the preamp and verifying that the signal voltage from the preamp to the analyzer is
attenuated by 10 dB at 2 MHz. Measurements above 150 kHz are at 10 kHz resolution bandwidth and 30
kHz video bandwidth. Above 2 MHz, a shielded room is required to provide an ambient level low enough
for measurement to the levels specified. Refer to LP-388C-41 for test procedure, which includes
calibration, system correction factor, ambient measurement and the use of ferrite clamps on the probe
cable to reduce variability.
NOTE: This test is to be performed after the supply voltage transient testing has been completed.
3.7 Radiated RF Emissions Tests (Optional)
Two additional RF emissions tests are described in Appendices B and C. These tests must be called out
specifically in the DUT PF to be requirements.
4.0 EMC REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC MOTORS
4.1 General
This section applies to mechanically commutated (brush) dc electric motors and to solenoids, relays,
buzzers and electromechanical horns (referred to as inductive devices) as described in Table 3. Refer to
Appendix H, EMC Design for Brush Commutated DC Electric Motors, for motor EMC design information.
The motor shall be loaded to approximate in vehicle operating conditions, where practical, for all tests.
The motor shall operate as specified with up to 60 microhenries of series inductance in the supply voltage
line(s) (typical motor BAN) (required for the conducted RF emissions and conducted transient testing).
4.1.1 Sample Size
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Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
Three samples are normally required for testing.
4.1.2 Order of Tests
The motor or inductive device is expected to pass all tests, whatever the order of tests, except that
transient testing precedes RF emissions testing for motors with RF suppression capacitors.
4.2 Supply Voltage Transients
4.2.1 Requirement
Motors utilizing RF suppression capacitors and all Category BCM/C or ECM motors shall be subjected to
the following supply voltage transients. These pulses are applied to the motor power feed line or lines.
There shall be no degradation of the motor RF suppression performance or effect on the performance of
the integral electronics for Category BCM/C or ECM motors.
The motor, its RF suppression components and any integral electronics shall be tolerant of transient
voltages generated by the operation of its own system.
4.2.2 Supply Voltage Spike Test
The motor shall be subjected to repetitive voltage spikes with reference to SAE J1113-11. For test pulses
and levels refer to Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 which illustrate the open circuit waveforms and specific
parameters for each pulse. Verify that the transient simulator provides isolation between transients and
the motor power supply. The pulse in Figure 1 is referenced to ground; all other pulses are referenced to
motor supply voltage. Pulse 1 is applied for 20 minutes, pulses 2, 3 and 4 are applied for 10 minutes
each. Refer to LP-388C-39 for test procedure.
4.3 Conducted RF Emissions
4.3.1 Requirement
The conducted emissions from the motor (or inductive device) shall be below the level that presents a
significant risk of generating conducted interference or radiated emissions that would interfere with
onboard vehicle radio receivers. The risk of such interference increases with motors in exposed or
unshielded locations. For example, wiper motors and power mirror motors (because their location is
usually exposed to the vehicle antenna) are at risk for higher radiated emissions. For most motor
locations in a metallic vehicle, the vehicle body provides some shielding. Refer to Appendix H, EMC
Design for Brush Commutated DC Electric Motors, to assure motor RF emissions compliance.
Long operating duration motors shall not exceed the conducted emissions limit level 3. Short operating
duration motors shall not exceed the conducted emissions limit level 4. Wiper motors and power mirror
motors, if their location is exposed to the vehicle antenna, shall require a vehicle level evaluation if their
measured emissions exceed level 2 and level 3 respectively.
Measurements are to be made over the following frequency ranges:
150 kHz to 2 MHz and 2 MHz to 200 MHz
An additional measurement shall be made over the frequency range of 200 MHz to 500 MHz if the noise
emissions from 180 to 200 MHz exceed 5 dB below the limit. Measurements over this frequency range
are for advisory information only.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 20
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
The frequency range of 100 Hz to 150 kHz shall also be measured, for advisory information only, if called
out in the motor PF or test plan.
4.3.2 Conducted RF Emissions Limit Levels (Refer to Figure 7)
-
Level 2 - see paragraph 3.6.2 for applicable motor evaluations
-
Level 3, for long operating duration motors / broadband sources:
110 dBuV rms for frequencies from 100 Hz to 110 kHz.
110 dBuV rms at 110 kHz linearly decreasing at the rate of 60 dB per decade of frequency increase
to 70 dBuV rms at 500 kHz.
70 dBuV rms for frequencies from 500 kHz to 6 MHz.
60 dBuV rms for frequencies from 6 MHz to 30 MHz.
50 dBuV rms for frequencies from 30 MHz to 500 MHz.
-
Level 4, for short operating duration motors / broadband sources:
110 dBuV rms for frequencies from 100 Hz to 110 kHz.
110 dBuV rms at 110 kHz linearly decreasing at the rate of 60 dB per decade of frequency increase
to 80 dBuV rms at 350 kHz.
80 dBuV rms for frequencies from 350 kHz to 6 MHz.
70 dBuV rms for frequencies from 6 MHz to 30 MHz.
60 dBuV rms for frequencies from 30 MHz to 500 MHz.
4.3.3 Test
This test is to be performed after the transient testing has been completed. Very-short-cycle motors (such
as power door lock actuators) are not subject to this test. Representative loading shall be used for the
motor whenever possible. This test evaluates the simulated open circuit RF voltage, referenced to
ground, appearing at all motor input and output lines. The RF emissions conducted out on the battery,
ignition or control lead(s) of the motor shall be measured with the motor connected to its power source
through a broadband motor isolator (see definition). Acceptable power sources are a 12 V automotive
type storage battery or a dc power supply with adequate current capacity and low conducted RF
emissions that will not affect the test results. If a storage battery is used, its terminal voltage, under load,
must not be below 12.0 V dc. The measurement shall be made using a 500 to 1000 ohm nominal input
impedance (10X to 20X) probe (50 ohm output impedance) connected through a blocking capacitor to a
preamplifier (if used) and a spectrum analyzer. A preamplifier is not normally needed for measurement of
inherently broadband devices such as brush commutated electric motors. Do not use a preamp for
measurements above level 2 or below 2 MHz. If a preamp is used, assure that the preamp is not being
overloaded by the DUT signal voltage by switching in 10 dB of attenuation between the probe and the
preamp and verifying that the signal voltage from the preamp to the analyzer is attenuated by 10 dB at 2
MHz. Measurements above 150 kHz are at 10 kHz resolution bandwidth and 30 kHz video bandwidth.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 21
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
Above 2 MHz, a shielded room is required to provide an ambient level low enough for measurement to
the levels specified. Refer to LP-388C-41 for test procedure, which includes calibration, system
correction factor, ambient measurement and the use of ferrite clamps on the probe cable to reduce
variability.
4.4 Magnetic Field Emissions
4.4.1 Requirement
Motors (or other inductive devices) generate a magnetic field proportional to motor current that falls off
with distance. This magnetic field emissions requirement is based on a minimum separation of 250 mm
(10 inches) between a motor and a magnetically sensitive module (e.g., blower motor to radio/cassette
unit). Small motors that are a part of a module with magnetically sensitive components (e.g. drive motors
contained in radio/cassette unit) are expected to be compatible with the overall function of the module
and are not evaluated for this requirement. The magnetic flux density measured at a distance of 250 mm
(10 inches) from the periphery of the motor (or Subcategory X module) shall not exceed 160 + 20
log(D/250) dBpT (dB picotesla) from 15 Hz to 60 Hz and above 60 Hz this shall decrease at a rate of 12
dB per octave to 52 + 20 log(D/250) dBpT at 30 kHz where ‘D’ represents the distance in millimeters from
the periphery of the DUT to the nearest magnetically sensitive module. See paragraph 3.5.7 for
corresponding immunity requirements for electronic modules.
4.4.2 Test
The magnetic field emissions from the motor (or other inductive device) shall be measured with the motor
loaded so that it is drawing its rated operating current. If this is not practical, the actual current is to be
measured and the magnetic emissions scaled at 6 dB increase for each doubling of motor current to
reach rated current. Refer to LP-388C-71 for test procedure.
4.5 Conducted Transient Emissions
The motor (or other inductive device or Subcategory X or Y module) shall conform to the following
restrictions on switching transients. Inductive devices, category ID, are to be tested with any parallel
suppression. If this suppression is remotely located at a driver in a module, the ID must be tested as a
system with the module or with the suppression simulated across the ID.
4.5.1 Requirement
Transients that can be conducted over the vehicle supply lines to electronic modules are limited to ± 115
volts if measured using a BAN or ± 75 volts if measured using a LISN. These voltages are referenced to
ground. “Ground” refers to the reference ground plane for the test that simulates the vehicle sheet metal
and/or vehicle power distribution return path.
Slow transients (rise time greater than 1 microsecond) from isolated sources that cannot be conducted
over the vehicle supply lines to electronic modules are not restricted. Faster transients from these
sources may present a risk unless wiring routing is controlled to avoid coupling to other circuits.
4.5.2 Test
Representative loading shall be used for the motor whenever possible. Measure the transient voltages
generated by the motor (or inductive device or module) with a storage scope (sampling rate of 400 million
samples per second minimum) while exercising all functions of the motor and while turning it on and off
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 22
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
ten times using a specified standard test relay or the appropriate vehicle system switch or relay. Use a
motor BAN or LISN between the power supply and the motor or other device under test as described in
paragraph 4.3.3. If a LISN is used in this application, the transient limit is reduced to +/- 75 volts. The
conducted transient is measured across the DUT with BAN or LISN isolation from the supply and with the
DUT switched on the supply side of the BAN or LISN. The rise time, peak voltage and pulse width are to
be recorded. Refer to LP-388C-30 for test procedure.
NOTE: Vehicle system switches and relays are subject to deterioration with accumulated operating time.
This can result in the generation of transients with faster rise times or higher peak voltages. Therefore,
the switch or relay used should represent ‘worst case’ to preclude later system problems.
5.0 RELIABILITY / DURABILITY REQUIREMENTS
The supplier shall verify that the components and/or techniques incorporated in the electrical or electronic
module or motor to achieve compliance with this standard meet the corporate guidelines for reliability and
durability.
6.0 PRODUCT ASSURANCE
The supplier shall develop an appropriate product assurance plan per the DaimlerChrysler “Product
Assurance Planning Manual” to assure the part meets the quality, durability, and warranty targets. The
general requirements for Design Verification (DV), Production Validation (PV), and Continuing
Conformance are explained in PF-8500, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS.
Testing shall be completed in the time frame depicted in the Product Assurance Plan or the Design
Verification Plan & Report (DVP&R), with the concurrence of the DaimlerChrysler releasing engineer.
6.1 Design Verification
The supplier is responsible for assuring that the tests are performed to meet the requirements as
specified in the releasing document, which references this standard. DaimlerChrysler reserves the right
to perform audit testing.
Design Verification data shall be provided to the releasing department to be forwarded to the appropriate
product team E/E Systems Department.
6.2 Production Validation and Continuing Conformance
The supplier shall perform the tests to meet the requirements as specified in the releasing document,
which references this standard. Production Validation data shall be provided to the releasing department.
Continuing Conformance Inspection data shall be provided upon request.
6.3 Vehicle Testing
In addition to meeting the requirements for a module or component as specified in this standard, the
module or component must comply with DaimlerChrysler Standard DS-149 when installed in a
representative vehicle. DaimlerChrysler may change the specific requirements for a given component or
module, as a result of testing to DS-149.
7.0 DEFINITIONS
Refer to SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) J1113-1 Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement
Procedures and Limits for Vehicles Components (Except Aircraft) (60 Hz to 18 GHz) and IEEE STD100
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 23
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
dictionary for additional definitions.
Anomaly. An effect that represents a deviation from performance as specified in the DUT PF and
described in the DUT test plan (see effect).
BAN. An acronym for Broadband Artificial Network. A device that presents a controlled impedance over
a specified frequency range to the DUT while allowing the DUT to be interfaced to its support system. In
this standard it refers to the device, also referred to as an isolator, developed by the E/E Systems
Compatibility Department of DaimlerChrysler Corporation Scientific Laboratories to replace the LISN for
RF testing. This device is covered by U. S. Patent 5,541,521. For information on construction, refer to
Appendix D. For licensed commercial sources, contact the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of
Scientific Laboratories.
Category. In this document, electronic modules, electric motors and inductive devices are classified into
categories and subcategories, which determine the appropriate test requirements.
-
-
-
Electronic module categories:
-
Category P: A passive electrical component or module. Examples: resistor, capacitor, blocking
or clamping diode
-
Category A: An electronic component or module that does not incorporate oscillators operating
at a frequency of 9 kHz or greater or clocked digital logic. Example: an analog op amp circuit
-
Category O: An electronic component or module with an oscillator operating at 9 kHz or greater
but no clocked digital logic. Example: switching power supply
-
Category D: An electronic component or module with clocked digital logic. Example:
microprocessor controller
-
Categories A, O and D are in increasing order of severity for EMC requirements. Modules that
qualify for more than one category shall be assigned the highest category that applies.
A subcategory is in addition to the basic category designation.
-
Subcategory MS: An electronic component or module that contains magnetically sensitive
elements.
-
Subcategory R: An electronic component or module operated from a regulated power source in
another module.
-
Subcategory S: An electronic component or module that has an audio output.
-
Subcategory X: An electronic module that contains an electric or electronically controlled motor
within its package.
-
Subcategory Y: An electronic module that contains a magnetically operated relay within its
package.
Electric motor and inductive device categories (subcategory is in addition to the basic category
designation):
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 24
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
-
Category BCM: A brush commutated dc electric motor.
-
Subcategory C: A brush commutated dc electric motor with integral electronic control.
-
Category ECM: An electronically commutated dc electric motor.
-
Category ID: Inductive devices such as solenoids, relays, buzzers and electromechanical
horns.
-
Subcategory R: Solenoids and relays (i.e., ID/R).
-
Subcategory P: Inductive devices pulsed at a rate of 100 Hz or greater (i.e., ID/P or ID/RP).
CISPR. An acronym for “Comite International Special des Perturbations Radioelectriques” (Special
International Committee on Radio Interference).
Controlled Manner. Refers to the response of the DUT to an applied stimulus. A response is considered
controlled when the operation of the DUT and its system returns to normal after the stimulus is removed
(see performance response, response II).
Damage. A DUT is considered damaged when it no longer performs as specified in the DUT PF or shows
visual evidence (such as discoloration) of electrical or electronic components that have exceeded their
ratings.
-4
dBpT. dB picotesla (160 dBpT or 10 tesla = 1 Gauss).
DCS/DCA. DaimlerChrysler Stuttgart / DaimlerChrysler Auburn Hills.
Dedicated Lines. Lines connecting the DUT to a sensor, load or similar input or output without a
conductive path, other than ground, to any other module or the vehicle electrical power system.
Diagnostic Indication. An output from the DUT that indicates system status and predefined failure
conditions. This output might be an indicator light or a data link to a diagnostic readout.
Direct RF Power Injection. A conducted RF immunity test technique that involves isolating the DUT so
that the RF coupling path is controlled. This test is also referred to as single line injection (SLI).
Disturbance. Any electrical transient or electromagnetic phenomenon that may affect the proper
operation of an electrical or electronic device (see stimulus).
DUT. An acronym for Device(s) Under Test. Any electrical or electronic component, module, motor, filter,
etc. Also referred to as EUT or equipment under test.
DUT PF. The DaimlerChrysler Corporation Performance Standard for the DUT (see Releasing
Document).
DRFI. Direct Radio Frequency Injection.
DV. Design Verification.
DVP&R. Design Verification Plan & Report defined in PS-8500, Product Assurance Testing Manual.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 25
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
E/E. Electrical and/or Electronic.
Effect. A detectable change in DUT performance due to an applied stimulus.
Effect Threshold. A repeatable transition of the DUT from normal to affected operation occurring at a
value or over a range of values of an electrical test parameter.
Electronically Controlled Motor. A motor that has active electronic devices as part of the motor package.
ESD. Electrostatic discharge.
Fail-safe mode. A predictable operating mode intended to minimize adverse effects by restricting or
shutting down operation when a significant stimulus has made operation unreliable. Operation shall be
recoverable after the stimulus is removed without permanent loss of function or corruption of stored data
or diagnostic information.
Function. The intended operation of a module for a specific purpose. The DUT can provide many
different functions, which are, defined (functional class and acceptable performance) by the DUT
performance standard.
Functional Class. In accordance with SAE J1113-1, with modification, DUT functions are divided into four
classes (functional class determines the appropriate test level - refer to Appendix A for typical function
list):
- Class A: Any function that provides a convenience.
Examples are entertainment systems and nonessential displays.
- Class B: Any function that enhances, but is not essential to, the operation and/or control of the vehicle.
Examples are important information displays.
- Class C: Any function that controls or affects the essential operation of the vehicle.
Examples are critical engine and transmission control functions, vehicle braking and steering ability.
- Class D: Any function that electronically controls the deployment of an electroexplosive device (EED)
actuated passive restraint system with the potential for inadvertent deployment. [Refer to definitions and
background in MIL-STD-1576 (USAF)]
High Data Rate BAN. A device developed at DaimlerChrysler Corporation, Auburn Hills as an adaptation
of the broadband artificial network designed to allow 125 k baud data transfer through the BAN. For
information on construction, refer to Appendix D. For licensed commercial sources, contact the E/E
Systems Compatibility Department of Scientific Laboratories.
Inductive Device. An electromechanical device that stores energy in a magnetic field. Examples are
solenoids, relays, buzzers and electromechanical horns.
LISN. An acronym for Line Impedance Stabilization Network as described in SAE J1113-1. This device
was originally developed to simulate the line impedance of ac power mains and facilitate a voltage
measurement using a 50 ohm impedance test instrument. It continues to be widely used as an isolator
for RF emissions measurements, even for dc powered DUT, but has many limitations inherent in its
construction. These include a relatively large size and significant resonances above 100 MHz that make
higher frequency measurements problematic.
LFC. Low Frequency Conducted.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 26
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
Logic Clock. Real time clock (RTC) and essential real time vehicle functions that require functional
wakeup capability.
Motor BAN. A device developed by the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of DaimlerChrysler
Corporation Scientific Laboratories as a high current adaptation of the broadband artificial network
designed to meet acceptable resistance and inductance limits for motors. For information on
construction, refer to Appendix D. For licensed commercial sources, contact the E/E Systems
Compatibility Department of Scientific Laboratories.
Motor - Long Operating Duration. Motors expected to be in operation for extended periods of time. (Also
applies for other broadband sources.) Examples are blower, wiper and radiator fan motors.
Motor - Short Operating Duration. Motors that operate for short periods of time under operator control.
(Also applies for other broadband sources.) Examples are power window, seat or mirror motors. Note:
Motors that cycle automatically, without direct operator input, are considered to be the same as long
operating duration motors for EMC performance.
Motor - Very-Short-Cycle. Motors that operate a single cycle of less than one second duration under
operator control (e.g., a power door lock actuator).
Necessary Operating Frequency Range. The frequency range or bandwidth required to transmit
essential information over signal lines as part of the operation of the DUT. For pulse signals, a frequency
range extending to 20 times the fundamental frequency is assumed.
NIST. An acronym for National Institute of Science and Technology.
PCB. Printed Circuit Board.
Performance Response. In accordance with SAE J1113-1, Appendix A, with modification, the
performance of DUT functions, when subjected to a disturbance, is divided into four responses (or
regions of performance):
-
Response I: The function operates as designed during and after exposure to a disturbance.
-
Response II: The function may deviate from designed performance, to a specified level, during
exposure to a disturbance or revert to a fail-safe mode of operation, but shall return to normal
operation after the disturbance is removed (see fail-safe mode).
-
Response III: The function may deviate from designed performance during exposure to a
disturbance. Driver action may be required to return the function to normal operation after the
disturbance is removed (i.e. ignition off/on).
-
Response IV: The device/function shall not sustain any permanent damage as a result of exposure
to a disturbance. Dealer action may be required to return the function to normal operation after the
disturbance is removed (i.e. battery reset).
PF. Performance Standard.
Powered-down State. A DUT connected in its operating configuration with battery power applied but
ignition or switched power turned off and all active functions timed out.
PV. Production Validation.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 27
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
PWM. Pulse Width Modulated.
Releasing Document. A DaimlerChrysler Corporation Performance Standard (PF) or part drawing. The
term "as specified" used in this standard refers to as specified in the releasing document.
Stability. The condition where the DUT maintains control, within defined limits, of a specific function in the
presence of an applied stimulus.
Stimulus. A change induced in the electrical environment of the DUT. This change may be an applied
voltage level, transient, ac signal or RF field.
Supply Voltage. The voltage that will be available in the vehicle or as simulated on the bench to power
the DUT. This voltage is applied to the battery and ignition lines and any DUT inputs or outputs sourced
from battery or ignition voltage as configured in a DUT's complete system including circuit protection.
This includes lines such as voltage sense, illumination and loads sourced from supply voltage and
switched to ground in the DUT.
TEM. An acronym for Transverse Electromagnetic Mode.
8.0 CONTROL
This standard has been developed by the E/E Systems Department (9320) of Small Vehicle Product
Team Engineering (SVPT) of DaimlerChrysler Corporation Vehicle Engineering Office, Auburn Hills,
U.S.A. with assistance from the E/E Systems Compatibility Department (5140) of Scientific Laboratories
and the EMC Technical Advisory Group and Tech Club. This development was in cooperation with the
DCS Electrical Group in order to commonize to the extent possible with their EMC Specification MBN
10284-2. To maintain that commonization, changes to this document need to be coordinated with the
groups that were involved in its development. A comparison between this PF and PF9326-D is given in
Appendix L.
9.0 GENERAL INFORMATION
Three asterisks “***” after the paragraph header denotes multiple technical changes to the paragraph.
Three asterisks before and after a string of text (***text***) identifies a single change. Minor corrections
or editorial changes are not marked.
Certain important information relative to this standard has been included in separate standards. To
assure the parts submitted meet all of DaimlerChrysler requirements, it is mandatory that the
requirements in the following standards be met.
CS-9800
PF-8500
CS-9003
QS-9000
-
Application of this standard, the subscription service, and approved sources
General requirements
Regulated substances and recyclability
Quality System Requirements
Within Engineering Standards, the Regulatory (Government-mandated) requirements are designated by
<S>, <E>, <N>, <T>, or <H> which correspond to Safety, Emission, Noise, Theft Prevention, and
Homologation Shields respectively. The DCC-mandated requirements are designated by <D>, <A> or
<X> and correspond to the Diamond, Appearance and Traceability symbols respectively.
For specific information on this document, please refer to the contact person shown in the "Publication
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 28
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
Information" Section of this document. For general information on obtaining Engineering Standards and
Laboratory Procedures, see CS-9800 or contact the Engineering Standards Department at
[email protected]
Parts shall only be purchased from those sources listed under Engineering Approved Source List.
10.0 REFERENCES
10.1 General
“Design Verification Plan & Report” (DVP&R) manual 84-231-1201
Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors manual, “Quality System Requirements QS – 9000”
CS-9800
PF-8500
CS-9003
QS-9000
10.2 International Documents
IEC 801-2
IEC CD61967-2
ISO 17025 (Guide 25)
ISO 7637
10.3 SAE Documents
SAE J1113-1, Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedures and Limits for Vehicle
Components (Except Aircraft) (60 Hz to 18 GHz), Society of Automotive Engineers (General and
Definitions)
SAE J1113-2, Conducted Immunity, 30 Hz to 250 kHz, Power Leads
SAE J1113-3, Conducted Immunity, 250 kHz to 500 MHz, Direct Radio Frequency (RF) Power Injection
SAE J1113-11, Immunity to Conducted Transients on Power Leads
SAE J1113-13, Immunity to Electrostatic Discharge
SAE J1113-21, Road Vehicles - Electrical Disturbances by Narrowband Radiated Electromagnetic Energy
- Component Test Methods - Absorber Lined Chamber
SAE J1113-22, Immunity to Radiated Magnetic Fields from Power Lines
SAE J1113-24, Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields, 10 kHz to 200 MHz, TEM Cell Method
SAE J1752-3, Measurement of Radiated Emissions from Integrated Circuits, 150 kHz to 1 GHz, TEM Cell
and 150 kHz to 8 GHz, Wideband TEM (GTEM) Cell
10.4 Military Standard
MIL-STD-1576 (USAF), 31 July 1984, Electroexplosive Subsystem Safety Requirements and Test
Methods for Space Systems
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 29
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
10.5 DaimlerChrysler Standards
PF-10541, Electrical Specifications for Electrical & Electronic Modules and Motors – 2004 E/E
Architecture
DS-108, Vehicle Grounding Requirements for Electrical and Electronic Systems
DS-149, Vehicle Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Immunity, Emissions and Transients
DS-150, Electronic Module Design Guidelines for Designers to meet EMC Requirements
DS-151, Electronic Module Design Guidelines for Engineers to meet EMC Requirements
10.6 DaimlerChrysler Laboratory Procedures
These lab procedures are subject to periodic updates. It is the responsibility of the supplier to maintain
current lab procedures for their testing.
LP-384D-20, Procedure for Scheduling System Level EMC Testing
LP-388C-30, Conducted Transient Emissions Test
LP-388C-32, Conducted Immunity, 500 kHz to 500 MHz, Direct RF Power Injection Test
LP-388C-33, Low Frequency Conducted Immunity Test, 15 Hz to 100 kHz
LP-388C-34, Radiated Immunity, 10 kHz to 200 MHz, Transverse Electromagnetic Mode (TEM) Cell Test
LP-388C-35, Radiated Immunity, 200 MHz to 4 GHz, (Anechoic Chamber) Test
LP-388C-36, Load Dump Test
LP-388C-38, Supply Voltage Transient Tests: Input Voltage Dropouts, Dips and Switched Logic
LP-388C-39, Supply Voltage Spike and I/O Line Spike Tests
LP-388C-41, Conducted RF Emissions Test, 150 kHz to 500 MHz
LP-388C-42, Electrostatic Discharge Tests
LP-388C-58, Magnetic Field Immunity Test
LP-388C-59, Radiated RF Emissions Test (TEM Cell)
LP-388C-65, Procedure for Controlling E/E System Level Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Testing at
a Supplier or Third Party EMC Laboratory
LP-388C-68, Low Voltage Cranking and Supply Voltage Ramp Tests
LP-388C-69, Operating Voltage Range, Voltage Extremes and Ignition Off Current Draw Tests
LP-388C-71, Magnetic Field Emissions Test
LP-388C-TBD, Audio Feedthrough Test
11.0 ENGINEERING APPROVED SOURCE LIST
A list of supplier and third party EMC labs approved for testing to this performance standard is available
from the E/E Systems Compatibility Department (5140) of Scientific Laboratories, Auburn Hills, MI, USA.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 30
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
12.0 PUBLICATION INFORMATION
Current Contact/Phone Number: T.M. North, (248) 576-1982
Alternate Contact/Phone Number: A.J. Shune, (248) 576-6919
Alternate Contact/Phone Number: D.M. Traynor, ( 248) 576-6928
Dept. Name & Dept. No./Tech Club/Organization: SVPT E/E Systems, Dept. 9320
Date Standard Originally (Initially) Published: December 11, 2001
Date Published:
Change Notice: Not required.
Change Level: Description of Change: Initial release.
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 31
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
V oltages are open circuit values, verify R i by 50% voltage reduction with 10 ohm load.
t3
+V
0V
Level is: [ 10% of V s ] volts
t4
Vr
t
10 %
P aram eters:
V r = +13.5 volts
E xponential decay
Vs
Level is: [ 90% of V s ] volts
90 %
t2
-V
T
t1
N ot to scale, use specified param eter values.
R i = 10 ohm s
V s = -100 volts
T = 2.0 m s ± 20%
t 1 = 10 s ± 20%
t 2 = 1.0 µ s ± 50%
t 3 : T im e b e tw e e n d is c o n n e c ti o n o f t h e
supply source and the zero crossing of the
transient waveform , to be less than 2.0 µ s.
t4 = 3 s ± 20% (tim e of one com plete pulse,
which term inate s w hen decaying
expon ential waveform , w hich is
asym ptotically approaching V r , nears zero,
at which tim e V r is applied to the D U T).
For default tolerances, see paragraph 2.4.
FIGURE 1: TEST PULSE #1
Note: In Figures 1 through 6, Ri is the internal source impedance of the transient generator. Note that
ISO is likely to change the Ri for Pulse 2 from 10 ohms to 2 ohms and this change should be anticipated
in a future revision of this standard.
V oltages are open circuit values, verify R i by 50% voltage reduction with 10 ohm load.
t1
P aram eters:
T
+V
V r = +13.5 volts
t2
90 %
Level is: [V r + 90% of V s ] volts
R i = 10 ohm s
V s = + 1 0 0 v o lts fo r p o w e r c irc u it te s ts .
N ote: For transient testing of I/O circuits,
this value is +30 volts and -30 volts.
T = 50 µ s ± 20%
Vs
E xponential decay
asym ptotically
approaches V r
t 1 = 500 m s ± 20%
t 2 = 1.0 µ s ± 50%
Level is: [V r +10% of V s ] volts
10 %
Vr
0V
N ot to scale, use specified param eter values.
For default tolerances, see paragraph 2.4.
FIGURE 2: TEST PULSE #2
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 32
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
t
V oltages are open circuit values, verify R i by 50% voltage reduction with 50 ohm load.
t3
+V
t4
Level is: [V r - 10% of V s ] volts
t1
Vr
t
0V
P aram eters:
T
Vs
R i = 50 ohm s
10 %
T = 100 to 200 ns
t 1 = 100 µ s
t 2 = 5.0 ns ± 30%
t 3 = 10 m s
E xponential decay
asym ptotically
approaches V r
approx. 100 pulses
V r = +13.5 volts
V s of P ulse (also see Table 6)
I/O
S upply V oltage
Lines
Lines
-150
-60
-V
90 %
N ot to scale, use specified param eter values.
t2
For default tolerances, see paragraph 2.4.
t 4 = 90 m s
(1 0 % to 9 0 % )
Level is: [V r - 90% of V s ] volts
FIGURE 3: TEST PULSE #3A
Note: In Figures 1 through 6, Ri is the internal source impedance of the transient generator.
N ot to scale, use specified param eter values.
t2
For default tolerances, see paragraph 2.4.
(10% to 90% )
90 %
+V
approx. 100 pulses
E xponential decay
asym ptotically
approaches V r
Level is: [V r + 90% of V s ] volts
P aram ete rs:
V s of P ulse (also see Table 6)
I/O
S upply V oltage
Lines
Lines
+100
+45
V r = +13.5 volts
R i = 50 ohm s
T = 100 to 200 ns
Vs
t 1 = 100 µ s
10 %
t 2 = 5.0 ns ± 30%
t 3 = 10 m s
T
t 4 = 90 m s
Vr
0V
t1
-V
t3
t4
Level is: [V r + 10% of V s ] volts
V oltages are open circuit values, verify R i by 50% voltage reduction with 50 ohm load.
FIGURE 4: TEST PULSE #3B
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 33
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
t
slightly rounded top is typical
P ara m ete rs:
T
+V
V r = + 13.5 volts
t1
90 %
V s = + 91.5 volts
Level is: [V r + 90% of V s ] volts
Vs
R i = 0.5 ohm s
N ote: V oc = V r + V s = 105 volts
T = 300 m s, pulse width at
10% level of 22.65 volts
E xponential decay to V r
t 1 = 5 to 10 m s
Level is: [V r +10% of V s ] volts
10 %
0V
Vr
t
N ot to sc ale, use specified param eter values .
For default toleranc es, see paragraph 2.4.
FIGURE 5: TEST PULSE #5A (Load Dump)
Note: In Figures 1 through 6, Ri is the internal source impedance of the transient generator.
Parameters:
R i = 0.5 ohms
Vr = +13.5 volts
+V
Load
Dump
Simulator
0.05
ohm
0.1
ohm
Prior to application (oc), V s = +91.5 volts
0.1
ohm
Vp is between 34 and 38 volts
DUT
For default tolerances, see paragraph 2.4.
Typical voltage signature when
vehicle suppression model is used
Zener diodes come out of conduction
Exponential decay
Vp
0V
Not to scale, use specified parameter values.
Vr
t
NOTE: Refer to paragraph 3.2.3, Load Dump Transient Test, for information on the use of this vehicle suppression model.
FIGURE 6: TEST PULSE #5B (Load Dump with Suppression Network)
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 34
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
1.0E+01
1.0E+05
1.0E+02
1.0E+03
L e ve l 1
L e ve l 2
1.0E+04
L e ve l 3
L e ve l 4
FIGURE 7: LIMITS FOR CONDUCTED RF EMISSIONS
#####
PF-10540, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page 35
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX A: FUNCTIONAL STATUS CLASSIFICATION EXAMPLES
- Note: This list is not necessarily all-inclusive.
CLASS A FUNCTIONS:
front park lamp and marker lamp operation
intermittent windshield wiper operation
I/P cluster operation (non-FMVSS functions & convenience telltales)
trip odometer operation
electronic compass operation
navigational display operation
climate control display
vehicle time or information display
remote keyless entry operation
entertainment radio operation
chime operation (non-FMVSS function)
illuminated entry operation
CLASS B FUNCTIONS:
anti-lock brake system operation (with fail-safe default)
rearview and outside mirror stability
speedometer operation
cluster enhancement telltale operation
odometer display
engine RPM stability (+/- 200 RPM)
vehicle speed control stability (+/- 3 mph)
fuel gauge operation
vehicle anti-theft system operation
vehicle immobilizer operation (at minimum range)
remote keyless entry stability
chime operation (FMVSS function)
power door lock and trunk/hatch release stability
entertainment radio volume stability
horn operation
headlight dimming/optical horn operation
electronic climate control functions that do not compromise windshield defrost system operation
license plate lamp operation and DRL (mandated)
informational diagnostic capability (non-FMVSS)
CLASS C FUNCTIONS:
inflatable restraints operation (non electronic control)
seat belt operation
vehicle braking ability
vehicle steering ability
engine stall control
engine acceleration control
vehicle immobilizer stability
transmission control (with fail-safe default)
prndl operation
windshield wiper operation ability
PF-10540, APPENDIX A, December 11, 2001, Page A-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
windshield defrost system operation
headlamp and tail lamp operation
brake lamp and CHMSL operation
turn signal operation
power seat position stability
power window stability
odometer memory stability
diagnostic memory stability and Class C functional inhibit capability
CLASS D FUNCTIONS:
Any function that has the potential to inadvertently deploy a passive restraint system actuated by an
electroexplosive device (EED).
PF-10540, APPENDIX A, December 11, 2001, Page A-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX B: RADIATED RF EMISSIONS - TEM CELL
GENERAL
This test is intended for product development and screening purposes. This test is still under
development and correlation between this and other module and vehicle tests is being investigated.
REQUIREMENT
This requirement applies only if specifically called out in the DUT PF. The narrowband RF emissions
radiated from the DUT operating in a TEM cell shall be measured using a spectrum analyzer with
resolution bandwidth of 10 kHz and video bandwidth of 30 kHz for the bands listed in Table B-1. Two
orthogonal orientations of the DUT shall be evaluated. The RF emissions shall not exceed the values
given in Table B-1 in either orientation.
TABLE B-1: RADIATED RF EMISSIONS LIMITS
Freq. Band (MHz)
Limits for 450 mm TEM Cell
Limits for 300 mm TEM Cell
30 – 54
1 dBuV
-6 dBuV
88 – 108
12 dBuV
-3 dBuV
144 – 174
-3 dBuV
-3 dBuV
TEST
TEM CELL REQUIREMENTS
The TEM cell used for this test shall have a VSWR not to exceed 1.3:1 (empty cell) from 100 kHz to 200
MHz. The TEM cell shall be tightly sealed against ambient RF leakage and double shielded coaxial cable
shall be used for all signal connections. With the input port connected to a 50 ohm termination and the
other TEM cell port connected to a preamp / spectrum analyzer, the measured ambient must be at least 6
dB below the target limit level. The TEM cell shall use a feedthrough filter assembly (see reference in LP388C-59) to provide isolated interfacing between the DUT and its system simulator outside the cell.
DUT SET UP
The DUT shall be placed on the floor of the TEM cell and connected to the TEM cell filter interface with an
unshielded wiring harness of 610 +/- 51 mm (24 +/- 2 in.) in length for the 450 mm (septum to floor
spacing) TEM cell and 305 +/- 51 mm (12 +/- 2 in.) In length for the 300 mm TEM cell. This harness shall
have controlled and documented orientation in the cell.
TEST PROCEDURE
The DUT shall be tested in two orthogonal orientations: one with the circuit board in the DUT parallel to
the TEM cell floor (vehicle mounting surface down) and the other with it perpendicular to the TEM cell
floor or rotated 90 degrees if perpendicular is not feasible due to exceeding the 1/3 floor to septum
distance. A preamplifier or preselector with a noise figure less than or equal to 3 dB should be used to
achieve the required noise floor and sensitivity. Refer to LP-388C-59 for test procedure.
NOTE: The measured emissions level from this test is affected by the septum to floor spacing of the TEM
cell used. The 300 mm TEM cell is no longer available and it is being replaced, for new applications, by
the 450 mm cell.
PF-10540, APPENDIX B, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page B-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX C: INTEGRATED CIRCUIT RADIATED EMISSIONS
BACKGROUND
This test procedure was developed in response to a need to evaluate the effect of changes in IC process
on RF emissions. The “signature” of the IC is obtained and can then be used to compare with the
signatures of ICs from other process lots. The intent is to provide a quantitative measure of the RF
emissions from ICs for comparison or other purposes.
This recommended practice defines a method for measuring the electromagnetic radiation from an
integrated circuit. The method uses a standardized IC test board containing the IC being evaluated
mounted to a mating port cut in the top or bottom of a 1 GHz TEM cell or GTEM cell. The standardized
test board controls the geometry and orientation of the operating IC relative to the TEM cell and
eliminates any connecting leads within the cell (these are on the backside of the board, which is outside
the cell). One of the TEM cell feeds is terminated with a 50 ohm load and the other one is connected to
the input of a spectrum analyzer which measures the RF emissions over the frequency range of 150 kHz
to 1 GHz emanating from the integrated circuit and impressed onto the septum of the TEM cell. The RF
voltage appearing at the input to the spectrum analyzer is related to the electromagnetic radiation
potential of the IC and of the electronic module of which it would be a part.
REQUIREMENT
This requirement applies only if specifically called out in the DUT PF. Digital ICs, LSI or larger scale (e.g.
microprocessors, clock driven displays) that are a part of the module shall be characterized for RF
emissions according to SAE J1752-3, SAE Standard for Measurement of Radiated Emissions from
Integrated Circuits, 150 kHz to 1 GHz, TEM Cell and 150 kHz to 8 GHz, Wideband TEM Cell. This SAE
recommended practice defines a method for characterizing the RF emissions from an IC and facilitates
evaluating the effect of significant IC changes on potential module RF emissions. Significant IC changes
include the following: a new product or source, altered die shrink factor, IC package changes,
manufacturing process changes and changes in IC clock or I/O drive capability. If this comparison of IC
emissions indicates an increased risk of module emissions, the module shall be retested.
TEST
Refer to SAE J1752-3 for test procedure. This test is also described in IEC CD61967-2 (draft document).
NOTE: This test can be extended to 2 GHz, using a 2 GHz TEM cell, or to 8 GHz using a wideband TEM
cell (GTEM).
PF-10540, APPENDIX C, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page C-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX D: BROADBAND ARTIFICIAL NETWORK (BAN) or RF ISOLATOR DESIGN
REQUIREMENTS
NOTE: DaimlerChrysler holds patents (#4,763,062 and #5,541,521) on an RF isolator or BAN design.
This BAN is commercially available. Other designs may be used if they meet the design intent.
L1
L2
L3
L4
L5
1
T erm
#1
T erm
#2
2
BAN
3
C
T erm
#3
L1
L2
L3
F igure 1 sym bols
L4
L5
T erm inal
#2
T erm inal
#1
T erm inal
#3
B
C
A
FIGURE D-1: EXAMPLE SCHEMATIC AND ASSEMBLY DRAWING OF A BAN (Side View)
The BAN is assembled from the appropriate wound toroid cores listed in Tables D-3 through D-7 on a
nonconductive and nonmagnetic rod supported over a copper ground plane. In order for this isolator to
function as designed up to 500 MHz, care must be taken to minimize and control parasitic capacitance,
especially on the DUT (terminal #1) end of the BAN. To this end, the ground plane shall not extend out
past L5 farther than necessary and any conductive support structure on the DUT end of the BAN shall be
minimized.
- A is the separation between the L1 core and the ground plane surface.
- B is the distance from the axis of the cores to the ground plane surface and is the minimum separation
between adjacent L1 of additional BAN when assembled into a multi line unit.
- Terminal #1: RF input, low capacitance BNC or similar RF connector (Example: Amphenol 21-236)
- Terminal #2: Connection to the DUT supply and/or load support circuitry
- Terminal #3: Connection to the DUT input or output lead
Note: Terminal #1 and #3 are connected together in the BAN.
BAN bypassing - The supply/load/support circuitry end of the BAN shall be bypassed to ground. This
requires the optimum value of capacitor or multiple capacitors to provide sufficiently low impedance
across the frequency range utilized for the test. Minimum lead length is to be used. Suggested optimum
bypass capacitor C is a 0.047 uF ceramic monolithic capacitor for normal BANs, 0.01 uF for high speed
BANs and 0.001 uF for CAN BANs.
PF-10540, APPENDIX D, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page D-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
L1
L2
L4
L3
L5
C
FIGURE D-2: TYPICAL WINDING ARRANGEMENT (Top View)
BAN winding - The recommended technique for winding the assembly utilizes one continuous piece of
wire. Leave sufficient wire for the termination on the capacitor end of L1 and wind the turns close-spaced
on the toroid for L1. At this point, hold the toroid for L2 approximately 6 mm from L1 and wind the turns
for L2 close-spaced in the opposite direction so that the windings are parallel to those of L1. Continue in
this manner with L3 through L5 with the windings zigzagging from L1 to L5. Figure D-2 shows this
arrangement. The remaining wire should be cut off allowing enough to connect L5 to its terminal lug.
Install the assembly on the dowel, and then assemble the dowel to the support lugs (with the closespaced windings away from the ground plane) with nonmetallic screws. Use minimum lead length for all
connections. It is very important to control the geometry of the BAN assembly to minimize the parasitic
capacitance at the terminal #1 end of the BAN, as this is critical to meeting the impedance requirements
specified in Tables D-1 and D-2. Through loss is measured from terminals 1 and 3 to terminal 2.
TABLE D-1: IMPEDANCE AND THROUGH LOSS REQUIREMENTS - BANs UP TO 8 AMP CAPACITY
Frequency Range
Impedance in Ohms (min.)
Through Loss in dB (min.)
Normal
High Speed
CAN
Normal
High Speed
CAN
0.25 MHz to 0.50 MHz
200
N/A
N/A
20
N/A
N/A
0.50 MHz to 1.0 MHz
500
N/A
300
20
N/A
10
1.0 MHz to 20.0 MHz
500
N/A
500
35
N/A
20
20.0 MHz to 250 MHz
500
500
500
35
35
35
250 MHz to 500 MHz
200
200
300
35
35
30
TABLE D-2: IMPEDANCE AND THROUGH LOSS REQUIREMENTS - BANs OVER 8 AMP CAPACITY
Frequency Range
Magnitude of Impedance in Ohms (min.)
Through Loss dB (min.)
0.25 MHz to 0.50 MHz
50
20
0.50 MHz to 1.0 MHz
100
20
1.0 MHz to 2.0 MHz
200
20
2.0 MHz to 150 MHz
400
20
PF-10540, APPENDIX D, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page D-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
TABLE D-2: IMPEDANCE AND THROUGH LOSS REQUIREMENTS - BANs OVER 8 AMP CAPACITY
Frequency Range
Magnitude of Impedance in Ohms (min.)
Through Loss dB (min.)
150 MHz to 500 MHz
100
20
Current Capacity - Current handling capacity shall be included in the parameters of the BAN design. The
saturation characteristics of ferrite or powdered iron cores are a significant factor in the current handling
capacity of a BAN.
TABLE D-3: COIL WINDING INFORMATION – 0.5 A BAN
Coil
Core Type
Number of Turns
Inductance in microhenries
L1
FT82-77
12
180
L2
FT50-61
4
1
L3
FT50-67
4
0.6
L4
FT50-68
4
0.2
L5
FT50-68
4
0.2
A = 4 mm, B is equal to or greater than 15 mm.
Wire is approximately 0.40 mm diameter (#26 AWG or #26 B&S) and approximately 1 m long.
Core material - Ferrite (Amidon part numbers shown, equivalent parts are acceptable).
Inductance is measured at 10 kHz for L1, calculated for L2-L5.
TABLE D-4: COIL WINDING INFORMATION – 0.5 A HIGH SPEED BAN
Coil
Core Type
Number of Turns
Inductance in microhenries
L2
FT50-61
4
1
L3
FT50-67
4
0.6
L4
FT50-68
4
0.2
L5
FT50-68
4
0.2
A = 4 mm, B is equal to or greater than 15 mm. Inductance is calculated for L2-L5.
Wire is approximately 0.40 mm diameter (#26 AWG or #26 B&S). Bypass capacitor is 0.01 uF.
Core material - Ferrite (Amidon part numbers shown, equivalent parts are acceptable).
NOTE: The high data rate BAN is available for testing high-speed, single line, signal or bus lines. To
fabricate a high data rate BAN, remove L1 (the 12-turn toroid) from a 0.5 amp isolator and replace the
0.047 uF bypass capacitor with 0.01 uF. This lowers the inductance of the isolator to approximately 2
microhenries and raises the resonant frequency allowing 125 k baud data transmission bandwidth. When
this isolator is required, the frequency range for Direct RF Injection is modified to 20 MHz to 500 MHz.
Check with the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of DaimlerChrysler Corporation Scientific
Laboratories for additional details.
NOTE: The CAN BAN has been developed for immunity and emissions testing of CAN bus lines. It is
constructed with two lines bifilar wound (ten turns per inch) on six cores with 0.001 uF bypass caps on
each line (terminal #2) and 3300 pF capacitor feeds from the two lines to a common BNC connector
(terminal #1) for common mode testing. Check with the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of
PF-10540, APPENDIX D, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page D-3
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
DaimlerChrysler Corporation Scientific Laboratories for additional details and current information as this
design is evolving.
TABLE D-5: COIL WINDING INFORMATION – 0.5 A CAN BAN
Coil
Core Type
Number of Turns (2 lines - Bifilar wound, 10 turns/in)
L1
FT82-77
12
L2
FT50-61
4
L3
FT50-67
4
L4
FT50-68
7
L5
FT50-68
5
L6
FT50-68
5
A = 4 mm, B is equal to or greater than 15 mm. BNC connector is Amphenol 21-236 minimum 30 mm
above the ground plane. Bypass capacitor is 0.001 uF, split feed capacitors are 3300 pF.
Wire is approximately 0.40 mm diameter (#26 AWG or #26 B&S) and approximately 1 m long.
Core material - Ferrite (Amidon part numbers shown, equivalent parts are acceptable).
TABLE D-6: COIL WINDING INFORMATION - 2 A BAN
Coil
Core Type
Number of Turns
Inductance in microhenries
L1
FT114A-77
8
180
L2
FT82-43
6
20
L3
FT50-67
6
1
L4
FT50-68
4
0.2
L5
FT50-68
4
0.2
A = 7 mm, B is equal to or greater than 17 mm
Wire is approximately 0.64 mm diameter (#22 AWG or #22 B&S) and approximately 1.3 m long.
Core material - Ferrite (Amidon part numbers shown, equivalent parts are acceptable).
Inductance is measured at 10 kHz for L1 and L2, calculated for L3-L5.
TABLE D-7: COIL WINDING INFORMATION - 30 A BAN
Coil
Core Type
Number of Turns
Inductance in microhenries
L1
T184-26
15
38
L2
T157-26
12
15
L3
T130-26
5
2.4
A = 12 mm, B is equal to or greater than 30 mm, Inductance is measured at 10 kHz
Wire is approximately 1.61 mm diameter (#14 AWG or #14 B&S) and approximately 1.5 m long.
Core material - Powdered Iron (Amidon part numbers shown, equivalent parts are acceptable).
PF-10540, APPENDIX D, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page D-4
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX E: SCHEDULE OF RF IMMUNITY TEST FREQUENCIES
TABLE E-1: LOGARITHMIC PROGRESSION RF IMMUNITY FREQUENCY TEST TABLE
10 kHz
to 100 kHz
10 freq/dec
10.0
12.6
15.8
20.0
25.2
31.6
39.8
50.0
63.0
79.5
100.0
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
100 kHz to10
MHz (2 dec)
Var rate 10 to
50 freq/dec
100 kHz
121 kHz
145 kHz
174 kHz
208 kHz
246 kHz
290 kHz
340 kHz
398 kHz
462 kHz
535 kHz
620 kHz
710 kHz
815 kHz
930 kHz
1060 kHz
1200 kHz
1350 kHz
1520 kHz
1700
1900
2120
2340
2580
2840
3120
3420
3740
4060
4420
4780
5150
5550
5950
6350
6800
7250
7700
8150
8600
9050
9550
10000
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
10 MHz
to 100 MHz
50 freq/dec
+ = 100 frq/dec
10.0 MHz
10.5 MHz
11.0 MHz
11.5 MHz
12.0 MHz
12.6 MHz
13.2 MHz
13.8 MHz
14.1 +MHz
14.5 MHz
Suggested frequency ranges
for DRFI, TEM, and MATC tests
Test
Frequency range
DRFI
0.5 MHz to 500 MHz
TEM
100 kHz to 200 MHz
MATC
200 MHz to 4 GHz
15.1
15.8
16.6
17.4
18.2
19.1
20.0
20.8
21.4
21.8
23.0
24.0
25.2
26.4
27.6
28.8
29.6
30.2
31.6
33.2
34.6
36.4
38.0
39.8
41.6
43.6
45.8
47.8
50.0
51.5
52.5
55.0
57.5
60.5
63.0
66.0
69.0
72.5
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
+MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
+MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
+MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
76.0
79.5
83.0
87.0
89.2
91.2
93.4
95.4
97.8
100.0
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
+MHz
MHz
+MHz
MHz
+MHz
MHz
100 MHz
to 1000 MHz
50 freq/dec
+ = 100 frq/dec
100.0 MHz
102.4 +MHz
104.8 MHz
107.2 +MHz
110 MHz
115 MHz
120 MHz
126 MHz
132 MHz
138.0 MHz
141.5 +MHz
144.5 MHz
148.0 +MHz
151.5 MHz
155.0 +MHz
158.5 MHz
162.0 +MHz
166.0 MHz
170.0 +MHz
174.0 MHz
182 MHz
191 MHz
200 MHz
208 MHz
+ = 100 freq/decade for bands
88-108 MHz; 138-174 MHz;
400-525 MHz; and single
added frequencies in 14, 21,
29, 51, and 224 MHz bands
\FREQTBL.xls; 08 Dec 1999
218 MHz
910 MHz
955 MHz
224 +MHz
230 MHz
1000 MHz
240 MHz
1-4 GHz
252 MHz
264 MHz
50 freq/dec
276 MHz
288 MHz
1.00 GHz
302 MHz
1.05 GHz
316 MHz
1.10 GHz
332 MHz
1.15 GHz
346 MHz
1.20 GHz
364 MHz
1.26 GHz
380 MHz
1.32 GHz
398 MHz
1.38 GHz
1.45 GHz
407 +MHz
417 MHz
1.51 GHz
1.58 GHz
427 +MHz
437 MHz
1.66 GHz
1.74 GHz
447 +MHz
457 MHz
1.82 GHz
1.90 GHz
468 +MHz
479 MHz
2.00 GHz
2.08 GHz
490 +MHz
501 MHz
2.18 GHz
2.30 GHz
513 +MHz
525 MHz
2.40 GHz
550 MHz
2.52 GHz
575 MHz
2.64 GHz
605 MHz
2.76 GHz
630 MHz
2.88 GHz
660 MHz
3.02 GHz
690 MHz
3.16 GHz
725 MHz
3.32 GHz
760 MHz
3.46 GHz
795 MHz
3.64 GHz
830 MHz
3.80 GHz
870 MHz
3.98 GHz
Three place rounding over
each decade as follows:
100-199, round to 1
200-499, round to 2
500-1000, round to 5
except in 100 frq/dec regions
PF-10540, APPENDIX E, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page E-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
Testing to requirements of paragraph 3.5.4 for the Direct RF Power Injection Test necessitates calculation
of power levels in the transition region between 25 MHz and 50 MHz for test frequencies from Table E-1.
To accomplish this the following procedure is recommended: Convert power levels in milliwatts to dBm,
by use of the formula: Power (dBm) = 10 log (power in milliwatts). Let P(1) = power in dBm at f(1) = 25
MHz; P(2) = power in dBm at f(2) = 50 MHz; and P(t) = power in dBm at test frequency f(t). Define test
frequency f(t) as not less than f(1) nor more than f(2). The following two calculations are then made:
- For any value of f(t), the respective power level P(t) in dBm is found from the first formula in Table E-2.
- After P(t) in dBm is calculated, the second formula in Table E-2 is used to find P(t) in milliwatts.
Alternately, the values shown below in Table E-2, may be used.
TABLE E-2: DRFI POWER LEVELS P(t) OVER 25 TO 50 MHz TRANSITION RANGE
Pwr levels
in transition
region from
25 - 50 MHz
in dBm, mW
+ = 100
freq/dec
1st: Power P(t) in dBm = P(1) + [P(2) - P(1) ] x [ log ( f(t) / f(1) ) ] / [ log ( f(2) / f(1) ) ]
2nd: Power P(t) in mW = 10 exp [ (Power P(t) in dBm) / (10) ]
CLASS
B
C
D
f(1) in MHz
mW at f(1)
dBm at f(1)
f(2) in MHz
mW at f(2)
dBm at f(2)
25.0 MHz
25.0 MHz
100 mW
200 mW
20.0 dBm
23.0 dBm
50.0 MHz
50.0 MHz
200 mW
400 mW
23.0 dBm
26.0 dBm
dBm
mW
dBm
mW
Test Frequency f(t)
24.0 MHz
20.0
100
23.0
200
25.2 MHz
20.0
101
23.0
202
26.4 MHz
20.2
106
23.2
211
27.6 MHz
20.4
110
23.4
221
28.8 MHz
20.6
115
23.6
230
20.7
118
23.7
237
29.6 +MHz
30.2 MHz
20.8
121
23.8
242
31.6 MHz
21.0
126
24.0
253
33.2 MHz
21.2
133
24.2
266
34.6 MHz
21.4
138
24.4
277
36.4 MHz
21.6
146
24.6
291
38.0 MHz
21.8
152
24.8
304
39.8 MHz
22.0
159
25.0
318
41.6 MHz
22.2
166
25.2
333
43.6 MHz
22.4
174
25.4
349
45.8 MHz
22.6
183
25.6
366
47.8 MHz
22.8
191
25.8
382
50.0 MHz
23.0
200
26.0
400
CLASS A functions are tested at a constant 100 mW, (20 dBm)
25.0
400
26.0
50.0
800
29.0
dBm
26.0
26.1
26.3
26.5
26.6
26.8
26.8
27.0
27.3
27.4
27.7
27.8
28.0
28.2
28.4
28.6
28.8
29.0
mW
400
403
422
442
461
474
483
506
531
554
582
608
637
666
698
733
765
800
\LEVELTBL.xls; 08 Dec 1999
PF-10540, APPENDIX E, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page E-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
MHz
mW
dBm
MHz
mW
dBm
APPENDIX F: GROUNDING CONFIGURATIONS FOR MODULE EMC TESTING
The test configurations shown below illustrate bench test methods recommended to accommodate
various module system grounding configurations. These are not intended as an endorsement of module
system grounding methods. MODULES CONTAINING MICROPROCESSOR OR OTHER DIGITAL DEVICES SHOULD
HAVE SUCH DEVICES IN A CONDUCTIVE CASE OR SUBASSEMBLY WITH A LOW IMPEDANCE INTERNAL RF GROUND TO
ITS CASE, AS ILLUSTRATED IN CONFIGURATIONS 1, 2, AND 3. The “noise source” configurations shown are for
illustrative purposes only and are not a factor in determining which of the five test configurations that is
applicable. A typical module will have a multitude of potential noise sources of various source
impedances and ground references.
TABLE F-1: MODULE GROUNDING TECHNIQUES FOR VARIOUS SYSTEM AND TEST CONFIGURATIONS
Configuration
1
2
3
4
5
Conductive Case
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Internal RF Ground to Case
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
N/A
Internal Power Ground to Case
No
No
Yes
No
N/A
Case to Bench Ground Plane
Yes
Note (1)
Note (1)
No
N/A
Connector Grd to Bench Ground Plane
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
(1) Yes, if in application case is bonded to sheet metal, see appropriate figure.
S Y S T E M C O N F I G U R A T I O N : C a s e is b o n d e d to
s h e et m e ta l. B y-p a ss c a p s re fe re n ce d to R F g ro u n d.
R F g ro u n d h a s n o s ig n a l c u rre n ts a n d is n o t d ire c tly
re fe re n c e d to p o w e r o r s ig n a l g ro u n d . R F g ro u n d is
re fe re n c e d to c a s e v ia lo w im p e d a n c e p a th . A ll
g ro un d s a re c a p a c itive ly c o up le d to th e R F gro u n d .
C o nd u c tive
M o du le C a se
B y-pa s s
C a pa c ito r
E a c h lin e e ith e r
Is o la te d o r O p e n
T E S T C O N F IG U R A T IO N : G ro u n d th e c a s e o f
th e D U T to th e b e n c h g r o u n d p la n e . Is o la te
u tilize d lin e s a n d a ll o th e r g ro u n d s v ia is o la tio n
n e tw o rk (B A N ).
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s w ill firs t b e
is o late d w ith a B A N , th e n m ad e
c o m m o n , a nd h a ve th is
c o n fig u ra tio n
1
3
PC
B o ard
BAN
2
B
O
X
Is o lato r U n it
RF
G round
N o ise S o u rce
E ith er a d is cre te c a pa c ito r
o r a d ire c t sh o rt to ca s e
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s fro m T e s t B o x
a n d D U T a re m a d e co m m o n to b o th
Is o lato rs ' a nd B e n c h G ro u n d P la n e s
R F G ro u n d fro m C a s e
to B e n c h G ro u n d P lan e
1
3
2
FIGURE F-1: RF GROUND CONFIGURATION #1
PF-10540, APPENDIX F, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page F-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
T
E
S
T
DC
Power
S u pp ly
+ 1 3 .6 V
S Y S T E M C O N F IG U R A T IO N : T h ere a re tw o p o s sib le
c o n fig u ra tio n s : 1 )C a s e is b o n d e d to s h e e t m e ta l o r
2 )C a s e is n o t b o n d e d to s h e e t m e ta l. F o r b o th b y p a s s c a p s a re re fe re n c e d to R F g ro u n d . R F g ro u n d
h a s n o s ig n al c u rre nts a n d is n o t d ire c tly refe re n c ed
to p o w e r o r s ig n a l g ro u n d . R F g ro u n d is re fe re n c e d
to c a s e v ia lo w im p e d a n c e p a th . A ll g r o u n d s a re
c a p ac itive ly c o u p le d to th e R F g ro u nd .
C o nd u c tive
M o du le C a se
B y-pa s s
C a pa c ito r
E a c h lin e e ith e r
Is o la te d o r O p e n
T E S T C O N F IG U R A T IO N : G ro u n d I/O R F
g ro u n d lin e to th e b e n c h g ro u n d p la n e . Is o la te
u tilize d lin e s a n d a ll o th e r g ro u n d s v ia is o la tio n
n e tw o rk (B A N ). If th e c a s e is b o n d e d to th e
s h e e t m e ta l, c a s e m u s t a ls o b e g ro u n d e d . If
n o t, flo a t th e c a s e .
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s w ill firs t b e
is o late d w ith a B A N , th e n m ad e
c o m m o n , a nd h a ve th is
c o n fig u ra tio n
1
3
PC
B o ard
BAN
2
B
O
X
Is o lato r U n it
RF
G round
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s fro m T e s t B o x
a n d D U T a re m a d e co m m o n to b o th
Is o lato rs ' a nd B e n c h G ro u n d P la n e s
R F G ro u n d C a se a n d I/O
R F gro u n d lin e to B en c h
G ro un d P la ne (S e e T e s t
C o nfig u ra tion fo r g n d.)
N o ise S o u rce
E ith er a d is cre te c a pa c ito r
o r a d ire c t sh o rt to ca s e
1
3
T
E
S
T
2
DC
Power
S u pp ly
+ 1 3 .6 V
FIGURE F-2: RF GROUND CONFIGURATION #2
S Y S T E M C O N F IG U R A T IO N : T h ere a re tw o p o s sib le
c o n fig u ra tio n s : 1 )C a s e is b o n d e d to s h e e t m e ta l o r
2 )C as e is n ot b o n d ed to s h ee t m e tal. F o r b oth p o w er
g ro u n d o n P C b o a rd is u tilize d a s R F g ro u n d fo r b yp a s s c a p s . P o w e r (R F ) g ro u n d h a s s ig n a l c u rre n ts
a n d is re fe re n c e d to c a s e v ia lo w im p e d a n c e p a th .
A n y o th e r g ro u n d s a re c a p a c itiv e ly c o u p le d to th e
p o w e r (R F ) gro u n d .
C o nd u c tive
M o du le C a se
B y-pa s s
C a pa c ito r
T E S T C O N F IG U R A T IO N : G ro u n d I/O R F
g ro u n d lin e to th e b e n c h g ro u n d p la n e . Is o la te
u tilize d lin e s a n d a ll o th e r g ro u n d s v ia is o la tio n
n e tw o rk (B A N ). If th e c a s e is b o n d e d to th e
s h e e t m e ta l, c a s e m u s t a ls o b e g r o u n d e d . If
n o t , flo a t th e c a s e .
E a c h lin e e ith e r
Is o la te d o r O p e n
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s w ill firs t b e
is o late d w ith a B A N , th e n m ad e
c o m m o n , a nd h a ve th is
c o n fig u ra tio n
1
3
PC
B o ard
BAN
2
B
O
X
Is o lato r U n it
Pow er
G round
N o ise S o u rce
E ith er a d is cre te c a pa c ito r
o r a d ire c t sh o rt to ca s e
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s fro m T e s t B o x
a n d D U T a re m a d e co m m o n to b o th
Is o lato rs ' a nd B e n c h G ro u n d P la n e s
R F G ro u n d C a se a n d D C
p w r g n d lin e to B e n ch
G ro un d P la ne (S e e T e s t
C o nfig u ra tion fo r g n d.)
1
3
2
FIGURE F-3: RF GROUND CONFIGURATION #3
PF-10540, APPENDIX F, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page F-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
T
E
S
T
DC
Power
S u pp ly
+ 1 3 .6 V
S Y S T E M C O N F IG U R A T IO N : C as e is n o t b o n d e d to
s h e e t m e ta l. P o w e r g ro u n d o n P C b o a rd is u tiliz e d
a s R F g ro u nd fo r b y-p a s s ca p s . P ow e r (R F ) g ro u nd
h a s s ig n a l cu rre n ts an d is n ot re fe ren c e d to th e c a s e.
A n y o th e r g ro u n d s a re c a p a c itiv e ly c o u p le d to th e
p o w e r (R F ) gro u n d .
C o nd u c tive
M o du le C a se
B y-pa s s
C a pa c ito r
E a c h lin e e ith e r
Is o la te d o r O p e n
T E S T C O N F IG U R A T IO N : C o n n e c t th e p o w e r
( R F ) g r o u n d lin e to th e b e n c h g ro u n d p la n e .
F lo a t th e c a s e , a n d is o la te u tiliz e d lin e s a n d a ll
o th er g ro u n ds via is ola tio n ne tw o rk (B A N ).
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s w ill firs t b e
is o late d w ith a B A N , th e n m ad e
c o m m o n , a nd h a ve th is
c o n fig u ra tio n
1
3
PC
B o ard
BAN
2
B
O
X
Is o lato r U n it
Pow er
Ground
N o ise S o u rce
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s fro m T e s t B o x
a n d D U T a re m a d e co m m o n to b o th
Is o lato rs ' a nd B e n c h G ro u n d P la n e s
R F G ro u n d D C pw r g n d lin e
to B e n c h G ro u n d P lan e
P o w e r g ro u nd is n o t
re fe re n c e d to th e c as e
1
3
T
E
S
T
2
DC
Power
S u pp ly
+ 1 3 .6 V
FIGURE F-4: RF GROUND CONFIGURATION #4
S Y S T E M C O N F IG U R A T IO N : N on -c o n d uc tive c as e .
P o w e r g ro u n d o n P C b o a rd is u tilize d a s R F g ro u n d
fo r b y - p a s s c a p s . P o w e r ( R F ) g ro u n d h a s s ig n a l
c u rren ts . A ny o th e r g ro u n d s a re c a pa c itive ly c o u p led
to the p o w e r (R F ) g ro u n d .
N o n-c o n d u ctive
M o du le C a se
B y-pa s s
C a pa c ito r
E a c h lin e e ith e r
Is o la te d o r O p e n
T E S T C O N F IG U R A T IO N : C o n n e c t th e p o w e r
( R F ) g r o u n d lin e to th e b e n c h g ro u n d p la n e .
Is o la te u tiliz e d lin e s a n d a ll o th e r g ro u n d s v ia
is o latio n n e tw o rk (B A N ).
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s w ill firs t b e
is o late d w ith a B A N , th e n m ad e
c o m m o n , a nd h a ve th is
c o n fig u ra tio n
1
3
PC
B o ard
BAN
2
B
O
X
Is o lato r U n it
Pow er
Ground
N o ise S o u rce
A ll S ig n a l G ro u n d L in e s fro m T e s t B o x
a n d D U T a re m a d e co m m o n to b o th
Is o lato rs ' a nd B e n c h G ro u n d P la n e s
R F G ro u n d D C pw r g n d lin e
to B e n c h G ro u n d P lan e
1
3
2
FIGURE F-5: RF GROUND CONFIGURATION #5
PF-10540, APPENDIX F, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page F-3
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
T
E
S
T
DC
Power
S u pp ly
+ 1 3 .6 V
APPENDIX G: EMC TESTING INFORMATION FOR MODULE / SYSTEM WITH J1850 BUS
The default J1850 Data Bus Functional Classification requirements are as follows:
Bus communications (vehicle bus is disabled due to latching or streaming):
Class C
Fault indicator lamp on, no diagnostic trouble code recorded:
Class C
False diagnostics (module J1850 communication faults):
Class B
The above functional classification information is offered as a guideline to be referred to when writing the
DUT test plan. The actual functional classification requirements for the DUT depend on the criticality of
the information the DUT transmits or receives.
For automotive applications, the J1850 IDR (integrated driver / receiver) chip is embedded within a
module. Vehicle system RC loading of this circuit is caused by: (i) DUT circuitry between the IDR chip
and the DUT’s external J1850 I/O pin, (ii) J1850 vehicle wiring and (iii) J1850 I/O circuitry on all of the
other modules in the vehicle.
Each module is configured to be either a dominant node or a non-dominant node, based on the value of
the termination resistor chosen. The typical shunt (parallel) RC loading of the IDR chip on a dominant
module is 3.3 kohm and 330 pF. The typical shunt RC loading on a standard or non-dominant module is
11.1 kohm and 330 pF. Based on these and other considerations (wire harness capacitance, connectors,
etc.), the estimated nominal RC shunt loading presented to an IDR chip on a Chrysler vehicle with J1850
equipped modules is approximately 900 ohms and 5500 pF. Consequently, for module EMC testing of
J1850 modules, this level of loading should be maintained to within 15% unless technical limitations exist.
For each requested EMC test, the RC loading of the J1850 circuit must be calculated. This calculation
should account for DUT bus termination, support equipment (test boxes, PC’s, etc.) bus termination and
test stand loading. The RC termination values of each component loading the bus should be documented
in the DUT test plan. Listed below are the as built values of J1850 bus RC termination for currently
available bus monitoring interface hardware. When using the JNAT, which is configurable, set it to the
indicated values.
TABLE G-1: J1850 BUS MONITOR INTERFACE HARDWARE AND RC LOADING
Monitor Box
R (kohm)
C (pF)
Bus
Function
Stand Alone
J1850 only
(2)
PC required
AVT model 715
11
470
J1850 only
(2)
PC required
AVT model 716
12.1
470
(1)
(2), (3), (4)
Yes
DRB III (Diagnostic Readout Box)
11
330
(1)
(2), (3), (4)
Yes or PC
EDT (Engineering Diagnostic Tool)
11
330
J1850 only
(2)
Yes
JNAT (J1850 Network Analysis Tool)
10
470
Notes: (1) Supports J1850, CCD, ISO, and SCI (2) Bus analysis (3) Diagnostics (4) Flash memory.
AVT: Advanced Vehicle Technologies. Monitoring tools are not restricted to those listed. Refer to the
DUT Test Plan for recommended monitoring method. Some of these listed diagnostic boxes are not
suitable for emissions testing due to excessive noise output, check with Department 5140 for details.
Proper resistive loading of the J1850 bus is achieved by calculating the parallel combination of the
required resistive loads and adding any additional resistance R(additional) in order to obtain the 900 ohm
average value. Using the DUT termination values and any of the listed monitoring tools, R(additional) has
been calculated to be 1500 ohms for a dominant node and 1000 ohms for a non-dominant node. For
other DUT termination resistor values, use the following equation to determine R(additional):
R(additional) = 1 / [(1/900) – (1/R(DUT)) – (1/R(monitor))]
Proper capacitive loading is achieved by calculating the parallel combination of the required capacitive
loads and adding any additional capacitance (C(additional)) in order to obtain the 5500 pF average value.
PF-10540, APPENDIX G, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page G-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
For the combination of standard DUT and bus monitor capacitive termination, C(additional) will be 4700 pF.
For DUT capacitive termination values other than the typical values described above, use the following
equation to determine C(additional):
C(additional) = 5500 pF – C(DUT) – C(monitor)
NOTE: If the calculated value of C(additional) is less than or equal to zero, C(additional) is not required.
Several of the EMC tests require specific J1850 bus loading. The following list details modifications to
EMC test hardware and the above R(additional) and C(additional) values, on a test by test basis, in order to
properly evaluate the J1850 bus (Note: All modifications to test hardware or bus loading shall be noted on
test diagrams and indicated in test run notes).
LF CONDUCTED IMMUNITY: Apply –10 dBV signal to J1850 line in the standard series configuration.
DIRECT RF INJECTION: A 0.5 amp isolator is used with the 0.047 uF capacitor replaced by a 0.001 uF
capacitor. In addition, the 0.047 uF capacitor in the DC Block is replaced with a 4700 pF capacitor.
These changes allow the test to be performed from 1.0 - 500 MHz. For the standard DUT and bus
monitor capacitive termination, replace C(additional) with a 3300 pF capacitor for this test. For other values
of DUT capacitive termination, calculate the appropriate value of C(additional) as follows:
C(additional) = 5500 pF – 1000 pF – C(DUT) – C(monitor)
Remove the C(additional) capacitor when testing the J1850 line(s). For DUT with multiple J1850 lines, only
one line should be tested at a time, with the others left open circuited.
RADIATED IMMUNITY (TEM CELL): Due to the capacitance of the pi filters (4000 pF typical), only one J1850
line is connected through the bulkhead harness. For the standard DUT and bus monitor capacitive
termination, replace C(additional) with a 1000 pF capacitor for this test. For other values of DUT capacitive
termination, calculate the appropriate value of C(additional) as follows:
C(additional) = 5500 pF – 4000 pF – C(DUT) – C(monitor)
RADIATED IMMUNITY (ANECHOIC CHAMBER): Due to the capacitance of the pi filters (4000 pF typical),
only one J1850 line is connected through the bulkhead filter/harness. For the standard DUT and bus
monitor capacitive termination, replace C(additional) with a 1000 pF capacitor for this test. For other values
of DUT capacitive termination, calculate the appropriate value of C(additional) as follows:
C(additional) = 5500 pF – 4000 pF – C(DUT) – C(monitor)
CONDUCTED EMISSIONS: Remove R(additional) and replace C(additional) with a 6800 pF capacitor. The
J1850 bus line emissions will be measured while terminated only with C(additional) and the Tektronix
P6156B RF voltage probe (1 pF, 500 ohm), no isolator is used on this line. When using a spectrum
analyzer with an internal DC block, an attenuator (10 - 20 dB) must be placed between the voltage probe
and the spectrum analyzer. Do not use a DC block between the probe and the attenuator. As an
alternative, a spectrum analyzer with no internal DC block and 50 ohm input impedance (such as an HP
8568B) may be used. Use a 5 second sweep time for the 150 kHz - 2.0 MHz range, 20 seconds for the
2.0 - 200 MHz range. Verify bus operation using an oscilloscope. The J1850 bus has been classified as a
broadband source below 2.0 MHz; therefore, the limit is typically Level 3 rather than Level 2 for this
range.
RADIATED EMISSIONS (TEM CELL): Due to the capacitance of the pi filters (4000 pF typical), only one
J1850 line is connected through the bulkhead harness. For the standard DUT and bus monitor capacitive
termination, replace C(additional) with a 1000 pF capacitor for this test. For other values of DUT capacitive
termination, calculate the appropriate value of C(additional) as follows:
C(additional) = 5500 pF – 4000 pF – C(DUT) – C(monitor)
PF-10540, APPENDIX G, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page G-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX H: EMC DESIGN FOR BRUSH COMMUTATED DC ELECTRIC MOTORS
INTRODUCTION
The operation of mechanically (brush) commutated dc electric motors involves switching current from
winding to winding. The stored magnetic energy generates a back EMF when the driving current is
switched resulting in an arc at the switching point. This arc generates broadband electrical noise over a
wide frequency spectrum. The rate of commutation (proportional to the motor RPM) influences the
spectral energy distribution.
NOISE MODES
Two modes of conducted noise can be produced by a two terminal motor, differential mode and common
mode. Differential noise current is conducted by the two terminals in a differential manner (out of phase).
This is the terminal to terminal noise where the path for noise current is from one terminal through the
external wiring returning on the other terminal. Common mode noise current is common to both terminals
(in phase) and the return path is via the capacitance between the motor and its surroundings, and the
capacitance internal to the motor between its case and internal conducting elements. At DC and low
frequencies, a two terminal motor is electrically balanced so that the current, which enters one terminal,
exits the other terminal. At higher frequencies, parasitic elements (i.e. stray capacitance and inductance)
unbalance the circuit, resulting in a common mode noise component.
FILTERING
Differential mode filtering can be accomplished with a shunt capacitor connected across the motor
terminals and use of series inductors or ferrite beads to reduce RF noise currents. Common mode
filtering is also aided by including a series impedance in both leads in addition to referencing the shunt
capacitor and the negative terminal to the case, provided that the case is permitted to be at vehicle
ground potential. If it is not, an additional capacitor can provide this RF reference.
CRITICAL FACTORS
To provide optimum filtering over several decades of RF, care must be exercised in choosing filter
elements for desirable characteristics, placement in the motor enclosure and the shielding effectiveness
of the enclosure. The filter complexity required for desired EMC performance (number and type of
elements and their placement) is estimated by analysis and confirmed by measurement. The following
factors must be considered to obtain optimum filter design:
(1)
The conductive enclosure must enclose the motor and all filter circuitry as completely as possible,
to assist in containing the electric and magnetic fields to the interior motor space.
(2)
Inductors must be evaluated for core saturation, self resonant frequency, and core material
frequency characteristics.
(3)
Capacitors must be evaluated for voltage breakdown and construction type as this directly relates
to internal inductance, self-resonant frequency, filtering performance, and failure mode. It is
essential that capacitors functioning as shunts have an absolute minimal lead length, including
terminal paths, to their bypass points.
(4)
Wire shunts and their terminations must provide minimal path length between bypass points.
ASK THE SUPPLIER IF THESE FACTORS WERE CONSIDERED IN THE MOTOR FILTER DESIGN.
Note: Design consultation is available from DaimlerChrysler Corporation EMC engineers.
Design example - experience has shown that in order to meet component and vehicle EMC
specifications, continuous duty DC motors, which draw from approximately three to twenty amperes, will
typically require a filter shown schematically as follows:
PF-10540, APPENDIX H, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page H-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
conductive m otor
case for E M I shield
illustrative
segm ent of
internal stra y
capacitance
R F noise
currents
inductor L
term inal o r w ire
brushes &
com m utato r
capacitor C
short leads
term inal o r w ire
illustrative
segm ent of
external stray
capacitance
short lead from neg
term to cas e, < 1cm
inductor L
R F noise
currents
C is a film c a p a c ito r o f lo w le a d in d u c ta n c e , its to ta l le a d le n g th le s s th a n 2 c m , typ . 0 .2 2 u F to 0 .4 7 u F .
L is a fe rrite c o re in d u c to r, typ ic a lly 4 to 7 u H w ith s e lf re s o n a n t fre q u e n c y (S R F ) > 6 0 M H z.
FIGURE H-1: Filter schematic for EMI suppression in DC commutating motors
The conductive motor case acts as a shield for the electric field generated by the motor if it contains all
electric and magnetic components of the motor, including the filter elements L and C, and the negative
lead shunt to case. The inductors radiate, and therefore must be inside the conductive motor housing.
Illustrated above in Figure H-1 is the internal stray capacitance C(int) between all internal conducting
elements and the motor case, and the external stray capacitance C(ext) between the case and the
“universe”, i.e., its environment. RF noise currents are also illustrated in Figure H-1. These currents are
both common mode and differential mode, as previously defined in “Noise Modes”. Capacitor C shunts
differential mode noise currents, and with the shunt from the negative lead to the case, the capacitor
passes common mode noise from the positive lead to the case. If the shunt to the case is not present,
the common mode noise currents exit the motor terminals and radiate from the wire harness, returning to
their origin through the external stray capacitance to the motor case. Leakage common mode noise
currents are those which do not pass through the shunt to the case, resulting in common mode radiation
from the wire harness. Longer shunts are less effective at higher frequencies. At high frequencies where
only surface currents are present, the self-inductance of a straight round wire, in metric units, is:
-7
L=
µl
4l
( ln - 1)
2π
d
in henries, where M (mu) = 4pi x 10 henries per meter,
l = length in meters, and d = wire diameter in meters.
EQUATION H-1: SELF-INDUCTANCE OF A STRAIGHT ROUND WIRE
While one centimeter of 20 ga wire has approximately 5.8 nanohenries of inductance and 3.6 ohms
inductive reactance at 100 MHz; 25 mm has approximately 19 nanohenries and 12 ohms of inductive
reactance at 100 MHz. Since attenuation of 30 dB or more to meet emissions requirements in the HF
and VHF frequency ranges is common, longer shunt lengths may lead to emissions exceeding the limit.
Good design is essential.
PF-10540, APPENDIX H, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page H-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX J: GENERAL EMC DESIGN INFORMATION
SILICON ISOLATION
Most electronic modules have integrated silicon technology devices (usually referred to as integrated
circuits or ICs) included in their circuit elements. RF or ESD that can find a path to the die of these
devices can result in unpredictable effects due to the proximity of elements in the device and the
existence of parasitic elements and paths. The higher the scale of integration of the device the greater
the risk involved. It is therefore strongly recommended that no direct path to integrated silicon devices be
provided from the module connector interface.
RKE SYSTEMS
Vehicle systems that use a low power RF link (i.e., RF remote keyless entry), require a low RF
environment near their operating frequency to realize their normal operating range. In the presence of RF
sources within this "window of vulnerability", devices such as RF RKE will exhibit reduced range or
inhibited remote operation. This window can be reduced by improved filtering in the receive module and
should not exceed +/- 5% of the system operating frequency. In order to operate as a remote system, the
vehicle receiver must be exposed to the vehicle RF environment and vehicle immunity levels should be
used (refer to DS-149). The DUT PF shall define the acceptable performance limits in this range.
RF SHIELDING AND CASE GROUNDS
A metal enclosure may be primarily designed to provide a durable protective structure and/or a heat sink
for power devices, however special considerations apply if it is intended to be an effective radio frequency
(RF) shield. An RF shield is a conductive surface that completely encloses a circuit board or module.
The effectiveness of a shield is a function of thickness of the shield relative to the skin depth of RF current
penetration. The skin depth is determined from the conductivity and permeability of the shield material
and the frequency of operation. For frequencies above 1 MHz, any complete conductive enclosure thick
enough to be practical provides more than adequate shielding effectiveness. The practical
implementation of a shield, however, will result in leakage due to openings and lead penetration.
Openings in a shield surface reduce the shielding effectiveness proportional to the longest dimension of
the opening and the square root of the number of openings. Therefore, a screen is almost as good as a
solid surface, but even a single slot can be a significant leak for RF above the cutoff frequency
determined by the slot length. This is analogous to the similarity between a grid ground and a solid
ground plane. The rule is to keep the longest dimension of openings as short as possible and minimize
the number of openings.
Leads penetrating a shielded enclosure provide a path for RF energy to propagate to or from the outside
world, greatly reducing the effectiveness of the shield. In order to restore some of the effectiveness of a
shield that has leads penetrating its surface, all leads must provide an effective bypass to return RF
currents to the shield as close to the point of penetration as possible. Effective bypassing means
providing a low impedance RF path from these leads to the shield. The most effective bypass system
utilizes feedthrough capacitors, referenced to the shield, on all leads. Achieving a low impedance RF
path without feedthrough capacitors requires bypass capacitors on all leads with minimal capacitor lead
length to a bypass ground plane which is connected to the shield through minimal lead length. Low
impedance leads are difficult to shunt with a capacitor and will require a series impedance to improve the
effectiveness of the bypass capacitor (a two-pole filter). Low impedance differential mode signals will
require a common mode filter.
It is essential that no RF currents flow on the outside surface of the shield, for then it will radiate as will
any conductor with RF currents flowing on its outside surface. The shield must not be used as a
conductor for any other currents, particularly signal currents. Even dc currents are often contaminated
PF-10540, APPENDIX J, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page J-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
with RF from clock harmonics or broadband sources and these will radiate. The only currents allowed on
the shield are bypass currents on the inner surface of the shield. It is essential that the shield be as
complete as possible and contain RF currents to its inside surface.
In theory, case grounding of the shield is not required for shielding effectiveness. It is required, however,
that the shield be referenced to body sheet metal through a case ground to preclude electrostatic charge
build up on the shield and to prevent the shield from acting as a resonant or radiating structure. A shield
with less than ideal filtering of penetrating leads will result in some common mode RF current flow on the
case ground lead (as well as the poorly filtered leads) and this current will radiate.
Ideally, one would case ground for ESD protection with no consequences for RF emissions. In practice,
however, there may be some degradation. If the design is properly implemented the effect on emissions
will be minimal, but, if the bypassing of the exiting leads is not properly implemented and/or if RF currents
are allowed to flow through a case ground, then a case grounded module can be a more effective RF
radiator than an ungrounded one. This risk of increased RF emissions is greater at lower frequencies
where the capacitive reactance of the case to vehicle sheet metal is higher and could result in radiated
RF emissions that are approximately 3 to 8 dB higher than if the case were floating.
PF-10540, APPENDIX J, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page J-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX K: EMC TESTING INFORMATION FOR MODULE / SYSTEM WITH CAN BUS
This area is still under development; check with the E/E Systems Compatibility Department of
DaimlerChrysler Corporation Scientific Laboratories for additional details and current information.
The default CAN Data Bus Functional Classification requirements are as follows:
CAN B:
Bus system communications (vehicle bus disabled due to latching or streaming):
Fault indicator lamp on, no diagnostic trouble code recorded:
DUT CAN communication faults (DUT not communicating correctly):
Class B
Class B
Class B
CAN C:
Bus communications (vehicle bus is disabled due to latching or streaming):
Fault indicator lamp on, no diagnostic trouble code recorded:
DUT CAN communication faults (DUT not communicating correctly):
Class C
Class C
Class B
The above functional classification information is offered as a guideline to be referred to when writing the
DUT test plan. The actual CAN bus functional classification requirements depend on the criticality of the
message content carried on the bus that the DUT is connected to. For example, if the CAN B bus is used
for vehicle immobilizer to allow the vehicle to start, the CAN B bus would be considered Class C for Bus
communications (vehicle bus is disabled due to latching or streaming).
For CAN applications, a PC based CANoe (CAN open environment) simulation program, along with the
vehicle message matrix (VMM) are required to provide the correct CAN bus traffic. The hardware
interface between the PC and the DUT is comprised of a CANcardX (PCMCIA card) and either a CANcab
1054 (CAN B node and cable connecting the CANcardX to the DUT CAN B transceiver) or a CANcab 251
(CAN C node and cable connecting the CANcardX to the DUT CAN C transceiver). The CAN bus shall
be monitored for stability via the CANOE tool error frame rate indicator and VMM mismatch indicator. A
Bus system communications failure (vehicle bus disabled due to latching or streaming) should be
indicated when the error frame rate exceeds 60%. A module CAN communication fault should be
indicated when the error frame rate exceeds 3% or there is a VMM mismatch.
Proper resistive loading of the CAN bus is achieved by calculating the parallel combination of the required
resistive loads and adding any additional resistance R(additional) in order to obtain the nominal system
target value. Each CAN module is configured to be either a dominant node or a non-dominant node,
based on the value of the termination resistor chosen. Reference the CAN System Specification for
dominant, non-dominant and system target resistor values. Since neither the CANcab 1054 nor the
CANcab 251 units contain termination, R(additional) is determined as follows:
1 / [(1/R(target maximum)) – (1/R(DUT))] ≥ R(additional) ≥ 1 / [(1/R(target minimum)) (1/R(DUT))]
NOTE: All resistor and capacitor tolerances are 1% and 10% respectively.
For proper CAN C capacitive loading, connect a 0.047uF capacitor at the center tap of the two R(additional)
resistors. No additional capacitive termination is required for CAN B.
The RC termination values of each component loading the bus should be documented in the DUT test
plan.
Connect the external bus termination as follows:
PF-10540, APPENDIX K, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page K-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
CAN L
D
U
T
R (additional)
C (optional)
CAN H
+
5 Volt
-
R (additional)
FIGURE K-1: CAN B
The C(additional) capacitor(s) should be used only if the 5 Volt power supply is a switching supply and shunt
capacitance is required to reduce switching noise. Several of the EMC tests affect bus loading. The
following list details modifications to EMC test hardware, on a test by test basis, in order to properly
evaluate the CAN bus. (Note: All modifications to test hardware or bus loading shall be noted on test
diagrams and indicated in test run notes).
CAN L
R (additional)
D
U
T
47000pF
CAN H
R (additional)
FIGURE K-2: CAN C
LF CONDUCTED IMMUNITY: Apply –10 dBVrms, using the common mode configuration, if this requirement
is called out in DUT PF.
DIRECT RF INJECTION: A 0.5 amp common mode isolator (CAN BAN) is used, refer to Appendix D. In
addition, the 0.047 uF capacitor in the DC Block is replaced with a 4700 pF capacitor. These changes
allow the test to be performed from 1.0 - 500 MHz. For DUT that have multiple CAN B or C bus pairs,
only one pair shall be isolated at a time. The others shall remain open circuited. All pairs must be tested.
External bus termination shall be placed on the low impedance side of the isolator.
RADIATED IMMUNITY (TEM CELL): No special considerations for CAN B. Due to the capacitance of the pi
filters (4,000 pF typical), only one CAN B pair is connected through the bulkhead harness. CAN B
external bus termination shall be outside the TEM cell. CAN C must be optically coupled in order to avoid
the capacitive loading of the bulkhead filters. CAN C external bus termination shall be inside the TEM
cell, prior to optical coupling.
RADIATED IMMUNITY (ANECHOIC CHAMBER): No special considerations for CAN B. Due to the capacitance
of the pi filters (4,000 pF typical), only one CAN B pair is connected through the bulkhead harness. CAN
B external bus termination shall be outside the TEM cell. CAN C must be optically coupled in order to
PF-10540, APPENDIX K, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page K-2
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
avoid the capacitive loading of the bulkhead filters. CAN C external bus termination shall be inside the
anechoic chamber, prior to optical coupling.
CONDUCTED EMISSIONS: Isolate CAN lines with a 0.5 Amp common mode isolator (CAN BAN). External
bus termination shall be placed on the low impedance side of the isolator. Verify bus operation using a
bus tool or oscilloscope. The CAN bus may be classified as a broadband source below 2.0 MHz; refer to
Appendix A of LP-388C-41 for signal source classification.
RADIATED EMISSIONS (TEM CELL): No special considerations for CAN B. Due to the capacitance of the pi
filters (4000 pF typical), only one CAN B pair is connected through the bulkhead harness. CAN B
external bus termination shall be outside the TEM cell. CAN C must be optically coupled in order to avoid
the capacitive loading of the bulkhead filters. CAN C external bus termination shall be inside the TEM
cell, prior to optical coupling.
PF-10540, APPENDIX K, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page K-3
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
APPENDIX L: COMPARISON OF PF-10540 TO PF9326-D
Component EMC performance standard PF9326-D is replaced for 2004 MY vehicle electrical architecture
applications by a new, more DCS commonized, component EMC performance standard, PF-10540. Most
of the electrical and transient requirements have been DCS commonized, but there are still differences in
immunity and emission requirements between this new PF and the corresponding DCS standard, MBN
10284-2 and there are significant differences in control of test methods. Therefore, for parts sourced from
European suppliers intended for use on DCA vehicles, this new specification does impose some
requirements in addition to the Mercedes component procedures, but these additional requirements have
been minimized. This is the level of commonization with DCS achievable at this time consistent with our
current product development process.
NEW REQUIREMENTS
-
I/O SPIKES REQUIRED FOR SUBCATEGORY R MODULES
ESD OPERATING TEST CHANGED TO 10 DISCHARGES AND IMPEDANCE REDUCED TO 330 OHMS (DCS)
LOW FREQUENCY CONDUCTED IMMUNITY TEST LOWER FREQUENCY CHANGED FROM 30 HZ TO 15 HZ
(DCS)
2 VRMS LOW FREQUENCY CONDUCTED IMMUNITY TEST FOR REMOTE BATTERY LOCATIONS (DCS)
AUDIO FEEDTHROUGH ATTENUATION REQUIREMENT CHANGED TO 60 DB BELOW APPLIED SIGNAL
TEM CELL IMMUNITY TEST LOWER FREQUENCY CHANGED FROM 100 KHZ TO 10 KHZ (DCS)
MAGNETIC IMMUNITY AND EMISSIONS LOWER FREQUENCY CHANGED FROM 60 HZ TO 15 HZ (DCS)
MAGNETIC IMMUNITY LIMIT DECREASES AT 5 DB PER OCTAVE
160 DBPT MAGNETIC IMMUNITY TEST FOR REMOTE BATTERY LOCATIONS (DCS)
CONDUCTED TRANSIENTS LIMITED TO +/- 75 V USING A LISN OR +/- 115 V USING A BAN (DCS)
NEW REFERENCE MATERIAL
-
APPENDIX D: DESIGN INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS FOR HIGH DATA RATE BANS AND THE CAN BAN
APPENDIX L: COMPARISON OF PF-10540 TO PF-9326-D
NOTE: (DCS) REFERS TO COMPATIBILITY WITH DAIMLERCHRYSLER STUTTGART
PF-10540, APPENDIX L, Change -, December 11, 2001, Page L-1
Copyright DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2001
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