Episode Engine
Telestream Episode Engine 4.4.2 User’s Guide
Note on License
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Telestream Episode Engine 4.4.2 User’s Guide
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Telestream Episode Engine 4.4.2 User’s Guide
ranty of any kind and Licensor and the third party suppliers EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT
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Contents
1
Using Episode Engine
1.1
1.2
What happens? . . . .
Once more, with details .
1.2.1 Settings files . . .
1.2.2 Input monitoring .
1.2.3 Transcoding . . .
1.3 Monitoring transcoding .
1.4 Advanced features . . .
1.4.1 Watermarks . . .
1.4.2 Bumpers and trailers
1.4.3 Metadata . . . .
1.4.4 Scripts . . . . .
1.4.5 Split-and-stitch . .
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Reference section
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
Watch folders. . . . . . .
Shared settings . . . . . .
Engine Admin . . . . . .
Optional files . . . . . . .
2.4.1 Watermarks . . . . .
2.4.2 Bumpers and trailers . .
2.4.3 Metadata . . . . . .
2.4.4 Using audio source files .
2.5 Scripting . . . . . . . .
A Supported formats
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Telestream Episode Engine 4.4.2 User’s Guide
Document conventions
A note
NOTE
Paragraphs marked like this highlight items of particular importance for the
proper function of the software.
A tip
TIP
Paragraphs marked like this highlight procedures that can save time or produce particularly good results.
A caution
Paragraphs marked like this warn about features which may cause loss of data
or failed execution if used incorrectly.
Document references, both internal and external, are shown in italics. Example:
See chapter 2 Before You Install. Literature references are given as numbers in
brackets with the full reference in the Bibliography. Example: See [2].
Directory names, file names, code examples, and prompts, are shown in plain
typewriter type. Example: The file printer.ppd can be found in /etc/cups/
ppd/.
The names of interface components are given in bold. Example: Adjust the time
limit with the Time limit slider. Select Show Log from the Window drop-down
menu.
Keys to be pressed on the keyboard are displayed in bold typewriter type. Example: Press Return to select the GUI installation. Examples of extended dialogue
will include the shell prompt> .
Brackets [ ] are used to enclose an optional item in the command syntax.
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1
1
Using Episode Engine
So, you (or someone else) just finished installing Episode Engine and you are
eager to start using it. This manual will tell you how to do it. We begin with a
very quick overview to get you started, and then more fully explain day-to-day
use of Episode Engine. The next chapter will magnify all the fine print and give
all the details of how things work.
1.1
What happens?
For a transcoding to take place, you need at least one source file and one settings
file. The source file is whatever input you have, video and/or audio. The settings
file is created with the companion product and defines how the source file should
be transformed into the output file.
Episode Engine can be set up to monitor any number of data sources, so that when
a media file is placed in one of these sources, Episode Engine will automatically
start the transcoding process. The resulting output file is placed in an output folder
from which you can retrieve it or let a script move it to its final destination.
1.2
1.2.1
Once more, with details
Settings files
You can use any of the number of template settings supplied with Episode Engine, which cover most of the usual output formats, or you can use to develop
specialised settings for your particular needs. If you want, you can make very
complex and fine-tuned settings, the art of which we cannot cover here, but instead refer you to the manual for the details. Note that mostly settings files do not
depend on the input material, so that you can use the same settings file for many
different input formats. Each settings file will generate a specific type of output.
If you are using watch folders (see below) you copy your settings files to the watch
folders where they are to be used, but in the general case, you upload settings files
to the Shared Patterns area on the Episode Engine server, where they also can be
used by others doing transcoding on the same server.
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1.2.2
Input monitoring
Episode Engine uses input monitoring to find media source files. Typically Episode Engine continuously checks the contents of a folder, on local disk, shared
storage, or on a remote file server, but you can also set up monitoring of a hardware device, such as a digital video camera, a satellite feed, or a Pipeline ingest
device.
The classical method of input monitoring is watch folders. Media files placed
in watch folders that also contain settings files will be transcoded. The location
of your watch folders was set up during installation, by default the watch folders
are the subfolders of /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/Input/. Note that
only the first level of folders under the root folder work as watch folders. Consequently, files placed in /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/Input/Test
will be transcoded, but files placed in /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/
Input/ or /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/Input/Test/Extras will
not be seen.
A more general method is File Monitors with which you can designate any arbitrary folder to be monitored for media files. When setting up the File Monitor in
Engine Admin you define what settings files to use for transcoding the files in
that folder.
In a similar manner you can use the FTP and SMB Monitors, which monitor
folders located on ftp and SMB servers, respectively.
Note that all input monitors only detect files moved into the folders they monitor,
all source files already present will be ignored.
Watch folders are deprecated and you should modify your workflows to instead
use File Monitors. Watch folders have some important differences in behaviour to
File Monitors, these differences will be pointed out as needed.
Best practice A good way to organise things is to create separate folders for
the different types of transcodings you need to perform. Consider a production
environment for three different customers: One has a website with continously
updated video clips in three different formats, one generates podcasts for the iPod,
one burns Video CDs and DVDs. You can either set this up so that you monitor
their ftp servers and retrieve files as they are created, or create separate accounts
for the users where they can log in and deposit their material. In each case, the
customers only ever see their own material and you can set the priorities of the
input monitors so that customers with stricter time limits get treated before those
with less urgent requirements. Event scripts (see section 2.5, Scripting) can then
be used to transfer the finished output files to their final destinations.
1.2.3
Transcoding
A source file will be transcoded into as many output files as there are settings files
associated with the input monitor. The output files will be placed in a folder that
by default will be located under /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/. Files
generated from sources in watch folders will be placed in a folder with the same
name as the input watch folder under /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/
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Output/, whereas files from other input monitors will be placed in a folder
with the same name as you gave the input monitor under /Users/Shared/
Episode Engine/Monitors/ (see section 2.3, Input Monitors for input mon-
itor naming).
The name of the output file is the name of the input file concatenated with the
name of the settings file.
By default source files in a watch folder will be deleted once they have been
transcoded with all associated settings. To retain your source files, you need
to set up archiving, in which case they are moved to an archive folder (by default in /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/Archive/) after they have been
transcoded. (See the Administrator’s Guide for how to set up archiving.) Other
input monitors will not delete their source files.
1.3
Monitoring transcoding
In order to monitor the progress of transcoding jobs Episode Engine has a graphical interface called Engine Admin. In a default installation it is in the Applications
folder.
On startup you must connect to a named server, since in a large installation you
might have multiple instances of Episode Engine running. Engine Admin will
display all servers on your local network, but you can also give the address of a
server anywhere on the Internet. Of course you have to supply the password to
the server you connect to.
Once you are connected to a server, you can monitor the health of jobs, clients
(the processes involved in transcoding) and the computing nodes.
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1.4
Advanced features
You can get more out of your installation with the advanced features Episode
Engine offers, by adding more information to your output files and by postprocessing them once transcoding is done.
1.4.1
Watermarks
Watermarks are images added to the video to indicate origin, enforce copyright
etc. A settings file can specify that a watermark be added to a video. In this
case, transcoding will not start unless the required watermark file is present in the
monitored folder.
Watermark files can be designated not to be automatically deleted from a watch
folder.
1.4.2
Bumpers and trailers
Bumpers and trailers, also called intros and outros, are short clips added respectively before and after your main material. These may be station signatures, credit
rolls and similar material. You can add bumper and trailer clips to folders in the
same manner as watermark files.
Bumpers and trailers can be designated not to be automatically deleted from a
watch folder.
1.4.3
Metadata
Metadata are data about a media file, author, copyright date, etc. Most output
formats support at least some metadata fields.
Metadata that should be applied to all source files should be defined in a settings
file, but more often one wants to supply metadata on a per-file basis. To do this you
use to create XML files with the same name as the source file and the extension
.inmeta. If an output format does not support a given metadata field, it will
instead be stored in an XML file with the same name as the the output file and the
extension .meta.
To use .inmeta files, this must have been specified in the settings file. If this
has been specified, transcoding will not start unless the required metadata file is
present in the monitored folder.
.inmeta files are deleted from watch folders when transcoding is finished.
1.4.4
Scripts
You can write scripts to take actions when jobs finish or generate error messages,
or when nodes fail. Scripts can be written in any language of your choice, but
they are stored in a single directory, so you cannot write scripts that are specific
to a given input or output folder; rather you should use the environment variables
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that are made available to the script to select the action appropriate to the file in
question.
1.4.5
Split-and-stitch
If you have the Episode Engine Pro version, you can run in split-and-stitch mode.
This means that source files are split into several parts, each part assigned to a
different cpu, transcoded in parallel and the resulting parts stitched together into
a single output file.
Episode
Engine Pro
Note that due to the operation of the split-and-stitch functions, there will be some
amount of bitrate overhead, you should therefore not use split-and-stitching for
files with very low bitrates—these will in general not get much of a transcoding
speedup anyway. For the same reason you cannot use split-and-stitch for streaming material.
Split-and-stitch operation is not supported for multi-bit-rate (MBR) files and RealMedia output.
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2
Reference section
Here we will go through all the fine print and details of using Episode Engine.
This is where to look if you have problems or want to figure out how to perform
non-standard functions.
2.1
Watch folders
Watch folder root The default root for input watch folders is /Users/Shared/
Episode Engine/Input/. The location is set during installation, but can be
changed in the System Preferences for Episode Engine. Only folders one level
down from the watch folder root are treated as watch folders.
Output folder creation Output folders with the same names as the input watch
folders are created under the output folder root. The location of the output folder
root is set during installation but can be changed in the System Preferences for
Episode Engine.
File discovery delay Input watch folders are polled for new files, so there may
be an interval of a few seconds before a new source file is discovered and sent
for transcoding. This interval can be adjusted in the services.conf file, as
explained in the Administrator’s Guide.
File deletion and archiving Source files and any optional (settings, watermark,
metadata, bumper and trailer) files specific to that source file are deleted when
all settings files have been used to generate output; global files will never be automatically deleted (see section 2.4, Optional files). If a settings file specifies a
watermark, bumper/trailer and/or a metadata file to be used, transcoding will only
start when the required files are present in the watch folder. If you have enabled
archiving in the System Preferences, the files will instead be moved to an archive
folder, by default in /Users/Shared/Episode Engine/Archive/.
File adding order Adding settings files to a watch folder that contains source
files does not have well-defined results, they may or may not be used for transcoding. Source files should therefore be added to a watch folder after all necessary
settings files.
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Priority Different folders can have different priorities for transcoding, so that
you for example can have a special folder for urgent jobs, or give higher priorities
to certain customers. Other jobs will not be placed on hold if a source file is
placed into a high-priority folder, but it will be the first one selected when a node
becomes free. The priority is an integer in the range 1–1000, higher numbers
corresponding to higher priority. You assign a folder a priority value p by adding
the suffix ^ p to the folder name. Folders without such a suffix will have a priority
of 500.
Episode
Engine Pro
Split-and-stitch You indicate that files are to be transcoded with split-and-stitch
by giving the watch folder a name that starts with stitch (not case sensitive).
2.2
Shared settings
In the default configuration input monitors will find their settings files in /Users/
Shared/Episode Engine/Settings. These settings are common for all
users of the same Episode Engine server. You can upload settings to shared
settings directly from .
2.3
Engine Admin
Connecting Starting Engine Admin brings up a window with a list of Episode
Engine servers visible through the Bonjour service. Either select one of these
or type a name or IP address of a server in the combo box Engine server. The
combo box will remember your latest connections. After selecting a server, enter
the appropriate password and press Login to connect.
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Check Remember this password in my keychain to let the Apple Keychain remember your password. For servers on the local network the correct port number
is automatically determined, for external servers you can enter a different port
number if it is different from the default one.
The username is currently not modifiable.
You can connect to additional servers with File→New Connection (Command-N)
and disconnect from a server with File→Disconnect (Command-D).
Active jobs
The Active Jobs tab shows the transcoding jobs currently underway or in queue.
The three buttons All, Queued and Running select whether to see all at a time or
just one category. Entering a string in the search field next to the buttons limits
the display to jobs matching the string.
The column Priority shows the current priority of each job. You can adjust this
priority by clicking on the priority value, which brings up a menu of symbolic
priority values, corresponding to numeric values as follows: Lowest = 0, Low =
250, Normal = 500, High = 750, Highest = 65535. You can also select a job row
and choose a priority from the Jobs menu.
The context menu on the job row also lets you set the priority. You can Abort
(Delete) a job or Stop And Requeue it.
Each job row starts with an Info button (
with detailed information on the job.
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). Clicking on it brings up a window
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Job history
The Job History tab shows jobs no longer executing, either because they finished
in good order or because they failed in some way. They can also be selected
by category with the buttons All, Failed, and Finished. Entering a string in the
search field by the buttons limits the display to jobs matching the string. Select
Jobs→Clear Job History or press Command-Alt-Backspace to remove the
entries in the list. Select a job and choose Remove in the context menu or press
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Telestream Episode Engine 4.4.2 User’s Guide
the Delete button (
The Info button (
) to remove individual jobs.
) gives the same information as for active jobs.
Connected nodes
The Connected Nodes tab shows the transcoding nodes connected to this server
process, their uptime and the number of running jobs on each.
Press the info icon ( ) to get a window with more information on the node and
an event log for that node.
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Connected clients
The Connected Clients tab shows all client processes connected to this server.
One of these will always be your own Engine Admin process, Event Action
Daemon, Watcher, and Dynamic Watcher will also always be visible.
Press the info icon ( ) to get a window with information on and from the client
processes and an event log for that node.
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Input Monitors
The Input Monitors tab shows all input monitors on this server. You can press
the + button or select Input Monitors→Add New Monitor to create a new input
monitor.
You can edit an inactive input monitor by double-clicking the monitor row, pressing the Edit button, selecting Edit Monitor in the context menu, or selecting
Input Monitors→Edit Monitor.
You can bring up an info window on an input monitor by clicking the Info button
( ), pressing Command-I, selecting Input Monitors→Get Info, or selecting
Get Info in the context menu.
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File Monitor
All input monitors have a name. This name is shown in the Input Monitors list
and also defines the name of the folder in which the output files are stored.
A File Monitor will monitor a folder anywhere on an Apple File System. The
parameters you can set for the file monitor are the following:
Poll Interval The folder will be checked for new files every t seconds. Note that
only new files in the folder are detected—any files already in the folder
when the monitor is activated will be ignored.
Safety Threshold When a new file is found, an external process may still be
writing to it. Thus the watcher will check again after the safety threshold.
If the file has not changed during that time, it is assumed that it is safe to
start reading from it.
Path The path to the monitored folder. The path is shown as a URL in the URL
field below.
Settings All settings that will be used for transcoding files found in the monitored
folder. Press the + button to bring up a browser of the Shared settings
storage from which you can select settings to use. Select a settings row and
press − to delete it from the file monitor.
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Split n’ Stitch If checked, files in the monitored folder will be transcoded with
the split-and-stitch function. Note that split-and-stitching is not possible for
streamable output, multi-bitrate output, and RealMedia output—in these
Episode
cases, regular transcoding will be performed instead.
Engine Pro
Priority The priority for jobs originating with this input monitor. Higher-priority
jobs will be transcoded before lower-priority jobs.
Active You have to explicitly activate the input monitor for it to actually start
monitoring. An inactive input monitor is still shown in the Input Monitors
list. You can select an input monitor and select Input Monitors→Start
Monitor or Start Monitor from the context menu to activate it. Likewise
you can select Input Monitor→Stop Monitor or Stop Monitor from the
context menu to inactivate the input monitor.
Image Sequence Monitor
The Image Sequence Monitor works lets you import a series of still images from
a local folder. The supported formats are BMP, DPX, GIF, JPEG, Targa and TIFF.
Like the File Monitor, the Image Sequence Monitor will only detect files placed
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in the monitored folder after the monitor has been activated. When no new files
have arrived in a period equal to three times the Safety Threshold, the sequence
is considered to be finished and it is sent for transcoding.
The image files should be named as hnamei hsequencenumberi . hextensioni. Files
must be added to the monitored folder in sequence and with an increment of 1. If
the sequence is broken, this will interpreted as the start of a new image sequence
and send the previous sequence for transcoding.
The Recursive button specifies that any subfolders of the monitored folder will
also be monitored, generating separate source clips for each subfolder.
FTP Monitor
While one may open an FTP connection in the Finder and access it with a File
Monitor, an FTP Monitor is more efficient and will reconnect if connection is
lost. The FTP Monitor will only detect files placed in the monitored folder after
the monitor has been activated. In addition to the fields that File Monitor has, FTP
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Monitor has additional fields for connecting to and logging in on an FTP server.
SMB/CIFS Monitor
The SMB/CIFS Monitor lets you connect to a Microsoft Windows Network file
server. The SMB/CIFS Monitor will only detect files placed in the monitored
folder after the monitor has been activated. In addition to the fields that File Monitor has, SMB/CIFS Monitor has additional fields for connecting to and logging
in on a Windows Network file server.
Message Log At the bottom of the window is the Message log showing information on the processing. Only messages starting from when you connected to
your current server will be shown. Next to the Clear messages button is a light
showing the highest severity of messages in the log.
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Clicking the checkbox Show only this level on the right, you can use the menu
to filter messages according to severity level: Debug, Info, Notice, Warning,
Error, Critical, Alert or Emergency.
Clear the message log as well as job info and client info logs by pressing the
button Clear messages or selecting Message Log→Clear Messages.
2.4
Optional files
As explained in section 1.4, Advanced features, the basic media file can be extended with additional information, such as metadata, watermarks and bumpers/
trailers. These “optional files” are placed in the same folders as the source files to
be transcoded, so to distinguish them from the source files, they must have special
file extensions indicating their role:
.setting, .mbrsetting
.watermark
.bumper, .intro
.trailer, .outro
.inmeta
.audio
Settings file
Watermark file
Bumper clip
Trailer clip
Input metadata
Audio source
In you indicate in the settings if a file is to be extended with optional files and
you also explicitly name the files to be used, but when exporting the settings file
for use in Episode Engine, the names are dropped and only the information that
optional files will be needed is carried along, so that you are not restricted to just
specifically named file(s).
If the use of any optional file has been requested, transcoding will not begin before
all requisite files are present in the folder. Conversely, if a setting does not require
the presence of a given file, the presence of such a file in the folder does not matter.
Engine Admin will indicate what optional files a settings file requires.
Optional files are either global or specific to a source file. A global file is the
default file, whereas a source-file specific file will be matched with one particular
source file and used for that instead of any global file. Optional files are independent of each other, so a source file can be transcoded with, e g, a global watermark
file and a specific metadata file.
A global file must have a filename that starts with ! followed by anything and
end with the appropriate extension from the list above, e g !Anyfilename.
trailer. A source-file specific file must have the same name as the source
file, including its extension, plus the appropriate extension from the list above, e g
MyFile.mpg.trailer will match the source file MyFile.mpg. Note that this
naming convention obscures the file type of watermarks and bumper/trailer clips,
but Episode Engine is not dependent on the file extension to determine the file
format.
Global files are never automatically removed from a watch folder, per-source files
are removed along with their matching source file. Settings files are always considered global, regardless of their names, so they are never removed from watch
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folders. Other input monitors do not remove any files.
Example Consider a monitored folder containing a settings file Example.setting,
a GIF file !general.watermark, and a JPEG file special.mov.watermark.
When the three source files general.mov, special.avi and special.mov
are added to the folder, they will be transcoded with the settings in Example.
setting. These settings specify that a watermark is to be used.
Since its name matches the name of the watermark, special.mov will be watermarked with special.mov.watermark, while general.mov and special.
avi will be watermarked with the global watermark !general.watermark.
2.4.1
Watermarks
Positioning The size and position of the watermark in the frame is set in .
Supported formats
Format
Bitmap
GIF
JPEG
QuickTime
Targa
TIFF
2.4.2
Comments
24 bit RGB
EXIF metadata also supported
24 bit RGB, 32 bit RGB
24 bit RGB, 32 bit RGB
Bumpers and trailers
Clip contents Bumpers and trailers are transcoded in the same format, size and
frame rate as the output file but will not be otherwise transformed, in particular
they will not be deinterlaced if the output is to be progressive and vice versa.
Bumpers and trailers must have video and audio tracks corresponding to the video
and audio tracks of the output file, i e output with both video and audio requires
bumpers and trailers with both video and audio, but video-only output does not
require audio tracks in the bumper and trailer.
2.4.3
Metadata
Metadata sources Metadata for an output file can come from three different
sources:
1. The Metadata tab in .
2. The Engine tab in .
3. An .inmeta file with metadata in XML format.
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Metadata from settings The Metadata tab in contains exactly the tags that are
supported by the given output format, the metadata are therefore written directly
to the output file.
Extra metadata fields Metadata from the Engine tab and/or an .inmeta file
are written to the output file for those tags that are supported by the output data
format. They override metadata with the same tags given in the Metadata tab.
Tags which are not supported by the output format are written to a .meta file that
is placed in the output folder together with the output media file.
The use of an .inmeta file requires checking the Use .inmeta File button in
the Engine tab in . If this option is used there has to be an .inmeta file in the
monitored folder before transcoding can begin.
Naming scheme The .inmeta file must have the same name as the source file
plus the extension .inmeta, e g, a source file sample.mov requires an inmeta
file called sample.mov.inmeta. The .meta file will have the same name as
the output media file plus the extension .meta, e g, an output file called mp4_
qcif_128_meta_sample.mp4 will have a metadata output file called mp4_
qcif_128_meta_sample.mp4.meta.
Example .inmeta file The precise syntax, the Document Type Definition, for
.inmeta files is in /usr/local/pwce/etc/inmeta.dtd.
<!DOCTYPE meta−data SYSTEM "inmeta.dtd">
<meta−data>
<!−− Metadata can be written to the output file, the .meta file or both. The "type"
attribute of the <meta−group> element specifies the destination. You can specify
up to eight metadata fields to be written to the output file: "title", "author",
"artist", "producer", "description", "copyright", "creation date", and "software".
The names of these will be converted to whatever the corresponding field name
is in the particular output format. If a field is not supported by the output format
it will be ignored. Metadata written to the .meta file are not interpreted, but just
written as they are given. Note that the <meta−group> elements have to come in
exactly the order shown. −−>
<!−− Values written to both output file and .meta file: −−>
<meta−group type="movie meta">
<meta name="title" value="Example Movie"/>
<meta name="copyright" value="Telestream, Inc"/>
<meta name="software" value="Episode Engine"/>
</meta−group>
<!−− Values written only to the output file: −−>
<meta−group type="movie">
<meta name="author" value="Ingmar Bergman"/>
<meta name="artist" value="Sven Nyqvist"/>
<meta name="producer" value="Harry Schein"/>
<meta name="description" value="A story of love and life lost"/>
<meta name="creation date" value="1984−04−01"/>
</meta−group>
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<!−− Values written only to the .meta file: −−>
<meta−group type="meta">
<meta name="database−id" value="123"/>
<meta name="Team" value="The Pops"/>
<meta name="result" value="2−0"/>
</meta−group>
<!−− The data in the <meta−movie−info> element are written as a log to the .meta
file after transcoding. The keys given in the "tokens" attributes determine what
data will be recorded. The different elements specify what will be recorded for
the entire movie, for each track of the movie, and specifically for video, audio
and streaming hint tracks. Note also that the "tokens" list can be split over
multiple elements (as in the two <meta−movie> elements) if that makes the file
more legible. −−>
<meta−movie−info>
<meta−movie tokens="duration bitrate size"/>
<meta−movie tokens="format duration bitrate size tracks"/>
<meta−track tokens="type format start duration bitrate size"/>
<meta−video−track tokens="width height framerate"/>
<meta−audio−track tokens="channels bitspersample samplerate"/>
<meta−hint−track tokens="payload fmtp"/>
</meta−movie−info>
</meta−data>
Example .meta file This is the .meta file generated from the .inmeta file
above, with comments added:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF−8"?>
<meta−data version="1.0">
<!−− Metadata coming from the first <meta−group> in the .inmeta file. −−>
<meta name="title" value="Verify Movie"/>
<meta name="copyright" value="Telestream, Inc"/>
<meta name="software" value="Episode Engine"/>
<!−− Metadata coming from the third <meta−group> in the .inmeta file. −−>
<meta name="database−id" value="123"/>
<meta name="Team" value="The Pops"/>
<meta name="result" value="2−0"/>
<!−− The <meta name="movie"> value is generated based on the settings file. −−>
<meta name="movie" value="file://out.3gp">
<!−− These elements are based on the tokens lists in the <meta−movie−info>
element of the .inmeta file. The values form a log of the transcoding. −−>
<meta name="format" value=".3gp"/>
<meta name="duration" value="15.1"/>
<meta name="bitrate" value="46039.8"/>
<meta name="size" value="695946"/>
<!−− The <meta−track tokens> in the .inmeta file generate a <meta
name="track"> for each track. These values are repeated for each track. In
addition, <meta−video−track tokens> generate values that are specific for
the video track. −−>
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<meta name="track" value="0">
<meta name="type" value="vide"/>
<meta name="format" value="h263"/>
<meta name="start" value="0.0"/>
<meta name="duration" value="15.0"/>
<meta name="bitrate" value="6122.0"/>
<meta name="size" value="92076"/>
<meta name="width" value="176"/>
<meta name="height" value="144"/>
<meta name="framerate" value="12.5"/>
</meta>
<!−− The <meta−audio−track tokens> in the .inmeta file generate the audio track
specific values. −−>
<meta name="track" value="1">
<meta name="type" value="audi"/>
<meta name="format" value="mp4a"/>
<meta name="start" value="0.0"/>
<meta name="duration" value="15.0"/>
<meta name="bitrate" value="16033.0"/>
<meta name="size" value="240862"/>
<meta name="channels" value="2"/>
<meta name="bitspersample" value="16"/>
<meta name="samplereate" value="44100.0"/>
</meta>
<!−− This is the streaming hint track for the video. The "type" to "size" elements
come from the <meta−track> element, "payload" and "fmt" from the
<meta−hint−track> in the .inmeta file. −−>
<meta name="track" value="2">
<meta name="type" value="hint"/>
<meta name="format" value="h263"/>
<meta name="start" value="0.0"/>
<meta name="duration" value="15.0"/>
<meta name="bitrate" value="6114.0"/>
<meta name="size" value="100012"/>
<meta name="payload" value="H263−1998"/>
<meta name="fmtp" value=""/>
</meta>
<!−− The same <meta−hint−track> is used for the audio hint track. −−>
<meta name="track" value="3">
<meta name="type" value="hint"/>
<meta name="format" value="mp4a"/>
<meta name="start" value="0.1"/>
<meta name="duration" value="15.0"/>
<meta name="bitrate" value="16137.0"/>
<meta name="size" value="253106"/>
<meta name="payload" value="MP4A−LATM"/>
<meta name="fmtp" value="profile−level−id=15;object=2;cpresent=0"/>
</meta>
<!−− This </meta> ends the earlier <meta name="movie">. −−>
</meta>
<!−− This ends the metadata document and file. −−>
</meta−data>
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2.4.4
Using audio source files
Sometimes one wishes to combine video and audio from different sources, but the
user interface does not let you do this directly. However, you can edit the settings
file to achieve this effect.
A settings file is an XML file, so it can be edited in Textedit, Emacs or whatever
word processor you want, as long as you remember to save in pure text format.
In particular and relevant for our current task, the settings file contains clauses
specifying the source file(s).
Consider a settings file that contains the following clause, specifying that a single
file is the source for both video and audio:
<importer media="movie" in="file://!SRCFILE!">
<video−out id="video_16e7a10_importer"/>
<audio−out id="audio_4f70140_importer"/>
</importer>
The !SRCFILE! is a template that represents source files that are to be transcoded.
Audio files are named like other optional files, with the extension .audio. A
matching audio file is represented in the settings file by the template !AUDIOFILE!,
so to use separate video and audio sources we would rewrite the clause as:
<importer media="movie" in="file://!SRCFILE!">
<video−out id="video_16e7a10_importer"/>
</importer>
<importer media="movie" in="file://!AUDIOFILE!">
<audio−out id="audio_4f70140_importer"/>
</importer>
2.5
Scripting
Scripts placed in /usr/local/pwce/evt/ (default location) will be executed
by Episode Engine when given events occur.
The scripts must be named on the form hdigiti hdigiti _job, hdigiti hdigiti _node
and hdigiti hdigiti _msg. The prefix number defines the order in which the scripts
will be executed, the suffix corresponds to the types of events that trigger their
execution.
Job scripts A job script is executed when a job finishes. Note that the script
is triggered even if the job finished due to an error. The script is executed in an
environment where the following variables are set:
JOB_CREATION_TIME The time when the job was created.
JOB_ID A unique integer that identifies this job.
JOB_NAME Identical to job_media.
JOB_NODE_ID An integer identifying the node that ran the job.
JOB_OUT_FOLDER Identical to job_folder.
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JOB_PRIO The priority of the job.
JOB_REAL_TIME The wall-clock time in seconds used for the job.
JOB_REASON One of no−start, bad−com, bad−job, fail, crash, lost, cancel or finish,
depending on how the job finished. If the job finished successfully (finish),
two additional variables will be set:
JOB_OUT_PATH The path to the output file.
JOB_OUT_URL The URL to the output file.
JOB_RUN_COUNT The number of times the job was processed. This should normally be “1”, but may be up to one higher than the value of max−job−retry
in engine.conf.
JOB_SETTING_NAME Identical to job_setting.
JOB_SOURCE_FILE Identical to job_media.
JOB_START_TIME The time when the job was started.
JOB_STOP_TIME The time when the job was finished.
client_host The name of the node that submitted the job.
client_name The name of the client process that submitted the job.
job_folder The name of the folder containing the input media file. If the job is
submitted by the watcher client, only the base name of the folder is given,
otherwise the full path of the folder is given.
job_kind A string indicating the type of job, can be regular, split, or stitch.
job_media The name of the input media file.
job_name The name of the job as set by the client.
job_setting The name of the settings file.
owner The username of the user that submitted the job.
Node scripts A “node” script is executed when contact is lost with a node (possibly due to an orderly shutdown at that node). The script is executed in an environment where the following variables are set:
NODE_ID The integer identifying the node.
NODE_NAME A string identifying the node, normally its host name.
NODE_STOPTIME The time when contact was lost.
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Msg scripts A “msg” script is triggered when a log message of severity up to 3
(= ERROR) has been generated. The script is executed in an environment where
the following variables are set:
MSG_ENTITY One of engine, client or node, indicating what type of entity caused
the log message. For client and node the following variables are also set:
MSG_ENTITY_ID The integer identifying the client or node.
MSG_ENTITY_NAME A string identifying the entity, normally the host name
of the node.
MSG_SEVERITY One of ERROR, CRITICAL, ALERT, or EMERGENCY.
MSG_STRING The actual log message.
MSG_TIME The time when the message was generated.
Some variables may be empty
NOTE
Depending on exactly what processes have processed a job, some of the variable values may be empty strings.
Example A set of example scripts are located in /usr/local/pwce/evt/
examples.
Below is the example script 00_job. It attempts to move the transcoding output
to an ftp server. If that fails it constructs and sends an email message describing
to problem to an administrator.
The script is written in bash, but any language can be used.
#!/bin/bash
USER="anonymous"
PASSWORD="anonymous"
HOST="example.com"
ADDRESS="ftp://${USER}:${PASSWORD}@${HOST}/"
RETURN_CODE=0
# Check if the job completed successfully
if [ "$JOB_REASON" == "finish" ]; then
# Create temp file for FTP server directory listing (to see if upload was successful)
TEMPFILE=‘/usr/bin/mktemp /tmp/ftp_XXXXXX‘
# Extract file name to use for naming file on FTP server
FILENAME=‘/usr/bin/basename "$JOB_OUT_PATH"‘
# Connect, set binary mode, upload file, list directory, close connection.
/usr/bin/ftp −iv "${ADDRESS}" << EOF
binary
put "${JOB_OUT_PATH}" "${FILENAME}"
ls . "$TEMPFILE"
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quit
EOF
# Check if file existsin the FTP directory listing
if /bin/cat "$TEMPFILE" | /usr/bin/grep "$FILENAME" >/dev/null 2>&1; then
# FTP upload ok
RETURN_CODE=0
else
# FTP upload failed
RETURN_CODE=1
fi
# Remove temporary file again
/bin/rm "$TEMPFILE" >/dev/null 2>&1
else
# Send mail to admin about the failed job
RECIPIENT="[email protected]"
MESSAGE="Job ’$JOB_NAME’ with id $JOB_ID dropped with reason:
$JOB_REASON"
/usr/sbin/sendmail $RECIPIENT << EOF
From: "Episode Engine" <[email protected]>
Subject: Job ’$JOB_NAME’ failed
$MESSAGE
EOF
fi
exit $RETURN_CODE
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Appendix A
Supported formats
The following media formats and codecs are supported by Episode Engine:
3GPP (.3gp)
The 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) video format is based on QuickTime and intended for mobile phones.
Supported codecs: AAC, AMR NB, H.263, H.264, MPEG-4.
Restrictions: H.264 is input only.
Pro adds: Multi-Bit Rate files, but for output only. H.264 support for output.
HE-AAC, but for output only.
3GPP2 (.3g2)
3GPP2 (3rd Generation Partnership Project 2) video format is based on QuickTime and intended for mobile phones.
Supported codecs: AAC, AMR NB, EVRC, H.263, H.264, MPEG-4, QCELP.
Restrictions: EVRC, H.264, QCELP are input only.
Pro adds: EVRC, H.264, QCELP support for output. HE-AAC, but for output
only.
3GPP2 (EZMovie) (.3g2)
KDDI have developed the EZMovie version of 3GPP2, which allows a distributor
to limit how many times a file is played.
Supported codecs: AAC, AMR NB, EVRC, H.263, H.264, MPEG-4, QCELP.
Restrictions: EZMovie is output only.
Pro adds: EZMovie is only available in Pro.
ADTS (.aac)
Audio Data Transport Stream is a wrapper format for AAC-encoded audio files.
Supported codecs: AAC.
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AIFF (.aif)
The Audio Interchange File Format was developed by Apple.
Supported codecs: PCM.
AMC (EZMovie) (.amc)
KDDI have developed the EZMovie version of AMC, which allows a distributor
to limit how many times a file is played.
Supported codecs: MPEG-4, QCELP
Restrictions: EZMovie files with distribution restrictions are only supported for
output.
Pro adds: EZMovie only available in Pro.
AMR (.amr)
AMR (Adaptive Multi-Rate) is an audio format.
Supported codecs: AMR Narrowband.
Restrictions: Input only.
Pro adds: AMR support for output.
ATSC A/52 (.a52)
ATSC A/52 is an audio format compatible with Dolby AC3.
Supported codecs: ATSC A/52.
AVI (.avi)
AVI is Microsoft’s wrapper format that encapsulates other video compression
standards.
Supported codecs: DV 25, DVC Pro 25, DVC Pro 50, MJPEG, MP3, MPEG4 (DivX, XVid), PCM, RGB16 (555), RGB16 (556), RGB24, RGB32, UYVY,
Windows RGB, YCbCr 4:2:0, Y8, YUY2, YV16, YVU16, YVU9, YV12.
Restrictions: DVC Pro 25, DVC Pro 50, Windows RGB, and YCbCr only supported for input.
Pro adds: DVC Pro 25, DVC Pro 50, Windows RGB, YCbCr supported for output.
DPX (.dpx)
DPX is the SMPTE standard for file format for Digital Moving-Picture Exchange.
It is an uncompressed format. DPX is almost the same as the Cineon format, but
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uses a different header.
Supported codecs: RGB
Restrictions: Input only.
DV (.dv)
Format for Digital Video; a recording format. This fileformat cannot handle separate timecode tracks like the .mov fileformat. iMovie uses this fileformat.
Supported codecs: DV 25, DVC Pro 25, DVC Pro 50.
Restrictions: Input only.
Pro adds: DVC Pro 25 and DVC Pro 50 supported for output.
Flash Video (.flv, .swf)
The Adobe/Shockwave Flash video format.
Supported codecs: Flash 7 Video, Flash 8 Video, MP3.
Restrictions: Flash 8 requires the Flash 8 Option.
GXF (.gxf)
GXF (General eXchange Format) is an interchange format for archival storage
and data networks developed by Grass Valley. The GXF format is only used as a
transfer format, the receiving server will convert the file to an appropriate internal
format. Although GXF can contain several formats like DV and JPEG streams, it
is mainly used with MPEG-2. A timecode track can be added to the file.
Supported codecs: MPEG-2, PCM.
Pro adds: GXF is only supported in Pro.
MP3 (.mp3)
A part of the MPEG-1 standard; the full name of this standard is MPEG-1 Audio
Layer III. MP3 is a common standard for audio and music compression.
Supported codecs: Lame MP3
MPEG Elementary Stream (.m1a, .m1v, .m2v, .mpg)
An MPEG Elementary stream contains a single medium, audio or video, and can
be contained in a Program Stream.
Supported codecs: MPEG Audio, MPEG-1, MPEG-2
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MPEG Program Stream (.mpg)
An MPEG Program Stream is intended for reliable media such as DVD or SVCD.
While the Elementary Streams of a Program Stream could be placed sequentially,
they are typically interleaved (muxed).
Supported codecs: AAC, ATSC A/52, H.264, MPEG Audio, MPEG-1, MPEG-2,
MPEG-4, PCM
MPEG Transport Stream (.m2t, .ts)
An MPEG Transport Stream is intended for broadcast media where packets may
be lost and viewers have to be able to enter a transmission in mid-stream. Elementary streams are interleaved (muxed) on the Transport Stream.
Supported codecs: AAC, ATSC A/52, H.264, HDV, MPEG Audio, MPEG-1,
MPEG-2.
Pro adds: MPEG-TS is only supported in Pro.
MPEG-4 (.m4a, .m4b, .m4v, .mp4)
The MPEG standard most commonly in use today, encapsulated by most modern
video applications in one aspect or another. The .m4a, .m4b, and .m4v versions
are adapted for iPods as audio, audiobook and video specialisations, respectively.
Supported codecs: AAC, H.264, MPEG-4.
Restrictions: H.264 is input only.
Pro adds: H.264 support for output. H.264 High Profile and HE-AAC, but only
for output.
MXF (.mxf)
The Material eXchange Format is a wrapper standard intended to better support
metadata for media files so that they can be easier kept track of in an environment
where media are transmitted, edited and stored entirely digitally. More information is available at http://www.mxf.info/.
Supported codecs: AES, D-10/IMX, DV 25, DVC Pro 25, DVC Pro 50, DV Audio, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG Audio, PCM.
Restrictions: Input only.
OGG (.ogg)
Ogg is an open media wrapper format designed for efficient streaming and manipulation. More information is available at http://Xiph.Org.
Supported codecs: Vorbis.
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PSP (.mp4)
PlayStation Portable can play MPEG-4 files, but requires that they be named
M4Vxxxxx.mp4, where xxxxx is five decimal digits, and stored in the directory
E:\MP_ROOT\100MNV01 on the PSP.
Supported codecs: AAC, H.264, MPEG-4
QuickTime™ (.mov)
Apple’s movie file format. This is an umbrella format that encapsulates other
video compression standards as well as a few of its own.
Supported codecs: µLaw 2:1, AAC, aLaw 2:1, AMR NB, Apple Animation, Apple Component, Apple GSM, Apple Intermediate Format, Apple Lossless, Apple
Video, Apple XDCam HD, Avid, Blackmagic, Cinepak, D-10/IMX, DV 25, DVC
Pro 25, DVC Pro 50, DVC PRO 100, H.261, H.263, H.264, HDV, IMA, Mace
3:1, Mace 3:2, Media 100, MJPEG, MP3, MPEG-4, PCM, Pixlet, Qdesign, RGB,
RGB16 (555), RGB16 (556), RGB24, RGB32, Sheer Video, Sorenson Video 1,
2, 3, Targa Cine YUV, XDCAM HD, YCbCr (YUV), UYVY, Y8, YUY2, YV16,
YVU16, YVU9, YV12.
Restrictions: Only AAC, AMR NB, Apple Component, Apple Video, Cinepak,
DV 25, H.261, H.263, H.264, MJPEG, MP3, MPEG-4, PCM, Pixlet, Sorenson
Video 1, Sorenson Video 3 supported for output. QuickTime reference files are
only supported for input. Timecodes are not supported by the native QuickTime
importer—this mainly affects reference files.
Pro adds: µLaw 2:1, aLaw 2:1, Apple Animation, Apple GSM, Apple Intermediate Format, Apple Lossless, Apple XDCam HD, Avid, Blackmagic, D-10/IMX,
DVC Pro 25, DVC Pro 50, DVC PRO 100, HDV, IMA, Mace 3:1, Mace 3:2,
Media 100, Qdesign, RGB, RGB16 (555), RGB16 (556), RGB24, RGB32, Sheer
Video, Sorenson Video 2, Targa Cine YUV, XDCAM HD, YCbCr (YUV), UYVY,
Y8, YUY2, YV16, YVU16, YVU9, YV12 also supported for output. In addition
any installed QuickTime codec plugins will be used. However, we do not guarantee full functionality of or helpline support for any such third party QuickTime
components.
Real (.rm, .rmvb)
Supported codecs: RealAudio/-Video 8, 9, 10 and SureStream.
Restrictions: RealMedia files are only supported for output.
Wave (.wav)
Microsoft’s basic audio format.
Supported codecs: PCM.
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Windows Media (.wma, .wmv)
The Windows Media encoder creates files in Windows Media format, a proprietary format currently playable in Windows Media player, VLC and, with the
help of the Flip4Mac Windows Media Components for QuickTime, in QuickTime Player.
Supported codecs: Intellistream, VC-1, Windows Media, Windows Media MBR,
WMA Pro, WMA Standard.
Restrictions: VC-1, Intellistream multi-bit rate files are only supported for output.
Telestream
33
Index
Engine Admin, 4
3GPP, 28
3GPP2, 28
3GPP2 (EZMovie), 28
AAC, ii
ADTS, 28
AIFF, 29
AMC (EZMovie), 29
AMR, 29
archiving, 4
ATSC A/52, 29
AVI, 29
bash, 26
BMP, 20
Bonjour, 8
bumper, 5
DPX, 29
DV, 30
Dynamic Watcher, 12
Emacs, 24
Engine Admin, 8–19
Event Action Daemon, 12
event actions, 5, 24–27
File Monitor, 15
File Monitors, 3
Finder, 17
Flash Video, 30
ftp, 3, 26
GIF, 20
GXF, 30
input monitoring, 3
interface components
+, 13, 15
−, 15
Active, 16
Active Jobs, 9
All, 9, 10
Telestream
Clear messages, 18, 19
Connected Clients, 12
Connected Nodes, 11
Delete, 11
Edit, 13
Engine, 20, 21
Engine server, 8
Failed, 10
Finished, 10
Info, 9, 11, 13
info, 11, 12
Input Monitors, 13, 15, 16
Job History, 10
Jobs, 9
Login, 8
Message log, 18
Metadata, 20, 21
Path, 15
Poll Interval, 15
Priority, 9, 16
Queued, 9
Recursive, 17
Remember this password in my keychain, 9
Running, 9
Safety Threshold, 15, 17
Settings, 15
Show only this level, 19
Split n’ Stitch, 16
Time limit, 1
URL, 15
Use .inmeta File, 21
Window, 1
intro, 5
JPEG, 20
metadata, 5, 24
mobile phones, 28
MP3, ii, 30
MPEG Elementary Stream, 30
MPEG Program Stream, 31
MPEG Transport Stream, 31
34
Telestream Episode Engine 4.4.2 User’s Guide
MPEG-4, ii, 31
MXF, 31
OGG, ii, 31
outro, 5
PSP, 32
QuickTime, 20
QuickTime Player, 33
QuickTime™, 32
Real, 32
scripts, 5, 24–27
System Preferences, 7
Targa, 20
Textedit, 24
TIFF, 20
trailer, 5
VLC, 33
Vorbis, ii
watch folders, 3
Watcher, 12
watcher, 25
watermarks, 5, 20
Wave, 32
Windows Media, 33
Windows Media player, 33
XML, 24
Telestream
35
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