glaze making - Ceramic Arts Daily
JANUARY
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1976
80c
P h o t o g r a p h e d at White Barn P o t t e r y , S u t t e r , C a l i f o r n i a , b y Mike M e r e d i t h .
Look whatt
at the bottom
of all this!
SHIMPO-WEST~RK-2 POTTER'S WHEELS...ASK YOUR LOCAL POTTER SUPPLY
SHIMPO-WEST P.O. BOX 2315, LA PUENTE, CALIFORNIA 91746
The ultimate in slabbing versatility, it will
accommodate all the demands of studio, production, and school situations. Constructed from
welded 1/4"steel, this rugged machine will roll
a 28" wide slab, 1/1(' to 1!/2'' thick, in any
length. In other words, the length of your canvas
determines the length of the slab. No prerolling
is necessary. From the bag, moist clay is sand-
wiched between canvas and fed through the
machines two 6" steel rollers. These rollers are
speed coordinated to offer absolute uniform
INTRO DUCIN G THE BAILEY SLAB MACHI NE
compression of the clay, thus eliminating all
possibilities of warpage.
Designed by a production potter who found all
other machines to be inadequate.
Write for a detailed brochure
explaining more of the many
advantages
in using a
"BAILEY".
DEALERSHIPS AVAILABLE
W r i t e Jim Bailey, Bailey P o t t e r y E q u i p m e n t , H e m i n g w a y R o a d , B r a n t Lake, N e w York 12815
January
1976
3
ALAOAMA
DONNAS CE RAMiC CRAFTS
HAZE LHURST CERAMICS
JEWEL BOX CERAMICS
M~w,na Avenue ~ 1 1
THE PlXrE POTTERY
2? ~ ~ h Avenue ~ u t n I,ond=le I n a . . , , . , ea,w
PIXIE POTTERYOF MONTGOMERY
ALASKA
ALASKA MUD PUDOL E
ARIZONA
MARJON CERAMICS INC
~ 1 8 North 24th Strut ~ n , x
MARJON CERAMICS TUCSON
426 We$, A~u,as T ~ m n
RRHNNSNS
CERAMIC ART CENTE R INC
FORT SMIT~ CERAMIC SUPPLy COMPANy tNC
7318Ro~, A enue. F ~ t Sm,th
CALIFORNIA
B J CERAMICS
2169 B,,,~d~a, Eu,e~,
BAY SHOr~ CERAMICS~PPL Y I~C
BS~ A r,, A....... S,.ta o . , a
BE TTY S CE aAMrCS
~3333 Sou,. pa a.,,>~ T B,>J,,.~,d SOuth G~te
CERAMIC SUPPL~ O~ SAn DI[GC)
]30 ~6'.S,,..,, S..D,.~o
S L CLUTTER
CRESt CERAMICS
'BOBN,,,~ C~,,,',, a.+.,,. Bak.,,,,e~
DAHm CERAmlCS
R74 [ Ca., ,n R*~r South Sa. Fran¢,~¢o
DUNCAN CERAMIC MOSBY S~)pPt Y
sF~9 F~,t S..,,,i. Fr.,.o
L(e S EeRaM,c sL~vL Y
105S ~ . . . . . . . BH ,,~ I V411.10
MAR LE CERAMIC
PAS(] RO9LESCF RA%~{: %HOp
RHOOY %CF R ~ , C S
T 6 4 0 C,,,, ,lq, ~ , i , , I N*i,Orl~
i cl,v
StE~,~Rt S O~ C~L ,rCR~,A , n (
16055 ~, ,i,, H, )
L 4 M,rada
'44OO L,.,,, ,, ~ .~, ¢ . ~ of " , d u . , ~
COLORADO
v a n HOWE C(R~','. S
;6O7 D,',,,,~ D, .. Colo,*do S~,"m
~An HOW[ CF~AMI( SUPPL ~ CO~'pAnv
1~9~5 Ea,, 40~, A. . . . Den.e,
COHHECTICUT
ELMWOC)U( [ RA'.'rC %TjUlu
62~,,., Q . , , A...... Fa,mlngzon
JEAN S C[ RA~mc STtJDIU
TCJZIBI,I,I,q* ,, R,,,~ G,oton
, ; ~ , T N t • C~ R,~M,
~'~'~.
GABS CERAMICS
4 / 0 / 9 G ......... ~" , ~ , . , :
~ , l m , , ,,,,
FLOHIOA
c A I L AWAY I : R ~ l T C[ N t r .
R,,,., 2 B , . S46 H a ~ . . . 22 Pa.amaC,tv
( ALLA~'AY (:RAt T CF~.T[ R i :,
~ I O ~ N , ' , , r S ' , , ' P,.~,ou
THE CERAV~C ~OPP~
h025 Ch,,*Ir, A,,,,,,, J..k,on,lll~
m)OLP~4m%ART C[ qAMIC%
~ 0 9 S . i t S, . , . HO)( , HIll
F L(IR~DACER ~ M , C SOPP~ Y
'699 ~,,, ,., R,~n We. PaI~ ~.~h
RANC{)~SF CERAMICS ~C
VIAMI ARt CRA~TS SUPPl IFS
, ¢~ ~ ,q,,,.,,.r 67., 5,,,,, M,~m*
~,,,;',V.H. % , . - Sa.,,o,a
GEORGIA
~L L~ N CE RA~iC Sk~PPL IE S
911 M, B, ,ii D,,.p CRaNia.
CSRa CE RAMICS
MOG,., Sir.., A , ~ , ,
%ALAXY (E RaMIeS IN(:
t;~ ORG~AC[ RAMICSUPp[ Y ,Nc
',.rR~ . , , n O ' , , , , A . . , . H . ~ . , , e
$'ARRISH L [ RA~ICS
.'426 ~,,,,n p , , , , , , S, .~. Valdo,ta
HAWAII
~220 K ,,,,,,,~,, S,,,,~' ~o.c~.,,,
T~RRA CE RA~ICS
]0J 5 C K,,dU~kd S' ,,~, Honolul e
IDAHO
~U A R T CERAMIC ~ G I r T SHOP
42? Nor,h Ms,) P~atlllo
,
TREASURE VALLEY CERAMICS
H g"*av 95 NU,,~ W,Idlr
ILLINOIS
CENTRAL CERAMmC ART SUPPLYCOMPANy
29W995 B a ~ a v , Road War,en.dle
CERAMIC CREATIONS
4115 WeB, L*wre.Ce A[email protected],us Ch,¢a~
CERAMICS BY JOY
3230 2],d Avenue ~ l l n l
JOLIET CERAMIC ARTS & CRAFTS INE
64 N,),r. Despm* nes ST,eet Johl~
SCHERTZ CE RAM~C STUOID
t ~ l Wesl Bron$ P~rI=
TOWN & COUNTRY CERAMIC SUPPLY
I NOrth US Route 83 & ~ [ e r St,ee~ 6r~vtllke
TOWN & COUNTRy CERAM~CSUPPLy
SPRINGFIELD BRANCH
INDINNN
INC
E DITH'S C ~ R A M I C S
INC
6511 J u l l - Avenue l.d,an*~ol.
M[L'S CERAM~c CORNER
~Ce E.~ Ma,~ S . m G r , . , t h
THE MUD HUT
19t9 SOUThRar, mn St.~T ~ t Way.a
NEELY S CERAMIC STUDIO
10106M,~,~16~ US 2O O1¢1Ol
iOWA
LYLE'S CERAMIC CENTER
161S south Fecle. d M m n Cl(y
4
KANSAS
LOU OAVrS INC
~ 7 Cen~r~1 Aver~ue K ~
Clty
EVANS CERAMIC SUPPLy
IS78 SOUth Wash,nglon Wrchlta
PRAIRIE DOG CERAMICS
RFO • . No,ton
SHAGOW BOX CERAMIC STUDIO
:308 Wes] Cloud Sheer Sal,n*
NEW MEXIC0
ANHOWE CERAMIC SUPPLy INC
4810 Pan Amer,can Freeway Nort~eas~
Ease P,omage Road Al~querque
NEW YORK
KENTUCKY
LOIS CERAMICS
~508 ~ash ngton S~,eel Menderson
POLLY S PLAY HOUSECERAMIC STUDIO
9806 TavlO[sv,,le Ro~d Jeffeesonlo,n
SANDY S CERAMICS
Roure 2 Ew ,,9 F a d RoJd Bowl,rig G,een
TOMS CERAMI C STUDIO
I~ w ~ v J4,n S~'ee, Co.,nglo~
WEST KENTUCKY CERAMICS
1101 JeHerso SIrp*t Paducah
LOUISIANA
BOEHM CERAMIC SUPPLY
NORTH CAROLINA
CREATIVE CRAFTS CERAMICS ,NO
63~6 Y~,lk, R,~d Faye~ewll~
~ U ~ H A ~ CE RAMIC SLIPPLIES INC
t ] 4 ' ~ . , ~ a , D. ~, Do,ha~
S~REVEPORT CERAMIC SUPPLy
444 DI . . S,r~? Shrevepors
.%ILMAR S CERAMIC SUPPLY
!;21 Bo~n, A . , ,., Ale,andr,a
•~IL'.IAR S CE RAMIC S~JPPLY
5934 H , . I ; . R,i~,l Batnn Rouge
•%rlLMAR S C[ RAMIC SUpPL y
F*~IR BLOF~ CE ~AMIES
P O B I . 96 E n St,,.,.
We~, Stdrborough
NORTH 0AKOTA
CARD[ SCERA'A~ ~:e'~rE~
MARYLAN0
DOTTLE SAR ~ CORNER I%C
509 S~,urh M ~ , S,,,,, Mount Aav
mG+ABqlDGE CE RAM'LS
SI S ' ~ I , I , J . C . , u , * R J : ~ , M D ~ , , "
~ A ~ Y L ~ D C[RAMIC HOi~S[ L ] )
~?
H a ~ ,,, R,,.,, Ba't,mo, e
Falr Bluff
G R A H A ~ CE RA~',CS LTD
I ] l g C , , , t j A ........ Chariot le
MUSE (:E ~ M I C S
' ~ . l D, ~,).,i r .,, wdYneiwlll ,
MAINE
~ [ "~ JO CER A ~ I C S
) S a , *,+ = i ,, a , ,1~ : . . . .
SMmTH 5 C[RAM,CS
21)8 MJ. S~,, .,. Ba.~o,
JACK IES CERAMIC STUDIO
123 Ld~e S~re~? Rous.s POln~
JEAN LEONARD CERAMICS
~6 24 Cotu.,a A~e lue Corona
LEZETTE CERAMICS
RO.le 712 ~ugt,,: e~ WOO~sIUcWR~ad S~u~rtles
LUNG ISLAND CERAMIC CENTER
? 190 ROUTe109 Llndenhu¢st
R U N I O N CERAMIC SUPPLY
236 W,,,I C .......... ~ St,,,~, East R~hesler
SEELEY S CERA~IC SERVJEE INC
STAATEN CERAMICS
5833 A,.,~. v R ,~,~ Staten Isl4nd
MET LA CERAMICS INC
4471 Co.,, .- S~r~., ~ta,,,e
D O R O T ~ A s C:[ g A M I c SUpPI •
.: I 0 E ' ' ,1, md~d~,,
22T 223 R
Gamh, ilh
MASSACHUSETTS
DIA ~ D ~ D CE R A % ' r c s
255 .V, . . . . R ,.,, R,,*l,.9 We,,bo, o
F LOS CE "AM,CS
2 .Yes,u,,S,,..,t W,l~ah*m
GINA S CE ~ AM'C SUPPLv HOJSE
588 B,,,~d S.r.~t East Weymouth
~ASHOBA C[ R~MICS
~ O B L ~ N CE R A % q C SUPPLY
20,~1 ,,+S* , I W o ~ r n
C~.~M~cs M o ~ L Y
G'L S(eRA'.~'CS "~C
932 , ' v , . . . , ~ . , ;,
Marq~etle
JOY RE,D CERA*.'IC St JD,O
201G N,, .' T,l.,~.~u, R ,,: Des,bur.
TARI TA% [ IRA'.'!( SL;pp( Y r~l
9~ ; C ' , . . S t . , ~ . Grand Rop,d,
,.~,,. Fargn
0HI0
H • ;~ ; B ' ' r .% , , ' R
Nvw Kno.vdle
KARSH~.~ R ~ ~ ~A%'l( 5
z2 ,~
R,., Columbu~
~ H , U Ct R ~ M I : S~mm Y ,N~
ME%~GERIE CE RAMICS
1003 %%',s , , A , ~ ,~ Laurel
MISSOURi
C ~ CE RAM~CS
611 M ~ St,.~* Ca,s,,lle
OOUGLAS CE RAMIC & CHRISTMASSHU~
Rmne 6 Box 6779 Mel~ I r Ri~a,~ Spr,nghe~d
FOUR CORNERS CERAMICS INC
10008 Eas, 50 H,g~*a v Raytown
GEN£V,EVE S CERAMIC STUDIO IN(:
6S1~ W.be' R~a(I S~ L o u .
THOMAS CERAMIC SUPPLIES
H.9~wa~ S7 SoUm Cahforn,a
MONTANA
ALICE'S CERAMICS
~77 Ea~r Telo,1Ave~e Shelby
COUNTRy COTTAGE CERAMICS
21S5 H, Wav 2 Eas,. KallmeN
MONTANA CERAMIC SUPPLY
2016 A derson Avenue. Bdllngs
SHIRLEY S CE RAMIC SUPPUES
NEBRASKA
BERNICE S CERAMICS
SS05 H,ghway 6 Northeast L , ~ o l n
F REiSZ CERAMIC STUDIO
sgss ~ S 7 .,j*" Street O m ~ a
W & M CERAMIC STUDIO
22~5 AvenueG K ~ , ~ V
NEVAON
CERAMIC ARTS. INC
190E We • n St e e l Las Ve~l
NEW HAMPSHIRE
DORA'S CERAMIC STUDIO
87 Bro~lway Avenue. M l ~ h ~ t e r
SUPERIOR VIEW CERAMICS
Route 12 W~tmofe)end
~EW JERSEY
BROWN'S CERAMIC SUPPLIES
819 NOr(h ~ c o n d Street Ml#lvllll
CERAMJC MAGIC
Roule I and Oikland Avenue Edison
DOLLY'S CERAMIC ART STUDIO
30 Mo~[gomery S r ~ C on
sAVAGE CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
Route 37 & satthelor S t , ~ t , Tom, Rlvlr
WEIDL CH CERAM CS NC
BATEMAN CERAMICS
7IS P e ce St eet Dal~al
BATEMAN CERAMICS
6615 Eas Lanca$1e. Fort Worth
LAURINE BROCK STUDIO
16Sl Wesl Woodlawn Avenue Sin Antomo
C C CERAMICS
4 ~ S KO~IO,yZ C o f ~ t Chr,$t,
CERAMIC ART & ANTIOUE SHOP
2 ~ Allen Drive W l r h l t l F ~ I I
THE CERAMIC PEEPLES
? '2 Miles East H,ghwav I 7~9 N ~ Deal
THE HOBBY SHOP
911 No.m M ~ k ngblrd La~e AbHene
HOUSTON ARTS & CRAFTS INC
~ 8 M~rshall. H ~ l t ~
LOMA CERAMICS INC
907 Lomaland Dr ve El Paso
UTAH
CAPITAL CERAMICS INC
2174 sour" ea,,, S~,~el Salt LaWe C,W
VERMONT
VERMONT CERAMIC SUPPLY CENTER
451 Wes~Street Rutland
VIRGINIA
DILL HAWK CERAMICS ~NC
Route 2 Box 436 H,~hwav 1~7 Roanoke
M C STUDIO INC
4115 Hopk.,s Road Rrchmond
POTTERY ART STUDIO INC
4407 ~ ham Avenue Norfolk
WASHINGTON
CF RAMIC HUT
3996 Vdl,¢. H,ghWaV . ~ Oem,ng
CERAMICS BY SHIRLEy
404 ~ u [ h Secon~ Streel Y l k l m 8
LLOYD'S CE RAMJCS AND POTTERY
318 Wesoake Avenue No,zh Seattle
MILLER S CERAMICS
4828 Pat,he Averrue Tacoma
SPOKANE CE RAMIC SUPPLy
We~l ]B Th ,d AVerl~e Spokane
WEST V I R G I N I A
B & M CERAMICS INC
1 ~ 2 Broadway Avenoe ~ r k l r l ~ r g
MULLENS CE RAMIC SHOP
101 I Mo,a,~ Avenue. Mullln$
TODD'S CERAMIC SUPPLY ~NC
2029 Pop,a, S,..~, Kenya
TOWN& COUNTRYARTS & CRAFTS
RL,TH~ ( [ R~MI(:~
R,, , R , , ,
NewW=sh,ngton
O,,e h~l~ roll.~r, Crooked R U . R ~ d o~,
R~ute 19 al Gor~ Oa,ksburg
WISCONSIN
VlLLAG~ CF RAMIC STL;DIt]
~ ' ~ 2 9 , , A., R , C,nclnnat,
OKLAHOMA
4 8 S., , { .'In,, .,, Tulsa
DOL LIE S : { RAMIE S & P~)R(:{ LAl'g
¢01" S,,,w S' . i . H , , . ,
i OklahomaC,ty
OREGON
'~8~ J , ;, , Junct,on C,tv
MINNESOTA
CERA'2 CS Bv 3EE
S95 r , i Av, , , , . . Sl P*ul
& H ( ER~MI(:~
6309 G,,, ,, .%........ Dululh
~ARA*.*OU%T CERAMIC INC
220 N ,i 5~.,t, S: . . r Fa,,mont
v j . CE ~AM,CS ~NC
i ] ' i E~,r 66.t, S.,, i Mi.neapoh~
MISSISSIPPI
S LL SCERAMIC & G I r " S~t)p
R~ 5 R , . 2428 Col~mb~
30UBLE L C£RAM(C SUPPL Y
SINGER CERAMICS
952 ~a,~ S r~el, N I ~ y , I ) I
TWIN C I T y CERAMICS INC
2516 Volun ee, Pa,kwav eflltOl
TEKAS
CEL ART CE RAMrCS INC
67S0 F,IIh Avenue B ook yn
CENTRAL NEW YORK CERAMIC SUPPLY
213 21S Second STreet L,.er~ol
THE CERAMIC TOUCH INC
34S New Karne, Ro~d Albany
DEAN'S CERAMIC & GIFT SHOPPE
249 Chend,,~ S{,ve~ Bmghamton
3OLLMAN CERAMIC SUPPLIES INC
663 Wa~de,, Avel~ue SWJIIIIo
GLAD WELL CERAMIC STUOIO & SUPPL Y
MICHIGAN
DELAWARE
CRAF S H ~
NORMA ~ u t RAM~Cb
I1(]/ NorTh E,gnlb S{ree[ Burl,ngton
PARKER CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
2204 West 23rd Slrev~ D~ Molnls
RWERVIEW C~RAMICS
Sl 1 .M.' Avenue NW C ~ a t RIp,ds
SCOTUN INC
236Ma, S:eel ~ G t e ~ r
FIRESrDE CERAMICS
280S North Ba,ke, R ~ d Br~kfildd
MARCE LLA'S CERAMICS INC
'150 I , , ~ a , ParW*a~ Belo, t
MARCELLA'S CERAMICS INC
~1 )~ EJSl ~dsh i,glu,, Awertu~ ~ d , t o n
ROLENE CE RAMIC STUDIO INE
252~ W~t m#$o. St,set G r i n B.ly
WAUGH'S CERAMIC STUD 0. NC
R,)ule 3 2 mlV~ Easto1 Tomah o,,
Hgn~av 12& ~6 tomah
WYOMING
2B09 S ,,h, a, ~ t , ,
S
, ' Portland
PENNSYLVANIA
a%'F IGH S C[ RA*.~IC ST~X~,O
19"g R . . . . ,: A . . . . . Wllh*mtport
HE~ ~E a {:( ~ M I : ~UPPI Y C~MPA'4y I%C
426 , .
, ~ , . ~ , N . w Oxford
B ~ . I S[ FR~MIC A R ' 5 ~ L
2 B R , , , . I S N Dllllbur9
::[ ~AM,( C;mOVF G , r t SHOPP~
• *~r, t2., A . , Jun.atdAIt~on.
ERA'.',CS B~ ~A~ORC~ ,NC
• '.' ,;, ~
R , , , 220 A,,s
CL,STU*.' C R ~ F T (:( RA~IC~
0 % , , . , S, e., Washm~lon
ELSIE S C[ RA%qICSO; .V~ITEHALL NC
J37 6,~;,, S~ , , , Whllehall (Alle~towlll
[ t S l ~ S CERAMICS fLOYD SCH[IB ;N(
669 [ a ; Ma, St,, ... Heront
KOCHS CE RA'.~,CS
624 G, ,v, A~,. ~, Johnslown
L[ BOEU~ F~'41SHING PRODUCTS~, CE RA%'ICSUPPLY
~.,,,.- M. , S, ,.,r Mill Village
LJB~RTY BELL C~QAMICS I~C
4~1 ~ No.lh B,uad S~,,.,n philadelphia
MITCHELL S CERAMIC SUPPLY CORPORATIOn*
51 Noble A.e,,uc p,tts(c~Jrgh
THE POTTER S MILL
Route 61 I & T~rh R~d<l Dovlestown
sHE D:)or, S CEg A'.~rC STUDIO
Apu, IS, R Jr] RD = ' Nor,,s,own
SUNSHINE CERAMICS INC
RoutP 307 Rural Delve, v 3 MR,CO*
RHODE ISLAND
CERAM ART STUDIO
S?O? Easl Ma,n Road Pott~mo~lh
LOUIS" CERAMI C SUPPLy COMPANY
114 Smithfield Avenue Pawtucket
SOUTH CAROLINA
ANOE RSON CE RAMICS COMPANy INC
1950 South McDuff e Street A n d e r t ~
FAITH'S CERAMICS INC
P O 8o* 24. NOrWay
ROURK'S CERAM C STUD O. NC
247S Ashley R,ver Roa4 at P,e,pont Chlrletton
SOUTH DAKOTA
CFRAMIC HOBBY SUPPLY
I 117 West 11th Street $1OU. Fills
CERAMIC SUPPLY CENTER
~J23 West R|pld. Rl~,d City
TENNESSEE
SCULLY CERAMIC SUPPLY INC
146S~uIM Elk Casper
CANAOA
ADANAC CERAMICS
B20 Re,.h,,* sT,~e,
V.ncouver 6. Brllllh Columb8
ALBE RTA CE RAMIC SUPP[ IES LTD
526 42rid Ave, ue Southedsl
Calga,Y Alberta
&LBE RTA ce RAMIC suPer IES u T o
I 1565 149th Street
Edmo.ton. A l ~ r t l
ALLAN CERAMICS [ TO
2404 ~ . r h Oueens~a v
I~,nce Geo,ge. S.,l,~h Columbia
CARPENTER CERAMICS
310B South Parks,deDr ve
Lelhbr*~e. A~berta
COBEOUID CERAMICS
43 47 Forleste* St,ee~
T , u r o Noes Scot,a
ISLAND CERAMIC SUPPLIES
I~,a~d H ~hwav 2 M,les South of Nar,a,mo
N|na,mo, British Columb*a
JONASSON CERAMIC SUPPL Y
S94 Nol.e Dame Avenue
REGINA CERAMICS LTO
%?33 McA,a SIreez
Rl~n~, salkatchewan
SYL AND SONS CERAMICS LTD
121 Jes~p Avenue
~ s k l t O ~ r Sa~katChe~n
UNICERAM INC
4070 S~ Oe~,~
THE VILLAGE CERAMICS LTD
2S 10 Connell Court
Toronto, O n ~ | . o
PUERTO RIC0
CASA DEL BARRO. INC
F,~al Clile F ~ r l c o A Cost~ i 1047
IJrb I~dustr,~l Tre$ Uonj,ti$. HItO R*~
AHO d=str,bu~o,s ,n the IoHowln~ foreign
court.,.
AOSTRALIA
BELGIUM
COOTA RICA
ENGLAND
FRANCE
GREECE
ICELAN0
JAPAN
NEW ZEALANO
PANAMA
PHiLiPPiNES
VENEZUELA
For f~rthe~ ,nformahon ~ r t e to
DOROTHY LAMAR CERAMICS
3302 G~llat,n Road, Nilhville
D u ~ n Cera~© P~odu©ti I~¢
HOUSE OF CERAMICS, INC
1011 North HOHyWOOd.Nl~m~ls
F,~.
LINOA'S CERAMIC KORNER. INC
134 S~ R~ndo ~ Rold, G Dye Cents, Oak Rrd~
MOUNTAIN VIEW CERAMIC CENTER INC
~ ? ' 2 0 o , : . -°'.a Chatu~oo~
P O. Box 782"/
Cilif ~n,~ 93727
M O N T H L Y
V o l u m e 24, N u m b e r
January
1
1976
7
Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Itinerary
11
........................................
Suggestions from Our Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
Answers to Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
Fire, Earth, and Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Pioneers of Contemporary American Ceramics
Arthur Baggs, Glen Lnkens by Elaine Levin . . . . . . . . . .
24
Twelve German Ceramists by Hildegard Storr-Britz . . . . 31
Bag Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
A King's Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Contemporary Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
A Clay Mixing Technique by David Taggart . . . . . . . . .
46
Richmond Exhibition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Craftsman's Fair of the Southern Highlands . . . . . . . . . .
50
Czech Faience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Glaze Color by Richard Behrens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
CeramActivitie s
63
..................................
New Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83
Index to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86
On Our Cover
D o n Reitz
Ron P r o p s t
Bruno LaVerdiere
Tyrone & Julie Larson
J a n e Peiser
Tom Suomalainen
"Bottle Family," sculptural and functional form, 14~ inches
in height, produced by Ingeborg and Bruno Asshoff. These
ceramists represent a segment of German artist-craftsmen
whose direction focuses on the expressive, rather than
traditional ceramics. A discussion of contemporary German
eeramists and their works is presented on page 31.
Cynthia B r i n q l e
Toshiko Tokoezu
In a fascinating text, these master pollers explain, step by
step, how ¢o make pieces they have designed especially for
this book. Using language clear enough for the beginner to
follow, they demonstrate the basic techniques of hand build;ng and wheel throwing, along with their own innovations never
before described in print. They also provide formulas for
glazes, sources of supplies, and a glossary.
The texts are highlighted by autobiographical sketches of
the pollers, in which they reveal how they got their start, how
they work, end how they feel about poHery making today.
For the beauty and inventiveness of the designs of these
Penland masters, and for the authority of their teaching, this
book will inspire beginner and advanced poller alike. $12.95
Publisher and Acting Editor: SPENCER L. DAvIs
Managing Editor: WtLI.IA,~t C. HU~T
Copy Editor: Do~N^ WOt.VmnA~O~R
Art Director: ROSERT L. CREAO~R
Circulation Manager: MA~Y Rus~xmv
Advertising Manager: CONNIE BELCHER
Editorial, Advertising, and Circulation Offices: 1609 Northwest
Blvd., P.O. Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212. (614) 488-8236.
West Coast Advertising Representative : Joseph Mervish Associates, 4721 Laurel Canyon, Suite
California 91607. (213) 877-7556
211, North
Hollywood,
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Box 12448, C o l u m b u s ,
Copyright 1976 Professional Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Please send me
Zeeh
R d XJm Arhr,r. Michigan 4810~ Manu,~ripts and ilh..maic.n~ dedlng ~,ifll 4vramh art arli~Lfie, are ~,eh.rne
..de~(rihin~
authors,
pmenfial
ta
e.st
,,iOmut
a~adable
is
ht.,klet
~
puhlicahon
for
and ~,ill he cons;dered
eedl,;e~ [ar tile preparation and submissl.n af :, manmcrlpt Send manu~(r pts and eorrespCmdemeabom ~llem
to the Editor, (:ERAMIC~ X I O N I H t y , ~,Ox 1244B, Columbus, O h i o 43212.
copies of PENLAND Book of POTTERY
@ $12.95
I
Address
City.
I
L
J
I
I Name
S.L.
C h R i s t i e s S l o x r l l ~ " is published m o n t h l y except Iul} and August by Pmfesslonal Publlcaticns. Inc.
J)a~is. Prec. P S Emery. S e ~ : 1609 Norih~,est B 6 d . [;olumhus, O h i o 43212. Correspondence cnn~erniu~ ~uh,t r,l)tLtltas, rene~,als, a n d chanRe of address should Im m a d e d to the C i r c u l a t i o n l ) e p a r t m e m (]FRAMICS ~*IONI HI X.
B,~X 1 2 4 4 8 Columbus, O h i o 43212. Se~cmd (:lass p ~ t a ~ v paid at Athens, O h i o , u.~.*. S u b ~ r i p t i n n s : ( ) h e ~ear
$ 8 : "1~,o }ears $ 1 4 : T h r e e }ears $[9. Add $1 per }ear outside t.~.A.
e '~r I n d e x and he Re de ' (
"lhe articDs in catch issue (ff C h : ~ , r c s M o x [ u l ~ are indexed
. "ra tire Slicrofihn cop es are . , ; l a b e t . ~uhseribem lront ( ' n i ~ e r ~ i t ~ ) . l i , r.fiims. 36K) N
d a
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1976
5
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AM|RIICAN
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ARKANSAS
Arkansas Clay Works
407 College Ave.
M o u n t a i n Home, Ark. 72653
(501) 425-8745
Madera Pottery
1309 W. Olive
Madere, CA 93637
(209) 674-1531
T h e Mug Shop
2925 Collage Ave.
Berkeley, CA 94705
(415) 548-1425
CALIFORNIA
Acorn Crafts Center
3318 Thousand Oaks Blvd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
(805) 495-9515
APPU Pottery
315 W. Polk St.
Santa Maria, CA 93454
(605) 922-3124
A r t w a r e by Frederick
2045 N. Wishon Ave.
Fresno, CA 93704
(209) 226-0474
Ceramic Supply of San Diego
330 16th St.
San Diego, CA 92101
(714) 233-6508
Western Ceramic Supply
1601 Howard St.
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 861-7019
CONNECTICUT
John Hull Enterprises
42 Bigelow St.
Manchester, Conn. 06040
(203) 646-8577
FLORIDA
Miami Clay Co.
18960 N.E. 4 t h Court
Miami, Fla. 33179
(305) 651-4695
clay & s t u f f
3013 Lindberg Ave.
Placerviile, CA 95667
(916) 622-5139
T h e Crackpot
540 E. Main St.
Venture. CA 93001
(805) 648-2155
I BAH0
• For more information regarding American Pottery
Wheels contact your nearest dealer or the factory.
LOUISIANA
Clay Per Se
4705 Iberville St.
N e w Orleans, La. 70019
(504) 482-3311
MISSOURI
G o o d Earth Clays, Inc.
3054 Southwest Blvd.
Kansas City, MO 64108
(816) 561-4437
NEW HAMPSHI RE
The Craftsmen's Market
105 Market St.
Portsmouth, N.H. 03801
(603) 431-6070
NEW JERSEY
Kits Ceramic Studio
7 2 5 H a m i l t o n St.
Somerset, N.J. 08873
(201) 246-4333
NEW Y O R K
Firehouse Ceramics
238 Mullberry St.
New York, N.Y. 10012
(212) 226-1821
T h e Potter's Center
210 Myrtle St.
Boise, ID 83706
(208) 336-1122
OKLAHOMA
ILLINOIS
Encee Ceramics
1275 Fremont St.
Monterey, CA 93940
(408) 372-1194
• Last, but certainly not least. A growing nationwide
network of consumer oriented dealers, many also
carry a complete selection of clays, glazes, chemicals, tools, kilns, as well as helpful suggestions.
a.r.t. Studio
2725 W. Howard St.
Chicago, Ill 60645
(312) 465-3288
Hobby Lobby Creative Center
4223 N.W. 10th St.
O k l a h o m a City, Okla. 73107
(405) 947-0921
OREGON
A r t Pak Products
6106 N. Denver Ave.
Portland, Ore. 97217
(503) 285-4572
SOUTH DAKOTA
F r o m the Fire Pottery
509 E. 18th St.
Sioux Falls, S.D. 57105
(605) 336-9229
TENNESSEE
A A A Rental Center
3843 Hixson Pike
Chattanooga, Tenn, 37415
(615) 877-3506
WASHINGTON
Clay A r t Center
4320 Pacific Hwy. E.
Tacoma, Wash. 98424
(206) 922-5342
Seattle Pottery Supoly
5261 University Way N.E.
Seattle, Wash. 98105
(206) 523-7754
WISCONSIN
T h e Clay Wheel
7917 W. Becher
West Allis, Wisc. 53219
(414) 3 2 1 - 3 3 2 2
For Further Information Contact
U ~
AJ tAIIC/AN IPOTT|A J WI,11
EEILS
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Dealer Inquiries Invited
6
CERAMICS MONTHLY
J
LETTERS
LET'S HEAR FROM JURORS
In regard to the controversy over funk
vs. functional work in exhibitions and
shows, perhaps CM could generate a series
of articles from a number of well-established jurors. It would seem that they must
approach the matter of selectivity with a
philosophy of craft which has come
through their own processes as craftspeople. If this is true, then they could
speak to such questions as: What is the
function of shows as a part of our total
culture? What is the educational impact
of shows? Does the art outweigh the craft
in objects they select? Should the craft
category in its modern application be
redefined?
S. King and L. Biehl
Lion's Head Pottery
Galena, Ohio
fads--current trends, which change very
rapidly. I hope we can get back to the
notion that everyone should find his own
valid direction, and stay with it long
enough to develop a mature expression that
has some depth.
Richard Peeler
Reelsville, Ind.
NOVEMBER CM
Thanks for coverage on women potters.
I particularly enjoyed the article and
photos on Toshiko Takaezu, also the his-
torical appreciation of Charles Binns and
Adelaide Robineau. Keep up the good
variety in CM.
Marian Ronsheim
Dansville, N.Y.
The article, "A Fuming Technique," by
Raul E. Acero, which appeared in the
November 1975 issue of CM, fails to develop a most important statement: "Good
ventilation is necessary for safe fuming."
Continued on Page 9
CALIFORNIA POTTERS
Try to put some California colleges,
potters, and artists in CM. I'm kind of
sick of Ohio and everyplace else back there.
Thank you.
John Rothstein
LaMirada, Calif.
FOR PROFESSIONALS
How about publishing some business information for professional crafters, e.g.,
facts on insurance and relevant legal info?
In general, I find CM useful, inspiring,
and great fun each month!
Peggy Brenner
Hamilton, N.Y.
POTTER'S SYNDROME
I have been experiencing lumbosacral
back strain, which seems to be aggravated
by working in a bent-over position at the
potter's wheel, and I am wondering if
there could be a "potter's back" syndrome
similar to "tennis elbow," "housemaid's
knee," and the new "Frisbee finger"?
Gwen Redding
Houston, Texas
TRENDS IN CERAMIC EDUCATION
I read with interest Mr. Buonagurio's
letter (November CM) commenting on the
similarity of work produced by Alfred's
students and faculty. I have a couple of
additional thoughts on current trends in
(ceramic) education.
It is probably inevitable that students
be influenced by their teachers' work. And
I feel it is a good thing that students do
learn one good way to do things as a
starting point. One of my teachers once
said that all work done as a student, under
the influence of teachers in schools, should
be destroyed so that a new start could be
made. Everything produced from that point
on would be the artist's own work.
I have always felt that the teacher's job
was to help the student gain the basic
skills, tools, and knowledge which he
needed to express his ideas effectively-whatever his ideas might be. What bothers
me a little is that the trend today is contrary to this philosophy. Both students and
teachers seem to be only concerned with
January
1976
7
8
CERAMICS MONTHI,Y
LETTERS
Continued [ram Page 7
In fact, the a c c o m p a n y i n g pictures show
no m e a n s of ventilating the electric kiln
being f u m e d . . . .
A f u m i n g technique
w h e t h e r it uses salts of tin or sodium
chloride should not be carried out indoors
without a (suitable) exhausting system . . . .
E. M. Ferreri
Rosedale, Queens, N.Y.
CONE 6 RESEARCH
I was glad to see the short s t a t e m e n t
a n d recipe for a C o n e 6 clay body in the
N o v e m b e r CeramActivities column. For the
last year, I have been c o n d u c t i n g research
along the same lines as Mr. Higgins, a n d
have h a d some fine results. I a m currently
testing two clay bodies t h a t m a t u r e from
Cone 4-6, a n d were originally gleaned from
the pages of past C M ' s :
C e d a r Heights Goldart . . . . . . . .
30 parts
A.P. G r e e n Fireclay . . . . . . . . . .
30
Ball Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Potash Feldspar . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Grog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
100 parts
Local Clay (plastic) . . . . . . . . . .
A.P. Green Fireclay . . . . . . . . . .
G r o g or W h i t e Sand . . . . . . . . . .
Potash Feldspar . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75 parts
15
5
3
2
100 parts
I have found that additions of from ten
to twenty per cent potash feldspar or
nepheline syenite will totally fuse clay
bodies at Cone 6, a n d if you w a n t that
rich organic earth brown in oxidation
firing, the addition of two to five per cent
b u r n t u m b e r will do the trick.
I have done quite a bit of research in
C o n e 4-6 bodies a n d glazes, a n d would
be glad to share m y information with anyone working along the same lines.
Bob Andersen
Potter-in-Residence
Des Moines Art Center
Des Moines, Iowa
DON'T BUY IT JUST BECAUSEIT'S AMERICAN
BUY IT BECAUSEIT'S THE BEST
BETIrER THAN EVER
I a m glad t h a t you publish artful,
subtle, stupid, erudite, a n d m i s h - m a s h
letters. Y o u show the world itself a n d
some do not like it . . . . C M is better t h a n
ever today a n d it exists because it is current in its views. W e revere a n d respect
o u r ancestral past, b u t if we stood still
technically, we would still be placing a
bit of wool a n d some cheese in a dark
corner, covering it with refuse, a n d getting
m i c e - - s p o n t a n e o u s generation!
D. Medes Grinef[
Webster, N.Y.
PROM PUERTO RICO
We are a group of eight potters working
in practical isolation here (Puerto R i c o ) ,
far removed from all sources of materials
a n d all contact with other potters. However, we have successfully entered shows
There's a lot of advertising these days encouraging
you to buy American made products m cars, steel, even
potter's wheels. And in a recessionary time, there's good
reason to keep our dollars at home. But we don't want to
be anybody's charity case, so we strive to build the finest
equipment available, and at competitive prices. Despite
inflationary pressure, we've held our prices since October
1975, without a single sacrifice in quality, by better prod'uction methods and higher volume. Isn't it nice that the
best is built right here. Send for a free brochure and dealer
llst. 128 Mill Street, Healdsburg, California 9S448.
Continued on Page 81
January
1976
9
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Any item made in seconds.
The JIGGER A R M fits all of our
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CERAMICS MONTHLY
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ITINERARY
Send your show announcements early:
"'Where to Show," three months ahead o[
entry deadline; "Where to Go," at least
six weeks be[ore opening. Direct in[ormation to Itinerary, CERAMICS MONTHLY,
Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212.
WHERE TO SHOW
ALBERTA, CALGARY
September 30-November 7 National Ceramics Exhibition is open to Canadian citizens and residents. Entry deadline: July
16. Write: Glenbow-Alberta Art Gallery,
National Ceramics Exhibition, Glenbow
Centre, 9th Avenue and 1st Street S.E.,
Calgary T2G OP3.
$5.00. Slides of work and entry forms due
March 1. Write: John Gagnon, 80 Belmont Street, Fall River 02720.
MONTANA, GREAT FALLS
April 6 Ten State Bi-Centennial Juried
Art Show, sponsored by Montana Institute
of the Arts is open to artists in Missouri,
Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, South and North
Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Washington, and
Oregon. Fee: $5.00; one entry per media
category. Jury by slides, due January 5.
30% commission. Write: C. M. Russell
Museum, 1201 4th Avenue North, Great
Falls 59401.
NEW JERSEY, LAYTON
May 8-30 2nd Annual Raku Exhibition
is an invitational show, juried by Robert
Piepenburg. Purchase awards. Slides due
March 13. Write: Gary Alexander, Peters
Valley Craftsmen, Layton 07851.
NEW MEXICO, ROSWELL
May 1-2 Arts and Crafts Fair of the
Continued on Page 58
~,RIZONA, ~I'ucsoN
May 7-9 Festival Arts and Crafts Fair
will be held at the Tucson Community
Center. Fee: $40. Entry forms due by
February 15. Write: Mrs. Harriett Harwood, Tucson Festival Society, Inc., 8 W.
Paseo Redondo, Tucson 85705.
GEORGIA, MACON
May 1-2 The Georgia Jubilee includes
a juried and nonjuried exhibition. Fee:
$25 (juried) and $15 (nonjuried). Entry
deadline: April 1. Write: Josephine B.
Lamb, The Georgia Jubilee, 4182 Forsyth
Road, Macon 31204.
ILLINOIS, NORTHBROOK
May 22-23 Midwest Craft Festival, sponsored by the North Shore Art League, is
open to craftsmen including ceramists in
Illinois and contiguous states. Slides due
February 14. Write: Jewell Berzon, Chairman, 620 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka,
Illinois 60093.
I,OUISIANA, SHREVEPORT
March 6-21 Shreveport Parks and Recreation National 1976 is open to artists in
all media. Juried. Cash awards. Fee: $10
for three entries; $1.00 each additional
entry (no limit). Slides and entry forms
due January 2. Write: Gwen Norworthy,
R. S. Barnwell Garden and Art Center,
501 Clyde Fant Memorial Parkway,
Shreveport 71101.
MARYLAND, FREDERICK
June 1-6 The Frederick Craft Fair is
open to all professional craftsmen. Juried.
Entry deadline is March 10. Write: Frederick Craft Fair, Noel Clark, Director,
Gapland, Maryland 21736.
MARVLAND~ GAITHERSBURG
September 22-26 The National Craft
Fair is open to all professional craftsmen.
Entry deadline is March 10. Write: National Craft Fair, Noel Clark, Director,
Gapland, Maryland 21736.
MASSACHUSETTS, FALL RIVER
May 9-30 Greater Fall River Art Association 18th National Exhibition is open to
all craftsmen and artists living in the
United States. Juried. Cash awards. Fee:
CREATIVITY
COMES
EASIER
True creativity is never easy, but it's a lot easier for the ceramist
who uses Mayco Colors. That's one of many reasons why the most
exacting craftsmen as well as beginners prefer Mayco'~ quality
Glazes, Underglazes, One Strokes or Accents. They're homogenized for extra smoothness and easy firing at Cone 06. And now
Mayco Colors has developed a line of glazes containing no lead
at all! Safe for use in schools and hospitals. Send for your free
chart of America's finest colors!
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MAYCO COLORS
20800 Dearborn Street
Chatsworth, Calif. 91311 • Dealerships Available
January
1976
11
If yOU are firing 12 to 16 hours, it is costing you a fortune.
" - SMOKE: Added insulation only aids in reaching cone 10.
FACT: Insulation also allows for a more economical firing, a slower
cooling rate, less heat loss, and allows for a cooler kiln surface temperature. The cooler the surface temperature, the
safer it is. It also allows you to work near the kiln more
comfortably.
SMOKE: Kanthal A-1 elements are only good for cone 10 firing.
FACT: Kanthal A-1 element wire is good for all conditions, and it
is the most chemical resistant wire! This aids in resisting
the sulphur attack. (Most clays contain sulphur.)
SMOKE: Stepless infinite control switches are not important.
FACT: Stepless infinite heat control switches proportion heat input. They allow for a much more uniform heat which
eliminates hot spots, and they allow for better temperature
control.
SMOKE: A uni-bloc top and bottom is not important.
FACT: Uni-bloc tops and bottoms eliminate sifting.
SMOKE: Stainless steel jackets look nice and aid in insulating a kiln.
FACT: Stainless steel alone is actually a heat transfer material
which will not prevent a heat loss. High temperature insulation should be used between the stainless steel jacket and
the firebrick to prevent heat loss.
SMOKE: It is not important to have a cone 10 kiln U. L. listed.
FACT: It is most important to have a cone 10 kiln U. L. listed
because the kiln is being fired to much higher temperatures
causing the electrical components and wiring to be subjected
to a much higher temperature. A cone 10 kiln must be
wired to U. L.'s rigid standards and local codes and should
have a U. L. listing number.
SMOKE: A cone 10 kiln is not practical for firing ceramics (greenware).
FACT: A cone 10 kiln is excellent for firing ceramics (greenware).
You will have less heat loss, and it will cost you less money
to operate.
All Crusader Therm-Armor Kilns feature true cone 10 firing,
added insulation, Kanthal A-1 elements, stepless infinite
heat control switches, and uni-bloc tops and bottoms. All
Crusader Therm-Armor Kilns are U. L. listed.
THANKS FOR ALLOWING US TO CLEAR THE AIR.
Crusader Industries, Inc.
937 S. WASHINGTON AVE., HOLLAND, MI 49423 PH: 616/392-1888
A S u b s i d i a r y of T h e r m o t r o n C o r p o r a t i o n
12
CERAMICS MONTHLY
CRUSADER
~TM
"SIR-AMIC"
Dealer
Distributor
Inquiries
Invited
=m
M I
SUGGESTI ONS
[rom our readers
STORE EXTRA PARTS
A supply of l e a t h e r - h a r d spouts, handles, a n d lids can be
stored indefinitely in zip-lock plastic bags. T h u s , an extra part is
always ready for a t t a c h m e n t to a teapot, m u g , or other multiple
--Conrad Weiser, Raleigh, N.C.
element ware.
SLAB ROLLER
A length of sewer pipe (5-inch diameter) works well for
rolling out clay slabs. T h e size a n d weight m a k e it easier to use
t h a n a conventional rolling pin, a n d discarded tiles are often
available free at construction sites.
--Mardes ]. York, Woodland Park, Colo.
SUPPORTS FOR GLAZING BOWLS
T h r o w n goblet shapes (glazed a n d fired) m a k e excellent supports w h e n p o u r i n g glaze on the exteriors of inverted bowls.
T h e y d o n ' t m a r the glaze on the interior of the ware, a n d there
is no need to touch up blemishes on rims.
--Hillar Bergman, EssexviUe, Mich.
a useful hauler. U n d o the bolts holding the engine a n d remove
it; t h e n place the clay can directly on the frame. It handles like
--Bruce Meyer, Hays, Ks.
a s h o p p i n g cart!
CLEANING HINTS
A m a s o n r y saw blade, m o u n t e d on the arbor of a ~ - h o r s e power motor, cleans the bases of glaze-fired ware m o r e efficiently
t h a n a n y g r i n d i n g device we have used.
In a studio where several people use the kiln, shelves become
a mess with kiln wash a n d glaze runs. For a small fee, a m o n u m e n t c o m p a n y in our area was able to clean a n u m b e r of shelves
with carbide blasting. T h e surfaces are s o m e w h a t m o r e r o u g h
than w h e n new, b u t excellent for applications of new kiln wash.
--Roger Allen, San Angelo, Texas
SMOOTH KILN WASH
W h e n kiln wash builds up on shelves, p r o d u c i n g a r o u g h
u n e v e n surface, it can be sanded s m o o t h with a section of h a r d
--Pat Wells, Temple, Okla.
firebrick.
MIX GLAZE
USE FOR OLD KILN ELEMENTS
M i x small quantities of glaze or slip in a coffee c a n with a
plastic lid w h i c h has been perforated to a c c o m m o d a t e a metal
paint stirrer a t t a c h m e n t for a n electric drill. T h i s a p p a r a t u s
works quickly a n d thoroughly, a n d the plastic cover prevents
a n y liquid from splashing out.
I have m a d e inexpensive stilts for ware by pressing sections of
coiled kiln elements (in concentric circles about one-fourth inch
apart) into clay slabs. Fire the clay, a n d brush off a n y residue
from the elements before using t h e m to stilt beads or other
--Maxine Weber, Lewiston, Idaho
small-based ware.
--Domenick Maldari, Brooklyn, N.Y.
HEAVY-DUTY HAULER
Instead of pulling your back out by t u g g i n g a garbage can of
clay from place to place, convert an old rotary power m o w e r to
THE OLD FAVORITE
REUSABLE CONE PLAC~UE
Eliminate the task of m a k i n g clay cone plaques for each firing
by constructing a reusable holder. Saw a 1 x I x 2-inch section
Continued on Page 15
used by a
generation of
potters & still
going strong
18,OOO
ESTRINwheels
sold in
north america
from $199
write for free catalog & price list ......
ESTI21N ,¢'IANUFACTU~ING LI/I,41TED
fl767 West 3rd ,4ve, Vancouver, BC,Canada V6J 1K7
Telephone: (604} 731-0312
F
January
1976
13
/ IH[/
Portable nowndrart=
2600 ° LOW IRON INSULATING FIRE BRICK
BACKED BY 2000 ° INSULATION
~O
ADDITIONAL FLUE HEIGHT NEEDED
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NO BAG WALLS OR
MUFFLE TUBES
100% GAS SAFETY SHUT OFF
WELDED STEEL FRAME WITH
HIGH HEAT Z I N C DUST COATING
(PREVENTS RUST)
SIZES F R O M 6 TO 24 CU. FT.
For further Information and prices w r i t e :
GEIL KILNS P.O. Box 504.. H e r m o s a Beach, Calif. 90254
14
CFRA~IICS .~[ONTHLV
Phone (213) 372-8003
Continued [rom Page 13
The Art Of Pottery
Is Developed Through Nature
And Nature Lends Itself To
All Form:
from the corner of an insulating firebrick, then carve two or
three slanting holes in the top surface to accommodate cones.
Our Company Was Established
, To Help You Find Nature's Form.
SUGGESTIONS
--Gretchen Quie, Silver Spring, Md.
NEEDLE TOOL HOLDER
Small holes drilled in a surface convenient to your work area
make good holders for needle tools. Multiple holes afford a
much better chance of hitting one when you want to set your
tool aside, yet they do not damage the surface or preclude its use
for other purposes.
--George Brad/ord, Preston, Ont.
HACKSAW TOOL
Before finishing foot rims with a conventional trimming tool,
I use a 4-inch section of coarse hacksaw blade to trim uneven
bottoms of bowls or plates. The serrated edge does not catch on
rough edges, and it quickly prepares surfaces for finishing
touches.
- - T i m Broedling, San Diego, Cali[.
WAX PAPER
When I was teaching ceramics, I found that wax paper was
a serviceable tool for various aspects of handbuilding. A strip of
the paper makes a good background for roiling slabs, and facilitates later transfer to the drying rack. And, a crumpled length
of wax paper can serve as an effective external support for the
damp rim of a flared bowl or plate.
--Irene Bernard, Farmington, Ark.
DOLLARS FOR YOUR IDEAS
CERAMICS MONTHLY pays up to ~5 /or suggestions used. Send
your ideas to CM, Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212. Sorry, but
we can't acknowledge or return unused items.
Create & Orom
The c r e a t i v i t y i n h e r e n t in c e r a m i c s w o r k is emotioz
cleansing. It is w i t h the belief t h a t our wheels can b,
e x c e l l e n t vehicle for realizing the c r e a t i v e experient
t h a t C r e a t i v e I n d u s t r i e s p r o u d l y offers i t s w h e e l s for
The Ci M e d i u m Power Wheel is powerful enough fc
centering up to 35 pounds of c l a y on i t s 12-inch diam,
head. It is an excellent choice for 90% of all potters.
P r i c e : $225.00 plus s h i p p i n g
If y o u ' r e o n e o f t h e 10% w h o n e e d s m o r e p o w e r , t h e
Wheel is for you. Producing 11/i horsepower, this w h e
than y o u are! A ten (10) belt p o w e r band t r a n s m i t s pd
m o t o r to the 14-inch d i a m e t e r head.
P r i c e : $315.00 p l u s shipping
Both Ci Wheels feature welded s t e e l construction,
and i n [ i n i t e l y variable (stepless) speed c o n t r o l All
heads h a v e r e m o v a b l e pins for bats. A full guarantee
and w a r r a n t y a c c o m p a n i e s each wheel.
Options include %" m a s o n i t e bats which are
drilled to fit the pins in the heads, and e a s i l y
r e m o v a b l e splash guards.
This 100 pound pot was far from th
maximum capability of this wheel
Ami
For detailed information write: ~ )
C r e a t i v e I n d u s t r i e s , P.O. B o x 343, La M e s a , Ca. 9204A
January
1976
15
.
The New
Craftool
"Heavies"
._L
Heavy-duty potter's wheels,
ranging from ½ HP to 1 HP.
Variable speed from 0 to
240 rpm with high torque
even at low range. All have
these features:
• Permanent magnet motor
with solid state speed
control.
• Precision machined
wheelhead with concentric circles for easy
centering, and removable
bat pins to hold Craftool
pressed wood bats.
• Large polyethylene splash
pan removes for quick
cleanout,
• Lightweight, unbreakable
foot pedal presets to
maintain any desired
speed without continuous
foot pressure.
• Lit on/off switch with
protective rubber boot -moisture can't pass
through or give potter
a shock.
• Maintenance-free; no
parts to oil or grease.
• One year factory
guarantee.
GO
O
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O
O
10" E l e c t r i c V a r i a b l e
Speed Potter's Wheel
UL approved--safe for classroom use.
• Variable speed 0 to 200
rpm
• Gear-driven -- no slippage
-- high torque
• 10" aluminum wheel head
with concentric circles for
easy centering
• Lightweight, unbreakable
foot pedal -- presets to
maintain anydesired speed
without continuous foot
press u re
• Removable unbreakable
plastic cleanout pan; carry
to sink for emptying
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3-Station Variable Speed
Potter's Wheel Unit
Three 15700 wheels mounted on a heavy steel frame
solves space problems in
studios and classrooms. 6"
shelf for tool storage. Multioutlet box on the unit provides wheels with a handy
power source.
Model No. 15780 . .$695.95
<
(I)
½ HP 12" V a r i a b l e S p e e d
Potter's Wheel
With a main frame of heavy
gauge plate steel covered
with an unbreakable charcoal Lexan housing, and
heavy duty 2" tubular steel
legs. The ½ HP permanent
magnet motor with solid
state speed control operates
a gear driven transmission
which is permanently sealed.
,V
~m
• Legs come with the unit:
remove them and the potter's wheel can rest on a
bench or table
• Portable -- weighs under
23 Ibs. Stores easily
Model No. 15700 . .$199.95
Model No. 15753 -Optional Sit-Down
Stand . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$39.95
Model No. 15710 . .$269.95
craftool
OUR
NEW
COMPLETE
THE
LINE
POTTER'S WHEELS
OF
CRAFTOOL
1421 W E S T 2 4 0 t h S T R E E T • H A R B O R
16
CERAMICSMONTHLY
ELECTRIC
VARIABLE
COMPANY
CITY, CALIFORNIA
SPEED
WHEELS
INC.
90710 (213) 325-9696
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1/2 HP 14" V a r i a b l e
S p e e d Potter's Wheel
A heavy duty professional
potter's wheel that will center better than 50 Ibs. of clay
while maintaining high torque even at low range. Ideal
for the professional potter
who does large work (14"
wheelhead) or for continuous classroom use. Unit has
a Poly-V-Drive belt for positive no-slip v i b r a t i o n - f r e e
transmission. Double row
p e r m a n e n t l y s e a l e d ball
bearings support the reinforced throwing head. Heavy
reinforced ~6" steel plate
c o n s t r u c t i o n forms main
chassis, integrally welded
motor and controller housing completely encloses all
electrical and moving parts
-- yet readily accessible
cover plate for motor housing quickly removes. Belt
tension is easily adjusted by
a heavy gauge sliding motor
mount plate. Table top is
quick cleaning polyethylene;
edge has raised rim to prevent spills.
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1 HP 14" V a r i a b l e S p e e d
Potter's Wheel
The heaviest poly-v-drive
wheel in our line. Centers
100 Ibs. of clay. Designed
for the most demanding potter or the heaviest-duty studio jobs, this powerful ultra
precision unit will give years
of maintenance-free service.
The body of this wheel is
constructed of heavy ~6"
plate. Unit has a Poly-VDrive belt for positive noslip vibration-free transmission. Double row permanently sealed ball bearings
support the reinforced 14"
throwing head. Belt tension
is easily adjusted by a heavy g a u g e s l i d i n g m o t o r
mount plate. Table top is
quick cleaning molded polyethylene, edge has raised
rim to prevent spills.
m
/
"-131
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1 HP 14" V a r i a b l e S p e e d
Gear-Driven Potter's
Wheel
The ultimate step up in the
Craftool Potter's Wheel line.
This is our most powerful,
most exacting unit. Capable
of throwing better than 100
Ibs. of clay, this unit delivers maximum power and
torque from its 1 HP permanent magnet motor at
even the slowest speeds.
Designed for the perfectionist who insists on precise
c o n t r o l and p o w e r even
when working on the largest
pieces. A super heavy duty
10:1 ball bearing worm gear
reduction system absolutely
eliminates slippage. The 14"
heavy duty machined wheelhead is permanently mounted on an arbor consisting of
double row sealed ball bearings. This arbor absorbs the
thrusts and weight of the
loaded throwing head, and
is carefully mounted on the
heavy ~6" steel chassis. The
output shaft of the arbor is
connected to the output
shaft of the gearbox via a
coupling -- thus eliminating
all gearbox vibration and removing all strain from the
gearbox bearings-- insuring
long life. Welded heavy plate
steel housing completely encloses motor, gear transmission and controller as well
as all electrical and moving
parts, yet readily accessible
cover plates to motor housing and gear train quickly
remove. Table top is quickcleaning molded polyethylene; edge has a raised rim
to prevent spills,
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Model No. 15720 . .$409.95
..........
Model No. 15730 . .$469.95
The Craftool Potter's
"~Pl'~K~.~i~ ~
Wheels are illustrated
t
~1[~,=,_.~-1~, 3_ t
and described in our
PJ~'~
~.~ latest brochure entitled
~ " ~ 4 F ~ I111['~t.~
"Craftool Ceramics
~ = . mLJ( I~bU~l . ~
Equipment "" In it we
~Jl,~-~ also show our new Clay
I-/
Extruder, Slab Rollers,
Banding Wheels, Vibro-Sieve,
Potter's Tools, Bats, Clay Cabinets
and Ceramic Shop Furniture. Write
for it by sending in the handy
coupon.
~ii!:~
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Model No. 15740 . .$519.95
THE C R A F T O O L C O M P A N Y , INC.
1421 WEST 240th STREET • HARBOR CITY, CALIFORNIA 90710
Please send me the new Craftool brochure on Potter's
Wheels & related Ceramics Equipment, (If a teacher, please use school a d d r e s s ) .
NAME
SCHOOL
ADDRESS
CITY, STATE, ZIP.
January 1976 17
the most versatile kickwheel yet
portable
Assembles in 15 minutes
Total weight 260 Ibs.
Disassembled, fits into small car
reliable
(
,
14"aluminum wheel head
Tubular steel frame
Double reinforced, edge-weighted
concrete kickwheel
flexible
Adjustable seat
Legs adjust for uneven floor
convenient
Durable formica countertop
available in three
different colors
Wheel head, splash pan and
countertop easily remove
for cleaning
M o t o r attachment available
arlos Frey Potters Wheels
Designed and built by a potter
Distributed by Mid-America A r t Studio
18
CERAMICS MONTHLY
7th & Logan, Wayne, Nebraska 68787 Phone: 402/375-4141
Answers to
QUESTIONS
Conducted
by the C M
~
I ant interested in preparing my ou'n ocerglazes. Do you
know o[ any base recipes [or experimentation? What is the
usual temperature range [or overglaze decoration?--M.P.
Overglaze decoration is usually fired from 1250 to 1450°F,
a n d C o n e 018 is a good starting point for experimentation.
Parmelee lists the following recipes for overglaze bases:
Boric Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
235~
Red L e a d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
1005~
T h i s base is useful for additions of cobalt oxide for bright blues,
a n d iron oxide for reds, Because of the significant lead content.
it should not be used on surfaces which m a y come in contact
with food. A lead-free recipe is:
Boric Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
655>
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
100c,#
T h i s base is particularly useful w h e n p r o d u c i n g pale or turquoise
greens.
Self-formulated overglaze m a y be fritted with a colorant or
stain, a n d this is carried out experimentally with the same
m e t h o d s outlined in R i c h a r d Behrens's article " M a k i n g Your O w n
Frits," ( S e p t e m b e r 1974 C M ) . Alternatively, the base m a y be
fritted w i t h o u t colorants, or a commercial low-temperature frit
m a y be substituted for the overglaze base. Ferro frits 31 I0 a n d
Technical Stall
3191 are t ~ o lead-free commercial silicates with
within a useful overglaze range. While raw bases
without fritting, they should be wet milled with the
m a y prove s o m e w h a t less reliable where soluble
involved in the composition.
fusion points
m a y be used
colorant, a n d
materials are
What happens chemically during glaze de~'itri[ication, and
how can this be controlled? Is there anything that can be
done with a whole kiln full o[ such a'are?--M.N.
Devitrification is a p h e n o m e n o n which occurs d u r i n g cooling
of the kiln, a n d in which the glaze components separate from the
fluid state to form micro- a n d macro-crystals. Both zinc silicate
and calcium borate types are c o m m o n . Even if the glaze does not
appear to contain sufficient materials for devitrification, they
m a y be leached from the clay body. Increasing the a l u m i n a or
silica content (or both) m a y be helpful in controlling devitrification: lowering calcium, barium, m a g n e s i u m , zinc, or similar
oxides m a y also succeed. While devitrification m a y produce
interesting effects, quantities of undesirably devitrified ware can
sometimes be salvaged by retiring to a higher temperature.
All subscriber inquiries are gicen individual attention at C M ;
and, out o[ the many received, those of general interest are
selected [or answer in this column. Direct your inquiries to the
Questions Editor, CERAX~ICS MONTI-IL',', Box 12448, Columbus,
Ohio 43212. Please enclose a stamped, sel[-addressed envelope.
ROVlN
e.YzRt~ll(6
]anuary
1976
19
Fire, Earth, and Water
Photos: The Fine.Arts Museums01 San Francisco
Right House group with ten [igures,
approximately 9 x 13 inches, Nayarit, Mexico.
The roo[ and walls are intricately decorated,
~uggestin.t~ a ceremonial rather than a
domestic gathering.
Right, below Incensario, two-part incense
burner with holloa' sha[t handle, 11 x 17 inches,
Nayarit, Mexico.
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco, more than 150 objects of pre-Columbian
Mesoamerican sculpture were on display July 4 through
September 14 at the California Palace of the Legion of
Honor. Compiled from the collection of Mr. and Mrs.
Lewis K. Land, the "Fire, Earth, and Water" exhibition
contained plain and polychrome ceramic vessels and effigy
forms as well as objects in jade and worked stone. Presented from the Jalisco-Colima area of western Mexico
were burial objects--representations of things needed for
the afterlife; from the Olmec area of eastern Mexico--
characteristically lifelike sculpture of human figures.
Central Mexico was represented by the controlled forms
of Teotihuacan and Monte Alban, in contrast to the
curvilinear style of Mayan sculpture from Yucatan and
Guatemala. This assemblage of artifacts, on view to the
public for the first time, was complemented by an audiovisual presentation of pre-Columbian architecture.
Currently featured through March 14 at the Honolulu
Academy of Art, Hawaii, the show will also be presented
at the Seattle Art Museum, Washington. from April 15
through June 27.
Polychrome bowl with painted figures on interior, 8 inches in diameter, Guatemala. The
vessel was broken in ancient times and m e n d e d by drilling small holes on either side o[ the
break which allowed the pieces to be tied together. This repair gives some indication that
the z'e~sel zcas ~'aluable to the .~laya and zcorth saz'in~.
t~
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Top Smiling [ace mold and modern cast; mold-10 x 15 inches, cast--9 x 14 inches; Veracruz,
~lIexico.
Center Trophy head bowl, approximatel y 7 x 8
inches, ]alisco, Mexico.
Bottom Tripod bowl, 9 inches in diameter,
Veracruz, Mexico.
January 1976
21
~ , ~ , ~ i ~ ~
~.
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~~
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Eight [igures and burial urn; [rom 8 to 9 inches in
height, urn with geometric bands o[ incising is 10 inches
in height; Colima, Mexico. The [igures are said to have
been [ound inside the urn, and none are constructed to
stand unsupported. One is made [rom an almost white
clay while the others are nearly bull.
Female [igure with white body
paint, approximately 11 inches
i~ h~'i~,ht. Michoacan, Mexico.
22
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Duck vessel with spout at back,
7 inches in height, Colima, Mexico.
Circular canteen with side spout,
approximately 5 inches in diameter,
Colima, Mexico.
~i~ ~!~i+i~i+i~i~!ii~iii~iii~ii~ii~i~!i]ii~iiiiii~i~i~!~!~!i~i~!i~ii~i~
~
Above Brasier with serpent moti/ handle, approximately
18 inches in length, Teotihuacan, AIexico.
Right Two seated "'mourners," 7 ~ and 9 inches in
height respectively, Jalisco, Mexico.
Seated drummers, 2 to 4 inches in height, Colima,
.l[~'~ico. T h c ta'o sr~laller .forms are also zchistles.
Pioneers o[ Contemporary
American Ceramics
Arthur Baggs
Glen Lukens
by ELAINE LEVlN
IN TODAY'S WORLD of rapid communication, it is difficult
to imagine the environment of the arts during the early
1900's. The various publications we know today--books,
magazines, and newspapers--that provide the artist with
the most current information on exhibits, new ideas, and
techniques, were, in that period, either nonexistent or in
the earliest stages of development.
In this atmosphere Arthur Eugene Baggs began his
career in ceramics. No doubt his cheerful,
optimistic personality helped him pursue the
goals of elevating public taste in design,
while researching problems in ceramics at a
time when there was very little information
or money for such projects.
It is fitting that Arthur Baggs would carry
on the standards set by Charles Binns of the
New York State College of Ceramics at
Alfred University. Baggs was born in Alfred,
New York, and graduated from the university as a student of Binns's. He said of his
teacher, "From him I got my initial enthusiasm about ceramics as an interesting job."
While the world in 1905 was not eagerly
looking for a young ceramics graduate, New
York City offered Baggs a dual opportunity
to continue his studies in design at the Art
Students League, and also to teach. He
found part-time assignments at the Ethical
Culture School and the School of Design
and Liberal Arts. However, his first real
challenge in ceramics came with an offer to
organize and direct the Marblehead Pottery
in Marblehead, Massachusetts.
Arthur Baggs (1886-1947). His technical
research and willingness to share discovery
advanced the knowledge o/ceramic processes
in an era when such in[ormation was either
nonexistent or in the earliest stages o/
development.
24
CERAMICS MONTHI,Y
Today it might be called picturesque, but in 1906,
the coastal town of Marblehead had the look of an unpretentious, weather-beaten fishing village. It was also
the home of some forgotten people, mental patients in a
sanatorium under the care of Dr. Herbert J. Hall. Hall
must have been a man in advance of the times since he
conceived the idea of a handicrafts program--woodcarving, weaving, and pottery--to give his patients an opportunity to "learn again gradually and without haste to use
the hand and the brain in a normal, wholesome way."
He soon discovered that the technical requirements for a
pottery were beyond simple craftsmanship. However, since
clay was available in the immediate vicinity and a beginning had been made, a separate, commercially run pottery
seemed the next logical step. An individual of high
standards, Dr. Hall would have nothing less than an
outstanding recent graduate of the foremost school of
ceramics to direct his production. Arthur Baggs went to
work for the Marblehead Pottery in 1908.
At the beginning of this century, there were many
potteries across the country producing ceramics in a wide
range of standards and designs. Frequently, what began
as a desire to create a product of high artistry, often had
to yield to the demands of public taste to continue production. Perhaps an understanding of this kind of pressure, as well as the physical and financial limitations of
the existing pottery, determined that Baggs would work
in Marblehead on a relatively small scale, turning this
feature into an asset. The pottery had one kickwheel, a
turning lathe, and a 6-burner kerosene kiln. With three
designers, one decorator, a man to do the throwing, and
another man to stack and fire the kiln, Baggs and his
fellow workers managed a weekly output of over 200
pieces, including decorated tiles. In those days, that represented a value of five hundred dollars a week. Simple,
straight-sided shapes were predominant with muted matt
colors closely related in tone. The motifs usually reflected
their New England seacoast environment with simple
abstract and geometric patterns which complemented the
sparse shapes and heavy clay body. The colors--gray,
green, blue, and brownish yellow--like the houses of
Marblehead, belonged to shore places.
Vases and bowl forms were thrown and decorated by
hand according to preestablished patterns set by Baggs
and two other designers. It was a compromise between
hand labor and industrialization and seemed to keep the
pottery away from a factory approach. This arrangement
and the small staff enabled individual workers to have a
voice in the production of each piece. Dr. Hall writes of
Arthur Baggs's direction of all elements in the pottery as
a "strong and sure touch . . . seen everywhere and his
attainments in matt glaze decorations are the sine qua
non of the pottery."
With the pottery functioning efficiently in the hands
of capable assistants, Baggs continued his teaching, returning to Marblehead each summer to reevaluate designs
and shapes and plan for the coming year. He extended
his own education and teaching assignments to the Cleveland School of Art, obtaining a master's degree in 1928.
His interests in the problems of production pottery led
him to an association with Guy Cowan (a former fellow
student at Alfred University) in the Cowan Pottery
Studios at Rocky River, Ohio.
Ohio is a state with a long history of
ceramic production, logically becoming one
of the first locations to foster an academic
approach to ceramics. In 1894, Edward
Orton Jr. established a ceramic engineering
"~ department at Ohio State University, offering a college degree in the subject, and
emphasizing the technolocy of ceramics and
its use in industry. By 1927, the need for
improving the design of ceramic products
caused the department to initiate a program
~ to train designers for the industry. With his
.~ knowledge of production problems as well
as his work in design, Arthur Baggs was a
logical choice as professor of fine arts. University teaching presented Baggs with a
unique opportunity, not only to establish a
department according to what he felt were
the needs of industry, but also to fulfill the
requirements of a new generation of pottery
students in the tradition of his mentor,
Charles Binns. In order to accomplish his
~oals he sought a competent staff. Edgar
Littlefield, a graduate of the O.S.U. ceramic
engineering department, joined him in 1929.
x
i
Glen Lukens (1887-1967). He helped to
develop the aesthetic and technical direction
which later emerged as the West Coast
movement in ceramic art.
January 1976
25
~,. 2 . ~-~ ~ ~ f
4"
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Carlton Atherton, a former pupil of Adelaide Robineau's
at Syracuse University, began teaching courses in ceramics
design and history in 1930.
The laboratory under Baggs's direction functioned like
the old guild workshops. Instructors were there to assist
students with problems, but also to do their own work
so that students learned both from personal projects
and from the instructors' accomplishments. Continuing
Charles Binns's philosophy of sharing research results,
there were no secrets or private glazes. Baggs wished to
introduce his students to the fundamentals of art, art
history, the technology of clay, and to furnish a wellequipped shop in which to explore. Most of all he hoped
to encourage individual initiative and experimental work,
"as long as useful knowledge and experience in regard to
the behavior of materials seems likely to result." His
patience, open-mindedness, and accessibility seemed to
promote the confidence of his students. "Mr. Baggs presents himself with no display. Humility and kindliness are
among his chief characteristics."
Money for the research he hoped to pursue was difficult
to find, but in 1932, with a grant from the Rockefeller
Foundation, he began to explore patterns for reproduction
in decalcomania on tableware. It was the first time this
type of research had been tried in the United States.
Specific patterns were produced for souvenir plates for
Chicago's Century of Progress Exposition. He was con26
CERAMICS
MONTHLY
vinced his students and industry would profit from the
establishment of a pilot plant at the university; commercial ideas could be continually tested, and students would
have an opportunity to apply their fine arts background
to an industrial situation, thus elevating product design.
Much of Baggs's research concerned the solution of
problems he had encountered in his years with production
potteries. The potential industrial uses of self-glazing clay
bodies led him to work toward a viable formula for
Egyptian paste. The ancient Egyptians made brilliant
turquoise-colored beads from a mixture of powdered flint
pebbles and soda obtained in dried alkaline lake deposits.
Baggs was intrigued by the fact that the soluble salts in
the clay came to the surface as the paste dried and formed
a glazelike covering when fired. He experimented with
the idea as a simple form of glazing, creating bands of
color from soluble salts.
Salt-glazing, another process with industrial possibilities,
was a popular technique with American potters from the
1800's to about 1875, when other products began to supplant salted ware. No one had looked at salt-glazing as an
interesting or beautiful surface until Arthur Baggs began
to work with it. His most famous piece of salt-glazing, a
sturdy cookie jar, won first prize (one of many awards he
received for his art) at the 7th Ceramic National Exhibition of 1938, sponsored by the Syracuse Museum of Art.
Charles Binns had always emphasized to his students
;?
Far left A selection of Glen
Lukens's earthenware plates and
bowls with crackle glazes.
Left Salt-glazed cookie jar by
Arthur Baggs. Perhaps his most
well-known work, it won first
prize at the 7th Ceramic
National Exhibition of 1938.
the need to understand and control every element in the
ceramic process. His own experiments with glazes provided students with a much clearer understandin g of the
function of each element in a formula. Arthur Baggs took
this training several steps further, becoming known for his
success in controlling one particular type of glaze--coppe r
red. After extensive experimentat ion, he and Edgar Littlefield discovered that silicon carbide introduced into a
glaze formula would act as a reducing agent in an oxidizing kiln; the compound breaks down to carbon and
silica when the glaze melts, robbing oxygen elements from
copper to produce reds. They published a paper describing their glaze results and formulas in the Journal of the
American Ceramic Society, thus enabling others to build
from their work.
After World War II, the pilot plant Baggs envisioned
seemed on the verge of reality. Unfortunatel y, in 1947,
as the necessary elements of funding and space materialized, Arthur Baggs died, and with him the leadership
of the project. However, his dedication to ceramics and
twenty years of teaching produced a legacy which continues to have an impact on contemporary ceramics.
As Baggs is identified with the eastern United States,
Glen Lukens, working in California, created pottery and
a climate for pottery, termed "Southwest," that confirmed
its distance from the east.
Glen Lukens was born in Cowgill, Missouri, in 1887,
into a family that had left the Kentucky hills for better
farmland further west. His early education was in Missouri and though he later proclaimed he was not a good
student--"no t one school I ever went to was proud to
claim m e ' - - h e received a bachelor of science degree
from Oregon State Agricultural College in 1921.
Something happened to Lukens's post-graduate plans
that turned him from farming the soil to modeling it into
ware. A year after graduating he was in Chicago, attending the Art Institute's ceramics classes. There, a potter's
wheel he constructed from a sewing machine base performed so well that the United States Surgeon General's
office became interested. Rehabilitatio n programs for the
wounded of World War I were being formulated by that
department and included instruction in pottery. Lukens's
wheel became a useful tool in restoring crippled hand
muscles and serving as therapy for psychotic and neurotic
patients. He left the Art Institute to work for several years
in soldiers' hospitals.
By 1924, Lukens was in Southern California teaching
crafts and ceramics on the secondary and junior college
levels, spending summers taking advanced courses in
pottery. For his sabbatical year in 1931, he went to Europe, primarily to see the pottery of Italy and Germany.
A side trip to the British Museum in London introduced
him to the brilliant blue beads of ancient Egyptian paste
jewelry. While Arthur Baggs's interest in Egyptian paste
January 1976
27
was in its self-glazing quality, Lukens was fascinated by
the intensity of the color. Death Valley, a day's drive
from his classroom, contained alkaline deposits similar to
those in the deserts of Egypt. When he returned from
Europe he began the first of many trips to the dry lake
beds of Death Valley. Mixing the alkaline substances he
found there with a clay containing copper, a paste was
formed that turned a blue color in a low-fire kiln. Making
beads from his paste he reproduced necklaces closely
resembling the Egyptian originals and by so doing attracted a great deal of public attention, subsequently
exhibiting his work at the Golden Gate International
Exposition in San Francisco.
While Ohio State University's ceramics department had
emerged out of the needs of industry for improved design,
it was the pressure of teacher interest in ceramic techniques that led the college of architecture at the University of Southern California to add a department of
ceramics to the fine arts division. Lukens's background
in teaching and research fit the department's needs.
Although the courses would initially be designed for
teachers, Lukens was already committed to the use of
native California clays and glaze ingredients. It was easy
for him to coordinate ceramics with an architectural philosophy "that was also searching for an expression and a
form that reflected the environment of California and
Right Under the direction o[ Arthur Baggs,
Marblehead Pottery produced a variety of
ware with simple shapes and designs such
as this vase.
Far right Earthenware bowl with fluid
crackle glaze, by Glen Lukens, 1940.
28
CERAMICS MONTHLY
the West. Lukens was also intrigued by the possibilities
for ceramics intimately coordinated with architectural
design. As he wrote, "Architecture has always been a good
pacemaker for the ceramist, and architecture today, with
its new methods, its varied use of mechanical devices, and
its new vocabulary of proportions, is gradually and surely
creating new needs in the ceramics field." The craftsman,
he felt, must be flexible and ready to adapt to these "new
structural materials and forms of new houses and to the
ever-changing modes and manners of the people who
live in them."
Lukens's first step was to create a department that gave
the student the necessary technical information and skill,
and he brought with him an improved design for his
potter's wheel constructed from a sewing machine base.
Acquiring skill at the wheel, as well as handbuilding and
using molds, were the basics of the course. He emphasized
working directly on clay rather than sketching ideas first.
"This direct method . . . leads to the spiritualization of
the medium and . . . the forms (the student) builds take
on the quality of life. They are no longer things. They
become the incarnation of an idea." His goal was to
encourage "the embryo artist . . . to follow his own tastes
in creation, building modern ceramic shapes with emphasis on line, form, and methods of surface enrichment."
The study of glazes became more and more important
He trains his emotions." He was telling them not to copy
another tradition, not to imitate the expressions of others,
but to look within themselves for their own way.
Glen Lukens's work gained national recognition when
his rough forms and brightly colored crackle glazes took
first prize in the Ceramic National Exhibition in Syracuse
in 1936. His work was also chosen to represent the Pacific
West in the Paris International Art Exhibit of 1937.
Oregon State College, his alma mater, awarded the
ceramist a degree of doctor of science and ceramics in
1939. However, he was probably most pleased with the
first all-California Ceramic Art Exhibition of 1938 as a
concrete example of new directions by West Coast potters.
He had worked diligently with other southern California
teacher/crafts men to develop artistic standards and the
reviews of the exhibition confirmed his hopes. "This
exhibition means that the Pacific Coast ceramic child
is able to walk alone." Lukens's conviction that architecture and ceramics should be partners in California
living was also substantiated by work in the exhibition.
In the words of one critic, "We may hope that the time
of nondescript art objects is passing . . . . "
By 1940, Lukens's very distinctive expression in ceramics
had been on exhibit coast to coast, in a one-man show in
New York, at the Honolulu Gallery of Fine Arts, and
featured at the New York World's Fair in a specially
to him, both in terms of his classes and also for his own
work. What began as a search for the secret of Egyptian
turquoise blue led him back to the desert of Death Valley
and later to other areas in the Southwest for additional
minerals he could test in and on clay. He developed glazes
he romantically named "Death Valley Yellow," "Mojave
Golden Amber," and "Mesa Blue." As explorations took
him further into Arizona and New Mexico he began
taking an interest in the pottery of the Southwest Indians.
Perhaps what struck him first was the way they lived,
their "never ending battle with the elements," as he
phrased it. This condition of life may have reminded him
of his own family's struggle with the land. His father had
once observed that Glen's attraction to clay "was the
clay hills still speaking, only that (I) . . . had tried to
grow corn from what (Glen) . . . was using to make
pottery." Whatever the reason, his fascination for the
area deepened when he met the writer, Mary Austin, in
Santa Fe. Lukens felt his personal creative art education
began at that moment because she communicate d the real
meaning of creativity. Instead of cleverness which he felt
his school education had emphasized, Mary Austin taught
him to be natural, honest, and sincere--the qualities she
saw in the past of New Mexico, in the Pueblo and Navajo
cultures. Lukens translated these experiences into teaching. He told his students, "One does not train his clay.
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designed outdoor living room. Quite apparent in the
displays was his interest in color. He had progressed from
an attraction to deep turquoise blue to a whole palette
of intense, luminous glaze colors for earthenware. He felt
colorful pottery in the home played a psychological role.
"Color relaxes the senses, making people work more
leisurely. The mind is at ease and although it is active,
it is at rest."
When the United States entered World War II, ceramics at the University of Southern California took on
a new aspect. Metals basic to the war effort became
unavailable for housewares. Substitutions had to be made,
and clay with a little help from Glen Lukens, stepped
into the void. He returned to Death Valley for talc, combined it with earthenware clay and potash, creating clay
skillets, baking pans, and pots that were resistant to thermal shock, breakage, and the cracking caused by rapid
heating. Aesthetics were not neglected in the pursuit of
function with the result that some of the designs produced
at that time by Lukens and his students are still evident
in much of the ware being produced today.
Crafts as therapy returned to importance in post-war
work with wounded soldiers, as they had after World
War I. Lukens developed a course in occupational therapy, using the many resources of the university as well as
the ceramics laboratory. This time there would be a
noticeable difference from the type of training Lukens
knew after World War I. He sought a professionalis m
for the therapists and a program for patients that would
improve physical ability while training them for creative,
economic independence . His ideas became the basis for
rehabilitation programs today.
Lukens faced his most difficult assignment in 1945
when he took a leave of absence from the university to
work in Haiti for the United States Government under
the auspices of the Inter-Americ an Education Council.
Replying to a request by the Haitian government, he left
for Port au Prince to develop a pottery industry. Prior
to his arrival, pottery making was not a part of Haitian
culture; the poor of the countryside used readily available
gourds for their household needs. Since gourds could not
be properly cleaned after use, they bred germs and attracted insects, adding to the health problems of poverty.
The purchase of an ordinary glazed pottery bowl for
household use was out of the question for the Haitian
laborer earning thirty cents a day. One solution was to
teach Haitians how to make pottery from available materials for their own use.
Lukens began by training fifty men and women in the
capitol's vocational schools. His students learned to test
native clays for useful qualities and to build simple kilns
suitable for construction in rural areas. He experimented
with materials indigenous to Haiti, using a mixture of
30
CERAMICS MONTHLY
native clays for cooking ware, making modeling tools of
local mahogany and orange wood, substituting vines for
sponges, making molds for tableware from calabash
gourds, and brushes from sisal. Besides teaching those who
would train others, he visited many remote areas, helping
villagers fire the pottery he taught them to make and
demonstratin g how to glaze the insides of cooking pots
adapted for use on their charcoal-burn ing stoves.
Although he returned to the university after a year's
leave, Glen Lukens felt his work in Haiti had just begun.
He was far from establishing a viable industry for the
country, but it was not until 1952 that he was able to
obtain the funding to continue this work. He returned
to Haiti as technical advisor for the International Labor
Organization (a division of the United Nations), this
time bringing kilns and equipment. Though there were
many disappointme nts and seemingly insurmountab le
obstacles, he found the Haitian people warm and friendly, willing to try whatever he suggested. As he wrote a
friend, "The work here is wonderful. Every day reveals
a new experience in teaching where emotion and instinct
are the outlet as well as the approach to learning . . . . "
Moreover, he had always felt each project gave him an
opportunity to learn. This was certainly true of his work
in Haiti. " I t seems impossible to write about the miracles
of achievement which occur daily on the barren hillsides
in Haiti. One thing I am certain o f - m y own educational
life is beginning all over again; here, one can be natural."
While money continued to be a problem, the Southern
California Division of the American Ceramic Society as
well as his friends collected additional funds to help finish
his work when the U.N. could no longer support the
project. Before leaving Haiti, he managed to develop
eleven training and pottery production centers.
Glen Lukens returned to the United States in 1953 to
a new series of involvements . Serious problems with
arthritis which had been held at bay under the warm
Haitian sun, surfaced to plague him so severely that he
had to give up pottery. He returned to glass, always his
parallel interest, and did extensive experimentat ion in
developing colors. A method of slumping glass which he
perfected is now a standard procedure.
Writing about pottery began with Lukens's first teaching assignment, so it was natural for him to continue to
write for various publications. No undertaking, if it meant
helping people, was too small. At age 77, he could still
be useful to the Peace Corps, describing conditions corpsmen would face in Haiti.
By the time of his death at the age of 80, a style he
had initiated had progressed in ways he could not foresee
but could claim as his own. California pottery by 1967
was a distinct entity, making a special contribution to the
history of American ceramics.
Twelve GermanCeramists
by HILDEGARDSTORR-BRITZ
MODERN GERMAN CERAMISTS are almost unknown in the
}Vestern Hemisphere since distance makes participation
in exhibitions both difficult and expensive.
Contemporary craftsmen of Germany can generally be
categorized in groups by their affiliations with certain
production trends. The traditional ceramist puts the most
emphasis on technical perfection of form and glaze,
European in derivation, striving to recreate objects regarded as good rather than aiming at innovation.
Another group of ceramists sees their ideal in the wellshaped functional pot complemented with delicate glazes,
many of East Asian origin. They build upon glaze research developed by technologists in the beginning of this
century. In addition, the modern potters of this school
use Asian ash glazes introduced by Bernard Leach.
The third trend in contemporary German ware is
borne out by those potters who are influenced neither by
the traditional European nor the East Asian ceramics.
They search for new ways and possibilities of expressing
their thoughts. Many of these craftsmen were first trained
as sculptors or painters and only later discovered the
clay medium. Present-day ceramics in Italy and the
United States have encouraged the unconventional opinions of these artists.
The course of ceramic development in Europe is represented by an uninterrupted history from the earliest times
to its present position in society. Ceramists entering the
craft even today are schooled in traditional methods. The
potters' guild functions as it did in the Middle Ages, and
continues to supervise the education of apprentices. After
a 3-year period of training with a master potter, they
are eligible to take the apprentice examination; then they
serve four years more before they can take the examination as a master potter. The alternative training process
is education in a ceramics school, or in an academy of
art. This academic concept more closely resembles the
educational situation in the United States.
The following survey of twelve contemporary German
ceramists illustrates the interrelated evolution of training
and its influence on modern production:
Ingeborg and Bruno Assho[[ were trained as apprentices,
but freed themselves from tradition. Early forms were
thrown and modified shapes full of contrasts--wide
bodies contracting to slender necks, often with slip,
brushwork, or stamp impressions emphasizing proportions. Complementing these fragile elegant forms were
rustic glazes, some with rough surfaces. Currently they
make ceramic montages or sculpture by throwing a basic
form in various sizes and joining related units into group
compositions. Their work often depicts fantasy, and generally may be classified with the type of forms which prepared the way for modern expression.
Heiner Balzar is a second generation master potter from
a family which originally became known for salt-glazed
ware. Moving away from local tradition, he has developed
Johannes Gebhardt ; "'Layer Construction," handbuilt
[orm o[ grogged clay, approximately 10 inches wide by
35 inches in height. His shapes have an organic
appearance.
January 1976
31
feldspar, ruffle, and titanium glazes for use in a salt kiln.
These recipes, partially matt and partially glossy, accentuate selected areas of ware, and are suited to Balzar's
thick-rimmed shapes with rustic feet.
Antje Bruggemann unites her apprentice training and
academic art studies to make handbuilt pots, square or
triangular forms which she splits vertically so that the
fissure constitutes an aesthetic element of the piece.
Thrown ware is modified and combined to form new
shapes and montages. Some pieces appear like cloth
draped over pots or square-shaped objects, and the effect
of trees and meadows in a landscape is created by mounting small clay particles on a tile background.
Mauriee de Coulon forms ceramics associated with processes of nature. His themes are the development and
growing of forms combined with simultaneous explosion
and breakup. De Coulon places a quiet plane in contrast
to zones of eruption in split areas; borders and rims of
cracks appear fragile and crumbly like rusty metal. Reliefs, some as large as seven by three feet, are assembled
as horizontally or vertically divided parts. Having begun
with traditional ware, de Coulon has now found an individual and technical direction.
Dieter Crumbiegel started his career as a painter, then
trained as a teacher of art, accidentally finding clay as a
medium for expression. He now teaches ceramics in the
Staatliche Fachschule fur Keramic in Hohr-Grenzhausen.
Pot-sculpture and wall reliefs comprise the core of his
production. Wall reliefs constructed from irregularly
broken pieces of tile are assembled in layers. Central in
these compositions are contrasts of closed-in and openedup planes, large and small structured areas, and contrasting directions of diagonals in shades of white, brown,
dark blue, and black.
Johannes Gebhardt teaches as a professor of art in the
Muthesius-Schule in Kiel. His training was divided among
the skills of ceramics, drawing, and painting. In wall
tiles and reliefs, he creates eroded forms, giving a broken
effect of violent action. A rough black-and-brown clay
treated with slip contributes to the organic appearance
of these forms. Some of his pieces are designated as "bud"
pots; their surfaces remind one of white-gray shells, as
he uses porcelain material mixed with fine grog, firing to
near translucency at Seger Cone 10.
Walburga Kulz trained with Otto Lindig, master potter
of the Bauhaus, and later took the master potter's examination. She initially formed functional pots, keeping to
basic geometric shapes, and subsequently has turned to
sculptural objects. She begins with a concrete idea
which she names, for example, "nightfrog," then develops
this motif into a symbolic sign. The forms are assembled
!!i
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Right Hildegard Storr-Britz;
"'Abstraction," reduction[ired ceramic painting in light
green, light brown, gray, and
black glazes, 13 x 18 inches.
The artist's glaze compositions
are usually abstract, but
symbolic.
Below Walter Popp; assembled
wheel-thrown vase, approximately 10 inches in height,
stoneware. Popp uses both
oxidation and reduction [irings
to complement his potsculpture.
Below, right Robert Sturm;
sculptural [orm with graygreen glaze, 15 x 18 inches.
He employs handbuilding
techniques to meld abstract
geometric elements, with
solid areas opposing hollow
ones and planes against ridges
in various directions.
Left Dieter Crumbiegel;
"'Cubic Pot," 14 inches wide.
His handbuilt constructions
[requently have rhomboid
shapes and structured sur[aces
accented with contrasting
planes o[ ash and temmoku
glazes.
~!~°~*~ T ~ ~
~'" ~
~ii
Ingeborg and Bruno Asshoff ; vases
with rough textured glazes, 7 and 20
inches in height.
Roll Overberg; slab-built vase with green ash glaze,
5 inches in height. Overberg's sculpture is often formed
from a cube, modeled, cut, and drilled to achieve detail.
Walburga Kulz:
"Gliding Balls,"
fantasy form
with pink glaze,
18 inches in
height. Object
ideas are the
artist's current
interest.
Maurice de Coulon; relief disk montage, 44 x 28 inches.
lle prefers earth tones and shades of blue.
from pieces thrown on the wheel. To accent the construction of forms, she glazes with fine color, matching
nuances and often using brushwork to make points or
graphic effects.
Rol/ Overberg produces functional pots, pictorial reliefs,
and sculpture. Basic geometric shapes are changed by
splitting or adding other forms. Some vases have double
walls, and delicate rims. A common image in his reliefs
is the open book, in which a thin sheet of clay is imprinted in the manner of a newspaper page. On tiles.
he layers slip so thickly that it becomes an ornament in
itself.
Walter Popp throws contrasting forms on the wheel, then
joins them to make new shapes--individual parts remain
distinctive. Basic shapes are completed with asymmetrical
openings bv which his pot-sculpture has no harmonic
34
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Left Heiner Balzar ; vapor-glazed
vases, taller vase--14 inches in
height. He uses feldspar, rutiIe,
and titanium glazes in a salt kiln.
Below Antje Bruggemann; two-
part pot. Fragmentary forms such
as the skeleton impression of
fibers or veins of a leaf embellish
surfaces, and texture is accented
with color schemes of white,
black, and gray-brown. She fires
in reduction to Seger Cone 10
with an electric kiln.
i
+
balance in the traditional sense. Colored planes of glaze
point out contrast on individual thrown pieces. His abstract figurines are intellectual forms of which the functional aspect is secondary. He prefers ash glazes of the
same type used by Bernard Leach, and calls himself a
pupil of Leach although he has never met him.
Hildegard Storr-Britz did not start in the traditional way
as a potter, but studied at the State School for Ceramics,
afterward completing studies in the university and fine
arts academy before taking the master potter's examination. She taught design and decoration for more than
thirty years in the State School for Ceramics, HohrGrenzhausen, and also maintained a private studio, recently turning to painting with glaze on bisque-fired tile.
The rich textures and colors of reduction-fired glazes are
a unique means of establishing abstract themes, and she
often uses contrasts of blue and red, violet and yellow,
and black and white. Gloss and matt glazes are combined on the same object with linear effects on
opposing surfaces.
Robert Sturm was a sculptor until he met ceramist
Walter Popp and was introduced to the clay medium.
Continuing his affiliation with three-dimensional representations he handbuilds pots and objects out of groggy
clay slabs, creating tectonic graduated shapes full of
strength and architectural power. Parallels in forms are
joined in contrasts full of tensions, while surfaces of pieces
are varied by adding structures in relief. Monochrome,
stonelike glazes are sometimes used in lines or areas as a
contrapoint on sculptural forms.
One can never say that a few artists are representative
of a nation. But one can say that these ceramists are
personalities who can make definite contributions to the
development of the medium.
January 1976
35
t~t
Bag Images
Photos: Philip Galgiani
A ONE-MAN EXHIBITIONof recent work by Vernon Patrick
was presented at the Quay Ceramics Gallery, San Francisco, California, from October 7 through November I.
The ceramist bases his stoneware sculpture on the image
of the brown paper bag. Pressing the wet clay into molds
taken from actual paper bags, he achieves realism against
the paradox of simulating paper with a hard, resistant
material. The exhibition included several wall pieces
ba~ed on unfolded paper bags, and a series of bags dealing
with ceramics in a more classical style through abstract
expressionism to the present use of low-fire lusters.
";)'%
Right, above "'Minimal Bags," stoneware, I 1 x 15 x 8
inches.
,i¢
Right "'Paper Bag Stairway to Success," stoneware.
approximately 27 x 15 x 11 inches.
Below "'Low-[ire B a g, "~ stoneware, approximately
18 x 14 x 6 inches.
¢
36
CERAMICS MO.NTHLY
A King's Collection
Photos: Museum o] Far Eastern Antiquities
GUSTAV VI ADOLF, late King of Sweden, collected Chinese
art throughout his lifetime, a selection of which was displayed through September 1975 at the Museum of Far
Eastern Antiquities in Stockholm. In regard to the works
which comprise the show, Douglas Barrett of The British
Museum, has commented, "There are two kinds of serious
collectors. The one, indifferent as to when or where they
were made, collects the things which satisfy his private
taste. Such collections are valuable for what they reveal
of the collector and of the society in which he lives. The
other kind of collector, no less passionate, is more thoughtful, judicious, and self-effacing. His collecting requires
not so much a strong, personal taste as simple taste: a
carefully cultivated sympathy for what is good of its kind
and best represents each phase of the life of a changing
culture. This is how museums collect or ought to collect.
And this is how the King of Sweden . . . has collected
for over sixty years the objects which express the endearing and richy varied personality of China."
Pottery tomb figure, partially covered with red paint,
T'ang dynasty, A.D. 618-906.
January 1976
37
Left Porcelain vase, 1I inches in
height, cloisonn~ design and violet-blue
glaze, Min~ dynasty, ca. A.D. 1500.
Right Gray pottery tomb [igure, 8
inches in length, partiaUy covered
with red paint over white slip, Wei
dynasty, A.I). 386-535.
Below Woman Head, painted clay,
Sung dynasty, A.D. 960-1279.
Below, right Ewer, northern temmoku
ware, dark slip and blackish brown
oil-spot glaze, Sung dynasty, A.D.
960-1279.
G
38
CERA~'IICS ]~'fONTII LY
Below, far right Porcelain dish with
blue underglaze design, T'ien Ch'i,
Ming dynasty, ca. A.D. 1500.
?! i ~ iiii ¸~
ii!iii~ ¸ i!i!i~i~i~
.[anuary 1976
39
ContemporaryClay
/
~
\
~-
i,.' }
\
Photos: Patrlcla Scott
TWENTY-ONE ARTISTS from across the country displayed
recent works in "Contemporary Clay," an invitational
ceramics exhibit held at California Institute of the Arts,
Valencia, September 13 through October 12. Those
showing included California potters Peter Voulkos,
Berkeley; Paul Soldner, Norm Hines, Harrison McIntosh,
David King, and Sal Perez, Claremont; Ralph Bacerra,
40
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Helen Watson, Michael and Magdalena Frimkess, Joe
Soldate, Phil Cornelius, and Jerry Rothman, Los Angeles
area; Sheldon Kaganoff and Michael Arntz, Santa Barbara; and R. Bret Price, Valencia. Representing other
regions of the country were Gail Hoag Savitz, Maine;
Karen Karnes, New York; Thom Collins, Colorado; Jim
Romberg, Idaho; and Jennifer Masterson, New Mexico.
t ,iy
Top Raku bottle with stopper, 30 inches in height, by
Jim Romberg.
Center Raku bottle, 3 [eet in height, by Sal Perez.
Bottom Co[[eepot and mug, 5 ~ and 9 inches in height
respectively, by Jerry Rothman.
Above "Blues Pot," 14 inches in diameter, by Michael
Frimkess. Thrown and extremely thin, this work sold
[or $5,000.
Opposite page Porcelain bowl, 23 inches in diameter,
by Ralph Bacerra.
January 1976
41
~'~
g
]ar, 20 inches in diameter and 16 inches in
height, by Michael and Magdalena Frimkess.
42
CERAMICSMONTHLY
, ~ ~,:
~
o
.~:~
i~2~
~
,
..... , .
Porcelain plate, 22 inches in diameter,
by David King.
: !i!ilill
4
Covered casserole, porcelain, 13 inches
in diameter, by Ralph Bacerra.
Salt-glazed incised [orm, 12 inches in height and 10
inches in diameter, by Thorn Collins.
]anuary 1976
43
• ,~.
,
¢~K~,~
,, , ~ , ~ , ~
~.~
-
Above "'Blue Garibaldi," stoneware plate, 22 inches in
diameter, by Norm Hines.
Center "'Form Drawing @ 1,'" 22 inches in height, by
Sheldon Kagano[[.
Far right "'Portrait o[ Spencer Tracy @ 1,'" high-[ire
porcelain plate, 20 inches in diameter, by R. Bret Price.
44
CERAMICSMONTHLY
::1
Raku platter, 21 inches in diameter, by
]ira Romberg.
"'Salamander Cactus Plate," 19 inches in
diameter, by Phil Cornelius.
I
january 1976
45
A Clay Mixing Technique
by
DANIEL TAGGART
Photos: Robert W. Cavenagh, Jr.
IcVHEN THE POTTERS OF CAPRICORNER, LTD.,
established
their crafts cooperative on an old farm five miles east of
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, they decided on an operating philosophy of self-sufficiency. Whenever possible, routine
tasks are accomplished without the aid of complicated
technology and energy-consuming equipment. In keeping
with this ethic, the many tons of clay used at the Capricorner pottery are mixed and wedged quickly and easily
using the ancient technique of foot pugging.
The simple method involves spreading dry clay on a
large smooth surface, adding water or slurry, and treading
the mixture into workable material. Specifically, the mixing area is a level expanse of concrete floor about ten
feet square; the concrete absorbs some moisture, is easy
to keep clean, and does not deteriorate with constant
wetting and drying. Other surfaces which might be used
for clay mixing are a smooth tile floor, a wood surface
covered with a tarpaulin, or even a child's plastic sandbox.
A dry batch is dumped onto the floor and the various
ingredients first mixed by hand. We have been using the
following clay body:
Stoneware Body (Cone 9)
A.P. Green Missouri Fireclay . . . . . . . . . . . .
100 parts
Cedar Heights Goldart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25-40
Cedar Heights Redart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20-25
Kentucky Ball Clay (O.M. # 4 ) . . . . . . . . .
25-40
Potash Feldspar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Initially weigh each of the ingredients, or measure the
batch by volume in pre-marked containers. We approximate various quantities by dumping directly from the
clay bags, having discovered that proportions of this
batch recipe are not critical.
When all ingredients have been hand-mixed on the
wedging surface, a shallow crater about five feet in
diameter is formed in the center of the pile and a quantity
of slurry or water is added to the depression. One person
then begins walking around the outside of the slurry mass,
carefully maintaining the outer wall of dry clay. Taking
many small steps, the treader spirals inward, reaching the
center of the pile in four or five revolutions. Then the
outer ten inches of wet clay is forced back into a central
pile and some of the dry clay evenly distributed over the
entire batch. The spiral mixing and gradual incorporation
of dry clay continues until the sticky mass becomes thick
and plastic---buoying up its processor. As the mixture
nears completion, of necessity, a more energetic dancing
motion is required to manipulate the clay. One can no
46
CERAMICS MONTHLY
longer pick up the outer rim of the flattened pile, and it
must be cut free with the outer edge of the foot, circling
the mound and freeing chunks of clay from the perimeter
of the mass. For the final incorporation, the remaining
dry clay is sprinkled carefully over the mound and the
cut rim chunks added as a third layer. At this point the
floor adjacent to the pile is scraped with a large putty
knife and any clay residue added to the central mass.
When the clay seems consistent, it is cut into 25-pound
chunks and placed in barrels to age.
At Capricorner, about 700 pounds of clay are mixed
each week--about an hour and a half of work for two
individuals. Good exercise, fun, not too strenuous, and a
method of considerable value to the small scale potter.
4. T h e p o t t e r walks a r o u n d the
slurry m a ~ . spirali~o, inward.
!i S!i ~i¸¸~
!i/~'~ii:!i ~
................
~
\
1. Ingredients are measured and
dumped on the [loor.
2. Materials are mixed by hand and a
shallow depression [ormed in the center.
3. Slurry or water is added to the
depression in the center o[ the pile.
5. T h e outer wet clay is [orced back
into a ~~'ntral pile.
6. Dry clay is redistributed over
the batch and spiralin~ repeated.
7. When clay is consistent, it is cut
in chunks and stored [or a,gi~.
:q
r
;~
!
!,~il.¸¸ ! i!iii!iiiiiiii~i
i~i~
~
,i ~. . . .
January 1976
47
Richmond Exhibition
Photos: Josephine
Coatsworth
A DIVERSE ARRAY OF ENTRIES in three categories--ceramics, fiber, and metalsIcomprised the Designer-Craftsman
'75 exhibition featured at the Richmond Art Center,
California, October 3 through November 16. Jurors Ruth
Asawa, David Gilhooley, Don Rich, and Barbara Shancroft screened nearly 900 entries by 382 artists before
selecting the final 121 craft objects. Among the 96 artists
whose work was displayed were 26 ceramists, with eight
of the 20 awards conferred in the ceramics section.
In the exhibition catalog, Art Center Curator J. T.
Soult elaborated on a point of some controversy stemming
from the stringent jurying and the critical nature of the
jurors' statement: "As in all competitive exhibitions the
group subjectivity of the jury prevails and must be respected. This year the jury was very severe in both action
and word. Their purpose in this severity, as they commented throughout the selection process, was not to
discourage, but to encourage craftspeople to constantly
strive for new directions and higher quality."
"Too Hot to Cool," [lash-[ired form, 20 inches in
diameter, by William Abright, San Anselmo, CaIi[ornia.
Right
Below Salt-glazed stoneware bowl, approximately 26
inches in diameter, by Lynn Maddox, Portola Valley,
Cali[ornia.
i
l,eft Lidded jar with burnished patina, dung-fired, 9
inches in height, by Charles Di Costanzo, Eureka,
California.
[
48
Right Set of blue and white, salt and pepper dogs, talc
clay body with low-[ire glazes, 4 inches in height,
by Tre Arenz, Oakland, California.
:
CERAMICS MONTHLY
~ i ~
i~
~ I ,~,
Craftsman's Fair of the Southern Highlands
Photos: Pat Rendleman
T~.VENTY CERAMISTS WERE REPRESENTED among 150 members of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild at their
annual fair October 21-25 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The
86 booths were visited by over 30,000 crafts enthusiasts
during the five days of the event. Ceramists concerned
that a recession economy might hurt sales were not justified in this belief, as sales increased nearly twenty per
cent over the 1974 fair. An effective yet positive approach
to reducing breakage in the members' exhibit areas were
signs, prominently displayed, stating "Thanks for not
handling the crafts." The next fair is scheduled for 1976
presentation in Knoxville, Tennessee.
I
J
Right Porcelain plate
with brush decoration,
approximately 9 inches
in diameter, by Jim
Sockwell, Spruce Pine,
North Carolina.
Far right Stoneware jar
with incising, by Charles
Counts, Rising Fawn,
Georgia.
50
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Right Stoneware bottle, approximately
8 inches in height, by Susan MasIowski,
Chester, West Virginia.
Far right Stoneware bottle with lea[
moti[, 28 inches in height, by Robert
Wagar, Vanceburg, Kentucky.
Czech Faience
Photos: ]itka ]anatkova, Ladislav Lapacek
ESSENTIALLY THE SAME EVERY~VHERE, tin-glazed pottery
is confusingly known by different names in different countries--majolica in Italy, faience in France, fayence in
Germany, and delftware in England. Ware of this type
may generally be recognized by its dense lead glaze,
opacified with tin oxide, and by the multi-colored surface
patterns in a variety of calcined colorant/flux pigments.
Among colorants commonly used on faience are cobalt
for blue, manganese for purple, copper for green, antimony for yellow, and iron for brick red.
Specific trends in design and morphology of ware make
possible the identification and study of faience traditions
unique to countries or geographical areas. It was as late
as about 1950 that researchers focused their interest on
works of Czech faience. This ware had hardly been heard
of before, though it belongs in the first stage to an important branch of craft and later to folk manufacture.
Italian faience probably came to Bohemia as early as
the late 14th century. At the beginning of the 16th century, faience articles were made in home workshops in
Kutna Hora and, perhaps, also in Prague, the method
of production probably introduced by Italian craftsmen
via Budapest, Tyrol, or south Germany.
In the years 1654-1800, the so-called Zitava faience
with light green background glaze and surface designs
painted with pyrolusite (the natural ore containing
manganese dioxide) was produced somewhere in the
north Bohemian, Saxon, Lusatian, and Silesian regions.
This ware consisted mainly of large bowl forms.
Production developed again in the Kutna Hora region
and in Prague in the 18th and 19th centuries, and it is
documented that no less than seven master craftsmen
were working in the area of Kutna Hora from 17601840. Other producers, mostly from Moravia, worked
for shorter periods in Bohemia, starting family traditions
in the production of faience.
Adapted [rom an English translation by "'Umeni a
Remesla,'" with original text by Vladimir Scheufler.
Above House Number, approximatel y
10 inches in diameter, by ]an Brozek,
Caslav, ca. 1850.
Above, right House Number
approximatel y 9 inches in diameter,
by ]an Brozek, ca. 1850.
Left Tile with the prophet Daniel,
approximatel y 6½ x 8 inches, Kutna
Hora, beginning of the 16th century.
Right Sugar bowl with lid,
approximatel y 5 inches in height, by
.[an Brozek, ca. 1870.
January 1976
53
2
\
i,
Below lug, approximatd y 10 ittches
in height, by Kuttenberg, Kutna
Hora, end o/ the Igth century.
Bottom photo shows artist's signature
on the base.
>
~i~. <
(
?
:7
!~ii ~¸¸~ ~....
i ii ?!L !~i! ~i~! :~
\
54
CERAMICS MONTt'I LY
lug, approximatel y 10 inches in height, made
at Nove Dvory or Caslav, early I9th century.
Far left
L e f t lug, approximatel y 11 inches in height, made at
Nove Dt'ory or CasIav, beginning o[ the 19th century.
]ug, approximatel y 9 inches in height, Kutna Hora
or Caslav region, ca. 1800.
Right
iiiiiil
Tablet with St. John o[ Nepomuk, approximatel y
1'~ ~ 19 inchc~. N~lfna l[~ra nr Ca~la~ rc~,~ior~,ca. IB30.
]ug, approximatel y 8 inches in height, Kutna Hora,
carI~' lGth ccTitur~'.
Right Beer mug, approximately 7 inches
in height, Kutna
Hora or Caslav region, earl), 19th century.
Below Faience box with cut decoration, approximately 6
inches in height, by ]an Brozek, ca. 1860.
.f
w
Glaze Color
by RICHARD
SELECTIONS OF HISTORICAL WARE document the efforts of the potter to
extend the ceramics color spectrum.
Initially, iron in the form of its natural minerals provided a variety of
colors which early potters exploited.
Copper, cobalt, and manganese followed the era of iron, and at least ten
or more colorants were commonly
used by Chinese Ming dynasty potters. During the 18th and 19th centuries, other metallic colorants were
added to the ceramics formulary,
and as the process of purification
through chemical treatment became
more highly developed, there has
been a proliferation of dependable,
refined stains.
Tables of oxide and carbonate
glaze colorants are listed in m a n y
pottery texts, providing suitable reference regarding general color performance. Unfortunately, these descriptions do not always convey exact
color designations. In addition, the
complexity of hue predictability is
compounded by a number of other
factors: reaction between colorants
and other glaze constituents, color of
the underlying clay body, and texture
of the glaze surface.
A standardized color/name chart,
illustrated with chromatic chips, may
be obtained, at a cost of thirteen
dollars, from the National Bureau of
Standards, Washington, D.C. 20234.
Developed by the Inter-Society Color
Council and the National Bureau of
Standards, this chart incorporates
much of the Munsell system of color,
and offers a useful tool for communicating color distinctions.
Here is a short formulary of base
glazes with colorant additions:
GLAZE I (Cone 0141
A transparent, highly alkaline glaze
Lithium Carbonate . . . . . . . .
Frit 3269 (Ferro) . . . . . . . . . .
Frit 54 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.0%
43.4
26.1
6.0
14.5
100.0%
T h e addition of five per cent red iron
BEHRENS
oxide produces a dark
three per cent copper
strong gray-blue glaze;
per cent gold chloride,
yellow glaze;
carbonate, a
and one-half
a dark red.
GLAZE II (Cone 061
A translucent, alkaline metal glaze
Boric Acid (dry) . . . . . . . . . .
Frit 3269 (Ferro) . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2%
61.2
5.0
26.6
100.0%
T h e addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a medium olive brown
glaze; three per cent copper carbonate, a medium green glaze; one
per cent cobalt carbonate, a deep
purple glaze; and two per cent nickel
oxide, a light olive green glaze.
GLAZE III (Cone 06)
A translucent glaze
Boric Acid (dry) . . . . . . . . . .
Gerstley Borate . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zinc Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4%
22.7
17.3
27.7
11.2
15.7
100.0%
The addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a yellow-brown glaze;
three per cent copper carbonate, a
deep green glaze; one per cent cobalt
carbonate, a purple-blue glaze; and
two per cent nickel oxide, a medium
yellow-brown glaze.
GLAZE IV (Cone 06)
A transparent, high-barlum glaze
Barium Carbonate . . . . . . . . .
Boric Acid (dry) . . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GLAZE V (Cone 04)
A satin matt glaze
Barium Carbonate . . . . . . . . .
Lithium Carbonate . . . . . . . .
Whiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zinc Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8%
10.0
9.8
9.8
22.4
42.2
100.0%
T h e addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a bright yellow-brown
glaze; three per cent copper carbonate, a deep yellow-green glaze;
one per cent cobalt carbonate, a dark
blue glaze; one and one-half per cent
nickel oxide, a light gray glaze; three
per cent manganese carbonate, a medium brown glaze; and three per cent
green chrome oxide, a light graybrown glaze.
GLAZE Vl (Cone 06)
A transparent, alkaline glaze
Lithium Carbonate . . . . . . . .
Frit 3143 (Ferro) . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5%
23.8
38.1
9.6
19.0
100.0%
A d d : Bentonite . . . . . . . . . . .
2.0%
The addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a pale yellow glaze;
three per cent copper carbonate, a
strong green glaze; one per cent cobalt carbonate, a strong purple glaze;
and two per cent nickel oxide, a deep
yellow-brown glaze.
GLAZE VII (Cone 06)
A transparent glaze
41.7%
23.0
16.8
13.7
4.8
100.0%
The addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a strong yellow-brown
glaze; three per cent copper carbonate, a deep green glaze; one per
cent cobalt carbonate, a purple-blue
glaze; and two per cent nickel oxide,
a deep yellow-brown glaze.
Boric Acid (dry) . . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48.6%
38.8
12.6
100.0%
A d d : Bentonite . . . . . . . . . . .
2.0%
The addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a red-gray glaze; three
per cent copper carbonate, a medium
yellow-gray glaze; one per cent cobalt
carbonate, a brilliant purple-blue
glaze; and two per cent nickel oxide,
a dark gray-brown glaze.
Continued on Page 59
January 1976
57
KILNS
ITINERARY
Continued [rom Page ll
Olympic
Bronze Medal 18
WHEELS
Southwest is a juried event. Send three
slides for each category. Fee: $35. Entry
forms due March 15. Write: Fidel Neria,
P.O. Box 122, Roswell 88201.
CLAY
NEXV YORK, RHINEBEGK
]une 21-27 Northeast Craft Fair 11 is
open to craftsmen in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island,
Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and
Washington, D.C. Applicants must submit
five slides by January 15. Write: Carol
Sedestrom, Director, Northeast Craft Fair,
12 North Chestnut Street, New Paltz, New
York 12561.
The Olympic Bronze Medal 18
series is perhaps the most popular
home kiln size available, with
depths ranging from 18 to 31½
inches.
The basic kiln is 1772 inches
wide by 18 inches deep providing
2.63 cubic feet of firing volume.
This kiln may be added to with a
4½ inch blank or wired ring making
the kiln 22½ inches deep.
All Olympic Bronze Medal Kilns
have a metal stand, hinged lid,
stainless steel jacket, Dawson
A u t o m a t i c Shut-off, plus the
unique Olympic inter-tie system
with the recessed prongs connecting
the rings.
Olympic Bronze Medal 18 series
kilns all have infinite position heat
switches
enabling
precise
temperature control and even
heating characteristics throughout
the entire firing range. The infinite
position switches make this model
particularily suited for glass sagging.
A bonus feature of Olympic
Kilns built in rings is the reversible
bottom which can be easily turned
over in the event of damage to one
side.
D/vision o f
RAUGEN MANUFACTURING, INC.
2222 North Pacific St.-Seattle, WA 98103
Phone (206) 632-0120
58
CERAMICS MONTHLY
PENNSYLVANIA, PITTSBURGH
May 28-]une 6 Three Rivers Arts Festival contains two events which are open
to all craftsmen living in Ohio, West
Virginia, and Pennsylvania. The Juried
Crafts Show requires an entry fee of
$5.00. Artists may enter up to six pieces.
Entries are due April 24-25. The Sidewalk
Show requires screening by 35mm slides,
due March 12 along with entry forms.
Entry forms for both shows are available
from the Three Rivers Arts Festival, 4400
Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh 15213, after February 1.
RAW
MATERIALS
FOR C A T A L O G
$I.00 per copy
WRITE
(Free to Schools and Institutions}
Harris Linden
Ceramics
1772 GenesseeAve., Columbus,Ohio 43211
(614) 267-5385or 267-5616
TEXAS, AMARILLO
April 4-18 Artist Studio Annual National Fine Art Show is open to artists in
all media. Prizes, purchase awards. Fee:
$3.00 for members and $5.00 for nonmembers, for each entry; limit of three
works per medium. Slides due February 15.
Write: Len Slesick, Box 13056, Amarillo
79101.
VIRGINIA, CHARLOTTESVILLE
April 2-4 Virginia Crafts Council Fair
'76 is open to all craftsmen. Juried. Cash
awards. Entry deadline: February 1. Fee.
Write: Les Riley, Liberty Station, 226
Piedmont West, Culpepper, Virginia 22701.
CERAMICS
ENAMELING & CRAFTS
Y O U NEED the 23rd Edition of
BERGEN'S C A T A L O G . . .
. . . . . an Encyclopedia of Ceramic,
Enameling & Craft Supplies.
WHERE TO GO
ALABAMA, HUNTSVILLE
through ]anuary 25 "200 Years of
Royal Copenhagen Porcelain," traveling
exhibition; at the Huntsville Museum, 228
Holmes Street.
•
•
•
•
ARIZONA, PHOENIX
through ]anuary 4 "Clay 75," an exhibition by the Clay Club; at the Heard
Museum.
ARKANSAS, LITTLE ROCK
through January 4 "Toys Designed by
Artists."
February 14-March 21 "200 Years of
Royal Copenhagen Porcelain," traveling
exhibltion; both at the Arkansas Arts
Center, MacArthur Park.
CALIFORNIA, CITY OF INDUSTRY
January 2-31 "Westwood Ceramics 1976
Continued on Page 60
•
America's Largest Selection of
Enameling Supplies
Tools for Ceramics and Sculpture
Raku & Other Clays & Glazes
Porcelains and Jewelry Settings
and More - More Complete China Painting
Supplies
Rush $1.00 ($2.00 in Canada)
for YOUR 200 page
II
| ~ l ~
catalog and price ][st to I
~
~
| ~
I 1 ~
I ~
BERGEN
Arts & Crafts
P.O. Box381 CMI
II
II
•
BEHRENS
Continued [rom Page 57
G L A Z E V I I I ( C o n e 04)
A sem~opaque glaze
Imported Rough C0rk STOPPERS.
These Stoppers are of the highest
quality and are available for immediate delivery at the present
time. Please enclose check with order. We invite you to compare our
prices and quality.
TOP
DIAMETER
BOTTOM
DIAMETER
PRICE
| 1/2"
11/4"
S . 06
2"
21/2 ``
13/4"
2"
S .09
$ .14
3"
21/2"
$ .22
5"
Sl/2u
41/4"
43/4'v
S .74
$ .89
6"
5V4"
$1.13
31/2"
4"
4V2"
3"
3112"
4"
S .30
$ .42
S .55
Height of corks varies from 11/2" to 13~"
Minimum Order $25.00 F.O.B. Chicago
Distributor Inquiries Invited
Phoenix Design Ltd.
Box 29048, Chicago,
Ill 60629
(312) 881-8803
If DUNCAN
manufactures or
publishes i t . . .
E-Z FLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glozes
SM & DM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Molds
E-Z STROKE . . . . . .
Underglaze
Transparent
Underglaze
B I S O - S T A I N S . . . Unfired Stains
BRUSHES
Joy Reid Catalog
58.9%
19.9
21.2
100.0%
T h e addition of five p e r cent red iron
oxide produces a light yellow-brown
glaze; three p e r cent copper carbonate, a strong yellow-green glaze;
one p e r cent cobalt carbonate, a light
gray-blue glaze; a n d two p e r cent
nickel oxide, a light olive brown glaze.
G L A Z E IX ( C o n e 4 )
A translucent glaze
Boric Acid (dry) . . . . . . . . . .
Lithium Carbonate ........
Frit 25 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Alumina Hydrate ..........
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9%
7.7
33.1
3.3
10.8
41.2
100.0%
T h e addition of five p e r cent red iron
oxide produces a dark yellow-brown
glaze; three p e r cent copper carbonate, a deep green glaze; one p e r
cent cobalt carbonate, a deep purpleblue glaze; a n d two p e r cent nickel
oxide, a deep yellow-brown glaze.
G L A Z E X ( C o n e 6)
A ffanslucent glaze
WE stock it!
COVER C O A T . . . . .
F r i t 54 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin ...................
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$1.SO
Duncan Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$1.50
CerarniCorner Decal Catalog...$1.S0
Glass Decal Catalog . . . . . . . . . . $ .S0
plus 25c e a . Postaqe
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gerstley Borate . . . . . . . . . . . .
Magnesium Carbonate .....
Whiting ..................
Frit 25 (Pemco) . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin ...................
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.8%
11.6
10.6
22.6
18.2
23.2
100.0%
T h e addition of five p e r cent red iron
oxide produces a dark yellow-brown
glaze; three p e r cent c o p p e r carbonate, a deep green glaze; one per
cent cobalt carbonate, a deep blue
glaze; and two per cent nickel oxide,
a dark brown glaze.
G L A Z E Xl ( C o n e 6)
A translucent glaze
•
Ceramic Studio
P.O. Box 5367
2016 N. Telegraph (US-24)
Dearborn, Mlch 48128 • Phone LO 1-0119
Whiting ..................
Zinc Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nepheline Syenite . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5%
13.5
43.7
8.4
27.9
100.0%
T h e addition of five per cent red iron
Continued on Page 61
eyklsaveI
s money |
and.'they
d,d!
We do what we s a y k ~
and what we say is: ~
We sell Shimpo~.~
West® wheels and
__~ j,#~
Crusader kilns at
~J ~
the lowest prices 1 ~ ' ~ " ~
and offer the best /A ~ ~ " ~
service. Forprice I/, ~ J~'t"N
list and catalog, / ( I ~',/] 15~c~Ck~ |
write:
I~J' ~~ ~i~)~/~
3345 North Halsted
Chicago, Illinois 60657
I H L.)
January 1976 59
ITINERARY
Continued [rom Page 58
Teapot Open," is an exhibition of teapots
by various southern California potters; at
the Retail Store Gallery, 14400 Lomitas
Avenue.
CALIFORNIA, L o s ANGELES
January 21-25 Arts Crafts and Indoor
Plants Show; at Pacific Design Center.
January 17-February 28 "Spectrum II"
presents works in a variety of m~d!a including ceramics.
January 27-March 21 "Wedgwood from
California Collections: Georgian through
Victorian, 1760-1901"; both at the Los
Angeles County M u s e u m of Art, 5905
Wilshire Blvd.
ceramics by Paul Meyers of Ridgecrest,
California; at the Carlisle Gallery, 322
West Cabrillo Boulevard.
COLORADO, DENVER
through January 4 Environment '76, an
exhibition of works submitted by Coloradoans to display the theme of improvement
of the environment.
through January 5 Third All-Colorado
Exhibition; both at the Denver Art Museum.
CONNECTICUT, AVON
through January 7 Christmas Exhibit
and Sale, sponsored by the Society of Connecticut Craftsmen; at Farmington Valley
Arts Center, Avon Park North.
CONNECTICUT~ NEW CANAAN
January lO-February 3 New Members
CALIFORNIA, SACRAMENTO
through May 31. T h e California State
Fair's Permanent Art Collection, includes
ceramics; at the Exposition Center, Bldg. 7.
CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
FLORIDA, BROOKSVILLE
January 24-25 First Annual Brooksville
Bicentennial Festival of the Arts; at
Courthouse Square.
FLORIDA, CLEARWATER
January 12-26 National Miniature Art
Show, sponsored by the Miniature Art
Society of Florida; at the Bank of Clearwater.
FLORIDA, FORT PIERCE
January 10-ll Sandy Shoes Festival,
O n the Green Art Show; at the Fort Pierce
Memorial Park.
FLORIDA, MZAMI BEACH
February 6-8 Second Annual Miami
Beach Festival of the Arts; at the Miami
Convention Center.
FLORIDA, SARASOTA
Exhibition in Hays Hall and Vassos Gallery; at Silvermine Guild of Artists, 1037
Silvermine Road.
January 18-31 Exhibition of works by
Eleanor Heller, includes ceramic forms;
at Kaleidoscope Gallery, 77 South Palm
Avenue.
D.C., WASHINGTON
HAWAII~ HONOLULU
through
February 15
Exhibition of
sculpture and drawings by Elie Nadelman
includes ceramics; at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian
Institution.
January 30-March 14 "Fire, Earth, and
Water," an exhibition of pre-Columbian
sculpture and pottery; at the Honolulu
Academy of Art.
Ceramic sculpture by
Robert Arneson; at Hansen Fuller Gallery.
FLOmDA, BOCA RATON
CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA
tery"; at the Humanities Art
Florida Atlantic University.
January 24-25 Raku workshop conducted by Paul Soldner.
April 25-27 "Once-Fired Ceramics," a
February 2l-March 28 California/Hawaii Biennial Exhibition 1976; at the Fine
Arts Gallery of San Diego, Balboa Park.
CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO
January 8-31
January 9-30 Two-man show includes
January 15-February 28 "Pueblo PotGallery,
IDAHO, SUN VALLEY
Continued on Page 71
DESIGNED TO
m
~
INCREASE
l
TH ROWl NG
COMFORT
m
IMACCO CLAYS
O0oOa>O0000000000000000000¢,O000000000',
STONEWARE 8 to 11 RED
STONEWARE 8 to 11 BUFF
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•
".
:5:
,<
:
"Newly"
positoned head
and kick bar;
extra adjustable
back rest with
optional "6" legs
to increase
or decrease
height of wheel.
Manufacturedfrom Californiaclays minedand
processed by Indus÷rlal Minerals Co. Formulated
fo
provide excellent workabilify and drying
light buff ¢o red-brown with
iron specking. Imacco cone I0 sfonewares
possess good ÷hermo-shock resMance fo provide
the studio poffer wlth maximum recovery of fired
objects. Write for complete 1976 clay datasheets
and prices.
it
285.00 F.O.B.
character.Firesfrom
000000040000¢,000000000¢,000000000¢,~000
INDUSTRIAL MINERALS CO.
1057 Commercial Sfreef
San Carlos, Colifornla ?4070
A BASIC PRODUCER OF
TALC, GERSTLEY BORATE,
KAOLIN, BALL AND FIRE CLAY
60
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Optional adjustable legs for increasing or decreasing
height by six inches/special angled kick and adjustable
back rest to comfortably set up the wheel to your throwins position: and to the size of piece being thrown:
recessed school safe kick bar and adjustable protector
shield: 14" cast iron head/120 lb. flywheel/30"x30'
pan/trim bar/pan drain plug/three bearings eliminated
for easier maintenance/1 year moving parts guarantee . .
SEASONS WHEEL COMPANY
P.O. Box 422, Sandusky, Ohio 44870
419-625-8794
"IT IS BETTER"
BEHRENS
Continued [tom Page 59
Cref~ Centre
LIMITED
OTTAWA'S
LEADING
SUPPLIER
Serving
WESTER N QUEBEC
•
Clays
•
Kilns
•
Tools
Glazes
Chemicals
Ama©o
• Estrin
• Brant
L & L • Kemper • Ohaus
Shimpo
•
Klngspln
$1.oo
64 page Catalog . . . . .
also
Looms. Spinning W h e e l s .Yarns
box 579
(613) 692 - 3843
19 main st,
Menotick ,
ONTARIO . KoA 2nO. CANADA
Boric Acid (dry) . . . . . . . . . .
Whiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Potash Feldspar . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.7~
8.7
48.6
21.0
Add : Bentonit e . . . . . . . . . . .
100.0~
2.0o~
The addition of five per cent red iro~
oxide produces a m e d i u m yellow
brown glaze; three per cent coppe:
carbonat e, a m e d i u m olive greet
glaze; one per cent cobalt carbonat e
a dark purple-b lue glaze; and two peJ
cent nickel oxide, a m e d i u m browr
glaze.
Whiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1 °A
Nephelin e Svenite . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . "..... ..... .. ... .. ... .. ... . . . . .
45.0
34.2
,0.,
i rl
Add : Bentonit e . . . . . . . . . . .
Creek
Pottery
equipme nt proven
• Shimpo-W est
• Brent
• Randall
• Walker
• Kemper
in the studio
•
•
•
•
•
KILN S
Formerly
GLAZE Xll (Cone 81
A somewhat mall glaze
GLAZE XIII (Cone 8)
A translucent glaze
W
STBY
POTTE RY by DOT
end
EASTERN ONTARIO
Wheels
oxide produces a m e d i u m yellow
brown glaze; three per cent coppe
carbonate , a m e d i u m olive gree
glaze; one per cent cobalt carbonate
a purple-b lue glaze; and two per cen
nickel oxide, a dark gray glaze.
Skuff
Crusader
Ge;I
Tyler
Ohaus
Raw Materiais and Dry Clays
Prices on request
11416 Shelbyville Road
Louisville, KY. 40243
502-245-1 282
Serving Kentu(:ky , Indiana,
Ohio and Tenness ee
0%
10-~.
2.0%
T h e addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a m e d i u m brown
glaze; three per cent copper carbonate, a m e d i u m olive green glaze;
one per cent cobalt carbonat e, a dark
blue glaze; and two per cent nickel
oxide, a dark yellow-b rown glaze.
GLAZE XIV (Cone 8)
A translucent glaze
Gerstley Borate . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lithium Carbonat e . . . . . . . .
Whiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nephelin e Syenite . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add : Bentonite . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3%
1.4
9.4
41.6
43.3
100.0%
2.0%
T h e addition of five per cent red iron
oxide produces a m e d i u m yellowbrown glaze; three per cent copper
carbonate , a m e d i u m olive green
glaze; one per cent cobalt carbonate ,
a dark blue glaze; a n d two per cent
nickel oxide, a m e d i u m brown glaze.
NOW!
A Good Kiln
Need No! Be
Expensive
Save up to 3 7 % using a few
pleasant hours to fit together
one of our easy-to-a ssemble
kiln kits. Fun to do ~ efficient
to use. Step by step instruc.
tions for assembly and easy
beautiful firing.
These Are Kilns Made By
People Who Do Ceramics and
Know What a Kiln Has To Do.
Commercial Kiln Kit
24"x24"x27 " deep . . . . . . . . $269.00
Stud;o Kiln Kit
18"xl8"xl 8" deep . . . . . . . . $137.95
Hobby Kiln Kit
12"x12"x]31 /2" deep . . . . . . $ 89.95
Send for free brochure.
WESTBY
C e r a m i c Supply & Mfg. Co.
20 N. 8Sth St., Seattle, Wash. 98103
January 1976 61
NEW SKUTT DC-1 POTTER'S WHEEL
THE QUIET REVOLUTION
BRUTE POWER
. . .
WITH PERFECT
CONTROL!
THROWING FEATURES
Extremely quiet and free of vibration and hum.
Truly Powerful. 1 H.P. special duty D.C. motor easily
handles 100-pound throws. 12 amps max. current.
Accurately holds any speed even with heaviest forming
operations.
It's no longer necessary to pot standing on one foot while
you try to delicately compensate for Speed Sag with the
other.
Full 25 =' pedal travel for 0-240 RPM with low speeds ideally
spread out.
Unrivaled smoothness and power at low speeds--perfect for
all decorative operations.
Cast aluminum speedhold!ng pedal is integral with rigid
burnt orange fiberglass pedestal which in turn is
Permanently Wedded to cast aluminum crib.
Pedal friction is adjustable so you can "settle" your foot
fully, then change speed with absolute control.
Acceleration is electronically restrained too at all times, to
avoid any possibility of jerkiness.
Optional hand lever control as shown in photo.
Rotation easily reversed--just tip wheel back, unplug motor
from FWD socket within pedestal and insert into REV
socket.
Sealed Off-On switch and pilot light, not shown in photo,
are convenient on near right side.
114 X 14" Tempered Masonite batts (4 furnished) are driven
by removable pins projecting from deeply-ribbed 13-1/4"
aluminum wheelhead having concentric scorings. Wheelhead 19-1/2" from floor.
For trimming or outsize throwing, any size of batt (we offer
23-1/2" diameter) can be raised clear of the crib and driven
by the two pins projecting from our optional 3/4"-thick
14"-dia. masonite Wheelhead Riser.
DESIGN FEATURES
Belt tensioning via built-in springs assures full torque under
all conditions, with extreme life for bearings and all drive
components. Because of this drive train's high efficiency,
the wheelhead can be easily rotated (not spun) by hand for
vertical decorative operations.
Large 24-1/2W X 25-1/4 X 5"-deep cast aluminum Crib with
heavy beige epoxy coating. Crib drains directly into tough
half-gallon Polythene cup (at left edge of photo) via nonclogging 7/8 X 2-1/2" slot.
So easily cleaned. Wheelhead is instantly removable from
improved interchangeable positive-drive stainless taper to
permit total access to crib.
Smooth outer contours are kind to both Operator and
Passers-By; The pedestal protects against any accidental
involvement with the belt drive.
Double safe. Grounded through the cord, with all exterior
parts double insulated in addition for your safety should
outlet be incompletely grounded.
Operates from any grounded 110-120 volt 50-60 cycle outlet.
Eight-foot grounding cord; any excess length can be pulled
back and stored inside pedestal.
And Portable! At 100 pounds it's an easy 2-man or 2woman, carry. Rides securely on its back on your car seat.
RUGGED AND TROUBLE FREE
Nothing to rust. Exposed parts are all aluminum, stainless
steel or fiberglass.
Permanently lubricated ball bearings throughout.
Durable, efficient multi-V belt drive avoids the bearing
failures, oil leaks and noise so common with wormgear
drives. And more of the motor's output reaches the wheelhead.
Motor, controller, all vital components are fully protected
from water, clay, and abuse within pedestal.
Motor and premium oversize industrial SCR controller are
fully protected against stalling etc. by proven currentlimiting circuitry and automatic-reset thermal cutout.
No fuses to replace, no risk of overfusing and voiding your
warranty.
All FM, AM and TV interference sharply reduced.
Voltage spikes--even those from elevator rooms and
spotwelders--cannot damage the controller or cause the
jerks that can be so terribly frustrating.
Modular electrical design facilitates diagnosis and
correction of any problem.
WARRANTY
Comprehensive 2 year warranty that means something by a
reliable company that's been manufacturing wheels for 18
years and kilns since 1953. No charge for labor or parts at
any of our servicing distributors in the U.S. or Canada.
CERAMIC PRODUCTS 2616 S.E. STEELE STREET PORTLAND, OREGON 97202 5031235-2164
MAUFACTURERS OF KILNS • POTTER'S WHEELS • CERAMIC TOOLS
62
CERAMICS M O N T H L Y
CERAMACTIVITIES
people, places, and things
PIEDMONT CRAFTSMEN
More than 100 exhibitors, including 39
ceramists, participated in the 12th Annual
Piedmont Craftsmen's Fair, held November
7-8 at the Winston-Salem ~Ilemorial Coliseum, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Organizers o~ the fair reported that sales
were slightly higher than last year, although attendance was down from the
1974 event. Shown from the cxhibit'on is
a covered jar by Richard Henslcy, raku
with painted arabesque design. Other participating ceramists included Clyde Gobble,
Tyrone and Julie Larson, Tom Turner,
paper stencil before applying the luster.
The paper was left to burn away during
firing. Sometimes the glaze was painted
with a greasy medium such as shellac,
SCHAUMBURG EXHIBITION
Cynthia Bringle, Ron Propst, Herb Cohen,
Lee Magdanz, Jane Peiser, Wally Smith,
and Jane Hatcher. Sponsored by the Piedmont Cra[tsmen, Inc., (PCI), a regional,
nonprofit, educational organization, the
fair is open to craftsmen whose work has
been approved by the Standards Committee of the PCÂ for exhibition and sale, and
by the Board of Trustees. An exhibiting
member of PCI is eligible to sell his work
in the organization's craft shop in WinstonSalem, to contract for a booth at the fair,
to schedule a two-man or group show in
lh, PCI Gallery. and l,, 1,~, pro.ented in
fully developed. The forms he creates are
unusually large for raku ware, yet fragile
and delicate . . . . " Shown from the exhibition is a raku form with crackle glaze.
David Kuraoka received his M.A. at San
Jose State College, California, and is presently teaching art at San Francisco State
College, California.
LusteJ l¢,,i~t I'it(h,~
glycerin, or varnish. The resist was removed with warm water and the desired
image remained in the negative on a lustered background.
Hispano-Moresque pottery with copper
luster decoration dates from the 14th century, while gold luster was used at Deruta
and Gubbio, Italy, from about 1515.
Josiah Wedgwood began experimenting
with lusters in England from about 1790,
and the process was later employed by
potters in the ceramics centers of Staffordshire, Sunderland, and Liverpool. Shown
from the exhibition is a pitcher with silver
luster resist decoration, 9 inches in height.
While the work is English in origin, its
maker is unknown.
Recent work by Don Schaumburg was
shown at The Hand and the Spirit Gallery,
Scottsdale, Arizona, from September 5-30.
Featured were porcelain and stoneware
forms with textural effects achieved with
copper-red, celadon, and mesquite ash
glazes combined with thrown surfaces and
incised decoration. The artist is involved
in the use of readily available material-the ash comes from one of the local steak
house cooking pits. One of his most successful glazes is:
White Ash Glaze (Cone 9-10)
Wood Ash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
60.0 parts
Ball Clay
(Tenn. Old Mine # 4 ) . . . . 30.0
Custer Feldspar . . . . . . . . . . . .
60.0
Titanium Dioxide . . . . . . . . . .
7.5
Don Schaumburg also vapor glazes with
bicarbonate of soda rather than the tradi-
KURAOKA RAKU WORK
RichmA 11, ~,/,
An exhibition of raku ware by David
Kuraoka was held at Cabrillo Gallery,
Cabrillo College, Aptos, California, from
November 2-23. Gallery director Howard
ll:cm,t,, ,4 llao Cal~rilb~ art facility corn-
PCI exhibits in other museums, galleries,
and invitationals. Piedmont Craftsmen, Inc.
conducts workshops, lectures, special programs, monthly exhibitions, and runs a
library and craft shop. Membership is
open to craftsmen living in Alabama,
Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Virginia.
DoTz ,~ [tftumbztrg
tionally used salt. Born in California, he
studied under Marguerite Wildenhain and
is presently chairman of the ceramics department at Arizona State University in
Tempe.
Shown from the exhibition are stoneware vase, 11 inches in height, sodium
vapor over blue ash glaze (left); and
open form, celadon with sodium vapor
glaze, 12 inches in height (right).
LUSTER RESIST
An exhibition of English and American
decorative art objects including glass, lusters, silver-resist, and transfer-printed ware
was presented at the Columbus Gallery o[
Fine Arts, Ohio, through October 26. The
luster technique involves the depositing of
a thin film of metal over a fired glaze;
metals used historically have been silver,
gold, copper, and platinum. The luster
resist process was commonly used in England with silver and copper lustered ware
of the 18th century. One method was to
cover the undecorated object with a cut
KEMENYFFY WORKSHOP
David Ku~a,,t,a
mented that the artist's use of " . . . crackle
pattern and characteristic luster are beauti-
Send neus, and photos, i[ available,
about people, places, or events you
think will be of interest. We will be
pleased to consider them ]or use in this
column. Send items to: CeramActivities, CERAMICS MONTHLY,Box 12448,
Columbus, Ohio 43212.
Susan and Steven Kemeny[[y, studio
potters who work jointly in Edinboro,
Pennsylvania, will be featured in a workshop at The Cleveland State University,
Ohio, January 27 and 28. The event is the
second in a series titled "Ceramics U.S.A.,"
sponsored by three Cleveland area institutions. The workshop will be held in the
ceramics department of University Hall
Annex, 2506 Chester Avenue, from 9 A.M.
to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 P.M. on both
Continued on Page 65
January
1976
63
Pasuo [tonomy,
amili o i}iialily.
/~---~ When building Pasco
iadc°:Ki!~! r:a:eo°~wts!s~:t:!
r!i!
" u ~ = ~ ; ] i i
safety in regard to casualty and
ill]/|
.
I ~,;~
11 ~ i!
us, c o nginuou s~st'ng,
g
i
~ = ~ i~'P~- 6| - ~
•
,,, i
ftii~enha::dd:nM:nt:rialnS' c:nd~uc; ~ : a ~ [ ! ~ . : . ~
ri"go or
f~-'-U'
m3il,illEli],
rigid standardsof II-;~=~:~,i~1
and meet their
I
!
u i, i I r ~ i f~, I~ ~ ~ m - - ~
---~--~~-~ ~ , ~
P:8-
' _il "
'
~
P-IO "
I
qlw
For more information about these fine hobby and educational type kilns, request Amaco Ceramic
and Metal Enameling Supplies and EquipmentCatalog No. 60.
gillg"AMERICAN
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THOMPSON Offers All Of
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and including a CAREFULLY SELECTED group of supplies
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The new Thompson catalog, along with its famous Color Guide,
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C l A Y BODIES ~ Stoneware, Sculpture & Porcelain
Raw Materials • Tools ~ All Types • Kilns •
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.
Thomas C. Thompson Co.
Dept. C M - I m 1S39 Old Deerfield Road
Highland Park, Illinois 60035
H o w proudly presenting the " M a x " and the
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[ ] Enclosed is payment for new kiln packacje.
(Illinois residents add 5% sales tax.)
Catalog
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(Free t o Schools and Institutions)
[ ] Please rush FREE Thompson Catalocj
Name
WESTERN CERAMICS SUPPLY COMPANY
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CERAMACTIVITIES
Continued ]rom Page 63
days. For further information contact Richard Schneider, Associate Professor of Art,
The Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115.
NOW AVAILABLE
N E W 1976 C A T A L O G
• RAW MATERIALS
" BLENDED & BASIC CLAYS
CERAMICS FROM IRAN
• FRITS AND GLAZE STAINS
• LEAD FREE CERAMIC GLAZES
• SPONGES, HANDLES & BRUSHES
An exhibition of ceramics from western
Iran was shown during November at the
Asian Art Museum o/ San Francisco, California. Giyan and Sialk are important
° MOROCCAN SAND GLAZES
to serve
the Mid-Atlantic ~
and South
~
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B I B
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• KEMPER TOOLS
• OHAUS SCALES
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• CORKS 1 V z " " 6 "
" KILN ACCESSORIES
N o w Stocks
" OSCAR PAUL & SKUTT WHEELS
20 moist clay bodies
manufacfured by
" LOCKERBIE KICK WHEELS
• SHIMPO WHEELS
Complete 60 Page Catalog
"Try us for those
hard-to.find items."
CATALOG $1.00
(Free To Schools & Institutions)
standard ceramics
l'rehistoric Pitcher
archaeological sites for the study of early
ceramic pieces in Iran, and the museum
exhibit incorporated tripods, jars, spherical footed bowls, goblets, and spouted
Paramount Ceramic, Inc.
220 No. State
imacco
westwood (wcs)
wide range of colors
both oxidation and reduction
low to hlqh fire
Falrmont,Minn. 56031
Also in stock:
CLAY BODIES& SLIPS
STONEWARE
EARTHENWARE
PORCELAIN
burr "thermolite" pull'able gas kilns
crusader
I & I "econokiln"
shimpo-west, pacifica, brant wheels
kemper, ohaus, orton products
Terra Cotta Ewer
Custom Pugging
ewers from different levels at the two sites.
Shown is a prehistoric pitcher (top) from
the Sialk VI site, 6~., inches in height and
12 inches in diameter. Also pictured is a
10th century n.(:. terra-cotta ewer from
the Sialk B site, 71/., inches in height and
11 inches in diameter.
Raw Materials
EXPERIMENTS IN GLAZED CONCRETE
Chemicals
Paul Rayar, an American living near
I'pt,n. I.imburg, a province of the Nether1.,~l.. t~. r,'~*'ived a grant from the Dutch
White, Terra Cotta
Buff, Red and Brown
High and Low
firing temperatures.
W H E E L S A N D KILNS IN
S T O C K A T ALL TIMES
WE GIVE SERVICE - - TRY US!
We carry all Ceramic Supplies.
CERAMIC
SUPPLY
CO.
INC.
95 8artley Road, Flanders, N.J. 07836
(201) 584-7492
cone I I electric kilns
Ministry of Culture
to continue experimental work to perfect the technique
of creating and firing walls of large,
lightweight ceramicsconcrete relief forms
in one piece. The
artist fires his work
in about an hour in
Paul J¢,~,,
:l brickless kiln of
soft retractory izlsulation. If successful in
his research, Rayar intends to design a
glazed mini-wall to possess both functional
and aesthetic attributes unique to the
thorley kiln furniture
terra silicon carbide shelves
fiberfrax insulation material
full llst of chemicals, dry clays, dry glazes
books, brushes, corks, handles, thongs
Institutional
equipment:
walker jamar pugm]ll
unique gas, electric kilns
soldner clay mixer
Catalog
available
Contact
eagle ceramics, inc.
12264 Wilkins Av., Rockville, Md. 20852
Phone (301) 881-2255
Continued on Page 67
January
1976
65
8 CERAMIC ART FILMS
for Junior High, Senior High, College, and Adult Audiences
The eight color films in this series are a wonderful
opportunity to supplement your art program. Producers of all eight films are Richard and Marj
Peeler, both production potters and former teachers
with many years' experience.
Four Instructive Films
1. CERAMICS: WHAT? WHY? HOW?
2. THE COIL METHOD
3. HANDBUILDiNG METHODS
4. CREATING MOSAICS AND TILES
Four Films for Ceramic Art Appreciation
5. POTTERS OF JAPAN, part I
Filmed on location in Japan in the workshops of outstanding
potters.
6. POTTERS OF JAPAN, part II
7. POTTERS OF THE U.S.A., part I
Includes: Charles Lakofsky, William Wyman, Vivika and
Otto Helno.
8. POTTERS OF THE U.S.A., part II
Includes: Warren MacKenzie, Paul Bogatay, Toshiko Takaezu,
Frans Wildenhain.
All films in this series are color, sound, 16rnm.
For brochure, rental, and sales information, write to:
CERAMIC
ART
FILMS
Box 320, ReelsvJlle, Indiana 46171
WE HAVE
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66
CERAMICS MONTHI,¥
• the most complete ceramic chemical inventory in the
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• 60,000 CORKS - rough and smooth, teapot handles.
• studio furniture - cabinets, carts, tables - OHAUS
scales, KEMPER tools.
• ORTON cones, Kiln shelves and posts.
• wheels by SHIMPO-WEST, ROBERT BRENT,
SKUTr, SOLDNER.
• electric kilns by SKUTT, CRESS, JENKEN
• CALIFORNIA gas kilns, WALKER pug mills,
BLUEBIRD and SOLDNER mixers.
• suppliers to schools, institutions and studio potters.
Let us bid your school needs.
BENNETT POTTERY SUPPLY, INC.
H e l e n B e n n e t t - S t o n e w a r e Potter
free catalog
B a n k A m e r i c a r d - - Master C h a r g e
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H A V E YOU
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Together they mate
CERAMACTIVITIES
Continued [rom Page 65
architectural and ceramics world. The
artist estimates that such constructions
could be prefabricated in large sizes, or
formed and glaze-fired on site.
In April 1975, Paul Rayar was invited
by the National Sculpture Center of the
University o/ Kansas to the 8th NationalInternational Conference to take part in
a panel discussion dealing with the glazed
concrete topic. Photo: Frank van Epenhuysen.
TERRA COTTA FORMS
THE COMPLE TELY
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Write.
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GUMMEDCLOTHHANGERS
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Hanqers in bulk - - $8.00 per thousand, All
orders $1.00 handlinq charge Wrte for
samp e to: ACE ART CO. - - Box 210 - - Readincj, Mass 01867
Terra cotta works by lira Lorio ol
Boulder, Colorado, were displayed at Exhibit A, Gallery o[ American Ceramics,
Evanston, Illinois,
from September 28
through October 24.
The artist created a
variety of plate and
container shapes relating to activities
and rituals of mankind throughout history. The clay's
warm red-earth c o l or and its retention Jim Lorio
of chromatic effects achieved with the influence of the fire provide a link from
past to present. Exhibited were works
with varied surfaces displaying slip decoration, overlaid with color and texture which
resulted from different materials such as
straw and salt contacting the clay surface
during firing. Shown is an unglazed flashed
cylinder, 13 inches in height. Jim Lorio
previously taught ceramics at Evanston
(Illinois) Art Center.
IDAHO EXHIBITION
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Marge Wennerstrom
Phone:
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V_
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RK
"Object: Idaho 75," held at the Boise
Gallery of Art from September 28 through
October 26, was designed to display the
diversity of style and philosophy of Idaho's
craftsmen. Among the media represented
were ceramics, glass, weaving, wood and
AEGEAN SPONGE CO.
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metal working, and jewelry, with approximately 17 ceramists exhibiting. Shown is
"Great Plains," stoneware bowl with horsehair decoration, by Kerry llIoosman of
Atlanta, Idaho. Jurors for the exhibition
were ]an de Vries, director of the ConContinued on Page 69
January
1976
67
K E m P E R TI]I]LS
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Potters, start your wheels! Kemper Tools
has put it "All-In-One"-- all the basic
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See your nearest dealer or distributor
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remember, the same high quality
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CERAMICS ~'IONTHLY
HO.. .YGUIDE
CERAMIC,NDUST
YOU W A N T IT
CERAMACTIVITIES
#
WE HAVE IT
Continued [tom Page 67
temporary Crafts Gallery in Portland,
Oregon, and Robert Max Peter, chairman
of the departmen t of art at the College
of Idaho, Caldwell.
SCHNEIDER EXHIBITION
Over 100 ceramic works by Richard
Schneider, associate professor of art at
The Cleveland State University, Ohio,
were shown at Dobama Gallery, Cleveland
Heights, during October 1975. The ma-
Completely revised and updated every
year. The Guide is really three books in
one: a Handbook of vital data and howto information on glazes, kilns,molds, etc; a
Directory of manufacturers, publishers,
distributors, traveling teachers, associations
and shews; a Buyers Guide to sources of
supply for ceramics, porcelain, airbrush ng,
glass, enameling, and other related crafts.
Indispensable for the studio owner, manufacturer, ceramic teacher, craft shop director, arts and crafts instructor. $4.00 ea.
(Include 2So postage and hand ng. California
residents also add 24c sales tax.)
Richard Schneider
POTLU CK PUBLIC ATIONS
(Formerly Ceramic Scope Books)
Box 48643, Los Angeles, CA 90048
I
DEC ALS
the very best
jority of the pieces displayed were saltfired and raku sculptural forms. Pictured
from the exhibition (left) is "Chicken
Delight," thrown, lidded jar with piaster
press-mold ed parts, salt-glazed and fumed,
22 inches in height. Also shown (right) is
"And the Cow Jumped Over the Moon,"
thrown form with plaster press-mold ed
parts, salt-glazed and fumed, 24 inches in
height.
RODIN MUSEUM
The Philadelphia Museum o[ Art, partial]y closed to accommod ate ten separate
constructio n projects, has installed a "jewel
case" exhibition at
the Rodin Museum,
" ~
22nd and Benjamin
Franklin Parkway,
also in Philadelph ia.
* !i
Please send $1.50 for your
complete decal catalog including application and f i r i n g
instruction s.
Ceram iCorne r, Inc.
P . O . Box 516, Azusa, Calif. 91702
Cree k-Tu rn Lab
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Pre-mix ed or custom mixed.
All temper atures.
RAW MATERIALS
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TOLTEC
Box 13015 San Antonio, TX
$5.50
78213
stone wareBEADS
along with works by Picasso, Manet, Renoir, Rubens, and van Gogh. Shown from
the exhibition is a Chinese porcelain vase
(1662-172 2), with overglaze decoration in
a panel motif separated by detailed geometric patterns. Photo: A. ]. Wyatt.
Raw Materials & Equipmen t
BERKELEY, CA.
Chinese t',,rcelain
AT THE WORKSHOP
An exhibition of pottery, sculpture, and
ceramic jewelry by the New School ceramic faculty, featuring work by Donald
O. Mavros and Myrna Bosse, was held at
the Workshop, New York City, from December 8-20.
Donald Mavros displayed slip-decora ted
stoneware pottery, both wheel thrown and
Continued on Page 77
&
YARNS
MACRAME
the museum's greatest ceramic masterpieces. Chosen by
director Evan H.
Turner, a selection
of Far Eastern potcelain is exhibited
l J
Cress
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free literatu re
I
CREEK.TURN
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Rf. 38. Halnespor t, N.J. 08036
January
1976
69
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IMPORTERS
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Manufacturers of SHERRY'S LIQUID GLAZES,
Cone 06-04 (225 colors, 10 types) over 100
LEAD-SAFE. LEAD-FREE SERIES, Cone 06-05
(over 35 colors). STONEWARE GLAZES, Cone
G-6 (25 colors). ENGOBES, (23 colors). All
available in 4 oz., pints, gallons at FANTASTIC
prices! ! !
ENGLISH CHINA & BALL CLAYS
Including
GROLLEG
White Firing Plastic China Clay for
Porcelain and Stoneware Throwing
Producers of
DRY BLENDED GLAZES, ALL LEAD-FREE, Cone 06-04,
Cone 5-6, Cone 9-10. Any amount I lb. to 1000 Ibs.!
DISTRIBUTORS FOR: Kemper Tools - - Corks m Sponges
m Marx Brushes m Bamboo Teapot Handles ~ Ohaus
Scales - - Lab. Equipment.
WHEELS: Brent, Spinning Tiger, Lockerbie, Shimpo,
Amaco, Oscar-PauL
"TRUE ALBANY"SLIP CLAY
BLACKBIRDCLAY
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CLAYS: Distributors for Industrial Minerals, Quyle,
Robert Brent. COMPLETE STOCK OF RAW MATERIALS, FRITS, GLAZE STAINS.
COLEMANITE NA
GERSTLEY BORATE - - 200
KILNS: Distributors for Paragon, Olympic Gas and
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Catalogs available 50c (Free to Schools, Institutions and
Military). Liberal wholesale discounts given on many
items. Dealer inquiries invited. Copper Enameling suppries and equipment too. Please write Dept. CM for
into. Attn: Ed Sherry
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CERAMICS MONTHLY
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P.O. Box 104, Livingston, N.J. 07039 (201) 994-36S0
ITINERARY
Continued [rom Page 60
workshop conducted by Dennis Parks;
both at the Sun Valley Center for the
Arts and Humanities. For further information, write: Jim Romberg, Ceramics Department, Sun Valley Center for the Arts
and Humanities, Box 656, Sun Valley
83353.
ILLINOIS~CHICAGO
through January 25 "Twentieth Century Japanese Prints, Paintings, and Ceramics"; at the Art Institute of Chicago.
IOWA, AMES
January l l-February 11 "Clay and Fiber
Show" will display clay sculpture; at The
Octagon Art Center, 232½ Main Street.
KENTUCKY, BEATTYVILLE
January 16-30 The Kentucky Artist/
Craftsman, traveling exhibition; at Lee
County Arts Council, Gourley Heights.
KENTUCKY, JACKSON
February 1-14 The Kentucky Artist/
Craftsman, traveling exhibition; at Breathitt County Arts Council, Lees Junior
College.
KENTUCKY, LONDON
January 1-15 Kentucky Artist/Craftsman, traveling exhibition; at Sue Bennett
College.
KENTUCKY~ PRESTONSBURG
March 13-14 Pottery Workshop con-
Area Exhibition; at the Flint Institute of
Arts, 1120 E. Kearsley Street.
ducted by Naoma Powell; at Prestonsburg
Community College. Write: James W.
Ratcliff, Coordinator, Community Services,
Prestonsburg 41653.
MINNESOTA, MINNEAPOLIS
through January 4 "Steuben: Seventy
MARYLAND~BALTIMORE
through January 26 "Japonisme: Japanese Influence on French Art 1854-1910";
at the Walters Art Gallery.
through June Potter's Guild of Baltimore exhibit and sale; at the guild gallery,
201 Homeland Avenue.
MARYLAND~ STEVENSON
through January 3 Ceramics by Warren MacKenzie.
January lO-February 7 Raku work by
Paul Soldner; both at Nostalgic Et Cetera
Galleries.
MICHIGAN, DETROIT
through January 10 Pewabic Christmas
Show--Annual Sale; at Pewabic Pottery,
10125 E. Jefferson Ave.
January 14-March 14 Michigan Crafts
Exhibition; at the Detroit Institute of
Arts, 5200 Woodward Avenue.
January 18-February 28 "Exhibition of
"funky" and functional work by Jerry
Berta and Madeline Kacsmarczyk; at Pewabic Pottery.
MICHIGAN, FLINT
through January 1l
The 43rd Flint
Years of American Glassmaking," traveling
exhibition; at the Minneapolis Museum of
Art.
]~¢[ISSOURI,KANSAS CITY
through January 4 The Campbell Museum Collection, includes ceramic tureens;
at the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of
Art, 4225 Oak Street.
January 15-February 29 "Ancient Ecuador: Culture, Clay and Creativity 3000300 B.c."; at William Rockhill Nelson
Gallery.
MissouRI, ST. Louis
February 1-March 3 "Ceramic and
Fiber Forms," includes ceramics by Henry
Serenco; at Craft Alliance Gallery.
NEW HAMPSHIRE, ENFIELD
January 11-17 A 5-day seminar for advanced craftsmen is being sponsored by the
League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.
Ceramists Ron Propst and Dennis Parks
will work with participants in ceramics. A
nonrefundable application fee of $10 must
accompany the entry form. Write: The
League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, 205
North Main Street, Concord New Hampshire 03301.
Continued on Page 73
January 1976
71
DiscriminatingCeramistsNeeda
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Exclusive 1 inch insulation in lld and bottom.
*
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3 moveable sections - separate controls and pilot lights.
*
Stainless Steel constructlon.
*
Fires everything from china to porcelain - daily - A must
for those tall pieces that won't fit anywhere else.
"A" DAWSON Automatic Kiln Sitter installed at Paragon.
Convenient Credit Terms available.
See your local Paragon Dealer or
write for our latest catalog
listing over 30 models.
~ ) ~
the
Industries, Inc.
Dept.Cm,
Box~0~33,Dallas, Texas75207
BRUT E
and t h e
GAS
KILNS
1
~4~ Y
which
is w h i c h ? B O T H
P.S. I f you want to SEE M O R E of our equipment,
write for a free brochure showing it all~
72
CERAMICS MONTHLY
For d e t a i l e d information on downdrafts,
updrafts a n d CKC Kiln Kits, r a n g i n g
in size from 1 to 31 cubic feet, write for
your free copy of our n e w catalog.
Nearly a Quarter of a Century
of Qua ty...For Those Who
Demand the Very Best.
ITINERARY
Continued /rom Page 71
Meir, Stoke-on-Trent, England
Since 1794
NEW JERSEY, CAMDEN
January 16-February 29 "Soup Tureens:
1976"; at the Campbell Museum.
NEW, JERSEY, FAIR LAWN
through January 3 Annual Crafts Show;
at the Lillian Kornbluth Gallery.
NEW JERSEY, LAYTON
April 23-25 Workshop in porcelain conducted by Paula Winokur; at Peters Valley. Write: Margot Raab, Administrator,
Peters Valley, Layton 07851.
$230.00 F.O.B. Crestline, Ohio
FEATURES:
• 30" x 30" x S", 14 ga. rust-proofed
steel pan • 13" cast iron throwing head.
a 100 lb. 20" flywheel a Height - - 36"
• Trim bar for foot rimming • Constructed of IV2" x IV2" x 3/16" angle
iron • All seven po;nts of action are
precision ball bearing • Handsome hammer finished pan with black stand a Hip
rest (non-adiustable).
NEV¢ JERSEY, NEWARK
through May "Silk, Tea and Porcelain:
Trade Goods from the Orient" includes
ceramics; at the Newark Museum, 49
Washington St.
]English
61az
N O W A V A I L A B L E IN T H E U . S . A .
NEW JERSEY, SCOTCH PLAINS
January 18-February 21 Garden sculpture, fountains, and other ceramic works
by Dianne and Louis Mendez; at The
Beautiful Things Factory, 1838 E. Second
Street.
YORK, BROOKLYN
HI B. KLOP,
1-19 Exhibition
F . 5' IN & SONS NEWFebruary
of ceramics,
sculpture, and drawings by Jacqueline Ann
Clipsham; at the Atlantic Gallery, 81
Atlantic Avenue.
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New YORK, NEW YORK
through January 4 "Homage to the
Bag" includes ceramics; at the Museum of
Contemporary Crafts, 23 West 53rd Street.
through January 10 White-on-white
porcelain by Ann Semko; at the Fairtree
Gallery, 924 Madison Avenue.
through February 1 "Art of the Six
Dynasties: Centuries of Change and Innovation," includes ceramics; at China House
Gallery, 125 East 65th Street.
January 6-31 Ceramic sculpture by
Richard Shaw; at Braunstein/Quay Gallery, 139 Spring Street.
January 9-24 Recent ceramics by Rene
Murray; at Greenwich House Pottery.
January 23-25 First International Craft
Film Festival, sponsored by the New York
State Craftsmen, Inc.; at the Fifth Avenue
Cinema, 70 Fifth Avenue.
January 30-February 14 "Masque and
Metamorphosis," an exhibit of stoneware
and porcelain masks, handbuilt bowls, and
recent work by Robert Sherman; at Greenwich House Pottery, 16 Jones St.
• English glazes, stains, offglaze colours
• Real English Bone China Clay
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and additional information
con tact our exclusive U. S. A
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Stewart Clay, Co, Inc
NEW YORK, ROCHESTER
January 17-February 6 Clay sculpture
by Scott Chamberlain, Graham Marks, and
George Mason; at The Archive, 345 East
Avenue.
NEW YORK, SCARSDALE
through January I0 "A Craftsworks
tMill mix
Celebration" includes ceramics; at The
e drudgery Craftsman's Gallery, 16 Chase Rd.
r creat[v¢
:tion.
H a r r i s o n M a y e r Ltd., t h e
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through January 18 The Fifth Regional
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FINE CLAY, GLAZES and POI"rERY EQUIPMENT
Page 74
January 1976
73
ITINERARY
Continued /rom Page 73
Crafts Show, sponsored by the Designer
Crafts Council; at the Schenectady Museum.
NORTH CAROLINA, CHAPEL HILl.
February 8-15 "Potters Choice," an exhibition by 20 Chapel Hill ceramists; at
the Wesley Foundation.
NORTH CAROLINA~ CULLO~,VHEE
January 11-30 "North Carolina Glass
'76" includes slide lecture by Harvey Littleton; at Western Carolina University.
P
AKU
Made from Aluminum and Fibreglass they are all super heat resistant
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NORTH CAROLINA, WINSTON-SALEM
January 2-31 Exhibition of ceramic environments by Paul Van Zandt; at the
Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art,
500 South Main Street.
NORTH DAKOTA, VALLEY CITY
through January 4 "Handicrafts of the
Southeast," Smithsonian traveling exhibition.
February 7-AIarch 7 "Contemporary
Crafts of the Americas," traveling exhibition; both at Second Crossing Gallery,
Valley City State College.
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OHIO, CINCINNAT1
February 18-March 28 "The Ladies,
God Bless 'Em" exhibition, featuring Japanese- and French-influenced works by
Cincinnati women artists; at the Cincinnati
Art Museum.
OHIO, COI.UMBUS
Contact:
January ll-February 29 28th Annual
Ohio Ceramic and Sculpture Show; at the
Butler Institute of American Art, 524 Wick
s._
m
P.O. Box 570-681, Miami, Fla. 33157
CERAMIC FIBER insulation will
reduce fuel consumption, decrease firing time. and improve
temperature distribution when
added to any brick kiln!
OHIO, YOUNGSTOWN
r-
BarlmmE. Wilson & Assoc.
OHIO, CI.EVEI.AN1)
January 27-28 "Ceramics U.S.A.," second in a workshop series, sponsored by
three Cleveland area institutions, features raku work with Susan and Steven
Kemenyffy of Edinboro, Pennsylvania; at
Cleveland State University.
through February 29 "Common Clay to
Ceramic: A Brief History of English Pottery"; at the Columbus Gallery of Fine
Arts, 480 East Broad Street.
0
z
To order write:
uperamics
h x $*. Lowrenceville Georgia ) 0 2 4 |
Deborah G. Mu¢how
- 404-96)437)
Avenue.
~orr
ONTARIO, LONDON
through January 3 Art in Craft, the
of:
4th Biennial of the Canadian Guild of
r
~o3
r- t:~
.¢.., o~ b.- ID
U 0
•7 _ = 3
f:oS
74
OREGON, EUGENE
~- G ~ ~
Exhibition includes ceramics by Betty Feves; at the Museum of
Art, University of Oregon.
o~t-
o=
,~" ~ L - ~ "
January 4-3l
"OO
0
Crafts (Ontario); at the London Public
Library and Art Museum.
<
CERAMICS MONTHLY
c)
OREGON~ PORTLAND
January 6-30 Exhibition includes ceramics by John Takehara.
Continued on Page 75
~ SHIMPO, BRENT,
MAX,WALRUS,&
~ SPINNING TIGER
-~--~
WHEELS • ALSO
L & L , AIM, & SKUTT KILNS • A N D
l o o m s , clay, tools, l e a t h e r t h o n g s ,
teapot handles, cork, spigots
and sponges. Write for brochure
3ALVIN f l . ~ E UPPERI~g.)N'I'CLMRN.J~ 07043
ITINERARY
Continued [rum Page 74
February 4-29 Two-man exhibition ineludes ceramics by Paul Soldner; both at
Contemporary Crafts Gallery, 3934 S.W.
Corbett Avenue.
PENNSVLVANIA~ PITTSBURGH
January 2-10 Redware and white earthenware plates, by Roger Zellner.
January 12-29 American Indian Pottery of the Southwest, pre-Columbian to
the present, and artifacts from the Kujundzic Collection; all at The Clay Place,
5600 Walnut Street.
PENNSYLVANIA, WEST CHESTER
through January 2 Exhibition includes
ceramics by Susan Wilson: at The Marshalton Gallery.
~I'ENNESSEE, CHATTANOOGA
February 28-April 4 "Chinese Export
Porcelain: Selections from the Reeves Collection"; at Hunter Museum of Art, 10
Bluff View.
TENNESSEE, JOHNSON CITY
February 2-26 Sixth Biennial Exhibition at the Carroll Reece Museum, East
Tennessee State University.
TENNESSEE, MEMPHIS
........
.n'taxinllUl~
in
January 3-February 8 "Chinese Export
Porcelain: Selections from the Reeves Collection"; at Brooks Memorial Art Gallery,
Overton Park.
CUSTOM
BUSINESS CARDS
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Sample on requesf. 50c each
"['ENNESSEE~ OAK RIDGE
January 17-February 21 Ceramics by
Charles Counts: at Ridgeway Gallery.
"I'EXAS, AUSTIN
through February 1,5 "Images for Eternity," artifacts from ancient Egypt: at
Michener Gallery. University of Texas.
~I'ExAS~ FORT WORTH
February 12-March 28 "Steuben: Sex'enty Years of American Glassmaking"
traveling exhibition; at Amon Carter Museum of Western Art.
KLECKNER'S SUPPLY CO.
23-.11 Cornaga Ave., Far Rockaway, N.Y. 11691
CUSTOM CERAMIC DECALS
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February 13-15 Third Annual Ceramic
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i~
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© 1974 Max Cord
UTAH~ PROVO
January 9-February 6 Sculpture and
ceramics invitational exhibition; at the art
department gallery, Weber State College.
UTAH, SALT LAKE CITY
through January 5 Exhibition of ceramics and glass by Roger Davis; at the
art department gallery, The University of
Utah.
Authorized
Dealers
1147 E. Elm
Fullertan, Calif. 92631
design..,
WISCONSIN, MILWAUKEE
through January 18 "Frontier America:
- - T h e Far West": at the Milwaukee Art
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Box 34068
Washington, D.C. 20034
(301) 365-1544
Free illustrated brochure.
Name
Address.
State/Zip
Phone
The Max Corporation
Box 34068 Washington, D.C. 20034
January 1976
75
HOBBY
& PROFESSIONAL
Precision KILNS
13
LO'
AT TH S
INSUL
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Write for COMPLETE information
Dept. B
IMMEDIATE
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I THOMASSTUARTWHEELS!
Precision Bu,lf
Now it is possible to eliminate the problems of plaster bats,
produce masonite, plywood or chipboard bats quickly and
inexpensively, and have a bat system which will permit the
use of the same bats on every wheel in the shop regardless of
make or model. Guilds can permit its members to make their
own bats, then usa the Guild's drill jig to drill them. Each
member can have his own bats.
Our Space Saver Bat System permits the use of bats as small
as 8½". A large percentage of the pots thrown in a dlop will
not require a 12" bat. Small bats conserve storage spacel
Blosser's Universal Bat System includes:
1) A rugged bat-head with 3 / 8 " nylon lugs on 10" centers,
which is mounted on the wheel-head of the potter's wheel- no
drilling necessary.
2) An accurate and sturdy drill-jig for drilling perfectly
aligned holes in bats.
3) A 1/4" tempered 12" masonite bet as a sample.
System Complete $23.00
Items may be purchased separately
Bat-head $11.00
Drill-jig $12.50
Bats $1.50
Ask your dealer first, if he doesn't have our bat systems write
us for our brochure:
Earth 'N Ore
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Michigan residents add 4% Sales Tax
76
CERAMICSMONTHLY
530-1541
Boll Togefher Mefal Frame
CERAMAGTIVITIES
Continued [rom Page 69
slat) constructed. Shown from the exhibition is one of the ceramist's heavily grogged
stoneware forms with scraped surface dec-
~ h i m p o Potters W h e e l s
Brent Potters Wheels
Pacifica Potters W h e e l s
Soldner Potters W h e e l s • Clay Mixer
Skutt Potters W h e e l s • Kilns
Crusader Kilns
Cress Kilns
r h e r m o l i t e Gas K i l n s
O l y m p i c Gas K i l n s
Estrin Clay Mixer • P u g Mill
Kemper Tools
Ohaus Scales
Walrus Potters W h e e l s
Toolwright Potters W h e e l s
~IlChe*IeY.N~VOrk]OS73
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tgt4)937.2047
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Solid Wood Rolling Pins For Clay
Select kiln dried maple, oil treated with
satin finish. Overall lengths below.
32" roller $8.95 (top of photo) 90c UPS
24" roller $6.95 [center of photo) 75c UPS
18" roller $4.95 [bottom of photo) 50c UPS
I I" maple pestles, A It., B rt., $3.9S, S0c UPS
D,nald O. MavH,~
oration typical of terra-cotta sculpture.
Donald Mavros is the a u t h o r of Getting
Started in Ceramics, published by Macmillan Company, New York.
M y r n a Bosse presented bronze, stone.
a n d clay sculpture, including a series of
ceramic pieces m a d e in the United States
a n d in J a p a n . She also exhibited jewelry,
with individual ceramic heads a n d h a n d formed silver and gt,ld mountings.
MISSOURI EXHIBITION
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AH~: John H. Kolstad, Pres.
1976 THIRTY YEARS
SUPPLYING
SCHOOLS
AND
INSTITUTIONS
~,
CERAMIC SUPPLIES AND
EQUIPMENT
S e n d for
catalogs.
Send o n e
to s c h o o l s
QUALITY WOOD PRODUCTS
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THE CERAMIST
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~ [email protected]@I
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s n~cServceIAC
9 River St..Oneonta.N.Y.,13820(6074323812)
T h e Missouri Cra/ts Council opened its
1975-76 season with an a n n u a l statewide
competition at the
Albrecht Museum o[
Art, St. Joseph, Miso
:~i ~ ¸
souri, held October
5 through November
3. Jurors selected 53
works in all m e d i a
for display at the
m u s e u m , with approximately 50 of
these to be shown
Richmd (,tim,t
in a traveling exhit)ition scheduled to visit eight locations in
Missouri. Shm~n from the exhibition is
" H o m a g e to R C A , " 30 inches in height, by
Richard Grimm, Clayton, Missouri. T h e
ceramist was selected for the "juror's
choice" award . f $100. Joyce Weller of
Columbia, Missouri, received a $75 award
for "best clay work." T h e Missouri Crafts
Council is a nonprofit organization partially supported by the Missouri State
Council on the Arts.
Pressed Wood Bats and Wedging Boards
Plastic Surface One Side. 3/4" thick
20" x 23" $3.50 plus $I.50 UPS
15" x 15" $2.50 plus $1.00 UPS
12" round bats 3 for $5.00 plus $I UPS
9" round bats 3 for $2.95 plus 80c UPS
9" round hardwood bets 3 for $2.95 plus 80c UPS
9" square hardwood bats 3 for $2.50 plus 75c UPS
Maple Mallets 3" dTa. heed $2.95 plus 50c UPS
.+
Solid Maple Mortar and Pestle
SS.gs
plus 75c UPS
Solid Maple (footed) Workboard 2" x 12" x
12", plus maple mallet and m;xing spoon.
Complete set $9.95 plus $1 UPS.
"CERAMIC FORMULAS"
AT THE WORKS GALLERY
Sculptural work in the ceramic m e d i u m
was exhibited by Frank Pereira in a group
show at The Works Gallery, Pelham, New
York, O c t o b e r 3-25. T h e artist's pieces
were constructed from smooth and geometrical wheel-thrown forms with slip a n d
iron oxide applied to areas defined by
incising. Most of the surfaces were left
Continued on Page 79
(complete compendium)
$10.95 postpaid.
West of Denver add 10c per item for shipping.
School and Art Dealers inquiries [nvlted.
FALCONCOMPANY
Box 224, Jennersfown, Pa. 15547
January
1976
77
THE KILN BOOK
r R e c o m m e n d e d books on ceramics from
BOOK DEPARTMENT
ORDER ANY OF THESE SELECT TITLES
ON OUR MONEY.BACK GUARANTEE. WE PAYPOST'AGE
NATUREAS DESIGNER
HANDBOOK OF DESIGNS AND DEVICES
by Bertel Bager. This unusual and stimulating
book presents a treasured collection of plant
llfe. The forms will suggest an infinite number of shapes end textures for pottery. An
outstanding gift select;on.
$14,95
MAKING POTTERY WITHOUT A WHEEL
by F. Carlton Ball and Janice Lovoos. This
richly illustrated book covers every phase
of handbuilding and decorating clay pieces.
No book covers the subiect of texture and
form so effectively. It is a book every
teacher should have.
$10.95
FINDING ONE'S WAY WITH CLAY
by Paulus Berensohn. This unique book offers
a new approach to making pots. It is a
clear, readable, and definitive book on
making pots using the pinch method. $9.95
PIONEER POTTERY
by Michael Cardew. The main purpose of
this book is to help craftsmen who want to
make pottery using natural materials without
depending on customary sources of supply.
Covers clays, glazes, kilns.
$15.00
CERAMIC FORMULAS:
THE COMPLETE COMPENDIUM
by John W. Conrad. This very useful text
contains over 700 tested formulas for clay
bodies and glazes in all firing ranges. Features special coded color charts.
$10.95
POTTERY WORKSHOP
by Charles Counts. A complete studio-workshop manual which guides the apprenticereader from clay to kiln in 250 step-by-step
photos. WriHen by a master craftsman, it
will serve as an inspiration and guide for
all students of pottery.
$8.95
ILLUSTRATED DICTIONARY
OF PRACTICAL POTTERY
by Robert Fournier. This work is exhaustive
in scope and detail. There are nearly 1200
entries which are listed alphabetically, and
over 450 illustrations.
$12.50
STEP- BY- STEP CERAMICS
by Jolyon Hofsted. A complete introduction
to ceramics! There are special sections on
the Potter's Wheel, Glazing, Firing a Kiln,
Building Your Own Kiln, and Raku. $2.95
THE COMPLETEBOOKOF
POTTERY MAKING
by John B. Kenny. The "best seller" in the
ceramic field! Step-by-step photo lessons
cover all of the pottery-making techniques:
clays, glazes, firing, plaster, etc.
$7.50
KERAMOS
by Franz Kriwanek. All of the basic areas of
ceramic work are covered in this book. The
examples of pottery are impressive. There
is a refreshing treatment of subject matter
that makes the book unique.
$5.50
CERAMIC SCIENCE FOR THE POTTER
by W. G. Lawrence. The best source for
information on producing flameware and
ovenware, complete wlfh body and glaze
formulas. A technical volume written for
those having no science background. $10.95
I
ir._~r[~._Bacjer--Nature $14.95
[]
Ball--Pottery $10.9S
[]
B Berensohn--Findincj $9.95 [ ]
Cardew--Pioneer $15.00 [ ]
[ ] Conrad--Formulas $10.95 [ ]
[ ] Counts--Workshop $8.95 [ ]
[]
by Bernard Leach. Now in its twelfth American edition, this book should be in the
library of every poffer.
$12.75
CERAMICS
by Glenn C. Nelson. A complete studio
handbook for the potter. Properties, preparation and forming of clay are covered
in detail, along with basic information on
decorating, glazing, and firing.
$14.95
SELLING YOUR CRAFTS
by Norbert N. Nelson. This book leads you
through the actual stages necessary to sell
successfully what you produce. Covers such
diverse channels of sales as wholesale, retail,
mail order and specialty markets.
$3.95
Fournier--Dictlonary $12.50
Hofsted--Ceramlcs $2.95
Hornuncjj--Desicjns $2.00
Kenny--Desiqn $9.95
Kenny--Sculpture $9.95
Kenny--Pottery $7.50
Krlwanek--Keramos SS.SO
NAME
i
CITY
j -
78
-j
[]
[]
[]
[]
~
Lawrence--Science $10.95
Leach--Potter's Book $12.75
Nelson--Ceramlcs $14.95
Nelson--Sellincj Crafts $3.95
Olsen--Kiln Book $8.95
~1 Parmelee--Glazes $18.50
Peterson--Shoji Hamada $t5.95
[ ] Plepenburg--Raku $12.95
[ ] Rhodes--Clay & Glazes $12.50
.'.--1 Rhodes -Kilns $10.00
[ ] Rhodes--Stoneware $7.S0
[ ] R|eggor--Raku $12.9S
l ADDRESs
STATE
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CERA~,ilCS ~IONTI-ILY
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CERAMIC GLAZES
by Cullen W. Parmelee. A carefully revised
edition of one of the standard texts on
glazes. If is • comprehensive study of every
aspect of the subject with clear, concise explanations. An essential reference with 612
pages of technical information.
$18.50
SHOJI HAMADA, A POTTER'S WAY
AND WORK
by Susan Peterson. Contains a wealth of
detail about Hamada's forming, glazing, and
firing techniques and includes a very useful
glossary-lndex. A great gift for a potter
friend.
$15.95
RAKU POTTERY
by Robert Piepenburg. This outstanding text
effectively covers the basic information on
raku. A very practical guide containing instruction on clays, glazes, kilns, firing, and e
chapter on safety precautions.
$12.95
CLAY AND GLAZES FOR THE POTTER
by Daniel Rhodes. This revised edition covers
all the fundamentals of clays and glazes. An
important reference source.
$12.50
KILNS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION
& OPERATION
by Daniel Rhodes. Everything you need to
know about kilns - - setting up, firing, types
- - i s described and demonstrated. $10.00
STONEWARE AND PORCELAIN
by Daniel Rhodes. Describes techniques and
materials used in hlgh-fire poffery. Includes
sections on clay bodies, glazes, colors, textures and decoration.
$7.50
RAKU: ART & TECHNIQUE
A POTTER'S BOOK
We Pay Postage
Order Form
-BOOK DEPARTMENT Box 12448. Columbus, Ohio 43212
[--
I
by Clarence Hornung. Over 1800 sketches
of basic designs and variations including the
circle, line, scroll, fret, shield, snow crystals
and many more useful symbols.
$2.00
CERAMIC DESIGN
by John B. Kenny. Complete instructions for
methods of forming and decorating ware are
given, with step-by-step photos to guide the
designer along the way.
$9.95
CERAMIC SCULPTURE
by John B. Kenny. Contains over I000 photos
and sketches covering all phases of the
sculptor's art. A valuable aid for all teachers
and craftsmen.
$9.98
by Frederick L. Olsen. Covers in detail
both the technical and aesthetic aspects
of kiln construction and firing. WriHen in
a style that ;s easy to follow and ;nformatively illustrated. Paperback.
$8.95
Sanders--Japanese $17.S0
Sanders--Special Effects SI3.95
Sunset edltors--Ceramics $1.95
WeHlaufer--Survival $2.95
Wildenhaln--Pottery $9.95
by Hal Riegger. The first complete book on
Raku. Covers clay and glaze preparation,
kiln building and firing techniques. BeautiFully illustrated.
$12.95
THE WORLD OF JAPANESE CERAMICS
by Herbert Sanders. This handsome book
illustrates the forming and decorating processes and the unique tools used by the
potters of Japan. Includes glaze formulas,
color charts, and American equivalents of
Japanese glaze compositions.
$17.50
GLAZES FOR SPECIAL EFFECTS
by Herbert Sanders. Covers the theory and
production of crystals in glazes, the technique of copper reduction glazes, the accumulation and use of ash for wood and
plant ash glazes, end embellishments such
as luster and underglaze decoration. $13.95
CERAMICS
by the editors of Sunset magazine. An excellent new text for becjinners end those
teaching beginners. Well-planned projects
carry the reader through basic handbuilding
and throwing techniques using a minimum
of tools and equipment.
$1.95
THE CRAFTSMAN'S SURVIVAL MANUAL
by George and Nancy Wefflaufer. This
manual is directed to those poffers who
wish to make • full- or part-time living from
their craft. Contains practical bus;hess and
marketing information.
$2.95
POTTERY: FORM AND EXPRESSION
by Marguerite Wildenhain. A truly beautiful
book! Magnificent pictures of the author at
work and of ancient and contemporary pottery. An outstanding gift selection. $9.95
AARDVARK
HI-LO BANDING WHEELS
WE'VE BEENACCUSED
Diam.
Wf. (Approx)
Continued [rom Page 77
unglazed and the pieces fired to Cone 10.
Lines of silver, gold, or bronze luster were
then applied to glaze areas and the forms
retired to Cone 018. Although the ceramist's work was sculptural in nature, the
Cost
73~"
7 Lb.
$16.50
91,/2"
II Lb.
20.50
I 13~,,
13 Lb.
26.50
AND
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CERAMACTIVITIES
Cast iron Heavy Duty Wheels
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D I S T R I B U T O R S FOR:
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EOUIPMENT
PARAGON kilns - OHAUS scales - ROBERT
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CAPITAL CERAMICS,
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Phone (801} 466.6471 or 466.6420
P~
F U L L LINE OF CORK P R O D U C T S
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IIW~l
Send'. . . . . . . . pJete
Ceramic Supply Catalog,
$1.00 refunded on
Ceramist Elizabeth MacDonald was one
.f .!\ { ~af~.rnen exhibiting their work
at The Cra[tsman's
Gallery, Scarsdale,
New York, from September 13 through
O c t o b e r 18. T h e
artist uses slab and
coil t e c h n i q u e s to
create forms, leaving
the works unglazed
to reveal the color
and texture of clay.
Shown is " L a n d Elizabeth 3Iml)ona/d
scape," 11 inches in
height, slab-built with multicolored body.
Also featured in the exhibition were glassblower John Cook, and enamelist Ginny
Whitney. Photo: Gordon Lewis.
4810 PAN ~IE~ICAN FREEWAY N.E.
AIBUQU~QUE. NEW HEXICO 87109
CLODION SCULPTURE
•
DISTRIBUTORS WANTED
t
•
7
EVERY TYPE OF CLAY . . .
FROM SLIP CASTING
"~ CLAY TO BEAUTIFUL
I \ THROWING STONEWARE
| ~ AND PORCELAIN.
THE CRAFTSMAN'SGALLERY
L & L KILNS
CERAMIC
l
I
Frank Pereira
majority of the 25 pieces exhibited were
also functional. Shown are two untitled
forms with incised decoration and luster
glaze. Frank Pereira is one of the directors
of The Works Gallery.
OF PRODUCING THE
FINEST CLAYS FOR
THE CERAMIC TRADE
An 18th century terra-cotta sculpture
was acquired recently by the Cincinnati
Art Museum, Ohio.
,i~ -~
"Bacchant and Bac•
~:
chante with Cupid,"
[~
I~
by the French sculptor Clodion (Claude
Michel) is represen/-~
~
tative of 18th cen/ E~\~%
tury rococo French
~.~,~,~.
~'~
art which often depicted scenes from
~ ~
classical mythology.
Signed by the artist
and dated 1799, the
Clodion
sculpture is approximately 22 inches in height. In 1885, the
work was described by its owner, Alfred
de Rothschild, as a "grouping of a bacchanal dressed in tiger's skin, supporting
a young girl slightly draped; she holds
a branch laden with grapes over her left
shoulder. The Bacchanal stands with his
right foot on an overturned vases and in
front is a cupid on tiptoe, vainly endeavoring to reach the grapes."
[ ] Enclosed" $27.50 for enameling furnace.
[ ] Enclosed: $.50 for brochure, prices and
new color chart for lead-free copper and
|
aluminum enamels.
I
I [ ] Enclosed: $5.00 for beginner kit of lead|
free copper enamels and instructions.
[ ] Enclosed: $B.O0 for beginner klt of leadfree alumlnum enamels and instructions,
Enclosed: $36 for all items listed above.
I
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CI'Pt
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STATE.
ZIP
,dOk the CERAMICCOATINGCo.
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~41l=ILII I~1~ P.O. Box 370C, Newport, Kentucky 41072
S
LARGESTDOMESTICMANUFACTUREROF ENAMELSFOR BOTHART & INDUSTRY
January 1976 79
WITTELSPOTTERSWHEELS,Inc.
P.O. Box 18010
Denver, Colorodo 80218
"wrife
for
more
informaflon"
Would you like to know what people are
saying about the ~ttelS potterS Wheel?
John Spiteri, owner of Stoneware & Porcelain in
Arvada, Colorado says:
"I need a reasonably priced wheel that will
answer the rigorous demands of studio production
work and still be portable enough to use for
demonstrations and teaching away f r o m the
studio. Wittels Wheels do both. The Wittels Wheel
stands up to day in, day out studio work. Its
smooth power and dependability allow me to
throw the largest stoneware forms on a
production basis and still be able to turn out
small, precise pieces."
"BEAUTY BY THE BRUSHFUL"
~'~
The approved, safe glaze for dinnerware
~-;;.::,. ~ and food or drink containers.
REWARD CERAMIC COLOR MFRS. INC.
314 Hammonds Ferry Road
Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061
" I M I T A T E D BUT NEVER DUPLICATED"
80
CERAMICS ~'IONTHLY
LETTERS
Continued from Page 9
which we learned about from C M (Itinerary), and some of our m e m b e r s have
done very well in them.
I just got back from the 9th A n n u a l
Super M u d Conference in Niagara Falls,
New York, a n d I now have a wider scope
in this m a t t e r of funk vs. traditional. I can
see w h y C M m u s t show so m u c h funk
p o t t e r y - - t h e r e really is a lot of it around!
Rosa M. de Castro
G u a y n a b o , Puerto Rico
~,
~~
READERS' COMMENTS
Old C M readers seldom w r i t e - - t h e y just
renew! K e e p showing some of all styles of
ceramics.
Mrs. R. L. Flatray
Stanwood, Wash.
f. onl
Except for an occasional glaze formula
a n d articles on folk pottery, e a r t h e n w a r e
is looked down on by C M !
Snake River Pottery
Bliss, l d a h .
You've really got your stuff together
with the September a n d O c t o b e r CM's- there's s o m e t h i n g for everyone.
Being a novice potter, I ' m concentrating
on craftsmanship, a n d your techniques
have greatly helped as I a m pretty m u c h
self-taught a n d have no one to show me
the tricks of the trade. And, while I m a y
not dig the funky pottery as m u c h as the
t r a d i t i o n a l / f u n c t i o n a l ware, I believe I
need to be exposed to it. As I get m y skills
together, I hope to b r a n c h off a n d develop
some of the i m a g i n a t i o n a n d p u r e creativity it takes to p u t together the u n u s u a l art
that a few of your readers disdain.
PEACH
NEW
C A S T L E , COLO. 8 1 6 4 7
Leslie Brockel
Milwaukee, Wis.
I do ceramics as a hobby, a n d enjoy
looking at pictures of other potters' work,
especially t h r o w n pieces.
John Kle[er
Kokomo, Ind.
Share your thoughts with other CM readers--be they quip, query, comment, or advice. All letters must be signed, but names
will be withheld on request. Address: The
Editor, CERAMICS MONTaLV, Box 12448,
Columbus, Ohio 4.3212.
303-914-2246
It takes 3
to dothe job
I.as Vegas, Nev.
I have subscribed to C M for about six
years now a n d a m impressed by the growth
of professionalism exhibited in the m a g a zine. However, you still have a distance to
go in order to wipe out the image of the
potter as merely a hobbyist occupation. I
c o m m e n d you for your efforts a n d encourage you to keep raising editorial policies in regard to professionalism.
POTTERY
RT. 1 BOX 101
Penny Fedorchak
W h y doesn't C M p u t dollar values on
pots shown in articles to help potters in
pricing ware?
Ron Borou,y
Baltimore, Md.
VALLEY
r
f ."iV.,.
Guido /
Cone
Cone
The Edward
ORTON
Jr. Ceramic
FOUNDATION
]445 Summit Street
Columbus, Ohio 43201
Three Orton cones are the
best firing insurance you
can have. The guide cone
lets you know the ware is
approaching maturity, and
the firing cone lets you
know the firing is at the
correct point. Deformation
of the guard cone indicates
you have gone beyond the
best point in the time-and.
temperature relationship.
/~
4
/
l
Guard
Cone
Plaques of cones placed so they may be
observed through the peep holesgive you
an indication of firing progress.These,and
others, placed' throughout the setting or used in
conjunction with automatic shut-off devices, may be
examinedafter firingis completedto giveyoua detailed
picture of conditionsin all parts of the kiln.
Learn moreaboutOrlonStandardPyrometricconesand
how they can help you to better, more uniform firing
results. Ask your dealer fora free copyof "OrtonCones
and their Importanceto the Hobby Potter".
January
1976
81
Cone 10 stoneware clays and glazes and the
very best suppliers throughout the nation to distribute them to you. Ask your local ceramic
supply about WCS; they'll tell you. Stoneware is our business!
Alberta Ceramic Supply Lid
11565 149 St.
Edmonton. Alberta C A N A D A
Clay Gallery
323 SW Higgins
Missoula, MT 59801
Franklin Gallery
6 W Santa Fe
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Leslie Ceramics
1212 San Pablo
Berkeley. CA 94706
Seattle Pottery Supply Inc.
5261 University Way S E.
Seattle, WA 98105
Capital Ceramics
2174 South Main
Salt Lake City, UT 83115
Clay N Things
1215 Barstow
Clovis, CA 93612
Hill Brothers
4450 N 42rid St.
Phoenix. AZ 85019
Ceramic & Crafts Supply
490 Fifth Street
San Francisco. CA 94107
Eagle Ceramics. Inc
12264 Wilkins Ave
Rockville. MD 20852
Hood Ceramics
Box 1213
San Antonio. TX 78294
Marin Candles & Ceramics
23 Simms St.
San Rafael. CA 94901
Marion Ceramics
3418 North 24th St
Phoenix. AZ 85016
Ceramics Hawaii Ltd
629 C Cooke St
Honolulu
HI 96313
Ceramic Supply of San Diego
330 16th St
San Diego, CA 92101
Estrin Mfg Ltd.
1767 W. 3rd Ave.
Vancouver. B.C.. CANADA
B6J 1K7
Interstate Stone & Block
3300 Crater Lake Highway
Medford. OR 97501
Shep Stoneware Supply
Route #2 Box 365H
Arroyo Grande, CA 93420
Shop of Art
26 East University Dr
Tempe. AZ 85281
Six G's Workshop
313 Main Ave.
Moorehead, MN 56560
Char Mar Ceramics
2126 No Stone
Tucson. AZ 85705
Evans Ceramics
1518 S. Washington
Wichita, KS 67211
Mile High Ceramics
1155 So. Cherokee
Denver. CO 80263
Northern Gate Ceramic Supply
5455 Hwy 9
Felton. CA 95018
Paramount Ceramics
220 N State St
Fairmont, MN 56031
Richards Pug Mill
8065 S.E 13th St
Portland. OR 97202
Kickwheel Pottery & Supply
217 Marray Dr.
Chamblee, GA 30341
L & R Specialties
120 So Main
Box 373
Westwood Ceramic Supply Co. Nixa,MO 85~14
14400 Lomitas Ave. City of Industw, Calif. 91744
m
i m
Stewarts of California
16055 Heron Ave
La Mirada. CA 90638
Waycraft
394 Delaware
Imperial Beach, CA 92032
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Designed by a potter who cares and an
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823 Rorke Way, Palo Alto, California 94303
82
CERAMICS l~iO NTHLY
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oTB~ cUI~y~ A, Axr.ABL~. Fol~. I~Fo,
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,, B
INI I'T£1' Y
NEW
HAMADA, POTTER
by Bernard Leach
This well-crafted and inclusive volume consists mainly of a dialogue between Bernard
Leach, England's legendary ceramist, and
Shoji Hamada, Japan's renowned Living
National Treasure. Tape-recorded interviews made in 1973, material selected from
all of Hamada's published writings, and
numerous letters are blended in the text
to form a dialogue which traces Hamada's
development as a potter until the present
day, revealing his ideas on materials and
techniques, insights into work and aesthetics, and the interrelation of craft and
lifestyle.
The preface of the book, by Janet Leach.
comments, "More often than not, a biography of one of the 'greats' is of little actual
value to those in the same profession who
are working out their own problems a
decade or more later. But I feel that
Hamada . . . sets an example and has a
viable statement to make to craftsmen
coping with today's problems."
The dialogue is followed by 80 biographical photos, a section of 40 full-page color
photos of ware including bottles, plates or
dishes, and teabowls: a selection of ware
BOOKS
in black-and-white; and six pages of
sketches. 305 pages. $50. Harper and Row,
Publishers, Inc., 10 East 53rd Street, New
York, New York 10022.
KILN BUILDING WITH SPACE-AGE MATERIALS
by Frank Colson
With the commercial introduction of lightweight ceramic-fiber refractory materials,
first developed for use in the space program, the concepts of kiln construction and
firing have been revolutionized. This text
by ceramist Frank Colson is concerned
with the adaptation and utilization of these
refractories for practical firing equipment,
from portable raku apparatus to production-size car kilns. An introductory section
orients the reader to the different types of
ceramic refractories now commercially
available, and provides a brief historical
sketch of their development. The first
chapter contains a theoretical survey of
kiln types and firing practices, while the
presentation is concluded with three chapters on additional applications for spaceage materials; methods for troubleshooting
problems encountered when firing in the
fiber-insulated kiln; and pollution problems, safety considerations, and the poten-
tial of firing with gas generated in a methane digester. Presented in individual chapters are tested designs and instructions for
constructing six types of fiber-insulated
kilns, including an updraft catenary arch
kiln, a downdraft roman arch kiln, a
suspension drum kiln, a portable raku kiln,
and a production-size kiln with two car
beds. A list of suppliers and an index are
also provided. Approximately 140 blackand-white photographs and diagrams. 127
pages. $11.95. Van Nostrand Reinhold
Company, 450 West 33rd Street, Nezc
York, New York 10001.
RAKU
by Christopher Tyler and Richard Hirsch
An inclusive commentary covering diverse
aspects of raku, from technical processes
through historical philosophy, this book
was assembled through traditional research
as we]l as active dialogue with contemporary raku potters. Introductory material
traces the origin and development of raku
in Japan and proceeds to an examination
of its evolution as a contemporary medium
in the United States. Four of the text's
seven chapters elaborate on approaches to
Continued on Page 85
t :b-
I=Sal
JACQUELYN:
JAL-CRAFT:
VELVA-GLO OPAQUE & TRANSLUCENT STAINS
BRUSH O N SEALERS & PEARL-ETTES
SPRAY-ETTE SEALERS & METALLICS
GOLD WASH & GOLD PEARL SPRAYETTES
LUSTER-ETTE POWDERS
TEXTURE MATERIALS
•
BRUSH ON CRACKLE
VELVA-GLO BRUSHES
•
TECHNIQUE BOOKS
TRAN-TINTS for China Paint Effects & Rouging
SPRAY-ETTE TRANSLUCENTS for Antiquing
OPAQUE & TRANSLUCENT WATER BASE STAINS
BRUSH ON SEALERS
•
GLUE
•
MASK
SYNTHETIC VARNETTE - - spray and pints
BRUSHES - - STAINS, LINERS, GLAZE,
SHADERS, DETAIL, UNDERGLAZE types
W O O D CRAFT ITEMS
DECOTIQUE rub-on designs
~ l ~ a
CERAMICART,Inc.
pt. CM-975
109 Monarch Dr.
JAL-CRAFT, P.O. l a x 250, Liverpool, N.Y. 13088
Supplies •v•il•ble from Disfribufors and D e • l e t s in
your a r e • . Disfrlbuforshlps avail•ble in some • r e • s .
For further informaflon, w r i f e f • Jacquelyn's.
Liverpool, N.Y. 13088
IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY
January
1976
83
IMPROVED
EXT
& HANDLE
A time saving must for professional potters. Ideal for schools.
Easily makes handles, foot rims,
kiln furniture, tubes, mirror
frames, pots without a wheel
and many other forms. Saves
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months of use. Solid steel construction, lifetime guarantee.
Extruder, one-inch round die,
and two blank dies with instructions $65.00 F.O.B. Scott Creek.
The New E x t r u d e r Die Kit
makes over 50 shapes. Solids,
hollow tubes from 1" to 21/2 ,'
in diameter. Squares, cylinders,
triangular tubes or any combination. Blank dies available to
cut your own shapes for beads,
handles, tiles, flutes, etc. Complete set of 12 dies, inserts
and bracket $32.00 F.O.B. Scott
Creek.
MAKER
Add 6 % sales tax in Calif. Send check or money
ordqr to:
SCOTT
482 Swanton
CREEK
POTTERY
Rd. Davenport,Ca.
95017
(415) 426-5091
The
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POTTERY
a better buy. III
540 LA GUARDIA PLACE
NEW YORK CITY N.Y. 10012
A.C. 212 475-72:56,-9742
BRENT
E Q U I P M E N T : AMACO,
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CALIFORNIA GAS KILN CO, CRESS,L&L,
JENKEN, MENCO, OHAUS, PACIFICA
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earth
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DIVISION OF DICK BLICK
84-
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Dept. C
P.O. Box 1267
Galesburg,
Illinois 61401
SUPPLIES:
cLAYs,
TOOLS,
CHEMICALS,
STONEWARE GLAZES, FIRINGS.
BEGINNERS,
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W 0 R K S H 0 P'°X'°'~'°",
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KILNS, ELECTRIC8 KICK WHEELS.
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FOB
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TROY MICH C O D
BOOKS
Continued from Page 83
*~ ,
ONLY
form and forming; clay and glazes; kilns-requirements, construction, and use; and
firing and post-firing. In addition to
step-by-step descriptions, specific material
such as glaze and clay body formulas,
kiln designs, a list of suppliers, and photographs of historical and contemporary
ware are included. 200 black-and-white
illustrations, 16 color plates. 176 pages.
$15.95. Watson-Guptill Publications, One
Astor Plaza, New York, New York 10036.
EVERYTHING
FOR THE POTTER!
CLAYS-CHEMICALS-DRY GLAZES
KILNS-ALPINE,
SKUTT, PARAGON
CRUSADER & THERMOLITE
WHEELS-BRENT, RANDALL, SKUTT
L O C K E R B I E , M A R K IV, S H I M P O
P U G M I L L S - M I X E R S - K E M PER TOOLS
• • • Much, Much More
Catalog
S l , Free t o Institutions
L & R SpEciAlTiES
202 E. Mt. Vernon, P.O. Box 309
Nixa, Mo. 65714 (417) 725-2606
FRANCOISE CERAMICS,
INC.
DISTRIBUTOR FOR: Hanovia Lusters & precious
metals, Paraqon Kilns. Duncan Ceramic Products.
IN STOCK: Larcje selection of Alberta • Arnel
• At;antic • Fres-O-Lone • Holland • JamarMallory • Kentucky • Kimple • Ludwig-SchmJd
• Weaver & White Horse Molds • Slip-O-Marie
represenflxtive. Complete ceramic supplies.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
113 49th St. Sowth
St. Petersburg, Fla. 33707
BATS
o,o.;t.
/,2 j 1.2
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For detailed information write:
Creative Industries
P.O. B o x 34:3
La M e s a , Ca. 92041
I.S'o
GAS KILNFIRING
by Ralph W. Ritchie
A reference for the accomplished potter as
well as the novice, this text is documented
with kiln research and technical information. Prefaced with a glossary of terms,
the book begins with an analysis of gas
firing procedures and a chapter on methods of monitoring and logging a firing.
Discussion then proceeds to an examination of hardware and equipment--burners,
plumbing, pressure gauges, pyrometers,
and automatic controls--and is concluded
with a series of chapters on physical aspects of firing, including ecology, safety,
and economy. Additional information is
~rovided in an appendix containing tables
and a trouble-shooting chart for firing
~roblems. 44 black-and-white illustrations
and figures. 81 pages. $5.95. Keramos
Books, 14400 Lomitas A~,enue,
Industry, California 91744.
earthworks
of rochester
120 PLUS
Chemicals & Raw Materials
bulk Quantifies available
C l a y Bodies
stoneware, sculpture, porcelaln,
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Tools
Scales
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amaco, brent, estrin, max,
pacifica, shirnpo, skutt, soldner
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716/288-40S0
City of
FOLK POTTERY OF THE
SHENANDOAH VALLEY
by William E. W i l l . i r e , III
"]'his regional study of folk pottery production concentrates on the stoneware and
earthenware traditions of the Shenandoah
Valley, Virginia, particularly featuring
some of the more obscure sculptural work.
"]'he discussion traces the development of
these traditions stemming from the heritage of immigrant potters, many of them
German, who settled in the valley during
the early 19th century. Utilitarian and
decorative ware by craftsmen such as the
Bell family, Anthony Baecher, the Eberly
potters, and John George Schweinfurt is
documented in photographs and text, and
related to the development of standards of
design and identifiable features of the
products of various potteries. On a more
technical format, the book offers information on forming techniques, indigenous
clays, glazing methods and materials, kilns
and firing procedures, as well as means by
which the potters distributed their ware.
An appendix of potters' marks and a selected bibliography are included. 60 fullpage color plates. 127 pages. $18.95. E.P.
POTTERS
Work
a t p o t t e r y next summer
in our studio.
Island S u m m e r Studio S p a c e and Facilities f o r rent. Sales on Island. Also
inquire a b o u t
RESIDENT
POTTER
possibilities and e x t e n d e d season.
THE LAKE ERIE ISLANDS WORKSHOP
2085 Cornell Rd., ~210, Cleveland, O. 44106
SAN
DIEGO - Kickwheel kit - - Mod-B
(metal parts) $49.$0. Full line of potter's
wheels, cjas and electric kilns. Gas kiln parts,
pug mill, chemical, scales etc. Catalog S1.00.
Brochure on selected items free. Ph. 424-3250.
WAY-CRAFT
394 Delaware St., Imperial Beach, CA 92032
Dutton and Company, Inc., 201 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10003.
APPROACHES TO CLAY MODELLING
by John Scoff and Eric Fisher
This elementary text on handbuilding presents in seventeen brief categories descriptions of the processes of pinching; drape
molding; coiling; hollowing and carving
solid clay: constructing slab cylinders; cast-
Continued on Page 86
January
1976
85
NEW
BOOKS
Continued lrom Page 85
Montgomery
Technical I n s t i t u t e
Troy,
N . C . 27371
YEAR-ROUND
POTTERY INSTRUCTION
RAKU * STONEWARE * SALT KILN
PORCELAIN * SHIMPOS
Contact Phil gissell (919] 572-1311
We are an equal opportunity employer
! qlNCKLEYSUMMER
SCI-IQDL
OF C FTS
CERAMICS• WEAVING• JEWELRY
PHOTOGRAPHY•GLASSBLOWING
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HIGH BCHOOL STUDENTS AGE
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For ;nlonn~lon
IINCKLEY8UMMER SCHOOLOF CRAFTS
BOX K, HINCKLEY,MAINE 04944
J
FOR SALE
i n g slip; a t t a c h i n g h a n d l e s , lids, spouts,
a n d k n o b s to w a r e ; as well as utilizing
substitute media for clay modelling. Methods of a c h i e v i n g t e x t u r e a n d p a t t e r n a r e
included along with i n f o r m a t i o n on glazing
a n d f i r i n g c e r a m i c objects. I n t e n d e d as a n
i n t r o d u c t o r y s u r v e y of a r a n g e of h a n d b u i l d i n g t e c h n i q u e s , sections of t h e b o o k
are d e v e l o p e d on a how-to format. M o r e
t h a n 150 b l a c k - a n d - w h i t e p h o t o g r a p h s a n d
line d r a w i n g s , a n d 8 c o l o r p l a t e s . 80 p a g e s .
$ 7 . 5 0 . Taplinger Publishing Company, 200
Park Arenue South, New York, New York
10003.
RESTORING CERAMICS
by Judith Larney
T h i s v o l u m e d e a l s w i t h s e v e r a l a s p e c t s of
r e s t o r i n g c e r a m i c objects. T h e a u t h o r begins w i t h a discussion of tools, e q u i p m e n t ,
c l e a n i n g solvents, a n d o t h e r m a t e r i a l s ,
then proceeds w i t h instructions for recons t r u c t i n g m i s s i n g a r e a s , m o l d i n g a n d casti n g n e w p a r t s , filling a n d b o n d i n g d a m a g e d sections, a n d r e t o u c h i n g r e p a i r e d
s u r f a c e s to s i m u l a t e o r i g i n a l finishes. F u r t h e r c h a p t e r s c o v e r specific p r o b l e m s a n d
include suggestions for w o r k i n g with other
m e d i a s u c h as j a d e , c o r a l , i v o r y , a n d glass.
In conclusion, the author presents twelve
i n d i v i d u a l r e p a i r cases a n d d e s c r i b e s t h e
p r o c e d u r e s f o r e f f e c t i n g r e s t o r a t i o n s . 90
b l a c k - a n d - w h i t e illustrations. I 1 1 p a g e s .
$ 1 0 . 9 5 . Watson-GuptiU Publications, One
Astor Plaza, New York, New York 10036.
THE POTTER'S DICTIONARY OF MATERIALS
AND TECHNIQUES
by Frank Homer
As a r e f e r e n c e f o r t h e b e g i n n i n g p o t t e r as
well as t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l , W e l s h c e r a m i s t
F r a n k H a m e r h a s c o m p i l e d this a l p h a b e t i c a l listing of i n f o r m a t i o n o n :
the
sources a n d c h a r a c t e r of c e r a m i c m a t e r i a l s ,
t h e b e h a v i o r of clays a n d g l a z e m i n e r a l s
d u r i n g f o r m i n g a n d firing, t y p e s of f o r m i n g m e t h o d s , a s p e c t s of g l a z e c a l c u l a t i o n ,
a n d historical d e v e l o p m e n t s within the pott e r y c r a f t . E a c h w o r d o r p h r a s e e n t r y is
a c c o m p a n i e d by a definition a n d explanation. F o r m o r e t e c h n i c a l p o i n t s , d i a g r a m s ,
p h o t o g r a p h s , o r line d r a w i n g s a r e i n c l u d e d .
A n a p p e n d i x of tables p r e s e n t s d a t a o n
c o n e e q u i v a l e n t s , c h e m i c a l a n a l y s e s of
c o m m o n m a t e r i a l s , a t a b l e of m i n e r a l constants, v a l e n c y c h a r t , a n d o t h e r t e c h n i c a l
f e a t u r e s . 5 5 4 b l a c k - a n d - w h i t e illustrations.
3 4 9 p a g e s . $ 2 5 . Watson-Guptill Publica-
tions, One Astor Plaza, New York, New
York 10036.
THE CRAFT OF POTTERY
by Frank Howell, Carol Woodward,
and Robert H. Woodward
D e s c r i b e d as a p r o b l e m - s o l v i n g a p p r o a c h
to t h e f u n d a m e n t a l s of p o t t e r y m a k i n g ,
this b a s i c i n s t r u c t i o n b o o k f e a t u r e s a n
l l - c h a p t e r s u r v e y of t h e c r a f t , f r o m c l a y
as a w o r k i n g m a t e r i a l t h r o u g h p r o c e d u r e s
for m a r k e t i n g w a r e on a c o m m e r c i a l scale.
F o r m i n g processes, b o t h w h e e l a n d h a n d b u i l d i n g , a r e discussed, a n d a c h a p t e r is
d e v o t e d to m e t h o d s of d e c o r a t i n g a n d
glazing ware. Two chapters explain the
essential t e c h n i c a l f e a t u r e s of p o t t e r y - f i r i n g kilns a n d f o r m u l a t i n g g l a z e s - - a n d a
final section considers some of the aspects
of b e c o m i n g a p r o f e s s i o n a l p o t t e r . A supp l e m e n t a r y r e a d i n g list a n d a n i n d e x c o n c l u d e t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n . 253 b l a c k - a n d w h i t e illustrations. 157 p a g e s . $6.95. Har-
per and Row, Publishers, Inc., 10 East
53rd Street, New York, New York 10022.
Ranchos de Taos P o t t e r y
2000-t- feet of studio and living space;
27 cu ft natural gas kiln; established reputation. Direct and gallery sales. WRITE:
Los Cordovas Rt ~ 1 3 1 Taos, N . M . 87571
1000 ISLANDS MUSEUM
CRAFT SCHOOLCLAYTON."'Y"
,3624
Early American Decoration
Enameling Jewelry
June 28
Oil Painting
Pottery
to
Reverse Painting on Gloss
A u g u s t 27
Abstract Art Batik
1 976
Design Dyeing
Slip-casting
Spinning
Wcrtercolor
Weaving Woodcarvinq
for details write ta: DEFT CM
1000 ISLAHDSMUSEUMCRAFTSCHOOL
314 JOHN STREET, CLAYTON, N.Y. 13624
Gate is dressed to kiln
• . . in stainless steel jackets and a 2-year factory w a r r a n t y on electrical components. Check
Gare's net prices before you make your next kiln
purchase and make a killing•
Gare Ceramic Supply Co., Inc.
P . O . Box 830, Haverhill, Mass. 01830
86
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Index to Advertisers
65
7 Paramount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
85 Peach Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Phoenix Design . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
G & L ..................
6, 67 Potlatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
Gate
......................
86 Potluck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Gell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14 Potter's World . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Hammill & Gillesple . . . . . . . . 70 Rare Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
Harris Linden . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58 Reid, Joy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
Haugen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58 Reward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
Hinckley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86 Rovin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
Industrial Minerals . . . . . . . . . 60 Salem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
Scott Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
Jacquelyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83 Season's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
60
77
Kemper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68 Seeley's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sherry's
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
70
Kerarnos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
Shimpo-Amerlca
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
66
Kiekwheel Pottery . . . . . . . . . . 85
Kleckner's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75 Shimpo-West . . . . . . . . . . Cover 2
Skutt
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
62
Klopfensteln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
72
Kraft Korner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67 Soldner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stewart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
74
L & L ....................
79 Superamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L & R .....................
85
....................
79
Lake Erie Workshop . . . . . . . 85 Tepplng
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Leslie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69 T h o m a s - S t u a r t
T
h
o
m
p
s
o
n
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Los Cordovas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86
A-1 Kilns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aardvark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aegean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alplne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8, 71,
85 Firehouse
Amaco
64
.....................
Anhowe
79
67
67
76
...................
79
Bailey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Baldwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bennett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bergen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bluebird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byrne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
8
66
58
75
9
65
California Kiln . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Campbell,
Gilmour
.... C o v e r
Capital
....................
Ceramic
Coating ............
Ceramic
Films
.............
CeramiCorner
..............
Clay Art ...................
Clay People ................
Conway
....................
Cork Products ..............
Craftool
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,
Creative Industries . . . . . . 15,
Creek
Turn
................
Cress
................. Cover
Crusader
...................
3
79
79
66
69
77
59
68
79
17
85
69
4
12
Dawson
Decals
Duncan
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
West
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
....................
4
Eagle 'n-- 7 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Earth
0 e ..............
Earth Treasures
............
Earthworks
.................
Estrin
.....................
Falcon
Fiherkiln
.....................
...................
Francoise
..................
..................
Max . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mayco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menco
.....................
Metro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mid-America
...............
Minnesota Clay . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Montgomery Technical . . . . . .
Ceramic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6S Ohio
Omni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
84
Orton
......................
.................
Owl
Creek
.................
13
....................
77 Pacifica
77 Paragon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85 Oscar-Paul
75
11
10
85
18
68
86
77
82
81
80
61
70
72
Thousand
Islands . . . . . . . . . . .
Toltec
.....................
Tuscarora
..................
Twin
Willows
..............
86
69
86
61
Van
Howe
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Vermont
C a r d s . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Walker
Jamar
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
85
Way-Craft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Webco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Westby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Western . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Westwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wittels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Worden Robinson . . . . . . . . . . .
61
64
82
74
80
67
for H O B B Y I S T S
• SCHOOLS
•
ART
&
CRAFT
CENTERS
•
INSTITUTIONS
~i~ ¸
. .;3
.
MODEL E-6 WITH 2 SIDE PANS
MODEL E-6 Only
Less Side Pans
515950e
• More Powerful
• Ball Bearings
• Easy to Use
• Easy to Clean
• Easy to Store
SPEED VARIES
PORTABLE
• Clamp on without the use of tools
~ °w;th
° ~ ' I ~Side
" Pen
$17800
~ °with
° ~ ' 2 ~Side Pans
$19650
with foot pedal smooth as an automobile
Carry it with you anywhere
• Bats fit our hand wheels
(as shown)
• Each student may have own bat and place on hand wheel
without losing center
110 Volt - AC. DC.
~r
With Water Trays
ONE YEAR SERVICE WARRANTY
•
•
PANS CAN BE PURCHASED
SEPARATELY TO FIT YOUR
PRESENT E-6 MODEL.
14258 Maiden, Detroit. Michigan 48213
$18.50
(313) 568-0561
Each
i
• ,ii
r
I~
L
~i
¸ ..,~
-
FIRE UP YOUR IIYIAGII"IATIOI'I
Really big.* Model B-18-H Automatic
Inside it's 171,4 inches wide and 18 inches deep.
Even bigger.* Model B-23-H Automatic
This one goes deeper. 2 2 ½ inches deep, 17½
inches wide.
The biggest.* Model B-27-H Automatic
Spacious 233~ inches wide inside and 27 inches
deep. Two rigidly fastened sections and six pilot
lights make it easy to use.
First, decide on a Cress Kiln. Cress lets you
control firing speed with the turn of a dial.
All three of these models can fire anything
through cone 6 with excellent temperature
uniformity.
They're all durable, yet light in weight and
have beautiful mirror-finish stainless steel sides.
But inside is where you'll shine! So think
about the size you need.
Write us for a catalog or see your dealer.
CRESS MANUFACTURING COMPANY
CALIFORNIAPLANT,1718FloradaleAvenue,
South El Monte,California91733 (213)443-3081
KENTUCKYPLANT,201 BradshawPikeExtension,
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