Use Energy Wisely Final.indd

Use Energy Wisely Final.indd
Use
Energy
Wisely
from the professionals at your local
electric cooperative
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Try this & save. . .
Use this guide to create an awareness of your lifestyle
and learn what effects it can have on your energy
budget and the environment. Make this your first step to
better energy management.
1
Your Unique
Energy Needs
Today, many consumers are looking for ways to
control their energy use and reduce their impact on the
environment. The best way to do this is to first be aware of
how much energy you use each month and how it is being
used in your home. This involves learning how to read your
meter, keeping track of energy use and using your meter as
a tool to locate problems.
friends and relatives are visiting, you can expect to use more
energy for cooking, baking, laundry and hot water.
In this way, you can budget your energy use just like you
budget for groceries and other household items.
Space Heating & Cooling
Take a few moments now to work through this guide. Then,
if you still have questions about electrical use and costs,
call the professionals at your local electric cooperative.
We’re here to help!
Lifestyle Makes a Difference
You have complete control over how you use your electricity by
choosing the ingredients that are necessary for you to maintain
your standard of living.
The way you live and the way you use your electrical appliances
have a greater impact on your consumption of electricity than the
number of appliances you have.
From a comfort standpoint, most of us prefer to be relatively cool in
summer and warm in winter. Others prefer temperature extremes.
Humidity plays an important part in our year-round comfort, too.
If you operate dehumidifiers in summer (and, to a lesser degree,
humidifiers in winter), this contributes to household energy
consumption because they tend to run often. Portable space
heaters, air conditioners and fans in such places as the garage and
basement also contribute to our energy consumption.
By taking a look at your “comfort” lifestyle in terms of maintaining
relative humidity and temperature, you can use energy wisely in
many ways. These range from adding insulation, weather-stripping
and caulking, to turning down the heat and turning off the air
conditioning in unused rooms.
For example, about eighteen percent of the energy used in the
average American home is for water heating. Hot water plays a very
important role in everyone’s lifestyle, but many lifestyles require
substantial quantities of hot water, which results in high energy use.
Water Heating
Let’s look at some of these “lifestyle considerations” that can
make your electric bill seem higher than “normal.”
Ask yourself some of the following questions:
Family Size
There is a direct relationship between the number of people
living in a home and the amount of energy that is used. That’s
especially true if you have teenagers at home. In addition, if
Hot water plays a very important role in everyone’s lifestyle, but
many people require substantial quantities of hot water and that
results in higher energy use.
• When I take a bath, do I use hot water sparingly, or is the tub
completely full?
• Do I take short showers, or do I stay in the shower until the hot
water gets cold?
• Do I repair leaky faucets, or simply let them drip and waste
hot water?
• Do I operate washers and dishwashers with a full load, or just
when convenient?
Try this & save. . .
Install water flow restrictors and aerators in sink faucets.
This can save you money by reducing water use. Reduce the
hot water temperature to 120°F. This can decrease heat loss
from your tank. Dishwashers may require higher temperature
settings. Many now have a temperature boost that allows you
to keep the water heater temperature set lower.
2
Appliance Use
We have a host of time and labor-saving devices at our service
to aid us in our work whenever we need them. As you progress
through this guide, you may notice how many more electrical
servants you have than you expected.
These appliances work for you around the clock, whenever you
choose to use them. The wise use of appliances can have a
positive effect on your energy consumption.
Ask yourself these questions:
• Do I turn off lights when a room is not in use, or do I leave them on?
U.S. and Midwest Electricity
Consumption by End Use
Since the weather in the Midwest is cooler than other areas of the
United States, space heating (56%) makes up a greater portion
of energy use in homes compared to the U.S. average, and air
conditioning makes up only 1% of energy use.
U.S.
Midwest
1%
6%
15%
18%
41%
• Are my appliances ENERGY STAR rated?
28%
• Does the television entertain the entire family or does it entertain
an empty room?
56%
35%
• Do I use the oven to reheat one dish, or do I use the microwave?
Air conditioning
Appliances, electronics, lighting
These are prime considerations that affect the amount of electricity you
use to maintain your lifestyle. All Americans are part of the residential
sector and energy management consciousness is likely to start at home.
Water heating
Space heating
Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration
--last updated May 2014
The effects of a home energy management program can pay big
dividends!
People in the Upper Midwest have relatively good lifestyles and we
tend to use more energy than the national average. This applies
to all forms of energy, not just electricity. The pie chart shows how
electricity is used in U.S. homes.
Why is my electric bill higher than
my neighbor’s?
You just answered this question yourself. It’s YOUR electric bill
and it reflects the amount of electricity consumed by you and your
family in your home.
Your neighbor may have a completely different set of
circumstances—different number of people living in the home,
different lifestyle, different size home, different equipment and
methods, etc. These and many other factors, make a comparison
with your neighbor less meaningful.
Make a Plan
Many people believe that when they leave for vacation, their
electric meter stops until they return. Ask yourself a few
questions before assuming your electric bill will decrease by any
considerable amount during vacation.
First, did you turn the water heater down or off while you were
away? If the electric water heater is left energized during vacation,
it will continue to operate and maintain the tank temperature even
if you’re not using any hot water.
Did you empty the refrigerator and freezers and turn them off? If not,
they will continue to operate to maintain the preset temperatures.
Take a look at other electrical appliances that keep running
while you are on vacation—clocks, fans and power ventilators,
heating and air conditioning equipment, computers, chargers, and
docking stations. Many appliances, including TVs use energy when
turned off due to their “instant-on” features. Most of these can be
unplugged during vacation time to save energy while they are not
needed.
Vacations & Seasonal Use
When vacation time comes and you plan to be gone for a couple of
weeks, your electric bill should decrease significantly, right? Wrong!
Try this & save. . .
Lower the thermostat during cool months and turn it up for air
conditioning, especially when the building is not occupied.
You can use a programmable thermostat to automatically adjust
temperatures to accommodate weekly schedules.
3
Try this & save. . .
I figured an afternoon of tracking down air leaks
earned me a day out in the woods. Find out what you
can do at TogetherWeSave.com.
I WENT HUNTING
WITH A CAULK GU
N.
Make Arrangements
Perhaps you can make arrangements with a neighbor to keep an
eye on your place and adjust the heat, water and/or air conditioner
shortly before you return.
In addition, you may wish to unplug all appliances not in use. If a
light is to be left on, it should be connected to a timer. If you intend
to be gone for an extended period of time, contact your electric
cooperative and make arrangements so your electric service will
remain uninterrupted.
Read your meter upon leaving and again when you return. This
will let you determine the number of kilowatt hours used
while you were gone.
Many vacationers bring home several days or weeks of
dirty laundry when they return. This will give your electric
appliances a workout your first day or two back home.
Remember These
In addition to vacation, take a look at some of the
seasonal uses for electricity that may cause an increase in
consumption. This includes air conditioners, pool pumps,
dehumidifiers, portable heaters in the garage or basement,
engine heaters to keep your vehicles ready to run, heat
tape to keep pipes from freezing...the list goes on and on.
consumption of individual appliances. You may also download an
app to your tablet or smart phone that will let you know the exact
amount of energy being used at home by different items. Free or
inexpensive apps are available on the Internet, and your device
will pick up readings and alerts through Wi-Fi to help you see
what is drawing energy while you are away from home.
Meter Tracking
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These days most electric meters
are recorded through an automated
system. You still have the ability to
track your energy use at the meter
to your home, or online if this is
available at your co-op. If you notice
a substantial increase from one
month to the next for no apparent
reason, you will be able to diagnose
an equipment problem sooner.
Fluctuation in the number of
days between meter readings
Ys
ENJO
may create a higher than typical
electric bill. People often overlook
Let’s not overlook hobbies
this important consideration.
or businesses that operate from
Check the number of days in your billing cycle to make accurate
home. They also have an effect on the
comparisons.
number of kilowatt hours you use.
s!
aving
Is the Meter Accurate?
Record
Take action to change how you and
your family spend energy. A smart
first step is tracking current energy
consumption. Take a few moments
each day to jot down the reading on
your electric meter. Your analysis
will be more accurate if you take
your readings at the same time
each day.
Subtract the previous day’s reading from the current reading to
determine how many kilowatt hours were used. Contact your
electric cooperative regarding portable meters to measure the
4
The electric meter is often accused of inaccuracy, but it’s
seldom the culprit. Your meter does not lie. When it records more
electricity being used, try to find out why by looking at your
family’s activities during that period…was the weather colder or
warmer than normal? See what activities, if any, can be altered to
use energy more wisely.
The meter is a finely calibrated, highly accurate device used
to measure electric power use. Your electric cooperative has
a continuing program to test the accuracy of all its meters to
assure that you are being billed for the exact number of kilowatt
hours used. All meters are tested on a regular basis. Historical
data bears out the fact that in more than 99 percent of the cases,
the electric meter is accurate. Higher bills are nearly always
traced to other causes.
Check
Common Sources of Trouble
Common sources of trouble include electrical faults in wiring
systems that are usually due to physical damage, moisture, dirt or
improper connections.
You may wish to call an electrician to check wiring and appliances
for grounds, shorts and other malfunctions.
Sometimes you’ll find equipment using electricity
that you thought was turned off. It could be a
thermostat, well pump, baseboard electric heat or
basement and attic lights.
If no problems are found, your electric cooperative
has test meters available to record the electrical
consumption of items plugged into them. By
comparing your recorded use with that of our list for
home appliances and equipment, you can determine
whether your own equipment is using an unusually high amount of
electricity.
However, if all methods fail, contact your electrician or seek further
advice from your electric cooperative.
Use Less
Change your
habits. Start with
easy changes.
• Set thermostats
for energy
economy. Make
changes in
temperature
levels gradually
so you and your
family can adjust.
• Adjust air
conditioning a few
degrees warmer in
the evenings.
• During the winter months, lower the themostat setting when you
retire at night.
• Select higher efficiency lighting options like compact
fluorescents (CFLs) or LEDs. Place them in areas where you use
lighting most often.
• Keep heating and cooling systems working more efficiently by
replacing filters and cleaning coils.
Act
• Remove unneeded light bulbs in areas where lighting is too
bright.
Do Something About Your Electric Bill
• Turn off lights whenever possible. Reduce or eliminate
unnecessary lighting.
You can do something about your electric bill by acting on the
information presented in this brochure.
• Keep fixtures clean.
Take a few moments each day (at the same time) to jot down the
reading on your electric meter.
• Use less hot water. Install low-flow shower head. Lowering the
temperature setting on the water heater can offer savings.
Monitor your daily meter readings for one month to get a better
idea of your energy use patterns. Note the activities that increase
your energy use.
• Fix hot water faucet leaks.
Keep Records
Keep records for a few months each season. Learn how changes in
your activities can affect your energy budget.
• Insulate pipes.
When your electric bill indicates more electricity use than normal,
try to find out why by looking at your family’s activities during
that billing period. For instance, was there above average air
conditioning or
heating used?
Energy Efficiency/Conservation References:
• Together We Save: www.togetherwesave.com
• ENERGY STAR: www.energystar.gov
• U.S. Department of Energy: Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy: www.energysavers.gov
• U.S. Department of Energy (tax credits, rebates, savings, weatherization): www.energy.gov
• Energy Education Council: www.energyedcouncil.org
5
Appliance Energy Use Guide
6
Kitchen
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
BBQ Grill
Broiler
Coffee Maker
Deep Fat Fryer
Dishwasher
Electric Griddle
Garbage Disposer
Microwave
Range (stove top & oven)
Slow Cooker/‘Crock-Pot’
Toaster
Toaster Oven
6 hours/month
3 hours/month
30 pots/month
5 hours/month
30 loads/month
13 hours/month
1 hour/month
15 hours/month
1 hr/day, 7 days/week
12 hours/month
20 times/month
6 hours/month
1.35/hour
1.5/hour
0.375/pot
1/hour
1/load
1.47/hour
0.67/hour
1.5/hour
3.9/hour
0.2/hour
0.11/use
1.2/hour
8.1
4.5
11.25
5
30
19.11
0.67
22.5
117
2.4
2.22
7.2
Food Storage
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Refrigerator: top/bottom freezer (before 1993)
Refrigerator: top/bottom freezer (1993-2001)
Refrigerator: top/bottom freezer (after 2001)
Refrigerator: side by side (before 1993)
Refrigerator: side by side (1993-2001)
Refrigerator: side by side (after 2001)
Freezer: upright (before 1993)
Freezer: upright (1993-2001)
Freezer: upright (after 2001)
Freezer: chest (before 1993)
Freezer: chest (1993-2001)
Freezer: chest (after 2001)
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.1703/hour
0.0975/hour
0.0611/hour
0.2172/hour
0.1236/hour
0.789/hour
0.1949/hour
0.1154/hour
0.0872/hour
0.1197/hour
0.0681/hour
0.0554/hour
124
71
45
159
90
58
142
84
64
87
50
40
Electronics
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Cable Box
Computer and Monitor
Cordless Telephone
DVD Player
DVR
Gaming Console
Laptop/Notebook
Printer
Satellite Dish
Stereo
Television: Standard
Television: Plasma
Television: LCD
Television: LED (46”)
Television: Rear Projection
Wireless router
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
10 min/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
1 hr/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
4 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.02/hour
0.17/hour
0.003/hour
0.017/hour
0.03/hour
0.09/hour
0.06/hour
0.07/hour
0.01389/hour
0.06/hour
0.15/hour
0.339/hour
0.214/hour
0.11/hour
0.21/hour
0.007/hour
2.4
20.4
2.16
2
3.6
10.8
7.2
0.35
1.7
1.8
18
40.7
25.7
13.2
25.2
5
Lighting
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Fluorescent 4 foot tubes (35 watt)
CFL (13-15 watts--equivalent of 60 watt incandescent)
CFL (25 watt--equivalent of 100 watt incandescent)
Incandescent (60 watt)
LED (6-8 watts--equivalent of 60 watt incandescent)
LED (19 watts--equivalent of 100 watt incandescent)
4 hours/day/7 days/wk
4 hours/day/7 days/wk
4 hours/day/7 days/wk
4 hours/day/7 days/wk
4 hours/day/7 days/wk
4 hours/day/7 days/wk
0.035/hour
0.01/hour
0.03/hour
0.06/hour
0.01/hour
0.02/hour
4.25
1.2
3.6
7.2
0.12
0.24
General Household
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Clothes Dryer
Clothes Washer: front loading
Clothes Washer: standard top loading
Vacuum Cleaner
Water Heater (average for 4 people)
20 loads/month
20 loads/month
20 loads/month
2 hrs/month
1800 gallons
2.3 kWh/load
1.4 kWh/load
2.1 kWh/load
0.62/hour
4.5/hour
46
28
42
1.24
400
Heating and Cooling
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Air Cleaner (Ionizer)
Central Air (3 ton, before 2006)
Central Air (3 ton, after 2006)
Dehumidifer
Electric Blanket
Fans-Ceiling
Fans-Portable
Heated Mattress Pad
Humidifier
Portable Space Heater (1,500 watt)
Window Air Conditioner (12,000 btu/hour)
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
12 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
3 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.07/hour
3.60/hour
2.77/hour
0.6/hour
0.1/hour
0.0778/hour
0.0296/hour
0.04/hour
0.12/hour
1.5/hour
1.6/hour
50
1314
1011
216
24
18.7
2.7
9
28.8
360
384
Miscellaneous
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Aquarium
Blow Dryer
Clock
Curling Iron
Garage Door Opener
Hot Tub
Iron
Swimming Pool Pump (1 HP)
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
10 min/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
10 min/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
12 hrs/month
8 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.06/hour
0.67/hour
0.002/hour
0.07/hour
0.006/hour
0.35-0.56/hour
1.1/hour
1/hour
43.2
3.36
1.44
0.35
4.32
252-403
13.2
240
Farm Miscellaneous
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Aerated Septic System
Electric Fence
Engine Block Heater: 500-watt
Engine Block Heater: 800-watt
Engine Block Heater: 1500-watt
Engine Block Heater: 2500-watt (diesel engine)
Heat Tape: 6’
Tank Heater (varies by wattage and location)
Farm Motor: 10 HP
Water Pump: 1/2 HP
Water Pump: 1 1/2 HP
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.38/hour
240 hrs/month
240 hrs/month
240 hrs/month
240 hrs/month
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.5/hour
1/hour
1.5/hour
2.5/hour
0.05/hour
1 hr/day, 7 days/wk
60 hrs/month
60 hrs/month
7.46/hour
0.5/hour
1.5/hour
274
0-7
120
240
360
600
36
40-300
224
30
90
Phantom Loads
Usage
kWh usage
kWh/month
Cost
Cell Phone Charger
Computer in Sleep Mode (varies by model)
Digital Cable Box
DVD Player
Gaming Console (varies by model)
Instant-on TV
Microwave Oven with Clock
Satellite Cable Box
Stereo with Remote Control
Stove with Electric Ignition
VCR
Wall Cube Power Supply (AC Adapter/charger)
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
0.001/hour
0-0.006/hour
0.035/hour
0.001/hour
0.003/hour
0.028/hour
0.008/hour
0.012/hour
0.008/hour
0.014/hour
0.014/hour
0.006/hour
0.72
0-4.32
25.2
0.72
0.36
20.16
5.76
8.64
5.76
10.08
10.08
4.32
7
How to Estimate Energy Use and Cost
The wattage of appliances (equipment) and the amount of operating time can vary greatly. The following
information will show you how to determine where the energy dollars are going in your home.
STEP 1
$ amount of electric bill = Average kWh Cost
kWh used
Since the cost of electricity is determined by the
number of kilowatt hours (kWh) used during a billing
period, the first step is to determine your average cost
per kilowatt hour.
EXAMPLE
$154
1400 kWh
= $0.11 per kWh
Check with your local electric cooperative for current rate.
STEP 2
Example of Serial Plate
Since the wattage of an appliance (equipment) determines the electrical usage per hour, the second step is to
determine the wattage.
The wattage of an appliance is found on the serial plate.
But it is possible that the electrical requirements will be
expressed in volts and amperes, rather than watts. If so,
multiply volts by amperes to obtain wattage; e.g. 120
volts x 12.1 amperes = 1,452 watts.
MICROWAVE OVEN
AMPS
12.1
HERTZ
60
FORM NO. 000000
CODE
0
VOLTS
WATTS
MODEL NO.
SERIAL NO.
120
1452
00000
0000
STEP 3
Use the formulas shown in the following examples to estimate usage and cost.
A light uses 100 watts and is left on 15 hours. How many kWhs are used and what does it cost?
100 watts x 15 hours x
1 kW
= 1.5 kWh used
1,000 watts
Your cost = 1.5 kWh X $0.11/kWh = $0.165 or 16 1/2 cents
A microwave oven uses 1,450 watts and is used for 30 minutes. How many kWhs are used and what does it cost?
1,450 watts x 0.5 hours x
1 kW
= 0.725 kWh or 0.73kWh used
1,000 watts
Your cost = 0.73 kWh X $0.11 = $0.083 or 8 cents
STEP 4
To find your daily cost for electricity, divide your bill by the number of days in your billing period.
EXAMPLE
$154
30 days
= $5.13 which is your daily cost
To find the daily cost for electricity per person in your family, divide the daily cost by the number in your family.
EXAMPLE
8
$5.13
4
= $1.28 per person per day
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