Middle School curriculum guide

Middle School curriculum guide
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Lakeside School Mission & Nondiscrimation Policy
Goals of a Lakeside Middle School Education
Course Requirements
Daily Schedule
After School
Free Periods/Study Hall
Advising
Academic Standards
Reports and Grading
Academic Probation and Academic Concern
Attendance
Attendance Procedures
Student Absences
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3
4
4
5
5
6
7
7
8
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Arts: Performing and Visual
Digital and Information Literacy
English
Experiential Learning
Local Service Learning
Global Service Learning
Outdoor Program
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17
19
21
21
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Languages
Mathematics
Personal Development
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies/History
Academic Support: The Brain & Learning Lab
Clubs
Interscholastic Athletics
Library
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31
35
37
39
41
43
45
49
51
Lakeside School Mission
The mission of Lakeside School is to develop in intellectually capable young people the creative minds, healthy
bodies, and ethical spirits needed to contribute wisdom, compassion, and leadership to a global society.
We provide a rigorous, dynamic academic program through which effective educators lead students to take
responsibility for learning.
We are committed to sustaining a school in which individuals representing diverse cultures and experiences
instruct one another in the meaning and value of community and in the joy and importance of lifelong learning.
Nondiscrimination Policy
Lakeside School does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, creed, disability, marital status, national or
ethnic origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, use of a trained guide dog or service
animal by a person with a disability, or genetic information. This policy applies to all areas of student concerns
(admissions, athletics, educational policies, financial aid, and other school-administered programs) as well as
to all areas of personnel and employee concerns and hiring, discipline, promotion, and termination. Lakeside
School is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).
The Middle School Curriculum Guide describes the division’s curricular and co-curricular programs and
provides general information about the daily schedule, attendance, advising, and expectations for students’
academic performance and growth. Current students receive course sign-up sheets and curriculum guides
from their advisors in early spring and, after consulting with advisors and parents/guardians, select classes
with the requirements for the next grade level in mind. New students will review the Curriculum Guide
and select courses on-line during the enrollment process.
We are pleased to offer a rich and varied curriculum that meets the intellectual and developmental needs
of students at this important age. In addition to standard subjects, such as math, science and English, every
Lakeside student takes a language, a performing art and a visual art, a computer class, and a life skills
course.
The National Middle School Association identifies four essential attributes that must guide a successful
middle school: “An education for young adolescents must be developmentally responsive, challenging,
empowering, and equitable.” We strive to make these attributes come to life every day in our classrooms
and in our school. We are pleased to do this work with every one of the young adolescents in our care.
If parents/guardians have questions about individual courses, these can be answered by the appropriate
department head, grade level coordinator, Ted Chen, Middle School Assistant Director, or by me.
Additionally, any of these individuals would be pleased to discuss with families a student’s specific learning
need.
Sincerely,
Elaine Christensen ‘82
Middle School Director and Director of Professional Development
What do we want a Lakeside student to have learned, developed, and experienced by the
time he/she graduates from the Middle School?
In 2008, the Lakeside Middle School faculty identified the knowledge, skills, attributes, and attitudes we
seek to develop in students by the time they graduate from eighth grade. Drawing from shared readings,
knowledge, and experience, the Middle School faculty identified four major areas that we seek to develop
in our students through the curriculum, co-curriculum, and school culture:
1. Cognitive, Creative, and Intellectual Development
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Critical thinking
Creativity
Generative capacity
Aesthetic appreciation
Curiosity
Ability to collaborate; make meaning with others
Mastery and ability to demonstrate understanding of course material
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2. Social-Emotional Intelligence
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Respect for community and others
Ethic of inclusivity
Understanding and respect for boundaries between self and others
Multicultural and global perspective
Respect for natural world and natural resources
3. Self-Health: Emotional and Physical
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Healthy development of brain and body
Humor, hope, resilience
Self-confidence
Willingness to try new things
4. Self-Management and Goal Management
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Time management
Ability to set goals and achieve them
Self-advocacy skills and communication skills
Ability to focus on a task or project
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Course requirements are met automatically through the required classes at each grade level:
Arts: Performing
4 years
Arts: Visual
4 years
Digital and
Information Literacy
3 years
English
4 years
Experiential Learning
4 years
Starting in 6th grade, students choose between Choir, Drama or
instrumental music. All 5th graders take Orchestra 5.
Fifth, 6th, 7th, and 8th graders take Digital Life classes. Fifth and 6th
graders use school-provided tablet computers. Seventh and 8th graders
own their own laptops.
Local Service Learning - Fifth- and 6th-grade students perform
theme-based service learning in their respective grades. Seventh-grade
students perform service learning in small groups based upon a theme
of their choosing (for example food, environment, and/or
homelessness). All 8th-grade students participate in a required, weeklong service learning trip connected to our school-wide Global Service
Learning program
Global Service Learning - Eighth graders participate in a mandatory
one-week trip to a site of their selection.
Outdoor Program – Fifth graders participate in a one night camping
trip, sixth graders go on a two night camping trip, and seventh graders
engage in a three night wilderness trip.
Languages
4 years
Students choose from French, Mandarin Chinese, Latin, or Spanish.
Personal
Development
4 years
The aim of the Lakeside Middle School Personal Development Program
is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to live a healthy
and rewarding life in middle school and beyond.
Math
4 years
Qualified 7th and 8th graders can place into an accelerated class.
Physical Education
4 years
Science
4 years
Social Studies/History
4 years
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On school days, the Middle School building and main office open at 7:30 a.m. and close at 4:30 p.m. The
daily schedule begins with advisor group at 8:10 a.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, and
Community Meetings are held on Thursdays. The school day ends at 3:05 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Friday and at 3:10 p.m. on Thursdays. Students should arrive in time to go to lockers
first. Students arriving during the advisor period should sign in at the main office before going to advisories
and are marked tardy. A Middle School regular schedule follows:
By 3:40 p.m. each day, students should be on the bus, in their carpools, or engaged in an adult-supervised
afternoon activity such as sports, clubs, tutoring sessions or study hall. The Middle School main office
closes at 4:30 and the front entrance to the building is locked at that time. Parents report to study hall in
the library through the upper level to pick up their students. Students may not stay at school past
6:00 p.m. unless directly supervised by an adult, such as a coach, faculty sponsor for a school
activity, or instrumental music teacher. Parents/guardians must be on time to pick up their
children after sports practices, after-school study hall, and evening events.
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Students have study halls and free periods as part of their regular weekly schedule. Fifth through seventh
graders are assigned study halls, which are supervised by teachers. Seventh and eighth graders also have
free periods. Free periods are scheduled to provide students an opportunity to practice taking
responsibility for their own learning during unstructured time. During free periods, students may choose
to be in the spline or in the library. Students may not leave campus at any time.
The purpose of our Middle School advisor program is to create a sense of belonging for each student
through regular meetings, thoughtful play, and friendly conversation. Advisors serve as a resource for
students and families and are the primary liaison between the school and the student’s family. We aim to
have students feel connected to their advisor group, to care about others in the group, and to see the
advisor as a helpful adult whom they can trust and approach with questions.
Each student at Lakeside has a designated advisor who is responsible for monitoring the academic
experience and personal growth of that student. In the Middle School, advisor groups of approximately
eight students meet four days each week from 8:10 to 8:25 a.m. In the fifth grade, advisories consist of
ten to twelve students.
ACADEMIC ADVISING
The academic responsibilities of advisors are outlined below.
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Thoroughly review each student’s comments at the end of each marking period.
Meet one-on-one with advisees four times during the school year to review mid-term and endof-term reports.
Write advisor comments two times a year that reflect the students’ responses to their end-ofterm reports, service-learning activity, and general contribution to school life. Advisor comments
also reflect concerns advisors might have or successes students have experienced.
Facilitate students’ and/or parent/guardian conversations with teachers if an advisee is having
academic difficulty or there is some other concern.
Advise students and families during the course sign-up process. This implies thorough knowledge
of the course offerings as well as a sense of the students’ abilities, interests, and goals.
COMMUNICATION
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Call all advisees’ parents/guardians prior to the start of the school year.
Meet with advisees’ parents/guardians during conference week in November to build on the initial
telephone contact and develop clear and open communication between advisors and families.
Communicate concerns to parents/guardians when appropriate. Advisors’ primary responsibility
is to the students, but they also serve as the initial point of contact for parents/guardians.
Refer concerns to the Director of Student Support, Middle School Counselor, Head of Student
Support and the Brain & Learning Lab, or Middle School Assistant Director, when appropriate.
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HOMEWORK
Students should generally expect to have nightly homework assignments for each of their academic classes.
Teachers at each grade level endeavor to coordinate daily assignments, long-term projects, and tests in
order to maintain a balanced homework load. As a rough guideline, fifth graders can expect to have about
50 minutes of homework per night; sixth graders about 60 minutes; seventh graders about 70 minutes;
and eighth graders about 80 minutes.
Teachers and advisors seek feedback from students (and sometimes from parents/guardians) regarding
the approximate time spent on homework per class and in the aggregate. Teachers who get frequent
feedback that their assignments are too long will adjust expectations accordingly. Students who
consistently need more time to complete assignments should confer with their teachers or advisors.
DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT POLICY
We know that middle school is a time during which students learn to study and start to recognize how
they learn best just as much as they learn specific concepts, subjects, and critical thinking skills. Learning
to study effectively involves many skills, including planning ahead, breaking large projects into smaller
chunks, and managing one’s time. Teachers assist students in learning these skills in a number of ways,
including posting all homework assignments to their Haiku web page no later than the end of the school
day. At a minimum, students should be able to end the day knowing precisely what their homework
assignments are for the next class period and having all the materials they need to complete their
assignments. Additionally, all assignments and materials such as handouts, study questions, or project
instructions, are available online. Most teachers post assignments one week in advance so that students
may plan ahead and schedule their homework time. Because of email’s unreliability, students will not
receive assignments via email. Additionally, we want students to know they can go to just one place their teachers’ Haiku sites - to access their assignments. We encourage students to use email as a way of
contacting their teachers in the evening or on weekends should they have questions.
HOLIDAY HOMEWORK POLICY
Teachers and administrators recognize that periods free of assigned schoolwork have value for our
students. Young adolescents benefit from family time, leisure time, and time to explore their own interests
and passions. In light of this value, teachers are asked to respect the policy - both in letter and in spirit of not assigning homework over the following holiday breaks: Thanksgiving, winter break, midwinter
break, and spring break. This means that no homework is due on the first class period after a holiday
break. The policy applies regardless of whether the first class period is or is not the first day back after a
holiday break. Thus, if the first day back is a Tuesday and the first class period is a Wednesday, the policy
still applies. This policy also means that nothing is due in the first week after break that requires any more
preparation than could be completed in the amount of time classes have been back in session. For example,
homework due the fourth class day back can require no more than three days of preparation.
SNOW DAY HOMEWORK POLICY
As with the Holiday Homework Policy above, the Lakeside Middle School policy is meant to keep snow
days free of homework as follows:
1. Work that was assigned before the snow day, but is due on a snow day, will be due on the first day
that the class meets following the snow day/days.
2. Work assigned before a snow day, but due on days following a snow day, will have deadlines extended,
unless there is a low-impact, reasonable way to maintain the deadline as is.
3. Work that was to be assigned on a snow day, will not be assigned until the first day that the class
meets following the snow day/days and deadlines will be extended accordingly.
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Reports and Grading
Teachers write mid-term and end-of-term reports for the benefit of parents/guardians. Teacher reports
are divided into two sections. The narrative comment describes the quality of a student’s work and
suggests ways in which a student may improve. Comments may speak broadly about effort, character, or
other qualities of citizenship, including a student’s enthusiasm and participation in class. The Markers for
Student Growth provide students with feedback on what the Middle School faculty has identified as
fundamental skills needed for success at Lakeside Middle School. These are: Shows respect to others;
Shows understanding of course material; Engages in class discussions and activities; Collaborates well;
Demonstrates organization and time management skills; Shows willingness to try new things; Exercises
self-advocacy and communication skills; and Comes prepared to class.
The Middle School year consists of two semesters. A report of student progress is sent via Veracross at
mid-term and end-of-term. Mid-term reports also include a student reflection. These reflections help
students review their work thus far in the term and set goals for the remainder of the semester. Fifthand sixth-grade students receive narrative comments at each marking period but are not assigned letter
grades. Seventh and eighth graders receive both comments and a letter grade for most courses. Grades
measure a student’s achievement. Parent/guardian-advisor conferences take place between the first midterm report and the final report for the first term. A student’s permanent record contains only the two
sets of term-end reports.
Academic Probation
Lakeside School believes that each student will demonstrate academic achievement, as well as comporting
him- or herself in a manner considerate, supportive, inclusive and respectful of others. To support and
encourage students in realizing these goals, parents/guardians, students, teachers, and administrators must
have a clear, common understanding about the terms of academic good standing characteristic of students
whose performance indicates intellectual accomplishment and a good-faith, consistent effort toward
mastery of curricular goals. On occasion, the academic match between student and school is not realized,
and continued enrollment may not be in the best interest of the student or the school. If a student is not
meeting academic expectations, he or she will be considered for academic probation, triggering an ongoing
process involving progress evaluations, probation, communication with the student’s family, and
consideration by teachers and administrators to determine contributing factors and appropriate next
steps.
GRADES 5 AND 6
In fifth and sixth grades, students receive narrative comments and they are also assessed using Markers of
Student Growth. Both are taken into consideration in determining a student’s academic standing.
If a student’s performance indicates that he or she “needs significant improvement” in multiple classes as
indicated by the letter “S” for academic markers in the Markers of Student Growth on a mid-semester or
end-of-semester report, he or she may be placed on academic probation and a parent/guardian conference
will be convened to develop a comprehensive student support plan. The student’s advisor will work in
conjunction with the student, family, and the Brain & Learning Lab faculty to follow up on the
recommendations and to monitor student progress. If a student is on academic probation for two grading
periods, it is possible that they will not qualify for reenrollment for the subsequent school year.
GRADES 7 AND 8
In seventh and eighth grades, students receive letter grades for certain classes as well as narrative
comments and Markers of Student Growth. All three are taken into consideration in determining a
student’s academic standing.
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In addition to not meeting expectations in the markers of student growth (“N,” “S”), if a student earns a
grade of D+ or lower or a “NC” on a mid-semester or end-of-semester report, he or she may be placed
on academic probation and a parent/guardian conference will be convened to develop a comprehensive
student support plan. The student’s advisor will work in conjunction with the student, family, and the
Brain & Learning Lab faculty to follow up on the recommendations and to monitor student progress. If a
student is on academic probation for two grading periods, it is possible that they will not qualify for
reenrollment for the subsequent school year.
Attendance
ABSENCES
Students are expected to meet all appointments (classes, conferences with teachers, class meetings,
assemblies, etc.). In the event of illness or absence from a school-sponsored activity, students are
responsible for conferring immediately with each of their teachers, who will help them arrange to make
up missed work. All students in fifth through eighth grades are expected to be on campus for the entire
school day unless they are excused during part of the day for specific reasons, in which case they must
have written or phoned-in permission from their parents/guardians and must sign out at the Middle School
main office. Any unexcused absence from a class, for whatever reason, is grounds for receiving zero credit
on any test, paper, or presentation due for that class. Teachers are neither expected nor required to
allow the student to make up the work. Students will not be allowed to participate in any after-school
programs, including athletics, arts, and co-curricular activities, if they have an unexcused absence during
the day, except in the rare situation that the after-school program is a graded component of an academic
class. In such instances, the student’s absence would create an unfair deficit for other students in the class
and the student would thus receive some other appropriate consequence in lieu of missing the activity.
Being a Lakeside student includes not only attendance in classes, but regular participation in the life of the
school. If a student misses 24 school days, a conference will be scheduled with parents/guardians, the
division director, and the student’s advisor to consider how best to support the student’s attendance. If
a student misses more than 32 days or classes, it is unlikely that credit will be granted.
The school does not excuse students for early vacation departures, extensions of vacations, or other
absences not a consequence of a family or medical emergency. Parents/guardians should understand that
students will be held responsible for the material missed and that teachers are under no obligation to give
credit or coaching for missed assignments or tests or to make special accommodations or arrangements
in the event of such absences.
RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS
Lakeside is a nondenominational school that is committed to celebrating the rich diversity of its students
and families. In keeping with the mission’s spirit of consideration and inclusion and wishing to be sensitive
to the traditions of all faiths, the Lakeside School administration will make every effort not to schedule on
major religious holidays any all-school event that could be scheduled for a different time. We cannot,
however, promise that school events specific to a particular division, grade level, or class will not be
scheduled on a religious holiday of one of the faiths found among Lakeside families, though we will try to
avoid such days if at all possible. The school understands that students may miss school on major religious
holidays and that such absences will be considered excused absences, without consequence. Teachers at
Lakeside are supportive of students who choose to attend religious services on these holidays. When a
student does miss school for this reason, and particularly because faith is a private matter for some
students, it is incumbent on the student who knows that he or she will miss class to participate in religious
holiday services to inform his or her teachers and to arrange in advance to make up any work missed.
Teachers are encouraged to help such students get ahead in their studies so that their religious
observances are not compromised by schoolwork.
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ILLNESS
A student who is not well should remain at home for a speedier recovery. Please be sure to call or email
the Middle School (206-368-3630 or [email protected]) first thing in the morning if
you know that your student will be staying home with an illness. If a student becomes ill during the school
day, the school will call parents/guardians at home or at work to pick up the student. Students who are
sick must be picked up as soon as possible after parents/guardians are alerted. If parents/guardians cannot
be reached, the designated emergency contact will be called. Please make sure that the emergency contact
information for your child is current.
Attendance Procedures
Attendance is taken in advisory groups from 8:10 to 8:25 a.m., and a student attendance memorandum is
emailed to Middle School faculty and staff by 9:00 a.m. Parents/guardians of absent students must call or
email the Middle School at 206-368-3630 or [email protected] by 8:30 a.m. Accurate
attendance records are important, and we depend on parents/guardians’ support.
If a medical/dental appointment cannot be scheduled for before or after school, or if a parent/guardianauthorized activity necessitates a late arrival or early dismissal, the student must bring a note to the Middle
School main office signed by a parent/guardian explaining why the student was late or why he or she will
be leaving early. Students must always sign in and out at the Middle School front desk when arriving late,
leaving early, or leaving and returning during school hours. Students are not permitted to leave campus
at any time without parent/guardian authorization. Students also are prohibited from visiting the nearby
7-Eleven store during school hours or after school hours.
Student Absences
Advisors can help collect homework assignments for students who are away from school for more than
a couple of days because of illness. Students can also access their assignments from teachers’ Haiku pages.
For planned absences of one full day or more, students can either pick up a Student Planned Absence form
from the Middle School office or print the form from the Lakeside website under Parents and
Guardians/Helpful Documents. This form must be submitted in advance of a student’s absence. The form
must be signed by the student’s teachers, the parent/guardian and the advisor, then submitted to the main
office. The student is responsible for collecting assignments and meeting with teachers regarding
expectations for course work missed.
In order to be excused from physical education class for health reasons, a student must provide the
teacher with a written excuse from a parent/guardian or physician. The note should include information
about the student’s condition and the expected duration.
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Visual art classes focus on elements and principles of design: color, line, value, shape, pattern, and texture.
Assignments build and maintain specific skills for both two- and three-dimensional projects. Work grows
more sophisticated and challenging as the student matures. Teachers help students to develop a critical
vocabulary and demonstrate how to provide constructive critique of their peers’ projects. These classes
help students to learn about the larger world and to reflect on their own personal process. Students are
encouraged, and supported, to take risks and an emphasis is placed on personal growth. Different artists,
styles, cultures, and techniques are discussed at all grade levels. Students have a sketchbook to use
throughout the year for sketching and planning projects. Students also have the opportunity to work with
supervision in the art rooms during free time and lunch periods.
(A11a)
ART 5
In this course fifth-grade students are exposed to many different media in the realm of drawing, ceramics,
and printmaking. Students have a great opportunity to build new skills while expressing themselves
creatively. One overarching theme of the year is the observation and use of negative space as a tool for
drawing and for designing more interesting compositions and sculptures. In the fall they complete drawing
projects with colored pencils, watercolor crayons, colored tissue paper, and learn some basics of color
theory and drawing three dimensionally. In the second term they build several clay projects using such
techniques as coiling and sculpting by pinching. This is followed with instruction in various styles of glazing
their projects. In the third term, they explore the world of printmaking, and experiment with many
methods of mono-printing. Cooperation, problem-solving, and appropriate use of tools are emphasized
throughout the course.
(A12a)
ART 6
The main goal of this course is to expose students to different materials and techniques that they can use
to find their own expression. Students begin the year in clay and learn a variety of hand building techniques
and tools. This is followed with instruction in various styles of glazing their projects. They then apply
these skills into a final project, a large “balloon” animal. During the winter term, students learn how to
needle felt to create a felt “painting” that has texture and three-dimensionality. Students then learn
traditional drawing and painting techniques, such as shading, observational drawing, creating value, grid
work and the basics of color theory are taught. Students draw a series of self-portraits in different styles
and collaborate to create a wall-sized painted mural. In the final term, students carve linoleum and
experiment with many different printmaking methods during the printing unit. Fundamental principles of
design and composition, as well as cooperation and problem solving, are emphasized throughout the
course. Students learn about different artists, cultures, and styles throughout the year, as well as the
appropriate use of tools in all media.
(A13a)
ART 7
This course builds upon what was learned in Art 6, adding more sophisticated approaches to sculpture,
drawing, painting, and printmaking. The fall term is dedicated to clay sculptures in which students learn
how to build a sturdy structure with coils allowing for a lot of design with negative space. The culminating
project in this unit is to make a powerful tall Tiki sculpture that honors one or more of the four elements.
This project is glazed using a staining technique that brings out all of their detailed designs. During the
winter term, students learn how to needle felt to create a felt “painting” that has texture and threedimensionality. They work with a reference photo of their choosing. Later in the winter they will learn
many techniques with watercolor painting, such as creating different types of washes, texture and
layering. They apply their learned skills to a final, large watercolor painting, working from a reference
photo. Students then move into drawing, focusing on the basic rules of perspective drawing.
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(A14a)
ART 8
Eighth-grade art begins with a drawing unit using charcoal. Students learn how to get into a “right brain”
mode of thinking to enhance their ability to see. They practice expressive gesture drawing and end with
a still-life project of their design. The emphasis of this unit is on seeing and depicting light values and
developing more confidence in their ability to advance their skill level. The second unit is ceramics, where
advanced coiling skills are added to students’ repertoire of techniques. Students build a cookie jar with a
detailed face and then glaze it after experimenting with possible color choices and glaze techniques. The
next unit is a brief introduction to linoleum reduction printmaking, using a minimum of three colors.
Thinking ahead and problem solving is a critical feature of this unit. The year culminates with an
independent art project that has a theme and which can be completed in a number of media: drawing,
painting, clay, printmaking and mixed media. This involves conceiving an idea first as well as writing a final
artist statement upon completion. Eighth-grade art is celebrated in a big display at graduation.
Performing arts classes develop the artistic ability of Lakeside students through the study of music and
drama. They support technical development, encourage creative problem solving, deepen selfunderstanding, and social skills through collaboration. Our performance courses are accessible and
engaging for both the beginner and the seasoned performer. The emphasis is placed on personal growth
rather than on innate talent, and students are engaged in a feedback-driven process where they learn the
importance of experimentation, play, and attention to detail.
Indicating Your Choices/Preferences in the Performing Arts
In fifth grade, all students take orchestra. Starting in sixth grade, students must rank their choices for a
performing arts course for that school year. Placement in the first choice is our goal; however, it is not
guaranteed. On the course sign-up forms, you will be asked to list performing arts option preferences.
DRAMA
Drama courses at the Middle School seek to introduce students to a wide variety of theatrical forms and
experiences. Emphasis is placed on building analytical as well as performative skills—training students to
think deeply about art as well as to make it. Theatre classes are places where creative risk-taking is
encouraged, failures are celebrated, processed and learned from, and students engage with open-ended
questions about art, identity and expression. One to two co-curricular productions will be presented each
year and rehearsed in the afternoons, outside of school hours.
(A15a)
DRAMA/CHOIR 6
This is a year-long class with two semester components. The drama semester introduces students to the
fundamental elements of creating, designing, and performing pieces of theatre. In a safe and trusting
classroom atmosphere, students will hone their verbal and non-verbal communication skills, learn how to
create characters and develop scenes through improvisation and writing exercises. Major projects include
designing and performing a content-less dialogue, adapting a folktale from an oral tradition into a short
play, and developing and performing a true personal story. In the choir semester, students learn and
reinforce basic music literacy skills as they read, write, and perform music from varied genres and time
periods. Students learn the basics of healthy vocal production, choral performance, and musical
improvisation. Students in Drama/Choir 6 will give at least one public performance per term.
(A19a)
DRAMA 7
In this course, students will deepen their understanding of the fundamental elements of creating, designing
and performing theatre. The focus of the year-long class is on translating texts into effective pieces of
theatre. Units of study include a contemporary scene study unit, a poetry-based project, and classical soloperformance utilizing monologues from Shakespeare’s plays. Throughout the year, students work
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collaboratively to incorporate feedback and practice utilizing professional scene study habits and
structures, aiming to communicate clearly the elements of their text: character, relationship, objective,
obstacle, setting, mood, tone and theme. Students will also serve as designers, learning fundamental
concepts of translating between textual and visual media such as lighting, sound, prop, set and costume
design. Students in Drama 7 will participate in at least one public performance during the year.
(A20a)
DRAMA 8
This course builds upon the work done in previous classes, helping students hone and expand their skills
as theatre makers and interpreters. There is an increased emphasis in Drama 8 on self-evaluation and selfdirected learning. Students will have opportunities to choose texts that appeal to them as artists and to
take on different roles in the theatrical process such as directing, designing, and producing. Projects and
in-class exercises will continue to emphasize collaborative skills, giving and receiving effective feedback,
and analysis of both text and performance. Units of study include improvisation, sketch comedy, solo
performance, and contemporary short plays. Students in Drama 8 will participate in at least one public
performance during the year.
MUSIC
The music program is open to all students regardless of previous experience. Beginning courses allow
students to learn the fundamentals necessary to participate in bands, orchestras, and choirs. Seventh and
eighth grade courses develop intermediate and advanced skills needed to participate in the Upper School
music program, and pursue music at the ninth-grade level. Private lessons are available on campus as an
independent study and concerts are an integral component of the educational program.
TRAVEL POLICY FOR MUSIC ENSEMBLES
We are committed to making all curricular activities accessible and affordable. To that end, we keep travel
costs below $250 per year, per student, and financial aid may apply. Please contact Tearon Joseph,
Associate Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Programs Director, for more information on financial
aid at [email protected]
Private Lessons for voice and instruments: Available after school, and during
study hall and free periods
On-campus private instruction on an instrument or voice is available. Please contact the Arts Program
Assistant, Allison Conkin at [email protected], for more information. The cost of
lessons is not included in tuition; however, financial aid may apply.
(A15a)
CHOIR/DRAMA 6
This is a year-long class with two semester components. The drama semester introduces students to the
fundamental elements of creating, designing, and performing pieces of theatre. In a safe and trusting
classroom atmosphere, students will hone their verbal and non-verbal communication skills, learn how to
create characters and develop scenes through improvisation and writing exercises. Major projects include
designing and performing a content-less dialogue, adapting a folktale from an oral tradition into a short
play, and developing and performing a true personal story. During the choir semester, students learn and
reinforce basic music literacy skills as they read, write, and perform music from varied genres and time
periods. Students learn the basics of healthy vocal production, choral performance, and musical
improvisation. Students in Choir/Drama 6 will give at least one public performance per term.
(A16a)
CHOIR 7
This is a year-long choir course designed to build upon the performance and musical skills learned in
Choir/Drama 6. Students in Choir 7 reinforce music literacy skills and vocal techniques, moving toward
intermediate-level musicianship and the performance of primarily two-part choral literature of many
13
genres. New singers are heartily welcomed. All students receive regular small group instruction with our
adjunct vocal coach and perform at least three times per year.
(A17a)
CHOIR 8
This is a year-long choir course that builds upon Choir/Drama 6 and Choir 7, though new students with
an interest in singing are heartily welcomed. Students practice intermediate-level musicianship skills,
intermediate-to-advanced vocal techniques for young singers, and perform repertoire for two, three, and
four parts. All students receive regular small group instruction with our adjunct vocal coach and perform
at least three times per year.
(A91a)
ORCHESTRA 5
This year-long course is required for fifth graders. Students learn to play the violin, viola, cello, or bass
through small group instruction and participation in a string orchestra. All ensemble members have the
opportunity to work closely with our highly-qualified teaching staff and have access to on-campus private
lessons. Students develop an ability to read music notation and compose melodies. No previous
instrumental music experience is necessary. For more information, please contact the Orchestra teacher,
Erica Johansen at [email protected]
(A92a)
ORCHESTRA 6
Open to students in sixth grade, this year-long course is for students with approximately one year of
training on the violin, viola, cello, or bass. Students develop technique on their instrument and perform
in concerts. Students new to the school enrolling in this course should contact the Orchestra teacher,
Erica Johansen, to receive more information at [email protected]
(A95a)
SENIOR ORCHESTRA 7/8
This is an advanced year-long course for students with experience on the violin, viola, cello, or bass.
Private lessons are encouraged but not required. Students who successfully complete this course will be
prepared to participate in the Upper School music program. Private lessons are encouraged but not
required. Students new to the school enrolling in this course should contact the Orchestra teacher, Erica
Johansen, to receive more information at [email protected]
(A90a)
BEGINNING BAND 6
This year-long beginning instrumental course is for sixth-grade students. No previous experience in
instrumental music is necessary. Students are accepted on a space available basis, but preference is given
to students new to Lakeside without prior instrumental music training. Students will learn to play a wind
instrument through small group instruction. The choice of instrument(s) varies from year to year and is
determined in the first week of class and families do not need to make any purchases or plans prior to
the start of the school year. Please contact Andrew Krus, Director of Visual and Performing Arts, for
more information at [email protected]
(A93a)
BAND 7
This ensemble provides an opportunity for students in seventh and eighth grades to continue the study of
a wind or percussion instrument. Students will develop technical proficiency on their instruments and
learn to play a variety of musical styles. This band challenges students through performance of concert
band and symphony orchestra music. Students new to the school enrolling in this course should contact
Andrew Krus, Director of Visual and Performing Arts, for more information at andrew.krus
@lakesideschool.org.
14
(A94a)
SENIOR BAND 8
This is an advanced ensemble for eighth-grade students. Students who successfully complete this course
will be prepared to participate in the Upper School music program. Private lessons are encouraged but
not required. Students will develop technical proficiency on their instruments and perform as a concert
band and full-symphony. They will also learn the fundamentals of jazz and other genres suited to the
instrumentation of the ensemble. Students new to the school enrolling in this course should contact
Andrew Krus, Director of Visual and Performing Arts, for more information at andrew.krus
@lakesideschool.org.
15
16
The goal of Middle School technology education is to ensure that all students have the computer and
multimedia skills needed to support their academic work and to provide a strong foundation for future
technology use. The Digital and Information Literacy department also ensures that students understand
the ethical uses of technology both in and out of the classroom.
Noted below are the computer skills courses offered to students at all grade levels. The focus of these
courses is experiential learning and is project based using a variety of tools. The core elements are:

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Digital literacy (find, evaluate, create and share content in digital form)
Digital citizenship (ethics and best practices for using technology appropriately)
Multi-media production (video, audio, graphics and images)
Design Thinking (empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test)
Computational thinking (algorithmic thinking, problem solving)
Data visualization (charts, infographics, analysis)
Responsible and innovative use of technology. Learning how to balance offline and online life.
Most courses include class and homework assignments requiring computer use.
(C50)
DIGITAL AND INFORMATION LITERACY 5
The general areas covered in fifth-grade Digital Life include: 1) managing and organizing one’s fifth-grade
academic life, including systematic use of Lakeside Blended Learning/PowerSchool class sites; 2) becoming
more skillful editing and manipulating media (audio, video, images, animation, text); 3) becoming more
adept at finding relevant information via search, including practice using databases and other resources
offered through our Library; 4) becoming consistent about citing sources; 5) participating in collaborative
projects; 6) using programming to animate and make interactive; and 7) having enjoyable and rewarding
experiences doing 1 through 6. Fifth graders will be assigned Surface Tablets with an array of applications,
including Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook), Office 365 cloud based applications,
Google Apps for Education, WeVideo, TinkerCad, Scratch, LOGO, among others. Fifth graders will each
be provided with an individual Lakeside email account to enhance communicating about school-related
issues and research. They will also be taught email etiquette and best practices. Students will each have
an online keyboarding account to help improve keyboarding speed and accuracy, although the expectation
will be that much of the practice time will take place outside of class. All of the above is done in the
context of and in compliance with Lakeside’s Computer User Agreement.
(C60)
DIGITAL AND INFORMATION LITERACY 6
The general areas covered in sixth-grade Digital Life include: 1) managing and organizing one’s sixth-grade
academic life, including systematic use of PowerSchool CMS class sites; 2) becoming more skillful editing
and manipulating media (audio, video, images, animation, text); 3) becoming more adept at finding relevant
information via search, including practice using databases and other resources offered through our Library;
4) becoming consistent about citing sources; 5) participating in collaborative projects that will include
coordination with assignments from different academic disciplines; 6) learning to create websites using
HTML and CSS; and 7) having enjoyable and rewarding experiences doing 1 through 6. In addition, sixth
graders will select a technology-related personal goal or goals that they will work on during the beginning
minutes of each class. Students will each have an online keyboarding account to help improve keyboarding
speed and accuracy, although the expectation will be that much of the practice time will take place outside
of class. All of the above is done in the context of and in compliance with the Lakeside’s Computer User
Agreement.
17
(C70)
DIGITAL AND INFORMATION LITERACY 7
The primary purpose of Seventh-grade Digital Life is twofold: 1) to help students acquire and integrate
multimedia skills in their academic work, and 2) to introduce computer programming to develop
computational thinking and problem solving skills. For the first half of the year, units include editing digital
citizenship and safety, digital images, recording and editing digital audio, and creating individual digital
videos from the ground up; from storyboarding to filming to digital editing. Digital literacy is also covered,
where students learn best practices for finding, evaluating, citing, and sharing digital media in an ethical
manner. Multimedia assignments are designed to dovetail with other subjects, and the curriculum has
built-in flexibility so that class time can be used to support major projects in other classes. For the second
half of the year, the emphasis shifts to programming and computational thinking skills. We start with
projects in Scratch 2.0, a graphical programming language, and introduce functional programming concepts
such as variables, conditionals, and loops. Projects are specifically chosen to be extensible to meet the
wide range of coding backgrounds of students, and to solve problems that they encounter in other subjects
such as math or science. Students also have class time to work on personal programming goals, and
advanced students may have the opportunity to explore text-based languages such as Javascript or Python
if they choose. A number of the resources used in this class are web-based, with special emphasis on Web
2.0 collaborative and cross-platform resources.
(C80)
DIGITAL AND INFORMATION LITERACY 8
The Eighth-grade Digital Life class builds on the fundamental skills that students received in earlier digital
life courses and allows time for deeper learning based on individual interests. The course is centered
around design and innovation. Each week, students brainstorm ways that technology can be used to
meet the 17 UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Later in the year, students select one of the
goals to research further and work towards designing a solution. 3D design and printing, programming,
app development, video and audio editing, robotics and electronics are explored. Projects are designed
to incorporate design thinking, research, user experience, creativity and intellectual property law.
18
The Middle School English Department is dedicated to nurturing a life-long love of reading and writing.
We strive to create a community of readers and writers that inspires students to experiment with a
variety of written forms. We believe that developing writers flourish when they have time, choice, and
regular feedback. By providing these three important elements, we hope to unleash the authentic voice of
each adolescent writer. With the aid of strong models, we teach students to consider the sound and
meaning of words and to use language effectively and artistically.
(E50a)
HUMANITIES 5
The language arts component of Humanities 5 asks students to consider themselves in relation to their
immediate communities—family, friends, and the people at school. Essential questions include, "How does
making choices affect me?" and "What responsibilities do I have to my communities?" Such questions frame
reading selections, classroom activities, and projects. Writer’s workshop provides a structured process
for students to brainstorm, draft, revise, edit, publish and celebrate. Students receive feedback about their
writing on a regular basis from their teacher, and peer editing is introduced so that developing writers
learn how to best give and receive feedback. Students learn to edit for grammar, punctuation and usage.
Writing is explored in several genres including personal narrative, poetry, short story, and persuasive
essay. Vocabulary building occurs through shared texts as well as supplemental materials. Close reading is
emphasized through annotations and group discussion. Texts include Among the Hidden, One Crazy Summer,
Peak, and excerpts from Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.
(E60a)
ENGLISH 6
The sixth-grade English program strives to foster a positive community of learners to support the
development of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills. Writing is taught in the
writer’s workshop format which emphasizes the analysis of mentor texts and the writing process. Reading
instruction aims to enhance critical thinking as students delve into and interpret more complex literature.
Classroom study involves the analysis of a wide selection of pieces including poetry, personal narratives
and memoirs, short stories, myths, and essays. Longer all-class texts may include Greek Myths, Touching
Spirit Bear, and Habibi. Additionally, students will participate in at least three reading groups during the
year in which they read a selected book, annotate, reflect, and write in order to prepare for a culminating
book group discussion. This is designed to broaden reading choices, build vocabulary, create connections
with writing, and strengthen reading and discussion skills. Grammar and correct usage are emphasized in
conjunction with spelling, capitalization, and punctuation and are taught through a workshop approach
with students exploring word formation, sentence structure and paragraph development. Vocabulary is
taught on a daily basis through class texts, related words, and supplemental materials.
(E70a)
ENGLISH 7
The goal of 7th-grade English is to create confident, fluent writers. At its best, the classroom becomes a
community for readers and writers, with students helping each other in drafting, revising, and editing.
Writing practices include dialogues, character descriptions, stories, narratives, essays, scripts, and poems.
Students learn to edit for accurate grammar, punctuation, and usage and also have formal lessons on
organization and sentence fluency. Required readings include fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; accompanying
activities include summarizing, annotating, and analyzing. Combined with group discussions and oral
presentations, these activities foster close reading skills and deepen the students’ understanding of the
texts. The readings are also used as models for student writing since authors’ styles and strategies are an
important part of each discussion. Texts include To Kill a Mockingbird, Monster and Of Beetles and Angels: A
Boy’s Remarkable Journey from a Refugee Camp to Harvard.
19
(E80a)
ENGLISH 8
Eighth-grade English uses both ancient and modern texts to explore the general theme of the course: the
development of personal identity. Building upon the skills practiced in 7th grade, the course helps students
become more concise, sophisticated writers and attentive, insightful readers. Reading activities include
annotation, interpretive discussions, literary analysis, and vocabulary development. Writing assignments
such as personal responses to literature, personal narratives, essays, graphic novels, vignettes, reviews,
and several types of poems give students practice with many forms and purposes. Instruction is provided
in revising and editing, as well as grammar, punctuation, and style. Using a variety of poems, short stories,
personal essays and memoirs as models, in addition to class texts, students study the strategies of excellent
writers in developing their own voice and style. Class texts include The House on Mango Street, The
Outsiders, and The Odyssey, as well as graphic novels and a choice of contemporary novels for literature
circle discussions.
20
Through its 5-12 service learning program, Lakeside seeks to develop in each student the ethos of service
– of giving back to one’s community. We seek to ensure that as students serve others, they develop a
keener sense of justice, empathy, and an appreciation for the unique challenges others face and the positive
contributions every individual makes to our world. Students should come away from their service
opportunities with the understanding that we all have much to learn from each other; it is never too early
to have an impact; and the common good is the responsibility of all.
SERVICE LEARNING 5
Fifth-grade students participate in a variety of service learning activities during their four service days
during the school year. Some activities remain the same from year to year and others change in response
to topics covered in the curriculum. Examples of past projects include sponsoring a school-wide food
drive; preparing special gifts for a holiday party at a youth shelter; clearing a nearby orchard of fallen
apples; and preparing the Giving Garden at a public park for the winter freeze. These activities are
designed to foster in our students a desire to make the world a better place for people, animals, and the
environment as well as an understanding that we can care for and help people outside of our immediate
community.
SERVICE LEARNING 6
The service theme for sixth grade is “local community support and enhancement.” Specific activities vary
from year to year. Sixth-grade students participate in four full days of service learning within the local
Seattle community. In the past, sixth grade students have partnered with EarthCorps for hands-on
environmental service. EarthCorps is a Seattle-based nonprofit with a mission to build global community
through local environmental service. Students will learn the following at EarthCorps service projects: a
brief history about the parks/natural areas they will be working in, native vs. non-native plant species,
basics in environmental restoration, the benefits of healthy urban forests, and why this work is important.
Students will learn restoration techniques including invasive plant removal, planting native trees/shrubs
and restoration site maintenance. Additional service learning projects include: managing the weekly Middle
School recycling program and learning how sustainability on a small local level impacts the broader
community.
SERVICE LEARNING 7
Seventh-grade students break from classes four times a year to participate in a service learning at an offcampus location. Students choose a theme for the year that interests them— such as hunger, elders,
homelessness, animals, or children—and are placed into smaller service groups of approximately 9
students with a faculty leader. Before the first service outing of the year, students participate in an
orientation in which they learn about their topic, the service agency or site where they will be working,
and what service learning means at Lakeside. Students work with the same topic and service agency all
year and share their experiences with their peers in their advisory groups to help reflect and process their
service learning experience.
21
Through active service and study, Lakeside’s 5-12 Global Service Learning (GSL) Program seeks to
develop in students an awareness of, respect for, and understanding of diverse cultural communities as
well as the common issues facing our local community. Our goal is to inspire and empower students to
be agents of change both in their local communities and around the world. The new Middle School GSL
program prepares all eighth-grade students for the global GSL locations, which all upper school students
can apply to.
The eighth-grade GSL program is mandatory for all students. It takes place during the school year and
combines on-site service learning with a cultural immersion experience. By making tangible curricular
connections, students gain insight into the dynamics of cultural communities by experiencing them
firsthand and appreciating them on their own terms. Eighth-grade students travel to one of six sites within
driving distance of Seattle for a week-long, culturally-immersive experience. In each location, students
learn from local partners and work alongside community members to gain a holistic understanding of daily
life, culture, and complex issues facing each community. The experiences are integrated with the academic
curriculum across the disciplines before, during and following the trips. The program serves as a
leadership opportunity and a culmination of experiences that students have had in the fifth-, sixth-, and
seventh-grade Service Learning and Outdoor Programs.
In spring of seventh grade, students indicate their trip preference of the six different GSL sites. Students
are informed about their trip group before the end of seventh grade. Trip preparation begins immediately
when students begin in eighth grade. All trips take October 1 to 7, 2017. Three adult trip leaders
(Lakeside faculty and outdoor educators) accompany each group of students. s
BROETJE ORCHARDS
Students spend the week immersed in the Broetje Orchard community in Prescott, Washington. Students
learn from the orchard employees and their families in the Vista Hermosa community. Students
work alongside of a peer group in Vista Hermosa on community-identified projects, connect with youth
in the before and after-school program, and spend time at the Jubilee Ranch school. Students also
participate in community activities such as soccer games and picnics. After their week in eastern
Washington, students will return home with a better understanding of daily life in the orchard
community, immigration and migrant farm worker issues, Mexican American culture, and the Spanish
language.
MAKAH INDIAN RESERVATION
Students spend the week on the Makah Reservation on the northwest tip of Washington’s Olympic
Peninsula. Students become involved in the life of the Makah tribe by making connections with community
members, including elders and youth. They explore ancient traditions and contemporary issues on the
Makah reservation. Students learn about Makah language, storytelling, ethnobotany, crafts, games, and
other aspects of folklore from tribal members. Service projects involve working at the Makah Museum,
helping out in Neah Bay Elementary School, and cleaning up area beaches. Students will gain an appreciation
for the deeply rooted connections between the Makah people and the natural environment of the Olympic
Coast, along with an understanding of importance of cultural preservation for the Makah Nation.
CLOUDVIEW ECO FARM
Students will learn about small-scale organic farming and the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)
movement at Cloudview Eco Farm in Ephrata, WA. Students will experience all aspects of life on the farm
during the week. They will assist farmers with daily tasks such as weeding and harvesting produce and
caring for livestock. Students will also help to facilitate farm fieldtrips for 1st and 2nd grade students,
support elders with a special farm-based community project, and prepare for the weekly shareholder’s
produce pickup and farmers market. Students will gain an understanding of complex environmental,
22
economic and social dynamics in the Columbia River watershed as they are immersed in region for the
week.
ELWHA RIVER
Students will examine issues relating to the restoration of the Elwha River watershed and the monumental
removal of the Elwha Dams on the north shore of the Olympic Peninsula. Students will learn first-hand
about the dynamic interactions between Olympic National Park, the US Forest Service, the Klallam tribe,
conservationists, the timber industry, and others who have a stake in this undertaking. Students will
volunteer with Olympic National Park and connect with Klallam tribal community leaders and youth as
part of their experience.
TIMBER COMMUNITY
Students explore the connections between forestry, economics, and culture in the Vernonia,
Oregon region. Students learn about issues of sustainability and work on forestry projects with youth
and other community members at the Vernonia School, Nehalem River Watershed Council, and the Hyla
Woods sustainable forest. Students will gain an understanding of the intersection of various logging,
farming, conservation, ecotourism, and educational interests in the region.
QUINAULT RESERVATION
Students travel to Lake Quinault on the southern portion of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. Students
connect and work alongside of youth at the Quinault School, a diverse student population including 34.5%
Native American and 20% Hispanic students. Students learn about the issues affecting the Quinault tribal
community and the relationship between the Quinault Reservation and Olympic National Park. Students
will examine topics such as fisheries, logging, and recreation in the Quinault watershed.
The Middle School Outdoor Program is based on the belief that the skills developed and practiced in the
outdoors—if deliberate self-reflection is built into the program curriculum—transfer back to everyday
life. Our program seeks to develop in students the following personal attributes and capacities through
their participation in the fifth- through eighth-grade outdoor program:
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Students develop a sense of place in the Pacific Northwest. Through their participation in the
outdoor program, students experience the varied terrains of Washington State, understand its
geography and ecology, and develop an appreciation for the immense beauty of our state. The program
gives each of our students the opportunity to develop a personal connection with the natural world
and our local environment.
Students learn how to contribute as members of teams. Each outdoor trip requires students
to work in teams. The success of each team depends on every trip member doing his or her part.
Each trip is designed so that students collaborate in performing shared tasks and meeting shared
challenges.
Students take physical, emotional, and social risks. In the natural environment, students are
pushed outside their comfort zones in safe and productive ways. Such experiences challenge students’
physical and emotional limits, thereby pressing them to expand those limits and develop the selfconfidence that comes with success.
Students practice problem solving. Each outdoor trip exposes students to situations in which
they face significant challenges without predetermined or familiar means of meeting those challenges.
In such situations, students learn to adapt and improvise to meet these challenges and predict potential
outcomes and consequences. This ability to adapt, improvise, and predict will transfer to students’
everyday lives.
23
Participation in the annual outdoor program trips is required of all Middle School students as part of the
Middle School curriculum and educational program. Potential restrictions regarding a student’s full
participation should be discussed with the Middle School director well in advance of the outdoor program
trip dates. Such restrictions must be of a medical nature serious enough to limit a student’s participation.
OUTDOOR EDUCATION 5
In late spring, the fifth-grade class travels together to a Washington state park, camps overnight in tents,
and prepares meals family style. In preparation for the overnight stay, students learn to set up tents, plan
meals for a big group, pack bags, and organize group games and activities. While in the outdoors, students
do a short hike and assist in meal preparation and clean up.
OUTDOOR EDUCATION 6
In late spring, sixth graders go out in groups of 16 for a two-night, three-day outdoor experience at a
group campsite in western Washington. In preparation, students learn to set up tents, put together
prepared menus, and pack their own bags. While in the outdoors, students go on two day hikes; assist in
meal preparation and clean up; and learn about the geography and ecology of the site.
OUTDOOR EDUCATION 7
In late spring, seventh graders go out in groups of 10 with two adult leaders for a three-night, four-day
wilderness experience. Prior to the trip, students participate in three educational sessions where they
learn about outdoor equipment; shelters; packing a backpack; menu planning; safety; and minimum
impact camping. Students are physically active over the four days, whether hiking, kayaking, canoeing, or
some other outdoor activity. They also tackle at least one high impact activity that, in students’
perceptions, poses a challenge or risk. Throughout the trip, students have opportunities to assume
leadership roles and to practice group decision making. The seventh-grade outdoor trip locations
represent diverse ecosystems in Washington State; students learn about the geography and ecology of
their outdoor site.
24
In keeping with Lakeside’s mission to prepare students to live in a global society, languages play a
prominent role in the Middle School curriculum. Lakeside offers courses in four distinct languages –
French, Latin, Mandarin Chinese and Spanish. The purpose of our language program, at both campuses, is
language acquisition. In the living languages, classes are conducted in an immersion setting; all instruction
is in the target language from the very beginning. Students are supported in acquiring vocabulary and
fluency with structures as they build their abilities to speak, read, write and comprehend the language.
Significant attention is paid to understanding the cultural context for language as well. The school does
not offer courses to support or build on native fluency in a language.
Policies for Language Placement for Students Entering the Middle School:
Second-language acquisition is a spiraling process, meaning that improving proficiency is dependent upon
revisiting and practicing the same material until one is able to utilize effectively the vocabulary and
grammatical concepts. Finding the level that is the best fit for each student, both linguistically and
developmentally, is of utmost importance to us. Because we have immersion classrooms and work at a
fast pace, there is often a period of adjustment and transition for students who are new to our language
program. Most often, students who have already taken several years of language classes at other schools
will still enter our beginning “A” level of their chosen language.
All sixth graders and incoming seventh and eighth graders who wish to enroll in Level B or
higher of a language must arrange to take a placement test with department head, Mirta
Blat at 206-440-2756 or [email protected] Language placement tests will be
given on Thursday, March 30, 2017 between 3:30 – 5:30 pm in Middle School Room 215.
Policies for Language Placement for Students Going into Ninth Grade at the Upper School:

Any student may begin a new language at the Upper School.
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Students who have completed Level B language courses at the Middle School will be placed in Level I
at the Upper School. They will have an excellent foundation and will be well prepared for the fastpaced Level 1 courses that will lead them through the four-year progression culminating in AP-level
language instruction senior year.
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Students who have successfully completed Level C language classes at the Middle School will be placed
in Level II language instruction at the Upper School.
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Students who have successfully completed Level D language classes at the Middle School will be placed
in Level II at the Upper School. They will be well prepared for and appropriately challenged by the
Level II language classes, which focus on polishing student grammar skills and completing all the
grammatical topics needed for a successful transition to Level III Introduction and higher level
literature and culture courses.
(L10a)
FRENCH A
This course is an introduction to the French language and francophone culture. Students begin to
communicate effectively in French by practicing functions such as asking and answering questions and
describing and narrating in present time. Emphasis is placed on basic oral proficiency as students learn
to speak within familiar contexts and situations. Essential to this class is the use of authentic materials.
For example, students learn about weather by studying French weather reports and maps. They learn
about school supplies by “buying” them at French online stores. Other instructional materials include
Bon Voyage 1 and the accompanying workbook.
25
(L11a)
FRENCH B
This course is a continuation of French A. Students become more skilled in the functions practiced in
French A. New functions include narrating in past tense and expressing likes and dislikes within familiar
contexts and situations. As in French A, authentic materials are essential learning materials. Students
access the internet in order to research and discuss such topics as sports and the French school system.
Other instructional materials include Bon Voyage 1 and the workbook.
(L12a)
FRENCH C
This course is a continuation of French B. Students receive additional practice with the functions
covered in French A and B. New functions include expressing opinions, comparing and contrasting,
hypothesizing and giving orders. They also work with the future, imperfect, and conditional tenses.
One example of a French C unit is cooking and French cuisine. They learn about cooking by studying
French cooking shows and recipes on the Internet. The culminating project for this particular unit is
producing their own cooking program where they make a French dish of their choice. Examples of other
units at this level focus on social media and French holidays. Other instructional materials are Bon
Voyage 2 and its workbook.
(L13a)
FRENCH D
This course is a continuation of French. Students apply their knowledge of grammatical structures by
continuing to work with culturally-relevant material in the target language. One unit is learning about
stress and how to handle it. The students read articles and watch videos on stress using only authentic
materials. Some other units at this level are clothing, leisure-time activities and French artists. Students
watch and study in depth the film “Les Intouchables.” French D students continue to improve their
fluency and comprehension.
(L20a)
LATIN A
In this introductory course, students begin reading Latin immediately. In the course of their reading, they
learn a range of basic grammatical structures, including the nominative and accusative cases and the
persons and numbers of present tense verbs. They also explore many different aspects of Roman life, from
the nature of the home and the layout of a Roman city to the various types of Roman food and
entertainment. As they acquire Latin vocabulary, students examine and assimilate challenging English
derivatives and so expand their knowledge of their own language. Through various projects they learn
about the Olympian gods and the mythology surrounding them. Homework assignments, ancillary
materials and online learning tools, such as practice quizzes and interactive vocabulary games, are posted
on the school’s Latin website. Instructional materials include Unit 1 of the Cambridge Latin Course.
(L21a)
LATIN B
This course is a continuation of Latin A. Students learn more advanced grammatical structures, including
the dative and ablative cases and the persons and numbers of imperfect and perfect tense verbs, which
knowledge enables them to read and translate more complex sentences. They continue to explore aspects
of Roman culture, from beliefs about death and the afterlife to the institution of slavery and the nature of
education. They continue to add new English derivatives to their repertoire, expanding their knowledge
of their own language. Through projects they learn about Greco-Roman demi-gods, heroes and monsters,
and the mythology surrounding them. Homework assignments, ancillary materials and online learning
tools, such as practice quizzes and interactive vocabulary games, are posted on the school’s Latin website.
Instructional materials include Unit 1 of the Cambridge Latin Course.
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(L22a)
LATIN C
This course is a continuation of Latin B. Students learn more advanced grammatical structures, including
the genitive and vocative cases and the persons and numbers of irregular and pluperfect tense verbs, which
knowledge enables them to read and translate ever more complex sentences. They continue to explore
aspects of Roman culture, from the British tribal system to daily life in Roman Britain. They continue to
add new English derivatives to their repertoire, expanding their knowledge of their own language. Through
hands on projects they will learn about important monuments and artifacts of the classical era. Homework
assignments, ancillary materials and online learning tools, such as practice quizzes and interactive
vocabulary games, are posted on the school’s Latin website. Instructional materials include Unit 2 of the
Cambridge Latin Course.
(L23a)
LATIN D
This course is a continuation of Latin C. Students learn more advanced grammatical structures, including
the forms of all five declensions and the forms and uses of participles and infinitives, which knowledge
enables them to read and translate ever more complex sentences. They continue to explore aspects of
Roman culture, from the influence of the Egyptians on Roman culture and beliefs to the role of science in
the Roman world. They continue to add new English derivatives to their repertoire, expanding their
knowledge of their own language. During a major class project students will create Roman dramatic masks
and enact a short Roman comedy. Homework assignments, ancillary materials and online learning tools,
such as practice quizzes and interactive vocabulary games, are posted on the school’s Latin website.
Instructional materials include Unit 2 of the Cambridge Latin Course and Lingua Latina I.
(L30a)
MANDARIN CHINESE A
In this introduction to Chinese language and culture, emphasis is placed on oral proficiency. At the A
level, students begin to acquire the skills needed to communicate effectively in Mandarin. They practice
such functions as asking and answering questions and describing and narrating within familiar contexts and
situations. They also begin learning the Pinyin pronunciation system and tones, how Chinese characters
are built, and how to read and write in simplified Chinese characters, how to use online Chinese-English
dictionary and type Chinese characters and Pinyin. Instructional materials, homework assignments and
online learning tools, such as stroke animation, Pinyin and tone exercises, and interactive flashcards, are
posted on school Chinese website. Students gain an invaluable understanding of Chinese culture through
fun and interactive explorations of holiday celebrations, making Chinese food, Chinese GO game, Chinese
Tea and calligraphy.
(L31a)
MANDARIN CHINESE B
This course is a continuation of Chinese A. Students acquire greater proficiency with the functions
introduced in Chinese A within a wider range of topics, vocabulary, and grammar. Students use a
computer to type Chinese characters, use online dictionaries, turn in discussion posts and assignments
online, do online research for team projects, and create visual and audio presentations using technology.
Instructional materials, homework assignments and online learning tools, such as stroke animation, Pinyin
and tone exercises, and interactive flashcards, are posted on the Chinese website. Students also watch
authentic Chinese movies and TV dramas. Students gain an invaluable understanding of Chinese culture
through fun and interactive explorations of holiday celebrations, making Chinese food, Chinese GO game,
Chinese Tea and calligraphy.
(L32a)
MANDARIN CHINESE C
This course is a continuation of Mandarin Chinese B. Students get additional practice with the functions
covered in Mandarin Chinese A and B. Functions emphasized this year include expressing opinions,
comparing and contrasting, hypothesizing, and more. Students use a computer to do online research for
team projects, turn in discussion posts, assignments and Wiki projects online, and create visual and audio
presentations using technology. Instructional materials, homework assignments and online learning tools,
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such as stroke animation and interactive flashcards, are posted on the Chinese website. Students also
watch authentic Chinese movies and TV dramas. The class reads an online story, and practices story
narrating. They also watch Chinese movies and TV dramas, hold discussions and write movie summaries.
Students gain an invaluable understanding of Chinese culture through fun and interactive explorations of
holiday celebrations, making Chinese food, Chinese GO game, Chinese Tea and calligraphy.
(L33a)
MANDARIN CHINESE D
This course is a continuation of Mandarin Chinese C. Students learn more complex structures and
advanced vocabulary. Writing complex sentences in characters is a daily practice. Students study Chinese
and American holidays, the origins and changes of Chinese characters, Chinese etymology-its radicals and
sound elements, Chinese dynasty, and they research the culture of various Chinese speaking areas.
Students use a computer to do online research for projects, turn in discussion posts, assignments and
Wiki projects online, and create visual and audio presentations using technology. Instructional materials,
homework assignments and online learning tools, such as dictionary, character converting tools, and
interactive flashcards, are posted on the Chinese website. The class reads an online story, role plays and
practices story narrating. Students also watch Chinese movies and TV dramas, hold discussions and write
movie summaries. Students gain an invaluable understanding of Chinese culture through fun and
interactive explorations of holiday celebrations, making Chinese food, Chinese GO game, Chinese Tea
and calligraphy.
(L60a)
SPANISH A
In this introduction to Spanish language and culture, emphasis is placed on oral proficiency. Students
acquire skills needed to begin to communicate effectively in Spanish. They practice such functions as
asking and answering questions and narrating in present and future tense within a variety of contexts and
situations. Students apply grammatical concepts and vocabulary through a variety of projects such as the
house of my dreams and presentations about specific Spanish-speaking countries where students research
and present information about the country and its culture. Authentic materials such as Spanish music and
video clips are used to learn about the culture of various Spanish-speaking countries. Instructional
materials include Así se dice 1 workbook and textbook with audio and video programs and Así leemos
reader.
(L61a)
SPANISH B
This course is a continuation of Spanish A. Students become more skilled with the concepts practiced in
Spanish A. New functions include narrating in the past tense and expressing likes and dislikes. Some of
the themes are cultural events and summer and winter sports. Homework assignments, ancillary materials
and online learning tools, such as practice quizzes and interactive vocabulary games, are posted on the
school’s Spanish website. Authentic materials such as weather reports, news about sports, and films are
watched, discussed, and reviewed. Students study Spanish poets, poetry, and proverbs as part of a variety
of cultural themes. Instructional materials include Así se dice 1 workbook and textbook with audio and
video programs and Así leemos reader.
(L62a)
SPANISH C
This course is a continuation of Spanish B. Students receive additional practice with the concepts covered
in Spanish A and B. New functions include expressing opinions, comparing and contrasting, talking about
past, present and recent events, expressing conditions, and differentiating between continuous, ongoing
actions in the past and those completed at a definite time. Students learn about the culture of various
Spanish-speaking countries from exposure to weekly cultural themes that highlight authentic materials
such as Spanish music, writings from important authors, and video clips of traditional celebrations. The
students also study Spanish poets, poetry, and watch Spanish movies, hold discussions and write movie
summaries. Homework assignments, ancillary materials and online learning tools, such as practice quizzes
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and interactive vocabulary games, are posted on the school’s Spanish website. Instructional materials
include Así se dice 2 workbook and textbook with audio and video programs and Así leemos reader.
(L63a)
SPANISH D
This course is a continuation of Spanish C. Students apply their knowledge of grammatical structures by
working with culturally-relevant media in the target language. They discuss literature, movies, immigration,
the Spanish Civil War and current events. They will also read an adapted version of El Lazarillo de Tormes.
The students study Spanish poets, poetry, and watch Spanish movies, hold discussions and write movie
summaries. They regularly research and present cultural themes of their choice. Homework assignments,
ancillary materials and online learning tools, such as practice quizzes and interactive vocabulary games, are
posted on the school’s Spanish website. Instructional materials include Así se dice 2 workbook and
textbook with audio and video programs and Así leemos reader.
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The main goal of the Middle School Mathematics Department’s program is to provide a strong foundation
in mathematics through challenging courses that are appropriate to the ages, abilities, and needs of our
students. We intend that, in addition to being well prepared for the mathematics they may encounter in
future schooling or careers, our students emerge from the program impressed with the elegance and
scope of the subject and excited by its vast potential for fun and creativity.
We also strive to equip students with the mathematical skills of a competent citizen in today’s world, such
as being able to model situations mathematically; to estimate and compare magnitudes; to interpret graphs
and statistics; to calculate probabilities; to evaluate numerical and spatial conclusions; to solve problems
mentally as well as with paper, calculator, and computer; and to communicate effectively in these areas.
Finally, while students do much of their class work and homework independently, one of our goals is to
foster the skills for and value of doing mathematics cooperatively with others.
The content of the Middle School mathematics courses, grades 5 through 8, is composed of subject matter
normally covered in grades 6 through 9 in many other schools. Grades 5 and 6 concentrate on arithmetic
skills and the use of numbers and mathematical thinking in a variety of contexts (measurement, data
collection, patterns, problem solving, etc.). Grade 7 is a pre-algebra and problem-solving course, which
consolidates and advances these skills, adding the conceptual and symbolic framework that will later be
used extensively in algebra and geometry. Grade 8 is a first-year algebra and trigonometry course with
extensive applications to problem solving using these conceptual structures systematically. In each course
in the mathematics curriculum, considerable reinforcement is achieved by returning at a higher level to
concepts and skills introduced in previous courses.
Note on Technology: The availability of calculators and computers has made it possible to teach certain
topics much earlier and in new ways. Particularly useful, are tools such as Excel and Geometer’s Sketchpad.
Data collection, functions, variables, geometric construction, sequences and series, linear functions, and
graphing are a few examples of topics explored through the use of computers in Lakeside mathematics
classes. Fifth- and sixth-grade math courses use desktop computers in the computer labs and classrooms;
seventh and eighth graders use laptop computers in their math classes.
(M50a)
MATH 5
The fifth-grade mathematics course explores the patterns and relationships that lie at the heart of
mathematics. Closely integrated with the science course, the math curriculum is organized around
interesting mathematical problems derived from real situations or imaginary extensions. Students solve
problems, and in so doing, observe patterns and relationships that can then be formalized and tested.
Math concepts are used in the fifth-grade science course; scientific experiments are used as examples of
math problems and concepts. The classroom environment encourages cooperation, individual questioning,
conjecturing, and mathematical reasoning. Fifth-grade mathematics is not organized into ability groups.
Variations in experience are addressed as needed via tutoring, remedial work, and enrichment activities
in the context of the course itself.
This course includes the following topics: operations on positive numbers; fractions, decimals,
percentages; proportional reasoning; rounding and estimating; probability; statistics and data analysis;
number theory; place value; graphing and other visualization of data; geometry; polygons; measurement
of time, mass, length, volume, temperature; the metric system; calculator use; and Microsoft Excel for
data and sorting.
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(M60a)
MATH 6
The sixth-grade mathematics course extends the fifth-grade experience with patterns and relationships by
covering a wide range of topics to develop abstract and logical thinking skills, problem-solving proficiency,
and mathematical techniques. The main thread of the course might be called “advanced arithmetic.” It is
a thorough building of the real number system and its associated operations: addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division, exponentiation, and roots. It reviews basic ideas (fraction arithmetic, ratio and
proportion) and also introduces topics that are new to most sixth graders (non-decimal bases, conversion
of repeating decimals to rational representation, scientific notation, countability, logarithms). Coursework
consists of daily homework, in-class projects, and class presentations, done both as individual work and
group tasks. Sixth-grade mathematics is not organized into ability groups. Variations in background are
addressed as needed via tutoring, support with basic skills, and extensions of the homework into a wide
variety of challenge work, known as “star problems.”
Additional topics in this course not mentioned above include: operations on negative numbers; fractions,
decimals, percent; estimation; problem-solving techniques; probability; primes, composites, prime
factorization; exponents; scientific notation; square roots; Pythagorean Theorem; coordinate graphing;
plane and solid geometry; use of compass and protractor; geometric constructions; measurement; the
metric system and U.S. standard system; scientific calculator use.
(M70a)
MATH 7
This course includes the following topics: operations on positive and negative numbers; fractions, decimals,
percent; percent increase/decrease; ratios and proportions; estimation (order of magnitude,
reasonableness); probability; statistics – mean, median, mode; counting techniques (elementary counting
principle); number theory (divisibility, composites, primes, prime factorization); exponents; scientific
notation; square and other roots; Pythagorean Theorem; pre-algebra topics (linear expressions, linear
equations, and higher order expressions); properties of real numbers: commutative, distributive, etc.;
coordinate graphing, including y = mx + b; plane and solid geometry (area, perimeter, volume, etc.);
measurement (unit conversion, precision, metric system; calculator use.
(M71a)
MATH 7A
This course is for students with high achievement in their current class, mastery of basic concepts
(fractions, decimals, percentages, area, volume, etc.), and strong interest in problem solving. Essentially
the same topics are covered as in Math 7, but with greater depth, pace, and expectation of independent
work.
Note regarding Math 7a: Most students in seventh grade will take Math 7. In addition to this, Math
7a, an advanced section, is offered to qualified students. This section covers the same material as Math 7,
but proceeds in greater depth and at greater speed with less time taken to review and reinforce basic
material. Accordingly, criteria for course placement are high achievement in the student’s current class,
mastery of basic material, and strong interest in advanced work. Placement decisions are considered
carefully, taking into account the recommendation of the current teacher, previous grades, standardized
test scores, and end-of-the-year placement tests. In late spring of their sixth-grade year, current students
are informed of their recommended placement for the following year, with time taken for discussion and
review as needed.
New seventh-grade students who wish to be considered for Math 7a should arrange to take
a placement test with department head, Tom Rona, as well as forward a recommendation
from their current math teacher to [email protected] Math placement tests
will be given on Thursday, March 30, 2017 at 3:30 in Middle School Room 102 (students
should bring a pencil and a calculator.)
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(M80a)
ALGEBRA 8
This is a standard first-year algebra course, with additional topics and use of computers and calculators to
explore the subject of algebra. Topics include operations on positive and negative real numbers (integer,
rational, radical); classification of the real numbers (rational, radical, transcendental, etc.); absolute value;
algebraic ratios and proportions; exponents, exponential growth and decay; scientific notation; radicals,
numerical and algebraic; solving radical equations; coordinate graphing, linear and non-linear; statistics;
estimation, problem-solving techniques; probability; relative frequency; absolute value; use of calculators,
graphing calculators, and spreadsheets; functions, f(x) notation; linear, quadratic, and rational algebraic
expressions and equations; polynomials; multivariable systems; sums and products of algebraic and
complex fractions; factoring; generalized laws of exponents; fractional, negative, and zero exponents;
logarithms; and using the Quadratic Formula, the Pythagorean Theorem, and the Midpoint Formula.
(M81a)
ALGEBRA 8A
This is a first-year algebra course for highly motivated and talented math students who want a strong focus
on mathematics in their eighth-grade year. While including the topics mentioned above under Algebra 8,
this course covers the concepts of algebra, graphing, and trigonometry with greater depth, pace, and
expectation of independent work and with a special emphasis on challenging word problems and formal
application of the constructs of algebra, including ventures into limits and derivatives.
Note regarding Algebra 8a: Most students in eighth grade will take Algebra 8. In addition to this,
Algebra 8a, an advanced section, is offered to qualified students. This section covers the same material as
Algebra 8, along with additional material, and proceeds in greater depth and at greater speed with less
time taken to review and reinforce basic material. Accordingly, criteria for course placement are high
achievement in the student’s current class, mastery of basic material, and strong interest in advanced
work. Placement decisions are considered carefully, taking into account the recommendation of the
current teacher, previous grades, standardized test scores, and end-of-the-year placement tests. In the
late spring, current seventh-grade students will be informed of their recommended placement for the
following year, with time taken for discussion and review as needed.
New eighth-grade students who wish to be considered for Algebra 8a should arrange to take
a placement test with department head, Tom Rona, as well as forward a recommendation
from their current math teacher to [email protected] Math placement tests
will be given on Thursday, March 30, 2017 at 3:30 in Middle School Room 102 (students
should bring a pencil and a calculator.)
33
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PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
The aim of the Lakeside Middle School Personal Development Program is to provide students with the
knowledge and skills to live a healthy and rewarding life in middle school and beyond. To achieve this aim,
our curriculum works to empower students to understand themselves, make intentional values-based
decisions, practice healthy behaviors, and positively engage with others in their local and global
communities. Our curriculum focuses on the following key elements as necessary components of a healthy
life.
 Identity
 Identity and Community
 Healthy Peer Relationships
 Emotional Health
 Brain development
 Body (puberty)
 Mindfulness
(G50a) Personal Development 5
The fifth-grade curriculum is primarily concerned with personal growth in areas of immediate concern for
children aged 10 and 11, for example friendship. The course centers around the theme of “Getting to
Know Yourself and Getting Along with Others.” A variety of resources are employed in this once a week
course to challenge students to use reflection and discussion as a means of communicating their ideas and
questions.
(G60a) Personal Development 6
The theme of the sixth-grade course is “Who am I?” with a focus on gaining awareness and learning about
identity as well as the basics of brain and body development. Many of the readings, class activities, and
discussions are geared towards increasing students’ self-awareness and helping them gain the information
and skills they need to lead successful, healthy, and fulfilling lives. Additional lessons focus on knowledge
and interpersonal skills that will enable students to be capable and comfortable interacting in a
multicultural and diverse community.
(G70a) Personal Development 7
The theme of the seventh-grade course is “Having a Positive Sense of Self Identity and Healthy
Relationships.” It focuses on helping students understand identity, adolescent brain development, and the
social, emotional, and physical pressures adolescents face. It also helps them develop the skills needed to
negotiate these challenges. Through a variety of activities that encourage metacognition, self-reflection,
self-monitoring, and self-advocacy, students learn that they can have more control over their lives and
potential. They learn how to apply these approaches to their own learning processes and to making healthy
life choices.
(G80a) Personal Development 8
The eighth-grade course is the culmination of the middle school Personal Development program. The
course theme is “Who am I in Community….” Students examine, identify, and build understanding of
their individual lenses, cultures and values and how they affect their interactions with the world. They
develop their leadership styles and learn how to advocate for causes, communities, and issues that are
meaningful to them. Students also examine topics that will help with their transition into high school, such
as emotional health, healthy relationships, and gender and sexual identity. Class activities in this year-long
35
course include creating group projects, holding values discussions, watching and discussing films,
researching current and relevant topics, and writing personal and analytical pieces.
36
VISION
It is our vision to foster the development of ethical individuals who practice healthy, active lifestyles and
play a vital role in building healthy communities.
MISSION
We will provide a dynamic program which inspires all students to engage in and explore a variety of
activities within a safe, supportive environment with the ultimate aim of establishing the habits necessary
for a healthy lifestyle.
VALUES STATEMENT
The Lakeside Middle School Physical Education Department values a comprehensive physical education
program that is an integral part of the school. It is achieved by:
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creating a dynamic, safe, fun and engaging learning environment
fostering interest in a variety of activities
offering rigorous, developmentally appropriate curriculum that is accessible to all students and
responsive to individual needs
developing authentic opportunities for goal-setting, self-reflection, and healthy decision making
cultivating ethical behavior both in the classroom and beyond
encouraging students to take risks by trying new activities and being willing to learn from failure
pursuing opportunities to make intentional connections with other stakeholders
The Physical Education curriculum is progressive, with each grade building on the prior year’s foundation.
Each class meets four times a week. The 5th and 6th grade classes are credit/no credit, while 7th and 8th
grade classes are graded. All students perform fitness tests twice a year using the Presidential Fitness
Youth Program. A report is emailed home to families after each testing period.
(P50a)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 5
Fifth-grade students learn to run, jump, kick, strike, catch, and throw efficiently in order to develop their
eye-hand and eye-foot coordination. Lead up games and low-organized games are used to introduce and
reinforce these elements. Sports and activities include soccer, pillo polo, floor hockey, football, basketball,
volleyball, soft lacrosse, and t-ball as well as scooter games, circus arts, rope skipping, wall climbing,
tumbling and peer facilitated games. Physical fitness is emphasized and is developed through regular,
vigorous activity throughout the year.
(P60a)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 6
In addition to continuing to develop basic motor skills, 6th grade students participate in lead up games,
low-organized games, and sport-themed games including: pickleball, soccer, floor hockey, volleyball, circus
games, pillo polo, soft tennis, basketball, throwing/ catching/fielding/striking, ultimate Frisbee and team
handball. Students learn the health-related components of fitness: flexibility, muscular strength, muscular
endurance, and cardiorespiratory endurance. They learn the skills necessary to set personal fitness goals
and develop fitness plans to reach their goals.
(P70a)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 7
Seventh-grade students participate in activities including ultimate Frisbee, flag football, soccer, spikeball,
pickleball, Speedminton, team handball, Kung Fu, yoga, volleyball, floor hockey, badminton, and
softball. Students are also introduced to erg training. Fitness work is incorporated into every lesson.
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Examples of fitness-related activities include: use of cardio machines, Bosu balls, foam rollers, assisted pullup bands, medicine balls and kettle bells. Fitness assessment results are used to set goals. Students learn
to develop personal fitness plans (PFP’s) applying the health-related fitness concepts they learned in 6th
grade as well as the skill-related concepts of fitness introduced in this course, working towards personal
improvement over the course of the 7th grade year.
(P80a)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 8
Eighth-grade students participate in activities including soccer, spikeball, pickleball, soft tennis, badminton,
ultimate games, Speedminton, floor hockey, circus arts, volleyball and team handball. Fitness work is
incorporated into every lesson. Examples of fitness related activities include use of cardio machines, bosu
balls, foam rollers, assisted pull-up bands, medicine balls and kettle bells. Students set goals as a result of
their fitness test, and learn to develop their own personal fitness plans (PFP’s) working towards personal
improvement over the course of the year.
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The Middle School Science Department program is designed to give every student repeated opportunities
to participate in hands-on, minds-on science and engineering. We engage students’ curiosity and teach
methods of scientific investigation by involving students in active learning through experimentation.
Students ask questions, design experiments, analyze data, and make conclusions based on their own
laboratory work. Students are engaged in project-based learning that allows them to apply their knowledge
of physical science, life science, earth science, and space science concepts.
The Middle School Science curriculum contains a focused study of global topics that are revisited every
year, including the ocean, disease, and exploration. Each grade level touches on a different aspect of these
three topics, allowing each student’s understanding to grow along with their deepening understanding of
fundamental scientific principles. Technology is broadly integrated into courses for data collection, analysis,
and presentation. Students leave the Middle School with a solid sense of the role of science and
engineering in global issues, supported by a firm grasp of natural science principles and what it means to
have scientific habits of mind.
(S50a)
SCIENCE 5
The fifth-grade science curriculum provides a laboratory experience that develops observational, manual,
cooperative, and analytic skills. Scientific inquiry is emphasized. Students access the global topics by
learning about disease prevention, designing suitable outdoor wear for a cold weather environment,
exploring the role of sonar in marine mammals, and investigating the oil industry’s search for ocean energy
resources. Lab topics include the physical and behavioral aspects of animal adaptation; chemical and
biochemical reactions; computer science; and robotics. Fifth-grade science is taught in conjunction with
math so that interdisciplinary units are the norm.
(S60a)
SCIENCE 6
The sixth-grade science curriculum focuses on developing students’ understanding of the way the world
works across a broad spectrum of content areas and refines students’ understanding of the engineering
design process. Sixth graders are encouraged to develop an appreciation for the wonder and
interdependence of life on Earth. Students learn about a variety of scientific concepts through
investigations into such areas as density, malaria, astronomy, evolution, chemistry, and hydraulic
engineering and design.
(S70a)
BIOLOGY 7
Seventh-grade students explore the physiology of a wide range of living things, including bacteria, fungi,
plants, and animals. Students design experiments to learn how these organisms meet the challenges of
being alive, such as obtaining and processing nutrients, excreting wastes, and sensing the environment.
Dissection allows students to explore the complexity of living things and understand the relationship
between structure and function in both simple and more advanced organisms. Students access global
topics by studying vaccinations, designing and building a self-propelled water creature, and imagining the
physiological adaptations of an inhabitant of an unusual biome. Focused on human biology, topics include
the nervous system, the musculoskeletal system, circulation and respiration, reproduction, digestion, and
evolution.
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(S80a)
PHYSICAL AND EARTH SCIENCE 8
Eighth-grade students learn about energy and matter and then apply this knowledge to the study of
geology, meteorology, chemistry, and astronomy. An introductory unit on atomic theory and chemical
bonds leads into the study of rocks and minerals. The meteorology unit focuses on how air and water
behave, with students designing several experiments and interpreting their results. The astronomy unit
focuses primarily on the interaction of the earth, moon, and sun. Students access global topics by writing
a blog of tectonic travels, experimenting with different water purification treatments, and studying global
winds and currents. Lab activities include earthquake simulations, experiments in physics and chemistry,
and investigations with stream tables to study erosion and watersheds.
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The primary goal of the Middle School History Department is to prepare students to live in an
interconnected world by developing in them an understanding of the past and its relationship to the world
today. Teachers encourage learning using a variety of methods, including simulations, projects,
presentations, literature, primary documents, films, and guest speakers. Students learn how to acquire,
evaluate, and interpret historical information, and to communicate their knowledge and ideas effectively.
THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: A GLOBAL MICROCOSM (GRADE 5)
The social studies component of Humanities 5 uses global themes such as change, interdependence,
diversity, human migration, human rights, quality of life, and sustainability to explore the history of
Washington State and the Pacific Northwest. Students learn how the physical and political geography of
the region influenced the region’s economic and cultural history. They study the roles that the fishing,
timber, and technology industries played in shaping the economic and social development of the Pacific
Northwest, and their impact upon the region’s natural environment and its indigenous cultures. Working
individually and in groups, students read historical accounts, analyze historical issues, discuss current
events, role-play, create art related to the content, and write persuasive essays on issues that affect their
local communities and the region as a whole.
THE SILK ROAD: EAST MEETS WEST (GRADE 6)
Sixth-grade social studies concentrates on the geography of Eurasia and on the cultures that existed along
the path of the Silk Road—once an intricate network of trade routes that connected Asia to the Western
world. As cultures encountered one another, they established important connections along the Silk Road
that enabled the migration of products, languages, inventions, belief systems, and forms of artistic
expression. Throughout the school year, students reflect on how these multiple connections relate to
their own experiences. The course stresses reading, writing, and interpretive work as students engage in
a series of thematic units focused on geography and cartography; archaeology and chronology; trade and
economics; religion; daily life; and conflict and conquest. A year-long current events program supplements
and extends the historical and cultural curriculum.
AMERICAN HISTORY: THE AMERICAN DREAM (GRADE 7)
According to the standard definition of what became known as the American Dream, the United States is
the land of opportunity where people can achieve success and realize their dreams through hard work,
education, and talent. In reality, different groups and people have defined the American Dream in different
ways. Throughout our nation’s history, the pursuit of these various American Dreams often caused social
conflict and disunity rather than cooperation and cohesion. Starting with the founding of the thirteen
colonies, this course charts how various segments of American society have sought to achieve their visions
of the American Dream and what happened when the visions differed.
LIVING IN THE ANTHROPOCENE (GRADE 8)
The goal of the eighth-grade global issues is to teach students to recognize the connection between what
happened in the past to the world that exists today, and to view themselves as participants in the global
community who have the knowledge and skills to create a more humane and sustainable world. Students
begin by reviewing the roles that geography and time play in the study of history, and they learn the means
and methods that scholars and scientists use to uncover the past. Students next use the Big History
approach to study the overarching eras of human history from the emergence of Homo sapiens to the
globalized world of today. Finally, students work in groups to study the issue of sustainability and to create
plans and designs for energy neutral cities. Students learn how to conduct research, to analyze and
interpret evidence, to work collaboratively, and to communicate effectively.
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The Brain & Learning Lab enhances student learning by promoting strategic learning or purposeful, goaloriented approaches to learning. We support the development of skills in four competency areas: 1)
homework and organization, 2) planning and prioritizing, 3) attention, retention, and learning, 4) selfmonitoring, self-reflection and self-advocacy. Lab faculty emphasize that learning can be maximized
through an understanding of how learning occurs in the brain. Our Brain & Learning Lab Coordinator
and Brain & Learning Lab Specialist are available to consult with parents, guardians, teachers, and students
to support academic performance. Students, parents, and guardians may access department services by
coming to the lab or scheduling an appointment.
CONTENT SUPPORT & TUTORIAL COORDINATION
As part of the Middle School student support team, Brain & Learning Lab faculty coordinate student
academic support plans. These plans might include short term content support by working with the Brain
and Learning Lab faculty. For long-term content support, referrals are made to professional tutors who
are available to work individually with students. Professional tutors provide ongoing support and
instruction on a fee basis, and financial support is available if a family qualifies. Space is available in the
Brain & Learning Lab for outside tutors to meet with students on campus.
SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
When recommendations for assessments by outside professionals are made and/or when there are
documented learning challenges, Brain & Learning Lab faculty develop academic support plans, coordinate
reasonable accommodations, provide ongoing case management, and act as liaisons between outside
professionals and the school and between families and teachers. Lab faculty also provide referrals for
educational and other professional assessments.
OTHER SERVICES
In addition to academic and learning support, Lab faculty provides teacher consultation and classroom
instruction on topics such as metacognition, executive functions, and learning and the brain. Lab faculty
also periodically present seminars and interactive faculty workshops related to teaching and learning. They
also coordinate and administer the Comprehensive Testing Program 4 (CTP-IV) completed by sixth and
eighth graders.
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The Middle School offers a range of after school clubs. The clubs listed below are those which were
offered last year and will most likely be offered again this year, though final offerings depend on student
interest and initiative. Clubs usually meet one afternoon per week from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. Some clubs are
offered during lunch periods on a specific day.
Additional clubs may be added once the school year begins. Students may propose new clubs by
completing a Clubs and Activities form available from the Middle School Assistant Director. This form
describes the requirements for initiating a club and guides the student through the application process.
Specific dates and times for first term clubs and activities listed below will be available in mid-September;
information about second term clubs and activities will be available in January. For an updated listing of
activities and meeting schedules, please contact Ted Chen at 206-440-2856 or [email protected]
lakesideschool.org.
CHESS CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
Students at all skill levels in grades 5-8 are welcome to drop in as their schedule permits to play practice
games and learn cool openings and strategies. Interested players, including those unable to attend Chess
Club, may participate in the monthly Friday afternoon Seattle Middle School Metro Chess League and
other local, state and national competitions. No tournament experience or participation is required.
COMPUTER CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
Students have the opportunity to explore programming, physical computing and robotics. This afterschool activity, guided by a computer science professional, allows students an opportunity to learn
programming in languages that are age/developmentally appropriate. Some may choose to do desktop
computing with Scratch, Agentsheets, Python, Processing, Java, C# or C; others may choose to do physical
computing with robots or arduino boards. The programming club is open to students of all experience
levels in grades 6-8 in the fall term. Beginning in February it will be open to students in grades 5-8.
Sometimes we run a separate Computer Science club depending on student interest/ faculty supervision.
DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS (GRADES 5-8)
Do you ever imagine yourself peering through hazy darkness, rough stone walls on either side of you
dripping with ooze, gripping a sword in your hand, wondering what eldritch horror lurks around the next
corner of a crumbling ruin? Does the notion of stealth, secrecy, and lightning reflexes stimulate your inner
Ninja? If so, you might be interested in joining the Dungeons and Dragons Club. The Dungeons & Dragons
club is open to grades 5-8.
GO & TEA CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
Go ("weiqi" in Chinese) is an ancient strategy board game for two players that originated in China over
2,000 years ago. The game is rich in strategy, yet simple in rules. Come play, drink Chinese tea, and eat
Chinese tea snacks with us. Go club is open to grades 5-8.
KNITTING (GRADES 5-8)
Students in grades 5-8 are invited to bring their knitting projects and spend time together knitting.
Beginning knitters may also come to learn some basic skills. Some knitting supplies are provided, but we
strongly encourage knitters to bring their own materials.
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KUNG FU (GRADES 5-8)
Students will learn traditional Kung Fu techniques in a family-like atmosphere with the goals of improving
personal health, developing discipline and self-confidence, and learning self-defense techniques. Kung Fu
club is available to grades 5-8.
MAKERS CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
Makers Club is a chance to work in the Maker Space Lab in the library. Come and use old recycled
materials and give them new life! Use the 3D printer! Learn new techniques to create the ideas that your
imagination and creativity have developed!
MATH CLUB 5/6 (GRADES 5-6)
Math Club 5/6 is designed for enthusiastic young mathematicians who want to extend themselves with
challenging problems. It is student centered with opportunities for students to work through problems
alone or in groups and can be attended on a drop-in basis. There will be very few teacher-led lessons,
although a faculty member will be present to provide general hints and advice.
MATH CLUB 7/8 (GRADES 7-8)
Gather with like-minded friends to have fun with math. Although much of our time is spent practicing for
upcoming competitions, Math Club 7 & 8 is open to everyone; you don’t have to compete to participate.
It is also just a fun place to explore interesting mathematical ideas and work together on challenging
problems. If you have conflicts with other after-school activities, you may pick up materials from the math
office. The year will culminate in two major off-campus competitions: MATHCOUNTS around February
and the Washington State Math Championships around March.
NEWSPAPER CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
Join us for this exciting club! This is a great place for both new and returning students to bond and make
new relationships. This is a place for integrity, inclusion, and consideration. If you want to use your
creativity and imagination, then the newspaper club is the place for you! Our goal is to create a monthly
publication to help keep you informed about what is going on and to learn about the community!
SPANISH CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
The Spanish Club welcomes all Spanish speakers! We’ll converse in Spanish, play games, sing songs, and
watch movies. We will learn some traditional dances, and cook dishes from different Hispanic countries.
¡Bienvenidos! This club is open to grades 5-8.
STUDENT COUNCIL (GRADES 6-8)
The Middle School Student Council provides leadership opportunities for interested students in grades 68. Student Council members promote the core values represented in the Community Expectations,
represent middle school students when in dialogue with the leadership teams of the school, and promote
and uphold the general welfare of all students by promoting inclusion, integrity, and consideration.
Members respond to student issues and create student activities that promote enthusiasm and school
spirit, building a community where each member and their constituents are valued and respected. Student
Council members work with students, faculty, staff, and administrators to make accomplish these goals in
a timely manner. Positions on the Student Council are decided by approval voting from the community.
There are three representatives from each grade.
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STUDENTS TAKING ACTION (STA) CLUB (GRADES 5-8)
Get ready to change the world around you! STA is a student-founded and student-run club empowering
students to join forces with others who want to make a positive difference to improve the quality of life
in our community and around the world. STA has run drives, organized awareness efforts such as Day of
Silence in the past, and this year plans to organize school wide student activities such as a School Film
Night. A club for all grades, STA is offered on Wednesdays, at 1st and 2nd lunch
ULTIMATE FRISBEE CLUB (GRADES 6-8)
In the spring, Lakeside sponsors an ultimate Frisbee team, co-ed, which competes in the DiscNW League.
Practices are held once a week for the first couple of weeks and after, games are played on the weekends.
The season runs approximately March to mid-May. Previous experience is not required – come one,
come all! Students can simultaneously participate in a Lakeside spring sport such as track, lacrosse or
baseball if they wish.
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The Middle School participates in the Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) sports program and the Boys
and Girls Lacrosse Associations. In addition to the required physical education classes, students may elect
to participate in our after-school interscholastic sports programs. The primary goal of fifth- and sixthgrade interscholastic sports is for students to have fun and learn skills. At the seventh- and eighth-grade
levels, interscholastic sports become more competitive. Students and parents/guardians looking for a
highly competitive experience should consider selecting teams outside of or in addition to Lakeside.
Registration for fall sports (cross country, sculling and soccer) takes place during course sign-ups the
previous spring. Online registration for winter and spring sports takes place several weeks before each
season. Since the CYO places limits on team sizes, our Lakeside Middle School “no-cut” policy means that
students who register during the stated timeframe will be assured a spot on a team, while those who do
not may be waitlisted and/or denied participation.
When a large number of students sign up for a sport and the numbers warrant a second team, teams will
be divided according to the league offerings for that sport. For example, basketball is divided into varsity
and junior varsity teams, while soccer is divided into two equally experienced teams. If a player has a
regularly scheduled commitment that prohibits him or her from attending the majority of basketball
practices or games, he/she will be placed on the junior varsity squad, rather than varsity, regardless of
his/her ability.
FALL (LATE AUGUST THROUGH OCTOBER)
Coed Cross-Country (Grades 5-8)
Sunday meet days
Sculling (Rowing) (Grades 7-8)
Practices only. Emphasis is on learning to scull.
Girls’ Soccer (Grades 5-8)
Saturday games
Boys’ Soccer (Grades 5-8)
Saturday games
WINTER (EARLY NOVEMBER TO MID-FEBRUARY)
Girls’ Basketball (Grades 5-8)
Saturday and/or Sunday games
Boys’ Basketball (Grades 5-8)
Mostly Sunday games
SPRING (EARLY FEBRUARY TO MIDDLE OF MAY)
Girls’ Volleyball (Grades 5-8)
Saturday and/or Sunday games
Boys’ Lacrosse (Grades 5-8)
Saturday late morning games
Girls’ Lacrosse (Grades 5-8)
Saturday and a few Sunday games
Coed Track and Field (Grades 5-8)
Saturday meets
Coed U.S. Crew (Grade 8 only)
Daily practice with weekend regattas. Open to students who
have participated in the fall ‘Learn to Scull’ program.
Most teams practice twice weekly for ninety minutes. All practices conclude by 6:00 p.m.
Student athletes who have late practice must attend after-school study hall until practice begins.
More information about the Interscholastic Sports Program can be found on the Lakeside website
(www.lakesideschool.org).
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The mission of a school library program is to ensure that students and staff are effective users and
producers of ideas and information (American Association of School Libraries). The Lakeside Middle
School library:
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Provides instruction and support for a comprehensive information literacy program;
Nurtures the love of reading and the habits of mind of life long readers;
Leads and collaborates with faculty/staff and students in research, guided inquiry and project-based
learning; and
Develops digital citizens who understand the responsible use of information.
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