four year program chart

four year program chart

Salesianum School

Program of Studies

2017-2018

(revised December 2016)

Table of Contents

Foundation Documents

Mission Statement

Belief Statements

Profile of the Graduate at Graduation

Course Selection and Related Academic Policies

Overview of Academic Approach

Course Selection Procedures for 2017-2018

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses

Driver Education

Graduation Requirements

NCAA Eligibility and Core Courses

Open Time (study hall)

Phasing System

Course Offerings (by Department)

Religious Studies

English

Social Studies

Mathematics

Science

World Languages

Physical Education

Arts and Innovation

9

10

10

11

4

4

7

8

2

2

2

29

36

41

43

12

14

18

23

Business Education

Planning for College

50

52

This Program of Studies is designed to assist returning students and their parents in the process of requesting courses for the 2017-2018 school year. Students will receive guidance in school from teachers, counselors (school and college), and the academic office. This document may be updated online without notice if specific course descriptions are under review.

This document only contains academic policies that affect the process of student scheduling. Complete academic policies are included in the Student Handbook, available in onCampus. These policies are updated each spring after the Program of Studies is published.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Salesianum School

Foundation Documents

Mission Statement

Salesianum School educates and develops the whole person based on the teaching of Saint Francis de Sales, whose spirituality can be summarized in

“Live Jesus.”

As an independent Catholic secondary school founded by the Oblates of Saint

Francis de Sales in 1903, Salesianum challenges young men through dynamic college preparatory and extracurricular programs to live as Salesian

Gentlemen devoted to faith, community, and service.

Belief Statements

At Salesianum School, we believe that:

Our Roman Catholic identity is shaped by the Oblate-Salesian tradition.

Our faithful practice of the Direction of Intention offers all activities to God.

Our college preparatory and extracurricular programs develop the whole person spiritually, intellectually, emotionally, physically and socially.

The strength of our community lies in our ongoing commitment to diversity and our respect for the uniqueness of each individual.

Our educational and spiritual vision inspires to live, flourish and serve in an increasingly diverse and everchanging world.

Profile of the Graduate at Graduation

Upon graduation, through the teachings of Saint Francis de Sales and the guidance of faculty, staff and administration, a graduate of Salesianum will:

1. Be prepared to face the challenges of higher education:

 Write and think critically and analytically

 Acquire, interpret and discern information objectively

 Use technology proficiently and responsibly

 Communicate effectively

 Live with a mind open to learning and growth.

“Each day we must begin again with renewed energy.” (Letter of Saint Francis de Sales, no. 1049)

2. Maintain self-discipline and make good moral decisions.

“Submit to the guidance of reason, which God has implanted in us, and in His Providence, that we may remain firm and constant.” (The Spiritual Conferences of Saint Francis de Sales, 3)

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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3. Engage in service to our community and world.

“Go to society and meet your neighbor with a joyful heart and look at your neighbor lovingly.”

(Introduction to the Devout Life, 3.24)

4. Embrace and foster the brotherhood that unites Salesian gentlemen.

“We have no bond but the bond of love, which is the bond of perfection.”

(The Spiritual Directory, quoting Colossians 3:14)

5. Contribute positively to society by freely sharing our unique gifts and talents.

“Be who you are and be that well.” (Introduction to the Devout Life)

6. Believe that success is a process of small steps and that all we do can make a difference.

“Do ordinary things extraordinarily well.” (Introduction to the Devout Life)

7. Continue to build a personal relationship with God.

“Prayer asks for and receives the love of God, and the sacraments give it.”

(Introduction to the Devout Life, 1.2)

8. Value the sacredness of all human life from conception until death.

“We must have tenderness toward our neighbors, bearing with their imperfections.”

(Introduction to the Devout Life, 3.2)

9. Recognize the inherent worth of each individual and build relationships in diverse global environments.

“All these together are called the universe, perhaps because all diversity is reduced to unity. It is as if one

were to say ‘unidiverse,’ unique along with diversity, and diversity along with unity.”

(Treatise on the Love of God, 2.2)

And above all else,

10. Live Jesus!

“I have wished above everything else to engrave upon your heart this sacred motto, ‘Live Jesus.’ Just as

Jesus will live within your heart so he will also live in all your conduct.”

(Introduction to the Devout Life, 3.23)

Quotations are from the writings of

Saint Francis de Sales

(1567 – 1622)

Priest, bishop, preacher, writer

Patron of the Oblates of Saint Francis de Sales

Patron of Salesianum School

Doctor of the Church

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

3

Salesianum School

Course Selection and Related Academic Policies

Overview

St. Francis de Sales believed knowledge to be the eighth sacrament. At Salesianum a genuine love for and interest in knowledge, along with a realistic understanding of what is involved in its acquisition, are absolutely necessary to be a successful student and a complete human being. Salesianum is dedicated to doing all it can to help each student develop this love, interest, and understanding.

The key to learning is study. Study helps clarify and reinforce what is taught in classrooms and class print

& online materials. Even more, study gives the student the opportunity to broaden his knowledge beyond what is required and to discipline his mind and his whole person to continue learning beyond high school. Study means a regular program of the following:

 daily review and previewing of each class completing all assignments

 reviewing for all tests and examinations

 consistent use of a student planner or a planning app of choice and attention to grades, assignments, and teacher feedback on OnCampus

 adhering to a disciplined system of studying and working ahead each weekend

Such a program as this should take at least two hours per school day, in addition to what is done at school and on weekends.

Course Selection

Introduction and Overview

The Course Selection Process begins in January with the publication of the Program of Studies, the distribution of Course Selection forms, and the payment of the Registration Fee (see “Financial Obligations” below for more on the fee and payment information). During late January and early February, students consult with their parents, current teachers, and counselor to determine the most appropriate course of study for next year.

Once the Course Selection forms are completed, students will enter their course requests in onCampus; teachers will approve or deny these requests. Selecting a course does not guarantee that the course will appear on a student’s schedule. The remaining weeks of the school year are devoted to resolving course conflicts and ensuring that phasing placements are correct. Student schedules are completed in June after final grades are reported.

Official schedules are posted through onCampus during late June to early July. Ordering of books online will be possible in mid-July. Many classes now use electronic books viewed on student iPads; most of these electronic books need not be purchased until the 1 st

week of school.

Choosing the Appropriate Course and Phase

At the end of the First Semester (January), teachers recommend students for particular courses and phases for the next school year. These recommendations are based on student performance in the First Semester, courses previously taken, and standardized tests. The general policy governing these recommendations is that a student moves down to a lower phase if he does not have at least a C average in a given subject and a student does not move up to a higher phase if he does not have an A average in the appropriate subject. It is not imperative that a student move to a higher phase if he has an A average. Changing phase should only be done in conversation with teachers and counselors. Parents and students are asked to carefully check phases when schedules become available in July.

In limited cases, phase recommendations are changed by teachers after final grades are calculated.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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A student’s current teachers place phase recommendations on his Course Selection sheet. Their signatures certify that the courses he has selected match their phase recommendations. Parents will be able to see these recommendations and signatures before signing their approval. Please note that a student’s phase for religious studies (other than freshmen religion) must be the same as his phase for English.

If a student has not been performing adequately to qualify for courses he wishes to take, he must sufficiently improve his performance during the Second Semester and plan to make up any remaining deficiencies in summer school. Recommendations are revised during the Second Semester and at the end of the school year according to changes in performance.

Changing Course Selections and Appealing Phase Recommendations

Great care is taken to assign the appropriate phases for courses based upon ability level and past performance. Students are to select electives with care, and alternates must be placed in order of priority. Once an elective is begun, the student is required to remain in the course to its completion and to receive a passing grade.

Students are to carefully consider total courseload when choosing 7, 7.5, or 8.0 total credits. Students choosing to take more than 7.25 credits must obtain approval from their counselor.

Student Scheduling Timeline:

March 1 st

-May 15 th

: Forms used to appeal a phase recommendation will be available. The student’s achievement for the Third Quarter and (if necessary) the Fourth Quarter or Final Grade will play a major role in any decision.

Electives may be dropped or added during this period without incurring the change fee (see below).

Before July 10 th

: Official student class schedules will be posted through OnCampus. July 31 st

is the deadline for the

Academic Office to receive a request in writing (course change form or email from an accepted parental email address) for a review of phasing in a course. It is essential that students carefully check their schedules for accuracy.

First cycle of the year: Only course conflicts, Academic Office errors, or teacher initiated requests will result in course changes during this time.

Start of school---October 1st: During this period, teachers may initiate a course change if they believe a student is inappropriately phased. No changes will be made after October 1

st

.

The Dean of Academic Affairs has the authority to waive elements of this policy as appropriate in cases of extraordinary academic or pastoral need. Dropping a course (with permission from the Dean of Academic Affairs) after the 3 rd

cycle will result in a grade of “withdraw pass (WP)” or “withdraw fail (WF)” being listed on the student’s report card and transcript; this does not apply to phase changes. If an elective is dropped in order to allow for more time to complete work for core courses, the Dean of Academic Affairs may choose not to include the dropped course on the transcript; this decision will be made in consultation with the student’s counselor, parent(s), and the teacher of the course being dropped.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Course Conflict Resolution and the Scheduling System

There are eight time slots in Salesianum’s seven-day rotating schedule. Most classes meet five times during the cycle (with the exception of the A1 class). The schedule works as the sample below indicates:

Period

1

2

3

A

English 2

Scripture

PE/ Health

B C

English 2 English 2

Spanish

Open

Geometry

Chemistry

D

English 2

PE/ Health

World Hist.

E

English 2

Open

Scripture

F

English 2

Chemistry

Spanish

G

Open

World Hist.

Geometry

4

5

6

World Hist.

Geometry

Scripture

PE/ Health

Spanish

Open

Chemistry World Hist. Scripture

Geometry PE/ Health Open

Chemistry World Hist. Scripture

Spanish Geometry PE/ Health

Chemistry

Spanish

Activity

There are multiple sections for most courses; however, some courses are limited to only one section. The

Exchange Program with Padua and Ursuline Academies, teacher availability, lab/room usage, and the minimum number of students needed to constitute a section are factors that compel a course to be offered at a particular period.

Salesianum’s computer generated schedule will satisfy the highest possible number of student requests.

The limitations noted above prevent all requests from being satisfied.

Exchange courses: Ursuline and Padua Academies

The following Exchange courses may be offered during first period, so students should avoid requesting more than one of these courses in a given academic year (you may request more than one as an alternate to these):

Offered at Salesianum School

Course No. Course Title

555

AP Environmental

Science*

691A

807-810

914

915

841

American Sign Language I

Wind Ensemble/

Marching Band

Marketing

Business Law

Drafting I*

Exchange Courses 2017-2018

Offered at Ursuline Academy

Course

No.

Course Title

251

341

839

A. P. English*

Introduction to Archaeology and

Human Origins-AC

1313 Innovation Powered by

Ursuline Academy-AC

Offered at Padua Academy

Course

No.

Course Title

258P

Science Fiction

Literature-3

809P Drama-3

631P

333

471

Italian-3

Life Unworthy of Life-3

Linux OS-A

*additional sections may be available during other periods of the day

Note: Other courses may be added as scheduling allows.

Exchange course offerings will be updated in the Spring as each participating school makes final scheduling decisions.

A student who participates in the Exchange Program abides by the attendance and discipline codes of both schools. Grades earned in exchange courses are calculated as numerical grades and then translated into the letter grades as determined by the school attended, not the school where the course is taken.

Due to the differences in school schedules, exchange courses typically run less than five days per seven-day cycle. Therefore, exchange students are expected to work independently on assignments. Exchange class days are published in a separate calendar that is given to all exchange students.

Transportation by school bus is provided for students to travel to and from Salesianum. All exchange students are

required to ride the exchange bus.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Financial Obligations, Registration Fee and Registration Eligibility

Course Selection forms will be distributed and collected (properly completed) in February. Online reenrollment, including your Registration Fee payment fee, is due March 1 st

. Any student not returning to Salesianum for the following school year should indicate so on the Online Re-enrollment form. Students who have not paid their registration fee by March 1 st

will not receive a Course Verification form in March, nor will they have any courses scheduled until this or any other financial obligation is met. If you have questions about the status of your account, contact the Student Finances Officer, Mrs. Heloise Osborn (ext. 124).

Advanced Placement Courses

The Advanced Placement Program (A. P. Program) of the College Board is designed to give highly capable and motivated students the opportunity to pursue college level work while still in high school. These courses are so designated in this Program of Studies. They require significantly more effort and achievement than ordinary college preparatory courses.

Individual departments will screen applicants for these courses carefully. Students taking these courses are required to sit for the Advanced Placement examination(s) in May. The College Board charges a fee to cover the exam to all students taking an A.P. course. The fee is determined annually by the College Board [the cost of each exam for

2016-2017 was $93]. A. P. courses carry extra grade points in calculating a student’s G.P.A. (see “Grading System” in Student Handbook)

AP Capstone Diploma and Certificate

Students who are performing at an exceptionally rigorous academic level, thrive in a collaborative atmosphere, and are recommended by their teachers will be invited to fill out an application for this program.

AP Capstone consists of two mandatory courses, AP Seminar and AP Research. Students who take four AP’s and earn a three or higher plus take AP Seminar and AP Research and earn a three or higher will graduate with an AP

Capstone Diploma. Students who take AP Seminar and AP Research who earn a three or higher but do not meet the other requirements for the diploma will earn an AP Capstone Certificate.

AP Seminar is a prerequisite to AP Research. The course descriptions for these classes can be found in the English

Department. As with all of Salesianum School’s AP Courses, students will be required to complete the AP exam.

The two AP Capstone courses, with their associated performance tasks, assessments, and application of research methodology, complement the rigor of AP courses and exams by challenging students to complete the following:

Think critically and creatively to construct meaning or gain understanding, Plan and conduct a study or investigation, Propose solutions to real-world problems, Plan and produce communication in various forms,

Collaborate to solve a problem, Integrate, synthesize, and make cross-curricular connections.

Independent Study Opportunities

Academic Assistantship 0.5 credit (semester)/1 credit (full year)

Grade: 10, 11, 12

In this program, the student is apprenticed to a teacher. Under the direction of the teacher the student works with a small group of students, offering helpful personal attention, challenging and working with the gifted students on specific projects, or working with and helping students having difficulties with their course work. The program is designed so that the student will help his fellow students and also enrich and improve his own skills in the subject area. Credit is earned for work in this program. Interested students are to meet with the Dean of

Academic Affairs to discuss the process for approval and scheduling. A student must be enrolled in at least six other courses in addition to being in the Academic Assistantship program. Academic Assistantship is available in a variety of disciplines. Note: The grade for the course does not enter into the student’s G.P.A.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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University Courses

Any student taking a university course because he has exhausted the school’s curriculum in a given area must have prior approval from the Dean of Academic Affairs. The grade is not computed into the Grade Point

Average and does not appear on the report card and permanent record. A waiver form must be completed and submitted to the Academic Dean for an exception to be considered.

Driver Education

All Delaware residents are required to take Driver Education; there is typically no fee for Delaware residents.

The course is also open to students from other states. The State of Delaware charges a fee to non-Delaware residents ($532 in 2016-2017) for Driver Education; the State of Delaware has charged a fee to Delaware residents during certain years, though not in 2015-2016. The fee is set annually by the state and is billed by Salesianum.

Normally, students are not to be scheduled for road work in Driver Education during class. If this is not possible, a student may not miss a test in order to do road work, nor should a student miss class more than two times in the same course. If a student is unable to be present for his scheduled road work, he should notify the Driver Education teacher in sufficient time so a substitute can be found.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Graduation Requirements

To graduate from Salesianum School, a student must earn a minimum of 28.25 credits; this credit total may be reduced by the Dean of Academic Affairs for transfer students and in other extenuating circumstances. Students must register for at least 7.00 credits per year, unless granted permission otherwise by the Dean of Academic

Affairs. Freshmen usually take 7.5 credits when Freshmen Innovation is included. Sophomores from Delaware have a minimum of 7.25 credits due to state-mandated Driver Education. Freshmen and seniors may take up to eight credits per year. All Salesianum students must complete at least one-half credit in fine arts; this currently includes all courses with a course number in the 800s as well as course # 474, Web Page Design. The Men’s Chorus course, conducted Tuesday evenings, satisfies the fine arts requirement, but its credits do not count toward the yearly minimum and the graduation credit total.

Minimum credit requirements (by Department)

Religious Studies

English

Social Studies

Mathematics

Science

World Language

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

3 credits

3 credits

Physical Education

Freshmen Innovation

*Arts & Innovation

Advisory (Guidance)

Electives

1 credit

0.5 credit

0.5 credits beyond

Innovation Seminar requirement

0.25 credit

3.5 credits

(Additional 0.25 credit for Delaware residents) (3 consecutive years of one language)

Health 0.5 credit

*470C, 476, and 477 do not count toward this requirement

Minimum Course Requirements (by grade)

Grade 9 (Freshman)

Religious Studies

English

Social Studies

Mathematics

Science

World Language

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

Physical Educ./Health 1 cr.

Grade 10 (Sophomore)

Religious Studies

English

Social Studies

Mathematics

Science

World Language

Physical Education

Electives

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

½ cr.

½ cr.

Freshman Innovation

Grade 11 (Junior)

Religious Studies

English

Social Studies

Mathematics

Science

Electives

World Language

½ cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.*

1 cr.

Guidance (Advisory) 0.25 cr.

Driver Education

(required for Delaware residents, optional for other students)

Grade 12 (Senior)

Religious Studies

English

U. S. Government

Social Studies elective

Mathematics

Electives

Arts & Innovation (800s only)

*minimum *minimum

**any grade or semester

¼ cr.

1 cr.

1 cr.

½ cr.

½ cr.

1 cr.

2.5 cr.*

½ cr.**

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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NCAA Eligibility and Core Courses

Those students who intend to participate in intercollegiate athletics are reminded that the National

Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) requires 16 core academic courses in order for a student to be eligible for intercollegiate sports. The NCAA’s approved list of Salesianum core courses is found below.

English Social Studies A. P. Physics

20th Century Literature

English 1

English 2

English Literature

A. P. English

A.P Economics

Economics

Foreign Policy

Human Origins and

Archaeology

A. P. Environmental Science

Ecology

Integrated Science

Cell Biology

Microbiology

British Literature

The Novel and Drama

Science Fiction Literature

United States Literature

World Literature

Mathematics

Introduction to Law

A. P. Modern European History

Psychology

A. P. Psychology

United States Government

United States History II

A. P. United States History

Additional Core Courses

American Sign Language I

American Sign Language II

French 1

French 2

French 3

Algebra 1

Algebra 2

Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus

A. P. Calculus (AB and BC)

Calculus & Statistics

Geometry

Pre-Calculus

Probability/Statistics

Trigonometry

Trigonometry/Calculus

A. P. Statistics

World Affairs

A. P. World History

A. P. United States Government

World History I

World History I/ US History II

Natural/Physical Science

Anatomy / Physiology

Biology

A. P. Biology

Biotechnology

Chemistry

A. P. Chemistry

Physics

French 4

A. P. French Language

Latin 1

Latin 2

Latin 3

A. P. Latin Literature 3

A. P. Latin Literature 4

Mandarin Chinese I

Mandarin Chinese II

Spanish 1

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Spanish 4

A. P. Spanish Language

A. P. Spanish Literature

Open Time (study hall)

During their Open Time, students may go to one of two areas: the Library or Study Hall. The Library is for silent research and study, but it has designated areas for group work and conversation.. The Study Hall, usually located in the cafeteria, is for individual or group work. Fourth period Study Hall takes place in a specified available classroom. Students must check into one of these areas at the beginning of the period.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Phasing System

At Salesianum, phasing seeks to intellectually challenge students in a positive learning environment among peers. Each student is placed in a particular phase in Religious Studies, English, Social Studies, Mathematics,

World Language, and Science. Differences between phases of the same course can include breadth and/or depth of content instruction, pacing, academic rigor, and homework expectations. Additionally, the expectations regarding compositions, analysis, research, and rhetorical capabilities differ among the phases. The characteristics of courses in each phase are as follows:

College Prep Foundations (CP): CP courses with the “Foundations” designation are available in English,

Mathematics, and Spanish for 9 th

and 10 th

grade courses. Fundamentals are emphasized to develop foundations for success at the college level. Scheduling of these courses allows for the best student-teacher ratio available. These courses are characterized by reinforcement of study and organization skills, frequent assessments, scaffolding

(moving students progressively toward greater understanding), and a variety of methodologies including guided discussion. Students build their composition, research, and rhetoric skills.

College Prep (CP): CP courses emphasize fundamentals in preparation for the college level. Students are actively led toward greater academic independence. These courses are characterized by frequent assessments, scaffolding

(moving students progressively toward greater understanding), and a variety of methodologies. Students build their composition, research, and rhetoric skills.

Accelerated (AC): Accelerated courses are characterized by increased pace, depth, and connections among unit concepts. Students are cognitively engaged for independent work, and the instructor challenges students to rapidly reach higher-order thinking. Students consistently demonstrate their established composition, research, and rhetoric skills. When calculating GPAs, 0.2 points are added to AC courses.

Honors (HN): Honors courses challenge students with exceptional content depth and complexity. Course tasks proceed rapidly from content introduction to higher-order thinking which challenges students to connect concepts and to apply knowledge to new situations. Formative assessment (monitoring student learning) is included, but summative assessment (evaluating student learning) drives the grading for these courses. Students should build upon established composition, research, and rhetoric skills and anticipate exceptionally rigorous expectations. When

calculating GPAs, 0.3 points are added to HN courses.

Advanced Placement (A.P.): These college-level courses are governed by the curriculum of the Advanced

Placement Program (A. P. Program) of the College Board and all syllabi are College Board approved. For an A. P. course, after successful completion of the cumulative examination offered by the College Board, college credit or advanced standing may be granted. When calculating GPAs, 0.4 points are added to A.P. courses.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Religious Studies

Chair: Mr. Stephen Menicucci

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: Four credits of Religious Studies (one credit for each year of enrollment).

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Grade 11

(Junior)

Grade 12

(Senior)

Catholic and Salesian Identity

(CP and AC)

Sacred Scripture

(CP – HN)

Morality and

Social Justice

(CP – HN)

God, Christ, and the Church

OR AP Senior Religion Seminar and Christian Lifestyles

(CP – HN)

Note: The letters/abbreviation at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course number.

110 Catholic and Salesian Identity-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

111 Catholic and Salesian Identity-AC

Catholic and Salesian Identity provides students with an introduction to the Catholic faith that is rooted in

Scripture and Tradition and that is shaped by the life and teachings of our patron, Saint Francis de Sales. Guided by the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the student will be led to understand and to appreciate what we believe, why we pray, and how we are called to act. The student’s lived experience is the foundation for fostering the development of his Salesian identity.

Co-requisite: Students in CP English must enroll in Catholic and Salesian Identity-CP. Students in AC and HN

English must enroll in Catholic and Salesian Identity-AC.

112 Sacred Scripture-CP

113 Sacred Scripture-AC

1 credit/full year

Grade: 10

114 Sacred Scripture-HN

Sacred Scripture introduces what the Bible is, how it came to be written, as well as how to make use of its notations such as footnotes and cross-references. Students are also introduced to biblical study aids and how Roman

Catholics interpret the Bible. Students will deal with the historic faith expression of the descendants of Abraham in the Hebrew Scriptures as well as the separate historical development of the text itself. Various adolescent life issues important for healthy human living such as self-knowledge, conflict management, and developing a healthy prayer life are integrated throughout the study of the Chosen People.

While studying the Christian Scriptures, students will focus on the historic person of Jesus of Nazareth as well as the faith experiences of the Apostles that led them to proclaim Jesus as the Christ and Son of God. After examining the meaning of these and other Christological titles of Jesus, the students will examine the historical and literary development of the Letters of St. Paul and then the Gospels. Throughout the study of the Christian

Scriptures, important faith themes essential to living out one’s Christian identity will be examined. These themes include the following: the Reign of God, Discipleship, the Holy Spirit, Salvation, Evangelization, Church life and ministry.

Co-requisite: Student must enroll in same phase for English and Religious Studies.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

12

137 Morality and Social Justice-CP

138 Morality and Social Justice-AC

1 credit/full year

Grade: 11

139 Morality and Social Justice-HN

Living a moral life is a key component of living a Christian life. This course will describe the Catholic approach to morality and social justice within the context of the student’s building of a committed relationship to

Jesus Christ and a deeper response to God’s call to become a holy people. After considering issues dealing with personal moral decision making, this course will focus on the Church’s teaching that working for justice is an integral part of living the Gospel message and cooperating in building the Kingdom of God. Students will be challenged to live a justice-centered lifestyle that promotes the common good. This course will also rely on the wealth of Biblical and ecclesial teachings, which identify the Church as a driving force in social reform. Each student will be encouraged to incorporate the principles of both social justice and morality into their daily lives as is consonant with Salesian spirituality. In this manner, all students will be exhorted to become morally and socially responsible persons living Jesus according to the Roman Catholic tradition.

Co-requisite: Student must enroll in same phase for English and Religious Studies.

142 God, Christ, and the Church-CP

143 God, Christ, and the Church-AC

½ credit/semester

Grade: 12

144 God, Christ, and the Church-HN

This is a semester course required for seniors. It examines the three elements in its title to a greater degree than the students have experienced in earlier courses. The following issues are central to the course: the rationality of Christian faith, evidence for God’s existence, the Person and natures of Christ, the Paschal Mystery, the nature and meaning of the Church in history and theology.

Co-requisite: Student must enroll in same phase for English and Religious Studies.

146 Christian Lifestyles-CP

½ credit/semester

Grade: 12

147 Christian Lifestyles-AC

148 Christian Lifestyles-HN

This required course is designed to challenge the students with the questions of vocation and of a calling to a lifestyle. In light of Gospel values, the student is presented with the vocational possibilities open to him in today’s world. He is assisted in discerning and naming his own gifts and accepting his weaknesses as he is called to respond generously and lovingly to God’s call. The student will be guided to examine personal identity, relationship, intimacy, generativity, and love as components of all vocations and lifestyles.

Co-requisite: Student must enroll in same phase for English and Religious Studies.

149 Senior Religion Seminar-Advanced ½ credit/semester

Grade: 12

This seminar style, one semester course is taken in lieu of the God, Christ, and the Church course. The aim of this course is to demonstrate that a scientific worldview and a faith perspective properly understood are in perfect harmony with each other. Faith and reason indeed lead us to God. This course displays the life and thought of the

Church in her relation to western culture over the course of two millennia. Through reading, reflecting, and sharing insight with one another, students will see that a faith-based approach to theology is wholly compatible with a historical and critical approach. Topics covered will include faith and reason; science and religion; Revelation;

Scripture; the Trinity; Christian anthropology; Christology; the Last Things and Salvation; and the Roman Catholic

Church. This course provides an overview of Christian and Catholic theology as it equips students with the basic skills they need to begin answering theological questions on their own.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

13

English

Chair: Mr. Jeremy Isaac

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: Four credits of English

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

English 1

Foundations-CP

English 1-CP

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

U.S. Literature

Foundations-CP

U.S. Literature-CP

Grade 11

(Junior)

British Literature -CP

English 1-AC U. S. Literature-AC British Literature-AC

Grade 12

(Senior)

The Novel and Drama-CP

The Novel and Drama-AC

English 1-HN

U. S. Literature-HN

AP Seminar

British Literature-HN

AP English Language

World Literature-HN

AP English*

*Offered at Ursuline and at Salesianum

Electives (see right)

Journalism for Publication-Hon.

Science Fiction Literature – AC (10, 11, 12)

Science Fiction Literature-AC (Exchange class - Padua)

Public Speaking (CP and AC)

Note: The letters/abbreviations at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course number.

211 English 1 Foundations-CP

212 English 1-CP

213 English 1-AC

214 English 1-HN

1 credit/full year Grade: 9

These courses provide instruction in the foundations of composition and literature and a solid beginning to

Salesianum’s college preparatory curriculum. They teach students to think, write, and speak effectively, to read with greater competency and enjoyment, and to develop critical thinking skills. Included is the study of literary themes and genres to develop the student’s ability to interpret and appreciate literature. Also, the curriculum contains lessons and practice in the fundamentals of composition, grammar, vocabulary, and research skills. The student is graded on his mastery of skills and concepts covered in the course as demonstrated through improvement and performance on objective and essay tests, written assignments, projects, and oral work in the classroom.

Each student is placed in a particular phase as determined by his scores on the Salesianum entrance/placement examination and other available data in his grade school records. The phase of a course is meant to meet the specific needs of the individual student at the level of his intellectual ability. Higher phase courses address tougher texts in greater depth, move at a faster rate, and incorporate lengthier and more frequent writing assignments, all of which require greater student autonomy. Through this phasing system, a student’s strengths are challenged and his weaknesses addressed.

Note: a student whose average drops below a C for any academic quarter in English 1 CP may be subject to academic conditions based upon review of the student's academic profile by the Director of Educational

Support Services, the Dean of Academic Affairs, and the Principal.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

14

226 AP Seminar 1 credit/full year Grade: 10

The following course is part of the AP Capstone Program. Admittance to this course is by invitation and requires a student to complete the application process. AP Seminar is a prerequisite for AP Research.

AP Seminar provides students with opportunities to think critically and creatively, research, explore, pose solutions, develop arguments, collaborate, and communicate using various media. Students explore real-world issues through a variety of lenses and consider multiple points of view to develop deep understanding of complex issues as they make connections between these issues and their own lives. Students read articles, research studies, and foundational and philosophical texts; listen to and view speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experience artistic and literary works to gain a rich appreciation and understanding of issues.

221 U.S. Literature and Composition Foundations-CP

222 U.S. Literature and Composition -CP

224 U.S. Literature and Composition -AC

225 U.S. Literature and Composition -HN

1 credit/full year Grade: 10

This course provides a solid foundation in the literature of the United States. The course surveys the development of American literature from its beginnings through Classicism, Romanticism, Transcendentalism,

Realism, and Naturalism. It includes such writers as Franklin, Poe, Hawthorne, Twain, Fitzgerald, and others. The student is expected to read the assigned material, make inferences, draw conclusions, participate in class discussions, take notes, and synthesize concepts in various pieces of writing. Development of language skills, vocabulary, and composition and research skills will be continued in this course. As with English I, higher phased courses address tougher texts in greater depth, move at a faster rate, and incorporate lengthier and more frequent writing assignments, all of which require greater student autonomy..

234 British Literature and Composition - CP

236 British Literature and Composition -AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11

237 British Literature and Composition -HN

This course surveys major literary works of British authors from Beowulf to modern novels, poetry, and stories. The course is intended primarily for students who have demonstrated a certain degree of competence in writing and who are ready to exercise their ability on various challenging expository, creative, and research-oriented assignments. Readings in both poetry and prose covering the major chronological periods of English literature will be assigned and discussed. The course will develop language and critical thinking skills through the study of literature, vocabulary, grammar, and composition. Students will be required to write a formal research paper.

238 AP English Language and Composition 1 credit/full year Grade: 11

Advanced Placement English Language is offered for those juniors seeking advanced standing in college

English and / or a possible exemption from the freshman writing course in college. The course focuses on the various types of writing and rhetoric: description, narration, exemplification, classification and division,

comparison and contrast, process analysis, cause and consequence analysis, definition, and argument. The literary choices that will complement the writing will be drawn primarily from British Literature, using a chronological approach that includes some historical context and linguistic study. Students will be required to write a formal

research paper. Students are required to sit for the AP English Language Examination in May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

15

241 The Novel & Drama and Composition -CP

244 The Novel & Drama and Composition -AC

1 credit/full year Grade: 12

Students in this course will read a variety of novels and both modern and Shakespearean drama to gain proficiency in analyzing fiction for important basic literary elements.

In doing so, students will learn how to uncover the practical and philosophical implications inherent in interpretive literature. They will also gain practice in judging the quality of fiction by applying sound judgmental criteria to works under consideration. Besides literary interpretation, the course will include the study of grammar and extensive writing. All students will be

required to write a formal research paper.

245 World Literature and Composition –HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 12

World Literature has both cultural and practical advantages. On the cultural level, the reading selections trace the developments in literary forms and subjects from the ancient Sumerian texts to contemporary world pieces.

Special emphasis is placed on Western literatures, yet all types of genres are presented with their contrasting styles and artistic emphasis. Practically, the selected material will offer the student an opportunity to use and improve upon his own literary skills, particularly his comprehension and writing abilities. All students will be required to

complete the senior research paper.

250 AP English Literature (Salesianum) 1 credit/full year Grade: 12

251 AP English Literature (Ursuline)

Advanced Placement English Literature is offered for those who seek advanced standing or placement in college English. The student must be able to read difficult and sophisticated literature with facility and to write extended analyses. The student learns to develop his ability to think, interpret, and write. Emphasis is placed on strengthening the skills necessary for analyzing and criticizing literature and for writing expository essays that meet college-level standards. In addition, the course prepares the student for the AP Examination in English through the close study of poetry, prose and drama, a review of pertinent terminology for literary analysis, and frequent in-class critical compositions. The student is required to sit for the A. P. English Literature Examination in May. The course at Ursuline may only be taken if scheduling issues prohibit a student from taking the course at Salesianum.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

252 Public Speaking-CP

253 Public Speaking-AC

½

credit/semester

Grade: 11, 12

This semester course will prepare students for public speaking as an important component of their academic and work lives. They will study several types of oral discourse (informative, persuasive, dramatic, and extemporaneous) as well as interview techniques and multi-media presentations. Students will examine famous orators and evaluate iconic speeches. Emphasis will also be placed on developing skills as fair and critical listeners.

Students will learn about the ethics of public speaking and discourse, proper diction and enunciation, and methods to overcome anxiety in preparation.

Prerequisite: Department approval. This is an elective course.

254 Journalism for Publication-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 11,12--elective

This course is designed for students who are interested in the development and production of Salesianum’s newspaper and yearbook. The course is divided between classroom instruction which includes textbook work, group evaluation and discussions of journalistic work, and lab work that includes collecting information, word processing and desktop publishing, writing, and editing articles. It involves design and writing assignments for the

Salesian (yearbook) and the Salesianum Review (newspaper).

Prerequisite: Department approval. This is an Honors elective course.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

16

258 Science Fiction Literature-AC 0.5 credit/semester

(Salesianum)

Grade: 10, 11, 12—elective

From speculative science-fiction to cautionary tales of the impact of science and technology on society, the genre has shaped the way that humans exist and function to this day. This elective course will examine the impact of various authors on not only the genre, but on society and Western culture in general. In this course, students will study novels and short stories from many of the most influential writers within the genre, as well as some lesser known, but impactful writers that have shaped the way that we operate in and think about the world. In addition to the authors, the themes, and the movements of the science-fiction genre—this course will also involve an analysis of where the genre began thematically, as well as a look at what topics the genre is currently trending toward and examining.

258P Science Fiction Literature-AC EXCHANGE

(Padua)

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12--elective

This elective course is designed for students who share a passion for the genre of science fiction, and are interested in expanding their knowledge of it by studying its history, evolution, and impact upon our culture, our technologies, and our collective conscience. This course is designed for students who are willing to participate; the goal is to spark curiosity, discussion, and exploration, as students confront the many profound and timeless issues found within science-fiction novels, short stories, poems, and movies. A midterm and final exam are components of this course. This is an elective course.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

17

Social Studies

Chair: Mr. Robert McConaghy

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: Four credits of Social Studies: 3 credits in the World History/United States History sequence, ½ credit of United States Government, and ½ credit or more in elective courses. Beginning with students in the Class

of 2019, students will be required to complete a ½ credit in Economics in addition to the ½ credit required in United

States Government; alternatively, students can take the full year A.P. United States Government course.

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

World History I-CP

World History I-AC

World History I-HN

AP Human Geography

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

World History II-CP

World History II-AC

World History II-HN

AP World History

World Affairs-CP (Elective)

Grade 11

(Junior)

United States History-CP

United States History-AC

United States History-HN

AP United States History

Grade 12

(Senior)

United States Government-CP

United States Government-AC

United States Government-HN

(1/2 credit/semester)

OR

AP United States Government

(1 credit/full year)

Electives:

Introduction to Archaeology & Human Origins (Ursuline)-AC

Introduction to Law-CP

Death & Dying-AC

Economics-CP

Economics-AC World Affairs-CP

Economics-HN AP World History

Psychology-CP AP Modern European History

AP Psychology

AP Economics

313 World History I-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

This course surveys world history from the emergence of Homo sapiens through the end of the Napoleonic

Wars in 1815. The development of Western civilization is discussed, but all major centers of civilization are examined in detail as well. The course stresses the basic skills of a historian (critical reading of primary and secondary sources, creating a historical argument, expression of an argument in a variety of media). The course is coordinated with the program of the English 1-CP literature and composition course. Independent study is a

significant feature of this course.

314 World History I-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

This course surveys world history from the emergence of Homo sapiens through the end of the Napoleonic

Wars in 1815. The development of Western civilization is discussed, but all major centers of civilization are examined in detail as well. The course stresses the basic skills of a historian (critical reading of primary and secondary sources, creating a historical argument, expression of an argument in a variety of media). The course is coordinated with the program of the English 1-AC.literature and composition course. Independent study is a

significant feature of this course.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

18

315 World History I-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

This course surveys world history from the emergence of Homo sapiens through the end of the Napoleonic

Wars in 1815. The development of Western civilization is discussed, but all major centers of civilization are examined in detail as well. The course stresses the basic skills of a historian (critical reading of primary and secondary sources, creating a historical argument, expression of an argument in a variety of media). The course is coordinated with the program of the English 1-HN literature and composition course. Independent study is a

significant feature of this course.

316 World History II-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 10

This course continues the study of World History from the Congress of Vienna to the present. The course will emphasize the development of Western European dominance of world affairs from 1815 to World War II, and the emergence of a globalized world community in the postwar era through the present day. Continued emphasis will be placed on the student’s mastery of the skills of a historian but at a higher level than freshman year.

Independent study is a significant feature of this course.

317 World History II-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 10

This course continues the study of World History from the Congress of Vienna to the present. The course will emphasize the development of Western European dominance of world affairs from 1815 to World War II, and the emergence of a globalized world community in the postwar era through the present day. Continued emphasis will be placed on the student’s mastery of the skills of a historian but at a higher level than freshman year.

Independent study is a significant feature of this course.

318 World History II-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 10

This course continues the study of World History from the Congress of Vienna to the present. The course will emphasize the development of Western European dominance of world affairs from 1815 to World War II, and the emergence of a globalized world community in the postwar era through the present day. Continued emphasis will be placed on the student’s mastery of the skills of a historian but at a higher level than freshman year.

Independent study is a significant feature of this course.

325 AP World History 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The purpose of the AP World History Course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contracts in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills, including how to answer a

Document Based Question. The course is organized by periodization and themes. There is a foundations section on the years prior to 600 C.E., but the majority of the course focuses on the past thousand years of the global experience building on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents. The Six periods are:

Technological and Environmental, Transformations, Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies; Regional and Trans-regional Interactions, Global Interactions, Industrialization and Global Integration, Accelerating Global

Change and Realignments. Summer reading will be required. The student is required to sit for the AP World

History Examination in May. Prerequisites: Successful completion of World History I; department approval.

326 AP Human Geography 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

The course introduces the student to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have created the human world on earth, as we know it today. It seeks to demonstrate how human beings change the earth locally, regionally, and globally by the way that they inhabit it. It will conversely show how humans arrange their habitation to fit the physical locale in which they live. The student is required to sit for the AP Human Geography

Examination in May. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and counselor/teacher recommendations.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

19

327 United States History-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 11

This course completes the United States History survey begun in the sophomore year. It will emphasize the growth of the United States from the Era of Good Feelings through the Election of 2008. This course will continue to stress the student’s mastery of the tools of the historian begun in the freshmen year.

328 United States History-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11

This course completes the United States History survey begun in the sophomore year. It will emphasize the growth of the United States from the Era of Good Feelings through the Election of 2008. This course will continue to stress the student’s mastery of the tools of the historian begun in the freshmen year. This course will employ a thematic approach to American History and require independent research, such as research reports and term papers.

329 United States History-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 11

This course completes the United States History survey begun in the sophomore year. It will emphasize the growth of the United States from the Era of Good Feelings through the Election of 2008. This course will continue to stress the student’s mastery of the tools of the historian begun in the freshmen year. This course will employ a thematic approach to American History and require independent research, such as research reports and term papers.

Prerequisites: Honors English recommendation and/or department approval.

333 Life Unworthy of Life-AC EXCHANGE (Padua)

1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course integrates an interdisciplinary approach (art, literature, film, psychology, and history) into the causes, effects and uses of historical memory related to the uniqueness of the Holocaust during the first semester. It uses a similar approach in the second semester to develop insight into twentieth century genocides drawn from case studies of events in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, and other locations. This is an elective course. A 1-semester option is available by request.

335 AP United States History 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This college level survey of United States history will extend from the birth of our nation to the twentieth century. It will stress political, social, and economic development and touch upon intellectual and cultural development and foreign affairs. There will be supplementary readings along with the textbook. It may be possible for a student to gain college credit for one year of United States History if he does well enough on the Advanced

Placement Exam. The student is required to sit for the A. P. United States History Examination in May. There is required summer work.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

341 Introduction to Archaeology & Human Origins-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

EXCHANGE (Ursuline)

So many people are fascinated by the idea of archaeology but many have little idea of what it really is.

Most think of Indiana Jones movies and aliens coming to build some of the famous world archaeological sites.

While this makes for good movies, it is not an accurate portrayal of what archaeology really is. This course will provide a glimpse of what archaeologists do and how they do it. We will explore some of the world’s most famous archaeological sites, including; Egypt, Macchu Picchu, King Tut’s grave, Pompeii, many fossil sites connected to human origins and the Ancient civilizations of the Americas. The course will include: taking a trip to the University of Pennsylvania’s Anthropology and Archaeology Museum, a visit to an archaeological dig, DVD presentations, examination of real artifacts, and guest speakers .

Enrollment for Salesianum students is limited. This is an elective course.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

20

342 Economics-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This is an introductory survey course in economic theory and practice. This course will cover the following topics: the rationing of resources, the role of supply and demand in our economy, the function of the price system, government intervention in the market place, economic cycles, causes of inflation and unemployment, measuring economic growth, and economic systems. We will also discuss how to apply economic indicators to: plan major purchases such as houses and cars, gain an advantage when investing in the stock market, plan for retirement. The class will also study and discuss current economic conditions, problems, and events.

346 Economics-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This course will cover the following topics: the rationing of resources, the role of supply and demand in our economy, the function of the price system, government intervention in the market place, economic cycles, causes of inflation and unemployment, measuring economic growth, and economic systems. An introduction to: the characteristics and forms of industries, and monetary and fiscal policy will also be covered. We will also discuss how to apply economic indicators to: plan major purchases such as houses and cars, gain an advantage when investing in the stock market, plan for retirement. The class will also study and discuss current economic conditions, problems, and events.

396 Economics-HN ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

The course will cover how the concept of supply and demand influence prices throughout the economy.

Learn how to predict the changes in the economy before they actually happen though your knowledge of key indicators like: unemployment, inflation, government spending, and changes in the interest rate. Students learn how the economic challenges of unemployment, inflation, and poverty are resolved through the use of actions taken by the government and the banking system, using fiscal and monetary policy. The class will discuss current economic conditions, problems, and events, make predictions on how the economy will perform in the future and what corrective actions will be taken by government and the banking industry. Analyzing economic situations and applying economic theory will be emphasized.

308 Death and Dying-AC ELECTIVE ½ credit/semester

Grade: 11,12

This one semester course will use a seminar format to study the psychological, cultural, and religious responses to death and the dying process. Topics will include understanding personal loss and the fear of death, social and cultural attitudes toward death and dying, the care of terminally ill patients, near-death experiences, euthanasia, suicide, and religious and secular funeral rituals and practices associated with death with an emphasis on

Catholic faith and beliefs. Class format will emphasize class discussion and participation based on assigned reading, as well as practical projects related to preparing students for the most difficult and challenging times of life: the loss of loved ones and our own mortality.

343 Psychology-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This survey course in Psychology will examine the question of human behavior. Some of the topics included are: consciousness, unconsciousness, dreams, motivation, defense mechanisms, hypnosis, learning theories, personality, and abnormal behavior. These topics will be developed in light of the three major forces (schools) of psychology - Psychoanalytic, Behaviorist, and Humanistic. Audiovisual and discussion methods of teaching are employed. Evaluation is based on tests and class participation.

344 AP Psychology 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course will introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will be exposed to psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The student is required to sit for the AP Psychology Examination in

May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

21

345 Introduction to Law-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This course is designed to present a clear, understandable and usable knowledge of law for young people preparing for legal responsibility. Topics to be considered include a general introduction to law, criminal law, consumer law, family law, housing law, environmental law, and the constitutional rights of the individual.

347 United States Government-CP

373 United States Government-AC

½ credit/semester Grade: 12

The U.S. Government course is intended to develop an understanding of the three branches of the federal government: the Presidency, Congress, and Supreme Court. Two analytical approaches will be used. First, the three branches will be analyzed as to how they function as organizations. Secondly, how individuals within the government make decisions will be analyzed. In some classes, simulations, case studies, and group projects such as public opinion surveys, research, and debates will be employed. In addition to test and class participation, term papers may be assigned to evaluate students.

378 United States Government-HN ½ credit/semester Grade: 12

This course is designed to be, in part, a self-directed study of U.S. government. Classes are organized on a

5 -day cycle built into the school’s 7-day cycle. These classes will take on different formats including meetings for lecture, discussion, film, testing periods, etc. Students are responsible for completing units on the Constitution, civil liberties, the Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary, and the electoral process.

Prerequisite: Honors English recommendation and/or department approval.

375 AP United States Government 1 credit/full year Grade: 12

This course is designed for students who desire a college level approach to the study of American

Government and Politics. The major goals are: (1) To provide students with a “working knowledge” of the

American processes including elections, interest groups, federal government principles and institutions, and resolutions to conflict; (2) To enable students to reach a level of comfort and confidence to sit for the Advanced

Placement examination in U.S. Government and Politics. The student is required to sit for the AP United States

Government Examination in May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

351 AP Modern European History 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course is designed to prepare students to complete successfully the A. P. Examination in Modern

European History. The course begins with the Renaissance in Italy and proceeds to study the major political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural events and concepts that have shaped modern Europe to 2001. Seniors will receive preference, but the course is open to qualified juniors as well. Summer reading is required. The student is required to sit for the AP Modern European History Examination in May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

374 AP Economics 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This is a full year course that will prepare students to take the AP Microeconomics and AP

Macroeconomics exams. Microeconomics will give students a complete understanding of the role of the individual decision maker in an economy. Students will examine theories on supply and demand, pricing, and market equilibrium and will analyze these theories in terms of Adam Smith’s “Invisible Hand”. Students will then analyze how consumers make choices regarding consumption, how producers seek to understand consumer needs in maintaining market equilibrium, and possible government solutions in the event of market failure.

Macroeconomics will give students an understanding of the economic system as a whole. Students will learn the following: how economic growth is measured, how government spending and taxes impact the economy, and how the Federal Reserve tries to promote economic growth and stability through its control of the nation’s money supply and interest rates. Students will discuss problems in the economy and how the government and

Federal Reserve try to resolve those problems.

Coursework will consist of nightly textbook reading and weekly problem sets that will reinforce the theories and concepts taught in the classroom. The student is required to sit for the AP Economics Examination in

May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

22

Mathematics

Chair: Mr. Dan Kegelman

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: Four credits of Mathematics.

Freshmen are required to have a TI-84 or other approved graphing calculator.

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Grade 11

(Junior)

Algebra I

Foundations-CP

Geometry

Foundations-CP

Algebra II-CP

Grade 12

(Senior)

Probability & Statistics-CP and

Trigonometry-CP

Algebra I-CP Geometry-CP Algebra II-CP

Probability & Statistics-CP and

Trigonometry-CP

Algebra I-AC

Algebra I-HN

Geometry-AC

Geometry-AC

Geometry-HN

Algebra II-AC

Algebra II-AC

Math Analysis-HN

Pre-Calculus-AC

Pre-Calculus-AC

Calculus w/

Trigonometry-AC

Calculus w/

Trigonometry-HN*

Calculus w/

Trigonometry-HN*

AP Calculus AB*

AP Statistics

Calculus w/

Trigonometry-HN*

AP Calculus AB*

Geometry-HN

Algebra II-AC

Math Analysis-HN

Pre-Calculus-AC

Calculus w/

Trigonometry-HN

AP Calculus AB

Calculus

Calculus w/ w/

Trigonometry-AC

Trigonometry-HN*

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus BC*

AP Statistics

Calculus w/

Trigonometry-HN*

AP Calculus AB*

AP Calculus BC*

* Teacher recommendation required

The letters (CP, AC, HN) at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course

number.

Advanced Standing and Phasing Information

Placement for Freshmen

Most students who enter Salesianum are enrolled in Algebra I in the ninth grade. However, any student who has taken a full year of Algebra I in seventh or eighth grade may request to test out of Algebra I and take Geometry in the ninth grade. In order to do so, the student must pass an Algebra I competency test administered by the

Mathematics Department in the month of May prior to matriculation. Students who have completed an entire year

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

23

of Geometry may request to test out of Geometry by taking the Geometry competency exam. This exam is given by appointment only in May.

Phasing Placement

Incoming freshmen are placed in one of three phases based on the results of their entrance test. Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors have their Math phases reviewed by their teachers during the third quarter when they register for the following year’s courses. Teachers’ recommendations are based on the following guidelines.

Honors (HN): In order for a student to remain in the Honors (HN) sequence, he must maintain at least a B average in his current math course.

Accelerated (AC): In order for a student to remain in the Accelerated (AC) sequence, he must maintain at least a C average in his current math course. An Accelerated student who has an A average may request to be raised to Honors (HN). Approval of this change, however, is at the discretion of the teacher.

College Prep (CP): A College Prep (CP) student who has an A average may request to be raised to

Accelerated (AC). Approval of this change, however, is at the discretion of the teacher.

College Prep-Foundations course (CP): A College Prep-Foundations student who has an A average may request to be raised to College Prep (CP). Approval of this change, however, is at the discretion of the teacher.

Algebra I Foundations-CP and Algebra I-CP students who receive a final grade below a “C-” must make up these grades in summer school in order to return to Salesianum.

Phase Changes

Changing phases in a math course from one year to the next is challenging because each phase in a given course may cover a different breadth and depth of material. Because of this, moving to a higher phase in math may require a specified amount of summer work with an approved tutor. Students who receive approval for a phase change by their current teacher must obtain the summer requirements from the Dean of Academic Affairs; this is especially important for students planning to phase up following the completion of Geometry and Algebra II.

411 Algebra I Foundations-CP

SUMMARY of MATHEMATICS COURSE OFFERINGS

1 credit/full year Grade: 9

Through completion of this course students will achieve mathematical competence in support of crosscurricular applications and future studies in math, science, and technology. They will develop personal responsibility for study, understanding, homework, and general success in mathematics courses. Students will learn and utilize the language of algebra and realize the unity in mathematical knowledge and the connection of algebra to past and future mathematical topics. Topics covered will include the real number line, absolute value, operations with positive and negative numbers, order of operations, fractions, percents, ratios, proportions, simplifying algebraic and numerical expressions, investigating powers, properties of exponents, simplifying and factoring polynomials, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, and calculating slope. If time permits, students will be exposed to basic quadratic equations and techniques for solving them.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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412 Algebra I-CP

1 credit/full year

Grade: 9

Through completion of this course students will achieve mathematical competence in support of crosscurricular applications and future studies in math, science, and technology. They will develop personal responsibility for study, understanding, homework, and general success in mathematics courses. Students will learn and utilize the language of algebra and realize the unity in mathematical knowledge and the connection of algebra to past and future mathematical topics. Topics covered will include the real number line, absolute value, operations with positive and negative numbers, order of operations, properties of real numbers, fractions, percents, ratios, proportions, simplifying algebraic and numerical expressions, investigating powers, properties of exponents, simplifying and factoring polynomials, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, and calculating slope. Students will also be exposed to basic quadratic equations and techniques for solving them.

413 Algebra I-AC

1 credit/full year

Grade: 9

The objective of Algebra 1-3 is to take the student proficient in arithmetic skills from his ideas of numbers to more involved algebraic concepts of variable and function. It acquaints the student with equations and formulas that will be useful in science and geometry. The course covers the following properties of real numbers, solutions of equations and inequalities, approaches to word problems, graphing, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, irrational numbers, and quadratic equations. The course includes the use of the graphing calculator as a tool for understanding numeric and graphical relationships.

414 Algebra I-HN

1 credit/full year

Grade: 9

The phase 4 Algebra 1 course is a more rigorous approach to the topics covered in Algebra I phase 2 and 3.

Theory and application will be stressed. The course includes the advanced study of word problems and the use of the graphing calculator as a tool for understanding numeric and graphical relationships. The course is designed for highly motivated students who are superior in mathematics.

421 Geometry I Foundations-CP 1 credit/full year

Grade: 10

Through a study of geometry the student arrives at an understanding of the nature of a mathematical system in addition to learning the properties and characteristics of triangles and circles. This course will focus on practical applications. Algebra 1 skills will be reinforced, and students will be prepared for the geometric topics they will encounter on the PSAT and SAT exams. The following topics will be presented: angle relationships, parallel lines, triangle congruency and similarity, properties of parallelograms, perimeter and area of polygons and circles, surface areas and volumes of selected solids. There will be some introduction to the basic trigonometric functions.

422 Geometry-CP

1 credit/full year

Grade: 10

Through a study of geometry the student arrives at an understanding of the nature of a mathematical system in addition to learning the properties and characteristics of triangles and circles. This course will focus on practical applications. Algebra 1 skills will be reinforced, and students will be prepared for the geometric topics they will encounter on the PSAT and SAT exams. The following topics will be presented: angle relationships, parallel lines, triangle congruency and similarity, properties of parallelograms, perimeter and area of polygons and circles, surface areas and volumes of selected solids. There will be some introduction to the basic trigonometric functions.

423 Geometry-AC

1 credit/full year

Grade: 9, 10

Students will study postulates and theorems from Euclidean Geometry. Students will practice visualization to connect properties of real objects with two-dimensional drawings of these objects. They begin by working with the fundamental parts of geometry: points, lines, and planes. Students will find measures of geometric figures when appropriate: length, area and surface area, volume, and angle measures. Students may complete simple geometric proofs and will discuss and identify different methods of reasoning. Students will study the properties of polygons, with an emphasis on triangles and quadrilaterals. Students will identify congruent triangles, work with similar figures, and the beginnings of trigonometry. They will work with transformations which may be described geometrically or by coordinates. Finally, students will study and utilize the properties of circles. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a stronger logical base that can be carried into later math courses.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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424 Geometry-HN

1 credit/full year

Grade: 9, 10

This accelerated geometry course terminates in three quarters so that the fourth quarter of the year can be devoted to Algebra 2. The first quarter will deal with angles and triangles, congruency, geometric inequalities of the triangle, and perpendicularity. The second quarter will cover parallelisms, quadrilateral areas, the Pythagorean

Theorem and similarity. The third quarter will be devoted to the study of circles and spheres, arcs and sectors, areas and volumes, and coordinate geometry techniques. The fourth quarter will consist of the study of Algebra 2 to include: the basic properties and operations of radicals and introduction of fractional exponents, completing the square to find the center and radius of a circle, operations with rational expressions and determining the domain of a rational expression

432 Algebra II-CP

1 credit/full year

Grade: 11, 12

This course is the continuation of the College Prep Mathematics sequence. The first quarter consists of a review of essentials to include axioms of real numbers, the solution of first-degree equations and inequalities, absolute value, and graphing linear functions. The second quarter covers rational expressions and operations involving rational expressions. During the second quarter, the study of systems of linear equations, exponents, radicals, and imaginary and complex numbers will be covered. The third quarter will be devoted to the study of quadratic equations, the solution of quadratic equations by formula, and a study of both exponential and logarithmic functions. The fourth quarter is focused on polynomials and polynomial functions, as well as radical and rational functions.

433 Algebra II-AC 1 credit/full year

Grade: 10, 11

This course is the logical continuation of Algebra 1-3. This course covers linear functions, quadratic functions and their graphs, polynomial functions and equations, applications of factoring, rational algebraic expressions, power functions, roots and radicals, operations with radicals, complex numbers, coordinates and distances in the plane, solving quadratic systems, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

434 Math Analysis-HN 1 credit/full year

Grade: 10, 11

This course is designed to be the bridge between the Algebra II portion of Course 424 and A.P. Calculus

AB. The Algebra II concepts covered in this course include an advanced study of functions, including polynomial, power, and rational functions. The course will extend to cover exponential, logistic, logarithmic and sinusoidal functions. Advanced vocabulary, notations, and nomenclature will be introduced and used exclusively throughout the year. Students will explore complex numbers, properties and behaviors of functions and their domains and ranges, graphical transformations, function operations and compositions, inverse functions, and modeling with functions. Beginning in the second semester, students will undergo an advanced study of trigonometry and the circular functions. This includes the graphs of the six trig functions, deriving and using trig identities, solving trig equations, including the derivation and extensive use of the Law of Sines and Cosines. Also included are the study of the fundamental topics of polar coordinates, the trigonometric form of complex numbers, and DeMoive’s

Theorem. If time permits, students will explore conic sections, vectors in the plane, counting rules, combinations, and permutations and the applications in binomial expansion will be explored.

441 Trigonometry-CP

½ credit/semester

Grade: 12

Trigonometry is a one-semester course usually taken in combination with Probability and Statistics-2.

Topics covered include the distance, midpoint, and Pythagorean formulas, the six trigonometric identities, finding exact and approximate trigonometric values, circular velocities, right and oblique triangle trigonometry with problem solving and applications including the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. Plotting the sinusoidal functions in both degrees and radians with vertical and horizontal shifts is covered in detail. The student will become well acquainted with the use of the graphing calculator. A project involving math learned at all levels of their previous education will conclude the course. Upon completion of the course, the student will be well prepared for college level work in Pre-Calculus or Calculus.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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442 Probability/Statistics-CP ½ credit/semester

Grade: 12

This course is designed for the student who wishes to examine real-life problems with real data through elementary probability and statistics. It is taught for two marking periods. (It is usually joined with Trigonometry-2, which is taught for the other two). Requiring only Algebra 1 and 2 as prerequisites, this course is introductory in nature. The topics of probability include elementary probability theorems, compound events, conditional probability, counting methods, and the normal distribution. Statistical topics include organizing data graphically and analysis of data numerically. Students will also describe the relationship between two variables. Probability and

Statistics is recommended for students desiring to continue their education in fields of business, economics, accounting, marketing, or statistics.

436 Pre-Calculus-AC 1 credit/full year

Grade: 11, 12

The Pre-Calculus course is intended to provide a solid preparation for the student who intends to continue his study of mathematics at the college level. This full year course includes a thorough study of trigonometry plus coverage of topics essential to the study of Calculus, namely: polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential, and inverse functions; graphical analysis, sequences, curve sketching, and an introduction to limits.

443 Calculus with Trigonometry-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11,12

Students will be introduced to the topics of Calculus in a typical first semester college Calculus course (Calculus I).

This will include a review of functions and an introduction to limits, differentiation, and applications of differentiation. In addition, the course will cover basic integration and its applications. Part of this course is a rigorous presentation of trigonometry; this includes trigonometric definitions, applications, identities, solving triangles, and inverse trigonometric functions. This course will give students who take Calculus in college a good foundation for such study

.

444 Calculus with Trigonometry-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Students will be introduced to the topics of Calculus typical in a first semester freshman college Calculus course (Calculus I) and some of the topics of the typical second semester course (Calculus B). In addition to the study of limits, advanced differentiation and its applications, and integration completed in the Phase 3 course, this course will also explore derivatives of logarithmic and exponential functions. Part of this course is a rigorous presentation of trigonometry; this includes trigonometric definitions, applications, identities, solving triangles, and inverse trigonometric functions, and polar coordinates. This course is not intended as a preparation for the A. P.

Calculus AB examination, but it will give students who take Calculus in college a good foundation for such study.

Prerequiste: Successful completion of Math Analysis or Pre-Calculus

445 A. P. Calculus AB 1 credit/full year

Grade: 11, 12

Topics in this course meet the needs of college students taking the first and second semester of college calculus. This course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement Calculus Examination of the College

Board given in May of each year. The first semester of the course covers Differential Calculus analytically, numerically, and geometrically. These topics include the tangent line problem, limits, intermediate forms, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, optimization problems and their applications, rectilinear motion, related rates, and curve sketching. The second semester of the course covers Integral Calculus. These topics include the area problem, Riemann sums, integration, differential equations, and slope fields. Applications of integration such as volume of solids, distance traveled, and area between two curves are also covered. Definitions and theorems are carefully stated. Simple proofs are given in full. The student is required to sit for the A. P.

Calculus AB (or BC) Examination in May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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446 A. P. Calculus BC 1 credit/full year

Grade: 11, 12

Advanced Placement Calculus BC is intended for students who have completed AP Calculus AB. It is considered an extension of the AB course and will include some fundamental review of differentiation and integration. The content will be explored in graphical, numeric, algebraic, and verbal representations. Topics will include, but not be limited to, a further study of limits, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals. Students will also analyze planar curves given in parametric form, vector form, and polar form. Also included is the study of polynomial approximations using Taylor and Maclaurin Series and error analysis. Concepts will be investigated and explored intensively, with a focus on applications. As time permits, other mathematical topics may be investigated, including discrete mathematics, conic sections, and mathematical modeling. All students taking AP Calculus BC will sit for the AP Calculus BC exam offered in May. Prerequisite: Department approval.

455 A. P. Statistics 1 credit/full year

Grade: 11, 12

The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1. Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns, 2. Planning a Study:

Deciding what and how to measure, 3. Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation,

4. Statistical Inference: Confirming models. Students who successfully complete the course and A. P. Examination may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester introductory college statistics course. A. P.

Statistics is an excellent option for a strong mathematics student who has completed Algebra 2. Students may take the A.P. Statistics course in conjunction with Precalculus-3, Trigonometry/Calculus-4, A.P. Calculus (AB or BC), or

A.P. Computer Science. The student is required to sit for the A. P. Statistics Examination in May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: Three credits of Science.

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Science

Chair: Dr. Jennifer Anthony

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Grade 11

(Junior)

Grade 12

(Senior)

Physics-CP Integrated Science-CP Cell Biology-CP Chemistry-CP

Biology-AC Chemistry-AC Physics-AC

Biology-HN Chemistry-HN

Physics-HN

Electives (see below)

Required Courses – Prerequisites

(1) Chemistry: Successful completion of Biology

(2) Physics: Successful completion of Chemistry

Electives – General Prerequisites Science Electives

Electives (see below)

(1) AP Electives: B in Biology and

Chemistry; (pre- or co-req.) Physics

(2) AP Electives: B in present Mathematics course

(3) Other electives: Biology, Chemistry and

Physics (pre- or co-req.) – refer to specific course for requirements

4) Exceptions are made on an individual basis

Advanced Biology Research

Advanced Chemistry Research

Anatomy & Physiology-HN

Aquatic & Marine Biology-AC

AP Biology and Lab

Geology of the National Parks-AC

AP Chemistry and Lab

(Earth Sci. elective)

AP Physics I

AP Physics II

Biotechnology & Forensics-AC

Disease & Human Civilization-AC

AP Physics-C Mechanics

AP Physics-C Electricity &

Ecology-AC

Independent Science Research

Magnetism

AP Environmental Science

Molecular Biology Techniques-HN

Science Olympiad-HN

STEM:Intro to Engineering

-AC/HN

Chemistry II-AC

Meteorology-AC

Microbiology-HN

Note: The letters/abbreviations at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course number.

512 Integrated Science-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

This introductory Science course is heavily based in Biology, Chemistry and Physical Science. Emphasis is placed on developing study skills, problem solving strategies and application of the scientific method. This course prepares students to formulate hypotheses, gather relevant data, draw conclusions and report their results. Special attention is given to conducting a laboratory experiment properly and analyzing the results to draw relevant conclusions.

522 Cell Biology-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 10

This course emphasizes the structure and function of the living cell, with extended study of cellular reproduction, photosynthesis, respiration, genetics and laboratory technology. The course will include discussion of the important bioethical issues. Lab work will reinforce the course content, application of the scientific method, and prepare students for a full year course in chemistry.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

29

523 Biology-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10

In this introductory life science course the student will become familiar with the correlation of structure and function in living organisms. Life processes will be studied from its subcellular foundations, its regulatory mechanisms at the cellular and organismic levels, to the relationships found among them and the environment. The student will utilize a study-guide that supplements the text and will spend a considerable amount of time in laboratory work.

524 Biology-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 9

This is a rigorous introductory biology course for the high ability student. It studies Biology with the molecule as the focal point and proceeds to present the levels of organization of living things. The student will utilize a study-guide that supplements the text, will spend a considerable amount of time in laboratory work, and the course will more quickly integrate each new unit into a growing knowledge base for foundational understanding of biological principles.

525 AP Biology 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Advanced Placement Biology exposes the student to a survey of the material in a first year college course for majors. Further, it emphasizes the syllabus recommended by the College Board. The student will be required to sit for the AP Biology Examination in May.

Prerequisites: Grade of at least a B in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, Department approval; Pre- or co-

requisite: Physics, AP Biology Laboratory

529 AP Biology Laboratory ½ credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course is a co-requisite to accompany Advanced Placement Biology. Students will perform the twelve laboratory investigations required by the College Board and other experiments. Grades in this course will be separate from the Advanced Placements Biology course and will reflect the rigor required at the university level.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Enrollment in Advanced Placement Biology; Department approval.

528 Microbiology-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

In this course students will be introduced to major groups of microorganisms, with emphasis on cell structure, function, metabolism, physiology, reproduction, and genetics. Microbiology will include study of bacteria, protozoa, algae, fungi, and viruses. Lab will focus on the techniques used to study microorganisms. Interactions between humans and microorganisms will also be studied. Departmental approval is required.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both Biology, Department approval; Pre- or co-requisite: Chemistry.

504 Independent Science Research-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The Independent Research elective provides students with a planned research experience that includes the steps of the scientific method. Course will cover basic research and laboratory skills. Students will propose a topic for investigation and create an experimental design. Once the proposal is approved students will conduct the experiment with guidance from a faculty member and a mentor or science professional. Students may choose their independent research project based on topics from biology, chemistry, physics, STEM or biotechnology. Successful completion of the course includes presentation of research at the New Castle Science Fair.

Pre-requisites: Grade of at least a B in biology. Enrollment in, or successful completion of Chemistry.

Department approval required.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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513 Disease & Human Civilization-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 10, 11, 12

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to disease outbreaks and show how they have shaped traditions and institutions of Western civilization. The course will focus on the effects, causes and outcomes from past and current epidemics, and show how disease control either was achieved or failed. This course takes an indepth look at the role epidemic diseases have played in our lives. Important diseases in history will be discussed including: Cholera, the Bubonic Plague, Malaria, Yellow fever, Influenza and AIDS. Current outbreaks, like Ebola and Zika, will also be analyzed and compared to past epidemics. Students will gain an understanding of how organisms cause each disease, how we have tried to control these outbreaks, and what the overall impact these epidemics have had on our society. Pre-requisites: Cell Biology/Biology-AC/Biology-HN

Co-requisite:

Chemistry

514 Science Olympiad-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

This elective is designed to support the regional and state Science Olympiad competitions held in the spring of each year. The Science Olympiad competition cover all areas of science including biology, chemistry, physics,

STEM, earth-space and scientific inquiry. The class consists of group study and independent research to prepare for the events in the competition. Students enrolled in the course are expected to participate in the competition.

Pre-requisites: Grade of at least a B in Biology, enrollment in, or successful completion of Chemistry. Department approval.

515 Molecular Biology Techniques-HN ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

The purpose of this course is to provide students with hands on laboratory experience in the field of

Molecular Biology. Students will put into practice many of the techniques discussed in Cell Biology-CP, Biology-

AC, or Biology-HN. This course will allow students to develop solid laboratory skills, improve critical thinking, and gain independence in experimental design and analysis. These skills play an integral role in the interdisciplinary field of STEM, and will provide students with first-hand knowledge of industrial processes that are at the core of modern biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.

Pre-requisites: Cell Biology/Biology-AC/Biology-HN and Chemistry

526 Advanced Biology Research –HN ½ credit/semester Grade: 12

This course is an independent-study curriculum intended for the student who has an interest in the science of biology and who wishes to work alone exploring some of the topics of first year biology to greater depths. The student will spend most of his time performing experiments and generating data, as well as doing a good deal of outside reading. Evaluation will be arranged by mutual agreement between student and teacher at the beginning of each unit.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, Department approval.

532 Chemistry-CP 1 credit/full year

533 Chemistry-AC

534 Chemistry-HN

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Chemistry is the study of matter. Throughout the course, students will attempt to answer questions such as

“What is matter?” “How much do I have?” “How can I change it?” and “How fast?” Emphasis is placed on laboratory work, so that student observations and measurements will be used to develop the unifying principles of chemistry. Lectures, discussions, problem solving sessions and video homework enhance this experimental theme.

Topics include: solids, liquids and gases; chemical reactions and calculations; the elements; structure and chemical bonding, thermochemistry, solution chemistry and acid/base reactions and titrations.

Prerequisites: Biology, Algebra 1, grade of C or better in current Mathematics course, Department approval.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

31

535 AP Chemistry 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This is a course (equivalent to a two semester freshman college course) for those students intending to major in science, in particular Chemistry, Medicine or Engineering. A thorough understanding of the principles of

Chemistry is developed through the study of fundamental topics, such as: bonding, structure, equilibrium, kinetics thermodynamics, electrochemistry and problem solving and laboratory analysis. Independent study is stressed so the student may become more responsible and self-reliant. A college level text is used. The student will be required to sit for the AP Chemistry examination in May.

Prerequisites: Grade of at least a B in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, and current Mathematics course.

Department approval; Pre- or co-requisite: Physics, AP Chemistry Laboratory and Problem Solving

538 AP Chemistry Laboratory & ½ credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Problem Solving

This course is a co-requisite to accompany Advanced Placement Chemistry. It is in keeping with the requirements recommended by College Board AP Central that laboratory be an integral topic, covered in double periods, with a formal record of investigations.

Students will investigate scientific principals learned in AP Chemistry through hands-on experimentation and problem solving. An Inquiry based approach to developing questions and answers through data collection is emphasized.

Grades in this course will be separate from the Advanced Placement Chemistry course, but they will reflect the high quality of work a college laboratory course requires.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in, or successful completion of Advanced Placement Chemistry; Department approval.

536 Advanced Chemistry Research –HN ½ credit/semester Grade: 12

This course is an independent-study curriculum intended for the student who has an interest in the science of chemistry and who wishes to work alone exploring some of the topics of first year chemistry to greater depths.

The student will spend most of his time performing experiments and generating data, as well as doing a good deal of outside reading. Evaluation will be arranged by mutual agreement between student and teacher at the beginning of each unit.

Prerequisites: Completion of Chemistry-3 or Chemistry-4 with a B average or better, or completion of Chemistry-2 with an A average; successful completion of a math pretest; Departmental approval.

Pre- or co-requisite: Physics.

539 Chemistry II-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course is designed for students who have demonstrated interest and mastery in Chemistry and who would like to spend more time working in the lab on chemistry experiments. This will be a lab based class that will include experiments involving stoichiometry, thermo chemisty, redox reactions, solution chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, acid-base reactions, electrochemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry and nuclear reactions.

Prerequisites: Grade of at least a B in Biology and Chemistry, Department approval; Pre- or co-requisite: Physics.

540 STEM: Introduction to Engineering - New Product Development – AC 1 credit/full year Grade 11, 12

541 STEM: Introduction to Engineering - New Product Development – HN

Do you have an interest in engineering and where good ideas come from? Do you watch Shark Tank and see yourself as an engineering-entrepreneur? It's time to develop the skills to begin your journey into engineering and entrepreneurship! Students will work as a team on an engineering project depending on their talents and interest.

Engineering projects will incorporate introductory aspects of robotics (Arduino) and automation due to the increasing prevalence of these technologies in the workplace. No experience in robotics is required. Students will learn how to perform a patent search, write a provisional patent, and create a business proposal. Students will view clips of the show Shark Tank and analyze proposals featured on the show. The conclusion of the course will consist of students presenting their projects to the class and sharing their projects with the community through an engineering fair. Requirement: Approval by Mr. Anderson.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

32

542 Physics-CP

543 Physics-AC

1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12 (Grade 12 only for 542)

544 Physics-HN

Physics is the study of the relationship between matter and energy. The goal of these courses is to investigate the motion and interaction of particles. Laboratory work is the basis for the development of the major physical concepts that are studied. The student’s ability to use mathematics in the solution of physical problems is also developed. Topics include: classical mechanics and electricity and magnetism. Additional topics may be covered at the discretion of the instructor.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry and Geometry. Current grade of B or higher in current

Chemistry and Mathematics courses is required for maintaining the same phasing. Department approval.

Prerequisites/ Corequisites: Algebra II.

545 AP Physics I 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course is intended for students interested in studying physics as a basis for more advanced work in the life sciences, medicine, geology and related areas. AP Physics 1 is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electric circuits.

Students who are interested in taking this course should consult with their Physics teacher in order to determine whether this course or A.P. Physics-C better suits their needs. . The student will be required to sit for the AP

Physics 1 examination in May.

Prerequisites: Grade of at least B in Physics-Accel. or Chemistry-Hon.. Grade of at least B in Algebra 2 (433, 434

Pre- or co-requisite: Enrollment in Pre-Calculus (443) or a higher level Math course.

Students have the following options after taking the new AP Physics 1 course:

Year One

545 AP Physics I: Algebra-Based

Year Two Options

546 AP Physics II : Algebra-Based

549 AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

(calculus-based) and/or

547 AP Physics C: Mechanics (calculus-based)

546 AP Physics II 1 credit/full year Grade: 12

This course builds upon topics from Physics 1. This course is also for students interested in studying physics as a basis for advanced work in life sciences, medicine, geology and related areas. AP Physics 2 is equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics.

Students who are interested in taking this course should consult with their Physics teacher in order to determine whether this course or A.P.

Physics-C better suits their needs. . The student will be required to sit for the A. P. Physics 2 examination in May.

Prerequisites: Grade of at least B in AP Physics 1 or Physics-4. Grade of at least B in Algebra 2 (433, 434)

Pre- or co-requisite: Enrollment in Pre-Calculus (443) or a higher level Math course.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

33

547 AP Physics C: Mechanics 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course is a college entry-level course in Newtonian Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism. It is designed for students who are interested in majoring in science or engineering while in college. Topics in mechanics include kinematics, Newton’s Laws, the conservation laws, rotation, and universal gravitation. This course is a calculus-based course, so students must have a strong background in mathematics. All students enrolled in this course will be required to take the AP Physics-C exam offered by the College Board. The student will be required to sit for the AP Physics C examination in May. Prerequisite: Completion of Physics-Hon with a course grade of A or B+ or completion of Physics-Accel. with a course grade of A. Current grade of B in current

Mathematics course. Department approval. Co-requisite: Enrollment in AP Calculus (445) or in Trigonometry-

Calculus (444).

549 AP Physics-C: Electricity & Magnetism 1 credit/full year Grade: 12

AP Physics-C (Electricity and Magnetism) is a calculus-based college entry level course in electricity and magnetism. It follows the guidelines published by the College Board. Topics include electric field, electric potential arising from discrete charge distributions, electrostatic energy and capacitance, magnetic fields, and induction. Students will undergo and in-depth study of introductory college-level physics limited to the discipline of electricity and magnetism, will learn to apply calculus in the solution of problems in classical physics, and will perform laboratory experiments to reinforce the concepts discussed in class and to develop an appreciation of the scientific method. The student will be required to sit for the electricity and magnetism part of the AP Physics C examination in May. Prerequisites/ Corequisites: Grade of at least B in AP Physics-C (Mechanics); Department approval.

553 Ecology-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Ecology: Living in the Environment is an introductory course to environmental science. An understanding of our environment and how it is related to both natural and man-made factors is a prime goal of the course. Major environmental problems will be discussed and various solutions will be presented. Laboratory investigations will be incorporated into the topics.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry; Pre- or co-requisite: Enrollment in Physics,

Department approval.

555 AP Environmental Science 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a first year, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the AP Environmental science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and /or preventing them.

Laboratory investigations will be an integral part of this course. The student will be required to sit for the AP

Environmental Science examination in May.

Prerequisites: Grade of at least a B in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, Department approval; Pre- or co-requisite

(for students in Honors track): Physics.

563 Biotechnology and Forensic Science-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course takes an in-depth look at how scientific and biotechnological concepts are applied to solve real life crime and the problem solving methods used. Specifically, students will study technology associated with DNA analysis, crime scene analysis and forensics investigations, toxicology and the use of human anatomy and physiology to determine the identity of an unknown person of interest. In this lab intensive course, students will take an interdisciplinary look at scientific principles used in forensic science as well as the moral and ethical implications of these topics in society. Prerequisites: Grade of at least a B in Biology, Chemistry and Physics,

Department approval; Pre- or co-requisite: Physics.

573 Geology of the National Parks-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

We will use the incredible variability of the North American landscape, specifically that of the United States and our

National Parks, to qualitatively describe the forces at play – both at the surface and deep within the Earth – and help students develop reasonable hypotheses to explain the origins of physiographic features visible here at the surface.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

34

583 Meteorology-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This course is designed for students who have interest learning about the weather and climate. Students will investigate the atmosphere, temperature, humidity, cloud formation, air pressure and circulation, fronts, forecasting, severe storms, and global climate issues. Students will use weather instruments to make measurements, learn to read charts and graphs, and use equations to better understand weather. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry, Pre

or co-requisite: Physics.

584 Human Anatomy & Physiology-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This full-year course uses an organ system approach to the study of the structure and function of the human body with some comparison to major vertebrate groups. Considerable time will be devoted to lab work with emphasis on dissection and microscopy, as well as on biochemistry.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology; Pre- or co-requisite: Chemistry; Departmental approval.

593 Aquatic & Marine Biology –AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

Why is the ocean so big? Why is it salty? How deep is it? How does the ocean work? Starting with these simple questions, this class will investigate this complex system by looking at the way its components – the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere – interact. Throughout the course, profiles of oceanographers at work will be highlighted along with technologies such as ocean-going robots and core-drilling programs that herald a new era of ocean exploration.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: Three credits of a World Language (earned in the same language in consecutive years).

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Spanish I

French I

Latin I

American Sign

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Spanish II

French II

Latin I/Latin II

American Sign

Mandarin Chinese I Mandarin Chinese II

World Languages

Chair: Mr. Daniel Pratt

Grade 11

(Junior)

Spanish III

French III

Latin I/Latin II/Latin III

American Sign Language

(ASL) III

Mandarin Chinese III

Grade 12

(Senior)

Spanish IV/AP Spanish

French IV/ AP French

Latin I/Latin II/Latin III/

Latin IV

American Sign Language

(ASL) IV

Mandarin Chinese IV/

A.P. Chinese

Note: Each phase has its own course number. Please see the courses below.

Students preparing for college are encouraged to opt for four years of language study. Many of the nation’s top colleges and universities now require three years of study of a modern foreign language. To begin language study, the student must demonstrate aptitude and skills demanded by such studies. An evaluation of such skills and aptitude will be determined from scores on the Entrance Examination and Language Placement Test. Students expecting advanced standing in foreign language must take the Salesianum Language Placement Test before the 9 th grade.

Although every effort is made to give students their first choice of foreign language, it may sometimes be necessary to give them their alternate choice.

691A American Sign Language I 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

ASL 1 is an introduction to American Sign Language, the history of ASL, and Deaf culture. Everyday communication is the centerpiece of every lesson. Topics revolve around sharing information about our environment and about us. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing questioning and answering skills. Students will learn conversational strategies to help them maintain a conversation.

692A American Sign Language II 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

ASL 2 continues the study of American Sign Language, the history of ASL, and Deaf culture. Students will deepen their knowledge of talking about the passage of time and life events, descriptions of people and things, verb tenses and storytelling. Students will grow their knowledge of ASL vocabulary and their understanding of ASL grammar.

693A American Sign Language III 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

ASL 3 expands on the study of American Sign Language, the history of ASL, and Deaf culture. Students will extend their understanding of advanced grammar and verb tenses, giving special directions, as well as learning to discuss opinions, plans and goals. Students will further develop their vocabulary and understanding of ASL grammar.

694A American Sign Language IV 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

ASL 4 builds on the groundwork of ASL 1, 2 and 3 to deepen the students’ understanding of the sociolinguistic aspects of ASL as it functions within the Deaf cultural context. Content of the course will focus on sentence construction, classifiers, inflecting verbs, and role-shifting. Fluency and accuracy of fingerspelling, numbers and lexical signs will be emphasized. This course will be taught primarily in ASL.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

36

654M Mandarin Chinese I

655M Mandarin Chinese II

1 credit/full year

1 credit/full year

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade: 10, 11, 12

The objective of the first two years of Mandarin is to provide students an exposure to Chinese culture and to develop their basic Chinese language skills. The emphasis is on listening, speaking, and reading skills, including correct pronunciation, accurate tones, mastery of basic grammatical structures, pinyin, and character recognition.

Writing is limited in scope and is guided through the use of learned vocabulary and language structures. Students will also participate in conversations, sing Chinese songs, art projects, write notes, dialogues, create and perform skits in Chinese. Upon completion of this course, students will gain knowledge on learning strategies, communicative strategies and resource strategies. Students will also gain Chinese cultural knowledge and acquired preliminary cross-cultural awareness and international perspective.

656M Mandarin Chinese III 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

The objective of the third year of Mandarin is to provide students with further knowledge of Chinese culture and continue to develop their listening and speaking skills through further exploration of Chinese grammatical structures. Students will acquire communicative skills enabling them to describe experiences and events. They will be able to organize and present their viewpoints on familiar topics. Students will be able to read and write approximately 200 characters. The textbook, workbook and class activities reinforce and enhance comprehension of vocabulary and structures to be learned. Students will be provided with ample opportunities to use the target language in the classroom.

657M Mandarin IV 1 credit/full year

The Mandarin IV course will bring students an opportunity to further develop their four language proficiency skills. These skills include: listening, speaking, reading and writing in the intermediate range. Students will further explore topics including the holiday celebrations and food, education and school life, travel and transportation, modern communication and sports. The Chinese IV course also exposes students to Chinese traditional culture such as calligraphy, paper cutting, classical music, poetry, art, and literature.

658 AP Chinese Language and Culture 1 credit/full year

AP Chinese Language & Culture course is designed to provide students with various opportunities to further improve their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to be ready for the AP Chinese exam held every May. Students enrolled in this course will also have the maximum exposure to Chinese cultural elements that are integrated in the process of learning the language. Students will be required to sit for the AP

Chinese Language and Culture Examination in May.

Students should be able to achieve the following objectives:

Develop communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Understand the textbook lessons and supplementary materials and participate in discussions of the cultural aspects of the readings in Chinese.

Use the knowledge gained through course materials to develop critical thinking and writing skills to compose essays in Chinese on given topics.

Use the Chinese language to communicate effectively both in the school setting and in real-life situations.

Use the Chinese language as they seek clarifications through the use of communication and language learning strategies that are running elements of the course.

Carry on a conversation or a discussion with other students in class.

631 Italian I-AC EXCHANGE (Padua)

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

Italian language and culture are introduced in this course. Emphasis is placed on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Through a variety of activities such as role-playing, presentations, dialogues and scenarios the students are expected to master basic concepts of the first year language curriculum, including present and past tenses. Active participation is a requirement. Varied assessments will be utilized to test written and oral skills. Students will use a variety of technology tools and resources in this course.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

37

611 Spanish IA Foundations-CP

621 Spanish IB Foundations-CP

1 credit/full year Grade: 9 (621, 10 th

grade only)

These are limited enrollment courses requiring special approval by the World Language Department and

Dean of Academic Affairs. Basic communication and comprehension skills, everyday vocabulary and the culture of Spanish-speaking countries are introduced. Upon successful completion of Spanish 2 Foundations-CP, students will progress to Spanish II-CP. Prerequisites: Department approval.

612 Spanish I-CP 622 Spanish II-CP

613 Spanish I-AC 623 Spanish II-AC

1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

614 Spanish I-HN 624 Spanish II-HN

The first two years of Spanish aim to develop in the student an active, flexible basis in the target language, as well as an appreciation of the cultures of Hispanic people. With the aid of modern multi-media, students see and hear native speakers in natural settings. The textbook, workbook and class activities reinforce and enhance comprehension of vocabulary and structures to be learned.

CP classes emphasize basic communicative and comprehension skills through practice drills and written exercises. In Accelerated and Honors a more extensive working knowledge of basic structures is expected, and the students are evaluated more thoroughly for oral-aural proficiency.

Prerequisites: Entrance Exam scores and/or previous experience, Department approval. Prerequisite for Spanish II:

Successful completion of Spanish I.

632 Spanish III-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The purpose of this course is to bring students from the novice level of oral proficiency, where they are beginning to communicate using memorized material, to the intermediate level, where they can create with language, participate in progressively more challenging conversations, and communicate successfully in basic survival situations. Students are exposed to advanced verb tenses and many common grammatical structures.

Cultural readings and supplemental materials are used to give the student a greater awareness of the Hispanic world.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish II, Department approval.

633 Spanish III-AC

634 Spanish III-HN

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The Spanish 3 course bridges the gap between the intensive skill development programs and Spanish 4 by providing a realistically balanced program for the third year of Spanish study. Grammar review, literature and culture are sensibly balanced to appeal to students who are not practiced enough to tackle full-scale literary studies, but have mastered the basics of the language. Students will be provided with ample opportunities to use the target language in the classroom. Supplemental materials will be used to give the student a greater awareness of the

Hispanic world.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

643 Spanish IV-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

644 Spanish IV-HN

Students will continue to refine grammar, expand vocabulary, and improve communicative ability as well as engage in an in-depth study of the history, culture and current events of Spanish-speaking countries. Students will read and analyze original and abridged works of Spanish and Latin American writers. Supplemental materials are used to provide stimulus for speaking Spanish in the classroom. It is expected that class discussions be carried on in the target language with a greater degree of fluency than in the third year. Prerequisites: Departmental approval is required. Students in Spanish 3-2 who wish to take Spanish 4-3 must pass Spanish 3-2 with a B (83) or higher and must pass a basic proficiency entrance test. Students in Spanish 3-3 must earn a B (83) or higher in

Spanish 3-3 in order to take Spanish 4-3.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

38

655 AP Spanish Language & Culture 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course will follow the curriculum established by the College Board. The student will be required to sit for the AP Spanish Language Exam in May. Prerequisite: Department approval.

670 French I-CP 673 French II-CP

671 French I-AC 674 French II-AC

1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

672 French I-HN 675 French II-HN

The primary goal of the French language program is to develop students’ proficiency in the four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while increasing learners’ awareness of their own language and culture within the global community. In both French I and French II, the course is conducted entirely in the target language, so that students begin acquiring communicative skills from the first day of class.

Technology is heavily integrated into the program with a personalized iBook written by the instructor, which provides authentic materials, original language samples, and exposure to a variety of accents from francophone regions. A wide variety of contextualized tasks is provided to foster growth in the interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication. College Prep (CP) emphasize basic communicative and comprehension skills. A more extensive working knowledge of basic structures is expected in Accelerated (AC) and

Honors (HN) classes.

Prerequisites: Entrance Exam scores and/or previous experience, Department approval

676 French III-AC

677 French III-HN

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The French 3 course bridges the gap between the intensive skill development programs and French 4 by providing a realistically balanced program for the third year of French study. Grammar review, literature and culture are sensibly balanced to appeal to students who are not practiced enough to tackle full-scale literary studies, but have mastered the basics of the language. Students will be expected to use only the target language in the classroom. Supplemental materials will be used through the personalized iBook to give the student a greater awareness of the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

678 French IV-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course concludes the review and intensification of grammar begun in the French 3 course. Students will read and discuss several short reading selections to increase reading comprehension. As in the French 3 course, students are expected to express themselves orally in French, and they will write 3-4 compositions per semester to improve their writing skills in French. To improve their oral comprehension, students will view a French film without the benefit of English subtitles.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

679 AP French Language & Culture 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course will follow the curriculum established by the College Board. The student will be required to sit for the A. P. French Language and Culture Exam in May.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

682 Latin I-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

683 Latin I-HN

The aim of this introductory course is to attain proficiency in translating basic Latin sentences. Implicit in this goal is a firm grasp of basic Latin grammar; formation and use of all declensions, conjugations, tenses, constructions and parts of speech. In learning Latin syntax students will better learn and appreciate the English language as well as Latin’s influence on Romance languages. Emphasis is put into strengthening English vocabulary derivative of Latin and Greek roots. Finally, the culture of the Roman world is explored for its influence throughout the ages in all facets of life.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

39

684 Latin II-AC

685 Latin II-HN

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

This course delves more deeply into Latin grammar and syntax. Texts translated are actual historical sources, most notably Julius Caesar’s Commentarii de Bello Gallico. Selections are also taken from the Latin

Vulgate Bible. Students are exposed to participles, the passive voice for all conjugations, the subjunctive mood and subordinate clauses. Continued emphasis on strengthening English vocabulary proficiency with derivative roots from Greek and Latin.

Prerequisites: Latin I-AC. or I-HN.. Departmental approval.

687 Latin III-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This course focuses on the literary giants of the first century b.c., the Golden Age of Latin. Featured are the lives and masterpieces of Cicero and Virgil. Cicero’s famous First Oration Against Catiline and Virgil’s epic poem

Aeneid are contextualized and read in the original texts. Roman history and the culture of the period are examined in greater detail. As in the previous years of Latin study, special attention is given to “Learning English through

Latin and Greek.” Prerequisites: Final grade B in Latin II.

688 Latin IV: Sport & Entertainment in

Ancient Rome and the Ancient World-HN

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11,12

This course will introduce students to the complex systems of local, regional, and "international" sports and entertainment in the ancient world, and it will explore the radically different ideas of the Greeks and Romans concerning sport and entertainment. Since sport and entertainment were viewed as crucial political, religious, and moral issues by the ancient Romans and Greeks, they reveal much about how these ancient cultures viewed themselves and the question of what made a good citizen. This course is open to students who have not taken Latin previously. Students who have completed Latin III will read texts in Latin; students who have not completed Latin

III will read the texts translated into English.

Prerequisites: Latin students must successfully complete Latin III. Non-Latin students must successfully complete their phase 3 or 4 courses in history and English with a grade or higher. All students need approval by Mr. Moore.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

40

Physical Education

Chair: Mr. Dennis Walker

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: One credit of Physical Education, one-half credit of Health, one-quarter credit of Driver Education

(required for Delaware residents only).

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Physical Education I

Health

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Physical Education II

Driver Education*

Grade 11

(Junior)

Grade 12

(Senior)

Sports Psychology-CP

Principles of Coaching-CP

Life Skills & Leadership-AC

* required for Delaware residents only

Note: All Health and Physical Education classes are unphased.

711 Physical Education 1 ½ credit/full year Grade: 9

The Physical Education 1 course is designed to allow all students to actively participate regardless of skill level. This fitness based course exposes students to a variety of team sports and recreational games. Each student will be taught the basic rules and techniques for each activity. They are also instructed to apply fitness principles emphasized in the health education course. A uniform (Salesianum Physical Education shirt) is required. Daily preparedness, participation, and respect for others are stressed.

712 Health ½ credit/full year Grade: 9

The Health course emphasizes individual responsibility for attaining and maintaining wellness through preventative measures. From the moment of our conception, our personal health, as well as the healthiness of our environment, directly affects our growth, development, and lifestyle. The goal of the instructor is to make the student aware of sound health practices. Units include: physical fitness, addictive drugs, first aid/C.P.R., mental health, anatomy, and nutrition.

721 Physical Education 2 ½ credit/full year Grade: 10

The Physical Education 2 course emphasizes concepts taught in Physical Education/Health during the freshman year. It provides an outlet for sophomores to participate in sport and recreational activities in a structured setting; with emphasis on game situations and strategies. Daily participation, preparedness, and respect for others are stressed.

722 Driver Education ¼ credit/full year Grade: 10

The Driver Education Program is administered and conducted by the State of Delaware Department of

Public Instruction. The goal of the course is to instruct every student in the state in safe and efficient motor vehicle operations. The course consists of thirty hours of classroom instruction, seven hours of actual driving experience, and seven hours of in-car observation. Delaware residents who are sophomores are required to enroll in Driver

Education. Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland residents who are sophomores are not required to enroll, but are permitted to register for Driver Education. . The State of Delaware charges a fee to all students, both resident and non-resident, for Driver Education. The fee is set annually by the state and is billed by Salesianum.

731 Sports Psychology-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This course is intended for students who wish to establish a basis for college-level study in the social sciences. The course emphasizes the study of human behavior in the athletic environment. Topics for discussion will range from the history of the profession to the psychological factors that influence individual athletic performance, such as anxiety, motivation, concentration, relaxation, and personality traits. Selected intervention techniques for enhancing athletic performance will also be discussed.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

41

734 Principles of Coaching-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

The course is designed to expose the student to sound coaching practices, including team/game management, practice organization, and the teaching of sport skills. Coaching responsibility related to discipline, sportsmanship, and the overall development of the student athlete will be addressed. Each student will be guided as they cultivate their personal coaching styles and philosophy. The required field experience will further aid each student in developing coaching skills. Previous athletic experience is recommended for students enrolling in this course.

736 Life Skills & Leadership-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 10, 11, 12

The course is designed to expose students to numerous life skills and leadership theories. The foundation for this course includes decision-making/problem solving, communication, self-awareness, and coping skills.

Instruction in character development will provide students with the tools to make good decisions and an understanding of how to effectively engage, influence, and inspire others to do the same.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

42

Arts & Innovation

Chair: Mr. Aaron Bogad

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: All Salesianum students must take at least ½ credit in Arts & Innovation beyond the Freshmen

Innovation Seminar for graduation. Computer Science courses are included in the Arts & Innovation Department, but these courses do not currently satisfy the graduation requirement.

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Grade 11

(Junior)

Grade 12

(Senior)

CORE COURSE:

Freshman Innovation

Seminar

Art 1/Intro to Art -Composition-CP Art 1/Intro to Art- Color-CP

Architectural Concepts -CP Art 1/Intro to Art-CP (full year)

Concert Band-AC Mixed Chorus-CP

Wind Ensemble-HN

Music Appreciation (Theory)-AC Music Appreciation (History)-AC

AP Music Theory

Art 1-CP/Intro. to Art

Audio Production Seminar-AC

Introduction to Drama-AC

Technical Theatre-AC

Art 1/Art 2

Drafting 2-AC

TV Production 2-AC

Art 1/Art 2/Art 3D-AC Practical Applications- AC

Art 4/AP Portfolio Drafting 2/3/4 (all AC)

Art 5/Indep. Study-HN TV Production 1-CP

Drafting 1

TV Production 1

AP Studio Art TV Production 2-AC

TV Production 3-AC

Acad. Assistantship (Music/Art/Drafting/TV)

Photography-Accel.

Communications Arts-AC (offered at Ursuline)

Film Making-AC., Film Study-AC

Note: The letters/abbreviations at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course number.

801 Freshman Innovation Seminar ½ credit/semester Grade: 9

This course is intended to provide foundational skills in building 7 essential 21st Century skills: curiosity and imagination, effective oral and written communication, accessing and analyzing information, critical thinking and problem solving, collaboration and leadership, agility and adaptability, and initiative and entrepreneurship. FI is a student-centered, project-based course. Students will explore and develop these skills while also focusing on the tenets of Salesian spirituality, learning to connect disparate thoughts and ideas, and thinking outside the box.

802 Guitar-AC 1/2 credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

All students are required to bring an acoustic guitar to class. Students will learn the mechanics of the guitar, and how to read music and chords to play songs. They will explore various styles of music. The instructor will work individually with each member of the class, as well as collectively as a group. Students will be tested on guitar skills once per cycle to check progression on their individual level of proficiency.

804 Concert Band-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Concert Band is designed for students who have played a musical instrument before. Pop, jazz, rock, and marches are taught. Concerts and performance tours go on during the year and a five-day band trip to distant places is an option during the spring. *Audition recommended.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

43

807-810 Wind Ensemble-HN 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This band is for select musicians at Salesianum as well as Padua and Ursuline. Meeting during the first period Exchange, the three schools provide a performance group with many concert opportunities. Involvement with the Marching Band is suggested because of the intense socio-musical experience, but not demanded except for

Freshmen. The Wind Ensemble performs at concerts, assemblies, and dinners as well as the graduation at

Salesianum. Members of the Wind Ensemble are invited to travel on the spring band trip to various locations and to participate in four parades. *An audition is required.

809P Drama-AC EXCHANGE (Padua)

1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

In this class, we will explore the genre of theater. We will study various acting techniques, do close scene studies, watch filmed and live theatrical productions, explore improvisational techniques as well as read and perform a variety of material. We will also study the theater and its history. The class will include student performances, and may include a field trip.

811 Mixed Chorus-CP 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is a vocal performance class devoted to traditional style choral literature. It employs music arranged for Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass (S.A.T.B.). Music reading/note reading is a valuable tool and is very desirable; however, it is not mandatory. Music reading skills are pursued and there is emphasis on developing an understanding of the basic rudiments of music. Music of all styles is utilized so that students can gain appreciation for the music of the masters as well as music from American Musical Theater and the popular idiom. A high level of proficiency is expected and many performance opportunities are presented each school year. Students from this group will be selected for membership in the chorale based on ability and interest. Mixed Chorus typically meets on

Tuesday nights. A minimum of 12 Salesianum students must be enrolled for this course to be available.

815 Introduction to Drama-AC ½ credit/1 semester Grade: 10, 11, 12

This course provides an overview to the history, method, and practice of Western Drama. Students will examine the creative process of human culture from ancient pre-Greek religious ritual through the most contemporary hip hop musical theatre…from Hammurabi to “Hamilton”. This course divides Western Cultural

History into five sections. Each unit will include historical examination and contextualization, the practice of a mode or style of theatre making from that period, and the reading or watching of examples of the work of that era.

816 Technical Theatre-AC ½ credit/1 semester Grade: 10, 11, 12

This course provides an overview to the history as well as practice of Technical Theatre. Students will be introduced to the standards and operational procedures of Technical Theatre. Elements of the course will include:

Set Design and Construction, Lighting Design and System Programming, Sound Design, Music Production and

Engineering, Prop and Costume Design and Construction, as well as Safety practices and guidelines in all areas.

Students will have the opportunity to apply the course work in the practical environment of theatre productions and technical support of any and all events in Spragg Auditorium.

817 Music Appreciation-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course requires no musical experience or prerequisites. It is open to students in all grade levels; however, enrollment will be limited to twenty students. The course will be geared toward the preparation of students for college-level music appreciation classes, and will encompass diverse musical styles of various cultures, idioms, and time periods. Music history, basic theory, and performance practices will be the major areas of study.

Students will be responsible for taking notes on lectures and performances, and keeping an audio “notebook” on tape of recorded examples. This course can also be completed in two ½ credit pieces (see 875 and 876 below).

818 Audio Production Seminar-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The seminar will focus on understanding the software and hardware used to produce music in a modern studio environment by studying recording/producing techniques used by audio engineering professionals. Projects within the course will be made using digital audio workstations (DAW’s) such as Ableton Live and Avid Pro Tools, both of which are widely used and respected in the industry. The different types of microphones and recording environments will also be studied and applied. A final project will be submitted demonstrating the utilization of skills learned throughout the semester.

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

44

819 AP Music Theory 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This full-year course is designed for students considering pursuing music studies at the university level.

Students should be proficient in performance on either a musical instrument or voice and must be able to read and interpret music at the high school level. This course will prepare students for the A.P. Music Theory Exam, and will cover five major topics: 1.) Musical Terminology 2.) Notational Skills 3.) Basic Compositional Skills 4.) Score

Analysis 5.) Aural Skills. Students will be required to have music notation software on their iPad or home computer and to have an active subscription to SmartMusic, a music assessment program. Teacher approval is required.

875 Music Appreciation -- Music Theory-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course will prepare students for college-level music appreciation classes. The course is open to

students in any grade and requires no previous musical experience. Basic music theory, composition, and instrument performance will be the focus of the course. Students will receive instruction in basic keyboarding skills.

They will learn how to use computer-based music notation programs. Students will be expected to take notes and keep an audio “notebook” of recorded examples. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students.

876 Music Appreciation – Music History-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course will prepare students for college-level music appreciation classes. The course is open to

students in any grade and requires no previous musical experience. The course will encompass diverse musical styles of various cultures, idioms, and time periods. Music history in Western Civilization from 500 A.D. until the present will be the major area of study. Students will be expected to take notes and keep an audio “notebook” of recorded examples. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students.

830 Art 1/Introduction to Art 1 credit/full year Grade: 9,10,11,12

The question, “What is Art?” is a recurring theme throughout the course. Students are exposed to the values and principles of Art History through the textbook and the Internet. Drawing, painting and 3-D work are the foci of this course.

879 Art 1-part 1 (Composition/Drawing)-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course will introduce students to the value of composition while enhancing their drawing skills.

Perspective drawing will be introduced. Pencil, pen and ink, and charcoals will be the mediums explored through the use of models, stills and student introduced imagery.

880 Art 1-part 2 (Color)-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

The color wheel will be the focus of this course. Color schemes will be explored through various color mediums. Perspective drawing will be reinforced through painting observation. Watercolor, acrylic painting, and pastels will be the mediums explored. “What is art?” will be the recurring theme throughout this course. This is a continuation of 879, but 879 is not a prerequisite.

832 Art 2/Medium Exploration-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

Art 2 continues Art 1. Students will paint and draw more frequently as art theory is discussed through each project. The class expands their ideas and techniques within the “art” process. The student will discuss his art confidentially with the class using a subjective and objective art critique processes.

Prerequisite: Art 1.

835 Art 3D-Accel. 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Art 3 experiments with new methods for artistic creation and expression. The student will solve visual communication problems using processes learned in Art 2, only now the solutions will be tangible. New tools, such as welders, grinders, and other metal working items are integrated. OSHA safety standards are taught and students are certified on these new tools as they are brought into use. Students will need to create work outside of the classroom.

Prerequisite: Art 2

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836 Art 4/AP Portfolio 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

This class is designed for the serious art student with a focus on a career in art. The objectives are to assist the student in choosing a body of work to represent him to colleges, to rework any ideas that should be included therein, to arrange work in a professional manner, and prepare him for school interviews. This class may be taken with Art 5/Independent Study (837). The student will be required to submit a portfolio for the A. P. Art exam in

May.

Prerequisites: Serious motivation as an art student, Art 2, Department approval.

837 Art 5/Independent Study-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11,12

Students in this class perform a variety of functions in and about the classroom and also have the opportunity to pursue their own artistic endeavors. The instructor closely monitors students but they maintain a certain artistic freedom. Students are expected to utilize their talents to promote the arts in the Salesianum community.

Prerequisites: Department approval.

838 Art 6/ Practical Applications-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 10,11, 12

The main focus of this class is to act as a room reporter for other art courses. Students will work with the instructor to design and maintain a website that announces projects and records classroom activities and projects.

They will learn about digital printing processes and the computer arts. Students in this class will be the main force behind production of the Gentlemen’s View, our printed creative arts magazine. Students will also create the magazine in an ibook format. Students will learn and develop the many tools used to scan and create digital versions of student art. They will photograph students in motion and develop the language of a designer.

Prerequisites: Self-motivation as an art student, Photography, Department approval.

839 1313 Innovation Powered by Ursuline Academy-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

EXCHANGE COURSE

New technologies will always impact our professional paths, so we need to learn how to keep pace with our ever-changing world. This class prepares a student to thrive in an environment of constant flux. Cultivating a mindset for change and enhancing creativity are important skills sought by colleges and employers. Students will learn how to collaborate on team projects as well as develop their own personal brand. The class includes a custom blending of creative process, teamwork, and tangible tools that enable the students to transform novel ideas into viable business or social solutions. Students enrolled in this class will participate in the worldwide Diamond

Challenge for High School Entrepreneurs and have the option to earn between 1-2 transferrable college credits from the University of Delaware (Note: an additional cost applies to students seeking college credits).

The class participates in an annual tour of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City. These entrepreneurs will have access to space in 1313 Innovation, Wilmington, DE for resources and interaction with business professionals and other entrepreneurs on a regular basis. Students who enroll in this class are expected to be active participants in both online and classroom discussion groups, to maintain an opportunity notebook, and to create and present a business concept as a team.

841 Drafting & Design Technologies 1-CP

849 Drafting 1-CP (Freshmen only)

½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11

Grade: 9

This is a detailed course of mechanical and technical drafting with a major emphasis on single view drawings, orthographic projections, dimensioning, and isometric pictorials. Most drawings will be done on Auto

Cad 2013. Seniors may not register for this course.

842 Drafting & Design Technologies II-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The study of technical and mechanical drafting is continued in this course. The emphasis is on drawing different kinds of pictorial views. This course also introduces the basic information needed to design and draft a complete set of architectural drawings for a residence or a dream house. The set will include preliminary design planning, area planning, and basic architectural plans. Some drawings will be done on Auto Cad 2013 and Chief

Architect 9.54. Prerequisites: Drafting 1 and Department approval.

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843 Drafting III-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

The students continue working on the architectural drawing set that they have already started. They will work on elevation drawings, pictorial drawings, and technically detailed architectural drawings of their designed residential house. A scaled model of the house representing the drawings may be required. Some drawings will be done on Auto CAD 2012 and Chief Architect 9.5.

Prerequisites: Drafting 1 and 2, Department approval.

844 Drafting IV-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 12

This course is a study of commercial architectural drafting. The students will complete an architectural drawing set of a commercial facility. They will work on area planning, all floor plans, elevation drawings, pictorial drawings, and technically detailed architectural drawings of the building. A scaled model of the house representing the drawings may be required. Some drawing will be done on Auto CAD R/2012 and 3D Architect and 3D VIZ.

Prerequisites: Drafting 1, 2, & 3, Department approval.

850 Architectural Concepts Using Legos-CP ½ credit/semester Gr. 9, 10, 11, 12

Students will study structural concepts and architectural design using “Lego” plastic toys. The students will study architectural trends and concepts while building with Legos. Students will complete individual and group projects exploring concepts such as the arch and column designs as well as modern home design. The final project will include reproducing an existing structure.

851 TV Production I-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

TV 1 helps the student become familiar with the operation of various television production elements. It is a practical course designed to lead to the production of actual television shows and field productions. Each student is trained to understand the elements of cameras, lenses, audio, lighting, computer graphics, video taping, sets and studio operation; and instructed and tested in the skillful operation of all studio equipment.

852 TV Production II-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 10, 11, 12

The broadcast production of TV 2 is an in-depth continuation of TV 1. The professional aspects of TV broadcasting in commercial and educational productions will be studied, developed, and employed. Students will be taught how to make productions outside of the studio with faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: At least a B average in TV Production 1, Department approval.

853 TV Production III-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Students in this course will run the WSAL Homeroom Show. Students take knowledge of studio equipment and film making skills and apply it daily to make a live 15 minute broadcast. Students are responsible for all content on the show and getting the show on the air.

Grade: 11, 12 867 Film Study-AC ½ credit/semester

This course description is under review.

869 Photography-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 10, 11, 12

Take a better picture! Learn to use an SLR professional camera! Explore composition, color and many more artistic concepts. Photo still life, stop action, sports, people and nature. At the end of the course you will have a small portfolio to show colleges for entrance. Portfolio of any five images required. Intro to art 1 recommended.

A Single Lens Reflect (SLR) camera is required; a Nikon 3000 or an equivalent is preferred. We use that particular camera for our demonstrations. We also have two loaner cameras if this is not possible. These are loaned on a first come-first served basis.

854 Academic Assistantship TV 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

Refer to the “Independent Study Opportunities” section of this Program of Studies (p. 8) for details.

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There is an emphasis on hands-on activities, with a minimum of lecture. These courses vary from partially to completely individualized.

Computer Science Courses

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Grade 10

(Sophomore)

Grade 11

(Junior)

Intro to Programming with Python-AC

Linux OS-AC (exchange course at Padua)

Grade 12

(Senior)

Web Page Design-AC

Intro to Computer Science with Java-HN (1/2 credit)

AP Computer Science

Web Page Design and Implementation-HN (1/2 credit)

Web Technology-HN (1/2 credit)

Note: The letters/abbreviations at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course number.

407 Salesianum Student Technology Help Desk

½ credit/semester

Grade: 10, 11, 12

The Salesianum Student Technology Help Desk course offers students a hands on study of technology and the ways in which it is integrated into the Salesianum academic culture. In this course, students will be required to assess technological problems as they arise and define the best solution to address the issue. In addition to troubleshooting technological problems as they arise, students will be required to collaborate as members of the

Help Desk team to proactively create tutorials and other resources to support the ongoing technology integration at

Salesianum. To complement the role of Help Desk team member, students will pursue a technology topic of interest to them through an individual learning endeavor. Throughout the course, students will learn to collaborate and communicate effectively, think critically and evaluate problems on the spot, and create artifacts that demonstrate their strong technological understanding.

470C Introduction

to Programming with Python –AC

½ credit/semester

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This hands-on course introduces computer programming through the Python language to students who have no prior knowledge of programming. This course covers everything you need to know to begin creating your own simple computer programs. This course is open to all students regardless of their previous level of experience.

Freshmen and sophomores who are interested in how computer programs work will find the course especially interesting.

471 Linux OS-AC EXCHANGE COURSE (Padua)

½ credit/semester

Grade: 10, 11, 12

This course is an introduction to the principle of Linux System management and enables the learner to explore the range of techniques and skills common to the utilization of this operating system. The course enables the learner to explore the management and support of a range of Linux Systems, working on different shells, user interfaces and desktops as well as manage administrative tasks. Learners will utilize Linux based network services as well as Linux System Security. This course may be offered during the Exchange Period.

474 Web Page Design-AC ½ credit/semester

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Learn how to create web pages with HTML. This course features a project based introduction to web page design. It includes tables, programming with JavaScript, and working with cascading style sheets. This course was previously named HTML and JavaScript-Accel.. No previous HTML experience is necessary, and this course fulfills the fine arts requirement.

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476 Introduction to Computer Science with Java-HN

½ credit/semester

Grade: 10, 11, 12

This Honors course will teach you the basics of the Java language and introduce OOP (object oriented programming). The course introduces fundamental concepts in programming: assignment statements, decision statements, repetition statements, etc. It also covers object oriented programming topics such as class use and class creation. This class is a good introduction to the topics in Computer Science and great preparation for the AP

Computer Science class. Those who intend to take AP Computer Science will need this course.

477 AP Computer Science 1 credit/full year

Grade: 11, 12

This course follows the Advanced Placement Program’s guidelines. The focus of the course is using a computer to solve problems. The focus is on object oriented design and development with some coverage of data structures. This course will build upon the material presented in Introduction to Computer Science with Java-Hon.

(476), while helping you to successfully complete the AP exam. The student is required to sit for the AP Computer

Science Exam in May.

Prerequisites: Intro. to Computer Science with Java-Hon. (476), Department approval (see Mr. Guinaugh).

478 Web Page Design and Implementation-HN ½ credit/semester

Grade: 11, 12

This course builds on the skills learned in Web Page Design. It focuses more on the proper design of web pages such as color choice, information placement, and menu design. We will move away from hand coding our pages and use the professional DreamWeaver tool to create our designs. This class works closely with the Web

Technology class.

Prerequisite: Math 474 Web Page Design. Approval by Mr. Guinaugh required.

481 Web Technology-HN ½ credit/semester

Grade: 11, 12

Learn how to deliver dynamic content to a web page. This course covers the use of PHP and SQL to store content and display it in real time from a database. You will focus more on server side scripting than on the actual coding of HTML.

Prerequisite: Math 474 Web Page Design and one other programming course (Python or Java). Approval by Mr.

Guinaugh required.

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Business Education

Chair: Mr. George Horn

Requirements and Program of Study

Requirements: All courses in this department are electives.

Program of Study

Grade 9

(Freshman)

Grade 11

(Junior)

Technology Skills-CP

Microsoft Office-CP

Microsoft Office-AC Business Law-CP

Personal Finance – AC

Accounting-AC Entrepreneurship-CP

Marketing-CP

Technology Skills-CP

Grade 12

(Senior)

Note: The letters/abbreviations at the end of the course title indicates the course phase. Each phase has its own course number.

910 Technology Skills-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students learn to type using the touch method to enhance typing speed and accuracy. During the course students will learn the new Windows 8 and Office 2013. In Word students will learn the new features that Microsoft has incorporated into the program such as: creating a report with MLA citations that Word can generate; create, format; edit pictures in a Word document; add special effects, and create business letters. In PowerPoint students learn to enhance a presentation with pictures, shapes, and Word Art and also how to add and edit audio and video files. In Excel students learn to create worksheets with embedded charts using formulas. How to apply and use conditional formatting to enhance values in a spreadsheet. Enhance both worksheets and charts by using a large variety of formatting tools that are new to Office 2013.

911 Microsoft Office-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is appropriate for all phases. In Word students learn how to edit and format tables in a word document, use templates, create a web page from a Word document, format and test a web page, create data sources and form letters while using mail merge to create letters and labels to be mailed to a group of people, and how to create a newsletter. In PowerPoint, students will learn to add Smart Art Graphics containing pictures and text into presentations, create and insert a chart generated from an Excel spreadsheet into a presentation, create and add tables to a presentation, convert an outline made in Microsoft Word into slides in a presentation, add hyperlinks that link to a word file, audio file, video file, as well as a page on the Internet, custom animate objects to move within a

PowerPoint slide. In Excel learn how to create, sort, and search data in a data table using advanced filtering techniques; and how to link and work with multiple worksheets and workbooks; and creating templates, importing data, and working with SmartArt Images and Screen Shots. You can pair this course with Internet Research (912).

913 Accounting-AC 1 credit/full year Grade: 11, 12

The Accounting course presents an introduction to the elements of accounting. The topics covered include the use of journals and ledgers, preparation of financial statements, adjusting and closing procedures, control of cash and inventory, payroll procedures and promissory notes. This course uses accounting software that allows the student to make the transition from manual to computer-based accounting, as used in the business world.

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914 Marketing-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

Marketing (or Distribution) is the performance of those business activities that direct the flow of goods and services from the producer to the consumer. This course is designed to acquaint the student with a basic understanding of marketing, sales promotion, and advertising, to relate marketing to the total economy, to provide an understanding of accepted tools, plans, and procedures, to familiarize the student with marketing principles and to give him some practice in applying them to real-life situations, to promote the ability to distinguish between mediocrity and excellence in marketing, sales promotion, and advertising.

915 Business Law-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

The basic elements of our legal tradition as they affect business relationships are studied in this course.

The emphasis is on the application of legal principles to individual's rights and obligations in practical business situations. Topics include: contracts, the procedures used in a civil suit, employment, bailments, rights of minors, negotiable instruments, real property, personal property, wills, partnerships, and corporations.

917 Entrepreneurship-CP ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This course is designed to provide students with a realistic framework for starting their own business.

Students will learn how to analyze, choose, organize, finance and market a new business. Students will also learn about pricing their product, personnel management, and contracts.

987 Personal Finance-AC ½ credit/semester Grade: 11, 12

This course is designed to prepare the student for their adult financial life after college. It covers personal finance topics such as careers, planning, budgeting, savings and investing, credit, banking services, transportation issues, housing issues and risk protection.

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Planning for College

The purpose of this section is to provide some general information about planning for college. This is only a very brief outline. Requirements and opportunities are constantly changing; you should keep this fact in mind when using the material that follows.

You should make use of the college planning materials that are available in the Guidance Center. Your educational and career choices are important factors in course selection at Salesianum. You are strongly encouraged to see your counselor if you have any questions as to posted Salesianum opportunities. He or she will be happy to help you get the information you need to make intelligent decisions.

Planning for Your Future

Choose your vocation as early as possible. Freshman year is not too early to start planning for your future. Seek experience in different occupations that interest you (e.g. good use of the Naviance Program). Also, check the career information on courses, college choices, etc. The College/Career Center in the Guidance Office is available during school hours and contains catalogues and basic reference books for your use.

Plan your high school program. Colleges usually require an individual to have completed a minimum of 18 or 20 units of college preparatory work. A unit represents a year’s work in a subject that meets four or five times a week.

The distribution should be as follows:

English 4 units

History

Mathematics

Science (Lab)

4 units

4 units

3 units (4 recommended)

Language

Electives

(Usually academic courses)

3 units (4 recommended)

6 units

Note: Computer science and accounting courses are not considered math courses by colleges and universities. Also,

4 units of a modern foreign language are strongly recommended. Latin is encouraged in addition to your modern language choice. Four years of science is also encouraged. Take the most demanding program of which you are capable.

Look at your permanent record (available through your College Counselor). Some indications of your college ability are: a) Your grades b) Course of studies - Phase 2 (CP), 3 (AC), 4 (HN), or 5 (A.P.) c) Ability in major areas: English, language, mathematics and sciences d) Results of standardized tests;

PSAT/NMSQT - October of freshman, sophomore and junior years

SAT Reasoning Test - March of junior year and October or November of senior year

SAT Subject Tests - June of junior year, December of senior year

ACT Tests – April of junior year, September of senior year

PSAT/NMSQT. The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a test designed to identify academically talented high school students and to serve as a practice instrument for the later

SAT Reasoning Test. The verbal sections measure the ability to read with skill and to understand and use words correctly. There is also a section of the PSAT which is called Writing Skills and which assesses the student’s ability to use and recognize the practices of standard American English. The mathematical sections measure the ability to reason with numbers. This test is administered to sophomores and juniors in October of each year. If an individual does well in this examination, he could win an excellent scholarship. Only juniors are eligible for scholarship consideration.

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Standardized tests. The College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) provides a Scholastic Assessment test and

Subject Tests which are used by many colleges and universities in accepting and placing students.

The Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT-Reasoning) is a three-hour and 45 minute objective test designed to indicate your ability to do college work. This test measures the basic verbal and mathematical abilities that you have acquired over the years.

The SAT Subject Tests are one hour tests designed to measure your level of achievement in particular subject fields.

The SAT is required by most colleges in this area of the country for admission purposes. Specific subject tests are required by a number of colleges for placement purposes and by all highly selective colleges for admission purposes. Sophomores and juniors should take a practice test in January at Salesianum.

Juniors should take the SAT-Reasoning test in March or May, and Seniors take the SAT-Reasoning in October,

November, or December. Most colleges want the student to take the SAT in the senior year even if the junior year scores are very good. It is your responsibility to have your test scores sent directly from the testing service.

The ACT is a test similar in function to SAT. However, the ACT is divided into four multiple choice subject tests:

English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science Reasoning with an optional Writing section. Students are scored on a scale of 1 to 36 not including the Writing section. This test is viewed as equally acceptable relative to the SAT at colleges throughout the US. Juniors should take the ACT in April, and seniors should take the ACT in September.

Selecting your college: Investigate the colleges that offer education in the field of your choice. Find out the cost of your proposed course and whether scholarships are offered at the college in the field of your interest. Many college catalogues and basic reference books are available in the Guidance Center.

Your teachers can help you to learn study habits for various subjects. Constantly work hard to improve your study habits. The best type of study takes place when: a) You know why you are studying. b) You care about what you are studying. c) You approach your work confident that you can do it. d) You try to get the most out of studies and not just enough to get by. e) You work for understanding, not just for the grade.

Earn good grades. Grades of B or better are needed for admission to most colleges. If interested in applying for scholarships, you should be working towards being in the top 20% of your class (3.50 or better).

Become a well-rounded individual. Develop hobbies and participate in school, community, and church activities.

Broaden your fields of interest through reading and contacts with people.

Keep informed on financial aid. There are many local scholarships available. Ask your parents to find out whether their employer or the professional organizations to which they belong offer scholarships. Watch for the announcements on Naviance and review the scholarship list in Naviance. The best way to get financial aid is to know as much about the process as possible.

Learn about scholarship requirements. What rank in class is required? What tests must be taken? When should the tests be taken? What score is acceptable? What is the application deadline?

Prepare for college applications early. Get references, transcripts, and other supporting material in order long before deadlines. If an essay is to be written, take time and plan. Remember that what you write can be the difference between being admitted or not.

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Learn about yourself. Interest and survey tests are available to you on Naviance and the College Board website to help you learn more about yourself. You should take all such testing programs very seriously. The purpose of the testing program is to give you as much information about yourself as possible so you can make wise career choices.

Ask Questions

If you have any questions or problems, seek advice from your counselors, teachers, and your parents. They will not make decisions for you, but they may provide the facts that will help you to make your own decisions.

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Notes:

New phase distinctions: Phases 1 & 2 = College Prep (CP) Phase 3 = Accelerated (AC) Phase 4 = Honors (HN)

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