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TECHNICAL INSTRUCTION
F. 2
Arrzyex 16-mm Motion-picture Camera
First issued May 1960
Instruction F.2
AMENDMENT RECORD
Amendment
Sheet No.
1
initiais
1
hte
1
Amendment
sheet NO.
Initials
Date
Instruction F.2
CONTENTS
Page
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
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KEY TO ANNOTATION OF ILLUSTRATIONS
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iii
v
SECTION I .
INTRODUCTION . .
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General
.. .. ..
Summary of Equipment
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1.1
1.1
1.1
SECTION 2 .
CONSTRUCTION . .
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Camera Housing
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Camera Mechanism
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Switch Assembly
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Film Shutter and Transport Mechanism
Camera Door and Viewfinder . .
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Lens Turret
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Matte Box
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Motor (Variable-speed) . .
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Motor (Governor Speed-controlled) . .
New Camera Door and Viewfinder . .
Batteries
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2.1
SECTION 3.
LENS MOUNTS . .
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General
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Cleaning and Lubrication
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2.1
2.2
2.4
2.5
2.8
2.8
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.12
2.12
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3.1
3.1
3.1
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SECTION 4.
OPERATION
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To Load the Camera . .
. . ..
To Operate the Camera Motor
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To Change the Camera Motor
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To Fit Lenses to the Turret
.. . .
To Remove Lenses from the Turret . .
To Adjust the Focus and Aperture of a Lens
To Fit the Matte Box . .
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..
..
To Insert Filter Holders into the Matte Box
To Sight the Camera (Hand-held Operation)
Tripod-mounted Operation
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4.1
4.1
4.1
4.2
4.2
4.2
4.2
4.3
4.3
4.3
4.3
SECTION 5.
MAINTENANCE . .
..
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Dismantling the Camera
.. . . ..
Adjusting the Centrifugal Governor of the Governor Speed.. . . . . . . . . . .
controlled Motor
Lubrication
..
. . . . .. .. . . . .
Cleaning . .
..
.. .. .. .. .. ..
Performance Checks
. . .. . . ..
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5.1
5.1
SECTION 6.
400-ft MAGAZINE
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General
.. .. .
Construction
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Electrical Connections . .
Operating Instructions . .
a
1
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5.1
5.2
5.2
5.2
6.1
6.1
6.2
6.4
6.4
CONTENTS (CONTINUED)
Pag :
SECTION 7.
ARRIFLEX BLIMP 16
. . . . ..
General
. . .. . . . . . .
Construction . .
..
. . . . ..
Modifications to Slating Unit on Camera
Circuit Description . .
. . . . ..
Operating Instructions
. . . . ..
SECTION 8.
SECTION 9.
SECTION 10.
..
GAUMONT-KALEE SINGLE-SYSTEM MAGNETIC
RECORDING EQUIPMENT
..
.. .. . .
General
.. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mechanical Construction . .
. . . . .. . .
Circuit Description . .
..
..
. . .. ..
Maintenance Information . .
.. . . . . . .
Operation
. . . . . . . . .. . . . .
8.1
8.1
8.1
8.4
8.5
8.14
GAUMONT-KALEE SOUNDHEAD TYPE 1690B WITH
.. . . ..
BBC AMPLIFIER TYPE AM151502
General
...
. . . . . . . . . . ..
Mechanical Construction . .
. . .. . . . .
Circuit ..
. . . . . . . . .. . . . .
Maintenance Information . .
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..
.. . .
Operation
.. . . . . . . .. .. ..
9.1
9.1
9.1
9.1
9.1
9.2
.
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10.1
10.1
10.1
10.3
10.5
SOUND SYSTEM USING MAIHAK REPORTOFON
MAGNETIC TAPE RECORDERS
. . . . ..
General
. . . . ..
. . . . . . ..
Mechanical Construction . .
..
. . . . ..
Circuit Description . .
. . . . . . . . ..
11.1
11.1
11.1
11.1
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A.1
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B.1
PARTS LIST : GAUMONT-KALEE SINGLE-SYSTEM
16-mm MAGNETIC SOUND RECORDING EQUIPMENT . .
. . . . .. . . . . . . . .
C.1
THE NON-INTERACTION OF LONGITUDINALLYAND LATERALLY-MAGNETISED RECORDING
TRACKS ON A COMMON MAGNETIC TAPE
..
D .I
APPENDIX B. PARTS LIST: 400-ft MAGAZINE
APPENDIX D
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MAGNETIC TAPE
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APPENDIX A . PARTS LIST: ARRIFLEX 16-mm CAMERA
APPENDIX C.
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7.1
7.1
7.1
7.5
7.5
7.6
SOUND SYSTEM USING BBC
RECORDER TYPE RD41501
General
. . .. . .
Mechanical Construction . .
Circuit Description . .
..
Test Data
.. . . . .
SECTION 1 1.
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Instruction F.2
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Page
.
Fig 2.1
Camera. with door removed. fitted with 400-ft magazine
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Fig 2.2
.
Camera mechanism and film shutter and transport mechanism. with
variable-speed motor . .
..
..
..
..
.. . .
Fig 2.3
.
Switch Assembly. viewed from left-hand side. with cover removed
Fig. 2.4
Switch Assembly. viewed from right-hand side
.
Fig.
Fig .
Film Shutter and Transport Mechanism
Fig 2.5
2.6
Lens Turret. viewed from rear. with one lens fitted
2.7
General View of Camera
Fig. 2.8
.
Fig.
Fig 3.1
.
Fig.
Fig.
Fig.
Fig.
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6.1
Fig 6.2
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Governor Speed-controlled Motor: construction of centrifugal
governor . .
. . . . . . . . .. .
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.
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400-ft Magazine. with Take-up Motor Sub-unit removed . .
..
Lens Moupt for use with Arriflex Cameras
400-ft Magazine: Take-up Motor Sub-unit
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.
a
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6.3
Motor Sub-unit: details of reversing mechanism
7.1
Blimp for 16-mm Arriflex Camera
7.2
Electrical Circuits of Blimp for 16-mm Arriflex Camera
8.1
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Camera with
Soundhead Type 1690 fitted . .
..
..
.. .. ..
Fig 8.2
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Head Unit
Assembly
..
.. . . . . .. . .
.. . .
.
.
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Fig 8.3
Head Alignment Jig for use with Gaumont-Kalee Single-system
Recording Equipment
..
..
.. .. .. ..
Fig 8.4
.
Attenuator Pads for Film Tests on Gaumont-Kalee Single-system
Recording Equipment
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..
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Fig 8.5
.
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Recording
Chain Frequency Response . .
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. . ..
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Fig 8.6
.
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Overall Frequency Response
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. . ..
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.
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Reproducing
Chain Frequency Response . .
.. . . . . . . . .
Fig 8.7
.
Fig. 8.9
Fig 8.8
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: V.I. Meter
Correction Curve
..
.. . . . . . . . . . .
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment:
Head Signal-current Frequency Response
..
iii
Recording
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2.2
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (CONTINUED)
Page
Fig. 8.10
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Direct Monitor
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Chain Frequency Response . .
Fig. 8.1 1
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment:
Indicator Frequency Response
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Fig. 8.12
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Control Panel
of Recording Amplifier Type 1691 . .
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Fig. 9.1
Recording and Playback Head Connections between Gaumont-Kalee
Soundhead Type 1690B and BBC Amplifier Type AM151502 . .
Fig. 9.2
Head Alignment Jig for use with Gaumont-Kalee Soundhead Type
1690B and BBC Amplifier Type AM151502
.. . . ..
Fig. 10.1
Modification to Gears for Shaft I1 of Arriflex 16-mm Camera Mechanism to provide drive for Synchronising Tone Generator
..
Fig. 10.2
Printed Wiring Card of Slating Unit for use with Recorder Type
RD4/501 . .
.. .. .. .. . . . . . ,
..
Fig. 10.3
Attachments to Door of Camera for use with Recorder Type RD4/501
Fig. 10.4
Electrical Modifications to Arriflex 16-mm Camera for use with
Recorder Type RD4/501
.. .. . . . . . . . .
Fig. 11.1
Electrical Modifications to Arriflex 16-mm Camera for use with
Maihak Recorder
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Fig. D.l
Magnetisation Pattern across Laterally-magnetised Track, showing
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Symmetry about Central Line . .
Fig. D.2
Laterally-magnetised Track crossing Gap of Conventional Replay
Head
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,.
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8.13
Volume
..
CIRCUIT DIAGRAM AT END
Fig. I.
Gaurnont-Kalee Single-system Magnetic Recording Equipment : Circuit
Diagram.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The BBC would like to express their thanks to Rank Precision Industries Ltd.
for supplying information used in this Instruction, for providing facilities for the taking
of photographs and for checking the draft for technical accuracy.
iv
Instruction F.2
KEY TO ANNOTATION OF ILLUSTRATIONS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
Core adaptors
Feed spool shaft in 400-ft magazine
Roller arm for feed spool of 400-ft magazine
Lip cast on interior of magazine body
Latch for roller a m 6
Roller arm for take-up spool of 400-ft magazine
Take-up spool shaft in 400-ft magazine
Nose of magazine
Locking slide actuating screws
Magazine locks
Lock lip
Lead
Releasing buttons on spool shafts
Take-up spool shaft pulley
Oiling point
Direction switch
Lower sprocket, with pulley
Film retaining arm
Knob on locking pin of film retaining arm
Upper sprocket, with pulley
Oiling point
Back pressure hinge
Feed spool shaft pulley
Pressure pad
Carrying screws
Counter drums
Gear on shaft 111
Large assembly plate
Central lubrication pin
Tachometer
Copper pipes
Tachometer housing
Gear on shaft IV
Upper bevel gear on claw shaft 36
Register cam on claw shaft 36 (actuates register claw 77)
Claw shaft
Part of register claw 77
Ballrace
Bearing bracket for mirror shutter 40
Mirror shutter
Worm gear on claw shaft 36
Pins on transport claw 75
Universal joint
Cam on claw shaft 36 (actuates transport claw 75)
Lower bevel gear on claw shaft 36
Bevel gear on driving shaft
Gears for shaft I
Bearing housing
Grubscrews in clutch ring of 50
v
Tension bush with clutch ring
Rubber coupling
Gears for shaft I1
Small assembly plate
Cursor line on motor case
Resistance control cover
Forward/Reverse knob
Inching knob
Extended wall of switch housing
Contact bridge of switch assembly
Part of contact spring 65 of switch assembly
Contact point on contact spring 65 of switch assembly
Part of contact spring 65 of switch assembly
Pin on contact spring 65 of switch assembly
Insulating sleeve
Contact spring of switch assembly
Switch fork
Compression spring
>
J
Switch lever
Clamp
Part of contact bridge 59 of switch assembly
Retaining plate
Film side tension runner
Side runner guide
Transport claw
Prism holder
Register claw
Prism
Aperture in aperture plate
Raised areas of aperture plate
Central bush in lens turret
Turret indexing wheels
Turret levers
Lens mount key
Lens retaining clips
Anti-reflection masks
Aluminium square runner
Lens releasing levers
Matte box bracket
Locating plate on aluminium square runner 87
Camera door latch
Switch lever
Rubber eye piece
Focus ring on viewfinder eyepiece
Knurled ring on viewfinder
Switch fixing lever
Rotating grip
Metal frame
Small metal frame
Large bellows frame
Knurled locking screw (on connecting rod) . ,.
Adjusting screws
Instruction F.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
1 12.
113.
114.
115.
116.
1 17.
118.
119.
120.
121.
122.
123.
124.
125.
126.
127.
128.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
134.
135.
136.
137.
138.
139.
140.
141.
L42'
143.
144.
145.
146.
147.
148.
149.
150.
151.
152.
153.
154.
155.
Motor shaft
Plexiglass disk
Pivoted arm
Contact
Tension spring
Threaded stud
Inching knob
Locknut
Metal bar
End cap
Keyway in cell of lens mount
Groove in focus ring 115 of lens mount
Focus ring of lens mount
Aperture ring of lens mount
Focus ears
Roller
Idler roller assembly
Screw securing head screening can
Head unit assembly
Roller assembly
Sound drum
Compliance arm assembly
Compliance spring
Door assembly of soundhead
Roller on compliance arm assembly 124
Roller assembly
Roller arm assembly
Friction roller assembly
Roller on roller arm assembly 129
Skid
Parts of head and bracket assemblies
Pole-faces of heads
Nuts securing heads to brackets
Slits in head mounting bracket 137
Head mounting bracket
Socket board
Sockets
Holes in printed circuit card
Washer soldered to printed circuit card
) Holes in
printed circuit card
Slating unit cover
Lamp cap over slating unit pilot lamp
Contact on camera door
Brass block
Lampholder for slating lamp
Slating lamp bracket
Slating unit output socket
Slating but on
Parts of spool shafts 2 and 7
Pointer
Latch plates on magazine body
Large contacts
vii
156.
157.
158.
159.
160.
Locking slides
Contact bridge
Contact pin
Pins on gear wheels 160 and 165
Gear wheel on stub shaft
16"
162.
163.
164.
165.
166.
167.
168.
169.
170.
171.
172.
173.
174.
175.
176.
177.
178.
179.
180.
181.
182.
183.
184.
185.
186.
187.
188.
189.
190.
191.
192.
193.
194.
195.
196.
197.
198.
199.
200.
201.
202.
203.
Gear wheels with bushes
J
Metal strip attached to reversing arm 175
Gear wheel on stub shaft
Motor sub-unit housing
Motor housing locking spindles
Gear wheel with pinion
Insulating strip
Motor contact
Circlips to secure cover plate 172
Cover plate
Retaining pin for gear wheel 168
Stops
Reversing arm
Cam
Reversing levers
Compression spring
Knurled nuts to secure skyshade
Toothed ring on rotatable drum 198
Hinged arm on rotatable drum 198
Plexiglass window
Push-button switch controlling pilot light
Pilot light inside blimp
Red pilot light
Annular clamp securing lens tube 188
Follow-focus handwheel at rear of blimp
Lens tube
Catches to secure camera on floating base 191
Studs on floating base 191
Floating base for camera, in blimp
Shaft for follow-focus handwheel 187
Sockets on floating base 191
Follow-focus handwheel on left-hand side of blimp
Window for viewing focus scale 199
Front door plunger sockets
Pins and clips to support filters
Rotatable drum on interior of front door of blimp
Focusing scale on rotatable drum 198
Lever actuating front door plungers
Cast metal frames supporting skyshade bellows
White-painted dots to facilitate lining-up of rotatable drum 198
Steel rods supporting metal frames 201
1
Technical Instructions
Teievision Volume 3
Instruction F.2
ARRIFLEX 16-mm MOTION-PICTURE CAMERA
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
General
The Arriflex 16-mm camera is a motion-picture
camera for use with standard 16-mm film stock.
It is very portable, and can be operated either
hand-held or tripod-mounted. As received from
the manufacturers, it has no provision for use
with a sound recording system, but it can be
modified for this purpose as described below. A
general view of the camera is given in Fig. 2.7.
The shutter is of the mirror reflex type, enabling
the taking lens to form part of the viewfinder
system. It gives a fixed exposure of one-fiftieth of
a second (180 degrees exposure angle) at the television film speed of twenty-five frames per second.
Up to three lenses can be accommodated on a
rotatable lens turret. A wide variety of lenses in
suitable mounts is available, and the fitting and
removal of a lens is rapid and easy. A sunshade
is supplied, to which are fitted two filter holder
receptacles, one of which is rotatable; the assembly
is designated the matte box. The camera accommodates 100-ft daylight-loading spools of film,
but to permit longer periods of continuous filming,
provision is made for the attachment of a magazine
to accommodate darkroom loads of up to 500 ft
of normal panchromatic stock or 200-ft daylightloading spools.
The camera is driven by an electric motor,
powered by an 8-volt battery of secondary cells.
Two alternative motors are available. One is
equipped'with means for varying its speed and
for reversing its direction of rotation and is used
if special effects are required. The second motor
contains a centrifugal governor which holds its
speed constant; this motor must be used if the
camera is worked in conjunction with a sound
system. The motors can be fitted and removed
quickly and easily, without the use of tools.
Three sound systems are used by the BBC with
the camera; all involve some modification to it.
One of these systems (the Gaumont-Kalee Single
System) utilises a single film, having a stripe of
magnetic coating along one edge, for the simul-
taneous recording of picture and sound; in this
system a soundhead is attached to the bottom of
the camera and is connected to a portable
transistorised amplifier containing its own battery.
Both the other sound systems employ separate
portable tape recorders equipped to record a
synchronising signal as an auxiliary track on the
tape; this synchronising signal is obtained from
an alternator driven from the camera mechanism.
Provision is made for the simultaneous marking
(' slating') of both film and tape to facilitate
subsequent editing. One of these two systems,
now obsolescent, uses the Maihak Reportofon
MMK3 or MMK4 recorder; the other uses the
Magnetic Tape Recorder Type RD4/501. (Instruction R.lO.)
A blimp is available, which for BBC use is
equipped to accommodate cameras modified to
work in conjunction with the RD4/501.
In this Instruction, the use of initial capital
letters for the name of a part (e.g., Small Metal
Frame) denotes that this is the manufacturers'
nomenclature for that part. Except where otherwise stated, the terms left-hand, right-hand, forward
and rear are used to denote these directions as
seen by the operator from his working position
behind the camera.
Summary of Equipment
Camera
Weight: 114 lb. (Including motor and 400-ft
magazine, but not lenses.)
Supplies: 8-volt battery. (Varley Type VPT7/9
cells hold sufficient charge for 2,000 ft of
filming.)
Film Stock: 16-mm, single perforated, plain or
with magnetic stripe, OR 100-ft daylightloading spools or in 400-ft darkroom loads.
Winding sense B.
Lens Mounting: Triple turret, accepting Arriflextype lens mounts.
Camera Mounting : f -in. and &in. tapped holes
in base of camera.
Instruction F.2
Section 1
Sound Systems
Sepmag: Tape Recorder Type RD4/501 in conjunction with synchronising tone generator on
camera. Dual tracks recorded on standard
&in. magnetic tape.
Commag : Magnetic Recording Soundhead
(Gaumont-Kalee Type 1690) attached to
camera, and either Gaumont-Kalee Type 1691
or BBC Type AM151502 Recording Amplifier.
100-mil edge track recorded on magneticstriped film
Sound Apparatus
Tape Recorder Type RD4/501
Weight: 18 Ib
Dimensions: 15i in. by 74 in. by 84 in.
Tape Speed : 73 in ./set
Supply: 12-volt d.c. (self-contained batteries)
Input: Single 30-ohm microphone
Magnetic Recording Soundhead Type 1690
Weight: 54 Ib
Dimensions: 5 4 in. by 4 in. by 3h in.
Recording Amplifier Type 1691
Weight : 48 lb
Dimensions: 74 in. by 34 in. by 8 in.
Supply: 7-5-volt d.c. (self-contained battery)
Inputs: 30-ohm microphone and 500-ohm
high-level (separate)
Recording Amplifier Type AM 151502
Weight: 86 Ib
Dimensions: 34 in. by 103 in. by 8& in.
Supply: 12-volt d.c. (self-contained batteries)
Inputs: Two 30-ohm microphanes, 600-ohm
line
Ancillary Equipment
Tripods: (a) Arriflex 16-mm types, standard or
short (with baby legs)
(b) Heavy Duty type (required when
Arriflex Blimp 16 is used)
Shoulder Pod
Blimps: fa) Soft Blimp, for use with standard
cameras
(b) Arriflex Blimp 16, for use with
specially modified cameras
Instruction F.2
SECTION 2
CONSTRUCTION
For the purpose of description, the camera can
be regarded as made up of the following ten
assemblies :
(a) Camera housing
(b) Camera mechanism
(c) Switch assembly
(d) Film shutter and transport mechanism
(e) Camera door and viewfinder
(f) Lens turret
(g) Matte box
(h) Motor (variable-speed)
(j) Motor (governor speed-controlled)
(k) New camera door and viewfinder
The batteries, and the man!ler in which they
are housed and connected, are also described in
this Section.
(a) Camera Housing
This is a cast aluminium alloy shell, forming the
main bulk of the camera; the other assemblies are
fitted to it. It provides sufficient space, with feed
and take-up spool shafts, to accommodate a
100-ft daylight-loading spool of film; thus a
separate magazinc (shown fitted in Fig. 2.1) is
necessary only when longer runs are required.
When the magazine is used, the fi1.m passes into
and from the camera through a magazine slot to
which access is given by the removal of a detachable light trap cover clipped between a pair of
catches 10 (the Magazine Locks) on the top of the
housing; these serve also to secure the magazine
in position.
Film can be run through the camera in either
direction if the variable-speed motor is used; both
spool shafts have therefore to be belt-driven, so
that either spool can perform the take-up function.
The speed at which the spool shafts are driven is
a ways greater than necessary for take-up of the
film, the belt driving the take-up spool being
forced to slip on its pulleys; in this way a tight
wind is ensured. Ratchets in the spool shaft
pulleys 14, 23 are over-ridden when the direction
of drive is such as to tend to unwind the spool,
i.e., when the latter is functioning as the feed
spool; the belt drive then merely idles, performing
no useful function. The unwinding of the upper
spool, which is normally the feed spool, is controlled by a pressure pad 24 mounted on a leaf
spring attached to the wall of the housing.
The spool shafts are fitted with spring ballcatches to retain spools in position; the spools are
released by pressing small buttons 13 on the tips
of the shafts.
Plexiglass windows are provided in the housing,
through which the readings of the tachometer and
of the frame and footage counters can b: observed;
these instruments are parts of assembly (b), the
camera mechanism. Two apertures in the housing
give access to the Counter Drums, enabling them
to be re-set.
The housing incorporates a two-pin male connector for the battery lead, and a cylindrical
receptacle to contain the motor; the wall of the
housing is slotted to form a flap which is tightened
against the motor casing to secure the motor in
position. The necessary pressure for this purpose
is applied to the free end of the flap by a Locking
Lever, which has a tapped collar working on a
screw projecting from the camera housing. A
smaller screw is tapped into the tip of that carrying
the Locking Lever to prevent the detachment and
loss of the lever. A brass ring (the Turret Bearing
Insert) is fastened to the housing by three rivets
to provide a bearing surface for the edge of the
lens turret (assembly f); the insert contains three
notches into which plungers in the lens turret fall
lo provide accurate-axial alignment of the turret
in its three working positions. Other fittings on
the housing are the Lens Turret Stud, the Matte
Box Bracket 89 (Fig. 2.7), the Inserting Plate (by
which the camera is mounted on a tripod or other
support), a pair of eyeletted Carrying Screws 25
(Fig. 2.1) (by which the camera can b: slung from
a neck strap) and a lead 12 and contact to connect
power to the take-up motor in the 400-ft magazine,
when used.
The housing is cast to a shape which provides
a right-hand thumb grip, to facilitate hand-held
operation.
A symbol 4 is engraved on the right-hand side
of the camera in a position corresponding to the
film plane. It forms a datum for the measurement
of object distances.
instruction F.2
Section 2
(b) Camera Mechanism
This is built up on the Large Assembly Plate
which, with the switch assembly (assembly c), divides the interior of the camera housing(assemb1ya)
into two compartments. The left-hand compartment is that to which access is giken by the camera
Fig. 2.1
The right-hand compartment, to which access is
obtained by the removal of the Large Assembly
Plate from the camera housing, contains the
remaining part of assembly (d) and the motor, in
addition to the greater part of the camera
mechanism.
Camera, with door removed, fitted with 400-ft magazine
door (assembly e or k) and contains the switch
assembly (assembly c), part of the film shutter and
transport mechanism (assembly d), the spool
shafts, already described as parts of assembly (a),
and the sprockets, strippers and Film Retaining
Arm, which are parts of the camera mechanism.
Fig. 2.2 is a view of the right-hand side of the
camera mechanism, with the film shutter and
transport mechanism (assembly d) and the variablespeed motor (assembly h) attached to it to show the
three assemblies in their positions relative to one
another. A bearing housing 48 mounted on the
Instruction F.2
Section 2
a
lowermost part of the Large Assembly Plate 28
carries a driving shaft, running in ballraces which
are supported in lnsulation Strips. These are
strips of crimped steel foil which surround the
ballraces, making them a push fit in oversized
holes in the housing. The foil is compressible, and
thus-takes up any variation in the space between
the housing and the ballraces due to different
dimensional changes of the two metals with
temperature.
(If the bsllraces were rigidly
supported in accurately fitting holes in the housing,
a fall of temperature could cause the metal of the
Fig. 2.2
3
inner tapered bush. It is secured to the driving
shaft by three grubscrews 49, and the end of the
shaft, which is threaded, projects from the end
of the bush. The rubber coupling fits between
the bush and the side of the cylinder. Two Key
Rings, which are in fact half rings, are placed
around the end of the driving shaft, inside the
Rubber Coupling, which is tubular in shape and
which they fit fairly closely. A nut on the threaded
end of the driving shaft is tightened against the
Key Rings, forcing them a short distance up the
tapered end of the bush and into the rubber. The
Camera mechanism and film shutter and transport mechanism, with variable-speed motor
housing to contract around the ballraces, squeezing
them sufficiently hard to impair their smoothness
of running.)
The driving shaft is driven by the motor via a
Rubber Coupling 51 which, with a specially-shaped
collar on the motor shaft, forms a friction drive;
this arrangement permits the motor to be changed
without the use of tools, and also slips if the film
jams in the camera, thus avoiding shock to the
mechanism. The Rubber Coupling is mounted on
the driving shaft by means of a component 50
designated the Tension Bush With Clutch Ring.
This has the shape of a cylindrical cup with an
rubber is thus compressed and forced into an
annular groove on the inner surface of the cylinder;
in this way it is gripped firmly but without a
concentration of stress on eny small area such as
could lead to tearing under torsional shock.
The driving shaft carries a bevel gear 46 which
meshes with a further bevel gear 45 on the claw
shaft. The latter is part of assembly (d), the film
shutter and transport mechanism, and carries,
amongst other components, a worm gear 41 by
which the drive is transmitted back to the camera
mechanism.
The gear wheel driven by the worm gear is the
Instruction F.2
Section 2
larger of two, screwed together and designated
Gears For Shaft I (47, Fig. 2.2). The smaller gear
drives the larger of a further pair 52 designated
Gears For Shaft 11. The pairs of gears run on
retaining pins tapped into the Large Assembly
Plate; shafts I and I1 have no physical existence,
the terms serving merely to identify the positions
of the gears in the gear train.
The shafts carrying the sprockets (17 and 20,
Fig. 2.1) are designated 111 and IV; they run in
brass bearings passing through the Large Assembly
Plate,andcarryat their right-hand ends gears 27 and
33 (Fig. 2.2) which are driven by the smaller of
the Gears for Shaft 11. Shaft I11 also carries a
second smaller gear which drives the frame and
footage counter.
Lubrication of the camera mechanism is via two
oiling points 15 and 21 (Fig. 2.1), sealed against
the entry of dust by spring-loaded steel balls.
One of these oiling points is in the Retaining Pin
for Shaft I, and a copper pipe conveys oil from it
to the Retaining Pin for Shaft 11. The other is
in a Central Lubrication Pin 29 (Fig. 2.2), from
which copper pipes 31 carry oil to the bearings
for shafts 111 and IV.
The film is held in contact with the sprockets
by the Film Retaining Arm 18 (Fig. 2.1), which is
loaded by a coil spring encircling the retaining
pin on which the arm is pivoted.* The pin is
attached to the Large Assembly Plate by a screw
on the right-hand side of the plate (obscured by
the motor in Fig. 2.2), which can be slackened to
enable the tension of the spring to be adjusted by
rotating the pin. To lace the camera the retaining
arm is swung downwards; a small pin projecting
from the surface of the arm adjacent to the Large
Assembly Plate is then caught by the end of a leaf
spring mounted on the plate, and the arm is thus
held clear of the sprockets. To restore the arm to
its normal position, a knob 19 (Fig. 2.1) is
pressed; the spring-loaded Locking Pin carrying
the knob then pushes down the leaf spring,
disengaging the arm.
Film Strippers are mounted on the Large
Assembly Plate close to the sprockets to ensure
that the film does not cling to the sprockets and
become wrapped around them, as might otherwise
happen should. shrinkage cause the holes in the
film to grip the sprocket teeth.
* No attempt should be made to remove the Film
Retaining Arm while the Large Assembly Plate is in position
in the camera housing, because it is then impossible to
replace the coil spring under proper tension.
The sprockets are integral with the pulleys from
which belt drives are taken to the spool shafts;
the belts are shown in Fig. 2.1.
The footage counter consists of a train of
gearing, driven from the smaller gear on shaft 111
of the mechanism, and supported between the
Large Assembly Plate and a Small Assembly
Plate 53 (Fig. 2.2). The latter is mounted on the
right-hand side of the Large Assembly Plate by
means of three distance pins. The last two shafts
of the gearing run in brass bearings on the Small
Assembly Plate, and their right-hand ends are
fitted with brass bushes. These carry Counter
Drums 26, calibrated in feet and frames. The
drums are free to rotate on the bushes which
carry them, but comp~essionsprings between the
drums and flanges of the bushes give sufficient
friction for this not normally to happen. Knurled
projections on the drums, accessible through
apertures in the camera housing, enable the drums
to be turned manually against the friction due to
the springs to re-set the indications to zero.
A housing 32 mounted at the top of the Large
Assembly Plate carries the tachometer 30; this is
driven from the claw shaft (assembly d) via the
bevel gear 34, and indicates speeds from 0 to 50
frames per second. The instrument does not
operate when the camera is running in reverse.
(c) Switch Assembly
The switch is assembled in a bakelite Switch
Housing, screwed into position at the bottom of
the left-hand compartment of the camera housing.
One wall of the Switch Housing is extended
(58, Fig. 2.3) to form part of the partition dividing
the two compartments.
The switch, which works on a quick-make-andbreak principle, is operated by the vertical movement of a component 16 (designated the Direction
Switch) which projects through the upper wall of
the Switch Housing, and is actuated directly by
the Switch Plunger on the camera door (assembly e
or k). Alternatively, when the camera is fitted with
the pistol grip (Section 4, p. 4.3), the Direction
Switch can be actuated by the Switch Lever; this
is a shaft, rocking in a bearing hole in the Switch
Housing, and carrying an arm a t each end. One
arm 68, inside the assembly, engages with the
Direction Switch and is biased by a compression
spring 67 to maintain the switch in its Off condition. The second arm 69 (Fig. 2.4), which is in
the right-hand compartment of the camera housing,
Instruction F.2
Section 2
place in the Switch Housing. The lead via which
the take-up motor in the 400-ft magazine is supplied
is connected to the spring blade by a small brass
clamp 70 with two set-screws.
The switch assembly is protected against the
entry of dust by a pressed sheet metal cover
retained in position by a single screw.
receives the upward thrust of a plunger working
in a longitudinal hole through the fixing screw of
the pistol grip. (The fixing screw mates with the
1nserting.Plate on the camera housing and projects
through into the interior of the housing.)
The moving contact of the switch is carried by
a contact spring 65 (Fig. 2.3) which is coupled to
the Direction Switch 16 by a compression spring
and the Switch Fork 66; the Switch Fork is a
bifurcated stud with a slotted head, which threads
the compression spring and serves to support it.
A second branch 62 of the contact spring carries
a pin 63 which projects through the wall of the
Switch Housing to make contact with one of the
contact pins (in assembly a) to which the battery
lead is connected. This contact is maintained by
a compressicn spring in an Insulation Sleeve 64
acting between the contact spring and a projection
moulded on the interior of the Switch Housing.
Fig. 2.3
(d) Film Shutter and Transport Mechanism
The components of this mechanism are assembled
on the Transport Mechanism Housing, which is
positioned forward in the camera housing behind
the lens turret. The assembly includes the camera
gate, with its associated film guides and runners,
the register and transporl claws, Lhe mirror reflex
shutter, and the rotathg parts by which these
items are actuated.
Switch Assembly, viewed from left-hand side,
with cover removed
Fig. 2.4
(The second contact pin is earthed to the camera
housing.)
The fixed ends of the two branches of the
contact spring are riveted together to a small
bakelite block 60, which is clamped in a slot in
the Switch Housing by a grubscrew tapped into
the housing. The ends of the two branches are
shaped to project slightly from the side of the slot
and form a contact point 61 via whicha connection
is made to the slating units of two of the sound
systems which can be used in conjunction with the
camera.
The fixed contact is mounted on the Contact
Bridge 59 which connects it t o a spring blade 71
(Fig. 2.4) projecting through the wall of the
Switch Housing into the right-hand compartnent
of the camera, to make contact with a stud on
the motor. The Contact Bridge is riveted into
Switch Assembly, viewed from right-hand
side
The aperture 79 (Fig. 2.5) of the gate is cut in
the Film Aperture Plate, which is mounted on the
Transport Mechanism Housing. The plate has
raised highly-polished areas 80 along its edges and
surrounding the aperture; these are the only parts
which touch the surface of the film, and their area
is made as small as possible. The transport claw
75 works through a slot in the plate, and a hole
receives the tip of the register claw 77 when it is
inserted into a sprocket hole of the film.
This hole in the plate is close to the aperture,
and the claw has a polished surface which could
reflect stray light on to the film; a small Cover is
therefore attached (by a single screw) to the
Transport Mechanism Housing, in front of the
hole, to prevent light from falling on the claw.
The surface of the Transport Mechanism Housing
has a dull black finish to prevent reflection of stray
2.5
Instruction F.2
Section 2
light, and as an additional precaution the region
surrounding the aperture has a stepped configuration which makes all parts of its surface either
normal to or parallel with rays of light from the
lens.
A rigidly-mounted polished strip (the Side
Runner Guide) (74, Fig. 2.5) gives lateral support
Fig. 2.5
between the ends of the runner and pins which
traverse the right-hand ends of the holes.
The film is pressed against the Film Aperture
Plate by the Back Pressure Plate, which has raised
polished areas corresponding to those on the
aperture plate; suitably placed cut-outs are provided for the operation of the register and transport
Film Shutter and Transport Mechanism
to the right-hand edge of the film, which is pressed
against it by a second strip 73 (the Film Side
Tension Runner). This runner floats on two pins
supported between the Transport Mechanism
Housing and a Retaining Plate 72, and is springloaded against the edge of the film by two tension
springs. The springs are accommodated in holes
in the Transport Mechanism Housing, and act
claws. The Back Pressure Plate is loosely mounted
on the Back Pressure Hinge 22 (Fig. 2.1), which
is a cover, having at each end of one of its edges
a lug bent at right-angles. Through these lugs,
screws are tapped into a projection on the Transport
Mechanism Housing, forming hinges. (The same
screws secure the Side Runner Guide 74, Fig. 2.5.)
A sprung Locking Lever on the Back Pressure
Instruction F.2
Section 2
Hinge, which engages with a notch in the Film
Side Tension Runner retaining plate 72, holds the
cover in its closed position. A double-ended leaf
compression spring attached to the Back Pressure
Plate and acting between it and the Back Pressurc
Hinge provides the necessary thrust to hold the
pressure plate against the film.
The drive from the motor is transmitted by
bevel gearing (45, 46, Fig. 2.2) from the driving
shaft in the camera mechanism to the Claw Shaft
36 in the film shutter and transport mechanism.
The Claw Shaft is mounted vertically in ballraces,
which are supported in the Transport Mechanism
Housing in corrugated Insulation Strips similar to
those described on page 2.3. On the shaft are
mounted (counting from its lower end) the bevel
gear 45 by which it is driven, a cam 44 (Fig. 2.5)
which actuates the transport claw, the worm gear
41 which drives the shutter and the camera
mechanism, a cam 35 which actuates the register
claw, and a bevel gear 34 which drives the
tachometer.
The transport claw 75 is formed by one end of
an arm, the central region of which is expanded
into an annulus encircling the cam 44; this cam
is approximately cylindrical, and is mounted
eccentically on the Claw Shaft. The other end of
the arm is mounted on the Transport Mechanism
Housing by a universal joint 43 which permits the
claw to move both vertically, and horizontally in
a direction perpendicular to the plane of the film.
Rollers, carried on pins 42 projecting from the
inner surface of the annulus, engage with a groove
cut in the curved surface of the cam. The path of
this groove is such as to impart the required
vertical component to the motion of the claw, the
horizontal component being due to the eccentricity
of the cam with respect to the Claw Shaft. The
transport claw is on the side of the film towards
the lens and works through a slot in the Film
Aperture Plate.
The shutter 40 (Fig. 2.2), which consists of a
rotating disk of mirrored glass with two verticallyopposite quadrants cut away, is set between the
lens and the camera gate at an angle of 45 degrees
to the axis of symmetry of the lens. The relative
timing of the movement of the various parts of
the mechanism is so arranged that the pull-down
of the film occurs while the shutter is closed, i.e.,
while the remaining quadrants of the disk are
interposed between the lens and the film, preventing
the passage of light. In this position these
quadrants direct the light from the lens into the
Viewfinder (assembly e or k). Each quadrant is
divided into two parts by a stripe of black paint
applied to the mirror surface ; in this way, the
frequency of flicker in the viewfinder image is
doubled and persistance of vision renders it
imperceptible, even when the camera is running
at less than normal speed.
While the film is stationary in the gate, the
rotation of the shutter brings one of the excised
quadrants between the lens and the gate, allowing
the passage of light snd the exposure of a frame of
film. The exposure time is 1/50 second a t the
television film speed of 25 frames per second.
The shutter is clamped to a smaller wheel 39
(the Bearing Bracket) by a large-headed screw
tapped into the end of the shaft on which the
Bearing Bracket is mounted. To prevent the shutter
from rotating on this shaft, a screw, fitted with a
rubber sleeve, passes through a hole in the shutter
and is tapped into the Bearing Bracket. The
shaft runs in ballraces 38, which are supported
in the Transport Mechanism Housing in corrugated
Insulation Strips similar to those described on
page 2.3. It is driven via a gear which meshes with
the worm gear on the Claw Shaft.
The same worm gear also drives the larger of
the Gears for Shaft I of the camera mechanism
(assembly b), already described.
The register claw 77 (Fig. 2.5) is inserted into
a sprocket hole of the film after each pull-down,
and remains there during the following exposure
period; this is to hold the film steady during the
exposure of the frame, and to ensure accurate
registration should double-exposure work be undertaken. The claw fits the sprocket holes closely
only in the longitudinal direction; lateral location
of the film is provided by the Side Runner Guide
and the Film Side Tension Runner, as described
above. The claw is formed by the bent-over tip of
one of two arms projecting from a sleeve 37
carried by a pillar tapped into the Transport
Mechanism Housing. The second arm carries a
Guiding Roller, on a Retaining Pin engaging
with a groove in the Register Cam 35. This cam
is a brass wheel, with a groove cut in one of its
plane surfaces; the shape of the groove is such as
to rock the sleeve on its pillar, moving the claw
in the required manner as the cam rotates.
The register claw is on the side of the film away
from the lens, and works through a cut-out in the
Back Pressure Plate.
The tachometer, driven by the bevel gear 34, is
part of assembly (b), the camera mechanism.
Instruction F.2
Section 2
are held with their axes of symmetry mutually
divergent, so that a physically short, wide-angle
lens can be used alongside larger ones without
danger of optical interference. The lens mounts
fit into three sockets in the turret. The parts of
the mounts in contact with the turret are the focus
rings, which must rotate; the sockets therefore
form bearing surfaces, and each lens is retained in
position by a pair of spring-loaded Lens Retaining
(e) Camera Door and Viewfinder
This has been superseded by the redesigned New
Camera Door and Viewfinder (assembly k), which
is fitted to the great majority of cameras in use
by the BBC. The differences between the two
assemblies are small, except for the provision of a
detachable eyepiece on the new Viewfinder in
place of the former fixed one; therefore no
description of the original door and viewfinder is
Fig. 2.6
Lens Turret, viewed from rear, with one lens fitted
given in this Instruction. The components of
assembly (e) are listed on pages 20 and 21 of the
manufacturers' Spare Part List, a copy of which is
held at Camera Maintenance Section, Television
Film Studios, Ealing.
Clips 85 (Fig. 2.6) at the rear of the turret, which
ride in a groove in the focus ring as this turns.
The cell of the lens mount is prevented from
turning by a Lens Mount Key 84; this is an angle
bracket, one arm of which is screwed to the rear
face of the turret, while the other fits into a keyway in the cell of the mount. (See Section 3.)
Each of the Lens Retaining Clips is mounted on
Lens Turret
This accommodates up to three lenses, which
(f)
2.8
Instruction F.2
Section 2
Stud, which is mounted on the camera housing
and passes through a central bush 81 in the turret.
A brass ring (the Turret Bearing Insert) riveted to
the camera housing forms a bearing surface for
the periphery of the turret, and contains three
notches into which Turret Indexing Wheels 82,
on Turret Indexing Plungers, are pressed by compression springs to give a definite stable position
a short stud which passes through a brass bush in
the turret and is part of a Lens Releasing Lever.
The Lens Releasing Levers (88, Fig. 2.7) have
upturned knurled tabs; by pressing the pair of
tabs of the levers associated with a given lens
between a finger and thumb, the Lens Retaining
Clips are withdrawn against the pressure of their
springs to permit the fitting or removal of a lens.
Fig. 2.7
General View of Camera
of the turret when it is turned to bring any one of
the lenses into the taking position. The Turret
Indexing Wheels, Turret Indexing Plungers and
compression springs are accommodated in holes
drilled radially in the edge of the turret.
Three Turret Levers 83, by means of which the
turret can be rotated, are located in dovetailed
Anti-reflection Masks 86 (Fig. 2.6), consisting
of triangular sheet-metal screens finished dull
black, are riveted to the rear face of the turret,
between lenses, to prevent reflection of stray light
on to the film from the mounts and associated
fittings of the lenses not in the taking position.
The turret is rotatable about the Lens Turret
2.9
Instruction F.2
Section 2
slots in the edge of the casting and secured by
screws. The levers project slightly beyond the
edge of the turret, so that whichever lens is in the
taking position, one of the levers is visible to the
operator from behind the camera. They are
marked with one, two or three engraved dots to
serve as a reminder of which lens is in use.
The taking position is on the right-hand side of
the turret, the other two positions being vertically
in line on the left-hand side. To ensure that the
axis of symmetry of the lens in the taking position
is normal to the plane of the film despite the
divergent mounting of the lenses on the turret, the
Lens Turret Stud and the Turret Bearing lnsert are
set at a slight angle to the principal dimensions
of the camera housing.
(g) Matte Box
This comprises the sunshade bellows and twin
receptacles for filter holders, supported on the
Aluminium Square Runner 87 (Fig. 2.7). The
runner is fitted a t one end with a Locating Plate
90 which mates with the Matte Eox Bracket 89
on the camera housing, and is locked in position
by the Ccnnecting Rod. One end of the rod forms
a knurled locking screw 101 working in a tapped
insert at the forward end of the runner; when
tightened, it drives the other end of the rod into
a depression in the Matte Box Bracket.
The two ends of the bellows are supported on
the Large Bellows Frame 100 and the Small Metal
Frame 99. These have integral brackets forming
square-sectioned, tubular guides which slide on the
runner, and may be locked in any desired positions
by the knurled Adjusting Screws 102.
As well as supporting the bellows, the Small
Metal Frame is one of the filter holder receptacles.
The filter holder slides into grooves machined in
projecting flanges on this frame. A second filter
holder receptacle, the Metal Frame 98, is secured
to the Small Metal Frame by the Filter Retaining
Brass Ring, which is screwed and pinned to the
Metal Frame and has a stepped edge engaging
with the inversely shaped edge of the circular
opening in the Small Metal Frame. By this arrangement, the Metal Frame can be rotated with respect
to the remainder of the camera about a central
axis normal to the planes of the filters; hence
polarised filters can be employed for the production
of fades and dissolves.
A tapped hole in the edge of the Metal Frame,
at one corner, accepts a handle 97 (the Rotating
Grip) by which the frame can be rotated. A pin
projecting from the surface of the Metal Frame
moves in an arc-shaped groove in the surface of
the Small Metal Frame; the length of the groove
determines the extent of rotation, which is of the
order of 120 degrees.
The filters available from the manufacturers of
the camera have optical characteristics which are
unfamiliar to British practice, and they are therefore not used by the BBC. Instead, standard
two-inch square glass filters are used, in duralumin
holders manufactured by Rank Precision Industries,
Ltd., and designated 2-inch Square Filter Trays.
(h) Motor (Variable-speed)
This motor contains an internal rheostat, by
which the film speed can be varied between
approximately five and fifty frames per second.
The rheostat is operated by rotating the Resistance
Control Cover 55 (Fig. 2.2) enclosing the rear of
the motor. The cover is engraved with an arbitrary
scale which can be read against a cursor line 54
adjacent to it on the motor case; thus particular
settings of the control can be noted for future
repetition. An Inching Knob 57 is provided at the
rear of the motor to enable the camera mechanism
to be turned slowly by hand. Concentric with the
Inching Knob is the larger-diameter Motor
Forward/Reverse Knob 56, engraved R-F.
The motor shaft carries a barrel-shaped collar
which is a push fit in the rubber coupling 51 carried
by the driving shaft of the camera mechanism
(assembly b), forming a friction drive.
The e!ectrical conneztions to the motor are via
an insulated contact stud on the forward end of
the motor case, and the case itself. The stud
makes contact with a branch 71 (Fig. 2.4) of the
Contact Bridge of the switch assembly (assembly c)
when the motor is in position in the camera. A
pin on the motor case engages in a corresponding
notch in the camera housing to ensure that the
motor is inserted with the correct axial alignment
for this contact to be made. The Locking Lever
mentioned on page 2.1 ensures good electrical
contact between the case of the motor and the
camera housing.
(j) Motor (Governor Speed-controlled)
This motor lacks the speed-control and reversing
facilities of that described as assembly (h), and is
fitted instead with a simple centrifugal governor.
The parts forming this are mounted on a plexiglass
disk 104 (Fig. 2.8) having a central bush by which
it is secured to the motor shaft. A pivoted arm 105
Instruction F.2
Section 2
carries a contact at its free end which is drawn
by a tension spring 107 against a further, fixed,
contact 106 carried by a bracket mounted on the
disk. The spring is anchored to a threaded stud
108 which is tapped into a metal bar 111 mounted
(Alternatively, it may be found more convenient
to remove the bright metal cap 112 and the ribbed
end-cap of the motor together, after withdrawing
the two countersunk screws securing the end-cap
to the motor body.) The inching knob 109 is
ria
Fig. 2.8
107
Governor Speed-controlled Motor : construction of centrifugal governor
on the disk; the stud is adjustable in the bar to
vary the tension in the spring, and is retained at a
chosen setting by a locknut 110.
The centrifugal governor is at the rear of the
motor, directly beneath a bright metal endcap
112 which can be unscrewed from the motor case
when the Inching Knob has been removed.
integral with a short length of shaft having a
threaded tip which screws into the end 103 of the
motor shaft.
In other respects, the motor is similar to the
variable-speed motor (assembly h), above. The
method of adjusting the centrifugal governor is
described in Section 5.
Instruction F.2
Section 2
The governor speed-controlled motor is distinguishable visually from the variable-speed motor
chiefly by the bright-metal end-cap which covers
the centrifugal governor and by the absence of a
Motor ForwardIReverse Knob.
The cover,
although having a similar ribbed appearance to the
Resistance Control Cover of the variable-speed
motor, is not rotatable and carries no engraved
scale.
(k) New Camera Door and Viewfinder
The camera door is a light-alloy casting, the
shape of which provides a receptacle for the
Viewfinder; it carries also the levers by which the
camera motor is started and stopped. It is referred
to as the new camera door to distinguish it from
one of earlier design (assembly e) having a different
type of Viewfinder and other minor differences.
The door is completely separable from the camera
housing; when closed, it is located by two pins on
the housing and locked by three levers which are
mounted inside the door and are moved longitudinally (by the rotation of a central plate on
which they are pivoted) to enter notches in the
rim of the camera housing. The three levers and
the plate together constitute the Locking Lever.
The Locking Lever is actuated by the Camera
Door Latch 91 (Fig. 2.7), a winged knob on the
outside of the door; the Open and Closed positions
of the latch are indicated by letters 0 and C (or
A and 2) respectively engraved on the door.
The greater part of the viewfinder optical system
is contained in a tube, called the Viewfinder.
This has an external thread at one end which mates
with a corresponding internal thread in the viewfinder receptacle on the camera door. It is
prevented from unscrewing by a grubscrew tapped
into the wall of the viewfinder receptacle (inside
the door).
The Viewfinder is fitted with a captive knurled
ring 95 of bright metal by which the detachable
eyepiece (the Viewer) is secured in place. When
the eyepiece is removed, a ground glass screen at
the end of the Viewfinder is revealed, on which
the viewfinder image is formed. The eyepiece is
focused on this image by rotating a castellated
ring 94 (finished black) fitted with a locking pin
by which it can be secured at the optimum setting
for the eye of a given operator. A Rubber Eye
Piece 93 is fitted to the eyepiece, and because it
is possible for light from a bright source to enter
the camera through a viewfinder of the reflex type
and fog the film, a small hinged cover (the
Reflection Cover for Viewfinder) is provided to
close the eyepiece when it is not in use.
Light from the mirror shutter is directed into
the Viewfinder by a small lens (designated the
Ground Glass by the manufacturers) and a prism
78 (Fig. 2.5) which reflects the light through the
necessary angle. These two elements are mounted
in the Prism Holder 76 on the Retaining Plate 72
of the Film Side Tension Runner (part of assembly
d) to the left of the aperture 79 of the gate.
A hole drilled obliquely downwards from a point
above the Viewfinder receptacle through the door
and a cast projection from its inner surface carries
the Switch Plunger. This is a pin, having its lower
end formed into a knob which presses on the
Direction Switch 16 (Figs. 2.1, 2.3) of the switch
assembly, and its upper end tapped into the
Switch Pin, which couples it to the Switch Lever 92
(Fig. 2.7). The Switch Plunger is spring-loaded to
its raised (Off) position, and is held down, after
the Switch Lever has been pressed to start the
motor, by the Switch Fixing Lever 96 which is
spring-loaded to enter a notch in the Switch Pin.
The motor is stopped by pressing the Switch
Fixing Lever, disengaging it from the Switch Pin
and allowing the plunger to rise.
A large-headed screw, the Fixing Screw For
L-Shaped Piece, is tapped into the inner surface
of the camera door at a point level with and to
the rear of the Viewfinder, and projects through to
form a pin which locates the primsmatic doubleelbow assembly employed when the camera is
fitted in the blimp. A grubscrew tapped into the
head of the fixing screw bites into the surface of
the camera door to lock the fixing screw in position.
Batteries
Either type of camera motor is powered by an
8-volt battery of Varley dry secondary cells Type
PT7/7 or PT7/9. They are housed in a metal box
of BBC design, fitted with a leather strap carrying
handle and a Cannon connector Type EP-2-13.
The battery is connected to the camera by a lead
having at one end a Cannon connector Type
EP-2-12 which mates with that on the battery box,
and at the other a two-way female connector which
mates with a corresponding male connector on the
camera housing. The connection to the camera
housing is non-reversible.
The capacity of a battery of cells Type PT7/7
is sufficient for the exposure of about 2,000 ft of
film; the cells Type PT7/9 have a slightly greater
capacity.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 3
LENS MOUNTS
General
Lenses f o ~use with the Arriflex 16-mm camera
must be fitted in the Arriflex type of lens mount,
which is illustrated in Fig. 3.1. Within the BBC,
the camera is normally issued with a set of Taylor,
Taylor & Hobson Kinetal lenses in this type of
mount, of barious focal lengths in the range
between 12-5 mm (45 degrees horizontal angle of
view) and 150 mm (4 degrees). In some instances,
a Berthiot Pan-Cinor or Angenieux zoom lens is
included to cover part of the range with greater
flexibility.
Lenses issued with different cameras should not
normally be interchanged unless means are to
hand for checking the accuracy of focus.
The lens mounts are supported in sockets
formed by tubular holes in the lens turret of the
camera (Fig. 2.7). The part of each lens mount
in contact with the turret is the focus ring 115
(Fig. 3.1), which forms a bearing surface against
the wall of the socket. The mount is retained in
position by spring-loaded clips on the turret which
ride in a groove 114 in the focus ring. The cell
of the mount is prevented from rotating by a lens
mount key on the turret which engages with a
keyway 1 13 in the cell.
The focus ring is fitted with a pair of metal ears
117, which provide a convenient finger grip by
which to manipulate it. The ears are secured by
screws tapped into the ring; in some instances an
extra pair of tapped holes, filled by masking screws,
is provided to give corresponding alternative
mounting positions for the focus-ring ears. The
focus ring is calibrated with a scale of units of
distance (feet or metres); the scale is read against
a white paint-filled dot on the rim of the socket
of the lens turret. The focus rings of some lens
mounts have twin scales, in feet and metres; such
mounts are provided with two keyways in the cell
so that they can be inserted in the turret with
alternative axial alignments, 180 degrees apart, to
bring either of the two scales into use.
'The lens mount contains an iris mechanism,
coupled to a rotatable knurled rung 116 on the
mount, forward of the focus ring. The iris ring
is calibrated in T or f numbers, and the scale is
read against a cursor line engraved on an adjacent
part of the cell of the mount.
Cleaning and Lubrication
Dust must be removed from the front and rear
surfaces of the lenses by means of a camel hair
brush; the brush should be cleaned, if it becomes
greasy, by being washed in ether and allowed to
Fig. 3.1
Lens Mount for use with Arriflex Cameras
dry at ambient temperature. When the lens surfaces
have been freed from dust they can be wiped clean
with a Selvyt cloth, which itself must be clean. (If
InstructionJP.2
Section 3
no Selvyt cloth is available, a cotton handkerchief
or similar well-washed lint-free cloth can be used.)
If grease is present the cloth should be moistened
with ether or with a proprietary lens cleaner
(e.g., May and Baker's Solution 10); industrial
methylated spirit should not be used because it
has a fairly high water content. If the greasy
deposit is heavy it may be necessary to use benzine
first and then to remove the residual smear with
ether or lens cleaner. The minimum quantity of
all solvents should be used, because any excess
may flow into the cell bore and remove the black
colouring matter from the edges of the lens
elements; this would result in increased internal
reflection and consequent loss of image contrast.
The cleaning process should be completed by a
final wipe with a clean dry cloth and the removal
of any lint particles by means of the camel hair
brush.
Lens mounts must not be dismantled; if any
repair is needed they should be returned to the
manufacturers.
The focus and iris rings should be lubricated
with Ragosine Molydest 50 grease. Particular
attention must be paid to the lubrication of the
focus rings of mounts issued for use with a blimped
camera; any friction in these may result in the
camera being rocked on its floating base in the
blimp when the follow-focus mechanism is
operated.
Instrnction F.2
Page reissued October 1962
SECTION 4
OPERATION
1. To Load the Camera
Turn the Camera Door Latch from C to 0
and remove the door.
Place a spool of film on the upper shaft,
pushing it well home so that the square
section of the shaft enters the square hole
in one of the spool cheeks, and the spool is
retained in position by the ball catches in the
shaft.
Draw about a foot of film from the spool.
Open the Back Pressure Hinge of the camera
gate by pressing the Locking Knob to the
right.
Pull the Film Retaining Arm downward
until it is caught by the spring provided for
the purpose.
Ensure that the register claw is clear of its
hole in the aperture plate, turning the Inching
Knob of the motor if necessary to make it so.
Thread the film first around the upper
sprocket, then through the gate (between the
register pin and the aperture plate), and
finally around the lower sprocket.
Ensure that there are adequate loops of film
above and below the gate, then fit the sprocket holes of the film over the teeth of the
sprockets and release the Film Retaining
Arm by pressing the Locking Pin.
W i d the loose end of film on to the take-up
spool, attaching it either by a small piece
of adhesive. tape or by inserting it into the
slot provided.
1.lo. old the film against the aperture plate by
the pressure of a finger at each end of the plate
and slide it longitudinally until a sprocket
hole is exactly under the tip of the register
claw, then turn the Inching Knob of the motor
until the claw enters the sprocket hole and
thus holds the film in position.
1.1 1. Close the Back Pressure Hinge.
1.12. Check that the mechanism is functioning
correctly by turning the Inching Knob of
the motor to pull a few frames of film
through the camera. Ensure that the loops
of film above and below the gate do not
touch the upper spool or the bottom of the
camera housing at any time during the
exposure of a frame. Connect the battery
and check the direction of rotation of the
motor in accordance with 2.2 below. Run
the motor by pressing down the Direction
Switch (16, Figs. 2.1 and 2.4) of the switch
assembly with the tip of a finger, and watch
the passage of a few feet of film through the
camera.
1.13. Press the Switch Fixing Lever 96 (Fig. 2.7)
on the camera door, to ensure that the Switch
Plunger is in its raised position; failure to
take this precaution may result in damage
to the Switch Plunger when the door is replaced on the camera.
1.14. Replace the camera door, and turn the
Camera Door Latch from 0 to C. (Note:if more than one camera is to hand, do not
interchange camera doors; they are readily
indentifiable by the serial numbers engraved
on them and on the camera housings.)
1.15. Set the frame and footage counters to zero.
2. To Operate the Camera Motor
2.1. Connect the camera battery by means.of the
lead provided, which mates with the two-pin
connector at the bottom left-hand rear of the
camera housing.
2.2. If the variable-speed motor is being used,
check that the Motor Forward/Reverse Knob
is turned as far as it will go in the appropriate direction.
2.3. If the camera is loaded with film, gently
turn the Knurled Knobs of the spool shafts
as far as they will go in the directions indicated by the arrows engraved on the camera
housing; this takes up any loops of film
between the spools and the sprockets and
thus avoids any risk of film breakage due
to the sudden tightening of such slack a m .
I~utructionF.2
Section 4
Page reissued Ocrober 1962
2.4.
Start the motor by pressing the Switch
Lever 92 (Fig. 2.7).
2.5. If the variable-speed motor is being used,
adjust the speed of the film to the required
rate by rotating the Resistance Control
Cover 55 of the motor, until the required
film speed is indicated by the tachometer.
(Note:- (a) The tachometer gives no indication when the camera is running in reverse.
(b) The unloaded camera must not be run
at high speeds.)
2.6. Stop the motor by pressing the Switch
Fixing Lever 96.
3. To Change the Camera Motor
3.1. Turn the Locking Lever anticlockwise, and
withdraw the motor from the camera housing.
3.2. Insert the replacement motor, taking care
that the pin in the side of the motor is in
line with the notch provided for it in the
camera housing, at the edge of the motor
receptacle and close to the battery connector.
Push the motor well home until the pin
enters the notch.
3.3. Turn the Locking Lever clockwise until it is
tight, securing the motor in position.
4. To Fit Lenses to the Turret
Up to three lenses in Arriflex-type lens mounts
can be carried on the turret simultaneously; the
lens mounts fit into sockets in the turret which are
otherwise fitted with dust-excluding sovers.
Grasp the pair of Lens ~ e l e a s i nLevers
~
88
(Fig. 2.7) on opposite sides of a socket between the finger and thumb of one hand and
squeeze them together; with the other hand,
remove the cover from the socket.
Inspect the socket, and note the position of
the Lens Mount Key 84 (Fig. 2.6), which is
visible as a metal tongue close to and parallel
with the side of the socket.
Inspect the lens mount, and note the position
of the keyway 113 (Fig. 3.1), into which the
Lens Mount Key must be fitted.
Maintaining the pressure on the Lens Locking
Levers, drop the lens mount into the socket,
taking care that its axial alignment is such
that the Lens Mount Key enters the keyway
in the required manner.
Release the pressure on the Lens Releasing
Levers, and check that the lens mount is
held in position in the socket, and that the
focus ring can be rotated freely.
Some lens mounts will be found to have two
keyways; these correspond to two focus calibrations, in feet and metres, and permit the lens
mount to be inserted in the turret with two axial
alignments, 180 degrees apart, to bring the desired
calibration into proximity with the white paintfilled engraved dot on the rim of the socket which
serves as a cursor.
5. To Remove Lenses from the Turret
5.1. Grasp the pair of Lens Releasing Levers on
opposite sides of the socket containing the
lens between the linger and tbumb of one
hand, squeeze them together, and lift out the
lens.
5.2. Insert the dust-excluding cover provided in
place of the lens.
The turret can be rotated by means of the three
Turret Levers 83 (Fig. 2.7)' and has three stable
seating positions, each of which brings one of
the three lenses into use. The taking position
for a lens is on !he right-hand side of the turret
the other two positions being vertically in line on
the left-hand side. Whichever of the three lenses
is in the taking position, one of the Turret Levers
is visible to the operator from his position behind
the camera, and the levers are marked with one,
two or three engraved dots to indicate which lens
is in use.
6. To Adjust the Focus and Aperture of a Lens
Apply the right eye to the Rubber Eye Piece
of the Viewfinder; if nothing can be seen,
the Mirror Shutter is probably open, and
should be closed by turning the Inching
Knob on the motor.
Adjust the focus of the Viewfinder eyepiece
by rotating the castellated ring 94 (Fig. 2.7)
to obtain the sharpest possible image of the
grain of the ground glass focusing screen.
Adjust the focus of the lens by rotating the
rear one of the two knurled rings on the
mount. This ring is fitted with a pair of
metal ears 117 (Fig. 3.1) ; when the camera is
hand-held, a finger of the operator's right
hand can rest between these, enabling the
focus to be adjusted while the scene is
viewed through the lens by means of the
reflex shutter viewfinder. The focus ring is
calibrated, and its setting can be read against
a mark on the turret.
Adjust the aperture of the lens by rotating
the forward one (116, Fig. 3.1) of the two
Instruction F.2
Section 4
knurled rings on the mount. This ring is
calibrated, and its setting can be read
against a cursor line on the adjacent fixed
portion of the mount.
7. To Fit the Matte Box
Loosen the Adjusting Screws 102 (Fig. 2.7)
on the Large Bellows Frame and the Small
Metal Frame to enable these frames to slide
freely on the Aluminium Square Runner 87,
and so to clear the lens mount.
Insert the Locating Plate 90 of the runner
into the Matte Box Bracket 89 on the camera
housing.
Lock the runner in position by tightening the
knurled locking screw 101 at its forward end.
Slide the Small Metal Frame 99 as far
towards the lens as possible, to give the
maximum exclusion of stray light, and lock
it in position on the runner by tightening the
Adjusting Screw.
Slide the Large Bellows Frame 100 as far
forward as possible without causing
vignetting (check for this by viewing the
scene through the viewfinder). Lock the
frame in position on the runner by tightening
the Adjusting Screw.
8. To Insert Filter Holders into the Matte Box
Filter holders can be inserted into the Metal
Frame and/or the Small Metal Frame.
8.1. Slightly raise the Filter Retaining Spring on
the appropriate frame, slide the filter holder
into the grooves provided, and release the
spring, which will grip the filter holder and
retain it in position.
9. TO Sight the Camera (Hand-held Operation)
Grasp the camera housing firmly in the right
hand, so that the moulded
on the
right-hand side lies between the base of the
thumb and forefinger, and the fingers reach
forward around the front of the housing to
manipulate the focus adjustment of the lens
in the taking position.
Place the palm of the left hand around the
Viewfinder housing tube on the camera door,
with the thumb pointing backwards along the
underside of the tube, and the 6ngers reaching
upwards to manipulate the Switch Lever and
the Switch Fixing Lever (92 and 96, Fig. 2.7.).
Raise the camera to eye level, and place the
Rubber Eye Piece of the Viewfinder eyepiece
to the right eye.
Focus the lens and if necessary the Viewfinder
eyepiece, and set the aperture of the lens, as
described on pages 4.2 and 4.3.
Start and stop the camera motor, as
necessary, by means of the Switch Lever and
the Switch Fixing Lever. Whenever possible,
take up slack film by means of the Knurled
Knobs on the spool shafts before starting
the motor.
A more comfortable hold for the left hand is
provided by the pistol grip, if available. This is
screwed into the Inserting Plate at the bottom of
the camera housing, and the screw has an axial
bore containing a plunger, coupled to a trigger on
the grip, which actuates a lever on the switch
assembly to switch on the camera motor. The
trigger is suitably positioned for operation by the
thumb of the left hand.
To fit the pistol grip, first rotate the locking
ring anticlockwise as far as possible (viewing
the grip from the bottom end of the handle).
Pierce the rubber seal at the inner end of the
appropriate hole in the Inserting Plate on the
camera housing, to allow the passage of the
plunger.
Screw the pistol grip into the Inserting Plate
as far as it will go, then unscrew it a fraction
of a turn, if necessary, to enable it to fit into
the hand comfortably when the camera is
held in its working position.
Turn the locking ring clockwise by means of
the lever tapped into it, to lock the pistol
grip solidly in place on the camera housing.
Tripod-mounted Operation
The camera can be mounted on a suitable tripod
and when it is thus solidly supported it may not
be necessary for the operator to use the viewfinder continuously. In this circumstance the
Reflection Cover of the Viewfinder eyepiece should
be closed to prevent the entry of light from any
bright source (e.g., direct horizontal sunlight or
powerful artificial light) behind the camera.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 5
MAINTENANCE
Dismantling the Camera
The following points should be remembered when
the camera is being dismantled:(a) The Turret Indexing Wheels, Turret Indexing
Plungers and compression springs (p. 2.9)
are accommodated in holes drilled radially
in the edge of the turret, and are retained in
position only by their contact with the Turret
Bearing Insert. Care must therefore be exercised when the turret is removed to ensure that
these components are not ejected by the
springs and possibly lost.
(b) When the camera mechanism is being removed
from the camera housing, the Back Pressure
Plate must be removed from the Back Pressure
Hinge (p. 2.6), to enable the Back Pressure
Hinge to be swung past its normal closed position. If the plate is not removed, the Locking
Knob of the Back Pressure Hinge fouls the
Large Assembly Plate of the camera mechanism.
(c) The Film Retaining Arm (page 2.4) must not
be removed from the Large Assembly Plate
of the camera mechanism unless time and
facilities are available to remove the camera
mechanism from the camera housing, because
the tension in the spring which thrusts the arm
against the sprockets must be adjusted by turning the retaining pin which carries the arm,
and this can only be done by loosening a screw,
on the right-hand side of the Large Assembly
Plate, which secures the pin to the plate.
NoTE:-T~~ hole in the plate in which the
pin is seated is over-sized, to enable the pin to
be moved before it is tightened, to fit the arm
closely against both sprockets.
(d) The Viewiinder screws into its receptacle in
the camera door, and is locked by a Securing
Screw tapped into the wall of the receptacle
from the inside of the door. Special tools are
necessary for the removal of the Viewfinder,
and this should not normally be attempted
owing to the risk of altering the optical distance
between the camera lens and the ground glass
screen in the Viewfinder. The result of such
an alteration would be that a sharp viewfinder
image would be obtained at a camera-lensfocus
setting giving an image of inferior focus on the
film.For the same reason the doors of different
cameras must not be interchanged because the
Viewfinder of each is set up accurately for use
with its own camera, and there may be small
dimensional differences between individual
equipments.
Adjusting the Centrifugal Governor of the Governor
Speedcontrolled Motor
The governor speed-controlled motor is stable in
use, and the need for this adjustment is rare.
Before any attempt is made to correct the film speed
by adjusting the governor, there must be no doubt
that the need for correction is not due to faulty
batteries, stiffness in the camera mechanism, or
some other abnormal condition. If possible,
another motor should be substituted and only if
the correct film speed is obtained using this should
the adjustment of a suspect motor be contemplated.
A possible reason for the adjustment having to
be made is the fitting of a new motor, set to run
at the standard motion-picture film speed of 24
frames per second, which must be adjusted to run
at the televisibn film speed of 25 frames per second.
The adiustment procedure is as follows:
~ e m & ethe mbtor from the camera.
Grip the collar on the motor shaft to prevent
the shaft from turning, and turn the Inching
Knob anticlockwise; the knob and a short
length of shaft will unscrew from the remainder
of the motor shaft.
Unscrew the bright metal cap from the rear end
of the motor cover. (Alternatively, withdraw
the two countersunk screws securing the ribbed
endcap of the motor to the motor body, and
remove the bright metal cap and the end-cap
together.) The plexiglass disk carrying the
centrifugal governor will then be revealed;
the governor is described on pages 2.10 and
2.1 1, and Fig. 2.8 shows its construction.
Loosen the nut 110 locking the threaded stud
108 to which the tension spring 107 is anchored,
and slightly adjust the stud in the metal bar I 1 I
Instruction F.2
Section 5
Page reissued Ocrober 1962
flat surface of a chisel-ended cocktail stick dipped
in acetone. The surfaces should then be polished
gently with a soft cloth or chamois leather.
The reflecting surface of the Mirror Shutter
should be cleaned with a soft camel hair brush.
It must not be touched with the fingers.
by means of the screwdriver slot in its end.
Clockwise rotation will decrease the tension in
the spring, causing the motor to be governed
to a lower speed; anticlockwise rotation will
have the reverse effect.
Re-tighten the locking nut.
Replace the Inching Knob, leaving the cap off
the motor cover in case further adjustments are
required, and fit the motor to the camera.
Load the camera with test film, and run it.
Note the film speed indicated by the tachometer. As a final check, run a length of
marked measured film through the camera;
the correct film speed (25 frames per second)
is 37.5 feet per minute.
If the speed is still incorrect, make a further
adjustment to the governor, and check the
speed again. Repeat the adjustment and
check until the correct film speed is indicated
by the tachometer.
Remove the motor from the camera, remove
the Inching Knob, replace the cap on the
motor cover over the governor disk, and
replace the Inching Knob. Fit the motor to
the camera and make a final check on the
film speed.
Performance Checks
Steadiness Test
Unsteadiness in either the vertical or the horizontal direction should not exceed 0.1 per cent of
the relevant picture dimension, as measured with
the aid of the Branson Steadiness Test Object.
This test object is a chart showing two main
scales, one vertical and the other horizontal, each
with twenty divisions of two per cent of the chart
dimensions. Alongside each main scale is a
vernier scale of nineteen divisions so that the chart
can easily be read to 0.105 per cent of its height or
width.
Means are provided for blanking off either the
main or the vernier scales. Film is exposed to one
set of scales and then rewound in the camera
without disturbing the lacing.* The film is then
run a second time through the camera, when it is
exposed to the other set of scales.
When the double-exposed film is developed and
projected, unsteadiness is shown as relative movement between the two scales and can be read
directly as a percentage.
Unsteadiness in the projector affects both scales
equally and is eliminated.
Lubrication
The following lubricants should be applied
the specified parts of the camera mechanism:
Esso Clock Oil 8119
This is a thin, but highly viscous oil which should
be applied to the oiling points 15 and 21 (Figs. 2.1)
on the Large Assembly Plate by means of an oil
gun after every 15,000 ft of filming. It should also
be used on the gear trains of the frame and
footage counters.
Lens Scaling
The accuracy of the lens scaling depends on the
correctness of the distance of the lens from the
plane of the camera gate ; with the focus ring of
the lens mount adjusted to give a lens scaling
indication of infinity, a distant object should be
brought into sharp focus on the film. This should
be checked by means of an auto-collimator (see
Appendix B of Instruction F.1) and by practical
tests a t measured distances after any work involving
disturbance of the lens mountings.
ArrifZex Speziubtt
This is a non-vaporising grease, and should be
used in preference to other greases which are
liable to evaporate and re-condense on the reflecting
surface of the mirror shutter. It should be used
on the gears of the camera mechanism, other than
those of the frame and footage counters, and to
pack all ballraces.
*Where this is not possible, the film should be marked
before removal from the camera so that it can be relaced
with an identical relationship to the moving parts of the
transport mechanism. This is of special importance in tests
with 35-mm film, where there are several perforations per
frame.
Cleaning
During filming, a deposit of emulsion collects
on the surfaces around the gate of the camera;
this should be removed regularly by the use of the
5.2
Instruction F.2
Section S
Page reissurd October 1962
Photographic Resolving Power
The limiting resolution of each lens should be
50 lines/mm, assessed by microscopic examination
of negative images shot under the following test
conditions:
should be obtained, but to allow for slight variations of stock processing, additional exposures
should be made with the illumination slightly
greater and slightly less than the theoretically
optimum value prescribed above.
Test Object: 16-mm BBC Resolution Chart for
use with transmitted light. (When the image
of this is correctly framed in the camera gate,
direct resolution readings in lineslmm are
obtained.)
Trunsport
Routine checks should be made to ensure that
the film is not being scratched due to wear in the
gate or excessive deposits of emulsion.
Stock: Ilford FP3
Lens Aperture: ,f/2
Illumination: Transmitted light adjusted to give a
Relative Brightness reading of 2 on a Weston
Master 11 exposure meter.
Processing: Develop to gamma
=
0.6
Under these conditions a negative density of 0.7
Motor Currents
The current taken by the governor speedcontrolled motor should be about 1.5 amps with
no film in the camera, and 2.5 to 3.0 amps with
film. These figures are increased.by approximately
0.3 amp when the camera is fitted with the Footage
Counter/Inching Extension Unit for use in the
blimp.
The currents taken by the variable-speed motor
depend on the speed at which it is running; when
the film speed is 25 frames per second, they should
be similar to those taken by the
speedcontrolled motor.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 6
400-ft MAGAZINE
a
General
To make possible longer periods of continuous
filming than are permitted by the 100-ft capacity of
the camera, a 400-ft magazine can be attached.
This is a single-compartment magazine, capable of
accommodating darkroom loads of up to 500 ft
of normal panchromatic negative. It works on
the displacement principle, i.e., as film is wound
on to the take-up spool, the spool increases in
diameter to occupy space vacated by the corres-
Fig. 6.1
a
either of the spool shafts of the magazine; the
camera can therefore still be run in reverse, if
desired, when the magazine is used. The motor
and its associated gear train are contained in a
separate readily detachable sub-unit; only one
sub-unit need be carried for use with several
magazines.
No alteration to the camera is necessary to
enable the magazine to be used. A detachable
cover (the 400-ft Magazine Light Trap Cover) is
400-ft Magazine, with Take-up Motor Sub-unit removed
pondingly shrinking feed spool. The magazine
will also accept 200-ft daylight-loading spools.
400 ft of film are sufficient for ten minutes of
continuous filming at the television film speed of
25 frames per second.
The magazine includes its own take-up motor,
the need for a mechanical coupling between the
magazine and the camera thus being avoided. By
moving a lever, the motor can be coupled to
provided, held between two clips (the Magazine
Locks) on the camera housing; the cover is simply
pulled off and the magazine fitted in its place. An
electrical connection to the take-up motor is
made automatically in the process.
A simple footage indicator is fitted, showing the
length of unexposed film in the magazine.
The winding of darkroom loads for the
magazine must be the Type B.
Instruction F.2
Section 6
Construction
The magazine consists basically of three lightalloy castings : the magazine body, a detachable
light-proof cover, and the housing of the take-up
motor sub-unit.
The magazine body is fitted with two spool
shafts 2, 7 (Fig. 2.1) resembling those in the
camera, two spring-loaded roller arms 6, 3 carrying
guide rollers to control the winding and unwinding
of the film when darkroom loads are used, an
arrangement of three velvet light-trap rollers
between which the film leaves and re-enters the
magazine, and a latching device by which the
magazine is locked to the camera.
The spool shafts run in bearings in the wall of
the magazine body, and project slightly outside it;
the projecting ends 152 (Fig. 6.1) carry transverse
pins which engage with the mechanism of the
take-up motor sub-unit. Core adaptors 1 (Fig. 2.1)
are supplied for use with darkroom loads; these
adaptors fit the spool shafts and have eight ballcatches and a spring locating tongue which enable
them to accept standard 16-mm spool centres.
The spring-loaded
roller arm 3 associated with
.
what is normally the feed spool has attached to
it a pointer 153 (Fig. 6.1) which moves under a
plexiglass panel spaced slightly from the outside
of the magazine body and marked with a scale
which forms, with the pointer, a simple footage
indicator showing the length of unexposed film on
the feed spool. (The ipdicator does not function
when daylight-loading spools are used.) The cast
shape of the interior of the magazine body includes
a lip 4 (Fig. 2.1), which serves as a latch to hold
the feed spool roller arm clear of the spool during
the loading of the magazine or when daylightloading spools are used, and a small depression,
across which is riveted a strip of metal 5 forming
a corresponding latch for the take-up spool roller
arm.
The felt light-trap rollers and the mechanism by
which the magazink is attached to the camera are
contained by group of machined parts forming
the ' nose ' 8 of the magazine, which is shaped to
fit the outline of the camera housing. A light-tight
joint between camera and magazine is ensured by
strips of sponge rubber let into the nose. Two
slits (the magazine throats) through the nose are
rendered light-proof by the light trap rollers; the
film passes between the rollers and through the
throats to form the loop which threads the camera.
Two locking slides 156 (Fig. 6.1) move longitudinally in the nose of the magazine, fastening it
-
a
in position on the camera by engaging with the
magazine locks 10 (Fig. 2.1). The slides are
actuated through slots in the nose by projections
from the heads of two locking slide actuating
screws 9, the threads of which engage with correspondingly tapped bores in the lock lip 11. One of
these screws has a normal right-hand thread, and
the other is left-handed; both are of coarse pitch.
Thus a downward movement of the lock lip moves
the screws apart, and with them the locking slides,
causing the latter to engage firmly with the
magazine locks. In some examples of the magazine,
a spring-loaded hook is fitted in the magazine nose
to hold the lock lip in its downward position, as a
precaution against accidental detachment of the
magazine while in use.
Two spring-loaded contact pins (the large
contacts) 155 (Fig. 6.1) project through holes in the
side of the magazine nose to make contact with
others let into the casting of the take-up motor
sub-unit housing. Behind the large contacts are
compres;ion springs, acting between these and
further contacts (the small contacts) bearing on the
locking slides. The electrical aspect of this arrangement is dealt with later; it is mentioned here to draw
attention to the fact that the contacts and springs
ride in bores in one of the castings of the nose of the
magazine, and are retained in place only by the
locking slides when these are in position; the small
contacts are liable to be ejected by the springs and
possibly lost if the nose is dismantled and the
locking slides removed without due caution.
The magazine cover is fitted at its lower edge
with two lugs, which engage with a slot in the
magazine body, and at its upper edge by a catch
actuated by the magazine cover lock; the Open
and Closed positions of the lock are indicated by
letters 0 and C respectively on its escutcheon.
The motor sub-unit housing 166 (Fig. 6.2) is a
light-alloy casting of roughly triangular shape.
The motor is at the lowest corner, i.e., that adjacent
to the nose of the magazine, and is contained in a
dome-like shell which is an integral part of the
housing. One of the bearings of the motor shaft
is at the summit of the dome, and the other in a
strip 169 of insulating material across the base;
this strip also supports the brushes and the motor
contact 170. At the other corners of the housing
are flanged bushes, forming bearings in which
run the shafts of gears 165 and 160. These gears
carry pins 159 which engage with those on the ends
of the magazine take-up and feed spool shafts.
The ends of the shafts of gears 165 and 160 outside
Instruction F.2
Section 6
the sub-unit housing are fitted with knurled antislack knobs.
The drive is transmitted to either of the gears
165, 160 by a train of gears 168, 162, 161, 163,
running ontetaining pins-to which-theyare secured
by screws. The screws securing 162, 161 and 163
have leji-hand threads. The gears 168-163 are in
constant mesh, but 161 and 163 are mounted on a
T-shaped reversing arm 175 (Fig. 6.3) which can
be rotated about the retaining pin 173 of 168 to
bring 161 into mesh with 166, 'or 163 with 165;
Fig. 6.2
whichever lever is not acted upon by the cam
against the reversing arm 175, turning it about
the retaining pin 173. The movement of the arm
is limited by stops 174, which are washers eccentric
with respect to the screws securing them to the
housing and can, therefore, be adjusted to ensure
that pairs of gears 161, 160 and 163, 165 mesh
accurately.
The reversing arm carries a metal strip 164 to
the ends of which are attached spring blades;
one of these blades bears against a brake disk
400-ft Magazine : Take-up Motor Sub-unit
thus either spool of the magazine can be used as
the take-up spool, enabling the film to be run in
reverse for special effects. The necessary adjustment is made by turning a small toggle on the
outside of the sub-unit through 180 degrees
between its two indicated positions: F (forward)
and R (reverse). This reversing toggle moves a
small cam inside the assembly (shown dotted at
176) to bear on one end of either of two pivoted
reversing levers 177, the other ends of which are
coupled by a compression spring 178 threaded
and supported by a pin. The spring presses
integral with whichever of the gears 165, 160 is
unmeshed, preventing over-running of the feed
spool shaft.
The motor sub-unit is attached to the magazine
body by pins projecting from two short spindles
167 (the motor housing locking spindles) which
are passed through keyhole-shaped apertures in
latch plates 154 (Fig. 6.1) riveted over cavities in
the magazine body. On the outside of the motor
sub-unit, the spindles carry toggles which are
turned to lock the sub-unit to the magazine.
The mechanism is protected by a sheet-metal
Instruction F.2
Section 6
cover plate 172 which fits inside the motor subunit housing and is punched to accommodate
the magazine spool shafts, the motor housing
locking spindles, and the motor contact. The
plate is secured in position by circlips 171 fitting
into grooves on the bushes carrying the locking
spindles.
155 (Fig. 6.1) in the nose of the magazine; behind
contacts 155 are compression springs which act
between them and the small contacts which bear
on the locking slides 156 (page 6.2). The locking
slides are forced into firm contact with the magazine locks 10 (Fig. 2.1) on the camera housing
when the magazine is in place.
Electrical Connections
The connections to the take-up motor are made
automatically when the magazine is placed in
position on the camera. A contact pin 158 (Fig.
Operating Instructions
To Load the Magazine
(a) Darkroom Loads
Users unfamiliar with the magazine are advised
first to practice the following procedure a few times
\
170
Fig. 6.3
-
Motor Sub-unit : details of reversing mechanism
6.1) fitting loosely in an insulating bush in the nose
of the magazine is pressed against the contact on
the camera housing (page 2.1) by a resilient bronze
contact bridge 157 which is mounted on the
magazine body but insulated from it. The other
end of the contact bridge presses against the
contact 170 (Fig. 6.2) on the insulating strip in the
motor sub-unit. The circuit is completed via the
metal castings of the various sub-units, and provision is made to ensure good electrical contact
between them. Silver contacts let into the motor
sub-unit housing connect with the large contacts
in daylight, using dummy film.
1. Turn the magazine cover lock to 0 and remove
the cover.
2. Fit the core adaptors to the spool shafts, if
they are not already in place.
3. Regarding the magazine from its open side
with the nose downward, place the roll of film
on the core adaptor of the left-hand spool
shaft so that it turns in a clockwise direction
when the free end of the film is pulled. Ensure
that the roll of film fits between the flanges
of the friction guide roller.
Instmction F.2
Section 6
Thread the free ehd of the film between the
left-hand and centre light trap rollers and
through the left-hand magazine throat, then
through the right-hand magazine throat and
between the centre and right-hand light trap
rollers. The film should now form a loop
outside the magazine, passing round the nose.
Place a spool centre on the core adaptor of the
right-hand spool shaft so that the direction of
its slit is anticlockwise towards the shaft.
Insert the end of the film into the slit, place the
guide roller in position and turn the shaft
clockwise by hand until sufficient film is wound
on to it to secure the end. (Alternatively, the
film can be secured to the spool centre by
means of adhesive tape.)
Holding the magazine cover at an angle of
about 30 degrees to the magazine body, fit
the two together so that the two lugs on the
lower edge of the cover engage accurately with
the slot in the corresponding edge of the body.
Close the cover, and turn the magazine cover
lock to C .
two together so that the two lugs on the lower
edge of the cover engage accurately with the
slot in the corresponding edge of the body.
Close the cover, and turn the magazine cover
lock to C.
As mentioned in operation 3 above, the magazine
film footage indicator is put out of action when
daylight-loading spools are used; it is therefore
necessary to use the film footage counter on the
camera, remembering that a rotation of the Counter
Drum from 100 to 0 corresponds to the passage of
ten feet of film. Thus, 200 ft of film have been
used when the counter indicates 90 for the second
time, and 400 ft when the counter indicates 70 for
the fourth time.
To Attach the Magazine to the Camera
1. Pull the 400-ft Magazine Light Trap cover
from between the Magazine Locks on the
camera.
2. Draw film from the feed spool only of the
magazine, to enlarge the loop of film exterior
to the magazine sufficiently to thread the
camera.
3. Insert the loop of film into the camera through
the aperture ih the camera housing exposed by
the removal of the 400-ft Magazine Light
Trap Cover. Raise the lock lip of the magazine.
Insert the rear locking slide of the magazine
into the rear Magazine Lock of the camera,
then lower the front of the magazine into
position, and press the lock lip down as far as
it will go, to expand the locking slides against
the Magazine Locks. Secure the lock lip by
means of the spring-loaded hook provided.
(The lip does not necessarily fit flush against the
nose of the magazine, and only hand pressure
should be applied to it.)
4. Thread the sprockets and gate of the camera
in the normal manner, and turn the knurled
anti-slack knobs on the magazine in the
directions indicated by the arrows, to take up
any slack film.
5. Run a few feet of film through the camera,
watching to ensure that it is taken up by the
magazine. (If not, the most likely cause is a
break in the electrical circuit supplying the
take-up motor; remove the motor sub-unit of
the magazine and check the bronze contact
bridge 157 (Fig. 6.1), bending it slightly if
necessary to improve its contact with the
contact pin 158 and/or the motor contact
170 (Fig. 6.2). If this does not clear the fault,
(b) Daylight Loads
TU& the magazine cover lock to 0 and remove
the cover.
Remove the core adaptors (if present) from
the spool shafts, releasing them by pressing
the small buttons on the tips of the shafts.
Latch the arms carrying the friction guide
rollers behind the lip and latch provided.
(This puts the magazine film footage indicator
out of action.)
Regarding the magazine from its open side with
the nose downward, place the spool of film
on the left-hand spool shaft so that it turns in
a clockwise diredtion when the free end of the
film is pulled.
Thread the free end of the film between the
left-hand and centre light trap rollers and
through the left-hand magazine throat, then
through the right-hand magazine throat and
between the centre and right-hand light trap
rollers. The film should now form a loop
outside the magazine, passing round the nose.
Place a n empty spool on the right-hand spool
shaft. Insert the end of the film into the slit
in the core of the spool and then turn the
shaft clockwise by hand until sufficient film
is wound on to it to secure the end.
Holding the magazine cover at an angle of
about 30 degrees to the magazine body, fit the
6.5
Instruction F.2
Section 6
remove the magazine from the camera, check
the contact on the camera housing and clean
if necessary.)
Close the camera door.
Set the camera film footage counter to 0.
(Each spool of film contains about 10 ft more
than the nominal length, to serve as leader and
trailer during processing; this permits the
amount of film wasted in carrying out operation
5 above to be neglected.)
Each time the camera is stopped, the knurled
knobs should be turned to take up any slack film
before re-starting it. Failure to observe this
precaution may result in film breakage due to the
sudden straightening (' snatching ') of loops.
The camera battery should be kept as nearly
fully charged as possible when the magazine is
used, because it must supply the extra power
required by the take-up motor. If long periods of
filming are expected, it is advisable to use two
batteries connected in parallel.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 7
ARRIFLEX BLIMP 16
General
houses part of the follow-focus mechanism,
described later. Some more recent examples of the
blimp are fitted with a modified, detachable forward
door to enable lenses in larger mounts (including
zoom lenses) to be used.
The camera is mounted on a base plate by a
fixing screw which fits the hole in the Inserting
Plate of the camera housing. The screw has a
large flat head with two U-shaped cut-outs in its
edge which enable it to be grasped firmly between
a finger and thumb for tightening. It is captive
in the larger-diameter, tubular shank of a locking
screw, which has a fine-pitch left-hand thread
fitting a hole tapped in the base plate. The head
of the locking screw is in the form of a flat disk
with a knurled edge which projects beyond that of
the fixing screw. By means of this arrangement,
when the fixing screw has been tightened to fasten
the camera in position, still further pressure can be
applied by a clockwise rotation of the locking
screw. Two stops are provided at the front of the
base plate to ensure correct alignment of the
camera; the right-hand stop is spring-loaded and
can be tightened, by means of a knurled screw, to
grip the camera. The camera, on its base plate,
rests cn a base 191 (Fig. 7.1) which floats on
rubber mountings in the blimp. The base plate is
located in position by two horizontal spigots
projecting from its right-hand edge, which engage
with sockets 193 on the base, and by two studs 190
on the base which engage with holes on the
underside of the base plate, at the ends of its
left-hand edge. The base plate is secured to the
base by turning two catches 189, which are in the
form of small levers mounted on the base, and
engage with the corners of the left-hand edge of
the base plate.
The case of the Footage Indicator / Inching
Extension Unit has a cylindrical extension, which
fits over the rear of the camera motor and is
slotted to form flaps which are tightened by means
of a screw to grip the motor casing. The mechanism
of the unit is coupled to the motor by a tubular
rubber coupling at the forward end of its input
shaft which grips the specially-fitted inching knob
A blimp is available to mask the sound of the
camera when it is used near a live microphone.
As edapted for BBC use, the blimp contains the
wiring for making connections to a camera fitted
to work in conjunction with the BBC magnetic
recorder Type RD4/501; a slight modification to
the slating unit of the camera is necessary to
enable it to be used in the blimp. The governor
speed-controlled motor must be used, and must be
fitted with a modified inching knob to couple it
mechanically to a Footage Indicator I Inching
Extension Unit of BBC design which is used in the
blimp.
The following operational controls and indicating
devices are provided which are described in detail
below under the heading Construction:
Focus handwheels
Focusing scales
Inching wheel
Footage indicator
Motor switch
Motor pilot lamp
Slating button
Aperture scale lamp and switch
Tachometer window
Spirit level
Tape measure hook
The camera can be installed in or removed from
the blimp quickly and easily, without the use of
tools, and can be fitted with the 400-ft magazine
if desired.
Construction
The blimp is of cast aluminium alloy construction, with a sound-proof lining consisting of
alternate layers of sheet lead and foam rubber.
Access to the interior is provided by three doors.
A large one on the left-hand side provides for the
fitting and lacing of the camera. Another, formed
by the hinged top of the blimp, permits the
insertion and removal of 400-ft magazines. A
circular, glass-windowed door in front of the lens
in the taking position enables lenses to be fitted
and removed and their apertures set; this door also
7.1
Instruction F.2
Section 7
on the motor. (The method of coupling is similar
to that by which the motor is coupled lo the
camera mechanism; see page 2.3.) A shaft projecting from the rear of the unit carries a wheel
having a bevelled, knurled edge. This forms one
member of a clutch coupling the inching wheel of
the blimp to the unit; the other member of the
clutch has a cylindrical rubber edge, and is
Fig. 7.1
disengaged until a light finger pressure is applied
to the wheel while turning it.
Because the
mechanical connection through the Footage
Indicator/Inching Extension Unit is by means of
gearing, the inching wheel must be turned anticlockwise to move the film forward through the
camera. Clockwise rotation is prevented by a
ratchet mechanism in the bearing carrying the
Blimp for 16-mm Arrifrex Camera
shaft on which the wheel is mounted.
A dial on the Footage Indicator/Inching Extension Unit provides footage indication up to 400 ft
and is therefore more useful than the footage
indicator on the camera when a 400-ft magazine
is used. (The indicator on the camera is calibrated up to 100 fi only.) The dial is illuminated
mounted on a shaft passing through a bearing in
the rear wall of the blimp, towards the right-hand
side. The inching wheel is a finger-operated wheel
by which the operator can turn the camera
mechanism slowly, e.g., to facilitate the lacing of
the camera. The shaft on which the wheel is
mounted is spring-loaded, so that the clutch is
7.2
Instruction F.2
Section 7
by a pilot lamp in a holder pinned to the fabric
inner lining of the blimp, and is viewed through a
small circular plexiglass window to the left of the
inching wheel.
The door at the front of the blimp carries on
its inner surface a rotatable drum 198 encircling
the window and concentric with the lens in the
taking position.
The drum carries a hinged
rubber-tipped arm 181 which engages with the
follow-focus grips of the lens mount. Thus the
lens can be focused by rotating the drum, which is
fitted with a toothed ring 180 for this purpose.
The ring is driven by a gear wheel mounted on a
shaft 192 connecting it to a focus handwheel 187
at the rear of the blimp, and also via bevel gearing
to a further focus handwheel 194 at the front of
the blimp on the left-hand side. (Thus, either
handwheel can be used; the rear one is convenient
for a single camera operator, and the forward one
for the member of a two-man team responsible
for focusing.) The gear wheel on the shaft 192 is
mounted so as to avoid the possibility of damage
in the event of its not meshing correctly with the
toothed ring when the front door of the blimp is
closed. A flanged bush attached to the shaft has
tapped into it three bolts, the shanks of which
pass through holes in the gear wheel. The wheel
is a sliding fit on the bolts, and is sprung into its
normal working position, against the flange of the
bush, by compression springs surrounding the
bolts. Thus, if the teeth of the gears clash when
the door is closed, the gear wheel is moved
harmlessly against the pressure of the springs,
and returns to its normal position as soon as the
mechanism is turned slightly and the teeth fall
into mesh.
The follow-focus handwheel 194 is positioned
immediately below a window 195 through which a
detachable focusing scale 199 on the drum can be
read against a cursor line marked on the window.
The scale is a strip of thin metal, with a nonglossy painted surface on which the appropriate
calibration for a particular lens can be marked; a
separate scale is necessary for each lens employed,
and a number of blank strips are provided together
with a jig which can be clipped into the front
door plunger sockets 196 to form, when the door
is slightly open, a ruling edge against the scale at
a point corresponding to the cursor line on the
glass of the window. The focusing scales are
stored in a cylindrical aluminium container supplied
with the blimp.
A small plexiglass window 182 is provided to
permit the aperture scale of the lens mount in the
taking position to be viewed. The scale is illuminated by a pilot lamp in a holder pinned to the
fabric inner lining of the blimp. This lamp is
separately controlled by a press-button switch 183
to avoid the possibility of light from it entering
the lens of the camera while filming is in progress.
Pins and clips 197 are fitted to the drum 198 to
enable three-inch square filters to be supported on
it if required.
Pivoted threaded studs, with knurled nuts 179,
are fitted to the top and bottom of the front door
to secure either the skyshade or a protective
circular metal cover over the front door window.
The skyshade consists of a leatherised fabric
bellows suspended between two cast metal frames
201 which are linked adjustably by steel rods 203.
The front (larger) frame is grooved along its top
and bottom edges to accept mattes if required.
When the camera is used in the blimp, the eyepiece of the Viewfinder is removed and a prismatic
double elbow assembly is fitted in its place to
direct light from the earlier stages of the system
into a lens tube 188 passing through the wall of
the blimp. The Viewfinder eyepiece is fitted to the
outer end of this tube. An ebonite ring captive
on the double elbow assembly can be pushed over
the gap between it and the lens tube to exclude
stray light. The tube is gripped in a cylindrical
holder, slotted to form a number of flaps which are
tightened against the tube by means of an annular
clamp 186. This arrangement permits the rapid
and easy removal of the lens tube to facilitate the
insertion of the camera into the blimp.
A small plexiglass window is provided above the
inching wheel at the rear of the blimp to enable
the tachometer of the camera to be viewed. The
tachometer is illuminated by a pilot lamp in a
holder 184 pinned to the fabric inner lining of the
blimp.
The cast shape of the blimp includes a m a l l
rectangular compartment (the switch compartment)
on the right-hand side, containing most of the
electrical equipment. The circuits are described
below. The motor switch is a large toggle switch
on the detachable cover of the compartment, and
the slating button is a small press-button set in the
upper wall. The camera-battery-lead connector is
accommodated at the lower forward corner of the
compartment in an aperture formed by the shaped
edges of the main casting of the blimp and the
cover of the switch compartment. For BBC use,
a Cannon connector is fitted in place of the German-
BLIMP
SWITCH
COUPdOTUEN
PANEL
Fig. 7.2
Electrical Circuits of Blimp for 16-mm Arriflex Camera
Instruction F.2
Section 7
type connector supplied by the manufacturers, and
the diameter of the barrel of the Cannon connector
must be reduced in a lathe to fit the aperture.
A red pilot light 185 on the left-hand side of the
blimp glows when the camera motor is running,
and a spirit level is provided at the rear, close to
the inching wheel, to facilitiate the levelling of the
camera. A tape measure hook is fitted on the
right-hand side, in the focal plane of the camera.
The bottom of the blimp is faced with a flat
aluminium plate, having a central tapped hole to
accept the inserting screw of a suitable tripod.
Modification to Slating Unit on Camera
A slight modification is necessary to the slating
unit on the camera to enable the latter to be used
in the blimp. When it is so used, the slating button
on the unit is inaccessible to the operator, and it
is therefore necessary for a connection to be made
from the camera battery, via a suitable switch, to
a point in the circuit of the slating unit on the
negative side of S1 (Fig. 10.4). For this purpose,
a pin is mounted on the printed wiring card, above
and at a distance of +in. from the Belling Lee
socket SKI, and connected to either of the elements
b and f of the printed wiring. A suitable hole is
drilled in the cover of the unit to permit a socket
on the connector provided as part of the wiring
of the blimp to mate with the pin.
Circuit Description
A diagram of the circuits in the blimp is given
in Fig. 7.2. A Cannon connector Type XL-3-11
(SK3) mates with PL2 on the synchronising tone
generator; its pins are connected via tags 1,2 and 3
of a panel in the switch compartment of the blimp
to correspondingly numbered pins of PL4, a
Cannon connector Type XL-3-42. To this the
normal lead to the recorder Type RD4/501 is
plugged, instead of directly to the generator as in
Fig. 10.4. It will be noted that the connection
from tag 1 of SK3 to tag 1 on the switch compartment panel serves no useful purpose; as mentioned
on page 10.3, pin 1 of PL2 is not connected.
A further lead from tag 1 on the switch compartment panel provides the necessary connection to
the output socket SKI of the slating unit; this
lead is one conductor of a twin lead terminating
in a BBC-fabricated hybrid connector HY5 which
comprises a plug to mate with SKI and a socket to
mate with PL6, the extra pin added to the slating
unit as a modification, described above. The
flying lead which is normally connected to SK1 is,
of course, outside the blimp and is not used.
(X, Fig. 7.2.)
The cable from the camera battery is connected
to PL7, a Cannon connector Type EP-2-14s. The
pins of PL7 are connected to the tags marked
and - on the switch compartment panel, which
serve as busbars from which power is distributed
to the various circuits in the blimp.
The supply to the camera motor is fed via a
connector (SK8) resembling that on the normal
camera battery lead, which is plugged into the
camera. The camera motor switch is kept permanently closed when the camera is used in the
blimp, and the supply is controlled by S2, connected
in the positive lead. S2 is one pole of the three-pole
motor switch originally fitted by the manufacturers;
the remaining two poles are not used in the BBCmodified version of the circuit. A pilot lamp LPl ,
in series with a voltage-dropping resistor R1, is
connected in parallel with the twin lead to SK6.
LPl is the red light which indicates when the motor
is running.
Power is supplied to the slating unit and the
film-marking lamp from the tag marked
on the
switch compartment panel, via the biased-to-off
microswitch S3 and the socket on the connector
HY5 which mates with PL6 on the slating unit.
The return circuit from the unit is completed via
the frame of the camera and the negative side of
the circuit to the camera motor, as normally. The
microswitch S3 is mounted at the top of the switch
compartment, and is actuated by a push-button
projecting through a hole in the upper wall of the
compartment. It serves as a slating switch in
place of that in the slating unit.
The pilot lamps inside the blimp are LP2, LP3
and LP4. They are connected across the battery
supply in two circuits, the first consisting of LP2
and LP3, in series with the two paralleled voltagedropping resistors R2 and R3, which are mounted
on tags 5 and 6 on the switch compartment panel.
LP2 and LP3 are the two pilot lamps towards the
rear of the blimp. The other circuit consists of
LP4 in series with the push-button switch S4 and
the voltage-dropping resistor R4, which is mounted
on tags 4 and 5 of the switch compartment panel.
LP4 is the pilot lamp which illuminates the aperture
scale of the lens mount in the taking position on
the camera; S4 is the push-button switch mounted
close to the window through which the scale is
viewed.
+
+
Instruction F.2
Section 7
Operating Instructions
To Insert the Camera
Remove any lenses from the lens turret, and
the eyepiece from the Viewfinder.
Fit the double elbow assembly to the Viewfinder in place of the eyepiece, and slide the
ebonite ring on the assembly as far towards the
front of the camera as possible.
Fit a governor speed-controlled motor, having
an appropriately modified inching knob, to the
camera, and to the motor fit a Footage
Indicator/Inching Extension Unit.
Fit the base plate provided to the camera.
Open the large door on the left-hand side of
the blimp, and the top door, formed by the
hinged upper part of the blimp.
Loosen the clamp 186 (Fig. 7.1) securing the
lens tube 188 containing the viewfinder optical
system of the blimp and slide the tube backwards in its holder sufficiently for it not to
impede the insertion of the camera.
Insert the rear end of the camera into the blimp
first, so that the Footage Indicator/Inching
Extension Unit passes to the right-hand side
of the lens tube, and the prism elbow to the
left-hand side. Then swing the front of the
camera into the blimp. Move the camera
forward in the blimp so that the prism elbow
can be lined up with the end of the lens tube.
Check that the levers 189 at the ends of the
left-hand side of the floating base in the blimp
are aligned so as to permit the camera on its
base plate to be placed in position. Through
the top door, obsene the spigots on the righthand side of the camera base plate, and the
sockets 193 on the floating base. Insert the
spigots into the sockets, then lower the lefthand side of the base plate so that the studs
190 on the left-hand side of the floating base
enter the cavities in the underside of the base
plate. Turn the levers 189 to lock the base
plate in position.
Slide the lens tube forward until it is not quite
in contact with the prism elbow on the camera,
and tighten the clamp 186 to secure it in its
holder in the blimp wall. Fit the eyepiece of
the camera Viewfinder to the rear end of the
lens tube. Slide the ebonite ring on the prism
elbow towards the rear of the camera to cover
the residual gap between the prism elbow and
lens tube.
Fit the following electrical connectors to the
camera :
(a) The hybrid connector to the slating unit,
tb)
. , The three-wav female connector to the
corresponding male connector on the
synchronising tone generator,
(c) The two-way female connector to the
bottom rear connector of the camera, in
place of the normal battery lead.
1 1. Open the circular door at the front of the blimp
by moving the lever 200 on the left-hand side
of it from a vertical to a horizontal position.
12. Fit the required lens(es) to the lens turret. If
a lens mount has two alternative keyways to
receive the Lens Mount Key, use that which
brings the focus ring ears uppermost when the
lens is in the taking position and the focus ring
is turned fully clockwise.
NOTE:-When a camera is used in the blimp, it is
particularly important that the focus rings of the
lens mounts should rotate easily, as any friction
will cause the camera to be rocked on its floating
base when the follow-focus mechanism is operated.
If necessary, the focus rings should be lubricated
with Ragosine Molydest 50 grease.
13. From the tubular case of focusing scales provided, select the appropriate one for use with
the lens in the taking position and fit it at 199
around the rotatable drum encircling the
window of the front door of the blimp.
14. Rotate the drum to bring the white spot painted
on it close to the similar white spot painted on
the inside of the door 202. Raise the hinged
rubber-tipped arm 181 mounted on the toothed
ring carried by the drum to the upper of its
two stable positions.
15. Set the aperture of the lens in the taking position
as required.
16. Close the front door and lock it by turning the
lever 200 on the left-hand side from the
horizontal to a vertical position (pointing
downwards).
17. Insert a hand into the top of the blimp and
press the rubber tip of the arm 181 down
between the focusing ears of the lens mount
in the taking position.
18. Lace the camera, if this has not already been
done, or fit a 400-ft magazine.
19. When the camera door is in place, press the
Switch Lever.
NOTE:-When the camera is used in the blimp, its
motor switch is kept permanently closed, but
must always be released when the camera door is
removed for reloading or any other purpose, and
Instruction F.2
Section 7
the Switch Lever pressed again after the door has
been replaced.
20. Close the top and side doors of the blimp.
21. Connect the blimp to a camera battery and to
a recorder Type RD4/501 by means of the
cables provided. The battery lead connector
mates with the two-pin male connector at the
front bottom comer of the switch compartment
on the right-hand side of the blimp. The lead
to the recorder mates with the three-pin male
connector on the door of the switch compartment.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 8
GAUMONT-KALEE SINGLESYSTEM MAGNETIC RECORDING EQUIPMENT
GENERAL
This equipment consists of the Gaumont-Kalee
16-mm Magnetic Recording Soundhead Type 1690
and the Gaumont-Kalee Recording Amplifier Type
1691. The recording is made on a 100-mil stripe of
magnetic oxide coating applied to the edge of the
picture film.
The soundhead is a box containing a magnetic
recording and playback head unit assembly, a
sound drum and a mechanical filter. It is attached
(as shown in Fig. 8.1) to the bottom of the camera,
in which a suitable aperture is cut to allow the
passage of the film; a portion of the switch housing
is also cut away. A shoe-plate is provided to close
the aperture when the sound system is not used.
Two holes are drilled in the camera housing to
accept dowels on the top of the soundhead or on
the shoeplate which serve to locate whichever is
fitted accurately in position. The only other
modification to the camera is the fitting of a film
guide roller, which is mounted on the switch
assembly. Camera and soundhead can be mounted
on a tripod as a single unit.
The film is drawn through the soundhead by one
of the sprockets of the camera mechanism; thus no
mechanical drive to the soundhead is necessary.
The amplifier is small and weighs only 42 Ib. It
is housed in a leather carrying case and can conveniently be suspended from the neck of the
camera operator, if one-man operation of bolh
sound and picture channels is desired. Its circuits
utilise transistors throughout, and are powered by
a single 7.5-volt dry battery contained within the
amplifier. The battery has an operational life of
approximately thirty hours.
Two inputs to the recording chain are provided,
of unequal sensitivities and impedances to suit
different recording conditions and types of microphone. The circuits include, as well as the recording
chain and bias oscillator, a reproducing chain
which enables the signal from the playback head
to be monitored through headphones while the
recording is in progress; alternatively, the incoming
signal can be monitored. A meter is provided to
serve as a volume indicator or to measure the bias
and battery voltages.
The electrical connections between the soundhead
and the amplifier are made via a single four-way
screened cable, which can be had in 6-ft and 30-ft
lengths. The 6-ft cable (Type 1725) is normally
used when the camera and amplifier are operated
by one man, and the 30-ft cable (Type 1702) when
the amplifier is operated by a separate recordist.
Two of the 30-ft cables can be connected end-to-end
if necessary to give a total length of 60 ft, but a
longer run than this is not recommended.
To obtain the optimum overall frequency
response, recordings made by the equipment should
be played back by a reproducing system having a
standard C.C.I.R. characteristic. The sound is
recorded on the film at the normal distance (28
frames) in advance of the corresponding picture.
The equipment cannot be used to replay
previously-recorded films.
MECHANICAL CONSTRUCTION
The soundhead Type 1690 is assembled in a cast
light-alloy case; having an integral partition which
divides it vertically into two compartments. Access
to the right-hand compartment is given by the rear
cover, secured by screws, and to the left-hand
compartment by a completely detachable lightproof door assembly 126 (Fig. 8.1) secured, when
in position, by a latch assembly resembling the
Locking Lever of the camera door.
Film enters and leaves the soundhead through
an opening in the upper wall of the case and a
corresponding opening which is cut in the bottom
of the camera housing. A light-tight joint between
soundhead and camera is ensured by a raised rim
around the opening in the soundhead case, and a
facing of black velvet on the top surface of the case.
Dowels on the soundhead engage with corresponding holes which are drilled in the bottom of the
camera housing, serving to strengthen the arrangement. The camera and soundhead are held
together by the fixing bolt assembly, which is a
single large bolt, captive in a tubular support and
extending through the height of the case to engage
with the insertion plate of the camera housing.
The shoe-plate which can be fitted to the camera
to re-convert it for silent filming is also faced with
Instruction F.2
Section 8
Fig. 8,l. Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Camera with Soundhead Type 1690 fitted
Instruction F.2
Section 8
a
black velvet and carries two dowels corresponding
to those on the soundhead case. A metal plate,
forming a skid, projects through the opening in the
camera housing to replace the missing portion of
the switch housing.
The mechanism of the soundhead consists of a
sound drum 123, integral with a shaft which also
carries a flywheel assembly; a friction roller
assembly 130; a spring-loaded roller arm assembly
129 which presses the film against the friction
roller; a compliance arm assembly 124; two roller
assemblies 122, 128 and an idler roller assembly
119.
The threading of the camera and soundhead is as
shown. The loop of film below the gate of the
camera is extended through the opening into the
soundhead; a skid 132 on the front wall of the
soundhead case prevents the picture area of the
film from being scratched. The loop ends where
the film is gripped between the friction roller 130
and the roller 131 of the roller arm assembly 129,
which is spring-loaded. The resistance of the
friction roller is provided by a friction washer
spring-loaded against its right-hand end face. The
purpose of the friction roller is to maintain sufficient
tension in the film to ensure constant contact
between the film and the recording and replay
heads. After leaving the friction roller, the film
passes under the heads and around the sound drum
123. The heads are parts of a single assembly 121,
described below. The sound drum is integral with
the sound drum shaft, which runs in ballraces, and
carries the flywheel at its right-hand end.
After leaving the sound drum, the film passes
around the rollers 128 and 127; the latter roller is
mounted on the compliance arm assembly 124,
which is pulled downwards by the compliance
spring 125. The mass of the flywheel, the compliance of the compliance arm and the friction
(approximating to mechanical resistance) of the
friction roller form a mechanical filter which
ensures that the film passes the recording and
playback heads at constant speed and with a
minimum of hunting when the camera is started.
The film is guided back into the camera by the
roller assembly 122 and the idler roller 119, which
runs on a spindle formed by a bolt passing across
the opening between soundhead and camera and
tapped into the soundhead case. Washers are
fitted on either side of the roller 119, if necessary, to
minimise end play; they are of larger diameter
than the roller, and so act as flanges, giving lateral
location to the film as well as to the roller. Inside
the camera, the film passes over the additional
roller 118, mounted on the switch assembly, to
the lower sprocket of the camera mechanism; this
pulls the film through the soundhead.
The head unit assembly is shown in Fig. 8.2.
The recording and playback heads are of conventional ring design but unusually small size, and
are enclosed in metal cans, through which only
the pole-faces 134 protrude. Each head has a
threaded stud by which it is mounted on one limb
of a U-shaped bracket; the opposite limb 133 of
the bracket is shaped to form a smooth bearing
surface for the unstriped edge of the film. The
heads and brackets together form the head and
bracket assemblies. The brackets are fitted with
spigots which are clamped in holes in the head
mounting bracket 137; this is a metal plate with a
Fig. 8.2.
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording
Equipment : Head Unit Assembly
flange by which it is secured to the socket board
138 (see below). Slits 136 are cut from the edges
of the head mounting bracket into the holes in
which the head and bracket assemblies are clamped,
and the sides of these slits are squeezed together
by tightening a pair of screws, thus reducing the
circumferance of the holes and gripping the spigots
of the head and bracket assemblies.
The socket board is a metal strip to which the
head mounting bracket is attached, and which
carries four sockets 139 via which the electrical
connections to the heads are made. The head
assembly is thus a plug-in unit, which is located on
the partition of the soundhead by the sockets and
their mating pins and by two dowel pins which
enter holes in the socket board and head mounting
bracket; the unit is secured in position by two
screws tapped into the partition through further
holes in the same two components.
Instruction F.2
Section 8
A shoulder screw tapped into the top of the
head mounting bracket serves to locate the head
screening can, which is a magnetic shield. The can
is secured by a screw 120 (Fig. 8.1).
The rear cover of the soundhead case carries at
its lower front comer a 6-way F. & E. female
connector Type EM-6-13 via which connections are
made to the head assembly and to a headphones
jack mounted directly above the connector.
The Amplifier Type 1691 is assembled on a lightalloy chassis and top panel; the chassis is enclosed
in a sheet-metal cover secured by a single screw.
The amplifier is carried in a leather case, with a lid
which can be opened to reveal the top panel on
which the operational controls and meter are
mounted, and a strap handle by which it can be
suspended from the camera operator's neck. The
amplifier is secured in the case by a large knurledheaded screw, captive in the bottom of the case,
which engages with a tapped insert in the bottom
of the chassis.
Cut-outs in the case and amplifier cover give
access to two Cannon connectors Type XL-3-14
(for microphone inputs), a 6-pin male connector
(via which connections are made to the soundhead)
and a headphones jack.
A circuit diagram of the equipment is given-in
Fig. 1.
provide the required recording characteristic.
V3 and V4 are coupled via R65, a variable
resistor which is the control labelled Main Gain.
From the collector of V4 an additional connection is made to a point in the reproducing chain
(see below) via C7 and series resistors R24, R25;
R25 is the preset control labelled Dir. Gain.
V5 has a small emitter load R66 across which a
signal voltage is developed which is fed to the
volume indicator stage.
The output from V5 to the recording head is
fed via the bias rejector circuit L1, C21 and pins 3
of 53 and 57.
The bias oscillator utilises a transistor Type OC72
(V6). The bias signal is injected in parallel with
the a.f. signal; it is taken from a tertiary winding
on the bias oscillator coil T1 and fed via C22,
the high reactance of which at a.f. prevents losses
due to any shunting effect of the winding.
The volume indicator is a single-stage amplifier
employing a transistor Type GET4 (V7), feeding
an integrating circuit 1134, C37. The integrating
circuit removes (for metering purposes) the
emphasis given to the higher frequencies by the
early stages of the recording chain. The output
from the volume indicator is fed to a fixed contact
of S3a, which is one wafer of the switch labelled
Off-Bat.-V. I.-Bias on the amplifier panel. R34
is selected to give the volume indicator the required
sensitivity; the process is described on page 8.7.
Recording Chain
Pin 2 of the Input I connector J1 is coupled by
C l to the base of V1, a transistor Type OC70 in
an amplifying stage the output of which is fed to
the Input I gain control R10. Pin 2 of the Input 2
connector 52 is coupled by T2 to a similar amplifying stage, the output of which is fed to the Input 2
gain control R11. The tapping points of the gain
controls RIO and R l I are paralleled via R12 and
R13 and the combined output is fed to the
subsequent stages via the switch S1, labelled M-S
(music-speech).
When the switch is set to S, a
low-value coupling capacitor C13 is brought into
circuit to attentuate low frequencies; a cut of
approximately 12.5 dB at 100 c/s is introduced.
V3, V4 and V5 (two transistors Type OC71 and
one Type OC72) form a three-stage amplifier
feeding the recording head. V3 and V4 operate
under conditions of frequency-selective negative
feedback due to resistance-capacitance networks in
their emitter leads; the amplifier thus has a
frequency response rising at high frequencies to
Reproducing Chain
V8 to V12 (a transistor Type OC70 followed by
four Type OC71) form a five-stage amplifier feeding
the headphones J4 and 56. The input from the
playback head is fed via pins 1 and 2 of 53 to the
emitter and base respectively of V8; a series
capacitor C27 prevents the standing base-toemitter potential from being short-circuited by the
winding of the playback head.
A shunt network R45, C29 between the first and
second stages gives the chain a rising low-frequency
characteristic; a short time-constant RC circuit in
the emitter lead of V10 causes frequency-selective
negative feedback over this stage, giving a rising
high-frequency characteristic. The gain of the
amplifier is adjustable by means of a potential
divider R49 (the preset PIB Gain control) forming
part of the collector load of V9.
VIO is connected to V11 via S2; this is the
switch labelled Dir.-P/B on the amplifier panel.
When S2 is set to P/B, the reproducing chain is
completed; when the switch is set to Dir., the
Instruction F.2
Section 8
last two stages only of the chain are fed from the
recording chain via R24, R25 and C7, as mentioned
above.
V12 is connected as an emitter follower; its
load consists of R63 and either headphones plugged
into the jacks 54 and 56, or the dummy loads R68,
R69 associated with the jacks. 54 is the jack
labelled Mon. in the side of the amplifier chassis,
and 56 is in the soundhead. The two jacks and
R63 are all connected in series, the connections to
56 being via pins 4 and 6 of 53 and 57.
Supply and Metering
The amplifier is powered by a single 7.5-volt dry
battery Bl (Vidor Type L5048 or equivalent), which
is accommodated within the amplifier chassis.
Connections to the battery are via a non-reversible
2-pin plug J5 which mates with a socket in the
battery. The negative pole of the battery is connected to the moving contact of S3b, which is one
wafer of the switch labelled Off-Bat.-V.1.-Bias
on the amplifier panel. The fixed contacts of S3b
corresponding to the Bat., V.I. and Bias settings
of the switch are connected together and to the
negative side of the amplifier circuits described
above; the fixed contact corresponding to the Off
setting is not connected, so that the battery circuit
is broken when the switch is turned to Off. The
positive pole of the battery is connected to pin 5
of 53 and via a strap between tags 5 and 6 of the
mating connector to earth (the frame-line of the
equipment). This arrangement ensures that the
battery circuit is broken when the equipment is
dismantled after use, even if it is inadvertently
left switched on. The 100-rF capacitor C36
provides a low-impedance shunt across the battery
at signal frequencies.
The meter MI is connected via a bridge of
germanium rectifiers W1-W4 between the moving
contact of S3a and earth. The points in the circuit
to which it is connected for the various settings of
the switch are as follows:
Bias: Via R36 to the junction of C22 and the bias
rejector circuit LI , C2I.
V.I.: Junction of R34, C37.
Bat.: Via R35 and S3b to the negative pole of the
battery.
Of: Earth. (This short-circuits the meter through
the rectifiers and provides electrical damping of
themovement, reducing the risk of damage due to
shaking during transport.)
MAINTENANCE
INFORMATION
General
Because the battery circuit is completed by a
link between two tags of the connector mating
with 53, the cable must be plugged to 53 before
any tests can be made, and if the aural monitoring
facility is required the soundhead must be connected also, the two headphones jacks being in
series. Before connecting the soundhead, ensure
that the meter switch of the amplifier is turned to
Off, to avoid the possibility of the heads becoming
magnetised. For the same reason, the continuity
of the head windings should never be checked by
causing a direct current to flow in them, unless
facilities are to hand for demagnetising the heads.
Head Unit Assembly
To Remove
I . Withdraw the screw 120 (Fig. 8.1) and remove
the cover.
2. Withdraw the screws securing the assembly to
the soundhead.
3. Grasp the assembly at each end and gently ease
it from its position.
To Replace
I . Fit the tips of the pins into the sockets in the
plug board assembly, and holding the head
assembly square with respect to the soundhead
partition, push it gently until it is stopped by
the dowel pins.
2. Gently shift the free end of the head assembly
to and fro along a short arc centered on the pins,
until the dowel pins are felt to enter their holes,
when the unit can be pushed completely home
and the screws inserted to secure it.
3. Replace the cover and the screw 120.
To Set Up the Heads
I . Connect a jig constructed in accordance with
Fig. 8.3 between the amplifier and the cable to
the soundhead.
2. Connect a sensitive valve voltmeter, with its
input shunted if necessary to present a load of
150 ohms, to the headphones jack on the
soundhead.
3. Turn the meter switch on the amplifier to V.I.
4. Lace the camera and soundhead with an
azimuth alignment film, by-passing the camera
gate.
5. Remove the screening can from the head unit.
6. Check that the clearances between the brackets
of the head and bracket assemblies and the
Instruction F.2
Section 8
head mounting bracket are such as to give the
correct film wrap over the heads. (These
clearances should be fB inch and & inch
for the record and playback head and bracket
assemblies, respectively.) If the clearances are
not correct, loosen the screws which clamp the
spigots of the head and bracket assemblies in
the head mounting bracket, and make the
necessary adjustments, disturbing the azimuthal
settings of the heads as little as possible; then
re-tighten the clamping screws.
7. Set the svitch in the jig to Rec. Head.
12. Set the switch in the jig to P/B Head and
repeat the above procedure (from operation 8)
to align the playback head.
To Check for Magnetisation
1. Run a length of bulk-erased film through a
high-quality reproducing equipment, and check
that its background noise level is low.
2. Run the same film through the camera and
soundhead, with the amplifier disconnected.
3. Repeat operation 1; any increase in noise
indicates that some part of the equipment is
ARPLIFIER.
2 PIB
HEAD
bREC HEAD
SWITCH POSITIONS
Fig. 8.3. Head Alignment jig for use with Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment
8. Insert a small screwdriver in the slot in the end
magnetised.
4. Repeat the test, using a fresh length of bulkerased film, this time lacing the camera only,
to determine whether the affected part is in
the camera or in the soundhead.
If the noise is due to the soundhead, and is
steady, it is probably the heads that are magnetised.
The only other parts likely to cause trouble are the
aperture plate and the back pressure plate in the
camera and, very rarely, ball bearings. Iron film
spools could also become magnetised, and therefore only spools of non-magnetic material should
be used with magnetic-coated film.
of the threaded stud by which the record head
is mounted on the bracket, and loosen the
appropriate one of the pair of nuts 135 (Fig
8.2) with an 8-B.A. spanner.
9. Run the camera, and slowly rotate the head
back and forth with the screwdriver to obtain
a maximum indication on the valve voltmeter.
10. Re-tighten the nut, preventing the head from
rotating by means of the screwdriver.
11. Adjust the azimuth by loosening the clamping
screw half a turn, fitting a 6-B.A. spanner to
the front of the head bracket and swinging it
slowly about the axis of the spigot to obtain
a maximum indication on the valve voltmeter;
then re-tighten the clamping screw.
To Demagnetise a Part
1. Remove the affected part from the camera or
soundhead.
8.6
Instruction F.2
Section 8
P w e reissued June 1961
2. Place the part in a strong alternating magnetic
field, and slowly withdraw it. (A bulk eraser
can be used, with a protective pad of soft
material interposed between it and the part to
prevent damage.)
When demagnetising the head unit assembly,
take particular care that the working faces of the
heads are not damaged or scratched. Ensure that
both heads are fully exposed to the magnetic field.
clockwise, then anti-clockwise until the strongest
reproduced signal is obtained.
The meter reading when the meter switch is set
to Bias should be between 80 and 110; however,
some magnetic coatings require a greater bias
current, and it is sometimes necessary to set the
Bias pre-set control to maximum. The Bias pre-set
control is the variable resistor R39 in the emitter
lead to V6.
Amplifier
General
Ohm meters and circuit testing buzzers should
not be used for fault tracing, as these could cause
damage to t h e low voltage-rated electrolytic
capacitors and the transistors. The amplifier
utilises transistors throughout, and these can be
damaged by the application either of excessive
heat or o: quite small potentials of the wrong
polarity. To avoid such damage during work on
[he amplifier
(a) Soldering irons should be earthed or disconnected from the mains.
(b) A heat sink should be used while soldering.
(c) The, battery should be discontinued while
connections are being made.
To Check the Bias Rejector Tuned ,Circuit Ll, C21
1. Set the mder switch to V.I. and the bias current
to maximum. Assuming there is no a.f. input
signal to the amplifier, there should be no
indication on the meter.
2. If there is an indication, tune Ll,, C21 by means
of the adjustable core of L1 to reduce it to zero.
3. Lock the core with varnish.
The pot core assembly L1 must not be loose
inside its screening can, or the tuning of L1, C21
will vary with movement of the amplifier.
Alternative Method. Connect a valve voltmeter
between the collector of V5 and the frame of the
amplifier and tune L1 for minimum indication.
To Dismantle the Amplijer
1 . Unscrew the operational controls and the meter
from the top panel.
2. Remove the top panel, which consists of a
plate beneath an engraved escutcheon.
3. Remove Mon. jack J4, complete with bracket.
4. Unsolder the connections to the transformer T2
and those between the main component assembly
and other components on the chassis.
5. Remove the main component assembly, with
the operational controls still connected to it.
6. Remove transistor V6 from its clamp, and
unsolder connections between the bias ocsillator
assembly and other components on the chassis.
7. Remove the bias oscillator assembly.
Avoid dismantling the amplifier if possible; a
faulty or suspect component can often be removed
by unsoldering both its connections and sliding it
out between the tag strips.
To Adjust the Amplitude of the R.F. Bias
1. With the amplifier out of its case, record 1-kc/s
tone at an input level of 1 mV (-60 dB). Set
the gain controls for a V.I. reading of about
- 10 dB.
2. Turn the pre-set control labelled Bias fully
To Select the Appropriate Value of R34
1. Replay a standard level film Type 100 mil TK2
on a highquality static equipment. If necessary,
adjust the gain of the reproducing chain to
obtain a reproduced signal level of 0 dB as
indicated by a P.P.M., and leave the controls
at this setting.
2. Load the equipment under test with magneticstriped film, and adjust bias to optimum level.
3. Make a series of recordings of 1-kc/s tone, and
replay them on the static equipment, adjusting
the gain of the recording chain until a recording
is obtained which gives an indicated reproduced
signal level of 0 dB. Leave the gain of the
recording chain at the setting which produced
the zero level recording.
4. Substitute a 10-kilohm variable resistor for the
existing R34, and adjust it to obtain a V.I.
meter indication of 0 dB. (The V.I. meter is
adjusted to read 0 dB and not -8 dB (40 per
cent modulation) as it is not a peak reading
meter and is calibrated for speech.)
5. Measure the value of the variable resistor and
select a fixed resistor of the nearest value to it
from the set of standard values 8-2 kilohms,
6.8 kilohms, 5.6 kilohms. (Erie 9 f5%.)
6. Connect a microphone to Input I of the equipment under test and record speech, setting the
Instruction F.2
Section 8
Page reissued June 1961
gain of the recording chain so that the V.I.
meter indicates 0 dB on peaks of modulation.
Replay the recording on the static equipment
and check that the P.P.M. indication is approximately 6 on peaks of modulation.
NOTE:-If it is found that the V.I. is insensitive,
suspect that C20 has a high power factor, and
check by connecting another capacitor in parallel
with it. If this has no effect, increase the value of
R66 to 15 ohms.
To Set the Monitor Gain Controls
The pre-set controls labelled Dir. Gain and
P/B Gain must be adjusted while the amplifier is
out of its case. They are set to give headphone
signals of the same comfortable volume when the
Dir.-P/B switch is at its two alternative settings.
The Dir. Gain pre-set control is the variable
resistor R25 in series with the signal connection
from the recording chain to the reproducing chain.
The P/B Gain pre-set control is R49 in the collector
circuit of V9.
Battery
The meter reading when the meter switch is set
to Bat. should be above 100 for a new battery; the
battery should be renewed before the reading, falls
to 80. If for any reason a battery other than the
recommended type must be used, there is a possibility'that it could be connected with the wrong
polarity; this reversed polarity can destroy the
transistors, and great care should therefore be
taken to ensure that the connections are correct.
Run-up Time: 3.5 sec.
Friction Drum Torque: 0-5 oz-in.
Pressure Roller Arm Tension: 7 oz. (Measured
at roller.)
Compliance Arm Spring Tension: 18 oz.
(Measured with spring disconnected and
extended to $-inch length.)
Compliance Arm Damping: With the compliance arm spring disconnected, the arm
should fall between its upper and lower
limits of movement in from It to 2 seconds.
Recording Head Electrical Properties:
R = 10 ohms, L = 5 mH.
Playback Head Electrical Properties:
R = 16 ohms, L = 9 mH.
Bias Frequency: 38 kc/s f3kc/s.
4
Test Data : General
Except where otherwise implied in the following
test data, tests should be made with the equipment
set up as for normal operation, using the standard
cables supplied and new batteries.
Test Data : Soundhead
Wow: Not worse than 0-2504 r.m.s.
Flutter: Not worse then 0.25% r.m.s.
(Measured by means of a Gaumont-Kalee
Wow and Flutter Meter Type 564 connected across a I-kilohm resistive load
plugged into the headphones jack on the
soundhead; signal recorded and replayed
simultaneously.)
Sound Drum Eccentricity: Not more than
0.0004 in. (Measured by means of a dial
gauge.)
Fig. 8.4. Attenuator Pads for Film Tests on GaumontKalee Single-system Recording Equipment
Test Data: Film Tests
Recording Chain Frequency Response
Conditions: Oscillator Type TS/9 followed by
repeating-coil connected (i) via pad (a) (Fig. 8.4)
to Input 1, then (ii) via pad (b) (Fig. 8.4) to Input 2.
Level of input signal adjusted to give a V.1, meter
indication of - 10 dB at 1 kc/s. Bias pre-set
control adjusted to give the optimum bias level
determined as described on page 8.7.
-
Instruction F.2
Section 8
Page reissued Junc 1967
Method: Frequency run recorded on Zonal
coated stock, keeping signal level at input constant,
then replayed on hlgh-quality static equipment set
to C.C.I.R. characteristic.
Results: A typical response curve for both (i)
and (ii) is shown in Fig. 8.5.
Overall Frequency Response
Conditions: As for recording chain frequency
response test (i), above: in addition, P/B Gain
pre-set control adjusted to give reproduced signal
level approximately equal to that of directlymonitored signal. Valve voltmeter connected
across 150-ohm resistive load plugged to Mon.
jack J4.
responses, measured as already described.
Results: A typical response curve, deduced from
Figs. 8.5 and 8.6 is given in Fig. 8.7.
Recorded (or System) Noise Level
Conditions: Oscillator TS/9 followed by repeating-coil connected via pad (a) (Fig. 8.4) to
Input 1. Level of input signal adjusted to give a
V.I. meter indication of 0 dB at 1 kc/s. Bias preset control adjusted to give the optimum bias level.
(See page 8.7.).
Method: I-kc/s signal recorded for sufficient
time to permit measurement when reproduced;
signal then removed, all gain controls turned to
zero, and recording continued for sufficient time to
Fig. 8.5. Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Recording Chain Frequency Response
Method: Frequency run recorded on Zonal
coated stock, keeping signal level at input constant;
output signal levels measured simultaneously.
Results: A typical curve is shown in Fig. 8.6.
Reproducing Chain Frequency Response'
Conditions: Bias reduced to zero by means of
Bias pre-set control. Valve voltmeter connected
across 150-ohm resistive load plugged into Mon.
jack 54.
Method: If standard test film is available, this
is reproduced and the output signal levels measured.
If no test film is available, the results are deduced
from the recoraing chain and overall frequency
permit measurement of noise level of resulting
recorded but unmodulated film. Film replayed on
high-quality static equipment, and reproduced
signal and noise levels measured on T.P.M.
Result: The 1-kc/s tone should read 0 dB on the
T.P.M. The noise (with T.P.M. peaking 6) should
read -40 dB or better. (Note that it is the ratio
of peak programme to peak noise that is effectively
compared.)
Distortion
Conditions: Oscillator TS/9 followed by repeating-coil connected via pad (a) (Fig. 8.4) to
Input I. Level of input signal adjusted to 8 dB
InrtrPction F.2
Section 8
Page reissued June 1%1
$2 2 2 2 ~
8
8
8 -8900 •E‹08w8 2
S
4
5
6 7 8910
kc/s
Frequency, CIS
Fig. 8.6.
z
~IIIIA
Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Overall Frequency Response
kc/s
Frequency, CIS
F~/IIZA
Fig. 8.7. Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recordlng Equipment: Reproducing Chaln Frequency Response
8.10
Instnrction F.2
Section 8
Pcrge reissued June 1961
above that giving a V.I. meter indication of 0 dB
at 1 kc/s. Bias pre-set control adjusted to give the
optimum bias level. (See page 8.7.)
Method: 1-k~+signal recorded, and distortion
measured when film replayed on high-quality
static equipment.
Result: Total distortion not worse than 3 per
cent.
Test Data :Amplifier
All the d.c. measurements quoted below were
made with an Avometer Model 8.
Battery
Fall in voltage between no-load and on-load
conditions: 0.15 volt.
Total feed current: 39 milliamps.
Voltage Checks
Conditions: Bias adjusted to maximum by means
of Bias pre-set control; on-load battery voltage
7-5volts; no signal input to equipment.
Point of Measurement
(a) Across R40
-
-
(b) V5 collector to chassis
(c) V4 collector to chassis
(d) V3 collector to chassis
1
1
Voltage
Tolerance
0.2
*0.03
2.2
*0.5
2.5
3.8
1
1
*0.6
*0.6
(e) V2 collector to chassis
2.8
*0.5
(f)
V1 collector to chassis
2.8
& 04
(g)
V7 colltctor to chassis
.2.3
*0.5
--
(h) V8 collector to chassis
1
1
2-3
1
1
*0.5
(j)
V9 collector to chassis
(It)
V10 collector to chassis
3.9
*0.5
(1) V11 collector to chassis
4.4
*0.5
(m) V12 emitter to chassis
2.3
*0.5
<2-7
NOTE:-If measurement (m) is greater than
2.7 volts, increase R62 to 82 kilohms. If a collector
voltage is very low, suspect the capacitor coupling
to the base of the transistor, or the emitter decoup
ling capacitor.
Bias Current in Recording Head
Conditions : Cathode-ray oscilloscope (having
response extending to high frequencies) connected
across 1-ohm resistor in series with recording head.
Method: Peak-to-peak amplitude E of waveform measured; bias current I calculated from
expression I = E12.8 amps.
Results: Minimum = 0 mA
Maximum = 15 mA
Normal = 12 mA
NOTE:^^ sufficient bias current cannot be
obtained, this may be due to the pre-set Bias
control R39 having an excessively high minimum
resistance. The effect of short-circuiting R39
should be tried, and the component renewed if
necessary.
V.I. Meter Scale Calibration
A typical correction curve, taken a t a signal
frequency of 1 kc/s, is given in Fig. 8.8.
Recording Chain Input Sensitivities
Conditions: Both relevant gain controls set to
maximum.
Method: Oscillator Type TS/9 connected to each
input in turn via the pads shown in Fig. 8.4.
Level of 1-kc/s input signal adjusted to give a V.I.
meter indication of 0 dB; input signal levels noted.
Results: Input 1: -76 dB (approx.)
Input 2: -89 dB (approx.)
Reproducing Chain Sensitivity
Conditions: TS19 followed by repeating-cod
connected via pair of 300-ohm series resistors to
1-ohm resistor connected in series with playback
head. V.V.M. connected across 150-ohm resistive
load plugged to Mon. jack 54. P/B Gain control.set
to maximum. Bias control set to minimum.
Method: Level of 1-kc/s input signal adjusted to
obtain output signal level of -3 dB; sigaal level
across 1-ohm resistor noted.
Result: -87 dB (approx.)
Recording Head Signal Current Frequency Response
Conditions: Bias reduced to zero by means of
Bias pre-set control. Oscillator Type TS/9 connected to Input 1 via pad (a) shown in Fig. 8.4.
Valve voltmeter connected across 1-ohm resistor
connected in series with recording head. M-S
switch set to M. Input I and Main Gain controls
set to maximum. Input 2 control set to minimum.
Method: Level of input signal adjusted to give
0-dB indication on V.I. meter at frequency of
1 kc/s. Frequency of signal varied, and input
signal level adjusted to maintain constant output
signal level as indicated by valve voltmeter. Input
Instruction F.2
Section 8
page rehsued June 1961
signal levels noted, and inverse variations plotted
to give the required response curve.
Results: A typical frequency response curve is
shown in Fig. 8.9; the broken line shows the
effect of the bass-cut circuit when the M-S switch
is set to S. Some variations between equipments
may be encountered at frequencies below 1 kc/s.
Direct Monitor Chain Frequency Response
Conditions: TS/9 followed by repeating-coil
connected via pad (a) shown in Fig. 8.4 to Input 1.
V.V.M. connected across 150-ohm resistive load
plugged to Mon. jack 54. Input 1, Main Gain and
Dir. Gain controls set to maximum. Input 2 control
set to minimum. M-S switch set to M. Dir.-
shown in Fig. 8.1 1. Some variation between
equipments may be encountered .below 1 kc/s.
NOTE:-The recording head signal current and
volume indicator frequency response tests can be
carried out simultaneously, if both sets of information are required.
Recording Chain Noise Level
Conditions: Bias reduced to zero by means of
Bias pre-set control. Input I, Input 2 and Main
Gain controls set to maximum. Input I terminated with pad (a) and Input 2 with pad (b).
Method: Measurement made at base of transistor V5.
Result: -64 dB (approx.).
V.I. Meter Reading, dB
F2/1l3
Fig. 8.8. Gaumont-Kalee Singlesystem Recording Equipment: V.I. Meter Correction Curve
PIBswitch set to Dir. Bias control set to minimum.
Method: Level of input signal adjusted to give
- 10 dB indication on V.I. meter at frequency of
1 kc/s. Frequency of signal varied; constant level
maintained at input. Output levels noted.
Results: A typical frequency response curve is
shown in Fig. 8.10.
Direct Monitor Chain Noise Level
Conditions: As for recording chain noise level
test described above; in addition, Dir. Gain control
set to maximum and Dir.-P/B switch set to Dir.
Method: Measurement made across 150-ohm
resistive load plugged to Mon. jack 54.
Result: -38 dB (approx.).
Volume Indicator Frequency Response
Conditions: As for recording head signal current
frequency response test described above.
Method: As for recording head signal current
frequency response test, but noting the V.I. meter
readings.
Results: A typical freqaency response curve is
Reproducing Chain Noise Level
Conditions: P/B Gain control set to maximum.
Dir.-PIB switch set to PIB. Bias control set to
minimum.
Method: Measurement made across 150-ohm
resistive load plugged to Mon. jack J4.
Result: -45 dB (approx.).
Instruction F.2
Section 8
Frequency, c l s
F21114
Fig. 8.9. Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment: Recording Head Signo!-current Frequency Response
Frequency, CIS
kcls
F21121
Fig. 8.10. Gaurnont-Kolee Single-system Recording Equipment: Direct Monitor Chain Frequency Response
8.13
Instruction F.2
Section 8
Possible Faults
High Background Noise
A high background noise level which persists
when the gain control of the amplifier is turned
fully anticlockwise may indicate that some part
of the equipment is magnetised; the procedure for
checking for magnetisation and for demagnetising
the part is given on page 8.6.
connection; if signals are obtained, and the
recording head is making proper contact with the
film, check for a fault in the head unit assembly
or the connections to it. If means are to hand
for demagnetising the head unit assembly, the
windings of the heads may be checked for continuity
and insulation from frame. (The resistances of
the recording and replay heads should be 10 ohms
+I0
+
6
m
"
+ b
=
w
+ 4
0
a
CL
z + 2
u
>
0
.-
0
Y
e
-
2
-4
Fig. 8.
Reproduced Sound Varying in Level and Quality
This may be due to incorrect lacing of the film,
resulting in loss of proper contact between the
film and the heads. Check the lacing by inspection.
Speed Variations
If speed variations are noticed, check the state
of the camera battery.
and 16 ohms respectively.)
Low Ampli$er Gain
This is most likely to be due to the failure of a
decoupling capacitor in the emitter circuit of one
of the transistors; the fault may be either an open
, circuit or poor power factor.
OPERATION
Failure to Record
If the amplifier appears to be working correctly,
but no signal is recorded on the film, check that signals are being applied to the recording head by connecting a pair of headphones between pins 3 and 6
of the connector mating with J7 on the soundhead.
(This test must be made at the soundhead end of
the cable because the unplugging of the cable from
the amplifier breaks the battery circuit.) If no
signals are obtained, check for a faulty cable or
Controls
The control panel of the amplifier (Fig. 8.12)
carries a meter and the following operational
controls :
1 . Input 1
2. Input 2
These are gain controls affecting
separate input stages, of different
input impedances and sensitivities
to suit various types of microphone and recording conditions.
Instruction F.2
Section 8
3. Main Gain
A gain control connected later in
the recording chain, affecting both
inputs.
4. Off-Bat.V. I.-Bias
switch
This is a combined on/off and
meter switch. When it is set to
Off, the amplifier is switched off.
When it is set to Bat. or Bias, the
battery and r.f. bias voltages,
respectively, are indicated by the
meter. When it is set to V.I., the
meter is connected as a volume
indicator.
5. Dir.-P/B
switch
This switch enables either the
incoming signal or that reproduced from the flm immediately
Setting up the Equipment
First check that the meter switch of the amplifier
(4 above) is set to Off. Then connect the amplifier
to the soundhead by means of a cable Type 1702
or Type 1725, which fits the six-way connectors on
the underside of the amplifier and on the righthand side of the soundhead. On no account must
the cable be connected or disconnected while the
amplifier is switched on, as this could lead to the
recording head becoming magnetised, with a
resulting increase in recorded background noise.
Turn the meter switch to Bat. and check that
the meter reading is above 100; then turn the
switch to Bias and d e c k that the reading is as
previously determined for optimum performance of
the equipment (page 8.7).
Plug a microphone to one of the input con-
Fig. 8.12. Gaumont-Kalee Single-system Recording Equipment:
Control Panel of Recording Amplifier Type 1691
after being recorded to be heard
in the monitor headphones (Dir.
and P/B settings respectively).
6. M-S
switch
nectors on the underside of the amplifier. If
speech close to the microphone is to be recorded,
Input 1 should be used, with a microphone of from
20 to 2000 ohms impedance. (The optimum
impedance for the best signal/noise ratio is 500
ohms.) Input 2 should be used when loud signals
are not expected, and the speaker or artist is to
be at a distance of from 6 to 10 feet from the
microphone; a microphone having an impedance
of from 20 to 60 ohms is recommended. Twomicrophone arrangements are possible, using both
inputs; if only one input is used, the gain control
for the unused input should be turned fully
anticlockwise to eliminate electrical noise from
the unused input stage.
Plug a pair of sensitive 150-ohm headphones
into the jack on the soundhead; if the equipment
When this is set to S, the lowfrequency response of the amplifier is cut to eliminate boominess
on recorded speech. This is partitularly useful when the speaker
is close to the microphone.
Pre-set controls are provided for the adjustment
of the r.f. bias voltage and the volume of the
monitoring signals; these controls are described
under Maintenance Information, and are not
accessible to the camera operator or recordist in
the field.
8.15
Instruction F.2
Section 8
is operated by a two-man team, plug a second
pair of headphones into the jack on the side of
the amplifier.
Thread the soundhead and camera as shown in
Fig. 8.1, and ensure that the camera battery is
fully charged. The governor speed-controlled
motor must be used.
Set the meter switch to V.Z., and adjust the gain
controls to obtain a meter reading of 0 dB for
peaks of modulation. During recording, do not
alter the setting of the meter switch, as this may
cause clicks to be recorded; for the same reason,
operation of the Dir.-P/B switch should be kept
to a minimum. It is a wise procedure to work
with this switch normally set to P/B, to ensure
that a recording is being made.
If the camera operator and recordist are working
out of earshot of one another, they can communicate by means of the headphones, using them as
microphones as well as for listening.
Do not run the film through the soundhead
twice, or try to use the equipment to reproduce a
recording previously made; if this is done, the r.f.
bias will partially erase the recording.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 9
GAUMONT-KALEE SOUNDHEAD TYPE 1690B WITH BBC AMPLIFIER TYPE AM151502
General
This equipment is a variation of that described
in Section 8, and produces the same type of
recording on magnetic-striped film. The soundhead
differs from Type 1690 only in being fitted with a
head unit assembly having recording and playback
heads of lower impedance, slightly differently
connected to the six-way connector J7 (Fig. 1) on
the soundhead. The amplifier is described in
Instruction F.4.
is similar to that of Type 1690, only the electrical
properties of the recording and playback heads
being different.
Circuit
A circuit diagram showing the connections of
the recording and playback heads to the amplifier
is given in Fig. 9.1.
Maintenance Information
The soundhead Type 1690B utilises the same
I CABLE TO AMPLIFIER
SOUNOHEAD TYPE 16900
I
I
Fig. 9.1.
Recording and Playback Head Connections between Gaumont-Kalee
Soundhead Type 16908 and BBC Amplifier Type AM 15/502
type of magnetic head, having a resistance of
3 ohms and an inductance of 1 mH, for both
recording and playback. The jig used to set up
the heads must be constructed in accordance with
Fig. 9.2, and the valve-voltmeter used to measure
the output of the amplifier must have an impedance
The electrical connections between the soundhead and the amplifier are made via a single six-way
cable.
Mechanical Construction
The construction of the soundhead Type 1690B
9.1
Instruction F.2
Section 9
of at least 10 kilohms. Apart from these differences,
the information relating to the soundhead Type
1690 on pages 8.5, 8.6 and 8.7 applies.
Film tests and maintenance of the amplifier
should be carried out in accordance with
Instruction F.4.
Most of the remarks on page 8.14 relating to
possible faults on the soundhead Type 1690 apply
to Type 1690B also.
connectors on the underside of the amplifier and
on the right-hand side of the soundhead. Do not
connect or disconnect the cable while the amplifier
is switched on, as this could lead to the recording
head becoming magnetised, with a resulting increase
in the recorded background noise. The six-way
cable is physically interchangeable with the fourway cables used in the system described in Section
8; care must be taken that they are not so inter-
connEcm
TYPE
I
REPRO
CHAIN
INPUT
/
OUTPUT
AMPLIFIER
PHONES
I
CABLE TO
SOUWDHEAD
{
REC CHAIN
OUWT
2 rls HEAD
REC HEAD
SWITCH POSITIONS
Fig. 9.2. Head Alignment jig for use with Gaumont-Kalee Somihead Type 16908 and
BBC Amplifier Type AM 15/502
Operation
Thread the soundhead and camera as shown in
Fig. 8.1, and ensure that the camera battery is
fully charged. The governor speed-controlled
motor must be used.
Connect the amplifier to the soundhead by
means of a six-way cable, which fits the six-way
changed, or the equipment will not function.
The operation of the amplifier is described in
Instruction F.4.
Do not run the film through the soundhead
twice, or try to use the equipment to reproduce a
recording previously made; if this is done, the
r.f. bias will partially erase the recording.
Instruction F.2
SECTION 10
SOUND SYSTEM USING BBC MAGNETIC TAPE RECORDER TYPE RD4/501
General
This system produces a recording on standard
4-inch magnetic tape. The recorder is described in
Instruction R.10. Certain additions to the camera
are necessary to enable the recorder to be used in
conjunction with it; these are a slating unit, a
synchronising-tone generator and a film-marking
lamp.
The slating unit contains a transistor multivibrator circuit, a press-button switch (the slating
button) via which power is supplied to the multivibrator and to the film-marking lamp, and a pilot
lamp connected in series with the film-marking
lamp to give a visual indication of its operation.
When the slating button is pressed momentarily,
a burst of tone (with a frequency of approximately
750 c/s) is produced by the multivibrator, and is
fed to the recorder, where it is recorded on one of
two half-width tracks of the tape, designated
Track 1. This track is primarily that on which the
programme sound is recorded.
The synchronising-tone generator is driven from
the camera mechanism; its output signal is thus
positively locked with the picture film. This
signal, which is of sinusoidal waveform and has a
frequency of 50 c/s when the film speed is 25
frames per second, is recorded on the second track
of the tape, designated Track 2, and provides a
means whereby the picture film and the tape can
be held in step during reproduction.
The film-marking lamp is inside the camera;
when the slating button is pressed, the lamp glows
and illuminates the film through apertures cut in
the Back Pressure Plate and the Back Pressure
Hinge. Thus the film is fogged at a point corresponding in programme time to the burst of tone
on the tape. This arrangement provides a means
by which the film and the tape can be synchronised
for reproduction.
The electrical connections between the camera
and the recorder are made via a three-way Cannon
connector on the generator and a single Belling
Lee socket on the slating unit.
The Arriflex Blimp 16 as used by the BBC
contains wiring and connections to enable the
recorder RD41501 to be used. A slight modification is necessary to the slating unit of a camera
when it is used in .the blimp; this is described on
page 7.5.
Mechanical Construction
The generator is driven from an extra gear
wheel, of BBC manufacture, which is added to the
Gears for Shaft I1 (see page 2.4) of the camera
mechanism. Fig. 10.1 shows the gears (a) in their
original form and (b) with the additional gear
added. The generator is mounted on the righthand side of the camera housing, with its shaft
extending into the interior of the camera. The
shaft carries a pinion which meshes with the extra
gear.
The drilling of the camera housing so that the
pinion on the generator shaft is brought into
accurate mesh with the extra gear on the camera
mechanism is an operation requiring a high degree
of mechanical precision; cameras should therefore
be handed over to he appropriate specialist
department when they are required to be modified.
The rotor of the generator, which runs in
ballraces, consists of an axially-magnetised toroidal
magnet of ticonal alloy, clamped on the shaft
between two four-limbed pole-pieces bent to form
a ring of alternate north and south poles. The
stator is constructed on the same principle, but
with the coil of the generator in place of the
magnet, and the limbs of the pole-pieces arranged
so that the rotor can fit inside them.
The connections to the coil are via two pins of
a Cannon connector Type XL-3-42 which is
mounted on the generator housing.
The slating unit is attached to the camera door;
it consists of a printed wiring card, with the
small components mounted on it; a microswitch;
a Belling Lee 3-mm socket 150 (Fig. 10.3) and a
pilot lamp. The printed card is shown in Fig. 10.2;
it is mounted in the unit by screws passing through
Instruction F.2
Section 10
holes 140. A washer 141, soldered to element a
of the printed wiring, provides a durable bearing
surface for the head of a further screw which is
one of two securing the unit to the camera door,
and which also forms the earth connection. The
the actuating spring of the microswitch to form
the slating button, the position of which enables
it to be operated by a finger of the camera operator's
left hand.
The unit is protected by a cover 144 secured
by a single screw, which passes through the hole
143 (Fig. 10.2) in the printed card into a tapped
brass block. The cover is pierced with holes
Fig. 10.2. Printed W i r i n g Card of Slating Unit for
use with Recorder Type RD4/501
Fig. 10.1. Modification to Gears for Shaft I1 of Arriflex
16-mm Camera Mechanism to provide drive for
Synchronising Tone Generator
Belling Lee socket is contained in the hole 142
and a corresponding hole in a tufnol block on
which the card is mounted; the block also accommodates the microswitch and the pilot lamp.
A brass switch button 151 (Fig. 10.3) is riveted to
through which the Belling Lee socket and the
slating button project; a further hole (indicated at
145 in Fig. 10.3) contains a green lamp cap,
soldered into place, through which the glow of the
pilot lamp is visible to the camera operator. The
lamp is of a specially small type, marketed by
Allen & Hanbury Ltd. (Cat. No. 28002).
The film marking lamp is of the same type as the
pilot lamp in the slating unit. It is housed in a
lampholder 148 consisting of two parts screwed
together, which enclose it except for a &-inch hole;
the lampholder is supported in a position immedi-
Instruction F.2
Section 10
Page reissued October 1%2
ately behind the Back Pressure Hinge of the
camera, and light from the hole passes through
corresponding holes drilled for the purpose in the
Back Pressure Hinge and the Back Pressure Plate
to illuminate a small area of the frame of film in
the camera gate. The lamp is a loose fit inside the
lampholder; a compression spring surrounding the
glass bulb maintains good electrical contact
between the body of the lamp and the holder,
and also thrusts the tip contact of the lamp against
an insulated rivet via which the remaining con-
when the door is closed.
Cucuit Description
A circuit diagram of the synchronising-tone
generator, slating unit and film-marking lamp is
given in Fig. 10.4.
The winding of the generator is connected to
pins 2 and 3 of PL2, which is the miniature
Cannon connector Type XL-3-42 mentioned on
page 10.1. Pin 3 is also earthed to the generator
housing and so to the camera housing, to provide
Fig. 10.3. Attachments to Door of Camera for use
with Recorder Type RD4/501
nection is made. The bracket on which the
lampholder is mounted is attached to the inside of
the camera door; it is partly visible at 149 (Fig.
10.3).
Power for the slating unit and the film marking
lamp is taken from the switch assembly of the
camera via a c m a c t point 61 (Fig. 2.3) originally
provided for the purpose in conjunction with the
Maihak sound system. A contact is mounted on
the camera door at a position indicated by 146
(Fig. 10.3) to mate with that on the switch assembly
continuity of earthing between the camera and the
recprder.
The slating unit contains a simple multivibrator
circuit, using two transistors Type OC71. The
output is taken via C3 from a tapping on the
collector load R4, R5 of VT2; it is connected via
the Belling Lee 3-mm socket SK1 and a flying
lead to tag 1 of the connector mating with PL2,
and thence to the recorder by way of a conductor
of the cable. Pin 1 of PL2 is not connected; only
the tag of the mating socket is used, as an anchoring
SLATING U N I T
GENERATOR
I
Fig. 10.4. Electrical Modifications to Arriflex 16-mm Camera for use with Recorder Type RD4/501
Instruction F.2
Section 10
point for the flying lead.
The pilot lamp LP1 and the film-marking lamp
are connected in series with the voltage-dropping
resistor R6 across the multivibrator circuit, so that
both lamps glow when power is applied to the
unit. Each lamp is rated at 2.5 volts.
Power for the slating unit and the film-marking
lamp is drawn from the camera battery via S1, by
means of which the circuit is operated; S1 is a
microswitch, biased to its off position, with a
switch button riveted to its actuating spring.
The connection of S1 to the camera circuit is by
means of a contact mounted on the camera door
which mates with one on the switch assembly.
The negative side of the multivibrator circuit is
earthed by a screw which is tapped into the camera
housing through washer 141 (Fig. 10.2) soldered to
metalised area a of the printed card.
Test Data
Synchronising Tone Generator output: 1.7 volts
(+7 dB approx.). (Measured by means of
an Avometer -Model 8 at pins 2 and 3 of
the input plug to the recorder Type
RD4/501, with the recorder connected.)
Slating Unit output: 3 volts d.a.p. (Measured
by means of a cathode-ray oscilloscope at
socket SKI on the unit.)
Slating Unit multivibrator current consumption: 3-9 mA.
lnstruction F.2
Page reissued Ofloher 1962
SECTION 11
SOUND SYSTEM USING MAIHAK REPORTOFON MAGNETIC TAPE RECORDERS
General
This system so closely resembles that described
in Section 10, and so few examples of it are in
BBC use, that only a brief description of the
modifications to the camera is deemed necessary.
Of the three recorders in use, two are Type MMK3
and one is Type MMK4, and all have been more
or less extensively and differently modified;
therefore no details of them are given in this
Instruction.
The programme signal is recorded in the normal
manner, on a full-width track. The synchronising
tone is recorded on a narrow track along the
middle of the tape; this recordl'ng is in the form of
a variation with tape length of lateral magnetisation,
instead of the variation of longitudinal magnetisation more usually employed. The purpose of
this arrangement is to minimise interaction
between the synchronising tone and the programme
signal (see Appendix D). The slating signal is
superimposed on the synchronising tone, instead
of on the programme signal as in the system
described in Section 10.
The electrical connections between the camera
and the recorder are made via a single cable; in
most equipments, this is fitted with a two-pin plug
which mates with an adaptor plugged into two
sockets fitted in the right-hand side of the camera
housing. A flying lead from the adaptor is plugged
into a socket on the slating unit.
(distinguished by an adjacent spot of white paint)
via which the output from the oscillator is fed
from the unit, two others are fitted, the purpose
of which is explained under the heading Circuit
Description. To ensure reliable electrical continuity between the camera door and housing, a
flying lead is fitted; -this is earthed to the camera
door in the slating unit, and carries at its free end
a pin which is inserted into the eyeletted Carrying
Screw 25 (Fig. 2.1) when the door is in position.
The slating unit is protected by a sheet metal
cover secured in position by a single screw.
The film-marking lamp, which is of the same type
as the pilot lamp, is housed in a brass block
attached to the lower front corner of the door.
The lamp is retained in position by a clip which
forms the electrical connection to the base contact
of the lamp. The body of the lamp is earthed
to the door by the brass block. This has a pinhole
in its bottom edge through which light passes
when the lamp glows; when the door is in position,
the loop of film below the camera gate passes
below the block, and so the film is marked by the
light from the lamp.
Power .for the slating unit and the film-marking
lamp is taken from the switch assembly of the
camera via the contact point 61 (Fig. 2.3). A
contact is mounted at the lower rear corner of the
door to mate with the contact point 61 when the
door is closed.
Mechanical Construction
The synchronising tone generator is mounted on
the right-hand side of the camera housing, and is
driven from the camera mechanism, in the same
manner as in the system described in Section 10.
The coil of the generator is connected to two
sockets, coloured red and black, mounted nearby.
The slating unit, which is attached to the camera
door, is of conventional construction, and provides
facilities similar to those described in Section 10.
The slating button is in the form of a tab extending
downward from the unit to a position just above
the Switch Lever and Switch Fixing Lever, where
it can be operated by a finger of the camera
operator's left hand. In addition to the socket
Circuit Description
A circuit diagram of the synchronising-tone
generator, slating unit and film-marking lamp is
shown in Fig. 11.1.
The winding of the generator is connected to
two sockets, distinguished by red and black
mouldings; the black socket is earthed to the
camera housing.
The slating unit contains a push-pull oscillator
circuit, using two transistors Type OC604 in a
common-base arrangement.*
The frequencydetermining element is a tuned circuit consisting
*The transistor Type OC72 has been used successfully
as a replacement.
SLATING UNIT
NOTES I IN CAMERAS USED
THE 66C.THf CONTACTS OF SZ ARE
PERMANTLY SHORT CIRCUITED.AS SHOWN BY THE DOTTED
CONNECTION.
2. R Z TO BE FITTED IF ORIGINAL 4v. LAMPS REPLACED 6 y
ALLEN AN0 HANWJRY 2.5V TYPE.
CAMERA
@g-}
ADAPTOR
SYNC AND
SLATING
SIGNALS
TO RECORDER
GENERATOR
FILM MARKING
4%
SWITCH
ASSEMBLY
H
I
DISUSED CONTACT
STUDS
sama
I
Fig. 11.1
Electrlcal Modifications to Arriflex 16-mm Camera for use with Malhak Recorder
Instruction F.2
Section 11
of the primary winding of the transformer and
C1; this forms the collector loads of the transistors
and is back-coupled to their emitters by the
secondary winding of the transformer. The resistor
R1 is a voltage-dropping component, adjusted on
test to obtain the correct operating potential at
the bases of the transistors. The output of the
circuit is taken from a tertiary winding of the
transfoimer, connected between earth and a socket
on the slating unit. This socket is connected to
the recorder via an adaptor which fits into the
generator sockets and accepts the cable to the
recorder; the purpose of the adaptor is to break
the connection which would otherwise be made
between the earthed side of the generator winding
and a conductor of the cable, and connect this
conductor, by means of a flying lead, to the output
socket of the slating unit. Thus the generator and
the tertiary winding of the slating oscillator are
connected in series, and the two signals are
recorded on the same track of the tape. The output
socket of the slating unit is distinguished by a
white mark from two others mounted near it.
One of these sockets, distinguished by a red mark,
is connected to the dead side of S1; the other,
with which S2 is associated, is connected to earth.
The latter sockets arc part of a facility, not used in
BBC practice, for linking two cameras to work
simultaneously with a single recorder.
The
contacts S2 are opened when a plug having a pin
of sufficient length is inserted into the socket
with which they are associated; in all equipments
in BBC use they have been short-circuited (as
shown by a dotted line in Fig. 11.1) because they
were found to be prone to accidental damage
which resulted in the oscillator being put out of
action.
The pilot lamp LPl and the film-marking lamp
are connected in series across the oscillator circuit,
and both lamps glow when power is applied to
the unit. The lamps are each rated at 4 volts;
they can be replaced by the Allen and Hanbury
2-5-volt lamps used in the system described in
Section 10 if a 27-ohm voltage-dropping resistor
R2 is connected in series with them.
Power for the slating unit and the film-marking
lamp is drawn from the camera battery via S1,
which is the slating button by which the circuits
are operated. The connection to the camera
battery is via a contact mounted on the camera
door, which mates with one on the switch assembly.
The negative sides of the circuits are earthed to
the camera door, and to ensure a good connection
to the camera housing a flying lead (not indicated
in Fig. 11.1, but already described on page 1 1.l)
is provided.
Some of the cameras modified for use with this
system are fitted with a pair of contact studs,
which are no longer used. The studs are mounted
on the bottom of the switch assembly and project
through insulating bushes in holes in the bottom
of the camera housing. One of these studs is
connected in the switch assembly to the live side
of the camera battery, and the other to the live
side of the synchronising tone generator. The
connections are shown in Fig. 11.1.
Instruction F.2
APPENDIX A
PARTS LIST:
Muker's
Part No.
Quantity
ARRIFLEX 16-mm CAMERA
Maker's Nomenclature
in Figs.
Notes
Assembled with turret bearing insert
and parts Nos. A-39, A-40, A-49
to 52, A-58 to 61, A-63 to 65,
A-70 to 73, A-77.
1
Camera housing
1
Brass bush for feed spool
1
Brass bush for take-up spool
2
Screws for A-15
2
Knurled knobs
2
Washers for A-15
1
Ratched clip (feed)
1
Ratched clip (take-up)
1
Ratched gear (feed)
1
Ratched gear (take-up)
1
Spool shaft, complete (feed)
Comprising parts Nos. A-7, A-14 to
17, A-20.
1
Spool shaft, complete (takeUP)
Comprising parts Nos. A-9, A-14 to
16, A-18, A-21.
2
Belt tension pulleys
Spring-cord belts transmitting drive
from camera mechanism to spool
shafts.
1
Lens turret stud
Secure knurled knobs to shafts of
ratched gears (parts Nos. A-20
and A-21).
Loose pulleys for parts No. A-24,
with spring-loaded pawls to engage
with ratched gears A-20 and A-21.
Spool shafts, with ratchet wheels.
A. 1
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Muker's
Part No.
Quantity
Rej: No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
Notes
-
Nut for A-27
1
Screw for A-27
I
Adjusting washer for A-27
1
I
I
Inserting plate with *-in. and
&in. thread
Secures lens turret stud to camera
housing.
Secures lens turret to lens turret stud.
Receives screw of tripod or other
mounting device.
i
Countersunk screws for A-39
Baffle
Screwed inside camera housing above
film aperture plate, forming parts of
front and right-hand walls of lefthand compartment.
Countersunk screws for A 4 2
Receives aluminium square runner
supporting skyshade.
Matte box bracket
Countersunk screws for A-46
Magazine locks
Clips securing 400-ft magazine or
light trap cover (part No. A-54).
Countersunk screws for A 4 9
Fixing pins for A-49
Carrying screws
Eye-screws, with split rings, for neck
strap.
400-ft magazine light trap
cover
Clips between A 4 9 to cover hole in
housing through which film passes
from and to 400-ft magazine.
Plexiglas cover for counter
Forms windows for footage and frame
counters, with cursor lines.
Countersunk screw for A-58
Locking lever
Screw for A-60
I
1
!
i
I
7
These form, with a flap cut from the
camera housing, a clamp securing
the motor.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quaritity
Re$ No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
Notes
Plexiglass screw
Tapped into tip of A-6 1, holds A-60
captive.
Insulation plate
Accommodates contact pins (parts
NO. A-65).
Contact pins with nuts
Engage with battery lead connector.
Cable with bi-metal contact
Length of insulated copper wire with
contact attached at end, forming
electrical connection from switch
assembly to take-up motor of
400-ft magazine.
Insulation bush
Insulates contact on A-70
camera housing.
Cable terminals
Clips securing A-70 in camera housing
from
Cheese-head screws for A-72
Plexiglass for tachometer
Circular window in camera housing
over tachometer dial.
Large assembly plate
Complete with lubrication system
consisting of parts Nos. B-3 to 4,
E l 2 to 14 and copper pipes.
Fixing screws for B-l
Brass bearing for I l l
Bearing for shaft I11 (part No. B-114)
of mechanism.
Brass bearing for IV
Bearing for shaft IV (part No. B-9)
of mechanism.
Countersunk screws for B-3
and B-4
Held parallel with large assembly
plate B-1 by distance pins 8-7
to form framework supporting
footage and frame counter gear
train. Has brass bearings for drum
shafts (parts Nos. B-34 and B-39).
Small assembly plate
I
Distance pins for B-1
A.3
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
--
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
--
Maker's Nomenclature
Rex No.
in Figs.
Notes
--
B-8
3
Screws for B-7
B-9
1
Shaft IV with gear
Extends though B-1 to carry upper
sprocket.
B-10
1
Gears for shaft I assembled
Two gears riveted together, running
loose on a retaining pin (part
No. B-12). (Shaft I is fictitious.)
B-11
1
Gears for shaft I1 assembled
Two gears riveted together, running
loose on a retaining pin (part No.
B-13). (Shaft I1 is fictitious.)
B-12
1
Retaining pin for shaft I
Contains oiling point; oil conducted
to B-13 also by copper pipe.
B-13
1
Retaining pin for shaft I1
B-14
1
Central lubrication pin
Contains oiling point; oil conducted
to bearings for I11 and IV by
copper pipes.
B-15
2
Screws for B-I2 and E-13
Secure gear assemblies (parts Nos.
B-10 and B-1 1) to the retaining
pins.
B-26
2
Sprockets with pulleys
B-27
2
Screws for B-26
B-28
2
Washers for B-26
B-34
1
Shaft with gear and brass bush
Final shaft of footage counter gear
train; runs in brass bearing on
B-6, carries footage counter drum.
B-39
1
Combined gear with brass
bush
Intermediate shaft of footage counter
gear train; runs in brass bearing
on B-6, carries frame counter drum.
B-41
2
Counter drums
One calibrated in frames, one in feet.
B-42
2
Compression springs for B-41
Give light friction coupling between
B-41 and bushes on B-34 and
B-39.
B-45
2
Nuts for B-41
Screw on to threaded ends of B-34
and B-39, securing drums B-41 in
position.
Grubscrews securing B-26 to shafts.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
Combined gear
Combined gear
Intermediate shafts of footage counter
gear train, supported between B-1
and B-6.
Combined gear
Retaining pin for film retaining arm
Secured to large assembly plate by
one of screws B-57.
Screws for B-56
One secures retaining pin B-56 to
large assembly plate; the other
retains film retaining arm on B-56.
Film retaining arm complete
Arm, spring-loaded against sprockets
to hold film in position. Includes
parts Nos. B-56 to 65 and B-70 to
72.
Bush for B-56
Push fit in base of film retaining arm,
forms bearing surface for B-56.
Coil spring
Surrounds r.h. end of B-59, in space
formed by step in diameter of
hole in arm. Acts between flange
of B-56 and arm, to press arm
against sprockets.
Locking pin
Fits loosely in hole through free end
of film retaining arm. L.H. end is
threaded, carries release knob B-63.
R.H. end presses on tension spring
B-64 when release knob is pressed.
Pin is retained in position by complementary steps in own diameter
and that of hole in arm.
Compression spring
Surrounds 1.h. end of B-61, acts
between release knob B-63 and
step in diameter of hole in film
retaining arm.
Release knob
Tension spring
Leaf spring, secured to large assembly
plate by screws B-65; free end
catches pin in r.h. face of film retaining arm when arm is pulled
clear of sprockets, to permit lacing
of camera.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
ReS. No.
in Figs.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
2
Cheese-head screws for B-64
2
Film strippers
Shells fitting closely to parts of
sprockets not in contact with film
to ensure that film does not become
wrapped round sprockets.
4
Countersunk screws for B-68
Secure strippers to large assembly
plate.
1
Film guide plate
Three-armed plate, secured to 1.h.
face of free end of film retaining
arm. Gives lateral location to film.
3
Screws for B-70
3
Washers for B-70
Between film guide plate and film
retaining arm. Variation of number used gives adjustment of film
guide plate.
4
Countersunk screws for B-80
Secure bearing housing B-80 to large
assembly plate.
2
Pins for B-80
Locate B-80 accurately on large
assembly plate.
2
Ballraces
Support driving shaft B-78 in bearing
housing B-80.
2
Insulation strips for B-75
Packing for B-75 in B-80.
3
Screws for B-81
Grubscrews securing tension bush
B-81 to driving shaft B-78.
1
Driving shaft with bevel gear
Couples motor to claw shaft D-6.
1
Distance bush
On driving shaft B-78 between ballraces B-75.
1
Bearing housing
Supports driving shaft B-78 in ballraces B-75 on large assembly plate.
1
Tension bush with clutch ring
Secures rubber coupling B-82
driving shaft B-78.
1
Rubber coupling
Engages with collar on motor spindle.
Secured to driving shaft B-78 by
tension bush B-81.
--
Notes
to
Instruction F.
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref- No.
in Figs.
Notes
Key rings
A pair of half-rings, encircling driving
shaft B-78 inside tension bush
B-8 1. For function, see page 2.3.
Nut for B-78
On threaded end of driving shaft
B-78, inside tension bush B-81.
For function see page 2.3.
Bearing housing for motor
drive complete
Comprising B-75 to 84.
Tachometer
Plexiglass bevel gear
Couples tachometer to claw shaft
(part No. D-I).
Screw for B-92
Grubscrew securing B-92 to shaft of
tachometer.
Tachometer housing
Supports tachometer.
Countersunk screws for B-95
Attach B-95 to large assembly plate.
Shaft I11 with gears
Extends through large assembly plate
to carry lower sprocket. Drives
footage counter gear train.
Complete switch unit assembled
Comprises parts Nos. C-2, C-4 to 12
and C-14.
Switch housing
Cover for C-1 with screw
Contact spring with silver
contact
Forms moving contact of switch and
connection to live contact pin
(part No. A-65). Clamped in
slot in C-2 by grub screw provided.
Contact bridge with fixing
rivets
Forms fixed contact of switch and
contact blade to motor. Attached
to C-2 by rivets.
Instroction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
(
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
Switch lever
68
69
Short spindle, passing through bearing in wall of C-2, with lever at
each end, via which switch is
actuated by plunger of pistol grip.
Lever inside switch assembly engages with C-7 and moves against
compression spring (part No. C- 11),
giving ' biased-to-off ' action.
Direction switch with pin
16
Vertically sliding member of switch
mechanism, linked to moving contact by C-9 and C-10 to give
quick-make-and-break action. Top
end works through slot in wall of
C-2, is actuated by switch plunger
(part No. E-13) of camera door.
Lower end supported by C-6 and
actuated by it when pistol grip used.
Clamp with screws
70
Small brass clamp, with two grubscrews, connecting cable (part No.
A-70) to motor contact blade of
C-5.
Switch fork
66
Bifurcated stud with slotted head,
supporting compression spring
(part No. C-10) which links C-7
and C-4.
Compression spring for C-6
67
Acts between one arm of C-6 and
bottom wall of C-2.
Insulation sleeve
64
Contains C-14.
Compression spring for C-9
Compression spring for C-4
Acts between branch of C-4 bearing
on A-65 and internal moulded
projection of C-2; ensures firm
contact between C-4 and A-65.
Claw shaft, mounted, complete with register claw
Comprises parts Nos. D-2,
D-6 to 8, D-13 to 15.
Transport claw with cam and
universal joint, fully assembled
44
75
D-4,
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
Notes
-
Supports transport claw on transport
mechanism housing. (Included in
D-2.)
Universal joint, fully assembled
Register claw with cam, assembled
Register cam, retaining pin
and guiding roller
Actuates register claw. (Included in
D-4.)
Claw shaft with gear, assembled
Vertical shaft of shutter and transport
mechanism, with worm gear.
Ballrace
Upper bearing for D-6.
Ballrace
Lower bearing for D-6.
Insulation strip for D-7
Packing for ballraces D-7 and D-8 in
transport mechanism housing.
Insulation strip for D-8
Retaining clip for D-7
Circlips, retaining D-7 and D-8 in
transport mechanism housing.
Retaining clip for D-8
Bevel gear
At upper end of claw shaft; drives
tachometer.
Plexiglass bevel gear
At lower end of claw shaft; couples
claw shaft to motor drive shaft.
Countersunk screws for D-14
Secure D-14 to lower end of transport
claw cam.
Mirror shutter, mounted on
bearing bracket
Zomprises parts Nos. D-29, D-32,
D-40 to 43.
Bearing bracket with ballrace
Bush wheel to carry mirror shutter,
on shaft with ballraces (parts Nos.
D-33 and D-34, screw (part No.
D-30) and washer (part No. D-3 1).
Cheese-head screw for D-29
h
..
/
Secure ballrace (part No. D-34) to
end of shaft of D-29.
I
Washer for D-29
J '
A.9
Instmction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
Quantity
I
Notes
D-32
Gear with bush complete
Couples mirror shutter shaft to worm
gear on claw shaft.
D-33
Ball race
Included in D-29; the nearer to the
minor shutter of two ballraces.
D-34
Ballrace
Included in D-29; the further from
the mirror shutter of two ballraces.
D-35
Insulation strip for D-33
D-36
Insulation strip for D-34
D 4
Mirror shutter
D41
Screw with rubber sleeve
D-42
Felt washer for D-43
D-43
Fixing screw for D-40
D-45
Transport mechanism housing
13-46
Cover with screw for D-45
D-47
Film aperture plate
D-48
Countersunk screws for M 7
Pins for D-47
J3-49
Side runner guide
Polished steel strip locating right-hand
edge of film.
D-50
Film side tension runner
Polished steel strip spring-loaded
against left-hand edge of film.
D-5 1
Tension springs with fixing
pins for D-50
Anti-vibration packing for ballraces.
Tapped into D 2 9 ; locates D-40.
Tapped into end of shaft of D-29;
secures D-40.
Small tab screwed to front of D-45,
shields hole receiving register claw
against entry of stray light.
I
I
Retaining plate
D-52
1
I
i
A. 10
In cavities in D-45; act between D-50
and the pins which lie across the
innermost ends of the cavities.
Screwed to edge of transport mechanism housing; guards film side tension runner, supports prism holder
,
(part No. E-10). -
Instmction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Ref: No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclatut e
Notes
Cheese-head screws for D-52
Pins for D-52
Back pressure hinge
Forms door closing over film aperture
plate; carries back pressure plate
(part No. D-56).
Screws for D 5 4
Tapped into transport mechanism
housing through bent-over tabs
at ends of back pressure hinge,
forming hinges; also secure side
runner guide (part No. E-49).
Back pressure plate with compression spring
Mounted on back pressure hinge;
presses film against film aperture
plate (part No. E-47).
Locking lever
Spring-loaded latch engaging with
retaining plate (part No. E-52)
to hold back pressure hinge in
closed position.
Locking knob
Screw for D-54
Secures locking lever to back pressure hinge.
Retaining screw for D-54
Thrust point for spring of locking
lever.
Cheese-head screws for D-100
Secure shutter and transport mechanism to camera housing. (Behind
D-47.)
Cmntersunk screws for D- 100
Secure shutter and transport mechanism to large assembly plate B-1.
Back pressure plate complete
with screws
Comprises parts Nos. D-54 to D-60.
and transport mechII Shutter
anism fully assembled
Comprises parts Nos. D-1, D-9 to
D-12, D-28, D-35 to D-36, D-45
to D-53, D-95.
I
1
( Comprises parts Nos. F-2 to F-17.
Turret fully assembled
88
Lens releasing levers
I
I
I
I
A.11
Small levers, on studs passing through
brass bushes in turret, actuating
lens retaining clips (part No. F-10).
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Part
Maker's
No.
1
Re$ No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
in Figs.
Notes
Hexagon nuts for F-2
Secure lens retaining clips to lens
releasing levers.
Countersunk screws for F-5
Secure turret levers to turret.
Turret levers
Turret with centre bush and
six brass bushes
Anti-reflection masks
Rivets for F-7
Cheese-head retaining screws
for F-10
Limit movement of three of lens
retaining clips.
Lens retaining clips with tension springs
Mounted on lens releasing levers
(part No. F-2); engage with groove
in focus ring of lens mount.
Lens mount keys
Angle brackets; one arm of each
secured to turret by F-12 and F-13,
other engages with keyway in lens
mount, giving correct axial alignment.
Cheese-head screws for F-1 1
Tapped into turret to secure lens
mount keys.
Cheese-head screws for F-1 I
Finer than F-12, tapped into turret
to secure lens mount keys, with
distance pieces F-14.
Distance pieces for F- 1 I
Fit over F-13 to space lens mount
keys from surface of turret where
latter is cut out to accommodate
lens retaining clips. Limit movement of three of lens retaining clips
not so served by screws F-9.
Compression springs
In cavities in periphery of turret,
press turret indexing wheels and
plungers against turret bearing insert of camera housing.
! Ride
Turret indexing wheels
I
I
I
A.12
/
on turret bearing insert of
camera housing; fall into three
notches to give three well-defined
seating
of turret.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
Quantity
-
-
Notes
-
Carry turret indexing wheels; slide
Turret indexing plungers
longitudinally in cavities in periphery of turret against springs F-15.
Large bellows frame
Supports forward (larger) end of
bellows.
Fixing strips
Clamp horizontal edges of forward
end of bellows to large bellows
frame.
Fixing strips
Clamp vertical edges of forward end of
bellows to large bellows frame.
Small metal frame
Supports small bellows frame (part
No. G-8) and metal frame (part
No. G-1 1). Accommodates filter
holder.
Fixing strips
Clamp horizontal edges of rear
(smaller) end of bellows to small
bellows frame (part No. G-8).
Fixing strips
Clamp vertical edges of rear end of
bellows to small bellows frame.
Leather bellows
Small bellows frame
Rectangular frame to which rear end
of bellows is clamped; supported by
small metal frame (part No. G-4).
Aluminium square runner
with locating plate
Square-sectioned tube forming runner
for large bellows frame (part No.
G-1) and small metal frame (part
No. G-4)' with rectangular plate at
end fitting matte box bracket (part
No. A-46) on camera housing.
Connecting rod with knurled
locking screw
I
I
I
Knurled headed screw, engaging
with tapped insert in forward end
of aluminium sauare runner. with
shank extended tb form rod passing
through locating plate and locking
j into depression in matte box bracket.
!
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
,
-
1
1
Quantity
/
Maker's Nomenclature
1 Metal frame
-:
Ref. No.
I
in Figs.
I
I
-
Filter holder receptacle with circular
aperture, locked into similar aperture in small metal frame (part
No. (3-4) by filter retaining brass
ring (part No. G-12). Rotatable
with respect to remainder of assembly.
1
Ring with stepped outer periphery,
engaging with correspondingly
shaped edge of aperture in small
metal frame (part No. G-4) and
supporting metal frame (part No.
G-1 I).
I Filter retaining brass ring
Pins
Locate and secure filter retaining
brass ring on metal frame.
Screws
I
Notes
Adjusting screws for G-1 and
G-4
Knurled headed screws, locking
large bellows frame (part No. G-1)
and small metal frame (part No.
G 4 ) to aluminium square runner
(part No. G-9).
Strips
Interposed between adjusting screws
and aluminium square runner to
prevent damage to runner.
Pins
Secure strips (part No. G-16) in
position.
Filter retaining springs
Attached to edges of small metal
frame (part No. G-4) and metal
frame (part No. G-1 I); have
plungers passing through holes in
frames to grip filter holders.
Screws for G-12
Secure filter retaining springs in
position.
Countersunk screws for G-l
I
Tapped into fixing strips (parts Nos.
G-2 and 3) through holes in large
bellows frame (part No. G-1) to
clamp bellows.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Re5 No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
11
Notes
I
(3-21
Countersunk screws for G-8
Tapped into small metal frame (part
No. G-4) through holes in fixing
strips (part No. G-5) and small
bellows frame (part No. G-8) to
clamp bellows and hold assembly
together.
(3-22
Countersunk screws for G-8
Tapped into fixing strips (part No.
G-6) through holes in small bellows
frame (part No. G-8) to clamp
bellows.
Countersunk screws for G-9
and G-10
Secure tapped insert in forward end
of aluminium square runner.
Rotating grip for polarisation
filter
Handle, tapped into edge of metal
frame (part No. G-11)' by which
frame can be rotated.
New camera door
So called to distinguish from older
type having viewfinder with fixed
eyepiece and other small differences. Most cameras in BBC use
are new type.
Camera door latch
Winged knob on outside of door,
actuating K-4.
Screw for K-4
Secures locking lever K-4 to camera
door latch K-2.
Locking lever
Assembly of three arms attached to
central actuating plate; rotation of
plate causes tips of arms to engage
with rim of camera housing.
Cheese-head screws for K - 4
Tapped into camera door through
slotted holes in arms of K-4,
thereby locating them.
Fixing screw for L-shaped
piece
I
I!
I
I1
Large-headed screw tapped into
camera door (from inside); shank
1 projects slightly through door forming pin to locate part of periscopic
viewfinder attachment when used.
1
*In the maker's Spare Part List, this Part No. is also allocated to a glass filter of a type not used by the
BBC. To avoid confusion, these screws should be ordered by name as well as by Part No.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Rej: No.
in Figs.
Notes
Securing screw for viewfinder
Grubscrew, tapped into wall of viewfinder receptacle (inside door) to
prevent rotation of viewfinder.
Securing screw for K-6
Grubscrew, tapped into the head of
K-6 and projecting from it to bite
into the door, thus locking K-6.
Viewfinder
Contains greater part of viewfinder
optical system, but does not include eyepiece (viewer) K-10.
10-times magnification viewer
Eyepiece of viewfinder. Does not
include rubber eye piece K-I I .
Rubber eye piece
93
Reflection cover for viewfinder
Prism holder
Small door on K-10.
76
Fixing screws for K-15
Prism
Mounted on retaining plate D-52,
contains prism K-15 and ground
glass K-16.
Tapped into top and bottom of K-13,
to grip prism K-15.
78
Ground glass
In fact, a small rectangular lens
mounted in prism holder K-13 on
r.h, side of K-15.
Fixing pieces for K-16
Screw for K-I9
Switch fixing lever
Compression spring for K- 19
Tapped into upper surface of viewfinder receptacle on door; forms
pivot for switch fixing lever K-19.
96
Spring loaded lever, engaging with
switch pin K-22 to lock motor
switch in On condition. Is pressed
to stop camera motor.
Works between tab of switch fixing
lever K-19 and camera door;
located in blind holes in them.
Instruction F.2
Appendix A
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
---
K-2 1
Switch lever
Tab which is pressed to start camera
motor. Includes pin for coupling
to switch pin K-22. One end is
loose fit in cavity in camera door;
lever is retained in position by
attachment to switch pin and so is
effectively pivoted.
K-22
Switch pin
Couples switch lever K-21 to switch
plunger K-24.
Has transverse
hole to receive pin in K-21, tapped
hole to receive threaded end of
switch plunger K-24 and notch to
engage with switch fixing lever
K-19.
K-23
Compression spring for K-24
Surrounds upper end of switch plunger
K-24, acts between end of switch
pin K-22 and step in diameter of
hole carrying K-24.
Serves to
bias switch lever to Off position.
K-24
Switch plunger
Rod, carried in hole through camera
door and cast projection on inside
surface of door. Lower end is
formed into small knob which
strikes direction switch C-7 of
switch assembly; upper end is
threaded to fit into switch vin K-22.
Instruction F.2
APPENDIX B
PARTS LIST : 400-ft MAGAZINE
NOTE:-This Parts List has been compiled from an illustrated German parts list, and the nomenclature used may not be that recognised by the manufacturers or their agents. It is therefore particularly
necessary for part numbers to be quoted when replacement components are ordered.
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
L- 1
Magazine body
L-2
Spool spindles in bearings
complete
L- 3
Core adaptors
L-4
Latch plates
L-5
Countersunk rivets for L-4
L-6
Latch
L-7
Round-headed rivets for L-6
L-8 (b)
Plexiglass panel
L-9
Countersunk
L-8 (b)
L-I0
Bushes
L-1 1
Countersunk screws for L-10
L-12
L-13
1
I
Notes
Riveted over cavities in L-1. Have
keyhole-shaped holes to accept
locking spindles M-3 1.
Small metal strip, riveted across
depression in inner surface of L-1,
to serve as stowage for roller arm
L-26.
Printed with footage indicator scale,
in English. L-8 (a) has metre
indicator scale, in German.
screws
for
Form bearings for flanged stub
spindles L-2 1.
Torsion spring for take-up
spool roller arm
Torsion spring for feed spool
roller arm
B.1
One end of each spring hook-shaped
to fit appropriate arm; other
secured to wall of L-1 by one of
screws L-14.
Instruction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's
Parr No.
Quanriry
Maker's Nomenclature
ReJ No.
in Figs.
Nores
Shoulder screws for L-12
and L-13
Spacer
Washer on stub spindle L-21 of roller
arm L-26, filling space equivalent
to that occupied by pointer L-17
on stub spindle of L-27.
Washers
With barrel-shaped holes, to fit shaped
ends of stub spindles L-21.
Pointer
Moves behind footage scale on plexiglass panel L-8 (b).
Screws
With special heads; tapped into ends
of stub spindles L-21 to retain
them in bushes L-10.
Roller arm, take-up
Roller arm, feed
Flanged stub spindles
Swaged into holes in L-19, L-20.
Retaining pins for guide rollers L-23
Swaged into holes in L-19, L-20.
Guide rollers
Washers
Retain L-23 on L-22.
Screws
Roller arm, take-up, complete
Comprising L-19, and G 2 1 to L-25
(one of each).
Roller arm, feed, complete
Comprising L-20, and L-21 to L-25
(one oi each).
Labels
One blank, two bearing any numeral
from 1 to 5.
Magazine cover
Lugs
Riveted to L-29 to retain lower
edge in position on L- 1.
Instruction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's
Part No.
-
Ref.No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
in Figs.
Notes
L-3 1
Round-headed rivets for L-30
L-32
Magazine cover lock
Winged knob on outside of magazine
cover L-29, actuating latch L-35.
L-33
Pin
In magazine cover L-29, limiting
movement of latch L-35.
L-34
Screw
With special head. Secures latch
L-35 to stub spindle of magazine
cover lock L- 32.
L-35
Latch
Rotatable tongue, actuated by magazine cover lock L-32, locking upper
edge of magazine cover L-29 to
magazine body L- 1.
L-36
Small contacts
L-37
Large contacts
L-38
Compression springs
L-39
Magazine nose
L-40
Locking slide actuating screws
(a) 1.h. thread
(b) r.h. thread
Couple locking slides L-42 to lock
lip L-41.
L-41
Lock lip
Movable flap adjacent to nose of
magazine, operated to actuate locking slides L-42.
L-42
Locking slides
Pair of sliding latches engaging with
magazine locks on camera housing
to secure magazine in place.
L-43
Small felt rollers
In magazine nose, on either side of
central large felt roller L-45.
Spindles for L-43
Left-hand ends threaded, inserted
from right-hand side of magazine
and tapped into left-hand wall of
nose.
Screw-slotted right-hand
ends concealed by wax filling in
Ensure good electrical continuity between magazine take-up motor and
camera housings. See text, pages
6.2 and 6.4.
lnstmction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's I
Part No. i Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
Large felt roller
In magazine nose, between small
felt rollers L-43.
Resiliently
mounted on spindle L-46 by means
of internal concentric spring L-47.
Spindle for L-45
As L-44 above.
Compression spring
See L-45 above.
Washers
At either end of L-47, on L-46.
Contact bridge
Phosphor bronze strip, forming electrical connection between contact
pin L-56 and motor contact M-4.
Shoulder screws for L-49
Tapped into magazine nose.
Insulating strip for L-49
Insulating bushes for L-49
Screws
Shoulder screws
Insulate contact bridge L-49 electrically from magazine nose.
'
Secure magazine nose L-39 to magazine body L-1.
Insulating bush for L-56
Insulates contact pin L-56 electrically
from magazine nose.
Contact pin
Rides in insulating bush L-55, thrust
by resilience of contact bridge L-49
against contact on camera.
Retaining bush for L-62
Tapped into magazine nose immediately below lock lip. Retains
L-58 to L-65 in position.
Lock lip hook
Spring rod for L-58
Flexible support for L-58. Is coupled
to and tensioned by compression
spring L-62.
Ring
Together with screw L-61 and pin
I.-64, couples spring rod L-59
to compression spring L-62.
Screw for L-59
Tapped into right-hand end of spring
rod L-59, secures ring L-60.
Instruction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
hmounds spring rod L-59. Acts
between retaining bush L-57 and
ring L-60.
L-62
Compression spring
L-63
Coupling ring for L-58
and L-65
L-64
Pin
L-65
Leather pull for L-58
L-66
Lock lip hook assembly complete
Zomprising L-57 Lo L-65.
L-67
Magazine nose assembly complete
Comprising L-36 to L-65.
M- 1
Take-up motor sub-unit
housing
Includes retaining pin M-19, reversing
levers assembly M-39, and studs
M-40 for M-39.
M-2
Motor armature assembly
Complete with insulating strip supporting left-hand bearing.
M-3
Insulating strips
Packing around ball-races of M-2.
M 4
Contact
Bush, tapped internally to receive
mounting screw of one of brush
holders M-7. Makes contact with
end of contact bridge L-49.
M-5
Motor field assembly
M-6
Screws for M-2
M-7
Brush-holders with brushes
M-8
Screws
M-9
Shoulder screws for M-5
M-10
Washers :for M-14
M-1 l
Gear .wheel
rhrough ring L-60 and screw L-61.
Tapped into insulating strip of M-2
on either side of left-hand bearing
of motor shaft; heads locate ballrace longitudinally.
Instruction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Pinion wheel
Ref: No.
in Figs.
Notes
Forms boss for M-11.
Retaining pin for M-11 and
M-12
Shoulder screws for M-13
Clamps for M-9
Under heads-of screws M-9, to grip
motor field assembly M-5.
Screw
Tapped into insulating strip of M-2
to form terminal f o leads
~
of M-5
and one of brush-holders M-7.
Gear wheel with boss
Screws, left-hand thread, for
M-19 and M-20
In tapped bores of retaining pins, to
retain gear wheels in position.
Retaining pin for M-17 and
M-20
Reversing arm
T-shaped member, with bush to fit
M-19, two retaining pins for gear
wheels M-21, and strip carrying
spring blades to brake gear wheels
M-25.
Gear wheels with bosses
Shoulder screws for M-23 and
M-24
Eccentric washers
Screwed to inner surface of M-1, over
M-24, to form adjustable stops
limiting range of movement of
reversing arm M-20.
Large washers
Under M-23, form bearing surfaces
for ends of reversing arm M-20.
Gear wheels, with brake disks,
coupling pins and stub
shafts
Flanged bushes for M-25
Form bearings in wall of M-1.
Instrnction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
M-27
2
Washers for M-25
M-28
2
Knurled knobs
M-29
2
Screws for M-28
With special heads. Secure M-27,
M-28 and M-30 to stub shafts of
M-25.
M-30
2
Spacers
Under knurled knobs M-28.
M-3 1
2
Motor
housing
locking
spindles (a) l.h., (b) r.h.
With threaded shafts to fit bushes
M-33.
M-32
2
Pins for M-31
Projecting from tips of M-31 to
engage with latch plates L-4 on
magazine body.
M-33
2
Flanged bushes for M-31 (a)
lh., (b) r,h.
Tapped internally, and grooved to
accept circlips M-35.
M-34
6
Round-headed rivets for M-33
M-35
2
Circlips for M-37
Fit into grooves in flanged bushes
M-33 to retain cover plate M-37 in
position.
M-36
2
Pins
In flanges of bushes M-33, limit rotation of locking spindles M-31.
M-37
1
Cover plate
M-38
1
Screw
M-39
2
Reversing levers (complete
assembly with pin and
spring)
Maker's Nomenclature
M-40
2
Studs for M-39
M-41
1
Reversing toggle, with stub
shaft
M-42
1
Cam for M-41
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
With barrel-shaped holes to fit shaped
ends of stub shafts.
With special head. Tapped into end
of stub shaft of reversing toggle
M-41 to retain cam M-42 in
position.
Normally fixtures in M-1, and supplied with it.
Instruction F.2
Appendix B
Maker's
Part No.
I
I
M43
M-44
I1
M-45
M-46
1
I
Spacing strip
Notes
1I
1
1
1 Countersunk rivets for M-45 I
1
3
Countersunk screws for M-43
I
Flanged bush for M-41
3
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Maker's Nomenclature
Quantity
Fills space due to step between surfaces of nose and body castings
L-39 and L-1.
APPENDIX C
PARTS LIST: GAUMONT-KALEE SINGLESYSTEM ldmm MAGNETIC SOUND RECORDING
EQUIPMENT
Maker's
Part No.
?f%z
)
Maker's Notnendature
200010
Washer
200011
Bush
I
1
i
I
I
I
Input jack
73228 1
1
I
,
i
1160008
Washer
1160011
Insulating bush
1160012
Socket
1231207
Knob
I
1647013
Shoulder screw
I
1690000
Magnetic sound attachment
for 16-mm Arriflex
I
Notes
Used to mount Mon. jack 54
(part No. 732281) on jack bracket
1691008 on amplifier chassis, and
jack on soundhead.
Mon. jack, 54, in side of amplifier
chassis, and jack on soundhead.
Insulate sockets 1 160012 from socket
board 1690057 in head assembly.
J
! Control knobs for amplifier.
1
I
Locates head screening can 1690064
on head unit assembly 1690055 or
1690103.
~
Soundhead, complete.
II
1
1690001
Door assembly
126
1690002
Case
Soundhead case.
1690008
Rear cover
R.H. cover of soundhead case.
1690009
Collar
I
I
I
I
1
Flywheel assembly
1 Flywheel.
1690013
1690014
1
Sound drum shaft
Bearing end cap
I
1
1
Spacer between 1.h. ballrace and
retaining ring on sound drum shaft.
I
I
1690010
Operationally detachable door on
1.h. side of soundhead. Consists of
parts Nos. 1690070, 1690071,
1690076, 1690080, 169008 1.
1
123
/
Includes sound drum.
:
Cap over 1.h. end of cylindrical
bearing housing in partition of
soundhead case.
i
Instruction F.2
Appendix C
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
1
Friction roller assembly
Friction roller.
1
Friction roller spindle assembly
Spindle for friction roller, with flange
for attachment to partition of
soundhead case.
1
Thrust washer
Flanged bush on friction roller spindle
assembly, prevented from rotating
by pin.
1
Friction washer
Pressed between thrust washer and
friction roller assembly 1690015.
1
Friction roller spring
Compression spring acting between
thrust washer and flange of friction
roller spindle assembly 1690017.
2
Roller assembly
Rollers above, to rear and below, to
front of sound drum.
4
R. & M. ballrace type KLNJ
& in.
For roller 1690023.
2
Spacer
Between ballraces on roller spindles
1690027 and 1690028.
3
Retaining screw, roller
Tapped into ends of spindles to retain
rollers 1690015 and 1690023in place.
1
Roller spindle
For roller above and to rear of sound
drum ; with flange for attachment
to partition of soundhead case.
1
Roller spindle, lower
For roller below and to front of
sound drum ; with flange for
attachment to partition of soundhead case.
1
Compliance arm assembly
Spring-loaded arm at lower rear of
soundhead, with roller.
1
Roller arm assembly
Spring-loaded arm towards front of
soundhead, with roller.
1
Idler roller assembly
Roller in aperture at top of soundhead.
1
Idler roller spindle
Spindle carrying roller 1690042. Is in
form of screw, tapped into wall
of soundhead case.
Instruction F.2
Appendix C
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
Cable screening can
In r.h. compartment of soundhead,
covers pins connecting to head
assembly.
Roller arm spindle
Spindle carrying compliance arm assembly 1690029. Has threaded end,
passing through partition of soundhead and secured by nut.
Pad roller arm spindle
Spindle carrying roller arm assembly
1690041. Resembles 1690046, but
has different dimensions.
Retaining screw, roller arm
Tapped into ends of spindles to retain
arms 169029 and 169041 in place.
Fixing bolt assembly
Large bolt, extending vertically
through soundhead to engage with
inserting plate of camera housing.
Klikax retaining ring No. 4
Fits into groove in fixing bolt assembly 1690049 to hold it captive
in soundhead.
Pad roller spring
Spiral spring, surrounding spindle
1690047, acting between it and arm
1690041.
Compliance spring
Tension spring acting between arm
1690029 and anchor 1690054.
Spring anchor
Tapped into bottom of soundhead
case to anchor spring 1690053.
Head unit assembly
Head assembly, comprising parts
Nos. 1160008, 1160011, 1160012,
1647013, 1690056, 1690057,
1690059, 1690096. For soundhead
Type 1690.
Head mounting bracket
L-shaped plate, supporting head and
bracket assemblies. Secured to
socket board 1690057.
Socket board
Strip of metal on which sockets
1160012 and head mounting bracket 1690056 are mounted.
Instruction F.2
Appendix C
- -
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
-
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
1690059
Recording head and bracket
assembly
Recording head 1690061 on bracket
1690060. For Soundhead Type
1690.
:I
690060
Bracket for recording or playback head
U-shaped bracket, with post for
insertion into head mounting bracket 1690056. With head, forms head
and bracket assembly.
1690061
Recording head
With bracket 1690060, forms recording head and bracket assembly
1690059 used in Soundhead Type
1690.
1690064
Head screening can
y ye tic shield over
1690070
Lid assembly
Door 1690001, less parts Nos.
1690071, 1690076, 1690080 and
1690081.
1690071
Catch lever and pin assembly
Winged knob, on short spindle, with
pins to engage with latch assembly
1690076.
1690076
Latch assembly
Set of three levers, centre one of
which is secured to catch lever
1690071, others engage with
notches in soundhead case.
1690080
Retaining screw
Tapped into end of spindle of catch
lever 1690071 to secure latch assembly 1690076.
1690081
Shoulder screw
Tapped into door 1690070 through
slotted holes in latch assembly
1690076.
1690086
Skid
1690087
Plug board assembly
132
head assembly.
Bearing surface for loop of film,
attached to front wall of soundhead
case.
Insulating panel, with pins to connect
with sockets on head assembly;
mounted in hole through partition
of soundhead case, shielded by
cable screeninn can 1690045.
Instmction F.2
Appendix C
Maker's
Part No.
Ref. No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
in Figs.
Notes
Washer
On spindle 1690044. See text, page 8.3.
1
Stop pin
Tapped into partition of soundhead
case to limit downward movement
of arm 1690029.
1
Playback head
With bracket 1690060, forms playback head and bracket assembly
1690096 used is Soundhead Type
1690.
1
Playback head and bracket
assembly
Playback head 1690095 on bracket
1690060. For Soundhead Type
1690.
2
Ballrace
For sound drum shaft 1690013.
2
Recording or playback head
With bracket 1690060, forms either
recording or playback head and
bracket assembly 1690102 used in
Soundhead Type 1690B.
2
Recording or playback head
and bracket assembly
Head 1690101 on bracket 1690060.
For Soundhead Type 1690B.
1
Head unit assembly
1
Seeger circlip No. 26, internal
Fits into groove inside bearing housing in partition of soundhead case;
retains 1.h. ball race 1690099 on
sound drum shaft.
2
Klikax retaining ring No. 7
Fit into grooves on sound drum shaft,
retain ball races 1690099.
1
Amplifier assembly
Amplifier, complete.
1
Top plate
Top of amplifier chassis, carrying
operational controls.
1
Escutcheon
Fits over top plate 1691004, engraved
with labelling of controls.
As reqd.
121
Head assembly, comprising parts Nos.
1160008, 1160011, 1160012,
1647013, 1690056, 1690057,
1690102. For Soundhead Type
1690B.
Instroction F.2
Appendix C
Maker's
Part No.
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
Ref. No.
in Figs.
Notes
1
Potentiometer bracket
Mounted on side of amplifier chassis,
carries Bias, Dir. Gain and PIE Gain
controls.
1
Support bracket
Mounted between potentiometer
bracket 1691006 and far side of
chassis; carries bias osc. assembly
1691017 and is shaped to form
receptacle for battery.
1
Jack bracket
Mounted on side of amplifier, carries
Mon. jack 54 in bush and washers
200010, 200011, 201006.
2
Angle
Angle brackets supporting controls
1691028 and 1691029 (S1 and S2)
on top plate 1691004.
1
Amplifier units assembly
Sub-assembly of six tag strips, on
brackets, with amplifier components, mounted between side of
chassis and support bracket 1691007
1
Terry spring clip Type 80/000
Mounted on support bracket 1691007,
holds transistor V6.
1
Bias oscillator assembly
Small subassembly mounted
support bracket 1691007.
1
Amplifier chassis
1
Meter
Fig. 1
Meter M1. E.T.I. No. 909.
1
Switch assembly
Fig. 1
Switch S3.
1
Control
Fig. 1
Switch S1. Fortiphone Type SW6.
Engraved M-S.
1
Control
Fig. 1
Switch S2. Fortiphone Type SW6.
Engraved Dir.-PIB.
1
Meter cover
1
Packing
1
Cinch 3-pin battery plug
Type 761380
on
In battery receptacle of amplifier,
to provide space for battery plug J5.
Instruction F.2
Appendix C
Maker's
Part No.
--
Quantity
Maker's Nomenclature
in Figs.
1691034
Notes
Modified for mounting on bottom of
chassis, to accept knurled-headed
captive screw in leather case.
1697000
Oscillator coil
Fig. 1
Transformer T 1.
1698000
Bias rejector
Fig. 1
L1.
1703000
Transformer
Fig. 1
Transformer T2.
APPENDIX D
THE NON-INTERACTION OF LONGITUDINALLY- AND LATERALLY-MAGNETISED
RECORDING TRACKS ON A COMMON MAGNETIC TAPE
The signal e.m.f. induced in the replay head
winding of a magnetic recording system depends
on the rate of change of the strength (including
polarity) of the magnetic field set up by that part
of the recording medium which lies between the
poles of the head. This change of field-strength
occurs when the recording medium, which carries
the recorded signal in the form of a spatial variation
of magnetisation, is moved across the pole-pieces
of the replay head.
The signal is usually recorded as a variation with
tape length of longitudinal magnetisation; at any
point in the length of the tape, the magnetisation
along a line at rightangles to the length is constant
across the width of the track. The replay head
has a short gap between the straight parallel edges
of its pole-pieces, across which the tape is drawn
in a direction at right-angles to the width of the
gap.
When the signal is recorded as a variation with
tape length of lateral magnetisation, the magnetisation along any line AA' (Fig. D.l(a)) at rightangles to the length of the tape has a gradient
between a point P at one edge of the track and a
point P' at the other edge. The magnetisation at
these two points is equal and of opposite polarities,
and for any intermediate point p there is another
point p' having equal and oppositely-polarised
magnetisation, symmetrical with respect to p
about a line along the length of the track mid-way
between P and P'. Thus, assuming a uniform
recording field, the pattern of magnetisation
throughout the length of the track is as shown in
Fig. D.l(b), the modulation taking the form of a
variation with tape length of the amplitude and
polarity of the pattern.
In Fig. D.2, (a) represents a magnetic tape
stretched across a gap of length L between the
pole-faces of a conventional replay head; any
longitudinal magnetisation of the tape will cause
a signal e.m.f. to be induced in the head winding
as the tape moves. The tape carries a laterallymagnetised track, the variation of magnetisation
along the length of the track due to the modulating
signal being indicated as a variation of the spacing
of the dotted lines representing the track. (For
the purpose of this simplified explanation, no
attempt is made to take account of r.f. bias, and
the gaplength L and the width of the track are
both shown greatly exaggerated.)
sl
FllllS
Fig. D. I. Magnetisation Pattern across Laterallymagnetised Track, showing Symmetry about Central
Line. (Track width greatly exaggerated)
Let the magnetisation of the tape along one
edge of the replay-head gap range from M to M
across the width of the track, and let the corresponding variation of magnetisation along the
-
Instruction F.2
Appendix D
other edge of the gap be from M' to -M'. Then
at one side of the track there is a change of
magnetisation of M - M' along the length of the
gap, and at the other side of the track a corres- ( M ' ) i.e.,
ponding change of M
/
r - - - - - - - -1
I
Fig. D.2.
REPLAY HEAD POLL
L
the longitudinal magnetic gradients at all other
symmetrically paired positions across the width of
the track also cancel one another. The effective
longitudinal magnetisation of the tape is therefore
zero.
-
FACES
\----------1
I
I
I
I
Laterally-magnetised Track crossing Gap of conventional Replay Head.
length both greatly exaggerated)
( M - M'). As indicated in Fig. D.2(b), the
longitudinal magnetic gradients at the two edges
of the track are equal and opposite, and they
therefore cancel one another. By similar reasoning,
7
1
I
I
(Track width and gap
Thus no signal e.m.f. is induced in the winding
of a normal replay head by a laterally magnetised
track which lies entirely within the width of the
replay head gap.
Instruction F.2
COMPONENT TABLE: FIG. I
PAGE I
--
Cornp.
CI
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
CIO
CI I
CI2
CI3
C14
C15
C16
C17
C18
C19
C20
C2 I
C22
C23
C24
C25
C26
C27
C28
C29
C30
C3 1
C32
C33
C34
C35
C36
C37
C38
C39
Tolerance
per cent
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
Plessey CE 123311 8V
Plessey CE 123311 8V
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
Dubilier 418 150V
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
Dubilier 418 150V
Plessey CE 123311 8V
Hunts W48 150V
Hunts W99 150V
Plessey CE 123311 8V
T.C.C. CE69A 6V
Plessey CE 126611 6V
Plessey CE 123311 8V
Plessey CE 128711 6V
T.C.C. CE 69/A 6V
Plessey CE 122711 6V
T.C.C. CP 33N 350V
T.C.C. CP 33N 350V
Dubilier 418 150V
Dubilier 418 150V
T.C.C. CE 68A 6V
Plessey CE 123311 8V
T.C.C. CE 69A 6V
Plessey CE 126611 8V
Dubilier 418 150V
Plessey CE 126611 6V
T.C.C. CE 68A 6V
T.C.C. CE 68A 6V
Hunts W48 250V
T.C.C. CE 68A 6V
Pleuey CE 122711 6V
T.C.C. CE 32A 6V
Erie K700418 1 1
Plessey CE 123311 8V
Hunts W48 250V
Camp.
Lot.
Tolerance
per cent
JI
12
13
14
15
16
17
G2
G6
FIO
Y13
YII
87
BIO'
Connector F. & E. XL-3-14
Connector F. & E. XL-3-14
Connector F. & E. EM-6-14
Jack Socket
Plug Cinch 761380
Jack Socket
Connector F. & E. EM-6-13
LI
u3
Bias Rejector
RI
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
RIO
RI I
RI2
R13
R14
R15
R16
R17
R18
R19
R2O
R2I
R22
R23
R24
R25
R27
R28
J4
J9
J2
J6
KI
K4
K6
K9
LI
L2
L6
L3
L4
N2
N4
01
04
05
PI
P4
QI
44
Q5
R3
R4
SI
S4
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Dubilier YTB
Dubilier YTB
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Morganite LHNAR 50410
Erie 9
Erie 9
--
COMPONENT TABLE : FIG. I
PAGE 2
-
Comp.
Lot.
Tolerance
per cent
R29
R30
R3 1
R32
R33
R34
R35
R36
R37
R39
R40
R4 1
R42
R43
R44
R45
R46
R47
R48
R49
R50
R5 1
R52
R53
R54
R55
R56
R57
R58
R59
R60
R6 1
56
58
56
S8
T5
U6
U6
V6
w2
Y4
YI
JI I
J 13
K II
K13
LIZ
LII
MI2
MI0
MI0
MI2
MI3
NIO
011
012
010
PI3
SIO
RI3
SIO
VIO
S13
-
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Select on Test
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Dubilier YTB
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Dubiller YTB
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erle 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
.
Erie 9
Tolerance
per cent
Comp.
-
-
R62
R63
R65
R66
R67
R68
R69
Erle 9
Erie 9
Dubllier YTE
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
Erie 9
sI
Switch Fortiphone SW6
Switch Fortiphone SW6
s2
S3a
S3b
vI
Switch
v2
v3
v4
v5
V6
v7
V8
v9
VlO
VI I
VI2
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Translstor
Transistor
Transistor
WI
W2
W3
w4
B.T.H.
B.T.H.
B.T.H.
B.T.H.
-
OC70
OC70
OC71
OC71
0 0 2
OCR
GET4
OC70
0 0I
OC7 1
OC7 1
OC71
Rec.
Rec.
Rec.
Rec.
CGlC
CGlC
CGlC
CGlC
5
5
5
5
5
20
FIG. I
C
R I D DO>
AMPLIFIER TYPE 1691
MULLARD TRANSISTOR
CONNECTIONS
0.E.C. TRANSISTOR
CONNECTIONS
SOUNDYEAD TYPE 1690
Jb
Clb
@'@
63 b
BAT
OFF
NOTE:-
FIGURCS IN CIRCLES ARC NEGATIVE VOLTAGES TO CHASSIS
ik
R34-SELECT
GAUMONT-KALEE SINGLE-SYSTEM MAGNETIC RECORDING EQUIPMENT: CIRCUIT DIAGRAM
FROM 4.711, C a l l , W4k f 5'1..
ERRATA
'
To Editor,
Technical Instructions,
305, St. Hilda's, Maida Vale.
The following errors have been noted in Instruction
Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date ..................
Signature ..................
ERRATA
,
To Editor,
Technical Instructions,
305, St. Hilda's, Maida Vale.
The following errors have been noted in Instruction
- -
Station ........................
~- -
~
Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Signature ..................
ERRATA
To Editor,
Technical Instructions,
305, St. ~il;a's, Maida Vale.
The following errors have been noted in Inshwction
Station ........................
- - ..
. . .
. . . . . .
Date ..................
. . .
.--
- -
Signature ..................
. . . . . . . . . . . .....-...........
ERRATA
To Editor,
Technical Instructions,
305, St. Hilda's, Maida Vale.
The following errors have been noted in Instruction
~
Station ........................
Date ..................
-
Signature ..................
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