HP | 4400 Dual Controller Enterprise Virtual Array | User's Manual | HP 4400 Dual Controller Enterprise Virtual Array User's Manual

HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array User
Guide
Abstract
This document describes the HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA4400) and provides information about operating the
EVA4400. It is intended for users who install, operate, and manage EVA4400 storage systems.
HP Part Number: 5697-2478
Published: September 2013
Edition: 14
© Copyright 2008, 2013 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express
warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall
not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
Warranty
To obtain a copy of the warranty for this product, see the warranty information website:
http://www.hp.com/go/storagewarranty
Acknowledgements
Itanium® is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
Microsoft® and Windows® are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Oracle® is a registered U.S. trademark of Oracle Corporation or its affiliates.
Contents
1 EVA4400 hardware...................................................................................9
Physical layout of the storage system...........................................................................................9
M6412 disk enclosures............................................................................................................10
Enclosure layout.................................................................................................................10
I/O modules.....................................................................................................................11
I/O module status indicators..........................................................................................11
Fiber optic Fibre Channel cables..........................................................................................12
Copper Fibre Channel cables..............................................................................................12
Fibre Channel disk drives....................................................................................................13
Disk drive status indicators..............................................................................................13
Disk drive blank............................................................................................................13
Controller enclosures...............................................................................................................14
Management module.........................................................................................................15
Controller status indicators.......................................................................................................16
HSV300 controller status LEDs.............................................................................................17
Power supplies.......................................................................................................................17
Fan module...........................................................................................................................18
Battery module.......................................................................................................................18
HSV controller cabling............................................................................................................19
Storage system racks ..............................................................................................................19
Rack configurations............................................................................................................20
Power distribution–Modular PDUs.............................................................................................20
PDUs................................................................................................................................22
PDU A.........................................................................................................................22
PDU B.........................................................................................................................23
PDMs...............................................................................................................................23
Rack AC power distribution.................................................................................................24
Moving and stabilizing a rack..................................................................................................25
2 EVA4400 operation.................................................................................27
Best practices.........................................................................................................................27
Operating tips and information................................................................................................27
Reserving adequate free space............................................................................................27
Using FATA disk drives........................................................................................................27
Using solid state disk drives.................................................................................................27
EVA4400 port does not log in to the embedded switch...........................................................27
Emulex HBAs require unique zoning.....................................................................................27
Creating 16 TB or greater virtual disks in Windows 2008.......................................................27
Importing Windows dynamic disk volumes............................................................................28
Losing a path to a dynamic disk..........................................................................................28
Microsoft Windows 2003 MSCS cluster installation................................................................28
Array I/O can halt after a power cycle with an HP-UX host.....................................................28
Reboot can be required after EVA power cycle to resume access to LUNs..................................28
Host port connection limit on B-series 3200 and 3800 switches...............................................29
Failback preference setting for HSV controllers............................................................................30
Changing virtual disk failover/failback setting.......................................................................31
Implicit LUN transition.........................................................................................................32
Storage system shutdown and startup........................................................................................32
Shutting down the storage system from HP P6000 Command View...........................................32
Shutting down the storage system from the array controller......................................................33
Starting the storage system..................................................................................................33
Connecting to the management module.....................................................................................34
Contents
3
Connecting through a public network...................................................................................34
Connecting through a private network..................................................................................35
Changing the default operating mode.......................................................................................36
Accessing the HP P6000 Control Panel through HP P6000 Command View...................................37
Saving storage system configuration data...................................................................................37
Adding disk drives to the storage system....................................................................................39
Handling fiber optic cables......................................................................................................39
3 Configuring application servers..................................................................41
Overview..............................................................................................................................41
Clustering..............................................................................................................................41
Multipathing..........................................................................................................................41
Installing Fibre Channel adapters..............................................................................................41
Testing connections to the EVA.................................................................................................42
Adding hosts..........................................................................................................................42
Creating and presenting virtual disks.........................................................................................42
Verifying virtual disk access from the host...................................................................................43
Configuring virtual disks from the host.......................................................................................43
HP-UX...................................................................................................................................43
Scanning the bus...............................................................................................................43
Creating volume groups on a virtual disk using vgcreate.........................................................44
IBM AIX................................................................................................................................45
Accessing IBM AIX utilities..................................................................................................45
Adding hosts.....................................................................................................................45
Creating and presenting virtual disks....................................................................................45
Verifying virtual disks from the host.......................................................................................45
Linux.....................................................................................................................................46
HBA drivers.......................................................................................................................46
Verifying virtual disks from the host.......................................................................................46
OpenVMS.............................................................................................................................46
Updating the AlphaServer console code, Integrity Server console code, and Fibre Channel FCA
firmware...........................................................................................................................46
Verifying the Fibre Channel adapter software installation........................................................46
Console LUN ID and OS unit ID...........................................................................................46
Adding OpenVMS hosts.....................................................................................................47
Scanning the bus...............................................................................................................48
Configuring virtual disks from the OpenVMS host...................................................................49
Setting preferred paths.......................................................................................................49
Oracle Solaris........................................................................................................................49
Loading the operating system and software...........................................................................49
Configuring FCAs with the Oracle SAN driver stack...............................................................50
Configuring Emulex FCAs with the lpfc driver....................................................................50
Configuring QLogic FCAs with the qla2300 driver.............................................................52
Fabric setup and zoning.....................................................................................................53
Oracle StorEdge Traffic Manager (MPxIO)/Oracle Storage Multipathing..................................53
Configuring with Veritas Volume Manager............................................................................53
Configuring virtual disks from the host...................................................................................55
Verifying virtual disks from the host..................................................................................56
Labeling and partitioning the devices...............................................................................57
VMware................................................................................................................................58
Configuring the EVA4400 with VMware host servers..............................................................58
Configuring an ESX server ..................................................................................................58
Loading the FCA NVRAM..............................................................................................58
Setting the multipathing policy........................................................................................59
Specifying DiskMaxLUN.................................................................................................60
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Contents
Verifying connectivity.....................................................................................................60
Verifying virtual disks from the host.......................................................................................60
Verifying virtual disks from the host.......................................................................................60
HP EVA P6000 Software Plug-in for VMware VAAI.................................................................61
System prerequisites......................................................................................................61
Enabling vSphere Storage API for Array Integration (VAAI).................................................61
Installing the VAAI Plug-in...............................................................................................62
Installation overview.................................................................................................62
Installing the HP EVA VAAI Plug-in using ESX host console utilities...................................63
Installing the HP VAAI Plug-in using vCLI/vMA.............................................................64
Installing the VAAI Plug-in using VUM.........................................................................66
Uninstalling the VAAI Plug-in...........................................................................................68
Uninstalling VAAI Plug-in using the automated script (hpeva.pl).......................................68
Uninstalling VAAI Plug-in using vCLI/vMA (vihostupdate)...............................................68
Uninstalling VAAI Plug-in using VMware native tools (esxupdate)....................................68
4 Replacing array components......................................................................70
Customer self repair ...............................................................................................................70
Parts-only warranty service..................................................................................................70
Best practices for replacing hardware components......................................................................70
Component replacement videos...........................................................................................70
Verifying component failure.................................................................................................70
Identifying the spare part....................................................................................................70
Replaceable parts...................................................................................................................71
Replacing the failed component................................................................................................73
Replacement instructions..........................................................................................................73
5 Single path implementation.......................................................................75
Installation requirements..........................................................................................................75
Recommended mitigations.......................................................................................................75
Supported configurations.........................................................................................................76
General configuration components.......................................................................................76
Connecting a single path HBA server to a switch in a fabric zone............................................76
HP-UX configuration................................................................................................................78
Requirements.....................................................................................................................78
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................79
Risks................................................................................................................................79
Limitations.........................................................................................................................79
Windows Server 2003 (32-bit), Windows Server 2008 (32-bit), Windows Server 2012 (32-bit)
configurations........................................................................................................................80
Requirements.....................................................................................................................80
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................80
Risks................................................................................................................................80
Limitations.........................................................................................................................80
Windows Server 2008 (64-bit) and Windows Server 2003 (64-bit) configurations..........................81
Requirements.....................................................................................................................81
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................81
Risks................................................................................................................................82
Limitations.........................................................................................................................82
Oracle Solaris configuration.....................................................................................................82
Requirements.....................................................................................................................82
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................83
Risks................................................................................................................................83
Limitations.........................................................................................................................83
OpenVMS configuration..........................................................................................................84
Requirements.....................................................................................................................84
Contents
5
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................84
Risks................................................................................................................................85
Limitations.........................................................................................................................85
Xen configuration...................................................................................................................85
Requirements.....................................................................................................................85
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................86
Risks................................................................................................................................86
Limitations.........................................................................................................................86
Linux (32-bit) configuration.......................................................................................................86
Requirements.....................................................................................................................87
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................87
Risks................................................................................................................................87
Limitations.........................................................................................................................87
Linux (Itanium) configuration.....................................................................................................88
Requirements.....................................................................................................................88
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................88
Risks................................................................................................................................89
Limitations.........................................................................................................................89
IBM AIX configuration.............................................................................................................89
Requirements.....................................................................................................................89
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................90
Risks................................................................................................................................90
Limitations.........................................................................................................................90
VMware configuration.............................................................................................................91
Requirements.....................................................................................................................91
HBA configuration..............................................................................................................91
Risks................................................................................................................................91
Limitations.........................................................................................................................91
Mac OS configuration.............................................................................................................92
Failure scenarios.....................................................................................................................92
HP-UX...............................................................................................................................92
Windows Servers...............................................................................................................93
Oracle Solaris...................................................................................................................93
OpenVMS........................................................................................................................94
Linux................................................................................................................................94
IBM AIX............................................................................................................................95
VMware...........................................................................................................................95
Mac OS...........................................................................................................................96
6 Error messages.........................................................................................97
7 Support and other resources....................................................................106
Contacting HP......................................................................................................................106
HP technical support........................................................................................................106
Subscription service..........................................................................................................106
Documentation feedback..................................................................................................106
Related information...............................................................................................................106
Documents......................................................................................................................106
Websites........................................................................................................................106
Typographic conventions ......................................................................................................108
Customer self repair..............................................................................................................108
Rack stability........................................................................................................................109
A Regulatory compliance notices.................................................................110
Regulatory compliance identification numbers..........................................................................110
Federal Communications Commission notice............................................................................110
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Contents
FCC rating label..............................................................................................................110
Class A equipment......................................................................................................110
Class B equipment......................................................................................................110
Declaration of Conformity for products marked with the FCC logo, United States only...............111
Modification...................................................................................................................111
Cables...........................................................................................................................111
Canadian notice (Avis Canadien)...........................................................................................111
Class A equipment...........................................................................................................111
Class B equipment...........................................................................................................111
European Union notice..........................................................................................................111
Japanese notices..................................................................................................................112
Japanese VCCI-A notice....................................................................................................112
Japanese VCCI-B notice....................................................................................................112
Japanese VCCI marking...................................................................................................112
Japanese power cord statement.........................................................................................112
Korean notices.....................................................................................................................112
Class A equipment...........................................................................................................112
Class B equipment...........................................................................................................113
Taiwanese notices.................................................................................................................113
BSMI Class A notice.........................................................................................................113
Taiwan battery recycle statement........................................................................................113
Turkish recycling notice..........................................................................................................113
Vietnamese Information Technology and Communications compliance marking.............................113
Laser compliance notices.......................................................................................................114
English laser notice..........................................................................................................114
Dutch laser notice............................................................................................................114
French laser notice...........................................................................................................114
German laser notice.........................................................................................................115
Italian laser notice............................................................................................................115
Japanese laser notice.......................................................................................................115
Spanish laser notice.........................................................................................................116
Recycling notices..................................................................................................................116
English recycling notice....................................................................................................116
Bulgarian recycling notice.................................................................................................116
Czech recycling notice......................................................................................................116
Danish recycling notice.....................................................................................................116
Dutch recycling notice.......................................................................................................117
Estonian recycling notice...................................................................................................117
Finnish recycling notice.....................................................................................................117
French recycling notice.....................................................................................................117
German recycling notice...................................................................................................117
Greek recycling notice......................................................................................................117
Hungarian recycling notice...............................................................................................118
Italian recycling notice......................................................................................................118
Latvian recycling notice.....................................................................................................118
Lithuanian recycling notice................................................................................................118
Polish recycling notice.......................................................................................................118
Portuguese recycling notice...............................................................................................119
Romanian recycling notice................................................................................................119
Slovak recycling notice.....................................................................................................119
Spanish recycling notice...................................................................................................119
Swedish recycling notice...................................................................................................119
Battery replacement notices...................................................................................................120
Dutch battery notice.........................................................................................................120
French battery notice........................................................................................................120
Contents
7
German battery notice......................................................................................................121
Italian battery notice........................................................................................................121
Japanese battery notice....................................................................................................122
Spanish battery notice......................................................................................................122
B Non-standard rack specifications..............................................................123
Internal component envelope..................................................................................................123
EIA310-D standards..............................................................................................................123
EVA cabinet measures and tolerances.....................................................................................123
Weights, dimensions and component CG measurements...........................................................123
Airflow and recirculation........................................................................................................124
Component airflow requirements........................................................................................124
Rack airflow requirements.................................................................................................124
Configuration standards........................................................................................................124
UPS selection.......................................................................................................................124
Shock and vibration specifications..........................................................................................125
Glossary..................................................................................................126
Index.......................................................................................................137
8
Contents
1 EVA4400 hardware
The EVA4400 contains the following hardware components:
•
EVA controller enclosure—Contains power supplies, cache batteries, fans, and HSV controllers.
•
Fibre Channel disk enclosure—Contains disk drives, power supplies, fans, midplane, and I/O
modules.
•
Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop cables—Provide connectivity to the EVA controller enclosure
and the Fibre Channel disk enclosures.
•
Rack—Several free standing racks are available.
Physical layout of the storage system
The basic physical components are shown in Figure 1 (page 9). The disk drives are installed in
the disk enclosures.
Figure 1 Storage system hardware components (back view)
1. Controller enclosure (showing HSV300)
2. Disk enclosures
3. Power distribution unit (at rear of enclosure)
Physical layout of the storage system
9
M6412 disk enclosures
The M6412 disk enclosure contains the disk drives used for data storage; a storage system contains
multiple disk enclosures. The major components of the enclosure are:
•
12-bay enclosure
•
Dual-loop, Fibre Channel disk enclosure I/O modules
•
Copper Fibre Channel cables
•
Fibre Channel disk drives and drive blanks
•
Power supplies
•
Fan modules
NOTE:
An EVA4400 requires a minimum of one disk shelf with eight disk drives.
Enclosure layout
The disk drives mount in bays in the front of the enclosure. The bays are numbered sequentially
from top to bottom and left to right. A drive is referred to by its bay number (see Figure 2 (page
10)). Enclosure status indicators are located at the right of each disk. Figure 3 (page 10) shows
the front and Figure 4 (page 11) shows the rear view of the disk enclosure.
Figure 2 Disk drive bay numbering
Figure 3 Disk enclosure (front view without bezel ears)
1. Rack-mounting thumbscrew
4. UID push button
2. Disk drive release
5. Enclosure status LEDs
3. Drive LEDs
10
EVA4400 hardware
Figure 4 Disk enclosure (rear view)
1. Power supply 1
5. Fan 1 status LED
9. Enclosure status LEDs
2. Power supply 1 status LED
6. I/O module A
10. Fan 2
3. Fan 1
7. I/O module B
11. Power push button
4. Enclosure product number and serial number 8. Rear UID push button
12. Power supply 2
I/O modules
Two I/O modules provide the interface between the disk enclosure and the host controllers, see
Figure 5 (page 11). For redundancy, only dual-controller, dual-loop operation is supported. Each
controller is connected to both I/O modules in the disk enclosure.
Figure 5 I/O module detail
1. Double 7-segment display: enclosure ID
4. Manufacturing diagnostic port
2. 4-Gb I/O ports
5. I/O module status LEDs
3. Port 1 (P1), Port 2 (P2) status LEDs
Each I/O module has two ports that can transmit and receive data for bidirectional operation.
Activating a port requires connecting a Fibre Channel cable to the port. The port function depends
upon the loop.
I/O module status indicators
There are five status indicators on the I/O module. See Figure 5 (page 11). The status indicator
states for an operational I/O module are shown in Table 1 (page 11). Table 2 (page 12) shows
the status indicator states for a non-operational I/O module.
Table 1 Port status LEDs
Status LED
Green (left)
Description
• Solid green—Active link.
• Flashing green—Locate: remotely asserted by application client.
Amber (right)
• Solid amber—Module fault, no synchronization.
• Flashing amber—Module fault.
M6412 disk enclosures
11
Table 2 I/O module status LEDs
Status LED
Description
• Locate.
• Flashing blue—Remotely asserted by application client.
• Module health indicator:
• Flashing green—I/O module powering up.
• Solid green—Normal operation.
• Green off—Firmware malfunction.
• Fault indicator:
• Flashing amber—Warning condition (not visible when solid amber showing).
• Solid amber—Replace FRU.
• Amber off—Normal operation.
Fiber optic Fibre Channel cables
The Enterprise Virtual Array uses orange, 50-µm, multi-mode, fiber optic cables for connection to
the SAN or the host, where there is a direct connection to the host. The fiber optic cable assembly
consists of two 2-m fiber optic strands and small form-factor connectors on each end. See
Figure 6 (page 12).
To ensure optimum operation, the fiber optic cable components require protection from
contamination and mechanical hazards. Failure to provide this protection can cause degraded
operation. Observe the following precautions when using fiber optic cables.
•
To avoid breaking the fiber within the cable:
◦
Do not kink the cable
◦
Do not use a cable bend-radius of less than 30 mm (1.18 inch)
•
To avoid deforming, or possibly breaking the fiber within the cable, do not place heavy objects
on the cable.
•
To avoid contaminating the optical connectors:
◦
Do not touch the connectors
◦
Never leave the connectors exposed to the air
◦
Install a dust cover on each transceiver and fiber cable connector when they are
disconnected
If an open connector is exposed to dust, or if there is any doubt about the cleanliness of the
connector, clean the connector as described in “Handling fiber optic cables” (page 39).
Figure 6 Fiber Optic Fibre Channel cable
Copper Fibre Channel cables
The Enterprise Virtual Array uses copper Fibre Channel cables to interconnect disk shelves. The
cables are available in 0.6 meter (1.97 ft.) and 2.0 meter (6.56 ft.) lengths. Copper cables provide
12
EVA4400 hardware
performance comparable to fiber optic cables. Copper cable connectors differ from fiber optic
small form-factor connectors (see Figure 7 (page 13)).
Figure 7 Copper Fibre Channel cable
Fibre Channel disk drives
The Fibre Channel disk drives are hot-pluggable and include the following features:
•
Dual-ported 4-Gb/s Fibre Channel controller interface that allows up to 96 disk drives to be
supported per array controller enclosure
•
Compact, direct-connect design for maximum storage density and increased reliability and
signal integrity
•
Both online high-performance disk drives and FATA disk drives supported in a variety of
capacities and spindle speeds
•
Better vibration damping for improved performance
Up to 12 disk drives can be installed in a disk enclosure.
Disk drive status indicators
Two status indicators display drive operational status. Figure 8 (page 13) identifies the disk drive
status indicators and Table 3 (page 13) describes them.
Figure 8 Disk status indicators
1. Bi-color (amber/blue)
2. Green
Table 3 Disk status indicator LED descriptions
Drive LED
Description
Bi-color (top)
• Slow flashing blue (0.5 Hz)—Used to locate drive.
• Solid amber—Drive fault.
Green (bottom)
• Flashing—Drive is spinning up or down and is not ready.
• Solid—Drive is ready to perform I/O operations.
• Flickering—Indicates drive activity.
Disk drive blank
To maintain the proper enclosure air flow, a disk drive or a disk drive blank must be installed in
each drive bay. The disk drive blank maintains proper airflow within the disk enclosure.
M6412 disk enclosures
13
Controller enclosures
The EVA4400 contains either the HSV300 or HSV300-S controller enclosure. Two interconnected
controllers ensure that the failure of a controller component does not disable the system. A single
controller can fully support an entire system until the defective controller, or controller component,
is repaired. A single enclosure contains two controllers. The HSV300 has 4 Gb host port capability;
the HSV300-S has 8 Gb host port capability with the Brocade 5410 switch embedded within the
controller. Other than the embedded switch, all controller enclosure components are the same for
the HSV300 and HSV300-S.
Figure 9 (page 14) and Figure 10 (page 14) show the bezel and front view of the HSV300 controller
enclosure respectively. Figure 11 (page 15) shows the back view of the HSV300 controller enclosure.
Figure 12 (page 15) shows the back view of the HSV300-S controller enclosure.
Figure 9 Controller enclosure (front bezel)
1. Battery 1 status LEDs
4. Battery 2 status LEDs
2. Fan 1 status LEDs
5. Enclosure status LEDs
3. Fan 2 status LEDs
6. Front UID push button
Figure 10 Controller enclosure (front view with bezel removed)
1. Rack-mounting thumbscrew
8. Fan 1 normal operation LED
2. Enclosure product number and serial number
9. Fan 1 fault LED
3. World Wide Number (WWN)
10. Fan 2
4. Battery 1
11. Battery 2
5. Battery normal operation LED
12. Enclosure status LEDs
6. Battery fault LED
13. Front UID push button
7. Fan 1
14
EVA4400 hardware
Figure 11 HSV300 controller enclosure (back view)
1. Power supply 1
9. Enclosure power push button
2. HSV300 controller 1
10. Power supply 2
3. Management module status LEDs
11. Host ports, FP1, FP2, connection to front end (host or SAN)
4. Ethernet port
12. DP1-A port, back-end connection to A loop
5. Management module
13. DP1-B port, back-end connection to B loop
6. HSV300 controller 2
14. Manufacturing diagnostic port
7. Rear UID push button
15. HSV300 controller status and fault LEDs
8. Enclosure status LEDs
Figure 12 HSV300-S controller enclosure (back view)
1. Power supply 1
10. Power supply 2
2. HSV300-S controller 1
11. Switch ports, 1, 2, ... up to 10 for connection to front end (switch
or SAN)
3. Management module status LEDs
12. DPI-A port, back-end connection to A loop
4. Ethernet port
13. DPI-B port, back-end connection to B loop
5. Management module
14. Console port (switch management), upper connection
6. HSV300-S controller 2
15. Ethernet port (switch management)
7. Rear UID push button
16. Manufacturing diagnostic port
8. Enclosure status LEDs
17. HSV300-S controller status and fault LEDs
9. Enclosure power push button
Management module
The HP P6000 Control Panel provides a direct interface to the management module within each
controller. From the HP P6000 Control Panel you can display storage system status and configuration
information, shut down the storage system, and manage the password. For tasks to perform with
the HP P6000 Control Panel, see the HP P6000 Control Panel online help.
The HP P6000 Control Panel provides two levels of administrator access and an interface for
firmware updates to the management module. For additional details about the HP P6000 Control
Panel, see the HP P6000 Control Panel online help.
Controller enclosures
15
Table 4 (page 16) describes the port LED indicators for the management module Ethernet port
(callouts 3 and 4 in Figure 11 (page 15) and Figure 12 (page 15)).
Table 4 Management module Ethernet port LED indicators
LED color
Location
LED function
LED state
Status
Green
Left
Link state indicator
Off
No link detected.
Solid green
Link detected.
Off
No activity.
Blinking amber
Normal activity.
Amber
Right
Link activity indicator
Controller status indicators
The status indicators display the operational status of the controller. The function of each indicator
is described in Table 8 (page 17). During initial setup, the status indicators might not be fully
operational.
Each port on the rear of the controller has an associated status indicator located directly above it.
Table 5 (page 16) lists the port and its status description for the HSV300. Table 6 (page 16) lists
the port and its status descriptions for the HSV300–S.
Table 5 HSV300 controller port status indicators
Port
Fibre Channel host ports
Description
• Green—Normal operation
• Amber—No signal detected
• Off—No SFP1 detected or the Direct Connect HP P6000 Control Panel setting
is incorrect
Fibre Channel device ports
• Green—Normal operation
• Amber—No signal detected or the controller has failed the port
• Off—No SFP1 detected
• Flashing green–Link recovery in progress (the link has been detected as down
or failed and attempts to re-initialize the link are in progress)
1
On copper Fibre Channel cables, the SFP is integrated into the cable connector.
Table 6 HSV300-S controller port status indicators
Port
Fibre Channel switch ports
Description
• Green on—Normal operation or loopback port
• Green flashing—Normal online I/O activity
• Amber on—Faulted port, disabled due to diagnostics or Portdisable
command
• Amber flashing—Port with no synchronization, receiving light but not yet online
or segmented port
• Off—No SFP1, no cable, no license detected
Fibre Channel device ports
• Green—Normal operation
• Amber—No signal detected or the controller has failed the port
• Off—No SFP1 detected
The HSV300-S controller includes an Ethernet port for the embedded switch (callout 15 in
Figure 12 (page 15)). Table 7 (page 17) describes the LED functions of the Ethernet port.
16
EVA4400 hardware
Table 7 Embedded switch management Ethernet port LED indicators
LED color
Location
LED function
LED state
Status
Green
Right
Port speed indicator
Off
Port speed is 10 Mb/s and 100
Mb/s.
Solid green
No link detected.
Solid amber
No link detected.
Blinking amber
Link detected.
Amber
Left
Link state or activity
indicator
HSV300 controller status LEDs
Figure 13 (page 17) shows the location of the controller status LEDs; Table 8 (page 17) describes
them.
Figure 13 Controller status LEDs
Table 8 Controller status LEDs
Item
LED
Indication
1
Blue LED used to identify a certain controller within the enclosure.
2
Controller health OK. Solid green LED after boot.
3
Blinking amber LED used to identify a controller failure either from
a voltage issue or driven by firmware.
4
N/A
Not used.
5
N/A
Cache status. Slow flashing green LED shows cache is being
powered by standby power.
6
Cache battery status. Slow flashing amber when cache is being
powered by battery (during AC power loss). Faster flashing amber
when testing. Solid amber when the controller determines a battery
fault.
Power supplies
Two power supplies provide the necessary operating voltages to all controller enclosure components.
If one power supply fails, the remaining supply is capable of operating the enclosure.
Power supplies
17
Figure 14 Power supply
1. Power supply
4. Status indicator (green—Normal operation; amber—Failure or no power)
2. AC input connector
5. Handle
3. Latch
Fan module
Fan modules provide the cooling necessary to maintain the proper operating temperature within
the controller enclosure. If one fan fails, the remaining fan is capable of cooling the enclosure.
Figure 15 Fan module pulled out
1. Green—Fan normal operation LED
2. Amber—Fan fault LED
Table 9 Fan status indicators
Status indicator
Green
Amber
Fault indicator
Description
Solid green
Normal operation.
Blinking
Maintenance in progress.
Off
Amber is on or blinking, or the enclosure is powered
down.
On
Fan failure. Green will be off. (Green and amber are
not on simultaneously except for a few seconds after
power-up.)
Battery module
Battery modules provide power to the controllers in the enclosure.
18
EVA4400 hardware
Figure 16 Battery module pulled out
1. Green—Normal operation LED
2. Amber—Fault LED
Each battery module provides power to the controller directly across from it in the enclosure.
Table 10 Battery status indicators
Status indicator
Green
Amber
Fault indicator
Description
Solid green
Normal operation.
Blinking
Maintenance in progress.
Off
Amber is on or blinking, or the enclosure is powered
down.
Solid amber
Battery failure; no cache hold-up. Green will be off.
Blinking amber
Battery degraded; replace soon. Green will be off.
(Green and amber are not on simultaneously except for
a few seconds after power-up.)
HSV controller cabling
All data cables and power cables attach to the rear of the controller. Adjacent to each data
connector is a two-colored link status indicator. Table 5 (page 16) identifies the status conditions
presented by these indicators.
NOTE: These indicators do not indicate whether there is communication on the link, only whether
the link can transmit and receive data.
The data connections are the interfaces to the disk enclosures or loops (depending on your
configuration), the other controller, and the fabric. Fiber optic cables link the controllers to the
fabric, and, if an expansion cabinet is part of the configuration, link the expansion cabinet disk
enclosures to the loops in the main cabinet. Copper cables are used the controllers (mirror port)
and the controllers and the disk enclosures or loops.
Storage system racks
All storage system components are mounted in a rack. Each configuration includes one controller
enclosure holding both controllers (the controller pair), FC cables the controller and the disk
enclosures. Each controller pair and all associated disk enclosures form a single storage system.
HSV controller cabling
19
The rack provides the capability for mounting standard 483 mm (19 inch) wide controller and disk
enclosures.
NOTE: Racks and rack-mountable components are typically described using U measurements.
U measurements are used to designate panel or enclosure heights. The U measurement is a standard
of 41 mm (1.6 inches).
The racks provide the following:
•
Unique frame and rail design—Allows fast assembly, easy mounting, and outstanding structural
integrity.
•
Thermal integrity—Front-to-back natural convection cooling is greatly enhanced by the innovative
multi-angled design of the front door.
•
Security provisions—The front and rear door are lockable, which prevents unauthorized entry.
•
Flexibility—Provides easy access to hardware components for operation monitoring.
•
Custom expandability—Several options allow for quick and easy expansion of the racks to
create a custom solution.
Rack configurations
Each system configuration contains several disk enclosures included in the storage system. See
“Storage system hardware components (back view)” (page 9) for a typical EVA4400 rack
configuration. The standard rack for the EVA4400 is the 42U HP 10000 Intelligent Series rack.
The EVA4400 is also supported with 22U, 36U, 42U 5642, and 47U racks. The 42U 5642 is a
field-installed option and the 47U rack must be assembled onsite because the cabinet height creates
shipping difficulties.
For more information on HP rack offerings for the EVA4400, see http://h18004.www1.hp.com/
products/servers/proliantstorage/racks/index.html.
Power distribution–Modular PDUs
NOTE: This section describes the most common power distribution system for EVA4400s. For
information about other options, see the HP power distribution units website:
http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/proliantstorage/power-protection/pdu.html
AC power is distributed to the rack through a dual PDU assembly mounted at the bottom rear of
the rack. The characteristics of the fully-redundant rack power configuration are as follows:
•
20
Each PDU is connected to a separate circuit breaker-protected, 30-A AC site power source
(100–127 VAC or 220–240 VAC ±10%, 50 or 60-Hz, ±5%). The following figures illustrate
the most common compatible 60-Hz and 50-Hz wall receptacles. For more information about
PDU support, see the HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array QuickSpecs.
EVA4400 hardware
NOTE:
This section describes 30-A, single phase power. You can order other voltage, amperage,
and phase configurations if you have a different power infrastructure.
NEMA L6-30R receptacle, 3-wire, 30-A, 60-Hz
NEMA L5-30R receptacle, 3-wire, 30-A, 60-Hz
IEC 309 receptacle, 3-wire, 30-A, 50-Hz
•
The standard power configuration for any HP Enterprise Virtual Array rack is the fully redundant
configuration. Implementing this configuration requires:
◦
Two separate circuit breaker-protected, 30-A site power sources with a compatible wall
receptacle.
◦
One dual PDU assembly. Each PDU connects to a different wall receptacle.
◦
Four to eight (depending on the rack) Power Distribution Modules (PDMs) per rack. PDMs
are split evenly on both sides of the rack. Each set of PDMs connects to a different PDU.
–
Eight PDMs for 42U, 47U, and 42U 5642 racks
–
Six PDMs for 36U racks
–
Four PDMs for 22U racks
◦
The disk enclosure power supplies on the left (disk PS 1) connect to the PDMs on the left
with a gray, 66 cm (26 inch) power cord.
◦
The disk enclosure power supplies on the right (disk PS 2) connect to the PDMs on the
right with a black, 66 cm (26 inch) power cord.
◦
Each controller enclosure has two power supplies:
–
Controller PS 1 connects to a PDM on the left with a gray, 152 cm (60 inch) power
cord.
–
Controller PS 2 connects to a PDM on the right with a black, 66 cm (26 inch) power
cord.
NOTE: Disk enclosures, when purchased separately, include one 50 cm black cable and one
50 cm gray cable.
The configuration provides complete power redundancy and eliminates all single points of failure
for both the AC and DC power distribution.
Power distribution–Modular PDUs
21
PDUs
Each Enterprise Virtual Array rack has either a 50- or 60-Hz, dual PDU mounted at the bottom rear
of the rack. The PDU placement is back-to-back, plugs facing toward the front (Figure 17 (page
22)), with circuit breaker switches facing the back (Figure 18 (page 22)).
•
The standard 50-Hz PDU cable has an IEC 309, 3-wire, 30-A, 50-Hz connector.
•
The standard 60-Hz PDU cable has a NEMA L6-30P, 3-wire, 30-A, 60-Hz connector.
If these connectors are not compatible with the site power distribution, you must replace the PDU
power cord cable connector. One option is the NEMA L5-30R receptacle, 3-wire, 30-A, 60-Hz
connector.
Each of the two PDU power cables has an AC power source specific connector. The circuit
breaker-controlled PDU outputs are routed to a group of four AC receptacles. The voltages are
then routed to PDMs, sometimes called AC power strips, mounted on the two vertical rails in the
rear of the rack.
Figure 17 Dual PDU—front view
1. PDU B
4. Power receptacle schematic
2. PDU A
5. Power cord
3. AC receptacles
Figure 18 Dual PDU—rear view
1. PDU B
3. Main circuit breaker
2. PDU A
4. Circuit breakers
PDU A
PDU A connects to AC PDM A1–A4.
22
EVA4400 hardware
A PDU A failure:
•
Disables the power distribution circuit
•
Removes power from the left side of the rack
•
Disables disk enclosure PS 1
•
Disables controller PS 1
PDU B
PDU B connects to AC PDM B1–B4.
A PDU B failure:
•
Disables the power distribution circuit
•
Removes power from the right side of the rack
•
Disables disk enclosure PS 2
•
Disables controller PS 2
PDMs
Depending on the rack, there can be up to eight PDMs mounted in the rear of the rack:
•
The PDMs on the left vertical rail connect to PDU A
•
The PDMs on the right vertical rail connect to PDU B
Each PDM has seven AC receptacles. The PDMs distribute the AC power from the PDUs to the
enclosures. Two power sources exist for each controller pair and disk enclosure. If a PDU fails, the
system will remain operational.
CAUTION: The AC power distribution within a rack ensures a balanced load to each PDU and
reduces the possibility of an overload condition. Changing the cabling to or from a PDM could
cause an overload condition. HP supports only the AC power distributions defined in this user
guide.
Figure 19 Rack PDM
1. Power receptacles
2. AC power connector
Power distribution–Modular PDUs
23
Rack AC power distribution
The power distribution in an Enterprise Virtual Array rack is the same for all variants. The site AC
input voltage is routed to the dual PDU assembly mounted in the rack lower rear. Each PDU
distributes AC to a maximum of four PDMs mounted on the left and right vertical rails (see
Figure 20 (page 24)).
•
PDMs A1 through A4 connect to receptacles A through D on PDU A. Power cords connect
these PDMs to the left power supplies on the disk enclosures (disk PS 1) and to the left power
supply on the controller enclosure (controller PS 1).
•
PDMs B1 through B4 connect to receptacles A through D on PDU B. Power cords connect
these PDMs to the right power supplies on the disk enclosures (disk PS 2) and to the right
power supply on the controller enclosure (controller PS 2) .
NOTE:
The locations of the PDUs and the PDMs are the same in all racks.
Figure 20 Rack AC power distribution
24
1. PDM A1
6. PDM B1
2. PDM A2
7. PDM B2
3. PDM A3
8. PDM B3
4. PDM A4
9. PDM B4
5. PDU B
10. PDU A
EVA4400 hardware
Moving and stabilizing a rack
WARNING! The physical size and weight of the rack requires a minimum of two people to move.
If one person tries to move the rack, injury may occur.
To ensure stability of the rack, always push on the lower half of the rack. Be especially careful
when moving the rack over any bump (e.g., door sills, ramp edges, carpet edges, or elevator
openings). When the rack is moved over a bump, there is a potential for it to tip over.
Moving the rack requires a clear, uncarpeted pathway that is at least 80 cm (31.5 inches) wide
for the 60.3 cm (23.7 inch) wide, 42U rack. A vertical clearance of 203.2 cm (80 inches) should
ensure sufficient clearance for the 200 cm (78.7 inch) high, 42U rack.
CAUTION: Ensure that no vertical or horizontal restrictions exist that would prevent rack movement
without damaging the rack.
Make sure that all four leveler feet are in the fully raised position. This process will ensure that the
casters support the rack weight and the feet do not impede movement.
Each rack requires an area 600 mm (23.62 inch) wide and 1000 mm (39.37 inch) deep (see
Figure 21 (page 25)).
Figure 21 Single rack configuration floor space requirements
1. Front door
5. Rear service area depth 300 mm
2. Rear door
6. Rack depth 1,000 mm
3. Rack width 600 mm
7. Front service area depth 406 mm
4. Service area width 813 mm
8. Total rack depth 1,706 mm
If the feet are not fully raised, complete the following procedure:
1. Raise one foot by turning the leveler foot hex nut counterclockwise until the weight of the rack
is fully on the caster (see Figure 22 (page 26)).
2. Repeat Step 1 for the other feet.
Moving and stabilizing a rack
25
Figure 22 Raising a leveler foot
1. Hex nut
2. Leveler foot
3.
To
1.
2.
3.
26
Carefully move the rack to the installation area and position it to provide the necessary service
areas (see Figure 21 (page 25)).
stabilize the rack when it is in the final installation location:
Use a wrench to lower the foot by turning the leveler foot hex nut clockwise until the caster
does not touch the floor. Repeat for the other feet.
After lowering the feet, check the rack to ensure it is stable and level.
Adjust the feet as necessary to ensure the rack is stable and level.
EVA4400 hardware
2 EVA4400 operation
Best practices
For useful information on managing and configuring your storage system, see the HP
4400/6400/8400 Enterprise Virtual Array configuration Best practices white paper available at:
http://h18006.www1.hp.com/storage/arraywhitepapers.html
Operating tips and information
Reserving adequate free space
To ensure efficient storage system operation, reserve some unallocated capacity, or free space, in
each disk group. The recommended amount of free space is influenced by your system configuration.
For guidance on how much free space to reserve, see the HP 4400/6400/8400 Enterprise Virtual
Array configuration Best practices white paper. See “Best practices” (page 27).
Using FATA disk drives
FATA drives are designed for lower duty cycle applications such as near online data replication
for backup. Do not use these drives as a replacement for EVA's high performance, standard duty
cycle, Fibre Channel drives. This practice could shorten the life of the drive. For more information
on FATA drives, see the HP 4400/6400/8400 Enterprise Virtual Array configuration Best practices
white paper. See “Best practices” (page 27).
Using solid state disk drives
•
Supported in the EVA4400 and EVA6400/8400 only, running a minimum controller software
version of 09500000 for the 72 GB drive and 09534000 for the 200 GB and 400 GB drives
•
SSD drives must be in a separate disk group
•
The SSD disk group supports a minimum of 6 and a maximum of 8 drives per array
•
SSD drives can only be configured with Vraid5 or Vraid1 (Vraid1 requires controller software
version 09534000
•
Supported with HP P6000 Business Copy
•
Not supported with HP P6000 Continuous Access
•
Dynamic Capacity Management extend and shrink features are not supported
Use of these devices in unsupported configurations can lead to unpredictable results, including
unstable array operation or data loss.
EVA4400 port does not log in to the embedded switch
It has been observed that an EVA4400 host port will occasionally not log in to the embedded
switch. If you encounter this issue, restart the controller to bring the port online.
Emulex HBAs require unique zoning
When multiple Emulex HBAs are connected to the same EVA4400, each HBA requires unique
zoning.
Creating 16 TB or greater virtual disks in Windows 2008
When creating a virtual disk that is 16 TB or greater in Windows 2008, ensure that the Allocation
unit size field is set to something other than Default in the Windows New Simple Volume wizard.
Best practices
27
The recommended setting is 16K. If this field is set to Default, you will receive the following error
message:
The format operation did not complete because the cluster count is
higher than expected.
Importing Windows dynamic disk volumes
If you create a snapshot, snapclone, or mirrorclone with a Windows 2003 RAID-spanned dynamic
volume on the source virtual disk, and then try to import the copy to a Windows 2003 x64 (64-bit)
system, it will import with Dynamic Foreign status. The following message displays in the DiskPart
utility:
The disk management services could not complete the operation.
This error occurs because the 64-bit version of DiskPart fails to import dynamic RAID sets on a new
server.
To avoid this issue, use the 32-bit version of DiskPart instead of the 64-bit version. Copy DiskPart
from a 32-bit x86 Windows system, located in C:\WINDOWS\system32. Place the DiskPart utility
in a temporary folder on the 64-bit x64 Windows system.
Losing a path to a dynamic disk
If you are using Windows 2003 with dynamic disks and a path to the EVA virtual disk is temporarily
lost, the Logical Disk Manager (LDM) will erroneously show a failed dynamic volume. For more
information, see the following issue on the Microsoft knowledge base website:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816307
To resolve the issue, reboot the Windows 2003 server to restore the dynamic volume.
Microsoft Windows 2003 MSCS cluster installation
The MSCS cluster installation wizard on Windows 2003 can fail to find the shared quorum device
and disk resources might not be auto-created by the cluster setup wizard. This is a known Windows
Cluster Setup issue that has existed since Windows 2003 was released.
There are two possible workarounds for this problem:
•
Follow the workaround recommendation described in the Microsoft support article entitled
Shared disks are missing or are marked as "Failed" when you create a server cluster in
Windows Server 2003 (ID 886807), available for download on the Microsoft website:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;EN-US;886807
•
Use the MPIO DSM CLI to set the load balancing policy for each LUN to NLB.
Microsoft is currently working on a resolution to address this issue.
Array I/O can halt after a power cycle with an HP-UX host
I/O halts after power cycling an HSV300-S enclosure connected to an HP-UX 11.23 host with
HP-UX driver versions earlier than B.11.23.08.02. To resolve this issue, either upgrade to version
B.11.23.08.02, or reset the HBAs on any server affected after an HSV300-S is power cycled.
Reboot can be required after EVA power cycle to resume access to LUNs
If an EVA4400 experiences a power cycle while the management GUI for Windows MPIO DSM
is open, the LUNs might not appear under Disk Management after they recover. This issue is seen
when the MPIO DSM Manager snap-in is open at the time of a power cycle. To reduce the
probability of this occurring, HP recommends that you close the GUI when you are not performing
management actions.
If this problem occurs, follow these steps:
28
EVA4400 operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Close the HP MPIO DSM Manager GUI.
Close Disk Management.
Stop and restart the Virtual Disk services.
Open Disk Management, and then rescan or Diskpart rescan to enumerate the LUNs.
If these steps are not successful, reboot the server.
Host port connection limit on B-series 3200 and 3800 switches
A maximum of three EVA4400 host ports are supported on a single B-Series 3200 or 3800 switch
running version 3.2.x. HP recommends that you connect only one storage host port on a B-Series
switch. However, if you must connect more than one storage host port to a switch, separate the
connection into different quadrants. Otherwise the connections can drop following an array
controller resynchronization or when an event impacts the fabric, such as rebooting or adding a
switch.
To manage the port limitation:
•
For all hosts, zone by HBA as defined in the HP SAN Design Reference Guide.
•
Limit affected switches to only one HBA connection per host.
•
Limit placement of the switch as an edge device and not part of the core.
•
If the switch drops a connection, re-establish the connection as follows:
1. Disconnect the Fibre Channel cable from the failed port.
2. Wait 10 seconds, and then reconnect the cable.
The port relogs into the fabric and re-establishes a connection to the array.
Operating tips and information
29
Failback preference setting for HSV controllers
Table 11 (page 30) describes the failback preference mode for the controllers.
Table 11 Failback preference settings
Setting
Point in time
Behavior
No Preference
At initial presentation
The units are alternately brought online to Controller 1 or to Controller 2.
On dual boot or controller
resynch
If cache data for a LUN exists on a particular controller, the unit will be
brought online there. Otherwise, the units are alternately brought online to
Controller 1 or to Controller 2.
On controller failover
All LUNs are brought online to the surviving controller.
On controller failback
All LUNs remain on the surviving controller. There is no failback except if a
host moves the LUN using SCSI commands.
At initial presentation
The units are brought online to Controller 1.
On dual boot or controller
resynch
If cache data for a LUN exists on a particular controller, the unit will be
brought online there. Otherwise, the units are brought online to Controller
1.
On controller failover
All LUNs are brought online to the surviving controller.
On controller failback
All LUNs remain on the surviving controller. There is no failback except if a
host moves the LUN using SCSI commands.
At initial presentation
The units are brought online to Controller 2.
On dual boot or controller
resynch
If cache data for a LUN exists on a particular controller, the unit will be
brought online there. Otherwise, the units are brought online to Controller
2.
On controller failover
All LUNs are brought online to the surviving controller.
On controller failback
All LUNs remain on the surviving controller. There is no failback except if a
host moves the LUN using SCSI commands.
At initial presentation
The units are brought online to Controller 1.
On dual boot or controller
resynch
If cache data for a LUN exists on a particular controller, the unit will be
brought online there. Otherwise, the units are brought online to Controller
1.
On controller failover
All LUNs are brought online to the surviving controller.
On controller failback
All LUNs remain on the surviving controller. After controller restoration, the
units that are online to Controller 2 and set to Path A are brought online to
Controller 1. This is a one-time occurrence. If the host then moves the LUN
using SCSI commands, the LUN will remain where moved.
At initial presentation
The units are brought online to Controller 2.
On dual boot or controller
resynch
If cache data for a LUN exists on a particular controller, the unit will be
brought online there. Otherwise, the units are brought online to Controller
2.
On controller failover
All LUNs are brought online to the surviving controller.
On controller failback
All LUNs remain on the surviving controller. After controller restoration, the
units that are online to Controller 1 and set to Path B are brought online to
Controller 2. This is a one-time occurrence. If the host then moves the LUN
using SCSI commands, the LUN will remain where moved.
Path A - Failover
Only
Path B - Failover
Only
Path A Failover/Failback
Path B Failover/Failback
Table 12 (page 31) describes the failback default behavior and supported settings when
ALUA-compliant multipath software is running with each operating system. Recommended settings
may vary depending on your configuration or environment.
30
EVA4400 operation
Table 12 Failback Settings by operating system
Operating system
Default behavior
Supported settings
HP-UX
Host follows the unit1
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
Host follows the unit1
IBM AIX
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
Linux
Host follows the unit
1
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
OpenVMS
Host follows the unit
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
(recommended)
Oracle Solaris
Host follows the unit1
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
Host follows the unit1
VMware
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
Windows
Failback performed on the host
No Preference
Path A/B – Failover Only
Path A/B – Failover/Failback
1
If preference has been configured to ensure a more balanced controller configuration, the Path A/B – Failover/Failback setting is
required to maintain the configuration after a single controller reboot.
Changing virtual disk failover/failback setting
Changing the failover/failback setting of a virtual disk may impact which controller presents the
disk. Table 13 (page 31) identifies the presentation behavior that results when the failover/failback
setting for a virtual disk is changed.
NOTE: If the new setting moves the presentation of the virtual disk to a new controller, any
snapshots or snapclones associated with the virtual disk are also moved.
Table 13 Impact on virtual disk presentation when changing failover/failback setting
New setting
Impact on virtual disk presentation
No Preference
None. The disk maintains its original presentation.
Path A Failover
If the disk is currently presented on Controller 2, it is moved to Controller 1.
If the disk is on Controller 1, it remains there.
nl
Path B Failover
If the disk is currently presented on Controller 1, it is moved to Controller 2.
If the disk is on Controller 2, it remains there.
nl
Path A Failover/Failback
If the disk is currently presented on Controller 2, it is moved to Controller 1.
If the disk is on Controller 1, it remains there.
nl
Path B Failover/Failback
If the disk is currently presented on Controller 1, it is moved to Controller 2.
If the disk is on Controller 2, it remains there.
nl
Failback preference setting for HSV controllers
31
Implicit LUN transition
Implicit LUN transition automatically transfers management of a virtual disk to the array controller
that receives the most read requests for that virtual disk. This improves performance by reducing
the overhead incurred when servicing read I/Os on the non-managing controller. Implicit LUN
transition is enabled in XCS.
When creating a virtual disk, one controller is selected to manage the virtual disk. Only this
managing controller can issue I/Os to a virtual disk in response to a host read or write request. If
a read I/O request arrives on the non-managing controller, the read request must be transferred
to the managing controller for servicing. The managing controller issues the I/O request, caches
the read data, and mirrors that data to the cache on the non-managing controller, which then
transfers the read data to the host. Because this type of transaction, called a proxy read, requires
additional overhead, it provides less than optimal performance. (There is little impact on a write
request because all writes are mirrored in both controllers’ caches for fault protection.)
With implicit LUN transition, when the array detects that a majority of read requests for a virtual
disk are proxy reads, the array transitions management of the virtual disk to the non-managing
controller. This improves performance because the controller receiving most of the read requests
becomes the managing controller, reducing proxy read overhead for subsequent I/Os.
Implicit LUN transition is disabled for all members of an HP Continuous Access EVA DR group.
Because HP Continuous Access EVA requires that all members of a DR group be managed by the
same controller, it would be necessary to move all members of the DR group if excessive proxy
reads were detected on any virtual disk in the group. This would impact performance and create
a proxy read situation for the other virtual disks in the DR group. Not implementing implicit LUN
transition on a DR group may cause a virtual disk in the DR group to have excessive proxy reads.
Storage system shutdown and startup
You can shut down the array from HP P6000 Command View or from the array controller.
The
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
shutdown process performs the following functions in the indicated order:
Flushes cache
Removes power from the controllers
Disables cache battery power
Removes power from the disk enclosures
Disconnects the system from HP P6000 Command View
NOTE: The storage system may take several minutes (up to 15) to complete the necessary cache
flush during controller shutdown when snapshots are being used. The delay may be particularly
long if multiple child snapshots are used, or if there has been a large amount of write activity to
the snapshot source virtual disk.
Individual EVA storage array components should not be powered off during normal operation.
Before powering off any storage system component, contact your HP-authorized service
representative for assistance.
Shutting down the storage system from HP P6000 Command View
1.
2.
Start HP P6000 Command View.
Select the appropriate storage system in the Navigation pane.
The Initialized Storage System Properties window for the selected storage system opens.
3.
Click Shut down.
The Shutdown Options window opens.
32
EVA4400 operation
4.
Under System Shutdown, click Power Down.
If you want to delay the initiation of the shutdown, enter the number of minutes in the Shutdown
delay field.
The controllers complete an orderly shutdown and then power off. The disk enclosures then
power off. Wait for the shutdown to complete.
Shutting down the storage system from the array controller
1.
2.
Push and hold the enclosure power button on the rear of the EVA4400 (see callout 9 in
Figure 11 (page 15) or Figure 12 (page 15)).
Wait 4 seconds.
The power button and the green LED start to blink.
NOTE: You must press and hold the power switch button for a minimum of 4 seconds.
Otherwise, nothing will happen.
3.
4.
Between 4 and 10 seconds, release the button. The button continues to blink and the firmware
starts the shutdown process (LED becomes solid amber, flushes the cache, disables the batteries).
After 10 seconds, the power shuts down.
Starting the storage system
1.
Verify that each Fibre Channel fabric switch connected to the HSV controllers is powered up
and fully booted. The power indicator on each switch should be on.
If you must power up the SAN switches, wait for them to complete their power-on boot process
before proceeding. This can take several minutes.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Power on the circuit breakers on both EVA rack PDUs. Verify that all disk enclosures are
operating properly. The status indicator and the power indicator should be on (green).
Power on the controller enclosure, which powers on both controllers.
After allowing the EVA4400 to start, connect to the HP P6000 Control Panel to verify the
display of the storage system name and WWN.
Start HP P6000 Command View and verify connection to the storage system. If the storage
system is not visible, click HSV Storage Network in the navigation pane, and then click Discover
in the Content pane to allow HP P6000 Command View to discover the array.
NOTE: If the storage system is still not visible, check zoning and cabling, and verify correct
configuration of server connectivity. If necessary, reboot the management server to re-establish
the communication link.
6.
Check the storage system status using HP P6000 Command View to ensure everything is
operating properly. If any status indicator is not normal, check the log files or contact your
HP-authorized service provider for assistance.
With XCS 10000000 or later and HP P6000 Command View 9.4 or later, there is a feature in
the HP P6000 Control Panel that enables the controllers to boot automatically when power is
applied after a full shutdown. See the HP P6000 Control Panel online help or user guide for details
about setting this feature. To further clarify the use of this feature:
•
If this feature is disabled and you turn on power to the array from the rack power distribution
unit (PDU), only the disk enclosures boot up. With this feature enabled, the controllers will
also boot up, making the entire array ready for use.
•
If, after setting this feature, you remove the management module from its slot and reinsert it
to reset power or you restart the management module from the HP P6000 Control Panel, only
the controllers will automatically boot up after a full shutdown. In this scenario, you must ensure
Storage system shutdown and startup
33
that the disk enclosures are powered up first; otherwise, the controller boot up process may
be interrupted.
•
After setting this HP P6000 Control Panel feature, if you have to shut down the array, perform
the following steps:
1. Use HP P6000 Command View to shut down the controllers and disk enclosures.
2. Turn off power from the rack power distribution unit (PDU).
3. Turn on power from the rack PDU.
After startup of the management module, the controllers will automatically start.
Connecting to the management module
You can connect to the management module through a public or a private network.
IMPORTANT: To aggregate additional HP Command View servers into a SPoG (Single Pane of
Glass) when the servers reside on a different IP network from the SPoG web server, some additional
configuration settings may be needed. To configure the system if the HP Command View servers
reside on a different network and you would like them visible in the SPoG, see Discovery URI under
Discovery configuration settings in the HP Management Integration Framework Administrator Guide.
If you use a laptop to connect to the management module, configure the laptop to have an address
in the same IP range as the management module (for example, 192.168.0.2 with a subnet mask
of 255.255.255.0).
The management module has an MDI-X port that supports straight-through or crossover Ethernet
cables. Use a Cat5e or greater cable to connect to the management module from its Ethernet jack
(2, Figure 23 (page 34)) to the management server.
Figure 23 Management module
1. Status LEDs
2. Ethernet jack
3. Reset button
Connecting through a public network
1.
2.
3.
Initialize the EVA4400 storage system, using HP P6000 SmartStart or HP P6000 Command
View.
If currently connected, disconnect the public network LAN cable from the back of the
management module in the controller enclosure.
Press and hold the recessed Reset button (3, Figure 23 (page 34)) for 4–5 seconds.
If you are running HP Command View EVA 9.3 or later, the green LED on the management
module (1, Figure 23 (page 34)) blinks to indicate the configuration reset has started. The
reset may take up to 2 minutes to complete. When the reset is completed, the green LED turns
solid. This sets IP addresses of 192.168.0.1/24 (IPv4) and fd50:f2eb:a8a::7/48 (IPv6). If
you are running a version earlier than HP Command View EVA 9.3 on the management
module, the amber LED will flash momentarily when the reset is completed.
34
EVA4400 operation
IMPORTANT: At initial setup, you cannot browse to the HP P6000 Control Panel until you
perform this step.
4.
Do one of the following:
a. Temporarily connect a LAN cable from a private network to the management module.
b. Temporarily connect a laptop computer to the management module using a LAN patch
cable.
5.
Browse to https://192.168.0.1:2373 or https://[fd50:f2eb:a8a::7]:2373/
and log in as an HP EVA administrator. HP recommends that you either change or delete the
default IPv4 or IPv6 addresses to avoid duplicate address detection issues on your network.
The default user name is admin. No password is required during the initial setup.
The HP P6000 control panel GUI appears.
NOTE:
6.
7.
•
If you are running a version of management module software earlier than 0001.1000
(which corresponds to XCS 09004000 or earlier), use port 2372.
•
If you change the password for the administrator or user account for the HP P6000 Control
Panel, be sure to record the new passwords since they cannot be cleared without resetting
the management module. HP recommends that you change the default passwords.
Select Administrator Options > Configure Network Options.
Enter an IP address and other network settings that apply.
NOTE: The management module firmware reserves IP addresses for internal communications.
If you are using HP Command View EVA 9.2 or earlier, the reserved IP addresses are 10.0.0.1
through 10.0.0.3. Later versions of the management module firmware will also use these
addresses if the array has older controller firmware loaded. The latest versions of controller
and management module firmware, however, use the reserved IP address range from
10.253.251.230 through 10.253.251.249. The management module cannot be configured
to use these addresses, nor can it communicate with external systems that fall within the reserved
address range (for example, web client, router, DNS server, and so on).
8.
Click Save Changes.
The IP address changes immediately, causing you to lose connectivity to the HP P6000 Control
Panel.
The new IP address is stored and remains in effect, even when the storage system is shut down
or restarted.
NOTE: If you uninitialize the storage system, wait one minute before reinitializing or you
may lose the IP address.
9. Remove the LAN cable to the private network and reconnect the cable to the public network.
10. From a computer on the public network, browse to https://newly configured ip
address:2373 and log in.
The HP P6000 control panel GUI appears.
Connecting through a private network
1.
Press and hold the recessed Reset button (3, Figure 23 (page 34)) for 4–5 seconds.
If you are running HP Command View EVA 9.3 or later, the green LED on the management
module (1, Figure 23 (page 34)) blinks to indicate the configuration reset has started. The
reset may take up to 2 minutes to complete. When the reset is completed, the green LED turns
solid. This sets IP addresses of 192.168.0.1/24 (IPv4) and fd50:f2eb:a8a::7/48 (IPv6). If
Connecting to the management module
35
you are running a version earlier than HP Command View EVA 9.3 on the management
module, the amber LED will flash momentarily when the reset is completed.
2.
Browse to https://192.168.0.1:2373 and log in as an HP EVA administrator. HP
recommends that you either change or delete the default IPv4 or IPv6 addresses to avoid
duplicate address detection issues on your network. The default user name is admin. No
password is required.
The HP P6000 control panel GUI appears.
NOTE: If you are running a version of management module software earlier than 0001.1000
(which corresponds to XCS 09004000 or earlier), use port 2372. At initial setup, you cannot
browse to the HP P6000 Control Panel until you perform this step.
3.
4.
Select Administrator Options > Configure Network Options.
Enter an IP address and other network settings that apply.
NOTE: The management module firmware reserves IP addresses for internal communications.
If you are using HP Command View EVA 9.2 or earlier, the reserved IP addresses are 10.0.0.1
through 10.0.0.3. Later versions of the management module firmware will also use these
addresses if the array has older controller firmware loaded. The latest versions of controller
and management module firmware, however, use the reserved IP address range from
10.253.251.230 through 10.253.251.249. The management module cannot be configured
to use these addresses, nor can it communicate with external systems that fall within the reserved
address range (for example, web client, router, DNS server, and so on).
5.
Click Save Changes.
The IP address changes immediately, causing you to lose connectivity to the HP P6000 Control
Panel. The new IP address is stored and remains in effect, even when the storage system is
shut down or restarted.
NOTE: If you uninitialize the storage system, wait one minute before reinitializing or you
may lose the IP address.
IMPORTANT: The IP address will be lost if the storage system is uninitialized or the
management module is reset.
6.
From a computer on the private network, browse to https://newly configured ip
address:2373 and log in.
The HP P6000 control panel GUI appears.
Changing the default operating mode
By default, the EVA4400 is shipped to operate in a Fibre Channel switch environment and is
configured in fabric mode. If you choose to connect the EVA4400 directly to a server, you must
change the default operating mode of the EVA4400 to direct mode. If you do not change this
mode, the EVA4400 will be unable to communicate with your server. Use the HP P6000 Control
Panel to change the default operating mode.
NOTE: You must have administrator privilege to change the settings in the HP P6000 Control
Panel. Change your browser settings for the HP P6000 Control Panel window as described in the
HP P6000 Command View Installation Guide.
To change the default operating mode:
36
EVA4400 operation
1.
2.
3.
Connect to the management module using one of the methods described in “Connecting
through a public network” (page 34) or “Connecting through a private network” (page 35).
Log into the HP P6000 Control Panel as an administrator. The default username is admin and
the password field is blank. For security reasons, change the password after you log in.
Select Administrator Options > Configure controller host ports.
The HP P6000 Control Panel screen appears.
Figure 24 HP P6000 Control Panel Configure controller host ports page
•
In the Topology box, select Direct from the drop-down menu.
•
Click Save Changes.
•
Change the default operating mode for the other controller.
•
Close the HP P6000 Control Panel and remove the Ethernet cable from the server.
Accessing the HP P6000 Control Panel through HP P6000 Command View
1.
2.
3.
Select the EVA4400 storage system to access.
Select Hardware→Controller Enclosure→Management Module.
Click Launch HP P6000 Control Panel.
Rarely, the Launch HP P6000 Control Panel button may not appear due to invalid array state or
if the management module IP address is unknown to HP P6000 Command View.
Saving storage system configuration data
As part of an overall data protection strategy, storage system configuration data should be saved
during initial installation, and whenever major configuration changes are made to the storage
system. This includes adding or removing disk drives, creating or deleting disk groups, and adding
or deleting virtual disks. The saved configuration data can save substantial time if re-initializing
the storage system becomes necessary. The configuration data is saved to a series of files, which
should be stored in a location other than on the storage system.
You can perform this procedure from the management server where HP P6000 Command View
is installed from any host running HP Storage System Scripting Utility and connected to the
management server.
Accessing the HP P6000 Control Panel through HP P6000 Command View
37
NOTE: For more information on using the HP Storage System Scripting Utility, see the HP Storage
System Scripting Utility Reference. See “Documents” (page 106).
1.
2.
3.
Double-click the SSSU desktop icon to run the application. When prompted, enter Manager
(management server name or IP address), User name, and Password.
Enter LS SYSTEM to display the EVA storage systems managed by the management server.
Enter SELECT SYSTEM system name, where system name is the name of the storage
system.
The storage system name is case sensitive. If there are spaces the letters in the name, quotes
must enclose the name: for example, SELECT SYSTEM “Large EVA”.
4.
Enter CAPTURE CONFIGURATION, specifying the full path and filename of the output files
for the configuration data.
The configuration data is stored in a series of from one to five files, which are SSSU scripts.
The file names begin with the name you select, with the restore step appended. For example,
if you specify a file name of LargeEVA.txt, the resulting configuration files would be
LargeEVA_Step1A.txt, LargeEVA_Step1B, etc.
The contents of the configuration files can be viewed with a text editor.
NOTE: If the storage system contains disk drives of different capacities, the SSSU procedures
used do not guarantee that disk drives of the same capacity will be exclusively added to the same
disk group. If you need to restore an array configuration that contains disks of different sizes and
types, you must manually recreate these disk groups. The controller software and the HP Storage
System Scripting Utility's CAPTURE CONFIGURATION command are not designed to automatically
restore this type of configuration. For more information, see the HP Storage System Scripting Utility
Reference.
The following examples illustrate how to save and restore the storage system configuration data
using SSSU on a Windows host.
38
EVA4400 operation
Example 1 Saving configuration data on a Windows host
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Double-click on the SSSU desktop icon to run the application. When prompted, enter Manager
(management server name or IP address), User name, and Password.
Enter LS SYSTEM to display the EVA storage systems managed by the management server.
Enter SELECT SYSTEM system name, where system name is the name of the storage
system.
Enter CAPTURE CONFIGURATION pathname\filename, where pathname identifies the
location where the configuration files will be saved, and filename is the name used as the
prefix for the configurations files: for example:CAPTURE CONFIGURATION
c:\EVAConfig\LargeEVA
Enter EXIT to close the SSSU command window.
Example 2 Restoring configuration data on a Windows host
If it is necessary to restore the storage system configuration, it can be done using the following
procedure.
1.
2.
3.
Double-click the SSSU desktop icon to run the application.
Enter FILE pathname\filename, where pathname identifies the location where the
configuration files are be saved and filename is the name of the first configuration file: for
example: FILE c:\EVAConfig\LargeEVA_Step1A.txt
Repeat the preceding step for each configuration file. Use files in sequential order. For example,
use Step1A before Step1B, and so on. Files that are not needed for configuration data are
not created, so there is no need to restore them.
Adding disk drives to the storage system
As your storage requirements grow, you may be adding disk drives to your storage system. Adding
new disk drives is the easiest way to increase the storage capacity of the storage system. Disk
drives can be added online without impacting storage system operation.
Consider the following best practices to improve availability when adding disks to an array:
•
Set the add disk option to manual.
•
Add disks one at a time, waiting a minimum of 60 seconds between disks.
•
Distribute disks vertically and as evenly as possible to all disk enclosures.
•
Unless otherwise indicated, use the SET DISK_GROUP command in the HP Storage System
Scripting Utility to add new disks to existing disk groups.
•
Add disks in groups of eight.
•
For growing existing applications, if the operating system supports virtual disk growth, increase
virtual disk size. Otherwise, use a software volume manager to add new virtual disks to
applications.
See the disk drive replacement instructions for the steps to add a disk drive. See “Replacement
instructions” (page 73) for a link to this document.
Handling fiber optic cables
This section provides protection methods for fiber optic connectors.
Contamination of the fiber optic connectors on either a transceiver or a cable connector can impede
the transmission of data. Therefore, protecting the connector tips against contamination or damage
is imperative. The tips can be contaminated by touching them, by dust, or by debris. They can be
damaged when dropped. To protect the connectors against contamination or damage, use the
Adding disk drives to the storage system
39
dust covers or dust caps provided by the manufacturer. These covers are removed during installation,
and should be installed whenever the transceivers or cables are disconnected.
The transceiver dust caps protect the transceivers from contamination. Do not discard the dust
covers.
CAUTION: To avoid damage to the connectors, always install the dust covers or dust caps
whenever a transceiver or a fiber cable is disconnected. Remove the dust covers or dust caps from
transceivers or fiber cable connectors only when they are connected. Do not discard the dust covers.
To minimize the risk of contamination or damage, do the following:
•
Dust covers—Remove and set aside the dust covers and dust caps when installing an I/O
module, a transceiver or a cable. Install the dust covers when disconnecting a transceiver or
cable.
One of the many sources for cleaning equipment specifically designed for fiber optic connectors
is:
Alcoa Fujikura Ltd. 1-888-385-4587 (North America)
011-1-770-956-7200 (International)
40
EVA4400 operation
3 Configuring application servers
Overview
This chapter provides general connectivity information for all the supported operating systems.
Where applicable, an OS-specific section is included to provide more information.
NOTE: You can use HP P6000 SmartStart to configure Windows application servers. See the
HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array Installation Guide or the HP P6000 SmartStart documentation
for more information.
Clustering
Clustering is connecting two or more computers together so that they behave like a single computer.
Clustering is used for parallel processing, load balancing, and fault tolerance.
See the Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK) website (http://www.hp.com/storage/
spock for the clustering software supported on each operating system.
NOTE: For OpenVMS, you must make the Console LUN ID and OS unit IDs unique throughout
the entire SAN, not just the controller subsystem.
Multipathing
Multipathing software provides a multiple-path environment for your operating system. See the
following website for more information:
http://h18006.www1.hp.com/products/sanworks/multipathoptions/index.html
See the Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK) website (http://www.hp.com/storage/
spock for the multipathing software supported on each operating system.
Installing Fibre Channel adapters
For all operating systems, supported Fibre Channel adapters (FCAs) must be installed in the host
server in order to communicate with the EVA.
NOTE: Traditionally, the adapter that connects the host server to the fabric is called a host bus
adapter (HBA). The server HBA used with the EVA4400 is called a Fibre Channel adapter (FCA).
You might also see the adapter called a Fibre Channel host bus adapter (Fibre Channel HBA) in
other related documents.
Follow the hardware installation rules and conventions for your server type. The FCA is shipped
with its own documentation for installation. See that documentation for complete instructions. You
need the following items to begin:
•
FCA boards and the manufacturer’s installation instructions
•
Server hardware manual for instructions on installing adapters
•
Tools to service your server
The FCA board plugs into a compatible I/O slot (PCI, PCI-X, PCI-E) in the host system. For instructions
on plugging in boards, see the hardware manual.
You can download the latest FCA firmware from the following website: http://www.hp.com/
support/downloads. Enter HBA in the Search Products box and then select your product. See the
Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK) website (http://www.hp.com/storage/spock for
supported FCAs by operating system.
Overview
41
Testing connections to the EVA
After installing the FCAs, you can create and test connections between the host server and the
EVA. For all operating systems, you must:
•
Add hosts
•
Create and present virtual disks
•
Verify virtual disks from the hosts
The following sections provide information that applies to all operating systems. For OS-specific
details, see the applicable operating system section.
Adding hosts
To add hosts using HP P6000 Command View:
1. Retrieve the world-wide names (WWNs) for each FCA on your host. You need this information
to select the host FCAs in HP P6000 Command View.
2. Use HP P6000 Command View to add the host and each FCA installed in the host system.
NOTE: To add hosts using HP P6000 Command View, you must add each FCA installed in
the host. Select Add Host to add the first adapter. To add subsequent adapters, select Add
Port. Ensure that you add a port for each active FCA.
3.
Select the applicable operating system for the host mode.
Table 14 Operating system and host mode selection
Operating System
Host mode selection in HP P6000 Command View
HP-UX
HP-UX
IBM AIX
IBM AIX
Linux
Linux
Mac OS X
Linux
OpenVMS
OVMS
Oracle Solaris
Oracle Solaris
VMware
VMware
Citrix XenServer
Linux
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft Windows 2008
Microsoft Windows 2012
4.
Check the Host folder in the navigation pane of HP P6000 Command View to verify that the
host FCAs are added.
NOTE: More information about HP P6000 Command View is available at http://
www.hp.com/support/manuals. Click Storage Software under Storage, and then select HP
P6000 Command View Software under Storage Device Management Software.
Creating and presenting virtual disks
To create and present virtual disks to the host server:
42
Configuring application servers
1.
2.
3.
4.
From HP P6000 Command View, create a virtual disk on the EVA4400.
Specify values for the following parameters:
•
Virtual disk name
•
Vraid level
•
Size
Present the virtual disk to the host you added.
If applicable (OpenVMS) select a LUN number if you chose a specific LUN on the Virtual Disk
Properties window.
Verifying virtual disk access from the host
To verify that the host can access the newly presented virtual disks, restart the host or scan the bus.
If you are unable to access the virtual disk:
•
Verify that all cabling is connected to the switch, EVA, and host.
•
Verify that all firmware levels are appropriate for your configuration. For more information,
refer to the Enterprise Virtual Array QuickSpecs and associated release notes. See “Documents”
(page 106) for the location of these documents.
•
Ensure that you are running a supported version of the host operating system. For more
information, see the HP P6000 Enterprise Virtual Array Compatibility Reference.
•
Ensure that the correct host is selected as the operating system for the virtual disk in HP P6000
Command View.
•
Ensure that the host WWN number is set correctly (to the host you selected).
•
Verify that the FCA switch settings are correct.
•
Verify that the virtual disk is presented to the host.
•
Verify that the zoning is correct for your configuration.
Configuring virtual disks from the host
After you create the virtual disks on the EVA4400 and rescan or restart the host, follow the
host-specific conventions for configuring these new disk resources. For instructions, see the
documentation included with your server.
HP-UX
To create virtual disks for HP-UX, scan the bus and then create volume groups on a virtual disk.
Scanning the bus
To scan the FCA bus and display information about the EVA4400 devices:
1. Enter the command # ioscan -fnCdisk to start the rescan.
All new virtual disks become visible to the host.
2.
Assign device special files to the new virtual disks using the insf command:
# insf -e
NOTE: Lowercase e assigns device special files only to the new devices—in this case, the
virtual disks. Uppercase E reassigns device special files to all devices.
Verifying virtual disk access from the host
43
The following is a sample output from an ioscan command:
# ioscan -fnCdisk
# ioscan -fnCdisk
Class
I H/W Patch
Driver
S/W
H/W Type
Description
State
========================================================================================
ba
3 0/6
lba
CLAIMED BUS_NEXUS Local PCI Bus
Adapter (782)
fc
2 0/6/0/0
td
CLAIMED INTERFACE HP Tachyon XL@ 2 FC
Mass Stor Adap /dev/td2
fcp
0 0/6/0/0.39
fcp
CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Domain
ext_bus 4 0/6/00.39.13.0.0
fcparray CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Array Interface
target
5 0/6/0/0.39.13.0.0.0
tgt
CLAIMED DEVICE
ctl
4 0/6/0/0.39.13.0.0.0.0 sctl
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/rscsi/c4t0d0
disk
22 0/6/0/0.39.13.0.0.0.1 sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c4t0d1
/dev/rdsk/c4t0d
ext_bus 5 0/6/0/0.39.13.255.0
fcpdev
CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Device Interface
target
8 0/6/0/0.39.13.255.0.0
tgt
CLAIMED DEVICE
ctl
20 0/6/0/0.39.13.255.0.0.0 sctl
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/rscsi/c5t0d0
ext_bus 10 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0
fcparray CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Array Interface
target
9 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0
tgt
CLAIMED DEVICE
ctl
40 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.0
sctl
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/rscsi/c10t0d0
disk
46 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.2
sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c10t0d2
/dev/rdsk/c10t0d2
disk
47 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.3
sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c10t0d3
/dev/rdsk/c10t0d3
disk
48 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.4
sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c10t0d4
/dev/rdsk/c10t0d4
disk
49 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.5
sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c10t0d5
/dev/rdsk/c10t0d5
disk
50 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.6
sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c10t0d
/dev/rdsk/c10t0d6
disk
51 0/6/0/0.39.28.0.0.0.7
sdisk
CLAIMED DEVICE
HP HSV300 /dev/dsk/c10t0d7
/dev/rdsk/c10t0d7
Creating volume groups on a virtual disk using vgcreate
You can create a volume group on a virtual disk by issuing a vgcreate command. This builds
the virtual group block data, allowing HP-UX to access the virtual disk. See the pvcreate,
vgcreate, and lvcreate man pages for more information about creating disks and file systems.
Use the following procedure to create a volume group on a virtual disk:
NOTE:
1.
Italicized text is for example only.
To create the physical volume on a virtual disk, enter the following command:
# pvcreate -f /dev/rdsk/c32t0d1
2.
To create the volume group directory for a virtual disk, enter the command:
# mkdir /dev/vg01
3.
To create the volume group node for a virtual disk, enter the command:
# mknod /dev/vg01/group c 64 0x010000
The designation 64 is the major number that equates to the 64-bit mode. The 0x01 is the
minor number in hex, which must be unique for each volume group.
4.
To create the volume group for a virtual disk, enter the command:
# vgcreate –f /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c32t0d1
5.
To create the logical volume for a virtual disk, enter the command:
# lvcreate -L1000 /dev/vg01/lvol1
In this example, a 1-Gb logical volume (lvol1) is created.
6.
7.
44
Create a file system for the new logical volume by creating a file system directory name and
inserting a mount tap entry into /etc/fstab.
Run the command mkfs on the new logical volume. The new file system is ready to mount.
Configuring application servers
IBM AIX
Accessing IBM AIX utilities
You can access IBM AIX utilities such as the Object Data Manager (ODM), on the following website:
http://www.hp.com/support/downloads
In the Search products box, enter MPIO, and then click AIX MPIO PCMA for HP Arrays. Select IBM
AIX, and then select your software storage product.
Adding hosts
To determine the active FCAs on the IBM AIX host, enter:
# lsdev -Cc adapter |grep fcs
Output similar to the following appears:
fcs0
Available 1H-08
FC Adapter
fcs1
Available 1V-08
FC Adapter
# lscfg -vl
fcs0 fcs0
U0.1-P1-I5/Q1 FC Adapter
Part Number.................80P4543
EC Level....................A
Serial Number...............1F4280A419
Manufacturer................001F
Feature Code/Marketing ID...280B
FRU Number..................
80P4544
Device Specific.(ZM)........3
Network Address.............10000000C940F529
ROS Level and ID............02881914
Device Specific.(Z0)........1001206D
Device Specific.(Z1)........00000000
Device Specific.(Z2)........00000000
Device Specific.(Z3)........03000909
Device Specific.(Z4)........FF801315
Device Specific.(Z5)........02881914
Device Specific.(Z6)........06831914
Device Specific.(Z7)........07831914
Device Specific.(Z8)........20000000C940F529
Device Specific.(Z9)........TS1.90A4
Device Specific.(ZA)........T1D1.90A4
Device Specific.(ZB)........T2D1.90A4
Device Specific.(YL)........U0.1-P1-I5/Q1b.
Creating and presenting virtual disks
When creating and presenting virtual disks to an IBM AIX host, be sure to:
1. Set the OS unit ID to 0.
2. Set Preferred path/mode to No Preference.
3. Select a LUN number if you chose a specific LUN on the Virtual Disk Properties window.
Verifying virtual disks from the host
To scan the IBM AIX bus and list all EVA devices, enter: cfgmgr -v
The -v switch (verbose output) requests a full output.
Output similar to the following is displayed:
hdisk1
hdisk2
hdisk3
Available 1V-08-01
Available 1V-08-01
Available 1V-08-01
HP HSV300 Enterprise Virtual Array
HP HSV300 Enterprise Virtual Array
HP HSV300 Enterprise Virtual Array
IBM AIX
45
Linux
HBA drivers
For most configurations and the latest version of Linux distributions, native HBA drivers are the
supported drivers. Native driver means the driver that is included with the OS distribution.
NOTE:
The term inbox driver is also sometimes used and means the same as native driver.
However, in some configurations, it may require the use of an out-of-box driver, which typically
requires a driver package be downloaded and installed on the host. In those cases, follow the
documentation of the driver package for instruction. Driver support information can be found on
the Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK) website:
http://www.hp.com/storage/spock
NOTE:
Registration is required to access SPOCK.
Verifying virtual disks from the host
To verify the virtual disks, first verify that the LUN is recognized and then verify that the host can
access the virtual disks.
•
To ensure that the LUN is recognized after a virtual disk is presented to the host, do one of
the following:
◦
Reboot the host.
◦
Execute the following command (where X is the SCSI host enumerator of the HBA):
echo “- — —” > /sys/class/scsi_host/host[X]/scan
•
To verify that the host can access the virtual disks, enter the # more /proc/scsi/scsi
command.
The output lists all SCSI devices detected by the server. An EVA4400 LUN entry looks similar
to the following:
Host: scsi3 Channel: 00 ID: 00 Lun: 01
Vendor: HP
Model: HSV300
Rev:
Type: Direct-Access
ANSI SCSI revision: 02
OpenVMS
Updating the AlphaServer console code, Integrity Server console code, and Fibre
Channel FCA firmware
The firmware update procedure varies for the different server types. To update firmware, follow
the procedure described in the Installation instructions that accompany the firmware images.
Verifying the Fibre Channel adapter software installation
A supported FCA should already be installed in the host server. The procedure to verify that the
console recognizes the installed FCA varies for the different server types. Follow the procedure
described in the Installation instructions that accompany the firmware images.
Console LUN ID and OS unit ID
HP P6000 Command View software contains a box for the Console LUN ID on the Initialized
Storage System Properties window.
46
Configuring application servers
It is important that you set the Console LUN ID to a number other than zero (0). If the Console LUN
ID is not set or is set to zero (0), the OpenVMS host will not recognize the controller pair. The
Console LUN ID for a controller pair must be unique within the SAN. Table 15 (page 47) shows
an example of the Console LUN ID.
You can set the OS unit ID on the Virtual Disk Properties window. The default setting is 0, which
disables the ID field. To enable the ID field, you must specify a value between 1 and 32767,
ensuring that the number you enter is unique within the SAN. An OS Unit ID greater than 9999
is not capable of being served by MSCP.
CAUTION: It is possible to enter a duplicate Console LUN ID or OS unit ID number. You must
ensure that you enter a Console LUN ID and OS Unit ID that is not already in use. A duplicate
Console LUN ID or OS Unit ID can allow the OpenVMS host to corrupt data due to confusion about
LUN identity. It can also prevent the host from recognizing the controllers.
Table 15 Comparing console LUN to OS unit ID
ID type
System Display
Console LUN ID set to 100
$1$GGA100:
OS unit ID set to 50
$1$DGA50:
Adding OpenVMS hosts
To obtain WWNs on AlphaServers, do one of the following:
•
Enter the show device fg/full OVMS command.
•
Use the WWIDMGR -SHOW PORT command at the SRM console.
To obtain WWNs on Integrity servers, do one of the following:
1. Enter the show device fg/full OVMS command.
2. Use the following procedure from the server console:
a. From the EFI boot Manager, select EFI Shell.
b. In the EFI Shell, enter “Shell> drivers”.
A list of EFI drivers loaded in the system is displayed.
3.
In the listing, find the line for the FCA for which you want to get the WWN information.
For a Qlogic HBA, look for HP 4 Gb Fibre Channel Driver or HP 2 Gb Fibre
Channel Driver as the driver name. For example:
D
R
V VERSION
== ========
22 00000105
4.
5.
T
Y
P
E
=
B
C
F
G
=
X
D
I
A
G #D #C DRIVER NAME
IMAGE NAME
= == == =================================== ===================
X 1 1 HP 4 Gb Fibre Channel Driver
PciROM:0F:01:01:002
Note the driver handle in the first column (22 in the example).
Using the driver handle, enter the drvdfg driver_handle command to find the Device
Handle (Ctrl). For example:
Shell> drvcfg 22
Configurable Components
Drv[22] Ctrl[25] Lang[eng]
6.
Using the driver and device handle, enter the drvdfg —s driver_handle device_handle
command to invoke the EFI Driver configuration utility. For example:
OpenVMS
47
Shell> drvcfg -s 22 25
7.
From the Fibre Channel Driver Configuration Utility list, select item 8 (Info)
to find the WWN for that particular port.
Output similar to the following appears:
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Path:
WWPN:
WWNN:
S/N:
Acpi(PNP0002,0300)/Pci(01|01)
50060B00003B478A
50060B00003B478B
3B478A
Scanning the bus
Enter the following command to scan the bus for the OpenVMS virtual disk:
$ MC SYSMAN IO AUTO/LOG
A listing of LUNs detected by the scan process is displayed. Verify that the new LUNs appear on
the list.
NOTE: The EVA4400 console LUN can be seen without any virtual disks presented. The LUN
appears as $1$GGAx (where x represents the console LUN ID on the controller).
After the system scans the fabric for devices, you can verify the devices with the SHOW DEVICE
command:
$ SHOW DEVICE NAME-OF-VIRTUAL-DISK/FULL
For example, to display device information on a virtual disk named $1$DGA50, enter $ SHOW
DEVICE $1$DGA50:/FULL.
The following output is displayed:
Disk $1$DGA50: (BRCK18), device type HSV210, is online, file-oriented device,
shareable, device has multiple I/O paths, served to cluster via MSCP Server,
error logging is enabled.
Error count
2
Operations completed
4107
Owner process
""
Owner UIC
[SYSTEM]
Owner process ID
00000000
Dev Prot
S:RWPL,O:RWPL,G:R,W
Reference count
0
Default buffer size
512
Current preferred CPU Id
0
Fastpath
1
WWID
01000010:6005-08B4-0010-70C7-0001-2000-2E3E-0000
Host name
"BRCK18"
Host type, avail AlphaServer DS10 466 MHz, yes
Alternate host name
"VMS24"
Alt. type, avail HP rx3600 (1.59GHz/9.0MB), yes
Allocation class
1
I/O paths to device
Path PGA0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A38
Error count
Path PGA0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A3A
Error count
Path PGA0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A3E
Error count
Path PGA0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A3C
Error count
Path PGB0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A39
Error count
Path PGB0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A3B
Error count
Path PGB0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A3D
Error count
Path PGB0.5000-1FE1-0027-0A3F
Error count
Path MSCP (VMS24).
Error count
9
(BRCK18), primary path.
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18).
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18).
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18).
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18).
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18).
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18).
0
Operations completed
(BRCK18), current path.
2
Operations completed
0
Operations completed
145
338
276
282
683
704
853
826
0
You can also use the SHOW DEVICE DG command to display a list of all Fibre Channel disks
presented to the OpenVMS host.
NOTE: Restarting the host system shows any newly presented virtual disks because a hardware
scan is performed as part of the startup.
48
Configuring application servers
If you are unable to access the virtual disk, do the following:
•
Check the switch zoning database.
•
Use HP P6000 Command View to verify the host presentations.
•
Check the SRM console firmware on AlphaServers.
•
Ensure that the correct host is selected for this virtual disk and that a unique OS Unit ID is used
in HP P6000 Command View.
Configuring virtual disks from the OpenVMS host
To set up disk resources under OpenVMS, initialize and mount the virtual disk resource as follows:
1. Enter the following command to initialize the virtual disk:
$ INITIALIZE name-of-virtual-disk volume-label
2.
Enter the following command to mount the disk:
MOUNT/SYSTEM name-of-virtual-disk volume-label
NOTE: The /SYSTEM switch is used for a single stand-alone system, or in clusters if you
want to mount the disk only to select nodes. You can use the /CLUSTER switch for OpenVMS
clusters. However, if you encounter problems in a large cluster environment, HP recommends
that you enter a MOUNT/SYSTEM command on each cluster node.
3.
View the virtual disk’s information with the SHOW DEVICE command. For example, enter the
following command sequence to configure a virtual disk named data1 in a stand-alone
environment:
$ INIT $1$DGA1: data1
$ MOUNT/SYSTEM $1$DGA1: data1
$ SHOW DEV $1$DGA1: /FULL
Setting preferred paths
You can use one of the following options for setting, changing, or displaying preferred paths:
•
To set or change the preferred path, use the following command:
$ SET DEVICE $1$DGA83: /PATH=PGA0.5000-1FE1-0007-9772/SWITCH
This allows you to control which path each virtual disk uses.
•
To display the path identifiers, use the SHOW DEV/FULL command.
•
For additional information on using OpenVMS commands, see the OpenVMS help file:
$ HELP TOPIC
For example, the following command displays help information for the MOUNT command:
$ HELP MOUNT
Oracle Solaris
NOTE: The information in this section applies to both SPARC and x86 versions of the Oracle
Solaris operating system.
Loading the operating system and software
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for loading the operating system (OS) and software onto the
host. Load all OS patches and configuration utilities supported by HP and the FCA manufacturer.
Oracle Solaris
49
Configuring FCAs with the Oracle SAN driver stack
Oracle-branded FCAs are supported only with the Oracle SAN driver stack. The Oracle SAN
driver stack is also compatible with current Emulex FCAs and QLogic FCAs. Support information
is available on the Oracle website:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris/overview/index-136292.html
To determine which non-Oracle branded FCAs HP supports with the Oracle SAN driver stack, see
the latest MPxIO application notes or contact your HP representative.
Update instructions depend on the version of your OS:
•
For Solaris 9, install the latest Oracle StorEdge SAN software with associated patches. To
locate the software, go log in to My Oracle Support:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/ui/flash.html
1. Select the Patches & Updates tab and then search for StorEdge SAN Foundation Software
4.4 (formerly called StorageTek SAN 4.4).
2. Reboot the host after the required software/patches have been installed. No further activity
is required after adding any new LUNs once the array ports have been configured with
the cfgadm –c command for Solaris 9.
Examples for two FCAs:
cfgadm -c configure c3
cfgadm -c configure c4
3.
Increase retry counts and reduce I/O time by adding the following entries to the
/etc/system file:
set ssd:ssd_retry_count=0xa
set ssd:ssd_io_time=0x1e
4.
•
Reboot the system to load the newly added parameters.
For Solaris 10, go the Oracle Software Downloads website (http://www.oracle.com/
technetwork/indexes/downloads/index.html) to install the latest patches. Under Servers and
Storage Systems, select Solaris 10. Reboot the host once the required software/patches have
been installed. No further activity is required after adding any new LUNs, as the controller
and LUN recognition are automatic for Solaris 10.
1. For Solaris 10 x86/64, ensure patch 138889-03 or later is installed. For SPARC, ensure
patch 138888-03 or later is installed.
2. Increase the retry counts by adding the following line to the /kernel/drv/sd.conf
file:
sd-config-list="HP HSV","retries-timeout:10";
3.
Reduce the I/O timeout value to 30 seconds by adding the following line to the
/etc/system file:
set sd:sd_io_time=0x1e
4.
Reboot the system to load the newly added parameters.
Configuring Emulex FCAs with the lpfc driver
To configure Emulex FCAs with the lpfc driver:
1. Ensure that you have the latest supported version of the lpfc driver (see http://www.hp.com/
storage/spock).
You must sign up for an HP Passport to enable access. For more information on how to use
SPOCK, see the Getting Started Guide (http://h20272.www2.hp.com/Pages/spock_overview/
introduction.html).
50
Configuring application servers
2.
Edit the following parameters in the /kernel/drv/lpfc.conf driver configuration file to
set up the FCAs for a SAN infrastructure:
topology=2;
scan-down=0;
nodev-tmo=60;
linkdown-tmo=60;
3.
If using a single FCA and no multipathing, edit the following parameter to reduce the risk of
data loss in case of a controller reboot:
nodev-tmo=120;
4.
If using Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM) DMP for multipathing (single or multiple FCAs), edit
the following parameter to ensure proper VxVM behavior:
no-device-delay=0;
5.
In a fabric topology, use persistent bindings to bind a SCSI target ID to the world wide port
name (WWPN) of an array port. This ensures that the SCSI target IDs remain the same when
the system reboots. Set persistent bindings by editing the configuration file or by using the
lputil utility.
NOTE: HP recommends that you assign target IDs in sequence, and that the EVA has the
same target ID on each host in the SAN.
The following example for an EVA4400 illustrates the binding of targets 20 and 21 (lpfc
instance 2) to WWPNs 50001fe100270938 and 50001fe100270939, and the binding of
targets 30 and 31 (lpfc instance 0) to WWPNs 50001fe10027093a and
50001fe10027093b:
fcp-bind-WWPN="50001fe100270938:lpfc2t20",
"50001fe100270939:lpfc2t21",
"50001fe10027093a:lpfc0t30",
"50001fe10027093b:lpfc0t31";
NOTE:
6.
Replace the WWPNs in the example with the WWPNs of your array ports.
For each LUN that will be accessed, add an entry to the /kernel/drv/sd.conf file. For
example, if you want to access LUNs 1 and 2 through all four paths, add the following entries
to the end of the file:
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=20 lun=1;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=21 lun=1;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=30 lun=1;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=31 lun=1;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=20 lun=2;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=21 lun=2;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=30 lun=2;
name="sd" parent="lpfc" target=31 lun=2;
7.
8.
Reboot the server to implement the changes to the configuration files.
If LUNs have been preconfigured in the /kernel/drv/sd.conf file, use the devfsadm
command to perform LUN rediscovery after configuring the file.
NOTE: The lpfc driver is not supported for Oracle StorEdge Traffic Manager/Oracle Storage
Multipathing. To configure an Emulex FCA using the Oracle SAN driver stack, see “Configuring
FCAs with the Oracle SAN driver stack” (page 50).
Oracle Solaris
51
Configuring QLogic FCAs with the qla2300 driver
See the latest Enterprise Virtual Array release notes or contact your HP representative to determine
which QLogic FCAs and which driver version HP supports with the qla2300 driver. To configure
QLogic FCAs with the qla2300 driver:
1. Ensure that you have the latest supported version of the qla2300 driver (see http://
www.hp.com/storage/spock).
2. You must sign up for an HP Passport to enable access. For more information on how to use
SPOCK, see the Getting Started Guide (http://h20272.www2.hp.com/Pages/spock_overview/
introduction.html).
3. Edit the following parameters in the /kernel/drv/qla2300.conf driver configuration file
to set up the FCAs for a SAN infrastructure (HBA0 is used in the example, but the parameter
edits apply to all HBAs):
NOTE: If you are using a Oracle-branded QLogic FCA, the configuration file is
\kernal\drv\qlc.conf.
hba0-connection-options=1;
hba0-link-down-timeout=60;
hba0-persistent-binding-configuration=1;
NOTE:
4.
If you are using Solaris 10, editing the persistent binding parameter is not required.
If using a single FCA and no multipathing, edit the following parameters to reduce the risk of
data loss in case of a controller reboot:
hba0-login-retry-count=60;
hba0-port-down-retry-count=60;
hba0-port-down-retry-delay=2;
The hba0-port-down-retry-delay parameter is not supported with the 4.13.01 driver;
the time between retries is fixed at approximately 2 seconds.
5.
In a fabric topology, use persistent bindings to bind a SCSI target ID to the world wide port
name (WWPN) of an array port. This ensures that the SCSI target IDs remain the same when
the system reboots. Set persistent bindings by editing the configuration file or by using the
SANsurfer utility.
NOTE:
Persistent binding is not required for QLogic FCAs if you are using Solaris 10.
The following example for an EVA4400 illustrates the binding of targets 20 and 21 (hba
instance 0) to WWPNs 50001fe100270938 and 50001fe100270939, and the binding of
targets 30 and 31 (hba instance 1) to WWPNs 50001fe10027093a and
50001fe10027093b:
hba0-SCSI-target-id-20-fibre-channel-port-name="50001fe100270938";
hba0-SCSI-target-id-21-fibre-channel-port-name="50001fe10027093a";
hba1-SCSI-target-id-30-fibre-channel-port-name="50001fe100270939";
hba1-SCSI-target-id-31-fibre-channel-port-name="50001fe10027093b";
NOTE:
6.
Replace the WWPNs in the example with the WWPNs of your array ports.
If the qla2300 driver is version 4.13.01 or earlier, for each LUN that users will access add
an entry to the /kernel/drv/sd.conf file:
name="sd" class="scsi" target=20 lun=1;
name="sd" class="scsi" target=21 lun=1;
52
Configuring application servers
name="sd" class="scsi" target=30 lun=1;
name="sd" class="scsi" target=31 lun=1;
If LUNs are preconfigured in the/kernel/drv/sd.conf file, after changing the configuration
file. use the devfsadm command to perform LUN rediscovery.
7.
If the qla2300 driver is version 4.15 or later, verify that the following or a similar entry is
present in the /kernel/drv/sd.conf file:
name="sd" parent="qla2300" target=2048;
To perform LUN rediscovery after configuring the LUNs, use the following command:
/opt/QLogic_Corporation/drvutil/qla2300/qlreconfig –d qla2300 -s
8.
Reboot the server to implement the changes to the configuration files.
NOTE: The qla2300 driver is not supported for Oracle StorEdge Traffic Manager/Oracle Storage
Multipathing. To configure a QLogic FCA using the Oracle SAN driver stack, see “Configuring
FCAs with the Oracle SAN driver stack” (page 50).
Fabric setup and zoning
To set up the fabric and zoning:
1. Verify that the Fibre Channel cable is connected and firmly inserted at the array ports, host
ports, and SAN switch.
2. Through the Telnet connection to the switch or Switch utilities, verify that the WWN of the
EVA ports and FCAs are present and online.
3. Create a zone consisting of the WWNs of the EVA ports and FCAs, and then add the zone
to the active switch configuration.
4. Enable and then save the new active switch configuration.
NOTE:
There are variations in the steps required to configure the switch between different
vendors. For more information, see the HP SAN Design Reference Guide, available for downloading
on the HP website http://www.hp.com/go/sandesign.
Oracle StorEdge Traffic Manager (MPxIO)/Oracle Storage Multipathing
Oracle StorEdge Traffic Manager (MPxIO)/Oracle Storage Multipathing can be used for FCAs
configured with the Oracle SAN driver and depending on the operating system version, architecture
(SPARC/x86), and patch level installed. For configuration details, see the HP MPxIO application
notes, available on the HP support website http://www.hp.com/support/manuals.
NOTE: MPxIO is included in the SPARC and x86 Oracle SAN driver. A separate installation of
MPxIO is not required.
In the Search products box, enter MPxIO, and then click the search symbol. Select the
application notes from the search results.
Configuring with Veritas Volume Manager
The Dynamic Multipathing (DMP) feature of Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM) can be used for all
FCAs and all drivers. EVA disk arrays are certified for VxVM support. When you install FCAs,
ensure that the driver parameters are set correctly. Failure to do so can result in a loss of path
failover in DMP. For information about setting FCA parameters, see “Configuring FCAs with the
Oracle SAN driver stack” (page 50) and the FCA manufacturer’s instructions.
The DMP feature requires an Array Support Library (ASL) and an Array Policy Module (APM). The
ASL/APM enables Asymmetric Logical Unit Access (ALUA). LUNs are accessed through the primary
controller. After enablement, use the vxdisk list <device> command to determine the
primary and secondary paths. For VxVM 4.1 (MP1 or later), you must download the ASL/APM
Oracle Solaris
53
from the Symantec/Veritas support site for installation on the host. This download and installation
is not required for VxVM 5.0 or later.
To download and install the ASL/APM from the Symantec/Veritas support website:
1. Go to http://support.veritas.com.
2. Enter Storage Foundation for UNIX/Linux in the Product Lookup box.
3. Enter EVA in the Enter keywords or phrase box, and then click the search symbol.
4. To further narrow the search, select Solaris in the Platform box and search again.
5. Read TechNotes and follow the instructions to download and install the ASL/APM.
6. Run vxdctl enable to notify VxVM of the changes.
7. Verify the configuration of VxVM as shown in Example 3 “Verifying the VxVM configuration”
(the output may be slightly different depending on your VxVM version and the array
configuration).
Example 3 Verifying the VxVM configuration
# vxddladm listsupport all | grep HP
libvxhpevale.so
HP HSV300, HSV400, HSV450
# vxddladm listsupport libname=libvxhpevale.so
ATTR_NAME
ATTR_VALUE
=======================================================================
LIBNAME
libvxhpevale.so
VID
HP
PID
HSV300, HSV400, HSV450
ARRAY_TYPE
A/A-A-HP
ARRAY_NAME
EVA4400, EVA6400, EVA8400
# vxdmpadm listapm all | grep HP
dmphpalua
dmphpalua
# vxdmpadm listapm dmphpalua
Filename:
dmphpalua
APM name:
dmphpalua
APM version:
1
Feature:
VxVM
VxVM version:
41
Array Types Supported: A/A-A-HP
Depending Array Types: A/A-A
State:
Active
1
A/A-A-HP
Active
# vxdmpadm listenclosure all
ENCLR_NAME
ENCLR_TYPE
ENCLR_SNO
STATUS
ARRAY_TYPE
============================================================================
Disk
Disk
DISKS
CONNECTED
Disk
EVA44000
EVA4400
50001FE1002709E0
CONNECTED
A/A-A-HP
By default, the EVA I/O policy is set to Round-Robin. For VxVM 4.1 MP1, only one path is used
for the I/Os with this policy. Therefore, HP recommends that you change the I/O policy to
Adaptive in order to use all paths to the LUN on the primary controller. Example 4 “Setting the
I/O policy” shows the commands you can use to check and change the I/O policy.
54
Configuring application servers
Example 4 Setting the I/O policy
# vxdmpadm getattr arrayname EVA4400 iopolicy
ENCLR_NAME
DEFAULT
CURRENT
============================================
EVA44000
Round-Robin
Round-Robin
# vxdmpadm setattr arrayname EVA4400 iopolicy=adaptive
# vxdmpadm getattr arrayname EVA4400 iopolicy
ENCLR_NAME
DEFAULT
CURRENT
============================================
EVA44000
Round-Robin
Adaptive
Configuring virtual disks from the host
The procedure used to configure the LUN path to the array depends on the FCA driver. For more
information, see Installing Fibre Channel adapters.
To identify the WWLUN ID assigned to the virtual disk and/or the LUN assigned by the storage
administrator:
•
Oracle SAN driver, with MPxIO enabled:
◦
You can use the luxadm probe command to display the array/node WWN and
associated array for the devices.
◦
The WWLUN ID is part of the device file name. For example:
/dev/rdsk/c5t600508B4001030E40000500000B20000d0s2
◦
If you use luxadm display, the LUN is displayed after the device address. For example:
50001fe1002709e9,5
•
Oracle SAN driver, without MPxIO:
◦
The EVA WWPN is part of the file name (which helps you to identify the controller). For
example:
/dev/rdsk/c3t50001FE1002709E8d5s2
/dev/rdsk/c3t50001FE1002709ECd5s2
/dev/rdsk/c4t50001FE1002709E9d5s2
/dev/rdsk/c4t50001FE1002709EDd5s2
If you use luxadm probe, the array/node WWN and the associated device files are
displayed.
◦
You can retrieve the WWLUN ID as part of the format -e (scsi, inquiry) output; however,
it is cumbersome and hard to read. For example:
09
45
45
42
30
◦
e8
31
31
34
30
20
30
30
30
30
04
30
30
30
30
00
32
32
31
42
00
37
37
30
32
00
30
30
33
30
00
39
39
30
30
00
45
45
45
30
00
30
38
34
30
35
35
36
30
00
30
30
30
30
00
30
30
30
30
00
30
30
35
30
00
31
31
30
35
00
46
46
38
30
00
.........50001F
E1002709E050001F
E1002709E8600508
B4001030E4000050
0000B20000
The assigned LUN is part of the device file name. For example:
/dev/rdsk/c3t50001FE1002709E8d5s2
You can also retrieve the LUN with luxadm display. The LUN is displayed after the
device address. For example:
Oracle Solaris
55
50001fe1002709e9,5
•
Emulex (lpfc)/QLogic (qla2300) drivers:
◦
You can retrieve the WWPN by checking the assignment in the driver configuration file
(the easiest method, because you then know the assigned target) or by using
HBAnyware/SANSurfer.
◦
You can retrieve the WWLUN ID by using HBAnyware/SANSurfer.
You can also retrieve the WWLUN ID as part of the format -e (scsi, inquiry) output;
however, it is cumbersome and difficult to read. For example:
09
45
45
42
30
◦
e8
31
31
34
30
20
30
30
30
30
04
30
30
30
30
00
32
32
31
42
00
37
37
30
32
00
30
30
33
30
00
39
39
30
30
00
45
45
45
30
00
30
38
34
30
35
35
36
30
00
30
30
30
30
00
30
30
30
30
00
30
30
35
30
00
31
31
30
35
00
46
46
38
30
00
.........50001F
E1002709E050001F
E1002709E8600508
B4001030E4000050
0000B20000
The assigned LUN is part of the device file name. For example:
/dev/dsk/c4t20d5s2
Verifying virtual disks from the host
Verify that the host can access virtual disks by using the format command. See Example 5 “Format
command”.
56
Configuring application servers
Example 5 Format command
# format
Searching for disks...done
c2t50001FE1002709F8d1: configured
c2t50001FE1002709F8d2: configured
c2t50001FE1002709FCd1: configured
c2t50001FE1002709FCd2: configured
c3t50001FE1002709F9d1: configured
c3t50001FE1002709F9d2: configured
c3t50001FE1002709FDd1: configured
c3t50001FE1002709FDd2: configured
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
capacity
capacity
capacity
capacity
capacity
capacity
capacity
capacity
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
1008.00MB
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
0. c0t0d0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248> /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/sd@0,0
1. c2t50001FE1002709F8d1 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/QLGC,qla@4/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709f8,1
2. c2t50001FE1002709F8d2 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/QLGC,qla@4/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709f8,2
3. c2t50001FE1002709FCd1 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/QLGC,qla@4/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709fc,1
4. c2t50001FE1002709FCd2 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/QLGC,qla@4/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709fc,2
5. c3t50001FE1002709F9d1 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/lpfc@5/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709f9,1
6. c3t50001FE1002709F9d2 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/lpfc@5/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709f9,2
7. c3t50001FE1002709FDd1 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/lpfc@5/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709fd,1
8. c3t50001FE1002709FDd2 <HP-HSV400-0952 cyl 126 alt 2 hd 128 sec 128>
/pci@1f,4000/lpfc@5/fp@0,0/ssd@w50001fe1002709fd,2
Specify disk (enter its number):
If you cannot access the virtual disks:
•
Verify the zoning.
•
For Oracle Solaris, verify that the correct WWPNs for the EVA (lpfc, qla2300 driver) have
been configured and the target assignment is matched in /kernel/drv/sd.conf (lpfc
and qla2300 4.13.01).
Labeling and partitioning the devices
Label and partition the new devices using the Oracle format utility:
CAUTION: When selecting disk devices, be careful to select the correct disk because using the
label/partition commands on disks that have data can cause data loss.
1.
2.
3.
Enter the format command at the root prompt to start the utility.
Verify that all new devices are displayed. If not, enter quit or press Ctrl+D to exit the format
utility, and then verify that the configuration is correct (see “Configuring virtual disks from the
host” (page 55)).
Record the character-type device file names (for example, c1t2d0) for all new disks.
You will use this data to create the file systems or to use the file systems with the Solaris or
Veritas Volume Manager.
4.
5.
When prompted to specify the disk, enter the number of the device to be labeled.
When prompted to label the disk, enter Y.
6.
Because the virtual geometry of the presented volume varies with size, select autoconfigure
as the disk type.
Oracle Solaris
57
7.
8.
9.
For each new device, use the disk command to select another disk, and then repeat 1 through
6.
Repeat this labeling procedure for each new device. (Use the disk command to select another
disk.)
When you finish labeling the disks, enter quit or press Ctrl+D to exit the format utility.
For more information, see the System Administration Guide: Devices and File Systems for your
operating system, available on the Oracle website:
http://www.oracle/com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
NOTE:
Some format commands are not applicable to the EVA storage systems.
VMware
Configuring the EVA4400 with VMware host servers
To configure an EVA4400 on a VMware ESX server:
1. Using HP P6000 Command View, configure a host for one ESX server.
2. Verify that the Fibre Channel Adapters (FCAs) are populated in the world wide port name
(WWPN) list. Edit the WWPN, if necessary.
3. Set the connection type to VMware.
4. To configure additional ports for the ESX server:
a. Select a host (defined in Step 1).
b. Select the Ports tab in the Host Properties window.
c. Add additional ports for the ESX server.
5.
Perform one of the following tasks to locate the WWPN:
•
From the service console, enter the wwpn.pl command.
Output similar to the following is displayed:
[root@gnome7 root]# wwpn.plvmhba0: 210000e08b09402b (QLogic)
6:1:0vmhba1: 210000e08b0ace2d (QLogic) 6:2:0[root@gnome7 root]#
•
Check the SCSI device information section of the /proc/scsi/qla2300/X directory,
where X is a bus instance number.
Output similar to the following is displayed:
SCSI Device Information:
scsi-qla0-adapter-node=200000e08b0b0638;
scsi-qla0-adapter-port=210000e08b0b0638;
6.
Repeat this procedure for each ESX server.
Configuring an ESX server
This section provides information about configuring the ESX server.
Loading the FCA NVRAM
The FCA stores configuration information in the non-volatile RAM (NVRAM) cache. You must
download the configuration for HP Storage products.
Perform one of the following procedures to load the NVRAM:
•
58
If you have a ProLiant blade server:
Configuring application servers
1.
Download the supported FCA BIOS update, available on http://www.hp.com/support/
downloads, to a virtual floppy.
For instructions on creating and using a virtual floppy, see the HP Integrated Lights-Out
user guide.
2.
3.
•
Unzip the file.
Follow the instructions in the readme file to load the NVRAM configuration onto each
FCA.
If you have a blade server other than a ProLiant blade server:
1. Download the supported FCA BIOS update, available on http://www.hp.com/support/
downloads.
2. Unzip the file.
3. Follow the instructions in the readme file to load the NVRAM configuration onto each
FCA.
Setting the multipathing policy
You can set the multipathing policy for each LUN or logical drive on the SAN to one of the following:
•
Most recently used (MRU)
•
Fixed
•
Preferred
ESX 2.5.x commands
•
The # vmkmultipath –s vmhba0:0:1 –p mru command sets vmhba0:0:1 with an
MRU multipathing policy for all LUNs on the SAN.
•
The # vmkmultipath -s vmhba1:0:1 -p fixed command sets vmhba1:0:1 with a
Fixed multipathing policy.
•
The # vmkmultipath -s vmhba1:0:1 -r vmhba2:0:1 -e vmhba2:0:1 command
sets and enables vmhba2:0:1 with a Preferred multipathing policy.
ESX 3.x commands
•
The # esxcfg-mpath --policy=mru --lun=vmhba0:0:1 command sets vmhba0:0:1
with an MRU multipathing policy.
•
The # esxcfg-mpath --policy=fixed --lun=vmhba0:0:1 command sets
vmhba1:0:1 with a Fixed multipathing policy.
•
The # esxcfg-mpath --preferred --path=vmhba2:0:1 --lun=vmhba2:0:1
command sets vmhba2:0:1 with a Preferred multipathing policy.
ESX 4.x commands
•
The # esxcli nmp device setpolicy --device
naa.6001438002a56f220001100000710000 --psp VMW_PSP_MRU command sets
device naa.6001438002a56f220001100000710000 with an MRU multipathing policy.
•
The # esxcli nmp device setpolicy --device
naa.6001438002a56f220001100000710000 --psp VMW_PSP_FIXED command sets
device naa.6001438002a56f220001100000710000 with a Fixed multipathing policy.
•
The # esxcli nmp fixed setpreferred --device
naa.6001438002a56f220001100000710000 --path vmhba1:C0:T2:L1 command
sets device naa.6001438002a56f220001100000710000 with a Preferred multipathing
policy.
VMware
59
NOTE: Each LUN can be accessed through both EVA storage controllers at the same time;
however, each LUN path is optimized through one controller. To optimize performance, if the LUN
multipathing policy is Fixed, all servers must use a path to the same controller.
Specifying DiskMaxLUN
The DiskMaxLUN setting specifies the highest-numbered LUN that can be scanned by the ESX
server.
•
For ESX 2.5.x, the default value is 8. If more than eight LUNs are presented, you must change
the setting to an appropriate value. To set DiskMaxLUN, select Options> Advanced Settings
in the MUI, and then enter the highest-numbered LUN.
•
For ESX 3.x or ESX 4.x, the default value is set to the Max set value of 256. To set
DiskMaxLun to a different value, in Virtual Infrastructure Client, select Configuration> Advance
Settings> Disk> Disk.MaxLun, and then enter the new value.
Verifying connectivity
To verify proper configuration and connectivity to the SAN:
•
For ESX 2.5.x, enter the # vmkmultipath -q command.
•
For ESX 3.x, enter the # esxcfg-mpath -l command.
•
For ESX 4.x, enter the # esxcfg-mpath -b command.
For each LUN, verify that the multipathing policy is set correctly and that each path is marked on.
If any paths are marked dead or are not listed, check the cable connections and perform a rescan
on the appropriate FCA. For example:
•
For ESX 2.5.x, enter the # cos-rescan.sh vmhba0 command.
•
For ESX 3.x or ESX 4.x, enter the # esxcfg-rescan vmhba0 command.
If paths or LUNs are still missing, see the VMware or HP documentation for troubleshooting
information.
Verifying virtual disks from the host
To verify that the host can access the virtual disks, enter the more /proc/scsi/scsi command.
The output lists all SCSI devices detected by the server. An EVA4400 LUN entry looks similar to
the following:
Host: scsi3 Channel: 00 ID: 00 Lun: 01
Vendor: HP
Model: HSV300
Type: Direct-Access
Rev:
ANSI SCSI revision: 02
Verifying virtual disks from the host
Use the VMware vCenter management GUI to check all devices (see Figure 25 (page 61)).
60
Configuring application servers
Figure 25 Verifying virtual disks from the host
HP EVA P6000 Software Plug-in for VMware VAAI
The vSphere Storage API for Array Integration (VAAI) is included in VMware vSphere solutions.
VAAI can be used to offload certain functions from the target VMware host to the storage array.
With the tasks being performed more efficiently by the array instead of the target VMware host,
performance can be greatly enhanced.
The HP EVA P6000 Software Plug-in for VMware VAAI (VAAI Plug-in) enables the offloading of
the following functions (primitives) to the EVA:
•
Full copy—Enables the array to make full copies of data within the array, without the ESX
server having to read and write the data.
•
Block zeroing—Enables the array to zero out a large number of blocks to speed up provisioning
of virtual machines.
•
Hardware assisted locking—Provides an alternative means to protect the metadata for VMFS
cluster file systems, thereby improving the scalability of large ESX server farms sharing a
datastore.
System prerequisites
VMware operating system:
ESX/ESXi 4.1 or later
VMware management station:
VMware vCenter 4.1,
VMware administration tools:
ESX/ESXi 4.1 environments: vCLI 4.1 (Windows or Linux)
HP P6000 controller software:
XCS 10100000 or later
Enabling vSphere Storage API for Array Integration (VAAI)
To enable the VAAI primitives, do the following:
NOTE:
By default, the three VAAI primitives are enabled.
NOTE: The EVA VAAI Plug-In is required with vSphere 4.1 in order to permit discovery of the
EVA VAAI capability. This is not required for vSphere 5.
1.
Install the XCS controller software.
VMware
61
2.
Enable the primitives from the ESX server.
Enable and disable these primitives through the following advanced settings:
•
DataMover.HardwareAcceleratedMove (full copy)
•
DataMover.HardwareAcceleratedInit (block zeroing)
•
VMFS3.HarwareAccelerated Locking (hardware assisted locking)
For more information about the vSphere Storage API for Array Integration (VAAI), see the
VMware documentation.
3.
Install the HP EVA VAAI Plug-in.
For information about installing the VAAI Plug-in, see “Installing the VAAI Plug-in” (page 62).
Installing the VAAI Plug-in
Depending on user preference and environment, choose one of the following three methods to
install the HP EVA VAAI Plug-in:
•
Using ESX host console utilities
•
vCLI/vMA
•
Using VUM
The following table compares the three VAAI Plug-in installation methods:
Table 16 Comparison of installation methods
Installation
method
Required
deployment tools
Host
Operating
System
Client operating
system
VMware
commands used
Scriptable
ESX host console
utilities—Local
console
N/A
ESX 4.1
N/A
esxupdate
esxcli
Yes
(eva-vaaip.sh)
ESX host console
utilities—Remote
console
SSH tool, such as
PuTTy
VMware CLI
(vCLI)
VMware vSphere
CLI
VM Appliance
(vMA)
N/A
VMware Update
Manager (VUM)
VMware vSphere
ServerVMware
Update Manager
Any computer running
SSH
ESX 4.1, ESXi
4.1
Windows XPWindows vicfg-hostops.pl Yes
VistaWindows
vihostupdate.pl (eva-vaaip.pl)
7Windows Server
2003Windows Server
2008 Linux x86Linux
x64
N/A
ESX 4.1, ESXi
4.1
Windows Server
2003, Windows
Server 2008
VUM graphical
user interface
No
Installation overview
Regardless of installation method, key installation tasks include:
1. Obtaining the HP VAAI Plug-in software bundle from the HP website.
2. Extracting files from HP VAAI Plug-in software bundle to a temporary location on the server.
3. Placing the target VMware host in maintenance mode.
4. Invoking the software tool to install the HP VAAI Plug-in.
Automated installation steps include:
a. Installing the HP VAAI plug-in driver (hp_vaaip_p6000) on the target VMware host.
b. Adding VIB details to the target VMware host.
62
Configuring application servers
c.
d.
5.
6.
Creating VAAI claim rules.
Loading and executing VAAI claim rules.
Restarting the target VMware host.
Taking the target VMware host out of maintenance mode.
After installing the HP VAAI Plug-in, the operating system will execute all VAAI claim rules and
scan every five minutes to check for any array volumes that may have been added to the target
VMware host. If new volumes are detected, they will become VAAI enabled.
Installing the HP EVA VAAI Plug-in using ESX host console utilities
NOTE: This installation method is supported for use only with VAAI Plug-in Version 1.00, in
ESX/ESXi 4.1 environments. This is required for ESX 4.1, but not for ESX 5i.
1.
Obtain the VAAI Plug-in software package and save to a local folder on the target VMware
host:
a. Go to the HP Support Download drivers and software website at http://www.hp.com/
support/downloads.
b. Navigate through the display to locate and then download the HP EVA P6000 Software
Plug-in for VMware VAAI to a temporary folder on the server. (Example folder location:
/root/vaaip)
2.
Install the VAAI Plug-in.
From the ESX service console, enter a command using the following syntax:
esxupdate --bundle hp_vaaip_p6000-xxx.zip --maintenancemode update
(where hp_vaaip_p6000-xxx.zip represents the filename of the VAAI Plug-in.)
3.
Restart the target VMware host.
VMware
63
4.
Verify the installation:
a. Check for new HP P6000 claim rules.
Using the service console, enter:
esxcli corestorage claimrule list -c VAAI
The return display will be similar to the following:
Rule Class
VAAI
VAAI
b.
Rule
5001
5001
Class
runtime
file
Type
vendor
vendor
Plugin
hp_vaaip_p6000
hp_vaaip_p6000
Matches
vendor=HP model=HSV
vendor=HP model=HSV
Check for claimed storage devices.
Using the service console, enter:
esxcli vaai device list
The return display will be similar to the following:
aa.600c0ff00010e1cbc7523f4d01000000
Device Display Name: HP iSCSI Disk (naa.600c0ff00010e1cbc7523f4d01000000)
VAAI Plugin Name: hp_vaaip_P6000
naa.600c0ff000da030b521bb64b01000000
Device Display Name: HP Fibre Channel Disk (naa.600c0ff000da030b521bb64b01000000)
VAAI Plugin Name: hp_vaaip_P6000
c.
Check the VAAI status on the storage devices.
Using the service console, enter:
esxcfg-scsidevs -l | egrep "Display Name:|VAAI Status:"
The return display will be similar to the following:
Display Name: Local TEAC CD-ROM (mpx.vmhba5:C0:T0:L0)
VAAI Status: unknown
Display Name: HP Serial Attached SCSI Disk (naa.600508b1001052395659314e39440200)
VAAI Status: unknown
Display Name: HP Serial Attached SCSI Disk (naa.600c0ff0001087439023704d01000000)
VAAI Status: supported
Display Name: HP Serial Attached SCSI Disk (naa.600c0ff0001087d28323704d01000000)
VAAI Status: supported
Display Name: HP Fibre Channel Disk (naa.600c0ff000f00186a622b24b01000000)
VAAI Status: unknown
Table 17 VAAI device status values
Value
Description
Unknown
The array volume is hosted by a non-supported VAAI Array (such as the EVA P6300 or
P6500)
Supported
The array volume is hosted by a supported VAAI array, and all three VAAI commands
completed successfully.
Not supported
The array volume is hosted by a supported VAAI array, but all three VAAI commands did
not complete successfully.
NOTE: VAAI device status is "Unknown" until all VAAI primitives are attempted by ESX on the
device and completed successfully. Upon completion, VAAI device status becomes “Supported."
Installing the HP VAAI Plug-in using vCLI/vMA
NOTE: This installation method is supported for use only with VAAI Plug-in version 1.00, in
ESX/ESXi 4.1 environments.
64
Configuring application servers
1.
Obtain the VAAI Plug-in software package and save to a local folder on the target VMware
host:
a. Go to the HP Support Downloads website at http://www.hp.com/support/downloads.
b. Navigate through the display to locate and then download the HP EVA P6000 Software
Plug-in for VMware VAAI to a temporary folder on the server. (Example folder location:
/root/vaaip)
2.
Enter maintenance mode.
3.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
vicfg-hostops.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username
User_Name--password Account_Password -o enter
Install the VAAI Plug-in using vihostupdate.
4.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
vihostupdate.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name
--password Account_Password --bundle
hp_vaaip_p6000_offline-bundle-xyz --install
Restart the target VMware host.
5.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
vicfg-hostops.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username
User_Name--password Account_Password -o reboot -f
Exit maintenance mode.
6.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
vicfg-hostops.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username
User_Name--password Account_Password -o exit
Verify the claimed VAAI device.
a. Check for new HP P6000 claim rules.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
esxcli --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name --password
Account_Password corestorage claimrule list –c VAAI
The return display will be similar to the following:
Rule Class
VAAI
VAAI
b.
Rule
5001
5001
Class
runtime
file
Type
vendor
vendor
Plugin
hp_vaaip_p6000
hp_vaaip_p6000
Matches
vendor=HP model=HSV
vendor=HP model=HSV
Check for claimed storage devices.
List all devices claimed by the VAAI Plug-in.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
esxcli --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name --password
Account_Password vaai device list
The return display will be similar to the following:
naa.600c0ff00010e1cbc7523f4d01000000
Device Display Name: HP iSCSI Disk (naa.600c0ff00010e1cbc7523f4d01000000)
VAAI Plugin Name: hp_vaaip_p6000
naa.600c0ff000da030b521bb64b01000000
Device Display Name: HP Fibre Channel Disk (naa.600c0ff000da030b521bb64b01000000)
VAAI Plugin Name: hp_vaaip_p6000
c.
Check the VAAI status on the storage devices. For more information about VAAI device
status values, see Table 17 (page 64) .
Use the vCenter Management Station as listed in the following section.
VMware
65
Installing the VAAI Plug-in using VUM
NOTE:
•
This installation method is supported for use with VAAI Plug-in versions 1.00 and 2.00, in
ESX/ESXi 4.1 environments.
•
HP recommends installing the plug-in using VMware Update Manager.
Installing the VAAI Plug-in using VUM consists of two steps:
1. “Importing the VAAI Plug-in to the vCenter Server” (page 66)
2. “Installing the VAAI Plug-in on each ESX/ESXi host” (page 67)
Importing the VAAI Plug-in to the vCenter Server
1.
Obtain the VAAI Plug-in software package and save it on the system that has VMware vSphere
client installed:
a. Go to the HP Download drivers and support website at http://www.hp.com/support/
downloads.
b. Locate the HP EVA P6000 Software Plug-in for VMware VAAI and then download it to
a temporary folder on the server.
c. Expand the contents of the downloaded .zip file into the temporary folder and locate
the HP EVA VAAI offline bundle file. The filename will be in one of the following formats:
hp_vaaip_p6000_offline-bundle_xyz.zip
(where xyz represents the VAAI Plug-in version.)
2.
Open VUM:
a. Double-click the VMware vSphere Client icon on your desktop, and then log in to the
vCenter Server using administrator privileges.
b. Click the Home icon in the navigation bar.
c. In the Solutions and Applications pane, click the Update Manager icon to start VUM.
NOTE: If the Solutions and Applications pane is missing, the VUM Plug-in is not installed
on your vCenter Client system. Use the vCenter Plug-ins menu to install VUM.
3.
Import the Plug-in:
a. Select the Patch Repository tab.
b. Click Import Patches in the upper right corner. The Import Patches dialog window opens.
c. Browse to the extracted HP EVA VAAI offline bundle file. The filename will be in the
following format:
hp_vaaip_p6000_offline-bundle_xyz.zip
(where xyz represents the VAAI Plug-in version).
d.
e.
66
Wait for the import process to complete.
Click Finish.
Configuring application servers
4.
Create a new Baseline set for this offline plug-in:
a. Select the Baselines and Groups tab.
b. Above the left pane, click Create.
c. In the New Baseline window:
d.
•
Enter a name and a description. (Example: HP P6000 Baseline and VAAI Plug-in for
HP EVA)
•
Select Host Extension.
•
Click Next to proceed to the Extensions window.
In the Extensions window:
•
Select HP EVA VAAI Plug-in for VMware vSphere x.x, where x.x represents the plug-in
version.
•
Click the down arrow to add the plug-in in the Extensions to Add panel at the bottom
of the display.
•
Click Next to proceed.
•
Click Finish to complete the task and return to the Baselines and Groups tab.
The HP P6000 Baseline should now be listed in the left pane.
Importing the VAAI Plug-in is complete. To install the plug-in, see “Installing the VAAI Plug-in on
each ESX/ESXi host” (page 67).
Installing the VAAI Plug-in on each ESX/ESXi host
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
From the vCenter Server, click the Home icon in the navigation bar.
Click the Hosts and Clusters icon in the Inventory pane.
Click the DataCenter that has the ESX/ESXi hosts that you want to stage.
Click the Update Manager tab. VUM automatically evaluates the software recipe compliance
for all ESX/ESXi Hosts.
Above the right pane, click Attach to open the Attach Baseline or Group dialog window.
Select the HP P6000 Baseline entry, and then click Attach.
6.
7.
8.
To ensure that the patch and extensions compliance content is synchronized, again click the
DataCenter that has the ESX/ESXi hosts that you want to stage. Then, in the left panel, right-click
the DataCenter icon and select Scan for Updates. When prompted, ensure that Patches and
Extensions is selected, and then click Scan.
Stage the installation:
a. Click Stage to open the Stage Wizard.
b. Select the target VMware hosts for the extension that you want to install, and then click
Next.
c. Click Finish.
Complete the installation:
a. Click Remediate to open the Remediation Wizard.
b. Select the target VMware host that you want to remediate, and then click Next.
c. Make sure that the HP EVA VAAI extension is selected, and then click Next.
d. Fill in the related information, and then click Next.
e. Click Finish.
Installing the VAAI Plug in is complete. View the display for a summary of which ESX/ESXi hosts
are compliant with the vCenter patch repository.
VMware
67
NOTE:
•
In the Tasks & Events section, the following tasks should have a Completed status: Remediate
entry, Install, and Check.
•
If any of the above tasks has an error, click the task to view the detail events information.
Verifying VAAI status
1.
2.
3.
From the vCenter Server, click the Home Navigation bar and then click Hosts and Clusters.
Select the target VMware host from the list and then click the Configuration tab.
Click the Storage Link under Hardware.
For more information about VAAI device status values, see Table 17 (page 64).
Uninstalling the VAAI Plug-in
Procedures vary, depending on user preference and environment:
Uninstalling VAAI Plug-in using the automated script (hpeva.pl)
1.
2.
Enter maintenance mode.
Query the installed VAAI Plug-in to determine the name of the bulletin to uninstall.
3.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
c:\>hpeva.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name --password
Account_Password --query
Uninstall the VAAI Plug-in.
4.
5.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
c:\>hpeva.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name --password
Account_Password --bulletin Bulletin_Name --remove
Restart the host.
Exit maintenance mode.
Uninstalling VAAI Plug-in using vCLI/vMA (vihostupdate)
1.
2.
Enter maintenance mode.
Query the installed VAAI Plug-in to determine the name of the VAAI Plug-in bulletin to uninstall.
3.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
c:\>vihostupdate.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name
--password Account_Password --query
Uninstall the VAAI Plug-in.
4.
5.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
c:\>vihostupdate.pl --server Host_IP_Address --username User_Name
--password Account_Password --bulletin
0-HPQ-ESX-4.1.0-hp-vaaip-p6000-1.0.10 --remove
Restart the host.
Exit maintenance mode.
Uninstalling VAAI Plug-in using VMware native tools (esxupdate)
1.
2.
Enter maintenance mode.
Query the installed VAAI Plug-in to determine the name of the VAAI Plug-in bulletin to uninstall.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
$host# esxupdate --vib-view query | grep hp-vaaip-p6000
68
Configuring application servers
3.
Uninstall the VAAI Plug-in.
4.
5.
Enter a command using the following syntax:
$host# esxupdate remove -b VAAI_Plug_In_Bulletin_Name
--maintenancemode
Restart the host.
Exit maintenance mode.
VMware
69
4 Replacing array components
Customer self repair
Table 18 (page 71) and Table 19 (page 72) identify hardware components that are customer
replaceable. Using WEBES, ISEE or other diagnostic tools, a support specialist will work with you
to diagnose and assess whether a replacement component is required to address a system problem.
The specialist will also help you determine whether you can perform the replacement.
Parts-only warranty service
Your HP Limited Warranty may include a parts-only warranty service. Under the terms of parts-only
warranty service, HP will provide replacement parts free of charge.
For parts-only warranty service, CSR part replacement is mandatory. If you request HP to replace
these parts, you will be charged for travel and labor costs.
Best practices for replacing hardware components
The following information will help you replace the hardware components on your storage system
successfully.
CAUTION: Removing a component significantly changes the air flow within the enclosure. All
components must be installed for the enclosure to cool properly. If a component fails, leave it in
place in the enclosure until a new component is available to install.
Component replacement videos
To assist you in replacing components, videos of the procedures have been produced. To view
the videos, go to the following website and navigate to your product:
http://www.hp.com/go/sml
Verifying component failure
•
Consult HP technical support to verify that the hardware component has failed and that you
are authorized to replace it yourself.
•
Additional hardware failures can complicate component replacement. Check HP P6000
Command View and/or the HP fault monitoring software as follows to detect any additional
hardware problems:
◦
When you have confirmed that a component replacement is required, you may want to
clear the Real Time Monitoring view. This makes it easier to identify additional hardware
problems that may occur while waiting for the replacement part.
◦
Before installing the replacement part, check the Real Time Monitoring view for any new
hardware problems. If additional hardware problems have occurred, contact HP support
before replacing the component.
◦
See the System Event Analyzer online help for additional information.
Identifying the spare part
Parts have a nine-character spare part number on their label. See Figure 26 (page 71). For some
spare parts, the part number is available in HP P6000 Command View. Alternatively, the HP call
center will assist in identifying the correct spare part number.
70
Replacing array components
Figure 26 Example of typical product label
1. Spare part number
Replaceable parts
This product contains the replaceable parts listed in “Controller enclosure replacement parts”
(page 71) and “M6412–A disk enclosure replaceable parts” (page 72). Parts that are available
for customer self repair (CSR) are indicated as follows:
✓ Mandatory CSR where geography permits. Order the part directly from HP and repair the
product yourself. On-site or return-to-depot repair is not provided under warranty.
• Optional CSR. You can order the part directly from HP and repair the product yourself, or you
can request that HP repair the product. If you request repair from HP, you may be charged for the
repair depending on the product warranty.
– No CSR. The replaceable part is not available for self repair. For assistance, contact an
HP-authorized service provider
Table 18 Controller enclosure replacement parts
Description
Spare part number (non
RoHS/RoHS)
CSR status
4Gb array controller (HSV300)
461488-005
•
4Gb array controller (HSV300-S)
460586-005
•
HSV300–S embedded switch console port cable
316131-001
✓
1GB cache DIMM
466263-001 (uses 512 Mb
DRAM chips)
•
635205-001 (uses 1 Gb
DRAM chips)1
Array battery
460581-001
✓
Array power supply
519842-001
✓
Array fan module
460583-001
✓
Array management module
460584-005
✓
Array LED membrane display
461489-001
•
Array midplane
461490-005
•
Array riser assembly
461491-001
•
Array power UID
466264-001
•
Array front bezel
460585-001
✓
Replaceable parts
71
1
Requires XCS 09522000 or later.
Table 19 M6412–A disk enclosure replaceable parts
Description
Spare part number (non
RoHS/RoHS)
4 Gb FC disk shelf midplane
461492-001, 635829-001
•
4 Gb FC disk shelf backplane
461493-001, 461493-005
•
SPS-BD Front UID
399053-001
•
SPS-BD Power UID with cable
399054-001
•
SPS-BD Front UID Interconnect PCA with cable
399055-001
•
4 Gb FC disk shelf I/O module
461494-001, 461494-005
•
FC disk shelf fan module
468715-001
✓
FC disk shelf power supply
405914-001
✓
Filler panel for unused drive bay
389015–001
✓
Disk drive 300 GB, 10K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel 537582-001
✓
Disk drive 450 GB, 10K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel
518734-001
✓
Disk drive 600 GB, 10K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel 518735-001
✓
Disk drive 146 GB, 15K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel
✓
454410-001
CSR status
Disk drive 300 GB, 15K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel 454411-001
✓
Disk drive 400 GB, 15K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel 466277-001
✓
Disk drive 450 GB, 15K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel
454412-001
✓
Disk drive 600 GB, 15K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, Fibre Channel 495808-001
✓
Disk drive 1 TB, 7.2K, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, FATA
671148-001
✓
Disk drive 72 GB, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, SSD
515189–001
✓
Disk drive 200 GB, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, SSD
595336-001
✓
Disk drive 400 GB, EVA M6412–A Enclosure, SSD
595337-001
✓
Disk drive 600 GB, 15K, Fibre Channel
621832-001
✓
Rail kit, 2U form factor
383663-001
✓
SPS-CABLE ASSY, 4Gb COPPER, FC, 2.0m
432374-001
✓
SPS-CABLE ASSY, 4Gb COPPER, FC, 0.6m
432375-001
✓
SPS-CABLE ASSY, 4Gb COPPER, FC, 0.41m
496917-001
✓
For more information about CSR, contact your local service provider or see the CSR website:
http://www.hp.com/go/selfrepair
To determine the warranty service provided for this product, see the warranty information website:
http://www.hp.com/go/storagewarranty
To order a replacement part, contact an HP-authorized service provider or see the HP Parts Store
online:
http://www.hp.com/buy/parts
72
Replacing array components
Replacing the failed component
CAUTION:
protection.
Components can be damaged by electrostatic discharge (ESD). Use proper anti-static
•
Always transport and store CRUs in an ESD protective enclosure.
•
Do not remove the CRU from the ESD protective enclosure until you are ready to install it.
•
Always use ESD precautions, such as a wrist strap, heel straps on conductive flooring, and
an ESD protective smock when handling ESD sensitive equipment.
•
Avoid touching the CRU connector pins, leads, or circuitry.
•
Do not place ESD generating material such as paper or non anti-static (pink) plastic in an ESD
protective enclosure with ESD sensitive equipment.
•
HP recommends waiting until periods of low storage system activity to replace a component.
•
When replacing components at the rear of the rack, cabling may obstruct access to the
component. Carefully move any cables out of the way to avoid loosening any connections.
In particular, avoid cable damage that may be caused by:
◦
Kinking or bending.
◦
Disconnecting cables without capping. If uncapped, cable performance may be impaired
by contact with dust, metal or other surfaces.
◦
Placing removed cables on the floor or other surfaces, where they may be walked on or
otherwise compressed.
Replacement instructions
Printed instructions are shipped with the replacement part. Instructions for all replaceable components
are also included on the documentation CD that ships with the EVA4400 and posted on the HP
website. For the latest information, HP recommends that you obtain the instructions from the HP
Business Support Center Manuals website at http://www.hp.com/support/manuals. Under Storage,
select Disk Storage Systems, and then under EVA Storage, select HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array.
The manuals page for the EVA4400 appears. Scroll to the Service and maintenance information
section where the following replacement instructions are posted:
•
HP Controller Enclosure 4Gb Array Controller Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure 4Gb Array Controller with Embedded Switch Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Battery Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Cache DIMM Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Fan Module Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure LED Display Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Management Module Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Midplane Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Power Supply Replacement Instructions
•
HP Controller Enclosure Riser Assembly Replacement Instructions
•
HP Disk Enclosure Backplane Replacement Instructions
•
HP Disk Enclosure Fan Module Replacement Instructions
•
HP Disk Enclosure Front UID Interconnect Board (with cable) Replacement Instructions
•
HP Disk Enclosure Front UID Replacement Instructions
Replacing the failed component
73
74
•
HP Disk Enclosure I/O Module Replacement Instructions
•
HP Disk Enclosure Midplane Replacement Instructions
•
HP Disk Enclosure Power Supply Replacement Instructions
•
HP Fibre Channel Disk Drive Replacement Instructions
•
HP Power UID Replacement Instructions
Replacing array components
5 Single path implementation
This chapter provides guidance for connecting servers with a single path HBA to the EVA storage
system with no multipath software installed. A single path HBA is defined as:
•
A single HBA port to a switch with no multipathing software installed
•
A single HBA port to a switch with multipathing software installed
HBA LUNs are not shared by any other HBA in the server or in the SAN. Failover action is different
depending on which single path method is employed.
The failure scenarios demonstrate behavior when recommended configurations are employed, as
well as expected failover behavior if guidelines are not met. To implement single adapter servers
into a multipath EVA environment, configurations should follow these recommendations.
The purpose of single HBA configurations for non-mission critical storage access is to control costs.
This chapter describes the configurations, limitations, and failover characteristics of single HBA
servers under different operating systems. Several of the descriptions are based on a single HBA
configuration resulting in a single path to the device, but OpenVMS has native multipath features
by default.
NOTE:
Tru64 UNIX is not supported with the EVA4400.
With OpenVMS, a single HBA configuration will result in two paths to the device by having
connections to both EVA controllers. Single HBA configurations are not single path configurations
with these operating systems.
In addition, cluster configurations for OpenVMS provide enhanced availability and security. To
achieve availability within cluster configurations, configure each member with its own HBAs and
connectivity to shared LUNs. For further information on cluster configurations and attributes, see
the appropriate operating system guide and the HP SAN Design Reference Guide.
NOTE: HP continually makes additions to its storage solution product line. For more information
about the HP Fibre Channel product line, the latest drivers, and technical tips, and to view other
documentation, see the following HP website:
http://www.hp.com/country/us/eng/prodserv/storage.html
Installation requirements
•
The host must be placed in a zone with any EVA worldwide IDs (WWIDs) that access storage
devices presented by the hierarchical storage virtualization (HSV) controllers to the single path
HBA host. The preferred method is to use HBA and HSV WWIDs in the zone configurations.
•
On HP-UX, Solaris, Microsoft Windows Server 2012, Microsoft Windows Server 2008,
Microsoft Windows Server, Linux and IBM AIX operating systems, the zones consist of the
single path HBA systems and one HSV controller port.
•
On OpenVMS, the zones consist of the single HBA systems and two HSV controller ports. This
results in a configuration where there are two paths per device, or multiple paths.
Recommended mitigations
EVA is designed for the mission-critical enterprise environment. When used with multipath software,
high data availability and fault tolerance are achieved. In single path HBA server configurations,
neither multipath software nor redundant I/O paths are present. Server-based operating systems
are not designed to inherently recover from unexpected failure events in the I/O path (for example,
loss of connectivity between the server and the data storage). It is expected that most operating
systems will experience undesirable behavior when configured in non-high-availability configurations.
Installation requirements
75
Because of the risks of using servers with a single path HBA, HP recommends the following actions:
•
Use servers with a single path HBA that are not mission-critical or highly available.
•
Perform frequent backups of the single path server and its storage.
Supported configurations
All examples detail a small homogeneous SAN for ease of explanation. Mixing of dual and single
path HBA systems in a heterogeneous SAN is supported. In addition to this document, reference
and adhere to the HP SAN Design Reference Guide for heterogeneous SANs, located at:
http://www.hp.com/go/sdgmanuals
General configuration components
All configurations require the following components:
•
XCS controller software
•
HBAs
•
Fibre Channel switches
Connecting a single path HBA server to a switch in a fabric zone
Each host must attach to one switch (fabric) using standard Fibre Channel cables. Each host has
its single path HBA connected through switches on a SAN to one port of an EVA.
Because a single path HBA server has no software to manage the connection and ensure that only
one controller port is visible to the HBA, the fabric containing the single path HBA server, SAN
switch, and EVA controller must be zoned. Configuring the single path by switch zoning and the
LUNs by Selective Storage Presentation (SSP) allows for multiple single path HBAs to reside in the
same server. A single path HBA server with the OpenVMS operating system should be zoned with
two EVA controllers. See the HP SAN Design Reference Guide at the following HP website for
additional information about zoning:
http://www.hp.com/go/sdgmanuals
To connect a single path HBA server to a SAN switch:
1. Plug one end of the Fibre Channel cable into the HBA on the server.
2. Plug the other end of the cable into the switch.
Figure 27 (page 77) and Figure 28 (page 78) represent configurations containing both single path
HBA server and dual HBA server, as well as a SAN appliance, connected to redundant SAN
switches and EVA controllers. Whereas the dual HBA server has multipath software that manages
the two HBAs and their connections to the switch, the single path HBA has no software to perform
this function. The dashed line in the figure represents the fabric zone that must be established for
the single path HBA server. Note that in Figure 28 (page 78), servers with OpenVMS can be
zoned with two controllers.
76
Single path implementation
Figure 27 Single path HBA server without OpenVMS
1. Network interconnection
6. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
7. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
8. Fabric zone
4. Management server
9. Controller A
5. Multiple single HBA paths
10. Controller B
Supported configurations
77
Figure 28 Single path HBA server with OpenVMS
1. Network interconnection
6. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
7. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
8. Fabric zone
4. Management server
9. Controller A
5. Multiple single HBA paths
10. Controller B
HP-UX configuration
Requirements
78
•
Proper switch zoning must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an exclusive path to
its LUNs.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
Single path HBA server cannot share LUNs with any other HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
Single path implementation
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA host.
•
Host 2 is a multiple HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 29 (page 79).
Risks
•
Disabled jobs hang and cannot umount disks.
•
Path or controller failure may results in loss of data accessibility and loss of host data that has
not been written to storage.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “HP-UX” (page 92).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single-path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is not supported.
Figure 29 HP-UX configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
HP-UX configuration
79
Windows Server 2003 (32-bit), Windows Server 2008 (32-bit), Windows
Server 2012 (32-bit) configurations
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
Single path HBA server cannot share LUNs with any other HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA host.
•
Host 2 is a multiple HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 30 (page 81).
Risks
•
Single path failure will result in loss of connection with the storage system.
•
Single path failure may cause the server to reboot.
•
Controller shutdown puts controller in a failed state that results in loss of data accessibility
and loss of host data that has not been written to storage.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “Windows Servers” (page 93).
Limitations
80
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is not supported on single path HBA servers.
Single path implementation
Figure 30 Windows Server 2008 (32-bit), Windows Server 2003 (32-bit), and Windows 2000
configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
Windows Server 2008 (64-bit) and Windows Server 2003 (64-bit)
configurations
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
Single path HBA server cannot share LUNs with any other HBAs.
HBA configuration
•
Hosts 1 and 2 are single path HBA hosts.
•
Host 3 is a multiple HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 31 (page 82).
NOTE: Single path HBA servers running the Windows Server 2003 (x64) or Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 (x64) operating system will support multiple single path HBAs in the same server.
This is accomplished through a combination of switch zoning and controller level SSP. Any single
path HBA server will support up to four single path HBAs.
Windows Server 2008 (64-bit) and Windows Server 2003 (64-bit) configurations
81
Risks
•
Single path failure will result in loss of connection with the storage system.
•
Single path failure may cause the server to reboot.
•
Controller shutdown puts controller in a failed state that results in loss of data accessibility
and loss of host data that has not been written to storage.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “Windows Servers” (page 93).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is not supported on single path HBA servers.
Figure 31 Windows Server 2008 (64-bit) or Windows Server 2003 (64-bit) configuration
1. Network interconnection
6. SAN switch 1
2. Management server
7. Multiple single HBA paths
3. Host 1
8. SAN switch 2
4. Host 2
9. Controller A
5. Host 3
10. Controller B
Oracle Solaris configuration
Requirements
82
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
Single path implementation
•
Single path HBA server cannot share LUNs with any other HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
•
HBA must be properly configured to work in a single HBA server configuration. The user is
required to:
◦
Download and extract the contents of the TAR file.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA host.
•
Host 2 is a multiple HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 32 (page 84).
Risks
•
Single path failure may result in loss of data accessibility and loss of host data that has not
been written to storage.
•
Controller shutdown results in loss of data accessibility and loss of host data that has not been
written to storage.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “Oracle Solaris” (page 93).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is not supported.
Oracle Solaris configuration
83
Figure 32 Oracle Solaris configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
OpenVMS configuration
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
All nodes with direct connection to a disk must have the same access paths available to them.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA host.
•
Host 2 is a dual HBA host.
See Figure 33 (page 85).
84
Single path implementation
Risks
•
For nonclustered nodes with a single path HBA, a path failure from the HBA to the SAN switch
will result in a loss of connection with storage devices.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “OpenVMS” (page 94).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
Figure 33 OpenVMS configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
Xen configuration
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
All nodes with direct connection to a disk must have the same access paths available to them.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
Xen configuration
85
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA.
•
Host 2 is a dual HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 34 (page 86).
Risks
•
Single path failure may result in data loss or disk corruption.
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is not supported.
Figure 34 Xen configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
Linux (32-bit) configuration
NOTE:
86
The information in this section also applies to RHEL Xen configurations.
Single path implementation
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
All nodes with direct connection to a disk must have the same access paths available to them.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA.
•
Host 2 is a dual HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 35 (page 88).
Risks
•
Single path failure may result in data loss or disk corruption.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “Linux” (page 94).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is supported on single path HBA servers.
Linux (32-bit) configuration
87
Figure 35 Linux (32-bit) configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
Linux (Itanium) configuration
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
All nodes with direct connection to a disk must have the same access paths available to them.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
•
Linux 64-bit servers can support up to14 single or dual path HBAs per server. Switch zoning
and SSP are required to isolate the LUNs presented to each HBA from each other.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA.
•
Host 2 is a dual HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 36 (page 89).
88
Single path implementation
Risks
•
Single path failure may result in data loss or disk corruption.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “Linux” (page 94).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is supported on single path HBA servers.
Figure 36 Linux (Itanium) configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
IBM AIX configuration
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
Single path HBA server cannot share LUNs with any other HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
IBM AIX configuration
89
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA host.
•
Host 2 is a dual HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 37 (page 90).
Risks
•
Single path failure may result in loss of data accessibility and loss of host data that has not
been written to storage.
•
Controller shutdown results in loss of data accessibility and loss of host data that has not been
written to storage.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “IBM AIX” (page 95).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single path HBA server is not part of a cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is not supported.
Figure 37 IBM AIX configuration
90
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
Single path implementation
VMware configuration
Requirements
•
Switch zoning or controller level SSP must be used to ensure each single path HBA has an
exclusive path to its LUNs.
•
All nodes with direct connection to a disk must have the same access paths available to them.
•
Single path HBA server can be in the same fabric as servers with multiple HBAs.
•
In the use of snapshots and snapclones, the source virtual disk and all associated snapshots
and snapclones must be presented to the single path hosts that are zoned with the same
controller. In the case of snapclones, after the cloning process has completed and the clone
becomes an ordinary virtual disk, you may present that virtual disk as you would any other
ordinary virtual disk.
HBA configuration
•
Host 1 is a single path HBA.
•
Host 2 is a dual HBA host with multipathing software.
See Figure 38 (page 92).
Risks
•
Single path failure may result in data loss or disk corruption.
NOTE:
For additional risks, see “VMware” (page 95).
Limitations
•
HP P6000 Continuous Access is not supported with single path configurations.
•
Single HBA path at the host server is not part of a cluster, unless in a VMware High Availability
Cluster.
•
Booting from the SAN is supported on single path HBA servers.
VMware configuration
91
Figure 38 VMware configuration
1. Network interconnection
5. SAN switch 1
2. Single HBA server (Host 1)
6. SAN switch 2
3. Dual HBA server (Host 2)
7. Controller A
4. Management server
8. Controller B
Mac OS configuration
For information about Mac OS connectivity, see Mac OS X Fibre Channel connectivity to the HP
Enterprise Virtual Array Storage System Configuration Guide (to download, see “Documents”
(page 106)).
Failure scenarios
HP-UX
92
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
Extremely critical event on UNIX. Can cause loss of system disk.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Job hangs, cannot umount disk, fsck failed, disk corrupted,
need mkfs disk.
Controller failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Job hangs, cannot umount disk, fsck failed, disk corrupted,
need mkfs disk.
Controller restart
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Job hangs, cannot umount disk, fsck failed, disk corrupted,
need mkfs disk.
Single path implementation
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server path failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Job hangs, cannot umount disk, fsck failed, disk corrupted,
need mkfs disk.
Storage path failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Job hangs, replace cable, I/O continues. Without cable
replacement job must be aborted; disk seems error free.
Windows Servers
Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, and Windows Server 2012
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
OS runs a command called chkdsk when rebooting. Data lost, data that
finished copying survived.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
Write delay, server hangs until I/O is cancelled or cold reboot.
Controller failure
Write delay, server hangs or reboots. One controller failed, other
controller and shelves critical, shelves offline. Volume not accessible.
Server cold reboot, data lost. Check disk when rebooting.
Controller restart
Controller momentarily in failed state, server keeps copying. All data
copied, no interruption. Event error warning error detected during paging
operation.
Server path failure
Write delay, volume inaccessible. Host hangs and restarts.
Storage path failure
Write delay, volume disappears, server still running. When cables
plugged back in, controller recovers, server finds volume, data loss.
Oracle Solaris
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
Check disk when rebooting. Data loss, data that finished copying survived.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages on console, no access to CDE.
System reboot causes loss of data on disk. Must newfs disk.
Controller failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages on console, no access to CDE.
System reboot causes loss of data on disk. Must newfs disk.
Controller restart
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages on console, no access to CDE.
System reboot causes loss of data on disk. Must newfs disk.
Server path failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages on console, no access to CDE.
System reboot causes loss of data on disk. Must newfs disk.
Storage path failure
Short term: Job hung, data lost.
Long term: Repeated error messages on console, no access to CDE.
System reboot causes loss of data on disk. Must newfs disk.
Failure scenarios
93
OpenVMS
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
Nonclustered-Processes fail.
Clustered—Other nodes running processes that used devices served from
the single-path HBA failed over access to a different served path. When
the single-path node crashes, only the processes executing on that node
fail.
In either case, no data is lost or corrupted.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
I/O is suspended or process is terminated across this HBA until switch is
back online. No data is lost or corrupted.
The operating system will report the volume in a Mount Verify state until
the MVTIMEOUT limit is exceeded, when it then marks the volume as
Mount Verify Timeout. No data is lost or corrupted.
Controller failure
I/O fails over to the surviving controller. No data is lost or corrupted.
Controller restart
I/O is suspended or process is terminated across this HBA until EVA is
back online. No data is lost or corrupted.
The operating system will report the volume in a Mount Verify state until
the MVTIMEOUT limit is exceeded, when it then marks the volume as
Mount Verify Timeout.
Server path failure
If the LUN is not shared, I/O is suspended or process is terminated across
this HBA until path is restored.
If running OpenVMS 7.3-1 and the LUN is shared, another cluster node
having direct access will take over serving the device, resulting in no loss
of service.
In either case, no data is lost or corrupted.
The operating system will report the volume in a Mount Verify state until
the MVTIMEOUT limit is exceeded, when it then marks the volume as
Mount Verify Timeout.
Storage path failure
I/O is suspended or process is terminated across this HBA until path is
restored. No data is lost or corrupted.
The operating system will report the volume in a Mount Verify state until
the MVTIMEOUT limit is exceeded, when it then marks the volume as
Mount Verify Timeout.
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
OS reboots, automatically checks disks. HSV disks must be manually
checked unless auto mounted by the system.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
Short: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. HBA driver must be reloaded
before failed drives can be recovered, fsck should be run on any failed
drives before remounting.
Controller failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. Cannot reload driver,
need to reboot system, fsck should be run on any failed disks before
remounting.
Controller restart
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. Cannot reload driver,
need to reboot system, fsck should be run on any failed disks before
remounting.
Linux
94
Single path implementation
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server path failure
Short: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. HBA driver must be reloaded
before failed drives can be recovered, fsck should be run on any failed
drives before remounting.
Storage path failure
Short: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. HBA driver must be reloaded
before failed drives can be recovered, fsck should be run on any failed
drives before remounting.
IBM AIX
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
Check disk when rebooting. Data loss, data that finished copying survived.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages in errpt output. System reboot causes
loss of data on disk. Must crfs disk.
Controller failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages in errpt output. System reboot causes
loss of data on disk. Must crfs disk.
Controller restart
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages in errpt output. System reboot causes
loss of data on disk. Must crfs disk.
Server path failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages in errpt output. System reboot causes
loss of data on disk. Must crfs disk.
Storage path failure
Short term: Data transfer stops. Possible I/O errors.
Long term: Repeated error messages in errpt output. System reboot causes
loss of data on disk. Must crfs disk.
VMware
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
OS reboots, automatically checks disks. HSV disks must be manually
checked unless auto mounted by the system.
Switch failure (SAN switch disabled)
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. HBA driver must be
reloaded before failed drives can be recovered, fsck should be run on
any failed drives before remounting.
Controller failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. Cannot reload driver,
need to reboot system, fsck should be run on any failed disks before
remounting.
Controller restart
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. Cannot reload driver,
need to reboot system, fsck should be run on any failed disks before
remounting.
Failure scenarios
95
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server path failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. HBA driver must be
reloaded before failed drives can be recovered, fsck should be run on
any failed drives before remounting.
Storage path failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss. HBA driver must be
reloaded before failed drives can be recovered, fsck should be run on
any failed drives before remounting.
Mac OS
Fault stimulus
Failure effect
Server failure (host power-cycled)
OS reboots. Both HFS and StorNext replay journal on filesystem. Disk
auto mounted by OS.
Switch failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors.
Controller failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O fails over to alternate storage controller if visible (by
zoning). Otherwise, I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss.
Can require a server reboot for full recovery.
Controller restart
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O fails over to alternate storage controller if visible (by
zoning). Otherwise, I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss.
Can require a server reboot for full recovery.
Server path failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O halts with I/O errors, data loss.
Can require a server reboot for full recovery.
Storage path failure
Short term: I/O suspended, possible data loss.
Long term: I/O fails over to alternate storage controller if available.
Otherwise, I/O halts with I/O errors.
Can require a server reboot for full recovery.
96
Single path implementation
6 Error messages
This list of error messages is in order by status code value, 0 to 100.
Table 20 Error messages
Status code value
Meaning
How to correct
0
Successful Status
The SCMI command completed successfully.
No corrective action required.
1
Object Already Exists
The object or relationship already exists.
Delete the associated object and try the
operation again. Several situations can cause
this message:
Presenting a LUN to a host:
• Delete the current association or specify a
different LUN number.
Storage cell initialize:
• Remove or erase disk volumes before the
storage cell can be successfully created.
Adding a port WWN to a host:
• Specify a different port WWN.
Adding a disk to a disk group:
• Delete the specified disk volume before
creating a new disk volume.
2
The command or response buffer is not large enough Report the error to product support.
Supplied Buffer Too Small to hold the specified number of items. This can be
caused by a user or program error.
3
The handle is already assigned to an existing object. Report the error to product support.
Object Already Assigned This can be caused by a user or program error.
4
There is insufficient storage available to perform the
Insufficient Available Data request.
Storage
Reclaim some logical space or add physical
hardware.
5
Internal Error
An unexpected condition was encountered while
processing a request.
Report the error to product support.
6
Invalid status for logical
disk
This error is no longer supported.
Report the error to product support.
7
Invalid Class
The supplied class code is of an unknown type. This
can be caused by a user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
8
Invalid Function
The function code specified with the class code is of
an unknown type.
Report the error to product support.
9
The specified command supplied unrecognized
Invalid Logical Disk Block values. This can indicate a user or program error.
State
Report the error to product support.
10
Invalid Loop
Configuration
The specified request supplied an invalid loop
configuration.
Verify the hardware configuration and retry the
request.
11
Invalid parameter
There are insufficient resources to fulfill the request,
the requested value is not supported, or the
parameters supplied are invalid. This can indicate a
user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
97
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
12
Invalid Parameter handle
Meaning
The supplied handle is invalid. This can indicate a
user error, program error, or a storage cell in an
uninitialized state.
In the following cases, the storage cell is in an
uninitialized state, but no action is required:
Storage cell discard (informational message):
Storage cell look up object count (informational
message):
How to correct
In the following cases, the message can occur
because the operation is not allowed when the
storage cell is in an uninitialized state. If you
see these messages, initialize the storage cell
and retry the operation.
Storage cell set device addition policy
Storage cell set name
Storage cell set time
Storage cell look up object (informational message): Storage cell set volume replacement delay
Storage cell free command lock
Storage cell set console lun id
13
Invalid Parameter Id
The supplied identifier is invalid. This can indicate a
user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
14
Invalid Quorum
Configuration
Quorum disks from multiple storage systems are
present.
Report the error to product support.
15
Invalid Target Handle
The supplied target handle is invalid. This can indicate Case 1: Report the error to product support.
a user or program error (Case 1),
Case 2: To add additional capacity to the disk
or
group, use the management software to add
disks by count or capacity.
Volume set requested usage (Case 2):
The operation could not be completed because the
disk has never belonged to a disk group and therefore
cannot be added to a disk group.
16
Invalid Target Id
The supplied target identifier is invalid. This can
indicate a user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
17
Invalid Time
The time value specified is invalid. This can indicate
a user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
18
Media is Inaccessible
The operation could not be completed because one
or more of the disk media was inaccessible.
Report the error to product support.
19
No Fibre Channel Port
The Fibre Channel port specified is not valid. This can Report the error to product support.
indicate a user or program error.
20
No Image
There is no firmware image stored for the specified
image number.
21
No Permission
The disk device is not in a state to allow the specified The disk device must be in either maintenance
operation.
mode or in a reserved state for the specified
operation to proceed.
22
Storage system not
initialized
The operation requires a storage cell to exist.
23
Not a Loop Port
The Fibre Channel port specified is either not a loop Report the error to product support.
port or is invalid. This can indicate a user or program
error.
24
Not a Participating
Controller
The controller must be participating in the storage cell Verify that the controller is a participating
to perform the operation.
member of the storage cell.
25
Objects in your system
are in use, and their state
prevents the operation
you wish to perform.
Several states can cause this message:
Case 1: The operation cannot be performed because
an association exists a related object, or the object
is in a progress state.
98
Error messages
Report the error to product support.
Create a storage cell and retry the operation.
Case 1: Either delete the associated object or
resolve the in progress state.
Case 2: . Report the error to product support.
Case 3: Unpresent the LUNs before deleting
this virtual disk.
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
Meaning
How to correct
Derived unit create: Case 2: The supplied virtual disk Case 4: Resolve the delay before performing
handle is already an attribute of another derived unit. the operation.
This may indicate a programming error
Case 5: Delete any remaining virtual disks or
Derived unit discard: Case 3: One or more LUNs are wait for the used capacity to reach zero before
presented to EVA hosts that are based on this virtual the disk group can be deleted. If this is the last
disk.
remaining disk group, uninitialize the storage
Case 4: Logical disk clear data lost: The virtual disk cell to remove it.
is in the non-mirrored delay window.
Case 6: Report the error to product support.
Case 5: LDAD discard: The operation cannot be
Case 7: The disk must be in a reserved state
performed because one or more virtual disks still exist, before it can be erased.
the disk group still may be recovering its capacity, or
Case 8: Delete the virtual disks or LUN
this is the last disk group that exists.
presentations before uninitializing the storage
Case 6: LDAD resolve condition: The disk group
cell.
contains a disk volume that is in a data-lost state. This
Case 9: Delete the LUN presentations before
condition cannot be resolved.
deleting the EVA host.
Case 7: Physical Store erase volume: The disk is a
Case 10: Report the error to product support.
part of a disk group and cannot be erased.
Case 8: Storage cell discard: The storage cell contains Case 11: Resolve the situation before
attempting the operation again.
one or more virtual disks or LUN presentations.
Case 9: Storage cell client discard: = The EVA host
contains one or more LUN presentations.
Case 12: Resolve the situation before
attempting the operation again.
Case 10: SCVD discard: The virtual disk contains one Case 13: This may indicate a programming
or more derived units and cannot be discarded. This error. Report the error to product support.
may indicate a programming error.
Case 14: Select another disk or remove the
disk from the disk group before making it a
Case 11: SCVD set capacity: The capacity cannot
member of a different disk group.
be modified because the virtual disk has a
dependency on either a snapshot or snapclone.
Case 15: Remove the virtual disks from the
Case 12: SCVD set disk cache policy: The virtual disk group and retry the operation.
cache policy cannot be modified while the virtual disk
is presented and enabled.
Case 13: SCVD set logical disk: The logical disk
attribute is already set, or the supplied logical disk is
already a member of another virtual disk.
Case 14: VOLUME set requested usage: The disk
volume is already a member of a disk group or is in
the state of being removed from a disk group.
Case 15: GROUP discard: The Continuous Access
group cannot be discarded as one or more virtual
disk members exist.
26
Parameter Object Does
Not Exist
The operation cannot be performed because the
Report the error to product support.
object does not exist. This can indicate a user or
program error.
VOLUME set requested usage: The disk volume set
requested usage cannot be performed because the
disk group does not exist. This can indicate a user or
program error.
27
Target Object Does Not
Exist
Case 1: The operation cannot be performed because
the object does not exist. This can indicate a user or
program error.
Case 2: DERIVED UNIT discard: The operation cannot
be performed because the virtual disk, snapshot, or
snapclone does not exist or is still being created.
Case 1: Report the error to product support.
Case 2: Retry the request at a later time.
Case 3: Report the error to product support.
Case 4: Report the error to product support.
Case 3: VOLUME set requested usage: The operation
cannot be performed because the target disk volume
does not exist. This can indicate a user or program
error.
99
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
Meaning
How to correct
Case 4: GROUP get name: The operation cannot be
performed because the Continuous Access group does
not exist. This can indicate a user or program error.
28
Timeout
A timeout has occurred in processing the request.
Verify the hardware connections and that
communication to the device is successful.
29
Unknown ID
The supplied storage cell identifier is invalid. This can Report the error to product support.
indicate a user or program error.
30
Unknown Parameter
Handle
The supplied parameter handle is unknown. This can Report the error to product support.
indicate a user or program error.
31
Unrecoverable Media
Error
The operation could not be completed because one
or more of the disk media had an unrecoverable
error.
Report the error to product support.
32
Invalid State
This error is no longer supported.
Report the error to product support.
33
Transport Error
A SCMI transport error has occurred.
Verify the hardware connections,
communication to the device, and that the
management software is operating successfully.
34
Volume is Missing
The operation could not be completed because the
drive volume is in a missing state.
Resolve the condition and retry the request.
Report the error to product support.
35
Invalid Cursor
The supplied cursor or sequence number is invalid.
This may indicate a user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
36
Invalid Target for the
Operation
The specified target logical disk already has an
existing data sharing relationship. This can indicate
a user or program error.
Report the error to product support.
37
No More Events
There are no more events to retrieve. (This message
is informational only.)
No action required.
38
Lock Busy
The command lock is busy and being held by another Retry the request at a later time.
process.
39
Time Not Set
The storage system time is not set. The storage system Report the error to product support.
time is set automatically by the management software.
40
The requested operation is not supported by this
Report the error to product support.
Not a Supported Version firmware version. This can indicate a user or program
error.
41
The specified SCVD does not have a logical disk
Report the error to product support.
No Logical Disk for Vdisk associated with it. This can indicate a user or program
error.
42
Logical disk Presented
The virtual disk specified is already presented to the
client and the requested operation is not allowed.
43
Operation Denied On
Slave
The request is not allowed on the slave controller. This Report the error to product support.
can indicate a user or program error.
44
Not licensed for data
replication
This error is no longer supported.
Report the error to product support.
45
Not DR group member
The operation cannot be performed because the
virtual disk is not a member of a Continuous Access
group.
Configure the virtual disk to be a member of a
Continuous Access group and retry the request.
100 Error messages
Delete the associated presentation(s) and retry
the request.
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
Meaning
How to correct
46
Invalid DR mode
The operation cannot be performed because the
Configure the Continuous Access group
Continuous Access group is not in the required mode. correctly and retry the request.
47
The target DR member is
in full copy, operation
rejected
The operation cannot be performed because at least Wait for the copying state to complete and
one of the virtual disk members is in a copying state. retry the request.
48
Security credentials
needed. Please update
your system's ID and
password in the Storage
System Access menu.
The management software is unable to log in to the
storage system. The storage system password has
been configured.
Use the management software to save the
password specified so communication can
proceed.
49
The management software is unable to login to the
Use the management software to set the
Security credentials
device. The storage system password may have been password to match the device so
supplied were invalid.
re-configured or removed.
communication can proceed.
Please update your
system's ID and password
in the Storage System
Access menu.
50
The management software is already logged in to the No action required.
Security credentials
device. (This message is informational only.)
supplied were invalid.
Please update your
system's ID and password
in the Storage System
Access menu.
51
Storage system
connection down
The Continuous Access group is not functioning.
Verify that devices are powered on and that
device hardware connections are functioning
correctly.
52
DR group empty
No virtual disks are members of the Continuous
Access group.
Add one or more virtual disks as members and
retry the request.
53
Incompatible attribute
The request cannot be performed because one or
more of the attributes specified is incompatible.
Retry the request with valid attributes for the
operation.
54
Vdisk is a DR group
member
The requested operation cannot be performed on a
virtual disk that is already a member of a data
replication group.
Remove the virtual disk as a member of a data
replication group and retry the request.
55
Vdisk is a DR log unit
The requested operation cannot be performed on a
virtual disk that is a log unit.
No action required.
56
Cache batteries failed or
missing.
The battery system is missing or discharged.
Report the error to product support.
57
Vdisk is not presented
The virtual disk member is not presented to a client.
The virtual disk member must be presented to
a client before this operation can be
performed.
58
Other controller failed
Invalid status for logical disk. This error is no longer
supported.
Report the error to product support.
59
Maximum Number of
Objects Exceeded.
Case 1: The maximum number of items allowed has
been reached.
Case 2: The maximum number of EVA hosts has been
reached.
Case 1: If this operation is still desired, delete
one or more of the items and retry the
operation.
Case 2: If this operation is still desired, delete
one or more of the EVA hosts and retry the
operation.
Case 3: The maximum number of port WWNs has
been reached.
101
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
Meaning
How to correct
Case 3: If this operation is still desired, delete
one or more of the port WWNs and retry the
operation.
60
Max size exceeded
Case 1: The maximum number of items already exist
on the destination storage cell.
Case 2: The size specified exceeds the maximum size
allowed.
Case 3: The presented user space exceeds the
maximum size allowed.
Case 4: The presented user space exceeds the
maximum size allowed.
Case 5: The size specified exceeds the maximum size
allowed.
Case 1: If this operation is still desired, delete
one or more of the items on the destination
storage cell and retry the operation.
Case 2: Use a smaller size and retry the
operation.
Case 3: No action required.
Case 4: No action required.
Case 5: Use a smaller size and retry the
operation.
Case 6: If this operation is still desired, delete
Case 6: The maximum number of EVA hosts already one or more of the EVA hosts and retry the
exist on the destination storage cell.
operation.
Case 7: The maximum number of EVA hosts already
exist on the destination storage cell.
Case 7: If this operation is still desired, delete
one or more of the virtual disks on the
Case 8: The maximum number of Continuous Access destination storage cell and retry the operation.
groups already exist.
Case 8: If this operation is still desired, delete
one or more of the groups and retry the
operation.
61
The login password entered on the controllers does
Password mismatch.
not match.
Please update your
system's password in the
Storage System Access
menu. Continued attempts
to access this storage
system with an incorrect
password will disable
management of this
storage system.
Reconfigure one of the storage system controller
passwords, then use the management software
to set the password to match the device so
communication can proceed.
62
DR group is merging
The operation cannot be performed because the
Continuous Access connection is currently merging.
Wait for the merge operation to complete and
retry the request.
63
DR group is logging
The operation cannot be performed because the
Continuous Access connection is currently logging.
Wait for the logging operation to complete and
retry the request.
64
The operation cannot be performed because the
Resolve the suspended mode and retry the
Connection is suspended Continuous Access connection is currently suspended request.
65
Bad image header
The firmware image file has a header checksum error. Retrieve a valid firmware image file and retry
the request.
66
Bad image
The firmware image file has a checksum error.
Retrieve a valid firmware image file and retry
the request.
67
The firmware image file
is too large.
Invalid status for logical disk. This error is no longer
supported.
Retrieve a valid firmware image file and retry
the request.
The firmware image file is incompatible with the
current firmware.
Retrieve a valid firmware image file and retry
the request
Image too large
70
Image incompatible with
system configuration.
Version conflict in
upgrade or downgrade
not allowed.
102 Error messages
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
Meaning
How to correct
71
Bad image segment
The firmware image download process has failed
because of a corrupted image segment.
Verify that the firmware image is not corrupted
and retry the firmware download process.
72
Image already loaded
The firmware version already exists on the device.
No action required.
73
Image Write Error
The firmware image download process has failed
because of a failed write operation.
Verify that the firmware image is not corrupted
and retry the firmware download process.
74
Logical Disk Sharing
Case 1: The operation cannot be performed because
the virtual disk or snapshot is part of a snapshot
group.
Case 2: The operation may be prevented because a
snapclone or snapshot operation is in progress. If a
snapclone operation is in progress, the parent virtual
disk should be discarded automatically after the
operation completes. If the parent virtual disk has
snapshots, then you must delete the snapshots before
the parent virtual disk can be deleted.
Case 1: No action required.
Case 2: No action required.
Case 3: If a snapclone operation is in progress,
wait until the snapclone operation has
completed and retry the operation. Otherwise,
the operation cannot be performed on this
virtual disk.
Case 4: No action required.
Case 5: No action required.
Case 3: The operation cannot be performed because
either the previous snapclone operation is still in
progress, or the virtual disk is already part of a
snapshot group.
Case 4: A capacity change is not allowed on a virtual
disk or snapshot that is a part of a snapshot group.
Case 5: The operation cannot be performed because
the virtual disk or snapshot is a part of a snapshot
group.
75
Bad Image Size
The firmware image file is not the correct size.
Retrieve a valid firmware image file and retry
the request.
76
The controller is currently processing a firmware
The controller is
download. Retry the request once the firmware
temporarily busy and it
download process is complete.
cannot process the
request. Retry the request
later.
Retry the request once the firmware download
process is complete.
77
Volume Failure Predicted
The disk volume specified is in a predictive failed
state.
Report the error to product support.
78
Invalid object condition
for this command.
The current condition or state is preventing the request Resolve the condition and retry the request.
from completing successfully.
79
Snapshot (or snapclone)
deletion in progress. The
requested operation is
currently not allowed.
Please try again later.
The current condition of the snapshot, snapclone or
parent virtual disk is preventing the request from
completing successfully.
Wait for the operation to complete and retry
the request.
80
Invalid Volume Usage
Case 1: The disk volume is already a part of a disk
group.
Resolve the condition by setting the usage to a
reserved state and 80 retry the request. Invalid
Volume Usage
Case 2: The disk volume usage cannot be modified, Report the error to product support.
as the minimum number of disks exist in the disk
group.
81
The disk volume usage cannot be modified, as the
Minimum Volumes In Disk minimum number of disks exist in the disk group.
Group
Resolve the condition by adding additional
disks and retry the request.
103
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
82
Shutdown In Progress
Meaning
The controller is currently shutting down.
How to correct
No action required.
83
The device is not ready to process the request.
Controller API Not Ready,
Try Again Later
Retry the request at a later time.
84
Is Snapshot
No action required.
This is a snapshot virtual disk and cannot be a
member of a Continuous Access group.
85
An incompatible mirror policy of the virtual disk is
Cannot add or remove DR preventing it from becoming a member of a
group member. Mirror
Continuous Access group.
cache must be active for
this Vdisk. Check
controller cache
condition.
Modify the mirror policy and retry the request.
86
Command View EVA has
detected this array as
inoperative. Contact HP
Service for assistance.
Report the error to product support.
Case 1: A virtual disk is in an inoperative state and
the request cannot be processed.
Case 2: The snapclone cannot be associated with a
virtual disk that is in an inoperative state.
Case 3: The snapshot cannot be associated with a
virtual disk that is in an inoperative state.
87
The disk group is in an inoperative state and cannot
Disk group inoperative or process the request.
disks in group less than
minimum.
Report the error to product support.
88
Storage system
inoperative
The storage system is inoperative and cannot process Report the error to product support.
the request.
89
Failsafe Locked
The request cannot be performed because the
Resolve the condition and retry the request.
Continuous Access group is in a failsafe locked state.
90
Data Flush Incomplete
The disk cache data need to be flushed before the
condition can be resolved.
Retry the request later.
91
Redundancy Mirrored
Inoperative
The disk group is in a redundancy mirrored
inoperative state and the request cannot be
completed.
Report the error to product support.
92
Duplicate LUN
The LUN number is already in use by another client
of the storage system.
Select another LUN number and retry the
request.
93
Other remote controller
failed
While the request was being performed, the remote
storage system controller failed.
Resolve the condition and retry the request.
Report the error to product support.
94
Unknown remote Vdisk
The remote storage system specified does not exist.
Correctly select the remote storage system and
retry the request.
95
Unknown remote DR
group
The remote Continuous Access group specified does
not exist.
Correctly select the remote Continuous Access
group retry the request.
96
PLDMC failed
The disk metadata was unable to be updated.
Resolve the condition and retry the request.
Report the error to product support.
97
Storage system could not
be locked. System busy.
Try command again.
Another process has already taken the SCMI lock on Retry the request later.
the storage system.
104 Error messages
Table 20 Error messages (continued)
Status code value
98
Error on remote storage
system.
Meaning
While the request was being performed, an error
occurred on the remote storage system.
How to correct
Resolve the condition and retry the request
99
The request failed because the operation cannot be
The DR operation can
performed on a Continuous Access connection that
only be completed when is up.
the source-destination
connection is down. If you
are doing a destination
DR deletion, make sure
the connection link to the
source DR system is down
or do a failover operation
to make this system the
source.
Resolve the condition and retry the request.
100
The management software is unable to log into the
Login required - password device as the password has changed.
changed.
The storage system password may have been
re-configured or removed. The management
software must be used to set the password up
to match the device so communication can
proceed.
105
7 Support and other resources
Contacting HP
HP technical support
For world wide technical support information, see the HP support website:
http://www.hp.com/support
Before contacting HP, collect the following information:
•
Product model names and numbers
•
Technical support registration number (if applicable)
•
Product serial numbers
•
Error messages
•
Operating system type and revision level
•
Detailed questions
Subscription service
HP recommends that you register your product at the Subscriber's choice for business website:
http://www.hp.com/go/wwalerts
After registering, you will receive email notification of product enhancements, new driver versions,
firmware updates, and other product resources.
Documentation feedback
HP welcomes your feedback.
To make comments and suggestions about product documentation, please send a message to
storagedocsFeedback@hp.com. All submissions become the property of HP.
Related information
Documents
For related documents, see the Manuals page of the HP Business Support Center website:
http://www.hp.com/support/manuals
Click Disk Storage Systems under Storage, and then click HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array under
P6000/EVA Disk Arrays. For software documentation, click Storage Software under Storage, and
then click HP P6000 Command View Software under Storage Device Management Software.
You can find HP 4400 Enterprise Virtual Array QuickSpecs from the main product page website.
For example, to find the QuickSpecs if you are in the U.S., use the following website:
http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/en/support.html
Websites
•
HP:
http://www.hp.com
•
HP Storage:
http://www.hp.com/go/storage
106 Support and other resources
•
HP Partner Locator:
http://www.hp.com/service_locator
•
HP Software Downloads:
http://www.hp.com/support/downloads
•
HP Software Depot:
http://www.software.hp.com
•
HP Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK):
http://www.hp.com/storage/spock
•
HP SAN manuals:
http://www.hp.com/go/sdgmanuals
•
HP Support Center
http://h20566.www2.hp.com/portal/site/hpsc/public/
Related information 107
Typographic conventions
Table 21 Document conventions
Convention
Element
Blue text: Table 21 (page 108)
Cross-reference links
Blue, underlined text: http://www.hp.com
Website addresses
Bold text
• Keys that are pressed
• Text typed into a GUI element, such as a box
• GUI elements that are clicked or selected, such as menu and
list items, buttons, tabs, and check boxes
Italic text
Text emphasis
Monospace text
• File and directory names
• System output
• Code
• Commands, their arguments, and argument values
Monospace, italic text
• Code variables
• Command variables
Monospace, bold text
Emphasized monospace text
WARNING!
An alert that calls attention to important information that if not
understood or followed can result in personal injury.
CAUTION:
An alert that calls attention to important information that if not
understood or followed can result in data loss, data corruption,
or damage to hardware or software.
IMPORTANT:
NOTE:
TIP:
An alert that calls attention to essential information.
An alert that calls attention to additional or supplementary
information.
An alert that calls attention to helpful hints and shortcuts.
Customer self repair
HP customer self repair (CSR) programs allow you to repair your product. If a CSR part needs
replacing, HP ships the part directly to you so that you can install it at your convenience. Some
parts do not qualify for CSR. Your HP-authorized service provider will determine whether a repair
can be accomplished by CSR.
For more information about CSR, contact your local service provider or see the CSR website:
http://www.hp.com/go/selfrepair
108 Support and other resources
Rack stability
WARNING!
To reduce the risk of personal injury or damage to equipment:
•
Extend leveling jacks to the floor.
•
Ensure that the full weight of the rack rests on the leveling jacks.
•
Install stabilizing feet on the rack.
•
In multiple-rack installations, secure racks together.
•
Extend only one rack component at a time. Racks may become unstable if more than one
component is extended.
Rack stability 109
A Regulatory compliance notices
Regulatory compliance identification numbers
For the purpose of regulatory compliance certifications and identification, this product has been
assigned a unique regulatory model number. The regulatory model number can be found on the
product nameplate label, along with all required approval markings and information. When
requesting compliance information for this product, always refer to this regulatory model number.
The regulatory model number is not the marketing name or model number of the product.
Product specific information:
HP ________________
Regulatory model number: _____________
FCC and CISPR classification: _____________
These products contain laser components. See Class 1 laser statement in the “Laser compliance
notices” (page 114) section.
Federal Communications Commission notice
Part 15 of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Rules and Regulations has established
Radio Frequency (RF) emission limits to provide an interference-free radio frequency spectrum.
Many electronic devices, including computers, generate RF energy incidental to their intended
function and are, therefore, covered by these rules. These rules place computers and related
peripheral devices into two classes, A and B, depending upon their intended installation. Class A
devices are those that may reasonably be expected to be installed in a business or commercial
environment. Class B devices are those that may reasonably be expected to be installed in a
residential environment (for example, personal computers). The FCC requires devices in both classes
to bear a label indicating the interference potential of the device as well as additional operating
instructions for the user.
FCC rating label
The FCC rating label on the device shows the classification (A or B) of the equipment. Class B
devices have an FCC logo or ID on the label. Class A devices do not have an FCC logo or ID on
the label. After you determine the class of the device, refer to the corresponding statement.
Class A equipment
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used
in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which
case the user will be required to correct the interference at personal expense.
Class B equipment
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions,
may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment
110
Regulatory compliance notices
off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit that is different from that to which the receiver
is connected.
•
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio or television technician for help.
Declaration of Conformity for products marked with the FCC logo, United States only
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
For questions regarding this FCC declaration, contact us by mail or telephone:
•
Hewlett-Packard Company P.O. Box 692000, Mail Stop 510101 Houston, Texas 77269-2000
•
Or call 1-281-514-3333
Modification
The FCC requires the user to be notified that any changes or modifications made to this device
that are not expressly approved by Hewlett-Packard Company may void the user's authority to
operate the equipment.
Cables
When provided, connections to this device must be made with shielded cables with metallic RFI/EMI
connector hoods in order to maintain compliance with FCC Rules and Regulations.
Canadian notice (Avis Canadien)
Class A equipment
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la class A respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel
brouilleur du Canada.
Class B equipment
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la class B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel
brouilleur du Canada.
European Union notice
This product complies with the following EU directives:
•
Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC
•
EMC Directive 2004/108/EC
Compliance with these directives implies conformity to applicable harmonized European standards
(European Norms) which are listed on the EU Declaration of Conformity issued by Hewlett-Packard
for this product or product family.
Canadian notice (Avis Canadien)
111
This compliance is indicated by the following conformity marking placed on the product:
This marking is valid for non-Telecom products and EU
harmonized Telecom products (e.g., Bluetooth).
Certificates can be obtained from http://www.hp.com/go/certificates.
Hewlett-Packard GmbH, HQ-TRE, Herrenberger Strasse 140, 71034 Boeblingen, Germany
Japanese notices
Japanese VCCI-A notice
Japanese VCCI-B notice
Japanese VCCI marking
Japanese power cord statement
Korean notices
Class A equipment
112
Regulatory compliance notices
Class B equipment
Taiwanese notices
BSMI Class A notice
Taiwan battery recycle statement
Turkish recycling notice
Türkiye Cumhuriyeti: EEE Yönetmeliğine Uygundur
Vietnamese Information Technology and Communications compliance
marking
Taiwanese notices
113
Laser compliance notices
English laser notice
This device may contain a laser that is classified as a Class 1 Laser Product in accordance with
U.S. FDA regulations and the IEC 60825-1. The product does not emit hazardous laser radiation.
WARNING! Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those
specified herein or in the laser product's installation guide may result in hazardous radiation
exposure. To reduce the risk of exposure to hazardous radiation:
•
Do not try to open the module enclosure. There are no user-serviceable components inside.
•
Do not operate controls, make adjustments, or perform procedures to the laser device other
than those specified herein.
•
Allow only HP Authorized Service technicians to repair the unit.
The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
implemented regulations for laser products on August 2, 1976. These regulations apply to laser
products manufactured from August 1, 1976. Compliance is mandatory for products marketed in
the United States.
Dutch laser notice
French laser notice
114
Regulatory compliance notices
German laser notice
Italian laser notice
Japanese laser notice
Laser compliance notices
115
Spanish laser notice
Recycling notices
English recycling notice
Disposal of waste equipment by users in private household in the European Union
This symbol means do not dispose of your product with your other household waste. Instead, you should
protect human health and the environment by handing over your waste equipment to a designated
collection point for the recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment. For more information,
please contact your household waste disposal service
Bulgarian recycling notice
Изхвърляне на отпадъчно оборудване от потребители в частни домакинства в Европейския
съюз
Този символ върху продукта или опаковката му показва, че продуктът не трябва да се изхвърля заедно
с другите битови отпадъци. Вместо това, трябва да предпазите човешкото здраве и околната среда,
като предадете отпадъчното оборудване в предназначен за събирането му пункт за рециклиране на
неизползваемо електрическо и електронно борудване. За допълнителна информация се свържете с
фирмата по чистота, чиито услуги използвате.
Czech recycling notice
Likvidace zařízení v domácnostech v Evropské unii
Tento symbol znamená, že nesmíte tento produkt likvidovat spolu s jiným domovním odpadem. Místo
toho byste měli chránit lidské zdraví a životní prostředí tím, že jej předáte na k tomu určené sběrné
pracoviště, kde se zabývají recyklací elektrického a elektronického vybavení. Pro více informací kontaktujte
společnost zabývající se sběrem a svozem domovního odpadu.
Danish recycling notice
Bortskaffelse af brugt udstyr hos brugere i private hjem i EU
Dette symbol betyder, at produktet ikke må bortskaffes sammen med andet husholdningsaffald. Du skal
i stedet den menneskelige sundhed og miljøet ved at afl evere dit brugte udstyr på et dertil beregnet
indsamlingssted for af brugt, elektrisk og elektronisk udstyr. Kontakt nærmeste renovationsafdeling for
yderligere oplysninger.
116
Regulatory compliance notices
Dutch recycling notice
Inzameling van afgedankte apparatuur van particuliere huishoudens in de Europese Unie
Dit symbool betekent dat het product niet mag worden gedeponeerd bij het overige huishoudelijke afval.
Bescherm de gezondheid en het milieu door afgedankte apparatuur in te leveren bij een hiervoor bestemd
inzamelpunt voor recycling van afgedankte elektrische en elektronische apparatuur. Neem voor meer
informatie contact op met uw gemeentereinigingsdienst.
Estonian recycling notice
Äravisatavate seadmete likvideerimine Euroopa Liidu eramajapidamistes
See märk näitab, et seadet ei tohi visata olmeprügi hulka. Inimeste tervise ja keskkonna säästmise nimel
tuleb äravisatav toode tuua elektriliste ja elektrooniliste seadmete käitlemisega egelevasse kogumispunkti.
Küsimuste korral pöörduge kohaliku prügikäitlusettevõtte poole.
Finnish recycling notice
Kotitalousjätteiden hävittäminen Euroopan unionin alueella
Tämä symboli merkitsee, että laitetta ei saa hävittää muiden kotitalousjätteiden mukana. Sen sijaan sinun
on suojattava ihmisten terveyttä ja ympäristöä toimittamalla käytöstä poistettu laite sähkö- tai
elektroniikkajätteen kierrätyspisteeseen. Lisätietoja saat jätehuoltoyhtiöltä.
French recycling notice
Mise au rebut d'équipement par les utilisateurs privés dans l'Union Européenne
Ce symbole indique que vous ne devez pas jeter votre produit avec les ordures ménagères. Il est de
votre responsabilité de protéger la santé et l'environnement et de vous débarrasser de votre équipement
en le remettant à une déchetterie effectuant le recyclage des équipements électriques et électroniques.
Pour de plus amples informations, prenez contact avec votre service d'élimination des ordures ménagères.
German recycling notice
Entsorgung von Altgeräten von Benutzern in privaten Haushalten in der EU
Dieses Symbol besagt, dass dieses Produkt nicht mit dem Haushaltsmüll entsorgt werden darf. Zum
Schutze der Gesundheit und der Umwelt sollten Sie stattdessen Ihre Altgeräte zur Entsorgung einer dafür
vorgesehenen Recyclingstelle für elektrische und elektronische Geräte übergeben. Weitere Informationen
erhalten Sie von Ihrem Entsorgungsunternehmen für Hausmüll.
Greek recycling notice
Απόρριψη άχρηοτου εξοπλισμού από ιδιώτες χρήστες στην Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση
Αυτό το σύμβολο σημαίνει ότι δεν πρέπει να απορρίψετε το προϊόν με τα λοιπά οικιακά απορρίμματα.
Αντίθετα, πρέπει να προστατέψετε την ανθρώπινη υγεία και το περιβάλλον παραδίδοντας τον άχρηστο
εξοπλισμό σας σε εξουσιοδοτημένο σημείο συλλογής για την ανακύκλωση άχρηστου ηλεκτρικού και
ηλεκτρονικού εξοπλισμού. Για περισσότερες πληροφορίες, επικοινωνήστε με την υπηρεσία απόρριψης
απορριμμάτων της περιοχής σας.
Recycling notices
117
Hungarian recycling notice
A hulladék anyagok megsemmisítése az Európai Unió háztartásaiban
Ez a szimbólum azt jelzi, hogy a készüléket nem szabad a háztartási hulladékkal együtt kidobni. Ehelyett
a leselejtezett berendezéseknek az elektromos vagy elektronikus hulladék átvételére kijelölt helyen történő
beszolgáltatásával megóvja az emberi egészséget és a környezetet.További információt a helyi
köztisztasági vállalattól kaphat.
Italian recycling notice
Smaltimento di apparecchiature usate da parte di utenti privati nell'Unione Europea
Questo simbolo avvisa di non smaltire il prodotto con i normali rifi uti domestici. Rispettare la salute
umana e l'ambiente conferendo l'apparecchiatura dismessa a un centro di raccolta designato per il
riciclo di apparecchiature elettroniche ed elettriche. Per ulteriori informazioni, rivolgersi al servizio per
lo smaltimento dei rifi uti domestici.
Latvian recycling notice
Europos Sąjungos namų ūkio vartotojų įrangos atliekų šalinimas
Šis simbolis nurodo, kad gaminio negalima išmesti kartu su kitomis buitinėmis atliekomis. Kad
apsaugotumėte žmonių sveikatą ir aplinką, pasenusią nenaudojamą įrangą turite nuvežti į elektrinių ir
elektroninių atliekų surinkimo punktą. Daugiau informacijos teiraukitės buitinių atliekų surinkimo tarnybos.
Lithuanian recycling notice
Nolietotu iekārtu iznīcināšanas noteikumi lietotājiem Eiropas Savienības privātajās mājsaimniecībās
Šis simbols norāda, ka ierīci nedrīkst utilizēt kopā ar citiem mājsaimniecības atkritumiem. Jums jārūpējas
par cilvēku veselības un vides aizsardzību, nododot lietoto aprīkojumu otrreizējai pārstrādei īpašā lietotu
elektrisko un elektronisko ierīču savākšanas punktā. Lai iegūtu plašāku informāciju, lūdzu, sazinieties ar
savu mājsaimniecības atkritumu likvidēšanas dienestu.
Polish recycling notice
Utylizacja zużytego sprzętu przez użytkowników w prywatnych gospodarstwach domowych w
krajach Unii Europejskiej
Ten symbol oznacza, że nie wolno wyrzucać produktu wraz z innymi domowymi odpadkami.
Obowiązkiem użytkownika jest ochrona zdrowa ludzkiego i środowiska przez przekazanie zużytego
sprzętu do wyznaczonego punktu zajmującego się recyklingiem odpadów powstałych ze sprzętu
elektrycznego i elektronicznego. Więcej informacji można uzyskać od lokalnej firmy zajmującej wywozem
nieczystości.
118
Regulatory compliance notices
Portuguese recycling notice
Descarte de equipamentos usados por utilizadores domésticos na União Europeia
Este símbolo indica que não deve descartar o seu produto juntamente com os outros lixos domiciliares.
Ao invés disso, deve proteger a saúde humana e o meio ambiente levando o seu equipamento para
descarte em um ponto de recolha destinado à reciclagem de resíduos de equipamentos eléctricos e
electrónicos. Para obter mais informações, contacte o seu serviço de tratamento de resíduos domésticos.
Romanian recycling notice
Casarea echipamentului uzat de către utilizatorii casnici din Uniunea Europeană
Acest simbol înseamnă să nu se arunce produsul cu alte deşeuri menajere. În schimb, trebuie să protejaţi
sănătatea umană şi mediul predând echipamentul uzat la un punct de colectare desemnat pentru reciclarea
echipamentelor electrice şi electronice uzate. Pentru informaţii suplimentare, vă rugăm să contactaţi
serviciul de eliminare a deşeurilor menajere local.
Slovak recycling notice
Likvidácia vyradených zariadení používateľmi v domácnostiach v Európskej únii
Tento symbol znamená, že tento produkt sa nemá likvidovať s ostatným domovým odpadom. Namiesto
toho by ste mali chrániť ľudské zdravie a životné prostredie odovzdaním odpadového zariadenia na
zbernom mieste, ktoré je určené na recykláciu odpadových elektrických a elektronických zariadení.
Ďalšie informácie získate od spoločnosti zaoberajúcej sa likvidáciou domového odpadu.
Spanish recycling notice
Eliminación de los equipos que ya no se utilizan en entornos domésticos de la Unión Europea
Este símbolo indica que este producto no debe eliminarse con los residuos domésticos. En lugar de ello,
debe evitar causar daños a la salud de las personas y al medio ambiente llevando los equipos que no
utilice a un punto de recogida designado para el reciclaje de equipos eléctricos y electrónicos que ya
no se utilizan. Para obtener más información, póngase en contacto con el servicio de recogida de
residuos domésticos.
Swedish recycling notice
Hantering av elektroniskt avfall för hemanvändare inom EU
Den här symbolen innebär att du inte ska kasta din produkt i hushållsavfallet. Värna i stället om natur
och miljö genom att lämna in uttjänt utrustning på anvisad insamlingsplats. Allt elektriskt och elektroniskt
avfall går sedan vidare till återvinning. Kontakta ditt återvinningsföretag för mer information.
Recycling notices
119
Battery replacement notices
Dutch battery notice
French battery notice
120 Regulatory compliance notices
German battery notice
Italian battery notice
Battery replacement notices
121
Japanese battery notice
Spanish battery notice
122
Regulatory compliance notices
B Non-standard rack specifications
This appendix provides information on the requirements when installing the EVA4400 in a
non-standard rack. All the requirements must be met to ensure proper operation of the storage
system.
Internal component envelope
EVA component mounting brackets require space to be mounted behind the vertical mounting rails.
Room for the mounting of the brackets includes the width of the mounting rails and needed room
for any mounting hardware, such as screws and clip nuts. Figure 39 (page 123) shows the dimensions
required for the mounting space for the EVA product line. It does not show required space for
additional HP components such as servers.
Figure 39 Mounting space dimensions
EIA310-D standards
The rack must meet the Electronic Industries Association, (EIA), Standard 310-D, Cabinets, Racks
and Associated Equipment. The standard defines rack mount spacing and component dimensions
specified in U units.
Copies of the standard are available for purchase at http://www.eia.org/.
EVA cabinet measures and tolerances
EVA component rack mount brackets are designed to fit cabinets with mounting rails set at depths
from 28.25 inches to 29.6 inches, inside rails to inside rails.
Weights, dimensions and component CG measurements
Cabinet CG dimensions are reported as measured from the inside bottom of the cabinet (Z), the
leading edge of the vertical mounting rails (Y), and the centerline of the cabinet mounting space
(X). Component CG measurements are measured from the bottom of the U space the component
is to occupy (Z), the mounting surface of the mounting flanges (Y), and the centerline of the
component (X).
Determining the CG of a configuration may be necessary for safety considerations. CG
considerations for CG calculations do not include cables, PDUs and other peripheral components.
Some consideration should be made to allow for some margin of safety when estimating
configuration CG.
Estimating the configuration CG requires measuring the CG of the cabinet the product will be
installed in. Use the following formula:
Internal component envelope
123
ΣdcomponentW = dsystem cgW
where dcomponent= the distance of interest and W = Weight
The distance of a component is its CG’s distance from the inside base of the cabinet. For example,
if a loaded disk enclosure is to be installed into the cabinet with its bottom at 10U, the distance
for the enclosure would be (10*1.75)+2.7 inches.
Airflow and recirculation
Component airflow requirements
Component airflow must be directed from the front of the cabinet to the rear. Components vented
to discharge airflow from the sides must discharge to the rear of the cabinet.
Rack airflow requirements
The following requirements must be met to ensure adequate airflow and to prevent damage to the
equipment:
•
If the rack includes closing front and rear doors, leave 830 inches2 (5,350 cm2) of open
space evenly distributed from top to bottom to permit adequate airflow (equivalent to the
required 64% open area for ventilation).
•
For side vented components, the clearance between the installed rack component and the
side panels of the rack must be a minimum of 2.75 inches (7 cm).
•
Always use blank panels to fill empty front panel U-spaces in the rack. This ensures proper
airflow. Using a rack without blank panels results in improper cooling that can lead to thermal
damage.
Configuration standards
EVA configurations are designed considering cable length, configuration CG, serviceability and
accessibility, and to allow for easy expansion of the system. If at all possible, it is best to configure
non-HP cabinets in a like manner.
UPS selection
This section provides information that can be used when selecting a UPS for use with the EVA. The
four HP UPS products listed in Table 22 (page 124) are available for use with the EVA and are
included in this comparison. Table 23 (page 124) identifies the amount of time each UPS can sustain
power under varying loads and with various UPS ERM (Extended Runtime Module) options.
NOTE:
The specified power requirements reflect fully loaded enclosures (14 disks) .
Table 22 HP UPS models and capacities
UPS Model
Capacity (in watts)
R1500
1,340
R3000
2,700
R5500
4,500
R12000
12,000
Table 23 UPS operating time limits
Minutes of operation
Load (percent)
With standby battery
With 1 ERM
With 2 ERMs
23
49
R1500
100
124
Non-standard rack specifications
5
Table 23 UPS operating time limits (continued)
Minutes of operation
Load (percent)
With standby battery
With 1 ERM
With 2 ERMs
80
6
32
63
50
13
57
161
20
34
146
290
R3000
100
5
20
80
6.5
30
50
12
45
20
40
120
R5500
100
7
24
46
80
9
31
60
50
19
61
106
20
59
169
303
R12000
100
5
11
18
80
7
15
24
50
14
28
41
20
43
69
101
Shock and vibration specifications
Table 24 (page 125) lists the product operating shock and vibration specifications. This information
applies to products weighing 45 Kg (100 lbs) or less.
NOTE: HP EVA products are designed and tested to withstand the operational shock and vibration
limits specified in Table 24 (page 125). Transmission of site vibrations through non-HP racks
exceeding these limits could cause operational failures of the system components.
Table 24 Operating shock/vibration
Shock test with half sine pulses of 10 G magnitude and 10 ms duration applied in all three axes (both positive and
negative directions).
Sine sweep vibration from 5 Hz to 500 Hz to 5 Hz at 0.1 G peak, with 0.020” displacement limitation below 10
Hz. Sweep rate of 1 octave/minute. Test performed in all three axes.
Random vibration at 0.25 G rms level with uniform spectrum in the frequency range of 10 to 500 Hz. Test performed
for two minutes each in all three axes.
Drives and other items exercised and monitored running appropriate exerciser (UIOX, P-Suite, etc.) with appropriate
operating system and hardware.
Shock and vibration specifications
125
Glossary
This glossary defines terms used in this guide or related to this product and is not a
comprehensive glossary of computer terms.
Symbols and numbers
3U
A unit of measurement representing three “U” spaces. “U” spacing is used to designate panel or
enclosure heights. Three “U” spaces is equivalent to 133 mm (5.25 inches).
See also rack-mounting unit.
µm
A symbol for micrometer; one millionth of a meter. For example, 50 µm is equivalent to 0.000050
m.
A
active member of
a virtual disk
family
A simulated disk drive created by the controllers as storage for one or more hosts. An active
member of a virtual disk family is accessible by one or more hosts for normal storage. An active
virtual disk member and its snapshot, if one exists, constitute a virtual disk family. An active
member of a virtual disk family is the only necessary member of a virtual disk family.
See also virtual disk,virtual disk copy,virtual disk family, and snapshot .
adapter
See controller.
AL_PA
Arbitrated loop physical address. A 1-byte value the arbitrated loop topology uses to identify the
loop ports. This value becomes the last byte of the address identifier for each public port on the
loop.
allocation policy
The storage system rules that govern how virtual disks are created. There are two rules:
•
Allocate Completely—The space a virtual disk requires on the physical disks is reserved,
even if the virtual disk is not currently using the space.
•
Allocate on Demand—The space a virtual disk requires on the physical disks is not reserved
until needed.
ALUA
Asymmetric logical unit access. Operating systems that support asymmetric logical unit access
work with the array’s active/active functionality to enable any virtual disk to be accessed through
either of the array’s two controllers.
ambient
temperature
The air temperature in the area where a system is installed. Also called intake temperature or
room temperature.
ANSI
American National Standards Institute. A non-governmental organization that develops standards
(such as SCSI I/O interface standards and Fibre Channel interface standards) used voluntarily
by many manufacturers within the United States.
arbitrated loop
A Fibre Channel topology that links multiple ports (up to 126) together on a single shared simplex
medium. Transmissions can only occur between a single pair of nodes at any given time.
Arbitration is the scheme that determines which node has control of the loop at any given moment
arbitrated loop
physical address
See AL_PA.
arbitrated loop
topology
See arbitrated loop.
array
synonym of storage array, storage system, and virtual array. A group of disks in one or more
disk enclosures combined with controller software that presents disk storage capacity as one or
more virtual disks.
array controller
See controller.
array controller
failover
The process that takes place when one controller assumes the workload of a failed companion
controller.
asynchronous
Events scheduled as the result of a signal requesting the event or that which is without any specified
time relation.
126
Glossary
B
backplane
An electronic printed circuit board that distributes data, control, power, and other signals among
components in an enclosure.
bad block
A data block that contains a physical defect.
bad block
replacement
A replacement routine that substitutes defect-free disk blocks for those found to have defects. This
process takes place in the controller and is transparent to the host.
bail lock
The part of the power supply AC receptacle that engages the AC power cord connector to ensure
that the cord cannot be accidentally disconnected.
battery
A rechargeable unit mounted within a controller enclosure that supplies backup power to the
cache module in case of primary power shortage.
baud
The maximum rate of signal state changes per second on a communication circuit. If each signal
state change corresponds to a code bit, then the baud rate and the bit rate are the same. It is
also possible for signal state changes to correspond to more than one code bit so the baud rate
may be lower than the code bit rate.
bay
The physical location of an element, such as a drive, I/O module, EMU or power supply in a
drive enclosure. Each bay is numbered to define its location.
bidirectional
Also called Bi-Di. The movement of optical signals in opposite directions through a common fiber
cable such as the data flow path typically on a parallel printer port. A parallel port can provide
two-way data flow for disk drives, scanning devices, FAX operations and even parallel modems.
block
Also called a sector. The smallest collection of consecutive bytes addressable on a disk drive. In
integrated storage elements, a block contains 512 bytes of data, error codes, flags, and the
block address header.
blower
See fan.
C
cabinet
An alternate term used for a rack.
cable assembly
A fiber optic cable that has connectors installed on one or both ends. General use of these cable
assemblies includes the interconnection of multimode fiber optic cable assemblies with either LC
or SC type connectors.
•
When there is a connector on only one end of the cable, the cable assembly is referred to
as a pigtail.
•
When there is a connector on each end of the cable, the cable assembly is referred to as
a jumper.
CAC
Corrective Action Code. An HP P6000 Command View graphical user interface (GUI) display
component that defines the action required to correct a problem.
cache
High-speed memory that sets aside data as an intermediate data buffer between a host and the
storage media. The purpose of cache is to improve performance.
cache battery
See battery.
carrier
A drive enclosure-compatible assembly containing a disk drive or other storage devices.
client
An intelligent device that requests services from other intelligent devices. In the context of HP
P6000 Command View, a client is a computer that is used to access the software remotely using
a supported browser.
clone
A full copy of a volume usable by an application.
communication
LUN
See console LUN.
condition report
A three-element code generated by the EMU in the form where e.t. is the element type (a
hexadecimal number), en. is the element number (a decimal number), and ec is the condition
code (a decimal number).
console LUN
A SCSI-3 virtual object that makes a controller pair accessible by the host before any virtual disks
are created. Also called a communication LUN.
127
console LUN ID
The ID that can be assigned when a host operating system requires a unique ID. The console
LUN ID is assigned by the user, usually when the storage system is initialized.
controller
A hardware/firmware device that manages communications between host systems and other
devices. Controllers typically differ by the type of interface to the host and provide functions
beyond those the devices support.
controller
enclosure
A unit that holds one or more controllers, power supplies, blowers or fans, cache batteries,
transceivers, and connectors.
controller event
A significant occurrence involving any storage system hardware or software component reported
by the controller to HP P6000 Command View.
controller pair
Two connected controller modules that control a disk array.
corrective action
code
See CAC.
CRITICAL Condition
A drive enclosure EMU condition that occurs when one or more drive enclosure elements have
failed or are operating outside of their specifications. The failure of the element makes continued
normal operation of at least some elements in the enclosure impossible. Some enclosure elements
may be able to continue normal operations. Only an UNRECOVERABLE condition has precedence.
This condition has precedence over NONCRITICAL errors and INFORMATION condition.
CRU
Customer replaceable unit. A storage system element that a user can replace without using special
tools or techniques, or special training.
customer
replaceable unit
See CRU.
D
data entry mode
The state in which controller information can be displayed or controller configuration data can
be entered. On the Enterprise Storage System, the controller mode is active when the LCD on the
HSV Controller OCP is Flashing.
default disk group
The disk group that is created when the array is initialized. The minimum number of disks the
group can contain is eight. The maximum is the number of installed disks.
Detailed Fault
View
An HSV Controller OCP display that permits a user to view detailed information about a controller
fault.
device channel
A channel used to connect storage devices to a host I/O bus adapter or intelligent controller.
device ports
The controller pair device ports connected to the storage system’s physical disk drive array through
the Fibre Channel drive enclosure. Also called a device-side port.
device-side ports
See device ports.
DIMM
Dual inline memory module. A small circuit board holding memory chips.
dirty data
The write-back cached data that has not been written to storage media even though the host
operation processing the data has completed.
disk drive
A carrier-mounted storage device supporting random access to fixed size blocks of data.
disk drive blank
A carrier that replaces a disk drive to control airflow within a drive enclosure whenever there is
less than a full complement of storage devices.
disk drive
enclosure
A unit that holds storage system devices such as disk drives, power supplies, fans, I/O modules,
and transceivers.
disk failure
protection
A method by which a controller pair reserves drive capacity to take over the functionality of a
failed or failing physical disk. For each disk group, the controllers reserve space in the physical
disk pool equivalent to the selected number of physical disk drives.
disk group
A named group of disks selected from all the available disks in a disk array. One or more virtual
disks can be created from a disk group. Also refers to the physical disk locations associated with
a parity group.
128
Glossary
disk migration
state
A physical disk drive operating state. A physical disk drive can be in a stable or migration state:
•
Stable—The state in which the physical disk drive has no failure nor is a failure predicted.
•
Migration—The state in which the disk drive is failing, or failure is predicted to be imminent.
Data is then moved off the disk onto other disk drives in the same disk group.
disk replacement
delay
The time that elapses between a drive failure and when the controller starts searching for spare
disk space. Drive replacement seldom starts immediately in case the “failure” was a glitch or
temporary condition.
DR group failover
An operation that reverses data replication direction so that the destination becomes the source
and the source becomes the destination. Failovers can be planned or unplanned and can occur
between DR groups or managed sets (which are sets of DR groups).
drive enclosure
event
A significant operational occurrence involving a hardware or software component in the drive
enclosure. The drive enclosure EMU reports these events to the controller for processing.
dual fabric
Two independent fabrics providing multipath connections between Fibre Channel end devices.
dual power supply
configuration
See redundant power configuration.
dual-loop
A configuration where each drive is connected to a pair of controllers through two loops. These
two Fibre Channel loops constitute a loop pair.
dynamic capacity
expansion
A storage system feature that provides the ability to increase the size of an existing virtual disk.
Before using this feature, you must ensure that your operating system supports capacity expansion
of a virtual disk (or LUN).
E
EIA
Electronic Industries Alliance. A standards organization specializing in the electrical and functional
characteristics of interface equipment.
EIP
Event Information Packet. The event information packet is an HSV element hexadecimal character
display that defines how an event was detected. Also called the EIP type.
electromagnetic
interference
See EMI.
electrostatic
discharge
See ESD.
element
In a disk enclosure, a device such as a, power supply, disk, fan/blower, or I/O module. The
object can be controllled, interrogated, or described by the enclosure services process.
EMI
Electromagnetic Interference. The impairment of a signal by an electromagnetic disturbance.
EMU
Environmental Monitoring Unit. An element which monitors the status of an enclosure, including
the power, air temperature, and blower status. The EMU detects problems and displays and
reports these conditions to a user and the controller. In some cases, the EMU implements corrective
action.
enclosure
A unit used to hold various storage system devices such as disk drives, controllers, power supplies,
I/O modules, or fans/blowers.
enclosure address
bus
An Enterprise storage system bus that interconnects and identifies controller enclosures and disk
drive enclosures by their physical location. Enclosures within a reporting group can exchange
environmental data. This bus uses enclosure ID expansion cables to assign enclosure numbers to
each enclosure. Communications over this bus do not involve the Fibre Channel drive enclosure
bus and are, therefore, classified as out-of-band communications.
enclosure number
(En)
One of the vertical rack-mounting positions where the enclosure is located. The positions are
numbered sequentially in decimal numbers starting from the bottom of the cabinet. Each disk
enclosure has its own enclosure number. A controller pair shares an enclosure number. If the
system has an expansion rack, the enclosures in the expansion rack are numbered from 15 to
24, starting at the bottom.
enclosure services
Those services that establish the mechanical environmental, electrical environmental, and external
indicators and controls for the proper operation and maintenance of devices with an enclosure
129
as described in the SES SCSI-3 Enclosure Services Command Set (SES), Rev 8b, American National
Standard for Information Services.
Enclosure Services
Interface
See ESI.
Enclosure Services
Processor
See ESP.
environmental
monitoring unit
See EMU.
error code
The portion of an EMU condition report that defines a problem.
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge. The emission of a potentially harmful static electric voltage as a result of
improper grounding.
ESI
Enclosure Services Interface. The SCSI-3 engineering services interface implementation developed
for storage products. A bus that connects the EMU to the disk drives.
ESP
Enclosure Services Processor. An EMU that implements an enclosure’s services process.
event
Any significant change in the state of the Enterprise storage system hardware or software
component reported by the controller to HP P6000 Command View.
See also controller event, drive enclosure event, management agent event, and termination event.
Event Information
Packet
See EIP.
Event Number
A sequential number assigned to each Software Code Identification (SWCID) event. It is a decimal
number in the range 0-255.
Evt No.
See Event Number.
exabyte
A unit of storage capacity that is the equivalent of 260 bytes or 1,152,921,504,606,846,976
bytes. One exabyte is equivalent to 1,024 petabytes.
F
fabric
A network of Fibre Channel switches or hubs and other devices.
fabric port
A port which is capable of supporting an attached arbitrated loop. This port on a loop will have
the AL_PA hexadecimal address 00 (loop ID 7E), giving the fabric the highest priority access to
the loop. A loop port is the gateway to the fabric for the node ports on a loop.
failover
See array controller failover or DR group failover.
failsafe
A safe state that devices automatically enter after a malfunction. Failsafe DR groups stop accepting
host input and stop logging write history if a group member becomes unavailable.
fan
The variable speed airflow device that cools an enclosure or component by forcing ambient air
into an enclosure or component and forcing heated air out the other side.
FATA
Fibre Attached Technology Adapted disk drive.
Fault Management
Code
See FMC.
FC HBA
Fibre Channel Host Bus Adapter.
See also FCA.
FCA
Fibre Channel Adapter.
See also FC HBA.
FCC
Federal Communications Commission. The federal agency responsible for establishing standards
and approving electronic devices within the United States.
FCP
Fibre Channel Protocol.
fiber
The optical media used to implement Fibre Channel.
fiber optic cable
A transmission medium designed to transmit digital signals in the form of pulses of light. Fiber
optic cable is noted for its properties of electrical isolation and resistance to electrostatic
contamination.
130 Glossary
fiber optics
The technology where light is transmitted through glass or plastic (optical) threads (fibers) for data
communication or signaling purposes.
Fibre Channel
A data transfer architecture designed for mass storage devices and other peripheral devices that
require high bandwidth.
Fibre Channel
adapter
See FCA.
Fibre Channel
drive enclosure
An enclosure that provides 12-port central interconnect for Fibre Channel arbitrated loops following
the ANSI Fibre Channel disk enclosure standard.
Fibre Channel Loop
Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop. The American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) document
that specifies arbitrated loop topology operation.
field replaceable
unit
See FRU.
flush
The act of writing dirty data from cache to a storage media.
FMC
Fault Management Code. The HP P6000 Command View display of the Enterprise Storage System
error condition information.
form factor
A storage industry dimensional standard for 3.5 inch (89 mm) and 5.25 inch (133 mm) high
storage devices. Device heights are specified as low-profile (1 inch or 25.4 mm), half-height (1.6
inch or 41 mm), and full-height (5.25 inch or 133 mm).
FPGA
Field Programmable Gate Array. A programmable device with an internal array of logic blocks
surrounded by a ring of programmable I/O blocks connected together through a programmable
interconnect.
frequency
The number of cycles that occur in one second expressed in Hertz (Hz). Thus, 1 Hz is equivalent
to one cycle per second.
FRU
Field replaceable unit. An assembly component that is designed to be replaced on site, without
the system having to be returned to the manufacturer for repair.
G
Giga (G)
The notation to represent 109 or 1 billion (1,000,000,000).
gigabaud
An encoded bit transmission rate of one billion (109) bits per second.
H
HBA
Host Bus Adapter.
host
A computer that runs user applications and uses the information stored on an array.
Host Bus Adapter
Host bus adapter.
host computer
See host.
host link indicator
The HSV Controller display that indicates the status of the storage system Fibre Channel links.
host ports
A connection point to one or more hosts through a Fibre Channel fabric.
host-side ports
See host ports.
hot-pluggable
The ability to add and remove elements or devices to a system or appliance while the appliance
is running and have the operating system automatically recognize the change.
hub
A communications infrastructure device to which nodes on a multi-point bus or loop are physically
connected. It is used to improve the manageability of physical cables.
I
I/O module
Input/Output module. The enclosure element that is the Fibre Channel drive enclosure interface
to the host or controller.
IDX
A 2-digit decimal number portion of the HSV controller termination code display that defines one
of 32 locations in the Termination Code array that contains information about a specific event.
in-band
communication
The communication that uses the same communications channel as the operational data.
131
INFORMATION
condition
A drive enclosure EMU condition that may require action. This condition is for information purposes
only and does not indicate the failure of an element.
initialization
A configuration step that binds the controllers together and establishes preliminary data structures
on the array. Initialization also sets up the first disk group, called the default disk group, and
makes the array ready for use.
input/output
module
See I/O module.
intake temperature
See ambient temperature.
interface
A set of protocols used between components such as cables, connectors, and signal levels.
J
JBOD
Just a Bunch of Disks.
L
laser
A device that amplifies light waves and concentrates them in a narrow, very intense beam.
Last Fault View
An HSV Controller display defining the last reported fault condition.
Last Termination
Error Array
See LTEA.
license key
A WWN-encoded sequence that is obtained from the license key fulfillment website.
link
1.
2.
logon
A procedure whereby a user or network connection is identified as being an authorized network
user or participant.
loop
See arbitrated loop.
loop ID
Seven-bit values numbered contiguous from 0 to 126 decimal that represent the 127 valid AL-PA
values on a loop. (With Fibre Channel, not all 256 hexadecimal values are allowed as AL-PA
values.)
loop pair
A Fibre Channel attachment between a controller and physical disk drives. Physical disk drives
connect to controllers through paired Fibre Channel arbitrated loops. There are two loop pairs,
designated loop pair 1 and loop pair 2. Each loop pair consists of two loops (called loop A and
loop B) that operate independently during normal operation, but provide mutual backup in case
one loop fails.
LTEA
Last termination event array. A two-digit HSV Controller number that identifies a specific event
that terminated an operation. Valid numbers range from 00 to 47.
LUN
Logical unit number. A LUN results from mapping a SCSI logical unit number, port ID, and LDEV
ID to a RAID group. The size of the LUN is determined by the emulation mode of the LDEV and
the number of LDEVs associated with the LUN. For example, a LUN associated with two OPEN-3
LDEVs has a size of 4,693 MB.
A connection of ports on fibre channel devices.
A full duplex connection to a fabric or a simplex connection of loop devices.
M
management
agent
The HP P6000 Command View software that controls and monitors the HP Enterprise storage
system. The software can exist on more than one management server in a fabric. Each installation
is a management agent.
management
agent event
A significant occurrence to or within the management agent software, or an initialized storage
cell controlled or monitored by the management agent.
mean time
between failures
See MTBF.
Mega
A notation denoting a multiplier of 1 million (1,000,000).
metadata
The data in the first sectors of a disk drive that the system uses to identify virtual disk members.
micro meter
See µm.
132
Glossary
mirrored caching
A process in which half of each controller’s write cache mirrors the companion controller’s write
cache. The total memory available for cached write data is reduced by half, but the level of
protection is greater.
mirroring
The act of creating an exact copy or image of data.
MTBF
Mean time between failures. The average time from start of use to first failure in a large population
of identical systems, components, or devices.
multi-mode fiber
A fiber optic cable with a diameter large enough (50 microns or more) to allow multiple streams
of light to travel different paths from the transmitter to the receiver. This transmission mode enables
bidirectional transmissions.
N
near-online
storage
On-site storage of data on media that takes slightly longer to access than online storage kept on
high-speed disk drives.
Network Storage
Controller
See NSC.
node port
A device port that can operate on the arbitrated loop topology.
non-OFC (Open
Fibre Control)
A laser transceiver whose lower-intensity output does not require special open fibre channel
mechanisms for eye protection. The HP Enterprise Storage System transceivers are non-OFC
compatible.
NONCRITICAL
Condition
An EMU condition that occurs when one or more elements in the drive enclosure fail or are
operating outside specifications. The failure does not affect operation of the enclosure; all devices
in the enclosure continue to operate according to specifications. If there are additional failures,
however, the devices may not operate properly. UNRECOVERABLE and CRITICAL errors take
precedence over this condition. This condition takes precedence over the INFORMATION
condition. Early correction can prevent the loss of data.
NSC
Network storage controller. The HSV controllers used by the HP Enterprise Storage System.
NVRAM
Nonvolatile Random Access Memory. Memory whose contents are not lost when a system is
turned Off or if there is a power failure. This is achieved through the use of UPS batteries or
implementation technology such as flash memory. NVRAM is commonly used to store important
configuration parameters.
O
occupancy alarm
level
A percentage of the total disk group capacity in blocks. When the number of blocks in the disk
group that contain user data reaches this level, an event code is generated. The alarm level is
specified by the user.
OCP
Operator Control Panel. The element that displays the controller’s status using indicators and an
LCD. Information selection and data entry is controlled by the OCP pushbutton.
online storage
An allotment of storage space that is available for immediate use, such as a peripheral device
that is turned on and connected to a server.
operator control
panel
See OCP.
P
param
password
That portion of the HP HSV controller termination code display that defines:
•
The two-character parameter identifier that is a decimal number in the 0 through 31 range.
•
The eight-character parameter code that is a hexadecimal number.
A security interlock where the purpose is to allow:
•
A management agent to control only certain storage systems
•
Only certain management agents to control a storage system
133
PDM
Power distribution module. A thermal circuit breaker-equipped power strip that distributes power
from a PDU to HP Enterprise Storage System elements.
PDU
Power distribution unit. The rack device that distributes conditioned AC or DC power within a
rack.
petabyte
A unit of storage capacity that is the equivalent of 250, 1,125,899,906,842,624 bytes or 1,024
terabytes.
physical disk
A disk drive mounted in a drive enclosure that communicates with a controller pair through the
device-side fibre channel loops. A physical disk is hardware with embedded software, as opposed
to a virtual disk, which is constructed by the controllers. Only the controllers can communicate
directly with the physical disks.
The physical disks, in aggregate, are called the array and constitute the storage pool from which
the controllers create virtual disks.
physical disk array
See array.
port
A physical connection that allows data to pass between a host and a disk array.
port-colored
Pertaining to the application of the color of port or red wine to a CRU tab, lever, or handle to
identify the unit as hot-pluggable.
port_name
A 64-bit unique identifier assigned to each fibre channel port. The port_name is communicated
during the login and port discovery processes.
power distribution
module
See PDM.
power distribution
unit
See PDU.
power supply
An element that develops DC voltages for operating the storage system elements from either an
AC or DC source.
preferred address
An AL_PA which a node port attempts to acquire during loop initialization.
preferred path
A preference for which controller of the controller pair manages the virtual disk. This preference
is set by the user when creating the virtual disk. A host can change the preferred path of a virtual
disk at any time. The primary purpose of preferring a path is load balancing.
protocol
The conventions or rules for the format and timing of messages sent and received.
Q
quiesce
The act of rendering bus activity inactive or dormant. For example, “quiesce the SCSI bus
operations during a device warm-swap.”
R
rack
A floorstanding structure primarily designed for, and capable of, holding and supporting storage
system equipment. All racks provide for the mounting of panels per Electronic Industries Alliance
(EIA) Standard RS310C.
rack-mounting unit
A measurement for rack heights based upon a repeating hole pattern. It is expressed as “U”
spacing or panel heights. Repeating hole patterns are spaced every 44.45 mm (1.75 inches)
and based on EIA’s Standard RS310C. For example, a 3U unit is 133.35 mm (5.25 inches)
high, and a 4U unit is 177.79 mm (7.0 inches) high.
read ahead
caching
A cache management method used to decrease the subsystem response time to a read request
by allowing the controller to satisfy the request from the cache memory rather than from the disk
drives.
read caching
A cache method used to decrease subsystem response times to a read request by allowing the
controller to satisfy the request from the cache memory rather than from the disk drives. Reading
data from cache memory is faster than reading data from a disk. The read cache is specified as
either On or Off for each virtual disk. The default state is on.
reconstruction
The process of regenerating the contents of a failed member data. The reconstruction process
writes the data to a spare set disk and incorporates the spare set disk into the mirrorset, striped
mirrorset or RAID set from which the failed member came.
134
Glossary
redundancy
1.
2.
Element Redundancy—The degree to which logical or physical elements are protected by
having another element that can take over in case of failure. For example, each loop of a
device-side loop pair normally works independently but can take over for the other in case
of failure.
Data Redundancy—The level to which user data is protected. Redundancy is directly
proportional to cost in terms of storage usage; the greater the level of data protection, the
more storage space is required.
redundant power
configuration
A capability of the HP Enterprise Storage System racks and enclosures to allow continuous system
operation by preventing single points of power failure.
reporting group
An Enterprise Storage System controller pair and the associated disk drive enclosures. The
Enterprise Storage System controller assigns a unique decimal reporting group number to each
EMU on its loops. Each EMU collects disk drive environmental information from its own
sub-enclosure and broadcasts the data over the enclosure address bus to all members of the
reporting group. Information from enclosures in other reporting groups is ignored.
RoHS
Reduction of Hazardous Substances.
room temperature
See ambient temperature.
RPO
Recovery point objective. The maximum age of the data you want the ability to restore in the
event of a disaster. For example, if your RPO is six hours, you want to be able to restore systems
back to the state they were in as of no longer than six hours ago. To achieve this objective, you
need to make backups or other data copies at least every six hours.
S
SCSI-3
The ANSI standard that defines the operation and function of fibre channel systems.
SCSI-3 Enclosure
Services
See SES.
selective
presentation
The process whereby a controller presents a virtual disk only to the host computer which is
authorized access.
serial transmission
A method of transmission where each bit of information is sent sequentially on a single channel,
not simultaneously on all channels as occurs in parallel transmission.
SES
SCSI-3 Enclosures Services. Those services that establish the mechanical environment, electrical
environment, and external indicators and controls for the proper operation and maintenance of
devices within an enclosure.
SFP
Small form-factor pluggable transceiver.
solid state disk
(SSD)
A high-performance storage device that contains no moving parts. SSD components include either
DRAM or EEPROM memory boards, a memory bus board, a CPU, and a battery card.
SSN
Storage system name. A unique 20-character name, assigned by HP P6000 Command View,
that identifies a storage system.
storage carrier
See carrier.
storage pool
The aggregated blocks of available storage in the total physical disk array.
storage system
See array.
Storage System
Name
See SSN.
switch
An electro-mechanical device that initiates an action or completes a circuit.
T
TC
Termination Code. An eight-character hexadecimal display that identifies why controller operations
have halted.
Termination Code
See TC.
termination event
The occurrences that cause the storage system to cease operation.
terminator
Interconnected elements that form the ends of the transmission lines in the enclosure address bus.
135
topology
An interconnection scheme that allows multiple Fibre Channel ports to communicate. Point-to-point,
arbitrated loop, and ed fabric are all Fibre Channel topologies.
transceiver
The device that converts electrical signals to optical signals at the point where the fiber cables
connect to the fibre channel elements such as hubs, controllers, or adapters.
U
UID
Unit identification.
uninitialized
system
A state in which the storage system is not ready for use.
UNRECOVERABLE
Condition
An EMU condition that occurs when one or more elements in the drive enclosure have failed and
have disabled the enclosure. The enclosure may not be able to recover or bypass the failure; this
will require repairs to correct the condition. This is the highest-level condition. It takes precedence
over all other errors and requires immediate corrective action.
unwritten cached
data
Also known as unflushed data.
See also dirty data.
UPS
Uninterruptible power supply. A battery-operated power supply guaranteed to provide power to
an electrical device in the event of an unexpected interruption to the primary power supply.
Uninterruptible power supplies are usually rated by the amount of voltage supplied and the length
of time the voltage is supplied.
UUID
Unique universal identifier. A unique 128-bit identifier for each component of an array. UUIDs
are internal system values that users cannot modify.
V
virtual disk
Variable disk capacity that is defined and managed by the array controller and presentable to
hosts as a disk.
virtual disk family
A virtual disk and its snapshot, if a snapshot exists, constitute a family. The original virtual disk
is called the active disk. When you first create a virtual disk family, the only member is the active
disk.
Vraid0
Optimized for I/O speed and efficient use of physical disk space, but provides no data
redundancy.
Vraid1
Optimized for data redundancy and I/O speed, but uses the most physical disk space.
Vraid5
Provides a balance of data redundancy, I/O speed, and efficient use of physical disk space.
Vraid6
Offers the features of Vraid5 while providing more protection for an additional drive failure, but
uses additional physical disk space.
W
World Wide Name
See WWN.
write back caching
A controller process that notifies the host that the write operation is complete when the data is
written to the cache. This occurs before transferring the data to the disk. Write back caching
improves response time since the write operation completes as soon as the data reaches the
cache. As soon as possible after caching the data, the controller then writes the data to the disk
drives.
write caching
A process when the host sends a write request to the controller, and the controller places the data
in the controller cache module. As soon as possible, the controller transfers the data to the physical
disk drives.
WWN
World Wide Name. A unique identifier assigned to a Fibre Channel device.
136
Glossary
Index
A
AC power
distributing, 20
accessing
multipathing, 41
Secure Path, 41
adding
hosts, 47
adding hosts, 42
B
bad image header, 102
bad image segment, 103
bad image size, 103
battery replacement notices, 120
bays
locating, 10
numbering, 10
bidirectional operation, 11
C
cabling controller, 19
Cache batteries failed or missing, 101
Canadian notice, 111
configuration
physical layout, 9
configuring EVA, 58
configuring the ESX server, 58
connection suspended, 102
connectivity
verifying, 60
connectors
power IEC 309 receptacle, 21
power NEMA L5-30R, 21
power NEMA L6-30R, 21
protecting, 39
controller
cabling, 19
connectors, 19
defined, 9
HSV300, 9
HSV300–S, 15
conventions
document, 108
text symbols, 108
creating virtual disks, 42
creating volume groups, 44
customer self repair, 108
parts list, 71
D
Declaration of Conformity, 111
disk drives
defined, 13
reporting status, 13
disk enclosures
defined, 9
front view, 10
DiskMaxLUN, 60
disks
labeling, 57
partinioning, 57
Disposal of waste equipment, European Union, 116
DMP, 53
document
conventions, 108
prerequisites, 106
documentation
providing feedback, 106
DR group empty, 101
DR group logging, 102
DR group merging, 102
dust covers, using, 40
E
enclosures
bays, 10
Enterprise rack
physical layout, 9
European Union notice, 111
F
fabric setup, 53
FATA drives, using, 27
FC loops, 11
FCA
configuring, 50
configuring QLogic, 52
configuring, Emulex, 50
Federal Communications Commission notice, 110
feedback
documentation, 106
fiber optics
protecting cable connectors, 39
Fibre Channel Disk Enclosure
defined, 9
H
hardware components, 9
help
obtaining, 106
high availability
HSV Controllers, 14
hosts
adding, 47
HP
technical support, 106
HP P6000 Command View
adding hosts with, 42
creating virtual disk with, 42
using, 42
137
HSV Controllers
defined, 9
I
I/O modules
bidirectional, 11
image already loaded, 103
image incompatible with configuration, 102
image too large, 102
image write error, 103
implicit LUN transition, 32
incompatible attribute, 101
invalid
parameter id, 98
quorum configuration, 98
target handle, 98
target id, 98
time, 98
invalid cursor, 100
invalid state, 100
invalid status, 102
invalid target, 100
iopolicy
setting, 54
P
parts
replaceable, 71
password mismatch, 102
PDUs, 20
physical configuration, 9
power connectors
IEC 309 receptacle, 21
NEMA L5-30R, 21
NEMA L6-30R, 21
prerequisites, 106
presenting virtual disks, 42
protecting fiber optic connectors
cleaning supplies, 40
dust covers, 40
proxy reads, 32
Q
qla2300 driver, 52
J
Japanese notices, 112
K
Korean notices, 112
L
laser compliance notices, 114
lock busy, 100
logical disk presented, 100
logical disk sharing, 103
lpfc driver, 50
M
maximum number of objects exceeded, 101
maximum size exceeded, 102
media inaccessible, 98
multipathing
accessing, 41
policy, 59
N
no FC port, 98
no image, 98
no logical disk for Vdisk, 100
no more events, 100
no permission, 98
non-standard rack, specifications, 123
not a loop port, 98
not participating controller, 98
O
object does not exist, 99
objects in use, 98
138
operation rejected, 101
Oracle SAN driver stack, 50
Oracle StorEdge, 50
Traffic Manager, 53
other controller failed, 101
Index
R
rack
defined, 20
non-standard specifications, 123
physical layout, 9
rack configurations, 20
recycling notices, 116
regulatory compliance
Canadian notice, 111
European Union notice, 111
identification numbers, 110
Japanese notices, 112
Korean notices, 112
laser, 114
recycling notices, 116
Taiwanese notices, 113
S
Secure Path
accessing, 41
security credentials invalid, 101
Security credentials needed, 101
slots see enclosures, bays
spare parts, 72
status, disk drives, 13
storage connection down, 101
storage not initialized, 98
storage system racks, defined, 20
Subscriber's choice, HP, 106
symbols in text, 108
system rack configurations, 20
T
Taiwanese notices, 113
technical support
HP, 106
service locator website, 106
text symbols, 108
time not set, 100
timeout, 100
transport error, 100
U
universal disk drives, 13
unknown id, 100
unknown parameter handle, 100
unrecoverable media error, 100
UPS, selecting, 124
V
Vdisk DR group member, 101
Vdisk DR log unit, 101
Vdisk not presented, 101
verifying virtual disks, 55
Veritas Volume Manager, 53
version not supported, 100
vgcreate, 44
virtual disks
configuring, 43, 49, 55
presenting, 42
verifying, 55, 56, 60
VMware
VAAI Plug-in, 61
volume groups, 44
volume is missing, 100
W
websites
customer self repair, 108
HP , 106
HP Subscriber's choice for business, 106
Oracle documentation, 58
Symantec/Veritas, 54
WWLUN ID
identitying, 55
Z
zoning, 53
139
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