HP 5/xx User's manual
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User’s Guide
HP Vectra VL
5/xx Series 4
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Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change
without notice.
Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this
material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard
shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or
consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance,
or use of this material.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of
its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by
copyright. All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be
photocopied, reproduced, or translated to another language without the
prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard Company.
Centronics® is a registered trademark of Centronics Data Computer
Corporation.
Matrox® is a registered trademark of Matrox Electronic Systems Ltd.
MGA™ and Millennium™ are trademarks of Matrox Graphics Inc.
Microsoft® and MS-DOS® are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation. Microsoft Windows®, and Windows® 95 are products of
Microsoft Corporation.
OS/2 is a registered trademark of International Business Machines
corporation.
Novell® and NetWare® are U.S. registered trademarks of Novell, Inc.
PENTIUMTM is a trademark of Intel Corporation.
UNIX® is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories Inc. in
the U.S.A. and other countries.
Hewlett-Packard France
Grenoble Personal Computer Division
Technical Marketing
38053 Grenoble Cedex 9
France
© 1995 Hewlett-Packard Company
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User’s Guide
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Welcome to Your HP Vectra PC
Congratulations on the purchase of your new Hewlett-Packard desktop
PC. Your high-performance PC provides:
• a PentiumTM processor in a Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) socket for
easy processor upgrades
• an integrated level-two cache of 256 KB for high performance
• a main memory of 8 MB or 16 MB, upgradeable to 128 MB
• an Ultra VGA PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) video
controller with 1 MB of video memory upgradeable to 2 MB. Some
models have a Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter board with
2MB as standard, upgradeable to 4MB or 8MB.
• an integrated Enhanced IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics)
controller on the PCI bus supporting Fast IDE and Standard IDE
• three front-access drive shelves (one can be used as an internal
shelf)
• one internal drive shelf
• four free slots for accessory boards:
❒ one 32-bit PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) slot
❒ two 16-bit ISA (Industry Standard Architecture) slots
❒ one combination ISA or PCI slot
• one parallel port, and two serial ports
• preloaded HP utilities to ease system configuration tasks
• BIOS stored in Flash ROM
• BIOS support for ISA “Plug and Play”
• pre-installed Operating system and Software.
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Your HP Vectra has other important attributes:
•
DMI compliant
•
designed for Windows® 95
•
Vectra Ergonomic Power Solution—Windows 95 soft power-down
using the mouse, and keyboard power-on.
•
Energy Star compliant power management.
The PC range described in this manual has a power saving capability
which complies with the Environment Protection Agency’s (EPA) 30
watt maximum power consumption in sleep mode, with the
exception of those models which are fully loaded multimedia PCs.
The fully loaded multimedia PCs also have energy saving capabilities,
but use slightly more than the maximum 30 watt limit in power
saving mode, required for the Energy Star label approval.
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vi Francais
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Contents
1 Setting Up Your PC
Unpacking Your PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Connecting the Mouse, Keyboard, and Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Connecting a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Connecting the Power Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Starting the PC for the First Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Creating Master Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
2 Using Your PC
Starting and Stopping Your PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
The HP Vectra Keyboard for Windows 95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
HP Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Accessing HP User Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Advanced Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Personalizing Your Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
The Desktop Management Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Supported HP Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Removing the Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
Replacing the Cover after Installing Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
Moving and Replacing the Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Replacing the Power Supply after Installing Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Installing Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
Main Memory Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Video Memory Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
28
Installing Accessory Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Configuring Accessory Boards with Plug and Play (Windows 3.11) . . . 31
Configuring non-Plug and Play ISA Accessory Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Installing the Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Installing Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Installing a Flexible Disk Drive or a CD-ROM Drive
in the Middle Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing an IDE Hard Disk Drive in the Rear Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a 3.5-inch Disk Drive in the Bottom Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a 5.25-inch Drive in the Bottom Shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Device or Devices you have installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
38
41
44
46
Installing an Upgrade Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Installing the Security Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Starting the Setup Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the SETUP Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
55
Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
After Installing an IDE Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5 Troubleshooting Your PC
Solving Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
If Your PC Does Not Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
If Your Display is Blank and There Are No Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . 67
If you are Unable to Change any Values in Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
If a POST Error Message is Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
To Clear the CMOS Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Power-On-Self-Test Errors that May Prevent Your PC From Starting . .69
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If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
If Your Display Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
If Your Display is Blurred or Unreadable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
If Your Keyboard or Mouse Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
If Your Printer Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
If the Flexible Disk Drive Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
If the Hard Disk Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
If the Hard Disk Activity Light Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
If the CD-ROM Drive Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
If an Accessory Board Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
If Your PC Has a Software Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
If You Have Forgotten Your Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
If Your Application Software Does Not Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
If Power Management Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
If the Date and Time are Incorrect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
78
78
79
80
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6 Technical Information
Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Power Consumption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Typical Power Consumption/Availability for ISA Accessory Slots . . . . . .87
Typical Power Consumption/Availability for PCI Accessory Slots . . . . . .87
IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses Used by Your PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Available Video Resolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
BIOS Video Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Windows Video Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Windows 95 Video Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
OS/2 Video Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Video Resolutions for the Matrox MGA Millennium Video Adapter Card,
Valid for Windows 3.11, Windows 95 and OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
The PC’s Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
The PC’s Rear Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
System Board Connectors and Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
System Board Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
Recycling Your PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
Your HP Authorized Reseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
HP SupportPack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
HP Support Assistant CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
102
Hewlett-Packard Information Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
HP Forum on CompuServe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HP Forum on America Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HP BBS Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internet—FTP Library Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access HP World Wide Web Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HP FAXback on Demand—HP FIRST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HP Audio Tips (USA only) HP Automated Support Directory. . . . . . .
Ordering Drivers and BIOS on Diskette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
104
105
105
105
106
106
107
HP Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
108
Hewlett-Packard Telephone Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109
Lifeline Telephone Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110
HP Network Phone-in Support Service (NPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
111
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
112
Hewlett-Packard Marketing Headquarters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
113
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1
Setting Up Your PC
This chapter leads you through the first time installation of your
HP Vectra PC.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Unpacking Your PC
Unpacking Your PC
1 When you receive your PC, unpack all the components:
•
•
•
•
the computer and power cord
the display and its cables
the keyboard and mouse
the manuals.
Typical Display
Computer
Computer Power Cord
Mouse
Display Power Cord
Manuals
Keyboard
NOTE
The operating system software, drivers, and HP utilities are preloaded
on the hard disk.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Unpacking Your PC
2 Place the PC on a sturdy desk near to easily accessible power outlets,
with enough space for the keyboard, mouse, and any other
accessories.
3 Position the PC so that its rear connectors are easily accessible.
4 Place the display on top of the computer. (If you have a large display,
place it next to the computer.)
Installation Tools
No tools are required to set up your PC. However, if you plan to install a
disk drive or an accessory board in your PC, you will need a flat-blade
screwdriver. For further information about installing accessories, refer
to chapter 3, “How to Install Accessories In Your PC”.
WARNING
If you are in any doubt that you can lift the display safely, do not try to
move it without help. Refer to the display’s manual for information
about the display.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Connecting the Mouse, Keyboard, and Display
Connecting the Mouse, Keyboard, and Display
1 Connect the mouse, keyboard, and display to the back of the
computer. The connectors are shaped to go in one way only.
2 Tighten the display cable attachment screws.
Mouse
Keyboard
4 English
Display
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Connecting a Printer
Connecting a Printer
Connect the printer cable to the back of the computer and tighten the
attachment screws. Use the connector labeled:
•
•
•
Parallel (25-pin parallel connector) for a parallel device
Serial A (9-pin serial connector) for a serial device
Serial B (9-pin serial connector) for a second serial device.
Parallel Connector
Serial Connector
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Connecting the Power Cords
Connecting the Power Cords
1 If fitted, remove the label covering the computer’s power connector.
2 Connect the power cords to the display and the computer.
3 Connect the display’s power cord and the computer’s power cord to
a grounded outlet. (The connectors are shaped to go in one way
only.)
Display
Power Cord
Computer
Power Cord
Grounded Outlet
WARNING
For your safety, always connect the equipment to a grounded wall
outlet. Always use a power cord with a properly grounded plug, such
as the one provided with this equipment, or one in compliance with
your national regulations.
This PC is disconnected from the power by removing the power cord
from the power outlet. This means the PC must be located close to a
power outlet that is easily accessible.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Starting the PC for the First Time
Starting the PC for the First Time
Your PC has preinstalled software. This software is initialized the first
time you start the PC. The software initialization takes approximately
three minutes, and:
•
sets up the software in your language
•
sets up your software to use the hardware installed in your
computer—note that you can change the settings after the software
has been initialized.
To initialize your software:
1 Switch on the display and then the PC.
Switch on the Display
Then switch on the PC
When the PC is switched on, the Vectra Logo is displayed. The PC
performs a Power-On-Self-Test (POST). Press
if you want to
view the POST.
If an error is detected during the Power-On-Self-Test, the PC will
automatically display the error. You may be prompted to press
to start the Setup program to correct the error.
NOTE
Do NOT switch OFF the PC while the software is being initialized as this
could cause unexpected results.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Starting the PC for the First Time
2 The software initialization routine starts. It displays the software
license agreement, gives you an opportunity to read Working in
Comfort (ergonomic advice for computer users), and then asks
questions about the PC. For example:
CAUTION
•
The name of the person who will use the PC and your company
name. (If necessary, the name of the user can be modified later.)
•
The current date and time.
•
The type of printer (for example, HP LaserJet 4M). This is shown
on the front of the printer. You also need to enter the connection
used by the printer.
•
The model number of your display. The display’s model number
is shown on the cover of the manual supplied with the display and
on a label on the rear of the display.
•
Depending on which model PC you have, you may also be asked
to select which operating system you want to use, Windows 3.11
or Windows 95.
Once you have confirmed your selection of the operating system, you
cannot change that selection. The operating system which you have
NOT chosen will be deleted from the computer’s hard disk.
3 While the initialization program is running, you might like to
complete the Warranty Registration card which you will find inside
the back of this manual.
When the initialization routine has finished, click on OK and the PC
will restart.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Starting the PC for the First Time
4 When your PC has restarted:
❒ Adjust the display screen’s brightness and contrast to your needs.
If the picture does not fill the screen or is not centered, adjust it
using the controls on the display. Refer to the display’s manual for
details.
❒ Set the keyboard to a comfortable position.
Adjust brightness
Your display may be different
from the display shown here.
Creating Master Diskettes
It is very important that you create master diskettes for your preloaded
software as soon as possible. HP recommends that you use new
diskettes. Should you need to restore the preloaded software on your
PC, you can use these diskettes to do so.
Windows 3.11
Choose this utility in the HPUtils group in Program Manager and follow
the screen messages, which will tell you how many diskettes you need.
Windows 95
Use the Microsoft Create System Disk utility. Refer to the Windows 95
documentation for further information.
Other Operating
Systems
Refer to the documentation for your operating system.
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1 Setting Up Your PC
Starting the PC for the First Time
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2
Using Your PC
This chapter explains how to use the HP Vectra features and tools
designed to increase your productivity.
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2 Using Your PC
Starting and Stopping Your PC
Starting and Stopping Your PC
Your PC can be started in two ways:
• pressing the power button on the front panel
• pressing the space bar on the HP Vectra keyboard for Windows 95.
When you start the computer, switch on the display first. When you
switch on the computer, the computer carries out the Power-On-SelfTest (POST) while the Vectra logo is displayed. If you wish to view the
POST, press
. If there is an error in the POST, the error will
automatically be displayed.
If you have set a password in the PC’s Setup program, the password
prompt displays after the POST has completed. If the Password prompt
is displayed, type your password and press
to be able to use
the PC.
Password Prompt
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2 Using Your PC
Starting and Stopping Your PC
Stopping the PC when To stop the PC, make sure that you have exited all programs and then
exited Windows before pressing the power button on the control panel.
using Windows 3.11
Stopping the PC when To stop or shut down the PC:
using Windows 95
1 Click on Start.
2 Click on Shut Down.
3 Click on Shut down the computer.
You can return the PC to full power mode by pressing the space bar.
Other Operating
Systems
For other operating systems refer to the operating system manual for
details of how to exit the operating system.
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2 Using Your PC
The HP Vectra Keyboard for Windows 95
The HP Vectra Keyboard for Windows 95
The HP Vectra keyboard for Windows 95 has several new features.
There are three additional keys which give speedy access to Windows
95 functions. These keys have icons indicating what these functions
are. The space bar also has an additional function, the
Power-On function, which is not specific to Windows 95.
The Windows Icon
You can display the Windows 95 Start menu by pressing either of
the two Windows keys, which are on either side of the space bar.
Refer to Windows 95 documentation for further information about
Windows 95.
The Power-On function enables you to start your PC by pressing
The Power-On Icon on
the space bar. This function is not specific to Windows 95, but is
the Space Bar
available whatever your operating system. The option can be enabled
or disabled in Setup. The default is enabled.
The Application Key
The Application key allows you to access all the same functions
as the right mouse button. It can be used to copy and move files, to
access shortcut menus and get Help information. The Application key
can also be programmed by your software.
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2 Using Your PC
HP Utilities
HP Utilities
You can access Hewlett-Packard Utilities from the HPutils group in the
Windows program manager. These utilities include:
❒ Discover Your HP Vectra.
An online introduction to the main features of your PC, which
includes information about the software supplied, and describes
features for installing accessories.
❒ The Master Diskette Creation utility.
Allows you to create master diskettes of your preloaded software.
❒ HP PCID.
HP PCID is a program which allows you to create a personalized
message, which will display during your PC’s Power-On-Self-Test (in
text mode only).
❒ HP User Tools.
These are tools which enable you to set many parameters for your
computer and give access to other useful features.
Accessing HP User Tools
Windows 3.11
1 Choose HPutils from Program Manager.
2 Choose the HP User Tools utility.
3 Choose the tool that you wish to use.
Windows 95
The HP InfoCenter provides information about your PC, and allows you
to use HP-supplied software to set up certain aspects of your PC.
All HP-specific online information is accessible via the HP InfoCenter.
To access the HP InfoCenter:
1 Click on Start.
2 Click on HP InfoCenter.
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2 Using Your PC
Advanced Power Management
Advanced Power Management
Your PC supports a power management system which complies with
the United States’ Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Energy
Star program. Power management enables you to reduce the PC’s
power consumption when you are not using it.
Two power management modes are supported in Windows 3.11:
• Standby Mode, which significantly reduces power consumption
• Sleep Mode, which reduces power consumption to a minimum.
Windows 95 supports a third mode, Shut Off Monitor.
Configuring Power
Management in
Windows 3.11
Use the Power icon from the Windows control panel in Program
Manager.
Configuring Power
Management in
Windows 95
• Standby Mode
CAUTION
If your PC is on a Novell® network, Suspend Mode will disconnect you
from the network. Some other software applications are also not
compatible with Suspend mode.
Other Operating
Systems
Refer to your operating system documentation.
Use the Display icon in the Control Panel (Click on Start and then
Settings).
• Shut Off Monitor mode
Use the Display icon in the Control Panel.
• Suspend Mode
Use the Power icon in the Control Panel to configure Suspend Mode.
Click on Suspend on the Start menu to activate Suspend Mode.
This mode is similar to Sleep Mode in Windows 3.11.
Activating Sleep Mode To activate Sleep Mode, click on the Sleep Mode icon
bottom-left hand corner of the screen).
in Windows 3.11
(at the
Press any key to return to full power mode.
Power Management in For more information about the DOS power management utility, refer
to the operating system manual.
DOS
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2 Using Your PC
Personalizing Your Mouse
Personalizing Your Mouse
Your PC has preinstalled software (the Mouse Control Center) which
you can use to personalize the functionality of your mouse.
The Desktop Management Interface
Your PC supports the Desktop Management Interface (DMI). The DMI
lets an application request information about your computer. For
example, an application can use the DMI to view:
•
•
•
the hardware and software components installed in your PC
the operating system used by your PC
the number of available accessory board slots.
Refer to your operating system manual for further information.
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2 Using Your PC
The Desktop Management Interface
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3
How to Install Accessories
In Your PC
This chapter explains how to install accessories, such as extra memory,
accessory boards, and additional disk drives, in your PC.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Supported HP Accessories
Supported HP Accessories
This chapter describes how to install memory, mass storage devices,
and accessory boards in your PC.
Refer to chapter 7, “Hewlett Packard Support and Information
Services”, for information about how to obtain an up-to-date list of
supported devices.
Up to three front access drives, such as:
5.25-inch 1.2 MB flexible disk drive, (half height) order D2881B
3.5-inch 1.44 MB flexible disk drive, (one third height), order D2035B
IDE CD-ROM Drive, order D2896A.
One internal mass storage device
540MB IDE, order D2918A, or
1GB IDE, order D2919A
Mounting Rails can be ordered
for front access devices:
5.25-inch disk drive rails, order D2880A
3.5-inch disk drive rails, order D3566A.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Supported HP Accessories
Video Memory Upgrade:
1 MB upgrade, order D3500A.
Processor
Voltage Regulator
Module (VRM)
Up to four accessory boards
Main Memory Modules (32-bit EDO, 60 ns):
8 MB kit (2 x 4 MB modules) order D3646A
16 MB kit (2 x 8 MB modules) order D3647A
32 MB kit (2 x 16 MB modules) order D3648A
Pairs of identical modules must be installed.
See “Installing
.
Memory” later in this chapter.
256 KB Level 2 cache memory
WARNING
For your safety, never remove the PC’s cover without first removing
the power cord from the power outlet, and any connection to a
telecommunications network.
Always replace the cover on the PC before switching it on again.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Removing the Cover
Removing the Cover
1 Switch off the display and the PC.
2 Disconnect the power cords from the power outlets, the PC, and the
display. Then remove the display.
3 If necessary, unlock the cover using the key provided with the PC.
4 Slide the two tabs on the front of the computer inwards. Firmly slide
the cover forward 5 cm (2 inches), and lift it up and off the
computer.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Removing the Cover
Replacing the Cover after Installing Accessories
1 Check that you have installed all your accessories.
2 Make sure that all internal cables are properly connected and safely
routed.
3 Ensure the cover lock is unlocked and the tabs are inwards.
4 Lower the cover onto the computer, and firmly slide it into position.
5 Slide the two tabs on the front of the cover outwards.
6 If a keylock is fitted, lock the cover using the key.
7 Place the display on top of the computer. Reconnect all cables and
power cords.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Moving and Replacing the Power Supply
Moving and Replacing the Power Supply
You must move the power supply to access the sockets for the main
memory, cache memory, video memory, processor, battery, or
accessory board slots.
1 Disconnect the computer’s power supply cord.
2 Remove the computer’s cover.
3 Lift the front of the power supply to disengage the hinge on the rear.
4 Lift the power supply clear and lay it upside down on the frame
above the disk drives.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Moving and Replacing the Power Supply
Replacing the Power Supply after Installing Accessories
1 Ensure that you have installed all your accessories in the PC.
2 Replace the power supply on the left-hand side of the PC, and ensure
that the cables are neatly routed around any accessory boards.
3 Raise the front of the power supply and engage the hinge on the rear.
4 Lower the front of the power supply into position so that it rests on
the front panel.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Memory
Installing Memory
Main Memory Modules
Your PC is supplied with main memory. If you need more main memory
to run your application software, you can install up to a total of 128 MB.
Main memory is available in modules of 4 MB, 8 MB, or 16 MB. You
must install identical modules in pairs in each bank.
Banks A and B will take 4 MB, 8 MB, 16 MB or 32 MB modules. Use only
4 MB and 16 MB modules in bank C, as 8 MB and 32 MB modules are
not fully detected in this bank. 32 MB modules are not available from
HP. You can obtain 32 MB modules from your HP reseller.
CAUTION
Static electricity can damage electronic components.
Turn all equipment OFF. Don’t let your clothes touch the accessory.
To equalize the static electricity, rest the accessory bag on top of the
power supply while you are removing the accessory from the bag.
Handle the accessory as little as possible and with care.
To install a main memory module:
1 Disconnect the computer’s power supply cord.
2 Remove the computer’s cover and power supply.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Memory
3 Align the main memory module directly over the socket. Slide the
memory module into the slot at 45°. Firmly press the memory
module completely into the connector.
4 Pivot the memory module to the vertical position.
5 Repeat this procedure for each memory module you are installing.
If you need to remove a main memory module:
Release the retaining clip and pull the module forward and out of the socket
6 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover and power
supply. Reconnect all cables and power cords.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Memory
Installing a Video Memory Upgrade
Your PC is supplied with 1 MB of video memory on the system board.
You can install more memory if you want more colors by installing a
pair of video memory modules which will increase your available video
memory to 2 MB. Detailed information about available video
resolutions is given in chapter 6, “Technical Information”.
Some PCs have a Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter board with 2
MB of video memory, which you can increase up to 8MB. To increase
the video memory to 4 MB, order HP 2 MB WRAM upgrade D3557A. To
increase the video memory to 8 MB, you need to install a 6 MB video
memory upgrade, which is not available from HP. You can obtain the 6
MB video memory upgrade, Matrox MGA - Mil/M06, from your HP
Reseller.
To Install a Pair of Video 1 Disconnect the power supply cord.
Memory Modules on
2 Remove the computer’s cover and power supply.
the System Board
3 Align the video memory module directly over the socket taking care
to align the dot on the module with the dot on the socket as
illustrated in the diagram. Firmly press the memory module
completely into the connector. Video memory modules must be
installed in pairs.
4 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover and power
supply. Reconnect all cables and power cords.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Memory
If you need to use a special video driver for your application, you may
be asked to insert a diskette containing the driver in drive A. In this
case, insert the video drivers diskette you created with the Master Disk
Creation utility. Alternatively, type C:\MASTERS\VIDDRV\DISKWIN (for
Windows applications) or type C:\MASTERS\VIDDRV\DISKDOS (for
DOS applications) and press
.
WARNING
Static electricity can damage electronic components. Turn all
equipment off. Don’t let your clothes touch the accessory. Handle the
accessory as little as possible and with care.
Installing more memory 1 Disconnect the power supply cord.
on the Matrox MGA
2 Remove the computer’s cover.
Video Adapter
3 Remove the MGA video adapter from the accessory slot and place it
on a flat static-free surface.
4 Install the memory module on the MGA video adapter as illustrated.
5 Replace the MGA video adapter in the computer.
6 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover. Reconnect
all cables and power cords.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Memory
After Installing a Video 1 Switch on the PC.
Memory Upgrade
2 When Windows is running, select HP User Tools.
3 Click on the Video Mode button and follow the screen messages to
change the video resolution and the number of colors displayed.
NOTE
If your display (monitor) is an HP Ultra VGA 1600 (D2800A) and you
have the Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter, the 1600 x 1200
resolution may not be highlighted, although it is supported. To select it
you must run the Monitor Selection utility. The following message will
be displayed:
“DDC-compliant monitor detected.
Use of monitor program is not recommended.
Test facility is not available.
Are you sure you want to over-ride DDC?”
1 Click on OK, then select the D2800A display, save the configuration
and exit.
2 Restart Windows.
3 Start HP User Tools.
4 The resolution 1600 x 1200 will now be highlighted and you can
select it.
Configuration Switches There are two configuration switches on the video adapter board.
Normally the settings for these switches do not need to be changed,
on the MGA Video
both are set to OFF. However, if you need to upgrade the VGA BIOS, you
Adapter
will need to set switch 1 to ON temporarily to enable the upgrade to be
performed.
Setting switch 2 to ON enables you to work in dual-screen mode. To
work in dual-screen mode you will either need to use a VGA in another
slot, or another Matrox video adapter board for output to second
monitor.
Contact your HP representative for further information about
upgrading the VGA BIOS.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Accessory Boards
Installing Accessory Boards
The PC has four accessory board slots:
Slot 1 (the top slot) can be used for a 32-bit PCI board
Slot 2 can be used for either a 32-bit PCI or a full-length 16-bit ISA
board
• Slot 3 can be used for full-length 16-bit ISA boards
• Slot 4 (the bottom slot) can be used for half-length 16-bit ISA boards.
•
•
Configuring Accessory Boards with Plug and Play (Windows
3.11)
Plug and Play is an industry standard for automatically configuring
your PC's hardware resources and the accessory boards installed in it.
Your PC has configurable support for Plug and Play in the BIOS.
NOTE
All PCI accessory boards are Plug and Play, although not all ISA boards
are. Check the accessory board’s documentation if you are unsure.
When you start your PC, the Plug and Play BIOS automatically detects
which hardware resources (IRQs, DMAs, memory ranges, and I/O
addresses) are used by the system-based components.
Configuring non-Plug and Play ISA Accessory Boards
Windows 3.11
If you wish to install an ISA accessory board which is not Plug and Play,
for example a Legacy board, before you do so, you must start the ICU
program to declare the resources used by the board.
To run the ICU:
Choose the Plug and Play facility in the Windows Program Manager.
Click on the ICU icon to launch the ISA Configuration Utility and
configure system resources for the accessory board.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Accessory Boards
The ICU is preloaded with configuration details for many non-Plug and
Play accessory boards. If your accessory board is not listed by the ICU,
there are two ways you can configure the accessory board:
1 Some non-Plug and Play accessory boards are supplied with a
configuration file which can be used by the ICU to determine which
resources are required by the board. When prompted by the ICU,
insert the diskette containing the configuration file.
2 If there is no configuration file for your accessory board, you will
need to enter the configuration details manually when prompted by
the ICU. Refer to the documentation supplied with the accessory
board for information about the resources the board requires.
Windows 95 and
Plug and Play
It is not necessary to use the ICU with Windows 95 as it has built-in Plug
and Play functionality. It works directly with the PC’s Plug and Play
BIOS to dynamically configure system resources for Plug and Play
accessories.
For boards which are not automatically recognized and configured, you
may need to run the Add New Hardware wizard to configure the
accessory. The settings selected by Windows 95 may be different from
those recommended by the board’s manufacturer. Should this be the
case, it might be necessary to alter the board’s jumpers.
Refer to the documentation supplied with Windows 95 for further
details.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Accessory Boards
Installing the Board
1 Disconnect the computer’s power supply cord.
2 Remove the computer’s cover and power supply.
3 Find a free slot. Some boards may have preferred locations and
special installation instructions detailed in their manuals.
4 Unscrew and remove the slot cover. Store it in a safe place.
If the slot cover is tight, loosen the screws on the adjacent slots.
5 Hold the board horizontally by its “top” edge. Slide it into the board
guide of the chosen slot. Do not bend the board.
6 Align the board’s connector with the slot’s socket. Firmly press the
board into the socket. Ensure the board’s connector engages
completely with the socket and does not touch components on other
boards.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Accessory Boards
7 Secure the board by replacing the slot cover screw.
If you loosened the screws on adjacent slots, tighten them.
8 If you install a VESA-standard video adapter board which uses the
integrated video graphics controller, connect the accessory board’s
cable to the VESA pass-through connector on the system board. To
access the VESA pass-through connector, lift the power supply out
of its seating, and lay it upside down on the frame above the disk
drives. Remove the protection cover from the rear base of the PC.
NOTE
When the 1 MB video memory upgrade is installed on the integrated
video graphics controller, connecting a VESA-standard video adapter
board will disable this additional 1 MB of video memory and only the
first 1 MB of video memory will be used.
VESA pass-through connector for video boards
Protection cover
9 Install any other accessories before replacing the power supply and
the cover. Reconnect all cables and power cords.
10 If you used the VESA Pass-through connector, run the FCON.EXE
utility in HPUtils to enable the connection.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
Installing Mass Storage Devices
You can install additional mass storage devices, if you need extra mass
storage space for your application software.
The PC has one internal drive shelf for a hard disk drive. If your PC
already has a hard disk drive, this shelf will be occupied.
There three front access drive shelves. The top shelf is occupied by a
3.5-inch flexible disk drive. The middle shelf may be used to install a
5.2-inch flexible disk drive or a CD-ROM drive. The bottom shelf may
be used to install a 1-inch high, 5.25-inch or 3.5-inch front access
device or to install a second hard disk drive internally.
Your PC has the following connectors on the system board which may
be used by mass storage devices:
NOTE
•
a flexible disk drive connector
which supports up to two flexible disk drives
•
two Enhanced IDE device connectors,
the first connector supports up to two IDE hard disk drives, the
second supports either an IDE CD-ROM or an IDE hard disk drive.
(Refer to the drive’s manual to check whether you need to set
jumpers, or if there are any special installation procedures).
You may install a non-IDE mass storage device, but it will need an
accessory board and driver software (usually supplied with the device).
Contact the product vendor for further information.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
Installing a Flexible Disk Drive or a CD-ROM Drive
in the Middle Shelf
1 Disconnect the computer’s power supply cord.
2 Remove the computer’s cover.
3 Remove the RFI bezel from the middle shelf and put it in a safe place.
RFI bezel
4 Slide the device into the middle shelf using mounting rails, and
secure the device in position using the screws provided.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
5 Connect the data and power cables to the rear of the device installed
in the middle shelf. The connectors are shaped to go in one way
only. If you are installing an IDE CD-ROM drive, connect the drive
to the CD-ROM data cable. This data cable should be connected to
the connector marked “CD-ROM” on the system board. If you are not
sure which connector to use, refer to “Connecting an IDE Device to
a Data Cable” on page 39.
Data cable
Power cable
6 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover. Reconnect
all cables and power cords.
WARNING
Do not open the CD-ROM drive enclosure as there is a danger of
electric shock, and the laser beam light could harm your eyes. Service
should be carried out by qualified personnel.
To avoid discomfort from unexpected noise, always turn the volume
down before connecting headphones or speakers.
Listening to loud sounds for prolonged periods may permanently
damage your hearing.
Before putting on headphones, place them round your neck and turn
the volume down. When you put on the headphones, slowly increase
the volume until you find a comfortable listening level and leave the
volume control in that position.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
Installing an IDE Hard Disk Drive in the Rear Shelf
The PC has an integrated Enhanced IDE controller which supports two
Fast IDE hard disk drives.
Refer to the drive’s manuals to see if you must set jumpers or if there is
a special installation procedure to follow.
1 Disconnect the computer’s power supply cord.
2 Remove the computer’s cover.
3 Slide the drive into the rear drive shelf, supporting the drive with
your hand.
4 Align the drive with the holes in the rear drive shelf. Then secure the
drive with the screws provided with it.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
5 Connect the power cable and the data cable to the rear of the drive.
The connectors are shaped to go in one way only.
Data cable
Power cable
6 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover. Reconnect
all cables and power cords.
There are two different data cables for IDE devices. The first is marked
Connecting an IDE
Device to a Data Cable “HDD” next to the system board attachment and has two drive
connectors. The middle connector of this data cable must be connected
to the bootable or master hard disk drive. The second has only one drive
connector which is red and marked “CD-ROM” next to the system board
attachment.
Up to three IDE devices can be connected to the system board using
these data cables.
After Installing an IDE
Drive
After installing an IDE drive, you will need to run Setup to confirm that
the drive has been detected by the PC. Refer to “After Installing an IDE
Drive” on page 64.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
HDD data cable,
Slave connector
CD-ROM drive
data cable
Flexible Disk Drive data cable
HDD data cable,
Master connector
Examples of multiple IDE drive combinations
Configuration
NOTE
Connections to data cables
1 Hard disk drive
1. Bootable hard disk drive:
Master connector, HDD data cable
2 Hard disk drives
1. Bootable hard disk drive:
2. Second hard disk drive:
Master connector, HDD data cable
Slave connector, HDD data cable
3 Hard disk drives
1. Bootable hard disk drive:
2. Second hard disk drive:
3. Third hard disk drive:
Master connector, HDD data cable
Slave connector, HDD data cable
CD-ROM data cable connector
1 Hard disk drive
1 CD-ROM
1. Bootable hard disk drive:
2. CD-ROM:
Master connector, HDD data cable
CD-ROM data cable connector
2 Hard disk drives
1 CD-ROM
1. Bootable hard disk drive:
2. Second hard disk drive:
3. CD-ROM:
Master connector, HDD data cable
Slave connector, HDD data cable
CD-ROM data cable connector
If you install two IDE devices with different data transfer rates on the
same data cable, the data transfer rate of the faster IDE device will be
reduced to match the rate of the slower IDE device.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
Installing a 3.5-inch Disk Drive in the Bottom Shelf
A slim, (1-inch high) 3.5-inch disk drive can be installed in the bottom
shelf.
Disk drives ordered from HP are delivered with mounting rails. You will
need to order drive mounting rails from HP if you order your disk drive
from another supplier.
1 Disconnect the computer’s power supply cord from the power outlet.
2 Remove the computer’s cover.
3 If there is a device in the middle shelf, remove it.
4 If there is no device in the middle shelf, remove the RFI bezel.
5 Remove the two RFI bezels from the bottom shelf.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
6 Support the power supply with your hand (to prevent it falling out)
and carefully turn the PC onto its side.
7 Slide the hard disk into the bottom shelf, supporting the disk with
your hand.
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Installing Mass Storage Devices
8 Align the drive with the holes in the bottom of the PC. Support the
drive with your hand while securing the drive with the four screws
provided.
9 Support the power supply with your hand and very carefully return
the PC to the upright position.
10 Connect the data and power cables to the rear of the drive.
The connectors are shaped to fit one way only. If you are not sure
which connector to use, refer to “Connecting an IDE Device to a Data
Cable” on page 39.
Data cable
Power cable
11 If a device was removed from the middle shelf, replace it.
12 If no device was removed from the middle shelf, replace the RFI
bezel.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
13 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover. Replace the
side bezel. Reconnect all cables and power cords.
Installing a 5.25-inch Drive in the Bottom Shelf
A slim (1-inch high) 5.25-inch front access drive can be installed in the
bottom shelf.
NOTE
Disk drives ordered from HP are supplied with mounting rails. If you
order your drive from another supplier, you will need to order drive
mounting rails from HP.
1 Carry out steps 1 to 5 in “Installing a 3.5-inch Disk Drive in the
Bottom Shelf” on page 41.
2 Remove the side bracket from the bottom shelf and store it in a safe
place.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
3 Slide the drive mid-way into the bottom shelf.
4 Connect the data and power cables to the rear of the drive.
The connectors are shaped to fit one way only. If you are not sure
which connector to use, refer to “Connecting an IDE Device to a Data
Cable” on page 39.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing Mass Storage Devices
5 Slide the drive completely into the bottom shelf and secure it with
the screws provided with the device.
6 If a device was removed from the middle shelf, replace it.
7 If no device was removed from the middle shelf, replace the RFI
bezel.
8 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover. Reconnect
all cables and power cords.
Configuring the Device or Devices you have installed
After installing an IDE drive or a flexible disk drive, you will need to
run the Setup program to autotype or to configure the device. Refer to
chapter 4, “The HP Setup Program” for details of how to do this.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing an Upgrade Processor
Installing an Upgrade Processor
As more powerful upgrade processors become available, you can
replace your main processor with a more powerful one. If you use an
Intel Overdrive processor, it is supplied with its own Voltage Regulator
Module (VRM), which must be installed with the processor. The VRM
ensures that the processor is provided with the correct voltage.
1 Disconnect the computer power cords from the power outlets.
2 Remove the computer’s cover and lift the power supply from it’s
seating as described in “Moving and Replacing the Power Supply” on
page 24.
3 If the heatsink is not attached to the processor, unclip and remove
the heatsink.
4 Raise the lever on the socket to unlock the processor and lift out the
processor.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing an Upgrade Processor
5 To install the new processor:
a Locate the corner markers:
• on the processor—a dot or notch (“broken” corner)
• on the processor socket—a dot.
b Position the processor over the socket, with it’s corner marker
facing the corner marker on the socket.
c Place the processor into the socket.
d Lower the lever to lock the processor into place.
e Replace the heatsink and fasten the clip, if the heatsink is not
attached to the processor.
6 Set switches 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 on the system board for the correct
processor speed. Refer to the section “System Board Connectors and
Switches” on page 95. If you use an Intel Overdrive processor, refer
to the instruction leaflet supplied with the processor to see whether
you should change the position of any switches on the system board.
7 Remove the old VRM by unclipping the two white tabs, and then slide
the module up and out of the socket. Slide the new VRM into the
socket, pressing it down firmly. Push the white tabs back into place.
The VRM module goes in one way only.
8 Replace the computer’s power supply and cover. Reconnect all
cables and power cords.
After Installing an
Upgrade Processor
Switch on the PC and verify that the new processor is recognized by the
Power-On-Self-Test.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing the Security Bracket
Installing the Security Bracket
The security bracket supplied with the computer can be used to fasten
the computer to your desk.
1 Remove the computer’s cover.
2 Remove the security bracket from the storage position.
Remove the
bracket from the
storage position
Insert the
bracket
in the computer
3 Insert the security bracket, from inside the computer, into the slot
shown in the diagram above.
4 Press it firmly until it snaps into place.
5 Install any other accessories before replacing the cover.
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3 How to Install Accessories In Your PC
Installing the Security Bracket
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4
The HP Setup Program
This chapter describes how to use the HP Setup program.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Setup is an integrated (ROM-based) program that displays the PC’s
configuration and allows you to set parameters.
Check the configuration when you first use the PC and each time after
you install, remove, or upgrade accessories.
If an error message is displayed, see chapter 5, “Troubleshooting Your
PC”.
NOTE
If you are unable to change the PC’s configuration, check that you
entered the correct password when you started Setup and whether the
Secure switch (system board switch 8) is set to the OPEN position. For
further information on switches refer to “System Board Connectors and
Switches” on page 95.
The BIOS Setup is menu-driven, enabling you to easily access all the
options which are grouped in the following categories:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Main
Preferences
Configuration
Security
Power, and
Exit.
A solid right arrow, , indicates categories which have sub-menus.
Starting the Setup Program
1 Turn on the display and then the PC.
If the PC is already turned on, save your data and exit all programs,
then press
and Delete to restart the PC (Windows
3.11). For Windows 95, use the Shut Down command.
2 Press
while F2=Setup is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
F2=Setup appears for a short period, during the POST (Power-On-
Self-Test). Press
if you wish to view the POST. If there is an error
during the POST, it will automatically be displayed.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
F2=Setup
3 The PC’s Setup program will display.
•
The
or
arrows,
and
or
be used to select fields in the current menu.
keys can
•
The
key moves to the previous page and the
moves to the next page in a scrollable menu.
key
•
The Home key moves to the top item, and the
the bottom item, of the current menu.
key moves to
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
•
Within a field
selects the next lower value and
next higher value.
•
displays a sub-menu for menu items marked with a solid
right arrow .
or
•
•
The
+
and
selects the
allows you to exit from a sub-menu.
arrows select menus from the menu bar.
•
loads factory-installed default values.
•
restores previous values from CMOS.
•
or
+
displays the general help screen.
exits from the general help screen.
•
•
Use the
key to exit Setup without saving any changes.
•
Use the
key to save your settings and exit Setup.
Pressing the
or
arrow keys while you are on a main menu
screen, will take you to the next menu option. If, however, you are on a
sub-menu screen and you press these arrows, you will stay on that
screen.
Use the
and
arrow keys to scroll through the items on the
general help screen.
You can view a summary of the PC’s configuration if you have chosen to
The Setup
Configuration Summary view the POST tests. A summary screen is displayed when the POST has
completed. It is displayed for a few seconds only, but you can “freeze” it
so that you can verify the configuration. Press the Pause/Break key to
“freeze” the summary screen. When you have finished reading the
summary, press any key to continue.
Setup changes system behavior by modifying the power-on
initialization parameters. Setting incorrect values may cause system
boot failure. Should this occur, press
. This will load Setup default
values to recover.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Understanding the SETUP Program
The built-in Setup program is accessed by pressing
during the PC’s
Power-On-Self-Test. On-line help is provided at the right hand side of
the Setup screen for each item on the Setup screens. When you
highlight an item, the help for that item is displayed.
The Setup items displayed on your screen may differ from those shown
in the following tables.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Setup Item
Main
System time
System date
System memory
Extended memory
Running Windows 95
Preferences
User Password is
Set User Password
Key Click
Key auto-repeat speed
Delay before auto-repeat
Numlock at POWER-ON
56 English
Default
640KB
15MB*
No
Disabled
Action
Allows you to set the system time and date. Select the
field you want to change with Tab, Shift Tab, or Enter.
Allows you to view the system memory and extended
memory. * Value is typical value, real value depends on
your configuration.
Allows you to enable/disable Windows 95.
If you are NOT running Windows 95, the BIOS Setup
program will offer you some of the Windows 95 features
and optimizes hardware resources.
Indicates if a user password has been set.
Allows you to set a password to prevent unauthorized
access to your PC. You cannot set a user password if an
administrator password HAS NOT been set.Setting a user
password prevents unauthorized use of your computer,
protects the data stored in it, and preserves the
preferences you set.
On
Allows you to turn the audible keyclick on or off.
21.8 per Second Allows you to set the number of times per second a
keystroke will be repeated when a key is held down.
This option is not displayed if you are running Windows
95.
.50 Second
Allows you to specify the length of the delay before a
character is repeated when a character is held down. If
you generally press keys slowly and heavily, set the delay
to a higher number to make your keyboard less sensitive
and to avoid characters being displayed more than once.
On
This field allows you to specify whether the number keys
of the numeric keypad are enabled when your computer
starts. Otherwise, the keypad keys act as cursor control
keys.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Setup Item
Configuration
Integrated Peripherals
Parallel port
Default
Action
378h IRQ7
Enables/disables the parallel port at the specified address.
“Disabled” frees resources used by the port.
Sets the operating mode of the parallel port.
Enables/disables the on-board serial port A. “Disabled”
frees resources used by the port.
Do not select 2E8h if you are running Windows 95.
Enables/disables the on-board serial port B. “Disabled”
frees resources used by the port.
Do not select 2E8h if you are running Windows 95.
Enables or disables the on-board flexible disk controller.
Selects the flexible disk drive type.
Selects the flexible disk drive type.
Enable this option only if you need to boot on flexible disk
B. Then flexible disks A and B will be swapped.
Parallel port Mode
Serial port A
Centronics TM
3F8h IRQ4
Serial port B
2F8h IRQ3
Flexible disk controller
Flexible disk drive 1
Flexible disk drive 2
A & B flexible disk swap
Enabled
1.44MB,3 1/2”
Not Installed
Disabled
Video
Video system
Video BIOS shadowing
EGA/VGA
Enabled
Video Plug & Play display
Enabled
640x480 mode
800x600 mode
1024x768 mode
1280x1024 mode
60Hz
60Hz
60Hz
i45Hz
Select video display type.
Enables / disables video BIOS shadowing (for AT external
boards only) Enabling the BIOS shadowing improves
performance.
Sets the best ergonomic refresh rates supported by your
DDC compliant display. Switch on the display before the
PC to enable this feature. If the display does not support
DDC, the BIOS might automatically disable the option.
Set your preferred refresh rate for each graphic mode. All
refresh rates may not be available for certain color
depths. The video BIOS will automatically choose the
best fit should this be the case. The higher the refresh
rate, the better the ergonomic performance. The lower
the refresh rate, the better the video performance. Your
display must be able to support the refresh rates (vertical
frequencies) you set.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Setup Item
Memory and Cache
Memory caching
Default
Action
Both
Controls internal (L1) and external cache (L2) memory
caching.
Sets a 1MB memory hole between 15 and 16MB if
needed. You need at least 16 MB for this option to be
available.
Enables shadowing and caching for ISA “Non-PnP” Option
ROMs for region X-Y, in order to improve performance.
Note that some Option ROMs cannot be shadowed.
Memory hole
Disabled
Shadow/Cache ISA Option
ROMs
Enabled
Hard Disk Drives
Hard disk drive 0 (xxxx MB) 540 MB
Hard disk drive 1 (xxxx MB) xxx MB
Hard disk drive 2 (xxxx MB) xxx MB
Hard disk drive 3 (xxxx MB) xxx MB
Translation method
Extended
On-board Bus IDE adapters
Both
Autotype fixed disk
Type
User 540 MB
Cylinders
Heads
Sectors/Track
Multi-sector transfers
944
14
40
8 sectors
LBA mode control
Enabled
32 bit I/O
Transfer mode
Enabled
PI0 mode 3
58 English
Configure IDE drive 0. It is not recommended to connect a
CD-ROM on a channel which already has an IDE hard disk
drive. Sub-menu items for each of these fields are given
below “On-board Bus IDE adapters” in this table.
Select “Standard” only if you are running a UNIX
Operating System.
Enable or disable the on-board IDE adapters.
“Primary” enables only the HDD data cable (marked
“HDD” next to the system board attachment).
“Both” enables the HDD data cable and the CD-ROM data
cable (marked “CD-ROM” next to the system board
attachment).
Automatically attempts to detect and identify the IDE
drive when you press the Enter key.
Select “Auto” for automatic hard disk drive detection. (To
initiate automatic hard disk detection, press the Enter key
at the “Autotype fixed disk” item). “User” allows you to
edit all the detected parameters. Select “CD” if drive is an
IDE CD-ROM, and “None” if there is no drive.
Sets the number of hard disk drive cylinders.
Sets the number of hard disk drive heads.
Sets the number of hard disk drive sectors per track.
Determines the number of sectors per block for multiple
sector transfers.
Enable or disable Logical Block Addressing mode in place
of Cylinder Heads Sectors.
Enable or disable 32 bit data transfer.
Selects the hard disk drive transfer mode and data
transfer rate.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Setup Item
PC I Devices
Slot #1 Bus Master
Slot #2 Bus Master
Slot #3 Bus Master*
PCI IRQ line 1
PCI IRQ line 2
PCI IRQ line 3
PCI IRQ line 4
Security
Administrator password is
Set Administrator Password
Default
Action
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enable this option if you need the BIOS to set the PCI Bus
Master bit. This could be necessary for some old PCI
cards. * Slot #3 is not supported for the VL 5/xxx series 4
desktop PC.
Select an IRQ number only if necessary (for example for
SCO-UNIX).
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Disabled
Start with keyboard locked
Disabled
Password on boot
Boot on flexible disk drive
Write on flexible disk drives
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Use of flexible disk drive
User
Boot on hard disk drive
Fixed disk boot sector
Enabled
Not protected
Boot on CD-ROM
Space-bar POWER-ON
Enabled
Enabled
Indicates whether administrator password is enabled.
Allows you to set the administrator password. This
password prevents unauthorized access to the computer’s
configuration and can also be used to start the computer.
This feature allows the PC to start automatically, without
waiting for a password to be typed in, but the keyboard
will be locked. Only the user password can unlock the
keyboard. This option is only displayed if a user password
has been set and is not available if you are running
Windows 95. When the PC is started with the keyboard
locked, the Caps Lock LED flickers until the keyboard is
unlocked.
Enable or disable password prompt on boot.
Enables or disables boot on flexible disk drive.
Enables or disables writes on flexible disk drives.
Disabling prevents data being copied in your absence.
Limits the use of flexible disk drive(s) to the user or the
administrator, depending on the boot password.
Password on boot must be enabled for this option to be
set.
Enables or disables boot on hard disk drive.
Write-protects boot sector on hard disk to protect against
viruses.
Enables or disables boot on CD-ROM.
Enables or disables the space-bar to power-on the PC.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Using the HP Setup Program
Setup Item
Power
Standby delay
Wakeup
Mouse PS2/IRQ12
Default
Action
30 minutes
Sets the period of inactivity before the system runs in
Standby mode. Standby mode slows down the processor.
The delay is an approximate time, depending on the CPU
speed.
Enabled
Enables or disables the system to return to full speed
when the mouse is moved.
Enables or disables the system to return to full speed
when an IRQ is generated.
IRQ3 (Serial Port)
Enabled
IRQ4 (Serial Port)
Enabled
Save changes and Exit
Exit without saving changes.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Setting Passwords
Setting Passwords
You can set two passwords, the administrator password and the user
password, to provide two levels of protection for your PC.
Administrator
Password
Set the Administrator Password to protect the PC’s configuration in
Setup. The Administrator Password must be entered before any Setup
options, except Preferences, can be modified.
User Password
Setting a User or Administrator Password can provide a power-on
password prompt to prevent your PC being started or used in your
absence. A user password can only be set if an administrator password
has been set. The user password also allows the possibility of starting
the PC with the keyboard locked. You must then type the password and
press
to unlock the keyboard.
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4 The HP Setup Program
Setting Passwords
Setting Passwords
1 Turn on the PC and the display.
If the PC is already turned on, save your data, exit all applications
and then press
and Delete to restart the PC (Windows
3.11). For Windows 95, use the Shut Down command.
2 When F2=Setup is displayed, press
.
F2=Setup
3 The PC’s Setup program will display.
Setting an
Administrator
Password
•
Use the
or
key to select the Security menu item.
•
Use the
or
arrow keys to highlight the
Set Administrator Password field.
•
Type the password twice and press
.
4 If you do not set an Administrator password you cannot set a user
password.
5 If that is all you want to change in Setup, press
password and exit Setup.
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to save your
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4 The HP Setup Program
Setting Passwords
Setting a User
Password
•
Start Setup as described for setting an administrator password.
•
You cannot set a User Password if an Administrator password has
not been set.
•
Use the
or
key to select the Preferences menu item.
Use the
or
arrow keys to highlight the Set User
•
Password field.
•
Type your password twice and press
6 If that is all you want to change in Setup, press
password and exit Setup.
.
to save your
Passwords become effective after you have exited Setup and re-booted
the PC.
Clearing Passwords
To remove either password, follow the same procedure as to set a
password, but do not enter anything in the password field, press return
and then press return a second time to confirm your action.
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4 The HP Setup Program
After Installing an IDE Drive
After Installing an IDE Drive
After installing an IDE drive you will need to run the Setup program to
confirm that the drive has been detected by the PC.
When an Additional IDE 1 Switch on the PC.
Drive is installed
2 When F2=Setup is displayed, press
to run the Setup program.
3 From the “Configuration” menu, choose “Hard disk drive”.
4 Select the disk you have just installed.
5 Select Auto in the Type field.
6 Select Autotype fixed disk and press
7 Press
to save your choice and exit Setup.
Refer to the operating system documentation for information about
formatting a drive and installing the operating system.
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5
Troubleshooting Your PC
This chapter can help you solve problems that you may encounter
when using your PC.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
Solving Problems
Solving Problems
This chapter can help you solve any problems you might have with
your PC.
If you are unable to solve your problem after following the advice in
this chapter, refer to chapter 7, “Hewlett Packard Support and
Information Services”.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Does Not Start
If Your PC Does Not Start
If Your Display is Blank and There Are No Error Messages
1 Check that the computer and display are turned on. (The power light
should be illuminated.)
2 Check the display’s contrast and brightness settings.
3 Make sure that all cables and power cords are firmly plugged in.
4 Make sure the power outlet is working.
5 If the PC still does not work:
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
Turn off the display, the computer, and all external devices.
Unplug all power cords and cables, noting their positions.
Remove the cover.
Check that all internal cables are correctly attached and firmly in
place.
Check that the processor is correctly installed, see “Installing an
Upgrade Processor” on page 47.
Check that the processor speed switches have been set correctly,
see “System Board Connectors and Switches” on page 95.
Check that the memory modules are correctly installed, see
“Installing Memory” on page 26.
Check that accessory boards are firmly seated in their slots, see
“Installing Accessory Boards” on page 31.
Verify that any switches and jumpers on the accessory boards are
properly set (refer to the manuals that came with each board).
Check that the switches on the system board are properly set, see
“System Board Connectors and Switches” on page 95.
Replace the cover.
Reconnect all cables and power cords.
Turn on the display and computer.
If your PC still does not start, remove all boards and accessories,
except the hard disk drive. Start the PC. If the PC now works, add the
boards and accessories one at a time to determine which one is causing
the problem.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Does Not Start
If you are Unable to Change any Values in Setup
Make sure that the Secure Switch is not set if you are unable to change
any of the values in Setup, see “Using the HP Setup Program” on
page 52.
If a POST Error Message is Displayed
If a POST error is detected when the PC starts, details of the error are
displayed. The BIOS offers two possibilities,
to ignore the error and continue, or
• you can press
to run Setup and correct the system
• you can press
configuration error.
It is recommended that you correct the error before proceeding, even if
the PC appears to start successfully. You should start Setup to verify
that the accessory which caused the error has been correctly configured.
If the PC then starts, but POST still reports an error, clear CMOS
memory.
To Clear the CMOS Memory
1 Switch off the PC and remove the cover.
2 Set the system board switch 6 (CMOS STATUS) on the switch block
to CLOSED to clear the configuration.
3 Switch on the PC to erase the CMOS memory.
4 Wait until the PC has started. The screen will flash with the message
“Configuration has been cleared, set switch 6 to the OPEN
position before rebooting.”
5 Switch off the PC.
6 Set the system board switch 6 (CMOS STATUS) on the switch block
to OPEN to re-enable the configuration.
7 Replace the cover.
8 Switch on the PC. An error message will be displayed
“System CMOS checksum bad - run SETUP”
The PC will stop.
. CMOS default values will be
9 Run Setup by pressing
automatically downloaded and saved.
10 Make any other changes you want and press
configuration and exit from Setup.
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to save the
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Does Not Start
Power-On-Self-Test Errors that May Prevent Your PC From Starting
Message
Corrective Action and/or Explanation
Operating system not found
Check whether the disk, HDD, FDD or CD-ROM disk drive is
connected.
If it is connected, check that it is detected by Setup, see
“After Installing an IDE Drive” on page 64.
Check that your boot device is enabled on the Setup
Security menu.
If the problem persists, check that the boot device contains
the operating system.
Missing operating system
If you have configured HDD user parameters, check that
they are correct. Otherwise, use HDD type “Auto”
parameters.
Failure fixed disk
(preceeded by a 30” time-out)
Check that HDD is connected.
Check that HDD is detected in Setup.
Check that boot on hard disk drive is enabled in Setup, see
“The HP Setup Program” on page 51.
Diskette Drive A (or B) error
Check whether the diskette drive is connected. Check
Setup for the configuration, see “The HP Setup Program”
on page 51.
System battery is dead
You may get this message if the PC is disconnected for a
few days. When you Power-on the PC, run Setup to update
the configuration information. The message should no
longer be displayed. Should the problem persist, replace the
battery see “Changing the Battery” on page 80.
Keyboard error
Check that the keyboard is connected.
Resource Allocation Conflict -PCI
device 0079 on motherboard
Clear CMOS, see “To Clear the CMOS Memory” on page 68.
Video Plug and Play interrupted or
failed Re-enable in Setup and try again
You may have powered your PC Off/On too quickly and the
PC turned off Video plug and play as a protection.
System CMOS checksum bad - run
Setup
CMOS contents have changed between 2 power-on
sessions. Run Setup for configuration.
I/O device IRQ conflict
Serial ports A and B may have been assigned the same IRQ.
Assign a different IRQ to each serial port and save the
configuration.
No message, system “hangs” after
POST
Check that cache memory and main memory are correctly
set in their sockets.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Does Not Start
Message
Corrective Action and/or Explanation
Other
An error message may be displayed and the PC may “hang”
for 20 seconds and then beep. The POST is probably
checking for a mass storage device which it cannot find and
the PC is in Timeout Mode. After Timeout, run Setup to
check the configuration.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
This section describes what to do if you have problems with your
display, disk drives, printer, accessory board, keyboard, or mouse.
If Your Display Does Not Work
If nothing is displayed on the screen, but the PC starts and the
keyboard, disk drives, and other peripheral devices seem to operate
properly:
1 Make sure that the display is plugged in and switched ON.
2 Check that the brightness and contrast controls are properly set.
3 Ensure that the display video cable is correctly connected.
4 Switch off the display, and unplug it from the power outlet.
Disconnect the video cable and examine the video cable connector
pins. bent. If the pins are bent, carefully straighten them.
5 Check that the video upgrade is properly installed if you have one.
6 Check that an accessory board doesn’t use the same I/O address as
the integrated video interface (03B0h to 03DFh). Refer to the
manual supplied with the accessory for further information.
7 If the display works correctly during the Power-On-Self-Test
(POST), but goes blank when Windows starts, check that you have
enough memory for the video mode you have selected.
If Your Display is Blurred or Unreadable
If you select the wrong display in the HP User Tools menu, the display
screen may become blurred or unreadable. To correct this problem:
Windows 3.11
1 Restart the PC — either switch the PC off then on, or press
and Delete . The PC will perform its Power-On-Self-Test
(POST).
2 When the POST is finished, press
display the MS-DOS prompt (C:\).
to bypass the startup files and
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
3 Type CD C:\WINDOWS
4 Type SETUP
.
.
5 Press the up-arrow key to select the Display line, and press
.
6 Select the VGA line, and press
7 Press
8 Press
again to accept the configuration.
and
9 If necessary, type WIN
Delete
to restart the PC.
to restart Windows.
10 When Windows starts, select the correct display with HP User Tools.
Windows 95
When you change the display type when using Windows 95, a
confirmation box is displayed prompting you to confirm the selection.
However, if you have selected the wrong display type and cannot read
the screen message because the screen is blurred, the display type will
automatically return to the previous selection after approximately 15
seconds.
Other Display Problems If the display image is not aligned with the screen, use the display’s
controls to center the image. Refer to the display manual for
instructions.
If the screens generated by the applications do not appear to be
correct, check the application’s manual to find out which video
standard is required. Also check your display manual to find out which
refresh rate is required. Use Setup or HP User Tools to select the
correct refresh rate when you are using Windows 3.11, or the HP
InfoCenter when you are using Windows 95.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
If Your Keyboard or Mouse Does Not Work
1 Ensure that the keyboard or mouse is correctly connected.
2 Ensure that the mouse driver supplied with the preloaded software
is installed correctly. (Choose a Logitech® mouse driver in Windows
SETUP.)
3 Clean the mouse ball and rollers as shown in the figure below (use a
non-residual contact cleaner).
Cleaning the mouse ball
Cleaning the mouse rollers
If Your Printer Does Not Work
1 Make sure the printer’s power switch is ON.
2 Verify that the power cord is plugged into the power outlet and the
printer.
3 Verify that you have the correct cable for the printer. Make sure that
it is securely connected to the correct connector (port) on the PC
and printer.
4 Check that the printer is on-line.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
5 Examine the paper feed mechanism for a paper jam.
6 Make sure that the printer is configured correctly for the PC and for
the application.
a Ensure the PC’s port has been correctly configured using Setup.
b Make sure the printer is correctly set up in Windows.
NOTE
If you are asked to insert a diskette when installing a printer, type
. All the Windows printer
drivers are located in this subdirectory.
C:\WINDOWS\OPTIONS and press
c Ensure the application program’s “print” menu has been correctly
set up. (Refer to the manual supplied with the application
software.)
7 Check that the PC’s port is working properly by running another
peripheral connected to the port.
8 If you receive an error message, refer to the printer’s manual for help.
If the Flexible Disk Drive Does Not Work
1 Ensure you are using a formatted diskette and it is inserted
correctly.
2 Check you are using a diskette that is the right density.
3 Check that your FDD is correctly declared in the Setup
Configuration menu.
4 Check that the correct diskette type has been configured in Setup.
5 Check that the flexible disk drive has been enabled in Setup. There
are three options on the Setup Security menu which may be used
to disable or enable:
•
•
•
Boot on flexible disk drive
Write on flexible disk drives
Use of flexible disk drive.
6 Check the option on the Setup Configuration menu which
enables or disables the on-board flexible disk controller.
7 Check that the disk power and data cables are correctly connected.
8 Clean the flexible disk drive using a diskette cleaning kit.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
If the Hard Disk Does Not Work
1 Check that the disk power and data cables are correctly connected.
2 Check that the hard disk drive has been enabled and detected on the
Hard Disk menu in Setup. There is also an option on the Setup
Security menu which allows you to disable or enable boot on hard
disk drive.
3 Check that the on-board Bus IDE is enabled if you are using the onboard IDE controller.
If the Hard Disk Activity Light Does Not Work
If you are using a hard disk drive with a controller board (a SCSI hard
disk, for example), the activity light does not flicker when the PC is
accessing the hard disk drive.
If the hard disk activity light does not flicker when the PC is accessing
the hard disk drive:
1 Check that the control panel connector is firmly attached to the
system board.
2 Check that the disk power and data cables are correctly connected.
If the CD-ROM Drive Does Not Work
1 Check that the cables have been properly connected.
2 Check that a CD is inserted in the drive.
3 Verify that the CD-ROM is declared as “CD” in Setup on the Hard
Disk Drives menu.
4 Verify that the On-board Bus IDE Adapters item is set to Both
in Setup.
5 If you intend to boot on CD-ROM, make sure that this option is
enabled in Setup on the Security menu.
6 For further information refer to the CD-ROM documentation.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Hardware Problem
If an Accessory Board Does Not Work
Carry out the following checks:
1 Ensure the board has been firmly installed in the accessory board
slot.
2 Check that the accessory board has been correctly configured with
the ISA Configuration Utility if necessary.
3 Ensure the board is not using memory, I/O addresses, an IRQ, or
DMA also used by the PC, see “IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses Used
by Your PC” on page 87.
Refer to the board’s manual for further details.
You can also obtain information about the current use of IRQs by the
PC by typing MSD at the MS-DOS prompt, and pressing
,
when using Windows 3.11. If you are using Windows 95, use the
Device Manager.
4 Check that the PC has been configured correctly in Setup.
5 If the problem persists, refer to Chapter 7, “Hewlett Packard Support
and Information Services” for information about where to obtain
support.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
If You Have Forgotten Your Password
❒ If you forget the User Password, but not the Administrator password,
carry out the following procedure:
1 Restart the PC. If the keyboard is locked, unplug the power cord
and plug it in again.
2 Wait for F2=Setup to be displayed.
3 Press
to start Setup.
4 Enter the Administrator Password to access the Preferences
menu.
5 Move to the User Password field and set a new User Password.
This will replace the old password which you had forgotten.
6 Press
to save the new Password and exit Setup.
❒ If you forget both the User Password and the Administrator
Password:
1 Switch off the PC.
2 Remove the computer’s cover.
3 Set switch 5 (PASWD EN) on the system board switch block to
CLOSED.
4 Switch on the PC and allow it to complete its startup routine.
The message “Passwords have been cleared, set
switch 5 to open position before rebooting” will
be displayed.
5 Switch off the computer.
6 Reset switch 5 (PASWD EN) to OPEN.
7 Replace the computer’s cover.
8 Switch on the PC and allow it to complete its startup routine.
9 After the Power-On Self-Test has completed, press
prompted to use Setup.
when
10 Set new User and System Administrator Passwords.
11 Press
to save the new passwords and exit Setup.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
If Your Application Software Does Not Work
If the PC reports the system is OK and the indicator light over the
power switch is illuminated, but some software won’t run:
1 Check to see if the AUTOEXEC.BAT file is present with the correct
settings. (Windows 3.11 only). Refer to the operating system and
application software manuals.
2 If Windows does not run properly, refer to the Windows manual for
guidance.
If Power Management Does Not Work
appears in the StartUp Windows group.
Power Management in Check that the Sleep icon
If it is absent, click on the File menu in the Program Manager and select
Windows 3.11
the New option to install SLEEP.EXE from the C:\WINDOWS directory in
the StartUp group.
Check that Power Management is enabled using the Power icon in the
Windows Control Panel:
1 Double-click on the Power icon in the Windows Control Panel.
2 Check that Advanced is selected in the Power dialog box.
If the Power icon does not appear in the Windows Control Panel:
1 Exit from Windows.
2 At the MS-DOS prompt, change to the C:\WINDOWS directory.
to run Windows SETUP and set the Computer field
3 Type SETUP
to MS-DOS with APM. Follow the instructions displayed by the
SETUP program to return to the MS-DOS prompt.
Power Management in 1 Check that Power Management is enabled using the Power icon in
the Windows Control Panel.
Windows 95
2 Check that Advanced is selected in the Power dialog box.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
If your PC supports power management features, but no power
management settings are displayed, make sure that the Energy Star
Compliant box is selected in the display’s settings. See the Windows 95
online help for further information.
Power Management in Use a text editor to check that DEVICE=C:\DOS\POWER.EXE ADV:MAX
is present in the CONFIG.SYS file.
DOS
If the Date and Time are Incorrect
The date and time can be incorrect for the following reasons:
•
the time has changed for the seasons
•
the PC has been unplugged from the power too long, and the battery
is discharged.
To change the date and time use the HP User Tools program (Windows
3.11) or the HP InfoCenter (Windows 95). You can also use the Setup
program to change the date and time.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
Changing the Battery
Special care is needed in changing the battery. Instructions for
changing the battery are given below.
You should order replacement battery HP 1420 - 0314 from your local
Sales and Service office, or a Rayovac 2325/2335 or Mitsubishi
BR2325/BR2335, either of which are available from most local stores.
After removing the computer’s cover:
1 Remove the old battery by gently sliding it from under the retaining
clip.
2 Place the new battery in the battery holder, with the cross
uppermost, and ensure that it is properly seated.
3 Ensure that the clip is in place and holds the battery firmly.
You can also install an external battery (order number 1420-0513)
which you can order from your authorized reseller.
Install the external battery as follows:
1 After removing the computer’s cover, connect the external battery
cable to the battery connector on the system board.
2 Mount the external battery on the backplane, using the self-adhesive
strip supplied.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
After installing either a replacement or an external battery, replace the
computer’s cover and run the Setup program to reconfigure the
computer.
WARNING
For your safety, never attempt to recharge, disassemble, or burn the
old battery. The battery in this PC is a lithium battery which does not
contain heavy metals, nevertheless, in order to protect the
environment, do not dispose of batteries in household waste. Please
return used batteries to the shop from which you bought them, or to the
dealer from whom you purchased your PC, or to HP, so that they can
either be recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sound way.
Returned used batteries will be accepted free of charge.
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5 Troubleshooting Your PC
If Your PC Has a Software Problem
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6
Technical Information
This chapter provides technical information about your PC.
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Specifications
Features
Feature
Description
Processor (standard)
PentiumTM
Level-one cache
8 KB code, 8 KB write-back data
Level-two cache
256 KB synchronous or pipeline burst cache
Main memory (size/speed)
Upgradable to 128 MB (60 ns, 32-bit)
Video
Integrated 64-bit Ultra VGA Controller on PCI bus
1 MB standard, upgradable to 2 MB, DDC1 compliant,
or
Matrox MGA Millennium board with 2MB standard,
upgradeable to 4MB using an upgrade module available from
Hewlett Packard, or 8MB using an upgrade module available
from Matrox.
Disk drive controller
Master Enhanced IDE controller on PCI bus
Rear connectors
•
•
•
•
•
mini-DIN mouse
mini-DIN keyboard
25-pin parallel
9-pin serial (two, buffered)
15-pin VGA
25-pin parallel connector
•
•
Mode: Centronics, bidirectional, EPP, or ECP.
Parallel port: 2C8h (IRQ5), 2D8h (IRQ5), 218h (IRQ7),
278h (IRQ 7), 378h (IRQ 7), 3C8h (IRQ 7), 3D8h (IRQ7), or
Disabled.
9-pin serial connectors
•
Standard: Two UART 16550 buffered serial ports
(both RS-232-C).
Serial port A or B: 238H (IRQ3), 2E8h (IRQ 3),
2F8h (IRQ 3), 228h (IRQ4), 338H (IRQ4), 3E8h (IRQ 4),
3F8h (IRQ 4), or Disabled.
•
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Feature
Description
Disk drive shelves
Four internal mass storage shelves supporting:
• one internal 3.5-inch hard disk drive
• three front-access devices: a 3.5-inch drive, a full-height
5.25-inch drive, and a 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch slim-line drive.
If you want to install a second hard disk drive, it can be
installed internally in one of these shelves and the space on
the front of the PC is blocked by a bezel.
System board connectors
•
•
•
Accessory slots
One PCI slot, one full-length combo ISA/PCI slot, one fulllength 16-bit ISA slot, and one half-length 16-bit ISA slot.
Keyboard/Mouse
HP keyboard with mini-DIN connector
HP mouse with mini-DIN connector.
VESA internal video pass-through connector
One flexible disk drive connector
Two Fast IDE connectors (for up to 3 IDE hard disk drives,
or 2 hard disk drives and 1 CD-ROM.)
Features
Characteristics
Description
Weight (excluding keyboard and display)
9 kilograms (20 pounds).
Dimensions
39 cm (D) by 42 cm (W) by 12.5 cm (H)
(15.3 inches by 16.5 inches by 4.9 inches).
Footprint
0.17 m2 (1.8 sq ft).
Storage temperature
-40 °C to 70°C (-40 °F to 158 °F).
Storage humidity
8% to 80% (relative).
Operating temperature
5 °C to 40 °C (40 °F to 104 °F).
Operating humidity
15% to 80% (relative).
Acoustic noise emission
LW ≤ 40 dBA
Power supply
•
•
•
Input voltage: 100-127 + 200-240 V ac auto-ranging
Input frequency: 50 / 60 Hz
Maximum power: 100 W continuous.
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Power Consumption
All measurements are in watts (rms).
Consumption at 115V / 60Hz
90MHz
100MHz
120MHz
133MHz
Off
1.27w
1.27w
1.29w
1.28w
Windows
31.9w
39.8w
42.00w
37.6w
Standby
23.7w
24.1w
26.4w
21.3w
Sleep
19.00w
19.4w
20.9w
20.5w
Consumption at 230V / 50Hz
NOTE
90MHz
100MHz
120MHz
133MHz
Off
2.94w
2.89w
2.95w
2.73w
Windows
34.5w
35.1w
43.9w
40.1w
Standby
26.6w
26.6w
29.0w
28.3w
Sleep
22.5w
22.5w
24.0w
23.5w
When the PC is turned off with the power button on the front panel, the
power consumption falls below 5 Watts, but is not zero. The special
on/off method used by this PC considerably extends the lifetime of the
power supply. To reach zero power consumption in “off” mode, either
unplug the PC from the power outlet or use a power block with a switch.
You should be aware that the PC will lose its time settings within a few
days if you unplug the PC, or switch off the PC at the power block.
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Typical Power Consumption/Availability for ISA Accessory Slots
+5 V
4.5A limit per slot (limited by system board)
+12 V
1.5A limit per slot (limited by system board)
-5 V
0.1A total power limit (limited by power supply)
-12 V
0.3A total power limit (limited by power supply)
Typical Power Consumption/Availability for PCI Accessory Slots
+5 V
4.5A maximum per slot
+12 V
0.5A maximum per slot
-12 V
0.1A maximum per slot
There is a maximum per-slot limit of 25 W between all supply rails.
IRQs, DMAs, and I/O Addresses Used by Your PC
IRQs used by PC
The IRQ, DMA, and I/O
address mappings shown
here are for a PC with a
basic configuration. The
resources used by your PC
may vary, depending upon
which accessory boards
are bundled with the PC.
For information on current
use of IRQs, DMAs, and I/O
addresses by your PC, type
MSD at the MS-DOS
prompt, (Windows 3.11) or
use the Device Manager
(Windows 95.)
IRQ0
IRQ1
IRQ2
IRQ3
IRQ4
IRQ5
IRQ6
IRQ7
IRQ8
IRQ9
IRQ10
IRQ11
IRQ12
IRQ13
IRQ14
IRQ15
system timer
keyboard
system cascade
free if not used for serial port
free if not used for serial port
free if not used for parallel port
flexible disk drive controller
free if not used for parallel port
real-time clock
available for PCI devices, if not used by ISA board
available for PCI devices, if not used by ISA board
available for PCI devices, if not used by ISA board
mouse
processor
integrated IDE hard disk drive controller
free if not used by second IDE controller
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
DMAs used by PC
DMA 0
DMA 1
DMA 2
DMA 3
DMA 4
DMA 5
DMA 6
DMA 7
I/O Addresses used by PC
170h - 177h, 376h IDE secondary channel
1F0h - 1F7h, 3F6h IDE primary channel
278h - 27Fh parallel port
2E8h - 2EFh serial port
2F8h - 2FFh serial port
370h - 371h integrated I/O controller
378h - 37Fh parallel port
3B0h - 3DFh integrated video graphics controller
3E8h - 3EFh serial port
3F0h - 3F5h, 3F7h integrated flexible disk controller
3F8h - 3FFh serial port
496h - 497h HP reserved
678h - 67Bh parallel port if ECP mode is selected
778h - 77Bh parallel port if ECP mode is selected
88 English
free
free if not used for parallel port in Setup
flexible disk drive controller
free if not used for parallel port in Setup
used to cascade DMA channels 0-3
free
free
free
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Available Video Resolutions
Depending on the model, your PC has either:
•
an integrated 64-bit Ultra VGA controller on a PCI bus with 1 MB of
memory as standard, which can be upgraded to 2 MB, or
•
a Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter board with 2MB of memory
as standard, which can be upgraded to 4MB (upgrade module from
HP) or 8MB (upgrade module from Matrox). Details of available
resolutions and the amount of memory required for each resolution
are given after the details for the different operating systems.
The video resolutions available for your PC depend on the operating
system which you have installed and the amount of memory. The tables
below give the typical resolutions for the operating systems: BIOS,
Windows 3.11, Windows 95 and OS/2.
For details of how to obtain further information, see chapter 7,
“Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services”.
BIOS Video Resolutions
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
16, 256, 32K, 64K
60, 72, 75
1 MB
800 x 600
16, 256, 32K, 64K
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
16, 256
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
16
i43, i45, 60
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
16, 256, 32K, 64K,
16M
60, 72, 75
2 MB
800 x 600
16, 256, 32K, 64K,
16M
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
16, 256, 32K, 64K
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
16, 256
i45, 60, 70, 75
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Windows Video Resolutions
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
16, 256, 32K, 64K
60, 72, 75
1 MB
800 x 600
256, 32K, 64K
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
256
i43, 60, 70, 75
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
16, 256, 32K, 64K,
16M
60, 72, 75
2 MB
800 x 600
256, 32K, 64K, 16M
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
256, 32K, 64K
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
256
i45, 60, 70, 75
Windows 95 Video Resolutions
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
16, 256, 64K,
16M/24Bpp1
60, 72, 75
1 MB
800 x 600
16, 256, 64K
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
16, 256
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
16
i45, 60, 72, 75
1.
Bpp = Bits per pixel
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
16, 256, 64K,
16M/24Bpp1,
16M/32Bpp
60, 72, 75
2 MB
800 x 600
16, 256, 64K,
16M/32Bpp
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
16, 256, 64K
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
16, 256
i45, 60, 72, 75
1.
Bpp = Bits per pixel
OS/2 Video Resolutions
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
256, 64K
60, 72, 75
1 MB
800 x 600
256
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
256
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
Not available
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
256, 64K, 16M
60, 72, 75
2 MB
800 x 600
256, 64K
60, 72, 75
1024 x 768
256, 64K
i43, 60, 70, 75
1280 x 1024
256
i43, 60, 72, 75
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6 Technical Information
Specifications
Video Resolutions for the Matrox MGA Millennium Video Adapter Card, Valid for
Windows 3.11, Windows 95 and OS/2
Resolution
Number of colors
Refresh Rate
Memory
640 x 480
256, 64K, 16M
2 MB
800 x 600
256, 64K, 16M
1024 x 768
256, 64K
All resolutions
support any refresh
rate available with
your display.
1600 x 12001
256
640 x 480
256, 64K, 16M
800 x 600
256, 64K, 16M
1024 x 768
256, 64K, 16M
1280 x 1024
256, 64K, 16M
(24Bpp)
1600 x 12001
256, 64K
640 x 480
256, 64K, 16M
800 x 600
256, 64K, 16M
1024 x 768
256, 64K, 16M
1280 x 1024
256, 64K, 16M
1600 x 12001
256, 64K, 16M
1.
4 MB
8 MB
Upper limit of refresh rate for HP monitors is 60Hz.
Only 24Bpp (Bits per pixel) is available for OS/2 16K colors.
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6 Technical Information
The PC’s Memory Map
The PC’s Memory Map
Memory Area
Memory Range
Hexadecimal
Address Range
Used By
01000 to 0F0000
Windows Applications
960 KB to 1024 KB
0F0000 to 010000
64 KB BIOS area
896 KB to 960 KB
0E0000 to 0F0000
64 KB (available)
800 KB to 896 KB
0C8000 to 0E0000
96 KB available for
accessory boards
768 KB to 800 KB
0C0000 to 0C8000
32 KB Video BIOS Area
640 KB to 768 KB
0A0000 to 0C0000
128 KB Video Memory Area
0 KB to 640 KB
09F000 to 0A0000
Extended BIOS Data Area
—
User Application Program
Area
—
MS-DOS Operating System
0500 to 0700
MS-DOS Temp Buffer
0400 to 04FF
BIOS Data Area
0000 to 03FF
Interrupt Vector Table
Extended Memory: 1 MB to 4 MB
Extended memory
1024 KB upward
Conventional Memory: 0 KB to 1024 KB (1 MB)
384 KB Reserved
Memory Area
640 KB Base
Memory Area
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6 Technical Information
The PC’s Rear Connectors
The PC’s Rear Connectors
Keyboard/Mouse
Parallel Connector
Serial Connector
VGA Video Connector
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6 Technical Information
System Board Connectors and Switches
System Board Connectors and Switches
VESA Connector
System Board Switches
System Board Switches
Switch
Switch function:
1-4
Processor speed, see table on next page
5
Password:
open = enabled
closed = disabled / clear passwords
6
CMOS:
open = normal
closed = clear CMOS
7
Processor speed, see table on next page
8
Secure mode selection:
open = normal
closed = Super secure mode (no BIOS flashing and no Setup changes allowed)
9
Keyboard power-on:
open = disabled
closed = enabled
10
Not used
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6 Technical Information
System Board Connectors and Switches
The settings for different processors at different speeds are a
combination of the settings of switches 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7.
Pentium processor
Switch1
Switch 2 Switch 3 Switch 4 Switch 7
CPU Frequency 75 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 50 MHz
PCI Frequency 25 MHz
AT Frequency 8.33 MHz
Closed
Closed
Open
Open
Open
CPU Frequency 90 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 60 MHz
PCI Frequency 30 MHz
AT Frequency 7.5 MHz
Closed
Open
Open
Open
Closed
CPU Frequency 100 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 66 MHz
PCI Frequency 33 MHz
AT Frequency 8.25 MHz
Open
Closed
Open
Open
Closed
CPU Frequency 120 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 60 MHz
PCI Frequency 30 MHz
AT Frequency 7.5 MHz
Closed
Open
Closed
Open
Closed
CPU Frequency 133 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 66 MHz
PCI Frequency 33 MHz
AT Frequency 8.25 MHz
Open
Closed
Closed
Open
Closed
The following processor speeds have been announced by Intel.
Pentium processor
Switch 1 Switch 2 Switch 3 Switch 4 Switch 7
CPU Frequency 150 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 60 MHz
PCI Frequency 30 MHz
AT Frequency 7.5 MHz
Closed
Open
Closed
Closed
Closed
CPU Frequency 166 MHz
CPU bus Frequency 66 MHz
PCI Frequency 33 MHz
AT Frequency 8.25 MHz
Open
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
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6 Technical Information
Recycling Your PC
Recycling Your PC
HP has a strong commitment toward the environment. Your HP
Personal Computer has been designed to respect the environment as
much as possible.
HP can also take back your old PC for recycling when it reaches the
end of its useful life.
HP has a product take-back program in several countries. The
collected equipment is sent to one of HP’s recycling facilities in Europe
or the USA. As many parts as possible are re-used. The remainder is
recycled. Special care is taken of batteries and other potentially toxic
substances, which are reduced into non-harmful elements by means of
a special chemical process.
If you require more information about HP’s product take-back program,
contact your dealer or your nearest HP Sales Office.
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6 Technical Information
Recycling Your PC
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7
Hewlett Packard Support and
Information Services
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Introduction
Introduction
Hewlett Packard computers are engineered for quality and reliability to
give you many years of trouble-free service. To ensure that your
desktop system maintains its reliability and to keep you up-to-date with
the latest developments, HP and a worldwide network of trained and
authorized resellers provide a comprehensive range of service and
support options which are listed below:
•
HP Authorized Reseller
•
HP SupportPack
•
HP Support Assistant CD-ROM
•
HP Information Services
•
Service
Means of Access
HP Forum on CompuServe
Modem
HP Forum on America Online (US only)
Modem
HP BBS Library
Modem
Internet FTP Library Service
FTP access to the Internet
HP Access World Wide Web Site
World Wide Web Access
HP FIRST Faxback
Phone and Fax
Audio Tips (US only)
Phone
HP Drivers/BIOS diskettes
Delivered by mail
HP Support Services
Technical phone support
Lifeline phone support
Network phone-in support.
NOTE
When calling any of the international telephone numbers listed in this
chapter, replace the ‘+’ with your international telephone access code.
100 English
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Your HP Authorized Reseller
Your HP Authorized Reseller
HP Authorized Resellers have been trained on HP Vectra equipment
and are familiar with its configuration and environment. Authorized
Resellers can also answer questions regarding non-HP hardware,
software and systems as well as answer queries about usage not
intended for, or not commonly used with the HP Vectra.
Authorized HP Resellers can also offer consulting services tailored to
your specific needs regarding product development or custom
installations, as will third party support services, or the HP Customer
Support organization in your country.
HP SupportPack
HP’s three-year SupportPack is available from your local reseller. It
must be purchased within 30 days of purchasing your HP Vectra.
The concept of SupportPack is simple. It allows you to extend your
one-year on-site hardware warranty to a three-year on-site hardware
warranty, offering next day on-site response.
SupportPack is valid for the piece of equipment for which it was
bought, but is not transferable from one piece of equipment to another.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
HP Support Assistant CD-ROM
HP Support Assistant CD-ROM
HP Support Assistant is a yearly subscription service on CD-ROM. It is
published four times a year.
Each CD-ROM contains information about Vectra PCs as well as other
HP computing products. The types of information you can find include:
• Product manuals and service manuals
• Installation and configuration information
• Troubleshooting information
• Drivers and utilities
• Technical reference manuals.
Subscriptions to HP Support Assistant can be obtained with an order
form which is available from the HP FIRST Faxback system. Request
document number 9025 (US and Asia Pacific) or 19025 (Europe).
Subscriptions can also be obtained by contacting the following
numbers:
Region
Phone Number
Fax Number
Asia-Pacific
+65 740-4477
+65 740-4499
Europe
+31 (55) 384279
+31 (55) 434455
Latin America
+1 (317) 364-8882
+1 (317) 364-8888
US/Canada
1 (800) 457-1762
+1 (317) 364-8888
102 English
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Information Services
Hewlett Packard Electronic Information Services are available 24 hours
per day, 7 days per week, ensuring that the most up-to-date
information is always available.
HP Forum on CompuServe
The HP Systems Forum on CompuServe is an on-line service,
accessible via modem. This service provides information about your HP
PC, and allows you to communicate with other HP users through an
on-line user forum. HP users share their knowledge and experience
with you, and you will be able to ask, or answer, technical questions
about your HP Vectra PC, and HP products.
You can also download the latest versions of drivers, BIOS and software
utilities for HP Vectra PCs.
As a preferred Hewlett Packard customer, you are invited to join
CompuServe at no initial charge.
For the United States and the United Kingdom, call the number shown
below and ask for representative 51. For all other locations, first call
the worldwide number to obtain the number of your local sales office,
then call your local sales office and ask for representative 51.
Country
Local Call / Freephone
Number
Direct Number
United States
1 (800) 848-8199
+1 (614) 529-1349
United
Kingdom
(0800) 289378
+44 (1272) 760680
Worldwide
—
+1 (614) 529-1349
CompuServe will send you a free introductory membership
immediately, including information on how to access CompuServe.
At the CompuServe ! prompt, type GO HP.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Information Services
HP Forum on America Online
The HP Forum on America Online is an electronic information and
communication service which can be accessed via modem.
To access the HP Forum:
• select Keyword Search from the menu,
• type HP,
• press
.
This will load the HP Home Page directly onto your screen.
In the HP Forum you can ask and answer questions about HP products
and you can also download drivers, software application notes, or
utilities for HP products.
Membership information can be obtained by calling 1(800) 827-6364,
giving the preferred customer number 1118.
104 English
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Information Services
HP BBS Library
The HP electronic bulletin board library service contains the latest
versions of drivers, BIOS, and utilities, which you can download to your
PC using a modem. Support documentation is also available.
Country
Number
Baud Rate
United States
+1 (208) 344-1691
300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 14400
United
Kingdom
+44 (1344) 3600880
up to 14400
Worldwide
+1 (208) 344-1691
300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 14400
Set your modem for no parity, 8 data bits, and 1 stop bit (N, 8, 1).
Internet—FTP Library Service
Hewlett-Packard provides a library service which offers the latest
versions of drivers, BIOS and utilities and other information about HP
products. This library service is available if you have FTP access to the
Internet, whatever your location.
Alias
ftp-boi.external.hp.com
Name
anonymous
Password
Enter your E-mail address
Access HP World Wide Web Site
Access HP, HP’s World Wide Web site gives you access to information
about HP, its products, including product data sheets, service and
support information, electronic newsletters and technical tips. You can
also download the latest versions of drivers, BIOS and software
utilities.
The Access Guide Directory guides you through the information and
services available.
World-Wide Web URL
http://www.hp.com
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Information Services
HP FAXback on Demand—HP FIRST
HP FIRST is a service where you can select documents, support and
technical information, data sheets and pre-sales information, which are
then faxed to you. To access this service, you can use a touch-tone
phone and have the fax sent to the fax machine of your choice, or use
the handset on your fax machine and dial one of the numbers given
below:
Country/Region
Number
Access Method
United States
1 (800) 333-1917
Phone or fax
U.K.
(0800) 960271
Phone or fax
Australia
+61 (3) 9272-2627
Phone or fax
Singapore
+ 65 291-7951
Phone or fax
Hong Kong
+ 852 2506-2422
Phone or fax
New Zealand
+ 64 (9) 356-6642
Phone or fax
Europe
+ 31 (20) 681-5792
Phone or fax
Worldwide
+ 1 (208) 344-4809
Fax
A complete description of Hewlett-Packard electronic services is
provided in document #9020.
HP Audio Tips (USA only) HP Automated Support Directory
HP Audio Tips is an automated system containing recordings which can
direct you to Hewlett Packard support services. Live support is not
available through this service.
Dial 1 (800) 333-1917 and press 3, to access HP Audio Tips.
106 English
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Information Services
Ordering Drivers and BIOS on Diskette
You can order diskettes from HP, with the latest versions of drivers,
BIOS and software utilities. The diskettes will be delivered by mail.
Information for ordering diskettes is set out in the table below:
North and Latin America
Europe
Phone +1 (970) 339 7009
Monday - Saturday
24 hours per day
Phone +44 (1429) 865511
Monday - Friday
8.30 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.
Central European Time
Fax +1 (970) 330 7655
Fax +44 (1429) 866000
Mail
US Driver Fulfillment for
Hewlett-Packard
PO Box 1754, Greeley,
Colorado 80632
USA
Mail
European Fulfillment for
Hewlett-Packard
c/o StarPak International, Ltd.,
Hartlepool, Cleveland,TS25 2YP
United Kingdom
Australia
Asia - Pacific
Phone + 61 (2) 565 6099
Monday - Friday
8.30 a.m. - 5.30 p.m.
Australian Eastern Time
Phone + 65 740 4477
Monday - Friday
8.30 a.m. - 5.30 p.m.
Singapore Time
Fax + 61 (2) 519 5631
Fax + 65 740 4499
Mail
Fulfill: Plus Pty Ltd.,
Private Bag 75,
Alexandria NSW
Australia 2015
Mail
Fulfill: Plus Pte Ltd.,
No 51, Ubi Ave. 3,
Singapore 1440
To identify a specific BIOS, driver or utility for your PC, please follow
the steps listed below prior to placing your order.
•
Contact your authorized HP reseller for assistance in selecting the
appropriate driver.
•
If your reseller is unable to help you, call HP FIRST for the most upto-date list of drivers.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
HP Support Services
HP Support Services
Hewlett-Packard provides a three year hardware warranty which
includes on-site service during the first year after purchase, and a
return service during the second and third years after purchase. This
warranty coverage will apply from the nearest HP or HP authorized
service outlet.
HP telephone support for your Vectra PC is available during the first
year of your hardware warranty. This service will also provide technical
assistance with the basic configuration and setup of your Vectra PC and
for the pre-loaded operating system.
Lifeline Telephone support is available during the second and third
years of hardware warranty, via the Lifeline program, which is a feebased service.
The HP telephone support service does NOT provide free telephone
support for PCs configured as network servers. If you do configure
your PC as a network server, you are advised to contact your HP
reseller to purchase a network phone-in support contract, which will
provide you with a fee-based telephone support service.
NOTE
Reloading the software pre-loaded on your PC is not covered by your HP
three-year warranty. HP strongly recommends that you make a set of
master diskettes of this software as soon as possible after receiving your
PC. To make the master diskettes, use the Master Diskette Creation
Utility, which can be accessed from HP Utilities.
Your HP authorized reseller offers various service contracts which can
be tailored to your particular support needs.
108 English
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Telephone Support
Hewlett-Packard Telephone Support
HP North American
Customer Support
Center
Assistance from the HP North American Customer Support Center is
available Monday to Friday, 7:00 am to 6:00 pm Mountain time, except
Wednesday when the hours are 7.00 am to 4:00 pm.
The number is: +1 (970) 635-1000
HP European Customer Assistance from the HP European Customer Support Center is available
in English, Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 6:00 pm Central European
Support Center
time, except Wednesday when the hours are 8.30 am to 4:00 pm.
The number is: +31 (20) 581-3330
Other Regions
Contact your reseller who will be able to help you, or direct you to the
appropriate HP telephone support service.
Please have the following information ready when you call so that your
enquiry can be dealt with quickly:
•
•
•
your HP Vectra model number and serial number
the operating system version and the configuration
a description of the software installed and the accessories used.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Lifeline Telephone Support
Lifeline Telephone Support
Lifeline is a fee-based telephone support program for Vectra PCs
available after the one-year telephone support provided as part of the
hardware warranty has expired.
Your call can either be charged to your phone bill at a per minute rate
or to your credit card (Visa, Mastercard or American Express) at a flat
fee.
The charge begins AFTER you have been put in contact with a support
technician. If your problem is found to be covered by the HP Hardware
Warranty, no charge will be applied.
In the US please call the appropriate number listed below.
Number
Method of Payment
Charge Type
1 (900) 555-1500
Charged to phone bill
per minute rate
1 (800) 999-1148
Charged to credit card
Flat fee
Free access to HP information services is not affected by this service.
You are encouraged to access HP Information Services throughout the
life of your PC, whether in or out of warranty.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
HP Network Phone-in Support Service (NPS)
HP Network Phone-in Support Service (NPS)
The HP Network Phone-in Support Service (NPS) provides fast access
to HP experts in networked Multivendor environments.
It can help you to:
•
resolve complex network problems,
•
leverage HP’s alliances with leading Network Operating Systems and
Network manufacturers,
•
support your HP and non-HP products with a single telephone call,
•
increase network uptime.
You can purchase the HP NPS service as an annual contract, billable in
advance annually, bi-annually, quarterly, or at an hourly rate. This
contract service provides unlimited toll-free access to HP Response
Center Engineers (RCEs).
To obtain an HP NPS contract, contact your HP authorized reseller, or
if you are in the US call (800) 437-9140.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Summary
Summary
The table below summarizes the services and support available from
HP or authorized resellers.
Service
Covers
Period
covered
Response
time
Fee
Basic
Warranty
Parts and labor for HP Three years from Next working day No charge.
products:
date of purchase. for on-site.
first year on-site,
second and third year
return to HP.
When
available
Purchase
from
At time of
purchase.
HP.
Parts and labor for HP First three years. Next working day. One fee which Within 30 days HP Authorized
HP
covers the three of purchase.
reseller.
SupportPack products.
years.
on-site
service
HP Support
Assistant
CD-ROM containing: Released
Product Manuals,
quarterly.
Technical Information
and Product features.
N/A
Annual
subscription.
Anytime.
HP.
Electronic
services
Technical information, Anytime.
drivers, utilities, tools
and diagnostics.
24-hour access.
No charge.
Anytime.
HP BBS,
Internet- FTP,
WWW,
CompuServe.
Technical
Phone
support
Basic assistance for
PC setup,
configuration,
start-up and
hardware diagnosis.
First year.
Business hours.
No charge.
At time of
purchase.
HP.
Lifeline
phone
support
Basic assistance for
PC setup,
configuration,
start-up and
hardware diagnosis.
After first year.
Business hours.
Per- call fee,
no time limit.
Anytime after
first year.
HP.
HP Network
Phone-in
support
Advanced remote
Annual contract.
technical support for
multivendor
networked
environments.
Business hours:
24-hour/ 7-day
service also
available.
Annual fee, or
minimum fee
per incident.
Anytime.
HP Authorized
reseller.
Service
Contracts
Technical Support.
As required.
Annual fee, or Anytime.
fee per incident.
112 English
Customer
defined.
Reseller.
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Marketing Headquarters
Hewlett-Packard Marketing Headquarters
Should you wish to contact Hewlett-Packard, check your local
telephone directory for the HP Sales and Service Office near you. If you
cannot find a convenient HP office, you can write to one of the major
HP Sales and Service Offices or one of the Worldwide Marketing
Headquarters listed here.
ASIA
Far East Sales Region Hdqtrs
Hewlett-Packard Asia Ltd.
22/F Peregrine Tower
Lipp Centre
89 Queensway, Central
Hong Kong
LATIN AMERICA
Hewlett-Packard Latin Am. Hdqtrs
Monte Pelvoux 111
Lomas de Chapultepec
11000 Mexico D.F.
EUROPE
European Operations Hdqtrs
Hewlett-Packard S.A.
150, route du Nant-d’Avril
P.O. Box 1217
Meyrin 2/Geneva
Switzerland
USA
Intercon Operations Hdqtrs
Hewlett-Packard Company
3495 Deer Creek Road
P.O. Box 10495
Palo Alto, CA 94303-0896
USA
MIDDLE EAST / AFRICA
Middle East / Central Africa Sales Hdqtrs
Hewlett-Packard S.A.
Rue de Veyrot 39
CH-1217 Meyrin 1/Geneva
Switzerland
CANADA
Hewlett-Packard Ltd.
6877 Goreway Drive
Mississauga
Ontario L4V 1M8
Canada
English 113
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7 Hewlett Packard Support and Information Services
Hewlett-Packard Marketing Headquarters
114 English
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Glossary
adapter An accessory board, that
connects to the system board via an
accessory board slot.
BBS Bulletin Board System. A
computer that uses a modem and
software to serve as an information
source for other computers equipped
with a modem. Hewlett-Packard has a
BBS that can be reached at +1 (408)
553-3500.
BIOS Basic Input-Output System.
Software that provides an interface
between the computer hardware and
the operating system.
bus An electrical connection over
which information is transported.
cache A block of high-speed memory
used for the temporary storage of
data.
CD-ROM Compact Disc Read Only
Memory. A mass storage device that
uses compact disc technology. CDs
can store data, but most cannot be
written to.
CMOS memory An area of your
computer’s memory whose contents
are preserved when you turn off the
computer. CMOS memory stores
information that must be maintained,
such as your computer’s
configuration.
controller A device that enables
another device (such as a hard disk)
to communicate with the computer.
device driver Software that enables
the computer to interface with a
specific peripheral, such as a printer
or display.
EPA energy star program A
standard for power management
which requires automatic powerdown to less than 30 W.
expansion slot A slot inside the
computer, connected to the system
board, that can be used for accessory
boards.
extended memory Memory which
can be addressed by the processor in
the area of memory above the first
1 MB.
HP Utilities Software provided by
Hewlett-Packard to perform certain
tasks, for example, changing the date
and time.
IDE Integrated Device Electronics.
An interface standard for
communications between the
computer and a hard disk or CD-ROM.
IRQ Interrupt Request. A signal,
which, when received by the
processor, halts the current process
and allows a different task to be
undertaken.
jumper An electrically-conductive
part that is used to connect two or
more points on a circuit board.
Commonly used to select
configuration options.
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Glossary
mass storage Any device used to
store large amounts of data. Usually
refers to hard disks and tape backup
units.
memory modules Miniature boards
containing memory chips. Used for
increasing the amount of memory
available in the computer.
multimedia Combining static media
(such as text and pictures) with
dynamic data (such as sound, video,
and animation) on the same system.
ROM Read-Only Memory. Computer
memory used to store parts of the
computer’s operating system
permanently. ROM chips can contain
instructions and data.
SCSI Small Computer System
Interface. A high-speed data bus used
for connecting hard disks, tape drives,
and other accessories to your
computer.
SCSI chain Devices connected on a
single SCSI bus.
network server mode A security
feature that prevents unauthorized
use of an input device (like a
keyboard or mouse) while your
computer is running as an unattended
network server.
Setup program Used to inform the
computer about its configuration, for
example the amount of memory
installed. The setup program is stored
in ROM on the system board.
pixel Picture element. The smallest
addressable spot on the screen.
shadow RAM A method of
relocating the system and/or video
BIOS from slower ROM chips to faster
RAM to improve system performance.
POST Power-On-Self-Test. A series
of tests your computer performs
when you switch the computer on.
RAM Random Access Memory. This
memory is used to hold programs and
data temporarily.
resolution A measure of the visible
detail on a screen or printout. Screen
resolution is measured in ‘pixels
across’ by ‘pixels down’ by ‘number of
colors’. Printer resolution is measured
in dpi (dots-per-inch).
SIMM Single In-line Memory
Module. A small board containing
several RAM chips.
terminator A resistor at the end of a
SCSI cable that prevents the signal
from reflecting back along the cable.
video controller A chip or
expansion card which converts
signals in the computer into
displayable signals.
video RAM Memory that enables or
speeds up drawing to the screen or
increases resolution or color options.
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Index
A
accessories
installing, 19–49
supported, 20
accessory board
installing, 33
Plug and Play, 31
problems, 76
Accessory boards
configuring, 31
installing, 31
Accessory boards, configuring in Windows 3.11, 31
Advanced Power Management, 9
After installing a video memory upgrade
on the MGA video adapter, 30
After Installing an IDE Drive, 64
After installing video memory upgrade
on MGA video adapter, 30
America Online
HP Forum, 104
B
BBS library
access numbers, 105
BIOS
obtaining via FTP, 105
obtaining via HP BBS, 105
obtaining via World Wide Web, 105
ordering by mail, 107
C
cables
keyboard, 4
CD-ROM drive
installing, 36
CD-ROM drive, does not work, 75
Changing the battery, 80
CMOS, clearing, 68
CompuServe
free introductory membership, 103
HP forum, 103
Configuring
security features, 61
Configuring accessory boards
Windows 95, 32
connecting
display, 4
keyboard, 4
power cords, 6
connectors
printer, 5
cover
removing, 22
replacing, 23
Creating master diskettes, 15
creating master diskettes, 9
D
DDC compliant, 30
Desktop Management Interface, 17
disconnecting from power, 6
Discover Your HP Vectra, 15
Diskettes
creating master, 15
display
connecting, 4
screen
brightness, 9
display, screen contrast, 9
DMA Channels
used by the PC, 87
DMI, 17
drivers
obtaining via FTP, 105
obtaining via HP BBS, 105
obtaining via World Wide Web, 105
ordering by mail, 107
E
Environmental Protection Agency, 16
Energy Star program, 16
error message, 68
Errors, Power-On-Self-Test, 69
F
flexible disk drive
installing, 36
installing 1-inch high, 44
problems, 74
FTP access to HP, 105
G
glossary, 115
H
hard disk
problems, 75
Hewlett-Packard
BBS library, 105
FTP access, 105
information services, 103
marketing headquarters, 113
product take back program, 97
support and information services, 99
World Wide Web access, 105
HP Forum
on America Online, 104
on CompuServe, 103
HP SETUP program
starting, 52
understanding, 55
HP User Tools, 15
using, 15
HP Utilities, 9
HP Vectra keyboard for Windows 95, 9
I
I/O addresses
used by the PC, 87
IDE drive, after installing, 64
IDE drives, 35
installing, 38, 41
IDE drives, installing additional, 64
information services, 103
Initializing
software, 7
Installing, 44
main memory, 26
memory, 26
video memory upgrade, 28
installing
1-inch high drive, 44
accessories, 19–49
accessory board, 31, 33
CD-ROM drive, 36
flexible disk drive, 36, 44
IDE drives, 38, 41
mass storage devices, 35
printer, 5
processor upgrade, 47
security bracket, 49
video memory, 28
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Index
Installing memory, 26
Installing, IDE drives, 64
Interrupt Request Channels
used by the PC, 87
J
jumper location, 95
K
keyboard
connecting, 4
problems, 73
M
mass storage devices
connectors, 35
installing, 35
Master diskette creation utility, 15
master diskettes
creating, 9
Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter
card
installing more memory, 29
Memory
installing, 26
memory
installing main memory, 26
installing video memory, 28
memory map, 93
Monitor Selection utility, 30
mouse
personalizing, 17
problems, 73
software, 17
N
network
telephone support, 111
P
parallel port
location, 5
password
setting, 61, 62
passwords
setting, 62
Passwords, clearing, 63
Passwords, setting administrator, 62
118
Passwords, setting user, 63
PC
memory map, 93
rear connectors, 94
recycling, 97
setting up, 1–9
starting, 12
starting for the first time, 7
stopping, 12
using, 11–17
PC, unpacking, 2
power
disconnecting from, 6
Power consumption, 16
reducing, 16
standby mode, 16
power cords
connecting, 6
Power icon, 16
Power Management, 16
DOS, 16
suspend mode, 16
Power management
Shut Off Monitor mode, 16
power management
configuring, 16
problems, 78
Power saving
sleep mode, 16
Power Supply, 24
replacing, 24
power supply
removing, 24
replacing, 25
Power-On Self-Test
errors, 69
screen, 7
printer
connector, 5
installing, 5
problems, 73
problems
with accessory board, 76
with power management, 78
with software, 77
with the display, 71
with the flexible disk drive, 74
with the hard disk, 75
with the keyboard or mouse, 73
with the printer, 73
processor upgrade
installing, 47
R
recycling your PC, 97
Removing cover, 22
Replacing cover, 23
S
s, 62
security bracket
installing, 49
security features
configuring, 61
serial port
location, 5
setting
passwords, 61
Setting up your PC, 1–9
SETUP, 51
SETUP program
starting, 52
understanding, 55
SETUP, can’t change values, 68
Sleep mode, 16
sleep mode, 16
slim drive
installing, 44
software
initializing, 7
license agreement, 8
master diskettes, 9
problems, 77
specifications
technical, 83
starting
HP SETUP program, 52
PC, 12
PC for the first time, 7
Starting and Stopping Your PC, 12
Static electricity, 29
stopping
PC, 12
support
by telephone, 109, 110
information services, 99
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Index
Network Phone-in Support, 111
summary of services, 112
Support Assistant
ordering information, 102
switch location, 95
System board, 95
system board, 95
jumper location, 95
switch location, 95
System board, switches, 95
Video Resolutions, Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter card, 92
Video Resolutions, OS/2, 91
Video Resolutions, Windows, 90
Video Resolutions, Windows ’95, 90
W
World Wide Web
access to HP, 105
T
technical specifications, 83
telephone support
for networks, 111
out of warranty, 110
under warranty, 109
The HP Keyboard for Windows 95
application key, 14
The HP Vectra Keyboard for Windows
95, 14
Windows icon, 14
The HP Vectra keyboard for Windows
95
space bar, 14
The HP Vectra keyboard for Windows
95 , Windows icon, 14
tools required for installation, 3
troubleshooting, 65
U
unpacking the PC, 2
URL
for HP World Wide Web site, 105
using
PC, 11–17
V
VESA connector, 34
Video driver, 29
Video memory
Matrox MGA Millennium video adapter, 28
video memory modules
installing, 28
Video Resolutions, 89
Video Resolutions, BIOS, 89
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Index
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Regulatory Information and Warranty
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Regulatory Information
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
according to ISO/IEC Guide 22 and EN 45014
Manufacturer’s Name and Address:
HEWLETT-PACKARD
Boulevard Steve Biko
38090 Villefontaine
FRANCE
Declares that the product:
Personal Computer
HP Vectra VL 5/ series 4
Product Name:
Model Number:
Conforms to the following Product Specifications:
SAFETY International: IEC 950: 1991+A1+A2 +A3
Europe: EN 60950: 1992+A1+A2
EMC
International: CISPR 22: 1985 Class B
Europe: EN 55022: 1988 Class B
EN 50082-1: 1992
IEC 801-2: 1992 / prEN 55024-2: 1992 - 3 kV CD, 8 kV AD
IEC 801-3: 1984 / prEN 55024-3: 1991 - 3 V/m
IEC 801-4: 1988 / prEN 55024-4: 1992 - 0.5 kV Signal Lines,
1 kV Power Lines
Supplementary information: The product complies with the requirements of the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC and
of the Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC.
Grenoble
July 1995
Gilbert BERTHET
Quality Manager
122
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FCC (for USA only)
Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference Statement
Warning:
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part
15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in
a residential installation. This equipment generates and uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures:
• reorient or relocate the receiving antenna
• increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver
• connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected
• consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Hewlett-Packard’s system certification tests were conducted with HP-supported peripheral devices and HP
shielded cables, such as those you receive with your system. Changes or modifications not expressly approved
by Hewlett-Packard could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Notice for Canada
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment
Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la Class B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du
Canada.
Safety Warning for the USA and Canada
If the power cord is not supplied with the computer, select the proper power cord according to your local
national electric code.
USA: use a UL listed type SVT or SJT detachable power cord.
Canada: use a CSA certified detachable power cord.
For your safety, never remove the PC’s cover without first removing the power cord and any connection to a
telecommunication network. Always replace the cover before switching on again.
Changing a battery
The old battery must be removed before installing a replacement battery. Replace only with the same or
equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer.
For your safety, never attempt to recharge, disassemble or burn the old battery.
The battery in this PC is a lithium battery which does not contain heavy metals, nevertheless, in order to protect
the environment, do not dispose of batteries in household waste.
Used batteries should be returned to the shop from which you bought them, to the dealer from whom you
purchased the PC, or to Hewlett Packard, so that they can either be recycled or disposed of in an
environmentally sound way. Returned used batteries will be accepted free of charge.
Si le cordon secteur n’est pas livré avec votre ordinateur, utiliser un cordon secteur en accord avec votre code
electrique national.
USA: utiliser un cordon secteur “UL listed”‚ de type SVT ou SJT.
Canada: utiliser un cordon secteur certifié CSA.
Pour votre sécurité, ne jamais retirez le capot de l’ordinateur sans avoir préalablement débranché le cordon
secteur et tout connection à un réseau de télecommunication. N’oubliez pas de remplacer le capot avant de
rebrancher le cordon secteur.
Changement du pile
L’ancienne pile doit être retirée avant l’installation de la nouvelle pile.
Pour votre sécurité, ne jamais essayer de recharger, de démonter ou de brûler l’ancienne pile. Remplacer
uniquement avec une batterie du même type ou d’un type équivalent recommandé par le constructeur.
La pile dans cet ordinateur est une pile au lithium qui ne contient pas de métaux lourds, néanmoins, afin de
protéger l’environnement, il ne faut pas jeter les piles dans les ordures ménagères. Il faut les rendre au magasin
ou vous les avez achetés, au revendeur òu vous avez acheté l’ordinateur, ou à Hewlett Packard, pour qu’elles
soient recyclées ou rangées de manière qui ne nuit pas l’environnement. Les piles usées seront acceptées
gratuitement.
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Notice for the United Kingdom
The HP Vectra PC is approved under approval number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect connection to Public
Telecommunication Systems within the United Kingdom.
Noise Declaration for Germany
Lärmangabe nach Maschinenlärmverordnung - 3 GSGV (Deutschland)
LpA < 70 db am Arbeitsplatz normaler Betrieb nach EN27779: 11.92.
Notice for Japan
Notice for Korea
124
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HP Hardware Warranty
Important: This is your hardware product warranty statement. Read it carefully.
Warranty terms may be different in your country. If so, your Authorized HP Dealer or
Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Office can give you details.
Three Year Limited Hardware Warranty
Hewlett-Packard (HP) warrants this hardware product against defects in materials and workmanship for a
period of three years from receipt by the original end-user purchaser.
The three year warranty includes on-site service during the first year of use, and return service provided by an
HP Service Center or a participating Authorized HP Personal Computer Dealer Repair Center, during the second
and third years of use.
If HP receives notice of above defined defects during the warranty period, HP will either, at its option, repair or
replace products which prove to be defective.
Should HP be unable to repair or replace the product within a reasonable amount of time, the customer’s
alternate exclusive remedy shall be a refund of the purchase price upon return of the product.
Limitation of Warranty
The above warranty shall not apply to defects resulting from: misuse; unauthorized modification; operation or
storage outside the environmental specifications for the product; in-transit damage; improper maintenance; or
defects resulting from use of non-HP software, accessories, media, supplies, consumables, or such items not
designed for use with the product.
HP makes no other express warranty, whether written or oral, with respect to this product.
Any implied warranty of merchantability or fitness is limited to the three-year duration of this written warranty.
Some states or provinces do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation
or exclusion may not apply to you.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state,
or province to province.
Limitation of Liability and Remedies
The remedies provided above are the customer’s sole and exclusive remedies.
In no event shall HP be liable for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, or consequential damages, whether
based on warranty, contract, tort, or any other legal theory.
The foregoing limitation of liability shall not apply in the event that any HP product sold hereunder is
determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to be defective and to have directly caused bodily injury, death,
or property damage; provided, that in no event shall HP’s liability for property damage exceed the greater of
$50,000 or the purchase price of the specific product that caused such damage.
Some states or provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential
damages–including lost profit–so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
Obtaining On-Site Warranty Service
To obtain on-site warranty service, the customer must contact an HP Sales and Service Office (in the US, call
the HP Customer Support Center at (303) 635-1000) or a participating Authorized HP Personal Computer
Dealer Repair Center and arrange for on-site repair of the product. The customer must be prepared to supply
proof of the purchase date.
This warranty is extended worldwide to products purchased from HP or an Authorized HP Personal Computer
Dealer which are reshipped by the original purchaser either for use by the original purchaser or provided as an
incidental part of systems integrated by the original purchaser. Service is provided in the same manner as if the
product was purchased in the country of use and can only be provided in countries where the product is
designed to operate. If the product is not normally sold by HP in the country of use, it must be returned to the
country of purchase for service.
The system processor unit, keyboard, mouse, and Hewlett-Packard accessories inside the system processor
unit–such as video adapters, mass storage devices, and interface controllers–are covered by this warranty.
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Customer-replaceable components–such as the keyboard or mouse–may be serviced through expedited part
shipment. In this event, HP will prepay shipping charges, duty, and taxes; provide telephone assistance on
replacement of the component; and pay shipping charges, duty, and taxes for any part that HP asks to be
returned.
HP products external to the system processor unit–such as external storage subsystems, displays, printers, and
other peripherals–are covered by the applicable warranties for those products; HP software is covered by the
HP Software Product Limited Warranty.
On-site visits caused by non-Hewlett-Packard products–whether internal or external to the system processor
unit–are subject to standard per-incident travel and labor charges.
On-site service for this product is restricted or unavailable in certain locations. In HP Excluded Travel
Areas–areas where geographical obstacles, undeveloped roads, or unsuitable public transportation prohibit
routine travel–service is provided on a negotiated basis at extra charge.
Response time for HP on-site service in an HP Service Travel Area is normally next business day (excluding HP
holidays) for HP Travel Zones 1-3 (generally 100 miles or 160 Km from the HP office). Response time is second
business day for Zones 4 and 5 (200 miles, 320 Km); third business day for Zone 6 (300 miles, 480 Km); and
negotiated beyond Zone 6. Worldwide Customer Support Travel information is available from any HP Sales and
Service Office.
Travel restrictions and response time for dealer or distributor service are defined by the participating dealer or
distributor.
Service contracts which provide after-hour or weekend coverage, faster response time, or service in an
Excluded Travel Area are often available from HP, an authorized dealer, or authorized distributor at additional
charge.
Customer Responsibilities
The customer may be required to run HP-supplied diagnostic programs before an on-site visit or replacement
part will be dispatched.
The customer is responsible for the security of its proprietary and confidential information and for maintaining a
procedure external to the products for reconstruction of lost or altered files, data, or programs.
For on-site service, the customer must provide: access to the product; adequate working space and facilities
within a reasonable distance of the product; access to and use of all information and facilities determined
necessary by HP to service the product; and operating supplies and consumables such as the customer would
use during normal operation.
When service is being performed on-site, a representative of the customer must be present at all times. The
customer must state if the product is being used in an environment which poses a potential health hazard to
repair personnel; HP or the servicing dealer may require that the product be maintained by customer personnel
under direct HP or dealer supervision.
Obtaining Return Warranty Service
When return warranty service applies, the product must be returned to a service facility designated by HP.
Customer must enclose a copy of a document proving date of purchase.
The customer shall prepay shipping charges (and shall pay all duty and taxes) for products returned to HP for
warranty service. HP shall pay for return of products to the customer except for products returned to the
customer from another country.
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HP Software Product License Agreement and Software & Product Limited Warranty
The HP Software Product License Agreement and Product Limited Warranty shall govern all Software which is
provided to you, the Customer, as part of the HP computer product. This HP Software Product Agreement and
Product Limited Warranty shall supersede any non-HP software license or warranty terms which may be found
in any documentation or other materials contained in the computer product packaging.
CAREFULLY READ THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT BEFORE PROCEEDING TO OPERATE THIS EQUIPMENT.
RIGHTS IN THE SOFTWARE ARE OFFERED ONLY ON THE CONDITION THAT THE CUSTOMER AGREES TO
ALL TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE LICENSE AGREEMENT. PROCEEDING TO OPERATE THE
EQUIPMENT INDICATES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. IF YOU DO NOT
AGREE TO THE LICENSE AGREEMENT, YOU MUST NOW EITHER REMOVE THE SOFTWARE FROM YOUR
HARD DISK DRIVE AND DESTROY THE MASTER DISKETTES, OR RETURN THE COMPLETE COMPUTER
AND SOFTWARE FOR A FULL REFUND.
Software License Agreement
In return for payment of the applicable fee, Hewlett-Packard grants the Customer a license in the software,
subject to the following:
1
USE. Customer may use the software on any one computer. Customer may not network the software or
otherwise use it on more than one computer. Customer may not reverse assemble or decompile the software
unless authorized by law.
2
COPIES AND ADAPTATIONS. Customer may make copies or adaptations of the software (a) for archival
purposes or (b) when copying or adaptation is an essential step in the use of the software with a computer
so long as the copies and adaptations are used in no other manner.
3
OWNERSHIP. Customer agrees that he/she does not have any title or ownership of the software, other than
ownership of the physical media. Customer acknowledges and agrees that the software is copyrighted and
protected under the copyright laws. Customer acknowledges and agrees that the software may have been
developed by a third party software supplier named in the copyright notices included with the software, who
shall be authorized to hold the Customer responsible for any copyright infringement or violation of this
Agreement.
4
TRANSFER OF RIGHTS IN SOFTWARE. Customer may transfer rights in the software to a third party only
as part of the transfer of all rights and only if Customer obtains the prior agreement of the third party to be
bound by the terms of this License Agreement. Upon such a transfer, Customer agrees that his/her rights in
the software are terminated and that he/she will either destroy his/her copies and adaptations or deliver
them to the third party.
5
SUBLICENSING AND DISTRIBUTION. Customer may not lease, sublicense the software or distribute copies
or adaptations of the software to the public in physical media or by telecommunication without the prior
written consent of Hewlett-Packard.
6
TERMINATION. Hewlett-Packard may terminate this software license for failure to comply with any of these
terms provided Hewlett-Packard has requested Customer to cure the failure and Customer has failed to do
so within thirty (30) days of such notice.
7
UPDATES AND UPGRADES. Customer agrees that the software does not include updates and upgrades
which may be available from Hewlett-Packard under a separate support agreement.
8
EXPORT CLAUSE. Customer agrees not to export or re-export the software or any copy or adaptation in
violation of the U.S. Export Administration regulations or other applicable regulation.
9
U.S. GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS. Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause in DFARS 252.227-7013. Hewlett-Packard Company, 3000 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA
94304 U.S.A. Rights for non-DOD U.S. Government Departments and Agencies are as set forth in FAR
52.227-19(c)(1,2).
(Rev. 0795)
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Software Product Limited Warranty
Ninety-Day Limited Software Warranty
HP warrants for a period of NINETY (90) DAYS from the date of the purchase that the software product will
execute its programming instructions when all files are properly installed. HP does not warrant that the
operation of the software will be uninterrupted or error free. In the event that this software product fails to
execute its programming instructions during the warranty period, Customer’s remedy shall be a refund or repair.
Should HP be unable to replace the media within a reasonable amount of time, Customer’s alternate remedy
shall be a refund of the purchase price upon return of the product and all copies.
Removable Media (If supplied)
HP warrants the removable media, if supplied, upon which this product is recorded to be free from defects in
materials and workmanship under normal use for a period of NINETY (90) DAYS from the date of purchase. In
the event the media proves to be defective during the warranty period, Customer’s remedy shall be to return the
media to HP for replacement. Should HP be unable to replace the media within a reasonable amount of time,
Customer’s alternate remedy shall be a refund of the purchase price upon return of the product and destruction
of all other nonremovable media copies of the software product.
Notice of Warranty Claims
Customer must notify HP in writing of any warranty claim not later than thirty (30) days after the expiration of
the warranty period.
Limitation of Warranty
HP makes no other express warranty, whether written or oral with respect to this product. Any
implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose is limited to the 90-day
duration of this written warranty. Some states or provinces do not allow limitations on how long an
implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
This warranty gives specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state, or
province to province.
Limitation of Liability and Remedies
THE REMEDIES PROVIDED ABOVE ARE CUSTOMER’S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES. IN NO EVENT
SHALL HP BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING LOST PROFIT) WHETHER BASED ON WARRANTY, CONTRACT, TORT OR ANY
OTHER LEGAL THEORY. Some states or provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or
consequential damages, so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
Obtaining Warranty Service
Warranty service may be obtained from the nearest HP sales office or other location indicated in the owner’s
manual or service booklet.
Consumer transactions in Australia and the United Kingdom: The disclaimers and limitations above shall not
apply and shall not affect the statutory rights of a Consumer.
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