HP | 8-Channel | User's Manual | HP 8-Channel User's Manual

HP E1433A
8-Channel 196 kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP
User’s Guide
Part Number E1433-90008
Printed in U.S.A
Print Date: April 1999, Sixth Edition
Hewlett-Packard Company, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999. All rights reserved.
8600 Soper Hill Road Everett, Washington 98205-1298 U.S.A.
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© Copyright 1979, 1980, 1983 The Regents of the University of California.
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ii
HP E1433A User's Guide
In This Book
The HP E1433A 8-Channel 196 kSa/s Digitizer plus DSP is a C-size VXI
module. “196 kSa/s” refers to the maximum sample rate of 196608 samples
per second. The HP E1433A may contain either one or two 4-channel
input assemblies so that the module may have a total of up to 8 inputs.
The module plugs into a single C-size slot in a VXI mainframe.
This book documents the HP E1433A module, including information on how
to use it. It provides:
q Installation information.
q Examples to help you get started, with information on how to use the
q
q
q
q
q
q
VXIplug&play Host Interface Library functions. There is also a chapter about the
C-Language version of the Host Interface Library. There are instructions for
printing the Function Reference for the Host Interface Library if desired. The
Function Reference can be accessed by way of online manual pages and online
help.
Information on how to use the HP E1433A.
A descriptions of the module.
Descriptions of the Arbitrary Source and Tachometer options.
Descriptions of the Break Out Boxes which can be used with the module.
Service information (troubleshooting and replacing assemblies).
Details about the module’s VXI registers (as an appendix for those who may want
this additional information).
iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
In This Book iii
1 Installing the HP E1433A
Installing the HP E1433A 1-2
To inspect the HP E1433A 1-2
To install the HP E1433A 1-3
Install the host interface libraries 1-6
To store the module 1-6
To transport the module 1-7
2 Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Introduction 2-2
To install the VXIplug&play libraries 2-3
System Requirements (Microsoft Windows95 and NT) 2-3
System Requirements (HP-UX 9.05) 2-3
System Requirements (HP-UX 10.2) 2-3
HP E1432A Software Distribution 2-3
Getting Updates Via FTP (HP-UX) 2-4
Getting Updates Via FTP (Windows) 2-4
To install the Windows VXIplug&play drivers for the HP E1432A
(for Windows 95 and Windows NT). 2-4
To install the HP-UX VXIplug&play drivers for the HP E1433A
(for HP-UX systems): 2-6
The Resource Manager 2-6
The VXIplug&play Soft Front Panel (SFP) 2-7
Using the soft front panel. 2-7
HP VEE example programs 2-10
scope.vee 2-10
minimum.vee 2-14
Other HP VEE example programs 2-16
C-Language Host Interface Library example programs 2-17
Demo Programs 2-17
Running a demo program: semascope.c 2-18
Visual Basic example programs 2-19
v
3 Using the HP E1433A
Introduction 3-2
What is VXIplug&play? 3-3
Overview 3-3
VXIplug&play drivers 3-3
Manufacturer and model codes 3-4
The Soft Front Panel (SFP) 3-5
Header and Library Files 3-6
Channels and groups 3-7
Channel Groups 3-7
Initialization 3-7
Creating a Channel Group 3-8
Input, Source, and Tach Channels 3-8
Multiple-module/mainframe Measurements 3-9
Grouping of Channels/Modules 3-9
Multiple-module Measurements 3-9
Possible Trigger Line Conflict 3-10
Managing Multiple-mainframe Measurements 3-11
Synchronization in Multiple-mainframe Measurements 3-14
Module Features 3-15
Data Flow Diagram and FIFO Architecture 3-15
Base Sample Rates 3-17
Measurement Process 3-23
Measurement Setup and Control 3-23
Parameter Settings 3-24
Measurement Initialization 3-24
Measurement Loop 3-25
Register-based VXI Devices 3-26
Arm and Trigger 3-27
HP E1433A Triggering. 3-28
Trigger Level 3-29
Data Transfer Modes 3-30
HP E1433A Interrupt Behavior 3-32
Data Gating 3-34
HP E1433A Parameters 3-34
New features of the HP E1432A/HP E1433A software 3-36
Averaging 3-36
Continuous re-sampled data 3-36
Fast span or range change 3-36
Peak level detection (HP E1433A only) 3-36
RMS level computation (HP E1433A only) 3-36
Time arming 3-37
Weighting filters (HP E1433A only) 3-37
Zoom (HP E1432A only) 3-37
Zoom (for the Arbitrary Source, option 1D4) 3-37
Auto range 3-37
vi
Where to get more information 3-38
The Function Reference for VXIplug&play 3-38
The Function Reference for the Host Interface Library (C-language version)
3-38
4 The C-Language Host Interface Library
Introduction 4-2
Header and Library Files 4-3
Parameter Information 4-4
Description of HP E1433A Parameters 4-4
Parameter Lists 4-5
Channel and Group IDs 4-10
Multiple-module/Mainframe Measurements 4-12
Grouping of Channels/Modules 4-12
Multiple-module Measurements 4-12
Possible Trigger Line Conflict 4-13
Managing Multiple-mainframe Measurements 4-14
Synchronization in Multiple-mainframe Measurements 4-17
Measurement Process 4-18
Measurement Setup and Control 4-18
Parameter Settings 4-19
Measurement initialization 4-19
Measurement Loop 4-20
Register-based VXI Devices 4-21
Arm and Trigger 4-22
HP E1433A Triggering. 4-23
Data Transfer Modes 4-24
HP E1433A Interrupt Behavior 4-26
Data Gating 4-28
HP E1433A Parameters 4-29
For More Information 4-29
vii
5 Module Description
Module Features 5-2
General Features 5-2
Arbitrary Source Features (option 1D4) 5-2
Tachometer Features (option AYF) 5-2
Other Options 5-2
Block Diagram 5-3
HP E1433A Front Panel Description 5-5
Front panels for four or eight channels 5-5
Standard Front Panel 5-6
VXI Backplane Connections 5-8
Power Supplies and Ground 5-8
Data Transfer Bus 5-8
DTB Arbitration Bus 5-8
Priority Interrupt Bus 5-8
Utility Bus 5-8
The Local Bus (Option UGV) 5-9
The HP E1433A VXI Device 5-10
Address Space 5-10
Shared Memory 5-10
Memory Map 5-10
List of A16 Registers 5-12
Trigger Lines (TTLTRG) 5-13
Providing an External Clock 5-14
Calibration Description 5-15
6 The Arbitrary Source Option (1D4)
Arbitrary Source Description 6-2
Trigger 6-2
Arbitrary Output 6-2
Source Output Modes 6-2
COLA (and Summer) 6-2
External Shutdown 6-2
Block Diagram 6-3
The Arbitrary Source Option Front Panel
6-4
LED’s and Connectors for the Arbitrary Source Option 6-5
Updating the arbitrary source firmware 6-5
viii
7 The Tachometer
Option (AYF)
Tachometer Description 7-2
Tachometer Inputs 7-2
External Trigger Input 7-2
Trigger Level 7-2
Tachometer Monitoring 7-2
Exact RPM Triggering 7-2
Input Count Division 7-3
Holdoff Time 7-3
Block Diagram 7-3
The Tachometer Option Front Panel 7-4
LED’s and Connectors for the Tachometer Option. 7-5
8 Break Out Boxes
Introduction 8-2
Service 8-2
The HP E1432-61600 and HP E1432-61602 Break Out Boxes 8-3
HP E1432-61602 Voltage-type Break Out Box 8-4
HP E1432-61600 ICP-type Break Out Box 8-4
Break Out Box Grounding 8-4
Break Out Box Cables 8-5
Making a Custom Break Out Box Cable 8-5
Recommendations on wiring for the E1432/3A 4 Channel Input Connector
8-7
9 Troubleshooting the HP E1433A
Diagnostics 9-2
ix
10 Replacing Assemblies
Replaceable Parts 10-2
Ordering Information 10-2
Direct Mail Order System 10-2
Code Numbers 10-3
Assemblies: without option AYF or 1D4 10-4
Assemblies: with option AYF 10-6
Assemblies: with option 1D4 10-8
Cables: without option AYF or 1D4 10-10
Cables: with option AYF 10-11
Cables: with option 1D4 10-12
Front Panel 10-13
To remove the top cover 10-14
To remove the front panel 10-15
To remove the input assemblies 10-18
To remove the option AYF assembly 10-20
To remove the option 1D4 assembly 10-21
To remove the A22/A24 assembly 10-22
To remove the A10/A11 assembly 10-23
11 Backdating
Backdating 11-2
Appendix A Register Definitions
The HP E1433A VXI Registers A-2
The A16 Registers A-2
The A24 Registers A-4
32-bit Registers A-10
Command/Response Protocol A-11
DSP Protocol A-13
DSP Bus Registers A-14
HP E1433A Technical Specifications
Glossary
Index
Need Assistance?
About this edition
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x
1
Installing the HP E1433A
1-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Installing the HP E1433A
Installing the HP E1433A
This chapter contains instructions for installing the HP E1433A 8-Channel
196 kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP Module and its drivers. This chapter also
includes instructions for transporting and storing the module.
To inspect the HP E1433A
The HP E1433A 8-Channel 196 kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP Module was
carefully inspected both mechanically and electrically before shipment.
It should be free of marks or scratches, and it should meet its published
specifications upon receipt.
If the module was damaged in transit, do the following:
q Save all packing materials.
q File a claim with the carrier.
q Call your Hewlett-Packard sales and service office.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Installing the HP E1433A
To install the HP E1433A
Caution
To protect circuits from static discharge, observe anti-static techniques
whenever handling the HP E1433A 8-Channel 196 kSa/s Digitizer plus DSP
Module.
1 Set up your VXI mainframe. See the installation guide for your mainframe.
2 Select a slot in the VXI mainframe for the HP E1433A module.
The HP E1433A module’s local bus receives ECL-level data from the
module immediately to its left and outputs ECL-level data to the module
immediately to its right. Every module using the local bus is keyed to
prevent two modules from fitting next to each other unless they are
compatible. If you will be using the local bus, select adjacent slots
immediately to the left of the data-receiving module. The local bus can
support up to four HP E1433A modules at full span at real time data rates.
If the VXI Bus is used, maximum data rates will be reduced but the
module can be placed in any available slot.
3 Using a small screwdriver or similar tool, set the logical address configuration
switch on the HP E1433A.
(See the illustration on the next page.) Each module in the system must
have a unique logical address. The factory default setting is 0000 1000
(8). If an HP-IB command module will be controlling the HP E1433A
module, select an address that is a multiple of 8. If your VXI system
dynamically configures logical addresses, set the switch to 255.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Installing the HP E1433A
4 Check the settings of the Boot Source and ROM Programming switches on the
bottom of the module.
Set switches 1 and 3 (BS1 and BS3) up, and all the other switches down.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Installing the HP E1433A
5 Set the mainframe’s power switch to standby ( O).
I
Caution
Installing or removing the module with power on may damage components in
the module.
6 Place the module’s card edges (top and bottom) into the module guides in the
slot.
7 Slide the module into the mainframe until the module connects firmly with the
backplane connectors. Make sure the module slides in straight.
8 Attach the module’s front panel to the mainframe chassis using the module’s
captive mounting screws.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Installing the HP E1433A
Install the host interface libraries
After the hardware has been assembled, the next step in installing the
HP E1433A is to install the host interface libraries. Refer to the chapter
titled “Getting Started With the HP E1433A” to continue the installation
process.
To store the module
Store the module in a clean, dry, and static free environment.
For other requirements, see storage and transport restrictions in the
chapter titled: “Specifications.”
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Installing the HP E1433A
To transport the module
• Package the module using the original factory packaging or packaging identical
to the factory packaging.
Containers and materials identical to those used in factory packaging are
available through Hewlett-Packard offices.
• If returning the module to Hewlett-Packard for service, attach a tag describing
the following:
q
q
q
q
Type of service required
Return address
Model number
Full serial number
In any correspondence, refer to the module by model number and full serial
number.
• Mark the container FRAGILE to ensure careful handling.
• If necessary to package the module in a container other than original
packaging, observe the following (use of other packaging is not recommended):
q
q
q
q
Caution
Wrap the module in heavy paper or anti-static plastic.
Protect the front panel with cardboard.
Use a double-wall carton made of at least 350-pound test material.
Cushion the module to prevent damage.
Do not use styrene pellets in any shape as packing material for the module. The
pellets do not adequately cushion the module and do not prevent the module
from shifting in the carton. In addition, the pellets create static electricity which
can damage electronic components.
1-7
2
Getting Started With the
HP E1433A
2-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Introduction
This chapter will help you to get your HP E1433A running and making
simple measurements. It shows how to install the software libraries and
how to run some of the example programs that are included.
For more information see the other chapters in this book and the on-line
function reference. (See “Where to get more information” in the chapter
titled “Using the HP E1433A).”
Two versions of the Host Interface Library are available. One is the HP-UX
C-Language Host Interface Library which uses SICL (the Standard
Instrument Interface Library) to communicate to the HP E1433A hardware.
The other is the HP-UX, Windows 95 and Windows NT VXIplug&play
Library which communicates with the hardware using VISA (Virtual
Instrument Software Architecture). VISA is the input/output standard upon
which all the VXIplug&play software components are based.
This chapter mainly covers the VXIplug&play version, and it also includes
some examples using the C-Language version. If you are using the
C-Language version, you should also refer to the chapter titled “The
C-Language Host Interface Library.”
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
To install the VXIplug&play libraries
System Requirements (Microsoft Windows95 and NT)
• An IBM compatible personal computer with either Microsoft Windows 95 or
Microsoft Windows NT. (With either Windows 95 or Windows NT, use the
VXIplug&play library)
• Additional hardware and software to connect the IBM compatible computer to
a VXI mainframe.
• Software is supplied on CD-ROM.
System Requirements (HP-UX 10.20)
• One of the following workstations:
q An HP V743 VXI-embedded workstation.
q A stand-alone HP Series 700 workstation with an HP E1489I EISA-to-MXIbus
card and an HP E1482B VXI-MXI Bus Extender.
• Software is supplied on CD-ROM, so a CD-ROM drive is needed
• HP-UX Version 10.20. This version of HP-UX can use either the C-language
library or the VXIplug&play library.
• SICL/VISA (product number E2091E, version E.01.01 or later).
HP E1432A Software Distribution
The HP E1432A distribution (software) is shipped on CD-ROM with the HP
E1433A module. This software works with the E4132, E1433, and E1434
modules. This distribution includes the HP E1432A C-Language Host
Interface library for HP-UX, the HP E1432A VXIplug&play Host Interface
library for HP-UX, Windows 95, and Windows NT with associated examples,
and manual pages.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Getting Updates Via FTP (HP-UX)
You can get the latest version of the HP E1432A software via FTP.
However, note that the latest version may be an interim version which has
not yet been fully tested and released. Released versions for HP-UX have
filenames beginning with E1432.A.xx.xx.depot.Z... Interim versions begin
with E1432.X.xx.xx.depot.Z...
For HP-UX, the latest version of the HP E1432A distribution can be
obtained via anonymous FTP at:
ftp://hpls01.lsid.hp.com/E1432/s700
Download file E1432.A.xx.xx.depot.Z for the latest update.
The A.xx.xx is the revision number, which will be something like
A.00.00. The file obtained via FTP has been compressed; it can be
uncompressed with the command:
uncompress E1432.A.xx.xx.depot.Z
The result will be a file E1432.A.xx.xx.depot This file is in swinstall
format, which is the same format as the file on the CD-ROM.
Getting Updates Via FTP (Windows)
You can get the latest version of the HP E1432A software via FTP.
However, note that the latest version may be an interim version which has
not yet been fully tested and released. Released versions for Windows have
filenames beginning with hpe1432.EXE.A... Interim versions begin with
hpe1432.EXE.X...
For Microsoft Windows the latest version of the HP E1432A distribution can
be obtained via anonymous FTP at:
ftp://hpls01.lsid.hp.com/E1432/pc
The README file contains information about the files in the directory.
The files corresponding to the first floppy disk of the distribution have the
form setup.EXE, click on “setup.EXE” to install.
Files of the form setup.w02 correspond to the second floppy disk of the
distribution. Files of the form setup.w03 correspond to the third floppy
disk (if any).
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
To install the Windows VXIplug&play drivers for the HP E1432A
(for Windows 95 and Windows NT).
This procedure assumes that you have already installed a VISA (Virtual
Instrument Software Architecture) library. If not, you can still install these
drivers but you will receive an error message reminding you to install the
VISA library.
1 Insert the HP E1432A CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
2 Run the program: d:\setup
(If your disk is in a drive other than “drive d,” replace “d:\” with the letter of the
drive containing your VXIplug&play Drivers disk.)
3 The setup program asks you to confirm or change the directory path. The
default directory path is recommended.
4 The setup program will ask you to confirm or change source code directory.
The default directory is recommended.
5 Setup creates a program group called “Hpe1432.” It includes:
An icon to run the Soft Front Panel
An icon for HELP text
An icon for UNISTALL
Setup can also place these icons in your “VXIplug&play” program group.
A dialog box asks if you wish to skip this step.
6 Setup asks if you want to run the Soft Front Panel (SFP).
See the next section in this chapter for more about the Soft Front Panel.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
To install the HP-UX VXIplug&play drivers for the HP E1433A
(for HP-UX systems):
1 Log in as root.
2 Insert the HP E1432A CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive or obtain the latest HP
E1432A distribution.
3 Type swinstall.
See the HP-UX Reference manual for information on the swinstall command.
The HP E1432A distribution is normally installed in the
/opt/vxipnp/hpe1432/ directory. The files have extensions such as .h, .fp, .sl,
and .hlp.
The Resource Manager
The Resource Manager is a program from your hardware interface
manufacturer. It looks at the VXI mainframe to determine what modules
are installed. You need to run it every time you power up. If you get the
message: “No HP E1433A can be found in this system,” then run the
Resource Manager.
Before running the HP E1432A /HP E1433A software make sure that your
hardware is configured correctly and that the Resource Manager runs
successfully. Before using your measurement system, you must set up all
of its devices, including setting their addresses and local bus locations. No
two devices can have the same address. Usually addresses 0 and 1 are
taken by the Resource Manager and are not available.
For more information about the Resource Manager, see the documentation
with your hardware interface.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
The VXIplug&play Soft Front Panel (SFP)
Using the soft front panel.
If you are running the HP E1432A/HP E1433A software in Microsoft
Windows 95 or Windows NT, you can use the Soft Front Panel (SFP)
program to interface with the HP E1433A.
The Soft Front Panel can be useful for checking your system to make sure
that it is installed correctly and that all of its parts are working. However,
it is not very useful for making measurements. It cannot be controlled from
a program and it does not access all of the HP E1433A’s functionality.
Figure 2-1: The Soft Front Panel interface
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
The buttons on the right side of the SFP display are defined as follows:
Meas
This button opens the Measurement Control dialog box. You can set:
q
q
q
q
q
Measurement single/repeat
Mode block/continuous
Trigger auto/manual/input/source
Frequency span
Blocksize
Input
This button opens a dialog box in which you can set up the HP E1433A’s
inputs. You can set:
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
Channel number
Range
AC or DC coupling
Grounding method
Digital anti-alias filter
Analog anti-alias filter
Trigger on/off
Trigger mode level/bound
Trigger level
Hysteresis
Trigger Slope
There is a checkbox to make all channels identical.
Source
This opens a dialog box for controlling the source output of the HP
E1433A’s source. This is only available for HP E1433A’s that have the
Arbitrary Source Option 1D4. You can set:
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
2-8
Channel number
Active on/off
Mode sine/burst sine/random/burst random
Ramp rate
Sine frequency
Sine phase
Output normal/grounded/open/cal/multi
Trigger on/off
Cola (Constant Output Level Amplifier) off/on
Duty Cycle
Sum off/on
Seed
Range
HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Display
This button opens a dialog box in which you can specify how the data is
displayed. For each trace you can specify an input channel (or OFF) and
an output file.
VXI
This button opens a dialog box showing the modules installed in your VXI
mainframe, and indicating which are active and inactive. The “resource
name” for each module is the interface card name that has been assigned to
it.
Go
Use the Go button to start the measurement.
Exit
Use the Exit button to exit the Soft Front Panel.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
HP VEE example programs
scope.vee
This program displays four channels with time record and FFT for each
channel.
The scope.vee program is located at \Hpe1432\examples\hpvee\ on a
Microsoft Windows system or at /usr/e1432/vee-examples on an HP-UX
system.
To run scope.vee, first type:
veetest
To begin using HP VEE.
In HP VEE click on File, then Open. In the Open File dialog box select
scope.vee from the list of files. Then click Ok.
Figure 2-2: HP VEE - Open File dialog box
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
The program scope.vee starts, showing four channels, with time record and
FFT for each channel.
Figure 2-3: scope.vee - panel view
To start a measurement, click the Run button on the toolbar (triangle
symbol). To pause, click on the Pause button (two vertical bars, next to
the Run button). To stop the measurement, click the Stop button (square
symbol).
This screen is VEE’s panel view, where you can interact with the system
much as you would with the front panel of a standalone instrument. You
can also go to VEE’s detail view screen where you can configure the system
and the view panel to make your own measurements.
To look at the scope.vee program “behind the scenes,” click on the View
Detail button on the toolbar (chart symbol). To return to the original
(panel) view, click on the View Panel button (sine wave symbol).
Click on the View Detail button again to look at the detail view screen.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
To use and modify scope.vee you need to be familiar with using the HP
VEE program. Refer to HP VEE documentation if necessary. In View
Detail mode you can click on Help on the menu bar to get help on using
HP VEE.
Figure 2-4: HP VEE help text
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
In detail view there are boxes representing parts of the scope.vee program.
For programs that are too large to be viewed all at one time, use the scroll
bars at the bottom and left side of the screen to scroll the display. You
can double-click on a box to see more detail, or click on the View Detail
(chart symbol) button on the top bar of the box. Some of the boxes
contain a function. If you click on the function you can view the
parameters associated with it.
Figure 2-5: scope.vee - detail view
To specify a new function, click on the blank space in the box where the
function is to be. A dialog box appears with a list of functions. After you
select a function you can choose Panel to “hard code” constants that the
function will use, or choose Parameters to allow a parameter to be input
from elsewhere (from the user or another function). The input appears as
a “pin” on the chart diagram. In the scope.vee program the user can select
the blocksize, span, and range.
You can click Add To Panel in the Edit menu to make a box in the detail
view visible on the panel view. This gives the user access to enter
parameters or view results.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
You can click on Alphnumeric in the Display menu to set up a box to
specify how to display the output of a function.
Use HP VEE to look at the functions that make up the simple “scope.vee”
program. This is an example of how the HP E1433A can be programmed
using HP VEE.
Click on the Panel View button (sine wave symbol) to go to panel view.
Set up your system to provide input signal to some of the input connectors
of your HP E1433A. Then use the scope.vee interface to view the time
records and FFTs of the input signals.
When you exit HP VEE, the program will ask if you want to save any
changes you made to scope.vee. Click No, or if you wish click Cancel and
then use File/Save As to save your changes with a different filename.
minimum.vee
This program provides a simple example to help you begin learning to use
the HP E1432A library, although it is not intended to be a finished
“user-friendly” program. It contains the minimum number of functions
needed (nine functions) to get data from the HP E1433A module. It does
not even include a “panel” user interface, so the first screen you will see is
the VEE View Detail screen. Use the scroll bar at the bottom of the screen
to scroll the display and see all of the detail view.
The minimum.vee program simply takes data for one channel and then
stops. You may find it useful to examine this program and use it as a
starting point for learning to write your own VEE programs for the HP
E1433A.
2-14
HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Figure 2-6: minimum.vee (scroll to see entire display)
2-15
HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Other HP VEE example programs
There are several other example programs that you can examine in the
same way that you looked at scope.vee. These programs are in the path
\Hpe1432\examples\hpvee\ on a Microsoft Windows system or
/usr/e1432/vee-examples on an HP-UX system.
bsrcsine.vee (Burst SouRCe SINE)
This program is similar to scope.vee. It displays eight (rather than four)
channels, with time record and FFT for each channel. It also turns on the
source in burst sine mode and ramps up the source output. The user can
specify the duty cycle, ramp rate, level of the source, and frequency of the
source. This program works with HP E1433A’s which are equipped with
the source option ID4.
bsrcrand.vee (Burst SouRCe RANDom)
This program is like bsrcsine.vee except the source is turned on in burst
random mode.
frf_rand.vee. (Frequency Response Function RANDom)
This program displays the frequency response of four channels. One way to
set up this example is to connect a cable between the channel 1 and
channel 2 inputs. Then connect channel 3 to channel 1 through a “black
box” containing the circuit to be tested (using a “T” on channel 1).
Channel 4 remains unconnected. On the display you will see a response for
channel 2 over channel 1 (a flat response for the bare cable), and a
response for channel 3 over channel 1 (representing the frequency response
of the “unknown” circuit). Channel 4 will show a random signal since it
has no input.
order.vee
This program can be used only with an HP1432A with the tachometer
option. It takes four channels of data and displays two channels. It shows
raw time domain data and resampled data for each rpm value. The raw
data can then be processed with a program such as Matlab to make order
ratio maps.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
C-Language Host Interface Library example programs
The HP E1432A C-Language Host Interface Library comes with several
example programs, which help demonstrate how to use the library. These
example programs are found in the “/opt/e1432/examples” directory or the
\Hpe1432\demo\ directory. The programs in this directory are all very
small, so that they will be easily understood and easy to copy into a real
application.
The files in the examples directory are:
Makefile
A unix Makefile which can be used to compile all of the programs in the examples
directory.
README
A file containing the information given here.
detect.c
Shows how to use SICL calls to find the logical addresses of the HP E1433A modules
in a system.
example.c
Shows the basics of setting up an E1433A, starting a measurement, and reading a
block of data.
intr.c
Shows how to set up SICL and an HP E1433A to use interrupts for data collection.
src_intr.c
Shows how to set up SICL and an HP E1433A to use interrupts with a 1D4 Source
board, for overload shutdown and overread.
tachmon.c
Shows how to monitor a tach channel signal using the other inputs in the HP E1433A
module.
throughput
A directory containing example programs for throughput to and post-processing from
an HP E1562A disk module.
Demo Programs
In addition to example programs, the HP E1432A Host Interface library also
comes with demo programs. These programs are found in the
“/opt/e1432/demo” directory.
One of these demo programs, called “semascope”, demonstrates that the
HP E1433A hardware and software are working properly. When run, it
identifies the HP E1433A modules in the VXI system, runs a measurement
using the HP E1433A modules that it finds, and plots the results in X11
windows. This program is not meant to be an example of how to use the
HP E1432A library, although we do provide the source code.
Other demo programs include “rpmtrig” and “rpmtrig2” and “semascope3.”
2-17
HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Running a demo program: semascope.c
To run this program, type:
/opt/e1432/demo/semascope
This program displays the time records for 32 channels (when hooked up to
two HP E1433A modules with 16 channels each). The channel that is
active for changing the display is highlighted. To exit, double-click the
horizontal bar symbol in the upper left corner of the window.
To see a list of parameters for semascope, type:
semascope -u
To specify a parameter, type its letter code after “semascope” on the
command line.
The source code for this program is at:
/opt/e1432/demo/semascope.c
Use a text viewer or editor (such as the “more” utility in unix) to list the
source code for semaphore.c. You can examine the code to learn more
about how this example program works.
2-18
HP E1433A User's Guide
Getting Started With the HP E1433A
Visual Basic example programs
HP VEE and the C Host Interface Library can be used on both Unix and
PC systems. In addition the PC can use Visual Basic. Visual Basic example
programs are at \Hpe1432\examples\vb\ on a Microsoft Windows system.
2-19
3
Using the HP E1433A
3-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Introduction
This chapter shows how to use the HP E1433A using the VXIplug&play
Host Interface Library.
The HP E1433A uses the same software as the HP E1432A 16 Channel 51.2
kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP.
The Host Interface Library for the HP E1433A is a set of functions that
allow the user to program the register-based HP E1433A at a higher level
than register reads and writes. The library allows groups of HP E1433As to
be set up and programmed as if they were one entity
Two versions of the Host Interface Library are included. One is the HP-UX
C-Language Host Interface Library which uses SICL (the Standard
Instrument Interface Library) to communicate to the HP E1433A hardware.
It works for HP-UX 10.20. The other is the VXIplug&play Library for
Windows 95, Windows NT, and HP-UX 10.20 which communicates with the
hardware using VISA (Virtual Instrument Software Architecture). VISA is
the input/output standard upon which all the VXIplug&play software
components are based.
This chapter covers the VXIplug&play version, but it will also be useful to
users of the C-Language version. If you are using the C-Language version,
you should also refer to the chapter titled “The C-Language Host Interface
Library.”
The library includes routines to set up and query parameters, start and stop
measurements, read and write data, and control interrupts. Routines to aid
debugging and perform low-level I/O are also included.
For information on diagnostics see the chapter titled “Troubleshooting the
HP E1433A.”
3-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
What is VXIplug&play?
Hewlett-Packard uses VXIplug&play technology in the HP E1433A. This
section outlines some of the details of VXIplug&play technology.
Overview
The fundamental idea behind VXIplug&play is to provide VXI users with a
level of standardization across different vendors well beyond what the VXI
standard specifications spell out. The VXIplug&play Alliance specifies a set
of core technologies centering on a standard instrument driver technology.
HP offers VXIplug&play drivers for VEE-Windows. The VXIplug&play
instrument drivers exist relative to so-called “frameworks”. A framework
defines the environment in which a VXIplug&play driver can operate. The
HP E1433A has VXIplug&play drivers for the following frameworks:
Windows 95, Windows NT, and HP-UX.
VXIplug&play drivers
The HP E1433A uses the same drivers as the HP E1432A 16 Channel 51.2
kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP.
The HP E1432A VXIplug&play driver is based on the following architecture:
Use r Pro g ra m (.E X E & .H LP file s, su c h a s so ft fro n t p a n e l)
F u n c tio n Pa n e l
(b a se d o n .F P file
Pro g ra m m a tic D e v e lo p e r's
In te rfa c e Lib ra ry
In stru m e n t D riv e r
(.KB, .D LL, .C , .H , .LIB, .H LP file )
V TL/V ISA
I/O In te rfa c e
Figure 3-1: VXI Plug&Play driver architecture
It is most useful to discuss this architecture from the bottom up.
The VISA/VTL I/O interface allows interoperability of the VXIplug&play
driver technology across interfaces.
3-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
The actual instrument driver itself is a DLL (Dynamic Linked Library)
created from:
q A set of source (.C) files.
q A set of header (.H) files, used for compiling the file as well as to describe the
driver’s calls to any program using the driver.
q A standard driver library (.LIB) file, to provide the standard functionality all the
drivers would require.
This DLL is a set of calls to perform instrument actions — at heart, that’s
all a VXIplug&play driver is — a library of instrument calls.
This driver is accessed by Windows applications programs written in
languages such as Visual C++ or Visual BASIC, using programming
environments such as VEE or NI LabView.
A Windows Help (.HLP) file is included which provides descriptive
information and code samples for the functions in the VXIplug&play DLL.
This help file can be viewed in the standard Windows Help viewer. A
viewer for HP-UX is provided in /opt/hyperhelp - see the READ.ME file.
Manufacturer and model codes
If desired, you can read the manufacturer code, model code and name of
the VXI instruments from the file /opt/e1432/lib/vximodel.cf (on unix
systems) or :\hpe1432\lib\vximodel.cf (on PC systems).
The following are the Hewlett-Packard VXI models in this file:
Manufacturer Code
0xfff
0xfff
0xfff
0xfff
0xfff
3-4
Model Code
0x200
0x201
0x202
0x203
0x210
Model Name
E143xA Non-booted Substrate Board
E1432A 16 Channel 51.2 kSa/s Digitizer + DSP
E1433A 8 Channel 196 kSa/s Digitizer + DSP
E1434A 4 Channel 65 kSa/s Arbitrary Source
E1562A/B/D/E Data Disk SCSI Interface
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
The Soft Front Panel (SFP)
The Soft Front Panel is a stand-alone Windows application, built on top of
the VXIplug&play driver DLL; it is used for instrument evaluation and
debugging and as a demo. It is not a programmable interface to the
instrument, nor can it be used to generate code.
The soft front panel also accesses the same Windows Help file as provided
with the DLL.
Figure 3-2: An example of a soft front panel (SFP)
3-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Header and Library Files
In the Windows environment, the following files are in the directory
\Vxipnp\WinXX\Hpe1432
hpe1432.fp
The “FP” file used by VEE and CVI
hpe1432.hlp
Windows help file
hpe1432.kb
Knowledge base file
hpe1432.bas
Header for Visual Basic
hpe1432.exe
Soft front panel program
Bin\hpe1432_32.dll
The VXIplug&play driver
Include\hpe1432.h
Header for linking to the VXIplug&play driver
Lib\Msc\
hpe1432_32.lib
Lib for linking C programs to VXIplug&play
The following files are in the directory \Hpe1432
Read.me
The latest information for the product
lib\sema.bin
Firmware program for the HP E1432A
lib\sfp.ico
Icon for help file
lib\sinewave.ico
Icon for Soft Front Panel
source\*
Source files for hpe1432_32.dll
examples\vb\*
Visual Basic example programs
examples\c\*
C example programs
examples\hpvee\*
HP VEE example programs
In the HP-UX environment, the following files are in the directory
/opt/vxipnp/hpux/hpe1432:
hpe1432.fp
The “FP” file used by VEE
.h
Header file
.hlp
Hyperhelp file (see /opt/hyperhelp/README for information on how
to view hpe1432.hpl In the HP-UX environment.)
.sl (lower-case “SL”)
The VXIplug&play shared library
3-6
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Channels and groups
This section gives some information about using channels and groups. For
more detailed information see the HP E1432A help text.
Channel Groups
In the HP E1432A VXIplug&play driver, a channel group is the basic unit of
hardware control. Any channel you want to control must first be assigned
to a group with the hpe1432_createChannelGroup function. In addition to
creating the group, this function returns a “handle” that uniquely identifies
the group. You can then use this handle to direct functions to all channels
in the group.
When you create a channel group, all input and tach channels in the group
are automatically activated and all source channels are inactivated. But
when you delete a channel group, input and tach channels are not
automatically inactivated. Any input or tach channel that remains active
after its group is deleted will continue to supply data to its module’s FIFO
buffer during a measurement—consuming module resources. For this
reason, you should always explicitly inactivate the channels in group before
deleting it. You can inactivate channels with hpe1432_setActive. You can
delete channel groups with hpe1432_deleteChannelGroup and
hpe1432_deleteAllChanGroups.
Also when you create a channel group, channels which are not mentioned
in the new group are not turned off. You must explicitly inactivate any
channels you do not wish to be active. (An exception is a power-up when
only the channels in the initial channel group are active.)
Initialization
The command used to initialize your system is hpe1432_init. This function
initializes the VXIplug&play library and registers all HP E1433A modules. It
also checks the existence of an HP E1432 module at each of the logical
addresses given in the resource list and allocates logical channel identifiers
for each channel in all of the HP E1432s. Input channels, source channels,
and tach/trigger channels are kept logically separated.
Most other functions cannot be used until after hpe1432_init, but there are
two functions which can be used before initialization to get information
needed by hpe1432_init. These are hpe1432_find and
hpe1432_getHWConfig. hpe1432_find searches the VXI mainframe and
returns the VXI Logical Address for every HP E1433A found.
hpe1432_getHWConfig returns additional information about the hardware.
After hpe1432_init has been run you can use hpe1432_getNumChans to get
the total count of inputs, sources, and tachs for all HP E1433A modules
named in the hpe1432_init call.
3-7
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Creating a Channel Group
The function hpe1432_createChannelGroup creates and initializes a channel
group. A channel group allows you to issue commands to several
HP E1433A channels at once, simplifying system setup. You can overlap
channel groups. The state of an individual HP E1433A channel that is in
more than one channel group is determined by the most recent operation
performed on any group to which this channel belongs.
As a side effect, this function makes all input and tach channels in the
channel group active and all source channels in the channel group inactive.
This function does not inactivate other channels within the modules that
the channels are in and does not preset the channels in the new group.
After a channel group has been created you can use hpe1432_getGroupInfo
to get selected information about the group. hpe1432_getGroupInfo can be
set up to return the number of modules, channels, inputs, sources, or tachs
in the group. It can also return a list of the modules, channels, inputs,
sources, or tachs.
Input, Source, and Tach Channels
Channel numbers must fall in particular ranges for different types of
channels. Input channel numbers range from 1 to 4095. Source channel
numbers range from 4097 to 8191. Tach channel numbers range from 8193
to 12287.
You can have a mixture of input, source, and tach channels in one group.
However it is also important for many functions to be sent only to the
appropriate type of channel. For example, asking for a blocksize from a
tach channel can cause an error. You might find it useful to set up several
channel groups at the beginning of your program: one for input channels,
one for source channels, one for tach channels, and one that combines all
three channel types. You could then use the input handle for input-only
functions, the source for source-only functions, and the tach handle for
tach-only functions. You would use the “all-channels” handle for all other
functions.
3-8
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Multiple-module/mainframe Measurements
Grouping of Channels/Modules
The interface library for the HP E1433A is designed to allow programming
of several channels from one or several distinct modules, as if they were
one entity. Each HP E1433A module has up to 16 channels. The library
may control up to a maximum of 255 HP E1433A modules (8160 channels).
The function hpe1432_createChannelGroup can be used to declare any
number of groups of channels, possibly overlapping. Each group can be
uniquely identified by a group ID.
The ‘target’ of a library function is either a channel, a group, or (rarely) a
module, depending on the nature of the call. When the same library
function may be called with either a channel or a group identifier, its
‘target’ is shown by @eter named ID.
Multiple-module Measurements
A channel group that spans more than one module will need to be
configured to use the TTL trigger lines on the VXI Bus for inter-module
communications. This configuration is automatically performed in the
hpe1432_initMeasure call unless defeated using hpe1432_setAutoGroupMeas.
The following discussion outlines what hpe1432_initMeasure does
automatically. This must be done by the user if
hpe1432_setAutoGroupMeas has been used to defeat auto configuration.
There are eight VXI TTL trigger lines that can be used for multi-module
synchronization. Often, these lines are used in pairs, one for sample clock
and one for Sync/Trigger. The hpe1432_setTtltrgLines function selects
which TTL trigger lines to use; this function always uses the TTL trigger
lines in pairs. Calling hpe1432_setClockSource with the group ID will set
all modules to the same pair.
All modules need to be set to use the shared sync line rather than the
default setting of internal sync. This can be done with the
hpe1432_setMultiSync function, using the group ID.
One module of the set of modules needs to be set to output the sync pulse.
The module with the lowest VXI logical address is called the “system
module” and is assigned this duty. This can be set with the
hpe1432_setMultiSync function call, using the lowest channel ID in the
group (NOT the group ID).
3-9
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
All modules except the “system module” need to be set to use the VXI TTL
trigger lines as the clock source. Use hpe1432_setClockSource for this.
Set the “system module” to output the clock. Use hpe1432_setClockMaster
for this. After this is done, all system sync pulses come from the “system
module” and drive the measurement state machines on all boards in the
group.
Possible Trigger Line Conflict
The following describes a scenario where HP E1433A modules might conflict
and prevent a proper measurement. The conditions allowing the conflict
are complex but must be understood by the user.
After a measurement has completed, the modules are left set up. If a
module (call it module ‘A’) is driving the TTL trigger lines and a different
group is started which also drives the TTL trigger lines (and that different
group does not include module ‘A’), then module ‘A’ will conflict and
prevent the other group from functioning. In this case make a call to
hpe1432_finishMeasure (using the old group ID which includes ‘A’) to turn
off module ‘A’ and allow the new group to function.
Note that if the new group includes all modules of the old group, the
conflict will not occur since hpe1432_initMeasure will reset all modules as
needed. Also note that single-module groups do not drive the TTL trigger
lines, so single-module groups are immune from causing or receiving this
conflict.
3-10
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Managing Multiple-mainframe Measurements
In a single-mainframe measurement, the HP E1433A communicates with
other HP E1433As through the TTLTRG lines. However, when using the
VXI-MXI bus extender modules, the TTLTRG lines, which carry the group
synchronization pulse and sample clock, are extended only in one direction.
This unidirectional signal connection restricts the types of measurements
you can make in a multiple mainframe environment.
You cannot perform the following types of multiple mainframe measurements:
q
q
q
q
Unequal pre-trigger delay settings between mainframes
Channel triggering by channels in Mainframe B
Lower spans or longer blocksizes in Mainframe B
Different digital filter settling times between HP E1433A modules
Slot 0
Contoller
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
Fail Acs Trigger Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196 8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe A
Fail Acs Trigger Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196 8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe B
HP E1433A
Figure 3-3: Multiple mainframes - two mainframes
3-11
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
In the example above, Mainframe A contains the Slot 0 Controller for a
multiple mainframe system. Mainframe A is connected to Mainframe B with
a VXI-MXI interface, HP E1482B. To successfully manage this multiple
mainframe environment, use the following guidelines.
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
Locate modules with logical addresses less than 128 in Mainframe A.
Locate modules with logical addresses greater than 127 in Mainframe B.
Locate the highest-numbered channels in Mainframe A.
Locate the last module in the module list specified in the call to hpe1432_init in
Mainframe A.
Locate the module that generates the group synchronization pulse in
Mainframe A.
Locate the channels performing channel triggering in Mainframe A.
Locate the module with the shared sample clock in Mainframe A.
If you do not use a groupID with the call hpe1432_readRawData or
hpe1432_readFloat64Data, empty the HP E1433As’ FIFOs in Mainframe B before
Mainframe A. In other words, do not empty the FIFOs in Mainframe A unless you
have emptied the FIFOs in Mainframe B. For more information about groupID
see “Grouping of Channels/Modules” in this chapter.
If more than two mainframes are needed, daisy-chain them together. Treat each
mainframe after the first as a Mainframe B. See the example on the next page.
Phase Performance in Multiple Mainframe Measurements
Phase specifications are degraded by the delay that the inter-mainframe
interface gives the sample clock. This delay is insignificant for many
low-frequency applications because the phase error is proportional to
frequency. A system with two VXI-MXI modules and a one-meter cable,
typically has a 76 nanosecond (ns) sample clock delay in Mainframe B.
This corresponds to an additional 0.007 degree phase error at 256 Hz and
an additional 0.55 degree phase error at 20 kHz.
Using a four-meter cable (which adds approximately 18 ns of delay) causes
a total of 94 ns clock delay in Mainframe B. This corresponds to an
additional 0.0087 degree phase error at 256 Hz and an additional 0.68
degree phase error at 20 kHz.
The cable adds approximately 6 ns per meter of cable.
Each daisy-chained mainframe adds another increment of delay, but only for
the additional cabling length.
3-12
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Slot 0
Contoller
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
Fail Acs Trigger
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
INTX
Cable
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe A
MXI Bus
Cable
Fail Acs Trigger
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe B
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
HP E1482B
HP E1433A
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe C
Figure 4: Multiple mainframes - three mainframes
3-13
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Synchronization in Multiple-mainframe Measurements
A TTL Trigger line between HP E1433As making group measurements
keeps all modules synchronized. This is an open-collector line where each
module holds the one designated as the SYNC line low until the module is
ready to advance to the next measurement state. Another TTL Trigger line
is designated to carry the sample clock to all modules. This shared sample
clock may come from any HP E1433A module in Mainframe A or from an
external signal routed through the Slot 0 Commander in Mainframe A.
One module is responsible for pulling the SYNC line low to start each
group’s state transition. Then, each module holds the line low until it is
ready. When all modules are ready, the SYNC line drifts high. The
unidirectional line prevents modules in Mainframe B from holding-off
modules in Mainframe A.
The lowest logical address must be in Mainframe A because of VXI-MXI and
Resource Manager (RM) constraints. Group constraints with the C-Library
force modules in Mainframe A to have their FIFOs emptied last. The
C-Library reads data in channel order, so the highest channel is read last.
To get this to work automatically, the call to hpe1432_init must list the
logical addresses in descending order.
Channel triggering must be done only by modules in Mainframe A. A
trigger in any other mainframe would not be communicated back on the
SYNC line to Mainframe A. The C-Library itself selects the HP E1433A
with the highest channel number for synchronization.
VXI-MXI Module Setup and System Configuration
To set up your multiple mainframe system, follow the “Hardware Installation
Rules” which appear in Chapter 2 of the HP E1482B VXI-MXI Bus Extender
User’s Manual. This allows the Resource Manager to configure your system.
The VXI-MXI Module setup in Mainframe A needs to be changed from those
set by the factory. The VXI-MXI module is not the Slot 0 Controller for
Mainframe A. See Table 2-1: Configuration Settings in the HP E1482B
VXI-MXI Bus Extender User’s Manual. This requires changing several
switch settings.
q Set the module as not being the Slot 0 Controller.
q
q
q
q
Set the VME timeout to 200 µs.
Set the VME BTO chain position to 1 extender, non-slot0.
Do not source CLK10.
Set the proper logical address.
3-14
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Module Features
Data Flow Diagram and FIFO Architecture
The illustration on the next page shows data flow in the HP E1433A. In
this example there are four 4-channel input assemblies for a total of 16
input channels. The data for all channels is sent to the FIFO. The FIFO is
divided into sections, one for each channel. The data moves through a
circular buffer (first-in-first-out) until a trigger causes it to be sent on to
the VME Bus. The data can also be sent to the Local Bus if option UGH is
present.
The size of the sections in the FIFO is flexible. The amount of DRAM
memory for each channel is the total DRAM memory divided by the number
of channels. The standard DRAM size is 4 MB; an optional 32 MB DRAM is
available.
The trigger can be programmed to trigger on the input or on information
from the software. The following are examples of ways a trigger can be
generated.
q
q
q
q
q
q
input level or bound
source
external trigger
RPM level (with tachometer option AYE)
ttl_trigger (VXI backplane)
freerun (automatic)
3-15
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
96002
trigger
Static
RAM
96002
host
port
VME Bus
Input 1
Local
Bus
FIFO
Local Bus
ch 1
FIFO
Input 2
ch 8
FIFO (DRAM)
circular
buffer
trigger
ch 1
ch 2
to VME Bus
or Local Bus
ch 3
ch 4
........
ch 5
Figure 3-5: Data flow and FIFO architecture
3-16
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Base Sample Rates
Baseband Measurement Spans
The table on the following page shows the measurement spans available for
base sample rates, for baseband measurements.
“Fs” is the sample frequency or sample rate. The value for zero
divide-by-two steps and no divide-by-5 step is the top measurement span
corresponding to the sample rate. This is with no decimation and using 400
lines to avoid alias. The other values on the table are for this top span
decimated by five and/or two.
For an HP E1433A which has option 1D4, the Arbitrary Source, the sample
rate for the source is automatically set to be the same as the sample rate
selected for the inputs. When the source is active the sample rate cannot
be greater than 65.536 kHz.
Decimation Filter Diagram
The drawing below illustrates the way the spans in the table are generated.
In the case of baseband spans (lower limit of span fixed at zero), the
frequency can (optionally) be divided by five and then (optionally) divided
by two up to sixteen times.
ADC
÷5
z e ro o r
o n e tim e
÷2
z e ro to
1 6 tim e s
Figure 3-6: Decimation filter diagram - baseband
3-17
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Table of Baseband Measurement Spans (part 1 of 4)
All values in Hertz.
sample
frequency
(Fs) —>
number of
divide-by-2
steps
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
48000
50000
51200
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
3750.000000
1875.000000
937.500000
468.750000
234.375000
117.187500
58.593750
29.296875
14.648438
7.324219
3.662109
1.831055
0.915527
0.457764
0.228882
0.114441
0.057220
18750.000000*
9375.000000
4687.500000
2343.750000
1171.875000
585.937500
292.968750
146.484375
73.242188
36.621094
18.310547
9.155273
4.577637
2.288818
1.144409
0.572205
0.286102
3906.250000
1953.125000
976.562500
488.281250
244.140625
122.070312
61.035156
30.517578
15.258789
7.629395
3.814697
1.907349
0.953674
0.476837
0.238419
0.119209
0.059605
19531.250000*
9765.625000
4882.812500
2441.406250
1220.703125
610.351562
305.175781
152.587891
76.293945
38.146973
19.073486
9.536743
4.768372
2.384186
1.192093
0.596046
0.298023
4000.000000
2000.000000
1000.000000
500.000000
250.000000
125.000000
62.500000
31.250000
15.625000
7.812500
3.906250
1.953125
0.976562
0.488281
0.244141
0.122070
0.061035
20000.000000*
10000.000000
5000.000000
2500.000000
1250.000000
625.000000
312.500000
156.250000
78.125000
39.062500
19.531250
9.765625
4.882812
2.441406
1.220703
0.610352
0.305176
Notes:
* For the top span the 3dB bandwidth is 1.15 times span shown.
To select a sample frequency for time domain data, first divide the desired
sample frequency by 2.56 to convert it to a measurement span. Then
locate the closest measurement span on this table and choose the
corresponding sample frequency at top of the table.
3-18
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Table of Baseband Measurement Spans (part 2 of 4)
All values in Hertz.
sample
frequency
(Fs) —>
number of
divide-by-2
steps
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
64000
65536
76800
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
5000.000000
2500.000000
1250.000000
625.000000
312.500000
156.250000
78.125000
39.062500
19.531250
9.765625
4.882812
2.441406
1.220703
0.610352
0.305176
0.152588
0.076294
25000.000000*
12500.000000
6250.000000
3125.000000
1562.500000
781.250000
390.625000
195.312500
97.656250
48.828125
24.414062
12.207031
6.103516
3.051758
1.525879
0.762939
0.381470
5120.000000
2560.000000
1280.000000
640.000000
320.000000
160.000000
80.000000
40.000000
20.000000
10.000000
5.000000
2.500000
1.250000
0.625000
0.312500
0.156250
0.078125
25600.000000*
12800.000000
6400.000000
3200.000000
1600.000000
800.000000
400.000000
200.000000
100.000000
50.000000
25.000000
12.500000
6.250000
3.125000
1.562500
0.781250
0.390625
6000.000000
3000.000000
1500.000000
750.000000
375.000000
187.500000
93.750000
46.875000
23.437500
11.718750
5.859375
2.929688
1.464844
0.732422
0.366211
0.183105
0.091553
30000.000000*
15000.000000
7500.000000
3750.000000
1875.000000
937.500000
468.750000
234.375000
117.187500
58.593750
29.296875
14.648438
7.324219
3.662109
1.831055
0.915527
0.457764
Notes:
*For the top span the 3dB bandwidth is 1.15 times span shown.
To select a sample frequency for time domain data, first divide the desired
sample frequency by 2.56 to convert it to a measurement span. Then
locate the closest measurement span on this table and choose the
corresponding sample frequency at top of the table.
3-19
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Table of Baseband Measurement Spans (part 3 of 4)
All values in Hertz.
sample
frequency
(Fs) —>
number of
divide-by-2
steps
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
80000
81920
96000
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
6250.000000
3125.000000
1562.500000
781.250000
390.625000
195.312500
97.656250
48.828125
24.414062
12.207031
6.103516
3.051758
1.525879
0.762939
0.381470
0.190735
0.095367
31250.000000*
15625.000000
7812.500000
3906.250000
1953.125000
976.562500
488.281250
244.140625
122.070312
61.035156
30.517578
15.258789
7.629395
3.814697
1.907349
0.953674
0.476837
6400.000000
3200.000000
1600.000000
800.000000
400.000000
200.000000
100.000000
50.000000
25.000000
12.500000
6.250000
3.125000
1.562500
0.781250
0.390625
0.195312
0.097656
32000.000000*
16000.000000
8000.000000
4000.000000
2000.000000
1000.000000
500.000000
250.000000
125.000000
62.500000
31.250000
15.625000
7.812500
3.906250
1.953125
0.976562
0.488281
7500.000000
3750.000000
1875.000000
937.500000
468.750000
234.375000
117.187500
58.593750
29.296875
14.648438
7.324219
3.662109
1.831055
0.915527
0.457764
0.228882
0.114441
37500.000000*
18750.000000
9375.000000
4687.500000
2343.750000
1171.875000
585.937500
292.968750
146.484375
73.242188
36.621094
18.310547
9.155273
4.577637
2.288818
1.144409
0.572205
Notes:
*For the top span the 3dB bandwidth is 1.15 times span shown.
To select a sample frequency for time domain data, first divide the desired
sample frequency by 2.56 to convert it to a measurement span. Then
locate the closest measurement span on this table and choose the
corresponding sample frequency at top of the table.
3-20
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Table of Baseband Measurement Spans (part 4 of 4)
All values in Hertz.
sample
frequency
(Fs) —>
number of
divide-by-2
steps
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
100000
102400
128000
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
with divide-by-5
without
divide-by-5
7812.500000
3906.250000
1953.125000
976.562500
488.281250
244.140625
122.070312
61.035156
30.517578
15.258789
7.629395
3.814697
1.907349
0.953674
0.476837
0.238419
0.119209
39062.500000*
19531.250000
9765.625000
4882.812500
2441.406250
1220.703125
610.351562
305.175781
152.587891
76.293945
38.146973
19.073486
9.536743
4.768372
2.384186
1.192093
0.596046
8000.000000
4000.000000
2000.000000
1000.000000
500.000000
250.000000
125.000000
62.500000
31.250000
15.625000
7.812500
3.906250
1.953125
0.976562
0.488281
0.244141
0.122070
40000.000000*
20000.000000
10000.000000
5000.000000
2500.000000
1250.000000
625.000000
312.500000
156.250000
78.125000
39.062500
19.531250
9.765625
4.882812
2.441406
1.220703
0.610352
10000.000000
5000.000000
2500.000000
1250.000000
625.000000
312.500000
156.250000
78.125000
39.062500
19.531250
9.765625
4.882812
2.441406
1.220703
0.610352
0.305176
0.152588
50000.000000*
25000.000000
12500.000000
6250.000000
3125.000000
1562.500000
781.250000
390.625000
195.312500
97.656250
48.828125
24.414062
12.207031
6.103516
3.051758
1.525879
0.762939
Notes:
*For the top span the 3dB bandwidth is 1.15 times span shown.
To select a sample frequency for time domain data, first divide the desired
sample frequency by 2.56 to convert it to a measurement span. Then
locate the closest measurement span on this table and choose the
corresponding sample frequency at top of the table.
3-21
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
HP E1433 sample frequencies
The following is a list of all sample frequencies (in Hz) available on the
HP E1433A, including those not listed in the preceding table.
48000.0
49152.0
50000.0
51200.0
52400.852878
61440.0
62500.0
64000.0
65536.0
66666.666667
76800.0
78125.0
80000.0
81920.0
96000.0
98304.0
100000.0
102400.0
122880.0
125000.0
128000.0
For the following frequencies (in Hz), filtered and decimated spans not
available:
133333.333333
153600.0
156250.0
163840.0
192000.0
196608.0
3-22
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Measurement Process
Measurement Setup and Control
When the HP E1433A makes a measurement, the measurement itself
consists of two phases: the measurement initialization, and the
measurement loop. Each of these phases consists of several states, through
which the measurement progresses.
The transition from one state to the next is tied to a transition in the
Sync/Trigger line (one of the TTL trigger lines on the VXI back plane). A
state (such as Idle) begins when the Sync/Trigger line goes low. The
Sync/Trigger line then remains low as long as the state is in effect. When
the Sync/Trigger line goes high it signals the transition to the next state.
See the sections “Measurement Initialization” and “Measurement Loop”
below for more details about these transitions. During all the transitions of
the Sync/Trigger line, the clock line continues with a constant pulse.
The Sync/Trigger line is “wire-OR’d” such that all modules in a
multiple-module system (within one mainframe) must release it for it to go
high. Only one HP E1433A is required to pull the Sync/Trigger line low.
In a system with only one HP E1433A, the Sync/Trigger line is local to the
module and not is routed to a TTL TRIGGER line on the VXI back plane.
Sync/Trigger line
Pre-arm
Start of
state
Trigger
Idle
Arm
Meas
End of
state
Figure 3-7: Transitions between states
3-23
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Parameter Settings
Many parameters are channel-dependent, meaning that each channel can be
set independently of the others in the module. Other parameters are
module-dependent; changing a module-dependent parameter for a channel
will change it for all channels on that module. For example, changing
blocksize, a module-dependent parameter, for input channel 3 will also
change the block size for all other channels in the same HP E1433A module
as channel 3.
When possible, parameters are written to the hardware as soon as they are
received. Sometimes, the parameter can’t be written to the hardware until
the start of a measurement; in this case the value of the parameter is saved
in RAM in the HP E1433A module until the measurement is started with
hpe1432_initMeasure. Some parameters can be changed while a
measurement is running, but many do not take effect until the next start of
a measurement.
Measurement Initialization
This section describes the measurement initialization process in the
HP E1433A.
The measurement initialization states, and the corresponding Sync/Trigger
line transitions (with ‘H’ for high, ‘L’ for Low) are:
Booting
Tested
H
L
Booted
L H
Settling
H
L
Pre-arm
Idle
L H
Sync/Trigger line
Figure 3-8: Measurement initialization
The module enters the TESTED state after a reset. In this state, all of the
module parameters may be set. The HP E1433A stays in the TESTED state
until it sees a high-to-low transition of the Sync/Trigger line.
3-24
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
In the BOOTING state, the digital processors of the module load their
parameters, and their program. Once done, the module releases the
Sync/Trigger line and moves to the BOOTED state. The HP E1433A stays
in the BOOTED state until it sees a high-to-low transition of the
Sync/Trigger line (that is, all the HP E1433As in the system have booted).
In the SETTLING state, the digital filters are synchronized, and the digital
filter output is ‘settled’ (it waits N samples before outputting any data).
Once the module is settled, it advances to the PRE_ARM state.
In the PRE_ARM state, the module waits for a pre-arm condition to take
place. The default is to auto-arm, so the module would not wait at all in
this case. When the pre-arm condition is met, the module releases the
Sync/Trigger line and advances to the IDLE state.
This complete measurement sequence initialization, from TESTED through
BOOTING, BOOTED, SETTLING, PRE-ARM, and IDLE, can be performed
with a call to the function hpe1432_initMeasure.
Measurement Loop
This section describes the measurement loop in the HP E1433A.
The progression of measurement states and the corresponding Sync/Trigger
line transitions are:
Idle
Arm
H
L
Trigger
L H
Measure
H
L
L H
Sync/Trigger line
Figure 3-9: Measurement loop
In the IDLE state the HP E1433A writes no data into the FIFO. The
HP E1433A remains in the IDLE state until it sees a high-to-low transition
of the Sync/Trigger line or an RPM arm/trigger point is calculated. If any of
the HP E1433As in the system is programmed for auto arming (with
hpe1432_setArmMode), the Sync/Trigger line is immediately pulled low by
that HP E1433A. The HP E1433A may also be moved to the ARM state by
an explicit call to the function hpe1432_armMeasure.
3-25
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Upon entering the ARM state the HP E1433A starts saving new data in its
FIFO. It remains in the ARM state until the Sync/Trigger line goes high. If
the HP E1433A is programmed with a pre-trigger delay, it collects enough
data samples to satisfy this pre-trigger delay, and then releases the
Sync/Trigger line. If no pre-trigger delay has been programmed, it releases
the Sync/Trigger line immediately. When all modules in a system have
released the Sync/Trigger line (allowing it to go high), a transition to the
TRIGGER state occurs.
Upon entering the TRIGGER state the HP E1433A continues to collect data
into the FIFO, discarding any data prior to the pre-trigger delay. The
HP E1433A remains in the TRIGGER state until it sees a high-to-low
transition of the Sync/Trigger line. The Sync/Trigger line is pulled low by
any HP E1433A which encounters a trigger condition and is programmed to
pull the Sync/Trigger line. If any HP E1433A is programmed for auto
triggering (with hpe1432_setAutoTrigger), the Sync/Trigger line is pulled
low immediately. The Sync/Trigger line may also be pulled low by an
explicit call to the function hpe1432_triggerMeasure.
Upon entering the MEASURE state the HP E1433A continues to collect
data. The HP E1433A also presents the first data from the FIFO to the
selected output port, making it available to the controller to read. The
HP E1433A holds the Sync/Trigger line low as long as it is actively
collecting data. In overlap block mode the HP E1433A stops taking data as
soon as a block of data has been collected, including any programmed preor post-trigger delays. (It starts again when another trigger occurs). In
continuous mode, the HP E1433A stops taking data only when the FIFO
overflows. When data collection stops, the HP E1433A releases the
Sync/Trigger line. When all HP E1433As are finished and the Sync/Trigger
line goes high, the HP E1433A goes into the IDLE state again.
The measurement initialization and loop may be interrupted at any time
with a call to hpe1432_resetMeasure, which puts the module in the
TESTED state.
Register-based VXI Devices
The HP E1433A is a register-based VXI device. Unlike message-based
devices which use higher-level programming using ASCII characters,
register-based devices are programmed at a very low level using binary
information. The greatest advantage of this is speed. Register-based
devices communicate at the level of direct hardware manipulation and this
can lead to much greater system throughput.
Users do not need to access the registers in order to use the HP E1433A.
The HP E1433A’s functions can be more easily accessed using the
HP E1433A Host Interface Library software. However, if you want more
information about the registers see Appendix A: Register Definitions.
3-26
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Arm and Trigger
This section explains some terminology relating the the “Arm” and “Trigger”
steps in the measurement loop. As an example a measurement might be
set up to arm at a certain RPM level and then subsequently trigger at an
external event corresponding to top dead center (TDC). The settings
would be:
q Arm:
q Trigger:
RPM Step Arm
External Trigger
If you want to begin a throughput session at this same RPM/TDC event,
then the first external trigger after a specified RPM would start a
continuous mode measurement. Now (using overlap block mode) the
settings would be:
q Pre-Arm:
q Arm:
q Trigger:
RPM Step Arm
Auto
Auto
In the measurement loop, an arm must take place before a trigger. You can
program how many triggers to do before waiting for another arm condition.
The default is one trigger for each arm. For each trigger, a block of data
is sent to the host.
The first arm in a measurement is the pre-arm. By default, the pre-arm
condition is the same as the regular arm conditions.
Valid Arm (and Pre-Arm) conditions are:
q Auto Arm
q Manual Arm
q RPM Step Arm
Valid trigger conditions are:
q
q
q
q
q
q
Auto Trigger
Input Trigger
Source Trigger
External Trigger
Manual Trigger
Tachometer Edge Trigger
3-27
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
HP E1433A Triggering.
The following is a short discussion of triggering for the HP E1433A.
Triggering is defined as the transition from the armed state to the triggered
state. This transition is caused by a low going edge on a TTL trigger line.
The function hpe1432_getTtltrgLines selects which of the eight TTL trigger
lines is to be used.
The low-going transition of the TTL trig line can be caused by any of the
following items:
trigger type
enabling function
the AUTO TRIGGER circuitry
hpe1432_setAutoTrigger
the hpe1432_triggerMeasure function
hpe1432_triggerMeasure
a source trigger
hpe1432_setTriggerChannel
a tach trigger
hpe1432_setTriggerChannel
an external trigger
hpe1432_setTriggerExt
an input level or bound trigger event
hpe1432_setTriggerChannel
and hpe1432_setTriggerMode
Each of these trigger sources can be enabled or disabled independently, so
quite complex trigger setups are possible. In all cases, however, the first
trigger event kicks off the measurement and the following trigger events
become superfluous.
Note that for hpe1432_setAutoTrigger the setting
HPE1432_MANUAL_TRIGGER really means “don’t auto trigger” not “expect
a manual trigger”.
For single-HP E1433A systems, the TTL trigger signal is not connected to
the VXI backplane. For multiple HP E1433A systems, the
hpe1432_initMeasure function connects the HP E1433A trigger lines to the
VXI backplane, and at that point, your selection of which TTL trigger lines
through hpe1432_getTtltrgLines is relevant. Multiple mainframe systems will
need to account for the unidirectional nature of the inter-mainframe MXI
extenders which will prevent all but the “upstream” mainframe from
triggering the system.
3-28
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Trigger Level
To set the trigger level, use hpe1432_setTriggerMode to select “level” or
“bound” mode; and use hpe1432_setTriggerLevel twice to set both the
upper and lower trigger levels. The difference between the upper and
lower trigger levels must be at least 10% of full scale (and 10% is usually
the best amount).
Also use hpe1432setTriggerSlope to specify a positive or negative trigger
slope.
Level mode
If the mode is set to “level” and the trigger slope is positive, then the
module triggers when the signal crosses both the upper and lower trigger
levels in the positive direction. If the trigger slope is negative, the module
triggers when the signal crosses both levels in the negative direction.
Setting two trigger levels prevents the module from triggering repeatedly
when a noisy signal crosses the trigger level.
Bound mode
If the mode is set to “bound” and the trigger slope is positive, then the
module triggers when the signal exits the zone between the upper and
lower trigger levels in either direction. If the trigger slope is negative, the
module triggers when the signal enters the zone between the upper and
lower trigger levels.
3-29
HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Data Transfer Modes
The HP E1433A can be programmed to use either of two data transfer
modes: overlap block mode and continuous mode. To help explain these
modes we will first describe block mode.
Block Mode (HP E1431A)
The HP E1433A’s overlap block mode is similar the block mode which is
used in other Hewlett-Packard instruments such as the HP E1431A. In
block mode, the input hardware acquires one block after getting an arm and
trigger. It does not allow the system to trigger until it is ready to process
the trigger, and it acquires pre-trigger data if necessary. The hardware does
not accept a new arm and trigger until the acquired block is sent to the
host. There is no provision for overlap or queuing up more than one block
when in block mode. There is also no way for a FIFO overflow to occur.
The HP E1433A’s overlap block mode can be configured to act exactly like
traditional block mode. It also has additional capabilities as described below.
Continuous Mode.
Both the HP E1433A and the HP E1431A use continuous mode. In this
mode , the input hardware waits for an arm and trigger, and then starts
acquiring data continuously. If the host is slow, several blocks can be
queued up in the input hardware. If the host gets far enough behind, a
FIFO overflow occurs and the input stops acquiring data.
The HP E1433A’s overlap block mode can be configured to act similarly to
continuous mode, but not identically. The HP E1433A can also use the
traditional continuous mode.
Overlap Block Mode
Overlap block mode combines features of both block mode and continuous
mode. The main difference between overlap block mode and traditional
block mode is that overlap block mode allows additional arms and triggers
to occur before an already-acquired block is sent to the host. A trigger can
occur before the end of the previous block, so overlapping blocks are
possible (hence the name “overlap block mode”). As in continuous mode,
there is an overlap parameter which controls how much overlap is allowed
between consecutive blocks.
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HP E1433A User's Guide
Using the HP E1433A
Limit on Queuing of Data
In overlap block mode, a number of trigger events may be queued up
before the host reads the data for those triggers. The host may get further
and further behind the data acquisition.
However, if the host gets far enough behind that the FIFO fills up, data
acquisition must momentarily stop and wait for data to get transferred to
the host. This places a limit on how far in time the host can be behind the
data acquisition. By setting the size of the FIFO, is you can control how
far behind the host can get.
Making Overlap Block Mode Act Like Traditional Block Mode
If the FIFO size is set the same as the block size, or if the number of
pending triggers is limited to zero, then overlap block mode becomes
identical to traditional block mode.
Making Overlap Block Act Like Continuous Mode
If the module is in auto-arm and auto-trigger mode, then overlap block
mode becomes nearly the same as continuous mode.
One difference is that traditional continuous mode has a single arm and
trigger, while overlap block mode may have multiple arms and triggers.
Another is that continuous mode can be configured to start at any type of
trigger event, while overlap block mode must be in auto-trigger mode to act
like continuous mode. Finally, continuous mode always stops when a FIFO
overflow occurs, but overlap block mode does not.
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Using the HP E1433A
HP E1433A Interrupt Behavior
Interrupt Setup
For an example of interrupt handling see the program event.c in the
examples directory.
The HP E1433A VXI module can be programmed to interrupt a host
computer using the VME interrupt lines. VME provides seven such lines.
Using hpe1432_setInterruptPriority, you can set up the HP E1433A module
to use any one of them.
The HP 1432A can interrupt the host computer in response to different
events. Using hpe1432_setInterruptMask you can specify a mask of events
on which to interrupt. This mask is created by OR-ing together the various
conditions for an interrupt. The following table shows the conditions that
can cause an interrupt:
Interrupt Mask Bit Definitions
Define (in e1432.h)
Description
HPE1432_IRQ_BLOCK_READY
Scan of data ready in FIFO
HPE1432_IRQ_MEAS_ERROR
FIFO overflow
HPE1432_IRQ_MEAS_STATE_CHANGE
Measurement state machine changed state
HPE1432_IRQ_MEAS_WARNING
Measurement warning
HPE1432_IRQ_OVERLOAD_CHANGE
Overload status changed
HPE1432_IRQ_SRC_STATUS
Source channel interrupt
HPE1432_IRQ_TACHS_AVAIL
Raw tach times ready for transfer to other
modules
HPE1432_IRQ_TRIGGER
Trigger ready for transfer to other modules
HP E1433A Interrupt Handling
To make the HP E1433A module do the interrupt, both a mask and a VME
Interrupt line must be specified, by calling hpe1432_setInterruptMask and
hpe1432_setInterruptPriority respectively. Once the mask and line have
been set, and an interrupt occurs, the cause of the interrupt can be
obtained by reading the HPE1432_IRQ_STATUS_REG register (using
hpe1432_getInterruptReason). The bit positions of the interrupt mask and
status registers match so the defines can be used to set and check IRQ bits.
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Using the HP E1433A
Once it has done this interrupt, the module will not do any more VME
interrupts until re-enabled with hpe1432_reenableInterrupt. Normally, the
last thing a host computer’s interrupt handler should do is call
hpe1432_reenableInterrupt.
Events that would have caused an interrupt, but which are blocked because
hpe1432_reenableInterrupt has not yet been called, will be saved. After
hpe1432_reenableInterrupt is called, these saved events will cause an
interrupt, so that there is no way for the host to “miss” an interrupt.
However, the module will only do one VME interrupt for all of the saved
events, so that the host computer will not get flooded with too many
interrupts.
For things like “HPE1432_IRQ_BLOCK_READY”, which are not events but
are actually states, the module will do an interrupt after
hpe1432_reenableInterrupt only if the state is still present. This allows the
host computer’s interrupt handler to potentially read multiple scans from an
HP E1433A module, and not get flooded with block ready interrupts after
the fact.
Host Interrupt Setup
This is a summary of how to set up an HP E1433A interrupt:
q Look at the Resource Manager to find out which VME interrupt lines are available.
q Tell the HP E1433A module to use the a VME interrupt line found in step one,
using hpe1432_setInterruptPriority.
q Set up an interrupt handler routine, using hpe1432_callBackInstall. The interrupt
handler routine will get called when the interrupt occurs.
q Set up interrupt mask in the HP E1433A module, using
hpe1432_setInterruptMask.
Host Interrupt Handling
When the HP E1433A asserts the VME interrupt line, the program will
cause the specified interrupt handler to get called. Typically the interrupt
handler routine will read data from the module, and then re-enable
HP E1433A interrupts with hpe1432_reenableInterrupt. The call to
hpe1432_reenableInterrupt must be done unless the host is not interested in
any more interrupts.
Inside the interrupt handler, almost any HP E1433A Host Interface library
function can be called. This works because the Host Interface library
disables interrupts around critical sections of code, ensuring that
communication with the HP E1433A module stays consistent. Things that
are not valid in the handler are:
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Using the HP E1433A
q Calling hpe1432_createChannelGroup to delete a group that is simultaneously
being used by non-interrupt-handler code.
q Calling one of the read data functions (hpe1432_readRawData or
hpe1432_readFloat64Data), if the non-interrupt-handler code is also calling one
of these functions.
q Calling hpe1432_init to reset the list of channels that are available to the
HP E1433A library.
As is always the case with interrupt handlers, it is easy to introduce bugs
into your program, and generally hard to track down these bugs. Be careful
when writing this function.
Data Gating
Sometimes you may wish to monitor data from some input channels and not
others. The function hpe1432_setEnable enables or disables data from an
input channel (or group of channels). If data is enabled, then the data can
be read using hpe1432_blockAvailable and hpe1432_readRawData or
hpe1432_readFloat64Data. If data is disabled, data from the specified
channel is not made available to the host computer.
This parameter can be changed while a measurement is running, to allow
the host computer to look at only some of the data being collected by the
HP E1433A module. While data from a channel is disabled the input
module continues to collect data but it is not made available to the host
computer. The host can then switch from looking at some channels to
looking at others during the measurement. In contrast, the function
hpe1432_setActive completely enables or disables a channel and can’t be
changed while a measurement is running.
For order tracking measurements this function can be used to switch
between receiving order tracking data, ordinary time data, or both.
HP E1433A Parameters
Some parameters, such as range or coupling, apply to specific channels.
When a channel ID is given to a function that sets a channel-specific
parameter, only that channel is set to the new value.
Some parameters, such as clock frequency or data transfer mode, apply
globally to a module. When a channel ID is used to change a parameter
that applies to a whole module, the channel ID is used to determine which
module. The parameter is then changed for that module.
Starting and stopping a measurement is somewhat like setting a global
parameter. Starting a measurement starts each active channel in each
module that has a channel in the group.
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Using the HP E1433A
After firmware is installed, and after a call to hpe1432_preset, all of the
parameters (both channel-specific and global) in an HP E1433A module are
set to their default values. For channel-specific parameters, the default
value may depend on the type of channel. Some channel-specific
parameters apply only to a specific type of channel. For example, tach
holdoff applies only to tach channels. Setting such a parameter for a
channel that doesn’t make sense will result in an error.
At the start of a measurement, the HP E1433A firmware sets up all
hardware parameters, and ensures that the input hardware is settled before
starting to take data. The firmware also ensures that any digital filters have
time to settle. This ensures that all data read from the module will be valid.
However, after a measurement starts, HP E1433A parameters can still be
changed. The effect of this change varies, depending on the parameter.
For some parameters, changing the value aborts the measurement
immediately. For other parameters, the measurement is not aborted, but
the changed parameter value is saved and not used until a new
measurement is started. For still other parameters, the parameter change
takes place immediately, and the data coming from the module may contain
glitches or other effects from changing the parameter. See the chapter
titled “The C-Language Host Interface Library” for Parameter Lists showing
the effects for each parameter. Parameter names for the VXIplug&play
library are similar to those for the C-Language Host Interface Library.
You cannot tell the module to wait for settling when changing a parameter
in the middle of a measurement. The only way to wait for settling is to
stop and re-start the measurement. Also, you cannot disable the settling
that takes place at the start of a measurement.
Refer to the (on-line) HP E1433A Function Reference for the parameters
needed for each function. (See “Where to get more information” in this
chapter.)
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Using the HP E1433A
New features of the HP E1432A/HP E1433A software
The following features have been added to the HP E1432A/HP E1433A
software since the previous edition of this manual. These and other
features are documented in the online Function Reference. For more
information look in the Function Reference entries for the functions that are
used by the feature.
Auto range
Auto range calculates the best range for each channel so that the signal is
full scale but not overloaded. Auto range works only while the
measurement is running.
Averaging
Averaging can be done for resampling measurements on frequency or order
data. It uses the function hpe1432_setAvgMode. You can set several
averaging modes: RMS averaging, linear averaging, exponential averaging, or
peak hold averaging.
Continuous re-sampled data
Continuous re-sampling forces the blocks of data to be contiguous, with no
gaps between them. It uses the existing function hpe1432_setArmMode.
(Without continuous re-sampling, each block of data follows the previous
block after some interval, depending on the next trigger event.
Fast span or range change
You can now change the span or range while the measurement is running,
using the existing functions hpe1432_setSpan or hpe1432_setRange.
Previously if you sent the command while a measurement was running, it
would wait until the next measurement. Now it will change the span or
range when the command is sent.
Time arming
This uses a new function hpe1432_setArmTimeInterval. It allows you to
specify a time interval for arming. For example you could set it to get a
block of data every second.
Weighting filters (HP E1433A only)
For the HP E1433A, you can set any of three weighting filters (A-weighting,
B-weighting, or C-weighting). This feature uses the function
hpe1432_setWeighting.
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Using the HP E1433A
Zoom (HP E1432A only)
Up to now the HP E1432A has made only baseband measurements (from
zero to some frequency.) Zoom allows you to set a center frequency and
look at a window of frequencies around it. It uses two new functions:
hpe1432_setZoom (turns zoom on/off) and hpe1432_setCenterFreq. (Zoom
has not been implemented for the HP E1433A).
Zoom (for the Arbitrary Source, option 1D4)
This is similar to zoom for the HP E1432A input. Zoom for the source
allows you to set a center frequency and a span for the output signal. It
uses the existing function hpe1432_setSourceMode with a new zoom
parameter.
Zoom applies to random burst source mode and continuous source mode,
for both the HP E1432A and the HP E1433A. When used with the
HP E1432A, if you set the source center frequency to zero, the source
center frequency will be the same as the center frequency set for the
HP E1432A input. This is also true for the span.
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Using the HP E1433A
Where to get more information
There is more information available about the HP E1433A. This section will
tell you how to access it and print it, if desired.
The HP E1433A uses the same software as the HP E1432A 16 Channel 51.2
kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP.
The Function Reference for VXIplug&play
On a PC: The HP E1432A Function Reference is in Microsoft Help text.
Select the Help icon in the “VXIPNP” folder. Refer to Microsoft Windows
documentation (including Help text) for information on using and printing
Help.
On a unix system, look at the README file at opt/hyperhelp. It includes
instructions on how to install and use the VXIplug&play help.
The Function Reference for the Host Interface Library (C-language
version)
The HP E1432A distribution includes manual pages for the HP E1432A Host
Interface library. These manual pages can be examined on-line, using the
“ptman” command that is shipped in “/opt/e1432/bin”. For example, you
can read the manual page for the “e1432_init_measure” function by typing:
ptman e1432_init_measure
The distribution also includes a nicely formatted set of these manual pages,
that can be printed on any postscript printer. This manual in postscript
form is in file “/opt/e1432/man/man.ps”. Typically, this manual can be
printed by typing:
lp -opostscript /opt/e1432/man/man.ps
Alternatively, if there is no postscript printer available, a plain text version
of the manual is in file “/opt/e1432/man/man.txt”. This can be printed on
any line printer.
Users of the C-language library will also find useful information about the
HP E1433A in the HP E1432A help text (see above).
3-38
4
The C-Language Host
Interface Library
4-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Introduction
The Host Interface Library for the HP E1433A is a set of functions that
allow you to program the register-based HP E1433A at a higher level than
register reads and writes. The library allows groups of HP E1433As to be
set up and programmed as if they were one entity.
The HP E1433A uses the same software as the HP E1432A 16 Channel 51.2
kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP.
Two version of the Host Interface Library are available. One is the HP-UX
C-Language Host Interface Library which uses SICL (the Standard
Instrument Interface Library) to communicate to the HP E1433A hardware.
The other is the VXIplug&play Library which communicates with the
hardware using the VXIplug&play standard. This chapter covers the
C-Language version. If you are using the VXIplug&play version, you will not
need this chapter. Instead, see the chapters titled “Getting Started With
the HP E1433A” and “Using the HP E1433A”
The library includes routines to set up and query parameters, start and stop
measurements, read and write data, and control interrupts. Routines to aid
debugging and perform low-level I/O are also included.
For information on diagnostics see the chapter titled “Troubleshooting the
HP E1433A.”
Almost all functions in this library return 0 if they complete successfully
and a negative error number if there is a problem. The return value of the
function should always be checked and appropriate action taken for
non-zero values. See the on-line man pages for more information on error
messages.
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The C-Language Host Interface Library
Header and Library Files
The /opt/e1432/lib directory contains several versions of the HP E1432A
Host Interface library:
lib1432.a
A normal HP-UX archive library, used by host programs wanting to talk to HP
E1433A hardware.
lib1432.sl
An HP-UX shared library, used by host programs wanting to talk to HP E1433A
hardware. This and the above archive library do exactly the same things.
Usually, host programs would use the shared library, because it makes the host
program smaller.
libd1432.a
An HP E1485A downloadable library. This is untested and not supported at this
time.
llib-l1432.ln
A lint library for the HP E1432A C-Language Host Interface Library. If you don’t
use lint (a unix tool for checking your source code for problems), you won’t care
about this file.
An application using the HP E1432A C-Language Host Interface Library
must link in one of these libraries, typically lib1432.sl. The HP-UX versions
of the HP E1432A library use SICL to communicate with the HP E1433A
hardware, so an application using the HP E1432A library must also link in
the SICL library. Normally, this is found in /usr/lib/libsicl.sl.
Any application source code which uses any of the HP E1432A C-Language
Host Interface Library functions must include the e1432.h include file, found
in /opt/e1432/include. Internally, this file includes machType.h, which is
also found in /opt/e1432/include. If the application refers to specific HP
E1433A error numbers, it must also include err1432.h.
4-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Parameter Information
Description of HP E1433A Parameters
Some parameters, such as range or coupling, apply to specific channels.
When a channel ID is given to a function that sets a channel-specific
parameter, only that channel is set to the new value.
Some parameters, such as clock frequency or data transfer mode, apply
globally to a module. When a channel ID is used to change a parameter
that applies to a whole module, the channel ID is used to determine which
module. The parameter is then changed for that module.
Starting and stopping a measurement is somewhat like setting a global
parameter. Starting a measurement starts each active channel in each
module that has a channel in the group.
After firmware is installed, and after a call to e1432_preset, all of the
parameters (both channel-specific and global) in an HP E1433A module are
set to their default values. For channel-specific parameters, the default
value may depend on the type of channel. Some channel-specific
parameters apply only to a specific type of channel. For example, tach
holdoff applies only to tach channels. Setting such a parameter for a
channel that doesn’t make sense will result in an error.
At the start of a measurement, the HP E1433A firmware sets up all
hardware parameters, and ensures that the input hardware is settled before
starting to take data. The firmware also ensures that any digital filters have
time to settle. This ensures that all data read from the module will be valid.
However, after a measurement starts, HP E1433A parameters can still be
changed. The effect of this change varies, depending on the parameter.
For some parameters, changing the value aborts the measurement
immediately. For other parameters, the measurement is not aborted, but
the changed parameter value is saved and not used until a new
measurement is started. For still other parameters, the parameter change
takes place immediately, and the data coming from the module may contain
glitches or other effects from changing the parameter.
You cannot tell the module to wait for settling when changing a parameter
in the middle of a measurement. The only way to wait for settling is to
stop and re-start the measurement. Also, you cannot disable the settling
that takes place at the start of a measurement.
4-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Parameter Lists
This section shows which parameters are global parameters, which are
channel-specific, and what types of channels the channel-specific parameters
apply to. Default values are shown for all of these parameters. In addition,
each parameter is categorized as “abort”, “wait”, “immediate”, or “glitch”
depending on the behavior when this parameter is changed during a
running measurement. Those with “abort” cause the measurement to abort.
Those with “wait” don’t take effect until the start of the next measurement.
Those with “immediate” take effect immediately. Those with “glitch” take
effect immediately, and may cause glitches in the data that is read back, or
on the source output if the parameter is applied to a source channel.
Global Parameters
Parameter
Default Value
Changes
append_status
Off
Immediate
arm_channel
None
Immediate
arm_mode
Auto Arm
Immediate
arm_time_interval
1 Sec
Immediate
auto_group_meas
On
Wait
avg_mode
None
Wait
avg_number
10
Wait
auto_trigger
Auto Trigger
Abort
avg_update
10
Wait
avg_weight
1
Immediate
blocksize
1024
Abort
cal_dac
0
Immediate
cal_voltage
0 Volts
Immediate
calin
Grounded
Immediate
center_freq
2 kHz
Immediate
clock_freq
51.2 kHz
Abort
clock_master
Off
Abort
clock_source
Internal
Abort
data_mode
Block Mode
Abort
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HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Parameter
Default Value
Changes
data_port
VME
Abort
data_size
16 Bit Integer
Abort
decimation_output
Single Pass
Wait
decimation_oversample
Off
Wait
decimation_undersamp
1
Wait
delta_order
0.1
Wait
fifo_size
0 (Use All DRAM)
Wait
filter_settling_time
64 samples
Wait
internal_debug
0x100
Immediate
interrupt_mask
0
Immediate
interrupt_priority
None
Immediate
lbus_mode
Pipe
Immediate
lbus_reset
Off (Not Reset)
Immediate
max_order
10
Wait
meas_time_lengh
0 (run forever)
Immediate
mmf_delay
0
Immediate
multi_sync
Off
Abort
overlap
0
Wait
pre_arm_mode
Auto Arm
Immediate
ramp
Off
Immediate
span
20000 Hz
Wait
sumbus
Off
Immediate
trigger_delay
0
Wait
trigger_ext
Off
Immediate
trigger_master
Off
Immediate
triggers_per_arm
1
Immediate
ttltrg_clock
TTLTRG1
Abort
ttltrg_gclock
TTLTRG1
Abort
ttltrg_satrg
TTLTRG0
Abort
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The C-Language Host Interface Library
Parameter
Default Value
Changes
ttltrg_trigger
TTLTRG0
Abort
window
Uniform
Glitch
xfer_size
0 (Use Blocksize)
Wait
zoom
Off
Waitt
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HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
196.608 kHz 4-channel Input Parameters
Parameter
Default Value
Changes
active
Off
Abort
anti_alias_digital(*)
On
Abort
auto_range_mode
Up/Down
Immediate
calc_data
Time
Wait
coupling
DC
Glitch
enable
On
Immediate
filter_freq
200 kHz
Immediate
input_high
Normal
Glitch
input_low
Floating
Glitch
input_mode(*)
Volt
Glitch
range
10 Volts
Glitch
range_charge
50,000 pico Coulombs
Glitch
range_mike
10 Volts
Glitch
trigger_channel
Off
Immediate
trigger_level_lower
-10%
Immediate
trigger_level_upper
0%
Immediate
trigger_mode
Level
Immediate
trigger_slope
Positive
Immediate
(*) Input mode is listed as channel-specific, but it actually applies to all
channels within an SCA (such as a 4-channel input assembly).
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The C-Language Host Interface Library
Option 1D4 Single-channel Source Parameters
Parameter
Default Value
Changes
active
Off
Abort
amp_scale
1.0
Immediate
anti_alias_digital
On
Wait
duty_cycle
0.5
Immediate
filter_freq
25.6 kHz
Wait
ramp_rate
1 Second
Wait
range
0.041567 Volt
Immediate
sine_freq
1000 Hz
Immediate
sine_phase
0 Degrees
Immediate
source_blocksize
0 (Use Input Blocksize)
Wait
source_centerfreq
0 Hz
Wait
source_cola
Off
Wait
source_mode
Sine
Abort
source_output
Normal
Abort
source_speed
3
Wait
source_span
0 (Use Input Span)
Wait
source_sum
Off
Wait
srcbuffer_init
Empty
Wait
srcbuffer_mode
Periodic_A
Wait
srcbuffer_size
1024
Wait
srcparm_mode
Immediate
Immediate
trigger_channel
Off
Wait
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HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Option AYF Tachometer Parameters
Parameter
Default Value
Changes
active
Off
Abort
input_high
Normal
Immediate
pre_arm_rpm
600 RPM
Immediate
rpm_high
6000 RPM
Immediate
rpm_interval
25 RPM
Immediate
rpm_low
600 RPM
Immediate
rpm_smoothing
0
Immediate
tach_decimate
0
Immediate
tach_holdoff
10 Microseconds
Immediate
tach_max_time
30 seconds
Immediate
tach_ppr
1
Immediate
trigger_channel
Off
Wait
trigger_level_lower
-0.05 Volts
Immediate
trigger_level_upper
0 Volts
Immediate
trigger_slope
Positive
Immediate
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HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Channel and Group IDs
Most functions in the HP E1432A C-Language Host Interface Library take
an ID parameter which specifies what channel or group of channels the
function should apply to. The ID can either be a channel ID or a group ID.
If a group ID is used, then the function is applied to each channel
contained in the group.
Channel IDs
Channel IDs are logical IDs which are created by a call to
e1432_assign_channel_numbers. The e1432_assign_channel_numbers
function must be called exactly once, following the call to
e1432_init_io_driver, in order to declare to the library the logical addresses
of the HP E1433A modules that will be used.
This function checks the existence of an HP E1433A module at each of the
logical addresses given in a list of logical addresses, and allocates logical
channel identifiers for each channel in all of the HP E1433As. Input
channels, source channels, and tach/trigger channels are kept logically
separated. Channel numbers for each type of channel are numbered
starting from one, so there will be input channels 1 through M, source
channels 1 through N, and tach/trigger channels 1 through P, where M is
the number of input channels, N is the number of source channels, and P is
the number of tach/trigger channels.
As an example, suppose two logical addresses 100 and 101 are passed to
the function, and the logical address 100 has two 4-channel input SCAs and
a 2-channel tach/trigger board, while logical address 101 has three 4-channel
input SCAs and a 1-channel source board. In this case, input channel IDs 1
through 8 are assigned to the eight input channels at logical address 100,
while input channel IDs 9 through 20 are assigned to the twelve input
channels at logical address 101. Tach/trigger channel IDs number 1 and 2
are assigned to the two tach/trigger channels at logical address 100, and
Source channel ID number 1 is assigned to the source channel at logical
address 101.
To use the ID of an input channel, the input channel number is given as an
argument to the E1432_INPUT_CHAN() macro. (For backwards
compatibility with theHP E1431A, the macro does nothing.) To use the ID
of a source channel, the source channel number is given as an argument to
the E1432_SOURCE_CHAN() macro. To use the ID of a tach/trigger
channel, the tach/trigger channel number is given as an argument to the
E1432_TACH_CHAN() macro. A channel ID is always positive.
For example, to set the range of the third input channel to 10 volts, the
source code would look something like:
status = e1432_set_range(hwid, E1432_INPUT_CHAN(3), 10.0);
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Group IDs
Group IDs are logical IDs which are created by a call to
e1432_create_channel_group. This function can be called multiple times to
create multiple groups, and each group can contain any combination of
channels, including mixtures of different types of channels. The channel
groups can overlap as well.
This function creates and initializes a channel group. A channel group
allows you to issue commands to several HP E1433A channels at once,
simplifying system setup. The state of an individual HP E1433A channel
that is in more than one channel group, is determined by the most recent
operation performed on any group to which this channel belongs.
If successful, this function returns the ID of the group that was created,
which is then used to reference the channel group in most other functions
in this library. A group ID is always negative.
As a side effect, this function makes all input channels in the channel group
active, and all source and tach channels in the channel group inactive.
Unlike the HP 1431A library, this function does not inactivate other
channels within the modules that the channels are in. Also unlike the HP
1431A library, this function does not preset the channels in the new group.
As an example, to create a group consisting of the first three input
channels and the eighth and ninth input channels, the code would like
something like this:
SHORTSIZ16 chan_list[5];
SHORTSIZ16 input_group;
chan_list[0] = E1432_INPUT_CHAN(1);
chan_list[1] = E1432_INPUT_CHAN(2);
chan_list[2] = E1432_INPUT_CHAN(3);
chan_list[3] = E1432_INPUT_CHAN(8);
chan_list[4] = E1432_INPUT_CHAN(9);
input_group = e1432_create_channel_group(hw, 5, chan_list);
To create a group consisting of the first two source channels, the code
would look something like this:
SHORTSIZ16 chan_list[2];
SHORTSIZ16 source_group;
chan_list[0] = E1432_SOURCE_CHAN(1);
chan_list[1] = E1432_SOURCE_CHAN(2);
source_group = e1432_create_channel_group(hw, 2, chan_list);
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Multiple-module/Mainframe Measurements
Grouping of Channels/Modules
The interface library for the HP E1433A is designed to allow programming
of several channels from one or several distinct modules, as if they were
one entity. Each HP E1433A module has up to 16 channels. The library
may control up to a maximum of 255 HP E1433A modules (8160 channels).
When initializing the interface library, all module logical addresses are
passed in the call to e1432_assign_channel_numbers. This function
associates a logical channel ID with each channel. From then on, library
functions use these logical IDs rather than the logical address.
The function e1432_create_channel_group can be used to declare any
number of groups of channels, possibly overlapping. Each group can be
uniquely identified by a group ID.
The ‘target’ of a library function is either a channel, a group, or (rarely) a
module, depending on the nature of the call. When the same library
function may be called with either a channel or a group identifier, it’s
‘target’ is shown by a parameter named ID.
Multiple-module Measurements
A channel group that spans more than one module will need to be
configured to use the TTL trigger lines on the VXI Bus for inter-module
communications. This configuration automatically performed in the
e1432_init_measure call unless defeated using e1432_set_auto_group_meas.
The following discussion outlines what e1432_init_measure does
automatically. This must be done by the user if
e1432_set_auto_group_meas has been used to defeat auto configuration.
There are eight VXI TTL trigger lines that can be used for multi-module
synchronization. Often, these lines are used in pairs, one for sample clock
and one for Sync/Trigger. The e1432_set_ttltrg_lines function selects which
TTL trigger lines to use; this function always uses the TTL trigger lines in
pairs. Calling e1432_set_clock_source with the group ID will set all modules
to the same pair.
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All modules need to be set to use the shared sync line rather than the
default setting of internal sync. This can be done with the
e1432_set_multi_sync function, using the group ID.
One module of the set of modules needs to be set to output the sync pulse.
Tthe module with the lowest VXI logical address is called the “system
module” and assigned this duty. This can be set with the
e1432_set_multi_sync function call, using the lowest channel ID in the
group (NOT the group ID).
All modules except the “system module” need to be set to use the VXI TTL
trigger lines as the clock source. Use e1432_set_clock_source for this.
Set the “system module” to output the clock. Use e1432_set_clock_master
for this. After this is done, all system sync pulses come from the “system
module” and drive the measurement state machines on all boards in the
group.
Possible Trigger Line Conflict
The following describes a scenario where HP E1433A modules might conflict
and prevent a proper measurement. The conditions allowing the conflict
are complex but must be understood by the user.
After a measurement has completed, the modules are left set up. If a
module (call it module ‘A’) is driving the TTL trigger lines and a different
group is started which also drives the TTL trigger lines (and that different
group does not include module ‘A’), then module ‘A’ will conflict and
prevent the other group from functioning. In this case make a call to
e1432_finish_measure (using the old group ID which includes ‘A’) to turn
off module ‘A’ and allow the new group to function.
Note that if the new group includes all modules of the old group, the
conflict will not occur since e1432_init_measure will reset all modules as
needed. Also note that single module groups do not drive the TTL trigger
lines, so single modules groups are immune from causing or receiving this
conflict.
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Managing Multiple-mainframe Measurements
In a single mainframe measurement, the HP E1433A communicates with
other HP E1433As through the TTLTRG lines. However, when using the
VXI-MXI bus extender modules, the TTLTRG lines, which carry the group
synchronization pulse and sample clock, are extended only in one direction.
This unidirectional signal connection restricts the types of measurements
you can make in a multiple mainframe environment.
You cannot perform the following types of multiple mainframe measurements:
q
q
q
q
Unequal pre-trigger delay settings between mainframes
Channel triggering by channels in Mainframe B
Lower spans or longer blocksizes in Mainframe B
Different digital filter settling times between HP E1433A modules
Slot 0
Contoller
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
Fail Acs Trigger Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196 8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe A
Fail Acs Trigger Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196 8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe B
HP E1433A
Figure 4-1: Multiple mainframes - two mainframes
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In the example above, Mainframe A contains the Slot 0 Controller for a
multiple mainframe system. Mainframe A is connected to Mainframe B with
a VXI-MXI interface, HP E1482B. To successfully manage this multiple
mainframe environment, use the following guidelines.
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
Locate modules with logical addresses less than 128 in Mainframe A.
Locate modules with logical addresses greater than 127 in Mainframe B.
Locate the highest-numbered channels in Mainframe A.
Locate the last module in the module list specified in the call to
e1432_assign_channels() in Mainframe A.
Locate the module that generates the group synchronization pulse in
Mainframe A.
Locate the channels performing channel triggering in Mainframe A.
Locate the module with the shared sample clock in Mainframe A.
If you do not use a groupID with the call e1432_read_data(), empty the HP
E1433As’ FIFOs in Mainframe B before Mainframe A. In other words, do not
empty the FIFOs in Mainframe A unless you have emptied the FIFOs in
Mainframe B. For more information about groupID see “Grouping of
Channels/Modules.”
If more than two mainframes are needed, daisy-chain them together. Treat each
mainframe after the first as a Mainframe B. See the example on the next page.
Phase Performance in Multiple Mainframe Measurements
Phase specifications are degraded by the delay that the inter-mainframe
interface gives the sample clock. This delay is insignificant for many
low-frequency applications because the phase error is proportional to
frequency. A system with two VXI-MXI modules and a 1 meter cable,
typically has a 76 nanosecond (ns) sample clock delay in Mainframe B.
This corresponds to an additional 0.007 degree phase error at 256 Hz and
an additional 0.55 degree phase error at 20 kHz.
A 4-meter cable adds approximately 18 ns of delay for a total of 94 ns
clock delay in Mainframe B. This corresponds to an additional 0.0087
degree phase error at 256 Hz and an additional 0.68 degree phase error at
20 kHz.
The cable adds approximately 6 ns per meter of cable.
Each daisy-chained mainframe adds another increment of delay, but only for
the additional cabling length.
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Slot 0
Contoller
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
Fail Acs Trigger
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
INTX
Cable
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe A
MXI Bus
Cable
Fail Acs Trigger
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe B
HP E1433A
HP E1482B
HP E1482B
HP E1433A
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
VXI Mainframe C
Figure 4-2: Multiple mainframes - three mainframes
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Synchronization in Multiple-mainframe Measurements
A TTL Trigger line between HP E1433As making group measurements
keeps all modules synchronized. This is an open-collector line where each
module holds the one designated as the SYNC line low until the module is
ready to advance to the next measurement state. Another TTL Trigger line
is designated to carry the sample clock to all modules. This shared sample
clock may come from any HP E1433A module in Mainframe A or from an
external signal routed through the Slot 0 Commander in Mainframe A.
One module is responsible for pulling the SYNC line low to start each
group’s state transition. Then, each module holds the line low until it is
ready. When all modules are ready, the SYNC line drifts high. The
unidirectional line prevents modules in Mainframe B from holding-off
modules in Mainframe A.
The lowest logical address must be in Mainframe A because of VXI-MXI and
Resource Manager (RM) constraints. Group constraints with the C-Library
force modules in Mainframe A to have their FIFOs emptied last. The
C-Library reads data in channel order, so the highest channel is read last.
To get this to work automatically, the call to e1432_assign_channels() must
list the logical addresses in descending order.
Channel triggering must be done only by modules in Mainframe A. A
trigger in any other mainframe would not be communicated back on the
SYNC line to Mainframe A. The C-Library itself selects the HP E1433A
with the highest channel number for synchronization.
VXI-MXI Module Setup and System Configuration
To set up your multiple mainframe system, follow the “Hardware Installation
Rules” which appear in Chapter 2 of the HP E1482B VXI-MXI Bus Extender
User’s Manual. This allows the Resource Manager to configure your system.
The VXI-MXI Module setup in Mainframe A needs to be changed from those
set by the factory. The VXI-MXI module is not the Slot 0 Controller for
Mainframe A. See Table 2-1. Configuration Settings in the HP E1482B
VXI-MXI Bus Extender User’s Manual. This requires changing several
switch settings.
q Set the module as not being the Slot 0 Controller.
q
q
q
q
Set the VME timeout to 200 µs.
Set the VME BTO chain position to 1 extender, non-slot0.
Do not source CLK10.
Set the proper logical address.
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Measurement Process
Measurement Setup and Control
When the HP E1433A makes a measurement, the measurement itself
consists of two phases: the measurement initialization, and the
measurement loop. Each of these phases consists of several states, through
which the measurement progresses.
The transition from one state to the next is tied to a transition in the
Sync/Trigger line (one of the TTL trigger lines on the VXI back plane). A
state (such as Idle) begins when the Sync/Trigger line goes low. The
Sync/Trigger line then remains low as long as the state is in effect. When
the Sync/Trigger line goes high it signals the transition to the next state.
See the sections “Measurement Initialization” and “Measurement Loop”
below for more details about these transitions. During all the transitions of
the Sync/Trigger line, the clock line continues with a constant pulse.
The Sync/Trigger line is “wire-OR’d” such that all modules in a
multiple-module system (within one mainframe) must release it for it to go
high. Only one HP E1433A is required to pull the Sync/Trigger line low.
In a system with only one HP E1432A, the Sync/Trigger line is local to the
module and not is routed to a TTL TRIGGER line on the VXI back plane.
Sync/Trigger line
Pre-arm
Start of
state
Trigger
Idle
Arm
Meas
End of
state
Figure 4-3: Transitions between states
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Parameter Settings
Many parameters are channel-dependent, meaning that each channel can be
set independently of the others in the module. Other parameters are
module-dependent; changing a module-dependent parameter for a channel
will change it for all channels on that module. For example, changing
blocksize, a module-dependent parameter, for input channel 3 will also
change the block size for all other channels in the same HP E1433A module
as channel 3.
When possible, parameters are written to the hardware as soon as they are
received. Sometimes, the parameter can’t be written to the hardware until
the start of a measurement; in this case the value of the parameter is saved
in RAM in the HP E1433A module until the measurement is started with
e1432_init_measure. Some parameters can be changed while a
measurement is running, but many do not take effect until the next start of
a measurement.
Measurement initialization
This section describes the measurement initialization process in the HP
E1433A.
The measurement initialization states, and the corresponding Sync/Trigger
line transitions (with ‘H’ for high, ‘L’ for Low) are:
Booting
Tested
H
L
Booted
L H
Settling
H
L
Pre-arm
Idle
L H
Sync/Trigger line
Figure 4-4: Measurement initialization
The module enters the TESTED state after a reset. In this state, all of the
module parameters may be set. The HP E1433A stays in the TESTED state
until it sees a high-to-low transition of the Sync/Trigger line.
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In the BOOTING state, the digital processors of the module load their
parameters, and their program. Once done, the module releases the
Sync/Trigger line and moves to the BOOTED state. The HP E1433A stays
in the BOOTED state until it sees a high-to-low transition of the
Sync/Trigger line (that is, all the HP E1433As in the system have booted).
In the SETTLING state, the digital filters are synchronized, and the digital
filter output is ‘settled’ (it waits N samples before outputting any data).
Once the module is settled, it advances to the PRE_ARM state.
In the PRE_ARM state, the module waits for a pre-arm condition to take
place. The default is to auto-arm, so the module would not wait at all in
this case. When the pre-arm condition is met, the module releases the
Sync/Trigger line and advances to the IDLE state.
This complete measurement sequence initialization, from TESTED through
BOOTING, BOOTED, SETTLING, PRE-ARM, and IDLE, can be performed
with a call to the function e1432_init_measure.
Measurement Loop
This section describes the measurement loop in the HP E1433A.
The progression of measurement states and the corresponding Sync/Trigger
line transitions are:
Idle
Arm
H
L
Trigger
L H
Measure
H
L
L H
Sync/Trigger line
Figure 4-5: Measurement loop
In the IDLE state the HP E1433A writes no data into the FIFO. The HP
E1433A remains in the IDLE state until it sees a high-to-low transition of
the Sync/Trigger line or an RPM arm/trigger point is calculated. If any of
the HP E1433As in the system is programmed for auto arming (with
e1432_set_auto_arm), the Sync/Trigger line is immediately pulled low by
that HP E1433A. The HP E1433A may also be moved to the ARM state by
an explicit call to the function e1432_arm_measure.
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Upon entering the ARM state the HP E1433A starts saving new data in its
FIFO. It remains in the ARM state until the Sync/Trigger line goes high. If
the HP E1433A is programmed with a pre-trigger delay, it collects enough
data samples to satisfy this pre-trigger delay, and then releases the
Sync/Trigger line. If no pre-trigger delay has been programmed, it releases
the Sync/Trigger line immediately. When all modules in a system have
released the Sync/Trigger line (allowing it to go high), a transition to the
TRIGGER state occurs.
Upon entering the TRIGGER state the HP E1433A continues to collect data
into the FIFO, discarding any data prior to the pre-trigger delay. The HP
E1433A remains in the TRIGGER state until it sees a high-to-low transition
of the Sync/Trigger line. The Sync/Trigger line is pulled low by any HP
E1433A which encounters a trigger condition and is programmed to pull the
Sync/Trigger line. If any HP E1433A is programmed for auto triggering
(with e1432_set_auto_trigger), the Sync/Trigger line is pulled low
immediately. The Sync/Trigger line may also be pulled low by an explicit
call to the function e1432_trigger_measure.
Upon entering the MEASURE state the HP E1433A continues to collect
data. The HP E1433A also presents the first data from the FIFO to the
selected output port, making it available to the controller to read. The HP
E1433A holds the Sync/Trigger line low as long as it is actively collecting
data. In overlap block mode the HP E1433A stops taking data as soon as a
block of data has been collected, including any programmed pre- or
post-trigger delays. (It starts again when another trigger occurs). In
continuous mode, the HP E1433A stops taking data only when the FIFO
overflows. When data collection stops, the HP E1433A releases the
Sync/Trigger line. When all HP E1433As are finished and the Sync/Trigger
line goes high, the HP E1433A goes into the IDLE state again.
The measurement initialization and loop may be interrupted at any time
with a call to e1432_reset_measure, which puts the module in the TESTED
state.
Register-based VXI Devices
The HP E1433A is a register-based VXI device. Unlike message-based
devices which use higher-level programming using ASCII characters,
register-based devices are programmed at a very low level using binary
information. The greatest advantage of this is speed. Register-based
devices communicate at the level of direct hardware manipulation and this
can lead to much greater system throughput.
You will not need to access the registers in order to use the HP E1433A.
The HP E1433A’s functions can be more easily accessed using the HP
E1432A Host Interface Library software. However, if you want more
information about the registers see Appendix A: Register Definitions.
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Arm and Trigger
This section explains some terminology relating the the “Arm” and “Trigger”
steps in the measurement loop. As an example a measurement might be
set up to arm at a certain RPM level and then subsequently trigger at an
external event corresponding to top dead center (TDC). The settings
would be:
q Arm:
q Trigger:
RPM Step Arm
External Trigger
If you want to begin a throughput session at this same RPM/TDC event,
then the first external trigger after a specified RPM would start a
continuous mode measurement. Now (using overlap block mode) the
settings would be:
q Pre-Arm:
q Arm:
q Trigger:
RPM Step Arm
Auto
Auto
In the measurement loop, an arm must take place before a trigger. You can
program how many triggers to do before waiting for another arm condition.
The default is one trigger for each arm. For each trigger, a block of data
is sent to the host.
The first arm in a measurement is the pre-arm. By default, the pre-arm
condition is the same as the regular arm conditions.
Valid Arm (and Pre-Arm) conditions are:
q Auto Arm
q Manual Arm
q RPM Step Arm
Valid trigger conditions are:
q
q
q
q
q
q
Auto Trigger
Input Trigger
Source Trigger
External Trigger
Manual Trigger
Tachometer Edge Trigger
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HP E1433A Triggering.
The following is a short discussion of triggering for the HP E1433A.
Triggering is defined as the transition from the armed state to the triggered
state. This transition is caused by a low going edge on a TTL trigger line.
Which one of the eight TTL trigger line is chosen by
e1432_get_ttltrg_lines().
The low-going transition of the TTL trig line can be caused by any of the
following items:
trigger type
enabling function
the AUTO TRIGGER circuitry
e1432_set_auto_trigger()
the e1432_trigger_measure() function
e1432_trigger_measure()
a source trigger
e1432_set_trigger_channel()
a tach trigger
e1432_set_trigger_channel()
an external trigger
e1432_set_trigger_ext()
an input level or bound trigger event
e1432_set_trigger_channel()
and e1432_set_trigger_mode()
Each of these trigger sources can be enabled or disabled independently, so
quite complex trigger setups are possible. In all cases, however, the first
trigger event kicks off the measurement and the following trigger events
become superfluous.
Note that for e1432_set_auto_trigger() the setting E1432_MANUAL_ARM
really means “don’t auto trigger” not “expect a manual trigger”.
For single HP E1433A systems, the TTL trigger signal is not connected to
the VXI backplane. For multiple HP E1433A systems, the
e1432_init_measure() function connects the HP E1433A trigger lines to the
VXI backplane, and at that point, your selection of which TTL trigger lines
through e1432_get_ttltrg_lines() is relevant. Multiple mainframe systems
will need to account for the unidirectional nature of the inter-mainframe
MXI extenders which will prevent all but the “upstream” mainframe from
triggering the system.
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Data Transfer Modes
The HP E1433A can be programmed to use either of two data transfer
modes: overlap block mode and continuous mode. To help explain these
modes we will first describe block mode.
Block Mode (HP E1431A)
The HP E1433A’s overlap block mode is similar the block mode which is
used in other Hewlett-Packard instruments such as the HP E1431A. In
block mode, the input hardware acquires one block after getting an arm and
trigger. It does not allow the system to trigger until it is ready to process
the trigger, and it acquires pre-trigger data if necessary. The hardware does
not accept a new arm and trigger until the acquired block is sent to the
host. There is no provision for overlap or queuing up more than one block
when in block mode. There is also no way for a FIFO overflow to occur.
The HP E1433A’s overlap block mode can be configured to act exactly like
traditional block mode. It also has additional capabilities as described below.
Continuous Mode.
Both the HP E1433A’s and the HP E1431A use continuous mode. In this
mode , the input hardware waits for an arm and trigger, and then starts
acquiring data continuously. If the host is slow, several blocks can be
queued up in the input hardware. If the host gets far enough behind, a
FIFO overflow occurs and the input stops acquiring data.
The HP E1433A’s overlap block mode can be configured to act similarly to
continuous mode, but not identically. The HP E1433A can also use the
traditional continuous mode.
Overlap Block Mode
Overlap block mode combines features of both block mode and continuous
mode. The main difference between overlap block mode and traditional
block mode is that overlap block mode allows additional arms and triggers
to occur before an already-acquired block is sent to the host. A trigger can
occur before the end of the previous block, so overlapping blocks are
possible (hence the name “overlap block mode”). As in continuous mode,
there is an overlap parameter which controls how much overlap is allowed
between consecutive blocks.
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Limit on Queuing of Data
In overlap block mode, a number of trigger events may be queued up
before the host reads the data for those triggers. The host may get further
and further behind the data acquisition.
However, if the host gets far enough behind that the FIFO fills up, data
acquisition must momentarily stop and wait for data to get transferred to
the host. This places a limit on how far in time the host can be behind the
data acquisition. By setting the size of the FIFO, is you can control how
far behind the host can get.
Making Overlap Block Mode Act Like Traditional Block Mode
If the FIFO size is set the same as the block size, or if the number of
pending triggers is limited to zero, then overlap block mode becomes
identical to traditional block mode.
Making Overlap Block Act Like Continuous Mode
If the module is in auto-arm and auto-trigger mode, then overlap block
mode becomes nearly the same as continuous mode.
One difference is that traditional continuous mode has a single arm and
trigger, while overlap block mode may have multiple arms and triggers.
Another is that continuous mode can be configured to start at any type of
trigger event, while overlap block mode must be in auto-trigger mode to act
like continuous mode. Finally, continuous mode always stops when a FIFO
overflow occurs, but overlap block mode does not.
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HP E1433A Interrupt Behavior
Interrupt Setup
The HP E1433A VXI module can be programmed to interrupt a host
computer using the VME interrupt lines. VME provides seven such lines,
and the HP E1433A module can be told to use any one of them (see
e1432_set_interrupt_priority).
The HP 1432A can interrupt the host computer in response to different
events. You can specify a mask of events on which to interrupt. This mask
is created by OR-ing together the various conditions that the you want.
The following table, copied from the e1432_set_interrupt_mask manual page,
shows the conditions that can cause an interrupt:
Interrupt Mask Bit Definitions
Define (in e1432.h)
Description
E1432_IRQ_MEAS_WARNING
Non-fatal measurement warning
E1432_IRQ_BLOCK_READY
Block of data ready in FIFO
E1432_IRQ_MEAS_STATE_CHANGE
Measurement state machine changed state
E1432_IRQ_TRIGGER
Trigger ready for transfer to other modules
E1432_IRQ_OVERLOAD_CHANGE
Overload status changed
E1432_IRQ_MEAS_ERROR
FIFO overflow
E1432_IRQ_TACHS_AVAIL
Raw tach-times available
E1432_IRQ_SRC_STATUS
Source status change
4-27
HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
HP E1433A Interrupt Handling
To make the HP E1433A module do the interrupt, both a mask and a VME
Interrupt line must be specified, by calling e1432_set_interrupt_mask and
e1432_set_interrupt_priority respectively. Once the mask and line have
been set, and an interrupt occurs, the cause of the interrupt can be
obtained by reading the E1432_IRQ_STATUS_REG register (using
e1432_read_register). The bit positions of the interrupt mask and status
registers match so the defines can be used to set and check IRQ bits.
Once it has done this interrupt, the module will not do any more VME
interrupts until re-enabled with e1432_reenable_interrupt. Normally, the
last thing a host computer’s interrupt handler should do is call
e1432_reenable_interrupt.
Events that would have caused an interrupt, but which are blocked because
e1432_reenable_interrupt has not yet been called, will be saved. After
e1432_reenable_interrupt is called, these saved events will cause an
interrupt, so that there is no way for the host to “miss” an interrupt.
However, the module will only do one VME interrupt for all of the saved
events, so that the host computer will not get flooded with too many
interrupts.
For things like “E1432_IRQ_BLOCK_READY”, which are not events but are
actually states, the module will do an interrupt after
e1432_reenable_interrupt only if the state is still present. This allows the
host computer’s interrupt handler to potentially read multiple scans from an
HP E1433A module, and not get flooded with block ready interrupts after
the fact.
Host Interrupt Setup
The HP E1432A Host Interface library normally uses the SICL I/O library to
communicate with the HP 1432A hardware. To receive VME interrupts, a
variety of SICL setup calls must be made. The “examples” directory of the
HP E1433A distribution contains an example of setting up SICL to receive
interrupts from an HP E1433A module.
This is a summary of how to set up SICL to receive an HP E1433A
interrupt:
q Query SICL for which VME interrupt lines are available, using ivxibusstatus and
ivxirminfo.
q Tell the HP E1433A module to use the VME interrupt line found in step one,
using e1432_set_interrupt_priority.
q Set up an interrupt handler routine, using ionintr and isetintr. The interrupt
handler routine will get called when the interrupt occurs.
q Set up interrupt mask in the HP E1433A module, using
e1432_set_interrupt_mask.
4-28
HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
Host Interrupt Handling
When the HP E1433A asserts the VME interrupt line, SICL will cause the
specified interrupt handler to get called. Typically the interrupt handler
routine will read data from the module, and then re-enable HP E1433A
interrupts with e1432_reenable_interrupt. The call to
e1432_reenable_interrupt must be done unless the host is not interested in
any more interrupts.
Inside the interrupt handler, almost any HP E1432A Host Interface library
function can be called. This works because the Host Interface library
disables interrupts around critical sections of code, ensuring that
communication with the HP E1433A module stays consistent. Things that
are not valid in the handler are:
q Calling e1432_delete_channel_group to delete a group that is simultaneously
being used by non-interrupt-handler code.
q Calling one of the read data functions (e1432_read_raw_data,
e1432_read_float32_data, or e1432_read_float64_data), if the
non-interrupt-handler code is also calling one of these functions.
q Calling e1432_assign_channel_numbers to reset the list of channels that are
available to the HP E1432A library.
As is always the case with interrupt handlers, it is easy to introduce bugs
into your program, and generally hard to track down these bugs. Be careful
when writing this function.
Data Gating
Sometimes you may wish to monitor data from some input channels and not
others. The function e1432_set_enable enables or disables data from an
input channel (or group of channels). If data is enabled, then the data can
be read using e1432_block_available and e1432_read_xxx_data. If data is
disabled, data from the specified channel is not made available to the host
computer.
This parameter can be changed while a measurement is running, to allow
the host computer to look at only some of the data being collected by the
HP E1433A module. While data from a channel is disabled the input
module continues to collect data but it is not made available to the host
computer. The host can then switch from looking at some channels to
looking at others during the measurement. In contrast, the function
e1432_set_active completely enables or disables a channel and can’t be
changed while a measurement is running.
For order tracking measurements this function can be used to switch
between receiving order tracking data, ordinary time data, or both.
4-29
HP E1433A User's Guide
The C-Language Host Interface Library
HP E1433A Parameters
Some parameters, such as range or coupling, apply to specific channels.
When a channel ID is given to a function that sets a channel-specific
parameter, only that channel is set to the new value.
Some parameters, such as clock frequency or data transfer mode, apply
globally to a module. When a channel ID is used to change a parameter
that applies to a whole module, the channel ID is used to determine which
module. The parameter is then changed for that module.
Starting and stopping a measurement is somewhat like setting a global
parameter. Starting a measurement starts each active channel in each
module that has a channel in the group.
After firmware is installed, and after a call to e1432_preset, all of the
parameters (both channel-specific and global) in an HP E1432A module are
set to their default values. For channel-specific parameters, the default
value may depend on the type of channel. Some channel-specific
parameters apply only to a specific type of channel. For example, tach
holdoff applies only to tach channels. Setting such a parameter for a
channel that doesn’t make sense will result in an error.
At the start of a measurement, the HP E1433A firmware sets up all
hardware parameters, and ensures that the input hardware is settled before
starting to take data. The firmware also ensures that any digital filters have
time to settle. This ensures that all data read from the module will be valid.
However, after a measurement starts, HP E1433A parameters can still be
changed. The effect of this change varies, depending on the parameter.
For some parameters, changing the value aborts the measurement
immediately. For other parameters, the measurement is not aborted, but
the changed parameter value is saved and not used until a new
measurement is started. For still other parameters, the parameter change
takes place immediately, and the data coming from the module may contain
glitches or other effects from changing the parameter.
There is no way to tell the module to wait for settling when changing a
parameter in the middle of a measurement. The only way to wait for
settling is to stop and re-start the measurement. Also, there is no way to
disable the settling that takes place at the start of a measurement.
For More Information
Refer to the (on-line) HP E1432A Function Reference for a list of all
functions and the parameters needed for each function. (See “Where to get
more information” in the chapter titled “Using the HP E1433A).”
4-30
5
Module Description
5-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Module Features
The HP E1433A 8-Channel 196 kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP is a VXI C-sized,
scaleable input module. The HP E1433A may contain one or two 4-channel
input assemblies so that the module may have a total of up to 8 inputs.
The following is a list of some of the features of the HP E1433A. See
“Specifications” for more detailed information.
The standard HP E1433A is described in this chapter. The Arbitrary
Source and Tachometer options are described in other chapters.
General Features
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
Fundamental sample rate selectable within the range of 32768 Hz to 196,608 Hz.
Digital sample rate decimation in a 1, 2, 5 sequence.
Variable Block Size (binary)
Optional Large Data Buffer (2 Msamples, expandable to 16 Msamples)
Data from FIFO available with overlap
VXI Shared Memory
Flexible triggering, including pre- and post-triggering
AC/DC coupling
ICP power supplies, with the optional ICP 8-Channel Input (breakout box)
Overload detection
Synchronous sampling over multiple channels and HP E1433A modules
Large FIFO for long pre-trigger delays
D32 VME Bus data transfer
VXI Local Bus data transfer (with Local Bus option)
Arbitrary Source Features (option 1D4)
q Sine output
q Random noise output
q Arbitrary output
Tachometer Features (option AYF)
q Current RPM value measurements
q Up/Down RPM triggered measurements
Other Options
q Local Bus, option UGV
q 32 MB total RAM, option ANC (standard is 4 MB)
5-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Block Diagram
LBUS/FIFO
[optional]
Local bus
VXI bus
Bus connector
96002
SRAM
512 kB
SRAM
512 kB
microprocessor
Hardware
registers
DRAM
4 MB or 32 MB
VXI
interface
B bus
Input 1
A bus
DMA/
memory
control
PLL
clock/
trigger
Input 2
[optional]
Tachometer
[optional]
or...
Source
[optional]
Figure 5-6: HP E1433A block diagram
For block diagrams of the Arbitrary Source and the Tachometer, see the
chapters on the Arbitrary Source option and the Tachometer option.
5-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
+
+
+
+
-
Input
Circuit
Differential
Amp
Range
Selection
Anti-Alias
Filter
DeltaSigma ADC
DSP
Input
Circuit
Differential
Amp
Range
Selection
Anti-Alias
Filter
DeltaSigma ADC
DSP
Input
Circuit
Differential
Amp
Range
Selection
Anti-Alias
Filter
DeltaSigma ADC
DSP
Input
Circuit
Differential
Amp
Range
Selection
Anti-Alias
Filter
DeltaSigma ADC
DSP
Figure 5-7: Input section diagram
5-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
HP E1433A Front Panel Description
Front panels for four or eight channels
The HP E1433A may have any of several front panels depending on options
and number of input channels. The following illustration shows front panels
for 4 or 8 channels.
Fail Acs Source
Fail Acs Source
COLA Shut Out
COLA Shut Out
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
1-4
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
HP E1433A
Figure 5-8: Front panels for 4 or 8 channels
5-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Standard Front Panel
This is the front panel for a standard HP E1433A (this example has eight
inputs). The LED’s and connectors are described on the next page.
If your HP E1433A has an Arbitrary Source (Option 1D4) or a Tachometer
(Option AYF) its front panel will be different. See the chapter on the
Arbitrary Source or the chapter on the Tachometer for a description of its
front panel.
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Fail Acs Trigger
ExSamp Cal ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Figure 5-9: HP E1433A standard front panel
5-6
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Status LEDs
q Fail: This is the standard VXI “Failed” indicator. It lights briefly when powering
up and normally goes out after a few seconds. If it stays on it indicates a
hardware failure in the module.
q Acs: This is the standard VXI “Access” indicator. When it is on, it indicates that
another device on the bus is contacting the module, for example to transfer data
or read registers.
q Trigger: This LED flashes on each time the measurement triggers, so when it is
blinking it indicates that the measurement is triggering.
If your HP E1433A has the Tachometer option, this LED is defined differently.
See the chapter: The Tachometer Option (AYF).
SMB Connectors
q ExSamp: This is an input connector for an external sample clock. The sample
clock must be TTL level and have a frequency between 40.96 kHz and 100 kHz.
Internally this frequency can be decimated.
q Cal: This connector is used for calibration. It can be configured to output a
calibration signal or to accept an input calibration signal. See the calibration
section in this chapter.
q ExTrig: This allows for an external trigger input to the HP E1433A. The input
signal must be TTL, other characteristics can be defined in software. ExTrig can
be enabled or disabled in software.
Input Connectors (1 or 2)
These connectors are attached to the cables from an 8-Channel Input
(breakout box). They connect the input signal to the HP E1433A. Each
connector carries four channels. Depending on options, there can be 1 or 2
input connectors (4 - 8 channels).
5-7
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
VXI Backplane Connections
Power Supplies and Ground
The HP E1433A conforms to the VME and VXI specifications for pin
assignment. The current drawn from each supply is given in the
specifications chapter.
Data Transfer Bus
The HP E1433A conforms to the VME and VXI specifications for pin
assignment and protocol. A16, A24, D16, and D32 data transfers are
supported.
DTB Arbitration Bus
The HP E1433A module is not capable of requesting bus control. Thus it
does not use the Arbitration bus. To conform to the VME and VXI
specifications, it passes the bus lines through.
Priority Interrupt Bus
The HP E1433A generates interrupts by applying a programmable mask to
its status bits. The priority of the interrupt is determined by the interrupt
priority setting in the control register.
Utility Bus
The VME specification provides a set of lines collectively called the utility
bus. Of these lines, the HP E1433A only uses the SYSRESET* line.
Pulling the SYSRESET* line low (a hardware reset) has the same effect as
setting the reset bit in the Control Register (a software reset), except that
pulling the SYSRESET* line low also resets the Control Register itself,
while a software reset does not .
5-8
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
The Local Bus (Option UGV)
The VXI specification includes a 12-wire Local Bus between adjacent
module slots. Using the Local Bus, Hewlett-Packard has defined a standard
byte-wide ECL protocol which can transfer data from left to right at up to
15.7 Mbytes/sec using HP E1433A. If equipped with option UGV, the HP
E1433A can be programmed to output its data using this high speed port
instead of the VME data output register. The Data Port Control register
determines which output port is used.
Local Bus vs VME Transfers
With this option, you can transfer data from the HP E1433A two different
ways; via the VME Bus or via the Local Bus.
The VME Bus is the universal data bus for VXI architecture. It provides
flexibility and versatility in transferring data. Transfers over the VME Bus
can be 16 or 32 bits wide.
The Local Bus supports faster transfer rates than the VME Bus. For
example, if you are transferring data from the HP E1433A to the HP
E1562A/B Throughput Disk Module, the Local Bus provides a direct pipeline
to the HP E1562A/B.
Using the Local Bus, you can transfer data in the background while
processing data in a signal- processing module.
All Local Bus data-transfers originate in an input module and move towards
a signal processing or disk throughput module to the right of the input
module. If other modules generate data to the left of the input module, the
input module will pass the data to its right and append its own data to the
data blocks from previous modules.
5-9
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
The HP E1433A VXI Device
Address Space
The VXI system architecture defines two types of address space. A16 space
consists of 64 KBytes and A24 consists of 16 MBytes.
The HP E1433A has a 32-bit port through which it has access to the A16
and A24 space. It can also use D32 to send and receive data though the
port. Or it can use the port for 16-bit data transfers by using only 16 of
the 32 bits available. The HP E1433A performs a different type of VME
cycle depending on the number of bits transferred per cycle (two cycles for
16-bit transfers and one cycle for 32-bit).
Shared Memory
Shared memory provides a way for the HP E1433A to transfer data to a
controller. The shared memory in the HP E1433A is mapped to the A24
VXI address space. The controller can then access that same address space
to receive or write data. You can call a function to get the data. See the
chapter on “The Host Interface Library.”
Memory Map
The following discussion of memory mapping is included for your
information. You do not need it to operate the HP E1433A because this
functionality is hidden when using the HP E1432A Host Interface Library
software.
Refer to the HP E1433A block diagram (figure 5-1). The VXI interface
maps some of the HP E1433A’s B-bus internal memory space so that it is
visible to the VXI Bus. The port connecting the A and B busses also allows
the VXI Bus access to the SRAM, DRAM, and inputs which are on the A
bus. (SRAM stands for Static RAM; DRAM is Dynamic RAM.)
The VXI interface has two “windows” on the B bus memory space. Each is
512 K-bytes, which is 128 32-bit words. One of the windows is fixed and
the other is movable. The movable window allows the VXI Bus access to
many different parts of the memory space. The fixed window contains:
q
q
q
q
The A16 registers
The B-bus SRAM
The hardware registers
The FIFO (which is in DRAM)
5-10
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
The mapping of the fixed and movable windows is illustrated as follows:
Address
FFFFF16
8000 016
7FFFF16
3000 016
2FFFF16
2000 016
1FFFF16
0004 F16
0003 F16
0000 016
Movable DSP
Bus Window,
Fixed DSP
Bus Window
Send/Receive
Data Registers
Fixed DSP
Bus Window
VXI Bus A16
Registers,
Movable
Fixed
For more information, see “The A24 Registers” in the chapter titled Register
Definitions.
5-11
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
List of A16 Registers
The following lists the A16 registers. For more information see “The A16
Registers” in the chapter titled Register Definitions.
Address
3E16
Read
Parameter 7 Register
3C16
3A16
3816
3616
3416
3216
3016
2E16
2C16
2A16
2816
2616
2416
2216
2016
1E16
1C16
1A16
1816
1616
1416
1216
1016
0E16
0C16
0A16
0816
0616
0416
0216
0016
5-12
Write
Parameter 6 Register
Parameter 5 Register
Parameter 4 Register
Parameter 3 Register
Parameter 2 Register
Parameter 1 Register
Query Response Register
Command Register
FIFO Count
Send Data
Receive Data
RAM 1
RAM 0
IRQ Status Register
IRQ Reset Register
IRQ Config Register
Page Map Register
Port Control Register
Offset Register
Status Register
Device Type
ID Register
Control Register
Logical Address Register
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Trigger Lines (TTLTRG)
TTLTRG consist of eight TTL lines on the VXI backplane on connector P2.
They are available to provide synchronization between devices. VXI devices
can use the TTLTRG lines for simple communication with other devices.
For example, a device can wait for a line to go high before taking an action,
or it can assert a line as a signal to another device.
The HP E1433A uses two trigger lines. These can be placed on any two of
the eight TTLTRG lines available on the VXI backplane. The lines are:
q Sync/Trigger line
q Free-running clock line
VXI bus
When programmed in a multiple-module configuration, only one of the HP
E1433A modules can provide the clock signal but any of them can trigger.
External Trigger
Input Trigger
Source or Tach Trigger
96002 Trigger
Clock
MUX
Sample 0
Logic
Sample 0
(word rate)
Sample 1
PLL
Oversampled Sample 2
Clock
Sample 3
Generator
Trigger
Sync
Trigger
Gate Array
to input circuits
External Sample
VXI 10 MHz Clock
24.576 MHz Clock
10 MHz Crystal Clock
Sync
10 MHz, Sample 0, none
Note: External Sample and External Trigger
inputs are not available on HP E1433A's with
a source option. The External Sample input
is not available on HP E1433A's with a
tachometer option.
Figure 5-10: Clock/sync diagram
5-13
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Providing an External Clock
You can program the HP E1433A to accept an external word rate clock
from the Sample 0 line on the VXI Bus. The digital filters are still
functional, providing a range of effective word rates. All sampling is done
simultaneously and is not multiplexed.
To connect an External Sample Clock, use the External Sample SMB
connector on front panel of the HP E1433A. External Sample at word rate
and External Trigger are available on the front panel of HP E1433A’s which
do not have an arbitrary source or tachometer option.
The external clock must be a fixed frequency. Its maximum frequency
must not be higher than 100 kHz. Its minimum frequency must be at least
40.96 kHz.
5-14
HP E1433A User's Guide
Module Description
Calibration Description
The Cal connector on the front panel of the standard HP E1433A can be
configured (in software) as either an input or an output. It can be set to
any of four settings:
q DC - The HP E1433A outputs a DC calibration signal from the millivolt range up
to 15 volts.
q AC - The HP E1433A outputs a signal from an Arbitrary Source option (in the
same module or a different HP E1433A module in the system.)
q Ground - The connector is shunted to ground for a zero-volt reference.
q Open Circuit - In this mode the connector becomes an input which can receive a
calibration signal up to +/-15 volts.
The HP E1433A is calibrated at the factory and the calibration placed in
EPROM memory for use at each power-up. In addition an auto-zero
function is provided.
Front panel connector
HP E1433A Substrate
Input circuitry
to ADC
DC Voltage
Reference
from
DC_BUS
CALIN
Source
CALOUT
from
Output
Tachometer
VXI SUMBUS
trigger
monitor
Figure 5-11: Calibration block diagram
5-15
6
The Arbitrary Source
Option (1D4)
6-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Arbitrary Source Option
Arbitrary Source Description
An arbitrary source can be included with the HP E1433A 8-Channel 196
kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP as Option 1D4. (It cannot be installed with a
Tachometer, Option AYF.) The Arbitrary Source Option can supply
arbitrary or sine signals under control of measurement software.
Trigger
The Arbitrary Source can be used to trigger the measurement and to trigger
other modules in the measurement system.
Arbitrary Output
The Arbitrary Source can be programmed to output any signal that is
described by data downloaded by the software.
Source Output Modes
The Arbitrary Source has several output modes including the following:
q
q
q
q
q
arbitrary
sine
noise
random
burst
COLA (and Summer)
The COLA (Constant Output Level Amplifier) output supplies a signal
similar to the Source “Out” output except that it is at a constant output
level of about one volt peak.
The same connector (labeled “COLA”) can also be programmed as a
summer input. A signal connected to this input is summed with the
internal source output to create the final output.
External Shutdown
Shorting the center pin of the shutdown connector to its shield causes the
source to ramp down and shut off.
6-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Arbitrary Source Option
Block Diagram
Analog
registers
128K x 24
RAM
56002
COLA
Signal
DAC
6.4 kHz
AMP
Range
DAC
Gate array
control
+
8
Digital
interpolation
filter
OUT
Shutdown
circuitry
25.6 kHz
Summer
input
96002 "B" Bus
or A24 VXI
Figure 6-12: Arbitrary source option block diagram
6-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Arbitrary Source Option
The Arbitrary Source Option Front Panel
The HP E1433A with the Arbitrary Source Option may have 4 or 8 input
channels. The following illustration shows a front panel for 8 channels.
The LED’s and connectors are described on the next page.
Fail Acs Source
COLA Shut Out
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Fail Acs Source
COLA Shut Out
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Figure 6-13: HP E1433A with source option - front panel
6-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Arbitrary Source Option
LED’s and Connectors for the Arbitrary Source Option
Status LEDs
q Fail: This is the standard VXI “Failed” indicator. It lights briefly when powering
up and normally goes out after a few seconds. If it stays on it indicates a
hardware failure in the module.
q Acs: This is the standard VXI “Access” indicator. When it is on, it indicates that
another device on the bus is contacting the module, for example to transfer data
or read registers.
q Source: If this LED is lighted it indicates that the source is on and producing
output.
SMB Connectors
q COLA: This is the output connector for the COLA (Constant Output Level
Amplifier) output.
This connector can also be configured as a Summer input. A signal connected to
this input is summed with the internal source output to create the final output.
q Shut (Shutdown): Shorting the center pin of this connector to its shield causes
the source to ramp down and shut off.
q Out: This is the main output of the Arbitrary Source.
The Out connector can also be configured to output a calibration signal. This is
not quite the same as the calibration signal described in chapter 5 because it
comes directly from the internal source without going through the other
circuitry of the calibration section.
Input Connectors (1 or 2)
These connectors are attached to the cables from an 8-Channel Input
(breakout box.) There are two input connectors for each 8-Channel Input.
They connect the input signal to the HP E1433A. Each connector carries
four channels. Depending on options, there can be 1 or 2 input connectors
(4 or 8 channels).
Updating the arbitrary source firmware
When updated firmware for the arbitrary source is available, you can update
the ROM in your module by using the procedure documented in
/usr/e1432/arbsrc/README.
6-5
7
The Tachometer
Option (AYF)
7-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Tachometer Option
Tachometer Description
A tachometer input can be included with the HP E1433A 8-Channel 196
kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP as Option AYF. (It cannot be installed with a
Source, Option 1D4.) The Tachometer Option is a two channel tachometer
input used to capture the contents of a freerun counter whenever an
external input crosses a programmable threshold.
Tachometer Inputs
The tachometer has two inputs which connect to analog conditioning,
holdoff, and FIFO circuitry. See the block diagram in this chapter. The
inputs can be configured so that one input connector (Tach 2) becomes an
external trigger input and the other (Tach 1) remains a tachometer input.
(The Tach 1 connector cannot be a trigger input.) The switch that
determines this configuration is controlled by software.
External Trigger Input
An HP E1433A without a tachometer option can accept a TTL external
trigger signal (see “Trigger Lines” in the chapter titled “Module
Description”). With the tachometer option the HP E1433A still has that
capability and is also able to accept an analog external trigger signal at the
Tach 2 input.
Trigger Level
The trigger level of the tachometer can be set by software.
Tachometer Monitoring
The tachometer is capable of sending its analog input signal onto the HP
E1433A module’s internal calibration line. The calibration line can be
connected to the 196 kHz 4-channel input assembly, so that the signal on
the tachometer’s connector can be monitored via an input channel. This
can be useful when deciding where to set the trigger level of the
tachometer. An example program is supplied with the HP E1433A Host
Interface library, which shows how to perform this tachometer monitoring.
Exact RPM Triggering
The tachometer can be used to create exact RPM triggering, controlled by
software. The RPM of the tach channel is calculated from tach transition
times. Then the sample numbers in the data FIFO are determined for
exact RPM triggering.
7-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Tachometer Option
Input Count Division
The tachometer can be programmed to divide the input signal. For
example if a signal is coming in at 100 counts per second, the tachometer
can be set to look at only every 10th count for a result of 10 counts per
second.
Holdoff Time
The tachometer can be programmed to wait for a specified period of time
between counts that it will detect. After a count is detected, subsequent
counts will be ignored until the holdoff time has passed.
Block Diagram
System
Trigger
Channel 2
Tach/Ext Trig Analog
Conditioning
Holdoff Ctrl
1 of N select
32-bit
Counter
10-20 MHz
Reset
Channel 1 Analog
Tach
Conditioning
32-bit
Latch
Holdoff Ctrl
1 of N select
32-bit
Latch
FIFO
Ctrl & Status
Registers
FIFO
DSP "B" Bus
or paged A24 VXI
Figure 7-14: Tachometer option block diagram
7-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Tachometer Option
The Tachometer Option Front Panel
The HP E1433A with the Tachometer Option may have 4 or 8 input
channels. The following illustration shows a front panel for 8 channels.
The LED’s and connectors are described on the next page.
Fail Acs Trigger
Tach 1 Tach2 ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Fail Acs Trigger
Tach 1 Tach2 ExTrig
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Figure 7-15: HP E1433A with tachometer - front panel
7-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
The Tachometer Option
LED’s and Connectors for the Tachometer Option.
Status LEDs
q Fail: This is the standard VXI “Failed” indicator. It lights briefly when powering
up and normally goes out after a few seconds. If it stays on it indicates a
hardware failure in the module.
q Acs: This is the standard VXI “Access” indicator. When it is on, it indicates that
another device on the bus is contacting the module, for example to transfer data
or read registers.
q Trigger: This LED flashes on each time an edge is detected on the tachometer
signal, so when it is blinking it indicates that the tachometer signal is on. (For an
HP E1433A that does not have the Tachometer option, this LED is defined
differently.)
SMB Connectors
q Tach1: This is one of the two tachometer inputs. Tach1 cannot be configured as
an external trigger.
q Tach2: This is the second of the two tachometer inputs. Tach2 can also be
configured (via software) to be an external trigger input
q ExTrig: This allows for an external trigger input to the HP E1433A. The input
signal must be TTL, other characteristics can be defined in software. ExTrig can
be enabled or disabled in software.
Input Connectors (1 or 2)
These connectors are attached to the cables from an 8-Channel Input
(breakout box) — two input connectors for each 8-Channel Input). They
connect the input signal to the HP E1433A. Each connector carries four
channels. Depending on options, there can be 1 or 2 input connectors (4
or 8 channels).
7-5
8
Break Out Boxes
8-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
Introduction
A Break Out Box connects the HP E1432A or HP E1433A to a set of
connectors to receive input signals.
Several types of Break Out Boxes are available. This chapter covers:
q HP E1432-61600 ICP Break Out Box
q HP E1432-61602 Voltage Break Out Box
Other Break Out Boxes include the HP E3242A Charge Break Out Box and
the HP E3243A Microphone Break Out Box. See the documentation
supplied with those products for more information.
Service
For service on the Break Out Boxes contact the nearest Hewlett-Packard
Sales and Service Office listed in the HP catalog. Or the inside back cover
of this manual for a list of regional offices.
8-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
The HP E1432-61600 and HP E1432-61602 Break Out
Boxes
Each of the Break Out Boxes described in this section has eight BNC
connectors for input. They each have two cables which connect to the
sub-miniature “D” connectors on the front panel of the HP E1432A/33A.
Each of the two cables carries four channels. For a 4-channel HP E1432A
or HP E1433A, one Break Out Box is used but only one of its cables is
used; and only connectors 1-4 are used (or connectors 5-8, depending on
which cable is used). For a 16-channel HP E1432A, two Break Out Boxes
are used.
VOLTAGE
8 CH INPUT
Figure 8-16: HP E1432-61602 Voltage Break Out Box
8-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
HP E1432-61602 Voltage-type Break Out Box
In this type of Break Out Box the signal is sent straight through to the
sub-miniature “D” connectors on the HP E1432A/33A.
HP E1432-61600 ICP-type Break Out Box
Each of the eight connectors in this type of Break Out Box is connected to
an independent, floating current source. These are intended to power
integrated-circuit piezo-electric (ICP) transducers. They supply 4.5 mA
(nominal) at up to 28 volts. The current sources are controllable by
software in groups of four. That is, the current sources for connectors 1-4
can be turned on or off as a group, as can the current sources for
connectors 5-8.
Break Out Box Grounding
Each connector on the HP E1432-61600 and HP E1432-61602 Break Out
Box has a small manual switch next to it. When this switch is in the
“GND” position the outer shell of the connector is grounded to the chassis
ground of the VXI mainframe. When it is in the “DIFF” position it is not
grounded to the mainframe and will float if not grounded elsewhere in the
system (such as at the sensor). The connector shell should not be allowed
to float: if the switch is in the “DIFF” position the shell should be
grounded elsewhere in the system.
8-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
Break Out Box Cables
Making a Custom Break Out Box Cable
A cable to connect the Break Out Box with the HP E1432A/33A is supplied
with the each of the Break Out Boxes described in this chapter. However,
this section is included for those users who may want to make their own
connecting cable. The drawing on this page shows the AMP part numbers
for the parts you will need to make the plug end of the cable. This
illustration shows an HP E1432-61602 Voltage Break Out Box, an HP
E3242A Break Out Box requires a single cable with connectors at both ends.
The next page shows the pinout for the connector.
Shielded cable
qty: 2
Backshell kit, plug
part number AMP 750850-3
qty: 2
Cable Connector, plug
part number AMP 750833-1
qty: 2
VOLTAGE
8 CH INPUT
Figure 8-17: Break Out Box cable and part numbers
8-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
Fail Acs Source
COLA Shut Out
8-CHANNEL 196
kSa/s DIGITIZER
+DSP
pin 26
pin 13
pin 14
pin 1
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Pin definitions for input connector
definition
pin #
pin #
definition
RFI GND/Cable Shield
+24V Power
GND Return for +/- 24V
-24 Power
RFI GND
I2C SCL
CAL HIGH
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
- Diff 1
+Diff 1
RFI GND/Drain Shield 1
RFI GND/Drain Shield 2
- Diff 2
+ Diff 2
CAL LOW
BoB_EN
RFI GND
19
18
6
5
- Diff 3
+ Diff 3
I2C SDA
RFI GND
I2C_EN
RFI GND/Cable Shield
17
16
15
14
4
3
2
1
RFI GND/Drain Shield 3
RFI GND/Drain Shield 4
- Diff 4
+ Diff 4
8-6
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
Recommendations on wiring for the E1432/3A 4 Channel Input
Connector
Allowed Connections
Differential Input Channels
Connect at E1432/3A end of cabling and at DUT
Recommended: shielded twisted pair
1
+ Diff 4
2
- Diff 4
5
+ Diff 3
6
- Diff 3
8
+ Diff 2
9
- Diff 2
12
+ Diff 1
13
- Diff 1
Input Channel Shielding
Connect at E1432/3A end of cabling ONLY
3
RFI GND/Drain Shield 4
4
RFI GND/Drain Shield 3
10
RFI GND/Drain shield 2
11
RFI GND/Drain Shield 1
Additional shielding of entire cable
GND for grounded measurements if required
14
RFI GND/Cable Shield
26
RFI GND/Cable Shield
8-7
HP E1433A User's Guide
Break Out Boxes
Dis-allowed Connections
Do NOT connect these pins on E1432/3A end of cabling. These signals and
supplies are provided for HP specified break out boxes and are unspecified
for other usage.
Do not use:
15
17
21
16
18
22
19
7
20
I2C_EN
I2C_SDA
I2C_SCL
RFI GND/I2C Shield
RFI GND/I2C Shield
RFI GND/I2C Shield
BOB_EN
CAL_LOW
CAL_HIGH
23
24
25
-24 V Power
+/-24 V GND Return
+24 V Power
In general:
q +/- DIFF n lines are the differential inputs for each channel. Shielded
twisted-pair is recommended.
q RFI GND/Drain Shield n are the grounds for the shield on the twisted-pair for
q
q
q
q
q
q
each input channel. Connect at the HP E1432A/33A end of the cable only.
RFI GND/Cable Shield are the grounds for a shield around the entire cable, and
the ground points for making individual channels single-ended.
I2C_xxx supply control signals to the active break out boxes. We do not provide
support for other usage. These are not used with the HP E3240/1A Voltage and
Voltage/ICP break out boxes.
RFI GND/I2C Shield protects the analog input lines.
BOB_EN is another break out box control signal. We do not provide support for
its usage for anything but certain HP-specified break out boxes.
CAL_HIGH/LOW are signal lines to send calibration signals to the HP-specified
break out boxes. The signals available on these lines are not specified and their
usage is discouraged.
+/- 24V Power and GND supply power to the signal conditioning circuitry in the
active break out boxes, and ICP in the active ICP break out box. The power
available on these lines is not specified and their usage is discouraged.
8-8
9
Troubleshooting the
HP E1433A
9-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Troubleshooting the HP E1433A
Diagnostics
The following describes a limited diagnostic program for the HP E1432A,
HP E1433A, and HP E1434A. It is to be run from an HP-UX host. The
program is called “hostdiag.” It can be found with the HP E1432A Host
Interface Software Library at location /usr/e1432/bin.
location: /usr/e1432/bin
Usage: hostdiag [-hPsuvV] [-f file] [-L laddr] [-S slot] [-O list]
-h
Does a quick, partial test by bypassing the tests which involve downloading
code to the module.
-f file
Uses “file” as the source of code to download to the module instead of the
default sema.bin.
-L logical_addr
Specifies the logical address of the module to be tested. The default value
is 8.
-O option_list
Tests the module against a list model/options. For example -O
“E1432,1DE,AYF” tests the module as an 8 channel E1432A with the
tachometer option. Without this option, hostdiag only tests what it finds
present. Hardware which has failed in such a way that it appears to be
absent will not be detected without this option.
-P
Prints only a pass/fail message - no diagnostic printouts.
-s
Additionally runs the “standard input/output” tests. Sources finish testing
with 1 VPk, 1 KHz sine on each output for manual verification of output
functionality. Input testing (both HP E1432A and HP E1433A inputs and
the Tachometer input) assumes 1 VPk, 1 KHz sine input on each channel.
This allows testing of additional portions of the signal path which
inaccessible from the internal tests.
-S vxi_slot
Test the module in the vxi slot, vxi_slot. Default is to test the module at
logical address 8.
9-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
Troubleshooting the HP E1433A
-u
Display usage message.
-v
Specifies the verbose printing. Normally, hostdiag does not print anything
unless an error is found. With this option, hostdiag prints status messages
as it operates. This option also enables additional diagnostic information
which is not generally useful.
-V
Print version info.
Hostdiag returns 0 upon success, or returns non-zero if an error is detected.
Coverage:
q
q
q
q
q
q
Main board
DRAM SIMMs
Input SCAs (Signal Conditioning Assemblies)
Source SCAs (HP E1434A)
Optional source
Optional tachometer (HP E1432A and HP E1433A)
Notes:
q Tests are somewhat limited but will catch many hardware errors
q No errors printed means that all tests passed
9-3
10
Replacing Assemblies
10-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Replaceable Parts
For information on upgrading your module or replacing parts, contact your
local Hewlett-Packard sales and service office. See the inside back cover of
this guide for a list of office locations and address
Replacement parts are listed in the following tables:
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
Assemblies: without option AYF or 1D4
Assemblies: with option AYF
Assemblies: with option 1D4
Cables: without option AYF or 1D4
Cables: with option AYF
Cables: with option 1D4
Front Panel
Ordering Information
To order a part listed in one of the tables, quote the Hewlett-Packard part
number (HP Part Number) and the check digit (CD). Indicate the quantity
required and address the order to the nearest Hewlett-Packard sales and
service office (see the inside back cover of this guide). The check digit
verifies that an order has been transmitted correctly, ensuring accurate and
timely processing of the order. The first time a part is listed in the table,
the quantity column (Qty) lists the total quantity of the part used in the
module. For the corresponding name and address of the manufacturer’s
codes shown in the tables, see “Code Numbers.”
Caution
The module is static sensitive. Use the appropriate precautions when removing,
handling, and installing to avoid unnecessary damage.
Direct Mail Order System
Within the U.S.A., Hewlett-Packard can supply parts through a direct mail
order system. Advantages of the Direct Mail Order System are:
q Direct ordering and shipment from the HP Parts Center.
q No maximum or minimum on any mail order. There is a minimum order for parts
ordered through a local HP sales and service office when the orders require
billing and invoicing.
q Transportation charges are prepaid. A small handling charge is added to
each order.
q No invoicing. A check or money order must accompany each order.
q Mail order forms and specific ordering information are available through
your local Hewlett-Packard sales and service office. See the inside back
cover of this guide for a list of Hewlett-Packard sales and service office
locations and addresses.
10-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Code Numbers
The following table provides the name and address for the manufacturers’
code numbers (Mfr Code) listed in the replaceable parts tables.
Mfr No.
Mfr Name
Address
28480
Hewlett-Packard Company
Palo Alto, CA 94304 U.S.A.
30817
83486
Instrument Specialties Co. Inc.
Elco Industries Inc.
Placentia, CA 92670 U.S.A.
Rockford, IL 61101 U.S.A.
10-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Assemblies: without option AYF or 1D4
10-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Ref
Des
A2
A4
A10
A11
A22
A24
HP Part
Number
E1433-66533
E1432-66504
E1433-66510
E1433-66511
1818-5622
1818-5624
CD Qty
0
4
2
4
8
0
2
1
1
1
1
1
MP001
MP002
MP003
MP004
MP005
E1432-00605
E1432-00603
8160-0862
0515-2033
0515-2028
9
6
3
6
9
MP006
MP007
MP008
MP009
MP010
E1432-44101
E1485-40601
0515-0372
E1450-01202
8160-0686
MP011
MP012
MP013
MP014
MP016
Description
PC ASSY-INPUT
PC ASSY-LED
PC ASSY-MAIN OPT UGV
PC ASSY-MAIN
ICM DRAM, SIMM, 8x32
ICM DRAM, SIMM, 1x32
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
E1433-66533
E1432-66504
E1433-66510
E1433-66511
1818-5622
1818-5624
1
1
0
5
4
SHTF CVR-BTTM ALSK
SHTF CVR-TOP
GSKT RFI STRIP FNGRS
SCR-MCH M3.0 10MMLG
SCR-MCH M2.5 6MMLG
28480
28480
30817
28480
28480
E1433-00605
E1432-00603
0097-553-17-020
0515-2033
0515-2028
1
1
2
5
6
1
1
3
4
1
GSKT THERMAL CONDUCTOR
GSKT-RFT, TOP CVR ADH SHT
SCR-MCH M3.0 8MMLG
STMP SHLD-RFI GRND
STMP FNGRS-RFI STRP BECU
28480
28480
28480
28480
30817
E14320-44101
E1485-40601
0515-0372
E1450-01202
786-185
8160-0683
8160-0869
0515-0368
0380-4042
0515-2383
3
7
6
4
9
0
6
2
5
4
STMP STRP-SPNG FLTR GRD
GSKT RFI, 2MM X 4MM
SCR-MCH M2.5 X 0.45
STDF-HXMF M3.0 16.7MMLG
SCR-MCH M3. X .50
30817
28480
28480
28480
28480
0097-551-17-X
8160-0869
0515-0368
0515-4042
0515-2383
MP017 0515-0664
5
4
SCR-MCH M3.0 12MMLG
28480
0515-0664
10-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Assemblies: with option AYF
10-6
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Ref
Des
A2
A4
A5
A10
A11
A22
A24
HP Part
Number
E1433-66533
E1432-66504
E1432-66505
E1433-66510
E1433-66511
1818-5622
1818-5624
CD Qty
0
4
5
2
4
8
0
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
MP001
MP002
MP003
MP004
MP005
E1433-00605
E1432-00603
8160-0862
0515-2033
0515-2028
9
6
3
6
9
Description
PC ASSY-INPUT
PC ASSY-LED
PC ASSY-OPT AYF
PC ASSY—MAIN OPT UGV
PC ASSY-MAIN
ICM DRAM, SIMM, 8x32
ICM DRAM, SIMM, 1x32
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
E1433-66533
E1432-66504
E1432-66505
E1433-66510
E1433-66511
1818-5622
1818-5624
1
1
0
5
4
SHTF CVR-BTTM ALSK
SHTF CVR-TOP
GSKT RFI STRIP FNGRS
SCR-MCH M3.0 10MMLG
SCR-MCH M2.5 6MMLG
28480
28480
30817
28480
28480
E1432-00601
E1432-00603
0097-553-17-020
0515-2033
0515-2028
MP006 E1432-44101 1
1
GSKT THERMAL CONDUCTOR
28480
E14320-44101
MP007
MP008
MP009
MP010
E1485-40601
0515-0372
E1450-01202
8160-0686
1
2
5
6
1
3
4
1
GSKT-RFT, TOP CVR ADH SHT
SCR-MCH M3.0 8MMLG
STMP SHLD-RFI GRND
STMP FNGRS-RFI STRP BECU
28480
28480
28480
30817
E1485-40601
0515-0372
E1450-01202
786-185
MP011
MP012
MP013
MP014
MP015
8160-0683
8160-0869
0515-0368
0380-4042
0380-4041
3
7
6
4
3
0
6
2
5
3
STMP STRP-SPNG FLTR GRD
GSKT RFI, 2MM X 4MM
SCR-MCH M2.5 X 0.45
STDF-HXMF M3.0 16.7MMLG
STDF-HXMF M3.0
30817
28480
28480
28480
28480
0097-551-17-X
8160-0869
0515-0368
0515-4042
0515-4041
MP016 0515-2383
MP017 0515-0664
9
5
4
4
SCR-MCH M3. X .50
SCR-MCH M3.0 12MMLG
28480
28480
0515-2383
0515-0664
10-7
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Assemblies: with option 1D4
10-8
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Ref
Des
A2
A4
A10
A11
A22
A24
A41
HP Part
Number
E1433-66533
E1432-66504
E1433-66510
E1433-66511
1818-5622
1818-5624
E1432-66541
CD Qty
0
4
2
4
8
0
9
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
MP001
MP002
MP003
MP004
MP005
E1433-00605
E1432-00603
8160-0862
0515-2033
0515-2028
9
6
3
6
9
Description
PC ASSY
PC ASSY-LED
PC ASSY-MAIN OPT UGV
PC ASSY-MAIN
ICM DRAM, SIMM, 8x32
ICM DRAM, SIMM, 1x32
PC ASSY-OPT 1D4
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
E1433-66533
E1432-66504
E1433-66510
E1432-66511
1818-5622
1818-5624
E1432-66541
1
1
0
5
4
SHTF CVR-BTTM ALSK
SHTF CVR-TOP
GSKT RFI STRIP FNGRS
SCR-MCH M3.0 10MMLG
SCR-MCH M2.5 6MMLG
28480
28480
30817
28480
28480
E1433-00605
E1432-00603
0097-553-17-020
0515-2033
0515-2028
MP006 E1432-44101 1
1
GSKT THERMAL CONDUCTOR
28480
E14320-44101
MP007
MP008
MP009
MP010
E1485-40601
0515-0372
E1450-01202
8160-0686
1
2
5
6
1
3
4
1
GSKT-RFT, TOP CVR ADH SHT
SCR-MCH M3.0 8MMLG
STMP SHLD-RFI GRND
STMP FNGRS-RFI STRP BECU
28480
28480
28480
30817
E1485-40601
0515-0372
E1450-01202
786-185
MP011
MP012
MP013
MP014
MP015
8160-0683
8160-0869
0515-0368
0380-4042
0380-4041
3
7
6
4
3
0
6
2
3
5
STMP STRP-SPNG FLTR GRD
GSKT RFI, 2MM X 4MM
SCR-MCH M2.5 X 0.45
STDF-HXMF M3.0 16.7MMLG
STDF-HXME M3.0
30817
28480
28480
28480
28480
0097-551-17-X
8160-0869
0515-0368
0515-4042
0515-4041
MP016 0515-2383
MP017 0515-0664
MP018 0340-0677
9
5
9
4
4
1
SCR-MCH M3. X .50
SCR-MCH M3.0 12MMLG
PLASTIC SHIELD
28480
28480
28480
0515-2383
0515-0664
0340-0677
10-9
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Cables: without option AYF or 1D4
Ref
Des
W1
W2
W4
10-10
HP Part
Number
8120-6767
8120-6765
8120-6762
CD Qty
2
0
7
1
2
1
Description
CBL-ASM CXL, 290MM
CBL-ASM CXL, 255MM
CBL-FLEX, 5-COND, 225MML
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
8120-6767
8120-6765
8120-6762
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Cables: with option AYF
Ref
Des
W2
W3
W4
HP Part
Number
8120-6765
8120-6766
8120-6762
CD Qty
0
1
7
1
2
1
Description
CBL-ASM CXL, 255MM
CBL-ASM CXL,
CBL-FLEX, 5-COND, 225MML
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
8120-6765
8120-6766
8120-6762
10-11
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Cables: with option 1D4
Ref
Des
W2
W3
W4
10-12
HP Part
Number
8120-6765
8120-6766
8120-6762
CD Qty
0
1
7
1
2
1
Description
CBL-ASM CXL, 255MM
CBL-ASM CXL,
CBL-FLEX, 5-COND, 225MML
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
8120-6765
8120-6766
8120-6762
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
Front Panel
Ref
HP Part
CD Qty
Description
Des
Number
MP200 E1433-00206 5 1 PNL-FRT, STANDARD
MP201 E1433-00205 4 1 PNL-FRT, OPT 1DL
Mfr
Code
28480
28480
Mfr Part
Number
E1433-00206
E1433-00205
MP203 E1432-44301 3
MP204 E1432-44302 4
1
1
LBL-FRT PNL SMB’S, STD
LBL-FRT PNL SMB’S, OPT 1D4
28480
28480
E1432-44301
E1432-44302
MP205 E1432-44303 5
1
LBL-FRT PNL SMB’S, OPT AYF
28480
E1432-44303
MP206 E1400-84106 1
MP207 E1400-84105 1
1
1
28480
28480
E1400-84106
E1400-84105
MP208 0515-1968
MP209 0515-1375
2
2
MOLD KIT-TOP EXTR HNDL ‘’HP’’
MOLD KIT-BTTM EXTR HNDL
‘’VXI’’
SCR-MCH M2.5 6MMLG
SCR-MCH M2.5 6MMLG
28480
83486
0515-1968
343-300-02506
4
7
10-13
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the top cover
1using
Remove the five long screws using a T-10 torx driver and remove the three short screws
a T-8 torx driver. Lift cover off.
10-14
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the front panel
1circuit
Remove top cover, see “To remove the top cover.” Gently disconnect cables from the printed
assemblies. Using a T-8 torx driver, remove the two screws that attach the handles to the
assembly. Pull out the handles making sure not to lose the two spacers.
2Gently
Using a T-8 torx driver, remove the screw that attaches the front panel to the bottom cover.
pull the front panel off.
10-15
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
3driver.
Remove the nuts that fasten the cables and assembly to the front panel. Using a 1/4-inch nut
4andRemove
ribbon cable from the A4 assembly, by pulling back the latch on the connector and
removing cable. Be sure to note the orientation of the cable.
10-16
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
5brackets
To replace the front panel with another that does not have its own side brackets, remove the
from the old front panel using a T-8 torx driver. Be sure to note the positioning of the
brackets, alignment is critical.
6theTotapereplace
the front panel with another that does not have the label already attached, remove
backing and place it on the front panel as shown.
10-17
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the input assemblies
1in “To
Remove top cover, see “To remove the top cover.” Remove the front panel, see steps 1 and 2
remove the front panel.” Note that the following steps are showing illustrations of an
HP E1433A with a standard configuration (two input assemblies). If your HP E1433A has option
1DL (one input assembly) , the following steps will be the same except the length of the screws
and the number of input assemblies to be removed.
2 Using a T-10 torx driver, remove the four screws that attach the assemblies to the bottom cover.
10-18
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
3 Remove the top assembly by gently pulling it forward, releasing it from the connectors.
4 Remove the remaining input assembly.
10-19
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the option AYF assembly
1
Remove the top cover, see “To remove the top cover.” Disconnect the two cables leading to the
A5 assembly and move cables aside.
2andUsing
a T-10 torx driver, remove the three screws that attach the assembly to the HP E1433A
lift the assembly off.
10-20
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the option 1D4 assembly
1
Remove the top cover, see “To remove the top cover.” Disconnect the three cables leading to
the A41 assembly and move cables aside.
2andUsing
a T-10 torx driver, remove the three screws that attach the assembly to the HP E1433A
lift the assembly off.
10-21
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the A22/A24 assembly
1
Remove the top cover, see “To remove the top cover.” Gently push the silver tabs outward and
tilt the A22/A24 assembly forward releasing it from the connector.
10-22
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
To remove the A10/A11 assembly
1
Remove top cover and input assemblies. See “To remove the top cover,” and “To remove the
input assemblies.”
2A
If your module does NOT have option AYF or option 1D4 do the following: Remove the 5
standoffs using a 1/4-inch nut driver, and remove the 3 screws using a T-8 torx driver.
10-23
HP E1433A User's Guide
Replacing Assemblies
2B
If your module has option AYF do the following: Remove the AYF option assembly, see
“To remove the option AYF assembly.” Remove the 5 long and the 3 short standoffs using a
1/4-inch nut driver.
2C
If your module has option 1D4 do the following: Remove the 1D4 option assembly, see
“To remove the option 1D4 assembly.” Remove the 3 long and the 5 short standoffs using a
1/4-inch nut driver.
10-24
11
Backdating
11-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Backdating
Backdating
This chapter documents modules that differ from those currently being
produced. With the information provided in this chapter, this guide can be
modified so that it applies to any earlier version or configuration of the
module.
11-2
Appendix A
Register Definitions
A-1
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
The HP E1433A VXI Registers
The HP E1433A 8-Channel 196 kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP is a
register-based VXI device. Unlike message-based devices which use
higher-level programming using ASCII characters, register-based devices are
programmed at a very low level using binary information. The greatest
advantage of this is speed. Register-based devices communicate at the level
of direct hardware manipulation and this can lead to much greater system
throughput.
Users do not need to access the registers in order to use the HP E1433A.
The HP E1433A’s functions can be more easily accessed using the
HP E1432A Host Interface Library software (which is used for both the
HP E1433A and the HP E1432A 16 Channel 51.2 kSa/sec Digitizer plus
DSP). However this chapter describing the registers is provided for your
information.
The A16 Registers
The following A16 registers are accessible at the base address defined by
the device’s logical address. The register at offsets 0016 to E16 are not
accessible using longword (D32) accesses. The registers at offsets 1016 to
3E16 may be accessed by any of the D08(EO), D16, or D32 modes. All of
these registers are also accessible at the device A24 base address.
A-2
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
Address
3E16
3C16
3A16
3816
3616
Read
Parameter 7 Register
Parameter 6 Register
Parameter 5 Register
3416
3216
3016
2E16
2C16
2A16
2816
2616
2416
2216
2016
1E16
1C16
1A16
1816
1616
1416
1216
1016
0E16
0C16
0A16
0816
0616
0416
0216
0016
Write
Parameter 4 Register
Parameter 3 Register
Parameter 2 Register
Parameter 1 Register
Query Response Register
Command Register
FIFO Count
Send Data
Receive Data
RAM 1
RAM 0
IRQ Status Register
IRQ Reset Register
IRQ Config Register
Page Map Register
Port Control Register
Offset Register
Status Register
Device Type
ID Register
Control Register
Logical Address Register
A-3
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
The A24 Registers
The following A24 registers are accessible at the base address defined by
the device’s offset Register. The registers at offsets 0 to E16 are not
accessible using longword (D32) accesses. The registers at offsets 1016 to
FFFFF16 may be accessed by any of the of the D08(EO), D16, or D32
modes.
FFFFF16
8000 016
7FFFF16
3000 016
2FFFF16
2000 016
1FFFF16
0004 F16
0003 F16
0000 016
Movable DSP
Bus Window
Fixed DSP
Bus Window
Send/Receive
Data Registers
Fixed DSP
Bus Window
VXI Bus A16
Registers
The A24 registers are defined as follows:
q VXI Bus A16 Registers: These are the same registers accessed at the device’s
A16 base address.
q Fixed DSP Bus Window: Accesses to this region are mapped to the
corresponding locations at the base of the internal DSP’s memory map, also
accessible through Page 0 of the moveable DSP bus window.
q Send/Receive Data Registers: Accesses to any address in this region will
read/write the Send and Receive Data registers defined in the A16 register set.
VME Bus D32 Block Transfers are supported for these addresses only.
q Movable DSP Bus Window: Accesses to this region are mapped (by the Page
Map register) to different 512 kB regions of the internal DSP bus.
A-4
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
The VXI Bus Registers are defined as follows:
q Id Register: A read of this 16 bit register provides information about the device’s
configuration. Its value is always CFFF16 as defined in the following table.
Bit
Contents
15-14
11
(Register Based Device)
13-12
00
(A16/A24)
11-0
111111111111
(HP’s ID)
q Logical Address Register: A write to this register changes the device’s logical
address according to the VXI Bus Dynamic Configuration protocol. Its format is
defined in the following table.
Bit
15-8
Contents
No effect
7-0
Logical
Address
q Device Type Register: A read of this register provides information about the
device’s configuration. Its format is defined in the following table.
Bit
15-12
0011
(1MB of A24)
Contents
11-0
Model Code
(20216 for HP E1433A)
q Status Register: A read of this register provides information about the device’s
status as defined in the following table.
Bit
Contents
15
A24
Active
14
13-12
MODID*
Unused
Bit
7
6
5
Contents
Done
Err*
Unused
11
Block
Ready
4
HW
OK
10
Data
Ready
3
2
Ready
Passed
9
ST
Done
1
Q Resp
Ready
8
Loaded
0
Cmd
Ready
A24 Active: A one (1) in this field indicates that the A24 registers can be
accessed. It reflects the state of the Control register’s A24 Enable bit.
MODID*: A one (1) in this field indicates that the device is not selected
via the P2 MODID line. A zero (0) indicates that the device is selected by
a high state on the P2 MODID line.
Unused: A read of these bits will always return zero (0).
Block Ready: A one (1) indicates that there is a block of data available to
be read from the Send Data registers. A zero (0) indicates that less than a
full block is available.
A-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
Data Ready: A one (1) indicates that there is at least one word (32 bits)
of data available in the Send Data register. A zero (0) indicates that there
is not valid data in the Send Data register.
ST Done: A one (1) indicates that the internal DSP has competed and
passed its self test.
Loaded: A one (1) indicates that the internal DSP has successfully booted
and has loaded a valid model code.
Done: A zero (0) indicates that the on-card microprocessor has not
finished processing the last command and the Err* bit is not valid. This bit
is set and cleared by the DSP.
Err*: A zero (0) indicates that an error has occurred in communicating
with the DSP (for example: invalid parameters). This bit is set and cleared
by the DSP.
Ready: The meaning of this depends on the state of the Passed bit. While
Passed is false, a one(1) indicates that the device is in the Config Reg Init
state and the Model Code bits of the Device Type register are not valid,
while a zero (0) indicates that the device is in either the self test or failed
state. When Passed is true, a one (1) indicates that the DSP has finished
its initialization and is ready for normal operation, while a zero (0) indicates
that the device is in the passed state.
Passed: A zero (0) indicates that the device is in either the Hard Reset,
Soft Reset, Config Reg Init, Failed, or Init Failed state. A one (1) indicates
that the device is in the passed state.
HW OK: A one (1) indicates that all the on-card FPGAs have successfully
be initialized.
Q Resp Ready (Query Response Ready): A one (1) indicates that the
Query Response Register is loaded and ready to be read. It is set by the
DSP and cleared in hardware by a write to the Command Register.
Cmd Ready: A one (1) indicates that the command register and parameter
register are available for writing. It is set by the DSP microprocessor and
cleared in hardware by a write to the Command Register. This bit, when
zero (0) additionally indicates that the Done bit is not valid.
A-6
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
q Control Register: A write to this register causes specific actions to be executed
by the device. The actions are described in the following table.
Bit
15
14-2
1
0
A24/A32
Contents
Unused
Sysfail Inhibit
Reset
Enable
A24/A32 Enable: A one (1) in this field enables access to the device’s A24
VME Bus registers. A zero (0) disables such access.
Sysfail Inhibit: A one (1) disables the device from driving the SYSFAIL*
line.
Reset: A one (1) forces the device into a reset state.
q Offset Register: This read/write register defines the base address of the device’s
A24 registers. The four most significant bits of the Offset register are the values
of the four most significant bits of the device’s A24 register addresses. The 12
least significant bits of the Offset register are always zero (0). Thus, the Offset
register bits 15-12 map the VME Bus address lines A23-A20 for A24 register
accesses. A read of the Offset register always returns the address offset most
recently written to the Offset register.
q Port Control Register: This register is used to override the Local Bus control of
the device. (This applies to HP E1433A modules that are equipped to use Local
Bus). It has the following format:
Bit
15-2
Contents
Unused
1
LBus
Pipe
0
LBus
Enable
LBus Pipe: Writing a one (1) puts the Local Bus into pipeline mode, if the
LBus Enable bit is also set. Writing a zero (0) allows the Local Bus to
operate in some other mode.
LBus Enable: Writing a one (1) enables the Local Bus interface. Writing a
zero (0) disables the local bus interface. RESET VALUE: 0
A-7
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
q Page Map Register: This read/write register defines the internal location of the
movable window into the device’s DSP bus. (This 512 kB window begins at 512
kB into the device’s A24 registers.) The eight least significant bits of the Page
Map register are the page number. These bits are mapped to the internal DSP
bus address lines as follows:
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Bit 4:
Bit 5:
Bit 6:
Bit 7:
DSP A(17)
DSP A(18)
DSP A(19)
DSP A(20)
DSP A(21)
DSP A(22)
DSP A(30) and A(24)
DSP A(31)
The eight most significant bits of the Page Map Register are always zero (0).
q IRQ Config Register: This register configures the first VME Bus interrupt source.
It provides for selection of the VME Bus IRQ level used, and a bit mask. It has
the following format:
Bit
15-8
7-4
Contents
Mask
Unused
3
IRQ
Enabled
2-0
IRQ
Line
Mask: This is a bit mask used to enable up to eight interrupt causes. A
bit value of zero (0) disables the corresponding interrupt source. RESET
VALUE: 0
IRQ Enable: A one (1) in this bit enables the generation of IRQ’s. A zero
(0) resets each of the eight interrupt causes and status bits. RESET
VALUE: 0
IRQ Line: This field select which VME Bus IRQ line is driven by this
device. A value of zero (0) disconnect the interrupt source. RESET
VALUE: 0
A-8
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
q IRQ Status Register: This read-only register indicates the reason for asserting the
VME Bus interrupt. The format of the data is identical to that of the Status/ID
word returned by an interrupt acknowledge (IACK) cycle. It differs from the
IACK cycle in that the IACK cycle will clear the status bits and cause the
de-assertion of the IRQ line. The register has the following format:
Bit
15-8
Contents
Status
7-0
Logical
Address
Status: Each of these bits indicates the status of a cause of interrupt. A
one (1) in a bit position indicates that the corresponding source is actively
requesting and interrupt.
Logical Address: This is the device’s current logical address.
q IRQ Reset Register: This register is used to resent the interrupt function. It has
the following format:
Bit
Contents
15-8
Reset
Bits
7-0
Unused
Reset Bits: Writing a one (1) to any of these bits will clear the
corresponding bit in the IRQ status register . This will not disable
subsequent interrupt generation. Clearing all of the IRQ status bits will
cause the de-assertion of the IRQ line. Writing a zero (0) has no effect.
q Ram 0-1: These are 32-bit general purpose RAM locations which are also
q
q
q
q
accessible to the on-board DSP. See the following section regarding D16/D08
access of 32-bit registers.
Send Data Register: Reading this register gets the next available word from the
measurement data FIFO. The measurement data FIFO is a 32-bit device. See
the following section regarding D16/D08 access of 32-bit registers.
Receive Data Register: Writing to this register puts a word into the source data
FIFO. The source data FIFO is a 32-bit device. See the following section
regarding D16/D08 access of 32-bit registers.
Count Register: The Count register contains an unsigned 16-bit integer which is
the number of 16-bit words of data which are currently available from the Send
Data register or which the Receive Data register is currently ready to accept.
While a device is generating or accepting data, the Count register may indicate
fewer than the actual number of words available.
Query Response/Command Register: This register is used to send commands to
and receive responses from the device. It is implemented as a 32-bit RAM
location. Writing the least significant byte (highest address) clears the
Command/Parameter Ready and Query Response Ready bits in the status
register and interrupts the on-board DSP. See the following section regarding
D16/D08 access of 32-bit registers and the communication protocol.
A-9
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
q Parameter 1-7 Registers: These are 32-bit RAM locations used to pass parameters
along with commands to the device or query responses from the device. See the
following section regarding D16/D08 access of 32-bit registers and the
communication protocol.
32-bit Registers
Several of the A16 registers (and all other 24-bit registers) are implemented
as 32-bit-only resources. These are accessible using VME Bus D16 and
D08(EO) accesses. However certain restrictions apply. The affected A16
registers are:
q
q
q
q
q
RAM 0-1
Send Data
Receive Data
Query Response Command
Parameter 1-7
Reading 32-bit Registers
When reading a 32-bit register using 8- or 16-bit modes, a simple caching
mechanism is used. On any read including the most significant byte (lowest
address), the 32-bit register is read and all 32-bits are latched into the read
cache. A read not including the most significant byte fetches data from the
read cache, without re-reading the register. This insures that the data will
be unchanged by any intervening write by the DSP (which would result in
garbled data).
This mechanism also introduces a hazard. Reads of less significant bytes
get data from the 32-bit register last read by a most-significant-byte read.
In other words, you can’t read the least significant byte first, or by itself.
Thus there are two important rules:
1 Always read all 32 bits of a 32-bit register.
2 Always read the most significant part first.
Writing 32-bit Registers
When writing to a 32-bit register using 8- or 16-bit modes, a simple caching
scheme is also employed. On any write not including the least significant
byte (highest address), the data is latched into the write cache. A write to
the least significant byte causes the cached data to be written to the 32-bit
register (in parallel with the current data for the least significant bytes(s).
This mechanism has its own hazards. Writes to the least significant byte
will always include the most recently cashed data, whether intended for
that register or not. Lone writes to the most significant part of a 32-bit
register will be lost if not followed by a write to the least significant part of
the same register. Thus there are two important rules:
1 Always write all 32 bits of a 32-bit register.
2 Always write the least significant part last.
A-10
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
Command/Response Protocol
The Command/Response protocol uses the following resources:
q
q
q
q
Command/Query Response register implemented as a general purpose RAM
Three parameter registers implemented as a general purpose RAM
Additional A24 accessible RAM contiguous with the parameter registers
The Command Ready, Query Response Ready, Err*, and Done bits of the Status
register.
The RAM registers are the communications media, while the Status register
bits provide synchronization. In general, a controller sends a command to
the DSP by first writing any parameters to the parameter registers and the
following RAM location. It then writes the command to the command
register, which clears the Command/Parameter Ready bit and interrupts the
DSP. At this point, the DSP has exclusive access to the RAM registers.
The controller may not access that RAM again until the
Command/Parameter Ready bit is true.
When interrupted, the DSP reads the command and its parameters, writes
any response data back to the Query Response Register and any other data
to the parameter registers and the following RAM, and set the
Command/Parameter Ready bit true.
The Query Response Ready bit is used to indicate that the DSP has written
query data to the RAM registers. It is set by the software and cleared by a
write of the Command Register.
The Done bit is set by DSP software when it finishes execution of a
command or a command sequence. This may by long after it has set the
Command/Parameter Ready bit. The DSP software clears the Done bit
immediately on receipt of a new command, before it sets the
Command/Parameter Ready bit.
The Err* bit is asserted (to 0) by the DSP software to indicate an error in
the decoding or execution of a command. It is asserted (to 1) if the
command was executed with no error. This bit must be valid before Done
is set at the end of a command.
A-11
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
In order to avoid contention and/or invalid data reads, there are certain
rules that must be observed:
1 A controller must not write to any of the RAM registers when
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Command/Parameter Ready is false.
The DSP must not write to any of the RAM registers when either
Command/Parameter Ready or Query Response Ready is true.
A controller must not read any of the RAM registers when Query Response
Ready is false.
The DSP must not read any of the RAM registers when Command/Parameter
Ready is true.
When writing a command together with parameter, a controller must always
write to the Command Register last.
When executing a command that requires it to return response data, the DSP
must set the Query Response Ready bit no later than the
Command/Parameter Ready bit.
The DSP must not clear the Done bit while Command/Parameter Ready is
true.
The DSP must not change the Err* bit while Done is true.
A controller must not regard the done bits a valid while Command/Parameter
Ready is false.
A controller must not regard the Err* bit as valid while Done is false.
Controller Protocol Examples
There are three basic procedures used by a controller, Write Command,
Read Response, and Wait for Done. These can be combined for more
complex sequences.
Write Command
This is the procedure to send a command to the DSP.
1 Wait for Command/Parameter Ready true.
2 Write any parameters to the Parameter registers and RAM.
3 Write the command to the Command register.
Read Response
This is the procedure for reading a response to query command.
1 Wait for Query Response Ready true.
2 Read the data from the Query Response register and any additional data from
the Parameter registers and RAM.
A-12
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
Wait for Done
This is the procedure to wait for command completion and check for error.
1 Wait for Command/Parameter Ready true.
2 Wait for Done true.
3 If Err* = 0 , handle error.
Complex Sequences
A robust procedure for sending a query and reading the response would
look like this:
1 Send Command.
2 Wait for Done.
3 If no error then Read Response.
Multiple commands may be sent with a test for errors at the end of the
sequence. This example sends three commands before checking for errors.
1
2
3
4
Send Command.
Send Command.
Send Command.
Wait for Done.
DSP Protocol
When a controller writes to the Command register, a DSP interrupt is
generated. When responding to this interrupt, the DSP will follow this
procedure.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Clear the Done bit.
Read and decode the command from the Command register.
Read any parameters from the Parameter registers and RAM.
If a response data is required:
a. Write the data to the Query Response register, Parameter registers,
and RAM.
b. Set Query Response Ready true.
Set Command/Parameter Ready true.
Finish command execution.
If any errors are pending set Err* = 0, else set Err* = 1.
Set Done true.
There are two additional requirement for the DSP:
1 Once it begins processing a command interrupt, the DSP must defer
processing subsequent commands until it has finished.
2 The DSP software maintains an error(s) pending flag (and possibly and error
queue) that is set by any command decoding or execution error, and cleared
by some other method such as an error query.
A-13
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
DSP Bus Registers
There are two 32-bit registers in the DSP bus address space. The VXI
FPGA does not assert TA* when these registers are accessed.
200A16 DSP Command Register
200B16
Boot Register
Note that these registers appear multiple times in the memory map, since
only the address lines A31-30, A17-13, A9-8, and A3-0 are used for decoding.
The A24 registers are defined as follows:
q Boot Register: This read/write register is used to configure the device after a
device reset. It has the following format:
Bit
31-16
Contents
Unused
15
Spare
14
ST Done
13
Loaded
12
Ready
11-0
Model
Code
Spare: This read/write bit has no pre-defined function.
ST Done: This bit should be written to a one (1) when the DSP
successfully competes its self-test, within five seconds after SYSRESET* is
de-asserted. Its initial value is zero (0).
Loaded: This bit should be written to a one (1) when (or immediately
after) the DSP loads the model code, before competing its self-test. Its
initial value is zero (0).
Ready: This bit is written to a one (1) to indicate that the device is ready
for normal operation. Its initial value is zero (0).
Model Code: As soon as possible, and within 25 ms after coming out of
reset, when the DSP has valid code loaded, it should write the VXI model
code to these bits. Their initial value is 0x0200.
A-14
HP E1433A User's Guide
Register Definitions
q DSP Command Register: This register is used to assert VXI interrupts and toggle
various status register bits. Many of the bits in this register are grouped into
related Clock and Value pairs. This allow the bits to be modified independently
with single register writes. In order to change an output value, the Clock bit
must be written as a one (1), while the Value is written as the desired output
value. Writing the Clock bit as a zero (0) will not change the output state. The
current state is read from the Value bit.
The DSP Command register has the following format:
Bit
31-24
Contents Unused
Bit
Contents
15
Q Resp
Ready
Clock
23
FIFO
Enable
Clock
14
Q Resp
Ready
Value
22
FIFO
Enable
Value
13
Cmd
Ready
Clock
21
FIFO
In
Clock
20
FIFO
In
Value
12
Cmd
Ready
Value
19
18
17
16
DONE
Clock
DONE
Value
ERRn
Clock
ERRn
Value
9-8
7-0
Unused
IRQ7-0
11
IRQ
Enable
Clock
10
IRQ
Enable
Value
A-15
H
HP E1433A
Technical Specifications
8-Channel 196 kSa/sec
Digitizer plus DSP
Rev. April 1999
Trigger
Fail Acs
ExSamp
Cal
ExTrig
8 CHANNEL
196 kSa/s
Digitizer + DSP
Fail Acs
Tach1
Trigger
Tach 2
ExTrig
8 CHANNEL
196 kSa/s
Digitizer + DSP
Chan
5-8
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Fail Acs
COLA
Source
Shut
Out
8 CHANNEL
196 kSa/s
Digitizer + DSP
HP E1433A
The HP E1433A may contain
either one or two 4-channel input
assemblies so that the module
may have a total of up to 8 inputs.
This module integrates transducer
signal conditioning, anti-alias
protection, digitization and high
speed measurement computation
in a single slot VXI card. Onboard
digital signal processing and up to
32 Mbytes of RAM maximizes
total system performance and
flexibility.
Chan
5-8
Chan
1-4
The HP E1433A 8-Channel
196 kSa/s Digitizer plus DSP is a
C-size VXI module. “196 kSa/s”
refers to the maximum sample
rate of 196608 samples per
second per channel.
Chan
1-4
HP E1433A
Specifications
Frequency
Sample
Rate (Hz)
Bandwidth
(Hz)
76800
196608
192000
75000
163840
64000
156250
61035.15
153600
60000
133333.3 52083.33
131072
51200
128000
50000
125000
48828.125
122880
48000
102400
40000
100000
39062.5
98304
38400
96000
37500
81920
32000
78125
30517.57
76800
30000
66666.66 26041.66
65536
25600
64000
25000
62500
24414.06
61440
24000
51200
20000
50000
19531.25
49152
19200
48000
18750
40960
16000
39062.5 15258.78
38400
15000
33333.33 13020.83
32768
12800
32000
12500
31250
12207.03
30720
12000
25600
10000
25000
9765.625
24576
9600
24000
9375
20480
8000
19660.8 7680
19531.25 7629.394
19200
7500
16666.66 6510.416
16384
6400
16000
6250
15625
6103.515
15360
6000
13333.33 5208.333
13107.2 5120
12800
5000
12500
4882.812
12288
4800
12000
4687.5
10240
4000
10000
3906.25
9830.4
3840
9765.625 3814.697
9600
3750
8333.33 3255.208
8192
3200
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Sample
Rate (Hz)
8000
7812.5
7680
6666.666
6553.6
6400
6250
6144
6000
5120
5000
4915.2
4882.812
4800
4166.666
4096
4000
3906.25
3840
3333.333
3276.8
3200
3125
3072
3000
2560
2500
2457.6
2441.406
2400
2083.333
2048
2000
1953.125
1920
1666.666
1638.4
1600
1562.5
1536
1500
1280
1250
1228.8
1220.703
1200
1041.666
1024
1000
976.5625
960
833.3333
819.2
800
781.25
768
750
640
625
614.4
Bandwidth
(Hz)
3125
3051.757
3000
2604.166
2560
2500
2441.406
2400
2343.75
2000
1953.125
1920
1907.348
1875
1627.604
1600
1562.5
1525.878
1500
1302.083
1280
1250
1220.703
1200
1171.875
1000
976.5625
960
953.6743
937.5
813.8020
800
781.25
762.9394
750
651.0416
640
625
610.3515
600
585.9375
500
488.28125
480
476.8371
468.75
406.9010
400
390.625
381.4697
375
325.5208
320
312.5
305.1757
300
292.9687
250
244.1406
240
Sample
Rate (Hz)
610.3515
600
520.8333
512
500
488.2812
480
416.6666
409.6
400
390.625
384
375
320
312.5
307.2
305.1757
300
260.4166
256
250
244.1406
240
208.3333
204.8
200
195.3125
192
187.5
160
156.25
153.6
152.5878
150
130.2083
128
125
122.07031
120
104.1666
102.4
100
97.65625
96
93.75
80
78.125
76.8
76.29394
75
65.10416
64
62.5
61.0351
60
52.08333
51.2
50
48.82812
46.875
Bandwidth
(Hz)
238.4185
234.375
203.4505
200
195.3125
190.7348
187.5
162.7604
160
156.25
152.5878
150
146.4843
125
122.0703
120
119.2092
117.1875
101.7252
100
97.65625
95.36743
93.75
81.38020
80
78.125
76.29394
75
73.24218
62.5
61.03515
60
59.60464
58.59375
50.86263
50
48.82812
47.68371
46.875
40.69010
40
39.0625
38.14697
37.5
36.62109
31.25
30.51757
30
29.80232
29.29687
25.43131
25
24.41406
23.84185
23.4375
20.34505
20
19.53125
19.07348
18.31054
2 of 12
Frequency (continued)
Sample
Rate (Hz)
40
39.0625
38.4
38.14697
37.5
32.55208
32
31.25
30.51757
30
26.04166
25.6
25
24.41406
24
23.4375
20
19.53125
19.2
19.07348
18.75
16.27604
16
15.625
15.25878
15
13.02083
12.8
12.5
12.20703
12
11.71875
10
9.765625
9.6
9.536743
9.375
8.138020
8 3.125
7.8125
7.629394
7.5
Bandwidth
(Hz)
15.625
15.25878
15
14.90116
14.64843
12.71565
12.5
12.20703
11.92092
11.71875
10.17252
10
9.765625
9.536743
9.375
9.155273
7.8125
7.629394
7.5
7.450580
7.324218
6.357828
6.25
6.103515
5.960464
5.859375
5.086263
5
4.882812
4.768371
4.6875
4.577636
3.90625
3.814697
3.75
3.725290
3.662109
3.178914
3.051757
2.980232
2.929687
Sample
Rate (Hz)
6.510416
6.4
6.25
6.103515
6
5.859375
5
4.882812
4.8
4.768371
4.6875
4.069010
4
3.90625
3.814697
3.75
3.255208
3.2
3.125
3.051757
3
2.929687
2.5
2.441406
2.4
2.384185
2.34375
2.034505
1.953125
1.907348
1.875
1.627604
1.6
1.5625
1.525878
1.5
1.464843
1.25
1.220703
1.2
1.192092
1.171875
Bandwidth
(Hz)
2.543131
2.5
2.441406
2.384185
2.34375
2.288818
1.953125
1.907348
1.875
1.862645
1.831054
1.589457
1.5625
1.525878
1.490116
1.464843
1.271565
1.25
1.220703
1.192092
1.171875
1.144409
0.9765625
0.9536743
0.9375
0.9313225
0.9155273
0.7947285
0.7629394
0.7450580
0.7324218
0.6357828
0.625
0.6103515
0.5960464
0.5859375
0.5722045
0.4882812
0.4768371
0.46875
0.4656612
0.4577636
Sample
Rate (Hz)
1.017252
1
0.976562
0.953674
0.9375
0.813802
0.8
0.78125
0.762939
0.75
0.732421
0.625
0.610351
0.6
0.585937
0.5
0.476837
0.46875
0.4069010
0.4
0.390625
0.3814697
0.375
0.3125
0.3051757
0.3
0.2929687
0.25
0.2384185
0.234375
0.2034505
0.2
0.1953125
0.1907348
0.1875
0.15625
0.1525878
0.15
0.1464843
Bandwidth
(Hz)
0.3973642
0.390625
0.3814697
0.3725290
0.3662109
0.3178914
0.3125
0.3051757
0.2980232
0.2929687
0.2861022
0.2441406
0.2384185
0.234375
0.2288818
0.1953125
0.1862645
0.1831054
0.1589457
0.15625
0.1525878
0.1490116
0.1464843
0.1220703
0.1192092
0.1171875
0.1144409
0.0976562
0.0931322
0.0915527
0.0794728
0.078125
0.0762939
0.0745058
0.0732421
0.0610351
0.0596046
0.0585937
0.0572204
These sample rates also have available bandwidths
that are 1.15 times the bandwidth of this table.
1
Frequency Accuracy
± 0.012% (120 ppm)
3 of 12
Input
Full Scale Input Ranges (in volts peak)
5 mV to 10 V (1, 2, 5 steps)
Maximum Input Level
42 Vp
Input Impedance
(dc coupled or ac coupled above 10 Hz)
Differential
Either side-to-chassis
2 MΩ nominal
1 MΩ nominal
Programmable AC Coupling 3 dB Corner Frequency
1 to 100 Hz
(2 pole, 12 dB/oct.)
Common Mode Rejection Ratio
ac or dc coupled, 10 Hz to 1 kHz
Maximum signal, low side to chassis
Maximum signal, high side to chassis (VT = 0)
Maximum signal, high side to chassis
Amplitude Over-Range Detection
Common mode overload
Differential mode overload (dc coupled)
Differential mode overload (ac coupled)
for cutoff frequency ≤6 Hz
for cutoff frequency >6 Hz
Residual DC
> 70 dB
± 10 Vpk
± 11.5 Vp
VT ± 10 Vpk (must be ≤ 20 V)
(VT = transducer offset cancellation voltage setting)
± 11.5 Vp (typical)
105% of full scale
100% of full scale
50% of full scale, worst case
1% of full scale + 2 mV
Amplitude
Amplitude Accuracy at 1 kHz
Flatness (relative to 1 kHz, at full scale)
± 0.5% of reading, ± 0.01% of full scale
< 29 kHz
< 88 kHz
± 1% (± 0.09 dB)
± 2% (± 0.17 dB)
Amplitude Resolution
16 bits, less 5 dB over-range
Cross Channel Matching (any HP E1433A module in the same mainframe)
Cross Channel Amplitude Match
(full-scale signal, input ranges equal)
up to 29 kHz
29 khz to 88 kHz
± 0.1 dB
± 0.2 dB
Cross Channel Phase Match
(full-scale signal, input ranges equal)
ac coupled (freq > 2x AC HPF corner freq)
to 750 Hz
750 Hz to 88 kHz
± 0.9°
± (f/22000)°
dc coupled
10 Hz to 88 kHz
at 1 kHz
± (f/22000)°
± 0.045°
4 of 12
Dynamic Range
Resolution
16 bits
Spurious Free Dynamic Range*
(includes spurs, harmonic distortion, intermodulation
distortion, alias products and sidebands > 300 Hz)
(source impedance = 50 Ω)
< -90 dBfs (typical)
51.2 kSa/s Fs, ≤ 1 Vpk
< -80 dBfs
48 kSa/s to 65.536 Sa/s Fs
< -74 dBfs
above 65.536 Sa/s Fs
< − 80 dBfs (typical)
Crosstalk
(receiving channel source impedance = 50 Ω, low side
grounded, full scale, < 10 kHz signal on other
channels, input ranges within 20 dB)
Noise (input terminated with 50 Ω, 5 mV range)
Noise density above 100 Hz
Total rms noise, 10 Hz to 10 kHz
< 70 nVrms/√Hz
< 7 µVrms
Trigger
Trigger Detection
Digital
Trigger Modes
Input, external, source, TTL TRG, software, RPM
(requires option AYF)
Max Trigger Delay
(8 channels active)
Pre-trigger delay
Post-trigger delay
262 kSa (4 MB RAM), 2 MSa (32 MB RAM)
16 MSa
* 5 mV range degrades 4 dB.
5 of 12
Option 1D4 Arbitary Source
Specifications
General
Output Modes
Sine and pseudo random with burst , arbitrary
waveform with continuous output
Frequency Bands
Sine, noise modes
Reconstruction filter bandwidth
DSP data rate (Fs)
Data word size
0 to 25.6 kHz
48.00 kHz to 65.536 kHz
16 bits
Arb modes
Reconstruction filter bandwidth
Data word size
0 to 6.4 kHz
20 bits
Frequency Accuracy
± 0.012% (120 ppm)
Signal Output
Number of Output Channels
1
Maximum Amplitude
10 Vp nominal
Output Impedance
< 0.5 Ω (typical)
Maximum Output Current
100 mA (typical)
Maximum Capacitive Load
0.01 µF (typical)
Amplitude Control
(signal amplitude = range × scale factor)
Maximum amplitude
Amplitude ranges
Amplitude scale factor
Residual Output Noise Voltage
(Freq > 500 Hz)
Residual DC Offset
10 Vp nominal
79 mVp to 10 Vp in 0.375 dB steps
0.0 to 1.0, with 20-bit resolution
< 500 nV/√Hz
Offset after autozero
Offset after shutdown
Zeroing resolution
± 2 mV
± 20 mV
100 µV
Output Overload Trip
> 17 V
Amplitude Ramp-down Time (Programmable)
0 to 30 seconds
Shutdown
Shutdown input
Shutdown time
Shutdown time, ac fail
TTL levels
<5s
< 4 ms
6 of 12
Sine Output Mode
Sine Frequency (65536 Hz Fs)
Frequency range
Frequency resolution
0 to 25.6 kHz
244 µHz
Amplitude Accuracy
(1 kHz sine wave, into ≥
10 Vp to 0.158 Vp ranges
0.152 Vp to 79 mVp ranges
200
Ω)
Flatness (relative to 1 kHz)
Harmonic and Aliased-harmonic Distortion
(≥ 1 kΩ load)
± 0.20 dB (2.3 %)
± 0.40 dB (4.7 %)
± 0.5 dB
1 Vp range, 1.0 scale factor, 0 to 6.4 kHz
2 to 10 Vp range, 0.05 to 1.0 scale factor,
0 to 25.6 kHz
< − 80 dBc
< − 70 dBc
Spurious responses
<− 60 dBVp
Constant Level Output
Output Level at 1 kHz
(after 1 second settling, amplitude scale factor >
0.001)
Output Impedance
Flatness
25 Hz to 5 kH, amplitude scale factor 0.001 to 1.0
5 Hz to 20 kHz, amplitude scale factor 0.01 to 1.0
5 Hz to 20 kHz, amplitude scale factor 0.1 to 1.0
Sine Wave Distortion
(at 1 kHz, amplitude scale factor 0.1 to 1.0)
Residual dc Offset
1 Vp (nominal)
1.2 kΩ (typical)
1.13 Vp to 0.50 Vp (+10, -6.0 dB) (typical)
1.13 Vp to 0.44 Vp (+10, -7.0 dB) (typical)
1.13 Vp to 0.88 Vp (±1.0 dB) (typical)
− 40 dBc (typical)
< 5 mV (typical)
Summer Input
Maximum Input Level
10 Vp
Gain, Summer Input to Signal Output
0 ± 0.5 dB at 1 kHz
Input Impedance
> 10 kΩ (typical)
Flatness, dc to 25.6 kHz
± 0.5 dB (typical)
Sine Wave Distortion
− 80 dBc (typical)
Residual dc Offset
1 mV (typical)
7 of 12
Option AYF Tachometer Input
Specifications
General
Option AYF, Tachometer Input, provides two
tachometer inputs. When this option is installed, 2 of
the 3 SMB connectors on the VXI module are used for
tachometer inputs. When this option is not installed,
these connectors are normally used for “External
Sample” and “Trigger.”
Each tachometer input has a programmable trigger
level. Each tach pulse causes a “Tach Edge Time” to
be recorded in a 16384-word FIFO. A “Tach Edge
Time” is the instantaneous value of the 32-bit “Tach
Counter”. A “Decimate” number can be set to ignore
a number of tach pulses before recording each Tach
Edge Time. A “Holdoff” time can be set to avoid false
triggering due to ringing.
One of the tachometer inputs can be programmed for
use as a trigger input rather than a tachometer input.
In this mode, the tachometer option can trigger the
system and measure the time between the trigger and
the next sample clock edge.
The analog signal from either of the Tachometer
inputs can be routed to an input channel using the
internal calibration path.
Tach Counter
32-bit counter with roll-over detector bit
Decimate Counter
16-bit counter
Input Signal Trigger Level (typical)
Voltage Range
Resolution, levels < ± 5V
Resolution, levels > ± 5V
Hysteresis, levels < ± 5V
Hysteresis, levels > ± 5V
Slope
Input Signal Timing
− 25 V to + 25 V
40 mV
200 mV
0 to 250 mV
0 to 1.25 mV
Programmable, positive or negative
Minimum pulse width
Maximum pulse rate
Trigger holdoff
5 µs
100 kHz
1 to 65536 clock periods
Input Impedance
20 kΩ (typical)
8 of 12
VXI System Level
Specifications
Features
VXI Standard Information
Signal Processing
Conforms to VXI revision 1.4
C-size, single slot width
Register-based programming
“Slave” Data Transfer Bus functionality
A24 address capability
D32 data capability
Optional Local Bus capability
SUMBUS driver and receiver
Requires 2 or 4 TTLTRG_ lines for multi-module
synchronization
33 MHz Motorola 96002 DSP
2 banks of 128 K word static RAM
4 M bytes dynamic RAM (32 M bytes with option
ANC)
128 K bytes Flash ROM
Direct Memory Access (DMA) data transfer
Software Drivers
Driver Type
C libraries with source code
Supported Operating Systems
Microsoft Windows 95 and NT, and HP-UX 10.20
Supply Media
CD-ROM
VXI Plug & Play Compliance
C libraries support MS Windows 95 and NT, and
HP-UX.
HP-UX 10.X for HP 9000
Series 700 and 800 computers are
X/Open Company UNIX 93
branded products.
MS Windows is a U.S. registered
trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
9 of 12
Regulatory Compliance
Safety Standards
Designed for compliance to:
UL 1244, 4th Edition
IEC 348, 2nd Edition, 1978
CSA C22.2, No. 231
CISPR 11: 1990, Group 1, Class A
(requires connector shields HP E1400-80920 or
of an HP E1401B Mainframe, HP V743 Controller, and HP E1421-80920)
HP E1432A module with option 1D4 or AYF)
Tested for compliance to the European Economic
Area’s EMC directive
Radiated Emissions
(tested in a “typical” system configuration, consisting
Electrostatic Discharge
Tested for compliance to the European Economic
Area’s EMC directive
Radiated Immunity
Tested for compliance to the European Economic
Area’s EMC directive
Environmental
Operating Restrictions
Ambient Temperature
Humidity, Non-condensing
Maximum Altitude
0° to 50°C
20% RH to 90% RH at 40°C
4600 meters (15,000 feet)
Storage and Transport Restrictions
− 20° to 65°C
Ambient Temperature
Humidity, Non-condensing
Maximum Altitude
20% RH to 90% RH at 40°C
4600 meters (15,000 feet)
10 of 12
General Characteristics
VXI Power Requirements
dc Current
No options installed
+5.0 V
+12.0 V
−12.0 V
+24.0 V
−24.0 V
−5.2 V
−2.0 V
Tachometer option installed (AYF)
+5.0 V
+12.0 V
−12.0 V
+24.0 V
−24.0 V
−5.2 V
−2.0 V
Source option installed (1D4)
+5.0 V
+12.0 V
−12.0 V
+24.0 V
−24.0 V
−5.2 V
−2.0 V
0.60 A
0.19 A
0.18 A
0.03 A
0.03 A
0.00 A
0.00 A
Dynamic Current
+5.0 V
+12.0 V
−12.0 V
+24.0 V
−24.0 V
−5.2 V
−2.0 V
0.20 A
0.02 A
0.01 A
0.01 A
0.01 A
0.02 A
0.01 A
VXI Cooling Requirements
5.08 liters/second
0.51 mm H2O
Warm-up Time
15 minutes
5.50 A
0.56 A
0.05 A
0.44 A
0.42 A
0.95 A
0.01 A
0.14 A
0.00 A
0.00 A
0.10 A
0.06 A
0.00 A
0.00 A
11 of 12
H
Performance Benchmarks
Because these performance benchmarks depend on the
software and hardware configuration, they are
included as supplemental, non-warranted
characteristics.
VXI Data Transfer Rate (P1 connector)
From HP E1433A DRAM to VXI V743 Controller
From HP E1433A DRAM to MXI to external
HP Series 700 Controller
From HP E1433A DRAM to VXLink interface
From HP E1433A DRAM to E6233A Pentium Controller
From HP E1433A DRAM to National MXI-2 to external
200 MHz Pentium Pro
6.5 MB/s
1.5 MB/s
345 kB/s
1.6 MB/s
1.2 MB/s
Local Bus Data Transfer Rate
From HP E1433A DRAM, one block, during
continuous acquisition.
From HP E1433A’s DRAM to HP E1562D
From HP E1433A’s DRAM to HP E1562E
Maximum number of input channels for continuous
throughput at 196 kSa/s sample rate
15.7 MB/s
5 MB/s to 7.8 MB/s
10 MB/s to 15.7 MB/s
40 channels
FIFO Memory
2 MSa/number active channels (standard)
16 MSa/number active channels (opt. ANC)
(Maximum FIFO size, 4MB DRAM installed)
(Maximum FIFO size, 32 MB DRAM installed)
Specification Note
Warranty Information
Specifications describe warranted
performance over the temperature
range of 0° to 50°C, after a
15-minute warm-up from ambient
conditions. Supplemental
characteristics identified as
“typical”, provide useful
information by giving
non-warranted performance
parameters. Typical performance
is applicable from 20° to 30°C.
The HP E1433A comes with a 3-yr
warranty. During that period, the
unit will either be replaced or
repaired, at HP’s option, and
returned to the customer without
charge. There is an option available at extra cost which extends
the repair support to five years.
Abbreviations
For More Information
www.hp.com/go/data_acq
HP E1432/33/34A
Fs = sample rate of ADC.
Fc = cut off frequency of high pass Product Overview
5965-9834E
or low pass filters.
dBfs = dB relative to full scale
amplitude range.
dBc = dB relative to carrier
amplitude.
Typical = typical, non-warranted,
performance specification included
to provide general product
information.
For more information on Hewlett-Packard
test & measurement products, applications,
services, and for a current sales office listing,
visit our web site, http://www.hp.com/go/tmdir.
You can also contact one of the following
centers and ask for a test and measurement
representative.
United States:
Hewlett-Packard Company
Test and Measurement Call Center
P.O. Box 4026
Englewood, CA 90155-4026
1 800 452 4844
Canada:
Hewlett-Packard Canada Ltd.
5150 Spectrum Way
Mississauga, Ontario
L4W 5G1
Tel: (905) 206 4725
Europe:
Hewlett-Packard
European Marketing Centre
P.O. Box 999
1180 AZ Amstelveen
The Netherlands
Tel: (31-20) 547-9900
Japan:
Hewlett-Packard Japan Ltd.
Measurement Assistance Center
9-1, Takakura-Cho, Hachioji-Shi,
Tokyo 192, Japan
Tel: (81-426) 56-7832
Fax: (81-426) 56-7840
Latin America:
Hewlett-Packard
Latin American Region Headquarters
5200 Blue Lagoon Drive 9th Floor
Miami, Florida 33126 U.S.A.
Tel: (305) 267-4245/4220
Fax: (305) 267-4288
Australia/New Zealand:
Hewlett-Packard Australia Ltd.
31-41 Joseph Street
Blackburn, Victoria 3130
Australia
Tel: 1 800 629 485
Asia Pacific:
Hewlett-Packard Asia Pacific Ltd
17-21/F Shell Tower, Times Square,
1 Matheson Street, Causeway Bay,
Hong Kong
Tel: (852) 2599-7777
Fax: (852) 2506-9285
Data is subject to change
Copyright 
1996, 1997, 1999 Hewlett-Packard Co.
Printed in USA 4/99
5963-9652E
12 of 12
Glossary
A16 registers
Address space using 16 address lines. The VXI definition gives each VXI
module 64 bytes of A16 registers.
A24 registers
Address space using 24 address lines. VXI modules can configure how
much A24 address space they use.
arbitrary source
A signal source capable of producing an arbitrary waveform according to the
way it is programmed.
arbitration bus
See DTB arbitration bus.
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange, a standard format for
data or commands.
backplane
A set of lines that connects all the modules in a VXI system.
baseband
A band in the frequency spectrum that begins at zero. In contrast a
zoomed band is centered on a specified center frequency.
block mode
A mode of data-collecting used in instruments such as the HP E1431A.
The instrument stops taking data as soon as a block of data has been
collected. Overlap block mode in the HP E1432A and HP 1433A can be
configured to act exactly like block mode.
block size
The number of sample points in a block of data.
breakout box
Another name for the 8-channel input connector.
C-Library (interface library)
A library of functions, written in C language, which can be used to operate
the HP E1432A and HP E143A.
G-1
HP 1432A User's Guide
Glossary
C-size
One of several possible sizes for VXI modules. The HP E1432A and HP
E1433A are C-size modules.
channel-dependent commands
Commands that are channel-dependent change a parameter for each
channel independently.
COLA
Constant Output Level Amplifier.
continuous mode
A mode of data-collecting used in the HP E1432A, the HP E1433A, and in
other instruments such as the HP E1431A. The instrument collects data
continuously and stops only if the FIFO overflows.
D32, D16, and D08 (EO)
The VXI Bus provides 32 data lines. Modules can use all 32 lines, or 16
lines, or 8 lines. For example, “D16 access” refers to data read across 16
lines.
daisy-chain
A set of instruments or modules connected together in a line. Data and
instructions enter each one before being buffered and passed out to the
next module in line.
decimation filter
A digital filter that simultaneously decreases the bandwidth of the signal
and decreases the sample rate. The digital filter provides alias protection
and increases frequency resolution. For more information, see Spectrum &
Network Measurements available through your Hewlett-Packard Sales Office.
delta sigma
A method for converting an analog input to digital data. It involves using a
difference of two voltages (delta) and a summation of signals (sigma) to
improve accuracy.
digitizer
An instrument which converts analog signals into digital data suitable for
digital signal processing.
DRAM
Dynamic Random Access Memory.
G-2
HP 1432A User's Guide
Glossary
DSP
Digital Signal Processing.
DTB arbitration bus
The HP E1432A does not use the arbitration bus. The arbitration bus is
part of the VXI specification and is used by some modules to request bus
control.
ECL
Emitter-Collector Logic, a standard for electrical signals.
Engineering Unit (EU)
A scale factor used to convert the output of a transducer (in volts) into
another unit (for example: g’s).
FFT
Fast Fourier Transform.
FIFO
First-In First-Out. A buffer and controller used to transmit data. The FIFO
in the HP E1432A/HP E1433A input is implemented using DRAM.
freerun counter
A counter in which the bits always increment. When the freerun counter
reaches all ones it resets to all zeros and continues counting.
Fs
Sample Frequency or sample rate.
group ID
Any number of channels may be declared and uniquely identified by a
groupID. A channel can be a member of more than one group.
holdoff time
A circuit that detects a trigger signal will not respond to another trigger
until the holdoff time has passed. This prevents a ringing signal from be
detected as multiple triggers.
HP VEE
A Hewlett-Packard program for graphical programming.
IACK
Interrupt ACKnowledge.
G-3
HP 1432A User's Guide
Glossary
ICP
Integrated-Circuit Piezo-electric transducer.
IRQ
Interrupt ReQuest.
kSa/s
Kilo-Samples per second.
LED
Light Emitting Diode.
Local Bus
A high-speed port that Hewlett-Packard has defined as a standard byte-wide
ECL protocol which can transfer measurement data at up to 2.62 Msamples
per second from left to right on the VXI backplane.
logical address
The VXI logical address identifies where each module is located in the
memory map of the VXI system.
message-based VXI device
Message-based devices communicate with the VXI Bus using high-level
ASCII commands. Programming is easier and more sophisticated, but
communication is slower than with register-based devices. Message-based
devices can also be programmed at the register level. The HP E1432A and
HP E1433A are register-based VXI devices.
module-dependent commands
Commands that are module-dependent change a parameter for all channels
of the module; even when only one channel has been specified in the
channel list.
MXI bus
A bus standard which can be used to connected multiple VXI mainframes.
overlap block mode
A mode of data-collecting in used in the HP E1432A and HP E1433A. It is
similar to block mode except that it allows additional arms and triggers to
occur before an already-acquired block is sent to the host.
pipeline mode
A Local Bus mode in which data is sent through a module and on to the
next one.
G-4
HP 1432A User's Guide
Glossary
Plug&Play
See VXIplug&play
RAM
Random Access Memory.
register-based VXI device
Register-based devices communicate with the VXI Bus by way of registers.
They must be programmed with low-level binary commands but they can
communicate faster than message-based devices. The HP E1432A and HP
E1433A are register-based VXI devices.
registers
Memory locations in the hardware of a VXI module which can be used to
program the module at a low level.
RPM
Revolutions Per Minute.
ROM
Read-Only Memory
SCA
Signal Conditioning Assembly. An example is the 4-channel input
assemblies used in the HP E1432A (also called Vibrato).
sample rate
The rate at which the measurement data is sampled. For the HP E1432A,
the sample rate is 2.56 times the frequency span. Sample rate is
abbreviated “Fs” (for “sample Frequency”).
settling
When settling, the digital filter waits a designated number samples before
outputting any data.
SFP
see Soft Front Panel
shared memory
Memory locations in both a VXI module and in a host or controller which
are shared and can be used to transmit data between the host and module.
slot 0 commander
The module which occupies the left-most slot in a VXI mainframe. It
supplies important signals for the rest of the system.
G-5
HP 1432A User's Guide
Glossary
SMB
Sub-Miniature “B”; a type of connector.
Soft Front Panel (SFP)
A VXIplug&play program which provides and easy-to-use interface for the
HP E1432A. It can be used in Microsoft Windows 95 or Windows NT.
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory.
summer
A circuit that outputs the sum of two input signals.
sync/trigger line
A TTL line on the VXI back plane, used for synchronization or triggering
signals.
SYSRESET*
SYStem RESET line, part of the VXI Bus.
system module
The module with the lowest VXI logical address. It needs to be set to
output the synchronization pulse for a multiple module group. All system
sync pulses come from the system module.
tachometer
The tachometer produces a signal which is proportional to the rotation of a
device. It can be programmed to produce one or more signals per
revolution.
target
The ‘target’ of a library function is either a channel, a group, or (rarely) a
module, depending on the nature of the call. When the same library
function may be called with either a channel or a group identifier, its
‘target’ is shown by a parameter named ID.
TTL
Transistor-Transistor Logic, a standard for electrical signals.
TTLTRG
TTL TRiGger lines, part of the VXI Bus.
VEE
See HP VEE
G-6
HP 1432A User's Guide
Glossary
VME Bus
An industry-standard bus on the VXI backplane for module control, setup
and measurement data transfers. For measurement data transfers, the
Local Bus offers higher transfer rates.
VXI
VME Extensions for Instrumentation, a standard specification for instrument
systems.
VXIplug&play
A set of standards which provides VXI users with a level of standardization
across different vendors beyond what the VXI standard specifications spell
out.
zoom
In instruments that support zoom you can select a frequency span around a
specified center frequency so you can focus on a specific frequency band.
G-7
INDEX
!
B
32-bit registers A-10
writing A-10
4-channel input 4-7, 4-10, 7-2
8-channel input 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
8-channel input (break out box) 8-3
B- bus 5-10
backdating 11-2
backplane connections 5-8
base sample rate 3-17
baseband 3-17
block diagram 5-10
arbitrary source 6-3
HP E1433A 5-3
tachometer 7-3
block mode 3-30 - 3-31, 4-24 - 4-25
block size 5-2
BOOTED state 3-24 - 3-25, 4-19 - 4-20
BOOTING state 3-24 - 3-25, 4-19 - 4-20
bound mode 3-29
break out box 8-3
grounding 8-4
ICP 8-3 - 8-4
voltage 8-3 - 8-4
break out box cable 8-5
breakout box 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
bsrcrand.vee (example program) 2-16
bsrcsine.vee (example program) 2-16
burst mode 6-2
burst source random 2-16
burst source sine 2-16
Bus
A 5-10
B 5-10
data transfer 5-8
DTB 5-8
local 5-9
priority interrupt 5-8
utility 5-8
VME 5-9
VXI 3-9, 4-12, 5-10, 5-14
A
A-bus 5-10
A16 address space 5-10
A16 registers 5-12, A-2
A24 address space 5-10
A24 registers 5-11, A-4
A32 address space 5-10
AC/DC coupling 5-2
access LED 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
acs LED 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
address space 5-10
amplifier, constant output level 6-2
arbitrary mode 6-2
arbitrary output 5-2, 6-2
arbitrary source
block diagram 6-3
connectors 6-5
front panel 6-4
LED’s 6-5
arbitrary source firmware 6-5
arbitrary source option 6-2
arm 3-27, 4-22
ARM state 3-25 - 3-26, 4-20 - 4-21
assembly
removing A1/A11 10-23
removing A2 10-18
removing A22/A24 10-22
removing A41 10-21
removing A5 10-20
replaceable parts 10-5, 10-7, 10-9
assistance (rear of manual)
auto arm 3-27, 4-22
auto trigger 3-27, 4-22
auto-zero 5-15
C
C library example programs 2-17
C-Language Library 2-2, 3-2
cable part numbers 10-10 - 10-12
HP E1433A User's Guide
cable, break out box 8-5
Cal 5-7
cal connector 5-15
calibration 5-15
channel group 3-7
channel ID 3-34, 4-4, 4-10, 4-29
clock 3-23, 4-18
external sample 5-14
COLA 6-2, 6-5
command/response protocol A-11
complex sequences A-13
configuration, hardware 3-7
conformity, declaration of (rear of
manual)
connectors
Cal 5-7
COLA 6-5
ExSamp 5-7
ExTrig 5-7, 7-5
input 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
Shut 6-5
Tach1 7-5
Tach2 7-5
connectors SMB 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
constant output level amplifier 6-2, 6-5
continuous mode 3-30 - 3-31,
4-24 - 4-25
control
measurement 3-23, 4-18
control register A-7
controller protocol examples A-12
count division 7-3
count register A-9
coupling 5-2
covers
part numbers 10-5, 10-7, 10-9
removing 10-14
create group 3-7 - 3-8, 4-11
current RPM value 5-2
D
D32 5-2
data
transfer bus 5-8
transferring 5-9
data buffer 5-2
data flow diagram 3-15
data transfer modes 3-30, 4-24
decimation 5-2
declaration of conformity (rear of
manual)
default logical address 1-4
default values, parameters 4-5
delete group 3-7
demo programs 2-17
SEE ALSO example programs
detect.c (example program) 2-17
device
message-based A-2
register-based A-2
device type register A-5
devices, setting up 2-6
diagnostics 9-2
disassembly 10-14
display button (SFP) 2-9
distribution (DAT tape) 2-4
division
input count 7-3
dll file 3-6
done, wait for A-13
DRAM 3-15, 5-10
driver
VXIplug&play 2-4, 2-6, 3-3, 3-6
DSP bus registers A-14
DSP command register A-15
DSP protocol A-13
DTB arbitration bus 5-8
dynamic configuration protocol A-5
Dynamic RAM 5-10
E
eight-channel input
SEE 8-channel input
error messages 4-2
errornumbers 4-2
exact RPM triggering 7-2
example programs
C library 2-17
SEE ALSO demo programs
HP VEE 2-10
Visual Basic 2-19
example.c (example program) 2-17
exit button (SFP) 2-9
ExSamp 5-7
external access 5-10
external sample clock 5-14
external shutdown 6-2
external trigger 3-27, 4-22,
5-13 - 5-14, 7-2
external trigger input 7-2
ExTrig 5-7, 7-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
F
failed LED 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
features 5-2
FIFO architecture 3-15
files
header 3-6, 4-3
library 3-6, 4-3
find module 3-7
firmware, source 6-5
FP file 3-6
free-running clock line 5-13
frequency response function random
2-16
frequency, external clock 5-14
frf_rand.vee (example program) 2-16
front panel 5-5 - 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
arbitrary source 6-4
part numbers 10-13
removing 10-15
function reference
SEE HP E1433A Function Reference
functions
initialization 3-38
G
general features 5-2
getting started 2-2
global parameters 4-5
glossary (rear of manual)
go button (SFP) 2-9
ground 5-8
group
channels 3-7, 3-9
create 3-7 - 3-8, 4-11
delete 3-7
get info 3-8
input channels 3-8
modules 3-9
source channels 3-8
tach channels 3-8
group ID 4-10 - 4-11
grouping of channels 4-12
grouping of modules 4-12
H
hardware configuration 3-7
header files 3-6, 4-3
help
HP VEE 2-12
SFP 2-5
VXIplug&play 3-38
help (continued)
Windows 3-5
holdoff time 7-3
host interface libraries 2-2, 3-2
installing 2-3 - 2-4, 2-6
host interface library 4-2, 5-10, A-2
HP E1432A Function Reference
on-line 3-38
printing 3-38
HP E1433A Function Reference
SEE HP E1432A Function Reference
HP SICL 2-3
HP VEE
example programs 2-10
help 2-12
HP-UX 10.2 2-3
HP-UX 9.05 2-3
HP-UX C-Language Library 3-2
hpe1432_32.dll 3-6
I
icon 3-6
ICP 5-2, 8-4
IDLE state 3-24 - 3-26, 4-19 - 4-21
incoming inspection 1-2
initialization 3-7
initialization functions 3-38
initiation 3-24, 4-19
input 5-2, 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
external trigger 7-2
ICP 8-4
tachometer 7-2
trigger 3-27, 4-22
voltage 8-4
input button (SFP) 2-8
input count division 7-3
input, 4-channel 4-7, 4-10, 7-2
interface libraries 2-2, 3-2
installing 2-3 - 2-4, 2-6
interrupts
handling 3-32, 4-27
host handling 3-33, 4-28
host setup 4-27
mask 3-32, 4-26
setup 3-32, 4-26
intr.c (example program) 2-17
IRQ config register A-8
IRQ reset register A-9
IRQ status register A-9
HP E1433A User's Guide
L
LEDs 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
level mode 3-29
level, trigger 7-2
libraries 2-2, 3-2
installing 2-3 - 2-4, 2-6
library files 3-6, 4-3
library, host interface 4-2
Local Bus 5-2, 5-9
logic level 1-3
logical address register A-5
logical address setting 1-4
loop, measurement 3-25, 4-20
M
mainframes, more than one 3-9, 3-11 3-12, 3-14, 4-12, 4-14 - 4-15, 4-17
manual (function reference)
SEE HP E1432A Function Reference
manual arm 3-27, 4-22
manual trigger 3-27, 4-22
meas button (SFP) 2-8
MEASURE state 3-25 - 3-26,
4-20 - 4-21
measurement control 3-23, 4-18
measurement control (SFP) 2-8
measurement initiation 3-24, 4-19
measurement loop 3-25, 4-20
measurement process 3-23, 4-18
measurement setup 3-23, 4-18
memory map 5-10
memory, shared 5-10
message-based device A-2
messages, error 4-2
minimum.vee (example program) 2-14
mode
block 3-30 - 3-31, 4-24 - 4-25
continuous 3-30 - 3-31, 4-24 - 4-25
data transfer 3-30, 4-24
overlap block 3-30 - 3-31, 4-24 - 4-25
module features 5-2
module, find 3-7
modules, more than one 3-9, 4-12
monitoring, tachometer 7-2
multiple channels 5-2
multiple mainframes 3-11, 4-14
limitations 3-11, 4-14
phase performance 3-12, 4-15
setup 3-14, 4-17
multiple modules 5-2
multiple-mainframe measurements 3-9,
4-12
multiple-module measurements 3-9,
4-12
N
noise mode 6-2
numbers, error 4-2
O
offset register A-7
order.vee (example program) 2-16
Out (source output) 6-5
output level amplifier, constant 6-2
overlap 5-2
overlap block mode 3-30 - 3-31,
4-24 - 4-25
overload detection 5-2
P
page map register A-8
parameter 1-7 registers A-10
parameters
changes 4-5
channel-specific 3-34, 4-4 - 4-5, 4-29
default values 4-5
global 3-34, 4-4 - 4-5, 4-29
list 4-5
settings 3-24, 4-19
settling 4-5
source 4-8
tachometer 4-9
types 3-34, 4-4, 4-29
part numbers
assemblies 10-5, 10-7, 10-9
cables 10-10 - 10-12
front panel 10-13
phone assistance (rear of manual)
Plug&Play
SEE VXIplug&play
port control register A-7
postscript 3-38
power supplies 5-8
pre-arm 3-27, 4-22
pre-trigger delay 5-2
printing, HP E1432A Function
Reference 3-38
priority interrupt bus 5-8
programs
demo 2-17
example 2-10, 2-17, 2-19
HP E1433A User's Guide
protocol
command/response A-11
controller A-12
DSP A-13
VXI Bus dynamic configuration A-5
ptman 3-38
Q
query response/command register A-9
R
RAM 5-10
RAM locations (registers) A-9
random mode 6-2
random noise 5-2
read response A-12
receive data register A-9
reference
SEE HP E1432A Function Reference
register
32-bit A-10
A16 5-12, A-2
A24 5-11, A-4
control A-7
count A-9
definitions A-2
device type A-5
DSP bus A-14
DSP command A-15
IRQ config A-8
IRQ reset A-9
IRQ status A-9
logical address A-5
offset A-7
page map A-8
parameter 1-7 registers A-10
port control A-7
query response/command A-9
RAM locations A-9
send data A-9
status A-5
VXI Bus A-5
register-based devices 3-26, 4-21, A-2
removing
A1/A11 assembly 10-23
A2 assembly 10-18
A22/A24 assembly 10-22
A41 assembly 10-21
A5 assembly 10-20
replaceable parts
assemblies 10-5, 10-7, 10-9
cables 10-10 - 10-12
replaceable parts (continued)
front panel 10-13
reset
hardware 5-8
software 5-8
Resource Manager 2-6
response, read A-12
RPM 5-2
RPM step arm 3-27, 4-22
RPM triggering 7-2
rpmtrig (demo program) 2-17
rpmtrig2 (demo program) 2-17
S
sample clock
external 5-14
sample rate 3-17, 5-2
source 3-17
scenarios (examples)
C library 2-17
HP VEE 2-10
Visual Basic 2-19
scope.vee (example program) 2-10
semascope (demo program) 2-17
send data register A-9
sequences
complex A-13
service assistance (rear of manual)
setting up devices 2-6
SETTLING state 3-24 - 3-25,
4-19 - 4-20
settling, parameters 4-5
setup, measurement 3-23, 4-18
SFP (Soft Front Panel) 2-7
help 2-5
shared memory 5-2, 5-10
shipping module 1-7
Shut 6-5
shutdown 6-2
SICL 2-3, 4-2
sine mode 6-2
sine output 5-2
SMB Connectors 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
source
SEE arbitrary source
button (SFP) 2-8
features 5-2
parameters 4-8
sample rate 3-17
trigger 3-27, 4-22
source firmware 6-5
HP E1433A User's Guide
Source LED 6-5
source option 6-2
span 3-17
SPlug&Play
VXIplug&play 3-3
SRAM 5-10
src_intr.c (example program) 2-17
starting 2-2
state
ARM 3-25 - 3-26, 4-20 - 4-21
BOOTED 3-25, 4-20
BOOTED 3-24, 4-19
BOOTING 3-24 - 3-25, 4-19 - 4-20
IDLE 3-24 - 3-26, 4-19 - 4-21
MEASURE 3-25 - 3-26, 4-20 - 4-21
SETTLING 3-24 - 3-25, 4-19 - 4-20
TESTED 3-24 - 3-26, 4-19 - 4-21
TRIGGER 3-25 - 3-26, 4-20 - 4-21
static RAM 5-10
status LEDs 5-7, 6-5, 7-5
status register A-5
summer 6-2
sync/trigger line 3-23 - 3-26,
4-18 - 4-21, 5-13
synchronization
multiple-mainframe 3-14, 4-17
TTLTRG 5-13
synchronous sampling 5-2
SYSRESET* 5-8
system requirements 2-3
T
Tach1 7-5
Tach2 7-5
tachmon.c (example program) 2-17
tachometer
block diagram 7-3
edge trigger 3-27, 4-22
features 5-2
parameters 4-9
tachometer input 7-2
tachometer monitoring 7-2
tachometer option 7-2
telephone assistance (rear of manual)
TESTED state 3-24 - 3-26, 4-19 - 4-21
throughput, examples 2-17
transferring data 5-9
transporting module 1-7
trigger 3-15, 3-27, 4-22, 5-2
analog 7-2
arbitrary source 6-2
trigger (continued)
auto 3-27, 4-22
external 3-27, 4-22, 5-13 - 5-14, 7-2
input 3-27, 4-22
LED 5-7
lines 5-13
manual 3-27, 4-22
source 3-27, 4-22
tachometer edge 3-27, 4-22
TTL 5-13, 7-2
Trigger LED 7-5
trigger level 3-29, 7-2
TRIGGER state 3-25 - 3-26, 4-20 - 4-21
triggering
exact RPM 7-2
troubleshooting 9-2
TTLTRG lines 5-13
U
up/down RPM 5-2
update source firmware 6-5
using
HP E1433A 3-2
utility bus 5-8
V
veetest 2-10
Vibrato
SEE 4-channel input
view detail button (HP VEE) 2-11
view panel button (HP VEE) 2-11
VISA 2-3
Visual Basic example programs 2-19
VME Bus 5-2, 5-9
VXI
backplane connections 5-8
button (SFP) 2-9
Local Bus 5-2
VXI Bus 3-9, 4-12, 5-10, 5-14
dynamic configuration protocol A-5
registers A-5
VXIplug&play
driver 2-4, 2-6, 3-3, 3-6
help 3-38
library 3-2
overview 3-3
VXIplug&play library 2-2 - 2-3
W
wait for done A-13
Windows Help 3-5
write command A-12
Need Assistance?
If you need assistance, contact your nearest Hewlett-Packard Service Office
listed in the HP Catalog, or contact your nearest regional office listed at the back
of this book. If you are contacting Hewlett-Packard about a problem with your
HP E1433A 8-Channel 196 kSa/sec Digitizer plus DSP Module, please provide
the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Model number: HP E1433A
Software version:
Serial number:
Options:
Date the problem was first encountered:
Circumstances in which the problem was encountered:
Can you reproduce the problem?
What effect does this problem have on you?
Declaration of Conformity
According to ISO/IEC Guide 22 and EN 45014
Manufacturer’s name:
Manufacturer’s address:
Hewlett-Packard Company
Lake Stevens Instrument Division
8600 Soper Hill Road
Everett, Washington 98205-1298
declares, that the product
Product Name:
8 Channel 196 kSa/s Digitizer plus DSP Module
Model Number:
HP E1433A
conforms to the following specifications:
Safety:
EMC:
IEC 1010-1:1990+A1/EN61010:1993
CISPR 11: 1990/EN55011 (1991), Group1, Class A
IEC 801-2: 1991/EN50082-1 (1992): 4 kV CD, 8 kV AD
IEC 801-3: 1984/EN50082-1 (1992): 3 V/m (1)
IEC 801-4: 1988/EN50082-1 (1992): 1 kV
Supplementary Information:
The product herewith complies with the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive
73/23/EEC and the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC.
(1) In a 3 V/m field, some degradation of product performance occurs.
Everett, Washington - Sept. 19, 1996
Cathy Thran, Quality Manager
About this edition
April 1999: Forth Edition. This edition was published to accommodate code
upgrades and the dropping of support for HP-UX 9.X.
July 1998: Third Edition. In this edition a section was added to describe new
features.
July 1997: Second Edition. In this edition a section was added to describe new
features.
September 1996: First Edition.
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