HP 10BASE-T Installation manual

HP 10BASE-T Installation manual
H
HP AdvanceStack Router
210 Module
Installation Guide
Installation Guide
HP AdvanceStack
Router 210 Module
© Copyright Hewlett-Packard
Company 1994.
All rights reserved.
This document contains proprietary
information, which is protected by
copyright. No part of this document
may be photocopied, reproduced, or
translated into another language
without the prior written consent of
Hewlett-Packard.
Publication Number: 5963-2632, E1294
Edition 1, December 1994
Printed in U.S.A.
Applicable Product
HP J2628A
Disclaimer
The information contained in this
document is subject to change without
notice.
HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY
MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS
MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Regulatory Information
The product described in this
document complies with specific international regulations. See the document section entitled “Regulatory
Statements” for the applicable
regulatory information.
Informations concernant la réglementation
Le produit décrit dans le présent
document satisfait à des normes internationales spécifiques. Pour plus de
détails sur les réglementations applicables, reportez-vous à la section «Regulatory Statements».
Informationen über Kontrollvorschriften
Das in diesem Dokument beschriebene
Produkt erfüllt bestimmte internationale Kontrollvorschriften. Für Informationen über die zutreffenden
Kontrollvorschriften lesen Sie bitte das
Kapitel mit der Überschrift “Regulatory
Statements”.
Informazioni sulla regolamentazione
Il prodotto descritto in questo documento è conforme alle specifiche
normative internazionali. Vedere la sezione del documento intitolata “Regulatory Statements” per le informazioni
sulle normative competenti.
Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for
errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connec- Informacin reglamentaria
tion with the furnishing, performance,
El producto que se describe en este
or use of this material.
documento cumple con determinados
reglamentos internacionales.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsi- En cuanto a la información reglamenbility for the use or reliability of its
taria correspondiente, ver la sección
software on equipment that is not
del documento titulada “Regulatory
furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
Statements”.
About This Manual
This manual is both a task-oriented installation guide and a reference
describing the hardware aspects of router features, operation, and
troubleshooting.
The manual is organized as follows:
Chapter 1: Installation. Describes how to prepare the network, install
the router module, connect the WAN cable, connect a console, and
verify that the router module starts up properly.
Chapter 2: Setup. Describes how to create or modify a router configuration, set the time and date, specify manager and user passwords, and
verify the network links.
Chapter 3: Operation. Describes the status LEDs, buttons, resetting
and clearing, and initialization.
Chapter 4: Troubleshooting. Provides basic tips and information
about interpreting LED error patterns, verifying LED operation, various
diagnostic tests, and replacing the battery.
Appendixes: Provide cable and connector descriptions; specifications;
information about SmartBoot; warranty and regulatory information; and
a subject index.
iii
HP AdvanceStack Router 210 Module:
An Overview
The HP AdvanceStack J2628A Router 210 Module is an auxiliary module
for the HP AdvanceStack J2603B Ethernet SNMP Module, which is an
optional component of an HP AdvanceStack 10Base-T Hub. The
HP AdvanceStack 10Base-T hubs into which the router module can be
installed (together with the SNMP module) include:
HP AdvanceStack J2600A 10Base-T Hub-12
HP AdvanceStack J2601A 10Base-T Hub-24
HP AdvanceStack J2602A 10Base-T Hub-48
SNMP module
connector
(internal LAN port)
Battery (maintains the configuration in RAM when the hub is
powered off)
Status LEDs
WAN port
connector
iv
Clear
button
Reset
button
The router module includes two ports:
An external synchronous WAN port supporting RS-232/V.24/V.28,
V.35, X.21, or RS-422/RS-449/V.36 interfaces at speeds of 9.6 Kbit/s to
2.048 Mbit/s. These allow HP Point-to-Point, PPP, V.25 bis
(dial-up/ISDN), SMDS, frame relay, and LAPB (X.25) connections to
other routers, over point-to-point or switched circuits.
An internal Ethernet/802.3 LAN port, through which the router
module communicates with the hub.
The router provides both bridging and routing capabilities and supports
the following routing services:
Internet Protocol (TCP/IP protocol suite)
DECnet Phase IV
Xerox XNS
Novell IPX
AppleTalk Phase 2
Transparent Bridging with Spanning Tree
The router module can be configured and managed in various ways:
Through the hub’s RS-232 Distributed Management port, connected
(locally, or through a modem) to a PC running the HP Stack Manager
software supplied with the router module.
Through any standard SNMP network management software, such
as HP OpenView Interconnect Manager in HP-UX.
Through Telnet access over the network.
Additional features include:
“SmartBoot”, which allows another HP router or a Bootp server on
the network to automatically configure the router module when it is
first booted after installation. This eliminates the need for expert
personnel at the site where the router module is installed.
HP EASE (Embedded Advanced Sampling Environment).
The ability for enhancements to the router module’s operating
system to be downloaded to the router module through the hub’s
RS-232 Distributed Management port.
v
vi
Contents
Contents
Installation
Installation Summary
Contents
1.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Items Included With the Router Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Looking at the SNMP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Using HP Stack Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
2. Prepare the Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
3. Install the Router Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
4. Connect the WAN Cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
5. Connect a Console (Optional). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
6. Verify That the Router Starts Up Properly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20
2.
Setup
Setup Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Using the Main Menu and NCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Using Quick Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Using the Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
2. Set the Date and Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
3. Specify Manager and User Passwords (Optional). . . . . . . . . . 2-9
4. Verify the Network Links. . . . . . . . . . .
Examine the Event Log. . . . . . . . . . .
Examine the Statistics Screens. . . . . . .
Examine the Bridging and Routing Tables.
Test Node Accessibility. . . . . . . . . . .
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2-10
2-11
2-13
2-16
2-18
vii
Contents
3.
Operation
LEDs and Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Reset and Clear Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Resetting and Clearing . . . . .
Resetting the Router Module
Clearing the Passwords . . .
Clearing the Router Module
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3-5
3-5
3-6
3-7
Initialization Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
4.
Troubleshooting
Basic Troubleshooting Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Interpreting LED Error Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Verifying LED Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Troubleshooting a Failure During Power-On or Reset Self-Test . . . 4-7
Router Self-Test LED On, Fault LED On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Router Self-Test LED On, Fault LED Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the Router Module . . . . . . .
Testing the Router Module’s WAN Port
Checking the Configuration . . . . . .
Testing a Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4-9
4-9
4-10
4-10
4-11
Replacing the Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
A. Cables and Connectors
HP Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V.35 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . .
RS-232/V.24/V.28 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs . .
X.21 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs . . . . . . . .
RS-449/RS-422/V.36 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs
Back-to-Back Test Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loopback Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.
viii
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A-4
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-8
A-10
Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electromagnetic Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Communications Specifications and Certifications
Third-Party Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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B-2
B-2
B-2
B-3
B-3
Specifications
Contents
C. SmartBoot
Regulatory Statements
Index
Contents
ix
1
Installation Summary
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module.
2. Prepare the Network.
3. Install the Router Module.
4. Connect the WAN Cable.
5. Connect a Console (Optional).
6. Verify That the Router Module Starts Up Properly.
Installation
Installation
Installation Summary
Installation Summary
This chapter describes the installation procedures for the router
module. The following is a summary of those procedures:
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module. The HP AdvanceStack
10Base-T Hub in which the HP Router 210 Module is to be installed
must also have an HP J2603B Ethernet SNMP Module installed. (The
router module will be mounted on the SNMP module.) This SNMP
module must be the HP J2603B version, not the HP J2603A version. If
an SNMP module is already installed but you are not sure which
version it is, you can determine the version using the procedure
beginning on page 1-5.
2. Prepare the Network. Create or update the network plan and the
network map (for details, refer to page 1-8). Verify that the network
equipment and links (in particular, the WAN-link-terminating
equipment) are operational. (Your WAN-link service provider can
verify that the WAN link is operating correctly.) If the LAN links are
not already connected to the hub, connect them now (refer to the
hub’s installation guide).
3. Install the Router Module.
a. Disconnect the hub from the power source, then remove the
cover plate from the hub’s Expansion Slot.
b. Connect a grounding wrist strap between your wrist and the hub.
c. Remove the module from its packaging, and place it on a nonconducting antistatic surface.
d. Remove the insulating paper between the battery and the battery
clip.
e. Remove the SNMP module from the Expansion Slot (if already
installed).
1-2
Installation
Installation Summary
f. Place the SNMP module, component-side down, on top of the
router module, with the male connector on the SNMP module
(behind the white extractor handle) mating with the female
connector on the router module.
g. Press the two connectors together, then insert and tighten the
supplied screws through the holes in the SNMP module into the
standoffs mounted on the router module.
h. Install the assembled router and SNMP modules, with the SNMP
module below, into the hub’s Expansion Slot
1
i. Install the new cover plate provided with the router module over
the Expansion Slot.
Installation
j. Install the two hex nut screws supplied with the router module
into the holes alongside the WAN port connector, then tighten
them using the supplied nutdriver.
For details about this procedure (including illustrations), refer to
page 1-10.
4. Connect the WAN Cable. For details, refer to page 1-16.
5. Connect a Console. If the router is to be configured, verified,
and/or managed from a PC running HP Stack Manager, connect the
serial port of the PC to the hub’s RS-232 Distributed Management
port, and install the software on the PC. For details, refer to page
1-18.
6. Verify the Router Module Starts Up Properly.
a. Connect the hub to the power source.
b. Check that the Router Self-test LED on the router’s cover plate
turns on (for about 30–60 seconds) and then off.
c. In HP Stack Manager, click on the Connect button.
d. Highlight the hub in the Device Chain List, then press and hold
down the Shift key while you click on the Access button.
e. Check that the Copyright and Main Menu screens appear.
For details about this procedure, refer to page 1-20.
1-3
Installation
Items Included With the Router Module
Items Included With the Router Module
The following items are included with the router module:
WAN Cable: The WAN cable you received with the router module
depends on the option specified when the router module was ordered:
Option
Cable
001
V.35 (28606-63008)
002
RS-232/V.24/V.28 (28606-63006)
003
X.21 (28606-63001)
004
RS-449/RS-422/V.36 (28606-63005)
For details about these cables, refer to appendix A, ‘‘Cables and Connectors’’.
Other Hardware:
1 Cover plate
4 1⁄4-inch number 4-40 screws
2 Hex nut screws
1 Nutdriver
1 Grounding wrist strap
To install the router module, you will also need the following screwdrivers (which are not supplied with the router module):
A Torx T-10 or flat-blade screwdriver
A Phillips (cross-head) screwdriver
Software:
HP Stack Manager Software Kit
Documentation:
The manuals shipped with the router module are
listed in the documentation map or release notes shipped with the
router module or with the latest software update.
1-4
Installation
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module.
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module.
The HP AdvanceStack 10Base-T Hub in which the HP AdvanceStack
Router 210 Module is to be installed must also have an HP J2603B Ethernet SNMP Module installed. (The router module will be mounted on
the SNMP module.) This SNMP module must be the HP J2603B version,
not the HP J2603A version.
1
If an SNMP module is already installed and you are not sure which version it is, you can determine it in either of two ways:
By removing the cover plate from the hub’s Expansion Slot and looking at the module (refer to the procedure below).
Installation
By using HP Stack Manager to display the version of the module
(refer to the procedure on page 1-7).
Looking at the SNMP Module
1. Using a Torx T-10 or flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captured
screws holding the cover plate over the hub’s Expansion Slot, then
remove the cover plate. Note that the screws are spring-loaded and
will release outward when unscrewed far enough. Do not unscrew
them completely from the cover plate.
Loosen these two screws
Figure 1-1. Cover Plate Screws
1-5
Installation
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module.
2. Look at the exposed edge of the SNMP module.
•
If an LED is mounted near the button switch, the installed SNMP
module is the HP J2603B version; you can proceed with installing
the router module.
•
If there is no LED there, the module is the HP J2603A version;
contact your HP dealer for information about obtaining the
HP J2603B version.
Button switch
If this LED is present,
the SNMP module is
the proper version
Figure 1-2. Checking SNMP Module
3. If you will not be installing the router module now, reinstall the cover
plate:
a. Insert the tabs on the bottom of the cover plate in the small slots
in the bottom of the Expansion Slot.
b. Close the cover plate, then tighten the two captured screws using
a Torx T-10 or flat-blade screwdriver. Be careful not to
overtighten them.
1-6
Installation
1. Check the Version of the SNMP Module.
Using HP Stack Manager
1. Connect the serial port of a PC to the hub’s RS-232 Distributed
Management port. (For details, refer to the hub’s installation guide.)
2. Start HP Stack Manager. (For information about installing and starting HP Stack Manager, refer to the hub’s installation guide. For specific information about using HP Stack Manager, refer to its online
help.)
3. Click on the Connect button.
1
Installation
After a few seconds, a list of the connected hubs appears in the
Device Chain List window. You can identify a particular hub by its
entry in the Station Address column. For hubs in which an SNMP
module has been installed, “SNMP” appears in the Exp Slot column.
4. In the Device Chain List, either double-click on the hub into which
the router module is to be installed, or select the hub and click on
the Access button.
HP Stack Manager displays a graphical representation of the front of
the hub (the “Hub Panel Graphic”).
5. Click on the Identify icon button.
HP Stack Manager displays information about the hub and the
installed SNMP module, which is referred to in the list as “SNMP
Agent”.
6. Check the value for “SNMP Agent H/W Version”. If it begins with “B”
(for example: B.01.00), the installed SNMP module is the
HP J2603B version; you can proceed with installing the router module. If the value begins with “A”, the module is the HP J2603A version; contact your HP dealer for information about obtaining the
HP J2603B version.
1-7
Installation
2. Prepare the Network.
2. Prepare the Network.
1. Create or update the network plan. Include all power sources,
computers, data links, hubs, repeaters, bridges, other routers, and
cabling (including types and lengths). Verify the design limits for the
cable lengths and the number of repeaters and nodes in the network.
2. Create or update the network map. This map provides a diagram of
how the network topology will look after the router module is
installed. Generally, this diagram includes:
•
•
•
The physical location of each network device and end node
The connections between each device and end node
The network-layer addresses for identifying network devices and
links
For each LAN link, include the following on the map:
•
•
•
LAN type (Ethernet/802.3, Token Ring/802.5, or FDDI)
LAN speed (4, 10, 16, or 100 Mbit/s)
Physical medium (cable type)
For each WAN link, include the following on the map:
•
•
•
•
•
•
WAN-link type (circuit type) and WAN-link speed
Interface type (X.21, V.35, etc.)
HDLC address (DCE/DTE) for HP Point- to-Point links
X.121 address and connection ID (for X.25 links)
Quality of service (LLC1, LLC2, X.25)
Other pertinent data, such as:
–
–
–
ISDN, switched 56, or other dial type numbers
Frame relay DLCI encoding type and length, and management
type (ANSI Annex D, Annex D switch, LMI, or LMI switch)
SMDS individual address
If you use multiple protocols (routing or bridging services) in the
network, you may want to make a separate map for each protocol.
3. Verify that the network equipment and links (in particular, the WANlink-terminating equipment) are operational. (Your WAN-link service
provider can verify that the WAN link is operating correctly.) If the
LAN links are not already connected to the hub, connect them now
(refer to the hub’s installation guide).
1-8
Installation
2. Prepare the Network.
4. If the router is to be automatically configured after it is installed
using a SmartBoot configuration created on another HP router or a
Bootp server, make sure that the following has been done before you
first boot the router (by powering on the hub):
•
The SmartBoot configuration has been created and assigned to
the proper network port connected to the router module.
•
The supporting WAN and/or LAN links have been connected
between the router module and the central HP router or Bootp
server.
1
For more information about automatic SmartBoot configuration,
refer to appendix C, “SmartBoot”, and to the User’s Guide, HP Routing Services and Applications, and the Release Notes.
Installation
1-9
Installation
3. Install the Router Module.
3. Install the Router Module.
The router module will be connected to the HP J2603B Ethernet SNMP
Module, and then the assembled modules will be installed in the
Expansion Slot in the back of the hub.
Note
The HP Ethernet SNMP Module must be the HP J2603B version, not the
HP J2603A version. If an Ethernet SNMP module is already installed but
you are not sure which version it is, use either of the procedures under
“Check the Version of the SNMP Module”, page 1-5, to determine it.
WARNING
Before installing the router module, unplug the HP AdvanceStack
hub from the power source. Electrical shock could result if you
attempt to install the router module without unplugging the hub.
Caution
Static electricity can severely damage sensitive electronic components
such as the router module or the SNMP module. While removing the
router module from its packaging and installing it in the hub, follow
these procedures to avoid damage from static electricity:
Equalize any static charge difference between your body and the hub
by using the grounding wrist strap supplied with the router module.
Handle the module by its edges, and avoid touching the components
or the circuitry on the board.
After removing the router module from its packaging and before
connecting it to the SNMP module, make sure it does not sit on a
metal surface. (After the insulating paper between the battery and
the battery clip is removed, placing the router module on a metal
surface can short out the battery and/or damage sensitive
components.)
1-10
Installation
3. Install the Router Module.
To install the router module:
1. Using a Torx T-10 or flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captured
screws holding the cover plate over the hub’s Expansion Slot, then
remove the cover plate. Note that the screws are spring-loaded and
will release outward when unscrewed far enough. Do not unscrew
them completely from the cover plate.
Loosen these two screws
1
Installation
Figure 1-3. Cover Plate Screws
2. Wrap one end of a grounding wrist strap (one is supplied with the
router module) around your wrist. Connect the other end as follows:
•
If using the grounding wrist strap supplied with the hub, connect
the other end to the unpainted surface at the left of the hub’s
Expansion Slot.
•
If using a grounding wrist strap that has an alligator clip at the
other end, connect the clip to the left screw on the back of the
hub.
Connect grounding
wrist strap here ...
... or here
Figure 1-4. Connecting Grounding Wrist Strap
1-11
Installation
3. Install the Router Module.
3. Holding the module by its edges—taking care not to touch the metal
connectors—carefully remove the router module from its protective
packaging. Place the module on a nonconducting antistatic surface.
Note
Save the original packaging material in case the router module needs to
be returned to HP. The nonconducting antistatic material surrounding
the router module ensures that the battery on the router module will not
short out while being shipped.
4. Remove the insulating paper between the battery and the battery clip.
5. If the SNMP module is already installed in the hub, you must remove
it so that you can install the router module on it. Disengage the
SNMP module by pulling the insides of its extractor handles back
and outward as far as they will go, then grasp the handles and pull
the SNMP module back until it slides out of the Expansion Slot.
Figure 1-5. Disengaging SNMP Module
1-12
Installation
3. Install the Router Module.
6. Position the SNMP module, component-side down, above the router
module as shown below.
Before mating the modules, make sure that the four standoffs
mounted on the router module are aligned with the inner of the two
holes in each corner of the SNMP module. This is the hole closest to
the center of the module, not the hole closest to the corner.
1
Installation
Figure 1-6. Positioning SNMP Module Over Router Module
7. Lower the router module onto the SNMP module, then carefully
press down on the circuit side of the SNMP module, alongside the
connector mounting pins, until the SNMP module is flush with the
tops of the standoffs.
Press here
Figure 1-7. Engaging Module Connectors
1-13
Installation
3. Install the Router Module.
8. Insert the supplied 1⁄4-inch number 4-40 screws through the holes in
the SNMP module into the standoffs, then secure them using a
Phillips (cross-head) screwdriver. Do not overtighten the screws.
Figure 1-8. Inserting Screws in Router Module
Caution
In the next step, be careful not to damage the router module by scraping
it against the edges of the Expansion Slot.
9. Position the assembled router and SNMP modules in back of the
hub’s Expansion Slot as shown below.
Router module above
SNMP module below
Extractor handles
facing outward
1-14
Figure 1-9. Installing Modules in Expansion Slot
Installation
3. Install the Router Module.
10. Align the edges of the SNMP module in the small slots near the
bottom of the Expansion Slot, then push the assembled modules
fully into the slot—until you feel the connector on the SNMP module
firmly engage its mating connector within the Expansion Slot.
Caution
For proper hub cooling, make sure you install the cover plate (as
described in the next two steps) after the modules are installed.
11. Install the new cover plate provided with the router module over the
Expansion Slot:
1
Installation
a. Insert the tabs on the bottom of the cover plate in the small slots
in the bottom of the Expansion Slot.
b. Close the cover plate, then tighten the two captured screws using
a Torx T-10 or flat-blade screwdriver. Be careful not to overtighten them.
Tighten two screws
Install two hex nut screws
Figure 1-10. Securing Router Cover Plate
12. Install the two hex nut screws supplied with the router module into
the holes alongside the WAN port connector, then tighten them using
the supplied nutdriver. Be careful not to overtighten them.
1-15
Installation
4. Connect the WAN Cable.
4. Connect the WAN Cable.
Connect the WAN cable as described below.
Also, if you have not already done so, verify that the network equipment
and links (in particular, the WAN-link-terminating equipment) are operational. (Your WAN-link service provider can verify that the WAN link is
operating correctly.) If the LAN links are not already connected to the
hub, connect them now (refer to the hub’s installation guide).
Caution
Static discharge may damage equipment. Do not touch the connector
pins on the router module or on the cable.
1. Attach the cable’s 62-pin connector to the WAN port. Hand-tighten
the connector’s screws into the hex nuts you installed alongside the
WAN port connector.
WAN port
WAN-link-terminating
equipment (for example,
a DSU/CSU)
Circuit from WAN
service provider
DSU/CSU stub cable
V.35 cable
Figure 1-11. Example of Connecting V.35 WAN Cable
2. Attach the other end of the cable to the WAN-link-terminating
equipment (such as a DSU/CSU).
1-16
Installation
4. Connect the WAN Cable.
The interface used for the WAN port—RS-232/V.24/V.28, V.35, X.21, or
RS-422/RS-449/V.36—is determined automatically by the router,
depending on which cable is attached to the port.
The maximum length for an RS-232/V.24/V.28 cable connected to the
WAN port is 15 meters (50 feet).
1
If an HP 28606-63006 5-meter RS-232/V.24/V.28 cable is connected to the
WAN port (and no additional cable, such as a stub cable, is connected
between the WAN port and the modem or DSU/CSU), the maximum
speed supported on the WAN is 64 Kbit/s. If any other RS-232/V.24/V.28
cable of any length is connected between the WAN port and the modem
or DSU/CSU, the maximum speed supported on the WAN is 19.2 Kbit/s.
Installation
1-17
Installation
5. Connect a Console (Optional).
5. Connect a Console (Optional).
The router module can be verified to be operating correctly, configured,
and managed in various ways:
From a console (a PC running HP Stack Manager) connected
(locally, or through a modem) to the hub’s RS-232 Distributed
Management port. (The console can also be connected to the RS-232
port of another hub in the Distributed Management chain, if that hub
has an SNMP module installed in it.)
From another device on the network using Telnet.
From any standard SNMP network management software (such as
HP OpenView Interconnect Manager in HP-UX) running on the
network.
The router module can also be configured automatically using a SmartBoot configuration created on another HP router or a Bootp server. (For
more information about SmartBoot, refer to appendix C, “SmartBoot”,
and to HP Routing Services and Applications, the User’s Guide, and the
Release Notes.)
If the router module is to be configured with a SmartBoot configuration
(including an IP address) on an HP Point-to-Point link and the router
module is to be verified and managed from another location on the
network using Telnet or network management software, you will not
need to connect a console. Otherwise, to connect a console:
1. Connect the serial port of a PC to the hub’s RS-232 Distributed
Management port. (For details, refer to the hub’s installation guide.)
2. Start HP Stack Manager. (For information about installing and
starting HP Stack Manager, refer to the hub’s installation guide. For
specific information about using HP Stack Manager, refer to its
online help.)
1-18
Installation
5. Connect a Console (Optional).
Note
You can use the HP Stack Manager software supplied with the hub,
provided that the version of that software is A.02.50 or later. The version
of the software is indicated on the HP Stack Manager installation disk.
To determine the version of HP Stack Manager software that has already
been installed, click on the About Stack Manager command in the Help
menu.
1
If the version of the installed software is earlier than A.02.50, install the
HP Stack Manager software supplied with the router module, specifying
the drive and directory where the earlier version was installed; the
installation procedure will prompt you to overwrite the earlier version.
Installation
1-19
Installation
6. Verify That the Router Starts Up Properly.
6. Verify That the Router Starts Up Properly.
In this procedure, you will verify that the router module starts up properly by powering up the hub (which boots the router) and checking that:
The router module completes its self-test successfully.
The Copyright and Main Menu screens appear on the console.
Note
1-20
If you have not connected a console, you will not be able to verify the
second phase of the router-module startup. (Connecting a console is
necessary except as described on page 1-18.) Instead, an operator at
another device on the network will need to access the router module’s
console interface using Telnet and verify that the Copyright and Main
Menu screens appear.
Installation
6. Verify That the Router Starts Up Properly.
To verify the router-module startup:
1. Plug a power cord into the hub’s power socket and into an ac power
source.
A self-test is run of the hub, the SNMP module, and the router
module.
2. Check that the Self-test LED on the router module’s cover plate turns
on during the self-test.
1
In addition to the Router Self-test LED, the Fault LED on the front of
the hub turns on, and the Exp Slot LED on the front of the hub
(labeled “AdvSlot” on some HP AdvanceStack hubs) flashes slowly.
Installation
The self-test may last for up to 30 seconds. If the hub has not
previously been powered on with this SNMP module installed, the
self-test is run twice.
Self-test LED
Figure 1-12. Self-Test LED
3. Check that the Self-test LED turns off within 30 seconds (if the hub
had previously been powered on with the SNMP module installed) or
60 seconds (if the hub had not previously been powered on with the
SNMP module installed).
If the router and SNMP modules have been installed and started up
properly, at the end of the self-test the Router Self-test LED should
turn off; also, the hub’s Fault LED should turn off and the hub’s
Exp Slot (or AdvSlot) LED should stop flashing.
If the Router Self-test LED does not turn on to indicate that the selftest has begun, or if it does not turn off within 30 (or 60) seconds,
refer to chapter 4, “Troubleshooting”.
1-21
Installation
6. Verify That the Router Starts Up Properly.
Note
If there is no network attached to the WAN port, it is normal for the
WAN Net Fail LED to turn on after the self-test of the router module is
complete.
Note
After the self-test is complete, the router module looks for a SmartBoot
configuration on the WAN or LAN by sending Bootp requests out the
WAN port and the internal LAN port.
If a SmartBoot configuration has been set up on the WAN or LAN for the
router module, that configuration is retrieved (provided that the
required WAN or LAN link is connected). The router module is then
rebooted with the SmartBoot configuration (this should occur within a
few seconds after the Self-test LED turns off).
If this SmartBoot configuration was created on a Bootp server that specifies a full configuration file, the router module will reboot one more time
after the configuration file is transferred to the router module. This
reboot will occur within a few seconds after the end of the first reboot if
the Bootp server is on a LAN, or within up to 20 seconds if it is on a
WAN.
(For more information about SmartBoot, refer to appendix C, “SmartBoot”, and to HP Routing Services and Applications, the User’s Guide,
and the Release Notes.)
Note
If you have not connected a console, skip the remaining steps. (An operator at another device on the network will need to complete the verification of the router startup using Telnet .)
4. In HP Stack Manager, click on the Connect button.
After a few seconds, a list of the connected hubs appears in the
Device Chain List window. You can identify a particular hub by its
entry in the Station Address column. For hubs in which a router
module has been installed, “SNMP/Router” appears in the Exp Slot
column.
1-22
Installation
6. Verify That the Router Starts Up Properly.
5. Do either of the following:
Note
•
Press and hold down the Shift key while you double-click on the
hub in the Device Chain List.
•
Highlight the hub in the Device Chain List, then press and hold
down the Shift key while you click on the Access button.
If you don’t hold down the Shift key in the preceding step, HP Stack
Manager displays a graphical representation of the hub. To connect to
the router, click on the Router icon button.
1
Figure 1-13. Copyright Screen
Installation
6. After a few seconds, HP Stack Manager displays a window showing
the Copyright screen (momentarily) followed by the Main Menu
screen.
Figure 1-14. Main Menu Screen
If the Copyright and Main Menu screens appear, the router has been
installed properly and has started up properly; proceed with the setup
procedures in chapter 2. If they do not appear, refer to chapter 4,
“Troubleshooting”.
1-23
2
Setup Summary
Using the Main Menu and NCL
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration.
2. Set the Time and Date.
3. Specify Manager and User Passwords (Optional).
4. Verify the Network Links.
Setup
Installation
Setup Summary
Setup Summary
Note
If you have not connected a console, you will not be able to do the setup
procedures described in this chapter. (Connecting a console is necessary except as described on page 1-18.) Instead, an operator at another
device on the network will need to do them by accessing the router
module’s console interface using Telnet.
This chapter describes the setup procedures for the router module. The
following is a summary of those procedures:
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration. Enter values for the
parameters that control the router module’s networking operation,
using the Quick Configuration and/or Configuration Editor utilities
(which you can select at the Main Menu). For details, refer to the
section beginning on page 2-5.
2. Set the Time and Date. For details, refer to the section beginning
on page 2-8.
3. Specify Manager and User Passwords (Optional). For details,
refer to the section beginning on page 2-9.
4. Verify the Network Links. Verify that the network links are
operational and that all networks can be reached from the router
module by examining the event log, the statistics screens, and the
bridging and routing tables; and by using the NCL Ping command.
For details, refer to the section beginning on page 2-10.
2-2
Installation
Using the Main Menu and NCL
Using the Main Menu and NCL
To do the procedures described in this chapter, you will use the Main
Menu screen and one or more of its menu options—in particular, the
Network Control Language Interpreter (NCL).
The Main Menu screen appears on the console after you connect to the
router module using HP Stack Manager (using the procedure on pages
1-22 – 1-23).
2
System name
Setup
NCL
Configuration Editor
Quick Configuration Utility
Pointer
Figure 2-1. Main Menu
You can select an option from the Main Menu by either:
Typing the number preceding it.
Moving the pointer to the option, then pressing [Enter].
2-3
Installation
Using the Main Menu and NCL
Several of the procedures in this chapter require using NCL (Network
Control Language Interpreter) commands.
To use NCL commands:
1. At the Main Menu screen, press [2 ].
The NCL prompt appears. This prompt matches the current system
name. For example, if the system name is DEFAULT_CONFIG, the
NCL prompt appears as shown below:
NCL prompt
Figure 2-2. Default NCL Prompt
2. Type the NCL command, then press [Enter].
3. To exit from NCL and return to the Main Menu screen, enter the NCL
Exit command:
exit [Enter]
For more information about using NCL, refer to the User’s Guide.
2-4
Installation
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration.
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration.
Configuring the router assigns values to the parameters that control its
networking operation. These parameter values are referred to collectively as the “configuration”.
2
The router module is shipped from the factory with default configuration values. This default state allows the router module to function as a
remote bridge; that is, it bridges between the internal LAN port and the
WAN port (in IP host-only mode with an IP address of 127.x.x.x). To
have the router module begin routing, you will need to change some
configuration parameters (and then you will need to reboot the router
module to put the new configuration into effect).
Setup
To make these additional changes in the configuration, Hewlett-Packard
recommends that you use the Quick Configuration utility (available at
the Main Menu screen). Quick Configuration provides access to the
most commonly used router parameters. In some cases, using Quick
Configuration may be all that you need to do for minimal routing operation. If necessary, you can then use the Configuration Editor (also
available at the Main Menu screen) to enter any other values that may be
needed or desirable.
You can also use network management software to create or modify a
router configuration. (For information about network management
software available from Hewlett-Packard, contact your HP dealer.)
Notes
When you create or change a configuration, the new values are not put
into effect until you reboot the router module. This reinitializes the
router module with the new configuration parameters. After creating or
modifying a configuration using Quick Configuration, Configuration
Editor, or network management software, you must reboot the router
module to activate the new configuration.
If you have made and saved changes to the factory-default configuration,
and subsequently you want to return to the factory-default configuration, clear the router module using procedure on page 3-8. (If a SmartBoot configuration has been set up on the WAN or LAN for the router
module, use the procedure on page C-3: This ensures that clearing the
router module will restore the factory-default configuration, rather than
retrieving a SmartBoot configuration from the network.)
2-5
Installation
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration.
Using Quick Configuration
The Quick Configuration utility lets you create a ‘‘getting started’’
configuration using a single screen that provides access to the most
commonly used router parameters. Some examples of Quick
Configuration uses are:
Setting a ‘‘getting started’’ configuration, either for the first time or
after using the reset/clear buttons to set the router module to its
factory-default state. (Refer to ‘‘Clearing the Router Module’’ on
page 3-7.)
Easily checking and/or resetting IP addresses and other ‘‘getting
started’’ parameters in existing configurations.
Use Quick Configuration first, to create your initial configuration. Then,
if testing shows that you need to configure more parameters, or if your
network design calls for such areas as spanning tree, static routes, or
filtering, use the full Configuration Editor.
To use Quick Configuration, press [6] at the Main Menu screen. For
details about using Quick Configuration, refer to the User’s Guide.
Note
When you exit Quick Configuration after changing parameter values,
you will be prompted:
Reboot now (y/n)?
To reboot the router module, type y and press [Enter].
Rebooting the router module disconnects it from the console. To
reconnect, refer to step 5 on page 1-23.
The new configuration parameter values are not put into effect until the
router is rebooted. If you do not boot while exiting from Quick Configuration, you can activate the new configuration by booting using the NCL
Boot command.
2-6
Installation
1. Create or Modify a Router Configuration.
Using the Configuration Editor
The Configuration Editor provides access to a hierarchy of menus and
screens that include any parameters you need for customizing the router
beyond the ‘‘getting started’’ level. Using this editor, you can customize
all parameters needed to integrate the router into your system (including the subset of parameters you can access through Quick Configuration).
When you create or change a configuration, the new values are not put
into effect until you reboot the router module. This reinitializes the
router module with the new configuration parameters. After creating or
modifying a configuration using Configuration Editor, you must reboot
the router module to activate the new configuration. To reboot the
router, use the NCL Boot command.
Setup
Note
2
To use the Configuration Editor, press [3] at the Main Menu screen. For
details about using the Configuration Editor, refer to the User’s Guide.
For details about the parameters you can access using the Configuration
Editor, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
Rebooting the router module disconnects it from the console. To
reconnect, refer to step 5 on page 1-23.
2-7
Installation
2. Set the Date and Time.
2. Set the Date and Time.
The current date and time appear at the top of the router module’s
console interface screens. The date and time is recorded with entries in
the event log (see page 2-11) and the crash history (which is displayed
by the NCL Crash command).
When the router module is first powered on after being installed in the
hub, it starts with a default date and time. The date and time are maintained in the router module’s battery-backed RAM. To set the current
date and time, use the NCL Time command as described below.
The date and time in the router module is used for other routers in the
network if the Time Protocol’s Mode parameter for DoD Internet Router
in the configuration is set to “Server only” or to “Server and client”. (For
more information about this parameter, refer to the Operator’s
Reference.)
To set the date and time:
At the NCL prompt, enter the Time command with the date and time as
follows:
time mm/dd/yy hh:mm:ss [Enter]
where:
mm = month
dd = day
yy = year
hh = hour
mm = minute
ss = second
For details about the NCL Time command, refer to the Operator’s
Reference.
2-8
Installation
3. Specify Manager and User Passwords (Optional).
3. Specify Manager and User Passwords
(Optional).
The router module provides two levels of password protection:
The Manager password controls access to the following system
manager tasks:
•
Saving a modified configuration.
•
Booting the router.
•
Resetting statistics or MIB variables.
•
Enabling or disabling services.
•
Downloading a configuration.
•
Changing a password.
•
Changing the date and time.
•
Using the Fget, Fput, Ping, Atping, and Test commands.
Setup
Assigning a user password.
2
•
The User password controls viewing of statistics, event log, MIB
variables, and configuration parameters.
Caution
Passwords are optional. If no password is specified, anyone can access
the router for viewing, booting, changing the configuration, resetting
statistics or variables, and using various commands.
To specify a password, use the NCL Password command:
1. At the NCL prompt, enter
password [Enter].
2. Type [M] to specify a Manager password, or [U] to specify a User
password.
2-9
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
4. Verify the Network Links.
To verify that the network links are operational and that all networks
can be reached by the router, use the procedures in this section:
Examine the event log (page 2-11).
Examine the statistics screens (page 2-13).
Examine the bridging and routing tables (page 2-16).
Test node access (page 2-18).
Note
2-10
If the steps in this section show that network links are not operating as
desired, re-examine the configuration performed in earlier steps. Some
links and services may need further customization beyond your initial
configuration; you may need to use the Configuration Editor to change
more parameters. (For information about using the Configuration
Editor, refer to the User’s Guide; for information about the parameters
and their defaults, refer to the Operator’s Reference.) Reconfigure the
router (refer to “Create or Modify a Router Configuration” on page 2-5),
then repeat the verification steps in this section.
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
Examine the Event Log.
Events such as enabling circuits and services, changes in spanning tree
states, and the occurrence of error conditions are recorded in an event
log. Included in the event log are events that indicate the success or
failure of the configuration and initialization procedures. Each event is
labeled with the date, time, severity, and a mnemonic indicating the
software resource that generated the message. To use the event log:
1. Display the event log by pressing [4] at the Main Menu or by using the
NCL Logi command.
2
Upon entering the event log, you will see the first event for the most
recent reboot at the top of the display. To navigate among the events
displayed, use the following keys.
Setup
[Enter]
Advance display by one page
[P]
Roll back display by one page
[v]
Advance display by one event
[^]
Roll back display by one event
[>]
Display last page (newest events)
[C]
Display first page of events for most recent reboot
[H]
Display help for event log (including more control keys)
[<]
Exit from event log
Refer to the User’s Guide for more key options and other information about display control keys, a full explanation of the parts of an
event line, the severity ratings, and the number and range of events
kept in the log. For the meaning of individual event messages, refer
to the Operator’s Reference.
2. Using the event log, verify that the circuits and services that you
configured are being enabled. (The default circuit names for the
WAN port and the internal LAN port are “wan1” and “ether1”.) The
events being listed in the event log should be consistent with
information recorded on the network maps.
3. Verify that no warning, major, or fatal events have occurred. (If any
such events have occurred, you will probably want to determine
what caused them and take remedial steps before continuing.)
2-11
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
For more information on using the event log and understanding the
events listed in it, refer to the User’s Guide.
The most recent event is also displayed in the event log line (the second
line of the console interface).
The event log line, showing
a message that appears after
the router boots
Figure 2-3. Event Log Line in the Main Menu
2-12
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
Examine the Statistics Screens.
The statistics screens provide information useful in verifying that network links are operational—namely, that circuits and the bridging and
routing services are transmitting and receiving data with zero or few
errors.
1. Display the Statistics Screen menu by pressing [1] at the Main Menu or
by using the NCL Stats command.
2
Setup
Figure 2-4. Example of the Statistics Screen Menu
Note
The Statistics Screen menu lists the service statistics screens only for
the services that have been enabled in the configuration. In the illustration above, the menu lists service statistics screens for all services.
2. Select and examine the Circuit Statistics screen. Verify that error-free
data is being exchanged over enabled circuits. Match the circuit
names with those on the network maps. (The default circuit names
for the WAN port and the internal LAN port are “wan1” and “ether1”.)
2-13
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
3. Select and examine the individual statistics screen for each routing
and bridging service enabled in the configuration. Verify that the
enabled services are exchanging frames or packets as expected. The
information listed should match the information on the site survey
worksheet and network maps. The statistics should reflect the
circuit groups, network interfaces, and traffic patterns expected for
the router configuration and the devices attached to the network.
The following statistics screens are available. (Service statistics screens
are listed on the Statistics Screen menu for only those services that have
been enabled in the configuration.)
Circuit Statistics: This screen provides summary data for each individual circuit, including how many bytes and frames were received
and transmitted, and how many frames contained errors.
Per Second Statistics: This screen provides summary data for traffic
on a per-second basis for each circuit on the router.
Bridge Statistics: This screen summarizes bridge traffic volume for
each circuit group. It shows the number of frames that were
received, forwarded, flooded, and dropped.
DoD IP Router Statistics: This screen provides summary data for
each IP network interface. The interfaces are identified by their IP
addresses. The screen shows the number of IP datagrams received,
forwarded, delivered to upper layer protocols, and dropped.
DECnet Router Statistics: This screen summarizes DECnet traffic
volume for each circuit group. It shows the number of data packets
received, forwarded, and dropped. The statistics do not represent
traffic generated by DECnet routing layer control messages, such as
Hello and routing messages.
IPX Router Statistics: This screen provides summary data for each
IPX network interface. The interfaces are identified by the IPX network numbers of the networks they are connected to. It shows the
number of datagrams received, forwarded, delivered to upper layer
protocols, and dropped.
Xerox (XNS) Router Statistics: This screen provides summary data
for each XNS network interface. The interfaces are identified by the
XNS network numbers of the networks they are connected to. The
screen shows the number of XNS datagrams received, forwarded,
delivered to an upper layer protocol, and dropped.
2-14
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
AppleTalk Router Statistics: This screen summarizes AppleTalk
traffic volume for each circuit group. It shows the number of packets
received, forwarded, and dropped.
Buffers Usage Statistics: This screen provides information on buffer
allocation and use.
For more information on the statistics screens, refer to the User’s Guide
and the Operator’s Reference.
2
Setup
2-15
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
Examine the Bridging and Routing Tables.
Use the NCL Rget commands to verify that the bridging and/or routing
tables represent the expected network topology. Note that Rget
commands are SNMP-based. IP routing or IP host-only service must be
enabled to use the Rget commands. (You can use the Quick Configuration utility to activate host-only service.)
(This section provides an overview of the Rget commands. For more
information on these commands, refer to the Operator’s Reference.)
RGETB: Use the Rgetb command to display the bridge forwarding
and filtering table for this node. Verify that the bridging service is
learning addresses. Verify proper configuration of source or
destination address filters.
RGETR: Use the Rgetr command to display the IP routing table for
this node. Verify that entries exist for all IP subnetworks represented
in the network map. Check the next-hop entries to determine the
route that IP packets will take to each destination subnet. Verify the
number of hops to these subnets; a very large hop count may
indicate that the route is invalid (type field I).
RGETIR: Use the Rgetir command to display the IPX routing table
for this node. Verify that entries exist for all IPX networks represented in the network map. Check the next-hop entries to determine
the route XNS packets will take to each destination network. Verify
the number of hops to these networks; a very large hop count may
indicate that the route is invalid (type field I).
RGETIS: Use the Rgetis command to display the IPX server table for
this node. Using your IPX network map, verify that the router has
learned about all IPX servers. Note that if IPX SAP filters are being
used in the network, the router may be restricted from learning
about some servers.
RGETXR: Use the Rgetxr command to display the XNS routing table
for this node. Verify that entries exist for all of the XNS networks
represented in your network map. Check the next hop entries to
determine the route the XNS packets will take to each destination
network. Verify that the number of hops to these networks is what
you expect. A very large hop count metric value may indicate that
the route is considered invalid. Check the type field for an ‘‘I’’
(invalid) entry.
2-16
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
RGETD: Use the Rgetd command to display the DECnet router
configuration table. Verify that all DECnet circuit groups are
available.
RGETDN: Use the Rgetdn command to display the DECnet router
level 1 (intra-area) routing table for a local or remote HP router.
Verify that the router has learned about all routers and end nodes in
its area. Also, trace the paths to the destination nodes to verify that
the hop counts and path costs are as expected.
2
RGETDA: Displays the DECnet router level 2 (inter-area) routing
table for a local or remote router. Verify that the router has learned
about a path to all areas. Trace the paths to the level 2 router in the
destination area to verify that hop counts and path costs are as
expected. Note that DECnet routing services on HP routers are
always level 1 and level 2 routing services, but this may not be true
for DECnet routing services from other vendors.
Setup
RGETATR: Displays the AppleTalk routing table. Verify that network
range entries exist for all AppleTalk networks. The network ranges
should be consistent with those recorded on the network map.
Check the next hop entries to determine the route that AppleTalk
packets will take to each destination network. Verify that the
number of hops to these subnets is what you expect. Check the
status field to verify that there are no entries that are marked
suspect or bad.
2-17
Installation
4. Verify the Network Links.
Test Node Accessibility.
To verify that other nodes can be accessed from the router module, use
the NCL Ping command.
Ping command can be used on a router with IP routing enabled to test
whether particular routers and end nodes can be reached. Use the
specific IP address of the target. For example, to determine whether a
WAN port having the IP address of 10.100.100.1 on a remote router can
be reached from the router module, you would execute Ping as follows
from the NCL prompt:
ping 10.100.100.1
When a target is “pinged”, the router module waits for a response. In the
above example, if a response was received within the specified time, the
console would display this message:
10.100.100.1 is alive
To send an AppleTalk Echo Protocol (AEP) request message to a
specific AppleTalk node address, use the NCL Atping command.
For more information on Ping and Atping, refer to pages 4-12 and 4-13 in
this manual and to the Operator’s Reference.
2-18
3
LEDs and Buttons
Resetting and Clearing
Initialization Sequence
Operation
Operation
LEDs and Buttons
LEDs and Buttons
Status LEDs
The status LEDs are located on the router module’s cover plate.
Hub (LAN) Router Tx
Hub (LAN) Router Rx
Hub (LAN) Net Fail
WAN Net Fail
WAN Rx
WAN Tx
Router Self-test
Router Fault
SNMP Mgt (module) Fault
Figure 3-1. Status LEDs
For information about what is indicated by each of these LEDs, refer to
table 3-1, “Status LEDs”, on the next page. For information on troubleshooting using these LEDs, refer to chapter 4, “Troubleshooting”.
3-2
Operation
LEDs and Buttons
Table 3-1. Status LEDs
Indicates
Router Self-test
(green)
A self-test of the router module is running. This self-test is run whenever the hub is powered on
or reset, and whenever the router module is reset (page 3-5) or cleared (page 3-7). (If initiated by
powering on or resetting the hub, the test can last up to 30 seconds if the hub had previously
been powered on with the SNMP module installed, or up to 60 seconds if the hub had not
previously been powered on with the SNMP module installed. If initiated by resetting or clearing
the router module, the test lasts about 18 seconds.) If an error is found during the self-test, the
Router Self-test LED remains on, and the Router Fault LED and/or the WAN Net Fail LEDs may
also turn on. The Router Self-test LED also turns on during the configuration clearing procedure
(page 3-7).
Router Fault
(orange)
A failure has been found either during a self-test or during router operation.
Hub (LAN) Net Fail
(orange)
A failure has been found in a network connected to the hub, or in the router module or the
SNMP module.
Hub (LAN) Router Rx
(green)
This LED blinks each time a packet is received from the hub through the router module’s internal
LAN port. The frequency indicates the amount of traffic; in heavy traffic, it may appear to be on
all of the time.
Hub (LAN) Router Tx
(green)
This LED blinks each time a packet is transmitted to the hub through the router module’s internal
LAN port. The frequency indicates the amount of traffic; in heavy traffic, it may appear to be on
all of the time.
WAN Net Fail
(orange)
The router module or the attached WAN has failed during a self-test or during operation.
WAN Rx
(green)
This LED blinks each time a packet is received from the WAN port; the frequency indicates the
amount of traffic. In heavy traffic, it may appear to be on all of the time.
WAN Tx
(green)
This LED blinks each time a packet is transmitted through the WAN port; the frequency indicates
the amount of traffic. In heavy traffic, it may appear to be on all of the time.
SNMP Mgt Fault
(orange)
Either a self-test of the SNMP module is running, or a failure in this module has occurred.
3
LED
3-3
Operation
The self-test of the SNMP module, which may last up to 60 seconds, is run when the hub is
powered on or when the hub is reset. If an error is found in the SNMP module during the selftest, both the Router Self-test LED and the SNMP Mgt Fault LED remain on.
Operation
LEDs and Buttons
Reset and Clear Buttons
The router Reset and Clear buttons are accessible through the router
module’s cover plate.
Router
Reset
button
Router
Clear
button
Hub Password Clear button
Figure 3-2. Reset and Clear Buttons
The router Reset and Clear buttons are used for the following procedures (the complete procedures are described on pages 3-5 – 3-9):
Resetting the router runs a minimal self-test and initializes (boots)
the router, regardless of the current operating mode.
Clearing the password(s) removes the current password(s), if
any, without interrupting the current state of the router. This enables
you to access the router using the console, Telnet, TFTP, or a network manager if you have forgotten the password(s).
Clearing the router removes the current password(s), restores the
factory-default configuration, and boots the router. Use this feature
only if you are prepared to lose the router’s current configuration.
You must use this procedure if the configuration is so corrupted that
you cannot access the router using the console.
The hub Password Clear button (which is located on the SNMP module)
is used to clear the password used for access to the hub through its
RS-232 Distributed Management port and from SNMP management
stations. (For more information, refer to the hub’s installation guide.)
3-4
Operation
Resetting and Clearing
Resetting and Clearing
Resetting the Router Module
The Reset button is recessed to prevent unintentional resets. To reset
the router module, use a nonconducting, pointed implement such as a
wooden pencil or a toothpick to press and release the recessed Reset
button on the router module’s cover plate. (See figure 3-2 on page 3-4.)
The Reset process includes the following:
All LEDs on the router module’s cover plate (except for SNMP Mgt
Fault) are turned on while the Reset button is pressed.
A self-test of the router module is run. During this test, which lasts
about 18 seconds, the Router Self-test LED is turned on.
The router module is disconnected from the console.
The router module is initialized (booted) using the most recently
saved configuration.
3
Operation
If the factory-default configuration is being used, the router module
looks for a SmartBoot configuration on the WAN or LAN by sending
Bootp requests out the WAN port and the internal LAN port for
approximately one minute.
If a SmartBoot configuration has been set up on the WAN or LAN for
the router module, that configuration is retrieved (provided that the
required WAN or LAN link is connected), then the router module is
rebooted with the SmartBoot configuration.
After you reconnect the console to the router (see step 5 on page 1-23),
the Copyright and Main Menu screens appear.
Resetting the hub, or powering the hub off and on, resets the router as
described above (except that the router self-test may last up to 30
seconds if the hub had previously been powered on with the SNMP
module installed, or up to 60 seconds if the hub had not previously been
powered on with the SNMP module installed).
For more information about the initialization that occurs when you reset
the router module, refer to “Initialization Sequence” on page 3-10. For
more information about SmartBoot, refer to appendix C, “SmartBoot”.
3-5
Operation
Resetting and Clearing
Notes
Resetting the router module does not affect any current password(s).
Any configuration changes you have not yet saved (in either Quick
Configuration or the Configuration Editor) are discarded. After a reset,
the router initializes with whatever configuration was last saved.
If the Self-test LED does not turn off within 20 seconds after pressing
and releasing the Reset button, the self-test has failed. If this occurs,
refer to chapter 4, “Troubleshooting”.
Clearing the Passwords
The Clear button is recessed to prevent unintentional clears. To clear the
passwords, use a nonconducting, pointed implement such as a wooden
pencil or a toothpick to press and release the recessed Clear button on
router module’s cover plate. (See figure 3-2 on page 3-4.)
Note
Access to the router will no longer be limited by either a manager or
user password. Using the Clear button removes all constraints on access
by anyone using the console, Telnet, TFTP, or a network manager.
To set new passwords, use the NCL Password command on the console.
(For more information, refer to “Specify Manager and User Passwords”,
page 1-9, or to the Operator’s Reference.)
3-6
Operation
Resetting and Clearing
Clearing the Router Module
You might want to clear the router module (using the procedure on the
next page) in situations such as the following:
So many parameters in the configuration need to be changed that it
would be easier to start over with the factory-default values.
You want to reinstall the router module in another hub using a different configuration, or connect the router module’s WAN port or a hub
LAN port to a different network.
The configuration has become so corrupted that you cannot access
the router from the console.
Clearing the router module does the following:
All factory defaults, including the factory-default values for the
configuration parameters, are restored.
The manager and user passwords are removed.
A self-test of the router module is run. During this test, which lasts
about 18 seconds, the Router Self-test LED is turned on.
The router module is disconnected from the console.
3
The router module is initialized (booted) with the factory-default
configuration.
Operation
The router module looks for a SmartBoot configuration on the WAN
or LAN by sending Bootp requests out the WAN port and the internal
LAN port for approximately one minute.
If a SmartBoot configuration has been set up on the WAN or LAN for
the router module, that configuration is retrieved (provided that the
required WAN or LAN link is connected), then the router module is
rebooted with the SmartBoot configuration.
After you reconnect the console to the router module (see step 5 on
page 1-23), the Copyright and Main Menu screens appear.
For more information about the initialization that occurs when you clear
the router module, refer to “Initialization Sequence” on page 3-10. For
more information about SmartBoot, refer to appendix C, “SmartBoot”.
3-7
Operation
Resetting and Clearing
Caution
Clearing the router module erases all changes made in the configuration
from their factory-default values. This means that bridging (in IP hostonly mode with an IP address of 127.x.x.x) is enabled and routing is not
enabled.
Note
When you clear the router module, a SmartBoot configuration is
retrieved (and the router is rebooted with it) only if there is a network
link between the router module’s WAN port or internal LAN port and the
HP router or Bootp server on which the SmartBoot configuration was
set up.
If you want to restore the factory-default configuration, disconnect the
WAN or LAN link before clearing the router module. For details, refer to
the procedure on page C-3.
Note
The Reset and Clear buttons are recessed to prevent unintentional
resets and clears. To press each button, use a nonconducting pointed
implement like a wooden pencil or a toothpick. (See figure 3-2 on
page 3-4.)
Do not wait more than 5 seconds after step 2 below. Holding the Clear
button too long prevents this procedure from working.
To clear the router module:
1. Press the Reset button on the router module’s cover plate until the
LEDs turn on. Continue holding down the Reset button (so that the
LEDs remain on) and immediately press and hold the Clear button.
2. Release the Reset button, but continue to hold the Clear button.
The Router Self-test LED begins flashing.
3. Release the Clear button within five seconds.
The Self-test LED stops flashing and remains lit during the self-test
portion of the initialization sequence, which lasts about 18 seconds.
(For more information about this, see “Initialization Sequence” on
page 3-10.) The Self-test LED turns off when the self-test is complete
(if no failures have been detected).
3-8
Operation
Resetting and Clearing
Note
If, within about 20 seconds after you released the Clear button, the Selftest LED has not turned off (and the Router Fault LED is not on), you
waited too long after releasing the Reset button before releasing the
Clear button. (If a console is connected, the prompt MON()> appears.)
To clear the router, repeat steps 1 – 3, and be sure to release the Clear
button within five seconds after releasing the Reset button.
After the self-test is complete, the router module reboots using the
factory default configuration, and looks for a SmartBoot configuration
on the network. If a SmartBoot configuration has been set up on the
WAN or LAN for the router module (and the required WAN or LAN link
is connected), the router module reboots using the SmartBoot
configuration.
3
Operation
3-9
Operation
Initialization Sequence
Initialization Sequence
Whenever the hub is powered on or reset, and whenever the router
module is reset (page 3-5) or cleared (page 3-7), the router module goes
through the following initialization sequence:
1. A self-test of the router module is run. If initiated by powering on or
resetting the hub, the test can last up to 30 seconds (60 seconds if the
hub had not previously been powered on with the SNMP module
installed). If initiated by resetting or clearing the router module, the
test lasts about 18 seconds. During the self-test, the Router Self-test
LED is turned on.
Note
If you boot the router using the NCL Boot command or the booting
option in Quick Configuration, the initialization sequence begins at
step 2.
2. The router module’s clock is reset to the time the router module was
last running; or, if the Time Protocol’s Mode parameter for DoD
Internet Router in the configuration is set to “Server only” or to
“Server and client”, the time is set to the time found on a time server.
3. The router module’s operating code (software) is executed.
4. Dynamic variables (such as the counters and events) are reset.
5. The configuration is read from battery-backed RAM into active
circuitry. This implements any configuration changes saved since the
router module was last reset.
6. Communication is started with the WAN and the hub (through the
router module’s internal LAN port) and with the routing applications
that are configured. Bridging and routing tables are reset.
7. If the router module’s factory-default configuration is being used, the
router module bridges on both ports (in IP host-only mode with an IP
address of 127.x.x.x, without spanning tree). You may see activity
reported on the Hub (LAN) Router Rx, Hub (LAN) Router Tx,
WAN Rx, and WAN Tx LEDs.
3-10
Operation
Initialization Sequence
8. The router module looks for a SmartBoot configuration on the WAN
or LAN by sending Bootp requests out the WAN port and the internal
LAN port for approximately one minute.
9. If a SmartBoot configuration has been set up on the WAN or LAN for
the router module, that configuration is retrieved (provided that the
required WAN or LAN link is connected). The router module is then
rebooted with the SmartBoot configuration (that is, this initialization
sequence is repeated, beginning with step 2).
After you connect the console to the router (using HP Stack Manager),
the Copyright and Main Menu screens appear.
For more information about SmartBoot, refer to appendix C, “SmartBoot”.
3
Operation
3-11
4
Basic Troubleshooting Tips
Interpreting LED Error Patterns
Verifying LED Operation
Troubleshooting a Failure During Power-On or
Reset Self-Test
Diagnostic Tests
Replacing the Battery
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Basic Troubleshooting Tips
Basic Troubleshooting Tips
WARNING
If the router module needs to be returned to HP, use the original
packaging. The nonconducting antistatic enclosure surrounding
the router module ensures that the battery on the router module
will not short out while being shipped.
Make sure that you have a valid network topology. If you have
trouble after a recent change to the network, switch back to the
previous topology. If you no longer have trouble, the new topology is
probably at fault.
Make sure that the WAN cable connection is secure.
If the router module’s Copyright and Main Menu screens do not
appear on the console when you attempt to connect to the router
module using HP Stack Manager, make sure the console is correctly
connected to the hub. (Refer to the hub’s installation guide.)
If characters on the console interface are missing or corrupted,
verify that the console cable is connected to a hub that has an SNMP
module installed in it.
Check the LEDs on the router module’s cover plate. For descriptions, see “Status LEDs” (page 3-2). LED patterns that indicate a
router or network error are shown in tables 4-1 and 4-2 (pages
4-4 – 4-5).
The LED error patterns described in this chapter indicate specific error
conditions that in some cases require either a recovery procedure done
by the operator or replacement of the router module. The router also
can display error messages indicating flash memory problems that
require powering the hub off and on, downloading new operating code
into the router module, or replacing the router module.
4-2
Troubleshooting
Interpreting LED Error Patterns
Interpreting LED Error Patterns
Whenever the hub is powered on or reset, and whenever the router
module is reset (page 3-5) or cleared (page 3-7), a self-test of the router
is run.
If the self-test was initiated by powering on or resetting the hub, this
self-test can last up to 30 seconds if the hub had previously been
powered on with the SNMP module installed, or up to 60 seconds if the
hub had not previously been powered on with the SNMP module
installed. During this time, the Fault LED on the front of the hub is
turned on, the Exp Slot LED (labeled “AdvSlot” on some HP AdvanceStack hubs) flashes slowly, and the Router Self-test LED on the router
module’s cover plate is turned on. If the hub’s Fault LED remains on and
the Exp Slot LED continues flashing for more than 60 seconds, a failure
has been found during the self-test.
If the self-test was initiated by resetting or clearing the router module,
the self-test lasts about 18 seconds; during this time, the Router Self-test
LED on the router module’s cover plate is turned on. If this LED remains
on for more than about 18 seconds, a failure has been found during the
self-test.
When a failure has been found during the self-test, check the LEDs on
the router module’s cover plate (see figure 3-1) to determine the cause
of the failure. The error conditions indicated by these LEDs are shown
in table 4-1 on page 4-4.
4 Troubleshooting
During router operation (that is, after the self-test has been passed), the
Fault LED on the front of the hub is normally off, and the Exp Slot LED
(labeled “AdvSlot” on some HP AdvanceStack hubs) is normally on. If a
failure is found during router operation, the Fault LED on the front of
the hub turns on and the Exp Slot LED flashes slowly. When this
happens, check the LEDs on the router module’s cover plate (see figure
3-1) to determine the cause of the failure. The error conditions indicated
by these LEDs are shown in table 4-2 on page 4-5.
4-3
Troubleshooting
Interpreting LED Error Patterns
Table 4-1. LED Error Patterns at End of Power-On or Reset Self-Test
LEDs on Router Module’s Cover Plate
Router Router
Self-Test Fault
Hub
WAN
(LAN) Net Fail
Net Fail
SNMP
Mgt
Fault
Diagnostic Tips
ON
ON
*
*
OFF
Refer to “Router Self-Test LED On, Fault LED On”, page 4-7.
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
*
Refer to “Router Self-Test LED On, Fault LED Off”, page 4-8.
*
ON
ON
*
OFF
Replace the router module.
ON
ON
*
*
ON
The SNMP module is faulty and/or its firmware code has become
corrupted. Firmware corruption is frequently the result of a failure
during downloading of new code into the SNMP module.
If this error occurs after downloading new code, repeat the
download process. If not, or if the error persists after repeating the
download process, replace the SNMP module.
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
*
Port failure detected.
1. Make sure that the proper WAN cable is properly connected to the
router module and to the network. (Refer to “Connect the WAN
Cable”, page 1-16, and to appendix A, “Cables and Connectors”.)
2. If the error persists, make sure the WAN is specified correctly in
the configuration. (Refer to “Create or Modify a Router
Configuration”, page 2-5.)
3. If the error still persists, check for a fault in the network equipment
or links.
4. If the error still persists, replace the WAN cable.
5. If the error still persists, replace the router module.
*This LED is not important for the diagnosis.
4-4
Troubleshooting
Interpreting LED Error Patterns
Table 4-2. LED Error Patterns During Router Operation
LEDs on Router Module’s Cover Plate
Router Router
Self-Test Fault
OFF
ON
Hub
WAN
(LAN) Net Fail
Net Fail
*
OFF
SNMP
Mgt
Fault
Diagnostic Tips
OFF
A router software failure was detected. When this error occurs, this
pattern of LEDs appears for only a few seconds until the router
reboots (which will occur unless Auto Reboot in the configuration
has been disabled). If Auto Reboot has been disabled, reset the
router module to reboot it.
After the router reboots, information about the failure will appear in
the crash history (which can be displayed using the NCL Crash
command) and in the event log (which can be displayed from the
Main menu).
OFF
ON
*
*
ON
Replace the SNMP module.
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
Port failure detected.
1. Verify that the node at the other end is up and running.
2. If this error persists, make sure the WAN is specified correctly in
the configuration. (Refer to “Create or Modify a Router
Configuration”, page 2-5.)
3. If the error still persists, check for a fault in the network equipment
or links.
4. If the error still persists, replace the WAN cable.
5. If the error still persists, replace the router module.
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
Either a device has not yet been connected, or the connection to the
remote device has been lost. The broken connection can be
detected if the Remote signal & sense parameter is enabled in the
configuration or if a protocol is running on this port. The circuit will
be enabled again when the connection is restored.
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
The router module’s LAN driver is unable to send data. (Data is sent
by a protocol or when XCVR Signal Polling is enabled on the internal
LAN port.) The failure may be due to faulty or disconnected network
hardware, excessive collisions, or excessive deferrals. Call for
service from your HP dealer or service provider.
*This LED is not important for the diagnosis.
4-5
4 Troubleshooting
For point-to-point non-X.25 circuits, if Remote signal & sense is
enabled, then the WAN port is not hearing properly addressed
Breath-of-Life packets from the remote device. This may be due to
faulty or disconnected network hardware or improper configuration.
Troubleshooting
Verifying LED Operation
Verifying LED Operation
If you suspect a faulty LED—for example, if the LEDs indicate a failure
as shown in table 4-1 or table 4-2, or they have some anomalous pattern;
but the router nevertheless appears to be operating correctly—you can
verify the LEDs by resetting the router using the following procedure.
Caution
Resetting the router causes bridging and routing tables to be reset. For
other effects, see “Initialization Sequence” on page 3-10.
Use a nonconducting, pointed implement such as a wooden pencil or a
toothpick to press and hold the recessed Reset button on the router
module’s cover plate. (See figure 3-2 on page 3-4.) Verify that while you
are holding the Reset button, all of the LEDs on the router module’s
cover plate (except for SNMP Mgt Fault) turn on. If any of these LEDs
does not turn on, the router module must be replaced.
4-6
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting a Failure During Power-On or Reset Self-Test
Troubleshooting a Failure During Power-On
or Reset Self-Test
Router Self-Test LED On, Fault LED On
If, at the end of the self-test run after a power-on or reset, the Router
Self-test and Fault LEDs remain on, a message like the following appears
on the console. (If a console was not connected when the self-test was
run, connect a console and power-on or reset again.)
Error number
Error message
7, MK5025 Test
ERROR: MK5025 failed interrupt test, errcode = 00000001
SELFTEST FAILURE
Error procedure
A hardware problem was detected while running selftest.
To enter the selftest monitor, press ‘s‘. To attempt to
load operating code, press any other key.
If no key is pressed after 10 seconds, an attempt will
be made to load operating code.
If a qualified support person is available to operate the self-test monitor,
press [s ] to enter the self-test monitor. Otherwise, press [Enter] or wait 10
seconds to start an attempt to load the router’s operating code.
4 Troubleshooting
If the router boots (that is, if the router’s Copyright and Main Menu
screens appear), you may continue router operation. However, you
should record the error number and message and then call for
service from your HP dealer or service provider. It may be necessary
to download new operating code to the router.
If the router module does not boot, record the failure information
and call for service from your HP dealer or service provider. It may
be necessary to replace the router module.
4-7
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting a Failure During Power-On or Reset Self-Test
Router Self-Test LED On, Fault LED Off
If, at the end of the self-test run after a power-on or reset, the Router
Self-test LED remains on but the Fault LED turns off, a message such as
those shown below may appear on the console. (If a console was not
connected when the self-test was run, connect a console and power-on
or reset again.)
The following two error messages indicate a problem in the router
module’s flash memory that might be corrected by powering the hub off
and on or resetting the router again. If the problem persists, then it
might be corrected by downloading new operating code; contact your
HP dealer or service provider for assistance.
ERROR: Erasure ERROR, block #
ERROR: Programming ERROR, block #
The following three error messages indicate a problem in the router
module’s flash memory that might be corrected by downloading new
operating code. Contact your HP dealer or service provider for assistance.
ERROR: Incorrect CRC in FLASH
ERROR: Invalid size field in FLASH
ERROR: Illegal FLASH ID, byte #, got XXXX,
expected YYYY
Bad product code in FLASH (err X)
4-8
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tests
Diagnostic Tests
Testing the Router Module
To run a self-test of the router module:
1. Do any of the following:
•
Power the hub off and on.
•
Press and release the Reset button on the hub’s front panel.
•
Press and release the Reset button on the router module’s cover
plate (see figure 3-2 on page 3-4).
2. Check the LEDs on the router module’s cover plate (see figure 3-1 on
page 3-2).
If the Self-test LED has not turned off within 60 seconds after powering
the hub off and on or after pressing and releasing the hub’s Reset button,
or within 20 seconds after pressing and releasing the router module’s
Reset button, the self-test has failed. Other LEDs on the router module’s
cover plate indicate the nature of the error; to interpret the error conditions indicated by these LEDs, refer to table 4-1, “LED Error Patterns at
End of Power-On or Reset Self-Test” (page 4-3 ).
The self-test does not test the router module’s ports. To test the WAN
port, use the procedure on the next page.
4 Troubleshooting
4-9
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tests
Testing the Router Module’s WAN Port
The following test requires a loopback connector. (For the HP part
number and pin-outs of the required loopback connector, refer to
“Loopback Connector”, page A-10.)
1. Disconnect the hub’s power cord.
2. Disconnect the WAN cable, then connect a loopback connector to
the WAN port.
3. Reconnect the hub’s power cord.
4. If the WAN Net Fail LED turns on at the end of the self-test, the WAN
port is bad; replace the router module.
Checking the Configuration
If neither of the above procedures corrects a problem, and you suspect
that a corrupted configuration rather than the terminal connection is a
possible cause, try clearing the configuration. (Refer to “Clearing the
Router” on page 3-7.)
4-10
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tests
Testing a Link
The router provides information on network links in the event log, statistics, routing tables, and the management information base.
In addition, the router provides three other specific link tests: Ping,
AppleTalk Ping, and Telnet, described on the following pages. Note that
you can use HP network management software to test the links (refer to
the software’s help screens).
The procedures for using these tests require entering NCL commands at
the console. For information about connecting a console to the router,
refer to “Connect a Console”, page 1-18. For information about entering
NCL commands, see “Using the Main Menu and NCL”, page 2-3; for
details about the NCL commands, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
Tests from Other Devices
Use this procedure to find the station address (also called MAC,
physical, or Ethernet address) of a port on this router for use in an IEEE
802.3 test from another network device.
1. At the NCL prompt, enter the following command:
get cct.cct-name.mac_addr [Enter]
where:
cct-name is the configured circuit name for the port. The
default circuit names for the WAN port and the internal LAN port
are “wan1” and “ether1”.
2. Note the resulting station address.
4 Troubleshooting
4-11
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tests
Ping
Ping is a network-layer test that sends an Internet Control Message
Protocol (ICMP) echo request message to another node that has an IP
address and is able to respond to an ICMP echo request message. The
router must have IP routing or IP host-only mode configured in order to
use this test.
1. At the NCL prompt, enter one of the following commands:
ping x.x.x.x
ping x.x.x.x count
ping x.x.x.x count wait
where:
x.x.x.x is the target node’s IP address in dotted decimal
notation.
count (optional) is the number of times to repeat the echo
request packet. If count is not included, the packet is sent once.
wait (optional) is how many seconds to wait for a response. If
a second integer is not included, the response must be received in
five seconds to be successful.
2. You will see a message, either that the target node is alive—meaning
that communications are passing successfully from the router to the
remote node on a specific link—or that the remote node did not
respond. If you cannot reach any remote node, the problem must be
isolated to the router, the links used in the test, or all of the remote
nodes.
For more details, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
4-12
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tests
AppleTalk Ping
AppleTalk Ping is a network-layer test that sends an AppleTalk Echo
Protocol (AEP) message to another AppleTalk node. The router must
have AppleTalk routing configured in order to use this test.
1. At the NCL prompt, enter one of the following commands:
atping x.y [Enter]
atping x.y wait [Enter]
where:
x is the target node’s network number.
y is the node identifier.
wait (optional) is how many seconds to wait for a response. If
wait is not specified, the response must be received in five seconds to be successful.
2. You will see a message, indicating either that the target node is
alive—meaning that communications are passing successfully from
the router to the remote node on a specific link—or that the remote
node did not respond. If you cannot reach any remote node, the
problem must be isolated to the router, the links used in the test, or
all of the remote nodes.
For more details, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
4 Troubleshooting
4-13
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tests
Telnet
Telnet is an upper-layer service that allows you to interactively control a
remote node’s console. You can establish this virtual terminal connection from an HP router that has Telnet and either IP routing or IP
host-only mode configured to a router that has Telnet configured and is
suspected of not routing successfully.
1. At the NCL prompt, enter the Telnet command:
telnet x.x.x.x
where
x.x.x.x is the IP address of the remote node in dotted decimal
notation.
2. Once the connection is established, Telnet passes your keystrokes to
the remote system. If the remote system is another HP router:
a. You will see the system name of the remote node as the NCL
prompt at the bottom of your display. Check the event log or
routing tables of the remote node as you do for your own router.
Use the Exit command to leave NCL and return to the remote
node’s Main menu:
exit [Enter]
b. To disconnect the Telnet session, use the Logout option from the
remote node’s Main Menu. When you are prompted with:
Do you want to disconnect? [Y/N:]
press [Y] for ‘‘yes’’. The remote node is disconnected, the Telnet
session ends, and your own system name appears in the display.
If the remote system is not another HP router, then type the appropriate commands to interact with that system and to disconnect Telnet.
4-14
Troubleshooting
Replacing the Battery
Replacing the Battery
If you have made changes to the factory-default configuration but that
factory-default configuration is restored when you boot the router, the
battery may need to be replaced.
To replace the battery:
1. Disconnect the hub from the power source,
2. Using the supplied nutdriver, remove the two hex nut screws alongside the WAN port connector. (See figure 1-10 on page 1-15.)
3. Using a Torx T-10 or flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captured
screws holding the cover plate over the hub’s Expansion Slot, then
remove the cover plate. (See figure 1-3 on page 1-11.)
4. Connect a grounding wrist strap between your wrist and the hub.
(Refer to step 2 on page 1-11.)
Caution
Static electricity can severely damage sensitive electronic components
such as the router module or the SNMP module.
5. Remove the router and SNMP modules from the hub. (Refer to step 5
on page 1-12.) Place the modules, with the router module on the
bottom, on a nonconducting antistatic surface.
4 Troubleshooting
6. Using a Phillips (cross-head) screwdriver, remove the four screws
securing the SNMP module to the standoffs. (See figure 1-8 on
page 1-14.)
7. Carefully disengage the connectors holding the two modules
together, then place the SNMP module on an antistatic surface.
4-15
Troubleshooting
Replacing the Battery
8. Using your fingers (or a nonmetallic tool), carefully lift up the
battery clip slightly, then slide the battery out of its holder.
Figure 4-1. Removing Battery
Caution
Replace the battery only with the same type.
9. Carefully insert the new battery—positive (+) side up—into the
battery holder.
10. Reassemble the the router module with the SNMP module, then reinstall them in the hub, as described in steps 6 – 12 on pages 1-13 – 1-15.
WARNING
4-16
Dispose of the used battery properly. Do not attempt to recharge,
crush, or disassemble it; do not incinerate it or expose it to heat
above 100°C (212°F).
A
Cables and Connectors
Cables and Connectors
This appendix lists cables that have been tested and verified for use with
this router module. It also includes minimum pin-out information, so
that if you wish to use an unlisted cable, you can verify that your cables
are correctly wired. Note that each pin-out does not necessarily match
the pin-out for the corresponding HP cable, but cables manufactured to
follow the minimum pin-out will function correctly. This appendix also
shows pin-outs for the loopback connector for the WAN port.
A-2
Cables and Connectors
HP Cables
A
HP Cables
Cables and
Connectors
The following table lists HP cables for the WAN port. For information
about cables that can be used to connect a console to the hub’s RS-232
Distributed Management port, refer to the hub’s installation guide.
Cable
Connector on Attached Device
HP Product or Part Number
V.35 cable (balanced X.27)
For 34-pin female port
28606-63008 (5 meters)
RS-232/V.24/V.28 cable
For 25-pin female port
28606-63006 (5 meters) *
X.21 cable
For 15-pin female port
28606-63001 (5 meters)
RS-422/RS-449/V.36 cable
For 37-pin female port
28606-63005 (5 meters)
Back-to-Back test cable for WAN port
connecting to HP routers having a 62pin synchronous WAN port or to the
HP Remote Bridge RB
For 62-pin female WAN port(s)
included on most HP routers
and the HP Remote Bridge RB
5061-2556 (5 meters)
* For this cable, the maximum speed supported on the WAN is 64 Kbit/s.
A-3
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
V.35 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs
WAN link
end
34-pin male
B
9
Router
end
62-pin male
CCITT Signal Name
and Circuit
102
Signal Ground
22
23
24
25
26
27
47
31
32
52
50
A-4
C
57
105
Ready to Send
D
4
106
Clear to Send
E
46
107
Data Mode
F
6
109
Receiver Ready
H
58
108.2
Terminal Ready
J
48
P
21
103
Send Data, A
R
20
104
Receive Data, A
S
42
103
Send Data, B
T
41
104
U
61
V
18
W
60
X
39
115
Receive Timing, B
Y
19
114
Send Timing, A
AA
40
114
Send Timing, B
Reserved
Receive Data, B
Transmit Timing, A
115
Receive Timing, A
Transmit Timing, B
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
Router end
62-pin male
EIA and Signal Name
2
59
BA
Send Data
3
1
BB
Receive Data
4
57
CA
Request to Send
5
4
CB
Clear to Send
6
46
CC
Data Mode
7
9
AB
Signal Ground
CF
Receiver Ready
Cables and
Connectors
WAN link end
25-pin male
A
RS-232/V.24/V.28 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs
22-27
47
30
31
52
Notes
8
6
12
28
Reserved
13
7
Reserved
14
13
15
2
16
49
17
3
19
12
Reserved
DB
Send Timing
DD
Receive Timing
Reserved
Reserved
20
58
21
29
CD
Reserved
Terminal Ready
22
48
Reserved
23
55
24
56
Reserved
DA
Terminal Timing
The maximum length for an RS-232/V.24/V.28 cable connected to the
WAN port is 15 meters (50 feet).
If an HP 28606-63006 5-meter RS-232/V.24/V.28 cable is connected to the
WAN port (and no additional cable, such as a stub cable, is connected
between the WAN port and the modem or DSU/CSU), the maximum
speed supported on the WAN is 64 Kbit/s. If any other RS-232/V.24/V.28
cable of any length is connected between the WAN port and the modem
or DSU/CSU, the maximum speed supported on the WAN is 19.2 Kbit/s.
A-5
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
X.21 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs
WAN link end
15-pin male
Router end
62-pin male
X.21 Signal Name and Circuit
2
17
T
3
16
C
Control, A
4
1
R
Receive Data, A
5
4
I
Indicator, A
6
3
S
Send Timing, A
8
9
G
Ground
Send Data, A
32
47
A-6
9
38
T
Send Data, B
10
37
C
Control, B
11
22
R
Receive Data, B
12
25
I
Indicator, B
13
24
S
Send Timing, B
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
Router end
62-pin male
RS-449 Signal Name
and Circuit
4
17
SD
Send Data, A
5
2
ST
Send Timing, A
6
1
RD
Receive Data, A
7
15
RS
Request to Send, A
8
3
RT
Receive Timing, A
9
4
CS
Clear to Send, A
10
54
11
5
DM
Data Mode, A
12
16
TR
Terminal Ready, A
13
6
RR
Receiver Ready, A
14
53
Reserved
15
48
Reserved
16
55
17
14
18
8
19
9
Cables and
Connectors
WAN link
end 37-pin male
A
RS-449/RS-422/V.36 WAN Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs
Reserved
Reserved
TT
Terminal Timing, A
Reserved
SG
Signal Ground
30
32
20
47
22
38
SD
Reserved
Send Data, B
23
23
ST
Send Timing, B
24
22
RD
Receive Data, B
25
36
RS
Request to Send, B
Receive Timing, B
26
24
RT
27
25
CS
28
33
29
26
DM
Data Mode, B
30
37
TR
Terminal Ready, B
31
27
RR
33
29
Reserved
34
34
Reserved
Clear to Send, B
Reserved
Receiver Ready, B
35
35
TT
Terminal Timing, B
37
10
SC
Send Common
A-7
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
Back-to-Back Test Cable
You can use a back-to-back, synchronous test cable to connect any HP
router having a (62-pin) synchronous WAN port to another HP router (or
an HP Remote Bridge) having the same port type, without using a
modem eliminator. The cable, which can be used for demonstrations,
instruction, or testing the router, uses the RS-422 signal level.
Note
The WAN port on one router must have the Clock Source parameter in
the configuration set to External, and the WAN port on the other router
must have it set to Internal.
A 5-meter, back-to-back, synchronous test cable is available from HP
(part number 5061-2556). If you want to purchase a non-HP cable or
make your own cable, refer to the next page, which shows the minimum
pin-outs for the cable. The maximum length for this cable is 60 meters
(200 feet).
A-8
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
62-pin male
1
RDA
38
22
RDB
RDA
1
17
SDA
RDB
22
38
SDB
RSA
15
4
CSA
RSB
36
25
CSB
CSA
4
15
RSA
CSB
25
36
RSB
TRA
16
37
5
RRA
6
DMB
26
RRB
27
TTA
14
TTB
STA
35
2
RTA
3
STB
23
RTB
35
GND
shield
5
DMA
6
RRA
26
DMB
27
RRB
16
TRA
37
TRB
2
STA
3
RTA
23
STB
24
RTB
14
TTA
35
TTB
GND
9
9
10
10
30
30
32
32
Cables and
Connectors
17
SDB
DMA
Note
62-pin male
SDA
TRB
A
Back-to-Back Test Cable—Minimum Pin-Outs
shield
In the cable, each of the differential signal pairs (SDA and SDB, RDA
and RDB, and so on) must be twisted pairs of wire.
A-9
Cables and Connectors
Cable and Connector Pin-Outs
Loopback Connector
HP part number 28606-63007; pin
connections:
pin 9 to pin 23
pin 10 to pin 27
pin 11 to pin 50
pin 12 (not used) to pin 7
(not used)
pin 13 (not used) to pin 49
(not used)
pin 14 to pin 19
pin 15 to pin 4
pin 16 to pin 46
pin 17 to pin 1
pin 21 to pin 20
pins 30, 31, and 32 to pin 27
pins 33 and 34 (not used) to pin 29 (not used)
pin 35 to pins 40 and 39
pin 36 to pin 25
pin 37 to pin 26
pin 38 to pin 22
pin 42 to pin 41
pin 47 (not used) to pin 24
pin 51 to pin 2
pin 53 (not used) to pin 8 (not used)
pin 54 (not used) to pin 29 (not used)
pin 55 (not used) to pin 8 (not used)
pin 56 to pin 3
pin 57 to pin 28 (not used)
pin 58 to pin 6
pin 59 to pin 48 (not used)
A-10
B
Specifications
Specifications
Power Consumption
7.3 watts
Environmental
Temperature
Relative humidity
Altitude
Operating
Non-Operating
0°C to 55°C
(32°F to 131°F)
–40°C to 70°C
(–40°F to 158°F)
15% to 95% at 40°C
(104°F), non-condensing
90% at 65°C
(149°F)
4.6 km (15,000 ft)
4.6 km (15,000 ft)
Electromagnetic Emissions
B-2
Country
Class
U.S.A., Canada,
and Latin America
FCC part 15 class A
Europe and other
countries
CISPR-22 class A
Europe
EN 55022 (1988) class A
Japan
VCCI class 1
Specifications
Data Communications Specifications and
Certifications
The WAN port (with the appropriate cable) meets the following
specifications:
RS-232 and CCITT V.24/V.28, synchronous
EIA RS-422/449 and CCITT V.36
CCITT X.21
CCITT V.35
ISO 2593 and MIL-C-28747
The HP J2628A AdvanceStack Router 210 Module is approved under
Approval Number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect connection to public
telecommunication systems within the United Kingdom.
Hewlett-Packard has applied for certification for use on X.25 packetswitching networks. Certifications were still in progress at the time of
printing. Please contact your local HP representative for latest certification status.
C
Third-Party Products
Specifications
Hewlett-Packard designed the HP Router 210 Module to operate with
industry-standard hardware and software products.
HP has conducted limited testing with certain non-HP products to
determine compatibility with the HP routers described in this guide.
Please contact your HP-authorized LAN dealer or HP representative for
the current list of tested products.
HP relies in part upon information from the suppliers of non-HP
products and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to
the operation of these products or their compliance with worldwide
regulatory requirements. HP advises customers to conduct independent
examination to determine suitable levels of compatibility for the
customer’s individual needs.
For information about the hardware and software/firmware warranties
applicable to the HP Router 210 Module, refer to the warranty card
shipped with the router module.
B-3
C
SmartBoot
SmartBoot
“SmartBoot” allows another HP router or a Bootp server on the
connected WAN or LAN to automatically configure the router module.
This eliminates the need for expert personnel at the site where the
router module is installed.
A “SmartBoot configuration” is created on the HP router or other Bootp
server at the central site and assigned to the router module. The router
module looks for a SmartBoot configuration on the WAN or LAN by
sending Bootp requests out the WAN port and the internal LAN port for
approximately one minute. This occurs whenever:
You clear the router module.
You reset the router module, or you power on or reset the hub—
provided that the router module is using either the factory-default
configuration or a SmartBoot Helper configuration. (A SmartBoot
Helper configuration is created using the SmartBoot Helper option
on the router module’s Main Menu screen. It is required whenever
the WAN is using the PPP, frame relay, X.25, or V.25 bis protocols.
For more information, refer to the Release Notes).
Depending on the response from the networks, the router then does one
of the following:
If the router module does not receive a response from either an HP
router (on which a SmartBoot configuration has been set up using
Quick Remote) or a Bootp server within approximately one minute
of being cleared, reset, or powered on, the router module bridges in
IP host-only mode with an IP address of 127.x.x.x. Also, the following entry is made in the event log:
BOOTP failed. Use Smartboot Helper to continue
If the router module receives a minimal configuration over the WAN
link from a Quick Remote source, it boots itself with this configuration and begins routing and/or bridging as specified in that
configuration. If a console is connected, it will show a system name
of BOOT_CONFIG. (For more information on Quick Remote setup
and operation, refer to the User’s Guide.)
If the router module receives a reply from a Bootp server, it configures itself with the intermediate configuration contained in the reply.
The router module then attempts to download a full configuration
from the TFTP server indicated in the Bootp reply message. Following download of the full configuration (which occurs almost
immediately if over a LAN, but can take up to 15 seconds if over a
WAN), the router then reboots itself and begins routing and/or bridging as specified in the full configuration. (For more information on
setup and operation with a Bootp server, refer to the User’s Guide.)
C-2
SmartBoot
If the router module is not using either the factory-default or a SmartBoot Helper configuration when you reset it or when you power on or
reset the hub, the router module does not send Bootp requests over its
ports, but simply boots using the configuration that was most recently
saved. (If you have made and saved any changes to the configuration,
the router module is no longer in the factory-default state—even if the
system name is still DEFAULT_CONFIG.)
If you have made and saved changes to either the factory-default
configuration or a SmartBoot configuration, and subsequently you want
to return to a SmartBoot configuration:
1. Make sure there is a network link between the router module’s WAN
port or internal LAN port and the HP router or Bootp server on
which the SmartBoot configuration was set up.
2. Clear the router module (refer to page 3-7).
The router module restores the factory-default configuration,
reboots, then sends out Bootp requests as described on page C-2.
If the router module is using a SmartBoot configuration or you have
made and saved changes to the factory-default configuration, and
subsequently you want to return to the factory-default configuration:
C
1. Disconnect the network link between the router module’s WAN port
or internal LAN port and the HP router or Bootp server on which the
SmartBoot configuration was set up.
SmartBoot
Disconnecting the network link will prevent the router module from
receiving a SmartBoot configuration when the router module is
rebooted (after you clear it in the next step).
2. Clear the router module (refer to page 3-7).
The router module restores the factory-default configuration,
reboots, then sends out Bootp requests as described on page C-2.
3. When the Main Menu screen appears, wait for the following message
to appear on the second line:
BOOTP failed. Use Smartboot Helper to continue
The appearance of this message indicates that the router module is
no longer sending out Bootp requests.
C-3
SmartBoot
4. When this message appears, reconnect the network link.
If you reconnect the network link before the message appears, the
router module will receive a response to its Bootp requests and will
boot with the SmartBoot configuration it receives as described on
page C-2.
Note
When booting with the factory-default configuration, the router begins
bridging on the WAN port and on the internal LAN port if a SmartBoot
configuration is not received from a remote source (as described on
page C-2). Therefore, if the router is expected to use SmartBoot for
configuration, but instead begins operating in the default bridging mode
due to some unforeseen problem, there may be unexpected effects on
the adjacent networks.
For more information about SmartBoot, refer to HP Routing Services
and Applications, the User’s Guide, and the Release Notes. For details
about SmartBoot Helper, refer to the Release Notes.
C-4
Regulatory Statements
Regulatory Statements
FCC Statement (For U.S.A. Only)
Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference Statement
Warning: This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy. If it
is not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, it may cause interference to radio communications. It has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class A computing device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide
reasonable protection against such interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference, in
Regulatory Statements
which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be
required to correct the interference.
If this equipment causes interference to radio reception (which can be determined by unplugging the power cord from the equipment) try these measures: Re-orient the receiving
antenna. Relocate the equipment with respect to the receiver. Plug the equipment and receiver into different branch circuits. Consult your dealer or an experienced technician for
additional suggestions.
VCCI Class 1 (Japan Only)
European Community
This equipment complies with EN55022 Class A.
Note
The HP Router 210 is a class A product. In a domestic environment, this
product may cause radio interference, in which case the user may be
required to take adequate measures.
1
Regulatory Statements
Declaration of Conformity
The following Declaration of Conformity complies with ISO/IEC Guide
22 and EN 45014. It identifies the product, the manufacturer’s name and
address, and the applicable specifications that are recognized in the
European Community.
2
Index
A
accessories ... 1-4
address tables ... 4-6
AEP: AppleTalk Echo Protocol ... 2-18, 4-13
altitude specifications ... B-2
AppleTalk Phase 2 routing service
Rget commands ... v, 2-17
Ping ... 2-9, 2-18, 4-11, 4-13
AppleTalk Router Statistics screen ... 2-15
Atping command in NCL ... 2-9, 2-18, 4-11,
4-13
B
C
cable ... 1-4, 1-16 – 1-17, A-1 – A-10
See also interface
pin-outs ... A-2, A-4 – A-10
recommended cables ... A-3
RS-232 ... 1-16, A-3, A-5, B-3
RS-422/449 ... 1-16, A-3, A-7, B-3
synchronous test cable ... A-3, A-8
V.24/V.28 ... B-3
Index-1
Index
back-to-back test cable ... A-3, A-8 – A-9
battery
maintains configuration in RAM ... 3-10
maintains date and time in RAM ... 2-8
replacing ... 4-15 – 4-16
Boot command in NCL ... 2-6 – 2-7, 3-10
BOOT_CONFIG ... C-2
booting ... 2-5 – 2-7, 3-4 – 3-5, 3-8, 3-10 – 3-12
Bootp request ... C-2 – C-3, C-5
Breath-of-Life packet ... 4-5
Bridge Statistics screen ... 2-14
bridging ... 2-5, 3-8, 3-10, C-2, C-4
tables ... 2-16, 3-10, 4-6
Buffers Usage Statistics screen ... 2-15
button ... 3-4
Clear ... 3-4, 3-6 – 3-8
Reset ... 3-4, 3-6 – 3-8, 4-6, 4-9
V.35 ... 1-16, A-3 – A-4, B-3
V.36 ... B-3
WAN ... A-3 – A-7
X.21 ... 1-16, A-3, A-6, B-3
certification
See data communications specifications
Circuit Statistics screen ... 2-14
Clear button ... 2-6, 3-4, 3-6 – 3-8
clearing
passwords ... 3-4, 3-6
router ... 3-4
router module ... 3-7
clock ... 3-10
collisions ... 4-5
command
Atping ... 2-9, 2-18, 4-11, 4-13
Boot ... 2-6 – 2-7, 3-10
Crash ... 2-8, 4-5
Exit ... 2-4, 4-14
Fget ... 2-9
Fput ... 2-9
Get ... 4-11
Logi ... 2-11
Password ... 2-9, 3-6
Ping ... 2-9, 2-18, 4-11 – 4-12
Rget ... 2-16 – 2-17
Rgetatr ... 2-17
Rgetb ... 2-16
Rgetda ... 2-17
Rgetdn ... 2-17
Rgetir ... 2-16
Rgetis ... 2-16
Rgetr ... 2-16
Rgetxr ... 2-16
Telnet ... 4-11, 4-14
Test ... 2-9
Time ... 2-8
communications standards ... B-3
compatibility
See data communications specifications
configuration ... 2-5 – 2-7
applying saved configuration ... 3-5 – 3-6,
3-10
corrupted ... 4-10
default ... 2-5, 3-4, 3-7
factory default ... 2-5, C-3
from another router ... 1-9
full ... C-2
intermediate ... C-2
minimal ... 2-5, C-2
process ... 2-6
Quick Remote ... C-2
Configuration Editor ... 2-5, 2-7
connector
See cable
console ... v, 1-18 – 1-19, 3-6 – 3-7, 3-10
copyright ... ii
Crash command in NCL ... 2-8, 4-5
D
data communications specifications ... B-3
date
See time
declaration of conformity ... 2
DECnet ... v
DECnet Router Statistics screen ... 2-14
DEFAULT_CONFIG ... 2-4
diagnostic tests ... 4-9 – 4-14
Distributed Management RS-232 port ... v,
1-7, 1-18
documentation ... 1-4
DoD IP Router Statistics screen ... 2-14
DSU/CSU ... 1-16
E
electromagnetic specifications ... B-2
emissions specifications ... B-2
environmental specifications ... B-2
error messages ... 4-7 – 4-8
error number ... 4-7
error patterns, LED ... 4-2
Ethernet address
See station address
Ethernet SNMP Module
See SNMP module
2-Index
event log ... 2-9, 2-11, 4-11
Exit command in NCL ... 2-4, 4-14
F
factory default ... 2-5, 3-7, 3-10, C-2 – C-3
failure
hardware ... 4-13
network ... 4-13
Fault LED ... 3-5 – 3-6
hub ... 1-21
See also Router Fault LED
Fault SNMP Mgt LED ... 4-6
Fget command in NCL ... 2-9
filtering ... 2-6
flash memory ... 4-2, 4-8
flashing LED ... 3-8
Fput command in NCL ... 2-9
frame relay ... v
G
Get command in NCL ... 4-11
H
HP cables ... A-3
HP Stack Manager ... 1-3 – 1-5, 1-7,
1-18 – 1-19, 1-22 – 1-23
hub
Exp Slot LED ... 1-21
Exp Slot or AdvSlot LED ... 1-21
Fault LED ... 1-21
Hub (LAN) Net Fail LED ... 3-2 – 3-3
Hub (LAN) Router Rx LED ... 3-2 – 3-3
Hub (LAN) Router Tx LED ... 3-2 – 3-3
humidity specifications ... B-2
I
ICMP: Internet Control Message Protocol
... 4-12
installation summary ... 1-2 – 1-4
interface
See also cable
RS-232/V.24/V.28 ... v
RS-422/RS-449/V.36 ... v
V.35 ... v
WAN ... 1-16, A-4 – A-8, B-3
X.21 ... v
Internet protocol ... v
IPX Router Statistics screen ... 2-14
L
M
MAC address
See station address
management of routers
See network management
manager password ... 3-7
N
NCL ... 2-3 – 2-4, 2-8, 2-16
Atping command ... 2-9, 2-18, 4-13
Boot command ... 2-6 – 2-7, 3-10
Crash command ... 2-8, 4-5
Exit command ... 2-4, 4-14
Fget command ... 2-9
Fput command ... 2-9
Get command ... 4-11
Logi command ... 2-11
Password command ... 2-9, 3-6
Ping command ... 2-9, 2-18, 4-12
prompt ... 2-4
Rget commands ... 2-16
Rgetatr command ... 2-17
Rgetb command ... 2-16
Rgetd command ... 2-17
Rgetda command ... 2-17
Rgetdn command ... 2-17
Rgetir command ... 2-16
Rgetis command ... 2-16
Rgetr command ... 2-16
Rgetxr command ... 2-16
Telnet command ... 4-14
Test command ... 2-9
Time command ... 2-8
Net Fail LED ... 1-22, 3-5 – 3-6, 4-10
See also Hub (LAN) Net Fail LED,
WAN Net Fail LED
network
links ... 4-11
management ... 3-6
map ... 1-8
plan ... 1-8
topology, problems ... 4-2
Network Control Language Interpreter
See NCL
node ... 4-13
Index
LAPB ... v
LED ... 3-2
error patterns ... 4-2
Fault ... 3-5 – 3-6
flashing ... 3-8
Hub (LAN) Net Fail ... 3-2 – 3-3
Hub (LAN) Router Rx ... 3-2 – 3-3
Hub (LAN) Router Tx ... 3-2 – 3-3
hub Exp Slot or AdvSlot ... 1-21
hub Fault ... 1-21
Net Fail ... 1-22, 3-5 – 3-6, 4-10
Router Fault ... 3-2 – 3-3
Router Self-test ... 3-2 – 3-3, 3-8, 3-10
Self-test ... 3-6, 3-8
SNMP Mgt Fault ... 3-2 – 3-3, 4-6
verifying operation ... 4-6
WAN Net Fail ... 1-22, 3-2 – 3-3
Wan Rx ... 3-2 – 3-3, 3-10
WAN Tx ... 3-2 – 3-3, 3-10
link test ... 4-11
Logi command in NCL ... 2-11
loopback connector ... A-10
See also password
manuals ... 1-4
MIB ... 2-9, 4-11
monitor, self-test ... 4-7
Index-3
O
operating code ... 4-2
P
password ... 2-9, 3-6
clear ... 3-4, 3-6, 3-8
manager ... 3-4, 3-6 – 3-8
setting ... 2-9
user ... 3-4, 3-6 – 3-8
Password command in NCL ... 2-9, 3-6
Per Second Statistics screen ... 2-14
physical address
See station address
pin-outs for cables ... A-2, A-4 – A-10
Ping command in NCL ... 2-9, 2-16, 2-18,
4-11 – 4-12
point to point
See WAN
power
applying power to the router ... 3-5, 3-10
consumption ... B-2
PPP ... v
Q
Quick Configuration utility ... 2-5 – 2-6
R
RAM
maintains configuration ... 3-10
maintains date and time ... 2-8
regulatory information ... ii, 1 – 2
remote bridge ... A-3, A-8
remote signal & sense ... 4-5
remote terminal
See Telnet
reset ... 3-4, 3-6, 3-8, 4-6
Reset button ... 2-6, 3-4, 3-6 – 3-8, 3-10, 4-6,
4-9
Rget command in NCL ... 2-16
Rget commands in NCL ... 2-16 – 2-17
Rgetatr command in NCL ... 2-17
Rgetb command in NCL ... 2-16
Rgetd command in NCL ... 2-17
Rgetda command in NCL ... 2-17
4-Index
Rgetdn command in NCL ... 2-17
Rgetir command in NCL ... 2-16
Rgetis command in NCL ... 2-16
Rgetr command in NCL ... 2-16
Rgetxr command in NCL ... 2-16
Router Fault LED ... 3-2 – 3-3
Router Rx LED
See Hub (LAN) Router Rx LED
Router Self-test LED ... 3-2 – 3-3, 3-6, 3-8
Router Tx LED
See Hub (LAN) Router Tx LED
routing tables ... 4-6, 4-11
RS-232 cable ... A-3, A-5
RS-232 WAN interface ... B-3
RS-422 WAN interface ... A-3, A-7 – A-8, B-3
RS-449 WAN interface ... B-3
S
screen
Copyright ... 1-23
Main Menu ... 1-23
security ... 3-4, 3-6, 3-8
self-test ... 3-6, 3-8, 3-10
monitor ... 4-7
Self-test LED
See Router Self-test LED
serial port
See console
serial ports and links
See WAN
server, Bootp
See Bootp request
setup summary ... 2-2
severity, events ... 2-11
Simple Network Management Protocol
See SNMP
SmartBoot ... v, 1-9, 1-18, 1-22, 3-5,
3-7 – 3-9, 3-11, C-1 – C-4
SMDS ... v
SNMP ... 2-16
SNMP Mgt Fault LED ... 3-2 – 3-3, 4-6
SNMP Module ... iv – v, 1-10, 1-12 – 1-15,
1-18, 1-21, 3-3 – 3-5, 4-2 – 4-3, 4-15 – 4-16
checking version ... 1-2, 1-5 – 1-7
failure of ... 3-3, 4-4 – 4-5
self-test of ... 1-21, 3-3
SNMP Mgt Fault LED ... 3-2
spanning tree ... 2-6, 2-11, 3-10
specifications ... B-1 – B-4
standards
See specifications
static routes ... 2-6
station address ... 4-11
statistics ... 2-9, 2-14 – 2-15, 4-11
synchronous port
See WAN port
T
Telnet ... 1-20, 1-22, 2-2, 3-6, 4-11
Telnet command in NCL ... 4-14
temperature specifications ... B-2
Test command in NCL ... 2-9
TFTP ... 3-6, C-2
time ... 2-8, 3-10
Time command in NCL ... 2-8
Time protocol ... 2-8, 3-10
U
user password ... 2-9, 3-7
See also password
V
Index
V.35 WAN interface ... A-3 – A-4, B-3
verification procedures ... 2-10 – 2-18
event log ... 2-11
hardware ... 4-6
network links ... 2-13, 4-13
node accessibility ... 2-18
Rget commands in NCL ... 2-16
router hardware ... 1-20 – 1-24
Index-5
W
WAN
cable ... B-3
interface ... 1-16
port ... 4-10, A-3 – A-8, B-3
test cable ... A-3
WAN Net Fail LED ... 1-22, 3-2 – 3-3
WAN Rx LED ... 3-2 – 3-3, 3-10
WAN Tx LED ... 3-2 – 3-3, 3-10
warranty ... ii, B-3
X
X.21 WAN interface ... A-3, A-6, B-3
X.25 ... v
XCVR signal polling ... 4-5
XNS Router Statistics screen ... 2-14
XNS/IPX ... v
6-Index
H
©Copyright 1994
Hewlett-Packard Company
Printed U.S.A. 12/94
Manual Part Number
5963-2632
*5963-2632*
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