HP | AdvanceStack Router 230 | User's Manual | HP AdvanceStack Router 230 User's Manual

User’s Guide
Commands and Procedures
HP AdvanceStack Routers
Hewlett-Packard Series 200, 400, and 600
Routers
User’s Guide
© Copyright HewlettPackard Company 1994.
All rights reserved.
This document contains proprietary information, which
is protected by copyright. No
part of this document may be
photocopied, reproduced, or
translated into another
language without the prior
written consent of HewlettPackard.
Publication Number
5962-8304
E0794
Edition 1, July 1994
Printed in Singapore
Product Numbers and Software Version
This guide provides information for Hewlett-Packard routers running software with the
following version numbers:
A.08 series
B.08 series
C.08 series
Earlier and later software versions may operate differently
than described in this manual.
Warranty
The information contained in
this document is subject to
change without notice
HEWLETT-PACKARD
COMPANY MAKES NO
WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND WITH REGARD TO
THIS MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Hewlett-Packard shall not be
liable for errors contained
herein or for incidental or
consequential damages in
connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of
this material.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no
responsibility for the use or
reliability of its software on
equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
Hewlett-Packard
8000 Foothills Boulevard
Roseville, California 95747-6588
916-786-8000
Commands and Procedures Guide
Preface
Preface
Why and When To Use This Guide
This guide describes how to use the Hewlett-Packard router commands
and features to configure, monitor, and manage local and remote HP
routers through the console interface and through SmartBoot.
Use this guide when you need help with the operations that begin after
the router hardware has been installed and verified according to the
instructions in the installation guide.
C o v e r a g e N o t e This manual addresses the entire range of commands and other software features found in Hewlett-Packard routers, including features that
are not found on all router models. Thus, for some routers, such as the
HP Router PR (J2540), certain features described in this manual are not
available in the router. For information on the features available in your
router, refer to the release notes you received with the router or most recent software upgrade.
Audience
This guide is intended for network managers and other technicians who
install and manage routers.
Note
The network design and network map should be completed before using
this guide.
3
Commands and Procedures Guide
Preface
Organization
Chapter 1, ‘‘Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router
Software’’, defines ‘‘initializing and verifying’’ a router, and introduces
you to the router console interface and the tools it offers for managing a
router.
Chapter 2, ‘‘How To Use the Main Menu’’, describes how to access
and operate the main menu.
Chapter 3, ‘‘How To Use Quick Configuration To Create or
Change a Minimal Configuration’’, describes how to use this
time-saving utility to quickly create a functional configuration.
Chapter 4, ‘‘How To Use the Configuration Editor To Create or
Change a Configuration’’, describes the tool to use for creating the
extensive configurations needed for many router applications.
Chapter 5, ‘‘How To Use the Event Log To Analyze Router
Operation’’ describes how to access and interpret Event Log messages.
Chapter 6, ‘‘How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router
Operation’’ describes how to use the router statistics features.
Chapter 7, ‘‘How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL)
Commands To Manage a Router’’, describes how to use the Network
Control Language Interpreter (NCL) and the various NCL commands.
This chapter includes the use of Telnet to manage or reconfigure a
remote router.
Chapter 8, ‘‘How To Use Quick Remote To Configure a Remote
Router’’, describes how to automatically configuring a remote router
from a central site via a WAN link.
Appendix A: ‘‘Parameter Locator’’, is an aide to locating individual
parameters in the Configuration Editor structure.
Subject Index
Other HP Router Manuals
For a current listing of manuals designed for use with your
Hewlett-Packard router, refer to the Hewlett-Packard Router Products
Release Notes shipped with your router or most recent software update.
4
Contents
1.
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Contents
Initializing the Router Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Verifying the Router Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Overview of the Console Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Overview of Methods for Creating or Modifying a Configuration . . 1-8
Configuration Tools in the Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Interaction Between the Configuration Tools . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Network Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
2.
How To Use the Main Menu
Introducing the Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
How To Access the Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Selecting an Option in the Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Getting Help in the Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
3.
How To Use Quick Configuration To Create or
Change a Minimal Configuration
Introducing Quick Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
How To Create a Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
The Numeric Hotkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
The Alphabetical Hotkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
How To Configure for X.25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Operating Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameter List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving vs. Saving and Rebooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When To Use the Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting a Quick Configuration . . . . . . . . . . .
The HP Router 650: How To Update the Interface Module
Configuration After Removing or Replacing a Module . .
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3-27
3-27
3-28
3-28
3-29
3-30
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5
4.
How To Use the Configuration Editor To Create or
Change a Configuration
Introducing the Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
The Configuration Editor Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
How To Enter the Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
How To Exit From the Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
How To Operate the Configuration Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving From One Screen to Another . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering or Changing Parameter Values in Configuration Screens
5.
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-14
How To Use the Event Log To Analyze Router Operation
Introducing the Event Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Entering and Navigating in the Event Log Display . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
6.
How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router
Operation
Introducing the Statistics Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
How To Access the Statistics Screen Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
How To Manage the Statistics Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
7.
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL)
Commands To Manage a Router
Introducing NCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
How To Start NCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
How To Execute an NCL Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
More: Continuing the Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
General NCL Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
6
How To Use Telnet To Establish a Virtual Terminal Connection to
a Remote Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisites for Telnet Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How To Enable Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How To Use Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7-10
7-10
7-11
7-11
Accessing the Management Information Base
Slot Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managed Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example of a Pathname to a Mib Variable
How To Use the List Command . . . . . .
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7-13
7-13
7-14
7-16
7-17
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How To Use the Get Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20
How To Use the Reset Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21
Accessing the Internet Management Information Base . . . . . . . . 7-22
Accessing a Remote Management Information Base . . . . . . . . . 7-23
Contents
Accessing a Foreign Management Information Base . . . . . . . . . 7-24
Accessing Bridging and Routing Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-25
Managing the Open Shortest Path First Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . 7-27
Blocking and Unblocking Spanning Tree Explorer Frames . . . . . 7-28
Controlling IP-Mapped Circuits for V.25 bis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-29
Using TFTP To Transfer Operating Code, Configuration, and NCL
Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-30
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display 7-32
How To Use Zput To Store the Configuration or NCL Command
Output to a PC Host File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-33
How To Use Zget To Load the Configuration to a Router . . . . . 7-36
8.
How To Use Quick Remote To Configure A Remote
Router
Introducing Quick Remote . . . . . . . . . .
What Can Quick Remote Configure? . .
Other Quick Remote Features . . . . . .
Set-Up Requirements for Quick Remote
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8-2
8-3
8-3
8-4
Quick Remote Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Basic Steps to Setting Up Quick Remote . . .
The Quick Remote Screen: Features and Control
How To Exit From Quick Remote . . . . . . . . .
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8-5
8-6
8-7
8-8
How To Create and Save a Quick Remote Configuration . . . . . . . 8-9
How to Delete a Quick Remote Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
Operating Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
A. Notes On Configuring From a Bootp Server
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Preparation Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Index
7
1
Overview of Initializing and Verifying
Router Software
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Note
This chapter provides an overview of getting started with a router. For
actual operating instructions, refer to chapters 2 through 8.
After a router has been installed and the hardware verified as described
in the installation guide, you are ready to use the console to initialize
and verify the router’s software operation. This chapter provides an
overview of these topics as well as an introduction to the console
interface and the software tools for creating or modifying a
configuration.
If you are new to Hewlett-Packard routers, this chapter can help you to
become more familiar with the functions of the console interface before
you actually begin to use it. If you are already familiar with HP
routers, you may want to bypass this chapter and use the following
chapters in this guide as needed for reference.
Note
1-2
In the case of a router that is automatically configured and subsequently
managed via Telnet from another location (such as configuration via
Quick Remote from another Hewlett-Packard router), local operator
intervention is usually unnecessary. In such cases, it may be unnecessary for a local operator to use the features described in this manual.
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Initializing the Router Software
Initializing the Router Software
When the router is installed with (or reset to) the factory default, it
boots and begins operation with all networking ports configured for
bridging. At this point you are ready to use the console interface to
initialize the router. The following is an overview of the initializing
process:
1. Configure for routing.
1
2. Boot the router.
3. Set the date and time (optional).
Overview
4. Set passwords (optional, but recommended for system access
security).
Configure for Routing
Configuring specifies the parameter values needed to conform router
operation to the needs of your network. You can use Quick
Configuration to create a minimal configuration or you can use the
Configuration Editor to create a more extensive configuration.
Boot the Router
After you specify a configuration, you must implement it by ‘‘booting’’
the router. Booting replaces the former configuration parameters with
the ones you have most recently saved, and restarts the router. Booting
is a simple process that can be done either when you exit from the
Quick Configuration screen or by executing the Boot command in the
Network Command Language Interpreter (NCL).
Set the Date and Time
In the factory default configuration, the router starts its clock and
calendar from a default setting. Setting the date and time ensures an
accurate date and time display in the console screen and accurate dates
and times in Event Log messages.
1-3
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Initializing the Router Software
Set Passwords
When your router is operating without passwords, anyone who has
access to your router through either the directly connected console or
Telnet can freely act as the router operator or manager. To discourage
unauthorized access, it is recommended that you set two levels of
passwords:
Manager password: Allows access to router management functions
such as timesetting, changing the configuration, and rebooting.
User password: Allows monitoring only of statistics, the event log,
MIB variables, and configuration values. It does not allow execution
of router management functions such as rebooting.
1-4
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Verifying the Router Software
Verifying the Router Software
Verifying the router software means to evaluate the performance of the
bridging and routing services that have been configured in the router to
ensure that bridging and routing is operating properly. Verifying occurs
after the router hardware has been installed and the software initialized,
and involves using the console to inspect router-generated data from the
following sources:
Statistics screens
1
Event log
Bridging and routing tables
Overview
Node accessability tests (ping, Atping)
The remainder of this chapter provides an overview of the console
interface, which is the tool to use for initializing, verifying, and managing
your router.
1-5
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Overview of the Console Interface
Overview of the Console Interface
The console interface is your tool for configuring and booting the router,
gathering data on router performance, and managing router operation.
Access to the console interface is via the Main menu, which displays the
router’s software management features. (You can access a router’s
console interface either by directly connecting your terminal to the
router’s console port or by using Telnet --page 7-10-- or a modem
connection.)
Figure 1-1. The Main Menu
Statistics Screen Menu: Provides ongoing data for analyzing circuit,
bridge, routing service, and buffer usage. (Refer to chapter 6, ‘‘How
To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router Operation’’.)
Network Control Language Interpreter: Referred to as ‘‘NCL’’,
provides a command line to execute router management commands
such as rebooting, password-setting, and access to bridging and
routing tables. (Refer to chapter 7, ‘‘How To Use the Network
Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router’’.)
1-6
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Overview of the Console Interface
Configuration Editor: Used to create and modify extensive configurations. (Refer to the next section and to chapter 4, ‘‘How To Use the
Configuration Editor To Create or Change a Configuration’’.)
Event Log: Displays event messages generated by the router. (Refer
to chapter 5, ‘‘How To Use the Event Log To Analyze Router
Operation’’.)
LOGOFF: Terminates a console session from a remote terminal.
(Refer to ‘‘How To Disconnect Telnet Access to Another HP Router’’
on page 7-12.)
1
Quick Configuration: Used to create and modify minimal configurations. (Refer to the next section and to chapter 3, ‘‘How To Use
Quick Configuration To Create or Change a Minimal Configuration’’.)
Overview
Quick Remote: Provides a tool for creating and holding minimal
configurations for automatic downloading to remote HP routers over
a WAN link. (Quick Remote does not affect the local router’s configuration.) Refer to chapter 8, ‘‘How To Use Quick Remote To Configure
a Remote Router’’.
1-7
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Overview of Methods for Creating or Modifying a Configuration
Overview of Methods for Creating
or Modifying a Configuration
This section describes tools that you can use to access the configuration
in any HP Series 200, 400, or 600 router, using either a direct console
connection to the router or Telnet access over the network.
The ports on a router must be configured for routing before they can
actually perform routing functions. Also, once a routing configuration
has been implemented, it may need adjustments to achieve optimum
performance. In these cases it is necessary to use the configuration tools
to create or modify a configuration.
The configuration tools
Figure 1-2. Methods for Configuring the Router
1-8
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Overview of Methods for Creating or Modifying a Configuration
Configuration Tools in the Main Menu
Quick Configuration: (Main Menu item number 6) queries you only
for the configuration parameters most commonly required to get
started. It provides help for each question and displays a table tracking your current settings, all on one screen. (If your network design
requires that you customize parameters others than those in Quick
Configuration, then you can use the full Configuration Editor.) To
use Quick Configuration, refer to chapter 3, ‘‘How To Use Quick
Configuration To Create or Change a Minimal Configuration’’.
1
Configuration Editor: (Main Menu item number 3) uses a structured
series of menus, screens, and prompts that lead logically through all
the parameters you may customize for your HP router. The Configuration Editor gives you more flexibility and many more parameters
than are available in Quick Configuration. Refer to chapter 4, ‘‘How
To Use the Configuration Editor To Create or Change a Configuration’’.
Overview
Interaction Between the Configuration Tools
Quick Configuration accesses a group of parameters that forms a subset
of the parameters accessed by the Configuration Editor.
That is, Quick Configuration and the Configuration Editor provide two
different ways to access the same router configuration. Thus, if you
change a parameter value such as an IP address in Quick Configuration,
then reboot the router, the new IP address will automatically map to the
Configuration Editor as well. Similarly, if you change any parameters in
the Configuration Editor that are also accessed from Quick
Configuration, then reboot the router, the changes will automatically
map to Quick Configuration.
1-9
Overview of Initializing and Verifying Router Software
Network Management Tools
Network Management Tools
Network management tools provide another method of monitoring and
configuring a router that is already installed in a network. For
information on how to access and manage a router using a network
management tool, refer to the documentation you received with your
network management software.
1-10
2
How To Use the Main Menu
How To Use the Main Menu
Introducing the Main Menu
Introducing the Main Menu
The Main Menu is the highest level in the console interface, and provides
operator access to the router. It lists each of the router’s main user
interface features, and includes Help information on each of these
features.
2-2
How To Use the Main Menu
How To Access the Main Menu
How To Access the Main Menu
How to connect a console to your router is described in the installation
guide for your router. The console is then used to verify that the router
hardware is operating properly.
Once the terminal or terminal emulation is switched on, connected, and
configured correctly and the router is plugged in and passes its self-test,
you are ready to proceed.
Note
If you use a personal computer for a console, press the [Enter] key whenever this manual tells you to press the [Return] key.
If a line of text (such as Waiting for speed sense) appears, press
[Return]. (You may have to pause and repeat [Return] two or three times to
get a response.) Pressing [Return] allows the router to sense the speed of
your terminal and respond accordingly. As soon as the router senses
and matches the terminal’s speed, the baud rate is displayed at the
correct speed. You will then see one of the following screens:
2
Main Menu
Figure 2-1. The Main Menu
Note
Figure 2-2. Copyright and Password
If your console is already displaying a screenful of other text, the ‘‘speed
sense’’ text mentioned above may appear anywhere on the screen.
When you see that a new line of text has appeared (garbled or not),
press [Return].
2-3
How To Use the Main Menu
How To Access the Main Menu
If the Copyright and Password screen (figure 2-2) appears first, then
a password has been set. Type in the password and press [Return] again
to display the Main menu. If you need to clear (remove) a password,
refer to the installation guide you received with your router.
If the Main menu (figure 2-1) appears first, then a password is not
required.
The items listed in the Main menu include the following:
Statistics Screen menu
Network Control Language Interpreter (NCL)
Configuration Editor
Event Log
Logout
Quick Configuration
Quick Remote (on most router models)
Figure 2-3. The Main Menu
2-4
How To Use the Main Menu
Selecting an Option in the Main Menu
Selecting an Option in the Main
Menu
To select (start) a Main menu option, press the number of that option.
For example, to display the Network Control Language Interpreter
(NCL), press [2].
NCL Prompt
2
Main Menu
Figure 2-4. Pressing [2] in the Main Menu Displays the NCL Prompt
To exit from NCL, type exit and press [Return].
2-5
How To Use the Main Menu
Getting Help in the Main Menu
Getting Help in the Main Menu
To display Help for an item listed in the Main Menu, use the [^] or [v] key
to move the pointer to the item for which you want Help, then press
[Shift] [?]. For example, to display Help for NCL:
1. Move the pointer to item 2, ‘‘Network Control Language Interpreter’’
in the Main Menu:
Figure 2-5. Move the Pointer to Item 2
2-6
How To Use the Main Menu
Getting Help in the Main Menu
2. Press [Shift] [?] to display the Help information.
Figure 2-6.The NCL Help Display
2
Press [<] (or any character key) to exit from Help and return to the Main
menu.
Main Menu
This completes the instructions on how to access the console interface
and use the Main menu. The remainder of this manual describes how to
operate the individual features listed in the Main menu.
2-7
3
How To Use Quick Configuration To
Create or Change a Minimal
Configuration
How To Use Quick Configuration
Introducing Quick Configuration
Introducing Quick Configuration
This chapter describes how to use the Quick Configuration utility to
create a minimal configuration for IP, IPX, AppleTalk, and DECnet
routing services. You can also use Quick Configuration to disable or
enable bridging on each port of your router.
Why Use Quick Configuration? Your HP router provides two methods
for configuring the router through the console port:
The Quick Configuration utility — the short path to basic configurations
The Configuration Editor — the detailed path to fully customized
configurations (described in chapter 4)
Quick Configuration provides the following:
A single-screen “worksheet” approach for basic configurations—you
can combine several steps into one for a configuration process that
is faster and easier than using the more detailed and extensive
Configuration Editor.
Access to a minimal set of IP, IPX, AppleTalk, and DECnet parameters, plus options for bridging and IP host-only operation.
Access to X.25 (available on most HP routers) and other selected
branches of the Configuration Editor, or to the entire Configuration
Editor—you can use the ‘‘hotkeys’’ to choose either, without having
to exit from Quick Configuration.
Optional rebooting upon exit from Quick Configuration—when
you’ve finished configuring, you can choose to reboot when you exit
from Quick Configuration. This makes it faster and easier to get your
router up and running after you’ve made configuration changes.
Note
3-2
Quick Configuration affects a small subset of the overall parameter set
accessed through the Configuration Editor. For more on this topic, refer
to ‘‘Interacting With the Configuration Editor’’ on page 3-29.
How To Use Quick Configuration
Introducing Quick Configuration
What are the basic steps to configuring a router?
The basic steps to configuring the router for minimal operation are:
1. Determine from your network map the minimal parameter values
you need.
2. Start Quick Configuration.
3. Enter the parameter values that you determined in step 1.
4. Exit from Quick Configuration with the reboot option selected.
5. After the router finishes rebooting, verify proper operation.
Note
Because of port differences and routing service differences, the Quick
Configuration screen differs among the various HP routers. Examples of
Quick Configuration use are the following screens for an HP Router SR
and an HP Router 650:
3
Quick
Configuration
3-3
How To Use Quick Configuration
Introducing Quick Configuration
Data entry field showing an entry in progress for the IP
address of the WAN- 2
Dynamic help
display
Sample IP
configurations
Figure 3-1. Quick Configuration Example (HP Router SR)
Slot numbers
identifying the
slots in which
the ports are installed
Sample IP
configurations
Figure 3-2.Quick Configuration Example (HP Router 650)
3-4
How To Use Quick Configuration
Introducing Quick Configuration
Quick Configuration also offers these other features:
Displays dynamic online help for each field
Automatically configures default lines, circuits, and circuit groups
Displays error messages for some error types, such as subnet
masking errors
Lets you view (and change) what has been configured earlier
Provides ‘‘hotkeys’’ for display control and direct access to the
Configuration Editor
Detects removal of a interface module and enables you to easily
update the interface module configuration to reflect the change
Detects replacement of one type of interface module with another
and enables you to eliminate the resulting configuration conflict
3
Quick
Configuration
3-5
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
To create a new configuration:
1. Start the Quick Configuration utility.
2. Enter a minimal set of configuration values.
3. Save the new configuration and reboot the router.
This section tells you how to do the above, as well as how to exit from
Quick Configuration when you don’t want to change the current
configuration.
To start the Quick Configuration utility and enter a minimal
configuration:
1. Plan the Quick Configuration parameters you will need.
2. Start the router (described in chapter 1 of the Installation Guide)
and display the Main menu.
Quick Configuration
option
Figure 3-3. The Main Menu
3-6
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
3. Start a Quick Configuration session. (Press [6].)
When the ‘‘Welcome...’’ screen appears, press [Return]. The console
then displays the Quick Configuration screen. The ports shown will
correspond to the router model you are configuring.
Data entry field
Cursor positioned at
System name field
Ports
Figure 3-4. Example of a Quick Configuration Screen
There are nine fields for each port configuration:
Brg DoD IP
Enab Address
DoD IP
Subnet
Mask
IPX
Network
Port
Conf
WAN Port
Parameters
These fields appear in the initial Quick Configuration
Screen
AppleTalk Net
Range
AppleTalk Zone
Name
DECnet
area.node
Use [>] to scroll to these fields or wrap to the first
column, and [<] to scroll back to the left or to wrap
to the last column
3
Quick
Configuration
3-7
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
4. Type the system name and press [Return]. The new system name then
appears in the ‘‘System name’’ field and the cursor moves to the next
field.
•
If you don’t want to change the data in the selected field, just
press [Return] to move to the next field.
•
If you want to skip over several fields, you can do so by using the
cursor keys ([^], [v], [<], and [>]) or [Tab] to select the next field you
want.
Also, pressing [<] when the cursor is in the first (‘‘Brg Enab’’)
column ‘‘wraps’’ the cursor to the last (‘‘DECnet area.node’’)
column in the preceeding row. Similarly, pressing [>] when the
cursor is in the last (‘‘DECnet area.node’’) column ‘‘wraps’’ the
cursor to the first (‘‘Brg Enab’’) column in the following row.
Figure 3-5. Use the [>] Key To Scroll the Display to Additional Parameters
5. Type the data for the next parameter, then press [Return] again. Repeat
this step until you have entered data for all needed fields.
3-8
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
How to exit from Quick Configuration and reboot the router:
Use this procedure if you want to save and implement any configuration
changes that you have made in the current Quick Configuration session.
1. Press the [Ctrl] [C] key combination and then type y to exit from the
Quick Configuration utility. You will then see the “save and exit”
prompt:
The
‘‘save
and exit’’
prompt
Figure 3-6.Example of ‘‘Save and Exit’’ Prompt
Note
If the cursor is located in the rightmost (DECnet area.node) cell of the
last port listed in the Quick Configuration screen, you can exit and
display the ‘‘Save and Exit’’ prompt by just pressing [Return].
3
Quick
Configuration
3-9
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
2. Type y and press [Return]. You will then see the reboot prompt:
The
reboot
prompt
Figure 3-7.The Reboot Prompt
3. Type y again and press [Return] to reboot the router.
While the router is rebooting, the console displays
REBOOTING THE SYSTEM
When you see the message
Waiting for speed sense
the router has finished rebooting. Any configuration changes you
made prior to exiting and rebooting will be implemented in the
router configuration.
Note
3-10
If you are configuring a remote router via Telnet or a modem, the link
will be interrupted by the reboot, and the ‘‘Waiting for speed sense’’
message will not appear. In this case, you will have to re-establish the
remote connection to return to the remote router’s Main menu.
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Create a Configuration
4. Press [Return] to return to the Main menu. (If a password has been previously set, you will see the Copyright and Password screen--page 23, with the password prompt. In this case, type the password and
press [Return] again to return to the Main menu.)
How to exit from Quick Configuration without saving changes:
Use this procedure if you want to exit from Quick Configuration without
saving any changes you have made during the current Quick
Configuration session.
1. Press the [Ctrl] [C] key combination to exit from the Quick Configuration utility. You will then see the “save and exit” prompt (figure 3-6
on page 3-9).
2. Type n and then press [Return]. You will then see the ‘‘make changes’’
prompt:
The
‘‘make
changes’’
prompt
3
Quick
Configuration
Figure 3-8.The ‘‘Make Changes’’ Prompt
3. Type n again and press [Return]. The router exits from Quick Configuration and displays the Main menu (page 3-6).
3-11
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
The ‘‘hotkeys’’ give you additional configuration editing controls, and are
in two groups:
Display control keys (numeric; 1 through 5)
Configuration Editor1 access keys (alphabetical; Y, N, etc.)
To display the hotkey menu: Type the forward slash (/).
For example, if you start Quick Configuration, display the Quick
Configuration screen and then type /, you will see a set of hotkey
options similar to the following:
Example of
hotkey
options
Figure 3-9. Example of Hotkey Display
Note
You can display the hotkey menu from any cursor position in the Quick
Configuration screen except in cases where you have already begun to
type a multiple-keystroke value, such as an IP address or subnet mask.
1For more information on the Configuration Editor itself, refer to chapter 4, ‘‘How To Use
the Configuration Editor To Create or Change a Configuration’’.
3-12
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
The Numeric Hotkeys
These keys are the same for every cursor position in Quick
Configuration. They let you control display features or exit from Quick
Configuration.
1 Done configuring
Typing [1] displays the ‘‘save and exit’’
prompt (page 3-9), allowing you to exit
from Quick Configuration. (Operation is the
same as that for the [Ctrl] [C] key
combination—step 1 on page 3-11.)
2 Display help message
When the Help display has previously
been disabled, typing 2 displays the Help
message for the currently highlighted field.
3 Redraw screen
Typing 3 redraws the current Quick
Configuration screen.
4 Edit current value
Typing 4 lets you change one or more
characters in a parameter value without
having to retype the entire value.
5 Disable help messages
Enable help messages
Typing [5] when Help messaging is enabled
turns off Help messaging for all fields.
Typing 5 when Help messaging is disabled
turns on Help messaging for all fields.
3
Quick
Configuration
3-13
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
The Alphabetical Hotkeys
These keys vary, depending on which parameter in the Quick
Configuration screen is currently selected. They either change the
setting of the currently highlighted parameter or take you to the
indicated screen in the Configuration Editor, where you can configure
parameters that are not available in the basic Quick Configuration
screen. In most cases (except for certain X.25 parameters on HP
routers that have the X.25 service), you won’t need these keys unless
you must access parameters that are not displayed in Quick
Configuration.
For example, if you type / while the cursor is on the ‘‘System name’’
field in the Quick Configuration screen, you will see the following
display.
‘‘E’’ option
Figure 3-10. The Hotkey Menu
3-14
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
If you then type E (for ‘‘Edit other system parms’’), you will then
see the Configuration Editor screen associated with the ‘‘System name’’
parameter:
Figure 3-11. Example of Using ‘‘Edit Other...’’ Hotkey
From this screen you can access any lower-level system parameter
screen in the ‘‘system’’ branch of the Configuration Editor. Similarly,
typing / M in figure 3-10 (for ‘‘Main configuration menu’’) takes
you to the main configuration menu screen (figure 3-3 on page 3-6).
3
Quick
Configuration
3-15
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
Figure 3-12. Example of using ‘‘Main...’’ Hotkey
Since the Main Configuration menu is at the ‘‘top’’ of the Configuration
Editor screen hierarchy, you can access any level of any branch of the
Configuration Editor from this screen.
Returning From the Configuration Editor to Quick Configuration.
Pressing [Return] to exit from the screen at which you entered the
Configuration Editor returns you to Quick Configuration. (That is, press
[Return] as many times as is needed to go through all displayed fields,
return to your entry point into the Configuration Editor, and, from there,
to exit.)
For Further Examples. The next section, ‘‘How To Configure for X.25’’,
includes examples of how to use the alphabetical hot keys to access
Configuration Editor screens without exiting from Quick Configuration.
3-16
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
How To Configure for X.25
The X.25 routing service is available on most HP routers. In the factory
default, most of the X.25 parameters are set to default values that may
be acceptable for your application. For a minimal X.25 configuration,
you will need to enter one of the following sets of values:
DDN
PDN
X.25 Point-to-Point
(PTOP)*
None
X.121 address of the local
X.121 address of the local
Default settings are provided
port
port
for all values needed for
minimal configuration
IP address and X.121 address X.121 address of the remote
of each remote port
port
The connection ID for the
remote port
*You can specify only one PTOP circuit in Quick Configuration. If you want to specify additional circuits,
you must use the Configuration Editor (which you can access from Quick Configuration by using the [/]
[M] Hotkey combination).
Note:
The Configuration Editor provides appropriate default circuit names and
circuit group names.
For descriptions of specific X.25 parameters, refer to the Operator’s
Reference.
3
Quick
Configuration
3-17
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
To Configure Minimal X.25 service:
1. Configure the desired WAN port in the Quick Configuration screen.
For example, WAN port 1 in the next figure is configured as follows:
•
Bridge enabled: Yes
•
IP address: 150.150.56.2
•
IP subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
(‘‘Port conf’’ and ‘‘WAN Port Parameters’’ are set to their default values.)
Configured
WAN Port
Figure 3-13. Example of Configured WAN Port
3-18
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
2. Type lapb in the ‘‘Port Conf’’ field and press [Return].) The circuit
type then changes to PTOP (Point-to-Point).
Link Type
Circuit Type
Figure 3-14. Specify LAPB as the Link Type
3
Quick
Configuration
3-19
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
3. Specify the X.25 circuit type—DDN, PDN, or PTOP (the default). (If
you don’t want PTOP, type ddn or pdn for the type of X.25 circuit,
then press [Return].)
Note
•
If you specified DDN for the circuit type, no more parameters are
needed for the default configuration. Go to step 4 on page 3-22.
•
If you specified PDN, you will need to enter the local DTE
address, the IP address, and the X.121 address, as follows:
Use the [Return] key to bypass fields that already contain default values.
•
Note
3-20
–
Local DTE address for PDN: Type / l (the [/] and [L]
keys), enter the X.121 address of the local port at ‘‘Local DTE
Address’’, and press [Return] as many times as needed to return
to Quick Configuration. (Refer to figure 3-15 on page 3-21.)
–
IP address and X.121 address for PDN: Type / r, enter
the IP address and X.121 address of the remote port, and
press the [Return] key as many times as needed to return to the
Quick Configuration screen. (Refer to figure 3-16 on page
3-21.)
If you specified PTOP, you will need to enter the local DTE
address, the remote DTE address, and the connection ID, as
follows:
–
Local DTE address: Type / l (the [/] and [L] keys), enter
the X.121 address of the local port (at ‘‘Local DTE Address’’),
and press [Return] as many times as needed to return to the
Quick Configuration screen. (Refer to figure 3-17 on page
3-22.)
–
Remote DTE address and Connection ID: Type / r,
enter the X.121 address (at ‘‘Remote DTE Addr’’) and the
Connection ID of the remote port, then use [Return] to return to
the Quick Configuration screen. (Refer to figure 3-18 on page
3-22.)
If you want to add more connection IDs, type / l instead of / r. Then
use [Return] to step past Local DTE Address. When you see ‘‘1. X.25
Virtual Circuits’’, type 1 and press [Return], then select the ‘‘Add’’ option. For more on how to use the Configuration Editor, refer to chapter 4.
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
Local DTE (X.121) address
Figure 3-15. Local X.121 Address for PDN
IP address
Remote X.121
address for
PDN
3
Quick
Configuration
Figure 3-16. Remote IP and X.121 Addresses for PDN
3-21
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
X.121 address for PTOP
Figure 3-17. Local X.121 Address for Point-to-Point
Remote Connection ID
Remote DTE (X.121) Address
Figure 3-18.Remote X.121 and Connection ID
4. Press the [Ctrl][C] key combination to display the ‘‘save and exit’’
prompt:
3-22
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
Save configuration and exit Quick Configuration
(y/n?)
5. Type y and press [Return] to display the ‘‘reboot’’ prompt
Reboot now (y/n?)
6. Type y (for ‘‘yes’’) and press [Return].
While the router is rebooting, the console displays
REBOOTING THE SYSTEM
When you see the message
Waiting for speed sense
the router has finished rebooting. Any configuration changes you
made prior to exiting and rebooting will be implemented in the
router configuration.
7. Press [Return] to return to the Main menu.
To configure additional (non-minimal) X.25 parameters:
As you may have noticed in the procedure to configure for minimal X.25
operation (page 3-18), the ‘‘l’’ and ‘‘r’’ hotkeys give you access to several
parameters other than those needed for minimal X.25 operation. Also,
there are other hot keys that give you access to additional parameters
that you may want to view and change. Thus, after you specify X.25
service and the circuit type (DDN, PDN, or PTOP), you can use the
hotkeys to access, view, and change the current settings of all X.25 (or
other) parameters if you find it necessary to do so.
1. Highlight the X.25 circuit type for the desired port. For example:
3
Quick
Configuration
3-23
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
X.25 circuit type
Figure 3-19. Highlight the X.25 Circuit Type
3-24
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
2. Type / . You will then see the hotkey menu. For example, with an
X.25 circuit type of PDN, you will see the following menu:
Figure 3-20. Hotkey Assignments
The ‘‘L’’ and ‘‘R’’ options access parameters you need to provide for
minimal X.25 operation (described in the procedure to configure for
minimal X.25 operation—page 3-18). The remaining options (listed
below) give you access to default parameters you can change as
required for non-minimal X.25 (and other) configurations:
•
E Edit virtual circuit parms (DDN only)
•
X Edit other X.25 parms
•
C Edit circuit parms
•
M Main configuration menu
3
Quick
Configuration
3. Type the letter for the option you want. You will then see the corresponding Configuration Editor screen. After you have entered your
changes, press [Return] as many times as necessary to return to the
Quick Configuration screen.
4. Press the [Ctrl] [C] key combination to display the ‘‘save and exit’’
prompt:
Save configuration and exit Quick Configuration
(y/n?)
3-25
How To Use Quick Configuration
How To Configure for X.25
5. Type y and press [Return] to display the ‘‘Reboot now (y/n)?’’ prompt
Reboot now (y/n?)
6. Type y (for ‘‘yes’’) and press [Return].
While the router is rebooting, the console displays
REBOOTING THE SYSTEM
When you see the message
Waiting for speed sense
the router has finished rebooting. Any configuration changes you
made prior to exiting and rebooting will be implemented in the
router configuration.
7. Press [Return] twice to return to the Main menu.
3-26
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
Operating Notes
Parameter List
Quick Configuration is set to the following default parameter values at
the factory and whenever you use the Reset/Clear button combination to
clear the router. (For more on clearing the router, refer to the
installation guide.)
Parameter
Default
System name
IP host-only
SNMP enabled
TELNET enabled
Brg Enab
DoD IP Address
DoD IP Subnet Mask
IPX Network
Port Conf
Ring interface (token ring)
Link type (WAN)
Bridge type (FDDI)
WAN Port Parameters
Quality of service (WAN)
Point-to-Point address
(WAN)
DEFAULT_CONFIG
NO (leaves router in router/host mode)
NO
NO
YES (enables bridging on indicated port)
—
—
— (IPX network number)
AppleTalk Net Range
AppleTalk Zone Name
DECnet area.node
—
—
—
16
HP (Hewlett-Packard)
TR (Translating)
AUTO
AUTO
3
Quick
Configuration
Note that when you start the Quick Configuration utility, the cursor is
always set to the ‘‘System name’’ field. (The default system name is
DEFAULT_CONFIG.) Also, the Help messages are active unless you
have previously used the / 5 hotkey combination to turn them off.
3-27
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
Data Entry
When you move the cursor from one field to another, the data entry field
changes to prompt you for the new data. When you type the new data, it
appears in the data entry field, but does not appear in the corresponding
field until you press [Return].
Saving vs. Saving and Rebooting
‘‘Saving’’ a new configuration holds that configuration in memory and
displays the new settings in the Quick Configuration display (and in the
Configuration Editor displays). However, because the router always
uses the configuration with which it was last booted, the new
configuration does not replace the previous configuration until you
reboot the router. Thus:
1. If you save a configuration (by typing y at the ‘‘save and exit’’
prompt—page 3-9). . .
2. . . . but then choose not to reboot the router (by typing n at the
‘‘Reboot now (y/n)?’’ prompt—page 3-10)
Then the configuration changes are saved in memory, but are not
implemented in the current configuration, unless you subsequently
reboot the router in one of the following ways:
Re-enter the Quick Configuration utility, then exit as described under
‘‘To exit from the Quick Configuration utility and reboot the router’’
on page 3-9.
Use the Network Control Language Interpreter (NCL) Boot
command.
Press the Reset button on the back of the router.
Cycle the power.
3-28
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
When To Use the Configuration Editor
Hewlett-Packard recommends that in most configuring situations you
use Quick Configuration first. Then, if necessary, use the Configuration
Editor to enter any additional configuration changes needed to optimize
the router for more efficient operation or to customize it for complex
routing situations. For example, you will need to use the Configuration
Editor for parameters in the following areas:
OSPF
V.25 bis
XNS
filters
static routes
adjacent hosts
timers
the internal clock (for WANs)
You can enter the Configuration Editor from the Main menu (page 3-6).
But if you are already in Quick Configuration, you can save time by
using the / m hotkey combination to enter the Configuration Editor, then
reboot as you exit from Quick Configuration.
3
Interacting with the Configuration Editor. The Quick Configuration
utility is a fast way to access a small subset of the complete parameter
set you can access by using the Configuration Editor. Thus, you can use
the Quick Configuration utility any time you want to add to or change
the parameter settings it covers. (To simply display the contents of
Quick Configuration, you can use the NCL Summary command —page
7-9.) When you change parameter values in Quick Configuration and
then reboot the router, these changes overwrite any earlier configuring
of the same values by the Configuration Editor. Similarly, when you
change parameter values in the Configuration Editor that affect the
parameter set accessed by Quick Configuration, and then reboot the
router, these changes will overwrite any earlier configuring of the same
values by Quick Configuration.
Quick
Configuration
3-29
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
Troubleshooting a Quick Configuration
If the router fails to operate in your network after you have used the
Quick Configuration utility, there are several areas to investigate for the
source of the problem:
Check the Quick Configuration display for errors or omissions in the
data that you provided.
Ensure that your network design allows for any Quick Configuration
default settings that may remain after you entered your parameter
values.
Ensure that you save the configuration and then reboot (page 3-9).
Ensure that all cable connections are firm and are routed properly.
Check the LEDs on all connected routers to ensure that all ports are
operating properly.
Use the NCL Ping command to send an ICMP echo request message
to each IP address connected to your router. (Refer to the ‘‘NCL
Command Summary’’ on page 7-7 or to the Operator’s Reference.)
Determine whether there is any need for additional configuring, as
indicated by unique or advanced configuration features used in the
network(s) to which your router is connected. (Refer to ‘‘When To
Use the Configuration Editor’’ on page 3-29.)
Check the event log to ensure that configured services (such as IP)
have started and are running properly. (Refer to the operator’s guide
for your router.)
Check the statistics screens you can access from the Main menu for
signs of impeded or failing operation.
Check your current configuration against the configurations of
adjacent routers to detect any settings that require reciprocal values
(such as DTE and DCE for WAN ports). Also check for any simple
configuration errors such as duplicate or incorrect IP addresses, or
incorrect subnet masks. (Create a list of interdependent values in the
other router(s) that dictate related or reciprocal settings in your
router.)
The installation and operator’s guides for your router provide additional
help for investigating and analyzing router operation and failures.
3-30
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
The HP Router 650: How To Update the
Interface Module Configuration After
Removing or Replacing a Module
Interface modules in an HP 650 router can be inserted, removed, or
replaced while the router is operating. However, when one of these
actions results in either no replacement for a removed module or
replacement with a module having a different set of ports, then the
software configuration will not match the current hardware
configuration. This subsection describes how Quick Configuration
operates in these conditions and how to use Quick Configuration to
update the interface module configuration after removing or replacing a
module.
Note
Quick Configuration reacts to a change in interface modules only when
the change takes place before you start Quick Configuration. That is, if a
module change occurs while Quick Configuration is in use, the effects of
the change will not appear in Quick Configuration until you exit from
Quick Configuration and then restart it.
Rebooting the router causes the router to re-initialize itself by using the
most recently saved configuration. Thus, after removing or replacing a
interface module, rebooting the router does not update the interface
module configuration unless you have also used Quick Configuration (or
the Configuration Editor) to update and save the router’s configuration.
3
Quick
Configuration
3-31
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
Removing a Previously Configured Interface Module
Removing a previously configured interface module and subsequently
starting Quick Configuration results in a modified display that indicates
which port configurations are no longer valid. For example, the
following screen illustrates an HP Router 650 with one WAN interface
module and one Ethernet interface module installed and configured as
shown:
Installed Interface Module
Configuration
Four-Port Synchronous WAN Module
WAN ports 1 and 2 configured
Four-Port Ethernet Module
Ethernet ports 1 and 2 configured
Figure 3-21. Two Interface Modules Installed and Configured
3-32
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
If the Ethernet interface module is removed and Quick Configuration is
subsequently restarted, the labels for the ports on the removed module
will be highlighted to indicate that they are still configured in the router,
even though they are no longer installed.
Highlighted port labels
indicate previously
configured ports on a
interface module that
has been removed
from the router
Figure 3-22. Identifying Nonexistent Ports in the HP Router 650 Configuration
You can then do one of the following:
Delete the non-existent ports from the configuration. This is the
recommended action if you will not be installing another interface
module in the same slot as the module you just removed. (Refer to
‘‘To use Quick Configuration to delete the non-existent ports from
the configuration’’ on the next page.)
3
Edit the configuration (including the parameters for the removed
interface module), then reboot the router. You would do this if you
wanted to install a new interface module in the slot from which have
just removed the original interface module. To edit the configuration,
refer to the earlier sections of this chapter.
Quick
Configuration
3-33
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
To Use Quick Configuration To Delete the Non-Existent Ports
from the Configuration:
1. Move the cursor to any row occupied by one of these ports. The Help
window will then display the messages indicated below:
Cursor positioned in any configured row for
which the interface module has been removed
Help message indicating
port configurations for
which there is no hardware
present
Figure 3-23. Removed Ports for which a Configuration Exists
2. Press the [Ctrl] [D] key combination to delete the configuration for the
nonexistent interface module. You will then be prompted with the
message
Are you sure you want to delete the old configurations for this empty slot?
3. Type y and press [Return] to delete the configuration for the empty slot.
Notice that the highlighted port labels for the deleted ports will remain
in the Quick Configuration screen until you save the new configuration
and exit from the Quick Configuration utility (described in the following
steps).
3-34
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
4. Reboot the router by doing the following:
5. Press the [Ctrl] [C] key combination.
6. When you see the ‘‘save and exit’’ prompt:
Save configuration and exit Quick Configuration
(y/n)?
7.
type y and press [Return].
8. When you see the reboot prompt:
Reboot now (y/n)?
9. Type y again and press [Return] to reboot the router.
10. While the router is rebooting, the console displays
REBOOTING THE SYSTEM
11. When you see the message
Waiting for speed sense
12. the router has finished rebooting. Any configuration changes you
made prior to exiting and rebooting will be iimplemented in the
router configuration.
3
Quick
Configuration
3-35
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
Replacing One Type of Interface Module with Another Type
Replacing a previously configured interface module with another
module having a different set of ports, and subsequently starting Quick
Configuration results in a ‘‘Configuration Conflict Alert’’. For example,
the following screen illustrates an HP Router 650 with one configured
WAN interface module.
Figure 3-24. One WAN Interface Module Installed and Configured
Moving the WAN interface module indicated above to slot 4 and
installing an Ethernet interface module in its place (slot 2) creates a
configuration conflict. If Quick Configuration is subsequently started, a
warning screen similar to the one shown in figure 3-25 appears.
3-36
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
Indicates slot(s) in which a
configuration conflict exists
Figure 3-25. The "Configuration Conflict" Screen
1. In the above case:
a. If you don’t want to continue in Quick Configuration, type n and
press [Return] to return to the Main Menu.
Note
If you type n and return to the Main menu, the configuration conflict
remains in the router and the above screen will re-appear the next time
you start Quick Configuration.
b. If you want to eliminate the conflict and continue with Quick
Configuration, type y and press [Return].
3
You will then see the following prompt:
Quick
Configuration
Are you sure you want to delete all conflicting
configurations (y/n)?
2. Type y and press [Return] again to confirm conflict deletion and to start
Quick Configuration.
3-37
How To Use Quick Configuration
Operating Notes
3. Continuing from the above example, the Quick Configuration screen
would show the WAN interface module moved to slot 4 and the
Ethernet interface module installed in slot 2.
Figure 3-26. Quick Configuration Showing Unconfigured Interface Modules
Neither module is configured because:
–
The WAN interface module configuration that was in slot 2
was in conflict with the Ethernet interface module and was
therefore deleted (step 1b), leaving slot 2 without any interface module configuration.
–
Slot 4 had no interface module configuration, and was therefore unaffected by moving the WAN interface module to that
slot.
4. In this example, to resume routing operations, it is necessary to
configure one or more ports on either module and reboot the router.
3-38
4
How To Use the Configuration
Editor To Create or Change a
Configuration
How To Use the Configuration Editor
Introducing the Configuration Editor
Introducing the Configuration
Editor
The Configuration Editor accesses a hierarchy of menus and screens
that include any parameters you need for customizing the router beyond
the ‘‘getting started’’, or factory default level. Using this editor, you can
customize all parameters needed to integrate the router into your
system (including the subset of parameters you can access through
Quick Configuration).
Generally, when you first create a configuration, it is easiest to begin by
using Quick Configuration to establish a minimal version of the
configuration to use in establishing functioning network connections.
However, when you are ready to use parameters that are not available in
the Quick Configuration screen, it is time to move on to the
Configuration Editor. You can do so either by starting the Configuration
Editor from the Main Menu or starting it from within Quick
Configuration by using the hotkeys. (Refer to ‘‘How To Use the Hotkeys’’
on page 3-12.)
You can use the Configuration Editor to create a configuration in a
router through either a directly connected terminal or a terminal
connected to the router via Telnet. (For information on Telnet, refer to
‘‘Telnet: How To Establish a Virtual Terminal Connection to a Remote
Node’’ on page 7-10.) You can also move an existing configuration
between routers or between a router and a host on the network. (Refer
to ‘‘Using TFTP To Transfer Operating Code, Configuration, and NCL
Display’’ on page 7-30, and ‘‘Using PC Modem Access To Transfer
Configuration and NCL Display on page 7–32.)
4-2
How To Use the Configuration Editor
The Configuration Editor Process
4
The Configuration Editor Process
Configuration
Editor
The configuration process consists of four major steps, described below.
Step 1: Define Global and Session Parameters Global parameters specify which routing service applications are enabled on your
router, and also define local and remote session modes. The specific
session parameters specify the interface between the router and various
I/O devices—console, modem, and Telnet—for the session modes. The
‘‘System’’ and ‘‘Software’’ items access these parameters.
Step 2: Establish Communication Channels Communication
channels define both the physical and logical connections between the
router and various network devices. The ‘‘Lines’’ item accesses the
physical connection parameters for each router interface (port). The
‘‘Circuits’’, ‘‘Circuit Groups’’, and ‘‘V.25 bis Network Mapping’’ items
access circuit-related parameters for individual ports. The circuit and
circuit group parameters are regularly used in all routing configurations.
V.25 bis network mapping is used only when V.25 bis circuits form part
of a network.
Step 3: Customize Protocol Application Modules The protocols
require network-specific data in order to provide bridging, routing,
and/or network-management services. The remaining items in the
Configuration Menu access these parameters. You need to use only
those items that correspond to the routing service modules you enable
in step 1, above (under the ‘‘Software’’ item).
Step 4: Implement the Configuration After you customize the
protocol applications, complete the configuration process by (1) saving
the configuration and then (2) implementing it by rebooting the router.
For further configuration information, refer to:
For tutorial information on the use and operation of the various
routing services, refer to HP Routing Services and Applications
For descriptions of the individual parameters used in the
Configuration Editor, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
For a guide to finding parameters in the Configuration Editor, refer to
the ‘‘Parameter Locator’’ in the appendix to the Operator’s Reference.
4-3
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Enter the Configuration Editor
How To Enter the Configuration
Editor
To enter from the
Main Menu, type 3
Figure 4-1. The Main Menu
You can enter the Configuration Editor from either the Main Menu or
from the Quick Configuration screen.
To enter from the Main menu, just type 3, which is the list number
for the Configuration Editor.
To enter from the Quick Configuration screen (described in chapter
3), type / m. (For more information on using the Configuration
Editor while in Quick Configuration, refer to ‘‘How To Use the
Hotkeys’’ on page 3-12.)
4-4
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Enter the Configuration Editor
Configuration
Editor
Note
4
When you start the Configuration Editor, the configuration menu
appears:
The actual configuration menu displayed on your console reflects the
configuration features available in your router. This manual uses examples depicting the full feature set, which is available in most HP routers.
For a listing of the features available in your router, refer to the release
notes you received with the router or with your most recent software
update.
Figure 4-2. The Configuration Menu
4-5
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Exit From the Configuration Menu
How To Exit From the
Configuration Menu
If you enter the Configuration Editor from the Main menu, do
the following to exit:
1. Press [Return] as many times as you need to return to the Configuration
menu (figure 4-2).
2. Press [Return] once again to display
Back to menu ?
3. Then do one of the following:
•
If you want to exit from the Configuration Editor without saving
any changes you made, press [<] to display
Exit without saving
?
Then press [Return] again to exit from the Configuration Editor
without saving any changes you made.
•
If you want to exit from the Configuration Editor and save any
changes you made, press [>] twice to display
Save and exit ?
Then press [Return] again to exit and save any changes you made.
Note
4-6
‘‘Saving’’ a new configuration retains it in memory, but does not delete
the ‘‘old’’ configuration nor re-initialize the router with the new configuration. To re-initialize the router with a new configuration that you have
just saved, reboot the router (or turn the power off, then on again). To
reboot the router, use the boot command (page 7-8 in this manual; refer
also to the description of the boot command in the Operator’s
Reference’’.
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Exit From the Configuration Menu
4
If you enter the Configuration Editor from Quick Configuration,
do one of the following to exit:
Configuration
Editor
To exit and reboot the router, refer to ‘‘How to exit from Quick
Configuration and reboot the router’’ on page 3-9.
To exit without rebooting, refer to ‘‘How to exit from Quick
Configuration without saving changes’’ on page 3-11.
4-7
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration
Editor
In the Main menu (figure 1-1 on page 1-6), type 3 to select the
Configuration Editor and display the Configuration Menu.
Note
Most HP routers have all of the configuration features described in this
chapter. However, some features are not available in certain basic router
models. To determine the feature set in your router, refer to the release
notes you received with the router or with your latest software update.
Access to global
and session
parameters
Access to protocol
selection
Access to
communication
channels
Access to
application and
network
management
modules
Selection prompt
Figure 4-3. Example of the Configuration Menu
4-8
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
4
Configuration Categories
Configuration
Editor
The configuration categories include the available routing applications
and some general items. The number in parentheses to the right of each
item indicates the number of entries currently configured in the
category. A 0 (zero) indicates that nothing is configured for that
category. For example, in the preceding screen, item 7 is not configured:
7. DoD Internet Router (0)
Note
In figure 4-3, the DEFAULT_CONFIG label appears when you have not
yet assigned another name to the router. HP recommends that you
assign a more specific name to this router later in the configuration
process. When you do, that name appears instead of DEFAULT_CONFIG.
Each item listed in figure 4-3 is briefly described below. For information
on the parameters accessed by these items, refer to the Operator’s
Reference.
1. System Names the router, specifies how the router initializes
software services during a power-up or boot situation, and assigns
values to global and session parameters.
2. Software
router.
Loads the application software supplied with your
3. Lines Specifies the physical connections between the router and
the LANs and/or long-haul transmission facilities with which the router
interfaces.
4. Circuits Specifies the logical connections between the router and
the LANs and/or long-haul transmission facilities with which the router
interfaces.
5. Circuit Groups
Balances traffic across circuits.
6. Bridge Configures the Bridge application to your specific
requirements.
4-9
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
The remaining items (including some that are not available on all
models) provide tools for adjusting application or network management
software modules to your requirements. Access only the items
corresponding to the application or network management software
modules you want to enable.
7. DoD Internet Router
8. DECNET IV Routing Service
9. SNMP Sessions
10. Xerox Routing Service
11. IPX Routing Service
12. AppleTalk Router
13. X.25 Network Service
14. V.25 bis Network Mapping
Moving From One Screen to Another
At the bottom of the Configuration Menu screen (figure 4-3) and many
other screens is the prompt:
Enter selection (0 for previous menu): _____
Whenever this prompt occurs, it is preceeded by a numbered list of
items you can select. If you don’t want to access any of the listed items,
just press [Enter] to return to the preceding screen or action item. But if
you want to access one of the listed items, type the number for that item
and press [Enter]. Then:
If the item you select contains no entries (indicated by ‘‘(0)’’ at the
end of the item) such as:
DoD Internet Router (0)
you will be prompted by the message
Do you wish to add ...?
4-10
Yes
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
o
n
4f
4
Press [Return] to select the Yes option. The parameters you want to
add will then appear. Follow the prompts to enter the values for the
desired parameters.
C
iguration
Configuration
Editor
Editor
For example, with the configuration menu displayed, if the DoD
Internet Router (IP) Service was not configured and you wanted to
access it, you would type 7 and press [Return] to display the following:
IP service (0 indicates ‘‘not configured’’)
Prompt to access IP configuration
Figure 4-4. Example of Accessing an Item That Is Not Currently Configured
Continuing from page 4-10, if the item you select contains one or
more entries (indicated by a ‘‘(1)’’, ‘‘(2)’’, or other number at the
end of the item) such as:
Circuits (2)
the entries will appear as a numbered list and you will be prompted
with
Action (->> for selections) : Previous Display
For example, with the configuration menu displayed, if one Ethernet
port and one WAN port were configured and you wanted to add
another port configuration, you would type 4 and press [Return] to see
a screen similar to the following:
4-11
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
List of configured circuits
Prompt for your next action
Figure 4-5. Example of Access to Previously Configured Elements
Note
4-12
The examples of default circuit names in figure 4-5, above, appear in HP
Series 200 and 400 routers. Default circuit names in HP Series 600 routers include the slot number in which the port is installed. For example, if
a four-port Ethernet interface module is installed in slot 2 of the HP
Router 650, the circuit name of the first port on that module would be
ETHER21. Similarly, if a WAN module was installed in slot 3, then the
circuit name of the first port on that module would be WAN31. To help
simplify circuit configurations on an HP Router 650, it is recommended
that you use this method for identifying the slot and port locations for all
circuits.
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
Previous Screen: To back up to the previous screen, choose
Previous Display by simply pressing [Return].
•
Delete: To delete an entry, use [<] to choose Delete, then press
[Return]. If you are then prompted for the number of a listed entry,
type the number of the entry to delete and press [Return] again.
When you are prompted with
Configuration
Editor
•
4
You then have five actions from which to choose:
You are sure you want to delete ? No
use [<] to select Yes, then press [Return].
•
Add: To add an entry, use [<] to choose Add. Then press [Return]
and follow the prompts to enter the desired parameter values.
Modify: To modify the configuration for an entry, use [<] to choose
Modify, then press [Return]. If you are then prompted for the number
of a listed entry, type the number of the entry to delete and press [Return]
again. Then follow the prompts to modify the desired parameters.
Browse: To view the current settings for an entry without changing
them, use [<] to choose Browse. If you are then prompted for the
number of a listed entry, type the number of the entry to delete and
press [Return] again.
4-13
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
Entering or Changing Parameter Values in
Configuration Screens
Throughout the configuration screens, there are ‘‘type-in’’ and ‘‘select an
option’’ parameter data fields. For example:
Circuit Name : ETHER1______
This is a ‘‘type-in’’ field in which you provide a value. Type-In fields
are always underlined. Fill in a blank underlined field or type over
the existing entry. Any underlines you see at the end of existing text
indicate how long the entry may be. To correct a mistake, use the
backspace key (not the [Delete] key) to reposition the cursor, and then
retype. When you finish typing an entry, press [Return] to terminate it
and move on to the next field or option. Notice that if you are typing
over one entry with another, shorter entry, you should not try to
delete the extra characters; just press [Return] after typing the last valid
character in the string. Any characters remaining from the old string
will be truncated. For example, if you were to replace an internet
address of 100.100.100.10 in the IP Network Interface Definitions
screen with another address of 10.10.10.1, you would just type the
second address over the first and press [Enter]. (The remaining ‘‘0.10’’
from the first address would be truncated when you pressed [Enter].)
Original Address String:
After New Entry Typed:
After You Press [Return]:
100.100.100.10_
10.10.10.10.10_
10.10.10.1
(‘‘0.10’’ is excess)
([Return] truncates the excess)
Cursor position after new entry
Auto Enable : Yes
This is a ‘‘Select an Option’’ field, which always displays a current
setting that is one of a number of preprogrammed options. Use the
[>] or [<] key to move through the supplied options. When the option
you choose is displayed, press [Return] to enter it. This also moves the
cursor to the next menu, screen, or prompt.
4-14
How To Use the Configuration Editor
How To Operate the Configuration Editor
4
To exit from the Configuration Editor, return to the Configuration Menu
screen (figure 4-3). At the Enter selection prompt, press
[Return]. At the option
Configuration
Editor
Back To Menu ?
use the [>] or [<] key to select either Save and Exit ? (if you want to
save any changes you have made) or Exit without Saving ? (if
you don’t want to save any changes you have made) Pressing [Return] for
either one then returns you to the Main menu.
To implement the changes you make in a Configuration Editor session, do the following:
a. Choose Save and Exit.
b. Boot the router (by using the NCL Boot command--refer to page
7-8).
To abandon the changes made in this Configuration Editor session
and keep the previous configuration, choose
Exit without Saving
and press [Return].
4-15
5
How To Use the Event Log To
Analyze Router Operation
How To Use the Event Log
Introducing the Event Log
Introducing the Event Log
This chapter describes the event messages generated by the router and
stored in the event log, how to access the event log from the Main menu,
and how to navigate through the log.
The event log is a first-in, first-out buffer in RAM. (See figure 5-1 for
some sample entries.) Each entry is a line composed of five fields:
severity is one of the following codes:
D
(debug) indicates installation and diagnostic information.
I
(information) indicates routine events.
W
(warning) indicates that a service has behaved unexpectedly.
P
(performance) indicates that a current service has degraded or
upgraded.
M
(major) indicates a service appearance/disappearance.
date is the date, in mm/dd/yy format, that the entry was placed
in the log.
time is the time, in hh:mm:ss format, that the entry was placed in
the log.
object is the system variable (such as ‘‘cct.’’ for ‘‘circuit event
messages’’) that generated the log entry.
event message (within quotes) is the event message.
For information about the event messages you find in your router’s
event log, refer to the Operator’s Reference. Each listed message is
accompanied by an explanation and a recommended action (if any is
required and/or available). The messages are grouped by the system
variables (objects) that generate them and are listed alphabetically.
More information about variables and their structure in the management
information base is also included in the HP Routing Services and
Applications.
5-2
How To Use the Event Log
Entering and Navigating in the Event Log Display
Entering and Navigating in the
Event Log Display
You can enter the event log in either of the following two ways:
In the Main menu (figure 1-1 on page 1-6), press [4] to display the
Event Log.
In the NCL interpreter, execute the Logi command.
5
Event Log
Figure 5-1. Example of an Event Log Display
Note
S 600:
S 200/400:
Event log messages in the HP Series 600 routers include, where appropriate, the slot number associated with the source of a displayed event.
Event log messages in HP Series 200 and 400 routers do not use slot
numbers. For example:
I 07/04/94 16:17:44 mgr.auto_enable: ‘auto-enabling ’cct.WAN21’‘
I 07/04/94 16:17:44 mgr.auto_enable: ‘auto-enabling ’cct.WAN1’‘
When you first display the event log, the first event of the most recent
reboot is positioned at the top of the display. (See the first two lines of
5-3
How To Use the Event Log
Entering and Navigating in the Event Log Display
the event display in figure 5-1.) To display other portions of the log
—preceding or following the currently visible portion—use the keys
described in the following table.
Event Log Control Keys
Key
Action
[Return] or
[N] or
[SPACE]
Advance display by one page
(next page)
[P]
Roll back display by one page (previous page)
[v] or
[D]
Advance display by one event
(down a line)
[^] or
[U]
Roll back display by one event
(up a line)
[>] or
[B] or
[E]
Display last, newest page
(bottom of log)
(end of log)
[T]
Display the first, oldest page (top of log)
[C]
Display the first page for current boot
[?] or
[Shift]-[?] or
[H]
Display help for event log
[<] or
[Q] or
[X]
Exit from event log back to Main menu
(quit)
This first event displayed at entry is not necessarily the first event in the
log. The log may contain entries that occurred prior to the most recent
reboot.
The event log holds up to 1,000 lines in chronological order, from the
oldest to the newest. Each line consists of one complete event message.
Once the log has received 1000 entries, it discards the current oldest line
5-4
How To Use the Event Log
Entering and Navigating in the Event Log Display
each time a new line is received. The event log window contains 20 lines
and can be positioned to any location in the log.
5
Event Log
Log status line
Range of events in the log
Range of log events displayed
Figure 5-2. The Event Log Status Line
Event Log Window
Current
event log
contents
Line 1184
(current beginning of log)
Line 1881
Line 1900
Line 2183
(current end of log)
Figure 5-3.The Event Log Display Window
The log status line at the bottom of the display identifies where in the
sequence of event messages the display is currently positioned. Figures
5-2 and 5-3 show an event log window, a log status line, and the location
of the window within the complete event log. In this example, events
1881-1900 are displayed and there are 1000 events currently in the log.
5-5
How To Use the Event Log
Entering and Navigating in the Event Log Display
The line numbers appearing in the status line continue consecutively.
However, as indicated earlier, the log never contains more than 1,000
consecutive lines. For example, if the status line reads
Log events on screen 3378–3397,in memory 2845–3844. Press ’?’ for help.”
then there are 1,000 lines in the log (it is full) and line 3378 (the 534th
line in the current log contents) is at the top of the display.
The router maintains the event log in a reserved area of memory that is
not affected by software reboots. This means that any reboot under
software control (the Boot command, TFTP updates, and ‘‘fatal
exceptions’’) preserves previous log entries. New entries are simply
appended to the existing list and old entries over the 1,000-line limit are
dropped.
However, the event log will be erased if either of the following occurs:
The router is cleared or reset using the Clear and/or Reset buttons.
A fatal exception occurs while the Automatic Reboot parameter is
set to No.
Power to the router is interrupted.
Note
If a fatal exception occurs, the event log will be maintained only if the
Automatic Reboot parameter in the Global Parameters screen is set to
Yes (the default). (If this parameter is set to ‘‘No’’, then it is necessary to
reboot the router by using the Reset button, which clears the event log.
To locate Automatic Reboot in the parameter hierarchy, refer to the
‘‘Parameter Locator’’ in the appendix to the Operator’s Reference. To
learn more about Automatic Reboot, refer also to the Operator’s
Reference.
Note
When the router goes down under software control, it enters this event
and the reason for it in the event log. It repeats this entry when the
router reboots, giving you information about the event in cases where
the existing log is lost after the router goes down. This happens in
instances where the router was cleared or reset as described above after
going down under software control.
5-6
6
How To Use the Statistics Screens To
Analyze Router Operation
How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router Operation
Introducing the Statistics Screens
Introducing the Statistics Screens
This chapter describes how to use the statistics recorded by the router
during network operation. It tells you how to access the Statistics
Screens menu, how to display specific statistics screens on the console,
and how to interpret statistical displays.
Figure 6-1. Example of a Statistics Screen
6-2
How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router Operation
Introducing the Statistics Screens
The functions of the statistics screens are to provide the following:
Circuits Statistics: Provide summary data for each individual circuit,
including how many bytes and frames were received and transmitted
and how many frames contained errors.
Per Second Statistics: Provide summary data on traffic volume for a
per-second basis for each circuit on the router.
Bridge Statistics: Provide summary data for each bridging circuit
group, including how many frames received, forwarded, flooded, and
dropped.
DECnet Router Statistics: Provide summary data for each IP router
network interface, including how many frames received, forwarded,
and dropped.
DoD IP Router Statistics: Provide summary data for each IP router
network interface, including how many datagrams received,
forwarded, handled within the router, and dropped.
XNS Router Statistics: Provide summary data for each XNS network
interface, including how many datagrams received, forwarded,
handled within the router, and dropped.
6
IPX Router Statistics: Provide summary data for each IPX network
interface, including how many datagrams received, forwarded,
handled within the router, and dropped.
Statistics
Screens
AppleTalk Router Statistics: Provide summary data for each AppleTalk router circuit group, including how many packets received,
forwarded, and dropped.
Buffers Usage Statistics: Provide information on buffer allocation
and use.
For an example of each statistics screen type, along with a description
of each statistics data category, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
6-3
How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router Operation
How To Access the Statistics Screen Menu
How To Access the Statistics
Screen Menu
With the Main menu (figure 1-1) displayed, press [1] to display the
Statistics Screen menu.
Note
The actual Statistics Screen menu displayed on your console reflects the
lines, circuits, and routing services you have already configured. You
may have fewer than the example shown below. The Circuits, Per
Second, and Buffers Usage Statistics items are always listed.
Figure 6-2. Example of the Statistics Screen Menu
6-4
How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router Operation
How To Access the Statistics Screen Menu
At the bottom of the Statistics Screens menu screen is the prompt:
PRESS: ? for help, Down, Up, <- to exit, <RETURN> to select
You can choose from:
To display help text for any statistics screen: Use [v] or [^] to position the pointer to the menu item about which you want help. Then
use the [Shift] [?] key combination to display the help. To return to the
Statistics Screen menu, press [<]. For example, to display help for the
buffers usage statistics item in figure 6-3, below, you would use the
[v] key to move the pointer to the Buffers Usage Statistics line, then
press the [Shift] [?] key combination.
To choose a statistics screen for display: Type the menu item
number to display the statistics screen for that item. Using the example of figure 6-3 below, you would type 5 to display the buffers usage
statistics. (You can also display a statistics screen by using [v] or [^]
to position the pointer at the desired menu item, then pressing [Return].
To exit from the Statistics Screen menu: Press [<] to return to the
Main menu.
6
Statistics
Screens
Buffers menu item
Figure 6-3. Getting Help and Choosing a Screen to Display
6-5
How To Use the Statistics Screens To Analyze Router Operation
How To Manage the Statistics Screens
How To Manage the Statistics
Screens
The statistics displayed on any of the statistics screens are cumulative
values gathered since the router last booted. You can reset the values to
zero at any time, by using a command on the individual statistics screen
(see below) or by using the Network Control Language (NCL)
Interpreter’s Reset command. (Refer to page 7-21.)
All statistics are dynamic and are updated periodically. The update
period is configurable using the Screen Refresh Rate parameter in the
Configuration Editor. The default rate is three seconds.
At the bottom of a statistics screen is the prompt:
PRESS: ’r’ for reset, Down, Up, <- to exit
You have the following choices:
To reset a displayed value to zero, use the [v] or [^] key to position
the pointer on the line containing the value to be reset, then press
[R]. Resetting a value also resets all other values displayed on the
same horizontal line. (Values displayed on the same horizontal line
refer to the same circuit, circuit group, or network interface.)
Occasionally a screen may display a number prefixed with an
asterisk (for example, *234345677). The asterisk indicates that the
number is too large to display, and that the number’s most significant
digits are truncated. This is when you may wish to reset the value.
To exit a statistics screen at any time, press the [<] key. The console
then returns to the Statistics Screen menu. (Refer to figure 6-2.)
For an example of each statistics screen type, along with a description
of each statistics data category, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
6-6
7
How To Use the Network Control
Language (NCL) Commands To
Manage a Router
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Introducing NCL
Introducing NCL
This chapter describes how to use the Network Control Language
Interpreter (NCL). NCL is an easy-to-access command-line control
interface with capabilities such as the following.
Restart (“boot”) the router.
Set two levels of passwords to control access to the router through
the console and via Telnet.
Set the date and time kept by the router.
Perform link-layer and network-layer tests of remote nodes on the
extended network.
Use an upper-layer IP router service to make a virtual terminal
connection to a remote node on the extended network.
Enable or disable specific software entities and services within the
router, such as routing services, and logical network connections,
such as circuits.
Use the IP router and the SNMP agent to access application-specific
bridging and routing tables from a local or remote router.
Access the router’s management information base (MIB) for detailed
information about router operations. Reset MIB variables.
Use the IP router and the Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) agent to access either the standard Internet MIB (as defined
in Internet RFC 1156) or the vendor-specific MIB of any remote node
with a standard SNMP/MIB implementation.
Download the router’s configuration or operating code from a
remote computer or router, or store its configuration or operating
code on a remote computer or router.
Display the router’s current configuration.
Direct the output of any display command to a printer or a file rather
than to the console. This file can be on the local PC used as the
console, or on a remote computer or router.
Access the configuration editor, the event log, statistics screens, or
quick configuration without returning to the Main menu.
Display help for NCL commands.
7-2
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
How To Start NCL
How To Start NCL
From the Main menu, press [2] to display the NCL screen.
Press [2] to start NCL
Figure 7-1. Starting NCL from the Main Menu
7
NCL
Commands
7-3
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
How To Start NCL
NCL Prompt
Figure 7-2. Example of the NCL Screen
The NCL command prompt, near the bottom of the screen, always
appears (followed by a colon) as the current system name of your
router, followed by a colon. In the above figure, the NCL prompt appears
as DEFAULT_CONFIG:, which is the factory default. (You can use Quick
Configuration or the Configuration Editor to change the system name.)
How To Exit From NCL
At the NCL prompt, type
exit
and press [Return] to return to the Main menu.
7-4
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
NCL Command Operation
NCL Command Operation
Some NCL commands like Ping (which tests your access to a specific IP
address), require you to type an argument after the command. Others,
like Boot (which reboots the router) do not. Some ‘‘expandable’’
commands, like Time (which displays the time and date and can also be
used to reset the time and date), give you the option of differing
responses, depending on whether you want the minimal or expanded
functionality of the command. Also, some commands invoke responses
that can be displayed in a single screen. Others require scrolling through
one or more additional screens.
How To Execute an NCL Command
To execute an NCL command:
1. Type the command name.
2. Type the required argument, if any, and any optional arguments you
want to use.
3. Press [Return].
For example, to change the current time in the router to 12:00, you
would type
time 12:00:00
and press [Return].
7
NCL
Commands
7-5
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
NCL Command Operation
More: Continuing the Display
When more than twenty lines are required to display all data from an
NCL command, you will see “—MORE—” at the bottom of the display
area. For example, if you execute the NCL Help All command, you will
see a screen similar to this one:
"More" indicates
that there is another
screen of data
Figure 7-3. Example of an NCL Command Using a Continued Display
Your choices are:
Press the Space bar to display an additional screen of data.
Press [Return] to display one more line of data.
Type a number from 1 through 9 to display that number of
additional lines.
Press [<] or [Q] to stop the display and return to the NCL prompt.
7-6
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
General NCL Command Summary
General NCL Command Summary
This section lists the NCL commands for general router management,
together with their syntax and functions. Later sections in this chapter
describe:
Additional NCL commands used for virtual terminal operation (page
7-10)
Accessing management information bases (MIBs) (page 7-13, 7-22,
7-23, and 7-24)
Accessing bridging and routing tables (page 7-25)
Managing OSPF protocol (page 7-27)
Managing STE frames (page 7-28)
Controlling V.25 bis circuits (page 7-29)
Moving configurations, operating code, and display output
(page 7-30)
If you need a more detailed description of any of these commands, refer
to the Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following example of the Ping command
demonstrates the conventions used in this table:
ping x.x.x.x [count] [wait]
where:
ping is the command name
x.x.x.x is a required value that you provide
[count] and [wait] are optional values that you provide
7
NCL
Commands
7-7
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
General NCL Command Summary
Command
Function
! [repetitions]
Repeats the preceeding NCL command once or a number of
times
atping X.X [wait]
Send an AppleTalk Echo Protocol request to another AppleTalk
node.
boot
Reboot the router.
browse
Display the entire current configuration in Configuration Editor
format.
config
Display the entire current configuration, in machine-readable
format.
crash
Display the router’s shutdown history.
date [mm/dd/yy] [hh:mm:ss]
Set or display the router’s current date and time.
disable [identifier]
Disable a protocol, service, circuit, or other configuration entity.
edit
Invoke the Configuration Editor without leaving NCL.
enable [identifier]
Enable a protocol, service, circuit, or other configuration entity.
exit
Leave NCL and return to the Main menu.
help [type]
Get help for NCL commands (rget, zmodem, ospf,
other, all).
log
log filter
Examine, and optionally filter, the internal event log.
logi
Invoke the automatically updating Event Log without leaving
NCL.
page
Disable and re-enable display-paging mode for the console.
password
Assign, change, or remove password protection on the router.
ping X.X.X.X [count] [wait] Send an Internet Control Message Protocol echo request to
another node.
print
Direct NCL display command output to a printer or file.
quick
Invoke Quick Configuration without leaving NCL.
quickr
Invoke Quick Remote without leaving NCL.
repeat
Continually repeat the last NCL command until another key is
pressed.
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How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
General NCL Command Summary
Command
Function
stamp
Display software version information.
stats
Invoke the Statistics Screens menu without leaving NCL.
summary
Display the Quick Configuration summary without leaving NCL.
telnet X.X.X.X
Establish an IP virtual terminal connection to another node.
Note: To use Telnet, it must first be enabled. (Refer to page 710.)
Test mac_addr [count] [delay] Send an 802.2 Test packet to another node.
Time [mm/dd/yy] [hh:mm:ss]
Set or display the router’s current date and time.
7
NCL
Commands
7-9
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
How To Use Telnet To Establish a Virtual Terminal Connection to a Remote Node
How To Use Telnet To Establish a
Virtual Terminal Connection to a
Remote Node
Telnet uses the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to enable you to
use the terminal connection to your local router as a virtual terminal
connection to a remote node, such as another router. This generally
gives you the ability to access and control the remote node in the same
way that you would if your terminal was directly connected to that node.
If the remote node is another HP router, you can use Telnet access to
operate the remote router’s statistics, NCL, configuration, and event log
in the same way that you can operate these same features in a local
(direct terminal connection) HP router. You can have up to two
simultaneous TCP connections; one inbound and one outbound.
Prerequisites for Telnet Operation
Telnet requires the following:
The remote node must have Telnet service operating
The following must be configured in your local router:
• System parameters
• Software Protocol parameter configured to ‘‘DoD IP Router’’
• The appropriate Lines parameters
• The appropriate Circuit and Circuit Group parameters
• IP (the DoD Internet Router)
• A Telnet session
Note
7-10
Use of Telnet for outbound access from a local router to other devices is
automatically enabled if DoD Internet Router (IP) is configured. However, for inbound access to a router from other devices, Telnet must be
specifically enabled on that router.
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
How To Use Telnet To Establish a Virtual Terminal Connection to a Remote Node
How To Enable Telnet
You can enable Telnet in either of the following ways:
In the Quick Configuration screen, set the ‘‘Telnet enabled’’
parameter to ‘‘yes’’ and reboot the router.
In the Configuration Editor, set the Session Mode parameter to
‘‘Telnet’’ and reboot the router. (Session Mode is in the
System/System Session menu.)
How To Use Telnet
Syntax
telnet X.X.X.X
where X.X.X.X is the IP address of the remote node in dotted
decimal notation.
Example
telnet 15.3.0.97
Once a connection is established, Telnet passes keystrokes from your
router to the remote node and displays the remote node’s control screen
in the same way that it would be displayed if your console was directly
connected to the remote node.
Telnet Access to Another HP Router
7
If the remote system is another HP router, you will see the Main menu of
the remote router with the remote system name at the top of the screen.
You can then operate the remote router in the same way that you
operate the router to which you are directly connected.
NCL
Commands
7-11
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
How To Use Telnet To Establish a Virtual Terminal Connection to a Remote Node
How To Disconnect Telnet Access to Another HP Router
To disconnect from a remote HP router, return to the Main menu in the
remote router and select “Logout” from the Main menu. When you see
the following prompt:
Do you want to disconnect? [Y/N:]
press [Y] for ‘‘yes’’. You will then see:
Hit <Return>
Press [Return]. The remote node and Telnet are disconnected, and you will
see your own system name on the the display.
If the remote system is not another HP router, then type the appropriate
commands to interact with that system. Disconnect Telnet when you are
finished. When Telnet is disconnected, you will see your own system
name on the display.
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How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
Accessing the Management
Information Base
The router’s management information base (MIB) is the repository of all
variables gathered and used by the router, as well as accessible to the
router’s console and to other devices in the network using SNMP. The
MIB is in the form of hierarchical structure composed of managed
objects and underlying variables. This structure can be represented as
an inverted tree, such as the one shown below for the ‘‘buffers’’
information base structure.
High-Level managed object
buf
[1]
Intermediate-Level
managed objects
pkt
msg
init
free
min
miss
size
init
free
min
miss
size
Figure 7-4."buf" Information Base Structure
MIB variables
7
NCL
Commands
Slot Numbers
Slot numbers are intermediate-level managed objects that appear in the
MIB structure of some objects, such as the ‘‘[1]’’ in the ‘‘buf’’ structure
shown above. For HP Series 200 and 400 routers, the slot number is
always ‘‘1’’. For HP Series 600 routers, such as the HP Router 650, the
7-13
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
slot number depends on which slot contains the desired MIB activity
information.
Managed Objects
“Managed objects”, such as ‘‘buf’’ describe varioius resources in the
router. Which managed objects currently reside in the router depends on
which protocols and services are enabled. The names of the
highest-level objects accessible through the router’s console using NCL
are listed in the “Managed Objects Table”, below. These are the heads of
branches, leading in some number of levels to single MIB variables.
Note
Most of the objects listed in the following table are available in all HP
routers. Certain objects are not available in all models. Some objects are
active only when the service to which they apply has been configured in
the router. For example, the ‘‘at’’ object for the AppleTalk routing service
is active only if AppleTalk has been configured.
Managed Objects Table
7-14
Managed Object
Name
Alarms (uses slot #)
alarm
AppleTalk router
at
AppleTalk router MIB
atmib
Bridge
lb
Bridge address table
lbmib
Buffers (uses slot #)
buf
Chassis information base
chassis
Circuits
cct
Configuration
config
Data link services
dls
DECnet router
drs
DECnet routing table
decnet
Device drivers (uses slot #)
driver
Event log information base
log
Experimental MIB (for future use)
exmib
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
Managed Objects Table
Managed Object
Name
Exterior Gateway Protocol
egp
Hardware (uses slot #)
hw
HP network management
hpnm
IP router
ip
IP (Internet) standard MIB
mib
IPX router
ipx
Key
key
Memory (uses slot #)
mem
Name server (uses slot #)
name
OSPF
ospf
Port module manager
pm
Router operating kernel
rok
Simple Network Management Protocol
snmp
System Manager
mgr
System services (SVC) (uses slot #)
svc
Telnet
telnet
Time Protocol
timep
Timers (use slot #)
timer
Transmission Control Protocol
tcp
TCP echo service
echo
Trivial File Transfer Protocol
tftp
V.25 bis
isdn
XNS router
xrx
X.25
x25
7
NCL
Commands
7-15
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
The levels within a MIB branch that lead to a single variable form a
pathname that is used by the following three commands to access the
variable:
Command
Function
Get
Display on the console the value of a MIB variable (page 7-20).
List
Display on the console a variable or part of the MIB structure
[page 7-17).
Reset
Reset the value of a MIB variable (to 0) (page 7-21).
Example of a Pathname to a Mib Variable
The “buf” variables shown on page 7-13 describe the router’s use of
global memory buffers. Of the four levels in this branch, the highest level
specifies the managed object, “buf”. The next lower level has only one
branch for this router, “[1]” (which, in this case, happens to be the slot
number). The next lower level distinguishes two buffer types, “msg” or
“pkt”. Multiple branches descend from each one of those buffer types
for the specific variables.
The names of the objects at each level make up a pathname for the
variable. For example, the pathname for the message buffer size variable
shown in figure 7-4 is
buf.1.msg.size
Note
For a listing and description of all variables contained in the enterprisespecific MIB on your router, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
The highest-level objects, such as ‘‘buf’’, in the “Managed Objects Table”
on page 7-14 are the first names in the pathnames used in NCL
commands. They are also branches (groups) within the Wellfleet private
enterprise branch of the standard MIB, accessible from outside the
router using SNMP functions.
The number of levels and intermediate branches is different for different
branches.
7-16
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
How To Use the List Command
Use the List command to discover and display all or any part of the
structure of the router’s management information base (MIB). List
displays the specific variables for the part of the MIB that you are
examining, including pathnames (which are listed as codes in the List
display).
Syntax
list [branch identifier]
list [branch identifier] *
where:
branch identifier is a pathname identifying any MIB branch.
The identifier can have a single name or a hierarchy of names.
* is a ‘‘wild card’’ specifying all in the branch beyond the object immediately preceding the *.
Examples:
list
displays a list of router-resident managed objects
7
NCL
Commands
7-17
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
MIB objects
Path names or "object
identification codes"
corresponding to each
MIB object
"buf" object shown in
figure 7-4
Figure 7-5.Example of List Display
7-18
list buf
Lists the next intermediate-level managed
object ([1]), with its code (1).
list buf.1
Lists the next intermediate-level managed objects
below [1] (msg and pkt), with their codes (0, 1).
list buf.1.msg
Lists the MIB variables below msg (free, init, min,
miss, and size), with their codes (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).
list buf.*
Lists all of the output for the above three
commands.
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
Intermediate objects
MIB variables
Object identification codes
Figure 7-6.Example of List Command Showing Output for "list buf.*
Using Codes To Specify Path Names
You can use the object identification codes instead of object names
when you specify a path name. Here are the preceding List command
examples repeated with their equivalent object identification codes:
list
list
list
list
buf
buf.1
buf.1.msg
buf.*
list
list
list
list
11
11.1
11.1.0
11.*
For more on the List command, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
7
NCL
Commands
7-19
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
How To Use the Get Command
Use the NCL Get command to display the value of MIB variables on the
router. You can obtain the pathname by using the List command (page
7-17).
Syntax
get MIB identifier
get MIB identifier [*]
where:
MIB identifier is a pathname identifying a specific MIB
variable. The identifier must be a pathname from one the router’s
highest-level objects, such as ‘‘buf’’. (Refer to the ‘‘Managed Objects
Table’’ on page 7-14.)
* is a ‘‘wild card’’ specifying all in the branch beyond the object
immediately preceding the *.
Examples
To get the value for all MIB variables in a branch, use Get with the
high-level managed object name for that branch.
get buf.*
Displays all MIB variable values for
buffers
To get the value for all MIB variables in an intermediate branch, use Get
with an intermediate-level managed object name. For example:
get buf.msg.*
get 11.1.0.*
Either command displays the values for
the message variables under buffers
To get the value for a single MIB variable, use Get with the complete
pathname to the variable. For example:
get buf.1.msg.size
get 11.1.0.5
Either command displays the value for the
message size buffer
For more information on the Get command, refer to the Operator’s
Reference.
7-20
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Management Information Base
How To Use the Reset Command
Use NCL’s Reset command to set the value of one or more MIB variables
to zero. You can obtain the pathname by using the List command (page
7-17).
Syntax
reset MIB identifier
reset MIB identifier [*]
where:
MIB identifier is a pathname identifying a specific MIB variable.
The identifier must be a pathname from one the router’s highest-level
objects, such as ‘‘buf’’. (Refer to ‘‘Managed Objects Table’’ on page
7-14.)
* is a ‘‘wild card’’ specifying all in the branch beyond the object
immediately preceding the *.
Examples
reset buf.*
reset 11.*
Either command resets all MIB variable
values for buffers
reset buf.1.msg.*
reset 11.1.0.*
Either command resets the message
variables under buffers
reset buf.1.msg.min
reset 11.1.0.3
Either command resets the value for
message minimum value under buffers
For more information on the Reset command, refer to the Operator’s
Reference.
7
NCL
Commands
7-21
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing the Internet Management Information Base
Accessing the Internet
Management Information Base
Use these commands to examine the MIB of any local or remote
network node that provides a standard SNMP/MIB implementation.
For More Information This section lists the Internet MIB commands
together with their syntax and functions. For a more detailed description of these commands, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following example of the Rgets command
demonstrates the conventions used in this table:
rgets identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
where:
rgets is the command name
identifier is a required value that you provide
[x.x.x.x] and [community] are optional values that you provide
Command
Function
rgeta [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the MIB IP address
translation table.
rgeti [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the MIB IP address table.
rgetms identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the value of a branch of Internet
standard MIB variables.
rgetr [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the MIB IP routing table.
rgets identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the value of an individual Internet
standard MIB variable.
These commands display their output on the console screen. To output
the display to a printer or file instead of the console screen, place the
command syntax within the Print or Zput command. For detailed
information on the Print command, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
7-22
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing a Remote Management Information Base
Accessing a Remote Management
Information Base
Use these commands to examine the MIB of any remote network node
that provides a standard SNMP/MIB implementation.
For More Information This section lists the remote MIB commands
together with their syntax and functions. For a more detailed description of these commands, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following example of the Rgetw command
demonstrates the conventions used in this table:
rgetw identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
where:
rgets is the command name
identifier is a required value that you provide
[x.x.x.x] and [community] are optional values that you provide
Command
Function
rgetmw identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the value of a branch of MIB
variables from a remote HP or Wellfleet
router.
rgetw identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the value of an individual MIB
variable from a remote HP or Wellfleet
router.
7
NCL
Commands
These commands display their output on the console screen. To output
the display to a printer or file instead of the console screen, place the
command syntax within the Print command. For detailed information on
the Print command, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
7-23
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing a Foreign Management Information Base
Accessing a Foreign Management
Information Base
Use these two commands in conjunction with the SNMP agent and the
IP routing application to provide access to the enterprise-specific
section of the MIB of any remote node—other than an HP or Wellfleet
router—that provides a standard SNMP/MIB implementation. You must
use a complete MIB pathname with these commands.
For More Information This section lists the remote MIB commands
together with their syntax and functions. For a more detailed description of these commands, refer to the HP Router Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following example of the Rget command demonstrates the conventions used in this table:
rget identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
where:
rgetw is the command name
identifier is a required value that you provide
[x.x.x.x] and [community] are optional values that you provide
Command
Function
rget identifier [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the value of an individual MIB
variable from a remote foreign node.
Rgetm identifier [x.x.x.x] [community] Display the value of a branch of MIB
variables from a remote foreign node.
These commands display their output on the console screen. To output
the display to a printer or file instead of the console screen, place the
command syntax within the Print command. For detailed information on
the Print command, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
7-24
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing Bridging and Routing Tables
Accessing Bridging and Routing
Tables
These NCL commands work with the SNMP agent and the IP routing
application to provide access to application- specific bridging, routing,
and configuration tables maintained by local or remote HP or Wellfleet
routers. Some of these commands are repeated from other sections of
this chapter because they belong in more than one category.
ForMore Information This section lists the commands accessing
bridging and routing tables, together with their syntax and functions.
For a more detailed description of these commands, refer to the
Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following example of the Rgeta command
demonstrates the conventions used in this table:
rgeta [x.x.x.x] [community]
where:
rgeta is the command name
identifier is a required value that you provide
[x.x.x.x] and [community] are optional values that you provide
Function
ospf rtab
Display the OSPF routing table.
rgeta [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the IP address translation table.
rgetat [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the AppleTalk configuration table.
7
Command
rgetatr [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the AppleTalk routing table.
rgetb [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the bridge forwarding and filtering table.
rgetd [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the DECnet configuration table.
rgetda [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the DECnet Level 2 routing table (area routes).
7-25
NCL
Commands
rgetata [x.x.x.x] [community] Display the AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol (AARP)
table.
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Accessing Bridging and Routing Tables
rgetdn [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the DECnet Level 1 routing table (node routes).
rgeti [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the IP address table.
rgetr [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the IP routing table.
rgetxr [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the XNS routing table.
rgetir [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the IPX routing table.
rgetis [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the IPX Service Advertising Protocol (SAP) table.
rgetrif [x.x.x.x] [community]
Display the source routing Routing Information Field (RIF)
cache.
These commands display their output on the console screen. To output
the display to a printer or file instead of the console screen, place the
command syntax within the Print command. For detailed information on
the Print command, refer to the Router Console Reference Guide.
7-26
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Managing the Open Shortest Path First Protocol
Managing the Open Shortest Path
First Protocol
OSPF is an IP internal gateway routing protocol that has an openly
available protocol specification that is not proprietary to any single
vendor. You can display the status of various OSPF elements on this
router using the NCL commands in this section. You must use a
complete MIB pathway with each of these commands.
Command
Function
ospf errs
Display OSPF error counts.
ospf intf
Display the status of the OSPF interfaces.
ospf lsdb
Display the OSPF link state database.
ospf nbrs
Display the status of the OSPF neighbors.
ospf rtab
Display the OSPF routing table.
ospf tq
Display the timer queue.
These commands display their output on the console screen. To output
the display to a printer or file instead of the console screen, place the
command syntax within the Print command. For detailed information on
the Print command, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
7
NCL
Commands
7-27
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Blocking and Unblocking Spanning Tree Explorer Frames
Blocking and Unblocking Spanning
Tree Explorer Frames
Because the spanning tree does not operate automatically on
source-route bridging circuits, it is necessary to “manually” build the
spanning tree in these circuits. Blockste and Unblockste allow you to
block and unblock the forwarding of spanning tree explorer frames on
source-route bridging circuit groups. This is an alternative to changing
the Block STE configuration parameter in the Configuration Editor and
booting the router to put the change into effect. (Refer to the HP Router
Operator’s Reference.) These commands override the current setting of
the Block STE parameter.
Command Syntax The following example of the Blockste command
demonstrates the conventions used in this table:
blockste circut group
where:
blockste is the command name
circuit group is a required value that you provide
Command
Function
Blockste all
Block spanning tree explorer frames on all circuit groups in the
router.
blockste circuit group
Block spanning tree explorer frames on the specified circuit
group.
Unblockste all
Unblock spanning tree explorer frames on all circuit groups in the
router.
unblockste circuit group
Unblock spanning tree explorer frames on the specified circuit
group.
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How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Controlling IP-Mapped Circuits for V.25 bis
Controlling IP-Mapped Circuits for
V.25 bis
Mapped data is IP data from an IP switched virtual circuit, which is
configured by defining an IP static route and a phone number to IP to
V.25 bis map entry. Individual map entries can be disabled while leaving
others enabled. Three NCL commands are provided for disabling,
enabling, and checking the status of virtual IP maps.
For More Information This section lists the commands accessing
bridging and routing tables, together with their syntax and functions.
For a more detailed description of these commands, refer to the HP
Router Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following examples demonstrate the
conventions used in this table:
ipmap [x.x.x.x]
disipmap x.x.x.x
where:
ipmap and disipmap are command names
[x.x.x.x] is an optional next-hop IP address that you provide.
x.x.x.x is a required next-hop IP address that you provide
Function
disipmap x.x.x.x
Disable an IP map.
enipmap x.x.x.x
Enable an IP map that was disabled earlier by Disipmap.
ipmap [x.x.x.x]
Show the current state of an IP map.
7
Command
NCL
Commands
7-29
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using TFTP To Transfer Operating Code, Configuration, and NCL Display
Using TFTP To Transfer Operating
Code, Configuration, and NCL
Display
The NCL Fget command and the workstation-generated TFTP Put
command provide two ways to load the router’s operating system or
configuration. That is, these two commands can be used to copy the
operating system or configuration to a host for storage and later
downloading to the router. Also, you can use the NCL Fput command to
redirect the output of any NCL command that displays data on the
console screen to a file on another host or to an HP Router CR. These
network transfers operate over any of the router’s network interfaces.
ForMore Information This section lists the commands for using
TFTP, together with their syntax and functions. For a more detailed
description of these commands, including TFTP security features, refer
to the Operator’s Reference.
Command Syntax The following examples demonstrate the
conventions used for these commands:
NCL command syntax
fget x.x.x.x operator filename
fput x.x.x.x NCL-command filename
Workstation command syntax
tftp x.x.x.x
put filename operator
quit
where:
fget, fput, tftp, put, and quit are command names.
operator is either os (for operating system) or config (for
configuration).
NCL-command is an NCL display command, and is used to redirect
displayed NCL command output t a file on another host or to an HP
Router CR. (NCL-command can be used only with Fput and must be
for a command that is available on your router.) If the NCL command
7-30
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using TFTP To Transfer Operating Code, Configuration, and NCL Display
has parameters and thus includes a space, then enclose the command string in double quotes.
filename is the name of the configuration or operating code file on
the remote host. On an HP Router CR, it can also be the name of the
configuration file.
x.x.x.x is the IP address of the remote host.
Command
Function
fget X.X.X.X operator filename
Initiate a TFTP read request from a specific host or
router for the configuration or operating system.
Note: Fget does not use NCL-command.
fput X.X.X.X NCL-command filename
Initiate a TFTP write request to a specific host or to
an HP Router CR for the configuration or operating
system or display command output.
7
NCL
Commands
7-31
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display
Using PC Modem Access to
Transfer Configuration and NCL
Display
With an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC host) connected to the
router’s console port, you can use the Zmodem protocol with two NCL
commands, Zput and Zget, to do the following:
Copy a router configuration to the PC host for storage.
Copy a router configuration from the PC host to the original router
or to other routers.
Copy the displayed output of certain NCL commands into a PC host
file.
The PC must be emulating a VT100 or ANSI terminal, and can be
connected either directly or using a modem to the router’s console port.
Also, the PC must be running a Zmodem-compatible terminal emulation
program such as PROCOMM PLUS*. This section describes the use of
NCL commands with the PROCOMM PLUS terminal emulation program
(version 2.01).
Note
You can use other PC host versons of Zmodem. However, the exact
procedure for invoking them depends on how each is implemented, and
is likely to differ from the procedures shown on the following pages.
The commands available in this category are the following:
Zput: Copies NCL command output or the router configuration from
the router to a file on the console PC. Refer to page 7-33.
Zget: Copies a router configuration from a file on the console PC to
the router. Refer to page 7-36.
Note
Recommended Hardware Connections:
For direct and modem hardware connections between the PC host and
the router, refer to the “HP Cables” and “Other Standard Cables”
sections in appendix A of the Installation Guide for the correct cables.
* PROCOMM PLUS is a product of Datastorm Technologies, Inc.
7-32
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display
How To Use Zput To Store the Configuration
or NCL Command Output to a PC Host File
Use NCL’s Zput command to download the router configuration or NCL
command output to a file on a PC connected to the router as a console.
Note
This procedure describes the use of Zput with PROCOMM PLUS. The
procedure is different when used with other terminal emulators.
Preparation:
1. Start PROCOMM PLUS .
2. Ensure that the PROCOMM PLUS “Auto downloading” feature for
the Zmodem protocol is set to “on”.
3. Press [Alt]-[S] to display the “PROCOMM PLUS SETUP UTILITY”
screen.
4. Select “PROTOCOL OPTIONS”.
5. Select “ZMODEM PROTOCOL OPTIONS”. In the resulting
“PROCOMM PLUS SETUP UTILITY”, verify that item C, “Auto
downloading”, is set to “on”. (If it is set to “off”, follow the
instructions in the screen to change the setting.)
6. Press [Esc] three times to return to the router’s Main menu
(see figure 1-1).
7. Select the “Network Control Language Interpreter” in the router’s
Main menu.
7
NCL
Commands
The procedure to download the configuration or NCL command display
to a PC host file (at the NCL prompt) is shown by the syntax and
examples on the following pages.
7-33
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display
Syntax
zput config filename [append][format]
transfer router
configuration
zput NCL-command filename[append][format]
store display
command output
where:
filename is the name of a file on the remote PC host to store
the output from this router.
NCL-command is an NCL display command string on this router.
Possible commands are listed above and described earlier in this
chapter. If the command has parameters and thus includes a
space, then enclose the command string in double quotes.
[append] (optional) specifies whether to append any existing
file of the same name as filename, either of the following:
0(the default) prevents appending.
1 allows appending.
[format](optional) selects the file formatting required by the
host, either:
0 (the default) ends lines with carriage returns and line feeds
(CR LF), as needed by most PCs.
1 ends lines with line feeds only (LF).
Examples
zput config inter1.cfg
zput "rgetr 10.1.2.1 public" pr1table.txt
In response, a status window temporarily appears to monitor
transfer data and progress.
7-34
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display
When the download is completed, a flashing “COMPLETED”
message appears briefly in the status window. Then the window
closes and control returns to the NCL prompt.
If the PC host does not respond within approximately 60 seconds
after you execute Zput, the command times out and control
returns to the NCL prompt.
Note
If the “Auto downloading” parameter described under “Preparation”
above has not been set to “on”, then to complete the download you must
press the [Pg Dn] key and follow the instructions in the resulting window.
For more information, refer to the PROCOMM PLUS User Manual.
For information on Zput event messages, refer to the Zmodem event
messages in the Operator’s Reference.
7
NCL
Commands
7-35
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display
How To Use Zget To Load the Configuration to
a Router
Use NCL’s Zget command to upload the router configuration previously
stored as a file on the PC connected to the router as a console.
Note
Zget overwrites the router’s current configuration with the uploaded
configuration.
This procedure describes the use of Zput with PROCOMM PLUS. The
procedure is different when used with other terminal emulators.
Preparation
You must have either acquired the configuration from another source or
used Zput earlier to download the configuration to the PC host (see page
7-33). Run the PROCOMM PLUS terminal emulation program. Start a
router console session with the manager password.
To upload the configuration to the router:
1. Enter the Zget command:
zget [Enter]
2. Press [Pg Up] to display the “Upload Protocols” window.
3. Type z to select the “ZMODEM“ option and to display the “Send
ZMODEM“ window.
4. Enter the name of the file containing the configuration you want to
upload. End with [Enter] to begin uploading.
7-36
How To Use the Network Control Language (NCL) Commands To Manage a Router
Using PC Modem Access to Transfer Configuration and NCL Display
For information on Zget event messages, refer to the Zmodem event
messages in the Operator’s Reference.
Notes
If the PC host does not respond within approximately 70 seconds after
you execute step 4, the command times out and control returns to the
NCL prompt. Also, if Zget is in use and the PC host is left in terminal
emulation mode, you may see Zmodem protocol packets displayed as a
series of character strings before the command times out.
You can use other host versions of Zmodem. However, the exact
procedure for invoking them depends on how each is implemented.
7
NCL
Commands
7-37
8
How To Use Quick Remote To
Configure A Remote Router
How To Use Quick Remote
Introducing Quick Remote
Introducing Quick Remote
Quick Remote is a component of SmartBoot that enables a central site
to manage a remote router without specially trained personnel at the
remote site. This means that, with the proper network preparation, a
remote router can be installed and configured by simply removing it
from its shipping carton, mounting it properly, attaching the necessary
network cable(s), and connecting the power. Minimal configuration is
automatic! (This operation also applies to a previously installed remote
router that has been cleared to the factory default by using the
Clear/Reset button combination.)
Quick Remote appears in the Main menu of most HP routers. It is used
in a central router to enable any remote, series 200 or 400 HP router that
has a WAN port to automatically download a minimal IP or IPX
configuration over a WAN link from the central router.
Quick Remote
access
Figure 8-1. Locating Quick Remote in the Main Menu
After a remote router has received a minimal configuration from a Quick
Remote configuration in a central router, it reboots itself and begins IP
and/or IPX routing. The remote router can then be more extensively
configured, if necessary, by TFTP (Fput) or Telnet from another site.
(The Quick Remote configuration also enables or disables bridging on
the remote router.)
8-2
How To Use Quick Remote
Introducing Quick Remote
8
What Can Quick Remote Configure?
Quick Remote
A Quick Remote configuration can include the following:
A minimal IP or IPX configuration for the first WAN port and/or the
first LAN port of an HP Series 200 or 400 router that has at least one
WAN port
Bridging enabled or disabled on the first WAN port and first LAN
port of the remote router
The IP address from which the remote router will accept a TFTP Put
of a configuration file from a remote device.
Note
It is recommended that you always include IP in any Quick Remote
configuration in order to enable remote management of the router.
Other Quick Remote Features
Displays dynamic online help for each field
Performs error checking and displays error messages for errors in
some areas, such as subnet masking
Lets you view (and change) what has been configured earlier
Provides ‘‘hotkeys’’ for display control
8-3
How To Use Quick Remote
Introducing Quick Remote
Set-Up Requirements for Quick Remote
The following is needed to enable Quick Remote operation:
The central router on which you are going to create the Quick
Remote configuration(s) must already be configured for HP Point-toPoint routing on the WAN ports that you will use for Quick Remote
access from remote routers. (The Quick Remote configurations that
you create are assigned to these WAN ports on the central router for
downloading to remote routers, but do not affect the configuration
of these ports.)
An active HP Point-to-Point WAN link must exist between a WAN
port on a remote router and a WAN port on a central HP router.
A minimal IP and/or IPX configuration must be stored in Quick
Remote on the central router for the WAN port linked to a WAN port
on the remote router
The remote HP router must be configured to the factory default
prior to power-up or rebooting
Note
8-4
‘‘Factory default’’ is the state of the router configuration either when the
router is shipped from the factory or when you use the Clear/Reset
button combination (described in the installation manual) to clear the
configuration and reboot the router.
How To Use Quick Remote
Quick Remote Operation
8
Quick Remote Operation
Quick Remote
Quick Remote maintains in the central router one or more minimal
router configurations that are accessed through the router’s WAN
port(s). That is:
1. In the central router, an operator uses Quick Remote to create a minimal configuration that will be available via a WAN port on that router.
2. When a WAN port on a remote router is connected to the same pointto-point link as the WAN port on the central router, and powered up,
the remote router downloads the configuration from step 1, above,
boots itself, and begins routing. (The remote router must be in the
factory default configuration at power-up.)
Thus, in the following illustration, to configure remote router X, you
would assign configuration A to WAN port 1, which is linked by an
active HP Point-to-Point WAN connection to router X.
Remote Router X
Central Router
Quick Remote
WANPort
WAN-RR 1
(WAN Port 1)
Configuration
A
Configuration
B
WAN-RR 2
(WAN Port 2)
Remote Router Y
WANPort
Figure 8-2. Example of Quick Remote Operation
8-5
How To Use Quick Remote
Quick Remote Operation
Similarly, you would make configuration B available to router Y by
assigning configuration B to WAN port 2, which is linked to router Y.
When remote router A is in the factory default and boots itself:
1. Remote router X sends a Bootp request message over the WAN link
to WAN port 1 on the central router.
2. The central router responds by transmitting a Bootp reply message
(containing the configuration assigned to port 1) across the WAN
link to remote router X.
3. Remote router X then reboots itself with the new configuration that
it just received from the central router, and begins routing and/or
bridging operations.
When remote router Y boots from the factory default, it receives
configuration B from WAN port 2, reboots itself, and begins routing
and/or bridging operations.
The Basic Steps to Setting Up Quick Remote
The basic steps to configuring the router for minimal operation are:
1. Determine the parameter values you want to provide at each WAN
link on the router.
2. Start Quick Configuration.
3. Enter the parameter values that you determined in step 1.
4. Save the configuration and exit from Quick Remote.
8-6
How To Use Quick Remote
Quick Remote Operation
8
The Quick Remote Screen: Features and
Control
Quick Remote
The number of WAN ports appearing in the Quick Remote screen
correspond to the number of WAN ports in the router. An example of a
Quick Remote screen is the following for an HP Router SR, which has
three WAN ports:
A. WAN ports on
the central router
B. Corresponding
configurations linked to
the central router WAN
ports
Figure 8-3. Example of Quick Remote Screen
There are eleven data fields for each configuration:
Auto
Enab
Brg
Enab
WAN WAN DoD
LAN
LAN DoD WAN IPX WAN IPX LAN IPX LAN IPX TFTP Security
DoD IP IP Subnet DoD IP IP Subnet Network Encap. Network Encap.
IP Address
Address
Mask
Address
Mask
These Fields appear in the initial Quick Remote
Screen
Use [>] to scroll to these fields, and [<] to scroll back to the left
The initial Quick Remote screen displays the first five fields. Use the [>]
and [<] keys to scroll right or left to access the fields at opposite ends of
the row.
8-7
How To Use Quick Remote
Quick Remote Operation
To move horizontally or vertically from one field to another, use the [>],
[<], [^], and [v] keys.
To enter a value in a field, move the cursor to that field and type the
value, then press [Return]. The cursor then moves to the next field.
How To Exit From Quick Remote
To exit from Quick Remote, press the [Ctrl] [C] key combination. You will
then be prompted with:
Save configuration and exit Quick Remote
(y/n)?
If you want to save the configuration and exit, type y. Quick Remote
then saves the currently displayed configurations and returns you to the
Main menu.
If you don’t want to save the configuration (or if you decide not to exit),
type n. You will then be prompted with
Make more changes
(y/n)?
•
To remain in Quick Remote, type y and press [Return].
•
To exit from Quick Remote without saving any changes, type n
and press [Return]. Quick Remote then returns you to the Main
Menu.
The remaining sections of this chapter describe how to set up Quick
Remote to create a minimal configuration for IP and IPX routing
services and to enable or disable bridging on the first WAN and LAN port
of the remote router.
8-8
How To Use Quick Remote
How To Create and Save a Quick Remote Configuration
8
Quick Remote
How To Create and Save a Quick
Remote Configuration
The main steps to creating and storing a configuration in Quick Remote
for use by an remote router are:
1. Start Quick Remote on the central router.
2. Select the WAN port through which you want to make the
configuration available to a remote HP router.
3. Enable or disable bridging and enter a minimal set of IP and/or IPX
configuration values.
4. Save the new configuration and exit from Quick Remote.
To start Quick Remote and enter a minimal configuration:
1. Plan the Quick Remote parameters for the remote router(s).
2. Display the Main menu on the central router.
3. Start a Quick Remote session. (Press [7].) When the ‘‘Welcome’’
screen appears, press [Return]. The console then displays the Quick
Remote screen.
8-9
How To Use Quick Remote
How To Create and Save a Quick Remote Configuration
Figure 8-4. Example of a Quick Remote Screen (HP Router SR)
(The WAN ports listed will correspond to the central router’s WAN
ports.)
4. Use the [v] key, if necessary, to move the cursor to the row for the
port at which you want the new configuration to be made available
for a remote router, then go on to the next step.
5. In the ‘‘Auto Enab’’ (Auto Enable) column of the desired WAN port,
type y and press [Return] to enable Quick Remote for that port. ‘‘Yes‘‘
then appears in the Auto Enable field, indicating that Quick Remote
is enabled for that port.
The cursor then moves to the ‘‘Brg Enab’’ (Bridge Enable) field.
6. Enable or disable bridging on the first WAN and LAN ports of the
remote router.
8-10
•
If you don’t want to change the setting in this field, just press
[Return] to move to the next field.
•
If you want to change the bridge setting, type y (for ‘‘Yes’’) and
press [Return] to disable bridging or (if the current setting is ‘‘Yes’’),
type n (for ‘‘No’’) and press [Return] to disable bridging.
How To Use Quick Remote
How To Create and Save a Quick Remote Configuration
Enter an IP address in the WAN DoD IP Address field.
•
Enter an IP subnet mask in the WAN DoD IP Subnet Mask field.
Quick Remote
Note
•
8
7. To configure IP for the first WAN port of a remote router:
This IP address must be for the same subnet as the central router WAN
port through which the Quick Remote configuration will be sent to the
remote router. For example, if the IP address for the WAN port on the
central router was 15.1.1.1, then the IP address for the corresponding
WAN port on the remote router could be 15.1.1.2.
If you don’t need IP WAN operation, use [>] to bypass these fields.
8. To configure IP for the first LAN port of a remote router:
•
•
Note
Enter an IP address in the LAN DoD IP Address field.
Enter an IP subnet mask in the LAN DoD IP Address field.
This IP address must be for a LAN port in another subnet.
If you don’t need IP LAN operation, use [>] to bypass these fields.
9. To configure IPX for the first WAN port of a remote router:
•
•
Enter an IPX network number in the WAN IPX Network field.
Enter an IPX encapsulation type in the WAN IPX Encap. field
If you don’t need IPX WAN operation, use [>] to bypass these fields.
10. To configure IPX for the first LAN port of a remote router:
•
•
Enter an IPX network number in the LAN IPX Network field.
Enter an IPX encapsulation type in the LAN IPX Encap. field
If you don’t need IPX LAN operation, use [>] to bypass these fields.
11. To configure the remote router to accept a TFTP Put of a configuration file from a remote device, enter the IP address of the remote
device. Otherwise, leave this field blank. (Refer to ‘‘TFTP Access’’ on
page 8-14.)
12. Do one of the following:
8-11
How To Use Quick Remote
How To Create and Save a Quick Remote Configuration
•
To create another minimal configuration on another WAN port in
the central router, use the cursor keys ([>], [<], [^], and [v]) to
move the cursor to the Auto Enab field for the desired WAN port,
then repeat steps 5 through 11..
•
To save the current Quick Remote configuration(s), press the [Ctrl]
[C] key combination. You will then be prompted with:
Save configuration and exit Quick Remote
(y/n)?
Type y (for ‘‘yes’’). Quick Remote then saves the currently
displayed configurations and returns you to the Main Menu.
8-12
How To Use Quick Remote
How to Delete a Quick Remote Assignment
8
Quick Remote
How to Delete a Quick Remote
Assignment
To delete a Quick Remote Assignment:
13. Move the cursor to the Auto Enab (Auto Enable) field for the WAN
port on which you do not want Quick Remote enabled.
14. Type n (for ‘‘No’’), and press [Return]. This disables Quick Remote for
the correspoinding WAN port.
15. Press the [Ctrl] [C] key combination. You will then be prompted with:
Save configuration and exit Quick Remote
(y/n)?
16. Type y (for ‘‘yes’’). Quick Remote then saves the currently displayed
configuration and returns you to the Main menu.
8-13
How To Use Quick Remote
Operating Notes
Operating Notes
TFTP Access
TFTP Client field
Figure 8-5. Example of a Quick Remote Screen With TFTP Client Field
TFTP access enables you to automatically configure a remote router to
accept a configuration file via TFTP PUT from a specific IP address.
That is, if the ‘‘TFTP Client IP Address’’ field contains an address, then
the remote router that downloads the Quick Remote configuration
containing that address will subsequently accept a TFTP PUT of a
configuration file from that address. But if no address is provided in a
Quick Remote configuration, then the remote router that downloads
that configuration will not accept a TFTP PUT request.
How To Use the ‘‘Hotkeys’’
The hotkeys in Quick Remote let you control display features or exit
from Quick Remote, and operate in the same way as the numeric
hotkeys described in chapter 3, ‘‘How To Use Quick Configuration’’.
For further information, refer to ‘‘The Numeric Hotkeys’’ on page 3-13.
To display the hotkey menu: Type the forward slash (/).
8-14
How To Use Quick Remote
Operating Notes
8
For further information, refer to ‘‘The Numeric Hotkeys’’ on page 3-13.
Quick Remote
SNMP Default Settings
If the minimal configuration a remote router receives from Quick
Remote in a central router includes the DoD Internet Router (IP)
service, then SNMP will be enabled in the remote router as follows:
Community Name: Public
Session Mode: Read (read-only access)
Session Type: Regular
Node Address: 0.0.0.0 (permits any network entity using Community
Name to query the agent)
For more on SNMP parameters, refer to the Operator’s Reference.
8-15
Index
Index
!
! ... 7-8
A
Action prompt ... 4-11
Add option ... 4-13
Alarm ... 7-14
Alert, configuration conflict ... 3-36
ANSI ... 7-32
AppleTalk Configuration ... 3-2
AppleTalk net range ... 3-27
AppleTalk router statistics ... 6-3
AppleTalk zone name ... 3-27
Asterisk, statistics screens ... 6-6
at (AppleTalk) ... 7-14
atmib ... 7-14
Atping ... 7-8
Automatic reboot parameter ... 5-6
Automatic reboot, event log ... 5-6
B
C
cct ... 5-2, 7-14
Central router ... 8-2
Change time ... 7-5
Changing parameter values ... 4-14
Chassis ... 7-14
Circuit group parameters, defined ... 4-9
Circuit name
default ... 4-12
slot number ... 4-12
Circuit type ... 3-19
Circuits parameters, defined ... 4-9
Circuits statistics ... 6-3
Clear/Reset buttons ... 8-2
Clearing a password ... 2-4
Clearing the router ... 5-6, 8-2, 8-4
Command line ... 7-2
Command prompt, NCL ... 7-4
Config ... 7-8, 7-14
Configuration
actions ... 4-13
AppleTalk ... 3-2
automatic ... 8-2
basic ... 3-2
conflict, HP router 650 ... 3-37
control options ... 4-13
creating ... 1-8
DECnet ... 3-2
extensive ... 3-2
implementing changes ... 3-10
IP ... 3-2
IPX ... 3-2
minimal ... 3-6, 8-2
modifying ... 1-8
Index
Baud rate, terminal ... 2-3
blockste ... 7-28
Blockste all ... 7-28
Boot ... 1-3, 3-26, 3-28 – 3-29, 3-31, 4-6, 4-15,
7-5, 7-8
from Quick Configuration ... 3-2, 3-9
Boot, effect on event log ... 5-4
Boot, event log ... 5-3
Boot, prompt ... 3-10
Bootp reply ... 8-6
Bootp request ... 8-6
Brg Enab ... 3-8, 3-27
Bridge parameters, defined ... 4-9
Bridge statistics ... 6-3
Bridge type (FDDI) ... 3-27
Bridging
disable ... 3-2
Browse ... 7-8
Browse option ... 4-13
Buf ... 7-13 – 7-14, 7-16, 7-18
Buffers information base
See buf
Buffers usage statistics ... 6-3
Index-1
Index
nonexistent ports ... 3-33
preparation ... 3-3
process ... 4-3
removing non-existent ports ... 3-34
saving ... 3-28, 3-31, 4-6
TFTP ... 7-30 - 7-31
transfer ... 7-32 – 7-37
Configuration conflict alert ... 3-36
Configuration editor ... 1-9
access from quick configuration ... 3-14
Effect on Quick Configuration ... 1-9
entering ... 4-4
exit and reboot ... 4-7
exiting ... 4-15
Exiting without saving ... 4-15
hotkey access ... 3-14, 3-16
navigation ... 4-10
starting ... 4-5
when to use ... 3-29, 4-2
Configuration menu ... 4-5
exiting ... 4-6
Configuring
basic steps ... 3-3
remote router ... 3-10
Connection ID ... 3-17, 3-20
Connection ID, adding ... 3-20
Console ... 2-3
Console interface ... 1-6
Control keys, event log ... 5-4
Copyright ... 2-3 - 2-4, 3-11
Coverage, this manual ... 1-2
Crash ... 7-8
Cursor, wrap ... 3-8
D
Date ... 1-3, 7-8
Date, event log ... 5-2
DDN ... 3-17, 3-20
Debug, event log ... 5-2
decnet ... 7-14
DECnet area.node ... 3-27
DECnet configuration ... 3-2
DECnet router statistics ... 6-3
Default circuit name ... 4-12
2-Index
Default configuration, quick configuration
... 3-27
Default parameters ... 3-17
quick configuration ... 3-27
DEFAULT_CONFIG ... 4-9
Delete option ... 4-13
Deleting nonexistent port configurations
... 3-33
Diagnostic information, event log ... 5-2
Disable ... 7-8
disipmap ... 7-29
Display output to a printer ... 7-8
Display output, redirecting ... 7-22
dls ... 7-14
DoD IP address ... 3-27
DoD IP router statistics ... 6-3
DoD IP subnet mask ... 3-27
Dotted decimal notations ... 7-11
driver ... 7-14
drs ... 7-14
E
echo ... 7-15
Edit ... 7-8
Editor, configuration
See Configuration editor
Enable ... 7-8
enipmap ... 7-29
Enter key ... 2-3
Enter Selection prompt ... 4-10, 4-15
Erasing the event log ... 5-6
Event log ... 3-30
automatic reboot parameter ... 5-6
boot ... 5-4
capacity ... 5-4
control keys ... 5-4
date ... 5-2
debug ... 5-2
discarding entries ... 5-4
displayed entries ... 5-4
effect of boot ... 5-6
effect of clear/reset ... 5-6
effect of software boot ... 5-6
entering ... 5-3
Index
erasing ... 5-6
exiting ... 5-4
illustrated ... 5-5
log status line ... 5-5
navigation ... 5-2, 5-4
object ... 5-2
performance ... 5-2
routine events ... 5-2
severity ... 5-2
slot number ... 5-3
status line ... 5-5
time ... 5-2
warning ... 5-2
Event log, filter ... 7-8
Exit ... 7-8
Exit without saving ... 4-15
Exit, from NCL ... 2-5
Exit, from statistics screens ... 6-5
Exiting
from quick configuration ... 3-9, 3-11
Exiting from the Configuration editor
... 4-15
Exiting, from event log ... 5-4
Exiting, NCL ... 7-4
exmib ... 7-14
F
G–H
Get ... 7-16, 7-20
Help ... 2-2, 2-7, 7-8
de-activate ... 3-27
Quick configuration ... 3-5
Help all ... 7-6
I
Initialize ... 1-3
Interface
console ... 2-2
Interface module ... 3-5, 4-12
hotswap ... 3-5
removing ... 3-32
replacing ... 3-31, 3-36
Interface module, removing ... 3-33
Internet MIB commands ... 7-22
ip ... 7-15
IP address, X.25 ... 3-20 – 3-21
IP configuration ... 3-2
IP host-only ... 3-27
IP mapped data ... 7-29
IP switched virtual circuit ... 7-29
ipmap ... 7-29
ipx ... 7-15
IPX configuration ... 3-2
IPX network ... 3-27
IPX router statistics ... 6-3
isdn ... 7-15
Index
Factory default ... 1-3, 3-27, 4-2, 7-4, 8-2,
8-4 – 8-5
X.25 ... 3-17
Fatal exception ... 5-6
FDDI bridge type ... 3-27
Features covered ... 1-2
Fget ... 7-30 - 7-31
Field, parameter ... 4-14
fput ... 7-30 - 7-31, 8-2
Functions, statistics screens ... 6-3
Help message, quick configuration ... 3-27
Help, in main menu ... 2-6
Help, statistics screens ... 6-5
Hot swap ... 3-31
Hotkey ... 3-2, 3-5, 3-12 – 3-16, 3-25, 3-29, 4-2
alphabetical ... 3-14
example of use ... 3-14
L option ... 3-25
main ... 3-16
numeric ... 3-13
R option ... 3-25
X.25 ... 3-17
Hotswap ... 3-5
HP router 650 ... 3-33, 3-36, 4-12
HP Router CR ... 7-30
HP Routing Services and Applications
... 5-2
hpnm ... 7-15
hw ... 7-15
Index-3
Index
J–L
J2540 ... 1-2
key ... 7-15
LAPB ... 3-19
lb ... 7-14
lbmib ... 7-14
Lines parameters, defined ... 4-9
Link type ... 3-19, 3-27
List ... 7-16 – 7-17
Local DTE address ... 3-20
See X.25
Log ... 7-8, 7-14
Log filter ... 7-8
Log status line, event log ... 5-5
Logi ... 5-3, 7-8
LOGOFF ... 1-7
M
Main menu ... 2-3 – 2-5, 3-6, 4-8
Main menu, Help ... 2-6
Main menu, using ... 2-5
Managed objects ... 7-13 – 7-14
Management information base
See MIB
Mask, subnet
See subnet mask
mem ... 7-15
Menu item, unconfigured ... 4-11
Menu, configuration ... 4-5
control options ... 4-13
Menu, main ... 2-2
mgr ... 7-15
MIB ... 7-13 – 7-21
bridging and routing tables ... 7-25–7-26
foreign management information base
... 7-24
internet commands ... 7-22
internet standard MIB variable ... 7-22
IP address table ... 7-22
IP address translation table ... 7-22
IP routing table ... 7-22
objects ... 7-18
pathname ... 7-16
4-Index
remote management information base
... 7-23
Minimal configuration ... 3-6
modem, configuring with ... 3-10
Modify option ... 4-13
Module, interface
See interface module
More ... 7-6
Movement, in configuration editor ... 4-10
Multiple data screens ... 7-6
N
name ... 7-15
Navigation
event log ... 5-2
quick configuration ... 3-20
Navigation, configuration editor ... 4-10
Navigation, quick configuration ... 3-8
Navigation, statistics screens ... 6-5
NCL
! ... 7-8
boot ... 7-2, 7-8
Browse ... 7-8
command execution ... 7-5
command line ... 1-6, 7-2
command prompt ... 7-4
config ... 7-8
crash ... 7-8
Date ... 7-8
disable ... 7-8
display output to printer ... 7-8
edit ... 7-8
enable ... 7-8
exit ... 7-8
exiting ... 7-4
expandable commands ... 7-5
features ... 7-2
general commands ... 7-7 – 7-8
Help ... 7-8
Help all command ... 7-6
log ... 7-8
log filter ... 7-8
logi ... 7-8
More ... 7-6
Index
page ... 7-8
password ... 7-8
ping ... 7-8
print ... 7-8
quick ... 7-8
quickr ... 7-8
repeat ... 7-8
stamp ... 7-9
starting ... 7-3 – 7-6
stats ... 7-9
summary ... 7-9
Summary command ... 3-29
test ... 7-9
time ... 7-8 – 7-9
NCL, exit from ... 2-5
NCL, Help ... 2-6
Network command language interpreter
See NCL
Network Control Language Interpreter
See NCL
Network management tools ... 1-10
Network planning ... 1-2
Non-existent ports, removing ... 3-34
O
P
Page ... 7-8
Parameter field ... 4-14
Parameter string ... 4-14
Parameter, changing ... 4-14
Index
Object identification codes ... 7-19
Object, event log ... 5-2
Objects ... 7-14
Objects, managed ... 7-13
Option, parameter ... 4-14
ospf ... 7-15, 7-27
ospf errs ... 7-27
ospf intf ... 7-27
ospf lsdb ... 7-27
ospf nbrs ... 7-27
OSPF routing table ... 7-25
ospf rtab ... 7-25, 7-27
ospf tq ... 7-27
Parameter, selecting an option ... 4-14
Parameter, truncating entry ... 4-14
Parameters, default ... 3-17
Parameters, global ... 4-3
Parameters, reciprocal settings ... 3-30
Password ... 1-4, 2-3, 3-11, 7-8
after booting ... 3-11
Password, clearing ... 2-4
Pathname, MIB ... 7-16
Pathnames, codes for MIB ... 7-19
PC modem access ... 7-32 – 7-37
PDN ... 3-17, 3-20
Per second statistics ... 6-3
Performance, event log ... 5-2
Personal computer, console ... 2-3
Ping ... 7-5, 7-7 – 7-8
pm ... 7-15
Point-to-Point address ... 3-27
Point-to-Point, X.25 ... 3-17
Port
interface module ... 3-5
Quick configuration ... 3-3
Port conf ... 3-27
Port conf parameter ... 3-18
Ports, quick configuration ... 3-7
Power interruption
effect on event log ... 5-6
Previous display ... 4-13
Print ... 7-8, 7-22 – 7-23
PTOP
See X.25
Q
Quality of service ... 3-27
Quick ... 7-8
Quick configuration ... 1-9, 4-2
access to configuration editor ... 3-14
boot ... 3-9 – 3-10
boot upon exit ... 3-2
Brg Enab ... 3-8
bypassing fields ... 3-20
cursor wrap ... 3-8
data entry ... 3-28
default configuration ... 3-27
Index-5
Index
default parameters ... 3-27
editing ... 3-12 – 3-14
effect on Configuration Editor ... 1-9
exiting ... 3-9
exiting without saving ... 3-11
fields ... 3-7
Help ... 3-5
hot swapping interface modules ... 3-31
hotkeys ... 3-5
moving among fields ... 3-8
parameters affected ... 3-2
port differences ... 3-3
ports ... 3-7
removing interface modules ... 3-32
scrolling ... 3-7
starting ... 3-6
X.25 ... 3-16 – 3-26
Quick remote ... 1-7
Bootp request message ... 8-6
bridging ... 8-9
data fields ... 8-7
delete assignment ... 8-13
exit ... 8-8
hotkeys ... 8-14
how it operates ... 8-5
IP ... 8-11
IPX ... 8-11
LAN port to use ... 8-3
LAN ports ... 8-11
navigation ... 8-10
navigation in screen ... 8-8
Point-to-Point link ... 8-4
procedure ... 8-2
save and exit ... 8-12
saving the configuration ... 8-8
screen layout ... 8-7
set-up ... 8-4
SNMP settings ... 8-15
starting ... 8-9
TFTP ... 8-14
TFTP put ... 8-14
TFTP security ... 8-11
WAN port addressing ... 8-11
WAN port correspondence ... 8-10
WAN port operation ... 8-5
6-Index
WAN port to use ... 8-3, 8-7
Quickr ... 7-8
Quit, event log ... 5-4
R
Reboot
See boot
Reboot prompt ... 3-23
REBOOTING THE SYSTEM ... 3-10, 3-23,
3-26
Redirecting display output ... 7-22
Refresh
statistics screens ... 6-6
Release notes ... 1-2
Remote DTE address ... 3-20
Remote router ... 8-2
Removing an interface module ... 3-33
Repeat ... 7-8
Reset ... 7-16, 7-21
Reset button ... 3-28, 8-2
Reset, statistics screen ... 6-6
Reset/clear button combination ... 3-27
RFC 1156 ... 7-2
rget ... 7-24
rgeta ... 7-22, 7-25
rgetat ... 7-25
rgetata ... 7-25
rgetatr ... 7-25
rgetb ... 7-25
rgetd ... 7-25
rgetda ... 7-25
rgetdn ... 7-26
rgeti ... 7-22, 7-26
rgetif ... 7-26
rgetir ... 7-26
rgetis ... 7-26
rgetm ... 7-24
rgetms ... 7-22
rgetmw ... 7-23
rgetr ... 7-22, 7-26
rgets ... 7-22
rgetw ... 7-23
rgetxr ... 7-26
Ring interface ... 3-27
Index
rok ... 7-15
Routine events, event log ... 5-2
Routing services ... 4-10
S
T
TCP ... 7-10, 7-15
Telnet ... 4-2, 7-10 - 7-12, 7-15, 8-2
disconnecting ... 7-12
use ... 7-11
Telnet enabled ... 3-27
Telnet, configuring with ... 3-10
Telnet, enable ... 7-11
Telnet, inbound ... 7-10
Telnet, outbound ... 7-10
Telnet, prerequisites ... 7-10
Terminal emulation ... 2-3
Terminal emulator ... 7-36
Test ... 7-9
tftp ... 7-15, 7-30 – 7-31, 8-2
tftp put ... 7-30
Time ... 1-3, 7-8 - 7-9
Time, change ... 7-5
Time, event log ... 5-2
timep ... 7-15
timer ... 7-15
Token ring ... 3-27
Troubleshooting ... 3-30
Truncated digits, statistics screens ... 6-6
Truncating a parameter entry ... 4-14
Index-7
Index
Save and exit ... 3-22, 4-15
Save and exit prompt ... 3-9
Saving a configuration ... 3-28, 4-6
Screen refresh rate parameter ... 6-6
Screens, controlling multiple ... 7-6
Screens, multiple data ... 7-6
Scrolling, quick configuration ... 3-7
Selecting a parameter option ... 4-14
Self-test ... 2-3
Service appearance/disappearance ... 5-2
Service, degraded ... 5-2
Services, routing ... 4-10
Severity, event log ... 5-2
Shutdown history ... 7-8
Slot
See also interface module
Slot number ... 4-12
Slot number, event log messages ... 5-3
Slot numbers ... 7-13
SmartBoot ... 1-2, 8-2
SNMP ... 7-13, 7-15, 7-24 – 7-25
SNMP agent ... 7-2
SNMP defaults ... 8-15
SNMP enabled ... 3-27
Software parameters, defined ... 4-9
Software update ... 4-8
Spanning tree explorer frames ... 7-28
Speed sense ... 2-3, 3-10, 3-26
Stamp ... 7-9
Starting NCL ... 7-3 – 7-6
Statistics screen ... 1-6
Statistics screens ... 3-30
asterisk ... 6-6
configured services ... 6-4
Exit ... 6-5
functions ... 6-3
Help ... 6-5
items always listed ... 6-4
navigation ... 6-5
operation ... 6-6
resetting ... 6-6
updating ... 6-6
Statistics screens, invoking ... 7-9
Stats ... 7-9
String, parameter ... 4-14
Subnet mask ... 3-27, 3-30
Summary ... 7-9
Summary command ... 3-29
svc ... 7-15
System name ... 3-8, 3-27, 7-4
System name field ... 3-14 – 3-15, 3-27
System parameters defined ... 4-9
Index
U
X
unblockste ... 7-28
unblockste all ... 7-28
Unconfigured menu items ... 4-11
Update, software ... 4-8
Updating
statistics screens ... 6-6
Upgrade, software ... 1-2
X.121 ... 3-17
X.121 address ... 3-20
See X.25
X.25 ... 7-15
access ... 3-2
configuring additional paramters ... 3-23
configuring in quick configuration
... 3-16 – 3-26
connection ID ... 3-20
DDN ... 3-17, 3-20
IP address ... 3-20
LAPB ... 3-19
local DTE address ... 3-20 – 3-21
minimal configuratioin ... 3-18
PDN ... 3-17, 3-20 - 3-21, 3-25
Point-to-Point ... 3-17
PTOP ... 3-20
remote connection ID ... 3-22
remote DTE (X.121) address ... 3-22
Virtual circuit parameters ... 3-25
X.121 address ... 3-20 – 3-21
X.121 for PTOP ... 3-22
X.25 service ... 3-14
XNS router statistics ... 6-3
xrx ... 7-15
V
V.25 bis ... 4-3, 7-29
Verification
hardware ... 2-3
Verifying ... 1-5
Version, software ... 7-9
Virtual circuit parameters ... 3-25
Virtual terminal connection ... 7-10 – 7-12
VT100 ... 7-32
W
WAN port parameters, default ... 3-18
Warning, event log ... 5-2
Wrap, cursor ... 3-8
Z
zget ... 7-32, 7-36
Zmodem protocol ... 7-32
Zput ... 7-22, 7-32
8-Index
©Copyright 1994
Hewlett-Packard Company
Printed Singapore 7/94
Manual Part Number
5962-8304
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