HP | Blade Workstation Client | User's Manual | HP Blade Workstation Client User's Manual

HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0
User's Guide
Copyrights and trademarks
© Copyright 2003 - 2006 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
The HP Remote Graphics Sender for Windows uses Microsoft Detours Professional
2.0. Detours is Copyright 1995-2004, Microsoft Corporation. Portions of the Detours
package may be covered by patents owned by Microsoft corporation.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and DirectX
are registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. and
other countries.
Intel, Pentium, Intel Inside, and Celeron are registered trademarks of Intel
Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and other countries.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
AMD and AMD64 are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
OpenGL is a registered trademark of Silicon Graphics, Inc.
Red Hat and Enterprise Linux are registered trademarks of Red Hat, Inc.
Linux is the registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States and other
countries.
InstallShield® is a registered trademark and service mark of Macrovision Corporation
and/or Macrovision Europe Ltd. in the United States and/or other countries.
Symantec and the Symantec logo are U.S. registered trademarks of Symantec
Corporation.
pcAnywhere is a trademark of Symantec Corporation.
ZeroC, Ice, and Internet Communications Engine are trademarks of ZeroC, Inc.
CORBA is a trademark or registered trademark of the Object Management Group,
Inc.
Audigy is a trademark of Creative Technology Ltd. in the United States and/or other
countries.
Python and PyCon are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Python Software
Foundation.
All other product names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective
companies.
Hewlett-Packard Company shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or
omissions contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection
with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material. The information in this
document is provided “as is” without warranty of any kind, including, but not limited
to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, and
is subject to change without notice. The warranties for HP products are set forth in
the express limited warranty statements accompanying such products. Nothing
herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright. No
part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated to another
language without the prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard Company.
Acknowledgments
HP Remote Graphics Software was developed using several third party products
including, but not limited to:
OpenSSL: This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use
in the OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/). This product includes software
written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com). This product includes cryptographic
software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com)
log4cplus: This product includes software developed by the Apache Software
Foundation (http://www.apache.org/). log4cplus is available from
http://log4cplus.sourceforge.net/
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA): ALSA provides audio and MIDI
functionality to the Linux operating system. ALSA is released in source code format
under the GNU LESSER GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE Version 2.1, February 1999. ALSA
is used in the HP Remote Graphics Software Receiver for Linux.
Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK): JACK is a low-latency audio server, written for
POSIX conformant operating systems such as GNU/Linux and Apple's OS X. JACK is
released in source code format under the GNU LESSER GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
Version 2.1, February 1999. JACK is used in the HP Remote Graphics Software
Receiver for Linux.
Libsndfile: Libsndfile is a C library for reading and writing files containing sampled
sound (such as MS Windows WAV and the Apple/SGI AIFF format) through one
standard library interface. Libsndfile is released in source code format under the GNU
LESSER GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE. Libsndfile is used in the HP Remote Graphics
Software Receiver for Linux.
Where required, related source code and licenses are re-distributed with HP Remote
Graphics Software.
Table Of Contents
Welcome to HP Remote Graphics Software.......................................................... 1
About Remote Graphics Software....................................................................... 3
What is Remote Graphics Software? ................................................................ 3
Features ...................................................................................................... 4
Security Features .......................................................................................... 7
System Requirements.................................................................................... 9
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software................................................. 13
Installing the Receiver ................................................................................. 13
Installing the Sender ................................................................................... 16
Creating Unattended Installers...................................................................... 22
Installing & Enabling Remote Audio ............................................................... 23
Installing and Enabling Single Sign-on ........................................................... 32
Installing and Enabling Easy Login................................................................. 35
Installing the Enterprise Service SDK............................................................. 39
Enabling OpenGL Applications....................................................................... 40
Enabling Direct3D Applications on Windows.................................................... 42
Using Remote Graphics Software ..................................................................... 43
Using the Receiver ...................................................................................... 43
Directory Mode ........................................................................................... 59
Enterprise Service Mode............................................................................... 62
Using the Sender ........................................................................................ 64
Command Line Options................................................................................ 71
Properties .................................................................................................. 74
How to Collaborate...................................................................................... 83
Using Single Sign-on ................................................................................... 85
Using Easy Login......................................................................................... 87
Remote Application Termination on Windows.................................................. 91
Using Timeouts......................................................................................... 106
Remote Graphics and Microsoft Remote Desktop Interaction .......................... 113
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Optimizing Performance............................................................................. 114
Utilities .................................................................................................... 116
Troubleshooting........................................................................................... 119
Troubleshooting Usage and Performance...................................................... 119
Known Issues and Limitations..................................................................... 129
Error Messages ......................................................................................... 138
License and Support..................................................................................... 143
End-user License Agreement ...................................................................... 143
Contacting HP........................................................................................... 147
viii
Welcome to HP Remote Graphics Software
Welcome to HP Remote Graphics Software (RGS). This document provides a
complete overview of the RGS product including the RGS Receiver, RGS Sender, and
RGS Enterprise Service.
1
About Remote Graphics Software
What is Remote Graphics Software?
Remote Graphics Software (RGS) is software that allows a user to access the
desktop of a remote computer over a standard computer network. The software is
conceptually similar to other remote access solutions such as Microsoft Remote
Desktop, Symantec pcAnywhere™ and others.
Remote Graphics Software is composed of three major software components:
1. RGS Sender is a software application that runs as a service or background
process on a remote computer and transmits graphics updates, audio, and
USB data to one or more RGS Receivers. The Sender receives keyboard
events, mouse events, and USB data from the Receiver, and processes them
locally.
2. RGS Receiver is a software application that runs on a local computer or thinclient. The Receiver establishes a connection to one or more Senders,
requests graphics updates from the Sender, and displays the desktop of the
remote computer inside a window on the local system. Keyboard and mouse
events in the Remote Display Window are transmitted to a Sender. USB data
is also transmitted and received from the Sender. The Receiver connects to
the RGS Enterprise Service if enabled.
3. RGS Enterprise Service is an optional software component that runs as a
service or daemon on a remote computer. The Enterprise Service (ES)
manages centralized system lookup and user enterprise properties for the
RGS Receiver over a standard computer network. The Enterprise Service is
delivered as a Software Development Kit (SDK).
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Features
HP Remote Graphics Software includes the following features:
4
•
Application transparency: No modification to applications is necessary to
access them remotely.
•
Audio follows focus: The RGS Receiver can be configured to enable audio
for the session displayed in the Remote Display Window that currently has
focus and is muted for all other remote sessions/windows.
•
Collaboration: Multiple users can simultaneously connect to the same
Sender. This allows several users to view and interact with the same
desktop. For example, several users at different remote locations can
simultaneously view 3D OpenGL applications using a RGS Receiver.
•
Collaboration Notification: The RGS Sender displays a collaboration
notification dialog when one or more non-primary connections are active.
The dialog displays the users currently connected to the Sender. This
provides a reminder to the user that multiple connections to the desktop
exist. Individual users can be disconnected using the collaboration
notification dialog. See Collaboration Notification for more details.
•
Directory Mode: Directory Mode enables the Receiver to locally lookup preassigned systems for a user from a file.
•
Direct3D: Direct3D 8.0 and Direct3D 9.0 applications are supported.
Remote access users and remote collaborators can easily interact with
Direct3D applications running on a remote desktop. Direct3D applications
run using the full power of the graphics adapter. See Enabling Direct3D
Applications on Windows for further information.
•
Disconnect primary or non-primary users: The RGS Sender desktop GUI
provides the ability to selectively disconnect either non-primary users or all
users (both primary and non-primary).
•
Easy Login: Enables fewer authentication steps when connecting to an HP
Blade Workstation running Windows XP Pro. See Using Easy Login for more
details.
•
Enterprise Service Mode: The Remote Graphics Software Enterprise Service
enables a customer to integrate remote graphics into their enterprise
directory infrastructure to support assignment of systems to users as well
as managing user settings and properties. The Enterprise Service enables
roaming usage. Users can work from any location on the network and
easily access their assigned systems and settings without re-entering
them. The Remote Graphics Software Enterprise Service also allows IT
organizations to easily manage user system assignment with their current
enterprise directory infrastructure.
•
Hotkeys: The RGS Receiver supports setting user-defined hotkeys for
entering Setup Mode as well as other operations.
About Remote Graphics Software
•
Image-based remote visualization technology: Proprietary HP image
compression/decompression algorithms enable real-time remote
visualization that is visually lossless and fast. Interactive remote
visualization of 2D and 3D OpenGL graphics are possible using hardware
acceleration. DirectX applications are not supported.
•
Logging: The RGS Sender for Windows logs to the Windows Event Log
connection status changes such as when a new connection is established,
when a disconnect occurs, the user that is assigned to a connection, and
whether that user is a primary or non-primary user.
•
Multi-head Display: Single-headed receivers can view multi-headed
senders. Multi-headed receivers can view single-headed senders. Multiheaded receivers can view multi-headed senders. The view can expand to
contain the entire area on the receiver's desktop. This gives the user the
impression of direct connection and full utilization of the sender's desktop.
•
Multi-platform support: Senders and Receivers are supported on Microsoft
Windows, Linux and HP-UX systems. See System Requirements for more
details.
•
Network Connection Warning Notification: The RGS Receiver visually warns
the user when network connectivity between a Receiver and Sender is
potentially lost. If network connectivity recovers, normal operation should
continue. See Network Options and Using Timeouts for more details.
•
OpenGL 3-D OpenGL applications are supported. Remote access users and
remote collaborators can easily interact with 3-D applications running on a
remote desktop. 3-D applications run using the full power of the graphics
adapter. See Enabling OpenGL Applications for further information. :
•
Properties: The RGS Receiver and Sender provide an easy to use public
interface that allows users and administrators to specify properties either
on the command-line, a configuration file, or using the RGS Enterprise
Service. See Properties for more details.
•
Remote Application Termination (RAT): Network outages or loss of
connectivity between a Receiver and Sender can leave a desktop session
running without supervision. To safeguard running applications, customerdesigned agents can monitor the status of connections to determine if
termination of applications is required. Remote Application Termination is
only available with the RGS Sender for Windows. See Remote Application
Termination on Windows for more details.
•
Remote Audio: Smooth, continuous, low-latency, high-quality remote audio
is possible from RGS Senders to RGS Receivers. See System Requirements
for more details on the supported systems.
•
Remote & Local Cursor Tracking: In a collaboration session (multiple users
connected to the same remote desktop) the shape of the local hardware
cursor is modified for the floor owner (the user that is currently in control
of the mouse and keyboard). For the other remote users, the local cursor is
left unchanged and a remote cursor is displayed in the Remote Display
Window.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
6
•
Remote USB: The HP Blade Workstation with RGS Sender supports multiple
USB devices connected from an HP Workstation Blade Client. See System
Requirements for more details on the supported systems.
•
Screen lock: When the primary user disconnects the desktop of the remote
system is locked.
•
Single Sign-on: Enables fewer authentication steps and automatic login
and unlocking of the desktop when connecting to a HP Blade Workstation
running Windows XP Pro. Activation of RGS Single Sign-on requires
enabling the RGS Sender for Windows GINA module (hprgina.dll) which
can be selected during installation.
•
Status Bar: A status bar in the RGS Receiver Control Panel provides status
notification such as connecting, authenticated, authorizing, and connected
messages. The banner in the RGS Control Panel also animates when a
connection is in progress.
•
Stateless client: Connections are completely stateless. No data is
persistently stored in the Receiver.
•
Timeout Configuration: Network and dialog timeouts can be controlled to
meet various network and user requirements. See Network Options and
Using Timeouts for more details.
•
Virtual KVM: A single Receiver can establish multiple remote connections to
several remote systems simultaneously when run in Directory or Enterprise
Service Mode. Virtual KVM (V-KVM) emulates the functionality of a KVM
switch in software to provide a convenient method to map workstations to
specific displays and switch between them. This feature emulates the
capabilities found in a physical KVM switch by allowing the user to easily
switch between remote session by "raising" the selected Remote Display
Window in a manner similar to the "alt-tab" capability provided in
Windows. The receiver can also switch audio between active sessions as
described in the Controlling Receiver Settings section using the audio
follows focus option.
About Remote Graphics Software
Security Features
HP Remote Graphics Software has the following features to maintain security:
•
Authentication: When a Receiver attempts to connect to a Sender, user
credentials are validated using the native authentication method on the
sender system. If the credentials are not authenticated, the connection is
closed. On Windows operating systems authentication uses NTLM or Kerberos.
On UNIX (Linux and HP-UX) authentication uses the Pluggable Authentication
Module (PAM).
•
Authorization: Multiple connections to the same Sender are only allowed if the
user logged into the desktop of the Sender system (primary user) allows the
connection. When a non-primary user attempts to connect to a Sender an
authorization dialog is displayed on the desktop of the remote system that
asks whether the user should be allowed to connect.
•
Automatic Desktop Locking: The desktop of the Sender system locks when
the primary user disconnects. This prevents non-primary users from being
able to interact with a remote session after the primary user has
disconnected.
This feature is supported on Windows systems, and on Linux and HP-UX, this
feature is supported on the Gnome, KDE, and CDE desktop environments.
•
Automatic Disconnect: On Linux and HP-UX systems all Receivers will
disconnect when the primary user disconnects. This prevents non-primary
users from interaction with a remote session after the primary user
disconnects.
•
Automatic Disconnect of non-primary users on Login: All non-primary users
are disconnected when a login event occurs. Only the primary user remains
connected when the desktop of the remote computer is logged in.
•
Automatic Disconnect on Log Off: All Receivers are disconnected when the
primary user logs off of the remote desktop. This can be disabled by setting
the "IsDisconnectOnLogoutEnabled" sender property to "0". See Sender
Properties for more information.
•
Connection Status: On Windows a desktop icon in the application tray
animates when other users are connected. Likewise, on Linux and HP-UX the
Sender GUI animates.
•
Collaboration notification: See Features.
•
Connections are not allowed when an iLO remote console is enabled: If the
iLO remote console is enabled on a HP Blade Workstation, connections to the
blade using RGS are denied.
•
Disconnect All: All Receivers can be easily disconnected using the Sender GUI.
This is useful when hosting a collaboration session, such as in a classroom
environment, and the session ends. On Windows system, the GUI is an icon
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
located in the system tray. On Unix systems, the GUI is an application on the
desktop. Simply right-click on the GUI and select "Disconnect All Receivers".
8
•
Enable/Disable I/O: The Sender GUI can enable or disable mouse and
keyboard input for all non-primary users.
•
Single user connection: A user, identified by a username, is only allowed one
connection to a RGS Sender. If the same username connects more than once
to a Sender, the previous connection drops and the new connection continues
on. If several users attempt to share a username, only one connection is
active at a time.
•
SSL encryption: SSL securely encrypts all data transmitted between a
Receiver and Sender pair.
About Remote Graphics Software
System Requirements
Sender
Feature
Supported Platforms
Supported Graphics
Supported Components
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 or XP Professional 32-bit
(Intel x86 and x86-64 processor families. AMD
x86 and AMD64 processor families.)
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
(Intel x86-64 processor families. AMD64
processor families.)
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS3 32-bit & 64-bit
(Intel x86 and x86-64 processor families. AMD
x86 and AMD64 processor families. HP Personal
Workstations only.)
•
HP-UX 11.0 and 11i V1 HP PA-RISC 2.0
architecture (PA-8500 or later)
Windows & Linux:
•
Any graphics adapter (nVIDIA, ATI, Matrox)
HP-UX:
Display Settings
Remote Audio
•
HP Visualize fx5, fx10
•
ATI FireGL-UX, FireGL T2-128p
•
FireGL X1-256p, FireGL X3-256
Supports the following Display Settings:
•
32 bit at 1024x768 resolution or higher
•
On Windows, video overlay planes, DirectX and
full-screen exclusive mode access not
supported.
•
On Windows, OpenGL overlay planes are not
supported.
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional 32-bit and 64bit
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Remote USB
Remote USB is only supported on an HP Blade
Workstation Client when connected to an HP Blade
Workstation sender system.
1. Any number of USB devices can be
simultaneously connected.
2. HP Remote Graphics Software requires
matched versions of the RGS Sender and RGS
Receiver systems. For example, RGS Sender
and Receiver at version 4.0 work together. If
they are both version 3.1, they will work
together. Versions 3.1 and 4.0 in any
combination will not work together.
Easy Login
3. Not all USB devices are supported. Refer to the
HP Blade Workstation documentation for more
details.
HP Blade Workstation running Microsoft Windows XP
Professional 32-bit.
Remote Application
Termination
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional or XP
Professional 32-bit and 64-bit.
Collaboration
Notification
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional or XP
Professional 32-bit and 64-bit.
Networking
•
Standard TCP/IP.
•
10/100/1000BASE-T (Gigabit) Ethernet.
•
Full-duplex recommended.
Receiver
Feature
Supported Platforms
10
Supported Components
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 or XP Professional 32-bit
(Intel x86 and x86-64 processor families. AMD
x86 and AMD64 processor families.)
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
(Intel x86-64 processor families. AMD64
processor families.)
•
HP Compaq t5720 Thin Client with Microsoft
Windows XP Embedded (SP2)
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux WS3 32-bit & 64-bit
(Intel x86 and x86-64 processor families. AMD
x86 and AMD64 processor families. HP Personal
About Remote Graphics Software
Workstations only.)
•
HP-UX 11.0 and 11i V1 HP PA-RISC 2.0
architecture (PA-8500 or later)
Supported Graphics
Any system graphics
Display Settings
Supports the following Windows XP Color Quality
settings:
•
16 bit
•
24 bit
•
32 bit
All Linux or HP-UX Color Quality settings are
supported at 1024x768 resolution or higher
Remote Audio
Remote USB
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional 32-bit and 64bit
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
•
HP Compaq t5720 Thin Client with Microsoft
Windows XP Embedded (SP2)
•
Linux 32-bit & 64-bit
Remote USB is only supported on an HP Blade
Workstation Client when connected to an HP Blade
Workstation sender system.
1. Any number of USB devices can be
simultaneously connected.
2. HP Remote Graphics Software requires
matched versions of the RGS Sender and RGS
Receiver systems. For example, RGS Sender
and Receiver at version 4.0 work together. If
they are both version 3.1, they will work
together. Versions 3.1 and 4.0 in any
combination will not work together.
3. Not all USB devices are supported. Refer to the
HP Blade Workstation documentation for more
details.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Networking
Keyboard Locales
•
Standard TCP/IP.
•
10/100/1000BASE-T (Gigabit) Ethernet.
•
Full-duplex recommended.
The following keyboard localizations are supported:
•
U.S. English
•
U.K. English
•
Japanese
•
German
•
French
The following keyboard localizations are supported on
the HP Blade Workstation Client:
•
U.S. English
•
U.K. English
•
German (ABD)
•
Italian (ABH)
•
French (ABF)
•
Spanish (ABE)
•
International keyboard (ABZ)
•
Swedish
•
Finnish
•
Danish,
•
German Swiss
•
French Canadian
•
Norwegian.
Enterprise Service
Feature
Operating System
12
Supported Components
•
Microsoft Windows XP Professional 32-bit & 64-bit
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
Installing the Receiver
Installation of the HP Remote Graphics Software Receiver is required on all systems
that will be connecting to a HP Remote Graphics Software Sender.
Installing the RGS Receiver for Windows
To begin the installation of the RGS Receiver for Windows login to an account with
administrator privileges:
1. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and in Explorer change to the
directory win32\receiver on your CD-ROM drive.
2. Double-click or select Setup.exe to start the installer.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen.
The installer will add a menu item folder to the Programs folder called HP Remote
Graphics. In this folder will be two items:
•
Receiver
•
Receiver -directory
Unattended Installations
If you need to install the Windows RGS Receiver on several systems, please refer to
Creating Unattended Installers.
Installing the RGS Receiver for Linux
To install:
1. Login as root.
2. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and mount the CD, if it is not
automatically mounted.
3. Go to the mount point of the CD, which is usually /mnt/cdrom and change
directories to lin32/receiver.
4. Execute the following command:
./install.sh
Note: If remote audio is installed the HP Remote Graphics Software requires
certain audio support utilities be available for remote audio support from
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
appropriate senders. This software (based upon ALSA sound libraries and
JACK-Audio-Connection-Kit libraries) must be built and installed on the target
system as a part of the install.sh script. The install script assumes a supported
set of ALSA sound libraries from HP or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (release 4 or
greater) already exist on the platform. Only the JACK-Audio-Connection-Kit is
built during install and it requires ALSA sound library support.
Note: The files contained within hp_rgs_4_audiosupport.tar.gz can also be
built and configured for RPM package creation. See script rgs_audio_support
for details.
5. The Receiver will be installed into /opt/hpremote/rgreceiver. To start the
Receiver, execute the following command:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh
To start the Receiver in directory mode, execute the following command:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh -directory
6. Optionally, add the directory /opt/hpremote/rgreceiver to your PATH
environment variable.
7. Refer to Installing & Enabling Remote Audio to complete the Receiver
installation.
Installing the RGS Receiver for HP-UX
To install:
1. Login as root.
2. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and mount the CD.
3. Go to the mount point of the CD, which is usually /mnt/cdrom and change
directories to hpux-pa/receiver.
4. Execute the following command:
./install.sh
5. The Receiver will be installed into /opt/hpremote/rgreceiver. To start the
Receiver, execute the following command:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh
To start the Receiver in directory mode, execute the following command:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh -directory
6. Optionally, add the directory /opt/hpremote/rgreceiver to your PATH
environment variable.
14
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
Uninstalling the RGS Receiver
Uninstalling the RGS Receiver for Windows:
To uninstall the RGS Receiver for Windows use the Windows 2000 or Windows XP
Add or Remove Programs feature from the Control Panel. Select Remote
Graphics Receiver and click Change/Remove.
Uninstalling the RGS Receiver for Linux:
To uninstall the RGS Receiver for Linux find the name of the RedHat RPM package for
the Remote Graphics Receiver, by typing:
rpm -q -a | grep -i rgreceiver
If the Receiver is installed on the system, you will see rgreceiver_linux_32-4.0-0
or a similar Receiver package. To remove the Receiver's RPM package, become root
and type:
rpm -e --allmatches rgreceiver_linux_32
Uninstalling the RGS Receiver for HP-UX
To uninstall the RGS Receiver for HP-UX, become root and type:
/usr/sbin/swremove rgreceiver_hpux_pa
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Installing the Sender
Installation of the RGS Sender for Windows, Linux and HP-UX is easily done by
following the directions specific to each platform in the following sections.
Installing the RGS Sender for Windows
To install the RGS Sender for Windows, login to an account with administrator
privileges:
1. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and change to the directory
win32\sender on your CD-ROM drive.
2. Double-click or select Setup.exe to start the installer.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen.
NOTE: The Remote Graphics Diagnostic tool runs during installation to detect
common setup issues (Windows XP firewall settings, Guest Account security
policies, RDP interoperability, Easy Login configuration, etc). The tool will only
display a window if it detects a potential problem. Use the tool anytime after
installation to determine installation problems. See Utilities for more details.
4. You will be prompted to restart the system after the installation is complete.
Select yes when asked to restart the system.
The Sender is installed as a Windows Service. In fact, this is necessary to enable
some features, such as the ability to send Ctrl-Alt-Del key sequences and also
view locked screens. Additionally, installing the Sender as a service allows the
Microsoft Windows operating system to automatically start the Sender when the
system is started.
NOTE: To enable OpenGL applications see Enabling OpenGL Applications for more
details.
NOTE: To enable remote audio see Installing & Enabling Remote Audio for more
details.
Installing the RGS Sender on HP Blade Workstations
The RGS Sender for Windows installer setup.exe will automatically upgrade software
versions prior to 4.0.0 when run. Upgrading the Sender is possible while connected
to a HP Blade Workstation. After completing the upgrade restart the system when
prompted. This will disconnect the current RGS connection and require a reconnect
after the Blade Workstation restarts.
16
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
First-time installs of the RGS Sender on Blade Workstations require installation via
the iLO Remote Console. This requires use of the administrative console in Setup
Mode (from the boot BIOS) to complete the RGS Sender installation. After the install
completes, return the iLO Remote Console Mode to User Mode. Please refer to the HP
Blade Workstation iLO documentation for further details about the iLO administrative
console.
Installing the RGS Sender and Remote Desktop
Using Microsoft Remote Desktop to remotely install the RGS Sender for Windows is
not supported. If attempted, the installation process displays an error message and
stops the installation process. If installing the RGS Sender on a HP Blade
Workstation, use the iLO Remote Console Mode in Setup Mode (from the boot BIOS)
instead.
Unattended Installations
If you need to install the Windows RGS Sender on several systems, please refer to
Creating Unattended Installers.
Installing the RGS Sender for Linux
Linux Sender Installation
1. Login as root.
2. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and mount the CD, if it is not
automatically mounted.
3. Go to the mount point of the CD, which is usually /mnt/cdrom and change
directories to lin32/sender.
4. Execute the following command:
./install.sh
5. The Sender will be installed to /opt/hpremote/rgsender.
6. Add the "rge" extension to the X Server configuration file. Edit the
/etc/X11/XF86Config, /etc/X11/XF86Config-4 or the appropriate XF86Config
file on your system for XFree86 X servers. Edit the xorg.conf file for X.Org X
Servers. In the Modules section of this file, add the following line:
Load "rge"
7. The Module section should read as follows:
Section "Module"
...
Load "rge"
...
17
HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
EndSection
8. The Sender will be installed to /opt/hpremote/rgsender and will be started
automatically when the X Server or system is restarted, provided the appropriate
XF86Config/xorg.conf file was correctly modified.
9. The Linux Sender uses the Pluggable Authentication Module ( PAM) for
authentication. If you are using the GNOME Desktop Manager or KDE Desktop
Manager you must manually add the following lines to the files /etc/pam.d/gdm,
/etc/pam.d/kde, and /etc/pam.d/xdm:
session
optional
pam_rg.so
10. If another desktop manager, such as Enlightenment, is being used then you will
need to make similar changes to the PAM configuration file used by it. You
should consult your Linux and Desktop Manager documentation for further
information.
11. If the PAM system has been configured to use custom PAM authentication
modules then you may need to manually configure the PAM module that is used
by the RGS Sender. You should consult your Linux documentation when
configuring PAM.If you are using a custom PAM authentication module called
“libpam_custom.1” you may need to edit the PAM configuration file
"/etc/pam.d/rgsender” to specify the PAM authentication module to be used by
the RGS Sender. For example, you may need to add the following to the file
"/etc/pam.d/rgsender”.
auth optional /lib/security/pam_custom.1
12. The default on RedHat Linux is to bind the machine name to the loopback
interface in the /etc/hosts file. The RGS Sender will not accept remote
connections with this configuration. Edit the /etc/hosts file and bind the
machine name to its proper IP address as follows:
127.0.0.1
localhost
localhost.localdomain
88.1.89.122
blade2
blade2.bigmoney.com
Linux Sender GUI Installation
The Sender GUI will automatically starts on Linux when the Sender process starts. If
you prefer to start the Sender GUI on a per-user basis, then edit the file
/opt/hpremote/rgsender/rgsender.sh, and add the -noautostartgui command
line option as follows
exec ./rgsender $* -noautostartgui -l logSetup
and then proceed to follow the directions below.
KDE RedHat GUI setup
To section describes how to manually start the Sender GUI when KDE is the desktop
manager.
1. Open the Konqueror file manager (the desktop icon that is named "Home").
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
2. On the menu bar select "Go/Autostart".
3. A new Konqueror window will open. Right click and select "Create New" and
choose "Link to Application".
4. A dialog box will open. On the General Tab page, give it a name such as
"rgsender".
5. On the Execute Tab page, add the following in the Command text edit box :
/opt/hpremote/rgsender/rgsender_gui.sh
6. Click the "OK" button to save the changes.
7. Logout and log back in and you should see the RG Sender GUI.
GNOME RedHat Enterprise GUI setup
To section describes how to start the Sender GUI when Gnome is the desktop
manager.
1. Open the Nautilus file manager (the desktop icon that is named "Start Here")
2. Select the "Preferences" icon.
3. Select the "Session" icon.
4. Select the "Session Properties & Startup Programs" icon. A new dialog window
will open.
5. Select the "Startup Programs" Tab in the new dialog window
6. Click the "Add" button. A new dialog window will open.
7. In the "Startup Command" text edit box in the new dialog window enter:
/opt/hpremote/rgsender/rgsender_gui.sh --display :0.0
8. Select the "OK" button.
9. Select the "Apply" button.
10. Logout and log back in and you should see the RG Sender GUI.
Optionally, you can also setup Gnome so the icon does not show up on the task bar the following instructions do not apply for RedHat Enterprise Edition systems.
1. Go back to the Nautilus file manager, select "Preferences" and then select
"Sawfish window manager."
2. Select "Matched Windows". A new dialog window will open.
3. Click the "Add" button. A new dialog window will open.
4. In the "Matchers" window select the down arrow button and select "Name" in the
left text edit window.
5. In the corresponding text edit window on the right enter the following
"rgsender_gui"
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
6. On the "Other" tab in this window select the "Skip tasklist" button.
7. On the "State" tab in this window select the "Cycle skip" button and the "Window
list skip" button.
8. Click on OK
9. Click on OK
10. Logout and log back in and you should not see the rgsender_gui listed in the
task bar although you should see the icon on the desktop.
Installing the RGS Sender for HP-UX
HP-UX Sender Installation
1. Login as root.
2. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and mount the CD.
3. Go to the mount point of the CD, which is usually /mnt/cdrom, and change
directoryies to hpux-pa/sender.
4. Execute the following command:
./install.sh
5. The Sender will be installed to /opt/hpremote/rgsender and will be started
automatically when the X Server or system is restarted.
6. The HP-UX Sender uses the Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) for
authentication. Add the following lines to the file /etc/pam.conf:
gdm
session optional /usr/lib/security/libpam_rg.1
dtlogin session optional /usr/lib/security/libpam_rg.1
7. If the PAM system has been configured to use custom PAM authentication
modules then you may need to manually configure the PAM module that is
used by the RGS Sender. You should always consult your HP-UX
documentation when configuring PAM. If you are using a custom PAM
authentication module called “libpam_custom.1” then you may need to edit
the PAM configuration file “/etc/pam.conf” to specify the PAM authentication
module to be used by the RGS Sender. For example, may need to add to the
file “/etc/pam.conf” the following:
rgsender auth optional /usr/lib/security/libpam_custom.1
NOTE: The system must contain the December 2002 or newer X server
patches. HP-UX 11.0 requires X server patch PHSS_26637 or newer. HPUX 11.11 requires X server patch PHSS_26638 or newer.
The system must also contain the September 2004 OpenGL patch
(PHSS_30882) or newer for proper 3D OpenGL operation.
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
HP Remote Graphics Software is not supported the HP-UX 10.20 or HP-UX
11i V2 operating system, and is only supported on PA-RISC 2.0
architecture.
HP-UX Sender GUI Installation
The Sender GUI will automatically start on HP-UX when the Sender process starts. If
you would rather start the GUI on a per-user basis, then edit the
/opt/hpremote/rgsender/rgsender.sh file, and add the -noautostartgui option
as follows:
exec ./rgsender $* -noautostartgui -l logSetup
Uninstalling the RGS Sender
Uninstalling the RGS Sender for Windows:
To uninstall the Windows Sender use the Windows 2000 or Windows XP Add or
Remove Programs feature from the Control Panel. Select Remote Graphics
Sender and click Change/Remove.
Uninstalling the RGS Sender for Linux:
To uninstall the Linux Sender find the name of the RedHat RPM package for the
Remote Graphics Sender, by typing:
rpm -q -a | grep -i rgsender
If the Sender is installed on the system, you will see rgsender_linux_32-4.0-0 or
something similar. To remove the Sender's rpm package, become root and type:
rpm -e --allmatches rgsender_linux_32
Uninstalling the RGS Sender for HP-UX:
To uninstall the HP-UX Sender, become root and type:
/usr/sbin/swremove -x autoreboot=true rgsender_hpux_pa
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Creating Unattended Installers
Unattended installers can be created for the RGS Receiver and Sender for Windows.
Unattended installers are useful when an enterprise needs to install RGS without
user interaction.
Creating an Unattended Receiver Installer for Windows
The RGS Receiver installer is created using InstallShield and normally requires user
interaction when run. To create unattended installers for the RGS Receiver install the
RGS Receiver by creating an installation script with the following commands:
1. First install the RGS Receiver by running the Setup.exe for the RGS Receiver
with the /r (record mode) and /f1 ("ef-one", alternative response filename)
flags. For example:
Setup.exe /r /f1"C:/TEMP/ReceiverInstall.iss"
This creates the InstallShield response file ReceiverInstall.iss which can be
used for unattended installs on other systems.
2. Install the RGS Receiver on other systems using the /s (silent mode) flag and
the response file created in the previous step. For example:
Setup.exe /s /f1"C:/TEMP/ReceiverInstall.iss"
Creating an Unattended Sender Installer for Windows
The RGS Sender installer is created using InstallShield and normally requires user
interaction when run. To create unattended installers for the RGS Sender install the
RGS Sender by creating an installation script with the following commands:
1. Install the RGS Sender by running the Setup.exe for the RGS Sender with the
/r (record mode) and /f1 ("ef-one", alternative response filename) flags. For
example:
Setup.exe /r /f1"C:/TEMP/SenderInstall.iss"
This creates the InstallShield response file SenderInstall.iss which can be
used for unattended installs on other systems.
2. Install the RGS Sender on other systems using the /s (silent mode) flag and
the response file created in the previous step. For example:
Setup.exe /s /f1"C:/TEMP/SenderInstall.iss"
22
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
Installing & Enabling Remote Audio
Remote Graphics Software supports remote audio. Refer to the System
Requirements section for the list of supported RGS Sender and Receiver operating
systems.
The Receiver Control Panel enables remote audio. When remote audio is enabled the
Sender records and transmits audio to the Receiver for playback. Audio controls in
the Receiver Control Panel allow you set the audio volume, quality, and stereo/mono
format. Note that audio quality and stereo settings will affect your overall network
usage and bandwidth.
The following sections assume the Remote Graphics Software is installed.
Installing Audio on a Receiver for Windows
The Receiver uses the default audio device. If you do not have an audio device
installed or if it is currently disabled, the audio controls in the receiver are disabled.
Note: The audio controls in the Receiver Control Panel can be disabled by setting
properties in the Receiver if the administrator does not want to allow the user to
modify the audio settings.
Installing and Calibrating Audio on a Sender for Windows
Installing Audio on a Sender for Windows
The RGS Sender records from the audio device mixer and sends this information to
the receiver. If an audio device is not detected during installation, the HP Remote
Audio device will be installed. The HP Remote Audio device has only the mixer
available in the recording control panel and the volume level for this line cannot be
adjusted. If an audio device is detected during installation, an attempt is made to
select the mixer as the recorder input. Due to wide variations in naming and volume
levels, it is likely that the mixer line will need to be selected by hand.
To select the mixer as the input line, open the Sounds and Audio Devices control
panel. You can find this by opening the Windows Control Panel in the Start menu.
The following picture shows an example of a Control Panel with the Audio tab
selected.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Press the Volume button in the Sound recording section in the middle of this window.
This brings up the Recording Control window. Many audio device drivers do not show
all available inputs by default. The mixer line is often one of the control lines that are
not visible by default. To make it visible, click on the Options item in the menu and
then click on the Properties item as shown in the following picture.
24
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
This brings up another window showing all available controls. The control associated
with the mixer is often called “Wave Out Mix”, “Stereo Mix”, or some variation on
“Mixer”. The Creative Audigy driver calls this the “What U Hear” control. Make sure
this control is enabled similar to the following.
Press the OK button and you should see that the Recording Control window now has
the mixer line as one of the controls. Make sure this item is selected and that the
volume level is not at the bottom. The following picture shows an example of a
selected mixer line.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
After you have selected the mixer, the Sender should record audio information and
send it to the Receiver. Refer to the Windows RGS Sender Audio Calibration section
to improve the audio quality. If you are not getting an audio signal, refer to the
Windows Audio Troubleshooting section.
Calibrating Audio on a Sender for Windows
The audio signal captured by the sender is modified by two different device driver
volume controls and then the master volume level is artificially inserted into the
signal. If these volume controls are too low, you might hear the audio signal. If they
are too high, the signal may be distorted. This section describes a technique to hand
tune the controls to reduce the amount of distortion. These operations should be
performed while connected to the sender through the receiver.
The Wave line of the Volume Control is the first volume control to impact the audio
signal outside of the application that generates the signal. Setting this value to the
maximum level gives you the most resolution in your audio signal. The following
image shows an example of this control at its maximum level.
26
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
The next volume control to adjust is the mixer line of the Recording Control. The
name of this line varies with different audio devices. See the Windows Sender Audio
Installation section for information on how to determine the name of this control. For
our example, the control is called Wave Out Mix. Adjust this volume control while
playing a sound. At higher levels, the audio signal gets clamped and the signal
becomes distorted. Decrease the level until the sound becomes clear. On some
devices, the mixer volume control does not go to zero. In this case, the Wave line of
the Volume Control will need reduction. The following image demonstrates the Wave
Out Mix level needed to eliminate distortion. Note that this is in the Recording
Control.
The best sound to play to calibrate your audio device is a low frequency sound with
high amplitude. By default, Windows assigns a program event that meets these
requirements. To play this sound, open up the Sound and Audio Devices control
panel and click on the Sounds tab as shown in the following windows.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Select the Critical Battery Alarm program event and press the play button (the
triangle located next to the Browse button). The wav file associated with this event is
recorded at near maximum intensity. If you can play this sound without distortion,
you should play mosts sounds without distortion. Some media applications modify
their audio signal prior to sending it to the audio device. The Windows Media Player
may appear to distort some audio files. This is due to signal modification by some
kind of enhancement such as an equalizer.
Installing Audio on a Receiver for Linux
If you install audio on a Receiver for Linux the audio component uses the JACK sound
server API. JACK is a low late ncy sound server that works in conjunction with the
ALSA sound drivers to mix and direct audio on your system. It runs as a daemon in
the background and acts as a “patch bay” for audio connections and applications that
use the JACK interface.
For reliable audio support with the Receiver for Linux, the bundled versions of the
ALSA sound libraries and JACK Audio Connection Kit software must be built and
installed. Versions of ALSA prior to the version provided with the installer may yield
unsupportable results. Removal of these previous versions is advised prior to
reinstallation of ALSA software.
If multiple audio devices are installed in a system, administrators should identify the
target audio system prior to installing the included ALSA software.
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
Properly configured kernel headers for the running kernel must be available from the
directory /lib/modules/<version>/build for proper installation. The example
installation script provided only builds/installs for the currently active kernel.
The installation and configuration scripts require administrator privileges on the
target system. If you cannot become root on your system, ask an administrator for
assistance.
Once ALSA and JACK are installed and correctly configured, you are ready to use
remote audio with the RGS Receiver for Linux.
Audio Requirements
For reliable audio support with the Receiver for Linux, the bundled version of the
JACK Audio Connection Kit software must be built and installed. ALSA sound libraries
must be HP-supported or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (release 4 or greater) versions for
best results. Manual installation of prior ALSA libraries may yield unpredictable
results on older releases of Linux. Do not mix versions of ALSA software.
If multiple audio devices are installed in a system, administrators should identify the
target audio system prior to installing the included ALSA software.
Properly configured kernel headers for the running kernel must be available from the
directory /lib/modules/<version>/build for proper installation. The example
installation script provided only builds/installs for the currently active kernel.
The installation and configuration scripts require administrator privileges on the
target system. If you cannot become root on your system, ask an administrator for
assistance.
System Preparation
It is recommended to remove all previously installed versions of JACK before
installation. If the RPM package manager was utilized, then the packages are located
by:
•
rpm -qa | grep -i jack
Removal by RPM involves utilizing the above search results with:
•
rpm -e --nodeps --allmatches {pkg-name}
The install script rgs_audio_support may detect residual directories from previous
installations. Respond as prompted during installation.
Customized Installation
The following remote audio installation for Linux process is used when the RGS
Receiver is installed (through the ./install.sh script). For those installations that
require customization or wish to use other features from the rgs_audio_support
script, here are additional details for its use.
The audio support bundle ships as hp_rgs_4_audiosupport.tar.gz. It is accessed
by the RGS install.sh script in /opt/hpremote or may be utilized for manual
installations / RPM package building.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
The install process requires a locally writable directory in which to build. Locate the
support bundle in an appropriate directory before installation.
Use the following command to unpack the file manually if desired:
•
tar xzf hp_rgs_4_audiosupport.tar.gz
As the user root, change directory into the one created by the command above. It
will contain important files such as:
•
README.txt - basic instructions and file manifest
•
rgs_audio_support - shell installation script for ALSA/JACK libraries
•
alsa-*.tar.bz2 - recent validated tar archives from the ALSA project
(provided only for open source requirements and legacy installations) http://alsa-project.org
•
jack-*.tar.gz - recent validated tar archives from the JACK-AudioConnection-Kit project - http://jackit.sourceforge.net
•
libsndfile-*.tar.gz - recent validated tar archives from the libsndfile
project (JACK dependency) - http://www.mega-nerd.com/libsndfile
The sample installation script, rgs_audio_support, offers three installation
scenarios:
1. install - This command unpacks all tar archives into a local build directory
in the current directory [ ./localroot ], configures, builds, and installs the
required ALSA/JACK libraries appropriate for the host system and active
kernel. It is a good choice for local installations or system development. A
system reboot is recommended for best results.
2. remove - This command removes and un-configures an installation provided
by the above install command.
3. build_rpms - This command runs an install command first and then attempts
to create a compatible set of binary RPMs for installation on matched system
configurations. This will greatly reduce the work of enterprise administrators
duplicating this install process across multiple nodes. After a successful build,
the following files are created:
•
./RPMS/*.rpms - binary RPMs copied from /usr/src/redhat/RPMS
•
./RPMS/RGS_audio_install.sh - customized install and configuration
script to associate with RPMs
Note: The build log created by this script is located in /var/log/hpaudio.log
Note: The install command does not yield results visible by the RPM package
manager, rpm. The rpm database is not updated nor will inquiries with rpm -q
report the installation. Only installations performed with the results of build_rpms
are manageable by the rpm command.
30
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
The sample installation script, rgs_audio_support, supports limited customization
capabilities for newer source deliveries as they become available. See the script
internals for more details.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Installing and Enabling Single Sign-on
Installing and Enabling Single Sign-on on Windows
Installing RGS Single Sign-on is for experienced users and IT administrators only.
Please read all the directions completely before proceeding and exercise caution
when installing.
The RGS shared library, hprgina.dll, enables Single Sign-on. The file hprgina.dll
is a GINA (Graphical Identification and Authentication) module that is loaded by the
Window's WinLogon.exe process. There are three ways to install and enable RGS
Single Sign-on.
1. Install time:
The hprgina.dll can be installed and enabled during the RGS Sender installation.
This is the preferred method and is the safest and easiest way to enable RGS Single
Sign-on. The default during installation is to not enable Single Sign-on. The user
must answer two questions before Single Sign-on is properly enabled. If enabled, the
system must be rebooted before RGS Single Sign-on is operational.
2. Using the rgadmin Tool:
The RGS Rgadmin Tool can be used to enable or disable the hprgina.dll. The
rgadmin tool can also be run from the command line with the proper options to
enable or disable the GINA module. This method is preferred over the manual
method.
3. Manual Method:
Although this is not the preferred method to enable RGS Single Sign-on, it is here so
that administrators will know exactly what parts of the system are modified. To
manually enable WinLogon to load the hprgina module, do the following steps in the
exact order listed:
1. Install the RGS Sender on the HP Workstation. If the RGS Sender is not
installed or installs with errors, DO NOT perform the remaining steps. Doing
so puts the system in a state that requires a complete re-installation of the
operating system.
2. After the RGS Sender is installed confirm that the hprgina.dll exists in the
C:\WINDOWS\system32 directory. The RGS Sender installer copies
hprgina.dll into the system32 directory directly. If it does not exist, DO
NOT perform the remaining steps. Doing so puts the system in a state that
requires a complete re-installation of the operating system.
3. Add the GinaDLL registry key if it does not already exist. This can be done
through the use of regedit, the Windows Registry Editor. Create the key as
type REG_SZ (a string type). The full path of the key is
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows
NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon\GinaDll
4. Set the value of the GinaDll key to the text "hprgina.dll". Confirm the
spelling before closing.
5. Add the GinaDllMode registry key if does not already exist. This can be done
through the use of regedit as well. Create the key as type RGS_SZ (a string
type). The full path of the key is
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\GinaDllMode
6. Set the value of the GinaDllMode key to the text "HprSso". Confirm the
spelling before closing.
7. Restart the system. The hprgina.dll will be loaded by WinLogon when
started.
WARNING: If the hprgina.dll does not exist in C:\WINDOWS\system32, do
not perform steps three and four. Doing so puts the system in a state that
requires a complete re-installation of the operating system.
If the GinaDLL key does not currently exist in the registry then Microsoft's default
GINA DLL (msgina.dll) is currently loaded by WinLogon. Adding the GinaDLL
registry key and setting its value to hprgina.dll tells WinLogon to load the
hprgina.dll instead of the default msgina.dll.
If the GinaDllMode key does not exist in the registry, or if the key does not contain
the text "HprSso", then RGS Single Sign-on will be enabled by default.
Setting the Local Security Policy
The local security policy "Interactive logon: Do not require CTRL-ALT-DEL" must be
disabled to support Single Sign-on. This can be set in the Windows "Local Security
Settings" under "Security Options." The RGS Diagnostic Tool programmatically
detects if this local security policy is set correctly. See the RGS Diagnostic Tool
section for more information.
Note: Creating the GinaDLL registry key disables Window's "Fast User Switching" and
"Welcome Screen" features.
Uninstalling and Disabling Single Sign-on
There are two methods used to disable Single Sign-on:
1. Using the rgadmin Tool:
The RGS Rgadmin Tool contains command-line options to disable RGS Single Signon. This method is preferred over the manual method.
2. Manual Method:
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
To disable Single Sign-on without the use of the rgadmin tool, delete or rename the
value of the GinaDLL registry key. If there is no other custom GINA module on the
system, simply removing the GinaDLL key definition from the registry disables Single
Sign-on. The GinaDLL key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows
NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon\GinaDll
is removed through the use of regedit, the Windows Registry Editor. Be certain to
actually remove the key by selecting the GinaDLL key in regedit and select the
Delete entry in the Edit menu. Once the key is deleted, it no longer shows up as a
key in the WinLogon subkey. When the system reboots, the default GINA module,
msgina.dll, will be loaded by the WinLogon.exe process.
If there is a custom GINA DLL module on the system and it replaces the default
msgina.dll, change the value of the GinaDLL value from hprgina.dll to the name
of the custom GINA module. To change the value of the GinaDLL key, select the
GinaDLL key in regedit and then select the Modify entry in the Edit menu. A dialog
box appears allowing the value of the key to be changed. Type the name of the
custom GINA module in the "Value data:" area. Confirm that the custom GINA
module entered actually exists on the system in C:\WINDOWS\system32. When the
system reboots the custom GINA module is loaded by the WinLogon.exe process.
WARNING: If the value of the GinaDLL key contains the name of a custom GINA DLL,
and the file does not exist in C:\WINDOWS\system32, the system will not start
correctly upon the next reboot. The system will then require a complete reinstallation of the operating system.
34
Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
Installing and Enabling Easy Login
Installing and Enabling Easy Login on Windows
Easy Login is only supported on HP Blade Workstations running the RGS Sender.
Installing Easy Login is for experienced users and IT administrators. Please read all
the directions completely before proceeding and exercise caution when installing.
The RGS shared library, hprgina.dll, enables Easy Login. The file hprgina.dll is
a GINA (Graphical Identification and Authentication) module that is loaded by the
Window's WinLogon.exe process. There are three ways to install and enable RGS
Easy Login.
1. Install time:
The hprgina.dll can be installed and enabled during the RGS Sender installation.
This is the preferred method and is the safest and easiest way to enable RGS Easy
Login. The default during installation is to not enable Easy Login. The user must
answer two questions before Easy Login is properly enabled. If enabled, the system
must be rebooted before RGS Easy Login is operational.
2. Using the rgadmin Tool:
The RGS Rgadmin Tool can be used to enable or disable the hprgina.dll. The
rgadmin tool can also be run from the command line with the proper options to
enable or disable the GINA module. This method is preferred over the manual
method.
3. Manual Method:
Although this is not the preferred method to enable RGS Easy Login, it is here so
that administrators will know exactly what parts of the system are modified. To
manually enable WinLogon to load the hprgina module, do the following steps in the
exact order listed:
1. Install the RGS Sender on the HP Blade Workstation. If the RGS Sender is not
installed or installs with errors, DO NOT perform the remaining steps. Doing
so puts the system in a state that requires a complete re-installation of the
operating system.
2. After the RGS Sender is installed confirm that the hprgina.dll exists in the
C:\WINDOWS\system32 directory. The RGS Sender installer copies
hprgina.dll into the system32 directory directly. If it does not exist, DO NOT
perform the remaining steps. Doing so puts the system in a state that
requires a complete re-installation of the operating system.
3. Add the GinaDLL registry key if it does not already exist. This can be done
through the use of regedit, the Windows Registry Editor. Create the key as
type REG_SZ (a string type). The full path of the key is
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows
NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon\GinaDll
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
4. Set the value of the GinaDll key to the text "hprgina.dll". Confirm the
spelling before closing.
5. Add the GinaDllMode registry key if does not already exist. This can be done
through the use of regedit as well. Create the key as type RGS_SZ (a string
type). The full path of the key is
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\GinaDllMode
6. Set the value of the GinaDllMode key to the text "HprEasyLogin". Confirm
the spelling before closing.
7. Restart the system. The hprgina.dll will be loaded by WinLogon when
started.
WARNING: If the hprgina.dll does not exist in C:\WINDOWS\system32, do
not perform steps three, four and five. Doing so puts the system in a state that
requires a complete re-installation of the operating system.
If the GinaDLL key does not currently exist in the registry then Microsoft's default
GINA DLL (msgina.dll) is currently loaded by WinLogon. Adding the GinaDLL
registry key and setting its value to hprgina.dll tells WinLogon to load the
hprgina.dll instead of the default msgina.dll.
The hprgina module is a chaining GINA DLL. When the RGS hprgina.dll is loaded
by WinLogon, the hprgina module then loads the msgina.dll shared library. The
hprgina module chains (forwards) all GINA requests to the msgina.dll module.
Chaining custom GINA modules
If it is discovered in step #3 above that the GinaDLL registry key does exist, and the
value of the key is not msgina.dll, then a custom GINA module is currently loaded
and being used by WinLogon. Custom GINA modules provide custom authentication
dialogs or even custom user authentication methods. If it is determined that
functionality of both the RGS Easy Login and a custom GINA module is necessary,
then the hprgina.dll needs further configuration. The hprgina.dll module needs
to be setup to load the custom GINA module rather than the default msgina.dll as
described above.
To enable the hprgina module to load a custom GINA module, create a new registry
key, ChainedGinaDLL, on the system with the value of the key containing the name
of the chained custom GINA module. Do steps #1 through #4 shown above (the
reboot will be done below) plus the following steps to chain custom modules:
1. Create the ChainedGinaDLL registry key. Create the key as type REG_SZ (a
string type). The full path of the key is:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\ChainedGinaDLL
2. Set the value of the new ChainedGinaDLL key to the name of the custom
GINA module. For instance, if the name of the custom GINA module is
foogina.dll, then the value of the key is foogina.dll. The value should
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
match the string originally discovered in the registry key GinaDLL. Confirm
the spelling before closing.
3. Restart the system.
When the RGS hprgina.dll is loaded by WinLogon, hprgina loads the chained GINA
DLL foogina.dll. The hprgina module then chains all GINA requests to the
foogina module.
If the custom foogina.dll is also a chaining GINA module, foogina, in turn, chains
itself to the msgina module. Three GINA DLLs will be loaded as part of the
WinLogon.exe process: 1) hprgina.dll, 2) foogina.dll, and 3) msgina.dll.
Setting the Local Security Policy
The local security policy "Interactive logon: Do not require CTRL-ALT-DEL" must be
disabled to support Easy Login. This can be set in the Windows "Local Security
Settings" under "Security Options." The RGS Diagnostic Tool programmatically
detects if this local security policy is set correctly. See the RGS Diagnostic Tool
section for more information.
Note: Creating the GinaDLL registry key disables Window's "Fast User Switching" and
"Welcome Screen" features.
Uninstalling and Disabling Easy Login
There are two methods used to disable RGS Easy Login.
1. Using rgadmin Tool:
The RGS Rgadmin Tool contains command-line options to disable RGS Easy Login.
This method is preferred over the manual method.
2. Manual Method:
To disable Easy Login without the use of the rgadmin tool, delete or rename the
value of the GinaDLL registry key. If there is no other custom GINA module on the
system, simply removing the GinaDLL key definition from the registry disables Easy
Login. The GinaDLL key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows
NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon\GinaDll
is removed through the use of regedit, the Windows Registry Editor. Be certain to
actually remove the key by selecting the GinaDLL key in regedit and select the
Delete entry in the Edit menu. Once the key is deleted, it no longer shows up as a
key in the WinLogon subkey. When the system reboots, the default GINA module,
msgina.dll, will be loaded by the WinLogon.exe process.
If there is a custom GINA DLL module on the system and it replaces the default
msgina.dll, change the value of the GinaDLL value from hprgina.dll to the name
of the custom GINA module. To change the value of the GinaDLL key, select the
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
GinaDLL key in regedit and then select the Modify entry in the Edit menu. A dialog
box appears allowing the value of the key to be changed. Type the name of the
custom GINA module in the "Value data:" area. Confirm that the custom GINA
module entered actually exists on the system in C:\WINDOWS\system32. When the
system reboots the custom GINA module is loaded by the WinLogon.exe process.
WARNING: If the value of the GinaDLL key contains the name of a custom GINA DLL,
and the file does not exist in C:\WINDOWS\system32, the system will not start
correctly upon the next reboot. The system will then require a complete reinstallation of the operating system.
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
Installing the Enterprise Service SDK
The RGS Enterprise Service SDK can be easily installed by following the directions
below. The Enterprise Service SDK is meant to be installed by IT administrators and
is not normally installed by end-users. The SDK is a Software Development Kit that
can be used to implement a RGS Enterprise Service. A sample implementation is
delivered with the SDK.
Installing the Enterprise Service SDK on Windows
To begin the installation, log in to an account with administrator privileges:
1. Insert the HP Remote Graphics Software CD and in Window's Explorer change
to the directory win32\enterprise-service on your CD-ROM drive.
2. Double-click or select Setup.exe to start the installer.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen.
The installer will add a menu item to the HP Remote Graphics Programs folder called
Start Enterprise Service.
Note: The Enterprise Service is a Python program and requires Python Version 2.4
for proper operation. For convenience, the Python installation package python2.4.msi is included in the Enterprise Service installation directory (C:\Program
Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics Enterprise Service).
Enabling the Enterprise Service in the Receiver
All of the functionality necessary to communicate with the Enterprise Service is in the
RGS Receiver. Refer to the Installing the Receiver section to install the RGS Receiver.
To use the Enterprise Service, refer to the Using the Enterprise Service section.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Enabling OpenGL Applications
HP Remote Graphics Software supports remote viewing of 3D applications. The
OpenGL 3D API is supported on all sender platforms. The HP-UX Sender supports all
HP-UX 3D APIs.
Enabling OpenGL Applications on Windows
Automatically Enabling 3D Updates from OpenGL Applications:
HP Remote Graphics Software will automatically receive updates from 3D OpenGL
applications. Automatic 3D updates are enabled by default during RGS Sender
installation. On a Windows’s 64-bit OS (XP Professional x64 Edition), automatic 3D
updates are enabled for 32-bit and 64-bit OpenGL applications. Previous versions of
HP Remote Graphics Software required a library called OpenGL32.dll to be manually
placed into the OpenGL application directory to obtain 3D updates. This file should be
removed from the OpenGL application directory to obtain maximum performance. Do
not remove the OpenGL32.dll library from the system directory
("C:\WINDOWS\system32").
Manually Enabling 3D Updates from OpenGL Applications:
If automatic updates are disabled through the RGS Admin Tool, 3D updates will only
be received from OpenGL applications that have the HP Remote Graphics Software
OpenGL32.dll library manually copied into the OpenGL application directory. For
example, suppose you want to enable remote viewing for the 3D OpenGL application
"foo3d.exe". If the executable "foo3d.exe" is installed in the directory "C:\Program
Files\foo3d", you will need to manually copy the HP Remote Graphics Software
OpenGL32.dll from "C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\OpenGL\32-bit" to "C:\Program Files\foo3d". This must be done before
the application "foo3d.exe" is started.
On a Window's 64-bit OS (XP Professional x64 Edition) system, there are two RGS
OpenGL32.dll libraries - a 32-bit library and a 64-bit library. They are both named
OpenGL32.dll and are use to enable viewing of OpenGL 32-bit or 64-bit
applications. The libraries are located in the RGS Sender install directory
"C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics Sender\OpenGL\32-bit"
and "C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics Sender\OpenGL\64bit". For remote viewing of 32-bit OpenGL applications running on a 64-bit OS, use
the instructions above. For remote viewing of 64-bit OpenGL applications, the 64-bit
RGS OpenGL32.dll must be manually copied to the same directory as the 64-bit
OpenGL application executable.
Enabling OpenGL Applications on Linux
There are two supported methods to enable remote viewing of OpenGL applications
on Linux. The first, and preferred method, requires an nVidia graphics device present
on the system. The second method requires the use of the LD_PRELOAD environment
variable.
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Getting Started with Remote Graphics Software
1. nVidia method: nVidia graphics drivers have extensions that enable remote
viewing of OpenGL applications using a Remote Graphics Software. This
method requires no user configuration other than making sure the proper
nVidia drivers (version 1.0-5336 and beyond) are properly installed on the
system.
2. LD_PRELOAD method: The LD_PRELOAD method is used for systems that do
not have nVidia graphics installed. Set the LD_PRELOAD environment variable
as follows:
$ export LD_PRELOAD=/opt/hpremote/lib/librgopengl.so
Once the LD_PRELOAD variable is properly set, any OpenGL application can be
started. The application should then properly display in a Remote Graphics
Software environment. To automate the setting of the environment variable,
the variable can be set in the users .profile. For example, for those using bash,
add the following to the system or users .bash_profile:
$ export LD_PRELOAD=/opt/hpremote/lib/librgopengl.so
Adding this to the .profile will enable remote viewing of 3D OpenGL
screensavers.
Enabling OpenGL, PHIGS, PEX and Starbase
Applications on HP-UX
OpenGL, PHIGS, PEX, and Starbase applications are automatically setup for remote
access within an HP Remote Graphics Software environment. No extra setup steps
are necessary. All that is required is that the proper X server and OpenGL libraries to
be installed on the system.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Enabling Direct3D Applications on Windows
HP Remote Graphics Software will automatically receive updates from Direct3D 8.0
and Direct3D 9.0 applications. Automatic updates are enabled by default during RGS
Sender installation. On a Windows’s 64-bit OS (XP Professional x64 Edition),
automatic updates are enabled for 32-bit and 64-bit applications.
Versions of the Direct3D API other than 8.0 and 9.0 are not supported. If automatic
updates are disabled using the RGS Admin Tool, updates from all Direct3D
applications will be unavailable.
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Using the Receiver
Overview of the Remote Graphics Receiver
Receiver Terminology
The Receiver is composed of three main components:
1. Control Panel: The main Receiver window that is used to connect and
control many Receiver settings.
2. Remote Display Window: The window that displays the desktop of the
remote computer.
3. Remote Display Window Toolbar: A toolbar that is displayed at the top of
the Remote Display Window that provides status information and has several
controls.
Modes of operation
There are three modes of operation for the Receiver - Normal Mode, Directory Mode,
and Enterprise Service Mode.
1. Normal Mode: Enables a user to connect to a system by specifying the
hostname or IP address in the Receiver Control Panel:
•
On Windows, to start the HP Remote Graphics Software Receiver from
the Start menu, select Start -> HP Remote Graphics -> Receiver
•
On Linux or HP-UX, execute
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh
2. Directory Mode: Enables a user to automatically open connections to several
systems based on the systems assigned to each user. These assignments are
saved in the RGS directory file on a shared file server or network mapped
drive. This file is normally created and maintained by the system
administrator or an IT support engineer.
•
On Windows, to start the HP Remote Graphics Software Receiver directory version from the Start menu, select:
Start -> HP Remote Graphics -> Receiver -directory
•
On Linux or HP-UX, type:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh -directory [file]
where the optional "file" is the path to the directory file. If the file path
is not entered, then the user can enter the directory file through the use
of the "Set Directory File" button on the user interface.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
3. Enterprise Service Mode: Is similar to Directory Mode, but rather than
looking up the systems assigned to a user in a file, they are looked up using
the RGS Enterprise Service. The RGS Enterprise Service is a network service
that is accessible over a standard computer network. Before the rgreceiver is
started in Enterprise Service Mode, the Enterprise Service must be
installed and running on the network and visible to the Receiver. After the
Enterprise Service is started, the location of the Enterprise Service is entered
on the command-line when starting the Receiver.
•
On Windows, to start the HP Remote Graphics Software Receiver in
Enterprise Service Mode:
cd "C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Receiver"
rgreceiver.exe -esdir service1 [service2 ... serviceN]
•
On Linux or HP-UX, execute:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/rgreceiver.sh -esdir service1
[service2 ... serviceN]
where "service1" is either the hostname or ipaddress of the system that
the Enterprise Service is running on. Multiple hostnames or ipaddresses
can be entered, each separated by white space.
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Opening and Closing Connections
To connect to a Sender using the Receiver:
1. Enter the hostname or IP address of the Sender.
2. Press Enter or select the Connect button to connect.
The RGS Receiver Control Panel is used to perform the following tasks:
•
Open a connection: To open a connection to a system, enter the hostname or
IP address of the system running the RGS Sender in the Hostname field.
Press Enter or select the Connect buttonto connect. The selector on the right
side of the text box displays a history of previously connected systems that
can be selected.
•
Close a connection: To close a connection, select the Disconnect button.
•
Authentication during a connection: When the Receiver connects to a Sender
the user must be authenticated and authorized. The Receiver displays
authentication dialogs where the user enters their credentials, such as
username and password. If the Sender validates the credentials and the user
is authorized, then the connection is established.
•
Enable Setup Mode: Select the Setup Mode button to configure the local
Remote Display Window. In Setup Mode, the Receiver suspends mouse and
keyboard input to the remote system. This allows the user to move or resize
the Remote Window Display Window. The Remote Display Window should also
dim when Setup Mode is enabled. See Setup Mode and Hotkeys for more
information.
•
Display Help: Click Help to display the online help. The online help is
displayed separately in a WEB browser, such as Internet Explorer or Mozilla.
•
Display Program Information: Select the About button to display program
and copyright information.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
The RGS Receiver Control Panel contains a status bar at the bottom of the window.
The status bar provides information that describes the current state of the RGS
receiver. For example, it displays messages that indicate “connection in progress”,
“connection succeeded”, and “connection failed.” The status bar can be useful in
diagnosing connection problems because it displays the general reason for the
failure, for example, “Authorization Failed”, “Authentication Failed”, and more.
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Controlling Receiver Settings
Receiver settings are controlled as follows:
•
Via a tabbed set of options accessible by pressing the Advanced button on the
Receiver Control Panel. The following groups of options are available: General
Options, Audio Options, USB Options, Network Options, Hotkey Options,
Logging Options, Statistics Options.
•
The Remote Display Window Toolbar.
General Options:
Prompt for username and password under specific scenarios this option enables
or disables prompting the user for domain, username and password credentials for
each connection. When deselected, the current domain user credentials are sent to
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
the Sender. When selected, the Receiver can prompt and send an alternate user
domain and password to the Sender. This is advantageous on Sender/Receiver pairs
running Windows and Enterprise Service Mode with different connection needs for
each session. Note: If Easy Login is installed on the Sender system, the user is
sometimes not prompted for the connection.
Enable global image updates updates selects a different image update algorithm.
When enabled, the Remote Display Window updates with all accumulated Sender
updates as a single operation (commonly referred to as a BLockTransfer, or BLT).
When disabled, the Remote Display Window updates with each intermediate change
sent rather than accumulating results. The tradeoff is time versus quality. Global
image updates reduces artifacts such as image tearing but sometimes at a higher
data transfer cost (especially for large display resolutions).
Select help browser allows the user to specify a Web browser, such as mozilla, to
display online help. This option is not available on Windows because the default Web
Browser is automatically read from the Windows Registry.
Audio Options:
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Using Remote Graphics Software
The Audio follows focus checkbox modifies the handling of the audio streams when
connected to multiple remote systems. Checking the box enables only the audio
stream corresponding to the Remote Display Window that currently has the keyboard
focus. When unchecked, the Receiver combines the audio from all active
connections into a single stream.
The Stereo checkbox enables or disables stereo audio. Stereo audio sends
independent audio streams for the left and right channels. Stereo mode requires
greater network bandwidth.
The Quality box allows the user to select one of three different audio quality
settings:
•
Low specifies a sampling rate of 11 KHz.
•
Medium specifies a sampling rate of 22 KHz.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
•
High specifies a sampling rate of 44 KHz which equivalent to CD quality
audio.
Higher quality settings (sampling rates) require more network bandwidth and can
impact the performance of HP Remote Graphics especially over bandwidthconstrained networks.
USB Options:
Remote USB is only supported on a HP Blade Workstation Client and a HP Blade
Workstation sender. See System Requirements for further details.
HP Remote Graphics Software supports a Remote USB capability. This allows a user
to connect any number of USB devices to a local RGS Receiver system and have the
devices appear connected to the RGS Sender system.
The toggle button labeled Enable Remote USB selectively enables or disables
Remote USB capability. When enabled, USB devices plugged into the local system
appear to the remote system as locally attached devices. Remote USB can
dynamically enable or disable USB connections while connected to a Sender system.
Remote USB supports hotplug events, so it is not necessary to disable Remote USB
before plugging or unplugging USB devices.
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Using Remote Graphics Software
When the Receiver uses Directory Mode or Enterprise Service Mode with multiple
Senders specified, the Select sender drop down box manages which system
receives the active Remote USB connection. The example above shows a RGS
Receiver setup for directory mode using the Directory File "directory.txt" and the
system bl122 selected for Remote USB devices at the next connection.
NOTE: In Directory Mode or Enterprise Service Mode, Remote USB requires selection
of one Sender system before connecting to any systems. Remote USB can only be
enabled to one Sender at a time. During an active connection, if users want to
change their Remote USB devices to another Sender system, they must
1. disconnect all systems using the "Disconnect All" button
2. use the "Select sender" box to select a new Remote USB system
3. reconnect to their remote systems using the "Connect All" button.
During device discovery, the new sender system will report the USB connection as a
hotplug event for the Remote USB devices.
Network Options:
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
The network timeouts control various timeouts that may occur within HP Remote
Graphics.
•
Error: Specifies the timeout in seconds used to detect and disconnect an
inactive connection.
•
Warning: Specifies the timeout in seconds used to detect and notify the user
of a potential network disruption. If network connectivity is restored before
reaching the error timeout, the warning notification disappears and the user
can continue often without interruption.
•
Dialog: Specifies the timeout in seconds used to display and wait for input
dialog responses from input, such as the authorization or PAM authentication
dialogs.
The Receiver must be disconnected from all Senders to change timeouts. See Using
Timeouts for a detailed discussion on setting timeouts.
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Hotkeys Options:
Ctrl-Alt-End Hotkey: On some platforms the local host operating-system intercepts
the Ctrl-Alt-Delete key sequence and does not forward it to the Receiver. For
example, on a Windows system Ctrl-Alt-Del displays a dialog box instead of sending
the sequence to the Receiver. With this option checked, the Receiver recognizes CtrlAlt-End as a signal to send a Ctrl-Alt-Delete sequence directly to the Sender. The
Ctrl-Alt-Delete sequence is also available via the Remote Display Window Toolbar.
Send First Key: The Receiver filters keystrokes and does not send hotkey
sequences to the Sender. For example, the default setup mode hotkey consists of a
shift press, space press, and space release. When the Receiver sees a shift key
press, the event does not pass immediately through to the Sender. The Receiver
holds the event to determine if the next keystroke forms a hotkey sequence. If the
next key pressed is not space, the Receiver immediately forwards all events to the
Sender.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Some applications require the first key press event to arrive separately from
subsequent events to function properly. If this is the case, check the 'Send First Key'
option to immediately pass the first key in a hotkey sequence.
Setup Mode Hotkey: While in a Remote Display Window, the remote desktop can
sometimes completely cover and hide your local desktop. If you need access to your
local desktop or Receiver, use the Setup Mode Hotkey to expose them. See Setup
Mode documentation for more information on other options available in Setup Mode.
By default, to access Setup Mode:
•
Press and hold down the Shift key.
•
At the same time, press then release the space bar to activate Setup
Mode.
You will remain in Setup Mode until you release the Shift key.
Pressing the Set button on the GUI begins redefinition of the Setup Mode Hotkey
sequence. Typing any combinations of Ctrl, Alt, Shift, and Space defines a new
sequence. Every sequence must begin with Ctrl, Alt, or Shift, and the first key
pressed remains held down through the entire sequence. When the first key is
released, the sequence is considered complete. When activating Setup Mode via this
hotkey, it remains active until release of the first key in the sequence. Pressing the
Reset button on the GUI restores the Setup Mode Hotkey sequence to its original
default values.
When defining a hotkey sequence via the GUI, the sequence becomes left-side and
right-side sensitive when multiple keys exist. For example, left-side shift key strokes
differ from right-side shift key strokes. To define a sequence that is side insensitive,
you must modify the property value from outside of the GUI while RGS is not
running. See the Hotkeys Properties documentation for information on modifying the
sequence from outside of the GUI.
Hotkey definitions are formed by strings of comma-separated word pairs. The first
word represents the key while the second represents a specific action for that key.
Each pair represents an event token. For example, the default Setup Mode Hotkey
sequence is defined by:
•
Shift Down, Space Down, Space Up
The valid words for the keys are:
•
LCtrl, RCtrl, Ctrl: Specifies a left, right or side insensitive ctrl key,
respectively.
•
LAlt, RAlt, Alt: Specifies a left, right or side insensitive alt key,
respectively.
•
LShift, RShift, Shift: Specifies a left, right or side insensitive shift key,
respectively.
•
Space: To specify a space key.
The valid words for the actions are:
•
54
Down: Specifies a key press.
Using Remote Graphics Software
•
Up: Specifies a key release.
Logging Options:
•
Console logging: enables logging to the console (standard output). This
option is only available on Linux and HP-UX. It is not supported on Windows.
•
File logging: enables logging to the specified file. The spinboxes for Max
logfile size and Log file backups limit the maximum logfile size and the
number of backup logfiles respectively.
•
Log level: determines the type and amount of information logged.
•
Clear Log: clears the contents of the log file.
•
View Log: displays the contents of the log file in a window.
•
Restore Defaults: resets all logging settings to default values.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Statistics Options:
The statistics tab displays aggregate data for all connected sessions.
•
Total network usage: The combined network bandwidth received from all
remote systems per second.
•
Image updates per second: The combined number of image updates per
second received from all connections.
•
Copy rectangles per second: The combined number of copy updates per
second received from all connections.
Remote Display Window Toolbar:
The Remote Display Window toolbar contains controls and information for the
session. The toolbar is made visible by entering Setup Mode (using the key
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Using Remote Graphics Software
sequence defined in the Hotkeys tab) and then pressing the "H" key. The toolbar
window appears at the top of the Remote Display Window:
The toolbar displays the following controls and information:
•
hostname: the hostname of the remote Sender
•
disconnect button: disconnects the current session
•
CTRL-ALT-DEL button: sends the CTRL-ALT-DEL key sequence to the
Sender. Some key-sequences, such as Ctrl-Alt-Del, are trapped by the
local system and therefore do not forward to the remote system using normal
methods. The user cannot send a Ctrl-Alt-Del key sequence using a
keyboard on the Receiver. The Ctrl-Alt-Del button in the toolbar sends
this key sequence to the Sender.
•
Borders button: adds or removes window borders and decorations to the
Remote Display Window.
•
Snap button: when selected, this option causes the Remote Display Window
to snap to the edges of the screen whenever the boundaries of the window
are within 10 pixels of the edge of the screen.
•
Image quality slider: sets the compression level. Higher settings require
greater bandwidth.
•
Network bandwidth: displays the current network bandwidth received by
this session.
•
Image update rate: displays the number of image updates per second
received by this session.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Setup Mode
The RGS Receiver enters Setup Mode via a hotkey sequence or button in the
Receiver Control Panel. See the hotkeys documentation for more information on
accessing Setup Mode with a standard PC keyboard. Note that within a Remote
Display Window, the Setup Mode Hotkey may sometimes be the only way to access
your local desktop.
When Setup Mode is active, the Receiver captures and interprets all keystrokes and
mouse events on your local computer. No mouse or keyboard events pass to the
Sender.
In Setup Mode, you can:
•
Easily move and resize Remote Display Windows - Use the left mouse button
in any Remote Display Window to drag or resize the window on the desktop.
•
Show the Receiver Control Panel - Press M to show the control panel.
•
Show or hide the Receiver Toolbar - Press H to show or hide the toolbar.
•
Activate the Remote Display Window selection dialog – Press TAB to display
the dialog
The Remote Display Window selection dialog allows the user to quickly
navigate between multiple active connections. The dialog displays a thumbnail
representing each Remote Display Window. Display the dialog by pressing
TAB while in Setup Mode. The dialog remains active while the initial Setup
Mode hotkey is depressed. Releasing the initial Setup Mode key closes the
selection dialog and switches focus to the selected Remote Display Window.
The currently selected Remote Display Window is highlighted with a red
border.
While the Remote Display Window selection dialog is active, navigate between
windows by:
• Pressing TAB to select the next window.
• Pressing the numeric key displayed beneath the thumbnail.
• Clicking the mouse on a thumbnail.
• Double clicking the mouse on a thumbnail (this will also immediately
close the selection dialog).
To directly switch to a window without activating the selection dialog, simply
press the number that corresponds to the identifier of the window (the same
identifier displayed in the dialog).
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Directory Mode
Starting the Receiver in Directory Mode
When the Receiver starts in Directory Mode the Receiver looks up the name and
location of a directory file containing the names of users and their assigned systems.
The Receiver reads this file to identify the systems assigned to the current user and
attempts to automatically connect to them. The directory file may contain multiple
users with a list of Senders assigned to each user.
The first time the Receiver starts in Directory Mode, if the command line (directory "filename") specifies a filename the Receiver will use that file as the
directory. If no file name is specified, the user is prompted to select the location and
name of the directory file.
After the location of the directory file is set, the Receiver automatically connects to
the Senders assigned to the user specified in the file. The locations of the directory
file can be reset using the Receiver control panel.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Configuring a directory file for Directory Mode
When the Receiver runs in Directory Mode, it requires a properly configured directory
file. Normally, the directory file is a common file for an entire group, department,
organization, or entire company. The directory file can manage and administer the
assignment of systems for any number of users. This file is specified as a normal
ASCII text file as follows:
domainName userName1 sender1 sender2 ... senderN
domainName userName2 sender1 sender2 ... senderN
For example, the following text specifies the directory for the users Sally and Joe.
Domain1 sally sender1 sender2 sender3
Domain1 joe sender4 sender5 sender6
In this example:
•
Sally is assigned sender1, sender2, and sender3
•
Joe is assigned sender4, sender5, sender6
If the domain name, user name, or sender name contains white-space characters,
then the name can be enclosed in double-quotes as follows:
"domain 1" "sally user" "sender 1" "sender 2" "sender 3"
"domain 1" "joe user" "sender 4" "sender 5" "sender 6"
When using the directory file for users on either Linux or HP-UX systems, the
"domain name" does not apply. Simply use the keyword "UNIX" in place of the
domain name. For example:
UNIX
sally
sender1
sender2
sender3
Save the directory file on a readily accessible network file share or mapped drive so
that each Receiver can read the file at start-up.
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Organizing Displays
Directory Mode is usually intended for a system with multiple displays attached. For
example, if the Receiver connects to two Senders, then at least two displays should
be available on the local system. Each Sender can then display on its own monitor.
The Receiver allows the user to easily move and position the Remote Display Window
on the local desktop using Setup Mode. For optimal viewing the display resolution of
the Sender and Receiver should be set to the same values. If the resolution of the
display connected to the local system is less than display resolution of the remote
system, the image will be cropped by the local display.
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Enterprise Service Mode
Using the Enterprise Service
The Enterprise Service (ES) supports assignment of systems to users and
management of user settings and properties through a standard network service.
The advantages of the Enterprise Service over using Directory Mode are:
•
Using a network service, a centralized database or enterprise directory
infrastructure can store systems assigned to a user. A service can support
dynamic and complex business logic for system assignment.
•
Users authenticate against the Enterprise Service.
•
The Receiver can also read and write the user's properties.
The Enterprise Service comes as a Software Development Kit (SDK). Developers use
the SDK to adapt and customize their required enterprise solution. Consequently, the
ES SDK does not directly implement the specific functionality required for assigning
and looking up user systems and settings. For example, the SDK does not provide
ready-to-use Active Directory or LDAP integration itself. The SDK provides the ICE
interfaces and a sample implementation written in Python. ICE (Internet
Communications Engine - see http://www.zeroc.com/ice.html) is a modern
alternative to object middleware such as CORBA™ or COM/DCOM/COM+, with
support for C++, Java, Python, PHP, C# and Visual Basic.
The sample implementation demonstrates a simple XML file as the enterprise
directory. Associated with the XML is a DTD that specifies a precise and legal set of
XML elements and attributes that represent syntax to specify the user to machine
mappings as well as the user RGS Properties. This sample implementation can be
used to test the Enterprise Service and become familiar with its capabilities. Simply
add a set of test users and user settings to the XML file, start the Enterprise Service,
and connect to RGS Senders from a RGS Receiver using the service. After the sample
is working, the job of creating an implementation that interacts with a customers
enterprise directory can begin.
To learn more about the SDK, review the README.txt file in the ES installation. It
explains the purpose and usage of each file in the installation.
Starting the RGS Receiver in Enterprise Service mode
When the RGS Receiver starts in Enterprise Service Mode using the command line
option -esdir, the Receiver connects to the Enterprise Service. The user will then
authenticate with the ES.
After the user authenticates, the Receier reads from the Enterprise Service a list of
systems assigned to the user and specified by hostname or ipadress. The Receiver
will try to connect to the specified systems.
If the command line option also specifies option -esdirsettings, the Receiver gets
the properties that the Receiver should use from the ES. The properties specify
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settings such as the location of each Remote Display Window on the local desktop,
codec quality settings, audio settings, and others. See Properties for more details.
If the command line options -esdirsettings is not specified, then the users settings
are read from the local system. When the Receiver closes, the users settings are
saved, either locally or remotely in the Enterprise Service, depending on the
specification of the command line option -esdirsettings.
When a connection to each of the RGS Senders is initiated, the credentials gathered
during the ES authentication are used to authenticate the connection. If "Prompt for
username and password" is enabled in the Receiver Control Panel, then the
credentials used to authenticate with the ES are not used and the user is prompted
to enter credentials for each connection.
Organizing Displays in Enterprise Service Mode
Refer to "Organizing Displays in Directory Mode" section.
Starting the Enterprise Service
To run the sample Enterprise Service, the system must have Python 2.4 installed.
See Installing the Enterprise Service for more information.
Once Python is installed, the user starts the ES as follows:
From the command line:
python C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics Enterprise
Service\HprEsPrivate.py
From the Start menu, select:
Start --> Hp Remote Graphics --> Start Enterprise Service
Configuring the Enterprise Service
As mentioned before, the current SDK provides a sample implementation using a
simple XML file as an enterprise directory. This is only a sample to learn how the
Enterprise Service operates. It is up to the customer to implement the ES interfaces,
by providing an implementation that communicates with their enterprise
infrastructure.
The README.txt file in the ES installation can help learn how to use the SDK. The
current ES is written in the Python language. Python is an interpreted object-oriented
(OO) language well suited for this problem and readily available on a wide variety of
platforms. All of the Python code is human readable and can be used to understand
the workings of the ES.
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Using the Sender
Controlling Sender Settings:
Controlling Settings on Microsoft Windows
Sender GUI
The Sender for Windows registers an HP Remote Graphics Software icon
in the
application tray. On Windows the icon animates when Receivers are connected to the
Sender. By right clicking on the icon, the user can display the Sender GUI
and select one of the following options:
•
"Remote Keyboard/Mouse --> Enable or Disable" - If "Disable" is selected,
all non-primary users are in "view-only" mode. Only the primary user, the
user that is logged into the desktop, will control the remote desktop remotely
using the Receiver. If "Enable" is selected, all users connected to the Sender
can interact with the remote desktop. All keyboard and mouse activity will be
injected into the Sender allowing non-primary users control of the remote
desktop.
•
"Disconnect --> Non-Primary Users or All Users" – disconnects receiver
sessions for either non-primary users or all users.
•
"Help" displays the Remote Graphics Help system.
•
"About" displays Remote Graphics program information.
Manually Starting & Stopping the Sender
By default the Sender installs as a Windows Service and configures to automatically
start on system startup. The user can control Windows Services by accessing the
"Services" panel. The "Services" panel can be accessed from the Windows "Control
Panel" and selecting "Administrative Tools".
The following diagram shows the Administrative Tool for Services. The Remote
Graphics Sender is highlighted. The status of the service is "started" and the service
is configured to startup automatically. By right clicking on the Sender, the service
can be stopped, started, or resumed. Additionally, the properties of the service can
be controlled such as the start-up type, and the recovery mode.
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Controlling Settings on Linux and HP-UX
Sender GUI
By default, the Sender GUI automatically starts on Linux and HP-UX when the
Sender process starts. The Sender GUI displays with the HP Remote Graphics
Software icon
on the desktop. By right clicking on the icon, the user can select
one of the following options:
•
"Remote Keyboard/Mouse --> Enable or Disable" - If "Disable" is
selected, all non-primary (A user of a RGS connection that does not match
the user logged into the desktop of the remote computer. If no one is logged
into the desktop of the remote computer, then all connections are nonprimary.) users are in "view-only" mode. Only the primary user, the user that
is logged into the desktop, will control the remote desktop remotely using the
Receiver. If "Enable" is selected, all users connected to the Sender can
interact with the remote desktop. All keyboard and mouse activity will be
injected into the Sender allowing non-primary users control of the remote
desktop.
•
"Disconnect --> Non-primary Users or All Users" – disconnects
receiver sessions for either non-primary users or all users.
•
"Help" displays the Remote Graphics Help system.
•
"About" displays Remote Graphics program information.
It is possible to disable the GUI from automatically starting. See Installing the
Sender for more details.
Starting & Stopping
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The Remote Graphics Software Sender on UNIX automatically starts when the X
server on the system starts. Starting the Sender process in any other way is not
supported. Typing the following command in a terminal emulator will show the
Sender's process information:
ps -ef | grep rgsender
If multiple X servers are running on the system, there will be one Sender running for
each X server.
If the Sender process is stopped or killed, the X server will attempt to restart the
Sender. When the X server is shutdown, the Sender will also stop running. If the X
server is recycled, the Sender process is stopped and a new Sender is started.
If for some reason the X server cannot start, and a Sender process is running, killing
the Sender will allow the X server to restart.
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Setting the Windows Sender Process Priority
This section describes how to adjust the process priority of the Windows Sender. The
default process priority of the Windows Sender is normal. Under some situations,
however, increasing the process priority of the Windows Sender may improve
interactivity. In some cases, the Windows operating system scheduling algorithms do
not give the RGS Sender sufficient CPU time to maintain smooth interactivity. Erratic
updates from a Windows Sender can sometimes result from a process load and
scheduling situation. (Networking performance can also contribute to poor
interactivity.)
RGS Sender for Windows on some laptops has exhibited erratic behavior. Increasing
the Sender priority to high usually improves interactivity in this case. This enables
the Sender more frequent access to the CPU and improve updates to the Receiver.
Process priority for the Sender is command-line accessible for the Windows Sender.
Four command-line options are available: -belownormal, -normal, -abovenormal,
or -high. Priorities low and realtime cannot be selected for the Windows Sender.
Please see Command Line Options for further information.
Currently, there are two ways of setting the process priority for a Windows Sender:
•
using regedit to modify the rgsender service start up parameters in the
Windows Registry
•
using HP Performance Tuning Framework (PTF) to configure Windows Sender
priority (available only on HP Workstations)
Both methods are covered below.
WARNING: Adjusting the process priority of the sender to a level higher than normal can cause other normally privileged processes to get fewer CPU cycles than
usual. Please adjust the priority of the sender with caution.
Setting the Sender process priority using regedit
This section describes how to use the Windows regedit command to increase the
process priority of the Sender service when it starts. Under normal operation the
Windows Sender runs as a Windows Service. When the system starts up, the
installed services are usually started. When the RGS Sender is installed an entry is
added in the Windows Registry for the Remote Graphics Sender service. regedit
can be used to modify the command line that is used for starting the Sender service:
1. Start regedit - this can be done by opening a Windows command prompt
and executing the command “regedit” or using the "run" command line from
the Start menu
2. Using regedit navigate to the key
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\rgsender
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3. Add the desired process priority command-line option for starting the Remote
Graphics Sender service. For example, to increase the process priority to high
add the “-high” option to the key “ImagePath” as follows:
"C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\rgsender.exe" -startService -l logSetup –high"
4. Restart the Sender service with the new option. This can be done using the
Windows Service Control Manager or re-starting the system.
Regedit should look like this prior to making any changes.
Double-clicking on the “ImagePath” key should bring up the following dialog which
allows the user to edit the value. The screen-shot shows the “-high” option already
added.
After the changes are made the registry should look like this
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Note the addition of the “-high” command line option to the end of the commandline.
Setting the Sender process priority using PTF
The HP Performance Tuning Framework (PTF) can adjust the priority of the Sender
without having to use regedit. PTF is available for HP Workstations only from this
location:
http://www.hp.com/workstations/software/framework/index.html
Please see the PTF help and documentation for further information.
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Collaboration Notification
The Remote Graphics Sender for Windows displays a notification dialog when nonprimary users are connected. The dialog displays a list of domain\usernames
representing each user connected to the Sender:
Two types of connections to a Sender are possible, primary and non-primary. A
primary connection is one where the login credentials match those of the user logged
into the desktop of the Sender system. A non-primary connection is defined as any
connection to the Sender with a login other than the primary. Within the
collaboration notification dialog, primary and non-primary users are identified using
different fonts. Primary users are italicized and listed first. Non-primary usernames
follow and are displayed using a normal font. The example screen-shot above shows
two connections are active, one a primary user and the other a non-primary. A small
button with an “X” is displayed next to all non-primary usernames. Pressing this
button disconnects the corresponding non-primary user. All non-primary users may
be disconnected with a single command using the Sender GUI as described in
Controlling Sender Settings.
When the collaboration notification dialog is displayed, it indicates that there are
multiple connections to the remote desktop. The collaboration notification dialog
cannot be dismissed. It is possible to move the dialog within the boundaries of the
desktop by clicking anywhere within the dialog and dragging it. The Sender removes
the dialog when all non-primary connections terminate.
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Command Line Options
This section describes the options that can be specified on the command line of the
Receiver and Sender. In addition, many properties can also be set on the command
line.
RGS Receiver Command Line Options
The Windows Receiver (rgreceiver.exe) or the Linux/HP-UX Receiver
(rgreceiver.sh) command line options are:
[-directory [file] | -esdir serv1 [serv2 ... servN [-esdirsettings]]]
[-nosplash]
[-v | -ver | -version]
[-h | -help | -?]
-directory [file] starts the Receiver in -directory mode. If the optional "file" file
path is specified, then the file is opened and used to lookup systems assigned to the
user. If the "file" is not specified, the user is prompted to enter a path to the
directory file. See Starting the Receiver in Directory Mode for more details.
-esdir serv1 [serv2 … servN] starts the Receiver in enterprise service mode using
service 1 and service 2 through service N where serv1, serv2, and servN are the
hostnames or ipaddresses of the enterprise service. Setting the –esdir option allows
the Remote Graphics Software Receiver to lookup the systems assigned to the user
using a RGS Enterprise Service. See Using The Enterprise Service for more details.
-esdirsettings enables the Receiver to get and set the Receiver settings from the
enterprise service. If this option is used, -esdir must also be set.
-nosplash disables display of the splash screen when the Receiver starts.
[-v | -ver | -version] prints the Receiver's version information.
[-h | -help | -?] prints a listing of the various command line options, those that are
listed on this page.
RGS Sender Command Line Options
The Windows Sender (rgsender.exe) or the Linux/HP-UX Sender (rgsender.sh)
command line options are:
[-nocollab]
[-timeout value]
[-authtimeout value]
[-l logSetupFile]
[-v | -ver | -version]
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[-h | -help | -?]
[-installService | -startService | -uninstallService]
[-belownormal | -normal | -abovenormal | -high]
[-noautostartgui]
[-display value]
Under normal operation the Windows Sender runs as a Windows Service. When the
system starts up, the installed services are usually started. When the RGS Sender is
installed an entry is added in the Windows Registry for the Remote Graphics Sender
service. regedit can be used to modify the command line that is used for starting
the Sender service:
1. Start regedit - this can be done by opening a Windows command prompt
and executing the command “regedit” or using the "run" command line from
the Start menu
2. Using regedit navigate to the key
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\rgsender
3. Add the desired process priority command-line option for starting the Remote
Graphics Sender service. For example, to increase the process priority to high
add the “-high” option to the key “ImagePath” as follows:
"C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\rgsender.exe" -startService -l logSetup –high"
4. Restart the Sender service with the new option. This can be done using the
Windows Service Control Manager or re-starting the system.
On HP-UX and Linux the Sender is started by the X Server. The file rgsender.sh can
be edited to set the command line options.
Platform independent command line options
The following options are available on all platforms.
-nocollab Disables collaboration. When specified, only the primary user can connect
to the Sender.
-timeout valueThe timeout in milliseconds used to detect and disconnect an
inactive connection. This option sets the property “Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Error.”
See Using Timeouts for more details.
-authtimeout valueThe timeout in milliseconds used to detect and notify the user
of a network disruption. This option sets the property
“Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog.” See Using Timeouts for more details.
-l logSetupFile Specifies the "logSetupFile" file used to describe various logging
parameters for Sender's error and informational output. Use this file to determine
where the output goes (to a file or to standard error) as well as the type of output
logged (INFO or DEBUG). At installation, the Sender default is with "-l logSetup"
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turned on, where the logSetup file in the installation directory is set for output to a
file named rg.log at INFO debug level.
[-v | -ver | -version] prints the Senders's version information.
[-h | -help | -?] prints a listing of the various command line options, those that are
listed on this page.
Windows specific command line options
The following options are only available on Windows.
-installService Installs the “Remote Graphics Sender” service.
-startService Starts the “Remote Graphics Sender” service. The Sender must be
installed as a service first.
-uninstallService Uninstalls the “Remote Graphics Sender” service.
-belownormal Sets the process priority of the Sender to below normal.
-normal Sets the process priority of the Sender to normal. This is the default
priority.
-abovenormal Sets the process priority of the Sender to above normal.
-high Sets the process priority of the Sender to high.
Linux/HP-UX specific command line options
The following options are only available on Linux and HP-UX.
-noautostartgui The RGS Sender GUI automatically starts on Linux when the
Sender process starts. To start the GUI on a per-user basis, edit the
/opt/hpremote/rgsender/rgsender.sh file, and add the -noautostartgui option. Refer
to the Linux Sender GUI Installation or HP-UX Sender GUI Installation sections for
more information.
-display value where value is the display number of the X server that the RGS
Sender will share. For example, if both X servers hostname:0 and hostname:1 are
running, use -display 1 to share the X server running at display hostname:1.
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Properties
Remote Graphics Software has a configuration mechanism that allows specifying
many controls. This configuration mechanism is called Properties. Properties are
name/value pairs. Properties are created with default values and can enable or
disable window borders, set the codec quality, set the audio quality, adjust the
connection timeouts, etc.
Properties are set in a configuration file, on the command line, or using the RGS
Enterprise Service. Properties specified on the command line override properties set
in a configuration file or RGS Enterprise Service.
Syntax
Properties are name/value pairs and can contain any non whitespace characters
except "=" and "#". The property name and property value are separated by an "=".
For example:
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning=10
The name of this property is Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning, and the value
of the property is 10.
All RGS Receiver properties begin with "Rgreceiver". All RGS Sender properties
begin with "Rgsender". Property values cannot contain the "=" or "#" characters.
Properties can contain values of the following types: string, int, bool, string
vector and int vector. Properties of type bool are set to either "1" or "0" representing true or false.
Any property set to an empty value,
Rgreceiver.Browser.Name=
initializes as follows: if the value of the property is of type STRING, the value will be
set to an empty string. If the value of the property is of type INT or BOOL, the value
will be set to "0". This can be used to initialize properties in a configuration file or on
the command line.
Configuration Files
All RGS properties can be set in a configuration file. The RGS Receiver uses a file
named rgreceiverconfig to read for its properties. The RGS Sender uses a file
named rgsenderconfig to read for its properties. On Windows these files are
installed in the directory where RGS is installed. On Linux and HP-UX these files are
installed in /etc/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver and /opt/opt/hpremote/rgsender
respectively.
The configuration files contain properties (name/value pairs) with only one property
per line. Empty lines (containing only whitespace characters) are ignored. The "#"
character begins a comment on the line extending to the end of the line. If a
property is listed more than once, the value of the last entry is used.
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Setting Properties on the Command Line
In addition to setting properties in a configuration file, properties can be set on the
command line. Properties entered on the command line override all properties set in
a configuration file. All properties must begin with a "-" on the command line to be
recognized as a valid property. For example:
rgreceiver.sh -Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning=10000
will starts the RGS Receiver with the Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning
property set to 10000 milliseconds. If any property is set more than once on the
command line, the value of the last entry is used. There cannot be any whitespace
between the property name, the "=" character, and the property value. The following
example:
rgreceiver.sh -Rgreceiver.IsSnap = 1
is invalid, due to the whitespace on either side of the "=" character.
Properties of type string vector and int vector cannot be set on the command
line.
RGS Receiver Properties
All of the following properties are used by the RGS Receiver, and available on the
command line or using the RGS Receiver property configuration file
(rgreceiverconfig).
All RGS Receiver properties are automatically saved away in a "Properties Archive"
when the receiver exits. They are used again with the next invocation of the
receiver.
General Properties:
Rgreceiver.IsBordersEnabled=bool
If set to "1", the borders on the Remote Display Window will be enabled. If set to "0"
the borders will be removed creating a borderless windows to display the remote
session. The default value is "1" - borders are on.
Rgreceiver.IsSnapEnabled=bool
If set to "1", as the Remote Display Window is being positioned on the display, the
window will snap to the edge of the screen when top edge of the window moves
within 10 pixels of the top of the display, or when the left edge of the window moves
within 10 pixels of the left edge of the display. The default value is "1" - snap is on.
Rgreceiver.IsAlwaysPromptCredentialsEnabled=bool
If set to "1", when connecting to an RGS Sender, the user will always be prompted
for the domain, username and password. There will be no attempt to automatically
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
verify the users credentials. The default value is "0" - prompting for credentials is
off.
Rgreceiver.Directory=string
Used to set the name and location of the directory to use for determining the Sender
systems that are assigned to the current user. This property is only used then the
RGS Receiver is in Directory Mode. The default value is "directory.txt".
Rgreceiver.ConnectionWarningColor=string
This is the color the Remote Display Window will be composited with when the RGS
Receiver detects a network disruption. The value is a hexadecimal number, with four
components (alpha, red, green, blue). The alpha component is used to specify the
level of transparency the color will take. An alpha value of zero will be totally
transparent, where no warning color will be visible by the user. An alpha value of one
will be totally opaque, completely covering the image in the remote sender.
The default value is "0x80b40000". The alpha component is 0x80 (128 decimal). The
red component is 0xb4 (180 decimal). The blue and green components are both
zero. Therefore, the color is a red of strength 180/256, or around 70% of full red.
The alpha value is 128/256, or 50% transparent.
Rgreceiver.IsGlobalImageUpdateMutable=bool
If set to "1", the user will be able to modify the Enable global image updates
check box in the Receiver Control Panel. If set to "0", the user will be unable to
modify the checkbox. This property can be used to permanently enable or disable
global image updates in the Receiver. The default value is "1" - global image updates
can be configured by the user.
Rgreceiver.IsGlobalImageUpdateEnabled=bool
If set to "1", the Receiver updates the area of the screen with the extents of all the
areas of the screen that have changed. If set to "0", the Receiver updates the screen
to just the areas of the screen that have changed - using individual update
rectangles. If image updates in the Remote Display Window seem to show image
tearing, setting the value to "1", enabling global image updates, might reduce the
tearing. Tearing usually occurs on large images that are updated quite frequently,
such as a model of a 3D object being rotated in an large window. Setting the value
to '"0", disabling global image updates, is usually best for large Remote Display
Windows (5120 x 1024 resolution) that display mostly text based applications. The
default value is "0" - global image updates are disabled.
Rgreceiver.RecentWindowPositions=int vector
This property can be used to initialize the positions of the Remote Display Windows.
The position of each Remote Display Window is controlled by an (xpos,ypox) tuple.
The following example contains two tuples, one for each of two Remote Display
Windows:
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Rgreceiver.RecentWindowPositions=0 0 1280 0
This property will set the coordinates of the first Remote Display Window to (0,0),
and the second Remote Display Window to (1280, 0). In this example, if each
Remote Display Window was at resolution 1280x1024, the first window would show
up at the far left of the receiver's display, and the second window would be placed
right next to the right edge of the first window, making them appear as one large
2560x1024 display.
Audio Properties:
Rgreceiver.Audio.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", the user will be able to modify all audio controls in the RGS Receiver. If
set to "0", none of the controls can be modifed by the user. The default value is "1" audio can be configured by the user.
This property only applies to the Windows or Linux versions of the RGS Receiver.
Rgreceiver.Audio.IsEnabled=bool
If set to "1", the audio subsystem in RGS will be enabled. If set to "0", all remote
audio will be disabled and no network bandwidth will be consumed for remote audio.
The default value is "1" - audio is enabled.
This property only applies to the Windows or Linux versions of the RGS Receiver.
Rgreceiver.Audio.IsInStereo=bool
If set to "1", stereo is enabled and both left and right channels are transmitted. The
highest quality setting with stereo enabled is equivalent to CD quality audio but
consumes more network bandwidth. The default value is "1" - stereo is enabled.
This property only applies to Windows or Linux versions of the RGS Receiver.
Rgreceiver.Audio.IsFollowsFocusEnabled=bool
If set to “1”, enables only the audio stream corresponding to the Remote Display
Window that currently has the keyboard focus. The audio stream from all other
active connections is disabled. Setting the property to “0” combines the audio from
all active connections into a single stream. The default value is “0” – combine audio
from all active connections and play in a single stream.
Rgreceiver.Audio.Quality=int
The AudioQuality can be set to low (0), medium (1) or high (2) quality. This property
is used to adjust the sample rate of the streaming audio. The lower the sample rate,
the less information that is sent over the network thereby reducing the amount of
consumed bandwidth. The default value is "1" - medium audio quality.
This property only applies to Windows or Linux versions of the RGS Receiver.
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Browser Properties:
Rgreceiver.Browser.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", the name of the browser used to display online help, can be changed by
the user in the Receiver Control panel. If set to "0", the name of the browser cannot
be changed by the user. This can be used to permanently set the browser to be used
before the RGS Receiver is started. This setting only applies to the Linux and HP-UX
versions of the RGS Receiver. The default value is "1".
For Window's versions of the RGS Receiver, the default browser that is set in the
Windows Registry is used to display the online help.
This property only applies to the Linux or HP-UX versions of the RGS Receiver.
Rgreceiver.Browser.Name=string
Use this property to set the name of the browser to be used to display online help.
For example, setting Rgreceiver.Browser.Name=mozilla will start up the Mozilla
browser when the "Help" button is selected in the Receiver Control Panel.
This property only applies to Linux or HP-UX versions of the RGS Receiver.
Hotkeys Properties:
Rgreceiver.Hotkeys.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", all Hotkey settings in the Receiver Control Panel will be able to be
changed by the user. If set to "0", none of the settings can be changed by the user.
This can be used to permanently enable or disable Hotkey settings before the RGS
Receiver is started. The default value is "1" - Hotkeys can be configured by the user.
Rgreceiver.Hotkeys.SetupModeSequence=string
Defines the Setup Mode hotkey sequence. The sequence may only consist of Ctrl, Alt,
Shift and Space keys. The sequence must also start with either a Ctrl, Alt or Shift
key. The first key must also be held down through the entire hotkey sequence. The
default value is "Shift Down, Space Down, Space Up".
Rgreceiver.Hotkeys.IsSendCtrlAltEndAsCtrlAltDeleteEnabled=bool
When enabled a Ctrl-Alt-End key sequence in the Remote Display Window is sent
to the RGS Sender as a Ctrl-Alt-Del key sequence. The default value is "1" - send
a Ctrl-Alt-Del when the user enters Ctrl-Alt-End.
Rgreceiver.Hotkeys.IsSendFirstKeyInSequenceEnabled=bool
When enabled the first key in the hotkey sequence is sent to the RGS Sender. The
default value is "0" - don't send the first key in the hotkey sequence.
ImageCodec Properties:
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Rgreceiver.ImageCodec.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", the image quality can be changed by the user in the Receiver Control
Panel. If set to "0", the user cannot change the image quality. This can be used to
permanently set the image quality before the RGS Receiver is started. The default
value is "1" - image quality can be adjusted by user.
Rgreceiver.ImageCodec.Quality=int
The CodecQuality can be set to a value between and including 0 and 100. This
property is used to set the quality of the image in the Remote Display Window. A
value of 100 is the highest image quality and should be visually lossless. A value of 0
is the lowest image quality. Under most circumstances a value of 65 should be
sufficient. Often, lowering the quality will reduce the bandwidth on the network. The
default value is 65.
Logging Properties:
Rgreceiver.Log.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", the logging settings in the Receiver Control Panel can be changed by
the user. If set to "0", the user will not be able to change any of the logging settings.
This can be used to permanently enable or disable logging settings before the RGS
Receiver is started. The default value is "1" - logging settings can be changed.
Rgreceiver.Log.IsFileLoggerEnabled=bool
If set to "1", logging output from the RGS Receiver will be sent to a file. The default
value is "1" - log to a file.
Rgreceiver.Log.IsConsoleLoggerEnabled=bool
If set to "1", logging output from the RGS Receiver will be sent to a console window.
The RGS Receiver must be started in a console window to see the logging output.
The default value is "1" - log to the console.
This property only applies to the Linux and HP-UX versions of the RGS Receiver.
Rgreceiver.Log.Filename=string
This is the path to the log file. This will only be used if
RgReceiver.Log.IsFileLoggerEnabled is set to "1". The default path on Windows
is located in the directory where the RGS Receiver is installed, normally C:/Program
Files/Hewlett-Packard/Remote Graphics Receiver/rg.log. The default path on
Linux or HP-UX is $HOME/.hpremote/rgreceiver/rg.log.
Rgreceiver.Log.Level=string
There are five logging levels: DEBUG, INFO, WARN, ERROR and FATAL. If DEBUG
level is chosen, then all level of output from DEBUG to FATAL will be output to the
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
log file. If WARN level is chosen, then all levels from WARN to FATAL will be output.
The default value is INFO - all DEBUG output is turned off.
Rgreceiver.Log.MaxFileSize=int
This sets the maximum size of the log file in kilobytes (Kbytes). The default
maximum size is 1024 Kbytes.
Rgreceiver.Log.NumBackupFiles=int
If the log file exceeds its maximum size, the log file will be saved and a new log file
will be created. This sets the number of extra files that will be saved. The default
number of saved files is five.
Networking Properties:
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", the user can modify all network timeout values in the RGS Receiver
Control Panel. If set to "0", the user cannot modify the values. This property can be
used to permanently set network timeouts before the RGS Receiver is started. The
default value is "1" - timeout values are changeable by the user.
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning=int
The timeout in milliseconds used to detect and notify the user of a network
disruption. The default value is 2000 milliseconds - two seconds.
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Error=int
The timeout in milliseconds used to detect and disconnect an inactive connection.
The default value is 30000 milliseconds - thirty seconds.
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog=int
The timeout in milliseconds used to display and wait on responses from input dialogs,
such as the authorization dialog and PAMauthentication dialog. The default value is
15000 milliseconds - fifteen seconds.
USB Properties:
Rgreceiver.Usb.IsMutable=bool
If set to "1", the user will be able to modify all USB controls in the RGS Receiver
Control Panel. If set to "0", none of the controls can be changed by the user. This
can be used to permanently enable or disable remote USB before the RGS Receiver
is started. The default value is "1".
This property only applies to HP Blade Workstation Client.
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Rgreceiver.Usb.IsEnabled=bool
If set to "1", remote USB will be enabled. If set to "0", all remote USB will be
disabled and no network bandwidth will be consumed for remote USB.
This property only applies to HP Blade Workstation Client.
Rgreceiver.Usb.ActiveSession=int
When the RGS Receiver is in Directory Mode or Enterprise Service Mode, the
Receiver can connect to one or more RGS Senders. This property will specify the RGS
Sender that remote USB will be connected to. To have all remote USB go to the first
sender, use value zero. To have all remote USB go to the second sender, use value
one, and so on. Remote USB can only go to one sender at a time. To change the
sender, all senders must be disconnected. Then, enter a new value and reconnect all
senders. The default value is zero - the first sender to be connected.
This property only applies to HP Blade Workstation Client.
RGS Sender Properties
All of the following properties are used by the RGS Sender, and can be set from the
command line or from the RGS Sender property configuration file (rgsenderconfig).
General Properties:
Rgsender.IsRdpLogoutDetected=bool
The methods provided by Microsoft to close a connection through Remote Desktop
Protocol (RDP) work quickly when the user disconnects from the RDP session. If the
user logs out of the RDP session, the RGS Sender will be unable to access the
desktop for about 60 seconds. If set to "1", the desktop will be available to the user
through RGS as soon as possible. The RGS Sender will monitor the RDP session for a
logout and begin the process of making the desktop available as soon as the logout
is detected. If set to "0", the RGS Sender will not monitor the RDP session for a
logout.
This property only applies to Windows versions of the RGS Sender.
Rgsender.IsCopyRegionEnabled=bool
If set to "1", RGS Copy Regions are sent from the Sender to the Receiver. If set to
"0", RGS Copy Regions are turned off and will be sent to the Receiver as Image
Update Regions. This is for advanced use and should not be set. The default value is
"1" - send RGS Copy Regions.
Rgsender.IsRegionLimitEnabled=bool
Used to limit the number of update rectangles in a update region. This is for
advanced use and should not be set. The default value is 0 - don't limit regions.
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Rgsender.IsDisconnectOnLogoutEnabled=bool
If set to "1", the RGS connection will be disconnected when the user logs out. If set
to "0", the RGS connection will remain connected to the sender when the user logs
out. The default value is 1 - always disconnect when the user logs out.
Rgsender.IsSnapToCodecEnabled=bool
If set to "1", the HP Codec will be aligned or snapped to tile boundaries. This will
avoid persistent visual artifacts at the expense of potentially increased bandwidth
usage. If set to "0", the alignment of the codec with respect to the screen will be
arbitrary, as determined by the exposed or modified region. For user desktops that
contain primarily 2D applications, turning off this property can save network
bandwidth. The default value is "1" - always snap the codec to tile boundaries.
Rgsender.MaxImageUpdateRate=int
Used to limit the number of image updates per second transmitted from the Sender
to the Receiver. The value is the maximum number of updates per second. If the
image update rate is too high, and using too much network bandwidth, the
MaxImageUpdateRate can be set to limit the number of image updates per second.
The default value is 0 - don't limit the image update rate.
Networking Properties:
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Error=int
The timeout in milliseconds used to detect and disconnect an inactive connection.
The default value is 30000 milliseconds - thirty seconds. See Using Timeouts for
more details.
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog=int
The timeout in milliseconds used to display and wait on responses from input dialogs,
such as the authorization dialog and PAM authentication dialog. The default value is
15000 milliseconds - fifteen seconds. See Using Timeouts for more details.
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How to Collaborate
The HP Remote Graphics Software allows users to share a desktop with several users
simultaneously. For example, a user can allow multiple connections to the same
system enabling multiple-desktop collaboration with several users. This feature can
be used for a variety of scenarios including classroom, design reviews, and support.
All users must use a unique username and cannot share usernames.
Multiple connections between Senders and Receivers are only allowed if the user
logged into the Sender system, referred to as the primary user, allows the
connection. A question dialog, stating the domain and user name of the user
attempting a connection, is displayed on the Sender's desktop when a new Receiver
attempts to connect. All currently connected users are given the option to allow or
disallow the connection using buttons in the message box.
•
If a user allows the connection, the new user is allowed to connect to the
Sender and view the desktop.
•
If the connection is not allowed, the new Receiver will be unable to connect.
•
If no one is logged into the Sender's desktop (in other words there is no
primary user) then all authenticated connections are connected and able to
view the Windows login desktop. However, when a user logs into the Sender
desktop, all non-primary users, are disconnected. This is a security
precaution.
•
On Windows, if the primary user disconnects, the desktop is locked, but the
Receivers will remain connected.
•
On HP-UX and Linux, if the primary user disconnects, the desktop is locked
and all users are disconnected.
•
If the remote user connecting is the same user as the user logged in the
desktop, the collaboration dialog is not displayed and the connection is
allowed.
On Microsoft Windows, a Sender desktop icon in the system application tray displays
the status of connections. The icon animates when Receivers are connected.
Additionally, a collaboration notification dialog is displayed on the desktop whenever
a non-primary user is connected.
On Linux and HP-UX, the Sender GUI is present on the desktop, but does not display
connection status.
The Sender icon or GUI can be used to enable and disable mouse and keyboard for
non-primary users. For example, if you wish to grant "view only" access to users
simply right-click on the icon or GUI and select "Remote IO" and then select
"Enable" or "Disable"
All Receivers can be easily disconnected from the HP Remote Graphics icon located in
the system tray or from the Sender GUI by right-clicking on the icon or GUI. This is
useful when hosting collaborative session, such as in a classroom environment, and
the session ends.
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The user currently controlling the mouse and keyboard is called the floor owner. Only
one user (the floor owner) can interact with the desktop at a time. To transition the
floor owner, the current owner must not use the keyboard or mouse for a short
period of time (0.5 seconds). If any other user attempts to use the mouse or
keyboard while the current owner is not using the input devices for this short period
of time, the floor ownership transfers to the new user.
The mouse and keyboard can be disabled for non-primary users. The primary user is
the user that is logged into the desktop of the Sender system. A non-primary user is
a user that is connected, but is not logged in. For example, if UserA is logged into
the Sender system and UserB is connected in, the with I/O disabled, UserB cannot
control the mouse and keyboard.
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Using Single Sign-on
When RGS Single Sign-on is not installed, users are normally required to
authenticate twice when connecting - once to connect from the RGS Receiver to the
RGS Sender (RGS connection) and another to log into or unlock the remote desktop
(Desktop session).
When Single Sign-on is installed, users will normally need to enter their credentials
only once. The user will be prompted on the RGS Receiver to enter their credentials.
These credentials will be used to authenticate the connection to the RGS Sender. If
the user is authenticated on the sender, the same credentials will be used to silently
log into or unlock the user onto the users desktop.
Single Sign-on will only occur when the Sender is in one of two states - the logged
off state or the locked desktop state. These two states are WinLogon states, and are
controlled by the WinLogon.exe process running on the Sender
system. WinLogon.exe is the Window's logon manager and is the process
responsible for managing user logon and logoff. The WinLogon.exe process controls
these states, more formally known as WlxDisplaySASNotice and
WlxDisplayLockedNotice states.
When the remote desktop is in the logged off state (WlxDisplaySASNotice), the
following dialog is present on the remote desktop:
When the remote desktop is in the locked desktop state (WlxDisplayLockedNotice),
the following dialog is present on the remote desktop:
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If the remote desktop displays either of these two states, then an RGS Single Signon connection will work. If the remote desktop state differs from these requirements,
Single Sign-on will not work and the user will need to enter their credentials twice.
To support Single Sign-on in the RGS Sender, the custom RGS GINA (Graphical
Identification and Authentication) module, hprgina.dll, must be installed and
loaded by Window's WinLogon process. The RGS GINA module resides in the
C:\WINDOWS\system32 directory of the Sender's system. The hprgina.dll module is
loaded by Window's WinLogon.exe process at system boot up.
The RGS Sender enables Single Sign-on functionality with a correctly installed and
configured hprgina.dll module. Please refer to Installing & Enabling Single Sign-on
section to learn more about enabling RGS Single Sign-on.
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Using Easy Login
Easy Login is only supported on HP Blade Workstations running Windows XP.
If Easy Login is not installed, users are normally required to authenticate twice when
connecting - once to connect from the RGS Receiver to the RGS Sender (RGS
connection) and another to log into or unlock the remote desktop (Desktop session).
When Easy Login is installed, users will normally need to enter their credentials only
once. The user will directly connect to the RGS Sender and immediately enter their
credentials to log in or unlock the remote desktop in the Remote Display Window.
Easy Login works only with one RGS connection - no other prior / simultaneous RGS
connections are allowed. Easy Login works only with the Sender in one of two states
- the logged off state or the locked desktop state. These two states are WinLogon
states, and are controlled by the WinLogon.exe process running on the Sender
system. WinLogon.exe is the Window's logon manager and is the process
responsible for managing user logon and logoff. The WinLogon.exe process controls
these states, more formally known as WlxDisplaySASNotice and
WlxDisplayLockedNotice states.
When the remote desktop is in the logged off state (WlxDisplaySASNotice), the
following dialog is present on the remote desktop:
When the remote desktop is in the locked desktop state (WlxDisplayLockedNotice),
the following dialog is present on the remote desktop:
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These two WinLogon states requires the user to type in Ctrl-Alt-Del, the standard
WinLogon SAS (Secure Attention Sequence), to enter in their credentials. If the
remote desktop displays either of these states with no other RGS connections
present, then an Easy Login connection will work. If the remote desktop state differs
from these requirements, Easy Login will not work and the user will need to enter
their credentials twice.
To support Easy Login in the RGS Sender, the Sender must know about the various
WinLogon states. The Sender uses a custom RGS GINA (Graphical Identification and
Authentication) module, hprgina.dll, to determine these states. It resides in the
C:\WINDOWS\system32 directory of the Sender's system. The hprgina.dll module is
loaded by Window's WinLogon.exe process at system boot up. Once the module is
loaded, the Sender receives notifications of all WinLogon state changes.
The RGS Sender enables Easy Login functionality with a correctly installed and
configured hprgina.dll module. Please refer to Installing & Enabling Easy Login
section to learn more about enabling Easy Login.
Microsoft Remote Desktop and Easy Login
Microsoft Remote Desktop and RGS Easy Login ideally coexist and work well together
under certain situations. The following scenarios demonstrate how a user and an IT
administrator can work together using their preferred methods:
•
UserA uses RGS to connect to his HP Blade Workstation.
•
UserB is an IT administrator and uses Microsoft Remote Desktop to connect to
UserA's Blade Workstation.
Careful orchestration keeps Easy Login enabled. Under certain scenarios, it can
become disabled. The following section describes several of the possible key
scenarios.
UserB never connects in - RGS Easy Login remains enabled for UserA:
This is the primary scenario assumed for day-to-day operations.
1. UserA logs off and then disconnects the RGS Receiver from the sender before
leaving work for the evening. UserA might also lock the workstation rather
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than logging off before disconnecting the RGS Receiver. A screen saver might
also be used to force the desktop to be locked after a certain amount of
elapsed time. In this case, UserA would just disconnect the RGS Receiver and
let the screen saver kick in to lock the desktop.
2. UserB never uses Remote Desktop to connect into UserA's Blade Workstation.
3. UserA returns the next morning and connects to his Blade Workstation using
the RGS Receiver. UserA connects directly to his workstation with an Easy
Login connection. He enters his credentials only once.
UserB logs off of the Blade Workstation when finished - RGS Easy Login
remains enabled for UserA:
This is the standard scenario assumed for IT support.
1. UserA logs off and then disconnects the RGS Receiver before leaving work for
the evening.
2. That night UserB connects into UserA's workstation using Remote Desktop
Connection. He logs in using an administrator account to update a software
package. Once UserB finishes, he logs off from the Blade Workstation. No
Remote Desktop session remains.
3. UserA returns the next morning and connects to his Blade Workstation using
the RGS Receiver. UserA connects directly to his workstation with an Easy
Login connection. He enters his credentials only once.
UserB connects in, but does not log in - RGS Easy Login remains enabled for
UserA:
This scenario should rarely occur.
1. UserA logs off and then disconnects the RGS Receiver before leaving work for
the evening.
2. That night UserB connects to UserA's Blade Workstation using Remote
Desktop Connection, but UserB does not log in. A Remote Desktop connection
remains active although no login exists.
3. UserA returns the next morning and connects to his Blade Workstation using
the RGS Receiver. UserA connects directly to his workstation with an Easy
Login connection. He enters his credentials only once.
UserB connects in, and then disconnects without logging out - RGS Easy
Login is disabled for UserA:
This scenario is possible but not recommended. IT administrators should always log
off (not just disconnect) when finished working with a Microsoft Remote Desktop
Connection. When a user only disconnects with Microsoft Remote Desktop, but the
user doesn't logoff, it leaves a terminal services session open and this interferes with
Easy Login.
1. UserA logs off and then disconnects the RGS Receiver before leaving work for
the evening.
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2. That night UserB connects into UserA's workstation using Remote Desktop
Connection. He logs in using an administrator account to update a software
package. Once UserB finishes, he disconnects from the Blade Workstation.
Since UserB just disconnected and did not logoff, a Remote Desktop or
Windows terminal services session remains active.
3. UserA returns the next morning and attempts to connect to his Blade
Workstation using the RGS Receiver. UserA must enter his credentials to
connect into the workstation. Due to the active session left by UserB (who did
not log off), UserA cannot connect to his workstation because UserB owns the
desktop session on UserA's Blade Workstation.
4. UserA must call up IT and seek help. IT must discover the Remote Desktop or
Windows terminal services session and log out the administrator session for
UserA to connect.
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Remote Application Termination on Windows
Remote Application Termination (RAT) is only supported on Windows.
Network outages or loss of connectivity between a RGS Receiver and Sender can
leave a desktop session running without supervision. To safeguard running
applications, customer-designed agents can monitor the status of connections to
determine if termination of applications is required. This support is available through
the RGS Sender for Windows.
This section describes how to interpret RGS connectivity status, decode Windows
Event Log messages from the Sender, and create effective control agents for remote
application management and termination during disconnects.
RGS Connection and User Status
The RGS Sender reports status of connections through a custom Windows Event Log
called HPRemote. RGS connections normally occur in two phases:
•
Phase 1: RGS Connection - a connection over a standard computer network
between an RGS Sender and RGS Receiver
•
Phase 2: Desktop Session - a logged-in session that gives access to a
desktop workspace on a remote workstation using a RGS connection
Desktop Sessions can operate independently of active RGS Connections. This allows
the user to disconnect and reconnect to Desktop Sessions as part of a normal
workflow. However, when a connection is unintentionally disconnected, a user may
require remote applications to be terminated after Desktop Sessions are left
unattended for a period of time to prevent them from operating unsupervised.
Ownership of a Desktop Session on Windows defines the type of user status in effect
for a RGS connection. Events posted to the HPRemote Windows Event Log reflect
the following control priorities:
•
Primary User - The user of a RGS Connection that matches the user logged
into the Desktop Session.
•
Non-primary User (also Collaborating User) - A user of a RGS Connection
that does not match the user logged into the Desktop Session. If no one is
logged into a Desktop Session, then all connections are non-primary.
Primary user status defines control and the need for a monitoring agent to take
action against running applications of interest. When the number of primary user
connections drops to zero, then the Desktop session may require user-defined
actions.
HPRemote - the RGS Windows Event Log
The RGS Sender posts events in the HPRemote Windows Event Log. Event
messages are directly viewable with the Windows Event Viewer or by an application
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using the Event Log Service API. Data in the Event Log consists of a Message ID
followed by optional data contained in both character string and binary data formats.
Binary data provides direct access to data without requiring application parsing.
Character strings format the binary data into human-readable messages compatible
with the Windows Event Viewer. Review each message type in the table below for
exact field and usage descriptions. Details for using the Event Viewer follow after the
table.
Message ID
Description
RGSENDER_CONNECT_STATE The connection state consists of zero or more
primary connections and zero or more nonprimary connections. Each event entry records
the current number of active connections in each
category. Events appear when the connection
status of these users changes. The first field
represents the number of primary connections.
The second field represents the number of nonprimary connections. Each state field provides a
text string and binary, 32-bit unsigned integer
for application use.
Event Viewer Message:
Primary connections: %1.
Non-primary connections: %2.
Strings:
%1 = number of primary connections
%2 = number of non-primary
connections
Data:
UINT32 numPrimary
UINT32 numNonprimary
Event Viewer Example:
Primary connections: 1
Non-primary connections: 0
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RGSENDER_CONNECT
A new connection was established with an
associated name. If Easy Login is enabled, the
name assignment will be deferred until login and
the associated name may be “Anonymous”.
Event Viewer Message:
Connect %1.
Strings:
%1 = name associated with connection
Data:
None
Event Viewer Example:
Connect MYDOMAIN\myusername.
RGSENDER_DISCONNECT
A receiver has disconnected. The message will
contain the name associated with the
connection. If Easy Login is enabled and the
receiver disconnects prior to a login, the
associated name may be “Anonymous”.
Event Viewer Message:
Disconnect %1.
Strings:
%1 = name associated with connection
Data:
None
Event Viewer Example:
Disconnect MYDOMAIN\myusername.
RGSENDER_STARTUP
Reference event registered to aid in
interpretation of the event log by Event Viewer.
Signifies proper startup of the RGS Sender
service.
Event Viewer Message:
RGS Sender startup.
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Strings:
None
Data:
None
RGSENDER_SHUTDOWN
Reference event registered to aid in
interpretation of the event log by Event Viewer.
Signifies proper shutdown of the RGS Sender
service.
Event Viewer Message:
RGS Sender shutdown.
Strings:
None
Data:
None
RGSENDER_SET_PRIMARY
A connection with an associated name is set as
the primary connection.
Event Viewer Message:
Set %1 as primary connection.
Strings:
%1 = name associated with connection
Data:
None
Event Viewer Example:
Set MYDOMAIN\myusername as primary
connection.
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RGSENDER_SET_NONPRIMARY A connection with an associated name is
assigned to a non-primary status. This may
happen as a result of a logout.
Event Viewer Message:
Set %1 as non-primary connection.
Strings:
%1 = name associated with connection
Data:
None
Event Viewer Example:
Set MYDOMAIN\myusername as nonprimary connection.
RGSENDER_ASSIGN_USER
If Easy Login is enabled, the assignment of the
name will be deferred until login. When the
name is assigned, this message will be
generated.
Event Viewer Message:
Assign %1 connection to %2.
Strings:
%1 = original name of connection
%2 = new name of connection
Data:
None
Event Viewer Example:
Assign Anonymous connection to
MYDOMAIN\myusername.
The Event Viewer is available as an "Administrative Tools" option in the Windows
system Control Panel. Invoking the Event Viewer makes the HPRemote log available
along with the standard system event logs:
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Assuming the RGS Sender is properly installed and active, an HPRemote Event Log is
created and reflects recent connection activity. By default, the most recent events
display first. Clicking any record allows inspection of that event. The next image
shows the detail of the 3:00:51 event. Note the radio button option to view the
UINT32 connection data in byte and word formats. The word format is selected
below. The HPRemote Event Log is also a fixed-size event log. All entries are "Last
In, First Out" (LIFO) order when it fills.
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Basic Application Control Agents
Basic Windows monitoring agents must have the ability to monitor the HPRemote
event log and interpret its events. When the number of primary user connections
drops to zero, an agent should execute its actions tied to applications of interest
running in the Desktop Session. Broader design issues for a control agent are
covered in the next section.
This section outlines a simple fixed-polling Windows agent that reads and interprets
a local HPRemote event log. The basic structure involves two simple core functions:
•
•
processEvent(eventServer, eventSource, dwEventNum)
o
open event log, read event dwEventNum, close event log
o
if valid read, process recognized EventIDs, then return
monitorEvents(eventServer, eventSource, seconds)
o
for a finite number of seconds (or infinite if seconds <= 0) do
o
open event log, read log length, close event log
o
if log has changed, processEvent(), else sleep for X mSec
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To properly use monitorEvents(...), the following strings must be defined in its
call:
•
LPCTSTR eventServer: if string is defined as "\\\\yourservername", then
the log is stored on a remote server - if the string is empty (NULL), then the
log is stored locally (note that four backlashes compiles to two in a string
constant).
•
LPCTSTR eventSource: the name of the target event generator, e.g.,
"rgreceiver"
The programming header file, RGSenderEvents.h, is located with the RGS Sender
installed software at:
C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\include\RGSenderEvents.h
A simple pseudo-code agent using these functions looks like this:
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "RGSenderEvents.h"
#define BUFFER_SIZE 1024
// safe EVENTLOGRECORD size for now
#define EVENT_SERVER NULL
// remote server = "\\\\nodename"; local = NULL
#define EVENT_SRC "rgsender"
// specifies specific event name source in
// HPRemote
BOOL processEvent(LPCTSTR eventServer, LPCTSTR eventSource, DWORD dwEventNum)
{
HANDLE h;
EVENTLOGRECORD *pevlr;
BYTE bBuffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
DWORD dwRead, dwNeeded;
BOOL result;
// Open, read, close event log ===========================================
if ((h = OpenEventLog(eventServer, eventSource)) == NULL)
{
... report error status ...
return true;
}
// Set the pointer to our buffer. Strings and data will get appended
// to the EVENTLOGRECORD structure.
pevlr = (EVENTLOGRECORD *) &bBuffer;
// Read the event specified by dwEventNum
result = ReadEventLog(h,
EVENTLOG_SEEK_READ |
EVENTLOG_FORWARDS_READ,
dwEventNum,
pevlr,
BUFFER_SIZE,
98
//
//
//
//
//
//
event log handle
start at specific event
advance forward
record to read
pointer to buffer
size of buffer
Using Remote Graphics Software
&dwRead,
// number of bytes read
&dwNeeded);
// bytes in next record
if (CloseEventLog(h) == false)
{
... report error status ...
return true;
}
// Process event (example: print out event) ==============================
if (result)
{
// We only know how to process specific events
if (pevlr->EventID == RGSENDER_CONNECT_STATE)
{
// Retrieve the two UINT32 fields of this message
// representing primary and non-primary connections.
unsigned int *pData = (unsigned int *)
((LPBYTE) pevlr + pevlr->DataOffset);
// Examine state of primary connections here for other
// agent response if number drops to zero...
... example only prints out retrieved record to console ...
printf ("Event: %u Primary: %u Secondary: %u\n",
dwEventNum, pData[0], pData[1]);
}
... Process other events here if desired ...
}
else
{
... report unrecognized event here ...
return true;
}
return false;
}
void monitorEvents(LPCTSTR eventServer, LPCTSTR eventSource, int seconds)
{
DWORD dwCurrentIndex = 0;
DWORD dwCurrentStart;
DWORD dwCurrentCount;
DWORD dwNewIndex;
int
waitedFor;
// This function will monitor the log for the specified number of
// seconds. If seconds is less than zero, we will wait forever.
for (waitedFor = 0; seconds < 0 || waitedFor < seconds; )
{
HANDLE h;
// Open, read status of log, close event log =========================
if ((h = OpenEventLog(eventServer, eventSource)) == NULL)
{
... report error status here ...
return;
}
// If an event is added, either the start or count will change.
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//
//
//
if
Get the start and count. Microsoft does not specify what
reasons these functions could fail, so we cannot ensure
success. Check the return value.
(GetOldestEventLogRecord(h, &dwCurrentStart) == false ||
GetNumberOfEventLogRecords(h, &dwCurrentCount) == false)
{
CloseEventLog(h);
... report error - unable to obtain event logs ...
return;
}
if (CloseEventLog(h) == false)
{
... report error status here ...
return;
}
// Determine state of log change =====================================
// Compute the index of the last event. If the count is zero, then
// there are no events and the index is 0.
if (dwCurrentCount == 0)
{
dwNewIndex = 0;
}
else
{
dwNewIndex = dwCurrentStart + dwCurrentCount - 1;
}
// If the new index is different than the current, update the current
// and process the current event. Otherwise, we sleep for a while.
if (dwNewIndex != dwCurrentIndex)
{
// We have at least one new event. Print out the last event.
dwCurrentIndex = dwNewIndex;
if (dwNewIndex)
{
if (processEvent(eventServer, eventSource, dwCurrentIndex))
{
... event processing error here ...
return;
}
}
}
else
{
// No new events. Sleep for 1 second.
Sleep(1000);
waitedFor += 1;
}
}
return;
}
main( ... )
{
... setup and initialize agent ...
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monitorEvents(EVENT_SERVER, EVENT_SRC, seconds);
... cleanup agent here or send alerts ...
... may wish to return status from monitorEvents ...
}
NOTE: The parameter EVENT_SRC above defines the name of an event generator
here, not necessarily the Windows Event Log name HPRemote as suggested by
external documentation. Supported event source names include:
RGS Event Source Name
(LPCTSTR)
Description
"rgsender"
Events generated by the RGS
Sender service
More information and examples for Event Log readers is available at:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library
Search on the topic OpenEventLog for a function description and additional
examples.
Agent Design Issues
Windows Application Agents for RGS remote session require careful design to
maximize their effectiveness. Issues and tradeoffs can minimize data loss and
determine when a last resort shutdown of a disconnected Windows session is
required.
The following list introduces topics of interest to consider when designing application
control agents for your environment. The topics are not exhaustive. Use them as a
starting point for a more complete design that meets your business requirements. In
general, remote administration of an arbitrary application environment will require
some pioneering work.
Desktop Session Logout
•
Issues - In some circumstances, loss of a primary user connection should
trigger a full shutdown of all applications and force a logout of the Desktop
Session (perhaps after a specific time allowance for reconnection has
expired). This action would drop all connections to the remote session.
•
Benefits - Implementing a full session shutdown / logout ensures that all
connection activity ceases immediately and applications are prevented from
further unattended actions. Shutdown of a remote session frees the
workstation for connection by other users. This approach is the most absolute
and secure solution for session management. Agent relies upon Windows
logout routines to terminate environment - simple in design and result.
•
Concerns - Forcing a shutdown / logout can result in data loss for any open
applications on the Desktop Session. Forcing session logouts can result in
application alert prompts requiring user interaction to save altered data.
These prompts can delay or halt an interactive logout. Session termination
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also destroys memory of window placement on the desktop and requires
intervention at restart.
Selective Environment Shutdown
•
Issues - Partial shutdown of an environment only terminates certain
applications of interest. It does not implement a full Desktop Session logout.
It selectively protects only the most critical applications requiring oversight
and control.
•
Benefits – Preserves the active Desktop Session for connection at a later
time. Selectively terminates the applications of interest. Preserves data not
governed by an automated shutdown policy. Supports session recovery with
an arbitrary connection time. If done in layers (giving some applications more
time to live than others), then a gradual "soft landing" shutdown can occur
that ultimately results in a full logout. Idle resources over a specific amount of
time can be returned to a remote server pool.
•
Concerns - Potentially more complicated to implement. Can require
coordination of multiple agents to handle layered shutdown. Can still result in
data loss for specific applications. May require a master semaphore to halt /
terminate multiple agents if user reconnects and wants to stop the shutdown
process.
Wrapping Applications of Interest
•
Issues - Agents can be launched and supervise only specific applications in a
given environment. Tying agents to specific applications is a selective safety
net for every user.
•
Benefits - Application-specific agents can be implemented as plug-ins or
support utilities for a given application. In the future, certain software
providers may provide custom interfaces for safe shutdown messages from an
agent or the operating system. Custom agents can be independently
maintained and tied to specific application releases for greater support
flexibility. Independent agent design supports unit testing and decouples
environmental dependencies.
•
Concerns - Users need specific recourse to disarm an agent if they
reconnect. Applications may not interact well with a dedicated agent (and
only shutdown due to a global shutdown request). Dedicated agents could
possibly be compromised.
Administrator Alerts
•
Issues - Instead of shutting down an environment, an agent can be designed
to alert an administrator or operator to determine the status of the user
before taking action. This watchdog approach can further be defined to exploit
redundant network connection support to a remote system to allow userdirected shutdowns to occur.
•
Benefits - System agents are not required to take destructive action - they
serve only as alarms and monitors for alternate human intervention.
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•
Concerns - May require redundant networking channel. Requires
administrator or operator availability to support.
Anticipating User Disconnects and Reconnection
•
Issues - Users must first be warned about the consequences of
disconnection. Agents that provide protection for a disconnected session can
also provide a nuisance for unsuspecting users if they fail to address
protective measures in place for their safety. For example, users must know
how much time they have to reconnect before safeguards take action. If a
remote agent arms itself for application termination, users should be
presented with a large, unmistakable disarming "opt-out" panel that, upon
login and discovery, they can halt any agent actions before termination.
Organizations should carefully discuss and publicize safety measures due to
potential data loss.
•
Concerns - Users should not be able to disable or specify their own timeouts
due to potential irreversible data loss.
General Design Issues
•
All active agents should externally log their decisions and actions for post
mortem analysis.
•
Independent agents should provide their own opt-out, disarming dialogs with
countdown feedback before taking action.
•
Expect the unexpected - where possible, limit your actions to those areas you
are certain of the outcomes to minimize loss of data and productivity.
•
Always inspect error codes when reading event logs - the reliability of this
RGS communication method depends upon the Windows Event Log system.
While we have yet to see a failure in this path, we recommend using all
information available to its fullest potential.
Additional Safeguard Features for Windows systems
The following optional procedures for the RGS Sender service can improve the
reliability of your remote agent solution if required in your environment.
RGS Sender Service Recovery Settings
•
By default, most Windows services are installed without any automatic
restart/recovery settings. This means that when a service terminates,
Windows will, by default, not restart the service unless explicitly set. When
RGS Sender software is first installed, it is installed with Windows defaults (do
not restart).
•
Restarting the RGS Sender service can support RGS reconnection with a RGS
Receiver client (unless a system error prevents the RGS service from
restarting).
•
Agent designs should take into account whether or not to check for the
existence of a running RGS Sender service as an indication of a sufficient
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primary user connection. If service restarts are programmed for your
environment, this test may be unnecessary.
•
To set the RGS Sender service for automatic restart, you must adjust its
Recovery Property through the "Administrative Tools" and "Services"
control panel options.
•
Actions to take for the first failure, second failure, and subsequent failures are
available in the properties menu. Recovery options seen in the properties
panel below include:
o
Take No Action
o
Restart the Service
o
Run a Program
o
Restart the Computer
Microsoft Remote Desktop Recovery
•
104
If the RGS Sender becomes unavailable and the Receiver can no longer
connect to the Sender, a Windows system with Remote Desktop services
enabled can also access the remote system to diagnose the issue.
Using Remote Graphics Software
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Using Timeouts
Various network conditions as well as end-user needs require the ability to specify
network warning, error and dialog timeouts. RGS enables relatively fine-grained
control over the network and dialog timeout values as well as an innovative form of
user notification when a warning timeout expires. This allows tuning for specific
network conditions and environments, such as low-bandwidth or high-latency
conditions. At the same time the user is notified of potential issues involving more
catastrophic or transient network conditions. This section describes the purpose,
type, function, and recommended settings for RGS timeouts.
The RGS Receiver and Sender have command-line options and properties that can
specify the network warning and error timeouts. The RGS Receiver also enables
timeout values available from the Receiver Control Panel.
There are several types or classifications of timeouts in the RGS product:
•
Network Warning Timeouts: The Receiver uses network warning timeouts to
display a warning or notification of potential network connectivity loss if the
timeout expires.
•
Network Error Timeouts: The Receiver and Sender use network error timeouts
to control the following:
•
o
The maximum time that a Sender and Receiver will wait for or retry a
network invocation before reporting a network error and fully closing
the connection.
o
The maximum time that a Receiver and Sender will wait for a syncpulse prior to fully closing the connection.
Dialog Timeouts: The maximum time that a Receiver and Sender will display
a message/response dialog or wait for an invocation response between the
pair.
RGS uses TCP/IP over a standard computer network to transmit data. TCP/IP is a
reliable transport mechanism, but it still offers no guarantees on network packet
delivery. This is in contrast to the reliable connection that a keyboard, mouse, and
monitor enjoy when using a PS/2, USB, or video cable on a computer. (A complete
discussion of TCP/IP is beyond the scope of this document. Interested readers should
refer to any number of excellent references on this subject to fully cover this
material.)
The TCP/IP network stack typically performs well on a relatively stable network.
However, issues outside of RGS can affect the probability and timing of network
packet delivery that ultimately impact system performance. Issues such as
•
network over-subscription results in congestion and packet loss
•
CPU utilization from other processes/tasks starves the network stack
•
send and receive response time fails due to inadequate bandwidth
•
network switches, routers, and NICs can fail or be incorrectly configured
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•
a network cable can be pulled (done often during testing) from its port
•
other failures are possible, too.
In some network scenarios, a disruption is transient while in other networks the
connectivity loss is more permanent. For example, a network cable can be
accidentally pulled and then plugged in again resulting in the network being restored.
If a network disruption is temporary, a network stack may wait and attempt to
recover connectivity before giving up and fully disconnecting. This is what the TCP
layer of the TCP/IP network stack automatically does. If a temporary network
disruption occurs, the network stack often detects the condition and continues to
retry, subject to the timeout parameters set in the TCP/IP network stack. However,
during these intervals of network inactivity, it is often important that the user receive
notification of a potential network connectivity loss, especially if important decisions
depend upon the temporal accuracy of the data presented to the user in the Remote
Display Window.
If connectivity is restored after a disruption, the RGS Receiver should continue to
receive updates and operate normally. In many cases, the user should experience
little or no inconvenience if connectivity is restored in a short amount of time.
However, if network connectivity loss persists, then a connection decision is required
to either wait, retry, or permanently close a connection. If the error timeout expires,
the RGS Receiver and Sender will fully close their connections and a new connection
must be initiated by the Receiver to restore connectivity.
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In the network section of the RGS Receiver Control Panel, the warning timeout
controls user notification if a potential network issue occurs. Under normal
conditions, the RGS Receiver and Sender use sync-pulses to establish connection
integrity. Sync-pulses are messages or, more appropriately, method invocations
between the Receiver and Sender. If the Receiver fails to detect a sync-pulse beyond
the warning timeout value, the Receiver's Remote Display Window will dim and
display a warning to the user. This serves to notify the user of stale contents in the
Remote Display Window. Users making critical decisions based upon data displayed
in the Remote Display Window should wait until their network returns. If connectivity
returns prior to reaching the error threshold (implying return of sync-pulses between
applications), the Remote Display Window becomes undimmed on the next image
update and normal operation continues.
If loss of sync-pulses and connectivity continues or a network invocation fails, the
error timeout will trigger the Receiver to close its connection. After this action, the
Receiver displays the "Connection Lost" error dialog.
A useful timeout strategy for end-users is to set short warning timeouts and longer
error timeouts. With these settings the end-user detects potential network
disruptions relatively quickly while allowing connections enough time to possibly
recover upon network restoration. The default warning timeout for RGS Receiver is
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two seconds (two-thousand milliseconds). The default error timeout is thirty seconds
(thirty-thousand milliseconds).
In a practical example, if a temporary network disruption occurs for less than two
seconds, the Receiver does not display a user notification and the user only
experiences a brief drop in Remote Display Window interactivity. This means that, for
a user moving or scrolling a window, the window will appear unresponsive or hung. If
no interaction with the display occurred while the network stalls, the event is usually
not even notable unless dynamic content such as video fails to update in a
reasonable amount of time.
If the disruption continues for greater than two seconds, then the Remote Display
Window dims and a warning appears. During this time the Remote Display Window
appears unresponsive to users. If connectivity returns, then the Remote Display
Window returns to its normal appearance and interactivity. A full loss of connection
beyond the error timeout results in closure of the Remote Display Window and
display of the "Connection Lost" error dialog as previously described.
Receiver properties are fully settable from the Receiver properties resource file or
command line. The default value for the Receiver property,
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning, is 2,000 milliseconds (two seconds). This
value works well for most installations. For networks with less stable connectivity
and disruptions greater than two seconds, higher warning timeout values will lessen
the appearance of network warning as a nuisance to user productivity.
The recommended default value for the Receiver property,
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Error, is 30,000 milliseconds (thirty seconds). In
practice, this works well, although some users adjust this value lower to force
connections to close sooner. Higher settings of one minute (60,000 milliseconds or
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
60 seconds) or greater are not necessarily practical as the connection usually
becomes useless and only frustrates the user with a waiting time that tries their
patience.
In the case of the Sender, the RGS Sender property,
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Error, also defines a required maximum network timeout
value independent of Receiver settings. Due to legacy issues, the Sender first starts
up using the maximum of either the Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Error or
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog property (discussed later) to set an internal error
timeout for method invocations between the Sender and Receiver as well as syncpulse detection.
When the Receiver negotiates its connection, it notifies the Sender of its error
timeout value. The Sender adopts the lesser of both timeouts to use for sync-pulse
error detection. If the user later adjusts the Receiver value greater than the Sender
error timeout, the Sender caps itself to its own timeout value. The total combined
error timeout can never exceed the Sender's error timeout value. If a sync-pulse or
an invocation between the Receiver and Sender exceeds the lesser of either limit
above, then the Sender will disconnect the Receiver. The user must initiate a reconnect to the Sender to restore connectivity. Note that there is no equivalent
timeout warning in the Sender that the Receiver will display. The Sender does not
inform the Receiver of its error timeout value. The connection simply drops at the
end of the computed timeout unless the network stack responds to an earlier
network error.
The following examples demonstrate the final behavior. When the Sender error
timeout is 30 seconds and the Receiver error timeout is 5 seconds, then the Sender
uses 5 seconds for its sync-pulse detection since this is the minimum of both. If the
Receiver error timeout is adjusted to 60 seconds, then the Sender uses a value of 30
seconds for sync-pulse detection since this is, again, the minimum of both timeouts.
The timeout for invocations between the Sender and Receiver is 30 seconds in both
cases.
A larger error timeout for the Sender is not recommended. If the Receiver and
Sender connection terminates ungracefully, then the Sender could possibly take as
long as its error timeout value to determine the connectivity loss and fully terminate
the connection. From the time of actual network disruption until the error timeout
expires, the Sender will not send image updates to all other Receivers (if it is serving
multiple Receiver connections). This will hang the interactivity of other users for no
apparent reason. After the error timeout expires, the Sender removes the one
connection and continues updating all other Receivers.
If the network stack determines a network failure has occurred, it can shutdown the
connection or entire network interface prior to expiration of the error timeout. For
example, if a network cable is pulled on a Receiver system, the Receiver system
might determine that it has lost its network and shutdown networking completely. In
this case the Receiver application might catch the network exception more quickly
than its timeout because the system error flows back to the receiver instead of
waiting for recovery. Consequently, this results in a full Receiver disconnection
before reaching its timeout threshold.
Dialog timeouts specify the maximum time that a message/response dialog appears
or is waited upon between the Receiver and Sender. Invocations between the
Receiver and Sender requiring user interaction often need much higher timeout
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values than normal steady-state timeouts. Authentication or authorization dialogs
often require more display time than standard messages and alerts due to their
importance. The RGS system supports alternate timeouts for user interaction to
separate them from operations such as sending graphics and audio content. This
enables usable authentication and authorization experiences as well as more
reasonable limits for standard messages and invocations.
The Receiver property, Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog, (also available from the
Receiver Control Panel Network tab), limits the display of incoming and outgoing
query dialogs from the Sender requiring user input and interaction. Similarly, the
Sender property, Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog, specifies from its side similar
limits for Receiver messages and queries. At startup the Sender uses the maximum
of either Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Error or Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog
properties to define its networking timeout between the Sender and Receiver.
An example of dialog timeouts follows. If User A attempts to connect to User B's
desktop, an authorization dialog prompts User B. The RGS Sender prompts User B on
the Sender desktop asking for permission to connect User A to the desktop. The RGS
Receiver property Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog limits how long the Receiver
waits on the invocation between the Receiver and Sender before returning failure.
The RGS Sender property Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog limits the display of the
authorization dialog on the Sender. If either timeout expires without action, the
dialog exits and connection is denied by default or it defaults secure. If the Sender
timeout is shorter than the Receiver's timeout, the authorization invocation from the
Receiver to the Sender usually times out faster that the dialog times out, so the
authorization fails. If the Sender timeout is longer than the Receiver's timeout, the
authorization dialog expires faster than the invocation from the Receiver to the
Sender and the authorization still fails.
Another example follows for a different type of authentication. When a Receiver
connects to a Sender running a Linux or HP-UX operating system, the Pluggable
Authentication Module (PAM) authenticates the connection. In this case, the PAM
subsystem invokes a PAM conversation/callback function that results in the Sender
making invocations back to the Receiver to prompt the user with PAM message
dialogs. The Sender receives the responses. Typically the dialogs request a username
and password, but any message is possible. The timeout for the PAM
message/response dialog invoked by the Sender and displayed by the Receiver is the
Receiver's Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog value.
The maximum of either the Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Error or
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog properties limits how long the Sender will wait for
a response. The Receiver controls the display time for the PAM message/response
dialog and the Sender controls how long to wait for a response from the Receiver. If
either timeout expires, the connection is denied by default or defaults secure if the
timeout is exceeded. If the Sender timeout is shorter than the Receiver's timeout,
then the authentication invocation from the Sender to the Receiver expires faster
than the PAM Authentication Dialog, resulting in a PAM authentication failure. If the
Receiver timeout is larger than the Sender's timeout, then the PAM authentication
dialog times out faster than the invocation from the Receiver to the Sender and the
PAM authentication still fails.
The property Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog does not control all dialogs
displayed by the Receiver. For example, the authentication dialog for a Windows
Sender connection displayed by the Receiver for username and password does not
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
have an associated timeout since it is not an incoming invocation from the Sender to
the Receiver. This dialog displays indefinitely until the user responds "OK" or
"Cancel" to its requests.
The default property for Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog and
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog is fifteen thousand milliseconds (15 seconds). This
should support most user authorization scenarios or PAM authentication dialogs
displayed by the Receiver. In cases of more complex scenarios requiring additional
time, the user should adjust both Receiver and Sender timeouts appropriately
through the Receiver Control Panel, specifying properties on the command line, or
using a properties configuration file.
In summary, the Receiver and Sender properties Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Dialog
and Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog similarly control the duration of response wait
time requiring user interaction while making outgoing connections and dialog display
time as a result of incoming messages/invocations.
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Remote Graphics and Microsoft Remote Desktop
Interaction
Prior to release 4.0, RGS Sender for Windows could not coexist on systems enabled
for Windows Remote Desktop connections. At release 4.0, connections made with
either HP Remote Graphics or Windows Remote Desktop will work. Simultaneous
desktop sharing, however, is not possible.
A RGS connection to a sender already occupied with a Remote Desktop connection
only works if the user credentials match for both connections. This implies that the
same user wants access to transition from Remote Desktop to a RGS connection. If
allowed, the current Remote Desktop connection disconnects and the RGS Receiver
takes control of the current Windows desktop session. The current user does not log
off and work continues with the new connection. The reverse works as well. A user
who connects to his or her RGS session with a Remote Desktop connection displaces
the first connection. In this case, the Remote Desktop connection causes the RGS
Sender to disconnect all of its receivers (including all RGS collaborators). The
Windows desktop session remains active during the switch.
If a user disconnects from a system using the Windows Remote Desktop disconnect
button, the session remains logged in and all applications continue to run. The
session, however, locks its screen. Remote Graphics connections only work if the
credentials match the currently logged-in user.
If a user logs out of their session while using Remote Desktop, the RGS Sender
returns the system to its initial logged out state. Any authorized user can connect
and log into this system using Remote Graphics.
A Remote Desktop connection made to a sender already occupied with a RGS
connection by a non-matching user prompts the new user to logout the current RGS
user. Only administrators can logout other users. Non-administrators are refused
with a warning message about permissions. If Remote Desktop logs out the current
RGS user, then the sender disconnects all of its receivers (including all RGS
collaborators). Note: Under reverse circumstances for the above, RGS connections
will not logout an existing Remote Desktop user regardless of authority. RGS will
report an authorization failure message concerning a different user owning the
desktop.
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Optimizing Performance
This section provides suggestions on how to optimize performance in RGS.
Performance Tuning for all platforms:
1. Set the network to operate in Full-Duplex mode
To get the best performance, the network between the RGS Sender and RGS
Receiver should run in Full-duplex mode. Read the section on Network
information to learn how to turn on Full-duplex mode.
2. Set the background of the desktop to a solid color on the Sender
One Windows using the Display Properties panel, select the Desktop tab. Set
the background to None.
3. Set the Sender and Receiver to 32 bits-per-pixel
On Windows, using the Display Properties panel, select the Settings tab and
set the highest color setting in the color quality box.
4. Lower the display resolution
HP Remote Graphics Software is an image-based remote visualization
technology. Consequently, lowering the display resolution can significantly
improve performance.
Performance Tuning for Windows:
This section provides performance tuning tips for RGS on Windows.
1. Use the Windows Classic desktop theme on the Sender
The Windows XP themes are more complicated and hence require more data
to be sent. From the Display Properties panel, select the Themes tab. Select
Windows Classic in the Theme box.
2. Lock desktop icons on the Sender
From with the Display Properties panel select the Desktop tab. Select
Customize Desktop. On the Web tab, check Lock desktop items.
3. Disable transition effects
Don't use color or animated cursors on the Sender. Although HP Remote
Graphics Software displays color and animated cursors very well, this can
take up more network bandwidth and CPU utilization.
4. Sender Process Priorities
Sometimes, for example, rotating a model in a 3D mechanical design program
using the mouse appears sluggish and image updates are inconsistent. One
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possible reason for the problems is network performance. If the Sender runs
on a Windows operating system, it can be an operating system scheduling
issue. Sometimes this can be resolved by increasing the process priority of
the Sender. See Setting Sender Priorities for further details.
Performance Tuning for Linux and HP-UX:
1. On a HP-UX sender move the window position feedback window to the edge of
the screen
On HP-UX systems running the CDE window manager, a window position
feedback dialog is displayed in the middle of the screen when windows are
moved around. Configure the window to be placed to the edge of the screen.
Doing this will allow windows to move more quickly.
There are two Dtwm resources that can be changed: feedbackGeometry or
showFeedback. To move the feedback window to the upper-left portion of the
screen, add one of the following entries to the Xdefaults file:
•
Dtwm*feedbackGeometry: +0+0 - This will force the feedback window
to the upper-left portion of the screen
•
Dtwm*showFeedback: none - This will totally turn off the feedback
window
•
Dtwm*showFeedback: -move - This will disable the feedback window
during window moves.
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Utilities
The HP Remote Graphics Software comes with the following utilities to help the user
set-up their systems.
Microsoft Windows Specific Utilities:
•
RGS Diagnostic Tool: At the end of a normal installation of the Windows
version of the RGS Sender, the RGS Diagnostic Tool runs to detect common
issues that can prevent remote connections. This tool does not run as a part of
an unattended install. The tool is installed in the RGS Sender installation folder
and is available for running any time after an installation.
The left panel with the title Test Name shows the list of tests that run.
Selecting a test with the mouse will display additional information in the right
panel with the title Results. The Rerun Tests button on the bottom left
reruns all tests. The example window shows that all tests have passed with
the exception of the Multiple Sessions test. To determine what this test
looked for, why it failed, whether this failure would prevent connections and
how to fix the problem on this system, simply select the Multiple Sessions test
title to display its details in the Results panel.
The RGS Diagnostic tool can be run any time after RGS Sender installation. To
execute, use Windows Explorer to display the RGS Sender installation folder
and locate a program called rgdiag.exe with the RGS icon. On a 32-bit
Windows system, this is normally located at:
C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\rgdiag.exe
On a 64-bit Windows system, this is normally located at:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\rgdiag.exe
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Using Remote Graphics Software
Double click the application to launch the diagnostic tool. If the tool runs
while connected to the sender through Windows Remote Desktop, the RDP
Session tests will fail. This is normal. Viewing the test results will show that
the currently active Remote Desktop session caused the failure. The current
session will prevent the sender from allowing further connections if attempted
using usernames that differ from the current session.
•
RGS Admin Tool: The RGS Admin Tool can be used to enable and disable
automatic updates from OpenGL and Direct3D applications.
On a 32-bit Windows system, this is normally located at:
C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\rgadmin.exe
On a 64-bit Windows system, this is located at:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Hewlett-Packard\Remote Graphics
Sender\rgadmin.exe
Double-click the application to launch the RGS Admin tool. This application
must be run using an account with Administrator permissions.
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Usage and Performance
This section covers troubleshooting networking configuration, graphics, cpu, remote
audio, and remote USB.
Troubleshooting Network Configuration
This section describes troubleshooting the network.
1. Image update rate appears slow:
Troubleshooting network issues is difficult. Although the HP Remote Graphics
Software is capable of excellent performance, if your network does not
support the required bandwidth and latency, Remote Graphics Software will
not run efficiently. If your network is not configured optimally, you may
experience problems.
The computer's NIC will auto-negotiate the network speed with the network
switches that are present on the local network. The negotiated speed can
vary from 10Mb half duplex (HD) to 10Gb full duplex (FD). Ideally most
modern NICs and switches negotiate the highest possible speed available. In
the real world, unless the network was carefully designed for maximum
throughput, the settings in the NICs and switches will auto-negotiate to a
sub-optimal speed. By understanding this effect, the NIC and switches can be
configured properly such that the highest speed possible is achieved. If the
NICs and switches are configured to auto-negotiate properly, you can leave
the settings to auto-negotiate. If you want to force the network to operate at
a particular speed, the settings in the NICs and switches can be hard-coded.
You must be careful with these settings though. If they are not setup such
that the NICs and switch settings complement each other, the network will
operate with poor performance.
o
Configuring the NIC on Windows
You change the link speed and duplex on Microsoft Windows by
opening the Device Manager. Open up the Control Panel -> System
-> Hardware Tab -> Device Manager button. Once the Device
Manager dialog is open, click the + next to Network adapters. Then,
right-click on the adapter that you want to change and select
Properties. Click the Advanced tab. Each network adapter has its own
properties/settings that can be changed. The property that affects the
link speed and duplex is usually named "Link Speed & Duplex". Click
that property. If you decide that Auto-negotiation is what you want,
pick the Auto Detect entry in the "Value" box. If you want to hardcode the speed and duplex, always choose the fastest link your
network can support and always choose the Full-duplex setting.
o
Configuring the NIC on Linux
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On Linux systems, there are two tools that can be used (mii-tool &
ethtool) to configure networking. If the mii-tool does not work for a
particular system, use ethtool. Do the following to get and set the
network characteristics on Linux:
To get the LAN characteristics for interface 0, as root, type:
$ /sbin/mii-tool eth0
or
$ /usr/local/sbin/ethtool eth0
To set the LAN characteristics for a 100 Mbit connection running fullduplex mode, as root, type:
$ /sbin/mii-tool -F 100baseTx-FD
or
$ /usr/local/sbin/ethtool -s eth0
full autoneg off
o
speed 100
duplex
Configuring the NIC on HP-UX
On HP-UX systems, do the following to get and set the network
characteristics:
To get the LAN characteristics type:
$ /usr/sbin/lanadmin -x 0
To set the LAN characteristics for a 100 Mbit connection running in fullduplex mode, as root type:
$ /usr/sbin/lanadmin -X 100FD 0
Remote Graphics Software depends on low network latency and reasonably
fast network bandwidth.
There are several methods to test and measure the network bandwidth,
latency, and the number of hops between Sender and Receiver computers:
•
Use the ping command to measure network latency. From a command
prompt on Windows or a terminal window on UNIX, execute ping
hostname. This will report the network latency.
Note: Be sure the ping protocol (ICMP) is not blocked by a firewall.
Windows can also be setup with IPSec filters - be sure there is no IPSec
filter policy disabling ICMP traffic.
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•
Use Traceroute or tracert to measure the network latency between two
systems. Traceroute will report the number of hops it takes to get to a
system in addition to the network latency. (Traceroute is available on
Unix systems; tracert is available on Windows systems.)
•
Use ttcp to measure the network bandwidth. ttcp should be available
here: http://www.pcausa.com/Utilities/pcattcp.htm
Troubleshooting
If you are still not satisfied with your network performance, look at the log
files on your network switch (if the Receiver is plugged into one). A significant
number of errors on the switch port may signify that the computer or network
is not configured correctly. Work with your IT organization to optimize your
system and network configuration.
2. Can't connect from an RGS Receiver to a Linux Sender:
The default on RedHat Linux is to bind the machine name to the loopback
interface in the /etc/hosts file:
127.0.0.1
blade2
localhost.localdomain
The RGS Sender will not accept remote connections with this configuration.
Edit the /etc/hosts file and bind the machine name to its proper IP address
as follows:
127.0.0.1
localhost
88.1.89.122 blade2
localhost.localdomain
blade2.bigmoney.com
Troubleshooting Graphics and CPU Performance
The single most dominant factor impacting performance on the sender is the framebuffer read performance of the graphics card. Frame-buffer read performance of at
least ten frames-per-second is recommended for optimum performance of HP
Remote Graphics Software.
The HP Remote Graphics Software uses the graphics card to accelerate the rendering
of the image being displayed on the monitor. After the desktop on the remote
system is modified, the Sender reads the rendered image from the frame-buffer, and
then compresses and transmits the image to the Receiver.
On Windows systems, use BltTest to test the frame-buffer read performance of the
server. This application is available here: http://www.stereopsis.com/blttest/.
If image updates from the Sender to the Receiver appear slow and erratic, the
Sender might not be getting enough of the CPU to do timely image updates. If the
Sender is running on a Windows operating-system, it can be an operating-system
scheduling issue. Sometimes this can be resolved by increasing the process priority
of the Sender. Please see the section Setting Sender Priorities for further details.
Troubleshooting Remote Audio
This section describes troubleshooting remote audio.
1. Disabling Audio on a Sender for Windows:
Most audio devices will allow the sender speakers to be disabled while still
allowing audio to arrive at the receiver. This is done by enabling the mute for
the master volume control through the Sounds and Audio Devices control
panel or through the Volume icon in the taskbar. The Volume icon in the
taskbar will change when mute is enabled.
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Enabling mute on some devices will prevent audio from arriving at the
receiver. The Realtek audio device used in the HP xw4300 is known to have
this issue. One possible solution when running the 32 bit version of Windows
XP is to disable the audio device prior to installing the sender. This will cause
the HP Remote Audio device driver to be installed. The real audio device and
the HP Remote Audio device should not be enabled at the same time. The
sender will connect to the first audio device it detects, which may not be the
device that is selected by the user.
2. RGS Receiver Audio Controls Are Disabled on a Receiver for Linux:
The audio controls will be disabled when the receiver cannot open or
communicate with the JACK audio server (jackd). The status can be
determined with the hprgsaudio script:
•
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/hprgsaudio status
This reports the existence of a user-owned jackd audio server.
•
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/hprgsaudio start
This will attempt to manually start of the jackd audio server if it is not
running.
•
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/hprgsaudio stop
This will attempt to manually stop the jackd audio server if unused by
rgreceiver.
•
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/hprgsaudio restart
This will attempt to shutdown and restart jackd if possible.
The hprgsaudio script should always be the preferred method of managing
jackd.
Note: Audio is not supported on HP-UX.
3. No Audio on Windows Receiver:
Verify that your local audio device is working. The volume control slider on
the Receiver should play the default beep when released. Make certain that
the mute is not enabled. Refer to the Windows Sender Audio Installation
section for information on selecting the mixer as the input line. Refer to the
Windows Sender Audio Calibration for information on how to ensure the
volume levels are not too low. Make sure the mute is not enabled on the
Wave line of the sender or receivers Volume Control.
4. No Audio on Linux Receiver:
Installations that fail to yield any sound should observe the following
checklist:
1. Verify the sender system is configured properly to use the correct
recording device and is recording from the correct source.
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2. Verify the JACK and ALSA components are installed and configured
properly on the receiver system. To see if the modules are present, as
root, type /sbin/lsmod. The modules show up as snd-*-* names.
They usually appear by either direct loading or system initialization in
the /etc/modules.conf [2.4 kernel] and /etc/modprobe.conf [2.6
kernel]. Examine these files for extraneous or duplicate configuration
lines.
3. Unset the channel "mute" and increasing "volume" settings with
volume controls such as /usr/bin/alsamixer - channels are unmuted with the "m" command and volume is increased by using arrow
keys in a terminal window.
4. Check alternate audio ports on your workstation with audio earphones
(in case the speaker is not active or provided).
5. The chipset was unrecognized by the provided source bundles - visit
the project sites to update your systems (after updating the script
rgs_audio_support).
6. On some sound hardware, ALSA mixer controls do not work as
expected. Try running alsamixer in a terminal window or your
favorite sound mixer application. Manually adjust the volume sliders in
conjunction with the volume slider in the Receiver's Control Panel.
Sometimes a sound device “Master Volume” will get mapped to the
wrong slider.
7. If you have a sound card installed in your system with multiple lineouts, be sure you are plugged into the correct one.
8. On some hardware, the headphones JACK might be inactive when
running ALSA sound drivers. Try plugging into the line-out in the back
of your machine.
5. Validating the JACK/ALSA installation on a Linux Receiver:
When the RGS Receiver starts it invokes the jack sound server (jackd) in the
background. When JACK is running it has control of the ALSA drivers on your
system and prevents other applications from being able to access the ALSA
drivers. Attempting to use another audio application that uses ALSA while the
RGS Receiver is active may cause unknown behavior. The behavior could be
observed as the audio from an application appearing to stop or causing the
application to hang. The rgreceiver.sh script attempts to minimize the use
of the jackd sound server.
Users can check the state of the ALSA sound drivers by playing any WAV file.
On most Linux installations there are WAV files in /usr/share/sounds. Use
the simple ALSA player /usr/bin/aplay to test the audio. Be sure to try this
when rgreceiver.sh is not in use and the RGS Receiver application has
halted.
The script hprgsaudio can determine the state of the JACK sound server
(jackd). Users who own the jackd process can inquire:
•
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/hprgsaudio status
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With ALSA working, users can validate JACK by performing the following
steps:
1. Ensure that the ALSA device is properly configured and can be heard
through the desired port, i.e., headphone jack, speaker, etc.
2. Determine that no other jackd process is running:
3. ps -ef | grep jackd
The following steps connect a simple beeping client to a JACK sound server
daemon:
4. jackd -d alsa hw:0 &
# start jackd
5. jack_metro -b 120 &
# audio client
6. jack_lsp -c
# display connections
7. jack_connect "metro:120_bpm" \ "alsa_pcm:playback_1"
Note: jack_lsp may suggest an alternate PCM playback channel based
on your hardware - use that for the jack_connect command
Other JACK tutorial ideas can be found at:
http://dis-dot-dat.net/jacktuts/starting/compiling.html
6. Cannot connect to running jackd process on Lunux Receiver:
You may not own the executing sound server process (i.e., your user Ids
(UID) may not match). Currently JACK systems only support client-server
combinations where the UIDs match. If UIDs do not match, you will often see
a client connection failure message:
jack server not running?
Troubleshooting Remote USB
HP Remote Graphics Software supports a Remote USB capability. This allows a user
to connect any number of USB devices to a local RGS Receiver system and have the
devices appear connected to the RGS Sender system.
Currently only a single Sender can receive the Remote USB device connections. If
you have problems connecting a Remote USB device, the following checklist may
help to identify the problem:
1. HP Blade Workstations Only:
Remote USB is only supported on an HP Blade Workstation Client receiver
system connected to a HP Blade Workstation sender system. In addition, the
Sender and Receiver versions must match. See the USB Remote
Requirements section for further details.
2. HP Remote Virtual USB Driver:
Verify that the HP Remote Virtual USB driver is installed and active on the HP
Remote Graphics sender system. Open the Windows XP Device Manager and
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Troubleshooting
verify that HP Remote Virtual USB is listed under Universal Serial Bus
Controllers. The following panel shows the HP Remote Virtual USB is properly
installed and configured.
If the driver is not reported, reinstall the RGS Sender Software on the HP
Blade Workstation sender system. During installation, verify that the Remote
USB box is checked in the Configuration window as shown in the next panel:
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3. Enable Remote USB:
Verify that the receiver has enabled Remote USB. Make certain that the
"Enable Remote USB" box is checked under the USB option tab of the RGS
Control Panel as shown below:
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Troubleshooting
4. Supported USB Devices:
Verify that the USB device is supported for remote connection. Not all USB
devices are supported by the current version of HP Remote Graphics
Software.
5. USB Device Drivers and Program Support:
Verify that the device drivers and programs required by the device are
installed and available on the Sender system. Many USB devices require
manufacturer-supplied software to work on a system. This software must
often be installed before the USB device is connected to the system.
6. Check USB cable Connections:
Verify that the USB device is physically connected to the Receiver system.
Check to see that it has power and is turned on. Some devices may require
that the user initiate an action before it connects. For example, Palm PDA
devices require starting a HotSync operation for the device to connect and
appear on the remote Sender system.
To further verify your connections, recognized devices on the Receiver system
appear in the Proc file system under the /proc/devices/usb_remote
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
directory. At least two files appear in this directory for a single connected
device:
a. /proc/devices/usb_remote/devices - File contains a list of
recognized devices by the Receiver system.
b. /proc/devices/usb_remote/# - If only one USB device is recognized,
the "devices" file will have a single entry, 192. The file descriptor
named 192 is the Remote USB device. Dumping this file with 'cat
192', for example, displays specific data about device 192. This should
reflect the connected USB device. If multiple devices are connected,
then each will have a file descriptor numbered consecutively starting
at 192.
7. Directory Mode and Enterprise Service Mode:
If running in Directory Mode or Enterprise Service mode, the sender system
must be selected before connecting to any systems. If a different sender
system is required after connection, then all systems must be disconnected, a
new sender system selected in the Receiver Control Panel, and then all
senders can be reconnected.
8. Reset the USB Device:
Press the reset button on the device if it has a reset button. If the device has
entered into a bad state, it may fail to connect. Pressing the reset may allow
the device to connect.
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Troubleshooting
Known Issues and Limitations
This section describes a list of known issues and limitations of the HP Remote
Graphics Software.
General Issues:
1. Switching Network Interfaces:
The Sender does not transition well when switching network interfaces or
hopping from one network interface to another. The Sender must be restarted so that it can re-discover the correct interface.
2. Multi-homed Systems:
Receivers that run on systems that are multi-homed might not work correctly.
The following multi-homed scenarios are presented:
•
Suppose a laptop is connected into the LAN through an Ethernet NIC
with a CAT5 cable and another Wireless NIC running 802.11b. When
the Receiver running on the laptop connects to the Sender, the system
sometimes gets confused as to what NIC should support the
connection. Disabling one of the NICs will allow the Receiver to
properly connect to the Sender.
•
The Sender is running on a system that is using the LAN through an
Ethernet NIC with a CAT5 cable. Then, if the LAN cable is unplugged
and a Wireless NIC is started, the Sender will no longer function
properly, since it is listening to connections from RGS Receivers on a
"dead" NIC. Simply restarting the RGS Sender will enable the Sender
to use the Wireless NIC, and will allow the RGS Receiver to connect
again.
•
Suppose a Sender is running on a machine with two Ethernet NICs,
where each NICs is using a CAT5 cable. The NIC that is listed first, for
example when the Windows command ipconfig /all is run, will be
the NIC that the Sender binds to. If it is desirable that the Sender runs
using the other NIC, change the binding order of the NIC in the
system. On Windows this is done by bringing up the "Network
Connections" dialog in the Control Panel. In the Advanced menu, select
"Advanced Settings" to bring up the "Advanced Settings" dialog. Select
the "Adapter and Bindings" tab. Here you can move the preferred NIC
to the top of the binding order.
3. Remote Audio Issues:
Audio Not Continuous:
Low bandwidth connections can cause discontinuities in the audio stream.
Reducing the quality and turning off stereo may improve the audio quality.
Some high priority CPU intensive tasks may disrupt the audio stream. The
Windows Task Manager may help you identify such a task. Another possible
problem may be a bad network setup.
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PC Speaker Sounds Not Working:
The Sender will capture all audio information sent through the mixer. This
includes most audio alerts, MIDI, Direct Sound and Direct Music. Sounds
generated by the PC Speaker are not captured by the sender and will not be
transmitted.
Audible Pops and Glitches in Sound:
Most likely this is because the network bandwidth and or system resources
are starving the audio streaming from continuous play.
•
Try a lower audio quality setting to reduce network bandwidth usage.
•
Be sure you system is not doing something so computationally
intensive that it is starving RGS from keeping up with graphics and
audio processing.
Enabling Audio Causes Continuous Network Traffic:
When the sender detects an audio signal, that signal is sent to the receiver. If
the audio device on the sender is silent, there should not be any network
traffic due to audio. If the audio device is generating a large amount of noise,
that noise may get interpreted as an audio signal and get sent to the receiver.
This may occur when something is connected to the "Line In" port of the
audio device. Reducing volume levels or disconnecting these external devices
may help reduce the interference.
4. Network Timeout Issues:
The Remote Display Window repeatedly dims out and displays a connection
warning message:
This is likely caused by frequent network disruptions between the Receiver
and Sender. The dimming of the display serves as a notification to the enduser that the Remote Display Window may reflect stale information. If
frequent notifications are annoying and the network issues do not improve,
then the user should refer to the section “Using Timeouts” and adjust the
Receiver’s warning timeout value found on the Receiver Control Panel or the
property Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Warning.
The Remote Display Window dims, the Receiver disconnects, and it displays a
“Connection closed” error dialog, but the user can often immediately connect
in again:
Most likely network connectivity between the Receiver and Sender was
temporarily lost for some reason. Other possibilities include
130
•
the Sender has ungracefully terminated
•
the Sender system experienced some sort of failure
•
the Sender system’s cpu utilization prevented the Sender from making
progress, or
•
the length of this connectivity loss exceeds the Receiver’s error
timeout value, controlled by the Receiver’s
Troubleshooting
Rgreceiver.Network.Timeout.Error property so the Receiver
disconnected.
If this condition persists, then it is likely that network disruptions are
exceeding the Receiver’s error timeout value. If this is a network issue and is
not resolvable, then the user might consider adjusting the error timeout of
the Receiver to reduce Receiver disconnection. Additionally, the Sender
timeout might need to be increased too. Please refer to the section Using
Timeouts for further details.
When connecting to a Linux or HP-UX system, the PAM authentication dialog
displayed by the Receiver does not appear long enough to enter the user’s
credentials such as username and password:
This is likely caused by too small of a Receiver’s dialog timeout value. Please
refer to the section “Using Timeouts” for further details on setting timeouts.
The user should first check the Receiver Control Panel to determine the
Network dialog timeout setting and adjust as appropriate.
When connecting to a Sender, the authorization dialog is not displayed long
enough for the user to respond to it:
This is likely caused by too small of a Sender’s dialog timeout value. Please
refer to the section Using Timeouts for further details on the property
Rgsender.Network.Timeout.Dialog. The default value for this property is 15
seconds.
When connecting to a Linux or HP-UX system the PAM authentication often
fails:
There are several reasons why this might occur:
•
PAM may be configured incorrectly
•
the user could be entering incorrect credentials, or
•
the timeouts are too short.
Please refer to the section Installing the Sender to understand if PAM is
correctly configured. Please refer to the section Using Timeouts for further
details on setting timeouts. The user could try increasing the Receiver’s
network dialog timeout as well as the Sender’s error and dialog timeouts to
see if this helps. If this does not help and the user is convinced that the
timeouts are not being exceeded, then it is likely a PAM authentication
configuration problem.
The Remote Display Window is not updating and appears to be hung:
Most likely a network disruption. The user can adjust the warning timeout to
get notification when this occurs. The user can also adjust the error timeout
to disconnect and dismiss the Remote Display Window sooner. The default
warning timeout is two seconds. The default error timeout is 30 seconds.
Please refer to the section Using Timeouts for further details on setting the
Receiver timeouts.
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Increasing the Receiver error dialog timeout doesn’t appear to have an effect
and the Receiver still disconnects:
Either a network failure results in detecting lost connectivity by the Receiver
(resulting in disconnected connections) or the Sender’s timeouts are shorter
than the Receiver’s timeouts and the Sender disconnects the Receiver. It is
not always the case that network error timeouts are honored. A network error
timeout only establishes an upper bound on the duration of retries before
returning with an error. If the system determines that network connectivity is
lost and an error returns by the network stack to the Receiver, then the
connection will disconnect sooner than the error timeout setting. If the
Sender’s timeout values are shorter than the Receiver’s, then the Sender may
close the connection sooner than the Receiver, disconnecting the Receiver. If
the issue continues, the user can consider increasing the Sender's error
timeout value. Please refer to the section Using Timeouts for further details
on setting timeouts.
Microsoft Windows Specific Issues:
1. Cannot Connect to Sender:
There are several common system setup issues that can prevent a connection
to the RGS Sender. The RGS Diagnostic Tool programmatically detects some
of these problems and suggests possible solutions. Please refer to the RGS
Diagnostic Tool section.
2. Guest Login Access:
By default, Microsoft Windows XP allows any user who can access your
computer over the network to login with Guest access. We believe this
represents a security risk. To disable this policy, open the "Control Panel",
selecting "Administrative Tools", selecting "Local Security Policy", expanding
the "Local Policies", expanding "Security Options", and setting "Network
access: Sharing and security model for local accounts" to "Classic - local users
authenticate as themselves". Click here for more information on this issueGo
to
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddoc
s/en-us/lpe_overview.mspx for more information on this issue.
3. Blank Password:
The RGS Sender will not allow a connection for an account with a blank or
undefined password. All accounts on the machine running the RGS Sender
should have password protection prior to connection.
4. Microsoft XP SP2 Firewall:
Installation of Microsoft Windows XP SP2 prevents Remote Graphics Software
from starting. Microsoft Windows XP SP2 by default enables a firewall. When
the Receiver trys to connect to a Sender, if the firewall is not configured
correctly, the firewall will ask the user to allow the connection. On the
Sender, the firewall blocks the Sender from starting. This can also be
configured. Please refer to the engineering
advisory(http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp
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Troubleshooting
?objectID=PSD_WO040917_CW01) for more details on how to resolve this
issue.
5. OpenGL Applications Not Starting:
Previous versions of HP Remote Graphics required the manual placement of
the HP Remote Graphics OpenGL32.dll library into the application's directory.
This library may cause some applications to fail on startup. Automatic updates
of OpenGL applications are now supported and the HP Remote Graphics
OpenGL32.dll library is no longer required. See Enabling OpenGL Applications
On Windows for more details.
If the use of the HP Remote Graphics OpenGL32.dll is still required (the
method for enabling automatic 3D updates is disabled), some OpenGL
applications (e.g.: PTC ProEngineer or Google Earth) will not start with the
Window's HP Remote Graphics Software Sender installed.
Only the following versions of ProEngineer are compatible with Remote
Graphics OpenGL32.dll:
Pro/E Wildfire 2.0 - all datecodes
Pro/E WildFire 1.0 - datecodes 2003051 or later
Pro/E 2001 - datecodes 2004290 or later
6. Accelerated DirectDraw Not Available:
The HP Remote Graphics Driver will cause accelerated DirectDraw to become
disabled. Many DirectDraw applications though, will continue to work as
expected. Your mileage may vary.
7. Video Overlay Planes Are Not Supported:
Video overlay planes are not supported. Some media players that use video
overlay planes will not update. This can often be resolved by disabling the use
of video overlay planes in the media player.
8. OpenGL Overlay Planes Are Not Supported:
OpenGL overlay planes are not support using RGS Sender for Windows. The
use of overlay planes can be often be disabled.
9. Full-screen and DOS Applications Are Not Supported:
Full-screen applications, such as DOS prompts and games, are not supported.
If you attempt to create a full-screen DOS window, the window will be reset
to the normal size.
10. Inability to Connect to Senders on HP xw6200 and xw8000 System:
Connections to the Sender may not appear to work on HP xw8200/xw6200
systems. This can sometimes be related to Microsoft Window's APIPA
(Automatic Private IP Addressing). APIPA can cause the Remote Graphics
Sender to open sockets on private IP addresses. The private IP addresses are
not visible from the RGS Receiver so connections will not work. You can verify
if the Sender is using private IP addresses by typing netstat -n -a in a
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command window. If the IP address associated with the Sender ports
(listening port 42966) are private, then APIPA is probably at fault. Consult the
Microsoft's APIPA WEB site for further information, including how to disable
APIPA
here(http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/res
kit/enus/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/reskit/enus/prjj_ipa_eiih.asp).
11. Remote Cursors Not Available During Login:
When a user on the Sender system is using the mouse on the Login Desktop,
mouse updates will not be visible on any Receiver.
12. Remote Audio Issues:
ToggleKeys Sound Not Working:
The Accessibility control in Windows will play a sound when some control keys
are pressed. This sound is not heard on the receiver because it is played
through the PC Speaker. See the section on PC Speaker Sounds Not Working.
No Audio With Multiple Audio Devices:
The HP Remote Graphics Software sender will open up the device that is
registered as the default audio device. The sender is a service that is running
in a different context. If you have multiple audio devices, it may choose a
different device than what the user has selected as the default. Disable the
extra audio device to ensure the sender uses the correct device. See the
Windows Sender Audio Installation section to setup the audio device after
disabling the extra audio device.
13. Image updates from the Sender to the Receiver appear slow and erratic:
For example, rotating a model in a 3D mechanical design program using the
mouse appears sluggish and image updates are inconsistent. One possible
reason for the problems is network performance. If the Sender is running on
a Windows operating-system, it can be an operating-system scheduling issue.
Sometimes this can be resolved by increasing the process priority of the
Sender. Please see the section Setting Sender Priorities for further details.
14. Easy Login Connections Don't Seem to be Enabled:
There are several common system setup issues that can prevent an Easy
Login connection to the RGS Sender. The RGS Diagnostic Tool
programmatically detects some of these problems and suggests possible
solutions. Please refer to the RGS Diagnostic Tool section.
Linux or HP-UX Specific Issues:
1. Hidden Receiver Control Panel:
The Receiver control panel will not stay on top of other windows in the
desktop, and can therefore get lost. Also, for session managers that support
multiple desktops, the Receiver control panel will not, by default, show up in
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Troubleshooting
all desktops. Read the Setup Mode section to learn how to bring the Receiver
control panel to the front.
2. Geometry Feedback Window And Performance:
Performance of window moves using a HP-UX Sender over a low-bandwidth
network connection is slow. This is related to the geometry feedback window
placed on top of the window that you are moving. This can be resolved by
disabling the geometry feedback window or moving the geometry feedback
window to a corner of the screen. Read the Optimizing Performance section to
learn how to relocate the feedback window.
3. 3D Animation Loops And Performance (Linux only):
When sharing an application that is running a 3D animation loop, such as a
continuously rotating object, the application seems to run smoothly at first for
a period of time (5 to 30 seconds), and then abruptly slows down. It will run
smoothly, then stop, then run smoothly again, then stop again, over and
over. The periodicity of the abruptness is around 1 to 2 seconds. The interval
of stopping is around 250 msec and is quite noticeable.
The problem is with the Linux scheduler, such that after a period of time, the
scheduler decides to give the animation loop process a higher priority and
therefore more CPU cycles, which effectively gives the X server process less
cycles. To temporarily fix the problem, simply reduce the priority of the
animation loop process (i.e. - "renice priority pid"). By default, priority is
set to 0. Simply bump the priority one at a time until the application runs
smoothly again.
4. Full-screen Crosshair Cursors:
Some applications that use large crosshair cursors (e.g.: PTC's ICEM Surf uses a full-screen crosshair cursor) don't display correctly on the Receiver.
The full-screen crosshair cursors can be disabled by typing the following a
terminal window:
/usr/contrib/bin/X11xprop -root -remove
_SGI_CROSSHAIR_CURSOR
/usr/contrib/bin/X11xprop -root -remove _HP_CROSSHAIR_CURSOR
This will force the application to use a real X cursor, which will display
correctly on the Receiver.
5. Gamma Correction On Receiver:
The gamma in a 3D Application on the Sender can look incorrect when
displayed on a Receiver. This is because the gamma of the Receiver's monitor
does not correctly match the gamma of the monitor on the Sender. To correct
this, any tool that will adjust the gamma for a display can be used. Some
tools will adjust the gamma for the entire monitor, while others will adjust the
gamma on a per window basis. Those that can adjust only the Receiver's
window will provide the best results.
6. Transparent Overlay Windows (aka Glass-bottom windows) Are Not
Supported (HP-UX only):
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Transparent Overlay Windows - Certain applications, primarily 3D
applications, create windows in the overlay planes that entirely cover the
main application windows that exist in the image planes. These overlay
windows are primarily transparent and are used to contain text or other
rendered images that should not be drawn into the image planes of the
application. These overlay transparent windows are also called glass-bottom
windows, as they can be used to "see into" the image planes. Applications
that use glass-bottom windows do not currently share well with Remote
Graphics Software.
This problem is present only on HP-UX systems with graphics devices that 1)
support overlay planes, 2) have the overlay planes enabled, and 3) run
applications that create glass-bottom windows. As a work-around, to enable
these applications to share properly over a Remote Graphics Software
connection, the overlay planes can be disabled. Most applications will still run
correctly with the overlays disabled. To disable the overlays, the X server's
configuration file must be edited. The following table shows where the various
configuration files exist:
X server (platform)
Configuration File
Xhp (PA HP-UX)
/etc/X11/X0screens
Xf86 (PA HP-UX)
/etc/X11/XF86Config
The following X0screens entries will disable the overlays for an Xhp X server:
Screen /dev/crt
ScreenOptions
SuppressPseudoColorOverlayVisual
The following XF86Config entries will disable the overlays for an Xf86 X server
running ATI Fire GL-UX graphics:
Section "Device"
Identifier
Driver
VendorName
BoardName
Card
Option
Option
#EndSection
7. Remote Audio Issues (Linux
"hp Fire GL-UX"
"firegl123"
"hp"
"Fire GL-UX"
"Fire GL-UX"
"Overlay"
"false"
.... other options ....
only):
ALSA Quirks:
ALSA drivers can have problems mapping correct mixer channels to the
correct sliders. This means that on some more advanced or proprietary sound
hardware, the “Master Volume” control might incorrectly get mapped to the
“Headphones” slider or “Wave Mix” slider for example. The Receiver tries to
do its best to remedy these situations by adjusting common sliders like
“PCM,” “WAVE,” and “LINE” to appropriate levels, then attaching the volume
slider to “Master Volume” and the “Headphone” mixer channels. This should
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Troubleshooting
work for most systems… but if not, try manually playing with mixer settings
via the alsamixer in a terminal window or via your favorite mixer application.
JACK Sound Server:
JACK is a sound server that interfaces with the ALSA drivers. Once installed
and configured on your machine, this is your sound.
8. User-started X environments (startx) do not reliably support outside
connections:
Users who manually start X desktops (such as with startx ) from the console
command line will find that outside access attempts may not properly connect
or be authenticated. This stems primarily from incomplete PAM session
management and permissions to the console. Users should avoid this
condition and achieve login management through init-level 5 of the X server.
9. Improperly configured /etc/hosts table (Linux only):
The default on RedHat Linux is to bind the machine name to the loopback
interface in the /etc/hosts file:
127.0.0.1
blade2
localhost.localdomain
The RGS Sender will not accept remote connections with this configuration.
Edit the /etc/hosts file and bind the machine name to its proper IP address
as follows:
127.0.0.1
localhost
88.1.89.122 blade2
localhost.localdomain
blade2.bigmoney.com
10. Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) support:
Release 4.0.0 for Linux requires Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA)
support to be installed prior to RGS installation. If the RGS installation script
runs on a system without ALSA installed, the subsequent JACK Audio
Connection Kit (JACK) built will not be compatible with ALSA loaded anytime
after the fact. If this occurs, first install the necessary ALSA support drivers
and libraries and then re run the JACK install script as:
/opt/hpremote/rgreceiver/hp_rgs_4_audiosupport/rgs_audio_sup
port install
and answer "yes" to the prompts to re-install JACK.
For information on any additional issues and limitations, see the release notes on the
HP Remote Graphics Software CD.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Error Messages
The following table lists the errors that are reported by the HP Remote Graphics
Software Receiver.
Error
Description
Connection lost!
The RGS Sender has closed the connection. Possible
reasons include:
1. The Sender may have explicitly disconnected
your connection. For example a user may
have selected disconnect all connections from
the Sender icon or Sender GUI or the user
may have logged off.
2. Another user has connected to the Sender
using the same username and password.
3. If you connected to a desktop that was not
logged in and another user logged in your
connection will be disconnected.
4. If you were connected to a logged in desktop
and the logged in user disconnects your
connection will be disconnected too.
5. The network may have been disconnected,
closed, or temporarily disrupted.
6. The Sender service/daemon may have been
stopped, re-started, or killed.
7. The Sender system may have been
stopped/shutdown, or re-started.
8. If connecting to a UNIX system the X Server
may have been stopped or re-started.
9. The Sender or X Server may have experienced
a failure.
Unable to connect
to Sender!
1. The Receiver is unable to find the hostname or IP
address that was entered. Verify that the
hostname or ipaddress that you entered is
correct.
If this does not correct the problem then make
sure you can reach the Sender over the network.
Opening a Command Prompt, then execute:
ping hostname
or
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Troubleshooting
ping IP address
If no ping reply is received, the Sender is
unreachable or is not running.
If a ping reply is received, the Sender software
may not be running on the remote computer.
2. A Sender is not running on the system you are
attempting to reach. Verify that the Sender is
running on the system.
3. The Sender system is not started or connected to
the network. You could try a basic connectivity
test, such as ping.
4. The network is not configured correctly. For
example, DNS may not have resolved the name
of the Sender system correctly or your /etc/hosts
file, if using UNIX, does not have the proper
ipaddress mapped to the hostname. Try entering
the ipaddress of the Sender.
5. The Sender is started and listening on a different
network interface than the one you are
attempting to reach. This could be the case if the
Sender system has multiple NICs, it is a multihomed system, or there is a virtual ethernet
device installed. If this is true you may need to
specify the binding order of hostnames to
ipaddress.
6. If you are attempting to connect to a UNIX
system you may have entered an incorrect
screen number.
7. If the Sender system has changed networks and
been assigned a new ipaddress after the Sender
was started then you'll need to re-start the
Sender service/daemon.
Authentication
failed!
The Remote Graphics Software Sender has refused to
allow a connection. Possible reasons include the
following:
1. The authentication credentials that you
entered, such as domain name, user name
and password, are not valid or recognized by
the Sender system.
2. The Sender's authentication is not configured
appropriately. Please consult the User's
manual and README.txt for the latest
directions and issues with respect to
configuring authentication.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Directory not found
or not accessible!
The directory file is not available. Possible reasons
include:
1. The directory file name or location has been
mistyped.
2. The file has been moved or is no longer
available.
3. The network is down or experiencing a
disruption.
4. The user does not have read permission on
the file.
User not found in
directory!
The username of the current user of the HP Remote
Graphics Software Receiver is not found in the
directory file. Possible reasons include:
1. The username entered in the directory file
does not exactly match the real username.
2. The username of the current user is not
entered in the directory. If the directory file is
on a shared drive with restrictive permissions,
consult an IT specialist to add the proper
entry.
140
Authorization
failed!
The connection was authenticated, but another user
is already logged into the desktop of the Sender
system. When a connection is attempted to another
user's desktop, a dialog is displayed on the Sender
desktop asking the logged in user to allow the
connection. A user is not allowed to connect to
another user's desktop unless they are explicitly
allowed/authorized. Either the connection was not
granted access, or the dialog timed-out and the
connection was implicitly denied.
Error: Receiver
License Not Found!
A license was not found for the RGS Receiver.
Error: Receiver
License Invalid!
The license is invalid for the RGS Receiver.
Error: No license
found for the
sender you are
trying to connect
to!
A license was not found for the RGS Sender.
Error: License
Expired for the
sender you are
trying to connect
The license has expired for the RGS Sender.
Troubleshooting
to!
Error: License
Invalid for the
sender you are
trying to connect
to!
The license is invalid for the RGS Sender.
Could not create an
Enterprise
Directory Session!
The Receiver was started in Enterprise Service Mode
and it could not connect to the RGS Enterprise
Service. There are several possibilities including the
following:
Authentication to
the Enterprise
Directory Service
failed!
•
The hostname or ipaddress of the RGS
Enterprise Service specified on the command
line is incorrect.
•
The RGS Enterprise Service is not running.
The Receiver was started in Enterprise Service Mode
and the user was not authenticated. There are
several possibilities including the following:
•
The user entered incorrect credentials.
•
The Enterprise Service cannot validate the
users credentials.
Could not lookup
the users systems
on the Enterprise
Directory Service!
The Receiver was started in Enterprise Service Mode,
but the user was not found.
No systems were
assigned to the
user in the
Enterprise
Directory Service!
The Receiver was started in Enterprise Service Mode,
but no systems were assigned to the user.
Setup Mode hotkey
sequence too short.
The key sequence specified by the user is too short.
Setup Mode hotkey
sequence too long.
The key sequence specified by the user is too long.
Setup Mode hotkey
sequence may only
consist of Ctrl, Alt,
Shift and Space.
The key sequence specified by the user contains
invalid keys.
A space may only
be entered after
Ctrl, Alt or Shift is
pressed.
The Setup Mode hotkey sequence cannot start with a
space.
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Setup Mode hotkey
sequence is invalid.
The sequence has
been reset to the
default.
The Setup Mode hotkey sequence specified using a
property either on the command-line, property
configuration file, or RGS Enterprise Service, is
invalid and has been reset to the default.
Setup Mode hotkey
sequence is invalid.
The sequence has
been disabled.
The Setup Mode hotkey sequence specified using a
property either on the command-line, property
configuration file, or RGS Enterprise Service, is
invalid and the property
Rgreceiver.Hotkeys.IsMutable is disabled. Therefore
hotkeys have been disabled.
Connection denied!
The iLO remote
console is enabled.
The iLO remote console is enabled on the HP Blade
Workstation. The Blade must be configured in User
Mode before connections are allowed.
Unable to connect
to Sender:
This is usually indicative of a DNS error.
The Receiver was
unable to resolve
the specified
hostname or IP
Address. Verify
that you entered
the value correctly.
Unable to connect
to Sender:
The Receiver
resolved the
specified hostname
or IP address, but
cannot connect to
the Sender. Verify
that the system is
accessible on your
network and that
the Remote
Graphics Sender
service has been
started and is
listening on a pubic
IP address and is
not blocked by a
firewall.
142
The Receiver was able to lookup and resolve the
specified hostname or IP address. However, the
Receiver was unable to establish a connection to the
Sender. There are several possibilities such as the
Sender is not installed, the Sender is not running, the
Sender is listening on the wrong network interface, or
a firewall is blocking the Sender.
License and Support
End-user License Agreement
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS EQUIPMENT:
This End-User license Agreement ("EULA") is a legal agreement between (a) you
(either an individual or a single entity) and (b) Hewlett-Packard Company ("HP") that
governs your use of any Software Product, installed on or made available by HP for
use with your HP product ("HP Product"), that is not otherwise subject to a separate
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a EULA in its online documentation. The term "Software Product" means computer
software and may include associated media, printed materials and "online" or
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PRODUCT (HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE) WITHIN 14 DAYS FOR A REFUND SUBJECT
TO THE REFUND POLICY OF YOUR PLACE OF PURCHASE.
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a. Use. You may use the Software Product on a single computer ("Your Computer").
If the Software Product is provided to you via the internet and was originally licensed
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you subject to the terms and conditions of the software license agreement
accompanying such Freeware whether in the form of a discrete agreement, shrink
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
Freeware by you shall be governed entirely by the terms and conditions of such
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f. Recovery Solution. Any software recovery solution provided with/for your HP
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License and Support
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HP Remote Graphics 4.2.0 User's Guide
© 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained
herein is subject to change without notice. All other product names mentioned herein
may be trademarks of their respective companies. The only warranties for HP
products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements
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constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial
errors or omissions contained herein.
Rev. 10/03
355096-001
Amendment to End User License Agreement For HP Remote Graphics Software
For HP Remote Graphics Software, Section 1.a. is replaced by the following:
1.a. Use. You may use the Software Product on a single computer (“Your Computer”)
which is supported by the Software Product. If the Software Product is provided to
you via the internet and was originally licensed for use on more than one computer,
you may install and use the Software Product only on those computers. You may not
separate component parts of the Software Product for use on more than one
computer. You do not have the right to distribute the Software Product. You may
load the Software Product in Your Computer’s temporary memory (RAM) for
purposes of using the Software Product.
382263-003
146
License and Support
Contacting HP
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147
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