HP | E3000/IX | User's Manual | HP E3000/IX User's Manual

HP e3000/iX Network Planning and
Configuration Guide
HP e3000 MPE/iX Computer Systems
Edition 6
Manufacturing Part Number: 36922-90043
E0801
U.S.A. August 2001
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change
without notice.
Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this
material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard
shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for direct, indirect,
special, incidental or consequential damages in connection with the
furnishing or use of this material.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of
its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
This document contains proprietary information which is protected by
copyright. All rights reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation
without prior written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under
the copyright laws.
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to
restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in
Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.
Rights for non-DOD U.S. Government Departments and Agencies are
as set forth in FAR 52.227-19 (c) (1,2).
Acknowledgments
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.
Hewlett-Packard Company
3000 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, CA 94304 U.S.A.
© Copyright 1988–1992, 1994, 1998 and 2001 by Hewlett-Packard
Company
2
Contents
1. Network Configuration Overview
Pre-Configuration Hardware Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Pre-Configuration Software Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Configuration Process Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2. Networking Concepts
Network Environment Design Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Line Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Geographical Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared Dial Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-HP e3000 Nodes (Including PCs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applicable SYSGEN Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Ldevs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Interface and Link Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Network Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Priority of Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnetworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why Use Subnets?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Subnetting Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Subnet Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internetworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Full Gateways versus Gateway Halves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gateway Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Neighbor Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Neighbor Gateway Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Gateway Half Pair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Resolution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Domain Name Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When a Network Directory is Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning the Network Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying and Merging Network Directory Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Probe and Probe Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Probe and ARP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Design Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Configuration Maximums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
22
22
23
23
23
23
24
25
25
26
27
27
27
27
31
31
31
32
32
32
33
35
35
36
36
36
37
38
38
38
39
41
3. Planning Your Network
Drawing an Internetwork Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3
Contents
Communication Between Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Network Boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
IP Network Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Completing the Internetwork Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Drawing a Network Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
LAN Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
LAN Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
LAN Network Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
LAN Internet Routing Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Token Ring Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
FDDI Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
100VG-AnyLAN Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
100Base-T Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Point-to-Point Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Point-to-Point Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Point-to-Point Network Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Point-to-Point Internet Routing Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
X.25 Network Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
X.25 Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
X.25 Network Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
X.25 Internet Routing Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Gateway Half Pair Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Gateway Half Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Gateway Half Network Interface Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Network Directory Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
4. Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
LAN Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Token Ring Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
FDDI Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
100VG-AnyLAN Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
100Base-T Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Point-to-Point Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
X.25 Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
Neighbor Gateway Worksheet Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Neighbor Gateway Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Worksheet Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
4
Contents
5. Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start NMMGR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select NS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select Guided Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guided/Unguided Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perform Guided Network Transport Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
80
81
83
85
86
87
6. Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a LAN Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Configure a Token Ring Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Configure an FDDI Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Configure Neighbor Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Identify Neighbor Gateways (If Any Are Present) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Identify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
7. Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Neighbor Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specify Neighbor Gateways (If Any Are Present) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Node Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select a Node Mapping Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Shared Dial Node Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Direct Connect/Dial Node Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109
114
115
116
118
118
119
122
8. Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure X.25 Virtual Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Neighbor Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identify Neighbor Gateways (If Any Are Present) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
127
131
135
136
137
9. Configuring a Gateway Half
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
10. Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN
Validate the Network Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Cross-Validate in SYSGEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
5
Contents
11. Configuring the Network Directory
Open Network Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Select Update Directory Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Add Nodes to Network Directory File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Configure Path Report Data for a Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
12. Configuring Domain Name Files
Create or Modify the Resolver File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Create or Modify the Hosts File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Additional Domain Name Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Network Name Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Protocol Name Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Service Name Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
13. Configuring Logging
Access Logging Configuration Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Modify the Logging Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Enable Users for Individual Logging Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
Activate Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
14. Operating the Network
Start Links and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Start Software Loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Start a Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Start a Host-Based X.25 Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Start Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
Test Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190
Shut Down Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
A. MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Configuration Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Applications Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Obtaining Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Migration Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Before You Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
File Migration Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Additional Migration Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
File Conversion Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
When to Convert Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
Converting Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
6
Contents
Updating From a Previous MPE/iX Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Reconfiguration Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
B. NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unsupported Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration of Terminals and Printers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining Device Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differences in X.25 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1980 Versus 1984 CCITT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Level 3 Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Level 3 Access with NetIPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pad Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting NS 3000/V Configuration Files to NS 3000/iX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting Secondary NIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving NS 3000/V X.25 Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying NS 3000/V Configuration Files to NS 3000/iX System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using NMMGRVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating X.25 XL System Access Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving X.25 XL System Access Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Other Link Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying DTS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the DTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
202
202
202
202
203
203
203
204
204
204
204
205
205
206
207
207
208
209
210
210
211
211
211
212
C. NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
PAD Support: NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating from NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Host-Based Network Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using PC-Based Network Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving NS 3000/V PAD Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PAD Access Migration Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-Nailed Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nailed Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration of Nailed Versus Non-Nailed Devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving DTS Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the DTC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
214
215
215
215
215
216
216
216
216
217
217
7
Contents
D. PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
Notes on Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
Notes on Autonegotiation and Autosensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Quick Troubleshooting Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
8
Figures
Figure 2-1. Class C Address with Subnet Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Figure 2-2. Class C Address with Subnet Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Figure 2-3. Gateway Configuration Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Figure 3-1. Internetwork Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Figure 3-2. LAN Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Figure 3-3. Point-to-Point Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Figure 3-4. X.25 Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Figure 3-5. Gateway-Half Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Figure 4-1. LAN Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Figure 4-2. Token Ring Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Figure 4-3. FDDI Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Figure 4-4. 100VG-AnyLAN Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Figure 4-5. 100Base-T Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Figure 4-6. Point-to-Point Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Figure 4-7. X.25 Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Figure 4-8. X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Figure 4-9. Neighbor Gateway Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Figure 4-10. Reachable Network Configuration Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Figure 5-1. NMMGR Screen Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Figure 5-2. Open Configuration/Directory File Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Figure 5-3. Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Figure 5-4. NS Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Figure 5-5. Network Transport Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Figure 6-1. Configuring Screen Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Figure 6-2. LAN Configuration Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Figure 6-3. Token Ring Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Figure 6-4. FDDI Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Figure 6-5. Neighbor Gateways Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Figure 6-6. Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Figure 7-1. Point-to-Point Link Configuration Screen Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Figure 7-2. Point-to-Point Link Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Figure 7-3. Neighbor Gateway Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Figure 7-4. Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Figure 7-5. Shared Dial Node Mapping Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Figure 7-6. Direct Connect/Dial Node Mapping Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Figure 7-7. Using an @ for Mapping Non-Adjacent Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Figure 8-1. X.25 Link Screen Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Figure 8-2. NS Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Figure 8-3. X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
9
Figures
Figure 8-4. Neighbor Gateways Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Figure 8-5. Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Figure 9-1. Gateway Half Link Screen Flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Figure 9-2. Gatehalf Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Figure 11-1. Network Directory Configuration Screen Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Figure 11-2. Open Configuration/Directory File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Figure 11-3. Network Directory Main . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Figure 11-4. Network Directory Select Node Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Figure 11-5. Network Directory Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Figure 12-1. Sample Resolver Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Figure 12-2. Sample Hosts Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Figure 13-1. Logging Configuration Screen Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Figure 13-2. Netxport Log Configuration (1) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Figure 13-3. Netxport Log Configuration (2) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Figure 13-4. Netxport Log Configuration (3) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Figure 13-5. Netxport Log Configuration (4) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Figure 13-6. Netxport Log Configuration (5) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Figure 13-7. Netxport Log Configuration (6) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Figure 13-8. Netxport Log Configuration (7) Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Figure 13-9. Logging Configuration: Class Data Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
10
Tables
Table 2-1. Valid Addresses of Example Subnetwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Table 2-2. Configuration Maximums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Table 3-1. Internetwork Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Table 3-2. LAN Network Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Table 3-3. LAN Internet Routing Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Table 3-4. Point-to-Point Network Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Table 3-5. Point-to-Point Internet Routing Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Table 3-6. X.25 Network Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Table 3-7. X.25 Internet Routing Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Table 3-8. Gateway Half Network Interface Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Table 3-9. Network Directory Information Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Table 4-1. Configuration Worksheet Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Table 11-1. Path Type Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Table 13-1. Subsystem Activation/Deactivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Table B-1. Supported Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
11
Tables
12
Preface
This manual documents functionality for the MPE/iX releases, for
HP e3000 systems. It describes the concepts and terminology needed to
design an NS 3000/iX network and to plan the configuration process for
that network. It also provides step-by-step instructions to assist you in
configuring the network links for HP e3000 systems.
Audience
This manual is intended for network managers and planners who are
responsible for setting up and configuring a communications network.
To make the best use of this guide, you should be familiar with basic
MPE commands as well as with the NS 3000/iX product.
You should also be familiar with NMMGR, the tool used to configure
network connections. If not, refer to Using the Node Management
Services (NMS) Utilities for information.
Special Note
MPE/iX, Multiprogramming Executive with Integrated POSIX, is the
latest in a series of forward-compatible operating systems for the
HP e3000 line of computers.
In HP documentation and in talking with HP e3000 users, you will
encounter references to MPE XL, the direct predecessor of MPE/iX.
MPE/iX is a superset of MPE XL. All programs written for MPE XL will
run without change under MPE/iX. You can continue to use MPE XL
system documentation, although it may not refer to features added to
the operating system to support POSIX (for example, hierarchical
directories).
Finally, you may encounter references to MPE V, which is the operating
system for HP e3000s, not based on the PA_RISC architecture. MPE V
software can be run on the PA_RISC HP e3000s in what is known as
compatibility mode.
Organization
This manual is divided into the following chapters and appendixes:
Chapter 1 , “Network Configuration Overview,” provides information
you should know before you begin configuration.
Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” describes networking concepts and
provides information you need to know to plan your configuration.
Chapter 3 , “Planning Your Network,” will help you draw your network
map and fill out network worksheets as you plan your network,
internetwork, gateway, and network directory configuration.
Chapter 4 , “Planning for Node Configuration,” describes how to fill out
node worksheets before you start configuring network links for each
node. It includes a table listing the parameters that you will need to
enter during NMMGR guided configuration.
13
Chapter 5 , “Introductory Screens,” provides step-by-step instructions
for configuring NMMGR introductory screens.
Chapter 6 , “Configuring a LAN Node,” provides step-by-step
instructions for configuring IEEE802.3/Ethernet LAN, token ring, and
Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) links.
Chapter 7 , “Configuring a Point-to-Point Node,” provides step-by-step
instructions for configuring Point-to-Point (router) links.
Chapter 8 , “Configuring a X.25 Node,” provides step-by-step
instructions for configuring X.25 links.
Chapter 9 , “Configuring a Gateway Half,” provides step-by-step
instructions for configuring the interface between two gateway halves.
Chapter 10 , “Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” provides
step-by-step instructions for validating the network transport and
cross-validating with SYSGEN.
Chapter 11 , “Configuring the Network Directory,” provides step-by-step
instructions for configuring a network directory.
Chapter 12 , “Configuring Domain Name Files,” provides instructions
for configuring the domain name resolver.
Chapter 13 , “Configuring Logging,” provides step-by-step instructions
for configuring logging.
Chapter 14 , “Operating the Network,” shows you how to bring up and
shut down NS 3000 links and services.
Appendix A , “MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration,” provides general MPE/V
to MPE/iX migration information.
Appendix B , “NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX,” provides
X.25-specific information on migration from a node running NS X.25
3000/V Link to a node that will be running NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or
later. Appendix C does not apply if an MPE V-based node s being used
as an X.25 server for NS 3000/XL-based machines.
Appendix C , “NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS
3000/iX,” tells how to migrate NS 3000/V versions of PAD access to
NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later.
Glossary, contains terms applicable to the network configuration
process.
14
Related HP
Publications
The following manuals are referenced in this manual or may be of use
to you as you plan and configure your network.
Networking
• Using the Node Management Services (NMS) Utilities
• Configuring and Managing Host-Based X.25 Links
• Managing Host-Based X.25 Links Quick Reference Guide
• NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference Manual
• NS 3000/iX Operations and Maintenance Reference Manual
• NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual
• NetIPC 3000/XL Programmer’s Reference Manual
• Berkeley Sockets/iX Reference Manual
• Using NS 3000/iX Network Services
Datacommunica- Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial Devices
and Troubleshooting Terminal, Printer, and Serial Device Connections
tions and
Terminal
Using the OpenView DTC Manager
Subsystem
General
Information
System Startup, Configuration, and Shutdown Reference Manual
Hardware
Installation
Guides
• PCI 100Base-T Network Adapter Installation and Service Guide
MPE/iX Commands Reference Manual
• HP-PB 100Base-T Network Adapter Installation and Service Guide
• 8-Port Serial PCI ACC Multiplexer Installation and User’s Guide
• HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN Network Adapter Installation and Service
Guide
• HP-IB FDDI Adapter Installation Guide
15
16
1
Network Configuration
Overview
This manual provides step-by-step instructions you can use to configure
an HP e3000 node for network communications. You can use the
information to configure an IEEE 802.3/Ethernet, Token Ring, FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T, Point-to-Point (router), or X.25 node.
Before you begin configuration, you must ensure your network is
physically set up and ready for network configuration.
This chapter provides information you should know before you begin
configuration. It tells you what preparations you must make and what
items you will be configuring.
This chapter contains the following configuration information:
• Pre-configuration hardware check.
• Pre-configuration software check.
• Configuration process overview.
17
Network Configuration Overview
Pre-Configuration Hardware Check
Pre-Configuration Hardware Check
Before beginning the actual configuration process, check that the
hardware components required for NS 3000/iX have been installed and
verified according to the procedures in the hardware installation
manuals listed in the preface to this guide.
18
Chapter 1
Network Configuration Overview
Pre-Configuration Software Check
Pre-Configuration Software Check
Once you have verified that your hardware has been correctly installed,
verify that the appropriate software is installed by performing the
following steps:
1. Ensure that the Datacommunications and Terminal Subsystem
(DTS) has been configured. If DTS has not been configured, refer to
Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial
Devices and configure the DTS before proceeding.
2. Check that the data communications software has been installed
properly by running the NMMAINT program (NMMAINT.PUB.SYS),
which is supplied as part of the node management services.
NMMAINT will tell you if any software modules are missing or
invalid. See the Using the Node Management Services (NMS)
Utilities manual for a discussion of the NMMAINT program.
3. Whenever you receive a new version of the node management
services (NMS) software (which includes NMMGR), and you have
earlier versions of NMS, you first have to run a conversion program.
The conversion program, called NMMGRVER (NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS),
ensures that configuration files created with an earlier version of
NMMGR are converted to the latest format.
Chapter 1
19
Network Configuration Overview
Configuration Process Overview
Configuration Process Overview
The instructions in this guide explain how to configure each node on
your network by using a “guided” branch of Hewlett-Packard’s NMMGR
configuration program. The principal steps in this process are as
follows:
1. Plan your network before you begin NMMGR. Use the worksheets
provided in Chapter 4 , “Planning for Node Configuration,” to record
all the items NMMGR requires. (See Chapter 2 , “Networking
Concepts,” for information on networking concepts.)
2. Configure the transport and link by using NMMGR to modify the
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS file. The instructions for this step are contained
in this manual.
3. If the node being configured is part of an internet or is on a network
with non-HP nodes, add the path of the new node to its network
directory file. See Chapter 11 , “Configuring the Network Directory,”
for information on configuring the network directory, or if using DNS
for nodename resolution.
4. Validate the network transport. This step checks data consistency
between values entered on different NMMGR data entry screens.
Instructions for validating the network transport are located in
Chapter 10 , “Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN.”
5. Cross-validate NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS with the system configuration
files within SYSGEN. Cross-validation ensures that there are no
conflicts in the use of node names, device classes, and physical paths.
Even if validation and cross-validation were already done after
configuring DTS, you still have to validate and cross-validate again
after you configure the network transport and link. Instructions for
cross-validating are located in Chapter 10 , “Validating and
Cross-Validating with SYSGEN.”
6. Start the network (links and services) using the NETCONTROL and
NSCONTROL commands. See Chapter 14 , “Operating the Network,”
for information on starting links and services.
7. Verify the NS services configuration and confirm network
connectivity by running the QVALNS program. See Chapter 14 ,
“Operating the Network,” for information on running QVALNS.
20
Chapter 1
2
Networking Concepts
Planning a network or internetwork (collection of networks) is an
important process that must be done with care to ensure that the
network meets the needs of your organization. Many factors must be
taken into consideration when planning the network or internetwork:
for example, volume of usage over particular links, volume of CPU
usage of each node, physical layout needs and limitations (such as
geographical distances), and desirability of connections to
non-NS 3000/iX nodes.
This chapter provides information to help you design your network and
plan for configuration using NMMGR. The following network design
elements are discussed:
• Design considerations of the network environment
• Network interface and link types
• Subnetworks
• Internetworks
• Address resolution methods:
— Domain names
— Network directory
— Probe and probe proxy
— Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
21
Networking Concepts
Network Environment Design Considerations
Network Environment Design Considerations
Network and internetwork design must take many factors into
consideration: the desired physical location of the computers
comprising the network, the volume of projected communications traffic
between nodes, communications traffic patterns, and the possibility of
connections to other types of nodes (such as those in a public data
network) are just some of the criteria to consider.
These factors will affect your choice of NS network type (LAN, Token
Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T, Point-to-Point, X.25) as well
as choice of specific links. They will also affect how you design your
network layout. You may want to create subnetworks within your
network by configuring IP subnet addresses. You may, on the other
hand, need to join several networks together to form an internetwork
or internet.
Line Speed
Line Speed is a measure of the rate at which data is transmitted by a
physical link (usually measured in kilobits or megabits per second). The
maximum line speed varies among different NS links. Line speed may
therefore influence your choice of link. Although line speed does not
indicate the exact throughput of a particular link, it can be used on a
comparative basis to indicate relative throughput.
In general, an IEEE 802.3/Ethernet LAN or Token Ring network will be
faster than a Point-to-Point or X.25 network because the bus or ring
topology provides a faster routing mechanism than a series of
Point-to-Point hops. FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T links will
be an order of magnitude faster than LAN or Token Ring. Links using
leased lines will have a higher line speed than links using normal
telephone lines.
Consult your Hewlett-Packard representative for line speeds and the
most up-to-date performance data for various links.
Geographical Location
The geographical location of the computers that will be part of your
network or internet will be an important factor in deciding both the
physical topology and the link types that you should use.
If all of the nodes you want to connect are located relatively close to
each other (in the same building, for example) you might choose to
connect them via a LAN, Token Ring link, 100VG-AnyLAN, or
100Base-T.
Another option for nodes located in the same geographic location is to
use hardwired (direct-connect) Point-to-Point links. You might wish to
22
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Network Environment Design Considerations
use a Point-to-Point network if the distance between some nodes on the
network will be greater than the maximum distance allowed between
nodes on a LAN. Bridges, hubs and routers are commonly implemented
to extend LANs.
FDDI networks also offer greater distances than LAN, Token Ring,
100VG-AnyLAN, or 100Base-T networks. FDDI networks can be up to
200 kilometers in length, with nodes up to 2 kilometers apart.
If you need to connect nodes that are geographically distant (for
example, HP e3000s located in different cities) you might choose to
connect them via a dial link. For NS dial links, you can use the
Point-to-Point 3000/iX Network Link.
Finally, if you need to use satellite transmission because of the large
geographical distance between nodes, or if you need to have access to
other nodes on a public or private X.25 network, you might wish to use
the DTC/X.25 iX Network Link.
Special Cases
The following sections describe certain design requirements for special
situations, such as shared dial links, personal computers, and using
non-HP e3000 minicomputers on an NS network.
Shared Dial Links
Shared dial links have two limitations that must be considered when
designing a network. First, a shared dial link cannot be used as an
intermediate link in a Point-to-Point network. Any other kind of dial
link can be used for intermediate links, but shared dial links can be
used only to connect leaf nodes (that is, nodes that receive messages
targeted only for themselves, also referred to as end nodes). Second,
cannot dial out on SMUX, shared dial links cannot be used as gateway
halves.
Non-HP e3000 Nodes (Including PCs)
LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T, and X.25
networks can access non-HP e3000 nodes. Point-to-Point networks
must be composed of only HP e3000s.
Applicable SYSGEN Parameters
VT terminals are not physical devices, instead they are virtual devices
created dynamically at remote logon, header entries are created for the
maximum number of VT terminals at system boot time. The exact
number of head entries created for VT terminals will depend on the
value of MAXDYNIO (which is configurable in SYSGEN).
The exact number of remote sessions which can be supported on a given
system will depend on the exact mix of jobs and sessions (remote and
local, active and inactive) on that system.
Chapter 2
23
Networking Concepts
Network Environment Design Considerations
The maximum number of concurrent processes may limit the number of
remote logons before the maximum number of dynamic I/O devices
does.
Dynamic Ldevs
This is actually a system parameter that can be configured to 999 in
SYSGEN. The default is 332, but the actual number that can be in use
may be limited by the IDD/ODD limits. VT and NS use one dynamic
ldev per remote session and one per LAN link and one per
Point-to-Point link.
NOTE
The result of having DYNAMIC IO DEVS configured too low for NS
VIRTUAL TERMINAL connections is VTERR 8 or VT INFORM 050.
Likewise the dynamic I/O device limit may be reached before the
concurrent process limit.
24
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Network Interface and Link Types
Network Interface and Link Types
The network interface (NI), the software that provides an interface
between a node and a network, specifies the type and maximum
number of links that can be configured for a node. Because a node’s
network interface determines what links can be configured for the node,
links are said to be configured underneath network interfaces.
There are nine types of network interfaces (in addition to loopback):
• LAN for IEEE 802.3 and Ethernet networks, 100VG-AnyLAN
networks, and 100Base-T networks.
• Token Ring for IEEE 802.5 networks.
• FDDI for fiber optic networks.
• 100VG-AnyLAN for 100VG-AnyLAN networks.
• 100Base-T for 100Base-T networks.
• Point-to-Point for networks that use Point-to-Point routing.
• X.25 for X.25 networks.
• NS over SNA is no longer offered as a product and has been
removed from the Corporate Price List. The product is obsolete with
no plans for support.
• Gateway half for nodes that function as gateway halves.
Number of Network Interfaces
A system can have up to 48 network interfaces (NI) configured. One of
these network interfaces must be loopback. For each network interface,
the maximum number of links you can configure and the kinds of links
possible are determined by the network interface type, as follows:
• A LAN network interface can have only one link configured under it;
however, a single link can reach a large number of nodes. ThickLAN
cable supports up to 100 nodes per segment; ThinLAN cable can be
used for up to 30 nodes per segment; and each Ethertwist 3000/iX
can be used for up to 50 nodes. Up to two LAN NIs can be active
at a time per system, 100BT allows a maximum distance of
100m between 2 nodes.
• A Token Ring interface can have only one link configured under it;
however, a single link can reach a large number of nodes. Token Ring
3000/iX Network Link can support up to 250 nodes per ring using
shielded twisted pair (STP) cabling at 4 or 16 Mbps and 50 nodes per
ring using unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cabling at 4 Mbps. Only
one Token Ring NI can be active at a time per system.
Chapter 2
25
Networking Concepts
Network Interface and Link Types
• An FDDI interface can have only one link configured under it;
however, a single link can reach a large number of nodes. FDDI/iX
Network Link can support up to 1000 nodes. Up to four FDDI NIs
can be active at a time per system.
• A Point-to-Point network interface can have up to 40 links
configured under it. Point-to-Point links may be dial links, in which a
modem attached to a node is used to transmit and receive data
carried across telephone wires, or leased lines, in which data is sent
over data-grade lines leased from a private carrier. Up to 11
Point-to-Point NI’s can be active at a time (one NI must be
loopback) for a total of 12 NI’s per system..
• An X.25 network interface can have from one to 11 links configured,
depending on the number of configured X.25 network interfaces on
the node. (A single node can have up to 11 NIs and up to 11 X.25
links.) Each link can be connected to as many as 1,024 remote nodes,
with communication allowed with as many as 256 nodes at the same
time. Up to 11 X.25 NI’s can be active at a time (one NI must be
loopback) for a total of 12 NI’s per system..
• A gateway half network interface can have only one link configured
under it (the gateway half link). Links connecting two gateway
halves can be only NS Point-to-Point 3000/iX Network links. Only
one gateway half NI can be active at a time per system.
If more than one (non-loopback) network interface is configured on a
node, the network portions of the IP addresses configured for the
interfaces should differ to correspond to the multiple networks to which
the node belongs.
Refer to “Software Configuration Maximums” at the end of this chapter
for information on configuration path maximums.
Priority of Network Interfaces
If it is possible to reach a destination through more than one active NI,
the network determines which NI to select according to the following
priority:
Loopback
100VG-AnyLAN
100Base-T
FDDI
LAN
Token Ring
X.25
Gateway Half
Point-to-Point (router)
If more than one NI of a given type is active, (for example, two X.25
NIs) the network will select the one that it finds first.
26
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Subnetworks
Subnetworks
IP Subnets are used to divide one network into two or more distinct
subnetworks. Subnet numbers identify subnetworks in the same way
that network addresses identify physically distinct networks.
Subnetting divides the node address portion of an IP address into two
portions—one for identifying a specific subnetwork and one for
identifying a node on that subnetwork.
Why Use Subnets?
The use of subnets is optional. Subnets are typically used in
organizations that have a large number of computers. You may want
two or more physically distinct networks to share the same network
address. This may occur, for example, if your organization has acquired
only one network number, but any of the following is true:
• A few nodes on a single network create the bulk of the network
traffic and you want to isolate those nodes on a subnetwork to reduce
overall congestion.
• You have a single LAN and have reached the limit of its technology
in terms of node numbers or cable length.
• LANs are located too far apart to be joined with bridges.
How Subnetting Works
You may use subnets to divide your current network into subnetworks
without informing remote networks about an internal change in
connectivity. A packet will be routed to the proper subnet when it
arrives at the gateway node. However, if you want a remote node to
know about only some of the subnets on your network, this must be
configured.
The network portion of an IP address must be the same for each
subnetwork of the same network. The subnet portion of an IP address
must be the same for each node on the same subnetwork.
Assigning Subnet Masks
Before you can determine subnet numbers, you first must determine
which bits of the node address will be used to contain your subnet
numbers.
The bits that you designate for subnet identifiers compose the subnet
mask. The subnet mask is configured with NMMGR. The remaining
part of the node address is used to identify the host portion of the IP
address.
Chapter 2
27
Networking Concepts
Subnetworks
The following rules apply when choosing a subnet mask and an IP
address:
• Although any bits in the node address can be used as the subnet
mask, Hewlett-Packard recommends aligning the subnet mask along
byte boundaries, adjacent to the network number.
• Although standards allow subnets on the same network to have
different subnet masks, Hewlett-Packard recommends that you
assign the same subnet mask to all subnets on a network.
• Do not assign an IP address where the network address and/or node
address bits are all off (all 0s) or all on (all 1s). Likewise, the subnet
address bits cannot be all 0s or all 1s.
To determine the subnet mask, you first need to estimate the number of
networks required and the number of nodes on each subnet. Allow
enough bits for both nodes and subnets, as described in example 1.
Example 1
Assume you are choosing a subnet mask for a class C network (three
bytes for network address, one byte for node address), and you need
four subnets with up to 30 nodes on each subnet. You will need to
reserve three bits for the subnet address (remember, all 0s and all 1s
cannot be used) and the remaining five bits for the node numbers as
shown in Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-1
Class C Address with Subnet Number
The 30 nodes per subnet will require at least five bits of the node
portion of the IP address (30 <32, and 32=25, therefore you need 5 bits).
This leaves three bits remaining in the node portion of the IP address
for use as the subnet identifier. Subnet parts of all 0’s or all 1’s are not
recommended because they can be confused with broadcast addresses.
Therefore, you can have up to six subnets (23 –2=6) when three bits are
used for the subnet identifier.
Example 2
An IP address on a class B network with an 8-bit subnet mask
separates as shown in Figure 2-2.
28
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Subnetworks
Figure 2-2
Class C Address with Subnet Number
Now, refer again to example 1. The subnet mask must indicate that
three bits of the node portion of the IP address will be used for the
subnet identifier. The subnet mask turns on (sets to 1) all the relevant
bits for its subnet scheme. The subnet mask for example 1 is shown
below. Note that the most significant three bits of the rightmost byte
are set.
Subnet Mask
Binary
11111111.11111111.11111111 11100000
Decimal
255.255.255 224
Table 2-1 shows valid addresses for the subnetwork in example 1. You
will need to know this information for NMMGR configuration. The
table shows the possible values of the rightmost byte of the IP address
for each of the subnets, given the criteria described in the example.
(Remember, an address of all 0s or all 1s is not valid).
Column 2 shows the values, in binary, of the six subnet addresses. Five
zeroes are shown in parentheses to indicate where the three
subnet-address bits are located in the byte. The equivalent decimal
value for each subnet address is shown in the third column. The fourth
column shows the range of possible values for the node address of each
subnet. The five rightmost bits make up the node portion, and the
range is the same for all subnets. By combining the subnet address with
the range of node addresses, the possible decimal values of the
rightmost byte are obtained and shown in the fifth column.
The table shows that subnets of 30 nodes each are possible given a
subnet mask of 255.255.255 224. This is derived from the column that
shows the range of possible values for the five bits that make up the
node portion of the IP address. The range for each of the six subnets
shows 30 possible values.
Chapter 2
29
Networking Concepts
Subnetworks
Table 2-1
Valid Addresses of Example Subnetwork
Subnet
Address of
Subnetwork in
Binary
Decimal Value
of Subnetwork
Possible Node
Address on
Subnetwork
Decimal Value of
Rightmost Byte
1
001 (00000)
32
00001–11110
33–62
2
010 (00000)
64
00001–11110
65–94
3
011 (00000)
96
00001–11110
97–126
4
100 (00000)
128
00001–11110
129–158
5
101 (00000)
160
00001–11110
161–190
6
110 (00000)
192
00001–11110
193–222
By looking at the binary values of two IP addresses, it is easy to tell if
nodes belong to the same subnet. If they do, all the bits that make up
the subnet mask will be the same between IP addresses in the subnet.
Take, for example, two IP addresses (in decimal and in binary) of
subnet number 1 from Table 2-1:
192.6.12.41 1100 0000 0000 0110 0000 1100 0010 1001
192.6.12.55 1100 0000 0000 0110 0000 1100 0011 0111
The subnet mask has already been defined as:
255.255.255 224 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1110 0000
Because the mask has all bits except the five rightmost bits set to 1, all
bits except the five rightmost bits must match between nodes on the
same subnet. Because the two example IP addresses from subnet 1 do
match except for their five rightmost bits, they belong to the same
subnet.
NOTE
Subnet addressing can be used in internetworks (networks with
gateways).
30
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Internetworks
Internetworks
Two or more networks of the same type or of different types can be
linked together to form an internetwork or internet. For example, if you
wanted to connect the nodes in a Point-to-Point network with the nodes
on a LAN, the combination of the two networks would be called an
internetwork. Creation of an internetwork allows any node on one
network to communicate with any node on another network that is part
of the same internetwork. Up to 256 individual networks can belong to
the same NS internetwork.
The divisions between the networks in an internetwork are called
network boundaries. Nodes in each network will have the same
network address (network portion of the IP address); however, each
network within the internetwork will have its own unique network
address.
The networks in an internetwork may be connected by a bridge or
router, or by HP e3000 systems configured as gateways.
Gateways
One method of joining networks in an internetwork is by using
gateways. An HP e3000 system can have up to 256 gateways (combined
number of full gateways and gateway halves).
Full Gateways versus Gateway Halves
NS 3000/iX allows you to choose between connecting two networks with
a full gateway or connecting them with two gateway halves. A full
gateway is a node configured as a full member of two (or more)
networks for the purpose of passing information between the networks
to which it belongs. The node is considered a member of each of the
networks for which it is configured.
A node that is a gateway half is configured as a member of a network
and as a partner of another gateway half. A gateway half link that joins
two networks connects two nodes (a gateway half pair) by a
Point-to-Point link (NS Point-to-Point 3000/iX Network link). The
gateway half link and pair is not considered a network itself. Each of
the paired gateway halves is configured as a member of a different
network (the two networks to be connected) and as a gateway half on
the same gateway half link. Together, the two gateway halves function
as a full gateway.
Chapter 2
31
Networking Concepts
Internetworks
Gateway Configuration Overview
Gateway configuration includes both identifying neighbor gateways in
each node’s configuration file and configuring gateway half NIs for
nodes that will serve as one half of a gateway half pair. These tasks are
described as follows.
Identifying Neighbor Gateways
If you are including gateways in your internet configuration, you may
want to modify each node’s configuration file so that the node is aware
of all of its neighbor gateways (gateways on the same link). You
accomplish this during configuration of each network interface for
which you want to allow communications over the gateway. You will
find step-by-step instructions for identifying neighbor gateways in each
of the link configuration sections of this manual.
An alternative to identifying neighbor gateways in every node’s
configuration file is to configure a default gateway for the node.
Instructions for doing so are included in this manual.
The next pages show several examples of gateway configuration.
Neighbor Gateway Examples
When using NMMGR to configure any node, you will be entering the
identities of all the neighbor gateways into the configuration of the
node. The following examples illustrate several gateway configuration
scenarios based on the network represented in Figure 2-3.
• Example 1: The node you are configuring may be a non-gateway,
such as node D in Figure 2-3. You would need to enter the identities
of each of its neighbor gateways, in this case nodes C and E, at the
Neighbor Gateways screen. On the Neighbor Gateway Reachable
Networks screen, you would also enter the IP addresses of networks
1 and 3 as two of the configured reachable networks reachable
through gateway node C.
• Example 2: The node you are configuring may be a gateway half,
such as node E in Figure 2-3. You will still need to enter the
identities of the node’s neighbor gateways as you configure the NI (in
this case, node C is the neighbor gateway). You will also need to
configure a gateway half NI for the node, as described under
“Configuring a Gateway-Half Pair.”
• Example 3: The node you are configuring may be a full gateway,
such as nodes B and C in Figure 2-3. Though full gateways are never
actually identified as such in the configuration process, they too,
must know about the other gateways. If you were configuring
node C, you would identify nodes B and E and neighbor gateways.
32
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Internetworks
• Example 4: One of the gateways on your internetwork may be
designated as a default gateway, such as node C in Figure 2-3. A
default gateway is a gateway that is designated to receive any traffic
for which the network is unable to identify a destination. You must
identify the node as a default gateway in the configuration file of
each node that will access it as the default gateway. If you were
configuring node D, you would identify node C as a default gateway
by entering an at sign (@) in one of the IP address fields of the
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen. Only one gateway
may be designated as a default gateway for each node. The default
gateway must be on a LAN or Token Ring network.
Configuring a Gateway Half Pair
If you are configuring a gateway half pair, you will need to configure a
gateway half NI for each half of the gateway pair. You will find
step-by-step instructions for configuring a gateway half NI in this
manual.
In Figure 2-3, nodes E and F form a gateway half pair. When you
configure a node as a gateway half, you enter its partner’s IP address
into this gateway half ’s configuration in the Gatehalf Configuration
screen. If you were to configure node E in the figure, you would enter
the IP address of node F.
Figure 2-3
Gateway Configuration Scenarios
Chapter 2
33
Networking Concepts
Internetworks
Gateway halves require the configuration of two separate network
interfaces on each node: one for the gateway half, the other for the
network it interfaces to (for example, a LAN or Point-to-Point NI). You
will need to follow the instructions for the specific NI type, depending
on the network type) and then follow the instructions to enter
configuration items specific to the gateway half NI.
Worksheets that will aid you in planning for internetwork
communication are located in Chapter 4 , “Planning for Node
Configuration.”
34
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Address Resolution
Address Resolution
Address resolution in NS networks refers to the mapping of node names
to IP addresses and the mapping of IP addresses to lower level
addresses (such as an X.25 address or a station address). Several
address resolution methods are available for you to use individually or
in combination with each other. You can configure these methods
according to the needs of your network.
The available address resolution methods are:
• Domain name services.
• Network directory.
• Probe (and probe proxy) (LAN, 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T
only).
• Address resolution protocol (ARP) (LAN, Token Ring, FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T only).
Domain Name Services
The domain name services are a mechanism for resolving node names
to IP addresses. They conform to an open networking standard and will
facilitate communications between HP e3000 systems as well as with
non-HP e3000 nodes.
To use the domain name services, you must assign a name, in
ARPANET standard format, to each system on the network or
internetwork. You configure this name on the NS Configuration screen
(see configuration chapters for details).
You will also need to create a set of ASCII files on each system which
contain the addressing information the system will need. Instructions
for creating these files are in Chapter 12 , “Configuring Domain Name
Files.”
Once you have configured the domain name services, the network will
be able to access the node using its domain name and the domain name
service routines will resolve the domain name to the node’s IP address.
NOTE
Domain name services provide name to IP address resolution only. If a
lower level address is required for network communication (for
example, an X.25 address) you will need to configure the network
directory as well.
Chapter 2
35
Networking Concepts
Address Resolution
Network Directory
The network directory is a set of files that contain information used by
the node to communicate with other nodes in the internetwork.
You use NMMGR to perform the following network directory functions:
• Add, modify, and delete entries in the directory.
• Review and inspect directory information.
• Merge a remote directory with a directory on the local node.
• Automatically update directories on a group of remote nodes by
using a background stream job controlled from a central
administrative node.
See Chapter 11 , “Configuring the Network Directory,” for more
information on configuring the network directory through NMMGR.
More information on merging directories and on central administrative
nodes is included in this chapter.
When a Network Directory is Required
A network directory must be configured in the following circumstances:
• nodes running on X.25
• nodes not using domain name services
• nodes on a LAN network that do not support the HP-PROBE
protocol
The network directory of a node in a Point-to-Point network must
contain the IP addresses of all other nodes that you want the node to be
able to reach.
When configuring the network directory for a Point-to-Point network,
make sure that the IP address you enter in the network directory
matches the data in the mapping screens (path name
NETXPORT.NI.NIname.MAPPING.mapentry).
For nodes on an X.25 network, the network directory maps the X.25
address key to an IP address to allow a node to communicate within the
X.25 network. You must configure a network directory for nodes using
X.25.
Planning the Network Directory
There are two theories about how network directories should be
planned and configured on a network, as follows:
• Centralized network directories.
• Decentralized network directories.
36
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Address Resolution
The centralized theory requires each node on the internet to have the
same network directory. This means that every node in the network
must have an entry in the network directory. The advantage to this is
that you update the network directory in one place, then copy it to the
rest of the world. The disadvantage is that network directories for large
internets are going to be large.
The recommended way to create and maintain your network directory
using the centralized method is to assign a single node as the central
administrative node. You configure the network directory on this node
and then copy it to all other nodes on the network. When the network
directory is updated, it is updated on the central administrative node,
then copied to the other nodes. This procedure decreases the possibility
of incompatible directories. You may want to assign a central
administrative node for each network or for the entire internet.
The decentralized theory suggests that each network directory be
configured individually on each node. The advantage to this is that you
can customize the network directory on each node for security purposes
using local and global entries. The network directory will also be
smaller because it will only contain entries for that particular node.
However, updates must be done manually on each node.
Copying and Merging Network Directory Files
The first time you configure the network directory, an entry for all
remote IP addresses must be added manually using the NMMGR
screens. After the first network directory is configured, you can use the
MPE STORE and RESTORE commands to copy the network directory to
other nodes. (This is assuming you have adopted the centralized
method of network directory maintenance. If you use the decentralized
method, you must always use NMMGR to create and maintain the
network directory.)
NOTE
The network directory uses a KSAM file pair. Therefore, when copying a
directory, be sure to copy both the data file and the key file. The system
names the key file automatically using the first six letters of the
network directory file name appended with a K. For example,
NSDIRK.NET.SYS is the name of the key file associated with the data file
NSDIR.NET.SYS.
Once a network directory has been established on each node in the
internet, you can set up a job stream to automate network directory
updates. The MERGEDIR command is part of a maintenance interface
provided primarily to support the updating of directories using a batch
job. Using this method, a job or series of jobs can be scheduled at
regular intervals to copy and then merge remote directories into the
local-system directory. See the MERGEDIR and the MAKESTREAM
commands in Using the Node Management Services (NMS) Utilities.
Chapter 2
37
Networking Concepts
Address Resolution
Probe and Probe Proxy
NS 3000 LAN, 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T NIs with the
IEEE 802.3 protocol enabled are able to make use of a proprietary HP
protocol called probe. Probe makes it possible for nodes on an NS
IEEE 802.3 LAN, 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T to communicate
without a network directory or domain names. A node can determine
connection information about a node on the same LAN by sending a
multicast probe request out on the network. The target node recognizes
its address in the probe request and sends an individually addressed
probe reply with the necessary connection information to the
requesting node. The probe request/reply mechanism is sufficient to
obtain connection requirements within a network.
If the nodes on that LAN are to communicate with other networks, at
least one node on the network must have a network directory. The node
with the network directory is called a proxy server. By using the
probe protocol, a node without a network directory can multicast a
request for an internet address from the proxy server. For backup
purposes, you should designate at least two nodes to be proxy servers.
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
HP e3000 LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, AND 100Base-T
NIs are able to make use of a standard protocol called Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP). ARP provides IP address to station address
resolution. ARP is enabled when the Ethernet protocol or Token Ring is
enabled.
Enabling Probe and ARP
With the concurrent configuration of IEEE 802.3 and Ethernet on a
network, both the probe and ARP protocols are also enabled. Both
protocols broadcast requests to all nodes on the network to resolve the
address of a given remote node.
If you disable IEEE 802.3 on a LAN NI, you also disable the probe
protocol. Likewise, by disabling Ethernet, you disable the ARP protocol
associated with it. You cannot disable both of these protocols
simultaneously; at least one must be active to facilitate network
communications.
38
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Network Design Questions
Network Design Questions
Ask yourself the following questions to make sure your design adheres
to the considerations mentioned above:
1. Are all of the nodes in the network within roughly 200 meters of
each other?
If so, consider connecting them with 100Base-T links, or ThinLAN
links with Ethertwist. For entry-level servers, choose ThinLAN since
that adapter will offload part of the CPU load.
2. Are all of the nodes in the network within roughly 550 meters of
each other?
If so, consider connecting them with ThinLAN 3000/iX links. The
maximum cable length for segments of ThinLAN 3000/iX cable is
185 meters, with a maximum of three segments connected by
repeaters.
3. Are all of the nodes in the network within roughly 1,500 meters of
each other?
If so, consider connecting them with ThickLAN (thick coaxial cable).
The maximum cable length for each segment of ThickLAN coaxial
cable is 500 meters, with a maximum of three segments connected
by repeaters.
4. Are all of the nodes in the network located within 2 kilometers of
each other?
If so, consider using FDDI/iX links. The maximum cable length for
each segment is 2 kilometers with a maximum network length of up
to 200 kilometers.
5. Are nodes located at remote sites? (For example, in different
buildings in the same city, or in different cities?)
If so, consider installing an X.25 network or a Point-to-Point network
using dial links or leased lines. Choose leased lines if you have a
critical need for clear transmission or if the volume of data to be
transmitted is relatively large.
Routers, switches, bridges and hubs are used to set up networks.
• Routers are used to route packets between networks and subnets
based on the packets destination address.
• Bridges are used to connect two LAN networks that are far apart.
• Hubs are multiport repeaters, used to build or extend a LAN
network. New nodes can be added to the LAN without disrupting
the existing network.
Chapter 2
39
Networking Concepts
Network Design Questions
• To connect two networks that run on different protocol stacks, a
gateway is needed. A gateway does conversion between the two
protocols at every layer until the application layer.
6. Is the set of nodes you wish to connect composed of some nodes that
are in close proximity to one another (for example, in the same
building) and other nodes that are geographically distanced (for
example, in different buildings or different cities)?
If so, you may wish to use ThinLAN 3000/iX, Token Ring 3000/iX,
FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, or 100Base-T networks for nodes that are
located near one another and Point-to-Point or X.25 links for nodes
in different buildings or cities.
7. Will HP 9000s or other minicomputers need to be part of the
network?
If so, consider ThinLAN 3000/iX (or its ThickLAN option),
Token Ring 3000/iX, FDDI/iX, 100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T, or
X.25/iX System Access.
8. Do you need access to nodes on public or private X.25 networks?
If so, consider using DTC/X.25 iX Network Links.
9. Is a subset of nodes either geographically or organizationally
distanced from another subset of nodes?
If so, you may wish to establish a network boundary between them
in order to make them two separate networks joined by a full
gateway or router. Alternatively, you may want to use subnets to
divide one network into two or more physically distinct subnetworks.
10.If you must use a gateway half, is the partner-gateway half in the
same building or further away?
If the two gateway halves are in the same building, you can use a
direct connect link between them. If the two gateway halves are
further away, you will need to use a dial link.
40
Chapter 2
Networking Concepts
Software Configuration Maximums
Software Configuration Maximums
The software maximums as shown in Table 2-2, must be adhered to
when configuring a supported link. These maximums may be further
limited by the system hardware (number of available slots). Maximums
are also documented throughout the manual for the appropriate screen.
Table 2-2
Configuration Maximums
NMMGR Screen
Number/Description
Path
Maximum Limit
#9 Network Directory
Select Node Name
None
File Size Limit
#44 Point-to-Point Link
Configuration
None
40 links/Router NI
(8 per screen)
#45 Direct Connect/Dial
Node Mapping
Configuration
None
1024 Mappings/Router
#46 Shared Dial Node
Mapping Configuration
None
1024 Mappings/Router
#48 X.25 Configuration
None
11 Links/X.25 NI
#112 Network Interface
Configuration
NETXPORT.NI
48 NI/system
#117 Gateway Half NI
Links
NETXPORT.NI.NIname.LINK
1 link/Gateway Half NI
#158 Neighbor Gateway
Reachable Networks
NETXPORT.NI.NIname.INTERNET.
gatewayn
2550 networks/NI
#85 Link Selection
LINK
256 Links/System
Chapter 2
41
Networking Concepts
Software Configuration Maximums
42
Chapter 2
3
Planning Your Network
This chapter will help you to draw your network map and contains
worksheets to help you plan your network, internetwork, gateway, and
network directory configuration. You will need to consider a number of
items as you plan your configuration. This chapter provides guidelines
to help you accomplish the following:
• Draw an internetwork map.
• Complete the internetwork table.
• Draw a network map and complete network worksheets for each link
that you are configuring.
• Complete the network directory worksheet if a network directory is
required.
• Update Domain name files if using DNS for node name resolution.
Refer to Chapter 12 , “Configuring Domain Name Files.”
43
Planning Your Network
Drawing an Internetwork Map
Drawing an Internetwork Map
This section deals with the internetwork as a whole. The internetwork
worksheets consist of an internetwork map, which shows an overview of
your internetwork, and an internetwork table. You will take the
following steps when filling out the internetwork worksheets:
• Draw sketches of each network in the internetwork.
• Write network names, IP network addresses, and network types.
• Draw gateway nodes.
• Indicate network boundaries.
An internetwork map provides information about the whole
internetwork. Figure 3-1 is an example of an internetwork map. This
sample internetwork will be used throughout the instructions in this
chapter to help explain the other drawings and tables that make up the
configuration worksheets.
Before you can draw your internetwork map, you must know how many
networks your internetwork will contain, and you must know each
network type (ThinLAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T, NS Point-to-Point, or X.25). The internetwork in the
example (Figure 3-1) contains six networks. NET1 and NET5 are LANs,
NET1 is 100Base-T LAN and NET5 is a ThinLAN, NET2 is a
Point-to-Point network, NET3 is an X.25 network, NET4 is a Token
Ring network, and NET6 is an FDDI network.
NOTE
If you have an X.25 network, you should indicate the presence of each
Datacomm and Terminal Controller (DTC) in your internetwork map,
as shown in this example (Figure 3-1). Both the NS 3000/iX node and
the DTC must be specially configured for X.25 links.
44
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Drawing an Internetwork Map
Figure 3-1
Internetwork Map
NET2
C 192.002.250 XXX
POINT-TO-POINT
K
B
A
N1
NET4
C 192.004.002 XXX
TOKEN RING
N2
N3
G
NET1
C 192.001.001 XXX
LAN
DTC
C
Router
Router
NET6
C 192.006.003 XXX
FDDI
H
L
X.25 PSN
N5
DTC
I
DTC
NET3
C 192.003.251 XXX
X.25
NET5
C 192.005.252 XXX
LAN
J
Communication Between Networks
Since the main purpose of the internetwork map is to show how
networks are connected, gateway nodes are the only nodes you should
label on the internetwork map. All other nodes and their networks can
be represented by drawing sketches of the networks, as shown in Figure
3-1. In the example, node B is a full gateway that belongs to NET1 and
NET2, node A is a full gateway that belongs to NET1 and NET4, and
node C is a full gateway that belongs to NET1 and NET6. Nodes G and
H are gateway halves that belong to NET2 and NET5, respectively.
NOTE
Single letters are used to represent node names in this example. Actual
node names must be in an accepted format. They may be either in the
form nodename.domain.organization or they may be in a valid
domain name format.
Network Boundaries
Once you have drawn your gateway nodes and routers, you have
established network boundaries. Consider the example and look at
Figure 3-1. Since node B in the example is a full gateway and belongs to
both NET1 and NET2, the boundary between these two networks is at
node B itself. The boundary between NET2 and NET5 is along the
gateway-half link that connects gateway nodes G and H.
Chapter 3
45
Planning Your Network
Drawing an Internetwork Map
IP Network Addresses
Each network in your internetwork must have a unique IP network
address. Add these IP addresses to your internetwork map.
In the example, assume that the Class C IP network addresses are
those shown in Figure 3-1. The specific IP node addresses do not need to
be shown until completion of specific parts of the network worksheets,
so node portions of IP addresses will be represented with XXX in some
maps and tables.
46
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Completing the Internetwork Table
Completing the Internetwork Table
Once your internetwork map contains the information just described,
you are ready to complete the internetwork table (Table 3-1).
The information requested for the first three columns of the
internetwork table can be taken directly from the internetwork map, as
in the example. In the Implementation Priority column, consider which
networks must be operational immediately. You also may want to
consider which networks will be the easiest to initiate. Analyzing these
and other factors important to you, determine the order in which you
plan to initiate your networks, and then enter the information in the
Implementation Priority column of the internetwork table.
When you have completed both the internetwork map and the
internetwork table, you have finished the internetwork worksheets.
Table 3-1
Internetwork Table
NETWORK
NETWORK TYPE
(LAN, PT–PT, X.25,
TOKEN RING)
IP NETWORK
ADDRESS
IMPLEMENTATION
PRIORITY
NET1
LAN
C 192.001.001 XXX
1
NET2
NS POINT-TO-POINT
C 192.002.250 XXX
2
NET3
X.25
C 192.003.001 XXX
3
NET4
TOKEN RING
C 192.004.001 XXX
4
NET5
LAN
C 192.005.001 XXX
5
NET6
FDDI
C 192.006.001 XXX
6
Chapter 3
47
Planning Your Network
Drawing a Network Map
Drawing a Network Map
A network map provides information about the configuration of the
computers on the network and their access to remote computers. A
network map can be invaluable when troubleshooting.
Whenever you install a new system on your network, be sure you also
update your network map. If you have not previously created a network
map, create one now and keep it updated whenever you add or delete
computers or interface cards or make cable changes.
In addition to maintaining a network map, you should also record
related system information on one of the network map worksheets,
provided later in this chapter. You can use the network map worksheet
as a guide for configuration and later as a record of your configuration
for both you and your HP support staff.
48
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Network Worksheets
For each network in your internetwork, you are asked to draw a map of
the network and to complete two tables. One table lists node-specific
information, and one table lists network routing information.
You also are asked to complete worksheets for each gateway half pair in
your internetwork. The worksheets for a gateway half pair consist of a
map of the gateway half nodes and their connecting link and a table
containing information about the gateway half network interfaces.
In the sample internetwork shown in Figure 3-1, six sets of network
worksheets need to be completed: one set for each of the six networks
and one set for the gateway half pair.
Take the following steps when filling out a set of network worksheets:
1. Draw your map, showing all nodes and node names. For
Point-to-Point networks, also show all Point-to-Point links and link
names.
2. Complete the two tables: for each network, for a gateway-half pair,
include the link name.
LAN Network Worksheets
One set of LAN network worksheets should be used for each LAN in
your internetwork. The LAN network worksheets consist of a map of
the LAN and two tables. One table contains information about each
node on the LAN and one table contains network-specific internet
routing information.
In this example, we have shown the network map and worksheet for
NET1, one of the LAN networks shown in Figure 3-1. Use the
discussion of the sample LAN network worksheets as a guide for filling
out your own LAN network worksheets.
LAN Network Map
Figure 3-2 is a drawing of the network map for NET1. The network map
is a detailed drawing of the same network shown in the internetwork
map (Figure 3-1). The network name, the IP network address, and the
network type are listed at the top of the network map.
In the example, the internetwork map shows that node B is a gateway
node. It is noted on the NET1 network map and shows the network that
the gateway node can reach. Node B is also a proxy server. The
remaining NET1 nodes and their names are added to the network map.
Chapter 3
49
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Figure 3-2
LAN Network Map
NET1
C 192.001.001.XXX
LAN
GATEWAY NODE
TO NET4:
A
N1
N2
GATEWAY NODE
TO NET2:
N3
B
NET2
C 192.002.250.XXX
POINT-TO-POINT
NET4
C 192.004.002.XXX
TOKEN RING
G
GATEWAY HALF
H
GATEWAY HALF
DTC
ROUTER
NET5
NET3
C 192.005.252.XXX
DTC
C 192.003.251.XXX
LAN
X.25
LAN Network Table
Refer to the LAN network map to fill in the LAN network table (Table
3-2). The first column lists the names of all the nodes on NET1. Each
node is assigned an IP address that is unique within the network. Only
the node portion of the IP address is listed since the IP network address
is noted at the top of the table. In the third column of Table 3-2, node B
is shown as a proxy server. The fourth column lists node B as a gateway
node. In the Implementation Priority column, the nodes are ranked in
the recommended order of configuration.
Table 3-2
LAN Network Table
NETWORK NAME:
NET1
IP NETWORK ADDRESS
C 192.001.001 XXX
NODE NAME
IP NODE
ADDRESS
PROXY
SERVER (Y/N)
A
001
2
L1
002
3
L2
003
4
L3
004
5
B
005
50
YES
GATEWAY
NODE (Y/N)
YES
IMPLEMENTATION
PRIORITY
1
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
LAN Internet Routing Table
The purpose of the LAN internet routing table (Table 3-3) is to list all
possible networks that can be reached from each gateway node on a
LAN, such as NET1 in the example.
As shown on the internetwork map, NET1 includes a neighbor gateway
node B. In the IP Node Address column of the LAN internet routing
table, the node portion of the gateway node’s IP address is listed. The
LAN internet routing table shows that NET1 nodes using node B as a
gateway can reach NET2 in one hop, NET5 in two hops, and NET3 in
three hops. Node B is also designated as a default gateway.
Table 3-3
LAN Internet Routing Table
NETWORK NAME:
NET1
IP NETWORK ADDRESS
C 192.001.001 XXX
GATEWAY
IP NODE
ADDRESS
DESTINATION
HOPS TO
DESTINATION
DEFAULT
GATEWAY (Y/N)
B
005
NET2
C 192.002.250 XXX
1
YES
NET5
C 192.005.252 XXX
2
NET3
C 192.003.251 XXX
3
Token Ring Network Worksheets
You may use the worksheets found in the LAN section for Token Ring.
It is important to note that Token Ring does not use a proxy server.
FDDI Network Worksheets
You may use the worksheets found in the LAN section for FDDI as well.
It is important to note that FDDI does not use a proxy server.
100VG-AnyLAN Network Worksheets
You may use the worksheets found in the LAN section for
100VG-AnyLAN.
100Base-T Network Worksheets
You may use the worksheets found in the LAN section for 100Base-T.
Chapter 3
51
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Point-to-Point Network Worksheets
One set of Point-to-Point network worksheets should be used for each
Point-to-Point network in your internetwork. These network
worksheets consist of a map of the Point-to-Point network and two
tables. One table contains information about each node on the network
and one table contains network-specific internet routing information.
Point-to-Point Network Map
NET2 is the Point-to-Point network in the sample internetwork. Figure
3-3 is a drawing of the network map for NET2. The network map is a
detailed drawing of the same network shown in the internetwork map
(Figure 3-1). The network name, the IP network address, and the
network type are listed at the top of the network map. This information
is derived from the internetwork map.
The internetwork map shows that nodes B and G are gateway nodes
and also shows the networks that the gateway nodes can reach. The
remaining NET2 nodes and their names are added to the network map.
Node G is a central administrative node.
Figure 3-3
Point-to-Point Network Map
NET2
C 192.002.250 XXX
POINT-TO-POINT
GATEWAY NODE
TO NET1
LINK3
LINK2
NET1
B
P3
P2
LINK1
LINK4
LINK5
P1
G
GATEWAY NODE
TO NET5;
Central Admin.
NET5
52
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Point-to-Point Network Table
Refer to the Point-to-Point network map to fill in the Point-to-Point
network table (Table 3-4). We have completed the first column by listing
the names of all the nodes on NET2. Each node is assigned an IP
address that is unique within the network. Only the node portions of
the IP addresses are listed because we have listed the IP network
address at the top of the table. In the third column of Table 3-4, note
that node G is a central administrative node. In the fourth column,
nodes B and G are indicated as gateway nodes. For the Implementation
Priority column, the nodes are ranked in the recommended order of
configuration.
Table 3-4
Point-to-Point Network Table
NETWORK NAME:
NET2
IP NETWORK ADDRESS
C 192.002.250 XXX
NODE NAME
IP NODE
ADDRESS
PROXY
SERVER (Y/N)
B
001
P1
002
3
P2
003
4
P3
004
5
G
005
YES
GATEWAY
NODE (Y/N)
IMPLEMENTATION
PRIORITY
YES
2
YES
1
Point-to-Point Internet Routing Table
The purpose of the Point-to-Point internet routing table (Table 3-5) is to
list all possible networks that can be reached from each gateway node
on a Point-to-Point network, which is NET2 in the example. (Note that
there may be more than one route to a network.)
As shown on the internetwork map, NET2 includes two gateway nodes,
B and G. In the IP Node Address column of the Point-to-Point internet
routing table, the node portion of each gateway node’s IP address is
listed. The Point-to-Point internet routing table indicates that NET2
nodes using node B as a gateway can reach NET1 in one hop, NET4 in
two hops, and so on.
Chapter 3
53
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
For Node G, the same type of information is listed.
Table 3-5
Point-to-Point Internet Routing Table
NETWORK NAME:
NET2
IP NETWORK ADDRESS
C 192.002.250 XXX
GATEWAY
IP NODE
ADDRESS
DESTINATION
HOPS TO
DESTINATION
B
001
NET1 C 192.001.001 XXX
1
NET4 C 192.004.002 XXX
2
NET3 C 192.003.251 XXX
2
NET5 C 192.005.252 XXX
3
NET6 C 192.006.003 XXX
2
NET5 C 192.005.252 XXX
1
NET3 C 192.003.251 XXX
2
NET1 C 192.001.001 XXX
3
NET4 C 192.004.002 XXX
4
NET3 C 192.003.003 XXX
4
G
005
X.25 Network Worksheets
One set of X.25 network worksheets should be used for each X.25
network in your internetwork. The X.25 worksheets consist of a map of
the X.25 network and two tables. One table contains information about
each node on the X.25 network. The other table contains
network-specific internet routing information.
X.25 Network Map
Figure 3-4 is a drawing of the network map for NET3. The network map
is a detailed drawing of the same network shown in the internetwork
map (Figure 3-1). The network name, the IP address, and the network
type are shown on the network map. This information is derived from
the internetwork map.
In the example, node B of NET1 and nodes H and I of NET5 are also
part of the X.25 network. The remaining NET3 nodes and their names
are added to the network map. The network map also shows node H as
a central administrative node.
54
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Figure 3-4
X.25 Network Map
B
NET1
DTC
NET3
C 192.003.251 XXX
X.25
Central Admin
Node
X.25 PSN
H
DTC
DTC
NET5
I
J
X.25 Network Table
Refer to the X.25 network map to fill in the X.25 network table as
shown in Table 3-6. We complete the first column by listing the names
of all the nodes on NET3. Each node is assigned an IP address that is
unique within the network. Only the node portions of the IP addresses
are listed since the IP network address is listed at the top of the table.
In the third column of the table, node H is indicated as a central
administrative node. The X.25 (subnet) address for each node is listed
in the fifth column of the network table. The X.25 address is a decimal
number (up to 15 digits) identifying a node’s location on the X.25 subnet
for connections using switched virtual circuits (SVCs). Usually this
address is inserted in CALL packets to set up connections using SVCs.
If the network you will access is a public packet switching network
(PSN), these addresses (where appropriate) are recorded on the
network subscription form.
Chapter 3
55
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Table 3-6
X.25 Network Table
NETWORK NAME:
NET3
IP NETWORK ADDRESS
C 192.003.251 XXX
NODE NAME
IP NODE ADDRESS
CENTRAL ADMIN NODE
(Y/N)
X.25 ADDRESS
H
001
Y
1234
I
002
5678
J
003
6879
B
004
9876
X.25 Internet Routing Table
The purpose of the X.25 internet routing table (Table 3-7) is to list the
other networks in the internetwork that can be reached from the X.25
network, which is NET3 in the example. (Note that there may be more
than one route to a network.)
As shown in the internetwork map (Figure 3-4), NET3 includes two
gateway nodes, B and H. In the X.25 internet routing table note that
NET3 nodes using Node H can reach NET5 in one hop, NET2 in two
hops, and so on. In the IP Node Address column, the node portion of the
node’s IP address is listed.
Table 3-7
X.25 Internet Routing Table
NETWORK NAME:
NET3
IP NETWORK ADDRESS
C 192.003.251 XXX
GATEWAY
IP NODE ADDRESS
DESTINATION
HOPS TO
DESTINATION
B
004
NET1 C 192.001.001 XXX
1
NET4 C 192.004.002 XXX
2
NET2 C 192.002.250 XXX
2
NET5 C 192.005.252 XXX
3
NET5 C 192.005.252 XXX
1
NET2 C 192.002.250 XXX
2
NET1 C 192.001.001 XXX
3
NET4 C 192.004.002 XXX
4
H
001
56
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Gateway Half Pair Worksheets
One set of gateway half pair worksheets should be used for each
gateway half pair in your internetwork. The gateway half pair
worksheets consist of a map of the two gateway half nodes and their
connecting link, and one table that contains information about the
gateway half network interfaces. In the sample internetwork shown in
Figure 3-1, nodes G and H form a gateway half pair. Use the discussion
of the sample gateway half pair worksheets as a guide for filling out
your own gateway half pair worksheets.
Gateway Half Map
The sample internetwork contains one gateway half pair, as shown in
the internetwork map, which is made up of nodes G and H and their
connecting link. Figure 3-5 is a drawing of the gateway half pair
showing the two nodes and the networks to which they belong. In
addition, the map shows the link name, LINKRL1.
Figure 3-5
Gateway-Half Map
NET2
C 192.002.250 XXX
POINT-TO-POINT
G
LINKRL1
H
NET5
C 192.005.252 XXX
LAN
Chapter 3
57
Planning Your Network
Network Worksheets
Gateway Half Network Interface Table
Table 3-8 is based on the map discussed in the previous section. Both
gateway half nodes, the full IP addresses of the partner nodes, the
connected networks, and the name of the link are listed. Usually, the
link name will be the same from the perspective of each gateway half.
The address of the partner gateway half is shown to demonstrate that
the partner’s address is entered during configuration of a gateway half
network interface.
Table 3-8
Gateway Half Network Interface Table
NETWORK NAMES:
NET2, NET3
GATEWAY
HALF NODE
FULL IP ADDRESS
OF PARTNER
CONNECTED
NETWORK
LINK NAME
G/NET2
C 192.005.250 005
NET5
LINKRL1
H/NET5
C 192.002.252 001
NET2
LINKRL1
58
Chapter 3
Planning Your Network
Network Directory Worksheet
Network Directory Worksheet
You can complete the network directory information table shown below
for each network directory you are configuring. For your node and for
each destination node, you must make a full entry in the network
directory. The entry includes the destination node’s name and IP
address, its NI type, the global/local setting, and any additional address
that is required based on the NI type. See Chapter 11 , “Configuring the
Network Directory,” for more information on NI types and additional
addresses. Table 3-9 shows some of the network directory entries you
might configure for node B of the internetwork shown in Figure 3-1.
Table 3-9
Network Directory Information Table
NODE
NAME
GLOBAL OR
LOCAL
IP ADDRESS
TYPE
H
GLOBAL
C 192.005.252 001
1
I
LOCAL
C 192.005.252 002
1
J
GLOBAL
C 192.005.251 003
3
6879
A
GLOBAL
C 192.001.001 001
5
08-00-09-11-22-11
K
GLOBAL
C 192.004.002 001
1
Chapter 3
ADDITIONAL
ADDRESS
59
Planning Your Network
Network Directory Worksheet
60
Chapter 3
4
Planning for Node Configuration
This chapter describes how to complete node worksheets before you
start configuration. You will need to collect some information ahead of
time to complete these tasks.
The main purpose of the node worksheets is to determine the
information you will need to configure for each node during NMMGR’s
guided configuration. This information depends on the type of network
you have. For a description of the fields in these worksheets, see
Chapter 6 , “Configuring a LAN Node,” for information on LAN, Token
Ring, and FDDI, and Chapter 7 , “Configuring a Point-to-Point Node,”
for information on Point-to-Point and Chapter 8 , “Configuring a X.25
Node,” for information on X.25.
It is recommended that you make copies of these worksheets and fill in
the parameter information, then use these worksheets to guide you
through configuration in NMMGR.
Node worksheets list only the fields you can configure during guided
configuration, which allows you to configure your nodes as quickly as
possible. For information on configuration parameters that are
available through non-guided configuration, see the NS 3000/iX
NMMGR Screens Reference Manual.
This chapter includes:
• Node worksheet information.
— Node worksheet information.
— Token Ring configuration worksheet
— FDDI configuration worksheet.
— 100VG-AnyLAN configuration worksheet.
— 100Base-T configuration worksheet.
— Point-to-Point configuration worksheet.
— X.25 configuration worksheet.
— X.25 virtual circuit configuration worksheet.
• Neighbor gateway worksheet information.
— Neighbor gateway configuration worksheet.
• Neighbor gateway reachable networks worksheet Information.
— Neighbor gateway reachable networks configuration worksheet.
61
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Node Worksheet Information
Table 4-1, has a description of the information that needs to be
gathered for the worksheets that are in this chapter. Check the
worksheets to see which is the appropriate information to gather. This
information is used in the configuration chapters of this manual.
Table 4-1
Configuration Worksheet Information
Field
Screen
Description
Address key
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
In the network directory, the name of
each node listed in the remote node
name field. HP recommends that you
use the node portion of the remote
node’s node name as the address key.
Card number
X.25 Configuration
Slot number of the DTC/X.25 Network
Access card.
DTC node name
X.25 Configuration
Node name of the DTC in the form
node.domain.organization. Must
agree with node name configured
through during configuration of the
datacommunications and terminal
subsystem (DTS). The node name
must be entered for each DTC/X.25
network access card that allows
system-to-system connections.
Enable ethernet/
Enable IEEE 802.3
LAN Configuration
Both ethernet and IEEE 802.3 are
enabled by default. You may disable
one or the other but not both (one
must be enabled). To disable either
ethernet or IEEE 802.3, enter an N
(no) in the field next to the enable
question.
Facility set
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
For SVCs only. A name for a collection
of X.25 connection parameters in the
network directory. Use the default
(STDSFSET) or enter a different
name, then go to Facility sets to define
parameters. It must match the
parameters specified by your network
subscription.
62
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Table 4-1
Configuration Worksheet Information
Field
Screen
Description
IP address
LAN Configuration;
Token Ring Configuration;
FDDI Configuration;
Point-to-Point Configuration;
X.25 Configuration
There are two methods of entering an
internet protocol (IP) address within
NMMGR:
1. Enter the fully qualified IP
address (for example, Class C,
C 192.191.191 009).
OR
2. Enter only the network (nnn) and
node (xxx) portions of the IP
address as four positive integers
between 0 and 255 separated by
periods or blanks (for example,
15.123.44.98).
You need not enter the following
items as NMMGR will fill these in:
a. Class A, B, C
b. Leading zeros for the network
and node portion of the IP
address.
All nodes on the same network must
use the same class of IP address. The
network portion of the address must
be the same for all nodes on the same
network.
IP subnet mask
LAN Configuration;
Token Ring Configuration;
FDDI Configuration;
Point-to-Point Configuration;
X.25 Configuration
Link name
The IP subnet mask is optional. An IP
subnet mask is specified in the same
format as an IP address. The mask
identifies which bits of an IP address
will be used to define a subnetwork.
For more information refer, to the
configuration chapter for the type of
link you are configuring.
The link name represents a hardware
interface card. This name must be
unique to both the node and the
network. The link name can have up
to eight alphanumeric characters and
the first character must be alphabetic.
(LAN Link name)
LAN Configuration
This represents the LAN card for
which you are configuring a link.
(Token Ring Link
name)
Token Ring configuration
This represents the Token Ring card
for which you are configuring a link.
Chapter 4
63
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Table 4-1
Configuration Worksheet Information
Field
Screen
Description
(FDDI Link name)
FDDI Configuration
This represents the FDDI card for
which you are configuring a link.
(100VG-AnyLAN
Link name)
LAN Configuration
This represents the 100VG-AnyLAN
card for which you are configuring a
link.
(100Base-T Link
name)
LAN Configuration
This represents the 100Base-T card
for which you are configuring a link.
(X.25 Link name)
X.25 Configuration
The name of the link used by X.25 iX
System Access. It must match the link
name configured during configuration
of the datacommunications and
terminal subsystem (DTS).
(Point-to-Point Link
name)
Point-to-Point Configuration
This represents the PSI card for
which you are configuring a link.
Local node name
Main
The node name is the name by which
the HP e3000 computer is known in
the network. The format of a node
name is
nodename.domain.organization
where the total number of characters
is 50 or fewer, and each field contains
16 or fewer characters (alphanumeric,
underscore, or hyphens). The first
character of each field must be
alphabetic.
Local domain name
NS Configuration
The name of the system in ARPANET
standard format. It is composed of
labels, with each label separated by a
period. Labels must start with a letter
or digit and have as interior
characters only letters, digits,
hyphens(-), or underbars (_). There
may be any number of labels, but the
total length of the name, including
periods, is limited to 255 characters.
(If not using domain names for
network access, leave the local node
name in this field.)
64
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Table 4-1
Configuration Worksheet Information
Field
Screen
Description
Network directory
name
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
The network directory name must be
configured for each new node. The
network directory contains
information that one node needs in
order to communicate with other
nodes. The only network directory
name supported by HP is
NSDIR.NET.SYS.
Network Interface
(NI) name
LAN Configuration;
Token Ring Configuration;
FDDI Configuration;
Point-to-Point Configuration;
X.25 Configuration
The network interface (NI) name is
used to easily identify a network
interface. The name can be up to eight
alphanumeric characters, starting
with a letter. The maximum number
of NIs that can be configured on a
node is 48. If a node interfaces to more
than one network, give each NI on
that node a unique name. You will use
the NI name with the NETCONTROL
command to start the transport and
network link.
Permanent VC
number
X.25 Virtual circuit
Configuration
For PVCs only. In the network
directory, the number of the
permanent virtual circuit on the
remote node.
Physical path
Point-to-Point Configuration
This is the location of the
programmable serial interface. Refer
to Chapter 7 , “Configuring a
Point-to-Point Node,” for further
details regarding physical path.
Physical path of
LANIC
LAN Configuration
This is the location of the LANIC
device adapter card. Refer to the LAN
section of Chapter 6 , “Configuring a
LAN Node,” for further details
regarding physical path.
Physical path of
device adapter
FDDI Configuration
This is the location of the FDDI device
adapter card. Refer to the FDDI
section of Chapter 6 , “Configuring a
LAN Node,” for further details
regarding the physical path.
Physical path of
Token Ring device
adapter
Token Ring Configuration
This is the location of the Token Ring
device adapter card. Refer to the
Token Ring section of Chapter 6 ,
“Configuring a LAN Node,” for further
details regarding physical path.
Chapter 4
65
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Table 4-1
Configuration Worksheet Information
Field
Screen
Description
Proxy node
LAN Configuration
The proxy field is optional. Enter Y
(yes) only if your network has
internetworks (networks with
gateways) or non-HP nodes.
Establishing a proxy node is a way of
placing node name and address
mapping information in a single
location. For more information, see
the configuration chapter for LAN
link.
Remote IP address
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
In the network directory, the IP
address of each node listed in the
remote node name field.
Remote node name
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
In the network directory, the name of
each remote X.25 node on the network
Remote X.25 address
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
For SVCs only. In the network
directory, the X.25 address of the
remote host for X.25 public data
networks or private networks.
Security class
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Configuration
For SVCs only. In the network
directory, the security to be applied for
connection establishment with the
remote node.
Speed
Point-to-Point Configuration
The line transmission speed is given
in bits per second. For direct connect
the value must be supported by the
cable. Values are 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200, 38400, 56000, and
64000. The default is 56000.
Type
Point-to-Point Configuration
Enter DD (direct dial) if you always
want to call the same host over a dial
link. If you choose DD the remote host
does not have to be adjacent and other
nodes can be accessed through the
remote host. Enter SD if you want to
call more than one adjacent remote
node over a dial link without
reconfiguring. If you choose SD, no
other remote nodes can be accessed
through the remote host; it is an end
point in the connection. Enter DC if
the link is a leased line, private line,
or other non-switched link.
66
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
LAN Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-1) for each LAN link you are
configuring.
Figure 4-1
LAN Configuration Worksheet
LAN Configuration Worksheet
Node Name ___________________________________________________
Network Interface (NI) name ____________________________________
IP address ____________________________________________
IP subnet mask__________________________________ (optional)
Proxy name____________________ (Y/N)
Node Name ___________________________________________________
Link type ___________________________ (BT100, VG100LAN, LAN)
Physical path of LANIC ______________________________
Enable Ethernet _____________________________________ (Y/N)
Enable IEEE 802.3 __________________________________ (Y/N)
Chapter 4
67
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Token Ring Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-2) for each Token Ring link
you are configuring.
Figure 4-2
Token Ring Configuration Worksheet
68
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
FDDI Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-3) for each FDDI link you are
configuring.
Figure 4-3
FDDI Configuration Worksheet
Chapter 4
69
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
100VG-AnyLAN Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-4) for each 100VG-AnyLAN
link you are configuring.
Figure 4-4
100VG-AnyLAN Configuration Worksheet
70
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
100Base-T Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-5) for each 100Base-T link
you are configuring.
Figure 4-5
100Base-T Configuration Worksheet
Chapter 4
71
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
Point-to-Point Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-6) for each Point-to-Point link
you are configuring.
Figure 4-6
Point-to-Point Configuration Worksheet
Point-to-Point Configuration Worksheet
Node Name ___________________________________________________ (Specify local system)
Network Interface (NI) name _______________________________________
IP address ___________________________________IP subnet mask ____________ (optional)
Link name
Link type
Physical Path
Speed
Type
(LAPBMUX or LAPB)
72
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
X.25 Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-7) for each X.25 link you are
configuring.
Figure 4-7
X.25 Configuration Worksheet
Chapter 4
73
Planning for Node Configuration
Node Worksheet Information
X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-8) for each X.25 Virtual
Circuit you are configuring.
Figure 4-8
X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration Worksheet
74
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Neighbor Gateway Worksheet Information
Neighbor Gateway Worksheet Information
The following is a description of the information that needs to be
gathered for the worksheets that follow in this chapter. This
information is used for configuring nodes.
Gateway name
Enter the name of a gateway that is on the same
network as the node that you are configuring. (Nodes
are on the same network if the network portions of
their IP addresses are the same.) Each gateway name
can be as long as eight alphanumeric characters. The
first character must be alphabetic
New name
Enter the name of a gateway that is on the same
network as the node that you are configuring. (Nodes
are on the same network if the network portions of
their IP addresses are the same.) Each gateway name
can be as long as eight alphanumeric characters. The
first character must be alphabetic.
Configured Gateways
This is a list of gateways that are configured. Gateway
names are automatically entered in these fields when
they are entered above.
Chapter 4
75
Planning for Node Configuration
Neighbor Gateway Worksheet Information
Neighbor Gateway Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-9) for each neighbor gateway
you are configuring.
Figure 4-9
Neighbor Gateway Configuration Worksheet
76
Chapter 4
Planning for Node Configuration
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Worksheet Information
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks
Worksheet Information
The following is a description of the information that needs to be
gathered for the worksheets that follow in this chapter. This
information is used for configuring nodes.
Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address
This is the IP address of the gateway specified on the
Neighbor Gateways screen. The IP address is in the
same format as the LAN Configuration screen. An
example of an address is: C 192.007.007 001
IP network address
The IP addresses of all the remote networks that can be
reached through the gateway whose IP address is
configured in the previous field. If the gateway node is
to serve as a default gateway, enter an at sign (@) in one
of these fields.
IP mask
The IP mask allows you to specify a subnet mask for
each reachable network. This is in the same format as
an IP address. This mask is optional.
Hops
This is the number of hops (full gateways) that a packet
travels to reach a remote network from a local network.
Two partner gateway halves count as one hop.
Chapter 4
77
Planning for Node Configuration
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Worksheet Information
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks
Configuration Worksheet
Fill out the following worksheet (Figure 4-10) for each neighbor
gateway reachable network you are configuring.
Figure 4-10
Reachable Network Configuration Worksheet
78
Chapter 4
Introductory Screens
5
The introductory screens are the first few screens that are displayed
when you configure a node using NMMGR.
Figure 5-1 shows the screen flow of the introductory screens.
[FUNCTION] denotes the function key used at a screen to invoke the next
screen on the screen flow. This chapter describes the introductory
screens relevant to configuring NS unguided networks.
Figure 5-1
NMMGR Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
Main Screen
If you have not created the
config file, then press the
OPEN CONFIG key a second
time.
[NS]
DTS
OSI
IBM
Utility
NS Config
[UNGUIDED]
[GUIDED]
Unguided
Config*
Network
Transport Config
[CONFIG
NETWORK]
[MODIFY
LOGGING]
[LIST
NETWORK]
LAN
Token Ring
FDDI
*For information specific to the unguided configuration screens, refer to the
NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference Manual.
Point-to-Point
X.25
Gateway Half
79
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Begin Configuration Process
The procedures that follow describe how to modify the NMMGR
configuration file for the introductory screens.
Start NMMGR
Node manager (NM) or network administrator (NA) capabilities are
required to run this program.
To run NMMGR:
1. Type NMMGR.PUB.SYS at the system prompt (:).
2. Press [RETURN].
NOTE
You can modify the link configurations in NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS when the
Network Services are active. However, the network must be stopped
and restarted for the changes made in NMMGR to be implemented.
If NS is down, you will see the following two messages in response to
the NETCONTROL STATUS command:
TRANSPORT NOT ACTIVE. (NETEXPORTWARN 0001) ENCOUNTERED ONE
OR MORE WARNINGS WHILE PROCESSING COMMAND. (CIWARN 4437)
80
Chapter 5
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Open Configuration File
The Open Configuration/Directory File screen (#1) in Figure 5-2 is the
first screen displayed when you run NMMGR.
Figure 5-2
Open Configuration/Directory File Screen
Follow the steps listed here to enter data for this screen. Refer to
“Fields” subsection for detailed information about each field on the
screen.
Step 1. Verify that the correct configuration file name, backup configuration file
name, and network directory file name are in the appropriate fields.
Step 2. If you have assigned a write access password, enter it in this field. If
you are not using the password feature, leave this field blank.
Step 3. Press the [Open Config] key. If you are creating the configuration file for
the first time, NMMGR will ask you to verify creation. Press the
[Open Config] key again to continue.
Fields
configuration file name
The only configuration file name the system recognizes
for use by the network subsystem is
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. You can, however, create or modify
a configuration file using a different name and save it
as an offline configuration file. You can use offline
configuration files as a means of creating and storing
configurations that you want to use in the future or
that you are preparing for use on a different system.
Chapter 5
81
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
When you are ready to use an offline configuration
file, rename it as NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS and reboot the
system. (Keep in mind that any file you use as a
configuration file must be successfully validated before
you try to use it.)
Backup configurationfile name
A backup file name must be specified whenever a
configuration file is opened or created. The default
backup configuration file name is
NMCBACK.group.account. The backup file will be
automatically updated with the contents of the
configuration file each time the configuration file is
successfully validated.
Network directory file name
A network directory must be configured in the following
circumstances:
• nodes running X.25
• nodes not using domain name services
• nodes on a LAN network that do not support the
HP-PROBE protocol
The only network directory file name supported by HP
is NSDIR.NET.SYS. This file is part of a KSAM pair. A
key file is created at the same time as this data file. The
key file will automatically be named using the first six
letters of the network directory file name, appended
with the character K. For example, NSDIRK.NET.SYS is
the name of the key file associated with the data file
NSDIR.NET.SYS. If the name of the data file is less than
six letters long, then the entire file name would be
appended with a K.
Write access password
The password is an optional feature. If a password has
been assigned, you must enter it in the password field
to update the configuration file or the directory file. It is
still possible to open an existing file without using an
assigned password, but the file will be in read only
mode and NMMGR will not accept changes.
If a password has not been assigned, you should ignore
the password field.
If you want to assign a password for the system you are
configuring, see Using the Node Management Services
(NMS) Utilities.
82
Chapter 5
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Select NS Configuration
To Select NS Configuration. The Main screen (#2) in Figure 5-3 is
displayed after you create or open a configuration file by pressing the
[Open Config] key from the Open Configuration Directory File screen
(#1) in Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-3
Main Screen
Step 1. Ensure that the information in the fields on this screen is correct. If not,
or if the information has not been entered, specify the correct
information and press the [Save Data] key. (See Configuring Systems for
Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial Devices for information about
configuring the information on this screen.)
Step 2. When you are satisfied with the information as configured, press the
[NS] key to select the NS configuration branch.
Chapter 5
83
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Fields
Local node name
The local node name is the name by which the
HP e3000 computer is known in the network. The
format of a node name is
nodename.domain.organization where the total
number of characters is 50 or fewer, and each field
contains 16 or fewer characters (alphanumeric,
underscore, or hyphens). The first character of each
field must be alphabetic.
The nodename portion of each node name must be
unique within the node’s network. The
nodename.domain portion of each node name must be
unique within the internetwork. HP recommends that
all nodes on the network be assigned the same domain
and organization.
Assign meaningful node names. For example,
MKTG.BND.HP and LAB.BND.HP are meaningful names
for two nodes on the same network within
Hewlett-Packard. One node (MKTG.BND.HP) is used by
the marketing department. The other node
(LAB.BND.HP) is used by the lab. The domain field is the
same because the nodes belong to the same network.
The organization field is the same because the nodes
belong to the same internetwork.
Are you using OpenView DTC Manager?
If you answer yes to this question, NMMGR assumes
you are using a PC to manage your system and takes
you to the corresponding set of screens when you
configure DTS. If you answer no, NMMGR assumes you
are using host-based network management and takes
you to a different set of DTS screens. You should
already have answered this question when you
configured DTS.
Do you have X.25 system- to-system or PAD connections?
If you answer yes to this question, NMMGR assumes
you are configuring X.25 connections and takes you to
the set of screens required to configure DTC X.25
Network Access Cards when you configure DTS. If you
answer no, NMMGR assumes you have no need to
configure X.25 connections and takes you to a different
set of DTS screens. You should already have answered
this question when you configured DTS.
84
Chapter 5
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Select Guided Configuration
The NS Configuration screen (#166) in Figure 5-4 is displayed if you
press the [NS] key at the Main screen (#2) in Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-4
NS Configuration Screen
Step 1. If you are using domain names for network access, replace the node
name in the field at the bottom of the screen with this system’s domain
name and press the [Save Data] key. If not using domain names, leave
the node name as is.
Step 2. Press the [Guided Config] key to proceed with guided configuration of
LAN.
Chapter 5
85
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Guided/Unguided Configuration
Hewlett-Packard recommends that you press the [Guided Config] key to
select the guided configuration branch whenever you need to initially
configure a network interface. Guided configuration supplies many
default values for your configuration and requires that you visit a
minimal number of screens. This manual provides information on every
screen available to you through unguided NS configuration.
The [Unguided Config] key is used to modify configuration values that
are not available in the guided screens. To use the unguided
configuration screens, refer to the NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens
Reference Manual.
Fields
Local Domain Name
The name of this system in the ARPANET standard
format. This name can be used by other nodes on the
network to access this host.
The domain name is composed of labels, with each label
separated by a period. Each label must start with a
letter or digit, and have as interior characters only
letters, digits, hyphens (-), or underbars (_). A domain
name may have any number of labels, but its total
length, including periods, is limited to 255 characters.
label[.label][...]
Domain names are not case sensitive.
Use of domain names is optional. If you are not using
domain names for network access, leave the local node
name in this field.
86
Chapter 5
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Perform Guided Network Transport Configuration
The Network Transport Configuration screen (#42) in Figure 5-5 is
displayed if you press the [Guided Config] key at the NS Configuration
screen (#166) in Figure 5-4.
Figure 5-5
Network Transport Configuration Screen
Step 1. Next to the words Enter a network interface:, enter a name for the
selected network interface (for example, LANNI).
Step 2. Next to the words Enter a network type:, enter the selected network
type number indicated on the above screen. (For example, enter a 1 to
indicate that the NI is a LAN NI.)
Step 3. Press the [Config Network] key. (There may be a short pause before the
next screen appears.)
Step 4. Proceed to the chapter of the network interface selected above for
screen information. Refer to Chapter 6 , “Configuring a LAN Node,” for
information on LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, and
100Base-T; and other chapters for information on Point-to-Point, X.25,
and Gateway Half respectively.
Chapter 5
87
Introductory Screens
Begin Configuration Process
Fields
Enter a network interface
The network name (NI name) is used to easily identify
one of the types of network interfaces: LAN, Token
Ring, FDDI, NS Point-to-Point, X.25 or Gateway Half.
The name can be up to eight alphanumeric characters,
starting with a letter. The maximum number of NIs
that can be configured on a node is 48. One of the 48
allowable NIs is reserved for loopback.
(Loopback is configured for you automatically.)
If a node interfaces to more than one network, give each
NI on that node a unique name. Although all nodes on
the same network do not have to have the same NI
name, it will be easier to remember if you make the NI
name the same for all nodes on the same network (for
instance, LANNET). You will use the NI name with the
NETCONTROL command to start the transport and
network link.
Enter a network type
Number that indicates the type of network interface
you are configuring. You must enter a network type if
you are configuring a new network interface. Refer to
the following for what number to enter:
• Enter 1 for a LAN NI (100Base-T, ThinLAN or
100VG-AnyLAN)
• Enter 2 for a Point-to-Point (router) NI
• Enter 3 for an X.25 NI
• Enter 5 for a Gateway Half NI
• Enter 6 for a Token Ring NI
• Enter 7 for an FDDI NI
88
Chapter 5
Configuring a LAN Node
6
This chapter provides step-by-step instructions for configuring local
area network (LAN), Token Ring, Fiber Distributed Data Interface
(FDDI), 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T links. This manual assumes
that you are using the guided configuration capabilities of NMMGR.
Figure 6-1 shows the screen flow for configuring LAN, Token Ring,
FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T screens. Screens unique to the
configuration of LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN and
100Base-T are indicated by bold boxed screens. [FUNCTION] denotes the
function key used at a screen to invoke the next screen on the screen
flow.
Figure 6-1
Configuring Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
Main Screen
[NS]
If you have not created the
config file, then press the
OPEN CONFIG key a second
time.
NS Config
[GUIDED]
Network Transport
Config
[CONFIG NETWORK]
(Network Interface)
LinkConfig
Selection
Enter Network Interface:
LAN, Token Ring or FDDI
[NEIGHBOR GATEWAY]
[VALIDATE NETXPORT]
Neighbor
Gateways
Link Selection
[ADD or MODIFY]
Validate Link,
Cross-validate
with SYSGEN
Neighbor Gateway
Reachable Networks
89
Configuring a LAN Node
Before using NMMGR to configure a link, you should complete the
worksheets provided. See Chapter 4 , “Planning for Node
Configuration,” for more information on planning your configuration
and filling out the configuration worksheets.
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Begin the configuration process.
• Configure a LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, or 100Base-T
network interface.
Once the above tasks are completed, refer to Chapter 10 , “Validating
and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” for step-by-step instructions to
help you perform the following validation tasks:
• Validate the network transport configuration.
• Cross-validate in SYSGEN.
90
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a LAN Network Interface
Configure a LAN Network Interface
The LAN Configuration screen (#41) in Figure 6-2 is displayed when
you press the [Config Network] key at the Network Transport
Configuration screen (#42) with an NI type of 1 (LAN). Refer to Chapter
5 , “Introductory Screens,” for information on the Network Transport
Configuration screen.
Figure 6-2
LAN Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the IP address field, enter the internet protocol (IP) address for the
node being configured. An example of an address is:
C 192.191.191 009.
Step 2. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the IP subnet
mask field and enter the number in the same format as an IP address.
Step 3. The proxy node is optional. Enter Y only if your network has
internetworks (networks with gateways) or non-HP nodes and you are
not using domain name services.
Step 4. Move to the Link name field. Enter a link name to represent the LAN
card for which you are configuring a link. This name must be unique to
the node.
Step 5. Move to the Link type field. Enter BT100 for a 100Base-T link, LAN
for a ThinLAN link, or VG100 LAN for a 100VG-AnyLAN link.
Chapter 6
91
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a LAN Network Interface
Step 6. Tab down to the field called Physical path of LANIC. Enter the
physical path number corresponding to the SPU slot number where the
LAN interface controller card is located.
Step 7. Tab down to the field called Enable Ethernet (Y/N). By default,
ethernet is enabled. Change the field to N if you do not want ethernet
and the ARP protocol enabled.
Step 8. Tab down to field called Enable IEEE 802.3 (Y/N). By default,
IEEE 802.3 is enabled. Change the field to N if you do not want
IEEE 802.3 and the Probe protocol enabled.
Step 9. Press the [Save Data] key to save the LAN link configuration. If you
need to identify neighbor gateways, press the [Neighbor Gateways] key
and proceed to the section in this chapter called “To Identify Neighbor
Gateways.” Otherwise, proceed to Chapter 10 , “Validating and
Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” and press the [Validate Netxport] key.
Optional Keys
Press the [List NIs] key to list the names and types of
already configured network interfaces.
Press the [Delete NI] key to remove a configured network
interface from the configuration file.
Press the [Read Other NI] key to call up a previously
configured Network Interface name.
Fields
Node name
Display only.
Network Interface (NI) name
Display only.
IP address
The IP address is an address of a node on a network. An
IP address has two parts: a network portion and a node
portion. The network portion must be the same for all
nodes on a LAN network; the node portion must be
unique for all nodes on a LAN network.
There are two methods of entering an internet protocol (IP) address
within NMMGR:
1. Enter the fully qualified IP address (for example, Class C,
C 192.191.191 009).
OR
2. Enter only the network (nnn) and node (xxx) portions of the IP
address as four positive integers between 0 and 255 separated by
periods or blanks (for example, 15.123.44.98).
92
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a LAN Network Interface
You need not enter the following items as NMMGR will fill these in:
• Class A, B, C
• Leading zeros for the network and node portion of the IP address.
HP assigns the network portion (initial nine digits) of IP addresses
from ARPA Class C, though your addresses may also be of Classes A
or B. The complete formats are:
Class
A nnn xxx.xxx.xxx
B nnn.nnn xxx.xxx
C nnn.nnn.nnn xxx
Where:
nnn = the network portion of the IP address and
xxx = the node portion of the IP address.
For Class C, the node portion of the IP address must be between 001
and 254.
If you are adding your NS 3000/iX node to an existing network, the
network portion of each node’s IP address should be the same. You will
have to find out what this is, and use it in the network portion of the IP
address of your NS 3000/iX node. Also, you will need to know the node
portions of the IP addresses of each of the nodes (usually they will be
numbered sequentially, such as 001, 002, and so on), so that you can
specify a unique node portion for the IP address of your node. If you
have a network map, it should provide a record of such items as the
node name and IP address of each node. If there is no record, and if you
want to find out each node’s IP address, you will have to issue the
following command (NM capability required) on each of the nodes:
NETCONTROL NET=NIname;STATUS
One of the lines of output from this command tells you what the
complete IP address is for that node; the last three digits are the unique
node portion of the class C address.
IP subnet mask
Chapter 6
An IP subnet mask is specified in the
same format as an IP address. The
32-bit mask is grouped in octets
expressed as decimal integers and
delimited by either a period (.) or a
space. An IP mask is used when
configuring subnetworks. The mask
identifies which bits of an IP address
will be used to define a subnetwork. To
determine these bits, you first need to
estimate how many subnetworks and
nodes per subnetwork you need. See
Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” for
details on deriving an IP subnet mask.
93
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a LAN Network Interface
Proxy node
Establishing a proxy node is a way of
placing node name and address
mapping information in a single
location. If you are configuring an
internetwork or a network with
non-HP nodes, it may be easier to
update your configurations if you have
them located in a central place, that is,
the proxy node. On an internetwork,
the proxy node is usually a gateway. (It
is not necessary to configure a proxy
node if you have configured domain
names. See Chapter 12 , “Configuring
Domain Name Files,” for information
on domain names.)
Link name
The link name can have up to eight
alphanumeric characters and the first
character must be alphabetic.
Physical Path of LANIC
The physical path number corresponds
to the slot location of a node’s local area
network interface controller (LANIC)
card. Recommended slot locations and
physical path calculations vary
according to the type of HP e3000
system you are running.
For the various platforms, physical
path syntax (examples only) look like:
Series 9x7:
48
Series 9x8:
56/44
Series 9x9:
10/4/16
Series 99x:
0/28/12
Series N4000:
1/10/0/0
Series A500:
0/2/0/0
If you are unsure of the slot location or
of the physical path number to
configure for your system, run the
offline ODE MAPPER utility, see your
system documentation, or consult your
Hewlett-Packard service
representative.
94
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a LAN Network Interface
Enable Ethernet?
A Y in this field enables ethernet for the
LAN. You can enable either ethernet or
IEEE 802.3 or both simultaneously.
One or the other must be enabled (both
fields may not be set to N). Ethernet is
enabled by default.
Disabling Ethernet has the effect of
disabling the ARP protocol and you will
need to handle both name to IP and IP
to station (MAC) address resolution by
other means.
Enable IEEE 802.3?
A Y in this field enables IEEE 802.3 for
the LAN. You can enable either
IEEE 802.3 or ethernet or both
simultaneously. One or the other must
be enabled (both fields may not be set
to N). IEEE 802.3 is enabled by default.
Disabling IEEE 802.3 has the effect of
disabling the probe protocol and you
will need to handle both name to IP
and IP to station (MAC) address
resolution by other means.
Chapter 6
95
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a Token Ring Network Interface
Configure a Token Ring Network Interface
The Token Ring Configuration screen (#49) in Figure 6-3 is displayed
when you press the [Config Network] key at the Network Transport
Configuration screen (#42) with an NI type of 6 (Token Ring). Refer to
Chapter 5 , “Introductory Screens,” for information on the Network
Transport Configuration screen.
Figure 6-3
Token Ring Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the IP address field, enter the internet protocol (IP) address for the
node being configured. An example of an address is
C 192.191.191 009.
Step 2. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the IP subnet
mask field and enter the number in the same format as an IP address.
Step 3. Move to the Link name field. Enter a link name to represent the Token
Ring card for which you are configuring a link. This name must be
unique to the node.
Step 4. Tab down to the field called Physical Path of Token Ring Device
Adapter. Enter the physical path number corresponding to the SPU
slot number where the Token Ring device adapter is located.
NOTE
If the same Token Ring card is being used for both NS and SNA
communications, you must use the same value for this field as is
configured for the SNA Link.
96
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a Token Ring Network Interface
Step 5. Press the [Save Data] key to save the Token Ring link configuration. If
you need to identify neighbor gateways, press the [Neighbor Gateways]
key and proceed to the section in the chapter called “To Identify
Neighbor Gateways.” Otherwise, proceed to Chapter 10 , “Validating
and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” and press the [Validate Netxport]
key.
Optional Keys Press the [List NIs] key to list the names and types of
already configured network interfaces.
Press the [Delete NI] key to remove a configured network
interface from the configuration file.
Press the [Read Other NI] key to call up a previously
configured Network Interface name.
Fields
Node name
Display only.
Network Interface (NI) name
Display only.
IP address
The IP address is an address of a node on a network. An
IP address has two parts: a network portion and a node
portion. The network portion must be the same for all
nodes on a LAN network; the node portion must be
unique for all nodes on a LAN network.
Class
A nnn xxx.xxx.xxx
B nnn.nnn xxx.xxx
C nnn.nnn.nnn xxx
Where:
nnn = the network portion of the IP address and
xxx = the node portion of the IP address.
For Class C, the node portion of the IP address must be between 001
and 254.
If you are adding your NS 3000/iX node to an existing network, the
network portion of each node’s IP address should be the same. You will
have to find out what this is, and use it in the network portion of the IP
address of your NS 3000/iX node. Also, you will need to know the node
portions of the IP addresses of each of the nodes (usually they will be
numbered sequentially, such as 001, 002, and so on), so that you can
specify a unique node portion for the IP address of your node. If you
have a network map, it should provide a record of such items as the
node name and IP address of each node. If there is no record, and if you
want to find out each node’s IP address, you will have to issue the
following command (NM capability required) on each of the nodes:
Chapter 6
97
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure a Token Ring Network Interface
NETCONTROL NET=NIname;STATUS
One of the lines of output from this command tells you what the
complete IP address is for that node; the last three digits are the unique
node portion of the class C address.
IP subnet mask
An IP subnet mask is specified in the same format as
an IP address. The 32-bit mask is grouped in octets
expressed as decimal integers and delimited by either a
period (.) or a space. An IP mask is used when
configuring subnetworks. The mask identifies which
bits of the IP address comprise the network and
subnetwork portion.
Link name
The link name can have up to eight alphanumeric
characters and the first character must be alphabetic.
NOTE
If the same Token Ring card is being used for both NS and SNA
communications, you must use the same name in this field as is
configured for the SNA Link.
Physical path of device adapter
The physical path number corresponds to the slot
location of a node’s device adapter. Recommended slot
locations and physical path calculations vary according
to the type of HP e3000 system you are running.
If you are unsure of the slot location or of the physical
path number to configure for your system, see your
system documentation or consult your Hewlett-Packard
service representative.
For the various platforms, physical path syntax
(examples only) look like:
Series 9x7:
48
Series 9x8:
56/44
Series 9x9:
10/4/16
Series 99x:
0/28/12
If you are unsure of the slot location or of the physical
path number to configure for your system, run the
offline ODE MAPPER utility, see your system
documentation, or consult your Hewlett-Packard
service representative.
98
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure an FDDI Network Interface
Configure an FDDI Network Interface
The FDDI Configuration screen (#201) in Figure 6-4 is displayed when
you press the [Config Network] key at the Network Transport
Configuration screen (#42) with an NI type of 7 (FDDI). Refer to
Chapter 5 , “Introductory Screens,” for information on the Network
Transport Configuration screen.
Figure 6-4
FDDI Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the IP address field, enter the internet protocol (IP) address for the
node being configured. An example of an address is
C 192.191.191 009.
Step 2. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the IP subnet
mask field and enter the number in the same format as an IP address.
Step 3. Move to the Link name field. Enter a link name to represent the FDDI
card for which you are configuring a link. This name must be unique to
the node.
Step 4. Tab down to the field called Physical Path of FDDI Device Adapter.
Enter the physical path number corresponding to the SPU slot number
where the FDDI device adapter is located.
Chapter 6
99
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure an FDDI Network Interface
Step 5. Press the [Save Data] key to save the FDDI link configuration. If you
need to identify neighbor gateways, press the [Neighbor Gateways] key
and proceed to the section in the chapter called “To Identify Neighbor
Gateways.” Otherwise, proceed to Chapter 10 , “Validating and
Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” and press the [Validate Netxport] key.
Optional Keys
Press the [List NIs] key to list the names
and types of already configured
network interfaces.
Press the [Delete NI] key to remove a
configured network interface from the
configuration file.
Press the [Read Other NI] key to call up
a previously configured Network
Interface name.
Fields
Node name
Display only.
Network Interface (NI) name
Display only.
IP address
The IP address is an address of a node on a network. An
IP address has two parts: a network portion and a node
portion. The network portion must be the same for all
nodes on a FDDI network; the node portion must be
unique for all nodes on a FDDI network.
There are two methods of entering an internet protocol (IP) address
within NMMGR:
1. Enter the fully qualified IP address (for example, Class C,
C 192.191.191 009).
OR
2. Enter only the network (nnn) and node (xxx) portions of the IP
address as four positive integers between 0 and 255 separated by
periods or blanks (for example, 15.123.44.98).
You need not enter the following items as NMMGR will fill these in:
• Class A, B, C
• Leading zeros for the network and node portion of the IP address.
100
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure an FDDI Network Interface
HP assigns the network portion (initial nine digits) of IP addresses
from ARPA Class C, though your addresses may also be of Classes A or
B. The complete formats are:
Class
A nnn xxx.xxx.xxx
B nnn.nnn xxx.xxx
C nnn.nnn.nnn xxx
Where:
nnn = the network portion of the IP address and
xxx = the node portion of the IP address.
For Class C, the node portion of the IP address must be between 001
and 254.
If you are adding your NS 3000/iX node to an existing network, the
network portion of each node’s IP address should be the same. You will
have to find out what this is, and use it in the network portion of the IP
address of your NS 3000/iX node. Also, you will need to know the node
portions of the IP addresses of each of the nodes (usually they will be
numbered sequentially, such as 001, 002, and so on), so that you can
specify a unique node portion for the IP address of your node. If you
have a network map, it should provide a record of such items as the
node name and IP address of each node. If there is no record, and if you
want to find out each node’s IP address, you will have to issue the
following command (NM capability required) on each of the nodes:
NETCONTROL NET=NIname;STATUS
One of the lines of output from this command tells you what the
complete IP address is for that node; the last three digits are the unique
node portion of the class C address.
IP subnet mask
An IP subnet mask is specified in the same format as
an IP address. The 32-bit mask is grouped in octets
expressed as decimal integers and delimited by either a
period (.) or a space. An IP mask is used when
configuring subnetworks. The mask identifies which
bits of the IP address comprise the network and
subnetwork portion.
Link name
The link name can have up to eight alphanumeric
characters and the first character must be alphabetic.
Physical path of device adapter
The physical path number corresponds to the slot
location of a node’s FDDI device adapter. Recommended
slot locations and physical path calculations vary
Chapter 6
101
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure an FDDI Network Interface
according to the type of HP e3000 system you are
running.
For the various platforms, physical path syntax
(examples only) look like:
Series 9x7:
48
Series 9x8:
56/44
Series 9x9:
10/4/16
Series 99x:
0/28/12
If you are unsure of the slot location or of the physical
path number to configure for your system, run the
offline ODE MAPPER utility, see your system
documentation, or consult your Hewlett-Packard
service representative.
102
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Configure Neighbor Gateways
You need to visit the next two screens only if you are configuring a
non-gateway node that is on the same network as a gateway. In this
case, the non-gateway node needs to know the identity of any neighbor
gateway. Neighbor gateways can be either full or half gateways.
Gateways that are on the same network are called neighbor
gateways. A non-gateway node on a LAN, Token Ring, or FDDI
network may need to go through a neighbor gateway in order to send
messages to an entirely different network. (Two nodes are on the same
network if the network portion of their IP addresses are the same.) All
LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN or 100Base-T nodes that are
on the same network as a neighbor gateway need to know the identity
of any neighbor gateways. When you configure a LAN, Token Ring,
FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, or 100Base-T node, you enter into its
configuration the identity of any accessible neighbor gateways that
share the same network. The identified gateways may be either full or
half gateways.
You may designate gateways as default gateways. Messages for a
network will be routed to a default gateway if there is no gateway
configured for the destination network. The default gateway will then
attempt to locate the destination of the message.
Chapter 6
103
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Identify Neighbor Gateways (If Any Are Present)
The Neighbor Gateways screen (#152) in Figure 6-5 is displayed when
you press the [Neighbor Gateways] key at the selected Guided
configuration screen for the LAN, Token Ring and FDDI networks.
Figure 6-5
Neighbor Gateways Screen
Step 1. In the Gateway name field, enter the name of a gateway that is on the
same network as the node that you are configuring. (Nodes are on the
same network if the network portions of their IP addresses are the
same.).
Step 2. If you are adding the identified gateway for the first time, press the
[Add] key. If you are modifying the configuration of this node, press the
[Modify] key. The Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen will be
displayed. Proceed to “Identify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks.
Step 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each gateway that is on the same network as
the node that you are configuring. When you have finished, press the
[Next Screen] key to return to the selected configuration screen (LAN,
Token Ring, or FDDI) and proceed to Chapter 10 , “Validating and
Cross-Validating with SYSGEN.”
Fields
Gateway name Each gateway name can be as long as eight
alphanumeric characters. The first character must be
alphabetic.
104
Chapter 6
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Identify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks
The Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen (#158) in Figure 6-6
is displayed when you press the [Add] or [Modify] key for a valid gateway
name from the Neighbor Gateways screen (#152) in Figure 6-5.
Figure 6-6
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Screen
Step 1. In the Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address field, enter the IP
address of the gateway specified on the Neighbor Gateways screen.
C 192.191.191 009 is a typical address.
Step 2. In the IP Network Address fields under the title Configured
Reachable Networks, enter the IP addresses of all the remote networks
that can be reached through the gateway whose IP address is
configured in the previous field. If you want to designate this gateway
as a default gateway, enter an at sign (@) in one of the fields as well.
Step 3. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the next field. In
the IP subnet mask field, enter the number in the same format as an IP
address.
Step 4. In the field labeled Hops, enter the number of hops (full gateways)
needed to get to the target network. Two partner gateway halves count
as one hop.
Step 5. Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 for each remote reachable network. The
information configured in this screen can extend to more than
one page, if necessary, to allow configuration of up to 2550
reachable networks per link (255 pages and 10 reachable nets
Chapter 6
105
Configuring a LAN Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
per page). If you need to configure more than 10 networks, press the
[Save Data] key then press the [Next Page] key to enter more networks.
Step 6. After you have finished entering the IP addresses of all the reachable
networks, press the [Save Data] key. Press the [Prior Screen] key to
return to the Neighbor Gateways screen.
Step 7. Back at the Neighbor Gateways screen, after you have finished adding
all of the neighboring gateways, press the [Prior Screen] key to return to
the selected configuration screen (LAN, Token Ring, or FDDI). Proceed
to Chapter 10 , “Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN.”
Fields
If you have identified any neighbor gateways, then you will also be
identifying: 1) the IP Network Addresses of all of the networks that you
can reach through that gateway, and 2) the number of hops
(corresponding to the number of gateways) that a packet passes
through to reach a remote network from the local network. Two
gateway halves count as one hop.
Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address
The IP address of the gateway whose name you have
specified on the Neighbor Gateways Screen. The IP
address is in the same format as the selected
configuration screen (LAN, Token Ring, or FDDI).
IP Network Address
In the fields under this heading, you list the IP
addresses of all of the networks that you will be able to
reach through the gateway you are configuring. You
also use this field to indicate whether or not the
gateway is to serve as a default gateway by
entering an at sign (@) to specify that it is a
default gateway. Only one gateway can be
designated as a default gateway for each
HP e3000 system.
IP Mask (Optional)
The fields under this heading allow you to specify a
subnet mask for each reachable network. This mask is
optional.
Hops
In the fields under this heading, enter the number of
hops corresponding to the number of gateways that a
packet travels to reach a remote network from a local
network.
106
Chapter 6
Configuring a Point-to-Point
Node
7
This chapter provides step-by-step instructions for configuring
Point-to-Point links. (Point-to-Point links are sometimes referred to as
router links.) This manual assumes that you are using the guided
configuration capabilities of NMMGR.
Figure 7-1 shows the screen flow for configuring Point-to-Point screens.
Screens unique to Point-to-Point configuration are indicated by bold
boxed screens. [FUNCTION] denotes the function key used at a screen to
invoke the next screen on the screen flow.
Figure 7-1
Point-to-Point Link Configuration Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
Main Screen
[NS]
NS Config
If you have not created
the config file, then
press the OPEN
CONFIG key a second
time.
[GUIDED CONFIG]
Network Transport
Config
[CONFIG NETWORK]
Point-to-Point Link
LinkConfig
Selection
[LINK ROUTING]
(TYPE SD)
Shared Dial Node
Mapping Config
[LINK ROUTING]
(TYPE DD or DC)
Direct Connect/Dial
Node Mapping Config
[NEIGHBOR GATEWAY]
Neighbor
Gateways
Link Selection
[ADD or MODIFY]
[VALIDATE NETXPORT]
Neighbor Gateway
Reachable Networks
Validate Link,
Cross-validate
with SYSGEN
107
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Before using NMMGR to configure a link, you should complete the
worksheets provided. See Chapter 4 , “Planning for Node
Configuration,” for more information on planning your configuration
and filling out the configuration worksheets.
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Begin the configuration process.
• Configure a Point-to-Point network interface.
• Configure neighbor gateways.
• Configure node mapping.
Once the above tasks are completed, refer to Chapter 10 , “Validating
and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” for step-by-step instructions to
help you perform the following validation tasks:
• Validate the network transport configuration.
• Cross-validate in SYSGEN.
108
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface
The Point-to-Point Configuration screen (#44) in Figure 7-2 is displayed
when you press the [Config Network] key at the Network Transport
Configuration screen (#42) with an NI type of 2 (Point-to-Point). Refer
Chapter 5 , “Introductory Screens,” for information on the Network
Transport Configuration screen.
Figure 7-2
Point-to-Point Link Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the IP address field, enter the internet protocol (IP) address for the
node being configured. An example of an address is:
C 192.191.191 009.
Step 2. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the IP subnet
mask field and enter the number in the same format as an IP address.
Step 3. Move to the Link Name field. Enter a link name to represent the
Point-to-Point card for which you are configuring a link. This name
must be unique to both the node and the network interface (NI). Up to
40 network links are supported per Point-to-Point (router) NI.
(Up to eight network links are supported per screen. To
configure additional links, save the current screen and then
clear the screen to add additional links.)
Step 4. Tab down to the Physical Path field. Enter the physical path number
corresponding to the SPU slot number of the programmable serial
interface (PSI) card, or slot and part of advanced communication
controller (ACC) card.
Chapter 7
109
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface
Step 5. Tab to the Speed field. Enter the line transmission speed of this link.
Step 6. Tab to the Type field. Enter DD for direct dial, SD for shared dial or DC
for direct connection.
Step 7. Tab to the Card Type field. Enter LAPBMUX if ACC adapter is being
used, or LAPB for a PSI adapter. Do not mix both Card Types under
the same NI.
Step 8. Press the [Save Data] key to record the data you have entered.
Step 9. If you need to identify neighbor gateways, press the [Neighbor Gateways]
key and proceed to the section in this chapter called “To Configure
Neighbor Gateways.”
Step 10. If you have already configured neighbor gateways for this link or your
network contains no neighbor gateways, press the [Link Routing] key
and proceed to the section in this chapter titled “To Configure Node
Mapping.”
Optional Keys Press the [List NIs] key to list the names and types of
already configured network interfaces.
Press the [Delete NI] key to remove a configured network
interface from the configuration file.
Press the [Read Other NI] key to call up a previously
configured Network Interface name.
There are two methods of entering an internet protocol (IP) address
within NMMGR:
Fields
Node name
Display only.
Network Interface (NI) name
Display only.
IP address
The IP address is an address of a node on a network. An
IP address has two parts: a network portion and a node
portion. The network portion must be the same for all
nodes on a LAN network; the node portion must be
unique for all nodes on a LAN network.
1. Enter the fully qualified IP address (for example, Class C,
C 192.191.191 009).
OR
2. Enter only the network (nnn) and node (xxx) portions of the IP
address as four positive integers between 0 and 255 separated by
periods or blanks (for example, 15.123.44.98).
110
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface
You need not enter the following items as NMMGR will fill these in:
• Class A, B, C
• Leading zeros for the network and node portion of the IP address.
HP assigns the network portion (initial nine digits) of IP addresses
from ARPA Class C, though your addresses may also be of Classes A or
B. The complete formats are:
Class
A nnn xxx.xxx.xxx
B nnn.nnn xxx.xxx
C nnn.nnn.nnn xxx
Where:
nnn = the network portion of the IP address and
xxx = the node portion of the IP address.
For Class C, the node portion of the IP address must be between 001
and 254.
If you are adding your NS 3000/iX node to an existing network, the
network portion of each node’s IP address should be the same. You will
have to find out what this is, and use it in the network portion of the IP
address of your NS 3000/iX node. Also, you will need to know the node
portions of the IP addresses of each of the nodes (usually they will be
numbered sequentially, such as 001, 002, and so on), so that you can
specify a unique node portion for the IP address of your node. If you
have a network map, it should provide a record of such items as the
node name and IP address of each node. If there is no record, and if you
want to find out each node’s IP address, you will have to issue the
following command (NM capability required) on each of the nodes:
NETCONTROL NET=NIname;STATUS
One of the lines of output from this command tells you what the
complete IP address is for that node; the last three digits are the unique
node portion of the class C address.
Card Type
Specify LAPB if the adapter card used
for this link is a single port PSI
adapter. Specify LAPBMUX if this link
is using one port on a multi-port
synchronous MUX adapter card (ACC).
Note: Card types cannot be mixed on
the same NI.
IP subnet mask
Chapter 7
An IP subnet mask is specified in the
same format as an IP address. The
32-bit mask is grouped in octets
expressed as decimal integers and
delimited by either a period (.) or a
111
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface
space. An IP mask is used when
configuring subnetworks. The mask
identifies which bits of an IP address
will be used to define a subnetwork. To
determine these bits, you first need to
estimate how many subnetworks and
nodes per subnetwork you need. See
Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” for
details on deriving an IP subnet mask.
Link Name
The link name can have up to eight
alphanumeric characters and the first
character must be alphabetic.
Physical Path
The physical path number corresponds
to the slot location of a node’s
programmable serial interface (PSI)
card, and LAPBMUX card (ACC).
Recommended slot locations and
physical path calculations vary
according to the type of HP e3000
system you are running.
For the various platforms, physical
path syntax (examples only) look like:
Series 9x7:
48
Series 9x8:
56/44
Series 9x9:
10/4/16
Series 99x:
0/28/12
Series N4000:
1/10/0/1.7
Series A500:
0/2/0/1.4
If you are unsure of the slot location or
of the physical path number to
configure for your system, run the
offline ODE MAPPER utility, see your
system documentation, or consult your
Hewlett-Packard service
representative.
Speed
112
The line transmission speed is given in
bits per second. For direct connect the
value, must be supported by the cable.
Values are 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200, 38400, 56000, and 64000. The
default is 56000.
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure a Point-to-Point Network Interface
Type
Chapter 7
Enter DD (direct dial) if you always
want to call the same host over a dial
link. If you choose DD the remote host
does not have to be adjacent and other
nodes can be accessed through the
remote host. Enter SD if you want to
call more than one adjacent remote
node over a dial link without
reconfiguring. If you choose SD, no other
remote nodes can be accessed through
the remote host; it is an end point in
the connection. Enter DC if the link is a
leased line, private line, or other
non-switched link.
113
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Configure Neighbor Gateways
You need to visit the next two screens only if you are configuring a
non-gateway node that is on the same network as a gateway. In this
case, the non-gateway node needs to know the identity of any neighbor
gateway. Neighbor gateways can be either full or half gateways.
Gateways that are on the same network are called neighbor
gateways. A non-gateway node on a Point-to-Point network may need
to go through a neighbor gateway in order to send messages to an
entirely different network. (Two nodes are on the same network if the
network portion of their IP addresses are the same.) All Point-to-Point
nodes that are on the same network as a neighbor gateway need to
know the identity of any neighbor gateways. When you configure a
Point-to-Point node, you enter into its configuration the identity of any
accessible neighbor gateways that share the same network. The
identified gateways may be either full or half gateways.
You may designate one gateway as a default gateway. Messages for a
network will be routed to the default gateway if there is no gateway
configured for the destination network. The default gateway will then
attempt to locate the destination of the message.
NOTE
HP e3000 should not be used as a gateway.
114
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Specify Neighbor Gateways (If Any Are Present)
The Neighbor Gateways screen (#152) in Figure 7-3 is displayed when
you press the [Neighbor Gateways] key at the Point-to-Point Link
Configuration screen (#44) in Figure 7-2.
Figure 7-3
Neighbor Gateway Screen
Step 1. In the Gateway name field, enter the name of a gateway that is on the
same network as the node that you are configuring. (Nodes are on the
same network if the network portions of their IP addresses are the
same.).
Step 2. If you are adding the identified gateway for the first time, press the
[Add] key. If you are modifying the configuration of this node, press the
[Modify] key. The Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen will be
displayed. Proceed to the section in this chapter titled “To Identify
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks.”
Step 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each gateway that is on the same network as
the node that you are configuring. When you have finished, press the
[Prior Screen] key to return to the Point-to-Point Configuration screen
and proceed to the section in this chapter titled “To Configure Node
Mapping.”
Fields
Gateway name Each gateway name can be as long as eight
alphanumeric characters. The first character must be
alphabetic.
Chapter 7
115
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Specify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks
The Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen (#158) in figure 7-4
is displayed when you press the [Add] key or the [Modify] key for a valid
gateway name from the Neighbor Gateways screen (#152) in Figure 7-3.
Figure 7-4
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks
Step 1. In the Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address field, enter the IP
address of the gateway specified on the Neighbor Gateways screen. An
example of an address is: C 192.191.191 009.
Step 2. In the IP Network Address fields under the title Configured
Reachable Networks, enter the IP addresses of all the remote networks
that can be reached through the gateway whose IP address is
configured in the previous field.
Step 3. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the next field. In
the IP subnet mask field, enter the number in the same format as an IP
address.
Step 4. In the field labeled Hops, enter the number of hops (full gateways)
needed to get to the target network. Two partner gateway halves count
as one hop.
Step 5. Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 for each remote reachable network. The
information configured in this screen can extend to more than
one page, if necessary, to allow configuration of up to 2550
reachable networks per link (255 pages and 10 reachable nets
per page). If you need to configure more than 10 networks, press the
[Save Data] key then press the [Next Page] key to enter more networks.
116
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Step 6. After you have finished entering the IP addresses of all the reachable
networks, press the [Save Data] key. Press the [Prior Screen] key to
return to the Neighbor Gateways screen.
Step 7. Back at the Neighbor Gateways screen, after you have finished adding
all of the neighboring gateways, press the [Prior Screen] key to return to
the Point-to-Point Link Configuration screen. Proceed to the section in
this chapter titled “To Configure Node Mapping.”
Fields
If you have identified any neighbor gateways, then you will also be
identifying: 1) the IP Network Addresses of all of the networks that you
can reach through that gateway, and 2) the number of hops
(corresponding to the number of gateways) that a packet passes
through to reach a remote network from the local network. Two
gateway halves count as one hop.
Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address
The IP address of the gateway whose name you have
specified on the Neighbor Gateways Screen. The IP
address is in the same format as on the Point-to-Point
Configuration screen.
IP Network Address
In the fields under this heading, you list the IP
addresses of all of the networks that you will be able to
reach through the gateway you are configuring. You
also use this field to indicate whether or not the
gateway is to serve as a default gateway by
entering an at sign (@) to specify that it is a
default gateway. Only one gateway can be
designated as a default gateway for each
HP e3000 system.
IP Mask (Optional)
The fields under this heading allow you to specify a
subnet mask for each reachable network. This mask is
optional. See Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” for
details on deriving the IP mask.
Hops
In the fields under this heading, enter the number of
hops corresponding to the number of gateways that a
packet travels to reach a remote network from a local
network. Note: if you choose SD, no other nodes can be
accessed through the remote host; it is an end point in
the connection. Enter DC if the link is a leased line,
private line, or other non-switched link.
Chapter 7
117
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
Configure Node Mapping
The screens discussed in the following pages allow you to configure
shared dial or direct connect and dial node mapping. These screens
allow you to specify routes to target (destination) nodes and to indicate
the priority of each route.
The number of mappings you enter depends on how many links are on
the node you are configuring.
Nodes Having Single Links
If you are configuring a node (call it Node A) that has only one
Point-to-Point link to a second node (call it Node B), you enter one route
name as the mapping to the adjacent node (Node B).
If there are additional nodes attainable beyond Node B, you would only
have to enter one more mapping: make up a route name, and then you
can indicate the additional (non-adjacent) nodes by specifying a
“wildcard” (@) in the destination IP address field of either the Dialed or
Non-dialed Node Mapping Configuration screens.
Nodes Having Multiple Links
If you are configuring a node that has more than one Point-to-Point
link, you could ultimately have several paths to a non-adjacent
destination node. Hence, if this node has more than one Point-to-Point
link, enter a symbolic route name for every other destination node on
the network.
The route name is only used during configuration of this node, and you
do not have to repeat it when you configure other nodes.
Select a Node Mapping Screen
To begin configuring node mapping, you should be at the Point-to-Point
Link Configuration screen (#44) in Figure 7-2. You will configure node
mapping for each link you are configuring.
Step 1. Enter the name of a configured link in the field at the bottom of the
screen next to the words To configure router mapping enter Link
Name.
Step 2. Press the [Link Routing] key.
Step 3. If the Type specified for the selected link is SD, proceed to the section in
this chapter titled “To Configure Shared Dial Node Mapping.”
Step 4. If the Type specified for the selected link is DD or DC, proceed to the
section in this section titled “To Configure Direct Connect/Dial Node
Mapping.”
118
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
Configure Shared Dial Node Mapping
The Shared Dial Node Mapping Configuration screen (#46) in Figure
7-5is displayed if you press the [Link Routing] key at the Point-to-Point
Link Configuration screen (#44) for a link of type SD.
Figure 7-5
Shared Dial Node Mapping Configuration Screen
Each router NI can have up to 1024 mappings. However, 4096 is the
absolute maximum number of unique phone numbers supported per
NMCONFIG File.
Step 1. In the Route Name field, enter a symbolic name that represents a route
between the node you are configuring and destination node
Step 2. In the Destination IP Address field, enter the IP address of the
destination node for which a route is being specified.
Step 3. In the Priority field, enter a number from 1 to 99 to indicate the
priority of this route if there are multiple routes to a destination.
Step 4. In the Phone Number field, enter the telephone number of the
destination node. (Leave this field blank if the target node is
non-adjacent.)
Step 5. The Security String field is optional. You may enter a string that
remote nodes must use to gain dial link access to the node you are
configuring.
Chapter 7
119
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
Step 6. In the Disable Route field, leave the default alone unless you want to
temporarily disable a configured route.
Step 7. Press the [Save Data] key to save the data on the screen. Proceed to
Chapter 10 , “Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” and
press the [Validate Netxport] key.
Optional Keys
Press the [Next Link] key to call up
another link when you want to
configure information about its
adjacent and non-adjacent nodes.
Press the [Config Directry] key to
configure the Network Directory
screen.
Fields
Route Name
A symbolic name, up to eight alphanumeric characters,
that represents a route between the node you are
configuring and a destination node. The route name is
only used within the NMMGR program. It is most
useful when the node you are configuring has more
than one possible way of accessing a target
(destination) node. It identifies different routes to
target nodes and is not the actual target node name. It
is used because you may need a way to identify more
than one route to a target node. There should be at
lease one symbolic route name for routes to every other
destination node on the network unless you use the “@”
wildcard destination IP address.
To help keep track of routes, you can use the
destination node name as the route name. If you have
more than one route to a given node, you can name the
routes nodename1, nodename2, and so forth.
Destination IP Address
IP address of the target (destination) node for which a
route is being defined.
Priority
Number from 1 to 99 that indicates which route has
precedence (priority) over another when there are
multiple routes to a destination. A route to a
destination that has a higher priority will take
precedence over a route with a lower priority. This field
is the primary means of influencing the choice of route.
120
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
Phone Number
Required if the link is a dial link. The field must be
blank if the target node is non-adjacent. Enter the
telephone number as a combination of decimal numbers
(0 through 9), dashes, and the following special
characters:
/
Separator used for automatic call units
that have second dial-tone detect.
E
Optional end-of-number indicator.
D
Three-second delay (used for European
modems and automatic call units that
require built-in delays).
#
Defined by local phone system.
*
Defined by local phone system.
To disable outbound dialing, enter an exclamation point
(!) by itself in the phone number field.
Each router NI can have up to 1024 mappings.
However, 4096 is the absolute maximum number of
unique phone numbers supported per NMCONFIG File.
Security String
An optional security string that remote nodes must use
to gain dial link access to the node. It can be up to eight
alphanumeric characters, left justified, with no
embedded blanks. The first character must be
alphabetic.
Disable Route
Y (yes) or N (no) indicator that allows you to temporarily
disable a configured route. Leave the default (N) alone if
you do not want to disable the route.
Chapter 7
121
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
Configure Direct Connect/Dial Node Mapping
The Direct Connect/Dial Node Mapping Configuration screen (#45) in
Figure 7-6 is displayed if you press the [Link Routing] key at the
Point-to-Point Link Configuration screen (#44) for a link of type DD
or DC.
Figure 7-6
Direct Connect/Dial Node Mapping Configuration Screen
Each router NI can have up to 1024 mappings. However, 4096 is the
absolute maximum number of unique phone numbers supported per
NMCONFIG File.
Step 1. In the Route Name field, enter a symbolic name that represents a route
between the node you are configuring and a destination node.
Step 2. In the Destination IP Address field, enter the IP address of the
destination node for which a route is being specified.
Step 3. In the Priority field, enter a number from 1 to 99 to indicate the
priority of this route if there are multiple routes to a destination.
Step 4. In the Disable Route field, leave the default alone unless you want to
temporarily disable a configured route.
Step 5. If this is a dial link, in the Phone Number field, enter the telephone
number of the destination node.
Step 6. The Security String field is optional. You may enter a string that
remote nodes must use to gain dial link access to the node you are
configuring.
122
Chapter 7
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
Step 7. Enter information for non-adjacent (remote) nodes in the same manner
in the fields provided. (You do not configure a phone number or security
string for non-adjacent nodes.)
Step 8. Press the [Save Data] key to save the data on the screen. Proceed to
Chapter 10 , “Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” and
press the [Validate Netxport] key.
Figure 7-7
Using an @ for Mapping Non-Adjacent Nodes
Priority
Number from 1 to 99 that indicates which route has
precedence (priority) over another when there are
multiple routes to a destination. A route to a
destination that has a higher priority will take
precedence over a route with a lower priority.
Disable Route
Y (yes) or N (no) indicator that allows you to temporarily
disable a configured route. Leave the default (N) alone if
you do not want to disable the route.
Phone Number
Required if the link is a dial link. The field must be
blank if the target node is non-adjacent. Enter the
telephone number as a combination of decimal numbers
(0 through 9), dashes, and the following special
characters:
Chapter 7
/
Separator used for automatic call units
that have second dial-tone detect.
E
Optional end-of-number indicator.
D
Three-second delay (used for European
modems and automatic call units that
require built-in delays).
#
Defined by local phone system.
*
Defined by local phone system.
123
Configuring a Point-to-Point Node
Configure Node Mapping
To disable outbound dialing, enter an exclamation point
(!) by itself in the phone number field.
Each router NI can have up to 1024 mappings.
However, 4096 is the absolute maximum number of
unique phone numbers supported per NMCONFIG File.
Security String
An optional security string that remote nodes must use
to gain dial link access to the node. It can be up to eight
alphanumeric characters, left justified, with no
embedded blanks. The first character must be
alphabetic.
124
Chapter 7
Configuring a X.25 Node
8
This chapter provides step-by-step instructions for configuring X.25 iX
System Access for systems using PC-based network management. This
manual assumes that you are using the guided configuration
capabilities of NMMGR.
Figure 8-1 shows the screen flow for configuring X.25 screens. Screens
unique to X.25 configuration are indicated by bold boxed screens.
[FUNCTION] denotes the function key used at a screen to invoke the next
screen on the screen flow.
Figure 8-1
X.25 Link Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
Main Screen
[NS]
NS Config
If you have not created
the config file, then
press the OPEN
CONFIG key a second
time.
[GUIDED CONFIG]
Network Transport
Config
[CONFIG NETWORK]
X.25
Configuration
Link
Selection
[NEIGHBOR
GATEWAYS]
[NEIGHBOR GATEWAY]
Neighbor Gateways
X.25 Virtual Circuit
Link Selection
Config
[ADD or MODIFY]
[VALIDATE NETXPORT]
Neighbor Gateway
Reachable Networks
Validate Link,
Cross-validate
with SYSGEN
125
Configuring a X.25 Node
Before using NMMGR to configure a link, you should complete the
worksheets provided. See Chapter 4 , “Planning for Node
Configuration,” for more information on planning your configuration
and filling out the configuration worksheets.
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Begin the configuration process.
• Configure an X.25 network interface.
• Configure neighbor gateways.
Once the above tasks are completed, refer to Chapter 10 , “Validating
and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” for step-by-step instructions to
help you perform the following validation tasks:
• Validate the network transport configuration.
• Cross-validate in SYSGEN.
NOTE
If you are configuring X.25 iX System Access on a system that is using
host-based network management (a PC running the HP OpenView
Network Manager is not part of the network), use Configuring and
Managing Host-Based X.25 Links instead of this manual for
step-by-step configuration instructions.
126
Chapter 8
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
The X.25 Configuration screen (#48) in Figure 8-2 is displayed when
you press the [Config Network] key at the Network Transport
Configuration screen (#42) with an NI type of 3 (X.25). Refer to Chapter
5 , “Introductory Screens,” for information on the Network Transport
Configuration screen.
Figure 8-2
NS Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the IP address field, enter the internet protocol (IP) address for the
node being configured. An example of an address is:
C 192.191.191 009.
Step 2. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the IP subnet
mask field and enter the number in the same format as an IP address.
Step 3. Move to the first Link name field. Enter a link name to represent the
DTC/X.25 Network Access card for which you are configuring a link.
This name must be unique to both the node and the DTC. It must also
be the same as the link name configured for this card when the
Datacommunications and Terminal Subsystem (DTS) was configured.
Step 4. Enter the node name of the DTC that houses the DTC/X.25 Access card
in the first DTC Node Name field then enter the slot number of the card
in the Card Number field. Enter a link name, DTC node name, and card
number for each link you are configuring.
Chapter 8
127
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
Step 5. When you are done adding links, press the [Save Data] key.
Step 6. If the network that this node is on contains ANY internetwork gateway
(either full or half) press the [Neighbor Gateways] key and proceed to the
section in this chapter called “To Configure Neighbor Gateways.”
Step 7. If the network that this node is on contains NO internetwork gateways
or if you have already configured gateways for this system, press the
[Config Directry] key and proceed to the section in this chapter titled “To
Configure X.25 Virtual Circuits.”
Optional Keys Press the [List NIs] key to list the names and types of
already configured network interfaces.
Press the [Delete NI] key to remove a configured network
interface from the configuration file.
Press the [Read Other NI] key to call up a previously
configured Network Interface name.
Fields
Node Name
Display only.
Network Interface (NI) name
Display only.
IP address
IP address is an address of a node on a network. An IP
address has two parts: a network portion and a node
portion. The network portion must be the same for all
nodes on an X.25 network; the node portion must be
unique for all nodes on an X.25 network.
There are two methods of entering an internet protocol
(IP) address within NMMGR:
1. Enter the fully qualified IP address (for example,
Class C, C 192.191.191 009).
OR
2. Enter only the network (nnn) and node (xxx)
portions of the IP address as four positive integers
between 0 and 255 separated by periods or blanks
(for example, 15.123.44.98).
You need not enter the following items as NMMGR
will fill these in:
• Class A, B, C
• Leading zeros for the network and node portion of
the IP address.
128
Chapter 8
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
HP assigns the network portion (initial nine digits) of
IP addresses from ARPA Class C, though your
addresses may also be of Classes A or B. The complete
formats are:
Class
A nnn xxx.xxx.xxx
B nnn.nnn xxx.xxx
C nnn.nnn.nnn xxx
Where:
nnn = the network portion of the IP address and
xxx = the node portion of the IP address.
For Class C, the node portion of the IP address must be
between 001 and 254.
If you are adding your NS 3000/iX node to an existing
network, the network portion of each node’s IP address
should be the same. You will have to find out what this
is, and use it in the network portion of the IP address of
your NS 3000/iX node. Also, you will need to know the
node portions of the IP addresses of each of the nodes
(usually they will be numbered sequentially, such as
001, 002, and so on), so that you can specify a unique
node portion for the IP address of your node. If you
have a network map, it should provide a record of such
items as the node name and IP address of each node. If
there is no record, and if you want to find out each
node’s IP address, you will have to issue the following
command (NM capability required) on each of the
nodes:
NETCONTROL NET=NIname;STATUS
One of the lines of output from this command tells you
what the complete IP address is for that node; the last
three digits are the unique node portion of the class C
address.
IP subnet mask
Chapter 8
An IP subnet mask is specified in the
same format as an IP address. The
32-bit mask is grouped in octets
expressed as decimal integers and
delimited by either a period (.) or a
space. An IP mask is used when
configuring subnetworks. The mask
identifies which bits of an IP address
will be used to define a subnetwork. To
determine these bits, you first need to
estimate how many subnetworks and
129
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
nodes per subnetwork you need. See
Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” for
details on deriving an IP subnet mask.
Link Name
The link name identifies a specific
DTC/X.25 Network Access card to be
used for X.25 system-to-system
connections. This link name must be
the same as the link name you entered
for this card when you configured your
DTCs. You may configure up to 11
links. (One link must be used for
loopback. Loopback will be
automatically configured during the
guided screen configuration.)
DTC Node Name
The DTC node name is the fully
qualified nodename
(name.domain.organization) of the
DTC that contains the DTC/X.25
Network Access card with the
configured link name.
Card Number
The DTC card number is the number of
the DTC/X.25 Network Access card in
the associated DTC. If the card is
contained in a DTC 48, the DTC card
number can be any number from 1 to 5.
If the card is contained in a DTC 16,
the card number must be 2.
130
Chapter 8
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
Configure X.25 Virtual Circuits
The X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration screen (#47) in Figure 8-3 is
displayed if you press the [Config Directry] key from the X.25
Configuration screen (#48) in Figure 8-2. This screen lets you configure
the network directory.
Figure 8-3
X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the Remote node name field, type in the nodename of each remote
X.25 node on your network in the format
nodename.domain.organization. Also, if you need to be able to
perform a loopback DSLINE command to the local node, then enter the
local node’s name here as well.
Step 2. For each node, type the IP address of the node in the Remote IP
address field.
Step 3. To specify that calls can be made to a node, enter its address key in the
Address key field. Enter the node portion of the remote node’s
configured nodename.
Chapter 8
131
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
NOTE
An address key called POOL is already preconfigured for you though it
doesn’t show up on the screen. POOL allows the node being configured to
receive any incoming calls even if the remote system’s address is not
configured on this screen. POOL will also allow you to use NetIPC to
programmatically provide an X.25 address that is not configured on this
screen. If you want to delete the POOL address key, in the last line of the
X.25 Virtual Circuit Configuration screen enter a 3 (for switched VCs)
and press the [Go To] key. That brings you to the X.25 SVC Address Key
Paths screen where you can then remove the default name POOL by
typing over it with spaces and then saving the data.
Step 4. If the address type is a switched virtual circuit complete steps a
through c, but if the address type is a permanent virtual circuit, skip to
step 5.
a. In the Remote X.25 address field, enter the X.25 address of the
remote host for X.25 public data networks or private networks.
b. Make sure the name of the facility set you are using is in the
Facility set field. You may either choose the default facility set
(STDSFSET) or enter an alternative. If you are configuring a new
facility set, enter a new name. (To modify facility set parameters,
enter a 5 in the last field on the screen and press the [Go To] key.)
c. In the Security class field, enter the level of logical security you
want to have on this particular entry. The possible values are IN
(accept calls from the address), IO (accept calls from and send calls
to the address, default), OU (send calls to the address, incoming calls
are rejected), and LK (block calls to or from the address).
Step 5. If the address type is a permanent virtual circuit (PVC), in the
Permanent VC number field, enter the PVC number of the PVC on the
remote node. This value cannot be greater than the number of PVCs for
which you are subscribed. It must be within the PVC range you defined
during DTC configuration.
Step 6. After you have finished entering new information for each remote node,
press the [Save Data] key. (Press the key once for each remote node you
are configuring.)
Step 7. If you have completed configuration of X.25, press the [Validate Netxport]
key and proceed to Chapter 10 , “Validating and Cross-Validating with
SYSGEN.” Otherwise, press the [Prior Screen] key to return to the X.25
Configuration screen.
Fields
Network directory name
The network directory file that will be updated by the
information entered through this screen.
132
Chapter 8
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
Remote node name
You must enter the remote node name of each X.25
node into the network directory. Include entries for all
remote nodes and, if you want to be able to perform
loopback, the local node as well.
Remote IP address
Also in the network directory, you must enter the IP
Address of each node whose identity you have entered
into the network directory. For the format of this
parameter, see the information in the “Fields” section
under “Configure X.25 Network.”
Address key
The X.25 address key is the name of a remote node with
which your local node will be communicating.
Hewlett-Packard recommends that you make the name
be the node portion of the remote node’s name (where
its full name is node.domain.organization). You
must configure an X.25 address key for each remote
node with which your node will be communicating. You
have a combined maximum of 1024 X.25 address keys
in the SVC and PVC path tables. The X.25 address key
name must be eight characters or less and the first
character must be alphabetic. A default address key
called POOL allows any system to access the local
system even if the remote system’s address is not
configured. POOL can also be used when level 3
programmatic access (NetIPC) provides an X.25
address.
Network Interface (NI) name
Display only.
SVC or PVC Parameters
The parameters for assigning either SVCs or PVCs are
described in the following paragraphs.
For SVCs
Remote X.25 address
The remote X.25 address is the remote node’s X.25
address. This address is required for SVCs if you have
specified an X.25 address key. This address must be
15 digits or less.
Chapter 8
133
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure an X.25 Network Interface
Facility set
The facility set name is a name for a set of X.25
connection parameters. The parameters are determined
by the type of X.25 network that you are subscribed to.
You can configure options in a facility set so that
specified options are available for every virtual circuit
or negotiated for each virtual circuit on a per-call basis.
This facility set will be used when a connection is made
from your node to the specified remote node or from the
specified remote node to your node. A Facility Set is
required for SVCs if you have specified an X.25 Address
Key. The facility set name must be eight characters or
less, and the first character must be alphabetic. You can
configure up to 128 facility sets.
To modify facility set parameters, enter a 5 in the field
at the bottom of the screen and press the [Go To] key.
This will take you to the X.25 User Facility Sets screen.
From this screen you can create new or modify existing
user facility sets. See the NS 3000/iX Screens
Reference Manual for more information.
Security class
The security class is the level of logical security you
want to have when a connection is made to or from the
specified remote node. A Security level is required for
SVCs if you have specified an X.25 Address Key. The
possible values are as follows:
• IO — Both incoming and outgoing calls are accepted.
This is the default value.
• IN — Only incoming calls are accepted from this
particular remote address. Outgoing calls will be
rejected.
• OU — Only outgoing calls are accepted to this
particular remote address. Incoming calls will be
rejected.
• LK — Entry is locked. No call is accepted, either
inbound or outbound.
For PVCs
Permanent VC number
The PVC Number identifies a permanent virtual circuit
(PVC) on the remote node. If you have entered a name
in the X.25 Address Key field and are configuring PVCs,
then you also have to enter a value for the PVC
Number.
134
Chapter 8
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Use the next two screens only if you are configuring a node that is on an
an X.25 network as a gateway. In this case, the local node needs to know
the identity of any neighbor gateways.
Gateways that are on the same network are called neighbor
gateways. A non-gateway node on an X.25 network may need to go
through a neighbor gateway in order to send messages to an entirely
different network. (Two nodes are on the same network if the network
portion of their IP addresses are the same.) If a node on the X.25
network is trying to access a node on a remote network, it needs to
know the identity of its neighbor gateways. When you configure an X.25
node, you enter into its configuration the identity of any accessible
neighbor gateways that share the same network. The identified
gateways may be either full or half gateways.
You may designate gateways as default gateways. Messages for a
network will be routed to a default gateway if there is no specific
gateway configured for the destination network. The default gateway
will then attempt to locate the destination of the message.
Chapter 8
135
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Identify Neighbor Gateways (If Any Are Present)
The Neighbor Gateways screen (#152) in Figure 8-4 is displayed when
you press the [Neighbor Gateways] key at the X.25 Configuration screen
(#48) in Figure 8-2.
Figure 8-4
Neighbor Gateways Screen
Step 1. In the Gateway name field, enter the name of a gateway that is on the
same network as the node that you are configuring. (Nodes are on the
same network if the network portions of their IP addresses are the
same.).
Step 2. If you are adding the identified gateway for the first time, press the
[Add] key. If you are modifying the configuration of this node, press the
[Modify] key. The Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen will be
displayed. Proceed to the section titled “To Identify Neighbor Gateway
Reachable Networks.”
Step 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each gateway that is on the same network as
the node that you are configuring. When you have finished, press the
[Prior Screen] key to return to the X.25 Configuration screen.
Fields
Gateway name Each gateway name can be as long as eight
alphanumeric characters. The first character must be
alphabetic.
136
Chapter 8
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
Identify Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks
The Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen (#158) in Figure 8-5
is displayed when you press the [Add] key or the [Modify] key for a valid
gateway name from the Neighbor Gateways screen (#152) in Figure 8-4.
Figure 8-5
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks Screen
Step 1. In the Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address field, enter the IP
address of the gateway specified on the Neighbor Gateways screen. An
example is: C 192.007.007 001
Step 2. In the IP Network Address fields under the title Configured
Reachable Networks, enter the IP addresses of all the remote
networks that can be reached through the gateway whose IP address is
configured in the previous field.
An “@” in the IP network address field designates the gateway as a
default gateway. It means this gateway can be used to reach all the
other remote networks.
Step 3. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab to the next field. In
the IP mask field, enter the number in the same format as an IP
address.
Step 4. In the field labeled Hops, enter the number of hops (full gateways)
needed to get to the target network. Two partner gateway halves count
as one hop.
Step 5. Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 for each remote reachable network. The
information configured in this screen can extend to more than one page,
Chapter 8
137
Configuring a X.25 Node
Configure Neighbor Gateways
if necessary, to allow configuration of up to 2550 reachable networks per
link (255 pages and 10 reachable nets per page). If you need to
configure more than 10 networks, press the [Save Data] key then press
the [Next Page] key to enter more networks.
Step 6. After you have finished entering the IP addresses of all the reachable
networks, press the [Save Data] key. Press the [Prior Screen] key to
return to the Neighbor Gateways screen.
Step 7. Back at the Neighbor Gateways screen, after you have finished adding
all of the neighboring gateways, press the [Prior Screen] key to return to
the X.25 Configuration screen. Follow the instructions for step 7 in the
section in this chapter titled “To Configure an X.25 Network.”
Fields
If you have identified any neighbor gateways, then you will also be
identifying: 1) the IP Network Addresses of all of the networks that you
can reach through that gateway, and 2) the number of hops
(corresponding to the number of gateways) that a packet passes
through to reach a remote network from the local network. Two
gateway halves count as one hop.
Neighbor Gateway IP Internet Address
The IP address of the gateway whose name you have
specified on the Neighbor Gateways Screen. The IP
address is in the same format as the LAN
Configuration screen.
IP Network Address
In the fields under this heading, you list the IP
addresses of all of the networks that you will be able to
reach through the gateway you are configuring. You
also use this field to indicate whether or not the
gateway is to serve as a default gateway by entering an
at sign (@) to specify that it is a default gateway.
Multiple gateways can be designated for each HP e3000
systems.
IP Mask (Optional)
The fields under this heading allow you to specify a
subnet mask for each reachable network. This mask is
optional. For details on deriving an IP subnet mask, see
Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts.”
Hops
In the fields under this heading, enter the number of
hops corresponding to the number of gateways that a
packet travels to reach a remote network from a local
network.
138
Chapter 8
9
Configuring a Gateway Half
This chapter describes how to plan and configure the interface between
one gateway half and another gateway half. Gateway halves is one of
the early technologies used to connect two separate networks. For
information on configuring a node as a gateway half, use this manual.
Gateways are rarely used since the introduction of routers and the
internet.
Configuring a node as a gateway half requires configuring two separate
network interfaces: one for the serial interface to the remote side of the
gateway half, and a second for the gateway half ’s interface to its home
network (for example, a LAN or point-to-point network).
Before configuring a gatehalf, you should have already configured its
home network interface, according to instructions in other chapters of
this manual.
Figure 9-1 shows the screen flow for configuring gateway half screens.
Screens unique to gateway half configuration are indicated by bold
boxed screens. [FUNCTION] denotes the function key used at a screen to
invoke the next screen on the screen flow.
139
Configuring a Gateway Half
Figure 9-1
Gateway Half Link Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
Main Screen
[NS]
If you have not created the
config file, then press the
OPEN CONFIG key a second
time.
NS Config
[GUIDED CONFIG]
Network Transport
Config
[CONFIG NETWORK]
Gateway
Link
Selection
Configuration
[VALIDATE NETXPORT]
Validate Link,
Cross-validate
with SYSGEN
Configuring a node as a gateway half requires configuring two separate
network interfaces: one for the interface between the two gateway
halves, and a second for the gateway half ’s interface to its home
network.
If this gateway half interfaces to a LAN, Token Ring, FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN, or 100Base-T network, you should have already
configured its network interface according to the instructions in
Chapter 6 , “Configuring a LAN Node.” If this gateway half interfaces to
a Point-to-Point or X.25 network, you should already have configured
its NI according to instructions in Chapter 7 , “Configuring a
Point-to-Point Node,” and Chapter 8 , “Configuring a X.25 Node,”
respectively. If you have not, do so now and then return to this chapter.
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Begin the configuration process.
• Configure a gatehalf.
Once the above tasks are completed, refer to Chapter 10 , “Validating
140
Chapter 9
Configuring a Gateway Half
and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” for step-by-step instructions to
help you perform the following validation tasks:
• Validate the network transport configuration.
• Cross-validate in SYSGEN.
Chapter 9
141
Configuring a Gateway Half
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface
The Gatehalf Configuration screen (#40) in Figure 9-2 is displayed
when you press the [Config Network] key at the Network Transport
Configuration screen (#42) with an NI type of 5 (Gateway Half). Refer
to Chapter 5 , “Introductory Screens,” for information on the Network
Transport Configuration screen.
Figure 9-2
Gatehalf Configuration Screen
Step 1. In the Partner’s IP address field, enter the internet protocol (IP)
address of this gateway half ’s partner.
Step 2. The IP subnet mask is optional. If entering one, tab down to the next
field. In the IP subnet mask field, enter the number in the same format
as an IP address.
Step 3. Tab to the Home NI name field. Enter a name that is the same as one of
the other network interface names of the node being configured (except
gatehalf or loopback networks).
Step 4. Tab down to the Link name field and enter a link name to represent
each individual hardware interface card.
Step 5. Tab over to the Link type field. Enter DD for direct dial or DC for leased
lines, private lines, or other non-switched links.
Step 6. Enter the physical path of this node’s Programmable Serial Interface
(PSI) card.
142
Chapter 9
Configuring a Gateway Half
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface
Step 7. Tab down to the next field. In the Transmission speed field, either
leave the default or enter the transmission speed in bits per second as a
number from 1200 to 64000.
Step 8. If this is a dial link, enter the phone number of this gateway half ’s
partner.
Step 9. If this is a dial link, in the Security string field, either leave the
default, or enter a value that HP nodes must use to gain dial link access
to the node you are configuring.
Step 10. Press the [Save Data] key. Proceed to Appendix 10 , “Validating and
Cross-Validating with SYSGEN,” and press the [Validate Netxport] key.
Optional Keys
Press the [List NIs] key to list the names and types of
already configured network interfaces.
Press the [Delete NI] to remove a configured network
interface from the configuration file.
Press the [Read Other NI] key to call up a previously
configured Network Interface name.
Fields
Partner’s IP address
This is the internet protocol (IP) address of the node
that will be the other half of the gateway half you are
configuring. Enter the address in the same format as on
the Point-to-Point Configuration screen.
Partner’s IP subnet mask
Allows you to specify the subnet mask of this gateway
half ’s partner gateway half. The 32-bit mask is grouped
in octets expressed as decimal integers and delimited
by either a period (.) or a space. The mask identifies
which bits of an IP address will be used to define a
subnetwork. To determine these bits, you first need to
estimate how many subnetworks and nodes per
subnetwork you need. For details on deriving an IP
subnet mask, see Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts.”
Home NI name
The home NI name will be used by the software to
determine which network address is the source
network address when packets are sent over the
gateway half. The home NI name cannot be either a
gateway half or loopback NI name, but it can refer to
any other type of network interface (LAN, Token Ring,
Point-to-Point, FDDI, or X.25 network interface).
Chapter 9
143
Configuring a Gateway Half
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface
Link name
Name that represents the hardware link. The link
name can have up to eight alphanumeric characters;
the first character must be alphabetic. The link name
must be unique to both the node and the network.
Link type
The link type for a gateway half can be either DD for
direct dial or DC for direct connect.
physical path
The physical path number corresponds to the slot
location of a node’s programmable serial interface (PSI)
card or, Advanced Communication Controller (ACC) for
N 4000 and A500 systems. Recommended slot locations
and physical path calculations vary according to the
type of HP e3000 system you are running.
For the various platforms, physical path syntax
(examples only) look like:
Series 9x7:
48
PSI
Series 9x8:
56/44
PSI
Series 9x9:
10/4/16
PSI
Series 99x:
0/28/12
PSI
Series N 4000:
1/10/0/1.7
ACC
Series A500:
0/2/0/1.4
ACC
If you are unsure of the slot location or of the physical
path number to configure for your system, run the
offline ODE MAPPER utility, see your system
documentation, or consult your Hewlett-Packard
service representative.
Transmission speed
The line transmission speed is given in bits per second.
For direct connect the value, must be supported by both
adapter and cable. Values are 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200, 38400, 56000, and 64000. The default is 56000.
144
Chapter 9
Configuring a Gateway Half
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface
Phone Number
Telephone number of this gateway half ’s partner
gateway half. Enter the telephone number as a
combination of decimal numbers (0 through 9), dashes,
and the following special characters:
/
Separator used for automatic call units
that have second dial-tone detect.
E
Optional end-of-number indicator.
D
Three-second delay (used for European
modems and automatic call units that
require built-in delays).
#
Defined by local phone system.
*
Defined by local phone system.
Spaces, and left and right parentheses ( ) are also
allowed.
To disable outbound dialing, enter an exclamation point
(!) by itself in the phone number field.
Security string
This is a string containing up to eight alphanumeric
characters, left justified, with no embedded blanks. The
first character must be alphabetic. A value in this field
is required if the remote (destination) node is an HP
node (dial ID protocol is used). Remote HP nodes must
use the security string to gain dial link access to the
node you are configuring.
Chapter 9
145
Configuring a Gateway Half
Configure a Gatehalf Network Interface
146
Chapter 9
10
Validating and Cross-Validating
with SYSGEN
This chapter discusses the validation of the network transport
configuration and cross-validation of NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS with the
system configuration files within SYSGEN.
Validating the network transport. This step checks data consistency
between values entered on different NMMGR data entry screens.
Cross-Validating with SYSGEN.
Cross-validation ensures that there are no conflicts in the use of node
names, device classes, and physical paths.
147
Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN
Validate the Network Transport
Validate the Network Transport
The following procedure assumes that you have already configured and
validated the Distributed Terminal Subsystem (DTS). The DTS must be
validated before you can validate the network transport (Netxport)
software. Upon configuring the selected screens for your network:
Step 1. Press the [Validate Netxport] key. Refer to the list of screens with the
[Validate Netxport] key.
LAN, 100Base-T, or 100VG-AnyLAN — Figure 6-2
Token Ring — Figure 6-3
FDDI — Figure 6-4
Point-to-Point Shared Dial — Figure 7-5
Point-to-Point Direct Dial — Figure 7-6
X.25 — Figure 8-3
Gateway Half — Figure 9-2
Logging — Figure 13-2
Messages similar to the following ones will be displayed:
Searching for subsystem validation routine VALIDATEDTS
---> Validation of DTS/LINK started. <-----> Validation of DTS/LINK finished. <--NMMGR will now cross-validate the NMCONFIG file with SYSGEN.
SYSGEN version V.uu.ff : catalog version V.uu.ff
WED, NOV 15, 2000, 11:10 AM
Copyright 1987 Hewlett-Packard Co. All Rights Reserved.
**note** Retrieving NMMGR configuration data...
** First level command **
io
log (lo)
misc (mi)
spu (sp)
keep(ke)
permyes (pe)
show (sh)
exit (ex)(e)
help (he)(h)
oclose (oc)
sysfile (sy)
basegroup (ba)
tape (ta)
clear (cl)(c)
redo
sysgen> PERMYES ON
sysgen> BA CONFIG
sysgen> SY
148
Chapter 10
Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN
Validate the Network Transport
** SYSFILE configurator commands **
aauto (aa)
aboot (ab)
acmsl (ac)
asprog (as)
cmsl (cm)
dauto (da)
dboot (db)
dcmsl (dc)
dsprog (ds)
lcmsl (lc)
rauto (ra)
rboot (rb)
rcat (rc)
rcmsl (rcm)
rdcc (rd)
ripl (ri)
rnmlib (rn)
rsprog (rs)
show (sh)
clear (cl)(c)
exit (ex)(e)
help (he)(h)
hold (ho)
sysfile> RDCC
**note** Retrieving NMMGR configuration data...
sysfile> HO
sysfile> EX
sysgen> KE
keeping to group CONFIG.SYS
Purge old configuration (yes/no)?Automatic yes
** configuration files successfully saved **
sysgen> EX
Cross-validation with SYSGEN was successful.
Copying validated configuration file to backup file, please wait ***
(Press RETURN when done viewing screen contents)
Step 2. See the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual for explanations
of any validation errors. After viewing the messages, press [RETURN] to
return to the LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, and 100Base-T
Configuration screen.
Step 3. If you need to configure a network directory, proceed to Chapter 11 ,
“Configuring the Network Directory.” If you do not need to configure the
network directory, exit NMMGR, and proceed to the section in this
chapter titled “To Cross-Validate in SYSGEN.” To exit NMMGR, press
the [Prior Screen] key on successive screens until you reach the Open
Configuration Directory File screen where you should press the
[Exit Program] key.
Chapter 10
149
Validating and Cross-Validating with SYSGEN
Cross-Validate in SYSGEN
Cross-Validate in SYSGEN
Cross-validation is automatically done on the KEEP, TAPE, I/O, and
RDCC commands in SYSGEN.
Cross-validation ensures that there are no conflicts in the use of node
names, device classes, and physical paths between the data currently
contained in NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS and the system configuration data.
To cross-validate, use the SYSGEN facility (OP capability is required).
To use SYSGEN, type the following commands at the MPE prompt:
:sysgen
sysgen> io
io> ld (optional)
io> exit
sysgen> exit
The optional ld (list devices) command allows you to verify the
NMMGR devices that are configured. For more information, see System
Startup, Configuration, and Shutdown.
If you have completed the configuration process, proceed to Chapter 14 ,
“Operating the Network.”
150
Chapter 10
11
Configuring the Network
Directory
A network directory is used by the node for internetwork routing. It is
one of several ways of specifying fixed/hardcoded addresses for specific
node names, in cases where dynamic name resolution cannot be used. It
is also used for specifying unique node names for a system which has
multiple interfaces. Each entry in a network directory consists of a node
name associated with an IP address, the network type, and an
additional address, if necessary. The network directory uses the
internet protocol (IP) address to transfer data between networks. See
Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” for more information on network
directory concepts and for guidelines as to when you need to configure a
network directory.
Figure 11-1 shows the screen flow for configuring the network directory
screens. Screens unique to the network directory configuration are
indicated by bold boxed screens. [FUNCTION] denotes the function key
used at a screen to invoke the next screen on the screen flow.
Figure 11-1
Network Directory Configuration Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
Network Directory
Main
[UPDATE DIR]
Network Directory
Link Selection
Select Node Name
[ADD or MODIFY]
Network Directory
Data
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Open the network directory file.
• Select the update directory function.
• Add nodes to the network directory file.
• Configure path report data for a node.
151
Configuring the Network Directory
NOTE
If you used the guided configuration facility to configure an X.25 link,
you will already have configured the network directory for that link.
152
Chapter 11
Configuring the Network Directory
Open Network Directory
Open Network Directory
The Open Configuration/Directory file screen (#1) in Figure 11-2 is the
first screen displayed when you run NMMGR.
Figure 11-2
Open Configuration/Directory File
Step 1. Verify that the correct network directory file name is in the Network
directory file name field.
Step 2. If you have assigned a write access password, enter it in this field. If
you are not using the password feature, leave this field blank.
Step 3. Press the [Open Directry] key. If you are creating the file for the first
time, NMMGR will ask you to verify creation. Press the [Open Directry]
key again to continue.
Fields
Configuration file name
The only configuration file name the system recognizes
for use by the network subsystem is
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. You can, however, create or modify
a configuration file using a different name and save it
as an offline configuration file. You can use offline
configuration files as a means of creating and storing
configurations that you want to use in the future or
that you are preparing for use on a different system.
Chapter 11
153
Configuring the Network Directory
Open Network Directory
When you are ready to use an offline configuration file,
rename it as NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS and reboot the system.
(Keep in mind that any file you use as a configuration
file must be successfully validated before you try to use
it.)
Backup configurationfile name
A backup file name must be specified whenever a
configuration file is opened or created. The default
backup configuration file name is
NMCBACK.group.account. The backup file will be
automatically updated with the contents of the
configuration file each time the configuration file is
successfully validated.
Network directory file name
The only network directory file name supported by HP
is NSDIR.NET.SYS. This file is part of a KSAM pair. A
key file is created at the same time as this data file. The
key file will automatically be named using the first six
letters of the network directory file name, appended
with the character K. For example, NSDIRK.NET.SYS is
the name of the key file associated with the data file
NSDIR.NET.SYS. If the name of the data file is less than
six letters long, then the entire file name would be
appended with a K.
Write access password
The password is an optional feature. If a password has
been assigned, you must enter it in the password field
to update the configuration file or the directory file. It is
still possible to open an existing file without using an
assigned password, but the file will be in read only
mode and no changes will be accepted.
If a password has not been assigned, you should ignore
the password field.
If you want to assign a password for the system you are
configuring, see Using the Node Management Services
(NMS) Utilities.
154
Chapter 11
Configuring the Network Directory
Select Update Directory Function
Select Update Directory Function
The Network Directory Main screen (#8) in Figure 11-3 is displayed
when you press the [Open Directry] function key at the Open
Configuration/Directory File screen (#1) in Figure 11-2. This screen is
also displayed if a network directory has already been opened and you
type NETDIR in the command window of any screen and press the [Enter]
key.
Figure 11-3
Network Directory Main
Step 1. Press the [Update Dir] function key to modify the contents of the
directory by adding, deleting and updating node names and path
reports.
Function Keys
This screen is the main select screen from which all directory functions
are accessed. The currently opened directory is displayed at the bottom
of all network directory screens. The percentage of the network
directory that is full is shown in the lower right corner of the screen.
Update Dir
Press this function key to go to the Network Directory
Select Node Name screen to add, delete, or modify
network directory node name entries and path reports.
Print Dir
Press this function key to print out a copy of the
directory to formal designator FORMLIST, device class
LP. You can use a file equation for FORMLIST to redirect
Chapter 11
155
Configuring the Network Directory
Select Update Directory Function
the output to another device class or disk file. To set a
file equation without leaving NMMGR, enter the
appropriate MPE command in the command window
and press the [Enter] key.
Maint Mode
Press this function key to enter the command interface
to perform directory merging or to expand the size of
your directory. See Using the Node Management
Services (NMS) Utilities for details on maintenance
mode.
Within the maintenance mode interface, command
input is read from the formal designator NMMGRCMD,
which defaults to $STDINX. Type EXIT and press the
[Return] key to leave maintenance mode.
156
Chapter 11
Configuring the Network Directory
Add Nodes to Network Directory File
Add Nodes to Network Directory File
The Network Directory Select Node Name screen (#9) in Figure 11-4 is
displayed when you press the [Update Dir] function key at the Network
Directory Main screen (#8) in Figure 11-3. The function of this screen is
to display node names that are currently configured in the directory,
and to allow you to delete, rename, add, or modify information about a
node.
Figure 11-4
Network Directory Select Node Name
Step 1. In the node name field, type in the node name of one of the nodes on
your network for which you want network directory information.
Step 2. Set the global/local flag for the entry by setting the value in the
Global? field. Leave the default (Y) if you want to allow this entry to be
merged into other directories using the MERGEDIR command. Change
the setting to “no” (N) if this is a local entry and should not be copied to
other configurations.
Step 3. Press the [Add] function key. You may add new entries as long as room
remains in the file. If the file fills, you may use the Maintenance Mode
command EXPANDDIR to expand the file. Refer to Using the Node
Management Services (NMS) Utilities for details on maintenance mode.
Step 4. Repeat steps 1, 2, and 3 for each node name you want to enter in the
network directory.
Chapter 11
157
Configuring the Network Directory
Add Nodes to Network Directory File
Fields
Node name
The name of the node for which you want network
directory information. The node name field must
contain a fully qualified node name, in the form
nodename.domain.organization, when used to add,
modify, delete, or rename a node.
The node name field when used with the Prev Page
and Next Page function keys allows you to browse
through a specified part of the network directory. You
can enter part of a node name in this field to designate
which node names you want displayed. For example, if
you enter the value NIK, and press the [Next Page]
function key, the list of nodes will begin with the first
matching node name, for example
NIKOLAI.FINANCE.IND, and continue through the rest
of the alphabet until all node names between the letters
NIK and Z are listed.
Global?
The global/local setting for node name. The acceptable
values are Y or N. When the Prev Page and Next Page
function keys are used, only node names whose
global/local setting matches the value in this field are
displayed.
Entries can be configured as either global or local in the
network directory. Global entries (the default) can be
merged into other directories using the MERGEDIR
command. Local entries are not merged into other
network directories. The local entries are used for
configuring localized network directory entries, thus
providing a mechanism to restrict directory data from
being propagated throughout the network.
A situation where this type of restriction could be
useful is when you want to change the configuration for
users on a single host, but not for everyone else. You
can configure two network directory entries: one local,
used by host users, and one global, used by everyone
else when establishing connections to the host. For
example, suppose Node A sets up a new link to Node C,
but Node A does not want other nodes (already
connected to A) to know about Node C until the new
link is tested. Users on Node A can configure a local
entry, which contains information about the new link
not included in the global entry configured for users on
other nodes.
Other uses of local entries include restricting certain
nodes from communicating with the internet, or being
able to direct which way to access remote nodes
depending on your configuration of local entries. When
158
Chapter 11
Configuring the Network Directory
Add Nodes to Network Directory File
both local and global entries exist for the same node,
the network transport uses the local entry.
Default value: Y
Range: Y or N
New name
(Required only when renaming an existing node name.)
New name to be assigned to the node with the Rename
function key.
New global
The global/local flag setting for the node named in the
new name field. The acceptable values are Y or N. The
only time this field is used is when you rename a node
or when you change the global/local setting of a node.
The new name field can be left blank if you wish to
change only the global/local setting.
Configured Entries (node names & global flag)
Display-only fields that show node names and their
global/local flag settings that are already configured in
the directory.
Chapter 11
159
Configuring the Network Directory
Configure Path Report Data for a Node
Configure Path Report Data for a Node
The Network Directory Data screen (#10) in Figure 11-5 is displayed
when you press the [Add] or the [Modify] function key at the Select Node
Name screen (#9) in Figure 11-4.
Figure 11-5
Network Directory Data
The function of this screen is to configure path report data for the node
name listed at the top of the screen. One path report is configured for
each NI on a node. Because the maximum number of NIs per node is 48
(including loopback), each node can contain as many as 47 path reports.
Step 1. Verify that the yes and no indicators in the TCP, Checksum for TCP
required, and PXP fields are set correctly.
Step 2. In the IP address field, type in the IP address of the node listed in the
Node name field.
Step 3. In the type field, enter the number that indicates the type of the path:
1 = IP
2 = LAN/IEEE 802.3 (LAN, 100VG, 100BT)
3 = X.25 ACCESS
5 = ETHERNET (LAN 100VG, 100BT)
6 = Token Ring, 100VG/IEEE 802.5
7 = FDDI
160
Chapter 11
Configuring the Network Directory
Configure Path Report Data for a Node
Step 4. If appropriate for the type of path you are configuring, enter an address
in the Additional Address field. (Type 1 requires no additional
address. Types 2, 5, and 6 require a station address. Type 3 requires an
X.25 address key. See additional explanation under “Fields.”
Step 5. Press the [Save Data] key.
Step 6. Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 for each path report for the specified node.
If you need to make additional entries in the network directory, press
the [Prior Screen] key to return to the Network Directory Select Node
Name screen. If you have finished making network directory entries,
home the cursor and type EXIT in the command field, then press
[ENTER].
Fields
Transport services
These three fields describe the transport services that
should be configured in each path.
TCP
Checksum
for TCP
PXP
TCP must be Y (yes) for all nodes. The
default is Y.
The checksum setting indicates
whether checksumming is optional (N)
or required (Y) for TCP. If this field is
set to N, then the use of checksums is
not requested when communicating
with this node. If this field is set to Y
then checksums are used when
communicating with this node.
Checksumming is required for
communication to non-HP systems. The
default is N.
PXP must be Y (yes) for all nodes. The
default is Y.
Note that the selection of transport services here must match the
settings in the remote node’s configuration file. If the checksum enabled
field in the path NETXPORT.GPROT.TCP of this node is set to Y, then TCP
checksum field in the network directory should also be set to Y.
IP address
Chapter 11
One IP address should be entered for each network
interface configured on the remote node that is directly
reachable from this node. Each address must match an
IP address configured in the remote node’s
configuration file. The path of the screen in the
configuration file that contains IP addresses is
NETXPORT.NI.NIname.PROTOCOL.IP.
161
Configuring the Network Directory
Configure Path Report Data for a Node
Type
A number indicating the type of path to configure:
1
Select this path type when the NI type
is ROUTER (Point-to-Point); or when the
NI type is LAN and the destination node
supports probe or ARP; or when the NI
type is TOKEN or FDDI and the
destination node supports ARP.
2
Select this path type when the NI type
is LAN, 100VG-AnyLAN or 100Base-T,
the destination node does not support
probe, and 802.3 framing is used.
3
Select this path type when the NI type
is X25.
5
Select this path type when the NI type
is LAN, 100VG-AnyLAN or 100Base-T,
the destination node does not support
ARP or probe, and Ethernet framing is
to be used.
6
Select this path type when the NI type
is TOKEN and the destination node does
not support ARP.
7
Select this path type when the NI type
is FDDI and the destination node does
not support ARP.
Table 11-1
Path Type Configuration
N1 Type
Framing
Protocols
Type
Point-to-Point (Router)
N/A
N/A
1
LAN
802.3 and Ethernet
Either Probe or ARP
1
802.3 and Ethernet
Neither Probe nor ARP
5
802.3 only
Not Probe
2
Ethernet only
Not ARP
5
X.25
N/A
N/A
3
Token Ring
N/A
ARP
1
N/A
Not ARP
6
N/A
ARP
1
N/A
Not ARP
7
FDDI
162
Chapter 11
Configuring the Network Directory
Configure Path Report Data for a Node
Additional address
A lower-level address, which depends on the type.
Type 1 does not contain lower-level addressing
information. You can leave the field blank, or enter the
keyword NONE.
Types 2, 5, 6, and 7 require the destination node’s
station address, which is a string of six hexadecimal
bytes, separated by dashes (XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX). The
station address must correspond to the address
configured on the remote node.
Type 3 requires an X.25 address key, which is an ASCII
string of up to 15 characters. The X.25 address key
must correspond to an X.25 address key entered in the
NETXPORT.NI.NIname.PROTOCOL.X25.SVPATH or the
NETXPORT.NI.NIname.PROTOCOL.X25.PVCPATH screen
for the destination node.
Chapter 11
163
Configuring the Network Directory
Configure Path Report Data for a Node
164
Chapter 11
12
Configuring Domain Name Files
If you are planning to use the domain name resolver for name to IP
address resolution, you will need to configure a set of ASCII files on
each node that contain needed information. To configure these files, you
use any standard editor to modify existing sample files according to the
instructions in this chapter. See Chapter 2 , “Networking Concepts,” for
more information on domain names.
This chapter details:
• How to modify the RSLVSAMP.NET.SYS file and save it as
RESLVCNF.NET.SYS for use as the domain name resolver.
• How to modify the HOSTSAMP.NET.SYS file and save it as
HOSTS.NET.SYS for use as the domain name host file.
• Other files you can configure to make additional information
available to the network.
165
Configuring Domain Name Files
Create or Modify the Resolver File
Create or Modify the Resolver File
The resolver file (RESLVCNF.NET.SYS) is an initialization file for the
domain name resolver. It contains information needed by the network
to determine how to resolve a domain name to an IP address. This file is
read by the resolver routines the first time they are invoked by a
process.
To create the resolver file, perform the following steps:
Step 1. Copy the sample file, RSLVSAMP.NET.SYS, to RESLVCNF.NET.SYS.
Step 2. Modify RESLVCNF.NET.SYS using any ASCII editor so that it contains
information about the name servers, domain, and search order for your
network. The keywords included in the file are described under “Fields.”
To modify an already existing RESLVCNF.NET.SYS file, simply use your
editor to update and save the existing file.
Fields
Each entry in the resolver file consists of a keyword followed by a value
separated by white space. The keyword and its associated value must
appear on a single line and the keyword must start the line. Figure 12-1
shows an example of a resolver file. Comment lines start with a pound
sign (#).
domain
Enter the local domain name. Most queries for names
within this domain can use short names relative to the
local domain name. If the host name does not contain a
domain part, the root domain is assumed. If more than
one instance of the domain keyword is present, the last
instance will override.
The domain name is composed of labels, with each label
separated by a period. Each label must start with a
letter or digit, and have as interior characters only
letters, digits, hyphens (-), or underbars (_). A domain
name may have any number of labels, but its total
length, including periods, is limited to 255 characters.
label[.label][...]
Domain names are not case sensitive.
search
166
The search entry is optional and indicates the order in
which domains should be searched for host name
lookup. You should add a search entry if users on this
system commonly try to connect to nodes in other
domains. The search list is limited to six domains with
a total of 256 characters. If more than one instance of
the search keyword is present, the last instance will
override.
Chapter 12
Configuring Domain Name Files
Create or Modify the Resolver File
Resolver queries will be attempted using each
component of the search path in turn until a match is
found. Note that this process may be slow and will
generate a lot of network traffic if the servers for the
listed domains are not local. Note also that queries will
time out if no server is available for one of the domains.
nameserver
NOTE
Enter the IP address of a name server the resolver
should query. The address must be in dot format, with
leading zeros omitted and a period between each
grouping. See example addresses in Figure 12-1.
It is very important that you omit the leading zeros in the network
addresses that you enter in the domain name resolver files. If you enter
leading zeros here, the domain name resolver will interpret the
numbers as octal numbers.
You can list up to three name servers, but you must use a separate
keyword entry for each. If there are multiple servers, the resolver will
query them in the order listed. If no nameserver entries are present,
the default is to use the HOSTS.NET.SYS file.
If you have no server, do not add any nameserver entries; the resolver
will immediately revert to the HOSTS.NET.SYS file.
Errors in the resolver file will be silently ignored by the resolver
routines.
Figure 12-1
Sample Resolver Configuration File
#resolv.conf file
#
domain loc1.inet.com
search loc1.inet.com inet.com
nameserver 192.255.25.33
nameserver 192.255.354.74
nameserver 192.15.360.75
NOTE
The IP addresses and domain names used in Figure 12-1 are for
purposes of the example only.
Chapter 12
167
Configuring Domain Name Files
Create or Modify the Hosts File
Create or Modify the Hosts File
The host name data base file, (HOSTS.NET.SYS), associates internet
addresses with official host names and aliases. This allows a user to
refer to a host by a symbolic name instead of an internet address.
When you have configured the name server, this file serves only as a
backup when the server is not running. In this circumstance, it is a
common practice that HOSTS.NET.SYS contains a few addresses of
machines on the local network.
To create the hosts file, perform the following steps:
Step 1. Copy the sample file, HOSTSAMP.NET.SYS, to HOSTS.NET.SYS.
Step 2. Modify HOSTS.NET.SYS using any ASCII editor so that it contains
information about the nodes on your network.
To modify an already existing HOSTS.NET.SYS file, simply use your
editor to update and save the existing file.
Enter a single line for each host, including the following information:
[internet address] [local host name] [aliases]
A line cannot start with a space. Items are separated by any number of
blanks and/or tab characters. A pound sign (#) indicates the beginning
of a comment.
Network addresses are specified in dot format, with leading zeros
omitted and a period between each grouping. (See example addresses in
Figure 12-2.)
Host names can contain any printable character other than a white
space, newline, or comment character.
NOTE
It is very important that you omit the leading zeros in the network
addresses. If you enter the leading zeros here, the domain name
resolver will interpret the numbers as octal numbers.
168
Chapter 12
Configuring Domain Name Files
Create or Modify the Hosts File
Figure 12-2
Sample Hosts Configuration File
# This file contains information regarding the known hosts.
#
# The for for each entry is:
# host IP address
local host name
host aliases
#
# Note: the entries cannot be preceded by a blank space.
#
172.0.0.1
localhost loopback me myself local
192.41.12.100
basful.loc1.inet.com
bashful
192.41.11.114
happy.loc1.inet.com
happy
192.41.11.413
queezy.loc1.inet.com
queezy
192.41.112.122 sneezy.loc2.inet.com
sneezy
192.41.124.4
mpmndda.loc1.inet.com
mpmndda
moose
192.41.124.6
mpmndwa.loc1.inet.com
mpmndwa
wabbit
192.41.114.132 mpmtchq.loc1.inet.com
mpmtchq
foo
192.41.110.16
mpmndiv.loc1.inet.com
mpmndiv
zephyr
192.41.110.82
abacus.loc1.inet.com
abacus
spots
192.41.112.161 camelot.loc1.inet.com
camelot
192.41.112.166 bigblue.loc1.inet.com
bigblue
NOTE
The IP addresses and host names used in Figure 12-2 are for purposes
of the example only.
Chapter 12
169
Configuring Domain Name Files
Additional Domain Name Configuration Files
Additional Domain Name Configuration Files
In addition to the resolver file and the host name data base, three other
files are available to allow you to configure additional information
about your network. Each of these files is provided in sample format in
the NET.SYS account. Each sample file contains an explanation of the
format for the data and a sample entry. The available files and their
functions are described as follows.
Network Name Database
The network name database, NETWORKS.NET.SYS, associates IP
addresses with official network names and aliases. This allows the user
to refer to a network by a symbolic name instead of an internet address.
To configure the network name database, modify the sample file
NETSAMP.NET.SYS.
Protocol Name Database
The protocol name database PROTOCOL.NET.SYS, associates protocol
numbers with official protocol names and aliases. This allows the user
to refer to a protocol by a symbolic name instead of a number. The
protocol number mappings are defined in RFC 1010 Assigned Numbers.
To configure the protocol name database, modify the sample file
PROTSAMP.NET.SYS (this is required for FTP use, starting in release 6.0).
Service Name Database
The service name database, SERVICES.NET.SYS, associates official
service names and aliases with the port number and protocol the
services use. Reserved port numbers 0 through 255 are assigned by
RFC 1010. To configure the service name database, modify the sample
file SERVSAMP.NET.SYS.
170
Chapter 12
Configuring Logging
13
This chapter provides step-by-step instructions for configuring logging.
Logging is configured for the purpose of recording events such as errors
and console commands.
Figure 13-1 shows the screen flow for configuring the logging screens.
Screens unique to logging are indicated by bold boxed screens.
[FUNCTION] denotes the function key used at a screen to invoke the next
screen on the screen flow.
Figure 13-1
Logging Configuration Screen Flow
Open Config/
Directory File Screen
[OPEN CONFIG]
If you have not created the
config file, then press the
OPEN CONFIG key a
second time.
Main Screen
[NS]
NS Config
To enable users for individual logging
classes, in the command window of any
screen, type the path name:
@LOGGING.SUBnnnn.CLASnnnn and
hit enter.
[UNGUIDED]
Unguided Config
[EXIT LOGGING]
[GO TO LOGGING]
Network Log
Link Selection
Config (1)
[PRV LOG SCREEN]
[NEXT SCREEN]
Logging
Config:
Logging
Config:
Link
Selection
Link
Selection
Class
ClassData
Data
Network Log
Config (2)
[PRV LOG SCREEN]
[NEXT SCREEN]
Network Log
Link Selection
Config (3)
[PRV LOG SCREEN]
[NEXT SCREEN]
Network Log
Config (4)
[PRV LOG SCREEN]
[NEXT SCREEN]
Network Log
Link Selection
Config (5)
[PRV LOG SCREEN]
[NEXT SCREEN]
Network Log
Config (6)
[PRV LOG SCREEN]
[NEXT SCREEN]
Network Log
Config (7)
171
Configuring Logging
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Access the logging configuration screens.
• Modify the logging configuration.
• Enable users for individual logging classes.
• Activate logging.
Logging is configured for the purpose of recording events such as errors
and console commands. You configure logging for each of the
subsystems of NS 3000/iX and for NS 3000/iX links. Each subsystem
includes different classes of events (such as internal errors). You can
record logging to a disk file for later analysis, to the system console so
that the system operator receives the messages, or both.
You can also display logging events at individual users’ list devices.
This may be valuable to allow the network manager to monitor NS
console activity from an alternate terminal. If you configure a logging
class so that logging is recorded to a user.account, the user will receive
logged messages any time there is an active session for that
user.account. (Take care if you enable users for logging; doing so can
place a strain on system resources.)
The guided configuration process configures logging for you using
defaults. You can also configure or modify the logging subsystem using
either guided or unguided configuration.
172
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Access Logging Configuration Screens
Access Logging Configuration Screens
Use the following steps to reach the logging configuration screens:
Step 1. Run NMMGR. The Open Configuration/Directory File screen is
displayed.
Step 2. Press the [OPEN CONFIG] key. The Main screen is dispayed.
Step 3. Press the [NS] function key. The NS Configuration screen is displayed.
Step 4. Press either the [Guided Config] or the [Unguided Config] function key.
Step 5. Press the [Modify Logging] function key if you are in guided
configuration or the [Go To Logging] function key if you are in unguided
configuration. The first of seven logging configuration screens is
displayed.
NOTE
HP recommends that you use the default logging configuration values
unless your HP representative tells you otherwise. Not using the
recommended default values may result in the degradation of system
performance.
Chapter 13
173
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
Modify the Logging Configuration
The Netxport Log Configuration (1) screen (#61) in Figure 13-2 is
displayed when you press the [Modify Logging] function key at the
Network Transport Configuration screen.
Figure 13-2
Netxport Log Configuration (1) Screen
Use the fields and the function keys of the screen to configure logging
for the subsystems represented on the screen. If the subsystem for
which you want to enable logging does not appear on the first screen,
press the [Next Screen] function key to go to the next Netxport Log
Configuration screen. There are a total of six logging configuration
screens.
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Fields
Console Logging
174
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to the system
console. A value must be entered for
each subsystem and class listed. A Y
(yes) enables logging to the console, N
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
(no) disables logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to a disk file. A
value must be entered for each
subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables
logging to a file. The file name for the
log file is NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS, where
nnnn is a number from 0000 to 9999.
All logging classes in all subsystems
are logged to this file. At each system
startup, or when a file is full, the node
management services subsystem
(NMS) creates a new
NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS file, naming each
successive logging file by incrementing
nnnn. When NMLG9999.PUB.SYS is full,
NMS names the next logging file
NMLG0000.PUB.SYS.
The Netxport Log Configuration (2) screen (#60) in Figure 13-3 is
displayed when you press the [Next Screen] function key from the
Netxport Log Configuration (1) screen (#61) in Figure 13-2.
Figure 13-3
Netxport Log Configuration (2) Screen
Chapter 13
175
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
Use the fields and the function keys of the screen to configure logging
for the subsystems represented on the screen. If the subsystem for
which you want to enable logging does not appear on this screen, press
the [Next Screen] function key to go to the next Netxport Log
Configuration screen. There are a total of six logging configuration
screens.
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Fields
Console Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to the system
console. A value must be entered for
each subsystem and class listed. A Y
(yes) enables logging to the console, N
(no) disables logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to a disk file. A
value must be entered for each
subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables
logging to a file. The file name that
NMS uses is NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS,
where nnnn is a number from 0000 to
9999. All logging classes in all
subsystems are logged to this file. At
each system startup, or when a file is
full, NMS creates a new
NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS file, naming each
successive logging file by incrementing
nnnn. When NMLG9999.PUB.SYS is full,
NMS names the next logging file
NMLG0000.PUB.SYS.
The Netxport Log Configuration (3) screen (#70) in Figure 13-4 is
displayed when you press the [Next Screen] function key from the
Netxport Log Configuration (2) screen (#60) in Figure 13-3.
176
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
Figure 13-4
Netxport Log Configuration (3) Screen
Use the fields and the function keys of the screen to configure logging
for the subsystems represented on the screen. If the subsystem for
which you want to enable logging does not appear on this screen, press
the [Next Screen] function key to go to the next Netxport Log
Configuration screen. There are a total of six logging configuration
screens.
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Fields
Console Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to the system
console. A value must be entered for
each subsystem and class listed. A Y
(yes) enables logging to the console, N
(no) disables logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to a disk file. A
value must be entered for each
subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
Chapter 13
177
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables
logging to a file. The file name that
NMS uses is NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS,
where nnnn is a number from 0000 to
9999. All logging classes in all
subsystems are logged to this file. At
each system startup, or when a file is
full, NMS creates a new
NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS file, naming each
successive logging file by incrementing
nnnn. When NMLG9999.PUB.SYS is full,
NMS names the next logging file
NMLG0000.PUB.SYS.
The Netxport Log Configuration (4) screen (#68) in Figure 13-5 is
displayed when you press the [Next Screen] function key from the
Netxport Log Configuration (3) screen (#70) in Figure 13-4.
Figure 13-5
Netxport Log Configuration (4) Screen
Use the fields and the function keys of the screen to configure logging
for the subsystems represented on the screen. If the subsystem for
which you want to enable logging does not appear on this screen, press
the [Next Screen] function key to go to the next Netxport Log
Configuration screen. There are a total of six logging configuration
screens.
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
178
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Press the [Exit Logging] function key when you have finished modifying
the logging configuration.
Fields
Console Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to the system
console. A value must be entered for
each subsystem and class listed. A Y
(yes) enables logging to the console, N
(no) disables logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to a disk file. A
value must be entered for each
subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables
logging to a file. The file name that
NMS uses is NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS,
where nnnn is a number from 0000 to
9999. All logging classes in all
subsystems are logged to this file. At
each system startup, or when a file is
full, NMS creates a new
NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS file, naming each
successive logging file by incrementing
nnnn. When NMLG9999.PUB.SYS is full,
NMS names the next logging file
NMLG0000.PUB.SYS.
The Netxport Log Configuration (5) screen (#69) in Figure 13-6 is
displayed when you press the [Next Screen] function key from the
Netxport Log Configuration (4) screen (#68) in Figure 13-5.
Chapter 13
179
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
Figure 13-6
Netxport Log Configuration (5) Screen
Use the fields and the function keys of the screen to configure logging
for the subsystems represented on the screen. If the subsystem for
which you want to enable logging does not appear on this screen, press
the [Next Screen] function key to go to the next Netxport Log
Configuration screen. There are a total of six logging configuration
screens.
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Press the [Exit Logging] function key when you have finished modifying
the logging configuration.
Fields
Console Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to the system
console. A value must be entered for
each subsystem and class listed. A Y
(yes) enables logging to the console, N
(no) disables logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies
whether or not logging events for the
subsystem and class listed beside the
field will be logged to a disk file. A
180
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
value must be entered for each
subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables
logging to a file. The file name that
NMS uses is NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS,
where nnnn is a number from 0000 to
9999. All logging classes in all
subsystems are logged to this file. At
each system startup, or when a file is
full, NMS creates a new
NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS file, naming each
successive logging file by incrementing
nnnn. When NMLG9999.PUB.SYS is full,
NMS names the next logging file
NMLG0000.PUB.SYS.
The Netxport Log Configuration (6) screen (#316) in Figure 13-7 is
displayed when you press the [Next Screen] function key from the
Netxport Log Configuration (5) screen (#69) in Figure 13-6.
Figure 13-7
Netxport Log Configuration (6) Screen
Use the fields and the function keys of the screen to configure logging
for the subsystems represented on the screen. If the subsystem for
which you want to enable logging does not appear on this screen, press
the [Next Screen] function key to go to the next Netxport Log
Configuration screen. There are a total of seven logging configuration
screens.
Chapter 13
181
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
Fields
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Console Logging
The value entered in this field specifies whether or not
logging events for the subsystem and class listed beside
the field will be logged to the system console. A value
must be entered for each subsystem and class listed. A
Y (yes) enables logging to the console, N (no) disables
logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies whether or not
logging events for the subsystem and class listed beside
the field will be logged to a disk file. A value must be
entered for each subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables logging to a file.
The file name that NMS uses is NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS,
where nnnn is a number from 0000 to 9999. All logging
classes in all subsystems are logged to this file. At each
system startup, or when a file is full, NMS creates a
new NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS file, naming each successive
logging file by incrementing nnnn. When
NMLG9999.PUB.SYS is full, NMS names the next
logging file NMLG0000.PUB.SYS.
The Netxport Log Configuration (7) screen (#353) in Figure 13-8 is
displayed when you press the [Next Screen] function key from the
Netxport Log Configuration (6) screen (#316) in Figure 13-7.
182
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Modify the Logging Configuration
Figure 13-8
Netxport Log Configuration (7) Screen
Use the fields and function keys of the screen to configure logging for
the subsystems represented on the screen. The subsystems 78 (PCI
100Base-T) and 82 (Sync MUX link) can be configured from this screen.
Fields
Enable or disable logging classes (or accept HP-recommended defaults).
Press the [Save Data] key on each screen to create or modify the data
record. Verify that the data record has been created by checking that
the Data flag is Y.
Console Logging
The value entered in this field specifies whether or not
logging events for the subsystem and class listed beside
the field will be logged to the system console. A value
must be entered for each subsystem and class listed. A
Y (yes) enables logging to the console, N (no) disables
logging to the console.
Disk Logging
The value entered in this field specifies whether or not
logging events for the subsystem and class listed beside
the field will be logged to a disk file. A value must be
entered for each subsystem and class listed. A Y (yes)
enables logging to a file, N (no) disables logging to a file.
Chapter 13
183
Configuring Logging
Enable Users for Individual Logging Classes
Enable Users for Individual Logging Classes
The logging screens described previously in this chapter make it
possible to completely configure logging for all subsystems by
traversing only seven screens. However, using these screens, it is not
possible to configure logging so that messages generated by specific
logging classes are sent to an individual user’s list device.
The following steps describe the method used to configure users to
receive logging messages. Using this method, you can create a
configuration that allows messages from a single logging class, or a set
of classes, to be sent to a user’s list device.
To do so, you access and update the Logging Configuration Class Data
screen (#67) in Figure 13-9, according to the steps that follow.
Figure 13-9
Logging Configuration: Class Data Screen
Step 1. Type the path name:
@LOGGING.SUBnnnn.CLASnnnn
in the command window of any screen and press the [ENTER] key, where
SUBnnnn is the subsystem ID and CLASnnnn is the class name of the
logging class you want directed to the user’s list device.
For example, subsystem 77, class 2 would be entered as:
@LOGGING.SUB0077.CLASS0002
184
Chapter 13
Configuring Logging
Enable Users for Individual Logging Classes
Step 2. To enable console logging for this subsystem logging class, enter a Y in
the Enable console logging? field. To disable console logging, enter
an N. Be aware that changing the value in this field will override
the previous setting for the logging class you are configuring.
Step 3. To enable disk logging for this subsystem logging class, enter a Y in the
Enable disk logging? field. To disable console logging, enter an N. Be
aware that changing the value in this field will override the
previous setting for the logging class you are configuring.
Step 4. Enter up to three names, in the form user.account, in the Users
enabled for logging fields. If these fields already contain names it is
because user names were previously configured using this screen. If
less than three user names are configured, type the new user name in
an empty field. If all fields are used, type over one of the old user names
to replace it with the new user name. (Note that the user name you type
over will no longer be enabled to receive these logging messages.)
Step 5. Press the [Save Data] function key to modify the data record.
Step 6. Press the [Prior Screen] key to return to the screen from which you
accessed the Logging Configuration: Class Data screen.
Repeat the above procedure for each subsystem logging class for which
you want to enable users.
CAUTION
Enabling users to receive logging messages can strain system
resources. Hewlett-Packard recommends that you use this capability
sparingly and only for short periods of time.
Chapter 13
185
Configuring Logging
Activate Logging
Activate Logging
NetIPC logging is automatically activated at system start up. Link
manager logging and network transport logging are activated when you
initiate the network transport (NETCONTROL START). Network Services
logging is activated when the Network Services are initiated (that is,
when the NSCONTROL START command is issued).
Network Link logging is activated when the specific link is first started.
When you are changing a logging configuration for a specific subsystem,
the changes will normally take effect when you perform a SWITCHNMLOG
UPDATE command. In some cases, however, such as when no logging is
currently active, the subsystem may need to be deactivated and
restarted. The steps that must be taken for each subsystem are shown
in Table 13-1.
Table 13-1
Subsystem Activation/Deactivation
Subsystem
Steps
Network Transport
NETCONTROL STOP (if already active)
NETCONTROL START
NetIPC (sockets)
NETCONTROL STOP (if already active)
NETCONTROL START
NETCONTROL UPDATE
Network Services
NSCONTROL STOP (if already active)
NSCONTROL START
Link Manager
NETCONTROL STOP (if already active)
SNACONTROL STOP;node=nodename (refer to
the SNA Link/XL Node Manger’s Guide)
SNACONTROL START;NODE=nodename
NETCONTROL START
Link Logging (non-DTS)
NETCONTROL STOP; NET = niname
(if already active)
NETCONTROL START; NET = niname
Link Logging (DTS link)
Restart the system or use :DTCCNTRL option
4 (shutdown) followed by option 5 (restart).
How to use the log messages for troubleshooting is described in the
NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual. How to format the log
file for examination is described in Using the Node Management
Services (NMS) Utilities.
186
Chapter 13
14
Operating the Network
After you have completed the configuration process, you are ready to
activate NS. This chapter shows you how to bring up an NS 3000/iX
node and how to shut it down. It assumes you have successfully
completed the configuration steps described previously.
For more detailed information on starting, stopping, and operating an
NS network, see the NS 3000/iX Operations and Maintenance
Reference Manual.
This chapter includes step-by-step instructions to help you perform the
following tasks:
• Start links and services.
— Start software loopback (optional).
— Start the links.
— Start Network Services.
• Test Network Services.
• Shut down links and services.
187
Operating the Network
Start Links and Services
Start Links and Services
Start Software Loopback
Issue the following command (NM capability required) to start software
loopback:
NETCONTROL START;NET=loopbackNIname
This starts up the control process, the transport, and software loopback.
Note: when you use guided NMMGR to create any NI, a loopback
network interface (whose loopbackNIname is LOOP) is automatically
generated. The loopback NI must be started if you wish to perform local
loopbacks or to DSLINE to the local node, also some ARPA services need
loopback to be started.
Start a Link
Issue the following command (NM capability required) to start a link:
NETCONTROL START;NET=NIname
This starts the link identified by the NI name. (If no previous
NETCONTROL START command was issued, then the control process and
transport are also started.) The NIname is the network interface (NI)
name that you supplied during NS configuration. You can start the link
before loopback if you want. Start other links as needed.
Start a Host-Based X.25 Link
If your network includes X.25 links and you are using host-based
network management, you will need to use the DTCCNTRL command
before you issue the NETCONTROL START command. DTCCNTRL starts
X.25 and PAD support for the DTC/X.25 Network Access card. Issue the
following command (System Operator capability required):
DTCCNTRL DTC=dtcname;CARD=cardnumber;FUNC=function
where function is one of the following:
STARTX25
to start X.25 services;
STARTPADSUP to start PAD support services;
STARTBOTH
to start both X.25 and PAD support services.
For more information on starting host-based X.25 links as well as other
uses of the DTCCNTRL command, see Configuring and Managing
Host-Based X.25 Links.
188
Chapter 14
Operating the Network
Start Links and Services
NOTE
If you are starting an X.25 link for a system using PC-based network
management or if you are not starting an X.25 link, you do not need to
use the DTCCNTRL command.
Start Network Services
Issue the following command (NM capability required) to start the
network services:
NSCONTROL START
This starts the NS 3000/iX Network Services, such as Virtual Terminal,
Network File Transfer, Remote File Access, and Remote Data Base
Access.
You may want to create a startup UDC or command file to activate
software loopback, the link(s), and the network services. If you do so,
you must separate each command with a brie pause to allow for
processing (rxample: “:PAUSE 5”).
Chapter 14
189
Operating the Network
Test Network Services
Test Network Services
In order to test that you have successfully configured and brought up
your NS node, HP provides an NS validation test called
QVALNS.NET.SYS. QVALNS is a program which modifies a file called
TQVALNS and streams it as a temporary job (JQVALNS). The job purges
and creates various files, and then runs a program called NSTEST.
NSTEST tests the network services (VT, RFA, RDBA, and NFT).
To run the NS validation test, follow the step below:
Step 1. Run the NS validation test on your own node. This tests the software
loopback capability. Issue the following command, where node is the
node portion of your own node name:
RUN QVALNS.NET.SYS;INFO=node
Step 2. Run the NS validation test on another system on the same network.
Select a remote node on the network and make sure that the link and
the network services are up on the remote system by issuing the
following commands on that node (NM capability required):
NETCONTROL STATUS
NSCONTROL STATUS
If the link or network services have not been started, either pick
another node or start them.
Note the node name of the remote node (given in the last line of output
from the NETCONTROL STATUS command). If you followed the
configuration steps in this manual, the second and third portions of the
node name (the domain and organization) should be the same as the
second and third portions of the local node.
Step 3. Run the NS validation test across the link by issuing the following
command at the local node, where node is the node portion of the
remote node name:
RUN QVALNS.NET.SYS;INFO=node
If you encounter problems, see the NS 3000/iX Operations and
Maintenance Reference Manual and to the NS 3000/iX Error Messages
Reference Manual for information on diagnostics and troubleshooting.
190
Chapter 14
Operating the Network
Shut Down Network Services
Shut Down Network Services
To shut down NS, issue the following commands (NM capability
required):
DSLINE @;CLOSE
NSCONTROL STOP
NETCONTROL STOP
The DSLINE command shown above closes connections for your session
only.
NSCONTROL STOP allows existing users to continue using the services
until they finish their current task but prevents new uses of the
services by these users or by new users. Therefore, the services are not
actually stopped until all existing users finish using them. You can use
NSCONTROL ABORT instead if you wish to immediately terminate all use
of the services.
NETCONTROL STOP closes all open connections. To determine if there are
any sessions still active, enter: NSCONTROL STATUS. If you do not want
to wait until existing users are finished with their current tasks before
you bring down the system, issue NSCONTROL ABORT and then
NETCONTROL STOP.
If a host-based X.25 link is started, you will also need to issue a
DTCCNTRL command to stop X.25 and PAD support for the DTC/X.25
Network Access card. Enter the DTCCNTRL command after the
NSCONTROL STOP and NETCONTROL STOP commands. Enter the
command as:
DTCCNTRL DTC=dtcname;CARD=cardnumber;FUNC=function
where function is one of the following:
STARTX25
to start X.25 services;
STARTPADSUP to start PAD support services;
STARTBOTH
Chapter 14
to start both X.25 and PAD support services.
191
Operating the Network
Shut Down Network Services
192
Chapter 14
A
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
This appendix provides a quick overview of the planning and tasks you
will need to do to migrate an NS 3000 network from an MPE/V system
to an MPE/iX system. This appendix assumes that you are migrating
your network as a whole; that is, replacing all MPE V systems with
MPE/iX systems and maintaining the same basic network function.
The following topics are covered by this appendix:
• Differences between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX networks.
• An overview of migration tasks.
• Guidelines for converting files.
• Guidelines for reconfiguring a network.
NOTE
For information on migrating X.25 links, refer to the remaining
appendixes of this manual.
193
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
There are a number of differences between the way NS is implemented
on MPE V systems and the way it is implemented on MPE/iX systems.
These differences affect the network itself, some of the applications that
users may run over the network, and the command used to obtain
status information about the network. Since it is helpful to understand
these differences as you prepare to move an existing MPE V network to
MPE/iX, they are summarized below.
Network
A number of the methods available for making connections to an
MPE V network are not available with NS 3000/iX. If your MPE V
network includes one of these you will need to modify your network
configuration before attempting to use the network on MPE/iX systems.
More information on the specific steps required to modify or remove
unsupported links or connections can be found later in this appendix.
The connection methods that are not supported on NS 3000/iX are:
• Manual dial modems.
• Asynchronous Network Link.
• Bisynchronous link-level protocol.
In addition, while it is possible to access a DS/3000 node directly from
an NS 3000/V node, this capability is not supported on NS 3000/iX. A
user of an NS 3000/iX network who wants to access a DS/3000 node
must first access an MPE V NS node. This is because the DS/3000 code
that was included as a subset of the NS 3000/V code is not provided
with NS 3000/iX.
Configuration Files
NS 3000/V network configuration files are separated into two files, the
NMCONFIG file, which contains link information, and the NSCONF file,
which contains the transport configuration and other subsystems you
have purchased such as SNA.
NS 3000/iX systems have a single NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS file that contains
information for the network transport, for NetIPC and link-level
logging, and also for the Datacommunications and Terminal Subsystem
(DTS). NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS also contains information for any other
subsystems you have purchased such as SNA.
194
Appendix A
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
Applications Support
There are also differences in the implementations of NS 3000/V and
NS 3000/iX that will affect certain applications that users may
currently be running on your MPE V network. These differences are as
follows:
• NS 3000/iX supports PTOP for HPDESK only.
On NS 3000/iX PTOP is not supported for applications other than
HPDESK. Network users who are running PTOP programs will
need to convert them to NetIPC/RPM or BSD programs before
running them on an NS 3000/iX network. Refer to the NetIPC
3000/XL Programmer’s Reference Manual and the Using
NS 3000/iX Network Services for more information.
• Nowait I/O RFA is not available with NS 3000/iX.
Privileged mode programs that use nowait I/O Remote File Access
over an MPE V network will need to be modified before they can be
run on an NS 3000/iX network. Refer to the Using NS 3000/iX
Network Services for more information.
Obtaining Status Information
On MPE V systems the SHOWCOM command returns status information
about a communication device, and is used to determine line activity
and quality. This information is still available on NS 3000/iX, but is
accessed through a different command. Use the LINKCONTROL STATUS
command to access status information on NS 3000/iX.
Appendix A
195
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
Migration Overview
Migration Overview
There are a number of steps that you must take to successfully convert
an MPE V network for use as an MPE/iX network. These tasks are
summarized below, and described in more detail in the remainder of
this appendix. Keep in mind that, depending on the needs of your
installation, you may need to perform additional tasks to complete your
migration. For example, if you are adding communication links that did
not exist on your MPE V network you will also need to configure those
new links.
Before You Start
This guide provides an extensive overview of NS architecture and
networking concepts. It also furnishes configuration design checks,
planning worksheets and examples to aid you in organizing new
network configurations. You should be thoroughly familiar with this
material before you begin your migration.
File Migration Tasks
There are two primary tasks you will need to perform to migrate your
network configuration files. These are:
1. Run the NMMGRVER utility on the old configuration files to convert
them to the current software version. (You will first need to install a
copy of all configuration files used for your NS 3000/V network to the
MPE/iX network). Refer to “File Conversion Guidelines” later in this
Appendix.
2. Run the NMMGR utility on the new configuration file(s) to make any
changes required due to the differences between NS 3000/V and
NS 3000/iX. Refer to “Reconfiguration Guidelines” later in this
Appendix.
Additional Migration Considerations
This appendix does not discuss hardware migration considerations;
however, you will find a description of hardware components in this
manual. Additionally, details of hardware installation and
configuration can be found in the following manuals:
• LANIC Installation and Service Manual.
• LAN Cable and Accessories Installation Manual.
— Central Bus Programmable Serial Interface Installation and
Reference Manual.
196
Appendix A
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
File Conversion Guidelines
File Conversion Guidelines
A file conversion utility called NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS allows you to convert
earlier versions of subsystems for use with the current version of Node
Management Services (NMS) by converting the files to an acceptable
format.
When to Convert Files
If you have not successfully converted your files you will be notified that
conversion is necessary when you try either to run NMMGR or to
perform a NETCONTROL command. If you attempt to run NMMGR
against an unconverted configuration file you will receive the message:
Version mismatch found on specified subsystem. Please run
NMMGRVER. (NMGRERR 53)
If you attempt to perform NETCONTROL while using unconverted files
you will receive the following message at the console:
Bad CONFIG File Version
In either case you should stop your current activity and run the
NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS file conversion utility on your configuration files.
WARNING
The conversion procedure that follows will not preserve any
previously configured Distributed Terminal Subsystem (DTS)
configuration values. If you are updating from an earlier
version of MPE/iX at the same time you are migrating from
NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX, you should see the information under
“Updating From a Previous MPE/iX Version” later in this
Appendix before converting your configuration files.
Converting Files
Follow these steps to convert configuration files using NMMGRVER:
Step 1. Make a backup copy of the existing configuration files.
Step 2. Install a copy of the MPE/V NMCONFIG file to NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS on the
MPE/iX system, and then install copies of any NSCONF files.
Step 3. Execute NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS by entering:
RUN NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS
The system responds with the following banner:
NMS Configuration File Conversion Utility 32099-11018 V.uu.ff (C)
Hewlett-Packard Co. 1985
Appendix A
197
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
File Conversion Guidelines
Step 4. The system will then prompt for the name of the configuration file to be
converted by displaying the message:
Fileset to be scanned?
You can then choose to end the conversion program by pressing the
[RETURN] key, or you can enter one of the following filesets:
filename [.groupname [.acctname]]
@ [.groupname [.acctname]]
@.@ [.acctname]
@.@.@
NMMGRVER searches for files of type nconf in the specified fileset. For
each file found, it asks:
OK to convert filename.groupname.acctname?
where filename.groupname.acctname is the name of a configuration
file. Enter Y for yes, or enter either N or [RETURN] for no.
Step 5. NMMGRVER checks the configuration file to determine whether it is
an MPE/V or an MPE/iX configuration file. If it is an MPE/iX file the
conversion proceeds without further user input. If the file is an MPE/V
file, however, NMMGRVER prompts you for the type of MPE/V file you
are converting, as follows:
What is the type of this file?
1) MPE V NSCONF
2) MPE V NMCONFIG
3) skip this file
Enter a value between 1 and 3.
Enter the appropriate value.
Step 6. After each file is converted NMMGRVER will display the following
message:
FILE CONVERTED
Continue to enter either Y, N, or [RETURN] until you have converted all
files.
In the conversion process, NMMGRVER will merge the information
from each NSCONF file accepted for conversion with NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS,
and create new (converted) NSCONF files. If you have converted more
than one NSCONF file, you will need to choose the file that corresponds to
the network configuration you want, and rename it as the new
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. Choose the NSCONF file that corresponds to the
network configuration you want to use as your NS 3000/iX
configuration.
198
Appendix A
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
File Conversion Guidelines
This new NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS file contains your NS configuration in a
format acceptable to MPE/iX. You can now run NMMGR to configure
the DTS subsystem, and to perform any needed modifications to the NS
configuration. See “Reconfiguration Guidelines” later in this appendix.
Updating From a Previous MPE/iX Version
Updating from an earlier version of MPE/iX at the same time migrating
from NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX, you will need to make a choice between
reconfiguring Distributed Terminal Subsystem (DTS) and reconfiguring
the NS network. The choice is necessary because MPE/V versions of
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS files do not include DTS configuration values.
The circumstances of the installation determine which configuration
values to preserve. If the NS network is complex, you may decide to
convert the existing MPE/V configuration files, and reconfigure DTS. In
this case you should follow the steps under “File Conversion
Guidelines” earlier in this appendix.
If, on the other hand, your DTS configuration is extensive, you may
decide to migrate your existing MPE/iX configuration files to the new
version of MPE/iX. You will then need to redo your NS network
configuration so that both the NS and DTS configurations are contained
in a single, valid, MPE/iX NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS file. In any case, you will
need to reconfigure either NS or DTS if you are both updating MPE/iX
and converting from an NS 3000/V network to an NS 3000/iX network.
Appendix A
199
MPE/V to MPE/iX Migration
Reconfiguration Guidelines
Reconfiguration Guidelines
Once the MPE/V NS configuration files have been converted for use
with the MPE/iX version of NS, reconfigure your network to account for
the implementation differences between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX.
Run the NMMGR utility against the configuration file generated by the
file conversion process and perform the following reconfiguration tasks:
• Configure the physical path of all links for your network. This
configuration consists of a channel number (ccc) and subchannel
number (sss) in the form ccc.sss. There is no channel or
subchannel associated with NS on MPE V.
• Since the LAP-B protocol is the only point-to-point link-level protocol
supported on the MPE/iX computer, you must reconfigure links that
were configured as bisynchronous links on NS 3000/V as LAP-B
links, or remove them from the network configuration.
• Configure the Distributed Terminal Subsystem (DTS) according to
the needs of your installation. Refer to Configuring Systems for
Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial Devices for instructions on how
to configure the DTS.
The above configuration tasks are a general summary of what you will
need to do to reconfigure your network to run on MPE/iX. You should be
aware that there are many changes to individual screens and screen
fields. Refer to this guide for information on individual screens and
screen fields.
200
Appendix A
B
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to
NS 3000/iX
This Appendix tells how to use the NMMGRVER utility to migrate
(update) configuration files from a node running NS X.25 3000/V Link
to a node that will be running NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later. This
appendix does not apply if an MPE V based node is being used as an
X.25 server for NS 3000/XL based machines. Refer to the following
appendixes depending on which X.25 network products you currently
have:
• Migrating a configuration file from a node running NS 3000/V PAD
to an NS 3000/iX node that will be running NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or
later, refer to Appendix C , “NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD
Access to NS 3000/iX.”
This Appendix also provides an overview of the differences between
networking functionality on an MPE V and an MPE/iX system you need
to consider for migration.
201
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
The following paragraphs summarize differences between NS 3000/V
and NS 3000/iX. Make sure that you account for these differences that
could affect your network when migrating to NS 3000/iX. For
information on operating system migration, refer to the MPE/iX
Migration series.
Hardware
Some NS 3000/V hardware components are not part of an NS 3000/iX
network, such as the ATP for terminal connections, and the INP for
network links.
On an NS 3000/iX network, the DTC provides connections for local or
remote terminals and serial printers. The DTC also provides MPE/iX
access to X.25 through a DTC/X.25 Network Access card. The
Datacommunications and Terminal Subsystem (DTS) LANIC on the
MPE/iX host is used for system-to-system X.25 connectivity.
Unsupported Network Connections
Before migrating your network, identify any unsupported network
connections. The network connections that are not supported on
NS 3000/iX networks are as follows:
• Manual-dial modems.
• Asynchronous SERIAL Network Link and bisynchronous link-level
protocol. To ease migration, you can convert Asynchronous SERIAL
network links to the NS 3000/V Point-to-Point links which can be
converted to NS 3000/iX. Point-to-Point links use the LAP-B
protocol.
• Connections to DS/3000 nodes. DS network services are not
supported on NS 3000/iX. If DS/3000 nodes are part of an existing
network, either migrate them to NS 3000/V or maintain NS 3000/V
connections to the DS/3000 nodes.
Configuration of Terminals and Printers
On NS 3000/V networks, the SYSDUMP program is used to perform I/O
configuration which includes configuring terminals, printers, and other
I/O devices and drivers. On NS 3000/iX, terminals and serial printers
are configured on the host (using NMMGR) and on the OpenView
Windows Workstation (using the OpenView DTC Manager software).
For more information on configuration using your OpenView Windows
Workstation, read Using the OpenView DTC Manager.
202
Appendix B
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Differences Between NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
PAD devices on NS 3000/V are configured (using NMMGR) as part of
the X.25 network configuration. On NS 3000/iX when PC-based
network management is used, PAD devices are configured both on the
host (using NMMGR) and on the OpenView Windows Workstation
(using the OpenView DTC Manager software).
Configuration Files
NS 3000/V network configuration files are separated into two files, the
NMCONFIG file, which contains link information, and the NSCONF file,
which contains the transport configuration and other subsystems you
have purchased such as SNA.
NS 3000/iX systems have a single NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS file that contains
information for the network transport, for NetIPC and link-level
logging, and also for the Datacommunications and Terminal Subsystem
(DTS). NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS also contains information for any other
subsystems you have purchased such as SNA.
Network Services
Differences in the support of network services between NS 3000/V and
NS 3000/iX can affect applications that users may currently be running
on the NS 3000/V network. These differences are:
• NS 3000/iX supports PTOP for HPDESK only. Network users who
are running PTOP programs will need to convert them to
NetIPC/RPM programs before running them on an NS 3000/iX
network. Refer to the NetIPC 3000/XL Programmer’s Reference
Manual and the Using NS 3000/iX Network Services for more
information.
• Nowait I/O RFA is not available with NS 3000/iX. Privileged mode
programs that use nowait I/O Remote File Access over an NS 3000/V
network will need to be modified before they can be run on an
NS 3000/iX network. Refer to Using NS 3000/iX Network Services
for more information.
Obtaining Device Status Information
On MPE V systems, the SHOWCOM command returns status information
about communication devices such as Local Area Network Interface
Controllers (LANICs). On NS 3000/iX systems, this information is
available with the LINKCONTROL...;STATUS command.
Appendix B
203
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Differences in X.25 Support
Differences in X.25 Support
There are differences in X.25 support between NS 3000/V and
NS 3000/iX which need to be considered when you migrate as described
in the following paragraphs.
1980 Versus 1984 CCITT
NS 3000/V supports CCITT 1980 and NS 3000/iX supports both 1980
and 1984.
General Level 3 Differences
In MPE V X.25, a Reset is sent to initialize or clear a Permanent
Virtual Circuit. In MPE/iX X.25, a Reset is not sent to initialize or clear
a Permanent Virtual Circuit.
MPE V X.25 has a timeout on an interrupt collision. MPE/iX X.25 does
not.
Level 3 Access with NetIPC
In addition to the X.25 features supported on NS 3000/V,
NetIPC 3000/XL provides the following CCITT 1984 features:
• Fast select facility.
• The capability of modifying and reading the facility field in call
packets.
• A new option in IPCDEST (called the destination network address
option) allows you to directly specify an X.25 address or PVC number
instead of a remote node name. See the NetIPC 3000/XL
Programmers Reference Manual for more information. If using this
feature, you can configure POOL as an X.25 Address Key with its
security option set to “O” (outbound) in the X.25 SVC Address Key
Paths screen to allow outbound calls to any destination address.
• IPCCONTROL request 12, reason for error or event, on NS 3000/V
can return 14 (network shutdown), 15 (restart sent by local
network), 16 (level 2 failure), 17 (restart sent by local protocol
module), and 18 (restart packet received). IPCCONTROL on
NS 3000/XL only returns 10 (Clear), 11 (Reset), or 12 (Interrupt).
• In NS 3000/V, IPCSHUTDOWN does not complete until a clear
confirmation arrives. In NS 3000/XL, IPCSHUTDOWN completes
immediately.
• In NS 3000/V, IPCCREATE requires that the network name be padded
with nulls. In NS 3000/XL, IPCCREATE requires the network name be
204
Appendix B
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Differences in X.25 Support
padded with blanks.
Facilities
The supported facilities of the DTC/X.25 XL Network Link are shown in
Table B-1.
Table B-1
Supported Facilities
Supported Facilities
1984 CCITT X.25 Reference
Extended packet sequence number
6.2
Incoming calls barred
6.5
Outgoing calls barred
6.6
Nonstandard default packet size
6.9
Nonstandard default window size
6.10
Flow control parameter negotiation
6.12
Throughput class negotiation
6.13
Closed user group selection (1980 CCITT)
6.14
Fast select request and acceptance
6.16–17
Reverse charging and acceptance
6.18–19
Local charging prevention
6.20
Hunt group
6.25
Supported Facilities with X.25 Level 3 Programmatic Access
Closed user group related facilities
6.14
Bilateral closed user groups
6.15
Network user identification
6.21
Called line modified address notification
6.26
Call redirection and notification
6.25–27
Transit delay selection and indication
6.28
Security
When configuring a host, you can now set security for each remote
system using the Security field on the X.25 SVC Address Key Paths
screen. System to System Local User Groups (LUGs) are now assigned
on the DTC instead of on the host. The LUG provides security in the
same way a CUG does, but you don’t have to subscribe to a CUG.
Appendix B
205
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Differences in X.25 Support
Pad Support
For complete information on migrating PAD support from NS 3000/V to
NS 3000/iX Release 2.0 or later, refer to Appendix C , “NS X.25
Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX.”
206
Appendix B
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Converting NS 3000/V Configuration Files to NS 3000/iX
Converting NS 3000/V Configuration Files to
NS 3000/iX
The procedures that follow are for updating (migrating) configuration
files from a node running NS X.25 3000/V Link to a node that will be
running NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later. This conversion procedure can
be used with NS 3000/V NMCONFIG and NSCONF files for version V-delta 3
or later. When updating a node running NS X.25 3000/V Link, all
NS 3000/V LAN, Point-to-Point, or NRJE as well as X.25 information
will be updated to work with MPE/iX.
NOTE
The procedures that follow assume that there is no existing
NS 3000/XL NMCONFIG file.
Deleting Secondary NIs
If you are migrating from NS X.25 3000/V (release V delta 7 or later) to
NS 3000/iX release 2.2 or later, make a backup copy of your NS 3000/V
NSCONF file. To migrate to NS 3000/iX release 2.2 or later, you must
delete the secondary NIs in the NS 3000/V NSCONF file before you use
NMMGRVER to convert it.
Appendix B
207
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Saving NS 3000/V X.25 Parameters
Saving NS 3000/V X.25 Parameters
Make a list of the following NS 3000/V parameters that must be
re-entered on the DTC.
• VC Assignment from the NS 3000/V screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25.VCSPEC
• X.25 Network type and Flow Control parms from the NS 3000/V
screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25.VCSPEC. FLOWCNTL
• L.U.G. Incoming Calls from the NS 3000/V screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25.LUGSPEC. INLUG
• L.U.G. Outgoing Calls from the NS 3000/V screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25.LUGSPEC. OUTLUG
208
Appendix B
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Copying NS 3000/V Configuration Files to NS 3000/iX System
Copying NS 3000/V Configuration Files to
NS 3000/iX System
Restore the NS 3000/V configuration files to the NS 3000/iX system.
Name the NS 3000/V files with the same names they had on the
NS 3000/V node, that is, NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS, and if present,
NSCONF.PUB.SYS.
Remember: This procedure assumes that there is no configuration file
on the NS 3000/iX node yet.
Appendix B
209
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Using NMMGRVER
Using NMMGRVER
To use the NMMGRVER utility to convert your NS 3000/V
configuration file to NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later, proceed as follows:
Step 1. At the MPE/iX prompt, type: NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS and answer the
questions.
Step 2. Do either steps a through c or steps d through g.
If your NS 3000/V node had only an NMCONFIG file (but no NSCONF files),
follow the instructions in steps a through c.
a. To convert the NMCONFIG file enter the file name:
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS.
b. Enter Y to proceed when prompted.
c. Select type 2 for NMCONFIG type file. The converted file will be saved
with the file name you entered. In this case it is NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS.
This is the only filename that the node will recognize as its
configuration file.
If your NS 3000/V node had one or more NSCONF files, follow the
instructions in steps d through g.
d. Merge your NS 3000/V NSCONF file with the NS 3000/V NMCONFIG
file, and convert it for use with NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later by
entering a file name, for example: NSCONF1.PUB.SYS.
e. Enter Y to proceed when prompted.
f. Select type 1 for NSCONF type file. NMMGRVER will merge the
contents of the existing NMCONFIG file with the NSCONF file you
specified. It will be saved in the NSCONF file you specified. In this
example, NSCONF1.
g. If you converted more than one NSCONF file, decide which one will be
the network configuration you want on the NS 3000/iX system.
Rename the file to NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS.
Updating X.25 XL System Access Parameters
On the NS 3000/iX host, use NMMGR to change the following
parameters to provide X.25 XL System Access:
1. If migrating from any NS 3000/V release before release V delta 7,
modify the screen at path @NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25 to
change the inactivity timer from minutes to seconds.
2. On the screen with the path @LINK, verify that the DTSLINK is
defined.
210
Appendix B
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Using NMMGRVER
3. On the screen with the path @LINK.DTSLINK, verify that the physical
path is correctly defined.
4. On the screen with the path @LINK, add the LINK name and Type
(X25) of the X25 link. Note: to migrate to NS 3000/iX release 2.2
or later, repeat this step and steps 5 through 7 for each
DTC/X.25 Network Access card.
5. On the screen with the path @LINK.linkname, where the LINK
name is the one added in the previous step, add the DTC Node name
and card number for the DTC/X.25 Network Access card.
6. On the screen with the path @NETXPORT.NI.niname.LINK, add the
LINK name entered in Step 4.
7. On the screen with the path
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.LINK.linkname, answer yes or no to start
device on network initalization (default is yes) then, press the
Update key.
Saving X.25 XL System Access Parameters
Make a list of the following X.25 XL System Access Parameters on the
host that must be re-entered under OpenView DTC Manager.
• Local Node Name.
• Link Name (the X25 link, not the DTSLINK).
• DTC Node Name.
• DTC Card Number.
• X.25 User Facility Set Parameters.
• SVC and/or PVC numbers for each reachable node.
Adding Other Link Types
For LAN and Point-to-Point link types, run NMMGR and see other
sections of this manual for the correct values to be entered.
Verifying DTS Configuration
If the datacommunications and terminal subsystem (DTS) has not been
configured, configure the DTS parameters on the host according to the
requirements of your network. For more information, refer to Getting
Started with the DTC and Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers,
and Other Serial Devices if you are using PC-based network
management. Refer to Configuring and Managing Host-Based X.25
Links if you are using host-based network management.
Appendix B
211
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX
Configuring the DTC
Configuring the DTC
If you are using PC-based network management, configure the DTC by
using the OpenView DTC Manager at your OpenView Windows
Workstation. For full details, see Using the OpenView DTC Manager.
If you are using host-based network management, configure the DTC
using NMMGR. For full details, see Configuring and Managing
Host-Based X.25 Links.
212
Appendix B
C
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V
PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
This Appendix tells how to migrate NS 3000/V versions of PAD access
to NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later. For information on migrating X.25,
refer to the following appendices, depending on which network
configuration you have.
• Migrating a configuration file from a node running NS X.25 3000/V
Link to a node that will be running NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later,
refer to Appendix B , “NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V to NS 3000/iX.”
213
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
PAD Support: NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
PAD Support: NS 3000/V and NS 3000/iX
The following paragraphs summarize differences between NS 3000/V
and NS 3000/iX PAD support. You must consider these differences
when migrating to NS 3000/iX. For system migration issues, refer to
the MPE/iX Migration series for more information.
• PAD facility sets are not supported on NS 3000/iX.
• The packet sizes supported on NS 3000/iX are 128, 256, and 512.
• NS 3000/V PAD sends PAD calls to socket #2563. NS 3000/iX PAD
sends PAD calls to the catch-all socket.
• The NS 3000/iX PAD configuration and communication path is
different than NS 3000/V. See the migration procedures later in this
appendix for details.
214
Appendix C
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
Migrating from NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
Migrating from NS 3000/V PAD Access to
NS 3000/iX
There is no conversion tool for migrating NS 3000/V PAD access to
NS 3000/iX Release 2.0 or later.
The tasks you must do in order to migrate from NS 3000/V PAD access
to NS 3000/iX release 2.0 or later are as follows:
1. Make sure you have accounted for the differences that could affect
your network as described in the previous sections of this appendix.
2. Make a list of the NS 3000/V PAD data that must be re-entered for
the DTC. Refer to the section in this appendix called “To Save
NS 3000/V PAD Parameters.”
Using Host-Based Network Management
1. Use NMMGR to configure DTS parameters on the host.
2. Complete PAD configuration using NMMGR. For complete
information on this, see Configuring and Managing Host-Based X.25
Links.
• Remove PAD terminals from the NS 3000/V network directory.
Using PC-Based Network Management
1. Use NMMGR to configure DTS parameters on the host. For complete
information on this, read Configuring Systems for Terminals,
Printers, an Other Serial Devices.
2. Make a list of the DTS parameters configured on the host that must
also be entered into the OpenView DTC Manager. Refer to the
section in this appendix called “To Save DTS Parameters on the
Host.”
3. Configure the DTC by using the OpenView DTC Manager at your
OpenView Windows Workstation.
• Remove PAD terminals from the NS 3000/V network directory.
Saving NS 3000/V PAD Parameters
Make a list of the following NS 3000/V parameters that must be
re-entered on the DTC:
• PAD device X.25 addresses fro the NS 3000/V screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25.SVCPATH
Appendix C
215
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
Migrating from NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
• L.U.G. Inbound Address from the NS 3000/V screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.LUGSPEC.INLUG
• L.U.G. Outbound Address from the NS 3000/V screen with the path:
@NETXPORT.NI.niname.PROTOCOL.X25.LUGSPEC. OUTLUG
PAD Access Migration Categories
The way you assign a PAD device depends on what the device is and
how it will be used. Asynchronous devices attached to DTCs can either
be configured with nailed or non-nailed logical device numbers on each
of the MPE/iX host systems to which they have access. The following
subsections describe the characteristics of nailed and non-nailed
devices.
Non-Nailed Devices
A non-nailed device is a session-accepting device that is not
permanently associated with an ldev number at configuration time.
When the user at such a device logs on to an MPE/iX system, an ldev is
assigned from a pool of ldevs set aside for this purpose at configuration
time. The device characteristics of the PAD devices must match the
non-nailed PAD terminal profile.
The association between a non-nailed device and the assigned ldev
exists only for the duration of the session. One advantage of the use of
non-nailed device connections is that configuration is simplified, since it
is not required that each non-nailed device be individually configured.
The host cannot make an outbound call to a non-nailed device.
Nailed Devices
A nailed device is one with a permanently assigned ldev. The
assignment is configured on the MPE/iX host system. Nailed devices
can be accessed programmatically through their ldev number. There is
an ldev-to-25-address mapping. The host can support both inbound and
outbound calls.
Configuration of Nailed Versus Non-Nailed Devices
Following are some points to remember when configuring nailed and
non-nailed PAD devices:
• Printer must be nailed.
• Terminals may be nailed or non-nailed.
• Programmatic access requires a nailed device.
• Logon access may be either nailed or non-nailed.
216
Appendix C
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
Migrating from NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
Saving DTS Parameters
Make a list of the following DTS parameters configured n the host that
must also be entered into the OpenView DTC Manager.
• Local Node Name.
• PAD Device Name.
• PAD Device Type.
• DTC Node Name.
• DTC Card Number.
Configuring the DTC
If you are using PC-based network management, configure the DTC by
using the OpenView DTC Manager at your OpenView Windows
Workstation. For full details, see Using the OpenView DTC Manager.
If you are using host-based network management, configure the DTC
using NMMGR. For full details, see Configuring and Managing
Host-Based X.25 Links.
Appendix C
217
NS X.25 Migration: NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
Migrating from NS 3000/V PAD Access to NS 3000/iX
218
Appendix C
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick
Installation
D
The PCI 10/100Base-TX adapter card (A5230A) for the HP e3000
supports 10Mbits/s and 100Mbits/s Fast Ethernet operation as well as
full and half-duplex modes. Ensure that the speed, duplex, and
autonegotiation settings of the associated data hub or switch match the
settings on this card (as configured in the network configuration file,
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS). Refer to the sections on “Notes on Manual
Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration” and “Notes on Autonegotiation
and Autosensing” in this appendix for background information on
determining these settings, if needed. For a detailed description of
using NMMGR to configure the 10/100Base-TX link in your
NMCONFIG file, see the NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference
Manual.
1. Verify the PCI 10/100Base-TX software is present in the installed
version of MPE/iX (must be 7.0 or later).
• Make sure MPE/iX 7.0 has been successfully installed on the
system. The PCI 10/100Base-TX software license is included with
MPE/iX 7.0. No additional software installation is required.
• Run the NMMAINT,78 command and verify complete version
information is displayed for the PCI 100Base-TX link software
(subsystem 78).
Sample output:
:nmmaint,78
NMS Maintenance Utility
1984
WED, DEC
32098-20014 B.00.10
(C) Hewlett Packard Co.
6, 2000, 11:12 AM
Datacom products build version: N.73.01
Subsystem version IDs:
Subsystem Number : 78
PCI 100Base-T Fast Ethernet driver
module versions:
NL procedure:
PCI_100BT_NL_VERS
Version:
A0070072
XL procedure:
PCI_100BT_XL_VERS
Version:
A0070072
Catalog file:
NMCAT78.NET.SYS
Version:
A0070072
NL procedure:
LNK_NL_VERS
Version:
A0070004
NL procedure:
WANDMPSURRVERS
Version:
A0070000
PCI 100Base-T Fast Ethernet driver -------
overall version = A.00.70
219
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
2. Prepare system for hardware installation and access the system card
bay:
• Login with appropriate system management capabilities and
prepare system for shutdown (e.g., terminate any active jobs or
sessions, etc.)
• Issue a <ctrl-a> shutdown. Make sure the system is halted before
continuing.
• When the system has shutdown completely, power off the system
by pressing the system off button. Unplug the system.
• Open the system to gain access to the PCI backplane, if
applicable.
• Select an empty PCI slot and remove the slot cover (if present).
3. Install the PCI 10/100Base-TX card:
• Observe the antistatic precautions.
• Record the serial number from the card, if present.
• Grasp the card by its edges or faceplate with both hands, insert
the card into the slot, and press the card firmly into place.
• Secure the card and retaining screws (if present). Reassemble the
system.
4. Attach the system to the network:
• Attach the 8-pin (RJ-45) plug on your twisted-pair LAN cable into
the RJ-45 connector on the card. The same RJ-45 connector is
used for either 10 or 100Mbit/s operation.
• Attach the free end of the cable to any unused port on the
appropriate hub or switch (or into a wall jack that is connected to
a hub or switch). Connect power to system. Set the hub or switch
speed and duplex mode. The PCI 10/100Base-TX card operates in
either full-duplex or half-duplex mode.
• Power up the system.
• Bring up the MPE/iX operating system.
5. Configure the link using NMMGR:
• Run NMMGR and open the network configuration file (e.g.,
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS).
• Using “Guided Configuration”, configure or update the LAN
Configuration. Change an existing, or add a new Network
Interface (NI) so that the NI has a link Type of BT100, Enter the
Physical path of the LANIC so that it references the path of the
newly installed 10/100Base-T card.
220
Appendix D
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
• On the 100Base-T “link configuration” screen, fill in the
appropriate autonegotiation, speed, and duplex settings. (For
more detailed information on the various screens, see the
NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference Manual.
• Perform configuration verification and exit NMMGR.
6. Verify the installation:
• Verify that the link starts successfully by starting a network
subsystem (e.g., NETCONTROL START; NET=LAN1) that uses the
newly configured link.
• Check console messages to verify that the link connected
successfully. The link status can also be checked via the
LINKCONTROL command. The following is a sample output for a
successfully connected link:
:linkcontrol tslink;status=L
Linkname: LANLINK
Linktype: PCI 100BT
Linkstate: CONNECTED
where “LANLINK” is the link name as configured in NMCONFIG
on the “link configuration” data screen.
• Verify that the card’s Link LED is on. Note that the LED cannot
light unless the link software is also started.
• Verify connectivity with a remote system, e.g., by issuing a “ping”
command via the NETTOOL or PING utilities, or by establishing
a remote VT session (after issuing an NSCONTROL START).
If the link could not be brought up and the remote connection
successfully verified, refer to the section on “Quick Troubleshooting
Tips”.
Appendix D
221
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
Notes on Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration
Notes on Manual Speed and Duplex Mode
Configuration
Because this PCI 10/100Base-TX LAN card supports autonegotiation,
you should not normally need to manually set the duplex mode.
Sometimes you may need to manually set the duplex mode of the card
— for example, if the switch is operating at full duplex but does not
autonegotiate.
Full-duplex mode is most commonly found in switches rather than
hubs. It may be found in either 10 Mbit/s or 100Mbit/s switch devices.
Full-duplex mode may provide a throughput advantage under some
circumstances, but the degree of the advantage is
application-dependent.
The PCI 10/100Base-TX card support both half- and full-duplex
operation.
Ensure that the speed, duplex mode, and autonegotiation of the
associated switch are configured the same as in the NMMGR
configuration for the PCI 10/100Base-TX card. If the switch supports
autonegotiation on the ports connected to the cards, this should be
enabled as explained in “Notes on Autonegotiation and Autosensing.”
To manually set the duplex mode of the PCI card, refer to the link
configuration screen in the active NMCONFIG network configuration
file, using NMMGR to access the configuration data and make changes.
222
Appendix D
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
Notes on Autonegotiation and Autosensing
Notes on Autonegotiation and Autosensing
The PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 product provides the means for
interfacing various types of HP e3000 systems to either a 10Base-T or
100Base-TX network. 100Base-TX is a subset of 100Base-T networking
defined by the IEEE 802.3u-1995 standard. 100Base-TX provides 100
Mbits/s data transmission over category 5 unshielded twisted-pair
(UTP) cable for which two pairs of wires in the cable are used — one
wire pair for receiving data, and one wire pair for transmitting data.
The same card port that supports 100Base-TX operation can also
support 10Base-T operation.
Autonegotiation is a mechanism defined in the IEEE 802.3u
specification whereby devices sharing a link segment can exchange
information while the link is being established and automatically
configure themselves to operate at the most efficient mode shared
between them.
Autonegotiation is like a rotary switch that automatically switches to
the correct technology such as 10Base-T or 100Base-TX or between
half- and full-duplex modes. Once the most efficient common mode is
determined, autonegotiation passes control of the link to the
appropriate technology, sets the appropriate duplex mode, and then
becomes transparent until the link is broken.
The following is the IEEE 802.3u-defined autonegotiation hierarchy for
resolving multiple common abilities for a 10/100Base-TX card:
• 100Base-TX full-duplex (most efficient)
• 100Base-TX half-duplex
• 10Base-T full-duplex
• 10Base-T half-duplex (least efficient)
For example, if both devices on the link support 10Base-T (half-duplex)
and 100Base-TX (half-duplex), autonegotiation at both ends will select
100Base-TX (half-duplex) instead of 10Base-T (half-duplex).
Many 100Base-TX devices on the market today such as hubs and
switches do not support autonegotiation. Either the speed and duplex
mode of the device are fixed (as is usually the case with hubs), or they
are often manually configured at the desired speed and duplex (as is
often the case for switches). However, switches that support
autonegotiation are becoming more commonplace
If the PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 card is connected to a device, such as a
switch, that is autonegotiating, the PCI card will autonegotiate with
the device to mutually determine the highest possible speed and duplex
settings between them.
Appendix D
223
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
Notes on Autonegotiation and Autosensing
If the PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 card is connected to a device that does
not support autonegotiation or a device that has autonegotiation
disabled, the PCI card will autosense the speed of the link and set itself
accordingly. The duplex mode of the card will be set to half-duplex in
this case. If you want the card to operate in full-duplex mode, you must
set it using the method described in “Notes on Manual Speed and
Duplex Mode Configuration” in this document.
The PCI 10/100Base-TX card will sense when the connection between
itself and a hub or switch on the other end of a link has been broken. If
a connection is made to another (or the same) device and
autonegotiation is enabled, the autonegotiation and autosensing
process will be done again automatically. Autonegotiation and
autosensing are also done whenever the interface is reset.
224
Appendix D
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
Quick Troubleshooting Tips
Quick Troubleshooting Tips
Problem:
Incomplete version information displayed when
:NMMAINT,78 command is issued.
This indicates that the MPE/iX 7.0 software installation or update has
not completed successfully. Consult your HP software support
representative.
Problem:
When an attempt is made to bring up the link (e.g., via
a :NETCONTROL START command for a LAN using that
link), it does not connect successfully. Connection
failure messages are logged to the console or a
:LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=L command
shows the link as “DISCONNECTED”.
This often suggests an incompatibility between the card’s speed and
duplex settings and the switch or hub settings. Make sure to review the
settings for autonegotiation, speed and duplex in the link configuration
data and make sure they are consistent with what the hub or switch
expects and supports. Bring the LAN down (:NETCONTROL STOP or
DTCCNTRL option 4) and back up again, to cause software to read the
new configuration. If you still cannot connect successfully, make sure all
the cables are securely connected between the card and the hub/switch
and that the card is properly seated. If that fails, consult your HP
support representative.
Appendix D
225
PCI 10/100Base-TX/3000 Quick Installation
Quick Troubleshooting Tips
226
Appendix D
Index
A
activate logging, 186
activating logging, 186
activating NS, 187
add
directory entry, 157
add nodes to the network directory, 157
adding a node to the directory, 157
additional domain name configuration files, 170
address key, 62, 131, 133
address resolution, 35
domain name services, 35
network directory, 36
address resolution protocol, 38
administrative node, 37
ARP, 38
assigning node name, 84
assigning subnet masks, 27
B
backup configuration file, 82, 154
backup configuration file name, 82
C
card number, 62, 130
central administrative node, 37
centralized network directory, 37
checksum for TCP, 161
classes of logging events, 172
command
DSLINE, 191
DTCCNTRL, 188
MAKESTREAM, 37
MERGEDIR, 37, 158
NETCONTROL START, 186, 188
NETCONTROL STATUS, 190
NETCONTROL STOP, 191
NSCONTROL START, 189
NSCONTROL STATUS, 190
NSCONTROL STOP, 191
RESTORE, 37
STORE, 37
SWITCHNMLOG UPDATE, 186
communication between networks, 45
completing the internetwork table, 47
configuration
administrative node, 37
domain name files, 165
logging, 171
configuration file, 80
configuration file name, 82, 154
Index
configuration process, 20
configure
a point-to-point network interface, 109
direct connect/dial node mapping, 122
domain name files, 165
domain name resolver, 166
FDDI network, 99
gatehalf network interface, 142
gateway half, 139
hosts file, 168
LAN network interface, 91
logging, 171
mapping
direct connect/dial, 122
neighbor gateways, 103, 114, 135
network directory, 155
node mapping, 118
path report data, 160
path report data for a node, 160
reachable networks, 116
shared dial node mapping, 119
token ring network, 96
X.25 network interface, 127
X.25 node, 125
X.25 virtual circuits, 131
configured
reachable networks, 105, 106, 117, 137, 138
configured gateways, 75
configurie
network directory, 151
configuring a gateway half pair, 33
console logging field, 175, 176, 177, 179, 180, 182,
183
copying a network directory, 37
create network directory, 37
cross-validating in SYSGEN, 150
cross-validation, 20, 150
D
decentralized network directory, 37
default gateway, 33, 105, 106, 114, 116, 117
default gateways, 103, 135
define
directory entry, 157
design considerations, 22
destination IP address
direct dial links, 122
non-dialed links, 122
shared dial links, 119, 120
dial link, 23, 26
direct connect, 142
direct dial, 142
227
Index
disable route
direct dial links, 123
non-dialed links, 123
shared dial links, 120, 121
disk logging field, 175, 176, 181, 182, 183
domain keyword, 166
domain name configuration
additional files, 170
overview, 165
domain name file configuration
guidelines, 165
domain name resolver
configure, 166, 168
domain name services, 35
draw a network map, 48
drawing a network map, 48
drawing an internetwork map, 44
DSLINE command, 191
DTC node name, 62, 127, 130
DTCCNTRL command, 188
E
enable Ethernet, 62, 95
enable IEEE 802.3, 62
enable users for individual logging classes, 184
enter maintenance mode, 156
entering maintenance mode, 156
Ethernet, 95
event logging, 172
exit maintenance mode, 156
F
facility set, 62, 132
facility sets
defined, 134
FDDI Configuration screen, 99
FDDI configuration worksheet, 68, 69, 70, 71
FDDI Link name, 64
field
console logging, 175, 176, 177, 179, 180, 182,
183
disk logging, 175, 176, 181, 182, 183
fields
NETXPORT Log Configuration screens, 175,
176, 177, 179, 182, 183
NETXPORT Log configuration screens, 180
full gateway
definition of, 31
full gateways versus gateway halves, 31
G
Gatehalf Configuration screen, 142
gateway configuration, 32
gateway half
definition of, 31
gateway half map, 57
gateway half network interface table, 58
gateway half pair worksheet, 57
gateway name, 75, 104, 105, 115, 116, 136
gateway-half configuration, 33
gateways, 31
geographical location, 22
global field, 158
global network directory entries, 158
global/local flag, 158
Global?, 158
guided network transport configuration
LAN, 87
H
home NI name, 143
hops, 77, 105, 116, 137, 138
host name data base file, 168
HOSTS.NET.SYS, 168
I
identify neighbor gateway reachable networks,
137
identify neighbor gateways, 104, 115, 136
identifying neighbor gateways, 32
interface types, 25
internetwork, 31
internetwork map, 44
internetwork table, 47
internetwork worksheets, 44
IP Address
network directory, 161
IP address, 63
definition of, 92, 97, 100, 110, 128
entering the gateway-half’s partner’s, 142
LAN, 92, 97, 100, 110
X.25, 128
IP address field, 91, 96, 97, 99, 100, 109, 127
IP internet address, 77
IP mask, 77
neighbor gateway, 106, 117, 138
IP network address, 46, 105, 116, 137
neighbor gateway, 106, 117, 138
IP subnet mask, 63, 96, 99, 104, 105, 115, 116,
118, 137
LAN, 93, 101, 112, 130
228
Index
Index
token ring, 98
IP subnets, 27
K
keyword
domain, 166
nameserver, 167
search, 167
keywords
resolver file, 166
L
LAN Configuration screen, 109
LAN configuration worksheet, 67
LAN internet routing table, 51
LAN Link name, 63
LAN network map, 49
LAN network worksheet, 49
leased line, 26
leaving maintenance mode, 156
line speed, 22
link manager logging, 186
link name, 63, 96, 99, 109, 127, 130
gateway half, 144
LAN, 94, 101, 112
token ring, 98
link type
gateway half, 144
link types, 25
local domain name, 64
local entries
uses of, 158, 159
local network directory entries, 158
local node name, 64, 84
logging classes, 172
logging configuration
guidelines, 171
overview, 171
logging configuration screens, 173
M
Main screen, 83
maint mode, 156
maintenance mode, 156
MAKESTREAM command, 37
map
internetwork, 44
point-to-point network, 52
MERGEDIR command, 37, 158
merging network directory files, 37
modify
Index
hosts file, 168
logging configuration, 174
modify logging configuration, 174
modify network directory, 37
modify the domain name resolver, 166
multicast request, 38
N
nameserver keyword, 167
neighbor gateway configuration worksheet, 76
neighbor gateway IP Internet Address
X.25, 138
neighbor gateway IP internet address, 77, 105,
106, 116, 117
neighbor gateway reachable networks, 105
neighbor gateway reachable networks
configuration worksheet, 77, 78
Neighbor Gateway Reachable Networks screen,
105, 116, 137
neighbor gateway worksheet information, 75
neighbor gateways, 32
defined, 103, 114, 135
Neighbor Gateways screen, 104, 115, 136
NETCONTROL START command, 186, 188
NETCONTROL STATUS command, 190
NETCONTROL STOP command, 191
NetIPC logging, 186
NETSAMP.NET.SYS, 170
network and internetwork design
considerations, 22
network boundaries, 45
network boundary, 31, 45
network directory, 36, 151
centralized, 37
configure, 155
configuring from NMMGR, 36
copying, 37
data screen, 160
decentralized, 37
file structure, 37
for X.25 networks, 36
global entries, 158
local entries, 158
planning, 36
Select Node Name screen, 157
Network Directory Data screen, 160
network directory entry, 151
network directory file name, 154
Network Directory Main screen, 155
network directory name, 65
X.25, 132
229
Index
Network directory Select Node Name screen,
157
network directory worksheet, 59
network interface
LAN, 87, 88
network Interface (NI) name, 65
network interface (NI) name
X.25, 133
network interface name, 87
guidelines for using, 88
network interface type priority, 26
network interfaces, 25
network map, 48
network name, 87
LAN, 88
network name database, 170
network planning, 21
Network Services, 189
starting, 189
testing, 190
Network Transport Configuration screen, 87
network transport logging, 186
network type, 87
network worksheets, 49
NETWORKS.NET.SYS, 170
NETXPORT Log Configuration, 174
NETXPORT Log Configuration screens, 174
new global field, 159
new name, 75, 159
for directory node entry, 159
NI name, 87
LAN, 88
NI type, 87
NI type priority, 26
NMCBACK.group.account, 82, 154
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS, 82, 154
NMMGR, 19, 20, 80
node name, 158
network directory, 158
node worksheet information, 62
nodes having multiple links, 118
nodes having single links, 118
non-HP e3000 nodes, 23
NS Configuration screen, 85
NS validation test, 190
NSCONTROL START command, 189
NSCONTROL STATUS command, 190
NSCONTROL STOP command, 191
NSDIR.NET.SYS, 82, 154
number of
LAN links, 25
network interfaces, 25
230
point-to-point links, 26
token ring links, 25
X.25 links, 26
O
offline configuration file, 82, 154
open configuration file, 81
Open Configuration/Directory file screen, 153
open network directory file, 37
operating the network, 187
overview of configuration, 20
P
partner’s IP address, 142, 143
partner’s IP subnet mask, 143
PASSWORD command, 82
path report data, 160
PDN, 132
permanent VC number, 65, 132, 134
permanent virtual circuit, 132, 134
phone number
direct dial links, 122
gateway half, 145
shared dial links, 119, 121, 123
physical path, 65, 112, 144
physical path of device adapter, 98, 102
planning the network directory, 36
point-to-point configuration worksheet, 72
point-to-point internet routing table, 53
Point-to-Point Link name, 64
point-to-point network map, 52
point-to-point network table, 53
point-to-point network worksheet, 52
print dir, 156
print network directory, 156
priority
direct dial links, 122, 123
non-dialed links, 122, 123
shared dial, 119, 120
priority of
network interfaces, 26
probe, 38
probe protocol, 38
probe request, 38
protocol name database, 170
PROTOCOL.NET.SYS, 170
PROTSAM.NET.SYS, 170
proxy
probe, 38
proxy node, 66, 94
proxy server, 38
Index
Index
public data network, 132
PVC, 132, 134
PVC number, 132
PVC parameters, 133
PXP field
network directory, 161
Q
QVALNS.NET.SYS, 190
R
redirect output, 156
remote IP address, 66, 131, 133
remote node name, 66, 131, 133
remote X.25 address, 66, 132, 133
RESLVCNF.NET.SYS, 166
resolver file, 166
resolver file keywords, 166
RESTORE command, 37
route name
defined, 120
direct dial links, 122
non-dialed links, 122
shared dial links, 120
routename
shared dial links, 119
S
search keyword, 167
security class, 66
security string
direct dial links, 122, 124
gateway half, 145
shared dial links, 119, 121
select guided configuration, 85
select NS configuration, 83
select the update directory function, 155
service name database, 170
SERVICES.NET.SYS, 170
SERVSAM.NET.SYS, 170
shared dial link, 23
limitations, 23
shut down
Network Services, 191
shutting down NS, 191
speed, 66
line, 22
point-to-point, 112
start
host-based X.25 link, 188
link, 188
Index
links and services, 188
network services, 189
NS, 189
software loopback, 188
start NMMGR, 80
stop
Network Services, 191
STORE command, 37
subnet masks
assigning, 27
determining, 28
subnetworks, 27
SVC, 132
SVC parameters, 133
switched virtual circuit, 132
SWITCHNMLOG UPDATE command, 186
SYSGEN facility
use for cross-validation, 150
T
TCP checksum, 161
TCP field
network directory, 161
test Network Services, 190
testing Network Services, 190
Token Ring Configuration screen, 96
token ring configuration worksheet, 68
Token Ring Link name, 63
transmission speed
gateway half, 144
transport services, 161
type, 66
network directory data, 162
U
update dir, 155
update network directory, 155
users enabled for logging, 185
uses of local entries, 158, 159
V
validate network transport, 20, 148
Virtual Circuit Configuration screen, 131
W
worksheet
gateway half pair, 57
worksheets
internetwork, 44
LAN network, 49
write access password, 82, 154
231
Index
X
X.25 Configuration screen, 127
X.25 configuration worksheet, 73
X.25 internet routing table, 56
X.25 Link name, 64
X.25 network
network directory, 36
X.25 network map, 54
X.25 network table, 55
X.25 network worksheet, 54
X.25 virtual circuit configuration worksheet, 74
232
Index
Download PDF

advertising