HP | Internet Appliances | Safety & Comfort Guide | HP Internet Appliances Safety & Comfort Guide

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Safety & Comfort Guide
Contents
Safety and Comfort
Promoting a Safe and Comfortable Work Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Important Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Take Action for Safety and Comfort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Key Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Finding Your Comfort Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
A Range of Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Different Tasks, Different Postures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Organizing Your Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Feet, Knees, and Legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Back . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Forearms, Wrists, and Hands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Shoulders and Elbows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Eyes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Arranging Your Work Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Keyboard and Pointing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
Arm Supports and a Palm Rest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
Papers and Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15
Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
Working in Comfort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17
Using a Notebook Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17
Typing Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
Pointing Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Using a Keyboard on a Sofa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20
Taking Breaks and Varying Your Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21
Monitoring Your Health Habits and Exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22
Organizing Your Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23
From the Ground Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23
From the Top Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23
Contents
i
Self-Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seated Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shoulders, Arms, Wrists, and Hands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eyes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typing Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard and Pointing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notebook Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical and Mechanical Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Safety Policy and General Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Precautions for Compaq Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Precautions for Portable Computer Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Precautions for Server and Network Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Precautions for Products with External Television Antenna Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Antenna Grounding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Precautions for Products with Modems, Telecommunications, or Local Area
Network Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Precautions for Products with Laser Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
For More Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Contents
Safety and Comfort
a
WARNING: There may be a risk of serious physical injuries from working at your computer
workstation. Read and follow the recommendations in this section to minimize the risk of injury and to
increase your comfort.
Some studies have suggested that long periods of typing, improper workstation setup,
incorrect work habits, stressful work conditions and relationships, or problems in
your personal health may be linked to injuries. These injuries could include carpal
tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, tenosynovitis, and other musculoskeletal disorders.
The warning signs of these disorders can occur in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders,
neck, or back, and can include:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Numbness, burning, or tingling
Soreness, aching, or tenderness
Pain, throbbing, or swelling
Tightness or stiffness
Weakness or coldness
Symptoms may be felt during typing, while using a mouse, or at other times when no
work with the hands is being performed, including during the night when these
symptoms might awaken you. If you experience these symptoms, or any other
persistent or recurring pain or discomfort that you think may be related to using a
computer, you should promptly consult a qualified physician and, if available, your
company’s health and safety department. The earlier a problem is properly diagnosed
and treated, the less chance there is that it will progress to a disabling condition.
The following pages describe proper workstation setup, posture, and health and work
habits for computer users. In addition, this Guide contains product safety information
applicable to all Compaq products.
Safety and Comfort
1
Promoting a Safe and Comfortable Work Environment
Posture, lighting, furniture, work organization, and other work conditions and habits
may affect the way you feel and how well you work. By adjusting your work
environment and personal practices, you may be able to minimize fatigue and
discomfort, and reduce the risk of resulting strains that some scientists believe can
lead to injury.
Important
Choices
If you share a computer with others, readjust the work environment to your needs.
Each time you sit down to work, adjust into your comfort zone.
Whenever you use a computer, you make choices that can affect your comfort and
potentially your safety. This is true whether you use a full-size keyboard and monitor
on a desk, a notebook computer, or a wireless keyboard on your lap. In every case,
you choose your working posture and your body’s position relative to your keyboard,
pointing device, monitor, remote control, phone, and any reference books and papers.
You may also have some control over lighting and other factors.
Take Action for
Safety and
Comfort
+
*
2
Many factors in our work environment determine whether we work efficiently and in
a manner that promotes good health and safety.
By considering, acting on, and periodically reevaluating the recommendations in this
Section, it is possible to create a safer, more comfortable, healthful, and efficient
work environment.
NOTE: Some scientists believe that working intensely, or for a long time in uncomfortable or unnatural
positions, may pose risks, such as those mentioned in the warning. The information included in this
Section is designed to help you work more safely by recommending ways to work more comfortably
and effectively.
HINT: SELF-CHECK: After reviewing the information in this chapter, double-check your postures and
habits using the section Self-Check on page 24.
Safety and Comfort
Key Principles
To promote safety and comfort, follow these principles whenever you use your
computer.
Adjust
Adjust your body position and your work equipment.
There is no one “right” position. Find your comfort
zone, as described in this Section, and when working at
your computer, frequently adjust within this zone.
Move
Vary your tasks so that you can move around; avoid
sitting in one posture all day. Perform tasks that require
walking.
Relax
Build positive relationships at work and home. Relax
and strive to reduce sources of stress. Stay aware of
physical tension such as clenching your muscles and
shrugging your shoulders. Continually release tension.
Take frequent short breaks.
Listen
Listen to your body. Pay attention to any tension,
discomfort, or pain you may feel, and take immediate
action to relieve it.
Safety and Comfort
3
Remember
Remember to exercise regularly and maintain general
fitness. Doing this will help your body withstand the
rigors of sedentary work. Respect any medical
conditions you may have or other health factors you
may know of. Adjust your work habits accordingly.
Finding Your Comfort Zone
A Range of
Positions
Rather than working in a single posture, find your comfort zone. Your comfort zone
is a range of positions that is generally appropriate and comfortable for your given
work situation.
Vary Your Posture
Depending on your tasks, you may find a range of seated
and standing postures that are comfortable. Within your
comfort zone, change postures often throughout the day.
Move
Sitting still for long periods can cause discomfort and muscle fatigue. Changing
postures is good for many parts of your body, including your spine, joints, muscles,
and circulatory system.
Within your comfort zone, change postures often throughout the day. Take frequent
short breaks: stand up, carefully stretch, or walk around. Frequently switch to brief
tasks that require getting up, such as retrieving output from a printer, filing
paperwork, or consulting a colleague down the hall.
If your furniture offers a wide range of adjustments, you might find it comfortable to
switch back and forth between sitting and standing positions.
4
Safety and Comfort
Different Tasks,
Different
Postures
Your choice of posture within your comfort zone may vary with your task. For
example, you may find a reclined posture most comfortable for computer tasks, and a
more upright posture more comfortable for tasks requiring frequent reference to
papers or books.
Organizing Your
Adjustments
The order in which you make various adjustments to your body position and work
area may vary depending on the adjustability of your furniture. For tips on how to
order your adjustments see the section Arranging Your Work Area on page 10.
*
HINT: THAT AFTERNOON SLUMP: Pay particular attention to adjusting your posture in the afternoon
when you may tend to get fatigued.
HINT: EVERYTHING IS CONNECTED: When you reposition any one part of your body, you may need to
adjust other parts as well.
AVOID!
Safety and Comfort
◆
◆
◆
Don't sit in one fixed posture all day.
Avoid slouching forward.
Be sure not to lean back too far.
5
Feet, Knees, and
Legs
Make sure your feet can rest solidly and comfortably on the floor while sitting. Use
an adjustable work surface and chair that allow your feet to rest firmly on the floor, or
use a footrest. If you use a footrest, be sure it is wide enough to accommodate
different leg positions within your comfort zone.
Providing enough leg room
Be sure you have sufficient space under your work surface for your knees and legs.
Avoid concentrated pressure points along the underside of your thigh near the knee
and the back side of your lower leg. Stretch your legs and vary your leg posture
throughout the day.
RIGHT!
Rest your feet firmly on the floor or a footrest.
WRONG!
Don’t dangle your feet and compress your thighs.
*
AVOID!
6
HINT: WALK: Get up from your desk frequently and take brief walks.
HINT: LEG COMFORT: Vary your leg positions throughout the day.
Avoid placing boxes or other items under your desk that limit your leg room. You should be able to pull
yourself all the way up to your desk without interference.
Safety and Comfort
Back
Use your chair to fully support your body. Distribute your weight evenly and use the
entire seat and backrest to support your body. If your chair has adjustable low back
support, match the contours of the chair’s backrest to the natural curve of your lower
spine.
Getting comfortable
Always make sure your lower back is well-supported. Make sure it feels comfortable
in the position in which you are working.
RIGHT!
Distribute your weight evenly and use the entire seat and
backrest to support your body.
WRONG!
Don’t slouch forward.
*
AVOID!
Safety and Comfort
HINT: ADJUST OFTEN: If your chair is adjustable, experiment with the adjustments to find numerous
comfortable positions, then adjust the chair frequently.
If you get a new adjustable chair, or if you share a chair with someone else, don’t assume the settings
are properly set for you.
7
Forearms,
Wrists, and
Hands
Keep your forearms, wrists, and hands aligned in a straight, neutral position, whether
you are working at a desk or table, or sitting on a couch or bed. Avoid bending or
angling your wrists while typing or using a pointing device.
Don’t anchor your wrists
When typing, do not anchor or rest your wrists on your work surface, your thighs, or
a palm rest (sometimes called a wrist rest). Resting your palms while typing may be
harmful because it can cause you to bend your wrists back and can apply pressure to
the undersides of your wrists. A palm rest is designed to provide support during
pauses, when you are not typing.
RIGHT!
Hold a straight, neutral wrist position while typing.
WRONG!
Don’t rest your palms on a work surface while typing.
RIGHT!
Hold a straight, neutral wrist position while typing.
WRONG!
Don’t angle your wrists; this may cause unnecessary
strain.
8
Safety and Comfort
*
HINT: Split Keyboards
AVOID!
Be sure not to rest your wrists on sharp edges.
Shoulders and
Elbows
If you find it difficult to type with a straight, neutral wrist position, you may want to try a split keyboard.
Be aware, however, that improper setup or posture while using a split keyboard can increase bending
in your wrists. So if you try one, set it up properly to align your forearms, wrists, and hands.
Adjust your chair height or keyboard height so that your shoulders are relaxed and
your elbows hang comfortably at your sides. Adjust your keyboard slope so that your
wrists are straight.
Checking elbow height
Position your elbows in a zone that is near the height of your keyboard’s home row
(the row that includes the letters G and H). This position allows you to relax your
shoulders. If you have long upper arms, you may find you need to position your
elbows a bit below the height of home row in order to provide enough space under
the work surface for your knees and legs.
RIGHT!
Turn your chair to the side to help determine if your
elbow height is near the height of your keyboard’s
home row.
*
Eyes
HINT: RELAX: Remember to relax, particularly in areas where muscle tension often builds, such as
your shoulders.
Working at your computer for long periods can be a visually demanding task and may
cause your eyes to become irritated and fatigued. Therefore, you should give special
attention to vision care, including the following recommendations:
Resting your eyes
Give your eyes frequent breaks. Periodically look away from the monitor and focus
at a distant point. This may also be a good time to stretch, breathe deeply, and relax.
Safety and Comfort
9
Cleaning your monitor and eyeglasses
Keep your display screen and your eyeglasses or contact lenses clean. If you use a
glare-reduction filter, clean it according to the manufacturer’s directions.
Having your eyes examined
To be sure that your vision is adequately corrected, have your eyes examined
regularly by a vision care specialist. Consider having glasses made that are
specifically suited for working with a computer monitor. If you wear bifocals or
trifocals, you may find these special monofocal glasses more comfortable for
computer use. For more information, see Adjusting monitor height for bifocal and
trifocal users on page 12.
*
HINT: Eye Comfort
While looking at your monitor and also while resting your eyes, remember to blink. This helps keep
your eyes naturally protected and lubricated and helps prevent dryness, a common source of
discomfort.
HINT: Eye Break
Give your eyes frequent rests by focusing them on a distant point.
Arranging Your Work Area
You may find a range of monitor heights that allows your head to be balanced
comfortably over your shoulders.
Monitor
10
You will reduce eye strain and muscle fatigue in your neck, shoulders, and upper
back by properly positioning your monitor and adjusting its angle.
Safety and Comfort
Positioning the monitor
Place the monitor directly in front of you. To
determine a comfortable viewing distance, stretch
your arm toward the monitor and notice the location
of your knuckles. Place your monitor near that
location. You should be able to clearly see the text on
your monitor.
Adjusting the monitor height
Your monitor position should allow your head to be balanced comfortably over your
shoulders. It should not cause your neck to bend forward uncomfortably or backward
to any degree. You may find it more comfortable to position the monitor so that the
top line of text is just below your eye height. Your eyes should look slightly
downward when viewing the middle of the screen.
Many computer designs allow you to place the monitor on top of the system unit. If
this places the monitor too high, you may want to move the monitor to the desktop.
On the other hand, if the monitor sits on your work surface and you feel any
discomfort in your neck or upper back, the monitor may be too low. In that case, try
using a thick book or a monitor stand to raise the monitor.
Tilting the monitor
Tilt the monitor so that it faces your eyes. In general, the monitor screen and your
face should be parallel to each other. To check for correct monitor tilt, have someone
hold a small mirror in the center of the viewing area. When sitting in your normal
work posture, you should be able to see your eyes in the mirror.
*
AVOID!
Safety and Comfort
HINT: Eye Height
Your eye height will change considerably whether you use a reclining or upright posture, or some
posture in between. Remember to adjust your monitor’s height and tilt each time your eye height
changes as you move through your comfort zone.
If you look at the monitor more than you look at paper documents, avoid placing your monitor to the
side.
11
Adjusting monitor height for bifocal and trifocal users
If you wear bifocals or trifocals, it’s especially important to properly adjust your monitor
height. Avoid tilting your head back to view the screen through the lower portion of your
glasses; this could lead to muscle fatigue in your neck and back. Instead, try lowering
your monitor. You may want to consider using monofocal glasses that are specially made
for computer use.
WRONG!
If you wear bifocals or trifocals, don't position your monitor
so high that you have to tilt your head back to view the
screen.
*
HINT: Notebook Viewing
*
HINT: Adjusting Brightness and Contrast
Whenever using a notebook computer for long periods, you may find it more comfortable to connect a fullsize monitor. A separate monitor gives you a wider range of viewing distance and height options.
Reduce the potential for eye discomfort by using brightness and contrast controls on your monitor to
improve the quality of text and graphics.
Eliminating glare and reflections on your monitor
Take the time to eliminate glare and reflections. To control daylight, use blinds, shades,
or drapes, or try other glare-reducing measures. Use indirect or reduced lighting to avoid
bright spots on your display screen.
If glare is a problem, consider these actions:
12
◆
Move your monitor to a place where glare and bright reflections are eliminated.
◆
Turn off or reduce ceiling lights and use task lighting (one or more adjustable lamps)
to illuminate your work.
◆
If you cannot control the ceiling lights, try positioning your monitor between rows of
lights instead of directly beneath a row of lights.
◆
Attach a glare-reduction filter to your monitor.
Safety and Comfort
*
AVOID!.
Keyboard and
Pointing Device
◆
Place a visor on your monitor. This device may be as simple as a piece of cardboard
extending out over the monitor’s top front edge.
◆
Avoid tilting or swiveling your display in a way that leads to an uncomfortable head
or upper back posture.
HINT: Eliminating Glare
Try positioning your monitor so that its side faces the windows.
◆
◆
Avoid compromising your posture to compensate for glare or reflections.
Try to avoid bright light sources in your field of vision. For example, don’t face an uncovered window
during daylight hours.
Place your keyboard, mouse, and other input devices, so that you can use them with your
body in a relaxed, comfortable position. In this way, you don’t have to reach or shrug your
shoulders while working.
Positioning the keyboard
Position the keyboard directly in front of you to avoid twisting your neck and torso. This
makes it possible to type with your shoulders relaxed and your upper arms hanging freely
at your sides.
Adjusting the keyboard height and slope
Your elbow height should be near the height of your keyboard’s home row (see illustration
under Shoulders and Elbows on page 9). Adjust your keyboard slope so that your wrists
are straight.
Aligning the mouse and keyboard
When using a mouse or detached trackball, position the device immediately to the right or
left of your keyboard.
Using a keyboard tray comfortably
If you use a keyboard tray, make sure it is wide enough to accommodate your pointing
device, such as a mouse or trackball. Otherwise, you will probably place the mouse on
your desktop, higher and farther away than the keyboard. This will lead you to stretch
forward repeatedly, and uncomfortably, to reach the mouse.
Safety and Comfort
13
RIGHT!
Position your pointing device immediately to the right or left of your
keyboard.
WRONG!
Don’t position your keyboard and pointing device at different levels
and distances.
Arm Supports
and a Palm Rest
You may find that supports for your forearms or hands allow you to be more relaxed and
comfortable.
Using arm supports
Some chairs and desks provide padded areas for resting your arms. You may find it
comfortable to rest the middle of your forearms on these supports while typing, pointing, or
pausing. Arm supports are properly adjusted when your shoulders are in a comfortable
position and your wrists are straight.
Using a palm rest
A palm rest is designed to provide support during pauses, not during typing or pointing.
While typing or using a pointing device, keep wrists free to move, not anchored or resting on
a palm rest, the desk, or your thighs.
RIGHT!
You may find that arm supports help you relax your shoulders
and keep your wrists free to move while typing.
14
Safety and Comfort
*
HINT: For Pauses Only
AVOID!
Armrests should not cause you to:
Palm rests should only be used during pauses, when you are not typing or using your pointing device.
◆
◆
◆
Papers and
Books
Shrug or drop your shoulders.
Put excessive pressure on your elbows.
“Wing” your arms (extend elbows out to the sides).
Select a work surface or surfaces that are large enough to hold the computer equipment
and any additional items required for your work. To help minimize eye fatigue, position
any materials to which you frequently refer at about the same viewing distance.
Minimizing your reach
Arrange your frequently used papers, books, or other items to minimize the distance
you reach for them. If you frequently refer to books, papers, and writing materials, and
if you use a keyboard tray, make sure the tray, when extended, doesn’t cause you to lean
forward or reach excessively. This can stress your shoulders and back. If you find that
such stress occurs, you may want to consider a different type of work setup.
Using a document holder
If you use a document holder, position it near the monitor at the same distance, height,
and angle as the monitor. Positioning the holder in this way can increase your neck
comfort as you refer back and forth between your papers and the display screen, by
helping you keep your head balanced over your shoulders.
If your primary task is typing from paper documents, you may find it more comfortable
to place your document holder directly in front of you and your monitor slightly to one
side, or on a slant board between your monitor and keyboard. Consider this option only
if you spend more time looking at the paper than at your monitor.
WRONG!
Don’t arrange your work area in a way that causes you to
repeatedly strain forward to see and reach frequently used
items such as books, papers, or a phone.
Safety and Comfort
15
Phone
Cradling your phone between your ear and shoulder may lead to neck, shoulder, and
back discomfort. If you use your phone a lot, try using a headset or positioning your
phone so you pick it up with your non-dominant hand. This frees your dominant hand
for note-taking. When not in use, place the phone within easy reach.
RIGHT!
Use a headset to free your hands and help you avoid
uncomfortable positions.
WRONG!
Don’t cradle your phone between your ear and shoulder.
16
Safety and Comfort
Working in Comfort
Using a
Notebook
Computer
Maintaining a high level of comfort when using a notebook computer may be more
challenging than when using a desktop computer. Therefore, you should be especially
alert to your body’s signals, such as any feeling of discomfort. Also, be sure to adhere
to the key principles presented earlier in this section.
The following strategies are intended to help you maintain comfort when using a
notebook computer:
On the road
In a hotel, use a blanket for padding your chair and a
rolled towel as an inventive way to support your
lower back area.
Seeking comfort
When working with a notebook computer, keep
your shoulders and neck relaxed and your head
balanced over your shoulders. You may find it comfortable to periodically use a
support surface (your briefcase, a bed table, firm blanket, pillow, or large book)
between your lap and your notebook computer.
Being inventive
Use pillows, blankets, towels, and books to:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Raise the height of your seat.
Create a footrest, if needed.
Support your back.
Raise your computer to elevate the keyboard and display.
Provide arm supports, if you are working on a couch or bed.
Provide padding wherever needed.
Transporting the computer
If you load up your carrying case with accessories and papers, avoid shoulder strain
by using a cart or a carrying case with built-in wheels.
*
Safety and Comfort
HINT: Notebook Comfort
When you must work where proper seating or support may not be available, such as on airplanes or in
wilderness areas, change your position often while working and take brief breaks more frequently.
17
*
Typing Style
HINT: Long Hours of Use
You may find it more comfortable to use a full-size keyboard, monitor, and detached mouse or trackball
with your notebook computer. This is especially important when working on your notebook computer for
long hours.
Observe your typing style and notice how you use your fingers and hands. Avoid
keeping any unnecessary tension in your thumbs and fingers. Observe whether you
have a heavy touch or a light touch while typing. Use the minimum amount of force
needed to depress the keys.
Reaching for keys and key combinations
To reach keys that are not near your keyboard’s home row, move your whole arm;
avoid stretching your fingers and angling your wrists. When pressing two keys
simultaneously, such as Ctrl+C or Alt+F, use two hands instead of contorting one hand
to reach both keys
RIGHT!
Relax your thumbs and fingers while typing and pointing;
notice and release excess tension.
WRONG!
Don’t type or point with unnecessary tension in your
thumbs and fingers.
*
18
HINT: Keep it Light
If your typing is on the heavy side, teach yourself to lighten up. Press the keys more gently.
Safety and Comfort
*
HINT: “Hunt-and-Peck” Typing
AVOID!
Avoid banging on the keys. Don’t use more force than needed to press the keys.
Pointing Style
Non-touch-typing causes the neck to bend forward repeatedly. To minimize this repetitive movement,
learn how to touch-type so you don’t need to look down at the keyboard as often.
Use your whole arm and shoulder to move the mouse, not just your wrist. Don’t rest
or anchor your wrist while using your pointing device; keep your wrist, arm, and
shoulder free to move.
Adjusting software controls
You can use the software control panel to adjust the properties of your pointing
device. For example, to reduce or eliminate mouse-lifting, try increasing the
acceleration setting. If you use a pointing device with your left hand, the software
control panel will allow you to switch the button assignments for maximum comfort.
Clean frequently
Dirt can make pointing more difficult. Remember to clean your mouse or trackball
frequenty.
RIGHT!
Keep your wrist in a straight, neutral position when using your
pointng device.
WRONG!
Don’t angle your wrist when using your pointing device.
Safety and Comfort
19
*
HINT: Pointing Comfort
When using a mouse or trackball, hold it loosely. Keep your hand relaxed, and click the buttons using a
light touch. When you are not using your pointing device, don’t hold onto it; let it go.
Switch Hands
To give your hand a break, you may choose to control your mouse or trackball with the opposite hand
for a while.
AVOID!
Using a
Keyboard on a
Sofa
Avoid gripping or pinching your mouse tightly.
Even if you use your keyboard in a seemingly comfortable place such as a sofa, bed,
or your favorite lounge chair, you can still cause discomfort by sitting in an awkward
position or in one position for long periods. Remember to frequently make changes to
your position, within your comfort zone, and to take short breaks.
Aligning forearms, wrists, and hands
When working on a keyboard on your lap, keep your forearms, wrists, and hands
comfortably aligned with each other in a straight, neutral line. Avoid bending or
angling your wrists. If your keyboard has palm rests, use them during pauses, not
while typing or using a pointing device.
RIGHT!
Experiment with positioning pillows under your
forearms; they may help keep your shoulders relaxed and
your wrists straight.
*
AVOID!
20
HINT: Even on a sofa
Remember to properly support your lower back.
◆
◆
◆
◆
Avoid slouching.
Be sure not to recline too much; this may fatigue your neck and upper back.
Don't bend or angle your wrists.
Avoid sitting completely still and working without breaks for long periods.
Safety and Comfort
Taking Breaks
and Varying
Your Tasks
As noted earlier in this section, your furniture placement, office equipment, and lighting
are only a few of the factors that determine comfort. Your work habits are also very
important. Remember the following:
Take breaks
When you work at your computer for long periods, take short breaks at least once per
hour and preferably more often. You may find that frequent, short breaks will benefit
you more than fewer, longer breaks.
If you find that you forget to take breaks, use a timer or specialized software. Several
software tools are available that remind you to take breaks at intervals you specify.
During your breaks, stand up and stretch, especially any muscles and joints you may
have held in an extended static posture while using the computer.
Vary your tasks
Examine your work habits and the types of tasks you perform. Break up the routine and
try to vary your tasks during the day. By doing so, you may avoid sitting in one position
or performing the same activities continuously for several hours using your hands,
arms, shoulders, neck, or back. For example, you could print out your work to
proofread rather than proofing from your monitor.
Reduce sources of stress
Take an inventory of things at work that are stressful to you. If you perceive that your
physical or psychological health is being affected, take time to evaluate what changes
you can make to reduce or eliminate the sources of stress.
*
HINT: Try it and see
Contrary to what some may believe, several studies have found that productivity does NOT decline when
frequent short breaks are added to the day.
Breathe deeply
Breathe fresh air deeply and regularly. The intense mental concentration that may accompany computer
use may tend to cause breath-holding or shallow breathing.
Safety and Comfort
21
Monitoring Your
Health Habits
and Exercise
The comfort and safety of working at your computer can be affected by your general
state of health. Studies have shown that a variety of health conditions may increase the
risk of discomfort, muscle and joint disorders, or injuries.
These preexisting conditions include:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Hereditary factors
Arthritis and other connective tissue disorders
Diabetes and other endocrine disorders
Thyroid conditions
Vascular disorders
Generally poor physical condition and dietary habits
Prior injuries, traumas, and musculoskeletal disorders
Excessive weight
Stress
Smoking
Advancing age
Pregnancy, menopause, and other conditions affecting hormone levels and water
retention
Monitoring personal tolerance levels and limits
Different users of computers have different levels of tolerance for intensive work over
a long period. Monitor your personal tolerance levels and avoid regularly exceeding
them.
If any of the listed health conditions apply to you, it is particularly important to know
and monitor your personal limits.
Cultivating health and fitness
Additionally, your overall health and tolerance for the rigors of work typically can be
improved by avoiding adverse health conditions and by exercising regularly to
improve and maintain your physical fitness.
22
Safety and Comfort
Organizing Your Adjustments
The order in which you follow the advice in this chapters depends on the adjustability
of your work surface.
If your work surface height adjusts, then systematically adjust yourself and your
computer “from the ground up.”
If you have a fixed desk or table, systematically adjust yourself and your computer
“from the top down.”
From the Ground
Up
From the Top
Down
*
1.
Seat height: you should be able to plant your feet firmly on the floor.
2.
Chair back angles and lower back support: your back should be well supported.
3.
Keyboard height: home row should be near your elbow height.
4.
Keyboard slope: wrists should be straight.
5.
Pointing device: should be placed to the immediate left or right of your
keyboard.
6.
Optional forearm supports: shoulder should not be elevated or dropped.
7.
Monitor distance, height, and angle: should allow your head to be balanced
comfortably over your shoulders.
8.
Document holder, phone, and reference materials: frequently used items should
be within easy reach.
1.
Seat height: elbow height should be near your keyboard’s home row.
2.
Footrest, if you need one.
3.
Follow steps 2 through 8 above.
HINT: Be Inventive
Adjustable furniture designed for computer use may not always be available. However, you can use
towels, pillows, blankets, and books in many ways, such as to:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Safety and Comfort
Raise the height of your chair.
Create a footrest.
Support your back.
Elevate the keyboard or display.
Provide arm supports if you are working on a sofa or bed.
Provide padding wherever needed.
23
Self-Check
To increase your comfort and reduce potential safety risks, use this checklist to help you
evaluate your work posture and habits.
Seated Position
Shoulders,
Arms, Wrists,
and Hands
Eyes
24
◆
Have you found a range of seated postures that are most comfortable for you?
◆
Are you changing postures within your “comfort zone” throughout the day,
especially in the afternoon?
◆
Are your feet firmly planted?
◆
Are the undersides of your thighs near your knees free of pressure?
◆
Are the backs of your lower legs free of pressure?
◆
Is there sufficient space under your work surface for your knees and legs?
◆
Is your lower back supported?
◆
Are your shoulders relaxed?
◆
Are your hands, wrists, and forearms aligned in a straight, neutral position?
◆
If you use arm supports, are they adjusted so that your shoulders are relaxed and your
wrists are straight?
◆
Are your elbows in a relaxed position near your body?
◆
Do you avoid resting your hands and wrists while typing or pointing?
◆
Do you avoid resting your hands and wrists on sharp edges?
◆
Do you avoid cradling the phone between your ear and shoulder?
◆
Are items you use frequently, such as your phone and reference materials, easy to
reach?
◆
◆
◆
◆
Do you rest your eyes frequently by focusing on a distant point?
Do you get your eyes examined regularly by a vision care specialist?
Do you blink enough?
If you wear bifocals or trifocals, do you avoid tilting your head back to see the
monitor?
Safety and Comfort
Typing Style
Keyboard and
Pointing Device
Monitor
Safety and Comfort
◆
Are you training yourself to lighten up when you find you are pounding on the
keys?
◆
If you are not a touch typist, have you been taking typing lessons?
◆
Are you training your fingers to relax when they become tense?
◆
Do you use your whole arm to reach for keys not located near the home row?
◆
Is your keyboard positioned directly in front of you?
◆
Are your keyboard height and slope adjusted so that your wrists are straight and
your shoulders relaxed?
◆
If you are typing with the keyboard on your lap, are your shoulders relaxed and
your wrists straight?
◆
If you are using a mouse or detached trackball, is it placed to the immediate right
or left of your keyboard?
◆
If you are using a mouse or trackball, are you holding it loosely, with a relaxed
hand?
◆
Do you let go of your pointing device when you are not using it?
◆
Are you using a light touch when you click the buttons on your pointing device
(mouse, trackball, touchpad, or pointing stick)?
◆
Are you cleaning your mouse or trackball frequently?
◆
Is your monitor positioned in front of you and at a comfortable viewing distance,
about arm’s length? Or if you look at a paper document more than your monitor,
is your document holder in front of you with your monitor to one side?
◆
Are the text and images on your monitor easily visible in a comfortably seated
position?
◆
Have you eliminated glare and bright reflections on your monitor, without
compromising your posture?
◆
Is your monitor’s entire viewing area located just below your eye height?
◆
Is your monitor tilted so your face and the monitor are parallel?
◆
Have you adjusted the brightness and contrast controls to improve the quality of
text and graphics?
◆
Is your document holder positioned near the monitor, at the same distance,
height, and angle as the monitor?
25
Notebook
Computing
General
Prevention
*
◆
Do you change postures frequently?
◆
Do you avoid resting your wrists on your thighs while typing?
◆
To avoid neck fatigue when using the computer on a sofa or bed, do you avoid
reclining too far?
◆
Where possible, have you tried using a full-size keyboard and detached pointing
device, such as a mouse or trackball, with your notebook computer?
◆
Similarly, have you tried using a full-size monitor?
◆
Do you take breaks and walk around briefly, at least once per hour?
◆
Do you exercise regularly?
◆
Periodically, do you take inventory of the stress in your life and change what is
within your control to change?
◆
If you experience any symptoms that you think may relate to your using a
computer, whether you experience them during work or at other times, have you
consulted a doctor and, if available, your company’s health and safety
department?
HINT: DOUBLE-CHECK
◆
◆
◆
Review your postures and habits using this checklist.
Periodically reread this section.
Listen to your body.
Anytime you make changes to your tasks, work area, or posture, “listen” to your body. Its signals of
comfort or discomfort will help you know whether your adjustments are right.
26
Safety and Comfort
Electrical and Mechanical Safety Information
Introduction
Compaq products are designed to operate safely when installed and used according to
general safety practices. The guidelines included in this section explain the potential
risks associated with computer operation and provide important safety practices
designed to minimize these risks. By carefully following the information contained in
this section, you can protect yourself from hazards and create a safer computer work
environment.
This section provides information on the following topics:
◆
◆
◆
Product safety policy
Product installation requirements
General safety precautions for all Compaq products
If you have a serious concern regarding the safe use of the equipment that your Compaq
authorized service provider cannot address, call Compaq Customer Support for your
area.
Compaq products are designed and tested to meet IEC 950, the Standard for the Safety
Product Safety
of Information Technology Equipment. This is the International Electrotechnical
Policy and
General Practice Commission's safety standard covering the type of equipment that Compaq
manufactures. Testing may include evaluation according to other criteria such as many
of the international, national, and regional standards based on deviations to IEC 950.
Safety
Standards
Safety and Comfort
The IEC 950 standards provide general safety design requirements that reduce the risk
of personal injury to both the computer user and the service provider. These standards
protect against the following hazards:
◆
◆
◆
◆
Electric shock
Fire
Mechanical
Energy
◆
◆
◆
Heat
Chemical
Radiation
Hazardous voltage levels contained in parts of the product
Overloads, temperature, material flammability
Sharp edges, moving parts, instability
Circuits with high energy levels (240 volt amperes) or
potential as burn hazards
Accessible parts of the product at high temperatures
Chemical fumes and vapors
Noise, ionizing, laser, ultrasonic wave
27
Installation
Requirements
+
Compaq products operate safely when used according to their marked electrical ratings
and product usage instructions. Use facilities that comply with the following electrical
codes to ensure the safe operation of Compaq products:
◆
In the United States, operate the product in commercial or residential structures that
have electrical installation in compliance with American National Standards
Institute/National Fire Protection Association (ANSI/NFPA) 70, United States
National Electric Code, or ANSI/NFPA 75, Protection of Electronic Computer/Data
Processing Equipment, with branch circuit current protection of up to 20 amperes.
◆
In Canada, operate the product in commercial or residential structures that have
electrical installation in compliance with the Canadian Standards Association
(CAN/CSA) C22.1, Canadian Electrical Code.
◆
In all other countries, operate the product in commercial or residential structures
that have electrical installation in compliance with local and regional office and
residential electrical wiring codes such as International Electrotechnical
Commission (IEC) 364 parts 1 through 7.
NOTE: Do not use Compaq products in areas classified as hazardous locations. Such areas include patient
care areas of medical and dental facilities, oxygen-laden environments, or industrial facilities. Contact
your local electrical authority governing building construction, maintenance, or safety for more information
regarding the installation of any product.
For more information, please consult the information, manuals, and literature provided
with your product or contact your local sales representative.
General
Precautions for
Compaq
Products
Retain the product’s safety and operating instructions for future reference. Follow all
operating and usage instructions. Observe all warnings on the product and in the
operating instructions.
To reduce the risk of fire, bodily injury, and damage to the equipment, observe the
following precautions.
Damage requiring service
Unplug the product from the electrical outlet and take the product to a Compaq
authorized service provider under the following conditions:
◆
◆
◆
◆
28
The power cord, extension cord, or plug is damaged.
Liquid has been spilled or an object has fallen into the product.
The product has been exposed to water.
The product has been dropped or damaged in any way.
Safety and Comfort
◆
◆
There are noticeable signs of overheating.
The product does not operate normally when you follow the operating
instructions.
Servicing
Except as explained elsewhere in the Compaq documentation, do not service any
Compaq product yourself. Opening or removing covers that are marked may expose
you to electric shock. Service needed on components inside these compartments
should be done by a Compaq authorized service provider.
Mounting accessories
Do not use the product on an unstable table, cart, stand, tripod, or bracket. The
product may fall, causing serious bodily injury and serious damage to the product.
Use only with a table, cart, stand, tripod, or bracket recommended by the
manufacturer, or sold with the product. Any mounting of the product should follow
the manufacturer’s instructions, and should use a mounting accessory recommended
by the manufacturer.
Ventilation
Slots and openings in the product are provided for ventilation and should never be
blocked or covered, since these ensure reliable operation of the product and protect it
from overheating. The openings should never be blocked by placing the product on a
bed, sofa, carpet, or other similar, flexible surface. The product should not be placed
in a built-in apparatus such as a bookcase or rack unless the apparatus has been
specifically designed to accommodate the product, proper ventilation is provided for
the product, and the manufacturer’s instructions have been followed.
Water and moisture
Do not use the product in a wet location.
Grounded (earthed) products
Some products are equipped with a three-wire electrical grounding-type plug that has
a third pin for grounding. This plug only fits into a grounded electrical outlet. This is
a safety feature. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the grounding-type plug by
trying to insert it into a non-grounded outlet. If you cannot insert the plug into the
outlet, contact your electrician to replace the obsolete outlet.
Safety and Comfort
29
Power sources
The product should be operated only from the type of power source indicated on the
product’s electrical ratings label. If you have questions about the type of power source to
use, contact your Compaq authorized service provider or local power company. For a
product that operates from battery power or other power sources, refer to the operating
instructions included with the product.
Accessibility
Be sure that the power outlet you plug the power cord into is easily accessible and located
as close to the equipment operator as possible. When you need to disconnect power to the
equipment, be sure to unplug the power cord from the electrical outlet.
Voltage select switch
Ensure that the voltage select switch is in the correct position for the type of voltage you
use (115 VAC or 230 VAC).
Internal battery
Your computer may contain an internal battery-powered real-time clock circuit. Do not
attempt to recharge the battery, disassemble it, immerse it in water, or dispose of it in fire.
Replacement should be done by a Compaq authorized service provider using the Compaq
spare part for the computer.
Power cords
If you have not been provided with a power cord for your computer or for any ACpowered option intended for use with your computer, you should purchase a power cord
that is approved for use in your country.
The power cord must be rated for the product and for the voltage and current marked on
the product’s electrical ratings label. The voltage and current rating of the cord should be
greater than the voltage and current rating marked on the product. In addition, the
diameter of the wire must be a minimum of 0.75 mm2/18AWG and the cord should be
between 5 and 6.5 feet (1.5 and 2 meters) long. If you have questions about the type of
power cord to use, contact your Compaq authorized service provider.
Route the power cord so that it will not be walked on, tripped over, or pinched by items
placed upon or against it. Pay particular attention to the plug, electrical outlet, and the
point where the cord exits the product.
30
Safety and Comfort
Protective attachment plug
In some countries, the product cord set may be equipped with a wall plug having
overload protection. This is a safety feature. If the plug needs to be replaced, be sure
the Compaq authorized service provider uses a replacement plug specified by the
manufacturer as having the same overload protection as the original plug.
Extension cord
If an extension cord or power strip is used, make sure that the cord or strip is rated for
the product and that the total ampere ratings of all products plugged into the
extension cord or power strip do not exceed 80% of the extension cord or strip
ampere ratings limit.
Overloading
Do not overload an electrical outlet, power strip, or convenience receptacle. The
overall system load must not exceed 80% of the branch circuit rating. If power strips
are used, the load should not exceed 80% of the power strip input rating.
Cleaning
Unplug the product from the wall outlet before cleaning. Do not use liquid cleaners
or aerosol cleaners. Use a damp cloth for cleaning.
Heat
The product should be placed away from radiators, heat registers, stoves, or other
pieces of equipment (including amplifiers) that produce heat.
Replacement parts
When replacement parts are required, be sure the service provider uses replacement
parts specified by Compaq.
Safety check
Upon completion of any service or repairs to the product, have your Compaq
authorized service provider perform safety checks to determine that the product is in
proper operating condition.
Options and upgrades
Use only the options and upgrades recommended by Compaq.
Safety and Comfort
31
Hot surfaces
Allow the equipment’s internal components and hot-pluggable drives to cool before
touching them.
Object entry
Never push a foreign object through an opening in the product.
Precautions for
Portable
Computer
Products
In addition to the general precautions described earlier in this section, be sure to
observe the following precautions when operating a portable computer product.
Failure to observe these precautions could result in fire, bodily injury, and damage to
the equipment.
◆
◆
◆
Precautions for
Server and
Network
Products
Monitor Support Cover Do not place a monitor with an unstable base or a
monitor heavier than 55 pounds (25 kilograms) on
top of a monitor support cover. Instead, place the
monitor on a work surface next to the docking base.
Rechargeable Battery
Do not crush, puncture, or incinerate the battery pack
Pack
or short the metal contacts. In addition, do not
attempt to open or service the battery pack.
Docking Base
To avoid pinching your fingers, do not touch the rear
of the computer when docking it into a base.
In addition to the general precautions described earlier in this section, be sure to
observe the following precautions when operating server and network products.
Failure to observe these precautions could result in fire, bodily injury, and damage to
the equipment.
Safety interlocks and enclosures
To prevent access to areas containing hazardous energy levels, some servers are
provided with enclosures and safety interlocks. Many Compaq servers are
interlocked so that the power supply is disabled when the enclosure cover is
removed. For servers provided with safety interlocks, observe the following
precautions:
32
◆
Do not remove enclosure covers or attempt to defeat the safety interlocks.
◆
Do not repair accessories and options inside enclosed or interlocked areas of the
system. Repair should be performed only by individuals who are qualified in
servicing computer equipment and trained to deal with products capable of
producing hazardous energy levels.
Safety and Comfort
Accessories and options
Installation of accessories and options in safety interlocked areas should performed
only by individuals who are qualified in servicing computer equipment and trained to
deal with products capable of producing hazardous energy levels.
Products with casters
Products provided with casters should be moved with care. Quick stops, excessive
force, and uneven surfaces may cause the product to overturn.
Hot-pluggable power supplies
Observe the following guidelines when connecting and disconnecting power to the
power supplies:
◆
◆
◆
Install the power supply before connecting the power cord to the power supply.
Unplug the power cord before removing the power supply from the server.
If the system has multiple sources of power, disconnect power from the system
by unplugging all power cords from the power supplies.
Floor standing products
Be sure the bottom stabilizers on the equipment are installed and fully extended.
Ensure that the equipment is properly stabilized and supported before installing
options and cards.
Rack-mountable products
Because the rack allows you to stack computer components vertically, you must take
precautions to provide for rack stability and safety:
Safety and Comfort
◆
Do not move large racks by yourself. Due to the height and weight of the rack,
Compaq recommends a minimum of two people to accomplish this task.
◆
Before working on the rack, be sure the leveling jacks (feet) extend to the floor
and that the full weight of the rack rests on the floor. Also install stabilizing feet
on a single rack or join multiple racks together before starting work.
◆
Always load the rack from the bottom up, and load the heaviest item in the rack
first. This makes the rack bottom-heavy and helps prevent the rack from
becoming unstable.
◆
Ensure that the rack is level and stable before extending a component from the
rack.
33
Precautions for
Products with
External
Television
Antenna
Connectors
◆
Extend only one component at a time. The rack may become unstable if more
than one component is extended.
◆
Use caution when pressing the component rail release latches and sliding a
component into the rack. The slide rails could pinch your fingers.
◆
Do not overload the AC supply branch circuit that provides power to the rack.
The total rack load should not exceed 80% of the branch circuit rating.
In addition to the general precautions described earlier in this section, be sure to
observe the following precautions when using external television antennas with your
product. Failure to observe these precautions could result in fire, bodily injury, and
damage to the equipment.
Compatibility
Compaq television tuner cards with antenna connections should be used only with
Compaq personal computers that are intended for home use.
External television antenna grounding
If an outside antenna or cable system is connected to the product, be sure the antenna
or cable system is electrically grounded to protect against voltage surges and built-up
static charges. Article 810 of the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, provides
information about proper electrical grounding of the mast and supporting structure,
grounding of the lead-in wire to an antenna discharge unit, size of grounding
conductors, location of antenna-discharge unit, connection to grounding electrodes,
and requirements for the grounding electrode.
Lightning protection
To protect a Compaq product during a lightning storm or when it will be unattended
and unused for long periods of time, unplug the product from the electrical outlet and
disconnect the antenna or cable system. This prevents damage to the product due to
lightning and power line surges.
Power lines
Do not place an outside antenna system in the vicinity of overhead power lines or
other electric light or power circuits, or where it can fall into power lines or circuits.
When installing an outside antenna system, take extreme care to avoid touching
power lines or circuits, as contact with them could be fatal.
34
Safety and Comfort
In addition to the general precautions described earlier in this section, be sure to
observe the following precautions when operating telecommunications and network
equipment. Failure to observe these precautions could result in fire, bodily injury, and
damage to the equipment.
Safety and Comfort
◆
Do not connect or use a modem or telephone (other than a cordless type) during
a lightning storm. There may be a remote risk of electric shock from lightning.
◆
Never connect or use a modem or telephone in a wet location.
◆
Do not plug a modem or telephone cable into the Network Interface Card (NIC)
receptacle.
◆
Disconnect the modem cable before opening a product enclosure, touching or
installing internal components, or touching an uninsulated modem cable or jack.
Do not use a telephone line to report a gas leak while you are in the vicinity of
the leak.
35
Antenna
Grounding
This reminder is provided to call the CATV (cable television) system installer’s
attention to Section 820-40 of the NEC (National Electrical Code), which provides
guidelines for proper grounding and, in particular, specifies that the cable ground
shall be connected to the grounding system of the building, as close to the point of
cable entry as practical.
Antenna Grounding
36
No.
Component
1
Electric Service Equipment
2
Power Service Grounding Electrode System (NEC Art 250, Part H)
3
Ground Clamps
4
Grounding Conductors (NEC Section 810-21)
5
Antenna Discharge Unit (NEC Section 810-20)
6
Ground Clamp
7
Antenna Lead-in Wire
Safety and Comfort
Precautions for
Products with
Modems,
Telecommunications, or Local
Area Network
Options
Precautions for
Products with
Laser Devices
In addition to the general precautions described earlier in this section, be sure to
observe the following precautions when operating telecommunications and network
equipment. Failure to observe these precautions could result in fire, bodily injury, and
damage to the equipment.
◆
Do not connect or use a modem or telephone (other than a cordless type) during
a lightning storm. There may be a remote risk of electric shock from lightning.
◆
Never connect or use a modem or telephone in a wet location.
◆
Do not plug a modem or telephone cable into the Network Interface Card (NIC)
receptacle.
◆
Disconnect the modem cable before opening a product enclosure, touching or
installing internal components, or touching an uninsulated modem cable or jack.
◆
Do not use a telephone line to report a gas leak while you are in the vicinity of
the leak.
All Compaq systems equipped with a laser device comply with safety standards,
including International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825. With specific regard
to the laser, the equipment complies with laser product performance standards set by
government agencies for a Class 1 laser product. The product does not emit
hazardous light; the beam is totally enclosed during all modes of customer operation
and maintenance.
Laser Safety Warnings
In addition to the general precautions described earlier in this section, be sure to
observe the following warnings when operating a product equipped with a laser
device. Failure to observe these warnings could result in fire, bodily injury, and
damage to the equipment.
a
Safety and Comfort
WARNING: To reduce the risk of exposure to hazardous radiation:
◆
◆
Do not try to open the unit enclosure. There are no user-serviceable components inside.
◆
Allow only Compaq Authorized Service technicians to repair the unit.
Do not operate controls, make adjustments, or perform procedures to the laser device other than
those specified herein.
37
Compliance with CDRH Regulations
The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration implemented regulations for laser products on August 2, 1976. These
regulations apply to laser products manufactured from August 1, 1976. Compliance
is mandatory for products marketed in the United States.
Compliance with International Regulations
All Compaq systems equipped with a laser device comply with appropriate safety
standards including IEC 825 and IEC 950.
Laser Product Label
The following label or equivalent is located on the surface of your laser device. This
label indicates that the product is classified as a CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT.
Laser information
38
Laser Type
Semiconductor GaAIAs
Wave Length
780 nm + / - 35 nm
Divergence Angle
53.5 degrees + / - 0.5 degrees
Output Power
Less than 0.2 m W or 10,869W m-2 sr-1
Polarization
Circular 0.25
Numerical Aperture
0.45 inches + / - 0.04 inches
Safety and Comfort
For More Information
If you want more information about arrangement of work space and equipment or
safety standards, consult the following references:
“American National Standard for Human Factors Engineering of Visual Display
Terminal Workstations,” ANSI/HFS Standard No. 100-1988. Human Factors Society,
Inc., P.O. Box 1369, Santa Monica, CA 90406.
Working Safely with Your Computer. Washington, D.C.: National Safety Council,
1991.
Or write to:
American National Standards Institute
11 West 42nd St.
New York, NY 10036
TEL: (212) 642-4900
FAX: (212) 398-0023
http://www.ansi.org
EMAIL: info@ansi.org
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
NIOSH Publications
4676 Columbia Pkwy, MS C-13
Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998
TEL: (800) 356-4674
FAX: (513) 533-8573
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/homepage.html
EMAIL: pubstaft@cdc.gov
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ANSI/HFS 100-1988 Standard
P.O. Box 1369
Santa Monica, CA 90406-1369
TEL: (310) 394-1811
FAX: (310) 394-2410
http://hfes.org
EMAIL: hfes@compuserve.com
Safety and Comfort
39
International Standards Organization (ISO)
Central Secretariat
International Organization for Standardization
1, rue de Varembé
Case postale 56
CH-1211 Genève 20, Switzerland
TEL: +41 22 749 01 11
FAX: +41 22 733 34 30
http://www.iso.ch
http://www.iso.ch/infoe/stbodies.html
EMAIL: central@iso.ch
National Safety Council Library
1121 Spring Lake Dr.
Itasca, IL 60143-3201
TEL: (630) 775-2199
FAX: (630) 285-0242
http://www.nsc.org
EMAIL: bob-nsc@dupagels.lib.il.us
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
Publications Office
U.S. Department of Labor
200 Constitution Ave. NW, Room N3101
Washington, DC 20210
http://www.osha.gov
http://www.osha-slc.gov/ergo
http://www.osha.gov/oshpubs/oshapubs
TCO Information Center
150 North Michigan Ave., Suite 1200
Chicago, IL 60601-7594
TEL: (312) 781-6223
FAX: (312) 346-0683
http://www.tco-info.com/chicago.html
EMAIL: info@tco-info.com
40
Safety and Comfort
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